Citation
The Tribune

Material Information

Title:
The Tribune
Uniform Title:
Tribune (Nassau, Bahamas)
Portion of title:
Nassau tribune
Place of Publication:
Nassau, Bahamas
Publisher:
Tribune
Publication Date:
Copyright Date:
2009
Frequency:
Daily, except Sunday
daily
normalized irregular
Language:
English
Physical Description:
v. : ill. ; 58 cm.

Subjects

Genre:
newspaper ( sobekcm )
newspaper ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage:
Bahamas

Notes

General Note:
Description based on: Vol. 79, no. 210 (Aug. 3, 1983); title from caption.

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Holding Location:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
This item was contributed to the Digital Library of the Caribbean (dLOC) by the source institution listed in the metadata. This item may or may not be protected by copyright in the country where it was produced. Users of this work have responsibility for determining copyright status prior to reusing, publishing or reproducing this item for purposes other than what is allowed by applicable law, including any applicable international copyright treaty or fair use or fair dealing statutes, which dLOC partners have explicitly supported and endorsed. Any reuse of this item in excess of applicable copyright exceptions may require permission. dLOC would encourage users to contact the source institution directly or dloc@fiu.edu to request more information about copyright status or to provide additional information about the item.
Resource Identifier:
09994850 ( OCLC )

Downloads

This item has the following downloads:


Full Text
{T\

Mim blowin’ it

84F
74F

HIGH
LOW

“ CLOUDY,

Volume: 105 No.148
et,
a




The



Third teacher
is questioned
by the police

m By DENISE MAYCOCK
Tribune Freeport Reporter
dmaycock@tribunemedia.net

FREEPORT - A third teacher
at the Eight Mile Rock School
has been taken in for question-
ing in connection with child
molestation claims, a senior police
official confirmed.

Although Edward Buchanan
was removed from the school in
February, he was required to sign-
in every morning at the Ministry
of Education.

Police officials caught up with
the teacher just as he had left the
Ministry of Education offices in
the International Building.

Mr Buchanan was escorted to
an unmarked police vehicle and
taken to Police Headquarters.

The Tribune contacted Asst
Supt Emrick Seymour, who con-
firmed that the teacher is being
questioned by police.

The sexual scandals at the
Eight Mile Rock High School first
broke in January when Trinida-
dian teacher Andre Birbal was
accused of molesting two former
male students.

Birbal, 46, was removed from
the school and transferred to New
Providence, where he was placed
on probationary leave pending
the outcome of an investigation

SEE page 10

By@humane

mas Humane Society

ANIMALFUNDAY

HIGHLIGHTS
SS.

More EMR schoo
molestation claims

THE ‘JUAN SEBASTIAN DE ELCANO’, an 81-year-old Spanish
Navy sail ship, called at the port of Nassau yesterday. The vessel
was commissioned in 1928 and built in the shipyards of Cadiz.
It is currently used as part of the 80th training cruise for
midshipmen who are senior students at the Spanish Naval
Academy and future naval officers and will remain in Nassau
Harbour until Sunday.

e SEE PAGE TWO

es cd
= a

SS

Firms seeking oil
drilling approvals
face many hurdles

m@ By TANEKA THOMPSON
Tribune Staff Reporter
tthompson@tribunemedia.net



WITH the possibility of oil
drilling in the country's waters
"at least a decade away" the com-
panies seeking approvals for this
venture face many hurdles before
the move becomes reality.

The applications for the oil
drilling are pending subject to the
country's boundary discussions
between Cuba at the United
Nations level and any drilling in
the seabed would be subject to
an environmental impact analysis
(EIA) study.

"We have three territories that
we have to determine the territo-

SEE page 10

The Tribune

=USA TODAY.

BAHAMAS EDITION

www.tribune242.com



Mt. Royal Ave.&

: Durham St.



P.0.Box N3723

Tel:326-1875





Two officials
‘questioned’
in land row
are named

Undersecretary

and Chief Housing
Officer reportedly
speaking to officials

Felipé Major/Tribune staff

A DEVELOPER
set his FNM
t-shirt on fire
yesterday ina
protest against
the government
he voted for and
the party he
rallied behind in
the last general
election.

¢ SEE PAGE
FIVE FOR
FULL STORY

Felipé Major/Tribune staff



@ By PAULG
TURNQUEST
Tribune Staff Reporter
pturnquest@tribunemedia.net

THE CURRENT under-
secretary in the Ministry of
Lands and Surveys Audley
Greaves and the Chief
Housing Officer Christo-
pher Russell are both
reportedly being questioned
by Ministry officials about
Crown land granted their
wives and other relatives.

According to documenta-
tion obtained by this news-
paper, Mr Greaves’ wife and
son were both granted lots
in the island of Abaco in
2003 and 2004 respectively.

Mr Greaves’ son, received
a 15,625 square foot lot on
Wood Cay, Abaco for
$1,786.25 while his wife
received an 18,343 square

SEE page 10

Sobering outlook
expected in the
2009/10 budget

m@ By PAUL G TURNQUEST
Tribune Staff Reporter
pturnquest@tribunemedia.net

DUE to the continuing eco-
nomic downturn in the global
economy, government is expected
to present a very sobering outlook
in its 2009/10 budget, having read-
justed its original ministerial sub-
missions lower by some seven to 10
per cent.

In a memorandum from the
Ministry of Finance’s Budget Sec-
tion, Prime Minister Hubert Ingra-
ham met with his permanent sec-
retaries on May 1 to advise them
on the current economic situation
and its impact on the upcoming
budget.

SEE page 10



MAN SET TO BE CHARGED
OVER CITY MARKETS
ROBBERIES

INVESTIGATION INTO CLAIMS
OF IMPOSTER BOTTLED WATER





NASSAU AND BAHAMA ISLANDS”? LEADING NEWSPAPER



PAGE 2, THURSDAY, MAY 21, 2009

GET MORE FOR LESS

Buy in bulk and

Per Ounce

In Nassau Location Only!
_ Store Hours: Mon. — Fri. 9
entre Mall « 242-322-7

a.m, to el m, & satu pier fam. to 9pm.

929 « Credit Cards Acceoted « Gift Cards Available



a CARIB INSURANCE MOSELEY + BURNSIDE

BROKERS & AGENTS 7D

<> NCUA
NOW WE ARE ONE.

A message to our Valued Customers:

We are pleased to announce that Garb Insurance Brokers & Agents Lid. and Moseley
Burnside Insurance Agency Lid. are now part of NUA insurance Agents & Brokers
Lid. For our customers, this means:

LOCATIONS

* The Moseley Burnside location at the Harbour Bay Shopping Centre becomes
NUA's second Service Centre in New Providence, complementing its existing
Service Cenire and Head Office on Collins Avenue.

* The Carb office on Charlotte Street in downtown Nassau will close effective
April 24, 2009, Customers will have the convenience of being served at either the
Colling Avenue or Harbour Bay Shopping Centre locations.

CUSTOMER BENEFITS

+ Greater convenience for all of your general insurance needs, including policy
renewals.

* The benefit of our combined experience, expertise and areas of specialization.

* Your insurance coverage remains unchanged. Nothing changes with your
current policies.

* Continued excellent service that you have come to expect.

As part of the Bahamas First Group of Companies, we have the security of the
largest and most trusted general insurer in The Bahamas. Bahamas First General
Insurance Gompany Lid. has an A.M. Best Rating of A- (Excellent) which reflects the
company's excellent capital and liquidity position as well as its superior operational
results.

Now we are one, committed to helping individuals and businesses with all of their
general insurance needs. If you have any questions please call or visit us al one of
our Service Genires.

The R.H. Bobby Symonette Building
ard Terrace & Collins Avenue

P.O. Box N-d670, Nassau

The Bahamas

Harbour Bay Shopping Centre
P.O.Box N-4870, Nassau
Tre Bahamas

Tel: S02-8100, 328 53023
or 356-7800)
Fax: 328 5974 of 326-3701

€e> N-U-A

302-9100, 3304-83906.
or 322-8210
a22-527T of 34-8909

meHands On

Insurance Agency

THE TRIBUNE



LOCAL NEWS

Two strip clubs targeted in
police and immigration raid

Several people apprehended

mw By ALISON LOWE
Tribune Staff Reporter
alowe@tribunemedia.net

A JOINT police and immigration raid on two
strip clubs on Sunday evening resulted in the appre-
hension of various individuals on immigration vio-
lations and other offences.

Both of the establishments are located in Palmdale
and are believed to be owned by the same people.

Senior Asst Commissioner Raymond Gibson yes-
terday told The Tribune that a “small quantity of
drugs” was also seized from both clubs.

He said the establishments are still “under inves-
tigation,” but declined to offer further comment.

Asked to respond to claims that one of the clubs
reopened as early as Monday, Mr Gibson said he
was unaware of this, but would look into it.

The legality of strip clubs and stripping for mon-

BAHAMIANS were treated
to a rare sight yesterday morn-
ing, as a 81-year-old Spanish Navy
sail ship called at the port of Nas-
sau.

The “Juan Sebastian de
Elcano” will be docked in the city
harbour until Sunday.

‘Small quantity of drugs’ seized

ey in the Bahamas has been in question since a 2005
court case saw six Russian strippers and other club
staff who worked at the now defunct Butterfly Club
on East Bay Street exonerated.

Wayne Munroe, the attorney for the strippers,
argued that as his clients were practising their craft
in the privacy of the club, away from public sight and
if customers were getting what they paid for and
no one was offended, they could not be found guilty
on the charges of indecent behaviour. The law relat-
ing to that offence notes that it must be insulting or
offensive to those in view.

As a result of this argument and others, Magistrate
Renee McKay agreed with Mr Munroe that the
prosecution had not established a prima facie case
against his clients on the indecent behaviour charges.

Messages left for immigration officials seeking
further details on those detained were not returned
up to press time.

SPLENDOUR: Inside at RBrael Spanish Aa ae



The ship was commissioned in
1928 and built in the shipyards of
Cadiz.

It is named after Spanish sailor
Juan Sebastian de Elcano, who
was the first man to circumnavi-
gate the world in 1522.

The Spanish training ship is
sailing the world’s seas as part of

the 80th training cruise for mid-
shipmen who are senior students
at the Spanish Naval Academy
and future naval officers.

Before docking in Nassau, the
Juan Sebastian de Elcano called
at the ports of Tenerife, Spain;
Fortaleza, Brazil; Port of Spain,
Trinidad and Tobago; San Juan
de Puerto Rico (United Stated;

Galveston, US; Cartagena de
Indias, Colombia, and Havana,
Cuba. The ship is carrying 223
midshipmen and its commanding
officer is Captain Javier Romero.

Captain Romero has a long his-
tory with the Spanish Navy and
has been awarded five Navy
Crosses and one NATO Article
V Medal.

ates Ce La T8)

FB





TRAINING CRUISE: The sac
Sebastian de Elcano”

TROPICAL
EXTERMINATORS
RR UE
PHONE: 322-2157

M, ae Mme hed ee

7 Miss CNBBeay
Enka Teens =

Gs she Teaches for aa erie
i Bohn re bias nae ass LTeRy *

~ Beauty Pageant, *



THE TRIBUNE

THURSDAY, MAY 21, 2009, PAGE 3



LOCAL NEWS



Haitian charged in
smuggling
operation may
face death penalty

A Haitian man charged in
connection with a smuggling
operation suspected to have
originated in Nassau and which
resulted in nine people drown-
ing off Florida may face death.

Father of nine Jimmy Metel-
lus, 33, was denied bail in a
West Palm Beach, Florida,
court yesterday.

US Immigration and Customs
enforcement investigators claim
he was hired by four men in the
Bahamas to captain the boat
carrying the large group of Hait-
lan migrants.

According to The Miami Her-
ald, investigators claim Metellus
agreed to do so for free to
escape hardships in Haiti.

The smugglers are alleged to
have been paid thousands of
dollars per person for the jour-
ney, which left Nassau for the
shores of Miami, by way of
Bimini.

It was on the way from Bimi-
ni that the boat, carrying more
than two dozen people, cap-
sized, resulting in the deaths of
nine people, and leaving 16 oth-
ers floundering in the water for
hours until they were rescued by
the US Coast Guard and a good
samaritan.

Despite the Bahamian origin
of the ill-fated smuggling opera-
tion, Assistant Commissioner
Raymond Gibson told The Tri-
bune that Bahamian police are
not currently investigating the
matter, but would do so if they
received a “specific request”
from the US authorities.

Man, 27, arrested
over Freeport
armed robbery

m By DENISE MAYCOCK
Tribune Freeport Reporter
dmaycock@tribunemedia.net

FREEPORT - The quick
response of police to an armed
robbery in progress in Freeport
has led to the arrest of a 27-
year-old man.

According to police reports,
officers responded to an armed
robbery at the Watkins Street
Liquor Store in the Boulevard
Plaza on Somerville Drive on
Monday morning.

A man entered the store
around 9.45am brandishing a
handgun, held the cashier at
bay, and robbed her of cash.

Moments after the robbery,
officers arrived on the scene.
Their quick investigation led
them to an apartment building
at Magella Crest, where officers
arrested a male suspect.

Police also recovered a .357
revolver with 2 live .357 rounds
and $12.00 cash believed to be
proceeds of the robbery.

The suspect is assisting police
with their investigation. He is
expected to be formally
charged.

Crime watch meeting
for businesses

On Friday, May 22 the Cen-
tral Police Division will hold a
crime watch meeting for all
businesses in the downtown
area at 4.30pm at Doctor’s
Hospital Conference Centre on
Dowdeswell Street.

Officers will speak on current
crime trends and make recom-
mendations to each owner/oper-
ator on how to improve the
work environment so as to pre-
vent crime.

US Embassy to mark
Memorial Day 2009

ON Monday, May 25, the
United States Embassy will
observe Memorial Day with a
wreath laying ceremony at
Clifton Pier in memory of fall-
en comrades and military vet-
erans.

Special recognition will be
given to the 23 sailors of the
US Patrol Squadron who died
off the coast of Nassau on
May 7, 1954.

US Chargé d’Affaires Timo-
thy Zuniga-Brown as well as
family members of the fallen
sailors will speak at the cere-
mony.

The ceremony is expected
to start at 10am and last 45
minutes.

FOR 3 IN 1 LAWN SERVICE
Ia aa
Pest Control

Ue at ty
322-2157



armed robbery of stores

m By ALISON LOWE
Tribune Staff Reporter
alowe@tribumemedia.net

A YOUNG man is expected
to be charged as early as today
with the armed robbery of three
City Market stores within the last
three weeks, as well as a number
of other similar offences.

Police did not report the City
Market robberies to the press,
but The Tribune has discovered
that a lone gunman entered the
supermarket chain’s locations on
Rosetta Street, Village Road and
Cable Beach, and demanded
cash.

The Cable Beach location was
robbed on Thursday, May 14;
Rosetta Street on May 10; while
the supermarket’s Village road
store was the first to be hit.

Yesterday senior police offi-
cers said that nobody was hurt
during the incidents and little cash

was obtained by the gunman. This
was also confirmed by Azaleta
Ishmael-Newry, marketing direc-
tor for City Market.

A 67-year-old woman who was
in the Rosetta Street store when
the gunman struck there said the
incident had made her nervous
about going back to the same
location.

“T said to myself, ‘I wonder if I
should go back here, or go to

dy 9

another one...’.

Alerted

The customer said she was at a
checkout counter in the store
when the cashier alerted her to
the fact that “something was
going on” at the customer service
counter near the front entrance.

“After a minute or two we
found out what happened: the
woman at the front said, “That

guy came in the store and he held
me up and wanted money!’

“He’d just came in the front
door, robbed her, and went back
out and left. The manager chased
him out there, but they didn’t
catch him then,” she said.

Another customer, Mary
Davis, expressed her disappoint-
ment that the police did not alert
the public to the incidents.

“Tf there’s a robbery in my
local foodstore I want to know!”
she said.

Police Commissioner Reginald
Ferguson, said he “did not know”
why the incidents were not dis-
closed to the media, but denied
that it was intentional on the part
of the force.

“T don’t have a problem with
people knowing what happened.
I think it gives people a better
opportunity to analyse what is
going on in their society,” said
Mr Ferguson.

Nassau Street crash during alleged bid to rob driver

Motorcyclist,

passenger
struck off
their bike

m@ By MEGAN REYNOLDS
and CHESTER ROBARDS
Tribune Staff Reporters
mreynolds@tribunemedia.net

A MOTORCYCLE driver and
his passenger were struck off their
bike in a dramatic crash in Nassau
Street after they allegedly
attempted to rob the driver.

The driver of a white 1999
Isuzu Rodeo told police the pil-
lion passenger on a red and white
Honda 650 trail bike snatched a
pair of Oakley sunglasses from
his face and tried to rip a chain
from around his neck while dri-
ving alongside him near the junc-
tion with Poinciana Drive and
Thompson Boulevard.

The side of the Sports Utility
Vehicle (SUV) hit the motorcycle
and sent the pillion passenger fly-
ing to the roadside around 25 ft
away from the bike while the
SUV careered over the concrete
median and central roundabout
and came to a stop on Thomp-
son Boulevard. Both vehicles had
been travelling south.

Traffic stopped and residents
of the surrounding area rushed
to the scene wondering what had
caused the loud bang Just before
9pm. Around 50 people sur-
rounded the injured pillion pas-
senger as he lay on the sidewalk
near Commonwealth Bank in
Nassau Street.

Police and Emergency Services
arrived within 10 minutes of the
crash to find tyre marks across
the road median and the round-
about. The SUV had two burst
tyres on its right side, and oil was
leaking from the engine.

The badly injured pillion pas-
senger lay motionless at the side
of the road for some time and
started to shake just before the
ambulance arrived.

One eye-witness said he was
dragged by the SUV, and others
claimed he had been carrying a
gun.

'| Felipé Major/ |
Tribune staff ;

THIS SMASHED-UP VEHICLE was involved in the accident in which a motorcy-
clist and his passenger were struck off their bike.



i Felipé Major/
Tribune staff

ONE OF THE accident victims being taken in to an ambulance.



“This is a suspicious
matter whereby it
appears as though
these fellas on the
bike were up to no
good.”

Insp. Anthony Curtis

His mother was told about the
accident at her home in Chip-
pingham and arrived at the scene
soon after the crash crying and
screaming, “Where is my son?”

The 21-year-old pillion passen-
ger and 23-year-old driver were
rushed to Princess Margaret Hos-
pital. The pillion passenger is said
to be in serious, but stable condi-
tion. His mother and sister were
also involved in a collision on
their way to the hospital on Tues-
day night. Their car was badly
damaged and the 21-year-old’s
mother was treated in hospital.

Relatives of the 21-year-old say
he has internal injuries affecting





his kidneys and pelvis, and they
believe the car may have rolled
over him. He is breathing with
the aid of a ventilator and his jaw
is broken. Doctors were waiting
for swelling to go down before
performing surgery yesterday.

The 23-year-old motorcycle dri-
ver is also recovering in hospital,
however he is said to have
escaped with minimal injuries as
bones in his hands and fingers
were broken.

Inspector Anthony Curtis in
the traffic division said the inci-
dent is under investigation and
no arrests have been made.

He said: “This is a suspicious
matter whereby it appears as
though these fellas on the bike
were up to no good. We are con-
ducting an investigation now so I
don’t want to pre-empt what the
outcome will be, but it appears
they were up to no good. They
were going to snatch his Oakleys
and rip the chain off his neck
while they were in the jeep, so
that could be what caused the
crash.”

72009

Q/ OFF ALL
ae! Jor |
| FABRICS

One of a kind Special Occasion Fabric

Iridescent Taffeta
Two Tone Shantung

Beaded & Sequin Fabric

Lomour, Chiffon

, 1 by OFF ALL PROM
Pda dtqe git

pn purchased same dayas fabric

ee —_ fan aT ae Ye

ee LG

Madeira St. [242] 325-8233 * Robinson Rd.[242] 322-3080

- Evening Bogs
“Gloves










Gpend « ane
Gnchantea

Sven CH... :

in one of our Fabulous
Designer Evening Dresses

The Cancer
Society Ball

Saturday, 30th May, 2009

Wyndham Nassau Resort
& Crystal Palace Casino
Cable Beach

) of Nassau

Established in 1956 by an old Bahamian family

Parliament Street (near Bay St.) Tel: 322-8393 or 328-7157
* Fax: 326-9953

Crystal Court at Atlantis, Paradise Island Tel: 363-4161/2

Lyford Cay (Harbour Green Shops at Lyford Cay)
Tel: 362-5235

e-mail; info@colesofnassau.com
www.colesofnassau.com ¢ P.O. Box N-121

= ey

CARPET, FURNITURE, MARBLE & TILE CARE

Tue Moet Tromooaa Rretoaanon & Cuan Ever, on Tun Jon & Fam!
Maseau"s Oey Poona, Come Sooan Cane & UPoLstey Caen Sse.

* Cans L Iptel ery, Shon mre Marhic L-beaniny o&
Resordion Spocmist.

* Poche Cleaning Sysnome romoves. Danep a Heay
SvoL, Heecteres, ‘Liregec, Waterourks and Sisire inom
Cupetag & Parmitire, restoring them to like ac
at b Troctios of replacement one.

Carpet, Sofa"s, Lowesons. Chairs. Dining Ciaies, Cars,
Boats, Groat, Ties, Marte & Some
© Pemaan, Worl d& Silk Canpet Cleaning Specialist

Site Polishiag. Resoration a Cane
* Wed Floor Resteralion

Suited Stent Tech Profeedinal Cotracior

CALL PROCHEM BAHAMAS
PHONE: 323-8083 or 323-1594
ONLY WE CAN OO FF RIGS

WR As a ee * WIT eee ae 0 * WEST, oF
? perl rao

AS Ad AA Oe PAD

PROCHEM SYSTEM [eon

Coe ee lm ag iad

re ‘aS
—_2 ho

3 a
(a

Pee lh

feeiere Ohne

Che Mall-et-*Lanat hen
BOX OFFICE OPENS AT io-00 4 DADLY

aaa a Era: iat
Tenmurcr samen new| on [890 wt | a0 [ean [ie
reece ve [oa [eff

ANCE FLICK = |

sone» [ora wa | ean fe
pectowyame ic | 20 | mas | WA | ean | ao [srs |
wenomcnswowenne + _| t:00 | x30 | WA | geno | 5 [roves |

cwonwemewe + [ot [ae [ut [oe
res [ aan P| es ||

a fee fee

aes

WW GALLERIA NEM AS JOO

Sey

anenseene cael | DO be [a
oar HEME Wee ft [396 [ MA | €00| ex

awecniens —__waw 120 | a0 [WA | 2 | wat | 1a
ANGELS &cemoKs oc | td | WIA | 4:00) 740 | Ni

15
sem 1 [6 | 05 | Wa | 05 | a0 | ve
es

380-FLIX





PAGE 4, THURSDAY, MAY 21, 2009

THE TRIBUNE



EDITORIAL/LETTERS TO THE EDITOR



The Tribune Limited

NULLIUS ADDICTUS JURARE IN VERBA MAGISTRI

Being Bound to Swear to The Dogmas of No Master

LEON E. H. DUPUCH, Publisher/Editor 1903-1914






















































































SIR ETIENNE DUPUCH, Kt, O.B.E., K.M., K.CS.G.,
(Hon.) LL.D., D.Litt.

Publisher/Editor 1919-1972
Contributing Editor 1972-1991

EILEEN DUPUCH CARRON, C.M.G., M.S., B.A. LL.B.
Publisher/Editor 1972-

Published Daily Monday to Saturday

Shirley Street, RO. Box N-3207, Nassau, Bahamas
Insurance Management Building., P.O. F-485, Freeport, Grand Bahama

WEBSITE
www.tribune242.com — updated daily at 2pm

More criminals back on the streets

THE POLICE have their hands full.

In addition to criminals already wandering
the streets while they await their court date,
and those youngsters, not yet caught, but out
there gun in hand, flirting with a life of crime,
the police now have 153 more to add to their list.
Last month 205 men were released from prison
with 153 of them sent back to the community to
await trial. Of that number, the Central Intelli-
gence Bureau, gave instructions that 39 of them
“should be monitored.”

These are all men with charges ranging from
murder, attempted murder, armed robbery and
assault to unlawful sexual intercourse and rape.
While they await their day in court, who is going
to employ them? How are they going to eat?
How can the police monitor them and keep up
with solving the daily crime and the now almost
daily murders?

Immigration regulations require all employ-
ers of foreign staff to supply a clean police
record for their applicant. This record has to be
updated with every permit renewal. We now
recommend that all employers demand police
records from all potential employees —
Bahamian and foreign — and regardless of job
description.

If we had followed these rules last year our
staff would not have had to endure the loss of so
much money from their handbags to a cold and
calculating thief who became embedded among
us, and who when fingered had so fooled certain
staff about her integrity that they were annoyed
that we had turned her in. If she had produced
a police certificate we would have known that
she was just out of prison for theft. Obviously
she was a kleptomaniac who could not help
herself.

On being fired from The Tribune she went
for a job interview to an agency. After the inter-
view, a staff member of the agency called one of
her friends at The Tribune to say that on the
young lady’s departure it was discovered that
she had filched money from the staff member’s
handbag. We were told that when the young
woman was arrested, she got an opportunity at
the station to steal from the handbag of the
arresting officer. This was indeed a mentally
sick woman. She was sent back to prison, and
must have been put in a programme for her
mental condition, because as a part of her ther-
apy she confessed her misdeeds — among them
the long string of thefts at The Tribune, right
down to the poor cleaning lady. These were
the thefts that she had so vehemently denied
when she took us before the Labour Board for
wrongful dismissal. She should have never been
on our staff. She should never have been on
anyone’s staff. And she certainly would not
have been at The Tribune if we had demanded
her police records. To look at her, she would
have been the last person anyone would have
suspected. She worked hard to keep the finger
of suspicion from hovering over her desk.

And then we have had complaints about

persons seemingly avoiding trial because they
have some family relation tucked securely in a
place of influence. We know that Police Com-
missioner Ferguson condemns this, but after
police investigations, prosecutions are out of
his hands.

And then there is the case of Welsh busi-
nessman Hywell Jones, who was shot and killed
by a “hit” man as he walked to his Goodman’s
Bay Corporate Centre office on West Bay Street
on April 22.

Early in April last year Mr Jones had com-
plained to the police that he feared for his life.
In asworn affidavit he said he rarely slept in his
home and was constantly looking over his shoul-
der.

What protection was he given, what investi-
gation was done, what was discovered, or did
everything go quiet because in his report he
said he had reason to believe that “one of the
assailants was a police officer”?

In early April, 2007, Mr Jones swore an affi-
davit in which he said: “On or about 5th April
2007, I was attacked in my bed at my home by
two assailants demanding I open a safe (which
did not exist) on the property. I received only
minor abrasions, but a guest at my home was
badly beaten, and stabbed in the same incident.
Both I and my guest were admitted to hospital
for treatment, my guest having to stay
overnight.”

And about a month later, Mr Jones again
filed a police complaint. “On or about 30th
May, 2007,” he said, “I was attacked in front of
my home for no apparent reason, with the
assailants not seeking any money or asking any
questions.

Once again I was admitted to hospital, this
time with a broken eye socket and jaw, multiple
head wounds and severe bruising to back and
legs.

I have reason to believe that one of the
assailants was a police officer.” The Canadian
accountant with him was not injured.

Mr Jones was at the time embroiled in a
legal matter. He was advised not to connect his
beatings with the legal dispute, because the tim-
ing might have just been coincidental. He reject-
ed the advice: “I remain ... convinced that these
attacks are not coincidental,” he said, “and feel
it paramount to my safety that I put my con-
cerns before the court at this time.”

It is now for the police to take those concerns
seriously and thoroughly investigate them. Obvi-
ously, someone at that time had reason to put
the fear of God in him.

If this incident were not properly investigat-
ed at the time, it is important that it be done so
now. It is also important to find out if Mr Jones
had any justification for his adamant belief that
his beatings were not a coincidence.

And the only way to do this to the satisfac-
tion of the public is for the Attorney General to
proceed with the pending criminal prosecution
in the case that concerned Hywel Jones.

Sirst Baptist Church

269 Market St. South = AO. Box N-7964 © Nassau, Bahamas

“Earth changes, but God and
His Word never change.”
SUNDAY SERVICES

PASTOR EARLE a JLP..O.0.
ala @ Gicer, Counselce, Inbercessor
Tore: S2245e5S © 99S-5 oe
Fae) 326-4 SRE -d 19

a 810

PLP legacy
— asset or

liability?

LETTERS

EDITOR, The Tribune.

This little tidbit is being given
in response to two articles that
appeared in two of our dailies
recently, I refer to “PLPs Say
They Have a True Vision And
Plan” by lanthia Smith, Journal
Staff Reporter, The Bahama
Journal of Monday, May 11th,
and Insight article “URCA and
the Milk of Hatchet Bay,” by
Rupert Missick Jr, Tribune
Chief Reporter, also of Mon-
day May 11th 2009.

PLP Members of Parliament
appeared on Issues of The Day,
said theirs is the party with a
true vision and plan for the
country, but we'll have to wait
leading up to 2012 to see exact-
ly what that plan and vision for
the country is. I cry shame on
Her Majesty's Loyal Opposi-
tion. Additionally, it would
appear from Chairwoman
Glenys Hanna-Martin, and her
companions, that the PLP is
depending more on its legacy
than a vision and plan for the
country, to win the next gener-
al election. What exactly is that
legacy, and whether or not it is
an asset or a liability for the
PLP, has been the subject of
much discussion of late. So let’s
examine the legacy.

Majority Rule - this is the
biggest farce of all. The black
majority, mainly poor folk, were
tricked into believing that
Majority Rule would usher in
an era of equal opportunity for
ordinary black Bahamians.
What they got in return was a
Socialist Dictatorship, mas-
querading as a Socialist Democ-
racy. Everything that was done,
every policy’s underlying objec-
tive was to win the next elec-
tion. The needs of the poor
masses would then be routinely
ignored, and then suddenly
remembered every election
cycle, with capital works pro-
jects that would get started and
never completed, or being com-
pleted after two or three elec-
tion cycles. “...We have our
work to do, and we will do our
work, but it’s about systemical-
ly organising to go out and win
the next election and that’s
where our focus is. We will deal
with our issues, but we will
focus on winning the next elec-
tion,” MP for West End and
Bimini, Obie Wilchcombe. And
what exactly are those issues,
Mr Wilchcombe, and which
ones are more important, those
internal matters impacting your
party’s chances at the next elec-
tion, or those national matters
in urgent need of attention
impacting the welfare of the
Bahamian people? Pity that this

Our DIAMONDâ„¢ Seal Technology uses a valve with a
tough diamond coating to bring you a faucet built to last up

WOOD AND COLD-FORMED STEEL

TRUSSES
DESIGN
ENGINEERING
COMPETITIVE PRICING
FAST BIDDING INFORMATION

361-7764

Road to City Dump after Premix
Email:ggongora@coralwave.com

Coa

ALITHORIZED:
MANUFOCTURER

LORS MUONS LOOM ec meee Mem ciel)
beautiful on the inside? It’s one of the many ideas that
make Delta® more than just a faucet.

A

ee td

Carey

@FINE BUILDERS HARDWARE & PLUMBING®
Established 1951

Dowdeswell Street » Tel: 322-1103

letters@tribunemedia net



sary to win an election, and
doing what’s right for country
and the Bahamian people.

There is a reason why Major-
ity Rule has never been cele-
brated in this country. The fact
that UBP and colonial legisla-
tion, designed to allow slum
landlords in 2009 to rent houses
with no running water or inside
toilets, are still a part of the
Statute Laws of The Bahamas,
bespeaks the lie of the achieve-
ment of Majority Rule. Bahami-
anisation — another fallacy.
The true purpose of Bahami-
anisation was never to promote
qualified Bahamians; its true
purpose was to inundate the civ-
il service, every government
agency and corporation, with
PLP supporters, being PLP the
only prequalification for the job.

And so began the transfor-
mation of the PLP from the
dreams and ideals of its
founders, into a Socialist Demo-
cratic government headed by a
Social Dictator. In this regard,
the Insight article previously
noted, gives a very revealing
picture of Bahamianisation at
work. In 1975, the PLP govern-
ment bought a successful dairy
and chicken farm from the Har-
risville Company — Hatchet
Bay Farm. We all know what
happened, the farm went into
problems with its creditors,
employees were laid off and the
farm that once supplied 60 per
cent of the domestic market
with eggs, provided poultry,
milk and cheese, as well as jobs
for 300 people in the settlement
of Alice Town collapsed. In the
Insight article, an Eleutheran
who experienced first hand the
PLP government of the late Sir
Lynden Pindling’s move to
“Bahamianise” the Hatchet Bay
Farm, paints a very devious and
self-serving, if not anti-Bahami-
an, purpose for Bahamianisa-
tion.

According to the Eleutheran,
“all of the foreign scientists and
veterinarians went home, but
that wasn’t it. All of the white
Bahamians were fired and then
all of the black Bahamians who
didn’t support the PLP were
sent home.”

It is incredulous to note then,
PLP MP for Bain and Grants
Town Dr Bernard Nottage, say-
ing in the Bahama Journal arti-
cle, that the PLP is keen on the
issue of The Bahamas being
able to feed itself. That the
FNM government has focused
on simply providing jobs for
Bahamians, but has placed very
little emphasis on the country

being self-sufficient. “The prob-
lem is that we’ve all concen-
trated on trying to create jobs,
but it was the PLP government
that put in place an agricultural
programme to expand agricul-
ture, to expand fishing, that’s
how BAIC was initially
formed.”

Are these people crazy, or
simply out of touch with this
generation of “New Bahami-
ans” of which I am a proud
member? The worn out, torn
and tattered legacy of the PLP,
one that wreaks of the betrayal
of the dreams and aspirations
of our great-grandparents, that
permeates with the oppression
of the masses in favour of polit-
ical patrimony, is totally irrele-
vant to the “New Bahamian,”
and will never win another elec-
tion in this country. Yet accord-
ing to PLP Chairwoman Glenys
Hanna-Martin, “What really
sets our party apart is the lega-
cy that follows it.” What legacy,
will the PLP ever get it?

We do not attend political
rallies; we can afford our own
entertainment. Our loyalty is
not to any political party, but
to our God and country, and in
that order.

We do not need your T-shirts,
whom we vote for is a private
matter, that’s why our country
has a private ballot. You can
never purchase our votes; do
not insult our intelligence with
offers of hams, turkeys, appli-
ances or jobs in return for our
votes. You will be embarrassed!

We do not believe that you
have a true vision and plan for
our country, as evidenced by
the fact that during your numer-
ous criticisms of the present
government’s lack thereof, you
have yet to offer an alternative
of your own.

Concluding recommendation
— talk to us, the “New Bahami-
ans,” not your rapidly deterio-
rating base.

Find out from us what our
dreams and vision is for our
country, and then incorporate
our ideas into a national devel-
opment plan with an accompa-
nying legislative agenda to
make those dreams a reality.

One more thing, if you're not
prepared to work with all
Bahamians, PLP, FNM and
what have you, then do not
waste our time.

A national plan by its very
nature is nonpartisan. We will
no longer allow ourselves, nor
our nation to be divided and
conquered by greedy, self-serv-
ing and clueless politicians and
aspirants! A word to the wise
should be sufficient.

LAVADE M DARLING
Nassau,
May 17, 2009.

Mrs. Dawn Hartman

&

Mr. and Mrs. Andy Knowles
AMOuUNce ie ey Cement

of their children

Erin Hartman and Elliott Knowles
Wedding Date is set for June 17, 2009





THE TRIBUNE

THURSDAY, MAY 21, 2009, PAGE 5



LOCAL NEWS



Man, 33, jailed for four years after pleading guilty to drug offence

@ By NATARIO McKENZIE
Tribune Staff Reporter

A MAN who was actively being sought
by police since early January was sen-
tenced to four years in prison yesterday
after pleading guilty to a drug charge
stemming from a $480,000 marijuana
seizure.

Prescott Roxbury, 33, told Magistrate
Carolita Bethel that he had been keeping

the drugs for a friend. According to
Inspector Ercell Dorsette, DEU officers
seized 321 pounds of marijuana while
executing a search warrant on a home
at Turks Close, Flamingo Gardens, on
January 3.

Four persons who were at the house at
the time were taken into custody. Rox-
bury, a resident of Soldier Road, eluded
police until he was arrested near his
home at around 6pm on Tuesday.

Winsome Williams, 28, Paula Morris,
32, Tricia Witter, 33, all of Jamaica, along
with Dexter Wilson, 30, of Turks Close,
have been charged in connection with
the seizure and have pleaded not guilty.

Remand

Wilson is out on bail while the three
Jamaican women are on remand at Her
Majesty’s Prison, Fox Hill.

According to the Inspector Dorsette,
Roxbury told police on Tuesday that he
had lived at the Flamingo Gardens house
and had placed the drugs there shortly
before police arrived to execute the
search warrant.

According to the prosecutor, Roxbury
told police that he would plead guilty to
the marijuana possession charge.

Roxbury’s attorney Willie Moss sub-
mitted to the court that his client had

Developer burns FNM T-shirt
in anti- “government protest

m@ By MEGAN REYNOLDS
Tribune Staff Reporter
mreynolds@tribunemedia.net

A DEVELOPER set his FNM
t-shirt on fire yesterday in protest
against the government he voted
for and the party he rallied
behind in the last general elec-
tion.

Randy Rolle, 53, said the FNM
has let him down and he is calling
on others who feel the same way
to join him in protest.

The contractor and small-time
developer burned his red FNM
t-shirt on RM Bailey Park oppo-
site the Mall at Marathon on
Robinson Road yesterday morn-
ing to make a public stand against
the FNM administration.

He said he is angry that the
Ministry of Housing provided
inadequate funds for his devel-
opment of two homes in the Pride
Estates government housing sub-
division, and has delayed him in
his work.

Mr Rolle, of West Bay Street,
said he requested $15,500 from
the department to cover the cost
of his work, which commenced
in January, but received only
$12,500, and has therefore been
unable to progress as planned.

However Mr Rolle did say the
Ministry of Housing was willing
to cover any additional expenses
should the cost of his project
exceed the allotted amount.



RANDY ROLLE set his FNM T-shirt on fire in protest against the govern-
ment he voted for and the party he rallied behind in the last election.

But the once fervent FNM sup-
porter said he is now disappoint-
ed in government for not assisting
him in the same way he expected
them to.

Mr Rolle said: “I didn’t vote
for the FNM based on a t-shirt
so I will burn the t-shirt in protest
of that. “I campaigned, I voted, I
worked the polls and everything
else, for a free and democratic
sovereign nation founded on spir-
itual values, and in which no man,
woman or child shall ever be slave
or bondsman to anyone, nor their
labour exploited or their lives
frustrated by deprivation and in
this instance, they brazenly did
not respect my manhood or my

US tourist drowns

A 62-year-old American tourist drowned in Eleuthera yes-
terday when he fell into the ocean near Governor’s Harbour.

David Anderson of Arkansas was on the beach when the
incident occurred at around 11am.

Presumed to have died of drowning, Mr Anderson was
pronounced dead at a local clinic.

Police do not suspect foul play but stated that an autopsy
will be conducted to determine the precise cause of death.

NES

custom built © attractive louver designs * storm bor locking feature

hurricane season is here.
ee ee

BY NPN MPAs

677.2100 * ROBINSON RD. * www.cbsbahamas.com



classy

Ta Ce)

Felipé Major/Tribune staff

entitlement. There are men on
the street pulling the trigger and
there are those in parliament
pulling the rug, all of which is a
destructive measure. I’m calling
on the entire Rolle family and
the Bahamian people to call on
the Ministry of Housing to do
everything possible to make cer-
tain every Bahamian has the
opportunity and the ability wher-
ever it is necessary, to fulfil some
of their dreams and prioritise
their craft or the crafts of their
forefathers in labour.”

Attempts to reach Minister of
Housing Kenneth Russell for
comment on the issue were
unsuccessful.

STINUCOM

RRO ta os

FLIES, MOSQUITOES, TICKS & FLEAS

PHONE: 327-6464
se

(aoe
MiMineED

JUST WEST OF CITY MARKET, TONIQUE DARLING HIGHWAY

2004 Hondas

Noah/ReguisVans

Startin
$9,

at

Js

—

not wasted the courts time as he had
pleaded guilty to the charge.

He asked the court to be as lenient as
possible, taking into account the volume
of drugs seized. Magistrate Bethel sen-
tenced Roxbury to four years in prison.
He was ordered to pay a reduced fine of
$25,000. Failure to pay the fine will result
in an additional year of imprisonment.

Williams, Morris, Witter and Wilson
are expected back in court on May 27.

Payment

for

Government

Workers
Come see our

ey Mage Rem eel

Vehicles

Hilh COM Heel Mistake

“IN-HOUSE FINANCING AVAILABLE”

i

Colors:
Gold
Black
Navy
Tan
Brown

$19,900.00 ©

—

——-

2005/06 30 SEATER

Me el
(242) 341-2249
FAX: (242) 361-1136

Visit our Website: waw.autohl.com

Black Multi
Brown Multi

neaHerbour

Tan Multi
¢ | \\e

Rosetta St. -

Ph: 325-3336





PAGE 6, THURSDAY, MAY 21, 2009

THE TRIBUNE





FirsiCaribhean donates 3

to the Prison Officers
Dependants’ Fund

FIRSTCARIBBEAN Interna-

of imposter bottled water

the cheque on behalf of his col-

tional Bank recently donated to Her
Majesty’s Prison Officers’ Depen-
dants Fund.

ASP Raymond Julien accepted

leagues.

“The fund was developed to assist
in the welfare of dependants of offi-
cers who have unselfishly given their i
lives in the execution of their duties :

on behalf of the country,” he said.

Contribution to the fund is in
keeping with FirstCaribbean’s com- i
mitment to “Enriching our commu- }

nities. Together,” the bank said.

m@ By TANEKA THOMPSON
Tribune Staff Reporter
tthompson@tribunemedia.net

THE Department of Environ-
mental Health has launched an
investigation into claims that
impostor water bearing the Aqua-
pure label was found at a local
depot.

Judging of Nassau 'Nastics Gymnasts
2nd Annual Awards Ceremony

coed i

Featured Performances
May 22 - 24, 2009

Frictory, Neto 22. 200
Cakes Feld Gyrm—lucging of Bears
4-épm
Susan Monahan
® USA. Nanoral rating : oC
® Over lbyeos udging experarce judgngof Row, Vail & Beam
8 Fotrer Ste ludgrig Daactat 14pm
© Currendy os on che Flonics Sore dusges
Beced
Sunred, Atay 24, AO)
endal Gil. baaace Gyrine
Fnay FREE =m
Aeaed Carernony & Fee
Ssturday Gerwral Adrmaion 53 tured
(nm Bunder free Performances
Sunde = Adu 5. 10
‘Chakra 5
(2 yr & undor frog

at

i

Nassau Magica Cokes Field Locabon Pa S622 Genres Locales Pe od
PO Bm S564 Mrssau Beberm:
Err natauresicaiyahaccom ‘Wetsle eee cers cunesicscon






BAHAMAS FAITH







MINISTRIES INT'L

The Diplomat Center « Carmichael Road
Tel: 461-6400 + Fax: 361-2260

cigs ANNUAL CONCLAVE

“Retreat....Advance....impact:
The Making of A Whole-In-One”

PEOPLE

iIsTRY

MA TM
wo INTERNATION AL Oo

Guest facilitators for

this plenary session are:

LOCAL NEWS

Investigation into claims

Environment Minister Dr Earl
Deveaux said that after the reports
were published in The Tribune, a
team was dispatched to investigate
the claims. While he would not
divulge the findings of that inves-
tigation, Mr Deveaux said a report
would be turned over to the Min-
istry of Health which would take
appropriate action.

Tropical
treat!

Unlimited Mileage
+ CDW + Free Upgrade

Midsize in Florida as low as

Daily/

US$ US$180 Weekly
when using the
upgrade coupon.

Fullsize in Florida as low as

STR) Ad

Daily/

US$ US$205 Weekly
when using the
upgrade coupon.

For reservations, as well as terms and
conditions please contact Destinations
at (786) 245-0520 or at 1-800-468-3334.
Be sure to use rate code RCT and
coupon code AU2253VLS when making
the reservation. Upgrade is only valid
on compact and intermediate cars on
rentals of two or more days. Rates
include unlimited mileage and CDW.
Offer valid through June 30th 2009.

alamo.com



Lady Patrice Ellis

PERSONAL DEVELOPMENT:

Lady Patrice Ellis — Mit. Tabor Full Gospel Baptist Church
“The Making of A Whole lin Onel"

Christopher Smith = The PE.O.RL.E Ministry, BFM

“Walking In Integrity”

PROFESSIONAL DEVELOPMENT:

Anthony Ferguson — Colina

Rachelle Lighthourne - BTC

“Successfully navigating the political and cultural
challenges within your working environment

eT
—

Anthony
Ferguson

Rochelle
Lightbourne

(Maintain, sustain and retain your work, your wits and your walk)"

RELATIONSHIPS:

Dr. Thomas Rolle - Psychologist/Love & Intimacy Therapist
“The religious aind cultural taboos that stall, stifle and
stagnate love (and other) relationships in the Ohurch”

Dr. Thomas Rolle

The Remnant Community Centre, Carmichael & Golden Isles Roads

Ele cee el Ree Ler Tan
Pree ete eM meee

mie

apse eet Ree et tyme ttl Mat cer ee a time A ee

For further information contact: 461 6400/461-6478

"Since that story
appeared, our team has
done some investiga-
tions which we'll pro-
vide to Health and
they'll also take action
but I can't say anymore
about that," he said yes-
terday.

After the story broke
earlier this week,
renewed calls emerged
from within the water
industry for an inde-
pendent regulatory
board to police the sec-
tor.

"First of all, I think that the
water industry as a whole needs
to be more regulated, no doubt
about it. As an industry we have to
all understand that we are dealing
with a very important product —
there are no short-cuts in this busi-
ness," said Tina Knowles, owner

of Chelsea's Choice. "The industry
needs to be policed, regulations
ought to be most definitely in place
and enforced, but I think it's very
important for there not to be a

FEU USUAL UL
—— ————e

Earl Deveaux



panic in the industry.”
Mr Deveaux said the
sector is currently over-
seen by a cartel of gov-
ernment agencies,
including the Consumer
Affairs Unit, the
Department of Envi-
ronmental Health and
the Ministry of Health.
"Anybody bottling
water would have to get
a license and in order to
get that they would be
required to pass sanita-
tion tests and standards
as set by the environ-
mental monitoring lab which is in
(the Ministry of Environment).
"Any infractions after that, that
cause a public health issue, are
dealt with by the Ministry of
Health and if they have issues of
quality, there's a division of con-
sumer affairs that has punitive
powers that any injured person can
complain to," he explained.
Last week, Aquapure officials
revealed the discovery of five bot-
tles of suspected impostor water

BAIC EXECUTIVE chairman Edison Key meets with Simpson Penn School officials. Pictured from left

they said was tainted with very
high levels of disease causing bac-
teria.

According to Aquapure presi-
dent Alex Knowles, the company
was tipped off about the suspected
fake products — being passed off
as demineralised water — after sus-
picious looking red-capped bottles
were spotted by an Aquapure
employee at an independent depot
in central New Providence last
week.

Aquapure does produce red-
capped demineralised water, and
has assured the public that there is
nothing wrong with the genuine
bottles.

Mr Knowles said the five bot-
tles were seized by police, tested by
company lab technicians and found
to be “heavily contaminated" with
coliform bacteria, indicators of dis-
ease-causing organisms, and fecal
bacteria.

Explaining the extensive daily
testing process executed by Aqua-
pure officials, he said there is no
chance the tainted water originat-
ed from the Bernard Road plant.



" ———



are superintendent Wrensworth Butler, chief of security Jerry Stubbs, Mr Key, and BAIC general manager

Benjamin Rahmng.

THE Bahamas Agricultural
and Industrial Corporation
(BAIC) is offering residents at
the Simpson Penn School for
Boys and the Williemae Pratt
School for Girls a chance at
agriculture and woodturning.

Executive chairman Edison
Key and a BAIC delegation
discussed the venture with
Superintendent Wrensworth

Butler and his team during a
meeting on Tuesday.

"We are going to work with
the students at the schools,"
said Mr Key. "We want to
teach them something they can
have to take them through life,
something by which they can
be self employed."

"This area is ideal for a good
agricultural programme for

BANK TELLERS ARE
a

Get the training you need to
qualify for a high-paying job.

Call Success Training College
324-7770

DON STAINTON |
PROTECTION Lia.

Tel: 322-8219 322-8160

TOP QUALITY TEMPERED
ALUMINUM SECURITY SCREENS

BEAUTYGUARD
| WE DO IT WHEN WE SAY WE WILL! |
__ Serving The Bahamian Community Since 1978 |



these youngsters," said Mr
Key. "We can assist by bringing
in technical persons to give
them the training they need to
grow a variety of fruit trees,
vegetables, root crops,
bananas. I see tremendous
potential there.

Mr Butler welcomed the
progamme as “wonderful
news.”

“(Mr Key) and I share the
same vision. I hope we can get
this project started as soon as
possible so we can impact the
lives of the boys in a very pos-
itive way,” he said.

"This would allow them to
walk away from this place with
meaningful skills with which
they can go back into the com-
munity. Farming is ideal.”

Meanwhile, Simpson Penn
staffers assist where they can
to encourage the youngsters to
produce their own food. Mr
Butler said the aim is to
achieve a greater degree of
self-sufficiency.

"One of the things that is
missing from our farming pro-
gramme is technical assis-
tance," he said. "Basically most
of the persons who assist, they
just have a green thumb.

"In order for us to be able
to do it at a level that would
make our products more mar-
ketable we would need techni-
cal assistance which (Mr Key)
has agreed to provide us with.
We are very pleased with that,”
Mr Butler said.

He said that he has found
agriculture to be very thera-
peutic for the boys. Occasion-
ally they are allowed plots in
which to grow various vegeta-
bles.

"The boys are very proud of
their achievements when they
grow corn and water melons
and tomatoes when they see
them come out of the ground,”
Mr Butler said.

"Definitely I feel that with a
little education and a little
assistance from the general
public and the various min-
istries, certainly we can take
our agriculture programme to a
higher level.

"It is our goal to become
self-sufficient. Presently we
purchase much of our vegeta-
bles from a private vendor.
Once we get the programme
underway that should cease in
short order,” he said.

On the tour of the school,
Mr Key was accompanied by
general manager Benjamin
Rahming, assistant general
manager Arnold Dorsett, assis-
tant manager of the Handicraft
Department Pam Deveaux,
and woodturning trainer
Vaughn Minnis.



THE TRIBUNE

GB Power Company Br) CPV ETE ii)

workers set to elect
new union officers

@ By DENISE MAYCOCK
Tribune Freeport
Reporter
dmaycock@tribunemedia.net

FREEPORT — More than
130 Grand Bahama Power
Company workers are expect-
ed to go the polls today to
elect a new slate of officers in
the Commonwealth Electrical
Workers Union (CEWU).

President Keith Knowles is
not seeking re-election. Six
candidates are vying for the
presidency.

Union Trustee Stevie
Forbes, a 14-year employee at
Grand Bahama Power, is one
of them.

Negotiations

Mr Forbes commended Mr
Knowles for “a job well done,”
especially during the very
tough times last year when the
union was embroiled in indus-
trial action with management
during negotiations for a new
industrial contract.

“T want to thank Mr
Knowles... for representing us;
he was a good and fair presi-
dent that dealt with matters
effectively.

“There are some persons
who were angry with president
Knowles for not giving up
Article 22 and moving on with
negotiations, but I encouraged
him to fight on because giving
up Article 22 would have been
detrimental to the union,” he
said.

Mr Forbes explained that
Article 22 dictates that GBPC
must consult with the union
on all matters concerning its
members and workers before
any decisions are made.

There are 134 members of
CEWU. Mr Forbes outlined
some plans he hopes to imple-
ment if elected president.

He proposes to make loans

available to members who are
facing financial hardship. He
explained that members will
be able to borrow money from
the union and pay it back with
a Salary deduction.

Mr Forbes said that mem-
bers needing assistance — to
pay utilities, car repairs, and
school fees for their children
— will be assisted.

“IT will put mechanisms in
place to accommodate all
members so that the union can
meet them half way with any
expense.

“It is just not right for a
member to face difficulty with
having to meet extra expenses
when they have an organisa-
tion, where they pay monthly
dues and is in a good financial
standing,” he said.

Mr Forbes will bring his
organisational skills and pro-
fessionalism to the union.

“T practise honesty and
integrity on the job, and I
know that there are a lot of
members who will support me
because they know I am a car-
ing person.

“This is not the first time
that I have run for an execu-
tive position. Iam presently a
trustee of the union and this
is my second time running for
president,” he said.

Mr Forbes promised that he
will not compromise the union,
which faced tremendous diffi-
culties last year during its
negotiations with manage-
ment.

“That was a very critical
time in the life of our union. It
was the first time that the
union had ever taken strike
action against the company,
but it was necessary for the
sake of the workers,” he said.

Elections will be held at 9am
at the union’s office on Yel-
low Pine Street under the
supervision of an officer at the
Department of Labour.

Start looking for that Special Prom Dress
early and remember our flexible
layaway plan at

ORALEE’S FASHIONS

Mackey Street « Telephone: 393-0744

Monday -

Saturday 9:00am - 5:30pm

Bahamas Bus & Truck Co., Ltd.

Montrose Avenue
Phone:322-1722 * Fax: 326-7452

a ponte EXTRA,

— Shipment

of
Used Cars

] COME CHECK

US OUT



Union Trustee Stevie Forbes

THURSDAY, MAY 21, 2009, PAGE 7

LOCAL NEWS

Carnival

FUN FOR ALL. ALL FOR FUN.

"$522...

)Camival Freedom
6-day Western Caribbean

From Ft. Lauderdale

Clamival reserves the nght to re-inetate fie fuel supplement

nore
ff way

$5 per person

the WYER of eeceeds 3
o2, Service Teas, per person, double occupancy
Qe al aft iff

pe

Sept 20, 2009

or all quests at up 42
0) per fnarre! Prices

a Caen! ae
BTA! tae

ee rER
PEE Euler t ee8)
Shirley Street.......... Keene!









get your onephone at

purchase your home
phone line and receive

FREE local number

Kelly's














FREE local and long distance calling for one month*
FREE inter-island calls to onephone customers

FREE activation

Cem OMI Meta eit

unlimited broadband internet
a one onephone telephone adapter

a touch tone telephone

*certain restrictions apply

House,
Home

: New Shipments Arrived

Hurry, Hurry, Hurry and
Get Your First Choice
For Easy Financing

Bank And Indurance

on Prenton = onephone
Tesi IndiGO



reeport www.indigonetworks.com N Ww OR K §



PAGE 8, THURSDAY, MAY 21, 2009

THE TRIBUNE



75090 -1 = ee
Junkanoo Summer Festival

moves to downtown Nassau

FOR RENT

Fully furnished town house in private area on
Eastern Road, near beach. 2 Bedrooms, 11/2 Baths,
Washroom, Large Kitchen; Burglar bars, A/C & C/A.

Asking $975 per month for quick rental; serious
inquiries only please; Ph:323-4326

Quality Auto Sales
1 Oem Ue es

For the best deal in town on

pre-owned cars, with warranty!
Trade-ins on new car sales

iN ea

‘01 TOYOTA CAMRY
‘05 TOYOTA CAMRY
‘07 TOYOTA YARIS

‘06 HYUNDAI TERRACAN

IN ANOTHER big move to improve the
highly-anticipated cultural experience known
as the Junkanoo Summer Festival, tourism
officials announced that the event will be
held in a new location — Woodes Rogers
Walk in the heart of downtown Nassau.

For several years, the festival has used
Arawak Cay as the site of its weekly events.
This year, it will be against the backdrop of
Nassau’s busy shopping thoroughfare, Bay
Street, next to the famous straw market, and
overlooking Nassau Harbour and its cruise
port.

The move will bring even more excite-
ment to the event, said Christine Ferguson,
the event’s main co-ordinator for the Min-
istry of Tourism.

“People will be able to feel the energy of
our vibrant city when they enter this new
festival site,” she said. “We are in the heart
of the city, and our festivities will be at the
centre of all the activities that normally make
Nassau such an interesting and exciting des-
tination.”

Ms Ferguson pointed out that downtown
Nassau also has sentimental appeal as a loca-
tion for the Junkanoo Summer Festival. The
move will conjure up memories of past fes-
tivals that were successfully staged there,
she said.

“Our residents and many of our visitors
from long ago would recall the days of
Goombay Summer Festival,” Ms Ferguson
pointed out. “Goombay Summer was one
of our landmark celebrations. It brought
our visitors together with our residents just as

ACTION JACKSON thrills the crowd at JSF 2008.

Junkanoo Summer Festival does today.

Goombay Summer was held right at
Woodes Rogers Walk, and we anticipate
that Junkanoo Summer will be just as special
and just as successful.”

Junkanoo Summer Festival will feature
Bahamian heritage in entertaining presen-
tations and demonstrations. Those who
attend the festival can expect to encounter
Bahamian music, dance, cuisine, and litera-
ture, organisers said.

Events will include heritage games such as



pineapple-eating and onion-peeling contests.
New goombay and rake ‘n scrape songs will
be introduced each week.

Culinary demonstrations will give audi-
ences a better understanding of the prepa-
ration of Bahamian meals, and the festival
will be punctuated each week by colourful,
high-energy junkanoo parades, Ms Fergu-
son said.

The Junkanoo Summer Festival will be
held every Saturday in July from noon to
10pm in downtown Nassau.

‘01 HYUNDAI COUPE
‘04 HYUNDAI SANTA FE
‘06 HYUNDAI ELANTRA
‘06 HYUNDAI SONATA
‘01 HYUNDAI HD-65 TRUCK
‘94 MITSUBISHI DIAMANTE
‘94 TOYOTA CAMRY
= auto
S | QUALTT sales B
ws | SHIRLEY STREET = 322- 3775 + 325- mnt am

apart) Lid tarsi fc al Chad &
ot Abode Mato Moll Di Aci Bhd, DaT-291 8

SRI GLIE TL
ey
Sa RS ee
TUT AM UT
Tea:
ew My CTH

-_—



AT A special assembly held
at the Uriah McPhee Primary
School, the Scotiabank
(Bahamas) Processing Support
Centre announced its adoption
of the school.

Each branch and unit within
Scotiabank has been asked to
select a primary school in their
community with whom to part-

IN CONCERT AT 9:30PM

SATURDAY, MAY 23, 2009

GRAND BALLROOM
DOORS OPEN 8:30PM

Hard Red Spring Wheat

CALL THE ATLANTIS LIVE BOX OFFICE
ee Oa ee wee eer

] Milian Street



East West Highway, Nassau « Tel: 242-
Freeport « Tel: 242-351-2201

ner. Each partnership is indi-
vidualised and can take the
form of financial support, vol-
unteering, shared expertise or
physical resources.

The Processing Support Cen-
tre has commenced with a liter-
acy programme at the school
and has plans to launch a sci-
ence project in the near future.

YOUR BABY CAN READ!

An early literacy system for babies,
toddlers and preschoolers

Authorized Distributor

Sherle Knowles

Phone: 393-8478 or 380-8023
babies

canread@ hotmail.com

Tam aT i
me ee

_ — ee of

* A premium flour that is milled from Canadian

* An enriched flour that is versatile and well suited
to various baking and cooking applications

Distributed throughout the Bahamas by

BWA

Bahamas Wholesale Agencies Ltd.

34-1759








On Friday, May 15, all 49
members of the unit were treat-
ed to a special assembly con-
ducted by students of the
school.

Uriah McPhee Primary
School Principal Helen Sim-
mons-Johnson thanked Scotia-
bank for its support.

“Tam elated that members of
the Processing Support Centre
chose to partner with my school,
this programme will allow Sco-
tiabank to observe first hand
what we are doing in our school
and will provide our students
with opportunities for enhanced
learning,” she said.

Rekell Griffin, senior man-
ager of marketing and public
relations at Scotiabank, pre-
sented Ms Simmons-Johnson
with two computers along with
reading software to be used in
the school’s reading lab.

In an address to the admin-
istrators, teachers and students
of Uriah McPhee, Ms Griffin
said: “Scotiabank is very excited
about this new initiative,
through this programme we
intend to utilise the human
resources, talents and ideas of
our employees to strengthen
and enhance the quality of edu-
cation in the communities
where we live and work.”

The Adopt A School Pro-
gramme spins off the Scotia-
bank Bright Future Programme,
which is a philanthropic initia-
tive that helps support oppor-
tunities for the country’s chil-
dren and communities.

“By bringing together the
passion of our employees, the
insight of our partners and the
spirit of our communities, the
Scotiabank Bright Future Pro-
gramme is helping to support
opportunities for children and
communities, building a
brighter future for everyone,”
the bank said.

share
your
news

The Tribune wants to hear
from people who are

making news in their
neighbourhoods. Perhaps
you are raising funds for a
good cause, campaigning
for improvements in the
area or have won an
award.

If so, call us on 322-1986
and share your story.



THE TRIBUNE

THURSDAY, MAY 21, 2009, PAGE 9



National Dance ©
School to head
to Tennessee

THE National Dance School }
of the Bahamas will attend a }
cultural exchange programme
in Tennessee this year thanks }
to a donation from First- }
Caribbean International Bank. }

The event will be held from :
July 26 to August 8 at the Mal- }

one Studios in Nashville.

The school said the pro- ;
gramme will educate and :
expose local dancers to inter- }
national techniques, while }
simultaneously giving them the }
opportunity to showcase the tra- ;
ditional music and dance of the ;

Bahamas.

Founded in 2003, the First- ;
International :
Comtrust Foundation Limited }
administers the corporate social i
responsibility agenda of First- }
Caribbean International Bank.

Through the foundation, the }
bank has provided nearly $7 }
million in funding for causes }
across the Caribbean, including }
community development, dis-
aster relief, education, health }

Caribbean

and wellness, and sports.

m@ By MEGAN REYNOLDS
Tribune Staff Reporter
mreynolds@
tribunemedia.net

AN AMERICAN fly-fish-
ing enthusiast who travelled
to Crooked Island with the
Ministry of Tourism on Tues-
day died within hours of
arriving.

James Birkholm, 74, and
his wife Deanna Birkholm
run a fly-fishing website from
their home in Poulsbo, Wash-
ington and flew from Nassau
to Crooked Island to explore
opportunities for bonefishing

LOCAL NEWS

‘US man dies after falling ill
on way to Crooked Island

US fly-fishing enthusiast was
travelling with Ministry of Tourism

on a media visit with the Min-
istry of Tourism.

During the flight Mr Birk-
holm complained of nausea
and was taken directly to the
local health clinic after the
flight landed in Crooked
Island.

His condition grew increas-

PELICAN BAY at Lucaya was named as one of the best hotels in the world.



Grand Bahama resort
receives top ranking

FREEPORT - A Grand
Bahama resort has been
ranked as one of the best
hotels in the world, receiving
the highest ranking in the
Bahamas, and placing 11th in
the Caribbean.

Expedia.com’s exclusive
‘Insiders’ Select List’ has
named Pelican Bay at Lucaya
as one of the best hotels in the
world with a score of 86.03,
according to a press release
issued by the resort.

The resort’s water views,
distinct architecture, and
choice amenities have put Pel-
ican Bay in the top 20 hotels
of the Caribbean and made it
the highest ranked hotel in the
Bahamas.

The Reef Atlantis and The
Cove, Paradise Island, are the
only other resorts in the
Bahamas to receive this dis-
tinction.

Millions of customers and
in-house experts chose Expe-
dia Insiders’ Select rankings as
a source when selecting the
appropriate travel destination
with first-class appeal.

Expedia ranks hotels
around the world using a rat-
ing system based on its trav-
eller opinions, expert input
and value, producing a list
that represents the top one
per cent of all of its hotels and
resorts.

Overlooking the Bell Chan-
nel Bay, Pelican Bay’s state
rooms feature furnishings
from around the world, water
views, private balconies, and
patios.

The resort also features
three swimming pools. Guests
can relax poolside and savour
a Caribbean-inspired meal or
tropical drink at the resort’s al
fresco dining option — Sabor
Restaurant and Bar.





242.422.4677

ken@erabahamas.com

Expedia.com’s
‘Insiders’ Select List’

Bahamas

acs. | dete ky
She . 2
[ethan tas

endl Wipes tar

a4
t

Agencies

serving Bahamians with fre best brands tor 60 years

WW Daharresageniciss carr

www.erabahamas.com

Mm.
Ean
ERA

Dupuch Real Estate







ingly serious and Mr Birk-
holm died at around 4pm
with his wife by his side.

Mrs Birkholm returned to
Nassau yesterday and an
autopsy was performed at
Doctor’s Hospital to confirm
Mr Birkholm’s cause of
death.

The couple were scheduled
to spend the night in Crooked
Island on Tuesday and go
fishing the following day with
a group of 10 media repre-
sentatives and Ministry of
Tourism representatives.

The remaining visitors from
across the United States will

go on to Acklins and
Mayaguana before returning
to Nassau and then going
home.

Mr Birkholm was editor of
a weekly online magazine for
fly-fishing enthusiasts, Fly-
AnglersOnline.com, and his
wife is the publisher.

The couple have been life-
long fishing aficionados and
ran a casting school in their
home town as well as the
website.

Crooked Island and the
Bahamas Ministry of Tourism
sponsored the latest edition
of the website.

aes a7 PM

Donations accepted in lieu of flowers

All contributions will be donated to
the COB Athletic Scholarship Fund:

Pare ee te
ee eee es
a shah mee it

2nd floor, Fort Nassau Centre,

iF Tiss ice lls aed
Nassau, Baharnas

eRe eee ee) Re ee |e














































hogging,



The Mercedes M-Class.
Beauty, brains and brawn.

When you think of the average SUV on
the road today, you think of road-
air-polluting gas
that wouldn’t know the meaning of
high precision and fuel efficiency if it
were emblazoned on their windshields.
But there is an alternative. The refined
M-Class from Mercedes-Benz.

guzzlers

Reference: Hywel Jones

With its superior German styling utilising
only high-grade materials,
engine power
turn-on-a-dime performance whilst still
being frugal on fuel and its handling of
pot-holed roads and 1.5 ft. flooded
streets, the Mercedes-Benz M-Class is
clearly the best choice in SUVs.

its robust
delivering exemplary

Mercedes-Benz

TYREFLEX STAR MOTORS
Call us today for your new Mercedes-Benz M-Class at 325.4961
Wulff Road, P. 0. Box N 9123, Nassau, The Bahamas ¢ Fax: 323.4667



PAGE 10, THURSDAY, MAY 21, 2009

THE TRIBUNE



achieve

your goals

Recruiting Now
for the July 2009 intake

Online/distance learning from
RDI in the Bahamas

World Class UK University qualifications from the world’s leading provider of UK distance learning

¢ Low study costs, flexible payments - start from as low as US$275
* Develop your career while studying * No attendance requirement * Tutor and
student support included « Free membership of International Management

Academy plus benefits

BACHELOR DEGREE COURSES

University of Wales - BA (Hons) Business [top up}

MASTERS

MBA - University of Bradford, University of
- specialisms in Marketing, Finance, Banking Sunderland, University of Wales

University of Sunderland - BA (Hons) Business MSc in Public Administration

LOCAL NEWS

EMR school

FROM page one

by Ministry of Education officials.

He fled the country after
resigning on February 12 just as
Grand Bahama police had
launched investigations into the
sexual molestation complaints
filed by the two former male stu-
dents, who are both now 19.

Police issued an international
All Points Bulletin on Birbal, who
was arrested on May 3 in New
York by US authorities on a traf-
fic violation. Grand Bahama
Police were immediately notified
of his arrest.

The Attorney General’s Office
is presently working with author-
ities in the United States to have
Birbal returned to Grand
Bahama, where he is wanted for
questioning in connection with
unnatural sexual intercourse.

Police officials are also wrap-
ping up their investigations into
molestation complaints concern-
ing a female teacher at Eight Mile

F -



EIGHT MILE ROCK teacher Edward Buchanan talks on his cell phone as a plain

clothed officer escorts him to an unmarked police vehicle in the parking lot of
the International Building, where the Ministry of Education Offices are located.

Rock High school.

The incidents have forced the
Ministry of Education to respond
to weaknesses in its public edu-
cation system concerning the hir-
ing of teachers.

Birbal, who has denied the
accusation, has been an art
teacher for some 20 years in the
public school system.

All new teachers will be
vetted by police, and safety com-
mittees made up of students,
teachers, parents, and adminis-
trators will be set up at the
schools.

The government has also estab-
lished a select committee to look
into the incidents at Eight Mile
Rock High.

& Management (top up}, BA {Hons}
Accountancy & Financial Management (top
up)

University of Derby - BSc (Hons) Applied
Psychology

University of Teesside - LLB, BSc (Hons) Business
Computing (top up)

Sheffield Hallam University - BSc (Hons)
International Hospitality & Tourism (top up}

Higher National
Diploma (HND} 24 —>

months

BA/BSc 12
months

Higher National Diploma (eniry to fop up
Degrees through 2-year HND) in Business and
Management, Information Technology, Travel!
and Tourism, Marketing, Finance

& Development -
University of Birmingham
MSc Marketing &
Management - University
of Bradford
MSc Finance, Accounting &
Management - University
of Bradford
MA Education - University of Derby
LLM - University of Derby
MSc Information Technology - University of
Teesside
MSc Telecommunications - Birmingham City
University
MSc International Hospitality Management
- Sheffield Hallam University
Diploma in Management - University of Wales
{pre-MBA for non-degree holders}
Certificate in Management - University of Wales

Featured Programme:
UNIVERSITY OF WALES MBA US$8,500 complete in minimum of one
year. World Top 20 Online MBA (Financial Times, 2009)

Call 1 888 496 6173 (toll free), today to fast-track your career

RDI (Regional Office)

27499 Riverview Center Boulevard, Suite 111, Bonita Springs, Florida 34134 USA ¢ Tel 1 239 444 1730 * email info@rdicaribbean.com

www.rdicaribbean.com



FROM page one

“At this meeting, Permanent Secretaries were
advised that it is likely that each agency’s 2009/10
allocation would be reduced by approximately seven
per cent. However, this reduction has had to be revis-
ited based on the revised 2009/10 revenue projec-
tion,” the memorandum reads.

With an annual average of over $1.5 billion in recur-
rent expenditure, this 10 per cent cut could represent
over $150 million in savings for government.

According to well placed sources, this reduction in
cost across each ministry signifies the extent to which
government is struggling to meet its expenses and
keep the country afloat in an ever worsening global
downturn.

While it is unlikely that government would out-
right terminate employees based on attempts to save
costs, it is believed that those who have reached the
age of retirement will be encouraged to accept pack-
ages and be removed from government payroll.

Additionally, it has also been suggested that gov-
ernment will not be engaging in any new staff, nor will
there be any promotions, or re-classification, and
most certainly no authorisation of “unnecessary”
overtime pay.

In terms of budget reallocations, one agency, the
Gaming Board has reportedly been instructed to
reduce its expenses by some $500,000. To reach this
figure, some 160 ex-police officers, and six consul-
tants are reportedly on the chopping block. Many of
them, having reached the retirement age of 60 years
will reportedly be asked to retire from the public ser-
vice, while others, who are currently enjoying their
pension packages from the Royal Bahamas Police
Force, will be terminated from the Board entirely.

Financial Controller at the Gaming Board Adrian
Sands declined to comment on the matter when tele-
phone by The Tribune yesterday. However, the Sec-
retary, Bernard Bonamy — a former Commissioner of
Police — confirmed that the department would be
making cut backs according to the instructions hand-
ed down by the Ministry of Finance.

“All departments were asked to bring their budgets

FROM page one

Soblering outlook expected

within line of the memorandum sent out from the
Ministry of Finance,” Mr Bonamy said.

Having regard to the current global economic down-
turn, Mr Bonamy said it is unknown what the final fig-
ures would be for the Gaming Board, or whether or
not any terminations would be focused primarily on
any former police officers employed at the Board.
Beyond this, he said he would not be able to comment.

Two officials ‘questioned

FROM page one

foot lot in a subdivision south of Treasure Cay for
$2,201.16.

On the other hand Mr Russell’s wife, sister-in-
law, and the husband of the former Director’s sec-
retary each bought an acre of Crown land in the
area of Blackwood Village, Abaco, for $4,356.

It is claimed that after The Tribune started report-
ing the allegations being made in connection with
land transactions in the Lands and Surveys depart-
ment, files started to be removed quietly.

Since then, all attempts by The Tribune to speak
with officials at this office have been met with
silence.

Yesterday, an attempt was made to speak with the
former director’s secretary. After The Tribune’s call
was transferred to the secretary, the calls were re-
routed and never answered.

Attempts to reach Mr Greaves also proved to be
just as eventful as he was often reported as being in
two different places at the same time.

On one call The Tribune was advised that Mr
Greaves was at the Ministry of Lands and Local
Government. Then, another call was placed with
the Department of Lands and Surveys, where Mr
Greaves was said to be “on the telephone” and
would return a call to this newspaper.

However, no call was returned up to press time
last night.

Firms seeking oil drilling approvals
















If you're thinking
about health insurance,

think of us.

When tough times come,
Cofmaimperial comes
through. Let The Bahermcs'
leader In life and health
Insurance help you meet the
chollenges of the day the
woy we've been doing it for
over a century
-with confidence.

Stay confident.
Stay connected.




we

Colinalmperial
=~

it a
mS. ry
Ay CU: SPA DOO 3464800
Freeport: SRA22S

Www. colinaimpenaloam

ry between us and Florida, the
territory between us and Cuba
and the territory between us and
the Turks (and Caicos) Islands,"
said Environment Minister Dr
Earl Deveaux.

News of the joint venture
between BPC and StatoilHydro
for oil exploration in Bahamian
waters aroused concerns about
the environmental consequences
of the project, but Mr Deveaux
said while he expects there will
be "minimal" environmental
impact from the seismic testing
any drilling would be precipitated
by an EJA.

"They do a lot of their work
based on hauling a very, very long
tube along the ocean that sends
waves down to test the profile of
the rocks and they analyse this
information. There have been a
number of holes drilled before
and they test the material that
they extract from these holes and
based on their theorizing they
come up with a probable estimate
of the likelihood of finding oil.

"The environmental impact of
all of that is minimal and we don't
require them to do an environ-
mental impact (analysis) for it.
The (apparatus) isn't dragged
along the seabed so it's not
destroying coral and we have no
information that it has been
proven to disturb marine life —

like, for example, we can say that
sonic waves from submarines
have done with whales. Any
drilling would have to be done
on the basis of a full environ-
mental impact statement and
management plan and we haven't
reached that stage yet," he said,
speculating that if approved, oil
drilling would be "at least a
decade" away.

BPC Limited — an oil and gas
company with 100 per cent owned
offshore license permits in the
Bahamas — recently announced
its new joint undertaking with
Norwegian-based StatoilHydro
Company the first major oil
exploration project in Bahamian
waters in 23 years.

The companies believe there is
high potential for valuable oil and
gas production in the southwest
Bahamas which they said will
benefit the local population.

In April, 2007 BPC was granted
five licenses for oil and gas explo-
ration in five areas in the south
central Bahamas. But as the
exploration licenses included in
this new joint venture agreement
are new license areas for BPC in
the southwest of the Bahamas,
they are still under application
pending the approval of the
Bahamas government, said a joint
press statement from StatoilHy-
dro and BPC earlier this week.

"The company (BPC) had
licenses approved for exploration,
but we'd suspended any activity
pending the outcome of discus-
sions with the Cuban government
and our representation to the
United Nations on the geograph-
ical territorial boundaries," said
Mr Deveaux.

Since April, 2007 BPC carried
out background work, including
the collection and evaluation of
scientific data and samples from
previous exercises.

The next stages will involve
seismic evaluations, and ulti-
mately, drilling, said BPC’s resi-
dent manager in the Bahamas
Idris Reid.

Kai Nielsen, Public Affairs
Manager for Statoil UK, said
environmental safety is top on
the company's agenda.

"Prior to any operations, we
will carry out a mapping of sensi-
tive areas.

“This will enable us to develop
and implement necessary protec-
tive measures.

“In addition, contingency
equipment will be available dur-
ing drilling operations, to ensure
the safety of people and protec-
tion of the environment. These
are things that we will
start working on, when we
have received the authority
approval."

KIDZ CLLY
BIG

ANNIVERSARY SALE

20% OFF STOREWIDE

15% OFF WITH CREDIT CARD
Sale Start This Friday May 22nd
& Ends Saturday May 30th

Montrose Avenue and Oxford Street (2 doors North of Multi-Discount)

P.O. Box N-1552
Nassau, Bahamas
Phone: 323-3460

Monday - Friday - 9:30 AM - 5:30 PM

Saturday - 9AM - 5PM





PAGE 12, THURSDAY, MAY 21, 2009

TRIBUNE SPORTS



INTERNATIONAL SPORTS



Bryant's chari
give Lakers

@ By BETH HARRIS
AP Sports Writer

LOS ANGELES (AP) — In
an inconsistent start to the
Western Conference finals,
Kobe Bryant was the steadying
presence the Los Angeles Lak-
ers needed.

He took over in the fourth
quarter, finishing with 40 points,
including six free throws in the
final 30 seconds, to lift Los
Angeles to a 105-103 win over
the Denver Nuggets in the
opener on Tuesday night after
the Lakers trailed most of the
game.

"Once I sensed we didn't
have the energy, I had to take it
upon myself to lead by exam-
ple," he said. "It's just part of
my responsibilities to this team."

He did it even with an injury.

Bryant had the right ring fin-
ger on his shooting hand taped
after the game. He dislocated it
against Cleveland in January
and had to have it popped back
in place Tuesday.

"He was the scoring oppor-
tunity for us," Lakers coach Phil
Jackson said. "We had very lit-
tle else going on. He muscled
his way through.”

Pau Gasol added 13 points
and 14 rebounds for the Lak-
ers, who were down by seven in
the fourth quarter. Gasol's two
free throws tied the game for
the last time at 99 before Bryant
started his closing streak at the
line, offsetting a 3-pointer by
Chauncey Billups and a free
throw by J.R. Smith.

Carmelo Anthony scored 39
points and Billups added 18 for
the Nuggets, who hadn't played
since taking care of Dallas in
five games last Wednesday.

"There's no moral victories
in playoff basketball," Denver
coach George Karl said. "The
next 48 hours are going to be
difficult."

Game 2 is Thursday at Sta-
ples Center. The Nuggets have
lost 11 consecutive playoff
games to the Lakers, including a

ty stripe shots
105-103 win



LAKERS forward Trevor Ariza (center left) steals a pass intended for Nuggets guard Chauncey Billups (right) in the final minutes of Game 1 Western
Conference finals Tuesday night in Los Angeles...

first-round sweep last season.

Bryant, who was 9 for 9 from
the line in the fourth quarter,
made two for a 101-99 lead with
30 seconds left. Trevor Ariza
stole the inbounds pass near
midcourt and the Lakers were
able to run the clock down to
10 seconds when Bryant made
two more free throws.

"He threw the ball and gave
me just enough air to go get it,”
Ariza said of Anthony Carter.
"That's all it took.”

Billups hit a 3-pointer to get
the Nuggets to 103-102 with 5
seconds left, but then Anthony
fouled Bryant, who made his
final two foul shots.

"They have the best closer in
the sport and we didn't do
enough,” Karl said.

Smith made one free throw
with 3.2 seconds left and missed
the second intentionally. Bryant
grabbed the game's last
rebound.

"Any great player would love
that moment, get the ball in
their hands every time down the
court and make something hap-
pen,” Anthony said.

The Lakers were back in
action 48 hours after closing out
Houston in seven games in the
conference semifinals.

"We won that game on ener-
gy and gutting it out,” Jackson

€) TOYOTA moving forward

cue

The Toyota 4Runner has supreme. power and sive ina
tough, sophisticated form.

Features include: V6 4.0 litre engine, automatic transmission, 2WD system, A/C,
dual airbags, power windows, locks and mirrors, keyless entry, automatic
power back door window and jam protection system and CD player.

>) TOYOTA

Backed by a 3-year/60,000 mile factory warranty.

EXECUTIVE
MOTORS LTD

AUTHORISED TOYOTA DEALER

Auto Mall, Shirley Street (opp. St. Matthew’s Church)
Open Mon to Fri 8am - 5:30pm
Sat 8am - 12noon

Tel: 397-1700

E-mail: execmotor@batelnet.bs

Parts and service guaranteed

Available in Grand Bahama at Quality Auto Sales (Freeport) * Queens Hwy, 352-6122 * Abaco Motor Mall, Don MacKay Blvd, 367-2916

said. "They outmuscled us and
put pressure on the passers. We
talked about getting the game
close enough to win it at the
end. We got a couple stops that
helped us."

Denver led most of the game
in its return to the conference
finals for the first time in 24
years. But the Nuggets could-
n't stop Bryant over the final
6:48, when he scored 15 points,
including seven straight to help
the Lakers improve to 7-1 at
home in the playoffs. They are
8-0 this postseason when scoring
100 points.

"You get used to greatness,"
Lamar Odom said. "He was

(AP Photo: Mark J Terrill)

amazing. He wanted the ball.
Kobe is always going to help
you or bail you out more than
he hurts you."

The Lakers used a 9-0 run,
including seven straight by
Derek Fisher, to go up 70-66.
From there, though, the
Nuggets ended the third quarter
on a 10-4 run to lead 76-74.
Billups had five consecutive
points, including a free throw
after a technical foul on Bryant,
in the spurt.

Bryant has five technicals in
the playoffs. "I won't get anoth-
er one," he vowed.

The Nuggets took a 13-point
lead in the opening quarter, but

NBA Today



@ By The Associated
Press

Denver at L.A. Lakers, 9
p.m. The Nuggets try to even
their series after a close loss
in Game 1.

STAR

Tuesday

—Kobe Bryant, Lakers,
scored 40 points and made
six free throws in the final
30 seconds to lift Los Ange-
les to a 105-103 win over
Denver in Game 1 of the
west finals.

HERE WE GO

The Los Angeles Clippers
won the NBA draft lottery
on Tuesday, giving the fran-
chise the chance to select
Blake Griffin, the national
college player of the year
from Oklahoma.

STRONG IN DEFEAT

Carmelo Anthony scored
39 points in Denver's 105-
103 loss to the Los Angeles
Lakers in Game 1 of the
Western Conference finals.

SPEAKING

"T think five years from
now Blake Griffin will be hit-
ting his stride in the NBA
and he will be an impact
player wherever he is."

— Clippers president Andy
Roeser, who represented the
Clippers at the draft lottery.
He was wearing a sports jack-
et lined with a Clippers uni-
form with a No. 1 on the left
side and a 23, Griffin's num-
ber, on the other

hurt themselves by going 12 of
21 from the line in the half.
Billups, who missed three free
throws in the first two playoff
series combined, missed his first
three of the game.

"We missed out on a great
opportunity to steal this game,”
he said. "We lose this game on
our poor free throw shooting."

Notes: Smith sprained his right
knee and will be re-evaluated
Wednesday. The Nuggets fell to
2-3 on the road in the playoffs.
Denver F-G Linas Kleiza played
despite a fracture on the tip of
his right thumb.

BAHAMAS REAL ESTATE ASSOCIATION

mi

OU WUE A tele

“REAL ESTATE WEEK”

Sunday, May 24"

Opening Church Service

ot. Francis Xavier Parish Centre

Tee ei

Friday, May 29”

SPA DAY-MANDARA SPA

Vlas [e 0 [ttm odio)

eh

Friday, May 29”
BREA Black-Tie Gala

Atlantis Resort & Casino, Crown Ballroom

Cocktails /‘QOPNM-8:00PM
Gala &:00PM-12:00AM

Tickets: $150.00 Per Person

TO RESERVE YOUR TICKETS CONTACT:
June: junebreai @ecoralwav ome) 1]
WW eR Selene ce ses a rice Ccareelite





TRIBUNE SPORTS THURSDAY, MAY 21, 2009, PAGE 13

SPORTS

Highlights: Primary school track championships



Photos: Felipé Major/Tribune staff

Track & Field
Officials Training

Are you interested in becoming an Official
for Track & Field?
The Bahamas Association of Certified
R M S R A MM E Officials (BACQ) fs extending an invitation
WINDOWS to all present officials and all interested

Nassau's Leading Manufacturer of Vinyl Windows and Vinyl Doors persons to participate in a training
session for track & field.

APRIL SHOWERS Date: Saturday, May 22, 2009

Venue: Thomas A. Robinson Track & Field

IN MAY ? Stadium

Time: 12:00 p.m. - 3:00 p.m,

Call for your FREE quote or

Came visit our factory located on 74 Mount Royal Avenue, Nassau,

TEL: 1-242-325-6633
FAX: 1-242-325-6638

KENISHA PINDER wins 200m...

Wireless Routers
from 585

Complete Desktops
starting at $900
Mini-Laptops starting at $525 —
Laptops starting at $725

Webcams and Mics from $25 Save BIG Fight Now!

| : kease- | 2009 FORD MUSTANG
3” Digital ene eag a Py j 4.0L Automatic - LOADED 4
USB Flash Drives from om NOW $26 900.00
o15 iFi MP3 Players
_ starting at $230

“comejinthe:staneatinanta Bau [ifext-taliowes)/

SS osthese savings anainiUcriaiore!
Register now for our Upcoming Courses! en cn . Le
Mice Ve Plead eee acer eels asec Reel) slicks EE canisces

; , yes: “ie 1,951.00
Web Design w/ Dreamweaver @ Microsoft Word | Excel 2007 a) ee oS NOW $28,800.00

Certified International Project Management (CIPM|PMP)

Lignum Institute of Technology is now a certified
ti eae eee) Pe)
7 3 years or 36,000 miles warranty, 3 years roadside assistant, 3 years rust protections
warranty and licensed and inspected up to birthday.

Se BSD) | how tears REALL A[ S3[|(@Deal

pre (Bahamas) Ltd. FRIENDLY MOTORS C0, LTD

Harb Bay Sh | P|
Ph 393-21€4 Fax 394-4971 THOMPSON BOULEVARD ° TEL.: 356-7100 + FAX: 328-6094
Em ai | . j nto (@ lign umtec h com EMAIL: friendlymotors@hotmail.com * WEBSITE: friendlymotorsbahamas.com





PAGE 14, THURSDAY, MAY 21, 2009

SPORTS

TRIBUNE SPORTS





DR RHADI shows Malcolm moves



Lae

| fone ———
1









5-Boor Modal.

#257 WAU Rood
Po. Bee Maes



b a2) Lad] PPS

Judo athletes get ready for
World Cadet Championship

WORLD renowned elite ath-
lete coach and 2004 Olympian
Dr Rhadi Ferguson was in New
Providence again for an inten-
sive three-day training seminar.

The purpose of the seminar
was to assist the Bahamas Judo





pee

in Affordable Compact Wagons

The Spectras/CERATO has a sporty attitude with ita aport-
tuned auspengion,
suapension. It can seat up to five occupants. It is powered by a
1.6-liter four-cylinder that ia mated to a standard four-speed
automatic transmission.
Door Locks, CD Radio, Two 4-Door Sedan Models including the

strut tower bar,

Ale Gondition,

ELITE MOTORS LTD. SANPIN MOTORS LIMITED
Thompson Bhd. « Oakes Field
t, 242.226.6377" f. 242.226.6315

®. sanpind@coralwave.com

and tully

PWR Windows, PWR

Federation in their elite training
preparation for the World
Cadet Championships, set for
August in Budapest, Hungary.

Dr Ferguson left the
Bahamas Judo Federation with
a detailed 17-page blueprint of

CKI”> 2009 Spectra5/CERATO

KIA MOTORS

The Power to Surprise”

= i

ree —





independent



ON THE SPST FINAN CIS ITH
COMMGHWE ALTH BARK

ISLC ALALABL EWI
ADVANTAGE IM SLEANCE
RADKERS & AGENTS LTO

what is necessary to succeed
competing against the world’s
best.

The Bahamas will be repre-
sented by 15-year-old Cynthia
Rahming, the number one rated
female in the country, along
with Alex Martinborough, the
third place medallist in the Bar-
bados International Champi-
onship.

“The new training is hard but
I feel it is necessary,” says Alex.
“Getting up at 4:30 in the morn-
ing is really tough,” says Cyn-
thia, “and then we have to be
back in the training hall at
7pm.”

If the athletes perform well
at the tournament they will
qualify for a spot in the Junior
Olympics which is scheduled to
be held in Singapore in 2010.
The training is intended to last
12 weeks.

A You Tube documentary
was produced on the training
by the Bahamas Judo Federa-
tion entitled, “Bahamas Judo -
Chasing the Dream”.

It has already received exten-
sive praise from many practi-
tioners around the world. This
documentary will also be fur-
ther developed for Cable



DR RHADI oversees ground fighting...

Bahamas.

“It is important for the
Bahamians to see young
Bahamians striving for excel-
lence,” says federation presi-
dent D’Arcy Rahming.

“What I am most pleased
with is that we had the partici-
pation of All-Star Family Cen-
tre, Island Jujitsu, Academy of
the Martial Arts and the Fox

A NUMBER of judo athletes participated in the seminar...

Hill Club at the seminar with
Dr Ferguson. The Judo com-
munity is selflessly helping to
prepare these athletes.”
Anyone wishing to assist or
become involved with Bahamas
Judo can contact the federation
at Joe Farrington Road Head-
quarters @ 364-6773 or through
the Federation website:
www.bahamasjudo.com



HAPPY 44th BIRTHDAY
WAUGH

CONSTRUCTION

Company Number #8191

Licensee #51 of the Grand Bahama Port Authority Co. Ltd

Licensee #22975 of the Bahamas Government.

Established May 21st, 1965

A family owned Limited Liability Company committed to building a better Bahamas from
Walker’s Cay in the North West to Mayaguana and Inagua in the South East.

We would like to thank our Employees, our Officers and our Directors for successfully guiding this firm

through many demanding and challenging years of continuous operation.

Harold “Sonny” Waugh - President

Godfrey Waugh - Vice President

Gregg T. Waugh - Director
V. Hariprashad (“Harv”) - Director

Brian Waugh - Vice President

Lee Malone - Secretary/Treasurer

Kevin Waugh - Director

Douglas Prudden - Director





Bryant’s charity
stripe shots
give Lakers
105-103 win...

See page 12



DAVYONA ROBINSON, of Martin

Town Primary in Grand Bahama,

soars in the high jump yesterday.
See more photos on page 13



Felipé Major/Tribune staff

Who are the Bahamas’ best
primary school athletes?

m@ By RENALDO DORSETT
Sports Reporter
rdorsett@tribunemedia.net

undreds of students
from around the
nation descended

upon the Thomas A Robinson
stadium yesterday to open the
first of a three-day competition
to determine the best primary
school athletes in the Bahamas.

The Annual Primary School
Track and Field Championships
began Wednesday with heats
and field events dominating the
schedule early on.

Family Island athletes topped
the leaderboards in many of the
contested events, led by the
Androsian contingent who made
frequent trips to the medal podi-
um.

In the Boys’ B division soft-
ball throw, Solomon Lloyd of
North Andros placed first in
57.70m, fellow Islander Dave
Pratt of South Andros was sec-
ond with a throw of 56.27s and
Julius Nottage of Temple Chris-
tian was third with a 52.90m toss.

North Androsian Shaquille
Newton had the top throw in the
Boys’ A division shot put far
ahead of the competition with
his throw of 11.26s.

John Jean of Sadie Curtis was
second with a throw of 9.69s and
Devon Ferguson of South
Andros was third with a 9.24m
throw.

Androsians placed first and
second in the Girls’ A division
long jump with North Andros’
Shantea Gibson first with a jump
of 3.96m, South Andros’ Kendra
King second with a jump of 3.87s
and Jasmine Farrington of Free-
dom Baptist third with a jump
of 3.86m.

In the Boys’ C division long
jump, Kai Jones of Queen’s Col-
lege took first with a leap of
3.60m, Temple Christian’s
Christopher Johnson was second
in 3.38m and Ricky Moxey Jr of
Exuma was third with 3.24m.

While just two finals were con-

1 Personal,
1-Topping Poza =
ea can of Coca-Cola

tested on the track — the 400m
and the 1200m — a number of
high level performances were
turned in on the field.

In the boys D division 400m,
Kendrick Major of Sadie Curtis
took first place in 1:22.47s.

Ulrich Ferguson of Claridge
Primary was second in 1:23.73s
while Nathan Moss of Temple
Christian was third in 1:24.09s.

In the girls’ quarter mile, Exu-





ma’s Brennia Smith took first
place in 1:28.15s.
Ekeminiabasi Morgan of
Sandilands Primary was second
in 1:28.52s and Tyrese Sands of
St Bede’s was third in 1:30.00s.
In the Boys’ B division 1200m,
Temple Christian’s Julius Not-
tage took first place in 4:08.63s,
Bernard Seymour of Long Island
was second in 4:11.72s. Compe-
tition continues at 10am today.

Golfers are invited.





































COMDOS MCLUCE
be a ire ded

reas cle

ee mer Mm teen.

sotahond

Enjoy championship golf from $30 a day at the Reef Golf Club and Lucayan Country Club at
Our Lucaya, Grand Bahama Island. For more information call (242) 373-2003/4.







www.ourlucaya.com

*Offer valid from May ist through Mary 31st, 2009. Proof of Bahamian residency required.





$499

1Personal,

S5pc. Buffalo
ee eo a
Breadsticks Se de ee Se ee ee |



2 Personal,
a a ns

41Personal,
1-Topping Pra,

1 Medium,
1-Tepping Pizza,1

ee pe ee ee ae |

$8379 344229



THE TRIBUNE





y

MONS Rene Gt



‘Big ticket’
firms to he
‘devastated

Businesses openly
discussing ‘drastic
measures’ list if
recession deepens

@ By NEIL HARTNELL

Tribune Business Editor

BAHAMIAN companies
selling “big ticket” products and
luxury goods are likely to be
“devastated” by the current
recession because consumers
are staying away from major
purchases, the outgoing Cham-
ber of Commerce president said
yesterday, as business owners
increasingly discuss their “dras-
tic measures list”.

Dionisio D’ Aguilar, who is
also Superwash’s president, said
the closure of Exuma’s Four
Seasons Emerald Bay Resort,
and the impending loss of a fur-
ther 500 jobs, had “sent a shud-
der” through the collective
Bahamian economy, and caused
business owners to wonder
whether something similar
might happen to a New Provi-
dence-based property.

“T think the closure of the
project in Exuma has caused
people to think this thing could
get worse than it is already, and
the unemployment rate could
go up significantly,” Mr
D’Aguilar told Tribune Busi-
ness. “I think it’s made every-
one nervous, and has got every-
one in a dither.”

The Chamber president said
it was hard to make sweeping
generalisations about the state
of the Bahamian economy, as
some companies were doing
well - the lkes of Cable
Bahamas and Abaco Markets
were all reporting net profit
increases for early 2009.

Mr D’ Aguilar said he consid-
ered himself lucky, Superwash’s
sales only being down by 5-10
per cent for 2009 to-date. In
comparison, the Bahamian auto
industry had been “devastated”,
with new car sales, as revealed
by Tribune Business, collec-

SEE page 8B

ine

THURSDAY,

M Agcy P21.



2009

SECTION B ¢ business@tribunemedia.net

Commercial fishery
solution to Lionfish

@ By NEIL HARTNELL
Tribune Business Editor

commercial

fishery opera-

tion targeting

the invasive

Lionfish species
could produce a “win-win” sit-
uation for the Bahamian econ-
omy, fishing industry and the
environment, a leading envi-
ronmental consultant told Tri-
bune Business yesterday, gen-
erating the perfect ‘triple bot-
tom line’ impact.

Keith Bishop, co-principal of
Islands by Design and head of
environmental management for
Abaco’s Schooner Bay devel-
opment, said a fishing trip spon-
sored by the project’s head,
Orjan Lindroth, had provided
an insight into the possible eco-
nomic impact a commercial
fishing operation targeting
Lionfish could have.

The four-day fishing trip
sponsored by Mr Lindroth and
Schooner Bay netted more than
1,200 Lionfish, a profitable
catch if it was to be turned into
money.

Praising Mr Lindroth’s initia-

Four Seasons’
8% gross fee
‘too much’

* Brand wanted $26m investment
into Emerald Bay by main
creditor in 2009

* Last offer for Exuma resort
was $40m, sources say

* But BHA president says too early
to write-off ‘anchor property’
strategy despite Exuma
hotel's demise

@ By NEIL HARTNELL
Tribune Business Editor

THE Four Seasons’ 30-year
management contract to brand
Exuma’s Emerald Bay Resort
paid it fees equivalent to 8 per
cent of the property’s gross per
annum revenues, informed
sources told Tribune Business
yesterday, a figure that proved
“too much to handle”.

This newspaper was also told
that Four Seasons made heavy
capital investment demands on
the resort’s initial ownership
group, Emerald Bay Resort
Holdings (EBRH), and latterly
its main creditor, the London
office of Japanese insurer, Mit-
sul.

Tribune Business was told
that Four Seasons had wanted
Mitsui to invest, in terms of cap-
ital expenditure, some $26 mil-

SEE page 9B

kien si Siig aire! ys eee

Ondy ninety lots in wis

exdusive, luxury gated develaprnent,

SWIMMING POOL
TENNIS COURT
24-HOUR SECURITY

v

KINGS REALTY

with arrsatirny alevaticrs

PICDUTESQ Le GOES yeereye.

Mult family tots ane sovd out.
Sonpe-fariy kare starting af

°175,000

Leading consultant says proposal would be ‘win-win’ for
Bahamian economy, fisheries industry and environment,
creating ‘triple bottom line’ impact

tive, Mr Bishop explained: “We
put it to the test locally because
we had a huge number of the
species here, in the area of
Crossing Rock. It was some-
thing that was readily accepted
by the local fishermen.

“We offered a bounty of
$1.50 per piece, and one indi-
vidual pulled in 250 of them in a
day. He was able to make him-
self $375 in one day. Not bad
money for an out-of-season fish-
erman.”

The Bahamian environmental
consultant pointed out that
apart from the local Bahamian
and resident population, there
was an immediate market for
Lionfish as food from the five
million tourists that visited the
Bahamas every year.

Lionfish, when properly fil-
leted, posed no threat to human
health, Mr Bishop telling Tri-
bune Business that one he had

eaten had “a pleasant taste”,
with the product treated as a
delicacy in the fish’s native
Indo-Pacific region.

He said efforts to develop a
Bahamian market for Lionfish
as a delicacy had already begun,
with New Providence resident
Alexandra Maillis-Lynch, own-
er of Alexandra’s Catering and
the August Moon Cafe, offering
up to $8 per pound for the fish,
up to 100 fish.

Lionfish are thought to have
been introduced to Bahamian
and Caribbean waters from
household fish tanks. While
small to medium-sized, they
have no known predators in the
Bahamas and breed rapidly,
releasing up to 30,000 eggs once
every 28 days.

Found around reefs and
marine structures, including
marinas, shipwrecks, jetties and
piers, their venom is poisonous,

causing muscular and respira-
tory system distress in human
victims.

But of far greater concern is
that Lionfish feed on virtually
anything - young groupers,
crawfish (lobster), grunts and
snappers. These are key prod-
ucts for the Bahamian fisheries
industry, and the nation’s envi-
ronment.

Mr Bishop yesterday warned
that the Bahamian fisheries
industry would suffer a “huge
negative impact” unless some-
thing was done to curtail the
growth of the Lionfish popula-
tion in the Bahamian waters.

He added that, in the absence
of a natural predator, Lionfish
“eat everything”. One fish he
had cut open revealed stomach
contents that included a host of
small-scale fish and a small lob-

SEE page 3B

Hotel room revenues off 20% into Q2

@ By NEIL HARTNELL
Tribune Business Editor

HOTEL room revenues have
continued to trend 20 per cent
behind prior year comparatives
into the 2009 second quarter,
the Bahamas Hotel Associa-
tion’s (BHA) president said yes-
terday, the industry’s main con-
cern being whether the first
quarter performance will be
enough to sustain resort prop-
erties through the remainder of
this year.

Robert Sands told Tribune
Business that the sector’s main
concern regarding the 2009 first
quarter, in which hotel room
revenues were off on average
by 23 per cent year-over-year,
was not so much the perfor-




















Industry ‘concerned’ over whether first quarter performance
will sustain resorts through quieter periods

mance but whether enough rev-
enue and net income had been
generated to sustain the indus-
try - and its resorts - through
the quieter second and third
quarters.

“What’s concerning about
that [the first quarter perfor-
mance] is this is traditionally
the period we maximise our
income in,” Mr Sands said.
“The concerning issue is what
will be the impact for subse-
quent quarters going forward.
That’s the concerning element.

“It’s not so much the perfor-
mance and what we achieved
in the first quarter, but how it

impacts the results in the sec-
ond and third quarters, which
are much softer periods of rev-
enue generation.”

Bahamian resorts tradition-
ally generate most of their
income during the period lead-
ing up to Easter every year, usu-
ally from February to April.
The profits and revenues gen-
erated during the first and ear-
ly second quarters then largely
sustain them through the year’s
quieter spells.

The BHA president added:
“Tt looks as if the industry is

SEE page 4B



Money Safe.
Money Fast.

Gram.

international Maney Teosster

§ Bank of The Bahamas

[IH THRSATION AL

Online at

BankBahamasOniline.com

Hotels assess
private plane
pre-clearance

@ By NEIL HARTNELL
Tribune Business Editor

THE Bahamas Hotel Asso-
ciation (BHA) is assessing how
pre-clearance facilities can be
extended to accommodate the
hundreds of tourists who visit
this nation by private plane, Tri-
bune Business was told yester-
day, with the industry wanting
to hold on to this high-end visi-
tor niche.

Speaking as the US Home-
land Security Department this
week implemented new rules
requiring private aircraft flying
between the US and the
Bahamas to submit electronic
passenger manifests in advance,
Robert Sands, the BHA’s pres-
ident, said: ‘““We want to make it
easier for them [private aircraft
and their passengers].

“One of the issues right now
is the question of pre-clearance,
and how that can be expanded
to accommodate private aircraft
passengers. At the moment,
they have to go through the US
for pre-clearance. There is no
pre-clearance in Nassau.”

Mr Sands said the “ease of
travel and ability to leave the
destination” smoothly were key

SEE page 11B



ARE YOU PREPARED. FOR THIS
UPCOMING HURRICANE SEASON?

APPLY FOR A
BOB, HOME

PROTECTION

_

b

LOAN

| Topay!
FINANCING UR TO, 7 YEARS

HURRICANE SHUTTERS
HURRICANE SUPPLIES
GENERATORS
INSURANCE PROTECTION

Bank of The Bahamas

INTERNATIONAL
Revolutionizing The Way You Bank!

New Providence « Grand Bahama + Andras = Inagua * Exuma
San Salvador « Cat Island « Coral Gables, FL

Head Office Nassau: (242) 397-3000



we, BankBahamasOnline.com



PAGE 2B, THURSDAY, MAY 21, 2009





THE TRIBUNE

Scotiabank units adopting schools



REKELL GRIFFIN (far right), Scotiabank’s senior manager for marketing and public relations, presents Helen Simmons-Johnson, the principal, with

two computers and reading software...

SCOTIABANK (Bahamas)
49-member processing support
centre has adopted Uriah
McPhee Primary School, part
of an initiative that will see each
unit of the bank partner with a

primary school in their commu-
nity.

Rekell Griffin, Scotiabank’s
senior manager for marketing
and public relations, presented
Helen Simmons-Johnson, the

school’s principal, with two
computers, plus with reading
software to be used in the
school’s reading laboratory.

In an address to the adminis-
trators, teachers and students




of Uriah McPhee, Ms Griffin
said: “Scotiabank is very excited
about this new initiative.
Through this programme, we
intend to use the human
resources, talents and ideas of
our employees to strengthen
and enhance the quality of edu-
cation in the communities







~ Whirpoot =

The poser te pel mare deen

where we live and work.”

The Adopt A School Pro-
gramme is a spin-off from Sco-
tiabank’s Bright Future Pro-
gramme, a philanthropic initia-
tive that helps support oppor-

southern style

Seay
BISCUIT















tunities for the children and
communities in which the bank
is present.

Each partnership can take the
form of financial support, vol-
unteering, shared expertise or
physical resources. The Pro-
cessing Support Centre has
commenced a literacy pro-
gramme at Uriah McPhee, and
has plans to launch a science
project in the near future.

esa act |



Add a Splash of Colo

1 TRE WHIRLPOOL CLASSIC LINE

Whirlpool® Classic Washer

WTWS57ESVH WGDS5700VH
$1,25 $1,200

1 oot The AccuDryl

Whirlpool® Classic Dryer

Washer

Save 25% when you pay casi.

ele”

The power be get more deme.

Open Mondoy thru Saturday, 8:30am ‘til 5:30pm
ee te teed
een eee cee fir

VeRO eee ah

Master Technici

APPLIANCES & ELECTRONICS

FOUNDATION

Keystone Developments

AT HIGH POINT ESTATES

4 spacious models from which to choose
3 or 4 bedroom townhouses and homes, with garage
$313,000 to $436,000
In-house Financing @ 7% interest
Immediate or near occupancy
First time homeowners incentives
Many upgrades included!
Hurricane engineered wall system!

T: 328-8287 / 424-6755
E: info@bahama-wall.com



THE TRIBUNE

THURSDAY, MAY 21, 2009, PAGE 3B



SINE
Banks delay e-commerce

lm By CHESTER ROBARDS
Business Reporter
crobards@tribunemedia.net

THE DELAYED implemen-
tation of the commercial banking
sector’s Automated Clearing
House (ACH) could impede the
growth of e-commerce in the
Bahamas, the Data Protection
Commissioner told Tribune
Business yesterday.

George Rodgers said the
ACH would “definitely assist”
Bahamas-based e-commerce to
move ahead much more swiftly
than has been the case in recent
years.

The Government has moved
forward to ready the Bahamas
for e-commerce by passing a
series of Bills related to elec-
tronic monitoring, misuse and
concessions, thus providing a reg-
ulatory framework for the indus-
try.

“The Government has pro-
duced thus far what firms and
individuals need to do to ensure
compliance with the Data Pro-
tection Act,” he said.

Mr Rodgers said the delay in
implementing the ACH was
something of an embarrassment
for the Bahamian commercial
banks, as several deadlines have
passed them by.

The Central Bank has conse-
quently decided to “step in and
drive forward” the process of
establishing the ACH.

One local bank told Tribune
Business recently that they have
been proactive in trying to inte-
grate their system with a device
that would make it possible for a
person anywhere in the world to
make a payment to a Bahami-

Commercial
FROM page 1B

ster.

By establishing a commercial
fishing operation targeting
Lionfish, Mr Bishop said the
Bahamas would not only be
removing an invasive species
and protecting its environment,
but also generating an econom-
ic return and providing work
for fishermen - especially out-
of-season.

“You're removing an invader,
but are able to provide food
from it,” Mr Bishop explained.
“You're removing a negative



an-owned website, and have that
payment posted to an account in
their establishment.

However, representatives of
that bank said the system’s acti-
vation would require more time
to be duly implemented.

The Government has already
provided the framework for this
kind of online transaction with
the implementation of the Com-
puter Misuse Act, Data Protec-
tion Act and Electronic Conces-
sions Act.

It is hoped that when the
ACH is activated, businesses will
have to deal with less cash and,
possibly, less crime.

One huge proponent of the
ACH has been Superwash own-
er and Bahamas Chamber of
Commerce president, Dionisio
D’ Aguilar.

He has been pessimistic about
the local banks’ urgency in
implementing the ACH, telling
this paper recently: “If it’s left
to the clearing banks it’s never
going to happen.”

Mr Rodgers asserted that the
ACH would be a step in the right
direction for e-commerce in the
Bahamas.

“It would definitely assist local
e-commerce, and would then
allow banks to deal with each
other directly,” he said.

The ACH is intended to
replace the current manual sys-
tem for settling cheque transac-
tions, where cheques drawn on
one bank but due to be deposit-
ed at another have to be taken
by armoured car to a central
location where they are settled
by representatives of the various
institutions.

Apart from allowing inter-

invader from the marine envi-
ronment, but turning it into an
economic upturn for persons
who can find a market for it.

“T think it’s a win-win for
everybody. We take an invader
out and sell it as food.”

Mr Bishop said any commer-
cial fishery did not necessarily
have to be started by the Min-
istry of Agriculture and Marine
Resources, as maybe all the
Government needed to do was
teach Bahamians how to han-
dle and catch Lionfish safely,
then “provide avenues to mar-

bank cheques to be processed
electronically rather than manu-
ally at a cheque clearing facili-
ty, the ACH system will allow
direct debits and credits from
accounts, debit cards and a
shared Automatic Teller
Machine (ATM) network.

The latter would allow
Bahamians to use their cash
cards at any bank branch. It
would also reduce the time per-
sons spent in line waiting to cash
and deposit pay cheques, as they
could be deposited to their
account.

Bahamian consumers would
also be able to use direct debits
from their bank accounts to pay
bills such as cable television and
electricity.

The ACH could ultimately
lead to the creation of just one
back office system for the entire
Bahamas. It may also help devel-
op SWITCH products, where
Bahamians could use their cash
cards at any bank's ATM
machine.

A further potential bonus
from the ACH will be the open-
ing up a whole range of elec-
tronic banking services in the
Bahamas, including its use in the
online purchase of government
goods and services.

Ultimately, through mod-
ernising the Bahamian payments
system through electronic means,
the ACH will provide buyers and
sellers with more certainty and
confidence, especially when it
comes to settling their transac-
tions.

It will also enhance economic
and business efficiency by set-
tling transactions quicker, boost-
ing business cash flows.

fishery solution to Lionfish

ket”.

Lionfish could be caught and
offered to Bahamian restaura-
teurs free - or for a nominal
charge — in order to stimulate
interest among consumers in
the region, it was suggested.

The Government and large
Bahamas-based hotel chains
could also step in as guaranteed
buyers until the industry got off
the ground, and cottage indus-
tries would spring up around it,
creating a much-needed rev-
enue source for local commu-
nities.

The effects of HPV could put your daughter's

future at risk—you can help protect her.

Denice cancer—it's not too carly to think about it,

yourg ;’wlTIer if ther eer gd 204 are more yulnesble to HP thee virus that

Califes Garvie CanGer, betaLiGe their ies fre BL | dewalaping Ifa girl OF Our

woman hag HP, and her bey doean't claar the viris, carvical cancer can davalop

ater in life. So while most women diagnosed with cervical cancer are between the

ages of 35 and S5 years old, many of them were probably exposed to a “high-risk”

type of HPY bn their youth

Having Pap tests regulary can help protect you

rom increased risk of cervical cancer.

= Can leering the facts about where goed Migs ditlererit Wwpes of Concer form,

Cervical cancer—s reeukt of WP

Certoal cancer is cancer of

thes cerwik—cne loser pet of che

Vaginal! canoer =hard to detent,

AS ta 20% of waging cancers

fiat in the Ging of te wugieun

uterus Bhat conrecthe the veanb

fife] eh nip meh

Weilvar cum rare

Art OSA Pree, no Bmore.

I
look for early cigms

Burning. aching, painful usination,
OF hire Duns Gould Siereel yubeor
cancer, which affects thee inner
odiges Ot the wegine'’s guber hokis,

Prectanetra—wittré Gaftecer bet Plies.

High-risk typos of MP con cause obnorrnaAal

clin to farm in the cerix, wagina, arid woh.

if net detached wacty, thease calle can tam ls
itn Hreonreoenne, ane chee cnc ;

it's dIMicuM bo Lniak of pour daughter suffering from any of Unese ilinessas
and ruining her drame of a healthy future. You can do eoemething te heli

Pretect fer and heer future move.

Talk to a doctor about the only vaccine that can
help protect your daughter from cervical cancer
and other HPV diseases.

FREE ANNUAL CERVICAL/BREAST SCREENING

May 9- Flamingo Gardens Clinic
May 16 - Elizabeth Esiaies Clinic

Fleming St. Clinic

May 23 - South Beach Clinic
May 30 - Annual Cancer Society Ball

































































The Long Islanders’ Association Annual Raffle Winners List - 2009
= =

# Pia

Tiket #

12650

Winner's Name
204 CHEVY AVEQ Armin Gercen
4DAY5,} NIGHTS STAY

February Point Resort Ratan, Ceca Eaouma

23846 Blevilke: Poaleer

WHIRLPOOL WASHING MACHINE

Aunioenryrnicaas

GE 7 CUBIC CHEST FREEZER
Cremiipey Joes Ae Co, Late.
2 ROUND TRIP TRT TO 11 & 3 STGHTS
ACOOMMODATION-Footh Caroll

03371 (Channine Snath

(M355, Christine Adderley

14104

Serene Munro

3 DAVE, 2 NIGHTS TAT
Stella Murs [inn Long Island
| 43 DAYS, ? NIGHTS STAY
| Cape Senta Mara, Long Island
| se
| $M GIFT CER TIFHCATE
Comemnocm Lig SHINE CELLULAR PHONE
Island Celbalar
2 ROUND TRIP THCRETS ON THE RYO)
BOAT WITH CAR TO ELEUTHERA OR
| AMDROS — Bahamas Sea Road
1 OOK TV
Mr. dé: Wore. Aree Harelirge
2? ROUND TRIP TICKETS OM THE
ROHEGY TO RLELTTHERA — Bahamas
| Fast Fomics Services Lad. =
GENTS & LADIES WRIST WATCH
Crown jewellers
LAWN MOWER
JHR Builckny Supplica
— =
BICYCLE

Pele, &t Kins, (Carl Treco

O71 jimmy Relic:
21682 Baby Lashawnte
03352 R&S hierinkworcugh

7450 Donne Smith

18376 Malig Foersaint

1H Ansell Warson

SMP Ansell Watson

SIMS Ann Maric Dhara

}0o24 Marva Jomes

S174. | Ietaygearet Laewless
$18). GIFT CERTIFICATE

AID

S10. GIFT CERTIFICATE.
Centreville Foe Store

5100.00 GIFT CERTIFICATE

Barly Bard Pomd Searcy

#1000 GIFT CERTIEM ATE

Shayne's Depammcot Sore

$100.00 GIFT CRRTIFICATE

The Preacripoiom Cenere Phasmacy
CEILING FAN

Henry P. Steer Electric fio. Lik
CELLING FAN

Wir. fic Pele Larelic Airane

VACUUM CLEAMER

Terry Pinder

PORTABLE (ASSETTESCD PLAYER
Lickery Spit Ice Ceeans end Deli

loos Pactrorn

Peser Cancina

E. Covington

Carola Agmbeister

O162s Herry Tee Cat

140n1 Fdsin Tayler

OoTeSl Matumrway Landecapang

Sandra ‘Thorns

The Long Islanders’ Association sincerely thanks all persons who
donated prizes, sold tickets and supported the raffle.

Thank You.

Prizes may be collected at “Tyre Empire Lid’ #16 Chesapeake Road

The Tribune apologizes for errors published in the
May 20th issue of the daily paper.
We apologize for any inconvenience caused,

Queen’s College

Centre for Further Education (C.F.E.)

P.O, Box N-7127, Nassau, Baharas
Tel: (242) 393-1666/284065, Fax: (242) 399-3248

AT Summer Classas at OC

~ Planning for college?

Oo you want to earn extra credits betore entering college ?
Oo you want to reduce college cost?

Do you want to qualify for scholarships?

Grade 10 & 11 students, give yourself the best advantage by
preparing for the SAT exam and attending the AP classes with
qualified instructors at Queen’s College.

WIN M K cdi BRCUPIIRS Ie RR CMW Rr

: July 08
Current Grade 10 & 11 students from all
achools are invited to attend.

i

eas

Current Grade 9 students from all schools
are Invited te attend.

VPay $255-first payment May20th, 2009
\Pay balance $140 on June 03, 2009

Email: cfe@chenceforth.com



PAGE 4B, THURSDAY, MAY 21, 2009

THE TRIBUNE



JOB OPENING

Needed immediately, experienced Nurses _ to
work in Operating Theatre. Must have a good
employment background, must possess a Bachelors
Degree in Nursing, must have Operating Theatre
experience and must be licensed in_ the
Por immediate
consideration, please send your resume to:

Commonwealth of the Bahamas.

PHYSICIANS ALLIANCE LTD.
P.O. BOX EE-17022
#3 GROSVENOR CLOSE OFFICE
NASSAU, BAHAMAS
FAX: (242) 326-8874













FROM page 1B

months.”

are maintained.

“Reporting for The Tribune is a

DeSpL

respon

ibility and privilege. We

t and honour the peaple’s

right to know everyday, I'm

proud to be a part of the leading

print

medium in The Bahamas.

The Tribune is my newspaper.”

The Tribune

BAHAMAS FINANCIAL CENTRE

NASSAU, BAHAMAS

RUPERT MISSICK, JR.
CHIEF REPORTER, THE TRIBUNE

To report the news, call our
News Tips Line at 502-2359.

TOTAL RENTABLE AREA: 2,278 SF

SUBLEASE
OPPORTUNITY

PREMISES: Third Floor

AM AILABILITY: June 30, 200% or sooner

For information, contaci:

W. Larry Roberts
T: 242_374.0026
lrobertsbahamasrecity bs

Class

TERM: Through December 30, 2011.
Lang tenn extension possible.

A Building

Centrally Located

Underground Parking

Donald Martinborough
T; 242.374,0028
dmartinborough’ibahamasrsalty Jos

Furniture option
Fibra Optic connectivity

Full standby generater

Boahomas Realty Limited

P.O. Box H-1132

Mossau, Bohomas

wera bohomascommerckal.com

wate CO Com

down about 20 per cent year-
to-date on room revenues.
That’s for the first four

The room revenue decline is
likely to have been produced
by a combination of declining
occupancies, with stopover vis-
itors to Nassau/Paradise Island
down 15.9 per cent year-over-
year for January 2009, and the
discounting that hotels have
used to ensure business volumes

Mr Sands added that while
room revenues might be down
by one-fifth, to assess how Nas-

sau/Paradise Island hotels were
performing overall, the bigger
picture needed to be examined.

Rooms were only one rev-
enue stream, with properties
such as Kerzner International’s
Atlantis resort and Baha Mar’s
Cable Beach properties also
generating revenues from casi-
no gaming and food and bev-
erage.

Mr Sands added that individ-
ual resort properties had also
“made some adjustments to
expenses” internally to mitigate
the bottom line impact from the
revenue downturn. He acknowl-
edged, though, that the top line
fall had “impacted on cash

The BHA president said it
was “difficult to say” whether
the Bahamian hotel industry
would experience any more
mass lay-offs, although he point-
ed to the RIU Paradise Island
resort’s planned closure for sev-
eral months, during which ren-
ovations to the property would

be made, as an example of the
decisions hotel owners were
taking.

“Certainly, there are still
downward pressures on occu-
pancies and downward pressure
on rates, but that’s the world
we’re living in during this reces-
sionary period in the US, and
individual properties are get-
ting used to making adjustments
internally to reflect the new
world order,” Mr Sands said.

“While booking windows are
still short, a lot of properties are
doing value-added marketing
to attract business to the desti-
nation. Many properties are
employing different strategies
to make things work.”

Kerzner International was
employing an events-based
strategy, via concerts from the
likes of Miley Cyrus and the
Jonas Brothers, to generate
excitement for its Atlantis prod-
ucts and attract US guests there.

Other hotel properties were
binding themselves more

I ="). <>
Hotel room revenues

off 20 per cent into Q2

strongly to their brands and the
latter’s network, offering value-
added and specific programmes
“to ensure we have volume at a
rate that can still generate
income”.

“The Bahamas is remaining
visible in the marketplace and
staying in the mindset of the
travelling consumer,” Mr Sands
said. “When you look at our
results in comparison to world
and regional competitors, we
are not faring too badly.

“T think the rest of 2009 will
remain a challenge for the
industry. Member hotels are
employing many initiatives to
reduce the level of decline and
to try to remain financially
viable operations going for-
ward.”

As for Baha Mar, where Mr
Sands is senior vice-president
for governmental and public
affairs, the Sheraton resort was
meeting plan expectations,
while the Wyndham was “not
meeting plans at all”.

CPA / CERTIFIED PUBLIC ACCOUNTANT

Apply principles of acecanting to analyze financial information and prepare financial reports by
compiling informaiton, preparing protil and loss statements, and utilizing appropriate accounting
comin procedures,

Primary Poesgenncsl billities
|. Prepare profit and loss statements and monthly closing and cost accountins reports.

2. Compile and analyze finascial information to prepare canries wo accounts, such as general ledger
accounts, and document business transactions.
3. Establish, maintain, aad coordinae the leypkmestation of accounting and accounting control

procedures.

4. Amalyze and review budgets and eqpenditures for contracts.

3, Monitor and review accounting and related system reports for accuracy and compleieness.
6. Prepare and review badget, revenue, expense, payroll entries. imoioes, and olher accounting

documents.

7. Analyae revenue and expenditure trends and recommend appropriate Gadget levels, and ensure
expenditure coniral.
4. Exgplain hilling invoices and accounting policies to staff, vendors and cliemts.
4, Resolve accounting discrepancies.
10). Recommend, develop and maintain financial data bases, computer software sysiems and manual

filing syste.

L1, Supervise che input and handling of financial data ond reports for ihe company’s automate

financial ester.

12. Interact with paditors. in completing audits if necessary.
13. Other duises as assigned.

Auditional Responsibilities
|. Develop the annual operating budget and consult with departmental management on the fiscal
mapects of program planning, salary recommendations, and other administrative actions.

2. Provide aceounling paliey orentation for new staff

Skills Required:

Kurcnatedge ol finance, accounting, bukgeling, and coat control principles including Generally Accepted

Accounting Principles. Kuncwledge of financial and accounting software applications
Quickbooks and Mireos software knowledge a plo

Employment Type: Full Tome

Yearly Salary: Unapecified
Level of Education: College

Veors of Work
Experience:

3 in 5 Years

Company: King’s Realty

‘(Contact Name:

Contact Phone: 22-4497

Contact Fax: 242-394-4492

Contact E-mail:
Preferred Meihad E-mail
of Contact:

BAH ANAS REALTY ir
COMMEECEAL
ih epcceber ert:

CBRE

CB AICHAND ELLUS.

Lillth Bostwack

Education & Experience

Contact Information

Th etkingsreany con | baharase kings ray com

Mingle with the Singles
Saturday May 30th &:00pm until
British Colonial Hilton

Nassau Singles

presents

Syeed Dating

Come and join a group of professional
singles all looking for love. There is
someone for everyone. The man or
woman of your dreams is just a phone
call away.

Call Nassau Singles: 341-8596
Thursday - Saturday 5-9pm
and all day Sunday for tickets

R.5.Â¥.P.
Tickets $60

includes food and drinks





THE TRIBUNE

THURSDAY, MAY 21, 2009, PAGE 5B

Bahamas recovery may start at end-Q3

lm By CHESTER ROBARDS
Business Reporter
crobards@tribunemedia.net

A LEADING Bahamian
financial analyst said yesterday
that the US economy appears
to be bottoming out, which
could mean the beginning of an
economic recovery for the
Bahamas by the end of the 2009
third quarter, with a noticeable
turnaround occurring by 2010.

Kenwood Kerr, speaking at
the Rotary Club of Southeast
Nassau’s monthly meeting, said
Americans are regaining confi-
dence in US capital markets.
He argued that Wall Street was
beginning to recover slowly
from its embarrassing topple
last year, when stock values
plummeted and hundreds of
workers were left without jobs.



Oe EAE Ly

The Providence
Advisors chief execu-
tive said some six mil-
lion people in the US
have lost their jobs in
the past 12 months,
and Bahamian unem-
ployment is at 12 per
cent.

“No on is immune
to these crises, and
we’re certainly not off
the hook from these
business closures,
spending cut backs,
the job losses and the
massive unemployment that
we’re seeing,” he added.

Mr Kerr said Bahamians
must remain prudent with their
finances, in spite of peaks and
troughs in the economy.

He suggested that the basic
principles of saving for the

Kenwood Kerr



future should hold
true whether the
economy is in a poor
state or booming, or
if the finances are
business-related or
personal.

Mr Kerr said busi-
nesses should keep
their models simple
and manageable,
know their competi-
tors, and remain flex-
ible.

To achieve success
in a recession, he sug-
gested businesses outsource
labour and prudently manage
cash flow.

Mr Kerr said individuals
should develop a “financial road
map”, budget in order to track
spending and recognise bad
spending habits.



a nee Ce Ue Lag ac

ee el

Tel: a =

ee ft



DHL JOB DESCRIPTION

POSITION:
JOB FAMILY:
RCS CODE:
REPORTS TO:
LOCATION:

OVERALL PURPOSE:

Collections Agent

Credit & Collections
A20004

Collections Lead

Country Finance Department

Under limited supervision in a team environment provide efficient and effec-
tive credit approvals. To ensure timely credit application processing, respond to
information requests and issues. Ensure accuracy of all credit decisions functions
while staying within company policy and procedural guidelines.

DUTIES AND RESPONSIBILITIES:

Gathers, compiles and maintains basic credit information to be used in
making credit decisions.
Reviews and monitors credit sources, customer applications and
delinquent accounts. Processes credit applications.

Works with smaller customers to resolve collections issues and disputes.

Investigates disputes and reviews documentation.

Prepares and processes credit and collections account adjustments.
Implements credit suspensions.
Recommends further actions on delinquent accounts.

Maintains records of credit risks and delinquent accounts.

Provides support and coordination with third party agencies as needed.
Handles customer calls related to Collection Agency accounts.

Prepares and files bankruptcy claim documents.

MINIMUM QUALIFICATIONS:

High School diploma required. .

1-3 years of experience in Collections.
Advanced administrative skills to function effectively with limited
direction amid competing priorities and deadlines.

Excellent customer service orientation and communication skills.
Proficiency using various computer software applications.
Excellent analytical and interpersonal skills.
Proficiency using various computer software applications

For more information please contact:

Romell K. Knowles I

Country Manager

Email:Romell.Knowles@dhl.com



ENERGY SAVING
CONSULTANTS

Cut Your EleGtgic Bl Bip
Up To 40"

* Tankless Water a A

* Compact Fluorescent Bulbs

* Energy Saving Capacitors for
Motors, A/C, Pumps etc.

* Fridgi-tech oil additive to increase A/C
efficiency

He said families are most at
risk from unwise spending, and
have been notoriously bad at
planning ahead for financial
emergencies.

“The Government, while it
has to be frugal in its fiscal
responsibilities, there is an
obligation to keep the general
state of the economy going until
things return to some normal-
cy,” said Mr Kerr.

According to him, govern-
ment spending is essential to
generating economic activity
during difficult times. He
argued that the Government’s
social safety net, road improve-
ments and airport development
are essential in generating this
economic stimulation.

“Governments have to be
spending to generate and initi-
ate economic activity,” he said.

"O

For more information or survey
Email: energysavingsconsultants @hotmail.com

Contact 326-6121 Gewese



The Grand Bahama Power Company, Limited invites qualified applicants to apply for the
position of Technician | (Instrument), responsible for conducting calibrations, repairs, routine
checks and tests control instrumentation in its Generation Power Plant.

The successful candidate is expected to lead instrament technicians in fault-finding,
trovbbeshooting and repairs, including analyses and calibration of all electronic and pneumatic
instrument and control systems.

Applicants must have a High School Diploma, BOCSE passes of C or better in Math, English
and a Technological Certificate in Electronics or its equivalent from an accredited institution.
Applicants must also have a minimum of five (3) years power station or equivalent industrial
experience or three (3) years at a Technician [I level in the Maintenance Department of an
industrial facility.

Applications with supporting documentation including a ckan Police Certificate and proof of Bahamian
citizenship shoukl be sent tio:

| ey ed
CRAND BAHAMA POWER COMPANY, LIMITED
ieee elt
| Freeport, Grand Bahai
SPEDE
.
GRAND BAHAKIA POWER COMPANY

ay (pened Soke) Mater Soph

OR BY EMAIL:

ramet Pa a Patti

i
es es Li

Teachers & Salaried Workers Co-operative
Credit Union Limited

NOTICE OF
ANNUAL GENERAL MEETING

TO: All Members of Teachers and Salaried Workers
Co-operative Credit Union Limited
East Street South and Independence Drive

Notice is hereby given that the Thirty-Second
(32nd) Annual Meeting of Teachers & Salaried
Workers Co-operative Credit Union Limited will be
held at the British Colonial Hilton Hotel located on
Bay Street, on Saturday May 23, 2009 commencing
at 8:00 a.m. for the following purposes:

To receive the Report of the Board of
Directors for 2008.

To receive the Audited Accounts for 2008.

To elect members of the Board of Directors.
To elect members of the Supervisory
Committee

To discuss and approve the Budget for 2009.
To take action on such matters as may come
before the meeting.

Lenn King
Secretary



me



THE TRIBUNE

THE Bahamian public will
shortly be consulted for their
views on content regulation in
the electronic communications
sector, a leading executive on
the committee overseeing the
reform effort has said.

Julian Francis, deputy chair-
man of the committee oversee-
ing the Bahamas Telecommu-
nications Company’s (BTC) pri-
vatisation, said during discus-
sions with the business, tourism
and financial services sectors
that public consultation has
been critical to shaping the pro-
posed new communications reg-

PlusGroup

of Companies

THURSDAY, MAY 21, 2009, PAGE 7B
as ee
Content consultation to be issued shortly

ulatory regime.

Since December 2008, he said
the committee had published
three public consultations invit-
ing comments from industry
stakeholders and the general
public on a number of issues,
including the new framework
for electronic communications,
licensing and universal service
obligations.

“In the weeks to come there
will also be a comprehensive
public consultation on the very
important issue of content reg-
ulation. The privatisation com-
mittee or URCA (if the URCA

Real Estate Division

3 Prime Locations

Rental Space Available - New Providence

Peo) Rem teal la reys.

Mackey Street
12,300 sq. ft.

12,000 sq. ft.

Retail

Warehouse

2x 4,050 sq. ft.
1x 4,200 sq. ft.
2x 6,000 sq. ft.

eee Res tcem ie

East West Highway & Blue Hill Road

3,718 sq. ft

20,000 so. ft.

Retail

Office

1x 1,118 sq. ft.
1x 1,200 sq. ft.
1x 1,400 sq. ft.
2x 5,000 sq. ft.
1x 10,000 sq. ft.

e Seagrapes Shopping Centre

Prince Charles Drive
9,563 sq. ft.

Retail

2x 1,061 sq. ft.
1x 1,591 sq. ft.
1x 1,750 sq. ft.
1x 1,790 sq. ft.
1x 2,310 sq. ft.

Space Limited * Call or Email Today
Tel: (242) 427 0106

eMail: realestate@theplusgrp.com

Act has already been brought
into effect by then) will engage a
pretty detailed formal consulta-
tion in the form of a document.
This document will describe
what it is the Government
thinks we should be doing going
forward, pose a certain number
of specific issues and questions,
and ask for responses to those as
well as other comments which
the respondents would wish to
make,” Mr Francis said.

He said responses from the
industry, the Bahamian public
and international organisations
and entities with an interest in
the Bahamas will largely inform
URCA as to how it should
structure the regulation of con-
tent going forward.

FROM page 14B

might question why Mr Francis
is speaking on regulation, given
that he is also executive chair-
man of BTC, one of the key
entities that will be regulated
by URCA.

Still, Mr Francis said the max-
imum penalty URCA might
impose on an operator that vio-
lates the law, or someone who is
not licensed, would be 10 per
cent of gross relevant revenue.
However, he said URCA will
be a “light-touch” rather than a
heavy handed regulator.

“Tt will regulate only where
it needs to regulate. It will not
seek to define every single
minute detail of how the sector
works. It will look at the opera-
tion of the sector. It will cer-
tainly fix the rules and put them
in place, and seek to ensure
there is a very transparent and
clear environment in the
Bahamas, but it will stay out of
the operation of the sector
except in those circumstances
which require the regulator to
be involved,” Mr Francis said.

He added that the industry
will now have its own ad-hoc
tribunal, which like URCA will
be funded by the industry.

Headed by a president, the
Utilities Appeals Tribunal
(UAT) will consist of panels of
experts brought together as
needed to review URCA deci-
sions. It is expected that the
UAT will allow for a more effi-
cient dispute resolution and
appeals process for licensees,
Mr Francis said.

DEPARTMENT OF STATISTICS

EXPORT/IMPORT PRICE SURVEY

During the month of May, 2009
The Department of Statistics will
conduct a_ pricing survey. The
staff of The Department will visit
selected businesses throughout
New Providence & Grand Bahama
to collect prices of various
commodities. The Department will
therefore be seeking the co-operation
of businesses involved in exporting
and importing as we embark upon this

most important exercise.

THE DEPARTMENT OF STATISTICS
APPRECIATES YOUR SUPPORT &
CO-OPERATION





PAGE 8B, THURSDAY, MAY 21, 2009

THE TRIBUNE



ee - s
‘Big ticket’ firms to be ‘devastated’

FROM page 1B

tively off by almost 50 per cent
for the 2009 first quarter.

This was because Bahamian
consumers had cut back “on sig-
nificant large purchases”,
whereas businesses specialising
in small item, fast-moving con-
sumer goods were faring bet-
ter. Televisions priced at $85-
$90 were “flying off the
shelves”, he said, while retail-
ers were having difficulty in
shifting wide-screen, $1,000-plus
models.

“You’ve got to shift your
business to things people can

ble,” Mr D’ Aguilar added, “tar-
geting those models or items
people are just not able to pur-
chase” for elimination from
inventory carried.

“There’s a lot of businesses
that are down, but it’s very hard
to generalise,” Mr D’Aguilar
said. “Economic activity is
down, things are tough and I
think that businesses have to
figure out or rethink their
strategies, unless they’re in a
business like cars or big ticket
items. Those businesses are
going to be devastated. They’re
going to be hit hard.

“And if you’re in retail, in
luxury goods, you’re in for a
hard slog.”

The Chamber president

added that established Bahami-
an businesses, and those that
were not highly leveraged on
debt, were best-placed to sur-
vive. Those in fast-moving con-
sumer goods needed to tighten
up on their inventory and be
smart with ordering, he advised.

Rick Lowe, Nassau Motor
Company’s (NMC) operations
manager, told Tribune Business
that Bahamian business owners
and managers were now dis-
cussing their “drastic measures
list” of how to ensure their com-
panies survived, if the recession
worsened.

He added: “Your revenues
have fallen dramatically, and
youre going to start reviewing
your organisation, piece by

piece. Can we stop this, stop
that? How do we get this to
where it should be? Ultimately,
when do we get to the point of
having to lay-off people. There’s
various aspects you go through.
You just do what you’ve got to
do.”

Mr Lowe added that NMC
had “made a commitment to
keep everyone employed as
long as we can”, and would
“give it another couple of
months and see how it turns
out”.

“Everyone’s talking about it.
It can’t go on forever,” Mr
Lowe said of the measures
being discussed by businesses.
“Tjust hope we’ll see a glimmer
of a turnaround before things

go too far.”

He added that Bahamian new
car motor dealers had enjoyed
“a reasonable April”, but that
month did not appear consis-
tent with trends or previous
months. “Maybe that’s as a
result of car show deals pend-
ing,” he said.

Mr Lowe said new car prices
were likely to further increase in
2010, and pointed out that ship-
ping rates remained at the level
they were increased to in sum-
mer 2008, despite the oil price
decline.

He added that the cost of
importing a shipment of natur-
al iced tea he had ordered one
month ago had risen from $79
to $84.

One financial industry source
told Tribune Business that
Bahamian businesses and con-
sumers would have to “adapt
to a lower level of economic
activity”, a shift that requires a
“special mindset”.

“The first waves of the finan-
cial crisis tsunami are lapping
at the shores of the Bahamas,
and all serious businesspeople
have to aggressively confront
the new financial situation, and
how do they survive and pros-
per in the new reality,” the
source said.

“Tf this drought continues for
18 months to two years, things
simply cannot carry on [as is].
They will have to do something
very drastic and aggressive.”

now afford as much as possi-

ESSAY COMPETITION

TENTH ANNUAL PUBLIC SERVICE WEEK

The Department of Public Service will host an Essay
Competition as one of the activities for the Tenth Annual
Public Service Week. The Competition is open to Junior
and Senior Students in New Providence.

Additionally, this year, a speech competition will be
for schools in the Northern & Southern Bahamas,
respectively. Students interested in participating in the
Essay Competition should write a 250 - 300 words (Junior
High), and 450 - 500 words (Senior High), essay on the
topic: “ The Public Service-Striving for Excellence in
Customer Service.”

The deadlines for entries, which should be referred
to the attention of Mrs. Antoinette Thompson, Deputy
Permanent Secretary, Department of Public Service, is
Friday 24th July, 2009.

A Dell Desktop 2400 Computer System will be awarded to
the winner each category. The first runners-up for both the
Essay and Speech Competition in the Junior & Senior High
School category, will be awarded a $500 gift certificate.

The winners will be announced during the Tenth Annual
Public Service Week Awards Ceremony scheduled for
Saturday 10th October 2009.

Students interested in the Speech Competition for the
Northern and Southern Bahamas should contact their
Language Arts Teacher.

MINISTRY OF FINANCE
TREASURY DEPARTMENT
PUBLIC NOTICE -REMINDER

The Treasurer of the Commonwealth of The Bahamas
advises all pensioners, Parliamentary, Judicial, Official,
World War 1 Veterans & Widows, Bahamas Widows’ &
Orphans and Re-employed, whose pension payments
are paid directly into their bank accounts and have not yet
verified for the current January, 2009 verification exercise,
to do so without delay. Failure to present oneself or the
appropriate Life and Payment Certificate as verification will
result in the disruption of payment directly into their bank
account June, 2009 and thereafter until verified.

The following Life and Payment Verification Certificates
are available at the Treasury Department, Nassau, the
Treasury Department, Freeport, and at offices of Family
Island Administrator’s for those pensioners who are unable
to appear in person:

* Parliamentary Pension - for retired Parliamentarians.
* Official Pension (Judicial) - for retired Judges.
* Official Pension - for retired Public Officers.

* World War 1 Veterans and Widows - for Veterans
& Widows of World War 1.

* Bahamas Widows’ & Orphans’ Pension Fund Certificate
- for Widows’ & Orphans’.

Pensioners submitting Life & Payment Certificates as
verification are to ensure that the certificate is duly signed
by a person designed on the said form and that the signed

date is within the designated period. Certificates may be
forwarded via facsimile to (242) 323-1459.

Pensioners are further advised to contact the Pension
Section, Treasury at telephone no. (242) 302-0539, 302-
0565 or 302-0524 in view of the above, with any concerns
they may have.

WANTED

MEDICAL SALES
REPRESENTATIVE

The medical sales representative will be responsible for
promoting international pharmaceutical brands to the
healthcare community in the Bahamas.

Skills & Educational Requirements

Bachelor’s degree in medical sciences, allied
health, or business administration

Effective communication and presentation
abilities

Effective time management, planning, and
organizing skills

Proficiency in a variety of computer applications
Self-motivated team player

Previous experience in pharmaceutical detailing
would be an asset

Candidates should possess a reliable motor vehicle, be
willing to travel to the family islands, the U.S., and
other foreign countries.

Please send application letter and résumé by
May 27, 2009 to:

Medical Rep
P.O. Box N-7504
Nassau, Bahamas
Or Fax 393.0440

We thank all applicants for their interest, however,
only short-listed candidates will be contacted.

PUBLIC NOTICE

TENDER FOR EXTERIOR PAINTING
AND GENERAL REPAIRS AT
FOREIGN AFFAIRS BUILDING
NASSAU, THE BAHAMAS

The Government of The Bahamas, through the
Ministry of Works and Transport is inviting
Tenders from general contractors to carry out
painting and general repairs

Schedule For Tender Opening

Companies interested in tendering may attend a Pre-
Tender meeting at the Ministry of Foreign Affairs
Conference Room at 10am May 22nd, 2009 and fol-
lowed by a site visit.

All tender bids should include the following:

¢ Complete Tender Document
¢ Copy of Current Business License
¢ National Insurance board letter of good standing

Tenders must be submitted in sealed envelopes marked
“Tender for Exterior Painting and General Repairs
at Foreign Affairs Building East Street Hill’ and
delivered to:

Chairman, Tenders Board
Ministry of Finance, 3rd Floor Reception Desk
Cecil Wallace - Whitfield Centre
P.O. Box N-3017, Cable Beach, West Bay Street
Nassau, The Bahamas

All Tenders must be received at the above address on
or before 10am Tuesday, 2nd June, 2009.

All persons who submit bids are invited to attend the
opening of Tenders at the Ministry of Finance, 3rd
Floor, Cecil Wallace-Whitfield Centre, Cable Beach,
West Bay Street, Nassau, The Bahamas at 10am, on
Tuesday, 2nd June, 2009.

The Ministry of Public Works and Transport reserves
the right to reject any or all Tenders.

FOR RENT

Fully furnished town house in private area on
eastern road, one minute from beach, 2 bed-
rooms, 1 1/2 baths, washroom, large kitchen,

burglar bars, A/C & C/A asking $1,050 per month,

$50 discount per month towards utilities, serious

enquires only please, 393-4396

PUBLIC NOTICE

MINISTRY OF PUBLIC WORKS
AND TRANSPORT

NOTICE FOR ROAD PAVING WORKS

WEST BAY St/MARLBOROUGH St/NAVY LION
Rd/BAY St/EAST BAY St.
(BLAKE Rd. eastward to MACKEY St.)

The Ministry of Public Works and Transport wishes
to advise members of the General Public that road
paving/patching works are scheduled for West
Bay Street from the Blake Road Intersection to
Mackey Street and East Bay Street Intersection
commencing on Friday, May 15, 2009 and will
remain in effect for approximately two weeks. The
works may necessitate closing sections of the
roadway and re-routing traffic during the period
of construction, otherwise the roadway will be
reduced to one-lane traffic. Work will be carried
out during the under-mentioned times unless
otherwise stated as follows:

Monday to Sunday not including Fridays except
Friday 15th May 7:00 pm to 6:00 am
Monday to Sunday not including Fridays except
Friday 15th May 9:30 am to 3:30 pm

Please note that all effort will be taken to mitigate the
inconvenience to the motoring public. Accordingly,
motorists are encouraged to reduce speed and
exercise caution when traversing these work
areas, obey the flagmen when on duty and note
the instructions of the various signage. Additionally,
motorists are also encouraged to avoid the work
areas if at all possible as delays are anticipated.
Work is initially scheduled to commence East of
Goodman’s Bay Round-About on Friday, 15th
May 2009 at 7:00 pm., in an easterly direction
to Mackey Street and then eastward from Blake
Road to Harrow Dr Round-About. The continuous
flow and pace of the work is such that the
affected areas will be continuously changing
with resulting changes in the traffic management
plan. The safety of the pedestrians and motoring
public throughout the work period is paramount
and once again they are asked to assist in
this endeavour by being cautious at all times.

WARNING AND CAUTIONARY SIGNS
The paving Contractor will erect precautionary
signs to enhance road safety to both motorized
and non-motorized traffic (pedestrians).

Members of the Public and motorist in particular,
are therefore urged to take note of the warning,
diversionary or prohibitory road signs along
the construction route and adjacent roads at
all times. Further notifications of possible traffic
flow disruptions will be issued to the Public in a
timely manner hereafter as they may be found
necessary.

Colin Higgs
Permanet Secretary
Ministry of Works & Transport





THE TRIBUNE

THURSDAY, MAY 21, 2009, PAGE 9B





Four Seasons’ eight per
cent gross fee ‘too much’

FROM page 1B

lion to further upgrade and
build-out Emerald Bay during
2009 - a demand which, when
taken with its management fee
and lengthy contract, proved
unsustainable.

Prime Minister Hubert Ingra-
ham told the House of Assem-
bly this week that the terms of
Four Seasons’ management
contract had effectively acted
as an obstacle to Emerald Bay’s
sale, their onerous conditions
discouraging buyers prior to the
resort’s announced closure on
May 26, 2009.

“As it transpired, the require-
ments contained in the man-
agement contract with the
hotel’s operators, the Four Sea-
sons, proved particularly chal-
lenging for a number of the
interested parties. During the

14 months of the process since
June 2007, the receivers signed
letters of intent with one party
and entered into formal con-
tract with two other parties;
none with success,” Mr Ingra-
ham said.

Four Seasons, as revealed by
Tribune Business, has admitted
it is unlikely to return as the
Emerald Bay Resort’s operating
partner, and there is some sus-
picion that Mitsui and the Price-
waterhouseCoopers (PwC)
receivers closed the property to
ensure it was removed as the
brand/management partner.

Russell Downs, the head
receiver, previously told Tri-
bune Business that the ability
of a buyer to bring in its own
hotel brand/operating partner
might get Emerald Bay’s sale
“over the finishing line”.

He subsequently said some

20 groups, including those that
had previously looked at the
Exuma resort but declined to
bid, were still interested and
assessing whether to renew their
interest.

Tribune Business can reveal
that the Emerald Bay purchase
price has dropped to $30 mil-
lion, and possible even lower.
The last deal in principle that
was agreed, with the group
headed by Los Angeles-based
developer Barry Silverton and
Cushman Wakefield, the real
estate/investment banking firm,
was said by sources to have
been for $40 million.

Meanwhile, Robert Sands,
the Bahamas Hotel Associa-
tion’s (BHA) president, said
Emerald Bay’s problems could
not be interpreted, in and of
themselves, as a sign that the
Government’s ‘anchor proper-

BAHAMAS DEVELOPMENT BANK
Cable Beach, West Ray Street,
P.0,Box N-3034
Nassau. Bahamas
Teli( 242) 327-S7SIVS27 S794
Fux:(242) 327-347, 327-1258
www, bahamasdevclopmenthank.com

The general public is invited to attend Bahamas
Development Bank s sale of repossessed assets.

Electronic Equipment

(1) Compaq Presario Computer Tower

ASSETS

Tables

(1) Canon Canoscan N640D EX Scanner

(1) Digital Scale (New)
(1) Whirl Microwave

* (1) Marble Table (Rectangle)

(1)Tec Cash Register

(1) Epson Stylus Pro 9600 Print Engine
(1) HP DeskJet 656c Printer (Desktop)
(1) Monitor

(1) 1520 Epson Stylus Color Printer

(1) Keyboard & Mouse

(1) Brothers Printer

(1) Samsung Digital Camcorder

(1) Dell Scanner & Printer

(1) Chrome Juice Filler

(1) Multi Fruit Juicer

(1) Quilting Sewing Machine

(1) Deli Showcase

(1) Singer Sewing Machine

(1) Janome Monogram/Embroidery Sewing Machine

(1) Singer Quantum XL150 Sewing Machine with Serger
(1) Meat Saw (New)

(1) Deli Selection (Minor 2000 MT-SE) (New)

Assortment of Items

* Cooking Utensils Pots, Pans & Plates
* (2) Breakfast Nooks

* Air Hockey Game

* (1) Yamaha Wave Runner

Location:

Directions:

Cooler/Freezers

* (1) Two Door Chest Freezer
* (1) Ice Cream Cooler

* (1) Single Door Cooler

* (1) 8’ Walk-in Freezer

wCompressor (New)

Beauty Salon Equipment

* (3) Nail Tables
* (7) Facial Machine
* (2) Nail Stools

Aero Motive Equipment

* (2) Tech Work Benches

* (1) Alternator Test Bench

* (1) Paint Booth

* (1) Rivet Machine

* (1) 6” Storage Cabinet

(1) 4” Craftsman Tool Cabinet

Brake Washer
Sand Blaster
Vari-Drive

Inland Steel, Sumner Street off Solider Rd.Nassau, Bahamas

Exit Abundant Life Road turn right onto Solider Road then the first left

onto Sumner Street tenth two storey white & blue building on the left

Date & Time:

All assets are sold as is where is for cash, cashier s cheque. No purchase(s) will be released

until paid in full.

The general public is invited to attend Bahamas Development Bank’s sale of repossessed Vehicles

and small Vessels.

10:00a.m. — 3:00p.m. — Saturday May 23, 2009

vehicles

2003 Dodge Caravan

2002 Hyundai H-1 Van SUX

1997 Double Axle Mack Dump Truck
1997 Dodge Stratus

1982 GMC Brigadier Drill Truck
2001 Kia Pregio Van

1989 Ford L8000 Drill Truck (Green)

2001 Hyundai H-1 Van SUX
2006 Mitsubishi Canter Truck
1996 Ford Explorer

2000 Ford Ranger Truck
1999 Ford F-250 Truck

2006 Hyundai H-1 SVX Van

Vessels

20’ Robolo Vessel (1996) with Evinrude Outboard Engine
19’ Fiberglass Sports Vessel (1989) Hull Only

21 Seacraft Vessel (1974) with 140 HP Yamaha Outboard Engine

19’ Spanish Wells Runabout Vessel (1991) with 115 HP Mercury Outboard Engine
20’ Abaco Skiff (1997) with 115 HP Mercury Outboard Engine

Location:
Nassau, Bahamas

Date & Time:

For additional information telephone 327-5780.

Internal Security Division Compound, Thompson Blvd

10:00a.m. — 3:00p.m. — Saturday May 23, 2009

ty’ strategy for the Family
Islands had failed.

The strategy, started by the
first Ingraham administration
with Emerald Bay and Bimini
Bay, and taken to new heights
by the Christie government, was
designed to place a major resort
on every Bahamian island to act
as a centre of economic activity,
employment and spin-off busi-
nesses, reversing the migration
to Nassau from the Family
Islands.

“T think it is an unfortunate
turn of events that has led to
the Four Seasons Emerald Bay















1. Lot #1246





(S00 04g. Mh)
whe 225-7 oy. 1,-
Golden Way Dr, Golden
Gates #2 (Appraised
Value $244,045.00)
2 Vacant loc #147
[LO.557sq, f.)-Menmings
Chr & ioe West Lame
Southern Heights Suh
(Appraised Value
S9D.00000 09
a Lo 4S"s1o00°
wy baildings (1,.040sq
ft.) Mirache Toweh Auto
Care Cenber-Fax Hill Rd
(Appraised Value
$149, 20, OO)
4 Lot [SOs Lou]
wy building 1,91 25. fr.-
Deveaux St (Appraised
Value $199,000.00)
5 Lots #29 & #30,
(50rn100°), Hk #47
wy baaildiing 1.1 40s. ft.
Matthew St, Massa
Village (Appraised
Value $145.000000)
Lots #5 i #6
(L50's 1. 0) we, bse-
Silver Palm La Imperial
Park (Appraised Value
$213,654.00)

fa

7. Lot 1135 (50'.90r)
wfhse 142=q. ft-
Sunflower (souch)

Sumshing Park Sul Hee
#8 (Appraised Valuac
$179,000.00)

& Lot #11 (207"«100')
wyfhse Z.026eq. (L-Sunset
Ridge Dr, Sunset Ridge
Sub Hee #26 (Appraised
Valine $20600000)

o Lot #176 [41'x1 13°)
whee D0Ssq. ft.-Old
Cedar St Yellow Elder
(Appraised Value
$65.000.0D)

Ta. Lots #3 & #4, Blk #47
(S0°x100°) wsdeplex &
retail shop 1,522 sq. ft-
Forbes St Nagsau Vilkere
(Appraised Value
$120,000.00)

Analros

Li. Beach frone lot 9 000sq.
Ft. wy building 2,1L00sq
It.-Pipders Mangrove
Cay Andros (Appraised
Valine S20000000)

12. Lot 4,344eq. ft. w/fduples
building 1,1 745q. ft.-
Fresh Creek Andis
(Appraised Vahie
$94 401M]

Wessels





= fs = = © ©
in
ray

4

OO (1996) Hobobo Vessel w'115 AP Evinrude engine
(L974) Seacraft Vesel wi!) 140 HP Yamaha engine
SP (1979) Hatters Vessel (MV Boddy)

1° (1981) Defender Vessel [Equility)

oon Steel Holl Vessel (Miss Kristy’)

Steed Hull Gull Coast Shrimp Trawler Vesse
(1980) with (2) ¥olvo Diesel engine (Sweet Gharkotte]

determining to close its doors
in Exuma,” Mr Sands said.
“The BHA is hopeful the clo-
sure will be shortlived, and the
impact on the economy and
businesses can be minimised.

“We feel this facility is excel-
lent. That Exuma has strong
appeal in the marketplace, and
there is a well-trained work-
force to support a quality guest
experience in Exuma.”

As to the impact the resort
closure will have on investor
and developer confidence in the
Bahamas, Mr Sands said: “The
quicker this matter can be

resolved will mitigate against
any negative impact for future
investors.”

Adding that Emerald Bay
“had all the elements in place to
make it work”, Mr Sands said
the reason for its failure to-date
needed to be assessed before
obituaries were written for the
‘anchor property’ strategy.

“T would prefer to look at the
glass as half full, rather than
half-empty,” he said, adding
that ‘anchor properties’ were
“still the right approach” to
growth and sustainable devel-
opment in the Family Islands.

BAHAMAS DEVELOPMENT BANK
(Cable Beach, West Bay Street,
PO.Box N-30354
Nassau, Bahamas
Tel:(242) 327-S7S0/327-5793-6
Fan:(242) 327-5047, 327-1258
www. hahamasdevclopmenthank.com

L7.1508q. f.)
wWihoe 20s, ot
Elkrtd, Secbhhoin £2-Sea
Gull Or, Bahama Reef
Yacht & Country Club
Sub Grand Bahama
[Appraised Vale
$20, O00)

14. Vacant lot #29, Blk #>
(14,39 75q. ft]-
Yorkshire DOr, kabamia
West Replat Grand
Fahama (Appraised
Walue $25 (000000)

1S Vacant Lot #4 Blk #12
Unset #3 (11.25 05q. ft]-
Henny Ave Derby Sub
Grand Bahama
[Appraised Value
$65 004) OU)

l& Lot afaa BLISS]
w hse & Duples-Nelson
Rd Podinciana Gardens
Grand Bahama
[Appraised Value
$96,000.00)

17 Loe as? (5051507)

w sixaples 2-storey
apartment building &
Church 5,4 q. At
Marin Town, Kings Suls
Pigiit Mlile Rock Grand
Bahama (Appradsed
Wahue $211,200.00)

LS. Lotw 10 reom botel
5 Oca. on
acres of heach tromt-
High Reck Grand
Bahama (Appradsed
Wahue £1,000, 000.000)

Lo Vacant Jot #13, Blk #59,
Unit #3 (22.7525q. I]
45° of canal frant-
Dagenham Circle &
Ingrave Dr Emerald Bay
Sub Grand Bahama
(Appraised Value
$110,000.00)

20. Vacant bot #21, Alk #3
(14,061.59. f-]-Waterfall
Or Seahorse Village Su
Grand Bahama
(Appraised Valme
$40,001.00)

21. Loe 15, Bk #15 Unit
AS [90'6125']-Derby
Sub Grand Bahama
(Appraised Value
$23,000.00)

22. Vacant bor #275, Ae #15
[17 66sq. ft ]=
Cutwater Lo Shannon
Country Chab Sub Gram
Eahama (Appraised
Value $36,000.00)

23. Vacant foc #4489 seerian
28 (95°x125']-Palmert
Dr Grand Bahama Fast
(Appraised Value
SS.00000)

24 Lot Ae (20,0009. ft)
wy huilding conyplex &
comin Laumdreanat
Queens Highway
Hobmes Rock
Coenmonage Grand
Eahama (Appraised
Value $178,500.00)









ASSETS

© 122" Single Screw Steel Hull (1960) MV Lisa | IIL
reszel bas a new engine requiring installation And
can be view at Bradford Marine, Grand Bahama

19 (1989) Fiberglass Sports Vessel (Hull Onkr)
60 (1992) Defender Vessel (hueen Vashti]

62° (1989) Desco Marine Vessel (Sweet Dreams)

2 (1997) Abaco Skill Vesnel wl 15 HP Mercury engine

19° (1991) Spanish Well Runabout Vessel w/115 Mercory engine
§1 (1996) Travis Marine Vessel (Farthutt)

Albace

2m. Lot #54 E [6G 501sq. tt]
w ftriplex foundation
2.7 08sq. f.-Munphy
Town Abacs
(App raiseed Valiv
$24, 5h50M0)

26 Vacant bot #6 (2 acres]
Pox Town /Uhacne
Appraised Value

$54), 000. Oe)

27. Lot #51 [15,00 is, fr]
w building=Murphy
Town sbace
(Appraised Value
$102,420.00)

2& Pormion of low ra
(15,0000 sq. F-Pt St
Murphy Town Abaco




43.

44,

a8

(Appraised Value
$29,250.00)
Lot #55 [6,90 PJ
w bulbdine—-Murpliy
‘Town Abaco
(Appraised Valux
$i? OF S.0)
Lot #45 (60'xteo')
wf14 neom mobel
3.9 008q. 'L-Sandy Point
Abert (4uppraised
Valoe $465,700.00)
Lot 87,1 20sq. Fr. wf
cottages £ 1] storage
buildings Cobaling
4,1 He5q. (-Saned Harics
Treasure Cay Abaca
(Appraised Value
SHO 30800)
Ekcuthera



. Vacant portion of lot #7

(S0'.110°)-West james
Cisterm Eleuthera
(Appraised Value
$18,000.00]

Cak Liban
Vacant 65 acres of
land-Arthur’s Town, Cat
Island (Appraised
Vallee $98,000.00)
Lat wl? room motel
139 acres-sirthur’s
Town Cat Island
(Appraised Value
$630, 0000090)

Exum

S. Vacant hot #6 (65 2080 cy

ft_)-Mess Town Exun
(Appraised Valuc
$110,198.00)

&. Lot [30,4002q. ft.) wy




srl! hotel 4,5 20sq. ft
& exclusive beackh-
Forbes Hill Exunia
[Appraised Valic
$1.400,000.00)



7. Vacant bot #121

[6 600s. ft.)-ikceanic
Aid Fubama Sound Sec
AS Esa [Ap era iol
Value $18,150.00)

Vacant bot #95

(80's122") Commodore
Ad Elizabeth Harbour
Est Exuma (Appraised
Valoc $45 000000)

Wehiches

[1] 04 Dodge Caravan
[0] %& Fond Explorer

[1] 97 Dodge Stratus

[2] OL Hyundai H-1 Yan

[2] Ol Kia Bus 12 Seaner

[0] 37 LT8000 Fond Boom Track

[0] @2 Hyundai H-1 Wan SVX

(1) 0 Hyundai H-1 Van SVX [Silver]
(1) 01 Sitchen Tandem Cheroke: Trailer
[0] OO Ferd Ranper Track

(1) 4 Ford F250 Track

(0) #2 GMC Brigadier Drill Truck

(1) 06 Mitsubishi Canter Truck
(1) 97 Daob ke Ake Mack Dorap Truck

(0) 92 Mack Truck (Canmichael Rd]
(1) 97 Baohle Agle Mack Gump Trock

Steel Building 70's" Sin (6) Windows, Two (2) Entry Doors, Twe (2) 5°x10' Rollup Doors White trimmed

The public is invited to come and view the aforementioned assets on the date and time indicated.
P Hiee Approved plans and engineering drawings are available $50,000.00

After which you may submit Sealed bids marked “TENDER-EQUIPMENT” to Bahamas
Development Bank, PO. Box N-3034, Nassau, Bahamas. A representative will be on the
compound from 10:00am to 3:00pm to collect and secure all offers, which will be opened on May
25, 2009. Please note that all bids on the aforementioned assets should be received by 3:00 pm
May 23, 2009. The Bahamas Development Bank reserves the right to reject any or all offers. All
assets are sold as is.

The public is invited to submit Sealed bids marked "Tender" to Bahamas Development Bank, Pal. Box K-34,
Nassau, Bahamas attention Fimamcial Controller, faxed bids will mot be accepted or telephowe F27-5780 for
Jdditional infeemation Please mote that all bids on the aforementioned properties and assets should be received
byooron May 29, 2009. The Bahamas Development Bank reserves the right to reject any or all offers. All assets
are sold as is.





THE TRIBUNE



THURSDAY, MAY 21, 2009, PAGE 11B



Hotels assess private
plane pre-clearance

FROM page 1B

to a tourist’s Bahamian experi-
ence, and private passengers,
frequently being drawn from
the high-end of the visitor mar-
ket, would automatically expect
this.

However, several outstand-
ing issues remain to be worked
through if pre-clearance in the
Bahamas for private aircraft
passengers is to become a real-
ity.

“We were trying to see if it
can be done in such a way that





it does not create problems for
Family Island airports, coming
into New Providence,” said Mr
Sands, explaining that they
wanted to avoid problems that
might be caused by private air-
craft flying to and from the
Family Islands having to stop
in Nassau for pre-clearance.
He added that another issue
to be settled was where to place
any pre-clearance facilities for
private aircraft passengers.
There were two fixed-base
operations (FBOs) in New
Providence, Odyssey Aviation
and Executive, and Mr Sands

said it had yet to be decided
whether one of these, or an
independent site, should be
used for pre-clearance.

“We don’t want to create an
opportunity that would be to
the detriment of the private
plane, private aircraft market
for New Providence,” Mr Sands
said. “We need to find common
ground that will be to the bene-
fit of the private aircraft user.”

The BHA president
described the private aircraft
passenger market as “extreme-

ly important” for the Bahamian
hotel and tourism industry,
bringing in “high-end business”
and “certainly a niche we would
not want to lose” given its par-
ticular importance to the Fami-
ly Islands.

Mr Sands said the new pas-
senger manifest rules had not
provoked any concerns from
BHA members yet, but the
organisation was monitoring the
situation to ensure the Bahamas
did not lose “this stimulant for
tourism”.

NOTICE

NOTICE is hereby given that DARRELL SIMILIAN of
HARBOUR WEST, EIGHT MILE ROCK, FREEPORT, GRAND
BAHAMA is applying to the Minister responsible for Nationality
and Citizenship, for registration/naturalization as a citizen of
The Bahamas, and that any person who knows any reason why
registration/ naturalization should not be granted, should send a
written and signed statement of the facts within twenty-eight days
from the 14TH day of MAY, 2009 to the Minister responsible for
Nationality and Citizenship, PO.BoxN-7147, Freeport, Bahamas.

Position of Accountant

A financial institution seeks an Accountant. Candi-
dates must have at least 3-5 years experience in ac-
counting in the financial industry with sound knowl-
edge of but not limited to:

¢ Formulating budgets

¢ Managing Accounts Receivables and Payables

¢ Preparation of monthly and annual financial re-
ports and statements

¢ Preparation of bank reconciliations and various
general ledger accounts to the sub ledgers

¢ Co-ordinate the annual audit with external auditors
and preparation of the necessary schedules

¢ Preparing reports for the regulators
¢ Must be a team player

¢ Must possess people skills and be prepared to
interact with members

* Qualifications: AA in Accounting

Please forward resume to
P. O. Box N-7544

NOTICE

WALDER INTERNATIONAL INC.
In Voluntary Liquidation

Notice is hereby given that in accordance with Section
1384) of the International Business Companies Act.
2000,WALDER INTERNATIONAL INC. is in dissolution as
of May 12, 2009.

International Liquidator Services Inc. situated
at 35A Regent Street, P.O. Box 1777, Belize
City, Belize is the Liquidator.

LIQUIDATOR

NOTICE

QADILLAC LIMITED

NOTICEIS HEREBY GIVEN as follows:

(a) QADILLAC LIMITED is in voluntary dissolution under
the provisions of Section 137 (4) of the International
Business Companies Act 2000.

(b) The dissolution of the said company commenced on
the 20th May, 2009 when the Articles of Dissolution were
submitted to and registered by the Registrar General.

(c) The Liquidator of the said company is Manex Limited,
The Bahamas Financial Centre, Shirley & Charlotte
Streets, Nassau, Bahamas

Dated this 21st day of May, A. D. 2009



Manex Limited
Liquidator

NOTICE

NOTICE is hereby given that HELTEN JAC QUELI of BOWE
AVENUE, off MONTEL HEIGHTS, P.O.Box N-3331 is
applying to the Minister responsible for Nationality and
Citizenship, for registration/naturalization as a citizen of The
Bahamas, and that any person who knows any reason why
registration/naturalization should not be granted, should
send a written and signed statement of the facts within
twenty-eight days from the 14'* day of May, 2009 to the
Minister responsible for nationality and Citizenship, P.O. Box
N-7147, Nassau, Bahamas.

NOTICE

NOTICE is hereby given that LONA DUMOND HONORAT of #78
MARLEY DRIVE, FREEPORT, GRAND BAHAMA is applying
to the Minister responsible for Nationality and Citizenship,
for registration/naturalization as a citizen of The Bahamas,
and that any person who Knows any reason why registration/
naturalization should not be granted, should send a written and
signed statement of the facts within twenty-eight days from the
14TH day of MAY, 2009 to the Minister responsible for Nationality
and Citizenship, P.O.Box N-7147, Freeport, Bahamas.

Legal Notice

NOTICE

JOHN WELL CORPORATION LTD.

— 4 —
Notice is hereby given that in accordance with Section 138
(8) of the International Business Companies Act 2000, the
dissolution of JOHN WELL CORPORATION LTD. has
been completed; a Certificate of Dissolution has been is-
sued and the Company has therefore been struck off the

Register.

ARGOSA CORP. INC.
(Liquidator)

Legal Notice

NOTICE
ANDROMEDA FOUNTAIN S.A.

— *,—

Notice is hereby given that in accordance with Section 138
(8) of the International Business Companies Act 2000, the
dissolution of ANDROMEDA FOUNTAIN S.A. has been
completed; a Certificate of Dissolution has been issued and

the Company has therefore been struck off the Register.

ARGOSA CORP. INC.
(Liquidator)

Legal Notice

NOTICE

WOLF BANE HOLDINGS LIMITED

— f—

Notice is hereby given that in accordance with Section 138
(8) of the International Business Companies Act 2000, the
dissolution of WOLF BANE HOLDINGS LIMITED
has been completed; a Certificate of Dissolution has been
issued and the Company has therefore been struck off the

Register.

ARGOSA CORP. INC.
(Liquidator)

Dairy
Queen

— DOs

Now Hiring

Assistant Managers

* Must have at least 2 years management ar
supervisory experience, preferably in food
service,

* Must have good communication and leadership
skills.

Fax resume to 394-4938 or complete application at
DO stores at Town Centre Mall or Harbour Bay
Shopping Centre.





Legal Notice

NOTICE

GRACEFUL MANTA LIMITED

— 4, —
Notice is hereby given that in accordance with Section 138
(8) of the International Business Companies Act 2000, the
dissolution of GRACEFUL MANTA LIMITED has been

completed; a Certificate of Dissolution has been issued and

the Company has therefore been struck off the Register.

ARGOSA CORP. INC.
(Liquidator)

Legal Notice

NOTICE

SENZINA GROUP LTD.

— 4, —
Notice is hereby given that in accordance with Section 138
(8) of the International Business Companies Act 2000, the
dissolution of SENZINA GROUP LTD. has been com-
pleted; a Certificate of Dissolution has been issued and the

Company has therefore been struck off the Register.

ARGOSA CORP. INC.
(Liquidator)

Legal Notice

NOTICE

LANESDERRY
INVESTMENTS PTE. LTD.
ee ¢, ae
Notice is hereby given that in accordance with Section 138
(8) of the International Business Companies Act 2000, the
dissolution of LANESDERRY INVESTMENTS PTE.
LTD. has been completed; a Certificate of Dissolution has
been issued and the Company has therefore been struck off

the Register.

ARGOSA CORP. INC.
(Liquidator)

Legal Notice

NOTICE

SHIFTSFIELD INVESTMENTS LTD.
— 4) —

Notice is hereby given that in accordance with Section 138
(8) of the International Business Companies Act 2000, the
dissolution of SHIFTSFIELD INVESTMENTS LTD.
has been completed; a Certificate of Dissolution has been
issued and the Company has therefore been struck off the

Register.

ARGOSA CORP. INC.
(Liquidator)



PAGE 12B, THURSDAY, MAY 21, 2009

THE TRIBUNE





EU, China to tackle climate
change amid tensions

@ By AOIFE WHITE
AP Business Writer

PRAGUE (AP) — EU and
Chinese leaders vowed Wednes-
day to tackle climate change
together and boost trade — but
tensions over Tibet were still
showing as China warned
Europe not to interfere in its
internal affairs.

Talks in Prague saw the Euro-
pean Union and China get back
to talking business five months
after the Chinese canceled an

earlier summit because French
President Nicolas Sarkozy met
the Dalai Lama, the religious
leader who Beijing accuses of
seeking Tibetan independence
from China.

Chinese Premier Wen Jiabao
told reporters the two sides must
"stick to the principles of mutu-
al respect and noninterference
in each other's internal affairs."

The EU countered that
human rights would remain a
Key part of future talks with Chi-
na. Czech President Vaclav

NOTICE

NOTICE is hereby given that ELIE RONY ETIENNE
of AUGUSTA STREET is applying to the Minister
responsible for Nationality and Citizenship, for registration/
naturalization as a citizen of The Bahamas, and that

any person who knows any reason why registration/

naturalization should not be granted, should send
a written and signed statement of the facts within
twenty-eight days from the 14 day of May, 2009 to the
Minister responsible for nationality and Citizenship, P.O. Box
N-7147, Nassau, Bahamas.

Part-time Accountant:

For Growing Franchise Group

Main Responsibilities:



Klaus, whose country holds the
rotating EU presidency, said the
issue was “something that we in
Europe consider extremely
important.”

EU Commission President
Jose Manuel Barroso said both
regions were determined to
build relations and "make a real
difference on the road to seal
the (United Nations climate
change) deal in Copenhagen by
the end of the year" and to
restarting World Trade Organi-
sation talks on a global trade
agreement.

"We now need the clear
engagement of all major
economies to make the deal pos-
sible," he said, calling on China,
the US and others to clearly
state how far they were ready
to go to reduce greenhouse gas
emissions.

The Copenhagen talks aim to
set new global targets for car-
bon dioxide cuts, replacing the
UN Kyoto Protocol after it
expires in 2012. Experts say
emissions must peak in 2015 and
then fall by half by 2050 to limit
global warming.

Wen was supportive, saying
China wanted "a positive out-

come" from the negotiations.

"In spite of the international
financial crisis, the international
community must not waver in
its resolve ... to address the cli-
mate," he said.

But he repeated Beijing's view
that the brunt of the effort must
be borne by richer nations such
as the US and the EU — and
not China which "still remains
a developing country.”

"China stands ready to work
with the European Union," he
said — but tempered this by say-
ing they should stick to "com-
mon but differentiated respon-
sibility.”

The two sides want concrete
progress on reducing emissions
and struck a deal to develop
"clean coal" technology that
would help China curb the car-
bon dioxide emissions from coal-
fired power stations.

Wen tried to ease tensions
over China's massive trade sur-
plus with the EU — its major
export market — by saying Chi-
na would buy more EU imports
and would send a business dele-
gation on a multibillion shop-
ping spree in recession-hit
Europe.

NOTICE

* Recording of all journal entries

* Handling accounts payable functions

* Preparing submission for franchisers

* Preparing financial statements

* Devising & monitoring internal cantrols

Qualifications:

Applicants should possess Bachelors degree in











Notice is hereby given that the Twenty-ninth
(29th) Annual General Meeting of THE

PUBLIC WORKERS’

CO-OPERATIVE

CREDIT UNION LIMITED will be held at
The British Colonial
Bay Street, on Friday, June 12th, 2009
commencing at 6:30 p.m. for the following

Accounting, at beast 5 years experience, knowledge af
retail/food accounting, be praficient in Quickbooks
and MS Office applications, must be able to multi
task, work with minimum supervision and possess a
high level of integrity and professionalism.

Fax application/resume to 364-2470

Clico (Bahamas) Limited
(In Liquidation)

LIQUIDATOR’S NOTICE

Policyholders of Clico (Bahamas) Limited (in Liquida-
tion) are advised that premium payments and other policy
transactions can be made at the Company’s main office,
located on Mt. Royal Avenue and Carew Street, Nassau,
Bahamas.

Policyholders and the public are further advised that office
hours are from 9:00 am to 4:30 pm daily.

Craig A. (Tony) Gomez
Official Liquidator

purposes:





Hilton Hotel, West

- To receive the report of the Board




of Directors

* To receive the Audited Report for 2008



* To elect members of the Board
of Directors, Supervisory Committee
and Credit Committee

- To discuss and approve the budget

for 2010

All eligible members, wishing to run for

a position on the
Supervisory

Committee or

Board of Directors,
Credit

Committee, are asked to submit their names
to the Credit Union’s offices in Nassau or
Freeport, no later than Monday, June 8th,

2009 by 4:00 p.m.

All members are urged to attend and
Exciting door prizes will be offered.
Refreshments will be served!

ROYAL = FIDELITY

Boney at Work

BISX LISTED & TRADED SECURITIES AS OF:
TUESDAY, 19 MAY 2009

BISX ALL SHARE INDEX: CLOSE 1,615.53 | CHG 0.36 | %CHG 0.02 | YTD -96.83 | YTD % -5.65

FINDEX: CLOSE 795.46 | YTD 4.72% | 2008 -12.31%

WWW.BISXBAHAMAS.COM | TELEPHONE:242-323-2330 | FACSIMILE: 242-323-2320

Security
Abaco Markets

Bahamas Property Fund
Bank of Bahamas
Benchmark

Bahamas Waste

Fidelity Bank

Cable Bahamas

Colina Holdings
Commonwealth Bank ($1)
Consolidated Water BDRs
Doctor's Hospital
Famguard

Finco

FirstCaribbean Bank
Focol ($)

Focol Class B Preference
Freeport Concrete

ICD Utilities

J. S. Johnson

Premier Real Estate

Previous Close
1.40

11.00

6.95

0.63

3.15

2.37

11.75

2.83

3.15
1.95
11.09
2.83
6.06
1.31
1.38

6.23
2.97
1.53
6.02
11.00
10.35
5.00
1.00
0.30
5.50
8.60
10.00

7.76
11.00
10.40

5.14

1.00

0.30

5.50
10.50
10.00

BISX LISTED DEBT SECURITIES - (Bonds trade

Today's Close

Change Daily Vol.
1.40
11.00
6.95
0.63
3.15
2.37
11.75
2.83
6.25
3.08
1.38
7.76
11.00
10.40
5.14
1.00
0.30
5.50
10.50
10.00

o0000000000000000
eocooooeos33000000000
Cocco ounsanogg00g500g

360

oo
eo
oo

0.00

EPS $

-0.877

Div $ P/E
0.127
0.992
0.244

11.1
28.5
N/M
0.078 40.4
0.055 43.1
1.406 8.4
0.249 11.4
0.419 14.9
0.111 27.7
0.240 5.8
18.5
34.2

0.420
0.322
0.794 13.1
0.332 15.5
0.000 N/M
0.035 B86
13.5
11.0
55.6

0.407
0.952
0.180

on a Percentage Pricing bases)

While China may escape a
recession this year, it will suffer
from plunging exports to the US
and the 27-nation EU which
bought some euro248 billion of
Chinese goods last year —
dwarfing the EU's euro78.4 bil-
lion in exports to China.

Wen also called for the EU to
"lift its arms embargo against
China as early as possible.”

Wen tried to assure the Euro-
peans that they would not be
shut out by China's growing role
in world affairs. "Some say that
the world affairs will be man-
aged solely by China and the
United States. That view is base-
less and wrong,” he said.

Wen was greeted by around
a hundred Chinese citizens out-
side Prague castle, who waved
Chinese and Czech flags and
held banners saying “we love

you, the Chinese people love
you."

Wang Xin, a 28-year-old
restaurant owner from the Czech
town of Liberec, waved a banner
saying 'Premier Wen, you must
be tired!’

"He works so hard, always the
first to be where something hap-
pens, he flies 12 hours to Prague
to spend four hours with offi-
cials and then he flies back. He
should take care of his health,"
said Wang, who shut the restau-
rant for the day to come and
greet Wen.

Pro-Chinese demonstrations
far outnumbered a small protest
by members of the Falun Gong
— a spiritual movement that
Beijing calls an evil cult.

¢ Associated Press writers
Karel Janicek and Ondrej Hejma
contributed to this story













NOTICE is hereby given that KENRICK KORDELL
LIGHTBOURNE of SEA GRAPE, EIGHT MILE ROCK, GRAND
BAHAMA is applying to the Minister responsible for Nationality
and Citizenship, for registration/naturalization as a citizen of
The Bahamas, and that any person who knows any reason why
registration/ naturalization should not be granted, should send a
written and signed statement of the facts within twenty-eight days
from the 21st day of MAY, 2009 to the Minister responsible for
Nationality and Citizenship, P.O.Box N-7147, Freeport, Bahamas.

PUBLIC NOTICE

INTENT TO CHANGE NAME BY DEED POLL

The Public is hereby advised that |, GATHANIE LOETTA
CHEA nee ROLLE of Blair Estates in the Eastern District of
the Island of New Providence, intends to change my name
to GATHNIE LOETTA CHEA nee ROLLE. If there are any
objections to this change of name by Deed Poll, you may
write such objections to the Chief Passport Officer, PO.Box

N-742, Nassau, Bahamas no later than thirty (30) days after
the date of publication of this notice.

LEGAL NOTICE OF DISSOLUTION
NOTICE

INTERNATIONAL BUSINESS COMPANIES ACT
(No.45 of 2000)

In Voluntary Liquidation

Notice is hereby given in accordance with Section 138 (8) of
the International Business Companies Act, (No.45 of 2000),
SABLEDOR HOLDINGS LTD. has been completed, a Cer-
tificate of Dissolution has been issued and the Company has
therefore been struck off the Register. The date of completion
of the dissolution was the 13th day of May, 2009.

po,
ar

Siped: —eee

Salen Baber EbDin Mounib EL Sac

DL iquigia tr

ae
Te as
NAD

Nassau Airport
Devolopmgnt Company

Environmental Coordinator

The Massau Airport Dewelopment Gompany (MAD) is
Sheting candicates for the postion of Environmental
Coordinator. The dutias and reaponaibiliies of the
successful agglicant will indude researching, planning and
‘atiling environmental procedures. and plans, conducting
reguiar imepection of company and tenant facilites and
acing as a liaison ath goverment agendes and
coniraciars on environmental matters.

The ideal candidate will have a minimum of an Assoriaies

S2wk-Low
1000.00
1000.00
1000.00
1000.00

Security
Fidelity Bank Note 17 (Series A) +
Fidelity Bank Note 22 (Series B) +
Fidelity Bank Note 13 (Series C) +
Fidelity Bank Note 15 (Series D) +

Last Sale
100.00
100.00

Maturity
19 October 2017
19 October 2022
30 May 2013
29 May 2015

Symbol Interest
FEB17

FBB22

Change Daily Vol.
0.00 7%
0.00 Prime + 1.75%

FBB13 100.00 0.00 7%
FBB15 100.00 0.00 18 Prime + 1.75%

Fidelity Over-The-Counter Securities

Bid $ Ask $ Last Price
7.92 8.42 14.60
4.00 6.25 6.00
0.35 0.40 0.35
Colina Over-The-Counter Securities
30.13 31.59 29.00
0.45 0.55 0.55
BISX Listed Mutual Funds
NAV YTD% Last 12 Months
1.3664 0.95 4.77
2.8962 -1.49 -3.35
1.4590 1.77 5.09
3.1964 -5.59 -13.64
12.7397 0.96 5.793
100.5606
96.4070
1.0000
9.1599
1.0440
1.0364 0.33
1.0452 0.76
MARKET TERMS
YIELD - last 12 month dividends divided by closing price
nd Fidelity

dertihying environmental issues, knowledge of
anviranmantal field monitoring protocols and the ability to
manage environmental programs fram inceplian ta
complebon

52wk-Low Symbol
14.25 Bahamas Supermarkets
6.00 Caribbean Crossings (Pref)
0.20 RND Holdings

Weekly Vol. EPS $ Div $ P/E
0.300
0.480

0.000

29.00 ABDAB
0.40 RND Holdings

0.000
0.000
52wk-Low COMSI Sian! WRN Gpenence and qualihcaions.
1.3041
2.9230
1.3883
3.1964
12.1564
100.0000
96.4070
1.0000
9.0950
1.0000
1.0000
1.0000

Eund Name Div $ Yield %
Colina Bond Fund

Colina MSI Preferred Fund
Colina Money Market Fund
Fidelity Bahamas G & 1 Fund
Fidelity Prime Income Fund
CFAL Global Bond Fund
CFAL Global Equity Fund
CFAL High Grade Bond Fund

28-Feb-09
31-Mar-09
41-May-09
31-Mar-09
28-Feb-09
31-Dec-08
31-Dec-08
31-Dec-07
31-Mar-09
9-Feb-09
9-Feb-09
9-Feb-09

For more details, please visit our website al
Wwww.nas.bs

0.56
-3.59
0.00
0.71
0.80

0.56
-3.59
0.00
-12.76
4.40
3.64
4.40

Fidelity International Investment Fund
FSG Financial Preferred Income Fund
FG Financial Growth Fund

FG Financial Diversified Fund

Hyot are qealtied and interested please sutra
your resume by Mary 23, 208 to

Managar People

Nassau Alpert Devalopmant Go

FO. Box AP Se228

Massau, Saher

Onty hoes applicants chor beled wil be contacted

BISX ALL SHARE INDEX - 19 Dec 02 = 1,000.00
ing price in last 52 weeks
last 52 weeks
ighted price for daily volume

Bid $ - Buying price of Goli

Ask $ - Selling pri

Last Price - Last

Today's Clo

Change - Gh

Daily Vol. - Number

DIV $ - Dividends p he last 12 months

PIE - Closing price led by the last 12 month earnin gs

KS) - 4-for-1 Stock Split - Effective Date 8/8/2007

KS41) - 3-for-1 Stock Split - Effective Date 7/11/2007
TO TRADE CALL: COLINA 242-502-7010 | ROYALFIDELITY 242-356-7764 | FG CAPITAL MARKETS 242-395-4000 | COLONIAL 242-502-7525

hted price for daily volume
om day to day
raded today

Weekly Vo
EPS $-Ac

glume of the prior week
ported earnings per share for the last 12 mths

NAMI - Not Meanin gful
FINDEX - The Fidelity Bahamas Stock Index. January 1, 1994 = 100





PAGE 14B, THURSDAY, MAY 21, 2009



THE communications industry regu-
lator will adopt a “light touch” approach
will overseeing competition in the sector,
a leading member of the committee
overseeing the reforms has pledged.

Julian Francis, deputy chairman of the
committee overseeing the Bahamas
Telecommunications Company’s (BTC)
privatisation, said the Utilities Regula-

You can TRUST a health plan that delivers

tion and Competition Authority
(URCA) would oversee the liberalised
communications market and technology
convergence, while also overseeing com-
petition.

“The Communications Act is a very
far reaching piece of legislation. I would
say it is quite innovative in our environ-
ment. It essentially empowers the regu-

on its promise.

a,
—

lator, and it establishes the transitional
arrangements which will be necessary to
move us from the current environment
to the new, liberalised environment,”
Mr Francis said.

“The Communications Act also pro-
vides the authority for the regulator to
adjudicate on issues of competition or
unfair practice or anti-trust. This, as you

in
aH

ATLANTIC
MEDICAL

ATLANTIC MEDICAL INSURANCE CO. LTD.
Aclantic House, 2nd Terrace & Collins Avenue, P.O. Box 55-5915, Nassau Tel. 326-8191
Suite 5, jasmine Corporate Cencer, East Sunrise Highway, PO. Box F-42655, Freeport Tel. 351-3960

A member of Colonial Group International Insurance, Health, Pensions, Lite

THE TRIBUNE

=
Communications regulator will be ‘light touch’

know, doesn’t exist in legislation at all
today in the Bahamas, and it is critical to
the liberalisation of the environment that
we have a level playing field in place
and that we have the means to guarantee
that level playing field.”

Some, especially Cable Bahamas,

SEE page 7B



JULIAN FRANCIS

Atlantic Medical

Atlantic Medical the market leading health insurance
provider because rt offers the best care at the best
possitte pice
Your health care & a very important part of your life, so

itis reassuring WT you know your plan and your insurance

ITOWIOeE WA Qe OF Care, beneits ANd Service Winer

ese] it,

YOu can enjoy that reassurance with Atlantic Medical. Just
ask ary one of SOL0O0 health plan members who trust
Colonial Group International to veork for them day-in,
day-ourt, at home or overseas.

and value

Peaple trust Atlant Medical for care, service

that really rakes a difference and makes sure you will

receive the best health cover rrianey can bury

ict >

Coleedal Group ternational a

fisted A-[Esocel beret) bey AM! Bees.





The Tribune oo"
OBIMUARIES
RELIGION



\ -< The Tribune
OLD | tty Arcee, My Newspaper!

—‘\ ene
» \0
707.9

SS hour chaice for ihe family:















PAGE 2, THURSDAY, MAY 21, 2009

CARD OF THANKS

Mabel Edith Jenoure pee Higgs)
13th November 1926 - 5th April 2009
Awoman of great strength
Known by God

Her children call her mother, they rise and fall on her
own words, she may stumble, but she has her children
and her strong faith steadies her. They need her, they
love her, she loves them so she gives of herself, all she
has, and it is enough more than enough.

90 we accept that her journey is over it is the Lord's will
not ours. He leads to pastures green and his grace and
mercy is our sweet reward. " Yes we do love thee
mother dear whom jesus loves so well". Sleep on
memes dear for you have earned your rest.

simple Words make light of your warm hugs, your kind
gifts, sympathetic touches? knowing eyes, gentle
»
smiles, powerful prayers, encouraging words. We the
familyPare forever indebted to everyone, each and
)¥ _—
every one of you! So the family says

Thanl)you, Thank you, Thank you.







RIB OBITUARI

KEMP'S FUNERAL HOME LIMITED

22 Palmdale Avenue, Palmdale
Nassau, N.P., The Bahamas

eS

A service of thanksgiving for the life of

FREDA MARY
RUSSELL, B.E.M., 97

of Lakeview Avenue,
Nassau, The Bahamas,
who died peacefully at her
home on Sunday, 10th
May, 2009, will be held at
St. Andrew's Presbyterian
Kirk, Princes Street,
Nassau, on Saturday, 23rd
May, 2009 at 11:00 a.m.













Reverend Charles A.

Sweeting and Mr. Ronald

Atkinson will officiate and

interment will be in

Ebenezer Methodist

Cemetery, East Shirley
Street, Nassau.

Freda Mary Russell (née Paget) was born in Bangalore,
India on September Sth, 1911 where her father, a
methodist minister was serving at the time. She was
predeceased by her husband, Mr. C. Seighbert Russell
in 1992, her elder sister, Eileen and a younger brother,
Donald.

In October, 1932 she and her family arrived in the Bahamas
where her father had been appointed chairman of the
Methodist churches. She began teaching kindergarten
at Queen's College in January, 1933 and remained there
until December, 1964. She was honoured with a British
Empire Medal in 2002 for her work in the field of education.

Mrs. Russell was a truly remarkable person and her loving
and caring spirit will be missed by all who knew her. She
is survived by her nephews and niece; Terry and Kathy
Russell, Colleen and Ron Springle, Don and Joan Russell,
Tommy and Cynthia Russell, and other family members
in England, particularly Margaret Williams, Celia Westhead
and Keith Paget. A special thank you to her church family
who cared for her over the years and to Karen Thompson
her companion and friend.

In lieu of flowers, donations may be made to The Salvation
Army, P.O. Box N-205, Nassau, in memory of MRS.
FREDA M. RUSSELL.

Arrangements by Kemp's Funeral Home Limited.















THURSDAY, MAY 21, 2009, PAGE 3









mM
*O



THE TRIBUNE OBITUARIE











IN LOVING MEMORY
&
TO OUR MOTHER HAPPY BIRTHDAY

ROSELLA BOSTWICK
SUNRISE: MAY 24, 1936
SUNSET: OCTOBER 13TH, 2008

Mother, Grandmother, Friend

Mammy we miss you $0 very much
Your birthday and our first "Mother's Day” without you was $0 hard;
And not just then, but every minute,
Since you went away.
You were the centre of our lives
It's just $0 dificault for us to believe that you are really gone.
But we celebrate the life you lived and all the things you gave us,’

We think of you with hearts so full of love;
we are looking up at you, sweet Mother dearest,
as you look at us from above.

acai lcalyn, Vanessa and Sanya, aint and great-qrand children.
Until we meet again, we love you!!!

CARD OF THANKS

special thanks is extended to all those who played a significant part in our mother's life; The family, of Bahamas Holy, Bible
Mission Church, especially Pastor Frankie Scott and family, Percy and ane Sands and family, Yvonr ne Si Simmons and family,
Pastor Jacob Adderley and family. Golden Gates World Outreach Ministry’ Pastor Bernie, Mossyand| family, Bishop Ricardo
and Elder Shandelene Grant, Bishop Victor Cooper, Bishop VG Clarke and Elder, Newry and family4Bishop Mott and family,
BTC family especially the Human Resources Department, Jonice Lockhart, Kim Woodside and IvyWalkes, Ruth Ferguson
and family, Pedro Roberts and staff of Sparkle Wash Laundromat, Baker's Construction, Police Prosecution office especially
Bank Lane and Nassau street courts, Superintend Glen Miller and family, Ted and Gloria Thompson, Julieann Ferguson and
family, Betty Pearce and family, Janice Cleare, Margaret Robinson, Shirley Major” Mrs. Cumberbatch and staff of D'C
collection, Blonvea Brice and family, Keva Clarke and famil, Pastor Bethel and Amazing Art Family, N Neighbors of Cordeaux
Avenue off East Street, Management and staff of Demerittes Funeral Home and the Management and staff of, Woodlawn
Garden and others to numerous to mention. Thank\you and God bless: fi;

















PAGE 4, THURSDAY, MAY 21, 2009





THE TRIBUNE OBITUARI













Yager funeral Home & Crematorium

Queen’s Highway
PO. Box F-40288, Freeport, Grand Bahama, Bahamas
Tel: 352-8118 © Paging: 352-6222 #1724
Fax: 351-3301

Me

| Saturday from 11:30 a.m. until service time.

ENID
LEWIS, 79

and a resident of Hunters, |
Grand Bahama, will be held ;
on Saturday, May 23, 2009 at :
1:00 p.m. at St. Vincent de :
Catholic Church, :
Hunters, Grand Bahama. :
Officiating will be Father :
Reginald Demeritte, assisted |
by Deacon Jeffrey Hollingsworth. Interment will follow in : \

Paul

the Hunter's Public Cemetery.

Wellington Williams; one daughter-in-law: Elizabeth Smith;

law: Granville Lewis, Oswald Williams and Harold Laing

Wright, Benjamin Grant, Mrs. Benson, St. Vincent de Paul
Church family, the entire communinities of Mack Town,

at The Rand Memorial Hospital.

JERELENE
CHRISTINA
COOPER, 82

a resident of Freetown, Grand
Bahama and formerly of
Cooper's Town, Abaco will

_ | beheld on Saturday, May 23
Ps) 2009 at 11:00 a.m. at New
fo) Zion Baptist Church,
ra Freetown, Grand Bahama.
Officiating will be Rev. Preston

Cherished memories will always remain with her children: | poo a Seo eee ote een
Jerome, Joycelyn, Marrietta, Arnold, Randolph Jr., Elias, | ¥

heat De suniiand Caoneleare tan eeoaaere ! Left to cherish her memories are her five children: Victoria
Arimelda Nairn and Louise DeGregory: one stepbrother: : Jordine, Leo Cooper, Pastor Dudley Cooper, Rosemary
: _ ? (Joy) Mcintosh and Lillian Cooper; 18 grandchildren:

. . : ; : Verona, Craig, Avril and David Jordine, Lashanda Cooper,
three sons-in-law: Roosevelt Wright, Fritto Michelle and : is ‘
Leonard Basden; 15 grandchildren: Rosario, Rocco, : D udley Jr. Asher, Jephtae, Elijah, Esther and Lydia Cooper,
Latoya, Lindsey, Erica, Amado, Aiesha, Anasika, Ricardo, | JUStin Feaster, Alvareze and Evanka Roxbury, Faye Cooper,
Vanessa, Antoinette, Rickeya, Bruce Jr., Lenricka and : Renardo Smith, Vieto Pinder and Marcus Cooper; 13
Leonard Jr.; six great grandchildren: Tominitra, Andre, : es shale eon wae Sede Enda CEE
Arrianna, Alliano, Laniya and Jernesko; one uncle; : \\0'@MS, Aarion hoagers, Muintina Bonaby, Mevonia
Osbourne Lewis; one aunt-in-law: Althea Lewis; five | ou ee sol at er ellelclba end a-ak
sisters-in-law: Geneva and Garnell Lewis, Lorraine and | 7a" nt sath and N caiinaiiea ce Seat aie
Delphine Russell and Lillian Williams; three brothers-in- | weap — eee ene Leena Maes eee

| law: Barbara Cooper and Etta Cooper and a host of other

; ; . = : relatives and friends including Samuel, Ortnell and Floyd

Sr, and a host of other relatives and friends including: | .

Anna Lewis, lva Rolle, Elta Jones, Verlene Bain pacdie ; Lowe, Ettamae Albury, Maggie Lowe, Theresa Murray,
: ‘ Edmund and Jerord Russell, Leroy, Harry, Lenard and

‘ Joan Sands, Washington Smith, McDonald Cooper,

2 Communities Of Mex ' Elizabeth Kemp, Eloise Kelly, Boston Cooper, Jerelene
Hunters, Lewis Yard, Pinder's Point, Eight Mile Rock, | ainury Carlton Roxbury, Clifton Laing and families and
Williams and Russell Town, Winn Dixie family, Nurse : th it f Freet fend Gal

Sears, Hawksbill Clinic, the Medical and Surgical Wards : *"" COMMUN OF Freetown, Mrang panama.

! Relatives and friends may pay their respects at Yager

; : : Funeral Home & Crematorium, Queens Highway on Friday
Relatives and friends may pay their respects at Yager : . a e.

Funeral Home & Crematorium, Queens Highway on Friday | de ects Hep SE ately ee
from 12:00 noon until 6:00 p.m. and at the church on | ¥ aed



ES









E TRIBUNE OBITUAR

dar Crest funeral Home

DIGNITY IN SERVICE











mM
*





pbinson Road and First Street « P.0.Box N-603 * Nassau, NLP, Bahamas

Telephone: 1-242-325-5168/328-1944/393-1352
Funeral Service For

JEPHETH LEWIS
RAHMING, 65

a resident of #20 Cerusus Avenue,
Garden Hilts #2, and formerty of Burnt
Ground, Long Island will be held 11:00
am., Sunday, May 24th, 2009 at
Hillview Seventh Day Adventist
Church, Tonique Williams Darling
Highway. Officiating will be Pastor
} Peter Joseph, assisted by other
Ministers. interment will be made in
Woodlawn Gardens, Soldier Road.

Left with chershed memories are his
loving and devoted wife, Zilpha
Liewilyn; five sons, Jepheth Jr. Jeffrey), Berkley Rahming, Craig P.
Curtis, Tracey J. Rahming (Deceased) and Wayne Rahming; six daughters,
Paulette Adderley, Michelle Rahming-Cartwright, Shindy Rahming,
Marietta Fowler, Dendra Gardiner and Candice Rahming; two brothers,
Albert and Georges Aahming: three sisters, Kathléan Brice of McKanns,
Long Island, Sarah Hahming and Estelle Farrington; four sons-in-law,
Frankie Adderley, Keith Fowler, Steven Gartwright and Lukandah Gardiner
Sr; two daughters-in-law, Charmaine Curtis and Leotha Rahming: twanty
two grandchildren, Gabrielle, Michael, Briana and Britany Gartwright,
Thristain and Graig Curtis Jr, Alexis, Tracell, Tanaj and Tracey Rahming
Jr, Khyi, Khailah, Lukandah Jr, Krystal and Keiandria Fowler, Ramone,
Tonanna, Charnene, Jena and Alicia Rahming, Radelle Stuart; sisters-
in-law, Rev. Barbara Rahming, Marie Rahming, Patience Clarke, Sonia
Davis, Jennifer Rolle, and Leani Wilson; brothers-in-law, Kermit, Vivian,
van, Isaac, Lynden and Nemiah Rolle, Patrick Wilson and Samuel Davis:
nieces and nephews, Randalph, Kevin, Albert Jr, Richardo, Desmond,
Thar, Stephen and Latario Rahming, Yorick Jr and Charles Brice, Leo
Farrington, Jamal Grant, Marisa, Adene and Rochelle Rahming, Sabrina
Brice, Gladys and Joseph Deal, Maxine and Angelo Bannister, Vanria
and Bertrum Cambridge, Lisa and lan Greene, Advara and Ken Joos,
Lynnishna and Brian Wilson, Debra and Herbert Bain, Lynn and Eric
Gibson, Linda and Lawerence Lightbourne, Kendal, Nicole, Franklyn,
Nancy, Lesle, Avis, Peter and Shannell Rahming, Carol and Kirkwood
Braynen, Leslie and Olivia Barr, Shawn and Mark Rolle, Kenwood, Ryan
and Kendera Hanna, Patrick Jr. and Michael Wilson, Jaketo, Dale and
Janell McPhee, Shantia Rolle Bethel, Quenten Rolla, Sasha Davis,
Cheryl, Antoinette, Cheryl, Charles, Jetfrey and Austin Clarke, Estella
Gibson, Hréula, Collins, Kermit Jr, Oniel, Vena, Marklyn, Jason and
Fannie Rolla, Sabrina Lockhart and Kava Burrows; sixty two grand
nieoes and nephews and other relatives and thends including, Vandeola
Bridgewater and farnily, Laura Graham and family of Delray Beach,
Florida, Lawerence Thomas, William, Clifford and Jamas Adderlay,
Evelina and Ruth Smith, Rev. Alphonso and Rev. James Shereer and
family, Mary Johnson and family, Basil Rahming and family, Mary Hanna
and family, Thelma Brice and family, June Adderlay and family, Anna
Musgrove and family, Gar Broce and family, Gladys Brice and family,
Hortence Rahming and family, Vernal Adderley and family, Jalotta
Rehming and family, Rev. Helen McPhee and family, Veronica Curtis,
Geleste Rolle, Eurydice Dean and family, Beverley Collins and family,
Alice Albury and family, Charity Braynen and family, Albertha Hall and
family, Franklyn Cubmer and family, Cedric Johnson and family, Orniel
Kemp and family, Sandra Simms and family, his life bong friend, Livingstone
Munroe, Doctors and Nurses of Male Medical Ill Ward Princess Margaret
Hospital, the entire community of Garden Hills #2 and others too
numerous to mention.

Relatives and friends may pay their respects at Cedar Crest Funeral
Home, Robinson Road and First Street on Saturday from 10am to Gem
and at the church on Sunday from 9:30am until service time.



U

THURSDAY, MAY 21, 2009,









AGE



Commonwealth Funeral Home

Pe Independence Drive ¢ Phone: 341-4055 —

FUNERAL SERVICE FOR

Terrance Berlin Cleare, 26
affectionately called "Bounty"

of Harbour Island, will be held
on Saturday 11:00a.m. at
Wesley Methodist Church
Harbour Island. Rev. Charles
Sweeting assisted by Rev.
Godfrey Bethell will officiate
and interment will follow in St.
Catherine's Cemetery Harbour
Island.

Left to cherish his memories
are his mother, Donna Cleare;
father, Terrance Roberts; one
daughter, Dashanti; step-
mother, Joanna Roberts; step-
father, Glen Higgs; three
sisters, Terika and Terishka
Cleare and Tamika Roberts;
four brothers, Gerrick and
Ganton Higgs, Tevin Roberts and
Joachim Cleare; one adopted sister, Suzanne Oliver; grand-mother,
Joyce Roberts; grand-father, Berlin Cleare; step grand-mother, Patricia
Cleare; one nephew, Macallan DeCosta; seven aunts, Roshelle, Valeria,
Nola and Ellen Roberts, Romilly Higgs, Loretta Johnson, Rosemary
Daniels; four uncles, Freddie and James Roberts, Dudley and Rockwell
Cleare; numerous cousins and other relatives including, Pam Cleare,
Andrew Johnson, Harry Neely, Debbie Sawyer, Wendy Collie, Agatha
Capron, Ruth Bynoe, Eloise Roberts, Miriam Cleare, Irene Davis, Patricia
Lewis, Ena Taylor, Ferris Higgs, Vincent and Joseph Cleare, Allen and
Wallace Saunders, Stephanie Cleare and Godparents, Patricia Fisher, Don
and Marsha, Fredrick Higgs, Terry Johnson; one (1) Godchild, Sincere
Brennen; special friends, Ivanette, Dennis, Owen, Darren, Stephen, Deon,
William, Karon, Clint, Marcia and Leonard Carey; neighbours and
friends including: Mrs Jacqueline Percentie and family; Mrs. Julia Barry
and family; Mr. and Mrs. Carl Higgs; Mr. and Mrs. Percival (Summer)
Johnson and family; Kathleen Major and family; Jessilee Mackey and
family; Romell Rolle and family, Eloise Sawyer and family, Mr. and Mrs.
Joseph Saunders and family; Eva Lorraine Sawyer and family; Nora
Albury and family; Mr. and Mrs. Michael Knowles and family; Mr. and
Mrs. Paul Percentie and family; Mr. and Mrs. Craig Lewis and family;
Luann and Shelly Saunders; Mr. and Mrs. Stuart Cleare and family; Brian
Neely and family; Sally Rolle and family; Loretta Miller and family;
Nina Davis and family; Patrice Barry and family; Mr. and Mrs. John
Sawyer and family; Susan Davis and family; the Higgs family; Joann
Cleare and family; Bertam Sawyer and family; Nita Curry and family;
Vhaul Thompson and family; Cleo Mather and family; Victoria Ferguson
and family, Cecil Boyd.; Mr. and Mrs. Jeremiah Neely and family, Mr
and Mrs. Dencil Higgs and family; Church of God family, Methodist
Church family, Catholic Church and family, Church of God of Prophecy
family, Coral Sands and Pink Sands staff, Harbour Island Community
Clinic, "da bottom crew" and the entire community of Harbour Island
and Eleuthera.

Relatives and friends may view the remains at THE CHAPEL OF
MEMORIES COMMONWEALTH FUNERAL HOME
INDEPENDENCE DRIVE on Thursday from 4:00-7:30 p.m. and at
Blessed Sacrament Catholic Church on Friday from 3:00- 11:00 p.m. and
at Wesley Methodist Church on Saturday from 9:30 a.m. to service time.



































AGE 6, THURSDAY, MAY 217, 2009 THE TRIBUNE OBITUARIES

NASSAU
Robinson and Soldier Roads, Nassau, MP. Bahamas
P.O. Box CB-12072
Talephone: (242) 394-8043 / (242) 34-8047
Pager: (242) 340-8043 = Fox: (242) 340-8034

FREEPORT
11A East Coral Rood, hg G.B., Bahamas
P.O. Box F 12
Telephone: (242) 373-1115 / (dz) 373-1471
Pager: (242) 340-8043 « Fox: (242) 373-3005

FUNERAL SERVICES FOR

: Special Friend: Andrea Wells; Other relatives and
_ friends: Sherrie Deal, Kimarr Knowles, Alex Plakaris,
- God father: Ralph Hepburn and Andre Moxey, Royal
_ Bahamas Defence Force Entry 44 Team, Crew HMS
Yellow Elder, Soldier Road Family, Deal’s Family
from Palmetto Point, NCA Class of 2006, Lilly Smith
and Family, Francita Saunders and Family, The Bethel
Family, The Johnson family, The McDonald Family,
_ The Davis Family, Gwendolyn Rolle and Family, The
- Thurston Family, The Thompson Family, The Moxey
| Family, The Hepburn and Family, The Crew at Arawak
: Cay, R.M. Bailey Class of 1983 and First Caribbean
: International Bank.

Full Military Funeral Service
for Marine Mechanic

GIOVANEY TRISTAN
DEAL, 20

of Coral Harbour, Coral

Heights will be held on

Thursday, May 21st, 2009 at

11:00am at Zion Baptist

Church East and Shirley Street

Officiating will be Pastor T.G. Morrison, assisted by
Rev. Ulric Smith, Rev. Anthony Sampson, and Rev.
Prince O, Bodie Interment will follow in Lakeview
Memorial Gardens John F. Kennedy Drive &
Gladstone Road.

: Viewing will be held in the Chapel at Restview
_ Memorial Mortuary and Crematorium ltd. Robinson
and Soldier Rods on Wednesday from 10:00am to

6:00pm and at the church from 9:30 am to service

Left to reflect and treasure the memories of this time

magnificent gem, is his father: George “Gio” Deal;

mother: Bridgette Coquillon nee Butler; Step father:

Emmanuel Coquillon; step mother: Nicolette Deal;
brothers: Edward Flowers, Devante Deal and Elton; |
Fifteen Uncles: Vernon, Roy, Fred, Franklyn, Arthur, -
Edmund, and Lincoln Deal, Dr. Frumentus Leon, :
Richard Wright, Franklyn Cox, Ian Storr, Franklyn, -
Anthony, and Decosda Rolle and Godfrey Higgs; :
Seventeen Aunts: Paula Leon, Gertrude Wright, Gloria :
Cox and Anna Storr, Ruth, Mildred, and Stephanie :

DEATH NOTICE

MR. VERNON
HUBERT DEAN,
70

Deal Doreen Deal, Margaret, Marilyn, Juliet, Terry,
Rochelle, Dimples, Beatrice, Estelle Higgs, and |

Beverly Lewis; Cousins: Vernon Jr., & Wernado Deal,
Leroy Jr., Kirklyn, Bernique, & Tanya Deal, Vaughn,
Vanessa, Melissa, Lashanda, Fred Jr., Wernencha,
Fredeca Deal, Mychelyn & Cedric Watson, Frumentia

& Frumentus Jr., Leon, Lamar Deal, Anishka & Corey |
Bain, Arthur Jr., Atia, Arista, Teleichia, Terissa, :
Lynette, Indira, and Lincoln Jr Deal, Felice and Felicia :
Cox, lan Storr and Sherrill; Close second cousins: :

Czaire Watson, Travelle, Taja, and Taylor Bain;

of Ebony Close, Eastern Estates
died at his residence on May
19th, 2009.

He is survived by his wife,
Cleomi Dean; son, Jarrad Dean; sisters, Gloria and
Barbara; brothers, Raliegh and June Dean; numerous
nieces and nephews and a host of other family members
and friends too numerous to mention.

Funeral arrangments will be announced at a later date.























E TRIBUNE OBITUAR

mM
*O

o

11A Eost Cora Rood. Freep: . GB., Bohamas
PO. Bom F

12
Telephone: (242) 373-1115 / (242) 373-1471
Pager: (242) 340-8043 « Fox: (242) 373-3005



UU





AGE







THURSDAY, MAY 21, 2009,

Retsioe Memoudl Morluary
and Crematouum Limited

Robinson ond ‘ciate uae AP., Bahomeas
P.O. Box CB-12072
Telephone: Gt 394-8043 / (242) 394-8047
Pager: (242) 340-8043 « Fox: (242) 340-8034

FUNERAL OU ICE FOR

MAYRICKA
“Cakka” “Bouncer”
FLOWERS, 51

of Sandy Point, Abaco will be held on
Saturday, May, 2009 at 10:00 a.m. at
Mt. Zion Baptist Church, Sandy, Sandy
Point, Abaco. Officiating will be Rev.
Napolean Roberts. Interment will follow
in the Sandy Point Public Cametery,
Sandy Point, Abaco.

Lait to continue the legacy engendered

by her includes her adopted daughter/niece: Chriselda iTieksi
Flowers; 7 brothers: Percy, Floyd and Clifford Burrows, Ernest,
Lawrance, Hamilton and Dashwell Flowers; 5 sisters: Francilla Burrows,
Elvere Clarke, Elverner St. Luce and Roselda iBonniei O'Brien and
Ettamae Swain; 2 adopted sisters: Mavis McKinney and Keva Dean

, Elsie, Gardenia Fox; 2 brother-in-laws: Mr. Whitney Clarke and =
Christopher O'Brien; 4 sister-in-law: Elsiemae Burrows, Lena Burrows, :
Muriel Burrows & Ruth Flowers; aunt Ms. Daisy Johnson; 14 nephews: =
Godfrey, Wesley, Ferdinand, Kendal, Randolph, Cleatus, Lowell and :
Emery Burrows, Cassinova O’Brien, Daniel & Kendrick Weech, Lavada :
Clarke, Bradley Walks, Mick Davis, Wendel Stuart and EJ; 22 nieces: =
Teika, Tiffany, Lawricka Flowers, Cotisha Hanna, Starlene, Raffaleta, :
Pamela, Kim and Miranda Burrows Christine Barr McGlory, Rev. Margo :
Burrows & Olivia Moss, Paula Symonette, Oeisha Roberts, Sonya, :
Ernestine Lightbourn, Samantha Mather, Raquel Russell, Anissa, and :
Valeka Sweeting, Nurse Shamell Weech, and Olivia Burrows: 5 :
nephews-in-law: Sintenie Greene, Al Russell, Jason Roberts, David :
. 7? nieces-in-law: Velva, Arnette, Dena, Marissa, =
grandnephews: Donte, Keon, Percy Laary, :

Lightbourn and Sand
and Carolyn;
Frederick, Wesley Jr. Neko, Percy Il, Percy Burrows Ill, Brent, Brian,
Malbourne Jr, Quinton, Harold (HJ), Lameko, Randolph Jr, Renaj,
Leon, Scotty, Otis Jr, Kaciano, Printica, Dominique, Godfrey Jr, Renaldo,
Daron, Ansero, Tristen and Hunter; 34 grandnieces: Bianca, Meredith,
Amelia, Ilreana, Shameil, Lynette, Florence, Ashley, Brittany, Petra,
Melicka, Sheena, Paige, Anatacia, Tishna, Phylicia, Trineka, Chloe,
Tiana, Renaysha, Randricka, Rickeah, Aalyah, Shamiah, Destiny,
Majesty, Percia, Tyler, KaiVanya, Alexandria, Asher; godchildren:
Rodenia Roker and Calvanique and a fost of other relatives & friends:
Mr. Giovanni & Mrs. Antonia Johnson and Family, Daisy, Veoshe,
Harrison, Brenda Rolle, Melanie, Nurse Deborah Coakley, Lonza
Prosper, James & Delarese Bowe, Huland McKinney, Frederick Dames,

Mr. Ron ©. Pinder, Mrs. Garnell, Francine Prosper, Nadia Dolce, Ashley |
Rolle, Michael Russell, Viola (Pingie) Small, Mrs.\Valeria Lightbourne, :
Francis, Edith and Denise, Mr. Pat Ruderford, oe Frazier, Barbara :

aphane Bain, Mr :
George & Mrs. Donna Bain, Mr. Anthony & Mrs. Yvonne Bain, Mr. :
Jimmy & Mrs. Annie Greene, Mr. David & Mrs. Leona Green, Mr. Ron :
& Mrs. Laurestine Fox, Mr. Robert & Mildred McKinney, Ms. Annie :
Darville, Mr. Ronnie Thompson, Cynthia Crawford, Theresa Simmons, :
Mrs. Lorine Burrows, Flo Johnson, Beatrice Pier, Inez Poitier, Mr. Greg :
& Mrs, Zelma Bain & Family, Ms. Dolly Russell and Family, Mr. Sam :
Roberts & Farnily, Mr. Aaron and Mr. Jessy Bain, Mr. Edward and Mrs, :
Dolly Pinder and Farnily, Rev. Carrington & Rev. Sabrina Pinder and :

Adderley, Mr. David Stuart, Mrs. Gamie Roker, Mrs.

: Family, Administrator Benjamin Pinder & Family, Mr. Cochies Hanna,
> Mr. Edney Gaitor, Mr. Basil & Mrs. Julia McKinney, Mr. Preston Roberts
: & Family, Stanley White & Family,
: Alice and the entire Crossing
: Community, Sandy Point Public Clinic, and the entire Sandy Point
>: Abaco Community; Extraordinary Efforts: Dr. Trac Roberts, Dr. John
: Lunn, Dr. Locksley Munroe, Dr Wells, Dr. Bullard (
: Department, particularly Nurse Nuvella & Nurse Kallifanie, Nurse Alex,
> PNIH Surgical Clinic, Nurse Shamell Weech, Nurse ria PMH (x-
: ray Dept), Mr Ron ©. Pinder, Percy & Bianca Leary, Meredit

> Frederick Moxey Ill, Ms. Elsiemae Burrows, Mr. Ashlie
: Francine Prosper, Ms. Nadia Dolce, Rev. Carrinton &

; Pinder, Dolly Russell, Mildred McKinney, Shanique Bain & Family, Olivia
| Moss, Ms. Raquel Russell, The Cancer Society of Marsh Harbour.

Rev. Napolean Roberts & Family,
locks Community, Moores Island

E) The Oncology

Willarns,
Rolle, Ms,
ev. Sabrina

Viewing will be held in the Serenity Suitei of Restview Memorial
Mortuary And Crematorium Ltd., Robinson and Soldier Roads, Nassau,
New Providence on Thursday, May 21, 2009, from 10:00 am to 5:00pm.
On Friday at her residence in Sandy Point, Abaco from 4:00 p.m. until
9:30 a.m. on Saturday when the Funeral Procession leaves for the
Church.

DEATH NOTICES

MRS. IVYRENE
REBECCA ROKER, 83

of #29 Albertha Circla, Freaport, Grand
Bahama died at her residence on
Thursday, May 14, 2009.

Funeral arrangements will be announced
at a later date.

MR. WILLY
ROGER JR., 19

of #2 Weddel Avenue, Freeport, Grand
Bahama died at The Rand Memorial
Hospital, Freeport Grand Bahama on
Sunday, May 17, 2009.

Funeral arrangements will be announced
a@ a later date.

















PAGE 8, THURSDAY, MAY 21, 2009



THE TRIBUNE OBITUARIE















Aemeritte’s Funeral Aome

BAHAMAS’ OLDEST MORTUARY

FUNERAL SERVICES FOR

Rosetta "Rose" Mary Murphy, 59

)) a resident of Ragged Island Street and :
formerly of Betsy Bay, Mayaguana, who
died on 11 May, 2009, will be held at Zion ;
Baptist Church, East & Shirley Streets, :
on Saturday at 2:30 p.m. Officiating will ;
be Reverend Kevin A. Collie, assisted by }
Other Ministers. Interment follows in Old }
Trail Cemetery, Old Trail Road. }
Cherished memories will remain with her :
children: Vernetha and Kevin Edwards }
(son-in-law), Louis and Donella Murphy
(daughter-in-law), Leroy Joseph, Viola :
Joseph, Carolyn Joseph, Victoria and Deon ;
Davis (son-in-law) and Terry Joseph; :
grandchildren: Valentino, Troy, Stacy, :
Donovan, Rhonda, Arlington Jr. Deon Jr., ;
Vantasia, Destinee and Bria; parents: :
Reverend Cleveland & Gladys Murphy; :
siblings: Roderick Murphy, Virginia :

Murphy, Hettamae and Alvin Flowers (brotherin-law), Frankiemae Murphy- and :
Isaac Moss (brother-in-law), Alfred Murphy, Ray Murphy Florence and Paul :
Roberts (brother-in-law), Elizabeth Murphy, Alice and Reverend Kevin Collie ;
(brother-in-law); nieces: Tiffany Cartwright, Monique Murphy, Tamika and Delano }
Brown (nephew-in-Iaw), Kendera and Kendrica Moss, Ivanya Roberts, Kaylesa :
and Alicia Murphy, Kevia, Hannah, and Kevonna Collie; nephews: Randy Cooper, }
Daronn, and Valentino Flowers, PC 3361 Kendrick and Kendon Moss, Ray Jr., }
and Anthony Murphy, Paul Roberts Jr., PC 1495 Keno Murphy, Bersil Rolle, and :
Leroy Murphy; aunts: Kathrina Murphy, Leatha Bain Emily Bain, Henrietta Black, ;
Sarah Collie, Sylvia Jones, Myrtle, Marjorie, *Margaret (*of Cat Island), and :
Isadora Murphy; uncles: Ephraim Jones, Jacob, Samuel, Ruthland, and Daniel :
Murphy; grand aunts: Mathilda Burrows, Victoria McPhee and Olive Murphy; :
other relatives and friends including: Linda Hall, Maxwell Bain and family, Ethel, :
Myrtle, Nicole, Marsha, Doreen Taylor and family, Minister Joy Johnson, Minister
Madlyn Thompson and family, Ruthmae Collie and family, Dwain and Paulamae :
Morley and family, Collins and Pamela Rolle and family, Dorceen Rolle, Prince }
and Linda Charlton, Nicola Brown, Rev. Levi and Florance McPhee, Pastor Joseph :
and Pearl Thompson, Rudolph and Ceola Missick, Kenneth and Advira Missick, i
Overseer Randolph Deleveaux, Effie McPhee, Agnes Ferguson and family, Rowena }
Taylor, Idamae Brown, Michael Bain, Vincent and Joyce Mitchell and family, :
Mario Murphy, Almartha Murphy and family, The Betsy Bay Social Club, Temple :
of Praise Ministries, Apostle Christopher and Elder Anna Russell, Leon and Ena
Charlton and family, Stanley and Edith Collie and family, Cecilia Davis, Althea :
Munroe and family, Cecil Higgins and family, Jeffrey Murphy and family, Member :
of Parliament for Blue Hills Constituency Sidney Collie and family, Vernon :
Symonette (former Member of Parliament for MICAL), Terry Saunders, Lynn :
Armbrister, Shantel Bain, Roslyn Curtis, Don Munroe, Sandra Coakley, the Higgins, :
Murphy, Brown, Gray, Taylor, McPhee, Charlton, Collie, and Burrows families, :
Ann Jackson and Staff of the Reef Restaurant, the Staff of Female Medical II of ;
the Princess Margaret Hospital, the inhabitants and descendants, of Mayaguana

and others to numerous to mention.

Friends may pay their last respects at Demeritte’s Funeral Home, Market Street,
from 10-6:00 p.m. on Friday & on Saturday from 9-12:30 p.m. & at the church ;

from 1:30 p.m. until service time.

Terry Josephine “Terry Jo” Clare, 46

a resident of Ridgeland Park West, who died on 3rd May, 2009, will be held at }
Zion Baptist Church, East & Shirley Streets, on Saturday at 11:00 a.m. Officiating :
will be Pastor T. G. Morrison, assisted by Rev. Ulric Smith, Rev. Anthony Sampson, :
Associate Ministers, Deacons & Evangelists. Interment follows in Woodlawn :

Gardens, Soldier Road.

Left to cherish her memories are: one son,

Krishand Severin; daughter: Krisany

(Meisha) Ghosh; Grandson: Enorj Dulce;

Brothers: Franklyn, Henry, Daniel Jr.,

Sterling, Maxwell, Jose and Walter;

Sisters: Beatrice, Clementina, Susan,

Terry, Patrice and Ilona; Nieces &

Nephews: Carol, Deborah, Sonovia,

Rhoda, Llewellyn, Don and Charles Clare,

De'shan Clare Paul, Marilyn, Morreau,

Lavern Wildgoose; Alice-Beatrice

Concepcion, Anne Rahming, Brenda Clare

Richards, Anita, David, Scott and Phillip

Clare and Patty Glinton; Helena, Michael

and Michelle Clare, Nicola Heastie,

Preston, James Clare Riley; Cher Nicholas,

Tamika, Nivia and Channelle Clare;
Bianca Clare, Detra Morris, Alicia, Quincy and Vanchelle Brown; Danelta Green,
Danika, Krisia, Indira, Vito, Quincy, Manchiter Clare and Marisa Pierre; Gigi
Williams, Mona-Lisa, Troy Saunders; Edward-Keith, Mico-Yon and Tito Seymour;
Rushan Muncuff; Javon Hall, John-Ross, Nicole, Simone Johnson, Trinese Smith
Williams and Kingsley Outten; great grand nieces & nephews including: Sasha,
Paige, Don Jr., Lakiesha, Larisa, Theoman, Brent, Tiffany, Thomas, Trevor; Aurecio,
Christoff, Christy, Daniel I, Danielle, Davia, David Jr., Daniel II, Deomardo,
Kingsley, Mona-Lisa, Phillip I, Phillip I, Phillippa, Tamara, Tavaldo, Tennielle,
Torry, Felicia, Joshua, Roberto, Raymond, Lushano, Antonio, Javanique, Jarvis
Jr.; Trinton, Tranae, Tonia, Andrianna, Jeff, Lexianna; Diamond, Lynden; Quetella,
Quincy Jr., Vandera, Ray-Jay, Vito Jr., D'Quante, Danielle, Shania, Shanell, Mya,
Makayla, Jay-Jay; Devon, Chardonae; Ronald Jr., Sherika, Tabitha, Tico, Tia, Troy,
Treasure, Trey, Shasta, Timonique, Kennedy and Larren; Great great grand nieces
& nephews: Cleavanna, Damien, Ikera, Marcia, Eduardo, Ronika, Deshawn,
Charles, Marcus, Latrevon, Latiea, Latwonna and Latonya; Godfathers: Edward
Seymour Jr. & James Lightbourne; Aunts: Gertrude Chisolm, Ruby and Lois Clare;
Sisters-in-law: Edna, Elaine, Jacqueline, Madge, Myrtis and Sonia; Grand nieces-
in-law: Avis Clare-Rose, Donna, Michelle, Nicola, Tamara, Latina, Gwendolyn
and Mary; Grand nephews-in-law: Raymond Concepcion Sr., Audley Glinton,
Samuel Heastie, Jeffrey Morris, Terah Pierre, Jarvis Rahming Sr., David Richards,
Larrington Williams and Stanford Green; Great grand niece-in-law: Kathy
Concepcion; Brotherin-law: Edward Seymour; Cousins: Helen, Mary, Iris, Ann,
Linda, Ellen, Louise, Eva, Gertie, Louise, Gertrude, Edith, Eva, Eliza, Katie,
Karen, Margaret, Patrice, Trisha, Karen, Allison, Becky, Bernadette Bethel, Blythe,
Brenda, Cheryl, Dianne, Edith, Enid, Eunice-Blythe, Wilma, Paula, Gertrude,
Margaret, Marilym, Maria, Mercedes, Muriel, Pat, Patrice, Rosella, Sally, June,
Valverine, Walley, Elva Hall, Annie Thomas, Sterlin, Gregg, Ted, Phillip, Kevin,
Maxwell, Timothy, Douglas, Charles, Cliford, Claude, Warren, Manfred, Theophilis,
Nathaniel, Henry Jr., Albert, Alfred Jr., Clayton, Derek, Edgar, Evan, Felton, James,
Leroy, Lee, Myron, Turton Jr., Wendell and William (Bill) Clare; a host of other
relatives & friends including: Rebecca of Tampa F1., James Haynes, Andrenria
and Asmerilda of Miami Fl; Aunce Dulce, Mark Arthur, Carlon Williams, Lorna
Ogilby, Samantha, Brenna, Dorelle and Monique of Providenciales; the family of
Dell Knowles, Richard Dixon, Irene Harvy, Rev. T. G. Morrison, Edith Moore,
William "Willy" Thompson, Lorna Hall, the Clares, Brooks, Malcoms, Earleen
Elliott, Jennings, Harvys, Seymours, Carters, Todds, Thomas, Lewis, Wilsons,
Basdens, Fulfords, Hanchells, Lightbournes, Frances, Joanne Handfield, Santino
Bown, and the community of South Caicos; Special thanks to: Rev. T. G. Morrison,
the Officers & Members of Zion Baptist Church, East and Shirley Street, Nassau,
the entire Medical staff of South Miami, the Baptist, the Holtz children Center,
Jackson Memorial Hospital, Miami and the Princess Margaret Hospital, Nassau;
the Myrtle Rigby Health Comples in Providenciales, Turks Island.

Friends may pay their last respects at Demeritte's Funeral Home, Market Street,
from 106:00 p.m. on Friday & on Saturday at the church from 10:00 a.m. until
service time.









THE TRIBUNE OBITUARIE















Y



Deweritte’s Funeral Home

BAHAMAS’ OLDEST MORTUARY

FUNERAL SERVICE FOR
Glenroy Joseph Lewis, 50

a resident of Wilson Street,
Nassau Village, who died on
7 May, 2009, will be held at
New Riverside Church of
God Pentecostal, Poinciana
Drive, on Saturday at 11 :00
a.m. Officiating will be Rev.
Sylvanus Rolle, assisted by
other Ministers of the Gospel.

Interment follows in
Woodlawn Gardens, Soldier
Road.

Left to cherish memories are his wife, Enid Lewis;
his daughter: Shonell Lewis, adopted daughters: Keisha
Robinson, granddaughter: Emerald McCourty; ten
sisters: Joycelyn Pinder, Florinda Lowe, Sharon Lewis
Woodside, Michelle Dykens of Halifax, Canada,
Denise, Kimberley, Carla, Valerie Lewis, Michelle
Collie and Idena Moss; five brothers: Jonathan
Campbell, Jerome, Arlington and Radley Lewis and
Gregory Collie; seven sisters-in-law: Fredricka Walters,
Leila Mason, Janice Rolle, Elaine Lewis, Tamara
Campbell, Danned Lewis and Lynn Lewis; eleven
brothers-in-law: Tyrone Woodside, John Dykens of
Halifax, Canada, Terry Moss, Ferdinand Lewis, Clive
Walters, David Mason, Oswald Rolle, Gerald Lewis,
Anthony Lewis, Donald Lewis, and Ricky Lewis;
sixteen cousins: Sonia, Leroy, Winkie, Charles Ramsey,
Rev. Jeffrey Hollingsworth of Freeport, Grand Bahama,
Dorothea Hollingsworth, Patrick Ferguson of Freeport,
Grand Bahama, Judith Major of Freeport, Grand
Bahama, Kevin Major, and Jennifer Nairn of Miami,
Florida, Monique Penn, Jason, Marcus and Lakeisha
Hollingworth and Latoya Sands; numerous nieces and
nephews too many to mention; other relatives and
friends including: the John Street Crew, Mother Frances
Gibson and The Church of the Lord Jesus F.O.A. and
Mr. John Mosko of Mosko Construction Co and his
fellow co-workers.

Friends may pay their last respects at Demeritte's
Funeral Home, Market Street, from 10-6:00p.m. on
Friday & on Saturday at the church from 10:00 a.m.
until service time.













THURSDAY, MAY 21, 2009, PAG

DEL 50 223

FUNERAL DIRECTORS

“Rendering the finest in caring and compassionate service
regardless of financial condition.”

tt Terrace, Calling Avenue * (242) 356-2187 *
P.O”. Box GT-2679 * Nassau, Bahamas

FUNERAL SERVICE FOR

FREDERICK (=
NELSON ROLLE, 72 [=

of Gleniston Gardens and formerly

of Rolle Town, Exuma, will be held

on Saturday, May 23rd, 2009 at
11:00 a.m. at Zion Baptist South |4
Beach Church, Full Gospel §
International, Zion Boulevard,
South Beach. Officiating will be
Bishop B. Wenith Davis, assisted

by Pastor Charles T. Dorsett,
Pastor Elliot Miller and Minister
Floyd Jones. Interment will be made

in Woodlawn Gardens Cemetery, Soldier Road.

Left to cherish his memories are his wife, Isadora Rolle; seven
sons, Franklyn, Derrick, Douglas, Reginald, Patrick, Mario and
Leading Seaman Zhivargo Rolle of The Royal Bahamas Defence
Force; six daughters, Charlotte and Patricia Rolle, Michelle Curtis,
Pamela and Bernadette Rolle; five step daughters, Denise Pratt,
Bernadette Davis, Sonia McKenzie, Brittney Rolle, Fostes and
Sheena Mcintosh; one brother, Richard Rolle; four sisters, Sylvia
and Henrietta Rolle, Mildred Hepburn and Francis Saunders; thirty
six grandchildren, Shamika Rahming, LaShanna Evans, Antonia
McKinney, Patricko and Francis Gibson, R.N. Branishka Lewis,
Joshua, Rishawn, Sidell and Silas Curtis, Deandrey Carey, PC.
3118 Javis Rolle, Javon, Jasmine, Javonia, Derricka, Derrick Jr.,
Terell, Mario Jr, Darius, Yanni, Justin, Regere, Davisha, Isaac,
Danajé and Donavon Rolle, Lacaja and Carlos Bain, Lakeisha,
Zaya, Silvio, Shagel, Stephano, Samuel, Orick and Reanna Pratt;
three adopted grandchildren, Skye Hanna, LaShon and Akeel
Adderley; fourteen great grandchildren, two sons-in-law, Sidney
Curtis and Simson McKinney; two daughters-in-law, Lechell and
Jackie Rolle; one uncle, Aaron Rolle; two aunts, Rowera and
Marion Rolle; seventeen nieces, twenty one nephews, father and
mother-in-law, Mr and Mrs Samuel Rolle; eleven brothers-in-law,
ten sisters-in-law, one godchild, Miss Sandra Gray; other relatives
and frends including, Dons Rolle, Edith Wilson, Thelma Ferguson,
Jocelyn Carey, Mae Armbrister, Philip and Dorothy Gardiner,
Edison, Huel Nairn, Constance Evans and family, Valerie Hart and
family, Karen and family, Monique and family, Edmund Moxey,
Lamb and family, Joe Curtis and family, Willard and Mary Hepdurn,
Anthony Smith, Cassie and Olive Forbes, Barbara Douglas, Clint
Ferguson, Hilda Carey, Courtney Forbes and Evadnell Fowler,

The body wil repose in the Blessed Redeemer Chapel at Ferguson's
Funeral Directors, 7th Terrace Collins Avenue on Friday from 10am
to Spm and at the church on Saturday from 10am until service
time.











PAGE 10, THURSDAY, MAY 21, 2009

» Bethel Brothers Morticians
Telephone: 322-4433, 326-7030
Nassau Street, P.O.Box N-1026

FUNERAL SERVICE FOR

ALICE ROSAMOND
TUCKER, 97

of &th Terrace, East Centreville, will
be held on Saturday May 23rd, 10:00
a.m. at Ghurch of God of Prophecy,
East Street Tabernacle. Rev. Bishop
Franklin M. Ferguson, Bishop
Woodley C. Thompson and Minister
Kendal C. Simmons will officiate.
Intarment will follow in the Western
Cemetery, Nassau Street.

ohe is survived by: Children - George

Walton Tucker of Orlando Florida,

Joycelyn Gibson, Kenneth Tucker,

Pamela Newbold, Judy Fields and

Willamae Cunningham; Adapted children - Esther Armbrister, Maude
Della Bullard, Bloomfield Ferguson and Nurse Patricia Bethel: Sons-
in-law - Rudolph Cunningham and Clifton Fields; Daughters-in-law
= Audrey Tucker and Catherine Tucker of Orlando Florida: hidiran
- Tonette Kemp of Atlanta, Georgia, Julie Campbell of London, England,
Kayla Cartwright, Shirley Martin of Freeport, Grand Baharna, Keith
and Lisa Tucker, Ken and, Judy Tucker of Washington D-C., Frederic
Tucker and Renee Tucker, Christopher Tucker of Orlando, Florida,
Pamela and Edward Willams of Jacksonville, Flonda, Lawrence Atwell
of Denver, Colorado, Craig and Carol Atwell of Miami Florida, Sean
Atwell of Miami, Florida, Kayla and Samuel Brown, Inspector Kent
Butler, Marvin Butler, Rosamond and Christian Knowles, Kenton
Tucker of Jacksonville, Florida, Kevin Tucker, Sophia Ridgell of
Jacksonville, Florida, Cheryl Donaldson of Ottawa, Canada, Janet
and Audley Munnings, Gay and Pastor Ricardo Dean, Patrona and
Glement Cartwright, Oral and Ria Newbold, C/lnspector Ricardo and
Allison Fields of Staffordshire, England and Christopher and Khaleiah
Cunningham; Sisters-in-law - Clara Gibson of Miami, Florida, Louise
Kinlock, Floraine Gibson of Richmond Heights, Florida; Brothers -in-
law - Dorrington Ferguson, Charles Freddie Tucker Sr. of Queens,
New York: Nieces and Naphews - Alice Una Clarke, Eleuthera, Zala
and Kirk Johnson, Wainwright and Vera Gibson, Eleuthera, Rosie
Gibson, Eleuthera, Harcourt and Cassandra Gibson, Dr Walter and
Sandra Gibson, Charles and Coralee Butler of California, Dorothy
and Leonard Dames, Exuma, Kathleen Demeritte, Sylvia Forbes,
Majorie Johnson, Rosetta Johneon, Joan Butler, Virginga Butler, Thelma
Butler, Bolyn and Rosevelt Gibson, Laura Lae Gisbon, Winifred
Williamson, Valerie Greene, Angella Phillips, Eloise Sands, Roland
Kinlock and Warren and Gwen Gibson, Miami Florida; 50 Great
Grandchildren including, Shavannah Bri ater of Freeport, Grand
Bahama, Jarmaina and Carlton Tucker, Aleisha and Lydein Williams
of Jacksonville, Florida, Jasmil and Jasma Munnings, A'chard and
Rico Bean, Vashti and Paige Cartwright, Oral Jr and Mia Newbold,
Michael, Marcian, Marcel, Marissa, Machara, Makira, Marcelle and
Miranda Tucker, Ciera and Christopher Cunningham Jr, Rachel and
Cameron Knowles, Micki Brown, Kendra and Keyanna Butler, Joseph
Fields of Staffordshire, England and 20 great great grandchildren;
numerous other relatives and friends - Mavis Humes and family, Paul
Lockhart, Elaine Scavella (caregiver), Ms. Woods, Mr. Terrance
Ferguson, Gregory Butler and family, Granville Butler and Butler, Rev.
T. G. Morrison, Church of God of Prophecy East Street family, Mildred
Mackey, Mrs Esther Adderley and family, Ernestine Douglas, RM.H,
Private Service Nursing staff, Retired Nurses Guild, Richard and Iris
Dean, the Gibson family, the Mount Moriah Baptist Church family and
the members of Family Faith Ministries International...







Friends may pay their last respects at Bethel Brothers Morticians,
fdd Nassau Street on Friday from 10:00 a.m. to 6:00 p.m. and on
Saturday at the church from 9:00 a.m. until service time.



















#2 Tonlque Williams-Darling Highway
P.O. Box EE-16634 © Tel: (242) 361-2560/361-8612 « Fam: (242) 361-1856
Mobile: (242) 457-1494 or (242) 477-2034 » Evening: 324-4687

ROSE TERESTA
ROLLE, 70

of West Dennis Court, Yellow Elder who
died on Monday, May 11th, 2009 wall be
held on Saturday, May 23rdth, 2009 at
10:00am at Mount Tabor Full Gospel
Baptist Church, Willow Tree Avenue and
Mount Taber Drive. Officiating will be
Bishop Neil C. Ellis, assisted by Pastor
Lorenza Clarke. Interment will follow in
the Woodlavn Gardens Cemetery, Soldier
Road,

Precious memories will forever linger in

the heart of her (4) Sons: Bruno, Delman, Simeon and Chancel Rolle; (3)
Daughters: Chevette Rolle, Gillian Burrows and Portia Taylor; (8)
Grandchildren: Ashley, Delmon, Delton and Bruano Rolle, Shealyn Burrows,

John Jr, and Jessica Taylor and Chancea Rolle; (1) Dauwghter-in-law: Anne
Rolle; (2) Sons-in-law: John Taylor and Shelton Burros; (1) Brother-in-
law: Holman Gilbert; (4) Sisters-in-law: Clementia Gilbert, Missic Pratt,
Pearline Rolle and Aramentia Sweeting; (15) Nephews: Wendell, Micheal,
Dowelas, Fredrick, Thomas, Patrick, Jerome, Steven, Dexter, Lambert, Jared,
VYandyke, Randolph, Kelsy and Kenny; (9) Nieces: Marion, Maria, Monique,
Estella, [retta Culmer, Patnicia Pearson, Brenda, Joann and Sharon Johnson;
A host of other relatives and friends including: Zorina Woods, Chery]
Alliance, Charles and Christopher Bain, Gilbert and Lizette Woods, Nickera
and Dean Richards, Cinderella Mouline, Dexter Whyms, Casanova Rolle,
Crissy Frazer, Helga Cummings, Judy Roberts, Vernetia Walkine, Medwellt
and Patrice Moultrie, Steven Larrimore, Jennifer Moultric, Joseph Whyms,
Patrice, Delarese, Denise Hinsey, Jane, Sharon, Melanie, Micheal, Marion,
Monalisa, Leola and Elaine Sands, Prince and Brenhilda Porter, Ellis and
Naomi Whyms, Lucille and Victoria Williams, Thomas and Telma Porter,
Larry, Caine Lighthourne, Donna Cargil, Pastor Harrington and Margaret
Frazier, Laverne Philencia Dames, Lisa Forbes, Jacqueline and Delaura Laing,
Menera Newton, Jennifer and Louis Munroe and family, C. Miller and family,
Allen Fawkes and family, Edward Humes and family, Iris Dean and family,
the Seymour family of Wulff Road, , Amette Davis and family, Delores
Knowles and family, Ivan and Edwin Missick and family, Tyrone Rolle and
family, Linda Heastie and famiby, Hanris Smith and family, China and family,
Ettermac Pinder and family, Keith, Wayne, Kevin, Almaric, Virginia and
Torey Sands, Eunice Seymour, Inez, Rev. Archelaus, Magalene, Everette
and #chelain Burrows, Ruthmac, Altenease Evans, Rueben, Martha Bullard,
Cheryl Saunders, Fanny, Pearline and Lutchman Rolle, Annie Pratt, McDonald,
Thelma Rolle, Kenneth Rolle, Brevis Moss, Ann Moxey, Apostle Ed and
Lee Watson, Pastor Reginald Cox and Servant Andrea Cox, Bishop Neil and
First Lady Ellis and the offices and members of Mount Tabor Full Gospel
Baptist Church, Dr. Graham Cates, Dr. Spencer, Dr. Morgan, Dr. Grant
Taylor, the Staffof Female Medical 1, Dialysis Unit and Maternity Ward,
the COB Custodial and Maintenance Section and stait, the Department of
Public Service Union, John Bull, Marathon Staff, Compass Poant and Atlantis
Mosaic Restaurant and Staff, Department of Environmental Health Services
and Staff, the entire #3 West Dennis Coun, Yellow Elder and Standard Creek,
Andros Communities.

Viewing will be held on Friday, May 22nd at Clarke’s Funeral Home #10
Tonigue Williams-Darling Highway from 10:(Qam to 6e(hpm and on Saturday
at 9:00am until service time.

























THE TRIBUNE OBITUARIES

larke s Yur



UU









AGE 11



THURSDAY, MAY 21, 2009,

Home

#2 Tonique Williams-Darling Highway
P.O. Box EE-16634 « Tel: (242) 361-2569/361-8612 « Fax: (242) 361-1856
Mobile: (242) 457-1491 or (242) 477-2034 « Evening: 324-4687

FUNERAL SERVICES FOR

VERA SAUNDERS-
MUNROE, 86

of Sugar Cane Lane,

Exuma who died on Sunday, May 10th,
2009 will be held on Saturday, May 23rd,

2009 at 11:00am at Salem Union Baptist +
Church, Taylor Street. Officiating will :
be Rey. Dr. C. W. Saunders, assisted by :
other Ministers. Interment will follow in:
the Woodlawn Gardens Cemetery, Soldier |

Road

She is survived by her Husband of'sixty-;
five (65) years: Ernest Munroe of Moss:
Town, Exuma; (7) Daughters: Sheila :

Curry, Elrita, Luella, Maria, Vernita and Marilyn Munroe and Loran Ferguson,

(5) Sons: Nathaniel, Emest Jr. . Simeon, Philip and David Munroe; (52)
Grandchildren: Charmine & Whiting Deleveaux, Belinda Hutchinson, Brent :
Stubbs, Marcia and Artin Swift, Barry and Dr. Alexya Williams, Shenique Rolle, :

Tanaicia and Norman Munroe, Kimberlee and Amy Rahming, Arnette McPhee,

Sabrina Culmer, Mathalee and Tyrone Tynes, Monique and Nathaniel Jr, Dellington 3

and Tamika Munroe, Renee, Lemmon, Jawanza, Brian, Garvin, Ernest III,

Philandrea and Philnovia, Munroe, Te‘rah Neymour, Prenecia Rolle, Tanya
uel Smith, Darmilus and Wendy Curry, Patricia and Authur Jr. and :

Knowles, Sh

Jason Munroe, MeQuell Curry, Patrice and Quincy Pratt, Dike and Marvin Newbold,

Shantell Chipman, Levania, Bernadette, Mispah, Pernell and Paula Ferguson, :
Christine Beneby, Rochelle Walker, Eslynn Smith and Glen Munroe: (47) Great- :
grandchildren: Rashaun, Whittkey and Elissa, Tynesha, Tyresha, Deandra, Kyle, :

Kenny, Kerrel, Kendrick, Shawn Rolle, Artin, Artrill, Leandrea, Nathan, Qutel,

Quindeira, Princia, Eugene Jr., Perez, Marvin jr. Marvinique, Kendiro, Brenzel :

Jr., Benalique, Raven, Dante, Shawn, Roshanda, Arnbrosine, Britnique, Simone,
Samantha, Trey, Catlyn Danielle, Deandra, Jasoryne, Ounel, Delano, Deago, Loren,
Gervaise IJr.,

Gregory and Dexter Brown, Virginia, Nyoka, Ingrid, Therevis and Jodi Deveaux,
Reith, Randy, Terrance, Theresa, Vernita, Pauline, Willuasee Brown, Rickey, Kent,
Edward, Wayde, Eureka, Shoranda, Henry, James, Bradley, Germaine Ann White,

Kayla & Nikita; Numerous Cousins Including; Rev. Or. C.W. Saunders and the :
officers and members of Salem Union Baptist Church, Deacon George Curtis and :
farnily, Sarah Rolle and family, Melvin, Clara, Thelma, Lillis, Francine Saunders :
and family, Lizzy Rolle and family, Harold and Cynthia Major and family, Stella ;
fictor Saunders and family, :
Barbara Dorsette and family, Rev. Elon Musgrove and family, Dependents of :
Maurice and Cesar Clarke and family, Veron Curtis and family, Rodney Musgrove :
and family, Pristina Gibson and family, Churtstine and Castherine Musgrove and :

Major and furnily, Aremina Musgrove and family, ¥

family, Beerthalee Curry and family, Magnola Hamilion Rolle and family, Rev.

Cedric Smith and family, Edna Bain and family, VWernic and Alvin Rolle and :
family Wellington and Neil Hamilton, Elvara Noel and Ginger Hamilton of Deer |
Field Beach Florida, Elise Smith, Fearlin Smith, Merdina Rolle, Kendal Butler; :
A host of other relatives and friends including: Rev. Randy Musgrove and the :

Fox Dale
Subdivision and formerly of Moss Town, :

Shervaise, Sabena, Ashea and Courtney; (1) Brother: Milton :
Saunders; Daughters-in-law: Rudy, Arnett and Patsy Munroe; Son-in-law: Ezra |
Curry and Clyde Ferguson; Sisters-in-law: Mary and Corrine Saunders of Mimphs :
Florida, Curleane Major, Cathleen and Millicent Munroe, Nathalie Evans and :
Myrtis Deveaux; Brothers-in-law: Greorge Evans, Arlington, James and Freddy :
Munroe and Alton Major, Numerons Nieces and Nephews incloding: James and +
Carolyn Darville of Thailand, Modina and Bishop Robert McPhee, Elder Maxine :
Newton, Ruth and Alfred Williams, Elder Shirley Brown, Zella and Kenneth :
Symonette, Yvette King, Patricia Brown, Ralph and Marva Brown, Ulis King, :

officers and members of Zion Union Baptist Church, Moss Town, Exuma, Prince
Rolle, Terry Ferguson, Shanelle Major, Malvease Bethel, Shirley Munroe, Dr.
Chery] Hanna, Dr. Delton Farquharson, Desiree Ferguson and tamily, Irene
Rahming and family, Isaiah Rolle and Family, Richard Clarke and family, Euthely
Rahming and family, Irena McPhee and family, Rev. Charles Rolle and the officers
and members of Cedars of Lebnon Church, Rev, Ivan Ford Butler and the officers
and members of Kemp Road Ministries, the Ministry of Education and Accounts
Department, the Thompson & Smith families from farmers Hill Exuma, the entire
Sugar Cane Lane, Fox Dale Subdivision and Moss Town, Exume communities.

Viewing will be held on Friday, May 22nd at Clarke's Funeral Home #10 Tonique
Williams-Darling Highway from 10:00am to 6:00pm and on Saturday at 10:00am
until service time.

CHARLES MONTEL
RITCHIE, 88

of Hibiscus Drive, Lyford Cay and
Formerly of Hamilton's, Long Island
who died on Thursday, May I4ith, 200%
will be held on Saturday, May 23rd, ZO
at 10:30am at Saint Christopher" s Church,
Lyford Cay, Officiating will be Venerable
Archdeacon Keith N. Cartwright assisted
by Reverend Fr. Ernest Pratt, Reverend
Fr. Peter A.G. Seott and Reverend Fr, (i.
Kingsley Knowles, Cremation will
follovar.

Left to cherished fomd memories are his
=| Brother: Alvin, (4) Sons: Paul, Cyril,

Montfomeny and Jackson Ritchie; (4)
Daughters: Ramona Ritchie-Taylor, Angeline Ritchie-Wells, Rosalie Major and
Alexandra Pratt; (4) Daughters-in-law: Paula Cindy, Catherine, Cheryl & Kim
Ritchie; (2) Sons-in-law: Jacoh Major and Daniel Taylor; (23) Grandchildren:
Richard iPablet, Christopher, Jason, Brian, Charles, Mathew, Joshua, Jordan,
Justin, Robin and Dylan Ritchie, Stephan and Angelo Storr, Kimra Johnson,
Melissa Johnson, Sheree, Nakia & Alexis Ritchie, Caroline Russell, Tuesday
White, Rachel, Simone and Hannah Ritchie; (11) Great-grandchildren: Mona
Maria Burrows, Stephanee, Sierra, Malik and Kaidin Storr, Kianna, Kamaron,
Jacob, Landon, Abigail & Isabella Ritchie; (2) Sisters-in-law: Alice Darille &
Iva Knowles; (31) Sieces & Nephews including: Hertha, Reginald iChampi
Gordon, David, Anthony iTonyi, Kathleen Ritchie, Elizabeth Strachan; Bert &
Rupert Knowles, Ivy Cartwright, Gloria Pratt, Madeline Cartwright, Reginald,
Kirk, Barbara, Marsha & Chubby Knowles, Betty Wells, Roscoc, Appollos, Steve
and Daniel Burrows, Desiree, Beryl & Lorraine Wanson, Ida Fox, Lester Darville,
Liewellyn & Collins Fox, Cindy Mavros, Chole Wells, Rogie Fox; A host of other
relatives and friends including: Margaret Meeres, Maryann Brazalote, Juana,
Sicha, Mark Russell, Adama Storr, Celia Uniz, Nea, Sarah, Vania & Tony Ritchie,
Stephen Johnson, Stephen Stor Sr, Lakesa Lloyd, Cynthia Burrows, ‘Maureen
Brown, Andrew iRabbai and Dora Taylor, Remelda Constantakis & farnily, Gregory
Cartaright & famuly, Robert Sandy & Michelle Sands, Raphact & Chloe C artwTight,
Arch Deacon Kerth Cartwright, Fr. Emest Pratt, Martred Knowles, Regina Cartwright,
Eva Knowles & family, Kelly Banks, P. Anthony White and the entire Hamilton's
Long Island community.

Viewing will be held on Friday, May 22nd at Clarke's Funeral Home #10 Tonique
Williams-Darling Highway from 10:00am to 6:00pm and on Saturday at 9:00am
until service tine.











PAGE 12, THURSDAY, MAY 21, 2009









THE TRIBUNE OBITUARIES

















Hutler’s Funeral Homes & Crematorium

Telephone: 393-2822, York & Ernest Sts.
P.O. Box N-712, Nassau, Bahamas

FUNERAL ANNOUNCEMENT

| sisters Varian Pople, Janet Carey, Brendamae
_ Adderley, Maria Smith, Joycetina Scott,
_ Cleopatra Braynen,, Miriam Burrows of New
_ York, Shirley Clarke and Susan Barr, three
-uncles; Hezekiah and George Johnson and
_ Alexander Burrows, one aunt; Eulean Kemp,
2 nine brothers-in-law; Rev. Frankie Scott,
_ Edward Pople, Jacob Adderley, Prince Braynen,
| George Barr, Apostle J.B. Sands, and William,
_ Elijah and Roswell Forbes, twelve sisters-in-
| law; Tabitha, Erica, Setesa, Eleanor, Donnalee,
_ and Sarah Burrows, Caron Klein, Erlie, Evelyn,

DANIEL RUSSEL
BURROWS, 47

of 44 Cassia Avenue, Garden Hills II, will be |
held on Saturday May 23, 2009 at 11:00a.m. at |
Bahamas Holy Bible Mission, Bahama Avenue. |
Officiating will be Pastor Frankie Scott, assisted |
by Rev. Henry Rolle and Rev. Oswald Bain |
Interment will follow in Woodlawn Gardens |
Cemetery, Soldier Road.

ron to cherish ms Sees ai ns mie Friends may pay their last respects at Butlers’
ale Sons, A “- | a ode _ Funeral Homes & Crematorium. Ernest and
Jr. and Devon Burrows, two daughters; | Yorks Streets on Friday May 22, 2009, from

Danesha and Derene Burrows, his mother |
Christina Burrows, six brothers; Prince, Neville, |
George, Raymond and Leroy Burrows and |
Lieutenant-Commander Loren Klein, nine |

_ Geneva and Elizabetha Forbes and Virginia
Rolle, twenty nine nephews, twenty three
nieces; five nephews-in-law, nine nieces-in-
law, ten grandnephews; six grandnieces,
and many other loving family and friends
Including Bridgette, Allen McPhee, Andrew
| McPhee, Rondell Rolle, Raquel McKenzie, John
| Fox ,Cathy Albury Coralee Smith and the

Stewarding Department and Culinary Staff of

_ Atlantis, Gary Gilligan and Theodora Major
_and many others too numerous to mention.

10:00 a.m. until 5:00 p.m. and on Saturday
from 10:00a.m. until service time at the church.







THE TRIBUNE OBITUARIE













Mm
*







VU

THURSDAY, MAY 21, 2009,









AGE 13



Rock of Ages Funeral Chapel

Wulff Road & Pinedale
Tel: 323-3800 or 322-1431 « Fax: 328-8852

FUNERAL SERVICES FOR

ALFRANCINE
MAGISTRAT, 77

of Balfour Ave, will be held on

Soldier Road.

This Rose will be forever missed |

in the hearts of her: Three (3) :

Daughters: Sylvela Josaphat Emanuel, Vergina and Ruth :
Magistrat; Four (4) Sons: Daniel, Delinor, Lavius and Ulioder |
Madgistrat; Four (4) Brothers: Sirisnord Majistra of Miami, Silot |
Majistra and Lafontaine Merzius of Nassau, and Yard Majistra :
of Haiti; One (1) Sister: Charitable Octave of Haiti; Thirty- :
three(33) Grandchildren: Herode Octave of Haiti, Jirda Gustave, ;
Antonio, Anton, Antoinisse and Mako Jasphat all of Nassau, ;
Loubins, Ellie, Roseline and Mathew Octave, Nathacha, Makenzi |
Princeten-Prince , Ftacy Nikkie, Nehemie and Deny Macelyn, |
All of Miami, Wed Dalincy of Haiti; Sarmuel Gustave of Nassau, |
Santia Mascelin of Miami, Berlina Mascelin of Nassau, Genesse, |
Maxx, Watson, Kervin, Quency and Kenson Mascelin of Miami, |
Fadince, James, Sendley and Andley Mitile all of Canada, Dalei |
Neoctave of Hait and Ready Macalin of Miami; Ten (10) Great |
Grandchildren: Shinika, Dangelo and Nadine Gustave of Nassau, |
Dana Octave, Rosenika and Hebinson Octave of Haiti, Genesse |
Mascelin of Miami, Hevinsli and Hebrine Octave of Haiti, |
Cherman of Nassau, Three (3) Sons-in-law: Tony Josaphat of |
Nassau, Onilus Octave and Luima Mitul of Miami; Four (4) |
Daugnhters-in-law: Silfida Mascelin of Haiti, Soilenie, Alsegrace |
and Abrisil Mascelin of Miami; One (1) Brother-in-law: Tiboss |
Octave of Haiti; Sisters-in-law: Glaise Majistra of Haiti and |
Anocia Merzius of Nassau; Numerous Nieces and Nephews |
including: Blius, Sadieudi and Boniface Octave of Miami, Tipepe, ;
Naomi and Ziane Octave of Haiti, Larones, Jacques, Saintadieu |
and Eliner Merzius of Nassau, Camille lvener, Sirisnard, Eloi- |
Telfort, Maraine and Philogene Majistra of Haiti, Marianie Onora |
of Haiti; One (1) Godchild: Maricia Octavien; and a host of :

other relatives and friends including: Louci Louis, Jasie, Tedilia, |
Danis, Jesner, Mrs. Francis, Mrs. Jeson, Marie, Laly, Lisitha, :
The Victory Chapel of the Nazarene, Minnie Street family, Rev. |
Dr. Antoine St. Louis and family, Pastor Perlius Youth and :
family, Dec. Ramy Delira and family, The entire Minnie Street :
Community, and The Balfour Ave Community; and a host of :

| other relatives and friends too numerous to mention.

| FRIENDS MAY PAY THEIR RESPECTS AT ROCK OF AGES
| FUNERAL CHAPEL; WULFF ROAD & PINEDALE ON FRIDAY
| FROM 10 A.M. TO 5 PRM. AND ON SATURDAY AT THE CHURCH
| FROM 1PM. UNTIL SERVICE TIME.

Saturday May 23, 2009 at 2 p.m. |
at Victory Chapel of The |:
Nazarene, Minnie Street. |
Officiating: Rev. Dr. Antoine St. :
Louis. Assisted By: Pastor Pelius :
Youth and Dec. Ramy Delira. |
Interment: Woodlawn Gardens, :

FRANCES MARY
JOHNSON, 60

of Bamboo Town, East Street
South; will be held on Saturday
May 23rd, 2009 at 10 a.m. at
Church of God Temple, Coconut
Grove & Crooked Island Street.
Officiating: Bishop Sherwin
Smith. Assisted By: Bishop
Moses A. Johnson & Bishop
Lindo Wallace. Interment:
Lakeview Memorial Gardens,
John F. Kennedy Drive

Left to cherish her memories are her Husband: Limon Johnson;
One (1) Brother: Joe Olsen and Wife Annette Olsen of New
York: Sisters-in-law: Rowena Hudson and Merle Johnson;
One (1) Step Son: Gregory Johnson; One (1) Step Daughter:
LaDonna Gardiner; One (1) Step-Son- in-law: Simeon Gardiner;
Five (5) Grandchildren: Leevan Johnson, Tamiko Ferguson,
Gerrard and Qutel Johnson and Simeon Gardiner Jr, One (1)
Grand Daughter fin-law: Vindell Ferguson; Thirteen (13) Great
Grandchildren: Levanchea, Lenah, Leah and Leevan Johnson,
Tameka Ferguson, Ziana and Zion Johnson, Elisha Adderley,
Jasis Bevans, Bianca Moxey, Carlton Wilson, Tanisha Ferguson
and Tarquin Kelly; Best Friends: Irene and Charles Swanson
and Freddy Castillo all of Florida, Janette Wuasileweski, Ann
Armbrister and Fenton Strachan; Numerous Nieces and
Nephews throughout U.S.A. and The Bahamas as well as a
host of other relatives and friends including: The Good Shepherd
Church of God family. The New Dimension Ministries family,
The Church of God East Street Cathedral family, The Avon
Family and The Church of God Temple family. And a host of
other relatives and friends too numerous to mention.

FRIENDS MAY PAY THEIR RESPECTS AT ROCK OF AGES
FUNERAL CHAPEL; WULFF ROAD & PINEDALE ON FRIDAY
FROM 10 A.M. TOS RM. AND ON SATURDAY AT THE CHURCH
FROM 9.4.M. UNTIL SERVICE TIME.











PAGE 14, THURSDAY, MAY 21, 2009











THE TRIBUNE OBITUAR















KRurtiss Memorial Mortuar

Chapel, Ramsey, Exuma - Tel: 345-7020° Robinson Rd & 5th Street
Tel: 325-6621/322-4969 « 24 Hour Paging Service 323-9761

LAST RITES FOR

BRENDA MAE
FERGUSON, 41

of Ramsey, Exuma will be held on Saturday

Auditorium, Ramsey Exuma. Officiating will
be Rey. Or. levin Clarke assisted

Ramsey Exuma.



Bloneva McKenzie (2) Sisters iin law Darlesia Ferguson

Precious & Grace Ching, Angel Taylor, D''Vanya Ma
Kaylee Ferguson (5) ae Winzel & Shawndon Smith, Kai & Kyte F
Kenyon Mackey (12) Aunts Lenora Rahiming, Marjorie, Stephanie &

Clarke, (9)Grand Aunts; Mrythe Knowles,

Bridgette Colebrooke, Nicole & Theodora Rahming, Shanell & Bermitta

McKenzie, Lunsworth & Jean McKenzie, Shawan & Dale Clarke, Wilton Jr &

Christal Mckenzie, Wilkeishna McKenzie, Vanessa & ¥ outhal Saunders, :
Margaret, Tanya, Brenda, Dexta, Barry & Luzanne McKenzie, Marvin, Blanca, ;
& Renaldo Clarke, Lloyd & Gregory Bodie, :
Mildred, Matred, Salina, & Melinda Bodie Jamie, Jason, Pamela, Franklyn, :
Gregory, Jamine & James, Paula, Vianda, Eslyn, Bernadette, Prenell & Godirey :
Ferguson, Kathleen McKenzie, Ethlyn Thurston, Betty & Joann Mckenzie, :
Annie Simmons, Daphne McKenzie, Karan Emmanuel, Martha McKenzie, :
Vermutta, Prisilla & Aldering Rolla, Edith & Leroy Rolle, Janaice Butler, Patiance :
Clarke, Jenny, Sonia, Loralyn & Leoni Rolle, Deniece Williams, Joy Miller, ‘
roara :
uegrove, Shirley McKenzie Verniece Margaret & Lennette McKenzie, Marva,

Brenell, Boldwin, Brian, Fran

oe Brown, Patricia Knowles, Paulette Braynen, Garol McDonald,

Hazel & Cleo Rolle, Virginia Bannister, Livi
Rolle, Rodney, Eric, Phillip, Donnie & Averial Rolle, Kinsey & é MeKenzie,
Kermit, Ivan, Isaac, Lynden, Vivian, Alworth, Fredrick, Garth, Tyrone Alfred,

Alle, Sidney, Ivan, Rudy, George, Rolston, Micheal, Kent, Nehmiah & Darren :
Rolle, Micheal Braynen, Jefferson & Marco McKenzie, Stephen, Kevin, Mario, :
Glenroy, & Micheal Rolle, Lakeisha Clarke, Lynden, Baldwin& Geo Rolle, :
Randolf Knowles, Samantha Forbes a host of other relatives and friends ;
including Rachel & Rupert Ferguson, Lettuce Clarke & family, Rodney & Elaine :
Burrows & family, Geletha Clarke & family, Lizzie-Ann Ferguson & family, :
Sheny Beneby, Joshua Sears & family, Rev. Terry Sears & family, Iris Gharlton :
& family, Olive Morley & family, Willamea Clarke & family, Rev. Adam Brawn :
And Family, Theresa Black and Farmlly, Laura Wright & family, Magnola Adderley :
& family, Margaret Melvin, Sharon Brownd& family, Theresa Munroe & family, :
Hosea Musgrove & family, Eric Taylor & family, James & Jerry Sweeting & |
tte Smith, Phillis Clarke & family, Terry Leia & family, :

family, Minister Bric
Management & Staff of Bahamas Customs, Management &
Aviation Department, M.P Anthony Moss & family,
Johnole & Pamela Gott, Francelna Forbes & family, Myris Deveaux & family,
South Beach Union Baptist church family, Ebenezer

taff of Civil

at 10:00 A.M. at The E. C. Mckenzie :

Rev, Cedric :
Smith, Rev. Adam Brown and Other Ministers. :
of Religion. Interment in The Pubic Cemetery, :

She is survived by her mother Mrs. Alvilda :
Sweating (2) Sons Brandon Pickering & Ashad :
Davis (4) Sisters Laverne Lewis, Winifred Ching, :
Gaynell Taylor & Kendra Ferguson; Stepmather: :
Patricia Ferguson; (1) Adopted sister Rebecca Sweeting (4) Brothers David ;
& Quinton Sweeting, Kendrick & Keno Ferguson (1) Step-Grand Mother Mrs. +
Lashanna Sweeting
(3) Brothers in law Jonathan Lewis, Vernal Ching & Troy Taylor (6) Nieces :
, Keanna Ferguson & ;
son, !
avis ;
McKenzie, Manerva Rolle, Leona Bodie, Patsy Johnson, Rose, Dembris, :
Bathsheba, Tency & Irma Clarke Ferguson (14) Uncles Rev. Wilton & Daniel :
Neate Celioe Cann tua Hediec der boieteoh, Cimerd ae cea : Torea, Marcus, Zebedee, and Garlos Butler, Kiki and Dennis, Monalisa, Able
ine Braynen, Rowena, Viola, : : ;
Naomi & Vera Rolle, Estella McKenzie, Veronica McKenzie & Tency Ferguson | Almoustafer and Geo Bullard, Kania Belle, Thelma Opiah, Letha Nottage,
(4) Grand Uncles Nigel & Nehemiah Rolle, Hansel Braynen & Charles Knowles |
(2) God Chidren Marissa Clarke & Kerbie Brown Jr. Cousins: Marvin McKenzie, |

ston McKenzie, Nigel & Jacob :

ancy Bottomly & staff, :

; nion Baptist Church, ;
Mike Burrows, Benjamin Moss, Irvin Martin, Gloria Lewis & family, Trevor :

Cooper & family the entire communities of Ramsey & Forest Exuma and a
host of other relatives and friends too numaérous to mention.

The body will Repose at Kurtiss Memorial Mortuary, Ramsey Exurna on Friday
from 17:00 .4.M. until 6:00 PM. and atthe church on Saturday from 9200 4.64.
until service time,

TELLIS ALEXANDER
BUTLER, 73

of Golden Gates Il will be held on Saturday
at 3:00 PM. at St. Francis Xavier Cathedral,
West Hill Street. Officiating will be Father Glen
Nixon. Interment in Woodlawn Gardens,
Saldier Road,

He is survived by his Wife: Thelma Butler;
Sons: Tito and Vandyke Butler and Garvin and
Gary Bullard; Daughters: Tameka Burton and
Melanie Butler, Floramae Garey, Gwendolyn
Belle, and Alhoda Bullard: Grand Children: Tito
Butler Jr. (Jacksonville), Samantha, Melissa,

Woman Marine Nyiesha, Det. 2937 Genisko, Gardenia, Gary Jr, Garvin dr,

Bianca Cooper Butterfield, Alexandria Sherman, Terrel Garey, Donald Jr. and
Doral Pratt; Great Grandchildren: Lamoute Butler, D' Andre Balle, Kaelyn ard
Ethan Bullard, Benay Butterfield: Sisters: Sylvia Demeritte Forbes, Kathlene
Demeritte, Dorothy Dames, Majone Johnson, Joan Butler and Rosetta Johnson;
Brother: Charles Butler (California), Daughters-in-law: Humeshia Butler, Cindy
Bullard; Sons-in-law: Rudyyard Burton and Benjamin Belle: Sisters-in-law:
Virginia and Goralee Butler, Maxine Gaiter, Albertha Bullard; Brothers-iin-law:
(Charlie Forbes, Leonard Dames, Maxwell Johnson, Sement Johnson, Colin
Bullard Jr; Aunt: Clara Gibson; Numerous nieces and nephews inchuding:
Patricia Bethel, Albertha Hall, Echendu and ‘Yuka Nwanodi, Azuka Cartwright,
James, Donna, Michael, Insp. Edward Demeritte, Insp. Glenis Demeritte,
Carlis Williams, Kayla Brown, Virgina Thurston, Insp. Franklyn Deameritte,
John, Leonard Jr, Donald, Amos and Randolph Dames, Unajane Butler,
Gaynell Dames Clarke, Gyprianna Dames Saunders, Meto-jo Dames, Crystal
Dames Roach, Valencia Swain, Terry-jo, Deveaux, Charmaine Green, Lyden,
Tanya, Desiree and Sheldon Johnson, Lisa, Lydia and Jennica Johnson,
Antonio Sr. and Cola Jane Butler, Angelo Sr. and Sandra Butler, Valerie Butler
Gibson, Janet and John De Barros, Alecia and David Johnson, Amoranna
and Richmond Mayoock, Aubrianna, Derek, Suzanne and Sherry Butler, ae
2027 Domell Butler, Insp. Julian Butler, Yurick and Una Mara Butler & Family;
Numerous great grand nieces and nephews and a host of relatives and friends
including: Dedra and Kenton Tucker & Family, Wainwright and Vera Gibson
& Family, Zala Gibson & Family, Una Clarke & Family, Harcourt and Rosetta
Gibson & Family, Dr. Walter Gibson & Family, Steven Pinder, Sweeting,
Joseph Jones, Keith Parker, Florence Curtis, Rev. Howard Williamson & the
Rodinson Morris Chapel AME Church Family, Rev. Randolph Patterson & the
Cousin Mephee AME Church Family, Reginald and Adora Hanna & Farnily,
tha Savannah Sound, Eleuthera community, Henry and Viola Sands & Farnily
and Sis. Ida Rahming, the Community of Mason's Additions and Rey. Faith
Maycock, Special thanks to the Dialysis Unit and Staff, Doctors and Nurses
of Male Medical Il.

The body will repose at Kurtiss Memorial Mortuary, Robinson Road and Fifth
Street on Friday from 17:00AM, until 600 PM, and at the church on Saturday
fram 2:00 BM. until service time.





Mm
*O





THE TRIBUNE OBITUARIE













mM
*O





fete PRA eee

a ‘Emerald Ridge, Ho rtnaru

& Monument Comp: any Wt.
Wir.

(i o er Aree
I Cr.) ) :
Ee
“i fell Gs. Dean II, crs te

dear! Manage Penonel [arecior

‘er Serviees Includes

Traditional and Personalion! Foneral Serviors,
Ceemathon, Grief Cousseling, Hurial-nSea,
Worekdwide Shipping, Local and Long Doetance
Reneah, Meweeots, (nine Ghtusres oral
Viadeo hota Tobuteson Char Website and EVDE.

“Hoauarivg These wine Liz,
c a wfoe Tae we eee
Ls i {242} 45, r= 1986
#20 Claridge Road oP 0. ae Bremer Remit cg
Email: emeraldridgémortuary@coralwave.com
etic ake emeraldridgemortuary.com

DEATH NOTICE

For

MR. RICARDO
LORENZO
“Lockie”
LOCKHART SR., 44

of #03 Zora Close, off Sandilands
Village Road Fox Hill played his last
inning and took his last jump short
at the Princess Margaret Hospital,
Nassau N. P. Bahamas on Saturday,
May 16, 2009.

The Radiance of this “Opal of A Gem” will always glow in
the hearts of his: :
Loving Wife: Cleo Christine Lockhart;

Four Sons: Ricardo Jr., Rico, Lanero and Kenrico Lockhart;

Four Daughters: Gail, Rickia and Rickell Lockhart and
Alana Frazer:

Mother: Judith Lorene Knowles;

and Stephen Walkin;

Grand Father: Freshwell Montague John;
Grand Mother: Vera Cole;

Seven Uncles: Lorenzo “Donie” and Ed Lockhart, Ralph :
even Uncles renzo “Donie an cKia ih Sardonyx fumeral service is pending, check website

Gooding, Noel Pinder, Deon Miller, Timothy Cole and Byron :
mith;











"AGE 15



THURSDAY, MAY 21, 2009,

Eleven Aunts: Barbara Chase-Johnson, Patricia and Ruth
Bethel, Donna Campbell, Iva and Susymae Lockhart, Majorie
Burton of Miami, Pat, Patricia, Playdell and Carolyn Cole;

One Grand Aunt: Margariet Roberts;

Numerous: Nephews and Nieces;

Mother-in-law: Miriam Gooding;

Five Brothers-in-law: Marvin and Michael Johnson,
Thomas Berry, Kenny and Shaka Bain;

Four Sisters-in-law: Yolanda Jones, Crystal Johnson,
Rima and Harita Bain;

Many other loving family and friends including:

_ Alvonda Rolle, Police Constable 2642 Duvall Francis, Jamal
a om Jacqueline Johnson, Tamar Horton and Jennifer
: Bethel.

Opal funeral services are pending, check website
| for updates.

SARDONYX
DEATH NOTICE

For

MR. LLOYD JOSEPH
“Dadda, Labbie”
WHYMS, 54

of Parker Street, off Meadow
Street completed this walk of life
at the Princess Margaret Hospital,
Nassau N. P. Bahamas on
Wednesday, May 13, 2009.

The Radiance of this “Sardonyx
of A Gem” will always glow in
e hearts of his:

: Four Sons: Joval, Christopher and Latherio Whymns and
Two Grand Children: Ricana Lockhart and Garron Dean; :

: Two Dau
: Johnson;

: Two Grand Daughters: Shania Duncombe and Shakinah
Four Brothers: Alexander and Don Bain, Bernard Storr :

Sharif Turnquest;
ters: Valarine Whyms and Latheria Whyms-

Rolle;

Three Brothers: Paul and Phillip Whyms and Kendal
Six Sisters: Monique Bain, Terah Walkin, Allison and Tanya :

Hall, Monique Taylor-Simmons and Monique Williams; : Three Sisters: Freda Darrell, Rosemary Miller and Donna

: Prince;

Babbs;

: Numerous: Nephews and Nieces other loving family and

friends.

| sor updates.

Visit our website: www.emeraldridgemortuary.com view video tributes, sign guest book, send condolence, sympathy,
share memories and make funeral arrangements.













PAGE 16, THURSDAY, MAY 21, 2009







THE TRIBUNE OBITUAR

















Vaughn O. Jones
MEMORIAL CENTER

“Honoring the memories of loved ones”

INDEPENDENTLY OWNED & OPERATED

FUNERAL ANNOUNCEMENT

RODGER
/ CHARLES HANNA,
37

/ 10:00 a.m.
| Seventh Day Adventist
Church, Prince Charles

assisted by Elder H. Barr, Elder B. Adderley and |
Elder Griffin. Interment will follow in Woodlawn :
Gardens, Soldier Road.

Precious memories will forever linger in the hearts
of his parents: Reginald & Faydora Hanna; five
brothers: Reginald Jr. of Boca Fla., Charles, Kim,
Justin & Radley; eight sisters: Bernadette
Duncombe, Melvern Hanna-Rolle, Denise Adderley,

& Regina Hanna; uncles: Wellington, Alfred Wilfred,
Charles & Horace Bullard; aunts: Doralyn Bain,

Rebecca Smith, Lydia Bullard, Daisy Bullard, Virgini
English, Doris Bridgewater, Margaret Styles; fifteen
nephews: Lynden, Latario, Charles, Michael,
Rashad, Demarco, Marco, Elvin, Elvis, Devon,

: Myah, Rhodia, Jamie, Angie, Esosa & Idia;
' grandnephew: Jenario; two grandnieces: Malia &
: Deshanique; four brothers-in-law: Dewey Rolle,
| Sgt. 1241 Ronald Adderley, Dr. Erhabor Ighodaro
of Miami, F1.; sister-in-law: Elisa Hanna; adopted

: mother: Norma Rahming; cousins: Tyrone Sears,

| of East Street will be held | Judy Cartwright & family; Jenifer, Bridgette, Paula,

on Sunday May 24, 2009 at : Marvin, Patrice, Kareem, Jamal, Vicky, Rocshell,

at Maranatha : Richads & Family, Pastors Stanley & Jenifer

: Ferguson, Cindy, Kendra, Valentino Gardiner, Ken,
' Dr. Vincent Forbes, Dustin, Timothy, Glen, Arnold,

Drive. Officiating will be Rev. Pastor Wilfred Adderley, | Quetell, Marth, Donna, Penny, Gaylean, Keneyatta,

Ted, Debbie, Garvin, Melony, Latoya, Shawn,

Amanda, Pastor Vincent Major & Family; and a
: host of other relatives and friends including: Pastor
: Wilfred Adderley & Family, Sister Patsy Russell &
: Family, Shawn Watson, Harmonious Praise, Marina
' Hanna & Family, Paula Hanna & Family, Betty Rolle
: & Family, Peardale Church family, Ronald Butterfield,
Elaine Butler & Family, Brend Rose & Family,

: Wellington Gardiner & Family, Denesia Rolle,
Shannan Ighodara of Miami, Cheryl, Dedrie, Keva ;

Vanessa Rolle, Hope Watson, The Neely Family,

: Keisa Lloyd, Tanice Cleare & Family and Lakiesha
: Miller & Family.

Gloria Bullard, Sarah Forbes, Josephine Bastian, :

: Viewing will be held in the "Legacy Suite" of
: Vaughn O. Jones Memorial Center, Wulff Road
: and Primrose Street on Saturday from 9:00 a.m.
' to 5:00 p.m. and at the church on Sunday from

nieces: Charlene, Crystal, Jan, Samantha, Brittany, :

Wulff Road and Primrose =

oO
Telephone: 326-9800)

site Studio of Draperie
« 24 Hour Emergency A34- 9220/380-8077



Mm
*O









RIBUNE OBITUARIES























PAGE



THURSDAY, MAY 21, 2009,

Vaughn O. Jones
MEMORIAL CENTER

“Honoring the memories of loved ones”

INDEPENDENTLY OWNED & OPERATED

FUNERAL NE ee

CARMEN GERTRUDE | 3

: Viewing will be held in the “Legacy Suite” of Vaughn 0.
' Jones Memorial Center, Wulff Road and Primrose Street on
' Friday from 10:00 a.m. to 6:00 p.m. and again on Saturday
of Palm Beach Street will be held !
on Saturday May 23, 2009 at 3:00

Salem Union Baptist |
Officiating :
will be Rev. Charles W. Saunders :
assisted by other Ministers of the :
|. Interment will follow in :!
Woodlawn Gardens, Soldier Road. |

BUTLER, 36

p.m. at
Ghurch, Taylor Street.

Gospel.

Fond memories are left in the hearts of her survivors which
include her sons, Camron and Ramon Ewing, mother, Florence :

Butler, brothers, John, Abram, Lawrence Jr., Dwight, Ricardo,
Jason, Thomas and inspector Derek Butler, sisters, Kenris,

Jennifer, Lorraine, Tanya, Doreen, Sandra, Brenda and Stg. |
1699 Jennifer Butler Gardiner, aunts, Joanna Butler, Agnes ;
Butler, Helen Edgecombe, Susann Cartwright, Hattie Saunders :
and Rhoda Ferguson and Gertrude Knowles, uncle, Bertie :
Knowles, nieces and nephews, Peteann, Dimitri, Annabel, tierra, :
Brandon, Dwight Jr., Danicka, Eunicia, Lauryn, Rickia, Kianna, }
Giovanna, Kayanna, Andrew, Mikele, Krizia, Derivia, Marilyn |
' Jerome, Oral & Kendall Pinder; two sisters: Anita & Deborah
| Pinder; two adopted sisters: Mitizi Barnett & Dianna Russell;
: four aunts: Bernice & Charlotte Kelly & Ettamae Major & Alfreda
Nanyamka, Adebamgbe, Useni, Mutazz, Ridwan, Lashonna, ; White; uncle: Wellington Kelly; nephews: Dexter, Calvin, Meko,
: Kendall Jr, Raymond, Nadier & Mannie Pinder; nieces: Valencia

Moss, Melinda Turner, Dorian, Dustin, Felicia, Lakeisha, Latoya,
Latia, Daneka, Danvit Jr, Dario, Deangelo, Tarnarco, Charles,
Orlando, Shantel, Baswell, Jamaal, Kisstonya, Dwanique,

Avera, Runako, Gaynell, Dakito, Ricardo, Pete and Darron,

grandnieces and nephews, Orlando Jr, Whitney, Tyler and
: Dale Pinder; Godfather: Rev. Felix Miller; and a host of other

Olivia Strachan, Paige Lightbourne and Miquel Turner, in-laws,

Ketlie, Yvette, Patrice, Marsha, Wilamae and Merilyn, and a I
host of other relatives and friends including Rev. Lernis & | Josey Harding & Family, Wilfred Kelly, Beryl Huyler & Family,
Rovina Cornish & family, Viola Johnson of Dundas Town, Abaco, :
Basil Darling, Mrs. Danina Black & family, Nanna, Erica, Cara, | , a0) c
: Smith, Mrs. Millicant Carroll-Ferguson & Family, Angie & Family

Celeste, Debbie and Andy, Jackie Hanna, Tonya Mcintosh,

Sandra Rolle, Hudith Sweeting, GHS Class of 1989, Mrs. |
Daphne Demeritte & family, Philip Ewing & family, Gifford :
Deveaux, Patrick, Vernell, Shenique, Rasheda, friends of
Margaret Avenue, Millars Heights, Buther, Knowles, Miller and :

Saunders families and other relatives and friends too numerous pall
: from 10:00 a.m. to service time.

to mention.

from 3:00 a.m. to 1:00 p.m. and at the church on Saturday
from 2:00 p.m. to service time.

HESKIT DELFIN
PINDER, 44

of Whites Addition, Kemp Road will
be held on Saturday, May 23, 2009
at 11:00 a.m. at Church of God
Auditorium, Fowler Street. Officiating
will be Bishop Godfrey Clarke,
assisted by Rev. Felix Miller.
Interment will follow in Woodlawn
Gardens, Soldier Road.

Precious memories will forever linger

in the hearts of his mother: Norma Pinder; father: Samuel
Pinder; daughter: Deltera Pinder; four brothers: Cornelius,

Thompson, Donishka & Asjah Pinder; sisters-in-law: Phillipa &
relatives and friends including: Teresita Strachan & Family,

Lynette White, Dorothy Rolle, Barbara Adderley & Family,
Dorothy Johnson & Family, Francita Brice & Family, Beradetta

and others too numerous to mention.
Viewing will be held in the "Legacy Sufte" of Vaughn O. Jones

Memorial Center, Wulff Road and Primrose Street on Friday
from 10:00 a.m. to 6:00 p.m. and at the church on Saturday

— Road and Primrose Street,

Telephone: 326- 9800! Pe

site Studio of Draperies
24 Hour Emergency 434-9220/380-8077

1/

















"AGE 18, THURSDAY, MAY 21 2009

Sinclair me LFe.
Previgien! | Tanaqgiag

een Matin oe err |

wie F
a — — i) tae hay sty Series

arent SA ea THE WN

VERON ALONZO
ROLLE, 27

a reisdent of Flamingo

Gardens, Nassau and

formerly of Bimini will be held

on Saturday, 23rd May, 2009

at 1:00 p.m. at The United

Church of God Bailey Town,

# Bimini; Officiating will be

Bishop Benjamin Rolle;

assisted by: Rev. Edmund

Ellis and Other Ministers and

interment will follow in Public Cemetery. Services

entrusted to Gateway Memorial Funeral Chapel, Mount
Royal Avenue and Kenwood Street.

Left to cherish his fond memories are his mother: Veronica
Rolle; father Christopher Rolle; stepmother: Sharon Rolle:
sisters: Cleo Pyfrom, Lashanti Finlayson, Lynsey Bain,
Marvette Rolle, Kerisca Kemp, Ramona and Shaquiel
Stuart; brothers: Vermon Rolle, Daleon Brown, Devon
Rose, Billy Stuart Jr, and Javon Kemp; grandfather:
Angelo Rolle; aunts: Mitirell Ellis of Freeport, Helen
Bowleg, Merlene Saunders, Evelyn Sawyer, Sherry
Roberts, Inderia Russell, Zellia Smith, Wendy and Arnette
Kelly, Patricia, Isabella, Deborah, Francis, Geneva, Crystal,
Sheena and Joycelyn Rolle, Linda Russell of Freeport,
Sandra Hinsey, Shatara Stuart, Lillian Weech and Esther
Edgecombe; uncles: Tellis Russell of Freeport, Rev. Oriel,
Ohilip, Arlington, Lawrence, Bishop Benjamin, Alvin, Rev.
Ephraim, Elvis and Hank Rolle, Darrald, Rodney and
Charles Kelly, Kenneth Stuart, Cassius Hinzey and Canute
Weech, Christopher Saunders, Erlin Sawyer, Alfred
Russell and Danny Smith; nieces: Cleshae, Shanique,
Lavincia, Lindeisha, Shantae, Audra, Mariah, Desirae,
Jada, Daleona, Dashawnaw, Aleisha, Javonia and
Jasmine; nephews: Elrico, Kivirrie, Kimani Jr, Lynardo,
Vernon Jr, Daleon Jr, Kari and Javon Jr; Grand Aunts:
Victoria Wilkinson, Ada Williams, Berdie Edgecombe,
Verna Cooper and Enith Dames; Grand Uncles: Benjamin
Grant and Ralph Hanna; God Parents: Ali, Robbie,
Benjamin, Vinola, Elenor, and Magg; Sir Michael and
Lady Checkley, Anne Moxey and a host of other relatives
and friends.

Friends may pay their last respects at the Church in
Bimini on Friday, May 22nd, 2009 from 3:00 p.m. until
service time on Saturday.





THE TRIBUNE OBITUARIES

DEATH
ANNOUNCEMENT

















Hugh Marshall
of New York and fromerly of Nassau
Sunrise February 20, 1924
Sunset May 17, 2009

Left to mourn are his wife Dianna
Daughters; Vera, Joe Ann, Jessica,
Sons Johnathan and Eric. Brothers
Herbert Marshall of Nassau, sisters.
Erid Ferguson of North Carolina,
Nazel Young of Miami Florida,
Hortense Harris-Smith, Hesher
Johnson and Francis Ledee of Nassau
Bahamas, numerous family and
friends including Sybil Fernander,
George, Jehugh and Patrick Edwards,
George Robinson, Reggie Woods and
many others to numerous to mention
May His Soul Rest In Peace

Memorial service will be held on
June 6th, 2009 Date and Time TBA



The Tribune RELIGION Thursday, May 21, 2009 ® PG 19

Sufficient Grace
International Ministries

presents
A Kingdom Connection
Connected With A Kingdom Purpose

Apostle Julian Johnson
Conference Host

Four nights of Wisdom, Revelation and
Prophetic Impartation
Tuesday, 26th May, 2009 through
Friday 29th May, 2009
7:30pm Nightly

Hear anointed speakers as they declare the
Oracles of God

i»

Apostle Kelson Miller Pastor Pedro Cartwright
Born Again Deliverance United Breakthrough Outreach
Christian Fellowship Centre Ministries International
Tuesday, 26th May, 2009 Wednesday, 27th May, 2009

Apostle C. Clifford Smith Prophetess Rochelle Sands
Southside Christian Ministries Friday, 29th May, 2009
International
Thursday, 26th May, 2009

Join us at:

The Sufficient Grace
International Ministries Sanctuary
on Nassau Street
(above Paul’s Air-conditioning

Special music by:
The Grace Tabernaclers

Come With An Attitude of Expectation





PG 20 ® Thursday, May 21, 2009

Do
u

O
fea

Od?

| SUNDAY: Worship - 9:30 am & 11 :00 am
| SERMON: ‘How do I show My Love For God?”
TUESDAY: Bible Study 7:30 pm
At The Manse #37 Harmony Hill - Blair
MINISTER: Rev. John Macleod
Email: manse1@live.com
Phone: 322-5475
Bringing All People Closer to God
Through Worship, Ministry & Service



RELIGION

@ By ALEX MISSICK
Tribune Features Reporter
amissick@tribunemedia.net

The Tribune

HEN it comes to being human, fear is a

common emotion that we can not control.

There is fear of commitment, fear of failure,
fear of rejection, fear of death- all of these spark
raised heart rates and sometimes health problems.
However, what about the spiritual realm? What about

the fear of almighty God?

According to Biblegateway.com,
Psalms 34: 7-11 states: “The
angel of the Lord encamps
around those who fear him, and
he delivers them. Taste and see
that the Lord is good; blessed is
the man who takes refuge in
him. Fear the Lord, you his
saints, for those who fear him
lack nothing. The lions may grow
weak and hungry, but those who
seek the Lord lack no good
thing. Come, my children, listen
to me; I will teach you the fear
of the Lord.”

Sometimes when people talk
about fearing God, they think
about just a deep respect or
being scared, but that is not what
the fear of the Lord is about.
Fear can mean a number of
things but when it comes to God,
He does not want us to be afraid
of Him and afraid of what He is
going to do to us.

Senior Pastor of Golden Gates
World Outreach Ministries
International, Bishop Ros Davis,
said this passage of scripture is a
cry to the righteous.

“The righteous are people that
listen to the Lord. Once you lis-
ten to the Lord, He shares with
you things about Him, in fact
this is what the Holy Spirit does.
It shares the things of Christ with
the saints. When the saints hear
the Holy Spirit and obey the
Holy Spirit this is what glorifies
God. When God is glorified He
then releases for you all that is
needed in your life,” Bishop
Davis said.

Bishop Davis explained that
the word “fear” really means to
“reverence” the Lord because
reverence is deeper than respect.
To reverence the Lord is to be in
awe of Him and this begins on
the inside.

“So when it says ‘to fear the
Lord,’ it means to enter into a
relationship with him. So when
we fear the Lord, we are saying
He is the Lord of the universe so
I must honor Him, fear Him, and
reverence Him. For example, if
you are in the presence of the
prime minister, whether you are
a PLP or FNM, there is an awe
about a leader and a sensible
person will respect that. Any
leader, God gives them this aura
and it is expected of his subjects
to honor him,” Bishop Davis
said.

Once you respect the awe that
comes with the Lord, Bishop
Davis said there is no want in
that person’s life.

“To fear the Lord is really to
submit to him and he in turn
fixes you up. When you rever-
ence God you begin to move out
of your flesh and your way of
thinking. When you reverence
Him the first thing you do is try
to learn his ways and learn about
him. It is being submissive to the
spirit so that the spirit can share
with you and talk with you,”
Bishop Davis said.

“Ultimately when you fear
God, He is going to bless you.
When people fear God they will
reach the place where they do
not lack any good thing. That
means if it is a good thing, they
will have it. God wants you to
have good things, but the only
way to qualify for those things is
to fear Him. If you are reverenc-
ing Him and are in awe of him,
you are going to recognise that
not only is He God, but that He
is always watching you because
you are his child.

“God is not just good for the
religious folks, but he is good for
everybody once you fear him.”



To tear the Lord is really to submit to
him and he in turn fixes you up. When
you reverence God you begin to move out
of your flesh and your way of thinking.



The Tribune

RELIGION

Thursday, May 21, 2009 ® PG 21

Cee
More about mothers

WE HAVE the opportunity to cel-
ebrate the momentous occasion of
the Virgin Mary’s encounter with the
angel throughout the month of May.
It leads us to celebrate all that moth-
erhood means in God’s eternal plan
even as it forces us to applaud the
God-inspired contributions of all
women in every facet of society who
respond to God’s call to obedient
service.

The Proverbs 31 woman is a wife
and mother but she also represents in
her several economic enterprises all
women who are gainfully employed
outside of the home. She highlights
the juggling that exists then and now
between the various demands made
on her to be a delightful home-maker,
dedicated child nurturer, disciplined
professional and devoted spouse.

Y. -Â¥

© REV. ANGELA
+. PALACIOUS

Other women in the Bible remind
us of the fine qualities that the aver-
age mother can bring to her approach
to parenting. May we all be: as clever
as Moses’ mother to hide her child
and save him; as persistent as the
Syrophoenician woman who is
engaged by our Lord in a lively
exchange that displays her faith
before her child is miraculously
healed many miles away; as inten-
tional in our desire to have our chil-
dren blessed by the Lord; and as pas-

sionate aS Hannah about faithfully
dedicating all of our children to be
servants of the Most High God. Let
us never be guilty of dissuading our
children from the call to ordination
because we want them to choose
something more lucrative.

Our deceased mothers and grand-
mothers who made us walk the
straight and narrow path are to be
commended, especially as we see
today what the absence of such vigi-
lance can produce. For those persons
whose mothers are still alive, you will
more than likely only realise what
your mother really means to you
after her ashes are placed in the urn
or her body slowly slips out of sight in
the grave.

In the meantime, try to do whatev-
er you can to make her feel blessed

‘Refreshed’ Richa resurfaces with new album

SHE'S been called everything from
the beauty queen who made it big to
the orphan who found her happy end-
ing that once included a real live
African king. She's been an actress, a
singer, a songwriter with a platinum
record and even a pageant director.
Yet, her happily ever after once
seemed like a happily never after at a
point when she once contemplated sui-
cide, dealt with depression and failed
relationships. Now, Richa Sands is
back, rejuvenated and refreshed with a
brand new album and brand new out-
look on life.

Refreshed, the third album released
under her company Bently
Productions is aptly titled with a thor-
oughly refreshing sound of a cool, con-
fident woman who puts the life she
once wanted to end firmly in the hands
of her Creator.

The album serves as the perfect
demo for any artist who aspires to
crossover. No two songs seem to fit the
same genre yet, it proves Richa is
indeed a force to be reckoned with
when it comes to versatility. Taking
time from her travels with living gospel
legend Ron Kenoly, Richa spoke can-
didly and openly about Refreshed
which took three years to complete.

“I chose the name for the album
because I took time away from front-
line music ministry because I needed to
be rejuvenated and refreshed...and
that I am.,” she said. “Also given the
season that we are presently living in, I
believe that everyday we need to be
renewed and refreshed. The mood of

this project also lends to that feeling.”

The former Miss Bahamas also
admits that her daughter Maleah
serves as a muse in bringing the project
to fruition, the first completed since
become a mom.

“How can children not serve as
inspiration?” she said. “They teach us
the meaning of ‘becoming like little
children, so as to make it into the
Kingdom of Heaven.’ My daughter
definitely serves as a major source of
inspiration. She fills my heart with joy
and laughter and came to me at a time
when my heart was broken and I am
grateful to God for sending her to me.”

Richa added that she inspired to
bring several elements to the album
and achieved her goal in an award-
worthy way. She starts off the album
with a jazzy style for Bless The Lord
before pouring out her Bahamian
roots with Revival In My Soul, a true
example of how the cultural expression
of Junknaoo rushin' was birthed from
the church. The album also reconnects
Richa with her Jamaican heritage in a
dancehall techno mix of Send Down
The Rain featuring Dangerous while
her elegant vocals lend a sense of class
to reggae with Marching To Zion.
Perhaps one of the more interesting
twists on her record is Take My Life, a
traditional funeral hymn that stands
out as an R&B love song to God.

Richa is also sure to lure in a new
fans as she ventures into the crunk/hip
hop genre with Clap Your Hands and
the pop jam Get Straight featuring
award-winning artists Monty G and Mr



Lynx.

way.”

available in The Bahamas at 100%

her through
MySpace.com.

“T would have to say that the single I :
released from the album T'is So Sweet i
To Trust In Jesus is the song that is most }
personal to me,” Richa noted of the i
project. “This is the great lesson we i
sometimes have such difficulty with - i
simply to trust God and allow Him to }
have His way in our lives. It's so much
more rewarding and beautiful that i

by God to have had you as her child.
Thank God for a praying, caring, lov-
ing, generous, Godly, and thoughtful
mother. Forgive her mistakes, and
ask God to heal you if the wounds go
really deep.

Show your appreciation every day
for all that women do in your life
does to make your life easier, better,
and brighter. Notice her efforts to
please, support her desire to grow
and succeed, and pray for her spirit to
be set free.

The more grateful a woman is for
life and energized she is by her activ-
ities, the more joy she brings to her
home and peace she leaves in each
room. When a woman’s heart is
turned to the Lord, and God’s love
overflows in her life, she is such a
blessing to behold.

RELIGIONBRIEFS

: Pope names Joseph Cistone
hew bishop of Saginaw

| MLSAGINAW, Mich.

JOSEPH R. Cistone was named

i Wednesday as leader of the Diocese of
? Saginaw and its about 119,000 Roman
i Catholic worshippers, according to the
i Associated Pres.

Cistone will be installed as bishop

: July 28. He will be the sixth bishop of
i the diocese, which was created in 1938
i and spans an 11-county region centered
i on Saginaw, about 80 miles north-
? northwest of Detroit.

"T fully trust in the providence of

i God, and I know it is the hand of God
? which has placed me in your midst to
i: lead and serve," Cistone told reporters
i at a Wednesday morning news confer-

Tenet

? get to know you."

ence in Saginaw. "I look forward to
being here with you and am anxious to

Pope Benedict XVI announced the
appointment.

Cistone, 60, is a native of
Philadelphia and attended St. Charles
Borromeo Seminary in Overbrook,
Penn. He was ordained as a priest in
1975 and in 1998 was named an hon-
orary prelate to Pope John Paul II. He
was consecrated a bishop in 2004, the
same year he became an auxiliary bish-

? op in Philadelphia.
Richa's new album Refreshed is }

"IT commit myself to you, the faithful

; of the Diocese of Saginaw, to shepherd
Bible Bookstore and Jukebox. Her :
album is also available by contacting }
Facebook or i
i archbishop of St. Louis.

you in faith and love," Cistone said.
Cistone succeeds Robert J. Carlson,
who last month was named the new



PG 22 ®@ Thursday, May 21, 2009

RELIGION

The Tribune

Under grace and not law - What does it mean?

m@ By LEONARD A. JOHNSON



I AM always amused when I hear
the remark, “We are no longer under
law but under grace,” implying that the
law does not serve any function or very
little. Conveniently, the expression is
used to support the argument that the
Seventh-day Sabbath is no longer
binding upon Christians. Additionally,
it is argued that the Old Testament is
irrelevant and that we should follow
and adhere to the New Testament.
However I ask, “Is that really so?” “Is
the law still relevant?” “To be a
Christian, does it mean that we shun
the Old Testament?” “Is there any
connection to the spirit of lawlessness
pervading our society?”

Taking a Look at the Sermon on
the Mount

In the Sermon on the Mount, Jesus
clearly stated in Matthew 3:17, "Do not
think that I came to destroy the Law or
the Prophets. I did not come to destroy
but to fulfill” (NKJV). The context, con-
sistent with the Greek translation, refers
to the first five books of Moses and not
just God's law referenced by Jesus in
verse 19. Jesus taught by referring to the
writings of Moses and the prophets that
essentially the Old Testament is relevant
and no less inspired, and that it was not
His agenda to destroy it. Instead He
came “to fulfill” which means to make
full; to explain; or to magnify as will be
seen from verse 21. In other words,
Jesus came to release His law, giving it
its full meaning and application.

Fulfilling the Law
Giving six examples between verses
21 and 48, Jesus clarified the relevance
of the law and its application. For the
purpose of this article, I refer to three of
them.

The first one, which is recorded in
Matthew 5:21-26, speaks to murder.
Referring to the prevailing thought of
the day, Jesus said: “You have heard
that it was said to those of old, 'You shall
not murder, and whoever murders will
be in danger of the judgment.'”
However, Jesus declared or explained:
“But I say to you that whoever is angry
with his brother without a cause shall be
in danger of the judgment. And whoev-
er says to his brother, 'Raca!' shall be in
danger of the council” (Matthew 5:21-
22, NKJV).

Jesus fulfilled this law by giving its full
meaning, explaining that murder begins
in the heart. The word “anger” which
comes from the Greek word “Orge”
refers to anger that is long-lived and that
which a person “nurses, cherishes and
refuses to let die”, resulting in or seeking
revenge. Isn't it interesting that the
other Greek word for anger, “Thumos”,
implying “a momentary anger that flares
up and dies” is not used? Yet the
Pharisees and Scribes felt that it was fine
to harbour hatred as long as no murder
was committed externally.

Do we not see a connection with vio-
lent crime and a spirit of hatred, anger
and revenge? It would seem that per-
sons would rather vent their anger in
pushing a knife into someone's chest or
pulling a trigger. Conflict resolution
seems foreign to many in our society.

Secondly, Jesus addresses adultery in
Matthew 5:27-30 stating: “You have
heard that it was said to those of old,
"You shall not commit adultery.’ But I
say to you that whoever looks at a
woman to lust for her has already com-
mitted adultery with her in his heart."
(Matthew 5:27-28, NKJV). Again, Jesus
in regard to His law taught that adultery
begins in the heart. For the Pharisees
and Scribes, adultery was committed
when the actual act was carried out, but
not so with Jesus. It starts in the heart.
The Old Testament writer, Job under-
stood this as seen in Job 31:1: “I have
made a covenant with my eyes; Why
then should I look upon a young
woman?"

In our society today one does not
have to imagine much given the exposed
manner in which some dress --both men
and women. It is inviting and tempting
to fall victim to lust if we fail to make a
covenant with our eyes and control our
passion.

Thirdly, Jesus in Matthew 5:43-48
gave attention to love for one's enemy.
Pharisees and Scribes misquoted
Leviticus 19:18 to say that it was alright
to love one's neighbors and hate one's
enemies. However, Jesus fulfilled the
law on love by pointing out: "But I say
to you, love your enemies, bless those
who curse you, do good to those who
hate you, and pray for those who spite-
fully use you and persecute you,"
(Matthew 5:44, NKJV). In Christ's day
this teaching was foreign, and today it is
certainly not popular.

Reasoning from the above three
examples, the meaning of “fulfilled” is

clear. Jesus, instead of abolishing His
law, gave it the prominence it deserved.
So shouldn't we His followers do like-
wise? ‘To do so does not make us legal-
istic as we ought to know :“By grace we
are saved.” However as noted in
Romans 3:31 grace does not mean that
we disregard God's instead we “uphold
the law.”

Summing it Up

Given the aforementioned, I submit
that if we took seriously the teaching of
Jesus it could serve to reduce hatred,
anger, murder, dishonesty and marital
infidelity etc. I would think that those
who loosely use the expression, “We
are no longer under law but under
grace” may wish to reconsider the
expression. It can suggest irresponsibil-
ity and lawlessness. While Christians
are under grace they show a healthy
relationship to God's will, always
remembering the purpose of the law
which is to point out sin and hopefully
lead to Christ. No wonder Christ said,
“Do not think that I came to destroy
the Law or the Prophets. I did not come
to destroy but to fulfill." More than
anyone Christ gave the law its rightful
place.

Thought to Ponder:
“Our attitude to the law of God is an
index of our attitude to God Himself.”

- SINCLAIR FERGUSON

e Leonard A. Johnson, D Min
President, Bahamas Conference of
Seventh-day Adventisis

Gonna get you good

AS TIME goes by you would think
one forgives and forgets what you may
have said or done to them. Well, some
do and there are others who eventual-
ly will, however, they're not quite
ready yet. They want revenge. They
want to inflict the worst pain on you
that they possibly can, to make you
hurt if but just for a moment or two,
the way in which they did. If after
someone, spills a drink on you, cuts in
front of you on a line, steps on your
toes, or does any of the other limitless
amounts of things against you; your
heart races, your teeth clench, your
mouth dries, your fingers ache, your
head lightens and your body trembles,
you may be experiencing symptoms of
revengeitis. Okay there's no such
thing, you already

know that. Nevertheless the feelings
are very real, and if you act on them

TONI
STYLES



you may get yourself in more trouble
than you bargained for.

Luckily most persons express their
desire for revenge, and some go into
great detail talking to anyone who
would listen. It is during these times
that it is very important for us, the lis-
teners, to act as a mediator to prevent
the possibility that their plan may
come to pass. All around our world we
hear stories of persons seeking
revenge; anything from the tyrannised
student at school, the recently dis-
missed worker, or the cheated spouse;

revenge seems to be the only avenue
where one can find complete satisfac-
tion. Well...maybe for a short period of
time. That is, before the feelings of
remorse or simply embarrassment take
them over, feelings that a person hope-
lessly tries to push aside in a final
attempt to thrust themselves into a
subhuman, emotionless suit of their
own making.

I remember as a child my parents
and other persons saying in respect to
my wanting revenge for some trivial
fault done to me, ‘Don't stoop to their
level’. Well as a kid, I didn't only want
to stoop to their level, I wanted to take
their whole level over and any other
level they may have been on. Now, as a
young adult, I can fully appreciate that
wise instruction, knowing that if a per-
son always places pride in front of rea-
son, the results can be tragic. = Not to

sound cliche’ but it does indeed take
two to tango.

In closing may you then implement,
or simply consider, the idea of turning
the other cheek, thus, allowing for
peace.

"You have heard it was said, ‘Love
your neighbour and hate your enemy.’
But I tell you: Love your enemies and
pray for those who persecute you, that
you may be sons of your Father in
heaven. He causes his sun to rise on the
evil and the good, and sends rain on
the righteous and the unrighteous. If
you love those who love you, what
reward will you get? Are not even the
tax collectors doing that? And if you
greet only your brothers, what are you
doing more than others? Do not even
pagans do that? Be perfect, therefore,
as your heavenly Father is perfect."

¢ Toni Elizabeth Styles is a Bahamian
writer and poet, currently residing in
Nassau, Bahamas.

Comments related to the article can be
sent to fearless247@gmail.com.



The Tribune

@r THE HISTORY OF RELIGION IN THE BAHAMAS

Thursday, May 21, 2009 ® PG 23

RELIGION



Roman Catholics established in Harbour Island

HARBOUR Island schoolteacher,
Marion Johnson, baptised a Methodist
but a catechist and sacristan in the
Anglican Church, after reading Roman
Catholic literature, decided she would
like to be baptised again as a Roman
Catholic. She took the mail boat to
Nassau to talk to Father Chrysostum
OSB, who told her, “If you want to be
baptised you have to live a Catholic
life.” At first he refused as Harbour
Island had no Catholic priest but she
persisted and the next day he baptised
her.

There was a long standing prejudice
against the Roman Catholic Church in
the Bahamas and Father Chrysostum
felt that it would never be removed
unless a Roman Catholic mission was
established in Harbour Island, the for-
mer home of many leading Bahamians.
In 1920, Father Bonaventure Hansen
OSB, after spending 15 years in North
Dakota, arrived in the Bahamas. After
a short time in Nassau, Father
Chrysostum asked him the favour of
opening a mission in Harbour Island,
“to break the backbone of
Protestantism in the islands.’ Father
Bonaventure held the first mass on
Harbour Island, in the home of Marion
Johnson and her friend Hattie
Thompson, on February 7 1921, later to
become the Little Boarding House.

A headline in the Nassau Daily
Tribune of July 8,1943 read: Brilander
in Canadian Army Chaplain Service :
“Reverend Carl Albury has been
assigned to the Pacific Command,
Combined Operations School. His tal-
ented younger sister Carrie Albury is
now 3rd in Command of the Sisters of
Service and her advancement is
remarkable.”

Table 1: Religious Affiliation in the Census of 1943 and 1953 in the N. W. Bahamas.

| | “Harbour Isl._| Spanish Wells | Abaco & Cays | Eleuthera | New Prov. _|
Anglican | 244 | 223 | 19 | 3 | 541 | 569 | 1765 | 1585 | 7846 | 13145 |
| Roman Catholic | 177 | 330 | 1 | 8 | 5 | 52 | 232 | 349 | 4881 | 9770 |
| Baptist S| 37_ «| 15 | 0 Tt 1017: | 1244 | 946 | 828 | 8359 | 12185 |
| ChurchofGod [| NA | 118 | NA | 0 | NA | 296 | NA | 274 | NA | 2129 |
[Others | 85 «| 25 | 287 | 9 | 921 | 210 | 725 | 564 | 3246 | 2158 |


















None

; IM
> LAWLOR

The conversion of the whole Albury
family had been Father Bonaventure’s
second success. The vocation of Carrie
and Carl and the faith of Marion and
Hattie were said to be the two corner-
stones of the new Catholic Church on
Harbour Island, which very quickly
built up a following and within 5 years
had 200 conversions.

In November 1921, Father
Chrysostom purchased four pieces of
property for a church, rectory, convent
and a school and a century old, battered
shell of a house as a home for the Sisters
of Charity. The Sisters, Mary Giovanni,

Too many opinions

THE word of God exhorts us that
when a brother is overtaken in a fault
those who are spiritual (persons with
the spirit of God in them) should
restore, lift or brace up such a one.

Someone called me the other day
saying, "Randy Frazier going to jail this
time." My answer was and still is we
need to pray for the bishop. In my short
time of adulthood I have learned that
people in our Bahamian society take
joy in pulling and tearing each other
down. There even seems to be an
extreme love for it when it is a leader of
any kind. I have witness the maligning
of parliamentarians, preachers, pastors,
managers, directors ect., you name it
I've seen it. I want it to be publicly
known that I will not be apart of that.

r



ALLISON
| MILLER

Now for you who may think that I am
agreement with the negative things that
go on in this country I'm not. We only
comprehend situations when it hits
close to home or happens at home. I'll
share with you how I emphasis with
others in their various situations. All I
do is put myself in their shoes and the
same understanding and mercy that I
would want in whatever situation I am

| NotStated {| 21 | 4 | it [| it | 224 | 39 | 302 | 37 | 1584 | 665 |
fe Mae Os in) 220s 39 AS
| Total | 769 ~| 840 | 665 | 636 | 3461 | 3407 | 6430 | 6070 | 29391 | 46125 |

Maria Agatha Sissler, Catherine Maria
Snee, Mary Regina Lynch and Maria
Rose O’Neill, arrived in Harbour Island
in late January 1922 and met bigotry
and prejudice against them.

But gradually, “the locals accepted
these smiling tenderhearted women as
they won over the people by their char-
ity and long suffering patience.” Life
was very primitive at the St Vincent’s
Convent where rainwater had to be col-
lected in large tubs and heated on a
kerosene stove and their only chairs had
to be carried from chapel to the refecto-
ry and to their bedrooms at night. On
February 2, 1922, the new combined
chapel and schoolhouse on Harbour
Island was dedicated and Father
Bonaventure assumed charge. Three
months later the first 4 converts to the
Catholic faith were baptised on
Harbour Island As predicted, the
Harbour Island mission was an impor-

able to give. Yes a lot of it makes you
angry, however, we cannot continue to
answer with anger. That only leads to
more problems.

I don't know if we perceive the fact
that if he is guilty all Bishop Randy
Frazier has to do is repent and God
WILL forgive him. It is God and God
alone who has the power of heaven and
hell. We don't have that power, why do
we act as if we do? All of us have made
bad decisions or would do something
different in our lives that we had to pay
for dearly. I have not forgotten the
scripture that says: "Touch not the
Lord's anointed and do His prophets
no harm." In all honesty do you think
that anyone of us can deal with Randy
Frazier better than God can? Are His
dealings not good enough for us?

A young man took the life of my co-
worker and friend Ericka Fowler. I was
so hurt and upset that I hoped that he
got lost in jail for the rest of his natural
life. I prayed to God that if I had never

| 40 | 259 | 307_|

tant step, and as Table 1 shows, by 1953,
Roman Catholicism was the most popu-
lar religious denomination on that
island.

Roman Catholic Education in
Harbour Island

Before the Sisters of Charity arrived,
Marion Johnson had gathered together
16 students, all non-Catholics, for the
new St Vincent’s Academy. The stu-
dents had the additional duty in the
afternoon of pushing the desks and
chairs to the walls to convert the room
to a church and in the morning re-
arranging the furniture to start school.
Within two years, the Sisters of Charity
opened St Benedict’s School and oper-
ated them both for many years as free
schools until in 1953, St Vincent’s
Academy was discontinued and the 26
students were added to the 136 stu-
dents attending St Benedict’s School.

had to see him again in life it would be
to soon. One day on my way to mid-day
prayer, guess who I saw? That same
young man. Immediately I became
uneasy and conflicted within myself
and needless to say could not find
prayer anywhere in my mind.

Later that day I had told a dear
friend of mine what had happen and
what I was thinking and feeling. She
said to me: "Allison you cannot afford
for that man to cause you to go to hell.
If God was to come now and find you in
the position you in that's you. What will
you say, I in hell because of what some-
one else did. That is unexceptable, you
Know all he has to do is ask God to for-
give him and that’s it. You busy being
mad in hell and he in heaven."

We can't afford others’ actions to
make us end up where we asked God to
redeem us from in the first place. No
matter what, we as a people have to
forgive if we are going to make it into
heaven.



PG 24 ® Thursday, May 21, 2009








ms
-
: — P a



-
ra

THE ladies of the Church
of God of Prophecy recently
held their first annual Pre
Mother's Day Tea Party and
Fashion Extravaganza at The
Botanical Gardens, West Bay
Street.

The event was organised by
assistant director, Patrice
Bain who encouraged a cross
section of women ranging
from the young to the very
mature from the East Street
Tabernacle, Elizabeth Estates
and the Englerston Churches
to display their talent by par-
ticipating in the ‘best set'
table competition using the
theme “Four Seasons.”

The team of judges for the
event included Mary Moss,

eg

i: a i "A
dae Oe ea a
DAY TEA PARTY

RELIGION




'

"oe

ee
pa

ae, |






Vylma Thompson-Curling,
Cheryl Bain, Enamae Cox,
Chynella Ferguson, Katherine
Beneby, Cherise Nottage and
Paulette Beneby.

The Englerston Church
received the first prize for the
‘best set' table, the Elizabeth
Estates Church placed second
and third place was awarded
to Karen Pratt one of the
table leaders from the East
Street Church. The attendees
were entertained by Simone
Beneby; received information
on the origin of tea parties as
well as native bush teas and
enjoyed a fashion show.

Pictured are scenes from
the day.

(Submitted by DONNA DELANCY)

The Tribune



























Full Text
xml version 1.0 encoding UTF-8
REPORT xmlns http:www.fcla.edudlsmddaitss xmlns:xsi http:www.w3.org2001XMLSchema-instance xsi:schemaLocation http:www.fcla.edudlsmddaitssdaitssReport.xsd
INGEST IEID EXGRRBD5I_YJVK8F INGEST_TIME 2011-08-02T19:25:48Z PACKAGE UF00084249_01318
AGREEMENT_INFO ACCOUNT UF PROJECT UFDC
FILES



PAGE 1

n By TANEKA THOMPSON Tribune Staff Reporter tthompson@tribunemedia.net WITH the possibility of oil drilling in the country's waters "at least a decade away" the companies seeking approvals for this venture face many hurdles before the move becomes reality. The applications for the oil drilling are pending subject to the country's boundary discussions between Cuba at the United Nations level and any drilling in the seabed would be subject to an environmental impact analysis (EIA "We have three territories that we have to determine the territoMore EMR school molestation claims N N A A S S S S A A U U A A N N D D B B A A H H A A M M A A I I S S L L A A N N D D S S L L E E A A D D I I N N G G N N E E W W S S P P A A P P E E R R C M Y K C M Y K V olume: 105 No.148THURSDAY, MAY 21, 2009 PRICE – 75 (Abaco and Grand Bahama $1.25 WEATHER CLOUDY, T-STORM HIGH 84F LOW 74F n By DENISE MAYCOCK Tribune Freeport Reporter dmaycock@tribunemedia.net FREEPORT A third teacher a t the Eight Mile Rock School has been taken in for question ing in connection with child molestation claims, a senior police official confirmed. Although Edward Buchanan was removed from the school in February, he was required to signin every morning at the Ministry of Education. Police officials caught up with the teacher just as he had left the Ministry of Education offices in the International Building. Mr Buchanan was escorted to an unmarked police vehicle and taken to Police Headquarters. The Tribune contacted Asst Supt Emrick Seymour, who con firmed that the teacher is being questioned by police. The sexual scandals at the Eight Mile Rock High School first broke in January when Trinida dian teacher Andre Birbal was accused of molesting two former male students. Birbal, 46, was removed from the school and transferred to New Providence, where he was placed on probationary leave pending the outcome of an investigation The Tribune ANYTIME ... ANYPLACE , WE RE #1 BAHAMASEDITION TRY OUR SOUTHERN CHICKEN BISCUIT www.tribune242.com I N S I D E I N S I D E C LASSIFIEDSTRADER STARTSONPAGE17A CARS! CARS! CARS!! INTODAY’STRIBUNE Third teacher is questioned by the police Two officials ‘questioned’ in land row are named SEE page 10 SP ANISH N AVY SHIP SAILS INTO NASSAU n By PAUL G TURNQUEST Tribune Staff Reporter pturnquest@tribunemedia.net THE CURRENT under secretary in the Ministry of L ands and Surveys Audley Greaves and the Chief Housing Officer Christopher Russell are both reportedly being questioned by Ministry officials about Crown land granted their wives and other relatives. According to documenta t ion obtained by this newspaper, Mr Greaves’ wife and son were both granted lots in the island of Abaco in 2003 and 2004 respectively. Mr Greaves’ son, received a 15,625 square foot lot on Wood Cay, Abaco for $1,786.25 while his wifer eceived an 18,343 square Undersecretary and Chief Housing Officer reportedly speaking to officials THE ‘JUAN SEBASTIAN DE ELCANO’ , an 81-year-old Spanish Navy sail ship, called at the port of Nassau yesterday. The vessel was commissioned in 1928 and built in the shipyards of Cadiz. I t is currently used as part of the 80th training cruise for midshipmen who are senior students at the Spanish Naval Academy and future naval officers and will remain in Nassau H arbour until Sunday. SEE P AGE TWO SEE page 10 Firms seeking oil drilling approvals f ace man y hur dles n By PAUL G TURNQUEST Tribune Staff Reporter p turnquest@tribunemedia.net DUE to the continuing economic downturn in the global economy, government is expected to present a very sobering outlook in its 2009/10 budget, having readjusted its original ministerial sub missions lower by some seven to 10 per cent. In a memorandum from the Ministry of Finance’s Budget Section, Prime Minister Hubert Ingraham met with his permanent secretaries on May 1 to advise them on the current economic situation and its impact on the upcoming budget. Sobering outlook expected in the 2009/10 budget F e l i p M a j o r / T r i b u n e s t a f f FNM T -SHIR T GOESUPINFLAMES ADEVELOPER set his FNM t-shirt on fire yesterday in a protest against the government he voted for and the party he rallied behind in the last general election. SEEPAGE FIVEFOR FULLSTORY SEE page 10 INSIDE MANSETTOBECHARGED OVERCITYMARKETS ROBBERIES PAGETHREE INVESTIGATION INTO CLAIMS OF IMPOSTER BOTTLED WATER P A GE SIX SEE page 10 OBITUARIES and RELIGION ANIMAL FUN DAY HIGHLIGHTS F e l i p M a j o r / T r i b u n e s t a f f

PAGE 2

C M Y K C M Y K LOCAL NEWS PAGE 2, THURSDAY, MAY 21, 2009 THE TRIBUNE B AHAMIANS were treated to a rare sight yesterday morn-i ng, as a 81-year-old Spanish Navy sail ship called at the port of Nass au. The “Juan Sebastin de Elcano” will be docked in the city harbour until Sunday. The ship was commissioned in 1 928 and built in the shipyards of Cadiz. I t is named after Spanish sailor Juan Sebastin de Elcano, who was the first man to circumnavigate the world in 1522. The Spanish training ship is s ailing the world’s seas as part of t he 80th training cruise for midshipmen who are senior students at the Spanish Naval Academy and future naval officers. Before docking in Nassau, the J uan Sebastin de Elcano called at the ports of Tenerife, Spain; F ortaleza, Brazil; Port of Spain, Trinidad and Tobago; San Juan d e Puerto Rico (United Stated; G alveston, US; Cartagena de Indias, Colombia, and Havana, Cuba. The ship is carrying 223 midshipmen and its commanding officer is Captain Javier Romero. C aptain Romero has a long history with the Spanish Navy and h as been awarded five Navy Crosses and one NATO Article V Medal. n By ALISON LOWE T ribune Staff Reporter alowe@tribunemedia.net A JOINT police and immigration raid on two strip clubs on Sunday evening resulted in the appre-h ension of various individuals on immigration violations and other offences. Both of the establishments are located in Palmdale and are believed to be owned by the same people. S enior Asst Commissioner Raymond Gibson yesterday told The Tribune that a “small quantity of drugs” was also seized from both clubs. He said the establishments are still “under investigation,” but declined to offer further comment. A sked to respond to claims that one of the clubs reopened as early as Monday, Mr Gibson said he was unaware of this, but would look into it. The legality of strip clubs and stripping for mone y in the Bahamas has been in question since a 2005 court case saw six Russian strippers and other club staff who worked at the now defunct Butterfly Club on East Bay Street exonerated. W ayne Munroe, the attorney for the strippers, argued that as his clients were practising their craft in the privacy of the club, away from public sight and if customers were getting what they paid for and n o one was offended, they could not be found guilty o n the charges of indecent behaviour. The law relating to that offence notes that it must be insulting or offensive to those in view. As a result of this argument and others, Magistrate R enee McKay agreed with Mr Munroe that the prosecution had not established a prima facie case against his clients on the indecent behaviour charges. Messages left for immigration officials seeking f urther details on those detained were not returned u p to press time. Two strip clubs targeted in police and immigration raid Several people apprehended ‘Small quantity of drugs’ seized Spanish sail ship calls at Nassau TRAINING CRUISE: The “Juan Sebastin de Elcano” S PLENDOUR: I nside the 81-year-old Spanish Navy ship.

PAGE 3

C M Y K C M Y K LOCAL NEWS THE TRIBUNE THURSDAY, MAY 21, 2009, PAGE 3 n By MEGAN REYNOLDS a nd CHESTER ROBARDS Tribune Staff Reporters m reynolds@tribunemedia.net A MOTORCYCLE driver and his passenger were struck off their bike in a dramatic crash in Nassau Street after they allegedly attempted to rob the driver. T he driver of a white 1999 Isuzu Rodeo told police the pill ion passenger on a red and white Honda 650 trail bike snatched a pair of Oakley sunglasses from his face and tried to rip a chain from around his neck while dri ving alongside him near the junction with Poinciana Drive and Thompson Boulevard. The side of the Sports Utility V ehicle (SUV and sent the pillion passenger fly ing to the roadside around 25 ft away from the bike while the SUV careered over the concrete median and central roundabout and came to a stop on Thompson Boulevard. Both vehicles had been travelling south. T raffic stopped and residents of the surrounding area rushed to the scene wondering what had caused the loud bang just before 9pm. Around 50 people surrounded the injured pillion passenger as he lay on the sidewalkn ear Commonwealth Bank in Nassau Street. P olice and Emergency Services arrived within 10 minutes of the c rash to find tyre marks across the road median and the roundabout. The SUV had two burst tyres on its right side, and oil was leaking from the engine. The badly injured pillion passenger lay motionless at the side of the road for some time and started to shake just before the ambulance arrived. One eye-witness said he was dragged by the SUV, and others claimed he had been carrying a gun. His mother was told about the accident at her home in Chip-p ingham and arrived at the scene soon after the crash crying and s creaming, “Where is my son?” The 21-year-old pillion passeng er and 23-year-old driver were rushed to Princess Margaret Hos pital. The pillion passenger is said to be in serious, but stable condition. His mother and sister were also involved in a collision on their way to the hospital on Tues day night. Their car was badly damaged and the 21-year-old’s mother was treated in hospital. Relatives of the 21-year-old say he has internal injuries affecting h is kidneys and pelvis, and they believe the car may have rolled over him. He is breathing with the aid of a ventilator and his jaw is broken. Doctors were waiting f or swelling to go down before performing surgery yesterday. T he 23-year-old motorcycle dri ver is also recovering in hospital, however he is said to have escaped with minimal injuries as bones in his hands and fingers were broken. Inspector Anthony Curtis in the traffic division said the inci dent is under investigation and no arrests have been made. He said: “This is a suspicious matter whereby it appears as though these fellas on the bike were up to no good. We are con ducting an investigation now so I don’t want to pre-empt what the outcome will be, but it appears they were up to no good. They were going to snatch his Oakleys and rip the chain off his neck while they were in the jeep, so that could be what caused the crash.” On Friday, May 22 the Central Police Division will hold a crime watch meeting for all businesses in the downtown area at 4.30pm at Doctor’s Hospital Conference Centre on Dowdeswell Street. Officers will speak on current crime trends and make recom mendations to each owner/operator on how to improve the work environment so as to prevent crime. Haitian charged in smuggling o peration may face death penalty Man, 27, ar rested over Fr eepor t armed robbery Crime watch meeting for businesses USEmbassy to mark Memorial Day 2009 In brief n B y ALISON LOWE Tribune Staff Reporter alowe@tribumemedia.net A YOUNG man is expected to be charged as early as today with the armed robbery of three City Market stores within the last t hree weeks, as well as a number o f other similar offences. Police did not report the City Market robberies to the press, but The Tribune has discovered t hat a lone gunman entered the supermarket chain’s locations on Rosetta Street, Village Road and Cable Beach, and demanded c ash. T he Cable Beach location was robbed on Thursday, May 14; Rosetta Street on May 10; while the supermarket’s Village road s tore was the first to be hit. Yesterday senior police officers said that nobody was hurt during the incidents and little cash was obtained by the gunman. This was also confirmed by AzaletaI shmael-Newry, marketing director for City Market. A 67-year-old woman who was in the Rosetta Street store when t he gunman struck there said the incident had made her nervous about going back to the same location. “I said to myself, ‘I wonder if I s hould go back here, or go to another one...’.” Alerted T he customer said she was at a checkout counter in the store when the cashier alerted her to the fact that “something was going on” at the customer servicec ounter near the front entrance. “After a minute or two we found out what happened: the woman at the front said, ‘That guy came in the store and he held me up and wanted money!’ He’d just came in the front door, robbed her, and went back out and left. The manager chased him out there, but they didn’t c atch him then,” she said. Another customer, Mary Davis, expressed her disappointment that the police did not alert the public to the incidents. If there’s a robbery in my local foodstore I want to know!” she said. Police Commissioner Reginald F erguson, said he “did not know” why the incidents were not disclosed to the media, but denied that it was intentional on the part of the force. I don’t have a problem with people knowing what happened.I think it gives people a better opportunity to analyse what is g oing on in their society,” said Mr Ferguson. ON Monday, May 25, the United States Embassy will observe Memorial Day with a wreath laying ceremony at Clifton Pier in memory of fallen comrades and military veterans. Special recognition will be given to the 23 sailors of the US Patrol Squadron who died off the coast of Nassau on May 7, 1954. US Charg d’Affaires Timothy Zuniga-Brown as well as family members of the fallen sailors will speak at the ceremony. The ceremony is expected to start at 10am and last 45 minutes. n By DENISE MAYCOCK Tribune Freeport Reporter d maycock@tribunemedia.net F REEPORT – The quick response of police to an armed r obbery in progress in Freeport has led to the arrest of a 27year-old man. According to police reports, officers responded to an armed r obbery at the Watkins Street Liquor Store in the BoulevardP laza on Somerville Drive on Monday morning. A man entered the store around 9.45am brandishing a handgun, held the cashier at bay, and robbed her of cash. Moments after the robbery, o fficers arrived on the scene. Their quick investigation ledt hem to an apartment building at Magella Crest, where officers a rrested a male suspect. Police also recovered a .357 revolver with 2 live .357 rounds and $12.00 cash believed to be proceeds of the robbery. The suspect is assisting police with their investigation. He ise xpected to be formally charged. A Haitian man charged in connection with a smuggling operation suspected to have originated in Nassau and which r esulted in nine people drowni ng off Florida may face death. Father of nine Jimmy Metellus, 33, was denied bail in a West Palm Beach, Florida, c ourt yesterday. US Immigration and Customs enforcement investigators claim he was hired by four men in the B ahamas to captain the boat carrying the large group of Haitian migrants. According to The Miami Herald , investigators claim Metellus agreed to do so for free to escape hardships in Haiti. The smugglers are alleged to have been paid thousands of d ollars per person for the journey, which left Nassau for the shores of Miami, by way of Bimini. I t was on the way from Bimini that the boat, carrying moret han two dozen people, capsized, resulting in the deaths of n ine people, and leaving 16 others floundering in the water for hours until they were rescued by the US Coast Guard and a good samaritan. D espite the Bahamian origin of the ill-fated smuggling opera-t ion, Assistant Commissioner Raymond Gibson told The Trib une t hat Bahamian police are not currently investigating the matter, but would do so if they received a “specific request” from the US authorities. Man set to be charged over armed robbery of stores THIS SMASHED-UP VEHICLE was involved in the accident in which a motorcyclist and his passenger were struck off their bike. ONE OF THE accident victims being taken in to an ambulance. Motorcyclist, passenger struck of f their bike Nassau Street crash during alleged bid to rob driver “This is a suspicious matter whereby it appears as though these fellas on the bike wer e up to no good.” Insp. Anthony Curtis Felip Major / Tribune staff Felip Major / Tribune staff

PAGE 4

EDITOR, The Tribune. This little tidbit is being given in response to two articles that appeared in two of our dailies recently, I refer to “PLPs Say They Have a True Vision And Plan” by lanthia Smith, Journal Staff Reporter, The Bahama Journal of Monday, May 11th, and Insight article “URCA and the Milk of Hatchet Bay,” by Rupert Missick Jr, Tribune Chief Reporter, also of Monday May 11th 2009. PLP Members of Parliament appeared on Issues of The Day , said theirs is the party with a true vision and plan for the country, but we’ll have to wait leading up to 2012 to see exactly what that plan and vision for the country is. I cry shame on Her Majesty's Loyal Opposition. Additionally, it would appear from Chairwoman Glenys Hanna-Martin, and her companions, that the PLP is depending more on its legacy than a vision and plan for the country, to win the next general election. What exactly is that legacy, and whether or not it is an asset or a liability for the PLP, has been the subject of much discussion of late. So let’s examine the legacy. Majority Rule this is the biggest farce of all. The black majority, mainly poor folk, were tricked into believing that Majority Rule would usher in an era of equal opportunity for ordinary black Bahamians. What they got in return was a Socialist Dictatorship, masquerading as a Socialist Democracy. Everything that was done, every policy’s underlying objec tive was to win the next election. The needs of the poor masses would then be routinely ignored, and then suddenlyr emembered every election cycle, with capital works projects that would get started and never completed, or being com pleted after two or three elec tion cycles. “...We have our work to do, and we will do ourw ork, but it’s about systemical ly organising to go out and win the next election and that’s where our focus is. We will deal with our issues, but we will focus on winning the next elec tion,” MP for West End andB imini, Obie Wilchcombe. And what exactly are those issues, Mr Wilchcombe, and which ones are more important, those internal matters impacting your party’s chances at the next elec tion, or those national matters in urgent need of attention impacting the welfare of the Bahamian people? Pity that this could not be one issue, and your party would not be perpetually torn between doing what’s right for party and friends, or necessary to win an election, and doing what’s right for country and the Bahamian people. There is a reason why Majority Rule has never been celebrated in this country. The fact that UBP and colonial legislation, designed to allow slum landlords in 2009 to rent houses with no running water or inside toilets, are still a part of the Statute Laws of The Bahamas, bespeaks the lie of the achievement of Majority Rule. Bahamianisation another fallacy. The true purpose of Bahamianisation was never to promote qualified Bahamians; its true purpose was to inundate the civil service, every government agency and corporation, with PLP supporters, being PLP the only prequalification for the job. And so began the transform ation of the PLP from the dreams and ideals of its founders, into a Socialist Democratic government headed by a Social Dictator. In this regard, the Insight article previously n oted, gives a very revealing p icture of Bahamianisation at work. In 1975, the PLP government bought a successful dairy and chicken farm from the Har risville Company Hatchet Bay Farm. We all know what happened, the farm went intop roblems with its creditors, employees were laid off and the farm that once supplied 60 per cent of the domestic market with eggs, provided poultry, milk and cheese, as well as jobs for 300 people in the settlement of Alice Town collapsed. In the Insight article, an Eleutheran who experienced first hand the PLP government of the late Sir Lynden Pindling’s move to “Bahamianise” the Hatchet Bay Farm, paints a very devious and self-serving, if not anti-Bahamian, purpose for Bahamianisation. According to the Eleutheran, “all of the foreign scientists and veterinarians went home, but that wasn’t it. All of the white Bahamians were fired and then all of the black Bahamians who didn’t support the PLP were sent home.” It is incredulous to note then, PLP MP for Bain and Grants Town Dr Bernard Nottage, say ing in the Bahama Journal article, that the PLP is keen on the issue of The Bahamas being able to feed itself. That the FNM government has focused on simply providing jobs for Bahamians, but has placed very little emphasis on the country being self-sufficient. “The problem is that we’ve all concentrated on trying to create jobs, but it was the PLP government that put in place an agricultural programme to expand agriculture, to expand fishing, that’s how BAIC was initially formed.” Are these people crazy, or simply out of touch with this generation of “New Bahamians” of which I am a proud member? The worn out, torn and tattered legacy of the PLP, one that wreaks of the betrayal of the dreams and aspirations of our great-grandparents, that permeates with the oppression of the masses in favour of political patrimony, is totally irrelevant to the “New Bahamian,” and will never win another election in this country. Yet according to PLP Chairwoman Glenys Hanna-Martin, “What really sets our party apart is the legacy that follows it.” What legacy, will the PLP ever get it? We do not attend political rallies; we can afford our own entertainment. Our loyalty is not to any political party, but to our God and country, and in that order. We do not need your T-shirts, whom we vote for is a private matter, that’s why our country has a private ballot. You can never purchase our votes; do not insult our intelligence with offers of hams, turkeys, appli ances or jobs in return for our votes. You will be embarrassed! We do not believe that you have a true vision and plan for our country, as evidenced by the fact that during your numer ous criticisms of the present government’s lack thereof, you have yet to offer an alternative of your own. Concluding recommendation talk to us, the “New Bahami ans,” not your rapidly deteriorating base. Find out from us what our dreams and vision is for our country, and then incorporate our ideas into a national devel o pment plan with an accompa nying legislative agenda to make those dreams a reality. One more thing, if you're not prepared to work with all Bahamians, PLP, FNM and what have you, then do not w aste our time. A national plan by its very nature is nonpartisan. We will no longer allow ourselves, nor our nation to be divided and conquered by greedy, self-serv ing and clueless politicians and aspirants! A word to the wise should be sufficient. LAVADE M DARLING Nassau, May 17, 2009. C M Y K C M Y K EDITORIAL/LETTERS TO THE EDITOR PAGE 4, THURSDAY, MAY 21, 2009 THE TRIBUNE The Tribune Limited NULLIUS ADDICTUS JURARE IN VERBA MAGISTRI Being Bound to Swear to The Dogmas of No Master L EON E. H. DUPUCH, Publisher/Editor 1903-1914 S IR ETIENNE DUPUCH, Kt., O.B.E., K.M., K.C.S.G., (Hon. P ublisher/Editor 1919-1972 Contributing Editor 1972-1991 EILEEN DUPUCH CARRON, C.M.G., M.S., B.A., LL.B. P ublisher/Editor 1972Published Daily Monday to Saturday S hirley Street, P.O. Box N-3207, Nassau, Bahamas Insurance Management Building., P.O. F-485, Freeport, Grand Bahama W EBSITE www.tribune242.com – updated daily at 2pm THE POLICE have their hands full. In addition to criminals already wandering the streets while they await their court date, and those youngsters, not yet caught, but out there gun in hand, flirting with a life of crime,t he police now have 153 more to add to their list. Last month 205 men were released from prison w ith 153 of them sent back to the community to await trial. Of that number, the Central Intelli-g ence Bureau, gave instructions that 39 of them should be monitored.” T hese are all men with charges ranging from m urder, attempted murder, armed robbery and assault to unlawful sexual intercourse and rape. W hile they await their day in court, who is going to employ them? How are they going to eat? H ow can the police monitor them and keep up with solving the daily crime and the now almostd aily murders? Immigration regulations require all employe rs of foreign staff to supply a clean police record for their applicant. This record has to be updated with every permit renewal. We now r ecommend that all employers demand police records from all potential employees B ahamian and foreign and regardless of job description. I f we had followed these rules last year our staff would not have had to endure the loss of so much money from their handbags to a cold and calculating thief who became embedded among us, and who when fingered had so fooled certain staff about her integrity that they were annoyed that we had turned her in. If she had produced a police certificate we would have known that she was just out of prison for theft. Obviouslys he was a kleptomaniac who could not help herself. O n being fired from T he Tribune s he went for a job interview to an agency. After the inter view, a staff member of the agency called one of her friends at The Tribune to say that on the young lady’s departure it was discovered that s he had filched money from the staff member’s handbag. We were told that when the youngw oman was arrested, she got an opportunity at the station to steal from the handbag of the a rresting officer. This was indeed a mentally sick woman. She was sent back to prison, and must have been put in a programme for her mental condition, because as a part of her ther apy she confessed her misdeeds among them t he long string of thefts at The Tribune, right down to the poor cleaning lady. These weret he thefts that she had so vehemently denied when she took us before the Labour Board for w rongful dismissal. She should have never been on our staff. She should never have been on anyone’s staff. And she certainly would not have been at The Tribune if we had demanded her police records. To look at her, she would have been the last person anyone would have suspected. She worked hard to keep the fingero f suspicion from hovering over her desk. And then we have had complaints about persons seemingly avoiding trial because they have some family relation tucked securely in a place of influence. We know that Police Commissioner Ferguson condemns this, but after police investigations, prosecutions are out ofh is hands. And then there is the case of Welsh busi n essman Hywell Jones, who was shot and killed by a “hit” man as he walked to his Goodman’sB ay Corporate Centre office on West Bay Street o n April 22. E arly in April last year Mr Jones had comp lained to the police that he feared for his life. In a sworn affidavit he said he rarely slept in his h ome and was constantly looking over his shoulder. W hat protection was he given, what investigation was done, what was discovered, or dide verything go quiet because in his report he said he had reason to believe that “one of the a ssailants was a police officer”? In early April, 2007, Mr Jones swore an affidavit in which he said: “On or about 5th April 2 007, I was attacked in my bed at my home by two assailants demanding I open a safe (which d id not exist) on the property. I received only minor abrasions, but a guest at my home was b adly beaten, and stabbed in the same incident. Both I and my guest were admitted to hospital for treatment, my guest having to stay overnight.” And about a month later, Mr Jones again filed a police complaint. “On or about 30th May, 2007,” he said, “I was attacked in front of m y home for no apparent reason, with the assailants not seeking any money or asking anyq uestions. Once again I was admitted to hospital, this t ime with a broken eye socket and jaw, multiple head wounds and severe bruising to back and legs. I have reason to believe that one of the assailants was a police officer.” The Canadian a ccountant with him was not injured. Mr Jones was at the time embroiled in a l egal matter. He was advised not to connect his beatings with the legal dispute, because the tim i ng might have just been coincidental. He reject ed the advice: “I remain convinced that these attacks are not coincidental,” he said, “and feel it paramount to my safety that I put my con cerns before the court at this time.” I t is now for the police to take those concerns seriously and thoroughly investigate them. Obvi-o usly, someone at that time had reason to put the fear of God in him. I f this incident were not properly investigated at the time, it is important that it be done so now. It is also important to find out if Mr Jones had any justification for his adamant belief that his beatings were not a coincidence. And the only way to do this to the satisfaction of the public is for the Attorney General top roceed with the pending criminal prosecution in the case that concerned Hywel Jones. PLP legacy – asset or liability? LETTERS letters@tribunemedia.net More criminals back on the streets '(6,*1 (1*,1((5,1* &203(7,7,9(,&,1* $67%,'',1*,1)250$7,21 5RDGWR&LW\'XPSDIWHUUHPL[ (PDLOJJRQJRUD#FRUDOZDYHFRP

PAGE 5

n B y MEGAN REYNOLDS Tribune Staff Reporter mreynolds@tribunemedia.net A DEVELOPER set his FNM t -shirt on fire yesterday in protest against the government he voted for and the party he rallied behind in the last general elect ion. Randy Rolle, 53, said the FNM has let him down and he is calling on others who feel the same way to join him in protest. T he contractor and small-time developer burned his red FNM t -shirt on RM Bailey Park oppos ite the Mall at Marathon on Robinson Road yesterday morning to make a public stand against the FNM administration. H e said he is angry that the Ministry of Housing providedi nadequate funds for his devel opment of two homes in the Pride E states government housing subdivision, and has delayed him in his work. Mr Rolle, of West Bay Street, said he requested $15,500 fromt he department to cover the cost of his work, which commencedi n January, but received only $12,500, and has therefore been unable to progress as planned. However Mr Rolle did say the Ministry of Housing was willing t o cover any additional expenses should the cost of his projecte xceed the allotted amount. B ut the once fervent FNM supp orter said he is now disappointed in government for not assisting h im in the same way he expected them to. M r Rolle said: “I didn’t vote for the FNM based on a t-shirts o I will burn the t-shirt in protest of that. “I campaigned, I voted, I w orked the polls and everything else, for a free and democratic sovereign nation founded on spiri tual values, and in which no man, woman or child shall ever be slave o r bondsman to anyone, nor their labour exploited or their lives f rustrated by deprivation and in this instance, they brazenly did n ot respect my manhood or my e ntitlement. There are men on t he street pulling the trigger and there are those in parliament p ulling the rug, all of which is a destructive measure. I’m calling o n the entire Rolle family and the Bahamian people to call ont he Ministry of Housing to do everything possible to make cert ain every Bahamian has the opportunity and the ability wherever it is necessary, to fulfil some o f their dreams and prioritise their craft or the crafts of their f orefathers in labour.” Attempts to reach Minister of H ousing Kenneth Russell for comment on the issue were u nsuccessful. C M Y K C M Y K LOCAL NEWS THE TRIBUNE THURSDAY, MAY 21, 2009, PAGE 5 R ATS, ANTS, TERMITES, ROACHES, FLIES, MOSQUITOES, TICKS & FLEAS PHONE: 327-6464W E SEND ‘EM PACKIN’!STRUCKUM( DF55) RANDY ROLLE set his FNM T-shirt on fire in protest against the government he voted for and the party he rallied behind in the last election. n By NATARIO McKENZIE Tribune Staff Reporter A MAN who was actively being sought by police since early January was sent enced to four years in prison yesterday after pleading guilty to a drug charge stemming from a $480,000 marijuana seizure. P rescott Roxbury, 33, told Magistrate C arolita Bethel that he had been keeping the drugs for a friend. According to Inspector Ercell Dorsette, DEU officers seized 321 pounds of marijuana whilee xecuting a search warrant on a home at Turks Close, Flamingo Gardens, on January 3. Four persons who were at the house at t he time were taken into custody. Roxbury, a resident of Soldier Road, eluded police until he was arrested near his home at around 6pm on Tuesday. Winsome Williams, 28, Paula Morris, 32, Tricia Witter, 33, all of Jamaica, along with Dexter Wilson, 30, of Turks Close,h ave been charged in connection with the seizure and have pleaded not guilty. Remand W ilson is out on bail while the three Jamaican women are on remand at Her Majesty’s Prison, Fox Hill. According to the Inspector Dorsette, Roxbury told police on Tuesday that he had lived at the Flamingo Gardens housea nd had placed the drugs there shortly before police arrived to execute the search warrant. According to the prosecutor, Roxbury t old police that he would plead guilty to the marijuana possession charge. Roxbury’s attorney Willie Moss submitted to the court that his client had not wasted the courts time as he had pleaded guilty to the charge. He asked the court to be as lenient as p ossible, taking into account the volume of drugs seized. Magistrate Bethel sentenced Roxbury to four years in prison. He was ordered to pay a reduced fine of $ 25,000. Failure to pay the fine will result in an additional year of imprisonment. Williams, Morris, Witter and Wilson are expected back in court on May 27. A 62-year-old American tourist drowned in Eleuthera yes terday when he fell into the ocean near Governor’s Harbour. David Anderson of Arkansas was on the beach when the incident occurred at around 11am. Presumed to have died of drowning, Mr Anderson was pronounced dead at a local clinic. Police do not suspect foul play but stated that an autopsy will be conducted to determine the precise cause of death. Man, 33, jailed for four years after pleading guilty to drug offence US tourist drowns Developer burns FNM T-shirt in anti-government protest F e l i p M a j o r / T r i b u n e s t a f f

PAGE 6

T HE Bahamas Agricultural and Industrial Corporation (BAICt he Simpson Penn School for Boys and the Williemae Pratt School for Girls a chance ata griculture and woodturning. Executive chairman Edison Key and a BAIC delegation d iscussed the venture with Superintendent Wrensworth B utler and his team during a meeting on Tuesday. "We are going to work with t he students at the schools," said Mr Key. "We want to teach them something they canh ave to take them through life, something by which they can be self employed." " This area is ideal for a good agricultural programme for t hese youngsters," said Mr Key. "We can assist by bringing in technical persons to givet hem the training they need to grow a variety of fruit trees, vegetables, root crops,b ananas. I see tremendous potential there. Mr Butler welcomed the p rogamme as “wonderful news.” “(Mr Key same vision. I hope we can get this project started as soon as possible so we can impact the lives of the boys in a very pos i tive way,” he said. "This would allow them to walk away from this place with meaningful skills with which they can go back into the community. Farming is ideal." Meanwhile, Simpson Penn staffers assist where they can to encourage the youngsters to produce their own food. Mr Butler said the aim is to achieve a greater degree of self-sufficiency. "One of the things that is missing from our farming programme is technical assistance," he said. "Basically most of the persons who assist, they just have a green thumb. "In order for us to be able to do it at a level that would make our products more marketable we would need technical assistance which (Mr Key has agreed to provide us with. We are very pleased with that,” Mr Butler said. He said that he has found agriculture to be very thera peutic for the boys. Occasionally they are allowed plots in which to grow various vegeta bles. "The boys are very proud of their achievements when they grow corn and water melons and tomatoes when they see them come out of the ground,” Mr Butler said. "Definitely I feel that with a little education and a little assistance from the general public and the various min istries, certainly we can take our agriculture programme to a higher level. "It is our goal to become self-sufficient. Presently we purchase much of our vegetables from a private vendor. Once we get the programme underway that should cease in short order,” he said. On the tour of the school, Mr Key was accompanied by general manager Benjamin Rahming, assistant general manager Arnold Dorsett, assis tant manager of the Handicraft Department Pam Deveaux, and woodturning trainer Vaughn Minnis. n By TANEKA THOMPSON Tribune Staff Reporter tthompson@tribunemedia.net THE Department of Environmental Health has launched an investigation into claims that impostor water bearing the Aquapure label was found at a local depot. Environment Minister Dr Earl Deveaux said that after the reports were published in The Tribune , a team was dispatched to investigate the claims. While he would not divulge the findings of that investigation, Mr Deveaux said a report would be turned over to the Ministry of Health which would take appropriate action. "Since that story appeared, our team has done some investigations which we'll provide to Health and they'll also take action but I can't say anymore about that," he said yesterday. After the story broke earlier this week, renewed calls emerged from within the water industry for an independent regulatory board to police the sector. "First of all, I think that the water industry as a whole needs to be more regulated, no doubt about it. As an industry we have to all understand that we are dealing with a very important product – there are no short-cuts in this business," said Tina Knowles, owner of Chelsea's Choice. "The industry needs to be policed, regulations ought to be most definitely in place and enforced, but I think it's very important for there not to be a panic in the industry." Mr Deveaux said the sector is currently overseen by a cartel of government agencies, including the Consumer Affairs Unit, the Department of Environmental Health and the Ministry of Health. "Anybody bottling water would have to get a license and in order to get that they would be required to pass sanitation tests and standards as set by the environmental monitoring lab which is in (the Ministry of Environment "Any infractions after that, that cause a public health issue, are dealt with by the Ministry of Health and if they have issues of quality, there's a division of consumer affairs that has punitive powers that any injured person can complain to," he explained. Last week, Aquapure officials revealed the discovery of five bottles of suspected impostor water they said was tainted with very high levels of disease causing bacteria. According to Aquapure president Alex Knowles, the company was tipped off about the suspected fake products – being passed off as demineralised water – after suspicious looking red-capped bottles were spotted by an Aquapure employee at an independent depot in central New Providence last week. Aquapure does produce redcapped demineralised water, and has assured the public that there is nothing wrong with the genuine bottles. Mr Knowles said the five bottles were seized by police, tested by company lab technicians and found to be "heavily contaminated" with coliform bacteria, indicators of disease-causing organisms, and fecal bacteria. Explaining the extensive daily testing process executed by Aquapure officials, he said there is no chance the tainted water originated from the Bernard Road plant. C M Y K C M Y K LOCAL NEWS PAGE 6, THURSDAY, MAY 21, 2009 THE TRIBUNE U nlimited Mileage + CDW + Free UpgradeTropical treat!Midsize in Florida as low as F ullsize in Florida as low asUS$45Daily/ US$180 Weekly when using the upgrade coupon.US$49Daily/ US$205 Weekly when using the upgrade coupon. Forreservations,aswellastermsand conditionspleasecontactDestinations at(786245-0520orat1-800-468-3334. BesuretouseratecodeRC1 and couponcodeAU2253VLS whenmaking t hereservation.Upgradeisonlyvalid o ncompactandintermediatecarson r entalsoftwoormoredays.Rates i ncludeunlimitedmileageandCDW. O ffervalidthroughJune30th2009. a lamo.com FIRSTCARIBBEAN International Bank recently donated to Her Majesty’s Prison Officers’ Dependants Fund. ASP Raymond Julien accepted the cheque on behalf of his colleagues. “The fund was developed to assist in the welfare of dependants of officers who have unselfishly given their lives in the execution of their dutieson behalf of the country,” he said. Contribution to the fund is in keeping with FirstCaribbean’s commitment to“Enriching our communities. Together,” the bank said. FirstCaribbean donates to the Prison Officers Dependants’ Fund Investigation into claims of imposter bottled water BAIC EXECUTIVE chairman Edison Key meets with Simpson Penn School officials. Pictured from left are superintendent Wrensworth Butler, chief of security Jerry Stubbs, Mr Key, and BAIC general managerB enjamin Rahmng. BAIC SUPPORTS SIMPSON PENN FARMING PROGRAMME Earl Deveaux

PAGE 7

n By DENISE MAYCOCK Tribune Freeport R eporter d maycock@tribunemedia.net FREEPORT – More than 130 Grand Bahama Power Company workers are expected to go the polls today to e lect a new slate of officers in the Commonwealth Electrical W orkers Union (CEWU P resident Keith Knowles is n ot seeking re-election. Six candidates are vying for thep residency. U nion Trustee Stevie Forbes, a 14-year employee at Grand Bahama Power, is oneof them. Negotiations Mr Forbes commended Mr Knowles for “a job well done,” e specially during the very t ough times last year when the u nion was embroiled in industrial action with managementd uring negotiations for a new i ndustrial contract. want to thank Mr Knowles for representing us; he was a good and fair president that dealt with matters effectively. “There are some persons w ho were angry with president K nowles for not giving up Article 22 and moving on with n egotiations, but I encouraged h im to fight on because giving up Article 22 would have been detrimental to the union,” he said. M r Forbes explained that A rticle 22 dictates that GBPC must consult with the unionon all matters concerning its m embers and workers before any decisions are made. There are 134 members of CEWU. Mr Forbes outlineds ome plans he hopes to imple ment if elected president. He proposes to make loans available to members who are facing financial hardship. He explained that members will be able to borrow money from the union and pay it back with a salary deduction. M r Forbes said that memb ers needing assistance to pay utilities, car repairs, and school fees for their children will be assisted. I will put mechanisms in p lace to accommodate all m embers so that the union can m eet them half way with any e xpense. It is just not right for a member to face difficulty with having to meet extra expenses when they have an organisation, where they pay monthly dues and is in a good financial standing,” he said. M r Forbes will bring his o rganisational skills and pro fessionalism to the union. I practise honesty and i ntegrity on the job, and I k now that there are a lot of members who will support me because they know I am a car i ng person. “This is not the first time that I have run for an executive position. I am presently a trustee of the union and this is my second time running for president,” he said. M r Forbes promised that he w ill not compromise the union, w hich faced tremendous diffic ulties last year during its n egotiations with management. “That was a very critical time in the life of our union. Itw as the first time that the u nion had ever taken strike action against the company, but it was necessary for thes ake of the workers,” he said. Elections will be held at 9am at the union’s office on Yellow Pine Street under thes upervision of an officer at the Department of Labour. C M Y K C M Y K LOCAL NEWS T HE TRIBUNE THURSDAY, MAY 21, 2009, PAGE 7 677 1111 nassau 688 1111 freeport www.indigonetworks.com purchase your home phone line and receiveFREE local number FREE local and long distance calling for one month* FREE inter-island calls to onephone customers FREE activationwhat you need to use onephoneunlimited broadband internet a one onephone telephone adapter a touch tone telephone*certain restrictions applyget your onephone at GBPower Company workers set to elect new union officers Union Trustee Stevie Forbes

PAGE 8

AT Aspecial assembly held a t the Uriah McPhee Primary School, the Scotiabank (Bahamas Centre announced its adoptiono f the school. Each branch and unit within Scotiabank has been asked tos elect a primary school in their community with whom to partner. Each partnership is indiv idualised and can take the form of financial support, vol unteering, shared expertise or physical resources. T he Processing Support Cen tre has commenced with a literacy programme at the schoola nd has plans to launch a science project in the near future. On Friday, May 15, all 49 m embers of the unit were treat ed to a special assembly con ducted by students of the school. U riah McPhee Primary School Principal Helen Simmons-Johnson thanked Scotia-b ank for its support. “I am elated that members of the Processing Support Centre chose to partner with my school,t his programme will allow Scotiabank to observe first hand what we are doing in our schoola nd will provide our students with opportunities for enhanced learning,” she said. Rekell Griffin, senior manager of marketing and public relations at Scotiabank, presented Ms Simmons-Johnson with two computers along with reading software to be used in the school’s reading lab. In an address to the administrators, teachers and students of Uriah McPhee, Ms Griffin said: “Scotiabank is very excited about this new initiative, through this programme we intend to utilise the human resources, talents and ideas of our employees to strengthen and enhance the quality of edu cation in the communities where we live and work.” The Adopt A School Pro gramme spins off the Scotiabank Bright Future Programme, which is a philanthropic initiative that helps support oppor tunities for the country’s chil dren and communities. “By bringing together the passion of our employees, the insight of our partners and the spirit of our communities, the Scotiabank Bright Future Programme is helping to support opportunities for children and communities, building a brighter future for everyone,” the bank said. C M Y K C M Y K PAGE 8, THURSDAY, MAY 21, 2009 THE TRIBUNE )25(17)XOO\IXUQLVKHGWRZQKRXVHLQSULYDWHDUHDRQ (DVWHUQRDGQHDUEHDFK%HGURRPV : DVKURRP/DUJH.LWFKHQ%XUJODUEDUV $ VNLQJSHUPRQWKIRUTXLFNUHQWDOVHULRXV LQTXLULHVRQO\SOHDVH LOCAL NEWS Scotiabank’s Processing Support Centre adopts the Uriah McPhee Primary School IN ANOTHERbig move to improve the h ighly-anticipated cultural experience known a s the Junkanoo Summer Festival, tourism officials announced that the event will be held in a new location – Woodes Rogers Walk in the heart of downtown Nassau. For several years, the festival has used Arawak Cay as the site of its weekly events.T his year, it will be against the backdrop of N assau’s busy shopping thoroughfare, Bay Street, next to the famous straw market, and overlooking Nassau Harbour and its cruise port. The move will bring even more excitem ent to the event, said Christine Ferguson, the event’s main co-ordinator for the Mini stry of Tourism. “People will be able to feel the energy of our vibrant city when they enter this new festival site,” she said. “We are in the heart of the city, and our festivities will be at the centre of all the activities that normally make N assau such an interesting and exciting dest ination.” M s Ferguson pointed out that downtown N assau also has sentimental appeal as a location for the Junkanoo Summer Festival. The m ove will conjure up memories of past fes tivals that were successfully staged there, she said. Our residents and many of our visitors from long ago would recall the days of Goombay Summer Festival,” Ms Ferguson pointed out. “Goombay Summer was one of our landmark celebrations. It brought our visitors together with our residents just as J unkanoo Summer Festival does today. Goombay Summer was held right at Woodes Rogers Walk, and we anticipate t hat Junkanoo Summer will be just as special a nd just as successful.” Junkanoo Summer Festival will feature B ahamian heritage in entertaining presentations and demonstrations. Those who attend the festival can expect to encounter Bahamian music, dance, cuisine, and literature, organisers said. E vents will include heritage games such as p ineapple-eating and onion-peeling contests. New goombay and rake ‘n scrape songs will be introduced each week. C ulinary demonstrations will give audie nces a better understanding of the preparation of Bahamian meals, and the festival w ill be punctuated each week by colourful, high-energy junkanoo parades, Ms Ferguson said. The Junkanoo Summer Festival will be held every Saturday in July from noon to 1 0pm in downtown Nassau. ACTION JACKSON thrills the crowd at JSF 2008. Junkanoo Summer Festival moves to downtown Nassau Shar e your news The T ribune wants to hear fr om people who are making news in their neighbour hoods. Per haps you ar e raising funds for a good cause, campaigning for improvements in the ar ea or have won an awar d. If so, call us on 322-1986 and share your story.

PAGE 9

n By MEGAN REYNOLDS Tribune Staff Reporter m reynolds@ t ribunemedia.net AN AMERICAN fly-fishing enthusiast who travelled to Crooked Island with the Ministry of Tourism on Tuesday died within hours ofa rriving. J ames Birkholm, 74, and h is wife Deanna Birkholm r un a fly-fishing website from their home in Poulsbo, Washington and flew from Nassau to Crooked Island to explore opportunities for bonefishing on a media visit with the Mini stry of Tourism. D uring the flight Mr Birkh olm complained of nausea a nd was taken directly to the l ocal health clinic after the f light landed in Crooked Island. His condition grew increasingly serious and Mr Birkh olm died at around 4pm w ith his wife by his side. M rs Birkholm returned to N assau yesterday and an a utopsy was performed at D octor’s Hospital to confirm Mr Birkholm’s cause of death. The couple were scheduled t o spend the night in Crooked I sland on Tuesday and go f ishing the following day with a group of 10 media repres entatives and Ministry of T ourism representatives. The remaining visitors from across the United States will go on to Acklins and Mayaguana before returning to Nassau and then going home. M r Birkholm was editor of a weekly online magazine for fly-fishing enthusiasts, FlyAnglersOnline.com, and his wife is the publisher. The couple have been lifel ong fishing aficionados and ran a casting school in their home town as well as the website. C rooked Island and the Bahamas Ministry of Tourism sponsored the latest edition o f the website. C M Y K C M Y K LOCAL NEWS THE TRIBUNE THURSDAY, MAY 21, 2009, PAGE 9 242.422.4677ken@erabahamas.comwww.erabahamas.comDupuch Real Estate need help selling or buying a home? The Mercedes M-Class. Beauty, brains and brawn. TYREFLEX STAR MOTORSCall us today for your new Mercedes-Benz M-Class at 325.4961Wulff Road, P. O. Box N 9123, Nassau, The Bahamas Fax: 323.4667When you think of the average SUV on t he road today, you think of roadhogging, air-polluting gas guzzlers that wouldnt know the meaning of high precision and fuel efficiency if it were emblazoned on their windshields. But there is an alternative. The refined M-Class from Mercedes-Benz. Withits superior German styling utilising o nly high-grade materials, its robust engine power delivering exemplary turn-on-a-dime performance whilst still being frugal on fuel and its handling of pot-holed roads and 1.5 ft. flooded streets, the Mercedes-Benz M-Class is clearly the best choice in SUVs. Grand Bahama resort receives top ranking US man dies after falling ill on way to Crooked Island FREEPORT – A Grand Bahama resort has been ranked as one of the best hotels in the world, receiving the highest ranking in the Bahamas, and placing 11th in the Caribbean. Expedia.com’s exclusive ‘Insiders’ Select List’ has named Pelican Bay at Lucayaas one of the best hotels in the world with a score of 86.03, according to a press release issued by the resort. The resort’s water views, distinct architecture, and choice amenities have put Pelican Bay in the top 20 hotels of the Caribbean and made it the highest ranked hotel in the Bahamas. The Reef Atlantis and The Cove, Paradise Island, are the only other resorts in the Bahamas to receive this distinction. Millions of customers and in-house experts chose Expedia Insiders’ Select rankings as a source when selecting the appropriate travel destination with first-class appeal. Expedia ranks hotels around the world using a rating system based on its traveller opinions, expert input and value, producing a list that represents the top one per cent of all of its hotels and resorts. Overlooking the Bell Channel Bay, Pelican Bay’s state rooms feature furnishings from around the world, water views, private balconies, and patios. The resort also features three swimming pools. Guests can relax poolside and savour a Caribbean-inspired meal or tropical drink at the resort’s al fresco dining option Sabor Restaurant and Bar. US fly-fishing enthusiast was travelling with Ministry of Tourism THE National Dance School of the Bahamas will attend a c ultural exchange programme in Tennessee this year thanks to a donation from FirstCaribbean International Bank. The event will be held from July 26 to August 8 at the Malone Studios in Nashville. The school said the programme will educate and expose local dancers to international techniques, while simultaneously giving them the opportunity to showcase the traditional music and dance of the Bahamas. Founded in 2003, the FirstCaribbean International Comtrust Foundation Limited administers the corporate social responsibility agenda of FirstCaribbean International Bank. Through the foundation, the bank has provided nearly $7 million in funding for causes across the Caribbean, including community development, disaster relief, education, health and wellness, and sports. National Dance School to headto Tennessee Expedia.com’ s ‘Insider s’ Select List’ PELICAN BAY at Lucaya was named as one of the best hotels in the world.

PAGE 10

C M Y K C M Y K LOCAL NEWS PAGE 10, THURSDAY, MAY 21, 2009 THE TRIBUNE .,'=&,7< 0RQWURVH$YHQXHDQG[IRUGWUHHWGRRUVRUWKRIXOWL'LVFRXQWf $11,9(56$5<6$/( 6DOHWDUWKLV)ULGD\D\QG t(QGVDWXUGD\D\WK %,* www.rdicaribbean.com Recruiting Now for the July 2009 intake 27499 Riverview Center Boulevard, Suite 111, Bonita Springs, Florida 34134 USA • Tel 1 239 444 1730 • email info@rdicaribbean.com your goals M ASTERSMBA University of Bradford, University of Sunderland, University of Wales MSc in Public Administration & Development University of Birmingham M Sc Marketing & Management University of Bradford MSc Finance, Accounting & Management University of Bradford MA Education University of Derby LLM University of Derby MSc Information Technology University of Teesside MSc Telecommunications Birmingham City University MSc International Hospitality Management Diploma in Management University of Wales (pre-MBA for non-degree holders University of Wales B ACHELOR DEGREE COURSES University of Wales specialisms in Marketing, Finance, Banking University of Sunderland Accountancy & Financial Management (top u p) University of Derby Psychology University of Teesside Computing (top up • Develop your career while studying • No attendance requirement • Tutor and student support included • Free membership of International Management months months HigherNationalDiploma(entrytotopup Degreesthrough2-yearHND)inBusinessand Management,InformationTechnology,Travel andTourism,Marketing,Finance by Ministry of Education officials. He fled the country after r esigning on February 12 just as Grand Bahama police had launched investigations into the sexual molestation complaints filed by the two former male students, who are both now 19. Police issued an international All Points Bulletin on Birbal, who was arrested on May 3 in New Y ork by US authorities on a traffic violation. Grand Bahama Police were immediately notified of his arrest. The Attorney General’s Office is presently working with authorities in the United States to have Birbal returned to Grand Bahama, where he is wanted for q uestioning in connection with unnatural sexual intercourse. Police officials are also wrapping up their investigations into molestation complaints concerning a female teacher at Eight Mile Rock High school. The incidents have forced the Ministry of Education to respond to weaknesses in its public education system concerning the hiring of teachers. Birbal, who has denied the accusation, has been an art teacher for some 20 years in the public school system. All new teachers will be vetted by police, and safety committees made up of students, teachers, parents, and administrators will be set up at the schools. The government has also established a select committee to look into the incidents at Eight Mile Rock High. ry between us and Florida, the territory between us and Cuba and the territory between us and the Turks (and Caicos said Environment Minister Dr Earl Deveaux. News of the joint venture between BPC and StatoilHydro for oil exploration in Bahamian waters aroused concerns about the environmental consequences of the project, but Mr Deveaux said while he expects there will be "minimal" environmental impact from the seismic testing any drilling would be precipitated by an EIA. "They do a lot of their work based on hauling a very, very long tube along the ocean that sends waves down to test the profile of the rocks and they analyse this information. There have been a number of holes drilled before and they test the material that they extract from these holes and based on their theorizing they come up with a probable estimate of the likelihood of finding oil. "The environmental impact of all of that is minimal and we don't require them to do an environ mental impact (analysis The (apparatus along the seabed so it's not destroying coral and we have no information that it has been proven to disturb marine life like, for example, we can say that sonic waves from submarines have done with whales. Any drilling would have to be done on the basis of a full environmental impact statement and management plan and we haven't reached that stage yet," he said, speculating that if approved, oil drilling would be "at least a decade" away. BPC Limited an oil and gas company with 100 per cent owned offshore license permits in the Bahamas recently announced its new joint undertaking with Norwegian-based StatoilHydro Company the first major oil exploration project in Bahamian waters in 23 years. The companies believe there is high potential for valuable oil and gas production in the southwest Bahamas which they said will benefit the local population. In April, 2007 BPC was granted five licenses for oil and gas exploration in five areas in the south central Bahamas. But as the exploration licenses included in this new joint venture agreement are new license areas for BPC in the southwest of the Bahamas, they are still under application pending the approval of the Bahamas government, said a joint press statement from StatoilHy dro and BPC earlier this week. "The company (BPC licenses approved for exploration, but we'd suspended any activity pending the outcome of discus sions with the Cuban government and our representation to the United Nations on the geographical territorial boundaries," said Mr Deveaux. Since April, 2007 BPC carried out background work, including the collection and evaluation of scientific data and samples from previous exercises. The next stages will involve seismic evaluations, and ulti mately, drilling, said BPC’s resident manager in the Bahamas Idris Reid. Kai Nielsen, Public Affairs Manager for Statoil UK, said environmental safety is top on the company's agenda. "Prior to any operations, we will carry out a mapping of sensi tive areas. “This will enable us to develop and implement necessary protec tive measures. “In addition, contingency equipment will be available during drilling operations, to ensure the safety of people and protection of the environment. These are things that we will start working on, when we have received the authority approval." “At this meeting, Permanent Secretaries were advised that it is likely that each agency’s 2009/10 allocation would be reduced by approximately seven per cent. However, this reduction has had to be revisited based on the revised 2009/10 revenue projection,” the memorandum reads. With an annual average of over $1.5 billion in recur rent expenditure, this 10 per cent cut could represent over $150 million in savings for government. According to well placed sources, this reduction in cost across each ministry signifies the extent to which government is struggling to meet its expenses and keep the country afloat in an ever worsening global downturn. While it is unlikely that government would outright terminate employees based on attempts to save costs, it is believed that those who have reached the age of retirement will be encouraged to accept packages and be removed from government payroll. Additionally, it has also been suggested that government will not be engaging in any new staff, nor will there be any promotions, or re-classification, and most certainly no authorisation of “unnecessary” overtime pay. In terms of budget reallocations, one agency, the Gaming Board has reportedly been instructed to reduce its expenses by some $500,000. To reach this figure, some 160 ex-police officers, and six consultants are reportedly on the chopping block. Many of them, having reached the retirement age of 60 years will reportedly be asked to retire from the public ser vice, while others, who are currently enjoying their pension packages from the Royal Bahamas Police Force, will be terminated from the Board entirely. Financial Controller at the Gaming Board Adrian Sands declined to comment on the matter when telephone by The Tribune yesterday. However, the Sec retary, Bernard Bonamy a former Commissioner of Police confirmed that the department would be making cut backs according to the instructions hand ed down by the Ministry of Finance. “All departments were asked to bring their budgets within line of the memorandum sent out from the Ministry of Finance,” Mr Bonamy said. Having regard to the current global economic downturn, Mr Bonamy said it is unknown what the final figures would be for the Gaming Board, or whether or not any terminations would be focused primarily on any former police officers employed at the Board. Beyond this, he said he would not be able to comment. EIGHT MILE ROCK teacher Edward Buchanan talks on his cell phone as a plain clothed officer escorts him to an unmarked police vehicle in the parking lot of the International Building, where the Ministry of Education Offices are located. F ROM page one EMR school FROM page one Fir ms seeking oil drilling approvals foot lot in a subdivision south of Treasure Cay for $2,201.16. On the other hand Mr Russell’s wife, sister-inlaw, and the husband of the former Director’s secretary each bought an acre of Crown land in the area of Blackwood Village, Abaco, for $4,356. It is claimed that after The Tribune started reporting the allegations being made in connection with land transactions in the Lands and Surveys department, files started to be removed quietly. Since then, all attempts by The Tribune to speak with officials at this office have been met with silence. Yesterday, an attempt was made to speak with the former director’s secretary. After The Tribune ’s call was transferred to the secretary, the calls were rerouted and never answered. Attempts to reach Mr Greaves also proved to be just as eventful as he was often reported as being in two different places at the same time. On one call The Tribune was advised that Mr Greaves was at the Ministry of Lands and Local Government. Then, another call was placed with the Department of Lands and Surveys, where Mr Greaves was said to be “on the telephone” and would return a call to this newspaper. However, no call was returned up to press time last night. FROM page one Sobering outlook expected T wo officials ‘questioned’ F ROM page one

PAGE 11

n By BETH HARRIS AP Sports Writer LOS ANGELES (AP an inconsistent start to the Western Conference finals, Kobe Bryant was the steadying presence the Los Angeles Lakers needed. He took over in the fourth quarter, finishing with 40 points, including six free throws in the final 30 seconds, to lift Los Angeles to a 105-103 win over the Denver Nuggets in the opener on Tuesday night after the Lakers trailed most of the game. "Once I sensed we didn't have the energy, I had to take it upon myself to lead by example," he said. "It's just part of my responsibilities to this team." He did it even with an injury. Bryant had the right ring finger on his shooting hand taped after the game. He dislocated it against Cleveland in January and had to have it popped back in place Tuesday. "He was the scoring opportunity for us," Lakers coach Phil Jackson said. "We had very lit-tle else going on. He muscled his way through." Pau Gasol added 13 points and 14 rebounds for the Lake rs, who were down by seven in t he fourth quarter. Gasol's two f ree throws tied the game for the last time at 99 before Bryant started his closing streak at the line, offsetting a 3-pointer by Chauncey Billups and a free throw by J.R. Smith. Carmelo Anthony scored 39 points and Billups added 18 for the Nuggets, who hadn't played since taking care of Dallas in five games last Wednesday. "There's no moral victories in playoff basketball," Denver coach George Karl said. "The next 48 hours are going to bed ifficult." Game 2 is Thursday at Staples Center. The Nuggets have lost 11 consecutive playoff games to the Lakers, including a first-round sweep last season. Bryant, who was 9 for 9 from t he line in the fourth quarter, m ade two for a 101-99 lead with 30 seconds left. Trevor Ariza stole the inbounds pass near midcourt and the Lakers were able to run the clock down to 10 seconds when Bryant made two more free throws. "He threw the ball and gave me just enough air to go get it," Ariza said of Anthony Carter. "That's all it took." Billups hit a 3-pointer to get the Nuggets to 103-102 with 5 seconds left, but then Anthony fouled Bryant, who made his final two foul shots. "They have the best closer in the sport and we didn't doe nough," Karl said. S mith made one free throw with 3.2 seconds left and missed the second intentionally. Bryant grabbed the game's last rebound. "Any great player would love that moment, get the ball in their hands every time down the court and make something hap pen," Anthony said. The Lakers were back in action 48 hours after closing out Houston in seven games in the conference semifinals. "We won that game on energy and gutting it out," Jackson said. "They outmuscled us and put pressure on the passers. Wet alked about getting the game c lose enough to win it at the end. We got a couple stops that helped us." Denver led most of the game in its return to the conference finals for the first time in 24 years. But the Nuggets couldn't stop Bryant over the final 6:48, when he scored 15 points, including seven straight to help the Lakers improve to 7-1 at home in the playoffs. They are 8-0 this postseason when scoring 100 points. "You get used to greatness," Lamar Odom said. "He was amazing. He wanted the ball. Kobe is always going to helpy ou or bail you out more than h e hurts you." The Lakers used a 9-0 run, including seven straight by Derek Fisher, to go up 70-66. From there, though, the Nuggets ended the third quarter on a 10-4 run to lead 76-74. Billups had five consecutive points, including a free throw after a technical foul on Bryant, in the spurt. Bryant has five technicals in the playoffs. "I won't get anoth er one," he vowed. The Nuggets took a 13-point lead in the opening quarter, but hurt themselves by going 12 of 21 from the line in the half. Billups, who missed three free throws in the first two playoff series combined, missed his first three of the game. " We missed out on a great o pportunity to steal this game," he said. "We lose this game on our poor free throw shooting." Notes: Smith sprained his right knee and will be re-evaluated Wednesday. The Nuggets fell to 2-3 on the road in the playoffs. Denver F-G Linas Kleiza played despite a fracture on the tip of his right thumb. C M Y K C M Y K INTERNATIONAL SPORTS PAGE 12, THURSDAY, MAY 21, 2009 TRIBUNE SPORTS Bryant’s charity stripe shots give Lakers 105-103 win n By The Associated Press Denver at L.A. Lakers, 9 p.m. The Nuggets try to even their series after a close loss in Game 1. S S T T A A R R Tuesday Kobe Bryant, Lakers, scored 40 points and made six free throws in the final 30 seconds to lift Los Angeles to a 105-103 win over Denver in Game 1 of the west finals. H H E E R R E E W W E E G G O O The Los Angeles Clippers won the NBA draft lottery on Tuesday, giving the franchise the chance to select Blake Griffin, the national college player of the year from Oklahoma. S S T T R R O O N N G G I I N N D D E E F F E E A A T T Carmelo Anthony scored 39 points in Denver's 105103 loss to the Los Angeles Lakers in Game 1 of the Western Conference finals. S S P P E E A A K K I I N N G G "I think five years from now Blake Griffin will be hitting his stride in the NBA and he will be an impact player wherever he is." Clippers president Andy Roeser, who represented the Clippers at the draft lottery. He was wearing a sports jacket lined with a Clippers uniform with a No. 1 on the left side and a 23, Griffin's number, on the other NBA Today LAKERS forward Trevor Ariza (center leftright Conference finals Tuesday night in Los Angeles... (AP Photo: Mark J Terrill

PAGE 12

C M Y K C M Y K SPORTS TRIBUNE SPORTS THURSDAY, MAY 21, 2009, PAGE 13 Highlights: Primary school track championships P h o t o s : F e l i p M a j o r / T r i b u n e s t a f f LEO KEMP , of Mangrove Cay All-Age School, wins the 200m... RONIKA MAJOR , of Long Island, in action yesterday... DAVYONA ROBINSON wins the 200m... KENISHA PINDER wins 200m...

PAGE 13

Judo athletes get ready for World Cadet Championships C M Y K C M Y K S PORTS PAGE 14, THURSDAY, MAY 21, 2009 TRIBUNE SPORTS W ORLD renowned elite athlete coach and 2004 Olympian Dr Rhadi Ferguson was in New Providence again for an intensive three-day training seminar. The purpose of the seminar was to assist the Bahamas Judo F ederation in their elite training preparation for the World Cadet Championships, set for August in Budapest, Hungary. Dr Ferguson left the Bahamas Judo Federation witha detailed 17-page blueprint of w hat is necessary to succeed competing against the world’s best. The Bahamas will be represented by 15-year-old Cynthia Rahming, the number one rated female in the country, alongw ith Alex Martinborough, the third place medallist in the Barbados International Championship. “The new training is hard but I feel it is necessary,” says Alex. “Getting up at 4:30 in the morning is really tough,” says Cynthia, “and then we have to be back in the training hall at 7pm.” If the athletes perform well a t the tournament they will qualify for a spot in the Junior Olympics which is scheduled to be held in Singapore in 2010. The training is intended to last 12 weeks. A You Tube documentary was produced on the training by the Bahamas Judo Federation entitled, “Bahamas Judo -C hasing the Dream”. It has already received exten sive praise from many practitioners around the world. This documentary will also be further developed for Cable Bahamas. It is important for the Bahamians to see young Bahamians striving for excel lence,” says federation president D’Arcy Rahming. “What I am most pleased with is that we had the partici p ation of All-Star Family Centre, Island Jujitsu, Academy of the Martial Arts and the Fox Hill Club at the seminar with D r Ferguson. The Judo community is selflessly helping to prepare these athletes.” Anyone wishing to assist or become involved with Bahamas Judo can contact the federation at Joe Farrington Road Head q uarters @ 364-6773 or through the Federation website: www.bahamasjudo.com /LFHQVHHRIWKH*UDQG%DKDPDRUW$XWKRULW\&R/WG /LFHQVHHRIWKH%DKDPDV*RYHUQPHQW $ IDPLO\RZQHG/LPLWHG/LDELOLW\&RPSDQ\FRPPLWWHGWREXLOGLQJDEHWWHU%DKDPDVIURP :DONHUV&D\LQWKHRUWK:HVWWRD\DJXDQDDQG,QDJXDLQWKHRXWK(DVW :HZRXOGOLNHWRWKDQNRXU(PSOR\HHVRXUIFHUVDQGRXU'LUHFWRUVIRUVXFFHVVIXOO\JXLGLQJWKLVUP WKURXJKPDQ\GHPDQGLQJDQGFKDOOHQJLQJ\HDUVRIFRQWLQXRXVRSHUDWLRQ +DU:DXJKUHVLGHQW%ULDQ:9LFHUHVLGHQW *RGIU:9LFHUHVLGHQW/HHDORQHHFUHWDU\—UHDVXUHU *UHJJ7:DXJK'LUHFWRU.HYLQ:DXJK'LUHFWRU 9+DULSUDVKDG+DULf'LUHFWRU'RXJODVUXGGHQ'LUHFWRU D R RHADI s hows Malcolm moves A NUMBER of judo athletes participated in the seminar... DR RHADI oversees ground fighting...

PAGE 14

n By RENALDO DORSETT Sports Reporter r dorsett@tribunemedia.net H u ndreds of students from around the nation descended upon the Thomas A Robinson stadium yesterday to open thef irst of a three-day competition t o determine the best primary school athletes in the Bahamas. The Annual Primary School Track and Field Championships began Wednesday with heatsa nd field events dominating the s chedule early on. Family Island athletes topped t he leaderboards in many of the contested events, led by the Androsian contingent who made frequent trips to the medal podi um. I n the Boys’ B division soft b all throw, Solomon Lloyd of N orth Andros placed first in 5 7.70m, fellow Islander Dave Pratt of South Andros was second with a throw of 56.27s and Julius Nottage of Temple Chris tian was third with a 52.90m toss. N orth Androsian Shaquille N ewton had the top throw in the Boys’ A division shot put far ahead of the competition with his throw of 11.26s. John Jean of Sadie Curtis was second with a throw of 9.69s andD evon Ferguson of South Andros was third with a 9.24m throw. Androsians placed first and second in the Girls’ A division long jump with North Andros’ Shantea Gibson first with a jump of 3.96m, South Andros’ Kendra King second with a jump of 3.87s and Jasmine Farrington of Freedom Baptist third with a jump of 3.86m. In the Boys’ C division long jump, Kai Jones of Queen’s Col lege took first with a leap of 3.60m, Temple Christian’s Christopher Johnson was second in 3.38m and Ricky Moxey Jr of Exuma was third with 3.24m. While just two finals were con tested on the track – the 400m and the 1200m – a number ofh igh level performances were t urned in on the field. In the boys D division 400m, Kendrick Major of Sadie Curtis took first place in 1:22.47s. Ulrich Ferguson of Claridge P rimary was second in 1:23.73s w hile Nathan Moss of Temple C hristian was third in 1:24.09s. I n the girls’ quarter mile, Exu ma’s Brennia Smith took first place in 1:28.15s. E keminiabasi Morgan of S andilands Primary was second in 1:28.52s and Tyrese Sands of St Bede’s was third in 1:30.00s. In the Boys’ B division 1200m, Temple Christian’s Julius Not-t age took first place in 4:08.63s, B ernard Seymour of Long Island w as second in 4:11.72s. Compe t ition continues at 10am today. C M Y K C M Y K THURSDAY, MAY 21, 2009 THETRIBUNE PAGE 15 PAGE 14 Judo athletes prepare for World Cadet Championships... Bryant’s charity stripe shots give Lakers 105-103 win... S ee page 12 Golfers are invited. Championship golf from $30 per person* Who are the Bahamas’ best primary school athletes? F e l i p M a j o r / T r i b u n e s t a f f DAVYONA ROBINSON , of Martin Town Primary in Grand Bahama, soars in the high jump yesterday. See more photos on page 13

PAGE 15

Four Seasons’ 8% gross fee ‘too much’ C M Y K C M Y K SECTIONB business@tribunemedia.net THURSDAY, MAY 21, 2009 THETRIBUNE $4. 68 $4. 51 $4. 69The information contained is from a third party and The Tribune can not be held r esponsible for errors and/or omission f rom the daily report.$ $3.61 $3.62 $3.48 DIONISIO D’AGUILAR n By NEIL HARTNELL Tribune Business Editor BAHAMIAN companies selling “big ticket” products and luxury goods are likely to be “devastated” by the current recession because consumersare staying away from major purchases, the outgoing Cham-ber of Commerce president said yesterday, as business owners increasingly discuss their “dras-tic measures list”. Dionisio D’Aguilar, who is also Superwash’s president, said the closure of Exuma’s Four Seasons Emerald Bay Resort,and the impending loss of a further 500 jobs, had “sent a shud der” through the collective Bahamian economy, and caused business owners to wonder whether something similar might happen to a New Provi dence-based property. I think the closure of the project in Exuma has caused people to think this thing could get worse than it is already, and the unemployment rate could go up significantly,” Mr D’Aguilar told Tribune Business. “I think it’s made everyone nervous, and has got everyone in a dither.” The Chamber president said it was hard to make sweeping generalisations about the state of the Bahamian economy, as some companies were doing well the likes of Cable Bahamas and Abaco Markets were all reporting net profit increases for early 2009. Mr D’Aguilar said he considered himself lucky, Superwash’s sales only being down by 5-10 per cent for 2009 to-date. In comparison, the Bahamian auto industry had been “devastated”, with new car sales, as revealed by Tribune Business, collec‘Big ticket’ fir ms to be ‘devastated’ Businesses openly discussing ‘drastic measures’ list if recession deepens S S E E E E p p a a g g e e 8 8 B B n By NEIL HARTNELL Tribune Business Editor HOTEL room revenues have continued to trend 20 per cent behind prior year comparatives into the 2009 second quarter, the Bahamas Hotel Association’s (BHA terday, the industry’s main concern being whether the first quarter performance will be enough to sustain resort properties through the remainder of this year. Robert Sands told Tribune Business that the sector’s main concern regarding the 2009 first quarter, in which hotel room revenues were off on average by 23 per cent year-over-year, was not so much the performance but whether enough revenue and net income had been generated to sustain the industry and its resorts through the quieter second and thirdq uarters. “What’s concerning about that [the first quarter perfor mance] is this is traditionally the period we maximise our income in,” Mr Sands said. “The concerning issue is whatw ill be the impact for subseq uent quarters going forward. T hat’s the concerning element. “It’s not so much the performance and what we achieved in the first quarter, but how it impacts the results in the second and third quarters, which are much softer periods of revenue generation.” Bahamian resorts tradition a lly generate most of their income during the period leading up to Easter every year, usu ally from February to April. The profits and revenues gen erated during the first and early second quarters then largelys ustain them through the year’s q uieter spells. T he BHA president added: “It looks as if the industry is Hotel room revenues off 20% into Q2 I ndustry ‘concerned’ over whether first quarter performance will sustain resorts through quieter periods S S E E E E p p a a g g e e 4 4 B B * Brand wanted $26m investment into Emerald Bay by main creditor in 2009 * Last offer for Exuma resort was $40m, sources say * But BHA president says too early to write-off ‘anchor property’ strategy despite Exuma hotel’ s demise n By NEIL HARTNELL Tribune Business Editor THE Four Seasons’ 30-year management contract to brand Exuma’s Emerald Bay Resort paid it fees equivalent to 8 per cent of the property’s gross per annum revenues, informed sources told Tribune Business yesterday, a figure that proved “too much to handle”. This newspaper was also told that Four Seasons made heavy capital investment demands on the resort’s initial ownership group, Emerald Bay Resort Holdings (EBRH its main creditor, the London office of Japanese insurer, Mit sui. Tribune Business was told that Four Seasons had wanted Mitsui to invest, in terms of cap ital expenditure, some $26 milS S E E E E p p a a g g e e 9 9 B B n By NEIL HARTNELL Tribune Business Editor T HE Bahamas Hotel Association (BHA pre-clearance facilities can be extended to accommodate the hundreds of tourists who visit this nation by private plane, Tribune Business was told yesterday, with the industry wanting to hold on to this high-end visitor niche. Speaking as the US Homeland Security Department this week implemented new rules requiring private aircraft flying between the US and the Bahamas to submit electronic passenger manifests in advance, Robert Sands, the BHA’s presi dent, said: “We want to make it e asier for them [private aircraft a nd their passengers]. “One of the issues right now is the question of pre-clearance, and how that can be expanded to accommodate private aircraft passengers. At the moment, they have to go through the USf or pre-clearance. There is no pre-clearance in Nassau.” Mr Sands said the “ease of travel and ability to leave the destination” smoothly were key Hotels assess private plane pre-clearance S S E E E E p p a a g g e e 1 1 1 1 B B n By NEIL HARTNELL Tribune Business Editor A commercial fishery operation targeting the invasive Lionfish species could produce a “win-win” situation for the Bahamian econ omy, fishing industry and the environment, a leading environmental consultant told Tribune Business yesterday, generating the perfect ‘triple bottom line’ impact. Keith Bishop, co-principal of Islands by Design and head of environmental management for Abaco’s Schooner Bay development, said a fishing trip sponsored by the project’s head, Orjan Lindroth, had provided an insight into the possible economic impact a commercialf ishing operation targeting Lionfish could have. The four-day fishing trip sponsored by Mr Lindroth and Schooner Bay netted more than 1,200 Lionfish, a profitablec atch if it was to be turned into m oney. Praising Mr Lindroth’s initiat ive, Mr Bishop explained: “We p ut it to the test locally because we had a huge number of the species here, in the area of Crossing Rock. It was something that was readily accepted by the local fishermen. “We offered a bounty of $1.50 per piece, and one individual pulled in 250 of them in a day. He was able to make himself $375 in one day. Not bad money for an out-of-season fisherman.” The Bahamian environmental consultant pointed out that apart from the local Bahamian and resident population, there was an immediate market for Lionfish as food from the five million tourists that visited the Bahamas every year. Lionfish, when properly filleted, posed no threat to human health, Mr Bishop telling Tribune Business that one he had e aten had “a pleasant taste”, w ith the product treated as a delicacy in the fish’s native Indo-Pacific region. He said efforts to develop a Bahamian market for Lionfish as a delicacy had already begun, with New Providence resident Alexandra Maillis-Lynch, owner of Alexandra’s Catering and the August Moon Cafe, offering up to $8 per pound for the fish, up to 100 fish. Lionfish are thought to have been introduced to Bahamian and Caribbean waters from household fish tanks. While small to medium-sized, they have no known predators in the Bahamas and breed rapidly, releasing up to 30,000 eggs once every 28 days. Found around reefs and marine structures, including marinas, shipwrecks, jetties and piers, their venom is poisonous, c ausing muscular and respirat ory system distress in human victims. But of far greater concern is that Lionfish feed on virtually anything young groupers, crawfish (lobster snappers. These are key products for the Bahamian fisheries industry, and the nation’s envi ronment. Mr Bishop yesterday warned that the Bahamian fisheries industry would suffer a “huge negative impact” unless something was done to curtail the growth of the Lionfish population in the Bahamian waters. He added that, in the absence of a natural predator, Lionfish “eat everything”. One fish he had cut open revealed stomach contents that included a host of small-scale fish and a small lobCommercial fishery solution to Lionfish Leading consultant says proposal would be ‘win-win’ for Bahamian economy, fisheries industry and environment, creating ‘triple bottom line’ impact S S E E E E p p a a g g e e 3 3 B B

PAGE 16

SCOTIABANK (Bahamas 49-member processing support centre has adopted Uriah McPhee Primary School, part of an initiative that will see each unit of the bank partner with a primary school in their community. Rekell Griffin, Scotiabank’s senior manager for marketing and public relations, presented Helen Simmons-Johnson, the school’s principal, with two computers, plus with reading software to be used in the school’s reading laboratory. In an address to the administrators, teachers and students of Uriah McPhee, Ms Griffin said: “Scotiabank is very excited about this new initiative. Through this programme, we intend to use the human resources, talents and ideas of our employees to strengthen and enhance the quality of education in the communities where we live and work.” The Adopt A School Programme is a spin-off from Scotiabank’s Bright Future Programme, a philanthropic initiative that helps support opportunities for the children and communities in which the bank is present. Each partnership can take the form of financial support, volunteering, shared expertise or physical resources. The Pro-c essing Support Centre has c ommenced a literacy pro gramme at Uriah McPhee, and has plans to launch a science project in the near future. C M Y K C M Y K BUSINESS PAGE 2B, THURSDAY, MAY 21, 2009 THE TRIBUNE for ScholarsTheDoctorsHospitalDr. Meyer Rassin FoundationDate:Thursday,May21st2009 Time:12noon Donation:Tickets$75.00 Place:Luciano’sofChicagoRestaurant (DVW%D\6WUHHW1DVVDX%DKDPDV 6LOHQW$XFWLRQ'RRU3UL]HV*LIW%DJVForticketsandinformation FDOORUYLVLW58%,16 orDoctorsHospitalMarketing 'HSWDoctorsHospital & RUBINS hostaluncheon&fashion showinaidof DedicatedtoCaringWhenyougiveagifttoTheDoctorsHospital Dr.MeyerRassinFoundation,youprovide scholarshipsandfinancialassistanceto personspursuingeducationinallareasof healthcare.Inadditionyouwillbemakinga valuablecontributiontowardsthefieldof medicine,education&healthofTheBahamas.RUBINS FashionshowbyRubinsfeaturing thenewlookofLizClaiborne NewYorkbyIsaacMizrahi. Scotiabank units adopting schools REKELL GRIFFIN (far right , Scotiabank’s senior manager for marketing and public relations, presents Helen Simmons-Johnson, the principal, with two computers and reading software...

PAGE 17

n B y CHESTER ROBARDS B usiness Reporter crobards@tribunemedia.net T HE DELAYED implementation of the commercial banking sector’s Automated ClearingH ouse (ACH growth of e-commerce in the B ahamas, the Data Protection Commissioner told Tribune Business yesterday. G eorge Rodgers said the ACH would “definitely assist”B ahamas-based e-commerce to move ahead much more swiftly than has been the case in recent years. The Government has moved forward to ready the Bahamas for e-commerce by passing a series of Bills related to electronic monitoring, misuse and concessions, thus providing a regu latory framework for the industry. “The Government has produced thus far what firms and individuals need to do to ensure c ompliance with the Data Protection Act,” he said. Mr Rodgers said the delay in implementing the ACH wass omething of an embarrassment f or the Bahamian commercial banks, as several deadlines have passed them by. The Central Bank has conseq uently decided to “step in and d rive forward” the process of e stablishing the ACH. One local bank told Tribune Business recently that they have been proactive in trying to integ rate their system with a device t hat would make it possible for a p erson anywhere in the world to make a payment to a Bahamian-owned website, and have that payment posted to an account in t heir establishment. However, representatives of t hat bank said the system’s activation would require more time to be duly implemented. The Government has already provided the framework for this k ind of online transaction with the implementation of the Computer Misuse Act, Data Protection Act and Electronic Concessions Act. I t is hoped that when the ACH is activated, businesses will h ave to deal with less cash and, possibly, less crime. One huge proponent of the ACH has been Superwash owner and Bahamas Chamber of C ommerce president, Dionisio D’Aguilar. He has been pessimistic about the local banks’ urgency in implementing the ACH, tellingt his paper recently: “If it’s left to the clearing banks it’s never going to happen.” Mr Rodgers asserted that the ACH would be a step in the right direction for e-commerce in the Bahamas. “It would definitely assist local e -commerce, and would then allow banks to deal with each o ther directly,” he said. The ACH is intended to replace the current manual system for settling cheque transact ions, where cheques drawn on o ne bank but due to be deposite d at another have to be taken by armoured car to a central location where they are settled by representatives of the variousi nstitutions. A part from allowing interbank cheques to be processed electronically rather than manua lly at a cheque clearing facility, the ACH system will allow d irect debits and credits from accounts, debit cards and a shared Automatic Teller Machine (ATM The latter would allow B ahamians to use their cash cards at any bank branch. It would also reduce the time persons spent in line waiting to cash and deposit pay cheques, as they c ould be deposited to their account. B ahamian consumers would also be able to use direct debits from their bank accounts to pay bills such as cable television and electricity. T he ACH could ultimately lead to the creation of just one back office system for the entire Bahamas. It may also help develop SWITCH products, whereB ahamians could use their cash cards at any bank's ATM machine. A further potential bonus from the ACH will be the opening up a whole range of electronic banking services in the Bahamas, including its use in the o nline purchase of government goods and services. U ltimately, through modernising the Bahamian payments system through electronic means, the ACH will provide buyers and s ellers with more certainty and c onfidence, especially when it c omes to settling their transactions. It will also enhance economic and business efficiency by set-t ling transactions quicker, boosti ng business cash flows. C M Y K C M Y K BUSINESS THE TRIBUNE THURSDAY, MAY 21, 2009, PAGE 3B Commercial fishery solution to Lionfish ster. By establishing a commercial fishing operation targetingL ionfish, Mr Bishop said the B ahamas would not only be removing an invasive species and protecting its environment, but also generating an econom-ic return and providing work for fishermen especially outof-season. You’re removing an invader, but are able to provide food from it,” Mr Bishop explained. “You’re removing a negative invader from the marine environment, but turning it into an economic upturn for persons who can find a market for it. “I think it’s a win-win for everybody. We take an invader out and sell it as food.” Mr Bishop said any commer cial fishery did not necessarily have to be started by the Ministry of Agriculture and Marine Resources, as maybe all the Government needed to do was teach Bahamians how to handle and catch Lionfish safely, then “provide avenues to market”. Lionfish could be caught and offered to Bahamian restaura teurs free or for a nominal charge – in order to stimulate interest among consumers in the region, it was suggested. The Government and large Bahamas-based hotel chains could also step in as guaranteed buyers until the industry got off the ground, and cottage indus tries would spring up around it, creating a much-needed revenue source for local communities. F F R R O O M M p p a a g g e e 1 1 B B Banks delay e-commerce

PAGE 18

down about 20 per cent yearto-date on room revenues. That’s for the first four months.” The room revenue decline is likely to have been produced by a combination of declining occupancies, with stopover visitors to Nassau/Paradise Island down 15.9 per cent year-overyear for January 2009, and the discounting that hotels have used to ensure business volumes are maintained. Mr Sands added that while room revenues might be down by one-fifth, to assess how Nassau/Paradise Island hotels were performing overall, the bigger picture needed to be examined. Rooms were only one revenue stream, with properties such as Kerzner International’s Atlantis resort and Baha Mar’s Cable Beach properties also generating revenues from casino gaming and food and beve rage. M r Sands added that individual resort properties had also “made some adjustments to expenses” internally to mitigate the bottom line impact from the revenue downturn. He acknowledged, though, that the top line fall had “impacted on cash flow”. The BHA president said it was “difficult to say” whether the Bahamian hotel industry would experience any more mass lay-offs, although he pointed to the RIU Paradise Island resort’s planned closure for several months, during which renovations to the property would be made, as an example of the decisions hotel owners were taking. “Certainly, there are still downward pressures on occupancies and downward pressure on rates, but that’s the world we’re living in during this recessionary period in the US, and individual properties are gett ing used to making adjustments i nternally to reflect the new world order,” Mr Sands said. “While booking windows are still short, a lot of properties are doing value-added marketing to attract business to the destination. Many properties are employing different strategies to make things work.” Kerzner International was employing an events-based strategy, via concerts from the likes of Miley Cyrus and the Jonas Brothers, to generate excitement for its Atlantis products and attract US guests there. Other hotel properties were binding themselves more strongly to their brands and the latter’s network, offering valueadded and specific programmes “to ensure we have volume at a rate that can still generate income”. “The Bahamas is remaining visible in the marketplace and staying in the mindset of the travelling consumer,” Mr Sands s aid. “When you look at our r esults in comparison to world and regional competitors, we are not faring too badly. “I think the rest of 2009 will remain a challenge for the industry. Member hotels are employing many initiatives to reduce the level of decline and to try to remain financially viable operations going forward.” As for Baha Mar, where Mr Sands is senior vice-president for governmental and public affairs, the Sheraton resort was meeting plan expectations, while the Wyndham was “not meeting plans at all”. C M Y K C M Y K BUSINESS PAGE 4B, THURSDAY, MAY 21, 2009 THE TRIBUNE Hotel room revenues off 20 per cent into Q2 F F R R O O M M p p a a g g e e 1 1 B B

PAGE 19

C M Y K C M Y K BUSINESS THE TRIBUNE THURSDAY, MAY 21, 2009, PAGE 5B Teachers & Salaried Workers Co-operative Credit Union Limited Lenn King SecretaryNOTICE OF ANNUAL GENERAL MEETING TO: All Members of Teachers and Salaried Workers Co-operative Credit Union Limited East Street South and Independence Drive Notice is hereby given that the Thirty-Second (32ndeachers & Salaried Workers Co-operative Credit Union Limited will be held at the British Colonial Hilton Hotel located on Bay Street, on Saturday May 23, 2009 commencing at 8:00 a.m. for the following purposes: To receive the Report of the Board of Directors for 2008. To receive the Audited Accounts for 2008. To elect members of the Board of Directors. To elect members of the Supervisory Committee To discuss and approve the Budget for 2009. To take action on such matters as may come beforethe meeting. DHL JOB DESCRIPTIONPOSITION: Collections Agent JOB FAMILY: Credit & Collections RCS CODE: A20004 REPORTS TO : Collections Lead LOCATION: Country Finance Department OVERALL PURPOSE: Under limited supervision in a team environment provide efcient and effective credit approvals. To ensure timely credit application processing, respond to information requests and issues. Ensure accuracy of all credit decisions functions while staying within company policy and procedural guidelines. DUTIES AND RESPONSIBILITIES: making credit decisions. delinquent accounts. Processes credit applications. Investigates disputes and reviews documentation. Implements credit suspensions. MINIMUM QUALIFICATIONS: direction amid competing priorities and deadlines. For more information please contact:Romell K. Knowles I Country Manager Email:Romell.Knowles@dhl.com n By CHESTER ROBARDS Business Reporter crobards@tribunemedia.net A LEADING Bahamian financial analyst said yesterday that the US economy appears to be bottoming out, which could mean the beginning of an economic recovery for the Bahamas by the end of the 2009 third quarter, with a noticeable turnaround occurring by 2010. Kenwood Kerr, speaking at the Rotary Club of Southeast Nassau’s monthly meeting, said Americans are regaining confidence in US capital markets.He argued that Wall Street was beginning to recover slowly from its embarrassing topple last year, when stock values plummeted and hundreds of workers were left without jobs. The Providence Advisors chief executive said some six million people in the US have lost their jobs in the past 12 months, and Bahamian unemployment is at 12 per cent. “No on is immune to these crises, and we’re certainly not off the hook from these business closures, spending cut backs, the job losses and the massive unemployment that we’re seeing,” he added. Mr Kerr said Bahamians must remain prudent with their finances, in spite of peaks and troughs in the economy. He suggested that the basic principles of saving for the future should hold true whether the economy is in a poor state or booming, or if the finances are business-related or personal. Mr Kerr said businesses should keep their models simple and manageable, know their competitors, and remain flexible. To achieve success in a recession, he suggested businesses outsource labour and prudently manage cash flow. Mr Kerr said individuals should develop a “financial road map”, budget in order to track spending and recognise bad spending habits. He said families are most at risk from unwise spending, and have been notoriously bad at planning ahead for financial emergencies. “The Government, while it has to be frugal in its fiscal responsibilities, there is an obligation to keep the general state of the economy going until things return to some normalcy,” said Mr Kerr. According to him, government spending is essential to generating economic activity during difficult times. He argued that the Government’s social safety net, road improvements and airport development are essential in generating this economic stimulation. “Governments have to be spending to generate and initiate economic activity,” he said. Bahamas recovery may start at end-Q3 Kenwood Kerr

PAGE 20

THE Bahamian public will shortly be consulted for their views on content regulation in the electronic communications sector, a leading executive on the committee overseeing the reform effort has said. Julian Francis, deputy chairman of the committee overseeing the Bahamas Telecommu-n ications Company’s (BTC v atisation, said during discuss ions with the business, tourism a nd financial services sectors t hat public consultation has b een critical to shaping the prop osed new communications regulatory regime. Since December 2008, he said the committee had published three public consultations inviting comments from industry stakeholders and the general public on a number of issues, including the new framework for electronic communications, licensing and universal serviceo bligations. In the weeks to come there w ill also be a comprehensive p ublic consultation on the very i mportant issue of content regu lation. The privatisation comm ittee or URCA (if the URCA Act has already been brought into effect by then) will engage a pretty detailed formal consultation in the form of a document. This document will describe what it is the Government thinks we should be doing going forward, pose a certain number of specific issues and questions, and ask for responses to those asw ell as other comments which t he respondents would wish to m ake,” Mr Francis said. H e said responses from the i ndustry, the Bahamian public a nd international organisations a nd entities with an interest in t he Bahamas will largely inform URCA as to how it should structure the regulation of content going forward. C M Y K C M Y K BUSINESS THE TRIBUNE THURSDAY, MAY 21, 2009, PAGE 7B Content consultation to be issued shortly might question why Mr Francis is speaking on regulation, given that he is also executive chairman of BTC, one of the key entities that will be regulated by URCA. Still, Mr Francis said the maximum penalty URCA might impose on an operator that violates the law, or someone who is not licensed, would be 10 perc ent of gross relevant revenue. However, he said URCA will be a “light-touch” rather than a heavy handed regulator. “It will regulate only where it needs to regulate. It will not seek to define every single minute detail of how the sector works. It will look at the operation of the sector. It will certainly fix the rules and put them in place, and seek to ensure there is a very transparent and c lear environment in the B ahamas, but it will stay out of t he operation of the sector except in those circumstances which require the regulator to be involved,” Mr Francis said. He added that the industry will now have its own ad-hoc tribunal, which like URCA will be funded by the industry. Headed by a president, the Utilities Appeals Tribunal (UAT experts brought together as needed to review URCA deci sions. It is expected that the UAT will allow for a more efficient dispute resolution and appeals process for licensees, Mr Francis said. F F R R O O M M p p a a g g e e 1 1 4 4 B B

PAGE 21

C M Y K C M Y K BUSINESS PAGE 8B, THURSDAY, MAY 21, 2009 THE TRIBUNE 0,1,675<)%/,&:25.6 $1'$163257127,&($9,1*:25.6 :(67%$
PAGE 22

lion to further upgrade and build-out Emerald Bay during 2009 a demand which, when taken with its management fee and lengthy contract, proved unsustainable. Prime Minister Hubert Ingraham told the House of Assembly this week that the terms of Four Seasons’ management contract had effectively acted as an obstacle to Emerald Bay’s sale, their onerous conditions discouraging buyers prior to the resort’s announced closure on May 26, 2009. “As it transpired, the requirements contained in the management contract with the hotel’s operators, the Four Seasons, proved particularly challenging for a number of the interested parties. During the 14 months of the process since June 2007, the receivers signed letters of intent with one party and entered into formal contract with two other parties; none with success,” Mr Ingraham said. Four Seasons, as revealed by Tribune Business, has admitted it is unlikely to return as the Emerald Bay Resort’s operating partner, and there is some suspicion that Mitsui and the PricewaterhouseCoopers (PwC receivers closed the property to ensure it was removed as the brand/management partner. Russell Downs, the head receiver, previously told Tribune Business that the ability of a buyer to bring in its own hotel brand/operating partner might get Emerald Bay’s sale “over the finishing line”. He subsequently said some 20 groups, including those that had previously looked at the Exuma resort but declined to bid, were still interested and assessing whether to renew their interest. Tribune Business can reveal that the Emerald Bay purchase price has dropped to $30 million, and possible even lower. The last deal in principle that was agreed, with the group headed by Los Angeles-based developer Barry Silverton and Cushman Wakefield, the real estate/investment banking firm, was said by sources to have been for $40 million. Meanwhile, Robert Sands, the Bahamas Hotel Association’s (BHA Emerald Bay’s problems could not be interpreted, in and of themselves, as a sign that the Government’s ‘anchor property’ strategy for the Family Islands had failed. The strategy, started by the first Ingraham administration with Emerald Bay and Bimini Bay, and taken to new heights by the Christie government, was designed to place a major resort on every Bahamian island to act as a centre of economic activity, employment and spin-off businesses, reversing the migration to Nassau from the Family Islands. “I think it is an unfortunate turn of events that has led to the Four Seasons Emerald Bay determining to close its doors in Exuma,” Mr Sands said. “The BHA is hopeful the closure will be shortlived, and the impact on the economy and businesses can be minimised. “We feel this facility is excellent. That Exuma has strong appeal in the marketplace, and there is a well-trained workforce to support a quality guest experience in Exuma.” As to the impact the resort closure will have on investor and developer confidence in the Bahamas, Mr Sands said: “The quicker this matter can be resolved will mitigate against any negative impact for future investors.” Adding that Emerald Bay “had all the elements in place to make it work”, Mr Sands said the reason for its failure to-date needed to be assessed before obituaries were written for the ‘anchor property’ strategy. “I would prefer to look at the glass as half full, rather than half-empty,” he said, adding that ‘anchor properties’ were “still the right approach” to growth and sustainable development in the Family Islands. C M Y K C M Y K BUSINESS THE TRIBUNE THURSDAY, MAY 21, 2009, PAGE 9B The general public is invited to attend Bahamas Development Bank’s sale of repossessed assets.ASSETS Electronic EquipmentTables C ooler/Freezers B eauty Salon Equipment M achineryAero Motive Equipment Assortment of Items Location: Directions: Date & Time: All assets are sold as is where is for cash, cashier’s cheque. No purchase(sbe released until paid in full. Vehicles Vessels Location: Date & Time: Sealed “TENDER-EQUIPMENT” All assets are sold as is. Four Seasons’ eight per cent gross fee ‘too much’ F F R R O O M M p p a a g g e e 1 1 B B

PAGE 23

to a tourist’s Bahamian experience, and private passengers, frequently being drawn from the high-end of the visitor market, would automatically expect this. However, several outstanding issues remain to be worked through if pre-clearance in the Bahamas for private aircraft passengers is to become a reality. “We were trying to see if it can be done in such a way that it does not create problems for Family Island airports, coming into New Providence,” said Mr Sands, explaining that they wanted to avoid problems that might be caused by private aircraft flying to and from the Family Islands having to stop in Nassau for pre-clearance. He added that another issue to be settled was where to placea ny pre-clearance facilities for private aircraft passengers. There were two fixed-base operations (FBOs Providence, Odyssey Aviation and Executive, and Mr Sands said it had yet to be decided whether one of these, or an independent site, should be used for pre-clearance. “We don’t want to create an opportunity that would be to the detriment of the private plane, private aircraft market for New Providence,” Mr Sands said. “We need to find common ground that will be to the bene-f it of the private aircraft user.” The BHA president described the private aircraft passenger market as “extremely important” for the Bahamian hotel and tourism industry, bringing in “high-end business” and “certainly a niche we would not want to lose” given its particular importance to the Family Islands. Mr Sands said the new passenger manifest rules had not provoked any concerns from BHA members yet, but theo rganisation was monitoring the situation to ensure the Bahamas did not lose “this stimulant for tourism”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otels assess private plane pre-clearance F F R R O O M M p p a a g g e e 1 1 B B

PAGE 24

n By AOIFE WHITE AP Business Writer PRAGUE (AP C hinese leaders vowed Wednesday to tackle climate change together and boost trade but tensions over Tibet were still showing as China warned E urope not to interfere in its internal affairs. Talks in Prague saw the European Union and China get back to talking business five months after the Chinese canceled an earlier summit because French P resident Nicolas Sarkozy met the Dalai Lama, the religious leader who Beijing accuses of seeking Tibetan independence from China. Chinese Premier Wen Jiabao told reporters the two sides must "stick to the principles of mutual respect and noninterference in each other's internal affairs." The EU countered that human rights would remain a key part of future talks with China. Czech President Vaclav Klaus, whose country holds the r otating EU presidency, said the issue was "something that we in Europe consider extremely important." EU Commission President Jose Manuel Barroso said both regions were determined to build relations and "make a real difference on the road to seal the (United Nations climate change) deal in Copenhagen by the end of the year" and to restarting World Trade Organisation talks on a global trade agreement. "We now need the clear engagement of all major economies to make the deal possible," he said, calling on China, the US and others to clearly state how far they were ready to go to reduce greenhouse gase missions. The Copenhagen talks aim to set new global targets for car bon dioxide cuts, replacing the UN Kyoto Protocol after it expires in 2012. Experts say e missions must peak in 2015 and then fall by half by 2050 to limit global warming. Wen was supportive, saying China wanted "a positive outcome" from the negotiations. " In spite of the international financial crisis, the international community must not waver in its resolve ... to address the climate," he said. But he repeated Beijing's view that the brunt of the effort must be borne by richer nations such as the US and the EU and not China which "still remains a developing country." "China stands ready to work with the European Union," he said but tempered this by saying they should stick to "common but differentiated responsibility." The two sides want concrete progress on reducing emissions and struck a deal to develop "clean coal" technology that would help China curb the car-b on dioxide emissions from coalfired power stations. Wen tried to ease tensions over China's massive trade surplus with the EU its major export market by saying Chin a would buy more EU imports and would send a business delegation on a multibillion shopping spree in recession-hit Europe. While China may escape a r ecession this year, it will suffer from plunging exports to the US and the 27-nation EU which bought some euro248 billion of Chinese goods last year dwarfing the EU's euro78.4 billion in exports to China. Wen also called for the EU to "lift its arms embargo against China as early as possible." Wen tried to assure the Europeans that they would not be shut out by China's growing role in world affairs. "Some say that the world affairs will be managed solely by China and the United States. That view is baseless and wrong," he said. Wen was greeted by around a hundred Chinese citizens outside Prague castle, who waved Chinese and Czech flags andh eld banners saying "we love you, the Chinese people love y ou." Wang Xin, a 28-year-old restaurant owner from the Czech town of Liberec, waved a banner saying 'Premier Wen, you must be tired!' "He works so hard, always the first to be where something happens, he flies 12 hours to Prague to spend four hours with officials and then he flies back. He should take care of his health," said Wang, who shut the restaurant for the day to come and greet Wen. Pro-Chinese demonstrations far outnumbered a small protest by members of the Falun Gong a spiritual movement that Beijing calls an evil cult. Associated Press writers Karel Janicek and Ondrej Hejma c ontributed to this story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hina to tackle climate change amid tensions

PAGE 25

C M Y K C M Y K BUSINESS PAGE 14B, THURSDAY, MAY 21, 2009 THE TRIBUNE THE communications industry regulator will adopt a “light touch” approach will overseeing competition in the sector, a leading member of the committee overseeing the reforms has pledged. Julian Francis, deputy chairman of the committee overseeing the Bahamas Telecommunications Company’s (BTC privatisation, said the Utilities Regulation and Competition Authority (URCA communications market and technology convergence, while also overseeing competition. “The Communications Act is a very far reaching piece of legislation. I would say it is quite innovative in our environment. It essentially empowers the regulator, and it establishes the transitional arrangements which will be necessary to move us from the current environment to the new, liberalised environment,” Mr Francis said. “The Communications Act also provides the authority for the regulator to adjudicate on issues of competition or unfair practice or anti-trust. This, as you know, doesn’t exist in legislation at all today in the Bahamas, and it is critical to the liberalisation of the environment that we have a level playing field in place and that we have the means to guarantee that level playing field.” Some, especially Cable Bahamas, Communications regulator will be ‘light touch’ JULIAN FRANCIS S S E E E E p p a a g g e e 7 7 B B

PAGE 26

The Tribune The T ribune M y V o i c e , M y N e w s p a p e r ! Thursday, May 21st, 2009

PAGE 27

PAGE 10, THURSDAY, MAY 21, 2009 THE TRIBUNE OBITUARIES

PAGE 28

PAGE 2, THURSDAY, MAY 21, 2009 THE TRIBUNE OBITUARIES

PAGE 29

THE TRIBUNE OBITUARIES THURSDAY, MAY 21, 2009, PAGE 3

PAGE 30

PAGE 4, THURSDAY, MAY 21, 2009 THE TRIBUNE OBITUARIES

PAGE 31

THE TRIBUNE OBITUARIES THURSDAY, MAY 21, 2009, PAGE 5

PAGE 32

PAGE 6, THURSDAY, MAY 21, 2009 THE TRIBUNE OBITUARIES

PAGE 33

THE TRIBUNE OBITUARIES THURSDAY, MAY 21, 2009, PAGE 7

PAGE 34

PAGE 8, THURSDAY, MAY 21, 2009 THE TRIBUNE OBITUARIES

PAGE 35

THE TRIBUNE OBITUARIES THURSDAY, MAY 21, 2009, PAGE 9

PAGE 36

THE TRIBUNE OBITUARIES THURSDAY, MAY 21, 2009, PAGE 11

PAGE 37

P AGE 12, THURSDAY, MAY 21, 2009 THE TRIBUNE OBITUARIES

PAGE 38

THE TRIBUNE OBITUARIES THURSDAY, MAY 21, 2009, PAGE 13

PAGE 39

PAGE 14, THURSDAY, MAY 21, 2009 THE TRIBUNE OBITUARIES

PAGE 40

THE TRIBUNE OBITUARIES THURSDAY, MAY 21, 2009, PAGE 15

PAGE 41

PAGE 16, THURSDAY, MAY 21, 2009 THE TRIBUNE OBITUARIES

PAGE 42

THE TRIBUNE OBITUARIES THURSDAY, MAY 21, 2009, PAGE 17

PAGE 43

PAGE 18, THURSDAY, MAY 21 2009 THE TRIBUNE OBITUARIES

PAGE 44

The Tribune Thursday, May 21, 2009 PG 19 RELIGION RELIGIOUS NEWS, STORIES AND CHURCH EVENTS

PAGE 45

n By ALEX MISSICK Tribune Features Reporter amissick@tribunemedia.net W HEN it comes to being human, fear is a common emotion that we can not control. There is fear of commitment, fear of failure, fear of rejection, fear of deathall of these spark raised heart rates and sometimes health problems. However, what about the spiritual realm? What about the fear of almighty God? The Tribune P G 20 Thursday, May 21, 2009 RELIGION God? Do you fear According to Biblegateway.com, Psalms 34: 7-11 states: “Thea ngel of the Lord encamps around those who fear him, and he delivers them. Taste and see that the Lord is good; blessed is the man who takes refuge in him. Fear the Lord, you his saints, for those who fear him lack nothing. The lions may grow weak and hungry, but those who seek the Lord lack no good thing. Come, my children, listen to me; I will teach you the fear of the Lord.” Sometimes when people talk about fearing God, they think about just a deep respect or being scar ed, but that is not what the fear of the Lor d is about. Fear can mean a number of things but when it comes to God, He does not want us to be afraid of Him and afraid of what He is going to do to us. Senior Pastor of Golden Gates World Outreach Ministries International, Bishop Ros Davis, said this passage of scripture is a cry to the righteous. “The righteous are people that listen to the Lord. Once you listen to the Lord, He shares with you things about Him, in fact this is what the Holy Spirit does. It shares the things of Christ with the saints. When the saints hear the Holy Spirit and obey the Holy Spirit this is what glorifies God. When God is glorified He then releases for you all that is needed in your life,” Bishop Davis said. Bishop Davis explained that the word “fear” really means to “reverence” the Lord because reverence is deeper than respect. To reverence the Lord is to be in awe of Him and this begins on the inside. “So when it says ‘to fear the Lor d,’ it means to enter into a r elationship with him. So when we fear the Lord, we are saying He is the Lord of the universe so I must honor Him, fear Him, and reverence Him. For example, if you are in the presence of the prime minister, whether you are a PLP or FNM, there is an awe about a leader and a sensible person will respect that. Any leader, God gives them this aura and it is expected of his subjects to honor him,” Bishop Davis said. Once you respect the awe that comes with the Lord, Bishop Davis said ther e is no want in that person’ s life. o fear the Lord is really to submit to him and he in tur n fixes you up. When you reverence God you begin to move out of your flesh and your way of thinking. When you reverence Him the first thing you do is try to learn his ways and learn about him. It is being submissive to the spirit so that the spirit can share with you and talk with you,” Bishop Davis said. “Ultimately when you fear God, He is going to bless you. When people fear God they will reach the place where they do not lack any good thing. That means if it is a good thing, they will have it. God wants you to have good things, but the only way to qualify for those things is to fear Him. If you are reverencing Him and are in awe of him, you are going to recognise that not only is He God, but that He is always watching you because you are his child. “God is not just good for the religious folks, but he is good for everybody once you fear him.” T o fear the Lord is really to submit to him and he in tur n fixes you up. When you reverence God you begin to move out of your flesh and your way of thinking.

PAGE 46

The Tribune RELIGION Thursday, May 21, 2009 PG 21 WE HAVEthe opportunity to celebrate the momentous occasion of the Virgin Mary’s encounter with the angel throughout the month of May.I t leads us to celebrate all that motherhood means in God’s eternal plan even as it forces us to applaud the God-inspired contributions of all women in every facet of society who respond to God’s call to obedient service. The Proverbs 31 woman is a wife and mother but she also represents in her several economic enterprises all women who are gainfully employed outside of the home. She highlights the juggling that exists then and now between the various demands made on her to be a delightful home-maker, dedicated child nurturer, disciplined professional and devoted spouse. Other women in the Bible remind us of the fine qualities that the average mother can bring to her approachto parenting. May we all be: as clever as Moses’ mother to hide her child and save him; as persistent as the Syrophoenician woman who is engaged by our Lord in a lively exchange that displays her faith before her child is miraculously healed many miles away; as intentional in our desire to have our children blessed by the Lord; and as passionate as Hannah about faithfully dedicating all of our children to be servants of the Most High God. Let us never be guilty of dissuading ourc hildren from the call to ordination because we want them to choose something more lucrative. Our deceased mothers and grandmothers who made us walk the straight and narrow path are to be commended, especially as we see today what the absence of such vigilance can produce. For those persons whose mothers are still alive, you will more than likely only realise what your mother really means to you after her ashes are placed in the urn or her body slowly slips out of sight in the grave. In the meantime, try to do whatever you can to make her feel blessed by God to have had you as her child. Thank God for a praying, caring, loving, generous, Godly, and thoughtful mother. Forgive her mistakes, anda sk God to heal you if the wounds go really deep. Show your appreciation every day for all that women do in your life does to make your life easier, better, and brighter. Notice her efforts to please, support her desire to grow and succeed, and pray for her spirit to be set free. The more grateful a woman is for life and energized she is by her activities, the more joy she brings to her home and peace she leaves in each room. When a woman’s heart is turned to the Lord, and God’s love overflows in her life, she is such a blessing to behold. More about mothers MEDITATION REV.ANGELA C BOSFIELD PALACIOUS SHE'S been called everything from the beauty queen who made it big to the orphan who found her happy ending that once included a real live African king. She's been an actress, a singer, a songwriter with a platinumr ecor d and even a pageant dir ector . Y et, her happily ever after once seemed like a happily never after at a point when she once contemplated suicide, dealt with depression and failed relationships. Now, Richa Sands is back, rejuvenated and refreshed with a brand new album and brand new outlook on life. Refr eshed , the thir d album r eleased under her company Bently Productions is aptly titled with a thoroughly refreshing sound of a cool, confident woman who puts the life she once wanted to end firmly in the hands of her Creator. The album serves as the perfect demo for any artist who aspires tocr ossover . No two songs seem to fit the same genre yet, it proves Richa is indeed a force to be reckoned with when it comes to versatility . T aking time from her travels with living gospel legend Ron Kenoly, Richa spoke candidly and openly about Refreshed which took three years to complete. “I chose the name for the album because I took time away fr om fr ontline music ministry because I needed to be rejuvenated and refreshed...and that I am.,” she said. “Also given the season that we are presently living in, I believe that everyday we need to be renewed and refreshed. The mood of this pr oject also lends to that feeling.” The former Miss Bahamas also admits that her daughter Maleah serves as a muse in bringing the project to fruition, the first completed since become a mom. “How can childr en not ser ve as inspiration?” she said. “They teach us the meaning of 'becoming like little children, so as to make it into the Kingdom of Heaven.' My daughter definitely serves as a major source of inspiration. She fills my heart with joy and laughter and came to me at a time when my heart was broken and I am grateful to God for sending her to me.” Richa added that she inspir ed to bring several elements to the album and achieved her goal in an awardworthy way. She starts off the album with a jazzy style for Bless TheLord before pouring out her Bahamian roots with Revival In My Soul , a true example of how the cultural expression of Junknaoo r ushin' was bir thed fr om the church. The album also reconnects Richa with her Jamaican heritage in a dancehall techno mix of Send Down TheRain featuring Dangerous while her elegant vocals lend a sense of class to reggae with Marching To Zion . Perhaps one of the more interesting twists on her record is Take My Life , a traditional funeral hymn that stands out as an R&B love song to God. Richa is also sure to lure in a new fans as she ventur es into the cr unk/hip hop genre with Clap Your Hands and the pop jam Get Straight featuring award-winning artists Monty G and Mr Lynx. “I would have to say that the single I released from the album T'is So Sweet ToTrust InJesus is the song that is most personal to me,” Richa noted of the project. “This is the great lesson we sometimes have such difficulty with simply to tr ust God and allow Him to have His way in our lives. It's so much more rewarding and beautiful that way Richa's new album Refr eshed is available in The Bahamas at 100% Bible Bookstore and Jukebox. Her album is also available by contacting her through Facebook or MySpace.com. 'Refreshed' Richa resurfaces with new album RELIGION BRIEFS Pope names Joseph Cistone new bishop of Saginaw n SAGINAW,Mich. JOSEPHR. Cistone was named Wednesday as leader of the Diocese of Saginaw and its about 119,000 Roman Catholic worshippers, according to the Associated Pres . Cistone will be installed as bishop July 28. He will be the sixth bishop of the diocese, which was created in 1938 and spans an 11-county r egion center ed on Saginaw , about 80 miles nor thnorthwest of Detroit. "I fully trust in the providence of God, and I know it is the hand of God which has placed me in your midst to lead and ser ve," Cistone told r epor ters at a Wednesday morning news conference in Saginaw. "I look forward to being her e with you and am anxious to get to know you." Pope Benedict XVI announced the appointment. Cistone, 60, is a native of Philadelphia and attended St. Charles Bor r omeo Seminary in Overbrook, Penn. He was ordained as a priest in 1975 and in 1998 was named an honorar y pr elate to Pope John Paul II. He was consecrated a bishop in 2004, the same year he became an auxiliary bishop in Philadelphia. "I commit myself to you, the faithful of the Diocese of Saginaw, to shepherd you in faith and love," Cistone said. Cistone succeeds Robert J. Carlson, who last month was named the new ar chbishop of St. Louis. Ric ha Sands

PAGE 47

The Tribune P G 22 Thursday, May 21, 2009 RELIGION n By LEONARD A.JOHNSON I AMalways amused when I hear the remark, “We are no longer under law but under grace,” implying that the law does not serve any function or very little. Conveniently, the expression is used to support the argument that the Seventh-day Sabbath is no longer binding upon Christians. Additionally, it is argued that the Old Testament is irrelevant and that we should follow and adhere to the New Testament. However I ask, “Is that really so?” “Is the law still relevant?” “To be a Christian, does it mean that we shun the Old Testament?” “Is there any connection to the spirit of lawlessness pervading our society?” Taking a Look at the Sermon on the Mount In the Sermon on the Mount, Jesus clearly stated in Matthew 5:17, "Do not think that I came to destroy the Law or the Prophets. I did not come to destroy but to fulfill" (NKJV sistent with the Greek translation, refers to the first five books of Moses and not just God's law r efer enced by Jesus in verse 19. Jesus taught by referring to the writings of Moses and the pr ophets that essentially the Old Testament is relevant and no less inspired, and that it was not His agenda to destroy it. Instead He came “to fulfill” which means to make full; to explain; or to magnify as will be seen from verse 21. In other words, Jesus came to release His law, giving it its full meaning and application. Fulfilling the Law Giving six examples between verses 21 and 48, Jesus clarified the relevance of the law and its application. For the purpose of this article, I refer to three of them. The first one, which is recorded in Matthew 5:21-26, speaks to murder. Referring to the prevailing thought of the day, Jesus said: “You have heard that it was said to those of old, 'You shall not murder, and whoever murders willb e in danger of the judgment.'” However, Jesus declared or explained: “But I say to you that whoever is angry with his brother without a cause shall be in danger of the judgment. And whoever says to his brother, 'Raca!' shall be in danger of the council” (Matthew 5:2122, NKJV). Jesus fulfilled this law by giving its full meaning, explaining that murder begins in the heart. The word “anger” which comes from the Greek word “Orge” refers to anger that is long-lived and that which a person “nurses, cherishes and refuses to let die”, resulting in or seeking revenge. Isn't it interesting that the other Greek word for anger, “Thumos”, implying “a momentary anger that flares up and dies” is not used? Y et the Pharisees and Scribes felt that it was fine to harbour hatr ed as long as no mur der was committed externally. Do we not see a connection with vio lent crime and a spirit of hatr ed, anger and r evenge? It would seem that persons would rather vent their anger in pushing a knife into someone's chest or pulling a trigger . Conflict r esolution seems foreign to many in our society. Secondly, Jesus addresses adultery in Matthew 5:27-30 stating: “You have heard that it was said to those of old, 'You shall not commit adultery.' But I say to you that whoever looks at a woman to lust for her has already committed adultery with her in his heart." (Matthew 5:27-28, NKJV Jesus in regard to His law taught that adultery begins in the heart. For the Pharisees and Scribes, adultery was committed when the actual act was carried out, butn ot so with Jesus. It starts in the heart. The Old Testament writer, Job understood this as seen in Job 31:1: “I have made a covenant with my eyes; Why then should I look upon a young woman?" In our society today one does not have to imagine much given the exposed manner in which some dress --both men and women. It is inviting and tempting to fall victim to lust if we fail to make a covenant with our eyes and control our passion. Thirdly, Jesus in Matthew 5:43-48 gave attention to love for one's enemy. Pharisees and Scribes misquoted Leviticus 19:18 to say that it was alright to love one's neighbors and hate one's enemies. However , Jesus fulfilled the law on love by pointing out: "But I say to you, love your enemies, bless those who curse you, do good to those who hate you, and pray for those who spite fully use you and persecute you," (Matthew 5:44, NKJV this teaching was foreign, and today it is cer tainly not popular . Reasoning fr om the above thr ee examples, the meaning of “fulfilled” is clear. Jesus, instead of abolishing His law, gave it the prominence it deserved. So shouldn't we His followers do likewise? To do so does not make us legalistic as we ought to know :“By grace we are saved.” However as noted in Romans 3:31 grace does not mean that we disregard God's instead we “uphold the law Summing it Up Given the aforementioned, I submit t hat if we took seriously the teaching of Jesus it could serve to reduce hatred, anger, murder, dishonesty and marital infidelity etc. I would think that those who loosely use the expression, “We are no longer under law but under grace” may wish to reconsider the expression. It can suggest irresponsibility and lawlessness. While Christians are under grace they show a healthy relationship to God's will, always remembering the purpose of the law which is to point out sin and hopefully lead to Christ. No wonder Christ said, “Do not think that I came to destroy the Law or the Prophets. I did not come to destroy but to fulfill." More than anyone Christ gave the law its rightful place. Thought to Ponder: “Our attitude to the law of God is an index of our attitude to God Himself.” SINCLAIR FERGUSON Leonard A. Johnson, D Min President, Bahamas Conference of Seventh-day Adventists Under grace and not law What does it mean? AS TIME goes by you would think one forgives and forgets what you may have said or done to them. W ell, some do and ther e ar e others who eventual ly will, however, they're not quite ready yet. They want revenge. They want to inflict the worst pain on you that they possibly can, to make you hur t if but just for a moment or two, the way in which they did. If after someone, spills a drink on you, cuts in fr ont of you on a line, steps on your toes, or does any of the other limitless amounts of things against you; your heart races, your teeth clench, your mouth dries, your fingers ache, your head lightens and your body trembles, you may be experiencing symptoms of revengeitis. Okay there's no such thing, you already know that. Never theless the feelings ar e ver y r eal, and if you act on them you may get yourself in mor e tr ouble than you bar gained for . Luckily most persons expr ess their desire for revenge, and some go into great detail talking to anyone who would listen. It is during these times that it is ver y impor tant for us, the listeners, to act as a mediator to prevent the possibility that their plan may come to pass. All ar ound our world we hear stories of persons seeking r evenge; anything from the tyrannised student at school, the recently dismissed worker, or the cheated spouse; r evenge seems to be the only avenue where one can find complete satisfaction. W ell...maybe for a shor t period of time. That is, befor e the feelings of remorse or simply embarrassment take them over, feelings that a person hopelessly tries to push aside in a final attempt to thrust themselves into a subhuman, emotionless suit of their own making. I remember as a child my parents and other persons saying in r espect to my wanting r evenge for some trivial fault done to me, 'Don't stoop to their level'. Well as a kid, I didn't only want to stoop to their level, I wanted to take their whole level over and any other level they may have been on. Now , as a young adult, I can fully appreciate that wise instruction, knowing that if a person always places pride in fr ont of r ea son, the r esults can be tragic. = Not to sound cliche' but it does indeed take two to tango. In closing may you then implement, or simply consider, the idea of turning the other cheek, thus, allowing for peace. "Y ou have heard it was said, 'Love your neighbour and hate your enemy.' But I tell you: Love your enemies and pray for those who persecute you, that you may be sons of your Father in heaven. He causes his sun to rise on the evil and the good, and sends rain on the righteous and the unrighteous. If you love those who love you, what reward will you get? Are not even the tax collectors doing that? And if you gr eet only your br others, what ar e you doing mor e than others? Do not even pagans do that? Be per fect, therefore, as your heavenly Father is perfect." Toni Elizabeth Styles is a Bahamian writer and poet, currently residing in Nassau, Bahamas. Comments related to the article can be sent to fearless247@gmail.com. Gonna get you good TONI STYLES FEARLESS

PAGE 48

THE HISTORY OF RELIGION IN THE BAHAMAS The Tribune Thursday, May 21, 2009 PG 23 RELIGION THE wor d of God exhor ts us that when a brother is overtaken in a fault those who are spiritual (persons with the spirit of God in them) should restore, lift or brace up such a one. Someone called me the other day saying, "Randy Frazier going to jail this time." My answer was and still is we need to pray for the bishop. In my shor t time of adulthood I have lear ned that people in our Bahamian society take joy in pulling and tearing each other down. There even seems to be an extr eme love for it when it is a leader of any kind. I have witness the maligning of parliamentarians, preachers, pastors, managers, dir ectors ect., you name it I've seen it. I want it to be publicly known that I will not be apar t of that. Now for you who may think that I am agreement with the negative things that go on in this country I'm not. We only compr ehend situations when it hits close to home or happens at home. I'll share with you how I emphasis with others in their various situations. All I do is put myself in their shoes and the same understanding and mer cy that I would want in whatever situation I am able to give. Yes a lot of it makes you angry, however, we cannot continue to answer with anger . That only leads to more problems. I don't know if we perceive the fact that if he is guilty all Bishop Randy Frazier has to do is r epent and God WILL forgive him. It is God and God alone who has the power of heaven and hell. We don't have that power, why do we act as if we do? All of us have made bad decisions or would do something different in our lives that we had to pay for dearly. I have not forgotten the scriptur e that says: "T ouch not the Lor d's anointed and do His pr ophets no harm." In all honesty do you think that anyone of us can deal with Randy Frazier better than God can? Are His dealings not good enough for us? A young man took the life of my coworker and friend Ericka Fowler. I was so hur t and upset that I hoped that he got lost in jail for the r est of his natural life. I prayed to God that if I had never had to see him again in life it would be to soon. One day on my way to mid-day prayer , guess who I saw? That same young man. Immediately I became uneasy and conflicted within myself and needless to say could not find prayer anywher e in my mind. Later that day I had told a dear friend of mine what had happen and what I was thinking and feeling. She said to me: "Allison you cannot afford for that man to cause you to go to hell. If God was to come now and find you in the position you in that's you. What will you say , I in hell because of what some one else did. That is unexceptable, you know all he has to do is ask God to forgive him and that's it. You busy being mad in hell and he in heaven." W e can't af for d others’ actions to make us end up where we asked God to redeem us from in the first place. No matter what, we as a people have to for give if we ar e going to make it into heaven. Too many opinions ALLISON MILLER HARBOURIsland schoolteacher, Marion Johnson, baptised a Methodist but a catechist and sacristan in the Anglican Church, after reading Roman Catholic literature, decided she would like to be baptised again as a Roman Catholic. She took the mail boat to Nassau to talk to Father Chrysostum OSB, who told her, “If you want to be baptised you have to live a Catholic life.” At first he refused as Harbour Island had no Catholic priest but she persisted and the next day he baptised her. There was a long standing prejudice against the Roman Catholic Church in the Bahamas and Father Chrysostum felt that it would never be removed unless a Roman Catholic mission was established in Harbour Island, the former home of many leading Bahamians. In 1920, Father Bonaventure Hansen OSB, after spending 15 years in North Dakota, arrived in the Bahamas. After a short time in Nassau, Father Chrysostum asked him the favour of opening a mission in Harbour Island, “to br eak the backbone of Protestantism in the islands.’ Father Bonaventure held the first mass on Harbour Island, in the home of Marion Johnson and her friend Hattie Thompson, on Febr uary 7 1921, later to become the Little Boarding House. A headline in the Nassau Daily Tribune of July 8,1943 read: Brilander in Canadian Ar my Chaplain Ser vice : Rever end Carl Alburyhas been assigned to the Pacific Command, Combined Operations School. His tal ented younger sister Car rie Albur y is now 3rd in Command of the Sisters of Service and her advancement is remarkable.” The conversion of the whole Albur y family had been Father Bonaventure’s second success. The vocation of Car rie and Carl and the faith of Marion and Hattie wer e said to be the two cor nerstones of the new Catholic Church on Harbour Island, which very quickly built up a following and within 5 years had 200 conversions. In November 1921, Father Chrysostom purchased four pieces of pr oper ty for a chur ch, r ectory, convent and a school and a centur y old, battered shell of a house as a home for the Sisters of Charity . The Sisters, Mar y Giovanni, Maria Agatha Sissler, Catherine Maria Snee, Mary Regina Lynch and Maria Rose O’Neill, arrived in Harbour Island in late January 1922 and met bigotry and prejudice against them. But gradually, “the locals accepted these smiling tender hearted women as they won over the people by their char ity and long suf fering patience.” Life was very primitive at the St Vincent’s Convent wher e rainwater had to be col lected in lar ge tubs and heated on a ker osene stove and their only chairs had to be carried from chapel to the refector y and to their bedr ooms at night. On Febr uar y 2, 1922, the new combined chapel and schoolhouse on Harbour Island was dedicated and Father Bonaventure assumed charge. Three months later the first 4 converts to the Catholic faith were baptised on Harbour Island As pr edicted, the Harbour Island mission was an impor tant step, and as Table 1 shows, by 1953, Roman Catholicism was the most popular religious denomination on that island. Roman Catholic Education in Harbour Island Befor e the Sisters of Charity ar rived, Marion Johnson had gather ed together 16 students, all non-Catholics, for the new St V incent’ s Academy . The students had the additional duty in the after noon of pushing the desks and chairs to the walls to convert the room to a chur ch and in the mor ning rear ranging the fur nitur e to star t school. Within two years, the Sisters of Charity opened St Benedict’s School and operated them both for many years as free schools until in 1953, St Vincent’s Academy was discontinued and the 26 students wer e added to the 136 stu dents attending St Benedict’ s School. PART 30 Roman Catholics established in Harbour Island JIM LA WLOR

PAGE 49

The Tribune P G 24 Thursday, May 21, 2009 RELIGION THE ladies of the Church of God of Prophecy recently held their first annual Pre Mother's Day Tea Party and Fashion Extravaganza at The Botanical Gardens, West Bay Street. The event was organised by assistant director, Patrice Bain who encouraged a cross section of women ranging from the young to the very mature from the East Street Tabernacle, Elizabeth Estates and the Englerston Churches to display their talent by par ticipating in the 'best set' table competition using the theme “Four Seasons.” The team of judges for the event included Mary Moss, Vylma Thompson-Curling, Cheryl Bain, Enamae Cox, Chynella Ferguson, Katherine Beneby, Cherise Nottage and Paulette Beneby. The Englerston Church received the first prize for the 'best set' table, the Elizabeth Estates Church placed second and third place was awarded to Karen Pratt one of the table leaders from the East Street Church. The attendees were entertained by Simone Beneby; received information on the origin of tea parties as well as native bush teas and enjoyed a fashion show. Pictured are scenes from the day. (Submitted by DONNA DELANCY ) PREMOTHER'S DAY TEA PARTY


{T\

Mim blowin’ it

84F
74F

HIGH
LOW

“ CLOUDY,

Volume: 105 No.148
et,
a




The



Third teacher
is questioned
by the police

m By DENISE MAYCOCK
Tribune Freeport Reporter
dmaycock@tribunemedia.net

FREEPORT - A third teacher
at the Eight Mile Rock School
has been taken in for question-
ing in connection with child
molestation claims, a senior police
official confirmed.

Although Edward Buchanan
was removed from the school in
February, he was required to sign-
in every morning at the Ministry
of Education.

Police officials caught up with
the teacher just as he had left the
Ministry of Education offices in
the International Building.

Mr Buchanan was escorted to
an unmarked police vehicle and
taken to Police Headquarters.

The Tribune contacted Asst
Supt Emrick Seymour, who con-
firmed that the teacher is being
questioned by police.

The sexual scandals at the
Eight Mile Rock High School first
broke in January when Trinida-
dian teacher Andre Birbal was
accused of molesting two former
male students.

Birbal, 46, was removed from
the school and transferred to New
Providence, where he was placed
on probationary leave pending
the outcome of an investigation

SEE page 10

By@humane

mas Humane Society

ANIMALFUNDAY

HIGHLIGHTS
SS.

More EMR schoo
molestation claims

THE ‘JUAN SEBASTIAN DE ELCANO’, an 81-year-old Spanish
Navy sail ship, called at the port of Nassau yesterday. The vessel
was commissioned in 1928 and built in the shipyards of Cadiz.
It is currently used as part of the 80th training cruise for
midshipmen who are senior students at the Spanish Naval
Academy and future naval officers and will remain in Nassau
Harbour until Sunday.

e SEE PAGE TWO

es cd
= a

SS

Firms seeking oil
drilling approvals
face many hurdles

m@ By TANEKA THOMPSON
Tribune Staff Reporter
tthompson@tribunemedia.net



WITH the possibility of oil
drilling in the country's waters
"at least a decade away" the com-
panies seeking approvals for this
venture face many hurdles before
the move becomes reality.

The applications for the oil
drilling are pending subject to the
country's boundary discussions
between Cuba at the United
Nations level and any drilling in
the seabed would be subject to
an environmental impact analysis
(EIA) study.

"We have three territories that
we have to determine the territo-

SEE page 10

The Tribune

=USA TODAY.

BAHAMAS EDITION

www.tribune242.com



Mt. Royal Ave.&

: Durham St.



P.0.Box N3723

Tel:326-1875





Two officials
‘questioned’
in land row
are named

Undersecretary

and Chief Housing
Officer reportedly
speaking to officials

Felipé Major/Tribune staff

A DEVELOPER
set his FNM
t-shirt on fire
yesterday ina
protest against
the government
he voted for and
the party he
rallied behind in
the last general
election.

¢ SEE PAGE
FIVE FOR
FULL STORY

Felipé Major/Tribune staff



@ By PAULG
TURNQUEST
Tribune Staff Reporter
pturnquest@tribunemedia.net

THE CURRENT under-
secretary in the Ministry of
Lands and Surveys Audley
Greaves and the Chief
Housing Officer Christo-
pher Russell are both
reportedly being questioned
by Ministry officials about
Crown land granted their
wives and other relatives.

According to documenta-
tion obtained by this news-
paper, Mr Greaves’ wife and
son were both granted lots
in the island of Abaco in
2003 and 2004 respectively.

Mr Greaves’ son, received
a 15,625 square foot lot on
Wood Cay, Abaco for
$1,786.25 while his wife
received an 18,343 square

SEE page 10

Sobering outlook
expected in the
2009/10 budget

m@ By PAUL G TURNQUEST
Tribune Staff Reporter
pturnquest@tribunemedia.net

DUE to the continuing eco-
nomic downturn in the global
economy, government is expected
to present a very sobering outlook
in its 2009/10 budget, having read-
justed its original ministerial sub-
missions lower by some seven to 10
per cent.

In a memorandum from the
Ministry of Finance’s Budget Sec-
tion, Prime Minister Hubert Ingra-
ham met with his permanent sec-
retaries on May 1 to advise them
on the current economic situation
and its impact on the upcoming
budget.

SEE page 10



MAN SET TO BE CHARGED
OVER CITY MARKETS
ROBBERIES

INVESTIGATION INTO CLAIMS
OF IMPOSTER BOTTLED WATER





NASSAU AND BAHAMA ISLANDS”? LEADING NEWSPAPER
PAGE 2, THURSDAY, MAY 21, 2009

GET MORE FOR LESS

Buy in bulk and

Per Ounce

In Nassau Location Only!
_ Store Hours: Mon. — Fri. 9
entre Mall « 242-322-7

a.m, to el m, & satu pier fam. to 9pm.

929 « Credit Cards Acceoted « Gift Cards Available



a CARIB INSURANCE MOSELEY + BURNSIDE

BROKERS & AGENTS 7D

<> NCUA
NOW WE ARE ONE.

A message to our Valued Customers:

We are pleased to announce that Garb Insurance Brokers & Agents Lid. and Moseley
Burnside Insurance Agency Lid. are now part of NUA insurance Agents & Brokers
Lid. For our customers, this means:

LOCATIONS

* The Moseley Burnside location at the Harbour Bay Shopping Centre becomes
NUA's second Service Centre in New Providence, complementing its existing
Service Cenire and Head Office on Collins Avenue.

* The Carb office on Charlotte Street in downtown Nassau will close effective
April 24, 2009, Customers will have the convenience of being served at either the
Colling Avenue or Harbour Bay Shopping Centre locations.

CUSTOMER BENEFITS

+ Greater convenience for all of your general insurance needs, including policy
renewals.

* The benefit of our combined experience, expertise and areas of specialization.

* Your insurance coverage remains unchanged. Nothing changes with your
current policies.

* Continued excellent service that you have come to expect.

As part of the Bahamas First Group of Companies, we have the security of the
largest and most trusted general insurer in The Bahamas. Bahamas First General
Insurance Gompany Lid. has an A.M. Best Rating of A- (Excellent) which reflects the
company's excellent capital and liquidity position as well as its superior operational
results.

Now we are one, committed to helping individuals and businesses with all of their
general insurance needs. If you have any questions please call or visit us al one of
our Service Genires.

The R.H. Bobby Symonette Building
ard Terrace & Collins Avenue

P.O. Box N-d670, Nassau

The Bahamas

Harbour Bay Shopping Centre
P.O.Box N-4870, Nassau
Tre Bahamas

Tel: S02-8100, 328 53023
or 356-7800)
Fax: 328 5974 of 326-3701

€e> N-U-A

302-9100, 3304-83906.
or 322-8210
a22-527T of 34-8909

meHands On

Insurance Agency

THE TRIBUNE



LOCAL NEWS

Two strip clubs targeted in
police and immigration raid

Several people apprehended

mw By ALISON LOWE
Tribune Staff Reporter
alowe@tribunemedia.net

A JOINT police and immigration raid on two
strip clubs on Sunday evening resulted in the appre-
hension of various individuals on immigration vio-
lations and other offences.

Both of the establishments are located in Palmdale
and are believed to be owned by the same people.

Senior Asst Commissioner Raymond Gibson yes-
terday told The Tribune that a “small quantity of
drugs” was also seized from both clubs.

He said the establishments are still “under inves-
tigation,” but declined to offer further comment.

Asked to respond to claims that one of the clubs
reopened as early as Monday, Mr Gibson said he
was unaware of this, but would look into it.

The legality of strip clubs and stripping for mon-

BAHAMIANS were treated
to a rare sight yesterday morn-
ing, as a 81-year-old Spanish Navy
sail ship called at the port of Nas-
sau.

The “Juan Sebastian de
Elcano” will be docked in the city
harbour until Sunday.

‘Small quantity of drugs’ seized

ey in the Bahamas has been in question since a 2005
court case saw six Russian strippers and other club
staff who worked at the now defunct Butterfly Club
on East Bay Street exonerated.

Wayne Munroe, the attorney for the strippers,
argued that as his clients were practising their craft
in the privacy of the club, away from public sight and
if customers were getting what they paid for and
no one was offended, they could not be found guilty
on the charges of indecent behaviour. The law relat-
ing to that offence notes that it must be insulting or
offensive to those in view.

As a result of this argument and others, Magistrate
Renee McKay agreed with Mr Munroe that the
prosecution had not established a prima facie case
against his clients on the indecent behaviour charges.

Messages left for immigration officials seeking
further details on those detained were not returned
up to press time.

SPLENDOUR: Inside at RBrael Spanish Aa ae



The ship was commissioned in
1928 and built in the shipyards of
Cadiz.

It is named after Spanish sailor
Juan Sebastian de Elcano, who
was the first man to circumnavi-
gate the world in 1522.

The Spanish training ship is
sailing the world’s seas as part of

the 80th training cruise for mid-
shipmen who are senior students
at the Spanish Naval Academy
and future naval officers.

Before docking in Nassau, the
Juan Sebastian de Elcano called
at the ports of Tenerife, Spain;
Fortaleza, Brazil; Port of Spain,
Trinidad and Tobago; San Juan
de Puerto Rico (United Stated;

Galveston, US; Cartagena de
Indias, Colombia, and Havana,
Cuba. The ship is carrying 223
midshipmen and its commanding
officer is Captain Javier Romero.

Captain Romero has a long his-
tory with the Spanish Navy and
has been awarded five Navy
Crosses and one NATO Article
V Medal.

ates Ce La T8)

FB





TRAINING CRUISE: The sac
Sebastian de Elcano”

TROPICAL
EXTERMINATORS
RR UE
PHONE: 322-2157

M, ae Mme hed ee

7 Miss CNBBeay
Enka Teens =

Gs she Teaches for aa erie
i Bohn re bias nae ass LTeRy *

~ Beauty Pageant, *
THE TRIBUNE

THURSDAY, MAY 21, 2009, PAGE 3



LOCAL NEWS



Haitian charged in
smuggling
operation may
face death penalty

A Haitian man charged in
connection with a smuggling
operation suspected to have
originated in Nassau and which
resulted in nine people drown-
ing off Florida may face death.

Father of nine Jimmy Metel-
lus, 33, was denied bail in a
West Palm Beach, Florida,
court yesterday.

US Immigration and Customs
enforcement investigators claim
he was hired by four men in the
Bahamas to captain the boat
carrying the large group of Hait-
lan migrants.

According to The Miami Her-
ald, investigators claim Metellus
agreed to do so for free to
escape hardships in Haiti.

The smugglers are alleged to
have been paid thousands of
dollars per person for the jour-
ney, which left Nassau for the
shores of Miami, by way of
Bimini.

It was on the way from Bimi-
ni that the boat, carrying more
than two dozen people, cap-
sized, resulting in the deaths of
nine people, and leaving 16 oth-
ers floundering in the water for
hours until they were rescued by
the US Coast Guard and a good
samaritan.

Despite the Bahamian origin
of the ill-fated smuggling opera-
tion, Assistant Commissioner
Raymond Gibson told The Tri-
bune that Bahamian police are
not currently investigating the
matter, but would do so if they
received a “specific request”
from the US authorities.

Man, 27, arrested
over Freeport
armed robbery

m By DENISE MAYCOCK
Tribune Freeport Reporter
dmaycock@tribunemedia.net

FREEPORT - The quick
response of police to an armed
robbery in progress in Freeport
has led to the arrest of a 27-
year-old man.

According to police reports,
officers responded to an armed
robbery at the Watkins Street
Liquor Store in the Boulevard
Plaza on Somerville Drive on
Monday morning.

A man entered the store
around 9.45am brandishing a
handgun, held the cashier at
bay, and robbed her of cash.

Moments after the robbery,
officers arrived on the scene.
Their quick investigation led
them to an apartment building
at Magella Crest, where officers
arrested a male suspect.

Police also recovered a .357
revolver with 2 live .357 rounds
and $12.00 cash believed to be
proceeds of the robbery.

The suspect is assisting police
with their investigation. He is
expected to be formally
charged.

Crime watch meeting
for businesses

On Friday, May 22 the Cen-
tral Police Division will hold a
crime watch meeting for all
businesses in the downtown
area at 4.30pm at Doctor’s
Hospital Conference Centre on
Dowdeswell Street.

Officers will speak on current
crime trends and make recom-
mendations to each owner/oper-
ator on how to improve the
work environment so as to pre-
vent crime.

US Embassy to mark
Memorial Day 2009

ON Monday, May 25, the
United States Embassy will
observe Memorial Day with a
wreath laying ceremony at
Clifton Pier in memory of fall-
en comrades and military vet-
erans.

Special recognition will be
given to the 23 sailors of the
US Patrol Squadron who died
off the coast of Nassau on
May 7, 1954.

US Chargé d’Affaires Timo-
thy Zuniga-Brown as well as
family members of the fallen
sailors will speak at the cere-
mony.

The ceremony is expected
to start at 10am and last 45
minutes.

FOR 3 IN 1 LAWN SERVICE
Ia aa
Pest Control

Ue at ty
322-2157



armed robbery of stores

m By ALISON LOWE
Tribune Staff Reporter
alowe@tribumemedia.net

A YOUNG man is expected
to be charged as early as today
with the armed robbery of three
City Market stores within the last
three weeks, as well as a number
of other similar offences.

Police did not report the City
Market robberies to the press,
but The Tribune has discovered
that a lone gunman entered the
supermarket chain’s locations on
Rosetta Street, Village Road and
Cable Beach, and demanded
cash.

The Cable Beach location was
robbed on Thursday, May 14;
Rosetta Street on May 10; while
the supermarket’s Village road
store was the first to be hit.

Yesterday senior police offi-
cers said that nobody was hurt
during the incidents and little cash

was obtained by the gunman. This
was also confirmed by Azaleta
Ishmael-Newry, marketing direc-
tor for City Market.

A 67-year-old woman who was
in the Rosetta Street store when
the gunman struck there said the
incident had made her nervous
about going back to the same
location.

“T said to myself, ‘I wonder if I
should go back here, or go to

dy 9

another one...’.

Alerted

The customer said she was at a
checkout counter in the store
when the cashier alerted her to
the fact that “something was
going on” at the customer service
counter near the front entrance.

“After a minute or two we
found out what happened: the
woman at the front said, “That

guy came in the store and he held
me up and wanted money!’

“He’d just came in the front
door, robbed her, and went back
out and left. The manager chased
him out there, but they didn’t
catch him then,” she said.

Another customer, Mary
Davis, expressed her disappoint-
ment that the police did not alert
the public to the incidents.

“Tf there’s a robbery in my
local foodstore I want to know!”
she said.

Police Commissioner Reginald
Ferguson, said he “did not know”
why the incidents were not dis-
closed to the media, but denied
that it was intentional on the part
of the force.

“T don’t have a problem with
people knowing what happened.
I think it gives people a better
opportunity to analyse what is
going on in their society,” said
Mr Ferguson.

Nassau Street crash during alleged bid to rob driver

Motorcyclist,

passenger
struck off
their bike

m@ By MEGAN REYNOLDS
and CHESTER ROBARDS
Tribune Staff Reporters
mreynolds@tribunemedia.net

A MOTORCYCLE driver and
his passenger were struck off their
bike in a dramatic crash in Nassau
Street after they allegedly
attempted to rob the driver.

The driver of a white 1999
Isuzu Rodeo told police the pil-
lion passenger on a red and white
Honda 650 trail bike snatched a
pair of Oakley sunglasses from
his face and tried to rip a chain
from around his neck while dri-
ving alongside him near the junc-
tion with Poinciana Drive and
Thompson Boulevard.

The side of the Sports Utility
Vehicle (SUV) hit the motorcycle
and sent the pillion passenger fly-
ing to the roadside around 25 ft
away from the bike while the
SUV careered over the concrete
median and central roundabout
and came to a stop on Thomp-
son Boulevard. Both vehicles had
been travelling south.

Traffic stopped and residents
of the surrounding area rushed
to the scene wondering what had
caused the loud bang Just before
9pm. Around 50 people sur-
rounded the injured pillion pas-
senger as he lay on the sidewalk
near Commonwealth Bank in
Nassau Street.

Police and Emergency Services
arrived within 10 minutes of the
crash to find tyre marks across
the road median and the round-
about. The SUV had two burst
tyres on its right side, and oil was
leaking from the engine.

The badly injured pillion pas-
senger lay motionless at the side
of the road for some time and
started to shake just before the
ambulance arrived.

One eye-witness said he was
dragged by the SUV, and others
claimed he had been carrying a
gun.

'| Felipé Major/ |
Tribune staff ;

THIS SMASHED-UP VEHICLE was involved in the accident in which a motorcy-
clist and his passenger were struck off their bike.



i Felipé Major/
Tribune staff

ONE OF THE accident victims being taken in to an ambulance.



“This is a suspicious
matter whereby it
appears as though
these fellas on the
bike were up to no
good.”

Insp. Anthony Curtis

His mother was told about the
accident at her home in Chip-
pingham and arrived at the scene
soon after the crash crying and
screaming, “Where is my son?”

The 21-year-old pillion passen-
ger and 23-year-old driver were
rushed to Princess Margaret Hos-
pital. The pillion passenger is said
to be in serious, but stable condi-
tion. His mother and sister were
also involved in a collision on
their way to the hospital on Tues-
day night. Their car was badly
damaged and the 21-year-old’s
mother was treated in hospital.

Relatives of the 21-year-old say
he has internal injuries affecting





his kidneys and pelvis, and they
believe the car may have rolled
over him. He is breathing with
the aid of a ventilator and his jaw
is broken. Doctors were waiting
for swelling to go down before
performing surgery yesterday.

The 23-year-old motorcycle dri-
ver is also recovering in hospital,
however he is said to have
escaped with minimal injuries as
bones in his hands and fingers
were broken.

Inspector Anthony Curtis in
the traffic division said the inci-
dent is under investigation and
no arrests have been made.

He said: “This is a suspicious
matter whereby it appears as
though these fellas on the bike
were up to no good. We are con-
ducting an investigation now so I
don’t want to pre-empt what the
outcome will be, but it appears
they were up to no good. They
were going to snatch his Oakleys
and rip the chain off his neck
while they were in the jeep, so
that could be what caused the
crash.”

72009

Q/ OFF ALL
ae! Jor |
| FABRICS

One of a kind Special Occasion Fabric

Iridescent Taffeta
Two Tone Shantung

Beaded & Sequin Fabric

Lomour, Chiffon

, 1 by OFF ALL PROM
Pda dtqe git

pn purchased same dayas fabric

ee —_ fan aT ae Ye

ee LG

Madeira St. [242] 325-8233 * Robinson Rd.[242] 322-3080

- Evening Bogs
“Gloves










Gpend « ane
Gnchantea

Sven CH... :

in one of our Fabulous
Designer Evening Dresses

The Cancer
Society Ball

Saturday, 30th May, 2009

Wyndham Nassau Resort
& Crystal Palace Casino
Cable Beach

) of Nassau

Established in 1956 by an old Bahamian family

Parliament Street (near Bay St.) Tel: 322-8393 or 328-7157
* Fax: 326-9953

Crystal Court at Atlantis, Paradise Island Tel: 363-4161/2

Lyford Cay (Harbour Green Shops at Lyford Cay)
Tel: 362-5235

e-mail; info@colesofnassau.com
www.colesofnassau.com ¢ P.O. Box N-121

= ey

CARPET, FURNITURE, MARBLE & TILE CARE

Tue Moet Tromooaa Rretoaanon & Cuan Ever, on Tun Jon & Fam!
Maseau"s Oey Poona, Come Sooan Cane & UPoLstey Caen Sse.

* Cans L Iptel ery, Shon mre Marhic L-beaniny o&
Resordion Spocmist.

* Poche Cleaning Sysnome romoves. Danep a Heay
SvoL, Heecteres, ‘Liregec, Waterourks and Sisire inom
Cupetag & Parmitire, restoring them to like ac
at b Troctios of replacement one.

Carpet, Sofa"s, Lowesons. Chairs. Dining Ciaies, Cars,
Boats, Groat, Ties, Marte & Some
© Pemaan, Worl d& Silk Canpet Cleaning Specialist

Site Polishiag. Resoration a Cane
* Wed Floor Resteralion

Suited Stent Tech Profeedinal Cotracior

CALL PROCHEM BAHAMAS
PHONE: 323-8083 or 323-1594
ONLY WE CAN OO FF RIGS

WR As a ee * WIT eee ae 0 * WEST, oF
? perl rao

AS Ad AA Oe PAD

PROCHEM SYSTEM [eon

Coe ee lm ag iad

re ‘aS
—_2 ho

3 a
(a

Pee lh

feeiere Ohne

Che Mall-et-*Lanat hen
BOX OFFICE OPENS AT io-00 4 DADLY

aaa a Era: iat
Tenmurcr samen new| on [890 wt | a0 [ean [ie
reece ve [oa [eff

ANCE FLICK = |

sone» [ora wa | ean fe
pectowyame ic | 20 | mas | WA | ean | ao [srs |
wenomcnswowenne + _| t:00 | x30 | WA | geno | 5 [roves |

cwonwemewe + [ot [ae [ut [oe
res [ aan P| es ||

a fee fee

aes

WW GALLERIA NEM AS JOO

Sey

anenseene cael | DO be [a
oar HEME Wee ft [396 [ MA | €00| ex

awecniens —__waw 120 | a0 [WA | 2 | wat | 1a
ANGELS &cemoKs oc | td | WIA | 4:00) 740 | Ni

15
sem 1 [6 | 05 | Wa | 05 | a0 | ve
es

380-FLIX


PAGE 4, THURSDAY, MAY 21, 2009

THE TRIBUNE



EDITORIAL/LETTERS TO THE EDITOR



The Tribune Limited

NULLIUS ADDICTUS JURARE IN VERBA MAGISTRI

Being Bound to Swear to The Dogmas of No Master

LEON E. H. DUPUCH, Publisher/Editor 1903-1914






















































































SIR ETIENNE DUPUCH, Kt, O.B.E., K.M., K.CS.G.,
(Hon.) LL.D., D.Litt.

Publisher/Editor 1919-1972
Contributing Editor 1972-1991

EILEEN DUPUCH CARRON, C.M.G., M.S., B.A. LL.B.
Publisher/Editor 1972-

Published Daily Monday to Saturday

Shirley Street, RO. Box N-3207, Nassau, Bahamas
Insurance Management Building., P.O. F-485, Freeport, Grand Bahama

WEBSITE
www.tribune242.com — updated daily at 2pm

More criminals back on the streets

THE POLICE have their hands full.

In addition to criminals already wandering
the streets while they await their court date,
and those youngsters, not yet caught, but out
there gun in hand, flirting with a life of crime,
the police now have 153 more to add to their list.
Last month 205 men were released from prison
with 153 of them sent back to the community to
await trial. Of that number, the Central Intelli-
gence Bureau, gave instructions that 39 of them
“should be monitored.”

These are all men with charges ranging from
murder, attempted murder, armed robbery and
assault to unlawful sexual intercourse and rape.
While they await their day in court, who is going
to employ them? How are they going to eat?
How can the police monitor them and keep up
with solving the daily crime and the now almost
daily murders?

Immigration regulations require all employ-
ers of foreign staff to supply a clean police
record for their applicant. This record has to be
updated with every permit renewal. We now
recommend that all employers demand police
records from all potential employees —
Bahamian and foreign — and regardless of job
description.

If we had followed these rules last year our
staff would not have had to endure the loss of so
much money from their handbags to a cold and
calculating thief who became embedded among
us, and who when fingered had so fooled certain
staff about her integrity that they were annoyed
that we had turned her in. If she had produced
a police certificate we would have known that
she was just out of prison for theft. Obviously
she was a kleptomaniac who could not help
herself.

On being fired from The Tribune she went
for a job interview to an agency. After the inter-
view, a staff member of the agency called one of
her friends at The Tribune to say that on the
young lady’s departure it was discovered that
she had filched money from the staff member’s
handbag. We were told that when the young
woman was arrested, she got an opportunity at
the station to steal from the handbag of the
arresting officer. This was indeed a mentally
sick woman. She was sent back to prison, and
must have been put in a programme for her
mental condition, because as a part of her ther-
apy she confessed her misdeeds — among them
the long string of thefts at The Tribune, right
down to the poor cleaning lady. These were
the thefts that she had so vehemently denied
when she took us before the Labour Board for
wrongful dismissal. She should have never been
on our staff. She should never have been on
anyone’s staff. And she certainly would not
have been at The Tribune if we had demanded
her police records. To look at her, she would
have been the last person anyone would have
suspected. She worked hard to keep the finger
of suspicion from hovering over her desk.

And then we have had complaints about

persons seemingly avoiding trial because they
have some family relation tucked securely in a
place of influence. We know that Police Com-
missioner Ferguson condemns this, but after
police investigations, prosecutions are out of
his hands.

And then there is the case of Welsh busi-
nessman Hywell Jones, who was shot and killed
by a “hit” man as he walked to his Goodman’s
Bay Corporate Centre office on West Bay Street
on April 22.

Early in April last year Mr Jones had com-
plained to the police that he feared for his life.
In asworn affidavit he said he rarely slept in his
home and was constantly looking over his shoul-
der.

What protection was he given, what investi-
gation was done, what was discovered, or did
everything go quiet because in his report he
said he had reason to believe that “one of the
assailants was a police officer”?

In early April, 2007, Mr Jones swore an affi-
davit in which he said: “On or about 5th April
2007, I was attacked in my bed at my home by
two assailants demanding I open a safe (which
did not exist) on the property. I received only
minor abrasions, but a guest at my home was
badly beaten, and stabbed in the same incident.
Both I and my guest were admitted to hospital
for treatment, my guest having to stay
overnight.”

And about a month later, Mr Jones again
filed a police complaint. “On or about 30th
May, 2007,” he said, “I was attacked in front of
my home for no apparent reason, with the
assailants not seeking any money or asking any
questions.

Once again I was admitted to hospital, this
time with a broken eye socket and jaw, multiple
head wounds and severe bruising to back and
legs.

I have reason to believe that one of the
assailants was a police officer.” The Canadian
accountant with him was not injured.

Mr Jones was at the time embroiled in a
legal matter. He was advised not to connect his
beatings with the legal dispute, because the tim-
ing might have just been coincidental. He reject-
ed the advice: “I remain ... convinced that these
attacks are not coincidental,” he said, “and feel
it paramount to my safety that I put my con-
cerns before the court at this time.”

It is now for the police to take those concerns
seriously and thoroughly investigate them. Obvi-
ously, someone at that time had reason to put
the fear of God in him.

If this incident were not properly investigat-
ed at the time, it is important that it be done so
now. It is also important to find out if Mr Jones
had any justification for his adamant belief that
his beatings were not a coincidence.

And the only way to do this to the satisfac-
tion of the public is for the Attorney General to
proceed with the pending criminal prosecution
in the case that concerned Hywel Jones.

Sirst Baptist Church

269 Market St. South = AO. Box N-7964 © Nassau, Bahamas

“Earth changes, but God and
His Word never change.”
SUNDAY SERVICES

PASTOR EARLE a JLP..O.0.
ala @ Gicer, Counselce, Inbercessor
Tore: S2245e5S © 99S-5 oe
Fae) 326-4 SRE -d 19

a 810

PLP legacy
— asset or

liability?

LETTERS

EDITOR, The Tribune.

This little tidbit is being given
in response to two articles that
appeared in two of our dailies
recently, I refer to “PLPs Say
They Have a True Vision And
Plan” by lanthia Smith, Journal
Staff Reporter, The Bahama
Journal of Monday, May 11th,
and Insight article “URCA and
the Milk of Hatchet Bay,” by
Rupert Missick Jr, Tribune
Chief Reporter, also of Mon-
day May 11th 2009.

PLP Members of Parliament
appeared on Issues of The Day,
said theirs is the party with a
true vision and plan for the
country, but we'll have to wait
leading up to 2012 to see exact-
ly what that plan and vision for
the country is. I cry shame on
Her Majesty's Loyal Opposi-
tion. Additionally, it would
appear from Chairwoman
Glenys Hanna-Martin, and her
companions, that the PLP is
depending more on its legacy
than a vision and plan for the
country, to win the next gener-
al election. What exactly is that
legacy, and whether or not it is
an asset or a liability for the
PLP, has been the subject of
much discussion of late. So let’s
examine the legacy.

Majority Rule - this is the
biggest farce of all. The black
majority, mainly poor folk, were
tricked into believing that
Majority Rule would usher in
an era of equal opportunity for
ordinary black Bahamians.
What they got in return was a
Socialist Dictatorship, mas-
querading as a Socialist Democ-
racy. Everything that was done,
every policy’s underlying objec-
tive was to win the next elec-
tion. The needs of the poor
masses would then be routinely
ignored, and then suddenly
remembered every election
cycle, with capital works pro-
jects that would get started and
never completed, or being com-
pleted after two or three elec-
tion cycles. “...We have our
work to do, and we will do our
work, but it’s about systemical-
ly organising to go out and win
the next election and that’s
where our focus is. We will deal
with our issues, but we will
focus on winning the next elec-
tion,” MP for West End and
Bimini, Obie Wilchcombe. And
what exactly are those issues,
Mr Wilchcombe, and which
ones are more important, those
internal matters impacting your
party’s chances at the next elec-
tion, or those national matters
in urgent need of attention
impacting the welfare of the
Bahamian people? Pity that this

Our DIAMONDâ„¢ Seal Technology uses a valve with a
tough diamond coating to bring you a faucet built to last up

WOOD AND COLD-FORMED STEEL

TRUSSES
DESIGN
ENGINEERING
COMPETITIVE PRICING
FAST BIDDING INFORMATION

361-7764

Road to City Dump after Premix
Email:ggongora@coralwave.com

Coa

ALITHORIZED:
MANUFOCTURER

LORS MUONS LOOM ec meee Mem ciel)
beautiful on the inside? It’s one of the many ideas that
make Delta® more than just a faucet.

A

ee td

Carey

@FINE BUILDERS HARDWARE & PLUMBING®
Established 1951

Dowdeswell Street » Tel: 322-1103

letters@tribunemedia net



sary to win an election, and
doing what’s right for country
and the Bahamian people.

There is a reason why Major-
ity Rule has never been cele-
brated in this country. The fact
that UBP and colonial legisla-
tion, designed to allow slum
landlords in 2009 to rent houses
with no running water or inside
toilets, are still a part of the
Statute Laws of The Bahamas,
bespeaks the lie of the achieve-
ment of Majority Rule. Bahami-
anisation — another fallacy.
The true purpose of Bahami-
anisation was never to promote
qualified Bahamians; its true
purpose was to inundate the civ-
il service, every government
agency and corporation, with
PLP supporters, being PLP the
only prequalification for the job.

And so began the transfor-
mation of the PLP from the
dreams and ideals of its
founders, into a Socialist Demo-
cratic government headed by a
Social Dictator. In this regard,
the Insight article previously
noted, gives a very revealing
picture of Bahamianisation at
work. In 1975, the PLP govern-
ment bought a successful dairy
and chicken farm from the Har-
risville Company — Hatchet
Bay Farm. We all know what
happened, the farm went into
problems with its creditors,
employees were laid off and the
farm that once supplied 60 per
cent of the domestic market
with eggs, provided poultry,
milk and cheese, as well as jobs
for 300 people in the settlement
of Alice Town collapsed. In the
Insight article, an Eleutheran
who experienced first hand the
PLP government of the late Sir
Lynden Pindling’s move to
“Bahamianise” the Hatchet Bay
Farm, paints a very devious and
self-serving, if not anti-Bahami-
an, purpose for Bahamianisa-
tion.

According to the Eleutheran,
“all of the foreign scientists and
veterinarians went home, but
that wasn’t it. All of the white
Bahamians were fired and then
all of the black Bahamians who
didn’t support the PLP were
sent home.”

It is incredulous to note then,
PLP MP for Bain and Grants
Town Dr Bernard Nottage, say-
ing in the Bahama Journal arti-
cle, that the PLP is keen on the
issue of The Bahamas being
able to feed itself. That the
FNM government has focused
on simply providing jobs for
Bahamians, but has placed very
little emphasis on the country

being self-sufficient. “The prob-
lem is that we’ve all concen-
trated on trying to create jobs,
but it was the PLP government
that put in place an agricultural
programme to expand agricul-
ture, to expand fishing, that’s
how BAIC was initially
formed.”

Are these people crazy, or
simply out of touch with this
generation of “New Bahami-
ans” of which I am a proud
member? The worn out, torn
and tattered legacy of the PLP,
one that wreaks of the betrayal
of the dreams and aspirations
of our great-grandparents, that
permeates with the oppression
of the masses in favour of polit-
ical patrimony, is totally irrele-
vant to the “New Bahamian,”
and will never win another elec-
tion in this country. Yet accord-
ing to PLP Chairwoman Glenys
Hanna-Martin, “What really
sets our party apart is the lega-
cy that follows it.” What legacy,
will the PLP ever get it?

We do not attend political
rallies; we can afford our own
entertainment. Our loyalty is
not to any political party, but
to our God and country, and in
that order.

We do not need your T-shirts,
whom we vote for is a private
matter, that’s why our country
has a private ballot. You can
never purchase our votes; do
not insult our intelligence with
offers of hams, turkeys, appli-
ances or jobs in return for our
votes. You will be embarrassed!

We do not believe that you
have a true vision and plan for
our country, as evidenced by
the fact that during your numer-
ous criticisms of the present
government’s lack thereof, you
have yet to offer an alternative
of your own.

Concluding recommendation
— talk to us, the “New Bahami-
ans,” not your rapidly deterio-
rating base.

Find out from us what our
dreams and vision is for our
country, and then incorporate
our ideas into a national devel-
opment plan with an accompa-
nying legislative agenda to
make those dreams a reality.

One more thing, if you're not
prepared to work with all
Bahamians, PLP, FNM and
what have you, then do not
waste our time.

A national plan by its very
nature is nonpartisan. We will
no longer allow ourselves, nor
our nation to be divided and
conquered by greedy, self-serv-
ing and clueless politicians and
aspirants! A word to the wise
should be sufficient.

LAVADE M DARLING
Nassau,
May 17, 2009.

Mrs. Dawn Hartman

&

Mr. and Mrs. Andy Knowles
AMOuUNce ie ey Cement

of their children

Erin Hartman and Elliott Knowles
Wedding Date is set for June 17, 2009


THE TRIBUNE

THURSDAY, MAY 21, 2009, PAGE 5



LOCAL NEWS



Man, 33, jailed for four years after pleading guilty to drug offence

@ By NATARIO McKENZIE
Tribune Staff Reporter

A MAN who was actively being sought
by police since early January was sen-
tenced to four years in prison yesterday
after pleading guilty to a drug charge
stemming from a $480,000 marijuana
seizure.

Prescott Roxbury, 33, told Magistrate
Carolita Bethel that he had been keeping

the drugs for a friend. According to
Inspector Ercell Dorsette, DEU officers
seized 321 pounds of marijuana while
executing a search warrant on a home
at Turks Close, Flamingo Gardens, on
January 3.

Four persons who were at the house at
the time were taken into custody. Rox-
bury, a resident of Soldier Road, eluded
police until he was arrested near his
home at around 6pm on Tuesday.

Winsome Williams, 28, Paula Morris,
32, Tricia Witter, 33, all of Jamaica, along
with Dexter Wilson, 30, of Turks Close,
have been charged in connection with
the seizure and have pleaded not guilty.

Remand

Wilson is out on bail while the three
Jamaican women are on remand at Her
Majesty’s Prison, Fox Hill.

According to the Inspector Dorsette,
Roxbury told police on Tuesday that he
had lived at the Flamingo Gardens house
and had placed the drugs there shortly
before police arrived to execute the
search warrant.

According to the prosecutor, Roxbury
told police that he would plead guilty to
the marijuana possession charge.

Roxbury’s attorney Willie Moss sub-
mitted to the court that his client had

Developer burns FNM T-shirt
in anti- “government protest

m@ By MEGAN REYNOLDS
Tribune Staff Reporter
mreynolds@tribunemedia.net

A DEVELOPER set his FNM
t-shirt on fire yesterday in protest
against the government he voted
for and the party he rallied
behind in the last general elec-
tion.

Randy Rolle, 53, said the FNM
has let him down and he is calling
on others who feel the same way
to join him in protest.

The contractor and small-time
developer burned his red FNM
t-shirt on RM Bailey Park oppo-
site the Mall at Marathon on
Robinson Road yesterday morn-
ing to make a public stand against
the FNM administration.

He said he is angry that the
Ministry of Housing provided
inadequate funds for his devel-
opment of two homes in the Pride
Estates government housing sub-
division, and has delayed him in
his work.

Mr Rolle, of West Bay Street,
said he requested $15,500 from
the department to cover the cost
of his work, which commenced
in January, but received only
$12,500, and has therefore been
unable to progress as planned.

However Mr Rolle did say the
Ministry of Housing was willing
to cover any additional expenses
should the cost of his project
exceed the allotted amount.



RANDY ROLLE set his FNM T-shirt on fire in protest against the govern-
ment he voted for and the party he rallied behind in the last election.

But the once fervent FNM sup-
porter said he is now disappoint-
ed in government for not assisting
him in the same way he expected
them to.

Mr Rolle said: “I didn’t vote
for the FNM based on a t-shirt
so I will burn the t-shirt in protest
of that. “I campaigned, I voted, I
worked the polls and everything
else, for a free and democratic
sovereign nation founded on spir-
itual values, and in which no man,
woman or child shall ever be slave
or bondsman to anyone, nor their
labour exploited or their lives
frustrated by deprivation and in
this instance, they brazenly did
not respect my manhood or my

US tourist drowns

A 62-year-old American tourist drowned in Eleuthera yes-
terday when he fell into the ocean near Governor’s Harbour.

David Anderson of Arkansas was on the beach when the
incident occurred at around 11am.

Presumed to have died of drowning, Mr Anderson was
pronounced dead at a local clinic.

Police do not suspect foul play but stated that an autopsy
will be conducted to determine the precise cause of death.

NES

custom built © attractive louver designs * storm bor locking feature

hurricane season is here.
ee ee

BY NPN MPAs

677.2100 * ROBINSON RD. * www.cbsbahamas.com



classy

Ta Ce)

Felipé Major/Tribune staff

entitlement. There are men on
the street pulling the trigger and
there are those in parliament
pulling the rug, all of which is a
destructive measure. I’m calling
on the entire Rolle family and
the Bahamian people to call on
the Ministry of Housing to do
everything possible to make cer-
tain every Bahamian has the
opportunity and the ability wher-
ever it is necessary, to fulfil some
of their dreams and prioritise
their craft or the crafts of their
forefathers in labour.”

Attempts to reach Minister of
Housing Kenneth Russell for
comment on the issue were
unsuccessful.

STINUCOM

RRO ta os

FLIES, MOSQUITOES, TICKS & FLEAS

PHONE: 327-6464
se

(aoe
MiMineED

JUST WEST OF CITY MARKET, TONIQUE DARLING HIGHWAY

2004 Hondas

Noah/ReguisVans

Startin
$9,

at

Js

—

not wasted the courts time as he had
pleaded guilty to the charge.

He asked the court to be as lenient as
possible, taking into account the volume
of drugs seized. Magistrate Bethel sen-
tenced Roxbury to four years in prison.
He was ordered to pay a reduced fine of
$25,000. Failure to pay the fine will result
in an additional year of imprisonment.

Williams, Morris, Witter and Wilson
are expected back in court on May 27.

Payment

for

Government

Workers
Come see our

ey Mage Rem eel

Vehicles

Hilh COM Heel Mistake

“IN-HOUSE FINANCING AVAILABLE”

i

Colors:
Gold
Black
Navy
Tan
Brown

$19,900.00 ©

—

——-

2005/06 30 SEATER

Me el
(242) 341-2249
FAX: (242) 361-1136

Visit our Website: waw.autohl.com

Black Multi
Brown Multi

neaHerbour

Tan Multi
¢ | \\e

Rosetta St. -

Ph: 325-3336


PAGE 6, THURSDAY, MAY 21, 2009

THE TRIBUNE





FirsiCaribhean donates 3

to the Prison Officers
Dependants’ Fund

FIRSTCARIBBEAN Interna-

of imposter bottled water

the cheque on behalf of his col-

tional Bank recently donated to Her
Majesty’s Prison Officers’ Depen-
dants Fund.

ASP Raymond Julien accepted

leagues.

“The fund was developed to assist
in the welfare of dependants of offi-
cers who have unselfishly given their i
lives in the execution of their duties :

on behalf of the country,” he said.

Contribution to the fund is in
keeping with FirstCaribbean’s com- i
mitment to “Enriching our commu- }

nities. Together,” the bank said.

m@ By TANEKA THOMPSON
Tribune Staff Reporter
tthompson@tribunemedia.net

THE Department of Environ-
mental Health has launched an
investigation into claims that
impostor water bearing the Aqua-
pure label was found at a local
depot.

Judging of Nassau 'Nastics Gymnasts
2nd Annual Awards Ceremony

coed i

Featured Performances
May 22 - 24, 2009

Frictory, Neto 22. 200
Cakes Feld Gyrm—lucging of Bears
4-épm
Susan Monahan
® USA. Nanoral rating : oC
® Over lbyeos udging experarce judgngof Row, Vail & Beam
8 Fotrer Ste ludgrig Daactat 14pm
© Currendy os on che Flonics Sore dusges
Beced
Sunred, Atay 24, AO)
endal Gil. baaace Gyrine
Fnay FREE =m
Aeaed Carernony & Fee
Ssturday Gerwral Adrmaion 53 tured
(nm Bunder free Performances
Sunde = Adu 5. 10
‘Chakra 5
(2 yr & undor frog

at

i

Nassau Magica Cokes Field Locabon Pa S622 Genres Locales Pe od
PO Bm S564 Mrssau Beberm:
Err natauresicaiyahaccom ‘Wetsle eee cers cunesicscon






BAHAMAS FAITH







MINISTRIES INT'L

The Diplomat Center « Carmichael Road
Tel: 461-6400 + Fax: 361-2260

cigs ANNUAL CONCLAVE

“Retreat....Advance....impact:
The Making of A Whole-In-One”

PEOPLE

iIsTRY

MA TM
wo INTERNATION AL Oo

Guest facilitators for

this plenary session are:

LOCAL NEWS

Investigation into claims

Environment Minister Dr Earl
Deveaux said that after the reports
were published in The Tribune, a
team was dispatched to investigate
the claims. While he would not
divulge the findings of that inves-
tigation, Mr Deveaux said a report
would be turned over to the Min-
istry of Health which would take
appropriate action.

Tropical
treat!

Unlimited Mileage
+ CDW + Free Upgrade

Midsize in Florida as low as

Daily/

US$ US$180 Weekly
when using the
upgrade coupon.

Fullsize in Florida as low as

STR) Ad

Daily/

US$ US$205 Weekly
when using the
upgrade coupon.

For reservations, as well as terms and
conditions please contact Destinations
at (786) 245-0520 or at 1-800-468-3334.
Be sure to use rate code RCT and
coupon code AU2253VLS when making
the reservation. Upgrade is only valid
on compact and intermediate cars on
rentals of two or more days. Rates
include unlimited mileage and CDW.
Offer valid through June 30th 2009.

alamo.com



Lady Patrice Ellis

PERSONAL DEVELOPMENT:

Lady Patrice Ellis — Mit. Tabor Full Gospel Baptist Church
“The Making of A Whole lin Onel"

Christopher Smith = The PE.O.RL.E Ministry, BFM

“Walking In Integrity”

PROFESSIONAL DEVELOPMENT:

Anthony Ferguson — Colina

Rachelle Lighthourne - BTC

“Successfully navigating the political and cultural
challenges within your working environment

eT
—

Anthony
Ferguson

Rochelle
Lightbourne

(Maintain, sustain and retain your work, your wits and your walk)"

RELATIONSHIPS:

Dr. Thomas Rolle - Psychologist/Love & Intimacy Therapist
“The religious aind cultural taboos that stall, stifle and
stagnate love (and other) relationships in the Ohurch”

Dr. Thomas Rolle

The Remnant Community Centre, Carmichael & Golden Isles Roads

Ele cee el Ree Ler Tan
Pree ete eM meee

mie

apse eet Ree et tyme ttl Mat cer ee a time A ee

For further information contact: 461 6400/461-6478

"Since that story
appeared, our team has
done some investiga-
tions which we'll pro-
vide to Health and
they'll also take action
but I can't say anymore
about that," he said yes-
terday.

After the story broke
earlier this week,
renewed calls emerged
from within the water
industry for an inde-
pendent regulatory
board to police the sec-
tor.

"First of all, I think that the
water industry as a whole needs
to be more regulated, no doubt
about it. As an industry we have to
all understand that we are dealing
with a very important product —
there are no short-cuts in this busi-
ness," said Tina Knowles, owner

of Chelsea's Choice. "The industry
needs to be policed, regulations
ought to be most definitely in place
and enforced, but I think it's very
important for there not to be a

FEU USUAL UL
—— ————e

Earl Deveaux



panic in the industry.”
Mr Deveaux said the
sector is currently over-
seen by a cartel of gov-
ernment agencies,
including the Consumer
Affairs Unit, the
Department of Envi-
ronmental Health and
the Ministry of Health.
"Anybody bottling
water would have to get
a license and in order to
get that they would be
required to pass sanita-
tion tests and standards
as set by the environ-
mental monitoring lab which is in
(the Ministry of Environment).
"Any infractions after that, that
cause a public health issue, are
dealt with by the Ministry of
Health and if they have issues of
quality, there's a division of con-
sumer affairs that has punitive
powers that any injured person can
complain to," he explained.
Last week, Aquapure officials
revealed the discovery of five bot-
tles of suspected impostor water

BAIC EXECUTIVE chairman Edison Key meets with Simpson Penn School officials. Pictured from left

they said was tainted with very
high levels of disease causing bac-
teria.

According to Aquapure presi-
dent Alex Knowles, the company
was tipped off about the suspected
fake products — being passed off
as demineralised water — after sus-
picious looking red-capped bottles
were spotted by an Aquapure
employee at an independent depot
in central New Providence last
week.

Aquapure does produce red-
capped demineralised water, and
has assured the public that there is
nothing wrong with the genuine
bottles.

Mr Knowles said the five bot-
tles were seized by police, tested by
company lab technicians and found
to be “heavily contaminated" with
coliform bacteria, indicators of dis-
ease-causing organisms, and fecal
bacteria.

Explaining the extensive daily
testing process executed by Aqua-
pure officials, he said there is no
chance the tainted water originat-
ed from the Bernard Road plant.



" ———



are superintendent Wrensworth Butler, chief of security Jerry Stubbs, Mr Key, and BAIC general manager

Benjamin Rahmng.

THE Bahamas Agricultural
and Industrial Corporation
(BAIC) is offering residents at
the Simpson Penn School for
Boys and the Williemae Pratt
School for Girls a chance at
agriculture and woodturning.

Executive chairman Edison
Key and a BAIC delegation
discussed the venture with
Superintendent Wrensworth

Butler and his team during a
meeting on Tuesday.

"We are going to work with
the students at the schools,"
said Mr Key. "We want to
teach them something they can
have to take them through life,
something by which they can
be self employed."

"This area is ideal for a good
agricultural programme for

BANK TELLERS ARE
a

Get the training you need to
qualify for a high-paying job.

Call Success Training College
324-7770

DON STAINTON |
PROTECTION Lia.

Tel: 322-8219 322-8160

TOP QUALITY TEMPERED
ALUMINUM SECURITY SCREENS

BEAUTYGUARD
| WE DO IT WHEN WE SAY WE WILL! |
__ Serving The Bahamian Community Since 1978 |



these youngsters," said Mr
Key. "We can assist by bringing
in technical persons to give
them the training they need to
grow a variety of fruit trees,
vegetables, root crops,
bananas. I see tremendous
potential there.

Mr Butler welcomed the
progamme as “wonderful
news.”

“(Mr Key) and I share the
same vision. I hope we can get
this project started as soon as
possible so we can impact the
lives of the boys in a very pos-
itive way,” he said.

"This would allow them to
walk away from this place with
meaningful skills with which
they can go back into the com-
munity. Farming is ideal.”

Meanwhile, Simpson Penn
staffers assist where they can
to encourage the youngsters to
produce their own food. Mr
Butler said the aim is to
achieve a greater degree of
self-sufficiency.

"One of the things that is
missing from our farming pro-
gramme is technical assis-
tance," he said. "Basically most
of the persons who assist, they
just have a green thumb.

"In order for us to be able
to do it at a level that would
make our products more mar-
ketable we would need techni-
cal assistance which (Mr Key)
has agreed to provide us with.
We are very pleased with that,”
Mr Butler said.

He said that he has found
agriculture to be very thera-
peutic for the boys. Occasion-
ally they are allowed plots in
which to grow various vegeta-
bles.

"The boys are very proud of
their achievements when they
grow corn and water melons
and tomatoes when they see
them come out of the ground,”
Mr Butler said.

"Definitely I feel that with a
little education and a little
assistance from the general
public and the various min-
istries, certainly we can take
our agriculture programme to a
higher level.

"It is our goal to become
self-sufficient. Presently we
purchase much of our vegeta-
bles from a private vendor.
Once we get the programme
underway that should cease in
short order,” he said.

On the tour of the school,
Mr Key was accompanied by
general manager Benjamin
Rahming, assistant general
manager Arnold Dorsett, assis-
tant manager of the Handicraft
Department Pam Deveaux,
and woodturning trainer
Vaughn Minnis.
THE TRIBUNE

GB Power Company Br) CPV ETE ii)

workers set to elect
new union officers

@ By DENISE MAYCOCK
Tribune Freeport
Reporter
dmaycock@tribunemedia.net

FREEPORT — More than
130 Grand Bahama Power
Company workers are expect-
ed to go the polls today to
elect a new slate of officers in
the Commonwealth Electrical
Workers Union (CEWU).

President Keith Knowles is
not seeking re-election. Six
candidates are vying for the
presidency.

Union Trustee Stevie
Forbes, a 14-year employee at
Grand Bahama Power, is one
of them.

Negotiations

Mr Forbes commended Mr
Knowles for “a job well done,”
especially during the very
tough times last year when the
union was embroiled in indus-
trial action with management
during negotiations for a new
industrial contract.

“T want to thank Mr
Knowles... for representing us;
he was a good and fair presi-
dent that dealt with matters
effectively.

“There are some persons
who were angry with president
Knowles for not giving up
Article 22 and moving on with
negotiations, but I encouraged
him to fight on because giving
up Article 22 would have been
detrimental to the union,” he
said.

Mr Forbes explained that
Article 22 dictates that GBPC
must consult with the union
on all matters concerning its
members and workers before
any decisions are made.

There are 134 members of
CEWU. Mr Forbes outlined
some plans he hopes to imple-
ment if elected president.

He proposes to make loans

available to members who are
facing financial hardship. He
explained that members will
be able to borrow money from
the union and pay it back with
a Salary deduction.

Mr Forbes said that mem-
bers needing assistance — to
pay utilities, car repairs, and
school fees for their children
— will be assisted.

“IT will put mechanisms in
place to accommodate all
members so that the union can
meet them half way with any
expense.

“It is just not right for a
member to face difficulty with
having to meet extra expenses
when they have an organisa-
tion, where they pay monthly
dues and is in a good financial
standing,” he said.

Mr Forbes will bring his
organisational skills and pro-
fessionalism to the union.

“T practise honesty and
integrity on the job, and I
know that there are a lot of
members who will support me
because they know I am a car-
ing person.

“This is not the first time
that I have run for an execu-
tive position. Iam presently a
trustee of the union and this
is my second time running for
president,” he said.

Mr Forbes promised that he
will not compromise the union,
which faced tremendous diffi-
culties last year during its
negotiations with manage-
ment.

“That was a very critical
time in the life of our union. It
was the first time that the
union had ever taken strike
action against the company,
but it was necessary for the
sake of the workers,” he said.

Elections will be held at 9am
at the union’s office on Yel-
low Pine Street under the
supervision of an officer at the
Department of Labour.

Start looking for that Special Prom Dress
early and remember our flexible
layaway plan at

ORALEE’S FASHIONS

Mackey Street « Telephone: 393-0744

Monday -

Saturday 9:00am - 5:30pm

Bahamas Bus & Truck Co., Ltd.

Montrose Avenue
Phone:322-1722 * Fax: 326-7452

a ponte EXTRA,

— Shipment

of
Used Cars

] COME CHECK

US OUT



Union Trustee Stevie Forbes

THURSDAY, MAY 21, 2009, PAGE 7

LOCAL NEWS

Carnival

FUN FOR ALL. ALL FOR FUN.

"$522...

)Camival Freedom
6-day Western Caribbean

From Ft. Lauderdale

Clamival reserves the nght to re-inetate fie fuel supplement

nore
ff way

$5 per person

the WYER of eeceeds 3
o2, Service Teas, per person, double occupancy
Qe al aft iff

pe

Sept 20, 2009

or all quests at up 42
0) per fnarre! Prices

a Caen! ae
BTA! tae

ee rER
PEE Euler t ee8)
Shirley Street.......... Keene!









get your onephone at

purchase your home
phone line and receive

FREE local number

Kelly's














FREE local and long distance calling for one month*
FREE inter-island calls to onephone customers

FREE activation

Cem OMI Meta eit

unlimited broadband internet
a one onephone telephone adapter

a touch tone telephone

*certain restrictions apply

House,
Home

: New Shipments Arrived

Hurry, Hurry, Hurry and
Get Your First Choice
For Easy Financing

Bank And Indurance

on Prenton = onephone
Tesi IndiGO



reeport www.indigonetworks.com N Ww OR K §
PAGE 8, THURSDAY, MAY 21, 2009

THE TRIBUNE



75090 -1 = ee
Junkanoo Summer Festival

moves to downtown Nassau

FOR RENT

Fully furnished town house in private area on
Eastern Road, near beach. 2 Bedrooms, 11/2 Baths,
Washroom, Large Kitchen; Burglar bars, A/C & C/A.

Asking $975 per month for quick rental; serious
inquiries only please; Ph:323-4326

Quality Auto Sales
1 Oem Ue es

For the best deal in town on

pre-owned cars, with warranty!
Trade-ins on new car sales

iN ea

‘01 TOYOTA CAMRY
‘05 TOYOTA CAMRY
‘07 TOYOTA YARIS

‘06 HYUNDAI TERRACAN

IN ANOTHER big move to improve the
highly-anticipated cultural experience known
as the Junkanoo Summer Festival, tourism
officials announced that the event will be
held in a new location — Woodes Rogers
Walk in the heart of downtown Nassau.

For several years, the festival has used
Arawak Cay as the site of its weekly events.
This year, it will be against the backdrop of
Nassau’s busy shopping thoroughfare, Bay
Street, next to the famous straw market, and
overlooking Nassau Harbour and its cruise
port.

The move will bring even more excite-
ment to the event, said Christine Ferguson,
the event’s main co-ordinator for the Min-
istry of Tourism.

“People will be able to feel the energy of
our vibrant city when they enter this new
festival site,” she said. “We are in the heart
of the city, and our festivities will be at the
centre of all the activities that normally make
Nassau such an interesting and exciting des-
tination.”

Ms Ferguson pointed out that downtown
Nassau also has sentimental appeal as a loca-
tion for the Junkanoo Summer Festival. The
move will conjure up memories of past fes-
tivals that were successfully staged there,
she said.

“Our residents and many of our visitors
from long ago would recall the days of
Goombay Summer Festival,” Ms Ferguson
pointed out. “Goombay Summer was one
of our landmark celebrations. It brought
our visitors together with our residents just as

ACTION JACKSON thrills the crowd at JSF 2008.

Junkanoo Summer Festival does today.

Goombay Summer was held right at
Woodes Rogers Walk, and we anticipate
that Junkanoo Summer will be just as special
and just as successful.”

Junkanoo Summer Festival will feature
Bahamian heritage in entertaining presen-
tations and demonstrations. Those who
attend the festival can expect to encounter
Bahamian music, dance, cuisine, and litera-
ture, organisers said.

Events will include heritage games such as



pineapple-eating and onion-peeling contests.
New goombay and rake ‘n scrape songs will
be introduced each week.

Culinary demonstrations will give audi-
ences a better understanding of the prepa-
ration of Bahamian meals, and the festival
will be punctuated each week by colourful,
high-energy junkanoo parades, Ms Fergu-
son said.

The Junkanoo Summer Festival will be
held every Saturday in July from noon to
10pm in downtown Nassau.

‘01 HYUNDAI COUPE
‘04 HYUNDAI SANTA FE
‘06 HYUNDAI ELANTRA
‘06 HYUNDAI SONATA
‘01 HYUNDAI HD-65 TRUCK
‘94 MITSUBISHI DIAMANTE
‘94 TOYOTA CAMRY
= auto
S | QUALTT sales B
ws | SHIRLEY STREET = 322- 3775 + 325- mnt am

apart) Lid tarsi fc al Chad &
ot Abode Mato Moll Di Aci Bhd, DaT-291 8

SRI GLIE TL
ey
Sa RS ee
TUT AM UT
Tea:
ew My CTH

-_—



AT A special assembly held
at the Uriah McPhee Primary
School, the Scotiabank
(Bahamas) Processing Support
Centre announced its adoption
of the school.

Each branch and unit within
Scotiabank has been asked to
select a primary school in their
community with whom to part-

IN CONCERT AT 9:30PM

SATURDAY, MAY 23, 2009

GRAND BALLROOM
DOORS OPEN 8:30PM

Hard Red Spring Wheat

CALL THE ATLANTIS LIVE BOX OFFICE
ee Oa ee wee eer

] Milian Street



East West Highway, Nassau « Tel: 242-
Freeport « Tel: 242-351-2201

ner. Each partnership is indi-
vidualised and can take the
form of financial support, vol-
unteering, shared expertise or
physical resources.

The Processing Support Cen-
tre has commenced with a liter-
acy programme at the school
and has plans to launch a sci-
ence project in the near future.

YOUR BABY CAN READ!

An early literacy system for babies,
toddlers and preschoolers

Authorized Distributor

Sherle Knowles

Phone: 393-8478 or 380-8023
babies

canread@ hotmail.com

Tam aT i
me ee

_ — ee of

* A premium flour that is milled from Canadian

* An enriched flour that is versatile and well suited
to various baking and cooking applications

Distributed throughout the Bahamas by

BWA

Bahamas Wholesale Agencies Ltd.

34-1759








On Friday, May 15, all 49
members of the unit were treat-
ed to a special assembly con-
ducted by students of the
school.

Uriah McPhee Primary
School Principal Helen Sim-
mons-Johnson thanked Scotia-
bank for its support.

“Tam elated that members of
the Processing Support Centre
chose to partner with my school,
this programme will allow Sco-
tiabank to observe first hand
what we are doing in our school
and will provide our students
with opportunities for enhanced
learning,” she said.

Rekell Griffin, senior man-
ager of marketing and public
relations at Scotiabank, pre-
sented Ms Simmons-Johnson
with two computers along with
reading software to be used in
the school’s reading lab.

In an address to the admin-
istrators, teachers and students
of Uriah McPhee, Ms Griffin
said: “Scotiabank is very excited
about this new initiative,
through this programme we
intend to utilise the human
resources, talents and ideas of
our employees to strengthen
and enhance the quality of edu-
cation in the communities
where we live and work.”

The Adopt A School Pro-
gramme spins off the Scotia-
bank Bright Future Programme,
which is a philanthropic initia-
tive that helps support oppor-
tunities for the country’s chil-
dren and communities.

“By bringing together the
passion of our employees, the
insight of our partners and the
spirit of our communities, the
Scotiabank Bright Future Pro-
gramme is helping to support
opportunities for children and
communities, building a
brighter future for everyone,”
the bank said.

share
your
news

The Tribune wants to hear
from people who are

making news in their
neighbourhoods. Perhaps
you are raising funds for a
good cause, campaigning
for improvements in the
area or have won an
award.

If so, call us on 322-1986
and share your story.
THE TRIBUNE

THURSDAY, MAY 21, 2009, PAGE 9



National Dance ©
School to head
to Tennessee

THE National Dance School }
of the Bahamas will attend a }
cultural exchange programme
in Tennessee this year thanks }
to a donation from First- }
Caribbean International Bank. }

The event will be held from :
July 26 to August 8 at the Mal- }

one Studios in Nashville.

The school said the pro- ;
gramme will educate and :
expose local dancers to inter- }
national techniques, while }
simultaneously giving them the }
opportunity to showcase the tra- ;
ditional music and dance of the ;

Bahamas.

Founded in 2003, the First- ;
International :
Comtrust Foundation Limited }
administers the corporate social i
responsibility agenda of First- }
Caribbean International Bank.

Through the foundation, the }
bank has provided nearly $7 }
million in funding for causes }
across the Caribbean, including }
community development, dis-
aster relief, education, health }

Caribbean

and wellness, and sports.

m@ By MEGAN REYNOLDS
Tribune Staff Reporter
mreynolds@
tribunemedia.net

AN AMERICAN fly-fish-
ing enthusiast who travelled
to Crooked Island with the
Ministry of Tourism on Tues-
day died within hours of
arriving.

James Birkholm, 74, and
his wife Deanna Birkholm
run a fly-fishing website from
their home in Poulsbo, Wash-
ington and flew from Nassau
to Crooked Island to explore
opportunities for bonefishing

LOCAL NEWS

‘US man dies after falling ill
on way to Crooked Island

US fly-fishing enthusiast was
travelling with Ministry of Tourism

on a media visit with the Min-
istry of Tourism.

During the flight Mr Birk-
holm complained of nausea
and was taken directly to the
local health clinic after the
flight landed in Crooked
Island.

His condition grew increas-

PELICAN BAY at Lucaya was named as one of the best hotels in the world.



Grand Bahama resort
receives top ranking

FREEPORT - A Grand
Bahama resort has been
ranked as one of the best
hotels in the world, receiving
the highest ranking in the
Bahamas, and placing 11th in
the Caribbean.

Expedia.com’s exclusive
‘Insiders’ Select List’ has
named Pelican Bay at Lucaya
as one of the best hotels in the
world with a score of 86.03,
according to a press release
issued by the resort.

The resort’s water views,
distinct architecture, and
choice amenities have put Pel-
ican Bay in the top 20 hotels
of the Caribbean and made it
the highest ranked hotel in the
Bahamas.

The Reef Atlantis and The
Cove, Paradise Island, are the
only other resorts in the
Bahamas to receive this dis-
tinction.

Millions of customers and
in-house experts chose Expe-
dia Insiders’ Select rankings as
a source when selecting the
appropriate travel destination
with first-class appeal.

Expedia ranks hotels
around the world using a rat-
ing system based on its trav-
eller opinions, expert input
and value, producing a list
that represents the top one
per cent of all of its hotels and
resorts.

Overlooking the Bell Chan-
nel Bay, Pelican Bay’s state
rooms feature furnishings
from around the world, water
views, private balconies, and
patios.

The resort also features
three swimming pools. Guests
can relax poolside and savour
a Caribbean-inspired meal or
tropical drink at the resort’s al
fresco dining option — Sabor
Restaurant and Bar.





242.422.4677

ken@erabahamas.com

Expedia.com’s
‘Insiders’ Select List’

Bahamas

acs. | dete ky
She . 2
[ethan tas

endl Wipes tar

a4
t

Agencies

serving Bahamians with fre best brands tor 60 years

WW Daharresageniciss carr

www.erabahamas.com

Mm.
Ean
ERA

Dupuch Real Estate







ingly serious and Mr Birk-
holm died at around 4pm
with his wife by his side.

Mrs Birkholm returned to
Nassau yesterday and an
autopsy was performed at
Doctor’s Hospital to confirm
Mr Birkholm’s cause of
death.

The couple were scheduled
to spend the night in Crooked
Island on Tuesday and go
fishing the following day with
a group of 10 media repre-
sentatives and Ministry of
Tourism representatives.

The remaining visitors from
across the United States will

go on to Acklins and
Mayaguana before returning
to Nassau and then going
home.

Mr Birkholm was editor of
a weekly online magazine for
fly-fishing enthusiasts, Fly-
AnglersOnline.com, and his
wife is the publisher.

The couple have been life-
long fishing aficionados and
ran a casting school in their
home town as well as the
website.

Crooked Island and the
Bahamas Ministry of Tourism
sponsored the latest edition
of the website.

aes a7 PM

Donations accepted in lieu of flowers

All contributions will be donated to
the COB Athletic Scholarship Fund:

Pare ee te
ee eee es
a shah mee it

2nd floor, Fort Nassau Centre,

iF Tiss ice lls aed
Nassau, Baharnas

eRe eee ee) Re ee |e














































hogging,



The Mercedes M-Class.
Beauty, brains and brawn.

When you think of the average SUV on
the road today, you think of road-
air-polluting gas
that wouldn’t know the meaning of
high precision and fuel efficiency if it
were emblazoned on their windshields.
But there is an alternative. The refined
M-Class from Mercedes-Benz.

guzzlers

Reference: Hywel Jones

With its superior German styling utilising
only high-grade materials,
engine power
turn-on-a-dime performance whilst still
being frugal on fuel and its handling of
pot-holed roads and 1.5 ft. flooded
streets, the Mercedes-Benz M-Class is
clearly the best choice in SUVs.

its robust
delivering exemplary

Mercedes-Benz

TYREFLEX STAR MOTORS
Call us today for your new Mercedes-Benz M-Class at 325.4961
Wulff Road, P. 0. Box N 9123, Nassau, The Bahamas ¢ Fax: 323.4667
PAGE 10, THURSDAY, MAY 21, 2009

THE TRIBUNE



achieve

your goals

Recruiting Now
for the July 2009 intake

Online/distance learning from
RDI in the Bahamas

World Class UK University qualifications from the world’s leading provider of UK distance learning

¢ Low study costs, flexible payments - start from as low as US$275
* Develop your career while studying * No attendance requirement * Tutor and
student support included « Free membership of International Management

Academy plus benefits

BACHELOR DEGREE COURSES

University of Wales - BA (Hons) Business [top up}

MASTERS

MBA - University of Bradford, University of
- specialisms in Marketing, Finance, Banking Sunderland, University of Wales

University of Sunderland - BA (Hons) Business MSc in Public Administration

LOCAL NEWS

EMR school

FROM page one

by Ministry of Education officials.

He fled the country after
resigning on February 12 just as
Grand Bahama police had
launched investigations into the
sexual molestation complaints
filed by the two former male stu-
dents, who are both now 19.

Police issued an international
All Points Bulletin on Birbal, who
was arrested on May 3 in New
York by US authorities on a traf-
fic violation. Grand Bahama
Police were immediately notified
of his arrest.

The Attorney General’s Office
is presently working with author-
ities in the United States to have
Birbal returned to Grand
Bahama, where he is wanted for
questioning in connection with
unnatural sexual intercourse.

Police officials are also wrap-
ping up their investigations into
molestation complaints concern-
ing a female teacher at Eight Mile

F -



EIGHT MILE ROCK teacher Edward Buchanan talks on his cell phone as a plain

clothed officer escorts him to an unmarked police vehicle in the parking lot of
the International Building, where the Ministry of Education Offices are located.

Rock High school.

The incidents have forced the
Ministry of Education to respond
to weaknesses in its public edu-
cation system concerning the hir-
ing of teachers.

Birbal, who has denied the
accusation, has been an art
teacher for some 20 years in the
public school system.

All new teachers will be
vetted by police, and safety com-
mittees made up of students,
teachers, parents, and adminis-
trators will be set up at the
schools.

The government has also estab-
lished a select committee to look
into the incidents at Eight Mile
Rock High.

& Management (top up}, BA {Hons}
Accountancy & Financial Management (top
up)

University of Derby - BSc (Hons) Applied
Psychology

University of Teesside - LLB, BSc (Hons) Business
Computing (top up)

Sheffield Hallam University - BSc (Hons)
International Hospitality & Tourism (top up}

Higher National
Diploma (HND} 24 —>

months

BA/BSc 12
months

Higher National Diploma (eniry to fop up
Degrees through 2-year HND) in Business and
Management, Information Technology, Travel!
and Tourism, Marketing, Finance

& Development -
University of Birmingham
MSc Marketing &
Management - University
of Bradford
MSc Finance, Accounting &
Management - University
of Bradford
MA Education - University of Derby
LLM - University of Derby
MSc Information Technology - University of
Teesside
MSc Telecommunications - Birmingham City
University
MSc International Hospitality Management
- Sheffield Hallam University
Diploma in Management - University of Wales
{pre-MBA for non-degree holders}
Certificate in Management - University of Wales

Featured Programme:
UNIVERSITY OF WALES MBA US$8,500 complete in minimum of one
year. World Top 20 Online MBA (Financial Times, 2009)

Call 1 888 496 6173 (toll free), today to fast-track your career

RDI (Regional Office)

27499 Riverview Center Boulevard, Suite 111, Bonita Springs, Florida 34134 USA ¢ Tel 1 239 444 1730 * email info@rdicaribbean.com

www.rdicaribbean.com



FROM page one

“At this meeting, Permanent Secretaries were
advised that it is likely that each agency’s 2009/10
allocation would be reduced by approximately seven
per cent. However, this reduction has had to be revis-
ited based on the revised 2009/10 revenue projec-
tion,” the memorandum reads.

With an annual average of over $1.5 billion in recur-
rent expenditure, this 10 per cent cut could represent
over $150 million in savings for government.

According to well placed sources, this reduction in
cost across each ministry signifies the extent to which
government is struggling to meet its expenses and
keep the country afloat in an ever worsening global
downturn.

While it is unlikely that government would out-
right terminate employees based on attempts to save
costs, it is believed that those who have reached the
age of retirement will be encouraged to accept pack-
ages and be removed from government payroll.

Additionally, it has also been suggested that gov-
ernment will not be engaging in any new staff, nor will
there be any promotions, or re-classification, and
most certainly no authorisation of “unnecessary”
overtime pay.

In terms of budget reallocations, one agency, the
Gaming Board has reportedly been instructed to
reduce its expenses by some $500,000. To reach this
figure, some 160 ex-police officers, and six consul-
tants are reportedly on the chopping block. Many of
them, having reached the retirement age of 60 years
will reportedly be asked to retire from the public ser-
vice, while others, who are currently enjoying their
pension packages from the Royal Bahamas Police
Force, will be terminated from the Board entirely.

Financial Controller at the Gaming Board Adrian
Sands declined to comment on the matter when tele-
phone by The Tribune yesterday. However, the Sec-
retary, Bernard Bonamy — a former Commissioner of
Police — confirmed that the department would be
making cut backs according to the instructions hand-
ed down by the Ministry of Finance.

“All departments were asked to bring their budgets

FROM page one

Soblering outlook expected

within line of the memorandum sent out from the
Ministry of Finance,” Mr Bonamy said.

Having regard to the current global economic down-
turn, Mr Bonamy said it is unknown what the final fig-
ures would be for the Gaming Board, or whether or
not any terminations would be focused primarily on
any former police officers employed at the Board.
Beyond this, he said he would not be able to comment.

Two officials ‘questioned

FROM page one

foot lot in a subdivision south of Treasure Cay for
$2,201.16.

On the other hand Mr Russell’s wife, sister-in-
law, and the husband of the former Director’s sec-
retary each bought an acre of Crown land in the
area of Blackwood Village, Abaco, for $4,356.

It is claimed that after The Tribune started report-
ing the allegations being made in connection with
land transactions in the Lands and Surveys depart-
ment, files started to be removed quietly.

Since then, all attempts by The Tribune to speak
with officials at this office have been met with
silence.

Yesterday, an attempt was made to speak with the
former director’s secretary. After The Tribune’s call
was transferred to the secretary, the calls were re-
routed and never answered.

Attempts to reach Mr Greaves also proved to be
just as eventful as he was often reported as being in
two different places at the same time.

On one call The Tribune was advised that Mr
Greaves was at the Ministry of Lands and Local
Government. Then, another call was placed with
the Department of Lands and Surveys, where Mr
Greaves was said to be “on the telephone” and
would return a call to this newspaper.

However, no call was returned up to press time
last night.

Firms seeking oil drilling approvals
















If you're thinking
about health insurance,

think of us.

When tough times come,
Cofmaimperial comes
through. Let The Bahermcs'
leader In life and health
Insurance help you meet the
chollenges of the day the
woy we've been doing it for
over a century
-with confidence.

Stay confident.
Stay connected.




we

Colinalmperial
=~

it a
mS. ry
Ay CU: SPA DOO 3464800
Freeport: SRA22S

Www. colinaimpenaloam

ry between us and Florida, the
territory between us and Cuba
and the territory between us and
the Turks (and Caicos) Islands,"
said Environment Minister Dr
Earl Deveaux.

News of the joint venture
between BPC and StatoilHydro
for oil exploration in Bahamian
waters aroused concerns about
the environmental consequences
of the project, but Mr Deveaux
said while he expects there will
be "minimal" environmental
impact from the seismic testing
any drilling would be precipitated
by an EJA.

"They do a lot of their work
based on hauling a very, very long
tube along the ocean that sends
waves down to test the profile of
the rocks and they analyse this
information. There have been a
number of holes drilled before
and they test the material that
they extract from these holes and
based on their theorizing they
come up with a probable estimate
of the likelihood of finding oil.

"The environmental impact of
all of that is minimal and we don't
require them to do an environ-
mental impact (analysis) for it.
The (apparatus) isn't dragged
along the seabed so it's not
destroying coral and we have no
information that it has been
proven to disturb marine life —

like, for example, we can say that
sonic waves from submarines
have done with whales. Any
drilling would have to be done
on the basis of a full environ-
mental impact statement and
management plan and we haven't
reached that stage yet," he said,
speculating that if approved, oil
drilling would be "at least a
decade" away.

BPC Limited — an oil and gas
company with 100 per cent owned
offshore license permits in the
Bahamas — recently announced
its new joint undertaking with
Norwegian-based StatoilHydro
Company the first major oil
exploration project in Bahamian
waters in 23 years.

The companies believe there is
high potential for valuable oil and
gas production in the southwest
Bahamas which they said will
benefit the local population.

In April, 2007 BPC was granted
five licenses for oil and gas explo-
ration in five areas in the south
central Bahamas. But as the
exploration licenses included in
this new joint venture agreement
are new license areas for BPC in
the southwest of the Bahamas,
they are still under application
pending the approval of the
Bahamas government, said a joint
press statement from StatoilHy-
dro and BPC earlier this week.

"The company (BPC) had
licenses approved for exploration,
but we'd suspended any activity
pending the outcome of discus-
sions with the Cuban government
and our representation to the
United Nations on the geograph-
ical territorial boundaries," said
Mr Deveaux.

Since April, 2007 BPC carried
out background work, including
the collection and evaluation of
scientific data and samples from
previous exercises.

The next stages will involve
seismic evaluations, and ulti-
mately, drilling, said BPC’s resi-
dent manager in the Bahamas
Idris Reid.

Kai Nielsen, Public Affairs
Manager for Statoil UK, said
environmental safety is top on
the company's agenda.

"Prior to any operations, we
will carry out a mapping of sensi-
tive areas.

“This will enable us to develop
and implement necessary protec-
tive measures.

“In addition, contingency
equipment will be available dur-
ing drilling operations, to ensure
the safety of people and protec-
tion of the environment. These
are things that we will
start working on, when we
have received the authority
approval."

KIDZ CLLY
BIG

ANNIVERSARY SALE

20% OFF STOREWIDE

15% OFF WITH CREDIT CARD
Sale Start This Friday May 22nd
& Ends Saturday May 30th

Montrose Avenue and Oxford Street (2 doors North of Multi-Discount)

P.O. Box N-1552
Nassau, Bahamas
Phone: 323-3460

Monday - Friday - 9:30 AM - 5:30 PM

Saturday - 9AM - 5PM


PAGE 12, THURSDAY, MAY 21, 2009

TRIBUNE SPORTS



INTERNATIONAL SPORTS



Bryant's chari
give Lakers

@ By BETH HARRIS
AP Sports Writer

LOS ANGELES (AP) — In
an inconsistent start to the
Western Conference finals,
Kobe Bryant was the steadying
presence the Los Angeles Lak-
ers needed.

He took over in the fourth
quarter, finishing with 40 points,
including six free throws in the
final 30 seconds, to lift Los
Angeles to a 105-103 win over
the Denver Nuggets in the
opener on Tuesday night after
the Lakers trailed most of the
game.

"Once I sensed we didn't
have the energy, I had to take it
upon myself to lead by exam-
ple," he said. "It's just part of
my responsibilities to this team."

He did it even with an injury.

Bryant had the right ring fin-
ger on his shooting hand taped
after the game. He dislocated it
against Cleveland in January
and had to have it popped back
in place Tuesday.

"He was the scoring oppor-
tunity for us," Lakers coach Phil
Jackson said. "We had very lit-
tle else going on. He muscled
his way through.”

Pau Gasol added 13 points
and 14 rebounds for the Lak-
ers, who were down by seven in
the fourth quarter. Gasol's two
free throws tied the game for
the last time at 99 before Bryant
started his closing streak at the
line, offsetting a 3-pointer by
Chauncey Billups and a free
throw by J.R. Smith.

Carmelo Anthony scored 39
points and Billups added 18 for
the Nuggets, who hadn't played
since taking care of Dallas in
five games last Wednesday.

"There's no moral victories
in playoff basketball," Denver
coach George Karl said. "The
next 48 hours are going to be
difficult."

Game 2 is Thursday at Sta-
ples Center. The Nuggets have
lost 11 consecutive playoff
games to the Lakers, including a

ty stripe shots
105-103 win



LAKERS forward Trevor Ariza (center left) steals a pass intended for Nuggets guard Chauncey Billups (right) in the final minutes of Game 1 Western
Conference finals Tuesday night in Los Angeles...

first-round sweep last season.

Bryant, who was 9 for 9 from
the line in the fourth quarter,
made two for a 101-99 lead with
30 seconds left. Trevor Ariza
stole the inbounds pass near
midcourt and the Lakers were
able to run the clock down to
10 seconds when Bryant made
two more free throws.

"He threw the ball and gave
me just enough air to go get it,”
Ariza said of Anthony Carter.
"That's all it took.”

Billups hit a 3-pointer to get
the Nuggets to 103-102 with 5
seconds left, but then Anthony
fouled Bryant, who made his
final two foul shots.

"They have the best closer in
the sport and we didn't do
enough,” Karl said.

Smith made one free throw
with 3.2 seconds left and missed
the second intentionally. Bryant
grabbed the game's last
rebound.

"Any great player would love
that moment, get the ball in
their hands every time down the
court and make something hap-
pen,” Anthony said.

The Lakers were back in
action 48 hours after closing out
Houston in seven games in the
conference semifinals.

"We won that game on ener-
gy and gutting it out,” Jackson

€) TOYOTA moving forward

cue

The Toyota 4Runner has supreme. power and sive ina
tough, sophisticated form.

Features include: V6 4.0 litre engine, automatic transmission, 2WD system, A/C,
dual airbags, power windows, locks and mirrors, keyless entry, automatic
power back door window and jam protection system and CD player.

>) TOYOTA

Backed by a 3-year/60,000 mile factory warranty.

EXECUTIVE
MOTORS LTD

AUTHORISED TOYOTA DEALER

Auto Mall, Shirley Street (opp. St. Matthew’s Church)
Open Mon to Fri 8am - 5:30pm
Sat 8am - 12noon

Tel: 397-1700

E-mail: execmotor@batelnet.bs

Parts and service guaranteed

Available in Grand Bahama at Quality Auto Sales (Freeport) * Queens Hwy, 352-6122 * Abaco Motor Mall, Don MacKay Blvd, 367-2916

said. "They outmuscled us and
put pressure on the passers. We
talked about getting the game
close enough to win it at the
end. We got a couple stops that
helped us."

Denver led most of the game
in its return to the conference
finals for the first time in 24
years. But the Nuggets could-
n't stop Bryant over the final
6:48, when he scored 15 points,
including seven straight to help
the Lakers improve to 7-1 at
home in the playoffs. They are
8-0 this postseason when scoring
100 points.

"You get used to greatness,"
Lamar Odom said. "He was

(AP Photo: Mark J Terrill)

amazing. He wanted the ball.
Kobe is always going to help
you or bail you out more than
he hurts you."

The Lakers used a 9-0 run,
including seven straight by
Derek Fisher, to go up 70-66.
From there, though, the
Nuggets ended the third quarter
on a 10-4 run to lead 76-74.
Billups had five consecutive
points, including a free throw
after a technical foul on Bryant,
in the spurt.

Bryant has five technicals in
the playoffs. "I won't get anoth-
er one," he vowed.

The Nuggets took a 13-point
lead in the opening quarter, but

NBA Today



@ By The Associated
Press

Denver at L.A. Lakers, 9
p.m. The Nuggets try to even
their series after a close loss
in Game 1.

STAR

Tuesday

—Kobe Bryant, Lakers,
scored 40 points and made
six free throws in the final
30 seconds to lift Los Ange-
les to a 105-103 win over
Denver in Game 1 of the
west finals.

HERE WE GO

The Los Angeles Clippers
won the NBA draft lottery
on Tuesday, giving the fran-
chise the chance to select
Blake Griffin, the national
college player of the year
from Oklahoma.

STRONG IN DEFEAT

Carmelo Anthony scored
39 points in Denver's 105-
103 loss to the Los Angeles
Lakers in Game 1 of the
Western Conference finals.

SPEAKING

"T think five years from
now Blake Griffin will be hit-
ting his stride in the NBA
and he will be an impact
player wherever he is."

— Clippers president Andy
Roeser, who represented the
Clippers at the draft lottery.
He was wearing a sports jack-
et lined with a Clippers uni-
form with a No. 1 on the left
side and a 23, Griffin's num-
ber, on the other

hurt themselves by going 12 of
21 from the line in the half.
Billups, who missed three free
throws in the first two playoff
series combined, missed his first
three of the game.

"We missed out on a great
opportunity to steal this game,”
he said. "We lose this game on
our poor free throw shooting."

Notes: Smith sprained his right
knee and will be re-evaluated
Wednesday. The Nuggets fell to
2-3 on the road in the playoffs.
Denver F-G Linas Kleiza played
despite a fracture on the tip of
his right thumb.

BAHAMAS REAL ESTATE ASSOCIATION

mi

OU WUE A tele

“REAL ESTATE WEEK”

Sunday, May 24"

Opening Church Service

ot. Francis Xavier Parish Centre

Tee ei

Friday, May 29”

SPA DAY-MANDARA SPA

Vlas [e 0 [ttm odio)

eh

Friday, May 29”
BREA Black-Tie Gala

Atlantis Resort & Casino, Crown Ballroom

Cocktails /‘QOPNM-8:00PM
Gala &:00PM-12:00AM

Tickets: $150.00 Per Person

TO RESERVE YOUR TICKETS CONTACT:
June: junebreai @ecoralwav ome) 1]
WW eR Selene ce ses a rice Ccareelite


TRIBUNE SPORTS THURSDAY, MAY 21, 2009, PAGE 13

SPORTS

Highlights: Primary school track championships



Photos: Felipé Major/Tribune staff

Track & Field
Officials Training

Are you interested in becoming an Official
for Track & Field?
The Bahamas Association of Certified
R M S R A MM E Officials (BACQ) fs extending an invitation
WINDOWS to all present officials and all interested

Nassau's Leading Manufacturer of Vinyl Windows and Vinyl Doors persons to participate in a training
session for track & field.

APRIL SHOWERS Date: Saturday, May 22, 2009

Venue: Thomas A. Robinson Track & Field

IN MAY ? Stadium

Time: 12:00 p.m. - 3:00 p.m,

Call for your FREE quote or

Came visit our factory located on 74 Mount Royal Avenue, Nassau,

TEL: 1-242-325-6633
FAX: 1-242-325-6638

KENISHA PINDER wins 200m...

Wireless Routers
from 585

Complete Desktops
starting at $900
Mini-Laptops starting at $525 —
Laptops starting at $725

Webcams and Mics from $25 Save BIG Fight Now!

| : kease- | 2009 FORD MUSTANG
3” Digital ene eag a Py j 4.0L Automatic - LOADED 4
USB Flash Drives from om NOW $26 900.00
o15 iFi MP3 Players
_ starting at $230

“comejinthe:staneatinanta Bau [ifext-taliowes)/

SS osthese savings anainiUcriaiore!
Register now for our Upcoming Courses! en cn . Le
Mice Ve Plead eee acer eels asec Reel) slicks EE canisces

; , yes: “ie 1,951.00
Web Design w/ Dreamweaver @ Microsoft Word | Excel 2007 a) ee oS NOW $28,800.00

Certified International Project Management (CIPM|PMP)

Lignum Institute of Technology is now a certified
ti eae eee) Pe)
7 3 years or 36,000 miles warranty, 3 years roadside assistant, 3 years rust protections
warranty and licensed and inspected up to birthday.

Se BSD) | how tears REALL A[ S3[|(@Deal

pre (Bahamas) Ltd. FRIENDLY MOTORS C0, LTD

Harb Bay Sh | P|
Ph 393-21€4 Fax 394-4971 THOMPSON BOULEVARD ° TEL.: 356-7100 + FAX: 328-6094
Em ai | . j nto (@ lign umtec h com EMAIL: friendlymotors@hotmail.com * WEBSITE: friendlymotorsbahamas.com


PAGE 14, THURSDAY, MAY 21, 2009

SPORTS

TRIBUNE SPORTS





DR RHADI shows Malcolm moves



Lae

| fone ———
1









5-Boor Modal.

#257 WAU Rood
Po. Bee Maes



b a2) Lad] PPS

Judo athletes get ready for
World Cadet Championship

WORLD renowned elite ath-
lete coach and 2004 Olympian
Dr Rhadi Ferguson was in New
Providence again for an inten-
sive three-day training seminar.

The purpose of the seminar
was to assist the Bahamas Judo





pee

in Affordable Compact Wagons

The Spectras/CERATO has a sporty attitude with ita aport-
tuned auspengion,
suapension. It can seat up to five occupants. It is powered by a
1.6-liter four-cylinder that ia mated to a standard four-speed
automatic transmission.
Door Locks, CD Radio, Two 4-Door Sedan Models including the

strut tower bar,

Ale Gondition,

ELITE MOTORS LTD. SANPIN MOTORS LIMITED
Thompson Bhd. « Oakes Field
t, 242.226.6377" f. 242.226.6315

®. sanpind@coralwave.com

and tully

PWR Windows, PWR

Federation in their elite training
preparation for the World
Cadet Championships, set for
August in Budapest, Hungary.

Dr Ferguson left the
Bahamas Judo Federation with
a detailed 17-page blueprint of

CKI”> 2009 Spectra5/CERATO

KIA MOTORS

The Power to Surprise”

= i

ree —





independent



ON THE SPST FINAN CIS ITH
COMMGHWE ALTH BARK

ISLC ALALABL EWI
ADVANTAGE IM SLEANCE
RADKERS & AGENTS LTO

what is necessary to succeed
competing against the world’s
best.

The Bahamas will be repre-
sented by 15-year-old Cynthia
Rahming, the number one rated
female in the country, along
with Alex Martinborough, the
third place medallist in the Bar-
bados International Champi-
onship.

“The new training is hard but
I feel it is necessary,” says Alex.
“Getting up at 4:30 in the morn-
ing is really tough,” says Cyn-
thia, “and then we have to be
back in the training hall at
7pm.”

If the athletes perform well
at the tournament they will
qualify for a spot in the Junior
Olympics which is scheduled to
be held in Singapore in 2010.
The training is intended to last
12 weeks.

A You Tube documentary
was produced on the training
by the Bahamas Judo Federa-
tion entitled, “Bahamas Judo -
Chasing the Dream”.

It has already received exten-
sive praise from many practi-
tioners around the world. This
documentary will also be fur-
ther developed for Cable



DR RHADI oversees ground fighting...

Bahamas.

“It is important for the
Bahamians to see young
Bahamians striving for excel-
lence,” says federation presi-
dent D’Arcy Rahming.

“What I am most pleased
with is that we had the partici-
pation of All-Star Family Cen-
tre, Island Jujitsu, Academy of
the Martial Arts and the Fox

A NUMBER of judo athletes participated in the seminar...

Hill Club at the seminar with
Dr Ferguson. The Judo com-
munity is selflessly helping to
prepare these athletes.”
Anyone wishing to assist or
become involved with Bahamas
Judo can contact the federation
at Joe Farrington Road Head-
quarters @ 364-6773 or through
the Federation website:
www.bahamasjudo.com



HAPPY 44th BIRTHDAY
WAUGH

CONSTRUCTION

Company Number #8191

Licensee #51 of the Grand Bahama Port Authority Co. Ltd

Licensee #22975 of the Bahamas Government.

Established May 21st, 1965

A family owned Limited Liability Company committed to building a better Bahamas from
Walker’s Cay in the North West to Mayaguana and Inagua in the South East.

We would like to thank our Employees, our Officers and our Directors for successfully guiding this firm

through many demanding and challenging years of continuous operation.

Harold “Sonny” Waugh - President

Godfrey Waugh - Vice President

Gregg T. Waugh - Director
V. Hariprashad (“Harv”) - Director

Brian Waugh - Vice President

Lee Malone - Secretary/Treasurer

Kevin Waugh - Director

Douglas Prudden - Director


Bryant’s charity
stripe shots
give Lakers
105-103 win...

See page 12



DAVYONA ROBINSON, of Martin

Town Primary in Grand Bahama,

soars in the high jump yesterday.
See more photos on page 13



Felipé Major/Tribune staff

Who are the Bahamas’ best
primary school athletes?

m@ By RENALDO DORSETT
Sports Reporter
rdorsett@tribunemedia.net

undreds of students
from around the
nation descended

upon the Thomas A Robinson
stadium yesterday to open the
first of a three-day competition
to determine the best primary
school athletes in the Bahamas.

The Annual Primary School
Track and Field Championships
began Wednesday with heats
and field events dominating the
schedule early on.

Family Island athletes topped
the leaderboards in many of the
contested events, led by the
Androsian contingent who made
frequent trips to the medal podi-
um.

In the Boys’ B division soft-
ball throw, Solomon Lloyd of
North Andros placed first in
57.70m, fellow Islander Dave
Pratt of South Andros was sec-
ond with a throw of 56.27s and
Julius Nottage of Temple Chris-
tian was third with a 52.90m toss.

North Androsian Shaquille
Newton had the top throw in the
Boys’ A division shot put far
ahead of the competition with
his throw of 11.26s.

John Jean of Sadie Curtis was
second with a throw of 9.69s and
Devon Ferguson of South
Andros was third with a 9.24m
throw.

Androsians placed first and
second in the Girls’ A division
long jump with North Andros’
Shantea Gibson first with a jump
of 3.96m, South Andros’ Kendra
King second with a jump of 3.87s
and Jasmine Farrington of Free-
dom Baptist third with a jump
of 3.86m.

In the Boys’ C division long
jump, Kai Jones of Queen’s Col-
lege took first with a leap of
3.60m, Temple Christian’s
Christopher Johnson was second
in 3.38m and Ricky Moxey Jr of
Exuma was third with 3.24m.

While just two finals were con-

1 Personal,
1-Topping Poza =
ea can of Coca-Cola

tested on the track — the 400m
and the 1200m — a number of
high level performances were
turned in on the field.

In the boys D division 400m,
Kendrick Major of Sadie Curtis
took first place in 1:22.47s.

Ulrich Ferguson of Claridge
Primary was second in 1:23.73s
while Nathan Moss of Temple
Christian was third in 1:24.09s.

In the girls’ quarter mile, Exu-





ma’s Brennia Smith took first
place in 1:28.15s.
Ekeminiabasi Morgan of
Sandilands Primary was second
in 1:28.52s and Tyrese Sands of
St Bede’s was third in 1:30.00s.
In the Boys’ B division 1200m,
Temple Christian’s Julius Not-
tage took first place in 4:08.63s,
Bernard Seymour of Long Island
was second in 4:11.72s. Compe-
tition continues at 10am today.

Golfers are invited.





































COMDOS MCLUCE
be a ire ded

reas cle

ee mer Mm teen.

sotahond

Enjoy championship golf from $30 a day at the Reef Golf Club and Lucayan Country Club at
Our Lucaya, Grand Bahama Island. For more information call (242) 373-2003/4.







www.ourlucaya.com

*Offer valid from May ist through Mary 31st, 2009. Proof of Bahamian residency required.





$499

1Personal,

S5pc. Buffalo
ee eo a
Breadsticks Se de ee Se ee ee |



2 Personal,
a a ns

41Personal,
1-Topping Pra,

1 Medium,
1-Tepping Pizza,1

ee pe ee ee ae |

$8379 344229
THE TRIBUNE





y

MONS Rene Gt



‘Big ticket’
firms to he
‘devastated

Businesses openly
discussing ‘drastic
measures’ list if
recession deepens

@ By NEIL HARTNELL

Tribune Business Editor

BAHAMIAN companies
selling “big ticket” products and
luxury goods are likely to be
“devastated” by the current
recession because consumers
are staying away from major
purchases, the outgoing Cham-
ber of Commerce president said
yesterday, as business owners
increasingly discuss their “dras-
tic measures list”.

Dionisio D’ Aguilar, who is
also Superwash’s president, said
the closure of Exuma’s Four
Seasons Emerald Bay Resort,
and the impending loss of a fur-
ther 500 jobs, had “sent a shud-
der” through the collective
Bahamian economy, and caused
business owners to wonder
whether something similar
might happen to a New Provi-
dence-based property.

“T think the closure of the
project in Exuma has caused
people to think this thing could
get worse than it is already, and
the unemployment rate could
go up significantly,” Mr
D’Aguilar told Tribune Busi-
ness. “I think it’s made every-
one nervous, and has got every-
one in a dither.”

The Chamber president said
it was hard to make sweeping
generalisations about the state
of the Bahamian economy, as
some companies were doing
well - the lkes of Cable
Bahamas and Abaco Markets
were all reporting net profit
increases for early 2009.

Mr D’ Aguilar said he consid-
ered himself lucky, Superwash’s
sales only being down by 5-10
per cent for 2009 to-date. In
comparison, the Bahamian auto
industry had been “devastated”,
with new car sales, as revealed
by Tribune Business, collec-

SEE page 8B

ine

THURSDAY,

M Agcy P21.



2009

SECTION B ¢ business@tribunemedia.net

Commercial fishery
solution to Lionfish

@ By NEIL HARTNELL
Tribune Business Editor

commercial

fishery opera-

tion targeting

the invasive

Lionfish species
could produce a “win-win” sit-
uation for the Bahamian econ-
omy, fishing industry and the
environment, a leading envi-
ronmental consultant told Tri-
bune Business yesterday, gen-
erating the perfect ‘triple bot-
tom line’ impact.

Keith Bishop, co-principal of
Islands by Design and head of
environmental management for
Abaco’s Schooner Bay devel-
opment, said a fishing trip spon-
sored by the project’s head,
Orjan Lindroth, had provided
an insight into the possible eco-
nomic impact a commercial
fishing operation targeting
Lionfish could have.

The four-day fishing trip
sponsored by Mr Lindroth and
Schooner Bay netted more than
1,200 Lionfish, a profitable
catch if it was to be turned into
money.

Praising Mr Lindroth’s initia-

Four Seasons’
8% gross fee
‘too much’

* Brand wanted $26m investment
into Emerald Bay by main
creditor in 2009

* Last offer for Exuma resort
was $40m, sources say

* But BHA president says too early
to write-off ‘anchor property’
strategy despite Exuma
hotel's demise

@ By NEIL HARTNELL
Tribune Business Editor

THE Four Seasons’ 30-year
management contract to brand
Exuma’s Emerald Bay Resort
paid it fees equivalent to 8 per
cent of the property’s gross per
annum revenues, informed
sources told Tribune Business
yesterday, a figure that proved
“too much to handle”.

This newspaper was also told
that Four Seasons made heavy
capital investment demands on
the resort’s initial ownership
group, Emerald Bay Resort
Holdings (EBRH), and latterly
its main creditor, the London
office of Japanese insurer, Mit-
sul.

Tribune Business was told
that Four Seasons had wanted
Mitsui to invest, in terms of cap-
ital expenditure, some $26 mil-

SEE page 9B

kien si Siig aire! ys eee

Ondy ninety lots in wis

exdusive, luxury gated develaprnent,

SWIMMING POOL
TENNIS COURT
24-HOUR SECURITY

v

KINGS REALTY

with arrsatirny alevaticrs

PICDUTESQ Le GOES yeereye.

Mult family tots ane sovd out.
Sonpe-fariy kare starting af

°175,000

Leading consultant says proposal would be ‘win-win’ for
Bahamian economy, fisheries industry and environment,
creating ‘triple bottom line’ impact

tive, Mr Bishop explained: “We
put it to the test locally because
we had a huge number of the
species here, in the area of
Crossing Rock. It was some-
thing that was readily accepted
by the local fishermen.

“We offered a bounty of
$1.50 per piece, and one indi-
vidual pulled in 250 of them in a
day. He was able to make him-
self $375 in one day. Not bad
money for an out-of-season fish-
erman.”

The Bahamian environmental
consultant pointed out that
apart from the local Bahamian
and resident population, there
was an immediate market for
Lionfish as food from the five
million tourists that visited the
Bahamas every year.

Lionfish, when properly fil-
leted, posed no threat to human
health, Mr Bishop telling Tri-
bune Business that one he had

eaten had “a pleasant taste”,
with the product treated as a
delicacy in the fish’s native
Indo-Pacific region.

He said efforts to develop a
Bahamian market for Lionfish
as a delicacy had already begun,
with New Providence resident
Alexandra Maillis-Lynch, own-
er of Alexandra’s Catering and
the August Moon Cafe, offering
up to $8 per pound for the fish,
up to 100 fish.

Lionfish are thought to have
been introduced to Bahamian
and Caribbean waters from
household fish tanks. While
small to medium-sized, they
have no known predators in the
Bahamas and breed rapidly,
releasing up to 30,000 eggs once
every 28 days.

Found around reefs and
marine structures, including
marinas, shipwrecks, jetties and
piers, their venom is poisonous,

causing muscular and respira-
tory system distress in human
victims.

But of far greater concern is
that Lionfish feed on virtually
anything - young groupers,
crawfish (lobster), grunts and
snappers. These are key prod-
ucts for the Bahamian fisheries
industry, and the nation’s envi-
ronment.

Mr Bishop yesterday warned
that the Bahamian fisheries
industry would suffer a “huge
negative impact” unless some-
thing was done to curtail the
growth of the Lionfish popula-
tion in the Bahamian waters.

He added that, in the absence
of a natural predator, Lionfish
“eat everything”. One fish he
had cut open revealed stomach
contents that included a host of
small-scale fish and a small lob-

SEE page 3B

Hotel room revenues off 20% into Q2

@ By NEIL HARTNELL
Tribune Business Editor

HOTEL room revenues have
continued to trend 20 per cent
behind prior year comparatives
into the 2009 second quarter,
the Bahamas Hotel Associa-
tion’s (BHA) president said yes-
terday, the industry’s main con-
cern being whether the first
quarter performance will be
enough to sustain resort prop-
erties through the remainder of
this year.

Robert Sands told Tribune
Business that the sector’s main
concern regarding the 2009 first
quarter, in which hotel room
revenues were off on average
by 23 per cent year-over-year,
was not so much the perfor-




















Industry ‘concerned’ over whether first quarter performance
will sustain resorts through quieter periods

mance but whether enough rev-
enue and net income had been
generated to sustain the indus-
try - and its resorts - through
the quieter second and third
quarters.

“What’s concerning about
that [the first quarter perfor-
mance] is this is traditionally
the period we maximise our
income in,” Mr Sands said.
“The concerning issue is what
will be the impact for subse-
quent quarters going forward.
That’s the concerning element.

“It’s not so much the perfor-
mance and what we achieved
in the first quarter, but how it

impacts the results in the sec-
ond and third quarters, which
are much softer periods of rev-
enue generation.”

Bahamian resorts tradition-
ally generate most of their
income during the period lead-
ing up to Easter every year, usu-
ally from February to April.
The profits and revenues gen-
erated during the first and ear-
ly second quarters then largely
sustain them through the year’s
quieter spells.

The BHA president added:
“Tt looks as if the industry is

SEE page 4B



Money Safe.
Money Fast.

Gram.

international Maney Teosster

§ Bank of The Bahamas

[IH THRSATION AL

Online at

BankBahamasOniline.com

Hotels assess
private plane
pre-clearance

@ By NEIL HARTNELL
Tribune Business Editor

THE Bahamas Hotel Asso-
ciation (BHA) is assessing how
pre-clearance facilities can be
extended to accommodate the
hundreds of tourists who visit
this nation by private plane, Tri-
bune Business was told yester-
day, with the industry wanting
to hold on to this high-end visi-
tor niche.

Speaking as the US Home-
land Security Department this
week implemented new rules
requiring private aircraft flying
between the US and the
Bahamas to submit electronic
passenger manifests in advance,
Robert Sands, the BHA’s pres-
ident, said: ‘““We want to make it
easier for them [private aircraft
and their passengers].

“One of the issues right now
is the question of pre-clearance,
and how that can be expanded
to accommodate private aircraft
passengers. At the moment,
they have to go through the US
for pre-clearance. There is no
pre-clearance in Nassau.”

Mr Sands said the “ease of
travel and ability to leave the
destination” smoothly were key

SEE page 11B



ARE YOU PREPARED. FOR THIS
UPCOMING HURRICANE SEASON?

APPLY FOR A
BOB, HOME

PROTECTION

_

b

LOAN

| Topay!
FINANCING UR TO, 7 YEARS

HURRICANE SHUTTERS
HURRICANE SUPPLIES
GENERATORS
INSURANCE PROTECTION

Bank of The Bahamas

INTERNATIONAL
Revolutionizing The Way You Bank!

New Providence « Grand Bahama + Andras = Inagua * Exuma
San Salvador « Cat Island « Coral Gables, FL

Head Office Nassau: (242) 397-3000



we, BankBahamasOnline.com
PAGE 2B, THURSDAY, MAY 21, 2009





THE TRIBUNE

Scotiabank units adopting schools



REKELL GRIFFIN (far right), Scotiabank’s senior manager for marketing and public relations, presents Helen Simmons-Johnson, the principal, with

two computers and reading software...

SCOTIABANK (Bahamas)
49-member processing support
centre has adopted Uriah
McPhee Primary School, part
of an initiative that will see each
unit of the bank partner with a

primary school in their commu-
nity.

Rekell Griffin, Scotiabank’s
senior manager for marketing
and public relations, presented
Helen Simmons-Johnson, the

school’s principal, with two
computers, plus with reading
software to be used in the
school’s reading laboratory.

In an address to the adminis-
trators, teachers and students




of Uriah McPhee, Ms Griffin
said: “Scotiabank is very excited
about this new initiative.
Through this programme, we
intend to use the human
resources, talents and ideas of
our employees to strengthen
and enhance the quality of edu-
cation in the communities







~ Whirpoot =

The poser te pel mare deen

where we live and work.”

The Adopt A School Pro-
gramme is a spin-off from Sco-
tiabank’s Bright Future Pro-
gramme, a philanthropic initia-
tive that helps support oppor-

southern style

Seay
BISCUIT















tunities for the children and
communities in which the bank
is present.

Each partnership can take the
form of financial support, vol-
unteering, shared expertise or
physical resources. The Pro-
cessing Support Centre has
commenced a literacy pro-
gramme at Uriah McPhee, and
has plans to launch a science
project in the near future.

esa act |



Add a Splash of Colo

1 TRE WHIRLPOOL CLASSIC LINE

Whirlpool® Classic Washer

WTWS57ESVH WGDS5700VH
$1,25 $1,200

1 oot The AccuDryl

Whirlpool® Classic Dryer

Washer

Save 25% when you pay casi.

ele”

The power be get more deme.

Open Mondoy thru Saturday, 8:30am ‘til 5:30pm
ee te teed
een eee cee fir

VeRO eee ah

Master Technici

APPLIANCES & ELECTRONICS

FOUNDATION

Keystone Developments

AT HIGH POINT ESTATES

4 spacious models from which to choose
3 or 4 bedroom townhouses and homes, with garage
$313,000 to $436,000
In-house Financing @ 7% interest
Immediate or near occupancy
First time homeowners incentives
Many upgrades included!
Hurricane engineered wall system!

T: 328-8287 / 424-6755
E: info@bahama-wall.com
THE TRIBUNE

THURSDAY, MAY 21, 2009, PAGE 3B



SINE
Banks delay e-commerce

lm By CHESTER ROBARDS
Business Reporter
crobards@tribunemedia.net

THE DELAYED implemen-
tation of the commercial banking
sector’s Automated Clearing
House (ACH) could impede the
growth of e-commerce in the
Bahamas, the Data Protection
Commissioner told Tribune
Business yesterday.

George Rodgers said the
ACH would “definitely assist”
Bahamas-based e-commerce to
move ahead much more swiftly
than has been the case in recent
years.

The Government has moved
forward to ready the Bahamas
for e-commerce by passing a
series of Bills related to elec-
tronic monitoring, misuse and
concessions, thus providing a reg-
ulatory framework for the indus-
try.

“The Government has pro-
duced thus far what firms and
individuals need to do to ensure
compliance with the Data Pro-
tection Act,” he said.

Mr Rodgers said the delay in
implementing the ACH was
something of an embarrassment
for the Bahamian commercial
banks, as several deadlines have
passed them by.

The Central Bank has conse-
quently decided to “step in and
drive forward” the process of
establishing the ACH.

One local bank told Tribune
Business recently that they have
been proactive in trying to inte-
grate their system with a device
that would make it possible for a
person anywhere in the world to
make a payment to a Bahami-

Commercial
FROM page 1B

ster.

By establishing a commercial
fishing operation targeting
Lionfish, Mr Bishop said the
Bahamas would not only be
removing an invasive species
and protecting its environment,
but also generating an econom-
ic return and providing work
for fishermen - especially out-
of-season.

“You're removing an invader,
but are able to provide food
from it,” Mr Bishop explained.
“You're removing a negative



an-owned website, and have that
payment posted to an account in
their establishment.

However, representatives of
that bank said the system’s acti-
vation would require more time
to be duly implemented.

The Government has already
provided the framework for this
kind of online transaction with
the implementation of the Com-
puter Misuse Act, Data Protec-
tion Act and Electronic Conces-
sions Act.

It is hoped that when the
ACH is activated, businesses will
have to deal with less cash and,
possibly, less crime.

One huge proponent of the
ACH has been Superwash own-
er and Bahamas Chamber of
Commerce president, Dionisio
D’ Aguilar.

He has been pessimistic about
the local banks’ urgency in
implementing the ACH, telling
this paper recently: “If it’s left
to the clearing banks it’s never
going to happen.”

Mr Rodgers asserted that the
ACH would be a step in the right
direction for e-commerce in the
Bahamas.

“It would definitely assist local
e-commerce, and would then
allow banks to deal with each
other directly,” he said.

The ACH is intended to
replace the current manual sys-
tem for settling cheque transac-
tions, where cheques drawn on
one bank but due to be deposit-
ed at another have to be taken
by armoured car to a central
location where they are settled
by representatives of the various
institutions.

Apart from allowing inter-

invader from the marine envi-
ronment, but turning it into an
economic upturn for persons
who can find a market for it.

“T think it’s a win-win for
everybody. We take an invader
out and sell it as food.”

Mr Bishop said any commer-
cial fishery did not necessarily
have to be started by the Min-
istry of Agriculture and Marine
Resources, as maybe all the
Government needed to do was
teach Bahamians how to han-
dle and catch Lionfish safely,
then “provide avenues to mar-

bank cheques to be processed
electronically rather than manu-
ally at a cheque clearing facili-
ty, the ACH system will allow
direct debits and credits from
accounts, debit cards and a
shared Automatic Teller
Machine (ATM) network.

The latter would allow
Bahamians to use their cash
cards at any bank branch. It
would also reduce the time per-
sons spent in line waiting to cash
and deposit pay cheques, as they
could be deposited to their
account.

Bahamian consumers would
also be able to use direct debits
from their bank accounts to pay
bills such as cable television and
electricity.

The ACH could ultimately
lead to the creation of just one
back office system for the entire
Bahamas. It may also help devel-
op SWITCH products, where
Bahamians could use their cash
cards at any bank's ATM
machine.

A further potential bonus
from the ACH will be the open-
ing up a whole range of elec-
tronic banking services in the
Bahamas, including its use in the
online purchase of government
goods and services.

Ultimately, through mod-
ernising the Bahamian payments
system through electronic means,
the ACH will provide buyers and
sellers with more certainty and
confidence, especially when it
comes to settling their transac-
tions.

It will also enhance economic
and business efficiency by set-
tling transactions quicker, boost-
ing business cash flows.

fishery solution to Lionfish

ket”.

Lionfish could be caught and
offered to Bahamian restaura-
teurs free - or for a nominal
charge — in order to stimulate
interest among consumers in
the region, it was suggested.

The Government and large
Bahamas-based hotel chains
could also step in as guaranteed
buyers until the industry got off
the ground, and cottage indus-
tries would spring up around it,
creating a much-needed rev-
enue source for local commu-
nities.

The effects of HPV could put your daughter's

future at risk—you can help protect her.

Denice cancer—it's not too carly to think about it,

yourg ;’wlTIer if ther eer gd 204 are more yulnesble to HP thee virus that

Califes Garvie CanGer, betaLiGe their ies fre BL | dewalaping Ifa girl OF Our

woman hag HP, and her bey doean't claar the viris, carvical cancer can davalop

ater in life. So while most women diagnosed with cervical cancer are between the

ages of 35 and S5 years old, many of them were probably exposed to a “high-risk”

type of HPY bn their youth

Having Pap tests regulary can help protect you

rom increased risk of cervical cancer.

= Can leering the facts about where goed Migs ditlererit Wwpes of Concer form,

Cervical cancer—s reeukt of WP

Certoal cancer is cancer of

thes cerwik—cne loser pet of che

Vaginal! canoer =hard to detent,

AS ta 20% of waging cancers

fiat in the Ging of te wugieun

uterus Bhat conrecthe the veanb

fife] eh nip meh

Weilvar cum rare

Art OSA Pree, no Bmore.

I
look for early cigms

Burning. aching, painful usination,
OF hire Duns Gould Siereel yubeor
cancer, which affects thee inner
odiges Ot the wegine'’s guber hokis,

Prectanetra—wittré Gaftecer bet Plies.

High-risk typos of MP con cause obnorrnaAal

clin to farm in the cerix, wagina, arid woh.

if net detached wacty, thease calle can tam ls
itn Hreonreoenne, ane chee cnc ;

it's dIMicuM bo Lniak of pour daughter suffering from any of Unese ilinessas
and ruining her drame of a healthy future. You can do eoemething te heli

Pretect fer and heer future move.

Talk to a doctor about the only vaccine that can
help protect your daughter from cervical cancer
and other HPV diseases.

FREE ANNUAL CERVICAL/BREAST SCREENING

May 9- Flamingo Gardens Clinic
May 16 - Elizabeth Esiaies Clinic

Fleming St. Clinic

May 23 - South Beach Clinic
May 30 - Annual Cancer Society Ball

































































The Long Islanders’ Association Annual Raffle Winners List - 2009
= =

# Pia

Tiket #

12650

Winner's Name
204 CHEVY AVEQ Armin Gercen
4DAY5,} NIGHTS STAY

February Point Resort Ratan, Ceca Eaouma

23846 Blevilke: Poaleer

WHIRLPOOL WASHING MACHINE

Aunioenryrnicaas

GE 7 CUBIC CHEST FREEZER
Cremiipey Joes Ae Co, Late.
2 ROUND TRIP TRT TO 11 & 3 STGHTS
ACOOMMODATION-Footh Caroll

03371 (Channine Snath

(M355, Christine Adderley

14104

Serene Munro

3 DAVE, 2 NIGHTS TAT
Stella Murs [inn Long Island
| 43 DAYS, ? NIGHTS STAY
| Cape Senta Mara, Long Island
| se
| $M GIFT CER TIFHCATE
Comemnocm Lig SHINE CELLULAR PHONE
Island Celbalar
2 ROUND TRIP THCRETS ON THE RYO)
BOAT WITH CAR TO ELEUTHERA OR
| AMDROS — Bahamas Sea Road
1 OOK TV
Mr. dé: Wore. Aree Harelirge
2? ROUND TRIP TICKETS OM THE
ROHEGY TO RLELTTHERA — Bahamas
| Fast Fomics Services Lad. =
GENTS & LADIES WRIST WATCH
Crown jewellers
LAWN MOWER
JHR Builckny Supplica
— =
BICYCLE

Pele, &t Kins, (Carl Treco

O71 jimmy Relic:
21682 Baby Lashawnte
03352 R&S hierinkworcugh

7450 Donne Smith

18376 Malig Foersaint

1H Ansell Warson

SMP Ansell Watson

SIMS Ann Maric Dhara

}0o24 Marva Jomes

S174. | Ietaygearet Laewless
$18). GIFT CERTIFICATE

AID

S10. GIFT CERTIFICATE.
Centreville Foe Store

5100.00 GIFT CERTIFICATE

Barly Bard Pomd Searcy

#1000 GIFT CERTIEM ATE

Shayne's Depammcot Sore

$100.00 GIFT CRRTIFICATE

The Preacripoiom Cenere Phasmacy
CEILING FAN

Henry P. Steer Electric fio. Lik
CELLING FAN

Wir. fic Pele Larelic Airane

VACUUM CLEAMER

Terry Pinder

PORTABLE (ASSETTESCD PLAYER
Lickery Spit Ice Ceeans end Deli

loos Pactrorn

Peser Cancina

E. Covington

Carola Agmbeister

O162s Herry Tee Cat

140n1 Fdsin Tayler

OoTeSl Matumrway Landecapang

Sandra ‘Thorns

The Long Islanders’ Association sincerely thanks all persons who
donated prizes, sold tickets and supported the raffle.

Thank You.

Prizes may be collected at “Tyre Empire Lid’ #16 Chesapeake Road

The Tribune apologizes for errors published in the
May 20th issue of the daily paper.
We apologize for any inconvenience caused,

Queen’s College

Centre for Further Education (C.F.E.)

P.O, Box N-7127, Nassau, Baharas
Tel: (242) 393-1666/284065, Fax: (242) 399-3248

AT Summer Classas at OC

~ Planning for college?

Oo you want to earn extra credits betore entering college ?
Oo you want to reduce college cost?

Do you want to qualify for scholarships?

Grade 10 & 11 students, give yourself the best advantage by
preparing for the SAT exam and attending the AP classes with
qualified instructors at Queen’s College.

WIN M K cdi BRCUPIIRS Ie RR CMW Rr

: July 08
Current Grade 10 & 11 students from all
achools are invited to attend.

i

eas

Current Grade 9 students from all schools
are Invited te attend.

VPay $255-first payment May20th, 2009
\Pay balance $140 on June 03, 2009

Email: cfe@chenceforth.com
PAGE 4B, THURSDAY, MAY 21, 2009

THE TRIBUNE



JOB OPENING

Needed immediately, experienced Nurses _ to
work in Operating Theatre. Must have a good
employment background, must possess a Bachelors
Degree in Nursing, must have Operating Theatre
experience and must be licensed in_ the
Por immediate
consideration, please send your resume to:

Commonwealth of the Bahamas.

PHYSICIANS ALLIANCE LTD.
P.O. BOX EE-17022
#3 GROSVENOR CLOSE OFFICE
NASSAU, BAHAMAS
FAX: (242) 326-8874













FROM page 1B

months.”

are maintained.

“Reporting for The Tribune is a

DeSpL

respon

ibility and privilege. We

t and honour the peaple’s

right to know everyday, I'm

proud to be a part of the leading

print

medium in The Bahamas.

The Tribune is my newspaper.”

The Tribune

BAHAMAS FINANCIAL CENTRE

NASSAU, BAHAMAS

RUPERT MISSICK, JR.
CHIEF REPORTER, THE TRIBUNE

To report the news, call our
News Tips Line at 502-2359.

TOTAL RENTABLE AREA: 2,278 SF

SUBLEASE
OPPORTUNITY

PREMISES: Third Floor

AM AILABILITY: June 30, 200% or sooner

For information, contaci:

W. Larry Roberts
T: 242_374.0026
lrobertsbahamasrecity bs

Class

TERM: Through December 30, 2011.
Lang tenn extension possible.

A Building

Centrally Located

Underground Parking

Donald Martinborough
T; 242.374,0028
dmartinborough’ibahamasrsalty Jos

Furniture option
Fibra Optic connectivity

Full standby generater

Boahomas Realty Limited

P.O. Box H-1132

Mossau, Bohomas

wera bohomascommerckal.com

wate CO Com

down about 20 per cent year-
to-date on room revenues.
That’s for the first four

The room revenue decline is
likely to have been produced
by a combination of declining
occupancies, with stopover vis-
itors to Nassau/Paradise Island
down 15.9 per cent year-over-
year for January 2009, and the
discounting that hotels have
used to ensure business volumes

Mr Sands added that while
room revenues might be down
by one-fifth, to assess how Nas-

sau/Paradise Island hotels were
performing overall, the bigger
picture needed to be examined.

Rooms were only one rev-
enue stream, with properties
such as Kerzner International’s
Atlantis resort and Baha Mar’s
Cable Beach properties also
generating revenues from casi-
no gaming and food and bev-
erage.

Mr Sands added that individ-
ual resort properties had also
“made some adjustments to
expenses” internally to mitigate
the bottom line impact from the
revenue downturn. He acknowl-
edged, though, that the top line
fall had “impacted on cash

The BHA president said it
was “difficult to say” whether
the Bahamian hotel industry
would experience any more
mass lay-offs, although he point-
ed to the RIU Paradise Island
resort’s planned closure for sev-
eral months, during which ren-
ovations to the property would

be made, as an example of the
decisions hotel owners were
taking.

“Certainly, there are still
downward pressures on occu-
pancies and downward pressure
on rates, but that’s the world
we’re living in during this reces-
sionary period in the US, and
individual properties are get-
ting used to making adjustments
internally to reflect the new
world order,” Mr Sands said.

“While booking windows are
still short, a lot of properties are
doing value-added marketing
to attract business to the desti-
nation. Many properties are
employing different strategies
to make things work.”

Kerzner International was
employing an events-based
strategy, via concerts from the
likes of Miley Cyrus and the
Jonas Brothers, to generate
excitement for its Atlantis prod-
ucts and attract US guests there.

Other hotel properties were
binding themselves more

I ="). <>
Hotel room revenues

off 20 per cent into Q2

strongly to their brands and the
latter’s network, offering value-
added and specific programmes
“to ensure we have volume at a
rate that can still generate
income”.

“The Bahamas is remaining
visible in the marketplace and
staying in the mindset of the
travelling consumer,” Mr Sands
said. “When you look at our
results in comparison to world
and regional competitors, we
are not faring too badly.

“T think the rest of 2009 will
remain a challenge for the
industry. Member hotels are
employing many initiatives to
reduce the level of decline and
to try to remain financially
viable operations going for-
ward.”

As for Baha Mar, where Mr
Sands is senior vice-president
for governmental and public
affairs, the Sheraton resort was
meeting plan expectations,
while the Wyndham was “not
meeting plans at all”.

CPA / CERTIFIED PUBLIC ACCOUNTANT

Apply principles of acecanting to analyze financial information and prepare financial reports by
compiling informaiton, preparing protil and loss statements, and utilizing appropriate accounting
comin procedures,

Primary Poesgenncsl billities
|. Prepare profit and loss statements and monthly closing and cost accountins reports.

2. Compile and analyze finascial information to prepare canries wo accounts, such as general ledger
accounts, and document business transactions.
3. Establish, maintain, aad coordinae the leypkmestation of accounting and accounting control

procedures.

4. Amalyze and review budgets and eqpenditures for contracts.

3, Monitor and review accounting and related system reports for accuracy and compleieness.
6. Prepare and review badget, revenue, expense, payroll entries. imoioes, and olher accounting

documents.

7. Analyae revenue and expenditure trends and recommend appropriate Gadget levels, and ensure
expenditure coniral.
4. Exgplain hilling invoices and accounting policies to staff, vendors and cliemts.
4, Resolve accounting discrepancies.
10). Recommend, develop and maintain financial data bases, computer software sysiems and manual

filing syste.

L1, Supervise che input and handling of financial data ond reports for ihe company’s automate

financial ester.

12. Interact with paditors. in completing audits if necessary.
13. Other duises as assigned.

Auditional Responsibilities
|. Develop the annual operating budget and consult with departmental management on the fiscal
mapects of program planning, salary recommendations, and other administrative actions.

2. Provide aceounling paliey orentation for new staff

Skills Required:

Kurcnatedge ol finance, accounting, bukgeling, and coat control principles including Generally Accepted

Accounting Principles. Kuncwledge of financial and accounting software applications
Quickbooks and Mireos software knowledge a plo

Employment Type: Full Tome

Yearly Salary: Unapecified
Level of Education: College

Veors of Work
Experience:

3 in 5 Years

Company: King’s Realty

‘(Contact Name:

Contact Phone: 22-4497

Contact Fax: 242-394-4492

Contact E-mail:
Preferred Meihad E-mail
of Contact:

BAH ANAS REALTY ir
COMMEECEAL
ih epcceber ert:

CBRE

CB AICHAND ELLUS.

Lillth Bostwack

Education & Experience

Contact Information

Th etkingsreany con | baharase kings ray com

Mingle with the Singles
Saturday May 30th &:00pm until
British Colonial Hilton

Nassau Singles

presents

Syeed Dating

Come and join a group of professional
singles all looking for love. There is
someone for everyone. The man or
woman of your dreams is just a phone
call away.

Call Nassau Singles: 341-8596
Thursday - Saturday 5-9pm
and all day Sunday for tickets

R.5.Â¥.P.
Tickets $60

includes food and drinks


THE TRIBUNE

THURSDAY, MAY 21, 2009, PAGE 5B

Bahamas recovery may start at end-Q3

lm By CHESTER ROBARDS
Business Reporter
crobards@tribunemedia.net

A LEADING Bahamian
financial analyst said yesterday
that the US economy appears
to be bottoming out, which
could mean the beginning of an
economic recovery for the
Bahamas by the end of the 2009
third quarter, with a noticeable
turnaround occurring by 2010.

Kenwood Kerr, speaking at
the Rotary Club of Southeast
Nassau’s monthly meeting, said
Americans are regaining confi-
dence in US capital markets.
He argued that Wall Street was
beginning to recover slowly
from its embarrassing topple
last year, when stock values
plummeted and hundreds of
workers were left without jobs.



Oe EAE Ly

The Providence
Advisors chief execu-
tive said some six mil-
lion people in the US
have lost their jobs in
the past 12 months,
and Bahamian unem-
ployment is at 12 per
cent.

“No on is immune
to these crises, and
we’re certainly not off
the hook from these
business closures,
spending cut backs,
the job losses and the
massive unemployment that
we’re seeing,” he added.

Mr Kerr said Bahamians
must remain prudent with their
finances, in spite of peaks and
troughs in the economy.

He suggested that the basic
principles of saving for the

Kenwood Kerr



future should hold
true whether the
economy is in a poor
state or booming, or
if the finances are
business-related or
personal.

Mr Kerr said busi-
nesses should keep
their models simple
and manageable,
know their competi-
tors, and remain flex-
ible.

To achieve success
in a recession, he sug-
gested businesses outsource
labour and prudently manage
cash flow.

Mr Kerr said individuals
should develop a “financial road
map”, budget in order to track
spending and recognise bad
spending habits.



a nee Ce Ue Lag ac

ee el

Tel: a =

ee ft



DHL JOB DESCRIPTION

POSITION:
JOB FAMILY:
RCS CODE:
REPORTS TO:
LOCATION:

OVERALL PURPOSE:

Collections Agent

Credit & Collections
A20004

Collections Lead

Country Finance Department

Under limited supervision in a team environment provide efficient and effec-
tive credit approvals. To ensure timely credit application processing, respond to
information requests and issues. Ensure accuracy of all credit decisions functions
while staying within company policy and procedural guidelines.

DUTIES AND RESPONSIBILITIES:

Gathers, compiles and maintains basic credit information to be used in
making credit decisions.
Reviews and monitors credit sources, customer applications and
delinquent accounts. Processes credit applications.

Works with smaller customers to resolve collections issues and disputes.

Investigates disputes and reviews documentation.

Prepares and processes credit and collections account adjustments.
Implements credit suspensions.
Recommends further actions on delinquent accounts.

Maintains records of credit risks and delinquent accounts.

Provides support and coordination with third party agencies as needed.
Handles customer calls related to Collection Agency accounts.

Prepares and files bankruptcy claim documents.

MINIMUM QUALIFICATIONS:

High School diploma required. .

1-3 years of experience in Collections.
Advanced administrative skills to function effectively with limited
direction amid competing priorities and deadlines.

Excellent customer service orientation and communication skills.
Proficiency using various computer software applications.
Excellent analytical and interpersonal skills.
Proficiency using various computer software applications

For more information please contact:

Romell K. Knowles I

Country Manager

Email:Romell.Knowles@dhl.com



ENERGY SAVING
CONSULTANTS

Cut Your EleGtgic Bl Bip
Up To 40"

* Tankless Water a A

* Compact Fluorescent Bulbs

* Energy Saving Capacitors for
Motors, A/C, Pumps etc.

* Fridgi-tech oil additive to increase A/C
efficiency

He said families are most at
risk from unwise spending, and
have been notoriously bad at
planning ahead for financial
emergencies.

“The Government, while it
has to be frugal in its fiscal
responsibilities, there is an
obligation to keep the general
state of the economy going until
things return to some normal-
cy,” said Mr Kerr.

According to him, govern-
ment spending is essential to
generating economic activity
during difficult times. He
argued that the Government’s
social safety net, road improve-
ments and airport development
are essential in generating this
economic stimulation.

“Governments have to be
spending to generate and initi-
ate economic activity,” he said.

"O

For more information or survey
Email: energysavingsconsultants @hotmail.com

Contact 326-6121 Gewese



The Grand Bahama Power Company, Limited invites qualified applicants to apply for the
position of Technician | (Instrument), responsible for conducting calibrations, repairs, routine
checks and tests control instrumentation in its Generation Power Plant.

The successful candidate is expected to lead instrament technicians in fault-finding,
trovbbeshooting and repairs, including analyses and calibration of all electronic and pneumatic
instrument and control systems.

Applicants must have a High School Diploma, BOCSE passes of C or better in Math, English
and a Technological Certificate in Electronics or its equivalent from an accredited institution.
Applicants must also have a minimum of five (3) years power station or equivalent industrial
experience or three (3) years at a Technician [I level in the Maintenance Department of an
industrial facility.

Applications with supporting documentation including a ckan Police Certificate and proof of Bahamian
citizenship shoukl be sent tio:

| ey ed
CRAND BAHAMA POWER COMPANY, LIMITED
ieee elt
| Freeport, Grand Bahai
SPEDE
.
GRAND BAHAKIA POWER COMPANY

ay (pened Soke) Mater Soph

OR BY EMAIL:

ramet Pa a Patti

i
es es Li

Teachers & Salaried Workers Co-operative
Credit Union Limited

NOTICE OF
ANNUAL GENERAL MEETING

TO: All Members of Teachers and Salaried Workers
Co-operative Credit Union Limited
East Street South and Independence Drive

Notice is hereby given that the Thirty-Second
(32nd) Annual Meeting of Teachers & Salaried
Workers Co-operative Credit Union Limited will be
held at the British Colonial Hilton Hotel located on
Bay Street, on Saturday May 23, 2009 commencing
at 8:00 a.m. for the following purposes:

To receive the Report of the Board of
Directors for 2008.

To receive the Audited Accounts for 2008.

To elect members of the Board of Directors.
To elect members of the Supervisory
Committee

To discuss and approve the Budget for 2009.
To take action on such matters as may come
before the meeting.

Lenn King
Secretary



me
THE TRIBUNE

THE Bahamian public will
shortly be consulted for their
views on content regulation in
the electronic communications
sector, a leading executive on
the committee overseeing the
reform effort has said.

Julian Francis, deputy chair-
man of the committee oversee-
ing the Bahamas Telecommu-
nications Company’s (BTC) pri-
vatisation, said during discus-
sions with the business, tourism
and financial services sectors
that public consultation has
been critical to shaping the pro-
posed new communications reg-

PlusGroup

of Companies

THURSDAY, MAY 21, 2009, PAGE 7B
as ee
Content consultation to be issued shortly

ulatory regime.

Since December 2008, he said
the committee had published
three public consultations invit-
ing comments from industry
stakeholders and the general
public on a number of issues,
including the new framework
for electronic communications,
licensing and universal service
obligations.

“In the weeks to come there
will also be a comprehensive
public consultation on the very
important issue of content reg-
ulation. The privatisation com-
mittee or URCA (if the URCA

Real Estate Division

3 Prime Locations

Rental Space Available - New Providence

Peo) Rem teal la reys.

Mackey Street
12,300 sq. ft.

12,000 sq. ft.

Retail

Warehouse

2x 4,050 sq. ft.
1x 4,200 sq. ft.
2x 6,000 sq. ft.

eee Res tcem ie

East West Highway & Blue Hill Road

3,718 sq. ft

20,000 so. ft.

Retail

Office

1x 1,118 sq. ft.
1x 1,200 sq. ft.
1x 1,400 sq. ft.
2x 5,000 sq. ft.
1x 10,000 sq. ft.

e Seagrapes Shopping Centre

Prince Charles Drive
9,563 sq. ft.

Retail

2x 1,061 sq. ft.
1x 1,591 sq. ft.
1x 1,750 sq. ft.
1x 1,790 sq. ft.
1x 2,310 sq. ft.

Space Limited * Call or Email Today
Tel: (242) 427 0106

eMail: realestate@theplusgrp.com

Act has already been brought
into effect by then) will engage a
pretty detailed formal consulta-
tion in the form of a document.
This document will describe
what it is the Government
thinks we should be doing going
forward, pose a certain number
of specific issues and questions,
and ask for responses to those as
well as other comments which
the respondents would wish to
make,” Mr Francis said.

He said responses from the
industry, the Bahamian public
and international organisations
and entities with an interest in
the Bahamas will largely inform
URCA as to how it should
structure the regulation of con-
tent going forward.

FROM page 14B

might question why Mr Francis
is speaking on regulation, given
that he is also executive chair-
man of BTC, one of the key
entities that will be regulated
by URCA.

Still, Mr Francis said the max-
imum penalty URCA might
impose on an operator that vio-
lates the law, or someone who is
not licensed, would be 10 per
cent of gross relevant revenue.
However, he said URCA will
be a “light-touch” rather than a
heavy handed regulator.

“Tt will regulate only where
it needs to regulate. It will not
seek to define every single
minute detail of how the sector
works. It will look at the opera-
tion of the sector. It will cer-
tainly fix the rules and put them
in place, and seek to ensure
there is a very transparent and
clear environment in the
Bahamas, but it will stay out of
the operation of the sector
except in those circumstances
which require the regulator to
be involved,” Mr Francis said.

He added that the industry
will now have its own ad-hoc
tribunal, which like URCA will
be funded by the industry.

Headed by a president, the
Utilities Appeals Tribunal
(UAT) will consist of panels of
experts brought together as
needed to review URCA deci-
sions. It is expected that the
UAT will allow for a more effi-
cient dispute resolution and
appeals process for licensees,
Mr Francis said.

DEPARTMENT OF STATISTICS

EXPORT/IMPORT PRICE SURVEY

During the month of May, 2009
The Department of Statistics will
conduct a_ pricing survey. The
staff of The Department will visit
selected businesses throughout
New Providence & Grand Bahama
to collect prices of various
commodities. The Department will
therefore be seeking the co-operation
of businesses involved in exporting
and importing as we embark upon this

most important exercise.

THE DEPARTMENT OF STATISTICS
APPRECIATES YOUR SUPPORT &
CO-OPERATION


PAGE 8B, THURSDAY, MAY 21, 2009

THE TRIBUNE



ee - s
‘Big ticket’ firms to be ‘devastated’

FROM page 1B

tively off by almost 50 per cent
for the 2009 first quarter.

This was because Bahamian
consumers had cut back “on sig-
nificant large purchases”,
whereas businesses specialising
in small item, fast-moving con-
sumer goods were faring bet-
ter. Televisions priced at $85-
$90 were “flying off the
shelves”, he said, while retail-
ers were having difficulty in
shifting wide-screen, $1,000-plus
models.

“You’ve got to shift your
business to things people can

ble,” Mr D’ Aguilar added, “tar-
geting those models or items
people are just not able to pur-
chase” for elimination from
inventory carried.

“There’s a lot of businesses
that are down, but it’s very hard
to generalise,” Mr D’Aguilar
said. “Economic activity is
down, things are tough and I
think that businesses have to
figure out or rethink their
strategies, unless they’re in a
business like cars or big ticket
items. Those businesses are
going to be devastated. They’re
going to be hit hard.

“And if you’re in retail, in
luxury goods, you’re in for a
hard slog.”

The Chamber president

added that established Bahami-
an businesses, and those that
were not highly leveraged on
debt, were best-placed to sur-
vive. Those in fast-moving con-
sumer goods needed to tighten
up on their inventory and be
smart with ordering, he advised.

Rick Lowe, Nassau Motor
Company’s (NMC) operations
manager, told Tribune Business
that Bahamian business owners
and managers were now dis-
cussing their “drastic measures
list” of how to ensure their com-
panies survived, if the recession
worsened.

He added: “Your revenues
have fallen dramatically, and
youre going to start reviewing
your organisation, piece by

piece. Can we stop this, stop
that? How do we get this to
where it should be? Ultimately,
when do we get to the point of
having to lay-off people. There’s
various aspects you go through.
You just do what you’ve got to
do.”

Mr Lowe added that NMC
had “made a commitment to
keep everyone employed as
long as we can”, and would
“give it another couple of
months and see how it turns
out”.

“Everyone’s talking about it.
It can’t go on forever,” Mr
Lowe said of the measures
being discussed by businesses.
“Tjust hope we’ll see a glimmer
of a turnaround before things

go too far.”

He added that Bahamian new
car motor dealers had enjoyed
“a reasonable April”, but that
month did not appear consis-
tent with trends or previous
months. “Maybe that’s as a
result of car show deals pend-
ing,” he said.

Mr Lowe said new car prices
were likely to further increase in
2010, and pointed out that ship-
ping rates remained at the level
they were increased to in sum-
mer 2008, despite the oil price
decline.

He added that the cost of
importing a shipment of natur-
al iced tea he had ordered one
month ago had risen from $79
to $84.

One financial industry source
told Tribune Business that
Bahamian businesses and con-
sumers would have to “adapt
to a lower level of economic
activity”, a shift that requires a
“special mindset”.

“The first waves of the finan-
cial crisis tsunami are lapping
at the shores of the Bahamas,
and all serious businesspeople
have to aggressively confront
the new financial situation, and
how do they survive and pros-
per in the new reality,” the
source said.

“Tf this drought continues for
18 months to two years, things
simply cannot carry on [as is].
They will have to do something
very drastic and aggressive.”

now afford as much as possi-

ESSAY COMPETITION

TENTH ANNUAL PUBLIC SERVICE WEEK

The Department of Public Service will host an Essay
Competition as one of the activities for the Tenth Annual
Public Service Week. The Competition is open to Junior
and Senior Students in New Providence.

Additionally, this year, a speech competition will be
for schools in the Northern & Southern Bahamas,
respectively. Students interested in participating in the
Essay Competition should write a 250 - 300 words (Junior
High), and 450 - 500 words (Senior High), essay on the
topic: “ The Public Service-Striving for Excellence in
Customer Service.”

The deadlines for entries, which should be referred
to the attention of Mrs. Antoinette Thompson, Deputy
Permanent Secretary, Department of Public Service, is
Friday 24th July, 2009.

A Dell Desktop 2400 Computer System will be awarded to
the winner each category. The first runners-up for both the
Essay and Speech Competition in the Junior & Senior High
School category, will be awarded a $500 gift certificate.

The winners will be announced during the Tenth Annual
Public Service Week Awards Ceremony scheduled for
Saturday 10th October 2009.

Students interested in the Speech Competition for the
Northern and Southern Bahamas should contact their
Language Arts Teacher.

MINISTRY OF FINANCE
TREASURY DEPARTMENT
PUBLIC NOTICE -REMINDER

The Treasurer of the Commonwealth of The Bahamas
advises all pensioners, Parliamentary, Judicial, Official,
World War 1 Veterans & Widows, Bahamas Widows’ &
Orphans and Re-employed, whose pension payments
are paid directly into their bank accounts and have not yet
verified for the current January, 2009 verification exercise,
to do so without delay. Failure to present oneself or the
appropriate Life and Payment Certificate as verification will
result in the disruption of payment directly into their bank
account June, 2009 and thereafter until verified.

The following Life and Payment Verification Certificates
are available at the Treasury Department, Nassau, the
Treasury Department, Freeport, and at offices of Family
Island Administrator’s for those pensioners who are unable
to appear in person:

* Parliamentary Pension - for retired Parliamentarians.
* Official Pension (Judicial) - for retired Judges.
* Official Pension - for retired Public Officers.

* World War 1 Veterans and Widows - for Veterans
& Widows of World War 1.

* Bahamas Widows’ & Orphans’ Pension Fund Certificate
- for Widows’ & Orphans’.

Pensioners submitting Life & Payment Certificates as
verification are to ensure that the certificate is duly signed
by a person designed on the said form and that the signed

date is within the designated period. Certificates may be
forwarded via facsimile to (242) 323-1459.

Pensioners are further advised to contact the Pension
Section, Treasury at telephone no. (242) 302-0539, 302-
0565 or 302-0524 in view of the above, with any concerns
they may have.

WANTED

MEDICAL SALES
REPRESENTATIVE

The medical sales representative will be responsible for
promoting international pharmaceutical brands to the
healthcare community in the Bahamas.

Skills & Educational Requirements

Bachelor’s degree in medical sciences, allied
health, or business administration

Effective communication and presentation
abilities

Effective time management, planning, and
organizing skills

Proficiency in a variety of computer applications
Self-motivated team player

Previous experience in pharmaceutical detailing
would be an asset

Candidates should possess a reliable motor vehicle, be
willing to travel to the family islands, the U.S., and
other foreign countries.

Please send application letter and résumé by
May 27, 2009 to:

Medical Rep
P.O. Box N-7504
Nassau, Bahamas
Or Fax 393.0440

We thank all applicants for their interest, however,
only short-listed candidates will be contacted.

PUBLIC NOTICE

TENDER FOR EXTERIOR PAINTING
AND GENERAL REPAIRS AT
FOREIGN AFFAIRS BUILDING
NASSAU, THE BAHAMAS

The Government of The Bahamas, through the
Ministry of Works and Transport is inviting
Tenders from general contractors to carry out
painting and general repairs

Schedule For Tender Opening

Companies interested in tendering may attend a Pre-
Tender meeting at the Ministry of Foreign Affairs
Conference Room at 10am May 22nd, 2009 and fol-
lowed by a site visit.

All tender bids should include the following:

¢ Complete Tender Document
¢ Copy of Current Business License
¢ National Insurance board letter of good standing

Tenders must be submitted in sealed envelopes marked
“Tender for Exterior Painting and General Repairs
at Foreign Affairs Building East Street Hill’ and
delivered to:

Chairman, Tenders Board
Ministry of Finance, 3rd Floor Reception Desk
Cecil Wallace - Whitfield Centre
P.O. Box N-3017, Cable Beach, West Bay Street
Nassau, The Bahamas

All Tenders must be received at the above address on
or before 10am Tuesday, 2nd June, 2009.

All persons who submit bids are invited to attend the
opening of Tenders at the Ministry of Finance, 3rd
Floor, Cecil Wallace-Whitfield Centre, Cable Beach,
West Bay Street, Nassau, The Bahamas at 10am, on
Tuesday, 2nd June, 2009.

The Ministry of Public Works and Transport reserves
the right to reject any or all Tenders.

FOR RENT

Fully furnished town house in private area on
eastern road, one minute from beach, 2 bed-
rooms, 1 1/2 baths, washroom, large kitchen,

burglar bars, A/C & C/A asking $1,050 per month,

$50 discount per month towards utilities, serious

enquires only please, 393-4396

PUBLIC NOTICE

MINISTRY OF PUBLIC WORKS
AND TRANSPORT

NOTICE FOR ROAD PAVING WORKS

WEST BAY St/MARLBOROUGH St/NAVY LION
Rd/BAY St/EAST BAY St.
(BLAKE Rd. eastward to MACKEY St.)

The Ministry of Public Works and Transport wishes
to advise members of the General Public that road
paving/patching works are scheduled for West
Bay Street from the Blake Road Intersection to
Mackey Street and East Bay Street Intersection
commencing on Friday, May 15, 2009 and will
remain in effect for approximately two weeks. The
works may necessitate closing sections of the
roadway and re-routing traffic during the period
of construction, otherwise the roadway will be
reduced to one-lane traffic. Work will be carried
out during the under-mentioned times unless
otherwise stated as follows:

Monday to Sunday not including Fridays except
Friday 15th May 7:00 pm to 6:00 am
Monday to Sunday not including Fridays except
Friday 15th May 9:30 am to 3:30 pm

Please note that all effort will be taken to mitigate the
inconvenience to the motoring public. Accordingly,
motorists are encouraged to reduce speed and
exercise caution when traversing these work
areas, obey the flagmen when on duty and note
the instructions of the various signage. Additionally,
motorists are also encouraged to avoid the work
areas if at all possible as delays are anticipated.
Work is initially scheduled to commence East of
Goodman’s Bay Round-About on Friday, 15th
May 2009 at 7:00 pm., in an easterly direction
to Mackey Street and then eastward from Blake
Road to Harrow Dr Round-About. The continuous
flow and pace of the work is such that the
affected areas will be continuously changing
with resulting changes in the traffic management
plan. The safety of the pedestrians and motoring
public throughout the work period is paramount
and once again they are asked to assist in
this endeavour by being cautious at all times.

WARNING AND CAUTIONARY SIGNS
The paving Contractor will erect precautionary
signs to enhance road safety to both motorized
and non-motorized traffic (pedestrians).

Members of the Public and motorist in particular,
are therefore urged to take note of the warning,
diversionary or prohibitory road signs along
the construction route and adjacent roads at
all times. Further notifications of possible traffic
flow disruptions will be issued to the Public in a
timely manner hereafter as they may be found
necessary.

Colin Higgs
Permanet Secretary
Ministry of Works & Transport


THE TRIBUNE

THURSDAY, MAY 21, 2009, PAGE 9B





Four Seasons’ eight per
cent gross fee ‘too much’

FROM page 1B

lion to further upgrade and
build-out Emerald Bay during
2009 - a demand which, when
taken with its management fee
and lengthy contract, proved
unsustainable.

Prime Minister Hubert Ingra-
ham told the House of Assem-
bly this week that the terms of
Four Seasons’ management
contract had effectively acted
as an obstacle to Emerald Bay’s
sale, their onerous conditions
discouraging buyers prior to the
resort’s announced closure on
May 26, 2009.

“As it transpired, the require-
ments contained in the man-
agement contract with the
hotel’s operators, the Four Sea-
sons, proved particularly chal-
lenging for a number of the
interested parties. During the

14 months of the process since
June 2007, the receivers signed
letters of intent with one party
and entered into formal con-
tract with two other parties;
none with success,” Mr Ingra-
ham said.

Four Seasons, as revealed by
Tribune Business, has admitted
it is unlikely to return as the
Emerald Bay Resort’s operating
partner, and there is some sus-
picion that Mitsui and the Price-
waterhouseCoopers (PwC)
receivers closed the property to
ensure it was removed as the
brand/management partner.

Russell Downs, the head
receiver, previously told Tri-
bune Business that the ability
of a buyer to bring in its own
hotel brand/operating partner
might get Emerald Bay’s sale
“over the finishing line”.

He subsequently said some

20 groups, including those that
had previously looked at the
Exuma resort but declined to
bid, were still interested and
assessing whether to renew their
interest.

Tribune Business can reveal
that the Emerald Bay purchase
price has dropped to $30 mil-
lion, and possible even lower.
The last deal in principle that
was agreed, with the group
headed by Los Angeles-based
developer Barry Silverton and
Cushman Wakefield, the real
estate/investment banking firm,
was said by sources to have
been for $40 million.

Meanwhile, Robert Sands,
the Bahamas Hotel Associa-
tion’s (BHA) president, said
Emerald Bay’s problems could
not be interpreted, in and of
themselves, as a sign that the
Government’s ‘anchor proper-

BAHAMAS DEVELOPMENT BANK
Cable Beach, West Ray Street,
P.0,Box N-3034
Nassau. Bahamas
Teli( 242) 327-S7SIVS27 S794
Fux:(242) 327-347, 327-1258
www, bahamasdevclopmenthank.com

The general public is invited to attend Bahamas
Development Bank s sale of repossessed assets.

Electronic Equipment

(1) Compaq Presario Computer Tower

ASSETS

Tables

(1) Canon Canoscan N640D EX Scanner

(1) Digital Scale (New)
(1) Whirl Microwave

* (1) Marble Table (Rectangle)

(1)Tec Cash Register

(1) Epson Stylus Pro 9600 Print Engine
(1) HP DeskJet 656c Printer (Desktop)
(1) Monitor

(1) 1520 Epson Stylus Color Printer

(1) Keyboard & Mouse

(1) Brothers Printer

(1) Samsung Digital Camcorder

(1) Dell Scanner & Printer

(1) Chrome Juice Filler

(1) Multi Fruit Juicer

(1) Quilting Sewing Machine

(1) Deli Showcase

(1) Singer Sewing Machine

(1) Janome Monogram/Embroidery Sewing Machine

(1) Singer Quantum XL150 Sewing Machine with Serger
(1) Meat Saw (New)

(1) Deli Selection (Minor 2000 MT-SE) (New)

Assortment of Items

* Cooking Utensils Pots, Pans & Plates
* (2) Breakfast Nooks

* Air Hockey Game

* (1) Yamaha Wave Runner

Location:

Directions:

Cooler/Freezers

* (1) Two Door Chest Freezer
* (1) Ice Cream Cooler

* (1) Single Door Cooler

* (1) 8’ Walk-in Freezer

wCompressor (New)

Beauty Salon Equipment

* (3) Nail Tables
* (7) Facial Machine
* (2) Nail Stools

Aero Motive Equipment

* (2) Tech Work Benches

* (1) Alternator Test Bench

* (1) Paint Booth

* (1) Rivet Machine

* (1) 6” Storage Cabinet

(1) 4” Craftsman Tool Cabinet

Brake Washer
Sand Blaster
Vari-Drive

Inland Steel, Sumner Street off Solider Rd.Nassau, Bahamas

Exit Abundant Life Road turn right onto Solider Road then the first left

onto Sumner Street tenth two storey white & blue building on the left

Date & Time:

All assets are sold as is where is for cash, cashier s cheque. No purchase(s) will be released

until paid in full.

The general public is invited to attend Bahamas Development Bank’s sale of repossessed Vehicles

and small Vessels.

10:00a.m. — 3:00p.m. — Saturday May 23, 2009

vehicles

2003 Dodge Caravan

2002 Hyundai H-1 Van SUX

1997 Double Axle Mack Dump Truck
1997 Dodge Stratus

1982 GMC Brigadier Drill Truck
2001 Kia Pregio Van

1989 Ford L8000 Drill Truck (Green)

2001 Hyundai H-1 Van SUX
2006 Mitsubishi Canter Truck
1996 Ford Explorer

2000 Ford Ranger Truck
1999 Ford F-250 Truck

2006 Hyundai H-1 SVX Van

Vessels

20’ Robolo Vessel (1996) with Evinrude Outboard Engine
19’ Fiberglass Sports Vessel (1989) Hull Only

21 Seacraft Vessel (1974) with 140 HP Yamaha Outboard Engine

19’ Spanish Wells Runabout Vessel (1991) with 115 HP Mercury Outboard Engine
20’ Abaco Skiff (1997) with 115 HP Mercury Outboard Engine

Location:
Nassau, Bahamas

Date & Time:

For additional information telephone 327-5780.

Internal Security Division Compound, Thompson Blvd

10:00a.m. — 3:00p.m. — Saturday May 23, 2009

ty’ strategy for the Family
Islands had failed.

The strategy, started by the
first Ingraham administration
with Emerald Bay and Bimini
Bay, and taken to new heights
by the Christie government, was
designed to place a major resort
on every Bahamian island to act
as a centre of economic activity,
employment and spin-off busi-
nesses, reversing the migration
to Nassau from the Family
Islands.

“T think it is an unfortunate
turn of events that has led to
the Four Seasons Emerald Bay















1. Lot #1246





(S00 04g. Mh)
whe 225-7 oy. 1,-
Golden Way Dr, Golden
Gates #2 (Appraised
Value $244,045.00)
2 Vacant loc #147
[LO.557sq, f.)-Menmings
Chr & ioe West Lame
Southern Heights Suh
(Appraised Value
S9D.00000 09
a Lo 4S"s1o00°
wy baildings (1,.040sq
ft.) Mirache Toweh Auto
Care Cenber-Fax Hill Rd
(Appraised Value
$149, 20, OO)
4 Lot [SOs Lou]
wy building 1,91 25. fr.-
Deveaux St (Appraised
Value $199,000.00)
5 Lots #29 & #30,
(50rn100°), Hk #47
wy baaildiing 1.1 40s. ft.
Matthew St, Massa
Village (Appraised
Value $145.000000)
Lots #5 i #6
(L50's 1. 0) we, bse-
Silver Palm La Imperial
Park (Appraised Value
$213,654.00)

fa

7. Lot 1135 (50'.90r)
wfhse 142=q. ft-
Sunflower (souch)

Sumshing Park Sul Hee
#8 (Appraised Valuac
$179,000.00)

& Lot #11 (207"«100')
wyfhse Z.026eq. (L-Sunset
Ridge Dr, Sunset Ridge
Sub Hee #26 (Appraised
Valine $20600000)

o Lot #176 [41'x1 13°)
whee D0Ssq. ft.-Old
Cedar St Yellow Elder
(Appraised Value
$65.000.0D)

Ta. Lots #3 & #4, Blk #47
(S0°x100°) wsdeplex &
retail shop 1,522 sq. ft-
Forbes St Nagsau Vilkere
(Appraised Value
$120,000.00)

Analros

Li. Beach frone lot 9 000sq.
Ft. wy building 2,1L00sq
It.-Pipders Mangrove
Cay Andros (Appraised
Valine S20000000)

12. Lot 4,344eq. ft. w/fduples
building 1,1 745q. ft.-
Fresh Creek Andis
(Appraised Vahie
$94 401M]

Wessels





= fs = = © ©
in
ray

4

OO (1996) Hobobo Vessel w'115 AP Evinrude engine
(L974) Seacraft Vesel wi!) 140 HP Yamaha engine
SP (1979) Hatters Vessel (MV Boddy)

1° (1981) Defender Vessel [Equility)

oon Steel Holl Vessel (Miss Kristy’)

Steed Hull Gull Coast Shrimp Trawler Vesse
(1980) with (2) ¥olvo Diesel engine (Sweet Gharkotte]

determining to close its doors
in Exuma,” Mr Sands said.
“The BHA is hopeful the clo-
sure will be shortlived, and the
impact on the economy and
businesses can be minimised.

“We feel this facility is excel-
lent. That Exuma has strong
appeal in the marketplace, and
there is a well-trained work-
force to support a quality guest
experience in Exuma.”

As to the impact the resort
closure will have on investor
and developer confidence in the
Bahamas, Mr Sands said: “The
quicker this matter can be

resolved will mitigate against
any negative impact for future
investors.”

Adding that Emerald Bay
“had all the elements in place to
make it work”, Mr Sands said
the reason for its failure to-date
needed to be assessed before
obituaries were written for the
‘anchor property’ strategy.

“T would prefer to look at the
glass as half full, rather than
half-empty,” he said, adding
that ‘anchor properties’ were
“still the right approach” to
growth and sustainable devel-
opment in the Family Islands.

BAHAMAS DEVELOPMENT BANK
(Cable Beach, West Bay Street,
PO.Box N-30354
Nassau, Bahamas
Tel:(242) 327-S7S0/327-5793-6
Fan:(242) 327-5047, 327-1258
www. hahamasdevclopmenthank.com

L7.1508q. f.)
wWihoe 20s, ot
Elkrtd, Secbhhoin £2-Sea
Gull Or, Bahama Reef
Yacht & Country Club
Sub Grand Bahama
[Appraised Vale
$20, O00)

14. Vacant lot #29, Blk #>
(14,39 75q. ft]-
Yorkshire DOr, kabamia
West Replat Grand
Fahama (Appraised
Walue $25 (000000)

1S Vacant Lot #4 Blk #12
Unset #3 (11.25 05q. ft]-
Henny Ave Derby Sub
Grand Bahama
[Appraised Value
$65 004) OU)

l& Lot afaa BLISS]
w hse & Duples-Nelson
Rd Podinciana Gardens
Grand Bahama
[Appraised Value
$96,000.00)

17 Loe as? (5051507)

w sixaples 2-storey
apartment building &
Church 5,4 q. At
Marin Town, Kings Suls
Pigiit Mlile Rock Grand
Bahama (Appradsed
Wahue $211,200.00)

LS. Lotw 10 reom botel
5 Oca. on
acres of heach tromt-
High Reck Grand
Bahama (Appradsed
Wahue £1,000, 000.000)

Lo Vacant Jot #13, Blk #59,
Unit #3 (22.7525q. I]
45° of canal frant-
Dagenham Circle &
Ingrave Dr Emerald Bay
Sub Grand Bahama
(Appraised Value
$110,000.00)

20. Vacant bot #21, Alk #3
(14,061.59. f-]-Waterfall
Or Seahorse Village Su
Grand Bahama
(Appraised Valme
$40,001.00)

21. Loe 15, Bk #15 Unit
AS [90'6125']-Derby
Sub Grand Bahama
(Appraised Value
$23,000.00)

22. Vacant bor #275, Ae #15
[17 66sq. ft ]=
Cutwater Lo Shannon
Country Chab Sub Gram
Eahama (Appraised
Value $36,000.00)

23. Vacant foc #4489 seerian
28 (95°x125']-Palmert
Dr Grand Bahama Fast
(Appraised Value
SS.00000)

24 Lot Ae (20,0009. ft)
wy huilding conyplex &
comin Laumdreanat
Queens Highway
Hobmes Rock
Coenmonage Grand
Eahama (Appraised
Value $178,500.00)









ASSETS

© 122" Single Screw Steel Hull (1960) MV Lisa | IIL
reszel bas a new engine requiring installation And
can be view at Bradford Marine, Grand Bahama

19 (1989) Fiberglass Sports Vessel (Hull Onkr)
60 (1992) Defender Vessel (hueen Vashti]

62° (1989) Desco Marine Vessel (Sweet Dreams)

2 (1997) Abaco Skill Vesnel wl 15 HP Mercury engine

19° (1991) Spanish Well Runabout Vessel w/115 Mercory engine
§1 (1996) Travis Marine Vessel (Farthutt)

Albace

2m. Lot #54 E [6G 501sq. tt]
w ftriplex foundation
2.7 08sq. f.-Munphy
Town Abacs
(App raiseed Valiv
$24, 5h50M0)

26 Vacant bot #6 (2 acres]
Pox Town /Uhacne
Appraised Value

$54), 000. Oe)

27. Lot #51 [15,00 is, fr]
w building=Murphy
Town sbace
(Appraised Value
$102,420.00)

2& Pormion of low ra
(15,0000 sq. F-Pt St
Murphy Town Abaco




43.

44,

a8

(Appraised Value
$29,250.00)
Lot #55 [6,90 PJ
w bulbdine—-Murpliy
‘Town Abaco
(Appraised Valux
$i? OF S.0)
Lot #45 (60'xteo')
wf14 neom mobel
3.9 008q. 'L-Sandy Point
Abert (4uppraised
Valoe $465,700.00)
Lot 87,1 20sq. Fr. wf
cottages £ 1] storage
buildings Cobaling
4,1 He5q. (-Saned Harics
Treasure Cay Abaca
(Appraised Value
SHO 30800)
Ekcuthera



. Vacant portion of lot #7

(S0'.110°)-West james
Cisterm Eleuthera
(Appraised Value
$18,000.00]

Cak Liban
Vacant 65 acres of
land-Arthur’s Town, Cat
Island (Appraised
Vallee $98,000.00)
Lat wl? room motel
139 acres-sirthur’s
Town Cat Island
(Appraised Value
$630, 0000090)

Exum

S. Vacant hot #6 (65 2080 cy

ft_)-Mess Town Exun
(Appraised Valuc
$110,198.00)

&. Lot [30,4002q. ft.) wy




srl! hotel 4,5 20sq. ft
& exclusive beackh-
Forbes Hill Exunia
[Appraised Valic
$1.400,000.00)



7. Vacant bot #121

[6 600s. ft.)-ikceanic
Aid Fubama Sound Sec
AS Esa [Ap era iol
Value $18,150.00)

Vacant bot #95

(80's122") Commodore
Ad Elizabeth Harbour
Est Exuma (Appraised
Valoc $45 000000)

Wehiches

[1] 04 Dodge Caravan
[0] %& Fond Explorer

[1] 97 Dodge Stratus

[2] OL Hyundai H-1 Yan

[2] Ol Kia Bus 12 Seaner

[0] 37 LT8000 Fond Boom Track

[0] @2 Hyundai H-1 Wan SVX

(1) 0 Hyundai H-1 Van SVX [Silver]
(1) 01 Sitchen Tandem Cheroke: Trailer
[0] OO Ferd Ranper Track

(1) 4 Ford F250 Track

(0) #2 GMC Brigadier Drill Truck

(1) 06 Mitsubishi Canter Truck
(1) 97 Daob ke Ake Mack Dorap Truck

(0) 92 Mack Truck (Canmichael Rd]
(1) 97 Baohle Agle Mack Gump Trock

Steel Building 70's" Sin (6) Windows, Two (2) Entry Doors, Twe (2) 5°x10' Rollup Doors White trimmed

The public is invited to come and view the aforementioned assets on the date and time indicated.
P Hiee Approved plans and engineering drawings are available $50,000.00

After which you may submit Sealed bids marked “TENDER-EQUIPMENT” to Bahamas
Development Bank, PO. Box N-3034, Nassau, Bahamas. A representative will be on the
compound from 10:00am to 3:00pm to collect and secure all offers, which will be opened on May
25, 2009. Please note that all bids on the aforementioned assets should be received by 3:00 pm
May 23, 2009. The Bahamas Development Bank reserves the right to reject any or all offers. All
assets are sold as is.

The public is invited to submit Sealed bids marked "Tender" to Bahamas Development Bank, Pal. Box K-34,
Nassau, Bahamas attention Fimamcial Controller, faxed bids will mot be accepted or telephowe F27-5780 for
Jdditional infeemation Please mote that all bids on the aforementioned properties and assets should be received
byooron May 29, 2009. The Bahamas Development Bank reserves the right to reject any or all offers. All assets
are sold as is.


THE TRIBUNE



THURSDAY, MAY 21, 2009, PAGE 11B



Hotels assess private
plane pre-clearance

FROM page 1B

to a tourist’s Bahamian experi-
ence, and private passengers,
frequently being drawn from
the high-end of the visitor mar-
ket, would automatically expect
this.

However, several outstand-
ing issues remain to be worked
through if pre-clearance in the
Bahamas for private aircraft
passengers is to become a real-
ity.

“We were trying to see if it
can be done in such a way that





it does not create problems for
Family Island airports, coming
into New Providence,” said Mr
Sands, explaining that they
wanted to avoid problems that
might be caused by private air-
craft flying to and from the
Family Islands having to stop
in Nassau for pre-clearance.
He added that another issue
to be settled was where to place
any pre-clearance facilities for
private aircraft passengers.
There were two fixed-base
operations (FBOs) in New
Providence, Odyssey Aviation
and Executive, and Mr Sands

said it had yet to be decided
whether one of these, or an
independent site, should be
used for pre-clearance.

“We don’t want to create an
opportunity that would be to
the detriment of the private
plane, private aircraft market
for New Providence,” Mr Sands
said. “We need to find common
ground that will be to the bene-
fit of the private aircraft user.”

The BHA president
described the private aircraft
passenger market as “extreme-

ly important” for the Bahamian
hotel and tourism industry,
bringing in “high-end business”
and “certainly a niche we would
not want to lose” given its par-
ticular importance to the Fami-
ly Islands.

Mr Sands said the new pas-
senger manifest rules had not
provoked any concerns from
BHA members yet, but the
organisation was monitoring the
situation to ensure the Bahamas
did not lose “this stimulant for
tourism”.

NOTICE

NOTICE is hereby given that DARRELL SIMILIAN of
HARBOUR WEST, EIGHT MILE ROCK, FREEPORT, GRAND
BAHAMA is applying to the Minister responsible for Nationality
and Citizenship, for registration/naturalization as a citizen of
The Bahamas, and that any person who knows any reason why
registration/ naturalization should not be granted, should send a
written and signed statement of the facts within twenty-eight days
from the 14TH day of MAY, 2009 to the Minister responsible for
Nationality and Citizenship, PO.BoxN-7147, Freeport, Bahamas.

Position of Accountant

A financial institution seeks an Accountant. Candi-
dates must have at least 3-5 years experience in ac-
counting in the financial industry with sound knowl-
edge of but not limited to:

¢ Formulating budgets

¢ Managing Accounts Receivables and Payables

¢ Preparation of monthly and annual financial re-
ports and statements

¢ Preparation of bank reconciliations and various
general ledger accounts to the sub ledgers

¢ Co-ordinate the annual audit with external auditors
and preparation of the necessary schedules

¢ Preparing reports for the regulators
¢ Must be a team player

¢ Must possess people skills and be prepared to
interact with members

* Qualifications: AA in Accounting

Please forward resume to
P. O. Box N-7544

NOTICE

WALDER INTERNATIONAL INC.
In Voluntary Liquidation

Notice is hereby given that in accordance with Section
1384) of the International Business Companies Act.
2000,WALDER INTERNATIONAL INC. is in dissolution as
of May 12, 2009.

International Liquidator Services Inc. situated
at 35A Regent Street, P.O. Box 1777, Belize
City, Belize is the Liquidator.

LIQUIDATOR

NOTICE

QADILLAC LIMITED

NOTICEIS HEREBY GIVEN as follows:

(a) QADILLAC LIMITED is in voluntary dissolution under
the provisions of Section 137 (4) of the International
Business Companies Act 2000.

(b) The dissolution of the said company commenced on
the 20th May, 2009 when the Articles of Dissolution were
submitted to and registered by the Registrar General.

(c) The Liquidator of the said company is Manex Limited,
The Bahamas Financial Centre, Shirley & Charlotte
Streets, Nassau, Bahamas

Dated this 21st day of May, A. D. 2009



Manex Limited
Liquidator

NOTICE

NOTICE is hereby given that HELTEN JAC QUELI of BOWE
AVENUE, off MONTEL HEIGHTS, P.O.Box N-3331 is
applying to the Minister responsible for Nationality and
Citizenship, for registration/naturalization as a citizen of The
Bahamas, and that any person who knows any reason why
registration/naturalization should not be granted, should
send a written and signed statement of the facts within
twenty-eight days from the 14'* day of May, 2009 to the
Minister responsible for nationality and Citizenship, P.O. Box
N-7147, Nassau, Bahamas.

NOTICE

NOTICE is hereby given that LONA DUMOND HONORAT of #78
MARLEY DRIVE, FREEPORT, GRAND BAHAMA is applying
to the Minister responsible for Nationality and Citizenship,
for registration/naturalization as a citizen of The Bahamas,
and that any person who Knows any reason why registration/
naturalization should not be granted, should send a written and
signed statement of the facts within twenty-eight days from the
14TH day of MAY, 2009 to the Minister responsible for Nationality
and Citizenship, P.O.Box N-7147, Freeport, Bahamas.

Legal Notice

NOTICE

JOHN WELL CORPORATION LTD.

— 4 —
Notice is hereby given that in accordance with Section 138
(8) of the International Business Companies Act 2000, the
dissolution of JOHN WELL CORPORATION LTD. has
been completed; a Certificate of Dissolution has been is-
sued and the Company has therefore been struck off the

Register.

ARGOSA CORP. INC.
(Liquidator)

Legal Notice

NOTICE
ANDROMEDA FOUNTAIN S.A.

— *,—

Notice is hereby given that in accordance with Section 138
(8) of the International Business Companies Act 2000, the
dissolution of ANDROMEDA FOUNTAIN S.A. has been
completed; a Certificate of Dissolution has been issued and

the Company has therefore been struck off the Register.

ARGOSA CORP. INC.
(Liquidator)

Legal Notice

NOTICE

WOLF BANE HOLDINGS LIMITED

— f—

Notice is hereby given that in accordance with Section 138
(8) of the International Business Companies Act 2000, the
dissolution of WOLF BANE HOLDINGS LIMITED
has been completed; a Certificate of Dissolution has been
issued and the Company has therefore been struck off the

Register.

ARGOSA CORP. INC.
(Liquidator)

Dairy
Queen

— DOs

Now Hiring

Assistant Managers

* Must have at least 2 years management ar
supervisory experience, preferably in food
service,

* Must have good communication and leadership
skills.

Fax resume to 394-4938 or complete application at
DO stores at Town Centre Mall or Harbour Bay
Shopping Centre.





Legal Notice

NOTICE

GRACEFUL MANTA LIMITED

— 4, —
Notice is hereby given that in accordance with Section 138
(8) of the International Business Companies Act 2000, the
dissolution of GRACEFUL MANTA LIMITED has been

completed; a Certificate of Dissolution has been issued and

the Company has therefore been struck off the Register.

ARGOSA CORP. INC.
(Liquidator)

Legal Notice

NOTICE

SENZINA GROUP LTD.

— 4, —
Notice is hereby given that in accordance with Section 138
(8) of the International Business Companies Act 2000, the
dissolution of SENZINA GROUP LTD. has been com-
pleted; a Certificate of Dissolution has been issued and the

Company has therefore been struck off the Register.

ARGOSA CORP. INC.
(Liquidator)

Legal Notice

NOTICE

LANESDERRY
INVESTMENTS PTE. LTD.
ee ¢, ae
Notice is hereby given that in accordance with Section 138
(8) of the International Business Companies Act 2000, the
dissolution of LANESDERRY INVESTMENTS PTE.
LTD. has been completed; a Certificate of Dissolution has
been issued and the Company has therefore been struck off

the Register.

ARGOSA CORP. INC.
(Liquidator)

Legal Notice

NOTICE

SHIFTSFIELD INVESTMENTS LTD.
— 4) —

Notice is hereby given that in accordance with Section 138
(8) of the International Business Companies Act 2000, the
dissolution of SHIFTSFIELD INVESTMENTS LTD.
has been completed; a Certificate of Dissolution has been
issued and the Company has therefore been struck off the

Register.

ARGOSA CORP. INC.
(Liquidator)
PAGE 12B, THURSDAY, MAY 21, 2009

THE TRIBUNE





EU, China to tackle climate
change amid tensions

@ By AOIFE WHITE
AP Business Writer

PRAGUE (AP) — EU and
Chinese leaders vowed Wednes-
day to tackle climate change
together and boost trade — but
tensions over Tibet were still
showing as China warned
Europe not to interfere in its
internal affairs.

Talks in Prague saw the Euro-
pean Union and China get back
to talking business five months
after the Chinese canceled an

earlier summit because French
President Nicolas Sarkozy met
the Dalai Lama, the religious
leader who Beijing accuses of
seeking Tibetan independence
from China.

Chinese Premier Wen Jiabao
told reporters the two sides must
"stick to the principles of mutu-
al respect and noninterference
in each other's internal affairs."

The EU countered that
human rights would remain a
Key part of future talks with Chi-
na. Czech President Vaclav

NOTICE

NOTICE is hereby given that ELIE RONY ETIENNE
of AUGUSTA STREET is applying to the Minister
responsible for Nationality and Citizenship, for registration/
naturalization as a citizen of The Bahamas, and that

any person who knows any reason why registration/

naturalization should not be granted, should send
a written and signed statement of the facts within
twenty-eight days from the 14 day of May, 2009 to the
Minister responsible for nationality and Citizenship, P.O. Box
N-7147, Nassau, Bahamas.

Part-time Accountant:

For Growing Franchise Group

Main Responsibilities:



Klaus, whose country holds the
rotating EU presidency, said the
issue was “something that we in
Europe consider extremely
important.”

EU Commission President
Jose Manuel Barroso said both
regions were determined to
build relations and "make a real
difference on the road to seal
the (United Nations climate
change) deal in Copenhagen by
the end of the year" and to
restarting World Trade Organi-
sation talks on a global trade
agreement.

"We now need the clear
engagement of all major
economies to make the deal pos-
sible," he said, calling on China,
the US and others to clearly
state how far they were ready
to go to reduce greenhouse gas
emissions.

The Copenhagen talks aim to
set new global targets for car-
bon dioxide cuts, replacing the
UN Kyoto Protocol after it
expires in 2012. Experts say
emissions must peak in 2015 and
then fall by half by 2050 to limit
global warming.

Wen was supportive, saying
China wanted "a positive out-

come" from the negotiations.

"In spite of the international
financial crisis, the international
community must not waver in
its resolve ... to address the cli-
mate," he said.

But he repeated Beijing's view
that the brunt of the effort must
be borne by richer nations such
as the US and the EU — and
not China which "still remains
a developing country.”

"China stands ready to work
with the European Union," he
said — but tempered this by say-
ing they should stick to "com-
mon but differentiated respon-
sibility.”

The two sides want concrete
progress on reducing emissions
and struck a deal to develop
"clean coal" technology that
would help China curb the car-
bon dioxide emissions from coal-
fired power stations.

Wen tried to ease tensions
over China's massive trade sur-
plus with the EU — its major
export market — by saying Chi-
na would buy more EU imports
and would send a business dele-
gation on a multibillion shop-
ping spree in recession-hit
Europe.

NOTICE

* Recording of all journal entries

* Handling accounts payable functions

* Preparing submission for franchisers

* Preparing financial statements

* Devising & monitoring internal cantrols

Qualifications:

Applicants should possess Bachelors degree in











Notice is hereby given that the Twenty-ninth
(29th) Annual General Meeting of THE

PUBLIC WORKERS’

CO-OPERATIVE

CREDIT UNION LIMITED will be held at
The British Colonial
Bay Street, on Friday, June 12th, 2009
commencing at 6:30 p.m. for the following

Accounting, at beast 5 years experience, knowledge af
retail/food accounting, be praficient in Quickbooks
and MS Office applications, must be able to multi
task, work with minimum supervision and possess a
high level of integrity and professionalism.

Fax application/resume to 364-2470

Clico (Bahamas) Limited
(In Liquidation)

LIQUIDATOR’S NOTICE

Policyholders of Clico (Bahamas) Limited (in Liquida-
tion) are advised that premium payments and other policy
transactions can be made at the Company’s main office,
located on Mt. Royal Avenue and Carew Street, Nassau,
Bahamas.

Policyholders and the public are further advised that office
hours are from 9:00 am to 4:30 pm daily.

Craig A. (Tony) Gomez
Official Liquidator

purposes:





Hilton Hotel, West

- To receive the report of the Board




of Directors

* To receive the Audited Report for 2008



* To elect members of the Board
of Directors, Supervisory Committee
and Credit Committee

- To discuss and approve the budget

for 2010

All eligible members, wishing to run for

a position on the
Supervisory

Committee or

Board of Directors,
Credit

Committee, are asked to submit their names
to the Credit Union’s offices in Nassau or
Freeport, no later than Monday, June 8th,

2009 by 4:00 p.m.

All members are urged to attend and
Exciting door prizes will be offered.
Refreshments will be served!

ROYAL = FIDELITY

Boney at Work

BISX LISTED & TRADED SECURITIES AS OF:
TUESDAY, 19 MAY 2009

BISX ALL SHARE INDEX: CLOSE 1,615.53 | CHG 0.36 | %CHG 0.02 | YTD -96.83 | YTD % -5.65

FINDEX: CLOSE 795.46 | YTD 4.72% | 2008 -12.31%

WWW.BISXBAHAMAS.COM | TELEPHONE:242-323-2330 | FACSIMILE: 242-323-2320

Security
Abaco Markets

Bahamas Property Fund
Bank of Bahamas
Benchmark

Bahamas Waste

Fidelity Bank

Cable Bahamas

Colina Holdings
Commonwealth Bank ($1)
Consolidated Water BDRs
Doctor's Hospital
Famguard

Finco

FirstCaribbean Bank
Focol ($)

Focol Class B Preference
Freeport Concrete

ICD Utilities

J. S. Johnson

Premier Real Estate

Previous Close
1.40

11.00

6.95

0.63

3.15

2.37

11.75

2.83

3.15
1.95
11.09
2.83
6.06
1.31
1.38

6.23
2.97
1.53
6.02
11.00
10.35
5.00
1.00
0.30
5.50
8.60
10.00

7.76
11.00
10.40

5.14

1.00

0.30

5.50
10.50
10.00

BISX LISTED DEBT SECURITIES - (Bonds trade

Today's Close

Change Daily Vol.
1.40
11.00
6.95
0.63
3.15
2.37
11.75
2.83
6.25
3.08
1.38
7.76
11.00
10.40
5.14
1.00
0.30
5.50
10.50
10.00

o0000000000000000
eocooooeos33000000000
Cocco ounsanogg00g500g

360

oo
eo
oo

0.00

EPS $

-0.877

Div $ P/E
0.127
0.992
0.244

11.1
28.5
N/M
0.078 40.4
0.055 43.1
1.406 8.4
0.249 11.4
0.419 14.9
0.111 27.7
0.240 5.8
18.5
34.2

0.420
0.322
0.794 13.1
0.332 15.5
0.000 N/M
0.035 B86
13.5
11.0
55.6

0.407
0.952
0.180

on a Percentage Pricing bases)

While China may escape a
recession this year, it will suffer
from plunging exports to the US
and the 27-nation EU which
bought some euro248 billion of
Chinese goods last year —
dwarfing the EU's euro78.4 bil-
lion in exports to China.

Wen also called for the EU to
"lift its arms embargo against
China as early as possible.”

Wen tried to assure the Euro-
peans that they would not be
shut out by China's growing role
in world affairs. "Some say that
the world affairs will be man-
aged solely by China and the
United States. That view is base-
less and wrong,” he said.

Wen was greeted by around
a hundred Chinese citizens out-
side Prague castle, who waved
Chinese and Czech flags and
held banners saying “we love

you, the Chinese people love
you."

Wang Xin, a 28-year-old
restaurant owner from the Czech
town of Liberec, waved a banner
saying 'Premier Wen, you must
be tired!’

"He works so hard, always the
first to be where something hap-
pens, he flies 12 hours to Prague
to spend four hours with offi-
cials and then he flies back. He
should take care of his health,"
said Wang, who shut the restau-
rant for the day to come and
greet Wen.

Pro-Chinese demonstrations
far outnumbered a small protest
by members of the Falun Gong
— a spiritual movement that
Beijing calls an evil cult.

¢ Associated Press writers
Karel Janicek and Ondrej Hejma
contributed to this story













NOTICE is hereby given that KENRICK KORDELL
LIGHTBOURNE of SEA GRAPE, EIGHT MILE ROCK, GRAND
BAHAMA is applying to the Minister responsible for Nationality
and Citizenship, for registration/naturalization as a citizen of
The Bahamas, and that any person who knows any reason why
registration/ naturalization should not be granted, should send a
written and signed statement of the facts within twenty-eight days
from the 21st day of MAY, 2009 to the Minister responsible for
Nationality and Citizenship, P.O.Box N-7147, Freeport, Bahamas.

PUBLIC NOTICE

INTENT TO CHANGE NAME BY DEED POLL

The Public is hereby advised that |, GATHANIE LOETTA
CHEA nee ROLLE of Blair Estates in the Eastern District of
the Island of New Providence, intends to change my name
to GATHNIE LOETTA CHEA nee ROLLE. If there are any
objections to this change of name by Deed Poll, you may
write such objections to the Chief Passport Officer, PO.Box

N-742, Nassau, Bahamas no later than thirty (30) days after
the date of publication of this notice.

LEGAL NOTICE OF DISSOLUTION
NOTICE

INTERNATIONAL BUSINESS COMPANIES ACT
(No.45 of 2000)

In Voluntary Liquidation

Notice is hereby given in accordance with Section 138 (8) of
the International Business Companies Act, (No.45 of 2000),
SABLEDOR HOLDINGS LTD. has been completed, a Cer-
tificate of Dissolution has been issued and the Company has
therefore been struck off the Register. The date of completion
of the dissolution was the 13th day of May, 2009.

po,
ar

Siped: —eee

Salen Baber EbDin Mounib EL Sac

DL iquigia tr

ae
Te as
NAD

Nassau Airport
Devolopmgnt Company

Environmental Coordinator

The Massau Airport Dewelopment Gompany (MAD) is
Sheting candicates for the postion of Environmental
Coordinator. The dutias and reaponaibiliies of the
successful agglicant will indude researching, planning and
‘atiling environmental procedures. and plans, conducting
reguiar imepection of company and tenant facilites and
acing as a liaison ath goverment agendes and
coniraciars on environmental matters.

The ideal candidate will have a minimum of an Assoriaies

S2wk-Low
1000.00
1000.00
1000.00
1000.00

Security
Fidelity Bank Note 17 (Series A) +
Fidelity Bank Note 22 (Series B) +
Fidelity Bank Note 13 (Series C) +
Fidelity Bank Note 15 (Series D) +

Last Sale
100.00
100.00

Maturity
19 October 2017
19 October 2022
30 May 2013
29 May 2015

Symbol Interest
FEB17

FBB22

Change Daily Vol.
0.00 7%
0.00 Prime + 1.75%

FBB13 100.00 0.00 7%
FBB15 100.00 0.00 18 Prime + 1.75%

Fidelity Over-The-Counter Securities

Bid $ Ask $ Last Price
7.92 8.42 14.60
4.00 6.25 6.00
0.35 0.40 0.35
Colina Over-The-Counter Securities
30.13 31.59 29.00
0.45 0.55 0.55
BISX Listed Mutual Funds
NAV YTD% Last 12 Months
1.3664 0.95 4.77
2.8962 -1.49 -3.35
1.4590 1.77 5.09
3.1964 -5.59 -13.64
12.7397 0.96 5.793
100.5606
96.4070
1.0000
9.1599
1.0440
1.0364 0.33
1.0452 0.76
MARKET TERMS
YIELD - last 12 month dividends divided by closing price
nd Fidelity

dertihying environmental issues, knowledge of
anviranmantal field monitoring protocols and the ability to
manage environmental programs fram inceplian ta
complebon

52wk-Low Symbol
14.25 Bahamas Supermarkets
6.00 Caribbean Crossings (Pref)
0.20 RND Holdings

Weekly Vol. EPS $ Div $ P/E
0.300
0.480

0.000

29.00 ABDAB
0.40 RND Holdings

0.000
0.000
52wk-Low COMSI Sian! WRN Gpenence and qualihcaions.
1.3041
2.9230
1.3883
3.1964
12.1564
100.0000
96.4070
1.0000
9.0950
1.0000
1.0000
1.0000

Eund Name Div $ Yield %
Colina Bond Fund

Colina MSI Preferred Fund
Colina Money Market Fund
Fidelity Bahamas G & 1 Fund
Fidelity Prime Income Fund
CFAL Global Bond Fund
CFAL Global Equity Fund
CFAL High Grade Bond Fund

28-Feb-09
31-Mar-09
41-May-09
31-Mar-09
28-Feb-09
31-Dec-08
31-Dec-08
31-Dec-07
31-Mar-09
9-Feb-09
9-Feb-09
9-Feb-09

For more details, please visit our website al
Wwww.nas.bs

0.56
-3.59
0.00
0.71
0.80

0.56
-3.59
0.00
-12.76
4.40
3.64
4.40

Fidelity International Investment Fund
FSG Financial Preferred Income Fund
FG Financial Growth Fund

FG Financial Diversified Fund

Hyot are qealtied and interested please sutra
your resume by Mary 23, 208 to

Managar People

Nassau Alpert Devalopmant Go

FO. Box AP Se228

Massau, Saher

Onty hoes applicants chor beled wil be contacted

BISX ALL SHARE INDEX - 19 Dec 02 = 1,000.00
ing price in last 52 weeks
last 52 weeks
ighted price for daily volume

Bid $ - Buying price of Goli

Ask $ - Selling pri

Last Price - Last

Today's Clo

Change - Gh

Daily Vol. - Number

DIV $ - Dividends p he last 12 months

PIE - Closing price led by the last 12 month earnin gs

KS) - 4-for-1 Stock Split - Effective Date 8/8/2007

KS41) - 3-for-1 Stock Split - Effective Date 7/11/2007
TO TRADE CALL: COLINA 242-502-7010 | ROYALFIDELITY 242-356-7764 | FG CAPITAL MARKETS 242-395-4000 | COLONIAL 242-502-7525

hted price for daily volume
om day to day
raded today

Weekly Vo
EPS $-Ac

glume of the prior week
ported earnings per share for the last 12 mths

NAMI - Not Meanin gful
FINDEX - The Fidelity Bahamas Stock Index. January 1, 1994 = 100


PAGE 14B, THURSDAY, MAY 21, 2009



THE communications industry regu-
lator will adopt a “light touch” approach
will overseeing competition in the sector,
a leading member of the committee
overseeing the reforms has pledged.

Julian Francis, deputy chairman of the
committee overseeing the Bahamas
Telecommunications Company’s (BTC)
privatisation, said the Utilities Regula-

You can TRUST a health plan that delivers

tion and Competition Authority
(URCA) would oversee the liberalised
communications market and technology
convergence, while also overseeing com-
petition.

“The Communications Act is a very
far reaching piece of legislation. I would
say it is quite innovative in our environ-
ment. It essentially empowers the regu-

on its promise.

a,
—

lator, and it establishes the transitional
arrangements which will be necessary to
move us from the current environment
to the new, liberalised environment,”
Mr Francis said.

“The Communications Act also pro-
vides the authority for the regulator to
adjudicate on issues of competition or
unfair practice or anti-trust. This, as you

in
aH

ATLANTIC
MEDICAL

ATLANTIC MEDICAL INSURANCE CO. LTD.
Aclantic House, 2nd Terrace & Collins Avenue, P.O. Box 55-5915, Nassau Tel. 326-8191
Suite 5, jasmine Corporate Cencer, East Sunrise Highway, PO. Box F-42655, Freeport Tel. 351-3960

A member of Colonial Group International Insurance, Health, Pensions, Lite

THE TRIBUNE

=
Communications regulator will be ‘light touch’

know, doesn’t exist in legislation at all
today in the Bahamas, and it is critical to
the liberalisation of the environment that
we have a level playing field in place
and that we have the means to guarantee
that level playing field.”

Some, especially Cable Bahamas,

SEE page 7B



JULIAN FRANCIS

Atlantic Medical

Atlantic Medical the market leading health insurance
provider because rt offers the best care at the best
possitte pice
Your health care & a very important part of your life, so

itis reassuring WT you know your plan and your insurance

ITOWIOeE WA Qe OF Care, beneits ANd Service Winer

ese] it,

YOu can enjoy that reassurance with Atlantic Medical. Just
ask ary one of SOL0O0 health plan members who trust
Colonial Group International to veork for them day-in,
day-ourt, at home or overseas.

and value

Peaple trust Atlant Medical for care, service

that really rakes a difference and makes sure you will

receive the best health cover rrianey can bury

ict >

Coleedal Group ternational a

fisted A-[Esocel beret) bey AM! Bees.


The Tribune oo"
OBIMUARIES
RELIGION



\ -< The Tribune
OLD | tty Arcee, My Newspaper!

—‘\ ene
» \0
707.9

SS hour chaice for ihe family:












PAGE 2, THURSDAY, MAY 21, 2009

CARD OF THANKS

Mabel Edith Jenoure pee Higgs)
13th November 1926 - 5th April 2009
Awoman of great strength
Known by God

Her children call her mother, they rise and fall on her
own words, she may stumble, but she has her children
and her strong faith steadies her. They need her, they
love her, she loves them so she gives of herself, all she
has, and it is enough more than enough.

90 we accept that her journey is over it is the Lord's will
not ours. He leads to pastures green and his grace and
mercy is our sweet reward. " Yes we do love thee
mother dear whom jesus loves so well". Sleep on
memes dear for you have earned your rest.

simple Words make light of your warm hugs, your kind
gifts, sympathetic touches? knowing eyes, gentle
»
smiles, powerful prayers, encouraging words. We the
familyPare forever indebted to everyone, each and
)¥ _—
every one of you! So the family says

Thanl)you, Thank you, Thank you.







RIB OBITUARI

KEMP'S FUNERAL HOME LIMITED

22 Palmdale Avenue, Palmdale
Nassau, N.P., The Bahamas

eS

A service of thanksgiving for the life of

FREDA MARY
RUSSELL, B.E.M., 97

of Lakeview Avenue,
Nassau, The Bahamas,
who died peacefully at her
home on Sunday, 10th
May, 2009, will be held at
St. Andrew's Presbyterian
Kirk, Princes Street,
Nassau, on Saturday, 23rd
May, 2009 at 11:00 a.m.













Reverend Charles A.

Sweeting and Mr. Ronald

Atkinson will officiate and

interment will be in

Ebenezer Methodist

Cemetery, East Shirley
Street, Nassau.

Freda Mary Russell (née Paget) was born in Bangalore,
India on September Sth, 1911 where her father, a
methodist minister was serving at the time. She was
predeceased by her husband, Mr. C. Seighbert Russell
in 1992, her elder sister, Eileen and a younger brother,
Donald.

In October, 1932 she and her family arrived in the Bahamas
where her father had been appointed chairman of the
Methodist churches. She began teaching kindergarten
at Queen's College in January, 1933 and remained there
until December, 1964. She was honoured with a British
Empire Medal in 2002 for her work in the field of education.

Mrs. Russell was a truly remarkable person and her loving
and caring spirit will be missed by all who knew her. She
is survived by her nephews and niece; Terry and Kathy
Russell, Colleen and Ron Springle, Don and Joan Russell,
Tommy and Cynthia Russell, and other family members
in England, particularly Margaret Williams, Celia Westhead
and Keith Paget. A special thank you to her church family
who cared for her over the years and to Karen Thompson
her companion and friend.

In lieu of flowers, donations may be made to The Salvation
Army, P.O. Box N-205, Nassau, in memory of MRS.
FREDA M. RUSSELL.

Arrangements by Kemp's Funeral Home Limited.












THURSDAY, MAY 21, 2009, PAGE 3









mM
*O



THE TRIBUNE OBITUARIE











IN LOVING MEMORY
&
TO OUR MOTHER HAPPY BIRTHDAY

ROSELLA BOSTWICK
SUNRISE: MAY 24, 1936
SUNSET: OCTOBER 13TH, 2008

Mother, Grandmother, Friend

Mammy we miss you $0 very much
Your birthday and our first "Mother's Day” without you was $0 hard;
And not just then, but every minute,
Since you went away.
You were the centre of our lives
It's just $0 dificault for us to believe that you are really gone.
But we celebrate the life you lived and all the things you gave us,’

We think of you with hearts so full of love;
we are looking up at you, sweet Mother dearest,
as you look at us from above.

acai lcalyn, Vanessa and Sanya, aint and great-qrand children.
Until we meet again, we love you!!!

CARD OF THANKS

special thanks is extended to all those who played a significant part in our mother's life; The family, of Bahamas Holy, Bible
Mission Church, especially Pastor Frankie Scott and family, Percy and ane Sands and family, Yvonr ne Si Simmons and family,
Pastor Jacob Adderley and family. Golden Gates World Outreach Ministry’ Pastor Bernie, Mossyand| family, Bishop Ricardo
and Elder Shandelene Grant, Bishop Victor Cooper, Bishop VG Clarke and Elder, Newry and family4Bishop Mott and family,
BTC family especially the Human Resources Department, Jonice Lockhart, Kim Woodside and IvyWalkes, Ruth Ferguson
and family, Pedro Roberts and staff of Sparkle Wash Laundromat, Baker's Construction, Police Prosecution office especially
Bank Lane and Nassau street courts, Superintend Glen Miller and family, Ted and Gloria Thompson, Julieann Ferguson and
family, Betty Pearce and family, Janice Cleare, Margaret Robinson, Shirley Major” Mrs. Cumberbatch and staff of D'C
collection, Blonvea Brice and family, Keva Clarke and famil, Pastor Bethel and Amazing Art Family, N Neighbors of Cordeaux
Avenue off East Street, Management and staff of Demerittes Funeral Home and the Management and staff of, Woodlawn
Garden and others to numerous to mention. Thank\you and God bless: fi;














PAGE 4, THURSDAY, MAY 21, 2009





THE TRIBUNE OBITUARI













Yager funeral Home & Crematorium

Queen’s Highway
PO. Box F-40288, Freeport, Grand Bahama, Bahamas
Tel: 352-8118 © Paging: 352-6222 #1724
Fax: 351-3301

Me

| Saturday from 11:30 a.m. until service time.

ENID
LEWIS, 79

and a resident of Hunters, |
Grand Bahama, will be held ;
on Saturday, May 23, 2009 at :
1:00 p.m. at St. Vincent de :
Catholic Church, :
Hunters, Grand Bahama. :
Officiating will be Father :
Reginald Demeritte, assisted |
by Deacon Jeffrey Hollingsworth. Interment will follow in : \

Paul

the Hunter's Public Cemetery.

Wellington Williams; one daughter-in-law: Elizabeth Smith;

law: Granville Lewis, Oswald Williams and Harold Laing

Wright, Benjamin Grant, Mrs. Benson, St. Vincent de Paul
Church family, the entire communinities of Mack Town,

at The Rand Memorial Hospital.

JERELENE
CHRISTINA
COOPER, 82

a resident of Freetown, Grand
Bahama and formerly of
Cooper's Town, Abaco will

_ | beheld on Saturday, May 23
Ps) 2009 at 11:00 a.m. at New
fo) Zion Baptist Church,
ra Freetown, Grand Bahama.
Officiating will be Rev. Preston

Cherished memories will always remain with her children: | poo a Seo eee ote een
Jerome, Joycelyn, Marrietta, Arnold, Randolph Jr., Elias, | ¥

heat De suniiand Caoneleare tan eeoaaere ! Left to cherish her memories are her five children: Victoria
Arimelda Nairn and Louise DeGregory: one stepbrother: : Jordine, Leo Cooper, Pastor Dudley Cooper, Rosemary
: _ ? (Joy) Mcintosh and Lillian Cooper; 18 grandchildren:

. . : ; : Verona, Craig, Avril and David Jordine, Lashanda Cooper,
three sons-in-law: Roosevelt Wright, Fritto Michelle and : is ‘
Leonard Basden; 15 grandchildren: Rosario, Rocco, : D udley Jr. Asher, Jephtae, Elijah, Esther and Lydia Cooper,
Latoya, Lindsey, Erica, Amado, Aiesha, Anasika, Ricardo, | JUStin Feaster, Alvareze and Evanka Roxbury, Faye Cooper,
Vanessa, Antoinette, Rickeya, Bruce Jr., Lenricka and : Renardo Smith, Vieto Pinder and Marcus Cooper; 13
Leonard Jr.; six great grandchildren: Tominitra, Andre, : es shale eon wae Sede Enda CEE
Arrianna, Alliano, Laniya and Jernesko; one uncle; : \\0'@MS, Aarion hoagers, Muintina Bonaby, Mevonia
Osbourne Lewis; one aunt-in-law: Althea Lewis; five | ou ee sol at er ellelclba end a-ak
sisters-in-law: Geneva and Garnell Lewis, Lorraine and | 7a" nt sath and N caiinaiiea ce Seat aie
Delphine Russell and Lillian Williams; three brothers-in- | weap — eee ene Leena Maes eee

| law: Barbara Cooper and Etta Cooper and a host of other

; ; . = : relatives and friends including Samuel, Ortnell and Floyd

Sr, and a host of other relatives and friends including: | .

Anna Lewis, lva Rolle, Elta Jones, Verlene Bain pacdie ; Lowe, Ettamae Albury, Maggie Lowe, Theresa Murray,
: ‘ Edmund and Jerord Russell, Leroy, Harry, Lenard and

‘ Joan Sands, Washington Smith, McDonald Cooper,

2 Communities Of Mex ' Elizabeth Kemp, Eloise Kelly, Boston Cooper, Jerelene
Hunters, Lewis Yard, Pinder's Point, Eight Mile Rock, | ainury Carlton Roxbury, Clifton Laing and families and
Williams and Russell Town, Winn Dixie family, Nurse : th it f Freet fend Gal

Sears, Hawksbill Clinic, the Medical and Surgical Wards : *"" COMMUN OF Freetown, Mrang panama.

! Relatives and friends may pay their respects at Yager

; : : Funeral Home & Crematorium, Queens Highway on Friday
Relatives and friends may pay their respects at Yager : . a e.

Funeral Home & Crematorium, Queens Highway on Friday | de ects Hep SE ately ee
from 12:00 noon until 6:00 p.m. and at the church on | ¥ aed



ES






E TRIBUNE OBITUAR

dar Crest funeral Home

DIGNITY IN SERVICE











mM
*





pbinson Road and First Street « P.0.Box N-603 * Nassau, NLP, Bahamas

Telephone: 1-242-325-5168/328-1944/393-1352
Funeral Service For

JEPHETH LEWIS
RAHMING, 65

a resident of #20 Cerusus Avenue,
Garden Hilts #2, and formerty of Burnt
Ground, Long Island will be held 11:00
am., Sunday, May 24th, 2009 at
Hillview Seventh Day Adventist
Church, Tonique Williams Darling
Highway. Officiating will be Pastor
} Peter Joseph, assisted by other
Ministers. interment will be made in
Woodlawn Gardens, Soldier Road.

Left with chershed memories are his
loving and devoted wife, Zilpha
Liewilyn; five sons, Jepheth Jr. Jeffrey), Berkley Rahming, Craig P.
Curtis, Tracey J. Rahming (Deceased) and Wayne Rahming; six daughters,
Paulette Adderley, Michelle Rahming-Cartwright, Shindy Rahming,
Marietta Fowler, Dendra Gardiner and Candice Rahming; two brothers,
Albert and Georges Aahming: three sisters, Kathléan Brice of McKanns,
Long Island, Sarah Hahming and Estelle Farrington; four sons-in-law,
Frankie Adderley, Keith Fowler, Steven Gartwright and Lukandah Gardiner
Sr; two daughters-in-law, Charmaine Curtis and Leotha Rahming: twanty
two grandchildren, Gabrielle, Michael, Briana and Britany Gartwright,
Thristain and Graig Curtis Jr, Alexis, Tracell, Tanaj and Tracey Rahming
Jr, Khyi, Khailah, Lukandah Jr, Krystal and Keiandria Fowler, Ramone,
Tonanna, Charnene, Jena and Alicia Rahming, Radelle Stuart; sisters-
in-law, Rev. Barbara Rahming, Marie Rahming, Patience Clarke, Sonia
Davis, Jennifer Rolle, and Leani Wilson; brothers-in-law, Kermit, Vivian,
van, Isaac, Lynden and Nemiah Rolle, Patrick Wilson and Samuel Davis:
nieces and nephews, Randalph, Kevin, Albert Jr, Richardo, Desmond,
Thar, Stephen and Latario Rahming, Yorick Jr and Charles Brice, Leo
Farrington, Jamal Grant, Marisa, Adene and Rochelle Rahming, Sabrina
Brice, Gladys and Joseph Deal, Maxine and Angelo Bannister, Vanria
and Bertrum Cambridge, Lisa and lan Greene, Advara and Ken Joos,
Lynnishna and Brian Wilson, Debra and Herbert Bain, Lynn and Eric
Gibson, Linda and Lawerence Lightbourne, Kendal, Nicole, Franklyn,
Nancy, Lesle, Avis, Peter and Shannell Rahming, Carol and Kirkwood
Braynen, Leslie and Olivia Barr, Shawn and Mark Rolle, Kenwood, Ryan
and Kendera Hanna, Patrick Jr. and Michael Wilson, Jaketo, Dale and
Janell McPhee, Shantia Rolle Bethel, Quenten Rolla, Sasha Davis,
Cheryl, Antoinette, Cheryl, Charles, Jetfrey and Austin Clarke, Estella
Gibson, Hréula, Collins, Kermit Jr, Oniel, Vena, Marklyn, Jason and
Fannie Rolla, Sabrina Lockhart and Kava Burrows; sixty two grand
nieoes and nephews and other relatives and thends including, Vandeola
Bridgewater and farnily, Laura Graham and family of Delray Beach,
Florida, Lawerence Thomas, William, Clifford and Jamas Adderlay,
Evelina and Ruth Smith, Rev. Alphonso and Rev. James Shereer and
family, Mary Johnson and family, Basil Rahming and family, Mary Hanna
and family, Thelma Brice and family, June Adderlay and family, Anna
Musgrove and family, Gar Broce and family, Gladys Brice and family,
Hortence Rahming and family, Vernal Adderley and family, Jalotta
Rehming and family, Rev. Helen McPhee and family, Veronica Curtis,
Geleste Rolle, Eurydice Dean and family, Beverley Collins and family,
Alice Albury and family, Charity Braynen and family, Albertha Hall and
family, Franklyn Cubmer and family, Cedric Johnson and family, Orniel
Kemp and family, Sandra Simms and family, his life bong friend, Livingstone
Munroe, Doctors and Nurses of Male Medical Ill Ward Princess Margaret
Hospital, the entire community of Garden Hills #2 and others too
numerous to mention.

Relatives and friends may pay their respects at Cedar Crest Funeral
Home, Robinson Road and First Street on Saturday from 10am to Gem
and at the church on Sunday from 9:30am until service time.



U

THURSDAY, MAY 21, 2009,









AGE



Commonwealth Funeral Home

Pe Independence Drive ¢ Phone: 341-4055 —

FUNERAL SERVICE FOR

Terrance Berlin Cleare, 26
affectionately called "Bounty"

of Harbour Island, will be held
on Saturday 11:00a.m. at
Wesley Methodist Church
Harbour Island. Rev. Charles
Sweeting assisted by Rev.
Godfrey Bethell will officiate
and interment will follow in St.
Catherine's Cemetery Harbour
Island.

Left to cherish his memories
are his mother, Donna Cleare;
father, Terrance Roberts; one
daughter, Dashanti; step-
mother, Joanna Roberts; step-
father, Glen Higgs; three
sisters, Terika and Terishka
Cleare and Tamika Roberts;
four brothers, Gerrick and
Ganton Higgs, Tevin Roberts and
Joachim Cleare; one adopted sister, Suzanne Oliver; grand-mother,
Joyce Roberts; grand-father, Berlin Cleare; step grand-mother, Patricia
Cleare; one nephew, Macallan DeCosta; seven aunts, Roshelle, Valeria,
Nola and Ellen Roberts, Romilly Higgs, Loretta Johnson, Rosemary
Daniels; four uncles, Freddie and James Roberts, Dudley and Rockwell
Cleare; numerous cousins and other relatives including, Pam Cleare,
Andrew Johnson, Harry Neely, Debbie Sawyer, Wendy Collie, Agatha
Capron, Ruth Bynoe, Eloise Roberts, Miriam Cleare, Irene Davis, Patricia
Lewis, Ena Taylor, Ferris Higgs, Vincent and Joseph Cleare, Allen and
Wallace Saunders, Stephanie Cleare and Godparents, Patricia Fisher, Don
and Marsha, Fredrick Higgs, Terry Johnson; one (1) Godchild, Sincere
Brennen; special friends, Ivanette, Dennis, Owen, Darren, Stephen, Deon,
William, Karon, Clint, Marcia and Leonard Carey; neighbours and
friends including: Mrs Jacqueline Percentie and family; Mrs. Julia Barry
and family; Mr. and Mrs. Carl Higgs; Mr. and Mrs. Percival (Summer)
Johnson and family; Kathleen Major and family; Jessilee Mackey and
family; Romell Rolle and family, Eloise Sawyer and family, Mr. and Mrs.
Joseph Saunders and family; Eva Lorraine Sawyer and family; Nora
Albury and family; Mr. and Mrs. Michael Knowles and family; Mr. and
Mrs. Paul Percentie and family; Mr. and Mrs. Craig Lewis and family;
Luann and Shelly Saunders; Mr. and Mrs. Stuart Cleare and family; Brian
Neely and family; Sally Rolle and family; Loretta Miller and family;
Nina Davis and family; Patrice Barry and family; Mr. and Mrs. John
Sawyer and family; Susan Davis and family; the Higgs family; Joann
Cleare and family; Bertam Sawyer and family; Nita Curry and family;
Vhaul Thompson and family; Cleo Mather and family; Victoria Ferguson
and family, Cecil Boyd.; Mr. and Mrs. Jeremiah Neely and family, Mr
and Mrs. Dencil Higgs and family; Church of God family, Methodist
Church family, Catholic Church and family, Church of God of Prophecy
family, Coral Sands and Pink Sands staff, Harbour Island Community
Clinic, "da bottom crew" and the entire community of Harbour Island
and Eleuthera.

Relatives and friends may view the remains at THE CHAPEL OF
MEMORIES COMMONWEALTH FUNERAL HOME
INDEPENDENCE DRIVE on Thursday from 4:00-7:30 p.m. and at
Blessed Sacrament Catholic Church on Friday from 3:00- 11:00 p.m. and
at Wesley Methodist Church on Saturday from 9:30 a.m. to service time.
































AGE 6, THURSDAY, MAY 217, 2009 THE TRIBUNE OBITUARIES

NASSAU
Robinson and Soldier Roads, Nassau, MP. Bahamas
P.O. Box CB-12072
Talephone: (242) 394-8043 / (242) 34-8047
Pager: (242) 340-8043 = Fox: (242) 340-8034

FREEPORT
11A East Coral Rood, hg G.B., Bahamas
P.O. Box F 12
Telephone: (242) 373-1115 / (dz) 373-1471
Pager: (242) 340-8043 « Fox: (242) 373-3005

FUNERAL SERVICES FOR

: Special Friend: Andrea Wells; Other relatives and
_ friends: Sherrie Deal, Kimarr Knowles, Alex Plakaris,
- God father: Ralph Hepburn and Andre Moxey, Royal
_ Bahamas Defence Force Entry 44 Team, Crew HMS
Yellow Elder, Soldier Road Family, Deal’s Family
from Palmetto Point, NCA Class of 2006, Lilly Smith
and Family, Francita Saunders and Family, The Bethel
Family, The Johnson family, The McDonald Family,
_ The Davis Family, Gwendolyn Rolle and Family, The
- Thurston Family, The Thompson Family, The Moxey
| Family, The Hepburn and Family, The Crew at Arawak
: Cay, R.M. Bailey Class of 1983 and First Caribbean
: International Bank.

Full Military Funeral Service
for Marine Mechanic

GIOVANEY TRISTAN
DEAL, 20

of Coral Harbour, Coral

Heights will be held on

Thursday, May 21st, 2009 at

11:00am at Zion Baptist

Church East and Shirley Street

Officiating will be Pastor T.G. Morrison, assisted by
Rev. Ulric Smith, Rev. Anthony Sampson, and Rev.
Prince O, Bodie Interment will follow in Lakeview
Memorial Gardens John F. Kennedy Drive &
Gladstone Road.

: Viewing will be held in the Chapel at Restview
_ Memorial Mortuary and Crematorium ltd. Robinson
and Soldier Rods on Wednesday from 10:00am to

6:00pm and at the church from 9:30 am to service

Left to reflect and treasure the memories of this time

magnificent gem, is his father: George “Gio” Deal;

mother: Bridgette Coquillon nee Butler; Step father:

Emmanuel Coquillon; step mother: Nicolette Deal;
brothers: Edward Flowers, Devante Deal and Elton; |
Fifteen Uncles: Vernon, Roy, Fred, Franklyn, Arthur, -
Edmund, and Lincoln Deal, Dr. Frumentus Leon, :
Richard Wright, Franklyn Cox, Ian Storr, Franklyn, -
Anthony, and Decosda Rolle and Godfrey Higgs; :
Seventeen Aunts: Paula Leon, Gertrude Wright, Gloria :
Cox and Anna Storr, Ruth, Mildred, and Stephanie :

DEATH NOTICE

MR. VERNON
HUBERT DEAN,
70

Deal Doreen Deal, Margaret, Marilyn, Juliet, Terry,
Rochelle, Dimples, Beatrice, Estelle Higgs, and |

Beverly Lewis; Cousins: Vernon Jr., & Wernado Deal,
Leroy Jr., Kirklyn, Bernique, & Tanya Deal, Vaughn,
Vanessa, Melissa, Lashanda, Fred Jr., Wernencha,
Fredeca Deal, Mychelyn & Cedric Watson, Frumentia

& Frumentus Jr., Leon, Lamar Deal, Anishka & Corey |
Bain, Arthur Jr., Atia, Arista, Teleichia, Terissa, :
Lynette, Indira, and Lincoln Jr Deal, Felice and Felicia :
Cox, lan Storr and Sherrill; Close second cousins: :

Czaire Watson, Travelle, Taja, and Taylor Bain;

of Ebony Close, Eastern Estates
died at his residence on May
19th, 2009.

He is survived by his wife,
Cleomi Dean; son, Jarrad Dean; sisters, Gloria and
Barbara; brothers, Raliegh and June Dean; numerous
nieces and nephews and a host of other family members
and friends too numerous to mention.

Funeral arrangments will be announced at a later date.




















E TRIBUNE OBITUAR

mM
*O

o

11A Eost Cora Rood. Freep: . GB., Bohamas
PO. Bom F

12
Telephone: (242) 373-1115 / (242) 373-1471
Pager: (242) 340-8043 « Fox: (242) 373-3005



UU





AGE







THURSDAY, MAY 21, 2009,

Retsioe Memoudl Morluary
and Crematouum Limited

Robinson ond ‘ciate uae AP., Bahomeas
P.O. Box CB-12072
Telephone: Gt 394-8043 / (242) 394-8047
Pager: (242) 340-8043 « Fox: (242) 340-8034

FUNERAL OU ICE FOR

MAYRICKA
“Cakka” “Bouncer”
FLOWERS, 51

of Sandy Point, Abaco will be held on
Saturday, May, 2009 at 10:00 a.m. at
Mt. Zion Baptist Church, Sandy, Sandy
Point, Abaco. Officiating will be Rev.
Napolean Roberts. Interment will follow
in the Sandy Point Public Cametery,
Sandy Point, Abaco.

Lait to continue the legacy engendered

by her includes her adopted daughter/niece: Chriselda iTieksi
Flowers; 7 brothers: Percy, Floyd and Clifford Burrows, Ernest,
Lawrance, Hamilton and Dashwell Flowers; 5 sisters: Francilla Burrows,
Elvere Clarke, Elverner St. Luce and Roselda iBonniei O'Brien and
Ettamae Swain; 2 adopted sisters: Mavis McKinney and Keva Dean

, Elsie, Gardenia Fox; 2 brother-in-laws: Mr. Whitney Clarke and =
Christopher O'Brien; 4 sister-in-law: Elsiemae Burrows, Lena Burrows, :
Muriel Burrows & Ruth Flowers; aunt Ms. Daisy Johnson; 14 nephews: =
Godfrey, Wesley, Ferdinand, Kendal, Randolph, Cleatus, Lowell and :
Emery Burrows, Cassinova O’Brien, Daniel & Kendrick Weech, Lavada :
Clarke, Bradley Walks, Mick Davis, Wendel Stuart and EJ; 22 nieces: =
Teika, Tiffany, Lawricka Flowers, Cotisha Hanna, Starlene, Raffaleta, :
Pamela, Kim and Miranda Burrows Christine Barr McGlory, Rev. Margo :
Burrows & Olivia Moss, Paula Symonette, Oeisha Roberts, Sonya, :
Ernestine Lightbourn, Samantha Mather, Raquel Russell, Anissa, and :
Valeka Sweeting, Nurse Shamell Weech, and Olivia Burrows: 5 :
nephews-in-law: Sintenie Greene, Al Russell, Jason Roberts, David :
. 7? nieces-in-law: Velva, Arnette, Dena, Marissa, =
grandnephews: Donte, Keon, Percy Laary, :

Lightbourn and Sand
and Carolyn;
Frederick, Wesley Jr. Neko, Percy Il, Percy Burrows Ill, Brent, Brian,
Malbourne Jr, Quinton, Harold (HJ), Lameko, Randolph Jr, Renaj,
Leon, Scotty, Otis Jr, Kaciano, Printica, Dominique, Godfrey Jr, Renaldo,
Daron, Ansero, Tristen and Hunter; 34 grandnieces: Bianca, Meredith,
Amelia, Ilreana, Shameil, Lynette, Florence, Ashley, Brittany, Petra,
Melicka, Sheena, Paige, Anatacia, Tishna, Phylicia, Trineka, Chloe,
Tiana, Renaysha, Randricka, Rickeah, Aalyah, Shamiah, Destiny,
Majesty, Percia, Tyler, KaiVanya, Alexandria, Asher; godchildren:
Rodenia Roker and Calvanique and a fost of other relatives & friends:
Mr. Giovanni & Mrs. Antonia Johnson and Family, Daisy, Veoshe,
Harrison, Brenda Rolle, Melanie, Nurse Deborah Coakley, Lonza
Prosper, James & Delarese Bowe, Huland McKinney, Frederick Dames,

Mr. Ron ©. Pinder, Mrs. Garnell, Francine Prosper, Nadia Dolce, Ashley |
Rolle, Michael Russell, Viola (Pingie) Small, Mrs.\Valeria Lightbourne, :
Francis, Edith and Denise, Mr. Pat Ruderford, oe Frazier, Barbara :

aphane Bain, Mr :
George & Mrs. Donna Bain, Mr. Anthony & Mrs. Yvonne Bain, Mr. :
Jimmy & Mrs. Annie Greene, Mr. David & Mrs. Leona Green, Mr. Ron :
& Mrs. Laurestine Fox, Mr. Robert & Mildred McKinney, Ms. Annie :
Darville, Mr. Ronnie Thompson, Cynthia Crawford, Theresa Simmons, :
Mrs. Lorine Burrows, Flo Johnson, Beatrice Pier, Inez Poitier, Mr. Greg :
& Mrs, Zelma Bain & Family, Ms. Dolly Russell and Family, Mr. Sam :
Roberts & Farnily, Mr. Aaron and Mr. Jessy Bain, Mr. Edward and Mrs, :
Dolly Pinder and Farnily, Rev. Carrington & Rev. Sabrina Pinder and :

Adderley, Mr. David Stuart, Mrs. Gamie Roker, Mrs.

: Family, Administrator Benjamin Pinder & Family, Mr. Cochies Hanna,
> Mr. Edney Gaitor, Mr. Basil & Mrs. Julia McKinney, Mr. Preston Roberts
: & Family, Stanley White & Family,
: Alice and the entire Crossing
: Community, Sandy Point Public Clinic, and the entire Sandy Point
>: Abaco Community; Extraordinary Efforts: Dr. Trac Roberts, Dr. John
: Lunn, Dr. Locksley Munroe, Dr Wells, Dr. Bullard (
: Department, particularly Nurse Nuvella & Nurse Kallifanie, Nurse Alex,
> PNIH Surgical Clinic, Nurse Shamell Weech, Nurse ria PMH (x-
: ray Dept), Mr Ron ©. Pinder, Percy & Bianca Leary, Meredit

> Frederick Moxey Ill, Ms. Elsiemae Burrows, Mr. Ashlie
: Francine Prosper, Ms. Nadia Dolce, Rev. Carrinton &

; Pinder, Dolly Russell, Mildred McKinney, Shanique Bain & Family, Olivia
| Moss, Ms. Raquel Russell, The Cancer Society of Marsh Harbour.

Rev. Napolean Roberts & Family,
locks Community, Moores Island

E) The Oncology

Willarns,
Rolle, Ms,
ev. Sabrina

Viewing will be held in the Serenity Suitei of Restview Memorial
Mortuary And Crematorium Ltd., Robinson and Soldier Roads, Nassau,
New Providence on Thursday, May 21, 2009, from 10:00 am to 5:00pm.
On Friday at her residence in Sandy Point, Abaco from 4:00 p.m. until
9:30 a.m. on Saturday when the Funeral Procession leaves for the
Church.

DEATH NOTICES

MRS. IVYRENE
REBECCA ROKER, 83

of #29 Albertha Circla, Freaport, Grand
Bahama died at her residence on
Thursday, May 14, 2009.

Funeral arrangements will be announced
at a later date.

MR. WILLY
ROGER JR., 19

of #2 Weddel Avenue, Freeport, Grand
Bahama died at The Rand Memorial
Hospital, Freeport Grand Bahama on
Sunday, May 17, 2009.

Funeral arrangements will be announced
a@ a later date.














PAGE 8, THURSDAY, MAY 21, 2009



THE TRIBUNE OBITUARIE















Aemeritte’s Funeral Aome

BAHAMAS’ OLDEST MORTUARY

FUNERAL SERVICES FOR

Rosetta "Rose" Mary Murphy, 59

)) a resident of Ragged Island Street and :
formerly of Betsy Bay, Mayaguana, who
died on 11 May, 2009, will be held at Zion ;
Baptist Church, East & Shirley Streets, :
on Saturday at 2:30 p.m. Officiating will ;
be Reverend Kevin A. Collie, assisted by }
Other Ministers. Interment follows in Old }
Trail Cemetery, Old Trail Road. }
Cherished memories will remain with her :
children: Vernetha and Kevin Edwards }
(son-in-law), Louis and Donella Murphy
(daughter-in-law), Leroy Joseph, Viola :
Joseph, Carolyn Joseph, Victoria and Deon ;
Davis (son-in-law) and Terry Joseph; :
grandchildren: Valentino, Troy, Stacy, :
Donovan, Rhonda, Arlington Jr. Deon Jr., ;
Vantasia, Destinee and Bria; parents: :
Reverend Cleveland & Gladys Murphy; :
siblings: Roderick Murphy, Virginia :

Murphy, Hettamae and Alvin Flowers (brotherin-law), Frankiemae Murphy- and :
Isaac Moss (brother-in-law), Alfred Murphy, Ray Murphy Florence and Paul :
Roberts (brother-in-law), Elizabeth Murphy, Alice and Reverend Kevin Collie ;
(brother-in-law); nieces: Tiffany Cartwright, Monique Murphy, Tamika and Delano }
Brown (nephew-in-Iaw), Kendera and Kendrica Moss, Ivanya Roberts, Kaylesa :
and Alicia Murphy, Kevia, Hannah, and Kevonna Collie; nephews: Randy Cooper, }
Daronn, and Valentino Flowers, PC 3361 Kendrick and Kendon Moss, Ray Jr., }
and Anthony Murphy, Paul Roberts Jr., PC 1495 Keno Murphy, Bersil Rolle, and :
Leroy Murphy; aunts: Kathrina Murphy, Leatha Bain Emily Bain, Henrietta Black, ;
Sarah Collie, Sylvia Jones, Myrtle, Marjorie, *Margaret (*of Cat Island), and :
Isadora Murphy; uncles: Ephraim Jones, Jacob, Samuel, Ruthland, and Daniel :
Murphy; grand aunts: Mathilda Burrows, Victoria McPhee and Olive Murphy; :
other relatives and friends including: Linda Hall, Maxwell Bain and family, Ethel, :
Myrtle, Nicole, Marsha, Doreen Taylor and family, Minister Joy Johnson, Minister
Madlyn Thompson and family, Ruthmae Collie and family, Dwain and Paulamae :
Morley and family, Collins and Pamela Rolle and family, Dorceen Rolle, Prince }
and Linda Charlton, Nicola Brown, Rev. Levi and Florance McPhee, Pastor Joseph :
and Pearl Thompson, Rudolph and Ceola Missick, Kenneth and Advira Missick, i
Overseer Randolph Deleveaux, Effie McPhee, Agnes Ferguson and family, Rowena }
Taylor, Idamae Brown, Michael Bain, Vincent and Joyce Mitchell and family, :
Mario Murphy, Almartha Murphy and family, The Betsy Bay Social Club, Temple :
of Praise Ministries, Apostle Christopher and Elder Anna Russell, Leon and Ena
Charlton and family, Stanley and Edith Collie and family, Cecilia Davis, Althea :
Munroe and family, Cecil Higgins and family, Jeffrey Murphy and family, Member :
of Parliament for Blue Hills Constituency Sidney Collie and family, Vernon :
Symonette (former Member of Parliament for MICAL), Terry Saunders, Lynn :
Armbrister, Shantel Bain, Roslyn Curtis, Don Munroe, Sandra Coakley, the Higgins, :
Murphy, Brown, Gray, Taylor, McPhee, Charlton, Collie, and Burrows families, :
Ann Jackson and Staff of the Reef Restaurant, the Staff of Female Medical II of ;
the Princess Margaret Hospital, the inhabitants and descendants, of Mayaguana

and others to numerous to mention.

Friends may pay their last respects at Demeritte’s Funeral Home, Market Street,
from 10-6:00 p.m. on Friday & on Saturday from 9-12:30 p.m. & at the church ;

from 1:30 p.m. until service time.

Terry Josephine “Terry Jo” Clare, 46

a resident of Ridgeland Park West, who died on 3rd May, 2009, will be held at }
Zion Baptist Church, East & Shirley Streets, on Saturday at 11:00 a.m. Officiating :
will be Pastor T. G. Morrison, assisted by Rev. Ulric Smith, Rev. Anthony Sampson, :
Associate Ministers, Deacons & Evangelists. Interment follows in Woodlawn :

Gardens, Soldier Road.

Left to cherish her memories are: one son,

Krishand Severin; daughter: Krisany

(Meisha) Ghosh; Grandson: Enorj Dulce;

Brothers: Franklyn, Henry, Daniel Jr.,

Sterling, Maxwell, Jose and Walter;

Sisters: Beatrice, Clementina, Susan,

Terry, Patrice and Ilona; Nieces &

Nephews: Carol, Deborah, Sonovia,

Rhoda, Llewellyn, Don and Charles Clare,

De'shan Clare Paul, Marilyn, Morreau,

Lavern Wildgoose; Alice-Beatrice

Concepcion, Anne Rahming, Brenda Clare

Richards, Anita, David, Scott and Phillip

Clare and Patty Glinton; Helena, Michael

and Michelle Clare, Nicola Heastie,

Preston, James Clare Riley; Cher Nicholas,

Tamika, Nivia and Channelle Clare;
Bianca Clare, Detra Morris, Alicia, Quincy and Vanchelle Brown; Danelta Green,
Danika, Krisia, Indira, Vito, Quincy, Manchiter Clare and Marisa Pierre; Gigi
Williams, Mona-Lisa, Troy Saunders; Edward-Keith, Mico-Yon and Tito Seymour;
Rushan Muncuff; Javon Hall, John-Ross, Nicole, Simone Johnson, Trinese Smith
Williams and Kingsley Outten; great grand nieces & nephews including: Sasha,
Paige, Don Jr., Lakiesha, Larisa, Theoman, Brent, Tiffany, Thomas, Trevor; Aurecio,
Christoff, Christy, Daniel I, Danielle, Davia, David Jr., Daniel II, Deomardo,
Kingsley, Mona-Lisa, Phillip I, Phillip I, Phillippa, Tamara, Tavaldo, Tennielle,
Torry, Felicia, Joshua, Roberto, Raymond, Lushano, Antonio, Javanique, Jarvis
Jr.; Trinton, Tranae, Tonia, Andrianna, Jeff, Lexianna; Diamond, Lynden; Quetella,
Quincy Jr., Vandera, Ray-Jay, Vito Jr., D'Quante, Danielle, Shania, Shanell, Mya,
Makayla, Jay-Jay; Devon, Chardonae; Ronald Jr., Sherika, Tabitha, Tico, Tia, Troy,
Treasure, Trey, Shasta, Timonique, Kennedy and Larren; Great great grand nieces
& nephews: Cleavanna, Damien, Ikera, Marcia, Eduardo, Ronika, Deshawn,
Charles, Marcus, Latrevon, Latiea, Latwonna and Latonya; Godfathers: Edward
Seymour Jr. & James Lightbourne; Aunts: Gertrude Chisolm, Ruby and Lois Clare;
Sisters-in-law: Edna, Elaine, Jacqueline, Madge, Myrtis and Sonia; Grand nieces-
in-law: Avis Clare-Rose, Donna, Michelle, Nicola, Tamara, Latina, Gwendolyn
and Mary; Grand nephews-in-law: Raymond Concepcion Sr., Audley Glinton,
Samuel Heastie, Jeffrey Morris, Terah Pierre, Jarvis Rahming Sr., David Richards,
Larrington Williams and Stanford Green; Great grand niece-in-law: Kathy
Concepcion; Brotherin-law: Edward Seymour; Cousins: Helen, Mary, Iris, Ann,
Linda, Ellen, Louise, Eva, Gertie, Louise, Gertrude, Edith, Eva, Eliza, Katie,
Karen, Margaret, Patrice, Trisha, Karen, Allison, Becky, Bernadette Bethel, Blythe,
Brenda, Cheryl, Dianne, Edith, Enid, Eunice-Blythe, Wilma, Paula, Gertrude,
Margaret, Marilym, Maria, Mercedes, Muriel, Pat, Patrice, Rosella, Sally, June,
Valverine, Walley, Elva Hall, Annie Thomas, Sterlin, Gregg, Ted, Phillip, Kevin,
Maxwell, Timothy, Douglas, Charles, Cliford, Claude, Warren, Manfred, Theophilis,
Nathaniel, Henry Jr., Albert, Alfred Jr., Clayton, Derek, Edgar, Evan, Felton, James,
Leroy, Lee, Myron, Turton Jr., Wendell and William (Bill) Clare; a host of other
relatives & friends including: Rebecca of Tampa F1., James Haynes, Andrenria
and Asmerilda of Miami Fl; Aunce Dulce, Mark Arthur, Carlon Williams, Lorna
Ogilby, Samantha, Brenna, Dorelle and Monique of Providenciales; the family of
Dell Knowles, Richard Dixon, Irene Harvy, Rev. T. G. Morrison, Edith Moore,
William "Willy" Thompson, Lorna Hall, the Clares, Brooks, Malcoms, Earleen
Elliott, Jennings, Harvys, Seymours, Carters, Todds, Thomas, Lewis, Wilsons,
Basdens, Fulfords, Hanchells, Lightbournes, Frances, Joanne Handfield, Santino
Bown, and the community of South Caicos; Special thanks to: Rev. T. G. Morrison,
the Officers & Members of Zion Baptist Church, East and Shirley Street, Nassau,
the entire Medical staff of South Miami, the Baptist, the Holtz children Center,
Jackson Memorial Hospital, Miami and the Princess Margaret Hospital, Nassau;
the Myrtle Rigby Health Comples in Providenciales, Turks Island.

Friends may pay their last respects at Demeritte's Funeral Home, Market Street,
from 106:00 p.m. on Friday & on Saturday at the church from 10:00 a.m. until
service time.






THE TRIBUNE OBITUARIE















Y



Deweritte’s Funeral Home

BAHAMAS’ OLDEST MORTUARY

FUNERAL SERVICE FOR
Glenroy Joseph Lewis, 50

a resident of Wilson Street,
Nassau Village, who died on
7 May, 2009, will be held at
New Riverside Church of
God Pentecostal, Poinciana
Drive, on Saturday at 11 :00
a.m. Officiating will be Rev.
Sylvanus Rolle, assisted by
other Ministers of the Gospel.

Interment follows in
Woodlawn Gardens, Soldier
Road.

Left to cherish memories are his wife, Enid Lewis;
his daughter: Shonell Lewis, adopted daughters: Keisha
Robinson, granddaughter: Emerald McCourty; ten
sisters: Joycelyn Pinder, Florinda Lowe, Sharon Lewis
Woodside, Michelle Dykens of Halifax, Canada,
Denise, Kimberley, Carla, Valerie Lewis, Michelle
Collie and Idena Moss; five brothers: Jonathan
Campbell, Jerome, Arlington and Radley Lewis and
Gregory Collie; seven sisters-in-law: Fredricka Walters,
Leila Mason, Janice Rolle, Elaine Lewis, Tamara
Campbell, Danned Lewis and Lynn Lewis; eleven
brothers-in-law: Tyrone Woodside, John Dykens of
Halifax, Canada, Terry Moss, Ferdinand Lewis, Clive
Walters, David Mason, Oswald Rolle, Gerald Lewis,
Anthony Lewis, Donald Lewis, and Ricky Lewis;
sixteen cousins: Sonia, Leroy, Winkie, Charles Ramsey,
Rev. Jeffrey Hollingsworth of Freeport, Grand Bahama,
Dorothea Hollingsworth, Patrick Ferguson of Freeport,
Grand Bahama, Judith Major of Freeport, Grand
Bahama, Kevin Major, and Jennifer Nairn of Miami,
Florida, Monique Penn, Jason, Marcus and Lakeisha
Hollingworth and Latoya Sands; numerous nieces and
nephews too many to mention; other relatives and
friends including: the John Street Crew, Mother Frances
Gibson and The Church of the Lord Jesus F.O.A. and
Mr. John Mosko of Mosko Construction Co and his
fellow co-workers.

Friends may pay their last respects at Demeritte's
Funeral Home, Market Street, from 10-6:00p.m. on
Friday & on Saturday at the church from 10:00 a.m.
until service time.













THURSDAY, MAY 21, 2009, PAG

DEL 50 223

FUNERAL DIRECTORS

“Rendering the finest in caring and compassionate service
regardless of financial condition.”

tt Terrace, Calling Avenue * (242) 356-2187 *
P.O”. Box GT-2679 * Nassau, Bahamas

FUNERAL SERVICE FOR

FREDERICK (=
NELSON ROLLE, 72 [=

of Gleniston Gardens and formerly

of Rolle Town, Exuma, will be held

on Saturday, May 23rd, 2009 at
11:00 a.m. at Zion Baptist South |4
Beach Church, Full Gospel §
International, Zion Boulevard,
South Beach. Officiating will be
Bishop B. Wenith Davis, assisted

by Pastor Charles T. Dorsett,
Pastor Elliot Miller and Minister
Floyd Jones. Interment will be made

in Woodlawn Gardens Cemetery, Soldier Road.

Left to cherish his memories are his wife, Isadora Rolle; seven
sons, Franklyn, Derrick, Douglas, Reginald, Patrick, Mario and
Leading Seaman Zhivargo Rolle of The Royal Bahamas Defence
Force; six daughters, Charlotte and Patricia Rolle, Michelle Curtis,
Pamela and Bernadette Rolle; five step daughters, Denise Pratt,
Bernadette Davis, Sonia McKenzie, Brittney Rolle, Fostes and
Sheena Mcintosh; one brother, Richard Rolle; four sisters, Sylvia
and Henrietta Rolle, Mildred Hepburn and Francis Saunders; thirty
six grandchildren, Shamika Rahming, LaShanna Evans, Antonia
McKinney, Patricko and Francis Gibson, R.N. Branishka Lewis,
Joshua, Rishawn, Sidell and Silas Curtis, Deandrey Carey, PC.
3118 Javis Rolle, Javon, Jasmine, Javonia, Derricka, Derrick Jr.,
Terell, Mario Jr, Darius, Yanni, Justin, Regere, Davisha, Isaac,
Danajé and Donavon Rolle, Lacaja and Carlos Bain, Lakeisha,
Zaya, Silvio, Shagel, Stephano, Samuel, Orick and Reanna Pratt;
three adopted grandchildren, Skye Hanna, LaShon and Akeel
Adderley; fourteen great grandchildren, two sons-in-law, Sidney
Curtis and Simson McKinney; two daughters-in-law, Lechell and
Jackie Rolle; one uncle, Aaron Rolle; two aunts, Rowera and
Marion Rolle; seventeen nieces, twenty one nephews, father and
mother-in-law, Mr and Mrs Samuel Rolle; eleven brothers-in-law,
ten sisters-in-law, one godchild, Miss Sandra Gray; other relatives
and frends including, Dons Rolle, Edith Wilson, Thelma Ferguson,
Jocelyn Carey, Mae Armbrister, Philip and Dorothy Gardiner,
Edison, Huel Nairn, Constance Evans and family, Valerie Hart and
family, Karen and family, Monique and family, Edmund Moxey,
Lamb and family, Joe Curtis and family, Willard and Mary Hepdurn,
Anthony Smith, Cassie and Olive Forbes, Barbara Douglas, Clint
Ferguson, Hilda Carey, Courtney Forbes and Evadnell Fowler,

The body wil repose in the Blessed Redeemer Chapel at Ferguson's
Funeral Directors, 7th Terrace Collins Avenue on Friday from 10am
to Spm and at the church on Saturday from 10am until service
time.








PAGE 10, THURSDAY, MAY 21, 2009

» Bethel Brothers Morticians
Telephone: 322-4433, 326-7030
Nassau Street, P.O.Box N-1026

FUNERAL SERVICE FOR

ALICE ROSAMOND
TUCKER, 97

of &th Terrace, East Centreville, will
be held on Saturday May 23rd, 10:00
a.m. at Ghurch of God of Prophecy,
East Street Tabernacle. Rev. Bishop
Franklin M. Ferguson, Bishop
Woodley C. Thompson and Minister
Kendal C. Simmons will officiate.
Intarment will follow in the Western
Cemetery, Nassau Street.

ohe is survived by: Children - George

Walton Tucker of Orlando Florida,

Joycelyn Gibson, Kenneth Tucker,

Pamela Newbold, Judy Fields and

Willamae Cunningham; Adapted children - Esther Armbrister, Maude
Della Bullard, Bloomfield Ferguson and Nurse Patricia Bethel: Sons-
in-law - Rudolph Cunningham and Clifton Fields; Daughters-in-law
= Audrey Tucker and Catherine Tucker of Orlando Florida: hidiran
- Tonette Kemp of Atlanta, Georgia, Julie Campbell of London, England,
Kayla Cartwright, Shirley Martin of Freeport, Grand Baharna, Keith
and Lisa Tucker, Ken and, Judy Tucker of Washington D-C., Frederic
Tucker and Renee Tucker, Christopher Tucker of Orlando, Florida,
Pamela and Edward Willams of Jacksonville, Flonda, Lawrence Atwell
of Denver, Colorado, Craig and Carol Atwell of Miami Florida, Sean
Atwell of Miami, Florida, Kayla and Samuel Brown, Inspector Kent
Butler, Marvin Butler, Rosamond and Christian Knowles, Kenton
Tucker of Jacksonville, Florida, Kevin Tucker, Sophia Ridgell of
Jacksonville, Florida, Cheryl Donaldson of Ottawa, Canada, Janet
and Audley Munnings, Gay and Pastor Ricardo Dean, Patrona and
Glement Cartwright, Oral and Ria Newbold, C/lnspector Ricardo and
Allison Fields of Staffordshire, England and Christopher and Khaleiah
Cunningham; Sisters-in-law - Clara Gibson of Miami, Florida, Louise
Kinlock, Floraine Gibson of Richmond Heights, Florida; Brothers -in-
law - Dorrington Ferguson, Charles Freddie Tucker Sr. of Queens,
New York: Nieces and Naphews - Alice Una Clarke, Eleuthera, Zala
and Kirk Johnson, Wainwright and Vera Gibson, Eleuthera, Rosie
Gibson, Eleuthera, Harcourt and Cassandra Gibson, Dr Walter and
Sandra Gibson, Charles and Coralee Butler of California, Dorothy
and Leonard Dames, Exuma, Kathleen Demeritte, Sylvia Forbes,
Majorie Johnson, Rosetta Johneon, Joan Butler, Virginga Butler, Thelma
Butler, Bolyn and Rosevelt Gibson, Laura Lae Gisbon, Winifred
Williamson, Valerie Greene, Angella Phillips, Eloise Sands, Roland
Kinlock and Warren and Gwen Gibson, Miami Florida; 50 Great
Grandchildren including, Shavannah Bri ater of Freeport, Grand
Bahama, Jarmaina and Carlton Tucker, Aleisha and Lydein Williams
of Jacksonville, Florida, Jasmil and Jasma Munnings, A'chard and
Rico Bean, Vashti and Paige Cartwright, Oral Jr and Mia Newbold,
Michael, Marcian, Marcel, Marissa, Machara, Makira, Marcelle and
Miranda Tucker, Ciera and Christopher Cunningham Jr, Rachel and
Cameron Knowles, Micki Brown, Kendra and Keyanna Butler, Joseph
Fields of Staffordshire, England and 20 great great grandchildren;
numerous other relatives and friends - Mavis Humes and family, Paul
Lockhart, Elaine Scavella (caregiver), Ms. Woods, Mr. Terrance
Ferguson, Gregory Butler and family, Granville Butler and Butler, Rev.
T. G. Morrison, Church of God of Prophecy East Street family, Mildred
Mackey, Mrs Esther Adderley and family, Ernestine Douglas, RM.H,
Private Service Nursing staff, Retired Nurses Guild, Richard and Iris
Dean, the Gibson family, the Mount Moriah Baptist Church family and
the members of Family Faith Ministries International...







Friends may pay their last respects at Bethel Brothers Morticians,
fdd Nassau Street on Friday from 10:00 a.m. to 6:00 p.m. and on
Saturday at the church from 9:00 a.m. until service time.



















#2 Tonlque Williams-Darling Highway
P.O. Box EE-16634 © Tel: (242) 361-2560/361-8612 « Fam: (242) 361-1856
Mobile: (242) 457-1494 or (242) 477-2034 » Evening: 324-4687

ROSE TERESTA
ROLLE, 70

of West Dennis Court, Yellow Elder who
died on Monday, May 11th, 2009 wall be
held on Saturday, May 23rdth, 2009 at
10:00am at Mount Tabor Full Gospel
Baptist Church, Willow Tree Avenue and
Mount Taber Drive. Officiating will be
Bishop Neil C. Ellis, assisted by Pastor
Lorenza Clarke. Interment will follow in
the Woodlavn Gardens Cemetery, Soldier
Road,

Precious memories will forever linger in

the heart of her (4) Sons: Bruno, Delman, Simeon and Chancel Rolle; (3)
Daughters: Chevette Rolle, Gillian Burrows and Portia Taylor; (8)
Grandchildren: Ashley, Delmon, Delton and Bruano Rolle, Shealyn Burrows,

John Jr, and Jessica Taylor and Chancea Rolle; (1) Dauwghter-in-law: Anne
Rolle; (2) Sons-in-law: John Taylor and Shelton Burros; (1) Brother-in-
law: Holman Gilbert; (4) Sisters-in-law: Clementia Gilbert, Missic Pratt,
Pearline Rolle and Aramentia Sweeting; (15) Nephews: Wendell, Micheal,
Dowelas, Fredrick, Thomas, Patrick, Jerome, Steven, Dexter, Lambert, Jared,
VYandyke, Randolph, Kelsy and Kenny; (9) Nieces: Marion, Maria, Monique,
Estella, [retta Culmer, Patnicia Pearson, Brenda, Joann and Sharon Johnson;
A host of other relatives and friends including: Zorina Woods, Chery]
Alliance, Charles and Christopher Bain, Gilbert and Lizette Woods, Nickera
and Dean Richards, Cinderella Mouline, Dexter Whyms, Casanova Rolle,
Crissy Frazer, Helga Cummings, Judy Roberts, Vernetia Walkine, Medwellt
and Patrice Moultrie, Steven Larrimore, Jennifer Moultric, Joseph Whyms,
Patrice, Delarese, Denise Hinsey, Jane, Sharon, Melanie, Micheal, Marion,
Monalisa, Leola and Elaine Sands, Prince and Brenhilda Porter, Ellis and
Naomi Whyms, Lucille and Victoria Williams, Thomas and Telma Porter,
Larry, Caine Lighthourne, Donna Cargil, Pastor Harrington and Margaret
Frazier, Laverne Philencia Dames, Lisa Forbes, Jacqueline and Delaura Laing,
Menera Newton, Jennifer and Louis Munroe and family, C. Miller and family,
Allen Fawkes and family, Edward Humes and family, Iris Dean and family,
the Seymour family of Wulff Road, , Amette Davis and family, Delores
Knowles and family, Ivan and Edwin Missick and family, Tyrone Rolle and
family, Linda Heastie and famiby, Hanris Smith and family, China and family,
Ettermac Pinder and family, Keith, Wayne, Kevin, Almaric, Virginia and
Torey Sands, Eunice Seymour, Inez, Rev. Archelaus, Magalene, Everette
and #chelain Burrows, Ruthmac, Altenease Evans, Rueben, Martha Bullard,
Cheryl Saunders, Fanny, Pearline and Lutchman Rolle, Annie Pratt, McDonald,
Thelma Rolle, Kenneth Rolle, Brevis Moss, Ann Moxey, Apostle Ed and
Lee Watson, Pastor Reginald Cox and Servant Andrea Cox, Bishop Neil and
First Lady Ellis and the offices and members of Mount Tabor Full Gospel
Baptist Church, Dr. Graham Cates, Dr. Spencer, Dr. Morgan, Dr. Grant
Taylor, the Staffof Female Medical 1, Dialysis Unit and Maternity Ward,
the COB Custodial and Maintenance Section and stait, the Department of
Public Service Union, John Bull, Marathon Staff, Compass Poant and Atlantis
Mosaic Restaurant and Staff, Department of Environmental Health Services
and Staff, the entire #3 West Dennis Coun, Yellow Elder and Standard Creek,
Andros Communities.

Viewing will be held on Friday, May 22nd at Clarke’s Funeral Home #10
Tonigue Williams-Darling Highway from 10:(Qam to 6e(hpm and on Saturday
at 9:00am until service time.






















THE TRIBUNE OBITUARIES

larke s Yur



UU









AGE 11



THURSDAY, MAY 21, 2009,

Home

#2 Tonique Williams-Darling Highway
P.O. Box EE-16634 « Tel: (242) 361-2569/361-8612 « Fax: (242) 361-1856
Mobile: (242) 457-1491 or (242) 477-2034 « Evening: 324-4687

FUNERAL SERVICES FOR

VERA SAUNDERS-
MUNROE, 86

of Sugar Cane Lane,

Exuma who died on Sunday, May 10th,
2009 will be held on Saturday, May 23rd,

2009 at 11:00am at Salem Union Baptist +
Church, Taylor Street. Officiating will :
be Rey. Dr. C. W. Saunders, assisted by :
other Ministers. Interment will follow in:
the Woodlawn Gardens Cemetery, Soldier |

Road

She is survived by her Husband of'sixty-;
five (65) years: Ernest Munroe of Moss:
Town, Exuma; (7) Daughters: Sheila :

Curry, Elrita, Luella, Maria, Vernita and Marilyn Munroe and Loran Ferguson,

(5) Sons: Nathaniel, Emest Jr. . Simeon, Philip and David Munroe; (52)
Grandchildren: Charmine & Whiting Deleveaux, Belinda Hutchinson, Brent :
Stubbs, Marcia and Artin Swift, Barry and Dr. Alexya Williams, Shenique Rolle, :

Tanaicia and Norman Munroe, Kimberlee and Amy Rahming, Arnette McPhee,

Sabrina Culmer, Mathalee and Tyrone Tynes, Monique and Nathaniel Jr, Dellington 3

and Tamika Munroe, Renee, Lemmon, Jawanza, Brian, Garvin, Ernest III,

Philandrea and Philnovia, Munroe, Te‘rah Neymour, Prenecia Rolle, Tanya
uel Smith, Darmilus and Wendy Curry, Patricia and Authur Jr. and :

Knowles, Sh

Jason Munroe, MeQuell Curry, Patrice and Quincy Pratt, Dike and Marvin Newbold,

Shantell Chipman, Levania, Bernadette, Mispah, Pernell and Paula Ferguson, :
Christine Beneby, Rochelle Walker, Eslynn Smith and Glen Munroe: (47) Great- :
grandchildren: Rashaun, Whittkey and Elissa, Tynesha, Tyresha, Deandra, Kyle, :

Kenny, Kerrel, Kendrick, Shawn Rolle, Artin, Artrill, Leandrea, Nathan, Qutel,

Quindeira, Princia, Eugene Jr., Perez, Marvin jr. Marvinique, Kendiro, Brenzel :

Jr., Benalique, Raven, Dante, Shawn, Roshanda, Arnbrosine, Britnique, Simone,
Samantha, Trey, Catlyn Danielle, Deandra, Jasoryne, Ounel, Delano, Deago, Loren,
Gervaise IJr.,

Gregory and Dexter Brown, Virginia, Nyoka, Ingrid, Therevis and Jodi Deveaux,
Reith, Randy, Terrance, Theresa, Vernita, Pauline, Willuasee Brown, Rickey, Kent,
Edward, Wayde, Eureka, Shoranda, Henry, James, Bradley, Germaine Ann White,

Kayla & Nikita; Numerous Cousins Including; Rev. Or. C.W. Saunders and the :
officers and members of Salem Union Baptist Church, Deacon George Curtis and :
farnily, Sarah Rolle and family, Melvin, Clara, Thelma, Lillis, Francine Saunders :
and family, Lizzy Rolle and family, Harold and Cynthia Major and family, Stella ;
fictor Saunders and family, :
Barbara Dorsette and family, Rev. Elon Musgrove and family, Dependents of :
Maurice and Cesar Clarke and family, Veron Curtis and family, Rodney Musgrove :
and family, Pristina Gibson and family, Churtstine and Castherine Musgrove and :

Major and furnily, Aremina Musgrove and family, ¥

family, Beerthalee Curry and family, Magnola Hamilion Rolle and family, Rev.

Cedric Smith and family, Edna Bain and family, VWernic and Alvin Rolle and :
family Wellington and Neil Hamilton, Elvara Noel and Ginger Hamilton of Deer |
Field Beach Florida, Elise Smith, Fearlin Smith, Merdina Rolle, Kendal Butler; :
A host of other relatives and friends including: Rev. Randy Musgrove and the :

Fox Dale
Subdivision and formerly of Moss Town, :

Shervaise, Sabena, Ashea and Courtney; (1) Brother: Milton :
Saunders; Daughters-in-law: Rudy, Arnett and Patsy Munroe; Son-in-law: Ezra |
Curry and Clyde Ferguson; Sisters-in-law: Mary and Corrine Saunders of Mimphs :
Florida, Curleane Major, Cathleen and Millicent Munroe, Nathalie Evans and :
Myrtis Deveaux; Brothers-in-law: Greorge Evans, Arlington, James and Freddy :
Munroe and Alton Major, Numerons Nieces and Nephews incloding: James and +
Carolyn Darville of Thailand, Modina and Bishop Robert McPhee, Elder Maxine :
Newton, Ruth and Alfred Williams, Elder Shirley Brown, Zella and Kenneth :
Symonette, Yvette King, Patricia Brown, Ralph and Marva Brown, Ulis King, :

officers and members of Zion Union Baptist Church, Moss Town, Exuma, Prince
Rolle, Terry Ferguson, Shanelle Major, Malvease Bethel, Shirley Munroe, Dr.
Chery] Hanna, Dr. Delton Farquharson, Desiree Ferguson and tamily, Irene
Rahming and family, Isaiah Rolle and Family, Richard Clarke and family, Euthely
Rahming and family, Irena McPhee and family, Rev. Charles Rolle and the officers
and members of Cedars of Lebnon Church, Rev, Ivan Ford Butler and the officers
and members of Kemp Road Ministries, the Ministry of Education and Accounts
Department, the Thompson & Smith families from farmers Hill Exuma, the entire
Sugar Cane Lane, Fox Dale Subdivision and Moss Town, Exume communities.

Viewing will be held on Friday, May 22nd at Clarke's Funeral Home #10 Tonique
Williams-Darling Highway from 10:00am to 6:00pm and on Saturday at 10:00am
until service time.

CHARLES MONTEL
RITCHIE, 88

of Hibiscus Drive, Lyford Cay and
Formerly of Hamilton's, Long Island
who died on Thursday, May I4ith, 200%
will be held on Saturday, May 23rd, ZO
at 10:30am at Saint Christopher" s Church,
Lyford Cay, Officiating will be Venerable
Archdeacon Keith N. Cartwright assisted
by Reverend Fr. Ernest Pratt, Reverend
Fr. Peter A.G. Seott and Reverend Fr, (i.
Kingsley Knowles, Cremation will
follovar.

Left to cherished fomd memories are his
=| Brother: Alvin, (4) Sons: Paul, Cyril,

Montfomeny and Jackson Ritchie; (4)
Daughters: Ramona Ritchie-Taylor, Angeline Ritchie-Wells, Rosalie Major and
Alexandra Pratt; (4) Daughters-in-law: Paula Cindy, Catherine, Cheryl & Kim
Ritchie; (2) Sons-in-law: Jacoh Major and Daniel Taylor; (23) Grandchildren:
Richard iPablet, Christopher, Jason, Brian, Charles, Mathew, Joshua, Jordan,
Justin, Robin and Dylan Ritchie, Stephan and Angelo Storr, Kimra Johnson,
Melissa Johnson, Sheree, Nakia & Alexis Ritchie, Caroline Russell, Tuesday
White, Rachel, Simone and Hannah Ritchie; (11) Great-grandchildren: Mona
Maria Burrows, Stephanee, Sierra, Malik and Kaidin Storr, Kianna, Kamaron,
Jacob, Landon, Abigail & Isabella Ritchie; (2) Sisters-in-law: Alice Darille &
Iva Knowles; (31) Sieces & Nephews including: Hertha, Reginald iChampi
Gordon, David, Anthony iTonyi, Kathleen Ritchie, Elizabeth Strachan; Bert &
Rupert Knowles, Ivy Cartwright, Gloria Pratt, Madeline Cartwright, Reginald,
Kirk, Barbara, Marsha & Chubby Knowles, Betty Wells, Roscoc, Appollos, Steve
and Daniel Burrows, Desiree, Beryl & Lorraine Wanson, Ida Fox, Lester Darville,
Liewellyn & Collins Fox, Cindy Mavros, Chole Wells, Rogie Fox; A host of other
relatives and friends including: Margaret Meeres, Maryann Brazalote, Juana,
Sicha, Mark Russell, Adama Storr, Celia Uniz, Nea, Sarah, Vania & Tony Ritchie,
Stephen Johnson, Stephen Stor Sr, Lakesa Lloyd, Cynthia Burrows, ‘Maureen
Brown, Andrew iRabbai and Dora Taylor, Remelda Constantakis & farnily, Gregory
Cartaright & famuly, Robert Sandy & Michelle Sands, Raphact & Chloe C artwTight,
Arch Deacon Kerth Cartwright, Fr. Emest Pratt, Martred Knowles, Regina Cartwright,
Eva Knowles & family, Kelly Banks, P. Anthony White and the entire Hamilton's
Long Island community.

Viewing will be held on Friday, May 22nd at Clarke's Funeral Home #10 Tonique
Williams-Darling Highway from 10:00am to 6:00pm and on Saturday at 9:00am
until service tine.








PAGE 12, THURSDAY, MAY 21, 2009









THE TRIBUNE OBITUARIES

















Hutler’s Funeral Homes & Crematorium

Telephone: 393-2822, York & Ernest Sts.
P.O. Box N-712, Nassau, Bahamas

FUNERAL ANNOUNCEMENT

| sisters Varian Pople, Janet Carey, Brendamae
_ Adderley, Maria Smith, Joycetina Scott,
_ Cleopatra Braynen,, Miriam Burrows of New
_ York, Shirley Clarke and Susan Barr, three
-uncles; Hezekiah and George Johnson and
_ Alexander Burrows, one aunt; Eulean Kemp,
2 nine brothers-in-law; Rev. Frankie Scott,
_ Edward Pople, Jacob Adderley, Prince Braynen,
| George Barr, Apostle J.B. Sands, and William,
_ Elijah and Roswell Forbes, twelve sisters-in-
| law; Tabitha, Erica, Setesa, Eleanor, Donnalee,
_ and Sarah Burrows, Caron Klein, Erlie, Evelyn,

DANIEL RUSSEL
BURROWS, 47

of 44 Cassia Avenue, Garden Hills II, will be |
held on Saturday May 23, 2009 at 11:00a.m. at |
Bahamas Holy Bible Mission, Bahama Avenue. |
Officiating will be Pastor Frankie Scott, assisted |
by Rev. Henry Rolle and Rev. Oswald Bain |
Interment will follow in Woodlawn Gardens |
Cemetery, Soldier Road.

ron to cherish ms Sees ai ns mie Friends may pay their last respects at Butlers’
ale Sons, A “- | a ode _ Funeral Homes & Crematorium. Ernest and
Jr. and Devon Burrows, two daughters; | Yorks Streets on Friday May 22, 2009, from

Danesha and Derene Burrows, his mother |
Christina Burrows, six brothers; Prince, Neville, |
George, Raymond and Leroy Burrows and |
Lieutenant-Commander Loren Klein, nine |

_ Geneva and Elizabetha Forbes and Virginia
Rolle, twenty nine nephews, twenty three
nieces; five nephews-in-law, nine nieces-in-
law, ten grandnephews; six grandnieces,
and many other loving family and friends
Including Bridgette, Allen McPhee, Andrew
| McPhee, Rondell Rolle, Raquel McKenzie, John
| Fox ,Cathy Albury Coralee Smith and the

Stewarding Department and Culinary Staff of

_ Atlantis, Gary Gilligan and Theodora Major
_and many others too numerous to mention.

10:00 a.m. until 5:00 p.m. and on Saturday
from 10:00a.m. until service time at the church.




THE TRIBUNE OBITUARIE













Mm
*







VU

THURSDAY, MAY 21, 2009,









AGE 13



Rock of Ages Funeral Chapel

Wulff Road & Pinedale
Tel: 323-3800 or 322-1431 « Fax: 328-8852

FUNERAL SERVICES FOR

ALFRANCINE
MAGISTRAT, 77

of Balfour Ave, will be held on

Soldier Road.

This Rose will be forever missed |

in the hearts of her: Three (3) :

Daughters: Sylvela Josaphat Emanuel, Vergina and Ruth :
Magistrat; Four (4) Sons: Daniel, Delinor, Lavius and Ulioder |
Madgistrat; Four (4) Brothers: Sirisnord Majistra of Miami, Silot |
Majistra and Lafontaine Merzius of Nassau, and Yard Majistra :
of Haiti; One (1) Sister: Charitable Octave of Haiti; Thirty- :
three(33) Grandchildren: Herode Octave of Haiti, Jirda Gustave, ;
Antonio, Anton, Antoinisse and Mako Jasphat all of Nassau, ;
Loubins, Ellie, Roseline and Mathew Octave, Nathacha, Makenzi |
Princeten-Prince , Ftacy Nikkie, Nehemie and Deny Macelyn, |
All of Miami, Wed Dalincy of Haiti; Sarmuel Gustave of Nassau, |
Santia Mascelin of Miami, Berlina Mascelin of Nassau, Genesse, |
Maxx, Watson, Kervin, Quency and Kenson Mascelin of Miami, |
Fadince, James, Sendley and Andley Mitile all of Canada, Dalei |
Neoctave of Hait and Ready Macalin of Miami; Ten (10) Great |
Grandchildren: Shinika, Dangelo and Nadine Gustave of Nassau, |
Dana Octave, Rosenika and Hebinson Octave of Haiti, Genesse |
Mascelin of Miami, Hevinsli and Hebrine Octave of Haiti, |
Cherman of Nassau, Three (3) Sons-in-law: Tony Josaphat of |
Nassau, Onilus Octave and Luima Mitul of Miami; Four (4) |
Daugnhters-in-law: Silfida Mascelin of Haiti, Soilenie, Alsegrace |
and Abrisil Mascelin of Miami; One (1) Brother-in-law: Tiboss |
Octave of Haiti; Sisters-in-law: Glaise Majistra of Haiti and |
Anocia Merzius of Nassau; Numerous Nieces and Nephews |
including: Blius, Sadieudi and Boniface Octave of Miami, Tipepe, ;
Naomi and Ziane Octave of Haiti, Larones, Jacques, Saintadieu |
and Eliner Merzius of Nassau, Camille lvener, Sirisnard, Eloi- |
Telfort, Maraine and Philogene Majistra of Haiti, Marianie Onora |
of Haiti; One (1) Godchild: Maricia Octavien; and a host of :

other relatives and friends including: Louci Louis, Jasie, Tedilia, |
Danis, Jesner, Mrs. Francis, Mrs. Jeson, Marie, Laly, Lisitha, :
The Victory Chapel of the Nazarene, Minnie Street family, Rev. |
Dr. Antoine St. Louis and family, Pastor Perlius Youth and :
family, Dec. Ramy Delira and family, The entire Minnie Street :
Community, and The Balfour Ave Community; and a host of :

| other relatives and friends too numerous to mention.

| FRIENDS MAY PAY THEIR RESPECTS AT ROCK OF AGES
| FUNERAL CHAPEL; WULFF ROAD & PINEDALE ON FRIDAY
| FROM 10 A.M. TO 5 PRM. AND ON SATURDAY AT THE CHURCH
| FROM 1PM. UNTIL SERVICE TIME.

Saturday May 23, 2009 at 2 p.m. |
at Victory Chapel of The |:
Nazarene, Minnie Street. |
Officiating: Rev. Dr. Antoine St. :
Louis. Assisted By: Pastor Pelius :
Youth and Dec. Ramy Delira. |
Interment: Woodlawn Gardens, :

FRANCES MARY
JOHNSON, 60

of Bamboo Town, East Street
South; will be held on Saturday
May 23rd, 2009 at 10 a.m. at
Church of God Temple, Coconut
Grove & Crooked Island Street.
Officiating: Bishop Sherwin
Smith. Assisted By: Bishop
Moses A. Johnson & Bishop
Lindo Wallace. Interment:
Lakeview Memorial Gardens,
John F. Kennedy Drive

Left to cherish her memories are her Husband: Limon Johnson;
One (1) Brother: Joe Olsen and Wife Annette Olsen of New
York: Sisters-in-law: Rowena Hudson and Merle Johnson;
One (1) Step Son: Gregory Johnson; One (1) Step Daughter:
LaDonna Gardiner; One (1) Step-Son- in-law: Simeon Gardiner;
Five (5) Grandchildren: Leevan Johnson, Tamiko Ferguson,
Gerrard and Qutel Johnson and Simeon Gardiner Jr, One (1)
Grand Daughter fin-law: Vindell Ferguson; Thirteen (13) Great
Grandchildren: Levanchea, Lenah, Leah and Leevan Johnson,
Tameka Ferguson, Ziana and Zion Johnson, Elisha Adderley,
Jasis Bevans, Bianca Moxey, Carlton Wilson, Tanisha Ferguson
and Tarquin Kelly; Best Friends: Irene and Charles Swanson
and Freddy Castillo all of Florida, Janette Wuasileweski, Ann
Armbrister and Fenton Strachan; Numerous Nieces and
Nephews throughout U.S.A. and The Bahamas as well as a
host of other relatives and friends including: The Good Shepherd
Church of God family. The New Dimension Ministries family,
The Church of God East Street Cathedral family, The Avon
Family and The Church of God Temple family. And a host of
other relatives and friends too numerous to mention.

FRIENDS MAY PAY THEIR RESPECTS AT ROCK OF AGES
FUNERAL CHAPEL; WULFF ROAD & PINEDALE ON FRIDAY
FROM 10 A.M. TOS RM. AND ON SATURDAY AT THE CHURCH
FROM 9.4.M. UNTIL SERVICE TIME.








PAGE 14, THURSDAY, MAY 21, 2009











THE TRIBUNE OBITUAR















KRurtiss Memorial Mortuar

Chapel, Ramsey, Exuma - Tel: 345-7020° Robinson Rd & 5th Street
Tel: 325-6621/322-4969 « 24 Hour Paging Service 323-9761

LAST RITES FOR

BRENDA MAE
FERGUSON, 41

of Ramsey, Exuma will be held on Saturday

Auditorium, Ramsey Exuma. Officiating will
be Rey. Or. levin Clarke assisted

Ramsey Exuma.



Bloneva McKenzie (2) Sisters iin law Darlesia Ferguson

Precious & Grace Ching, Angel Taylor, D''Vanya Ma
Kaylee Ferguson (5) ae Winzel & Shawndon Smith, Kai & Kyte F
Kenyon Mackey (12) Aunts Lenora Rahiming, Marjorie, Stephanie &

Clarke, (9)Grand Aunts; Mrythe Knowles,

Bridgette Colebrooke, Nicole & Theodora Rahming, Shanell & Bermitta

McKenzie, Lunsworth & Jean McKenzie, Shawan & Dale Clarke, Wilton Jr &

Christal Mckenzie, Wilkeishna McKenzie, Vanessa & ¥ outhal Saunders, :
Margaret, Tanya, Brenda, Dexta, Barry & Luzanne McKenzie, Marvin, Blanca, ;
& Renaldo Clarke, Lloyd & Gregory Bodie, :
Mildred, Matred, Salina, & Melinda Bodie Jamie, Jason, Pamela, Franklyn, :
Gregory, Jamine & James, Paula, Vianda, Eslyn, Bernadette, Prenell & Godirey :
Ferguson, Kathleen McKenzie, Ethlyn Thurston, Betty & Joann Mckenzie, :
Annie Simmons, Daphne McKenzie, Karan Emmanuel, Martha McKenzie, :
Vermutta, Prisilla & Aldering Rolla, Edith & Leroy Rolle, Janaice Butler, Patiance :
Clarke, Jenny, Sonia, Loralyn & Leoni Rolle, Deniece Williams, Joy Miller, ‘
roara :
uegrove, Shirley McKenzie Verniece Margaret & Lennette McKenzie, Marva,

Brenell, Boldwin, Brian, Fran

oe Brown, Patricia Knowles, Paulette Braynen, Garol McDonald,

Hazel & Cleo Rolle, Virginia Bannister, Livi
Rolle, Rodney, Eric, Phillip, Donnie & Averial Rolle, Kinsey & é MeKenzie,
Kermit, Ivan, Isaac, Lynden, Vivian, Alworth, Fredrick, Garth, Tyrone Alfred,

Alle, Sidney, Ivan, Rudy, George, Rolston, Micheal, Kent, Nehmiah & Darren :
Rolle, Micheal Braynen, Jefferson & Marco McKenzie, Stephen, Kevin, Mario, :
Glenroy, & Micheal Rolle, Lakeisha Clarke, Lynden, Baldwin& Geo Rolle, :
Randolf Knowles, Samantha Forbes a host of other relatives and friends ;
including Rachel & Rupert Ferguson, Lettuce Clarke & family, Rodney & Elaine :
Burrows & family, Geletha Clarke & family, Lizzie-Ann Ferguson & family, :
Sheny Beneby, Joshua Sears & family, Rev. Terry Sears & family, Iris Gharlton :
& family, Olive Morley & family, Willamea Clarke & family, Rev. Adam Brawn :
And Family, Theresa Black and Farmlly, Laura Wright & family, Magnola Adderley :
& family, Margaret Melvin, Sharon Brownd& family, Theresa Munroe & family, :
Hosea Musgrove & family, Eric Taylor & family, James & Jerry Sweeting & |
tte Smith, Phillis Clarke & family, Terry Leia & family, :

family, Minister Bric
Management & Staff of Bahamas Customs, Management &
Aviation Department, M.P Anthony Moss & family,
Johnole & Pamela Gott, Francelna Forbes & family, Myris Deveaux & family,
South Beach Union Baptist church family, Ebenezer

taff of Civil

at 10:00 A.M. at The E. C. Mckenzie :

Rev, Cedric :
Smith, Rev. Adam Brown and Other Ministers. :
of Religion. Interment in The Pubic Cemetery, :

She is survived by her mother Mrs. Alvilda :
Sweating (2) Sons Brandon Pickering & Ashad :
Davis (4) Sisters Laverne Lewis, Winifred Ching, :
Gaynell Taylor & Kendra Ferguson; Stepmather: :
Patricia Ferguson; (1) Adopted sister Rebecca Sweeting (4) Brothers David ;
& Quinton Sweeting, Kendrick & Keno Ferguson (1) Step-Grand Mother Mrs. +
Lashanna Sweeting
(3) Brothers in law Jonathan Lewis, Vernal Ching & Troy Taylor (6) Nieces :
, Keanna Ferguson & ;
son, !
avis ;
McKenzie, Manerva Rolle, Leona Bodie, Patsy Johnson, Rose, Dembris, :
Bathsheba, Tency & Irma Clarke Ferguson (14) Uncles Rev. Wilton & Daniel :
Neate Celioe Cann tua Hediec der boieteoh, Cimerd ae cea : Torea, Marcus, Zebedee, and Garlos Butler, Kiki and Dennis, Monalisa, Able
ine Braynen, Rowena, Viola, : : ;
Naomi & Vera Rolle, Estella McKenzie, Veronica McKenzie & Tency Ferguson | Almoustafer and Geo Bullard, Kania Belle, Thelma Opiah, Letha Nottage,
(4) Grand Uncles Nigel & Nehemiah Rolle, Hansel Braynen & Charles Knowles |
(2) God Chidren Marissa Clarke & Kerbie Brown Jr. Cousins: Marvin McKenzie, |

ston McKenzie, Nigel & Jacob :

ancy Bottomly & staff, :

; nion Baptist Church, ;
Mike Burrows, Benjamin Moss, Irvin Martin, Gloria Lewis & family, Trevor :

Cooper & family the entire communities of Ramsey & Forest Exuma and a
host of other relatives and friends too numaérous to mention.

The body will Repose at Kurtiss Memorial Mortuary, Ramsey Exurna on Friday
from 17:00 .4.M. until 6:00 PM. and atthe church on Saturday from 9200 4.64.
until service time,

TELLIS ALEXANDER
BUTLER, 73

of Golden Gates Il will be held on Saturday
at 3:00 PM. at St. Francis Xavier Cathedral,
West Hill Street. Officiating will be Father Glen
Nixon. Interment in Woodlawn Gardens,
Saldier Road,

He is survived by his Wife: Thelma Butler;
Sons: Tito and Vandyke Butler and Garvin and
Gary Bullard; Daughters: Tameka Burton and
Melanie Butler, Floramae Garey, Gwendolyn
Belle, and Alhoda Bullard: Grand Children: Tito
Butler Jr. (Jacksonville), Samantha, Melissa,

Woman Marine Nyiesha, Det. 2937 Genisko, Gardenia, Gary Jr, Garvin dr,

Bianca Cooper Butterfield, Alexandria Sherman, Terrel Garey, Donald Jr. and
Doral Pratt; Great Grandchildren: Lamoute Butler, D' Andre Balle, Kaelyn ard
Ethan Bullard, Benay Butterfield: Sisters: Sylvia Demeritte Forbes, Kathlene
Demeritte, Dorothy Dames, Majone Johnson, Joan Butler and Rosetta Johnson;
Brother: Charles Butler (California), Daughters-in-law: Humeshia Butler, Cindy
Bullard; Sons-in-law: Rudyyard Burton and Benjamin Belle: Sisters-in-law:
Virginia and Goralee Butler, Maxine Gaiter, Albertha Bullard; Brothers-iin-law:
(Charlie Forbes, Leonard Dames, Maxwell Johnson, Sement Johnson, Colin
Bullard Jr; Aunt: Clara Gibson; Numerous nieces and nephews inchuding:
Patricia Bethel, Albertha Hall, Echendu and ‘Yuka Nwanodi, Azuka Cartwright,
James, Donna, Michael, Insp. Edward Demeritte, Insp. Glenis Demeritte,
Carlis Williams, Kayla Brown, Virgina Thurston, Insp. Franklyn Deameritte,
John, Leonard Jr, Donald, Amos and Randolph Dames, Unajane Butler,
Gaynell Dames Clarke, Gyprianna Dames Saunders, Meto-jo Dames, Crystal
Dames Roach, Valencia Swain, Terry-jo, Deveaux, Charmaine Green, Lyden,
Tanya, Desiree and Sheldon Johnson, Lisa, Lydia and Jennica Johnson,
Antonio Sr. and Cola Jane Butler, Angelo Sr. and Sandra Butler, Valerie Butler
Gibson, Janet and John De Barros, Alecia and David Johnson, Amoranna
and Richmond Mayoock, Aubrianna, Derek, Suzanne and Sherry Butler, ae
2027 Domell Butler, Insp. Julian Butler, Yurick and Una Mara Butler & Family;
Numerous great grand nieces and nephews and a host of relatives and friends
including: Dedra and Kenton Tucker & Family, Wainwright and Vera Gibson
& Family, Zala Gibson & Family, Una Clarke & Family, Harcourt and Rosetta
Gibson & Family, Dr. Walter Gibson & Family, Steven Pinder, Sweeting,
Joseph Jones, Keith Parker, Florence Curtis, Rev. Howard Williamson & the
Rodinson Morris Chapel AME Church Family, Rev. Randolph Patterson & the
Cousin Mephee AME Church Family, Reginald and Adora Hanna & Farnily,
tha Savannah Sound, Eleuthera community, Henry and Viola Sands & Farnily
and Sis. Ida Rahming, the Community of Mason's Additions and Rey. Faith
Maycock, Special thanks to the Dialysis Unit and Staff, Doctors and Nurses
of Male Medical Il.

The body will repose at Kurtiss Memorial Mortuary, Robinson Road and Fifth
Street on Friday from 17:00AM, until 600 PM, and at the church on Saturday
fram 2:00 BM. until service time.





Mm
*O


THE TRIBUNE OBITUARIE













mM
*O





fete PRA eee

a ‘Emerald Ridge, Ho rtnaru

& Monument Comp: any Wt.
Wir.

(i o er Aree
I Cr.) ) :
Ee
“i fell Gs. Dean II, crs te

dear! Manage Penonel [arecior

‘er Serviees Includes

Traditional and Personalion! Foneral Serviors,
Ceemathon, Grief Cousseling, Hurial-nSea,
Worekdwide Shipping, Local and Long Doetance
Reneah, Meweeots, (nine Ghtusres oral
Viadeo hota Tobuteson Char Website and EVDE.

“Hoauarivg These wine Liz,
c a wfoe Tae we eee
Ls i {242} 45, r= 1986
#20 Claridge Road oP 0. ae Bremer Remit cg
Email: emeraldridgémortuary@coralwave.com
etic ake emeraldridgemortuary.com

DEATH NOTICE

For

MR. RICARDO
LORENZO
“Lockie”
LOCKHART SR., 44

of #03 Zora Close, off Sandilands
Village Road Fox Hill played his last
inning and took his last jump short
at the Princess Margaret Hospital,
Nassau N. P. Bahamas on Saturday,
May 16, 2009.

The Radiance of this “Opal of A Gem” will always glow in
the hearts of his: :
Loving Wife: Cleo Christine Lockhart;

Four Sons: Ricardo Jr., Rico, Lanero and Kenrico Lockhart;

Four Daughters: Gail, Rickia and Rickell Lockhart and
Alana Frazer:

Mother: Judith Lorene Knowles;

and Stephen Walkin;

Grand Father: Freshwell Montague John;
Grand Mother: Vera Cole;

Seven Uncles: Lorenzo “Donie” and Ed Lockhart, Ralph :
even Uncles renzo “Donie an cKia ih Sardonyx fumeral service is pending, check website

Gooding, Noel Pinder, Deon Miller, Timothy Cole and Byron :
mith;











"AGE 15



THURSDAY, MAY 21, 2009,

Eleven Aunts: Barbara Chase-Johnson, Patricia and Ruth
Bethel, Donna Campbell, Iva and Susymae Lockhart, Majorie
Burton of Miami, Pat, Patricia, Playdell and Carolyn Cole;

One Grand Aunt: Margariet Roberts;

Numerous: Nephews and Nieces;

Mother-in-law: Miriam Gooding;

Five Brothers-in-law: Marvin and Michael Johnson,
Thomas Berry, Kenny and Shaka Bain;

Four Sisters-in-law: Yolanda Jones, Crystal Johnson,
Rima and Harita Bain;

Many other loving family and friends including:

_ Alvonda Rolle, Police Constable 2642 Duvall Francis, Jamal
a om Jacqueline Johnson, Tamar Horton and Jennifer
: Bethel.

Opal funeral services are pending, check website
| for updates.

SARDONYX
DEATH NOTICE

For

MR. LLOYD JOSEPH
“Dadda, Labbie”
WHYMS, 54

of Parker Street, off Meadow
Street completed this walk of life
at the Princess Margaret Hospital,
Nassau N. P. Bahamas on
Wednesday, May 13, 2009.

The Radiance of this “Sardonyx
of A Gem” will always glow in
e hearts of his:

: Four Sons: Joval, Christopher and Latherio Whymns and
Two Grand Children: Ricana Lockhart and Garron Dean; :

: Two Dau
: Johnson;

: Two Grand Daughters: Shania Duncombe and Shakinah
Four Brothers: Alexander and Don Bain, Bernard Storr :

Sharif Turnquest;
ters: Valarine Whyms and Latheria Whyms-

Rolle;

Three Brothers: Paul and Phillip Whyms and Kendal
Six Sisters: Monique Bain, Terah Walkin, Allison and Tanya :

Hall, Monique Taylor-Simmons and Monique Williams; : Three Sisters: Freda Darrell, Rosemary Miller and Donna

: Prince;

Babbs;

: Numerous: Nephews and Nieces other loving family and

friends.

| sor updates.

Visit our website: www.emeraldridgemortuary.com view video tributes, sign guest book, send condolence, sympathy,
share memories and make funeral arrangements.










PAGE 16, THURSDAY, MAY 21, 2009







THE TRIBUNE OBITUAR

















Vaughn O. Jones
MEMORIAL CENTER

“Honoring the memories of loved ones”

INDEPENDENTLY OWNED & OPERATED

FUNERAL ANNOUNCEMENT

RODGER
/ CHARLES HANNA,
37

/ 10:00 a.m.
| Seventh Day Adventist
Church, Prince Charles

assisted by Elder H. Barr, Elder B. Adderley and |
Elder Griffin. Interment will follow in Woodlawn :
Gardens, Soldier Road.

Precious memories will forever linger in the hearts
of his parents: Reginald & Faydora Hanna; five
brothers: Reginald Jr. of Boca Fla., Charles, Kim,
Justin & Radley; eight sisters: Bernadette
Duncombe, Melvern Hanna-Rolle, Denise Adderley,

& Regina Hanna; uncles: Wellington, Alfred Wilfred,
Charles & Horace Bullard; aunts: Doralyn Bain,

Rebecca Smith, Lydia Bullard, Daisy Bullard, Virgini
English, Doris Bridgewater, Margaret Styles; fifteen
nephews: Lynden, Latario, Charles, Michael,
Rashad, Demarco, Marco, Elvin, Elvis, Devon,

: Myah, Rhodia, Jamie, Angie, Esosa & Idia;
' grandnephew: Jenario; two grandnieces: Malia &
: Deshanique; four brothers-in-law: Dewey Rolle,
| Sgt. 1241 Ronald Adderley, Dr. Erhabor Ighodaro
of Miami, F1.; sister-in-law: Elisa Hanna; adopted

: mother: Norma Rahming; cousins: Tyrone Sears,

| of East Street will be held | Judy Cartwright & family; Jenifer, Bridgette, Paula,

on Sunday May 24, 2009 at : Marvin, Patrice, Kareem, Jamal, Vicky, Rocshell,

at Maranatha : Richads & Family, Pastors Stanley & Jenifer

: Ferguson, Cindy, Kendra, Valentino Gardiner, Ken,
' Dr. Vincent Forbes, Dustin, Timothy, Glen, Arnold,

Drive. Officiating will be Rev. Pastor Wilfred Adderley, | Quetell, Marth, Donna, Penny, Gaylean, Keneyatta,

Ted, Debbie, Garvin, Melony, Latoya, Shawn,

Amanda, Pastor Vincent Major & Family; and a
: host of other relatives and friends including: Pastor
: Wilfred Adderley & Family, Sister Patsy Russell &
: Family, Shawn Watson, Harmonious Praise, Marina
' Hanna & Family, Paula Hanna & Family, Betty Rolle
: & Family, Peardale Church family, Ronald Butterfield,
Elaine Butler & Family, Brend Rose & Family,

: Wellington Gardiner & Family, Denesia Rolle,
Shannan Ighodara of Miami, Cheryl, Dedrie, Keva ;

Vanessa Rolle, Hope Watson, The Neely Family,

: Keisa Lloyd, Tanice Cleare & Family and Lakiesha
: Miller & Family.

Gloria Bullard, Sarah Forbes, Josephine Bastian, :

: Viewing will be held in the "Legacy Suite" of
: Vaughn O. Jones Memorial Center, Wulff Road
: and Primrose Street on Saturday from 9:00 a.m.
' to 5:00 p.m. and at the church on Sunday from

nieces: Charlene, Crystal, Jan, Samantha, Brittany, :

Wulff Road and Primrose =

oO
Telephone: 326-9800)

site Studio of Draperie
« 24 Hour Emergency A34- 9220/380-8077



Mm
*O






RIBUNE OBITUARIES























PAGE



THURSDAY, MAY 21, 2009,

Vaughn O. Jones
MEMORIAL CENTER

“Honoring the memories of loved ones”

INDEPENDENTLY OWNED & OPERATED

FUNERAL NE ee

CARMEN GERTRUDE | 3

: Viewing will be held in the “Legacy Suite” of Vaughn 0.
' Jones Memorial Center, Wulff Road and Primrose Street on
' Friday from 10:00 a.m. to 6:00 p.m. and again on Saturday
of Palm Beach Street will be held !
on Saturday May 23, 2009 at 3:00

Salem Union Baptist |
Officiating :
will be Rev. Charles W. Saunders :
assisted by other Ministers of the :
|. Interment will follow in :!
Woodlawn Gardens, Soldier Road. |

BUTLER, 36

p.m. at
Ghurch, Taylor Street.

Gospel.

Fond memories are left in the hearts of her survivors which
include her sons, Camron and Ramon Ewing, mother, Florence :

Butler, brothers, John, Abram, Lawrence Jr., Dwight, Ricardo,
Jason, Thomas and inspector Derek Butler, sisters, Kenris,

Jennifer, Lorraine, Tanya, Doreen, Sandra, Brenda and Stg. |
1699 Jennifer Butler Gardiner, aunts, Joanna Butler, Agnes ;
Butler, Helen Edgecombe, Susann Cartwright, Hattie Saunders :
and Rhoda Ferguson and Gertrude Knowles, uncle, Bertie :
Knowles, nieces and nephews, Peteann, Dimitri, Annabel, tierra, :
Brandon, Dwight Jr., Danicka, Eunicia, Lauryn, Rickia, Kianna, }
Giovanna, Kayanna, Andrew, Mikele, Krizia, Derivia, Marilyn |
' Jerome, Oral & Kendall Pinder; two sisters: Anita & Deborah
| Pinder; two adopted sisters: Mitizi Barnett & Dianna Russell;
: four aunts: Bernice & Charlotte Kelly & Ettamae Major & Alfreda
Nanyamka, Adebamgbe, Useni, Mutazz, Ridwan, Lashonna, ; White; uncle: Wellington Kelly; nephews: Dexter, Calvin, Meko,
: Kendall Jr, Raymond, Nadier & Mannie Pinder; nieces: Valencia

Moss, Melinda Turner, Dorian, Dustin, Felicia, Lakeisha, Latoya,
Latia, Daneka, Danvit Jr, Dario, Deangelo, Tarnarco, Charles,
Orlando, Shantel, Baswell, Jamaal, Kisstonya, Dwanique,

Avera, Runako, Gaynell, Dakito, Ricardo, Pete and Darron,

grandnieces and nephews, Orlando Jr, Whitney, Tyler and
: Dale Pinder; Godfather: Rev. Felix Miller; and a host of other

Olivia Strachan, Paige Lightbourne and Miquel Turner, in-laws,

Ketlie, Yvette, Patrice, Marsha, Wilamae and Merilyn, and a I
host of other relatives and friends including Rev. Lernis & | Josey Harding & Family, Wilfred Kelly, Beryl Huyler & Family,
Rovina Cornish & family, Viola Johnson of Dundas Town, Abaco, :
Basil Darling, Mrs. Danina Black & family, Nanna, Erica, Cara, | , a0) c
: Smith, Mrs. Millicant Carroll-Ferguson & Family, Angie & Family

Celeste, Debbie and Andy, Jackie Hanna, Tonya Mcintosh,

Sandra Rolle, Hudith Sweeting, GHS Class of 1989, Mrs. |
Daphne Demeritte & family, Philip Ewing & family, Gifford :
Deveaux, Patrick, Vernell, Shenique, Rasheda, friends of
Margaret Avenue, Millars Heights, Buther, Knowles, Miller and :

Saunders families and other relatives and friends too numerous pall
: from 10:00 a.m. to service time.

to mention.

from 3:00 a.m. to 1:00 p.m. and at the church on Saturday
from 2:00 p.m. to service time.

HESKIT DELFIN
PINDER, 44

of Whites Addition, Kemp Road will
be held on Saturday, May 23, 2009
at 11:00 a.m. at Church of God
Auditorium, Fowler Street. Officiating
will be Bishop Godfrey Clarke,
assisted by Rev. Felix Miller.
Interment will follow in Woodlawn
Gardens, Soldier Road.

Precious memories will forever linger

in the hearts of his mother: Norma Pinder; father: Samuel
Pinder; daughter: Deltera Pinder; four brothers: Cornelius,

Thompson, Donishka & Asjah Pinder; sisters-in-law: Phillipa &
relatives and friends including: Teresita Strachan & Family,

Lynette White, Dorothy Rolle, Barbara Adderley & Family,
Dorothy Johnson & Family, Francita Brice & Family, Beradetta

and others too numerous to mention.
Viewing will be held in the "Legacy Sufte" of Vaughn O. Jones

Memorial Center, Wulff Road and Primrose Street on Friday
from 10:00 a.m. to 6:00 p.m. and at the church on Saturday

— Road and Primrose Street,

Telephone: 326- 9800! Pe

site Studio of Draperies
24 Hour Emergency 434-9220/380-8077

1/














"AGE 18, THURSDAY, MAY 21 2009

Sinclair me LFe.
Previgien! | Tanaqgiag

een Matin oe err |

wie F
a — — i) tae hay sty Series

arent SA ea THE WN

VERON ALONZO
ROLLE, 27

a reisdent of Flamingo

Gardens, Nassau and

formerly of Bimini will be held

on Saturday, 23rd May, 2009

at 1:00 p.m. at The United

Church of God Bailey Town,

# Bimini; Officiating will be

Bishop Benjamin Rolle;

assisted by: Rev. Edmund

Ellis and Other Ministers and

interment will follow in Public Cemetery. Services

entrusted to Gateway Memorial Funeral Chapel, Mount
Royal Avenue and Kenwood Street.

Left to cherish his fond memories are his mother: Veronica
Rolle; father Christopher Rolle; stepmother: Sharon Rolle:
sisters: Cleo Pyfrom, Lashanti Finlayson, Lynsey Bain,
Marvette Rolle, Kerisca Kemp, Ramona and Shaquiel
Stuart; brothers: Vermon Rolle, Daleon Brown, Devon
Rose, Billy Stuart Jr, and Javon Kemp; grandfather:
Angelo Rolle; aunts: Mitirell Ellis of Freeport, Helen
Bowleg, Merlene Saunders, Evelyn Sawyer, Sherry
Roberts, Inderia Russell, Zellia Smith, Wendy and Arnette
Kelly, Patricia, Isabella, Deborah, Francis, Geneva, Crystal,
Sheena and Joycelyn Rolle, Linda Russell of Freeport,
Sandra Hinsey, Shatara Stuart, Lillian Weech and Esther
Edgecombe; uncles: Tellis Russell of Freeport, Rev. Oriel,
Ohilip, Arlington, Lawrence, Bishop Benjamin, Alvin, Rev.
Ephraim, Elvis and Hank Rolle, Darrald, Rodney and
Charles Kelly, Kenneth Stuart, Cassius Hinzey and Canute
Weech, Christopher Saunders, Erlin Sawyer, Alfred
Russell and Danny Smith; nieces: Cleshae, Shanique,
Lavincia, Lindeisha, Shantae, Audra, Mariah, Desirae,
Jada, Daleona, Dashawnaw, Aleisha, Javonia and
Jasmine; nephews: Elrico, Kivirrie, Kimani Jr, Lynardo,
Vernon Jr, Daleon Jr, Kari and Javon Jr; Grand Aunts:
Victoria Wilkinson, Ada Williams, Berdie Edgecombe,
Verna Cooper and Enith Dames; Grand Uncles: Benjamin
Grant and Ralph Hanna; God Parents: Ali, Robbie,
Benjamin, Vinola, Elenor, and Magg; Sir Michael and
Lady Checkley, Anne Moxey and a host of other relatives
and friends.

Friends may pay their last respects at the Church in
Bimini on Friday, May 22nd, 2009 from 3:00 p.m. until
service time on Saturday.





THE TRIBUNE OBITUARIES

DEATH
ANNOUNCEMENT

















Hugh Marshall
of New York and fromerly of Nassau
Sunrise February 20, 1924
Sunset May 17, 2009

Left to mourn are his wife Dianna
Daughters; Vera, Joe Ann, Jessica,
Sons Johnathan and Eric. Brothers
Herbert Marshall of Nassau, sisters.
Erid Ferguson of North Carolina,
Nazel Young of Miami Florida,
Hortense Harris-Smith, Hesher
Johnson and Francis Ledee of Nassau
Bahamas, numerous family and
friends including Sybil Fernander,
George, Jehugh and Patrick Edwards,
George Robinson, Reggie Woods and
many others to numerous to mention
May His Soul Rest In Peace

Memorial service will be held on
June 6th, 2009 Date and Time TBA
The Tribune RELIGION Thursday, May 21, 2009 ® PG 19

Sufficient Grace
International Ministries

presents
A Kingdom Connection
Connected With A Kingdom Purpose

Apostle Julian Johnson
Conference Host

Four nights of Wisdom, Revelation and
Prophetic Impartation
Tuesday, 26th May, 2009 through
Friday 29th May, 2009
7:30pm Nightly

Hear anointed speakers as they declare the
Oracles of God

i»

Apostle Kelson Miller Pastor Pedro Cartwright
Born Again Deliverance United Breakthrough Outreach
Christian Fellowship Centre Ministries International
Tuesday, 26th May, 2009 Wednesday, 27th May, 2009

Apostle C. Clifford Smith Prophetess Rochelle Sands
Southside Christian Ministries Friday, 29th May, 2009
International
Thursday, 26th May, 2009

Join us at:

The Sufficient Grace
International Ministries Sanctuary
on Nassau Street
(above Paul’s Air-conditioning

Special music by:
The Grace Tabernaclers

Come With An Attitude of Expectation


PG 20 ® Thursday, May 21, 2009

Do
u

O
fea

Od?

| SUNDAY: Worship - 9:30 am & 11 :00 am
| SERMON: ‘How do I show My Love For God?”
TUESDAY: Bible Study 7:30 pm
At The Manse #37 Harmony Hill - Blair
MINISTER: Rev. John Macleod
Email: manse1@live.com
Phone: 322-5475
Bringing All People Closer to God
Through Worship, Ministry & Service



RELIGION

@ By ALEX MISSICK
Tribune Features Reporter
amissick@tribunemedia.net

The Tribune

HEN it comes to being human, fear is a

common emotion that we can not control.

There is fear of commitment, fear of failure,
fear of rejection, fear of death- all of these spark
raised heart rates and sometimes health problems.
However, what about the spiritual realm? What about

the fear of almighty God?

According to Biblegateway.com,
Psalms 34: 7-11 states: “The
angel of the Lord encamps
around those who fear him, and
he delivers them. Taste and see
that the Lord is good; blessed is
the man who takes refuge in
him. Fear the Lord, you his
saints, for those who fear him
lack nothing. The lions may grow
weak and hungry, but those who
seek the Lord lack no good
thing. Come, my children, listen
to me; I will teach you the fear
of the Lord.”

Sometimes when people talk
about fearing God, they think
about just a deep respect or
being scared, but that is not what
the fear of the Lord is about.
Fear can mean a number of
things but when it comes to God,
He does not want us to be afraid
of Him and afraid of what He is
going to do to us.

Senior Pastor of Golden Gates
World Outreach Ministries
International, Bishop Ros Davis,
said this passage of scripture is a
cry to the righteous.

“The righteous are people that
listen to the Lord. Once you lis-
ten to the Lord, He shares with
you things about Him, in fact
this is what the Holy Spirit does.
It shares the things of Christ with
the saints. When the saints hear
the Holy Spirit and obey the
Holy Spirit this is what glorifies
God. When God is glorified He
then releases for you all that is
needed in your life,” Bishop
Davis said.

Bishop Davis explained that
the word “fear” really means to
“reverence” the Lord because
reverence is deeper than respect.
To reverence the Lord is to be in
awe of Him and this begins on
the inside.

“So when it says ‘to fear the
Lord,’ it means to enter into a
relationship with him. So when
we fear the Lord, we are saying
He is the Lord of the universe so
I must honor Him, fear Him, and
reverence Him. For example, if
you are in the presence of the
prime minister, whether you are
a PLP or FNM, there is an awe
about a leader and a sensible
person will respect that. Any
leader, God gives them this aura
and it is expected of his subjects
to honor him,” Bishop Davis
said.

Once you respect the awe that
comes with the Lord, Bishop
Davis said there is no want in
that person’s life.

“To fear the Lord is really to
submit to him and he in turn
fixes you up. When you rever-
ence God you begin to move out
of your flesh and your way of
thinking. When you reverence
Him the first thing you do is try
to learn his ways and learn about
him. It is being submissive to the
spirit so that the spirit can share
with you and talk with you,”
Bishop Davis said.

“Ultimately when you fear
God, He is going to bless you.
When people fear God they will
reach the place where they do
not lack any good thing. That
means if it is a good thing, they
will have it. God wants you to
have good things, but the only
way to qualify for those things is
to fear Him. If you are reverenc-
ing Him and are in awe of him,
you are going to recognise that
not only is He God, but that He
is always watching you because
you are his child.

“God is not just good for the
religious folks, but he is good for
everybody once you fear him.”



To tear the Lord is really to submit to
him and he in turn fixes you up. When
you reverence God you begin to move out
of your flesh and your way of thinking.
The Tribune

RELIGION

Thursday, May 21, 2009 ® PG 21

Cee
More about mothers

WE HAVE the opportunity to cel-
ebrate the momentous occasion of
the Virgin Mary’s encounter with the
angel throughout the month of May.
It leads us to celebrate all that moth-
erhood means in God’s eternal plan
even as it forces us to applaud the
God-inspired contributions of all
women in every facet of society who
respond to God’s call to obedient
service.

The Proverbs 31 woman is a wife
and mother but she also represents in
her several economic enterprises all
women who are gainfully employed
outside of the home. She highlights
the juggling that exists then and now
between the various demands made
on her to be a delightful home-maker,
dedicated child nurturer, disciplined
professional and devoted spouse.

Y. -Â¥

© REV. ANGELA
+. PALACIOUS

Other women in the Bible remind
us of the fine qualities that the aver-
age mother can bring to her approach
to parenting. May we all be: as clever
as Moses’ mother to hide her child
and save him; as persistent as the
Syrophoenician woman who is
engaged by our Lord in a lively
exchange that displays her faith
before her child is miraculously
healed many miles away; as inten-
tional in our desire to have our chil-
dren blessed by the Lord; and as pas-

sionate aS Hannah about faithfully
dedicating all of our children to be
servants of the Most High God. Let
us never be guilty of dissuading our
children from the call to ordination
because we want them to choose
something more lucrative.

Our deceased mothers and grand-
mothers who made us walk the
straight and narrow path are to be
commended, especially as we see
today what the absence of such vigi-
lance can produce. For those persons
whose mothers are still alive, you will
more than likely only realise what
your mother really means to you
after her ashes are placed in the urn
or her body slowly slips out of sight in
the grave.

In the meantime, try to do whatev-
er you can to make her feel blessed

‘Refreshed’ Richa resurfaces with new album

SHE'S been called everything from
the beauty queen who made it big to
the orphan who found her happy end-
ing that once included a real live
African king. She's been an actress, a
singer, a songwriter with a platinum
record and even a pageant director.
Yet, her happily ever after once
seemed like a happily never after at a
point when she once contemplated sui-
cide, dealt with depression and failed
relationships. Now, Richa Sands is
back, rejuvenated and refreshed with a
brand new album and brand new out-
look on life.

Refreshed, the third album released
under her company Bently
Productions is aptly titled with a thor-
oughly refreshing sound of a cool, con-
fident woman who puts the life she
once wanted to end firmly in the hands
of her Creator.

The album serves as the perfect
demo for any artist who aspires to
crossover. No two songs seem to fit the
same genre yet, it proves Richa is
indeed a force to be reckoned with
when it comes to versatility. Taking
time from her travels with living gospel
legend Ron Kenoly, Richa spoke can-
didly and openly about Refreshed
which took three years to complete.

“I chose the name for the album
because I took time away from front-
line music ministry because I needed to
be rejuvenated and refreshed...and
that I am.,” she said. “Also given the
season that we are presently living in, I
believe that everyday we need to be
renewed and refreshed. The mood of

this project also lends to that feeling.”

The former Miss Bahamas also
admits that her daughter Maleah
serves as a muse in bringing the project
to fruition, the first completed since
become a mom.

“How can children not serve as
inspiration?” she said. “They teach us
the meaning of ‘becoming like little
children, so as to make it into the
Kingdom of Heaven.’ My daughter
definitely serves as a major source of
inspiration. She fills my heart with joy
and laughter and came to me at a time
when my heart was broken and I am
grateful to God for sending her to me.”

Richa added that she inspired to
bring several elements to the album
and achieved her goal in an award-
worthy way. She starts off the album
with a jazzy style for Bless The Lord
before pouring out her Bahamian
roots with Revival In My Soul, a true
example of how the cultural expression
of Junknaoo rushin' was birthed from
the church. The album also reconnects
Richa with her Jamaican heritage in a
dancehall techno mix of Send Down
The Rain featuring Dangerous while
her elegant vocals lend a sense of class
to reggae with Marching To Zion.
Perhaps one of the more interesting
twists on her record is Take My Life, a
traditional funeral hymn that stands
out as an R&B love song to God.

Richa is also sure to lure in a new
fans as she ventures into the crunk/hip
hop genre with Clap Your Hands and
the pop jam Get Straight featuring
award-winning artists Monty G and Mr



Lynx.

way.”

available in The Bahamas at 100%

her through
MySpace.com.

“T would have to say that the single I :
released from the album T'is So Sweet i
To Trust In Jesus is the song that is most }
personal to me,” Richa noted of the i
project. “This is the great lesson we i
sometimes have such difficulty with - i
simply to trust God and allow Him to }
have His way in our lives. It's so much
more rewarding and beautiful that i

by God to have had you as her child.
Thank God for a praying, caring, lov-
ing, generous, Godly, and thoughtful
mother. Forgive her mistakes, and
ask God to heal you if the wounds go
really deep.

Show your appreciation every day
for all that women do in your life
does to make your life easier, better,
and brighter. Notice her efforts to
please, support her desire to grow
and succeed, and pray for her spirit to
be set free.

The more grateful a woman is for
life and energized she is by her activ-
ities, the more joy she brings to her
home and peace she leaves in each
room. When a woman’s heart is
turned to the Lord, and God’s love
overflows in her life, she is such a
blessing to behold.

RELIGIONBRIEFS

: Pope names Joseph Cistone
hew bishop of Saginaw

| MLSAGINAW, Mich.

JOSEPH R. Cistone was named

i Wednesday as leader of the Diocese of
? Saginaw and its about 119,000 Roman
i Catholic worshippers, according to the
i Associated Pres.

Cistone will be installed as bishop

: July 28. He will be the sixth bishop of
i the diocese, which was created in 1938
i and spans an 11-county region centered
i on Saginaw, about 80 miles north-
? northwest of Detroit.

"T fully trust in the providence of

i God, and I know it is the hand of God
? which has placed me in your midst to
i: lead and serve," Cistone told reporters
i at a Wednesday morning news confer-

Tenet

? get to know you."

ence in Saginaw. "I look forward to
being here with you and am anxious to

Pope Benedict XVI announced the
appointment.

Cistone, 60, is a native of
Philadelphia and attended St. Charles
Borromeo Seminary in Overbrook,
Penn. He was ordained as a priest in
1975 and in 1998 was named an hon-
orary prelate to Pope John Paul II. He
was consecrated a bishop in 2004, the
same year he became an auxiliary bish-

? op in Philadelphia.
Richa's new album Refreshed is }

"IT commit myself to you, the faithful

; of the Diocese of Saginaw, to shepherd
Bible Bookstore and Jukebox. Her :
album is also available by contacting }
Facebook or i
i archbishop of St. Louis.

you in faith and love," Cistone said.
Cistone succeeds Robert J. Carlson,
who last month was named the new
PG 22 ®@ Thursday, May 21, 2009

RELIGION

The Tribune

Under grace and not law - What does it mean?

m@ By LEONARD A. JOHNSON



I AM always amused when I hear
the remark, “We are no longer under
law but under grace,” implying that the
law does not serve any function or very
little. Conveniently, the expression is
used to support the argument that the
Seventh-day Sabbath is no longer
binding upon Christians. Additionally,
it is argued that the Old Testament is
irrelevant and that we should follow
and adhere to the New Testament.
However I ask, “Is that really so?” “Is
the law still relevant?” “To be a
Christian, does it mean that we shun
the Old Testament?” “Is there any
connection to the spirit of lawlessness
pervading our society?”

Taking a Look at the Sermon on
the Mount

In the Sermon on the Mount, Jesus
clearly stated in Matthew 3:17, "Do not
think that I came to destroy the Law or
the Prophets. I did not come to destroy
but to fulfill” (NKJV). The context, con-
sistent with the Greek translation, refers
to the first five books of Moses and not
just God's law referenced by Jesus in
verse 19. Jesus taught by referring to the
writings of Moses and the prophets that
essentially the Old Testament is relevant
and no less inspired, and that it was not
His agenda to destroy it. Instead He
came “to fulfill” which means to make
full; to explain; or to magnify as will be
seen from verse 21. In other words,
Jesus came to release His law, giving it
its full meaning and application.

Fulfilling the Law
Giving six examples between verses
21 and 48, Jesus clarified the relevance
of the law and its application. For the
purpose of this article, I refer to three of
them.

The first one, which is recorded in
Matthew 5:21-26, speaks to murder.
Referring to the prevailing thought of
the day, Jesus said: “You have heard
that it was said to those of old, 'You shall
not murder, and whoever murders will
be in danger of the judgment.'”
However, Jesus declared or explained:
“But I say to you that whoever is angry
with his brother without a cause shall be
in danger of the judgment. And whoev-
er says to his brother, 'Raca!' shall be in
danger of the council” (Matthew 5:21-
22, NKJV).

Jesus fulfilled this law by giving its full
meaning, explaining that murder begins
in the heart. The word “anger” which
comes from the Greek word “Orge”
refers to anger that is long-lived and that
which a person “nurses, cherishes and
refuses to let die”, resulting in or seeking
revenge. Isn't it interesting that the
other Greek word for anger, “Thumos”,
implying “a momentary anger that flares
up and dies” is not used? Yet the
Pharisees and Scribes felt that it was fine
to harbour hatred as long as no murder
was committed externally.

Do we not see a connection with vio-
lent crime and a spirit of hatred, anger
and revenge? It would seem that per-
sons would rather vent their anger in
pushing a knife into someone's chest or
pulling a trigger. Conflict resolution
seems foreign to many in our society.

Secondly, Jesus addresses adultery in
Matthew 5:27-30 stating: “You have
heard that it was said to those of old,
"You shall not commit adultery.’ But I
say to you that whoever looks at a
woman to lust for her has already com-
mitted adultery with her in his heart."
(Matthew 5:27-28, NKJV). Again, Jesus
in regard to His law taught that adultery
begins in the heart. For the Pharisees
and Scribes, adultery was committed
when the actual act was carried out, but
not so with Jesus. It starts in the heart.
The Old Testament writer, Job under-
stood this as seen in Job 31:1: “I have
made a covenant with my eyes; Why
then should I look upon a young
woman?"

In our society today one does not
have to imagine much given the exposed
manner in which some dress --both men
and women. It is inviting and tempting
to fall victim to lust if we fail to make a
covenant with our eyes and control our
passion.

Thirdly, Jesus in Matthew 5:43-48
gave attention to love for one's enemy.
Pharisees and Scribes misquoted
Leviticus 19:18 to say that it was alright
to love one's neighbors and hate one's
enemies. However, Jesus fulfilled the
law on love by pointing out: "But I say
to you, love your enemies, bless those
who curse you, do good to those who
hate you, and pray for those who spite-
fully use you and persecute you,"
(Matthew 5:44, NKJV). In Christ's day
this teaching was foreign, and today it is
certainly not popular.

Reasoning from the above three
examples, the meaning of “fulfilled” is

clear. Jesus, instead of abolishing His
law, gave it the prominence it deserved.
So shouldn't we His followers do like-
wise? ‘To do so does not make us legal-
istic as we ought to know :“By grace we
are saved.” However as noted in
Romans 3:31 grace does not mean that
we disregard God's instead we “uphold
the law.”

Summing it Up

Given the aforementioned, I submit
that if we took seriously the teaching of
Jesus it could serve to reduce hatred,
anger, murder, dishonesty and marital
infidelity etc. I would think that those
who loosely use the expression, “We
are no longer under law but under
grace” may wish to reconsider the
expression. It can suggest irresponsibil-
ity and lawlessness. While Christians
are under grace they show a healthy
relationship to God's will, always
remembering the purpose of the law
which is to point out sin and hopefully
lead to Christ. No wonder Christ said,
“Do not think that I came to destroy
the Law or the Prophets. I did not come
to destroy but to fulfill." More than
anyone Christ gave the law its rightful
place.

Thought to Ponder:
“Our attitude to the law of God is an
index of our attitude to God Himself.”

- SINCLAIR FERGUSON

e Leonard A. Johnson, D Min
President, Bahamas Conference of
Seventh-day Adventisis

Gonna get you good

AS TIME goes by you would think
one forgives and forgets what you may
have said or done to them. Well, some
do and there are others who eventual-
ly will, however, they're not quite
ready yet. They want revenge. They
want to inflict the worst pain on you
that they possibly can, to make you
hurt if but just for a moment or two,
the way in which they did. If after
someone, spills a drink on you, cuts in
front of you on a line, steps on your
toes, or does any of the other limitless
amounts of things against you; your
heart races, your teeth clench, your
mouth dries, your fingers ache, your
head lightens and your body trembles,
you may be experiencing symptoms of
revengeitis. Okay there's no such
thing, you already

know that. Nevertheless the feelings
are very real, and if you act on them

TONI
STYLES



you may get yourself in more trouble
than you bargained for.

Luckily most persons express their
desire for revenge, and some go into
great detail talking to anyone who
would listen. It is during these times
that it is very important for us, the lis-
teners, to act as a mediator to prevent
the possibility that their plan may
come to pass. All around our world we
hear stories of persons seeking
revenge; anything from the tyrannised
student at school, the recently dis-
missed worker, or the cheated spouse;

revenge seems to be the only avenue
where one can find complete satisfac-
tion. Well...maybe for a short period of
time. That is, before the feelings of
remorse or simply embarrassment take
them over, feelings that a person hope-
lessly tries to push aside in a final
attempt to thrust themselves into a
subhuman, emotionless suit of their
own making.

I remember as a child my parents
and other persons saying in respect to
my wanting revenge for some trivial
fault done to me, ‘Don't stoop to their
level’. Well as a kid, I didn't only want
to stoop to their level, I wanted to take
their whole level over and any other
level they may have been on. Now, as a
young adult, I can fully appreciate that
wise instruction, knowing that if a per-
son always places pride in front of rea-
son, the results can be tragic. = Not to

sound cliche’ but it does indeed take
two to tango.

In closing may you then implement,
or simply consider, the idea of turning
the other cheek, thus, allowing for
peace.

"You have heard it was said, ‘Love
your neighbour and hate your enemy.’
But I tell you: Love your enemies and
pray for those who persecute you, that
you may be sons of your Father in
heaven. He causes his sun to rise on the
evil and the good, and sends rain on
the righteous and the unrighteous. If
you love those who love you, what
reward will you get? Are not even the
tax collectors doing that? And if you
greet only your brothers, what are you
doing more than others? Do not even
pagans do that? Be perfect, therefore,
as your heavenly Father is perfect."

¢ Toni Elizabeth Styles is a Bahamian
writer and poet, currently residing in
Nassau, Bahamas.

Comments related to the article can be
sent to fearless247@gmail.com.
The Tribune

@r THE HISTORY OF RELIGION IN THE BAHAMAS

Thursday, May 21, 2009 ® PG 23

RELIGION



Roman Catholics established in Harbour Island

HARBOUR Island schoolteacher,
Marion Johnson, baptised a Methodist
but a catechist and sacristan in the
Anglican Church, after reading Roman
Catholic literature, decided she would
like to be baptised again as a Roman
Catholic. She took the mail boat to
Nassau to talk to Father Chrysostum
OSB, who told her, “If you want to be
baptised you have to live a Catholic
life.” At first he refused as Harbour
Island had no Catholic priest but she
persisted and the next day he baptised
her.

There was a long standing prejudice
against the Roman Catholic Church in
the Bahamas and Father Chrysostum
felt that it would never be removed
unless a Roman Catholic mission was
established in Harbour Island, the for-
mer home of many leading Bahamians.
In 1920, Father Bonaventure Hansen
OSB, after spending 15 years in North
Dakota, arrived in the Bahamas. After
a short time in Nassau, Father
Chrysostum asked him the favour of
opening a mission in Harbour Island,
“to break the backbone of
Protestantism in the islands.’ Father
Bonaventure held the first mass on
Harbour Island, in the home of Marion
Johnson and her friend Hattie
Thompson, on February 7 1921, later to
become the Little Boarding House.

A headline in the Nassau Daily
Tribune of July 8,1943 read: Brilander
in Canadian Army Chaplain Service :
“Reverend Carl Albury has been
assigned to the Pacific Command,
Combined Operations School. His tal-
ented younger sister Carrie Albury is
now 3rd in Command of the Sisters of
Service and her advancement is
remarkable.”

Table 1: Religious Affiliation in the Census of 1943 and 1953 in the N. W. Bahamas.

| | “Harbour Isl._| Spanish Wells | Abaco & Cays | Eleuthera | New Prov. _|
Anglican | 244 | 223 | 19 | 3 | 541 | 569 | 1765 | 1585 | 7846 | 13145 |
| Roman Catholic | 177 | 330 | 1 | 8 | 5 | 52 | 232 | 349 | 4881 | 9770 |
| Baptist S| 37_ «| 15 | 0 Tt 1017: | 1244 | 946 | 828 | 8359 | 12185 |
| ChurchofGod [| NA | 118 | NA | 0 | NA | 296 | NA | 274 | NA | 2129 |
[Others | 85 «| 25 | 287 | 9 | 921 | 210 | 725 | 564 | 3246 | 2158 |


















None

; IM
> LAWLOR

The conversion of the whole Albury
family had been Father Bonaventure’s
second success. The vocation of Carrie
and Carl and the faith of Marion and
Hattie were said to be the two corner-
stones of the new Catholic Church on
Harbour Island, which very quickly
built up a following and within 5 years
had 200 conversions.

In November 1921, Father
Chrysostom purchased four pieces of
property for a church, rectory, convent
and a school and a century old, battered
shell of a house as a home for the Sisters
of Charity. The Sisters, Mary Giovanni,

Too many opinions

THE word of God exhorts us that
when a brother is overtaken in a fault
those who are spiritual (persons with
the spirit of God in them) should
restore, lift or brace up such a one.

Someone called me the other day
saying, "Randy Frazier going to jail this
time." My answer was and still is we
need to pray for the bishop. In my short
time of adulthood I have learned that
people in our Bahamian society take
joy in pulling and tearing each other
down. There even seems to be an
extreme love for it when it is a leader of
any kind. I have witness the maligning
of parliamentarians, preachers, pastors,
managers, directors ect., you name it
I've seen it. I want it to be publicly
known that I will not be apart of that.

r



ALLISON
| MILLER

Now for you who may think that I am
agreement with the negative things that
go on in this country I'm not. We only
comprehend situations when it hits
close to home or happens at home. I'll
share with you how I emphasis with
others in their various situations. All I
do is put myself in their shoes and the
same understanding and mercy that I
would want in whatever situation I am

| NotStated {| 21 | 4 | it [| it | 224 | 39 | 302 | 37 | 1584 | 665 |
fe Mae Os in) 220s 39 AS
| Total | 769 ~| 840 | 665 | 636 | 3461 | 3407 | 6430 | 6070 | 29391 | 46125 |

Maria Agatha Sissler, Catherine Maria
Snee, Mary Regina Lynch and Maria
Rose O’Neill, arrived in Harbour Island
in late January 1922 and met bigotry
and prejudice against them.

But gradually, “the locals accepted
these smiling tenderhearted women as
they won over the people by their char-
ity and long suffering patience.” Life
was very primitive at the St Vincent’s
Convent where rainwater had to be col-
lected in large tubs and heated on a
kerosene stove and their only chairs had
to be carried from chapel to the refecto-
ry and to their bedrooms at night. On
February 2, 1922, the new combined
chapel and schoolhouse on Harbour
Island was dedicated and Father
Bonaventure assumed charge. Three
months later the first 4 converts to the
Catholic faith were baptised on
Harbour Island As predicted, the
Harbour Island mission was an impor-

able to give. Yes a lot of it makes you
angry, however, we cannot continue to
answer with anger. That only leads to
more problems.

I don't know if we perceive the fact
that if he is guilty all Bishop Randy
Frazier has to do is repent and God
WILL forgive him. It is God and God
alone who has the power of heaven and
hell. We don't have that power, why do
we act as if we do? All of us have made
bad decisions or would do something
different in our lives that we had to pay
for dearly. I have not forgotten the
scripture that says: "Touch not the
Lord's anointed and do His prophets
no harm." In all honesty do you think
that anyone of us can deal with Randy
Frazier better than God can? Are His
dealings not good enough for us?

A young man took the life of my co-
worker and friend Ericka Fowler. I was
so hurt and upset that I hoped that he
got lost in jail for the rest of his natural
life. I prayed to God that if I had never

| 40 | 259 | 307_|

tant step, and as Table 1 shows, by 1953,
Roman Catholicism was the most popu-
lar religious denomination on that
island.

Roman Catholic Education in
Harbour Island

Before the Sisters of Charity arrived,
Marion Johnson had gathered together
16 students, all non-Catholics, for the
new St Vincent’s Academy. The stu-
dents had the additional duty in the
afternoon of pushing the desks and
chairs to the walls to convert the room
to a church and in the morning re-
arranging the furniture to start school.
Within two years, the Sisters of Charity
opened St Benedict’s School and oper-
ated them both for many years as free
schools until in 1953, St Vincent’s
Academy was discontinued and the 26
students were added to the 136 stu-
dents attending St Benedict’s School.

had to see him again in life it would be
to soon. One day on my way to mid-day
prayer, guess who I saw? That same
young man. Immediately I became
uneasy and conflicted within myself
and needless to say could not find
prayer anywhere in my mind.

Later that day I had told a dear
friend of mine what had happen and
what I was thinking and feeling. She
said to me: "Allison you cannot afford
for that man to cause you to go to hell.
If God was to come now and find you in
the position you in that's you. What will
you say, I in hell because of what some-
one else did. That is unexceptable, you
Know all he has to do is ask God to for-
give him and that’s it. You busy being
mad in hell and he in heaven."

We can't afford others’ actions to
make us end up where we asked God to
redeem us from in the first place. No
matter what, we as a people have to
forgive if we are going to make it into
heaven.
PG 24 ® Thursday, May 21, 2009








ms
-
: — P a



-
ra

THE ladies of the Church
of God of Prophecy recently
held their first annual Pre
Mother's Day Tea Party and
Fashion Extravaganza at The
Botanical Gardens, West Bay
Street.

The event was organised by
assistant director, Patrice
Bain who encouraged a cross
section of women ranging
from the young to the very
mature from the East Street
Tabernacle, Elizabeth Estates
and the Englerston Churches
to display their talent by par-
ticipating in the ‘best set'
table competition using the
theme “Four Seasons.”

The team of judges for the
event included Mary Moss,

eg

i: a i "A
dae Oe ea a
DAY TEA PARTY

RELIGION




'

"oe

ee
pa

ae, |






Vylma Thompson-Curling,
Cheryl Bain, Enamae Cox,
Chynella Ferguson, Katherine
Beneby, Cherise Nottage and
Paulette Beneby.

The Englerston Church
received the first prize for the
‘best set' table, the Elizabeth
Estates Church placed second
and third place was awarded
to Karen Pratt one of the
table leaders from the East
Street Church. The attendees
were entertained by Simone
Beneby; received information
on the origin of tea parties as
well as native bush teas and
enjoyed a fashion show.

Pictured are scenes from
the day.

(Submitted by DONNA DELANCY)

The Tribune