Citation
The Tribune

Material Information

Title:
The Tribune
Uniform Title:
Tribune (Nassau, Bahamas)
Portion of title:
Nassau tribune
Place of Publication:
Nassau, Bahamas
Publisher:
Tribune
Publication Date:
Copyright Date:
2009
Frequency:
Daily, except Sunday
daily
normalized irregular
Language:
English
Physical Description:
v. : ill. ; 58 cm.

Subjects

Genre:
newspaper ( sobekcm )
newspaper ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage:
Bahamas

Notes

General Note:
Description based on: Vol. 79, no. 210 (Aug. 3, 1983); title from caption.

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Holding Location:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
This item was contributed to the Digital Library of the Caribbean (dLOC) by the source institution listed in the metadata. This item may or may not be protected by copyright in the country where it was produced. Users of this work have responsibility for determining copyright status prior to reusing, publishing or reproducing this item for purposes other than what is allowed by applicable law, including any applicable international copyright treaty or fair use or fair dealing statutes, which dLOC partners have explicitly supported and endorsed. Any reuse of this item in excess of applicable copyright exceptions may require permission. dLOC would encourage users to contact the source institution directly or dloc@fiu.edu to request more information about copyright status or to provide additional information about the item.
Resource Identifier:
09994850 ( OCLC )

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Full Text
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The Tribune

=USA TODAY.

BAHAMAS EDITION

www.tribune242.com

TUESDAY, MAY 19, 2009

CARS FOR SALE,
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Persons accused
of murder are
released on bail

flead for ae

Man killed outside
of bar he worked in

m@ By MEGAN REYNOLDS
Tribune Staff Reporter
mreynolds@tribunemedia.net

A FATHER of two was
robbed of $50 and shot in the
head as he closed up Gibson’s
Bar and Lounge off Kemp
Road early yesterday morning.

Peter Johnson, 48, was with a
friend as he waited outside the
bar in Strachan’s Alley for his
brother Sterling Moss, a chef at
Old Fort Bay, to pick him up.

As he was locking the gate
outside the bar at around
12.30am, a masked man held a
gun to his head and demanded
cash.

Mr Johnson gave the robber
all the money he had, amount-
ing to $50, and his friend gave
him the $110 in his pocket,
before Mr Johnson asked the
masked gunman a question and
he shot him in the head.

His friend broke off running
to hide around the corner where
he heard another gunshot, Mr
Johnson’s former partner Sher-
ry Babbs, 41, told The Tribune.

When he peered around the
corner he saw Peter Johnson
lying lifeless on the ground in
front of the front door of the
bar where he had worked for
the last three years, Ms Babbs
said.

PETER JOHNSON and his son PJ
outside the Gibson’s Bar and
Lounge in Strachan’s Alley.

Photo: Jakemia Lightbourne
of Strachan’s Alley

She broke down in tears as
she recalled the shooting,
lamenting the loss of her life
partner, and the father of her
son PJ, 12, and daughter Petra,
five.

The couple had separated last
year and Ms Babbs moved to
Freeport with Petra while PJ
stayed at his father’s home in

SEE page six

The Taste

on

Tribune obtains
numbers of those
bailed and facing
serious charges







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ALLEY, OFF KEMP ROAD

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Tim Clarke/Tribune staff

PETER JOHNSON was shot dead outside of Gibson’s Bar (above).
Blood was visible yesterday on the door and ground.

Lands and Surveys probe ‘now
focused on two senior officers’

il re | ' | | m@ By PAULG in the department who have
e es 2 VED tie TURNQUEST held key positions in deter-
Tribune Staff Reporter mining the granting and leas-
pturnquest@ ing of Crown land over the

Uy (ol nly La rge tribunemedia.net
Pardo we he T more. AS THE probe into cor-
6r ruption allegations continues
at the Department of Lands

and Surveys, sources close to
government reveal that their
investigations have now
focused on two senior officers

pingsyes Kat laimedium,

sfefefoiin ay

falreae) aoasohitslyy

past few years.

Last week, the former direc-
tor of Lands Tex Turnquest
resigned from his post after
The Tribune published allega-
tions that members of his fam-
ily, including his mother-in-

SEE page seven

m@ By PAULG
TURNQUEST
Tribune Staff Reporter
pturnquest@
tribunemedia.net

LAST month 11 persons
were released from Her
Majesty’s Prison on bail for
murder or attempted mur-
der.

In documentation
obtained by this newspaper,
it was revealed that some 205
persons were released from
the prison many of them
with multiple charges rang-
ing from murder and armed
robbery, to unlawful sexual
intercourse and rape.

Of these 205 persons, 153
were released on bail and 39
of them were classified by
the Central Intelligence
Bureau as persons who
“should be monitored.”

Eleven persons released



on bail were in prison for
murder or attempted mur-
der, three for unlawful sexu-
al intercourse, three for rape,
and one for assault with
intent to rape.

Numerous persons were
incarcerated for house-
breaking, shop breaking,
armed robbery, indecent
assault, stealing, and posses-
sion of dangerous drugs.

With 28 homicides record-
ed for the year thus far and a
community crying out for
action on this vexing issue of
crime, sources within the
legal fraternity claim that the
Bahamas will be engulfed in
this “wicked” spiral for some
time until the government
takes a serious position on
the issue.

Recently, Rev. Dr CB
Moss cautioned government

SEE page six

Lawyer: ‘no good grounds’ for Senior Justice
Anita Allen to recuse herself from case

@ By NATARIO McKENZIE
Tribune Staff Reporter

THE APPEAL court challenge over
Senior Justice Anita Allen’s refusal to recuse
herself from a civil case involving two Israeli
brothers continued yesterday with a lawyer
submitting that there were no good grounds
for the judge to recuse herself from the case.

Senior Justice Allen refused to step down
from a case involving Rami and Amir Weiss-
fisch in March, after she expressed concerns
about the integrity of a forensic accounting

SEE page seven



PM: EMERALD BAY
PURCHASE TALKS ARE
UNDERWAY

CALL FOR BOARD TO POLICE
LOCAL WATER COMPANIES

MAN ACCUSED OF
SCOTIABANK ROBBERY
APPEARS IN COURT

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SENIOR JUSTICE
Anita Allen

Weather system
has potential of
becoming first
tropical storm

WITH less than two weeks
to go to the official start of the
2009 Atlantic hurricane sea-
son, weather experts are mon-
itoring a system that has a
slight potential of becoming
the year’s first named tropi-
cal storm.

Senior officer with the
Bahamas Meteorological
Office Neil Armstrong told
The Tribune yesterday that
the low pressure system cur-
rently over eastern Cuba and

SEE page seven

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NASSAU AND BAHAMA ISLANDS” LEADING NEWSPAPER



PAGE 2, TUESDAY, MAY 19, 2009

THE TRIBUNE



LOCAL NEWS



PM: Emerald Bay purchase talks under way

CONSULTATIONS have
begun with various parties that
had previously expressed an
interest in purchasing the Emer-
ald Bay Resort in Exuma,
Prime Minister Hubert Ingra-
ham told the House of Assem-
bly yesterday.

However, the prime minister
said a time frame for the sale
and the re-opening of the hotel,
golf course and marina cannot
be given.

The Emerald Bay Hotel and
Golf Course closes on May 26.
Mr Ingraham said that the clo-

sure presents a tremendous
challenge for the economy of
Exuma.

“The government has been
in close contact with the
receivers over the past 14
months and will continue to
work with them to identify the

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best investor group to acquire
and reopen the hotel, golf
course and marina, and to com-
plete the full development
planned for the Emerald Bay
Site.

“As I have indicated, the
Four Seasons has undertaken
to ensure that all employees will
receive severance payments and
all other benefits owed. The
government has received similar
assurances with regard to
monies owed to other creditors
of the project including govern-
ment utility corporations,” Mr
Ingraham said.

Counselling

The prime minister said
arrangements are being put in
place to extend a variety of
counselling services to disen-
gaged workers.

“Specialists from the Ministry
of Health, the Department of
Social Services and the Nation-
al Insurance Board will be avail-
able in Exuma, prior to the clo-
sure of the hotel, to provide
necessary guidance and support
to all those seeking assistance
including information on the
criteria for registration for
unemployment benefits,” Mr
Ingraham said.

EBR Holdings , the devel-
opers of the Emerald Bay pro-
ject, placed the project in
receivership in June, 2007.

This took place after the loan
secured by all of the assets of
the development fell into
default. The directors of EBR
Holdings determined that the
company was unable to pay its
debts.

Mr Ingraham said that inter-
est in the property was high and
the government’s advice from
the secured creditor, Mitsui, was
that suitable new investors with
the wherewithal to meet the
requirements of the government
and complete the development
would be identified shortly,
which would avert the closure
of the resort.

“As it transpired, the require-
ments contained in the man-
agement contract with the
hotel’s operators, the Four Sea-
sons, proved particularly chal-
lenging for a number of the
interested parties.

“During the 14 months of the
process since June, 2007, the
receivers signed letters of intent
with one party and entered into
formal contract with two other
parties; none with success,” Mr
Ingraham said. The receivers
said that by September, 2008,
when the signs of the global
economic slowdown became
increasingly evident, the pro-

Ingraham’s response on
hotel closure ‘disappointing’

PRIME Minister Hubert
Ingraham’s response to the
Emerald Bay Resort clo-
sure was “disappointing”,
PLP chairman Glenys Han-
na-Martin said.

In a statement issued
after Mr Ingraham
addressed the matter in par-
liament yesterday, Mrs
Hanna-Martin said: “We
have waited since the
shocking news of the loss
of employment for more
than 500 people at the
Emerald Bay Resort in
Exuma for the governmen-
t’s considered response on
this terrible turn of events.

“Today in the House of
Assembly the prime minis-
ter made a communication
to parliament which proved
most disappointing as it pro-
vided no insight into this
state of affairs. In fact every-
thing contained in that com-
munication was public
knowledge through various
newspaper reports and

Glenys Hanna-Martin

“This is not
good governance.
Our people
deserve better.”

word on the street over the last several days.”
She said the prime minister gave “no hope” as to when

the resort will open again.

“What he did say, however, was that his government
has been in close communication with the resort’s receivers
over the period of receivership namely over the last 14
months. The question then arises which the Bahamian peo-
ple would like answered: when did the government become
aware that hundreds of Bahamians would be left jobless
and why were the people affected not advised earlier so as
to prepare themselves as best they could?”

Mrs Hanna-Martin added that the opposition ought to
have been briefed on a matter of such national impor-
tance so that legislators could pool their efforts and “look
at all possible interventions in the interests of protecting our

people.”

“While thousands of workers are being given the pink
slip all over the country, the government of the Common-
wealth of the Bahamas sits idly by, conducting business as
usual. This is not good governance. Our people deserve bet-

ter,” she said.

ject began to suffer significant
losses.

The receivers had not been
successful in identifying new
investors able to acquire the
project and assume the man-
agement contract with the Four
Seasons Management Group.

“The secured lender there-
fore took the decision to tem-
porarily close the resort. Four
Seasons has agreed to the
orderly closure of the hotel on
May 26. The staff will be dis-
missed over the following 30-



day period. It is to be noted that
a skeleton staff will be retained
by the receivers through the
transition period to new own-
ership,” Mr Ingraham said.

‘YOUR VIEW”

To have your say on this or any
other issue, email The Tribune at:
letters@tribunemedia.net or
deliver your letter to The Tribune
on Shirley Street, P.O. Box N-3207



Laing lashes back at ‘spineless

innuendoes’ about his intes

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m@ By ALISON LOWE
Tribune Staff Reporter
alowe@tribunemedia.net

MINISTER of State for
Finance Zhivargo Laing yester-
day defended himself against
allegations that his former
involvement with the insurance
company Colinalmperial com-
promises his capacity to objec-
tively execute his duty as min-
ister with responsibility for the
insurance industry.

Addressing the House of
Assembly, Mr Laing accused St
Thomas More MP Frank Smith
of making “spineless,
broadsweeping innuendoes”
about his integrity as a minis-
ter and demanded that he sub-
stantiate his suggestions.

Mr Smith had charged that
as a former director at Colina,
Mr Laing should resign from
his post “or at least declare his
interest and recuse himself” as
the company “now stands to
benefit from a decision he could
make.”

Withdraw

Speaking during the debate
on proposed amendments to
the Insurance Act 2005, which
are intended to better regulate
the insurance industry, Mr
Smith was forced to withdraw a
comment in which he referred
to Mr Laing’s responsibility
over the sector as the equiva-
lent of “the rat watching the
cheese.”

Stating that “inquiring minds
want to know the extent of the
relationship between the min-
ister of state for finance and
players in the industry,” Mr
Smith alluded to Mr Laing
being caught in a conflict which
would place him in a position
contrary to the FNM party’s
code of conduct for ministers
as published in its Manifesto,
2007. Mr Smith’s comments
came after he was asked to

rity



Zhivargo Laing

reveal his own private interest
in an insurance company —
specifically shares in Colina.

An irate Mr Laing said that
he was “upset” by Mr Smith’s
attempt to “falsely accuse some-
one so as to advance (his) nar-
row political agenda.”

“This is not right... be care-
ful the hole you dig,” said Mr
Laing. The Minister of State for
Finance said he does not know
“what the member is talking
about” in terms of a conflict of
interest.

“Tserved as a director at Col-
inalmperial. I ceased to be a
director at Colinalmperial in
2006 or 2005. I have no owner-
ship in Colinalmperial — unlike
(Mr Smith) — and I have no
interest in any insurance com-
pany, unlike himself.”

He added that “as a matter
of conscience” he already recus-
es himself “from all matters
relating to Colina.”

Meanwhile, MP for Pineridge
Kwasi Thompson, speaking
after Mr Smith, suggested he
found the member’s assertions
“frankly unbelievable”.

“Some in the insurance indus-
try believe the government is
going too far in protecting the
people. So it makes no sense to
me that the government is being
accused of being too far on the
side of the insurance industry,”
he said.



THE TRIBUNE

TUESDAY, MAY 19, 2009, PAGE 3



LOCAL NEWS



Call for board to police
local water companies

m@ By TANEKA THOMPSON
Tribune Staff Reporter
tthompson@tribunemedia. net

CALLS have been renewed
for an independent regulatory
board to police local water com-
panies and crack down on boot-
leggers after claims that "cont-
aminated" impostor water bear-
ing the Aquapure label was
found at a Nassau depot last
week.

Aquapure officials main-
tained the safety of their prod-
uct and said they suspect the
fake water was funneled into
used bottles by some third par-
ty to be sold to the unsuspecting
public.

While stressing that there is
no need for public panic, anoth-
er leading water supplier yes-
terday said more stringent reg-
ulatory controls should be in
place.

Regulated

"First of all, I think that the
water industry as a whole needs
to be more regulated, no doubt
about it. As an industry we have
to all understand that we are
dealing with a very important
product — there are no short
cuts in this business," said Tina
Knowles, owner of Chelsea's
Choice. "The industry needs to
be policed, regulations ought to
be most definitely in place and
enforced, but I think it's very
important for there not to be a
panic in the industry”.

Water that doesn't meet
industry standards — sold most-
ly in generic bottles by persons
looking to make a quick buck —
has been a problem in the
industry for years.

"Particularly in the summer,
bootleg water has been a prob-
lem... but each incident is not



CHARLENE SMITH, quality control manager at Aquapure, tests the
imposter water for bacteria.

the same and each warrants its
own internal investigation,” said
Ms Knowles, who added that
avoiding independent depots is
not the answer to the dilemma.

Last week, Aquapure officials
revealed the discovery of five
bottles of suspected impostor
water they said was tainted with
chart-topping levels of disease
causing bacteria.

According to Aquapure pres-

Legislation amendments

‘should help to prevent
a Clico-like fiasco’

m By ALISON LOWE
Tribune Staff Reporter
alowe@tribunemedia. net



PROPOSED amendments to legislation governing the insurance
industry will better protect the public and should “go a long way” in
ensuring a “Clico-like fiasco” will never happen again, parliamentar-
ians said yesterday.

Admitting that government has been “behind the eight ball” on
regulating the insurance sector, Prime Minister Hubert Ingraham said
“earlier would have been better, but it’s never too late.”

He was speaking in the House of Assembly as parliament began
debate on amendments to the Insurance Act, 2005 — legislation passed
in that year, but never brought into law.

Once it is approved, the government intends to immediately enforce
the Act, replacing the outdated Insurance Act, 1969.

Mtr Ingraham said the proposed regulations come after extensive con-
sultation with the industry and have its support, except with respect to
certain powers relating to the regulator’s capacity to intervene in a com-
pany’s affairs.

He dismissed this concern, proposing that the government is doing
what it must to protect the public and cannot “contract out its respon-
sibility to vested interests.”

Kwasi Thompson, government MP for Pineridge, said the amend-
ments “are focused on the protection of the policy holder and adding
more controls and stiffer penalties in the insurance industry.”

“Laws must be in place so we know who is running these companies,
who is buying them, what they are doing and so we have a body who
has significant powers to regulate the industry.”

“If these provisions had been in place (previously), maybe the
CLICO tragedy could have been avoided,” he said.

The provisions provide for the regulator to react “more speedily”
than it has been able to up until now when there are signs an insurance
company may be putting its policyholders “‘at risk” — as an investigation
of CLICO (Bahamas) found had been the case.

Assets

Specifically, a statutory administrator can immediately be appoint-
ed by the insurance regulator to take over the management of a com-
pany if this is deemed necessary; for example when assets fall signifi-
cantly, bringing into question the company’s ability to meet financial
obligations.

This can, if the amendments are approved, be done without referring
to the courts until after the appointment has been made.

Mr Ingraham vehemently denied published claims that this provision
would give the regulator greater power than exists anywhere else in the
world, stating that similar authority is provided for in Canada and is cur-
rently vested in the governor of the Central Bank of the Bahamas in
relation to the country’s banks.

Another protection provided for by the amendments will see insur-
ance companies for the first time required to place some assets in a
statutory fund controlled by the regulator to which resort can be made
if something happens to the insurance company so that funds can be
accessed to cover certain specified liabilities.

Meanwhile, insurance companies will have to be more transparent
in the way they conduct business and accept the right of the regulator
to intervene in their affairs if they do not satisfy enhanced capital and
solvency requirements, or if they engage or appear about to engage in
“unsafe or unsound” practices that might jeopardise policyholders.

Under the new requirements, the Registrar of Insurance must be
notified if 10 per cent or more of the company’s ownership changes, and
insurance companies must publish balance sheets and financial state-
ments on a regular basis.

The amendments also provide “more options” for the insurance
regulator — other than liquidation — if it appears that a company is being
operated unsustainably. These include appointing a judicial manager,
as has happened in the case of CLICO (Guyana), who can keep the
business operating whilst overseeing an “orderly disposition” of its
assets, said Mr Ingraham.

Sidney Collie, Blue Hills MP, said he welcomed this change as liq-
uidation is often costly and takes time.

“These amendments are intended to remedy any mischief as a result
of loopholes or silence in the existing legislation,” he said.

ident Alex Knowles, the com-
pany was tipped off to the sus-
pected fake products — being
passed off as demineralised
water — after suspicious look-
ing red-capped bottles were
spotted by an Aquapure
employee at an independent
depot in central New Provi-
dence last week.

Aquapure does produce red-
capped demineralised water,



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and has assured the public that
there is nothing wrong with the
genuine bottles.

Mr Knowles said the five bot-
tles were seized by police, test-
ed by company lab technicians
and found to be "heavily conta-
minated" with coliform bacte-
ria, indicators of disease-causing
organisms, and fecal bacteria.

Detailing the extensive daily
testing process executed by
Aquapure officials, he said
there is no chance the tainted
water originated from the
Bernard Road plant.

Siylish &
Glegant

DPT ichelle
Obama

Dresses

that every
Industry

woman should
have!

Currently, the industry is
sample checked by Department
of Environmental Health offi-
cials once a month to ensure
that companies are up to stan-
dard. But Ms Knowles does not
thinks these checks are enough.

"Environmental Health
comes here once a month to get 4
samples but a lot of things can
change in a month and a lot of
things can change in a day and
that's why you need indepen-
dent testing of a water,” he said.

Chelsea's Choice has inde-
pendent lab technicians on site
to test water before bottling and
every half an hour throughout
the day, Tina Knowles said.

Attempts to reach the
Department of Environmental
Health for comment were
unsuccessful up to press time.

my

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PAGE 4, TUESDAY, MAY 19, 2009

THE TRIBUNE



EDITORIAL/LETTERS TO THE EDITOR



The Tribune Limited

NULLIUS ADDICTUS JURARE IN VERBA MAGISTRI
Being Bound to Swear to The Dogmas of No Master




































































LEON E. H. DUPUCH, Publisher/Editor 1903-1914

SIR ETIENNE DUPUCH, Kt, O.B.E., K.M., K.CS.G.,
(Hon.) LL.D., D.Litt.

Publisher/Editor 1919-1972
Contributing Editor 1972-1991

EILEEN DUPUCH CARRON, C.M.G., M.S., B.A. LL.B.
Publisher/Editor 1972-

Published Daily Monday to Saturday

Shirley Street, RO. Box N-3207, Nassau, Bahamas
Insurance Management Building., P.O. F-485, Freeport, Grand Bahama

TELEPHONES
Switchboard (News, Circulation and Advertising) 322-1986
Advertising Manager - (242) 502-2352
Circulation Department - (242) 502-2387
Nassau Fax: - (242) 328-2398

WEBSITE
www.tribune242.com — updated daily at 2pm

Democrats’ security feud may cost them

WASHINGTON — Democrats just can't
seem to get on the same page on national secu-
rity — and it could cost them dearly on an issue
Republicans have dominated for decades.

Increasingly, President Barack Obama and
Democrats who run Congress are being pulled
between the competing interests of party liber-
als and the rest of the country on Bush-era
wartime matters of torture, detention and inter-
rogation of suspected terrorists.

The Democratic Party's struggle over how to
position itself on these issues is threatening to
overshadow Obama's ambitious plans for ener-
gy, education and health care. It's also keeping
the country looking backward on the eight years
of George W. Bush's presidency, much to the
chagrin of the new White House. And, it's cre-
ating an opening for an out-of-power Republi-
can Party in an area where Democrats have
made inroads.

Governing from the centre and backtracking
on a previous position, Obama decided this
past week to fight the release of photos that
show U.S. troops abusing prisoners. The presi-
dent said he feared the pictures would "further
inflame anti-American opinion" and endanger
USS. forces in Iraq and Afghanistan.

Then he decided to resume military tribunals
for some Guantanamo detainees after a tem-
porary suspension. "This is the best way to pro-
tect our country, while upholding our deeply
held values," he said.

The developments riled liberals who are
important campaign-year foot soldiers and
fundraisers. "These recent decisions are dis-
heartening," said Jameel Jaffer of the American
Civil Liberties Union. "He has shown back-
bone on some issues and not on others.”

On Capitol Hill, House Speaker Nancy
Pelosi protected the party's left flank by accus-
ing the CIA of lying to her about the agency's
use of a form of simulated drowning on sus-
pected terrorists. "We were told that water-
boarding was not being used," said Pelosi. "And
we now know that earlier they were." The CIA
disputes Pelosi's account.

As Democrats splintered, Republicans
watched with glee.

The irony is these are the same wartime
issues created by Bush and the Republican-led
Congress that Democrats successfully cam-
paigned against in 2006 and 2008. The conflict-
ing Democratic positions threaten to undercut
the party's gains on national security; polls last
fall showed Democrats had drawn even on
national security issues long dominated by the
Republicans. The White House desperately
wants to get Democrats in Congress focused
on the president's priorities. Obama's team has
made it clear it's not eager to retread the past.

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But House and Senate liberals, prodded by a
vocal and active network of grass-roots and
"netroots" supporters, relish doing just that,
seemingly fixated on how Bush and former Vice
President Dick Cheney handled Iraq and ter-
rorism. And it's the popular new president
who may have the most to lose.

Obama is facing the same predicament that
confronted and confounded other recent Demo-
cratic presidents. While governing as centrists,
Bill Clinton and Jimmy Carter bent over back-
ward on issues of war and peace, working to
appease the party's left wing without being held
hostage by it.

Defeated Democratic nominees — John Ker-
ry in 2004, Al Gore in 2000, Michael Dukakis in
1988 — lost in part because Republicans suc-
cessfully tagged them as soft on security.

Obama appears to be trying for a balance
between keeping campaign promises to reverse
Bush policies and protecting national security.

Overall, Obama seems less willing to sys-
tematically overturn Bush's national security
positions than his domestic policies.

There are signs that making good on his
promise to close Guantanamo in his first year is
proving exceedingly difficult. Last week, Attor-
ney General Eric Holder reassured lawmakers
that the administration would not release Guan-
tanamo prisoners into U.S. neighbourhoods.

In blogs and on cable TV, Democratic critics
griped that Obama was appearing more like
Bush than the Democrat who won the nomina-
tion by rallying liberals around his pledge to
end the Iraq war quickly.

Answering liberal complaints, White House
press secretary Robert Gibbs said: "First and
foremost, the president does what is in the best
security interest of the United States."

Obama is betting that liberals will forgive him
for changing course on these issues. He does
have several years to make it up to them before
his likely re-election campaign.

Conversely, Obama may have further
endeared himself to moderates and indepen-
dents who are more hawkish on national secu-
rity and are important to his winning coalition.
It's also possible that conservative Republicans
may now be more open to dealing with him
because of his moves on security issues.

With those actions, Obama may have under-
cut Cheney's complaint that the Democrat's
policies were endangering the country. The
president also may have insulated himself from
further weak-on-security attacks following a
campaign during which sceptics questioned his
readiness to lead the military in wartime.

(This article was written by Liz Sidoti of the
Associated Press Writer).

NE say Med ed, Da? E51

Baseball:
why is it
dying?

LETTERS

EDITOR, The Tribune.

We as Bahamians complain
too much and say nothing. It is
high time someone spoke up for
the young and impressionable
youth who seem to be taken
advantage of. In good con-
science I could not stand by and
not help through your valuable
columns.

What is happening with
Baseball in the Bahamas? Has
the confusion with the Baseball
Federation been cleaned up and
if not why.

Who is responsible? Is it
important enough for us as a
nation to start to pressure the
relevant players to get their act
together?

How long will the advance-
ment of our children through
baseball be stifled? Does any-
one give a damn?

I have a son that has been
involved with the Freedom
Farm Baseball League from the
age of five years.

He started with T-ball then
Coached Pitched where he had
the opportunity and distinct
pleasure of playing in the Okee-
heelee Baseball Classic last
year. Now he is playing in the 9-
11 division.

I have seen firsthand how
much he has improved and
matured in the game of base-
ball as well as with the interac-
tion with other children. This is
good, but is there any advance-
ment as a country as it relates to
the benefits of these kinds of
disciplines?

From my own investigation
it would seem that Mr. Jim
Wood is standing between the

letters@tribunemedia net



Bahamas moving forward with
its national baseball pro-
gramme.

What is most astonishing to
me is that it appears that Mr.
Wood has no teams, no associ-
ation, no players, no officers
and he does not have the bless-
ings of the players of the sport.
There seems to be no thought
of the interference of the young
men who could have had some
international exposure while
representing the country.

There is no calculation that
could reveal how many young
men’s chances might have been
destroyed because of Mr.
Wood’s inaction.

This behaviour is interfering
with the forward mobility of
many otherwise wayward youth
who have now found solace in
baseball. When is Mr. Wood
going to get the memo? The
Bahamas is not interested in
him leading baseball anymore.
He needs to get over it. Give it
up man!

If Mr. Wood is the man we
all remember him to be, he
should move with haste to end
this most embarrassing position
he finds himself in. The young
men who are being prevented
from advancing do not look at
him favourably, so it would
seem that his popularity is no
longer there.

If my calculation is correct,
Mr. Wood should be far past
retirement age. He should be

focused on his grandchildren.
He should really be enjoying
his beautiful family, not squab-
bling over a position that cannot
profit him any at this time or
any time in the future.

If Mr. Wood loves this coun-
try and if his original intention
was to help young men through
baseball, then his actions so far
seem to suggest otherwise.

It is highly unfair that the
sport of Baseball in the
Bahamas has been held hostage
all of this time.

The relevant movers and
shakers have been more than
tolerant.

It is past time for the people
with the power to end this most
unfortunate bizarre series of
events.

Minister of Youth and Sport
Desmond Bannister should use
whatever influence he has in
assisting and expediting this.

I do not think that anyone
who thinks rationally would
agree with Mr. Wood. But an
old Bahamian saying comes to
mind: “Hard head bird don’t
make good soup.”

The young boys and men
who love baseball should not
be allowed to wait one more
minute. It is most puzzling how
one man can seemingly hold a
country hostage while all of its
intellectuals stand quietly by
and say nothing. Stop the mad-
ness! Mr. Wood does not own
baseball and he certainly does
not own the Bahamas alone.
Enough is enough.

IVOINE W INGRAHAM
Nassau,
May 16, 2009

Beach outing organisers should clean up afterwards

EDITOR, The Tribune.

Please allow us a response and appreciation
for Mr Sands writing about beach party groups
leaving all their rubbish for the rest of us Bahami-
ans to wince at as we drive around our island.

The locals who use “public” beaches are incred-
ibly selfish and, it seems, quite happy to create an
eyesore for the rest of us who take such pride in
keeping our country in gorgeous condition.

We need litter laws to be strengthened badly to
control those who just don’t care! Better still
those who organise beach outings should accept
responsibility for the clean up at the end of the
day! At this time we would like to add a huge
thank you to the ministry and the clean-up crews
working very visibly around the island on your
tireless and never ending task is very much

noticed and appreciated!

Thank you also to Coca-Cola for the dump-
sters placed around in public use places, what a
shame there are those who will still throw the

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trash on the ground not 50 feet from opening the
container! Thank you also to NAD for the airport

provided!

Nassau,

May 13, 2009.

roadsides being cleaned and receptacles placed
where the taxis park under the trees before one
reaches general aviation.

What a shame there are drivers who park there
and leave the Kentucky box and Coke can on
the ground under the car instead of getting their
lazy butt out of the vehicle and over to the bin

The trash that was pushed back from the road-
sides on Cowpen Road was a great start but the
mountains of unsightly mess need to go please
along with abandoned cars all over the place.

We are on the right track Bahamas, let's hope
all Bahamians see what fabulous surroundings
we are blessed with and make that little extra
effort to help preserve our beautiful Bahamas!

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THE TRIBUNE



LOCAL NEWS

TUESDAY, MAY 19, 2009, PAGE 5



0 In brief



Brenford Christie
appointed to the
GBPA board

THE Grand Bahama Port
Authority has announced the
appointment of attorney Bren-
ford Christie to the board of
directors.

“We are very pleased that
Mr Christie decided to join our
board. Our company will ben-
efit from his many years of suc-
cessful business experience and
extensive background in law.
His counsel will be particularly
valuable in the areas of corpo-
rate finance and board gover-
nance,” said Hannes Babak,
Chairman of GBPA.

Mr Christie is a partner of
one of the oldest and largest
firms in the Bahamas — McK-
inney Bancroft and Hughes.

In 2004 Mr Christie was
appointed as a member of the
Judicial Review Commission
and in 2006 he was named a
leading lawyer by the Guide to
the World’s Leading Financial
Law Firms.

He is a member of the real
estate practice group of Lex
Mundi, the world’s leading
association of independent law
firms.

Clarence Russell



Upgrades to
Freeport Passport
Difice underway

FINDING a new office loca-
tion, creating an appointment
system for the processing appli-
cations and holding customer
service training programmes are
among the steps being taken to
upgrade the Freeport Passport
Office, officer in charge
Clarence Russell said.

Deputy Prime Minister Brent
Symonette, the minister respon-
sible for the issuance of new
passports, recently reaffirmed
the government’s commitment
to enhance services at the office.

Mr Russell, whose tenure
began on May 5, said: “We
have immediately embarked on
getting a lease which is in the
works with the old FINCO
building directly opposite the
Passport Office that has ade-
quate spacing.

“It also has adequate safes
so that we can properly and
adequately secure government
property in that building. The
government has already given
approval for us to begin seeking
internally, staff members who
are competent in data process-
ing because data is one of the
many challenges with which we
are faced; actually getting the
information in from month to
month.

At present, the Passport
Office has a staff of seven
including the officer in charge.
Mr Russell said this number
must be increased to 20.

He said the government
plans to have the new building
ready for occupancy by next
month.

Mr Russell also said the long-
lines and “first come, first
serve” approach to serving
clients will become a thing of
the past.

“In the next few weeks we
are going to embark on an ini-
tiative where, like the [US]
Embassy, you can call in to us
and make an appointment to
deliver your applications at
your convenience,” Mr Russell
said.

“You call and give us a date
when you are available and if
that time and date is available in
our calendar up to the end of
the year, we will submit your
name in there. Five minutes
before your interview time you
come in and we assist you; there
is no need for you to be on a
line hoping and praying that
you get some help — it will be in
order.”

Man accused of Scotiabank
robbery appears in court

46-year-old is remanded
to Her Majesty’s Prison

@ By NATARIO McKENZIE
Tribune Staff Reporter

THE MAN accused of the daring
daylight robbery of Scotiabank on
Wulff Road last Friday was arraigned
in Magistrates Court yesterday.

Ricardo Jones, 36, of Peter Street
off East Street, appeared before Mag-
istrate Janet Bullard in Court One,
Bank Lane, charged with one count
of armed robbery and one count of

receiving.

Court dockets allege that on Fri-
day May 15, while armed with an
unknown object, Jones robbed The-
mera Ferguson of $1,805 cash, the

police officers, are listed on the dock-

ets.

According to reports, a man
dressed in a white shirt, short jeans
and white tennis shoes entered the
bank around 10am on Friday.

The man reportedly presented him-
self as a customer to a female bank
teller, then made gestures with an
object before escaping with the cash.

Cynthia ‘Mother’ Pratt, former
deputy prime minister, was among the
customers in the bank at the time.

Jones was not required to enter a
plea to the charges. He was remanded

to Her Majesty’s Prison.

property of Scotiabank Bahamas Lim- 25.

ited.

It was also alleged that the accused

unlawfully received the sum.

Eleven witnesses, most of them

RICARDO JONES was arraigned in
Magistrates Court yesterday.

The case has been adjourned to May

=
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s
wn
wo
=
=;
=
=
ao
as
—_
&
oO
=
—



CC Sweeting principal AIRIIIITISTS eas
denies stabbing claims

m@ By MEGAN REYNOLDS
Tribune Staff Reporter
mreynolds@tribunemedia.net

CC SWEETING principal
Delores Ingraham has denied
claims that pupils were stabbed
on campus last week, although
she admitted that violence occurs
at the school.

Mrs Ingraham, wife of Prime
Minister Hubert Ingraham, said
parents who have held their chil-
dren back from school because
they are afraid they will be hurt
or killed on campus have no
need to fear.

Although she admits there are
gangs in the school, and that stu-
dents have brought weapons on
to the campus in College
Avenue, she said violence is no
more of a problem at CC Sweet-
ing Senior High School than it
is at any other school in the cap-
ital.

During her 44 years in educa-
tion, including 12 years at CC
Sweeting, Mrs Ingraham said she
has learned to accept that fight-
ing will always be a problem in
schools.

And at CC Sweeting where
there are 850 students, many of
whom may be affiliated with
gangs associated with where they
live, there are bound to be con-
flicts.

Mrs Ingraham said: “When
you are putting hundreds of
them together and you say you
don’t have disagreements, you
are putting your head in the
sand.

“Fighting isn’t new in any
school in any country. The
method used to be different
because they would fight with
their hands, and now we have to
be careful because we don’t
know what the children are up
to.

“But it’s just a reflection of
what’s happening in the commu-
nity, and it’s not that you need to
be afraid, because I would be the
first to go if I was afraid. It’s no
worse than any place else, and I
wouldn’t change CC Sweeting
for anywhere else.”

Parents believe students take
knives, cutlasses, knuckle-dusters
and even guns to the school, and
the mother of a 15-year-old

But Delores
Ingraham admits
that violence
occurs at school

grade 10 student ordered her son
to stay home as she fears for his
life after he was threatened by
a group of boys last month.

The mother also alleged two
boys had been injured in a knife
fight on campus last Tuesday,
but Mrs Ingraham denied there
was a stabbing at the school, and
police were unable to comment
before The Tribune went to
press.

Mrs Ingraham said the wor-
ried parents should be more con-
cerned about who their children
associate with outside of school.

She said: “Sometimes parents
sit on the outside and lambaste
us and say all sorts of things, but
their children are not always as
good as they perceive them to
be.

“T have told the children you
must make the choice as to who
you want to keep company with.

“You may not have a choice to
where you live but you have a
choice about the company you
keep.”

Mrs Ingraham said teachers
search bags at random, have
access to a metal detector, and
affirmed that any weapons found
will be confiscated and the police
will be called as there is a zero
tolerance policy.

She added: “Our school has
no more violence than any other
schools in the Bahamas, includ-
ing private schools, but we are
aware of it and we deal with our
students.

“We try to enforce rules and
when students break them, there
are consequences, and we deal
with it accordingly.”

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m By DENISE MAYCOCK
Tribune Freeport Reporter
dmaycock@tribunemedia.net

FREEPORT - Passengers who were stranded on
Grand Bahama when the Discovery cruise ship
experienced mechanical problems are being flown
back to the United States by charter flights.

Discovery officials have been flying their cruise
passengers from Grand Bahama since Sunday when
the vessel was forced to remain in port for repairs.

The company made arrangements with Miami
Air, which conducted two charter flights on Sunday.
Flight arrangements were also made for those pas-
sengers scheduled to leave on the cruise ship yes-
terday.

Yannick Toussaint, on-island representative for
Discovery, reported that the some 344 passengers
left on Sunday.

“We still have some passengers here on the
island, but we were not asking people to shorten
their vacations. We have chartered flights for pas-
sengers who were scheduled to leave on Sunday
and Monday,” she said.

Janet Albury of VIP Services — the local public
relations firm contracted by Discovery — said that

the ship had deployed its agents to assist passengers
staying at the various resorts on the island.

According to Ms Albury, agents were sent to
Club Fortuna Resort, Sheraton and Westin Resorts,
Island Seas Resort, Pelican Bay and the Ritz Hotel.

She said that agents were also stationed at the
airport to assist passengers booked on chartered
flights.

Those passengers scheduled to sail and return on
the same day will receive a full refund for the can-
celled cruise, Ms Albury said.

Passengers scheduled to overnight in Freeport
may cancel their voyage altogether and receive a
full refund, as well as a free future round-trip tick-
et valid for one year commencing on May 20, 2009
(surcharges additional).

Or they may rebook their trip for a later date and
also receive a free round-trip ticket valid for one
year commencing May 20, (surcharges addition-
al).

ii is not known when repairs to the vessel will be
completed. Sometime in April, the ship had dis-
continued sailings for several days for engine
repairs and resumed services on May 4.

Discovery Cruise Line apologised for any incon-
venience caused by its cancelled sailing.

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PAGE 6, TUESDAY, MAY 19, 2009

THE TRIBUNE



LOCAL NEWS

Persons accused of murder released on bail

FROM page one

that it would be endangering the lives of its citi-
zens if it continued on its present course of
neglecting its duty to deal with the unacceptably
high levels of crime and criminality.

by the government to get up and provide the
leadership that is so critically necessary at this
very vulnerable time in our society.

“The media is urged to demand more account-
ability, especially from all public institutions and
officials in order to create more transparency.
This will greatly reduce corruption, and injus-

Po

lice seeking

In his statement issued to the media, Mr Moss tice which fuels crimes and violence,” he said.

‘YOUR VIEW? |

To have your say on this or any other issue,
email The Tribune at: letters@tribunemedia.net
lives. or deliver your letter to The Tribune on
Shirley Street, P.O. Box N-3207

said government must not be “narrow-minded
or fearful” in dealing with this scourge that is
currently plaguing the nation.

“Religious leaders are called upon to lift their
sights beyond the walls of the church and work
toward improved security of people. The corpo-
rate community is challenged to seek the public
good, not just private gain in their economic

“Civil society is called upon to agitate and lob-



Independent Auditor's report to the members of Standard Chartered PLC

We haw mda thi Group (Starciard Chartered PLC and ibs
Leedienies) 6nd Comper Giandand Chartered PLC] financia
Statements logether referred to as. the ‘financal satemne te)
far the year ended 31 Gecember 2008 which

Group income Statement. ihe Group aod Comper Gaknce
Sheels, the Group and Company Cash Flow &

Group and Company Siatement -

Experts, and the related notes. These financial

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franein, We have eto audinied the infarmation in the Grectors’
Retureeation Aeport that is described as having be

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Goch, ini Sc noe wih section 235 of The Gomipearies ACT
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Reapective responsibilities of directors and auditor
The directors’ responsitiiiies tor preparing the Anrual Repeat,
the Linectoes Reniuneraiion Fagor and live franca staiements
n Bocordance wilh apolosble law and Indemeational Financial
Reps ing & Standards (FRSs) as adopted by The FL are Sel
out nthe Stahamers of Directors’ Recooneibeies on page a4.

Our responsiblity is to aut ihe drancal statements and the
cart of the Cangct Remunerslion Rapa to be audited in
BOCOrtance with relevant legal and reguitory requiramerits
and Wierliona Standards on Aud hing (LE and belanc

Wie report to you dur opinien as fo whether the financial
SHINES Gre A iru anc ms ew and whether the financial

Salements and the pan of ihe Drectors’ Aemunersiion

d have been procerly prepared in acconda

Ac 1985 and, a regards the Grow

4 af the tS Amguiatinn, Vii repan bo

1 OGinon The information given in ihe Report

Conger wilh (he financal statements. The
infor TE he Raport af Ginectors inclucies informatio
pra ad n the ¢ _hainman's statement, tha Group Creaf
Exec eves Rewer and the Financal and Business Rew
thet £2: ralereanced fret the Report of the Directors, In
aad we report bo you if the Company has not kept prone
BOCOUNING Maoords, Wee Fee mot remand ail ihe infer vile on
and copies we require for Gur audit, or if information
Speciied by lw regarding directors’ remuneration and oiher
beraclions ane not disclosed

wou whether in

Wie review whelher the Conmoraie Governance Statemerd
reflects the Company's compliance wiih tie rane ¢
7: FRO Combined Gode apectied for our revinw bry fhe:
Rules of the Financial Serene Quthornty, and we repeat
not. Wie 2ine mot nequinnd to consider whether ihe
Baard's slaiemenis on imemal cortrol oover all reks and
Gontrots. Of Tonm an opinor on ihe @fecinerass of the

Group's corporate gowernance promedunes or itp risk and
Garin! protedunces

Consolidated balance sheet
As al 31 December 20068

Assets. _

(ash and balances at central banks
Financial assets held at dai valet through profit or loss
Denveiive financial instruments
Loans and advances io banks
Loans and advances to customers
Invesiment secunibes

Inierasts in aocmles

Goodwill and intangible assets
Property, plant and equipment
Current lax aasets

Deferred tax assets

Othe assets

Prapayments and accrued income

Deposits by banks

Quatomer aooounls

Financial Gahiltes held at fair value through profit oF loss.
Derivative financial insirumernls

Debt securities in issue

Current tax fabilties:

Deferred tax lattes

Other iabdities

Actuals and digenned incor

Provisions tor liabilities and charges

Retirement benefit obligations

Subordinaied Gaba bac and other borrowed funds
Total liabilities /

Equity

Share capital

Peper _
Total parent company shareholders’ equi equity
Minority interests:

Total equity

Total equity and liabilities

* AN UrS Faean Den Nghe oe apie i ne Sh

We pad other information contained in the Annual Peper
and conmder whaler il @ cones with the giudéed financial
Siatemanis. We comidier the: implications for our report if

we Decorip aware of any apparent missialemnerts or

material in noes wal the fravcial stalemenbs. Ci
(EROS bles Go nol exhed to ary other information

Basis of audit opinicn

Vite onducied our aucht in scoordance with Intemational
Standards on Guditing (UK and land) eee by Ihe Auditing
gt 5 ae Fun BU inches examination, onatest

nihe 6 Tiree oe J eivomarts and ihe pan of tt
danse muinn Report to be aided. i aso incuciest an

ISSESETIEN Of the signilcanl esinnalést and judgemerts made
on one G@rectare in the prepanstion od the: financial shatemes,
and of whether the aout Me] POSS 6 aporoariaie ba the
Group's and Gompany's crcumngiances, cansetently applied
And acdesualety decoaed.
We planned and peetormed our audit so as to obtain al ihe
TeonMaion and explanations which wr considered necessary
nonde io proade Le walh sutiopnt evidence bo give raasoreie
ae SSUMIOR thal Se fing nce! spheres and (he cert o

Lanectors’ Hemuneralion Report bo be audfed an + c
TTenenal MieStalement, whether caused by fraud of other
reguiaty oFenror, In forming our ofr we alo evaiusted
the qvardl adequacy of the praeeniaten of infomation in the
tinancial sielamenie. and fhe part of the Denctors*
Femuneraiion Report to be audited
Opinion
Nour Goer:

The Group francal stalemerts ong a true ard fair view,

in Socordance with IFREs es 3 bed oy the BU ef ihe Stabe

ot te Group's Stee a6 af 31 Deoenber 2008 and of its

Groh for the year then enced

paety Trees Alaris oy Que a inue and fiir vag,
ancaé wilh IFRSS a adophed by ihe EL as applied
Sod ane wah (he proveeDres al the Gorigarmes Act

71965, of the state of the Gor Terry's alaurs as at 21

Oacemiber 7008:

fe financial eatemerts and ihe part of te Giresct

Recnuumeraiion Pegort to be aud files | rea been

Prepuined in aoocordance with tha {

and, 26 Fegards the Coron tree cae

Of ihe AS Regulator: ane

the intonation ge in ihe Alepeort of shh Carectors:

5 OOneien wilh ihe francmal stata

KPMG Audit Fic
Lock
Chartered AcogQuniants.
Piatt ed Au sche

3 March 2009

ong
_Smiffien_

24,167
15,425
69,657
46,583
174,178
69,342
$11
6,261
3,536

11,091
3.85?
920,871

31,909 25,880
#24,008 178,760
15,478 14,250
67,775 26,270
2,447 a7,137
512 B18
176 3
17,383 14,742
4,192 3,429
140
447
16,986
412,373

948
21,192 20,146
22,140 20,851
§45 601

22696 21,452
435,068 320,871

These financial statements were approved by the board of directors and authorised for issue on 3 March 2008 and signed on its

PA Sande
Group chief execulive

RH Meddings
‘Group Gnance director



foreign help in
fugitive search

m By DENISE MAYCOCK
Tribune Freeport Reporter
dmaycock@tribunemedia.net

FREEPORT - Grand Bahama Police are seeking foreign help in
their search for fugitive Lester Adderley, who is wanted in connection
with the murder of a Grand Bahama businessman.

Asst Supt Edmund Rahming said police are now working with
international law enforcement agencies to locate Adderley, who is
thought to have fled the Bahamas some time in 2007. The police have
issued a warrant for his arrest with Interpol.

Konstantino Vardoulis, 31, owner of Grand Bahama Foods and
the Chicken Farm, was shot to death at his home on Bahama Reef
Boulevard on April 12, 2007. George Alexander Ferguson was charged
with Vardoulis’ murder on June 22, 2007.

Grand Bahama police have had recent success in appealing to inter-
national law enforcement agencies for help.

Fugitive Andre Birbal was arrested by US authorities in New York
on May 3, after police issued an international APB for the Trinidadi-

an teacher.

Senior Assistant Commissioner of Police
Marvin Dames said the arrest of Birbal, who is
wanted for questioning in a child molestation
case, proves that the system does in fact work.

Birbal, 46, was arrested by a New York
Transit Police Officer after committing a traf-
fic violation. A check was made and authorities
discovered that there was an APB out on him

in the Bahamas.

The Attorney General’s Office is working
with authorities in the US to have Birbal

returned to Grand Bahama.

Birbal was suspended from the Eight Mile



FUGITIVE Andre Birbal
was arrested by US
Rock from the school when molestation alle- authorities in New York
gations surfaced in January.

A female teacher at the school was also removed following molesta-
tion claims.

Father shot dead for $50

FROM page one

Coral Harbour.

Both PJ and Petra loved to
spend time with their father, Ms
Babbs said, and Petra would insist
on calling him every morning
before she went to school in
Grand Bahama.

“He was a good father,” Ms
Babbs recalled. “A very good
man, and a very good dad. PJ
loved his daddy, and the little girl
especially did love him.”

But the last PJ saw of his father
was his lifeless body being lifted
into a body bag in the early hours
of yesterday morning. His moth-
er said she tried to cover his eyes
as he watched, but he moved her
hand to take a last look.

She said: “It was like he was
frozen, all he was doing was look-
ing, and I tried to cover his eyes
and he was just focusing on his
daddy, looking at him just lying
down on the ground.

“When they lifted him up to
put him in the body bag and his
head fell apart, he started to cry.”

Mr Johnson was also a loving
step-father to Ms Babbs’ daughter
Anthoinette, 24, who he took in
as a toddler. He was also popular
in the Kemp Road area where he
grew up.

Jakemia Lightbourne, 23, who
took the photograph of Peter and
PJ, said: “Peter was a lovable per-
son for kids and adults. If you
were troubled by anything he
would sit you down and talk to
you like you was his own. He was
so sweet.”

Mr Johnson was the oldest of
70-year-old Prince Johnson’s six
children. He was raised by his
grandparents in Sun Street, off
Kemp Road, attended St Bede’s
and CI Gibson schools, and met
Ms Babbs browsing around the
Kemp Road area when she was
21.



i

The mourning mother of three
was surrounded by friends and
family outside Gibson’s Bar and
Lounge after visiting the morgue
at Princess Margaret Hospital
yesterday morning.

She had moved to Freeport for
economic reasons after leaving
her Social Services job in Nassau
last year, but came back to Nas-
sau for a wedding last month.

Ms Babbs is still unemployed
and is concerned about how she is
going to care for her children
without Mr Johnson when, she
said, she does not even feel strong
enough to tell her daughter the
truth about her father’s murder.

She said: “T told her her daddy
was in the hospital and that he
got shot, and she is asking why
the police don’t catch the person
and lock him up, but I haven’t
told her that he’s dead.”

Although the couple had split,
Ms Babbs said neither of them
had yet entered into other rela-
tionships.

She said: “Although we weren’t
together we were very close
because of the kids, and I had no
problem with him.

“He would send money for the
kids and he was very good to me.

“Peter is not a troublesome
person. No one in this world
could say Peter is their enemy.
He’s a loving person, he talked
and cracked jokes with every-
body. We were together for 17
years and Peter had no enemies.

“T could understand if he was a
troublesome person, but I don’t
understand this.

“T want to know for what?
That’s what I’m trying to find out.
He had $50 on him — he got shot
for $50.”

The murder of Peter Johnson
was the 29th homicide in the
Bahamas this year.

Police are questioning two 23-
year-old men in connection with
the murder.

Wana me tet a ek

a

=]





THE TRIBUNE

TUESDAY, MAY 19, 2009, PAGE 7



LOCAL NEWS



Scuffle prompts concerns over
unsupervised teens at resort

FOLLOWING a scuffle
between three young Bahami-
ans at Marina Village, execu-
tives at Atlantis have expressed
concern about parents drop-
ping off unsupervised teenagers
at the resort.

While Atlantis welcomes
families and all Bahamians to
its property, senior vice-presi-
dent of public affairs Ed Fields
said yesterday that it is not fair
for parents to treat the resort as
a “baby-sitter” for their chil-
dren.

In recent months, Marina
Village and the Atlantis hotel

have become popular
hang-out spots, where
parents feel teenagers
can spend weekend
evenings in a safe
environment.

But Mr Fields said
people are dropping
off their 13 to 16-year-
olds at Marina Village
without any regard as
to what their children
get up to.

“J mean, would you drop
your teenager off at a bar?
They could end up anywhere —
in a hotel room, at a bar — it’s



ED FIELDS

basically a bar with
rooms,” he said of the
resort.

Just two weeks ago,
Mr Fields said, three
young men got into a
fight in Marina Vil-
lage and security per-
sonnel had to get
involved. The three
teens were escorted
off the property.

The Atlantis exec-
utive said teenagers becoming
disruptive on the property is a
continuing problem which
detracts from the experience

of vacationers.

“It’s really not fair to our
guests,” he said.

Mr Fields said that the resort
is conscious of the fact that par-
ents want to ensure that their
children “hang out” at a safe
place. However, he said, they
cannot expect Atlantis to take
responsibility for their children.

It often happens that parents
drop off teenagers at the resort,
who then leave the property
with a third party, only to
return to Marina Village short-
ly before they are due to be
picked up, Mr Fields added.

Lawyer: ‘no good grounds’ for Senior Justice
Anita Allen to recuse herself from case

FROM page one

report prepared by Daniel
Ferguson, an accountant who
had been appointed by Jus-
tice Lyons to work on the
Weissfisch case. Justice Lyons
tendered his resignation from
the bench earlier this month.
Calls for his resignation came
after a highly publicised state-
ment by Justice Allen
revealed that he had shared
“more than a friendship” with
the sister of Mr Ferguson.
Nicholas Lavender, QC,
attorney for Rami Weissfisch

who is seeking to have Justice
Allen step down from the
case, had previously argued,
that during a meeting with
counsel in chambers, Justice
Allen had raised the possibil-
ity of her own recusal and had
stated that she had felt con-
flicted. Mr Lavender claimed
to be the only person taking
notes during the meeting.
However, what was said dur-
ing that meeting is disputed
by Justice Allen as she in her
ruling against the recusal
application in Supreme Court,
referred to her recollection of

Lands and Surveys probe ‘now

focused on two senior officers’



FROM page one

law, were granted Crown land lots on the island of Exuma.

These beachfront lots, which were sold at less than $2,500 each,
were flipped a few years later for more than $550,000 apiece. Mr
Turnquest denied any connection to any of the transactions.

Before Mr Turnquest could resign, government officials had
changed the locks to his office and secured boxes of documents.

These documents, it is understood could be beneficial to the
Attorney General’s office.

While government has been criticised over the scandal brew-
ing in this department, sources close to the investigation claim
they will also use this time to implement “significant changes” to
the law to ensure that such abuses of Crown land cannot be
repeated.

Mr Turnquest’s removal from the department comes at a
time when the Opposition has already introduced a motion in the
House of Assembly, led by Fox Hill MP Fred Mitchell, calling for
a Select Committee to review all Crown land grants issued by
government since the early 1990’s.

This committee will review all Crown grants issued to indi-
viduals or entities since 1992 up until the present date with all
outstanding applications that have yet to receive final approval.

The committee will also ascertain a list of all public servants
and retired public servants who have received grants, along
with government’s official position on its policy in relation to the
disposition of publicly held lands generally; as well as govern-
ment’s policy in relation to granting lands to employees of gov-
ernment or their relatives.

Since the revelations of these transactions and claims that
other civil servants had secured substantial grants of Crown
land, several irate individuals have come forward outlining
many years of abuse they claim they endured from this depart-
ment. Among them was PLP general Ezra Russell, who com-
plained of having to wait more than 12 years to get final approval
to purchase some 34 acres of Crown land in Fountain Bay, Cat
Island.

Weather system has potential of
becoming first tropical storm

off to the east of the Bahamas
into the open ocean.
The United States’ Nation-

FROM page one

the southeastern Bahamas has

a less than 30 per cent chance
of becoming a tropical system
over the next 24 hours.

However, should it become
necessary, a hurricane hunter
aircraft will be deployed today
to further investigate the sys-
tem, he said.

Current projected paths
have the system travelling
north from Cuba through the
chain of Bahamian islands
towards the east coast of Flori-
da by the weekend.

Other trajectories, howev-
er, predict the system will veer

al Hurricane Centre (NHC)
yesterday issued a special
tropical weather outlook, say-
ing that “slow development of
this system is possible during
the next day or two as it
moves generally northward at
10mph to 15mph.”

The system is expected to
produce much needed rainfall
and high winds.

If the system reaches tropical
storm strength it will be
named “Ana.”

The hurricane season offi-
cially runs from June 1 to
November 30.

what she stated in chambers.

Alan Steinfeld, QC, who is
representing Amir Weissfisch,
submitted to the Court of
Appeal yesterday that the
grounds Mr Lavender had
relied upon were not ade-
quate. Mr Lavender had sub-
mitted that Justice Allen’s
comments and conduct would
suggest to the fair minded
observer a real possibility of
bias on her part in relation to
the case.

Mr Steinfeld noted that the
issue had been argued as to
whether it was Justice Allen
who first raised issue of
recusal and whether she had
stated, “I would be happy to
recuse myself,” as Mr Laven-
der’s notes reflected.

“That in itself, is not a mat-
ter which would lead a fair
minded and informed observ-
er to think that there was
remotely any prejudice or bias
by the judge because it went
only toa matter is not in itself
a ground for recusal,” Mr Ste-
infeld said.

“Let us assume that Mr
Lavender’s note was accurate
and that the judge was wrong
in her recollection, that still
would not be a ground for
recusal,” he said.

Mr Steinfeld submitted that
the issue was whether a fair
minded observer would con-
clude that the judge might not
be able to deal with the case in
an unbiased manner.

According to Mr Steinfeld,
the fair minded observer
would say that there was a dis-
agreement between the judge
and counsel as to what was
said by the judge to counsel
and that that was not a matter
that went to the merits of
whether she should recuse
herself.

He submitted that there
was no reason to believe that
because the judge had a dis-
agreement of recollection, that
she would be antipathetic
towards Mr Lavender and his
client.

President of the Court of
Appeal Dame Joan Sawyer
noted that the main issue the
court saw was that the judge
during the course of her ruling
talked about her memory and
what she recalled transpiring
in chambers.

“Her memory would never
be known to the objective
observer unless the objective
observer is a clairvoyant,”
Dame Joan noted. The appeal
continues.

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? ing out for swine flu cases in the
? Bahamas, Health Minister Dr
? Hubert Minnis said.

? been no laboratory cases con-
? firmed, but health officials are
? keeping alert when it comes to the
: A(HIN1) virus.

? the A(HIN1) virus has not been
? introduced into our shores, but we
: will not let our guard down as we
? will continue to aggressively mon-
? itor the situation at all ports of
? entry and indeed within the coun-
? try as we have been doing from
: day one,” Dr Minnis said.

? ness and access to vaccines and
? other benefits, particularly those
? that relate to the A(H1N1) virus
? (swine flu), will be discussed at the
: 62nd annual World Health Assembly (WHA) meeting, scheduled
: for May 18 to 29 in Geneva, Switzerland.

Govt ‘still looking
for swine flu cases’

THE government is still look-

Dr Minnis said that there have

“We have been fortunate that

Pandemic influenza prepared-

DR HUBERT MINNIS



Dr Minnis will lead a four-member delegation representing the

Bahamas.

He will also attend a Meeting of Heads of Delegations of the

i Americas and a Commonwealth Heads Minister’s Meeting.

The delegation to the 62nd World Health Assembly will include

chief medical officer Dr Merceline Dahl-Regis, director of Pub-
? lic Health Dr Pearl McMillan, and National Chronic, Non-Com-
; municable Diseases Coordinator Dr Yasmin Williams-Robinson.

“The WHA agenda was recently modified to include discus-

? sions on the A(H1N1) virus and the development of a vaccine for
: the virus now that the virus has been identified,” Dr Minnis
i said. “That discussion is expected to take up the bulk of the
? agenda.

“These discussions will be very, very pertinent to all coun-

: tries participating in the meetings, but particularly to the Third
? World and developing countries, as access to vaccines and the
? sharing of health information go a long way in helping to reduce
} disease burdens in these areas,” Dr Minnis added.

The WHA is the decision-making forum through which the

: World Health Organisation (WHO) is governed by its 193 mem-
? ber states. It is the world’s highest health policy-setting body and
? is composed of health ministers from member states.

The main tasks of the WHA are to approve the WHO pro-

i gramme, supervise financial policies, review and approve the
? proposed programme budget, and decide major policy ques-
i tions.

According to WHO Update 28 on May 14, 33 countries have

officially reported 6,497 cases of A(HINI) infection.

Mexico leads the way with 2,446 reported cases including 60

? deaths; the United States reported 3,352 cases, including three
? deaths; Canada reported 389 cases, including one death; and
: Costa Rica, eight reported cases including one death. Twenty-nine
? other countries have reported from one to 100 cases, but with no
: deaths.

ROYAL BANK OF CANADA TRUST COMPANY
OSS U ENB RIEU SD
is considering suitable applications for the role of

Manager, Trust and
Corporate Services

Description of role and key responsibilities:

¢ Lead and manage a team of trust officers and other
staff: this includes providing advice in respect of clients
and cases, coaching staff and ensuring the effective
utilisation of other resources. Instrumental in developing
and implementing company procedures within
appropriate frameworks.
Possess a superior knowledge of Trust (complex and
simple), Company and Fiduciary structures, and tax
and legal issues affecting the administration of Trusts
and Companies.
Ensure that strong technical knowledge of all aspects
of trust and company administration is delivered: this
includes attending client meetings and
supervising/assisting in respect of the preparation of
accounting and investment information prior to
submission to clients
Experience with the preparation and presentation of
financial and estate planning proposals to high net
worth individuals
Providing assistance to increase profitability of the
company/shareholder value by identifying
opportunities to extend the trust services, and to use
the bank offering to implement solutions for clients
where appropriate
Proven superior sales acumen. With ability to attract,
build and strengthen relationships with key clients and
intermediaries and identify new ideas in relation to
products and services that may be offered by the
company

Core skills and knowledge:

* A University degree in business, accounting, or other
related discipline

¢ Aminimum of ten years’ relevant experience
Professionally qualified, e.g. accounting/finance
qualification, STEP ICSA, TER ACCA
Self-motivation with excellent project management
Demonstrably strong technical knowledge of all aspects
of trust and company administration, including the
nuances and statutory requirements of the major
offshore jurisdictions used in connection with clients'
structures
Strong analytical and problem-solving skills
Methodical, thorough and attentive to detail
Strong supervisory skills coupled with the ability to lead
by example
Strong skills in time management and prioritisation
Excellent oral and written communication skills
Microsoft Office skills
Cultural awareness and sensitivity on both an individual
and corporate basis

Interested persons should apply by May 22, 2009 to:
Royal Bank of Canada Trust Company

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If so, call us on 322-1986
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THE TRIBUNE PAGE 8

S
\

TUESDAY, MAY 19,



2009 \





COLLEGE OF THE BAHAMAS ATHLETICS DEPARTMENT: Press conference

Leading the charge

RG (3

Scotiabank and

t (242) 3944? £ [242] 393-8298

Titans claim
early season
victories

Bahamas Cricket Association league play con-
tinued over the weekend, with perennial power-
houses picking up wins early in the season.

Scotiabank Paradise won the match over St.
Agnes due to inclement weather and bad light,
while the Dockendale Titans cruised to victory
over Castrol Commonwealth.

Scotiabank bowled first against St. Agnes and
gave up 247 runs for the loss of eight wickets.

Youth player Orlando Stewart was the top scor-
er for St. Agnes with 48 runs, while Orwell Grant
and Ray Haniff added 30 and 26 runs respectively.

In his final game as a member of the Scotiabank
Paradise, Youth player Gary Bell led his team to
the win taking two wickets while Kester Duncan
took two wickets as well.

Bell leaves the game after completing his training
at the Hotel Training College and according to
cricket enthusiast Paul Thompson, “During his
years here he thrilled cricket fans with his spin
bowling and aggressive batting. Bell made a con-
tribution to the Bahamas.”

Light

In their turn at bat, Scotiabank scored 145 runs
for the loss of three wickets before rain and insuf-
ficient light stopped play.

Aeon Lewin led the scoring with 56 runs and
Andrew Nash scored 44 to lead the offense.

Bowling for St. Agnes, Earl Thomas, Hesketh
Dean, and Ray Haniff took one wicket each.

In Saturday’s match, the Titans won over the
Castrol by two wickets.

Commonwealth batted first and was bowled out
for 190 runs.

Terry Seepersad led all scorers with 67 runs and
Mike Graham added 31.

Top bowlers for Dockendale included veteran
Danavan Morrison who took four wickets while
Dwight Weakly took two.

At bat, the Titans scored 194 runs for the loss of
five wickets, to take the match by two.

Weakly and Morrison displayed their versatility
by leading the team as batsmen with 71 and 42
runs respectively.

Garth Davis took two wickets for Castrol.

Next weekend’s schedule is as follows: Dynasty
vs. Castrol Commonwealth at Windsor Park, Police
vs. Scotiabank Paradise at Haynes Oval.



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@ by RENALDO DORSETT
Sports Reporter
rdorsett@tribunemedia.net

I: an effort to provide lead-
ership in the area of nation-
al sports and wellness, the coun-
try’s leading tertiary institution
made an integral step towards
development of the aforemen-
tioned programs.

The College of The Bahamas
Athletics Department officially
launched its Sports & Wellness
Institute aimed at providing pro-
fessional development opportu-
nities for persons working in this
area.

Representatives from the col-
lege suggest the initiative repre-
sents a significant move as it seeks
to support and drive national
development through education;
research & innovation; and ser-
vice.

The Sports and Wellness Insti-
tute’s ultimate goals will be to
“provide professional develop-
ment opportunities for persons
working in wellness/sports within
the community, to assist with the
certification of professionals, par-
ticularly those who teach and
coach young people, and to
benchmark or provide credibility
for professionals.”

President of the College of the
Bahamas, Janyne Hodder, said
Institute arose out of a need to
create more certified coaches
within the country’s core sports.

“As one of the country’s most
important strategic actors, the
mission of The College of The
Bahamas is to support and drive
national development through
education, research & innovation
and service, by offering high qual-
ity programs grounded in unique
features of the Bahamian envi-
ronment. We believe that the
launch of a Sports & Wellness
Institute helps us to accomplish
this,” she said, “The concept of a
Sports & Wellness Institute
emanated from a pilot workshop
last summer held jointly between
The College of The Bahamas and
The Ministry of Education, Youth
Sports & Culture. During that
workshop approximately 40
teachers and coaches received

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COB launches Sports & Wellness Institute

is aa

HR aRac aeanense nce

professional development in the
Art of Injury Prevention and the
Fundamentals of Coaching Bas-
ketball. It was clear from this
workshop that the need existed
for further training of this and
other groups involved in sports
and wellness.

Swimming

The current core sports include
track and field, basketball, soft-
ball, volleyball and soccer.

Swimming is on the cusp of
receiving core sport status while
the list of secondary sports
includes boxing, baseball, and ten-
nis.

“We want to emphasise that
the focus of this Institute will not
be solely on the development of
sports but also on wellness, nutri-
tion and lifestyle. It is important
that The College of The Bahamas
partners with other entities to
ensure that the message of good
health and wellness is spread
throughout the length and
breadth of The Bahamas,” Hod-
der, “We must work to ensure
that the high levels of obesity,
cholesterol, diabetes and hyper-
tension — all of which are preven-
tative diseases — are minimised in
our country, particularly among
our young people. The target
groups therefore will include, but
are not limited, to coaches across
the spectrum, schools, national
teams, officials, referees, statisti-
cians, sports administrators, man-
agers, trainers, wellness coaches,
fitness instructors, and nutrition-
ists.”

College of the Bahamas Ath-

nq Aen eoliter Olmlal enn Athletic Director.

a a




a)

letic Director, Kim Rolle, said the
Institute will place a premium on
blending the theory learned in
the classroom with practical appli-
cation in the field.

“One of the things that we
found in the pilot project was that
those persons were really hungry
for some sort of professional
development. We want to ensure
that these persons have contact
hours and also a follow up mech-
anism so that these persons follow
up with exactly what they were
trained to do,” she said, “If a
coach has a team, we want a
someone from the institute to be
able to go a practice on any given
day and ask a coach to see their
practice plan, as you should have
if you are doing a Level One cer-
tification. So that we know these
persons are not just taking the
material and going with them and
not using them.”

Rolle said an added benefit of
the program is the accelerated
certification of prospective teach-
ers and coaches while enrolled at
the college.

“We train our students to be
physical education teachers, not
coaches. In many instances these
persons coach. So what we are
saying is since they coach we
might as well train them as best
we can to do so,” she said, “This
is another opportunity for some-
body who is a physical education
major to receive certification pri-
or to them leaving the Collge of
the Bahamas so they can leave
with a level one certification as
apart of their college experience.”

The Sports & Wellness Insti-
tute’s working group consists of





aE ae
Re



5

COB’S Janyne Hodder

representatives from the core
Sporting Federations, Ministries
of Education, Health and Youth,
Sports & Culture and personnel
from The College of The
Bahamas.

The working group includes
Lawrence Hepburn (Bahamas
Basketball Federation); Curt
Hollingsworth (Bahamas Ama-
teur Athletics Association); Col-
lege of The Bahamas Athletics
Director Kimberley Rolle;
Valerie Lowe (Bahamas Swim
Federation); Dr. Anne Rolle
(Ministry of Health); Keith Saun-
ders (Ministry of Education);
Oria Wood-Knowles (Ministry of
Youth, Sports & Culture); Rom-
mel Knowles (Bahamas Softball
Federation); Wellington Miller
(Bahamas Olympic Association);
Lionel Haven (Bahamas Football
Association); Joe Smith
(Bahamas Volleyball Federation);
Wesley Rolle (Bahamas Lawn
Tennis Association); Dr. Pandora
Johnson (COB); Dr. Linda Davis
(COB) and Antona Curry
(COB).

President of the Bahamas Bas-
ketball Federation, Lawrence
Hepburn, speaking on behalf of
the working group said the for-
mation of such a venture is long
overdue.

“For too long our sports have
been developing ‘willy-nilly.’ A
little clinic here or there and we
wanted to move away from that.
We wanted something, a program
that our people can be well
trained in,” he said, “It is in line
with what all our federations want
to do and something that we need
to do for the development for
world class athletes of the future.”

MEMBERS of the College of
the Bahamas Caribs men’s
basketball team are from left
kneeing: Dominic Sweeting,
Damian Sturrup, Jamaal Dar-
ling, Danzel Barr. Left Stand-
| ing: Coach Bastian, Jude Vil-
mar, Sheron Murphy, Theron
Butler, Frisco Mckay, Garvin
Lightbroune, Rashad Mcken-
zie, Philip Colebrook, Assis-
tant Coach Kirk Basden.



TRIBUNE SPORTS

TUESDAY, MAY 19, 2009, PAGE 9



INTERNATIONAL SPORTS



CRICKET

England rout West indies

A wonderful display of swing
bowling helped propel England
to a series whitewash over the
West Indies. The victory gives
the team momentum leading
into the Ashes series later this
summer. Lancashire seamer
James Anderson led the charge,
ending with match figures of
nine for 125. It enabled England
to win by an innings and 83 runs
in the second npower Test and
regain the Wisden Trophy just
three overs after lunch at
Chester-le-Street.

Two interruptions for rain in
the morning session helped cre-
ate swing-friendly conditions.
And man-of-the-match Ander-
son, partnered by Yorkshire all-
rounder Tim Bresnan, made the
most of them, causing a rapid
West Indies collapse either side
of lunch of seven wickets for 35
runs in just 88 balls. Resuming
144 runs adrift on 115 for three,
the tourists fell to 176 all out
with Shivnarine Chanderpaul
the only batsman to offer any
resistance on the final day with
a gritty 47 over two hours.

TENNIS



THE ENGLAND squad are seen celebrating with their trophy after beating
the West Indies during the 5th day of the second test match at the River-
side's cricket ground, Chester-le-Street, England, Monday May 18, 2009.
The team are back row left to right, Kevin Pietersen, Jimmy Anderson,
Graeme Swann, Graham Onions, and Stuart Broad a Front row left to right,
Alistair Cook, Paul Collingwood, Ravi Bopara, captain Andrew Strauss Tim

Bresnan and Matt Prior.



ENGLAND'S PAUL COLLING-
WOOD, left, celebrates with Graeme
Swann, , after catching West Indies
Shivnarine Chanderpaul during the
5th day of the second test match at
the Riverside's cricket ground.

RS eg

Kirsty Wigglesworth/AP Photo

FORMER BRITISH tennis player Tim pant aun a shot,
during the mixed double tennis match with playing partner, for-
mer tennis champion Belgium's Kim Clijsters, against former
tennis champion Andre Agassi from the US and his wife, former
tennis champion, German born Steffi Graf, during a test event

on Wimbledon's Centre Court, in London, Sunday, May 17,

Scott Heppell/

AP Photos

2009. Wimbledon's Centre Court has had a moveable roof
installed so that play can continue at the grass court champi-
onships in wet weather. The Championships begin June 22.



Beating Nadal gives Federer boost into French Open

m By PAUL LOGOTHETIS
AP Sports Writer
MADRID

A victory over Rafael Nadal in a clay-court final
has Roger Federer feeling good about his chances

heading into the French Open.
It’s not the first time.

Federer broke a sluggish Nadal once in each set
for a 6-4, 6-4 win Sunday that earned him a second
Madrid Open trophy. It was the second-ranked

Swiss player’s first title of 2009.

With Roland Garros a week away, the victory
over four-time defending French Open champion
Nadal is sure to provide a big boost for Federer.

“At this stage it does, considering I hadn’t won a
tournament yet (this season),” the 13-time Grand

Slam winner said.

“Tt’s all finally paying off but it’s not the moment
to get carried away. I’m very excited going to Paris
whereas a couple of weeks ago I was still a little bit

unsure about my game.”

Federer had similar feelings two years ago after he



beat Nadal on clay at Hamburg to snap the
Spaniard’s record 81-match winning streak on the
surface.

After that win, Federer said he’d figured Nadal
out ahead of Paris. But he then lost the ensuing
final in four sets. Last year he lost the French Open

Sharapova

final to Nadal in straight sets. “I know what I have to
do but that doesn’t make it easy,” Federer said Sun-
day. Nadal, meanwhile, was only thinking about the
first week at the French — a long way ahead of any

TIKI O

return to

tour but

shows rust

m By RYAN LUCAS
WARSAW, Poland

\ \ | earing strips of white
tape on her right

shoulder, Maria Sharapova
played her first singles match on
tour in nearly 10 months, and
while she won on Monday, her
game did show signs of rust.

The three-time Grand Slam
title winner needed nine match
points to finally put away 68th-
ranked Tathiana Garbin of Italy
6-1, 6-7 (6), 6-3 in the first round
of the Warsaw Open.

“When you haven’t been there,
haven’t done that in a while, it
throws you off a little bit,” said
Sharapova, whose last competi-
tive singles match was July 30,
“and then there you are after nine
months, and you have an oppor-
tunity to win your first match
back, and you start thinking of
everything that’s gone on, and
you kind of lose the present
time.”

The Russian had surgery for a
torn rotator cuff last year and
missed the past two Grand Slam
tournaments. She wouldn’t dis-
cuss the French Open, which
starts Sunday — and is the only
major championship she hasn’t
won. Sharapova, who said her
shoulder didn’t bother her against
Garbin, did stress that playing
matches is the only way to return
to the form that carried her to
the No. 1 ranking.

She’s now ranked 126th.

“T’ve been absent for so long,
and I’ve said it many times: You
can do so many things, you can
practice and you can play practice
matches, but it’s never the same
as going out and playing in a tour-
nament, and I think that’s what
Til need,” she said.

“T’ve played millions of match-
es in my career, and I'll play mil-
lions more, and I think right now

ies

RUSSIA'S Maria Sharapova returns a shot to Italy's Tathiana Garbin
during their first round match of the Warsaw Open tennis tournament
in Warsaw, Poland, on Monday May 18 2009.



“I'm hungry. I
haven’t played for a
while, and I want it
really bad, and
sometimes I
actually have to stop
myself at times and
tell myself to be

patient.”



it’s just going to be getting that
experience back and the thought
process on the court and doing
the right things to finish the
match.”

Sharapova did have problems
in that department Monday.

She cruised through the first
set and grabbed a 4-0 lead in the
second before her serve started
to falter. Serving at 5-3, she wast-
ed four match points — double-
faulting on two of them — and
then failed to convert two more in
the tiebreaker before netting a
forehand to give that set to
Garbin. “I was definitely a little
bit nervous closing that second
set out,” Sharapova said.

In the third, she dropped an
early break before rallying with
her trademark groundstrokes to
overpower the Italian. Sharapova
held serve to go up 5-3, then con-
verted her third match point
when Garbin knocked a back-



Czarek Sokolowski/AP Photo

hand long. “I certainly had desire
to win my first match back,”
Sharapova said. “I’m hungry. I
haven’t played for a while, and I
want it really bad, and sometimes
I actually have to stop myself at
times and tell myself to be
patient.”

She made a brief return to pro-
fessional tennis in March, play-
ing — and losing — one doubles
match in Indian Wells, Calif. But
she pulled out of a series of sin-
gles events, waiting until this
week to test her shoulder in com-
petition.

“In these nine months, the only
thing I’ve accomplished is proba-
bly a good pasta carbonara,”
Sharapova said. “At the end of
the day, that’s not my specialty.
My specialty is to go out and com-
pete and win Grand Slams.”

In other first-round action at
this clay-court tournament, Mar-
ta Domachowska of Poland beat
Akgul Amanmuradova of Uzbek-
istan, 6-2, 6-1; Anne Keothavong
of Britain eliminated Bethanie
Mattek-Sands of the United
States, 6-2, 7-6 (4); Jie Zheng of
China beat Olga Govortsova of
Belarus, 4-6, 7-6 (0), 6-3; Katery-
na Bondarenko of Ukraine beat
Tsvetana Pironkova of Bulgaria,
7-5, 6-2; Julia Goerges of Ger-
many defeated Aleksandra Woz-
niak of Canada 7-6 (5), 6-3; and
Alona Bondarenko of Ukraine
eliminated Katarzyna Piter of
Poland 6-0, 6-0.

Daniel Ochoa de Olza/AP Photo

ROGER FEDERER from Switzerland, right, seen, with Rafael Nadal from Spain, after winning the Madrid Open
Tennis Tournament, in Madrid, Sunday May 17, 2009.

rematch with Federer. “Federer has the potential to
win at Paris and at any site in the world. He’s showed
that throughout his career. But Paris begins with
the first round, not the final,” Nadal said. “If I was

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In 2006 and 2007, one loss to Nadal was all that
stood between Federer and a season Grand Slam —
wins in all four majors. The situation is different
approaching Roland Garros this year. For a start,
Nadal is ranked No. 1, having ended Federer’s 237-
week stint atop the men’s rankings by winning the
Olympic gold medal at Beijing in August.

Nadal also beat Federer in the finals at both Wim-
bledon and the Australian Open.

The loss at Melbourne Park in January left the 27-
year-old Federer in tears. He did go some way to
rebounding from that in Madrid by ending Nadal’s
33-match winning streak on clay and denying him a
sixth title this year. Nadal, with an imposing 25-2
record in clay court finals, said his loss in Madrid
would have little influence on the upcoming major.

“To me, this tournament has nothing to do with
Paris. This tournament is practically another sur-
face compared with Paris,” said Nadal, who wasn’t
at his best following a record 4-hour semifinal win
over Novak Djokovic. “There are points on nor-
mal clay that aren’t points but they are here. The
conditions favored him more than me.”

Nadal said he was “empty” after Madrid and that
he needed a few days to recover. He said his right
knee is OK, but it acted up again on Saturday and
has troubled him since November.

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PAGE 10, TUESDAY, MAY 19, 2009

TRIBUNE SPORTS



INTERNATIONAL SPORTS

SOCCER

Tevez uncertain future typical of tangled life

m@ By ROBERT MILLWARD
AP Soccer Writer
LONDON

Coxe Tevez’s farewell to Man-
chester United fans celebrating
their latest title was another painful chap-
ter in a life and career that simply refus-
es to go in a straight line.

Seemingly unwanted by Man United,
the 24-year-old Argentine striker is reluc-
tantly looking for another club even
though he wants to stay and fans have
been pleading for months for manager
Alex Ferguson to make the loan perma-
nent.

What seems on the outside to be a
logical move just doesn’t happen in the
world of Carlos Tevez.

The small but tough striker, who bears
scars on his neck and chest after a child-
hood scalding, has weaved through tan-
gled transfers and rule-breaking contro-
versies, none his own fault. Now he
appears to be leaving United in a move
that clouds the club’s most recent cham-
pionship.

Tevez, whose tournament-leading
eight goals helped Argentina win its first
Olympic soccer gold medal at the Athens
Games, is one of the many South Amer-
ican stars whose contracts are owned by
various investors because clubs cannot
afford the transfer or salary.

When he moved from Argentina’s
Boca Juniors to Brazil’s Corinthians, the
transfer fee of almost $20 million was a
record for a Brazilian club. Some said
it was far too much to spend on one play-
er. But the bulk of the money came from
the English-based Media Sports Invest-
ment, and the criticism abated when his
goals led Corinthians to league titles.



Jon Super/AP Photo

MANCHESTER UNITED'S Carlos Tevez reacts after scoring against Wigan during their Eng-
lish Premier League soccer match at The JJB Stadium, Wigan, England, Wednesday May

13, 2009.

He had problems at Corinthians, how-
ever. He fought with a teammate during
training, and the club considered legal
action against him after he went missing
and was seen singing in a Buenos Aires
nightclub with a group he helped form.

MSI eventually sold Tevez on to Eng-
land’s West Ham, along with fellow
Argentina star Javier Mascherano. That
caused another furor on the other side of
the Atlantic.

Premier League rules say that clubs
cannot buy players from a third party
and fined West Ham $11 million. Tevez
continued to play for the Hammers, how-

ever, and his goal on the final day of the
Premier League championship saved the
club from relegation.

That led to more legal trouble for
West Ham when Sheffield United, which
went down instead, won a compensa-
tion claim after arguing that Tevez
shouldn’t have been allowed to keep
playing for the club.

Tevez finally thought he’d found a sta-
ble home at Old Trafford, where he
arrived on a two-year loan last season
with a view to a permanent transfer. He
helped the Red Devils win two straight
Premier League titles, a Champions

0 Soccer shorts

League title, a Club World Cup and a
League Cup.

The fans loved him because of his
work ethic, his persistence in tackling
after losing the ball and his skills in scor-
ing or setting up goals.

“The fans love a trier,” said Fergu-
son, ducking questions about why the
team won’t spend the estimated $37.5
million to buy him.

So Tevez is resigned to leaving at the
end of the season, either because the
club won’t complete the complicated
transfer with the people who own his
contract or because the Red Devils don’t
want him any more. The official line
from the club is that nothing will be
decided until after the season.

Tevez had moved his wife and young
daughter to England and has repeatedly
said he and his family were happy in
Manchester. But he felt betrayed by the
club and told Argentine media he also
was upset at being frequently left on the
bench.

Although he seemed to enjoy the title
celebrations at Old Trafford on Satur-
day, he wore an Argentina national team
shirt instead of Man United colors
toward the end of the ceremony.

“T feel a lot of pain to have to leave
Manchester United because of the fans.
It’s hard for me to accept this,” Tevez
said.

“Each day that goes by is more diffi-
cult for me because I know that I am
not going to play at the club anymore.”

Although Ferguson is likely to rest
most of his front-line players in Sunday’s
final league game at Hull, there is still the
Champions League final May 27 against
Barcelona. If Tevez is not in the lineup
or on the bench, that will signal his Unit-
ed career is over.

Beckham backs England's
2018 World Cup bid

m@ WEMBLEY, England (AP)
— David Beckham teamed up
with Prime Minister Gordon
Brown to launch England’s bid
for the 2018 World Cup on Mon-
day, saying that winning the right
to host would be as satisfying as
anything he’s accomplished on
the field.

“Tt would be up there with win-
ning (trophies) and the success
I’ve had in my career because to
be part of a successful bid, like I
was with the Olympics, would be

a huge honour,” the former Eng-
land captain said.

England is competing against
the United States, Australia,
Mexico, Russia, Indonesia and
Japan, as well as possible joint
bids by Spain and Portugal and
the Netherlands and Belgium.
FIFA’s executive committee will
make the decision in December
2010. “I’ve played with some of
the biggest and best (players) in
the world and all they talk about
is the passion and atmosphere
that is shown at England games
and games against teams from
England,” Beckham said.

Beckham won the Champions
League with Manchester United

and the Spanish league title with
Real Madrid. He is now on loan
at AC Milan from the Los Ange-
les Galaxy. Beckham, who was
part of London’s successful bid
for the 2012 Olympics, said Eng-
land would probably be able to
stage the World Cup right now.

Juventus fires coach
Claudio Ranieri

@ TURIN, Italy — Juventus fired
coach Claudio Ranieri on Mon-
day, saying a change was the only
way to salvage what’s left of a
season in which the team has

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gone winless in its last seven
games.

He was replaced by Ciro Fer-
rara, a former Juventus defender
and current coach of the club’s
youth team. Ferrara was an assis-
tant to Marcello Lippi, the World-
Cup winning coach who is back
leading the national team.

Juventus drew 2-2 at home
Sunday with Atalanta, leaving the
Turin club three points behind
second-placed AC Milan with two
games left. Inter Milan has
clinched the Serie A title.

“We absolutely have to do
something different,” general
manager Jean-Claude Blanc told
the ANSA news agency. “We

wanted to give a strong shake-up
and now it’s all in the hands of
the players.”

Ferrara is expected to remain
coach only until the end of the
season, but Blanc suggested he
might stay longer. The GM said
Ferrara had “all the qualities to
be considered with a lot of atten-
tion for the future,” but stressed
the final two games would be crit-
ical. Juventus has not won since
March, with six draws and a
defeat in its last seven games. It
lost to Chelsea in the first knock-
out round of the Champions
League and fell in the semifinals
of the Italian Cup to eventual
champion Lazio.

0 In brief

Jolinson
repeats as
Texas Open
champion

@ SAN ANTONIO — Zach John-
son left town with another Texas
Open win, a PGA Tour distinc-
tion and the top spot in the
FedEx Cup standings, reports
Associated Press.

No wonder he’s going to miss it
here. Winning at La Cantera Golf
Club for the second time in seven
months, Johnson needed just one
hole to beat James Driscoll in a
sudden-death playoff Sunday and
successfully defend his title for
his sixth career tour victory.

Johnson beat Driscoll, who ral-
lied from eight strokes back in a
final-round shootout to force the
playoff, with a 10-foot birdie on
the par-4 18th. The two finished
regulation at 15-under 265 — one
the 2007 Masters champion, the
other a conditional-status tour
player who was 141st on the mon-
ey list last year. Johnson won in
the La Cantera finale, with the
tournament moving to anew TPC
course in 2010.

London mayor
visits Seoul
for inspiration

HM SEOUL, South Korea —
London’s mayor says a tour of
the Seoul Olympics sites has giv-
en him good ideas on how to
build venues that will have a last-
ing legacy long after the 2012
Games. Mayor Boris Johnson sin-
gled out the 1988 Olympic Vil-
lage as an “amazing” example of
how to sell apartments in advance
to help raise money for the site.

The British government has
had to dip into a contingency fund
to help build the Olympic Village
because of a lack of private
financing during the global eco-
nomic recession.

Johnson praised the sculpture
garden, parks, glades and water-
side features at the 1988 Olympics
site in southeastern Seoul. John-
son says he also watched hun-
dreds going for a swim in the
Olympic Games pool Monday.

London’s 85,000-seat Olympic
stadium is to be converted into a
25,000-seat arena after the 2012
Games are over.

UTR RU Tea



att Dunham/AP Photo

SUNDERLAND'S Kenwyne Jones does a backflip as he celebrates scoring during the English Premier
League soccer match between Portsmouth and Sunderland at Fratton Park stadium in Portsmouth, England,

Monday, May 18, 2009.



SUNDERLAND'S ccna Jones
reacts in disappointment on the
final whistle.

Sunderland still face a battle
for Premier League survival
after two defensive howlers
allowed Portsmouth to grab a
3-1 victory at Fratton Park.

The Black Cats could have
ensured top flight status with a
win. It started so well for them
when they led with a 59th
minute strike from Kenwyne
Jones.

Portsmouth, however,
scored twice inside seven min-
utes through John Utaka and
Phil Bardsley's own-goal after
a horrible blunder from Anton
Ferdinand, before an Armand
Traore strike sealed victory
three minutes from time.

Sunderland boss Ricky
Sbragia bemoaned his side's
defending, saying after the
game: "It's happening too
often in general — we play
well, we think we're sort of in
charge of the game.”



Matt Dunham/AP Photo

PORTSMOUTH'S Peter Crouch, top, battles for the ball with Sunder-
land's Grant Ledbitter during the English Premier League soccer
match between Portsmouth and Sunderland at Fratton Park stadium
in Portsmouth, England, Monday, May 18, 2009. Portsmouth won the
match 3-1.



PAGE 12, TUESDAY, MAY 19, 2009 THE TRIBUNE
LOCAL NEWS





4 oa p.
cole

*2po Thigh & Leg

=2 Dinner Rall

tae

Raymond A Bethel/BIS

Miss Bahamas World, contestants and executives
pay a courtesy call on the Governor General

MISS Bahamas World Tinnyse Johnson, assistant director of talent development; Miss
executives of the Miss Bahamas World Organ- Sposabelle Bridal, formal and evening wear,
isation, and contestants in the 2009 pageant Devera Pinder; Miss Galleria Cinemas Emily
paid a courtesy call on the Governor General Darville; Miss Red Hot Gabrielle Major; Miss
Arthur Hanna on Monday, May 11 at Gov- D § Lifestyles Inc Kendra Wilkinson; Miss



ernment House. Bahamas Experience Llatetra Laing; Miss Col-

iqinal Famous Bowl , rae Pictured seated from left are Miss Davis _ ors Entertainment McChenier Johnson; Miss

SS siya CU es “ Trucking Dashanique Poitier; Miss Theodore Bella Donna Michaela Ferguson; Miss But-

ren Ellyett Productions, Channa Cius; Governor tons Bridal and Formal Wear Shavonne

reer eer General Hanna; Miss Bahamas World 2008; McKenzie; Miss Harbour Island Swanique

Pere len eed doers ES) isis Sehr te ene Ms Johnson; Miss Exuma Danielle Morley; Sawyer, and Leslia Miller, MBO director of



(standing from left) Shavonne Bain, MBO pageant affairs.

NEMA oversees
preparedness of
hurricane shelters

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@ By LINDSAY
THOMPSON

THE National Emergency
Management Agency
(NEMA) is readying shelters
throughout the country as the
2009 Atlantic Hurricane Sea-
son approaches.

NEMA and its partners
headed by the Department of
Social Services conducted a
re-classification exercise of
the 26 identified shelters on
New Providence last Thurs-
day to ensure they are ready
in the event a hurricane
strikes. The season runs from
June 1 to November 30.

Captain Stephen Russell,
director of NEMA, said that
in accordance with the
national emergency disaster
plan, the inspection was to
ensure that there are suitable
shelter facilities throughout
the country.

“We are vigorously trying
to inspect proposed shelters
to ensure that they are prop-
erly equipped in the event the
country is faced with a disas-
ter, especially a hurricane,”
he said.

Inspection of Family Island
shelters has already begun.
Shelter managers workshops
are also being scheduled.

Captain Russell thanked
NEMA’s international part-
ners - the United States
Agency for International
Development (USAID) and
the Office of United States
Foreign Disaster Assistance
(OFDA), for their help in dis-
aster management.

William Pratt, assistant
director of Social Services,
said consent letters were sent
to church leaders requesting
their facilities to be used as
shelters for the upcoming
hurricane season.

And, following a
favourable response, inspec-
tions were carried out.

Each facility will carry the
sign, ‘Emergency Hurricane
Shelter’ with the blue hurri-
cane symbol on top, replacing
the Red Cross symbol.

Previously, school gyms
were used as shelters but that
“posed a problem,” he
explained. They were still
occupied when = school
reopened.

The team comprises repre-
sentatives from NEMA, the
Department of Social Ser-
vices, Environmental Health,
the Fire Branch of the Royal
Bahamas Police Force, the
Royal Bahamas Defence
Force and the Red Cross.

A checklist is used to deter-
mine whether the facility is
designated a hurricane shel-
ter.

The team looks at the
building location for easy
access, the building code reg-

ulations, storm shutters and
whether window frames are
properly affixed to walls, cer-
tain amenities and services
including proper electrical
wiring, safe and adequate
water supply, sanitary facili-
ties, kitchen facilities, and
wheelchair accessibility
among others.

Shelter management is now
the responsibility of the
Department of Social Ser-
vices.

The 2009 hurricane shelters
for New Providence are as
follows:

- Church of God Auditori-
um, Joe Farrington Road;

- Epiphany Anglican
Church, Prince Charles Dri-
ve;

- Epworth Hall, Shirley
Street;

- Holy Cross Anglican
Church, Highbury Park off
Soldier Road;

- Kemp Road Ministries,
Kemp Road;

- Pilgrim Baptist Church,
St James Road;

- Salvation Army, Mackey
Street;

- St Mary’s Hall, St Augus-
tine, Bernard Road in Fix
Hill;

- Agape Full Gospel Bap-
tist Church, Kennedy Subdi-
vision;

- Golden Gates Assembly,
Carmichael Road;

- New Bethlehem Baptist
Church, Independence Dri-
ve;

- Southwest Cathedral
Church of God, Carmichael
Road;

- Church of God of Prophe-
cy, East Street;

- Calvary Bible Church,
Collins Avenue;

- Church of God of Prophe-
cy, Augusta and Patton
Streets;

- Ebenezer Mission Baptist
Church, Charles Vincent
Street;

- Salvation Army, Meadow
Street;

- St Barnabas Anglican
Church, Wulff Road;

- Bahamas Association for
the Physically Disabled, Dol-
phin Drive;

- Church of God of Prophe-
cy, Gambier Village;

— Hillview Seventh Day
Adventist Church, Tonique
Williams- Darling Highway;

— Mount Moriah Baptist
Church, Farrington Road;

— New Providence Com-
munity Centre, Blake Road;

— Good News Seventh Day
Adventist Church, Great
Britain Street, Flamingo Gar-
dens;

— Workers’ House, Tonique
Williams- Darling Highway;

— New Hope Missionary
Baptist Church, Joan’s
Heights West.





u





i, i
= I

THE TRIBUNE



THE TY SCREENS inside Cable Bahamas...

Cable Bahamas ‘vehemently
opposes’ USO obligations

@ By NEIL HARTNELL
Tribune Business Editor

CABLE Bahamas and its
subsidiaries “vehemently
oppose” the Government’s
plans to impose universal ser-
vice obligations (USO) on it for
the provision of television ser-
vices throughout the Bahamas,
and are also challenging its des-
ignation of the company as hav-
ing “significant market power”
in the provision of Internet and
pay-per-view television services.

A copy of the BISX-listed
company’s feedback to the
USO and licensing consulta-
tions, initiated as part of the
Government’s communications
sector regulatory reform, which
has been obtained by Tribune

* Says no universal service
obligations for television
anywhere else in the world

* BISX-listed firm also
challenges its designation
as having ‘significant
market power’ in
Internet, pay-TV markets

Business, said Cable Bahamas
was “unaware of any other
jurisdiction in the world where
the concept of universal service
has been applied to the provi-
sioning of television service”.
Acknowledging that its

SEE page 7B

Venture fund sees 75%
fall in new plans

@ By NEIL HARTNELL
Tribune Business Editor

THE Government-sponsored
venture capital fund’s adminis-
trator yesterday said it had seen
a 75 per cent drop in new busi-
ness plan submissions to five
per month, as he urged Bahami-
an entrepreneurs to “start
small” and not attempt to “get
rich quick”.

Jerome Gomez, the Baker
Tilly Gomez executive who
oversees the Bahamas Entre-
preneurial Venture Fund, said it
had provided financing to a fur-
ther three Bahamian businesses
for 2009 to-date, taking the total
number of ventures it had assist-
ed to 48.

While the number of business
plans/financial applications sub-
mitted to the fund had
decreased to around five per
month, down from a previous
average of 20, Mr Gomez said
this was due more to “people
forgetting that we are around”,
rather than the prevailing eco-
nomic climate.

“We’ve been quite for a
while,” Mr Gomez said. “We’ve
not been out there as we have
been in the past, so people may
have forgotten.”

While financial institutions
were currently unlikely to be
interested in providing capital
to the Bahamas Entrepreneurial
Venture Fund, largely due to

* Applications fall from 20 per
month to 5, but administrator
believes due to lack of
fund publicity

* Three businesses - cheque
authorisation, catering and block
making - financed this year so far

* 48 businesses aided, with 11
receiving $1.2m in equity and 37
some $2.8m in debt financing
for $4m grand total

* Venture fund ‘putting house in
order’ with portfolio pruning,
with two businesses it has financed
already gone, and ‘hard decisions’
likely on others

the economy and their own
related internal issues, Mr
Gomez said the fund was busy
“putting the house in order”
and pruning its company port-
folio to make it attractive to the
private sector.

He added that 50 per cent of
the 48 entrepreneurs and start-
ups it had financed to date were
“on their way to some degree of
success”, while the other 50 per
cent were “shaky, still struggling
to stand on their feet”.

“We’ve lost two companies
[we financed] on the way so
far,” Mr Gomez told Tribune
Business, “and there may be
one or two more if they can’t

SEE page 4B

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MAY 19, 2009

SECTION B « business@tribunemedia.net

Cable hits at BTC’s
‘reform influence’

@ By NEIL HARTNELL
Tribune Business Editor

able Bahamas has accused the
Government’s communications
regulatory reform process of giv-
ing its rival, the Bahamas
Telecommunications Company
(BTC), “preferential treatment and influence”
through having three of its senior executives
sitting on the committee overseeing the effort.

The BISX-listed entity, in its April 20, 2009,
feedback to the communications sector reform
proposals, argued that the perception of
integrity in the process had been “under-
mined” because BTC’s executive chairman,
Julian Francis; Felicity Johnson, BTC’s vice-
president for legal, regulatory and intercon-
nection, and its company secretary; and Tellis
Symonette, BTC’s senior vice-president for
Family Islands and administration, were all
on the BTC Privatisation Committee over-
seeing it.

In its response, signed by in-house legal
counsel Judith Smith, Cable Bahamas and its
Caribbean Crossings subsidiary said they want-
ed to “register their disappointment with, and
formally protest, the apparent decision of the
Government to abandon its original, and
recently re-espoused, commitment to an open,
transparent and non-discriminatory public con-
sultation process by according preferential
treatment and influence in that process to
BTC, to the exclusion of all other carriers”.

Business Reporter

Claims rival had ‘preferential
treatment and position’ in
communications sector overhaul
by having three persons on
committee overseeing effort

The inference from Cable Bahamas is that
BTC had influence over the outcome of com-
munications reform and the consultation/feed-
back process to its benefit, and the detriment
of other, rival carriers and telecoms competi-
tors.

Such assertions, though, have not been
proven. T. B. Donaldson, the BTC privatis-
taion committtee’s chairman, did not return a
voice mail left on his office telephone, seeking
comment, before last night’s press deadline.

Cable Bahamas also complained that the
Broadcasting Corporation of the Bahamas
(BCB) was represented on the committee by
its chairman Michael Moss, to the exclusion
again of other carriers.

While the strong BTC presence on the com-
mittee was understandable when efforts were
underway to facilitate the 100 per cent state-
owned carrier’s privatisation, Cable Bahamas
said “the privileged position” enjoyed by BTC
and the BCB “lost any plausible rationale”

SEE page 5B



‘Zero margin of error’

m@ By CHESTER ROBARDS = Independent testers ensure bottled water



crobards@tribunemedia.net

MOST Bahamian potable
water companies are conduct-
ing some manner of testing on
their products, the president of
an environmental laboratory
and consultant company that
specialises in testing and quali-
ty controls, said yesterday.

Anthony Knowles, of Adka
Environmental Laboratories
and Consultants, told Tribune
Business that his company does
testing for many water suppli-
ers and contends that many oth-
er suppliers use different labo-
ratories.

Mr Knowles said he was not

How do you attract and retain

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quality, as greater regulation of sector urged

aware of any water companies
that did not test their water.

Recently, however, several
impostor bottles bearing the
Aquapure label were confiscat-
ed by police and, after testing,
were found to have off-the-
chart levels of disease-causing
and potentially deadly bacteria.

Mr Knowles said companies
who were using his testing facil-
ities were doing well. “We make
recommendations and see that
they are carried out,” he
explained.

Chelsea’s Choice cannot
begin daily bottling until their

water and facilities have been
tested by Adka, according to
the company’s managing direc-
tor.

Tina Knowles said that hav-
ing an independent quality con-
trol and testing company on site
is costly, but necessary. “We
operate with a zero margin of
error,” she said.

Ms Knowles said Adka sani-
tises all of Chelsea’s equipment
daily, and then gives the go-
ahead for water production to
begin.

SEE page 5B

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Sentinels
Anshacher
purchase
‘imminent’

B By NEIL HARTNELL
Tribune Business Editor

SENTINEL Bank & Trust,
the offshore financial institu-
tion that is part of the former
Colina Financial Group (CFG),
it set to “imminently close” its
acquisition of Ansbacher
(Bahamas), Tribune Business
sources revealed last night.

Separate sources told this
newspaper that the Ansbacher
(Bahamas) deal “might be clos-
ing some time this week or
next”, while another confirmed
it was “closing imminently”.

Tribune Business was told
that the acquisition’s closing had
been delayed by the need to
obtain Central Bank of the
Bahamas approval for the
acquisition, which has now been
forthcoming.

“Tt got stalled on the Central
Bank approval for a couple of

SEE page 5B

The information contained is from a third
party and The Tribune can not be held
responsible for errors and/or omission,
from the daily report.



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PAGE 2B, TUESDAY, MAY 19, 2009

City Markets aims to
escape ‘perfect storm’

IN the last 10 days, Bahamas
Supermarkets (BSL) has suf-
fered armed robberies at three
of its City Markets stores, the
latest at the gleaming blue-chip
Cable Beach supermarket.
Internal employee pilferage and
cashier fraud have plagued the
business and impacted margins
for the last couple of years, a
leakage gradually being reduced
by dismissals, prosecutions and
better surveillance and technol-
ogy.

The soft-spoken Sunil Cha-
trani, who was moved by Neal &
Massey, the Trinidad conglom-
erate that acts as BSL’s largest

shareholder, from his senior
post in Barbados last October
to become chief executive of the
Bahamian company, was frank
in telling us that the level of
crime in Nassau far exceeds
what Neal & Massey has expe-
rienced at its other operations in
Barbados, Trinidad, or St. Lucia.

But other issues have been
dominating his time. Working
together with Evangeline
(Vangie) Rahming, the crisp
Bahamian accountant who left
KPMG early in 2008, and was
later promoted to corporate
chief financial officer, he creat-
ed a multi-page Business Recov-

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Strong odor &

ery Plan dated April 9, 2009,
which has demonstrated some
$5 million already achieved in
cost savings. When Mr Chatrani
took over last autumn, the
enterprise was at a low point.
The outlook offered by the
chairman at last August’s annu-
al general meeting (AGM)
proved over-optimistic, and by
October even Bahamian whole-
salers were threatening to cut
off credit and effectively shut
the company down.

Since that time, Mr Chatrani
and his executives have held
many meetings to renegotiate
supply and delivery contracts,
and are getting greater cooper-
ation from their counterparties.
Bahamas Food Services even
installed warehouse refrigera-
tion equipment free of charge.
Staffing, which had ballooned
to 850 compared to 700 under
previous Winn-Dixie manage-
ment, has now been shrunk
back to around 700 employees.

Of course, the company is not
yet out of the woods, as can be
seen by the operating loss of
$3.4 million for the six months
ended January 9, 2009. This may
suggest an improvement in the

decline from the last full
year’s loss of $13.4 million, but
whether the improvement is sus-
tainable can only be judged
when the latest quarterly results
are published. One factor that
continues to concern Mr Cha-
trani is the low percentage of
product that he can buy direct
from foreign suppliers — about 7
per cent, instead of a normal 35
per cent. The balance must be
bought from Bahamian whole-
salers, who of course charge
their own commissions that
sharply reduce BSL’s operating
margins. BSL simply does not
have the cash resources or cred-
it to buy in bulk from abroad.

So the response to the Busi-
ness Recovery Plan is crucial. It
has been circulated to all the

by Richard an

BSL Holdings shareholders, the
entity that owns 78 per cent of
the operating company, BSL.
Neal & Massy in turn holds 40
per cent of Holdings, with the
remaining 60 per cent Bahami-
an-owned via various wealthy
individuals, the Hotel Pension
Funds, and the Fidelity private
investment group.

The Plan forecasts that BSL
could break even later in 2009
and return to profit in 2010, but
only on condition that all these
parties provide new funding,
partly to the operating company
and partly to Holdings to ser-
vice its loan from the Royal
Bank of Canada. Mr Chatrani
told us that these contributions
must be made oportionate-
ly”, which suggests that Neal &
Massey will only step forward
if the Bahamian shareholders
also share the burden.

s we write, firm commit-
ments from all the Bahamians
are actively being sought with
an end-of-month deadline.
Although meeting it seems
probable, BSL is still on a knife-
edge until every signature is in
place. Only then can the com-
pany’s auditors, KPMG, be
expected to release their certifi-
cation for the 2008 fiscal year
without the “going concern”
qualification that would be dis-

astrous for BSL’s credit stand-
ing.

The odds seem favourable,
though not certain, that Mr Cha-
trani and Ms Rahming, sup-
ported by visiting Neal &
Massey staffers and a stronger
Bahamian management team
(and more cash), will be suc-
cessful in engineering a turn-
around. The question of how
BSL fell into these serious
straits, and who personally or
what extraneous conditions
were responsible, can long be
debated. Mr Chatrani, in office
just since last autumn though an
earlier observer, does not point
fingers but simply says the con-
ditions for a “perfect storm”
prevailed after the 2006 acqui-
sition.

The record shows that in its
last year of ownership, Winn-
Dixie sold over $21 million
worth of products to BSL, on
which it increased prices by at
least 5 per cent after the sale to
Holdings, and these items had to
be replaced by IGA and other
brands unfamiliar to Bahami-
ans. The current recession has
had its unavoidable impact on
sales. The abrupt transfer of
accounting and inventory func-
tions from Jacksonville to Nas-
sau — perhaps necessary, but
perhaps premature — combined
with personal frictions and
changes in the executive ranks,
inevitably resulted in degrada-
tion of financial controls.

In April 2008, the chief oper-
ating office Stephen Boyle
issued an ill-timed press release
that a $4 million investment in
retail IT scanning technology
was already paying its way in
reducing losses — followed by
the sharp earnings decline
announced in August and his
own departure in September. In
May 2008, the chief financial
officer Bryan Knowles left the
company, leading later to a high-
ly publicised dispute between

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himself and chairman Basil
Sands over whether he and his
team had given the Board mis-
leading financial information.
Whoever was right or wrong, it
was an unseemly squabble for
a public company. The situation
was not alleviated by the chair-
man’s comment, duly reported
in the press, that the Board
might have exercised more dili-
gence.

Whether these issues should
be buried in past history, or
whether the present BSL Board
is competent enough to carry
the company forward, é
for shareholder decisions
can be aired at the next AGM.

We have recommended to
the Board that before the
é n as the auditors’
nis published, a pub-
“investor presentation” be
made by Mr Chatrani and Ms
Rahming, giving them the
opportunity to speak openly and
answer questions about the pre-
sent condition and future
prospects of BSL. This would
be normal practice for any pub-
lic company in BSL’s delicate
but hopeful state of affairs.
Whatever the future holds
for BSL does not extinguish the
special grievance of the 1,500
minority shareholders, owning
22 per cent of the company.
Their potential legal claim under
the Companies Act against the
directors, and against BSL
Holdings, for completing the
Winn-Dixie transaction with no
offer or information to the
minority, is being reviewed by
them and their counsel. It is
unquestioned that while Winn-
Dixie got the nice price of $16
for their shares, the minority got
nothing and are now holding
non-marketable shares of dubi-
ous value that have paid no div-
idends for over 18 months.
Whether Bahamian law will give
them any recourse remains to
be tested.





THE TRIBUNE

TUESDAY, MAY 19, 2009, PAGE 3B





Bahamas urged to
be ‘vigilant’ on G-20

m@ By CHESTER ROBARDS
Business Reporter
crobards@tribunemedia.net

THE IMPENDING reforms to the US
tax code may not impact the Bahamas
much due to this country’s continued coop-
eration with Washington through the Tax
Information Exchange Agreement (TIEA),
the Bahamas Financial Services Board’s
(BFSB) chief executive/executive director
believes.

Wendy Warren said the Bahamas has
met all the standards required by the US,
and contended that the amendments to the
US tax code are a domestic policy change.

She said the bigger picture was how these
initiatives would impact global business,
including business brought to the Bahamas-
through foreign investment.

The BFSB held a follow-up session last
Friday with key players in the financial ser-
vices sector to discuss what issues and ini-
tiatives could be taken to government for
consideration.

According to Ms Warren, the BFSB
makes recommendations to the Govern-
ment about how it should proceed on mat-
ters impacting the financial services indus-
try on a global stage.

“Tt is very easy following the G-20 meet-
ing to think this has gone quiet, but we
think there is still a lot of activity and the
Bahamas must remain vigilant,” she said.

“We must remain focused on these devel-

Government works
on the impact of

WENDY WARREN



opments, so that’s really the objective
today; to get a sense from the industry on
any further input that would want to take to
government.”

One suggestion that has been put forth by
financial experts is the taxation of foreign
client assets. However, Ms Warren said she
has not seen any indication that the

Bahamas is moving toward this kind of tax-
ation, which could change the allure of its
international banking sector.

“From the Bahamas’ perspective, I
haven’t received any indication that the
Bahamas is looking to tax individuals,” she
said. “I don’t see that in the cards any-
where.”

The BFSB, she continued, will be exam-
ining the current environment to see if
there are modifications that will allow this
country to become more attractive to
investors.

Ms Warren said the entire world’s eco-
nomic environment has been rattled by the
recent financial crisis, and she suspects
there will be many more changes to come,
“but in terms of preparing ourselves, we
have made significant advances.

“We want to ensure we are engaging and
keeping that conversation going, and being
able to provide input to the relevant stake
holders,” she said.

The Bahamas was recently place on a
grey list by OECD nations, meaning it has
begun to comply with standards that could
keep it from being placed under the dis-
tinction of a tax haven.

“The Bahamas has been in this business
for many years, and we see financial ser-
vices as being critical to the social environ-
ment in the Bahamas and the economic
environment, so we have to invest in this
industry,” said Ms Warren. “It’s critical to
our economy and critical to our society.”



#

THE BAHAMAS SOCIETY OF ENGINEERS

The Public Is Cordially Invited To Attend
THE MONTHLY LUNCHEON PRESENTATION
Hosted by The Bahamas Society of Engineers

On
Thursday, May 21, 2009

Topic

“THE IMPACT OF THE EPA ON
THE ENGINEERING FIELD”

Guest Speaker
MR. JOHN K.F. DELANEY

Managing Partner
Higgs & Johnson

PLACE:
EAST VILLA RESTAURANT
East Bay Street
Time: 12:00p.m.

If possible please confirm your attendance by e-mail

Gracesharma0S5@yahoo.com or JEENiott@bahamaselectricty.com
or quentin. knowles@flameless.com

BAHABSTAS DEWERDIAOPMENT BANK

Cable Beach, West Buy Street.
PaO. Box M- 304
Abi, Daahanogs
Telit 242) 327-378 S27-S793-6
Pase( 242) 327-5047, 327-L2SH
jw. Ib hinnueschewe hope nthe nk. com




The general public is invited to attend Bahamas
Development Bank’s sale of repossessed assets.

global warming

lm By CHESTER ROBARDS
Business Reporter
crobards@tribunemedia.net

THE GOVERNMENT is
working closely with interna-
tional agencies in order to find
solutions to the problem of
global warming, according to
the minister of state for the
environment, after a recent
World Bank study revealed its
effects could deal an almost $50
million blow to this economy.

Phenton Neymour told Tri-
bune Business that the
Bahamas has been active in
raising awareness on the issue of
global warming, and this coun-
try’s standing as one of the top
10 countries that could be most

These are the things that are
essential to moving forward,
including letting our voice be
heard internationally.”

Mr Neymour said the
Bahamas will be represented at
the United Nations Climate
Change Conference in Copen-
hagen this December.

The World Bank study
revealed that an estimated 1,517
square miles of Bahamian
coastline could be impacted
over a number of years, repre-
senting 54.67 per cent of the
total coastline. As a result, the
study estimates 3,711 persons
could be impacted over the
same period of time, represent-

ing 73.03 per cent of the total
Bahamian population living on
a coastline that could possibly
be affected.

In a list of 10 countries most
at risk for serious damage as
storm surges intensify, the
Bahamas tops the list three
times out of six categories, as
assessed by the World Bank.

“We have discussed and have
put in the public domain the
fact that we need to reduce the
number homes being built in
low lying areas that are prone to
flooding,” said Mr Neymour.
“And we must be aware of the
damage to homes should we
build in coastal areas.”

ASSET























lectronic Equipment Tables.

(1) Compaq Presario Computer Tower * (1) Marble Table (Rectangle)
(1) Canon Canoscan N640D EX Scanner
(1) Digital Scale (New)

(1) Whirl Microwave

(1)Tec Cash Register

(1) Epson Stylus Pro 9600 Print Engine
(1) HP DeskJet 656c Printer (Desktop)
(1) Monitor

(1) 1520 Epson Stylus Color Printer

Cooler/Freezers

) Two Door Chest Freezer
) lce Cream Cooler

) Single Door Cooler

) 8’ Walk-in Freezer
wCompressor (New)

(1) Keyboard & Mouse B ‘t lon Equipment
(1) Brothers Printer - (3) Nail Tables

(1) Samsung Digital Camcorder * (7) Facial Machine

(1) Dell Scanner & Printer * (2) Nail Stools

. qd
. qa
. qd
. qa

achinery

(1) Chrome Juice Filler

(1) Multi Fruit Juicer

(1) Quilting Sewing Machine

(1) Deli Showcase

(1) Singer Sewing Machine

(1) Janome Monogram/Embroidery Sewing Machine

(1) Singer Quantum XL150 Sewing Machine with Serger

(1) Meat Saw (New)

(1) Deli Selection (Minor 2000 MT-SE) (New)
Tech Work Benches
Alternator Test Bench

impacted by its effects.
As a low lying chain of
islands, the Bahamas is expect-

Assortment of Items

- Cooking Utensils Pots, Pans & Plates

+ (2) Breakfast Nooks
- Air Hockey Game
* (1) Yamaha Wave Runner

)

)

) Paint Booth

) Rivet Machine

) 6” Storage Cabinet
1) 4” Craftsman Tool Cabinet
Brake Washer





ed to be one of many nations
around the world affected by
Sea level Rise (SLR) brought
about by rising global tempera-
tures.

Scientists have also predict-
ed that rising surface tempera-
tures of the world’s oceans will
spawn a greater number of high
intensity hurricanes and, cou-
pled with SLR, will increase the
instance of damaging storm
surges.

“We are in the top five most
vulnerable to climate change
and we need to be aware that it
will impact us,” said Mr Ney-
mour.

The Bahamas has launched
its National Energy Policy
which looks at ways to reduce
dependency on fossil fuels as
an energy source. This also
underscores the Bahamas’ com-
mitment to act on the impend-
ing global impact of climate
change.

“The whole drive is to dimin-
ish our reliance on fossil fuels,”
said Mr Neymour.

“The real emphasis need to
be put on reducing the potential
impact from storm surges, hur-
ricanes, etc, and improving the
design and construction of our
sea walls.

For the stories
behind the news,
eetle Marler
on Mondays

NMC SALES, SERVICE and PARTS
All for One NEW NUMBER

Distributors for Honda, Chevrolet, Cadillac and ACDelco Parts | Shirley Street, Nassau








ESSAY COMPETITION

TENTH ANNUAL PUBLIC SERVICE WEEK

The Department of Public Service will host an Essay
Competition as one of the activities for the Tenth Annual
Public Service Week. The Competition is open to Junior
and Senior Students in New Providence.












Additionally, this year, a speech competition will be
for schools in the Northern & Southern Bahamas,
respectively. Students interested in participating in the
Essay Competition should write a 250 - 300 words (Junior
High), and 450 - 500 words (Senior High), essay on the
topic: “ The Public Service-Striving for Excellence in











Customer Service.”

The deadlines for entries, which should be referred
to the attention of Mrs. Antoinette Thompson, Deputy
Permanent Secretary, Department of Public Service, is








Friday 24th July, 2009.

A Dell Desktop 2400 Computer System will be awarded to
the winner each category. The first runners-up for both the
Essay and Speech Competition in the Junior & Senior High
School category, will be awarded a $500 gift certificate.






The winners will be announced during the Tenth Annual
Public Service Week Awards Ceremony scheduled for

Saturday 10th October 2009.

Students interested in the Speech Competition for the
Northern and Southern Bahamas should contact their

Language Arts Teacher.



Sand Blaster
Vari-Drive

Inland Steel, Sumner Street off Solider Rd.Nassau, Bahamas

Exit Abundant Life Road turn right onto Solider Road then the first left
onto Sumner Street tenth two storey white & blue building on the left

Date & Time: 10:00a.m. — 3:00p.m. — Saturday May 23, 2009

All assets are sold as is where is for cash, cashier’s cheque. No purchase(s) will be released
until paid in full.

The general public is invited to attend Bahamas Development Bank’s sale of repossessed Vehicles
and small Vessels.

2003 Dodge Caravan

2002 Hyundai H-1 Van SUX

1997 Double Axle Mack Dump Truck
1997 Dodge Stratus

1982 GMC Brigadier Drill Truck
2001 Kia Pregio Van

1989 Ford L8000 Drill Truck (Green)

2001 Hyundai H-1 Van SUX
2006 Mitsubishi Canter Truck
1996 Ford Explorer

2000 Ford Ranger Truck
1999 Ford F-250 Truck

2006 Hyundai H-1 SVX Van

Vessels

20’ Robolo Vessel (1996) with Evinrude Outboard Engine

19’ Fiberglass Sports Vessel (1989) Hull Only

21 Seacraft Vessel (1974) with 140 HP Yamaha Outboard Engine

19’ Spanish Wells Runabout Vessel (1991) with 115 HP Mercury Outboard Engine
20’ Abaco Skiff (1997) with 115 HP Mercury Outboard Engine

Location: Internal Security Division Compound, Thompson Blvd

Nassau, Bahamas

Date & Time: 10:00a.m. — 3:00p.m. — Saturday May 23, 2009

For additional information telephone 327-5780.

The public is invited to come and view the aforementioned assets on the date and time indicated.
After which you may submit Sealed bids marked “TENDER-EQUIPMENT” to Bahamas
Development Bank, P.O. Box N-3034, Nassau, Bahamas. A representative will be on the
compound from 10:00am to 3:00pm to collect and secure all offers, which will be opened on May
25, 2009. Please note that all bids on the aforementioned assets should be received by 3:00 pm
May 23, 2009. The Bahamas Development Bank reserves the right to reject any or all offers. All
assets are sold as is.

302-0130 Kos



PAGE 4B, TUESDAY, MAY 19, 2009

THE TRIBUNE





Venture fund sees 75 per
cent fall in new plans

FROM page 1B

reorganise or restructure. We
may have to consider closing
them.”




Mr Gomez said the Bahamas
Entrepreneurial Venture Fund
had assessed Bahamian finan-
cial services businesses it
thought might be interested in

NOTICE

NOTICE OF DISSOLUTION










WILD FLOWER INC.





Pursuant to Park LX, Section 137 (6) of the (Interna-
tional Business Companies Act, 2000), we hereby sub-
mit that winding-up and dissolution of the Company
has been completed on the 29 day of May, 2009.


















Credit Suisse Trust Limited
Liquidator

NOTICE
RC FINCO INVITES TENDERS

RBC FINCO invites janders for the purchase of the tollrwing

“All THAT™ poece parcel o¢ kot of land comprising
Mo. 45 in Massan Village Subdivision =
ol New Providence one of nomorreecalth of the Pabaertes
Situated thereon is a Deplex Apartment with each unit consisting of (2) bedenoms
and (1) bereom

who, 0) ad 11 od Bock
fe ip ihe Souther Lastest of the lkond

of the Glands of &

Peoperty Suze: 5000 sq fi
Boing Sane: 20175 sy fl

This Property is heing sold under Power of Sale contained ina Reelpage te
FINANCE CORPORATION OF BAHAMAS LIMITED,

All edters shoud be forwarded i woiling in sealed envelope, addressed to the
Manager, Reval Bask Collections Centns, P.O, Box 8-754, Nie, Bahamas
and marked “Tender 0129", All offers must be reocived by the close of besiness
4:00 pom. Friday 29" May, ZMH

Choco dade eee Ee HEE POTTS ETRE TEETER TREE RE RRS

MOTICE
RBC FINCO INVITES TENDERS

RBC FINCO invites tanders for the purchase of the following

‘All THAT piece parcel or lot of land comprising Lat No. 12 in Block Mo. 3 in
Section 2 of S¢a Breeze Subdivision situate in the Exaem District of the island of
New Providence one of the islands of the Comes f the Bahan
SAiated thereon is a single family residence cunisting af (4) bedrooms and (3

Dat bnceaeiis.

Property Shae: 12,000 sy fh
Building Size: 2540 29 fi
[hs property 15 being sold under Power of Sale contained in a Wee pape bo

FINANCE CORPORATION OF BAFAMAS LIMITED.

All offers should be forwarded in writing im sealed envelope, addressed to the
Manager, Royal Bank Collections Centre, PO. Bow N-7529, Nassau Bahamas
aod marked “Tender (427°. All offers most be received by the close of business
4:00 pum., Friday 29" May, 209

PPE TTT OTTERS E SOPH EE ETE REE ee

RBC
FINCO

\

ie

NOTICE
REC FINCO INVITES TENDERS

RBC FINGO invites tenders for the purchase of the folowing

“AL THAT piece parcel or lot of land comprising Lot No. 145 situate in South
Seas Estanes Subdivisacn stuale in the Souther District of the Island of New
Prowidiene of the islands of the Commonwealth of the Bahamas, Sibarisd
thereon is vacant land

5

Property Sine: 7,067 sq fi

This property is being sold under Power of Sale contained in a Morpape to

FINANCE CORPORATION OF BAHAMAS LIMITED.

All ater: should be foracmded im writing in sealed envelope, addressed to the
Manager, Royal Hank Collections Centre, P.O, Box W-7549, Nags, Bokamaes
and marked “Tender 2735", All offers must be receved by the close of business
4:10 pm. Friday 29° May, 200.

SESSEAEEEREEEE AE EEE PEASE SSS SHSS ETE ETT TERETE ERR

providing capital to the fund,
and many had taken “some sub-
stantial hits” as a result of the
economy.

In expectation for when the
economy and financial markets
turned around, the fund admin-
istrator told Tribune Business
that “we’re still putting the
house in order”, ensuring audits
were completed on time and
“looking at businesses on the
books that may n o longer be
viable or have a chance to sur-
vive, making hard decisions as
to whether they could. We’re
making tough decisions; clean-
ing up the portfolio”.

Of the three businesses
financed by the Bahamas Entre-
preneurial Venture Fund this
year, one has received an equi-
ty injection, the other two debt.

Mr Gomez said one recipient
was a cheque authorisation
business, where customer
cheques are swiped through a
“credit card-like machine”
before cashiers are authorised
to accept them. The company
had developed a database of
Bahamian customers who rou-
tinely handed over bad cheques,
and those who did not, and was
now working for City Markets.

\

RBC

The other two recipients of
financing, Mr Gomez added,
were a small catering business
that operated the staff cafete-
ria for banks, and a block-mak-
ing company.

So far, the Bahamas Entre-
preneurial Venture Fund has
financed 11 approved applicants
with equity, and the remaining
37 with debt financing. A total
of $4 million has been invest-
ed, some $1.2 million in equity
and $2.8 million in debt financ-
ing.

Mr Gomez said the fund had
not drawn down on the $1 mil-
lion allocated to it by the Gov-
ernment in the 2008-2009 Bud-
get, and added that there was
no need to increase its financing
limits - a maximum of $100,000
in debt financing for any one
project, and $200,000 in equity
financing.

“We don’t think the market
dictates that at this time,” Mr
Gomez said. “We find we’re
able to fund most of the pro-
jects coming to us, so there is
no need to increase the limits
at this time. The amount of
money we have on hand is more
than enough.”

He added: “We can be a

RBC
FINCO

NOTICE
REC FINCO INVITES TENDERS

RBC FINCO inviles benders for the purchase of the following:

“All THAT™ piece parce! or lot of land comprising Lat Ne. 398 situate in
Doynam Heights Subdivision siluate in the Eastern District of the Island of New
Providence one of the sslands of the Commonveealth of the Babomas, Situnted
thereon is a Single Family Residence consisting of (2) bedrooms and (2)

hathream.

Property Size: 15,499 sq ft

This property 1 being sold under Power of Sale contained in a Mortgage to
FINANCE CORPORATION OF BAHAMAS LIMITED.

All offers should be forwarded im writing in staked envelope, addressed wo the

Manager. Royal Bank Cy
and marked “Tender

Ketods Oenie, PO. Bow N-7549, MN
All offers must be received by the close of beamess

au, Hahamas

NOTICE
RBC FINCO INVITES TENDERS

RSC FINCO invites tenders for the purchase of the following:

All THAT® piece parcel o¢ lot of land c mnpeising Lot No. 952 eee in
Pinewood Gardens Subdivision situate in ihe Souther Destict of the Island of
New Providence one of the islands of the Commonweadth ef the Bahama:

Situsted thereon is a Sangle Fem
bathroom.

ly Residence OMS Of

3) bedroums and (2)

Property Size: 3,000) eq ff
Building Size; 294 ay fi

This property is being sold under Power of Sale contained ina Morlgave io

FINANCE CORPORATION OF BAHAMAS LIMITED.

All allfers should be forwarded in writing in seaked eewehipe, addressed to the

Mianazer, Bi

yal Bank Collections Centre, PO), Bow N-7449. Nasa, Babamas

and marked “Tender 5074", All offers must be received by the close of busamess

4:00 pum., Friday 29* May, 2009,

PCP FCAA CAAA heehee Pee Pe eee

Y
RBC

RBC
FINCO

NOTICE
RBC FINCO INVITES TENDERS

REC FINCO invites tenders for lhe purchase of the following

“All THAT® piece parcel of lot of and comprising Lot No. 1695 aituase in
Pinewood Crandess Subdivision situate in the Southern Deginet of the Bland of
New Providence one of the glands of the Commonwealth

Situated thereon is a Single Famvly Residence consisting

bathroom

Property Sie: SA) a i

Build Sane: 1,729 ay 1

This property if being sold under Power of Sale contained in a Mortgage to
FINANCE CORPORATION OF BAHAMAS LIMITED.

All offers should be gorameded in writing in sealed envelope, addressed to the

Manager, Royal Bank Collections Centre, PO, Box 6-7549, Nassau, Bahamas

afd marked “Lender eS
4:00 pn. Friday 20" May, 2009.

All atlers must be recenved by the close of business

SHCA AATESERKHRRAAEER EERE RRR ERREREEA DEERE EEEEEEEEE EEE REESE

great help to entrepreneurs who
want to start small. The biggest
issue is that people want to start
big in this economic climate.
We advise people to start small
and build their businesses from
the revenues received and paid
to them.”

Mr Gomez said the best busi-
ness plans were those that ini-
tially envisaged just the entre-
preneur and a small staff work-
ing in the business, adding that
the Bahamas Entrepreneurial
Venture Fund would find it dif-
ficult to finance more grandiose
projects worth $500,000 to $1
million.

Explaining that providing
$150,000-$200,000 in financing

in this economic climate would
be difficult for the Bahamas
Entrepreneurial Venture Fund,
Mr Gomez said: “When we go
and talk to persons, we tell
them to start small, with one
truck instead of two. Those peo-
ple are the ones who are suc-
cessful. But too many people
want to get rich quick.”

The administrator added that
he had seen “no improvement
in the quality of business plans
coming into” the Bahamas
Entrepreneurial Venture Fund,
the main weaknesses being
over-optimistic revenue projec-
tions, lack of knowledge of the
market and its size, and the
absence of marketing plans.

PUBLIC NOTICE

INTENT TO CHANGE NAME BY DEED POLL

The Public is hereby advised that |, CARA VERON SAUNDERS of the
South Western District of the Island of New Providence on of the
Islands of the Commonwealth of the Bahamas, intend to my son’s name
from KELVIN VICTOR GERMAN to MALACHI ADRIEL SAUNDERS. If
there are any objections to this change of name by Deed Poll, you may
write such objections to the Chief Passport Officer, PO.Box N-742, Nassau,
Bahamas no later than thirty (30) days after the date of publication of this
notice.

NOTICE

NOTICE is hereby given that ORINDA TAMARA KATHLEEN
WITTSHIRE of #2 BACHELOR’S HOUSE, HUDSON AVENUE,
FREEPORT, BAHAMAS is applying to the Minister responsible
for Nationality and Citizenship, for registration/naturalization as
a citizen of The Bahamas, and that any person who knows any
reason why registration/naturalization should not be granted,
should send a written and signed statement of the facts within
twenty-eight days from the 19" day of May, 2009 to the
Minister responsible for nationality and Citizenship, P.O. Box
N-7147, Nassau, Bahamas.

NOTICE

NOTICE is hereby given that BOLIE EDWARD LLOYD of
ST. ANDREW BEACH ESTATES, P.O. BOX EE-17773,
is applying to the Minister responsible for Nationality and
Citizenship, for registration/naturalization as a citizen of The
Bahamas, and that any person who knows any reason why
registration/naturalization should not be granted, should
send a written and signed statement of the facts within
twenty-eight days from the 13 day of May, 2009 to the
Minister responsible for nationality and Citizenship, P.O. Box
N-7147, Nassau, Bahamas.

Clico (Bahamas) Limited
(In Liquidation)

LIQUIDATOR’S NOTICE

Policyholders of Clico (Bahamas) Limited dn Liquida-
tion) are advised that premium payments and other policy
transactions can be made at the Company’s main office,
located on Mt. Royal Avenue and Carew Street, Nassau,
Bahamas.

Policyholders and the public are further advised that office
hours are from 9:00 am to 4:30 pm daily.

Craig A. (Tony) Gomez
Official Liquidator

COMMONWEALTH OF THEBAHAMAS = 2007/Fam/Div/FP/No.148
IN THE SUPREME COURT
FAMILY DIVISION
BETWEEN: -
BENJAMIN BENEBY
Petitioner
AND

FERRYLYN O. BENEBY (nee) GUERRERO
Respondent

PETITION

In The Supreme Court of the Commonwealth of the
Bahamas.

By: The Firm, Attorney at Law, Marsh Harbour, P.O. Box
AB20191 Abaco, Bahamas. (242) 367-3572 ph/fax



THE TRIBUNE

TUESDAY, MAY 19, 2009, PAGE 5B





Cable

‘reform influence’

Sentinel’s Ansbacher
purchase ‘imminent’



FROM page 1B

weeks,” one source confirmed
to Tribune Business. This news-
paper understands, though, that
all documents and conditions
needed to complete the trans-
action are in place, and that the
way is clear for a smooth clo-
sure.

Tribune Business revealed
last year that Ansbacher
(Bahamas) parent, Qatar
National Bank (QNB), had
decided to place the Bahamian
financial institution on the mar-
ket for sale. This newspaper
also revealed on January 12,
2009, that Sentinel was the insti-
tution leading the race to
acquire Ansbacher (Bahamas).

The institution, which
employs 60 staff, has some obvi-
ous attractions for Sentinel
Bank & Trust and its parent,
the group controlled by A. F.
Holdings (the former Colina
Financial Group), whose prin-
cipals are Emanuel Alexiou and

Anthony Ferguson.

Mr Ferguson did not return
Tribune Business messages left
on his office and cell phone
voicemails before press time last
night.

Ansbacher (Bahamas) has a
significant Bahamian dollar
portfolio, being involved in
domestic pension fund man-
agement and administration,
and one possibility would be for
that business book to be merged
with CFAL, the brokerage/cor-
porate advisory entity that is
part of A. F. Holdings. The
international portfolio could
then be absorbed by Sentinel
Bank & Trust.

It is unclear how any trans-
action would be structured, and
whether it would be Sentinel
Bank & Trust or an affiliate
acquiring Ansbacher
(Bahamas) and its book of busi-
ness, which is estimated to con-
tain assets worth around $200
million. It is possible that Sen-
tine] may even be part of a
wider acquiring group.

FROM page 1B

once the exercise was broad-
ened to regulatory reform.

“Thus, from the operation of
the public consultation process,
BTC, and BTC alone, has had a
unique, privileged opportunity
to shape the content and pro-
cedures of the public consulta-
tion process, and will have a
unique role, denied to its com-
petitors, in shaping the out-
come,” Cable Bahamas said.

It questioned why the Gov-
ernment did not extend the
April 20, 2009, deadline for
industry feedback on its uni-
versal service obligation (USO)
and licensing regimes.

“The companies [Cable and
Caribbean Crossings] protest
this refusal, which is manifestly
discriminatory against licensed
operators other than BTC, who

have not already had an oppor-
tunity to shape the content of
the public consultation docu-
ments themselves, much less an
adequate opportunity to
respond to its content,” Cable
Bahamas said.

The BISX-listed operator
also questioned whether KPMG
Corporate Finance (Bahamas)
was potentially conflicted, due
to its dual roles as advisor to
the Government and BTC pri-
vatisation committee on sector
liberalisation, and in helping
BTC develop its business plan
and valuing the company for
privatisation.

Cable Bahamas had urged
the Government to extend the
feedback deadline and, if the
BTC and BCB representatives
were not taken off the commit-
tee, to then give all other com-
munications operators equal
representation.





The Bahamas Utilities Co-operative




Credit Union Ltd.






1B

She said a sterile water pro-
cessing facility is paramount for
a water company operating in
an industry in need of more reg-
ulation.

The impostor water seized
by police was found to have
bacteria that was too numerous
to count, and its mineral con-
tent was 17 parts per one mil-
lion. Aquapure’s quality con-
trol manager told The Tribune
that the mineral content should
not exceed 10 parts per million.

Ms Knowles said Chelsea’s
water, through constant testing,
never passes five to six parts per
million.

“Our water is tested every
half hour and goes back to the
lab daily for in-depth testing,”
she said.

Ms Knowles said the water
can pick up bacteria through
any part of the bottling process,
which is why her company
found it necessary to employ an
independent quality control lab-
oratory.

“Tts’ an expensive alterna-
tive, but it works,” she said.
“There is no bias with indepen-
dent testing.”

COMMONWEALTH OF THE BAHAMAS

hits at BIC’ S i margin of error’

Ms Knowles said the Gov-
ernment needs to properly reg-
ulate the industry.

Phenton Neymour told Tri-
bune Business recently that the
Environmental Health Depart-
ment tests water for companies
that do not employ an indepen-
dent company.

According to him, many
companies simply acquire a
piece of land, sink wells and
then begin to sell water.

Supplier

According to another suppli-
er, who wished to remain
anonymous, some of the small-
er water suppliers that have
popped up recently do not have
adequate equipment to wash
and sterilize their bottles.

The supplier said proper
industry detergents could cost
as much as $800 to $1000 per
barrel.

“You can’t be ni the industry
unless you have the proper
washer,” said the supplier.
“And that washer has to be at
the required temperature for
the duration (of the washing).
Some of these companies are
operating without proper facil-
ities.”

2008/CLE/qui/16 16

IN THE SUPREME COURT

IN THE MATTER OF ALL THAT piece parcel or
lot of land being Lot 76 containing Twenty seven



thousand six hundred and ninety one square feet
(27,697.00), Stella Maris Subdivision Section

Stella Maris, situate between the settlements
of Burnt Ground and Millerton in the Northern
Portion of Long Island, one of the Islands of the
Commonwealth of The Bahamas, which said
piece parcel or lot of land has such position shape
boundaries marks and dimensions as are shown
on a plan filed herein and thereon coloured yellow

Real PTET)

le

WP Tulia het ake al ton



aes

earl eo cy

Notice of
Annual General Meeting

sey Lod J 4-54 “+

The Annual General Meeting of the Bahamas
Utilities Co-operative Credit Union Ltd will
be held on
Thursday, May 28th, 2009
at 6:00pm
in
The Patrick A. Bain Training Room
at
The Bahamas Co-operative League Building
Russell Road

eS

CcFAL
BISX LISTED & TRADED SECURITIES AS OF:
MONDAY, 18 MAY 2009
BISX ALL SHARE INDEX: CLOSE 1,615.17 | CHG 6.14 | %CHG 0.38 | YTD -97.19 | YTD % -5.68
FINDEX: CLOSE 795.46 | YTD -4.72% | 2008 -12.31%

WWW.BISXBAHAMAS.COM | TELEPHONE:242-323-2330 | FACSIMILE: 242-323-2320

52wk-Low Change Daily Vol. EPS $ Div $ P/E
1.28 0.00 0.127
11.00 0.00 0.992
6.95 0.00 0.244
0.63 0.00 -0.877
3.15 0.00 0.078
125 0.00 0.055
11.09 0.00 1.406 : 84
2.83 0.00 0.249 11.4
6.06 0.12 0.419 14.9
1.31 0.07 0.111 26.8
1.53 0.00
6.02 0.00
11.00 0.00
10.35 0.00
5.00 0.00
1.00 0.00
0.30 0.00
5.50 0.00
8.60 J. S. Johnson 10.50 10.50 0.00
10.00 Premier Real Estate 10.00 10.00 0.00
BISX LISTED DEBT SECURITIES - (Bonds trade on a Percentage Pricing bases)
Security Symbol Last Sale Change Daily Vol.
Fidelity Bank Note 17 (Series A) + FBB17 100.00 0.00 7%
Fidelity Bank Note 22 (Series B) + FBB22 100.00 0.00 Prime + 1.75%
Fidelity Bank Note 13 (Series C) + FBB13 100.00 0.00 7%
Fidelity Bank Note 15 (Series D) + FBB15 100.00 0.00 18 Prime + 1.75%
Fidelity Over-The-Counter Securities
Bid $ Ask $ Last Price
7.92 8.42 14.60
4.00 6.25 6.00
0.35 0.40 0.35
Colina Over-The-Counter Securities
30.13 31.59 29.00
0.45 0.55 0.55
BISX Listed Mutual Funds
NA V YTD% Last 12 Months
1.3664 0.95 4.77
2.8962 -1.49 -3.35
1.4590 1.77 5.09
3.1964 -5.59 -13.64
12.7397 0.96 5.79
100.5606 0.56 0.56
96.4070 -3.59 -3.59
1.0000 0.00 0.00
9.1599 0.71 -12.76
1.0440 0.80 440
1.0364 0.33 3.64
1.0452 0.76 440
MARKET TERMS
YIELD - last 12 month dividends divided by closing price
Bid $ - Buying price of Colina and Fidelity
Ask §$ - Selling price of Colina and fidelity
Last Price - Last traded over-the-counter price
Weekly Vol. - Trading volume of the prior week
EPS $ - Acompany's reported earnings per share for the last 12 mths
NAV - Net Asset Value
N/M - Not Meaningful
FINDEX - The Fidelity Bahamas Stock Index. January 1, 1994 = 100

AND IN THE MATTER of the Quieting Titles Act, 1959

AND IN THE MATTER of the Petition of Allan

Spector

NOTICE
The Quieting Titles Act 1959

The Petition of Allan Spector of the city of
Toronto, in the Province of Ontario, one of the
Provinces in Canada in respect of: - ALL THAT
piece parcel or lot of land being Lot 76 containing
Twenty seven thousand six hundred and ninety one
square feet (27,697.00), Stella Maris Subdivision
Section 1, Stella Maris, situate between the
settlements of Burnt Ground and Millerton in the
Northern Portion of Long Island, one of the Islands
of the Commonwealth of The Bahamas, which said
piece parcel or lot of land has such position shape
boundaries marks and dimensions as are shown
on a plan filed herein and thereon coloured yellow

FG CAPITAL MARKETS

BROKERAGE & ADVISORY SERVICES
|e

COLONTAL

ROYAL FIDELITY

Money at Work

Securit y
Abaco Markets
Bahamas Property Fund
Bank of Bahamas
Benchmark
Bahamas Waste
Fidelity Bank
Cable Bahamas
Colina Holdings
Commonwealth Bank (S1)
Consolidated Water BDRs
Doctor's Hospital
Famguard
Finco
FirstCaribbean Bank
Focol (S)
Focol Class B Preference
Freeport Concrete
ICD Utilities

Previous Close Today's Close
1.40 1.40
11.00 11.00
6.95 6.95
0.63 0.63
3.15 3.15
2.37 2.37
11.75 11.75
2.83 2.83
6.11 6.23
2.90 2.97
1.53 1.53
7.76 7.76
11.00 11.00
10.40 10.40
5.14 5.14
1.00 1.00
0.30 0.30
5.50 5.50

Allan Spector claims to be the owner of the
fee simple estate in possession of the tract of land
hereinbefore described free from encumbrances.

AND the Petitioner has made application
to the Supreme Court of the Commonwealth of
The Bahamas under Section 3 of The Quieting
Titles Act 1959 to have his title to the said
tract of land investigated and the nature and
extent thereof determined and declared in a
Certificate of Title to be granted by the Court in
accordance with the provisions of the said Act.

NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that any
persons having Dower or a Right to Dower or an
Adverse Claim or a claim not recognized in the
petition shall on or before the 19% of June A.D., 2009
file in the Supreme Court and serve on the Petitioner
or the undersigned a statement of his claim in the
prescribed form verified by an Affidavit to be filed
therewith. Failure of any such person to file and
serve a statement of his claim on or before the 19" of
June A.D., 2009 will operate as a bar to such claim.
Copies of the Filed Plan may be inspected at:
The Registry of the Supreme Court;
The Chambers of Graham, Thompson & Co.
attorneys for the Petitioner, Sassoon House, Shirley
Street & Victoria Avenue, Nassau, N.P., Bahamas;
The Notice Board of the Administrator
at Stella Maris, Long Island: and
The Local Constable at Stella Maris, Long Island

40.4

0.240 : 64

0.420
0.322
0.794
0.332 15.5
0.000 : N/M
0.035 : 8.6
0.407 13.5
0.952 11.0
0.180 55.6

18.5
34.2
13.1

S2wk-Hi _52wk-Low
1000.00
1000.00
1000.00

1000.00

Interest Maturity

19 October 2017

19 October 2022
30 May 2013

29 May 2015

52wk-Low Symbol
14.25 Bahamas Supermarkets
6.00 Caribbean Crossings (Pref)
0.20 RND Holdings

Weekly Vol. EPS $
-0.041
0.000

0.001

Div $
0.300
0.480
0.000

N/M
256.6

29.00 ABDAB
0.40 RND Holdings

4.540
0.002

0.000
0.000

9.03
261.90

52wk-Low
1.3041
2.9230
1.3883
3.1964
12.1564
100.0000
96.4070
1.0000
9.0950
1.0000
1.0000
1.0000

Div $ Yield % NAV Date
28-Feb-09
31-Mar-09
1-May-09
31-Mar-09
28-Feb-09
31-Dec-08
31-Dec-08
31-Dec-07
31-Mar-09
9-Feb-09
9-Feb-09
9-Feb-09

Fund Name
Colina Bond Fund
Colina MSI Preferred Fund
Colina Money Market Fund
Fidelity Bahamas G & | Fund
Fidelity Prime Income Fund
CFAL Global Bond Fund
CFAL Global Equity Fund
CFAL High Grade Bond Fund
Fidelity International Investment Fund
FG Financial Preferred Income Fund
FG Financial Growth Fund
FG Financial Diversified Fund

Dated the 23rd day of April A.D., 2009

BISX ALL SHARE INDEX - 19 Dec 02 = 1,000.00
52wk-Hi - Highest closing price in last 52 weeks
52wk-Low - Lowest closing price in last 52 weeks
Previous Close - Previous day's weighted price for daily volume
Today's Close - Current day's weighted price for daily volume
Change - Change in closing price from day to day
Daily Vol. - Number of total shares traded today
DIV § - Dividends per share paid in the last 12 months
P/E - Closing price divided by the last 12 month earnings
) - 4-for-1 Stock Split - Effective Date 8/8/2007
) - 3-for-1 Stock Split - Effective Date 7/11/2007
TO TRADE CALL: COLINA 242-502-7010 | ROYALFIDELITY 242-356-7764 | FG CAPITAL MARKETS 242-396-4000 | COLONIAL 242-502-7525

GRAHAM, THOMPSON & CO.,
Chambers,
Sassoon House,
Shirley Street & Victoria Avenue,
Nassau, Bahamas.
Attorneys for the Petitioner





THE TRIBUNE

FROM page 1B

licence imposed certain obliga-
tions upon it, and that it had
entered - at the Government’s
request - a Memorandum of
Understanding with the
Bahamas Telecommunications
Company (BTC) to provide off-
air television at no charge to
certain Family Islands, Cable
Bahamas said neither of these
imposed a USO obligation to
provide multi-channel televi-
sion or basic television services,
as the Communications Bill
mandated.

Cable Bahamas’ response,
signed by its in-house attorney,
Judith Smith, and dated April
20, 2009, said: “The companies

The Tribune wants to hear
from people who are
making news in their
neighbourhoods. Perhaps
you are raising funds for a
good cause, campaigning
for improvements in the
area or have won an
award.

If so, call us on 322-1986
and share your story.

TUESDAY, MAY 19, 2009, PAGE 7B

Cable Bahamas
‘vehemently opposes’
USO obligations

[Cable and Caribbean Cross-
ings] vehemently oppose the
Government’s proposal to
impose upon Cable Bahamas a
universal service obligation for
television services, independent
of the obligations already set
forth in the terms of its licence
and the Memorandum of
Understanding (MoV).

Impose

“The establishment of such a
requirement would also impose
an unfair burden on Cable
Bahamas since, unlike BTC
with respect to its USO, Cable
Bahamas would be required to
provide service at no cost, with
no prospect of new entrants
seeking to provide television
service under more desirable,
competitive terms.

“As a result, Cable Bahamas
would effectively become a
Universal Service Provider
(USP) for television in perpe-
tuity.”

Cable Bahamas added that
its USO would be unlike that
imposed on BTC for telecom-
munications services, as the lat-
ter at least recovered part of its
costs by charging Family Island
consumers for services, and did
not have to necessarily build
infrastructure.

“The application of USO
principles in this context would
be manifestly arbitrary and
unfair. To the extent a universal
service obligation for broad-
casting should exist at all, it
should be imposed solely on the
nation’s public broadcasting
company [ZNS],” Cable
Bahamas said.

The BISX-listed company
argued that if it was to become
the USO for television services
in the Bahamas, it “should be
fully subsidised for undertak-
ing this onerous burden”.

>} bh 7 . 5 r z *
2s TMOVates Mme to do

good job, The Tribune is

my newspaper.”

ESTHER BARRY
PRODUCTION MAR, R

THE

The Tribune

My Verce. My Vewgpqper!



If ‘must carry’ provisions
were imposed, Cable Bahamas
urged that they be restricted to
local television signals, the Par-
liamentary Channel, local edu-
cation channels and community
channels. These channels also
had to be carried at no charge
to Cable Bahamas or the pro-
grammer, and transmitted only
where cable television was
available.

Elsewhere, Cable Bahamas
“vehemently challenged” the
Government’s decision to des-
ignate it as having ‘Significant
Market Power’ (SMP) in the
provision of high speed data
(Internet) and pay-TV services.

The BISX-listed company
argued that the criteria for
determining whether a compa-
ny had a dominant market posi-
tion, which is to be used by the
Utilities Regulation and Com-
petition Authority (URCA),
were “unreasonably subjective
and vague, and unfairly penalise
efficient operators”.

Tentative

“The Government’s tentative
conclusion with respect to Cable
Bahamas’ presumed SMP is
both premature and unfair,”
Cable Bahamas argued.

“Compounding this inequity,
the proposed Bill also imposes
upon Cable Bahamas regulato-
ry burdens which are onerous
and disproportionate to the
facts at hand, and will frustrate
Cable Bahamas’ ongoing efforts
to achieve efficiencies and meet
its fiduciary obligations to
shareholders.

“At the same time, the Bill
neglects to define precisely how
an operator may overcome a
presumption of SMP, thereby
avoiding or alleviating the bur-
densome extra layer of regula-
tion, which the Bill imposes.”





PAGE 8B, TUESDAY, MAY 19, 2009

THE TRIBUNE





Four Seasons: We’re unlikely to be back

B By NEIL HARTNELL
Tribune Business Editor

THE Four Seasons hotel
brand has admitted it is unlike-
ly to return to Exuma’s Emer-
ald Bay resort as its operat-
ing/management partner, the
Prime Minister saying yester-
day that its contract with the

hotel “proved particularly chal-
lenging” for several potential
buyers.

An e-mail from Jim Fitzgib-
bon, president of worldwide
hotel operations for Four Sea-
sons, a copy of which has been
seen by Tribune Business, said:
“Four Seasons has agreed to an
orderly closure of the hotel to

EDMOND DE ROTHSCHILD LTD
LCF ROTHSCHILD GROUP

guests effective as of May 26,
2009. It is unlikely that the hotel
will reopen as a Four Seasons.”

Explaining the reasons for
Emerald Bay’s closure, Mr
Fitzgibbon said: “After much
deliberation, and in the absence
of being able to identify a new
owner for the development, the
receiver has reluctantly decided

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to close the development.

“This is a decision which was
very difficult for the receivers
to make, and they look forward
to a point in the future when
this development will reopen
under new ownership and con-
tinue to contribute to the Exu-
ma community.”

And he added: “Our sales
teams both at the hotel and in
New York are actively working
with our clients and guests to
rearrange any bookings that
have been confirmed for
beyond May 26. If any of your
clients have been affected, you
can be sure that someone from
Four Seasons will be in touch
with you in the next day or so.

“We are deeply disappoint-
ed to have to share this news
with you, as the [Emerald Bay]
hotel has become a favourite
amongst many of our guests and
clients. We appreciate the sup-
port you have given the hotel



and know that you join us in
commending the excellent team
there.”

Prime Minister Hubert Ingra-
ham’s statement to the House
of Assembly on the Four Sea-

sons Emerald Bay Resort’s clo-
sure yesterday added very lit-
tle that was new, although he
confirmed that “the require-
ments contained in the man-
agement contract with the
hotel’s operators, the Four Sea-
sons, proved particularly chal-
lenging for a number of the
interested [buyers]”.

The Prime Minister said Mit-
sui, the Japanese insurer acting
as the Four Seasons Emerald
Bay Resort’s main creditor, had
advised his administration that
it was seeking buyers “with the
wherewithal to meet the
requirements of the Govern-
ment and complete the full
build-out of the development”.

It was for this reason that the
Government turned down one
potential buyer, Ambrose Hold-
ings (UK), due to doubts over
whether it had the necessary
financial muscle to complete
Emerald Bay’s full build-out.

Emerald Bay ‘did more
to develop Exuma than
previous century’s events’

@ By NEIL HARTNELL
Tribune Business Editor

THE Four Seasons Emerald
Bay Resort “has done more to
develop Exuma in the last 10
years than anything in the pre-
vious 100 years”, a leading busi-
nessman and Exuma native told
Tribune Business yesterday,
adding that his company was
“committed to staying the
course” and would not walk
away from its newly-opened
office on the island.

Chester Cooper, British
American Financial’s president
and chief executive, acknowl-
edged that the resort’s impend-
ing May 26 closure was “a dev-
astating, significant blow to the
island, quite frankly”, yet pre-
sented an opportunity to change
its “economic model” by reviv-
ing traditional sectors such as
agriculture and fishing.

“I believe the Four Seasons
Emerald Bay property has done

ahamas

.islIbahamas.com



Insurer pledges not to walk away from island

more for Exuma in the last 10
years, in the development of the
island, than the island received
ever before in the 100 years that
preceded it,” Mr Cooper told
Tribune Business.

“This [the closure] is without
question a significant change in
the economy, and I believe that
finding a buyer for this proper-
ty in the very short-term, if that
can be achieved, or if there is a
way to negotiate with the
receivers on the Government’s
part to keep the property open
until a buyer is found, that
would a more favourable out-
come.

“Without question, this prop-
erty needs to be open to see the
kind of growth and develop-
ment the island has seen over
the last five years. There’s defi-
nitely going to be a shrinkage of
the local economy.”

Mr Cooper said it seemed
that the price the Pricewater-
houseCoopers (PwC) receivers
and the resort’s main creditor,
the London office of Japanese
insurer, Mitsui, were seeking
had “gone down to almost
peanuts”.

Mitsui had initially been seek-
ing around $125 million
upwards, a figure that would
have covered the $120 million
debt it inherited from the Four
Seasons Emerald Bay’s lenders
when the property initially went
into receivership.

However, while PwC has
acknowledged that the purchase
price has decreased, it has not
specified an amount, although it
is believed to have fallen to
around $35-$50 million.

“T think it could be a value
acquisition for some companies
with the resources to pump in
and keep it going,” Mr Cooper
said, adding that one potential
stumbling block for any buyer
was the fact that “a lot of prime
real estate has been sold”.

This would make it more dif-

ficult for any acquirer, he
explained, to generate an
instant return on their invest-
ment via real estate sales.

Mr Cooper said British
American Financial had been
present in Exuma for 25 years,
initially via a home-based agent,
before opening its own office
with four staff in 2006.

“We don’t expect in the
short-term that we’re going to
be making any decision with
respect to this office. We’re
committed to the island, and
are staying the course with
respect to operating on the
island.

“The resort’s closure will
impact our business. Our clients
include a large number of
Emerald Bay workers. We
expect a lot of our clients to be
out of work.”

Mr Cooper added that British
American Financial was offer-
ing free financial consultations
to displaced Four Seasons
Emerald Bay Resort workers
at is Exuma office.

The British American Finan-
cial chief, though, said “all is
not lost for Exuma”, as it still
enjoyed the presence of the
$100 million Grand Isle Villas
project and numerous other
resorts and investments. With-
out the Four Seasons Emerald
Bay’s presence, over resorts on
Exuma were likely to enjoy
increased bookings.

“This is an opportunity for
correcting the model,” Mr
Cooper told Tribune Business.
“Over the years, many people
have gone away from the core
businesses of the island, fishing
and agriculture, to some extent.

“This [the resort closure] will
cause people to reflect on the
path taken, as in some cases you
have not been able to buy fish.
This is an opportunity to cre-
ate small businesses to cater to
the remaining hotel properties
and the local market.”

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THE TRIBUNE

TUESDAY, MAY

19, 2009



VALERY CORNISH (not shown)
told Tribune Woman that she
wrote off ever dating men with
children...













@ By ALEX MISSICK
Tribune Features Reporter
amissick@tribunemedia.net

ost single women looking
to start a family with that
Prince Charming would
prefer he didn’t have chil-
dren, as they feel dating a
father will only leave them with the dreaded
“baby daddy drama” and affect their bottom
line- finding a good, genuine, dedicated man.

Valery Cornish, a 24 year old profession-
al woman, said she made a promise to herself
not to date a man with children and feels
she has had a hard time meeting men
because of this.

“T always told myself that when I do get
married I wanted a fresh start with my new
husband. Unfortunately that has not hap-
pened yet and I feel as I get older I am run-
ning out of options and time. It is hard now
to find a man age 25 and older without at
least one child in this country and that is
sad. I have met the most handsome and car-
ing guys, but as soon as I ask them if they
have children the response is always, one,
three, and one guy even told me he had five
kids,” Ms Cornish said.

Ms Cornish said while she would like to
give a guy with children a chance, she does

not know if the child will accept her and
how the relationship between the child’s
mother and the man will affect her life.

“T don’t want to feel like I am intruding on
anyone’s life. I don’t want to think that I
am the real reason they are not together or
that I cannot be just as good a mother to
that child. I don’t want to have to cause that
man to not see his child because the mother
is jealous of me. These are the things I have
to think about before I get into that kind or
relationship. It takes a strong person to deal
with that and I don’t know if I am ready to
deal with that,” Ms Cornish said.

Barrington Brennen, a marriage and fam-
ily therapist and counseling psychologist,
said its all about changing the way you think
and looking harder for what you really want.

“You have to decide what you want. You
have to make decisions in life. This is not
new. My warning to most women is to look
harder for a potential mate. If someone has
multiple children born too close together
for multiple people, then I would tell them to
think twice about that no matter how nice
the person may be,” Mr Brennen said.

Mr Brennen said he thinks many persons
have lost a good partner because that was
not a real criteria standard for selecting a
mate.

“When it comes to having children a par-



“T always told myself that when
I do get married I wanted a fresh
start with my new husband.
Unfortunately that has not happened
yet and I feel as I get older I am
running out of options and time. It
is hard now to find a man age 25 and
older without at least one child in this
country and that is sad...”

— Valery Cornish

ticular person may know that maybe they
will not be able to handle being married to a
person with a child. Others have no problem.
I don’t think its a matter of right or wrong-
you just have to go with your gut feeling
and what you think you can live with,” Mr
Brennen said.

Ms Cornish said she tried dating a man
with a child but could not look past the fact
that there was a child involved and decided
to end the relationship. Mr Brennen said
this is the right thing to do if the situation is
that painful for you.







“Tf you know you can’t do it, don’t even
enter in to a heavy friendship relationship-
don’t lead the guy on getting all hot and
spicy and tell the man you don’t want to
marry him yet you are still acting that way. It
is hard but it is not impossible to find a man
out there without a child,” Mr Brennen said.

Mr Brennen said that before you decide to
enter a relationship with someone that has a
child, look at the child’s age to determine
how or even if that person has moved on.

“Tf the child is very young, go with cau-
tion. If the child is maybe five or ten years
old, watch how the man deals with the child
and what happened during that time period
when he didn’t have children. If the child 1s
older then you have evidence that he knows
how to keep his zipper up and that was just
a bad choice he made. Find out the circum-
stances that he got the child. However with
one or two year olds, that’s risky business
and you will just be another one he has a
baby with,” Mr Brennen said.

In the end, it’s all about finding what
makes you happy as a woman and what you
know you can deal with mentally, physically
and emotionally.

¢ Tell us what you think, send an email to
features@tribunemedia.net or fax your
thoughts to 328-2398.







Distributed by: BWA, East West Highway ¢ 394-1759













PAGE 2C, TUESDAY, MAY 19, 2009

THE TRIBUNE





@ By MAGGIE BAIN

IT is Tuesday and you have a
first date in a few days and you
are filled with a mixture of
excitement and nervous ques-

az
> Es

@

]

CKEN

tions. Aside from the obvious
thoughts of, "Will we have
enough in common and will we
be able to keep a conversation
going?,’ your mind has probably
already leapt a hundred miles

= ae |



to 'Is this the one who I could
have a real future with or do
they just want sex? “You have
not even kissed and wonder
why and if you will. Will the
kiss be the determining factor;
the 'make or break '? How will
you know if they have any sex-
ually transmitted diseases? So
much to think about and so
much to find out and it is only
the first date.

With heightened anticipation
the time has come. Does your
heart sink with disappointment
due to miscalculating physical
appearances or do you have an
overwhelming high with
thoughts of ‘love at first sight?’
All too often we are put off by
things such as bad breath, ner-
vous mannerisms, kissing and
even clothes. We could allow
these things to become deal
breakers or we could mention
them to allow the other person
to make changes if they desire.
A first date is never too early
for honesty but you have to be
willing to accept feed back in
return. Keeping the first date
short, preferably less than two
hours, allows time to sit back
and reassess without undue
pressure. There is nothing
worse than feeling you have
made a mistake, want to get out
but feel obligated to sit through
hours of a date.

In previous weeks we have
talked about relationships that
have little substance besides
sexual intimacy. Being able to
express oneself and the ability
to really connect and listen to
someone else with true empathy
is rarely achieved instantly. Do
not be fooled by couples that
appear to have it all. Yes, they
may have understood early on
the skills to reach a deep con-
nection but they worked at it.
Even though we know all of
these sensible things, the
thoughts and feelings about sex
inevitably pop up on the first
date. Those sex hormones can-
not be denied. It is best then to
know yourself and your own
boundaries. What is right for
one person may not be right for
another. It is probably advis-
able to bring up the topics of
expectations, desires, prefer-
ences, birth control, and sexu-

The first date...



A FIRST DATE is never too early for honesty but you have to be willing to accept feed back in return. Keeping
the first date short, preferably less than two hours, allows time to sit back and reassess without undue pressure.

ally transmitted diseases as ear-
ly as possible. Of course this
may not be reasonable to cover
all this within the first date but
at least the cards have been put
on the table. If the new love
interest is scared off then be
rest assured they were not seri-
ous partner material.

Let us say the first date went
well and the arrangement is that
one person will call to make the
second date. The set time has
elapsed and your imagination
has replayed the same scenario
over and over. It is an uncom-

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you to understand your own
fears and defenses. If however it
starts to interfere with your dai-
ly life then go ahead and call.
All too often we all make
assumptions and until you hear
with certainty what the reasons
are then we have difficulty mov-
ing on. If the answer is nega-
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invest too heavily or for too
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and move on.

As you can see dating with
honesty and truth saves you
unnecessary heartache. Of
course relationships are ever
changing and do not always run
so smoothly. Others may like
the idea of honesty but are inex-
perienced or have difficulty giv-
ing definitive answers. If you
feel a true connection then give
it time to develop before rush-
ing to a decision. The next few
dates will continue to give you
an opportunity to discover more
about your joint compatibility.



THE TRIBUNE



WOMAN AND HEALTH

TUESDAY, MAY 19, 2009, PAGE 3C



Emotional & Financial Improve your t

Uncertainty: How much
is stress costing you?

“Stress, left unchecked adversely tax-
es our emotional health and physical
well-being.”

— Michelle Miller

WHETHER you believe it or not, you
are paying what is known as a Stress Tax!
If you don't think so, try to calculate the
accumulative cost of low productivity,
absenteeism, anxiety, depression, heart
disease and all the other stress-related
illnesses and you will see that directly or
indirectly a Stress Tax is being paid.

And considering that most people do
not intentionally address their stress, this
tax will consistently become more bur-
densome.

But Life Is Not A Stress Rehearsal...

Too many seem hell bent on waiting
for the neon signs of stress to physically
show up before they improve their emo-
tional state of health, at which time it’s
too late or too difficult for solutions to be
effective.

We say that life is not a ‘dress
rehearsal’; nor is it a ‘Stress Rehearsal’.
You must find the self-discipline to take
ownership of your life and state of well-
being. In this climate of change, waiting
until your emotional capacity has com-
pletely deteriorated before seeking solu-
tions is no longer acceptable.

Research indicates that more than 80
per cent of all illnesses are stress-related;
and the issue of low productivity,
increased insurance premiums, irritabili-
ty, work-related accidents, absenteeism
etc., costs US companies a whopping
$300 billion annually.

This staggering statistic should strike a
cord with local health care, insurance
professionals and business owners across
the board; moving them towards proac-
tive measures in which employees and
clients alike can effectively deal with the
vital issues of stress.

But we know that only he who feels it
- knows it; so how much is stress really
costing you on a personal and or business
level? And how much is it collectively
costing us as a country?

If we took half as much time with our
inner selves (emotions-mind-spirit) as we
do with our outer possessions ie our jobs,
homes, yards, cars etc; our overall state of
well-being would dramatically improve.

Instead of relentlessly complaining
about your challenges, find ways to take
responsibility for your emotional state

RINGWORM (Dermatophytosis )





of health; because healthy emotions
equals healthy mind.

Final thoughts...

Stress is really about attitude. If you
take the attitude that it doesn't matter or
that there is nothing you can do about it;
then you will continue to be saddled with
an ever increasing stress tax.

The reality is, any individual or organ-
isation can effectively transition from ill-
ness to wellness, but it requires a new
mindset of consistent proactive measures.
Whether you stand still or sit down, rest
assured that stress is not going anywhere;
and unless you manage stress, it will sure-
ly manage you.

Remember - it's not what happens but
how you deal with what happens that
matters most. With the right tools and
techniques, you can confidently and effec-
tively improve your emotional wellness.
Get up and make it happen!

If you are ready to effectively Manage
Your Stress, please register for Stress
Management 101 Workshop. - June13,
2009. Please send an e-mail to
coach4ward@Yahoo.com or call 429-
6770. Seats Are Limited!

Michelle M. Miller is a certified Life-
Coach and Stress Management Consul-
tant. She is the Principal Coach of the
Coaching Studio, which located in the
Jovan Plaza, Madeira Street. Questions
or comments can be sent to P.O. Box CB-
13060 - email - coach4ward@yahoo.com
or telephone 429-6770.

‘inner self’ at
The Coaching
Studio

lm By CARA BRENNEN-BETHEL
Tribune Features Editor

LIFE coach Michelle Miller has
realised her dream to open a studio
where persons can gather to improve
their inner self and develop the talent
and potential that lies inside.

Earlier this month, she opened The
Coaching Studio, one of the first of its
kind in the country designed to provide
an environment to facilitate self learning,
empowerment and personal develop-
ment.

“This is something that I have been
intending to give birth to for a long time.
The studio will serve as a place for self
help and development through work-
shops and personal development ses-
sions.”

Ms Miller said that the Coaching Stu-
dio and the practice of coaching is some-
thing that is greatly needed in the coun-
try, particularly now. She said that with
all the challenges currently facing the
country, Bahamians need to tap into
and apply their inner resources.

“Coaching is a process that seeks to
pull out of a person rather than put into
them,” she explained.” It allows a way
for people to realise and accept that they
have potential and that they have inside
them all tools they need to have a better
life.”

The concept is relatively new to the
Bahamas and Miss Miller said that that
most Bahamians can certainly benefit
from it. To her knowledge there are only
three other certified coaches in the coun-
try. She herself received her certifica-
tion through a distance learning course.

“T think it is absolutely needed in this
country, for a lot of people with that
missing link- self esteem and confidence,
something I think is not ingrained in a
lot of people.

She added that this can also certainly

“This is something
that I have been
intending to give

birth to for a long
time. The studio

will serve as a
place for self help
and development
through workshops
and personal

development
sessions.”
— Michelle Miller

be linked to the level of stress affecting
Bahamians and the ability to effectively
manage stress.

“We need to become more confident,”
she added, saying that sometimes the
fear of doing something can prevent a
person from trying to do it.

The brand new Coaching Studio is
located in the Jovan Plaza Madeira
Street. As a logo, Ms Miller chose the
butterfly- a universal symbol of change
which she hopes will illustrate the jour-
ney everyone who visits will undergo.

“T love butterflies, they are a symbol
of transformation and change. The cater-
pillar is born with the potential to
become a butterfly, but it must first
undergo the change and embrace it and
people have that same potential and
they have to go with it and pull it out the
greatness that they have within.”

Proper
techniques

for sensitised

ait

HEARD the phrase “less
is more”? It really applies
to those with sensitive or
sensitised skin. Follow these
skin care dos and don'ts to
help cut down on redness,
reactivity, and flare-ups.

o Do not use hot water
when cleansing.

o When cleansing, if skin
is too sensitised even for
water, use tissue or a gentle
non-fabric cloth to remove
product.

o Don't use excessive or
abrasive movements.

Instead, go for gentle,
upward circles.

o Speak to a skin care
professional about a “less

is more” product regimen
that will help calm skin,
reduce redness, and protect
against flare-ups.

o Be mindful of exfo-
liants. First speak with a
professional skin therapist
to see if exfoliation is right
for your skin. If it is, he or
she will recommend a gen-
tle exfoliant that won't
scratch or inflame skin.

o Use a moisturiser that
helps block potentially-irri-
tating pollutants from
aggravating skin. These
ingredients include:

o Evening Primrose

o Shea Butter

o Vitamin E

o Oat Kernel Extract

¢ Sarah Beek is a skin
care therapist at the Dermal
Clinic. Visit her and her
team of skin and body ther-
apists at One Sandyport
Plaza (the same building as
Bally’s Gym). For more
information visit www.der-
mal-clinic.com or call
327.6788.



mg By DR BASIL SANDS

Ringworm is not a worm; it is
a fungal parasite (DER-
MATOPHYTE) that feeds on
the outer dead surface of grow-
ing hair, skin and toenails.
There are many types of der-
matophytes, but most cases of
canine and feline ringworms are
caused by microsporum canis.
Ringworm is a zoonotic disease
and therefore can infect people
as well.

Ringworm is named for the
ring like lesions typical of
human disease. In fact, ring-
worm is comparable to a con-
tact allergy. Skin inflammation
results from a by-product pro-
duced by the fungus. The der-
matophyte dislikes inflamma-
tion and continually moves
beyond its point of origination
in ever widening rings, leaving
the center to heal.

The sores in dogs and cats
grow outward in expanding
areas of hair loss. Typically
there is scaling and crusting at
the margins of bald patches,
with broken hair in these areas
with variable itchiness. The
face, head and forelimbs are the
first areas affected, but the fun-
gus can spread and affect the
whole body.

The condition is transmitted
by direct animal to animal con-
tact, usually from infected hair
or skin debris. However, ring-
worm can also be transmitted
from contaminated grooming
equipment.

All dogs and cats are at high
risk for ringworms, but the con-
dition is most common in pup-
pies and kittens, less than a year
old and older pets with a com-
promised immune system.
Some pets are asymptomatic
carriers, that is, they carry the
fungus without showing signs
themselves, while spreading it
to other pets or people. If one
pet in the house is diagnosed,
all should be treated, whether
showing signs or not.

Ringworm is diagnosed by
identification of the fungus,
either by a wood’s lamp, or a
skin scraping or a culture test.

In most cases, healthy ani-
mals will self cure in sixty to
one hundred days without any
treatment. However, in severe
cases and when the infected pet
may expose humans to infec-
tion, specific topical or oral anti-
fungal treatment may be rec-
ommended.



People who are immune com-
promised; (very young or very
old) are at higher risk.

Ringworm fungus is difficult
to eradicate. Human products
are not effective. Topical
miconazole preparations do
work (e.g. Miconazole Spray,
Malaseeb Shampoo). The
drugs griseofulvin and keto-
conazole are also very effective.
Once swallowed, these drugs
are incorporated into the grow-
ing hair where it slows the
growth of the fungus. Pills or
liquid medications are usually
given for up to 4 weeks. How-
ever, griseofulvin is contradict-



We ‘ane as

ed in pregnant dogs, because it
may cause birth defects.

Contaminated hairs and skin
debris shed into the environ-
ment remain infected for over a
year and act as a reservoir for
reinfection. Treating the envi-
ronment helps reduce the num-
ber of fungal spores and helps
prevent reinfection. Experts
recommend environmental con-
trol by daily cleaning of all sur-
faces using a diluted bleach
solution (one part bleach to 10
parts water) along with thor-
ough vacuuming.

There are certain breeds of
animals that have selective
Immuno deficiencies (Rot-
tweillers and Parvo, Persian
Cats and Ringworm). Persian
cats have a predilection toward
severe and sometimes protract-
ed dermatophye (ringworm)
infections. In some Persian cats,
the fungal infections invade the
dermis and can cause granulo-
matous disease (mycetomas).

As mentioned earlier, most
animals will self cure in several
months. Treatment for the dis-
ease hastens clinical cure and
helps reduce environmental
contaminations. Some infec-
tions, particularly in long-haired
cats or homes with more than
one animal, can be very persis-
tent.

Ts a i. mlal ‘



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PAGE 8C, TUESDAY, MAY 19, 2009

THE TRIBUNE



a AN





The Tribune

B O Di

ea



ith



Trea ‘thrush Hefore it spreads

@ By ALEX MISSICK
Tribune Features Reporter
amissick@tribunemedia.net

s a young child you

enjoyed exploring your

new world outside

your mother’s womb

most of the time by
putting objects into your mouth. For
some reason, everything from the tele-
vision remote to your dad’s car keys
seemed to be a yummy snack.

However, due to all these things
being orally explored, you may have
been subject to a very uncomfortable
infection called thrush.

Pediatricians from Agape Child and
Adolescent Clinic located on Mackey
Street, Doctor Paul Roberts and Doc-
tor Paul Hennis, said the name
“thrush” is used locally and may
involve infections of the mouth or the
skin.

“Thrush is really a common name of
infection with a fungus which is referred
to as Oral Candida. It may also infect
the body system, be in the blood and
infect organs in the blood. However,
it is most commonly seen in the mouth
and on the skin especially in the diaper
area. Thrush is most commonly seen
in the very young and the very old who
are immuno compromised like HIV
and diabetic persons,” Dr Roberts said.

According to medicinenet.com,
thrush usually develops suddenly, but
may become chronic, persisting over a
long period of time.

“A common sign of thrush is the
presence of creamy white, slightly
raised lesions in your mouth usually
on your tongue or inner cheeks but
also sometimes on the roof of your
mouth, gums, tonsils, or back of your



YOU SHOULD carefully clean any objects that go into your child’s mouth...

throat. The lesions, which may have a
cottage cheese appearance, can be
painful and may bleed slightly when
you scrape them or brush your teeth. In
severe cases, the lesions may spread
into your esophagus, or swallowing
tube, causing pain or difficulty swal-

lowing, a feeling that food gets stuck in
the throat or mid-chest area, fever, if
the infection spreads beyond the esoph-
agus. Thrush can spread to other parts
of the body, including the lungs, liver,
and skin,” the study said.

Dr Hennis said even persons cur-

rently on antibiotics can contract this
infection.

“People who are on antibiotics can
also contract this infection because
antibiotics suppress the normal flow of
bacteria that live in the body and that
allow thrush to grow out. With new-

borns if they are born vaginally, Can-
dida may be one of the organisms in the
birth canal of the mother, so they can
contract it that way as a new born,” Dr
Hennis said.

When it comes to younger children,
Dr Roberts said thrush can also occur
in the diaper area due to moisture.

“With the plastic outer lining of these
pampers and the urine and stools in
there, the heat which can be generated
by having the outer plastic covering,
will encourage the growth of the fun-
gus. If the child is not changed often,
the stools and urine the child may
develop an irritant and the skin begins
to break down and exfoliate. The
exposed area will then be likely to
become colonised by the fungus and
the infection is going to develop. If the
child is changed often or even left
exposed to the open air, you may not
even need to apply a topical because
the long non heat exposure will get rid
of the fungus due to the change of envi-
ronment,” Dr Roberts said.

“Oral infections can happen no mat-
ter how carefully you clean and sterilise
pacifiers, bottles, toys, etc., your baby
will likely still be exposed to this yeast.
Still, you should carefully clean any
objects that go into your child's
mouth,” he added.

Dr Hennis said that because thrush is
caused by a fungus, the best way to
deal with it is to treat it.

“The best way to get rid of a fungus
is to treat it with an anti fungal med-
ication depending on where it is. If it is
on the skin, you can get a topical cream,
if it is in the mouth, oral medication is
needed. However, if it is systematic
and in the blood stream they would
need an IV antifungal treatment,” Dr
Hennis said.

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GARDENER

Spring fruits...

THIS year’s mango harvest
looks as though it will be a
heavy one with hundreds of
fruits hanging from the trees.
But they will not be ready for
another month or so. What can
we eat now?

One fruit we can enjoy while
we wait for the mangoes is wax
jambu, also called Java apple
(Syzygium samarangense). Out
of the two names I prefer wax
jambu because Java and apple
are part of everybody’s vocab-
ulary. Jambu has an exotic ring
about it and makes it easier to
remember.

Wax jambu fruits are about
three inches long and shaped
rather like the NASA re-entry
vehicles used in early space
flights. The outside of the pink
to red fruit does indeed seem
waxy. The flavour is somewhat
like a perfumed apple and liked
by many, spurned by some.

I like to simmer wax jambu
fruits in sugar water until they
are tender. They lose their love-
ly colour to the water and turn
fig brown but the taste is
enhanced. Once cooked the
flavour is much like lychee and
very refreshing.

The spiky creamy-white flow-
ers grow like pom-poms all over
the bower and attract bees by
the dozens, even though I can-
not detect a scent. Once the
bees have done their job the
fruits are produced quickly and
in abundance. The fruit masses
are so productive that some
fruits are squeezed out of the
mass, even though they are
aerodynamic in design.

Fruit production starts in
April on Abaco and lasts into
June. My tree is about 10 feet
tall and will give far more fruit
than my family can handle. Wax
jambu trees can grow to 30 feet
and I really do not know what I
will do with all that fruit if my
tree ever gets that big. Wax
JAMbu — maybe that is the
answer.

Another minority fruit in sea-
son right now is Panama berry
or Jamaica cherry (Muntingia
calabura). The white flowers of
the rather sparsely- limbed trees
much resemble strawberry flow-
ers and are pollinated by bees.
They also attract butterflies.

The graceful downy leaves
are very attractive and help to



THIS year’s mango harvest looks as though it will be a heavy one with hun-
dreds of fruits hanging from the trees...

hide the fruits from birds. The
fruits are produced singly and
are apple- shaped but only a lit-
tle over half-an-inch in diame-
ter. Luckily they are fast and
prolific growers and hang by 3-
inch stems below the foliage.
As soon as they are ripe they
tend to fall to the ground.

The outside skin of the fruits
is rather leathery and the inside
is packed with tiny seeds. The
best way to eat them is the chew
and spit method. The taste is
vaguely like strawberry, but the
sort of strawberry flavour you
get in boiled candies or cotton
candy. You know the flavour is
strawberry but it does not taste
like fresh real strawberries. Kids
love them, however, and the
fruits have lots of vitamins.

The muntingia tree is very
fast growing, just about the
fastest I know. A two-feet
sapling will be a 20-feet adult
in under two years. There is a
drawback, however. Muntingia
trees tend to twist in hurricane-
strength winds and are
destroyed.

Muntingia trees are usually
grown from root suckers but

you can propagate them from
seed by crushing fruits and
soaking them in water. Remove
the skins and the seeds will sink
to the bottom. Keep changing
the water until it is clear, then
dry the seeds an plant them. It
takes two years from seed to
fruit.

The favourite spring fruit in
The Bahamas has to be sapodil-
la (Manilkara zapota). Dillies
grow wild in coppice land and
the location of a particular dilly
tree is often a well-kept secret.
The outside of a dilly fruit is
not promising: rough and
brown. The inside pulp is also
not very prepossessing but the
proof is in the eating. Dillies
have a unique brown sugar
flavour that can be close to
addictive.

Sapodilla trees are erect and
handsome, with whorls of leaves
the distinguishing feature. There
are cultivators available that
produce very large and sweet
fruits.

Plant some saplings now and
future generations will have
cause to thank you.

j-hardy@coralwave.com



Full Text

PAGE 1

N N A A S S S S A A U U A A N N D D B B A A H H A A M M A A I I S S L L A A N N D D S S L L E E A A D D I I N N G G N N E E W W S S P P A A P P E E R R C M Y K C M Y K Volume: 105 No.146TUESDAY, MAY 19, 2009 PRICE – 75 (Abaco and Grand Bahama $1.25 WEATHER CLOUDY, T-STORMS HIGH 83F LOW 75F F E A T U R E S SEE WOMANSECTION S P O R T S No to ‘baby daddy drama’ SEEPAGEEIGHT Leading the charge for sports leaders! n By MEGAN REYNOLDS Tribune Staff Reporter mreynolds@tribunemedia.net A FATHER of two was robbed of $50 and shot in the head as he closed up Gibson’s Bar and Lounge off Kemp Road early yesterday morning. Peter Johnson, 48, was with a friend as he waited outside the bar in Strachan’s Alley for his brother Sterling Moss, a chef at Old Fort Bay, to pick him up. As he was locking the gate outside the bar at around 12.30am, a masked man held a gun to his head and demanded cash. Mr Johnson gave the robber all the money he had, amounting to $50, and his friend gave him the $110 in his pocket, before Mr Johnson asked the masked gunman a question and he shot him in the head. His friend broke off running to hide around the corner where he heard another gunshot, Mr Johnson’s former partner Sherry Babbs, 41, told The Tribune . When he peered around the corner he saw Peter Johnson lying lifeless on the ground in front of the front door of the bar where he had worked for the last three years, Ms Babbs said. She broke down in tears as she recalled the shooting, lamenting the loss of her life partner, and the father of her son PJ, 12, and daughter Petra, five. The couple had separated last year and Ms Babbs moved to Freeport with Petra while PJ stayed at his father’s home in Man killed outside of bar he worked in The Tribune ANYTIME ... ANYPLACE , WE RE #1 B AHAMASEDITION TRY OUR SOUTHERN CHICKEN BISCUIT www.tribune242.com Switch to Fidelity products they have built-in savings plans:It’s not too late to build yours...Weather the storm with Fidelity. Father shot dead for $50 BAHAMASBIGGEST CARSFORSALE, HELPWANTED ANDREALESTATE I N S I D E P ETER JOHNSON a nd his son PJ o utside the Gibson’s Bar and Lounge in Strachan’s Alley. Photo: Jakemia Lightbourne of Strachan’s Alley SEE page six PETER JOHNSON was shot dead outside of Gibson’s Bar (above Blood was visible yesterday on the door and ground. T i m C l a r k e / T r i b u n e s t a f f n B y NATARIO McKENZIE Tribune Staff Reporter THE APPEAL court challenge over Senior Justice Anita Allen’s refusal to recuse herself from a civil case involving two Israeli brothers continued yesterday with a lawyer submitting that there were no good grounds for the judge to recuse herself from the case. Senior Justice Allen refused to step down from a case involving Rami and Amir Weiss fisch in March, after she expressed concerns about the integrity of a forensic accounting Persons accused of murder are released on bail n By PAUL G TURNQUEST T ribune Staff Reporter pturnquest@ t ribunemedia.net L AST month 11 persons were released from Her Majesty’s Prison on bail for murder or attempted murder. I ndocumentation obtained by this newspaper,i t was revealed that some 205 persons were released from t he prison many of them with multiple charges ranging from murder and armed robbery, to unlawful sexual intercourse and rape. O f these 205 persons, 153 were released on bail and 39 o f them were classified by the Central Intelligence B ureau as persons who “should be monitored.” Eleven persons released on bail were in prison for murder or attempted murder, three for unlawful sexual intercourse, three for rape, a nd one for assault with intent to rape. N umerous persons were incarcerated for houseb reaking, shop breaking, armed robbery, indecent a ssault, stealing, and posses sion of dangerous drugs. With 28 homicides record ed for the year thus far and a community crying out for a ction on this vexing issue of crime, sources within thel egal fraternity claim that the Bahamas will be engulfed in t his “wicked” spiral for some time until the government takes a serious position on the issue. Recently, Rev. Dr CB M oss cautioned government Tribune obtains numbers of those bailed and facing serious charges SEE page six WITH less than two weeks to go to the official start of the 2009 Atlantic hurricane season, weather experts are mon itoring a system that has a slight potential of becoming the year’s first named tropical storm. Senior officer with the Bahamas Meteorological Office Neil Armstrong told The Tribune yesterday that the low pressure system currently over eastern Cuba and n By PAUL G TURNQUEST Tribune Staff Reporter pturnquest@ tribunemedia.net AS THEprobe into corruption allegations continues at the Department of Lands and Surveys, sources close to government reveal that their investigations have now focused on two senior officers in the department who have held key positions in deter mining the granting and leasing of Crown land over the past few years. Last week, the former director of Lands Tex Turnquest resigned from his post after The Tribune published allegations that members of his fam ily, including his mother-inLawyer: ‘no good gr ounds’ for Senior Justice Anita Allen to recuse herself from case SENIOR JUSTICE Anita Allen SEE page seven W eather system has potential of becoming first tropical storm SEE page seven INSIDE PM: EMERALDBAY PUR CHASETALKSARE UNDER W A Y PAGETWO CALL FOR BOARD TO POLICE LOCAL WATER COMPANIES PAGETHREE MAN ACCUSED OF SCOTIABANK ROBBERY APPEARS IN COURT PAGEFIVE Lands and Surveys probe ‘now focused on two senior officers’ SEE page seven

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n By ALISON LOWE Tribune Staff Reporter alowe@tribunemedia.net MINISTER of State for Finance Zhivargo Laing yester day defended himself against allegations that his former involvement with the insurance company ColinaImperial compromises his capacity to objectively execute his duty as minister with responsibility for the insurance industry. Addressing the House of Assembly, Mr Laing accused St Thomas More MP Frank Smith of making “spineless, broadsweeping innuendoes” about his integrity as a minister and demanded that he substantiate his suggestions. Mr Smith had charged that as a former director at Colina, Mr Laing should resign from his post “or at least declare his interest and recuse himself” as the company “now stands to benefit from a decision he could make.” Withdraw Speaking during the debate on proposed amendments to the Insurance Act 2005, which are intended to better regulate the insurance industry, Mr Smith was forced to withdraw a comment in which he referred to Mr Laing’s responsibility over the sector as the equiva lent of “the rat watching the cheese.” Stating that “inquiring minds want to know the extent of the relationship between the minister of state for finance and players in the industry,” Mr Smith alluded to Mr Laing being caught in a conflict which would place him in a position contrary to the FNM party’s code of conduct for ministers as published in its Manifesto, 2007. Mr Smith’s comments came after he was asked to reveal his own private interest in an insurance company – specifically shares in Colina. An irate Mr Laing said that he was “upset” by Mr Smith’s attempt to “falsely accuse someone so as to advance (his row political agenda.” “This is not right . . . be careful the hole you dig,” said Mr Laing. The Minister of State for Finance said he does not know “what the member is talking about” in terms of a conflict of interest. “I served as a director at ColinaImperial. I ceased to be a director at ColinaImperial in 2006 or 2005. I have no ownership in ColinaImperial – unlike (Mr Smith interest in any insurance company, unlike himself.” He added that “as a matter of conscience” he already recuses himself “from all matters relating to Colina.” Meanwhile, MP for Pineridge Kwasi Thompson, speaking after Mr Smith, suggested he found the member’s assertions “frankly unbelievable”. “Some in the insurance industry believe the government is going too far in protecting the people. So it makes no sense to me that the government is being accused of being too far on the side of the insurance industry,” he said. CONSULTATIONS have begun with various parties that had previously expressed an interest in purchasing the Emerald Bay Resort in Exuma, Prime Minister Hubert Ingraham told the House of Assembly yesterday. However, the prime minister said a time frame for the sale and the re-opening of the hotel, golf course and marina cannot be given. The Emerald Bay Hotel and Golf Course closes on May 26. Mr Ingraham said that the closure presents a tremendous challenge for the economy of Exuma. “The government has been in close contact with the receivers over the past 14 months and will continue to work with them to identify the best investor group to acquire and reopen the hotel, golf course and marina, and to complete the full development planned for the Emerald Bay site. “As I have indicated, the Four Seasons has undertaken to ensure that all employees will receive severance payments and all other benefits owed. The government has received similar assurances with regard to monies owed to other creditors of the project including government utility corporations,” Mr Ingraham said. Counselling The prime minister said arrangements are being put in place to extend a variety of counselling services to diseng aged workers. “Specialists from the Ministry of Health, the Department of Social Services and the National Insurance Board will be available in Exuma, prior to the closure of the hotel, to provide necessary guidance and support to all those seeking assistance including information on the criteria for registration for unemployment benefits,” Mr Ingraham said. EBR Holdings , the devel opers of the Emerald Bay project, placed the project in receivership in June, 2007. This took place after the loan secured by all of the assets of the development fell into default. The directors of EBR Holdings determined that the company was unable to pay its debts. Mr Ingraham said that interest in the property was high andt he government’s advice from the secured creditor, Mitsui, was that suitable new investors with the wherewithal to meet the requirements of the government and complete the development would be identified shortly,w hich would avert the closure o f the resort. “As it transpired, the requirements contained in the man agement contract with the hotel’s operators, the Four Seasons, proved particularly chal lenging for a number of the i nterested parties. “During the 14 months of the process since June, 2007, the receivers signed letters of intent with one party and entered into formal contract with two other parties; none with success,” Mr Ingraham said. The receivers said that by September, 2008, when the signs of the global economic slowdown became increasingly evident, the project began to suffer significant losses. The receivers had not been successful in identifying new investors able to acquire the project and assume the man agement contract with the Four Seasons Management Group. “The secured lender therefore took the decision to temporarily close the resort. Four Seasons has agreed to the orderly closure of the hotel on May 26. The staff will be dismissed over the following 30day period. It is to be noted that a skeleton staff will be retained by the receivers through the transition period to new own ership,” Mr Ingraham said. C M Y K C M Y K LOCAL NEWS PAGE 2, TUESDAY, MAY 19, 2009 THE TRIBUNE PRIME Minister Hubert I ngraham’s response to the Emerald Bay Resort closure was “disappointing”, PLP chairman Glenys Hanna-Martin said. I n a statement issued after Mr Ingraham addressed the matter in parliament yesterday, Mrs Hanna-Martin said: “Weh ave waited since the s hocking news of the loss of employment for more than 500 people at theE merald Bay Resort in Exuma for the government ’s considered response on this terrible turn of events. “Today in the House of A ssembly the prime minister made a communication to parliament which proved most disappointing as it prov ided no insight into this s tate of affairs. In fact everything contained in that communication was publick nowledge through various newspaper reports and w ord on the street over the last several days.” She said the prime minister gave “no hope” as to when the resort will open again. What he did say, however, was that his government has been in close communication with the resort’s receivers o ver the period of receivership namely over the last 14 months. The question then arises which the Bahamian people would like answered: when did the government becomea ware that hundreds of Bahamians would be left jobless and why were the people affected not advised earlier so as to prepare themselves as best they could?” Mrs Hanna-Martin added that the opposition ought to have been briefed on a matter of such national impor-t ance so that legislators could pool their efforts and “look at all possible interventions in the interests of protecting our people.” While thousands of workers are being given the pink slip all over the country, the government of the Commonw ealth of the Bahamas sits idly by, conducting business as usual. This is not good governance. Our people deserve better,” she said. PM: Emerald Bay purchase talks under way Ingraham’s response on hotel closure ‘disappointing’ Glenys Hanna-Martin T o have your say on this or any other issue, email The Tribune at: l etters@tribunemedia.net or deliver your letter to The Tribune on Shirley Street, P.O. Box N-3207 Laing lashes back at ‘spineless innuendoes’ about his integrity “This is not g ood governance. Our people deserve better Zhivargo Laing

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n By ALISON LOWE T ribune Staff Reporter alowe@tribunemedia.net PROPOSED amendments to legislation governing the insurance industry will better protect the public and should “go a long way” in ensuring a “Clico-like fiasco” will never happen again, parliamentarians said yesterday. Admitting that government has been “behind the eight ball” on regulating the insurance sector, Prime Minister Hubert Ingraham said earlier would have been better, but it’s never too late.” He was speaking in the House of Assembly as parliament began debate on amendments to the Insurance Act, 2005 – legislation passed in that year, but never brought into law. Once it is approved, the government intends to immediately enforce t he Act, replacing the outdated Insurance Act, 1969. Mr Ingraham said the proposed regulations come after extensive cons ultation with the industry and have its support, except with respect to certain powers relating to the regulator’s capacity to intervene in a company’s affairs. He dismissed this concern, proposing that the government is doing what it must to protect the public and cannot “contract out its respon sibility to vested interests.” Kwasi Thompson, government MP for Pineridge, said the amendments “are focused on the protection of the policy holder and adding more controls and stiffer penalties in the insurance industry.” “Laws must be in place so we know who is running these companies, who is buying them, what they are doing and so we have a body who has significant powers to regulate the industry.” “If these provisions had been in place (previously CLICO tragedy could have been avoided,” he said. The provisions provide for the regulator to react “more speedily” than it has been able to up until now when there are signs an insurance company may be putting its policyholders “at risk” – as an investigation of CLICO (Bahamas Assets Specifically, a statutory administrator can immediately be appointed by the insurance regulator to take over the management of a company if this is deemed necessary; for example when assets fall signifi cantly, bringing into question the company’s ability to meet financial obligations. This can, if the amendments are approved, be done without referring to the courts until after the appointment has been made. Mr Ingraham vehemently denied published claims that this provision would give the regulator greater power than exists anywhere else in the world, stating that similar authority is provided for in Canada and is currently vested in the governor of the Central Bank of the Bahamas in relation to the country’s banks. Another protection provided for by the amendments will see insurance companies for the first time required to place some assets in a statutory fund controlled by the regulator to which resort can be made if something happens to the insurance company so that funds can be accessed to cover certain specified liabilities. Meanwhile, insurance companies will have to be more transparent in the way they conduct business and accept the right of the regulatorto intervene in their affairs if they do not satisfy enhanced capital and solvency requirements, or if they engage or appear about to engage in “unsafe or unsound” practices that might jeopardise policyholders. Under the new requirements, the Registrar of Insurance must be notified if 10 per cent or more of the company’s ownership changes, and insurance companies must publish balance sheets and financial state ments on a regular basis. The amendments also provide “more options” for the insurance regulator – other than liquidation – if it appears that a company is being operated unsustainably. These include appointing a judicial manager, as has happened in the case of CLICO (Guyana business operating whilst overseeing an “orderly disposition” of its assets, said Mr Ingraham. Sidney Collie, Blue Hills MP, said he welcomed this change as liq uidation is often costly and takes time. “These amendments are intended to remedy any mischief as a result of loopholes or silence in the existing legislation,” he said. n By TANEKA THOMPSON Tribune Staff Reporter t thompson@tribunemedia.net CALLS have been renewed for an independent regulatory board to police local water companies and crack down on bootleggers after claims that "contaminated" impostor water bearing the Aquapure label was found at a Nassau depot last week. Aquapure officials maintained the safety of their product and said they suspect the fake water was funneled into used bottles by some third party to be sold to the unsuspecting public. While stressing that there is no need for public panic, another leading water supplier yesterday said more stringent regulatory controls should be in place. Regulated "First of all, I think that the water industry as a whole needs to be more regulated, no doubt about it. As an industry we have to all understand that we are dealing with a very important product – there are no short cuts in this business," said Tina Knowles, owner of Chelsea's Choice. "The industry needs to be policed, regulations ought tobe most definitely in place and enforced, but I think it's very important for there not to be a panic in the industry". Water that doesn't meet industry standards – sold most ly in generic bottles by persons looking to make a quick buck – has been a problem in the industry for years. "Particularly in the summer, bootleg water has been a problem . . . but each incident is not the same and each warrants its own internal investigation," said Ms Knowles, who added that avoiding independent depots is not the answer to the dilemma. Last week, Aquapure officials revealed the discovery of five bottles of suspected impostor water they said was tainted with chart-topping levels of disease causing bacteria. According to Aquapure pres ident Alex Knowles, the company was tipped off to the suspected fake products – being passed off as demineralised water – after suspicious looking red-capped bottles were spotted by an Aquapure employee at an independent depot in central New Provi dence last week. Aquapure does produce redcapped demineralised water, and has assured the public that there is nothing wrong with the genuine bottles. Mr Knowles said the five bottles were seized by police, tested by company lab technicians and found to be "heavily contaminated" with coliform bacteria, indicators of disease-causing organisms, and fecal bacteria. Detailing the extensive daily testing process executed by Aquapure officials, he said there is no chance the tainted water originated from the Bernard Road plant. Industry Currently, the industry is sample checked by Department of Environmental Health offic ials once a month to ensure t hat companies are up to stand ard. But Ms Knowles does not thinks these checks are enough. "Environmental Health comes here once a month to get samples but a lot of things can change in a month and a lot of things can change in a day and that's why you need independent testing of a water," he said. Chelsea's Choice has independent lab technicians on site to test water before bottling and every half an hour throughout t he day, Tina Knowles said. A ttempts to reach the Department of Environmental Health for comment were unsuccessful up to press time. C M Y K C M Y K LOCAL NEWS THE TRIBUNE TUESDAY, MAY 19, 2009, PAGE 3 Call for board to police local water companies CHARLENE SMITH , quality control manager at Aquapure, tests the imposter water for bacteria. Legislation amendments ‘should help to prevent a Clico-like fiasco’ HUBERTINGRAHAM

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EDITOR, The Tribune . We as Bahamians complain too much and say nothing. It is high time someone spoke up for the young and impressionable youth who seem to be taken advantage of. In good conscience I could not stand by and not help through your valuable columns. What is happening with Baseball in the Bahamas? Has the confusion with the Baseball Federation been cleaned up and if not why. Who is responsible? Is it important enough for us as a nation to start to pressure the relevant players to get their act together? How long will the advancement of our children through baseball be stifled? Does anyone give a damn? I have a son that has been involved with the Freedom Farm Baseball League from the age of five years. He started with T-ball then Coached Pitched where he had the opportunity and distinct pleasure of playing in the Okee heelee Baseball Classic last year. Now he is playing in the 911 division. I have seen firsthand how much he has improved and matured in the game of base ball as well as with the interaction with other children. This is good, but is there any advance ment as a country as it relates to the benefits of these kinds of disciplines? From my own investigation it would seem that Mr. Jim Wood is standing between the Bahamas moving forward with its national baseball programme. What is most astonishing to me is that it appears that Mr. Wood has no teams, no association, no players, no officers and he does not have the blessings of the players of the sport. There seems to be no thought of the interference of the young men who could have had some international exposure while representing the country. There is no calculation that could reveal how many young men’s chances might have been destroyed because of Mr. Wood’s inaction. This behaviour is interfering with the forward mobility of m any otherwise wayward youth w ho have now found solace in b aseball. When is Mr. Wood going to get the memo? The Bahamas is not interested in him leading baseball anymore. He needs to get over it. Give it up man! If Mr. Wood is the man we a ll remember him to be, he should move with haste to end this most embarrassing position he finds himself in. The young men who are being prevented from advancing do not look at him favourably, so it would seem that his popularity is no longer there. If my calculation is correct, Mr. Wood should be far past retirement age. He should be focused on his grandchildren. He should really be enjoying his beautiful family, not squabbling over a position that cannot profit him any at this time or any time in the future. If Mr. Wood loves this country and if his original intention was to help young men through baseball, then his actions so far seem to suggest otherwise. It is highly unfair that the sport of Baseball in the Bahamas has been held hostage all of this time. The relevant movers and shakers have been more than tolerant. It is past time for the people with the power to end this most unfortunate bizarre series of events. Minister of Youth and Sport Desmond Bannister should use whatever influence he has in assisting and expediting this. I do not think that anyone who thinks rationally would agree with Mr. Wood. But an old Bahamian saying comes to mind: “Hard head bird don’t make good soup.” The young boys and men who love baseball should not be allowed to wait one more minute. It is most puzzling how one man can seemingly hold a country hostage while all of its intellectuals stand quietly by and say nothing. Stop the madness! Mr. Wood does not own baseball and he certainly does not own the Bahamas alone. Enough is enough. IVOINE W INGRAHAM Nassau, May 16, 2009 C M Y K C M Y K EDITORIAL/LETTERS TO THE EDITOR PAGE 4, TUESDAY, MAY 19, 2009 THE TRIBUNE The Tribune Limited NULLIUS ADDICTUS JURARE IN VERBA MAGISTRI Being Bound to Swear to The Dogmas of No Master L EON E. H. DUPUCH, Publisher/Editor 1903-1914 S IR ETIENNE DUPUCH, Kt., O.B.E., K.M., K.C.S.G., (Hon. P ublisher/Editor 1919-1972 Contributing Editor 1972-1991 EILEEN DUPUCH CARRON, C.M.G., M.S., B.A., LL.B. P ublisher/Editor 1972Published Daily Monday to Saturday S hirley Street, P.O. Box N-3207, Nassau, Bahamas Insurance Management Building., P.O. F-485, Freeport, Grand Bahama T ELEPHONES Switchboard (News, Circulation and Advertising Advertising Manager (242 C irculation Department (242 N assau Fax: (242 W EBSITE w ww.tribune242.com – updated daily at 2pm W ASHINGTON Democrats just can't seem to get on the same page on national secu-r ity and it could cost them dearly on an issue Republicans have dominated for decades. I ncreasingly, President Barack Obama and Democrats who run Congress are being pulled between the competing interests of party liberals and the rest of the country on Bush-era wartime matters of torture, detention and inter-r ogation of suspected terrorists. The Democratic Party's struggle over how to p osition itself on these issues is threatening to overshadow Obama's ambitious plans for energ y, education and health care. It's also keeping the country looking backward on the eight years o f George W. Bush's presidency, much to the chagrin of the new White House. And, it's creating an opening for an out-of-power Republican Party in an area where Democrats have made inroads. G overning from the centre and backtracking on a previous position, Obama decided this p ast week to fight the release of photos that show U.S. troops abusing prisoners. The presid ent said he feared the pictures would "further inflame anti-American opinion" and endanger U.S. forces in Iraq and Afghanistan. Then he decided to resume military tribunals for some Guantanamo detainees after a tem p orary suspension. "This is the best way to protect our country, while upholding our deeply h eld values," he said. The developments riled liberals who are i mportant campaign-year foot soldiers and fundraisers. "These recent decisions are disheartening," said Jameel Jaffer of the American Civil Liberties Union. "He has shown backbone on some issues and not on others." On Capitol Hill, House Speaker Nancy Pelosi protected the party's left flank by accus ing the CIA of lying to her about the agency's use of a form of simulated drowning on susp ected terrorists. "We were told that waterboarding was not being used," said Pelosi. "And we now know that earlier they were." The CIA disputes Pelosi's account. As Democrats splintered, Republicans watched with glee. The irony is these are the same wartime issues created by Bush and the Republican-led Congress that Democrats successfully campaigned against in 2006 and 2008. The conflict ing Democratic positions threaten to undercut the party's gains on national security; polls last fall showed Democrats had drawn even on national security issues long dominated by the Republicans. The White House desperately wants to get Democrats in Congress focused on the president's priorities. Obama's team has made it clear it's not eager to retread the past. B ut House and Senate liberals, prodded by a vocal and active network of grass-roots and" netroots" supporters, relish doing just that, seemingly fixated on how Bush and former Vice P resident Dick Cheney handled Iraq and terrorism. And it's the popular new president who may have the most to lose. Obama is facing the same predicament that confronted and confounded other recent Demo-c ratic presidents. While governing as centrists, Bill Clinton and Jimmy Carter bent over back-w ard on issues of war and peace, working to appease the party's left wing without being held h ostage by it. Defeated Democratic nominees John Kerr y in 2004, Al Gore in 2000, Michael Dukakis in 1988 lost in part because Republicans successfully tagged them as soft on security. Obama appears to be trying for a balance between keeping campaign promises to reverse B ush policies and protecting national security. Overall, Obama seems less willing to syst ematically overturn Bush's national security positions than his domestic policies. T here are signs that making good on his promise to close Guantanamo in his first year is proving exceedingly difficult. Last week, Attorney General Eric Holder reassured lawmakers that the administration would not release Guan t anamo prisoners into U.S. neighbourhoods. In blogs and on cable TV, Democratic critics g riped that Obama was appearing more like Bush than the Democrat who won the nominat ion by rallying liberals around his pledge to end the Iraq war quickly. Answering liberal complaints, White House press secretary Robert Gibbs said: "First and foremost, the president does what is in the best security interest of the United States." Obama is betting that liberals will forgive him for changing course on these issues. He does have several years to make it up to them before h is likely re-election campaign. Conversely, Obama may have further endeared himself to moderates and independents who are more hawkish on national secu rity and are important to his winning coalition. It's also possible that conservative Republicans may now be more open to dealing with him because of his moves on security issues. With those actions, Obama may have undercut Cheney's complaint that the Democrat's policies were endangering the country. The president also may have insulated himself from further weak-on-security attacks following a campaign during which sceptics questioned his readiness to lead the military in wartime. (This article was written by Liz Sidoti of the Associated Press Writer). Baseball: why is it dying? LETTERS letters@tribunemedia.net Democrats’ security feud may cost them '(6,*1 (1*,1((5,1* &203(7,7,9(,&,1* $67%,'',1*,1)250$7,21 5RDGWR&LW\'XPSDIWHUUHPL[ (PDLOJJRQJRUD#FRUDOZDYHFRP EDITOR, The Tribune. Please allow us a response and appreciation for Mr Sands writing about beach party groups leaving all their rubbish for the rest of us Bahami ans to wince at as we drive around our island. The locals who use “public” beaches are incred ibly selfish and, it seems, quite happy to create an eyesore for the rest of us who take such pride in keeping our country in gorgeous condition. We need litter laws to be strengthened badly to control those who just don’t care! Better still those who organise beach outings should accept responsibility for the clean up at the end of the day! At this time we would like to add a huge thank you to the ministry and the clean-up crews working very visibly around the island on your tireless and never ending task is very much noticed and appreciated! Thank you also to Coca-Cola for the dump sters placed around in public use places, what a shame there are those who will still throw the trash on the ground not 50 feet from opening the container! Thank you also to NAD for the airport roadsides being cleaned and receptacles placed where the taxis park under the trees before one reaches general aviation. What a shame there are drivers who park there and leave the Kentucky box and Coke can on the ground under the car instead of getting their lazy butt out of the vehicle and over to the bin provided! The trash that was pushed back from the road sides on Cowpen Road was a great start but the mountains of unsightly mess need to go please along with abandoned cars all over the place. We are on the right track Bahamas, let's hope all Bahamians see what fabulous surroundings we are blessed with and make that little extra effort to help preserve our beautiful Bahamas! P HARDING (Capt Nassau, May 13, 2009. Beach outing organisers should clean up afterwards

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n By MEGAN REYNOLDS Tribune Staff Reporter mreynolds@tribunemedia.net CC SWEETING principal D elores Ingraham has denied claims that pupils were stabbed o n campus last week, although she admitted that violence occurs a t the school. Mrs Ingraham, wife of Prime Minister Hubert Ingraham, said parents who have held their chil dren back from school becauset hey are afraid they will be hurt or killed on campus have no n eed to fear. Although she admits there are g angs in the school, and that students have brought weapons on to the campus in College Avenue, she said violence is no more of a problem at CC Sweeti ng Senior High School than it is at any other school in the capi tal. During her 44 years in educat ion, including 12 years at CC Sweeting, Mrs Ingraham said she h as learned to accept that fight ing will always be a problem in schools. And at CC Sweeting where there are 850 students, many of w hom may be affiliated with gangs associated with where they l ive, there are bound to be con flicts. Mrs Ingraham said: “When you are putting hundreds of them together and you say you don’t have disagreements, you are putting your head in the sand. “Fighting isn’t new in any school in any country. The method used to be different because they would fight with their hands, and now we have to be careful because we don’t know what the children are up to. “But it’s just a reflection of what’s happening in the community, and it’s not that you need to be afraid, because I would be the first to go if I was afraid. It’s no worse than any place else, and I wouldn’t change CC Sweeting for anywhere else.” Parents believe students take knives, cutlasses, knuckle-dusters and even guns to the school, and the mother of a 15-year-old grade 10 student ordered her son t o stay home as she fears for his life after he was threatened bya group of boys last month. The mother also alleged two boys had been injured in a knife fight on campus last Tuesday, but Mrs Ingraham denied there w as a stabbing at the school, and police were unable to commentb efore T he Tribune w ent to press. M rs Ingraham said the wor ried parents should be more concerned about who their children associate with outside of school. She said: “Sometimes parents s it on the outside and lambaste us and say all sorts of things, butt heir children are not always as good as they perceive them to b e. “I have told the children you must make the choice as to who you want to keep company with. “You may not have a choice to w here you live but you have a choice about the company youk eep.” Mrs Ingraham said teachers s earch bags at random, have access to a metal detector, and a ffirmed that any weapons found will be confiscated and the police will be called as there is a zero tolerance policy. She added: “Our school has no more violence than any other schools in the Bahamas, including private schools, but we are aware of it and we deal with our students. “We try to enforce rules and when students break them, there are consequences, and we deal with it accordingly.” C M Y K C M Y K LOCAL NEWS THE TRIBUNE TUESDAY, MAY 19, 2009, PAGE 5 HATTERAS SPORTSFISHERBOATDESCRIPTION: 197842’SIZE:Beam-15’/Depth11”GROSS TON:22,800lbs LOCATION: TexacoEastBayDock APPRAISED VALUE: $198,800 F O R S A L E INTERESTED PARTIESSHOULD SUBMITOFFERSINCLUSIVE OF TELEPHONECONTACTAND POSTAL ADDRESS TO: CBDISTRESSED PROPERTIES, CREDIT RISK MANAGEMENT DEPARTMENT, P.O BOXSS-6263 NASSAU,BAHAMAS OR EMAIL US AT:DISTRESSED.PROPERTIES@COMBANKLTD.COM *WERESERVETHERIGHTTOREJECTANYORALL OFFERS. THE Grand Bahama Port Authority has announced the appointment of attorney Brenford Christie to the board of d irectors. “We are very pleased that Mr Christie decided to join our board. Our company will benefit from his many years of successful business experience and extensive background in law. His counsel will be particularly v aluable in the areas of corporate finance and board govern ance,” said Hannes Babak, Chairman of GBPA. M r Christie is a partner of one of the oldest and largest f irms in the Bahamas – McKinney Bancroft and Hughes. In 2004 Mr Christie was appointed as a member of the Judicial Review Commissiona nd in 2006 he was named a leading lawyer by the Guide tot he World’s Leading Financial Law Firms. H e is a member of the real estate practice group of Lex Mundi, the world’s leading association of independent law firms. n B y DENISE MAYCOCK T ribune Freeport Reporter dmaycock@tribunemedia.net FREEPORT – Passengers who were stranded on G rand Bahama when the Discovery cruise ship experienced mechanical problems are being flown b ack to the United States by charter flights. Discovery officials have been flying their cruise p assengers from Grand Bahama since Sunday when the vessel was forced to remain in port for repairs. The company made arrangements with Miami Air, which conducted two charter flights on Sunday. Flight arrangements were also made for those pass engers scheduled to leave on the cruise ship yesterday. Y annick Toussaint, on-island representative for Discovery, reported that the some 344 passengers l eft on Sunday. “We still have some passengers here on the island, but we were not asking people to shorten their vacations. We have chartered flights for passengers who were scheduled to leave on Sunday a nd Monday,” she said. Janet Albury of VIP Services – the local public r elations firm contracted by Discovery – said that the ship had deployed its agents to assist passengers staying at the various resorts on the island. A ccording to Ms Albury, agents were sent to Club Fortuna Resort, Sheraton and Westin Resorts, Island Seas Resort, Pelican Bay and the Ritz Hotel. She said that agents were also stationed at the a irport to assist passengers booked on chartered f lights. Those passengers scheduled to sail and return on t he same day will receive a full refund for the can celled cruise, Ms Albury said. P assengers scheduled to overnight in Freeport may cancel their voyage altogether and receive a full refund, as well as a free future round-trip ticket valid for one year commencing on May 20, 2009 (surcharges additional O r they may rebook their trip for a later date and also receive a free round-trip ticket valid for one y ear commencing May 20, (surcharges addition al). I t is not known when repairs to the vessel will be completed. Sometime in April, the ship had discontinued sailings for several days for engine repairs and resumed services on May 4. Discovery Cruise Line apologised for any incon v enience caused by its cancelled sailing. n By NATARIO McKENZIE Tribune Staff Reporter THE MAN accused of the daring daylight robbery of Scotiabank on Wulff Road last Friday was arraigned in Magistrates Court yesterday. Ricardo Jones, 36, of Peter Street off East Street, appeared before Magistrate Janet Bullard in Court One, Bank Lane, charged with one count of armed robbery and one count of receiving. C ourt dockets allege that on Frid ay May 15, while armed with an u nknown object, Jones robbed Themera Ferguson of $1,805 cash, the property of Scotiabank Bahamas Limited. It was also alleged that the accused unlawfully received the sum. Eleven witnesses, most of them police officers, are listed on the dockets. According to reports, a man dressed in a white shirt, short jeans and white tennis shoes entered the bank around 10am on Friday. The man reportedly presented himself as a customer to a female bank teller, then made gestures with an object before escaping with the cash. Cynthia ‘Mother’ Pratt, former deputy prime minister, was among the customers in the bank at the time. Jones was not required to enter a plea to the charges. He was remanded to Her Majesty’s Prison. The case has been adjourned to May 25. RICARDOJONES was arraigned in Magistrates Court yesterday. Man accused of Scotiabank robbery appears in court 36-year-old is remanded to Her Majesty’s Prison T i m C l a r k e / T r i b u n e s t a f f F INDING a new office loca tion, creating an appointment system for the processing appli cations and holding customer service training programmes area mong the steps being taken to upgrade the Freeport Passport O ffice, officer in charge Clarence Russell said. D eputy Prime Minister Brent Symonette, the minister respons ible for the issuance of new passports, recently reaffirmed the government’s commitment to enhance services at the office. Mr Russell, whose tenure began on May 5, said: “We have immediately embarked on getting a lease which is in the works with the old FINCO building directly opposite the Passport Office that has adequate spacing. “It also has adequate safes so that we can properly and adequately secure government property in that building. The government has already given approval for us to begin seeking internally, staff members who are competent in data processing because data is one of the many challenges with which we are faced; actually getting the information in from month to month. At present, the Passport Office has a staff of seven including the officer in charge. Mr Russell said this number must be increased to 20. He said the government plans to have the new building ready for occupancy by next month. Mr Russell also said the longlines and “first come, first serve” approach to serving clients will become a thing of the past. “In the next few weeks we are going to embark on an initiative where, like the [US] Embassy, you can call in to us and make an appointment to deliver your applications at your convenience,” Mr Russell said. “You call and give us a date when you are available and if that time and date is available in our calendar up to the end of the year, we will submit your name in there. Five minutes before your interview time you come in and we assist you; there is no need for you to be on a line hoping and praying that you get some help – it will be in order.” Brenford Christie appointed to the GBPA board Upgrades to Freeport Passport Office underway In brief C larence Russell CC Sweeting principal denies stabbing claims But Delores Ingraham admits that violence occur s at school Stranded cruise passengers flown back to US

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n By DENISE MAYCOCK T ribune Freeport Reporter dmaycock@tribunemedia.net FREEPORT Grand Bahama Police are seeking foreign help in t heir search for fugitive Lester Adderley, who is wanted in connection w ith the murder of a Grand Bahama businessman. Asst Supt Edmund Rahming said police are now working with international law enforcement agencies to locate Adderley, who is thought to have fled the Bahamas some time in 2007. The police have i ssued a warrant for his arrest with Interpol. Konstantino Vardoulis, 31, owner of Grand Bahama Foods and the Chicken Farm, was shot to death at his home on Bahama Reef Boulevard on April 12, 2007. George Alexander Ferguson was charged w ith Vardoulis’ murder on June 22, 2007. G rand Bahama police have had recent success in appealing to international law enforcement agencies for help. Fugitive Andre Birbal was arrested by US authorities in New York on May 3, after police issued an international APB for the Trinidadian teacher. S enior Assistant Commissioner of Police Marvin Dames said the arrest of Birbal, who is w anted for questioning in a child molestation case, proves that the system does in fact work. Birbal, 46, was arrested by a New York Transit Police Officer after committing a traffic violation. A check was made and authoritiesd iscovered that there was an APB out on him in the Bahamas. T he Attorney General’s Office is working with authorities in the US to have Birbal r eturned to Grand Bahama. Birbal was suspended from the Eight Mile Rock from the school when molestation allegations surfaced in January. A female teacher at the school was also removed following molestat ion claims. C M Y K C M Y K LOCAL NEWS PAGE 6, TUESDAY, MAY 19, 2009 THE TRIBUNE Coral Harbour. Both PJ and Petra loved to s pend time with their father, Ms Babbs said, and Petra would insist o n calling him every morning before she went to school in Grand Bahama. “He was a good father,” Ms Babbs recalled. “A very good m an, and a very good dad. PJ loved his daddy, and the little girl e specially did love him.” But the last PJ saw of his father w as his lifeless body being lifted into a body bag in the early hours of yesterday morning. His mother said she tried to cover his eyes as he watched, but he moved her h and to take a last look. She said: “It was like he was f rozen, all he was doing was look ing, and I tried to cover his eyes a nd he was just focusing on his daddy, looking at him just lying down on the ground. “When they lifted him up to put him in the body bag and his head fell apart, he started to cry.” Mr Johnson was also a loving step-father to Ms Babbs’ daughter Anthoinette, 24, who he took in as a toddler. He was also popular in the Kemp Road area where he grew up. Jakemia Lightbourne, 23, who took the photograph of Peter and PJ, said: “Peter was a lovable person for kids and adults. If you were troubled by anything he would sit you down and talk to you like you was his own. He was so sweet.” Mr Johnson was the oldest of 70-year-old Prince Johnson’s six children. He was raised by his grandparents in Sun Street, off Kemp Road, attended St Bede’s and CI Gibson schools, and met Ms Babbs browsing around the Kemp Road area when she was 21. The mourning mother of three w as surrounded by friends and family outside Gibson’s Bar and L ounge after visiting the morgue at Princess Margaret Hospital yesterday morning. She had moved to Freeport for economic reasons after leaving h er Social Services job in Nassau last year, but came back to Nas-s au for a wedding last month. Ms Babbs is still unemployed a nd is concerned about how she is going to care for her children without Mr Johnson when, she said, she does not even feel strong enough to tell her daughter the truth about her father’s murder. She said: “I told her her daddy w as in the hospital and that he got shot, and she is asking why t he police don’t catch the person and lock him up, but I haven’t told her that he’s dead.” Although the couple had split, Ms Babbs said neither of them had yet entered into other relationships. She said: “Although we weren’t together we were very close because of the kids, and I had no problem with him. “He would send money for the kids and he was very good to me. “Peter is not a troublesome person. No one in this world could say Peter is their enemy. He’s a loving person, he talked and cracked jokes with every body. We were together for 17 years and Peter had no enemies. “I could understand if he was a troublesome person, but I don’t understand this. “I want to know for what? That’s what I’m trying to find out. He had $50 on him – he got shot for $50.” The murder of Peter Johnson was the 29th homicide in the Bahamas this year. Police are questioning two 23year-old men in connection with the murder. that it would be endangering the lives of its citiz ens if it continued on its present course of neglecting its duty to deal with the unacceptably high levels of crime and criminality. In his statement issued to the media, Mr Moss said government must not be “narrow-minded or fearful” in dealing with this scourge that is currently plaguing the nation. “Religious leaders are called upon to lift their sights beyond the walls of the church and work t oward improved security of people. The corporate community is challenged to seek the public good, not just private gain in their economic lives. “Civil society is called upon to agitate and lobby the government to get up and provide the leadership that is so critically necessary at this very vulnerable time in our society. The media is urged to demand more accounta bility, especially from all public institutions and officials in order to create more transparency. This will greatly reduce corruption, and injustice which fuels crimes and violence,” he said. Police seeking foreign help in fugitive search P ersons accused of murder released on bail FROM page one F UGITIVE A ndre Birbal was arrested by US a uthorities in New York Father shot dead for $50 F ROM page one To have your say on this or any other issue, email The Tribune at:letters@tribunemedia.net o r deliver your letter to The Tribune on Shirley Street, P.O. Box N-3207

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C M Y K C M Y K LOCAL NEWS THE TRIBUNE TUESDAY, MAY 19, 2009, PAGE 7 W W A A R R E E H H O O U U S S E E P P a a l l m m D D a a l l e e Fixtures & Fittings Clothing and More Fixtures & Fittings Clothing and More MEN COVERALL’S $5.00 MEN BRIEF 4 PK. $6.00 MEN JEANS 42-50 $15.00 LONG SLEEVE WHT. SHIRT $3.00-$5.00 SHORT SLEEVE WHT. SHIRT $1.00-$4.00 BOY’S & GIRLS BLK SHOES $5.00-$7.00 3 -Ford Trucks $400.00 & UP BLANK CD’S $0.50 LIGHT BULB’S $1.00 & Up BLANK ID CARDS (500 16” STAND FANS (1 FAX PAPER 374-280 $2.50 SHOE DISPLAYS ——GRIG HOOKS MARRORS— RACKS——GLASS HANAGERS ——GRIDWALL 4 ARM RACKS————Gondolas MANY OTHER ITEMS Call OR Email Stacey@adamandeve.bs Tell:326-8215 or 465-8648 Tuesday to Friday8:00am to 5:00pm WAREHOUSE THE government is still looki ng out for swine flu cases in the Bahamas, Health Minister Dr Hubert Minnis said. Dr Minnis said that there have b een no laboratory cases conf irmed, but health officials are keeping alert when it comes to the A(H1N1 “We have been fortunate that t he A(H1N1 introduced into our shores, but we will not let our guard down as we will continue to aggressively moni tor the situation at all ports of e ntry and indeed within the country as we have been doing from day one,” Dr Minnis said. Pandemic influenza preparedn ess and access to vaccines and other benefits, particularly those that relate to the A(H1N1 (swine flu 6 2nd annual World Health Assembly (WHA for May 18 to 29 in Geneva, Switzerland. Dr Minnis will lead a four-member delegation representing the Bahamas. He will also attend a Meeting of Heads of Delegations of the A mericas and a Commonwealth Heads Minister’s Meeting. The delegation to the 62nd World Health Assembly will include chief medical officer Dr Merceline Dahl-Regis, director of Public Health Dr Pearl McMillan, and National Chronic, Non-Comm unicable Diseases Coordinator Dr Yasmin Williams-Robinson. “The WHA agenda was recently modified to include discus s ions on the A(H1N1 the virus now that the virus has been identified,” Dr Minnis said. “That discussion is expected to take up the bulk of the agenda. These discussions will be very, very pertinent to all countries participating in the meetings, but particularly to the Third World and developing countries, as access to vaccines and the sharing of health information go a long way in helping to reduced isease burdens in these areas,” Dr Minnis added. T he WHA is the decision-making forum through which the World Health Organisation (WHO ber states. It is the world’s highest health policy-setting body and is composed of health ministers from member states. T he main tasks of the WHA are to approve the WHO programme, supervise financial policies, review and approve the proposed programme budget, and decide major policy questions. A ccording to WHO Update 28 on May 14, 33 countries have officially reported 6,497 cases of A(HINI Mexico leads the way with 2,446 reported cases including 60 deaths; the United States reported 3,352 cases, including three deaths; Canada reported 389 cases, including one death; and C osta Rica, eight reported cases including one death. Twenty-nine other countries have reported from one to 100 cases, but with nod eaths. FOLLOWING a scuffle b etween three young Bahamia ns at Marina Village, executives at Atlantis have expressed concern about parents dropping off unsupervised teenagers at the resort. W hile Atlantis welcomes f amilies and all Bahamians to its property, senior vice-president of public affairs Ed Fields said yesterday that it is not fair for parents to treat the resort asa “baby-sitter” for their child ren. In recent months, Marina V illage and the Atlantis hotel have become popular h ang-out spots, where p arents feel teenagers can spend weekend evenings in a safe environment. But Mr Fields said p eople are dropping o ff their 13 to 16-yearolds at Marina Village without any regard as to what their children get up to. I mean, would you drop y our teenager off at a bar? They could end up anywhere – i n a hotel room, at a bar – it’s basically a bar with r ooms,” he said of the r esort. Just two weeks ago, Mr Fields said, three young men got into a fight in Marina Vil-l age and security pers onnel had to get involved. The three teens were escorted off the property. The Atlantis execu tive said teenagers becoming d isruptive on the property is a continuing problem which d etracts from the experience of vacationers. It’s really not fair to our g uests,” he said. Mr Fields said that the resort is conscious of the fact that parents want to ensure that their children “hang out” at a safep lace. However, he said, they c annot expect Atlantis to take responsibility for their children. It often happens that parents drop off teenagers at the resort, who then leave the propertyw ith a third party, only to r eturn to Marina Village shortly before they are due to be p icked up, Mr Fields added. Scuffle prompts concerns over unsupervised teens at resort EDFIELDS Govt ‘still looking for swine flu cases’ DR HUBERT MINNIS r eport prepared by Daniel Ferguson, an accountant who had been appointed by Jus-t ice Lyons to work on the Weissfisch case. Justice Lyons t endered his resignation from the bench earlier this month. Calls for his resignation camea fter a highly publicised statement by Justice Allen revealed that he had shared “more than a friendship” with the sister of Mr Ferguson. N icholas Lavender, QC, attorney for Rami Weissfisch who is seeking to have Justice A llen step down from the case, had previously argued, t hat during a meeting with counsel in chambers, Justice Allen had raised the possibil-i ty of her own recusal and had stated that she had felt conf licted. Mr Lavender claimed to be the only person taking notes during the meeting.H owever, what was said during that meeting is disputed b y Justice Allen as she in her ruling against the recusal application in Supreme Court,r eferred to her recollection of what she stated in chambers. A lan Steinfeld, QC, who is representing Amir Weissfisch, s ubmitted to the Court of Appeal yesterday that the grounds Mr Lavender hadr elied upon were not adequate. Mr Lavender had subm itted that Justice Allen’s comments and conduct would suggest to the fair mindedo bserver a real possibility of bias on her part in relation to t he case. Mr Steinfeld noted that the issue had been argued as tow hether it was Justice Allen who first raised issue of recusal and whether she had stated, “I would be happy to recuse myself,” as Mr Laven-d er’s notes reflected. “That in itself, is not a matter which would lead a fairm inded and informed observer to think that there was r emotely any prejudice or bias by the judge because it went only to a matter is not in itselfa ground for recusal,” Mr Steinfeld said. “Let us assume that Mr Lavender’s note was accurate and that the judge was wrongi n her recollection, that still would not be a ground for recusal,” he said. Mr Steinfeld submitted that t he issue was whether a fair minded observer would conc lude that the judge might not be able to deal with the case in an unbiased manner. A ccording to Mr Steinfeld, the fair minded observer w ould say that there was a disagreement between the judge and counsel as to what wass aid by the judge to counsel and that that was not a matter t hat went to the merits of whether she should recuse herself. H e submitted that there was no reason to believe that because the judge had a disagreement of recollection, that she would be antipathetict owards Mr Lavender and his client. President of the Court of A ppeal Dame Joan Sawyer noted that the main issue the c ourt saw was that the judge during the course of her ruling talked about her memory andw hat she recalled transpiring in chambers. “Her memory would never be known to the objective observer unless the objectiveo bserver is a clairvoyant,” Dame Joan noted. The appeal continues. the southeastern Bahamas has a less than 30 per cent chance of becoming a tropical system over the next 24 hours. However, should it become necessary, a hurricane hunter aircraft will be deployed today to further investigate the system, he said. Current projected paths have the system travelling north from Cuba through the chain of Bahamian islands towards the east coast of Florida by the weekend. Other trajectories, however, predict the system will veer off to the east of the Bahamas into the open ocean. The United States’ National Hurricane Centre (NHC yesterday issued a special tropical weather outlook, saying that “slow development of this system is possible during the next day or two as it moves generally northward at 10mph to 15mph.” The system is expected to produce much needed rainfall and high winds. If the system reaches tropical storm strength it will be named “Ana.” The hurricane season officially runs from June 1 to November 30. Lawyer: ‘no good grounds’ for Senior Justice Anita Allen to recuse herself from case law, were granted Crown land lots on the island of Exuma. These beachfront lots, which were sold at less than $2,500 each, w ere flipped a few years later for more than $550,000 apiece. Mr Turnquest denied any connection to any of the transactions. Before Mr Turnquest could resign, government officials had changed the locks to his office and secured boxes of documents. These documents, it is understood could be beneficial to the A ttorney General’s office. While government has been criticised over the scandal brewing in this department, sources close to the investigation claim they will also use this time to implement “significant changes” to the law to ensure that such abuses of Crown land cannot be repeated. M r Turnquest’s removal from the department comes at a time when the Opposition has already introduced a motion in the H ouse of Assembly, led by Fox Hill MP Fred Mitchell, calling for a Select Committee to review all Crown land grants issued by government since the early 1990’s. T his committee will review all Crown grants issued to indi viduals or entities since 1992 up until the present date with allo utstanding applications that have yet to receive final approval. The committee will also ascertain a list of all public servants and retired public servants who have received grants, along with government’s official position on its policy in relation to the disposition of publicly held lands generally; as well as government’s policy in relation to granting lands to employees of government or their relatives. Since the revelations of these transactions and claims that other civil servants had secured substantial grants of Crown land, several irate individuals have come forward outlining many years of abuse they claim they endured from this department. Among them was PLP general Ezra Russell, who complained of having to wait more than 12 years to get final approval to purchase some 34 acres of Crown land in Fountain Bay, Cat Island. FROM page one Lands and Surveys probe ‘now focused on two senior officers’ FROM page one Weather system has potential of becoming first tropical storm FROM page one Share your news The Tribune wants to hear fr om people who ar e making news in their neighbourhoods. Perhaps you are raising funds for a good cause, campaigning for impr ovements in the area or have won an award. If so, call us on 322-1986 and shar e your stor y .

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n by RENALDO DORSETT Sports Reporter r dorsett@tribunemedia.net I n an effort to provide leadership in the area of national sports and wellness, the country’s leading tertiary institution m ade an integral step towards d evelopment of the aforementioned programs. The College of The Bahamas Athletics Department officially l aunched its Sports & Wellness Institute aimed at providing prof essional development opportun ities for persons working in this area. R epresentatives from the col lege suggest the initiative represents a significant move as it seeks t o support and drive national development through education; r esearch & innovation; and service. T he Sports and Wellness Insti t ute’s ultimate goals will be to “provide professional developm ent opportunities for persons working in wellness/sports within the community, to assist with the certification of professionals, par ticularly those who teach andc oach young people, and to benchmark or provide credibility for professionals.” President of the College of the Bahamas, Janyne Hodder, said Institute arose out of a need to create more certified coaches within the country’s core sports. “As one of the country’s most important strategic actors, the mission of The College of The Bahamas is to support and drive national development through education, research & innovation and service, by offering high qual i ty programs grounded in unique features of the Bahamian envir onment. We believe that the launch of a Sports & Wellness Institute helps us to accomplish t his,” she said, “The concept of a Sports & Wellness Institute emanated from a pilot workshop last summer held jointly between The College of The Bahamas and The Ministry of Education, Youth Sports & Culture. During that workshop approximately 40 teachers and coaches received p rofessional development in the Art of Injury Prevention and the F undamentals of Coaching Bas ketball. It was clear from this w orkshop that the need existed for further training of this and other groups involved in sports and wellness. Swimming The current core sports include track and field, basketball, soft ball, volleyball and soccer. Swimming is on the cusp of receiving core sport status while the list of secondary sports includes boxing, baseball, and ten nis. “We want to emphasise that the focus of this Institute will not be solely on the development of sports but also on wellness, nutrition and lifestyle. It is important that The College of The Bahamas partners with other entities to ensure that the message of good health and wellness is spread throughout the length and breadth of The Bahamas,” Hodder, “We must work to ensure that the high levels of obesity, cholesterol, diabetes and hypertension – all of which are preventative diseases – are minimised in our country, particularly among our young people. The target groups therefore will include, but are not limited, to coaches across the spectrum, schools, national teams, officials, referees, statisti cians, sports administrators, managers, trainers, wellness coaches, fitness instructors, and nutrition ists.” College of the Bahamas Athl etic Director, Kim Rolle, said the Institute will place a premium on b lending the theory learned in the classroom with practical applic ation in the field. “One of the things that we found in the pilot project was that those persons were really hungry for some sort of professional development. We want to ensure that these persons have contact hours and also a follow up mech anism so that these persons follow up with exactly what they were trained to do,” she said, “If a coach has a team, we want a someone from the institute to be able to go a practice on any given day and ask a coach to see their practice plan, as you should have if you are doing a Level One cer tification. So that we know these persons are not just taking the material and going with them and not using them.” Rolle said an added benefit of the program is the accelerated certification of prospective teachers and coaches while enrolled at the college. “We train our students to be physical education teachers, not coaches. In many instances these persons coach. So what we are saying is since they coach we might as well train them as best we can to do so,” she said, “This is another opportunity for somebody who is a physical education major to receive certification pri or to them leaving the Collge of the Bahamas so they can leave with a level one certification as apart of their college experience.” The Sports & Wellness Institute’s working group consists of representatives from the core Sporting Federations, Ministries of Education, Health and Youth, Sports & Culture and personnel from The College of The Bahamas. The working group includes Lawrence Hepburn (Bahamas Basketball Federation); Curt Hollingsworth (Bahamas Amateur Athletics Association); College of The Bahamas Athletics Director Kimberley Rolle; Valerie Lowe (Bahamas Swim Federation); Dr. Anne Rolle (Ministry of Health ders (Ministry of Education Oria Wood-Knowles (Ministry of Youth, Sports & Culture); Rommel Knowles (Bahamas Softball Federation); Wellington Miller (Bahamas Olympic Association Lionel Haven (Bahamas Football Association); Joe Smith (Bahamas Volleyball Federation Wesley Rolle (Bahamas Lawn Tennis Association); Dr. Pandora Johnson (COB (COB (COB President of the Bahamas Basketball Federation, Lawrence Hepburn, speaking on behalf of the working group said the for mation of such a venture is long overdue. “For too long our sports have been developing ‘willy-nilly.’ A little clinic here or there and we wanted to move away from that. We wanted something, a program that our people can be well trained in,” he said, “It is in line with what all our federations want to do and something that we need to do for the development for world class athletes of the future.” C M Y K C M Y K TUESDAY, MAY 19, 2009 THETRIBUNE PAGE 8 I NSIDE Maria Sharapova in winning return MEMBERS of the College of the Bahamas Caribs men’s basketball team are from left kneeing: Dominic Sweeting, Damian Sturrup, Jamaal Dar ling, Danzel Barr. Left Standing: Coach Bastian, Jude Vilmar, Sheron Murphy, Theron Butler, Frisco Mckay, Garvin Lightbroune, Rashad Mcken zie, Philip Colebrook, Assis tant Coach Kirk Basden. Leading the charge for sports leaders! Scotiabank and Titans claim early season victories Bahamas Cricket Association league play cont inued over the weekend, with perennial powerhouses picking up wins early in the season. Scotiabank Paradise won the match over St. A gnes due to inclement weather and bad light, while the Dockendale Titans cruised to victory o ver Castrol Commonwealth. Scotiabank bowled first against St. Agnes and gave up 247 runs for the loss of eight wickets. Y outh player Orlando Stewart was the top scorer for St. Agnes with 48 runs, while Orwell Grant a nd Ray Haniff added 30 and 26 runs respectively. In his final game as a member of the Scotiabank P aradise, Youth player Gary Bell led his team to the win taking two wickets while Kester Duncan took two wickets as well. B ell leaves the game after completing his training at the Hotel Training College and according to cricket enthusiast Paul Thompson, “During his years here he thrilled cricket fans with his spin bowling and aggressive batting. Bell made a con-t ribution to the Bahamas.” Light In their turn at bat, Scotiabank scored 145 runs for the loss of three wickets before rain and insuf-f icient light stopped play. Aeon Lewin led the scoring with 56 runs and A ndrew Nash scored 44 to lead the offense. Bowling for St. Agnes, Earl Thomas, Hesketh Dean, and Ray Haniff took one wicket each. I n Saturday’s match, the Titans won over the Castrol by two wickets. Commonwealth batted first and was bowled out for 190 runs. Terry Seepersad led all scorers with 67 runs and M ike Graham added 31. Top bowlers for Dockendale included veteran Danavan Morrison who took four wickets while Dwight Weakly took two. At bat, the Titans scored 194 runs for the loss of f ive wickets, to take the match by two. Weakly and Morrison displayed their versatility by leading the team as batsmen with 71 and 42 runs respectively. Garth Davis took two wickets for Castrol. Next weekend’s schedule is as follows: Dynasty vs. Castrol Commonwealth at Windsor Park, Police vs. Scotiabank Paradise at Haynes Oval. n CRICKET COLLEGEOFTHEBAHAMASATHLETICSDEPARTMENT: Press conference COB launches Sports & Wellness Institute KIM ROLLE, College of the Bahamas Athletic Director. THECOLLEGE of the Bahamas. COB’S Janyne Hodder

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C M Y K C M Y K INTERNATIONAL SPORTS TRIBUNE SPORTS TUESDAY, MAY 19, 2009, PAGE 9 n By RYAN LUCAS WARSAW, Poland W earing strips of white tape on her right shoulder, Maria Sharapova played her first singles match on tour in nearly 10 months, and while she won on Monday, her game did show signs of rust. The three-time Grand Slam title winner needed nine match points to finally put away 68thranked Tathiana Garbin of Italy 6-1, 6-7 (6 of the Warsaw Open. “When you haven’t been there, haven’t done that in a while, it throws you off a little bit,” said Sharapova, whose last competitive singles match was July 30, “and then there you are after nine months, and you have an oppor tunity to win your first match back, and you start thinking of everything that’s gone on, and you kind of lose the present time.” The Russian had surgery for a torn rotator cuff last year and missed the past two Grand Slam tournaments. She wouldn’t discuss the French Open, which starts Sunday and is the only major championship she hasn’t won. Sharapova, who said her shoulder didn’t bother her against Garbin, did stress that playing matches is the only way to return to the form that carried her to the No. 1 ranking. She’s now ranked 126th. “I’ve been absent for so long, and I’ve said it many times: You can do so many things, you can practice and you can play practice matches, but it’s never the same as going out and playing in a tournament, and I think that’s what I’ll need,” she said. “I’ve played millions of matches in my career, and I’ll play mil lions more, and I think right now it’s just going to be getting that experience back and the thought process on the court and doing the right things to finish the match.” Sharapova did have problems in that department Monday. She cruised through the first set and grabbed a 4-0 lead in the second before her serve started to falter. Serving at 5-3, she wast ed four match points doublefaulting on two of them and then failed to convert two more in the tiebreaker before netting a forehand to give that set to Garbin. “I was definitely a little bit nervous closing that second set out,” Sharapova said. In the third, she dropped an early break before rallying with her trademark groundstrokes to overpower the Italian. Sharapova held serve to go up 5-3, then con verted her third match point when Garbin knocked a backhand long. “I certainly had desire to win my first match back,” Sharapova said. “I’m hungry. I haven’t played for a while, and I want it really bad, and sometimes I actually have to stop myself at times and tell myself to be patient.” She made a brief return to professional tennis in March, playing and losing one doubles match in Indian Wells, Calif. But she pulled out of a series of singles events, waiting until this week to test her shoulder in competition. “In these nine months, the only thing I’ve accomplished is proba bly a good pasta carbonara,” Sharapova said. “At the end of the day, that’s not my specialty. My specialty is to go out and com pete and win Grand Slams.” In other first-round action at this clay-court tournament, Marta Domachowska of Poland beat Akgul Amanmuradova of Uzbekistan, 6-2, 6-1; Anne Keothavong of Britain eliminated Bethanie Mattek-Sands of the United States, 6-2, 7-6 (4 China beat Olga Govortsova of Belarus, 4-6, 7-6 (0 na Bondarenko of Ukraine beat Tsvetana Pironkova of Bulgaria, 7-5, 6-2; Julia Goerges of Germany defeated Aleksandra Wozniak of Canada 7-6 (5 Alona Bondarenko of Ukraine eliminated Katarzyna Piter of Poland 6-0, 6-0. n By PAUL LOGOTHETIS A P Sports Writer MADRID A victory over Rafael Nadal in a clay-court final has Roger Federer feeling good about his chances heading into the French Open. It’s not the first time.F ederer broke a sluggish Nadal once in each set for a 6-4, 6-4 win Sunday that earned him a secondM adrid Open trophy. It was the second-ranked Swiss player’s first title of 2009. W ith Roland Garros a week away, the victory over four-time defending French Open champion N adal is sure to provide a big boost for Federer. “At this stage it does, considering I hadn’t won a tournament yet (this season Slam winner said. “It’s all finally paying off but it’s not the moment t o get carried away. I’m very excited going to Paris whereas a couple of weeks ago I was still a little bitu nsure about my game.” Federer had similar feelings two years ago after he b eat Nadal on clay at Hamburg to snap the Spaniard’s record 81-match winning streak on the surface. After that win, Federer said he’d figured Nadal out ahead of Paris. But he then lost the ensuing final in four sets. Last year he lost the French Open final to Nadal in straight sets. “I know what I have to do but that doesn’t make it easy,” Federer said Sun d ay. Nadal, meanwhile, was only thinking about the first week at the French a long way ahead of any rematch with Federer. “Federer has the potential to win at Paris and at any site in the world. He’s showed t hat throughout his career. But Paris begins with the first round, not the final,” Nadal said. “If I was told now that I can play the final against him, show m e the paper and I’ll sign.” In 2006 and 2007, one loss to Nadal was all that s tood between Federer and a season Grand Slam wins in all four majors. The situation is different a pproaching Roland Garros this year. For a start, Nadal is ranked No. 1, having ended Federer’s 237week stint atop the men’s rankings by winning the Olympic gold medal at Beijing in August. Nadal also beat Federer in the finals at both Wimb ledon and the Australian Open. The loss at Melbourne Park in January left the 27y ear-old Federer in tears. He did go some way to rebounding from that in Madrid by ending Nadal’s 3 3-match winning streak on clay and denying him a sixth title this year. Nadal, with an imposing 25-2 record in clay court finals, said his loss in Madrid would have little influence on the upcoming major. “To me, this tournament has nothing to do with P aris. This tournament is practically another surface compared with Paris,” said Nadal, who wasn’ta t his best following a record 4-hour semifinal win over Novak Djokovic. “There are points on norm al clay that aren’t points but they are here. The conditions favored him more than me.” Nadal said he was “empty” after Madrid and that he needed a few days to recover. He said his right knee is OK, but it acted up again on Saturday and has troubled him since November. RUSSIA'S Maria Sharapova returns a shot to Italy's Tathiana Garbin during their first round match of the Warsaw Open tennis tournament in Warsaw, Poland, on Monday May 18 2009. Beating Nadal gives Federer boost into French Open Sharapova wins in return to tour but shows rust C z a r e k S o k o l o w s k i / A P P h o t o ROGER FEDERER from Switzerland, right, seen, with Rafael Nadal from Spain, after winning the Madrid Open Tennis Tournament, in Madrid, Sunday May 17, 2009. D a n i e l O c h o a d e O l z a / A P P h o t o “I’m hungry. I haven’t played for a while, and I want it really bad, and sometimes I actually have to stop myself at times and tell myself to be patient FORMER BRITISH tennis player Tim Henman, returns a shot, during the mixed double tennis match with playing partner, former tennis champion Belgium's Kim Clijsters, against former tennis champion Andre Agassi from the US and his wife, former tennis champion, German born Steffi Graf, during a test event on Wimbledon's Centre Court, in London, Sunday, May 17, 2009. Wimbledon's Centre Court has had a moveable roof installed so that play can continue at the grass court championships in wet weather. The Championships begin June 22. K i r s t y W i g g l e s w o r t h / A P P h o t o WIMBLEDONCOVER-UP C RICKET TENNIS ENGLAND'S PAUL COLLINGWOOD , left, celebrates with Graeme Swann, , after catching West Indies Shivnarine Chanderpaul during the 5th day of the second test match at the Riverside's cricket ground. THE ENGLAND squad are seen celebrating with their trophy after beating the West Indies during the 5th day of the second test match at the Riverside's cricket ground, Chester-le-Street, England, Monday May 18, 2009. The team are back row left to right, Kevin Pietersen, Jimmy Anderson, Graeme Swann, Graham Onions, and Stuart Broad a Front row left to right, Alistair Cook, Paul Collingwood, Ravi Bopara, captain Andrew Strauss Tim Bresnan and Matt Prior. England rout West Indies S cott Heppell/ AP Photos A wonderful display of swing bowling helped propel England to a series whitewash over the W est Indies. The victory gives t he team momentum leading into the Ashes series later this summer. Lancashire seamer James Anderson led the charge, e nding with match figures of nine for 125. It enabled England to win by an innings and 83 runs in the second npower Test and r egain the Wisden Trophy just t hree overs after lunch at Chester-le-Street. Two interruptions for rain in the morning session helped crea te swing-friendly conditions. And man-of-the-match Anderson, partnered by Yorkshire allrounder Tim Bresnan, made the m ost of them, causing a rapid W est Indies collapse either side of lunch of seven wickets for 35 runs in just 88 balls. Resuming 144 runs adrift on 115 for three, t he tourists fell to 176 all out with Shivnarine Chanderpaul the only batsman to offer any resistance on the final day witha gritty 47 over two hours.

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C M Y K C M Y K INTERNATIONALSPORTS PAGE 10, TUESDAY, MAY 19, 2009 TRIBUNE SPORTS DHL JOB DESCRIPTIONPOSITION: Collections Agent JOB FAMILY: Credit & Collections RCS CODE: A20004 REPORTS TO : Collections Lead LOCATION: Country Finance Department OVERALL PURPOSE: Under limited supervision in a team environment provide efcient and effective credit approvals. To ensure timely credit application processing, respond to information requests and issues. Ensure accuracy of all credit decisions functions while staying within company policy and procedural guidelines. DUTIES AND RESPONSIBILITIES: making credit decisions. delinquent accounts. Processes credit applications. Investigates disputes and reviews documentation. Implements credit suspensions. MINIMUM QUALIFICATIONS: direction amid competing priorities and deadlines. For more information please contact:Romell K. Knowles I Country Manager Email:Romell.Knowles@dhl.com n By ROBERT MILLWARD AP Soccer Writer LONDON C arlos Tevez’s farewell to Manchester United fans celebrating their latest title was another painful chapter in a life and career that simply refuses to go in a straight line. Seemingly unwanted by Man United, the 24-year-old Argentine striker is reluctantly looking for another club even though he wants to stay and fans have been pleading for months for manager Alex Ferguson to make the loan permanent. What seems on the outside to be a logical move just doesn’t happen in the world of Carlos Tevez. The small but tough striker, who bears scars on his neck and chest after a childhood scalding, has weaved through tangled transfers and rule-breaking controversies, none his own fault. Now he appears to be leaving United in a move that clouds the club’s most recent championship. Tevez, whose tournament-leading eight goals helped Argentina win its first Olympic soccer gold medal at the Athens Games, is one of the many South American stars whose contracts are owned by various investors because clubs cannot afford the transfer or salary. When he moved from Argentina’s Boca Juniors to Brazil’s Corinthians, the transfer fee of almost $20 million was a record for a Brazilian club. Some said it was far too much to spend on one player. But the bulk of the money came from the English-based Media Sports Invest ment, and the criticism abated when his goals led Corinthians to league titles. He had problems at Corinthians, howe ver. He fought with a teammate during t raining, and the club considered legal a ction against him after he went missing and was seen singing in a Buenos Aires nightclub with a group he helped form. MSI eventually sold Tevez on to England’s West Ham, along with fellow Argentina star Javier Mascherano. That caused another furor on the other side of the Atlantic. Premier League rules say that clubs cannot buy players from a third party and fined West Ham $11 million. Tevez continued to play for the Hammers, however, and his goal on the final day of the P remier League championship saved the c lub from relegation. T hat led to more legal trouble for West Ham when Sheffield United, which went down instead, won a compensation claim after arguing that Tevez shouldn’t have been allowed to keep playing for the club. Tevez finally thought he’d found a stable home at Old Trafford, where he arrived on a two-year loan last season with a view to a permanent transfer. He helped the Red Devils win two straight Premier League titles, a Champions League title, a Club World Cup and a League Cup. The fans loved him because of his work ethic, his persistence in tackling after losing the ball and his skills in scoring or setting up goals. “The fans love a trier,” said Ferguson, ducking questions about why the team won’t spend the estimated $37.5 million to buy him. So Tevez is resigned to leaving at the end of the season, either because the club won’t complete the complicated transfer with the people who own his contract or because the Red Devils don’t want him any more. The official line from the club is that nothing will be decided until after the season. Tevez had moved his wife and young daughter to England and has repeatedly said he and his family were happy in Manchester. But he felt betrayed by the club and told Argentine media he also was upset at being frequently left on the bench. Although he seemed to enjoy the title celebrations at Old Trafford on Saturday, he wore an Argentina national team shirt instead of Man United colors toward the end of the ceremony. “I feel a lot of pain to have to leave Manchester United because of the fans. It’s hard for me to accept this,” Tevez said. “Each day that goes by is more difficult for me because I know that I am not going to play at the club anymore.” Although Ferguson is likely to rest most of his front-line players in Sunday’s final league game at Hull, there is still the Champions League final May 27 against Barcelona. If Tevez is not in the lineup or on the bench, that will signal his United career is over. Beckham backs England’ s 2018 W orld Cup bid n WEMBLEY, England (AP David Beckham teamed up w ith Prime Minister Gordon Brown to launch England’s bid f or the 2018 World Cup on Monday, saying that winning the right t o host would be as satisfying as anything he’s accomplished on the field. “It would be up there with win ning (trophiesI ’ve had in my career because to be part of a successful bid, like I w as with the Olympics, would be a huge honour,” the former Eng land captain said. England is competing against the United States, Australia, M exico, Russia, Indonesia and Japan, as well as possible joint b ids by Spain and Portugal and the Netherlands and Belgium. F IFA’s executive committee will make the decision in December 2010. “I’ve played with some of the biggest and best (players the world and all they talk about i s the passion and atmosphere that is shown at England games a nd games against teams from England,” Beckham said. B eckham won the Champions League with Manchester United and the Spanish league title with Real Madrid. He is now on loan at AC Milan from the Los Ange les Galaxy. Beckham, who wasp art of London’s successful bid for the 2012 Olympics, said Engl and would probably be able to stage the World Cup right now. Juventus fires coach Claudio Ranieri n TURIN, Italy Juventus fired c oach Claudio Ranieri on Mon day, saying a change was the only way to salvage what’s left of a season in which the team has gone winless in its last seven games. He was replaced by Ciro Fer rara, a former Juventus defendera nd current coach of the club’s youth team. Ferrara was an assist ant to Marcello Lippi, the WorldCup winning coach who is back l eading the national team. Juventus drew 2-2 at home Sunday with Atalanta, leaving the Turin club three points behind second-placed AC Milan with two g ames left. Inter Milan has clinched the Serie A title. We absolutely have to do something different,” general m anager Jean-Claude Blanc told the ANSA news agency. “We wanted to give a strong shake-up and now it’s all in the hands of the players.” Ferrara is expected to remain c oach only until the end of the season, but Blanc suggested he m ight stay longer. The GM said Ferrara had “all the qualities to b e considered with a lot of attention for the future,” but stressed the final two games would be critical. Juventus has not won since March, with six draws and a d efeat in its last seven games. It lost to Chelsea in the first knocko ut round of the Champions League and fell in the semifinals o f the Italian Cup to eventual champion Lazio. MANCHESTER UNITED'S Carlos Tevez reacts after scoring against Wigan during their English Premier League soccer match at The JJB Stadium, Wigan, England, Wednesday May 13, 2009. Johnson r epeats as Texas Open champion London mayor visits Seoul for inspiration In brief Tevez uncertain future typical of tangled life SOCCER J o n S u p e r / A P P h o t o Soccer shorts n S EOUL, South Korea London’s mayor says a tour of t he Seoul Olympics sites has giv en him good ideas on how to b uild venues that will have a lasting legacy long after the 2012 Games. Mayor Boris Johnson singled out the 1988 Olympic Village as an “amazing” example of h ow to sell apartments in advance to help raise money for the site. T he British government has had to dip into a contingency fund to help build the Olympic Village because of a lack of private financing during the global econ omic recession. Johnson praised the sculpture g arden, parks, glades and water side features at the 1988 Olympics s ite in southeastern Seoul. John son says he also watched hun dreds going for a swim in the Olympic Games pool Monday. London’s 85,000-seat Olympic s tadium is to be converted into a 25,000-seat arena after the 2012 G ames are over. n SAN ANTONIO Zach Johnson left town with another Texas O pen win, a PGA Tour distinct ion and the top spot in the FedEx Cup standings, reports Associated Pres s. No wonder he’s going to miss it h ere. Winning at La Cantera Golf Club for the second time in seven months, Johnson needed just one hole to beat James Driscoll in a s udden-death playoff Sunday and s uccessfully defend his title for his sixth career tour victory. Johnson beat Driscoll, who rallied from eight strokes back in a f inal-round shootout to force the playoff, with a 10-foot birdie on the par-4 18th. The two finished regulation at 15-under 265 one t he 2007 Masters champion, the o ther a conditional-status tour player who was 141st on the money list last year. Johnson won in the La Cantera finale, with the t ournament moving to a new TPC c ourse in 2010. SUNDERLAND'S Kenwyne Jones does a backflip as he celebrates scoring during the English Premier League soccer match between Portsmouth and Sunderland at Fratton Park stadium in Portsmouth, England, Monday, May 18, 2009. M a t t D u n h a m / A P P h o t o M a t t D u n h a m / A P P h o t o PORTSMOUTH'S Peter Crouch, top, battles for the ball with Sunder land's Grant Ledbitter during the English Premier League soccer match between Portsmouth and Sunderland at Fratton Park stadium in Portsmouth, England, Monday, May 18, 2009. Portsmouth won the match 3-1. SUNDERL AND S TILL IN RELEGA TION DANGER Sunderland still face a battle for Premier League survival after two defensive howlers allowed Portsmouth to grab a 3-1 victory at Fratton Park. The Black Cats could have ensured top flight status with a win. It started so well for them when they led with a 59th minute strike from Kenwyne Jones. Portsmouth, however, scored twice inside seven min utes through John Utaka and Phil Bardsley's own-goal after a horrible blunder from Anton Ferdinand, before an Armand Traore strike sealed victory three minutes from time. Sunderland boss Ricky Sbragia bemoaned his side's defending, saying after the game: "It's happening too often in general – we play well, we think we're sort of in charge of the game.” SUNDERLAND'S Kenwyne Jones reacts in disappointment on the final whistle.

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C M Y K C M Y K LOCAL NEWS PAGE 12, TUESDAY, MAY 19, 2009 THE TRIBUNE your safe harbourfor Life & Health Insurance, Pension Management, and Brokerage & Advisory ServicesFAMILY GUARDIAN 396-1355 I BAHAMAHEALTH 396-1300 I FG CAPITAL MARKETS 396-4076 I FG FINANCIAL 396-4080SALES OFFICES: NASSAU I FREEPORT I ABACO I ELEUTHERA I EXUMA I CORPORATE CENTRE: EAST BAY STREET I www.famguardbahamas.com A MBESTA-ExcellentFinancialStrengthRating MISS Bahamas World Tinnyse Johnson, e xecutives of the Miss Bahamas World Organ isation, and contestants in the 2009 pageant paid a courtesy call on the Governor GeneralA rthur Hanna on Monday, May 11 at Gov ernment House. P ictured seated from left are Miss Davis Trucking Dashanique Poitier; Miss Theodore Ellyett Productions, Channa Cius; GovernorG eneral Hanna; Miss Bahamas World 2008; Ms Johnson; Miss Exuma Danielle Morley; (standing from left assistant director of talent development; Miss S posabelle Bridal, formal and evening wear, Devera Pinder; Miss Galleria Cinemas Emily Darville; Miss Red Hot Gabrielle Major; MissD S Lifestyles Inc Kendra Wilkinson; Miss Bahamas Experience Llatetra Laing; Miss Col o rs Entertainment McChenier Johnson; Miss Bella Donna Michaela Ferguson; Miss But tons Bridal and Formal Wear Shavonne M cKenzie; Miss Harbour Island Swanique Sawyer, and Leslia Miller, MBO director of pageant affairs. Raymond A Bethel /BIS Miss Bahamas World, contestants and executives pay a courtesy call on the Governor General n B y L INDSAY THOMPSON THE National Emergency ManagementAgency( NEMA) is readying shelters throughout the country as the 2009 Atlantic Hurricane Season approaches. NEMA and its partners h eaded by the Department of Social Services conducted a re-classification exercise of the 26 identified shelters on New Providence last Thurs-d ay to ensure they are ready in the event a hurricane strikes. The season runs from June 1 to November 30. Captain Stephen Russell, d irector of NEMA, said that in accordance with the national emergency disasterp lan, the inspection was to ensure that there are suitable shelter facilities throughout the country. “We are vigorously trying to inspect proposed shelters to ensure that they are properly equipped in the event the country is faced with a disas ter, especially a hurricane,” he said. Inspection of Family Island shelters has already begun. Shelter managers workshops are also being scheduled. Captain Russell thanked NEMA’s international part ners the United States Agency for International Development (USAID the Office of United States Foreign Disaster Assistance (OFDA aster management. William Pratt, assistant director of Social Services, said consent letters were sent to church leaders requesting their facilities to be used as shelters for the upcoming hurricane season. And, following a favourable response, inspec tions were carried out. Each facility will carry the sign, 'Emergency Hurricane Shelter' with the blue hurricane symbol on top, replacing the Red Cross symbol. Previously, school gyms were used as shelters but that “posed a problem,” he explained. They were still occupied when school reopened. The team comprises representatives from NEMA, the Department of Social Ser vices, Environmental Health, the Fire Branch of the Royal Bahamas Police Force, the Royal Bahamas Defence Force and the Red Cross. A checklist is used to deter mine whether the facility is designated a hurricane shel ter. The team looks at the building location for easy access, the building code reg u lations, storm shutters and whether window frames are p roperly affixed to walls, certain amenities and services including proper electricalw iring, safe and adequate water supply, sanitary facilities, kitchen facilities, and wheelchair accessibility among others. S helter management is now the responsibility of the Department of Social Services. The 2009 hurricane shelters f or New Providence are as follows: Church of God Auditorium, Joe Farrington Road; Epiphany Anglican Church, Prince Charles Drive; Epworth Hall, Shirley Street; Holy Cross Anglican Church, Highbury Park off Soldier Road; Kemp Road Ministries, Kemp Road; Pilgrim Baptist Church, St James Road; Salvation Army, Mackey Street; St Mary’s Hall, St Augustine, Bernard Road in Fix Hill; Agape Full Gospel Baptist Church, Kennedy Subdivision; Golden Gates Assembly, Carmichael Road; New Bethlehem Baptist Church, Independence Drive; Southwest Cathedral Church of God, Carmichael Road; Church of God of Prophecy, East Street; Calvary Bible Church, Collins Avenue; Church of God of Prophecy, Augusta and Patton Streets; Ebenezer Mission Baptist Church, Charles Vincent Street; Salvation Army, Meadow Street; St Barnabas Anglican Church, Wulff Road; Bahamas Association for the Physically Disabled, Dolphin Drive; Church of God of Prophecy, Gambier Village; – Hillview Seventh Day Adventist Church, Tonique WilliamsDarling Highway; – Mount Moriah Baptist Church, Farrington Road; – New Providence Community Centre, Blake Road; – Good News Seventh Day Adventist Church, Great Britain Street, Flamingo Gardens; – Workers’ House, Tonique WilliamsDarling Highway; – New Hope Missionary Baptist Church, Joan’s Heights West. NEMA oversees preparedness of hurricane shelters

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C M Y K C M Y K SECTIONB business@tribunemedia.net TUESDAY, MAY 19, 2009 THETRIBUNE $4. 68 $4. 51 $4. 69The information contained is from a third p arty and The Tribune can not be held responsible for errors and/or omission from the daily report.$ $3.53 $3.62 $3.48 #!( btnff ,&"#' ,#!"r#&!&##! &##! +(&#*')&+#+'#* )'!)& " #'&"t'#)'(#$"'(#&##!( $## (%)&('+($&&'(",#& bnnrfffrbt n By NEIL HARTNELL Tribune Business Editor THE Government-sponsored venture capital fund’s adminis trator yesterday said it had seen a 75 per cent drop in new business plan submissions to five per month, as he urged Bahami a n entrepreneurs to “start s mall” and not attempt to “get rich quick”. Jerome Gomez, the Baker Tilly Gomez executive who oversees the Bahamas Entrepreneurial Venture Fund, said it h ad provided financing to a further three Bahamian businesses for 2009 to-date, taking the total number of ventures it had assisted to 48. While the number of business plans/financial applications sub mitted to the fund had decreased to around five per month, down from a previous average of 20, Mr Gomez said this was due more to “people forgetting that we are around”, rather than the prevailing eco nomic climate. “We’ve been quite for a while,” Mr Gomez said. “We’ve not been out there as we have been in the past, so people may have forgotten.” While financial institutions were currently unlikely to be interested in providing capital to the Bahamas Entrepreneurial Venture Fund, largely due to the economy and their own related internal issues, Mr Gomez said the fund was busy “putting the house in order” and pruning its company port folio to make it attractive to the private sector. He added that 50 per cent of the 48 entrepreneurs and startups it had financed to date were “on their way to some degree of success”, while the other 50 per cent were “shaky, still struggling to stand on their feet”. “We’ve lost two companies [we financed] on the way so far,” Mr Gomez told Tribune Business, “and there may be one or two more if they can’t Venture fund sees 75% fall in new plans * Applications fall from 20 per m onth to 5, but administrator believes due to lack of fund publicity * Three businesses cheque authorisation, catering and blockm aking financed this year so far * 48 businesses aided, with 11 receiving $1.2m in equity and 37 some $2.8m in debt financing for $4m grand total * Venture fund ‘putting house in order’ with portfolio pruning, with two businesses it has financed a lready gone, and ‘hard decisions’ likely on others S S E E E E p p a a g g e e 4 4 B B n By NEIL HARTNELL Tribune Business Editor SENTINEL Bank & Trust, the offshore financial institution that is part of the former Colina Financial Group (CFG it set to “imminently close” its acquisition of Ansbacher (Bahamas Tribune Business sources revealed last night. Separate sources told this newspaper that the Ansbacher (Bahamas ing some time this week or next”, while another confirmed it was “closing imminently”. Tribune Business was told that the acquisition’s closing had been delayed by the need to obtain Central Bank of the Bahamas approval for the acquisition, which has now been forthcoming. “It got stalled on the Central Bank approval for a couple of Sentinel’s Ansbacher purchase ‘imminent’ S S E E E E p p a a g g e e 5 5 B B n B y CHESTER ROBARDS Business Reporter crobards@tribunemedia.net MOST Bahamian potable water companies are conducting some manner of testing on their products, the president of an environmental laboratory and consultant company that specialises in testing and quali ty controls, said yesterday. Anthony Knowles, of Adka Environmental Laboratories and Consultants, told Tribune Business that his company does testing for many water suppli ers and contends that many other suppliers use different laboratories. Mr Knowles said he was not aware of any water companies that did not test their water. Recently, however, several impostor bottles bearing the Aquapure label were confiscat ed by police and, after testing, were found to have off-thechart levels of disease-causing and potentially deadly bacteria. Mr Knowles said companies who were using his testing facilities were doing well. “We make recommendations and see that they are carried out,” he explained. Chelsea’s Choice cannot begin daily bottling until their water and facilities have been tested by Adka, according to the company’s managing director. Tina Knowles said that hav ing an independent quality con trol and testing company on site is costly, but necessary. “We operate with a zero margin of error,” she said. Ms Knowles said Adka sanitises all of Chelsea’s equipment daily, and then gives the goahead for water production to begin. ‘Zer o mar g in of er r or’ Independent testers ensure bottled water quality , as g r eater r egulation of sector urged S S E E E E p p a a g g e e 5 5 B B n By NEIL HARTNELL Tribune Business Editor CABLE Bahamas and its subsidiaries “vehemently oppose” the Government’s plans to impose universal service obligations (USO the provision of television serv ices throughout the Bahamas, a nd are also challenging its designation of the company as having “significant market power” in the provision of Internet and pay-per-view television services. A copy of the BISX-listed c ompany’s feedback to the USO and licensing consultations, initiated as part of the Government’s communications sector regulatory reform, which has been obtained by Tribune Business, said Cable Bahamas was “unaware of any other jurisdiction in the world where the concept of universal service has been applied to the provi sioning of television service”. Acknowledging that its Cable Bahamas ‘vehemently opposes’ USO obligations THE TV SCREENS inside Cable Bahamas... * Says no universal service o bligations for television a nywhere else in the world * BISX-listed firm also challenges its designation as having ‘significant market power’ in I nternet, pay-TV markets S S E E E E p p a a g g e e 7 7 B B n By NEIL HARTNELL Tribune Business Editor C able Bahamas has accused the Government’s communications regulatory reform process of giving its rival, the Bahamas Telecommunications Company (BTC through having three of its senior executives sitting on the committee overseeing the effort. The BISX-listed entity, in its April 20, 2009, f eedback to the communications sector reform p roposals, argued that the perception of i ntegrity in the process had been “undermined” because BTC’s executive chairman, Julian Francis; Felicity Johnson, BTC’s vicepresident for legal, regulatory and interconnection, and its company secretary; and Tellis Symonette, BTC’s senior vice-president for Family Islands and administration, were all on the BTC Privatisation Committee overseeing it. In its response, signed by in-house legal counsel Judith Smith, Cable Bahamas and its Caribbean Crossings subsidiary said they wanted to “register their disappointment with, and formally protest, the apparent decision of the Government to abandon its original, and recently re-espoused, commitment to an open, transparent and non-discriminatory public con sultation process by according preferential treatment and influence in that process to BTC, to the exclusion of all other carriers”. T he inference from Cable Bahamas is that BTC had influence over the outcome of comm unications reform and the consultation/feedback process to its benefit, and the detriment of other, rival carriers and telecoms competitors. Such assertions, though, have not been proven. T. B. Donaldson, the BTC privatistaion committtee’s chairman, did not return a voice mail left on his office telephone, seeking comment, before last night’s press deadline. Cable Bahamas also complained that the Broadcasting Corporation of the Bahamas( BCB) was represented on the committee by its chairman Michael Moss, to the exclusion a gain of other carriers. While the strong BTC presence on the committee was understandable when efforts were underway to facilitate the 100 per cent stateowned carrier’s privatisation, Cable Bahamas said “the privileged position” enjoyed by BTC and the BCB “lost any plausible rationale” Cable hits at BTC’s ‘reform influence’ Claims rival had ‘preferential treatment and position’ in communications sector overhaul by having three persons on committee overseeing effort S S E E E E p p a a g g e e 5 5 B B

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I N the last 10 days, Bahamas S upermarkets (BSL fered armed robberies at three of its City Markets stores, the latest at the gleaming blue-chip Cable Beach supermarket. Internal employee pilferage and cashier fraud have plagued the b usiness and impacted margins f or the last couple of years, a l eakage gradually being reduced by dismissals, prosecutions and better surveillance and technology. The soft-spoken Sunil Chatrani, who was moved by Neal & Massey, the Trinidad conglomerate that acts as BSL’s largest s hareholder, from his senior p ost in Barbados last October to become chief executive of the Bahamian company, was frank in telling us that the level of crime in Nassau far exceeds what Neal & Massey has experienced at its other operations in B arbados, Trinidad, or St. Lucia. B ut other issues have been d ominating his time. Working together with Evangeline (Vangie Bahamian accountant who left KPMG early in 2008, and was later promoted to corporate chief financial officer, he created a multi-page Business Recove ry Plan dated April 9, 2009, w hich has demonstrated some $5 million already achieved in cost savings. When Mr Chatrani took over last autumn, the enterprise was at a low point. The outlook offered by the chairman at last August’s annua l general meeting (AGM p roved over-optimistic, and by O ctober even Bahamian wholesalers were threatening to cut off credit and effectively shut the company down. Since that time, Mr Chatrani and his executives have held many meetings to renegotiate supply and delivery contracts, and are getting greater cooperation from their counterparties. B ahamas Food Services even i nstalled warehouse refrigerat ion equipment free of charge. S taffing, which had ballooned to 850 compared to 700 under p revious Winn-Dixie managem ent, has now been shrunk b ack to around 700 employees. Of course, the company is not yet out of the woods, as can be seen by the operating loss of $ 3.4 million for the six months e nded January 9, 2009. This may suggest an improvement in the r ate-of-decline from the last full y ear’s loss of $13.4 million, but w hether the improvement is sust ainable can only be judged when the latest quarterly results are published. One factor thatc ontinues to concern Mr Chatrani is the low percentage of product that he can buy direct from foreign suppliers – about 7p er cent, instead of a normal 35 p er cent. The balance must be bought from Bahamian wholesalers, who of course charge their own commissions thats harply reduce BSL’s operating margins. BSL simply does not have the cash resources or credit to buy in bulk from abroad. So the response to the Busin ess Recovery Plan is crucial. It has been circulated to all the B SL Holdings shareholders, the e ntity that owns 78 per cent of t he operating company, BSL. Neal & Massy in turn holds 40 per cent of Holdings, with the remaining 60 per cent Bahamian-owned via various wealthy i ndividuals, the Hotel Pension Funds, and the Fidelity private investment group. The Plan forecasts that BSL c ould break even later in 2009 a nd return to profit in 2010, but only on condition that all these parties provide new funding, partly to the operating company a nd partly to Holdings to service its loan from the Royal Bank of Canada. Mr Chatrani told us that these contributions m ust be made “proportionately”, which suggests that Neal & Massey will only step forward if the Bahamian shareholdersa lso share the burden. A s we write, firm commitments from all the Bahamians are actively being sought with an end-of-month deadline.A lthough meeting it seems p robable, BSL is still on a knifeedge until every signature is in place. Only then can the com-p any’s auditors, KPMG, be e xpected to release their certification for the 2008 fiscal year without the “going concern” qualification that would be dis a strous for BSL’s credit standi ng. The odds seem favourable, though not certain, that Mr Chatrani and Ms Rahming, supported by visiting Neal & Massey staffers and a stronger Bahamian management team ( and more cash), will be succ essful in engineering a turna round. The question of how BSL fell into these serious straits, and who personally or what extraneous conditions were responsible, can long be debated. Mr Chatrani, in office just since last autumn though an earlier observer, does not point fingers but simply says the conditions for a “perfect storm” p revailed after the 2006 acquis ition. T he record shows that in its l ast year of ownership, WinnDixie sold over $21 million w orth of products to BSL, on w hich it increased prices by at l east 5 per cent after the sale to Holdings, and these items had to be replaced by IGA and other brands unfamiliar to Bahamia ns. The current recession has h ad its unavoidable impact on sales. The abrupt transfer of a ccounting and inventory funct ions from Jacksonville to Nas s au – perhaps necessary, but p erhaps premature – combined with personal frictions and changes in the executive ranks,i nevitably resulted in degradation of financial controls. In April 2008, the chief operating office Stephen Boylei ssued an ill-timed press release t hat a $4 million investment in retail IT scanning technology was already paying its way in reducing losses – followed byt he sharp earnings decline announced in August and his own departure in September. In May 2008, the chief financial officer Bryan Knowles left the c ompany, leading later to a highly publicised dispute between h imself and chairman Basil S ands over whether he and his team had given the Board misleading financial information. Whoever was right or wrong, it was an unseemly squabble for a public company. The situation was not alleviated by the chairm an’s comment, duly reported i n the press, that the Board m ight have exercised more diligence. Whether these issues should be buried in past history, or whether the present BSL Board is competent enough to carry the company forward, are issues for shareholder decisions that can be aired at the next AGM. We have recommended to t he Board that before the A GM, as soon as the auditors’ c ertification is published, a publ ic “investor presentation” be made by Mr Chatrani and Ms R ahming, giving them the o pportunity to speak openly and a nswer questions about the present condition and future prospects of BSL. This would be normal practice for any publ ic company in BSL’s delicate b ut hopeful state of affairs. Whatever the future holds f or BSL does not extinguish the s pecial grievance of the 1,500 m inority shareholders, owning 2 2 per cent of the company. Their potential legal claim under the Companies Act against thed irectors, and against BSL Holdings, for completing the Winn-Dixie transaction with no offer or information to them inority, is being reviewed by t hem and their counsel. It is unquestioned that while WinnDixie got the nice price of $16 for their shares, the minority gotn othing and are now holding non-marketable shares of dubious value that have paid no dividends for over 18 months. Whether Bahamian law will give t hem any recourse remains to be tested. C M Y K C M Y K BUSINESS PAGE 2B, TUESDAY, MAY 19, 2009 THE TRIBUNE City Markets aims to escape ‘perfect stor by Richard Coulson

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n B y CHESTER ROBARDS Business Reporter crobards@tribunemedia.net THE GOVERNMENT is working closely with interna t ional agencies in order to find s olutions to the problem of global warming, according to the minister of state for the environment, after a recent World Bank study revealed its effects could deal an almost $50m illion blow to this economy. Phenton Neymour told Tribune Business that theB ahamas has been active in raising awareness on the issue of global warming, and this coun try’s standing as one of the top 10 countries that could be most impacted by its effects. As a low lying chain of islands, the Bahamas is expect ed to be one of many nations around the world affected by Sea level Rise (SLR about by rising global temperatures. Scientists have also predicted that rising surface temperatures of the world’s oceans will spawn a greater number of high intensity hurricanes and, cou pled with SLR, will increase the instance of damaging storm surges. “We are in the top five most vulnerable to climate change and we need to be aware that it will impact us,” said Mr Neymour. The Bahamas has launched its National Energy Policy which looks at ways to reduce dependency on fossil fuels asan energy source. This also underscores the Bahamas’ com mitment to act on the impending global impact of climate change. “The whole drive is to dimin ish our reliance on fossil fuels,” said Mr Neymour. “The real emphasis need to be put on reducing the potential impact from storm surges, hurricanes, etc, andimproving the design and construction of our sea walls. These are the things that are essential to moving forward,i ncluding letting our voice be h eard internationally.” Mr Neymour said the Bahamas will be represented att he United Nations Climate Change Conference in Copen hagen this December. T he World Bank study revealed that an estimated 1,517 square miles of Bahamianc oastline could be impacted over a number of years, representing 54.67 per cent of the total coastline. As a result, thes tudy estimates 3,711 persons could be impacted over the same period of time, representing 73.03 per cent of the total Bahamian population living ona coastline that could possibly b e affected. In a list of 10 countries most at risk for serious damage ass torm surges intensify, the Bahamas tops the list three times out of six categories, asa ssessed by the World Bank. “We have discussed and have put in the public domain thef act that we need to reduce the number homes being built in low lying areas that are prone to flooding,” said Mr Neymour. And we must be aware of the damage to homes should we build in coastal areas.” C M Y K C M Y K BUSINESS T HE TRIBUNE TUESDAY, MAY 19, 2009, PAGE 3B 7KHXEOLF,V&RUGLDOO\,QYLWHG$WWHQG 7 +(+/
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reorganise or restructure. We may have to consider closing them.” Mr Gomez said the Bahamas Entrepreneurial Venture Fund had assessed Bahamian financ ial services businesses it t hought might be interested in providing capital to the fund, and many had taken “some substantial hits” as a result of the e conomy. I n expectation for when the economy and financial markets turned around, the fund administrator told Tribune Business that “we’re still putting the house in order”, ensuring auditsw ere completed on time and looking at businesses on the books that may n o longer be viable or have a chance to survive, making hard decisions as to whether they could. We’re making tough decisions; clean-i ng up the portfolio”. O f the three businesses f inanced by the Bahamas Entrep reneurial Venture Fund this y ear, one has received an equit y injection, the other two debt. M r Gomez said one recipient was a cheque authorisation b usiness, where customer c heques are swiped through a “credit card-like machine” b efore cashiers are authorised to accept them. The company had developed a database of Bahamian customers who routinely handed over bad cheques, a nd those who did not, and was now working for City Markets. The other two recipients of financing, Mr Gomez added, were a small catering business t hat operated the staff cafeter ia for banks, and a block-making company. So far, the Bahamas Entrepreneurial Venture Fund has financed 11 approved applicants with equity, and the remaining3 7 with debt financing. A total o f $4 million has been invested, some $1.2 million in equity and $2.8 million in debt financing. Mr Gomez said the fund had not drawn down on the $1 mil-l ion allocated to it by the Gove rnment in the 2008-2009 Budg et, and added that there was n o need to increase its financing l imits a maximum of $100,000 i n debt financing for any one p roject, and $200,000 in equity financing. We don’t think the market d ictates that at this time,” Mr Gomez said. “We find we’re a ble to fund most of the projects coming to us, so there is no need to increase the limits at this time. The amount of money we have on hand is more t han enough.” He added: “We can be a great help to entrepreneurs who want to start small. The biggest issue is that people want to start b ig in this economic climate. W e advise people to start small and build their businesses from the revenues received and paid to them.” Mr Gomez said the best business plans were those that ini-t ially envisaged just the entrep reneur and a small staff working in the business, adding that the Bahamas Entrepreneurial Venture Fund would find it difficult to finance more grandiose projects worth $500,000 to $1m illion. E xplaining that providing $ 150,000-$200,000 in financing in this economic climate would be difficult for the Bahamas Entrepreneurial Venture Fund, M r Gomez said: “When we go a nd talk to persons, we tell them to start small, with one truck instead of two. Those people are the ones who are successful. But too many people want to get rich quick.” T he administrator added that h e had seen “no improvement in the quality of business plans coming into” the Bahamas Entrepreneurial Venture Fund, the main weaknesses being over-optimistic revenue projec-t ions, lack of knowledge of the m arket and its size, and the a bsence of marketing plans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enture fund sees 75 per cent fall in new plans F F R R O O M M p p a a g g e e 1 1 B B

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‘Zero margin of error’ C M Y K C M Y K BUSINESS THE TRIBUNE TUESDAY, MAY 19, 2009, PAGE 5B 52wk-Hi52wk-LowSecurit y Previous CloseToday's CloseChangeDaily Vol.EPS $Div $P/EYield 1.951.28Abaco Markets1.401.400.000.1270.00011.00.00% 11.8011.00Bahamas Property Fund11.0011.000.000.9920.20011.11.82% 9.686.95Bank of Bahamas6.956.950.000.2440.26028.53.74% 0.900.63Benchmark0.630.630.00-0.8770.000N/M0.00%3 .743.15Bahamas Waste3.153.150.000.0780.09040.42.86% 2.601.95Fidelity Bank2.372.370.008830.0550.04043.11.69% 14.1511.09Cable Bahamas11.7511.750.001.4060.2508.42.13% 3.142.83Colina Holdings2.832.830.000.2490.04011.41.41% 7.446.06Commonwealth Bank (S16.116.230.129,3000.4190.05014.90.80% 3.381.31Consolidated Water BDRs2.902.970.070.1110.05226.81.75% 3.001.53Doctor's Hospital1.531.530.000.2400.0806.45.23% 8.106.02Famguard7.767.760.000.4200.30018.53.87% 12.5011.00Finco11.0011.000.000.3220.67034.26.09% 14.6610.35FirstCaribbean Bank10.4010.400.000.7940.40013.13.85% 5.555.00Focol (S5.145.140.000.3320.15015.52.92% 1.001.00Focol Class B Preference1.001.000.000.0000.000N/M0.00% 0.500.30Freeport Concrete0.300.300.000.0350.0008.60.00% 8.205.50ICD Utilities5.505.500.000.4070.50013.59.09% 12.508.60J. S. Johnson10.5010.500.000.9520.64011.06.10% 10.0010.00Premier Real Estate10.0010.000.000.1800.00055.60.00% 52wk-Hi52wk-LowSecuritySymbolLast SaleChangeDaily Vol. 1000.001000.00Fidelity Bank Note 17 (Series AFBB17100.000.00 1000.001000.00Fidelity Bank Note 22 (Series BFBB22100.000.00 1000.001000.00Fidelity Bank Note 13 (Series CFBB13100.000.00 1000.001000.00Fidelity Bank Note 15 (Series DFBB15100.000.0018 52wk-Hi52wk-LowSymbolBid $ A sk $Last PriceWeekly Vol.EPS $Div $P/EYield 14.6014.25Bahamas Supermarkets7.928.4214.60-0.0410.300N/M2.05% 8.006.00Caribbean Crossings (Pref4.006.256.000.0000.480N/M7.80% 0.540.20RND Holdings0.350.400.350.0010.000256.60.00% 41.0029.00ABDAB30.1331.5929.004.5400.0009.030.00% 0.550.40RND Holdings0.450.550.550.0020.000261.900.00% 52wk-Hi52wk-LowFund NameNA V YTD%Last 12 MonthsDiv $Yield % 1.36641.3041Colina Bond Fund1.36640.954.77 3.03512.9230Colina MSI Preferred Fund2.8962-1.49-3.35 1.45901.3883Colina Money Market Fund1.45901.775.09 3.69603.1964Fidelity Bahamas G & I Fund3.1964-5.59-13.64 12.739712.1564Fidelity Prime Income Fund12.73970.965.79 100.5606100.0000CFAL Global Bond Fund100.56060.560.56 100.000096.4070CFAL Global Equity Fund96.4070-3.59-3.59 1.00001.0000CFAL High Grade Bond Fund1.00000.000.00 10.50009.0950Fidelity International Investment Fund9.15990.71-12.76 1.04401.0000FG Financial Preferred Income Fund1.04400.804.40 1.03641.0000FG Financial Growth Fund1.03640.333.64 1.04521.0000FG Financial Diversified Fund1.04520.764.40 BISX ALL SHARE INDEX 19 Dec 02 = 1,000.00YIELD last 12 month dividends divided by closing price 52wk-Hi Highest closing price in last 52 weeksBid $ Buying price of Colina and Fidelity 52wk-Low Lowest closing price in last 52 weeksAsk $ Selling price of Colina and fidelity Previous Close Previous day's weighted price for daily volumeLast Price Last traded over-the-counter price Today's Close Current day's weighted price for daily volumeWeekly Vol. Trading volume of the prior week Change Change in closing price from day to dayEPS $ A company's reported earnings per share for the last 12 mths Daily Vol. Number of total shares traded todayNAV Net Asset Value DIV $ Dividends per share paid in the last 12 monthsN/M Not Meaningful P/E Closing price divided by the last 12 month earningsFINDEX The Fidelity Bahamas Stock Index. January 1, 1994 = 100 (S (S19-Feb-09 9-Feb-09 W W W WW W . .B B I I S S X X B B A A H H A A M M A A S S . .C C O O M M | | T T E E L L E E P P H HO ON N E E : :2 24 4 2 2 -3 3 2 2 3 3 -2 23 3 3 3 0 0 | | F F A A C C S S I I M M I I L L E E : : 2 2 4 4 2 2 -3 3 2 2 3 3 -2 23 3 2 2 0 0NAV Date 31-Mar-09 1-May-09 31-Mar-09 28-Feb-09 31-Dec-08 9-Feb-09 28-Feb-09 31-Dec-08 31-Dec-07 31-Mar-09 Prime + 1.75% Maturity 19 October 2017 19 October 2022 30 May 2013 29 May 2015 Interest 7% Prime + 1.75% 7%T T O O T T R R A A D D E E C C A A L L L L : : C C O O L LI I N N A A 2 24 4 2 2 5 5 0 0 2 2 7 70 0 1 10 0 | | R R O O Y Y A A L L F F I I D D E E L LI I T T Y Y 2 2 4 42 2 -3 35 5 6 67 7 7 7 6 64 4 | | F FG G C C A A P P I I T T A A L L M M A A R R K K E E T T S S 2 24 4 2 2 3 3 9 9 6 6 -4 40 0 0 00 0 | | C C O O L L O O N N I I A A L L 2 2 4 4 2 2 5 50 0 2 2 -7 75 5 2 2 5 5FINDEX: CLOSE 795.46 | YTD -4.72% | 2008 -12.31%BISX LISTED & TRADED SECURITIES AS OF: Fidelity Over-The-Counter Securities Colina Over-The-Counter Securities BISX Listed Mutual Funds MARKET TERMSMONDAY, 18 MAY 2009B ISX ALL SHARE INDEX: CLOSE 1,615.17 | CHG 6.14 | %CHG 0.38 | YTD -97.19 | YTD % -5.68BISX LISTED DEBT SECURITIES (Bonds trade on a Percentage Pricing bases &20021:($/7+(%$+$0$6 ,17+(0$77(52)$//7+$7 $1',17+($77(5 $ 1',17+($77(5 RIWKHHWLWLRQRI$OODQ 6SHFWRU 127,&( $//7+$7 127,&(,6+(5(%<*,9(1 WK WK 7KH1RWLFH%RDUGRIWKH$GPLQLVWUDWRU DW6WHOOD0DULV/RQJ,VODQGDQG *5$+$07+203621t&2 The Bahamas Utilities Co-operative Credit Union Ltd.Notice of Annual General MeetingThe Annual General Meeting of the Bahamas Utilities Co-operative Credit Union Ltd will b e held on T hursday, May 28th, 2009 at 6:00pm in The Patrick A. Bain Training Room at The Bahamas Co-operative League Building Russell Road She said a sterile water processing facility is paramount fora water company operating in an industry in need of more regulation. The impostor water seized by police was found to have bacteria that was too numerous to count, and its mineral content was 17 parts per one million. Aquapure’s quality control manager told The Tribune that the mineral content should not exceed 10 parts per million. Ms Knowles said Chelsea’s water, through constant testing, never passes five to six parts per million. “Our water is tested every half hour and goes back to the lab daily for in-depth testing,” she said. Ms Knowles said the water can pick up bacteria through any part of the bottling process, which is why her company found it necessary to employ an independent quality control laboratory. “Its’ an expensive alternative, but it works,” she said. “There is no bias with independent testing.” Ms Knowles said the Government needs to properly regulate the industry. Phenton Neymour told Tribune Business recently that the Environmental Health Department tests water for companies that do not employ an independent company. According to him, many companies simply acquire a piece of land, sink wells and then begin to sell water. Supplier According to another supplier, who wished to remain anonymous, some of the smaller water suppliers that have popped up recently do not have adequate equipment to wash and sterilize their bottles. The supplier said proper industry detergents could cost as much as $800 to $1000 per barrel. “You can’t be ni the industry unless you have the proper washer,” said the supplier. “And that washer has to be at the required temperature for the duration (of the washing Some of these companies are operating without proper facilities.” F F R R O O M M p p a a g g e e 1 1 B B Cable hits at BTC’s eform influence’ once the exercise was broadened to regulatory reform. “Thus, from the operation of the public consultation process, BTC, and BTC alone, has had a unique, privileged opportunity to shape the content and procedures of the public consultation process, and will have a unique role, denied to its competitors, in shaping the outcome,” Cable Bahamas said. It questioned why the Government did not extend the April 20, 2009, deadline for industry feedback on its universal service obligation (USO and licensing regimes. “The companies [Cable and C aribbean Crossings] protest t his refusal, which is manifestly discriminatory against licensed o perators other than BTC, who have not already had an opport unity to shape the content of t he public consultation docum ents themselves, much less an adequate opportunity to respond to its content,” Cable Bahamas said. The BISX-listed operator also questioned whether KPMG Corporate Finance (Bahamas was potentially conflicted, due to its dual roles as advisor to the Government and BTC privatisation committee on sector liberalisation, and in helping BTC develop its business plan a nd valuing the company for p rivatisation. Cable Bahamas had urged the Government to extend the feedback deadline and, if the BTC and BCB representatives were not taken off the committee, to then give all other communications operators equal representation. Sentinel’s Ansbacher purchase ‘imminent’ weeks,” one source confirmed to Tribune Business. This newspaper understands, though, that all documents and conditions needed to complete the transaction are in place, and that the way is clear for a smooth closure. T ribune Business revealed last year that Ansbacher (Bahamas National Bank (QNB decided to place the Bahamian financial institution on the market for sale. This newspaper also revealed on January 12, 2009, that Sentinel was the institution leading the race to acquire Ansbacher (Bahamas The institution, which employs 60 staff, has some obvious attractions for Sentinel Bank & Trust and its parent, the group controlled by A. F. Holdings (the former Colina Financial Group), whose principals are Emanuel Alexiou and Anthony Ferguson. Mr Ferguson did not return Tribune Business messages left on his office and cell phone voicemails before press time last night. Ansbacher (Bahamas significant Bahamian dollar portfolio, being involved in domestic pension fund management and administration, and one possibility would be for that business book to be merged with CFAL, the brokerage/corporate advisory entity that is part of A. F. Holdings. The international portfolio could then be absorbed by Sentinel Bank & Trust. It is unclear how any transaction would be structured, and whether it would be Sentinel Bank & Trust or an affiliate acquiring Ansbacher (Bahamas ness, which is estimated to contain assets worth around $200 million. It is possible that Sentinel may even be part of a wider acquiring group. F F R R O O M M p p a a g g e e 1 1 B B F F R R O O M M p p a a g g e e 1 1 B B

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C M Y K C M Y K BUSINESS THE TRIBUNE TUESDAY, MAY 19, 2009, PAGE 7B Cable Bahamas ‘vehemently opposes’ USO obligations licence imposed certain obligations upon it, and that it had entered at the Government’s request a Memorandum of Understanding with the Bahamas Telecommunications Company (BTC air television at no charge to certain Family Islands, Cable Bahamas said neither of these imposed a USO obligation to provide multi-channel televis ion or basic television services, a s the Communications Bill m andated. Cable Bahamas’ response, signed by its in-house attorney, Judith Smith, and dated April 20, 2009, said: “The companies [Cable and Caribbean Crossings] vehemently oppose the Government’s proposal to impose upon Cable Bahamas a universal service obligation for television services, independent of the obligations already set forth in the terms of its licence and the Memorandum of Understanding (MoU Impose “The establishment of such a requirement would also impose an unfair burden on Cable Bahamas since, unlike BTC with respect to its USO, Cable Bahamas would be required to provide service at no cost, with no prospect of new entrants s eeking to provide television s ervice under more desirable, c ompetitive terms. “As a result, Cable Bahamas would effectively become a Universal Service Provider (USP tuity.” Cable Bahamas added that its USO would be unlike that imposed on BTC for telecommunications services, as the latter at least recovered part of its costs by charging Family Island consumers for services, and did not have to necessarily build infrastructure. “The application of USO principles in this context would be manifestly arbitrary and unfair. To the extent a universal service obligation for broadcasting should exist at all, it should be imposed solely on the nation’s public broadcasting company [ZNS],” Cable Bahamas said. The BISX-listed company argued that if it was to become the USO for television services in the Bahamas, it “should be fully subsidised for undertaking this onerous burden”. If ‘must carry’ provisions were imposed, Cable Bahamas urged that they be restricted to local television signals, the Parliamentary Channel, local education channels and community channels. These channels also had to be carried at no charge to Cable Bahamas or the programmer, and transmitted only where cable television was available. Elsewhere, Cable Bahamas “vehemently challenged” the Government’s decision to designate it as having ‘Significant Market Power’ (SMP provision of high speed data (Internet The BISX-listed company argued that the criteria for d etermining whether a compan y had a dominant market posit ion, which is to be used by the Utilities Regulation and Competition Authority (URCA were “unreasonably subjective and vague, and unfairly penalise efficient operators”. Tentative “The Government’s tentative conclusion with respect to Cable Bahamas’ presumed SMP is both premature and unfair,” Cable Bahamas argued. “Compounding this inequity, the proposed Bill also imposes upon Cable Bahamas regulatory burdens which are onerous and disproportionate to the facts at hand, and will frustrate Cable Bahamas’ ongoing efforts to achieve efficiencies and meet its fiduciary obligations to shareholders. “At the same time, the Bill neglects to define precisely how an operator may overcome a presumption of SMP, thereby avoiding or alleviating the burdensome extra layer of regulation, which the Bill imposes.” Share your news The T ribune wants to hear from people who are making news in their neighbourhoods. Perhaps you ar e raising funds for a good cause, campaigning for improvements in the area or have won an awar d. If so, call us on 322-1986 and share your story. F F R R O O M M p p a a g g e e 1 1 B B

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n By NEIL HARTNELL Tribune Business Editor THE Four Seasons hotel brand has admitted it is unlike-ly to return to Exuma’s Emerald Bay resort as its operating/management partner, the Prime Minister saying yesterday that its contract with the hotel “proved particularly challenging” for several potential buyers. An e-mail from Jim Fitzgibbon, president of worldwide hotel operations for Four Seas ons, a copy of which has been s een by Tribune Business, said: Four Seasons has agreed to an orderly closure of the hotel to guests effective as of May 26, 2009. It is unlikely that the hotel will reopen as a Four Seasons.” Explaining the reasons for Emerald Bay’s closure, Mr Fitzgibbon said: “After much d eliberation, and in the absence o f being able to identify a new o wner for the development, the receiver has reluctantly decided to close the development. “This is a decision which was very difficult for the receivers to make, and they look forward to a point in the future when this development will reopen u nder new ownership and cont inue to contribute to the Exum a community.” And he added: “Our sales teams both at the hotel and in New York are actively working with our clients and guests to rearrange any bookings that have been confirmed for beyond May 26. If any of your clients have been affected, you can be sure that someone from Four Seasons will be in touch with you in the next day or so. “We are deeply disappointe d to have to share this news with you, as the [Emerald Bay] hotel has become a favourite amongst many of our guests and clients. We appreciate the support you have given the hotel and know that you join us in commending the excellent team there.” Prime Minister Hubert Ingraham’s statement to the House of Assembly on the Four Seasons Emerald Bay Resort’s closure yesterday added very little that was new, although he confirmed that “the requirements contained in the management contract with the h otel’s operators, the Four Seas ons, proved particularly chall enging for a number of the interested [buyers]”. The Prime Minister said Mitsui, the Japanese insurer acting as the Four Seasons Emerald Bay Resort’s main creditor, had advised his administration that it was seeking buyers “with the wherewithal to meet the requirements of the Government and complete the full build-out of the development”. It was for this reason that the G overnment turned down one potential buyer, Ambrose Holdings (UK whether it had the necessary financial muscle to complete Emerald Bay’s full build-out. n By NEIL HARTNELL T ribune Business Editor THE Four Seasons Emerald Bay Resort “has done more to develop Exuma in the last 10 years than anything in the previous 100 years”, a leading businessman and Exuma native told Tribune Business yesterday, adding that his company was “committed to staying the course” and would not walk away from its newly-opened office on the island. Chester Cooper, British American Financial’s president and chief executive, acknowl edged that the resort’s impending May 26 closure was “a dev astating, significant blow to the island, quite frankly”, yet presented an opportunity to change its “economic model” by reviving traditional sectors such as agriculture and fishing. “I believe the Four Seasons Emerald Bay property has done more for Exuma in the last 10 years, in the development of the island, than the island received ever before in the 100 years that preceded it,” Mr Cooper told Tribune Business. “This [the closure] is without question a significant change in the economy, and I believe thatf inding a buyer for this propert y in the very short-term, if that can be achieved, or if there is a way to negotiate with the receivers on the Government’s part to keep the property open until a buyer is found, that would a more favourable out come. “Without question, this property needs to be open to see the kind of growth and development the island has seen over the last five years. There’s defi nitely going to be a shrinkage of the local economy.” Mr Cooper said it seemed that the price the Pricewater houseCoopers (PwC and the resort’s main creditor, the London office of Japanese insurer, Mitsui, were seeking had “gone down to almost peanuts”. Mitsui had initially been seek ing around $125 million upwards, a figure that would have covered the $120 million debt it inherited from the Four Seasons Emerald Bay’s lenders when the property initially went into receivership. However, while PwC has acknowledged that the purchase price has decreased, it has not specified an amount, although it is believed to have fallen to around $35-$50 million. “I think it could be a value acquisition for some companies with the resources to pump in and keep it going,” Mr Cooper said, adding that one potential stumbling block for any buyer was the fact that “a lot of prime real estate has been sold”. This would make it more difficult for any acquirer, he explained, to generate an instant return on their investment via real estate sales. Mr Cooper said British American Financial had been present in Exuma for 25 years, initially via a home-based agent, before opening its own officew ith four staff in 2006. We don’t expect in the short-term that we’re going to be making any decision with respect to this office. We’re committed to the island, and are staying the course with respect to operating on the island. “The resort’s closure will impact our business. Our clients include a large number of Emerald Bay workers. We expect a lot of our clients to be out of work.” Mr Cooper added that British American Financial was offer ing free financial consultations to displaced Four Seasons Emerald Bay Resort workers at is Exuma office. The British American Financial chief, though, said “all is not lost for Exuma”, as it still enjoyed the presence of the $100 million Grand Isle Villas project and numerous other resorts and investments. Without the Four Seasons Emerald Bay’s presence, over resorts on Exuma were likely to enjoy increased bookings. “This is an opportunity for correcting the model,” Mr Cooper told Tribune Business. “Over the years, many people have gone away from the core businesses of the island, fishing and agriculture, to some extent. “This [the resort closure] will cause people to reflect on the path taken, as in some cases you have not been able to buy fish. This is an opportunity to create small businesses to cater to the remaining hotel properties and the local market.” C M Y K C M Y K BUSINESS PAGE 8B, TUESDAY, MAY 19, 2009 THE TRIBUNE Four Seasons: We’re unlikely to be back PM HUBERT INGRAHAM Emerald Bay ‘did more to develop Exuma than previous century’s events’ Insurer pledges not to walk away from island

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C M Y K C M Y K THETRIBUNE SECTIONC HEALTH: Body and mind TUESDAY, MAY 19, 2009 N N N N o o o o t t t t o o o o b b b b a a a a b b b b y y y y d d d d a a a a d d d d d d d d y y y y d d d d r r r r a a a a m m m m a a a a n By ALEX MISSICK Tribune Features Reporter amissick@tribunemedia.net M ost single women looking to start a family with that Prince Charming would prefer he didn’t have chil dren, as they feel dating a father will only leave them with the dreaded “baby daddy drama” and affect their bottom linefinding a good, genuine, dedicated man. Valery Cornish, a 24 year old professional woman, said she made a promise to herself not to date a man with children and feels she has had a hard time meeting men because of this. “I always told myself that when I do get married I wanted a fresh start with my new husband. Unfortunately that has not happened yet and I feel as I get older I am running out of options and time. It is hard now to find a man age 25 and older without at least one child in this country and that is sad. I have met the most handsome and car ing guys, but as soon as I ask them if they have children the response is always, one, three, and one guy even told me he had five kids,” Ms Cornish said. Ms Cornish said while she would like to give a guy with children a chance, she does not know if the child will accept her and how the relationship between the child’s mother and the man will affect her life. “I don’t want to feel like I am intruding on anyone’s life. I don’t want to think that I am the real reason they are not together or that I cannot be just as good a mother to that child. I don’t want to have to cause that man to not see his child because the mother is jealous of me. These are the things I have to think about before I get into that kind or relationship. It takes a strong person to deal with that and I don’t know if I am ready to deal with that,” Ms Cornish said. Barrington Brennen, a marriage and family therapist and counseling psychologist, said its all about changing the way you think and looking harder for what you really want. “You have to decide what you want. You have to make decisions in life. This is not new. My warning to most women is to look harder for a potential mate. If someone has multiple children born too close together for multiple people, then I would tell them to think twice about that no matter how nice the person may be,” Mr Brennen said. Mr Brennen said he thinks many persons have lost a good partner because that was not a real criteria standard for selecting a mate. “When it comes to having children a par ticular person may know that maybe they will not be able to handle being married to a person with a child. Others have no problem. I don’t think its a matter of right or wrongyou just have to go with your gut feeling and what you think you can live with,” Mr Brennen said. Ms Cornish said she tried dating a man with a child but could not look past the fact that there was a child involved and decided to end the relationship. Mr Brennen said this is the right thing to do if the situation is that painful for you. “If you know you can’t do it, don’t even enter in to a heavy friendship relationshipdon’t lead the guy on getting all hot and spicy and tell the man you don’t want to marry him yet you are still acting that way. It is hard but it is not impossible to find a man out there without a child,” Mr Brennen said. Mr Brennen said that before you decide to enter a relationship with someone that has a child, look at the child’s age to determine how or even if that person has moved on. “If the child is very young, go with cau tion. If the child is maybe five or ten years old, watch how the man deals with the child and what happened during that time period when he didn’t have children. If the child is older then you have evidence that he knows how to keep his zipper up and that was just a bad choice he made. Find out the circumstances that he got the child. However with one or two year olds, that’s risky business and you will just be another one he has a baby with,” Mr Brennen said. In the end, it’s all about finding what makes you happy as a woman and what you know you can deal with mentally, physically and emotionally. Tell us what you think, send an email to features@tribunemedia.net or fax your thoughts to 328-2398. V ALERY CORNISH ( not shown) t old T ribune Woman t hat she wrote off ever dating men with children... “I always told myself that when I do get married I wanted a fresh start with my new husband. Unfortunately that has not happened yet and I feel as I get older I am running out of options and time. It is hard now to find a man age 25 and older without at least one child in this country and that is sad...” V V a a l l e e r r y y C C o o r r n n i i s s h h

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n By MAGGIE BAIN IT is Tuesday and you have a first date in a few days and you are filled with a mixture of excitement and nervous questions. Aside from the obvious thoughts of, 'Will we have enough in common and will we be able to keep a conversation going?,’ your mind has probably already leapt a hundred miles to 'Is this the one who I could have a real future with or do they just want sex? ‘You have not even kissed and wonder why and if you will. Will the kiss be the determining factor; the 'make or break '? How will you know if they have any sexually transmitted diseases? So much to think about and so much to find out and it is only the first date. With heightened anticipation the time has come. Does your heart sink with disappointment due to miscalculating physical appearances or do you have an overwhelming high with thoughts of 'love at first sight?' All too often we are put off by things such as bad breath, nervous mannerisms, kissing and even clothes. We could allow these things to become deal b reakers or we could mention t hem to allow the other person t o make changes if they desire. A first date is never too early for honesty but you have to be willing to accept feed back in return. Keeping the first date short, preferably less than two hours, allows time to sit back and reassess without undue pressure. There is nothing worse than feeling you have made a mistake, want to get out but feel obligated to sit through hours of a date. I n previous weeks we have talked about relationships that have little substance besides sexual intimacy. Being able to express oneself and the ability to really connect and listen to someone else with true empathy is rarely achieved instantly. Do not be fooled by couples that appear to have it all. Yes, they may have understood early on the skills to reach a deep con nection but they worked at it. Even though we know all of these sensible things, the thoughts and feelings about sex inevitably pop up on the first date. Those sex hormones can not be denied. It is best then to know yourself and your own boundaries. What is right for one person may not be right for another. It is probably advisable to bring up the topics of expectations, desires, preferences, birth control, and sexually transmitted diseases as ear ly as possible. Of course this m ay not be reasonable to cover all this within the first date but at least the cards have been put on the table. If the new love interest is scared off then be rest assured they were not serious partner material. L et us say the first date went well and the arrangement is that one person will call to make the second date. The set time has elapsed and your imagination has replayed the same scenario over and over. It is an uncomfortable situation to be in and one that can throw you off bal a nce. It tests you but also allows you to understand your own fears and defenses. If however it starts to interfere with your dai ly life then go ahead and call. All too often we all make assumptions and until you hearw ith certainty what the reasons are then we have difficulty moving on. If the answer is nega tive then know that you did not invest too heavily or for too long and all is not lost. Take a deep breath, brush yourself off and move on. As you can see dating with h onesty and truth saves you unnecessary heartache. Of course relationships are ever changing and do not always run so smoothly. Others may like the idea of honesty but are inexperienced or have difficulty giv i ng definitive answers. If you feel a true connection then give it time to develop before rush ing to a decision. The next few dates will continue to give you an opportunity to discover more about your joint compatibility. C M Y K C M Y K WOMAN PAGE 2C, TUESDAY, MAY 19, 2009 THE TRIBUNE The first date... A FIRST DATE is never too early for honesty but you have to be willing to accept feed back in return. Keeping the first date short, preferably less than two hours, allows time to sit back and reassess without undue pressure.

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S S t t r r e e s s s s , , l l e e f f t t u u n n c c h h e e c c k k e e d d a a d d v v e e r r s s e e l l y y t t a a x x e e s s o o u u r r e e m m o o t t i i o o n n a a l l h h e e a a l l t t h h a a n n d d p p h h y y s s i i c c a a l l w w e e l l l l b b e e i i n n g g . . Michelle Miller WHETHER you believe it or not, you are paying what is known as a Stress Tax! If you don't think so, try to calculate the accumulative cost of low productivity, absenteeism, anxiety, depression, heart disease and all the other stress-related illnesses and you will see that directly or indirectly a Stress Tax is being paid. A nd considering that most people do n ot intentionally address their stress, this t ax will consistently become more burd ensome. B B u u t t L L i i f f e e I I s s N N o o t t A A S S t t r r e e s s s s R R e e h h e e a a r r s s a a l l T oo many seem hell bent on waiting for the neon signs of stress to physically show up before they improve their emotional state of health, at which time it’s too late or too difficult for solutions to be effective. We say that life is not a 'dress rehearsal'; nor is it a 'Stress Rehearsal'. You must find the self-discipline to take ownership of your life and state of well-b eing. In this climate of change, waiting u ntil your emotional capacity has comp letely deteriorated before seeking solut ions is no longer acceptable. R esearch indicates that more than 80 p er cent of all illnesses are stress-related; and the issue of low productivity, increased insurance premiums, irritability, work-related accidents, absenteeism etc., costs US companies a whopping $ 300 billion annually. T his staggering statistic should strike a cord with local health care, insurance professionals and business owners across the board; moving them towards proac tive measures in which employees and clients alike can effectively deal with the vital issues of stress. But we know that only he who feels it knows it; so how much is stress really costing you on a personal and or business level? And how much is it collectively c osting us as a country? I f we took half as much time with our i nner selves (emotions-mind-spirit d o with our outer possessions ie our jobs, h omes, yards, cars etc; our overall state of well-being would dramatically improve. I nstead of relentlessly complaining a bout your challenges, find ways to take r esponsibility for your emotional state o f health; because healthy emotions e quals healthy mind. F F i i n n a a l l t t h h o o u u g g h h t t s s S tress is really about attitude. If you t ake the attitude that it doesn't matter or that there is nothing you can do about it; then you will continue to be saddled with a n ever increasing stress tax. The reality is, any individual or organisation can effectively transition from illness to wellness, but it requires a new mindset of consistent proactive measures. Whether you stand still or sit down, resta ssured that stress is not going anywhere; a nd unless you manage stress, it will surel y manage you. R emember it's not what happens but how you deal with what happens that matters most. With the right tools and techniques, you can confidently and effectively improve your emotional wellness. Get up and make it happen! If you are ready to effectively Manage Your Stress, please register for Stress Management 101 Workshop. June13,2 009. Please send an e-mail to c oach4ward@Yahoo.com or call 4296 770. Seats Are Limited! Michelle M. Miller is a certified LifeCoach and Stress Management Consultant. She is the Principal Coach of the Coaching Studio, which located in the Jovan Plaza, Madeira Street. Questions or comments can be sent to P.O. Box CB13060 email coach4ward@yahoo.com or telephone 429-6770. C M Y K C M Y K WOMAN AND HEALTH THE TRIBUNE TUESDAY, MAY 19, 2009, PAGE 3C HEARD the phrase “less is more”? It really applies to those with sensitive or sensitised skin. Follow these skin care dos and don'ts to help cut down on redness, reactivity, and flare-ups. o Do not use hot water when cleansing. o When cleansing, if skin is too sensitised even for water, use tissue or a gentle non-fabric cloth to remove product. o Don't use excessive or abrasive movements. Instead, go for gentle, upward circles. o Speak to a skin care professional about a “less is more” product regimen that will help calm skin, reduce redness, and protect against flare-ups. o Be mindful of exfoliants. First speak with a professional skin therapist to see if exfoliation is right for your skin. If it is, he or she will recommend a gentle exfoliant that won't scratch or inflame skin. o Use a moisturiser that helps block potentially-irritating pollutants from aggravating skin. These ingredients include: o Evening Primrose o Shea Butter o Vitamin E o Oat Kernel Extract Sarah Beek is a skin care therapist at the Dermal Clinic. Visit her and her team of skin and body therapists at One Sandyport Plaza (the same building as B ally’s Gym). For more information visit www.dermal-clinic.com or call 327.6788. Proper techniques for sensitised skin n By DR BASIL SANDS Ringworm is not a worm; it is a fungal parasite (DER MATOPHYTE) that feeds on the outer dead surface of grow ing hair, skin and toenails. There are many types of dermatophytes, but most cases of canine and feline ringworms are caused by microsporum canis. Ringworm is a zoonotic disease and therefore can infect people as well. Ringworm is named for the ring like lesions typical of human disease. In fact, ringworm is comparable to a contact allergy. Skin inflammation results from a by-product pro duced by the fungus. The dermatophyte dislikes inflamma tion and continually moves beyond its point of origination in ever widening rings, leaving the center to heal. The sores in dogs and cats grow outward in expanding areas of hair loss. Typically there is scaling and crusting at the margins of bald patches, with broken hair in these areas with variable itchiness. The face, head and forelimbs are the first areas affected, but the fun gus can spread and affect the whole body. The condition is transmitted by direct animal to animal contact, usually from infected hair or skin debris. However, ringworm can also be transmitted from contaminated grooming equipment. All dogs and cats are at high risk for ringworms, but the condition is most common in pup pies and kittens, less than a year old and older pets with a com promised immune system. Some pets are asymptomatic carriers, that is, they carry the fungus without showing signs themselves, while spreading it to other pets or people. If one pet in the house is diagnosed, all should be treated, whether showing signs or not. Ringworm is diagnosed by identification of the fungus, either by a wood’s lamp, or a skin scraping or a culture test. In most cases, healthy animals will self cure in sixty to one hundred days without any treatment. However, in severe cases and when the infected pet may expose humans to infection, specific topical or oral antifungal treatment may be recommended. People who are immune compromised; (very young or very old) are at higher risk. Ringworm fungus is difficult to eradicate. Human products are not effective. Topical miconazole preparations do work (e.g. Miconazole Spray, Malaseeb Shampoo). The drugs griseofulvin and ketoconazole are also very effective. Once swallowed, these drugs are incorporated into the growing hair where it slows the growth of the fungus. Pills or liquid medications are usually given for up to 4 weeks. However, griseofulvin is contradict ed in pregnant dogs, because it may cause birth defects. Contaminated hairs and skin debris shed into the environ ment remain infected for over a year and act as a reservoir for reinfection. Treating the envi ronment helps reduce the number of fungal spores and helps prevent reinfection. Experts recommend environmental con trol by daily cleaning of all surfaces using a diluted bleach solution (one part bleach to 10 parts water) along with thorough vacuuming. There are certain breeds of animals that have selective Immuno deficiencies (Rottweillers and Parvo, Persian Cats and Ringworm). Persian cats have a predilection toward severe and sometimes protract ed dermatophye (ringworm infections. In some Persian cats, the fungal infections invade the dermis and can cause granulomatous disease (mycetomas As mentioned earlier, most animals will self cure in several months. Treatment for the dis ease hastens clinical cure and helps reduce environmental contaminations. Some infections, particularly in long-haired cats or homes with more than one animal, can be very persistent. RINGWORM (Dermatophytosis By DR BASIL SANDS By SARAH BEEK By Michelle M Miller, CC Emotional & Financial Uncertainty: How much is stress costing you? n By CARA BRENNEN-BETHEL Tribune Features Editor LIFE coach Michelle Miller has realised her dream to open a studio where persons can gather to improve their inner self and develop the talent and potential that lies inside. Earlier this month, she opened The Coaching Studio, one of the first of its kind in the country designed to provide an environment to facilitate self learning, empowerment and personal development. “This is something that I have been i ntending to give birth to for a long time. T he studio will serve as a place for self h elp and development through workshops and personal development sessions.” Ms Miller said that the Coaching Studio and the practice of coaching is something that is greatly needed in the country, particularly now. She said that with all the challenges currently facing the country, Bahamians need to tap into and apply their inner resources. “Coaching is a process that seeks to pull out of a person rather than put into them,” she explained.” It allows a way for people to realise and accept that they have potential and that they have inside them all tools they need to have a better life.” The concept is relatively new to the Bahamas and Miss Miller said that that most Bahamians can certainly benefit from it. To her knowledge there are only three other certified coaches in the country. She herself received her certification through a distance learning course. “ I think it is absolutely needed in this country, for a lot of people with that missing linkself esteem and confidence, something I think is not ingrained in a lot of people. She added that this can also certainly be linked to the level of stress affecting Bahamians and the ability to effectively manage stress. “We need to become more confident,” she added, saying that sometimes the fear of doing something can prevent a person from trying to do it. The brand new Coaching Studio is located in the Jovan Plaza Madeira Street. As a logo, Ms Miller chose theb utterflya universal symbol of change which she hopes will illustrate the journey everyone who visits will undergo. “I love butterflies, they are a symbol of transformation and change. The caterpillar is born with the potential to become a butterfly, but it must first undergo the change and embrace it and people have that same potential and they have to go with it and pull it out the greatness that they have within.” Improve your ‘inner self’ at The Coaching Studio “This is something that I have been intending to give birth to for a long time. The studio will serve as a place for self help and development through workshops and per sonal development sessions. M M i i c c h h e e l l l l e e M M i i l l l l e e r r

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n By ALEX MISSICK Tribune Features Reporter amissick@tribunemedia.net A s a young child you enjoyed exploring your new world outside y our mother’s womb most of the time by p utting objects into your mouth. For some reason, everything from the telev ision remote to your dad’s car keys seemed to be a yummy snack. H owever, due to all these things being orally explored, you may have been subject to a very uncomfortable infection called thrush. Pediatricians from Agape Child and A dolescent Clinic located on Mackey Street, Doctor Paul Roberts and Doct or Paul Hennis, said the name “thrush” is used locally and may i nvolve infections of the mouth or the s kin. Thrush is really a common name of i nfection with a fungus which is referred to as Oral Candida. It may also infect the body system, be in the blood and infect organs in the blood. However, i t is most commonly seen in the mouth and on the skin especially in the diaper a rea. Thrush is most commonly seen i n the very young and the very old who a re immuno compromised like HIV a nd diabetic persons,” Dr Roberts said. According to medicinenet.com, thrush usually develops suddenly, but may become chronic, persisting over a long period of time. “A common sign of thrush is the presence of creamy white, slightly raised lesions in your mouth usuallyo n your tongue or inner cheeks but a lso sometimes on the roof of your m outh, gums, tonsils, or back of your throat. The lesions, which may have a cottage cheese appearance, can be painful and may bleed slightly wheny ou scrape them or brush your teeth. In s evere cases, the lesions may spread i nto your esophagus, or swallowing t ube, causing pain or difficulty swallowing, a feeling that food gets stuck in the throat or mid-chest area, fever, if the infection spreads beyond the esoph-a gus. Thrush can spread to other parts o f the body, including the lungs, liver, a nd skin,” the study said. D r Hennis said even persons currently on antibiotics can contract this infection. “People who are on antibiotics can a lso contract this infection because a ntibiotics suppress the normal flow of b acteria that live in the body and that a llow thrush to grow out. With newborns if they are born vaginally, Candida may be one of the organisms in the birth canal of the mother, so they can contract it that way as a new born,” Dr Hennis said. When it comes to younger children, Dr Roberts said thrush can also occur i n the diaper area due to moisture. “With the plastic outer lining of these pampers and the urine and stools in there, the heat which can be generated by having the outer plastic covering, will encourage the growth of the fung us. If the child is not changed often, t he stools and urine the child may develop an irritant and the skin begins to break down and exfoliate. The exposed area will then be likely to become colonised by the fungus and the infection is going to develop. If the c hild is changed often or even left exposed to the open air, you may not e ven need to apply a topical because the long non heat exposure will get rid o f the fungus due to the change of envir onment,” Dr Roberts said. Oral infections can happen no matter how carefully you clean and sterilise pacifiers, bottles, toys, etc., your baby w ill likely still be exposed to this yeast. Still, you should carefully clean any o bjects that go into your child's mouth,” he added. D r Hennis said that because thrush is c aused by a fungus, the best way to d eal with it is to treat it. The best way to get rid of a fungus i s to treat it with an anti fungal medication depending on where it is. If it is on the skin, you can get a topical cream, if it is in the mouth, oral medication is needed. However, if it is systematic and in the blood stream they wouldn eed an IV antifungal treatment,” Dr H ennis said. C M Y K C M Y K HEALTH PAGE 8C, TUESDAY, MAY 19, 2009 THE TRIBUNE health BODYANDMIND T T h h e e T T r r i i b b u u n n e e Treat ‘thrush’ before it spreads THIS year’s mango harvest l ooks as though it will be a heavy one with hundreds of fruits hanging from the trees. But they will not be ready for a nother month or so. What can we eat now? One fruit we can enjoy while w e wait for the mangoes is wax jambu, also called Java apple (Syzygium samarangense of the two names I prefer wax jambu because Java and apple are part of everybody’s vocab ulary. Jambu has an exotic ring about it and makes it easier to remember. Wax jambu fruits are about three inches long and shaped rather like the NASA re-entry vehicles used in early space flights. The outside of the pink to red fruit does indeed seem waxy. The flavour is somewhat like a perfumed apple and liked by many, spurned by some. I like to simmer wax jambu fruits in sugar water until they are tender. They lose their lovely colour to the water and turn fig brown but the taste is enhanced. Once cooked the flavour is much like lychee and very refreshing. The spiky creamy-white flowers grow like pom-poms all over the bower and attract bees by the dozens, even though I cannot detect a scent. Once the bees have done their job the fruits are produced quickly and in abundance. The fruit masses are so productive that some fruits are squeezed out of the mass, even though they are aerodynamic in design. Fruit production starts in April on Abaco and lasts into June. My tree is about 10 feet tall and will give far more fruit than my family can handle. Wax jambu trees can grow to 30 feet and I really do not know what I will do with all that fruit if my tree ever gets that big. Wax JAMbu – maybe that is the answer. Another minority fruit in sea son right now is Panama berry or Jamaica cherry (Muntingia calabura). The white flowers of the rather sparselylimbed trees much resemble strawberry flowers and are pollinated by bees. They also attract butterflies. The graceful downy leaves are very attractive and help to hide the fruits from birds. The fruits are produced singly and are appleshaped but only a lit tle over half-an-inch in diame ter. Luckily they are fast and prolific growers and hang by 3inch stems below the foliage. As soon as they are ripe they tend to fall to the ground. The outside skin of the fruits is rather leathery and the inside is packed with tiny seeds. The best way to eat them is the chew and spit method. The taste is vaguely like strawberry, but the sort of strawberry flavour you get in boiled candies or cotton candy. You know the flavour is strawberry but it does not taste like fresh real strawberries. Kids love them, however, and the fruits have lots of vitamins. The muntingia tree is very fast growing, just about the fastest I know. A two-feet sapling will be a 20-feet adult in under two years. There is a drawback, however. Muntingia trees tend to twist in hurricanestrength winds and are destroyed. Muntingia trees are usually grown from root suckers but you can propagate them from seed by crushing fruits and soaking them in water. Remove the skins and the seeds will sink to the bottom. Keep changing the water until it is clear, then dry the seeds an plant them. It takes two years from seed to fruit. The favourite spring fruit in The Bahamas has to be sapodil la (Manilkara zapota grow wild in coppice land and the location of a particular dilly tree is often a well-kept secret. The outside of a dilly fruit is not promising: rough and brown. The inside pulp is also not very prepossessing but the proof is in the eating. Dillies have a unique brown sugar flavour that can be close to addictive. Sapodilla trees are erect and handsome, with whorls of leaves the distinguishing feature. There are cultivators available that produce very large and sweet fruits. Plant some saplings now and future generations will have cause to thank you. j j . . h h a a r r d d y y @ @ c c o o r r a a l l w w a a v v e e . . c c o o m m Spring fruits... GARDENER JACK THIS year’s mango harvest looks as though it will be a heavy one with hundreds of fruits hanging from the trees... Y OU SHOULD c arefully clean any objects that go into your child’s mouth...


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Volume: 105 No.146

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The Tribune

=USA TODAY.

BAHAMAS EDITION

www.tribune242.com

TUESDAY, MAY 19, 2009

CARS FOR SALE,
a
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BAHAMAS BIGGEST

raliier sho

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LOW



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Persons accused
of murder are
released on bail

flead for ae

Man killed outside
of bar he worked in

m@ By MEGAN REYNOLDS
Tribune Staff Reporter
mreynolds@tribunemedia.net

A FATHER of two was
robbed of $50 and shot in the
head as he closed up Gibson’s
Bar and Lounge off Kemp
Road early yesterday morning.

Peter Johnson, 48, was with a
friend as he waited outside the
bar in Strachan’s Alley for his
brother Sterling Moss, a chef at
Old Fort Bay, to pick him up.

As he was locking the gate
outside the bar at around
12.30am, a masked man held a
gun to his head and demanded
cash.

Mr Johnson gave the robber
all the money he had, amount-
ing to $50, and his friend gave
him the $110 in his pocket,
before Mr Johnson asked the
masked gunman a question and
he shot him in the head.

His friend broke off running
to hide around the corner where
he heard another gunshot, Mr
Johnson’s former partner Sher-
ry Babbs, 41, told The Tribune.

When he peered around the
corner he saw Peter Johnson
lying lifeless on the ground in
front of the front door of the
bar where he had worked for
the last three years, Ms Babbs
said.

PETER JOHNSON and his son PJ
outside the Gibson’s Bar and
Lounge in Strachan’s Alley.

Photo: Jakemia Lightbourne
of Strachan’s Alley

She broke down in tears as
she recalled the shooting,
lamenting the loss of her life
partner, and the father of her
son PJ, 12, and daughter Petra,
five.

The couple had separated last
year and Ms Babbs moved to
Freeport with Petra while PJ
stayed at his father’s home in

SEE page six

The Taste

on

Tribune obtains
numbers of those
bailed and facing
serious charges







“GIBSON'S "BAR & LOUNGE |

ALLEY, OFF KEMP ROAD

STRACHAN'S ° A 838
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Tim Clarke/Tribune staff

PETER JOHNSON was shot dead outside of Gibson’s Bar (above).
Blood was visible yesterday on the door and ground.

Lands and Surveys probe ‘now
focused on two senior officers’

il re | ' | | m@ By PAULG in the department who have
e es 2 VED tie TURNQUEST held key positions in deter-
Tribune Staff Reporter mining the granting and leas-
pturnquest@ ing of Crown land over the

Uy (ol nly La rge tribunemedia.net
Pardo we he T more. AS THE probe into cor-
6r ruption allegations continues
at the Department of Lands

and Surveys, sources close to
government reveal that their
investigations have now
focused on two senior officers

pingsyes Kat laimedium,

sfefefoiin ay

falreae) aoasohitslyy

past few years.

Last week, the former direc-
tor of Lands Tex Turnquest
resigned from his post after
The Tribune published allega-
tions that members of his fam-
ily, including his mother-in-

SEE page seven

m@ By PAULG
TURNQUEST
Tribune Staff Reporter
pturnquest@
tribunemedia.net

LAST month 11 persons
were released from Her
Majesty’s Prison on bail for
murder or attempted mur-
der.

In documentation
obtained by this newspaper,
it was revealed that some 205
persons were released from
the prison many of them
with multiple charges rang-
ing from murder and armed
robbery, to unlawful sexual
intercourse and rape.

Of these 205 persons, 153
were released on bail and 39
of them were classified by
the Central Intelligence
Bureau as persons who
“should be monitored.”

Eleven persons released



on bail were in prison for
murder or attempted mur-
der, three for unlawful sexu-
al intercourse, three for rape,
and one for assault with
intent to rape.

Numerous persons were
incarcerated for house-
breaking, shop breaking,
armed robbery, indecent
assault, stealing, and posses-
sion of dangerous drugs.

With 28 homicides record-
ed for the year thus far and a
community crying out for
action on this vexing issue of
crime, sources within the
legal fraternity claim that the
Bahamas will be engulfed in
this “wicked” spiral for some
time until the government
takes a serious position on
the issue.

Recently, Rev. Dr CB
Moss cautioned government

SEE page six

Lawyer: ‘no good grounds’ for Senior Justice
Anita Allen to recuse herself from case

@ By NATARIO McKENZIE
Tribune Staff Reporter

THE APPEAL court challenge over
Senior Justice Anita Allen’s refusal to recuse
herself from a civil case involving two Israeli
brothers continued yesterday with a lawyer
submitting that there were no good grounds
for the judge to recuse herself from the case.

Senior Justice Allen refused to step down
from a case involving Rami and Amir Weiss-
fisch in March, after she expressed concerns
about the integrity of a forensic accounting

SEE page seven



PM: EMERALD BAY
PURCHASE TALKS ARE
UNDERWAY

CALL FOR BOARD TO POLICE
LOCAL WATER COMPANIES

MAN ACCUSED OF
SCOTIABANK ROBBERY
APPEARS IN COURT

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SENIOR JUSTICE
Anita Allen

Weather system
has potential of
becoming first
tropical storm

WITH less than two weeks
to go to the official start of the
2009 Atlantic hurricane sea-
son, weather experts are mon-
itoring a system that has a
slight potential of becoming
the year’s first named tropi-
cal storm.

Senior officer with the
Bahamas Meteorological
Office Neil Armstrong told
The Tribune yesterday that
the low pressure system cur-
rently over eastern Cuba and

SEE page seven

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NASSAU AND BAHAMA ISLANDS” LEADING NEWSPAPER
PAGE 2, TUESDAY, MAY 19, 2009

THE TRIBUNE



LOCAL NEWS



PM: Emerald Bay purchase talks under way

CONSULTATIONS have
begun with various parties that
had previously expressed an
interest in purchasing the Emer-
ald Bay Resort in Exuma,
Prime Minister Hubert Ingra-
ham told the House of Assem-
bly yesterday.

However, the prime minister
said a time frame for the sale
and the re-opening of the hotel,
golf course and marina cannot
be given.

The Emerald Bay Hotel and
Golf Course closes on May 26.
Mr Ingraham said that the clo-

sure presents a tremendous
challenge for the economy of
Exuma.

“The government has been
in close contact with the
receivers over the past 14
months and will continue to
work with them to identify the

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best investor group to acquire
and reopen the hotel, golf
course and marina, and to com-
plete the full development
planned for the Emerald Bay
Site.

“As I have indicated, the
Four Seasons has undertaken
to ensure that all employees will
receive severance payments and
all other benefits owed. The
government has received similar
assurances with regard to
monies owed to other creditors
of the project including govern-
ment utility corporations,” Mr
Ingraham said.

Counselling

The prime minister said
arrangements are being put in
place to extend a variety of
counselling services to disen-
gaged workers.

“Specialists from the Ministry
of Health, the Department of
Social Services and the Nation-
al Insurance Board will be avail-
able in Exuma, prior to the clo-
sure of the hotel, to provide
necessary guidance and support
to all those seeking assistance
including information on the
criteria for registration for
unemployment benefits,” Mr
Ingraham said.

EBR Holdings , the devel-
opers of the Emerald Bay pro-
ject, placed the project in
receivership in June, 2007.

This took place after the loan
secured by all of the assets of
the development fell into
default. The directors of EBR
Holdings determined that the
company was unable to pay its
debts.

Mr Ingraham said that inter-
est in the property was high and
the government’s advice from
the secured creditor, Mitsui, was
that suitable new investors with
the wherewithal to meet the
requirements of the government
and complete the development
would be identified shortly,
which would avert the closure
of the resort.

“As it transpired, the require-
ments contained in the man-
agement contract with the
hotel’s operators, the Four Sea-
sons, proved particularly chal-
lenging for a number of the
interested parties.

“During the 14 months of the
process since June, 2007, the
receivers signed letters of intent
with one party and entered into
formal contract with two other
parties; none with success,” Mr
Ingraham said. The receivers
said that by September, 2008,
when the signs of the global
economic slowdown became
increasingly evident, the pro-

Ingraham’s response on
hotel closure ‘disappointing’

PRIME Minister Hubert
Ingraham’s response to the
Emerald Bay Resort clo-
sure was “disappointing”,
PLP chairman Glenys Han-
na-Martin said.

In a statement issued
after Mr Ingraham
addressed the matter in par-
liament yesterday, Mrs
Hanna-Martin said: “We
have waited since the
shocking news of the loss
of employment for more
than 500 people at the
Emerald Bay Resort in
Exuma for the governmen-
t’s considered response on
this terrible turn of events.

“Today in the House of
Assembly the prime minis-
ter made a communication
to parliament which proved
most disappointing as it pro-
vided no insight into this
state of affairs. In fact every-
thing contained in that com-
munication was public
knowledge through various
newspaper reports and

Glenys Hanna-Martin

“This is not
good governance.
Our people
deserve better.”

word on the street over the last several days.”
She said the prime minister gave “no hope” as to when

the resort will open again.

“What he did say, however, was that his government
has been in close communication with the resort’s receivers
over the period of receivership namely over the last 14
months. The question then arises which the Bahamian peo-
ple would like answered: when did the government become
aware that hundreds of Bahamians would be left jobless
and why were the people affected not advised earlier so as
to prepare themselves as best they could?”

Mrs Hanna-Martin added that the opposition ought to
have been briefed on a matter of such national impor-
tance so that legislators could pool their efforts and “look
at all possible interventions in the interests of protecting our

people.”

“While thousands of workers are being given the pink
slip all over the country, the government of the Common-
wealth of the Bahamas sits idly by, conducting business as
usual. This is not good governance. Our people deserve bet-

ter,” she said.

ject began to suffer significant
losses.

The receivers had not been
successful in identifying new
investors able to acquire the
project and assume the man-
agement contract with the Four
Seasons Management Group.

“The secured lender there-
fore took the decision to tem-
porarily close the resort. Four
Seasons has agreed to the
orderly closure of the hotel on
May 26. The staff will be dis-
missed over the following 30-



day period. It is to be noted that
a skeleton staff will be retained
by the receivers through the
transition period to new own-
ership,” Mr Ingraham said.

‘YOUR VIEW”

To have your say on this or any
other issue, email The Tribune at:
letters@tribunemedia.net or
deliver your letter to The Tribune
on Shirley Street, P.O. Box N-3207



Laing lashes back at ‘spineless

innuendoes’ about his intes

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m@ By ALISON LOWE
Tribune Staff Reporter
alowe@tribunemedia.net

MINISTER of State for
Finance Zhivargo Laing yester-
day defended himself against
allegations that his former
involvement with the insurance
company Colinalmperial com-
promises his capacity to objec-
tively execute his duty as min-
ister with responsibility for the
insurance industry.

Addressing the House of
Assembly, Mr Laing accused St
Thomas More MP Frank Smith
of making “spineless,
broadsweeping innuendoes”
about his integrity as a minis-
ter and demanded that he sub-
stantiate his suggestions.

Mr Smith had charged that
as a former director at Colina,
Mr Laing should resign from
his post “or at least declare his
interest and recuse himself” as
the company “now stands to
benefit from a decision he could
make.”

Withdraw

Speaking during the debate
on proposed amendments to
the Insurance Act 2005, which
are intended to better regulate
the insurance industry, Mr
Smith was forced to withdraw a
comment in which he referred
to Mr Laing’s responsibility
over the sector as the equiva-
lent of “the rat watching the
cheese.”

Stating that “inquiring minds
want to know the extent of the
relationship between the min-
ister of state for finance and
players in the industry,” Mr
Smith alluded to Mr Laing
being caught in a conflict which
would place him in a position
contrary to the FNM party’s
code of conduct for ministers
as published in its Manifesto,
2007. Mr Smith’s comments
came after he was asked to

rity



Zhivargo Laing

reveal his own private interest
in an insurance company —
specifically shares in Colina.

An irate Mr Laing said that
he was “upset” by Mr Smith’s
attempt to “falsely accuse some-
one so as to advance (his) nar-
row political agenda.”

“This is not right... be care-
ful the hole you dig,” said Mr
Laing. The Minister of State for
Finance said he does not know
“what the member is talking
about” in terms of a conflict of
interest.

“Tserved as a director at Col-
inalmperial. I ceased to be a
director at Colinalmperial in
2006 or 2005. I have no owner-
ship in Colinalmperial — unlike
(Mr Smith) — and I have no
interest in any insurance com-
pany, unlike himself.”

He added that “as a matter
of conscience” he already recus-
es himself “from all matters
relating to Colina.”

Meanwhile, MP for Pineridge
Kwasi Thompson, speaking
after Mr Smith, suggested he
found the member’s assertions
“frankly unbelievable”.

“Some in the insurance indus-
try believe the government is
going too far in protecting the
people. So it makes no sense to
me that the government is being
accused of being too far on the
side of the insurance industry,”
he said.
THE TRIBUNE

TUESDAY, MAY 19, 2009, PAGE 3



LOCAL NEWS



Call for board to police
local water companies

m@ By TANEKA THOMPSON
Tribune Staff Reporter
tthompson@tribunemedia. net

CALLS have been renewed
for an independent regulatory
board to police local water com-
panies and crack down on boot-
leggers after claims that "cont-
aminated" impostor water bear-
ing the Aquapure label was
found at a Nassau depot last
week.

Aquapure officials main-
tained the safety of their prod-
uct and said they suspect the
fake water was funneled into
used bottles by some third par-
ty to be sold to the unsuspecting
public.

While stressing that there is
no need for public panic, anoth-
er leading water supplier yes-
terday said more stringent reg-
ulatory controls should be in
place.

Regulated

"First of all, I think that the
water industry as a whole needs
to be more regulated, no doubt
about it. As an industry we have
to all understand that we are
dealing with a very important
product — there are no short
cuts in this business," said Tina
Knowles, owner of Chelsea's
Choice. "The industry needs to
be policed, regulations ought to
be most definitely in place and
enforced, but I think it's very
important for there not to be a
panic in the industry”.

Water that doesn't meet
industry standards — sold most-
ly in generic bottles by persons
looking to make a quick buck —
has been a problem in the
industry for years.

"Particularly in the summer,
bootleg water has been a prob-
lem... but each incident is not



CHARLENE SMITH, quality control manager at Aquapure, tests the
imposter water for bacteria.

the same and each warrants its
own internal investigation,” said
Ms Knowles, who added that
avoiding independent depots is
not the answer to the dilemma.

Last week, Aquapure officials
revealed the discovery of five
bottles of suspected impostor
water they said was tainted with
chart-topping levels of disease
causing bacteria.

According to Aquapure pres-

Legislation amendments

‘should help to prevent
a Clico-like fiasco’

m By ALISON LOWE
Tribune Staff Reporter
alowe@tribunemedia. net



PROPOSED amendments to legislation governing the insurance
industry will better protect the public and should “go a long way” in
ensuring a “Clico-like fiasco” will never happen again, parliamentar-
ians said yesterday.

Admitting that government has been “behind the eight ball” on
regulating the insurance sector, Prime Minister Hubert Ingraham said
“earlier would have been better, but it’s never too late.”

He was speaking in the House of Assembly as parliament began
debate on amendments to the Insurance Act, 2005 — legislation passed
in that year, but never brought into law.

Once it is approved, the government intends to immediately enforce
the Act, replacing the outdated Insurance Act, 1969.

Mtr Ingraham said the proposed regulations come after extensive con-
sultation with the industry and have its support, except with respect to
certain powers relating to the regulator’s capacity to intervene in a com-
pany’s affairs.

He dismissed this concern, proposing that the government is doing
what it must to protect the public and cannot “contract out its respon-
sibility to vested interests.”

Kwasi Thompson, government MP for Pineridge, said the amend-
ments “are focused on the protection of the policy holder and adding
more controls and stiffer penalties in the insurance industry.”

“Laws must be in place so we know who is running these companies,
who is buying them, what they are doing and so we have a body who
has significant powers to regulate the industry.”

“If these provisions had been in place (previously), maybe the
CLICO tragedy could have been avoided,” he said.

The provisions provide for the regulator to react “more speedily”
than it has been able to up until now when there are signs an insurance
company may be putting its policyholders “‘at risk” — as an investigation
of CLICO (Bahamas) found had been the case.

Assets

Specifically, a statutory administrator can immediately be appoint-
ed by the insurance regulator to take over the management of a com-
pany if this is deemed necessary; for example when assets fall signifi-
cantly, bringing into question the company’s ability to meet financial
obligations.

This can, if the amendments are approved, be done without referring
to the courts until after the appointment has been made.

Mr Ingraham vehemently denied published claims that this provision
would give the regulator greater power than exists anywhere else in the
world, stating that similar authority is provided for in Canada and is cur-
rently vested in the governor of the Central Bank of the Bahamas in
relation to the country’s banks.

Another protection provided for by the amendments will see insur-
ance companies for the first time required to place some assets in a
statutory fund controlled by the regulator to which resort can be made
if something happens to the insurance company so that funds can be
accessed to cover certain specified liabilities.

Meanwhile, insurance companies will have to be more transparent
in the way they conduct business and accept the right of the regulator
to intervene in their affairs if they do not satisfy enhanced capital and
solvency requirements, or if they engage or appear about to engage in
“unsafe or unsound” practices that might jeopardise policyholders.

Under the new requirements, the Registrar of Insurance must be
notified if 10 per cent or more of the company’s ownership changes, and
insurance companies must publish balance sheets and financial state-
ments on a regular basis.

The amendments also provide “more options” for the insurance
regulator — other than liquidation — if it appears that a company is being
operated unsustainably. These include appointing a judicial manager,
as has happened in the case of CLICO (Guyana), who can keep the
business operating whilst overseeing an “orderly disposition” of its
assets, said Mr Ingraham.

Sidney Collie, Blue Hills MP, said he welcomed this change as liq-
uidation is often costly and takes time.

“These amendments are intended to remedy any mischief as a result
of loopholes or silence in the existing legislation,” he said.

ident Alex Knowles, the com-
pany was tipped off to the sus-
pected fake products — being
passed off as demineralised
water — after suspicious look-
ing red-capped bottles were
spotted by an Aquapure
employee at an independent
depot in central New Provi-
dence last week.

Aquapure does produce red-
capped demineralised water,



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and has assured the public that
there is nothing wrong with the
genuine bottles.

Mr Knowles said the five bot-
tles were seized by police, test-
ed by company lab technicians
and found to be "heavily conta-
minated" with coliform bacte-
ria, indicators of disease-causing
organisms, and fecal bacteria.

Detailing the extensive daily
testing process executed by
Aquapure officials, he said
there is no chance the tainted
water originated from the
Bernard Road plant.

Siylish &
Glegant

DPT ichelle
Obama

Dresses

that every
Industry

woman should
have!

Currently, the industry is
sample checked by Department
of Environmental Health offi-
cials once a month to ensure
that companies are up to stan-
dard. But Ms Knowles does not
thinks these checks are enough.

"Environmental Health
comes here once a month to get 4
samples but a lot of things can
change in a month and a lot of
things can change in a day and
that's why you need indepen-
dent testing of a water,” he said.

Chelsea's Choice has inde-
pendent lab technicians on site
to test water before bottling and
every half an hour throughout
the day, Tina Knowles said.

Attempts to reach the
Department of Environmental
Health for comment were
unsuccessful up to press time.

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PAGE 4, TUESDAY, MAY 19, 2009

THE TRIBUNE



EDITORIAL/LETTERS TO THE EDITOR



The Tribune Limited

NULLIUS ADDICTUS JURARE IN VERBA MAGISTRI
Being Bound to Swear to The Dogmas of No Master




































































LEON E. H. DUPUCH, Publisher/Editor 1903-1914

SIR ETIENNE DUPUCH, Kt, O.B.E., K.M., K.CS.G.,
(Hon.) LL.D., D.Litt.

Publisher/Editor 1919-1972
Contributing Editor 1972-1991

EILEEN DUPUCH CARRON, C.M.G., M.S., B.A. LL.B.
Publisher/Editor 1972-

Published Daily Monday to Saturday

Shirley Street, RO. Box N-3207, Nassau, Bahamas
Insurance Management Building., P.O. F-485, Freeport, Grand Bahama

TELEPHONES
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Democrats’ security feud may cost them

WASHINGTON — Democrats just can't
seem to get on the same page on national secu-
rity — and it could cost them dearly on an issue
Republicans have dominated for decades.

Increasingly, President Barack Obama and
Democrats who run Congress are being pulled
between the competing interests of party liber-
als and the rest of the country on Bush-era
wartime matters of torture, detention and inter-
rogation of suspected terrorists.

The Democratic Party's struggle over how to
position itself on these issues is threatening to
overshadow Obama's ambitious plans for ener-
gy, education and health care. It's also keeping
the country looking backward on the eight years
of George W. Bush's presidency, much to the
chagrin of the new White House. And, it's cre-
ating an opening for an out-of-power Republi-
can Party in an area where Democrats have
made inroads.

Governing from the centre and backtracking
on a previous position, Obama decided this
past week to fight the release of photos that
show U.S. troops abusing prisoners. The presi-
dent said he feared the pictures would "further
inflame anti-American opinion" and endanger
USS. forces in Iraq and Afghanistan.

Then he decided to resume military tribunals
for some Guantanamo detainees after a tem-
porary suspension. "This is the best way to pro-
tect our country, while upholding our deeply
held values," he said.

The developments riled liberals who are
important campaign-year foot soldiers and
fundraisers. "These recent decisions are dis-
heartening," said Jameel Jaffer of the American
Civil Liberties Union. "He has shown back-
bone on some issues and not on others.”

On Capitol Hill, House Speaker Nancy
Pelosi protected the party's left flank by accus-
ing the CIA of lying to her about the agency's
use of a form of simulated drowning on sus-
pected terrorists. "We were told that water-
boarding was not being used," said Pelosi. "And
we now know that earlier they were." The CIA
disputes Pelosi's account.

As Democrats splintered, Republicans
watched with glee.

The irony is these are the same wartime
issues created by Bush and the Republican-led
Congress that Democrats successfully cam-
paigned against in 2006 and 2008. The conflict-
ing Democratic positions threaten to undercut
the party's gains on national security; polls last
fall showed Democrats had drawn even on
national security issues long dominated by the
Republicans. The White House desperately
wants to get Democrats in Congress focused
on the president's priorities. Obama's team has
made it clear it's not eager to retread the past.

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But House and Senate liberals, prodded by a
vocal and active network of grass-roots and
"netroots" supporters, relish doing just that,
seemingly fixated on how Bush and former Vice
President Dick Cheney handled Iraq and ter-
rorism. And it's the popular new president
who may have the most to lose.

Obama is facing the same predicament that
confronted and confounded other recent Demo-
cratic presidents. While governing as centrists,
Bill Clinton and Jimmy Carter bent over back-
ward on issues of war and peace, working to
appease the party's left wing without being held
hostage by it.

Defeated Democratic nominees — John Ker-
ry in 2004, Al Gore in 2000, Michael Dukakis in
1988 — lost in part because Republicans suc-
cessfully tagged them as soft on security.

Obama appears to be trying for a balance
between keeping campaign promises to reverse
Bush policies and protecting national security.

Overall, Obama seems less willing to sys-
tematically overturn Bush's national security
positions than his domestic policies.

There are signs that making good on his
promise to close Guantanamo in his first year is
proving exceedingly difficult. Last week, Attor-
ney General Eric Holder reassured lawmakers
that the administration would not release Guan-
tanamo prisoners into U.S. neighbourhoods.

In blogs and on cable TV, Democratic critics
griped that Obama was appearing more like
Bush than the Democrat who won the nomina-
tion by rallying liberals around his pledge to
end the Iraq war quickly.

Answering liberal complaints, White House
press secretary Robert Gibbs said: "First and
foremost, the president does what is in the best
security interest of the United States."

Obama is betting that liberals will forgive him
for changing course on these issues. He does
have several years to make it up to them before
his likely re-election campaign.

Conversely, Obama may have further
endeared himself to moderates and indepen-
dents who are more hawkish on national secu-
rity and are important to his winning coalition.
It's also possible that conservative Republicans
may now be more open to dealing with him
because of his moves on security issues.

With those actions, Obama may have under-
cut Cheney's complaint that the Democrat's
policies were endangering the country. The
president also may have insulated himself from
further weak-on-security attacks following a
campaign during which sceptics questioned his
readiness to lead the military in wartime.

(This article was written by Liz Sidoti of the
Associated Press Writer).

NE say Med ed, Da? E51

Baseball:
why is it
dying?

LETTERS

EDITOR, The Tribune.

We as Bahamians complain
too much and say nothing. It is
high time someone spoke up for
the young and impressionable
youth who seem to be taken
advantage of. In good con-
science I could not stand by and
not help through your valuable
columns.

What is happening with
Baseball in the Bahamas? Has
the confusion with the Baseball
Federation been cleaned up and
if not why.

Who is responsible? Is it
important enough for us as a
nation to start to pressure the
relevant players to get their act
together?

How long will the advance-
ment of our children through
baseball be stifled? Does any-
one give a damn?

I have a son that has been
involved with the Freedom
Farm Baseball League from the
age of five years.

He started with T-ball then
Coached Pitched where he had
the opportunity and distinct
pleasure of playing in the Okee-
heelee Baseball Classic last
year. Now he is playing in the 9-
11 division.

I have seen firsthand how
much he has improved and
matured in the game of base-
ball as well as with the interac-
tion with other children. This is
good, but is there any advance-
ment as a country as it relates to
the benefits of these kinds of
disciplines?

From my own investigation
it would seem that Mr. Jim
Wood is standing between the

letters@tribunemedia net



Bahamas moving forward with
its national baseball pro-
gramme.

What is most astonishing to
me is that it appears that Mr.
Wood has no teams, no associ-
ation, no players, no officers
and he does not have the bless-
ings of the players of the sport.
There seems to be no thought
of the interference of the young
men who could have had some
international exposure while
representing the country.

There is no calculation that
could reveal how many young
men’s chances might have been
destroyed because of Mr.
Wood’s inaction.

This behaviour is interfering
with the forward mobility of
many otherwise wayward youth
who have now found solace in
baseball. When is Mr. Wood
going to get the memo? The
Bahamas is not interested in
him leading baseball anymore.
He needs to get over it. Give it
up man!

If Mr. Wood is the man we
all remember him to be, he
should move with haste to end
this most embarrassing position
he finds himself in. The young
men who are being prevented
from advancing do not look at
him favourably, so it would
seem that his popularity is no
longer there.

If my calculation is correct,
Mr. Wood should be far past
retirement age. He should be

focused on his grandchildren.
He should really be enjoying
his beautiful family, not squab-
bling over a position that cannot
profit him any at this time or
any time in the future.

If Mr. Wood loves this coun-
try and if his original intention
was to help young men through
baseball, then his actions so far
seem to suggest otherwise.

It is highly unfair that the
sport of Baseball in the
Bahamas has been held hostage
all of this time.

The relevant movers and
shakers have been more than
tolerant.

It is past time for the people
with the power to end this most
unfortunate bizarre series of
events.

Minister of Youth and Sport
Desmond Bannister should use
whatever influence he has in
assisting and expediting this.

I do not think that anyone
who thinks rationally would
agree with Mr. Wood. But an
old Bahamian saying comes to
mind: “Hard head bird don’t
make good soup.”

The young boys and men
who love baseball should not
be allowed to wait one more
minute. It is most puzzling how
one man can seemingly hold a
country hostage while all of its
intellectuals stand quietly by
and say nothing. Stop the mad-
ness! Mr. Wood does not own
baseball and he certainly does
not own the Bahamas alone.
Enough is enough.

IVOINE W INGRAHAM
Nassau,
May 16, 2009

Beach outing organisers should clean up afterwards

EDITOR, The Tribune.

Please allow us a response and appreciation
for Mr Sands writing about beach party groups
leaving all their rubbish for the rest of us Bahami-
ans to wince at as we drive around our island.

The locals who use “public” beaches are incred-
ibly selfish and, it seems, quite happy to create an
eyesore for the rest of us who take such pride in
keeping our country in gorgeous condition.

We need litter laws to be strengthened badly to
control those who just don’t care! Better still
those who organise beach outings should accept
responsibility for the clean up at the end of the
day! At this time we would like to add a huge
thank you to the ministry and the clean-up crews
working very visibly around the island on your
tireless and never ending task is very much

noticed and appreciated!

Thank you also to Coca-Cola for the dump-
sters placed around in public use places, what a
shame there are those who will still throw the

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trash on the ground not 50 feet from opening the
container! Thank you also to NAD for the airport

provided!

Nassau,

May 13, 2009.

roadsides being cleaned and receptacles placed
where the taxis park under the trees before one
reaches general aviation.

What a shame there are drivers who park there
and leave the Kentucky box and Coke can on
the ground under the car instead of getting their
lazy butt out of the vehicle and over to the bin

The trash that was pushed back from the road-
sides on Cowpen Road was a great start but the
mountains of unsightly mess need to go please
along with abandoned cars all over the place.

We are on the right track Bahamas, let's hope
all Bahamians see what fabulous surroundings
we are blessed with and make that little extra
effort to help preserve our beautiful Bahamas!

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THE TRIBUNE



LOCAL NEWS

TUESDAY, MAY 19, 2009, PAGE 5



0 In brief



Brenford Christie
appointed to the
GBPA board

THE Grand Bahama Port
Authority has announced the
appointment of attorney Bren-
ford Christie to the board of
directors.

“We are very pleased that
Mr Christie decided to join our
board. Our company will ben-
efit from his many years of suc-
cessful business experience and
extensive background in law.
His counsel will be particularly
valuable in the areas of corpo-
rate finance and board gover-
nance,” said Hannes Babak,
Chairman of GBPA.

Mr Christie is a partner of
one of the oldest and largest
firms in the Bahamas — McK-
inney Bancroft and Hughes.

In 2004 Mr Christie was
appointed as a member of the
Judicial Review Commission
and in 2006 he was named a
leading lawyer by the Guide to
the World’s Leading Financial
Law Firms.

He is a member of the real
estate practice group of Lex
Mundi, the world’s leading
association of independent law
firms.

Clarence Russell



Upgrades to
Freeport Passport
Difice underway

FINDING a new office loca-
tion, creating an appointment
system for the processing appli-
cations and holding customer
service training programmes are
among the steps being taken to
upgrade the Freeport Passport
Office, officer in charge
Clarence Russell said.

Deputy Prime Minister Brent
Symonette, the minister respon-
sible for the issuance of new
passports, recently reaffirmed
the government’s commitment
to enhance services at the office.

Mr Russell, whose tenure
began on May 5, said: “We
have immediately embarked on
getting a lease which is in the
works with the old FINCO
building directly opposite the
Passport Office that has ade-
quate spacing.

“It also has adequate safes
so that we can properly and
adequately secure government
property in that building. The
government has already given
approval for us to begin seeking
internally, staff members who
are competent in data process-
ing because data is one of the
many challenges with which we
are faced; actually getting the
information in from month to
month.

At present, the Passport
Office has a staff of seven
including the officer in charge.
Mr Russell said this number
must be increased to 20.

He said the government
plans to have the new building
ready for occupancy by next
month.

Mr Russell also said the long-
lines and “first come, first
serve” approach to serving
clients will become a thing of
the past.

“In the next few weeks we
are going to embark on an ini-
tiative where, like the [US]
Embassy, you can call in to us
and make an appointment to
deliver your applications at
your convenience,” Mr Russell
said.

“You call and give us a date
when you are available and if
that time and date is available in
our calendar up to the end of
the year, we will submit your
name in there. Five minutes
before your interview time you
come in and we assist you; there
is no need for you to be on a
line hoping and praying that
you get some help — it will be in
order.”

Man accused of Scotiabank
robbery appears in court

46-year-old is remanded
to Her Majesty’s Prison

@ By NATARIO McKENZIE
Tribune Staff Reporter

THE MAN accused of the daring
daylight robbery of Scotiabank on
Wulff Road last Friday was arraigned
in Magistrates Court yesterday.

Ricardo Jones, 36, of Peter Street
off East Street, appeared before Mag-
istrate Janet Bullard in Court One,
Bank Lane, charged with one count
of armed robbery and one count of

receiving.

Court dockets allege that on Fri-
day May 15, while armed with an
unknown object, Jones robbed The-
mera Ferguson of $1,805 cash, the

police officers, are listed on the dock-

ets.

According to reports, a man
dressed in a white shirt, short jeans
and white tennis shoes entered the
bank around 10am on Friday.

The man reportedly presented him-
self as a customer to a female bank
teller, then made gestures with an
object before escaping with the cash.

Cynthia ‘Mother’ Pratt, former
deputy prime minister, was among the
customers in the bank at the time.

Jones was not required to enter a
plea to the charges. He was remanded

to Her Majesty’s Prison.

property of Scotiabank Bahamas Lim- 25.

ited.

It was also alleged that the accused

unlawfully received the sum.

Eleven witnesses, most of them

RICARDO JONES was arraigned in
Magistrates Court yesterday.

The case has been adjourned to May

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CC Sweeting principal AIRIIIITISTS eas
denies stabbing claims

m@ By MEGAN REYNOLDS
Tribune Staff Reporter
mreynolds@tribunemedia.net

CC SWEETING principal
Delores Ingraham has denied
claims that pupils were stabbed
on campus last week, although
she admitted that violence occurs
at the school.

Mrs Ingraham, wife of Prime
Minister Hubert Ingraham, said
parents who have held their chil-
dren back from school because
they are afraid they will be hurt
or killed on campus have no
need to fear.

Although she admits there are
gangs in the school, and that stu-
dents have brought weapons on
to the campus in College
Avenue, she said violence is no
more of a problem at CC Sweet-
ing Senior High School than it
is at any other school in the cap-
ital.

During her 44 years in educa-
tion, including 12 years at CC
Sweeting, Mrs Ingraham said she
has learned to accept that fight-
ing will always be a problem in
schools.

And at CC Sweeting where
there are 850 students, many of
whom may be affiliated with
gangs associated with where they
live, there are bound to be con-
flicts.

Mrs Ingraham said: “When
you are putting hundreds of
them together and you say you
don’t have disagreements, you
are putting your head in the
sand.

“Fighting isn’t new in any
school in any country. The
method used to be different
because they would fight with
their hands, and now we have to
be careful because we don’t
know what the children are up
to.

“But it’s just a reflection of
what’s happening in the commu-
nity, and it’s not that you need to
be afraid, because I would be the
first to go if I was afraid. It’s no
worse than any place else, and I
wouldn’t change CC Sweeting
for anywhere else.”

Parents believe students take
knives, cutlasses, knuckle-dusters
and even guns to the school, and
the mother of a 15-year-old

But Delores
Ingraham admits
that violence
occurs at school

grade 10 student ordered her son
to stay home as she fears for his
life after he was threatened by
a group of boys last month.

The mother also alleged two
boys had been injured in a knife
fight on campus last Tuesday,
but Mrs Ingraham denied there
was a stabbing at the school, and
police were unable to comment
before The Tribune went to
press.

Mrs Ingraham said the wor-
ried parents should be more con-
cerned about who their children
associate with outside of school.

She said: “Sometimes parents
sit on the outside and lambaste
us and say all sorts of things, but
their children are not always as
good as they perceive them to
be.

“T have told the children you
must make the choice as to who
you want to keep company with.

“You may not have a choice to
where you live but you have a
choice about the company you
keep.”

Mrs Ingraham said teachers
search bags at random, have
access to a metal detector, and
affirmed that any weapons found
will be confiscated and the police
will be called as there is a zero
tolerance policy.

She added: “Our school has
no more violence than any other
schools in the Bahamas, includ-
ing private schools, but we are
aware of it and we deal with our
students.

“We try to enforce rules and
when students break them, there
are consequences, and we deal
with it accordingly.”

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m By DENISE MAYCOCK
Tribune Freeport Reporter
dmaycock@tribunemedia.net

FREEPORT - Passengers who were stranded on
Grand Bahama when the Discovery cruise ship
experienced mechanical problems are being flown
back to the United States by charter flights.

Discovery officials have been flying their cruise
passengers from Grand Bahama since Sunday when
the vessel was forced to remain in port for repairs.

The company made arrangements with Miami
Air, which conducted two charter flights on Sunday.
Flight arrangements were also made for those pas-
sengers scheduled to leave on the cruise ship yes-
terday.

Yannick Toussaint, on-island representative for
Discovery, reported that the some 344 passengers
left on Sunday.

“We still have some passengers here on the
island, but we were not asking people to shorten
their vacations. We have chartered flights for pas-
sengers who were scheduled to leave on Sunday
and Monday,” she said.

Janet Albury of VIP Services — the local public
relations firm contracted by Discovery — said that

the ship had deployed its agents to assist passengers
staying at the various resorts on the island.

According to Ms Albury, agents were sent to
Club Fortuna Resort, Sheraton and Westin Resorts,
Island Seas Resort, Pelican Bay and the Ritz Hotel.

She said that agents were also stationed at the
airport to assist passengers booked on chartered
flights.

Those passengers scheduled to sail and return on
the same day will receive a full refund for the can-
celled cruise, Ms Albury said.

Passengers scheduled to overnight in Freeport
may cancel their voyage altogether and receive a
full refund, as well as a free future round-trip tick-
et valid for one year commencing on May 20, 2009
(surcharges additional).

Or they may rebook their trip for a later date and
also receive a free round-trip ticket valid for one
year commencing May 20, (surcharges addition-
al).

ii is not known when repairs to the vessel will be
completed. Sometime in April, the ship had dis-
continued sailings for several days for engine
repairs and resumed services on May 4.

Discovery Cruise Line apologised for any incon-
venience caused by its cancelled sailing.

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PAGE 6, TUESDAY, MAY 19, 2009

THE TRIBUNE



LOCAL NEWS

Persons accused of murder released on bail

FROM page one

that it would be endangering the lives of its citi-
zens if it continued on its present course of
neglecting its duty to deal with the unacceptably
high levels of crime and criminality.

by the government to get up and provide the
leadership that is so critically necessary at this
very vulnerable time in our society.

“The media is urged to demand more account-
ability, especially from all public institutions and
officials in order to create more transparency.
This will greatly reduce corruption, and injus-

Po

lice seeking

In his statement issued to the media, Mr Moss tice which fuels crimes and violence,” he said.

‘YOUR VIEW? |

To have your say on this or any other issue,
email The Tribune at: letters@tribunemedia.net
lives. or deliver your letter to The Tribune on
Shirley Street, P.O. Box N-3207

said government must not be “narrow-minded
or fearful” in dealing with this scourge that is
currently plaguing the nation.

“Religious leaders are called upon to lift their
sights beyond the walls of the church and work
toward improved security of people. The corpo-
rate community is challenged to seek the public
good, not just private gain in their economic

“Civil society is called upon to agitate and lob-



Independent Auditor's report to the members of Standard Chartered PLC

We haw mda thi Group (Starciard Chartered PLC and ibs
Leedienies) 6nd Comper Giandand Chartered PLC] financia
Statements logether referred to as. the ‘financal satemne te)
far the year ended 31 Gecember 2008 which

Group income Statement. ihe Group aod Comper Gaknce
Sheels, the Group and Company Cash Flow &

Group and Company Siatement -

Experts, and the related notes. These financial

Fant Denn prenEned uncer fhe aocouiing PObCes Set oul
franein, We have eto audinied the infarmation in the Grectors’
Retureeation Aeport that is described as having be

THe: PADOrT 18 ede eolety to the Company's members, as &
Goch, ini Sc noe wih section 235 of The Gomipearies ACT
1985. Qur aunt work hes been uderakern ao that we oe it
siete to ihe Gonpany's menbers. o
feguired Lo slate to lhem in an aucito vO and for re
BS SRE Derireiied Ex ray, wee dio
Of @5oume rpeponebdaty to arrvane olher than the
1 the Cora,’ s members a5 a body. for our

Bude wirk, for (Prs report, or for the omuniors we have formed

Reapective responsibilities of directors and auditor
The directors’ responsitiiiies tor preparing the Anrual Repeat,
the Linectoes Reniuneraiion Fagor and live franca staiements
n Bocordance wilh apolosble law and Indemeational Financial
Reps ing & Standards (FRSs) as adopted by The FL are Sel
out nthe Stahamers of Directors’ Recooneibeies on page a4.

Our responsiblity is to aut ihe drancal statements and the
cart of the Cangct Remunerslion Rapa to be audited in
BOCOrtance with relevant legal and reguitory requiramerits
and Wierliona Standards on Aud hing (LE and belanc

Wie report to you dur opinien as fo whether the financial
SHINES Gre A iru anc ms ew and whether the financial

Salements and the pan of ihe Drectors’ Aemunersiion

d have been procerly prepared in acconda

Ac 1985 and, a regards the Grow

4 af the tS Amguiatinn, Vii repan bo

1 OGinon The information given in ihe Report

Conger wilh (he financal statements. The
infor TE he Raport af Ginectors inclucies informatio
pra ad n the ¢ _hainman's statement, tha Group Creaf
Exec eves Rewer and the Financal and Business Rew
thet £2: ralereanced fret the Report of the Directors, In
aad we report bo you if the Company has not kept prone
BOCOUNING Maoords, Wee Fee mot remand ail ihe infer vile on
and copies we require for Gur audit, or if information
Speciied by lw regarding directors’ remuneration and oiher
beraclions ane not disclosed

wou whether in

Wie review whelher the Conmoraie Governance Statemerd
reflects the Company's compliance wiih tie rane ¢
7: FRO Combined Gode apectied for our revinw bry fhe:
Rules of the Financial Serene Quthornty, and we repeat
not. Wie 2ine mot nequinnd to consider whether ihe
Baard's slaiemenis on imemal cortrol oover all reks and
Gontrots. Of Tonm an opinor on ihe @fecinerass of the

Group's corporate gowernance promedunes or itp risk and
Garin! protedunces

Consolidated balance sheet
As al 31 December 20068

Assets. _

(ash and balances at central banks
Financial assets held at dai valet through profit or loss
Denveiive financial instruments
Loans and advances io banks
Loans and advances to customers
Invesiment secunibes

Inierasts in aocmles

Goodwill and intangible assets
Property, plant and equipment
Current lax aasets

Deferred tax assets

Othe assets

Prapayments and accrued income

Deposits by banks

Quatomer aooounls

Financial Gahiltes held at fair value through profit oF loss.
Derivative financial insirumernls

Debt securities in issue

Current tax fabilties:

Deferred tax lattes

Other iabdities

Actuals and digenned incor

Provisions tor liabilities and charges

Retirement benefit obligations

Subordinaied Gaba bac and other borrowed funds
Total liabilities /

Equity

Share capital

Peper _
Total parent company shareholders’ equi equity
Minority interests:

Total equity

Total equity and liabilities

* AN UrS Faean Den Nghe oe apie i ne Sh

We pad other information contained in the Annual Peper
and conmder whaler il @ cones with the giudéed financial
Siatemanis. We comidier the: implications for our report if

we Decorip aware of any apparent missialemnerts or

material in noes wal the fravcial stalemenbs. Ci
(EROS bles Go nol exhed to ary other information

Basis of audit opinicn

Vite onducied our aucht in scoordance with Intemational
Standards on Guditing (UK and land) eee by Ihe Auditing
gt 5 ae Fun BU inches examination, onatest

nihe 6 Tiree oe J eivomarts and ihe pan of tt
danse muinn Report to be aided. i aso incuciest an

ISSESETIEN Of the signilcanl esinnalést and judgemerts made
on one G@rectare in the prepanstion od the: financial shatemes,
and of whether the aout Me] POSS 6 aporoariaie ba the
Group's and Gompany's crcumngiances, cansetently applied
And acdesualety decoaed.
We planned and peetormed our audit so as to obtain al ihe
TeonMaion and explanations which wr considered necessary
nonde io proade Le walh sutiopnt evidence bo give raasoreie
ae SSUMIOR thal Se fing nce! spheres and (he cert o

Lanectors’ Hemuneralion Report bo be audfed an + c
TTenenal MieStalement, whether caused by fraud of other
reguiaty oFenror, In forming our ofr we alo evaiusted
the qvardl adequacy of the praeeniaten of infomation in the
tinancial sielamenie. and fhe part of the Denctors*
Femuneraiion Report to be audited
Opinion
Nour Goer:

The Group francal stalemerts ong a true ard fair view,

in Socordance with IFREs es 3 bed oy the BU ef ihe Stabe

ot te Group's Stee a6 af 31 Deoenber 2008 and of its

Groh for the year then enced

paety Trees Alaris oy Que a inue and fiir vag,
ancaé wilh IFRSS a adophed by ihe EL as applied
Sod ane wah (he proveeDres al the Gorigarmes Act

71965, of the state of the Gor Terry's alaurs as at 21

Oacemiber 7008:

fe financial eatemerts and ihe part of te Giresct

Recnuumeraiion Pegort to be aud files | rea been

Prepuined in aoocordance with tha {

and, 26 Fegards the Coron tree cae

Of ihe AS Regulator: ane

the intonation ge in ihe Alepeort of shh Carectors:

5 OOneien wilh ihe francmal stata

KPMG Audit Fic
Lock
Chartered AcogQuniants.
Piatt ed Au sche

3 March 2009

ong
_Smiffien_

24,167
15,425
69,657
46,583
174,178
69,342
$11
6,261
3,536

11,091
3.85?
920,871

31,909 25,880
#24,008 178,760
15,478 14,250
67,775 26,270
2,447 a7,137
512 B18
176 3
17,383 14,742
4,192 3,429
140
447
16,986
412,373

948
21,192 20,146
22,140 20,851
§45 601

22696 21,452
435,068 320,871

These financial statements were approved by the board of directors and authorised for issue on 3 March 2008 and signed on its

PA Sande
Group chief execulive

RH Meddings
‘Group Gnance director



foreign help in
fugitive search

m By DENISE MAYCOCK
Tribune Freeport Reporter
dmaycock@tribunemedia.net

FREEPORT - Grand Bahama Police are seeking foreign help in
their search for fugitive Lester Adderley, who is wanted in connection
with the murder of a Grand Bahama businessman.

Asst Supt Edmund Rahming said police are now working with
international law enforcement agencies to locate Adderley, who is
thought to have fled the Bahamas some time in 2007. The police have
issued a warrant for his arrest with Interpol.

Konstantino Vardoulis, 31, owner of Grand Bahama Foods and
the Chicken Farm, was shot to death at his home on Bahama Reef
Boulevard on April 12, 2007. George Alexander Ferguson was charged
with Vardoulis’ murder on June 22, 2007.

Grand Bahama police have had recent success in appealing to inter-
national law enforcement agencies for help.

Fugitive Andre Birbal was arrested by US authorities in New York
on May 3, after police issued an international APB for the Trinidadi-

an teacher.

Senior Assistant Commissioner of Police
Marvin Dames said the arrest of Birbal, who is
wanted for questioning in a child molestation
case, proves that the system does in fact work.

Birbal, 46, was arrested by a New York
Transit Police Officer after committing a traf-
fic violation. A check was made and authorities
discovered that there was an APB out on him

in the Bahamas.

The Attorney General’s Office is working
with authorities in the US to have Birbal

returned to Grand Bahama.

Birbal was suspended from the Eight Mile



FUGITIVE Andre Birbal
was arrested by US
Rock from the school when molestation alle- authorities in New York
gations surfaced in January.

A female teacher at the school was also removed following molesta-
tion claims.

Father shot dead for $50

FROM page one

Coral Harbour.

Both PJ and Petra loved to
spend time with their father, Ms
Babbs said, and Petra would insist
on calling him every morning
before she went to school in
Grand Bahama.

“He was a good father,” Ms
Babbs recalled. “A very good
man, and a very good dad. PJ
loved his daddy, and the little girl
especially did love him.”

But the last PJ saw of his father
was his lifeless body being lifted
into a body bag in the early hours
of yesterday morning. His moth-
er said she tried to cover his eyes
as he watched, but he moved her
hand to take a last look.

She said: “It was like he was
frozen, all he was doing was look-
ing, and I tried to cover his eyes
and he was just focusing on his
daddy, looking at him just lying
down on the ground.

“When they lifted him up to
put him in the body bag and his
head fell apart, he started to cry.”

Mr Johnson was also a loving
step-father to Ms Babbs’ daughter
Anthoinette, 24, who he took in
as a toddler. He was also popular
in the Kemp Road area where he
grew up.

Jakemia Lightbourne, 23, who
took the photograph of Peter and
PJ, said: “Peter was a lovable per-
son for kids and adults. If you
were troubled by anything he
would sit you down and talk to
you like you was his own. He was
so sweet.”

Mr Johnson was the oldest of
70-year-old Prince Johnson’s six
children. He was raised by his
grandparents in Sun Street, off
Kemp Road, attended St Bede’s
and CI Gibson schools, and met
Ms Babbs browsing around the
Kemp Road area when she was
21.



i

The mourning mother of three
was surrounded by friends and
family outside Gibson’s Bar and
Lounge after visiting the morgue
at Princess Margaret Hospital
yesterday morning.

She had moved to Freeport for
economic reasons after leaving
her Social Services job in Nassau
last year, but came back to Nas-
sau for a wedding last month.

Ms Babbs is still unemployed
and is concerned about how she is
going to care for her children
without Mr Johnson when, she
said, she does not even feel strong
enough to tell her daughter the
truth about her father’s murder.

She said: “T told her her daddy
was in the hospital and that he
got shot, and she is asking why
the police don’t catch the person
and lock him up, but I haven’t
told her that he’s dead.”

Although the couple had split,
Ms Babbs said neither of them
had yet entered into other rela-
tionships.

She said: “Although we weren’t
together we were very close
because of the kids, and I had no
problem with him.

“He would send money for the
kids and he was very good to me.

“Peter is not a troublesome
person. No one in this world
could say Peter is their enemy.
He’s a loving person, he talked
and cracked jokes with every-
body. We were together for 17
years and Peter had no enemies.

“T could understand if he was a
troublesome person, but I don’t
understand this.

“T want to know for what?
That’s what I’m trying to find out.
He had $50 on him — he got shot
for $50.”

The murder of Peter Johnson
was the 29th homicide in the
Bahamas this year.

Police are questioning two 23-
year-old men in connection with
the murder.

Wana me tet a ek

a

=]


THE TRIBUNE

TUESDAY, MAY 19, 2009, PAGE 7



LOCAL NEWS



Scuffle prompts concerns over
unsupervised teens at resort

FOLLOWING a scuffle
between three young Bahami-
ans at Marina Village, execu-
tives at Atlantis have expressed
concern about parents drop-
ping off unsupervised teenagers
at the resort.

While Atlantis welcomes
families and all Bahamians to
its property, senior vice-presi-
dent of public affairs Ed Fields
said yesterday that it is not fair
for parents to treat the resort as
a “baby-sitter” for their chil-
dren.

In recent months, Marina
Village and the Atlantis hotel

have become popular
hang-out spots, where
parents feel teenagers
can spend weekend
evenings in a safe
environment.

But Mr Fields said
people are dropping
off their 13 to 16-year-
olds at Marina Village
without any regard as
to what their children
get up to.

“J mean, would you drop
your teenager off at a bar?
They could end up anywhere —
in a hotel room, at a bar — it’s



ED FIELDS

basically a bar with
rooms,” he said of the
resort.

Just two weeks ago,
Mr Fields said, three
young men got into a
fight in Marina Vil-
lage and security per-
sonnel had to get
involved. The three
teens were escorted
off the property.

The Atlantis exec-
utive said teenagers becoming
disruptive on the property is a
continuing problem which
detracts from the experience

of vacationers.

“It’s really not fair to our
guests,” he said.

Mr Fields said that the resort
is conscious of the fact that par-
ents want to ensure that their
children “hang out” at a safe
place. However, he said, they
cannot expect Atlantis to take
responsibility for their children.

It often happens that parents
drop off teenagers at the resort,
who then leave the property
with a third party, only to
return to Marina Village short-
ly before they are due to be
picked up, Mr Fields added.

Lawyer: ‘no good grounds’ for Senior Justice
Anita Allen to recuse herself from case

FROM page one

report prepared by Daniel
Ferguson, an accountant who
had been appointed by Jus-
tice Lyons to work on the
Weissfisch case. Justice Lyons
tendered his resignation from
the bench earlier this month.
Calls for his resignation came
after a highly publicised state-
ment by Justice Allen
revealed that he had shared
“more than a friendship” with
the sister of Mr Ferguson.
Nicholas Lavender, QC,
attorney for Rami Weissfisch

who is seeking to have Justice
Allen step down from the
case, had previously argued,
that during a meeting with
counsel in chambers, Justice
Allen had raised the possibil-
ity of her own recusal and had
stated that she had felt con-
flicted. Mr Lavender claimed
to be the only person taking
notes during the meeting.
However, what was said dur-
ing that meeting is disputed
by Justice Allen as she in her
ruling against the recusal
application in Supreme Court,
referred to her recollection of

Lands and Surveys probe ‘now

focused on two senior officers’



FROM page one

law, were granted Crown land lots on the island of Exuma.

These beachfront lots, which were sold at less than $2,500 each,
were flipped a few years later for more than $550,000 apiece. Mr
Turnquest denied any connection to any of the transactions.

Before Mr Turnquest could resign, government officials had
changed the locks to his office and secured boxes of documents.

These documents, it is understood could be beneficial to the
Attorney General’s office.

While government has been criticised over the scandal brew-
ing in this department, sources close to the investigation claim
they will also use this time to implement “significant changes” to
the law to ensure that such abuses of Crown land cannot be
repeated.

Mr Turnquest’s removal from the department comes at a
time when the Opposition has already introduced a motion in the
House of Assembly, led by Fox Hill MP Fred Mitchell, calling for
a Select Committee to review all Crown land grants issued by
government since the early 1990’s.

This committee will review all Crown grants issued to indi-
viduals or entities since 1992 up until the present date with all
outstanding applications that have yet to receive final approval.

The committee will also ascertain a list of all public servants
and retired public servants who have received grants, along
with government’s official position on its policy in relation to the
disposition of publicly held lands generally; as well as govern-
ment’s policy in relation to granting lands to employees of gov-
ernment or their relatives.

Since the revelations of these transactions and claims that
other civil servants had secured substantial grants of Crown
land, several irate individuals have come forward outlining
many years of abuse they claim they endured from this depart-
ment. Among them was PLP general Ezra Russell, who com-
plained of having to wait more than 12 years to get final approval
to purchase some 34 acres of Crown land in Fountain Bay, Cat
Island.

Weather system has potential of
becoming first tropical storm

off to the east of the Bahamas
into the open ocean.
The United States’ Nation-

FROM page one

the southeastern Bahamas has

a less than 30 per cent chance
of becoming a tropical system
over the next 24 hours.

However, should it become
necessary, a hurricane hunter
aircraft will be deployed today
to further investigate the sys-
tem, he said.

Current projected paths
have the system travelling
north from Cuba through the
chain of Bahamian islands
towards the east coast of Flori-
da by the weekend.

Other trajectories, howev-
er, predict the system will veer

al Hurricane Centre (NHC)
yesterday issued a special
tropical weather outlook, say-
ing that “slow development of
this system is possible during
the next day or two as it
moves generally northward at
10mph to 15mph.”

The system is expected to
produce much needed rainfall
and high winds.

If the system reaches tropical
storm strength it will be
named “Ana.”

The hurricane season offi-
cially runs from June 1 to
November 30.

what she stated in chambers.

Alan Steinfeld, QC, who is
representing Amir Weissfisch,
submitted to the Court of
Appeal yesterday that the
grounds Mr Lavender had
relied upon were not ade-
quate. Mr Lavender had sub-
mitted that Justice Allen’s
comments and conduct would
suggest to the fair minded
observer a real possibility of
bias on her part in relation to
the case.

Mr Steinfeld noted that the
issue had been argued as to
whether it was Justice Allen
who first raised issue of
recusal and whether she had
stated, “I would be happy to
recuse myself,” as Mr Laven-
der’s notes reflected.

“That in itself, is not a mat-
ter which would lead a fair
minded and informed observ-
er to think that there was
remotely any prejudice or bias
by the judge because it went
only toa matter is not in itself
a ground for recusal,” Mr Ste-
infeld said.

“Let us assume that Mr
Lavender’s note was accurate
and that the judge was wrong
in her recollection, that still
would not be a ground for
recusal,” he said.

Mr Steinfeld submitted that
the issue was whether a fair
minded observer would con-
clude that the judge might not
be able to deal with the case in
an unbiased manner.

According to Mr Steinfeld,
the fair minded observer
would say that there was a dis-
agreement between the judge
and counsel as to what was
said by the judge to counsel
and that that was not a matter
that went to the merits of
whether she should recuse
herself.

He submitted that there
was no reason to believe that
because the judge had a dis-
agreement of recollection, that
she would be antipathetic
towards Mr Lavender and his
client.

President of the Court of
Appeal Dame Joan Sawyer
noted that the main issue the
court saw was that the judge
during the course of her ruling
talked about her memory and
what she recalled transpiring
in chambers.

“Her memory would never
be known to the objective
observer unless the objective
observer is a clairvoyant,”
Dame Joan noted. The appeal
continues.

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? ing out for swine flu cases in the
? Bahamas, Health Minister Dr
? Hubert Minnis said.

? been no laboratory cases con-
? firmed, but health officials are
? keeping alert when it comes to the
: A(HIN1) virus.

? the A(HIN1) virus has not been
? introduced into our shores, but we
: will not let our guard down as we
? will continue to aggressively mon-
? itor the situation at all ports of
? entry and indeed within the coun-
? try as we have been doing from
: day one,” Dr Minnis said.

? ness and access to vaccines and
? other benefits, particularly those
? that relate to the A(H1N1) virus
? (swine flu), will be discussed at the
: 62nd annual World Health Assembly (WHA) meeting, scheduled
: for May 18 to 29 in Geneva, Switzerland.

Govt ‘still looking
for swine flu cases’

THE government is still look-

Dr Minnis said that there have

“We have been fortunate that

Pandemic influenza prepared-

DR HUBERT MINNIS



Dr Minnis will lead a four-member delegation representing the

Bahamas.

He will also attend a Meeting of Heads of Delegations of the

i Americas and a Commonwealth Heads Minister’s Meeting.

The delegation to the 62nd World Health Assembly will include

chief medical officer Dr Merceline Dahl-Regis, director of Pub-
? lic Health Dr Pearl McMillan, and National Chronic, Non-Com-
; municable Diseases Coordinator Dr Yasmin Williams-Robinson.

“The WHA agenda was recently modified to include discus-

? sions on the A(H1N1) virus and the development of a vaccine for
: the virus now that the virus has been identified,” Dr Minnis
i said. “That discussion is expected to take up the bulk of the
? agenda.

“These discussions will be very, very pertinent to all coun-

: tries participating in the meetings, but particularly to the Third
? World and developing countries, as access to vaccines and the
? sharing of health information go a long way in helping to reduce
} disease burdens in these areas,” Dr Minnis added.

The WHA is the decision-making forum through which the

: World Health Organisation (WHO) is governed by its 193 mem-
? ber states. It is the world’s highest health policy-setting body and
? is composed of health ministers from member states.

The main tasks of the WHA are to approve the WHO pro-

i gramme, supervise financial policies, review and approve the
? proposed programme budget, and decide major policy ques-
i tions.

According to WHO Update 28 on May 14, 33 countries have

officially reported 6,497 cases of A(HINI) infection.

Mexico leads the way with 2,446 reported cases including 60

? deaths; the United States reported 3,352 cases, including three
? deaths; Canada reported 389 cases, including one death; and
: Costa Rica, eight reported cases including one death. Twenty-nine
? other countries have reported from one to 100 cases, but with no
: deaths.

ROYAL BANK OF CANADA TRUST COMPANY
OSS U ENB RIEU SD
is considering suitable applications for the role of

Manager, Trust and
Corporate Services

Description of role and key responsibilities:

¢ Lead and manage a team of trust officers and other
staff: this includes providing advice in respect of clients
and cases, coaching staff and ensuring the effective
utilisation of other resources. Instrumental in developing
and implementing company procedures within
appropriate frameworks.
Possess a superior knowledge of Trust (complex and
simple), Company and Fiduciary structures, and tax
and legal issues affecting the administration of Trusts
and Companies.
Ensure that strong technical knowledge of all aspects
of trust and company administration is delivered: this
includes attending client meetings and
supervising/assisting in respect of the preparation of
accounting and investment information prior to
submission to clients
Experience with the preparation and presentation of
financial and estate planning proposals to high net
worth individuals
Providing assistance to increase profitability of the
company/shareholder value by identifying
opportunities to extend the trust services, and to use
the bank offering to implement solutions for clients
where appropriate
Proven superior sales acumen. With ability to attract,
build and strengthen relationships with key clients and
intermediaries and identify new ideas in relation to
products and services that may be offered by the
company

Core skills and knowledge:

* A University degree in business, accounting, or other
related discipline

¢ Aminimum of ten years’ relevant experience
Professionally qualified, e.g. accounting/finance
qualification, STEP ICSA, TER ACCA
Self-motivation with excellent project management
Demonstrably strong technical knowledge of all aspects
of trust and company administration, including the
nuances and statutory requirements of the major
offshore jurisdictions used in connection with clients'
structures
Strong analytical and problem-solving skills
Methodical, thorough and attentive to detail
Strong supervisory skills coupled with the ability to lead
by example
Strong skills in time management and prioritisation
Excellent oral and written communication skills
Microsoft Office skills
Cultural awareness and sensitivity on both an individual
and corporate basis

Interested persons should apply by May 22, 2009 to:
Royal Bank of Canada Trust Company

Share your news

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award.

If so, call us on 322-1986
and share your story.



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THE TRIBUNE PAGE 8

S
\

TUESDAY, MAY 19,



2009 \





COLLEGE OF THE BAHAMAS ATHLETICS DEPARTMENT: Press conference

Leading the charge

RG (3

Scotiabank and

t (242) 3944? £ [242] 393-8298

Titans claim
early season
victories

Bahamas Cricket Association league play con-
tinued over the weekend, with perennial power-
houses picking up wins early in the season.

Scotiabank Paradise won the match over St.
Agnes due to inclement weather and bad light,
while the Dockendale Titans cruised to victory
over Castrol Commonwealth.

Scotiabank bowled first against St. Agnes and
gave up 247 runs for the loss of eight wickets.

Youth player Orlando Stewart was the top scor-
er for St. Agnes with 48 runs, while Orwell Grant
and Ray Haniff added 30 and 26 runs respectively.

In his final game as a member of the Scotiabank
Paradise, Youth player Gary Bell led his team to
the win taking two wickets while Kester Duncan
took two wickets as well.

Bell leaves the game after completing his training
at the Hotel Training College and according to
cricket enthusiast Paul Thompson, “During his
years here he thrilled cricket fans with his spin
bowling and aggressive batting. Bell made a con-
tribution to the Bahamas.”

Light

In their turn at bat, Scotiabank scored 145 runs
for the loss of three wickets before rain and insuf-
ficient light stopped play.

Aeon Lewin led the scoring with 56 runs and
Andrew Nash scored 44 to lead the offense.

Bowling for St. Agnes, Earl Thomas, Hesketh
Dean, and Ray Haniff took one wicket each.

In Saturday’s match, the Titans won over the
Castrol by two wickets.

Commonwealth batted first and was bowled out
for 190 runs.

Terry Seepersad led all scorers with 67 runs and
Mike Graham added 31.

Top bowlers for Dockendale included veteran
Danavan Morrison who took four wickets while
Dwight Weakly took two.

At bat, the Titans scored 194 runs for the loss of
five wickets, to take the match by two.

Weakly and Morrison displayed their versatility
by leading the team as batsmen with 71 and 42
runs respectively.

Garth Davis took two wickets for Castrol.

Next weekend’s schedule is as follows: Dynasty
vs. Castrol Commonwealth at Windsor Park, Police
vs. Scotiabank Paradise at Haynes Oval.



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lor sports leaders:

@ by RENALDO DORSETT
Sports Reporter
rdorsett@tribunemedia.net

I: an effort to provide lead-
ership in the area of nation-
al sports and wellness, the coun-
try’s leading tertiary institution
made an integral step towards
development of the aforemen-
tioned programs.

The College of The Bahamas
Athletics Department officially
launched its Sports & Wellness
Institute aimed at providing pro-
fessional development opportu-
nities for persons working in this
area.

Representatives from the col-
lege suggest the initiative repre-
sents a significant move as it seeks
to support and drive national
development through education;
research & innovation; and ser-
vice.

The Sports and Wellness Insti-
tute’s ultimate goals will be to
“provide professional develop-
ment opportunities for persons
working in wellness/sports within
the community, to assist with the
certification of professionals, par-
ticularly those who teach and
coach young people, and to
benchmark or provide credibility
for professionals.”

President of the College of the
Bahamas, Janyne Hodder, said
Institute arose out of a need to
create more certified coaches
within the country’s core sports.

“As one of the country’s most
important strategic actors, the
mission of The College of The
Bahamas is to support and drive
national development through
education, research & innovation
and service, by offering high qual-
ity programs grounded in unique
features of the Bahamian envi-
ronment. We believe that the
launch of a Sports & Wellness
Institute helps us to accomplish
this,” she said, “The concept of a
Sports & Wellness Institute
emanated from a pilot workshop
last summer held jointly between
The College of The Bahamas and
The Ministry of Education, Youth
Sports & Culture. During that
workshop approximately 40
teachers and coaches received

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COB launches Sports & Wellness Institute

is aa

HR aRac aeanense nce

professional development in the
Art of Injury Prevention and the
Fundamentals of Coaching Bas-
ketball. It was clear from this
workshop that the need existed
for further training of this and
other groups involved in sports
and wellness.

Swimming

The current core sports include
track and field, basketball, soft-
ball, volleyball and soccer.

Swimming is on the cusp of
receiving core sport status while
the list of secondary sports
includes boxing, baseball, and ten-
nis.

“We want to emphasise that
the focus of this Institute will not
be solely on the development of
sports but also on wellness, nutri-
tion and lifestyle. It is important
that The College of The Bahamas
partners with other entities to
ensure that the message of good
health and wellness is spread
throughout the length and
breadth of The Bahamas,” Hod-
der, “We must work to ensure
that the high levels of obesity,
cholesterol, diabetes and hyper-
tension — all of which are preven-
tative diseases — are minimised in
our country, particularly among
our young people. The target
groups therefore will include, but
are not limited, to coaches across
the spectrum, schools, national
teams, officials, referees, statisti-
cians, sports administrators, man-
agers, trainers, wellness coaches,
fitness instructors, and nutrition-
ists.”

College of the Bahamas Ath-

nq Aen eoliter Olmlal enn Athletic Director.

a a




a)

letic Director, Kim Rolle, said the
Institute will place a premium on
blending the theory learned in
the classroom with practical appli-
cation in the field.

“One of the things that we
found in the pilot project was that
those persons were really hungry
for some sort of professional
development. We want to ensure
that these persons have contact
hours and also a follow up mech-
anism so that these persons follow
up with exactly what they were
trained to do,” she said, “If a
coach has a team, we want a
someone from the institute to be
able to go a practice on any given
day and ask a coach to see their
practice plan, as you should have
if you are doing a Level One cer-
tification. So that we know these
persons are not just taking the
material and going with them and
not using them.”

Rolle said an added benefit of
the program is the accelerated
certification of prospective teach-
ers and coaches while enrolled at
the college.

“We train our students to be
physical education teachers, not
coaches. In many instances these
persons coach. So what we are
saying is since they coach we
might as well train them as best
we can to do so,” she said, “This
is another opportunity for some-
body who is a physical education
major to receive certification pri-
or to them leaving the Collge of
the Bahamas so they can leave
with a level one certification as
apart of their college experience.”

The Sports & Wellness Insti-
tute’s working group consists of





aE ae
Re



5

COB’S Janyne Hodder

representatives from the core
Sporting Federations, Ministries
of Education, Health and Youth,
Sports & Culture and personnel
from The College of The
Bahamas.

The working group includes
Lawrence Hepburn (Bahamas
Basketball Federation); Curt
Hollingsworth (Bahamas Ama-
teur Athletics Association); Col-
lege of The Bahamas Athletics
Director Kimberley Rolle;
Valerie Lowe (Bahamas Swim
Federation); Dr. Anne Rolle
(Ministry of Health); Keith Saun-
ders (Ministry of Education);
Oria Wood-Knowles (Ministry of
Youth, Sports & Culture); Rom-
mel Knowles (Bahamas Softball
Federation); Wellington Miller
(Bahamas Olympic Association);
Lionel Haven (Bahamas Football
Association); Joe Smith
(Bahamas Volleyball Federation);
Wesley Rolle (Bahamas Lawn
Tennis Association); Dr. Pandora
Johnson (COB); Dr. Linda Davis
(COB) and Antona Curry
(COB).

President of the Bahamas Bas-
ketball Federation, Lawrence
Hepburn, speaking on behalf of
the working group said the for-
mation of such a venture is long
overdue.

“For too long our sports have
been developing ‘willy-nilly.’ A
little clinic here or there and we
wanted to move away from that.
We wanted something, a program
that our people can be well
trained in,” he said, “It is in line
with what all our federations want
to do and something that we need
to do for the development for
world class athletes of the future.”

MEMBERS of the College of
the Bahamas Caribs men’s
basketball team are from left
kneeing: Dominic Sweeting,
Damian Sturrup, Jamaal Dar-
ling, Danzel Barr. Left Stand-
| ing: Coach Bastian, Jude Vil-
mar, Sheron Murphy, Theron
Butler, Frisco Mckay, Garvin
Lightbroune, Rashad Mcken-
zie, Philip Colebrook, Assis-
tant Coach Kirk Basden.
TRIBUNE SPORTS

TUESDAY, MAY 19, 2009, PAGE 9



INTERNATIONAL SPORTS



CRICKET

England rout West indies

A wonderful display of swing
bowling helped propel England
to a series whitewash over the
West Indies. The victory gives
the team momentum leading
into the Ashes series later this
summer. Lancashire seamer
James Anderson led the charge,
ending with match figures of
nine for 125. It enabled England
to win by an innings and 83 runs
in the second npower Test and
regain the Wisden Trophy just
three overs after lunch at
Chester-le-Street.

Two interruptions for rain in
the morning session helped cre-
ate swing-friendly conditions.
And man-of-the-match Ander-
son, partnered by Yorkshire all-
rounder Tim Bresnan, made the
most of them, causing a rapid
West Indies collapse either side
of lunch of seven wickets for 35
runs in just 88 balls. Resuming
144 runs adrift on 115 for three,
the tourists fell to 176 all out
with Shivnarine Chanderpaul
the only batsman to offer any
resistance on the final day with
a gritty 47 over two hours.

TENNIS



THE ENGLAND squad are seen celebrating with their trophy after beating
the West Indies during the 5th day of the second test match at the River-
side's cricket ground, Chester-le-Street, England, Monday May 18, 2009.
The team are back row left to right, Kevin Pietersen, Jimmy Anderson,
Graeme Swann, Graham Onions, and Stuart Broad a Front row left to right,
Alistair Cook, Paul Collingwood, Ravi Bopara, captain Andrew Strauss Tim

Bresnan and Matt Prior.



ENGLAND'S PAUL COLLING-
WOOD, left, celebrates with Graeme
Swann, , after catching West Indies
Shivnarine Chanderpaul during the
5th day of the second test match at
the Riverside's cricket ground.

RS eg

Kirsty Wigglesworth/AP Photo

FORMER BRITISH tennis player Tim pant aun a shot,
during the mixed double tennis match with playing partner, for-
mer tennis champion Belgium's Kim Clijsters, against former
tennis champion Andre Agassi from the US and his wife, former
tennis champion, German born Steffi Graf, during a test event

on Wimbledon's Centre Court, in London, Sunday, May 17,

Scott Heppell/

AP Photos

2009. Wimbledon's Centre Court has had a moveable roof
installed so that play can continue at the grass court champi-
onships in wet weather. The Championships begin June 22.



Beating Nadal gives Federer boost into French Open

m By PAUL LOGOTHETIS
AP Sports Writer
MADRID

A victory over Rafael Nadal in a clay-court final
has Roger Federer feeling good about his chances

heading into the French Open.
It’s not the first time.

Federer broke a sluggish Nadal once in each set
for a 6-4, 6-4 win Sunday that earned him a second
Madrid Open trophy. It was the second-ranked

Swiss player’s first title of 2009.

With Roland Garros a week away, the victory
over four-time defending French Open champion
Nadal is sure to provide a big boost for Federer.

“At this stage it does, considering I hadn’t won a
tournament yet (this season),” the 13-time Grand

Slam winner said.

“Tt’s all finally paying off but it’s not the moment
to get carried away. I’m very excited going to Paris
whereas a couple of weeks ago I was still a little bit

unsure about my game.”

Federer had similar feelings two years ago after he



beat Nadal on clay at Hamburg to snap the
Spaniard’s record 81-match winning streak on the
surface.

After that win, Federer said he’d figured Nadal
out ahead of Paris. But he then lost the ensuing
final in four sets. Last year he lost the French Open

Sharapova

final to Nadal in straight sets. “I know what I have to
do but that doesn’t make it easy,” Federer said Sun-
day. Nadal, meanwhile, was only thinking about the
first week at the French — a long way ahead of any

TIKI O

return to

tour but

shows rust

m By RYAN LUCAS
WARSAW, Poland

\ \ | earing strips of white
tape on her right

shoulder, Maria Sharapova
played her first singles match on
tour in nearly 10 months, and
while she won on Monday, her
game did show signs of rust.

The three-time Grand Slam
title winner needed nine match
points to finally put away 68th-
ranked Tathiana Garbin of Italy
6-1, 6-7 (6), 6-3 in the first round
of the Warsaw Open.

“When you haven’t been there,
haven’t done that in a while, it
throws you off a little bit,” said
Sharapova, whose last competi-
tive singles match was July 30,
“and then there you are after nine
months, and you have an oppor-
tunity to win your first match
back, and you start thinking of
everything that’s gone on, and
you kind of lose the present
time.”

The Russian had surgery for a
torn rotator cuff last year and
missed the past two Grand Slam
tournaments. She wouldn’t dis-
cuss the French Open, which
starts Sunday — and is the only
major championship she hasn’t
won. Sharapova, who said her
shoulder didn’t bother her against
Garbin, did stress that playing
matches is the only way to return
to the form that carried her to
the No. 1 ranking.

She’s now ranked 126th.

“T’ve been absent for so long,
and I’ve said it many times: You
can do so many things, you can
practice and you can play practice
matches, but it’s never the same
as going out and playing in a tour-
nament, and I think that’s what
Til need,” she said.

“T’ve played millions of match-
es in my career, and I'll play mil-
lions more, and I think right now

ies

RUSSIA'S Maria Sharapova returns a shot to Italy's Tathiana Garbin
during their first round match of the Warsaw Open tennis tournament
in Warsaw, Poland, on Monday May 18 2009.



“I'm hungry. I
haven’t played for a
while, and I want it
really bad, and
sometimes I
actually have to stop
myself at times and
tell myself to be

patient.”



it’s just going to be getting that
experience back and the thought
process on the court and doing
the right things to finish the
match.”

Sharapova did have problems
in that department Monday.

She cruised through the first
set and grabbed a 4-0 lead in the
second before her serve started
to falter. Serving at 5-3, she wast-
ed four match points — double-
faulting on two of them — and
then failed to convert two more in
the tiebreaker before netting a
forehand to give that set to
Garbin. “I was definitely a little
bit nervous closing that second
set out,” Sharapova said.

In the third, she dropped an
early break before rallying with
her trademark groundstrokes to
overpower the Italian. Sharapova
held serve to go up 5-3, then con-
verted her third match point
when Garbin knocked a back-



Czarek Sokolowski/AP Photo

hand long. “I certainly had desire
to win my first match back,”
Sharapova said. “I’m hungry. I
haven’t played for a while, and I
want it really bad, and sometimes
I actually have to stop myself at
times and tell myself to be
patient.”

She made a brief return to pro-
fessional tennis in March, play-
ing — and losing — one doubles
match in Indian Wells, Calif. But
she pulled out of a series of sin-
gles events, waiting until this
week to test her shoulder in com-
petition.

“In these nine months, the only
thing I’ve accomplished is proba-
bly a good pasta carbonara,”
Sharapova said. “At the end of
the day, that’s not my specialty.
My specialty is to go out and com-
pete and win Grand Slams.”

In other first-round action at
this clay-court tournament, Mar-
ta Domachowska of Poland beat
Akgul Amanmuradova of Uzbek-
istan, 6-2, 6-1; Anne Keothavong
of Britain eliminated Bethanie
Mattek-Sands of the United
States, 6-2, 7-6 (4); Jie Zheng of
China beat Olga Govortsova of
Belarus, 4-6, 7-6 (0), 6-3; Katery-
na Bondarenko of Ukraine beat
Tsvetana Pironkova of Bulgaria,
7-5, 6-2; Julia Goerges of Ger-
many defeated Aleksandra Woz-
niak of Canada 7-6 (5), 6-3; and
Alona Bondarenko of Ukraine
eliminated Katarzyna Piter of
Poland 6-0, 6-0.

Daniel Ochoa de Olza/AP Photo

ROGER FEDERER from Switzerland, right, seen, with Rafael Nadal from Spain, after winning the Madrid Open
Tennis Tournament, in Madrid, Sunday May 17, 2009.

rematch with Federer. “Federer has the potential to
win at Paris and at any site in the world. He’s showed
that throughout his career. But Paris begins with
the first round, not the final,” Nadal said. “If I was

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me the paper and I'll sign.”

In 2006 and 2007, one loss to Nadal was all that
stood between Federer and a season Grand Slam —
wins in all four majors. The situation is different
approaching Roland Garros this year. For a start,
Nadal is ranked No. 1, having ended Federer’s 237-
week stint atop the men’s rankings by winning the
Olympic gold medal at Beijing in August.

Nadal also beat Federer in the finals at both Wim-
bledon and the Australian Open.

The loss at Melbourne Park in January left the 27-
year-old Federer in tears. He did go some way to
rebounding from that in Madrid by ending Nadal’s
33-match winning streak on clay and denying him a
sixth title this year. Nadal, with an imposing 25-2
record in clay court finals, said his loss in Madrid
would have little influence on the upcoming major.

“To me, this tournament has nothing to do with
Paris. This tournament is practically another sur-
face compared with Paris,” said Nadal, who wasn’t
at his best following a record 4-hour semifinal win
over Novak Djokovic. “There are points on nor-
mal clay that aren’t points but they are here. The
conditions favored him more than me.”

Nadal said he was “empty” after Madrid and that
he needed a few days to recover. He said his right
knee is OK, but it acted up again on Saturday and
has troubled him since November.

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PAGE 10, TUESDAY, MAY 19, 2009

TRIBUNE SPORTS



INTERNATIONAL SPORTS

SOCCER

Tevez uncertain future typical of tangled life

m@ By ROBERT MILLWARD
AP Soccer Writer
LONDON

Coxe Tevez’s farewell to Man-
chester United fans celebrating
their latest title was another painful chap-
ter in a life and career that simply refus-
es to go in a straight line.

Seemingly unwanted by Man United,
the 24-year-old Argentine striker is reluc-
tantly looking for another club even
though he wants to stay and fans have
been pleading for months for manager
Alex Ferguson to make the loan perma-
nent.

What seems on the outside to be a
logical move just doesn’t happen in the
world of Carlos Tevez.

The small but tough striker, who bears
scars on his neck and chest after a child-
hood scalding, has weaved through tan-
gled transfers and rule-breaking contro-
versies, none his own fault. Now he
appears to be leaving United in a move
that clouds the club’s most recent cham-
pionship.

Tevez, whose tournament-leading
eight goals helped Argentina win its first
Olympic soccer gold medal at the Athens
Games, is one of the many South Amer-
ican stars whose contracts are owned by
various investors because clubs cannot
afford the transfer or salary.

When he moved from Argentina’s
Boca Juniors to Brazil’s Corinthians, the
transfer fee of almost $20 million was a
record for a Brazilian club. Some said
it was far too much to spend on one play-
er. But the bulk of the money came from
the English-based Media Sports Invest-
ment, and the criticism abated when his
goals led Corinthians to league titles.



Jon Super/AP Photo

MANCHESTER UNITED'S Carlos Tevez reacts after scoring against Wigan during their Eng-
lish Premier League soccer match at The JJB Stadium, Wigan, England, Wednesday May

13, 2009.

He had problems at Corinthians, how-
ever. He fought with a teammate during
training, and the club considered legal
action against him after he went missing
and was seen singing in a Buenos Aires
nightclub with a group he helped form.

MSI eventually sold Tevez on to Eng-
land’s West Ham, along with fellow
Argentina star Javier Mascherano. That
caused another furor on the other side of
the Atlantic.

Premier League rules say that clubs
cannot buy players from a third party
and fined West Ham $11 million. Tevez
continued to play for the Hammers, how-

ever, and his goal on the final day of the
Premier League championship saved the
club from relegation.

That led to more legal trouble for
West Ham when Sheffield United, which
went down instead, won a compensa-
tion claim after arguing that Tevez
shouldn’t have been allowed to keep
playing for the club.

Tevez finally thought he’d found a sta-
ble home at Old Trafford, where he
arrived on a two-year loan last season
with a view to a permanent transfer. He
helped the Red Devils win two straight
Premier League titles, a Champions

0 Soccer shorts

League title, a Club World Cup and a
League Cup.

The fans loved him because of his
work ethic, his persistence in tackling
after losing the ball and his skills in scor-
ing or setting up goals.

“The fans love a trier,” said Fergu-
son, ducking questions about why the
team won’t spend the estimated $37.5
million to buy him.

So Tevez is resigned to leaving at the
end of the season, either because the
club won’t complete the complicated
transfer with the people who own his
contract or because the Red Devils don’t
want him any more. The official line
from the club is that nothing will be
decided until after the season.

Tevez had moved his wife and young
daughter to England and has repeatedly
said he and his family were happy in
Manchester. But he felt betrayed by the
club and told Argentine media he also
was upset at being frequently left on the
bench.

Although he seemed to enjoy the title
celebrations at Old Trafford on Satur-
day, he wore an Argentina national team
shirt instead of Man United colors
toward the end of the ceremony.

“T feel a lot of pain to have to leave
Manchester United because of the fans.
It’s hard for me to accept this,” Tevez
said.

“Each day that goes by is more diffi-
cult for me because I know that I am
not going to play at the club anymore.”

Although Ferguson is likely to rest
most of his front-line players in Sunday’s
final league game at Hull, there is still the
Champions League final May 27 against
Barcelona. If Tevez is not in the lineup
or on the bench, that will signal his Unit-
ed career is over.

Beckham backs England's
2018 World Cup bid

m@ WEMBLEY, England (AP)
— David Beckham teamed up
with Prime Minister Gordon
Brown to launch England’s bid
for the 2018 World Cup on Mon-
day, saying that winning the right
to host would be as satisfying as
anything he’s accomplished on
the field.

“Tt would be up there with win-
ning (trophies) and the success
I’ve had in my career because to
be part of a successful bid, like I
was with the Olympics, would be

a huge honour,” the former Eng-
land captain said.

England is competing against
the United States, Australia,
Mexico, Russia, Indonesia and
Japan, as well as possible joint
bids by Spain and Portugal and
the Netherlands and Belgium.
FIFA’s executive committee will
make the decision in December
2010. “I’ve played with some of
the biggest and best (players) in
the world and all they talk about
is the passion and atmosphere
that is shown at England games
and games against teams from
England,” Beckham said.

Beckham won the Champions
League with Manchester United

and the Spanish league title with
Real Madrid. He is now on loan
at AC Milan from the Los Ange-
les Galaxy. Beckham, who was
part of London’s successful bid
for the 2012 Olympics, said Eng-
land would probably be able to
stage the World Cup right now.

Juventus fires coach
Claudio Ranieri

@ TURIN, Italy — Juventus fired
coach Claudio Ranieri on Mon-
day, saying a change was the only
way to salvage what’s left of a
season in which the team has

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gone winless in its last seven
games.

He was replaced by Ciro Fer-
rara, a former Juventus defender
and current coach of the club’s
youth team. Ferrara was an assis-
tant to Marcello Lippi, the World-
Cup winning coach who is back
leading the national team.

Juventus drew 2-2 at home
Sunday with Atalanta, leaving the
Turin club three points behind
second-placed AC Milan with two
games left. Inter Milan has
clinched the Serie A title.

“We absolutely have to do
something different,” general
manager Jean-Claude Blanc told
the ANSA news agency. “We

wanted to give a strong shake-up
and now it’s all in the hands of
the players.”

Ferrara is expected to remain
coach only until the end of the
season, but Blanc suggested he
might stay longer. The GM said
Ferrara had “all the qualities to
be considered with a lot of atten-
tion for the future,” but stressed
the final two games would be crit-
ical. Juventus has not won since
March, with six draws and a
defeat in its last seven games. It
lost to Chelsea in the first knock-
out round of the Champions
League and fell in the semifinals
of the Italian Cup to eventual
champion Lazio.

0 In brief

Jolinson
repeats as
Texas Open
champion

@ SAN ANTONIO — Zach John-
son left town with another Texas
Open win, a PGA Tour distinc-
tion and the top spot in the
FedEx Cup standings, reports
Associated Press.

No wonder he’s going to miss it
here. Winning at La Cantera Golf
Club for the second time in seven
months, Johnson needed just one
hole to beat James Driscoll in a
sudden-death playoff Sunday and
successfully defend his title for
his sixth career tour victory.

Johnson beat Driscoll, who ral-
lied from eight strokes back in a
final-round shootout to force the
playoff, with a 10-foot birdie on
the par-4 18th. The two finished
regulation at 15-under 265 — one
the 2007 Masters champion, the
other a conditional-status tour
player who was 141st on the mon-
ey list last year. Johnson won in
the La Cantera finale, with the
tournament moving to anew TPC
course in 2010.

London mayor
visits Seoul
for inspiration

HM SEOUL, South Korea —
London’s mayor says a tour of
the Seoul Olympics sites has giv-
en him good ideas on how to
build venues that will have a last-
ing legacy long after the 2012
Games. Mayor Boris Johnson sin-
gled out the 1988 Olympic Vil-
lage as an “amazing” example of
how to sell apartments in advance
to help raise money for the site.

The British government has
had to dip into a contingency fund
to help build the Olympic Village
because of a lack of private
financing during the global eco-
nomic recession.

Johnson praised the sculpture
garden, parks, glades and water-
side features at the 1988 Olympics
site in southeastern Seoul. John-
son says he also watched hun-
dreds going for a swim in the
Olympic Games pool Monday.

London’s 85,000-seat Olympic
stadium is to be converted into a
25,000-seat arena after the 2012
Games are over.

UTR RU Tea



att Dunham/AP Photo

SUNDERLAND'S Kenwyne Jones does a backflip as he celebrates scoring during the English Premier
League soccer match between Portsmouth and Sunderland at Fratton Park stadium in Portsmouth, England,

Monday, May 18, 2009.



SUNDERLAND'S ccna Jones
reacts in disappointment on the
final whistle.

Sunderland still face a battle
for Premier League survival
after two defensive howlers
allowed Portsmouth to grab a
3-1 victory at Fratton Park.

The Black Cats could have
ensured top flight status with a
win. It started so well for them
when they led with a 59th
minute strike from Kenwyne
Jones.

Portsmouth, however,
scored twice inside seven min-
utes through John Utaka and
Phil Bardsley's own-goal after
a horrible blunder from Anton
Ferdinand, before an Armand
Traore strike sealed victory
three minutes from time.

Sunderland boss Ricky
Sbragia bemoaned his side's
defending, saying after the
game: "It's happening too
often in general — we play
well, we think we're sort of in
charge of the game.”



Matt Dunham/AP Photo

PORTSMOUTH'S Peter Crouch, top, battles for the ball with Sunder-
land's Grant Ledbitter during the English Premier League soccer
match between Portsmouth and Sunderland at Fratton Park stadium
in Portsmouth, England, Monday, May 18, 2009. Portsmouth won the
match 3-1.
PAGE 12, TUESDAY, MAY 19, 2009 THE TRIBUNE
LOCAL NEWS





4 oa p.
cole

*2po Thigh & Leg

=2 Dinner Rall

tae

Raymond A Bethel/BIS

Miss Bahamas World, contestants and executives
pay a courtesy call on the Governor General

MISS Bahamas World Tinnyse Johnson, assistant director of talent development; Miss
executives of the Miss Bahamas World Organ- Sposabelle Bridal, formal and evening wear,
isation, and contestants in the 2009 pageant Devera Pinder; Miss Galleria Cinemas Emily
paid a courtesy call on the Governor General Darville; Miss Red Hot Gabrielle Major; Miss
Arthur Hanna on Monday, May 11 at Gov- D § Lifestyles Inc Kendra Wilkinson; Miss



ernment House. Bahamas Experience Llatetra Laing; Miss Col-

iqinal Famous Bowl , rae Pictured seated from left are Miss Davis _ ors Entertainment McChenier Johnson; Miss

SS siya CU es “ Trucking Dashanique Poitier; Miss Theodore Bella Donna Michaela Ferguson; Miss But-

ren Ellyett Productions, Channa Cius; Governor tons Bridal and Formal Wear Shavonne

reer eer General Hanna; Miss Bahamas World 2008; McKenzie; Miss Harbour Island Swanique

Pere len eed doers ES) isis Sehr te ene Ms Johnson; Miss Exuma Danielle Morley; Sawyer, and Leslia Miller, MBO director of



(standing from left) Shavonne Bain, MBO pageant affairs.

NEMA oversees
preparedness of
hurricane shelters

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@ By LINDSAY
THOMPSON

THE National Emergency
Management Agency
(NEMA) is readying shelters
throughout the country as the
2009 Atlantic Hurricane Sea-
son approaches.

NEMA and its partners
headed by the Department of
Social Services conducted a
re-classification exercise of
the 26 identified shelters on
New Providence last Thurs-
day to ensure they are ready
in the event a hurricane
strikes. The season runs from
June 1 to November 30.

Captain Stephen Russell,
director of NEMA, said that
in accordance with the
national emergency disaster
plan, the inspection was to
ensure that there are suitable
shelter facilities throughout
the country.

“We are vigorously trying
to inspect proposed shelters
to ensure that they are prop-
erly equipped in the event the
country is faced with a disas-
ter, especially a hurricane,”
he said.

Inspection of Family Island
shelters has already begun.
Shelter managers workshops
are also being scheduled.

Captain Russell thanked
NEMA’s international part-
ners - the United States
Agency for International
Development (USAID) and
the Office of United States
Foreign Disaster Assistance
(OFDA), for their help in dis-
aster management.

William Pratt, assistant
director of Social Services,
said consent letters were sent
to church leaders requesting
their facilities to be used as
shelters for the upcoming
hurricane season.

And, following a
favourable response, inspec-
tions were carried out.

Each facility will carry the
sign, ‘Emergency Hurricane
Shelter’ with the blue hurri-
cane symbol on top, replacing
the Red Cross symbol.

Previously, school gyms
were used as shelters but that
“posed a problem,” he
explained. They were still
occupied when = school
reopened.

The team comprises repre-
sentatives from NEMA, the
Department of Social Ser-
vices, Environmental Health,
the Fire Branch of the Royal
Bahamas Police Force, the
Royal Bahamas Defence
Force and the Red Cross.

A checklist is used to deter-
mine whether the facility is
designated a hurricane shel-
ter.

The team looks at the
building location for easy
access, the building code reg-

ulations, storm shutters and
whether window frames are
properly affixed to walls, cer-
tain amenities and services
including proper electrical
wiring, safe and adequate
water supply, sanitary facili-
ties, kitchen facilities, and
wheelchair accessibility
among others.

Shelter management is now
the responsibility of the
Department of Social Ser-
vices.

The 2009 hurricane shelters
for New Providence are as
follows:

- Church of God Auditori-
um, Joe Farrington Road;

- Epiphany Anglican
Church, Prince Charles Dri-
ve;

- Epworth Hall, Shirley
Street;

- Holy Cross Anglican
Church, Highbury Park off
Soldier Road;

- Kemp Road Ministries,
Kemp Road;

- Pilgrim Baptist Church,
St James Road;

- Salvation Army, Mackey
Street;

- St Mary’s Hall, St Augus-
tine, Bernard Road in Fix
Hill;

- Agape Full Gospel Bap-
tist Church, Kennedy Subdi-
vision;

- Golden Gates Assembly,
Carmichael Road;

- New Bethlehem Baptist
Church, Independence Dri-
ve;

- Southwest Cathedral
Church of God, Carmichael
Road;

- Church of God of Prophe-
cy, East Street;

- Calvary Bible Church,
Collins Avenue;

- Church of God of Prophe-
cy, Augusta and Patton
Streets;

- Ebenezer Mission Baptist
Church, Charles Vincent
Street;

- Salvation Army, Meadow
Street;

- St Barnabas Anglican
Church, Wulff Road;

- Bahamas Association for
the Physically Disabled, Dol-
phin Drive;

- Church of God of Prophe-
cy, Gambier Village;

— Hillview Seventh Day
Adventist Church, Tonique
Williams- Darling Highway;

— Mount Moriah Baptist
Church, Farrington Road;

— New Providence Com-
munity Centre, Blake Road;

— Good News Seventh Day
Adventist Church, Great
Britain Street, Flamingo Gar-
dens;

— Workers’ House, Tonique
Williams- Darling Highway;

— New Hope Missionary
Baptist Church, Joan’s
Heights West.


u





i, i
= I

THE TRIBUNE



THE TY SCREENS inside Cable Bahamas...

Cable Bahamas ‘vehemently
opposes’ USO obligations

@ By NEIL HARTNELL
Tribune Business Editor

CABLE Bahamas and its
subsidiaries “vehemently
oppose” the Government’s
plans to impose universal ser-
vice obligations (USO) on it for
the provision of television ser-
vices throughout the Bahamas,
and are also challenging its des-
ignation of the company as hav-
ing “significant market power”
in the provision of Internet and
pay-per-view television services.

A copy of the BISX-listed
company’s feedback to the
USO and licensing consulta-
tions, initiated as part of the
Government’s communications
sector regulatory reform, which
has been obtained by Tribune

* Says no universal service
obligations for television
anywhere else in the world

* BISX-listed firm also
challenges its designation
as having ‘significant
market power’ in
Internet, pay-TV markets

Business, said Cable Bahamas
was “unaware of any other
jurisdiction in the world where
the concept of universal service
has been applied to the provi-
sioning of television service”.
Acknowledging that its

SEE page 7B

Venture fund sees 75%
fall in new plans

@ By NEIL HARTNELL
Tribune Business Editor

THE Government-sponsored
venture capital fund’s adminis-
trator yesterday said it had seen
a 75 per cent drop in new busi-
ness plan submissions to five
per month, as he urged Bahami-
an entrepreneurs to “start
small” and not attempt to “get
rich quick”.

Jerome Gomez, the Baker
Tilly Gomez executive who
oversees the Bahamas Entre-
preneurial Venture Fund, said it
had provided financing to a fur-
ther three Bahamian businesses
for 2009 to-date, taking the total
number of ventures it had assist-
ed to 48.

While the number of business
plans/financial applications sub-
mitted to the fund had
decreased to around five per
month, down from a previous
average of 20, Mr Gomez said
this was due more to “people
forgetting that we are around”,
rather than the prevailing eco-
nomic climate.

“We’ve been quite for a
while,” Mr Gomez said. “We’ve
not been out there as we have
been in the past, so people may
have forgotten.”

While financial institutions
were currently unlikely to be
interested in providing capital
to the Bahamas Entrepreneurial
Venture Fund, largely due to

* Applications fall from 20 per
month to 5, but administrator
believes due to lack of
fund publicity

* Three businesses - cheque
authorisation, catering and block
making - financed this year so far

* 48 businesses aided, with 11
receiving $1.2m in equity and 37
some $2.8m in debt financing
for $4m grand total

* Venture fund ‘putting house in
order’ with portfolio pruning,
with two businesses it has financed
already gone, and ‘hard decisions’
likely on others

the economy and their own
related internal issues, Mr
Gomez said the fund was busy
“putting the house in order”
and pruning its company port-
folio to make it attractive to the
private sector.

He added that 50 per cent of
the 48 entrepreneurs and start-
ups it had financed to date were
“on their way to some degree of
success”, while the other 50 per
cent were “shaky, still struggling
to stand on their feet”.

“We’ve lost two companies
[we financed] on the way so
far,” Mr Gomez told Tribune
Business, “and there may be
one or two more if they can’t

SEE page 4B

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MAY 19, 2009

SECTION B « business@tribunemedia.net

Cable hits at BTC’s
‘reform influence’

@ By NEIL HARTNELL
Tribune Business Editor

able Bahamas has accused the
Government’s communications
regulatory reform process of giv-
ing its rival, the Bahamas
Telecommunications Company
(BTC), “preferential treatment and influence”
through having three of its senior executives
sitting on the committee overseeing the effort.

The BISX-listed entity, in its April 20, 2009,
feedback to the communications sector reform
proposals, argued that the perception of
integrity in the process had been “under-
mined” because BTC’s executive chairman,
Julian Francis; Felicity Johnson, BTC’s vice-
president for legal, regulatory and intercon-
nection, and its company secretary; and Tellis
Symonette, BTC’s senior vice-president for
Family Islands and administration, were all
on the BTC Privatisation Committee over-
seeing it.

In its response, signed by in-house legal
counsel Judith Smith, Cable Bahamas and its
Caribbean Crossings subsidiary said they want-
ed to “register their disappointment with, and
formally protest, the apparent decision of the
Government to abandon its original, and
recently re-espoused, commitment to an open,
transparent and non-discriminatory public con-
sultation process by according preferential
treatment and influence in that process to
BTC, to the exclusion of all other carriers”.

Business Reporter

Claims rival had ‘preferential
treatment and position’ in
communications sector overhaul
by having three persons on
committee overseeing effort

The inference from Cable Bahamas is that
BTC had influence over the outcome of com-
munications reform and the consultation/feed-
back process to its benefit, and the detriment
of other, rival carriers and telecoms competi-
tors.

Such assertions, though, have not been
proven. T. B. Donaldson, the BTC privatis-
taion committtee’s chairman, did not return a
voice mail left on his office telephone, seeking
comment, before last night’s press deadline.

Cable Bahamas also complained that the
Broadcasting Corporation of the Bahamas
(BCB) was represented on the committee by
its chairman Michael Moss, to the exclusion
again of other carriers.

While the strong BTC presence on the com-
mittee was understandable when efforts were
underway to facilitate the 100 per cent state-
owned carrier’s privatisation, Cable Bahamas
said “the privileged position” enjoyed by BTC
and the BCB “lost any plausible rationale”

SEE page 5B



‘Zero margin of error’

m@ By CHESTER ROBARDS = Independent testers ensure bottled water



crobards@tribunemedia.net

MOST Bahamian potable
water companies are conduct-
ing some manner of testing on
their products, the president of
an environmental laboratory
and consultant company that
specialises in testing and quali-
ty controls, said yesterday.

Anthony Knowles, of Adka
Environmental Laboratories
and Consultants, told Tribune
Business that his company does
testing for many water suppli-
ers and contends that many oth-
er suppliers use different labo-
ratories.

Mr Knowles said he was not

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quality, as greater regulation of sector urged

aware of any water companies
that did not test their water.

Recently, however, several
impostor bottles bearing the
Aquapure label were confiscat-
ed by police and, after testing,
were found to have off-the-
chart levels of disease-causing
and potentially deadly bacteria.

Mr Knowles said companies
who were using his testing facil-
ities were doing well. “We make
recommendations and see that
they are carried out,” he
explained.

Chelsea’s Choice cannot
begin daily bottling until their

water and facilities have been
tested by Adka, according to
the company’s managing direc-
tor.

Tina Knowles said that hav-
ing an independent quality con-
trol and testing company on site
is costly, but necessary. “We
operate with a zero margin of
error,” she said.

Ms Knowles said Adka sani-
tises all of Chelsea’s equipment
daily, and then gives the go-
ahead for water production to
begin.

SEE page 5B

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Sentinels
Anshacher
purchase
‘imminent’

B By NEIL HARTNELL
Tribune Business Editor

SENTINEL Bank & Trust,
the offshore financial institu-
tion that is part of the former
Colina Financial Group (CFG),
it set to “imminently close” its
acquisition of Ansbacher
(Bahamas), Tribune Business
sources revealed last night.

Separate sources told this
newspaper that the Ansbacher
(Bahamas) deal “might be clos-
ing some time this week or
next”, while another confirmed
it was “closing imminently”.

Tribune Business was told
that the acquisition’s closing had
been delayed by the need to
obtain Central Bank of the
Bahamas approval for the
acquisition, which has now been
forthcoming.

“Tt got stalled on the Central
Bank approval for a couple of

SEE page 5B

The information contained is from a third
party and The Tribune can not be held
responsible for errors and/or omission,
from the daily report.



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PAGE 2B, TUESDAY, MAY 19, 2009

City Markets aims to
escape ‘perfect storm’

IN the last 10 days, Bahamas
Supermarkets (BSL) has suf-
fered armed robberies at three
of its City Markets stores, the
latest at the gleaming blue-chip
Cable Beach supermarket.
Internal employee pilferage and
cashier fraud have plagued the
business and impacted margins
for the last couple of years, a
leakage gradually being reduced
by dismissals, prosecutions and
better surveillance and technol-
ogy.

The soft-spoken Sunil Cha-
trani, who was moved by Neal &
Massey, the Trinidad conglom-
erate that acts as BSL’s largest

shareholder, from his senior
post in Barbados last October
to become chief executive of the
Bahamian company, was frank
in telling us that the level of
crime in Nassau far exceeds
what Neal & Massey has expe-
rienced at its other operations in
Barbados, Trinidad, or St. Lucia.

But other issues have been
dominating his time. Working
together with Evangeline
(Vangie) Rahming, the crisp
Bahamian accountant who left
KPMG early in 2008, and was
later promoted to corporate
chief financial officer, he creat-
ed a multi-page Business Recov-

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Strong odor &

ery Plan dated April 9, 2009,
which has demonstrated some
$5 million already achieved in
cost savings. When Mr Chatrani
took over last autumn, the
enterprise was at a low point.
The outlook offered by the
chairman at last August’s annu-
al general meeting (AGM)
proved over-optimistic, and by
October even Bahamian whole-
salers were threatening to cut
off credit and effectively shut
the company down.

Since that time, Mr Chatrani
and his executives have held
many meetings to renegotiate
supply and delivery contracts,
and are getting greater cooper-
ation from their counterparties.
Bahamas Food Services even
installed warehouse refrigera-
tion equipment free of charge.
Staffing, which had ballooned
to 850 compared to 700 under
previous Winn-Dixie manage-
ment, has now been shrunk
back to around 700 employees.

Of course, the company is not
yet out of the woods, as can be
seen by the operating loss of
$3.4 million for the six months
ended January 9, 2009. This may
suggest an improvement in the

decline from the last full
year’s loss of $13.4 million, but
whether the improvement is sus-
tainable can only be judged
when the latest quarterly results
are published. One factor that
continues to concern Mr Cha-
trani is the low percentage of
product that he can buy direct
from foreign suppliers — about 7
per cent, instead of a normal 35
per cent. The balance must be
bought from Bahamian whole-
salers, who of course charge
their own commissions that
sharply reduce BSL’s operating
margins. BSL simply does not
have the cash resources or cred-
it to buy in bulk from abroad.

So the response to the Busi-
ness Recovery Plan is crucial. It
has been circulated to all the

by Richard an

BSL Holdings shareholders, the
entity that owns 78 per cent of
the operating company, BSL.
Neal & Massy in turn holds 40
per cent of Holdings, with the
remaining 60 per cent Bahami-
an-owned via various wealthy
individuals, the Hotel Pension
Funds, and the Fidelity private
investment group.

The Plan forecasts that BSL
could break even later in 2009
and return to profit in 2010, but
only on condition that all these
parties provide new funding,
partly to the operating company
and partly to Holdings to ser-
vice its loan from the Royal
Bank of Canada. Mr Chatrani
told us that these contributions
must be made oportionate-
ly”, which suggests that Neal &
Massey will only step forward
if the Bahamian shareholders
also share the burden.

s we write, firm commit-
ments from all the Bahamians
are actively being sought with
an end-of-month deadline.
Although meeting it seems
probable, BSL is still on a knife-
edge until every signature is in
place. Only then can the com-
pany’s auditors, KPMG, be
expected to release their certifi-
cation for the 2008 fiscal year
without the “going concern”
qualification that would be dis-

astrous for BSL’s credit stand-
ing.

The odds seem favourable,
though not certain, that Mr Cha-
trani and Ms Rahming, sup-
ported by visiting Neal &
Massey staffers and a stronger
Bahamian management team
(and more cash), will be suc-
cessful in engineering a turn-
around. The question of how
BSL fell into these serious
straits, and who personally or
what extraneous conditions
were responsible, can long be
debated. Mr Chatrani, in office
just since last autumn though an
earlier observer, does not point
fingers but simply says the con-
ditions for a “perfect storm”
prevailed after the 2006 acqui-
sition.

The record shows that in its
last year of ownership, Winn-
Dixie sold over $21 million
worth of products to BSL, on
which it increased prices by at
least 5 per cent after the sale to
Holdings, and these items had to
be replaced by IGA and other
brands unfamiliar to Bahami-
ans. The current recession has
had its unavoidable impact on
sales. The abrupt transfer of
accounting and inventory func-
tions from Jacksonville to Nas-
sau — perhaps necessary, but
perhaps premature — combined
with personal frictions and
changes in the executive ranks,
inevitably resulted in degrada-
tion of financial controls.

In April 2008, the chief oper-
ating office Stephen Boyle
issued an ill-timed press release
that a $4 million investment in
retail IT scanning technology
was already paying its way in
reducing losses — followed by
the sharp earnings decline
announced in August and his
own departure in September. In
May 2008, the chief financial
officer Bryan Knowles left the
company, leading later to a high-
ly publicised dispute between

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himself and chairman Basil
Sands over whether he and his
team had given the Board mis-
leading financial information.
Whoever was right or wrong, it
was an unseemly squabble for
a public company. The situation
was not alleviated by the chair-
man’s comment, duly reported
in the press, that the Board
might have exercised more dili-
gence.

Whether these issues should
be buried in past history, or
whether the present BSL Board
is competent enough to carry
the company forward, é
for shareholder decisions
can be aired at the next AGM.

We have recommended to
the Board that before the
é n as the auditors’
nis published, a pub-
“investor presentation” be
made by Mr Chatrani and Ms
Rahming, giving them the
opportunity to speak openly and
answer questions about the pre-
sent condition and future
prospects of BSL. This would
be normal practice for any pub-
lic company in BSL’s delicate
but hopeful state of affairs.
Whatever the future holds
for BSL does not extinguish the
special grievance of the 1,500
minority shareholders, owning
22 per cent of the company.
Their potential legal claim under
the Companies Act against the
directors, and against BSL
Holdings, for completing the
Winn-Dixie transaction with no
offer or information to the
minority, is being reviewed by
them and their counsel. It is
unquestioned that while Winn-
Dixie got the nice price of $16
for their shares, the minority got
nothing and are now holding
non-marketable shares of dubi-
ous value that have paid no div-
idends for over 18 months.
Whether Bahamian law will give
them any recourse remains to
be tested.


THE TRIBUNE

TUESDAY, MAY 19, 2009, PAGE 3B





Bahamas urged to
be ‘vigilant’ on G-20

m@ By CHESTER ROBARDS
Business Reporter
crobards@tribunemedia.net

THE IMPENDING reforms to the US
tax code may not impact the Bahamas
much due to this country’s continued coop-
eration with Washington through the Tax
Information Exchange Agreement (TIEA),
the Bahamas Financial Services Board’s
(BFSB) chief executive/executive director
believes.

Wendy Warren said the Bahamas has
met all the standards required by the US,
and contended that the amendments to the
US tax code are a domestic policy change.

She said the bigger picture was how these
initiatives would impact global business,
including business brought to the Bahamas-
through foreign investment.

The BFSB held a follow-up session last
Friday with key players in the financial ser-
vices sector to discuss what issues and ini-
tiatives could be taken to government for
consideration.

According to Ms Warren, the BFSB
makes recommendations to the Govern-
ment about how it should proceed on mat-
ters impacting the financial services indus-
try on a global stage.

“Tt is very easy following the G-20 meet-
ing to think this has gone quiet, but we
think there is still a lot of activity and the
Bahamas must remain vigilant,” she said.

“We must remain focused on these devel-

Government works
on the impact of

WENDY WARREN



opments, so that’s really the objective
today; to get a sense from the industry on
any further input that would want to take to
government.”

One suggestion that has been put forth by
financial experts is the taxation of foreign
client assets. However, Ms Warren said she
has not seen any indication that the

Bahamas is moving toward this kind of tax-
ation, which could change the allure of its
international banking sector.

“From the Bahamas’ perspective, I
haven’t received any indication that the
Bahamas is looking to tax individuals,” she
said. “I don’t see that in the cards any-
where.”

The BFSB, she continued, will be exam-
ining the current environment to see if
there are modifications that will allow this
country to become more attractive to
investors.

Ms Warren said the entire world’s eco-
nomic environment has been rattled by the
recent financial crisis, and she suspects
there will be many more changes to come,
“but in terms of preparing ourselves, we
have made significant advances.

“We want to ensure we are engaging and
keeping that conversation going, and being
able to provide input to the relevant stake
holders,” she said.

The Bahamas was recently place on a
grey list by OECD nations, meaning it has
begun to comply with standards that could
keep it from being placed under the dis-
tinction of a tax haven.

“The Bahamas has been in this business
for many years, and we see financial ser-
vices as being critical to the social environ-
ment in the Bahamas and the economic
environment, so we have to invest in this
industry,” said Ms Warren. “It’s critical to
our economy and critical to our society.”



#

THE BAHAMAS SOCIETY OF ENGINEERS

The Public Is Cordially Invited To Attend
THE MONTHLY LUNCHEON PRESENTATION
Hosted by The Bahamas Society of Engineers

On
Thursday, May 21, 2009

Topic

“THE IMPACT OF THE EPA ON
THE ENGINEERING FIELD”

Guest Speaker
MR. JOHN K.F. DELANEY

Managing Partner
Higgs & Johnson

PLACE:
EAST VILLA RESTAURANT
East Bay Street
Time: 12:00p.m.

If possible please confirm your attendance by e-mail

Gracesharma0S5@yahoo.com or JEENiott@bahamaselectricty.com
or quentin. knowles@flameless.com

BAHABSTAS DEWERDIAOPMENT BANK

Cable Beach, West Buy Street.
PaO. Box M- 304
Abi, Daahanogs
Telit 242) 327-378 S27-S793-6
Pase( 242) 327-5047, 327-L2SH
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The general public is invited to attend Bahamas
Development Bank’s sale of repossessed assets.

global warming

lm By CHESTER ROBARDS
Business Reporter
crobards@tribunemedia.net

THE GOVERNMENT is
working closely with interna-
tional agencies in order to find
solutions to the problem of
global warming, according to
the minister of state for the
environment, after a recent
World Bank study revealed its
effects could deal an almost $50
million blow to this economy.

Phenton Neymour told Tri-
bune Business that the
Bahamas has been active in
raising awareness on the issue of
global warming, and this coun-
try’s standing as one of the top
10 countries that could be most

These are the things that are
essential to moving forward,
including letting our voice be
heard internationally.”

Mr Neymour said the
Bahamas will be represented at
the United Nations Climate
Change Conference in Copen-
hagen this December.

The World Bank study
revealed that an estimated 1,517
square miles of Bahamian
coastline could be impacted
over a number of years, repre-
senting 54.67 per cent of the
total coastline. As a result, the
study estimates 3,711 persons
could be impacted over the
same period of time, represent-

ing 73.03 per cent of the total
Bahamian population living on
a coastline that could possibly
be affected.

In a list of 10 countries most
at risk for serious damage as
storm surges intensify, the
Bahamas tops the list three
times out of six categories, as
assessed by the World Bank.

“We have discussed and have
put in the public domain the
fact that we need to reduce the
number homes being built in
low lying areas that are prone to
flooding,” said Mr Neymour.
“And we must be aware of the
damage to homes should we
build in coastal areas.”

ASSET























lectronic Equipment Tables.

(1) Compaq Presario Computer Tower * (1) Marble Table (Rectangle)
(1) Canon Canoscan N640D EX Scanner
(1) Digital Scale (New)

(1) Whirl Microwave

(1)Tec Cash Register

(1) Epson Stylus Pro 9600 Print Engine
(1) HP DeskJet 656c Printer (Desktop)
(1) Monitor

(1) 1520 Epson Stylus Color Printer

Cooler/Freezers

) Two Door Chest Freezer
) lce Cream Cooler

) Single Door Cooler

) 8’ Walk-in Freezer
wCompressor (New)

(1) Keyboard & Mouse B ‘t lon Equipment
(1) Brothers Printer - (3) Nail Tables

(1) Samsung Digital Camcorder * (7) Facial Machine

(1) Dell Scanner & Printer * (2) Nail Stools

. qd
. qa
. qd
. qa

achinery

(1) Chrome Juice Filler

(1) Multi Fruit Juicer

(1) Quilting Sewing Machine

(1) Deli Showcase

(1) Singer Sewing Machine

(1) Janome Monogram/Embroidery Sewing Machine

(1) Singer Quantum XL150 Sewing Machine with Serger

(1) Meat Saw (New)

(1) Deli Selection (Minor 2000 MT-SE) (New)
Tech Work Benches
Alternator Test Bench

impacted by its effects.
As a low lying chain of
islands, the Bahamas is expect-

Assortment of Items

- Cooking Utensils Pots, Pans & Plates

+ (2) Breakfast Nooks
- Air Hockey Game
* (1) Yamaha Wave Runner

)

)

) Paint Booth

) Rivet Machine

) 6” Storage Cabinet
1) 4” Craftsman Tool Cabinet
Brake Washer





ed to be one of many nations
around the world affected by
Sea level Rise (SLR) brought
about by rising global tempera-
tures.

Scientists have also predict-
ed that rising surface tempera-
tures of the world’s oceans will
spawn a greater number of high
intensity hurricanes and, cou-
pled with SLR, will increase the
instance of damaging storm
surges.

“We are in the top five most
vulnerable to climate change
and we need to be aware that it
will impact us,” said Mr Ney-
mour.

The Bahamas has launched
its National Energy Policy
which looks at ways to reduce
dependency on fossil fuels as
an energy source. This also
underscores the Bahamas’ com-
mitment to act on the impend-
ing global impact of climate
change.

“The whole drive is to dimin-
ish our reliance on fossil fuels,”
said Mr Neymour.

“The real emphasis need to
be put on reducing the potential
impact from storm surges, hur-
ricanes, etc, and improving the
design and construction of our
sea walls.

For the stories
behind the news,
eetle Marler
on Mondays

NMC SALES, SERVICE and PARTS
All for One NEW NUMBER

Distributors for Honda, Chevrolet, Cadillac and ACDelco Parts | Shirley Street, Nassau








ESSAY COMPETITION

TENTH ANNUAL PUBLIC SERVICE WEEK

The Department of Public Service will host an Essay
Competition as one of the activities for the Tenth Annual
Public Service Week. The Competition is open to Junior
and Senior Students in New Providence.












Additionally, this year, a speech competition will be
for schools in the Northern & Southern Bahamas,
respectively. Students interested in participating in the
Essay Competition should write a 250 - 300 words (Junior
High), and 450 - 500 words (Senior High), essay on the
topic: “ The Public Service-Striving for Excellence in











Customer Service.”

The deadlines for entries, which should be referred
to the attention of Mrs. Antoinette Thompson, Deputy
Permanent Secretary, Department of Public Service, is








Friday 24th July, 2009.

A Dell Desktop 2400 Computer System will be awarded to
the winner each category. The first runners-up for both the
Essay and Speech Competition in the Junior & Senior High
School category, will be awarded a $500 gift certificate.






The winners will be announced during the Tenth Annual
Public Service Week Awards Ceremony scheduled for

Saturday 10th October 2009.

Students interested in the Speech Competition for the
Northern and Southern Bahamas should contact their

Language Arts Teacher.



Sand Blaster
Vari-Drive

Inland Steel, Sumner Street off Solider Rd.Nassau, Bahamas

Exit Abundant Life Road turn right onto Solider Road then the first left
onto Sumner Street tenth two storey white & blue building on the left

Date & Time: 10:00a.m. — 3:00p.m. — Saturday May 23, 2009

All assets are sold as is where is for cash, cashier’s cheque. No purchase(s) will be released
until paid in full.

The general public is invited to attend Bahamas Development Bank’s sale of repossessed Vehicles
and small Vessels.

2003 Dodge Caravan

2002 Hyundai H-1 Van SUX

1997 Double Axle Mack Dump Truck
1997 Dodge Stratus

1982 GMC Brigadier Drill Truck
2001 Kia Pregio Van

1989 Ford L8000 Drill Truck (Green)

2001 Hyundai H-1 Van SUX
2006 Mitsubishi Canter Truck
1996 Ford Explorer

2000 Ford Ranger Truck
1999 Ford F-250 Truck

2006 Hyundai H-1 SVX Van

Vessels

20’ Robolo Vessel (1996) with Evinrude Outboard Engine

19’ Fiberglass Sports Vessel (1989) Hull Only

21 Seacraft Vessel (1974) with 140 HP Yamaha Outboard Engine

19’ Spanish Wells Runabout Vessel (1991) with 115 HP Mercury Outboard Engine
20’ Abaco Skiff (1997) with 115 HP Mercury Outboard Engine

Location: Internal Security Division Compound, Thompson Blvd

Nassau, Bahamas

Date & Time: 10:00a.m. — 3:00p.m. — Saturday May 23, 2009

For additional information telephone 327-5780.

The public is invited to come and view the aforementioned assets on the date and time indicated.
After which you may submit Sealed bids marked “TENDER-EQUIPMENT” to Bahamas
Development Bank, P.O. Box N-3034, Nassau, Bahamas. A representative will be on the
compound from 10:00am to 3:00pm to collect and secure all offers, which will be opened on May
25, 2009. Please note that all bids on the aforementioned assets should be received by 3:00 pm
May 23, 2009. The Bahamas Development Bank reserves the right to reject any or all offers. All
assets are sold as is.

302-0130 Kos
PAGE 4B, TUESDAY, MAY 19, 2009

THE TRIBUNE





Venture fund sees 75 per
cent fall in new plans

FROM page 1B

reorganise or restructure. We
may have to consider closing
them.”




Mr Gomez said the Bahamas
Entrepreneurial Venture Fund
had assessed Bahamian finan-
cial services businesses it
thought might be interested in

NOTICE

NOTICE OF DISSOLUTION










WILD FLOWER INC.





Pursuant to Park LX, Section 137 (6) of the (Interna-
tional Business Companies Act, 2000), we hereby sub-
mit that winding-up and dissolution of the Company
has been completed on the 29 day of May, 2009.


















Credit Suisse Trust Limited
Liquidator

NOTICE
RC FINCO INVITES TENDERS

RBC FINCO invites janders for the purchase of the tollrwing

“All THAT™ poece parcel o¢ kot of land comprising
Mo. 45 in Massan Village Subdivision =
ol New Providence one of nomorreecalth of the Pabaertes
Situated thereon is a Deplex Apartment with each unit consisting of (2) bedenoms
and (1) bereom

who, 0) ad 11 od Bock
fe ip ihe Souther Lastest of the lkond

of the Glands of &

Peoperty Suze: 5000 sq fi
Boing Sane: 20175 sy fl

This Property is heing sold under Power of Sale contained ina Reelpage te
FINANCE CORPORATION OF BAHAMAS LIMITED,

All edters shoud be forwarded i woiling in sealed envelope, addressed to the
Manager, Reval Bask Collections Centns, P.O, Box 8-754, Nie, Bahamas
and marked “Tender 0129", All offers must be reocived by the close of besiness
4:00 pom. Friday 29" May, ZMH

Choco dade eee Ee HEE POTTS ETRE TEETER TREE RE RRS

MOTICE
RBC FINCO INVITES TENDERS

RBC FINCO invites tanders for the purchase of the following

‘All THAT piece parcel or lot of land comprising Lat No. 12 in Block Mo. 3 in
Section 2 of S¢a Breeze Subdivision situate in the Exaem District of the island of
New Providence one of the islands of the Comes f the Bahan
SAiated thereon is a single family residence cunisting af (4) bedrooms and (3

Dat bnceaeiis.

Property Shae: 12,000 sy fh
Building Size: 2540 29 fi
[hs property 15 being sold under Power of Sale contained in a Wee pape bo

FINANCE CORPORATION OF BAFAMAS LIMITED.

All offers should be forwarded in writing im sealed envelope, addressed to the
Manager, Royal Bank Collections Centre, PO. Bow N-7529, Nassau Bahamas
aod marked “Tender (427°. All offers most be received by the close of business
4:00 pum., Friday 29" May, 209

PPE TTT OTTERS E SOPH EE ETE REE ee

RBC
FINCO

\

ie

NOTICE
REC FINCO INVITES TENDERS

RBC FINGO invites tenders for the purchase of the folowing

“AL THAT piece parcel or lot of land comprising Lot No. 145 situate in South
Seas Estanes Subdivisacn stuale in the Souther District of the Island of New
Prowidiene of the islands of the Commonwealth of the Bahamas, Sibarisd
thereon is vacant land

5

Property Sine: 7,067 sq fi

This property is being sold under Power of Sale contained in a Morpape to

FINANCE CORPORATION OF BAHAMAS LIMITED.

All ater: should be foracmded im writing in sealed envelope, addressed to the
Manager, Royal Hank Collections Centre, P.O, Box W-7549, Nags, Bokamaes
and marked “Tender 2735", All offers must be receved by the close of business
4:10 pm. Friday 29° May, 200.

SESSEAEEEREEEE AE EEE PEASE SSS SHSS ETE ETT TERETE ERR

providing capital to the fund,
and many had taken “some sub-
stantial hits” as a result of the
economy.

In expectation for when the
economy and financial markets
turned around, the fund admin-
istrator told Tribune Business
that “we’re still putting the
house in order”, ensuring audits
were completed on time and
“looking at businesses on the
books that may n o longer be
viable or have a chance to sur-
vive, making hard decisions as
to whether they could. We’re
making tough decisions; clean-
ing up the portfolio”.

Of the three businesses
financed by the Bahamas Entre-
preneurial Venture Fund this
year, one has received an equi-
ty injection, the other two debt.

Mr Gomez said one recipient
was a cheque authorisation
business, where customer
cheques are swiped through a
“credit card-like machine”
before cashiers are authorised
to accept them. The company
had developed a database of
Bahamian customers who rou-
tinely handed over bad cheques,
and those who did not, and was
now working for City Markets.

\

RBC

The other two recipients of
financing, Mr Gomez added,
were a small catering business
that operated the staff cafete-
ria for banks, and a block-mak-
ing company.

So far, the Bahamas Entre-
preneurial Venture Fund has
financed 11 approved applicants
with equity, and the remaining
37 with debt financing. A total
of $4 million has been invest-
ed, some $1.2 million in equity
and $2.8 million in debt financ-
ing.

Mr Gomez said the fund had
not drawn down on the $1 mil-
lion allocated to it by the Gov-
ernment in the 2008-2009 Bud-
get, and added that there was
no need to increase its financing
limits - a maximum of $100,000
in debt financing for any one
project, and $200,000 in equity
financing.

“We don’t think the market
dictates that at this time,” Mr
Gomez said. “We find we’re
able to fund most of the pro-
jects coming to us, so there is
no need to increase the limits
at this time. The amount of
money we have on hand is more
than enough.”

He added: “We can be a

RBC
FINCO

NOTICE
REC FINCO INVITES TENDERS

RBC FINCO inviles benders for the purchase of the following:

“All THAT™ piece parce! or lot of land comprising Lat Ne. 398 situate in
Doynam Heights Subdivision siluate in the Eastern District of the Island of New
Providence one of the sslands of the Commonveealth of the Babomas, Situnted
thereon is a Single Family Residence consisting of (2) bedrooms and (2)

hathream.

Property Size: 15,499 sq ft

This property 1 being sold under Power of Sale contained in a Mortgage to
FINANCE CORPORATION OF BAHAMAS LIMITED.

All offers should be forwarded im writing in staked envelope, addressed wo the

Manager. Royal Bank Cy
and marked “Tender

Ketods Oenie, PO. Bow N-7549, MN
All offers must be received by the close of beamess

au, Hahamas

NOTICE
RBC FINCO INVITES TENDERS

RSC FINCO invites tenders for the purchase of the following:

All THAT® piece parcel o¢ lot of land c mnpeising Lot No. 952 eee in
Pinewood Gardens Subdivision situate in ihe Souther Destict of the Island of
New Providence one of the islands of the Commonweadth ef the Bahama:

Situsted thereon is a Sangle Fem
bathroom.

ly Residence OMS Of

3) bedroums and (2)

Property Size: 3,000) eq ff
Building Size; 294 ay fi

This property is being sold under Power of Sale contained ina Morlgave io

FINANCE CORPORATION OF BAHAMAS LIMITED.

All allfers should be forwarded in writing in seaked eewehipe, addressed to the

Mianazer, Bi

yal Bank Collections Centre, PO), Bow N-7449. Nasa, Babamas

and marked “Tender 5074", All offers must be received by the close of busamess

4:00 pum., Friday 29* May, 2009,

PCP FCAA CAAA heehee Pee Pe eee

Y
RBC

RBC
FINCO

NOTICE
RBC FINCO INVITES TENDERS

REC FINCO invites tenders for lhe purchase of the following

“All THAT® piece parcel of lot of and comprising Lot No. 1695 aituase in
Pinewood Crandess Subdivision situate in the Southern Deginet of the Bland of
New Providence one of the glands of the Commonwealth

Situated thereon is a Single Famvly Residence consisting

bathroom

Property Sie: SA) a i

Build Sane: 1,729 ay 1

This property if being sold under Power of Sale contained in a Mortgage to
FINANCE CORPORATION OF BAHAMAS LIMITED.

All offers should be gorameded in writing in sealed envelope, addressed to the

Manager, Royal Bank Collections Centre, PO, Box 6-7549, Nassau, Bahamas

afd marked “Lender eS
4:00 pn. Friday 20" May, 2009.

All atlers must be recenved by the close of business

SHCA AATESERKHRRAAEER EERE RRR ERREREEA DEERE EEEEEEEEE EEE REESE

great help to entrepreneurs who
want to start small. The biggest
issue is that people want to start
big in this economic climate.
We advise people to start small
and build their businesses from
the revenues received and paid
to them.”

Mr Gomez said the best busi-
ness plans were those that ini-
tially envisaged just the entre-
preneur and a small staff work-
ing in the business, adding that
the Bahamas Entrepreneurial
Venture Fund would find it dif-
ficult to finance more grandiose
projects worth $500,000 to $1
million.

Explaining that providing
$150,000-$200,000 in financing

in this economic climate would
be difficult for the Bahamas
Entrepreneurial Venture Fund,
Mr Gomez said: “When we go
and talk to persons, we tell
them to start small, with one
truck instead of two. Those peo-
ple are the ones who are suc-
cessful. But too many people
want to get rich quick.”

The administrator added that
he had seen “no improvement
in the quality of business plans
coming into” the Bahamas
Entrepreneurial Venture Fund,
the main weaknesses being
over-optimistic revenue projec-
tions, lack of knowledge of the
market and its size, and the
absence of marketing plans.

PUBLIC NOTICE

INTENT TO CHANGE NAME BY DEED POLL

The Public is hereby advised that |, CARA VERON SAUNDERS of the
South Western District of the Island of New Providence on of the
Islands of the Commonwealth of the Bahamas, intend to my son’s name
from KELVIN VICTOR GERMAN to MALACHI ADRIEL SAUNDERS. If
there are any objections to this change of name by Deed Poll, you may
write such objections to the Chief Passport Officer, PO.Box N-742, Nassau,
Bahamas no later than thirty (30) days after the date of publication of this
notice.

NOTICE

NOTICE is hereby given that ORINDA TAMARA KATHLEEN
WITTSHIRE of #2 BACHELOR’S HOUSE, HUDSON AVENUE,
FREEPORT, BAHAMAS is applying to the Minister responsible
for Nationality and Citizenship, for registration/naturalization as
a citizen of The Bahamas, and that any person who knows any
reason why registration/naturalization should not be granted,
should send a written and signed statement of the facts within
twenty-eight days from the 19" day of May, 2009 to the
Minister responsible for nationality and Citizenship, P.O. Box
N-7147, Nassau, Bahamas.

NOTICE

NOTICE is hereby given that BOLIE EDWARD LLOYD of
ST. ANDREW BEACH ESTATES, P.O. BOX EE-17773,
is applying to the Minister responsible for Nationality and
Citizenship, for registration/naturalization as a citizen of The
Bahamas, and that any person who knows any reason why
registration/naturalization should not be granted, should
send a written and signed statement of the facts within
twenty-eight days from the 13 day of May, 2009 to the
Minister responsible for nationality and Citizenship, P.O. Box
N-7147, Nassau, Bahamas.

Clico (Bahamas) Limited
(In Liquidation)

LIQUIDATOR’S NOTICE

Policyholders of Clico (Bahamas) Limited dn Liquida-
tion) are advised that premium payments and other policy
transactions can be made at the Company’s main office,
located on Mt. Royal Avenue and Carew Street, Nassau,
Bahamas.

Policyholders and the public are further advised that office
hours are from 9:00 am to 4:30 pm daily.

Craig A. (Tony) Gomez
Official Liquidator

COMMONWEALTH OF THEBAHAMAS = 2007/Fam/Div/FP/No.148
IN THE SUPREME COURT
FAMILY DIVISION
BETWEEN: -
BENJAMIN BENEBY
Petitioner
AND

FERRYLYN O. BENEBY (nee) GUERRERO
Respondent

PETITION

In The Supreme Court of the Commonwealth of the
Bahamas.

By: The Firm, Attorney at Law, Marsh Harbour, P.O. Box
AB20191 Abaco, Bahamas. (242) 367-3572 ph/fax
THE TRIBUNE

TUESDAY, MAY 19, 2009, PAGE 5B





Cable

‘reform influence’

Sentinel’s Ansbacher
purchase ‘imminent’



FROM page 1B

weeks,” one source confirmed
to Tribune Business. This news-
paper understands, though, that
all documents and conditions
needed to complete the trans-
action are in place, and that the
way is clear for a smooth clo-
sure.

Tribune Business revealed
last year that Ansbacher
(Bahamas) parent, Qatar
National Bank (QNB), had
decided to place the Bahamian
financial institution on the mar-
ket for sale. This newspaper
also revealed on January 12,
2009, that Sentinel was the insti-
tution leading the race to
acquire Ansbacher (Bahamas).

The institution, which
employs 60 staff, has some obvi-
ous attractions for Sentinel
Bank & Trust and its parent,
the group controlled by A. F.
Holdings (the former Colina
Financial Group), whose prin-
cipals are Emanuel Alexiou and

Anthony Ferguson.

Mr Ferguson did not return
Tribune Business messages left
on his office and cell phone
voicemails before press time last
night.

Ansbacher (Bahamas) has a
significant Bahamian dollar
portfolio, being involved in
domestic pension fund man-
agement and administration,
and one possibility would be for
that business book to be merged
with CFAL, the brokerage/cor-
porate advisory entity that is
part of A. F. Holdings. The
international portfolio could
then be absorbed by Sentinel
Bank & Trust.

It is unclear how any trans-
action would be structured, and
whether it would be Sentinel
Bank & Trust or an affiliate
acquiring Ansbacher
(Bahamas) and its book of busi-
ness, which is estimated to con-
tain assets worth around $200
million. It is possible that Sen-
tine] may even be part of a
wider acquiring group.

FROM page 1B

once the exercise was broad-
ened to regulatory reform.

“Thus, from the operation of
the public consultation process,
BTC, and BTC alone, has had a
unique, privileged opportunity
to shape the content and pro-
cedures of the public consulta-
tion process, and will have a
unique role, denied to its com-
petitors, in shaping the out-
come,” Cable Bahamas said.

It questioned why the Gov-
ernment did not extend the
April 20, 2009, deadline for
industry feedback on its uni-
versal service obligation (USO)
and licensing regimes.

“The companies [Cable and
Caribbean Crossings] protest
this refusal, which is manifestly
discriminatory against licensed
operators other than BTC, who

have not already had an oppor-
tunity to shape the content of
the public consultation docu-
ments themselves, much less an
adequate opportunity to
respond to its content,” Cable
Bahamas said.

The BISX-listed operator
also questioned whether KPMG
Corporate Finance (Bahamas)
was potentially conflicted, due
to its dual roles as advisor to
the Government and BTC pri-
vatisation committee on sector
liberalisation, and in helping
BTC develop its business plan
and valuing the company for
privatisation.

Cable Bahamas had urged
the Government to extend the
feedback deadline and, if the
BTC and BCB representatives
were not taken off the commit-
tee, to then give all other com-
munications operators equal
representation.





The Bahamas Utilities Co-operative




Credit Union Ltd.






1B

She said a sterile water pro-
cessing facility is paramount for
a water company operating in
an industry in need of more reg-
ulation.

The impostor water seized
by police was found to have
bacteria that was too numerous
to count, and its mineral con-
tent was 17 parts per one mil-
lion. Aquapure’s quality con-
trol manager told The Tribune
that the mineral content should
not exceed 10 parts per million.

Ms Knowles said Chelsea’s
water, through constant testing,
never passes five to six parts per
million.

“Our water is tested every
half hour and goes back to the
lab daily for in-depth testing,”
she said.

Ms Knowles said the water
can pick up bacteria through
any part of the bottling process,
which is why her company
found it necessary to employ an
independent quality control lab-
oratory.

“Tts’ an expensive alterna-
tive, but it works,” she said.
“There is no bias with indepen-
dent testing.”

COMMONWEALTH OF THE BAHAMAS

hits at BIC’ S i margin of error’

Ms Knowles said the Gov-
ernment needs to properly reg-
ulate the industry.

Phenton Neymour told Tri-
bune Business recently that the
Environmental Health Depart-
ment tests water for companies
that do not employ an indepen-
dent company.

According to him, many
companies simply acquire a
piece of land, sink wells and
then begin to sell water.

Supplier

According to another suppli-
er, who wished to remain
anonymous, some of the small-
er water suppliers that have
popped up recently do not have
adequate equipment to wash
and sterilize their bottles.

The supplier said proper
industry detergents could cost
as much as $800 to $1000 per
barrel.

“You can’t be ni the industry
unless you have the proper
washer,” said the supplier.
“And that washer has to be at
the required temperature for
the duration (of the washing).
Some of these companies are
operating without proper facil-
ities.”

2008/CLE/qui/16 16

IN THE SUPREME COURT

IN THE MATTER OF ALL THAT piece parcel or
lot of land being Lot 76 containing Twenty seven



thousand six hundred and ninety one square feet
(27,697.00), Stella Maris Subdivision Section

Stella Maris, situate between the settlements
of Burnt Ground and Millerton in the Northern
Portion of Long Island, one of the Islands of the
Commonwealth of The Bahamas, which said
piece parcel or lot of land has such position shape
boundaries marks and dimensions as are shown
on a plan filed herein and thereon coloured yellow

Real PTET)

le

WP Tulia het ake al ton



aes

earl eo cy

Notice of
Annual General Meeting

sey Lod J 4-54 “+

The Annual General Meeting of the Bahamas
Utilities Co-operative Credit Union Ltd will
be held on
Thursday, May 28th, 2009
at 6:00pm
in
The Patrick A. Bain Training Room
at
The Bahamas Co-operative League Building
Russell Road

eS

CcFAL
BISX LISTED & TRADED SECURITIES AS OF:
MONDAY, 18 MAY 2009
BISX ALL SHARE INDEX: CLOSE 1,615.17 | CHG 6.14 | %CHG 0.38 | YTD -97.19 | YTD % -5.68
FINDEX: CLOSE 795.46 | YTD -4.72% | 2008 -12.31%

WWW.BISXBAHAMAS.COM | TELEPHONE:242-323-2330 | FACSIMILE: 242-323-2320

52wk-Low Change Daily Vol. EPS $ Div $ P/E
1.28 0.00 0.127
11.00 0.00 0.992
6.95 0.00 0.244
0.63 0.00 -0.877
3.15 0.00 0.078
125 0.00 0.055
11.09 0.00 1.406 : 84
2.83 0.00 0.249 11.4
6.06 0.12 0.419 14.9
1.31 0.07 0.111 26.8
1.53 0.00
6.02 0.00
11.00 0.00
10.35 0.00
5.00 0.00
1.00 0.00
0.30 0.00
5.50 0.00
8.60 J. S. Johnson 10.50 10.50 0.00
10.00 Premier Real Estate 10.00 10.00 0.00
BISX LISTED DEBT SECURITIES - (Bonds trade on a Percentage Pricing bases)
Security Symbol Last Sale Change Daily Vol.
Fidelity Bank Note 17 (Series A) + FBB17 100.00 0.00 7%
Fidelity Bank Note 22 (Series B) + FBB22 100.00 0.00 Prime + 1.75%
Fidelity Bank Note 13 (Series C) + FBB13 100.00 0.00 7%
Fidelity Bank Note 15 (Series D) + FBB15 100.00 0.00 18 Prime + 1.75%
Fidelity Over-The-Counter Securities
Bid $ Ask $ Last Price
7.92 8.42 14.60
4.00 6.25 6.00
0.35 0.40 0.35
Colina Over-The-Counter Securities
30.13 31.59 29.00
0.45 0.55 0.55
BISX Listed Mutual Funds
NA V YTD% Last 12 Months
1.3664 0.95 4.77
2.8962 -1.49 -3.35
1.4590 1.77 5.09
3.1964 -5.59 -13.64
12.7397 0.96 5.79
100.5606 0.56 0.56
96.4070 -3.59 -3.59
1.0000 0.00 0.00
9.1599 0.71 -12.76
1.0440 0.80 440
1.0364 0.33 3.64
1.0452 0.76 440
MARKET TERMS
YIELD - last 12 month dividends divided by closing price
Bid $ - Buying price of Colina and Fidelity
Ask §$ - Selling price of Colina and fidelity
Last Price - Last traded over-the-counter price
Weekly Vol. - Trading volume of the prior week
EPS $ - Acompany's reported earnings per share for the last 12 mths
NAV - Net Asset Value
N/M - Not Meaningful
FINDEX - The Fidelity Bahamas Stock Index. January 1, 1994 = 100

AND IN THE MATTER of the Quieting Titles Act, 1959

AND IN THE MATTER of the Petition of Allan

Spector

NOTICE
The Quieting Titles Act 1959

The Petition of Allan Spector of the city of
Toronto, in the Province of Ontario, one of the
Provinces in Canada in respect of: - ALL THAT
piece parcel or lot of land being Lot 76 containing
Twenty seven thousand six hundred and ninety one
square feet (27,697.00), Stella Maris Subdivision
Section 1, Stella Maris, situate between the
settlements of Burnt Ground and Millerton in the
Northern Portion of Long Island, one of the Islands
of the Commonwealth of The Bahamas, which said
piece parcel or lot of land has such position shape
boundaries marks and dimensions as are shown
on a plan filed herein and thereon coloured yellow

FG CAPITAL MARKETS

BROKERAGE & ADVISORY SERVICES
|e

COLONTAL

ROYAL FIDELITY

Money at Work

Securit y
Abaco Markets
Bahamas Property Fund
Bank of Bahamas
Benchmark
Bahamas Waste
Fidelity Bank
Cable Bahamas
Colina Holdings
Commonwealth Bank (S1)
Consolidated Water BDRs
Doctor's Hospital
Famguard
Finco
FirstCaribbean Bank
Focol (S)
Focol Class B Preference
Freeport Concrete
ICD Utilities

Previous Close Today's Close
1.40 1.40
11.00 11.00
6.95 6.95
0.63 0.63
3.15 3.15
2.37 2.37
11.75 11.75
2.83 2.83
6.11 6.23
2.90 2.97
1.53 1.53
7.76 7.76
11.00 11.00
10.40 10.40
5.14 5.14
1.00 1.00
0.30 0.30
5.50 5.50

Allan Spector claims to be the owner of the
fee simple estate in possession of the tract of land
hereinbefore described free from encumbrances.

AND the Petitioner has made application
to the Supreme Court of the Commonwealth of
The Bahamas under Section 3 of The Quieting
Titles Act 1959 to have his title to the said
tract of land investigated and the nature and
extent thereof determined and declared in a
Certificate of Title to be granted by the Court in
accordance with the provisions of the said Act.

NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that any
persons having Dower or a Right to Dower or an
Adverse Claim or a claim not recognized in the
petition shall on or before the 19% of June A.D., 2009
file in the Supreme Court and serve on the Petitioner
or the undersigned a statement of his claim in the
prescribed form verified by an Affidavit to be filed
therewith. Failure of any such person to file and
serve a statement of his claim on or before the 19" of
June A.D., 2009 will operate as a bar to such claim.
Copies of the Filed Plan may be inspected at:
The Registry of the Supreme Court;
The Chambers of Graham, Thompson & Co.
attorneys for the Petitioner, Sassoon House, Shirley
Street & Victoria Avenue, Nassau, N.P., Bahamas;
The Notice Board of the Administrator
at Stella Maris, Long Island: and
The Local Constable at Stella Maris, Long Island

40.4

0.240 : 64

0.420
0.322
0.794
0.332 15.5
0.000 : N/M
0.035 : 8.6
0.407 13.5
0.952 11.0
0.180 55.6

18.5
34.2
13.1

S2wk-Hi _52wk-Low
1000.00
1000.00
1000.00

1000.00

Interest Maturity

19 October 2017

19 October 2022
30 May 2013

29 May 2015

52wk-Low Symbol
14.25 Bahamas Supermarkets
6.00 Caribbean Crossings (Pref)
0.20 RND Holdings

Weekly Vol. EPS $
-0.041
0.000

0.001

Div $
0.300
0.480
0.000

N/M
256.6

29.00 ABDAB
0.40 RND Holdings

4.540
0.002

0.000
0.000

9.03
261.90

52wk-Low
1.3041
2.9230
1.3883
3.1964
12.1564
100.0000
96.4070
1.0000
9.0950
1.0000
1.0000
1.0000

Div $ Yield % NAV Date
28-Feb-09
31-Mar-09
1-May-09
31-Mar-09
28-Feb-09
31-Dec-08
31-Dec-08
31-Dec-07
31-Mar-09
9-Feb-09
9-Feb-09
9-Feb-09

Fund Name
Colina Bond Fund
Colina MSI Preferred Fund
Colina Money Market Fund
Fidelity Bahamas G & | Fund
Fidelity Prime Income Fund
CFAL Global Bond Fund
CFAL Global Equity Fund
CFAL High Grade Bond Fund
Fidelity International Investment Fund
FG Financial Preferred Income Fund
FG Financial Growth Fund
FG Financial Diversified Fund

Dated the 23rd day of April A.D., 2009

BISX ALL SHARE INDEX - 19 Dec 02 = 1,000.00
52wk-Hi - Highest closing price in last 52 weeks
52wk-Low - Lowest closing price in last 52 weeks
Previous Close - Previous day's weighted price for daily volume
Today's Close - Current day's weighted price for daily volume
Change - Change in closing price from day to day
Daily Vol. - Number of total shares traded today
DIV § - Dividends per share paid in the last 12 months
P/E - Closing price divided by the last 12 month earnings
) - 4-for-1 Stock Split - Effective Date 8/8/2007
) - 3-for-1 Stock Split - Effective Date 7/11/2007
TO TRADE CALL: COLINA 242-502-7010 | ROYALFIDELITY 242-356-7764 | FG CAPITAL MARKETS 242-396-4000 | COLONIAL 242-502-7525

GRAHAM, THOMPSON & CO.,
Chambers,
Sassoon House,
Shirley Street & Victoria Avenue,
Nassau, Bahamas.
Attorneys for the Petitioner


THE TRIBUNE

FROM page 1B

licence imposed certain obliga-
tions upon it, and that it had
entered - at the Government’s
request - a Memorandum of
Understanding with the
Bahamas Telecommunications
Company (BTC) to provide off-
air television at no charge to
certain Family Islands, Cable
Bahamas said neither of these
imposed a USO obligation to
provide multi-channel televi-
sion or basic television services,
as the Communications Bill
mandated.

Cable Bahamas’ response,
signed by its in-house attorney,
Judith Smith, and dated April
20, 2009, said: “The companies

The Tribune wants to hear
from people who are
making news in their
neighbourhoods. Perhaps
you are raising funds for a
good cause, campaigning
for improvements in the
area or have won an
award.

If so, call us on 322-1986
and share your story.

TUESDAY, MAY 19, 2009, PAGE 7B

Cable Bahamas
‘vehemently opposes’
USO obligations

[Cable and Caribbean Cross-
ings] vehemently oppose the
Government’s proposal to
impose upon Cable Bahamas a
universal service obligation for
television services, independent
of the obligations already set
forth in the terms of its licence
and the Memorandum of
Understanding (MoV).

Impose

“The establishment of such a
requirement would also impose
an unfair burden on Cable
Bahamas since, unlike BTC
with respect to its USO, Cable
Bahamas would be required to
provide service at no cost, with
no prospect of new entrants
seeking to provide television
service under more desirable,
competitive terms.

“As a result, Cable Bahamas
would effectively become a
Universal Service Provider
(USP) for television in perpe-
tuity.”

Cable Bahamas added that
its USO would be unlike that
imposed on BTC for telecom-
munications services, as the lat-
ter at least recovered part of its
costs by charging Family Island
consumers for services, and did
not have to necessarily build
infrastructure.

“The application of USO
principles in this context would
be manifestly arbitrary and
unfair. To the extent a universal
service obligation for broad-
casting should exist at all, it
should be imposed solely on the
nation’s public broadcasting
company [ZNS],” Cable
Bahamas said.

The BISX-listed company
argued that if it was to become
the USO for television services
in the Bahamas, it “should be
fully subsidised for undertak-
ing this onerous burden”.

>} bh 7 . 5 r z *
2s TMOVates Mme to do

good job, The Tribune is

my newspaper.”

ESTHER BARRY
PRODUCTION MAR, R

THE

The Tribune

My Verce. My Vewgpqper!



If ‘must carry’ provisions
were imposed, Cable Bahamas
urged that they be restricted to
local television signals, the Par-
liamentary Channel, local edu-
cation channels and community
channels. These channels also
had to be carried at no charge
to Cable Bahamas or the pro-
grammer, and transmitted only
where cable television was
available.

Elsewhere, Cable Bahamas
“vehemently challenged” the
Government’s decision to des-
ignate it as having ‘Significant
Market Power’ (SMP) in the
provision of high speed data
(Internet) and pay-TV services.

The BISX-listed company
argued that the criteria for
determining whether a compa-
ny had a dominant market posi-
tion, which is to be used by the
Utilities Regulation and Com-
petition Authority (URCA),
were “unreasonably subjective
and vague, and unfairly penalise
efficient operators”.

Tentative

“The Government’s tentative
conclusion with respect to Cable
Bahamas’ presumed SMP is
both premature and unfair,”
Cable Bahamas argued.

“Compounding this inequity,
the proposed Bill also imposes
upon Cable Bahamas regulato-
ry burdens which are onerous
and disproportionate to the
facts at hand, and will frustrate
Cable Bahamas’ ongoing efforts
to achieve efficiencies and meet
its fiduciary obligations to
shareholders.

“At the same time, the Bill
neglects to define precisely how
an operator may overcome a
presumption of SMP, thereby
avoiding or alleviating the bur-
densome extra layer of regula-
tion, which the Bill imposes.”


PAGE 8B, TUESDAY, MAY 19, 2009

THE TRIBUNE





Four Seasons: We’re unlikely to be back

B By NEIL HARTNELL
Tribune Business Editor

THE Four Seasons hotel
brand has admitted it is unlike-
ly to return to Exuma’s Emer-
ald Bay resort as its operat-
ing/management partner, the
Prime Minister saying yester-
day that its contract with the

hotel “proved particularly chal-
lenging” for several potential
buyers.

An e-mail from Jim Fitzgib-
bon, president of worldwide
hotel operations for Four Sea-
sons, a copy of which has been
seen by Tribune Business, said:
“Four Seasons has agreed to an
orderly closure of the hotel to

EDMOND DE ROTHSCHILD LTD
LCF ROTHSCHILD GROUP

guests effective as of May 26,
2009. It is unlikely that the hotel
will reopen as a Four Seasons.”

Explaining the reasons for
Emerald Bay’s closure, Mr
Fitzgibbon said: “After much
deliberation, and in the absence
of being able to identify a new
owner for the development, the
receiver has reluctantly decided

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to close the development.

“This is a decision which was
very difficult for the receivers
to make, and they look forward
to a point in the future when
this development will reopen
under new ownership and con-
tinue to contribute to the Exu-
ma community.”

And he added: “Our sales
teams both at the hotel and in
New York are actively working
with our clients and guests to
rearrange any bookings that
have been confirmed for
beyond May 26. If any of your
clients have been affected, you
can be sure that someone from
Four Seasons will be in touch
with you in the next day or so.

“We are deeply disappoint-
ed to have to share this news
with you, as the [Emerald Bay]
hotel has become a favourite
amongst many of our guests and
clients. We appreciate the sup-
port you have given the hotel



and know that you join us in
commending the excellent team
there.”

Prime Minister Hubert Ingra-
ham’s statement to the House
of Assembly on the Four Sea-

sons Emerald Bay Resort’s clo-
sure yesterday added very lit-
tle that was new, although he
confirmed that “the require-
ments contained in the man-
agement contract with the
hotel’s operators, the Four Sea-
sons, proved particularly chal-
lenging for a number of the
interested [buyers]”.

The Prime Minister said Mit-
sui, the Japanese insurer acting
as the Four Seasons Emerald
Bay Resort’s main creditor, had
advised his administration that
it was seeking buyers “with the
wherewithal to meet the
requirements of the Govern-
ment and complete the full
build-out of the development”.

It was for this reason that the
Government turned down one
potential buyer, Ambrose Hold-
ings (UK), due to doubts over
whether it had the necessary
financial muscle to complete
Emerald Bay’s full build-out.

Emerald Bay ‘did more
to develop Exuma than
previous century’s events’

@ By NEIL HARTNELL
Tribune Business Editor

THE Four Seasons Emerald
Bay Resort “has done more to
develop Exuma in the last 10
years than anything in the pre-
vious 100 years”, a leading busi-
nessman and Exuma native told
Tribune Business yesterday,
adding that his company was
“committed to staying the
course” and would not walk
away from its newly-opened
office on the island.

Chester Cooper, British
American Financial’s president
and chief executive, acknowl-
edged that the resort’s impend-
ing May 26 closure was “a dev-
astating, significant blow to the
island, quite frankly”, yet pre-
sented an opportunity to change
its “economic model” by reviv-
ing traditional sectors such as
agriculture and fishing.

“I believe the Four Seasons
Emerald Bay property has done

ahamas

.islIbahamas.com



Insurer pledges not to walk away from island

more for Exuma in the last 10
years, in the development of the
island, than the island received
ever before in the 100 years that
preceded it,” Mr Cooper told
Tribune Business.

“This [the closure] is without
question a significant change in
the economy, and I believe that
finding a buyer for this proper-
ty in the very short-term, if that
can be achieved, or if there is a
way to negotiate with the
receivers on the Government’s
part to keep the property open
until a buyer is found, that
would a more favourable out-
come.

“Without question, this prop-
erty needs to be open to see the
kind of growth and develop-
ment the island has seen over
the last five years. There’s defi-
nitely going to be a shrinkage of
the local economy.”

Mr Cooper said it seemed
that the price the Pricewater-
houseCoopers (PwC) receivers
and the resort’s main creditor,
the London office of Japanese
insurer, Mitsui, were seeking
had “gone down to almost
peanuts”.

Mitsui had initially been seek-
ing around $125 million
upwards, a figure that would
have covered the $120 million
debt it inherited from the Four
Seasons Emerald Bay’s lenders
when the property initially went
into receivership.

However, while PwC has
acknowledged that the purchase
price has decreased, it has not
specified an amount, although it
is believed to have fallen to
around $35-$50 million.

“T think it could be a value
acquisition for some companies
with the resources to pump in
and keep it going,” Mr Cooper
said, adding that one potential
stumbling block for any buyer
was the fact that “a lot of prime
real estate has been sold”.

This would make it more dif-

ficult for any acquirer, he
explained, to generate an
instant return on their invest-
ment via real estate sales.

Mr Cooper said British
American Financial had been
present in Exuma for 25 years,
initially via a home-based agent,
before opening its own office
with four staff in 2006.

“We don’t expect in the
short-term that we’re going to
be making any decision with
respect to this office. We’re
committed to the island, and
are staying the course with
respect to operating on the
island.

“The resort’s closure will
impact our business. Our clients
include a large number of
Emerald Bay workers. We
expect a lot of our clients to be
out of work.”

Mr Cooper added that British
American Financial was offer-
ing free financial consultations
to displaced Four Seasons
Emerald Bay Resort workers
at is Exuma office.

The British American Finan-
cial chief, though, said “all is
not lost for Exuma”, as it still
enjoyed the presence of the
$100 million Grand Isle Villas
project and numerous other
resorts and investments. With-
out the Four Seasons Emerald
Bay’s presence, over resorts on
Exuma were likely to enjoy
increased bookings.

“This is an opportunity for
correcting the model,” Mr
Cooper told Tribune Business.
“Over the years, many people
have gone away from the core
businesses of the island, fishing
and agriculture, to some extent.

“This [the resort closure] will
cause people to reflect on the
path taken, as in some cases you
have not been able to buy fish.
This is an opportunity to cre-
ate small businesses to cater to
the remaining hotel properties
and the local market.”

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THE TRIBUNE

TUESDAY, MAY

19, 2009



VALERY CORNISH (not shown)
told Tribune Woman that she
wrote off ever dating men with
children...













@ By ALEX MISSICK
Tribune Features Reporter
amissick@tribunemedia.net

ost single women looking
to start a family with that
Prince Charming would
prefer he didn’t have chil-
dren, as they feel dating a
father will only leave them with the dreaded
“baby daddy drama” and affect their bottom
line- finding a good, genuine, dedicated man.

Valery Cornish, a 24 year old profession-
al woman, said she made a promise to herself
not to date a man with children and feels
she has had a hard time meeting men
because of this.

“T always told myself that when I do get
married I wanted a fresh start with my new
husband. Unfortunately that has not hap-
pened yet and I feel as I get older I am run-
ning out of options and time. It is hard now
to find a man age 25 and older without at
least one child in this country and that is
sad. I have met the most handsome and car-
ing guys, but as soon as I ask them if they
have children the response is always, one,
three, and one guy even told me he had five
kids,” Ms Cornish said.

Ms Cornish said while she would like to
give a guy with children a chance, she does

not know if the child will accept her and
how the relationship between the child’s
mother and the man will affect her life.

“T don’t want to feel like I am intruding on
anyone’s life. I don’t want to think that I
am the real reason they are not together or
that I cannot be just as good a mother to
that child. I don’t want to have to cause that
man to not see his child because the mother
is jealous of me. These are the things I have
to think about before I get into that kind or
relationship. It takes a strong person to deal
with that and I don’t know if I am ready to
deal with that,” Ms Cornish said.

Barrington Brennen, a marriage and fam-
ily therapist and counseling psychologist,
said its all about changing the way you think
and looking harder for what you really want.

“You have to decide what you want. You
have to make decisions in life. This is not
new. My warning to most women is to look
harder for a potential mate. If someone has
multiple children born too close together
for multiple people, then I would tell them to
think twice about that no matter how nice
the person may be,” Mr Brennen said.

Mr Brennen said he thinks many persons
have lost a good partner because that was
not a real criteria standard for selecting a
mate.

“When it comes to having children a par-



“T always told myself that when
I do get married I wanted a fresh
start with my new husband.
Unfortunately that has not happened
yet and I feel as I get older I am
running out of options and time. It
is hard now to find a man age 25 and
older without at least one child in this
country and that is sad...”

— Valery Cornish

ticular person may know that maybe they
will not be able to handle being married to a
person with a child. Others have no problem.
I don’t think its a matter of right or wrong-
you just have to go with your gut feeling
and what you think you can live with,” Mr
Brennen said.

Ms Cornish said she tried dating a man
with a child but could not look past the fact
that there was a child involved and decided
to end the relationship. Mr Brennen said
this is the right thing to do if the situation is
that painful for you.







“Tf you know you can’t do it, don’t even
enter in to a heavy friendship relationship-
don’t lead the guy on getting all hot and
spicy and tell the man you don’t want to
marry him yet you are still acting that way. It
is hard but it is not impossible to find a man
out there without a child,” Mr Brennen said.

Mr Brennen said that before you decide to
enter a relationship with someone that has a
child, look at the child’s age to determine
how or even if that person has moved on.

“Tf the child is very young, go with cau-
tion. If the child is maybe five or ten years
old, watch how the man deals with the child
and what happened during that time period
when he didn’t have children. If the child 1s
older then you have evidence that he knows
how to keep his zipper up and that was just
a bad choice he made. Find out the circum-
stances that he got the child. However with
one or two year olds, that’s risky business
and you will just be another one he has a
baby with,” Mr Brennen said.

In the end, it’s all about finding what
makes you happy as a woman and what you
know you can deal with mentally, physically
and emotionally.

¢ Tell us what you think, send an email to
features@tribunemedia.net or fax your
thoughts to 328-2398.







Distributed by: BWA, East West Highway ¢ 394-1759










PAGE 2C, TUESDAY, MAY 19, 2009

THE TRIBUNE





@ By MAGGIE BAIN

IT is Tuesday and you have a
first date in a few days and you
are filled with a mixture of
excitement and nervous ques-

az
> Es

@

]

CKEN

tions. Aside from the obvious
thoughts of, "Will we have
enough in common and will we
be able to keep a conversation
going?,’ your mind has probably
already leapt a hundred miles

= ae |



to 'Is this the one who I could
have a real future with or do
they just want sex? “You have
not even kissed and wonder
why and if you will. Will the
kiss be the determining factor;
the 'make or break '? How will
you know if they have any sex-
ually transmitted diseases? So
much to think about and so
much to find out and it is only
the first date.

With heightened anticipation
the time has come. Does your
heart sink with disappointment
due to miscalculating physical
appearances or do you have an
overwhelming high with
thoughts of ‘love at first sight?’
All too often we are put off by
things such as bad breath, ner-
vous mannerisms, kissing and
even clothes. We could allow
these things to become deal
breakers or we could mention
them to allow the other person
to make changes if they desire.
A first date is never too early
for honesty but you have to be
willing to accept feed back in
return. Keeping the first date
short, preferably less than two
hours, allows time to sit back
and reassess without undue
pressure. There is nothing
worse than feeling you have
made a mistake, want to get out
but feel obligated to sit through
hours of a date.

In previous weeks we have
talked about relationships that
have little substance besides
sexual intimacy. Being able to
express oneself and the ability
to really connect and listen to
someone else with true empathy
is rarely achieved instantly. Do
not be fooled by couples that
appear to have it all. Yes, they
may have understood early on
the skills to reach a deep con-
nection but they worked at it.
Even though we know all of
these sensible things, the
thoughts and feelings about sex
inevitably pop up on the first
date. Those sex hormones can-
not be denied. It is best then to
know yourself and your own
boundaries. What is right for
one person may not be right for
another. It is probably advis-
able to bring up the topics of
expectations, desires, prefer-
ences, birth control, and sexu-

The first date...



A FIRST DATE is never too early for honesty but you have to be willing to accept feed back in return. Keeping
the first date short, preferably less than two hours, allows time to sit back and reassess without undue pressure.

ally transmitted diseases as ear-
ly as possible. Of course this
may not be reasonable to cover
all this within the first date but
at least the cards have been put
on the table. If the new love
interest is scared off then be
rest assured they were not seri-
ous partner material.

Let us say the first date went
well and the arrangement is that
one person will call to make the
second date. The set time has
elapsed and your imagination
has replayed the same scenario
over and over. It is an uncom-

You could spend $2,000jfomlasemtreatments
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PAIT?

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and move on.

As you can see dating with
honesty and truth saves you
unnecessary heartache. Of
course relationships are ever
changing and do not always run
so smoothly. Others may like
the idea of honesty but are inex-
perienced or have difficulty giv-
ing definitive answers. If you
feel a true connection then give
it time to develop before rush-
ing to a decision. The next few
dates will continue to give you
an opportunity to discover more
about your joint compatibility.
THE TRIBUNE



WOMAN AND HEALTH

TUESDAY, MAY 19, 2009, PAGE 3C



Emotional & Financial Improve your t

Uncertainty: How much
is stress costing you?

“Stress, left unchecked adversely tax-
es our emotional health and physical
well-being.”

— Michelle Miller

WHETHER you believe it or not, you
are paying what is known as a Stress Tax!
If you don't think so, try to calculate the
accumulative cost of low productivity,
absenteeism, anxiety, depression, heart
disease and all the other stress-related
illnesses and you will see that directly or
indirectly a Stress Tax is being paid.

And considering that most people do
not intentionally address their stress, this
tax will consistently become more bur-
densome.

But Life Is Not A Stress Rehearsal...

Too many seem hell bent on waiting
for the neon signs of stress to physically
show up before they improve their emo-
tional state of health, at which time it’s
too late or too difficult for solutions to be
effective.

We say that life is not a ‘dress
rehearsal’; nor is it a ‘Stress Rehearsal’.
You must find the self-discipline to take
ownership of your life and state of well-
being. In this climate of change, waiting
until your emotional capacity has com-
pletely deteriorated before seeking solu-
tions is no longer acceptable.

Research indicates that more than 80
per cent of all illnesses are stress-related;
and the issue of low productivity,
increased insurance premiums, irritabili-
ty, work-related accidents, absenteeism
etc., costs US companies a whopping
$300 billion annually.

This staggering statistic should strike a
cord with local health care, insurance
professionals and business owners across
the board; moving them towards proac-
tive measures in which employees and
clients alike can effectively deal with the
vital issues of stress.

But we know that only he who feels it
- knows it; so how much is stress really
costing you on a personal and or business
level? And how much is it collectively
costing us as a country?

If we took half as much time with our
inner selves (emotions-mind-spirit) as we
do with our outer possessions ie our jobs,
homes, yards, cars etc; our overall state of
well-being would dramatically improve.

Instead of relentlessly complaining
about your challenges, find ways to take
responsibility for your emotional state

RINGWORM (Dermatophytosis )





of health; because healthy emotions
equals healthy mind.

Final thoughts...

Stress is really about attitude. If you
take the attitude that it doesn't matter or
that there is nothing you can do about it;
then you will continue to be saddled with
an ever increasing stress tax.

The reality is, any individual or organ-
isation can effectively transition from ill-
ness to wellness, but it requires a new
mindset of consistent proactive measures.
Whether you stand still or sit down, rest
assured that stress is not going anywhere;
and unless you manage stress, it will sure-
ly manage you.

Remember - it's not what happens but
how you deal with what happens that
matters most. With the right tools and
techniques, you can confidently and effec-
tively improve your emotional wellness.
Get up and make it happen!

If you are ready to effectively Manage
Your Stress, please register for Stress
Management 101 Workshop. - June13,
2009. Please send an e-mail to
coach4ward@Yahoo.com or call 429-
6770. Seats Are Limited!

Michelle M. Miller is a certified Life-
Coach and Stress Management Consul-
tant. She is the Principal Coach of the
Coaching Studio, which located in the
Jovan Plaza, Madeira Street. Questions
or comments can be sent to P.O. Box CB-
13060 - email - coach4ward@yahoo.com
or telephone 429-6770.

‘inner self’ at
The Coaching
Studio

lm By CARA BRENNEN-BETHEL
Tribune Features Editor

LIFE coach Michelle Miller has
realised her dream to open a studio
where persons can gather to improve
their inner self and develop the talent
and potential that lies inside.

Earlier this month, she opened The
Coaching Studio, one of the first of its
kind in the country designed to provide
an environment to facilitate self learning,
empowerment and personal develop-
ment.

“This is something that I have been
intending to give birth to for a long time.
The studio will serve as a place for self
help and development through work-
shops and personal development ses-
sions.”

Ms Miller said that the Coaching Stu-
dio and the practice of coaching is some-
thing that is greatly needed in the coun-
try, particularly now. She said that with
all the challenges currently facing the
country, Bahamians need to tap into
and apply their inner resources.

“Coaching is a process that seeks to
pull out of a person rather than put into
them,” she explained.” It allows a way
for people to realise and accept that they
have potential and that they have inside
them all tools they need to have a better
life.”

The concept is relatively new to the
Bahamas and Miss Miller said that that
most Bahamians can certainly benefit
from it. To her knowledge there are only
three other certified coaches in the coun-
try. She herself received her certifica-
tion through a distance learning course.

“T think it is absolutely needed in this
country, for a lot of people with that
missing link- self esteem and confidence,
something I think is not ingrained in a
lot of people.

She added that this can also certainly

“This is something
that I have been
intending to give

birth to for a long
time. The studio

will serve as a
place for self help
and development
through workshops
and personal

development
sessions.”
— Michelle Miller

be linked to the level of stress affecting
Bahamians and the ability to effectively
manage stress.

“We need to become more confident,”
she added, saying that sometimes the
fear of doing something can prevent a
person from trying to do it.

The brand new Coaching Studio is
located in the Jovan Plaza Madeira
Street. As a logo, Ms Miller chose the
butterfly- a universal symbol of change
which she hopes will illustrate the jour-
ney everyone who visits will undergo.

“T love butterflies, they are a symbol
of transformation and change. The cater-
pillar is born with the potential to
become a butterfly, but it must first
undergo the change and embrace it and
people have that same potential and
they have to go with it and pull it out the
greatness that they have within.”

Proper
techniques

for sensitised

ait

HEARD the phrase “less
is more”? It really applies
to those with sensitive or
sensitised skin. Follow these
skin care dos and don'ts to
help cut down on redness,
reactivity, and flare-ups.

o Do not use hot water
when cleansing.

o When cleansing, if skin
is too sensitised even for
water, use tissue or a gentle
non-fabric cloth to remove
product.

o Don't use excessive or
abrasive movements.

Instead, go for gentle,
upward circles.

o Speak to a skin care
professional about a “less

is more” product regimen
that will help calm skin,
reduce redness, and protect
against flare-ups.

o Be mindful of exfo-
liants. First speak with a
professional skin therapist
to see if exfoliation is right
for your skin. If it is, he or
she will recommend a gen-
tle exfoliant that won't
scratch or inflame skin.

o Use a moisturiser that
helps block potentially-irri-
tating pollutants from
aggravating skin. These
ingredients include:

o Evening Primrose

o Shea Butter

o Vitamin E

o Oat Kernel Extract

¢ Sarah Beek is a skin
care therapist at the Dermal
Clinic. Visit her and her
team of skin and body ther-
apists at One Sandyport
Plaza (the same building as
Bally’s Gym). For more
information visit www.der-
mal-clinic.com or call
327.6788.



mg By DR BASIL SANDS

Ringworm is not a worm; it is
a fungal parasite (DER-
MATOPHYTE) that feeds on
the outer dead surface of grow-
ing hair, skin and toenails.
There are many types of der-
matophytes, but most cases of
canine and feline ringworms are
caused by microsporum canis.
Ringworm is a zoonotic disease
and therefore can infect people
as well.

Ringworm is named for the
ring like lesions typical of
human disease. In fact, ring-
worm is comparable to a con-
tact allergy. Skin inflammation
results from a by-product pro-
duced by the fungus. The der-
matophyte dislikes inflamma-
tion and continually moves
beyond its point of origination
in ever widening rings, leaving
the center to heal.

The sores in dogs and cats
grow outward in expanding
areas of hair loss. Typically
there is scaling and crusting at
the margins of bald patches,
with broken hair in these areas
with variable itchiness. The
face, head and forelimbs are the
first areas affected, but the fun-
gus can spread and affect the
whole body.

The condition is transmitted
by direct animal to animal con-
tact, usually from infected hair
or skin debris. However, ring-
worm can also be transmitted
from contaminated grooming
equipment.

All dogs and cats are at high
risk for ringworms, but the con-
dition is most common in pup-
pies and kittens, less than a year
old and older pets with a com-
promised immune system.
Some pets are asymptomatic
carriers, that is, they carry the
fungus without showing signs
themselves, while spreading it
to other pets or people. If one
pet in the house is diagnosed,
all should be treated, whether
showing signs or not.

Ringworm is diagnosed by
identification of the fungus,
either by a wood’s lamp, or a
skin scraping or a culture test.

In most cases, healthy ani-
mals will self cure in sixty to
one hundred days without any
treatment. However, in severe
cases and when the infected pet
may expose humans to infec-
tion, specific topical or oral anti-
fungal treatment may be rec-
ommended.



People who are immune com-
promised; (very young or very
old) are at higher risk.

Ringworm fungus is difficult
to eradicate. Human products
are not effective. Topical
miconazole preparations do
work (e.g. Miconazole Spray,
Malaseeb Shampoo). The
drugs griseofulvin and keto-
conazole are also very effective.
Once swallowed, these drugs
are incorporated into the grow-
ing hair where it slows the
growth of the fungus. Pills or
liquid medications are usually
given for up to 4 weeks. How-
ever, griseofulvin is contradict-



We ‘ane as

ed in pregnant dogs, because it
may cause birth defects.

Contaminated hairs and skin
debris shed into the environ-
ment remain infected for over a
year and act as a reservoir for
reinfection. Treating the envi-
ronment helps reduce the num-
ber of fungal spores and helps
prevent reinfection. Experts
recommend environmental con-
trol by daily cleaning of all sur-
faces using a diluted bleach
solution (one part bleach to 10
parts water) along with thor-
ough vacuuming.

There are certain breeds of
animals that have selective
Immuno deficiencies (Rot-
tweillers and Parvo, Persian
Cats and Ringworm). Persian
cats have a predilection toward
severe and sometimes protract-
ed dermatophye (ringworm)
infections. In some Persian cats,
the fungal infections invade the
dermis and can cause granulo-
matous disease (mycetomas).

As mentioned earlier, most
animals will self cure in several
months. Treatment for the dis-
ease hastens clinical cure and
helps reduce environmental
contaminations. Some infec-
tions, particularly in long-haired
cats or homes with more than
one animal, can be very persis-
tent.

Ts a i. mlal ‘



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PAGE 8C, TUESDAY, MAY 19, 2009

THE TRIBUNE



a AN





The Tribune

B O Di

ea



ith



Trea ‘thrush Hefore it spreads

@ By ALEX MISSICK
Tribune Features Reporter
amissick@tribunemedia.net

s a young child you

enjoyed exploring your

new world outside

your mother’s womb

most of the time by
putting objects into your mouth. For
some reason, everything from the tele-
vision remote to your dad’s car keys
seemed to be a yummy snack.

However, due to all these things
being orally explored, you may have
been subject to a very uncomfortable
infection called thrush.

Pediatricians from Agape Child and
Adolescent Clinic located on Mackey
Street, Doctor Paul Roberts and Doc-
tor Paul Hennis, said the name
“thrush” is used locally and may
involve infections of the mouth or the
skin.

“Thrush is really a common name of
infection with a fungus which is referred
to as Oral Candida. It may also infect
the body system, be in the blood and
infect organs in the blood. However,
it is most commonly seen in the mouth
and on the skin especially in the diaper
area. Thrush is most commonly seen
in the very young and the very old who
are immuno compromised like HIV
and diabetic persons,” Dr Roberts said.

According to medicinenet.com,
thrush usually develops suddenly, but
may become chronic, persisting over a
long period of time.

“A common sign of thrush is the
presence of creamy white, slightly
raised lesions in your mouth usually
on your tongue or inner cheeks but
also sometimes on the roof of your
mouth, gums, tonsils, or back of your



YOU SHOULD carefully clean any objects that go into your child’s mouth...

throat. The lesions, which may have a
cottage cheese appearance, can be
painful and may bleed slightly when
you scrape them or brush your teeth. In
severe cases, the lesions may spread
into your esophagus, or swallowing
tube, causing pain or difficulty swal-

lowing, a feeling that food gets stuck in
the throat or mid-chest area, fever, if
the infection spreads beyond the esoph-
agus. Thrush can spread to other parts
of the body, including the lungs, liver,
and skin,” the study said.

Dr Hennis said even persons cur-

rently on antibiotics can contract this
infection.

“People who are on antibiotics can
also contract this infection because
antibiotics suppress the normal flow of
bacteria that live in the body and that
allow thrush to grow out. With new-

borns if they are born vaginally, Can-
dida may be one of the organisms in the
birth canal of the mother, so they can
contract it that way as a new born,” Dr
Hennis said.

When it comes to younger children,
Dr Roberts said thrush can also occur
in the diaper area due to moisture.

“With the plastic outer lining of these
pampers and the urine and stools in
there, the heat which can be generated
by having the outer plastic covering,
will encourage the growth of the fun-
gus. If the child is not changed often,
the stools and urine the child may
develop an irritant and the skin begins
to break down and exfoliate. The
exposed area will then be likely to
become colonised by the fungus and
the infection is going to develop. If the
child is changed often or even left
exposed to the open air, you may not
even need to apply a topical because
the long non heat exposure will get rid
of the fungus due to the change of envi-
ronment,” Dr Roberts said.

“Oral infections can happen no mat-
ter how carefully you clean and sterilise
pacifiers, bottles, toys, etc., your baby
will likely still be exposed to this yeast.
Still, you should carefully clean any
objects that go into your child's
mouth,” he added.

Dr Hennis said that because thrush is
caused by a fungus, the best way to
deal with it is to treat it.

“The best way to get rid of a fungus
is to treat it with an anti fungal med-
ication depending on where it is. If it is
on the skin, you can get a topical cream,
if it is in the mouth, oral medication is
needed. However, if it is systematic
and in the blood stream they would
need an IV antifungal treatment,” Dr
Hennis said.

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GARDENER

Spring fruits...

THIS year’s mango harvest
looks as though it will be a
heavy one with hundreds of
fruits hanging from the trees.
But they will not be ready for
another month or so. What can
we eat now?

One fruit we can enjoy while
we wait for the mangoes is wax
jambu, also called Java apple
(Syzygium samarangense). Out
of the two names I prefer wax
jambu because Java and apple
are part of everybody’s vocab-
ulary. Jambu has an exotic ring
about it and makes it easier to
remember.

Wax jambu fruits are about
three inches long and shaped
rather like the NASA re-entry
vehicles used in early space
flights. The outside of the pink
to red fruit does indeed seem
waxy. The flavour is somewhat
like a perfumed apple and liked
by many, spurned by some.

I like to simmer wax jambu
fruits in sugar water until they
are tender. They lose their love-
ly colour to the water and turn
fig brown but the taste is
enhanced. Once cooked the
flavour is much like lychee and
very refreshing.

The spiky creamy-white flow-
ers grow like pom-poms all over
the bower and attract bees by
the dozens, even though I can-
not detect a scent. Once the
bees have done their job the
fruits are produced quickly and
in abundance. The fruit masses
are so productive that some
fruits are squeezed out of the
mass, even though they are
aerodynamic in design.

Fruit production starts in
April on Abaco and lasts into
June. My tree is about 10 feet
tall and will give far more fruit
than my family can handle. Wax
jambu trees can grow to 30 feet
and I really do not know what I
will do with all that fruit if my
tree ever gets that big. Wax
JAMbu — maybe that is the
answer.

Another minority fruit in sea-
son right now is Panama berry
or Jamaica cherry (Muntingia
calabura). The white flowers of
the rather sparsely- limbed trees
much resemble strawberry flow-
ers and are pollinated by bees.
They also attract butterflies.

The graceful downy leaves
are very attractive and help to



THIS year’s mango harvest looks as though it will be a heavy one with hun-
dreds of fruits hanging from the trees...

hide the fruits from birds. The
fruits are produced singly and
are apple- shaped but only a lit-
tle over half-an-inch in diame-
ter. Luckily they are fast and
prolific growers and hang by 3-
inch stems below the foliage.
As soon as they are ripe they
tend to fall to the ground.

The outside skin of the fruits
is rather leathery and the inside
is packed with tiny seeds. The
best way to eat them is the chew
and spit method. The taste is
vaguely like strawberry, but the
sort of strawberry flavour you
get in boiled candies or cotton
candy. You know the flavour is
strawberry but it does not taste
like fresh real strawberries. Kids
love them, however, and the
fruits have lots of vitamins.

The muntingia tree is very
fast growing, just about the
fastest I know. A two-feet
sapling will be a 20-feet adult
in under two years. There is a
drawback, however. Muntingia
trees tend to twist in hurricane-
strength winds and are
destroyed.

Muntingia trees are usually
grown from root suckers but

you can propagate them from
seed by crushing fruits and
soaking them in water. Remove
the skins and the seeds will sink
to the bottom. Keep changing
the water until it is clear, then
dry the seeds an plant them. It
takes two years from seed to
fruit.

The favourite spring fruit in
The Bahamas has to be sapodil-
la (Manilkara zapota). Dillies
grow wild in coppice land and
the location of a particular dilly
tree is often a well-kept secret.
The outside of a dilly fruit is
not promising: rough and
brown. The inside pulp is also
not very prepossessing but the
proof is in the eating. Dillies
have a unique brown sugar
flavour that can be close to
addictive.

Sapodilla trees are erect and
handsome, with whorls of leaves
the distinguishing feature. There
are cultivators available that
produce very large and sweet
fruits.

Plant some saplings now and
future generations will have
cause to thank you.

j-hardy@coralwave.com



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