Citation
The Tribune

Material Information

Title:
The Tribune
Uniform Title:
Tribune (Nassau, Bahamas)
Portion of title:
Nassau tribune
Place of Publication:
Nassau, Bahamas
Publisher:
Tribune
Publication Date:
Copyright Date:
2009
Frequency:
Daily, except Sunday
daily
normalized irregular
Language:
English
Physical Description:
v. : ill. ; 58 cm.

Subjects

Genre:
newspaper ( sobekcm )
newspaper ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage:
Bahamas

Notes

General Note:
Description based on: Vol. 79, no. 210 (Aug. 3, 1983); title from caption.

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Holding Location:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
This item was contributed to the Digital Library of the Caribbean (dLOC) by the source institution listed in the metadata. This item may or may not be protected by copyright in the country where it was produced. Users of this work have responsibility for determining copyright status prior to reusing, publishing or reproducing this item for purposes other than what is allowed by applicable law, including any applicable international copyright treaty or fair use or fair dealing statutes, which dLOC partners have explicitly supported and endorsed. Any reuse of this item in excess of applicable copyright exceptions may require permission. dLOC would encourage users to contact the source institution directly or dloc@fiu.edu to request more information about copyright status or to provide additional information about the item.
Resource Identifier:
09994850 ( OCLC )

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Full Text
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BAHAMAS EDITION

www.tribune242.com

WEDNESDAY, MAY 20, 2009

CARS FOR SALE,
a
a i

favours claims

Allegations
surround two
senior Lands and
Surveys officers

m@ By PAUL G TURNQUEST
Tribune Staff Reporter
pturnquest@tribunemedia. net

CLAIMS of nepotism continue
to plague the Department of
Lands and Surveys when it was
alleged yesterday that the wives
of two senior officers in that
department, and other close rela-
tives had been granted Crown
land on Abaco.

In The Tribune’s efforts to
obtain documentation to sub-
stantiate these claims, it was
revealed that certain files at the
department were no longer acces-
sible by staff at this ministry.

However, where there
appeared to be an attempt to con-
ceal this information, it was for-
gotten that once the grants had
been approved they were record-
ed at the Register General’s
office.

It was here that it was discov-
ered that the wife and son of one
of the senior officials had received
an 18,343 square foot and a 15,635
square foot lot respectively. The
first parcel, granted in a subdivi-
sion south of Treasure Cay, Aba-
co was sold for $2,201.16 while
the second lot, on Wood Cay,
Abaco, was sold for $1,786.25.

SEE page eight




Liter

SEE PAGE ELEVEN



More than 20

potential buyers

for Emerald Bay

Receivers
keep their
identities
under wraps

HEAVY RAIN TAKES ITS TOLL ON STREETS OF NASSAU







THE STORMY WEATHER
yesterday caused flood-
ing problems throughout
New Providence, with
this man stopped from
getting to his business by
the water.

more photos of the after-
math of the morning rain.

Felipé Major/Tribune staff

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SEE PAGE TWO for

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Tim Clarke/Tribune staff

THE FRONT portion of the Central Detective Unit building collapsed yesterday.

Extreme weather leads to
canopy collapse at CDU

m By TANEKA THOMPSON
Tribune Staff Reporter
tthompson@tribunemedia.net

EXTREME weather conditions
ripped through the Central Detec-
tive Unit yesterday morning leading
to the collapse of a steel canopy at
the front of the building and heavy
flooding at the adjacent Criminal
Records Office on Thompson Boule-
vard.

Torrential rain and wind, which
tore through the capital yesterday
morning, led to the partial collapse of
the building after 10 am yesterday,
although there were reports that tor-
nado like conditions "shook" the
building before the canopy fell in.

"Persons been telling us they saw
a tornado this morning and some
persons are saying that they felt the

SEE page eight

new printed
tees & tanks



Located on Ernest & Mackey Streets # Mon-Fri 10am-4pm + Sat 10am-2p














INSIDE

TALK SHOW HOST ACCUSED

OF TAKING ADVANTAGE OF

THOSE SEEKING HIS HELP
PAGE THREE

FIRM SAYS
BUREAUCRACY
GETTING IN WAY OF
FIXING TRAFFIC LIGHTS

PAGE FIVE
PRO-GAMBLING GROUP
LOOKS TOWARDS
INDUSTRY TRAINING
FOR BAHAMIANS

PAGE SIX



NASSAU AND BAHAMA

ISLANDS’ LEADING NEWSPAPER



m@ By MEGAN
REYNOLDS
Tribune Staff Reporter
mreynolds@
tribunemedia. net

MORE than 20 interested
parties are considering buy-
ing the Emerald Bay Resort
and Marina in Exuma but
receivers are keeping their
identities under wraps.

Russell Downs, a repre-
sentative for receivers Price-
waterhouseCoopers, told
The Tribune yesterday he
did not wish to reveal the
names of the bidders to
avoid a public auction and
because confidentiality
agreements have been
signed.

However, Mr Downs did
confirm there are around
two dozen interested buy-
ers, some which have shown
interest in Emerald Bay
before, and some which are
new to the development.

The Emerald Bay Resort
and Marina, Four Seasons
Hotel and golf course, will
close temporarily on May
26, leaving around 500
employees out of work,
while receivers and creditors
attempt to secure investors
to acquire the project and
assume the management
contract with the Four Sea-
sons Management Group.

SEE page eight

Downpours
are expected
to continue

OCCASIONAL downpours
are expected over the next four to
five days as a low pressure sys-
tem moving slowly northeast
from the Gulf of Mexico contin-
ues to head towards the north-
west Bahamas.

Meanwhile another low pres-
sure system off the eastern coast
of Cuba, which was being moni-
tored by forecasters on Monday,
is no longer a threat to the
Bahamas.

Yesterday the National Hurri-
cane Centre in Florida reported
that the weak area of low pres-
sure located near the central
Bahamas was becoming absorbed
by a larger non-tropical low cen-
tred over Florida.

The NHC said development of
that system appeared unlikely and
a hurricane hunter mission sched-
uled for yesterday was subse-
quently cancelled.

"That low pressure system in

SEE page eight

Mel aidleile lad



PAGE 2, WEDNESDAY, MAY 20, 2009

LOCAL NEWS

THE TRIBUNE





THIS CAR is
left under
water after
two hours of
rain.






THIS RESIDENT is calling upon Government to fix
this road as for years it has stopped him from get-

ting to his business on Mackey Street.

CARS IN PINE WOOD
had to drive slowly
because of high waters
from a two hour down
fall.



SCENES of flooding from around Nassau yesterday after
torrential showers pummelled the island throughout the
morning. Those who had been wishing for an end to the
drought, which had taken hold over the last few months,
may have got too much of a good thing.

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Sittle—Swisecland

TLUeeM USL RRORSESU Lae eect m ee) melee
Monday May léth - 25th
Bay Street
John Hardy creates designs that are in balance with
nature and fashion
VaR esl Meme OSU O Same ne AY
‘No purchase hecessary

Bee Ue eae eee reread eee ns ea) Ce erage



‘My sister was
nearly crushed
y a Mack truck’

m@ By MEGAN REYNOLDS
Tribune Staff Reporter
mreynolds@tribunemedia.net

A BROTHER is calling for
stricter regulations of heavy-
duty cargo trucks after his sis-
ter was nearly crushed by a
Mack truck weeks after anoth-
er brother died in a truck col-
lision.

Angelo Knowles launched
a petition on the Internet after
a Mack truck ploughed into
the car of his sister, Monica
Knowles, at the Paradise
Island Bridge toll booth on
Friday.

Her traumatising accident
came just seven weeks after
their brother, Peter Knowles,
a 32-year-old married father
of two, was killed when his
scooter collided with a truck at
the junction of JFK Drive and
Prospect Ridge on March 26.

Now Angelo Knowles, 30,
is urging Bahamians to call for
greater safety on the streets
by signing the petition on the
website: www.bahamasis-
sues.com.

Supportive comments have
flooded the site under Mr
Knowles’ account of his sis-
ter’s horrific accident and the
collision that caused his broth-
er’s untimely death, but the
petition on the website’s new
“petitions” section had only
two signatures last night.

Mr Knowles said: “This is
ridiculous; my brother gets
killed and my sister almost
dies in an accident.

“Lots of people are aware
that something should be
done, but I want us to do
something about it by signing
the petition, so something can
be done.

“T’m appalled by the situa-
tion of these trucks on the
road. I have heard about truck
drivers drinking in the bar and
speeding off into the night like
speed racers.

“There are no service
checks so the brakes, lights
and mirrors may not be there,
and the companies who own
these trucks, it’s like they’re
not checking.

“And it’s been going on for
too long, more lives are going
to be lost.”

Monica Knowles told The
Tribune how a truck came
barreling towards her sound-
ing its horn as she stopped to
activate the transponder in the
far right lane of the Paradise
Island bridge. She felt the
impact immediately as the

Man lashes out weeks after
brother dies in truck collision

elipé Major/Tribune staff

wL



FLASHBACK: The scooter lies under the dump truck after the fatal



i,

accident weeks ago which killed Peter Knowles.

truck crushed the left side of
her car. Miss Knowles said:
“Everything was getting
crushed and I watched every-
thing crumple on the side of

Don’t miss tomorrow’s
edition of The Tribune for

4
Bvehumane

The Bahamas Humane Society

ANIMALFUNDAY

HIGHLIGHTS

MAIN/SPORTS SECTION

Local News

Editorial/Letters. ..........

Pilbceo oro cl

See Me ante Manaus meeneRenct asa: P4

CLASSIFIED SECTION 40 PAGES

INSERTS - LITTLE SWITZERLAND

USA TODAY MAIN SECTION 12 PAGES



me — I just couldn't believe it.

“T was just waiting to black
out and it felt like it lasted for-
ever. Then I realised it had
stopped and I looked around
at my body and I was fine.”

Miss Knowles only escaped
the impact because her car
was a right-hand drive — unlike
the vast majority of cars on
the island.

“Tt felt like a miracle,” she
said. The truck driver told
Miss Knowles his brakes had
failed, she said. Miss Knowles’
brother claims there was an
open beer bottle in the truck.
He has posted a photograph
of it on Bahamas Issues.

His petition calls for drivers
to take a mandatory mental
and physical exam twice a
year to ensure they are of
sound mind and able to drive
on the busy and crowded Nas-
sau streets. Signatories also
demand that heavy duty com-
mercial trucks are thoroughly
inspected to ensure brakes
cannot fail. Mr Knowles said:
“My brother is dead and left
many grieving souls. The truck
driver is back on the road
again. I haven't met or heard
from this guy. I don't even
know his name.

“But whoever you are, I
pray that you and all the oth-
er truck drivers be more care-
ful and cautious when you dri-
ve and that you be more
aware of your surroundings,
so that you do not miss and
kill somebody else's brother,
father, uncle, cousin, sister,
mother, aunt, or friend.”

FOR 3 IN 1 LAWN SERVICE
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Pest Control

Ue Perl
322-2157





THE TRIBUNE

WEDNESDAY, MAY 20, 2009, PAGE 3



Talk show host accused of taking

advantage of those seeking his help

Accusations made
against Ortland Bodie

Man accused |
of having sex
with sister, 10

A MAN accused of hav-
ing sex with his 10-year-old
sister has been arraigned in
the Magistrates Court on an
incest charge.

The 24-year-old man is
accused of having inter-
course with his underage
sister on May 11, 2009.

The man, who was
arraigned in Court 6, Parlia-
ment Street on Monday,
was not required to enter a
plea to the incest charge.
He was granted bail in the
sum of $10,000 with two
sureties. The case has been
adjourned to August 17 for
the start of a preliminary
inquiry.

Three minor
shark attacks
are reported
in Florida

m@ NEW SMYRNA BEACH,
Fla.

AUTHORITIES say
three people received rela-
tively minor bites from
sharks off New Smyrna
Beach over the weekend,
according to Associated
Press.

Emergency officials say
two bites were reported
about five minutes apart on
Saturday morning. A third
bite was reported around
the same time of day Sunday
morning.

One of Saturday’s victims
was bitten on his hand but
was able to drive himself to
the hospital. Another man
was bitten on his foot and
required surgery. Sunday’s
victim was bit on the leg and
required several stitches.

Astronauts
say goodbye
to Hubble
for good

@ CAPE CANAVERAL,
Fla.

ATLANTIS’ astronauts
gingerly dropped the Hub-
ble Space Telescope over-
board Tuesday, sending the
restored observatory off on
a new voyage of discovery
and bidding it farewell on
behalf of the planet, accord-
ing to Associated Press.

Hubble — considered
better than new following
five days of repairs and
upgrades — will never be
seen up close by humans
again. This was NASA’s
last service call.

The shuttle and telescope
had just crossed the
Atlantic, and were soaring
350 miles above the coast of
northwestern Africa, when
astronaut Megan McArthur
used a robot arm to release
the snares gripping Hubble.
Then the shuttle slowly
backed away.

“Hubble has been
released,” reported com-
mander Scott Altman. “It’s
safely back on its journey of
exploration as we begin
steps to conclude ours.
Looking back on this mis-
sion, it’s been an incredible
journey for us as well.”

Mission Control radioed
congratulations: “It’s won-
derful to see Hubble, the
most famous scientific
instrument of all time, new-
ly upgraded and ready for
action thanks to you.”

With Hubble flying on its
own again, the seven astro-
nauts looked ahead to Fri-
day’s planned landing. But
first they had to inspect
their ship one last time to
make sure it had not been
smacked by space junk. The
telescope’s unusually high
orbit had placed the shuttle
and its crew at increased
risk and, because of the
lack of a refuge, prompted
NASA to keep a rescue
ship on standby until the
end of the 11-day flight.

During five consecutive
days of spacewalks loaded
with drama, Atlantis’ crew
labored tirelessly on the 19-
year-old observatory. Four
men working in teams of
two gave the telescope two
new high-powered science
instruments and a suite of
other up-to-date equip-
ment, and fixed two broken
instruments, something nev-
er before attempted in
orbit.

m@ By ALISON LOWE
Tribune Staff Reporter
alowe@tribunemedia.net

SELF-STYLED hero of the down-
trodden, controversial talk show host
Ortland Bodie has been accused of
using his position to take advantage
of Bahamians who have come to him
looking for help.

Benson Beneby and Patrick Smith
told The Tribune that they want to
warn other disadvantaged people
“who may not know their rights”
about what happened to them so
that they can avoid getting into the
same situation.

Mr Beneby, a courier, claimed
that through his radio programme
Mr Bodie has said “he’s going to
assist Bahamian people.” However,
in his case, he claims he discovered
otherwise.

He and Mr Smith were sued by
Mr Bodie for hundreds of dollars
that they refused to pay for “con-
sultation and research services” the
disbarred attorney claimed he did
on their behalf after they separately
approached him in his capacity as a
radio personality.

The pair claim they received let-
ters demanding payment for the
alleged services and threatening
legal action, before being summoned
to court last Wednesday, although
they denied making any written or
verbal agreement with Mr Bodie.

Meanwhile, despite his previously
vigorous pursuit of the funds, Mr
Bodie failed to show up in court,
causing Magistrate James Moxey to
dismiss the suits against the men.

Attorney for Mr Smith, Jairam
Mangra of the Lockhart and Munroe

eee ee ett

THE GOVERNMENT yesterday announced
the closure of a public road due to the long-
awaited commencement of construction on the

national stadium.

Tim Clarke/Tribune staff [

Appeal Court challenge over Senior
Justice Allen decision continues

The Ministry of Youth, Sports and Culture
advised the public that the main entrance road
leading to the Thomas A Robinson stadium has
been closed to vehicular and pedestrian traffic in
light of the work in the vicinity of the

law firm, told The Tribune yester-
day that the suit was “frivolous,
vexatious and an abuse of the
court.”

In the case of Mr Beneby, who
also turned to the law firm for guid-
ance, paying $200 for its advice, Mr
Mangra confirmed that it was also
their recommendation in his case
that the suit could not be substanti-
ated.

“We advised Mr Beneby that he
didn’t really need an attorney at all,”
said Mr Mangra.

Court

After meeting in court, the men
agreed the host “had to be exposed”
for what he had done to them.

On Friday the normally vocal Mr
Bodie, who airs daily on More94.fm,
told The Tribune not “to get
involved in private matters between
people” and threatened legal action
if an article is published.

Pressed as to why he failed to
show up to court, he said only that
Mr Beneby “should not be calling
you about this.”

“If you publish something about a
private matter between myself and
Mr Beneby I will do what I have to
do,” he said.

Revealing the series of events that

Queen Elizabeth Sports Centre.

cause.”



“A new roadway has been constructed at the
Thompson Boulevard and Moss Road intersec-
tion to facilitate entry to the Thomas A Robin-
son stadium,” said a statement from the ministry.

“The ministry seeks the cooperation of the
public during the construction phase and regrets
and inconvenience this new arrangement may

led to last Wednesday’s court
date, Mr Beneby claimed he first
approached Mr Bodie last year as
he had thought he might be inter-
ested in publicly discussing a judg-
ment he had been awarded in 2006,
which the defendant in the case had
refused to pay.

Feeling that he had exhausted his
legal avenues, Mr Beneby’s hope
was that through receiving a public
airing on the radio, the defendant
might feel pressured to pay the costs
awarded to him by the court.

But he said it was his impression
that all Mr Bodie was interested in
was charging him money to do things
other than talk on the radio.

“He was doing a radio show in Fox
Hill. As he was leaving I went up to
him in his car and gave him a copy of
the judgment with my contact
details.

“Two weeks later he called me ...
he said he’d had a look at it and this
was what he could do for me: He’d
charge me $500 to go and file a sum-
mons on my behalf and have some-
one serve it.

“T told him, ‘Pll get back to you
when I’m ready’. I left and I never
called him back: I already had a
lawyer, if I wanted something like
that ’'d have asked him to do it,” he
said. He said he went on to ignore
several more proposals of the same

MORLEY
FOR

kind from the talk show host before
he received the court summons.

In Mr Smith’s case, Mr Smith
claims he turned to Mr Bodie after
the host announced on the radio that
he would “help any Bahamian that
needed help with a legal problem.”

“T took him up on his offer and
apparently that’s the worst experi-
ence I ever had,” said Mr Smith, who
was hoping the talk show host could
offer him some advice on a land dis-
pute. He claimed he was hit with an
unexpected demand for $500 for Mr
Bodie’s “services.”

Letters

When he refused to pay, he too
was sent threatening letters, then
later sued and called to court. He
ultimately paid $700 to the law firm
Lockhart and Munroe to fight the
$300 suit the host put to him.

“Basically the attorney cost me the
more than (Bodie) wanted but I
don’t care cos I’m not going to pay
(Bodie) any amount of money,” said
Mr Smith.

Both men said they feel it is likely
that other people who might have
gone to the talk show host in the
hope for assistance might have been
put in the same position. “Bahami-
ans who don’t know their rights are
going to pay him before they go to
court,” said Mr Beneby.

He claims he forwarded copies of
the summons and the letter sent to
him by Mr Bodie to More94.fm
CEO Galen Saunders.

Mr Saunders declined to comment
on the men’s claims, directing this
newspaper to speak with Mr Bodie.

Great selection of Belts
fo complete any attire!!/

y

@ By NATARIO McKENZIE
Tribune Staff Reporter

THE APPEAL court challenge
over Senior Justice Anita Allen’s
decision not to recuse herself
from a civil case continued yes-
terday with an attorney submit-
ting that Justice Allen had not
demonstrated any inappropriate
behavior to suggest she could not
hear the case in a proper and judi-
cious manner.

“That is not to say that the
judge acted perfectly in all
respects. To say that there was
any lack of perfection or judicial
error by the learned judge, it did
not rise to the level to cause a
well informed observer to think
that there was a real possibility
of bias or apparent bias,” Attor-
ney Brian Moree submitted to
the Court of Appeal yesterday.

In March, Senior Justice Allen
refused to recuse herself from a
case involving Israeli brothers
Rami and Amir Weissfisch. On
his second point, Mr Moree who
is representing the children of
Amir Weissfisch contended that
at no time did Justice Allen
behave in a manner or express
herself in a way which demon-
strated to the informed fair mind-
ed observer that she had a closed
mind on the admissibility and or
weight to be given to the report
made by accountant Daniel Fer-
guson.

Mr Moree also submitted that
Justice Allen did not demonstrate
through her comments or behav-
ior that she had a concluded view
of the direction to be given in the
event that the accountants report
was not approved.

Justice Allen had expressed
concerns about the integrity of a
forensic accounting report pre-
pared by Mr Ferguson, who had
been appointed by Justice Lyons

to work on the Weissfisch case. In
a highly publicized ruling by Jus-
tice Allen, it was revealed that
Justice Lyons shared “more than
a friendship” with Mr Ferguson’s
sister who also assisted in prepar-
ing the report.

Mr Moree yesterday also ques-
tioned the accuracy of the notes
taken by Nicholas Lavender, QC,
who is representing Rami Weiss-
fisch. Mr Lavender who was the
only person taking notes during
the meeting in chambers in
March, had previously argued
that it was Justice Allen who first
raised the issue of her recusal by
stating, “I would be happy to
recuse myself.”

“Mr Moree contended that
that Mr Lavender’s notes were
not complete and not in context.
Court of Appeal President Dame
Joan Sawyer noted however that
the appellate court has no other
record of what transpired during
that meeting in chambers.

Dame Joan noted that the
court transcripts showed that
when the matter had resumed in
open court, the judge did not
deny making the statement but
said she didn’t recall saying it.

According to the transcripts,
after two attorneys in the case
told her that she had made the
statement she then said, “I stand
corrected.” She subsequently
however referred to her own rec-
ollection and after conferring with
her clarks, said that she had not
made the statement Dame Joan
noted.

Dame Joan noted that the
main issue was whether a fair
minded informed observer would
have a doubt as to whether or not
the judge had lost her objectivity
in regards to matter.

“Tt is not usual for a judge to
raise the issue of recusal unless
the judge anticipates that an issue

for the judge’s recusal has arisen,”
she said.

Mr Moree also argued that
when Justice Allen had used the
word ‘conflicted,’ she was not
implying that she would no longer
be able to deal the matter objec-
tively. Mr Moree however noted
that ‘concerned’ may have been
the more appropriate word to
use. Dame Joan questioned why a
judge would be conflicted about
something that didn’t affect her
personally.

Drinks Trelli
Coffee Table;
End Tables >

Cushions





Harbour Green Shops at Lyford Cay
Telephone: (242) h-hh
Bayparl Building, Parliament Street
Telephone: (242) 323-K240 = Fax: (242) 32-9953
PAD. Box S-121, Nassau, NPL, Bahamas
e-mall: info colkesafnassa.com



loor Elegance

wa



PAGE 4, WEDNESDAY, MAY 20, 2009

EDITORIAL/LETTERS TO THE EDITOR

THE TRIBUNE





The Tribune Limited

NULLIUS ADDICTUS JURARE IN VERBA MAGISTRI
Being Bound to Swear to The Dogmas of No Master

LEON E. H. DUPUCH, Publisher/Editor 1903-1914

SIR ETIENNE DUPUCH, Kt, O.B.E., K.M., K.C.S.G.,

(Hon.) LL.D., D.Litt.

Publisher/Editor 1919-1972
Contributing Editor 1972-199]

EILEEN DUPUCH CARRON, C.M.G., M.S., B.A., LL.B.

Publisher/Editor 1972-

Published Daily Monday to Saturday

Shirley Street, RO. Box N-3207, Nassau, Bahamas
Insurance Management Building., P.O. F-485, Freeport, Grand Bahama

TELEPHONES
Switchboard (News, Circulation and Advertising) 322-1986
Advertising Manager - (242) 502-2352
Circulation Department - (242) 502-2387
Nassau Fax: - (242) 328-2398
Freeport, Grand Bahama: 1-(242)-352-6608

WEBSITE
www.tribune242.com — updated daily at 2pm

In praise of dullness

SHOULD CEOs read novels?

The question seems to answer itself. After
all, CEOs work with people all day. Novel-
reading should give them greater psychological
insight, a feel for human relationships, a greater
sensitivity toward their own emotional chords.

Sadly, though, most of the recent research
suggests that these are not the most important
talents for a person who is trying to run a com-
pany. Steven Kaplan, Mark Klebanov and
Morten Sorensen recently completed a study
called “Which CEO Characteristics and Abili-
ties Matter?”

They relied on detailed personality assess-
ments of 316 CEOs and measured their com-
panies’ performances. They found that strong
people skills correlate loosely or not at all with
being a good CEO. Traits like being a good lis-
tener, a good team builder, an enthusiastic col-
league, a great communicator do not seem to be
very important when it comes to leading suc-
cessful companies.

What mattered, it turned out, were execu-
tion and organizational skills. The traits that
correlated most powerfully with success were
attention to detail, persistence, efficiency, ana-
lytic thoroughness and the ability to work long
hours. In other words, warm, flexible, team-
oriented and empathetic people are less likely to
thrive as CEOs. Organized, dogged, anal-reten-
tive and slightly boring people are more likely to
thrive.

These results are consistent with a lot of work
that’s been done over the past few decades. In
2001, Jim Collins published a best-selling study
called “Good to Great.” He found that the best
CEOs were not the flamboyant visionaries.
They were humble, self-effacing, diligent and
resolute souls who found one thing they were
really good at and did it over and over again.

That same year Murray Barrick, Michael
Mount and Timothy Judge surveyed a century’s
worth of research into business leadership. They,
too, found that extroversion, agreeableness and
openness to new experience did not correlate
well with CEO success. Instead, what mattered
was emotional stability and, most of all, consci-
entiousness — which means being dependable,
making plans and following through on them.

All this work is a reminder that, while it’s
important to be a sensitive, well-rounded person
for the sake of your inner fulfilment, the market
doesn’t really care. The market wants you to fill
an organizational role.

The market seems to want CEOs to offer a
clear direction for their companies. There’s a
tension between being resolute and being flex-
ible. The research suggests it’s more important

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to be resolute, even at the cost of some flexi-
bility.

The second thing the market seems to want
from leaders is a relentless and somewhat mind-
numbing commitment to incremental efficiency
gains. Charismatic CEOs and politicians always
want the exciting new breakthrough — whether
it is the SUV or a revolutionary new car. The
methodical executives at successful companies
just make the same old four-door sedan, but
they make it better and better.

These sorts of dogged but diffident traits do
not correlate well with education levels. CEOs
with law or M.B.A. degrees do not perform
better than CEOs with college degrees. These
traits do not correlate with salary or compen-
sation packages. Nor do they correlate with
fame and recognition. On the contrary, a study
by Ulrike Malmendier and Geoffrey Tate found
that CEOs get less effective as they become
more famous and receive more awards.

What these traits do add up to is a certain ide-
al personality type. The CEOs that are most
likely to succeed are humble, diffident, relentless
and a bit unidimensional. They are often not the
most exciting people to be around.

For this reason, people in the literary, acad-
emic and media worlds rarely understand busi-
ness. It is nearly impossible to think of a novel
that accurately portrays business success. That’s
because the virtues that writers tend to admire
— those involving self-expression and self-
exploration — are not the ones that lead to
corporate excellence.

For the same reason, business and politics
do not blend well. Business leaders tend to per-
form poorly in Washington, while political lead-
ers possess precisely those talents — charisma,
charm, personal skills — that are of such limit-
ed value when it comes to corporate execution.

Fortunately, America is a big place. Literary
culture has thrived in Boston, New York and on
campuses. Political culture has thrived in Wash-
ington. Until recently, corporate culture has
been free to thrive in such unlikely places as
Bentonville, Omaha and Redmond.

Of course, that’s changing. We now have an
administration freely interposing itself in the
management culture of industry after industry.
It won’t be the regulations that will be costly,
but the revolution in values. When Washington
is a profit centre, CEOs are forced to adopt
the traits of politicians. That is the insidious
way that other nations have lost their competi-
tive edge.

(This article was written by David Brooks —
c.2009 New York Times News Service).



For the best deal in town on
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I envisage a
brain drain

economic

sectors

LETTERS

EDITOR, The Tribune.

Once again I remain amazed
by our political leaders.

This time my amazement is
attributed to recent statements
made relative to the employment
of a foreigner for the post of
Director of Policy of the new
Utilities Regulatory and Compe-
tition Authority (URCA).

I recall the statement being
somewhat to the effect that “no
suitable Bahamian persons were
found that would qualify to fill
the post and that this person’s
salary would be much higher than
similar positions of any existing
public service company” — or
something like that. Basically,
Bahamians you are too incompe-
tent and unqualified to set policy
and/or regulate your own utilities
and communications sector — ha
take that like a swift kick to you
know where!

I wonder if in the United States
of America or other major coun-
tries would feel the same of its
citizens. Senior members of the
now defunct Public Utilities Com-

letters@tribunemedia net



mission (PUC) should be upset.

I think that it is high time we
discontinue this apparent “diss-
ing” of our citizens when it comes
to the appointment of senior per-
sons in both the private and pub-
lic sectors. Bahamians, in my
view, are more than qualified to
assume policy and regulatory
roles in this country.

A lot of us have proven our-
selves abroad and locally.

The message that we are send-
ing our current and future career
seekers is clear — you are not
worthy to lead.

I totally envision a braindrain
in our economic sectors.

Young professionals will
increasingly opt to not come back
home to contribute to nation
building.

As I look through the want ads,
I see jobs for handymen, maids,

salespersons and the occasional
Bank/Finance jobs, where
increasingly they are adding a lan-
guage requirement with no sug-
gestion of even offering language
training.

Personally, I spent 12 years
working at a major telecommu-
nications company in the USA in
specialised areas, the last being
negotiating international settle-
ment rates between the telecom-
munications company and foreign
telecommunications carriers sav-
ing monies — still can’t get a job
at the Bahamas Telecommunica-
tions Corporation (BTC) — per-
haps I’m not qualified or compe-
tent either — duh!

Well, Bahamians time to go
fishing, farming and selling
phonecards on the street.

And don’t forget to keep on
playing numbers to try to supple-
ment your income. That’s the way
it looks from here!

FRANKLYN
“DOOM” MUNROE
Nassau,

May 14, 2009.

Learning from France and Canada

EDITOR, The Tribune.

Please allow me a brief space
in your column to voice a slightly
leftist view on the topic of gov-
ernment involvement in econom-
ic recovery, and as a response to
Mr. Lowe’s ever growing extreme
right wing views on this topic.

I will start by stating that I have
had the privilege to have lived in
two countries which embrace
more left or socialist views, those
being France during the mid
eighties, and Canada for the entire
decade of the 1990s. My observa-
tions and experiences have been
this:

In France, possibly one of the
wealthiest countries on the planet
with a standard of living most of
us would kill for, there is an infra-
structure there that surpasses any
that I have seen elsewhere in the
world, with a public transporta-
tion system to boot and a nation-
al health care system that takes
care of its citizens in times of
need.

Likewise in Canada, again an
extremely wealthy country with a
relatively low national debt and
which — with the exception of
this year alone — has had sur-
pluses for over 20 years in its
annual budgets. There I experi-
enced a very developed country
with superior infrastructure,
health care benefits and a stan-
















Constant Working
Pressure Hoses

dard of living for the majority of
its citizens that many elsewhere
on the planet envy.

My observation was that in
both of these countries there is
heavy government involvement.
But the government involvement
in these cases is not so much
financed by debt, but rather
through sensible and equitable tax
systems. One only has to look in
particular at the debt of Canada
to clearly see that as a result of
sound budget management and
accountability it is a country that
has been able to finance its social
programmes and infrastructural
development through a sensible
and equitable tax system and not
exorbitant debt which has been
the tactic of its southern neigh-
bour.

In fact this brings to mind a
very interesting comment made
by famous Canadian author Mar-
garet Atwood, who, when asked
why Canada hadn’t experienced a
similar banking financial crisis as
that experienced to the south, she
simply said, “Well you see in
Canada the Scotts arrived, and
although it may be fair weather
today sooner or later you’ll have
to pay for it! And indeed much
of the world is doing just that.
You see in Canada the capitaliza-
tion requirements for banks is
about 2 to 3 times that of both
the US and UK banking systems.”
Makes sense don’t you think?

The point Iam making is that
government involvement is an
ongoing necessity, particularly
now with the stimulus package
proposed by the Obama adminis-
tration. The private system is just
too damaged to work on its own;
therefore, there is definite need
for government intervention.
Unfortunately, due to the exis-
tence of excessive debt in the US,
partially attributed to ineffective
taxation, the cost of this package

is going to have to be borne by
future generations for many years
to come.

In conclusion, I will say this,
any country, particularly one that
has attained a certain size, must, in
order to ensure the interest of the
majority of its citizens, have a gov-
ernment that enforces an equi-
table method of taxation — and
by this I mean, yes it must tax on
the ability to pay so that the Bill
Gates of the world contribute to
the benefit of all so that their fel-
low countrymen have schools,
roads, and health care benefits
and thus form a healthier society
overall. Generally, the more gov-
ernment intervention and social
programmes a country has, the
lower the crime rate; I don’t think
I have to tell you how the crime
rates of both France and Canada
are negligible as compared to
those in say the US and Mexico.
Here in The Bahamas we have
government debt principally
because government has not
implemented an equitable tax sys-
tem, and secondly it is ineffective
in collecting the taxes that it has
imposed. The result: The Trea-
sury is broke.

So, as our Government is not
able to provide the benefits that
its people so desperately need, I
try to do my bit on a micro level
such that the company I currently
run offers both a health care plan
and a pension benefit plan for
ALL employees. Less money in
my pocket at the end of the day
for sure, but I sleep better at night
knowing my employees have cov-
erage. I would only hope that
some of the extreme right wing
companies here in The Bahamas

offer the same — somehow I
doubt it.
RICHARD PERRY PINDER
Nassau,
May 18, 2009.

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THE TRIBUNE

WEDNESDAY, MAY 20, 2009, PAGE 5



LOCAL NEWS



0 In brief

Young man
who iedin
traffic accident |
is identified
@ By DENISE
MAYCOCK
Tribune Freeport
Reporter

dmaycock@
tribunemedia.net

<

FREEPORT - The young
man who lost his life in a
traffic accident on Grand
Bahama on the weekend
has been identified as 19-
year-old Willie Rodgers of
Garden Villas.

Mr Rodgers became the
island’s sixth traffic fatality
for the year early Sunday
morning when he lost con-
trol of a Dodge Ram 1500
truck, which overturned and
crashed on Pinta Avenue
near Bahamia Arms.

He was taken to hospital
and was pronounced dead
on arrival.

His passenger, 19-year-old
Loudie Cinrus of Hunters,
was ejected from the vehicle
but survived the crash.

Asst Supt Emrick Sey-
mour said that Cinrus has
since been discharged from
the hospital.

Police are urging
motorists to slow down and
drive with care and caution
on the street.

Govt fast-tracks
roat works
programme

THE government has
fast-tracked its road works
programme as Nassau pre-
pares for the International
Federation of Association
Football (FIFA) Congress
and the Miss Universe
Pageant.

Public Works and Trans-
port Minister Neko Grant
signed a $2,436,504 contract
with Bahamas Hot Mix on
Monday for the paving and
patching of the stretch of
Bay Street from Blake
Road to Mackey Street.

“As a result of hosting
the FIFA Congress and the
Miss Universe Pageant, the
government has fast-
tracked its road works pro-
gramme for the northwest-
ern coastal roads and Bay
Street to ensure that the
route between the Lynden
Pindling International Air-
port (LPIA) and Paradise
Island is an enjoyable one
for Bahamians and our visi-
tors,” said Minister Grant.

Mr Grant explained that
officers from his ministry
evaluated the main vehicu-
lar route for access to the
Paradise Island Bridge from
LPIA via Blake Road, West
Bay Street, Marlborough
Street, Navy Lion Road and
Bay Street.

As a result, they recog-
nised the need to improve
the road for an enjoyable
and safe ride, he said.

The road works, which
began May 15, may necessi-
tate closing sections of Bay
Street and re-routing traffic
during the construction
period. Otherwise, he said,
the roadway will be
reduced to one-lane traffic.

The work will be carried
out from Monday to Sunday
(not including Fridays)
from 7pm to 6am and Mon-
day to Sunday (not includ-
ing Fridays) from 9.30am to
3.30pm.

“Efforts will be taken to
mitigate the inconvenience
to the motoring public,”
said Mr Grant.

“Accordingly, motorists
are encouraged to reduce
speed and exercise caution
when driving through the
work areas, to obey the
traffic management mea-
sures put in place and to, if
at all possible, avoid the
work areas as delays will be
experienced.”

Mr Grant acknowledged
and thanked the team from
his ministry for their contri-
butions. They are, perma-
nent secretary Colin Higgs;
acting director of Works
Gordon Major; project
engineers Dion Munroe and
Robert Garraway, and
Nicole Campbell, undersec-
retary.

Ebbie Saidi, managing
director of Bahamas Hot
Mix, thanked the govern-
ment for the contract.

The work, he said, has to

Firm says bureaucracy getting
in way of fixing traffic lights



m By ALISON LOWE
Tribune Staff Reporter
alowe@tribunemedia. net

A LOCAL company contracted by gov-
ernment to repair faulty traffic lights wants
the authorities to let them do their job
without bureaucratic interference.

Matthew Williams, project coordinator
for Hypower, said were it not for the long
delays in receiving permission from the
Ministry of Works to repair and maintain
signals there would be far fewer problems
for motorists.

“It would be perfect if we had blanket
permission. We could get a call from the
public, the police, BEC, and instead of
waiting for weeks or days we could fix it
immediately,” he said.

“We are hoping that (the government)
will embrace the fact that we are local guys
and let us go ahead and do it,” added Mr
Williams, referring to the fact that the gov-
ernment previously contracted out the
responsibility to a foreign company.

His comments come as faulty traffic
lights continue to plague drivers.

These blinking and damaged signals,
photographed yesterday, contributed to
dangerous driving conditions for those tra-
versing the island.

This was despite the fact that, according
to Mr Williams, his company repaired

almost 20 traffic signals last weekend.

“We fix whatever they give us permis-
sion to fix. On Friday afternoon we got
the go-ahead (from the Ministry) and so
from Friday until Sunday we worked all
weekend to fix those intersections,” said
Mr Williams.

Among those were the traffic lights at
the intersection of Thompson Boulevard
and the entrance to the Queen Elizabeth
Sports Centre. The lack of traffic control at
the site had made it dangerous and chaot-
ic for weeks.

Also corrected were lights at the junc-
tions of: Wulff Road and Mackey Street,
Kemp and Parkgate roads, Cowpen road
and Faith Avenue, Robinson Road and
Claridge Road.

“There are 60 plus intersections in New
Providence. If in two days we can deal with
over 20 some intersections, it goes to show
we have the manpower and everything we
need to do the job. It’s just a matter of
authorisation,” said Mr Williams.

A message left for Minister of Works
Neko Grant on the matter was not
returned yesterday afternoon. Mr Grant,
who described the light problems as a
“nightmare” earlier this month, was in
Cabinet.

Motorists are asked to call the Ministry
of Works on 322-4830 or Hypower on 380-
8064 to report faulty lights.

Laing defends decision to liquidate CLICO (Bahamas)

@ By ALISON LOWE
Tribune Staff Reporter
alowe@tribunemedia.net

THE Government yesterday
sought to explain why it made the
“agonising” decision to liquidate
CLICO (Bahamas).

Minister of State for Finance
Zhivargo Laing defended the
move in face of Opposition claims
that government overreacted and
could have kept the ailing insurer
working.

Fox Hill MP Fred Mitchell not-
ed that under the not yet enforced
Insurance Act 2005, there is a
provision that gives government
an alternative to liquidating the
company.

Under that provision, a judi-
cial manager can be appointed to
keep in operation but take over
the day-to-day management of
an insurer — as happened in the
case of CLICO (Guyana) — if it
is found to be putting its policy-
holders at risk.

According to Mr Mitchell, the
existence of the provision under
the 2005 leglisation means that
despite Mr Ingraham’s assertion
earlier in parliament that while it
“would have been wonderful if
the Bahamian government could
have done the same” it lacked
the legal opportunity to do so,
the government could and should
have appointed such a manager.

AITGCORNIG



“It didn’t make sense for the
company to be declared insol-
vent,” he said.

But while agreeing that this was
in theory an option, Mr Laing
said that under the circumstances,
liquidation was the safest move
government could take to protect
policyholders.

“The new registrar of insur-
ance, when he came to office,
determined that it needed to be
dealt with expeditiously,” said Mr
Laing, referring to evidence that
CLICO had compromised its abil-
ity to meet the needs of its poli-
cyholders in view of a huge loan it
had made to a subsidiary abroad
that showed little likelihood of
being repaid.

Senator: intended BTC sale under
PLP govt ‘would have been bad deal’

m By DENISE MAYCOCK
Tribune Freeport Reporter
dmaycock@tribunemedia.net

THE intended sale of the Bahamas Telecommunication Company
(BTC) under the former PLP government would have been a bad deal
for the Bahamian people, said Senator Kay Smith, parliamentary sec-

retary in the Prime Minister’s Office.

Mrs Smith’s remarks came during her contribution in the Senate to the

Communications Bill.

She said in the days and hours leading up to the 2007 General Elec-
tions, the Government intended to sell BTC to Bluewater on a payment

plan.

Senator Smith noted that negotiations were progressed to an advanced
stage to sell BTC to Bluewater for $260 million.

As a part of that deal, she said Bluewater would immediately have
access to $130 million which was in the BTC bank account at that time.

“The former Prime Minister (Perry Christie) described the $130 mil-
lion in the BTC account as “enterprise money”.

“My description of that money is simply dollars and cents intended to
mask the fact that the Bluewater offer was effectively significantly less
than was being touted,” said Senator Smith.

“The former Prime Minister also characterized the Bluewater deal as
a great deal. I agree. But I ask, “for whom?”

In addition to enterprisingly having access to the $130 million in the
BTC account, Senator Smith said Bluewater was to be given a seven year

cellular exclusivity license.

She noted that BTC was earning annual profits of $50 million at the

time.

“Without any improvement in BTC’s operations; profits of $350 mil-
lion would be earned over the seven year period with Bluewater being
entitled to 49 per cent; which amounts to approximately $175 million of

this sum.

“Monies virtually guaranteed from profits; plus the ‘enterprise mon-
ey’, would effectively mean that Bluewater would have been given BTC
for free. Yes, Madam President, a good deal but certainly not for the

Bahamian people,” she said.

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“If we sought (to protect poli-
cyholders) by bringing this law
into force...you would have had to
serve notice on the company that
you want to conduct an investi-
gation on the company. Then 30
days would have been required
for them to answer. Then you
would have to investigate the
company, and on completion of
your investigation you go to the
courts to petition them for judicial
management — and all the while
the problem which you consider
urgent (the risk posed to policy-
holders by the company’s mis-
management) are still continuing.

He suggested it would have
been irresponsible for the gov-
ernment not to have used its
existing powers.

“All the while, as blunt as they
might be, they allowed you to go
to the courts, put the company in
liquidation and take control of it

to prevent any further deteriora-
tion to protect policyholders,” he
said.

Parliamentarians debating the
amendments yesterday said that
once passed and enforced the
Insurance Act 2005 will provide a
greater number of options to deal
with insurance companies that do
not meet certain standards
deemed necessary to ensure they
are acting in the public interest
to a more empowered insurance
regulator.

This regulator, the Office of
the Registrar of Insurance, will
for the first time be overseen by a
newly formed Insurance Com-
mission.

Essentially making liquidation
a “last resort”, the new legisla-
tion would provide for a judicial
manager to be appointed if nec-
essary to dispose of the business
of a troubled insurance compa-

ya es ba ic

ny, or a “statutory administrator”
to temporarily step in for a period
of up to 90 days in cases where it
is deemed that an insurer is
engaging in “bad business prac-
tices” or may have solvency
issues.

On Wednesday, Sidney Collie
MP — also the legal representa-
tive for 200 CLICO (bahamas)
policyholders — lauded the step
towards moving away from liqui-
dation as a first resort, saying that
such a step is always costly and
lengthy and provides little assur-
ance to the company’s clients.

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PAGE 6, WEDNESDAY, MAY 20, 2009

THE TRIBUNE



LOCAL NEWS

Pro-gambling group looks towards
industry training for Bahamians

Turks and
Caicos officials
set for meetings
in London

PROVIDENCIALES,
Turks and Caicos
Islands - Premier Gal-
mo W Williams and his
Deputy Premier and
Minister of Finance
Royal S Robinson
left for London on
Tuesday to hold meet-
ings with high-level
officials in the United
Kingdom.

The objective of the
meetings are to change
the tone of the discus-
sion surrounding the
proposed suspension of
the Turks and Caicos
Islands 2006 Constitu-
tion.

0 In brief

Transparency

“The Deputy Premier
and I want to demon-
strate to Her Majesty’s
Government that our
administration has
made remarkable
strides in moving the
country forward along
the path of good gover-
nance and transparen-
cy,” Premier Williams
said.

Also, they are to
meet Prime Minister
Gordon Brown and
opposition leader David
Cameron.

“This year marks a
decade since the 1999
White Paper: 'Partner-
ship for Progress and
Prosperity’ which sets
out the policy of Her
Majesty’s Government
for strengthening and
modernising its rela-
tionship with the Over-
seas Territories.

“T believe it is time
for the leader of the UK
to meet with the leader
of the TCI,” Mr
Williams said.



IN ITS ongoing effort to have the
country’s gambling laws changed,
the Bahamas Gaming Reform Com-
mittee (BGR) is taking first steps to
ready Bahamians to take advantage
of the industry if and when it is
legalised for locals.

The BGR is advocating for the
legalisation of gaming in the
Bahamas under the control of locals
with optimum economic, social and
educational impact.

The committee said yesterday ina
statement that it has forged links
with leading experts in the gaming
field with a view to initiating the
necessary steps to put training pro-
grammes in place which would
ready Bahamians for the jobs that
legalised gambling will create.

BGR continues effort to
legalise gaming for locals

“It will look to internationally
recognised experts for advice and
insight to ensure legalised gaming in
the Bahamas employs responsible
methods to full advantage. Further
it has opened lines of communica-
tion with experts to shape progres-
sive policies in the interests of the
entire Bahamian nation,” BGR’s
chairman Sidney Strachan said.

“This is the sort of work the gov-
ernment should be doing. Sadly, this
has not been evident among our

elected officials. Bahamians want
gaming legalised, the evidence is
compelling to this effect. The BGR
is intent on paving the way with the
very best of systems, policies and
procedures to ensure the people of
this country benefit as it is their
right to expect.”

The BGR said that gaming is a
thriving industry worldwide.

“Virtually all modern democra-
cies operate and regulate gaming in
a controlled legalised context. The

end result is important revenue for
a bevy of important social, eco-
nomic and educational pro-
grammes.”

“Our government has its head in
the sand on gaming,” said Mr Stra-
chan. “It embarrassing and an
affront frankly. Arcane laws are
denying Bahamians access to more
than $20 million yearly in revenue
from gaming. In a country hungry
for jobs, legalised gaming could cre-
ate several hundred quality posi-
tions. Gaming proceeds could be
applied by government to countless
important social programmes to
help thousands of Bahamians.
Responsible men and women can-
not simply stand by while the gov-
ernment refuses to act.”

GBPA appoints vice president of
building and development services

FREEPORT - The Board of
Directors of the Grand Bahama
Port Authority (GBPA) yester-
day announced the appointment
of Arthur Jones as its vice-pres-
ident of building and develop-
ment services.

“Mr Jones has worked with
the GBPA group in the past and
brings with him a wealth of
experience with regard to
the technical planning
and development of the
City of Freeport,” said
Ian Rolle, GBPA
president.

In his capacity, Mr
Jones will be respon-
sible for town plan-
ning and project
manage-








-
Ci

ARTHUR Jones

EARNBONJS
INTEREST WITH THE

SCOTIABANK SAVINGS
REWARD PLAN.

SAVE REGULARLY - AND REWARD YOUR GOOD HABITS!

ment, building code and inspec-
tion, city (maintenance) man-
agement, environmental com-
pliance and geographical infor-
mation systems.

Mr Jones holds dual bachelor
degrees in both Arts and Sci-
ence with a concentration in Civ-
il Engineering.

Working in the field of resi-

dential and commercial con-
struction, his experience

has exposed him to pro-
jects in the northern

United States, Puerto

Rico, Syria, Jordan,

Saudi Arabia, Iran,
Iraq and at home, in
the Bahamas.

He is a engineer with-
in the community, pro-
viding services for many
businesses such as
Shoreline

Homes,
Discovery

Boa sy

| Resort,

| Grand
Bahama
: Yacht

THE MORE YOU SAVE, THE MORE YOU EARN. SO START
SAVING WITH SCOTIABANK TODAY!



Ask your Scotiabank representative for details.

§ Scotiabank

+ Conditions apely Trader of The Bank of Nove Scotia, wed under licence

BSO7ICE

Club, Pelican Bay Hotel, and
Underwater Explorer’s Society
via his firm Nervee Engineer-

ing. ward to benefiting from his
“Mr Jones possesses strong

Ee RTL SUISUN












THE ROYAL Bahamas
Defence Force Monday
commissioned two new air-
craft which will improve its
reconnaissance and mar-
itime efforts by providing
surveillance over larger
areas while assisting in the
strategic deployment of sur-
face crafts.

Commander of the
Defence Force, Com-
modore Clifford “Butch”
Scavella, said the strategic
placement of the aircraft at
either of the Force’s north-
ern or southern commands
will provide for “concen-
trated and coordinated”
efforts being undertaken
between the air assets and
the vessels at sea.

















ey

leadership skills, has extensive
management experience, proven
track records and we look for-

insights and experience as a

—

ABOVE: National Security and Immigration Minister Tommy
Turnquest in the cockpit of the Cessna Caravan 208b.

member of the GBPA team in
the capacity of vice-president of
building and development ser-
vices,” said Hannes Babak,
chairman of GBPA.

ca















BAHAMIANS RAFAEL MUNNINGS (left) and Basil Smith celebrate Duke Ellington Day with the

legendary musicians’ grandchildren, Paul and Mercedes Ellington.

Bahamas teams up with New
York for Duke Ellington Day

NEW YORK - The Bahamas recently
teamed up with the city of New York to pay
tribute to one of the Bahamas’ famous visiting
musicians.

New York City Mayor Michael Bloomberg
declared April 29 Duke Ellington Day in hon-
our of the 110th anniversary of the jazz legend’s
birth. To commemorate his life, the Bahamas
sponsored a special run of the last surviving
1939 New York City ‘A’ Train, made famous
by Duke Ellington’s signature tune “Take the
A Train.”

The train was outfitted with the Bahamas’
logo and signage, and was dubbed
“The Bahamas Express” for the day’s special
events.

A regular visitor to the Bahamas, Duke
Ellington was known to play at the hottest
venues in Nassau in the 1950s and 60s with the
late Fred Munnings. His son, Rafael Munnings,
was present in New York to help commemo-

rate Duke Ellington Day. Additional special
guests in attendance included Duke Elling-
ton’s grandchildren Mercedes and Paul; stage,
screen and television performer Maurice Hines;
designer of the US Mint’s Ellington Quarter
Joel Iskowitz, and Stanley Kay, personal friend
of Duke Ellington.

To kick off the event, Paul Ellington, the
Duke Ellington Orchestra and musicians from
Music Under New York performed several
jazz hits on both the mezzanine at 125th Street
in Harlem and onboard the historic train as it
travelled to JFK airport. A natural tie-in, Jet
Blue crew members attended the event and
promoted the new $79 one-way fares from JFK
to Nassau.

The event was warmly received by the gen-
eral public and media alike, appearing promi-
nently on television stations like WABC-TV
and in print publications like The New York
Times.



PAGE 8, WEDNESDAY, MAY 20, 2009

THE TRIBUNE





Andros: a vastly different place

ORTH ANDROS -

Rivean Gibson Riley is
one of the few Bahamians who has
given his name to a geological fea-
ture.

A native of Staniard Creek —
"it's like a gated community except
we haven't got around to putting
up the gate yet" — Riley was the
first of an expedition to arrive at a
blue hole near Cargill Creek that
the accompanying researchers
promptly named after him.

That was eight years ago, when
he was just a young man wielding a
cutlass. But since then he has
earned an ecotourism degree at
Hocking College in Ohio, where
he made the Dean's list and won a
scholarship.

Hocking is one of many col-
leges that send students to the non-
profit Forfar Field Station near
Blanket Sound. According to its
website, students can "earn certi-
fication in SCUBA or sea kayak-
ing off the world’s third largest bar-
rier reef, learn the basics of blue
water sailing, and wind-surf around
uninhabited islands in The
Bahamas."

That doesn't sound like a hard-
ship assignment. But Riley has a
tough job these days convincing
his fellow Androsians that they can
benefit from the environment that
many of them regard as simply
bush to be scraped, swamp to be
filled or coastline to be polluted.

Riley has been interested in
nature since high school days, and
he enjoyed hanging out at the
Fofar Field Station where he
absorbed a lot of information.
Eventually he was able to save
enough to pay for tuition at Hock-
ing, living at the home of a pro-

fessor. And after graduation he
joined the Bahamas National Trust
as parks supervisor for Andros.

In fact, Riley was our guide on
a field trip to North Andros this
past weekend organised by the
BNT. And one of the first stops
on the itinerary was an inland blue
hole in the Central Andros Nation-
al Park, where he was able to put
his ecological training to good use.

The term “blue hole” first
appeared on charts of the Bahamas
in 1843, and there are thousands
scattered around the islands —
hundreds at Andros alone. Some
are inland and some offshore, but
each is a portal into an unknown
world. Scientists are discovering
new species and classes of animals
in these unique environments deep
underground, as well as ancient
fossils and human artifacts and
remains.

On Andros, many caves are
formed along coastal stress frac-
tures about a mile inland from the
offshore wall that plunges into the
Tongue of the Ocean. These 150-
kilometre-long cracks can easily
be seen from the air — and their
flooded passages can extend for
several kilometres underground.

The Lucayan word for a blue
hole was "coaybay'" — or house of
the dead — and they were fre-
quently used as burial chambers. In
fact, a ceremonial Lucayan canoe
was found in association with

and Crematoviam Limited

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Marine Wlechanic
GIOVANEY TRISTAN
DEAL, 20

of Coral Harbour, Coral Heights

will be held on Thursday May

2ist 2009 at 11:00am at Aion

Baptist Church East and Shirley

Street Officiating will be Pastor

T.G, Morrison, assisted by Rev

Ulric Smith, Rey. Anthony rm

Sampson, and Rey. Prince 0.

Bodie Interment will follow in Lakeview Memorial Crardens
John F. Kennedy Drive & Gladstone Road.

Left to reflect and treasure the memories of this magnificent
gem, is his father: George “Gio” Deal; mother: Bridgette
Coquillon nee Butler; Step father: Emmanuel Coquillon;
step mother: Nicolette Deal; brothers: Edward Flowers,
Devante Deal and Elton; Fifteen Uncles: Vernon, Roy,
Fred, Franklyn, Arthur, Edmund, and Lincoln Deal, Dr.
Frumentus Leon, Richard Wright, Franklyn Cox, lan Storr,
Franklyn, Anthony, and Decosda Rolle and Gioxdfrey Higgs;
Seventeen Aunts; Paula Leon, Gertrude Wright, Gloria
Cox and Anna Storr, Ruth, Mildred, and Stephanie Deal
Doreen Deal, Margaret, Marilyn, Juliet, Terry, Rochelle,
Dimples, Beatrice, Estelle Higgs, and Beverly Lewis;
Cousins: Vernon Jr, & Vernado Deal, Leroy Ir, Kirklyn,
Bernique, & Tanva Deal, Vaughn, Vanessa, Melissa,

Lashanda, Fred Jr., Vernencha, Fredeca Deal, Mychelyn
& Cedric Watson, Frumentia & Fromentus Jr. Leon, Lamar

Deal,
Peleichia,

Anishka & Corey Bain, Arthur Jr.,
lerissa, Lynette, Indira, and Lincoln Jr Deal,

Atia, Arista,

Felice and Felicia (Cox, lan Storr and Shenill: Close second
cousins: Czaire Watson, Travelle, Taja, and Taylor Bain;
Special Friend: Andrea Wells; Other relatives and friends:
Sherrie Deal, Kimarr Knowles, Alex Plakaris, God father:
Ralph Hepbum and Andre Moxey, Royal Bahamas Defence
Force Entry 44 Team, Crew HMS Yellow Elder, Soldier

Road Family, Deal's Family from Palmetto Point, NCA
Class of 2006, Lilly Smith and Family, Franeita Saunders
and Family, The Bethel Family, The Johnson family, The
McDonald Family, The Davis Family, Gwendolyn Rolle
and Family, The Thurston Family, The Thompson Family,
The Moxey Family, The Hepburn and Family, The Crew
at Arawak Cay, R.M. Bailey Class of 1983 and first
Caribbean International Bank.

View ing Wy il be held in the oie al Restv lew Me morial

on W air wedes fenin 0: (iam to 6:00pm ep at ‘the daiedh
from 9:30 am to service tine.





human remains in the Stargate
blue hole near the Bluff on South
Andros in 1996 by renowned cave
diver Rob Palmer.

The development process for
both dry and flooded caves in the
Bahamas is the same. They are
essentially giant banana holes, and
the ones in the ocean were formed
during the ice age, when the sub-
merged bank was above the high
water mark. Good examples
include Mermaid’s Lair and the
Lucayan Caverns on Grand
Bahama.

A diver named George Ben-
jamin began the first explorations
of these unusual cave systems in
1950. He was followed by Jaques
Cousteau in the ’70s and Rob
Palmer in the ’80s. Today, the
Antiquities, Monuments and
Museums Corporation has com-
missioned Brian Kakuk, a former
US Navy hardhat diver with more
than 20 years of underwater cave
diving experience in the Bahamas,
to survey blue holes throughout
the country.

The Central Andros National
Park was established six years ago
and covers more than 280,000 acres
— incorporating barrier reef, wet-
land and forest ecosystems in five
distinct park areas. It contains the
highest concentration of blue holes
in the Bahamas. The one we visit-
ed features observation platforms
and boardwalks, as well as useful
interpretive signage. From there
it was back on the highway to dri-
ve through seemingly endless
stands of spindly pine trees inter-
spersed with cabbage palms all the
way to the northwest tip of
Andros.

Red Bays is not quite the cul-
tural oddity that it was before the
20-mile logging road was cut from

New Grown land |
nepotism claims

FROM page one

Both sales were recorded on
June 8, 2003 and May 3, 2004.
Relatives of a second offi- :
cial, including his wife, and the }
sister-in-law of a current Cabi- }
net Minister, were listed as }
having acquired four acres of :
property in the settlement of }
Blackwood Village in Abaco.
Each acre was sold for }
$4,356. They were recorded on }
February 1, 2002, March 21 and }
27, and May 12th. i
Unlike the case involving rel-
atives of former director of :
Lands Tex Turnquest, where }
the properties were flipped a
few years later for hundreds of }
thousands of dollars in profits, ;
these lots have not been resold. i
However, the investigations ;
into these and other Crown }
land transactions continue. i
Despite leaving many mes- i
sages and even waiting on the }
telephone for more than 15 }
minutes for one of the officials :
who was reportedly “on anoth- }
er call”, no return calls were }
ever received up to press time }
last night from either the }
Department of Lands and Sur- :
veys or the Ministry of Lands }
and Local Government. i
Currently government is }
contemplating approving a }
Select Committee to review all i
Crown land grants issued by }
government since the early }
1990's. i
This committee, which was }
called for in Parliament will :
review all Crown grants issued }
to individuals or entities since i
1992 up until the present date ;
along with all outstanding }
applications that have yet to }
receive final approval. :
The committee will also }
ascertain a list of all publicser- }
vants and retired public ser-
vants who have received grants,
along with government’s offi- i
cial position on its policy in }
relation to the disposition of }
publicly held lands generally;
as well as the government’s
policy in relation to granting
lands to employees of the gov- }
ernment or their relatives.








TRAN db
ANTS:



“ Fashion ona
Skimpy Budget

A Fashion Extravaganza
Sunday, May 24", 2009

4 eae
ode a The Crystal Palace Ballroom, Wyndham Nassau Resort
Pp y Cable Beach

Telephone - 394-6209 or E-Mail: yodephy@mac.com

for more information

Lowe Sound in 1968, but it still
represents one of the more inter-
esting stories of Bahamian settle-
ment. It's a tale that lives on
through the memories of the
town's patriarch — Rev Bertram
Newton — and matriarch — Wid-
ow Omelia Marshall, both now in
their 80s but still active.

You could say that Red Bays
was discovered in 1937 by an
American anthropologist named
John Goggin who happened to
meet up with some of the inhabi-
tants at Mastic Point. They were
descended from black Seminoles
— escaped African slaves from
American plantations who migrat-
ed into the Florida wilderness in
the mid-1700s with a variety of
Indian bands that later became
known as Seminoles.

Africans and Indians had a
mutual interest in securing the
Florida territory as a refuge from
the American whites. And by the
early 1820s, when Florida became
a US territory, there were hun-
dreds of former slaves living
among the Seminoles, which posed
a threat to the institution of slavery
itself. According to Dr Rosalyn
Howard's 2002 book, Black Semi-
noles in the Bahamas, the Africans
lived independently among the
Indians in Florida, paying tribute to
the Seminole chiefs.

These free communities were
eventually driven southward by
attacks from the US Army, into
the more remote and inaccessible
areas of the peninsula, from where
they made a last stand in the mid-
1800s. A band of about 200 Indians
and blacks held out in the ever-
glades, and were the genesis of
today's Seminole tribe, who claim
to be the only unconquered indige-
nous people in the United States.

But in the face of such pres-
sure, several groups of black Semi-
noles took to their canoes and left
Florida for the Bahamas between
1821 and 1837 in what Howard
describes as "an epic journey born
of desperation, which has a mod-
ern counterpart in the Haitian and
Cuban boat people." They chose
to settle on the remote west coast

of Andros, a land behind God's
back as they say.

Over 100 of these earliest illegal
immigrants were discovered by a
Customs officer in 1828 who
brought them to Nassau where
they were detained for a year
before being allowed to return to
Red Bays. Rev Newton's great
grandfather, Moses Newton, and
Omelia Marshall's great grandfa-
ther, Scipio Bowleg, were among
the names on that 1828 Customs
roster.

In fact, Rev Newton, who was
head teacher at Red Bays for
decades, published a pamphlet in
1968 to record the settlements oral
tradition. Howard says the story
"emphasizes the fundamental
courage and tenacity of those black
Seminoles whose journey origi-
nated long ago on the plantations
of Georgia, South Carolina and
Florida," and who recreated their
identity and culture in the
Bahamas, living an isolated sub-
sistence lifestyle until well into the
20th century.

During our visit Red Bays was
gearing up for the annual Snapper
Fest, although it is now some three
miles inland from the original set-
tlement site along the low-lying
coast. The community was forced
to move after the 1899 hurricane
killed more than a hundred people.
A similar situation exists today at
nearby Lowe Sound, where the
government is encouraging resi-
dents to build on higher ground to
escape the deadly storm surge that
will inevitably come one day.

Just off the road to Red Bays is
a unique feature known as Jungle
Pond. This is a surprising pocket of
mangroves growing on a 10-foot-
thick mat of algae covering a 150-
foot diameter blue hole. Stepping
onto the swampy, overgrown sur-
face is like entering a lost world.
Giant custard apple trees compete
with the largest red mangroves on
Andros, and every branch drips
with orchids and bromeliads. It is a
remarkable oasis in the middle of a
vast pine barren.

Accommodation for the dozen
or so people who took part in the

field trip was provided by the
Pineville Motel in Nicholl's Town,
an eccentric hostelry owned and
operated by one Eugene Camp-
bell, whose pet goat trots behind
him everywhere like a puppy. Par-
ticipants included a Customs bro-
Ker, two bankers (one retired), a
Junkanoo artist and photographer,
a real estate agent, a physiothera-
pist, a graphic artist and yours tru-
ly.

A It was one of a series of tours
being organised by the BNT for
two purposes — to educate inter-
ested persons about the flora and
fauna of the Bahamas, and to show
family islanders that they can gen-
erate income from the environ-
ment. The tour begins with a two-
hour Bahamas Ferries voyage to
Fresh Creek. Once fortified by a
traditional breakfast of stewed and
boiled fish at the Lighthouse Club,
participants board a bus for the
trip to Nicholl's Town and Red
Bays.

"We know there is a pent-up
demand for this sort of thing,”
BNT Executive Director Eric
Carey told me. "People want to
know about our national parks and
the natural environment in gener-
al. When we organise nature walks
on New Providence we can have as
many as a hundred people show
up. Right now we are exploring
destinations and activities to get
the right mix and trying to get the
Ministry of Tourism involved. This
kind of domestic tourism can pro-
vide many benefits for local com-
munities."

As Professor Howard notes in
her book, life in Nassau today is
likened in a popular Bahamian
song to living in "sardine cans,"
where all food and water is import-
ed and where people can no longer
sleep without bars on their win-
dows. Andros is a vastly different
place, and well worth the time to
visit.

What do you think?

Send comments to
larry@tribunemedia. net

Or visit www.bahamapundit.com



FROM page one

The resort closure
comes nearly two years
after it was handed over to
receivers by developers
EBR Holdings in June
2007 when the company
fell into debt.

Although there was high
interest in the property, all
agreements fell through,
and when the economic
downturn struck in Sep-
tember last year the resort
suffered significant losses.

Without new investors to acquire the project,
secured creditor Mitsui decided to temporarily
close the resort.

Prime Minister Hubert Ingraham announced
consultations have begun with various parties
when speaking in the House of Assembly on
Monday, and receivers confirmed there is sig-
nificant interest in the resort, although negoti-
ations are still at an early stage.

Mr Downs said: “I don't think it's helpful to
announce who the parties are and conduct an
auction in public, there is nothing served by
that.

“It's a very sensitive situation, of course,
because of our decision to close the resort on a
temporary basis so I think it's better to keep
that confidential.

“It's been up for sale for probably three

Hubert rr mene

FROM page one



Emerald Bay

years so it had a pretty good airing for the pub-
lic.

“There are a good couple of dozen bidders
who have signed confidentiality agreements,
so we have got to respect their privacy as we ask
them to respect ours.

“Of the parties who have been interested in
the past, some of them are having a new look at
the site, as well as a number of other parties
who I don't think had looked at it before and
are having a first look at it this time.”

Mr Downs said any decision will be made in
consultation with Mitsui and the government of
the Bahamas.

He added: “The decision will be made care-
fully and we will discuss with Mitsui and will
decide what we think is the best to go for based
on anumber of criteria.

“Purchasers are going to have to meet gov-
ernment approval so it's going to be important
for us to make sure that any bidder is likely to
be well disposed towards the government.”

*VOUR VIEW’

To have your say on this or any other issue,
email Tbe Tribune at: letters@tribunemedia.net
or deliver your letter to The Tribune on
Shirley Street, P.O. Box N-3207



go before the official start of the
2009 Atlantic hurricane season,

the eastern gulf of Mexico it's still
affecting the northwest Bahamas
with heavy showers and thunder-
storms. It's moving slowly north-
east, however, the tropical mois-
ture will remain with us for the
next four to five days triggering
occasional downpours," said
Deputy Director of the Depart-
ment of Meteorology Basil Dean.

The system was moving at

Downpours

about 10 miles per hour yesterday
with less than a 30 per cent
chance of it developing into a
tropical cyclone over the next two
days, the NHC said.

Yesterday heavy rains and
winds hit the capital leading to
extensive flooding in low lying
areas.

With just about two weeks to

Mr Dean warned the public to
get a head start on hurricane
preparations.

"It certainly kicks off the wet
season, which is typically the sum-
mer months, and we are just
about two weeks away from the
start of the hurricane seasons. We
don't want to wait for that time to
start hurricane preparedness —
we must be in a state of readi-

FROM page one

building kind of shake. One of the structural engineers
from Ministry of Works said he was in the (area of the)
sports centre when he saw what appeared to be a torna-
do in the area and when he came around to Central
Detective Unit (CDU) he saw the damage," Supt
Elsworth Moss, CDU head said.

Another officer, who spoke to The Tribune on the
condition of anonymity, said he was outside the building
when he saw a huge lightening bolt hit the CDU.

"T don't think it was a tornado, I think it was the light-
ning that probably strike it — it was a flash of lightening
and it (the canopy) just fall to the ground," he said.

Deputy Director of the Department of Meteorology
Basil Dean could not confirm the reports, but said tor-
nado like conditions were possible yesterday. Another
sighting of a tornado was said to be in the Bar 20 Corner
area around 11 am yesterday .

"We haven't been able to confirm (the tornado
reports) but I would not be surprised if there was. There
were a number of thunderous cells and whenever we
have those embedded in the area of showers it is very pos-
sible that tornado activity could have spawned out of one
of those cells," he said.

While there were no reported injuries stemming from
the incident, several air conditioners in the CDU's build-
ing were damaged and debris from the fallen steel canopy
littered the front of the building.

Ministry of Health officials were scheduled to inves-
tigate a potential threat yesterday afternoon when gas
escaped from several air conditioning units after the col-
lapse. Structural engineers from the Ministry of Works
were also dispatched to assess whether the building was
fit to remain in operation.

Business continued at the CDU yesterday with its
officer-in-charge monitoring the situation and the safety
of his officers.

ness," said Mr Dean.

Extreme weather

"T don't know if I'm afraid — I'm concerned, just
monitoring everything that's happening and if we feel that
we are unsafe here we're going to get an expert opinion
and then we'll make the decision," Supt Moss.

Business at the Criminal Records Office (CRO) was
brought to a standstill because of the standing flood
water, but none of the sensitive records was damaged,
said Mr Moss.

"So far no paperwork was damaged, the only equip-
ment that was damaged was several of the air condi-
tioners — we had a little leak of the air conditioning
gas coming in the building, but we shut those off. We're
still inside — we're still doing some work, the Criminal
Records office is not functioning because of the flood
water damage," he said.

Depending on weather conditions tomorrow, the sec-
tion may be up and running. If not, persons are advised
to visit the Quackoo Street, Elizabeth Estates, Carmichael
Road or Cable Beach police stations for copies of police
records.

While business continued at the CDU yesterday, per-
sons who were being held for questioning were relocat-
ed to another site, said Mr Moss.

As for the fate of the officers stationed at the building
that will depend on the report from Works officials.

"Once the debris is removed and the engineer would
have checked and the electriaan would have made a
check to see if we can continue to work — most of the air
conditioners have been turned off — because most of the
areas that the work is going to be carried out in the
evening doesn't have the ventilation, doesn't have the
windows that we can open up for fresh air.

"Ministry of Works will give an assessment report to
the Minister of National Security who will decide whether
or not to it's (suitable) for us to inhabit. If not then they
will make the decision that we move," said Mr Moss.



TRIBUNE SPORTS



INTERNATIONAL SPORTS

WEDNESDAY, MAY 20, 2009, PAGE 9



Stars collide as King Jame

Superman meet in n playotls

@ By TOM WITHERS
AP Sports Writer

INDEPENDENCE, Ohio
(AP) — Two of the NBA's
youngest ambassadors, they
share infectious smiles, great
senses of humor and unchained
joy when they play. In a league
loaded with remarkably gifted
athletes, this pair stands out as
physical phenomenons.

Superheroes in shorts.

One is Superman, a power-
ful, 6-foot-11 shot-blocking
machine who went so far as to
reject his coach during the post-
season.

The other's a King, and based
on recent royal command per-
formances, his reign may be just
beginning.

Dwight Howard and LeBron
James have known each other
for years. Casual friends, for-
mer No. | overall draft picks as
teenagers and U.S. Olympic
teammates who won gold
medals together last summer,
they have been undeniable
forces on the court this season.

And they are about to col-
lide.

When the Orlando Magic and
Cleveland Cavaliers meet in this
year's Eastern Conference final
starting Wednesday, all eyes will
be on Howard and James, the
getting-better-by-the-day super-
stars who have each elevated
their games and carried their
teams to new heights.

"We both work hard in the
offseason, and we're both hap-
py we're in this situation right
now,” James said following
practice on Monday.

Orlando's landing in the con-
ference final was nothing short
of magical.

In dethroning the defending
champion Celtics on Sunday by
winning Game 7 in Boston, the
Magic became the first team in
33 tries to overcome a 3-2 series
deficit against the league's most
storied franchise. Howard
scored 12 points with 16
rebounds and five blocks in the
finale.

Orlando's surprising come-
back began after Howard criti-
cized coach Stan Van Gundy
following a loss in Game 5,
when the Magic blew a 14-point
fourth-quarter lead. Howard
was upset that he didn't touch
the ball enough late in the game
and questioned some of Van
Gundy's substitution patterns.

By the time the Magic made
the Celtics disappear, all
seemed to be forgotten.

"Me and coach talked,"
Howard said. "Everything is
great. We have a new stat that
we came up with. When we call
out the coach, we are 3-0."

Turning serious for a
moment, the fun-loving
Howard, who often does spot-
on imitations of his coach,
attributed Orlando's recovery
to growing older and wiser.

"We have matured as a
team,” he said. "We have
learned that we can't allow frus-
tration to take over us during
games or after games. We have

Bucks



IN THIS October 20, 2007 file photo, Dwight Howard (left), defends against LeBron James during an exhibition game in Macau. Howard and James
— two of the NBA’s biggest stars — will meet in the playoffs for the first time when the Orlando Magic face the Cleveland Cavaliers in the Eastern Con-
ference finals.

to play through all that and Stan
has been a great mentor and a
coach for me personally, know-
ing that there are going to be
nights when I am frustrated. He
has always found a way to moti-
vate me to keep myself and my
teammates in line."

While Howard may enjoy
communicating his thoughts to
legions of his followers on Twit-
ter, the 23-year-old has an old-
school sensibility when it comes
to relationships and learning
from mistakes. The league's
defensive player of the year,
now deeper in the postseason
than ever before, is beginning to
understand what he needs to
block out and what he needs to
embrace.

"He holds himself to a pretty
high standard," Magic general
manager Otis Smith said. "He's
learning a lot. It's the postsea-
son. Things are going to hap-
pen. You learn by experience,
and some things he still has to
learn. That's the playoffs."

James, on the contrary, has





yet to experience adversity of
any sort in this postseason. He
and the Cavaliers are a perfect
8-0, with all eight wins coming
by 10 points or more. It’s been
easy so far, but James and his
teammates have been through
enough end-of-the-year drama
to know tougher times are
ahead.

Series

"It's going to be a tough
series," Cavs center Zydrunas
Ilgauskas said. "I wouldn't be
surprised if it goes all seven
games."

As an outside observer,
James viewed Howard's com-
ments about Van Gundy as
signs of the center's develop-
ment and frustration.

"If he's the leader of the
team, he has a right to call out
some things as wrong,” James
said. "I didn't see it as a bad.
There are always ways to han-
dle situations like that, and he
didn't do it the right way —



maybe. But they still won the
series and learned from that sit-
uation."

The Cavaliers intend to rely
on their lessons after going 1-2
against the Magic during the
regular season. Cleveland suf-
fered its worst loss, 116-87, at
Orlando on April 3. The 29-
point setback was humbling for
the Cavs, who contained
Howard (20 points, 11
rebounds) but couldn't stop
Orlando's outside game as the
Magic made 13 of 27 3-point-
ers.

While Cleveland's defensive
game plan will focus on limiting
Orlando's looks, Howard can't
be ignored. Under assistant
coach Patrick Ewing's care,
Howard's offensive game has
blossomed.

"Before he was just a shot
blocker, somebody who would

(AP Photo: Kin Cheung)

just clog the lane, dunk the ball
and that was pretty much it,”
Cavs forward Joe Smith said.
"Now he's developing his game
and his footwork and that's only
going to make him a tougher
player to guard."

Like James and Howard,
Smith was the first player select-
ed in the draft. The 14-year vet-
eran appreciates the pressure
of those enormous expectations
and has been impressed with
how the young All-Stars have
handled their early success.
Smith hasn't played with
Howard, but sees him as being
very similar to James.

"He seems like a joy to be
around,” Smith said. "Like I say
about LeBron, when your
leader is that way, everybody
feeds of him and wants to go
out there and perform up to or
over your level."

S, NBA Today

By The Associated Press

Orlando at Cleveland
(8:30pm EDT). The Cava-
liers, who swept Detroit and
Atlanta in the first two
rounds and had the league's
best regular-season record,
open the Eastern Confer-
ence finals against the Mag-
ic, who eliminated the
defending champion Celtics
in seven games after beat-
ing the 76ers in six.

WRESTLING WITH

THE NBA

The Lakers are scheduled
to be at the Pepsi Center in
Denver next Monday night
for Game 4 of the Western
Conference finals. So are a
bunch of wrestlers. World
Wrestling Entertainment
said it is booked at the arena
for an episode of Monday
Night Raw.

WWE spokesman Robert
Zimmerman said the orga-
nization secured the Pepsi
Center last Aug. 15 and has
already sold more than
10,000 tickets for the event.
He says the organization
expects a sellout, with tick-
ets ranging from $20 to $70.

SEARCHING SIXERS

The Philadelphia 76ers
are moving forward with
their coaching search, set-
ting up mterviews with assis-
tants Dwane Casey of the
Dallas Mavericks and Tom
Thibodeau of the Boston
Celtics. The Sixers already
interviewed former Wizards
coach Eddie Jordan. The
Philadelphia job became
vacant when Tony DiLeo
stepped down last week and
returned to the front office.

NOT INTERESTED

Portland assistant general
manager Tom Penn pulled
his name out of the running
for the Timberwolves’ top
front office position and
received a promotion to stay
with the Trail Blazers. Penn
is the third candidate to pull
his name out of the race,
joining San Antonio Spurs
assistant GM Dennis Lind-
sey and former Miami assis-
tant GM Randy Pfund.

HIGH RATINGS

Game 7 of the Magic-
Celtics series was the most-
viewed NBA second-round
playoff game ever on cable.
TNT said Orlando's 101-82
win Sunday was watched by
8.41 million viewers. The
previous record was 7.65
million for Game 6 of Spurs-
Lakers in 2004.

SPEAKING

"The fans in Denver had
a lot more faith in making
the playoffs than the own-
er.”

— WWE chairman Vince
McMahon on Nuggets man-
agement allowing his orga-
nization to book the Pepsi
Center for May 25, when
Game 4 of the Western Con-
ference finals is scheduled



Track & Field
Officials Training

have one
per cent
chance
of getting
top pick

MILWAUKEE (AP) — The
Milwaukee Bucks enter Tues-
day night's NBA draft lottery
with a 1 percent chance of
securing the No. | overall pick.

The Bucks are slotted to pick
10th if they don't get one of the
top three positions awarded in
the lottery. They finished the

Are you interested in becoming an Official
for Track & Field?
The Bahamas Association of Certified
Officials (BACO) is extending an invitation
to all present officials and all interested

persons to participate in a training

session for track & field.

Date: Saturday, May 23, 2009
Venue: Thomas A. Robinson Track & Field

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PAGE 10, WEDNESDAY, MAY 20, 2009

TRIBUNE SPORTS



INTERNATIONAL SPORTS



Nassau Nastics
to host ‘Spring
Spectacular’

lm By RENALDO DORSETT
Sports Reporter
rdorsett@tribunemedia.net

AS the profile for local gymnastics
continues to grow, some of the sport’s
athletes will have an opportunity to test
their efforts under international scrutiny.

Nassau Nastics is scheduled to host
“Spring Spectacular” May 22-24, which
features a series of exhibitions where
local gymnasts will be critiqued by inter-
national judge Susan Monahan.

Monahan is amongst a select few of
USA nationally rated judges with over
16 years of judging experience.

She has also served as a state judging
director and currently sits on the Florida
State Judges Board.

On May 22, gymnasts will be judged
on bars from 4-6pm at the Oakes Field
Gym, while Saturday they will be judged
on vault, floor exercise and beam at the
Kendal Isaacs Gym from 12-4 pm.

Sunday will cap the weekend with an
awards ceremony and featured perfor-
mances.

Barbara Thompson, executive director
of Nassau ‘Nastics, said exposure to an
internationally renowned judge can
serve as a barometer for their level of
development.

“Tt aides the gymnasts in terms of giv-
ing them ideas on what they need to
improve, what skills they have already
accomplished and what the next step is
in mastering their craft and learning
more difficult moves,” she said. “Most of
our gymnasts are unable to travel for
competitions so they will never be able
to perform in front of a judge and be
critiqued as such.”

Thompson said it will give the ath-
letes an opportunity to see how their
skills would fare against others in inter-
national competition.

“This gives them an opportunity to
get that critique on a same level of who

OLYMPIAN Chris “Bay” Brown (shown in this file photo) opened with an impressive showing against top competition...

A second for Brown in 400m
at the Adidas Track Classic

they would be ordinarily competing
against should they be able to travel.
There is not a lot of gymnastics action in
the Bahamas so it is not as if we would
be able to go to Freeport and compete
against a local club there so we bring
the judge here,” she said.

“We do bring in coaches that host spe-
cial clinics so that is a very beneficial
operation we do. This is the first time
that we have ever brought a judge in to
evaluate our gymnasts and it will be
something I am sure we will be repeating
in the future.”

lm By RENALDO DORSETT
Sports Reporter
rdorsett@tribunemedia.net

IN his first event of the outdoor sea-
son, Olympian Chris “Bay” Brown —
the Bahamas’ 400m national record
holder — opened with an impressive
showing against top competition.

Chris Brown posted a time of 45.03s
to place second in his signature event at
the Adidas Track Classic in Carson,
California, over the weekend.

Jeremy Wariner of the United States
won in 44.66s and Trinidad and Toba-
go was third in 45.05s.

Fellow Bahamian and Beijing
Olympics silver medal winning 1600m
relay teammate Andretti Bain was sev-
enth in 46.32s.

A number of other Bahamians com-
peted at the meet, including 100m
national record holder Derrick Atkins
and 110m hurdles record holder
Shamar Sands.

Atkins finished fourth in the 100m in

10.19s in a race that American Darvis
Patton won in 10.12. Antiguan Daniel
Bailey was second in 10.14s and
Jamaican Steve Mullings was third in
10.19s.

Beijing silver medallist in the event,
Richard Thompson of Trinidad and
Tobago, finished a disappointing sixth
in 10.22s.

Sands finished third in the 13.58s
behind Americans Terrence Trammell
and Antwon Hicks who ran 13.39s and
13.45s respectively.



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Mayweather Jr to square
off with Marquez

BOXERS Floyd Mayweather Jr (left) and Juan Manuel Marquez,
pose for photographs Tuesday in New York at a news conference
to announce their upcoming fight. Mayweather Jr and Marquez are
scheduled to fight at MGM Grand in Las Vegas on July 18...

(AP Photo:Frank Franklin II)



New
Orleans
gets 2013
Super Bowl,
its 10th

@ By TIM REYNOLDS
AP Sports Writer

FORT LAUDERDALE,
Fla. (AP) — New Orleans is a
Super Bowl city again.

NFL owners voted Tuesday
to play the 2013 Super Bowl in
New Orleans, the first time the
championship game will be
played there since Hurricane
Katrina shredded parts of the
Louisiana Superdome. The hur-
ricane caused 1,600 deaths and
devastated the Gulf Coast four
years ago.

New Orleans beat out Mia-
mi — which sought a record
1ith Super Bowl — and 2008
host Glendale, Ariz., for the
game. This is the 10th time New
Orleans will be the site for the
Super Bowl.

"It's a great day for our com-
munity,” Saints owner Tom
Benson said as he walked onto
an elevator at a South Florida
hotel, on his way to the formal
announcement.

New Orleans last hosted in
2002, when Adam Viniateri's
48-yard field goal as time
expired lifted New England
over St. Louis.

Still unclear: Where will the
2013 Pro Bowl be played? It's
coming to Miami a week before
this coming season's Super
Bowl, then going back to
Hawaii in 2011 and 2012.

It was not part of the bidding
process for the 2013 Super
Bowl.

"Where it (the Pro Bowl)
goes after 2012 is something
we'll decide later on," said
Frank Supovitz, the NFL's
senior vice president for events.

Louisiana lawmakers have
already approved plans to
spend $85 million in Superdome
upgrades, which would be com-
pleted in time for the 2013 NFL
title game. The upgrades would
include additional seating, new
suites, wider concourses and
other measures for the New
Orleans Saints to generate new
revenue streams.

The Superdome played an
iconic role during Katrina,
which struck the city in August
2005. It was an evacuation cen-
ter during the storm, housing
thousands of people who had
nowhere else to go, and the dev-
astation was nightmarish. With-
in days, the building was tat-
tered, filthy inside from mold,
debris and raw sewage.

Over the next year, the
Superdome was rebuilt, and
slowly, New Orleans has tried to
get back to what it once was.
The stories of suffering are still
everywhere — even now, some
who lost nearly everything in
2005 are fighting to keep their
federally provided trailers a bit
longer.

One thing is back to normal:
New Orleans still knows how
to host an event. College foot-
ball's national championship
game was played there in 2008,
followed about six weeks later
by the NBA All-Star game.

Arizona also failed in bids for
the 2011 and 2012 Super Bowls,
which were awarded to new sta-
diums in North Texas and Indi-
anapolis, respectively.

Lucescu predicting style clash in UEFA Cup final

@ By STUART CONDIE
AP Sports Writer

ISTANBUL (AP) —
Shakhtar Donetsk coach
Mircea Lucescu is predicting a
clash of styles when his team
takes on Werder Bremen in
Wednesday's UEFA Cup
final.

The 63-year-old Romanian
coach is preparing his players
team for the match in Istanbul
— the last ever UEFA Cup
final before its rebranding as
the Europa League — by mak-
ing sure they are ready to cope
with an athletic, speedy side
that already knocked out for-
mer continental champions
AC Milan and Hamburg.

Lucescu said Tuesday he
expected Bremen to try to
physically dominate a young
Shakhtar side aiming to
become the first from Ukraine
to hoist the trophy.

"Bremen is the attacking
team with very good physique
and a lot of really good ath-
letes on their team,” Lucescu
said. "And as for Shakhtar
Donetsk, the style is based on
the good technique of the
players and, naturally owing to
our specific qualities, they will
try to exercise control over the
progress of the game.”

Whether Lucescu can do so
will go some way to demon-
strating how successfully he
has managed to emulate the
template of youth, skill and
tactical flexibility he estab-
lished in spells with Dinamo
Bucharest, Galatasaray and
Besiktas.

There are just three players
over 30 years of age in
Shakhtar’s 25-man squad,
which features a quintet of
skillful Brazilians, of whom
midfielders Fernandinho, Ilsin-
ho and likely substitute
Willian average just 22 years
of age.

Striker Luiz Adriano should
start the game against the Ger-
man club but Jadson, the old-
est of his compatriots at 25,
could miss the final because of
injury.

But the free kick specialist,
who scored and then set up the
winning goal in the second leg
of the semifinal win over
Dynamo Kiev, has not given
up hope of recovering. He was
rested at the weekend, along
with Fernandinho and Isinho,
for Saturday's 3-0 domestic
league win at Zorya.

"He was involved in the gen-
eral group in training for the
last two days and most likely
he will appear on the pitch

tomorrow," Lucescu said. "As
for the lineup, we are going to
analyze training. Most likely,
we will make the decision just
before the game starts.”

Bremen has its own prob-
lems, with playmaker Diego
and Hugo Almeida suspended,
and Germany midfielder Per
Mertesacker ruled out because
of a ligament injury.

"Of course we miss them a
great deal because they are
important players, but we can't
do anything about it,” mid-
fielder Torsten Frings said.
"We want to take the trophy
home for them."

Coach Thomas Schaaf said
he had yet to decide how to
compensate for the losses, par-
ticularly of Almeida and
Diego — who hit a total of 10
goals to help carry Bremen to
its first European final since
winning the 1992 Cup Win-
ners’ Cup.

"T don't even know who is
fit and who can actually play,
so I'm not even thinking of a
formation or a system or a
variation,” Schaaf said. "Both
of them are something special.
That's something you can't
replace on a one-to-one basis,
but we have a good squad and
we know we have good quality
there."



THE TRIBUNE





lm By RENALDO DORSETT
Sports Reporter
rdorsett@tribunemedia.net

r | Wwo Caribbean ath-
letes, including our
own “Golden Girl”

Debbie Ferguson-McKenzie,
made their presence felt during
a track meet in Manchester,
England, over the weekend.

Ferguson-McKenzie won the
women’s 150m final during the
Great Manchester City Games
on Sunday. After posting the
fastest qualifying time of 16.90s
in the heat, Ferguson-McKen-
zie ran 16.54s in the final to
win convincingly ahead of an
all British field which included
reigning Commonwealth,
World and Olympic 400m
champion, Christine Ohurugu.

Ohurugu placed second in
17.10s, Shaunna Thompson
was third in 17.20s and Lee
McConell rounded out the *A’
final in 17.28s.

The veteran sprinter suc-
cessfully continued a season
where she posted a season’s
best time of 11.11s just over a
week ago in Orlando, Florida
and season’s best time of 23.01
in the 200m set in April in
Coral Gables, Florida.
Jamaican sprinter Usain Bolt



PAGE 11



WEDNESDAY, MAY 20,

ran the world’s fastest 150
meters to win a soggy street
sprint on Sunday that marked
his return to action after a car
crash left him requiring minor
foot surgery.

In windy Manchester, the
triple Olympic champion ran
down the English city's main
thoroughfare in 14.35 seconds,
breaking Italian Pietro Men-
nea’s 26-year-old mark of 14.99
in the rarely run 150.

In less than a year, Bolt has
captured four sprinting world
records with his latest 150m
triumph accompanying the
100m, 200m and 400m relay
records set in Beijing.

The men’s field featured a
more eclectic field than the
women with eight athletes
from three countries compet-
ing.

Great Britain’s Marlon
Devonish finished a distant
second in 15.07s, Ivory
Williams of the United States
was third in 15.08s and Great
Britain’s Rikki Fifton was
fourth in 15.13s.

Home favourite Andy Turn-
er took the ‘B’ final in 15.20s,
countryman Leevan Yearwood
was second in 15.29, while
Jamaican Xavier Brown fin-
ished third in 15.53.



Stars collide

as King James,
Superman meet
in playoffs...

2009 See page 9



DEBBIE FERGUSON-McKENZIE is
seen winning the women’s 150m
final at the Great Manchester City
Games in England on Sunday.

(AP Photos: Paul Thomas)

‘Golden Girl’ Debbie, lightning
their presence felt







































PAGE 12, WEDNESDAY, MAY 20, 2009 THE TRIBUNE





LOCAL NEWS

MISS BAHAMAS WORLD SWIMSUIT AND TOP MODEL OF THE BAHAMAS COMPETITIONS

i . i. s 7 7 ey i
ae | THE hee f SWANIQUE , :
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Earth Angels
compete in
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| competition.




The Retreat Gardens
provide backdrop for

Top Model of The
Bahamas contest

N surroundings evocative of the Garden of

Eden, 13 Earth Angels commanded attention

as they strutted down a red carpet catwalk,

wearing sexy white swimwear, and not much
else.

Even the rain stopped for the highly anticipated Miss
Bahamas World Swimsuit and Top Model of the
Bahamas competitions held at The Retreat, head-
quarters of the Bahamas National Trust on Village
! Road.

CHANNA The ladies did not disappoint, displaying spectacular
CIUS. Miss runway skills and even more impressive physiques in
Theo d ore one of the most important
events on the Miss Bahamas
Elyett : World calendar.
Productions The exciting double-head-
er began with the Swimsuit
Competition, which is one
of the “fast track” events of | |
the Miss Bahamas World :
pageant — the winner auto- | — ~
matically advances to the |
semifinal round of the com- |
petition. With so much at
stake, the ladies had been
working out for months — |=
and it showed. One by one, |
the contestants faced a dis-
tinguished panel of judges
which included Top Model
of the Bahamas 2008 Chrys-
tal Bethell; Bahamian snow- | -
boarder Korath Wright; |
Pilates instructor Denise }
Carter; fitness coach Nardo
Dean, and MBO Assistant
Director of Pageant Affairs
Anishka Lockhart.

The judges’ task was to |_
look for body symmetry, the
general fitness of the con-
testant, poise, stage pres-
ence, and modeling skills.
After appearing individual-
ly before the judges, the ladies stood before them as a
group, giving the panel one last look before they made
their final decisions. The winner of the Swimsuit com-
petition will be announced during the finals of the Miss
Bahamas World pageant on May 31.

Following a brief intermission, the show’s focus
switched to haute couture as the Top Model of the
BB wg ’ ae Be: Bahamas competition got underway. A competition
METH |. ca he ee within a competition — this event is used to select the

Bahamian representative for the Top Model of the



Rak te d ; World competition. Last year’s winner Chrystal Bethell
5 ee . travelled to Germany earlier this year to compete.

ae ’ | She just recently returned from China where she

= oh. ee 7 competed in the Beauty and Model Festival, capturing

a ‘ the title of Miss Caribbean in the process. She and her

HTT Ty Pe ea . fellow judges — Bahamian models Stephanie Smollet,

a Bid Felicia Forbes, Kendrick Kemp, and MBO Assistant

SS Director of Talent Development Shavonne Bain, were

looking for the young woman who owned the catwalk

— ar in the strength of her walk, attitude, and the way she

qa os, carried the clothes. The fashions of Bahamian design-

ALL COMDOS IMCLUCE L M ers Lisa Humes, Apryl Burrows, Patrice Lockhart, Sab-

ale rina Francis, and Jarvi created a colourful, festive
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7 4 \ KENDRA WILKINSON, Miss D. title will be announced during the pageant on May 31,

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THE TRIBUNE

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US!

r,

WEDNESDAY,

MAY 20,



2009





ROYAL FIDELITY

Money at Work

NASSAU OFFICE

(242) 356-9801

FREEPORT OFFICE
(242) 351-3010

UBS Bahamas hit by $7m injunction

@ By NEIL HARTNELL
Tribune Business Editor

New York court has

imposed an injunction on

UBS (Bahamas) to pre-

vent it selling a Brazilian
client’s shares in a dispute involving
collateral for a $7 million loan made by
the Bahamian-based offshore institu-
tion.

The US District Court for the south-
ern district of New York granted the
injunction on April 14, 2009, after an
action was filed against UBS (Bahamas)
and its UBS AG parent by husband-
and-wife clients Carlos and Maria
Christina Aguinaga, and his D.A.S.
Trading company.

In their lawsuit, the pair alleged that
they had borrowed $7 million from
UBS (Bahamas), which was secured by
a lien over their stock portfolio held by
the bank.

DAS Trading was said to manage a
portfolio for a company called Global
Management Enterprises, which had
an account with UBS (Bahamas). Glob-
al’s entire stock portfolio was alleged to
consist of shares in Ideiaset, a micro-
cap Brazilian company chaired by Mr
Aguinaga.

The Aguinagas admitted that due to
the global financial crisis and economic

turmoil, the Ideiaset shares “became
worth less than the value of the UBS
loan to Global”, which had seen its port-
folio value decline to $6.7 million.

“The portfolio is illiquid and may be
difficult to sell, except at an unreason-
ably low price,” the lawsuit admitted.
“A sale of all or a substantial part of the
portfolio will likely bring a price that is
below the fair market value of the secu-
rities in the portfolio.

“In or about October 2008, Guil-
herme Pini, the UBS (Bahamas)
account officer in charge of the Global
account, asked plaintiff Carlos Aguina-
ga for more collateral against the Glob-
al loan so that UBS would not be
required to sell shares in the Global
portfolio.

“Because selling the shares would
cause irreparable harm to Global and
consequently to plaintiffs, the plaintiffs
posted additional collateral to secure
UBS’ loan to Global. UBS agreed to
hold off selling the shares.”

The Aguinagas alleged that they met
Brenda Bellantone, a UBS AG officer,
who had responsibility for credit risk
control at UBS (Bahamas), on Octo-
ber 23, 2008, where they offered to give
the bank security interests over their
farm and Manhattan apartment in
return for not selling the shares.

This then resulted in an alleged meet-

Bank alleges: We
had no choice but
to sell-off client’s
assets to recover
margin loan



ing on December 23, 2008, with Katie
Feder, a UBS (Bahamas) executive, Ms
Bellantone and the bank’s lawyer, at
which the agreement was concluded.

Both the security interest on the farm
and Manhattan apartment were valued
at more than $5 million each, with the
value of UBS (Bahamas) lien on the
Ideiaset shares in the Global portfolio
fixed at $7 million. This “provides col-
lateral worth substantially more than
the value of the UBS loan”.

The Aguinagas said there was no
issue with servicing the loan, and the
agreement was designed to give him
time to increase the value of Ideiaset’s
shares or reduce/pay down the UBS

(Bahamas) loan.

He alleged that he was seeking fur-
ther financing from J P Morgan Chase
to enable him to pay down the UBS
(Bahamas) loan, but on March 30, 2009,
the bank said that “if Chase did not
make a commitment to the additional
financing immediately, UBS would sell
the Global share portfolio.

“Moreover, UBS said that it would
make such sale by the close of business
on March 31, 2009, despite the fact that
it is amply secured by its existing mort-
gage and security agreement with plain-
tiffs, and despite being told that Chase
was close to completing its due dili-
gence needed to provide the financing
to the Aguinagas.”

This prompted the Brazilian couple to
go to court and successfully obtain the
injunction and restraining order block-
ing the sale of Ideiaset shares by UBS
(Bahamas).

In response, Ms Bellatone alleged in
an affidavit that UBS, in initially extend-
ing credit to Global via the early 2008
margin loan, only lent $6 million in
return for $28 million in assets. The
credit limit was extended to $13 mil-
lion, and the current loan balance stood
at $10.4 million.

The autumn 2008 stock price declines,
she alleged, left the UBS (Bahamas)
loan to Global “significantly underse-

cured”, with a $9.9 million balance par-
tially offset by $8.6 million worth of
assets - a situation described as negative
equity.

Ms Bellatone alleged that the securi-
ty taken over the Aguinagas’ farm and
apartment did not “supersede” the lien
over the Ideiaset shares, which contin-
ued to decline after no action was taken
by UBS for “two months”.

As at March 16, 2009, the value of
the Ideiaset shares held by Global had
fallen to $6.4 million when set against a
$10.4 million loan balance.

Ms Bellatone alleged: “Even with the
$7 million lien on plaintiffs’ properties,
UBS had only $13.4 million in assets
securing a current loan value of more
than $10.4 million. The total equity
securing the loan was therefore 22 per
cent of the loan amount, well below the
70 per cent equity that we had initially
required before lending against Ideiaset
shares.

“In this case, nearly half the $13.4
million of collateral was in Ideiaset
stock, a security that UBS had deter-
mined effectively had no lending val-
ue and that had limited liquidity.
Accordingly, UBS determined that, in
order to protect itself against further
depreciation in the Ideiaset stock, it
would have no choice but to sell off the
Ideiaset stock.”

Project’s pre-sale buyers Qualifications obstacle to EPA benefits

95 per cent local

m@ By NEIL HARTNELL

m By CHESTER ROBARDS
Business Reporter
crobards@tribunemedia.net

THE $100 million BAL-
MORAL development is set to
break ground next week, with
phase one construction to begin
soon after, its principal said yes-
terday, with the pre-sold town
homes under 95 per cent Bahami-
an ownership.

Jason Kinsale, who purchased
the vintage property only 18
months ago, said the develop-
ment’s target market was young
Bahamian professionals. He said
skyrocketing property values in
New Providence, and diminish-
ing land availability, prompted
him to construct the affordable
gated community.

Two bedroom, 1,400 square
foot town homes at Balmoral
begin at $359,000, while four-bed-
room, 2,000 square foot homes
sell for about $559,000. The more
conservative spender can acquire

a 1,200 square foot condo for
$300,000.

“Our buyers have seen a lot of
value in the price point,” said Mr
Kinsale. “We’ve been able to
appeal to different market seg-
ments, and what I consider to be
affordable for the young profes-
sional market.”

The 43-acre property belonged
to Lord Oliver Simmonds in the
1940s, and was purchased by the
Tomlinson family in the 1960s.

When Mr Kinsale, a native of
Grand Bahama, bought the prop-
erty, the house, which has been
redesigned to be the Balmoral’s
clubhouse, underwent a five
month, $1 million renovation. The
17,000 square foot property was
redesigned around its historical
trimmings and original spiral
staircase.

“The Tomlinson family did a
tremendous job of maintaining
the history,” said Mr Kinsale.

SEE page 4B

Bahamas at ‘real disadvantage’
on food and health safety

@ By NEIL HARTNELL
Tribune Business Editor

THE Bahamas will be at “a
real disadvantage” when it
becomes a full World Trade
Organisation (WTO) member
because it has not developed and
implemented recognised interna-
tional standards for food safety,
plus plant and animal health, Tri-
bune Business was told yester-
day.

Dr Maurice Isaacs, chair of the
National Sanitary and Phytosan-
itary Measures (SPS) committee,
which deals with food, plant and
animal health, said a “lack of
interest” from the private sector
in achieving internationally-recog-
nised standards in this area was
undermining both the commit-
tee’s work and, potentially, the
long-term competitiveness of the
Bahamas in these areas.

The information contained is from a third
party and The Tribune can not be held
tesponsible for errors and/or omission
from the daily report.



Absence of internationally-
accredited testing laboratory
could compromise food
import safety if Bahamas
does not risk trade sanctions

While the absence of interna-
tionally-recognised standards for
food and animal safety/health
could prevent Bahamian
exporters from accessing over-
seas markets with their agricul-
tural/fisheries products, the
absence of an internationally-
accredited and certified testing
laboratory could also jeopardise
this nation’s food safety when it
came to imports.

Dr Isaacs and Dwayne Curtis,
assistant director at the Depart-
ment of Environmental Health
Services (DEHS), explained that
under a rules-based trading
regime such as the WTO or EPA,
the Bahamas could not automat-
ically ban food imports to this
nation on health and safety
grounds.

It needed to produce solid sci-
entific evidence to explain why
particular imports were banned,
Dr Isaacs and Mr Curtis said, oth-
erwise the Bahamas could be
referred by the impacted nation
to a trade sanctions/dispute reso-
lution committee. To produce this
evidence, the Bahamas will need
to have an internationally certi-
fied and recognised testing labo-
ratory.

Dr Isaacs explained that
before, if an issue such as ‘mad
cow disease’ arose, the Bahamas
could simply tell the exporting
nation it was not accepting its
products. But under a rules-based
trading regime, and standards
designed to prevent SPS being

SEE page 4B

Tribune Business Editor

BAHAMIAN services profes-
sionals will be unable to supply
the European Union (EU) mar-
ket under the Economic Partner-
ship Agreement (EPA) if their
qualifications are “not recog-
nised” by countries in that trading
bloc, a Caribbean Export Devel-
opment Agency (CEDA) execu-
tive warned yesterday.

Carlos Wharton, a senior poli-
cy advisor to CEDA, emphasised
that market access to the EU for
Bahamian and CARIFORUM
services providers was not auto-
matically guaranteed just because
they had signed the EPA, the
achievement of recognised inter-
national “standards and qualifi-
cations” instead being “key” to
maximising this trade relation-
ship.

Mr Wharton told a seminar
organised by the Bahamas Cham-
ber of Commerce’s small and
medium-sized enterprises unit
that it was critical for this nation
and the entire CARIFORUM

* Bahamian services professionals must have qualifications recognised
by EU counterparts via Mutual Recognition Agreements
* ‘Scary’ list of things Bahamas needs to do to comply with EPA obligations
* Regional preferences have ‘most profound implications for Bahamas’
* No safeguards can be used to protect Bahamas’ infant industries after
10 years, while WTO has implications for investment incentives

bloc to build up “negotiating
capacity” in their respective pro-
fessional organisations, enabling
the likes of attorneys and accoun-
tants to reach agreements with
their EU counterparts.

This was critical, he explained,
because Bahamian services pro-
fessionals would need to agree
Mutual Recognition Agreements
that “must be signed” with their
EU counterparts, and approved
by the relevant EPA governing
body, to ensure they could supply
the EU market.

“We’ve got a lot of work to
do,” Mr Wharton said. “If quali-
fications are not recognised in the
EU market, you can’t sell goods
and services there.”

He added that this was one

Make it a reality.

area where “we see the Bahamas
offering a lot of support and tak-
ing the lead” for CARIFORUM,
based on the fact that this nation’s
high volume of trade with the US
meant its exporters must be
attaining high standards/qualifi-
cations that satisfied US regula-
tors and business partners.

Mr Wharton said: “With barri-
ers coming down, standards and
qualifications are going to be they
key. Right now, many of our
firms don’t have the capacity to
meet the standards, and we have
to work with professional organ-
isations to ensure qualifications
are met.”

The seminar highlighted just
how much remains to be done for
the Bahamas to fulfill and imple-

Prime Income Fund

e A higher, stable rate of return

e Long-term capital preservation

e Lower risk investment

PA

Nassau: 242.356.9801
Freeport: 242.351.3010

FUP ele

St. Michael: 246.435.1955

royalfidelity.com

e Diversified portfolio

ment its EPA obligations, an
exercise likely to tax the country
and its public/private sector insti-
tutions to the bone. The EPA
agreement’s signing, unlike what
many seem to believe, marks the
start of a 25-year process, not the
end of it.

The Government will be
required to finance the creation of
new institutions, bodies and laws
at a time when its fiscal position is
under immense pressure as a
result of the global recession,
while the private sector will be
required to adapt to a rules-based
trading system and new ways of
doing business.

Hank Ferguson, the Bahamas

SEE page 4B

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PAGE 2B, WEDNESDAY, MAY 20, 2009

THE TRIBUNE



>). =<;\;
Don’t take large bites from marketing plan

NOW is not the time to cut,
slice, mince or chop your sales
and marketing efforts. In a
tough economy, you have to
do the exact opposite of what
your instincts are telling you to
do. Many will cut costs in mar-
keting and advertising, hoping
to survive until things get bet-
ter.

The best defence is a good
offense. Think about this. If
you are coach of a football
team and your team was down
after the first half, do you
bench your best players? Do
you throw away your best
equipment? Do you call the
owner or boss, and say we’re
out of the game? I don’t think
so. At least I hope not.

As head coach you do the
opposite. During the half-time
break you motivate your play-
ers, tweak strategies, use your
best players, dig your heels in
and fight right? Well, what is
the difference? In business, do
the same.

According to Ron Snyder, a
leading international sales and
marketing expert: “Those who
choose to be aggressive and

create new opportunities will
be handsomely rewarded - gen-
erating additional revenue and
opportunities.”

SHORT TERM PLANS

Who really, honestly knows
the future? If someone tells
you they know exactly what’s
going to happen, run, because
we only have our best guess.

So instead of making an
annual sales and marketing
plan (I’m not saying don’t look
ahead), make a short-term
plan. Look at the next month,
three months or six months.
Take little bites you can swal-
low and manage with ease.
Have you ever taken a bite of
food you can barely chew,
much less talk (I’m sure we all
have).

Take a small bite you can
easily and concisely handle. If
you plan on advertising via
radio or newspaper, do it for
one month, and maybe two or
three. Figure out what’s the
best time for your product or
company. Take a short-term
approach.

Promotional
Marketing

mooie ermal rey TT



SIMPLICITY/IDEAS
FROM THE PAST

We have all heard “keep it
simple stupid”? Stop compli-
cating things. Simplicity in itself
is overlooked all too often. We
think we have to be clever and
create the world’s best mar-
keting plan or approach, when
some of the simplest ads and
plans have worked the best.

Ask yourself what has
worked in the past and why?
As a youngster, my dad often
said: “You can judge your
future by your past.” I disliked
that statement at the time,
because then I was not creating
a good past (typical teenager
stuff). However, how profound
and simple a statement. If a
specific plan, idea or tool has
worked previously, why not
revisit it, re-think and re-tool

THE COLLEGE OF THE BAHAMAS

Visit our website at www.cob.edu.bs

REGISTRATION
ANNOUNCEMENT

If you have reserved a seat for classes for Fall 2009
but have not yet paid, please be advised that the first scheduled
cancellation for non payment of tuition and fees will take place on
May 18th, 2009, and will be repeated every 14 days thereafter.

Students will be able to reserve seats online until
July 26th, 2009, at www.cob.edu.bs

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slightly? Simply just use what
has worked.

How long have can openers
been around? A very long
time. However, in today’s mar-
ket you see the same tool, just
different variations achieving
the same goal.

So take some time, review
what has worked in the past
and simply tweak or modify.

Remember keep it simple --
won---- , you get the point.

BE CONSISTENT WITH
YOUR MESSAGE

Digestion is easier when we
take small bites of the same
food.

Speak English if your mar-
ket speaks in English. In other
words, keep your wording
SIMPLE (and short/small). If
using different medias to get
your message out, make sure
the same message is conveyed
throughout, whether it is radio,
newspaper, flyers or e-mail.
This will not only save you time
and money but will consistent-
ly convey your message. The
same theme should be

expressed and
through.

Use what I call the three to
five-second rule. If your reader
or viewer cannot digest in three
to five seconds the basis of your
message, you have lost them
and given them indigestion.
Our attention span in today’s
environment is not what it used
to be.

Again, keep it simple. Take
small bites, look at your past
and keep marketing. All of
these marketing strategies are
certain to keep your business
on top during these challenging
economic times. Have a pro-
ductive and profitable week.
Remember: “THOSE WHO
MARKET WILL MAKE IT.”

through

NB: Scott Farrington is pres-
ident of SunTee EmbroidMe, a
promotional and marketing
company specialising in pro-
motional products. Established
over 27 years ago, SunTee
EmbroidMe has assisted
Bahamian businesses in vari-
ous industries, ranging from
tourism and banking to
telecommunications, in mar-

IN THE MATTER OF THE LEGAL PROFESSION ACT, 1992

AND

IN THE MATTER OF A COMPLAINT AGAINST COUNSEL
AND ATTORNEY

BETWEEN

SOLOMON GUTSTEIN

Complainants

KENDALL KNOWLES

Respondent

NOTICE OF HEARING

TAKE NOTICE that the Disciplinary Tribunal shall
hear the subject Complaint on Wednesday the 20th day
of May, A.D., 2009 at 3:00 o’clock in the afternoon
before Her Ladyship The Honourable Mrs. Justice
Albury at 3rd Floor British American Building, George

Street, Nassau, The Bahamas.

AND FURTHER TAKE NOTICE that the Respondent,
Kendall Knowles, is required to produce to the Bahamas
Bar Council within seven (7) days from the date hereof,
an address to which the Decision may be sent by prepaid

Registered Post.

Dated the 14th day of May, A.D., 2009

Bahamas Bar Association
Elizabeth Avenue
Nassau, The Bahamas

keting themselves. Readers can
contact Mr Farrington at Sun-
Tee EmbroidMe on East
Shirley Street, by e-mail at
scott@sun-tee.com or by tele-
phone at 242-393-3104.




























Benchmark
unveils O1
$9,171 loss

BENCHMARK
(Bahamas) yesterday
unveiled a $9,171 net loss
for the 2009 first quarter,
an improved performance
from its Alliance Invest-
ment Management sub-
sidiary offsetting a $471,155
decline in the unrealised
value of its Bahamian equi-
ty portfolio.

Alliance, its offshore bro-
ker/dealer, generated net
profits of $315,720 for the
three months to March 31,
2009, while the Benchmark
(Advisors) and Benchmark
(Bahamas) subsidiaries lost
$11,666 and $312,875
respectively.

Benchmark (Bahamas)
saw consolidated first quar-
ter revenues drop 16 per
cent to $258,051 year-over-
year, while expenses fell by
3 per cent to $258,924.

The Tribune wants to hear
from people who are
making news in their
neighbourhoods. Perhaps
you are raising funds for a
good cause, campaigning
for improvements in the
area or have won an
award.

If so, call us on 322-1986
and share your story.

For the stories
behind the news,
ele M atleast
on Mondays

and Climate Change
Impacts in The Bahamas

PRESENTER:
lan Elliott
Ph.D, Student, University of Exeter, UK
DATE: May 26th, 2009

Time: 7:00 pm

VENUE: The Retreat, Village Road

lan Elliott is a Ph.D. student who is re-
searching patterns of biodiversity and cli-
mate change impacts in The Bahamas util-

izing Geographic Information Systems
(GIS). GIS 1s a powerful tool that allows
for mapping and analyses of landscapes,
and the data from Mr. Elliott's project are
currently being used to design a more sus-
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Through his research, Mr. Elliott has cre-
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habitat, and the impacts of climate change
and hurricanes, Visit http://mselex.ac.uk/
ast for propect information,

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THE TRIBUNE

WEDNESDAY, MAY 20, 2009, PAGE 3B





Cable accused of ‘bellyaching’

@ By NEIL HARTNELL
Tribune Business Editor

CABLE Bahamas’ claims
that the rival Bahamas
Telecommunications Compa-
ny (BTC) enjoyed “preferen-
tial treatment and influence”
in the communications reform
process were yesterday brand-
ed “ridiculous”, with the com-
pany accused of “bellyaching”
now that it was being forced
to live up to its previous com-
mitments.

T. B. Donaldson, head of the
BTC privatisation committee,
which oversaw the consulta-
tion and feedback effort on the
Government’s behalf, said in
response to Cable Bahamas’
assertions that the process was
compromised by the presence
of three BTC executives on the
committee: “Nothing could be
further from the truth.”

“T don’t know which hat
Cable Bahamas has pulled that
from. That’s so ridiculous,” Mr
Donaldson, a former Central
Bank governor, told Tribune
Business.

“They have no evidence to
prove that. No influence,
undue or otherwise, was exer-
cised by BTC.”

Cable Bahamas, in its April
20, 2009, feedback to the BTC
privatisation committee,
argued that the perception of
integrity in the process had
been “undermined” because
BTC’s executive chairman,
Julian Francis; Felicity John-
son, BTC’s vice-president for
legal, regulatory and intercon-
nection, and its company sec-
retary; and Tellis Symonette,
BTC’s senior vice-president for
Family Islands and adminis-
tration, were all on the BTC
Privatisation Committee over-
seeing it.

In addition, the Broadcasting
Corporation of the Bahamas
(BCB) was also said by Cable
Bahamas to have enjoyed a
privileged position in the con-
sultation effort as its chairman,

* Claim rival BTC had ‘preferential treatment and influence’ over communications
reform process branded as ‘ridiculous’ by committee chairman
* Says BISX-listed firm ‘frustrated’ 15-year monopoly ending and being held to account

should refund to it revenues

chise comes to an end in Octo-

ed persons were “involved in

the process, if anything BTC
will probably have been disad-
vantaged because they were
wearing their committee, not
their BTC, hats”.

When asked why Cable
Bahamas had made these alle-
gations, Mr Donaldson, the
current Commonwealth Bank
chairman, replied: “ I think
Cable Bahamas is frustrated,
having had a 15-year monop-
oly, that they are now having
to do by law some of the things
they should have been doing.

“T see them bellyaching
about the Universal Service
Obligation,” he added, sug-
gesting that the Government
should previously obtained
commitments from Cable
Bahamas in writing, so that the
BISX-listed company could
have been more easily held to
account.

Referring to comments



made in the House of Assem-
bly by Zhivargo Laing, minis-
ter of state for finance, that the
Government would look into
whether Cable Bahamas

Part-time Accountant

For Growing Franchise Group

Main Responsibilities:

Recording of all journal entries
Handling accounts payable functions

paid for Internet/cable televi-
sion services in schools and
other educational institutions,
Mr Donaldson said it had been
agreed that Cable Bahamas
should provide this free of
charge.

Describing the company’s
claims over the communica-
tions reform consultation
process as “absolute non-
sense”, Mr Donaldson said he
did not know whether Cable
Bahamas was trying to
mobilise “public sympathy”
behind it.

However, he warned the
company that it will “find out
sooner or later that the public
have no sympathy or them at
all, having had a 15-year
monopoly”.

Cable Bahamas’ 15-year
exclusive cable television fran-

ber 2009, in theory allowing
over entrants to come into the
market. Yet Cable Bahamas is
so well-established, that com-
petitors will find it hard to
challenge them.

Mr Donaldson criticised the
exclusive franchise given to
Cable Bahamas, saying the pri-
vatisation committee had
learnt that a private monopoly
was just as bad as a public one.

“T don’t think anything they
[Cable Bahamas] do or say
would surprise me,” he added.
“All I can say is that not too
many people in this country
are sympathetic to Cable
Bahamas, because in many
instances they’ve not lived up
to their promises. We should
have realised what we found
in the beginning, that a private
monopoly is just as bad as a

public monopoly.

“They're [Cable Bahamas]
trying to drag up red herrings.
They’ve had a good run, a 15-
year monopoly, and should
now focus on trying to do
something for the people.”

It is unclear what motivated
Cable Bahamas’ comments in
the consultation process, but
it appears that the company’s
once-close relationship with
the Government has, for now,
cooled considerably.

There may also be some
frustration over the protract-
ed wait for the Ministry of
Finance/Central Bank of the
Bahamas to give the company
exchange control approval for
its $40 million preference share
issue, a key component of the
$80 million deal to buy out its
controlling shareholder,
Columbus Communications.














BAHAMAS DEVELOPMENT BANK
Cable Beach, West Bay Street,
PO.Box W-3034
Nassau. Bahamas
‘Tel:( 242) 327-57R0V427 257936
Fax:(242) 327-3047, 327-1258
www, bahamasdevelopmenthank.com

The general public is invited to attend Bahamas



Preparing submission for franchisers

Development Bank s sale of repossessed assets.



Preparing financial statements




Devising & monitoring internal cantrols





Qualifications:

Applicants should possess Bachelors degree in

ASSETS

T




Accounting, at least 5 years experience, knowledge of

* (1) Compaq Presario Computer Tower

* (1) Canon Canoscan N640D EX Scanner

PELE
* (1) Marble Table (Rectangle)



retail/food accounting, be proficient in Quickbooks

* (1) Digital Scale (New)



and MS Office applications, must be able te multi

* (1) Whirl Microwave




* (1)Tec Cash Register

Cooler/Freezers

Michael Moss, also sat on the task, work with minimum supervision and possess a

BTC privatisation committee.

Mr Donaldson yesterday
told Tribune Business that
while the three BTC-connect-

* (1) Epson Stylus Pro 9600 Print Engine
* (1) HP DeskJet 656c Printer (Desktop)
* (1) Monitor
* (1) 1520 Epson Stylus Color Printer
(1) Keyboard & Mouse
(1) Brothers Printer
(1) Samsung Digital Camcorder ore AIO guipme
(1) Dell Scanner & Printer * (3) Nail Tables
* (7) Facial Machine
* (2) Nail Stools

(1) Two Door Chest Freezer

(1) Ice Cream Cooler

(1) Single Door Cooler

(1) 8’ Walk-in Freezer
wCompressor (New)







high level of integrity and professionalism.

Fax application, resume to 364-2470

d = erg @ = e $
(1) Chrome Juice Filler * (2) Tech Work Benches
(1) Multi Fruit Juicer * (1) Alternator Test Bench
(1) Quilting Sewing Machine * (1) Paint Booth

(1) Deli Showcase * (1) Rivet Machine

(1) Singer Sewing Machine * (1) 6” Storage Cabinet
(1) Janome Monogram/Embroidery Sewing Machine * (1) 4’ Craftsman Tool Cabinet
(1) Singer Quantum XL150 Sewing Machine with Serger Brake Washer

(1) Meat Saw (New) Sand Blaster

(1) Deli Selection (Minor 2000 MT-SE) (New) Vari-Drive

Assortment of Items

* Cooking Utensils Pots, Pans & Plates
* (2) Breakfast Nooks

* Air Hockey Game

* (1) Yamaha Wave Runner

DHL JOB DESCRIPTION

POSITION:
JOB FAMILY:
RCS CODE:
REPORTS TO:
LOCATION:

Collections Agent

Credit & Collections
A20004

Collections Lead

Country Finance Department

OVERALL PURPOSE:

Location: Inland Steel, Sumner Street off Solider Rd.Nassau, Bahamas

Under limited supervision in a team environment provide efficient and effec-
tive credit approvals. To ensure timely credit application processing, respond to
information requests and issues. Ensure accuracy of all credit decisions functions
while staying within company policy and procedural guidelines.

Directions: Exit Abundant Life Road turn right onto Solider Road then the first left

onto Sumner Street tenth two storey white & blue building on the left
Date & Time: 10:00a.m. — 3:00p.m. — Saturday May 23, 2009
All assets are sold as is where is for cash, cashier s cheque. No purchase(s) will be released
DUTIES AND RESPONSIBILITIES: Cote nnn

The general public is invited to attend Bahamas Development Bank’s sale of repossessed Vehicles

and small Vessels.
Vehicles

2001 Hyundai H-1 Van SUX
2006 Mitsubishi Canter Truck
1996 Ford Explorer

2000 Ford Ranger Truck
1999 Ford F-250 Truck

2006 Hyundai H-1 SVX Van

Gathers, compiles and maintains basic credit information to be used in
making credit decisions.

Reviews and monitors credit sources, customer applications and
delinquent accounts. Processes credit applications.

Works with smaller customers to resolve collections issues and disputes.
Investigates disputes and reviews documentation.

Prepares and processes credit and collections account adjustments.
Implements credit suspensions.

Recommends further actions on delinquent accounts.

Maintains records of credit risks and delinquent accounts.

Provides support and coordination with third party agencies as needed.
Handles customer calls related to Collection Agency accounts.
Prepares and files bankruptcy claim documents.

2003 Dodge Caravan

2002 Hyundai H-1 Van SUX

1997 Double Axle Mack Dump Truck
1997 Dodge Stratus

1982 GMC Brigadier Drill Truck
2001 Kia Pregio Van

1989 Ford L8000 Drill Truck (Green)

WEES

20’ Robolo Vessel (1996) with Evinrude Outboard Engine

19’ Fiberglass Sports Vessel (1989) Hull Only

21 Seacraft Vessel (1974) with 140 HP Yamaha Outboard Engine

19’ Spanish Wells Runabout Vessel (1991) with 115 HP Mercury Outboard Engine
20’ Abaco Skiff (1997) with 115 HP Mercury Outboard Engine

MINIMUM QUALIFICATIONS:

High School diploma required. .

1-3 years of experience in Collections.

Advanced administrative skills to function effectively with limited
direction amid competing priorities and deadlines.

Excellent customer service orientation and communication skills.
Proficiency using various computer software applications.
Excellent analytical and interpersonal skills.

Proficiency using various computer software applications

Location: Internal Security Division Compound, Thompson Blvd

Nassau, Bahamas

Date & Time: 10:00a.m. — 3:00p.m. — Saturday May 23, 2009

For additional information telephone 327-5780.

The public is invited to come and view the aforementioned assets on the date and time indicated.
After which you may submit Sealed bids marked “TENDER-EQUIPMENT” to Bahamas
Development Bank, P.O. Box N-3034, Nassau, Bahamas. A representative will be on the
compound from 10:00am to 3:00pm to collect and secure all offers, which will be opened on May
25, 2009. Please note that all bids on the aforementioned assets should be received by 3:00 pm
May 23, 2009. The Bahamas Development Bank reserves the right to reject any or all offers. All
assets are sold as is.

For more information please contact:
Romell K. Knowles I

Country Manager
Email:Romell.Knowles@dhl.com



PAGE 4B, WEDNESDAY, MAY 20, 2009

THE TRIBUNE



US offshore attack provides financial reform opportunity

lm By CHESTER ROBARDS
Business Reporter
crobards@tribunemedia.net

THE AMENDMENTS being made to the
US tax code represent a unique opportunity
to craft and mould a new 21st century business
model for the Bahamas’ financial services sec-
tor, a partner in the McKinney, Bancroft and
Hughes law firm said yesterday.

John Wilson, speaking at the Bahamas Insti-
tute of Financial Services’ week of seminars,
said the Bahamas should use the US reform to
retool the Bahamian financial services sector
and quell whatever impact they and the ‘Stop
Tax Haven Abuse’ Bill will have on this coun-
try.

According to Mr Wilson, the OECD coun-
tries have sounded the death knell for the tax-
out of the Bahamas’ private client business.

“We should use these opportunities to inno-
vate and develop a sustainable financial model
and product for the Bahamas,” he said. “The
next three to five years promise to be a dynam-
ic time for the development of offshore busi-
nesses.”

Cheryl Bazard, senior counsel and head of

Chambers at her law firm, said that Bahamians
should know that the business that has been
done in so-called “tax haven” jurisdictions, “has
all been legal within the framework of legisla-
tion coming out of the US”.

She said that the ever since the US and
Europe announced their plans to go after inter-
national financial centres, the Bahamas has
been challenged on every side of the issue.

However, she, like many, believes the US is
using offshore financial centres as a scapegoat
for the global financial crisis, and is seeking to
recapture lost tax revenue it claims offshore
financial centres withhold.

“For the United States to bolster its welfare
plans, it is to now attack tax havens across the
board to get that wealth back on to their shores
and into their financial institutions,” Ms Bazard
said.

She suggested that the Bahamas put its best
and brightest minds behind these issues in order
to move from national ‘think-tanks’ to nation-
al ‘do’ tanks, because the US is not relenting on
its mission to do away with offshore financial
centres.

Former finance minister James Smith, who
was also a panellist at the seminar, said the US

was attempting to “obliterate offshore financial
centres”.

He said that in order for the Bahamas to
remain a competitive international financial
centre, it needs to adopt strategies that would
move it forward as possibly damaging US tax
policies bear down.

Attorney Ryan Pinder said the US is com-
mitted to put its laws into effect by the end of
the year, and suggested that Bahamians keep an
eye on policies coming out of the US at a rate of
at least one per week.

“Every offshore financial institution should
closely monitor the US policies, but also pay
attention to the what’s coming out of Europe,”
he said.

Mr Wilson said this country needs to adopt a
coordinated strategy for all segments of its
international business in order to moved for-
ward successfully.

“Our task is to decide whether we will be
the cadre professional officiating at the funeral
parlour of the financial services industry, or
will we oversee the retooled and re-energised
sector, which like the mythical phoenix bird,
will rise form the ashes more beautiful than
before,” Mr Wilson said.

Project’s pre-sale buyers
95 per cent local
The contract to construct the

FROM 1B
70 phase one homes has been
awarded to Bahama Wall Systems Ltd.

When construction commences and infrastructure is put
in place, Mr Kinsale said he expects buyer interest to peak.
“We anticipate much stronger demand once the project
starts,” he said.

The construction side of the development is expected to
create around 100 jobs, with 50 more employed at Bal-
moral’s clubhouse as gardeners, waiting staff, culinary staff
and administration.

“We have been able to create a significant number of
jobs and hiring processes for local Bahamian contractors,”
said Mr Kinsale.

According to him, because of the current state of the
market, Balmoral’s sales and marketing team have been
working overtime to push pre-sales in order to give the pro-
ject legs.

The project has placed a huge emphasis on making the
Balmoral a family-oriented community, with pools and a
Mark Knowles tennis centre to complement the clubhouse
amenity available to all home owners. It has taken steps to
save as many indigenous trees as possible, as a part of the
landscaping process. “There is a lot of focus on the ameni-
ties,” said Mr Kinsale.

EPA, from 1B

Chamber of Commerce’s inter-
national trade consultant, said in
relation to the EPA: “If you go
through the list of things that
need to be done, it would be
scary.

“We're the only country in the
Western Hemisphere that does
not have a competition policy.
We do not have a clear govern-
ment procurement policy. If the
IDB’s involved, we comply with
the rules. If not, we make do with
it as we see fit.

“These things are not possible
in a rules-based trading regime.”

Mr Wharton told the seminar

that the EPA’s “regional prefer-
ence clause” “has probably the
most profound implications for
the Bahamas”. This requires the
Bahamas to offer the same trade
preferences, benefits and tariff
liberalisation schedule to other
CARIFORUM states and the
Dominican Republic as it is to
the EU, the Europeans having
been unwilling to sign an agree-
ment that did not permit this.
“The regional preference
clause has serious implications for
the [CARICOM] community,”
Mr Wharton explained. “This
clause has probably the most pro-
found implications for the
Bahamas, because the Bahamas is
not part of the CARICOM Single

Market & Economy (CSME).

“If goods originate from
CARICOM countries, the tariffs
the Bahamas has agreed to phase-
out for the EU also have to be
phased-out for the same products
in the context of Bahamas-CARI-
COM relations, and equally in
the Bahamas-Dominican Repub-
lic relationship.”

Mr Wharton said this would
give the Bahamas an opportunity
to source products from CARI-
COM countries and the Domini-
can Republic at more competi-
tive prices.

And he added: “It provides an
opportunity for you [the
Bahamas] more goods and ser-
vices to the CARICOM market.”

Mr Wharton later told Tribune
Business that more developed
countries in the CARIFORUM
bloc, which would include the
Bahamas, had to implement the
EPA provisions in respect of their
fellow CARICOM states (and the
Dominican Republic) within one
year of the agreement’s signing.
This means that this nation has
to give its fellow Caribbean
nations the same trade prefer-
ences and benefits it has accorded
the EU by late 2009.

The Chamber and CEDA are
likely to conduct a study examin-
ing the impact of the regional
preference clause for the
Bahamas.

Mr Wharton also warned that,

10 years after the EPA’s signing,
the Bahamas and other CARI-
FORUM states will “no longer
be able to apply safeguard mea-
sures on imports impacting infant
industries” in their nations.

Describing this as a “slap in the
face”, Mr Wharton said it had
important implications for manu-
facturing industries, not to men-
tion start-ups and entrepreneurs.

“We are not only competing in
the export market, but have to
build confidence among our peo-
ple to compete in the domestic
market before we consider com-
peting outside,” he added.

Mr Wharton also urged the
Bahamas to beware of the World
Trade Organisation’s (WTO)

Subsidies and Countervailing
Measures Agreement, which pro-
hibited the use of export subsi-
dies by 2015.

The Bahamas has formally sub-
mitted its Memorandum of Trade
regime to being the accession
process to full WTO membership,
and Mr Wharton said current
members, such as Barbados, were
already studying how this agree-
ment would affects its econom-
ic/trade legislation and policies.

“T encourage the Chamber and
the Government of the Bahamas
to this thing to the fullest extent,
because it can have an impact for
the type of incentives you offer
going forward,” Mr Wharton
added.

SAFETY, from 1B

used as a trade barrier, exporting coun-
tries could insist their products were safe.

“Now, if there’s an international stan-
dard, we have to accept the product of
prove scientifically why we aren’t,” Dr
Isaacs said.

Mr Curtis added: “Even if we think
we have a good reason to prohibit, based
on our scientific opinion, if our facilities
do not meet the standard, that can be
challenged.”

Dr Isaacs, who addressed a Bahamas
Chamber of Commerce-organised con-
ference on the SPS issue, said: “We find
that not too many people know about
the SPS committee and the international

agreements in general.”

The WTO, which the Bahamas is
already applying for full membership in,
has such an agreement on SPS issues.
And this nation, having signed on to the
Economic Partnership Agreement
(EPA) with the European Union (EU),
will be expected to meet those SPS stan-
dards, otherwise its agricultural and fish-
eries exporters might be denied access
to the EU.

Dr Isaacs said the SPS committee,
which comes under the Ministry of Agri-
culture and Fisheries, aimed to be an
advocate for SPS measures, acting as a
venue to facilitate their eventual imple-
mentation and a communications channel
between the Government and Bahamian
industry.

“Some of the strong challenges we face

are that some local manufacturers and
producers benefit from the lack of local
standards,” Dr Isaacs explained. “The
absence of some standards may be ben-
eficial for some companies.”

He said the SPS standards drive was
also being impacted by the lack of eco-
nomic diversification in the Bahamas,
and the fact that few Bahamian compa-
nies were goods and agricultural/fisheries
exporters.

“We've not really made economic
diversification a priority,” Dr Isaacs said.
“We haven’t tried to think of things for
the export market. Things are changing
and we have to catch up.”

He explained that the wait for full
WTO membership, and the Bahamas’
current status as an observer members,
offered the best opportunity for this.

“Once we join, the options regarding
change will be limited,” Dr Isaacs said,
explaining that a failure to improve nego-
tiating capacity and legislation in this
area would place the Bahamas at a com-
petitive disadvantage.

He told Tribune Business: “There is
some interest, but most of the compa-
nies doing the trading have created their
own standards, quality assurance pro-
grammes within their own company.”
Commonwealth Brewery and Paradise
Fisheries were cited as examples of this.

“Other companies are not really aware
of the benefits or have the wherewithal to
properly regulate their internal environ-
ment,” Dr Isaacs added.

A failure to adopt and implement
internationally-recognised SPS standards
was “going to put us at a real competitive

disadvantage”, Dr Isaacs said. “Once we
join, because it seems other people are
more used to dealing with the standards
in general, they will be better able to
adjust to changes in the standards.

“Those people not used to standards
will have a lot more difficulty in con-
forming to those standards if they change
of increase.”

He added: “What we’re trying to do is
develop the capacity in regards to imple-
mentation, so that we can implement the
WTO agreement when we become mem-
bers. The whole idea is to develop this
capacity. The whole purpose of the SPS
committee is to act as the driving force.”

The absence of private sector interest
meant there was no drive to establish a
Board of Standards, leaving the whole
issue in the Government’s hands.

PUBLIC NOTICE

INTENT TO CHANGE NAME BY DEED POLL

The Public is hereby advised that |, HELENA DELCINA
SYMONETTE of Monastery Height, PO. Box CB-12766,
Nassau, Bahamas, intend to change my name to HELENA
DELCINA STUART. If there are any objections to this change
of name by Deed Poll, you may write such objections to the
Chief Passport Officer, PO.Box N-742, Nassau, Bahamas no
later than thirty (30) days after the date of publication of this

NOTICE

NOTICE is hereby given that SEAN THOMPSON PALMER
of BARN CLOSE, PRINCE CHARLES DRIVE, P.O. BOX
N-4309, is applying to the Minister responsible for Nationality
and Citizenship, for registration/naturalization as a citizen of
The Bahamas, and that any person who knows any reason
why registration/naturalization should not be granted, should
send a written and signed statement of the facts within
twenty-eight days from the 20" day of May, 2009 to the
Minister responsible for nationality and Citizenship, P.O. Box
N-7147, Nassau, Bahamas.

PUBLIC NOTICE

INTENT TO CHANGE NAME BY DEED POLL

The Public is hereby advised that |, SERVNOVIA
AMANDA SANDS of P.O. Box N-8581, Nassau,
Bahamas, intend to change my name to AMANDA
VERNESSA_ SANDS-RUSSELL. If there are any
objections to this change of name by Deed Poll, you
may write such objections to the Chief Passport Officer,
P.O.Box N-742, Nassau, Bahamas no later than thirty
(30) days after the date of publication of this notice.

NOTICE

NOTICE is hereby given that CURRY VALBRUN OF
EXUMA STREET OFF ANDROS AVENUE, P.O. BOX
EE-15093, is applying to the Minister responsible
for Mationality and Citizenship, for registration’
naturalization as a citizen of The Bahamas, and thal
any person who knows any reason why registration!
naturalization should not be granted, should send
a written and signed statement of the facts within
twenty-eight days fram the 12° day of May, 2005 to the
Minister responsible for nationality and Citizenship,
RO. Box N-7147, Nassau, Bahamas.

NOTICE

NOTICE is hereby given that MARTIN JERMAINE
McGREGOR OF #25 DIAMOND DRIVE, P.O. BOX F-44900,
GRAND BAHAMA, BAHAMAS is applying to the Minister
responsible for Nationality and Citizenship, for registration/
naturalization as a citizen of The Bahamas, and that any
person who knows any reason why registration/ naturalization
should not be granted, should send a written and signed
statement of the facts within twenty-eight days from the 20th
day of MAY, 2009 to the Minister responsible for Nationality
and Citizenship, PO. Box N-7147, Freeport, Bahamas.



PUBLIC NOTICE

INTENT TO CHANGE NAME BY DEED POLL

The Public is hereby advised that |, CARA VERON SAUNDERS of the
South Western District of the Island of New Providence on of the
Islands of the Commonwealth of the Bahamas, intend to change my
son's name from KELVIN VICTOR GERMAN to MALACHI ADRIEL
SAUNDERS. If there are any objections to this change of name by Deed
Poll, you may write such objections to the Chief Passport Officer, P.O.Box
N-742, Nassau, Bahamas no later than thirty (30) days after the date of
publication of this notice.

JOB OPENING

Needed immediately, experienced Nurses to
work in Operating Theatre. Must have a good
employment background, must possess a Bachelors
Degree in Nursing, must have Operating Theatre
experience and must be licensed in the
Commonwealth of the Bahamas. For immediate
consideration, please send your resume to:

PHYSICIANS ALLIANCE LTD.
P.O. BOX EE-17022
#3 GROSVENOR CLOSE OFFICE
NASSAU, BAHAMAS
FAX: (242) 326-8874

Now Hiring
Assistant Managers

* Must have at least 2 years management ar
supervisory experience, preferably in food
service,

* Must have good communication and leadership
skills.

Fax resume to 394-4938 or complete application at
DO stores at Town Centre Mall or Harbour Bay
Shopping Centre.

NOTICE

NOTICE is hereby given that MAXEN PROPHETE of 1611
NE, 3RDAVE., APT. 5, DELRAY BEACH, FLORIDA, 33444,
is applying to the Minister responsible for Nationality and
Citizenship, for registration/naturalization as a citizen of The
Bahamas, and that any person who knows any reason why
registration/naturalization should not be granted, should
send a written and signed statement of the facts within
twenty-eight days from the 20" day of May, 2009 to the
Minister responsible for nationality and Citizenship, P.O. Box
N-7147, Nassau, Bahamas.

Clico (Bahamas) Limited
(In Liquidation)

LIQUIDATOR’S NOTICE

Policyholders of Clico (Bahamas) Limited (dn Liquida-
tion) are advised that premium payments and other policy
transactions can be made at the Company’s main office,
located on Mt. Royal Avenue and Carew Street, Nassau,
Bahamas.

Policyholders and the public are further advised that office
hours are from 9:00 am to 4:30 pm daily.

Craig A. (Tony) Gomez
Official Liquidator

Notice



OSPIN INTERNATIONAL INC.

In Voluntary Liquidation

Notice is hereby given that in accordance with Section
1384) of the International Business Companies Act. 2000,
OSPIN INTERNATIONAL INC. is in dissolution as of

May 18, 2009.
International Liquidator Services Inc. situaated at 35A

Regent Street, PO. Box 1777, Belize City, Belize is the
Liquidator.

LIQUIDATOR





PAGE 6B, WEDNESDAY, MAY 20, 2009

eS

THE TRIBUNE





Danish’s from the Bread Shop.

i
"

“lll
-

Bread

done
right

ECO AM eC CCUM mS CCl mt Erm atte



The Tribune



@ By ALEX MISSICK
Tribune Features Reporter
amissick@tribunemedia.net

THERE is nothing that takes you
back to your childhood more
than the aroma of Grammy in
the kitchen making a batch of
her warm homemade bread.
That same soft, fluffy melt in
your mouth goodness that you
were eager to get your hands on
is exactly what the Bread Shop,
located on Shirley Street and
Okra Hill has to offer.

Michael Dillet, Managing Director at
the Bread Shop, started the business in
1992 along with his mother a native of
Exuma.

“My wife and I perfected the baking
the techniques that I learned from my
mother. We are presently operating the
Bread Shop alone. All of our bread prod-

Fresh Baked breads cooling at the Bread Shop.



ucts are hand kneaded,” Mr Dillet said.

Although the Bread shop specialises in
bread, they also bake pastries such as
cupcakes, pineapple tarts, coconut tarts,
cookies, bread buns and other pastries.

“When you start buying bread from us,
you either have to hit the gym or the
streets because we will keep you coming
back-the bread is just that good,” Mr Dil-
Kray ites

Mr Dillet said although he would like
to consider the Bread Shop as a mom
and pop type of store, their clientele
spreads world wide as they cater to many
international and high end clients.

“We have customers from all walks of
life. We have corporate customers, time
share persons, Atlantis workers, private
yachts, and international customers. We
have customers that have grown up their
kids on this bread. We have customers
who came in from their conception and
are now 17 and 18 years old. We know
our customers so well that when they pull
up in the drive way I already know what
they want and I just start packing their
order before they reach inside,” Mr Dil-





let said.

Mr Dillet said cinnamon swirl bread is
the unique signature bread of the Bread
Shop. The cinnamon swirl is a blend of
sugars and cinnamon glazed with white
icing that is not too heavy to satisfy any
sweet tooth.

“Our signature bread contains a num-
ber of ingredients including a cinnamon
blend that only we can make. It is a tasty
sweet bread that many people enjoy and
you will only find it at the Bread shop,”
Mr Dillet said.

As for the future of the Bread Shop,
Mr Dillet said he would like to continue
the store and continue to provide good
tasting bread “like mama used to make
it” for years to come.

“It is a pleasure to provide such good
tasting bread from the Bread Shop
because of the warm feelings we get from
our customers when they approve of how
good our product is. When you bite into
bread from the Bread Shop, you bite into
ingredients and bread prepared with love
and this is what makes the Bread Shop
stand out from its competitors.”

CupCakes from the Bread Shop.

—



Tribune Taste is once again showcasing
some of the super sized produce, being
grown by local farmers.
~ Check out these whoppers grown by
Spanish Wells farmer Lloyd Higgs. Mr
Higgs recently broke his own seven
pound onion record with this amazing
tear jerker which tipped the scales at
over nine pounds. He also grew this
massive 41 pound pumpkin.

Mr Higgs takes tremendous pride in the
farming industry of the Bahamas as do
all the farmers in Spanish Wells who
say that “it’s grown bigger and better in
the Bahamas in Spanish Wells.”



THE TRIBUNE WEDNESDAY, MAY 20, 2009, PAGE 7B






















The Tribune

This week, Tribune Entertain-
ment features an eclectic list of
events happening at the week-
end. From a major beauty
pageant to a celebration of fine
foods for a good cause- there is
sure tobe something on this =
list for everyone.

41. Miss Bahamas Universe
Finals- The new queen will be
crowned on Sunday May 24 at
the Rain Forest Theatre at the
Wyndham resort at 8 pm.
Attend this gala event and see
who will represent the country
at this year’s Miss Universe
Pageant to be held right here at
the Atlantis Resort on Paradise
Island in August.

THE BAHAMAS HUMANE SOCIETY'S

2. Paradise Plates - Local

chefs from thirteen different i
restaurants will showcase excit- i
ing new creations or their well-

FUN DAY

loved signature fare to guests THE Bahamas

at Paradise Plates, Hands For =} eae Society hada
Hunger's first annual fundraiser i

event being held on Saturday, dog fun day over the

weekend at the Botani-
cal Gardens grounds
allowing dogs of all
shapes sizes and per-
sonalities to make new
friends and show off
various talents in a
number of different
competitions. Pictured
are some four legged
friends having a great
time.

May 23from7-11pmatthe i
Atlantis Crown Ballroom. Spon-
sored by The New Providence:
Development Company Limited
and Old Fort Bay, the unique
event will feature a sampling of
gourmet food, fine wine and
live entertainment with all pro-
ceeds benefiting Hands For
Hunger the non-profit, humani-
tarian organisation committed
to the elimination of hunger and :
the reduction of food wastein
The Bahamas. Tickets are $125. :

3. Blue and White Ball - On
Saturday, May 23, Phi Beta Sig- |
ma Fraternity Inc and Zeta Phi:
Beta Sorority Inc will host their
2nd annual Blue & White Ball at
the Wyndam Nassau Resort,
Cable Beach. High school stu-
dents participating in the frater-
nity and sorority's programmes
will be honoured during the
ball. Outstanding students will Fi ae d
also be awarded scholarships : ~) > ) la WAL) LU
to assist in tertiary education. pas Swi tsk a eS. =

For tickets call 557-2673 or 5 ae : t 7
royce COUIGSWI Wy reales hi lol nl i ceve

: L | ; ry ( I |
4-the Golege of The Bahamas ountoyOrnando:
will be celebrating the launch of ; # By LLOYD ALLEN
their Sports & Wellness insti. { Tribune Features Reporter

tute by holding a Fun Run Walk : /allen@tribunemedia.net My eyes TTL

a ae fe me | : READ The Tribune’s e-splash for on time updates of enter- z ~ = read you a $3,000
pation Include dinner tor two, a ; tainment news, events, and happenings throughout Nassau as they : , A
Chapter One bookstore gift cer- : unfold. “4 se eT Reco Life)
tificate, One Month Gym Mem- : _ Recently the Kappa Alpha Psi fraternity hosted its Impromptu j $1,000 spending
bership and more. Entry fee is i Four at the Marley Resort, a wine and cheese, art, and jazz event, / | ae — ..
$10 (includes T-shirt Sm - Xlg) i as a fundraiser for one of the organisation’s community causes.

? ~=According to Errol L Bodie, one of the senior members of the

$12 (includes shirt 2Xlg and fraternity’s local chapter, the first few times the Jmpromptu event
up). Entry forms for the event} was held, proceeds had been earmarked for various causes, includ-
are available at the Centre for ©} ing local non-profit groups and other NGOs. However, proceeds

Continuing Education & Exten- i from this ie ee co slated for a youth mentoring pro-
i ; i gramme known as Guide Right.

a ctioaee ee bey i Mr Bodie explained that this is one of the many initiatives by nF oo i
ewe ness ented S i Kappa Alpha Psi, to target and assist at risk high school senior boys, Wy’ Cy

Oakes Field campus. The event; by showing and providing them healthy alternatives to a brighter , u

begins at 6 am at the Portia ? future.

Smith Building, Poinciana Dri- i This year’s event was nothing short of a who’s who celebrity

ve. This event is sponsored by i social, as dozens of fraternity and sorority affiliates along with

1 : : Other young professionals turned out to show support. With the
The d'Albenas Agency and Min ; Other young professional e hh pporl, Willy th

. : i melodic tunes of various entertainers, including Tingum Dem, and a Aa »
of Health. For more information ? an encore unveiling of the Kenisis experience by local artist Scharad : poe eeeD CRUNCH!
Call 302-4349. : Lightbourne, this event was certainly an overall success. wer < .
: Creators and designers of the Conchience Clothing (CC) line — ,
5. Dollars for Scholars - On : a local urban and uptown clothing company — are gearing to
Thursday, May 21, Doctor’s : launch their new summer line. Chief Executive Officers of the

; Fath ervf : company Giorgio Knowles and Deangelo Charlton, say this new
hospital and Rubin s will host : : line will bring a new level of new and creative styles. The duo, who
luncheon and fashion showin | have over the past two years become well-known for their hats,
aid of the Doctor's Hospital Dr | shirts, and hoodies, have been heavily supported by many local
Meyer Rassin Foundation. The : celebrities in the music and entertainment arena. This season they ,
event is $75 and will be held at : intend to feature cardigans, tailored pants, belts, and bikinis. 3% The dAlbenas Agency Ltd
Luciano’s Restaurant at noon. Local entertainer So$A Man aka Brandon Major recently MADIERA STREET, PALMDALE * TELEPHONE: 322-1441 A Bright Start
Tincnionmaan a h 1 : returned from Canada, where he, MDEEZ, Sammi Starr, and
e foun a lon provi es sc Ol- : Canadian artist Lion, recorded the video for his newest single,
arships and financial assistance : We Winning.
to persons pursuing careers in So$A explained in a recent interview, that as the final edit is being ENTRY FORM 9
healthcare. : completed for the video, the official release is scheduled for May 29 a
The Fashion Show will feature | at a Premiere launch party - Social Light 6 - at the Balcony night ' 7 â„¢
: club, where there also will be a special performance by other local Wi na vacation for fou r from

the new collections of Liz Clai- : entertainers. With his song Shawty over the last year making him

°°

njoy Kellogg § for br Cak fas,
e

as
ow
~ and fiyaway © 4

Kellogg’s Apple Jacks®, Froot Loops®, Frosted Flakes®, Corn Flakes® and Corn Pops® are registered brands.

borne, and New York by Isaac : a force to be reckoned with in the local music industry, So$A said Buy two qualifying boxes of your favourite

Mizrahi as provided by Rubin's. : fans can look forward to bigger and better things from him in the Name: a oe

For tickets or information on ; coming months. aes; OF two Tr-Fun pack or Froot Loops and

the “Dollars for Scholars” Fash- ; Producers of local online entertainment magazine Elife242 say the i F eore CaO Mi cine cary fo onl

ion Show and Luncheon. con- _; fifth edition of the magazine is now available, with local DJ Dion Address: a oi ek tops and dive inta

tact Doctors Hospital at 302- : Da Butcha on the cover, along with a two page spread. The mag- ss is ’nitty boxes in participating stores or at the
nap i azine which in the past has featured other big names in Bahamian pore ce es 2008

4603/7, Rubin’s, Harbour Bay i entertainment, including TaDa, SO$A Man and MDEEZ, and Telephone: Employees ofthe TAbenas Agency and Medi Enterprises, and

322-3170 or Rubin’s, Cable ; Sammie Starr, also will be releasing its sixth edition. Although nm thet iimediate Faris, are not eligible to enter.

Cottage, Cable Beach at 327- they haven’t officially announced who will be on the front cover, we . ;

7072. : have confirmed that it will be an entertainer who has recently Flyaway to Orlando with K__ 1 o_ g s!

i interviewed Jamaican icon Empress Jeanelle.



PAGE 8B, WEDNESDAY, MAY 20, 2009

THE TRIBUNE





TS fom BTVI gather with Shirley Pearson (2nd

), Brynda Knowles, Dr Iva Dahl, Arianne Etuk

om right) as Mode Iles Ltd presents gifts to fhe =~
lol ter their support at IWFW last November. _
ao i




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To enter attach 2 package wrappers
from any size package of Kotex to an
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A chance to win with every 2 purchased products by K__t__ xX.

A STEAM iron and three portable racks
were donated to the Bahamas Technical and
Vocational Institute’s fashion department
Friday by representatives of Mode Iles Ltd as
tokens of appreciation for their participa-
tion at Islands of the World Fashion Week
last November.

“We would like to thank BTVI and the
rest of the Islands of the World Fashion
Week Team for their dedicated support and
hard work during the launch last Novem-
ber,” said Arianne Etuk, chief operations
officer, and Brynda Knowles, senior fashion
consultant.

Ms Etuk credited the school’s participa-
tion for the company’s recent success of win-
ning the award for ‘Best Fashion Show or
Fashion Week attended’ category at the 2nd
annual Caribbean Fashion Awards (CFA)
held in at the Hilton Hotel in Bridgetown,
Barbados, on April 11.

“We know that without BTVI, it would

The many
faces of woot

FROM page 10

about 10 inches thick and then you cut it with
a chainsaw. After the chainsaw, then you have
all these machines for sanding the whole thing
down to smooth it out,” Mr Taylor said.

Mr Taylor said a friend in South Carolina
really got him started in working and making
art with this material.

“I saw what he did and it excited me but
strangely enough in 1999 was the first time I
saw it and it was always in the back of my
mind. I then finally tried it and I liked it and I
want to take it much further,” Mr Taylor said.

Dozens of sketches are made before a piece
can take shape. Mr Taylor said good plan-
ning and careful cutting can make a great piece
as he even draws inspiration from other sculp-
tors.

“The cutting process is sometimes very dif-
ficult. Sometimes the chainsaws rip up the
wood so you have to be very careful. I try or
attempt to do at least two of the sketches I
make out of the dozen I draw. So it is really
about planning. There is a magazine called
Sculptural Pursuit and they had a feature on
this guy, I think he lives in Hawaii. He is doing
the same thing but then I learned something
from him because my pieces are very heavy.
What he does is when he cuts his shape out, he
cuts out a hollow but Iam taking my sculptures
further because I’m doing figures,” Mr Taylor
said.

Mr Taylor said it is his hope in the future to
see a visual arts school in the Bahamas because
of the amount of talent this country has.

“I think we are ready for that right now —a
specific arts school with painting, sculpture,
drawing. I think it will be a success.”

Mode Iles Ltd.
presents gifts to
BTVI’s fashion dept.











not have been possible,” she said. “We do
appreciate it and we do look forward to
working with you in the future.”

The school had 14 students take part as
volunteers at IWFW 2008 serving in several
capacities from pressing garments to sewing
to dressing models for the runway.

Receiving the gifts on behalf of BTVI were
Dr Iva Dahl, manager/IDB Consultant
(BTVD), and Shirley Pearson, coordinator of
fashion, trade and souvenir manufacturing
(BTVI).

“We are very grateful for the gifts and we
will gladly help out at this year’s event,” said
Ms. Pearson. “It was a lot of fun and I hope
when we put on our fashion show you will be
there to support us.”

The school’s showcase will be held on June
14 at 4 p.m. at the Wyndham Nassau Resort
& Crystal Palace Casino. Islands of the
World Fashion Week is scheduled to take
place November 4 to 8.






The Bahamas
Humane Society's
Dog Fun Day

See page seven







The Tribune SECTION B od

WEDNESDAY, MAY 20, 2009

Plywood Two headed
sculpture sculpture.
with ceramic
masks in the
ee ilcie
i
' '
i
be
Plywood
sculpture of
male head.
m@ By ALEX MISSICK
Tribune Features Reporter
amissick@tribunemedia.net =
RTISTS can take —

Crate meliTe,

turn it into some-
thing grand and mind P
blowing. Some use mud,
others use paints, however,
artist Max Taylor takes a
common material- ply
wood and recreates the
human form through his

sculptures.

Mr Taylor has been an artist for
about 50 years immersing himself in
all artistic mediums being a potter,

Plywood







ae sculptor, ceramic artist and print-
fo, t _ maker.
eid ee Ea ean eo Beane Aveesiarie
where the main post office is now, sericea
back in 1962 being an apprentice Ainea
with the likes of Eddie Minnis, and P
conch shell. yj

Vernon Cambridge. The Chelsea
Pottery was an opportunity for
many young artists. It was a place
where you could just walk in if you
wanted to learn,” Mr Taylor said.

Mr Taylor said when it comes to
creating his plywood sculptures, it is
not as difficult as it may seem to
construct the pieces.

“You get three quarter inch ply-
wood, cut out the shape and you glue
all the pieces together. After you glue
the pieces together they are almost

SEE page eight



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PAGE 1

N N A A S S S S A A U U A A N N D D B B A A H H A A M M A A I I S S L L A A N N D D S S L L E E A A D D I I N N G G N N E E W W S S P P A A P P E E R R New Crown land favours claims C M Y K C M Y K V olume: 105 No.147WEDNESDAY, MAY 20, 2009 PRICE – 75 (Abaco and Grand Bahama $1.25 WEATHER SHOWERS ANDT-STORM HIGH 84F LOW 75F F E A T U R E S SEE ‘THEARTS’ SECTION S P O R T S Faces of SEEPAGEELEVEN Wood Debbie makes presence felt n By PAUL G TURNQUEST Tribune Staff Reporter pturnquest@tribunemedia.net CLAIMS of nepotism continue to plague the Department of Lands and Surveys when it was alleged yesterday that the wives of two senior officers in that department, and other close relatives had been granted Crown land on Abaco. In The Tribune’s efforts to obtain documentation to substantiate these claims, it was revealed that certain files at the department were no longer acces sible by staff at this ministry. However, where there appeared to be an attempt to con ceal this information, it was forgotten that once the grants had been approved they were recorded at the Register General’s office. It was here that it was discovered that the wife and son of one of the senior officials had received an 18,343 square foot and a 15,635 square foot lot respectively. The first parcel, granted in a subdivi sion south of Treasure Cay, Abaco was sold for $2,201.16 while the second lot, on Wood Cay, Abaco, was sold for $1,786.25. Allegations surround two senior Lands and Surveys officers The Tribune ANYTIME ... ANYPLACE , WE RE #1 BAHAMASEDITION TRY OUR SOUTHERN CHICKEN BISCUIT www.tribune242.com HEAVYRAINTAKESITSTOLLONSTREETSOFNASSAU More than 20 potential buyers for Emerald Bay n By MEGAN REYNOLDS Tribune Staff Reporter mreynolds@ tribunemedia.net MORE than 20 interested parties are considering buy ing the Emerald Bay Resort and Marina in Exuma but receivers are keeping their identities under wraps. Russell Downs, a representative for receivers Price waterhouseCoopers, told The Tribune yesterday he did not wish to reveal the names of the bidders to avoid a public auction and because confidentiality agreements have been signed. However, Mr Downs did confirm there are around two dozen interested buyers, some which have shown interest in Emerald Bay before, and some which are new to the development. The Emerald Bay Resort and Marina, Four Seasons Hotel and golf course, will close temporarily on May 26, leaving around 500 employees out of work, while receivers and creditors attempt to secure investors to acquire the project and assume the management contract with the Four Seasons Management Group. SEE page eight THE STORMYWEATHER yesterday caused flooding problems throughout New Providence, with this man stopped from getting to his business by the water. SEEPAGETWO for more photos of the aftermath of the morning rain. F e l i p M a j o r / T r i b u n e s t a f f Receivers keep their identities under wraps n By TANEKA THOMPSON Tribune Staff Reporter tthompson@tribunemedia.net EXTREME weather conditions ripped through the Central Detective Unit yesterday morning leading to the collapse of a steel canopy at the front of the building and heavy flooding at the adjacent Criminal Records Office on Thompson Boulevard. Torrential rain and wind, which tore through the capital yesterday morning, led to the partial collapse of the building after 10 am yesterday, although there were reports that tor nado like conditions "shook" the building before the canopy fell in. "Persons been telling us they saw a tornado this morning and some persons are saying that they felt the Extreme weather leads to canopy collapse at CDU SEE page eight THE FRONT portion of the Central Detective Unit building collapsed yesterday. T i m C l a r k e / T r i b u n e s t a f f SEE page eight INSIDE T ALK SHOW HOST ACCUSED OF T AKING AD V ANTAGE OF THOSE SEEKING HIS HELP PAGETHREE FIRM SAYS BUREAUCRACY GETTING IN W A Y OF FIXING TRAFFIC LIGHT S P AGEFIVE PRO-GAMBLING GROUP LOOKS TOWARDS INDUSTRY TRAINING F OR B AHAMIANS PAGESIX OCCASIONAL downpours are expected over the next four to five days as a low pressure sys tem moving slowly northeast from the Gulf of Mexico continues to head towards the north west Bahamas. Meanwhile another low pressure system off the eastern coast of Cuba, which was being monitored by forecasters on Monday, is no longer a threat to the Bahamas. Yesterday the National Hurri cane Centre in Florida reported that the weak area of low pressure located near the central Bahamas was becoming absorbed by a larger non-tropical low centred over Florida. The NHC said development of that system appeared unlikely and a hurricane hunter mission scheduled for yesterday was subse quently cancelled. "That low pressure system in Downpours are expected to continue SEE page eight BAHAMASBIGGEST CARSFORSALE, HELPWANTED ANDREALESTATE I N S I D E

PAGE 2

n By MEGAN REYNOLDS Tribune Staff Reporter m reynolds@tribunemedia.net A BROTHER is calling for stricter regulations of heavyduty cargo trucks after his sis-t er was nearly crushed by a Mack truck weeks after anothe r brother died in a truck collision. Angelo Knowles launched a petition on the Internet after a Mack truck ploughed into the car of his sister, MonicaK nowles, at the Paradise Island Bridge toll booth on F riday. Her traumatising accident came just seven weeks aftert heir brother, Peter Knowles, a 32-year-old married father o f two, was killed when his scooter collided with a truck at the junction of JFK Drive andP rospect Ridge on March 26. Now Angelo Knowles, 30, i s urging Bahamians to call for greater safety on the streets by signing the petition on thew ebsite: www.bahamasissues.com. Supportive comments have flooded the site under Mr Knowles’ account of his sis-t er’s horrific accident and the collision that caused his brother’s untimely death, but thep etition on the website’s new “petitions” section had only t wo signatures last night. Mr Knowles said: “This is ridiculous; my brother getsk illed and my sister almost dies in an accident. “Lots of people are aware that something should be done, but I want us to dos omething about it by signing the petition, so something can be done. “I’m appalled by the situation of these trucks on ther oad. I have heard about truck drivers drinking in the bar and speeding off into the night like speed racers. “There are no service c hecks so the brakes, lights and mirrors may not be there, and the companies who ownt hese trucks, it’s like they’re not checking. “And it’s been going on for too long, more lives are going to be lost.” M onica Knowles told T he Tribune how a truck came barreling towards her sounding its horn as she stopped to activate the transponder in the far right lane of the Paradise Island bridge. She felt the impact immediately as the truck crushed the left side of her car. Miss Knowles said: “Everything was getting crushed and I watched everything crumple on the side of Don’t miss tomorrow’s edition of The T ribune for C M Y K C M Y K LOCAL NEWS PAGE 2, WEDNESDAY, MAY 20, 2009 THE TRIBUNE INDEX MAIN/SPORTS SECTION Local News.............................P1,2,3,5,6,8,12 Editorial/Letters. .........................................P4 Advt ...........................................................P7 Sports...............................................P9,10,11 BUSINESS/ARTS SECTION Business............................................P1,2,3,4 Comics........................................................P5 Taste........................................................P6,7 Arts........................................................P8,10 Weather.......................................................P9 CLASSIFIED SECTION 40 PAGES INSERTS LITTLE SWITZERLAND USA TODAY MAIN SECTION 12 PAGES ANIMAL FUN DAY HIGHLIGHTS SCENES of flooding from around Nassau yesterday after torrential showers pummelled the island throughout the morning. Those who had been wishing for an end to the drought, which had taken hold over the last few months, may have got too much of a good thing. ‘My sister was nearly crushed by a Mack truck’ Man lashes out weeks after brother dies in truck collision NASSAUUNDERWATER THIS RESIDENT is calling upon Government to fix this road as for years it has stopped him from get ting to his business on Mackey Street . THIS CAR is left under water after two hours of rain. me I just couldn't believe it. “I was just waiting to black out and it felt like it lasted forever. Then I realised it had stopped and I looked around at my body and I was fine.” Miss Knowles only escaped the impact because her car was a right-hand drive – unlike the vast majority of cars on the island. “It felt like a miracle,” she said. The truck driver told Miss Knowles his brakes had failed, she said. Miss Knowles’ brother claims there was an open beer bottle in the truck. He has posted a photograph of it on Bahamas Issues. His petition calls for drivers to take a mandatory mental and physical exam twice a year to ensure they are of sound mind and able to drive on the busy and crowded Nassau streets. Signatories also demand that heavy duty commercial trucks are thoroughly inspected to ensure brakes cannot fail. Mr Knowles said: “My brother is dead and left many grieving souls. The truck driver is back on the road again. I haven't met or heard from this guy. I don't even know his name. “But whoever you are, I pray that you and all the other truck drivers be more careful and cautious when you drive and that you be more aware of your surroundings, so that you do not miss and kill somebody else's brother, father, uncle, cousin, sister, mother, aunt, or friend.” CARS IN PINE WOOD had to drive slowly because of high waters from a two hour down fall . PHOTOS: Felip Major /Tribune staff C RASH SCENE: T he Mack truck accident is investigated. SMASHED: The aftermath of the crash at Paradise Island Bridge. NASSAUANDBAHAMAISLANDSLEADINGNEWSPAPER Casinos in Bahamas ‘need radical change’ C M Y K C M Y KV olume: 105 No.104FRIDAY, MARCH 27, 2009 PRICE – 75 (Abaco and Grand Bahama $1.25 WEATHERSUNNYAND BREEZYHIGH 82F LOW 71F SEEBUSINESSFRONTS P O R T SGlobal chief: Myassets and firm’s all for saleSEEPAGEFOURTEENGetting ready forthe IAAF championshipsn By ALISON LOWE Tribune Staff Reporter alowe@tribunemedia.netCASINOS in the Bahamas will have to undergo “radical change” if they are to survive new competitive threats, a tourism leader warned yesterday. Two new pieces of Florida gaming legislation stand ready to have a “dramatic impact” on the future of the Bahamian industry, he added. President of the Bahamas Hotel Association Robert Sands said the industry in this country remains “in the dark ages” at a time when proposed upgrades to Florida’s gambling centres in particular represent a looming threat to the attractiveness of Bahamian casinos in the US market. Consequently, recommendations to modernise the Bahamian gaming sector are set to be put to the government by the Casino Association, through the Bahamas Hotel Association, within the next week. Mr Sands, also senior vice-president at Bahamar, told The Tribune yesterday that “time is of the essence” when it comes to the government’s reaction. On Wednesday, The Florida Senate Regulated Industries Committee swiftly approved the two new bills, which US commentators are describing as offering a “no holds barred” expansion of gambling in the state. The editor of an industry web-New Florida gaming legislation ‘to have dramatic impact’ on the industryThe TribuneANYTIME...ANYPLACE, WERE#1 B AHAMASEDITIONTRY OUR D OUBLE F ISH FILETwww.tribune242.com B U S I N E S SBAHAMASBIGGESTCARSFORSALE, HELPWANTED ANDREALESTATE I N S I D EPM’s statements on tax transparency ‘may not prevent a blacklisting’nBy TANEKA T HOMPSON Tribune Staff Reporter tthompson@ tribunemedia.netTHE prime minister's statements regarding tax transparency and information exchange may not be enough to avoid a potential blacklisting that may come out of an upcoming meeting of the G-20 nations in London next month, a financial expert said yesterday. Raymond Winder, managing partner of prominent accounting firm Deloitte and Touche, is hopeful the recent announcement was enough to ward off any negative actions by the two parties but thinks immediate action by the Bahamas is needed to validate the country's stance. "I would like to hope and believe that it (the prime minister's announcement) would put us in good standing (with the G-20 nations). It would be unfair that after we made this announcement to still put us on the blacklist but you can't say 100 per cent it won't happen, but I would like to believe that that would be sufficient. "And I think the Bahamas w ill have to show good faith by immediately beginning the process with some countries," Mr Winder told The Tribune yesterday. Prime Minister Hubert Ingraham announced Wednesday that the country has had a number of requests for the country to enter into tax information exchangea greements. He said the country was n ow prepared to consider these requests on a case-bycase basis. At present, the country has only one Tax Information Exchange Agreem ent (TIEA States. The agreements have been c riticised by some as being b eneficial to one side theFinancial expert speaks out ahead of G-20 meeting next monthSEE page 11 nB y ALISON LOWE Tribune Staff Reporter a lowe@tribunemedia.net A COLLISIONbetween a dumptruck and a scooter left a man dead his body unrecognisable due to the extent of its i njuries. The incident, which occurred at the junction of Prospect R idge and John F Kennedy Drive yesterday, led to traffic being held up for over an hour as police cleared up the scene. A ccording to an eyewitness who was in a car stopped behind the Mack truck which rolled over the driver of the silv er scooter, the victim pulled up on the right-hand side of the dumptruck as it signalled to turn right on to JFK at aroundMANDIESAFTERSCOOTERCOLLIDESWITHDUMPTRUCKSEE page eight SEE page eightT HESCOOTER lies under the front of the dumptruck.F e l i p M a j o r / T r i b u n e s t a f fVAUGHN JONES, brother of Jones Communications CEO Wendall Jones, is among the latest high-profile employers to a ppear in court for allegedly failing to pay National Insurance contributions, The Tribune h as learned. National Insurance officials confirmed that Mr Jones, owne r of Jones Brothers Morticians, M ount Royal Avenue, appeared in Court 11, NassauBrother of Wendall Jones in court for allegedly failing to pay NIB contributionsSEE page eightnB y PAUL G TURNQUEST Tribune Staff Reporter p turnquest@tribunemedia.net GLOBAL United CEO J ackson Ritchie said he expects to lose hundreds and millions o f dollars in future profits if his c ompany is wound up today by the government. Continuing his push for a meeting with the government through Prime Minister Hubert Ingraham, Mr Ritchie said he hoped the two parties could t hrash out an agreement to save G lobal United and ensure the government and the host of other local businesses that the company owes would eventually gett heir money. Having sunk “millions and millions” of his own money into trying to save the company, Mr Ritchie said: “This is all or nothing. This is my 18-year-old child. I have five, and this is the sixthCEO of Global Unitedexpects to lose millions if company wound upSEE page eightnBy MEGAN REYNOLDS Tribune Staff Reporterm reynolds@ t ribunemedia.net AN INNOCENT man claims police officers took turns to brutally beat him, putting him in fear for his life, a fter he was arrested without reason. Kevin Anthonio Flowers, 2 2, maintains he was handcuffed and held at Arawak Cay Police Station while sevKEVIN ANTHONIO FLOWERS c laims police officers beat him.Innocent man claims he was brutally beaten by police officersSEE page 11nBy ALISON LOWE T ribune Staff Reporter alowe@tribunemedia.net THEmanager of a wellk nown Nassau business was assaulted, kidnapped from his h ome and forced to help masked men rob his workplace before b eing left bound with a telephone cable, according to police. T he shocking scenario unfolded in broad daylight on Wednesd ay, at around 5.30pm, when the Tyre Empire employee arrived at h is home off Eastern Road. Police and Tyre Empire prop rietor Henderson Burrows both believe it is possible that the c riminals involved knew the victim and his routine. I t was moments after he arrived home that the man was accosted by three masked and armed men, dressed all in black. He was gun-butted and kicked, and forced to drive with the men in his own car to the Chesapeake Road business before being told to unlock the company safe.Business manager assaulted, kidnapped and forced to help in robbery of workplaceSEE page eight FLASHBACK: The scooter lies under the dump truck after the fatal accident weeks ago which killed Peter Knowles.

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n By NATARIO McKENZIE Tribune Staff Reporter THE APPEAL court challenge over Senior Justice Anita Allen’s decision not to recuse herself from a civil case continued yes terday with an attorney submit ting that Justice Allen had not demonstrated any inappropriate behavior to suggest she could not hear the case in a proper and judicious manner. “That is not to say that the judge acted perfectly in all respects. To say that there was any lack of perfection or judicial error by the learned judge, it did not rise to the level to cause a well informed observer to think that there was a real possibility of bias or apparent bias,” Attor ney Brian Moree submitted to the Court of Appeal yesterday. In March, Senior Justice Allen refused to recuse herself from a case involving Israeli brothers Rami and Amir Weissfisch. On his second point, Mr Moree who is representing the children of Amir Weissfisch contended that at no time did Justice Allen behave in a manner or express herself in a way which demonstrated to the informed fair mind ed observer that she had a closed mind on the admissibility and or weight to be given to the report made by accountant Daniel Ferguson. Mr Moree also submitted that Justice Allen did not demonstrate through her comments or behavior that she had a concluded view of the direction to be given in the event that the accountants report was not approved. Justice Allen had expressed concerns about the integrity of a forensic accounting report prepared by Mr Ferguson, who had been appointed by Justice Lyons to work on the Weissfisch case. In a highly publicized ruling by Jus tice Allen, it was revealed that Justice Lyons shared “more than a friendship” with Mr Ferguson’s sister who also assisted in preparing the report. Mr Moree yesterday also ques tioned the accuracy of the notes taken by Nicholas Lavender, QC, who is representing Rami Weiss fisch. Mr Lavender who was the only person taking notes during the meeting in chambers in March, had previously argued that it was Justice Allen who first raised the issue of her recusal by stating, “I would be happy to recuse myself.” “Mr Moree contended that that Mr Lavender’s notes were not complete and not in context. Court of Appeal President Dame Joan Sawyer noted however that the appellate court has no other record of what transpired during that meeting in chambers. Dame Joan noted that the court transcripts showed that when the matter had resumed in open court, the judge did not deny making the statement but said she didn’t recall saying it. According to the transcripts, after two attorneys in the case told her that she had made the statement she then said, “I stand corrected.” She subsequently however referred to her own recollection and after conferring with her clarks, said that she had not made the statement Dame Joan noted. Dame Joan noted that the main issue was whether a fair minded informed observer would have a doubt as to whether or not the judge had lost her objectivity in regards to matter. “It is not usual for a judge to raise the issue of recusal unless the judge anticipates that an issue for the judge’s recusal has arisen,” she said. Mr Moree also argued that when Justice Allen had used the word ‘conflicted,’ she was not implying that she would no longer be able to deal the matter objectively. Mr Moree however noted that ‘concerned’ may have been the more appropriate word to use. Dame Joan questioned why a judge would be conflicted about something that didn’t affect her personally. n By ALISON LOWE Tribune Staff Reporter a lowe@tribunemedia.net S ELF-STYLEDhero of the downtrodden, controversial talk show host Ortland Bodie has been accused of using his position to take advantage of Bahamians who have come to him looking for help. B enson Beneby and Patrick Smith told The Tribune that they want to warn other disadvantaged people “who may not know their rights” about what happened to them so t hat they can avoid getting into the s ame situation. Mr Beneby, a courier, claimed that through his radio programme Mr Bodie has said “he’s going to a ssist Bahamian people.” However, in his case, he claims he discovered otherwise. H e and Mr Smith were sued by M r Bodie for hundreds of dollars t hat they refused to pay for “cons ultation and research services” the d isbarred attorney claimed he did o n their behalf after they separately approached him in his capacity as a radio personality. The pair claim they received letters demanding payment for the alleged services and threatening legal action, before being summoned t o court last Wednesday, although they denied making any written or verbal agreement with Mr Bodie. M eanwhile, despite his previously v igorous pursuit of the funds, Mr B odie failed to show up in court, causing Magistrate James Moxey to dismiss the suits against the men. A ttorney for Mr Smith, Jairam Mangra of the Lockhart and Munroe law firm, told The Tribune yesterday that the suit was “frivolous, vexatious and an abuse of the court.” In the case of Mr Beneby, who a lso turned to the law firm for guidance, paying $200 for its advice, Mr Mangra confirmed that it was also their recommendation in his case t hat the suit could not be substantiated. “We advised Mr Beneby that he d idn’t really need an attorney at all,” s aid Mr Mangra. Court After meeting in court, the men agreed the host “had to be exposed”f or what he had done to them. On Friday the normally vocal Mr Bodie, who airs daily on More94.fm, told The Tribune not “to get i nvolved in private matters between people” and threatened legal action if an article is published. P ressed as to why he failed to s how up to court, he said only that M r Beneby “should not be calling you about this.” If you publish something about a p rivate matter between myself and Mr Beneby I will do what I have to do,” he said. Revealing the series of events that led to last Wednesday’s court date,Mr Beneby claimed he first approached Mr Bodie last year as he had thought he might be interested in publicly discussing a judg-m ent he had been awarded in 2006, which the defendant in the case had refused to pay. Feeling that he had exhausted his l egal avenues, Mr Beneby’s hope was that through receiving a public airing on the radio, the defendant m ight feel pressured to pay the costs a warded to him by the court. B ut he said it was his impression that all Mr Bodie was interested in was charging him money to do things o ther than talk on the radio. “He was doing a radio show in Fox H ill. As he was leaving I went up to him in his car and gave him a copy of the judgment with my contact d etails. “Two weeks later he called me ... h e said he’d had a look at it and this was what he could do for me: He’d charge me $500 to go and file a sum-m ons on my behalf and have someone serve it. I told him, ‘I’ll get back to you when I’m ready’. I left and I never c alled him back: I already had a lawyer, if I wanted something like that I’d have asked him to do it,” he s aid. He said he went on to ignore several more proposals of the same kind from the talk show host before he received the court summons. I n Mr Smith’s case, Mr Smith c laims he turned to Mr Bodie after the host announced on the radio that he would “help any Bahamian that needed help with a legal problem.” “I took him up on his offer and apparently that’s the worst experience I ever had,” said Mr Smith, who w as hoping the talk show host could o ffer him some advice on a land disp ute. He claimed he was hit with an unexpected demand for $500 for Mr Bodie’s “services.” Letters W hen he refused to pay, he too w as sent threatening letters, then l ater sued and called to court. He ultimately paid $700 to the law firmL ockhart and Munroe to fight the $ 300 suit the host put to him. “Basically the attorney cost me the more than (Bodie don’t care cos I’m not going to pay (Bodie Mr Smith. Both men said they feel it is likely t hat other people who might have g one to the talk show host in the h ope for assistance might have been p ut in the same position. “Bahamia ns who don’t know their rights are g oing to pay him before they go to court,” said Mr Beneby. He claims he forwarded copies of the summons and the letter sent to him by Mr Bodie to More94.fm CEO Galen Saunders. Mr Saunders declined to comment o n the men’s claims, directing this newspaper to speak with Mr Bodie. C M Y K C M Y K LOCAL NEWS T HE TRIBUNE WEDNESDAY, MAY 20, 2009, PAGE 3 x xChairs Chairsx xTables Tablesx xBenches Benchesx xUmbrellas Umbrellasx xLoungers Loungersx xDrinks Trolleys Drinks Trolleysx xCoffee Tables Coffee Tablesx xEnd Tables End Tablesx xCushions CushionsT T h h e e J J a a v v a a G G a a l l l l e e r r y y T T h h e e J J a a v v a a G G a a l l l l e e r r y yWong’s Plaza • Madeira St. Wong’s Plaza • Madeira St. Tel: (242 Tel: (242)326 2335 2335Outdoor Elegance Outdoor Elegance Great selection of Belts to complete any attire!!! Man accused of having sex with sister, 10 In brief A MAN accused of havi ng sex with his 10-year-old sister has been arraigned int he Magistrates Court on an incest charge. The 24-year-old man is accused of having intercourse with his underages ister on May 11, 2009. The man, who was arraigned in Court 6, Parliament Street on Monday, was not required to enter a plea to the incest charge. He was granted bail in thes um of $10,000 with two s ureties. The case has been adjourned to August 17 for the start of a preliminary inquiry. Talk show host accused of taking advantage of those seeking his help THE GOVERNMENTyesterday announced the closure of a public road due to the longawaited commencement of construction on the national stadium. The Ministry of Youth, Sports and Culture advised the public that the main entrance road leading to the Thomas A Robinson stadium has been closed to vehicular and pedestrian traffic in lightoftheworkinthevicinityofthe Queen Elizabeth Sports Centre. “A new roadway has been constructed at the Thompson Boulevard and Moss Road intersec tion to facilitate entry to the Thomas A Robin son stadium,” said a statement from the ministry. “The ministry seeks the cooperation of the public during the construction phase and regrets and inconvenience this new arrangement may cause.” S T ADIUM C ONS TRUCTIONFORCESROADCLOSURE T i m C l a r k e / T r i b u n e s t a f f Accusations made against Ortland Bodie Appeal Court challenge over Senior Justice Allen decision continues n NEW SMYRNA BEACH, Fla. AUTHORITIESsay three people received relatively minor bites from sharks off New Smyrna Beach over the weekend, a ccording to Associated P ress. Emergency officials say two bites were reported a bout five minutes apart on Saturday morning. A third bite was reported around t he same time of day Sunday m orning. O ne of Saturday’s victims was bitten on his hand but w as able to drive himself to the hospital. Another man was bitten on his foot andr equired surgery. Sunday’s victim was bit on the leg and required several stitches. Three minor shark attacks are reported in Florida n CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. ATLANTIS astronauts gingerly dropped the Hubble Space Telescope overboard Tuesday, sending the restored observatory off on a new voyage of discovery and bidding it farewell on behalf of the planet, according to Associated Press . Hubble considered better than new following five days of repairs and upgrades will never be seen up close by humans again. This was NASA’s last service call. The shuttle and telescope had just crossed the Atlantic, and were soaring 350 miles above the coast of northwestern Africa, when astronaut Megan McArthur used a robot arm to release the snares gripping Hubble. Then the shuttle slowly backed away. “Hubble has been released,” reported commander Scott Altman. “It’s safely back on its journey of exploration as we begin steps to conclude ours. Looking back on this mis sion, it’s been an incredible journey for us as well.” Mission Control radioed congratulations: “It’s won derful to see Hubble, the most famous scientific instrument of all time, newly upgraded and ready for action thanks to you.” With Hubble flying on its own again, the seven astro nauts looked ahead to Friday’s planned landing. But first they had to inspect their ship one last time to make sure it had not been smacked by space junk. The telescope’s unusually high orbit had placed the shuttle and its crew at increased risk and, because of the lack of a refuge, prompted NASA to keep a rescue ship on standby until the end of the 11-day flight. During five consecutive days of spacewalks loaded with drama, Atlantis’ crew labored tirelessly on the 19year-old observatory. Four men working in teams of two gave the telescope two new high-powered science instruments and a suite of other up-to-date equip ment, and fixed two broken instruments, something never before attempted in orbit. Astr onauts say goodbye to Hubble for good WORK BEGINS in the vicinity of the Queen Elizabeth Sports Centre.

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E DITOR, The Tribune . Please allow me a brief space in your column to voice a slightly leftist view on the topic of gove rnment involvement in econom ic recovery, and as a response toM r. Lowe’s ever growing extreme right wing views on this topic. I will start by stating that I have had the privilege to have lived in two countries which embrace more left or socialist views, those being France during the mid eighties, and Canada for the entire decade of the 1990s. My observat ions and experiences have been this: I n France, possibly one of the wealthiest countries on the planet with a standard of living most of us would kill for, there is an infra structure there that surpasses any that I have seen elsewhere in the world, with a public transporta tion system to boot and a national health care system that takes care of its citizens in times of need. Likewise in Canada, again an extremely wealthy country with a relatively low national debt and which with the exception of this year alone has had surpluses for over 20 years in its annual budgets. There I experi enced a very developed country with superior infrastructure, health care benefits and a stand ard of living for the majority of its citizens that many elsewhere on the planet envy. My observation was that in both of these countries there is h eavy government involvement. But the government involvementi n these cases is not so much financed by debt, but rather t hrough sensible and equitable tax systems. One only has to look in particular at the debt of Canada to clearly see that as a result of sound budget management and accountability it is a country that has been able to finance its social p rogrammes and infrastructural development through a sensible a nd equitable tax system and n ot exorbitant debt which has been the tactic of its southern neigh bour. In fact this brings to mind a very interesting comment made by famous Canadian author Mar garet Atwood, who, when asked why Canada hadn’t experienced a similar banking financial crisis as that experienced to the south, she simply said, “Well you see in Canada the Scotts arrived, and although it may be fair weather today sooner or later you’ll have to pay for it! And indeed much of the world is doing just that. You see in Canada the capitaliza tion requirements for banks is about 2 to 3 times that of both the US and UK banking systems.” Makes sense don’t you think? The point I am making is that government involvement is an ongoing necessity, particularly now with the stimulus package proposed by the Obama adminis tration. The private system is just too damaged to work on its own; therefore, there is definite need for government intervention. Unfortunately, due to the existence of excessive debt in the US, partially attributed to ineffective taxation, the cost of this package i s going to have to be borne by future generations for many years to come. In conclusion, I will say this, any country, particularly one that h as attained a certain size, must, in order to ensure the interest of them ajority of its citizens, have a government that enforces an equit able method of taxation and by this I mean, yes it must tax on the ability to pay so that the Bill Gates of the world contribute to the benefit of all so that their fellow countrymen have schools, roads, and health care benefits a nd thus form a healthier society overall. Generally, the more gove rnment intervention and social programmes a country has, the lower the crime rate; I don’t thinkI have to tell you how the crime rates of both France and Canada are negligible as compared to those in say the US and Mexico. Here in The Bahamas we have government debt principally because government has not implemented an equitable tax system, and secondly it is ineffective in collecting the taxes that it has imposed. The result: The Treasury is broke. So, as our Government is not able to provide the benefits that its people so desperately need, I try to do my bit on a micro level such that the company I currently run offers both a health care plan and a pension benefit plan for ALL employees. Less money in my pocket at the end of the day for sure, but I sleep better at night knowing my employees have coverage. I would only hope that some of the extreme right wing companies here in The Bahamas offer the same somehow I doubt it. RICHARD PERRY PINDER Nassau, May 18, 2009. EDITOR, The Tribune. O nce again I remain amazed by our political leaders. This time my amazement is attributed to recent statements m ade relative to the employment o f a foreigner for the post of Director of Policy of the new Utilities Regulatory and Competition Authority (URCA I recall the statement being s omewhat to the effect that “no suitable Bahamian persons were found that would qualify to fill the post and that thisperson’ss alary would be much higher than s imilar positions of any existing public service company” or something like that. Basically, Bahamians you are too incompet ent and unqualified to set policy and/or regulate your own utilities and communications sector ha take that like a swift kick to youk now where! I wonder if in the United States of America or other major countries would feel the same of its citizens. Senior members of the n ow defunct Public Utilities Com mission (PUC I think that it is high time we discontinue this apparent “dissing” of our citizens when it comes to the appointment of senior pers ons in both the private and public sectors. Bahamians, in my v iew, are more than qualified to assume policy and regulatoryr oles in this country. A lot of us have proven ours elves abroad and locally. The message that we are send ing our current and future career seekers is clear you are not worthy to lead. I totally envision a braindrain in our economic sectors. Y oung professionals will increasingly opt to not come back h ome to contribute to nation building. As I look through the want ads, I see jobs for handymen, maids, salespersons and the occasional Bank/Finance jobs, wherei ncreasingly they are adding a language requirement with no suggestion of even offering language training. P ersonally, I spent 12 years w orking at a major telecommunications company in the USA in specialised areas, the last being negotiating international settle-m ent rates between the telecomm unications company and foreign telecommunications carriers saving monies still can’t get a job at the Bahamas Telecommunica-t ions Corporation (BTC h aps I’m not qualified or competent either duh! Well, Bahamians time to go fishing, farming and selling p honecards on the street. And don’t forget to keep on playing numbers to try to supplement your income. That’s the wayi t looks from here! FRANKLYN “DOOM” MUNROE Nassau, M ay 14, 2009. C M Y K C M Y K EDITORIAL/LETTERS TO THE EDITOR PAGE 4, WEDNESDAY, MAY 20, 2009 THE TRIBUNE The Tribune Limited NULLIUS ADDICTUS JURARE IN VERBA MAGISTRI Being Bound to Swear to The Dogmas of No Master L EON E. H. DUPUCH, Publisher/Editor 1903-1914 S IR ETIENNE DUPUCH, Kt., O.B.E., K.M., K.C.S.G., (Hon. P ublisher/Editor 1919-1972 Contributing Editor 1972-1991 EILEEN DUPUCH CARRON, C.M.G., M.S., B.A., LL.B. P ublisher/Editor 1972Published Daily Monday to Saturday S hirley Street, P.O. Box N-3207, Nassau, Bahamas Insurance Management Building., P.O. F-485, Freeport, Grand Bahama T ELEPHONES Switchboard (News, Circulation and Advertising Advertising Manager (242 C irculation Department (242 N assau Fax: (242 Freeport, Grand Bahama: 1-(242 W EBSITE w ww.tribune242.com – updated daily at 2pm SHOULD CEOs read novels? The question seems to answer itself. After all, CEOs work with people all day. Novel-r eading should give them greater psychological insight, a feel for human relationships, a greaters ensitivity toward their own emotional chords. Sadly, though, most of the recent research s uggests that these are not the most important talents for a person who is trying to run a com pany. Steven Kaplan, Mark Klebanov and Morten Sorensen recently completed a study called “Which CEO Characteristics and Abili-t ies Matter?” They relied on detailed personality assessm ents of 316 CEOs and measured their com panies’ performances. They found that strong p eople skills correlate loosely or not at all with being a good CEO. Traits like being a good lis tener, a good team builder, an enthusiastic colleague, a great communicator do not seem to be very important when it comes to leading succ essful companies. What mattered, it turned out, were execut ion and organizational skills. The traits that correlated most powerfully with success were a ttention to detail, persistence, efficiency, ana lytic thoroughness and the ability to work long hours. In other words, warm, flexible, teamoriented and empathetic people are less likely to thrive as CEOs. Organized, dogged, anal-retent ive and slightly boring people are more likely to thrive. T hese results are consistent with a lot of work that’s been done over the past few decades. In 2 001, Jim Collins published a best-selling study called “Good to Great.” He found that the best C EOs were not the flamboyant visionaries. They were humble, self-effacing, diligent and resolute souls who found one thing they were really good at and did it over and over again. That same year Murray Barrick, Michael M ount and Timothy Judge surveyed a century’s worth of research into business leadership. They,t oo, found that extroversion, agreeableness and openness to new experience did not correlate well with CEO success. Instead, what mattered was emotional stability and, most of all, consci entiousness which means being dependable, making plans and following through on them. All this work is a reminder that, while it’s important to be a sensitive, well-rounded person for the sake of your inner fulfilment, the market doesn’t really care. The market wants you to fill an organizational role. The market seems to want CEOs to offer a clear direction for their companies. There’s a tension between being resolute and being flexible. The research suggests it’s more important to be resolute, even at the cost of some flexibility. The second thing the market seems to want f rom leaders is a relentless and somewhat mindnumbing commitment to incremental efficiencyg ains. Charismatic CEOs and politicians always want the exciting new breakthrough whether i t is the SUV or a revolutionary new car. The methodical executives at successful companies just make the same old four-door sedan, but they make it better and better. These sorts of dogged but diffident traits do n ot correlate well with education levels. CEOs with law or M.B.A. degrees do not perform b etter than CEOs with college degrees. These traits do not correlate with salary or compens ation packages. Nor do they correlate with fame and recognition. On the contrary, a study by Ulrike Malmendier and Geoffrey Tate found that CEOs get less effective as they become more famous and receive more awards. W hat these traits do add up to is a certain ideal personality type. The CEOs that are most l ikely to succeed are humble, diffident, relentless and a bit unidimensional. They are often not the m ost exciting people to be around. For this reason, people in the literary, acad emic and media worlds rarely understand business. It is nearly impossible to think of a novel that accurately portrays business success. That’s b ecause the virtues that writers tend to admire those involving self-expression and selfe xploration are not the ones that lead to corporate excellence. F or the same reason, business and politics do not blend well. Business leaders tend to perf orm poorly in Washington, while political lead ers possess precisely those talents charisma, charm, personal skills that are of such limited value when it comes to corporate execution. Fortunately, America is a big place. Literary c ulture has thrived in Boston, New York and on campuses. Political culture has thrived in Wash i ngton. Until recently, corporate culture has been free to thrive in such unlikely places as Bentonville, Omaha and Redmond. Of course, that’s changing. We now have an administration freely interposing itself in the management culture of industry after industry. It won’t be the regulations that will be costly, but the revolution in values. When Washington is a profit centre, CEOs are forced to adopt the traits of politicians. That is the insidious way that other nations have lost their competitive edge. (This article was written by David Brooks c.2009 New York Times News Service). I envisage a brain drain in economic sectors LETTERS letters@tribunemedia.net In praise of dullness VENICEBAYSUBDIVISIONLOT NO. 1 Block No. 25 PROPERTY DESCRIPTION: Single-family Residence and Six Apartment Complex PROPERTYSIZE: 10,066 sq. ft. GROSS FLOOR AREA: 4,745 sq. ft. LOCATION: Property is located in the southern district of New Providence, off Bacardi Road; positioned outside the main entrance of the Venice Bay Development. APPRAISEDVALUE: $697,000 F O R S A L E I NTERESTED PARTIES SHOULD SUBMITOFFERS INCLUSIVE OF TELEPHONECONTACTAND POSTAL ADDRESS TO: CB DISTRESSEDPROPERTIES, CREDIT RISK MANAGEMENT DEPARTMENT,P.O BOX-SS-6263 NASSAU,BAHAMAS OR EMAIL US AT:DISTRESSED.PROPERTIES@COMBANKLTD.COM *WERESERVETHERIGHTTOREJECTANYORALL OFFERS. Learning from France and Canada

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n By ALISON LOWE Tribune Staff Reporter alowe@tribunemedia.net THE Government yesterday sought to explain why it made the “agonising” decision to liquidate CLICO (Bahamas Minister of State for Finance Zhivargo Laing defended the move in face of Opposition claims that government overreacted andc ould have kept the ailing insurer working. Fox Hill MP Fred Mitchell noted that under the not yet enforced Insurance Act 2005, there is a provision that gives government an alternative to liquidating the company. Under that provision, a judi c ial manager can be appointed to keep in operation but take over the day-to-day management of an insurer as happened in the case of CLICO (Guyana is found to be putting its policy holders at risk. According to Mr Mitchell, the existence of the provision undert he 2005 leglisation means that despite Mr Ingraham’s assertion earlier in parliament that while it “would have been wonderful if the Bahamian government could have done the same” it lacked the legal opportunity to do so, the government could and should have appointed such a manager. “It didn’t make sense for the company to be declared insol vent,” he said. B ut while agreeing that this was in theory an option, Mr Laing said that under the circumstances, liquidation was the safest move government could take to protect policyholders. “The new registrar of insur ance, when he came to office, determined that it needed to bed ealt with expeditiously,” said Mr Laing, referring to evidence that CLICO had compromised its ability to meet the needs of its policyholders in view of a huge loan it had made to a subsidiary abroad that showed little likelihood of being repaid. “If we sought (to protect policyholders) by bringing this law into force...you would have had to serve notice on the company that you want to conduct an investigation on the company. Then 30 days would have been required for them to answer. Then you would have to investigate the company, and on completion of your investigation you go to the courts to petition them for judicial management and all the while the problem which you consider urgent (the risk posed to policy holders by the company’s mis management) are still continuing. He suggested it would have been irresponsible for the gov ernment not to have used its existing powers. “All the while, as blunt as they m ight be, they allowed you to go to the courts, put the company in liquidation and take control of it to prevent any further deterioration to protect policyholders,” he said. Parliamentarians debating the amendments yesterday said that once passed and enforced the Insurance Act 2005 will provide a greater number of options to deal with insurance companies that do not meet certain standards deemed necessary to ensure they are acting in the public interest to a more empowered insurance regulator. This regulator, the Office of the Registrar of Insurance, will for the first time be overseen by a newly formed Insurance Commission. Essentially making liquidation a “last resort”, the new legislation would provide for a judicial m anager to be appointed if nec essary to dispose of the business of a troubled insurance compa ny, or a “statutory administrator” to temporarily step in for a period of up to 90 days in cases where it is deemed that an insurer is engaging in “bad business practices” or may have solvency issues. On Wednesday, Sidney Collie MP also the legal representative for 200 CLICO (bahamas policyholders lauded the step towards moving away from liquidation as a first resort, saying that such a step is always costly and lengthy and provides little assur ance to the company’s clients. C M Y K C M Y K LOCAL NEWS T HE TRIBUNE WEDNESDAY, MAY 20, 2009, PAGE 5 n By DENISE MAYCOCK Tribune Freeport Reporter dmaycock@ tribunemedia.net FREEPORTThe young man who lost his life in a t raffic accident on Grand B ahama on the weekend has been identified as 19y ear-old Willie Rodgers of Garden Villas. Mr Rodgers became the i sland’s sixth traffic fatality f or the year early Sunday m orning when he lost control of a Dodge Ram 1500t ruck, which overturned and crashed on Pinta Avenue n ear Bahamia Arms. He was taken to hospital a nd was pronounced dead on arrival. His passenger, 19-year-old Loudie Cinrus of Hunters, was ejected from the vehicle b ut survived the crash. Asst Supt Emrick Sey mour said that Cinrus hass ince been discharged from t he hospital. P olice are urging motorists to slow down and drive with care and cautiono n the street. n By ALISON LOWE Tribune Staff Reporter a lowe@tribunemedia.net A LOCAL company contracted by government to repair faulty traffic lights wants the authorities to let them do their job without bureaucratic interference. Matthew Williams, project coordinator for Hypower, said were it not for the long delays in receiving permission from the M inistry of Works to repair and maintain signals there would be far fewer problems for motorists. “It would be perfect if we had blanket permission. We could get a call from the public, the police, BEC, and instead of waiting for weeks or days we could fix it immediately,” he said. “We are hoping that (the government w ill embrace the fact that we are local guys and let us go ahead and do it,” added Mr Williams, referring to the fact that the government previously contracted out the responsibility to a foreign company. His comments come as faulty traffic lights continue to plague drivers. These blinking and damaged signals, p hotographed yesterday, contributed to dangerous driving conditions for those trav ersing the island. This was despite the fact that, according to Mr Williams, his company repaired almost 20 traffic signals last weekend. “We fix whatever they give us permission to fix. On Friday afternoon we got the go-ahead (from the Ministry from Friday until Sunday we worked all weekend to fix those intersections,” said Mr Williams. Among those were the traffic lights at the intersection of Thompson Boulevard and the entrance to the Queen Elizabeth Sports Centre. The lack of traffic control at the site had made it dangerous and chaotic for weeks. Also corrected were lights at the junctions of: Wulff Road and Mackey Street, Kemp and Parkgate roads, Cowpen road and Faith Avenue, Robinson Road and Claridge Road. “There are 60 plus intersections in New Providence. If in two days we can deal with over 20 some intersections, it goes to show we have the manpower and everything we need to do the job. It’s just a matter of authorisation,” said Mr Williams. A message left for Minister of Works Neko Grant on the matter was not returned yesterday afternoon. Mr Grant, who described the light problems as a “nightmare” earlier this month, was in Cabinet. Motorists are asked to call the Ministry o f Works on 322-4830 or Hypower on 3808064 to report faulty lights. THE government has fast-tracked its road worksp rogramme as Nassau prepares for the International Federation of Association Football (FIFAand the Miss Universe Pageant. Public Works and Trans port Minister Neko Grant signed a $2,436,504 contractw ith Bahamas Hot Mix on Monday for the paving and patching of the stretch of Bay Street from Blake Road to Mackey Street. “As a result of hosting the FIFA Congress and the Miss Universe Pageant, the government has fasttracked its road works programme for the northwestern coastal roads and Bay Street to ensure that the route between the Lynden Pindling International Airport (LPIA Island is an enjoyable one for Bahamians and our visi tors,” said Minister Grant. Mr Grant explained that officers from his ministry evaluated the main vehicular route for access to the Paradise Island Bridge from LPIA via Blake Road, West Bay Street, Marlborough Street, Navy Lion Road and Bay Street. As a result, they recog nised the need to improve the road for an enjoyableand safe ride, he said. The road works, which began May 15, may necessi tate closing sections of Bay Street and re-routing traffic during the construction period. Otherwise, he said, the roadway will be reduced to one-lane traffic. The work will be carried out from Monday to Sunday (not including Fridays from 7pm to 6am and Monday to Sunday (not includ ing Fridays) from 9.30am to 3.30pm. “Efforts will be taken to mitigate the inconvenience to the motoring public,” said Mr Grant. “Accordingly, motorists are encouraged to reduce speed and exercise caution when driving through the work areas, to obey the traffic management mea sures put in place and to, if at all possible, avoid the work areas as delays will be experienced.” Mr Grant acknowledged and thanked the team from his ministry for their contributions. They are, perma nent secretary Colin Higgs; acting director of Works Gordon Major; project engineers Dion Munroe and Robert Garraway, and Nicole Campbell, undersecretary. Ebbie Saidi, managing director of Bahamas Hot Mix, thanked the govern ment for the contract. The work, he said, has to be done in conjunction with the utility companies. The three-month project involves milling and paving. n By DENISE MAYCOCK Tribune Freeport Reporter dmaycock@tribunemedia.net THE intended sale of the Bahamas Telecommunication Company (BTC for the Bahamian people, said Senator Kay Smith, parliamentary secretary in the Prime Minister’s Office. Mrs Smith’s remarks came during her contribution in the Senate to the Communications Bill. She said in the days and hours leading up to the 2007 General Elec tions, the Government intended to sell BTC to Bluewater on a payment plan. Senator Smith noted that negotiations were progressed to an advanced stage to sell BTC to Bluewater for $260 million. As a part of that deal, she said Bluewater would immediately have access to $130 million which was in the BTC bank account at that time. “The former Prime Minister (Perry Christie lion in the BTC account as “enterprise money”. “My description of that money is simply dollars and cents intended to mask the fact that the Bluewater offer was effectively significantly less than was being touted,” said Senator Smith. “The former Prime Minister also characterized the Bluewater deal as a great deal. I agree. But I ask, “for whom?” In addition to enterprisingly having access to the $130 million in the BTC account, Senator Smith said Bluewater was to be given a seven year cellular exclusivity license. She noted that BTC was earning annual profits of $50 million at the time. “Without any improvement in BTC’s operations; profits of $350 million would be earned over the seven year period with Bluewater being entitled to 49 per cent; which amounts to approximately $175 million of this sum. “Monies virtually guaranteed from profits; plus the ‘enterprise mon ey’, would effectively mean that Bluewater would have been given BTC for free. Yes, Madam President, a good deal but certainly not for the Bahamian people,” she said. Firm says bureaucracy getting in way of fixing traffic lights F AULTYTRAFFIC LIGHTS, i ncluding these ones on East Bay Street, have plagued drivers. T i m C l a r k e / T r i b u n e s t a f f Laing defends decision to liquidate CLICO (Bahamas Z HIVARGO LAING Senator: intended BTC sale under PLP govt ‘would have been bad deal’ Young man who died in traffic accident is identified Govt fast-tracks road works programme In brief

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C M Y K C M Y K LOCAL NEWS PAGE 6, WEDNESDAY, MAY 20, 2009 THE TRIBUNE IN ITSongoing effort to have the country’s gambling laws changed, t he Bahamas Gaming Reform Comm ittee (BGR r eady Bahamians to take advantage of the industry if and when it is legalised for locals. The BGR is advocating for the legalisation of gaming in the Bahamas under the control of locals with optimum economic, social and educational impact. The committee said yesterday in a s tatement that it has forged links w ith leading experts in the gaming field with a view to initiating the necessary steps to put training pro-g rammes in place which would ready Bahamians for the jobs that legalised gambling will create. “It will look to internationally recognised experts for advice and i nsight to ensure legalised gaming in t he Bahamas employs responsible m ethods to full advantage. Further it has opened lines of communica-t ion with experts to shape progressive policies in the interests of the e ntire Bahamian nation,” BGR’s c hairman Sidney Strachan said. This is the sort of work the government should be doing. Sadly, thish as not been evident among our elected officials. Bahamians want gaming legalised, the evidence is c ompelling to this effect. The BGR i s intent on paving the way with the v ery best of systems, policies and procedures to ensure the people oft his country benefit as it is their right to expect.” T he BGR said that gaming is a t hriving industry worldwide. Virtually all modern democracies operate and regulate gaming ina controlled legalised context. The end result is important revenue for a bevy of important social, econ omic and educational prog rammes.” Our government has its head in the sand on gaming,” said Mr Strachan. “It embarrassing and an affront frankly. Arcane laws are denying Bahamians access to more than $20 million yearly in revenue from gaming. In a country hungry for jobs, legalised gaming could create several hundred quality posit ions. Gaming proceeds could be a pplied by government to countless important social programmes to help thousands of Bahamians.R esponsible men and women cannot simply stand by while the government refuses to act.” Pro-gambling group looks towards industry training for Bahamians PROVIDENCIALES, Turks and Caicos Islands Premier Galm o W Williams and his D eputy Premier and M inister of Finance Royal S Robinson left for London on Tuesday to hold meetings with high-level officials in the UnitedK ingdom. T he objective of the m eetings are to change t he tone of the discussion surrounding the proposed suspension oft he Turks and Caicos Islands 2006 Constitution. Transparency “The Deputy Premier and I want to demonstrate to Her Majesty’s Government that our administration has made remarkable s trides in moving the country forward along the path of good govern ance and transparenc y,” Premier Williams s aid. Also, they are to meet Prime MinisterG ordon Brown and opposition leader David Cameron. “This year marks a decade since the 1999 White Paper: 'Partnership for Progress and Prosperity' which setso ut the policy of Her Majesty’s Government for strengthening andm odernising its relat ionship with the Overseas Territories. “I believe it is time for the leader of the UKt o meet with the leader of the TCI,” Mr Williams said. FREEPORT The Board of Directors of the Grand Bahama Port Authority (GBPA day announced the appointment of Arthur Jones as its vice-president of building and development services. Mr Jones has worked with the GBPA group in the past and brings with him a wealth of experience with regard to the technical planning and development of the City of Freeport,” said Ian Rolle, GBPA president. I n his capacity, Mr Jones will be responsible for town plan ning and project manage ment, building code and inspection, city (maintenance agement, environmental compliance and geographical information systems. Mr Jones holds dual bachelor degrees in both Arts and Sci-e nce with a concentration in Civil Engineering. Working in the field of residential and commercial construction, his experience has exposed him to projects in the northern United States, Puerto Rico, Syria, Jordan, S audi Arabia, Iran, Iraq and at home, in the Bahamas. He is a engineer with in the community, pro viding services for many businesses such as Shoreline Homes, Discovery Bay Resort, Grand Bahama Yacht Club, PelicanBayHotel,and Underwater Explorer’s Society via his firm Nervee Engineering. “Mr Jones possesses strong leadership skills, has extensive management experience, proven track records and we look forward to benefiting from his insights and experience as a member of the GBPA team in the capacity of vice-president of building and development services,” said Hannes Babak, chairman of GBPA. NEW YORK – The Bahamas recently teamed up with the city of New York to pay tribute to one of the Bahamas’ famous visiting musicians. New York City Mayor Michael Bloomberg declared April 29 Duke Ellington Day in hon our of the 110th anniversary of the jazz legend’s birth. To commemorate his life, the Bahamas sponsored a special run of the last surviving 1939 New York City ‘A’ Train, made famous by Duke Ellington’s signature tune “Take the A Train.” The train was outfitted with the Bahamas’ logo and signage, and was dubbed “The Bahamas Express” for the day’s special events. A regular visitor to the Bahamas, Duke Ellington was known to play at the hottest venues in Nassau in the 1950s and 60s with the late Fred Munnings. His son, Rafael Munnings, was present in New York to help commemo rate Duke Ellington Day. Additional special guests in attendance included Duke Ellington’s grandchildren Mercedes and Paul; stage, screen and television performer Maurice Hines; designer of the US Mint’s Ellington Quarter Joel Iskowitz, and Stanley Kay, personal friend of Duke Ellington. To kick off the event, Paul Ellington, the Duke Ellington Orchestra and musicians from Music Under New York performed several jazz hits on both the mezzanine at 125th Street in Harlem and onboard the historic train as it travelled to JFK airport. A natural tie-in, Jet Blue crew members attended the event and promoted the new $79 one-way fares from JFK to Nassau. The event was warmly received by the gen eral public and media alike, appearing promi nently on television stations like WABC-TV and in print publications like The New York Times. BAHAMIANS RAFAEL MUNNINGS (left legendary musicians’ grandchildren, Paul and Mercedes Ellington. Bahamas teams up with New York for Duke Ellington Day GBP A appoints vice president of building and development services THE ROYAL Bahamas Defence Force Mondayc ommissioned two new air craft which will improve its reconnaissance and mar itime efforts by providing surveillance over larger areas while assisting in the strategic deployment of surface crafts. Commander of the D efence Force, Commodore Clifford “Butch” Scavella, said the strategic placement of the aircraft at either of the Force’s north ern or southern commands will provide for “concentrated and coordinated” efforts being undertaken b etween the air assets and the vessels at sea. DEFENCEFORCECOMMISSIONSNEWAIRCRAFT A BOVE: N ational Security and Immigration Minister Tommy T urnquest in the cockpit of the Cessna Caravan 208b. BGR continues effort to legalise gaming for locals Turks and Caicos officials set for meetings in London In brief ARTHUR JONES

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N ORTH ANDROS Rivean Gibson Riley is one of the few Bahamians who has given his name to a geological feature. A native of Staniard Creek "it's like a gated community except we haven't got around to putting up the gate yet" Riley was the first of an expedition to arrive at a blue hole near Cargill Creek that the accompanying researchers promptly named after him. That was eight years ago, when he was just a young man wielding a cutlass. But since then he has earned an ecotourism degree at Hocking College in Ohio, where he made the Dean's list and won a scholarship. Hocking is one of many colleges that send students to the nonprofit Forfar Field Station near Blanket Sound. According to its website, students can "earn certification in SCUBA or sea kayaking off the world’s third largest bar-rier reef, learn the basics of blue water sailing, and wind-surf around uninhabited islands in The Bahamas." That doesn't sound like a hardship assignment. But Riley has a tough job these days convincing his fellow Androsians that they can benefit from the environment thatmany of them regard as simply bush to be scraped, swamp to be filled or coastline to be polluted. Riley has been interested in nature since high school days, and he enjoyed hanging out at the Fofar Field Station where he absorbed a lot of information. Eventually he was able to save enough to pay for tuition at Hocking, living at the home of a professor. And after graduation he joined the Bahamas National Trust as parks supervisor for Andros. In fact, Riley was our guide on a field trip to North Andros this p ast weekend organised by the BNT. And one of the first stops on the itinerary was an inland blue hole in the Central Andros National Park, where he was able to put his ecological training to good use. The term “blue hole” first appeared on charts of the Bahamas in 1843, and there are thousands scattered around the islands hundreds at Andros alone. Some are inland and some offshore, but each is a portal into an unknown world. Scientists are discovering new species and classes of animals in these unique environments deep underground, as well as ancient fossils and human artifacts and remains. On Andros, many caves are formed along coastal stress fractures about a mile inland from the offshore wall that plunges into the Tongue of the Ocean. These 150kilometre-long cracks can easily be seen from the air and their flooded passages can extend for several kilometres underground. The Lucayan word for a blue hole was "coaybay'" or house of the dead and they were frequently used as burial chambers. In fact, a ceremonial Lucayan canoe was found in association with human remains in the Stargate blue hole near the Bluff on South Andros in 1996 by renowned cave diver Rob Palmer. The development process for b oth dry and flooded caves in the Bahamas is the same. They are essentially giant banana holes, and the ones in the ocean were formed during the ice age, when the submerged bank was above the high water mark. Good examples include Mermaid’s Lair and the Lucayan Caverns on Grand Bahama. A diver named George Benjamin began the first explorations of these unusual cave systems in 1950. He was followed by Jaques Cousteau in the s and Rob Palmer in the s. Today, the Antiquities, Monuments and Museums Corporation has commissioned Brian Kakuk, a former US Navy hardhat diver with more than 20 years of underwater cave diving experience in the Bahamas, to survey blue holes throughout the country. The Central Andros National Park was established six years ago and covers more than 280,000 acres incorporating barrier reef, wetland and forest ecosystems in five distinct park areas. It contains the highest concentration of blue holes in the Bahamas. The one we visit ed features observation platforms and boardwalks, as well as useful interpretive signage. From there it was back on the highway to drive through seemingly endless stands of spindly pine trees interspersed with cabbage palms all the way to the northwest tip of Andros. Red Bays is not quite the cultural oddity that it was before the 20-mile logging road was cut from Lowe Sound in 1968, but it still represents one of the more interesting stories of Bahamian settlement. It's a tale that lives on through the memories of the town's patriarch Rev Bertram Newton and matriarch Widow Omelia Marshall, both now in their 80s but still active. You could say that Red Bays was discovered in 1937 by an American anthropologist named John Goggin who happened to meet up with some of the inhabitants at Mastic Point. They were descended from black Seminoles escaped African slaves from American plantations who migrated into the Florida wilderness in the mid-1700s with a variety of Indian bands that later became known as Seminoles. Africans and Indians had a mutual interest in securing the Florida territory as a refuge from the American whites. And by the early 1820s, when Florida becamea US territory, there were hundreds of former slaves living among the Seminoles, which posed a threat to the institution of slavery itself. According to Dr Rosalyn Howard's 2002 book, Black Seminoles in the Bahamas , the Africans lived independently among the Indians in Florida, paying tribute to the Seminole chiefs. These free communities were eventually driven southward by attacks from the US Army, into the more remote and inaccessible areas of the peninsula, from where they made a last stand in the mid1800s. A band of about 200 Indians and blacks held out in the everglades, and were the genesis of today's Seminole tribe, who claim to be the only unconquered indigenous people in the United States. But in the face of such pres sure, several groups of black Seminoles took to their canoes and left Florida for the Bahamas between 1821 and 1837 in what Howard describes as "an epic journey born of desperation, which has a modern counterpart in the Haitian and Cuban boat people." They chose to settle on the remote west coast of Andros, a land behind God's back as they say. Over 100 of these earliest illegal immigrants were discovered by a Customs officer in 1828 who brought them to Nassau where they were detained for a year before being allowed to return to Red Bays. Rev Newton's great grandfather, Moses Newton, and Omelia Marshall's great grandfather, Scipio Bowleg, were among the names on that 1828 Customs roster. In fact, Rev Newton, who was head teacher at Red Bays for decades, published a pamphlet in 1968 to record the settlement's oral tradition. Howard says the story "emphasizes the fundamental courage and tenacity of those black Seminoles whose journey originated long ago on the plantations of Georgia, South Carolina and Florida," and who recreated their identity and culture in the Bahamas, living an isolated subsistence lifestyle until well into the 20th century. During our visit Red Bays was gearing up for the annual Snapper Fest, although it is now some three miles inland from the original settlement site along the low-lying coast. The community was forced to move after the 1899 hurricane killed more than a hundred people. A similar situation exists today at nearby Lowe Sound, where the government is encouraging residents to build on higher ground to escape the deadly storm surge that will inevitably come one day. Just off the road to Red Bays is a unique feature known as Jungle Pond. This is a surprising pocket of mangroves growing on a 10-footthick mat of algae covering a 150foot diameter blue hole. Stepping onto the swampy, overgrown sur face is like entering a lost world. Giant custard apple trees compete with the largest red mangroves on Andros, and every branch drips with orchids and bromeliads. It is a remarkable oasis in the middle of a vast pine barren. Accommodation for the dozen or so people who took part in the field trip was provided by the Pineville Motel in Nicholl's Town, an eccentric hostelry owned and operated by one Eugene Campbell, whose pet goat trots behind him everywhere like a puppy. Participants included a Customs broker, two bankers (one retired Junkanoo artist and photographer,a real estate agent, a physiotherapist, a graphic artist and yours truly. It was one of a series of tours being organised by the BNT for two purposes to educate interested persons about the flora and fauna of the Bahamas, and to show family islanders that they can generate income from the environment. The tour begins with a twohour Bahamas Ferries voyage to Fresh Creek. Once fortified by a traditional breakfast of stewed and boiled fish at the Lighthouse Club, participants board a bus for the trip to Nicholl's Town and Red Bays. "We know there is a pent-up demand for this sort of thing," BNT Executive Director Eric Carey told me. "People want to know about our national parks and the natural environment in general. When we organise nature walks on New Providence we can have as many as a hundred people show up. Right now we are exploring destinations and activities to get the right mix and trying to get the Ministry of Tourism involved. This kind of domestic tourism can provide many benefits for local communities." As Professor Howard notes in her book, life in Nassau today is likened in a popular Bahamian song to living in "sardine cans," where all food and water is imported and where people can no longer sleep without bars on their win dows. Andros is a vastly different place, and well worth the time to visit. What do you think? Send comments to larry@tribunemedia.net Or visit www.bahamapundit.com C M Y K C M Y K PAGE 8, WEDNESDAY, MAY 20, 2009 THE TRIBUNE Andros: a vastly different place Both sales were recorded on June 8, 2003 and May 3, 2004. Relatives of a second official, including his wife, and the sister-in-law of a current Cabi n et Minister, were listed as having acquired four acres of property in the settlement of Blackwood Village in Abaco. Each acre was sold for $4,356. They were recorded on February 1, 2002, March 21 and 27, and May 12th. Unlike the case involving rel atives of former director of Lands Tex Turnquest, where the properties were flipped a few years later for hundreds of thousands of dollars in profits, these lots have not been resold. However, the investigations into these and other Crown land transactions continue. Despite leaving many messages and even waiting on the telephone for more than 15 minutes for one of the officials who was reportedly “on another call”, no return calls were ever received up to press time last night from either the Department of Lands and Surveys or the Ministry of Lands and Local Government. Currently government is contemplating approving a Select Committee to review all Crown land grants issued by government since the early 1990’s. This committee, which was called for in Parliament will review all Crown grants issued to individuals or entities since 1992 up until the present date along with all outstanding applications that have yet to receive final approval. The committee will also ascertain a list of all public servants and retired public ser vants who have received grants, along with government’s official position on its policy in relation to the disposition of publicly held lands generally; as well as the government’s policy in relation to granting lands to employees of the gov ernment or their relatives. The resort closure c omes nearly two years a fter it was handed over to receivers by developers EBR Holdings in June 2007 when the companyf ell into debt. Although there was high interest in the property, alla greements fell through, and when the economic downturn struck in September last year the resorts uffered significant losses. W ithout new investors to acquire the project, secured creditor Mitsui decided to temporarily close the resort. Prime Minister Hubert Ingraham announced consultations have begun with various parties when speaking in the House of Assembly on M onday, and receivers confirmed there is sign ificant interest in the resort, although negotia tions are still at an early stage. Mr Downs said: “I don't think it's helpful to announce who the parties are and conduct an auction in public, there is nothing served by that. “It's a very sensitive situation, of course, because of our decision to close the resort on a temporary basis so I think it's better to keep that confidential. “It's been up for sale for probably three y ears so it had a pretty good airing for the pub lic. “There are a good couple of dozen bidders w ho have signed confidentiality agreements, so we have got to respect their privacy as we ask them to respect ours. “Of the parties who have been interested in t he past, some of them are having a new look at t he site, as well as a number of other parties who I don't think had looked at it before and are having a first look at it this time.” Mr Downs said any decision will be made in consultation with Mitsui and the government of the Bahamas. He added: “The decision will be made care f ully and we will discuss with Mitsui and will d ecide what we think is the best to go for based on a number of criteria. “Purchasers are going to have to meet government approval so it's going to be important for us to make sure that any bidder is likely to be well disposed towards the government.” building kind of shake. One of the structural engineers from Ministry of Works said he was in the (area of the sports centre when he saw what appeared to be a tornado in the area and when he came around to Central Detective Unit (CDU Elsworth Moss, CDU head said. Another officer, who spoke to The Tribune on the condition of anonymity, said he was outside the building when he saw a huge lightening bolt hit the CDU. "I don't think it was a tornado, I think it was the lightning that probably strike it it was a flash of lightening and it (the canopy Deputy Director of the Department of Meteorology Basil Dean could not confirm the reports, but said tor nado like conditions were possible yesterday. Another sighting of a tornado was said to be in the Bar 20 Corner area around 11 am yesterday . "We haven't been able to confirm (the tornado reports) but I would not be surprised if there was. There were a number of thunderous cells and whenever we have those embedded in the area of showers it is very possible that tornado activity could have spawned out of one of those cells," he said. While there were no reported injuries stemming from the incident, several air conditioners in the CDU's building were damaged and debris from the fallen steel canopy littered the front of the building. Ministry of Health officials were scheduled to inves tigate a potential threat yesterday afternoon when gas escaped from several air conditioning units after the collapse. Structural engineers from the Ministry of Works were also dispatched to assess whether the building was fit to remain in operation. Business continued at the CDU yesterday with its officer-in-charge monitoring the situation and the safety of his officers. "I don't know if I'm afraid I'm concerned, just monitoring everything that's happening and if we feel that we are unsafe here we're going to get an expert opinion and then we'll make the decision," Supt Moss. Business at the Criminal Records Office (CRO brought to a standstill because of the standing flood water, but none of the sensitive records was damaged, said Mr Moss. "So far no paperwork was damaged, the only equip ment that was damaged was several of the air conditioners we had a little leak of the air conditioning gas coming in the building, but we shut those off. We're still inside we're still doing some work, the Criminal Records office is not functioning because of the flood water damage," he said. Depending on weather conditions tomorrow, the section may be up and running. If not, persons are advised to visit the Quackoo Street, Elizabeth Estates, Carmichael Road or Cable Beach police stations for copies of police records. While business continued at the CDU yesterday, persons who were being held for questioning were relocated to another site, said Mr Moss. As for the fate of the officers stationed at the building that will depend on the report from Works officials. "Once the debris is removed and the engineer would have checked and the electrician would have made a check to see if we can continue to work most of the air conditioners have been turned off because most of the areas that the work is going to be carried out in the evening doesn't have the ventilation, doesn't have the windows that we can open up for fresh air. "Ministry of Works will give an assessment report to the Minister of National Security who will decide whether or not to it's (suitable will make the decision that we move," said Mr Moss. the eastern gulf of Mexico it's still affecting the northwest Bahamas with heavy showers and thunder storms. It's moving slowly northeast, however, the tropical moisture will remain with us for the next four to five days triggering occasional downpours," said Deputy Director of the Depart ment of Meteorology Basil Dean. The system was moving at about 10 miles per hour yesterday with less than a 30 per cent chance of it developing into a tropical cyclone over the next two days, the NHC said. Yesterday heavy rains and winds hit the capital leading to extensive flooding in low lying areas. With just about two weeks to go before the official start of the 2009 Atlantic hurricane season, Mr Dean warned the public to get a head start on hurricane preparations. "It certainly kicks off the wet season, which is typically the summer months, and we are just about two weeks away from the start of the hurricane seasons. We don't want to wait for that time to start hurricane preparedness we must be in a state of readiness," said Mr Dean. FROM page one Extreme weather New Cr own land nepotism claims FROM page one FROM page one Downpours To have your say on this or any other issue, email The Tribune at: letters@tribunemedia.net or deliver your letter to The Tribune on Shirley Street, P.O. Box N-3207 FROM page one Emerald Bay Hubert Ingraham

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n By TOM WITHERS AP Sports Writer INDEPENDENCE, Ohio (AP Two of the NBA's youngest ambassadors, they share infectious smiles, great senses of humor and unchained joy when they play. In a league loaded with remarkably gifted athletes, this pair stands out as physical phenomenons. Superheroes in shorts. One is Superman, a powerful, 6-foot-11 shot-blocking machine who went so far as to reject his coach during the postseason. The other's a King, and based on recent royal command performances, his reign may be just beginning. Dwight Howard and LeBron James have known each other for years. Casual friends, former No. 1 overall draft picks as t eenagers and U.S. Olympic t eammates who won gold m edals together last summer, they have been undeniable forces on the court this season. And they are about to collide. When the Orlando Magic and Cleveland Cavaliers meet in this year's Eastern Conference final starting Wednesday, all eyes will be on Howard and James, the getting-better-by-the-day superstars who have each elevated their games and carried their teams to new heights. "We both work hard in the offseason, and we're both hap-py we're in this situation right now," James said following practice on Monday. Orlando's landing in the con ference final was nothing short of magical. In dethroning the defending champion Celtics on Sunday by winning Game 7 in Boston, the Magic became the first team in 33 tries to overcome a 3-2 series deficit against the league's most storied franchise. Howard scored 12 points with 16 rebounds and five blocks in the finale. Orlando's surprising comeback began after Howard criticized coach Stan Van Gundy following a loss in Game 5, when the Magic blew a 14-point fourth-quarter lead. Howard was upset that he didn't touch the ball enough late in the game and questioned some of Van Gundy's substitution patterns. By the time the Magic made the Celtics disappear, all seemed to be forgotten. "Me and coach talked," Howard said. "Everything is great. We have a new stat that we came up with. When we call out the coach, we are 3-0." Turning serious for a moment, the fun-loving Howard, who often does spot-on imitations of his coach, attributed Orlando's recovery to growing older and wiser. "We have matured as a team," he said. "We have learned that we can't allow frustration to take over us during games or after games. We have to play through all that and Stan has been a great mentor and a coach for me personally, knowing that there are going to be nights when I am frustrated. He has always found a way to moti vate me to keep myself and my teammates in line." While Howard may enjoy communicating his thoughts to legions of his followers on Twitter, the 23-year-old has an oldschool sensibility when it comes to relationships and learning from mistakes. The league's defensive player of the year, now deeper in the postseason than ever before, is beginning to understand what he needs to block out and what he needs to embrace. "He holds himself to a pretty high standard," Magic general manager Otis Smith said. "He's learning a lot. It's the postseason. Things are going to hap pen. You learn by experience, and some things he still has to learn. That's the playoffs." James, on the contrary, has yet to experience adversity of any sort in this postseason. He and the Cavaliers are a perfect 8-0, with all eight wins coming by 10 points or more. It's been easy so far, but James and his teammates have been through enough end-of-the-year drama to know tougher times are ahead. Series "It's going to be a tough series," Cavs center Zydrunas Ilgauskas said. "I wouldn't be surprised if it goes all seven games." As an outside observer, James viewed Howard's com ments about Van Gundy as signs of the center's development and frustration. "If he's the leader of the team, he has a right to call out some things as wrong," James said. "I didn't see it as a bad. There are always ways to han dle situations like that, and he didn't do it the right way maybe. But they still won the series and learned from that situation." The Cavaliers intend to rely on their lessons after going 1-2 against the Magic during the regular season. Cleveland suf fered its worst loss, 116-87, at Orlando on April 3. The 29point setback was humbling for the Cavs, who contained Howard (20 points, 11 rebounds) but couldn't stop Orlando's outside game as the Magic made 13 of 27 3-pointers. While Cleveland's defensive game plan will focus on limiting Orlando's looks, Howard can't be ignored. Under assistant coach Patrick Ewing's care, Howard's offensive game has blossomed. "Before he was just a shot blocker, somebody who would just clog the lane, dunk the ball and that was pretty much it," Cavs forward Joe Smith said. "Now he's developing his game and his footwork and that's only going to make him a tougher player to guard." Like James and Howard, Smith was the first player selected in the draft. The 14-year vet eran appreciates the pressure of those enormous expectations and has been impressed with how the young All-Stars have handled their early success. Smith hasn't played with Howard, but sees him as being very similar to James. "He seems like a joy to be around," Smith said. "Like I say about LeBron, when your leader is that way, everybody feeds of him and wants to go out there and perform up to or over your level." C M Y K C M Y K INTERNATIONAL SPORTS TRIBUNE SPORTS WEDNESDAY, MAY 20, 2009, PAGE 9 MILWAUKEE (AP Milwaukee Bucks enter Tuesday night's NBA draft lottery with a 1 percent chance of securing the No. 1 overall pick. The Bucks are slotted to pick 10th if they don't get one of the top three positions awarded in the lottery. They finished the season 34-48, an eight-win improvement over the previous year. Milwaukee was in a playoff position in the Eastern Conference until March, when seasonending injuries to guard Michael Redd and center Andrew Bogut wore the team down. Along with the lottery pick, the Bucks will have a selection in the second round either 40th or 41st depending on the lottery outcome to break atie with New Jersey. Milwaukee won the draft lottery in 2005 and selected Bogut. Buc ks have one per cent c hance of getting top pick By The Associated Press Orlando at Cleveland (8:30pm EDT liers, who swept Detroit and A tlanta in the first two rounds and had the league's best regular-season record, o pen the Eastern Conference finals against the Magic, who eliminated the defending champion Celtics in seven games after beating the 76ers in six. W W R R E E S S T T L L I I N N G G W W I I T T H H T T H H E E N N B B A A The Lakers are scheduled to be at the Pepsi Center in Denver next Monday night for Game 4 of the Western Conference finals. So are a bunch of wrestlers. World Wrestling Entertainment said it is booked at the arena for an episode of Monday Night Raw. W WE spokesman Robert Zimmerman said the organization secured the Pepsi Center last Aug. 15 and has already sold more than 10,000 tickets for the event. He says the organization expects a sellout, with tickets ranging from $20 to $70. S S E E A A R R C C H H I I N N G G S S I I X X E E R R S S The Philadelphia 76ers are moving forward with their coaching search, setting up interviews with assistants Dwane Casey of the D allas Mavericks and Tom Thibodeau of the Boston Celtics. The Sixers already interviewed former Wizards coach Eddie Jordan. The Philadelphia job became vacant when Tony DiLeo stepped down last week and returned to the front office. N N O O T T I I N N T T E E R R E E S S T T E E D D Portland assistant general manager Tom Penn pulled his name out of the running for the Timberwolves' top front office position and received a promotion to stay with the Trail Blazers. Penn i s the third candidate to pull his name out of the race, joining San Antonio Spurs assistant GM Dennis Lindsey and former Miami assistant GM Randy Pfund. H H I I G G H H R R A A T T I I N N G G S S Game 7 of the MagicCeltics series was the mostviewed NBA second-round playoff game ever on cable. TNT said Orlando's 101-82 win Sunday was watched by 8.41 million viewers. The previous record was 7.65 million for Game 6 of SpursLakers in 2004. S S P P E E A A K K I I N N G G "The fans in Denver had a lot more faith in making the playoffs than the own er." WWE chairman Vince McMahon on Nuggets management allowing his organization to book the Pepsi Center for May 25, when Game 4 of the Western Con ference finals is scheduled NBA Today Stars collide as King James, Superman meet in playoffs IN THIS October 20, 2007 file photo, Dwight Howard (left – two of the NBA’s biggest stars – will meet in the playoffs for the first time when the Orlando Magic face the Cleveland Cavaliers in the Eastern Con ference finals. (AP Photo: Kin Cheung

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A second for Brown in 400m at the Adidas T rack Classic C M Y K C M Y K INTERNATIONAL SPORTS PAGE 10, WEDNESDAY, MAY 20, 2009 TRIBUNE SPORTS n By TIM REYNOLDS AP Sports Writer FORT LAUDERDALE, Fla. (AP Super Bowl city again. NFL owners voted Tuesday to play the 2013 Super Bowl in New Orleans, the first time the championship game will be played there since Hurricane Katrina shredded parts of the Louisiana Superdome. The hurricane caused 1,600 deaths and devastated the Gulf Coast four years ago. New Orleans beat out Miami which sought a record 11th Super Bowl and 2008 host Glendale, Ariz., for the game. This is the 10th time New Orleans will be the site for the Super Bowl. "It's a great day for our community," Saints owner Tom Benson said as he walked onto an elevator at a South Florida hotel, on his way to the formal announcement. New Orleans last hosted in 2002, when Adam Viniateri's 48-yard field goal as time expired lifted New England over St. Louis. S till unclear: Where will the 2013 Pro Bowl be played? It's coming to Miami a week before this coming season's Super Bowl, then going back to Hawaii in 2011 and 2012. It was not part of the bidding p rocess for the 2013 Super Bowl. "Where it (the Pro Bowl goes after 2012 is something we'll decide later on," said Frank Supovitz, the NFL's senior vice president for events. L ouisiana lawmakers have a lready approved plans to spend $85 million in Superdome upgrades, which would be completed in time for the 2013 NFL title game. The upgrades would include additional seating, new suites, wider concourses and other measures for the New Orleans Saints to generate new revenue streams. The Superdome played an iconic role during Katrina, which struck the city in August 2005. It was an evacuation cen ter during the storm, housing thousands of people who had nowhere else to go, and the devastation was nightmarish. With in days, the building was tattered, filthy inside from mold, debris and raw sewage. Over the next year, the Superdome was rebuilt, and slowly, New Orleans has tried to get back to what it once was. The stories of suffering are still everywhere even now, some who lost nearly everything in 2005 are fighting to keep their federally provided trailers a bit longer. One thing is back to normal: New Orleans still knows how to host an event. College football's national championship game was played there in 2008, followed about six weeks later by the NBA All-Star game. Arizona also failed in bids for the 2011 and 2012 Super Bowls, which were awarded to new stadiums in North Texas and Indianapolis, respectively. New Orleans gets 2013 Super Bowl, its 10th BOXERS Floyd Mayweather Jr (left pose for photographs Tuesday in New York at a news conference to announce their upcoming fight. Mayweather Jr and Marquez are scheduled to fight at MGM Grand in Las Vegas on July 18... (AP Photo:Frank Franklin II Mayweather Jr to square off with Marquez n By STUART CONDIE AP Sports Writer ISTANBUL (AP Shakhtar Donetsk coach Mircea Lucescu is predicting a clash of styles when his team takes on Werder Bremen in Wednesday's UEFA Cup final. The 63-year-old Romanian coach is preparing his players team for the match in Istanbul the last ever UEFA Cup final before its rebranding as the Europa League by making sure they are ready to cope with an athletic, speedy side that already knocked out former continental champions AC Milan and Hamburg. Lucescu said Tuesday he expected Bremen to try to physically dominate a young Shakhtar side aiming to become the first from Ukraine to hoist the trophy. "Bremen is the attacking team with very good physique and a lot of really good athletes on their team," Lucescu said. "And as for Shakhtar Donetsk, the style is based on the good technique of the players and, naturally owing to our specific qualities, they will try to exercise control over the progress of the game." Whether Lucescu can do so will go some way to demon strating how successfully he has managed to emulate the template of youth, skill and tactical flexibility he established in spells with Dinamo Bucharest, Galatasaray and Besiktas. There are just three players over 30 years of age in Shakhtar's 25-man squad, which features a quintet of skillful Brazilians, of whom midfielders Fernandinho, Ilsinho and likely substitute Willian average just 22 years of age. Striker Luiz Adriano should start the game against the Ger man club but Jadson, the oldest of his compatriots at 25, could miss the final because of injury. But the free kick specialist, who scored and then set up the winning goal in the second leg of the semifinal win over Dynamo Kiev, has not given up hope of recovering. He was rested at the weekend, along with Fernandinho and Ilsinho, for Saturday's 3-0 domestic league win at Zorya. "He was involved in the gen eral group in training for the last two days and most likely he will appear on the pitch tomorrow," Lucescu said. "As for the lineup, we are going to analyze training. Most likely, we will make the decision just before the game starts." Bremen has its own problems, with playmaker Diego and Hugo Almeida suspended, and Germany midfielder Per Mertesacker ruled out because of a ligament injury. "Of course we miss them a great deal because they are important players, but we can't do anything about it," midfielder Torsten Frings said. "We want to take the trophy home for them." Coach Thomas Schaaf said he had yet to decide how to compensate for the losses, particularly of Almeida and Diego who hit a total of 10 goals to help carry Bremen to its first European final since winning the 1992 Cup Win ners' Cup. "I don't even know who is fit and who can actually play, so I'm not even thinking of a formation or a system or a variation," Schaaf said. "Both of them are something special. That's something you can't replace on a one-to-one basis, but we have a good squad and we know we have good quality there." Lucescu predicting style clash in UEF A Cup final n By RENALDO DORSETT Sports Reporter rdorsett@tribunemedia.net AS the profile for local gymnastics continues to grow, some of the sport’s athletes will have an opportunity to test t heir efforts under international scrutiny. N assau Nastics is scheduled to host Spring Spectacular” May 22-24, which features a series of exhibitions where local gymnasts will be critiqued by international judge Susan Monahan. Monahan is amongst a select few of USA nationally rated judges with over 16 years of judging experience. She has also served as a state judging director and currently sits on the Florida State Judges Board. On May 22, gymnasts will be judged on bars from 4-6pm at the Oakes Field Gym, while Saturday they will be judged on vault, floor exercise and beam at the Kendal Isaacs Gym from 12-4 pm. Sunday will cap the weekend with an a wards ceremony and featured perform ances. B arbara Thompson, executive director of Nassau ‘Nastics, said exposure to an internationally renowned judge can serve as a barometer for their level of development. “It aides the gymnasts in terms of giv ing them ideas on what they need to improve, what skills they have already accomplished and what the next step is in mastering their craft and learning more difficult moves,” she said. “Most of our gymnasts are unable to travel for competitions so they will never be able t o perform in front of a judge and be c ritiqued as such.” Thompson said it will give the athletes an opportunity to see how their skills would fare against others in international competition. “This gives them an opportunity to get that critique on a same level of who they would be ordinarily competing against should they be able to travel. There is not a lot of gymnastics action in the Bahamas so it is not as if we would be able to go to Freeport and compete against a local club there so we bring the judge here,” she said. “We do bring in coaches that host spe cial clinics so that is a very beneficial operation we do. This is the first time that we have ever brought a judge in to evaluate our gymnasts and it will be something I am sure we will be repeating in the future.” Nassau Nastics to host ‘Spring Spectacular’ n By RENALDO DORSETT Sports Reporter rdorsett@tribunemedia.net IN his first event of the outdoor season, Olympian Chris “Bay” Brown – the Bahamas’ 400m national record holder – opened with an impressive showing against top competition. Chris Brown posted a time of 45.03s to place second in his signature event at the Adidas Track Classic in Carson, California, over the weekend. Jeremy Wariner of the United States won in 44.66s and Trinidad and Tobago was third in 45.05s. Fellow Bahamian and Beijing Olympics silver medal winning 1600m relay teammate Andretti Bain was seventh in 46.32s. A number of other Bahamians com peted at the meet, including 100m national record holder Derrick Atkins and 110m hurdles record holder Shamar Sands. Atkins finished fourth in the 100m in 10.19s in a race that American Darvis Patton won in 10.12. Antiguan Daniel Bailey was second in 10.14s and Jamaican Steve Mullings was third in 10.19s. Beijing silver medallist in the event, Richard Thompson of Trinidad and Tobago, finished a disappointing sixth in 10.22s. Sands finished third in the 13.58s behind Americans Terrence Trammell and Antwon Hicks who ran 13.39s and 13.45s respectively. OLYMPIAN Chris “Bay” Brown (shown in this file photo

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‘Golden Girl’ Debbie, lightning Bolt make their presence felt C M Y K C M Y K WEDNESDAY, MAY 20, 2009 THETRIBUNE PAGE 11 P AGES 9 & 10 International sports news... n By RENALDO DORSETT Sports Reporter rdorsett@tribunemedia.net T wo Caribbean athletes, including our own “Golden Girl” Debbie Ferguson-McKenzie, made their presence felt during a track meet in Manchester, England, over the weekend. Ferguson-McKenzie won the women’s 150m final during the Great Manchester City Games on Sunday. After posting the fastest qualifying time of 16.90s in the heat, Ferguson-McKenzie ran 16.54s in the final to win convincingly ahead of an all British field which included reigning Commonwealth, World and Olympic 400m champion, Christine Ohurugu. Ohurugu placed second in 17.10s, Shaunna Thompson was third in 17.20s and Lee McConell rounded out the ‘A’ final in 17.28s. The veteran sprinter successfully continued a season where she posted a season’s best time of 11.11s just over a week ago in Orlando, Florida and season’s best time of 23.01 in the 200m set in April in Coral Gables, Florida. Jamaican sprinter Usain Bolt ran the world’s fastest 150 meters to win a soggy street sprint on Sunday that marked his return to action after a car crash left him requiring minor foot surgery. In windy Manchester, the triple Olympic champion ran down the English city's main thoroughfare in 14.35 seconds, breaking Italian Pietro Mennea’s 26-year-old mark of 14.99 in the rarely run 150. In less than a year, Bolt has captured four sprinting world records with his latest 150m triumph accompanying the 100m, 200m and 400m relay records set in Beijing. The men’s field featured a more eclectic field than the women with eight athletes from three countries competing. Great Britain’s Marlon Devonish finished a distant second in 15.07s, Ivory Williams of the United States was third in 15.08s and Great Britain’s Rikki Fifton was fourth in 15.13s. Home favourite Andy Turner took the ‘B’ final in 15.20s, countryman Leevan Yearwood was second in 15.29, while Jamaican Xavier Brown finished third in 15.53. DEBBIE FERGUSON-McKENZIE is seen winning the women’s 150m final at the Great Manchester City Games in England on Sunday. (AP Photos: Paul Thomas USAIN BOLT is seen winning the 150m final... Stars collide a s King James, Superman meet i n playoffs... See page 9

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C M Y K C M Y K LOCAL NEWS PAGE 12, WEDNESDAY, MAY 20, 2009 THE TRIBUNE I N surroundings evocative of the Garden of Eden, 13 Earth Angels commanded attention a s they strutted down a red carpet catwalk, wearing sexy white swimwear, and not much else. Even the rain stopped for the highly anticipated Miss Bahamas World Swimsuit and Top Model of theB ahamas competitions held at The Retreat, headquarters of the Bahamas National Trust on Village R oad. The ladies did not disappoint, displaying spectacular r unway skills and even more impressive physiques in one of the most important e vents on the Miss Bahamas World calendar. The exciting double-header began with the Swimsuit Competition, which is one of the “fast track” events of the Miss Bahamas World pageant – the winner automatically advances to the semifinal round of the com petition. With so much at stake, the ladies had been working out for months – and it showed. One by one, the contestants faced a distinguished panel of judges which included Top Model of the Bahamas 2008 Chrys tal Bethell; Bahamian snow boarder Korath Wright; Pilates instructor Denise Carter; fitness coach Nardo Dean, and MBO Assistant Director of Pageant Affairs Anishka Lockhart. The judges’ task was to look for body symmetry, the general fitness of the con testant, poise, stage presence, and modeling skills. After appearing individually before the judges, the ladies stood before them as a group, giving the panel one last look before they made their final decisions. The winner of the Swimsuit competition will be announced during the finals of the Miss Bahamas World pageant on May 31. Following a brief intermission, the show’s focus switched to haute couture as the Top Model of the Bahamas competition got underway. A competition within a competition – this event is used to select the Bahamian representative for the Top Model of the World competition. Last year’s winner Chrystal Bethell travelled to Germany earlier this year to compete. She just recently returned from China where she competed in the Beauty and Model Festival, capturing the title of Miss Caribbean in the process. She and her fellow judges – Bahamian models Stephanie Smollet, Felicia Forbes, Kendrick Kemp, and MBO Assistant Director of Talent Development Shavonne Bain, were looking for the young woman who owned the catwalk in the strength of her walk, attitude, and the way she carried the clothes. The fashions of Bahamian designers Lisa Humes, Apryl Burrows, Patrice Lockhart, Sabrina Francis, and Jarvi created a colourful, festive atmosphere while the Earth Angels brought attitude galore to the runway. Like the Swimsuit Competition, the winner of the 2009 Top Model of the Bahamas title will be announced during the pageant on May 31, Angels Earth MISS BAHAMAS WORLD SWIMSUIT AND TOP MODEL OF THE BAHAMAS COMPETITIONS THE The Retreat Gardens provide backdrop for Top Model of The Bahamas contest DEVERA PINDER , Miss Sposabella Bridal, Formal & Evening Wear HEAVENLY: Earth Angels compete in swimsuit competition. SWANIQUE SAWYER , Miss Harbour Island MCCHENIER JOHNSON , Miss Colors Entertainment DANIELLE MORLEY , Miss Exuma CHANNA CIUS , Miss Theodore Elyett Productions SHAVONNE MCKENZIE , Miss Buttons Bridal & Formal Wear KENDRA WILKINSON , Miss D. S. Lifestyles Inc. LLATETRA LAING , Miss Bahamas Experience

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n By NEIL HARTNELL Tribune Business Editor A New York court has imposed an injunction on UBS (Bahamas vent it selling a Brazilian client’s shares in a dispute involving collateral for a $7 million loan made by the Bahamian-based offshore institution. The US District Court for the southern district of New York granted the injunction on April 14, 2009, after an action was filed against UBS (Bahamas and its UBS AG parent by husbandand-wife clients Carlos and Maria Christina Aguinaga, and his D.A.S. Trading company. In their lawsuit, the pair alleged that they had borrowed $7 million from UBS (Bahamas a lien over their stock portfolio held byt he bank. DAS Trading was said to manage a portfolio for a company called Global Management Enterprises, which had an account with UBS (Bahamas al’s entire stock portfolio was alleged to consist of shares in Ideiaset, a microc ap Brazilian company chaired by Mr Aguinaga. The Aguinagas admitted that due to the global financial crisis and economic turmoil, the Ideiaset shares “became worth less than the value of the UBS loan to Global”, which had seen its portfolio value decline to $6.7 million. “The portfolio is illiquid and may be d ifficult to sell, except at an unreasonably low price,” the lawsuit admitted. “A sale of all or a substantial part of the portfolio will likely bring a price that is b elow the fair market value of the securities in the portfolio. “In or about October 2008, Guilherme Pini, the UBS (Bahamas account officer in charge of the Global account, asked plaintiff Carlos Aguinaga for more collateral against the Global loan so that UBS would not be required to sell shares in the Globalp ortfolio. “Because selling the shares would cause irreparable harm to Global and consequently to plaintiffs, the plaintiffs posted additional collateral to secure UBS’ loan to Global. UBS agreed to hold off selling the shares.” T he Aguinagas alleged that they met Brenda Bellantone, a UBS AG officer, who had responsibility for credit risk control at UBS (Bahamas b er 23, 2008, where they offered to give the bank security interests over their farm and Manhattan apartment in return for not selling the shares. T his then resulted in an alleged meeting on December 23, 2008, with Katie Feder, a UBS (Bahamas Bellantone and the bank’s lawyer, at w hich the agreement was concluded. Both the security interest on the farm and Manhattan apartment were valued at more than $5 million each, with the value of UBS (Bahamas Ideiaset shares in the Global portfolio f ixed at $7 million. This “provides collateral worth substantially more than the value of the UBS loan”. The Aguinagas said there was no issue with servicing the loan, and the agreement was designed to give him time to increase the value of Ideiaset’s shares or reduce/pay down the UBS (Bahamas He alleged that he was seeking further financing from J P Morgan Chase to enable him to pay down the UBS (Bahamas t he bank said that “if Chase did not make a commitment to the additional financing immediately, UBS would sell the Global share portfolio. Moreover, UBS said that it would make such sale by the close of business on March 31, 2009, despite the fact that it is amply secured by its existing mortgage and security agreement with plaintiffs, and despite being told that Chase was close to completing its due diligence needed to provide the financing to the Aguinagas.” T his prompted the Brazilian couple to go to court and successfully obtain the injunction and restraining order blocking the sale of Ideiaset shares by UBS (Bahamas In response, Ms Bellatone alleged in an affidavit that UBS, in initially extendi ng credit to Global via the early 2008 margin loan, only lent $6 million in return for $28 million in assets. The credit limit was extended to $13 mill ion, and the current loan balance stood at $10.4 million. The autumn 2008 stock price declines, she alleged, left the UBS (Bahamas l oan to Global “significantly undersecured”, with a $9.9 million balance partially offset by $8.6 million worth of assets a situation described as negative equity. Ms Bellatone alleged that the securit y taken over the Aguinagas’ farm and apartment did not “supersede” the lien over the Ideiaset shares, which continued to decline after no action was taken b y UBS for “two months”. As at March 16, 2009, the value of the Ideiaset shares held by Global had fallen to $6.4 million when set against a $10.4 million loan balance. Ms Bellatone alleged: “Even with the $7 million lien on plaintiffs’ properties, UBS had only $13.4 million in assets securing a current loan value of moret han $10.4 million. The total equity securing the loan was therefore 22 per cent of the loan amount, well below the 70 per cent equity that we had initially required before lending against Ideiaset shares. “In this case, nearly half the $13.4 m illion of collateral was in Ideiaset stock, a security that UBS had deter mined effectively had no lending value and that had limited liquidity. A ccordingly, UBS determined that, in order to protect itself against further depreciation in the Ideiaset stock, it would have no choice but to sell off the I deiaset stock.” n By NEIL HARTNELL Tribune Business Editor THE Bahamas will be at “a real disadvantage” when it becomes a full World Trade Organisation (WTO because it has not developed and implemented recognised international standards for food safety, plus plant and animal health, Tri bune Business was told yesterday. Dr Maurice Isaacs, chair of the National Sanitary and Phytosan itary Measures (SPS which deals with food, plant and animal health, said a “lack of interest” from the private sector in achieving internationally-recog nised standards in this area was undermining both the committee’s work and, potentially, the long-term competitiveness of the Bahamas in these areas. While the absence of interna tionally-recognised standards for food and animal safety/health could prevent Bahamian exporters from accessing overseas markets with their agricul tural/fisheries products, the absence of an internationallyaccredited and certified testing laboratory could also jeopardise this nation’s food safety when it came to imports. Dr Isaacs and Dwayne Curtis, assistant director at the Department of Environmental Health Services (DEHS under a rules-based trading regime such as the WTO or EPA, the Bahamas could not automat ically ban food imports to this nation on health and safety grounds. It needed to produce solid scientific evidence to explain why particular imports were banned, Dr Isaacs and Mr Curtis said, otherwise the Bahamas could be referred by the impacted nation to a trade sanctions/dispute reso lution committee. To produce this evidence, the Bahamas will need to have an internationally certified and recognised testing laboratory. Dr Isaacs explained that before, if an issue such as ‘mad cow disease’ arose, the Bahamas could simply tell the exporting nation it was not accepting its products. But under a rules-based trading regime, and standards designed to prevent SPS being C M Y K C M Y K SECTIONB business@tribunemedia.net WEDNESDAY, MAY 20, 2009 THETRIBUNE $4. 68 $4. 51 $4. 69The information contained is from a third party and The Tribune can not be held responsible for errors and/or omission from the daily report.$4.29 $4.29 $4.29The information contained is from a third party and The Tribune can not be held responsible for errors and/or omission from the daily report. $3.53 $3.62 $3.48 n B y NEIL HARTNELL Tribune Business Editor BAHAMIAN services professionals will be unable to supply t he European Union (EU ket under the Economic Partners hip Agreement (EPA qualifications are “not recogn ised” by countries in that trading bloc, a Caribbean Export Development Agency (CEDA tive warned yesterday. Carlos Wharton, a senior poli c y advisor to CEDA, emphasised that market access to the EU for B ahamian and CARIFORUM services providers was not auto-m atically guaranteed just because they had signed the EPA, the a chievement of recognised inter national “standards and qualifications” instead being “key” to maximising this trade relation ship. M r Wharton told a seminar organised by the Bahamas Chamb er of Commerce’s small and medium-sized enterprises unit that it was critical for this nation and the entire CARIFORUM b loc to build up “negotiating capacity” in their respective prof essional organisations, enabling the likes of attorneys and account ants to reach agreements with their EU counterparts. This was critical, he explained, because Bahamian services pro fessionals would need to agree Mutual Recognition Agreements that “must be signed” with their E U counterparts, and approved by the relevant EPA governingb ody, to ensure they could supply the EU market. We’ve got a lot of work to do,” Mr Wharton said. “If qualifications are not recognised in the EU market, you can’t sell goods and services there.” He added that this was one a rea where “we see the Bahamas offering a lot of support and taki ng the lead” for CARIFORUM, based on the fact that this nation’s h igh volume of trade with the US meant its exporters must be attaining high standards/qualifications that satisfied US regula tors and business partners. Mr Wharton said: “With barri ers coming down, standards and q ualifications are going to be they key. Right now, many of ourf irms don’t have the capacity to meet the standards, and we have t o work with professional organ isations to ensure qualifications are met.” The seminar highlighted just how much remains to be done for the Bahamas to fulfill and implem ent its EPA obligations, an exercise likely to tax the country a nd its public/private sector institutions to the bone. The EPA a greement’s signing, unlike what many seem to believe, marks the start of a 25-year process, not the end of it. The Government will be required to finance the creation of new institutions, bodies and laws a t a time when its fiscal position is under immense pressure as ar esult of the global recession, while the private sector will be r equired to adapt to a rules-based trading system and new ways of doing business. Hank Ferguson, the Bahamas Qualif ications obstac le to EP A benef its * Bahamian services professionals must have qualifications recognised b y EU counterpar ts via Mutual Recognition Ag r eements * ‘Scary’ list of things Bahamas needs to do to comply with EPA obligations * Reg ional pr ef er ences ha v e ‘most pr ofound implications for Bahamas’ * No saf eguar ds can be used to pr otect Bahamas’ infant industries after 10 years, while WTO has implications for investment incentives S S E E E E p p a a g g e e 4 4 B B S S E E E E p p a a g g e e 4 4 B B Bahamas at ‘real disadvantage’ on food and health safety Absence of internationallyaccredited testing laboratory could compromise food import safety if Bahamas does not risk trade sanctions n By CHESTER ROBARDS Business Reporter crobards@tribunemedia.net THE $100 million BALMORAL development is set to break ground next week, with p hase one construction to begin soon after, its principal said yest erday, with the pre-sold town homes under 95 per cent Bahamia n ownership. Jason Kinsale, who purchased the vintage property only 18 months ago, said the develop ment’s target market was youngB ahamian professionals. He said skyrocketing property values in N ew Providence, and diminish ing land availability, prompted h im to construct the affordable gated community. Two bedroom, 1,400 square foot town homes at Balmoral begin at $359,000, while four-bedroom, 2,000 square foot homes sell for about $559,000. The morec onservative spender can acquire a 1,200 square foot condo for $300,000. Our buyers have seen a lot of value in the price point,” said Mr K insale. “We’ve been able to appeal to different market seg ments, and what I consider to be affordable for the young professional market.” T he 43-acre property belonged to Lord Oliver Simmonds in the 1 940s, and was purchased by the Tomlinson family in the 1960s. W hen Mr Kinsale, a native of Grand Bahama, bought the prop erty, the house, which has been redesigned to be the Balmoral’s clubhouse, underwent a five m onth, $1 million renovation. The 17,000 square foot property was r edesigned around its historical trimmings and original spiral s taircase. “The Tomlinson family did a t remendous job of maintaining the history,” said Mr Kinsale. P P r r o o j j e e c c t t s s p p r r e e s s a a l l e e b b u u y y e e r r s s 9 9 5 5 p p e e r r c c e e n n t t l l o o c c a a l l UBS Bahamas hit by $7m injunction Bank alleges: We had no choice but to sell-off client’s assets to recover margin loan S S E E E E p p a a g g e e 4 4 B B

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C M Y K C M Y K BUSINESS PAGE 2B, WEDNESDAY, MAY 20, 2009 THE TRIBUNE THE COLLEGE OFTHE BAHAMASV isit our website at www.cob.edu.bsREGISTRATION ANNOUNCEMENT If you have reserved a seat for classes for Fall 2009 but have not yet paid, please be advised that the first scheduled cancellation for non payment of tuition and fees will take place on May 18th, 2009, and will be repeated every 14 days thereafter. Students will be able to reserve seats online until July 26th, 2009, at www.cob.edu.bs IN THE MATTER OFTHE LEGAL PROFESSION ACT, 1992 A ND IN THE MATTER OFA COMPLAINTAGAINST COUNSEL AND ATTORNEYBETWEEN SOLOMON GUTSTEIN C omplainants A ND KENDALL KNOWLES Respondent NOTICE OF HEARING TAKE NOTICE that the Disciplinary Tribunal shall h ear the subject Complaint on Wednesday the 20th day of May, A.D., 2009 at 3:00 o’clock in the afternoon b efore Her Ladyship The Honourable Mrs. Justice A lbury at 3rd Floor British American Building, George Street, Nassau, The Bahamas. AND FURTHER TAKE NOTICE that the Respondent, K endall Knowles, is required to produce to the Bahamas B ar Council within seven (7hereof, an address to which the Decision may be sent by prepaid R egistered Post. D ated the 14th day of May, A.D., 2009 B ahamas BarAssociation Elizabeth Avenue Nassau, The Bahamas NOW is not the time to cut, slice, mince or chop your sales and marketing efforts. In a tough economy, you have todo the exact opposite of what your instincts are telling you todo. Many will cut costs in marketing and advertising, hoping to survive until things get better. The best defence is a good offense. Think about this. Ify ou are coach of a football team and your team was down after the first half, do you bench your best players? Do you throw away your best equipment? Do you call theowner or boss, and say we’re o ut of the game? I don’t think so. At least I hope not. As head coach you do the opposite. During the half-time break you motivate your play-e rs, tweak strategies, use your best players, dig your heels in and fight right? Well, what ist he difference? In business, do the same. According to Ron Snyder, a leading international sales and marketing expert: “Those who choose to be aggressive and create new opportunities will be handsomely rewarded generating additional revenue and opportunities.” S S H H O O R R T T T T E E R R M M P P L L A A N N S S Who really, honestly knows the future? If someone tells you they know exactly what’s going to happen, run, because we only have our best guess. S o instead of making an annual sales and marketing plan (I’m not saying don’t look ahead), make a short-term plan. Look at the next month, three months or six months. Take little bites you can swal-l ow and manage with ease. Have you ever taken a bite of food you can barely chew, much less talk (I’m sure we all have). T ake a small bite you can easily and concisely handle. If you plan on advertising viar adio or newspaper, do it for one month, and maybe two or three. Figure out what’s the best time for your product or company. Take a short-term approach. S S I I M M P P L L I I C C I I T T Y Y / / I I D D E E A A S S F F R R O O M M T T H H E E P P A A S S T T We have all heard “keep it simple stupid”? Stop complicating things. Simplicity in itself is overlooked all too often. We think we have to be clever and create the world’s best marketing plan or approach, when some of the simplest ads and plans have worked the best. Ask yourself what has w orked in the past and why? As a youngster, my dad often said: “You can judge your future by your past.” I disliked that statement at the time, because then I was not creating a good past (typical teenager stuff). However, how profound and simple a statement. If as pecific plan, idea or tool has worked previously, why not revisit it, re-think and re-tool slightly? Simply just use what has worked. How long have can openers been around? A very long time. However, in today’s market you see the same tool, just different variations achieving the same goal. So take some time, review what has worked in the past and simply tweak or modify. Remember keep it simple -------, you get the point. B B E E C C O O N N S S I I S S T T E E N N T T W W I I T T H H Y Y O O U U R R M M E E S S S S A A G G E E Digestion is easier when we take small bites of the samef ood. Speak English if your market speaks in English. In other words, keep your wording SIMPLE (and short/smallu sing different medias to get your message out, make sure the same message is conveyedt hroughout, whether it is radio, newspaper, flyers or e-mail. This will not only save you time and money but will consistently convey your message. The same theme should be expressed through and through. Use what I call the three to five-second rule. If your reader or viewer cannot digest in three to five seconds the basis of your message, you have lost them and given them indigestion. Our attention span in today’s environment is not what it used to be. Again, keep it simple. Take s mall bites, look at your past and keep marketing. All of these marketing strategies are certain to keep your business on top during these challenging economic times. Have a productive and profitable week.R emember: “THOSE WHO MARKET WILL MAKE IT.” N N B B : : S S c c o o t t t t F F a a r r r r i i n n g g t t o o n n i i s s p p r r e e s s i i d d e e n n t t o o f f S S u u n n T T e e e e E E m m b b r r o o i i d d M M e e , , a a p p r r o o m m o o t t i i o o n n a a l l a a n n d d m m a a r r k k e e t t i i n n g g c c o o m m p p a a n n y y s s p p e e c c i i a a l l i i s s i i n n g g i i n n p p r r o o m m o o t t i i o o n n a a l l p p r r o o d d u u c c t t s s . . E E s s t t a a b b l l i i s s h h e e d d o o v v e e r r 2 2 7 7 y y e e a a r r s s a a g g o o , , S S u u n n T T e e e e E E m m b b r r o o i i d d M M e e h h a a s s a a s s s s i i s s t t e e d d B B a a h h a a m m i i a a n n b b u u s s i i n n e e s s s s e e s s i i n n v v a a r r i i o o u u s s i i n n d d u u s s t t r r i i e e s s , , r r a a n n g g i i n n g g f f r r o o m m t t o o u u r r i i s s m m a a n n d d b b a a n n k k i i n n g g t t o o t t e e l l e e c c o o m m m m u u n n i i c c a a t t i i o o n n s s , , i i n n m m a a r r k k e e t t i i n n g g t t h h e e m m s s e e l l v v e e s s . . R R e e a a d d e e r r s s c c a a n n c c o o n n t t a a c c t t M M r r F F a a r r r r i i n n g g t t o o n n a a t t S S u u n n T T e e e e E E m m b b r r o o i i d d M M e e o o n n E E a a s s t t S S h h i i r r l l e e y y S S t t r r e e e e t t , , b b y y e e m m a a i i l l a a t t s s c c o o t t t t @ @ s s u u n n t t e e e e . . c c o o m m o o r r b b y y t t e e l l e e p p h h o o n n e e a a t t 2 2 4 4 2 2 3 3 9 9 3 3 3 3 1 1 0 0 4 4 . . Don’t take large bites from marketing plan Promotional M arketing by Scott Farrington BENCHMARK (Bahamas unveiled a $9,171 net loss for the 2009 first quarter, an improved performance from its Alliance Investment Management subsidiary offsetting a $471,155 decline in the unrealised value of its Bahamian equity portfolio. Alliance, its offshore broker/dealer, generated net profits of $315,720 for the three months to March 31, 2009, while the Benchmark (Advisors (Bahamas $ 11,666 and $312,875 r espectively. B enchmark (Bahamas saw consolidated first quarter revenues drop 16 per cent to $258,051 year-overyear, while expenses fell by 3 per cent to $258,924. Benchmark unveils Q1 $9,171 loss Shar e your news The Tribune wants to hear fr om people who ar e making news in their neighbour hoods. Per haps you are raising funds for a good cause, campaigning for improvements in the ar ea or have won an awar d. If so, call us on 322-1986 and share your story. F o o r r t t h h e e s s t t o o r r i i e e s s b b e e h h i i n n d d t t h h e e n n e e w w s s , , r r e e a a d d I I n n s s i i g g h h t t o o n n M M o o n n d d a a y y s s

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n B y NEIL HARTNELL Tribune Business Editor C ABLE Bahamas’ claims that the rival Bahamas Telecommunications Compan y (BTC tial treatment and influence” in the communications reform process were yesterday brand-ed “ridiculous”, with the company accused of “bellyaching” now that it was being forced to live up to its previous comm itments. T. B. Donaldson, head of the BTC privatisation committee,w hich oversaw the consultation and feedback effort on the Government’s behalf, said in r esponse to Cable Bahamas’ a ssertions that the process was c ompromised by the presence o f three BTC executives on the c ommittee: “Nothing could be further from the truth.” “I don’t know which hat Cable Bahamas has pulled that from. That’s so ridiculous,” Mr Donaldson, a former Central B ank governor, told Tribune Business. “They have no evidence to p rove that. No influence, undue or otherwise, was exercised by BTC.” C able Bahamas, in its April 2 0, 2009, feedback to the BTC privatisation committee, a rgued that the perception of integrity in the process had been “undermined” because B TC’s executive chairman, J ulian Francis; Felicity Johnson, BTC’s vice-president for l egal, regulatory and interconnection, and its company secretary; and Tellis Symonette, BTC’s senior vice-president forF amily Islands and adminis tration, were all on the BTC Privatisation Committee over-s eeing it. In addition, the Broadcasting Corporation of the Bahamas( BCB) was also said by Cable Bahamas to have enjoyed a privileged position in the con sultation effort as its chairman, Michael Moss, also sat on the B TC privatisation committee. M r Donaldson yesterday told Tribune Business that while the three BTC-connected persons were “involved in the process, if anything BTC w ill probably have been disadv antaged because they were wearing their committee, not their BTC, hats”. W hen asked why Cable Bahamas had made these alleg ations, Mr Donaldson, the c urrent Commonwealth Bank chairman, replied: “ I think C able Bahamas is frustrated, h aving had a 15-year monopoly, that they are now having to do by law some of the things t hey should have been doing. “I see them bellyaching a bout the Universal Service O bligation,” he added, suggesting that the Government should previously obtained c ommitments from Cable B ahamas in writing, so that the BISX-listed company could h ave been more easily held to a ccount. Referring to comments made in the House of Assembly by Zhivargo Laing, minis-t er of state for finance, that the Government would look into whether Cable Bahamas should refund to it revenues paid for Internet/cable televis ion services in schools and o ther educational institutions, Mr Donaldson said it had been agreed that Cable Bahamas s hould provide this free of charge. D escribing the company’s c laims over the communications reform consultation p rocess as “absolute nons ense”, Mr Donaldson said he did not know whether Cable Bahamas was trying to m obilise “public sympathy” behind it. H owever, he warned the c ompany that it will “find out sooner or later that the public have no sympathy or them at a ll, having had a 15-year m onopoly”. Cable Bahamas’ 15-year e xclusive cable television franchise comes to an end in October 2009, in theory allowing o ver entrants to come into the m arket. Yet Cable Bahamas is so well-established, that competitors will find it hard to c hallenge them. Mr Donaldson criticised the e xclusive franchise given to C able Bahamas, saying the privatisation committee had l earnt that a private monopoly w as just as bad as a public one. “I don’t think anything they [Cable Bahamas] do or say w ould surprise me,” he added. “All I can say is that not too m any people in this country a re sympathetic to Cable Bahamas, because in many instances they’ve not lived up t o their promises. We should h ave realised what we found in the beginning, that a private m onopoly is just as bad as a public monopoly. “They’re [Cable Bahamas] t rying to drag up red herrings. T hey’ve had a good run, a 15year monopoly, and should now focus on trying to do s omething for the people.” It is unclear what motivated C able Bahamas’ comments in t he consultation process, but it appears that the company’s o nce-close relationship with t he Government has, for now, cooled considerably. There may also be some f rustration over the protracted wait for the Ministry of F inance/Central Bank of the B ahamas to give the company exchange control approval for its $40 million preference share i ssue, a key component of the $ 80 million deal to buy out its controlling shareholder, C olumbus Communications. C M Y K C M Y K BUSINESS THE TRIBUNE WEDNESDAY, MAY 20, 2009, PAGE 3B The general public is invited to attend Bahamas Development Bank’s sale of repossessed assets.A SSETS E lectronic EquipmentTables Cooler/Freezers Beauty Salon Equipment MachineryAero Motive Equipment Assortment of Items Location: Directions: Date & Time: All assets are sold as is where is for cash, cashier’s cheque. No purchase(sbe released until paid in full. Vehicles Vessels Location: Date & Time: Sealed “TENDER-EQUIPMENT” All assets are sold as is. DHL JOB DESCRIPTIONPOSITION: Collections Agent JOB FAMILY: Credit & Collections RCS CODE: A20004 REPORTS TO : Collections Lead LOCATION: Country Finance Department OVERALL PURPOSE: Under limited supervision in a team environment provide efcient and effective credit approvals. To ensure timely credit application processing, respond to information requests and issues. Ensure accuracy of all credit decisions functions while staying within company policy and procedural guidelines. DUTIES AND RESPONSIBILITIES: making credit decisions. delinquent accounts. Processes credit applications. Investigates disputes and reviews documentation. Implements credit suspensions. MINIMUM QUALIFICATIONS: direction amid competing priorities and deadlines. For more information please contact:Romell K. Knowles I Country Manager Email:Romell.Knowles@dhl.com Cable accused of ‘bellyaching’ * Claim rival BTC had ‘preferential treatment and influence’ over communications reform process branded as ‘ridiculous’ by committee chairman * Says BISX-listed firm ‘frustrated’ 15-year monopoly ending and being held to account T B DONALDSON

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Project’s pre-sale buyers 95 per cent local used as a trade barrier, exporting countries could insist their products were safe. “Now, if there’s an international stand ard, we have to accept the product of prove scientifically why we aren’t,” DrI saacs said. Mr Curtis added: “Even if we think w e have a good reason to prohibit, based on our scientific opinion, if our facilities do not meet the standard, that can be challenged.” Dr Isaacs, who addressed a Bahamas C hamber of Commerce-organised con ference on the SPS issue, said: “We findt hat not too many people know about the SPS committee and the international a greements in general.” The WTO, which the Bahamas is a lready applying for full membership in, has such an agreement on SPS issues. And this nation, having signed on to the E conomic Partnership Agreement (EPAEUw ill be expected to meet those SPS standards, otherwise its agricultural and fish e ries exporters might be denied access to the EU. Dr Isaacs said the SPS committee, which comes under the Ministry of Agriculture and Fisheries, aimed to be an a dvocate for SPS measures, acting as a venue to facilitate their eventual imple m entation and a communications channel between the Government and Bahamian i ndustry. “Some of the strong challenges we face a re that some local manufacturers and producers benefit from the lack of local s tandards,” Dr Isaacs explained. “The absence of some standards may be beneficial for some companies.” H e said the SPS standards drive was also being impacted by the lack of eco n omic diversification in the Bahamas, and the fact that few Bahamian compa n ies were goods and agricultural/fisheries exporters. “We’ve not really made economic diversification a priority,” Dr Isaacs said. “We haven’t tried to think of things for t he export market. Things are changing and we have to catch up.” H e explained that the wait for full WTO membership, and the Bahamas’ c urrent status as an observer members, offered the best opportunity for this. Once we join, the options regarding change will be limited,” Dr Isaacs said, e xplaining that a failure to improve negotiating capacity and legislation in this area would place the Bahamas at a comp etitive disadvantage. He told Tribune Business: “There is s ome interest, but most of the companies doing the trading have created their o wn standards, quality assurance pro grammes within their own company.” Commonwealth Brewery and Paradise Fisheries were cited as examples of this. “Other companies are not really aware o f the benefits or have the wherewithal to properly regulate their internal environ m ent,” Dr Isaacs added. A failure to adopt and implement i nternationally-recognised SPS standards was “going to put us at a real competitive d isadvantage”, Dr Isaacs said. “Once we join, because it seems other people are m ore used to dealing with the standards in general, they will be better able to adjust to changes in the standards. Those people not used to standards will have a lot more difficulty in con f orming to those standards if they change of increase.” H e added: “What we’re trying to do is develop the capacity in regards to implementation, so that we can implement the WTO agreement when we become members. The whole idea is to develop this c apacity. The whole purpose of the SPS committee is to act as the driving force.” T he absence of private sector interest meant there was no drive to establish a B oard of Standards, leaving the whole issue in the Government’s hands. C M Y K C M Y K BUSINESS PAGE 4B, WEDNESDAY, MAY 20, 2009 THE TRIBUNE NOTICE is hereby given that MARTINJERMAINE McGREGOR OF #25 DIAMOND DRIVE, P.O. BOX F-44900, GRAND BAHAMA, BAHAMAS is applying to the Minister responsible for Nationality and Citizenship, for registration/ naturalization as a citizen of The Bahamas, and that any person who knows any reasonwhy registration/ naturalization should not be granted, should send a written and signed statement of the facts within twenty-eight days from the 20th day of MAY, 2009 to the Minister responsible for Nationality and Citizenship, P.O. Box N-7147, Freeport, Bahamas. NOTICE The Public is hereby advised that I, SERVNOVIA AMANDASANDS of P.O. Box N-8581, Nassau, Bahamas, intend to change my name to AMANDA VERNESSASANDS-RUSSELL. If there are any objections to this change of name by Deed Poll, you may write such objections to the P.O.Box N-742, Nassau, Bahamas no later than thirty (30 PUBLIC NOTICE INTENT TO CHANGE NAME BY DEED POLL NOTICE is hereby given that MAXEN PROPHETE of 1611 NE, 3RD AVE., APT. 5,DELRAYBEACH, FLORIDA, 33444, is applying to the Minister responsible for Nationality and Citizenship, for registration/naturalization as a citizen of The Bahamas, and that any person who knows any reason why registration/naturalization should not be granted, should send a written and signed statement of the facts withint wenty-eight days from the 2OTH d ay of May, 2009 to the Minister responsible for nationality and Citizenship, P.O. Box N-7147, Nassau, Bahamas.NOTICE NoticeOSPIN INTERNATIONAL INC.In Voluntary LiquidationNotice is hereby given that in accordance with Section 138(4Business Companies Act. 2000, OSPIN INTERNATIONALINC. is in dissolution as of May 18, 2009. International Liquidator Services Inc. situaated at 35A Regent Street,P.O. Box 1777, Belize City, Belize is the Liquidator. L I Q U I D AT O R The Public is hereby advised that I, CARAVERON SAUNDERS of the South Western District of the Island of New Providence on of the I slands of the Commonwealth of the Bahamas , intend to change my son’s name from KELVIN VICTOR GERMAN to MALACHI ADRIEL SAUNDERS. If there are any objections to this change of name by Deed P oll, you may write such objections to the PUBLIC NOTICE INTENT TO CHANGE NAME BY DEED POLL NOTICE is hereby given that SEAN THOMPSON PALMER of BARN CLOSE, PRINCE CHARLES DRIVE, P.O. BOX N-4309, is applying to the Minister responsible for Nationality and Citizenship, for registration/naturalization as a citizen of The Bahamas, and that any person who knows any reason why registration/naturalizationshould not be granted, should send a written and signed statement of the facts within twenty-eight days from the 20T Hday of May, 2009 to the Minister responsible for nationality and Citizenship, P.O. Box N-7147, Nassau, Bahamas.NOTICE T he Public is hereby advised that I, HELENADELCINA SYMONETTE of Monastery Height, P.O. Box CB-12766, Nassau, Bahamas, intend to change my name to HELENA D ELCINASTUART. If there are any objections to this change of name by Deed Poll, you may write such objections to the later than thirty (30 notice. PUBLIC NOTICE INTENT TO CHANGE NAME BY DEED POLL Chamber of Commerce’s intern ational trade consultant, said in relation to the EPA: “If you go through the list of things that n eed to be done, it would be scary. We’re the only country in the Western Hemisphere that does not have a competition policy. We do not have a clear government procurement policy. If theI DB’s involved, we comply with the rules. If not, we make do withi t as we see fit. “These things are not possible i n a rules-based trading regime.” Mr Wharton told the seminar that the EPA’s “regional preference clause” “has probably the most profound implications fort he Bahamas”. This requires the Bahamas to offer the same trade preferences, benefits and tariff liberalisation schedule to other CARIFORUM states and the D ominican Republic as it is to t he EU, the Europeans having b een unwilling to sign an agreem ent that did not permit this. “The regional preference c lause has serious implications for the [CARICOM] community,” M r Wharton explained. “This clause has probably the most pro-f ound implications for the Bahamas, because the Bahamas is n ot part of the CARICOM Single Market & Economy (CSME “If goods originate from CARICOM countries, the tariffst he Bahamas has agreed to phaseout for the EU also have to be phased-out for the same products in the context of Bahamas-CARICOM relations, and equally in t he Bahamas-Dominican Repub l ic relationship.” M r Wharton said this would g ive the Bahamas an opportunity to source products from CARIC OM countries and the Dominican Republic at more competi t ive prices. And he added: “It provides an o pportunity for you [the Bahamas] more goods and serv ices to the CARICOM market.” Mr Wharton later told Tribune Business that more developed countries in the CARIFORUMb loc, which would include the Bahamas, had to implement the EPA provisions in respect of their fellow CARICOM states (and the Dominican Republic) within one y ear of the agreement’s signing. T his means that this nation has t o give its fellow Caribbean n ations the same trade preferences and benefits it has accorded t he EU by late 2009. The Chamber and CEDA are l ikely to conduct a study examining the impact of the regionalp reference clause for the Bahamas. M r Wharton also warned that, 10 years after the EPA’s signing, the Bahamas and other CARIFORUM states will “no longerb e able to apply safeguard measures on imports impacting infant industries” in their nations. Describing this as a “slap in the face”, Mr Wharton said it had i mportant implications for manu f acturing industries, not to ment ion start-ups and entrepreneurs. We are not only competing in the export market, but have to b uild confidence among our people to compete in the domestic m arket before we consider competing outside,” he added. M r Wharton also urged the Bahamas to beware of the World T rade Organisation’s (WTO Subsidies and Countervailing Measures Agreement, which prohibited the use of export subsi-d ies by 2015. The Bahamas has formally submitted its Memorandum of Trade regime to being the accession process to full WTO membership, a nd Mr Wharton said current m embers, such as Barbados, were a lready studying how this agreem ent would affects its economic/trade legislation and policies. I encourage the Chamber and the Government of the Bahamas t o this thing to the fullest extent, because it can have an impact fort he type of incentives you offer going forward,” Mr Wharton a dded. E E P P A A , , f f r r o o m m 1 1 B B S S A A F F E E T T Y Y , , f f r r o o m m 1 1 B B n By CHESTER ROBARDS Business Reporter crobards@tribunemedia.net THE AMENDMENTS being made to the US tax code represent a unique opportunity to craft and mould a new 21st century business model for the Bahamas’ financial services sector, a partner in the McKinney, Bancroft and Hughes law firm said yesterday. John Wilson, speaking at the Bahamas Institute of Financial Services’ week of seminars, said the Bahamas should use the US reform to retool the Bahamian financial services sector and quell whatever impact they and the ‘Stop Tax Haven Abuse’ Bill will have on this country. According to Mr Wilson, the OECD countries have sounded the death knell for the taxout of the Bahamas’ private client business. “We should use these opportunities to innovate and develop a sustainable financial model and product for the Bahamas,” he said. “The next three to five years promise to be a dynamic time for the development of offshore businesses.” Cheryl Bazard, senior counsel and head of Chambers at her law firm, said that Bahamians should know that the business that has been done in so-called “tax haven” jurisdictions, “has all been legal within the framework of legislation coming out of the US”. She said that the ever since the US and Europe announced their plans to go after international financial centres, the Bahamas has been challenged on every side of the issue. However, she, like many, believes the US is using offshore financial centres as a scapegoat for the global financial crisis, and is seeking to recapture lost tax revenue it claims offshore financial centres withhold. “For the United States to bolster its welfare plans, it is to now attack tax havens across the board to get that wealth back on to their shores and into their financial institutions,” Ms Bazard said. She suggested that the Bahamas put its best and brightest minds behind these issues in order to move from national ‘think-tanks’ to national ‘do’ tanks, because the US is not relenting on its mission to do away with offshore financial centres. Former finance minister James Smith, who was also a panellist at the seminar, said the US was attempting to “obliterate offshore financial centres”. He said that in order for the Bahamas to remain a competitive international financial centre, it needs to adopt strategies that would move it forward as possibly damaging US tax policies bear down. Attorney Ryan Pinder said the US is committed to put its laws into effect by the end of the year, and suggested that Bahamians keep an eye on policies coming out of the US at a rate of at least one per week. “Every offshore financial institution should closely monitor the US policies, but also pay attention to the what’s coming out of Europe,” he said. Mr Wilson said this country needs to adopt a coordinated strategy for all segments of its international business in order to moved forward successfully. “Our task is to decide whether we will be the cadre professional officiating at the funeral parlour of the financial services industry, or will we oversee the retooled and re-energised sector, which like the mythical phoenix bird, will rise form the ashes more beautiful than before,” Mr Wilson said. US offshore attack provides financial reform opportunity The contract to construct the 70 phase one homes has been awarded to Bahama Wall Systems Ltd. W hen construction commences and infrastructure is put in place, Mr Kinsale said he expects buyer interest to peak. “We anticipate much stronger demand once the project starts,” he said. T he construction side of the development is expected to create around 100 jobs, with 50 more employed at Balmoral’s clubhouse as gardeners, waiting staff, culinary staff and administration. “We have been able to create a significant number of j obs and hiring processes for local Bahamian contractors,” said Mr Kinsale. According to him, because of the current state of the market, Balmoral’s sales and marketing team have been w orking overtime to push pre-sales in order to give the project legs. The project has placed a huge emphasis on making the Balmoral a family-oriented community, with pools and a Mark Knowles tennis centre to complement the clubhousea menity available to all home owners. It has taken steps to save as many indigenous trees as possible, as a part of the landscaping process. “There is a lot of focus on the amenities,” said Mr Kinsale. F F R R O O M M 1 1 B B

PAGE 16

C M Y K C M Y K TASTE PAGE 6B, WEDNESDAY, MAY 20, 2009 THE TRIBUNE T h e T r i b u n e n B y ALEX MISSICK Tribune Features Reporter amissick@tribunemedia.net THERE is nothing that takes you back to your childhood more t han the aroma of Grammy in t he kitc hen making a batc h of her warm homemade bread. That same sof t , fluffy melt in your mouth goodness that youw er e eager t o ge t y our hands on is exactly what the Bread Shop, located on Shirley Street and Okr a Hill has t o of f er . Michael Dillet, Managing Director at the Bread Shop, started the business in1 992 along with his mother a native of Exuma. “My wife and I perfected the baking the techniques that I learned from my mother. We are presently operating the Bread Shop alone. All of our bread products are hand kneaded,” Mr Dillet said. Although the Bread shop specialises in bread, they also bake pastries such as cupcakes, pineapple tarts, coconut tarts,c ookies, bread buns and other pastries. “When you start buying bread from us, you either have to hit the gym or thes treets because we will keep you coming back-the bread is just that good,” Mr Dill et said. Mr Dillet said although he would like to consider the Bread Shop as a moma nd pop type of store, their clientele spreads world wide as they cater to many international and high end clients. “We have customers from all walks of life. We have corporate customers, times hare persons, Atlantis workers, private yachts, and international customers. We have customers that have grown up their kids on this bread. We have customers who came in from their conception and are now 17 and 18 years old. We know our customers so well that when they pull up in the drive way I already know what they want and I just start packing their order before they reach inside,” Mr Dillet said. Mr Dillet said cinnamon swirl bread is the unique signature bread of the Bread Shop. The cinnamon swirl is a blend ofs ugars and cinnamon glazed with white icing that is not too heavy to satisfy any sweet tooth. Our signature bread contains a number of ingredients including a cinnamon b lend that only we can make. It is a tasty sweet bread that many people enjoy and you will only find it at the Bread shop,”M r Dillet said. As for the future of the Bread Shop, Mr Dillet said he would like to continue the store and continue to provide good tasting bread “like mama used to makei t” for years to come. “It is a pleasure to provide such good tasting bread from the Bread Shop because of the warm feelings we get from our customers when they approve of how good our product is. When you bite into bread from the Bread Shop, you bite into ingredients and bread prepared with love and this is what makes the Bread Shop stand out from its competitors.” Bread done right Tribune Taste is once again showcasing some of the super sized produce, being grown by local farmers. Check out these whoppers grown by Spanish Wells farmer Lloyd Higgs. Mr Higgs recently broke his own seven pound onion record with this amazing tear jerker which tipped the scales at over nine pounds. He also grew this massive 41 pound pumpkin. Mr Higgs takes tremendous pride in the farming industry of the Bahamas as do all the farmers in Spanish Wells who say that “it’s grown bigger and better in the Bahamas in Spanish Wells.” BIGGER AND BETTER IN THE BAHAMAS Danish’s from the Bread Shop. Fresh Baked breads cooling at the Bread Shop. CupCakes from the Bread Shop. Cinnamon Swirl Bread covered in a sweet glazed icing.

PAGE 17

T h e T r i b u n e C M Y K C M Y K TASTE THE TRIBUNE WEDNESDAY, MAY 20, 2009, PAGE 7B This week, Tribune Entertainment features an eclectic list of events happening at the weeke nd. From a major beauty pageant to a celebration of fine foods for a good causethere is s ure to be something on this list for everyone. 1. Miss Bahamas Universe F inalsThe new queen will be crowned on Sunday May 24 at t he Rain Forest Theatre at the Wyndham resort at 8 pm. A ttend this gala event and see who will represent the countrya t this year’s Miss Universe Pageant to be held right here at t he Atlantis Resort on Paradise I sland in August. 2. Paradise Plates Local chefs from thirteen different r estaurants will showcase exciti ng new creations or their wellloved signature fare to guests a t Paradise Plates, Hands For Hunger's first annual fundraiser event being held on Saturday, May 23 from 7 11 pm at the Atlantis Crown Ballroom. Sponsored by The New ProvidenceD evelopment Company Limited and Old Fort Bay, the unique e vent will feature a sampling of gourmet food, fine wine and l ive entertainment with all proceeds benefiting Hands ForH unger the non-profit, humani tarian organisation committedto the elimination of hunger and the reduction of food waste in The Bahamas. Tickets are $125. 3 . B lue and White Ball On Saturday, May 23, Phi Beta Sigma Fraternity Inc and Zeta Phi Beta Sorority Inc will host their2 nd annual Blue & White Ball at the Wyndam Nassau Resort, C able Beach. High school students participating in the frater n ity and sorority's programmes will be honoured during the b all. Outstanding students will also be awarded scholarships to assist in tertiary education. For tickets call 557-2673 or 424-6195. 4. The College of The Bahamas will be celebrating the launch of their Sports & Wellness Institute by holding a Fun Run Walk this Saturday. Prizes for participation include dinner for two, a Chapter One bookstore gift cer tificate, One Month Gym Membership and more. Entry fee is $10 (includes T-shirt Sm Xlg $12 (includes shirt 2Xlg and up). Entry forms for the event are available at the Centre for Continuing Education & Extension Services, Moss Road and the Wellness Centre at COB's Oakes Field campus. The event begins at 6 am at the Portia Smith Building, Poinciana Drive. This event is sponsored by The d'Albenas Agency and Min of Health. For more information call 302-4349. 5. Dollars for Scholars On Thursday, May 21, Doctor’s Hospital and Rubin’s will host a luncheon and fashion show in aid of the Doctor’s Hospital Dr Meyer Rassin Foundation. The event is $75 and will be held at Luciano’s Restaurant at noon. The foundation provides scholarships and financial assistance to persons pursuing careers in healthcare. The Fashion Show will feature the new collections of Liz Claiborne, and New York by Isaac Mizrahi as provided by Rubin’s. For tickets or information on the “Dollars for Scholars” Fashion Show and Luncheon, contact Doctors Hospital at 3024603/7, Rubin’s, Harbour Bay 322-3170 or Rubin’s, Cable Cottage, Cable Beach at 3277072. things 2 DO n By LLOYD ALLEN Tribune Features Reporter lallen@tribunemedia.net READ The Tribune’s e-splash for on time updates of entertainment news, events, and happenings throughout Nassau as they unfold. Recently the Kappa Alpha Psi fraternity hosted its Impromptu Four at the Marley Resort, a wine and cheese, art, and jazz event, as a fundraiser for one of the organisation’s community causes. According to Errol L Bodie, one of the senior members of the fraternity’s local chapter, the first few times the Impromptu event was held, proceeds had been earmarked for various causes, including local non-profit groups and other NGOs. However, proceeds from this year’s recent event are slated for a youth mentoring pro gramme known as Guide Right. Mr Bodie explained that this is one of the many initiatives by Kappa Alpha Psi, to target and assist at risk high school senior boys, by showing and providing them healthy alternatives to a brighter future. This year’s event was nothing short of a who’s who celebrity social, as dozens of fraternity and sorority affiliates along with other young professionals turned out to show support. With the melodic tunes of various entertainers, including Tingum Dem, and an encore unveiling of the Kenisis experience by local artist Scharad Lightbourne, this event was certainly an overall success. Creators and designers of the Conchience Clothing (CC a local urban and uptown clothing company are gearing to launch their new summer line. Chief Executive Officers of the company Giorgio Knowles and Deangelo Charlton, say this new line will bring a new level of new and creative styles. The duo, who have over the past two years become well-known for their hats, shirts, and hoodies, have been heavily supported by many local celebrities in the music and entertainment arena. This season they intend to feature cardigans, tailored pants, belts, and bikinis. Local entertainer So$A Man aka Brandon Major recently returned from Canada, where he, MDEEZ, Sammi Starr, and Canadian artist Lion, recorded the video for his newest single, We Winning . So$A explained in a recent interview, that as the final edit is being completed for the video, the official release is scheduled for May 29 at a Premiere launch party Social Light 6 at the Balcony night club, where there also will be a special performance by other local entertainers. With his song Shawty over the last year making him a force to be reckoned with in the local music industry, So$A said fans can look forward to bigger and better things from him in the coming months. Producers of local online entertainment magazine Elife242 say the fifth edition of the magazine is now available, with local DJ Dion Da Butcha on the cover, along with a two page spread. The magazine which in the past has featured other big names in Bahamian entertainment, including TaDa, SO$A Man and MDEEZ, and Sammie Starr, also will be releasing its sixth edition. Although they haven’t officially announced who will be on the front cover, we have confirmed that it will be an entertainer who has recently interviewed Jamaican icon Empress Jeanelle. e-splash T HE BAHAMAS HUMANE SOCIETY DOG FUN DAY THE Bahamas H umane Society held a dog fun day over the weekend at the Botani-c al Gardens grounds allowing dogs of all shapes sizes and per-s onalities to make new friends and show off various talents in an umber of different competitions. Pictured are some four legged friends having a great time. F e l i p e M a j o r T r i b u n e s t a f f

PAGE 18

A STEAMiron and three portable racks were donated to the Bahamas Technical and Vocational Institute’s fashion department Friday by representatives of Mode Iles Ltd as tokens of appreciation for their participa-t ion at Islands of the World Fashion Week last November. “We would like to thank BTVI and the r est of the Islands of the World Fashion Week Team for their dedicated support and h ard work during the launch last November,” said Arianne Etuk, chief operations officer, and Brynda Knowles, senior fashion consultant. Ms Etuk credited the school’s participation for the company’s recent success of winning the award for 'Best Fashion Show or Fashion Week attended' category at the 2nd annual Caribbean Fashion Awards (CFA held in at the Hilton Hotel in Bridgetown, Barbados, on April 11. “We know that without BTVI, it would n ot have been possible,” she said. “We do appreciate it and we do look forward to working with you in the future.” The school had 14 students take part as volunteers at IWFW 2008 serving in severalc apacities from pressing garments to sewing to dressing models for the runway. Receiving the gifts on behalf of BTVI were D r Iva Dahl, manager/IDB Consultant (BTVI f ashion, trade and souvenir manufacturing (BTVI “We are very grateful for the gifts and we will gladly help out at this year’s event,” said Ms. Pearson. “It was a lot of fun and I hope when we put on our fashion show you will be there to support us.” The school’s showcase will be held on June 14 at 4 p.m. at the Wyndham Nassau Resort & Crystal Palace Casino. Islands of the World Fashion Week is scheduled to take place November 4 to 8. C M Y K C M Y K ARTS PAGE 8B, WEDNESDAY, MAY 20, 2009 THE TRIBUNE about 10 inches thick and then you cut it with a chainsaw. After the chainsaw, then you have all these machines for sanding the whole thing down to smooth it out,” Mr Taylor said. Mr Taylor said a friend in South Carolina really got him started in working and making art with this material. “I saw what he did and it excited me but strangely enough in 1999 was the first time I saw it and it was always in the back of my mind. I then finally tried it and I liked it and I want to take it much further,” Mr Taylor said. Dozens of sketches are made before a piece can take shape. Mr Taylor said good plan ning and careful cutting can make a great piece as he even draws inspiration from other sculp tors. “The cutting process is sometimes very difficult. Sometimes the chainsaws rip up the wood so you have to be very careful. I try or attempt to do at least two of the sketches I make out of the dozen I draw. So it is really about planning. There is a magazine called Sculptural Pursuit and they had a feature on this guy, I think he lives in Hawaii. He is doing the same thing but then I learned something from him because my pieces are very heavy. What he does is when he cuts his shape out, he cuts out a hollow but I am taking my sculptures further because I’m doing figures,” Mr Taylor said. Mr Taylor said it is his hope in the future to see a visual arts school in the Bahamas because of the amount of talent this country has. “I think we are ready for that right now – a specific arts school with painting, sculpture, drawing. I think it will be a success.” The many faces of wood FROM page 10 Plywood sculpture showing a males head. Mode Iles Ltd. presents gifts to BTVI’s fashion dept. STUDENTS from BTVI gather with Shirley Pearson (2nd from left), Brynda Knowles, Dr Iva Dahl, Arianne Etuk (3rd from right school for their support at IWFW last November.

PAGE 19

C M Y K The Tribune SECTIONB I N S I D E Bread done right See page six WEDNESDAY, MAY 20, 2009 The Bahamas Humane Society’s Dog Fun Day S ee page seven n By ALEX MISSICK Tribune Features Reporter amissick@tribunemedia.net A R TIS T S can t ak e any medium and turn it into something grand and mind blowing. Some use mud, others use paints, however, ar tist Max T a ylor takes a common materialply wood and recreates the human f or m t hr ough his sculptures. Mr Taylor has been an artist for about 50 years immersing himself in all artistic mediums being a potter, sculptor, ceramic artist and printmaker. “I started at the Chelsea Pottery, where the main post office is now, back in 1962 being an apprentice with the likes of Eddie Minnis, and Vernon Cambridge. The Chelsea Pottery was an opportunity for many young artists. It was a place where you could just walk in if you wanted to learn,” Mr Taylor said. Mr Taylor said when it comes to creating his plywood sculptures, it is not as difficult as it may seem to construct the pieces. “You get three quarter inch plywood, cut out the shape and you glue all the pieces together. After you glue the pieces together they are almost SEE page eight wood of The many faces Plywood sculpturew ith ceramic masks in the center. Two headed sculpture. Plywood sculpture of male head. A ceramic bowl with painted conch shell. Plywood sculpture of the female form.


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BAHAMAS EDITION

www.tribune242.com

WEDNESDAY, MAY 20, 2009

CARS FOR SALE,
a
a i

favours claims

Allegations
surround two
senior Lands and
Surveys officers

m@ By PAUL G TURNQUEST
Tribune Staff Reporter
pturnquest@tribunemedia. net

CLAIMS of nepotism continue
to plague the Department of
Lands and Surveys when it was
alleged yesterday that the wives
of two senior officers in that
department, and other close rela-
tives had been granted Crown
land on Abaco.

In The Tribune’s efforts to
obtain documentation to sub-
stantiate these claims, it was
revealed that certain files at the
department were no longer acces-
sible by staff at this ministry.

However, where there
appeared to be an attempt to con-
ceal this information, it was for-
gotten that once the grants had
been approved they were record-
ed at the Register General’s
office.

It was here that it was discov-
ered that the wife and son of one
of the senior officials had received
an 18,343 square foot and a 15,635
square foot lot respectively. The
first parcel, granted in a subdivi-
sion south of Treasure Cay, Aba-
co was sold for $2,201.16 while
the second lot, on Wood Cay,
Abaco, was sold for $1,786.25.

SEE page eight




Liter

SEE PAGE ELEVEN



More than 20

potential buyers

for Emerald Bay

Receivers
keep their
identities
under wraps

HEAVY RAIN TAKES ITS TOLL ON STREETS OF NASSAU







THE STORMY WEATHER
yesterday caused flood-
ing problems throughout
New Providence, with
this man stopped from
getting to his business by
the water.

more photos of the after-
math of the morning rain.

Felipé Major/Tribune staff

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Tim Clarke/Tribune staff

THE FRONT portion of the Central Detective Unit building collapsed yesterday.

Extreme weather leads to
canopy collapse at CDU

m By TANEKA THOMPSON
Tribune Staff Reporter
tthompson@tribunemedia.net

EXTREME weather conditions
ripped through the Central Detec-
tive Unit yesterday morning leading
to the collapse of a steel canopy at
the front of the building and heavy
flooding at the adjacent Criminal
Records Office on Thompson Boule-
vard.

Torrential rain and wind, which
tore through the capital yesterday
morning, led to the partial collapse of
the building after 10 am yesterday,
although there were reports that tor-
nado like conditions "shook" the
building before the canopy fell in.

"Persons been telling us they saw
a tornado this morning and some
persons are saying that they felt the

SEE page eight

new printed
tees & tanks



Located on Ernest & Mackey Streets # Mon-Fri 10am-4pm + Sat 10am-2p














INSIDE

TALK SHOW HOST ACCUSED

OF TAKING ADVANTAGE OF

THOSE SEEKING HIS HELP
PAGE THREE

FIRM SAYS
BUREAUCRACY
GETTING IN WAY OF
FIXING TRAFFIC LIGHTS

PAGE FIVE
PRO-GAMBLING GROUP
LOOKS TOWARDS
INDUSTRY TRAINING
FOR BAHAMIANS

PAGE SIX



NASSAU AND BAHAMA

ISLANDS’ LEADING NEWSPAPER



m@ By MEGAN
REYNOLDS
Tribune Staff Reporter
mreynolds@
tribunemedia. net

MORE than 20 interested
parties are considering buy-
ing the Emerald Bay Resort
and Marina in Exuma but
receivers are keeping their
identities under wraps.

Russell Downs, a repre-
sentative for receivers Price-
waterhouseCoopers, told
The Tribune yesterday he
did not wish to reveal the
names of the bidders to
avoid a public auction and
because confidentiality
agreements have been
signed.

However, Mr Downs did
confirm there are around
two dozen interested buy-
ers, some which have shown
interest in Emerald Bay
before, and some which are
new to the development.

The Emerald Bay Resort
and Marina, Four Seasons
Hotel and golf course, will
close temporarily on May
26, leaving around 500
employees out of work,
while receivers and creditors
attempt to secure investors
to acquire the project and
assume the management
contract with the Four Sea-
sons Management Group.

SEE page eight

Downpours
are expected
to continue

OCCASIONAL downpours
are expected over the next four to
five days as a low pressure sys-
tem moving slowly northeast
from the Gulf of Mexico contin-
ues to head towards the north-
west Bahamas.

Meanwhile another low pres-
sure system off the eastern coast
of Cuba, which was being moni-
tored by forecasters on Monday,
is no longer a threat to the
Bahamas.

Yesterday the National Hurri-
cane Centre in Florida reported
that the weak area of low pres-
sure located near the central
Bahamas was becoming absorbed
by a larger non-tropical low cen-
tred over Florida.

The NHC said development of
that system appeared unlikely and
a hurricane hunter mission sched-
uled for yesterday was subse-
quently cancelled.

"That low pressure system in

SEE page eight

Mel aidleile lad
PAGE 2, WEDNESDAY, MAY 20, 2009

LOCAL NEWS

THE TRIBUNE





THIS CAR is
left under
water after
two hours of
rain.






THIS RESIDENT is calling upon Government to fix
this road as for years it has stopped him from get-

ting to his business on Mackey Street.

CARS IN PINE WOOD
had to drive slowly
because of high waters
from a two hour down
fall.



SCENES of flooding from around Nassau yesterday after
torrential showers pummelled the island throughout the
morning. Those who had been wishing for an end to the
drought, which had taken hold over the last few months,
may have got too much of a good thing.

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Nb A

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TLUeeM USL RRORSESU Lae eect m ee) melee
Monday May léth - 25th
Bay Street
John Hardy creates designs that are in balance with
nature and fashion
VaR esl Meme OSU O Same ne AY
‘No purchase hecessary

Bee Ue eae eee reread eee ns ea) Ce erage



‘My sister was
nearly crushed
y a Mack truck’

m@ By MEGAN REYNOLDS
Tribune Staff Reporter
mreynolds@tribunemedia.net

A BROTHER is calling for
stricter regulations of heavy-
duty cargo trucks after his sis-
ter was nearly crushed by a
Mack truck weeks after anoth-
er brother died in a truck col-
lision.

Angelo Knowles launched
a petition on the Internet after
a Mack truck ploughed into
the car of his sister, Monica
Knowles, at the Paradise
Island Bridge toll booth on
Friday.

Her traumatising accident
came just seven weeks after
their brother, Peter Knowles,
a 32-year-old married father
of two, was killed when his
scooter collided with a truck at
the junction of JFK Drive and
Prospect Ridge on March 26.

Now Angelo Knowles, 30,
is urging Bahamians to call for
greater safety on the streets
by signing the petition on the
website: www.bahamasis-
sues.com.

Supportive comments have
flooded the site under Mr
Knowles’ account of his sis-
ter’s horrific accident and the
collision that caused his broth-
er’s untimely death, but the
petition on the website’s new
“petitions” section had only
two signatures last night.

Mr Knowles said: “This is
ridiculous; my brother gets
killed and my sister almost
dies in an accident.

“Lots of people are aware
that something should be
done, but I want us to do
something about it by signing
the petition, so something can
be done.

“T’m appalled by the situa-
tion of these trucks on the
road. I have heard about truck
drivers drinking in the bar and
speeding off into the night like
speed racers.

“There are no service
checks so the brakes, lights
and mirrors may not be there,
and the companies who own
these trucks, it’s like they’re
not checking.

“And it’s been going on for
too long, more lives are going
to be lost.”

Monica Knowles told The
Tribune how a truck came
barreling towards her sound-
ing its horn as she stopped to
activate the transponder in the
far right lane of the Paradise
Island bridge. She felt the
impact immediately as the

Man lashes out weeks after
brother dies in truck collision

elipé Major/Tribune staff

wL



FLASHBACK: The scooter lies under the dump truck after the fatal



i,

accident weeks ago which killed Peter Knowles.

truck crushed the left side of
her car. Miss Knowles said:
“Everything was getting
crushed and I watched every-
thing crumple on the side of

Don’t miss tomorrow’s
edition of The Tribune for

4
Bvehumane

The Bahamas Humane Society

ANIMALFUNDAY

HIGHLIGHTS

MAIN/SPORTS SECTION

Local News

Editorial/Letters. ..........

Pilbceo oro cl

See Me ante Manaus meeneRenct asa: P4

CLASSIFIED SECTION 40 PAGES

INSERTS - LITTLE SWITZERLAND

USA TODAY MAIN SECTION 12 PAGES



me — I just couldn't believe it.

“T was just waiting to black
out and it felt like it lasted for-
ever. Then I realised it had
stopped and I looked around
at my body and I was fine.”

Miss Knowles only escaped
the impact because her car
was a right-hand drive — unlike
the vast majority of cars on
the island.

“Tt felt like a miracle,” she
said. The truck driver told
Miss Knowles his brakes had
failed, she said. Miss Knowles’
brother claims there was an
open beer bottle in the truck.
He has posted a photograph
of it on Bahamas Issues.

His petition calls for drivers
to take a mandatory mental
and physical exam twice a
year to ensure they are of
sound mind and able to drive
on the busy and crowded Nas-
sau streets. Signatories also
demand that heavy duty com-
mercial trucks are thoroughly
inspected to ensure brakes
cannot fail. Mr Knowles said:
“My brother is dead and left
many grieving souls. The truck
driver is back on the road
again. I haven't met or heard
from this guy. I don't even
know his name.

“But whoever you are, I
pray that you and all the oth-
er truck drivers be more care-
ful and cautious when you dri-
ve and that you be more
aware of your surroundings,
so that you do not miss and
kill somebody else's brother,
father, uncle, cousin, sister,
mother, aunt, or friend.”

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THE TRIBUNE

WEDNESDAY, MAY 20, 2009, PAGE 3



Talk show host accused of taking

advantage of those seeking his help

Accusations made
against Ortland Bodie

Man accused |
of having sex
with sister, 10

A MAN accused of hav-
ing sex with his 10-year-old
sister has been arraigned in
the Magistrates Court on an
incest charge.

The 24-year-old man is
accused of having inter-
course with his underage
sister on May 11, 2009.

The man, who was
arraigned in Court 6, Parlia-
ment Street on Monday,
was not required to enter a
plea to the incest charge.
He was granted bail in the
sum of $10,000 with two
sureties. The case has been
adjourned to August 17 for
the start of a preliminary
inquiry.

Three minor
shark attacks
are reported
in Florida

m@ NEW SMYRNA BEACH,
Fla.

AUTHORITIES say
three people received rela-
tively minor bites from
sharks off New Smyrna
Beach over the weekend,
according to Associated
Press.

Emergency officials say
two bites were reported
about five minutes apart on
Saturday morning. A third
bite was reported around
the same time of day Sunday
morning.

One of Saturday’s victims
was bitten on his hand but
was able to drive himself to
the hospital. Another man
was bitten on his foot and
required surgery. Sunday’s
victim was bit on the leg and
required several stitches.

Astronauts
say goodbye
to Hubble
for good

@ CAPE CANAVERAL,
Fla.

ATLANTIS’ astronauts
gingerly dropped the Hub-
ble Space Telescope over-
board Tuesday, sending the
restored observatory off on
a new voyage of discovery
and bidding it farewell on
behalf of the planet, accord-
ing to Associated Press.

Hubble — considered
better than new following
five days of repairs and
upgrades — will never be
seen up close by humans
again. This was NASA’s
last service call.

The shuttle and telescope
had just crossed the
Atlantic, and were soaring
350 miles above the coast of
northwestern Africa, when
astronaut Megan McArthur
used a robot arm to release
the snares gripping Hubble.
Then the shuttle slowly
backed away.

“Hubble has been
released,” reported com-
mander Scott Altman. “It’s
safely back on its journey of
exploration as we begin
steps to conclude ours.
Looking back on this mis-
sion, it’s been an incredible
journey for us as well.”

Mission Control radioed
congratulations: “It’s won-
derful to see Hubble, the
most famous scientific
instrument of all time, new-
ly upgraded and ready for
action thanks to you.”

With Hubble flying on its
own again, the seven astro-
nauts looked ahead to Fri-
day’s planned landing. But
first they had to inspect
their ship one last time to
make sure it had not been
smacked by space junk. The
telescope’s unusually high
orbit had placed the shuttle
and its crew at increased
risk and, because of the
lack of a refuge, prompted
NASA to keep a rescue
ship on standby until the
end of the 11-day flight.

During five consecutive
days of spacewalks loaded
with drama, Atlantis’ crew
labored tirelessly on the 19-
year-old observatory. Four
men working in teams of
two gave the telescope two
new high-powered science
instruments and a suite of
other up-to-date equip-
ment, and fixed two broken
instruments, something nev-
er before attempted in
orbit.

m@ By ALISON LOWE
Tribune Staff Reporter
alowe@tribunemedia.net

SELF-STYLED hero of the down-
trodden, controversial talk show host
Ortland Bodie has been accused of
using his position to take advantage
of Bahamians who have come to him
looking for help.

Benson Beneby and Patrick Smith
told The Tribune that they want to
warn other disadvantaged people
“who may not know their rights”
about what happened to them so
that they can avoid getting into the
same situation.

Mr Beneby, a courier, claimed
that through his radio programme
Mr Bodie has said “he’s going to
assist Bahamian people.” However,
in his case, he claims he discovered
otherwise.

He and Mr Smith were sued by
Mr Bodie for hundreds of dollars
that they refused to pay for “con-
sultation and research services” the
disbarred attorney claimed he did
on their behalf after they separately
approached him in his capacity as a
radio personality.

The pair claim they received let-
ters demanding payment for the
alleged services and threatening
legal action, before being summoned
to court last Wednesday, although
they denied making any written or
verbal agreement with Mr Bodie.

Meanwhile, despite his previously
vigorous pursuit of the funds, Mr
Bodie failed to show up in court,
causing Magistrate James Moxey to
dismiss the suits against the men.

Attorney for Mr Smith, Jairam
Mangra of the Lockhart and Munroe

eee ee ett

THE GOVERNMENT yesterday announced
the closure of a public road due to the long-
awaited commencement of construction on the

national stadium.

Tim Clarke/Tribune staff [

Appeal Court challenge over Senior
Justice Allen decision continues

The Ministry of Youth, Sports and Culture
advised the public that the main entrance road
leading to the Thomas A Robinson stadium has
been closed to vehicular and pedestrian traffic in
light of the work in the vicinity of the

law firm, told The Tribune yester-
day that the suit was “frivolous,
vexatious and an abuse of the
court.”

In the case of Mr Beneby, who
also turned to the law firm for guid-
ance, paying $200 for its advice, Mr
Mangra confirmed that it was also
their recommendation in his case
that the suit could not be substanti-
ated.

“We advised Mr Beneby that he
didn’t really need an attorney at all,”
said Mr Mangra.

Court

After meeting in court, the men
agreed the host “had to be exposed”
for what he had done to them.

On Friday the normally vocal Mr
Bodie, who airs daily on More94.fm,
told The Tribune not “to get
involved in private matters between
people” and threatened legal action
if an article is published.

Pressed as to why he failed to
show up to court, he said only that
Mr Beneby “should not be calling
you about this.”

“If you publish something about a
private matter between myself and
Mr Beneby I will do what I have to
do,” he said.

Revealing the series of events that

Queen Elizabeth Sports Centre.

cause.”



“A new roadway has been constructed at the
Thompson Boulevard and Moss Road intersec-
tion to facilitate entry to the Thomas A Robin-
son stadium,” said a statement from the ministry.

“The ministry seeks the cooperation of the
public during the construction phase and regrets
and inconvenience this new arrangement may

led to last Wednesday’s court
date, Mr Beneby claimed he first
approached Mr Bodie last year as
he had thought he might be inter-
ested in publicly discussing a judg-
ment he had been awarded in 2006,
which the defendant in the case had
refused to pay.

Feeling that he had exhausted his
legal avenues, Mr Beneby’s hope
was that through receiving a public
airing on the radio, the defendant
might feel pressured to pay the costs
awarded to him by the court.

But he said it was his impression
that all Mr Bodie was interested in
was charging him money to do things
other than talk on the radio.

“He was doing a radio show in Fox
Hill. As he was leaving I went up to
him in his car and gave him a copy of
the judgment with my contact
details.

“Two weeks later he called me ...
he said he’d had a look at it and this
was what he could do for me: He’d
charge me $500 to go and file a sum-
mons on my behalf and have some-
one serve it.

“T told him, ‘Pll get back to you
when I’m ready’. I left and I never
called him back: I already had a
lawyer, if I wanted something like
that ’'d have asked him to do it,” he
said. He said he went on to ignore
several more proposals of the same

MORLEY
FOR

kind from the talk show host before
he received the court summons.

In Mr Smith’s case, Mr Smith
claims he turned to Mr Bodie after
the host announced on the radio that
he would “help any Bahamian that
needed help with a legal problem.”

“T took him up on his offer and
apparently that’s the worst experi-
ence I ever had,” said Mr Smith, who
was hoping the talk show host could
offer him some advice on a land dis-
pute. He claimed he was hit with an
unexpected demand for $500 for Mr
Bodie’s “services.”

Letters

When he refused to pay, he too
was sent threatening letters, then
later sued and called to court. He
ultimately paid $700 to the law firm
Lockhart and Munroe to fight the
$300 suit the host put to him.

“Basically the attorney cost me the
more than (Bodie) wanted but I
don’t care cos I’m not going to pay
(Bodie) any amount of money,” said
Mr Smith.

Both men said they feel it is likely
that other people who might have
gone to the talk show host in the
hope for assistance might have been
put in the same position. “Bahami-
ans who don’t know their rights are
going to pay him before they go to
court,” said Mr Beneby.

He claims he forwarded copies of
the summons and the letter sent to
him by Mr Bodie to More94.fm
CEO Galen Saunders.

Mr Saunders declined to comment
on the men’s claims, directing this
newspaper to speak with Mr Bodie.

Great selection of Belts
fo complete any attire!!/

y

@ By NATARIO McKENZIE
Tribune Staff Reporter

THE APPEAL court challenge
over Senior Justice Anita Allen’s
decision not to recuse herself
from a civil case continued yes-
terday with an attorney submit-
ting that Justice Allen had not
demonstrated any inappropriate
behavior to suggest she could not
hear the case in a proper and judi-
cious manner.

“That is not to say that the
judge acted perfectly in all
respects. To say that there was
any lack of perfection or judicial
error by the learned judge, it did
not rise to the level to cause a
well informed observer to think
that there was a real possibility
of bias or apparent bias,” Attor-
ney Brian Moree submitted to
the Court of Appeal yesterday.

In March, Senior Justice Allen
refused to recuse herself from a
case involving Israeli brothers
Rami and Amir Weissfisch. On
his second point, Mr Moree who
is representing the children of
Amir Weissfisch contended that
at no time did Justice Allen
behave in a manner or express
herself in a way which demon-
strated to the informed fair mind-
ed observer that she had a closed
mind on the admissibility and or
weight to be given to the report
made by accountant Daniel Fer-
guson.

Mr Moree also submitted that
Justice Allen did not demonstrate
through her comments or behav-
ior that she had a concluded view
of the direction to be given in the
event that the accountants report
was not approved.

Justice Allen had expressed
concerns about the integrity of a
forensic accounting report pre-
pared by Mr Ferguson, who had
been appointed by Justice Lyons

to work on the Weissfisch case. In
a highly publicized ruling by Jus-
tice Allen, it was revealed that
Justice Lyons shared “more than
a friendship” with Mr Ferguson’s
sister who also assisted in prepar-
ing the report.

Mr Moree yesterday also ques-
tioned the accuracy of the notes
taken by Nicholas Lavender, QC,
who is representing Rami Weiss-
fisch. Mr Lavender who was the
only person taking notes during
the meeting in chambers in
March, had previously argued
that it was Justice Allen who first
raised the issue of her recusal by
stating, “I would be happy to
recuse myself.”

“Mr Moree contended that
that Mr Lavender’s notes were
not complete and not in context.
Court of Appeal President Dame
Joan Sawyer noted however that
the appellate court has no other
record of what transpired during
that meeting in chambers.

Dame Joan noted that the
court transcripts showed that
when the matter had resumed in
open court, the judge did not
deny making the statement but
said she didn’t recall saying it.

According to the transcripts,
after two attorneys in the case
told her that she had made the
statement she then said, “I stand
corrected.” She subsequently
however referred to her own rec-
ollection and after conferring with
her clarks, said that she had not
made the statement Dame Joan
noted.

Dame Joan noted that the
main issue was whether a fair
minded informed observer would
have a doubt as to whether or not
the judge had lost her objectivity
in regards to matter.

“Tt is not usual for a judge to
raise the issue of recusal unless
the judge anticipates that an issue

for the judge’s recusal has arisen,”
she said.

Mr Moree also argued that
when Justice Allen had used the
word ‘conflicted,’ she was not
implying that she would no longer
be able to deal the matter objec-
tively. Mr Moree however noted
that ‘concerned’ may have been
the more appropriate word to
use. Dame Joan questioned why a
judge would be conflicted about
something that didn’t affect her
personally.

Drinks Trelli
Coffee Table;
End Tables >

Cushions





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wa
PAGE 4, WEDNESDAY, MAY 20, 2009

EDITORIAL/LETTERS TO THE EDITOR

THE TRIBUNE





The Tribune Limited

NULLIUS ADDICTUS JURARE IN VERBA MAGISTRI
Being Bound to Swear to The Dogmas of No Master

LEON E. H. DUPUCH, Publisher/Editor 1903-1914

SIR ETIENNE DUPUCH, Kt, O.B.E., K.M., K.C.S.G.,

(Hon.) LL.D., D.Litt.

Publisher/Editor 1919-1972
Contributing Editor 1972-199]

EILEEN DUPUCH CARRON, C.M.G., M.S., B.A., LL.B.

Publisher/Editor 1972-

Published Daily Monday to Saturday

Shirley Street, RO. Box N-3207, Nassau, Bahamas
Insurance Management Building., P.O. F-485, Freeport, Grand Bahama

TELEPHONES
Switchboard (News, Circulation and Advertising) 322-1986
Advertising Manager - (242) 502-2352
Circulation Department - (242) 502-2387
Nassau Fax: - (242) 328-2398
Freeport, Grand Bahama: 1-(242)-352-6608

WEBSITE
www.tribune242.com — updated daily at 2pm

In praise of dullness

SHOULD CEOs read novels?

The question seems to answer itself. After
all, CEOs work with people all day. Novel-
reading should give them greater psychological
insight, a feel for human relationships, a greater
sensitivity toward their own emotional chords.

Sadly, though, most of the recent research
suggests that these are not the most important
talents for a person who is trying to run a com-
pany. Steven Kaplan, Mark Klebanov and
Morten Sorensen recently completed a study
called “Which CEO Characteristics and Abili-
ties Matter?”

They relied on detailed personality assess-
ments of 316 CEOs and measured their com-
panies’ performances. They found that strong
people skills correlate loosely or not at all with
being a good CEO. Traits like being a good lis-
tener, a good team builder, an enthusiastic col-
league, a great communicator do not seem to be
very important when it comes to leading suc-
cessful companies.

What mattered, it turned out, were execu-
tion and organizational skills. The traits that
correlated most powerfully with success were
attention to detail, persistence, efficiency, ana-
lytic thoroughness and the ability to work long
hours. In other words, warm, flexible, team-
oriented and empathetic people are less likely to
thrive as CEOs. Organized, dogged, anal-reten-
tive and slightly boring people are more likely to
thrive.

These results are consistent with a lot of work
that’s been done over the past few decades. In
2001, Jim Collins published a best-selling study
called “Good to Great.” He found that the best
CEOs were not the flamboyant visionaries.
They were humble, self-effacing, diligent and
resolute souls who found one thing they were
really good at and did it over and over again.

That same year Murray Barrick, Michael
Mount and Timothy Judge surveyed a century’s
worth of research into business leadership. They,
too, found that extroversion, agreeableness and
openness to new experience did not correlate
well with CEO success. Instead, what mattered
was emotional stability and, most of all, consci-
entiousness — which means being dependable,
making plans and following through on them.

All this work is a reminder that, while it’s
important to be a sensitive, well-rounded person
for the sake of your inner fulfilment, the market
doesn’t really care. The market wants you to fill
an organizational role.

The market seems to want CEOs to offer a
clear direction for their companies. There’s a
tension between being resolute and being flex-
ible. The research suggests it’s more important

Quality Auto Sales
PRE-OWNED CARS & TRUCKS

to be resolute, even at the cost of some flexi-
bility.

The second thing the market seems to want
from leaders is a relentless and somewhat mind-
numbing commitment to incremental efficiency
gains. Charismatic CEOs and politicians always
want the exciting new breakthrough — whether
it is the SUV or a revolutionary new car. The
methodical executives at successful companies
just make the same old four-door sedan, but
they make it better and better.

These sorts of dogged but diffident traits do
not correlate well with education levels. CEOs
with law or M.B.A. degrees do not perform
better than CEOs with college degrees. These
traits do not correlate with salary or compen-
sation packages. Nor do they correlate with
fame and recognition. On the contrary, a study
by Ulrike Malmendier and Geoffrey Tate found
that CEOs get less effective as they become
more famous and receive more awards.

What these traits do add up to is a certain ide-
al personality type. The CEOs that are most
likely to succeed are humble, diffident, relentless
and a bit unidimensional. They are often not the
most exciting people to be around.

For this reason, people in the literary, acad-
emic and media worlds rarely understand busi-
ness. It is nearly impossible to think of a novel
that accurately portrays business success. That’s
because the virtues that writers tend to admire
— those involving self-expression and self-
exploration — are not the ones that lead to
corporate excellence.

For the same reason, business and politics
do not blend well. Business leaders tend to per-
form poorly in Washington, while political lead-
ers possess precisely those talents — charisma,
charm, personal skills — that are of such limit-
ed value when it comes to corporate execution.

Fortunately, America is a big place. Literary
culture has thrived in Boston, New York and on
campuses. Political culture has thrived in Wash-
ington. Until recently, corporate culture has
been free to thrive in such unlikely places as
Bentonville, Omaha and Redmond.

Of course, that’s changing. We now have an
administration freely interposing itself in the
management culture of industry after industry.
It won’t be the regulations that will be costly,
but the revolution in values. When Washington
is a profit centre, CEOs are forced to adopt
the traits of politicians. That is the insidious
way that other nations have lost their competi-
tive edge.

(This article was written by David Brooks —
c.2009 New York Times News Service).



For the best deal in town on
pre-owned cars, with eT
de-ins on new car sales

I envisage a
brain drain

economic

sectors

LETTERS

EDITOR, The Tribune.

Once again I remain amazed
by our political leaders.

This time my amazement is
attributed to recent statements
made relative to the employment
of a foreigner for the post of
Director of Policy of the new
Utilities Regulatory and Compe-
tition Authority (URCA).

I recall the statement being
somewhat to the effect that “no
suitable Bahamian persons were
found that would qualify to fill
the post and that this person’s
salary would be much higher than
similar positions of any existing
public service company” — or
something like that. Basically,
Bahamians you are too incompe-
tent and unqualified to set policy
and/or regulate your own utilities
and communications sector — ha
take that like a swift kick to you
know where!

I wonder if in the United States
of America or other major coun-
tries would feel the same of its
citizens. Senior members of the
now defunct Public Utilities Com-

letters@tribunemedia net



mission (PUC) should be upset.

I think that it is high time we
discontinue this apparent “diss-
ing” of our citizens when it comes
to the appointment of senior per-
sons in both the private and pub-
lic sectors. Bahamians, in my
view, are more than qualified to
assume policy and regulatory
roles in this country.

A lot of us have proven our-
selves abroad and locally.

The message that we are send-
ing our current and future career
seekers is clear — you are not
worthy to lead.

I totally envision a braindrain
in our economic sectors.

Young professionals will
increasingly opt to not come back
home to contribute to nation
building.

As I look through the want ads,
I see jobs for handymen, maids,

salespersons and the occasional
Bank/Finance jobs, where
increasingly they are adding a lan-
guage requirement with no sug-
gestion of even offering language
training.

Personally, I spent 12 years
working at a major telecommu-
nications company in the USA in
specialised areas, the last being
negotiating international settle-
ment rates between the telecom-
munications company and foreign
telecommunications carriers sav-
ing monies — still can’t get a job
at the Bahamas Telecommunica-
tions Corporation (BTC) — per-
haps I’m not qualified or compe-
tent either — duh!

Well, Bahamians time to go
fishing, farming and selling
phonecards on the street.

And don’t forget to keep on
playing numbers to try to supple-
ment your income. That’s the way
it looks from here!

FRANKLYN
“DOOM” MUNROE
Nassau,

May 14, 2009.

Learning from France and Canada

EDITOR, The Tribune.

Please allow me a brief space
in your column to voice a slightly
leftist view on the topic of gov-
ernment involvement in econom-
ic recovery, and as a response to
Mr. Lowe’s ever growing extreme
right wing views on this topic.

I will start by stating that I have
had the privilege to have lived in
two countries which embrace
more left or socialist views, those
being France during the mid
eighties, and Canada for the entire
decade of the 1990s. My observa-
tions and experiences have been
this:

In France, possibly one of the
wealthiest countries on the planet
with a standard of living most of
us would kill for, there is an infra-
structure there that surpasses any
that I have seen elsewhere in the
world, with a public transporta-
tion system to boot and a nation-
al health care system that takes
care of its citizens in times of
need.

Likewise in Canada, again an
extremely wealthy country with a
relatively low national debt and
which — with the exception of
this year alone — has had sur-
pluses for over 20 years in its
annual budgets. There I experi-
enced a very developed country
with superior infrastructure,
health care benefits and a stan-
















Constant Working
Pressure Hoses

dard of living for the majority of
its citizens that many elsewhere
on the planet envy.

My observation was that in
both of these countries there is
heavy government involvement.
But the government involvement
in these cases is not so much
financed by debt, but rather
through sensible and equitable tax
systems. One only has to look in
particular at the debt of Canada
to clearly see that as a result of
sound budget management and
accountability it is a country that
has been able to finance its social
programmes and infrastructural
development through a sensible
and equitable tax system and not
exorbitant debt which has been
the tactic of its southern neigh-
bour.

In fact this brings to mind a
very interesting comment made
by famous Canadian author Mar-
garet Atwood, who, when asked
why Canada hadn’t experienced a
similar banking financial crisis as
that experienced to the south, she
simply said, “Well you see in
Canada the Scotts arrived, and
although it may be fair weather
today sooner or later you’ll have
to pay for it! And indeed much
of the world is doing just that.
You see in Canada the capitaliza-
tion requirements for banks is
about 2 to 3 times that of both
the US and UK banking systems.”
Makes sense don’t you think?

The point Iam making is that
government involvement is an
ongoing necessity, particularly
now with the stimulus package
proposed by the Obama adminis-
tration. The private system is just
too damaged to work on its own;
therefore, there is definite need
for government intervention.
Unfortunately, due to the exis-
tence of excessive debt in the US,
partially attributed to ineffective
taxation, the cost of this package

is going to have to be borne by
future generations for many years
to come.

In conclusion, I will say this,
any country, particularly one that
has attained a certain size, must, in
order to ensure the interest of the
majority of its citizens, have a gov-
ernment that enforces an equi-
table method of taxation — and
by this I mean, yes it must tax on
the ability to pay so that the Bill
Gates of the world contribute to
the benefit of all so that their fel-
low countrymen have schools,
roads, and health care benefits
and thus form a healthier society
overall. Generally, the more gov-
ernment intervention and social
programmes a country has, the
lower the crime rate; I don’t think
I have to tell you how the crime
rates of both France and Canada
are negligible as compared to
those in say the US and Mexico.
Here in The Bahamas we have
government debt principally
because government has not
implemented an equitable tax sys-
tem, and secondly it is ineffective
in collecting the taxes that it has
imposed. The result: The Trea-
sury is broke.

So, as our Government is not
able to provide the benefits that
its people so desperately need, I
try to do my bit on a micro level
such that the company I currently
run offers both a health care plan
and a pension benefit plan for
ALL employees. Less money in
my pocket at the end of the day
for sure, but I sleep better at night
knowing my employees have cov-
erage. I would only hope that
some of the extreme right wing
companies here in The Bahamas

offer the same — somehow I
doubt it.
RICHARD PERRY PINDER
Nassau,
May 18, 2009.

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THE TRIBUNE

WEDNESDAY, MAY 20, 2009, PAGE 5



LOCAL NEWS



0 In brief

Young man
who iedin
traffic accident |
is identified
@ By DENISE
MAYCOCK
Tribune Freeport
Reporter

dmaycock@
tribunemedia.net

<

FREEPORT - The young
man who lost his life in a
traffic accident on Grand
Bahama on the weekend
has been identified as 19-
year-old Willie Rodgers of
Garden Villas.

Mr Rodgers became the
island’s sixth traffic fatality
for the year early Sunday
morning when he lost con-
trol of a Dodge Ram 1500
truck, which overturned and
crashed on Pinta Avenue
near Bahamia Arms.

He was taken to hospital
and was pronounced dead
on arrival.

His passenger, 19-year-old
Loudie Cinrus of Hunters,
was ejected from the vehicle
but survived the crash.

Asst Supt Emrick Sey-
mour said that Cinrus has
since been discharged from
the hospital.

Police are urging
motorists to slow down and
drive with care and caution
on the street.

Govt fast-tracks
roat works
programme

THE government has
fast-tracked its road works
programme as Nassau pre-
pares for the International
Federation of Association
Football (FIFA) Congress
and the Miss Universe
Pageant.

Public Works and Trans-
port Minister Neko Grant
signed a $2,436,504 contract
with Bahamas Hot Mix on
Monday for the paving and
patching of the stretch of
Bay Street from Blake
Road to Mackey Street.

“As a result of hosting
the FIFA Congress and the
Miss Universe Pageant, the
government has fast-
tracked its road works pro-
gramme for the northwest-
ern coastal roads and Bay
Street to ensure that the
route between the Lynden
Pindling International Air-
port (LPIA) and Paradise
Island is an enjoyable one
for Bahamians and our visi-
tors,” said Minister Grant.

Mr Grant explained that
officers from his ministry
evaluated the main vehicu-
lar route for access to the
Paradise Island Bridge from
LPIA via Blake Road, West
Bay Street, Marlborough
Street, Navy Lion Road and
Bay Street.

As a result, they recog-
nised the need to improve
the road for an enjoyable
and safe ride, he said.

The road works, which
began May 15, may necessi-
tate closing sections of Bay
Street and re-routing traffic
during the construction
period. Otherwise, he said,
the roadway will be
reduced to one-lane traffic.

The work will be carried
out from Monday to Sunday
(not including Fridays)
from 7pm to 6am and Mon-
day to Sunday (not includ-
ing Fridays) from 9.30am to
3.30pm.

“Efforts will be taken to
mitigate the inconvenience
to the motoring public,”
said Mr Grant.

“Accordingly, motorists
are encouraged to reduce
speed and exercise caution
when driving through the
work areas, to obey the
traffic management mea-
sures put in place and to, if
at all possible, avoid the
work areas as delays will be
experienced.”

Mr Grant acknowledged
and thanked the team from
his ministry for their contri-
butions. They are, perma-
nent secretary Colin Higgs;
acting director of Works
Gordon Major; project
engineers Dion Munroe and
Robert Garraway, and
Nicole Campbell, undersec-
retary.

Ebbie Saidi, managing
director of Bahamas Hot
Mix, thanked the govern-
ment for the contract.

The work, he said, has to

Firm says bureaucracy getting
in way of fixing traffic lights



m By ALISON LOWE
Tribune Staff Reporter
alowe@tribunemedia. net

A LOCAL company contracted by gov-
ernment to repair faulty traffic lights wants
the authorities to let them do their job
without bureaucratic interference.

Matthew Williams, project coordinator
for Hypower, said were it not for the long
delays in receiving permission from the
Ministry of Works to repair and maintain
signals there would be far fewer problems
for motorists.

“It would be perfect if we had blanket
permission. We could get a call from the
public, the police, BEC, and instead of
waiting for weeks or days we could fix it
immediately,” he said.

“We are hoping that (the government)
will embrace the fact that we are local guys
and let us go ahead and do it,” added Mr
Williams, referring to the fact that the gov-
ernment previously contracted out the
responsibility to a foreign company.

His comments come as faulty traffic
lights continue to plague drivers.

These blinking and damaged signals,
photographed yesterday, contributed to
dangerous driving conditions for those tra-
versing the island.

This was despite the fact that, according
to Mr Williams, his company repaired

almost 20 traffic signals last weekend.

“We fix whatever they give us permis-
sion to fix. On Friday afternoon we got
the go-ahead (from the Ministry) and so
from Friday until Sunday we worked all
weekend to fix those intersections,” said
Mr Williams.

Among those were the traffic lights at
the intersection of Thompson Boulevard
and the entrance to the Queen Elizabeth
Sports Centre. The lack of traffic control at
the site had made it dangerous and chaot-
ic for weeks.

Also corrected were lights at the junc-
tions of: Wulff Road and Mackey Street,
Kemp and Parkgate roads, Cowpen road
and Faith Avenue, Robinson Road and
Claridge Road.

“There are 60 plus intersections in New
Providence. If in two days we can deal with
over 20 some intersections, it goes to show
we have the manpower and everything we
need to do the job. It’s just a matter of
authorisation,” said Mr Williams.

A message left for Minister of Works
Neko Grant on the matter was not
returned yesterday afternoon. Mr Grant,
who described the light problems as a
“nightmare” earlier this month, was in
Cabinet.

Motorists are asked to call the Ministry
of Works on 322-4830 or Hypower on 380-
8064 to report faulty lights.

Laing defends decision to liquidate CLICO (Bahamas)

@ By ALISON LOWE
Tribune Staff Reporter
alowe@tribunemedia.net

THE Government yesterday
sought to explain why it made the
“agonising” decision to liquidate
CLICO (Bahamas).

Minister of State for Finance
Zhivargo Laing defended the
move in face of Opposition claims
that government overreacted and
could have kept the ailing insurer
working.

Fox Hill MP Fred Mitchell not-
ed that under the not yet enforced
Insurance Act 2005, there is a
provision that gives government
an alternative to liquidating the
company.

Under that provision, a judi-
cial manager can be appointed to
keep in operation but take over
the day-to-day management of
an insurer — as happened in the
case of CLICO (Guyana) — if it
is found to be putting its policy-
holders at risk.

According to Mr Mitchell, the
existence of the provision under
the 2005 leglisation means that
despite Mr Ingraham’s assertion
earlier in parliament that while it
“would have been wonderful if
the Bahamian government could
have done the same” it lacked
the legal opportunity to do so,
the government could and should
have appointed such a manager.

AITGCORNIG



“It didn’t make sense for the
company to be declared insol-
vent,” he said.

But while agreeing that this was
in theory an option, Mr Laing
said that under the circumstances,
liquidation was the safest move
government could take to protect
policyholders.

“The new registrar of insur-
ance, when he came to office,
determined that it needed to be
dealt with expeditiously,” said Mr
Laing, referring to evidence that
CLICO had compromised its abil-
ity to meet the needs of its poli-
cyholders in view of a huge loan it
had made to a subsidiary abroad
that showed little likelihood of
being repaid.

Senator: intended BTC sale under
PLP govt ‘would have been bad deal’

m By DENISE MAYCOCK
Tribune Freeport Reporter
dmaycock@tribunemedia.net

THE intended sale of the Bahamas Telecommunication Company
(BTC) under the former PLP government would have been a bad deal
for the Bahamian people, said Senator Kay Smith, parliamentary sec-

retary in the Prime Minister’s Office.

Mrs Smith’s remarks came during her contribution in the Senate to the

Communications Bill.

She said in the days and hours leading up to the 2007 General Elec-
tions, the Government intended to sell BTC to Bluewater on a payment

plan.

Senator Smith noted that negotiations were progressed to an advanced
stage to sell BTC to Bluewater for $260 million.

As a part of that deal, she said Bluewater would immediately have
access to $130 million which was in the BTC bank account at that time.

“The former Prime Minister (Perry Christie) described the $130 mil-
lion in the BTC account as “enterprise money”.

“My description of that money is simply dollars and cents intended to
mask the fact that the Bluewater offer was effectively significantly less
than was being touted,” said Senator Smith.

“The former Prime Minister also characterized the Bluewater deal as
a great deal. I agree. But I ask, “for whom?”

In addition to enterprisingly having access to the $130 million in the
BTC account, Senator Smith said Bluewater was to be given a seven year

cellular exclusivity license.

She noted that BTC was earning annual profits of $50 million at the

time.

“Without any improvement in BTC’s operations; profits of $350 mil-
lion would be earned over the seven year period with Bluewater being
entitled to 49 per cent; which amounts to approximately $175 million of

this sum.

“Monies virtually guaranteed from profits; plus the ‘enterprise mon-
ey’, would effectively mean that Bluewater would have been given BTC
for free. Yes, Madam President, a good deal but certainly not for the

Bahamian people,” she said.

Caves Village Professional
CRUST CE

“The premier choice for serious business”

1,661 sq. ft.
1,083 sq. ft.
839 sq. ft.
850 sq. ft.

$5,813.50 p. month incl. CAM Fees
$3,790.00 p. month incl. CAM Fees
$2,936.50 p. month incl. CAM Fees
$2,975.00 p. month incl. CAM Fees

“If we sought (to protect poli-
cyholders) by bringing this law
into force...you would have had to
serve notice on the company that
you want to conduct an investi-
gation on the company. Then 30
days would have been required
for them to answer. Then you
would have to investigate the
company, and on completion of
your investigation you go to the
courts to petition them for judicial
management — and all the while
the problem which you consider
urgent (the risk posed to policy-
holders by the company’s mis-
management) are still continuing.

He suggested it would have
been irresponsible for the gov-
ernment not to have used its
existing powers.

“All the while, as blunt as they
might be, they allowed you to go
to the courts, put the company in
liquidation and take control of it

to prevent any further deteriora-
tion to protect policyholders,” he
said.

Parliamentarians debating the
amendments yesterday said that
once passed and enforced the
Insurance Act 2005 will provide a
greater number of options to deal
with insurance companies that do
not meet certain standards
deemed necessary to ensure they
are acting in the public interest
to a more empowered insurance
regulator.

This regulator, the Office of
the Registrar of Insurance, will
for the first time be overseen by a
newly formed Insurance Com-
mission.

Essentially making liquidation
a “last resort”, the new legisla-
tion would provide for a judicial
manager to be appointed if nec-
essary to dispose of the business
of a troubled insurance compa-

ya es ba ic

ny, or a “statutory administrator”
to temporarily step in for a period
of up to 90 days in cases where it
is deemed that an insurer is
engaging in “bad business prac-
tices” or may have solvency
issues.

On Wednesday, Sidney Collie
MP — also the legal representa-
tive for 200 CLICO (bahamas)
policyholders — lauded the step
towards moving away from liqui-
dation as a first resort, saying that
such a step is always costly and
lengthy and provides little assur-
ance to the company’s clients.

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PAGE 6, WEDNESDAY, MAY 20, 2009

THE TRIBUNE



LOCAL NEWS

Pro-gambling group looks towards
industry training for Bahamians

Turks and
Caicos officials
set for meetings
in London

PROVIDENCIALES,
Turks and Caicos
Islands - Premier Gal-
mo W Williams and his
Deputy Premier and
Minister of Finance
Royal S Robinson
left for London on
Tuesday to hold meet-
ings with high-level
officials in the United
Kingdom.

The objective of the
meetings are to change
the tone of the discus-
sion surrounding the
proposed suspension of
the Turks and Caicos
Islands 2006 Constitu-
tion.

0 In brief

Transparency

“The Deputy Premier
and I want to demon-
strate to Her Majesty’s
Government that our
administration has
made remarkable
strides in moving the
country forward along
the path of good gover-
nance and transparen-
cy,” Premier Williams
said.

Also, they are to
meet Prime Minister
Gordon Brown and
opposition leader David
Cameron.

“This year marks a
decade since the 1999
White Paper: 'Partner-
ship for Progress and
Prosperity’ which sets
out the policy of Her
Majesty’s Government
for strengthening and
modernising its rela-
tionship with the Over-
seas Territories.

“T believe it is time
for the leader of the UK
to meet with the leader
of the TCI,” Mr
Williams said.



IN ITS ongoing effort to have the
country’s gambling laws changed,
the Bahamas Gaming Reform Com-
mittee (BGR) is taking first steps to
ready Bahamians to take advantage
of the industry if and when it is
legalised for locals.

The BGR is advocating for the
legalisation of gaming in the
Bahamas under the control of locals
with optimum economic, social and
educational impact.

The committee said yesterday ina
statement that it has forged links
with leading experts in the gaming
field with a view to initiating the
necessary steps to put training pro-
grammes in place which would
ready Bahamians for the jobs that
legalised gambling will create.

BGR continues effort to
legalise gaming for locals

“It will look to internationally
recognised experts for advice and
insight to ensure legalised gaming in
the Bahamas employs responsible
methods to full advantage. Further
it has opened lines of communica-
tion with experts to shape progres-
sive policies in the interests of the
entire Bahamian nation,” BGR’s
chairman Sidney Strachan said.

“This is the sort of work the gov-
ernment should be doing. Sadly, this
has not been evident among our

elected officials. Bahamians want
gaming legalised, the evidence is
compelling to this effect. The BGR
is intent on paving the way with the
very best of systems, policies and
procedures to ensure the people of
this country benefit as it is their
right to expect.”

The BGR said that gaming is a
thriving industry worldwide.

“Virtually all modern democra-
cies operate and regulate gaming in
a controlled legalised context. The

end result is important revenue for
a bevy of important social, eco-
nomic and educational pro-
grammes.”

“Our government has its head in
the sand on gaming,” said Mr Stra-
chan. “It embarrassing and an
affront frankly. Arcane laws are
denying Bahamians access to more
than $20 million yearly in revenue
from gaming. In a country hungry
for jobs, legalised gaming could cre-
ate several hundred quality posi-
tions. Gaming proceeds could be
applied by government to countless
important social programmes to
help thousands of Bahamians.
Responsible men and women can-
not simply stand by while the gov-
ernment refuses to act.”

GBPA appoints vice president of
building and development services

FREEPORT - The Board of
Directors of the Grand Bahama
Port Authority (GBPA) yester-
day announced the appointment
of Arthur Jones as its vice-pres-
ident of building and develop-
ment services.

“Mr Jones has worked with
the GBPA group in the past and
brings with him a wealth of
experience with regard to
the technical planning
and development of the
City of Freeport,” said
Ian Rolle, GBPA
president.

In his capacity, Mr
Jones will be respon-
sible for town plan-
ning and project
manage-








-
Ci

ARTHUR Jones

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INTEREST WITH THE

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ment, building code and inspec-
tion, city (maintenance) man-
agement, environmental com-
pliance and geographical infor-
mation systems.

Mr Jones holds dual bachelor
degrees in both Arts and Sci-
ence with a concentration in Civ-
il Engineering.

Working in the field of resi-

dential and commercial con-
struction, his experience

has exposed him to pro-
jects in the northern

United States, Puerto

Rico, Syria, Jordan,

Saudi Arabia, Iran,
Iraq and at home, in
the Bahamas.

He is a engineer with-
in the community, pro-
viding services for many
businesses such as
Shoreline

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Club, Pelican Bay Hotel, and
Underwater Explorer’s Society
via his firm Nervee Engineer-

ing. ward to benefiting from his
“Mr Jones possesses strong

Ee RTL SUISUN












THE ROYAL Bahamas
Defence Force Monday
commissioned two new air-
craft which will improve its
reconnaissance and mar-
itime efforts by providing
surveillance over larger
areas while assisting in the
strategic deployment of sur-
face crafts.

Commander of the
Defence Force, Com-
modore Clifford “Butch”
Scavella, said the strategic
placement of the aircraft at
either of the Force’s north-
ern or southern commands
will provide for “concen-
trated and coordinated”
efforts being undertaken
between the air assets and
the vessels at sea.

















ey

leadership skills, has extensive
management experience, proven
track records and we look for-

insights and experience as a

—

ABOVE: National Security and Immigration Minister Tommy
Turnquest in the cockpit of the Cessna Caravan 208b.

member of the GBPA team in
the capacity of vice-president of
building and development ser-
vices,” said Hannes Babak,
chairman of GBPA.

ca















BAHAMIANS RAFAEL MUNNINGS (left) and Basil Smith celebrate Duke Ellington Day with the

legendary musicians’ grandchildren, Paul and Mercedes Ellington.

Bahamas teams up with New
York for Duke Ellington Day

NEW YORK - The Bahamas recently
teamed up with the city of New York to pay
tribute to one of the Bahamas’ famous visiting
musicians.

New York City Mayor Michael Bloomberg
declared April 29 Duke Ellington Day in hon-
our of the 110th anniversary of the jazz legend’s
birth. To commemorate his life, the Bahamas
sponsored a special run of the last surviving
1939 New York City ‘A’ Train, made famous
by Duke Ellington’s signature tune “Take the
A Train.”

The train was outfitted with the Bahamas’
logo and signage, and was dubbed
“The Bahamas Express” for the day’s special
events.

A regular visitor to the Bahamas, Duke
Ellington was known to play at the hottest
venues in Nassau in the 1950s and 60s with the
late Fred Munnings. His son, Rafael Munnings,
was present in New York to help commemo-

rate Duke Ellington Day. Additional special
guests in attendance included Duke Elling-
ton’s grandchildren Mercedes and Paul; stage,
screen and television performer Maurice Hines;
designer of the US Mint’s Ellington Quarter
Joel Iskowitz, and Stanley Kay, personal friend
of Duke Ellington.

To kick off the event, Paul Ellington, the
Duke Ellington Orchestra and musicians from
Music Under New York performed several
jazz hits on both the mezzanine at 125th Street
in Harlem and onboard the historic train as it
travelled to JFK airport. A natural tie-in, Jet
Blue crew members attended the event and
promoted the new $79 one-way fares from JFK
to Nassau.

The event was warmly received by the gen-
eral public and media alike, appearing promi-
nently on television stations like WABC-TV
and in print publications like The New York
Times.
PAGE 8, WEDNESDAY, MAY 20, 2009

THE TRIBUNE





Andros: a vastly different place

ORTH ANDROS -

Rivean Gibson Riley is
one of the few Bahamians who has
given his name to a geological fea-
ture.

A native of Staniard Creek —
"it's like a gated community except
we haven't got around to putting
up the gate yet" — Riley was the
first of an expedition to arrive at a
blue hole near Cargill Creek that
the accompanying researchers
promptly named after him.

That was eight years ago, when
he was just a young man wielding a
cutlass. But since then he has
earned an ecotourism degree at
Hocking College in Ohio, where
he made the Dean's list and won a
scholarship.

Hocking is one of many col-
leges that send students to the non-
profit Forfar Field Station near
Blanket Sound. According to its
website, students can "earn certi-
fication in SCUBA or sea kayak-
ing off the world’s third largest bar-
rier reef, learn the basics of blue
water sailing, and wind-surf around
uninhabited islands in The
Bahamas."

That doesn't sound like a hard-
ship assignment. But Riley has a
tough job these days convincing
his fellow Androsians that they can
benefit from the environment that
many of them regard as simply
bush to be scraped, swamp to be
filled or coastline to be polluted.

Riley has been interested in
nature since high school days, and
he enjoyed hanging out at the
Fofar Field Station where he
absorbed a lot of information.
Eventually he was able to save
enough to pay for tuition at Hock-
ing, living at the home of a pro-

fessor. And after graduation he
joined the Bahamas National Trust
as parks supervisor for Andros.

In fact, Riley was our guide on
a field trip to North Andros this
past weekend organised by the
BNT. And one of the first stops
on the itinerary was an inland blue
hole in the Central Andros Nation-
al Park, where he was able to put
his ecological training to good use.

The term “blue hole” first
appeared on charts of the Bahamas
in 1843, and there are thousands
scattered around the islands —
hundreds at Andros alone. Some
are inland and some offshore, but
each is a portal into an unknown
world. Scientists are discovering
new species and classes of animals
in these unique environments deep
underground, as well as ancient
fossils and human artifacts and
remains.

On Andros, many caves are
formed along coastal stress frac-
tures about a mile inland from the
offshore wall that plunges into the
Tongue of the Ocean. These 150-
kilometre-long cracks can easily
be seen from the air — and their
flooded passages can extend for
several kilometres underground.

The Lucayan word for a blue
hole was "coaybay'" — or house of
the dead — and they were fre-
quently used as burial chambers. In
fact, a ceremonial Lucayan canoe
was found in association with

and Crematoviam Limited

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TUT oem dente

Marine Wlechanic
GIOVANEY TRISTAN
DEAL, 20

of Coral Harbour, Coral Heights

will be held on Thursday May

2ist 2009 at 11:00am at Aion

Baptist Church East and Shirley

Street Officiating will be Pastor

T.G, Morrison, assisted by Rev

Ulric Smith, Rey. Anthony rm

Sampson, and Rey. Prince 0.

Bodie Interment will follow in Lakeview Memorial Crardens
John F. Kennedy Drive & Gladstone Road.

Left to reflect and treasure the memories of this magnificent
gem, is his father: George “Gio” Deal; mother: Bridgette
Coquillon nee Butler; Step father: Emmanuel Coquillon;
step mother: Nicolette Deal; brothers: Edward Flowers,
Devante Deal and Elton; Fifteen Uncles: Vernon, Roy,
Fred, Franklyn, Arthur, Edmund, and Lincoln Deal, Dr.
Frumentus Leon, Richard Wright, Franklyn Cox, lan Storr,
Franklyn, Anthony, and Decosda Rolle and Gioxdfrey Higgs;
Seventeen Aunts; Paula Leon, Gertrude Wright, Gloria
Cox and Anna Storr, Ruth, Mildred, and Stephanie Deal
Doreen Deal, Margaret, Marilyn, Juliet, Terry, Rochelle,
Dimples, Beatrice, Estelle Higgs, and Beverly Lewis;
Cousins: Vernon Jr, & Vernado Deal, Leroy Ir, Kirklyn,
Bernique, & Tanva Deal, Vaughn, Vanessa, Melissa,

Lashanda, Fred Jr., Vernencha, Fredeca Deal, Mychelyn
& Cedric Watson, Frumentia & Fromentus Jr. Leon, Lamar

Deal,
Peleichia,

Anishka & Corey Bain, Arthur Jr.,
lerissa, Lynette, Indira, and Lincoln Jr Deal,

Atia, Arista,

Felice and Felicia (Cox, lan Storr and Shenill: Close second
cousins: Czaire Watson, Travelle, Taja, and Taylor Bain;
Special Friend: Andrea Wells; Other relatives and friends:
Sherrie Deal, Kimarr Knowles, Alex Plakaris, God father:
Ralph Hepbum and Andre Moxey, Royal Bahamas Defence
Force Entry 44 Team, Crew HMS Yellow Elder, Soldier

Road Family, Deal's Family from Palmetto Point, NCA
Class of 2006, Lilly Smith and Family, Franeita Saunders
and Family, The Bethel Family, The Johnson family, The
McDonald Family, The Davis Family, Gwendolyn Rolle
and Family, The Thurston Family, The Thompson Family,
The Moxey Family, The Hepburn and Family, The Crew
at Arawak Cay, R.M. Bailey Class of 1983 and first
Caribbean International Bank.

View ing Wy il be held in the oie al Restv lew Me morial

on W air wedes fenin 0: (iam to 6:00pm ep at ‘the daiedh
from 9:30 am to service tine.





human remains in the Stargate
blue hole near the Bluff on South
Andros in 1996 by renowned cave
diver Rob Palmer.

The development process for
both dry and flooded caves in the
Bahamas is the same. They are
essentially giant banana holes, and
the ones in the ocean were formed
during the ice age, when the sub-
merged bank was above the high
water mark. Good examples
include Mermaid’s Lair and the
Lucayan Caverns on Grand
Bahama.

A diver named George Ben-
jamin began the first explorations
of these unusual cave systems in
1950. He was followed by Jaques
Cousteau in the ’70s and Rob
Palmer in the ’80s. Today, the
Antiquities, Monuments and
Museums Corporation has com-
missioned Brian Kakuk, a former
US Navy hardhat diver with more
than 20 years of underwater cave
diving experience in the Bahamas,
to survey blue holes throughout
the country.

The Central Andros National
Park was established six years ago
and covers more than 280,000 acres
— incorporating barrier reef, wet-
land and forest ecosystems in five
distinct park areas. It contains the
highest concentration of blue holes
in the Bahamas. The one we visit-
ed features observation platforms
and boardwalks, as well as useful
interpretive signage. From there
it was back on the highway to dri-
ve through seemingly endless
stands of spindly pine trees inter-
spersed with cabbage palms all the
way to the northwest tip of
Andros.

Red Bays is not quite the cul-
tural oddity that it was before the
20-mile logging road was cut from

New Grown land |
nepotism claims

FROM page one

Both sales were recorded on
June 8, 2003 and May 3, 2004.
Relatives of a second offi- :
cial, including his wife, and the }
sister-in-law of a current Cabi- }
net Minister, were listed as }
having acquired four acres of :
property in the settlement of }
Blackwood Village in Abaco.
Each acre was sold for }
$4,356. They were recorded on }
February 1, 2002, March 21 and }
27, and May 12th. i
Unlike the case involving rel-
atives of former director of :
Lands Tex Turnquest, where }
the properties were flipped a
few years later for hundreds of }
thousands of dollars in profits, ;
these lots have not been resold. i
However, the investigations ;
into these and other Crown }
land transactions continue. i
Despite leaving many mes- i
sages and even waiting on the }
telephone for more than 15 }
minutes for one of the officials :
who was reportedly “on anoth- }
er call”, no return calls were }
ever received up to press time }
last night from either the }
Department of Lands and Sur- :
veys or the Ministry of Lands }
and Local Government. i
Currently government is }
contemplating approving a }
Select Committee to review all i
Crown land grants issued by }
government since the early }
1990's. i
This committee, which was }
called for in Parliament will :
review all Crown grants issued }
to individuals or entities since i
1992 up until the present date ;
along with all outstanding }
applications that have yet to }
receive final approval. :
The committee will also }
ascertain a list of all publicser- }
vants and retired public ser-
vants who have received grants,
along with government’s offi- i
cial position on its policy in }
relation to the disposition of }
publicly held lands generally;
as well as the government’s
policy in relation to granting
lands to employees of the gov- }
ernment or their relatives.








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Lowe Sound in 1968, but it still
represents one of the more inter-
esting stories of Bahamian settle-
ment. It's a tale that lives on
through the memories of the
town's patriarch — Rev Bertram
Newton — and matriarch — Wid-
ow Omelia Marshall, both now in
their 80s but still active.

You could say that Red Bays
was discovered in 1937 by an
American anthropologist named
John Goggin who happened to
meet up with some of the inhabi-
tants at Mastic Point. They were
descended from black Seminoles
— escaped African slaves from
American plantations who migrat-
ed into the Florida wilderness in
the mid-1700s with a variety of
Indian bands that later became
known as Seminoles.

Africans and Indians had a
mutual interest in securing the
Florida territory as a refuge from
the American whites. And by the
early 1820s, when Florida became
a US territory, there were hun-
dreds of former slaves living
among the Seminoles, which posed
a threat to the institution of slavery
itself. According to Dr Rosalyn
Howard's 2002 book, Black Semi-
noles in the Bahamas, the Africans
lived independently among the
Indians in Florida, paying tribute to
the Seminole chiefs.

These free communities were
eventually driven southward by
attacks from the US Army, into
the more remote and inaccessible
areas of the peninsula, from where
they made a last stand in the mid-
1800s. A band of about 200 Indians
and blacks held out in the ever-
glades, and were the genesis of
today's Seminole tribe, who claim
to be the only unconquered indige-
nous people in the United States.

But in the face of such pres-
sure, several groups of black Semi-
noles took to their canoes and left
Florida for the Bahamas between
1821 and 1837 in what Howard
describes as "an epic journey born
of desperation, which has a mod-
ern counterpart in the Haitian and
Cuban boat people." They chose
to settle on the remote west coast

of Andros, a land behind God's
back as they say.

Over 100 of these earliest illegal
immigrants were discovered by a
Customs officer in 1828 who
brought them to Nassau where
they were detained for a year
before being allowed to return to
Red Bays. Rev Newton's great
grandfather, Moses Newton, and
Omelia Marshall's great grandfa-
ther, Scipio Bowleg, were among
the names on that 1828 Customs
roster.

In fact, Rev Newton, who was
head teacher at Red Bays for
decades, published a pamphlet in
1968 to record the settlements oral
tradition. Howard says the story
"emphasizes the fundamental
courage and tenacity of those black
Seminoles whose journey origi-
nated long ago on the plantations
of Georgia, South Carolina and
Florida," and who recreated their
identity and culture in the
Bahamas, living an isolated sub-
sistence lifestyle until well into the
20th century.

During our visit Red Bays was
gearing up for the annual Snapper
Fest, although it is now some three
miles inland from the original set-
tlement site along the low-lying
coast. The community was forced
to move after the 1899 hurricane
killed more than a hundred people.
A similar situation exists today at
nearby Lowe Sound, where the
government is encouraging resi-
dents to build on higher ground to
escape the deadly storm surge that
will inevitably come one day.

Just off the road to Red Bays is
a unique feature known as Jungle
Pond. This is a surprising pocket of
mangroves growing on a 10-foot-
thick mat of algae covering a 150-
foot diameter blue hole. Stepping
onto the swampy, overgrown sur-
face is like entering a lost world.
Giant custard apple trees compete
with the largest red mangroves on
Andros, and every branch drips
with orchids and bromeliads. It is a
remarkable oasis in the middle of a
vast pine barren.

Accommodation for the dozen
or so people who took part in the

field trip was provided by the
Pineville Motel in Nicholl's Town,
an eccentric hostelry owned and
operated by one Eugene Camp-
bell, whose pet goat trots behind
him everywhere like a puppy. Par-
ticipants included a Customs bro-
Ker, two bankers (one retired), a
Junkanoo artist and photographer,
a real estate agent, a physiothera-
pist, a graphic artist and yours tru-
ly.

A It was one of a series of tours
being organised by the BNT for
two purposes — to educate inter-
ested persons about the flora and
fauna of the Bahamas, and to show
family islanders that they can gen-
erate income from the environ-
ment. The tour begins with a two-
hour Bahamas Ferries voyage to
Fresh Creek. Once fortified by a
traditional breakfast of stewed and
boiled fish at the Lighthouse Club,
participants board a bus for the
trip to Nicholl's Town and Red
Bays.

"We know there is a pent-up
demand for this sort of thing,”
BNT Executive Director Eric
Carey told me. "People want to
know about our national parks and
the natural environment in gener-
al. When we organise nature walks
on New Providence we can have as
many as a hundred people show
up. Right now we are exploring
destinations and activities to get
the right mix and trying to get the
Ministry of Tourism involved. This
kind of domestic tourism can pro-
vide many benefits for local com-
munities."

As Professor Howard notes in
her book, life in Nassau today is
likened in a popular Bahamian
song to living in "sardine cans,"
where all food and water is import-
ed and where people can no longer
sleep without bars on their win-
dows. Andros is a vastly different
place, and well worth the time to
visit.

What do you think?

Send comments to
larry@tribunemedia. net

Or visit www.bahamapundit.com



FROM page one

The resort closure
comes nearly two years
after it was handed over to
receivers by developers
EBR Holdings in June
2007 when the company
fell into debt.

Although there was high
interest in the property, all
agreements fell through,
and when the economic
downturn struck in Sep-
tember last year the resort
suffered significant losses.

Without new investors to acquire the project,
secured creditor Mitsui decided to temporarily
close the resort.

Prime Minister Hubert Ingraham announced
consultations have begun with various parties
when speaking in the House of Assembly on
Monday, and receivers confirmed there is sig-
nificant interest in the resort, although negoti-
ations are still at an early stage.

Mr Downs said: “I don't think it's helpful to
announce who the parties are and conduct an
auction in public, there is nothing served by
that.

“It's a very sensitive situation, of course,
because of our decision to close the resort on a
temporary basis so I think it's better to keep
that confidential.

“It's been up for sale for probably three

Hubert rr mene

FROM page one



Emerald Bay

years so it had a pretty good airing for the pub-
lic.

“There are a good couple of dozen bidders
who have signed confidentiality agreements,
so we have got to respect their privacy as we ask
them to respect ours.

“Of the parties who have been interested in
the past, some of them are having a new look at
the site, as well as a number of other parties
who I don't think had looked at it before and
are having a first look at it this time.”

Mr Downs said any decision will be made in
consultation with Mitsui and the government of
the Bahamas.

He added: “The decision will be made care-
fully and we will discuss with Mitsui and will
decide what we think is the best to go for based
on anumber of criteria.

“Purchasers are going to have to meet gov-
ernment approval so it's going to be important
for us to make sure that any bidder is likely to
be well disposed towards the government.”

*VOUR VIEW’

To have your say on this or any other issue,
email Tbe Tribune at: letters@tribunemedia.net
or deliver your letter to The Tribune on
Shirley Street, P.O. Box N-3207



go before the official start of the
2009 Atlantic hurricane season,

the eastern gulf of Mexico it's still
affecting the northwest Bahamas
with heavy showers and thunder-
storms. It's moving slowly north-
east, however, the tropical mois-
ture will remain with us for the
next four to five days triggering
occasional downpours," said
Deputy Director of the Depart-
ment of Meteorology Basil Dean.

The system was moving at

Downpours

about 10 miles per hour yesterday
with less than a 30 per cent
chance of it developing into a
tropical cyclone over the next two
days, the NHC said.

Yesterday heavy rains and
winds hit the capital leading to
extensive flooding in low lying
areas.

With just about two weeks to

Mr Dean warned the public to
get a head start on hurricane
preparations.

"It certainly kicks off the wet
season, which is typically the sum-
mer months, and we are just
about two weeks away from the
start of the hurricane seasons. We
don't want to wait for that time to
start hurricane preparedness —
we must be in a state of readi-

FROM page one

building kind of shake. One of the structural engineers
from Ministry of Works said he was in the (area of the)
sports centre when he saw what appeared to be a torna-
do in the area and when he came around to Central
Detective Unit (CDU) he saw the damage," Supt
Elsworth Moss, CDU head said.

Another officer, who spoke to The Tribune on the
condition of anonymity, said he was outside the building
when he saw a huge lightening bolt hit the CDU.

"T don't think it was a tornado, I think it was the light-
ning that probably strike it — it was a flash of lightening
and it (the canopy) just fall to the ground," he said.

Deputy Director of the Department of Meteorology
Basil Dean could not confirm the reports, but said tor-
nado like conditions were possible yesterday. Another
sighting of a tornado was said to be in the Bar 20 Corner
area around 11 am yesterday .

"We haven't been able to confirm (the tornado
reports) but I would not be surprised if there was. There
were a number of thunderous cells and whenever we
have those embedded in the area of showers it is very pos-
sible that tornado activity could have spawned out of one
of those cells," he said.

While there were no reported injuries stemming from
the incident, several air conditioners in the CDU's build-
ing were damaged and debris from the fallen steel canopy
littered the front of the building.

Ministry of Health officials were scheduled to inves-
tigate a potential threat yesterday afternoon when gas
escaped from several air conditioning units after the col-
lapse. Structural engineers from the Ministry of Works
were also dispatched to assess whether the building was
fit to remain in operation.

Business continued at the CDU yesterday with its
officer-in-charge monitoring the situation and the safety
of his officers.

ness," said Mr Dean.

Extreme weather

"T don't know if I'm afraid — I'm concerned, just
monitoring everything that's happening and if we feel that
we are unsafe here we're going to get an expert opinion
and then we'll make the decision," Supt Moss.

Business at the Criminal Records Office (CRO) was
brought to a standstill because of the standing flood
water, but none of the sensitive records was damaged,
said Mr Moss.

"So far no paperwork was damaged, the only equip-
ment that was damaged was several of the air condi-
tioners — we had a little leak of the air conditioning
gas coming in the building, but we shut those off. We're
still inside — we're still doing some work, the Criminal
Records office is not functioning because of the flood
water damage," he said.

Depending on weather conditions tomorrow, the sec-
tion may be up and running. If not, persons are advised
to visit the Quackoo Street, Elizabeth Estates, Carmichael
Road or Cable Beach police stations for copies of police
records.

While business continued at the CDU yesterday, per-
sons who were being held for questioning were relocat-
ed to another site, said Mr Moss.

As for the fate of the officers stationed at the building
that will depend on the report from Works officials.

"Once the debris is removed and the engineer would
have checked and the electriaan would have made a
check to see if we can continue to work — most of the air
conditioners have been turned off — because most of the
areas that the work is going to be carried out in the
evening doesn't have the ventilation, doesn't have the
windows that we can open up for fresh air.

"Ministry of Works will give an assessment report to
the Minister of National Security who will decide whether
or not to it's (suitable) for us to inhabit. If not then they
will make the decision that we move," said Mr Moss.
TRIBUNE SPORTS



INTERNATIONAL SPORTS

WEDNESDAY, MAY 20, 2009, PAGE 9



Stars collide as King Jame

Superman meet in n playotls

@ By TOM WITHERS
AP Sports Writer

INDEPENDENCE, Ohio
(AP) — Two of the NBA's
youngest ambassadors, they
share infectious smiles, great
senses of humor and unchained
joy when they play. In a league
loaded with remarkably gifted
athletes, this pair stands out as
physical phenomenons.

Superheroes in shorts.

One is Superman, a power-
ful, 6-foot-11 shot-blocking
machine who went so far as to
reject his coach during the post-
season.

The other's a King, and based
on recent royal command per-
formances, his reign may be just
beginning.

Dwight Howard and LeBron
James have known each other
for years. Casual friends, for-
mer No. | overall draft picks as
teenagers and U.S. Olympic
teammates who won gold
medals together last summer,
they have been undeniable
forces on the court this season.

And they are about to col-
lide.

When the Orlando Magic and
Cleveland Cavaliers meet in this
year's Eastern Conference final
starting Wednesday, all eyes will
be on Howard and James, the
getting-better-by-the-day super-
stars who have each elevated
their games and carried their
teams to new heights.

"We both work hard in the
offseason, and we're both hap-
py we're in this situation right
now,” James said following
practice on Monday.

Orlando's landing in the con-
ference final was nothing short
of magical.

In dethroning the defending
champion Celtics on Sunday by
winning Game 7 in Boston, the
Magic became the first team in
33 tries to overcome a 3-2 series
deficit against the league's most
storied franchise. Howard
scored 12 points with 16
rebounds and five blocks in the
finale.

Orlando's surprising come-
back began after Howard criti-
cized coach Stan Van Gundy
following a loss in Game 5,
when the Magic blew a 14-point
fourth-quarter lead. Howard
was upset that he didn't touch
the ball enough late in the game
and questioned some of Van
Gundy's substitution patterns.

By the time the Magic made
the Celtics disappear, all
seemed to be forgotten.

"Me and coach talked,"
Howard said. "Everything is
great. We have a new stat that
we came up with. When we call
out the coach, we are 3-0."

Turning serious for a
moment, the fun-loving
Howard, who often does spot-
on imitations of his coach,
attributed Orlando's recovery
to growing older and wiser.

"We have matured as a
team,” he said. "We have
learned that we can't allow frus-
tration to take over us during
games or after games. We have

Bucks



IN THIS October 20, 2007 file photo, Dwight Howard (left), defends against LeBron James during an exhibition game in Macau. Howard and James
— two of the NBA’s biggest stars — will meet in the playoffs for the first time when the Orlando Magic face the Cleveland Cavaliers in the Eastern Con-
ference finals.

to play through all that and Stan
has been a great mentor and a
coach for me personally, know-
ing that there are going to be
nights when I am frustrated. He
has always found a way to moti-
vate me to keep myself and my
teammates in line."

While Howard may enjoy
communicating his thoughts to
legions of his followers on Twit-
ter, the 23-year-old has an old-
school sensibility when it comes
to relationships and learning
from mistakes. The league's
defensive player of the year,
now deeper in the postseason
than ever before, is beginning to
understand what he needs to
block out and what he needs to
embrace.

"He holds himself to a pretty
high standard," Magic general
manager Otis Smith said. "He's
learning a lot. It's the postsea-
son. Things are going to hap-
pen. You learn by experience,
and some things he still has to
learn. That's the playoffs."

James, on the contrary, has





yet to experience adversity of
any sort in this postseason. He
and the Cavaliers are a perfect
8-0, with all eight wins coming
by 10 points or more. It’s been
easy so far, but James and his
teammates have been through
enough end-of-the-year drama
to know tougher times are
ahead.

Series

"It's going to be a tough
series," Cavs center Zydrunas
Ilgauskas said. "I wouldn't be
surprised if it goes all seven
games."

As an outside observer,
James viewed Howard's com-
ments about Van Gundy as
signs of the center's develop-
ment and frustration.

"If he's the leader of the
team, he has a right to call out
some things as wrong,” James
said. "I didn't see it as a bad.
There are always ways to han-
dle situations like that, and he
didn't do it the right way —



maybe. But they still won the
series and learned from that sit-
uation."

The Cavaliers intend to rely
on their lessons after going 1-2
against the Magic during the
regular season. Cleveland suf-
fered its worst loss, 116-87, at
Orlando on April 3. The 29-
point setback was humbling for
the Cavs, who contained
Howard (20 points, 11
rebounds) but couldn't stop
Orlando's outside game as the
Magic made 13 of 27 3-point-
ers.

While Cleveland's defensive
game plan will focus on limiting
Orlando's looks, Howard can't
be ignored. Under assistant
coach Patrick Ewing's care,
Howard's offensive game has
blossomed.

"Before he was just a shot
blocker, somebody who would

(AP Photo: Kin Cheung)

just clog the lane, dunk the ball
and that was pretty much it,”
Cavs forward Joe Smith said.
"Now he's developing his game
and his footwork and that's only
going to make him a tougher
player to guard."

Like James and Howard,
Smith was the first player select-
ed in the draft. The 14-year vet-
eran appreciates the pressure
of those enormous expectations
and has been impressed with
how the young All-Stars have
handled their early success.
Smith hasn't played with
Howard, but sees him as being
very similar to James.

"He seems like a joy to be
around,” Smith said. "Like I say
about LeBron, when your
leader is that way, everybody
feeds of him and wants to go
out there and perform up to or
over your level."

S, NBA Today

By The Associated Press

Orlando at Cleveland
(8:30pm EDT). The Cava-
liers, who swept Detroit and
Atlanta in the first two
rounds and had the league's
best regular-season record,
open the Eastern Confer-
ence finals against the Mag-
ic, who eliminated the
defending champion Celtics
in seven games after beat-
ing the 76ers in six.

WRESTLING WITH

THE NBA

The Lakers are scheduled
to be at the Pepsi Center in
Denver next Monday night
for Game 4 of the Western
Conference finals. So are a
bunch of wrestlers. World
Wrestling Entertainment
said it is booked at the arena
for an episode of Monday
Night Raw.

WWE spokesman Robert
Zimmerman said the orga-
nization secured the Pepsi
Center last Aug. 15 and has
already sold more than
10,000 tickets for the event.
He says the organization
expects a sellout, with tick-
ets ranging from $20 to $70.

SEARCHING SIXERS

The Philadelphia 76ers
are moving forward with
their coaching search, set-
ting up mterviews with assis-
tants Dwane Casey of the
Dallas Mavericks and Tom
Thibodeau of the Boston
Celtics. The Sixers already
interviewed former Wizards
coach Eddie Jordan. The
Philadelphia job became
vacant when Tony DiLeo
stepped down last week and
returned to the front office.

NOT INTERESTED

Portland assistant general
manager Tom Penn pulled
his name out of the running
for the Timberwolves’ top
front office position and
received a promotion to stay
with the Trail Blazers. Penn
is the third candidate to pull
his name out of the race,
joining San Antonio Spurs
assistant GM Dennis Lind-
sey and former Miami assis-
tant GM Randy Pfund.

HIGH RATINGS

Game 7 of the Magic-
Celtics series was the most-
viewed NBA second-round
playoff game ever on cable.
TNT said Orlando's 101-82
win Sunday was watched by
8.41 million viewers. The
previous record was 7.65
million for Game 6 of Spurs-
Lakers in 2004.

SPEAKING

"The fans in Denver had
a lot more faith in making
the playoffs than the own-
er.”

— WWE chairman Vince
McMahon on Nuggets man-
agement allowing his orga-
nization to book the Pepsi
Center for May 25, when
Game 4 of the Western Con-
ference finals is scheduled



Track & Field
Officials Training

have one
per cent
chance
of getting
top pick

MILWAUKEE (AP) — The
Milwaukee Bucks enter Tues-
day night's NBA draft lottery
with a 1 percent chance of
securing the No. | overall pick.

The Bucks are slotted to pick
10th if they don't get one of the
top three positions awarded in
the lottery. They finished the

Are you interested in becoming an Official
for Track & Field?
The Bahamas Association of Certified
Officials (BACO) is extending an invitation
to all present officials and all interested

persons to participate in a training

session for track & field.

Date: Saturday, May 23, 2009
Venue: Thomas A. Robinson Track & Field

oe ae Stadium
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Along with the lottery pick,

the Bucks will have a selection

in the second round — either : :

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PAGE 10, WEDNESDAY, MAY 20, 2009

TRIBUNE SPORTS



INTERNATIONAL SPORTS



Nassau Nastics
to host ‘Spring
Spectacular’

lm By RENALDO DORSETT
Sports Reporter
rdorsett@tribunemedia.net

AS the profile for local gymnastics
continues to grow, some of the sport’s
athletes will have an opportunity to test
their efforts under international scrutiny.

Nassau Nastics is scheduled to host
“Spring Spectacular” May 22-24, which
features a series of exhibitions where
local gymnasts will be critiqued by inter-
national judge Susan Monahan.

Monahan is amongst a select few of
USA nationally rated judges with over
16 years of judging experience.

She has also served as a state judging
director and currently sits on the Florida
State Judges Board.

On May 22, gymnasts will be judged
on bars from 4-6pm at the Oakes Field
Gym, while Saturday they will be judged
on vault, floor exercise and beam at the
Kendal Isaacs Gym from 12-4 pm.

Sunday will cap the weekend with an
awards ceremony and featured perfor-
mances.

Barbara Thompson, executive director
of Nassau ‘Nastics, said exposure to an
internationally renowned judge can
serve as a barometer for their level of
development.

“Tt aides the gymnasts in terms of giv-
ing them ideas on what they need to
improve, what skills they have already
accomplished and what the next step is
in mastering their craft and learning
more difficult moves,” she said. “Most of
our gymnasts are unable to travel for
competitions so they will never be able
to perform in front of a judge and be
critiqued as such.”

Thompson said it will give the ath-
letes an opportunity to see how their
skills would fare against others in inter-
national competition.

“This gives them an opportunity to
get that critique on a same level of who

OLYMPIAN Chris “Bay” Brown (shown in this file photo) opened with an impressive showing against top competition...

A second for Brown in 400m
at the Adidas Track Classic

they would be ordinarily competing
against should they be able to travel.
There is not a lot of gymnastics action in
the Bahamas so it is not as if we would
be able to go to Freeport and compete
against a local club there so we bring
the judge here,” she said.

“We do bring in coaches that host spe-
cial clinics so that is a very beneficial
operation we do. This is the first time
that we have ever brought a judge in to
evaluate our gymnasts and it will be
something I am sure we will be repeating
in the future.”

lm By RENALDO DORSETT
Sports Reporter
rdorsett@tribunemedia.net

IN his first event of the outdoor sea-
son, Olympian Chris “Bay” Brown —
the Bahamas’ 400m national record
holder — opened with an impressive
showing against top competition.

Chris Brown posted a time of 45.03s
to place second in his signature event at
the Adidas Track Classic in Carson,
California, over the weekend.

Jeremy Wariner of the United States
won in 44.66s and Trinidad and Toba-
go was third in 45.05s.

Fellow Bahamian and Beijing
Olympics silver medal winning 1600m
relay teammate Andretti Bain was sev-
enth in 46.32s.

A number of other Bahamians com-
peted at the meet, including 100m
national record holder Derrick Atkins
and 110m hurdles record holder
Shamar Sands.

Atkins finished fourth in the 100m in

10.19s in a race that American Darvis
Patton won in 10.12. Antiguan Daniel
Bailey was second in 10.14s and
Jamaican Steve Mullings was third in
10.19s.

Beijing silver medallist in the event,
Richard Thompson of Trinidad and
Tobago, finished a disappointing sixth
in 10.22s.

Sands finished third in the 13.58s
behind Americans Terrence Trammell
and Antwon Hicks who ran 13.39s and
13.45s respectively.



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Mayweather Jr to square
off with Marquez

BOXERS Floyd Mayweather Jr (left) and Juan Manuel Marquez,
pose for photographs Tuesday in New York at a news conference
to announce their upcoming fight. Mayweather Jr and Marquez are
scheduled to fight at MGM Grand in Las Vegas on July 18...

(AP Photo:Frank Franklin II)



New
Orleans
gets 2013
Super Bowl,
its 10th

@ By TIM REYNOLDS
AP Sports Writer

FORT LAUDERDALE,
Fla. (AP) — New Orleans is a
Super Bowl city again.

NFL owners voted Tuesday
to play the 2013 Super Bowl in
New Orleans, the first time the
championship game will be
played there since Hurricane
Katrina shredded parts of the
Louisiana Superdome. The hur-
ricane caused 1,600 deaths and
devastated the Gulf Coast four
years ago.

New Orleans beat out Mia-
mi — which sought a record
1ith Super Bowl — and 2008
host Glendale, Ariz., for the
game. This is the 10th time New
Orleans will be the site for the
Super Bowl.

"It's a great day for our com-
munity,” Saints owner Tom
Benson said as he walked onto
an elevator at a South Florida
hotel, on his way to the formal
announcement.

New Orleans last hosted in
2002, when Adam Viniateri's
48-yard field goal as time
expired lifted New England
over St. Louis.

Still unclear: Where will the
2013 Pro Bowl be played? It's
coming to Miami a week before
this coming season's Super
Bowl, then going back to
Hawaii in 2011 and 2012.

It was not part of the bidding
process for the 2013 Super
Bowl.

"Where it (the Pro Bowl)
goes after 2012 is something
we'll decide later on," said
Frank Supovitz, the NFL's
senior vice president for events.

Louisiana lawmakers have
already approved plans to
spend $85 million in Superdome
upgrades, which would be com-
pleted in time for the 2013 NFL
title game. The upgrades would
include additional seating, new
suites, wider concourses and
other measures for the New
Orleans Saints to generate new
revenue streams.

The Superdome played an
iconic role during Katrina,
which struck the city in August
2005. It was an evacuation cen-
ter during the storm, housing
thousands of people who had
nowhere else to go, and the dev-
astation was nightmarish. With-
in days, the building was tat-
tered, filthy inside from mold,
debris and raw sewage.

Over the next year, the
Superdome was rebuilt, and
slowly, New Orleans has tried to
get back to what it once was.
The stories of suffering are still
everywhere — even now, some
who lost nearly everything in
2005 are fighting to keep their
federally provided trailers a bit
longer.

One thing is back to normal:
New Orleans still knows how
to host an event. College foot-
ball's national championship
game was played there in 2008,
followed about six weeks later
by the NBA All-Star game.

Arizona also failed in bids for
the 2011 and 2012 Super Bowls,
which were awarded to new sta-
diums in North Texas and Indi-
anapolis, respectively.

Lucescu predicting style clash in UEFA Cup final

@ By STUART CONDIE
AP Sports Writer

ISTANBUL (AP) —
Shakhtar Donetsk coach
Mircea Lucescu is predicting a
clash of styles when his team
takes on Werder Bremen in
Wednesday's UEFA Cup
final.

The 63-year-old Romanian
coach is preparing his players
team for the match in Istanbul
— the last ever UEFA Cup
final before its rebranding as
the Europa League — by mak-
ing sure they are ready to cope
with an athletic, speedy side
that already knocked out for-
mer continental champions
AC Milan and Hamburg.

Lucescu said Tuesday he
expected Bremen to try to
physically dominate a young
Shakhtar side aiming to
become the first from Ukraine
to hoist the trophy.

"Bremen is the attacking
team with very good physique
and a lot of really good ath-
letes on their team,” Lucescu
said. "And as for Shakhtar
Donetsk, the style is based on
the good technique of the
players and, naturally owing to
our specific qualities, they will
try to exercise control over the
progress of the game.”

Whether Lucescu can do so
will go some way to demon-
strating how successfully he
has managed to emulate the
template of youth, skill and
tactical flexibility he estab-
lished in spells with Dinamo
Bucharest, Galatasaray and
Besiktas.

There are just three players
over 30 years of age in
Shakhtar’s 25-man squad,
which features a quintet of
skillful Brazilians, of whom
midfielders Fernandinho, Ilsin-
ho and likely substitute
Willian average just 22 years
of age.

Striker Luiz Adriano should
start the game against the Ger-
man club but Jadson, the old-
est of his compatriots at 25,
could miss the final because of
injury.

But the free kick specialist,
who scored and then set up the
winning goal in the second leg
of the semifinal win over
Dynamo Kiev, has not given
up hope of recovering. He was
rested at the weekend, along
with Fernandinho and Isinho,
for Saturday's 3-0 domestic
league win at Zorya.

"He was involved in the gen-
eral group in training for the
last two days and most likely
he will appear on the pitch

tomorrow," Lucescu said. "As
for the lineup, we are going to
analyze training. Most likely,
we will make the decision just
before the game starts.”

Bremen has its own prob-
lems, with playmaker Diego
and Hugo Almeida suspended,
and Germany midfielder Per
Mertesacker ruled out because
of a ligament injury.

"Of course we miss them a
great deal because they are
important players, but we can't
do anything about it,” mid-
fielder Torsten Frings said.
"We want to take the trophy
home for them."

Coach Thomas Schaaf said
he had yet to decide how to
compensate for the losses, par-
ticularly of Almeida and
Diego — who hit a total of 10
goals to help carry Bremen to
its first European final since
winning the 1992 Cup Win-
ners’ Cup.

"T don't even know who is
fit and who can actually play,
so I'm not even thinking of a
formation or a system or a
variation,” Schaaf said. "Both
of them are something special.
That's something you can't
replace on a one-to-one basis,
but we have a good squad and
we know we have good quality
there."
THE TRIBUNE





lm By RENALDO DORSETT
Sports Reporter
rdorsett@tribunemedia.net

r | Wwo Caribbean ath-
letes, including our
own “Golden Girl”

Debbie Ferguson-McKenzie,
made their presence felt during
a track meet in Manchester,
England, over the weekend.

Ferguson-McKenzie won the
women’s 150m final during the
Great Manchester City Games
on Sunday. After posting the
fastest qualifying time of 16.90s
in the heat, Ferguson-McKen-
zie ran 16.54s in the final to
win convincingly ahead of an
all British field which included
reigning Commonwealth,
World and Olympic 400m
champion, Christine Ohurugu.

Ohurugu placed second in
17.10s, Shaunna Thompson
was third in 17.20s and Lee
McConell rounded out the *A’
final in 17.28s.

The veteran sprinter suc-
cessfully continued a season
where she posted a season’s
best time of 11.11s just over a
week ago in Orlando, Florida
and season’s best time of 23.01
in the 200m set in April in
Coral Gables, Florida.
Jamaican sprinter Usain Bolt



PAGE 11



WEDNESDAY, MAY 20,

ran the world’s fastest 150
meters to win a soggy street
sprint on Sunday that marked
his return to action after a car
crash left him requiring minor
foot surgery.

In windy Manchester, the
triple Olympic champion ran
down the English city's main
thoroughfare in 14.35 seconds,
breaking Italian Pietro Men-
nea’s 26-year-old mark of 14.99
in the rarely run 150.

In less than a year, Bolt has
captured four sprinting world
records with his latest 150m
triumph accompanying the
100m, 200m and 400m relay
records set in Beijing.

The men’s field featured a
more eclectic field than the
women with eight athletes
from three countries compet-
ing.

Great Britain’s Marlon
Devonish finished a distant
second in 15.07s, Ivory
Williams of the United States
was third in 15.08s and Great
Britain’s Rikki Fifton was
fourth in 15.13s.

Home favourite Andy Turn-
er took the ‘B’ final in 15.20s,
countryman Leevan Yearwood
was second in 15.29, while
Jamaican Xavier Brown fin-
ished third in 15.53.



Stars collide

as King James,
Superman meet
in playoffs...

2009 See page 9



DEBBIE FERGUSON-McKENZIE is
seen winning the women’s 150m
final at the Great Manchester City
Games in England on Sunday.

(AP Photos: Paul Thomas)

‘Golden Girl’ Debbie, lightning
their presence felt




































PAGE 12, WEDNESDAY, MAY 20, 2009 THE TRIBUNE





LOCAL NEWS

MISS BAHAMAS WORLD SWIMSUIT AND TOP MODEL OF THE BAHAMAS COMPETITIONS

i . i. s 7 7 ey i
ae | THE hee f SWANIQUE , :
‘ i _ | SAWYER, a -
| es ye ' Miss
} , | Harbour 7 vi
: M8 | Island /
S| ; MCCHENIER
ee ' _ | JOHNSON,
i is , a ’ Miss Colors
wi edhe 7 A, : Entertainment

a = eee
ah "
















DEVERA
PINDER,
Miss
Sposabella
Bridal,
Formal &
Evening
Wear





af




MIDYDAT Sst]



HEAVENLY:
Earth Angels
compete in
swimsuit

| competition.




The Retreat Gardens
provide backdrop for

Top Model of The
Bahamas contest

N surroundings evocative of the Garden of

Eden, 13 Earth Angels commanded attention

as they strutted down a red carpet catwalk,

wearing sexy white swimwear, and not much
else.

Even the rain stopped for the highly anticipated Miss
Bahamas World Swimsuit and Top Model of the
Bahamas competitions held at The Retreat, head-
quarters of the Bahamas National Trust on Village
! Road.

CHANNA The ladies did not disappoint, displaying spectacular
CIUS. Miss runway skills and even more impressive physiques in
Theo d ore one of the most important
events on the Miss Bahamas
Elyett : World calendar.
Productions The exciting double-head-
er began with the Swimsuit
Competition, which is one
of the “fast track” events of | |
the Miss Bahamas World :
pageant — the winner auto- | — ~
matically advances to the |
semifinal round of the com- |
petition. With so much at
stake, the ladies had been
working out for months — |=
and it showed. One by one, |
the contestants faced a dis-
tinguished panel of judges
which included Top Model
of the Bahamas 2008 Chrys-
tal Bethell; Bahamian snow- | -
boarder Korath Wright; |
Pilates instructor Denise }
Carter; fitness coach Nardo
Dean, and MBO Assistant
Director of Pageant Affairs
Anishka Lockhart.

The judges’ task was to |_
look for body symmetry, the
general fitness of the con-
testant, poise, stage pres-
ence, and modeling skills.
After appearing individual-
ly before the judges, the ladies stood before them as a
group, giving the panel one last look before they made
their final decisions. The winner of the Swimsuit com-
petition will be announced during the finals of the Miss
Bahamas World pageant on May 31.

Following a brief intermission, the show’s focus
switched to haute couture as the Top Model of the
BB wg ’ ae Be: Bahamas competition got underway. A competition
METH |. ca he ee within a competition — this event is used to select the

Bahamian representative for the Top Model of the



Rak te d ; World competition. Last year’s winner Chrystal Bethell
5 ee . travelled to Germany earlier this year to compete.

ae ’ | She just recently returned from China where she

= oh. ee 7 competed in the Beauty and Model Festival, capturing

a ‘ the title of Miss Caribbean in the process. She and her

HTT Ty Pe ea . fellow judges — Bahamian models Stephanie Smollet,

a Bid Felicia Forbes, Kendrick Kemp, and MBO Assistant

SS Director of Talent Development Shavonne Bain, were

looking for the young woman who owned the catwalk

— ar in the strength of her walk, attitude, and the way she

qa os, carried the clothes. The fashions of Bahamian design-

ALL COMDOS IMCLUCE L M ers Lisa Humes, Apryl Burrows, Patrice Lockhart, Sab-

ale rina Francis, and Jarvi created a colourful, festive
atmosphere while the Earth Angels brought attitude

nt 1 CT TH c 3, i ' rl Cc 1 * te) re galore to the runway. Like the Swimsuit Competition,
pet lal ; the winner of the 2009 Top Model of the Bahamas
7 4 \ KENDRA WILKINSON, Miss D. title will be announced during the pageant on May 31,

i
oo Il S. Lifestyles Inc.



THE TRIBUNE

SECTION B « business@tribunemedia.net

US!

r,

WEDNESDAY,

MAY 20,



2009





ROYAL FIDELITY

Money at Work

NASSAU OFFICE

(242) 356-9801

FREEPORT OFFICE
(242) 351-3010

UBS Bahamas hit by $7m injunction

@ By NEIL HARTNELL
Tribune Business Editor

New York court has

imposed an injunction on

UBS (Bahamas) to pre-

vent it selling a Brazilian
client’s shares in a dispute involving
collateral for a $7 million loan made by
the Bahamian-based offshore institu-
tion.

The US District Court for the south-
ern district of New York granted the
injunction on April 14, 2009, after an
action was filed against UBS (Bahamas)
and its UBS AG parent by husband-
and-wife clients Carlos and Maria
Christina Aguinaga, and his D.A.S.
Trading company.

In their lawsuit, the pair alleged that
they had borrowed $7 million from
UBS (Bahamas), which was secured by
a lien over their stock portfolio held by
the bank.

DAS Trading was said to manage a
portfolio for a company called Global
Management Enterprises, which had
an account with UBS (Bahamas). Glob-
al’s entire stock portfolio was alleged to
consist of shares in Ideiaset, a micro-
cap Brazilian company chaired by Mr
Aguinaga.

The Aguinagas admitted that due to
the global financial crisis and economic

turmoil, the Ideiaset shares “became
worth less than the value of the UBS
loan to Global”, which had seen its port-
folio value decline to $6.7 million.

“The portfolio is illiquid and may be
difficult to sell, except at an unreason-
ably low price,” the lawsuit admitted.
“A sale of all or a substantial part of the
portfolio will likely bring a price that is
below the fair market value of the secu-
rities in the portfolio.

“In or about October 2008, Guil-
herme Pini, the UBS (Bahamas)
account officer in charge of the Global
account, asked plaintiff Carlos Aguina-
ga for more collateral against the Glob-
al loan so that UBS would not be
required to sell shares in the Global
portfolio.

“Because selling the shares would
cause irreparable harm to Global and
consequently to plaintiffs, the plaintiffs
posted additional collateral to secure
UBS’ loan to Global. UBS agreed to
hold off selling the shares.”

The Aguinagas alleged that they met
Brenda Bellantone, a UBS AG officer,
who had responsibility for credit risk
control at UBS (Bahamas), on Octo-
ber 23, 2008, where they offered to give
the bank security interests over their
farm and Manhattan apartment in
return for not selling the shares.

This then resulted in an alleged meet-

Bank alleges: We
had no choice but
to sell-off client’s
assets to recover
margin loan



ing on December 23, 2008, with Katie
Feder, a UBS (Bahamas) executive, Ms
Bellantone and the bank’s lawyer, at
which the agreement was concluded.

Both the security interest on the farm
and Manhattan apartment were valued
at more than $5 million each, with the
value of UBS (Bahamas) lien on the
Ideiaset shares in the Global portfolio
fixed at $7 million. This “provides col-
lateral worth substantially more than
the value of the UBS loan”.

The Aguinagas said there was no
issue with servicing the loan, and the
agreement was designed to give him
time to increase the value of Ideiaset’s
shares or reduce/pay down the UBS

(Bahamas) loan.

He alleged that he was seeking fur-
ther financing from J P Morgan Chase
to enable him to pay down the UBS
(Bahamas) loan, but on March 30, 2009,
the bank said that “if Chase did not
make a commitment to the additional
financing immediately, UBS would sell
the Global share portfolio.

“Moreover, UBS said that it would
make such sale by the close of business
on March 31, 2009, despite the fact that
it is amply secured by its existing mort-
gage and security agreement with plain-
tiffs, and despite being told that Chase
was close to completing its due dili-
gence needed to provide the financing
to the Aguinagas.”

This prompted the Brazilian couple to
go to court and successfully obtain the
injunction and restraining order block-
ing the sale of Ideiaset shares by UBS
(Bahamas).

In response, Ms Bellatone alleged in
an affidavit that UBS, in initially extend-
ing credit to Global via the early 2008
margin loan, only lent $6 million in
return for $28 million in assets. The
credit limit was extended to $13 mil-
lion, and the current loan balance stood
at $10.4 million.

The autumn 2008 stock price declines,
she alleged, left the UBS (Bahamas)
loan to Global “significantly underse-

cured”, with a $9.9 million balance par-
tially offset by $8.6 million worth of
assets - a situation described as negative
equity.

Ms Bellatone alleged that the securi-
ty taken over the Aguinagas’ farm and
apartment did not “supersede” the lien
over the Ideiaset shares, which contin-
ued to decline after no action was taken
by UBS for “two months”.

As at March 16, 2009, the value of
the Ideiaset shares held by Global had
fallen to $6.4 million when set against a
$10.4 million loan balance.

Ms Bellatone alleged: “Even with the
$7 million lien on plaintiffs’ properties,
UBS had only $13.4 million in assets
securing a current loan value of more
than $10.4 million. The total equity
securing the loan was therefore 22 per
cent of the loan amount, well below the
70 per cent equity that we had initially
required before lending against Ideiaset
shares.

“In this case, nearly half the $13.4
million of collateral was in Ideiaset
stock, a security that UBS had deter-
mined effectively had no lending val-
ue and that had limited liquidity.
Accordingly, UBS determined that, in
order to protect itself against further
depreciation in the Ideiaset stock, it
would have no choice but to sell off the
Ideiaset stock.”

Project’s pre-sale buyers Qualifications obstacle to EPA benefits

95 per cent local

m@ By NEIL HARTNELL

m By CHESTER ROBARDS
Business Reporter
crobards@tribunemedia.net

THE $100 million BAL-
MORAL development is set to
break ground next week, with
phase one construction to begin
soon after, its principal said yes-
terday, with the pre-sold town
homes under 95 per cent Bahami-
an ownership.

Jason Kinsale, who purchased
the vintage property only 18
months ago, said the develop-
ment’s target market was young
Bahamian professionals. He said
skyrocketing property values in
New Providence, and diminish-
ing land availability, prompted
him to construct the affordable
gated community.

Two bedroom, 1,400 square
foot town homes at Balmoral
begin at $359,000, while four-bed-
room, 2,000 square foot homes
sell for about $559,000. The more
conservative spender can acquire

a 1,200 square foot condo for
$300,000.

“Our buyers have seen a lot of
value in the price point,” said Mr
Kinsale. “We’ve been able to
appeal to different market seg-
ments, and what I consider to be
affordable for the young profes-
sional market.”

The 43-acre property belonged
to Lord Oliver Simmonds in the
1940s, and was purchased by the
Tomlinson family in the 1960s.

When Mr Kinsale, a native of
Grand Bahama, bought the prop-
erty, the house, which has been
redesigned to be the Balmoral’s
clubhouse, underwent a five
month, $1 million renovation. The
17,000 square foot property was
redesigned around its historical
trimmings and original spiral
staircase.

“The Tomlinson family did a
tremendous job of maintaining
the history,” said Mr Kinsale.

SEE page 4B

Bahamas at ‘real disadvantage’
on food and health safety

@ By NEIL HARTNELL
Tribune Business Editor

THE Bahamas will be at “a
real disadvantage” when it
becomes a full World Trade
Organisation (WTO) member
because it has not developed and
implemented recognised interna-
tional standards for food safety,
plus plant and animal health, Tri-
bune Business was told yester-
day.

Dr Maurice Isaacs, chair of the
National Sanitary and Phytosan-
itary Measures (SPS) committee,
which deals with food, plant and
animal health, said a “lack of
interest” from the private sector
in achieving internationally-recog-
nised standards in this area was
undermining both the commit-
tee’s work and, potentially, the
long-term competitiveness of the
Bahamas in these areas.

The information contained is from a third
party and The Tribune can not be held
tesponsible for errors and/or omission
from the daily report.



Absence of internationally-
accredited testing laboratory
could compromise food
import safety if Bahamas
does not risk trade sanctions

While the absence of interna-
tionally-recognised standards for
food and animal safety/health
could prevent Bahamian
exporters from accessing over-
seas markets with their agricul-
tural/fisheries products, the
absence of an internationally-
accredited and certified testing
laboratory could also jeopardise
this nation’s food safety when it
came to imports.

Dr Isaacs and Dwayne Curtis,
assistant director at the Depart-
ment of Environmental Health
Services (DEHS), explained that
under a rules-based trading
regime such as the WTO or EPA,
the Bahamas could not automat-
ically ban food imports to this
nation on health and safety
grounds.

It needed to produce solid sci-
entific evidence to explain why
particular imports were banned,
Dr Isaacs and Mr Curtis said, oth-
erwise the Bahamas could be
referred by the impacted nation
to a trade sanctions/dispute reso-
lution committee. To produce this
evidence, the Bahamas will need
to have an internationally certi-
fied and recognised testing labo-
ratory.

Dr Isaacs explained that
before, if an issue such as ‘mad
cow disease’ arose, the Bahamas
could simply tell the exporting
nation it was not accepting its
products. But under a rules-based
trading regime, and standards
designed to prevent SPS being

SEE page 4B

Tribune Business Editor

BAHAMIAN services profes-
sionals will be unable to supply
the European Union (EU) mar-
ket under the Economic Partner-
ship Agreement (EPA) if their
qualifications are “not recog-
nised” by countries in that trading
bloc, a Caribbean Export Devel-
opment Agency (CEDA) execu-
tive warned yesterday.

Carlos Wharton, a senior poli-
cy advisor to CEDA, emphasised
that market access to the EU for
Bahamian and CARIFORUM
services providers was not auto-
matically guaranteed just because
they had signed the EPA, the
achievement of recognised inter-
national “standards and qualifi-
cations” instead being “key” to
maximising this trade relation-
ship.

Mr Wharton told a seminar
organised by the Bahamas Cham-
ber of Commerce’s small and
medium-sized enterprises unit
that it was critical for this nation
and the entire CARIFORUM

* Bahamian services professionals must have qualifications recognised
by EU counterparts via Mutual Recognition Agreements
* ‘Scary’ list of things Bahamas needs to do to comply with EPA obligations
* Regional preferences have ‘most profound implications for Bahamas’
* No safeguards can be used to protect Bahamas’ infant industries after
10 years, while WTO has implications for investment incentives

bloc to build up “negotiating
capacity” in their respective pro-
fessional organisations, enabling
the likes of attorneys and accoun-
tants to reach agreements with
their EU counterparts.

This was critical, he explained,
because Bahamian services pro-
fessionals would need to agree
Mutual Recognition Agreements
that “must be signed” with their
EU counterparts, and approved
by the relevant EPA governing
body, to ensure they could supply
the EU market.

“We’ve got a lot of work to
do,” Mr Wharton said. “If quali-
fications are not recognised in the
EU market, you can’t sell goods
and services there.”

He added that this was one

Make it a reality.

area where “we see the Bahamas
offering a lot of support and tak-
ing the lead” for CARIFORUM,
based on the fact that this nation’s
high volume of trade with the US
meant its exporters must be
attaining high standards/qualifi-
cations that satisfied US regula-
tors and business partners.

Mr Wharton said: “With barri-
ers coming down, standards and
qualifications are going to be they
key. Right now, many of our
firms don’t have the capacity to
meet the standards, and we have
to work with professional organ-
isations to ensure qualifications
are met.”

The seminar highlighted just
how much remains to be done for
the Bahamas to fulfill and imple-

Prime Income Fund

e A higher, stable rate of return

e Long-term capital preservation

e Lower risk investment

PA

Nassau: 242.356.9801
Freeport: 242.351.3010

FUP ele

St. Michael: 246.435.1955

royalfidelity.com

e Diversified portfolio

ment its EPA obligations, an
exercise likely to tax the country
and its public/private sector insti-
tutions to the bone. The EPA
agreement’s signing, unlike what
many seem to believe, marks the
start of a 25-year process, not the
end of it.

The Government will be
required to finance the creation of
new institutions, bodies and laws
at a time when its fiscal position is
under immense pressure as a
result of the global recession,
while the private sector will be
required to adapt to a rules-based
trading system and new ways of
doing business.

Hank Ferguson, the Bahamas

SEE page 4B

e Professional fund management

We can get you there!

ROYAL FIDELITY

Money at Work

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PAGE 2B, WEDNESDAY, MAY 20, 2009

THE TRIBUNE



>). =<;\;
Don’t take large bites from marketing plan

NOW is not the time to cut,
slice, mince or chop your sales
and marketing efforts. In a
tough economy, you have to
do the exact opposite of what
your instincts are telling you to
do. Many will cut costs in mar-
keting and advertising, hoping
to survive until things get bet-
ter.

The best defence is a good
offense. Think about this. If
you are coach of a football
team and your team was down
after the first half, do you
bench your best players? Do
you throw away your best
equipment? Do you call the
owner or boss, and say we’re
out of the game? I don’t think
so. At least I hope not.

As head coach you do the
opposite. During the half-time
break you motivate your play-
ers, tweak strategies, use your
best players, dig your heels in
and fight right? Well, what is
the difference? In business, do
the same.

According to Ron Snyder, a
leading international sales and
marketing expert: “Those who
choose to be aggressive and

create new opportunities will
be handsomely rewarded - gen-
erating additional revenue and
opportunities.”

SHORT TERM PLANS

Who really, honestly knows
the future? If someone tells
you they know exactly what’s
going to happen, run, because
we only have our best guess.

So instead of making an
annual sales and marketing
plan (I’m not saying don’t look
ahead), make a short-term
plan. Look at the next month,
three months or six months.
Take little bites you can swal-
low and manage with ease.
Have you ever taken a bite of
food you can barely chew,
much less talk (I’m sure we all
have).

Take a small bite you can
easily and concisely handle. If
you plan on advertising via
radio or newspaper, do it for
one month, and maybe two or
three. Figure out what’s the
best time for your product or
company. Take a short-term
approach.

Promotional
Marketing

mooie ermal rey TT



SIMPLICITY/IDEAS
FROM THE PAST

We have all heard “keep it
simple stupid”? Stop compli-
cating things. Simplicity in itself
is overlooked all too often. We
think we have to be clever and
create the world’s best mar-
keting plan or approach, when
some of the simplest ads and
plans have worked the best.

Ask yourself what has
worked in the past and why?
As a youngster, my dad often
said: “You can judge your
future by your past.” I disliked
that statement at the time,
because then I was not creating
a good past (typical teenager
stuff). However, how profound
and simple a statement. If a
specific plan, idea or tool has
worked previously, why not
revisit it, re-think and re-tool

THE COLLEGE OF THE BAHAMAS

Visit our website at www.cob.edu.bs

REGISTRATION
ANNOUNCEMENT

If you have reserved a seat for classes for Fall 2009
but have not yet paid, please be advised that the first scheduled
cancellation for non payment of tuition and fees will take place on
May 18th, 2009, and will be repeated every 14 days thereafter.

Students will be able to reserve seats online until
July 26th, 2009, at www.cob.edu.bs

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slightly? Simply just use what
has worked.

How long have can openers
been around? A very long
time. However, in today’s mar-
ket you see the same tool, just
different variations achieving
the same goal.

So take some time, review
what has worked in the past
and simply tweak or modify.

Remember keep it simple --
won---- , you get the point.

BE CONSISTENT WITH
YOUR MESSAGE

Digestion is easier when we
take small bites of the same
food.

Speak English if your mar-
ket speaks in English. In other
words, keep your wording
SIMPLE (and short/small). If
using different medias to get
your message out, make sure
the same message is conveyed
throughout, whether it is radio,
newspaper, flyers or e-mail.
This will not only save you time
and money but will consistent-
ly convey your message. The
same theme should be

expressed and
through.

Use what I call the three to
five-second rule. If your reader
or viewer cannot digest in three
to five seconds the basis of your
message, you have lost them
and given them indigestion.
Our attention span in today’s
environment is not what it used
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through

NB: Scott Farrington is pres-
ident of SunTee EmbroidMe, a
promotional and marketing
company specialising in pro-
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IN THE MATTER OF THE LEGAL PROFESSION ACT, 1992

AND

IN THE MATTER OF A COMPLAINT AGAINST COUNSEL
AND ATTORNEY

BETWEEN

SOLOMON GUTSTEIN

Complainants

KENDALL KNOWLES

Respondent

NOTICE OF HEARING

TAKE NOTICE that the Disciplinary Tribunal shall
hear the subject Complaint on Wednesday the 20th day
of May, A.D., 2009 at 3:00 o’clock in the afternoon
before Her Ladyship The Honourable Mrs. Justice
Albury at 3rd Floor British American Building, George

Street, Nassau, The Bahamas.

AND FURTHER TAKE NOTICE that the Respondent,
Kendall Knowles, is required to produce to the Bahamas
Bar Council within seven (7) days from the date hereof,
an address to which the Decision may be sent by prepaid

Registered Post.

Dated the 14th day of May, A.D., 2009

Bahamas Bar Association
Elizabeth Avenue
Nassau, The Bahamas

keting themselves. Readers can
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scott@sun-tee.com or by tele-
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Benchmark
unveils O1
$9,171 loss

BENCHMARK
(Bahamas) yesterday
unveiled a $9,171 net loss
for the 2009 first quarter,
an improved performance
from its Alliance Invest-
ment Management sub-
sidiary offsetting a $471,155
decline in the unrealised
value of its Bahamian equi-
ty portfolio.

Alliance, its offshore bro-
ker/dealer, generated net
profits of $315,720 for the
three months to March 31,
2009, while the Benchmark
(Advisors) and Benchmark
(Bahamas) subsidiaries lost
$11,666 and $312,875
respectively.

Benchmark (Bahamas)
saw consolidated first quar-
ter revenues drop 16 per
cent to $258,051 year-over-
year, while expenses fell by
3 per cent to $258,924.

The Tribune wants to hear
from people who are
making news in their
neighbourhoods. Perhaps
you are raising funds for a
good cause, campaigning
for improvements in the
area or have won an
award.

If so, call us on 322-1986
and share your story.

For the stories
behind the news,
ele M atleast
on Mondays

and Climate Change
Impacts in The Bahamas

PRESENTER:
lan Elliott
Ph.D, Student, University of Exeter, UK
DATE: May 26th, 2009

Time: 7:00 pm

VENUE: The Retreat, Village Road

lan Elliott is a Ph.D. student who is re-
searching patterns of biodiversity and cli-
mate change impacts in The Bahamas util-

izing Geographic Information Systems
(GIS). GIS 1s a powerful tool that allows
for mapping and analyses of landscapes,
and the data from Mr. Elliott's project are
currently being used to design a more sus-
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Through his research, Mr. Elliott has cre-
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habitat, and the impacts of climate change
and hurricanes, Visit http://mselex.ac.uk/
ast for propect information,

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THE TRIBUNE

WEDNESDAY, MAY 20, 2009, PAGE 3B





Cable accused of ‘bellyaching’

@ By NEIL HARTNELL
Tribune Business Editor

CABLE Bahamas’ claims
that the rival Bahamas
Telecommunications Compa-
ny (BTC) enjoyed “preferen-
tial treatment and influence”
in the communications reform
process were yesterday brand-
ed “ridiculous”, with the com-
pany accused of “bellyaching”
now that it was being forced
to live up to its previous com-
mitments.

T. B. Donaldson, head of the
BTC privatisation committee,
which oversaw the consulta-
tion and feedback effort on the
Government’s behalf, said in
response to Cable Bahamas’
assertions that the process was
compromised by the presence
of three BTC executives on the
committee: “Nothing could be
further from the truth.”

“T don’t know which hat
Cable Bahamas has pulled that
from. That’s so ridiculous,” Mr
Donaldson, a former Central
Bank governor, told Tribune
Business.

“They have no evidence to
prove that. No influence,
undue or otherwise, was exer-
cised by BTC.”

Cable Bahamas, in its April
20, 2009, feedback to the BTC
privatisation committee,
argued that the perception of
integrity in the process had
been “undermined” because
BTC’s executive chairman,
Julian Francis; Felicity John-
son, BTC’s vice-president for
legal, regulatory and intercon-
nection, and its company sec-
retary; and Tellis Symonette,
BTC’s senior vice-president for
Family Islands and adminis-
tration, were all on the BTC
Privatisation Committee over-
seeing it.

In addition, the Broadcasting
Corporation of the Bahamas
(BCB) was also said by Cable
Bahamas to have enjoyed a
privileged position in the con-
sultation effort as its chairman,

* Claim rival BTC had ‘preferential treatment and influence’ over communications
reform process branded as ‘ridiculous’ by committee chairman
* Says BISX-listed firm ‘frustrated’ 15-year monopoly ending and being held to account

should refund to it revenues

chise comes to an end in Octo-

ed persons were “involved in

the process, if anything BTC
will probably have been disad-
vantaged because they were
wearing their committee, not
their BTC, hats”.

When asked why Cable
Bahamas had made these alle-
gations, Mr Donaldson, the
current Commonwealth Bank
chairman, replied: “ I think
Cable Bahamas is frustrated,
having had a 15-year monop-
oly, that they are now having
to do by law some of the things
they should have been doing.

“T see them bellyaching
about the Universal Service
Obligation,” he added, sug-
gesting that the Government
should previously obtained
commitments from Cable
Bahamas in writing, so that the
BISX-listed company could
have been more easily held to
account.

Referring to comments



made in the House of Assem-
bly by Zhivargo Laing, minis-
ter of state for finance, that the
Government would look into
whether Cable Bahamas

Part-time Accountant

For Growing Franchise Group

Main Responsibilities:

Recording of all journal entries
Handling accounts payable functions

paid for Internet/cable televi-
sion services in schools and
other educational institutions,
Mr Donaldson said it had been
agreed that Cable Bahamas
should provide this free of
charge.

Describing the company’s
claims over the communica-
tions reform consultation
process as “absolute non-
sense”, Mr Donaldson said he
did not know whether Cable
Bahamas was trying to
mobilise “public sympathy”
behind it.

However, he warned the
company that it will “find out
sooner or later that the public
have no sympathy or them at
all, having had a 15-year
monopoly”.

Cable Bahamas’ 15-year
exclusive cable television fran-

ber 2009, in theory allowing
over entrants to come into the
market. Yet Cable Bahamas is
so well-established, that com-
petitors will find it hard to
challenge them.

Mr Donaldson criticised the
exclusive franchise given to
Cable Bahamas, saying the pri-
vatisation committee had
learnt that a private monopoly
was just as bad as a public one.

“T don’t think anything they
[Cable Bahamas] do or say
would surprise me,” he added.
“All I can say is that not too
many people in this country
are sympathetic to Cable
Bahamas, because in many
instances they’ve not lived up
to their promises. We should
have realised what we found
in the beginning, that a private
monopoly is just as bad as a

public monopoly.

“They're [Cable Bahamas]
trying to drag up red herrings.
They’ve had a good run, a 15-
year monopoly, and should
now focus on trying to do
something for the people.”

It is unclear what motivated
Cable Bahamas’ comments in
the consultation process, but
it appears that the company’s
once-close relationship with
the Government has, for now,
cooled considerably.

There may also be some
frustration over the protract-
ed wait for the Ministry of
Finance/Central Bank of the
Bahamas to give the company
exchange control approval for
its $40 million preference share
issue, a key component of the
$80 million deal to buy out its
controlling shareholder,
Columbus Communications.














BAHAMAS DEVELOPMENT BANK
Cable Beach, West Bay Street,
PO.Box W-3034
Nassau. Bahamas
‘Tel:( 242) 327-57R0V427 257936
Fax:(242) 327-3047, 327-1258
www, bahamasdevelopmenthank.com

The general public is invited to attend Bahamas



Preparing submission for franchisers

Development Bank s sale of repossessed assets.



Preparing financial statements




Devising & monitoring internal cantrols





Qualifications:

Applicants should possess Bachelors degree in

ASSETS

T




Accounting, at least 5 years experience, knowledge of

* (1) Compaq Presario Computer Tower

* (1) Canon Canoscan N640D EX Scanner

PELE
* (1) Marble Table (Rectangle)



retail/food accounting, be proficient in Quickbooks

* (1) Digital Scale (New)



and MS Office applications, must be able te multi

* (1) Whirl Microwave




* (1)Tec Cash Register

Cooler/Freezers

Michael Moss, also sat on the task, work with minimum supervision and possess a

BTC privatisation committee.

Mr Donaldson yesterday
told Tribune Business that
while the three BTC-connect-

* (1) Epson Stylus Pro 9600 Print Engine
* (1) HP DeskJet 656c Printer (Desktop)
* (1) Monitor
* (1) 1520 Epson Stylus Color Printer
(1) Keyboard & Mouse
(1) Brothers Printer
(1) Samsung Digital Camcorder ore AIO guipme
(1) Dell Scanner & Printer * (3) Nail Tables
* (7) Facial Machine
* (2) Nail Stools

(1) Two Door Chest Freezer

(1) Ice Cream Cooler

(1) Single Door Cooler

(1) 8’ Walk-in Freezer
wCompressor (New)







high level of integrity and professionalism.

Fax application, resume to 364-2470

d = erg @ = e $
(1) Chrome Juice Filler * (2) Tech Work Benches
(1) Multi Fruit Juicer * (1) Alternator Test Bench
(1) Quilting Sewing Machine * (1) Paint Booth

(1) Deli Showcase * (1) Rivet Machine

(1) Singer Sewing Machine * (1) 6” Storage Cabinet
(1) Janome Monogram/Embroidery Sewing Machine * (1) 4’ Craftsman Tool Cabinet
(1) Singer Quantum XL150 Sewing Machine with Serger Brake Washer

(1) Meat Saw (New) Sand Blaster

(1) Deli Selection (Minor 2000 MT-SE) (New) Vari-Drive

Assortment of Items

* Cooking Utensils Pots, Pans & Plates
* (2) Breakfast Nooks

* Air Hockey Game

* (1) Yamaha Wave Runner

DHL JOB DESCRIPTION

POSITION:
JOB FAMILY:
RCS CODE:
REPORTS TO:
LOCATION:

Collections Agent

Credit & Collections
A20004

Collections Lead

Country Finance Department

OVERALL PURPOSE:

Location: Inland Steel, Sumner Street off Solider Rd.Nassau, Bahamas

Under limited supervision in a team environment provide efficient and effec-
tive credit approvals. To ensure timely credit application processing, respond to
information requests and issues. Ensure accuracy of all credit decisions functions
while staying within company policy and procedural guidelines.

Directions: Exit Abundant Life Road turn right onto Solider Road then the first left

onto Sumner Street tenth two storey white & blue building on the left
Date & Time: 10:00a.m. — 3:00p.m. — Saturday May 23, 2009
All assets are sold as is where is for cash, cashier s cheque. No purchase(s) will be released
DUTIES AND RESPONSIBILITIES: Cote nnn

The general public is invited to attend Bahamas Development Bank’s sale of repossessed Vehicles

and small Vessels.
Vehicles

2001 Hyundai H-1 Van SUX
2006 Mitsubishi Canter Truck
1996 Ford Explorer

2000 Ford Ranger Truck
1999 Ford F-250 Truck

2006 Hyundai H-1 SVX Van

Gathers, compiles and maintains basic credit information to be used in
making credit decisions.

Reviews and monitors credit sources, customer applications and
delinquent accounts. Processes credit applications.

Works with smaller customers to resolve collections issues and disputes.
Investigates disputes and reviews documentation.

Prepares and processes credit and collections account adjustments.
Implements credit suspensions.

Recommends further actions on delinquent accounts.

Maintains records of credit risks and delinquent accounts.

Provides support and coordination with third party agencies as needed.
Handles customer calls related to Collection Agency accounts.
Prepares and files bankruptcy claim documents.

2003 Dodge Caravan

2002 Hyundai H-1 Van SUX

1997 Double Axle Mack Dump Truck
1997 Dodge Stratus

1982 GMC Brigadier Drill Truck
2001 Kia Pregio Van

1989 Ford L8000 Drill Truck (Green)

WEES

20’ Robolo Vessel (1996) with Evinrude Outboard Engine

19’ Fiberglass Sports Vessel (1989) Hull Only

21 Seacraft Vessel (1974) with 140 HP Yamaha Outboard Engine

19’ Spanish Wells Runabout Vessel (1991) with 115 HP Mercury Outboard Engine
20’ Abaco Skiff (1997) with 115 HP Mercury Outboard Engine

MINIMUM QUALIFICATIONS:

High School diploma required. .

1-3 years of experience in Collections.

Advanced administrative skills to function effectively with limited
direction amid competing priorities and deadlines.

Excellent customer service orientation and communication skills.
Proficiency using various computer software applications.
Excellent analytical and interpersonal skills.

Proficiency using various computer software applications

Location: Internal Security Division Compound, Thompson Blvd

Nassau, Bahamas

Date & Time: 10:00a.m. — 3:00p.m. — Saturday May 23, 2009

For additional information telephone 327-5780.

The public is invited to come and view the aforementioned assets on the date and time indicated.
After which you may submit Sealed bids marked “TENDER-EQUIPMENT” to Bahamas
Development Bank, P.O. Box N-3034, Nassau, Bahamas. A representative will be on the
compound from 10:00am to 3:00pm to collect and secure all offers, which will be opened on May
25, 2009. Please note that all bids on the aforementioned assets should be received by 3:00 pm
May 23, 2009. The Bahamas Development Bank reserves the right to reject any or all offers. All
assets are sold as is.

For more information please contact:
Romell K. Knowles I

Country Manager
Email:Romell.Knowles@dhl.com
PAGE 4B, WEDNESDAY, MAY 20, 2009

THE TRIBUNE



US offshore attack provides financial reform opportunity

lm By CHESTER ROBARDS
Business Reporter
crobards@tribunemedia.net

THE AMENDMENTS being made to the
US tax code represent a unique opportunity
to craft and mould a new 21st century business
model for the Bahamas’ financial services sec-
tor, a partner in the McKinney, Bancroft and
Hughes law firm said yesterday.

John Wilson, speaking at the Bahamas Insti-
tute of Financial Services’ week of seminars,
said the Bahamas should use the US reform to
retool the Bahamian financial services sector
and quell whatever impact they and the ‘Stop
Tax Haven Abuse’ Bill will have on this coun-
try.

According to Mr Wilson, the OECD coun-
tries have sounded the death knell for the tax-
out of the Bahamas’ private client business.

“We should use these opportunities to inno-
vate and develop a sustainable financial model
and product for the Bahamas,” he said. “The
next three to five years promise to be a dynam-
ic time for the development of offshore busi-
nesses.”

Cheryl Bazard, senior counsel and head of

Chambers at her law firm, said that Bahamians
should know that the business that has been
done in so-called “tax haven” jurisdictions, “has
all been legal within the framework of legisla-
tion coming out of the US”.

She said that the ever since the US and
Europe announced their plans to go after inter-
national financial centres, the Bahamas has
been challenged on every side of the issue.

However, she, like many, believes the US is
using offshore financial centres as a scapegoat
for the global financial crisis, and is seeking to
recapture lost tax revenue it claims offshore
financial centres withhold.

“For the United States to bolster its welfare
plans, it is to now attack tax havens across the
board to get that wealth back on to their shores
and into their financial institutions,” Ms Bazard
said.

She suggested that the Bahamas put its best
and brightest minds behind these issues in order
to move from national ‘think-tanks’ to nation-
al ‘do’ tanks, because the US is not relenting on
its mission to do away with offshore financial
centres.

Former finance minister James Smith, who
was also a panellist at the seminar, said the US

was attempting to “obliterate offshore financial
centres”.

He said that in order for the Bahamas to
remain a competitive international financial
centre, it needs to adopt strategies that would
move it forward as possibly damaging US tax
policies bear down.

Attorney Ryan Pinder said the US is com-
mitted to put its laws into effect by the end of
the year, and suggested that Bahamians keep an
eye on policies coming out of the US at a rate of
at least one per week.

“Every offshore financial institution should
closely monitor the US policies, but also pay
attention to the what’s coming out of Europe,”
he said.

Mr Wilson said this country needs to adopt a
coordinated strategy for all segments of its
international business in order to moved for-
ward successfully.

“Our task is to decide whether we will be
the cadre professional officiating at the funeral
parlour of the financial services industry, or
will we oversee the retooled and re-energised
sector, which like the mythical phoenix bird,
will rise form the ashes more beautiful than
before,” Mr Wilson said.

Project’s pre-sale buyers
95 per cent local
The contract to construct the

FROM 1B
70 phase one homes has been
awarded to Bahama Wall Systems Ltd.

When construction commences and infrastructure is put
in place, Mr Kinsale said he expects buyer interest to peak.
“We anticipate much stronger demand once the project
starts,” he said.

The construction side of the development is expected to
create around 100 jobs, with 50 more employed at Bal-
moral’s clubhouse as gardeners, waiting staff, culinary staff
and administration.

“We have been able to create a significant number of
jobs and hiring processes for local Bahamian contractors,”
said Mr Kinsale.

According to him, because of the current state of the
market, Balmoral’s sales and marketing team have been
working overtime to push pre-sales in order to give the pro-
ject legs.

The project has placed a huge emphasis on making the
Balmoral a family-oriented community, with pools and a
Mark Knowles tennis centre to complement the clubhouse
amenity available to all home owners. It has taken steps to
save as many indigenous trees as possible, as a part of the
landscaping process. “There is a lot of focus on the ameni-
ties,” said Mr Kinsale.

EPA, from 1B

Chamber of Commerce’s inter-
national trade consultant, said in
relation to the EPA: “If you go
through the list of things that
need to be done, it would be
scary.

“We're the only country in the
Western Hemisphere that does
not have a competition policy.
We do not have a clear govern-
ment procurement policy. If the
IDB’s involved, we comply with
the rules. If not, we make do with
it as we see fit.

“These things are not possible
in a rules-based trading regime.”

Mr Wharton told the seminar

that the EPA’s “regional prefer-
ence clause” “has probably the
most profound implications for
the Bahamas”. This requires the
Bahamas to offer the same trade
preferences, benefits and tariff
liberalisation schedule to other
CARIFORUM states and the
Dominican Republic as it is to
the EU, the Europeans having
been unwilling to sign an agree-
ment that did not permit this.
“The regional preference
clause has serious implications for
the [CARICOM] community,”
Mr Wharton explained. “This
clause has probably the most pro-
found implications for the
Bahamas, because the Bahamas is
not part of the CARICOM Single

Market & Economy (CSME).

“If goods originate from
CARICOM countries, the tariffs
the Bahamas has agreed to phase-
out for the EU also have to be
phased-out for the same products
in the context of Bahamas-CARI-
COM relations, and equally in
the Bahamas-Dominican Repub-
lic relationship.”

Mr Wharton said this would
give the Bahamas an opportunity
to source products from CARI-
COM countries and the Domini-
can Republic at more competi-
tive prices.

And he added: “It provides an
opportunity for you [the
Bahamas] more goods and ser-
vices to the CARICOM market.”

Mr Wharton later told Tribune
Business that more developed
countries in the CARIFORUM
bloc, which would include the
Bahamas, had to implement the
EPA provisions in respect of their
fellow CARICOM states (and the
Dominican Republic) within one
year of the agreement’s signing.
This means that this nation has
to give its fellow Caribbean
nations the same trade prefer-
ences and benefits it has accorded
the EU by late 2009.

The Chamber and CEDA are
likely to conduct a study examin-
ing the impact of the regional
preference clause for the
Bahamas.

Mr Wharton also warned that,

10 years after the EPA’s signing,
the Bahamas and other CARI-
FORUM states will “no longer
be able to apply safeguard mea-
sures on imports impacting infant
industries” in their nations.

Describing this as a “slap in the
face”, Mr Wharton said it had
important implications for manu-
facturing industries, not to men-
tion start-ups and entrepreneurs.

“We are not only competing in
the export market, but have to
build confidence among our peo-
ple to compete in the domestic
market before we consider com-
peting outside,” he added.

Mr Wharton also urged the
Bahamas to beware of the World
Trade Organisation’s (WTO)

Subsidies and Countervailing
Measures Agreement, which pro-
hibited the use of export subsi-
dies by 2015.

The Bahamas has formally sub-
mitted its Memorandum of Trade
regime to being the accession
process to full WTO membership,
and Mr Wharton said current
members, such as Barbados, were
already studying how this agree-
ment would affects its econom-
ic/trade legislation and policies.

“T encourage the Chamber and
the Government of the Bahamas
to this thing to the fullest extent,
because it can have an impact for
the type of incentives you offer
going forward,” Mr Wharton
added.

SAFETY, from 1B

used as a trade barrier, exporting coun-
tries could insist their products were safe.

“Now, if there’s an international stan-
dard, we have to accept the product of
prove scientifically why we aren’t,” Dr
Isaacs said.

Mr Curtis added: “Even if we think
we have a good reason to prohibit, based
on our scientific opinion, if our facilities
do not meet the standard, that can be
challenged.”

Dr Isaacs, who addressed a Bahamas
Chamber of Commerce-organised con-
ference on the SPS issue, said: “We find
that not too many people know about
the SPS committee and the international

agreements in general.”

The WTO, which the Bahamas is
already applying for full membership in,
has such an agreement on SPS issues.
And this nation, having signed on to the
Economic Partnership Agreement
(EPA) with the European Union (EU),
will be expected to meet those SPS stan-
dards, otherwise its agricultural and fish-
eries exporters might be denied access
to the EU.

Dr Isaacs said the SPS committee,
which comes under the Ministry of Agri-
culture and Fisheries, aimed to be an
advocate for SPS measures, acting as a
venue to facilitate their eventual imple-
mentation and a communications channel
between the Government and Bahamian
industry.

“Some of the strong challenges we face

are that some local manufacturers and
producers benefit from the lack of local
standards,” Dr Isaacs explained. “The
absence of some standards may be ben-
eficial for some companies.”

He said the SPS standards drive was
also being impacted by the lack of eco-
nomic diversification in the Bahamas,
and the fact that few Bahamian compa-
nies were goods and agricultural/fisheries
exporters.

“We've not really made economic
diversification a priority,” Dr Isaacs said.
“We haven’t tried to think of things for
the export market. Things are changing
and we have to catch up.”

He explained that the wait for full
WTO membership, and the Bahamas’
current status as an observer members,
offered the best opportunity for this.

“Once we join, the options regarding
change will be limited,” Dr Isaacs said,
explaining that a failure to improve nego-
tiating capacity and legislation in this
area would place the Bahamas at a com-
petitive disadvantage.

He told Tribune Business: “There is
some interest, but most of the compa-
nies doing the trading have created their
own standards, quality assurance pro-
grammes within their own company.”
Commonwealth Brewery and Paradise
Fisheries were cited as examples of this.

“Other companies are not really aware
of the benefits or have the wherewithal to
properly regulate their internal environ-
ment,” Dr Isaacs added.

A failure to adopt and implement
internationally-recognised SPS standards
was “going to put us at a real competitive

disadvantage”, Dr Isaacs said. “Once we
join, because it seems other people are
more used to dealing with the standards
in general, they will be better able to
adjust to changes in the standards.

“Those people not used to standards
will have a lot more difficulty in con-
forming to those standards if they change
of increase.”

He added: “What we’re trying to do is
develop the capacity in regards to imple-
mentation, so that we can implement the
WTO agreement when we become mem-
bers. The whole idea is to develop this
capacity. The whole purpose of the SPS
committee is to act as the driving force.”

The absence of private sector interest
meant there was no drive to establish a
Board of Standards, leaving the whole
issue in the Government’s hands.

PUBLIC NOTICE

INTENT TO CHANGE NAME BY DEED POLL

The Public is hereby advised that |, HELENA DELCINA
SYMONETTE of Monastery Height, PO. Box CB-12766,
Nassau, Bahamas, intend to change my name to HELENA
DELCINA STUART. If there are any objections to this change
of name by Deed Poll, you may write such objections to the
Chief Passport Officer, PO.Box N-742, Nassau, Bahamas no
later than thirty (30) days after the date of publication of this

NOTICE

NOTICE is hereby given that SEAN THOMPSON PALMER
of BARN CLOSE, PRINCE CHARLES DRIVE, P.O. BOX
N-4309, is applying to the Minister responsible for Nationality
and Citizenship, for registration/naturalization as a citizen of
The Bahamas, and that any person who knows any reason
why registration/naturalization should not be granted, should
send a written and signed statement of the facts within
twenty-eight days from the 20" day of May, 2009 to the
Minister responsible for nationality and Citizenship, P.O. Box
N-7147, Nassau, Bahamas.

PUBLIC NOTICE

INTENT TO CHANGE NAME BY DEED POLL

The Public is hereby advised that |, SERVNOVIA
AMANDA SANDS of P.O. Box N-8581, Nassau,
Bahamas, intend to change my name to AMANDA
VERNESSA_ SANDS-RUSSELL. If there are any
objections to this change of name by Deed Poll, you
may write such objections to the Chief Passport Officer,
P.O.Box N-742, Nassau, Bahamas no later than thirty
(30) days after the date of publication of this notice.

NOTICE

NOTICE is hereby given that CURRY VALBRUN OF
EXUMA STREET OFF ANDROS AVENUE, P.O. BOX
EE-15093, is applying to the Minister responsible
for Mationality and Citizenship, for registration’
naturalization as a citizen of The Bahamas, and thal
any person who knows any reason why registration!
naturalization should not be granted, should send
a written and signed statement of the facts within
twenty-eight days fram the 12° day of May, 2005 to the
Minister responsible for nationality and Citizenship,
RO. Box N-7147, Nassau, Bahamas.

NOTICE

NOTICE is hereby given that MARTIN JERMAINE
McGREGOR OF #25 DIAMOND DRIVE, P.O. BOX F-44900,
GRAND BAHAMA, BAHAMAS is applying to the Minister
responsible for Nationality and Citizenship, for registration/
naturalization as a citizen of The Bahamas, and that any
person who knows any reason why registration/ naturalization
should not be granted, should send a written and signed
statement of the facts within twenty-eight days from the 20th
day of MAY, 2009 to the Minister responsible for Nationality
and Citizenship, PO. Box N-7147, Freeport, Bahamas.



PUBLIC NOTICE

INTENT TO CHANGE NAME BY DEED POLL

The Public is hereby advised that |, CARA VERON SAUNDERS of the
South Western District of the Island of New Providence on of the
Islands of the Commonwealth of the Bahamas, intend to change my
son's name from KELVIN VICTOR GERMAN to MALACHI ADRIEL
SAUNDERS. If there are any objections to this change of name by Deed
Poll, you may write such objections to the Chief Passport Officer, P.O.Box
N-742, Nassau, Bahamas no later than thirty (30) days after the date of
publication of this notice.

JOB OPENING

Needed immediately, experienced Nurses to
work in Operating Theatre. Must have a good
employment background, must possess a Bachelors
Degree in Nursing, must have Operating Theatre
experience and must be licensed in the
Commonwealth of the Bahamas. For immediate
consideration, please send your resume to:

PHYSICIANS ALLIANCE LTD.
P.O. BOX EE-17022
#3 GROSVENOR CLOSE OFFICE
NASSAU, BAHAMAS
FAX: (242) 326-8874

Now Hiring
Assistant Managers

* Must have at least 2 years management ar
supervisory experience, preferably in food
service,

* Must have good communication and leadership
skills.

Fax resume to 394-4938 or complete application at
DO stores at Town Centre Mall or Harbour Bay
Shopping Centre.

NOTICE

NOTICE is hereby given that MAXEN PROPHETE of 1611
NE, 3RDAVE., APT. 5, DELRAY BEACH, FLORIDA, 33444,
is applying to the Minister responsible for Nationality and
Citizenship, for registration/naturalization as a citizen of The
Bahamas, and that any person who knows any reason why
registration/naturalization should not be granted, should
send a written and signed statement of the facts within
twenty-eight days from the 20" day of May, 2009 to the
Minister responsible for nationality and Citizenship, P.O. Box
N-7147, Nassau, Bahamas.

Clico (Bahamas) Limited
(In Liquidation)

LIQUIDATOR’S NOTICE

Policyholders of Clico (Bahamas) Limited (dn Liquida-
tion) are advised that premium payments and other policy
transactions can be made at the Company’s main office,
located on Mt. Royal Avenue and Carew Street, Nassau,
Bahamas.

Policyholders and the public are further advised that office
hours are from 9:00 am to 4:30 pm daily.

Craig A. (Tony) Gomez
Official Liquidator

Notice



OSPIN INTERNATIONAL INC.

In Voluntary Liquidation

Notice is hereby given that in accordance with Section
1384) of the International Business Companies Act. 2000,
OSPIN INTERNATIONAL INC. is in dissolution as of

May 18, 2009.
International Liquidator Services Inc. situaated at 35A

Regent Street, PO. Box 1777, Belize City, Belize is the
Liquidator.

LIQUIDATOR


PAGE 6B, WEDNESDAY, MAY 20, 2009

eS

THE TRIBUNE





Danish’s from the Bread Shop.

i
"

“lll
-

Bread

done
right

ECO AM eC CCUM mS CCl mt Erm atte



The Tribune



@ By ALEX MISSICK
Tribune Features Reporter
amissick@tribunemedia.net

THERE is nothing that takes you
back to your childhood more
than the aroma of Grammy in
the kitchen making a batch of
her warm homemade bread.
That same soft, fluffy melt in
your mouth goodness that you
were eager to get your hands on
is exactly what the Bread Shop,
located on Shirley Street and
Okra Hill has to offer.

Michael Dillet, Managing Director at
the Bread Shop, started the business in
1992 along with his mother a native of
Exuma.

“My wife and I perfected the baking
the techniques that I learned from my
mother. We are presently operating the
Bread Shop alone. All of our bread prod-

Fresh Baked breads cooling at the Bread Shop.



ucts are hand kneaded,” Mr Dillet said.

Although the Bread shop specialises in
bread, they also bake pastries such as
cupcakes, pineapple tarts, coconut tarts,
cookies, bread buns and other pastries.

“When you start buying bread from us,
you either have to hit the gym or the
streets because we will keep you coming
back-the bread is just that good,” Mr Dil-
Kray ites

Mr Dillet said although he would like
to consider the Bread Shop as a mom
and pop type of store, their clientele
spreads world wide as they cater to many
international and high end clients.

“We have customers from all walks of
life. We have corporate customers, time
share persons, Atlantis workers, private
yachts, and international customers. We
have customers that have grown up their
kids on this bread. We have customers
who came in from their conception and
are now 17 and 18 years old. We know
our customers so well that when they pull
up in the drive way I already know what
they want and I just start packing their
order before they reach inside,” Mr Dil-





let said.

Mr Dillet said cinnamon swirl bread is
the unique signature bread of the Bread
Shop. The cinnamon swirl is a blend of
sugars and cinnamon glazed with white
icing that is not too heavy to satisfy any
sweet tooth.

“Our signature bread contains a num-
ber of ingredients including a cinnamon
blend that only we can make. It is a tasty
sweet bread that many people enjoy and
you will only find it at the Bread shop,”
Mr Dillet said.

As for the future of the Bread Shop,
Mr Dillet said he would like to continue
the store and continue to provide good
tasting bread “like mama used to make
it” for years to come.

“It is a pleasure to provide such good
tasting bread from the Bread Shop
because of the warm feelings we get from
our customers when they approve of how
good our product is. When you bite into
bread from the Bread Shop, you bite into
ingredients and bread prepared with love
and this is what makes the Bread Shop
stand out from its competitors.”

CupCakes from the Bread Shop.

—



Tribune Taste is once again showcasing
some of the super sized produce, being
grown by local farmers.
~ Check out these whoppers grown by
Spanish Wells farmer Lloyd Higgs. Mr
Higgs recently broke his own seven
pound onion record with this amazing
tear jerker which tipped the scales at
over nine pounds. He also grew this
massive 41 pound pumpkin.

Mr Higgs takes tremendous pride in the
farming industry of the Bahamas as do
all the farmers in Spanish Wells who
say that “it’s grown bigger and better in
the Bahamas in Spanish Wells.”
THE TRIBUNE WEDNESDAY, MAY 20, 2009, PAGE 7B






















The Tribune

This week, Tribune Entertain-
ment features an eclectic list of
events happening at the week-
end. From a major beauty
pageant to a celebration of fine
foods for a good cause- there is
sure tobe something on this =
list for everyone.

41. Miss Bahamas Universe
Finals- The new queen will be
crowned on Sunday May 24 at
the Rain Forest Theatre at the
Wyndham resort at 8 pm.
Attend this gala event and see
who will represent the country
at this year’s Miss Universe
Pageant to be held right here at
the Atlantis Resort on Paradise
Island in August.

THE BAHAMAS HUMANE SOCIETY'S

2. Paradise Plates - Local

chefs from thirteen different i
restaurants will showcase excit- i
ing new creations or their well-

FUN DAY

loved signature fare to guests THE Bahamas

at Paradise Plates, Hands For =} eae Society hada
Hunger's first annual fundraiser i

event being held on Saturday, dog fun day over the

weekend at the Botani-
cal Gardens grounds
allowing dogs of all
shapes sizes and per-
sonalities to make new
friends and show off
various talents in a
number of different
competitions. Pictured
are some four legged
friends having a great
time.

May 23from7-11pmatthe i
Atlantis Crown Ballroom. Spon-
sored by The New Providence:
Development Company Limited
and Old Fort Bay, the unique
event will feature a sampling of
gourmet food, fine wine and
live entertainment with all pro-
ceeds benefiting Hands For
Hunger the non-profit, humani-
tarian organisation committed
to the elimination of hunger and :
the reduction of food wastein
The Bahamas. Tickets are $125. :

3. Blue and White Ball - On
Saturday, May 23, Phi Beta Sig- |
ma Fraternity Inc and Zeta Phi:
Beta Sorority Inc will host their
2nd annual Blue & White Ball at
the Wyndam Nassau Resort,
Cable Beach. High school stu-
dents participating in the frater-
nity and sorority's programmes
will be honoured during the
ball. Outstanding students will Fi ae d
also be awarded scholarships : ~) > ) la WAL) LU
to assist in tertiary education. pas Swi tsk a eS. =

For tickets call 557-2673 or 5 ae : t 7
royce COUIGSWI Wy reales hi lol nl i ceve

: L | ; ry ( I |
4-the Golege of The Bahamas ountoyOrnando:
will be celebrating the launch of ; # By LLOYD ALLEN
their Sports & Wellness insti. { Tribune Features Reporter

tute by holding a Fun Run Walk : /allen@tribunemedia.net My eyes TTL

a ae fe me | : READ The Tribune’s e-splash for on time updates of enter- z ~ = read you a $3,000
pation Include dinner tor two, a ; tainment news, events, and happenings throughout Nassau as they : , A
Chapter One bookstore gift cer- : unfold. “4 se eT Reco Life)
tificate, One Month Gym Mem- : _ Recently the Kappa Alpha Psi fraternity hosted its Impromptu j $1,000 spending
bership and more. Entry fee is i Four at the Marley Resort, a wine and cheese, art, and jazz event, / | ae — ..
$10 (includes T-shirt Sm - Xlg) i as a fundraiser for one of the organisation’s community causes.

? ~=According to Errol L Bodie, one of the senior members of the

$12 (includes shirt 2Xlg and fraternity’s local chapter, the first few times the Jmpromptu event
up). Entry forms for the event} was held, proceeds had been earmarked for various causes, includ-
are available at the Centre for ©} ing local non-profit groups and other NGOs. However, proceeds

Continuing Education & Exten- i from this ie ee co slated for a youth mentoring pro-
i ; i gramme known as Guide Right.

a ctioaee ee bey i Mr Bodie explained that this is one of the many initiatives by nF oo i
ewe ness ented S i Kappa Alpha Psi, to target and assist at risk high school senior boys, Wy’ Cy

Oakes Field campus. The event; by showing and providing them healthy alternatives to a brighter , u

begins at 6 am at the Portia ? future.

Smith Building, Poinciana Dri- i This year’s event was nothing short of a who’s who celebrity

ve. This event is sponsored by i social, as dozens of fraternity and sorority affiliates along with

1 : : Other young professionals turned out to show support. With the
The d'Albenas Agency and Min ; Other young professional e hh pporl, Willy th

. : i melodic tunes of various entertainers, including Tingum Dem, and a Aa »
of Health. For more information ? an encore unveiling of the Kenisis experience by local artist Scharad : poe eeeD CRUNCH!
Call 302-4349. : Lightbourne, this event was certainly an overall success. wer < .
: Creators and designers of the Conchience Clothing (CC) line — ,
5. Dollars for Scholars - On : a local urban and uptown clothing company — are gearing to
Thursday, May 21, Doctor’s : launch their new summer line. Chief Executive Officers of the

; Fath ervf : company Giorgio Knowles and Deangelo Charlton, say this new
hospital and Rubin s will host : : line will bring a new level of new and creative styles. The duo, who
luncheon and fashion showin | have over the past two years become well-known for their hats,
aid of the Doctor's Hospital Dr | shirts, and hoodies, have been heavily supported by many local
Meyer Rassin Foundation. The : celebrities in the music and entertainment arena. This season they ,
event is $75 and will be held at : intend to feature cardigans, tailored pants, belts, and bikinis. 3% The dAlbenas Agency Ltd
Luciano’s Restaurant at noon. Local entertainer So$A Man aka Brandon Major recently MADIERA STREET, PALMDALE * TELEPHONE: 322-1441 A Bright Start
Tincnionmaan a h 1 : returned from Canada, where he, MDEEZ, Sammi Starr, and
e foun a lon provi es sc Ol- : Canadian artist Lion, recorded the video for his newest single,
arships and financial assistance : We Winning.
to persons pursuing careers in So$A explained in a recent interview, that as the final edit is being ENTRY FORM 9
healthcare. : completed for the video, the official release is scheduled for May 29 a
The Fashion Show will feature | at a Premiere launch party - Social Light 6 - at the Balcony night ' 7 â„¢
: club, where there also will be a special performance by other local Wi na vacation for fou r from

the new collections of Liz Clai- : entertainers. With his song Shawty over the last year making him

°°

njoy Kellogg § for br Cak fas,
e

as
ow
~ and fiyaway © 4

Kellogg’s Apple Jacks®, Froot Loops®, Frosted Flakes®, Corn Flakes® and Corn Pops® are registered brands.

borne, and New York by Isaac : a force to be reckoned with in the local music industry, So$A said Buy two qualifying boxes of your favourite

Mizrahi as provided by Rubin's. : fans can look forward to bigger and better things from him in the Name: a oe

For tickets or information on ; coming months. aes; OF two Tr-Fun pack or Froot Loops and

the “Dollars for Scholars” Fash- ; Producers of local online entertainment magazine Elife242 say the i F eore CaO Mi cine cary fo onl

ion Show and Luncheon. con- _; fifth edition of the magazine is now available, with local DJ Dion Address: a oi ek tops and dive inta

tact Doctors Hospital at 302- : Da Butcha on the cover, along with a two page spread. The mag- ss is ’nitty boxes in participating stores or at the
nap i azine which in the past has featured other big names in Bahamian pore ce es 2008

4603/7, Rubin’s, Harbour Bay i entertainment, including TaDa, SO$A Man and MDEEZ, and Telephone: Employees ofthe TAbenas Agency and Medi Enterprises, and

322-3170 or Rubin’s, Cable ; Sammie Starr, also will be releasing its sixth edition. Although nm thet iimediate Faris, are not eligible to enter.

Cottage, Cable Beach at 327- they haven’t officially announced who will be on the front cover, we . ;

7072. : have confirmed that it will be an entertainer who has recently Flyaway to Orlando with K__ 1 o_ g s!

i interviewed Jamaican icon Empress Jeanelle.
PAGE 8B, WEDNESDAY, MAY 20, 2009

THE TRIBUNE





TS fom BTVI gather with Shirley Pearson (2nd

), Brynda Knowles, Dr Iva Dahl, Arianne Etuk

om right) as Mode Iles Ltd presents gifts to fhe =~
lol ter their support at IWFW last November. _
ao i




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To enter attach 2 package wrappers
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A STEAM iron and three portable racks
were donated to the Bahamas Technical and
Vocational Institute’s fashion department
Friday by representatives of Mode Iles Ltd as
tokens of appreciation for their participa-
tion at Islands of the World Fashion Week
last November.

“We would like to thank BTVI and the
rest of the Islands of the World Fashion
Week Team for their dedicated support and
hard work during the launch last Novem-
ber,” said Arianne Etuk, chief operations
officer, and Brynda Knowles, senior fashion
consultant.

Ms Etuk credited the school’s participa-
tion for the company’s recent success of win-
ning the award for ‘Best Fashion Show or
Fashion Week attended’ category at the 2nd
annual Caribbean Fashion Awards (CFA)
held in at the Hilton Hotel in Bridgetown,
Barbados, on April 11.

“We know that without BTVI, it would

The many
faces of woot

FROM page 10

about 10 inches thick and then you cut it with
a chainsaw. After the chainsaw, then you have
all these machines for sanding the whole thing
down to smooth it out,” Mr Taylor said.

Mr Taylor said a friend in South Carolina
really got him started in working and making
art with this material.

“I saw what he did and it excited me but
strangely enough in 1999 was the first time I
saw it and it was always in the back of my
mind. I then finally tried it and I liked it and I
want to take it much further,” Mr Taylor said.

Dozens of sketches are made before a piece
can take shape. Mr Taylor said good plan-
ning and careful cutting can make a great piece
as he even draws inspiration from other sculp-
tors.

“The cutting process is sometimes very dif-
ficult. Sometimes the chainsaws rip up the
wood so you have to be very careful. I try or
attempt to do at least two of the sketches I
make out of the dozen I draw. So it is really
about planning. There is a magazine called
Sculptural Pursuit and they had a feature on
this guy, I think he lives in Hawaii. He is doing
the same thing but then I learned something
from him because my pieces are very heavy.
What he does is when he cuts his shape out, he
cuts out a hollow but Iam taking my sculptures
further because I’m doing figures,” Mr Taylor
said.

Mr Taylor said it is his hope in the future to
see a visual arts school in the Bahamas because
of the amount of talent this country has.

“I think we are ready for that right now —a
specific arts school with painting, sculpture,
drawing. I think it will be a success.”

Mode Iles Ltd.
presents gifts to
BTVI’s fashion dept.











not have been possible,” she said. “We do
appreciate it and we do look forward to
working with you in the future.”

The school had 14 students take part as
volunteers at IWFW 2008 serving in several
capacities from pressing garments to sewing
to dressing models for the runway.

Receiving the gifts on behalf of BTVI were
Dr Iva Dahl, manager/IDB Consultant
(BTVD), and Shirley Pearson, coordinator of
fashion, trade and souvenir manufacturing
(BTVI).

“We are very grateful for the gifts and we
will gladly help out at this year’s event,” said
Ms. Pearson. “It was a lot of fun and I hope
when we put on our fashion show you will be
there to support us.”

The school’s showcase will be held on June
14 at 4 p.m. at the Wyndham Nassau Resort
& Crystal Palace Casino. Islands of the
World Fashion Week is scheduled to take
place November 4 to 8.



The Bahamas
Humane Society's
Dog Fun Day

See page seven







The Tribune SECTION B od

WEDNESDAY, MAY 20, 2009

Plywood Two headed
sculpture sculpture.
with ceramic
masks in the
ee ilcie
i
' '
i
be
Plywood
sculpture of
male head.
m@ By ALEX MISSICK
Tribune Features Reporter
amissick@tribunemedia.net =
RTISTS can take —

Crate meliTe,

turn it into some-
thing grand and mind P
blowing. Some use mud,
others use paints, however,
artist Max Taylor takes a
common material- ply
wood and recreates the
human form through his

sculptures.

Mr Taylor has been an artist for
about 50 years immersing himself in
all artistic mediums being a potter,

Plywood







ae sculptor, ceramic artist and print-
fo, t _ maker.
eid ee Ea ean eo Beane Aveesiarie
where the main post office is now, sericea
back in 1962 being an apprentice Ainea
with the likes of Eddie Minnis, and P
conch shell. yj

Vernon Cambridge. The Chelsea
Pottery was an opportunity for
many young artists. It was a place
where you could just walk in if you
wanted to learn,” Mr Taylor said.

Mr Taylor said when it comes to
creating his plywood sculptures, it is
not as difficult as it may seem to
construct the pieces.

“You get three quarter inch ply-
wood, cut out the shape and you glue
all the pieces together. After you glue
the pieces together they are almost

SEE page eight