Citation
The Tribune

Material Information

Title:
The Tribune
Uniform Title:
Tribune (Nassau, Bahamas)
Portion of title:
Nassau tribune
Place of Publication:
Nassau, Bahamas
Publisher:
Tribune
Publication Date:
Copyright Date:
2009
Frequency:
Daily, except Sunday
daily
normalized irregular
Language:
English
Physical Description:
v. : ill. ; 58 cm.

Subjects

Genre:
newspaper ( sobekcm )
newspaper ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage:
Bahamas

Notes

General Note:
Description based on: Vol. 79, no. 210 (Aug. 3, 1983); title from caption.

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Holding Location:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
This item was contributed to the Digital Library of the Caribbean (dLOC) by the source institution listed in the metadata. This item may or may not be protected by copyright in the country where it was produced. Users of this work have responsibility for determining copyright status prior to reusing, publishing or reproducing this item for purposes other than what is allowed by applicable law, including any applicable international copyright treaty or fair use or fair dealing statutes, which dLOC partners have explicitly supported and endorsed. Any reuse of this item in excess of applicable copyright exceptions may require permission. dLOC would encourage users to contact the source institution directly or dloc@fiu.edu to request more information about copyright status or to provide additional information about the item.
Resource Identifier:
09994850 ( OCLC )

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Full Text
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Volume: 105 No.145

ST



m@ By TANEKA THOMPSON
Tribune Staff Reporter
tthompson@tribunemedia.net

SEVERAL imposter bottles
bearing the Aquapure label
have been confiscated from an
independent depot and found
to have off-the-chart levels of
disease-causing and potential-
ly-deadly bacteria.

The company was tipped off
to the fake products - being
passed off as demineralised
water - after suspicious looking
red-capped bottles were spot-
ted by an Aquapure employee
at an independent depot in cen-
tral New Providence.

The five bottles were seized
by police, tested by company
lab technicians and found to be
"heavily contaminated" with
coliform bacteria, indicators of
disease-causing organisms, and
fecal bacteria, due to fecal waste
contamination.

The bottles in question were
outfitted with used labels, were
not stamped with a bottling date
and did not have the company's
embossed logo.

It is suspected that used bot-
tles collected at the depot were
re-filled with foreign, contami-
nated water in order to cash in
on the demand for the more
expensive demineralised brand.

Company president Alex
Knowles told The Tribune:
"The problem we have is to

Sale Ends
May 30th

FSTORMS

eT
LUN Hs
juestions linger

SEE INSIGHT FRONT

c.



CM cu AAMAS RSIESUIE

CHARLENE SMITH, quality control
manager at Aquapure, tests the
imposter water for bacteria.

police this. It is kind of diffi-
cult."

During a visit to his Bernard
Road plant on Saturday to
inspect the results, Mr Knowles
called on environmental health
officials to vigorously monitor
small depots and to crackdown
on the problem.

He also demanded govern-
ment legislation to allow for the
prosecution of persons found

SEE page nine

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The Tribune

=USA TODAY.

BAHAMAS EDITION

www.tribune242.com

MONDAY, MAY 18, 2009



TS

Fake bottled wate
sparks disease fear

Imposter products
‘heavily contaminated’

Felipé Major/Tribune staff

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TEN-YEAR-OLD potca

ats, ag
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ps a.

he best dressed dog category on

Saturday at the Humane Society’s Animal Fun Day. The annual event
was held at the Botanical Gardens. Keep an eye out for a picture
special of the event in this week’s Tribune.

Youth killed, passenger
injured in traffic accident

@ By DENISE MAYCOCK
Tribune Freeport
Reporter
dmaycock@tribunemedia.net

FREEPORT - A 19-year-old
youth died and a female pas-
senger was detained in hospital
in serious condition following a
traffic accident early Sunday
morning on Grand Bahama.

Asst Supt Welbourne Bootle
said the accident occurred
around 3.55am at Pinta Avenue
near Bahamia Arms.

The identities of the victims

have not been released. The
young man’s death pushes the
island traffic fatality count to
six for the year.

ASP Bootle said police
received a call about an acci-
dent in the Bahamia area and
went to investigate.

When officers arrived they
found a young driver pinned
between the vehicle and a lamp
pole protector. The female pas-
senger, who is also 19, had been
ejected from the vehicle.

SEE page 10





SEE PAGE FIFTEEN

Teenager shot
dead in 28th
homicide
of the year

Nassau Village resident is
fired on by SUV occupants

A 18-YEAR-OLD youth
was killed on Saturday after
being gunned down in an
inner-city community.

The young man, a resident
of Nassau Village, was walk-
ing in the Lifebouy Street
area shortly before midnight
when a SUV pulled up
alongside him.

The occupants got out of
the car and started firing
shots in the direction of the
victim, press liaison officer
Assistant Superintendent
Walter Evans reported.

Police rushed to the scene
to find the man lying on the
ground in a vacant lot.

He had sustained gunshot
wounds to his chest and his
ankles. He was dressed in a
white T-shirt, blue jeans and
brown shoes at the time of
his death.



Police recovered a .380
handgun with three live
rounds of ammunition from
the area where the victim
was found.

The Central Detective
Unit said yesterday
that details are still very
sketchy.

The victim had not been
positively identified up until
press time last night, and
police had not determined
a motive for the shooting.

The CDU did not wish to
speculate if the murder — the
country’s 28th homicide for
the year — could have been
gang or drug related.

Police could also not ver-
ify if the victim had been
specifically targeted by the
gunmen.

Investigations into the
matter are continuing.

Body found floating
in waters near BASRA

THE body of a man was found floating in waters east of the
Bahamas Air and Sea Rescue Association (BASRA) on East Bay

Street yesterday morning.

Assistant Superintendent Walter Evans said police received a
report of the startling find around 10 am.

The body was removed from the water and upon an initial exam-
ination police found no visible signs of injury that would suggest foul

play, said ASP Evans.
SEE page nine



SHOOTING, ARMED
ROBBERY AND STABBINGS
IN GRAND BAHAMA

MAN QUESTIONED OVER
BANK ROBBERY

RETAILERS ‘NEED MORE
OF THE DOMESTIC
MARKET’ TO STAY AFLOAT

Joint venture

for major oil
exploration
in Bahamas

@ By KARIN HERIG
Tribune Staff Reporter
kherig@tribunemedia.net

ANEW JOINT VENTURE
has been established between a
Norwegian company and BPC
Limited for the first major oil
exploration project in Bahami-
an waters in 23 years.

Both companies said they
believe there is a high potential
for valuable oil and gas pro-

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PAGE 2, MONDAY, MAY 18, 2009

THE TRIBUNE



LOCAL NEWS



24-year-old wanted by police in.
connection with armed robbery |

of slim build, 5°10” tall, :
weighing approximate- }
ly 180lbs. i

Anyone with infor- }
mation regarding the }
suspect’s whereabouts is
asked to contact the }
police emergency hot- }
line at 919 or 911; the :
Central Detective Unit }
at 502-9930/9991; the i
Police Control Room at }
322-3333; Crime Stop- }
pers at 328-8477 or the nearest }
police station. ;

POLICE are asking
the public for assistance
in the apprehension of
24-year-old David
Daniel Mettulus who is
wanted in connection
with an armed robbery.

An all-points bulletin
has been issued for Met-
tulus, describing him as
“armed and dangerous.”

His last known
address was Ridgeland
Park West in New Providence.

Mettulus is described as being



David Daniel
Mettulus
























MAIN/SPORTS SECTION

Local News Pl ype fonler elensh, MOL Weil %

Eqitonialy betters cus et eee P4
P11,18,19

Comics

BUSINESS/INSIGHT SECTION

Business P1,2,3,4,5,6,7,8
Insight

Weather

CLASSIFIED SECTION 40 PAGES

REAL ESTATE GUIDE 24 PAGES

USA TODAY MAIN SECTION 12 PAGES

and

Shooting, armed robbery and
stabbings in Grand Bahama

@ By DENISE MAYCOCK
Tribune Freeport Reporter
dmaycock@tribunemedia.net

FREEPORT - Grand Bahama
Police are investigating a shoot-
ing, armed robbery, and two stab-
bing incidents that occurred over
the weekend.

Asst Supt Welbourne Bootle
said a 33-year-old man was shot at
Pinder’s Point early Saturday
morning.

According to reports, at about
3am police received reports of
gunshots in the area of the 313
nightclub, where a man was dis-
covered suffering from apparent
gunshot injuries to both thighs.

The victim was taken to Rand
Memorial Hospital, where he is
being treated.

ASP Bootle said the shooter
was armed with a handgun and
escaped in a brown-coloured Cav-
alier. He was wearing a dark
coloured mask, blue shirt, and
black pants.

m ARMED ROBBERY
THE Hawksbill Service Station
was robbed of an undetermined
amount of cash on Saturday
evening by three armed suspects.
According to reports, three

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masked men entered the service
station around 8.30pm. They held
up and robbed a cashier of cash.

One man was armed with a
high-powered weapon and anoth-
er with a crow bar. The suspects
wore dark clothing and escaped in
a champagne or green-coloured
Ford Taurus, license 23303.

Anyone with information that
can assist police with their inves-
tigation is asked to contact the
police.

@ STABBING
A 21-year-old man was stabbed





=,
lt

Felipé Major/Tribune staff

= Tr sass

Saxons celebrate on
the streets of Nassau

MEMBERS OF THE SHELL SAXONS SUPERSTARS took to
the streets of Nassau on Saturday to mark their victory in the
New Year’s Junkanoo parade. Delighted tourists were caught
up in the event - some thinking it was a regular occurrence.

during an altercation at the
Grand Bahama Taxi Union Hall
on Saturday evening.

Asst Supt Welbourne Bootle
reported that sometime around
8.25pm several persons were
involved in a fight at the taxi
union hall where a function was
being held.

A 21-year-old waiter, who
was working at the event, was
stabbed in the back with a
sharp object. He is detained in
hospital.

Grand Bahama Police are also
investigating a stabbing which

aa





occurred at Worker’s House ear-
ly Sunday morning.

A 33-year-old man of Yeoman
Wood told police that around
12.40am on Sunday he was
attacked by three men who beat
him about the body and stabbed
him in the back with a sharp
instrument.

As a result of information
received from the victim, police
went to Pinder’s Point around
1.10pm and arrested a 19-year-
old male resident for possession
of a 44 Magnum revolver with
one .44 bullet.





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THE TRIBUNE

MONDAY, MAY 18, 2009, PAGE 3



Man questioned over bank robbery

Fifteen packets |

in house search

POLICE seized 15 pack-

ets of cocaine while search- }

ing a house in the Kemp
Road area.
ASP Walter Evans said

officers made the discovery }

as they executed a search
warrant at a home through
Williams Lane, off Kemp
Road, around 9pm Thurs-
day.

A 39-year-old man was
arrested.

g FIREARM
RECOVERED

PUBLIC assistance led to
the discovery of a .38 hand- :

gun with six rounds of
ammunition concealed ina

bushy area off Kemp Road.

Acting on a tip, officers

from the Wulff Road Police i

Station found the illegal
firearm and related para-
phernalia shortly after
noon on Friday.

tinue.

officers promotions

featured in special
two-page spread

FEATURED in today’s
Tribune on pages 18 and 19
are Bahamas Customs offi-

cers recently promoted with- ;

in the senior ranks of the
Department. The two-page
spread features senior offi-
cers, 95 per cent of whom
having received promotions
including Glenn Gomez to

the post of Acting Comptrol-
ler of Customs and Earl Sey- :

mour to the post of Deputy
Comptroller of Customs.
Glenn Gomez was
appointed to act as Comp-
troller of Customs on April
15, 2009, upon the retire-
ment of former Comptroller

ley.

Mr. Gomez joined the
Public Service in 1967 and
was promoted through the
ranks to the post of Superin-
tendent in the Customs
Department in 1993. He
attended numerous courses
both locally and internation-
ally, and in 1994 was afford-

ed the opportunity to partici- :

pate in a nine-week Crown
Agent Course in London,
England.

Upon successful comple-
tion he returned to the Cus-
toms Department before

being transferred to the Rev- i

enue Section of the Ministry
of Finance where he
remained until his promo-
tion to Deputy Comptroller
of Customs.

Earl Seymour has been
employed with the Customs
Department for more than
AO years. His earlier years
widely exposed him to both
theory and application of

Customs Laws, which served :

as a sound foundation for
additional local and interna-
tional exposure.

In 1980 upon his return
from Treasure Cay, Abaco
to Headquarters in New
Providence, Mr. Seymour
was promoted to the post of
Senior Customs Officer and
continued to ascend through
the ranks of the Customs
Department.

He was appointed Assis-

tant Comptroller of Customs :

in 1997 where he remained
until his promotion to the
post of Deputy Comptroller
of Customs on April 1,
2009.

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Police investigations con-

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Arrest after
hold up in
front of PLP
deputy leader

m@ By TANEKA THOMPSON
Tribune Staff Reporter
tthompson@tribunemedia.net

POLICE are questioning a
man connection with the day-
light armed robbery of the Sco-
tia Bank on Wulff Road and
East Street.

The suspect, who is 37 and
lives at Peter Street, was
arrested at around 5pm on Sat-
urday, a day after the incident
occurred.

Police began their hunt after
a man entered the bank alone
around 10 am and presented
himself as a customer to a
woman bank teller. He made
gestures towards "an object"
used in the hold-up, before
making good his escape with
an undetermined amount of
cash.

Cynthia ‘Mother’ Pratt,
deputy leader of the Opposi-
tion and MP for St Cecilia,
was among the few customers
in the bank at the time.

She credited the prayers of
her pastor for getting her out







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CYNTHIA PRATT was among the
customers in Scotia Bank on Wulff
Road (right) during Friday’s robbery.

of a what could have been a
deadly situation.

Speaking to The Tribune,
Mrs Pratt said she had no idea
the man who followed her into
the bank was about to rob it.

Still shaken by the harrow-
ing events, she recounted how
the bank was nearly empty
when she entered.

She said she stopped briefly
to speak with the security
guard at the front door, before
making her way to the female
teller - but as she approached
the woman a nearby male
teller motioned for her to

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come to his station instead.

“When I went to the teller
he was talking to me and I
noticed how the people were
starting to act strange.

“T didn’t know it was a rob-
bery until I noticed everyone
going to the back and I said to
the young man, what is going
on.

“Then the young man said
to me, ‘Mother, we just got
robbed!?’? And I said, what?

“And the (robber) was right
next to the next teller and I
didn’t know.

“Only after the police
showed up did I take with the



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shakes. It all happened so
fast.

“T could have been gone as
quickly as that. It was a matter
of seconds,” Mrs Pratt told The
Tribune just hours after the
ordeal.

Early Friday morning Dr
Inez Rolle, pastor of Wings of
the Eagle Redemption Min-
istries, phoned her and asked
her to allow her to cover her

that morning in prayer.
These prayers, said 'Moth-

er' Pratt, kept her safe
throughout the agonizing
ordeal.

. .[f it wasn’t for that I
might have been dead,” the
former national security min-
ister said, adding that officers
on the scene credited her pres-
ence as the reason why the
robbery did not turn deadly.

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PAGE 4, MONDAY, MAY 18, 2009

EDITORIAL/LETTERS TO THE EDITOR

THE TRIBUNE





The Tribune Limited

NULLIUS ADDICTUS JURARE IN VERBA MAGISTRI
Being Bound to Swear to The Dogmas of No Master

LEON E. H. DUPUCH, Publisher/Editor 1903-1914

SIR ETIENNE DUPUCH, Kt, O.B.E., K.M., K.C.S.G.,

(Hon.) LL.D., D.Litt.

Publisher/Editor 1919-1972
Contributing Editor 1972-1991

EILEEN DUPUCH CARRON, C.M.G., M.S. B.A., LL.B.

Publisher/Editor 1972-

Published Daily Monday to Saturday

Shirley Street, RO. Box N-3207, Nassau, Bahamas
Insurance Management Building., P.O. F-485, Freeport, Grand Bahama

TELEPHONES
Switchboard (News, Circulation and Advertising) 322-1986
Advertising Manager - (242) 502-2352
Circulation Department - (242) 502-2387
Nassau Fax: - (242) 328-2398
Freeport, Grand Bahama: 1-(242)-352-6608
Freeport fax: (242) 352-9348

WEBSITE
www.tribune242.com — updated daily at 2pm

This murder needs to be solved

JOSEPH-MARIE, comte de Maistre, French
ambassador to Russia in the nineteenth centu-
ry once remarked that if you “scratch a Russian
you wound a Tartar.”

The same observation can be made of the
Bahamas’ tourism industry. If you scratch a
tourist you wound this country’s bread and but-
ter — tourism.

And as for the murder of a well-known and
liked banker, the repercussions can forever tar-
nish the image of the Bahamas as an impor-
tant financial centre.

In other words it will get out that it is neither
safe nor desirable to do business in this country.

On April 22 Hywel Jones, 55, of Peterston-
super-Ely, near Cardiff, Wales, president of
Britannia Investment Group in Nassau, stepped
from his car and started to walk towards his
West Bay Street office when he fell to the
ground in a pool of blood.

He had been shot twice, once straight through
the head. He fought for his life for three weeks
while a policeman stood guard at his hospital
door. Police classified his killing as a “hit job.”

It was a bold killing. The unmasked gun-
man is reported to have walked up to him about
10 o’clock that Wednesday morning, fired
directly at his head, jumped on a motorcycle
and sped off towards Gambier Village.

Of course, this is now a high profile case, not
because— as suggested by an article sent to us
anonymously last week — he is a white man, but
because he is a foreign banker, the Bahamas is
an important financial centre, and the foreign
press is now on the trail, asking the usual ques-
tions, and pressing for answers.

His younger brother, has flown in from Los
Angeles, California, and vows not to leave until
Hywel Jones’ killer is found. Friends have put
up a $50,000 reward for information that will
result in the arrest and conviction of whoever is
responsible.

Hywel Jones settled in the Bahamas in 1988.
Up until two years ago he lived a peaceful life—
a conscientious banker by day; a man who
enjoyed his discos at night.

However, all that changed about two years
ago when he had two unpleasant experiences —
once when he was held up at knifepoint in his
West Bay Street home, and on another occasion
when he was beaten up and threatened.

He filed a criminal complaint, and hired a
private investigator. Information was given to
the police, but apparently nothing was done.

It is understood that this file, which could
not be found immediately after his murder, has

since been located and presumably will now be
investigated.

About this time a dispute arose between Mr
Jones and an associate when they severed their
business relations and went their separate ways.
A case was pending and was due for hearing
about a week before Mr Jones was murdered. In
fact there are two cases — one civil and one
criminal.

As is the wont with sip-sip in Nassau, arm-
chair sleuths are muddying the waters, mixing
everything together, probably arriving at wrong
conclusions, and possibly unfairly sullying the
reputations of others along the way.

We understand that all the statements, and
affidavits have been sworn and filed and ready
for prosecution in these cases.

It would probably be advisable for the police
to proceed with the criminal case and get that
behind them, so that full concentration can be
given to solving the murder.

It is understood that Mr Jones’ family is giv-
ing their full support to our Bahamian police,
but if the foreign press keep pushing and ques-
tions are asked at the Foreign Office in London,
Scotland Yard, may be the next on the scene.

We are equally concerned about all the
Bahamians being murdered in what, in some
cases, also appear to be “hit jobs.”

Eventually these killings will also affect our
tourist industry should they result in a travel
advisory listing this country among those con-
sidered “unsafe for travel.”

However, a high profile banker can have this
result overnight.

That is why it is important that no stone be
left unturned in solving his murder.

Don’t forget Aruba and the disappearance
and presumed murder of Natalee Holloway, an
American high school student, who disappeared
from a class trip to that island in June, 2005.

Aruba has never recovered from that pub-
licity. In February this year it was reported that
Aruba’s tourism was down between 15 and 20
per cent “and still falling even in high season.”

Already the Bahamas is in economic trouble.
Therefore, it is in every Bahamian’s interest to
have Hywel Jones’ murder solved as quickly
as possible.

And so if anyone has any information that
would help they should call Crime Stoppers
toll-free at 328-8477.

These calls will be answered by operators in
the United States who will ensure complete
anonymity. Otherwise call the Criminal Detec-
tive Unit at 502-9942 or 502-9991.



Please help
our efforts
to preserve
sea turtles

EDITOR, The Tribune.

Please publish this open letter
to the local community for their
support in the preservation of
the endangered sea turtle.

The Bahamas Sea Turtle
Conservation Group

Dear Friends,

I once again write to you,
cap in hand, begging for help. I
actually do feel very guilty com-
ing to you for help but this is a
dire situation; it always is, isn’t
it?

I don’t know if you have
noticed that there is a reason-
ably fierce battle raging over
the Sea Turtles in the Bahamas.
There are huge numbers of peo-
ple in this country who feel that
the only responsible thing to do
is to have a total ban on the har-
vesting and killing of all sea tur-
tles in order to preserve them
for generations to come. Unfor-
tunately we are still meeting
some resistance to the Bill. It is
difficult for me to understand
why people are not unanimous
in the passing of the turtle ban,
however they are not, in spite of
knowing that every sea turtle
in the world is on the threat-
ened list, and some are already
on the endangered list.

Last October the Bahamas
Government offered a partial

LETTERS

letters@triounemedia net



ban by December 31, 2008, and
a TOTAL ban by April 1, 2009.
Perhaps it was an April Fools
joke because those dates have
been and gone and we are no
closer to protecting the Sea Tur-
tles than we were a year ago.
The environmental impact is
huge, we will gradually lose the
sea turtle as we have already
lost so many other species, they
will became a rarity in the lives
of our children and grandchil-
dren. How unbelievably sad
that would be.

I am asking for help as we,
the Bahamas Sea Turtle Con-
servation Group, are planning
to print 1000 brochures laying
out why it is important to pre-
serve the Sea Turtle, we are fly-
ing in Dr. Alan Bolton, who is
an expert on Sea Turtles to
speak at a town meting. He will
stay at my house, but we need
to pay for his ticket. We plan
to print more educational mate-
rials for the general public and
would also like to have funds
to be able to print t-shirts that
we could sell to raise even more
money for this cause. We want
to teach people the importance
of Eco tourism. You can kill a
turtle ONCE you can photo-

graph and swim with the same
turtle 365 days a year.

If you could send a donation
to us we would be enormously
grateful. Cheques should be
made out to “the Bahamas Sea
Turtle Conservation Group”,
they can be mailed to P.O. Box
CB 11099, Nassau. They can be
dropped to The Bahamas
Humane Society c/o Kim Aran-
ha. You can email us at
bahamasturtles@gmail.com and
we can pick your donation up.

We would be grateful for
anything, it is never too small,
small donations when put
together equal a large donation.
I know it’s a lousy time but if
you can spare $5.00 or more
Please, please help us do the
right thing here.

We plan to have a candle-
light vigil on June 8th, at 7pm
at Rawson Square, and on June
10th we are having a town
meeting at COB at 6pm. In
August there will be a wonder-
ful Turtle Art Show at Doon-
galik Studios at Marina Village,
Paradise Island, to coincide with
The Miss Universe Pageant.

Thank you for reading this
long letter.

KIM ARANHA
The Bahamas Sea Turtle
Conservation Group

Nassau,
May 14, 2009

Government doing more is not the answer

EDITOR, The Tribune.

More and more every day we see signs of the
fallout from the world’s economic troubles.

Locally we read of more layoffs, and business
people are now openly discussing their "drastic
measures list" if things continue to worsen.

At the same time, there are calls for the gov-
ernment to do more.

These are tough times for sure, but if we are
realistic, how can the government do any more
without burdening future generations with more
debt and a heavier tax burden?

Government is being called upon for more
help, while it's desperately looking for cash flow
for current commitments, all at a time when it
might be nearing borrowing limits.

There is one clear message from all of this
and Gerald Ford, the 38th President of the US
was right when he said in a speech to Congress in
1974 that: "A government big enough to give you
everything you want is a government big enough to
take from you everything you have".

The Bahamas Government must take delib-
erate steps to reduce its size and the scope of

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services it supposedly offers if we are to survive
this economic downturn without taking more
drastic measures, that will wreak more hardship
on the "small man" and everyone else.

Otherwise, they will have to continue to raise
taxes and debt levels any way they can, which
will only stifle the economy even more.

As a friend commented recently:

"Years of profligacy has left the country in
financial jeopardy. It did not have to happen. Both
political parties chose potential bankruptcy over
conservative, disciplined spending."

"The seeds have been sown — it is left now to
reap the whirlwind."

Let's work together to figure out how we can
reduce the government. Not call on it to do more
harmful things to us.

Of course I shouldn't say The Nassau Institute
was right all along about the size of our govern-
ment, but...the reality is, it is self evident
now...isn't it?

RICK LOWE
Nassau,
May 17, 2009

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THE TRIBUNE

MONDAY, MAY 18, 2009, PAGE 5



LOCAL NEWS



Retailers ‘need more of the
domestic market to stay afloat

m@ By TANEKA THOMPSON
Tribune Staff Reporter
tthompson@tribunemedia.net

WITH lackluster business in
the capital's downtown hub not
expected to turnaround until at
least early 2010, a prominent
Bay Street merchant said retail-
ers must snag more of the
domestic market in order to stay
afloat.

Mark Finlayson - president of
luxury retail chain Solomon's
Mines - said the recent closure
of once robust stores at the east-
ern end of Bay Street were a
long time coming, because of a
failure to court Bahamian cus-
tomers, compounded with a
softened tourism industry.

"IT think we've got a rough
ride into January or February
of next year. I think all of us
have to be innovative and find
new ways in order to keep
things going, but I think it's
going to be very, very rough for



MARK FINLAYSON

everybody, for all sectors,"
said Mr Finlayson.

"High rent is part of it (Bay
Street store closures) but the
main reason is we haven't
shaped ourselves up in terms of
the product we are delivering to
tourists but also we are short-
changing ourselves in terms of

the product we are delivering to
Bahamians.

"One of the things I see in
terms of revitalisation of any
area is bringing local clientele
back to these areas it's absolute-
ly essential but somehow we
have not managed to focus our-
selves enough on getting
Bahamians," he said.

A crucial part of attracting
more local consumers down-
town, said Mr Finlayson, is the
creation of more tiered parking
areas and the installation of
metres for short-term parkers.

Plans for a downtown revi-
talisation have been years in the
making - most recently with the
formation of the Downtown
Nassau Partnership (DNP)
which earlier this month said the
public will soon “see many visi-
ble improvements to the city”.

At arecent town meeting held
at the British Colonial Hilton
DNP managing director Vaughn
Roberts said some of the vari-

ous improvements to be pushed
by the DNP over the next few
months are: Cleaning and sani-
tation, beautification, reducing
congestion, increasing the avail-

ability of parking options, under-
taking streetscaping, maintain-
ing buildings and sidewalks and
creating new entertainment pos-
sibilities.

S) suelo eel

POLS LS

FLIES, MOSQUITOES, TICKS & FLEAS

PHONE: 327-6464
re



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Renewed calls for police on school campuses

RECENT reports of violence and
sexual abuse in the country’s schools

have sparked renewed calls for police |:

officers to be stationed on campuses.

The Bahamas Against Crime
organisation said recent reports are
only the “tip of the iceberg” of prob-
lems plaguing the nation’s education
system.

In the wake of accusations of sex-
ual abuse of students at Eight Mile
Rock High in Grand Bahama and
unconfirmed reports of gang violence
at C C Sweeting in New Providence,
the anti-crime organisation’s execu-
tive director Rev C B Moss is
demanding immediate action to
address the problems and consider

reinstating police officers on campuses.

“These reports, as horrible as they are, are but
the tip of the iceberg. Our schools are in deep
trouble and require urgent and critical attention,”

he said.

Rev Moss said that each day information comes
into Bahamas Against Crime which is cause for
alarm “even among the most hardened of us.”

The organisation’s statement released yesterday
calls for the Ministry of Education and the them.
government “to arise from what appears to be a
state of paralysis and implement action to halt the

REV C B MOSS



rot and decay occurring in our
schools.”

“In spite of its policy against
putting police officers on campuses,

) the current situation may warrant

and justify deploying police officers
to bring the schools under control,”
he said.

Bahamas Against Crime is also
challenging parents to wake up and
protect their children as it is their
responsibility, not the government’s.
“These parents may want to note
that for the most part, the children of
the education and government offi-
cials do not attend the violence rid-
dled schools that their children
attend. This alone demands some

response from them.”

The non-profit organisation is further chal-
lenging the wider society to demand immediate
and drastic changes in the way the country’s

schools are being operated.

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“This is a recipe for disaster, and we are very
near the tipping point,” said Rev Moss.

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PAGE 6, MONDAY, MAY 18, 2009 THE TRIBUNE

Minister of Works tours new | | anspor Minster

facilities at Abaco Central High

Neko Grant (right)
@ By KATHRYN CAMPBELL

is pictured with
Caves Village Professional Bahamas Information Services _

Permanent Secretary
Colin Higgs and Lenora
Black, District Superin-
tendent for Abaco
schools, at the Central
= = MINISTER of Public Works and
ay iC Office TT Cet wi AAT Transport Neko Grant said he is satisfied
with the progress of the administration
7 J . . . complex, technical block and restores
The premier choice for serious business” presently under construction at the Aba-



Abaco High School.
co Central High School.

1,661 sq. ft. $5,813.50 p. month incl. CAM Fees He and a team of ministry officials
toured the facilities during a visit to Aba-
co last week.

includes a reception area, offices for the
principal and vice- principal, student sick
bay, staff lounge, rest rooms, clerical
space and kitchenette.

1,083 sq. ft. $3,790.00 p. month incl. CAM Fees
839 sq. ft. $2,936.50 p. month incl. CAM Fees “Tam very pleased with the progress of = “" THs technical block and restrooms

th dditions to Abaco Central
850 sq. ft. $2,975.00 p. month incl. CAMFees | Hioh*hesaid.

District Superintendent for Abaco

comprise some 4,049 square feet and
include three classrooms and male and
female restrooms.



Contact Mr. Simon Chappell on schools Lenora Black said the adminis-
327-1575 or 477-7610 tration building is almost ready for occu- MINISTER OF PUBLIC WORKS and
Email: sj @ heish pancy. ; Transport Neko Grant inspects the new
mail: simon @cavesheights.com Last October, the government signed technical block at Abaco Central High
contracts totaling $900,000 with Jones School’s newly constructed technical
Construction and Williams and Sons block. Pictured behind Mr Grant is Cephas
Construction to build the additions. Cooper, Administrator for the Central
The new administration building Abaco District.




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“rey, & Chance to mark your MPs’ performances
, @ By ALISON LOWE

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THE TRIBUNE

MONDAY, MAY 18, 2009, PAGE 7



Pe
The big three and little
CARICOM in the Caribbean

= i
+ - _ ——" -

WORLD VIEW,

m By SIR RONALD
SANDERS

(The writer is a Consultant
and former Caribbean
diplomat)

"Le government of the
Dominican Republic
(DR) has applied to become a
member of the Caribbean Com-
munity and Common Market
(Caricom) and heads of govern-
ment of the regional organisa-
tion will consider the application
at their meeting in July.

There is not much to consider.

Caricom countries along with
the DR form CARIFORUM
and last year they each signed an
Economic Partnership Agree-
ment (EPA) with the 27-nation
European Union (EU) which
overtakes the objectives of Cari-
com’s slow-paced Single Market
and Economy in many aspects.

Professor Norman Girvan has
pointed out that “the EPA
defines the Dominican Republic
as part of the ‘region’: the DR
has an economy that is larger
than that of any single Caricom
country and the equivalent of 64
per cent of the combined size of
all 14 Caricom economies.

The existing Caricom-Domini-
can Republic free trade agree-
ment covers only goods, has not
yet been extended to services,
and does not contemplate exten-
sion to trade-related issues.

“The EPA’s Regional Prefer-
ence clause obliges Cariforum
states to extend to each other the
same treatment they extend to
the EU. CSME countries will,
therefore, liberalise goods, ser-
vices and investment with regard
to non-CSME Caricom countries
and to the Dominican Republic
at the same rate as to the EU”.

Therefore, from the DR’s
standpoint since it has entered a
game, it makes sense to help
make the rules.

The DR is already an elephant
in the Caricom room that cannot
be ignored — its participation in
CARIFORUM and the terms of
the EPA with the EU make it a
big player.

Things have changed appre-
ciably.

The English-speaking coun-
tries of Caricom no longer inhab-
it an exclusive neighbourhood.
They have to concede they are
small players, and acknowledge
that only cohesive action will pre-
serve their identity, their culture,
their language — and a meaningful
place in the Caribbean economic
space.

It is significant that the EU
urged the DR’s inclusion in
CARIFORUM and it had to be
accepted by Caricom as a neces-
sary condition of the EPA.

From the EU standpoint, the
DR’s inclusion in the EPA made
sense since its population of 9.6
million constitutes a market that
is almost twice the size of CARI-
COM, and the EU is interested in
larger markets for its goods and
services to help preserve and
advance the standard of living in
its own member states.

Undoubtedly, if Cuba were not
subject to a US trade embargo,
the EU might also have insisted
that Cuba with a population of
11.4 million be part of the EPA.

By any objective analysis, the
US embargo of Cuba will be lift-
ed within the next decade.

The burning desire by the pri-
vate sector in many States in the
US to do business with Cuba is
pushing change.

US companies want a signifi-
cant piece of the Cuban action
which they now see going to
European and Canadian compa-
nies, and increasingly to China
and Russia.

When the embargo is lifted,
the Caribbean will be a very dif-
ferent place.

It would be one in which its
two largest countries in popula-
tion terms would be Spanish-
speaking and of far greater
importance to the global com-
munity than the little countries
of Caricom.

It is only the US trade embar-
go against Cuba that now pre-
vents an integrated relationship
between Cuba and the Domini-
can Republic in the Caribbean
that would dwarf CARICOM.

Then, there is Puerto Rico —
another island territory in the
Caribbean with a population of
3.9 million that is Spanish-speak-
ing.

Even if Puerto Rico does not
seek separation from the US,
once the embargo on Cuba is lift-
ed, the deepening of economic
relations between Puerto Rico,



nt

“It is only
the US trade

embargo against
Cuba that now

prevents an
integrated
relationship
between

Cuba and the
Dominican
Republic in the
Caribbean that
would dwarf
CARICOM.”

Cuba and the Dominican Repub-
lic would make perfect sense.

The Caribbean will then be
dominated by these “big three” —
with markets and investment
opportunities far greater than all
the CARICOM countries.

Caricom countries would
delude themselves if they believe
that with their individual small
markets, high investment costs,
high costs of doing business and
vulnerabilities both to natural dis-
asters and external economic
shocks — such as the current glob-
al financial meltdown — they
could each operate successfully
in the global market place in
competition with the “big three.”

Caricom governments would
do well to bolster their economies
and their capacity for dealing
with their Caribbean neighbours
and the international community
by urgently completing the
arrangements for implementing
their own Single Market. They
should also swiftly reform the
governance of Caricom which
sorely needs overhaul.

Against this background, roles
for the media in Caricom coun-
tries begin to emerge.

Umbrella organizations such
as the Caribbean Media Corpo-
ration (CMC) and the Caribbean
Broadcasting Union (CBU)
should be geared for: (a) the
development of a capability to
deliver CARICOM information
into the DR, Cuba and Puerto
Rico in Spanish; and to deliver
information from these countries
into CARICOM in English; (b)
the development of relations with
media in the DR, Cuba and Puer-
to Rico who would purchase and
market information from CARI-
COM delivered in Spanish; and
(c) establishing the mechanics of
delivering such information as
widely as possible.

Having served on the first
Board of Directors of CMC (then
known as the Caribbean News
Agency) and as President of the
Caribbean Broadcasting Union, I
am painfully aware that neither
of the two institutions have fully
fulfilled the objectives for which
they were intended — that is to
knit the Caribbean peoples into a
single community through the
spread of information and knowl-
edge.

This is not the fault of the tal-
ented journalists and broadcast-
ers who have served the organi-
zations for more than three





yl

SIR RONALD SANDERS



decades; they have been con-
strained by the lack of financial
resources to do their jobs.

Expecting the financially
under-resourced CMC and CBU
to take on the task of information
flow between English-speaking
CARICOM countries and their
Spanish-speaking partners — espe-
cially now the Dominican Repub-
lic — is almost certainly impossi-
ble, unless the two organizations
get external help.

Such help should come from
three sources.

First, the governments of
CARICOM and the DR should
make a “no-strings attached”
subvention to the two organiza-
tions to undertake the necessary
information flow between their
countries.

Second, the EU should be
asked to provide the budgetary
support which CMC and the
CBU would require to undertake
the project. After all, the DR is
part of CARIFORUM and will
in time become a member of
CARICOM - largely due to the
EU’s insistence.

And, recognizing that this pro-
ject should not be limited to the
DR alone, but should include
Cuba and Puerto Rico, the third
source of financing should be
UNESCO which should be
approached to provide funding
for a communication infrastruc-
ture that promotes greater cohe-
sion and understanding among
Caribbean peoples who, though
geographically close, have been
separated politically and eco-
nomically in service to coloniz-
ing nations.

(This is an abridged version
of a paper delivered to a
UNESCO sponsored Caribbean
Media Conference in Grenada
on May 14, 2009).

Responses to:
ronaldsanders29@hotmail.com

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FMR. Sen.
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’ MBE, J.P.-5S.C.
» Jan. 27, 1928 - May 18, 1995
A
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A
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PAGE 8, MONDAY, MAY 18, 2009

1. CANTERBURY PARK ESTATES
LOT NO. 13
PROPERTY DESCRIPTION:
Single-storey Residence
3 Beds / 2 1/2 Baths
PROPERTY SIZE: 8,086 sq. ft.
LOCATION: Traveling east
on Prince Charles Drive, turn
through corner on the right
(opposite St. Augustine’s Road)
and head south around the
curve to the right. The property
is the 2nd to the last house on
the left.
APPRAISED VALUE: $283,000

2. COLLEGE GARDENS
SUBDIVISION
LOT NO. 5
PROPERTY DESCRIPTION:
Single-storey Duplex Apartment
2 Beds /1 Bath each
PROPERTY SIZE: 5,976 sq. ft.
LOCATION: Traveling east along
Prince Charles Drive for St.
Augustine’s Road, take the 2nd
corner right (College Gardens
Road) and head south to the “T”
junction; turn onto Pine Barren
Road. Heading west, turn through
2nd paved road on left. The
property is the 5th building on the
right.
APPRAISED VALUE: $209,000

. BEL-AIR ESTATES —
CARMICHAEL ROAD
LOT NO. 259
PROPERTY DESCRIPTION:
Single-storey Residence,
3 beds / 2 baths
PROPERTY SIZE: 6,000 sq. ft.
LOCATION: Traveling east on
Carmichael Road from Faith
Avenue, take the 4th corner right
(Turtle Drive). The property is the
4th house on the right.
APPRAISED VALUE: $186,000

. CHIPPINGHAM SUBDIVISION
LOT NO. 17
PROPERTY DESCRIPTION:
Single-storey Residence,
2 beds / 1 bath
PROPERTY SIZE: 6,375 sq. ft.
LOCATION: Traveling west on
Quarry Mission Road off Nassau
Street, the property is located on
the northern side (approximately
500 ft. from Nassau Street).
APPRAISED VALUE: $120,000

10. ENGLERSTON SUBDIVISION
LOT NO. 4 Block 7
PROPERTY DESCRIPTION:
Triplex Apartment building
PROPERTY SIZE: 7,000 sq. ft.
LOCATION: Traveling east on
Cordeaux Avenue from East
Street, take the 2nd right (Key
West Street) and head south. The
property is the 6th building on the
left.
APPRAISED VALUE: $243,000

. BERNARD TERRACE
SUBDIVISION
LOT NO. 14 - Southern Moiety
PROPERTY DESCRIPTION:
Multi-Family Residential Lot
PROPERTY SIZE: 5,700 sq. ft.
with foundation
LOCATION: Traveling east on
Bernard Road, take the 1st
corner on the right past Windsor
Terrace. The vacant lot is the 4th
on the left.
APPRAISED VALUE: $85,000

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. CARMICHAEL VILLAGE
LOT NO. “A”
PROPERTY DESCRIPTION:
Single family Residential Lot
PROPERTY SIZE: 4,650 sq. ft.
LOCATION: Traveling west
on Avocado Road from Faith
Avenue, turn through the 1st
graveled corner on the left. The
vacant lot is the 2nd on the left,
enclosed with chain link fence
and fruit trees.
APPRAISED VALUE: $51,000

3.

. GAMBLE HEIGHTS

SUBDIVISION

LOT NO. Parcel of Land
PROPERTY DESCRIPTION:
Split Level Residence with Two
1 bed/1 bath Apartment Units
under construction
PROPERTY SIZE: 7,141 sq. ft.
LOCATION: Traveling south on
Blue Hill Road from Faith
United Way, take the 1st corner
left (Sunrise Road) and head
south; take the 5th corner

left and head east to the 1st
corner right. The property is
the 7th house on the right.
APPRAISED VALUE: $150,000

. PINEWOOD GARDENS

SUBDIVISION

LOT NO. 1714

PROPERTY DESCRIPTION:
Single-storey Residence
PROPERTY SIZE: 5,000 sq. ft.
LOCATION: Traveling east onto
Bamboo Boulevard from East
Street, take the 3rd corner right
(Thatch Palm Avenue) and travel
south, turn through 2nd corner
on the left (Avocado Street). The
property is the 17th house on
the left.

APPRAISED VALUE: $137,000

. GOLDEN ISLES ROAD

LOT NO. “B”

PROPERTY DESCRIPTION:
Triplex Apartment Complex
PROPERTY SIZE: 7,203 sq. ft.
LOCATION: Traveling north on
Golden Isles Road from Cowpen
Road, after the 1st paved road
on left; the property is the 2nd
building on the left.
APPRAISED VALUE: $333,000

12. MARSHALL ROAD

LOT NO. 17D

PROPERTY DESCRIPTION:
Triplex Apartment-One 2-
bedroom/ 2-bath & Two 2-
bedroom /1-bath

PROPERTY SIZE: 10,000 sq. ft.
LOCATION: Traveling west on
Marshall Road from South Beach
Road, take the 1st corner right
(Tiao End Road). The property is
the 4th building on the left.
APPRAISED VALUE: $288,000

13. MARSHALL ROAD

LOT NO. 52

PROPERTY DESCRIPTION:
Single-storey Residence 3 beds /
2 baths

PROPERTY SIZE: 37,550 sq. ft.
LOCATION: Traveling on Marshall
Road from Blue Hill Road, turn
left at “T” junction, then right. The
property is the 5th on the right, to
the rear.

APPRAISED VALUE: $345,000

. KOOL ACRES SUBDIVISION

LOT NO. 46 Parcel ‘C”
PROPERTY DESCRIPTION:
Multi / Single Family Residential
PROPERTY SIZE: 7,604 sq. ft.
LOCATION: Traveling south

on Fox Hill Road from Joe
Farrington Road, take the 2nd
corner left - opposite Guana
Cay Avenue - on to Kool Acres
Subdivision Road. The vacant lot
is 1st on the left; directly on the
corner of Fox Hill Road and Kool
Acres Subdivision Road.
APPRAISED VALUE: $84,000

4. SEA GULL GARDEN

SUBDIVISION

LOT NO. 33

PROPERTY DESCRIPTION: Multi
- Family Residential Lot

Beach Front

PROPERTY SIZE: 14,723 sq. ft.
LOCATION: On Flemming Road.
APPRAISED VALUE: $200,000

\

DEVELOPED RESIDENTIAL & COMMERCIAL

5. CENTERVILLE

LOT NO. 5 Block 14
PROPERTY DESCRIPTION:
Single-storey Commercial
Building

PROPERTY SIZE: 5,000 sq. ft.
LOCATION: Madeira Street
between Montrose Avenue and
Mt. Royal Avenue
APPRAISED VALUE: $302,000

6. _ SIR LYNDEN PINDLING

ESTATES SUBDIVISION

LOT NO. 3014/15

PROPERTY DESCRIPTION:
Single-family Residence

3 beds / 2 baths

PROPERTY SIZE: 5,000 sq. ft.
LOCATION: Traveling east

on Bamboo Boulevard to the
roundabout, continue traveling
eastward on C.W. Saunders
Highway. Take the 2nd right (Lady
Pindling Avenue) and head south
to the 1st paved corner on the left
(Lauren Street); turn through 2nd
corner left (Pear Tree Avenue).
The property is the 6th house on
the left.

APPRAISED VALUE: $145,000

14. PINEWOOD GARDENS

SUBDIVISION

LOT NO. 13

PROPERTY DESCRIPTION:
Single-storey Residence,

3 beds / 2 baths

PROPERTY SIZE: 7,191 sq. ft.
LOCATION: Traveling east on
Sapodilla Boulevard from East
Street, take the 1st left (Thatch
Palm Avenue) and head north
to the “T” junction. Take a left

(Mahogany Street); the property is

the 2nd on the right.
APPRAISED VALUE: $148,000

15. SANDILANDS VILLAGE

LOT NOS. 7 and 8
PROPERTY DESCRIPTION:
Single-storey Residence

With 3 apartments under
construction

PROPERTY SIZE: Lot 7: 7,970
sq. ft, Lot 8:8,419 sq. ft.
LOCATION: Traveling west on
Sandilands Village Road from
Fox Hill Road, turn through the
9th paved road on left (Vanessa

Close). The properties are located

on the northwestern side of the
street.
APPRAISED VALUE: $277,000

._ SOUTH OCEAN ESTATES

SUBDIVISION

LOT NO. 1 Block 5

PROPERTY DESCRIPTION:
Multi-family Residential Lot
PROPERTY SIZE: 11,566 sq. ft.
LOCATION: Traveling south of
Lyford Cay, immediately pass
Mount Pleasant turn left on
South Ocean Boulevard to New
South Ocean Estates. The vacant
lot is the 1st on the right.
APPRAISED VALUE: $110,000

6. SOUTHERN SHORES

SUBDIVISION

LOT NO. 4 parcel of lot 24
PROPERTY DESCRIPTION:
Multi - Family Residential Lot
PROPERTY SIZE: 7,706 sq. ft.
LOCATION: The vacant

lot is on the west side of a
road reservation nearly 400
feet south of Marshall Road.
APPRAISED VALUE: $77,000

vt

7. WINTON MEADOWS ESTATES

SUBDIVISION |

LOT NO. 115

PROPERTY DESCRIPTION:
Single-storey Residence 3 beds
/ 2 baths

PROPERTY SIZE: 8,000 sq. ft.
LOCATION: Traveling east

on Prince Charles Drive for
Culberts Hill, take the 1st corner
right (Jasmine Drive) and head
south; turn through 2nd corner
on the right (Violette Drive). The
property is the 4th house on the
left.

APPRAISED VALUE: $274,000

16. SANDILANDS VILLAGE

LOT NO. “E”

PROPERTY DESCRIPTION:
Duplex Apartment Complex
PROPERTY SIZE: 5,500 sq. ft.
LOCATION: Traveling west on
Sandilands Village Road from
Fox Hill Road, turn through the
2nd paved road on the left. The
property is the 5th on the left.
APPRAISED VALUE: $219,000

VACANT LOTS

INTERESTED PARTIES SHOULD SUBMIT OFFERS INCLUSIVE OF TELEPHONE CONTACT AND POSTAL ADDRESS
TO: CB DISTRESSED PROPERTIES, CREDIT RISK MANAGEMENT DEPARTMENT, P.O BOX - SS-6263 NASSAU, BAHAMAS OR
EMAIL US AT: DISTRESSED.PROPERTIES@COMBANKLTD.COM * WE RESERVE THE RIGHT TO REJECT ANY OR ALL OFFERS.



THE TRIBUNE

Chamber of Commerce
to award outstanding
businessperson of year

DESPITE the current
economic crisis, nomina-
tions are pouring in for this
year’s Annual Business
Awards. Every year, the
Chamber of Commerce
honours the contributions
of outstanding Bahamian
businesses and executives
to the business community.
This year will be no differ-
ent, as Bahamian busi-
nesspersons will vie for the
distinguished titles of Out-
standing Businessperson of
the Year and Developing
Entrepreneur of the Year.
Two leading Bahamian
businesses will be designat-
ed Company of the Year,
which is awarded in two
categories, businesses with
over fifty employees and
those with less.

Last year’s prestigious
Business Person of the
Year Award went to Eileen
Carron, CEO of the Tri-
bune Media Group. A lead-
ing businesswoman, Mrs
Carron was recognised for
building a successful media
empire and her immense
contributions to journalism
in the Bahamas.

The Tribune Media
Group owns The Tribune
and 100 Jamz and also man-
ages three other radio sta-
tions. Mrs Carron was also
the first woman CEO of a
radio station in the
Bahamas and the
Caribbean.

Said the Chamber’s exec-
utive director Philip Simon:
“This year presents a very
unique situation as Bahami-
an businesses have had to
respond to the current eco-
nomic crisis; for many, this
is the very first time they
are dealing with a market
slowdown. Innovation and
creativity have been key for
those businesses that have
shown growth and
remained profitable and we
look forward to recognising
the efforts of those busi-
nesses and individuals that
continue to make meaning-
ful contributions to our
economy.”

The Developing Entre-
preneur Award salutes the
business pioneer who has
established a business in
the private sector within
the past five years with at
least one full year of opera-
tion.

Last year, this award
went to Christian Sawyer,
president of Sunryse Shred-
ding Services, the first doc-
ument destruction company
to be established in the
Bahamas. John Bull was
presented with the Cham-
ber’s 2008 Business of the
Year Award Category A
(51 or more employees).
The Chamber’s Category B
2008 Business of the Year
Award went to the Eagle
Electrical Supplies and
Lighting Centre.

The Chamber’s coveted
2008 Lifetime Achievement
Award was presented to
leading businessman,
Franklyn Wilson, CMG,
chairman of Sunshine
Holdings Group of Compa-
nies and a chartered
accountant by profession.
Mr Wilson was recognised
for his efforts towards the
development of the local
business community.

Successful businesses and
businesspersons who are
growing and excelling and
meet the judging criteria
are eligible for nomination.
Nominations are being
accepted through May 22
and information is available
through the Chamber of
Commerce.

The Annual Business
Awards will be presented
during the Chamber’s 38th
Annual Awards Banquet
and Silent Auction sched-
uled for Saturday, June 27,
at Sandals Royal Bahami-
an.

The banquet marks the
culmination of Chamber
Week, which begins on
June 22. The week’s events
also include the highly
anticipated business-net-
working event Mix N Min-
gle on Tuesday, June 23,
and the Meet the Ministers
forum on Thursday, June
25.

The Chamber of Com-
merce is a non-profit organ-
isation, which represents a
wide cross-section of pri-
vate sector businesses in
the Bahamas.





THE TRIBUNE



LOCAL NEWS

Fake bottled water
sparks disease fear

FROM page one

bottling or selling impostor
water.

No arrests were made but Mr
Knowles said officials at the
Department of Environmental
Health were informed and are
looking at ways to pursue the
matter in civil court.

While the depot manager
claimed the water was delivered
from an Aquapure truck, Mr
Knowles said he failed to pro-
duce an invoice and the driver
for that route said he had not
delivered that brand of water
to the depot in a year.

Demineralised water has
been a company best seller. It is
distributed to local hospitals and
clinics due to its low sodium
content.

Charlene Smith, Aquapure's
quality control manager, said
the bacteria found in the impos-
tor water can be fatal in elderly
people, infants or anyone with a
compromised immune system
stemming from diabetes, can-
cer or kidney disease.

If ingested, the bacteria could
induce vomiting, hepatitis, diar-
rhea, intestinal infections and
possible death in vulnerable
people, she added.

"The water sample in ques-
tion was found to have bacteria
present which was too numer-
ous to count (which) means that
it exceeded 500 colonies. And
fecal coliform bacteria - fecal
contamination is disease causing
- the level we found again was
too numerous to count," she
said.

"The total dissolved solids -
the mineral content of the (test-
ed) water - was 17 parts per mil-
lion and for demineralised or
dionised water it should not
have exceeded 10 parts per mil-
lion".

To date, company officials
said they had no report of con-
sumers ingesting the contami-
nated water.

Meanwhile, Mr Knowles said
water bottled at the plant is sub-
jected to a rigorous multiple-
step filtering process and every
morning the water towers are

YOUR FUTURE

IS ABOUT TO GET BRIGHTER

tested for possible contamina-
tion and again every half an
hour until shutdown.

As a further precaution, bot-
tles are machine-washed at a
temperature of 150 degrees and
are not handled by hand before
they are filled.

Company officials are advis-
ing people to ensure that any
bottles bearing the Aquapure
logo are date stamped, have an
embossed company logo or
bought from an Aquapure dis-
tribution centre to ensure
authenticity.

Body found floating
in waters near BASRA

FROM page one

Police believe the man had been in
the water about 12 hours before his

body was discovered.

Up to press time the man's identity
was unknown and police appealed for
members of the public with missing rel-

atives to contact police.

ASP Evans said the deceased has a [J
light complexion, is about six feet two
inches tall and was found wearing dark
coloured shorts and brown sandals.

At this stage police said they do not
suspect any foul play but are awaiting
results of an autopsy report to confirm

the cause of death.

ASP WALTER EVANS

Earlier this month, a man who worked in the area stumbled
upon the gruesome discovery of a lifeless body bobbing near a barge
behind the Harbour Moon Hotel on East Bay Street.

Like yesterday's discovery, police said there were no signs of trau-
ma on the body or signs of foul play — it was suspected the man

somehow fell into the water.

The man, believed to be in his late 20s to early 30s, was dressed
in a white T-shirt and blue shorts when his body was found. He has

not been identified by police.

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MONDAY, MAY 18, 2009, PAGE 9

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PAGE 10, MONDAY, MAY 18, 2009

THE TRIBUNE



BAHAMAS REAL ESTATE ASSOCIATION
Se

Ue A tele

Sy

“REAL ESTATE WEEK”

Sunday, May 24"
Opening Church Service
St Francis Xavier Parish Centre
Tie eis

CEN AE
SPA DAY-MANDARA SPA
VE TAC eel ie l0 tin ltl gle]
ale eh

Friday, May 29"
BREA Black-Tie Gala
eat 8 ieee emcees 1 [reel
Cocktails 7:00PM-8:00PM
Gala 8:00PM-12:00AM
iife dc) we ORO Oe) marae)

TO RESERVE YOUR TICKETS CONTACT:
June: junebrea@coralwave.com
The Bahamas Real Estate Association
ieee he i
Tek (242) 356-4503
Fax: (242) 356-5401

Joint venture for major oil

exploration in Bahamas

FROM page one

duction in the southwest
Bahamas which will benefit the
local population.

The partnership agreement
between the Norway-based Sta-
toilHydro and the energy explo-
ration company BPC was signed
on May 12, and the official
announcement was expected to be
made in London at 8am today.

Based on research so far, Sta-
toilHydro said there could be as
many as 500 MMBOE (Million
Barrels of Oil Equivalent) oil fields
in the areas identified by BPC in
the southern Bahamas.

However, as the licences for
exploration included in this joint
venture agreement are new licence
areas for BPC in the southwest of
the Bahamas, they are still under
application pending the approval
of the Bahamian government, a
joint press statement from Statoil-

Hydro and BPC said yesterday.

The two companies said they
hope the licenses will be approved
and processed before the end of
this year.

BPC’s chairman Alan Burns
said:‘“We are delighted to partner
with a respected industry leader
like StatoilHydro. It is testament to
the prospects of the southern
Bahamas and to BPC’s contacts
and commitment to the region that
a large business such as StatoilHy-
dro sees it as an important addition
to their exploration portfolio. The
terms of this agreement will
strengthen BPC’s capital position
and eliminate the need for near-
term fresh capital funding for the
(joint venture).”

BPC principals said they are
confident the partnership with Sta-
toilHydro will produce successful
benefits for the company and for
the Bahamas.

“BPC is highly encouraged by
the results of the exploratory work

Youth killed, passenger
injured in traffic accident

FROM page one

According to reports, the deceased was driving a Dodge Ram
1500 truck, license T-7150, west on Pinta Avenue when he lost con-
trol while trying to manoeuvre around a curve.

Mr Bootle said the vehicle travelled 350 feet and knocked down
a lamp pole. It continued for an additional 120ft, overturned, and

crashed into a pole protector.

The vehicle was extensively damaged and the victims were tak-
en to Rand Memorial Hospital, where the man was pronounced

dead on arrival.

The woman is still in hospital with serious injuries.
Mr Bootle said police are urging motorists to drive with extreme

caution and care on the street.

“We are warning the public to please slow down and obey safe-
ty rules of the road, and to remember that speed kills.

“One life lost is one too many and we are asking drivers to be
cautious and courteous and to adhere to road signs,” he said.

undertaken in the Bahamas which
indicates that there is high poten-
tial for successful and valuable oil
and gas production within the ter-
ritorial waters of the Bahamas, and
in order to move the project to the
next stage, an association with a
reputable drilling company had to
be developed. BPC therefore con-
siders itself fortunate to have
attracted StatoilHydro for involve-
ment in its operations in the
Bahamas,” BPC’s resident man-
ager in the Bahamas Idris Reid
said.

BPC was granted five licenses
for oil and gas exploration in five
areas in the south central Bahamas
in April, 2007. Since then, the com-
pany has carried out the back-
ground work including the collec-
tion and evaluation of scientific
data and samples from previous
exercises, the company said. “The
next stages of work to be under-
taken will involve seismic evalua-
tions, and ultimately, drilling. In
that context and following exami-
nation of proposals sought from
various companies, BPC has select-
ed StatoilHydro of Norway as its
partner in the ventures being pro-
posed for the future,” Mr Reid
said.

Both companies assured the
public that they are committed to
the preservation of the environ-
ment during all phases of explo-
ration and development.

StatoilHydro is considered to be
a world leader in integrated tech-
nology-based, international energy
company. The Norwegian govern-
ment is a majority shareholder in
the company.

BPC is registered in the Falk-
land Islands, but its main country
of operation is the Bahamas. The
company was formed to invest in
an offshore oil exploration pro-
gramme in licence areas in the ter-
ritorial waters of the Bahamas.

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GOVERNOR GENERAL OF
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PAGE 12, MONDAY, MAY 18, 2009

TRIBUNE SPORTS



INTERNATIONAL SPORTS

























BOLT'S |
RECORD

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Fifton to win a
150m street race
in central
Manchester,
Manchester,
England, Sun-
day, May 17,
2009. Bolt won
with a world
record time of
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BROKERS & AGENTS LID.

CRICKET

England in winning position
against the West Indies

England have put them-
selves in a winning position
against West Indies. Now they
say they are determined to be
ruthless in pursuit of a 2-0
npower series success on Mon-
day.

Stuart Broad, who took two
of the biggest wickets among
the ten England chiselled out
on the fourth day of the sec-
ond Test at Riverside, is confi-
dent they have it in them to
take another seven on the
final day.

West Indies closed on 115
for three, still 144 runs short
of making England bat again
to take the Wisden Trophy in
style, and were most indebted
to Ramnaresh Sarwan (100)
and Denesh Ramdin (55) in
their first innings and captain
Chris Gayle (54) after follow-
ing on.



Scott Heppell/AP Photo

WEST INDIES Denesh Ramain, cel-
ebrates reaching 50 during the 4th
day of the second test match
against England at the Riverside's
cricket ground, Chester-le-Street,
England, Sunday May 17, 2009.






WEST INDIES Ramnaresh Sarwan, right, hits a ball bowled by Eng-
land's Graham Onions during the 4th day of the second test match at
the Riverside's cricket ground, Chester-le-Street, England, Sunday May
17, 2009.

SG Bethel Brothers Morticians

Telephone: 322-4433, 326-7030
Nassau Street, P.O.Box N-1026

FUNERAL SERVICE FOR

7 oe =

Charles Leon
Johnson, 55

| of #4 High Vista Drive will be
held on Wednesday May 20th,
11:00 a.m. at Sf. Anselm's
Catholic Church, Bernard
Road, Fox Hill. Rev.
Monsignor Preston Moss, Fr.
Noel Clarke, Fr. Reginald
Demeritte and Deacon
Raymond Forbes will officiate.
Interment will follow in the
Church's Cemetery.
He will forever remain in the
hearts of: his loving and
devoted Wife, Eulease Stuart-Johnson; Children: Primrose, Charles
I, Crystal, Sanchez and Kristjan Johnson; Siblings: Helen Johnson,
Janet and Derek Davis, Anthony and Keva McKinney, Andrew
McKinney, Alicia and Harold Brown, Vernita Wright, Winifred
and Michael Thompson, Chester and Gail Johnson, Sherman and
Solomon Johnson; Madison and Aldece Turnquest, Cindy Major
and Racine Melfort Parents-in-law: Cleveland and Matilda Stuart;
Adopted Mother: Marjorie McKinney, In laws: Ricardo and Carla
Stuart, W. Renae McKay; Christine and Bishop Chadwick James
II, Lindburgh and Laura Stuart, Erica and Terrell Stuart, Effie
Burrows, Deborah McKinney and Janet Turnquest, Mr. and Mrs.
Oral Newbold; Uncles: Sam and Madeline Basden and family,
Fr Rodney Burrows and family, Patrick Smith; Aunts: Gwendolyn
Brice, Eulease, Gwenith, Sylvia and Beverley Smith and Alice
Stubbs; Nieces and Nephews: Jamal Davis and family, Alexis
and Krishelle McKinney, Val and Bill Wallace, Samantha and
Lenny Bannister, Amanda Johnson, Deandria Beckford, Roscoe,
Derrick Johnson, Melvin Hall, Dwayne and Denario Brown ,
Melissa Armaly, Greg and Stella Thompson, Angela Thompson,
Shelly Maccow, Tanya Bell, Nicoyas Hilbert, Brynae McKay,
Chadwick II, Chadwin and Chad-Vaughn James, Ricardo Jr. and
Rickelle Stuart, Lindburgh Jr, and Linae Stuart, Brittany, Kendal,
Sherman Jr., Matthew, Elizabeth, Daniel, Jordan, Chester Jr,
Solomon Jr, Crystal, Michael, and Alberto Johnson, Extended
family: Eugene Palacious and family, Don and Kay Aranha and
family, Hubert and Roxanne Chipman and family, Lambert and
Margaret Campbell and Family, Godwin and Michelle Cargill
and family, Algernon and Lamar Cargill and family, Roscoe and
Fabianna Davis and family, Phillip and Sharlamae Stubbs and
family, Elijah and Sherry Brice and family, Melford Clarke and
family, Larry and Candy Farrington and family, Jeffrey and
Corrine Major and family, Eurick and Lisa Dean and family,
John Williams and family, Leo Ferguson and family, Mr and Mrs.
Mosely, Whitfield and Cinderella Johnson and family, Afton and
Shasta Moxey and family, Cyril and Mary Taylor and family,
Viola and Herbert Lightbourne and family, Duke and Cynthia
Stubbs, Curlene McQueen and family, Ashley Cargill and family,
Retired Supt. George Mortimer and family, Edwin and Timolyn_
Thompson and family, Clinton Pearce and family, William BillyE
Brown and family, Archdeacon James Palacious and family,
James Mackey and family, Wayne Edgecombe and family, Marina
and Johnny Young, Millie Young, Elsworth Turnquest and family,
Monzell Turnquest and family, Millie and Al Cartley, Quinton,
Sharina Basden, the Young family, the Curtis family, the Laramores,
the Taylor family, the Smith family, the Brice Family; his Kwanis
family, his Fox Hill Community family including the PLP branch
of the Fox Hill Constituency, the Fox Hill Festival Committee;
his adopted children: Edward Symonette, George Hayles, Ronald
Dean, Jacqueline Maxwell, Terran Munroe, Jovie Major, Michael
Carroll, Kathleen Smith, Ferdinand Agenor, Sharon Brown, Shane
Vidal, Helen Storr, the staff of Johnsonis Autobody Repair and
Johnsonis Paint Supply, the staff of Shell Harold and Wulff Road
service stations; Special friends: Hon. Fred Mitchell, Senator
Jacintha Higgs, Mr. Bismarck Coakley, Patrick Ward, Anton
Saunders, Anton Sealey, Keith Rolle, Marvin Bain, Philip Taylor
and Elsworth Rolle, Members of the Fund Raising Committee
of St. Anselmis Parish, the entire St. Anselmfs Church family,
members of the Progressive Liberal Party, members of Bahamas
Petroleum Retailers Association and numerous other family and
friends too numerous to mention.

Friends may pay their last respects at the P.L.P Headquarters, Sir
Lynden Pindling Centre, Farrington Road on Tuesday from
10:00a.m. to 5:00p.m. and on Wednesday at the church from
10:00am until service time.

Scott Heppell/AP Photo

Ouro soccer
roundup

Man United,
Inter and

Barcelona win
their leagues



Jon Super/AP Photo

MANCHESTER UNITED'S Carlos
Tevez, centre right, lifts the English
Premier League trophy alongside
teammate Park Ji-Sung, left, as the
team celebrate winning the league
after their 0-0 draw against Arsenal
at Old Trafford Stadium, Manches-
ter, England, on Saturday.

m LONDON

Manchester United clinched
its third consecutive English
Premier League title on Satur-
day while Inter Milan won its
fourth straight Serie A title in
Italy and Barcelona earned La
Liga’s championship in Spain
for the first time in three years,
according to Associated Press.

Saturday’s results left only
Germany and France undecided
among the five major European
leagues. Manchester United
matched Liverpool’s mark of 18
league championships with a 0-0
tie Saturday against visiting
Arsenal. In a poorly played
game between two of England’s
glamour clubs, United won their
11th league title in 17 seasons.
All came under manager Alex
Ferguson, who has major 25 tro-
phies in his 23 years at Old Traf-
ford.

Amid the celebrations,
Argentina striker Carlos Tevez
appeared to wave farewell to
the fans in his last home game
with his loan deal two weeks
from ending. More than a thou-
sand United fans converged on
the directors’ exit and players’
tunnel, demanding that the
team keep him. Yesterday West
Brom were relegated after los-
ing 0-2 at home to Liverpool.

Middlesbrough has little
chance of survival after it threw
away a lead and was held to a 1-
1 draw at home by Aston Villa.
Newcastle slipped back into the
relegation zone after a 1-0
defeat at home to Fulham. Hull
moved out of the zone with a 1-
1 draw at Bolton. The final
round of games is May 24.

Hull has 35 points, Newcastle
34, Middlesbrough 32 and West
Brom 31, with three teams to go
down. Sunderland, which visits
Portsmouth on Monday, is not
out of danger with 36 points.



m MADRID - Barcelona
clinched La Liga when Real
Madrid lost 3-2 at Villarreal.
Barcelona has 86 points with
three games left. Madrid has 78
with two to play.

This was the 19th Spanish
league title for Barcelona, which
completed its first domestic
double in 11 years. The team
won the Copa del Rey last
Wednesday. Next up for
Barcelona is Premier League
champ Manchester United in
the Champions League final
May 27. It is trying to become
the first Spanish team to win the
three trophies in one season.

Barcelona, which plays at
Mallorca on Sunday, has 86
points with three games left,
while Madrid has 78 with two to
play. The 19th title in Barcelon-
a’s history was a triumph for 38-
year-old coach Pep Guardiola,
the club’s former midfielder
who was in his first season in
charge.



@ MILAN — Inter Milan clinched
its 17th Serie A title when AC
Milan lost 2-1 to Udinese.
Going into the match, AC
Milan needed to win, but knew
Inter could still take the title if it
won its match with Siena on
Sunday night. The result left
AC Milan with 71 points, seven
behind its cross-city rival with
two matches remaining follow-
ing this weekend. Gaetano
D’ Agostino opened the scoring
with a penalty in the first half
after Antonio Floro Flores was
brought down by Paolo Maldini.

Cristian Zapata doubled Udi-
nese’s lead two minutes into the
second half to settle the tie.
Milan threw men forward, but
Massimo Ambrosini’s header
came to late to have any effect.

Inter Milan became the first
club in more than 50 years to
win four successive Serie A
titles.

The Serie A title was its 17th
overall.



TRIBUNE SPORTS

SPORTS

MONDAY, MAY 18, 2009, PAGE 13



OTE TLE

Wilticats show thei

STRIKING OUT: Mary Edgecombe-Sweeting (above), who struck out
four batters. Pictured right is Wildcats’ Hyacinth Farrington.





Pennant winners pull away SL. lutions Ltd.

in final inning to topple L|ST@ Ck UP

Boomer G Swingers On xerox ¢) paper

@ by RENALDO DORSETT
Sports Reporter
rdorsett@tribunemedia.net

The pennant winners and
defending league runners-up
look to return to the status
near the league’s leaderboard
and appear to be well on their
way early in the NPSA sea-
son.

The Pineapple Air Wildcats
pulled away in the final inning
and doubled up the Boomer
G Swingers, 14-7 for their sec-
ond win of the season.

Mary Edgecombe-Sweeting
struck out four batters and at
the plate she went 3-4 with
three runs and two RBI to led
the Wildcats.

The Wildcats took an early
2 run lead in the top half of
the opening inning, but the
Swingers responded with the
equalizing runs in the bottom
half of the second.

The Wildcats regained the
lead in the third, outscoring
the Swingers 3-2 to take a 5-4
lead heading into the fourth
inning.

Pineapple Air repeated the
feat, outscoring the Swingers
3-2 in the inning to increase
their lead by a one run.

© In brief

Bird, Spielherg
honoured at
Boston University
commencement

m BOSTON

Boston Celtics legend Larry
Bird and film director Steven
Spielberg were feted Sunday at
Boston University with honorary
degrees, according to Associated
Press.

Bird, who played for the Celtics
for 13 seasons and was enshrined
in basketball’s Hall of Fame, is
now president of basketball oper-
ations for the Indiana Pacers.

Spielberg has made classic
movies such as “Jaws” and
“Raiders of the Lost Ark.” He
recently directed “Indiana Jones
and the Kingdom of the Crystal
Skull.”

U.S. Rep. Michael Capuano
delivered the commencement
address and received an honorary
doctor of laws degree.

Zhang Yimou, the Chinese
filmmaker who produced the
opening and closing ceremonies
at the Beijing Olympics, also
received an honorary degree at
the school’s 136th graduation. He
didn’t attend the commencement
ceremonies. Zhang will start
shooting a new movie in late May
or June, his assistant told The
Associated Press last month,
marking the “Raise the Red
Lantern” director’s first project
since designing the Beijing
Olympics ceremonies.





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PAGE 14, MONDAY, MAY 18, 2009

SPORTS

TRIBUNE SPORTS





SOFTBALL

The Bahamas Electricity Corporation

Tender

Wilson City Road Grading & Transmission
Circuit Easement Clearing
Wilson City, Abaco, The Bahamas

The Bahamas Electricity Corporation
invites tenders for the above named services.

Bidders are required ta collect packages from the
Corporation's Administration Office, Blue Hill & Tucker Roads

Contact: Mrs. Delmeta Seymour at telephone 302-1158

Tenders are to be addressed to:
Mr. Kevin Basden
General Manager
Bahamas Electricity Corporation
Executive Offices - Blue Hill & Tucker Roads
Nassau, Bahamas

Deadline for delivery to BEC: on of before
ind June 2009
no later than 4:00 p.m,

Submissions should be marked as follows
Tender No. 705/09
WILSOM CITY ROAD GRADING AND
TRANSMISSION CIRCUIT EASEMENT CLEARING
WILSOW CITY, ABACO, THE BAHAMAS

The Corporation reserves the right to
accept or reject any or all proposals.

For all enquiries regarding the tenders and site visits, contact

Mr. Clark Allem at telephone 302-1212.



ROYAL BANK OF CANADA TRUST COMPANY
OSS E NR AI IE UD)
is considering suitable applications for the role of



Manager, Trust and
Corporate Services

Description of role and key responsibilities:

¢ Lead and manage a team of trust officers and other
staff: this includes providing advice in respect of clients
and cases, coaching staff and ensuring the effective
utilisation of other resources. Instrumental in developing
and implementing company procedures within
appropriate frameworks.
Possess a superior knowledge of Trust (complex and
simple), Company and Fiduciary structures, and tax
and legal issues affecting the administration of Trusts
and Companies.
Ensure that strong technical knowledge of all aspects
of trust and company administration is delivered: this
includes attending client meetings and
supervising/assisting in respect of the preparation of
accounting and investment information prior to
submission to clients
Experience with the preparation and presentation of
financial and estate planning proposals to high net
worth individuals
Providing assistance to increase profitability of the
company/shareholder value by identifying
opportunities to extend the trust services, and to use
the bank offering to implement solutions for clients
where appropriate
Proven superior sales acumen. With ability to attract,
build and strengthen relationships with key clients and
intermediaries and identify new ideas in relation to
products and services that may be offered by the
company

Core skills and knowledge:

¢ A University degree in business, accounting, or other
related discipline

* Aminimum of ten years’ relevant experience

¢ Professionally qualified, e.g. accounting/finance
qualification, STEP ICSA, TER ACCA

* Self-motivation with excellent project management

¢ Demonstrably strong technical knowledge of all aspects
of trust and company administration, including the
nuances and statutory requirements of the major
offshore jurisdictions used in connection with clients’
structures

* Strong analytical and problem-solving skills

¢ Methodical, thorough and attentive to detail

* Strong supervisory skills coupled with the ability to lead
by example

¢ Strong skills in time management and prioritisation

¢ Excellent oral and written communication skills

* Microsoft Office skills

¢ Cultural awareness and sensitivity on both an individual
and corporate basis

Interested persons should apply by May 22, 2009 to:

Royal Bank of Canada Trust Company
(Bahamas) Limited
PO Box N-3024
Nassau, NP Bahamas
Attention: Human Resource Manager
Via Email: paul.lewis @rbc.com or
elizabeth.dorsch@rbc.com

Only applications from suitably qualified candidates
will be acknowledged

RBC
Royal Bank
RBC), of Canada

www.rbcroyalbank.com/caribbean/bahamas

Cee ue SUS etc)

New Breed hold on for
first win of the season

@ by RENALDO DORSETT
Sports Reporter
rdorsett@tribunemedia.net

After trailing for much of
the contest, the New Breed
took control late in the game
and was able to withstand a
late rally to hold on for their
first win of the season.

The New Breed held on late
in the seventh inning and a
late strikeout by Eugene Pratt
preserved a 14-13 win over
Morgan’s Buccaneers.

In a high scoring affair, both

QONVENIENT








Late strikeout by Eugene Pratt preserves
14-13 win over Morgan’s Buccaneers

teams came out aggressively
on the offensive end with the
Bucs taking a 3-2 lead after
the first inning.

Morgan’s top of the lineup,
Prescott Wilson, Caurdero
Pinder and Angelo Dilate
each scored runs while New
Breed reached the scoreboard

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with runs from Ashton Lewis
and Ken Wood.

The Bucs added another
run in the second while Dilett
kept the New Breed lineup at
bay striking out two in the
inning to maintain a 4-2 lead.

Both teams added three
runs apiece and the Bucs took
a 7-5 lead into the third

Outscored

After chipping away for the
entire game the New Breed
took the lead in the fourth
inning when they outscored
the Bucs 4-1 to grab a 9-8 lead.

While they managed to
score a run each in the fifth
and sixth innings, the Bucs
game up two runs apiece in
both inning and failed to cut
into the deficit.

Wood capped the scoring
for the New Breed with his

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fourth run of the game in the
seventh inning to give his team
a 14-10 lead.

The Bucs staged a late
comeback in the bottom of the
seventh with three runs but
feel just short.

Dilett, Kristofer Turnquest
and Dino Sweeting brought
the Bucs within a single run,
however with two outs, Pratt
struck out Kendal Knowles to
clinch the win for the New
Breed.

Offensively for the winners
Rigby was 2-4 with one run
and two RBI, Lewis was 1-3
with two runs, Wood was 2-4
with four runs and one RBI,
Prat wass 1-4 with one run and
three RBI and Addie Finley
was 2-2 with two runs.

For the Buccaneers, Wilson
was 3-4 with four runs, Dilett
was 1-1 with three runs and
one RBI, Ron Pinder was 1-1
with one run and one RBI.

Andres Kudacki/AP Photo

ROGER FEDERER of Switzerland
returns a shot during the final
match against Rafael Nadal of
Spain at the Madrid Open Tennis in
Madrid, Sunday, May 17, 2009.

Federer beats
Nadal for the
Madrid title

m@ By PAUL LOGOTHETIS
AP Sports Writer
MADRID

Roger Federer got a badly
needed confidence boost ahead
of the French Open, beating top-
ranked Rafael Nadal 6-4, 6-4 on
Sunday to win his first title of the
season at the Madrid Open,
according to Associated Press.

The second-ranked Federer
broke a sluggish Nadal once in
both sets before firing his sixth
ace to win his 15th Masters Series
title on the second match point.
Federer also won here in 2006
when the event was played
indoors on a hard court.

“There are no positives, there
is little to analyze,” said Nadal,
the 2005 champion. “He broke
and broke and I went home.”

It was only the second victory
Federer has on clay against his
top rival, with the other coming at
the Hamburg final two years ago.
The win also ended Federer’s
five-match losing streak to Nadal,
a stretch that included losses in
the finals at Roland Garros, Wim-
bledon and Australia.

Federer called his first win over
Nadal since the 2007 Masters Cup
“very satisfying.” Especially after
being left in tears in February fol-
lowing his defeat to Nadal at Mel-
bourne. “T thought I took all the
right decisions today. In the end it
was a perfect game for me,” the
Swiss player said after drawing
even with Nadal in Masters titles.
“(You) stay positive and I did. I
got the win I needed badly.”

Earlier, top-ranked Dinara
Safina of Russia won her second
straight title on clay by beating
Danish teenager Caroline Woz-
niacki 6-2, 6-4 in the women’s
final. Federer also ended Nadal’s
33-match clay winning streak. The
Spaniard will be going for a fifth
straight title at the French Open
beginning on May 25.

“T don’t think he’s going to
take any damage away from this,”
Federer said. “I’m sure he’s going
to be rock solid in Paris again.”

Nadal sounded so after only a
fifth loss in his last 155 matches
on clay. “To me, this tournament
has nothing to do with Paris. This
tournament is practically another
surface compared to Paris,” said
Nadal.



THE TRIBUNE PAGE 15

§



r = rT
\ q
q y 7
: /

MONDAY, MAY 18, 2009 -_ A bi





New Providence Softball Association championship







OVERPOWERING PERFORMANCE: Edny Bethel

m@ by RENALDO DORSETT

spore report... Edny Bethel in dominant
Wie seuss ne form as Heavylift Dorsey Park
Boys stake early claim to title

pitcher in the country on the
mound, the Heavylift Dorsey
Park Boys are staking a claim as
one of the early contenders for
the New Providence Softball
Association title.

Edny Bethel delivered a
overpowering performance
from the mound to lead their
Dorsey Park Boys to their sec-
ond consecutive win of the
young season, 9-2 over the
Robin Hood Hitmen.

Bethel pitched a complete
game and in seven innings gave
up just a single hit and recorded
16 strikeouts. The Dorsey Park
Boys scored the opening run of
the game and took a 1-0 lead
ee. TO Maia nora sck UCM CUM ORL

In a duel between pitchers,
the Hitmen's Alcott Forbes was run and two RBI. For the Hit- = run while William Delancey
brilliant over the first two men, Pinder was 1-3 with one added another run.
innings, striking out two hitters
in the opening inning and strik-
ing out the side in the second
inning as his team scored the
equalizing run in the second.

Dorsey Park added a pair of
runs in the third, courtesy of
Kevin Helley and Mario Ford.

Bethel kept the Hitmen at
bay by striking out six batters
over the course of the next
three scoreless innings.

Dorsey Park took a 3-1 lead
heading into the fifth before
they decisively added to their
margin.

They had their most produc-
tive inning in the sixth with four
runs scored in the inning to take
a commanding 7-1 advantage.

Sigmund Bethel, Lorenzo
Carter, Desmond Rolle and
Oracho Greene.

The Hitmen responded with
just a single run in the bottom
half of the sixth when Adrian
Pinder crossed home plate.

Dorsey Park added another
pair of runs in the seventh
inning for the game's final score
and improve to 2-0 while the
Hitmen fell to 0-2.

In a losing effort Forbes also
pitched a complete game with
eight strikeouts.

At the plate, Dwayne Pratt
led the charge offensively for
Dorsey Park with a productive

aid a Fs ATE] a i ) E rae aH

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Mario Ford was 1-2 with one *Offer valid from May 1st through Mary 31st, 2009. Proof of Bahamian residency required.

run and Carter was 1-1 with one





PAGE 16, MONDAY, MAY 18, 2009

THE TRIBUNE



LEFT: Sea shells
were used to

Lh ;

create a variety
of useful items.



RIGHT: Showing
off their
certificates,
Harbour Island
craft graduates
are pictured with
executive
chairman Edison
Key and other
BAIC officials.



Gladstone Thurston/BIS

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BAIC encourages
Briland artisans

HARBOUR Island - Artisans on the island have
joined the growing number of Bahamians who are
tapping into the multimillion-dollar souvenir market.

With assistance from the Bahamas Agricultural and
Industrial Corporation (BAIC), more Bahamians are
taking advantage of lucrative linkages in tourism.

Forty participants in BAIC's shell and straw craft
training programmes received their official certification
during an awards ceremony last week in Dunmore
Town.

"TL applaud you graduates for having the wisdom to
view the handicraft industry as a significant income gen-
erator and an industry in which one can find job satis-
faction,” said BAIC executive chairman Edison Key.

Using sea shells and combinations of ingredients
found commonly on the island, participants created a
variety of intricately designed products - jewellery,
hats, bags, tableware.

"This programme has empowered the unemployed
in Harbour Island to become future entrepreneurs
and allowed some participants to create and enter
full-time careers," said Mr Key.

Speaking of the steps BAIC has taken to develop the
handicraft industry, he said:

"We have plotted a new path to bring to fruition the
hopes and dreams and aspirations of the Bahamian
people in accordance with our mandate.

"Tam of the firm view that through BAIC we can
significantly impact unemployment and increase the
standard of living in the Bahamas.”

The handicraft industry provides substantial linkages
to tourism and the means to diversify within the
tourism product, thereby providing the means to keep
a significant portion of the tourism dollar in the econ-
omy, Mr Key noted.

"The estimated millions we use to import items are
a good indication of what can be earned, and a good
indication of the impact the handicraft industry can





BAIC EXECUTIVE CHAIRMAN Edison Key and board
member Lonnie Rolle admire this intricate piece by
Audrey Curry.

have on the economy if we seize the opportunities
that exist," he said.

The response to BAIC's handicraft programmes
has been "significant," he said, "proving there is a
growing belief that handicraft can become an estab-
lished and vibrant industry in the Bahamian economy."

"I charge you to strive to apply ingenuity in estab-
lishing a niche in the domestic market by offering
products of excellence which are competitively priced
and of good quality and standards,” he said.

Mr Key was joined in Harbour Island by BAIC's
assistant general manager Donnalee Bowe, board
members Sonny Russell and Lonnie Rolle, domestic
investment officer Joan Stubbs along with trainers
April Martin-Fox of New Providence and Emily
Munnings of Eleuthera.

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THE TRIBUNE



ine

MONDAY,

MAY

18,



2009

SECTION B ¢ business@tribunemedia.net

S

Colinalmperial.

Confidence For Life





SL

DLO) OL O) Aste)



130-140
Bahamians
per day signing
up for jobless
benefits

* $6.7m expected total
payout to those registered
with unemployment
scheme by May 2

* 4,334 cheques disbursed
to date, with 1,335 of 7,078
applicants turned down

* Minister says two major
Bay Street businesses
refusing to lay-off staff
despite ‘significant losses’

* 1,900 job losses needed
for 1% unemployment
rate increase

@ By NEIL HARTNELL

Tribune Business Editor

SOME 130-140 Bahamians
per day are signing up to claim
unemployment benefit, the min-
ister of labour and social devel-
opment has told Tribune Busi-
ness, with the Government
expecting to pay out a total $6.7
million to those who registered
—and were approved — by May
2, 2009.

Dion Foulkes said the
National Insurance Board
(NIB), which is administering

See page 9B

Emerald Isle
correction

In Tribune Business’s joint
lead article on the Four Sea-
sons Emerald Bay Resort’s
closure on Thursday, May 14,
it was reported that the near-
by Emerald Isle Shopping
Centre on Exuma was also
due to close on June 15, 2009.

This is not correct. The
shopping centre is uncon-
nected to the resort and its
closure, and both it and its
business tenants will remain
open with no change to their
operations. Tribune Business
apologises for the error.



Government on ‘collision
course’ with insurance

@ By NEIL HARTNELL
Tribune Business Editor

he Government is
on “a collision
course” with the
Bahamian insur-
ance industry over
reforms to the Domestic Insur-
ance Act, Tribune Business can
reveal, the sector believing it
has “overreacted” to CLICO
(Bahamas) collapse through the
unfettered powers it proposes
to give the regulator and com-
pany administrator he appoints.

Timothy Ingraham, the
Bahamas General Insurance
Association’s (BGIA) chair-
man, confirmed to this newspa-
per that the industry was “very
disappointed” that its recom-
mendations on the proposed
amendments — due to be debat-
ed in the House of Assembly
this week — “seem to have been
ignored or not taken into
account”.

The BGIA had previously
threatened to mount a Supreme
Court challenge to the amend-
ments, which give the Insurance
Commissioner (the Registrar of
Insurance’s successor under the
Act), the power to appoint a
‘statutory administrator’ for any

Four firms
failing per
week since
September

@ By NEIL HARTNELL
Tribune Business Editor

FOUR small to medium-
sized Bahamian companies
have been going out of business
every week since September
2008, a consultant to the sector
has warned, again calling for
the Government to develop a
Small Business Act to “save
honest businesses”.

Mark Turnquest, of Mark
Turnquest Consulting, said “90
per cent” of his customer base
was struggling to survive amid
the deepening recession, with
the remaining 10 per cent only
faring better because they had
back-up assets and collateral to
fall back on.

Speaking ahead of his upcom-
ing National Small Business
Summit, which starts on May
21, Mr Turnquest said: “A cou-
ple of months ago, beginning in
September 2008, you were look-
ing at four businesses going out
of business every week.

“Ninety per cent of my clients
are doing bad. The other 10 per
cent, the only reason they’re
doing well is because they have

See page 5B

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* Industry ‘very disappointed’ concerns over Act reforms ‘seem to have been ignored’
* Fears centre on ‘draconian powers’ given to regulator and company administrators
* General insurers keeping options, including court action, open

* Colinalmperial likely to take on CLICO (Bahamas) portfolio, sources say

insurer carrier or broker/agent
without first obtaining the
court’s permission.

Mr Ingraham said the BGIA
“will certainly look at the
options” if the proposed
amendments tabled in the
House of Assembly some 10
days ago remain as they are,
refusing to rule out a court chal-
lenge.

The Bahamian insurance sec-
tor is especially concerned that
the Commissioner’s reasons for
appointing an administrator
seem vague and subjective, with
the latter appointed purely
according to one person’s judg-
ment.

The company concerned has
no ability to challenge the
administrator’s appointment
until after the event, creating
fears that ‘the damage will
already have been done’, not
just to the firm’s reputation but
also to its operational, manage-

ment and business affairs.

Mr Ingraham told Tribune
Business: “We were very disap-
pointed that some recommen-
dations we have made, and
some concerns we expressed,
seem to have been ignored or
not taken into account.

“The things we expressed
concern about were still tabled
in the versions in the House.
We’re quite concerned about
that, and are still in ongoing dia-
logue with the Registrar of
Insurance’s Office over the
issue.”

The BGIA chairman said the
“concern is mainly over the
powers they gave the Commis-
sioner”. The amendments, he
added, gave the regulator “fair-
ly wide powers” to appoint an
administrator if, in his judg-
ment, an insurance company
“should be closed down” or it
was “not doing things the way
he thinks they should be done”.

Mr Ingraham, though, said
the BGIA’s position was that
the appointment of an insur-
ance company administrator
should still go through — and be
ratified — by the Supreme Court.
“We feel it’s putting a lot of
power in the hands of one per-
son,” he explained.

“The powers vested in the
Commissioner and the admin-
istrator seem to be purely in
that person’s judgment. It’s
always a concern when some-
one comes in and takes over a
business, and what they’re like-
ly to do with it. We’re still in
discussions with the Registrar
of Insurance, and making our
voices heard.”

A copy of the Domestic
Insurance Act amendments that
have been tabled in Parliament,
and obtained by Tribune Busi-
ness, show that the Insurance

See page 6B

Plan to make Water Corp a
$20.2m profit maker ignored

B By NEIL HARTNELL
Tribune Business Editor

THE Water & Sewerage Corporation could
be generating $20.2 million in net income and
$68.2 million in operating revenue in its 2012
financial year, if the proposals contained in a 10-
year business recovery plan are implemented.

Yet the reforms contained in the Corporation’s
2002-2012 Corporate Business Plan, produced
by the consulting arm of UK water utility, Thames
Water, in May 2002, have seemingly never been
implemented by either the former Christie gov-
ernment or the current Ingraham administration

to date.

position the Water & Sewerage Corporation “as
a highly-regarded, self-financing service provider”
rather than the $24.107 million net loss making

ernment”.

The plan, which has been obtained by Tribune

Business, lays-out a “10-year vision” designed to

See page 4B

burden it had become by fiscal 2007.

This has left the Corporation as the biggest
loss-making government agency, ahead of
Bahamasair, and the greatest burden on Bahami-
an taxpayers, costing them $30 million in the
2008-2009 Budget year.

The Corporate Business Plan said the goals it
set out for the Water & Sewerage Corporation
were “quite feasible given effective management
of the organisation, associated with a greater
independence from the direct influence of gov-

medical emergencies

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Grand Bahama
firm's revenues
increase 105%

* South Riding Point still
locked in $2.7m contractor
claim, plus government
tax claim

* Freeport-based tug boat
business sees first quarter
revenues rise 7%

@ By NEIL HARTNELL
Tribune Business Editor

A GRAND Bahama-based
bulk storage terminal saw its
revenues more than double dur-
ing the 2009 first quarter,
increasing by $4.491 million or
105 per cent, due to a capacity
increase of 1.5 million barrels.

World Point Terminals, the
Canadian parent for South Rid-
ing Point, said the revenue
increase for the three months
to March 31, 2009, was due to
“both higher storage and
marine revenues” at the Grand
Bahama operation.

“Storage revenues increased
due to 1.5 million barrels of new
storage coming into service in
the third and fourth quarters of
2008,” World Pint said of South
Riding Point in its first quarter
results statement.

“While the company antici-

See page 7B

responsi or
from the daily report,
=



ColinaImperial.





PAGE 2B, MONDAY, MAY 18, 2009

THE TRIBUNE





Sa

The Bahamian Stock Market

FINDEX 795.46 (-4.72%) YTD
a ; . . : . BISX CLOSING CHANGE VOLUME YTD PRICE
Bf By RoyalFidelity Capital tems (DHS) was the big declin- | CWCO reported net income of Doctors Hospital Health Sys- SYMBOL PRICE CHANGE
Markets er, its stock price falling by $0.33 $2.6 million, an increase of $1 tems (DHS) released unaudited AML $1.40 $- 0 -18.13%
to a new 52-week low of $1.53 million or 65 per cent compared results for the year ended Jan- BBL $0.63 ce -4.55%
THERE was an increase in ona volume of 14,000 shares. to $1.7 million in the same peri- — uary 31, 2009. DHS reported a BOB $6.95 Ve 0 -9.03%
trading activity last week in the ICD Utilities (CD) saw od last year. net income of $3.8 million, an BPF $11.00 cs 0 -6.78%
Bahamian market, with 10,268 shares trade, its stock Income from operations increase of $411,000 or 12 per BSL $7.92 ce 0 -22.28%
investors trading in seven out price falling by $0.09 toend the — stood at $3.5 million, up by $1.4 — cent compared to $3.4 million at BWL $3.15 $- 0. 0.00%
of the 24 listed securities, of | week at $5.50. million or 68 per cent. Total rev- year-end 2008. CAB $11.75 ie 0 -16.25%
which three declined and four enues totalled $15.9 million, Total revenues stood at $43.1 CBL $6.11 $-0.28 34,088 -12.71%
remained unchanged. BOND MARKET which rose by 11 per cent from million, up $985,000 or 2 per CHL $2.83 ce 161 0.00%
Investors traded $8,000 (par the 2008 first quarter, while cent from $42.1 million for the CIB $10.40 $- 0 -0.48%
EQUITY MARKET value) Fidelity Bank (Bahamas) costs of revenues of $9.9 mil- same 12-month period in 2008, CWCB © $2.91 $0.32 0 29.33%
A total of 58,767 shares Notes C Notes (FBB13) Due _ lion increased by $128,000 or while total expenses increased DHS $1.53 $-0.33 14,000 -40.00%
changed hands last week, rep- 2013, and $18,000 (par value) 1.31 per cent. by $749,000 or 2 per cent to FAM $7.76 Ve 0 -0.51%
resenting an increase of 43,778 Fidelity Bank (Bahamas) Series Other expenses stood at total $38.8 million. FBB $2.37 ce 0. 0.00%
shares compared to the previ- D Notes (FBB15) Due 2015. $832,000, up by $364,000 over Management indicated that FCC $0.30 $- 0 0.00%
ous week’s week's trading vol- the same period in 2008. a change in the mix of patients FCL $5.14 ve 0 -0.58%
ume of 14,989 shares. COMPANY NEWS Total assets were $155.5 mil- _ produced an increase in net rev- FCLB $1.00 ce 0. 0.00%
Commonwealth Bank (CBL) lion, which rose by $860,000 or enues, while increases in FIN $11.00 $- 250 -7.33%
led the volume for a fourth con- Earnings Releases: 0.56 per cent, while total liabil- | expenses were due to challenges ICD $5.50 $-0.09 10,268 -10.28%
secutive week with 34,088 Consolidated Water Compa- __ ities totalled $30.2 million, rep- with staff compensation and JSJ $10.50 - 5.41%
shares trading, its stock falling ny (CWCO) released its unau- resenting an average of increased utility rates. PRE $10.00 ice 0. 0.00%

dited financial results for the
quarter ending March 31, 2009.

by $0.28 end the week at $6.11.
Doctors Hospital Health Sys-

$951,000 or 3 per cent from
year-end 2008.

Earnings per common share
stood at $0.38, representing an

Vie PLAT RES

built-In Tariff

increase of 12 per cent from
$0.34 in 2008. Total assets and
liabilities stood at $31.8 million
and $8.6 million respectively,
compared to $31.3 million and
$11.5 million at year-end 2008.

Cable Bahamas (CAB)
released its unaudited financial
results for the quarter ending
March 31, 2009. Net income
increased by 35 per cent to $7.4
million, compared to $5.5 mil-
lion in the 2008 first quarter.

Net income per ordinary
share stood at $0.38, up 36 per
cent from $0.28 for the 2008 first
quarter. CAB reported rev-
enues of $21.1 million, an
increase of $1 million or 5 per
cent from $20 million in 2008.

Cable television accounted
for the bulk of the quarter's rev-
enues at $11.2 million, followed
by Data at $3.3 million and
Internet at $6.5 million. Oper-
ating income of $8 million grew
by $821,000 or 11 per cent from
$7.2 million in 2008. Operating
expenses remained relatively
flat at $9.8 million versus $9.7

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million in the 2008 first quar-
ter.

ICD Utilities (CD) released
its audited financial results for
the year ended December 31,
2008. Net income rose to $4.9
million, up $1.9 million or 68
per cent compared to $2.9 mil-
lion at year-end 2008.

ICD reported revenues of $5
million and expenses of $76,000,
compared to $3 million and
$67,000 in fiscal 2007. Total
assets and liabilities stood at
$76.3 million and $5,700 respec-
tively, versus $76.8 million and
$2,700 in fiscal 2007.

Dividend Notes:

Famguard Corporation
(FAM) has declared a dividend
of $0.06 per share, payable on
May 18, 2009, to all sharehold-
ers of record date May 11, 2009.

Doctors Hospital Health Sys-
tems (DHS) has declared an
extraordinary dividend of $0.04
per share, payable on May 21,
2009, to all shareholders of
record date May 7, 2009.

Annual General Meeting
(AGM) Notes:

Commonwealth Bank (CBL)
announced that it will be hold-
ing its Annual General Meet-
ing on Wednesday, May 20,
2009, at 5pm at Superclubs
Breezes, West Bay Street,
Cable Beach, New Providence,
the Bahamas.

Consolidated Water Compa-
ny (CWCB) announced that it
will be holding its Annual Gen-
eral Meeting on Wednesday,
May 20, 2009, at 10am at the
Grand Cayman Marriott Hotel
in Grand Cayman. Shareholders
of record as of March 18, 2009,
will be qualified to vote in per-
son or by proxy at the Annual
Meeting.

Colina Holdings (CHL)
announced that it will be hold-
ing itsAnnual General Meeting
on Thursday May 28, 2009, at
5.30pm at the J. W. Pinder
Building, Colinalmperial Insur-
ance, Collins Avenue. Share-
holders of record as of April 24,
2009, will be qualified to vote
at the Annual Meeting.

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THE TRIBUNE

MONDAY, MAY 18, 2009, PAGE 3B



‘Dash’ for local

Service saving
$200k per plane

m@ By CHESTER ROBARDS
Business Reporter
crobards@tribunemedia.net

BAHAMASAIR is in the
process of reassembling the
third of its Dash-8 aircraft to
be completely overhauled
locally, according to its director
of maintenance and engineer-
ing, saving the airline more
than $200,000 as opposed to
sending it abroad.

Tracey Cooper said it was
an exciting day when Bahama-
sair received the go-ahead to
completely overhaul its entire
fleet of Dash-8 aircraft at its
hangar in the Lynden Pindling
International Airport.

The move, which could save
the airline almost $1.4 million
this year, was done in response
to the increasing value of the
Canadian dollar.

The Dash-8s were originally
flown to Canada, where they
would be handed over to a
Canadian firm to be over-
hauled.

Bahamasair spent over
$800,000 per plane contracting
the overhauling of the aircraft
out to the Canadian company,
whereas in their own hangar it
is done for closer to $600,000
per plane.

According to Mr Cooper,
the airline would then also
incur fuel costs, crew costs and
the cost of the overhaul itself.
Sometimes, the aircraft would
take more than its scheduled
one-day trip to Canada, due to
weather and other unforeseen
hold-ups.

When in the company’s
hangar, Mr Cooper said the
aircraft would be one among
many being repaired and refit-
ted. Here in Bahamasair’s
hangar, a dedicated crew

works on the Dash-8s.

“They are dedicated to this
aircraft,” Mr Cooper said.
“They come back after a night
and start where they left off.
In essence, we’re producing a
better product because we’re
putting the kind of care into it
that others might not feel

“To them, this is yust anoth-
er plane coming in. For us this
is a product we want to put out
there to impress the customers
at the end of the day.”

The planes are stripped
down to their bare bones in
the hangar.

Seats are removed, overhead
bins are pulled down, the
plane’s engines are taken off
and even the cockpit windows
are replaced.

According to Mr Cooper, a
staff of about 20 workers,
including some expert foreign
labour, is used to completely
gut and restock the aircraft.

He said that in order for
Bahamasair to receive
approval to work on its aircraft
itself, the regulators had to
ensure the airline had suffi-
cient skilled labour and the
tools necessary to complete the
job.

“Some of the guys here
know the plane like the back of
their hand and have been
working on them for 20 years,”
Mr Cooper said.

He added that Bahamasair
has also saved 50 per cent on
labour costs, as Canadian
workers demand $45 to $50 an
hour, whereas Bahamian
workers are paid $20 to $24 an
hour.

This type of complete ser-
vice, as a cost-saving initiative,
is done every two-and-a-half
years. Mr Cooper said the
inspection done on the first

Dash-8 that was completely
overhauled locally was the
most difficult. However, no
problems were found with the
completed aircraft.

He said the aircraft under-
goes rigorous inspections dur-
ing its overhaul, as every
process and part is logged and
filed in an organized mountain
of paperwork.

“Tn aviation everything must
be signed off on,” Mr Cooper
said.

The airline also dedicated
one section of its parts ware-
house to components for the
Dash-8. Mr Cooper said
Bahamasair will overhaul their
fourth airplane sometime this
year.

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award.

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and share your story.

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THE TRIBUNE





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BIND

Plan to make Water
orp a $20.2m profit
maker ignored

FROM page 1B

Analysing the Water & Sew-
erage Corporation’s problems,
the report’s findings are as
applicable now as they were
then in May 2002. “At present,
the Water & Sewerage Corpo-

Teachers & Salaried Workers Co-operative
Credit Union Limited

NOTICE OF

ANNUAL GENERAL MEETING

TO: All Members of Teachers and Salaried Workers
Co-operative Credit Union Limited
East Street South and Independence Drive

Notice is hereby given that the Thirty-Second
(32nd) Annual Meeting of Teachers & Salaried
Workers Co-operative Credit Union Limited will be
held at the British Colonial Hilton Hotel located on
Bay Street, on Saturday May 23, 2009 commencing
at 8:00 a.m. for the following purposes:

To receive the Report of the Board of

Directors for 2008.

To receive the Audited Accounts for 2008.
To elect members of the Board of Directors.
To elect members of the Supervisory

Committee

To discuss and approve the Budget for 2009.
To take action on such matters as may come

before the meeting.

Lenn King
Secretary



ration is not well placed to take
advantage of the opportunities
that are open to it,” the Corpo-
rate Business Plan said.

“Water & Sewerage Corpo-
ration is not a monopoly sup-
plier, and to a large extent is
operating in an open market,
whilst having statutory respon-
sibilities to supply water and
provide sewerage services.

“Consequently, only about
one-third of the residents of
New Providence take their dai-
ly water supplies from the
Water & Sewerage Corpora-
tion. The remainder make their
own provisions. This includes
large commercial users, such as
hotels, and residents with indi-
vidual bore holes alike. The
provision of sewerage services is
limited to some 6,000 dwellings.
Competition is increasing, and
over the past few years the
trend is towards an overall loss
of market share.”

To deal with this situation,
the Corporate Business Plan
said the Water & Sewerage
Corporation would need to
increase market share by
increasing the number of water
customers it served from 20,000
to 34,000 by end-2005, and to
55,000 by end-2012.

It also needed to raise the
number of sewage customers
from 6,000 to 20,000 by 2012. It
was also recommended that the
Water & Sewerage Corporation
be reduced in size by 117 staff,
with a new management struc-
ture put in place under the lead-
ership of a chief executive.

Apart from reducing the
Government’s annual subsidy,
efficiency savings and an

increased capital investment
programme were necessary, the
Corporate Business Plan said,
with economic regulation of the
water sector by the Public Util-
ities Commission (PUC) rec-
ommended to start in 2004.
This, though, has never hap-
pened, and has now been over-
taken by the liberalization of
the communications sector, with
the Utilities Regulation and
Competition Authority
(URCA) set to replace the
PUC.

On the tariff front, the Cor-
porate Business Plan recom-
mended that while there be no
changes for the period 2002-
2005, amendments were
required to enable the Water
& Sewerage Corporation to
“recover its costs in a more cost-
reflective and equitable man-
ner”.

“There is an urgent need to
put the financial relationship
with the Government on a
sound footing,” the report said.
“The changes proposed need
not increase the overall tariff
burden on customers, but will
enable Water & Sewerage Cor-
poration to better manage its
income, and will position it for
its future role as a regulated
operator.”

The Corporate Business Plan
said a financial restructuring
was also imperative, especially
when it came to reducing the
Water & Sewerage Corpora-
tion’s existing indebtedness. A
“due allowance” was needed
for water revenues owed by
government departments, the
sustainability of the Corpora-
tion’s pension fund needed to

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be accounted for, and income
to cover the full costs of opera-
tions generated.

If all the recommendations
had been implemented, the
Corporate Business Plan had
projected that the Water &
Sewerage Corporation would
generate $2 million in net
income in its 2005 fiscal year,
based on $40 million worth of
operating revenues and $28.8
million in operational spending.

This, it forecast, would
increase to a $10.8 million net
profit for 2008 (unlikely, given
the $24.107 million loss in 2007),
generated by $54.8 million in
revenues and $32.7 million in
operational spending. This
would have created $20.2 mil-
lion in operating income, with
the net profit achieved from
allowances of $9.6 million for
depreciation; $2.4 million in
financing expenses; and $2.4
million in government subsidies.

For 2012, the projection,
which now looks unrealistic,
was that $68.2 million in oper-
ating revenues and $36.5 mil-
lion in capital spending, would
generate $31.7 million in oper-
ating income and $20.2 million
in net profit. This allowed for
$11.9 million in depreciation,
$1.9 million in financing costs,
and a $2.4 million government
subsidy.

“On the basis of the achieve-
ment of the recommended effi-
ciency savings being made, and
a successful marketing cam-
paign to win customers back as
reliability and quality improve,
the plan will result in Water &
Sewerage Corporation reach-
ing a break even operating sit-
uation during the fiscal year
2004, with a net surplus in
2005,” the Corporate Business
Plan predicted optimistically.

“Thereafter, income generat-
ed should be sufficient to cover
operating expenses and provide
funds for capital investment.”

If no action was taken, the
Corporate Business Plan pre-
dicted that the Water & Sew-
erage Corporation would con-
tinue to be a perennial loss-
maker, incurring a $5.9 million
loss in 2008 and $4.9 million loss
in 2012. Yet even this could not
have envisaged the scale of the
losses now being incurred.

“In the Plan, we have stressed
the need for investment in the
service infrastructure in order
to improve the levels of service
that are currently being provid-
ed,” the Corporate Business
Plan said.

“This, we believe, is essential
for recovery and for a sustain-
able long-term business. Cur-
rently, the level of investment in
maintaining and enhancing the
systems in New Providence is
inadequate, the infrastructure
is running down and services
are suffering. A backlog of
investment to bring the systems
up to the required standards is
accumulating.”

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THE TRIBUNE



MONDAY, MAY 18, 2009, PAGE 5B



Four firms failing
per week since
September

FROM page 1B

back-up systems in terms of col-
lateral. The businesses that are
in business now will survive.
They are the ones that have
adjusted their plans and have
been battle tested.

“The economy as it relates to
small business is in a devastating
way. This Summit is going to
change the future of the coun-
try. We cannot move forward
unless we have a Small Busi-
ness Act. You have to have pro-
grammes that protect the econ-
omy as it relates to small busi-
ness development.”

Small businesses and entre-
preneurship are regarded in
many circles as the ‘magic ingre-
dient’ driving much economic
growth. All large, successful cor-
porations trace their roots to
this sector, and it is the risk-tak-
ing approach of these compa-
nies’ owners, and their willing-
ness to hire persons, that take
economies forward.

Mr Turnquest said he hoped
his proposed Small Business
Act could be crafted and taken
to Parliament by 2010, describ-
ing it as something that would
“practically shape everything
that happens in the economy”.

One of its key roles, he indi-
cated, would be to ensure the
Government and commercial
banks worked together to help
rescue floundering Bahamian
small businesses during times
of economic recession, espe-
cially those that hitherto had
been paying all their taxes and
bills on time.

“Tf a business was paying its

taxes and bills, hired 25 persons
and comes on hard times, the
Government and financial sec-
tor would come together and
save the business, protect the
business,” Mr Turnquest
explained. “The Act will save
businesses that are honest.”

This was preferable, he
added, to allowing companies
to fail and employees to lose
their jobs, leaving the latter
claiming unemployment benefit.

When the economy picked
back up, Mr Turnquest said it
would be far more difficult for a
failed business to return to
operations, hence the need to
keep them operating and staff
employed. No one, including
the Government, would be able
to absorb all laid-off employ-
ees during a recession.

“In order to develop the
economy, the small business-
man must be working, must
employ people, and be prof-
itable. Otherwise, there’s no
incentive for him to carry on,”
Mr Turnquest said. “We need
this Act to help future genera-
tions.”

There had been a lack of syn-
ergy and co-operation between
different sectors of the Bahami-
an economy, Mr Turnquest
said, and he urged: “My advice
to the private sector is to come
and work together. There’s
strength in numbers, identify
the root causes of the problems,
and this Small Business Act will
work.”

The National Small Business
Summit would aim to identify
difficulties in all industries, Mr
Turnquest said, and the infor-
mation it collected would be

NOTICE
THE COMPANIES ACT, 1992, CHAPTER 308
NOTICE OF APPOINTMENT OF RECEIVER-MANAGER
Pursuant to Section 139

The New South Ocean Development Company limited.

used to develop a strategic plan
that all organisations, such as
the Bahamas Chamber of Com-
merce and the Government,
would have input into.

MEDICAL

He also urged the commer-
cial banking industry to develop
more imaginative policies when
it came to small business lend-
ing.

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COMMONWEATH OF THE BAHAMAS

2008

IN THE SUPREME COURT CLE/qui/01815

IN THE MATTER of the Quieting Titles Act, 1959
AND
IN THE MATTER of The Petition of Mary Wilson

NOTICE OF PETITION

NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that Mary Wilson presently
of the Settlement of Love Hill on the Island of Andros one
of the Islands of the Commonwealth of The Bahamas, is
applying to the Supreme Court of the Commonwealth of
The Bahamas to have his title investigated determined and

declared under the Quieting Titles Act, 1959 (Ch. 393) in

respect of the land hereafter described, that is to say:

“IN THE MATTER OF ALL THAT piece
pe or tract of land containing Seven
housand Four Hundred and Fifteen
{F 415) square feet being Lot Number
7) situate approximately 205 feet South
of Meadows Street and East Side of
Hutchinson Street in the Southern District
of the Island of New Providence which
said piece parcel or lot of land is bounded
on the NORTH by land now or formerly the
property of John S. Carey, Sr. and running
thereon Ejighty-Five and _ Forty-One
Hundredth (85.41) feet on the EAST by
land now or formerly the property of Annie
Knowles and running thereon Ninety-One
and Fifty-Two Hundredth (91.52) feet on
the SOUTH by land now or formerly the
property of Merlene Bethel and running
thereon Scare aia and _ Ninety-Five
Hundredth (76.95) feet and on the WEST
by Hutchinson Street and running thereon

nO te and Thirty-Eight Hundredth
(91.38) feet which said parcel of land
is recorded in the Department of Lands
and Surveys in the Commonwealth of
The Bahamas as Plan 3614 N.P. and is
thereon coloured pink.”

AND TAKE NOTICE that copies of the Petition and the

Plan of the said land may be inspected during normal
office hours at the following places:

Supreme Court Registry, Ansbacher House, East Street North,
New Providence, The Bahamas.

Sharon Wilson & Co., Chambers, East Shirley Street, Highland
Terrace, New Providence, The Bahamas.

AND FURTHER TAKE NOTICE that any person
having dower or right to dower, an adverse claim or a claim not
recognized in the Petition shall on or before the 29 June A.D.,
2009 file in the Supreme Court and serve on the Petition or his
attorney an Adverse Claim in the prescribed form supported by
Affidavit.

FAILURE OF ANY PERSON to file and serve an
Adverse Claim on or before 29" June A.D., 2009 date will operate

Take Notice that an Order was granted by His Lordship, the
Honourable Mr. Justice Neville Adderley, Justice of the Supreme
Court of The Commonwealth of The Bahamas on the 30th day of
April, A.D., 2009 appointing Mr. Anthony Kikivarakis of Deloitte
& Touche Chartered Accountants and Management Consultants
of 2nd Terrace West, Centreville P.O. Box N-7120, Nassau, The
Bahamas as Receiver-Manager of all of the assets and properties
of The New South Ocean Development Company Limited
charged by the Supplemental Debentures and Legal Mortgages
both dated the 12th day of February, 2008 in the amounts of
$US50 million and US$22.5 million respectively in favour of |.F.
Propco Holdings (Ontario) 39 Ltd., and recorded in the Registry of
Records in the City of Nassau, in the Island of New Providence,
The Bahamas in Volume 10480 at pages 185 to 256 and Volume
10480 at pages 97 to 169.

Sears & Co.
Counsel and Attorneys-at-Law Chambers
No. 10 Market Street North,
Nassau, The Bahaams
Attorneys for |.F. Propco Holdings (Ontario) 39 Ltd

Dated the 13th day of May, 2009.

NOTICE

IN THE ESTATE of URBAN SINCLAIR MILLER
JR. late of the Southern District of the Island of New
Providence, one of the Islands of The Commonwealth
of The Bahamas, deceased.

Notice is hereby given that all persons having any claim
or demand against the above Estate are required to
send their names, addresses and particulars of the same
certified in writing to the undersigned on or before the 28th
day May A. D., 2009, and if required, prove such debts
or claims, or in default be excluded fron{ any distribution;
after the above date the assets will be distributed having
regard only to the proved debts or claims of which the
Administrator shall have had Notice.

And Notice is hereby given that all persons indebted to the
said Estate are requested to make full settlement on or
before the aforementioned date.

MICHAEL A. DEAN & CO.,
Attorneys for the Administrator Alvernia Court, 94
Dowdeswell Street
P.O. Box N-3114
Nassau, The Bahamas



as a bar to such claim.

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Dated this 21° day of April A.D., 2009
Sharon Wilson & Co.
Chambers

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PAGE 6B, MONDAY, MAY 18, 2009

THE TRIBUNE





Government on ‘collision
course’ with insurance

FROM page 1B

Commission (the successor to
the Registrar of Insurance)
“may appoint an administrator
who shall seize the management
and control of a company, or
any part of the insurance busi-
ness of the company”, in various
situations.

aN
NAD

Nassau Airport
Developenomt Company

Among the seemingly sub-
jective situations for doing so
are if an asset on the insurance
company’s books, “in the opin-
ion of the Commission”, is “not
satisfactorily accounted for;
“where, in the opinion of the
Commission”, the company’s
affairs are such that they could

C-120 Airside Civil and

C-130 Landside Civil, Stage 1

Nassay Arpon Develooment Company (MAD) & pleased io
ainaunce (he release of Tender C-120 Airside Cid and
6-130 Landside Coal for Stage 1 of the Lynden Pincling

infemational Airport Expansion. MAD) intends to enter inio
one contrac Tor the campletion of lhese wark packages, The

Scone of Work includes

-Gigniicant sarthmoving, drainage and utility works
bolh arse and landside:

-Fioedveay, paring lot and apron construction
exceeding 50,000 tors. of asphalt paving

Signage and bohting for roadways, parking lols
Aprons and taxnways; and

-Instalation of hard and soll lancside landscaping and

imgakon

The (0-120 Airside Civil and C-130 Landside Civil, Stage 7
Terminal Expansion Project Tender Documents will be

available for pick up or @ectronic distribution afer
2:00pm, April 16th, 2009. 4 bidders mesting wil
be hekl at 1:00am, Tuesday April 28th,
2008. Please contact Traci Bristy to register at the MAD
Project Office

prejudice policyholders, credi-
tors or asset owners; and
“where, in the opinion of the
Commission”, the insurance
carrier, intermediary or person
“is committing or about to com-
mit” an unsafe or unsound busi-
ness practice, or pursue such a
course.

Other reasons for the admin-
istrator’s appointment, such as
the company’s failure to meet
or pay its liabilities; the value
of its assets being less than its
liabilities or placing policyhold-
ers in jeopardy; a significant
erosion in the value of the com-
pany’s assets; and the conduct
of business in a manner that is
detrimental to policyholders,
seem more valid.

But again, if “in the opinion
of the Commission” a company
is likely to be unable to meet
its liabilities, an administrator
can be summoned.

Mr Ingraham, though, said
these powers went too far,
implying there was a danger of
‘throwing the baby out with the
bath water’ in the Government
and regulators’ haste to respond
— and be seen to be doing some-
thing - in the CLICO
(Bahamas) matter. It is not
uncommon for Bahamian regu-
lators, having been caught nap-
ping, to overreact.

“T feel that’s the case here.
It’s a bit of an overreaction,”
Mr Ingraham told Tribune
Business. “We feel it might have
gone too far the other way. We
can understand them wanting
to go in, but the current system
can still work.

“Go in, get court orders done.
Have a judge look at them, and
decide if a reasonable request is
being made, rather than some-
one deciding to go in and do

this, possibly without the com-
pany having a chance to explain
itself. By then, the damage is
done. There is no recourse.”

In the CLICO (Bahamas) sit-
uation, Mr Ingraham added:
“The system should have
worked. No two situations are
the same. If the Registrar had
had more powers to go in early
on, and the ability to apply sanc-
tions, I don’t think the situation
would have got to where it got
to.”

Chairman

The BGIA chairman said his
organisation would “certainly
look at the options” open to it if
the legislation remained
unchanged, as it had to protect
its members’ interests and pre-
vent them from becoming
exposed to future problems.

Once appointed, the admin-
istrator has, under the current
proposed reforms, “the exclu-
sive powers to manage and con-
trol the company’s affairs”. He
can discontinue its operations,
stop or limit payment of its
obligations, and re-organise the
company. In doing the latter,
the administrator can appoint
new officers and directors, and
also consummate the sale or
merger of the insurance com-
pany to others if he so chooses.

One insurance industry
source, who requested
anonymity, told Tribune Busi-
ness: “I’ve never seen such a
strong reaction from the indus-
try. They are furious. The pow-
ers given the administrator far
exceed those given to any regu-
lator anywhere else. They can
come in and take control, fire
the Board and fire the execu-
tives.”

The source added: “By sim-
ply going ahead with the initial
wording almost intact, the Govy-
ernment is clearly putting itself
on a collision course with the
insurance industry.

This is very disappointing
bearing in mind that it has
always been the Government's
stance that it would not put for-
ward insurance legislation that
was not supported by the major-
ity of the industry.

:"It may be the Government's
position that the industry
messed up with CLICO and
should now therefore be dictat-
ed to. If so, this is entirely mis-
conceived - the CLICO deba-
cle was more accurately encour-
aged by the failure of the regu-
lators and respective govern-
ments.

“They have also included
intermediaries in these dracon-
ian provisions. One is at a loss
to understand why. Intermedi-
aries had nothing to do with the
CLICO scandal.”

* Talking of CLICO
(Bahamas), Prime Minister
Hubert Ingraham is due to
make a statement on the insur-
er’s collapse in the House of
Assembly today. Hopes are
high that he may announce that
the Government has decided to
make good the potential loss
suffered by the company’s pol-
icyholders and annuity deposi-
tors by taking over the $57 mil-
lion guarantee previously held
by CL Financial.

That is uncertain. But
informed sources have told Tri-
bune Business that the Prime
Minister may also announce the
transfer of CLICO (Bahamas)
life and health insurance policy
portfolio to another company,

with Colinalmperial Insurance
Company said to be the pre-
ferred option.

Tribune Business under-
stands that Colinalmperial and
FamGuard Corporation, BISX-
listed parent of Family
Guardian, are the two leading
candidates to take on the CLI-
CO (Bahamas) portfolio under
what will initially be an admin-
istration agreement, the transfer
of policies taking place later.

Two previous candidates,
British American Financial and
Atlantic Medical, are no longer
thought to be in the running,
the latter having withdrawn its
initial interest.

Sources suggested that Coli-
nalmperial was likely to be the
preferred choice of liquidator
Craig “Tony’ Gomez because of
its stronger balance sheet, and
surplus of assets over liabilities.
This would enable it to find
assets to match CLICO
(Bahamas) insurance portfolio
liabilities, which stand at around
$11-$12 million.

One source told Tribune
Business: “Colinalmperial prob-
ably have the most financial
might and infrastructure to real-
ly deal with it. They have a
strong balance sheet and good
rating from A. M. Best.”

The likely selection of Coli-
nalmperial will have to be rati-
fied by both the Registrar of
Insurance and the Supreme
Court. Critics are likely to argue
that transferring CLICO
(Bahamas) insurance portfolio
to Colinalmperial will further
increase the latter’s dominant
position in the Bahamian life
insurance market, but the book
of business it could gain will be
relatively small and make min-
imal difference.

Conmact TRAD ERSEY

Gontracts and Procurement Manager

Phe (242) PO2-10686 | Fam: (242) 2117
PO Geo AP 9 Nessa Bahamas
Erral: traci brebyiiines b=

COMMONWEALTH OF THE BAHAMAS

IN THE SUPREME COURT No. 00219

2006

PUBLIC NOTICE

INTENT TO CHANGE NAME BY DEED POLL

The Publicis hereby advised that], DAPHNE KETURAMcKENZIE
the mother of JAYDE DENIQUA McKENZIE intend to change the
surname of my said daughter from McKENZIE to SMITH. If there
are any objections to this change of name by Deed Poll, you
may write such objections to the Chief Passport Officer, PO.Box
N-742, Nassau, Bahamas no later than thirty (30) days after the

PUBLIC NOTICE

INTENT TO CHANGE NAME BY DEED POLL

The Public is hereby advised that |, MYRON MATSON
DELANCEY of P.O. Box F-44804, Nassau, Bahamas,
intend to my name to MYRON MATTHIAS MARTIN.
lf there are any objections to this change of name by
Deed Poll, you may write such objections to the Chief
Passport Officer, P.O.Box N-742, Nassau, Bahamas no
later than thirty (30) days after the date of publication of

Equity Side this notice.

NOTICE OF SALE

Rawson Court Condominium Owners Association
Pursuant to Section 21
Law of Property & Conveyancing (Condominium) Act
Invite tenders for the following:

date of publication of this notice.

NOTICE

NOTICE is hereby given that LOVENCENT CLECIDOR of
JOHNSON ROAD, FOX HILL, P.O. Box FH-14412, Nassau,
Bahamas is applying to the Minister responsible for Nationality
and Citizenship, for registration/naturalization as a citizen of
The Bahamas, and that any person who knows any reason
why registration/naturalization should not be granted, should
send a written and signed statement of the facts within
twenty-eight days from the 18 day of May, 2009 to the
Minister responsible for nationality and Citizenship, P.O. Box
N-7147, Nassau, Bahamas.

IN THE MATTER OF ALL THAT piece parcel
or lot of land containing 20,283 sq. ft. situate on
the southwestern side of Queen’s Highway in the
settlement of Doctors Creek in the island of Long Island
in the Commonwealth of the Bahamas.
AND
IN THE MATTER of the Quieting Titles Act, 1959.
AND
IN THE MATTER of the Petition of Leonard Knowles and
Patrice Knowles.

NOTICE 1) Unit G03 Rawson Court, Cable Beach
3 Bedrooms, 3 1/2 Bathrooms

The Petition of Leonard Knowles and Patrice Knowles ; a :
- Living Area 1,937 sq. feet

in respect of all that piece parcel or lot of land containing 20, 283
sq. ft. sttuate on the southwestern side of Queen’s Highway in the
settlement of Doctors Creek in the island of Long Island in the
Commonwealth of the Bahamas, which said piece parcel or lot
of land is bounded on the NORTHWEST by land said to be the
property of Antonette Beckford running thereon One hundred and
Seventy-five (175) feet thereon. One hundred and Fifty and Three
hundredths (150.03) feet SOUTHWEST by land the property of
Llewolyn Knowles and running thereon One hundred and Forty-
five and Twenty-two hundredths (145.22) feet on the Southwest by
the sea and running thereon One hundred and Ten and Sixty-four
hundredths (110.64) feet which said piece parcel or lot of land has
the dwelling home of the Petitioner upon it and is more particularly
described by the Amended Plan filed herewith and is thereon
coloured PINK.

2) Unit GOS Rawson Court, Cable Beach
| a 3 Bedrooms, 3 Bathrooms
~~ - Living Area 2,795 sq. feet

Nassau Airport
Devslopmont Company

Interested person should immediately
submit tenders to

The Manager,
FO. Box N-1953
Nassau, Bahamas

P-130 Supply & Delivery of

Chillers and Heat Exchangers

COMMONWEALTH OF THE BAHAMAS == 2007/FamDiv/FP/No.148

The Petitioners, Leonard and Patrice Knowles, claim to be the legal
and beneficial owners of the fee simple estate in possession of the
piece parcel or lot of land hereinbefore described and the Petitioners
have made application to the Supreme Court of the Commonwealth
of The Bahamas under Section 3 of the Quieting Titles Act, 1959,
to have their title to the said lot of land investigated.

Nassau Arport Development Gampany (MAD) has a
requirement for the Supely and Delivery af four, (Oty, 4), 650 IN THE SUPREME COURT
fan chillers and four, (Oty. 4), heal exchangers in
accordance with the required schedule and specficaiona FAMILY DIVISION
for complebon of Stage 1 and Stage 2 of the LPIA Expansion
Project, Thess sa Supoly and Delivery only contract

BETWEEN: -

Copies of the filed plan may be inspected during normal working
hours at:-

(a) The Registry of the Supreme Court, Second Floor, Ansbacher
House, East Street, Nassau, The Bahamas.

BENJAMIN BENEBY
Price Inquiry Packages will be available for pick up after Petitioner
1:00 pm, cn Wednesday, May 6th, 2009,
(b) The Chambers of Martin, Martin and Co., Second Floor, Pond AND

Plaza, East Bay and Ernest Streets, Nassau N.P., The Bahamas. Price Inquiry closing is Thursday, June 11th, 2009 at

3:00 pm Bahamas Time

FERRYLYN O. BENEBY (nee) GUERRERO
Respondent

PETITION

In The Supreme Court of the Commonwealth of the
Bahamas.

Notice is hereby given that any person having dower or right to
dower or any adverse claim/s not recognized 1n the Petition shall on
or before the 15th. day of July, A.D., 2009, file in the Registry of
the Supreme Court and serve on the Petitioner or the undersigned
a statement of such claim 1n the prescribed form and verified by an
affidavit to be filed therewith. Failure of any such person to file and
serve a statement of such claim on or before the aforementioned

date will operate as a bar to such claim.
Contact Traci Arraby

(Contract & Procurement Manager

LPLA Eepacenn Prog eact

Ph: (242) FOE OOGE | Frum: (242) STFS
PO. Boo AP S825, Mersey, Bahamas
Emal trac brebyiiires bs

MARTIN, MARTIN & CO.
Chambers, Second Floor, Pond Plaza
East Bay and Emest Streets
Nassau, N.P., The Bahamas

ATTORNEYS FOR THE PETITONERS

By: The Firm, Attorney at Law, Marsh Harbour, P.O. Box
AB20191 Abaco, Bahamas. (242) 367-3572 ph/fax





THE TRIBUNE

MONDAY, MAY 18, 2009, PAGE 7B





Grand Bahama firm’s revenues

increase 105 per cent

FROM page 1B

pates revenues from marine
activity [at South Riding Point]
will remain strong throughout
2009, these revenues are diffi-
cult to predict as they fluctuate
based on the business decisions
of the company’s customers,
and general market conditions.”

World Point said the increase
in marine activity at South Rid-
ing Point had helped to gener-
ate extra port revenue fees.
This, coupled with the increased
storage capacity at the Grand
Bahama operation, had helped
to increase the company’s over-
all 2009 first quarter revenue
by 29 per cent year-over-year,

rising from $18.666 million to
$24.055 million.

Meanwhile, Freepoint, the
Grand Bahama-based tug boat
fleet that World Point owns in a
50/50 joint venture, saw its 2009
first quarter revenues increase
by $53,000 or 7 per cent, due to
fuel surcharges and rate increas-
es.
Freepoint handles most of the
tug boat work at the Freeport
Container Port and Freeport
Harbour Company.

Elsewhere, South Riding
Point is dealing with two other
pressing matters. World Point
said the company had been con-
tacted by the Bahamian gov-

ernment last year over the
alleged “non-payment of a local
revenue based tax”.

The World Point statement
did not identify the tax in ques-
tion, and no alleged amount
owed had been submitted to it.
Therefore, South Riding Point
was unable to assess the extent
of the liability in question, but
warned that if a tax claim was
made, “the amount may be sig-
nificant”.

World Point added: “South
Riding Point is in the process
of evaluating the claim.”

The Grand Bahama opera-
tion also remains locked in a
$2.7 million dispute with an

COMMUNITY ANNOUNCEMENT

WATER CONVERSATION MEASURES

The Water and Sewerage Corporation wishes to advise its customers
in New Providence that the Corporation is presently experiencing
water supply challenges. The Corporation will be implementing

water conservation efforts that may result in periods of reduced
water supply. Customers are asked to conserve their water usage

where possible,

The Corporation sincerely apologizes for any inconvenience caused
and will do its endeavor best to limit the severity and duration of
these conservation measures. Customers with specific complaints
are urged to call the Corporation’s Call Center at 302-5599 or 325-

0505."

MANAGEMENT

WATER AND SEWERAGE COPORATION

NOTICE



The National Insurance Board

will conduct free

Seminars for Employers & Self-Employed Persons
for the remainder of 2009 as follows:

Wednesday, May 27

Wednésday, September 30

unnamed contractor over repair
work done to its offshore jet-
ties in the aftermath of the 2004
hurricane season.

The repair contract, executed
on September 14, 2005, was for
$7.853 million, and some $3.574
million of this sum will not be
reimbursed by reinsurance as
South Riding Point chose to
complete other projects while
contractors were being mobi-

lized.

World Point said in a state-
ment: “In June 2007, South Rid-
ing Point terminated the con-
tractor on the jetty repair con-
tract and hired a new contrac-
tor. In 2008, the new contrac-
tor completed the hurricane
repairs to the offshore jetty.

“South Riding Point is now
in an arbitration proceeding
with the original contractor it

hired to restore and repair the
offshore jetty. Both South Rid-
ing Point and the original con-
tractor are seeking damages
against each other. The con-
tractor has claimed damages of
$2.7 million.

“South Riding Point is vigor-
ously contesting this claim and,
in the process, continues to sig-
nificantly incur legal expenses
associated with this matter.”

THE COLLEGE OF THE BAHAMAS

Visit our website at www.cob.edu.bs

Last Samet
Ape

Emergency Comtact Name

Cabeneryt

lS and imder| | lfels | |

Sand under[ |] lf-25 |] ]

P-Shirt Sizer Child | JM | Ul

Entre Fee: SM | SeX La:

The College of The Bahansas
SPORTS & WELLNESS INSTITUTE

WELLNESS APPLICATION FORM

FUN BUNS ALUK - Samurclay Mhay 23rd, Dee

First aim

MALE| | FEMALE |

Pelopheme

(A) RUSNER
S040] | 4] ttl [
(6) WALKER

4-35 [ ] 36-50 |

Adem | |= [| IM

S20 (| XL or larger

Deliver to: Wellness Centre, Oakes Field Campus

Telephone: 1245949

FUN RUMW ALR START TIME: &: (Mita. im.

aie, |

ROUTES Siac at the Poetia Sreith Basi King om Posnicaana Drive: teavel cast onto Wulff Road, north onto Collins Avenue;
west onto Shitkew Strect; north omc Cumberland Street, weet amo West Bay Sirect; south onto Nassau Sirect; cmt onto
Poinciana Dring and back so they Portia Sah Pak ny

DESC LAMUER: 1 dertere and aftr chat om @inewelhy fits partripes ia The Cobege of The Meena: Spee A Wellness leerinae's Pa

Ree Wak ood fee eet bere od ed ocherviey by og eedkol pracdt@ecr. The erck regard ecrept: ond aackreterets then aeitine The College of The Pobormes
oor any atl: of Tee dbo The Metis coe, Pie eh A Aelies iedilabe, adept eee relish any ioper canter oo keheg Cres Vee may
eres whik pordripwteg is the Fon Meee, The portictpees, os bok of the participee’) Geir ed cede, ee he right oe er ed eek ol beers
md deena gre the my die tect prtaipae tl L che pantkipee! aed ond aon ao Pek that may be es eed ie the Fem Raa Walk.

Siznature! Parent (If onder the age of 18 years old}

Sponsired bry;

#% The dAlbenas Agency Ltd.

MINISTRY OF HEALTH

GHEAT PRIZES.



CPA/ CERTIFIED PUBLIC ACCOUNTANT

deb Deseripiion:

Apply principles of accounting to amalyae financial information and prepare financial reports by

compiling information, preparing profit and Inss statements, and wtilizing appropriate accounting

coma! procedures

Primary Responsibilities
|. Prepare profit and hoes statements and monthly chsing and cost accounting reports.

2 Compele and analyae fnancal information i prepare enies to aocounts, such a general ledger
accounts, and document business transactions.
1. Establish, maintain, and coordinate the implemestation of acceanting and accounting contral

procedures.

4. Analyze ond review badgets and expenditures for contracts

§. Monitor and review accounting and relaled system reports for accuracy and completeness.
4. Prepare and review budpet, reverie, expense, payed) entries, imoices, and other aconunting

documents.

7. Analyze pevenuc and expenditure trends and recommend appropriate budget lewels, and ensure
expenditure comirol,
& Explam balling invaices and accounting palicses to stall, vender: and clienes.
9. Resolve accounting discrepancies
10. Recommend, develop and maintam financial data bases, computer sodiwane systems and manual

filing systems.

11. Sapendse the input and handling of financial data and reports for the company’s automated
firtamcial systems.

12. brteract with auditors in completing audits if necessary.

13. Other duties a3 aed

Wednesday, June 24 Wednesday, October 28
Wednesday, November 25

Sessions will be held trom 8:30 aim. to 1200) pam. in the Training Room of
\ 1 = 7 Te : 1 Additional Ries ponsibilities
5 Z { * + F F fy . 2 SEE me P ' -
NBs Wultt Road C1 mmplex, Wultt Road at Minnie Street |. Develop the annual operating budget.and consul with departmental management on the fiscal
aspects of program planning, salary recommendations, and other administrative actions,

' I ‘ mo j 2 Provide accounting policy onentation for mew stall.
| SORES Ue be Seed

Skills Required: Knowledge of finance, accounting, badgeting, and cost comin principles including Generally Accepted
Accounting Principles. Keowledge of financial and accounting sofware applications.
Quickbooks and Mircos software knowledge a pele

Seminar Description












For everyone - fraey the sel-enploped berton inhe monks alone, lo the eebloyer af a




Emplovment Type: = Full Time



few persons, fo the berren reshonsiile for the peperent af COMPPUAAORLD OF De



an employer of fbonsandr The Seaunar nel! ove an overview af the National Yearly Salary: Unspecified

vee of is benefits ana aststance proernameres, and



fassmance programe, inc

Education & Experience



5 * i ® i : f 1 7
eghore the scope and imembact of fhe National Inserance Fund on the econanzy af Level of Education: College

al .
foe COMM

Years of Work
Experience:

4005 Years



Contact Information

Ovestions and or concerns abot the monthly hayaent af conteibations or ather
!



Company:

aff, Harry f atte ui! ef nee vy ie eet E Cie, nit aly be ade i eee i Allie a Realty

Contact Name: Lilith Bostwick

Contact Phone: 242-384-4597

Persons interested in attending a Seminar

4 . . 1 +44 TO aay
should reserve a space by calling the Contact Fax: 242-4

Board’s Public Relations Department Contact E-maik:

a at peck ae
at 356-2070, ext. 256/254 352

lillithiikingsrealty.com | bahamas kingsrealn. com

Proferred “ethene
of Contact:

E-maal





PAGE 8B, MONDAY, MAY 18, 2009

THE TRIBUNE



USI ee
130-140 Bahamians per day signing up for jobless benefits

FROM page 1B

the unemployment benefit
scheme, had paid out a total
4,334 cheques to jobless
Bahamians as of Thursday, May
14. Most cheques, some 3,089,
had not surprisingly been paid

out to applicants in New Provi-
dence, with a further 1,069
issued on Grand Bahama.
“The total amount of claims
we had received up until yes-
terday [Thursday, May 14] was
7,078, and the total amount of
cheques issued 4,334,” Mr
Foulkes told Tribune Business.




Legal Notice



NOTICE




MADERA LINBO S.A.




(In Voluntary Liquidation)






Notice is hereby given that the above-named




Company is in dissolution, which commenced



on the 14th day of May 2009. The Liquidator is



Argosa Corp. Inc., P.O. Box N-7757 Nassau,












Bahamas.

ARGOSA CORP. INC.




(Liquidator)






Legal Notice

“We’ve been averaging 130-140
persons per day in terms of new
persons claiming.”

Funds

Mr Foulkes said the total
amount of funds issued to
unemployed Bahamians — those
persons who had registered and
been approved up until May 2,
2009 — totalled more than $1.2
million.

For the 13-week period those
same registrants will be eligible
to claim unemployment bene-
fit, their total claims have been
pegged at $6.7 million. Howev-
er, Mr Foulkes pointed out that
not all of the 7.078 who had
applied for unemployment ben-
efit had been approved, with
some 1,335 of that number dis-
qualified for a variety of rea-
sons.

Of those whose unemploy-
ment benefit claims had been
disallowed or were pending, the
most common reason for this
was that additional NIB contri-
bution records were still
required. This applied to 668 of
the applications disqualified or
pending.

Some 39 unemployment ben-
efit applications were rejected
because the claimant was still
working; another 19 were
turned down because they were
self-employed; and 79 claimants

had last been employed prior
to July 1, 2004, the date the
scheme had been made retroac-
tive to.

Another 11 claimants had
been rejected because their
employer was not registered
with NIB; 12 because the com-
pany had closed; 47 because
they were in receipt of other
NIB benefits and assistance;
and 61 because they had yet to
confirm their last work date.

“The actuary had estimated,
at this instance, that 7,000 peo-
ple would be eligible for that
benefit,” Mr Foulkes said. “I
think the actuary was correct in
his estimates. It is right on tar-
get.”

The minister added that the
unemployment benefit’s fund-
ing pool would “remain healthy
for quite some time, as we have
$20 million allocated”. Those
funds have been allocated from
NIB’s medical benefits branch,
and once they are exhausted,
the unemployment benefit will
be funded by a combination of
employer and employee contri-
butions, each paying the equiv-
alent of 0.5 per cent of an
employee’s salary.

Labour

Meanwhile, Mr Foulkes said
the Department of Labour had
not experienced an increase in

Legal Notice




NOTICE

NOTICE




SCHONE MIRIAM LTD.

TROON INC.




(In Voluntary Liquidation)

(In Voluntary Liquidation)






Notice is hereby given that the above-named

Notice is hereby given that the above-named



Company is in dissolution, which commenced

Company is in dissolution, which commenced



on the 6th day of April 2009. The Liquidator is
Argosa Corp. Inc., P.O. Box N-7757 Nassau,

Bahamas.

ARGOSA CORP. INC.
(Liquidator)

Legal Notice

NOTICE
CANIS MAJOR LTD.

(In Voluntary Liquidation)

Notice is hereby given that the above-named
Company is in dissolution, which commenced
on the 14th day of May 2009. The Liquidator is
Argosa Corp. Inc., P.O. Box N-7757 Nassau,

Bahamas.

ARGOSA CORP. INC.
(Liquidator)

ROYAL = FIDELITY

Momey at Work

on the 14th day of May 2009. The Liquidator is
Argosa Corp. Inc., P.O. Box N-7757 Nassau,

Bahamas.

ARGOSA CORP. INC.
(Liquidator)

Legal Notice

NOTICE
MAYASOMARIK INC.

(In Voluntary Liquidation)

Notice is hereby given that the above-named
Company is in dissolution, which commenced
on the 16th day of April 2009. The Liquidator is
Argosa Corp. Inc., P.O. Box N-7757 Nassau,

Bahamas.

ARGOSA CORP. INC.
(Liquidator)

G

cr A Ll”

BISX LISTED & TRADED SECURITIES AS OF:

FG CAPITAL MARKETS

labour-related disputes filed
with it, despite the expectation
that the economic recession and
increasing number of redun-
dancies would provoke such a
rise.

“Surprisingly, we have not,”
Mr Foulkes replied, when asked
whether there had been an
increase in the filing of labour-
related disputes.

“We have noticed that we
have the same rate, the same
number of persons who are fil-
ing trade disputes. Employers,
employees, and particularly the
unions, at this time are doing
whatever they can to cope with
the downturn.

“I know of two businesses,
two major businesses, on Bay
Street that have decided,
notwithstanding significant loss-
es over the last quarter, not to
lay-off people and put them on
reduced work weeks.

“We've been encouraging
businesses to do that, and
encouraging employees to
accept reduced hours and
reduced rates of pay. At the end
of the day, we know the econo-
my will turn around. There’s no
doubt about that. What ’m
very pleased about is that most
employers are doing whatever
they can to keep Bahamians
working.”

The impending closure of the
Four Seasons Emerald Bay
Resort on May 26 will leave a
further 500 Bahamians out of
work on Exuma, with the ripple
effects likely to impact jobs in
other businesses, plus the self-
employed.

Mr Foulkes said he was less
worried about a further increase
in the unemployment statistics
than the direct impact on the
500 Four Seasons employees
and their families, and what it
meant for the wider Exuma
community.

He added that with the
Bahamian workforce estimat-
ed to be 190,000-strong, some
1,900 job losses were necessary
to provoke a | per cent increase
in the unemployment rate. The
total Four Seasons jobs losses
were around 1/3 of 1 per cent.

Minister

“The Prime Minister indicat-
ed that he anticipated that the
unemployment rate would
increase,” Mr Foulkes said. “To
what extent, we are not certain.
As you know, in order for the
unemployment rate to move by
1 per cent, about 1900 Bahami-
ans have to lose their jobs.
That’s based on a workforce of
190,000.”

Mr Foulkes added that he
was more concerned about the
impact on the lives of those
employed at the Four Seasons
Emerald Bay Resort.

“Exuma is such a small com-
munity, and it’s going to have a
devastating effect on many per-
sons on the island and in the
business community,” he added.

Explaining that the loss of 50
jobs at that resort would be bad
enough, Mr Foulkes said: “We
are going to do all we can to
ease the burden, and make it
easier for those persons being
laid-off to make a transition to
another job,. All of them will
probably qualify for the unem-
ployment benefit programme,
and the social assistance pro-
grammes we have also apply to
Exuma.

“Out of the $20 million we
have allocated for the unem-
ployment benefit, we have suf-
ficient funding to assist with the
added demand. I spoke to [NIB
director Algernon] Cargill
today, and there is sufficient
funding to accommodate the
added demand.”

Legal Notice

NOTICE
PARAGON RIVER CORP.

(In Voluntary Liquidation)

Notice is hereby given that the above-named
Company is in dissolution, which commenced
on the 14th day of May 2009. The Liquidator is
Argosa Corp. Inc., P.O. Box N-7757 Nassau,

Bahamas.

ARGOSA CORP. INC.
(Liquidator)

Legal Notice

NOTICE
LA SARRAZ S.A.

(In Voluntary Liquidation)

Notice is hereby given that the above-named
Company is in dissolution, which commenced
on the 14th day of May 2009. The Liquidator is
Argosa Corp. Inc., P.O. Box N-7757 Nassau,

Bahamas.

THURSDAY, 14 MAY 2009
BISX ALL SHARE INDEX: CLOSE 1,607.86 | CHG -5.66 | %CHG -0.35 | YTD -104.50 | YTD % -6.10
FINDEX: CLOSE 797.42 | YTD -4.49% | 2008 -12.31%

WWW .BISXBAHAMAS.COM | TELEPHONE:242-323-2330 | FACSIMILE: 242-323-2320
52wk-Low Securit y Previous Close Today's Close Change Daily Vol. EPS $ Div $ P/E
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0.63 Benchmark
3.15 Bahamas Waste
1.95 Fidelity Bank
11.09 Cable Bahamas
Colina Holdings
Commonwealth Bank ($1)
Consolidated Water BDRs
Doctor's Hospital
Famguard
Finco
FirstCaribbean Bank
Focol (S)
Focol Class B Preference
Freeport Concrete
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J. S. Johnsen 10.50 10.50
Premier Real Estate 10.00 10.00 a
BISX LISTED DEBT SECURITIES - (Bonds trade on a Percentage Pricing bases)
Securi Last Sale
Fidelity Bank Note 17 (Series A) + zl x 7%
Fidelity Bank Note 22 (Series B) + FBB22 0.00 Prime + 1.75%
Fidelity Bank Note 13 (Series C) + FBB13 100.00 0.00 T%
Fidelity Bank Note 15 (Series D) + FBB15 100.00 0.00 Prime + 1.75%
Fidelity Over-The-Counter Securities
Bid $ Ask $ Last Price
¢.92 8.42 14.60
4.00 6.25 6.00
0.35 0.40 0.35
Colina Over-The-Counter Securities
30.13 31.59 29.00
0.45 0.55 0.55
BISX Listed Mutual Funds
YTD% Last 12 Months
0.95 4.77
-1.49 -3.35
1.77 5.09
-5.59 -13.64
0.96 5.79

0.127
0.992
0.244
-0.877
0.078
0.055
1.406
0.249
0.419
0.111
0.240
0.420
0.322
0.794
0.332
0.000
0.035
0.407
0.952
0.180

ARGOSA CORP. INC.
(Liquidator)

0.63
3.15
2.37
11.75
2.83
6.17
3.01
1.70
7.76
11.00
10.40
5.14

0.63
3.15
2.37
11.75
2.83
6.06
2.91
1.70
7.76
11.00
10.40
5.14

2.83
6.06
1.31
1.70
6.02
11.00
10.35
5.00

Legal Notice

NOTICE
PRIMROSE HILLS INC.

(In Voluntary Liquidation)

1.00
0.30
5.50
8.60
10.00

1.00
0.30
5.59

1.00
0.30
5.59

oog9g99995599090009
eceooceosesoo0e0e0eooo
ecooocoocescoc“eoooga

S2wk-Hi S2wk-Low
1000.00
1000.00
1000.00
1000.00

Interest
19 October 2017
19 October 2022
30 May 2013
29 May 2015
S2wk-Low Symbol Yield
Bahamas Supermarkets
Caribbean Crossings (Pref)
RND Holdings

Weekly Vol. EPS $ P/E
-0.041
0.000

0.001

Div $
0.300
0.480
0.000

Notice is hereby given that the above-named
Company is in dissolution, which commenced
on the 30th day of April 2009. The Liquidator is
Argosa Corp. Inc., P.O. Box N-7757 Nassau,

Bahamas.

ABDAB
RND Holdings

4.540
0.002

0.000
0.000

NA Vv
1.3664
2.8962
1.4590
3.1964

12.7397
100.5606
96.4070

1.0000
9.1599
1.0440
1.0364 0.33
1.0452 0.76

MARKET TERMS
YIELD - last 12 month dividends divided by closing price
Bid $ - Buying price of Colina and Fidelity
Ask $ - Selling price of Coli

Fund Name Div $ Yiela %
Colina Bond Fund

Colina MSI Preferred Fund

Colina Money Market Fund
Fidelity Bahamas G & I Fund
Fidelity Prime Income Fund

CFAL Global Bond Fund

CFAL Global Equity Fund

CFAL High Grade Bond Fund
Fidelity International Investment Fund
FG Financial Preferred Income Fund
FG Financial Growth Fund

FG Financial Diversified Fund

28-Feb-09
31-Mar-09

1.3041
2.9230
1.3883
3.1964
12.1564
100.0000
96.4070
1.0000
9.0950
1.0000
1.0000
1.0000

11-May-09
31-Mar-09
28-Feb-09
31-Dec-08
31-Dec-08
31-Dec-07
31-Mar-09
9-Feb-09
9-Feb-09
9-Feb-09

0.56
-3.59
0.00
0.71
0.80

0.56
-3.59
0.00
-12.76
4.40
3.64
4.40

BISX ALL SHARE INDEX - 19 Dec 02 = 1,000.00

S52wk-Hi - Highest closing price in last 52 weeks

last 52 weeks

ighted price for daily volume

and fidelity
Previous Close
Today's Close - hted price for daily volume
om day to day

raded today

olume of the prior week
reported earnings per share for the last 12 mths.

ARGOSA CORP. INC.
(Liquidator)

he last 12 months
ide st 12 month earnings
Effective Date 8/8/2007
(S41) - 3-for-1 Stock Split - Effective Date 7/11/2007
TO TRADE CALL: COLINA 242-502-7010 | ROYALFIDELITY 242-356-7764 | FG CAPITAL MARKETS 242-396-4000 | COLONIAL 242-502-7525

FINDEX - The Fidelity Bahamas Stock Index. January 1, 1994 = 100





THE TRIBUNE

MONDAY, MAY 18, 2009, PAGE 9B



INSIGHT

PM’s words

Prime Minis-
ter Hubert
Ingraham said
last week:

¢ “T want to
be clear: abuse
of detained per-
sons whether in
their homes, at
a work site, on
an immigration bus or at the
Carmichael Road Detention
Centre is contrary to the law.
Everyone must be treated
with respect at all times; that
is the law and that is the pol-
icy of the government which
Thead.”

Ingraham

e “We expect immigration
officers to respect the pro-
tocols called for by (interna-
tional human rights) con-
ventions and by our own
laws and constitution which
guarantee respect for human
rights of all individuals in the
Bahamas regardless of their
immigration status. And, I
may add, this includes the
obligation of immigration
officers to relay claims from
illegal immigrants of any
fear of persecution
expressed by an illegal immi-
grant/potential refugee on
return to his or her country
of origin.”



DETAINEE ABUSE CLAI

FROM page 12B

as after the FNM came to power
in 2007, the new national security
minister, Tommy Turnquest, told
The Tribune he had never heard
about the matter and that there
was “no investigation” whatsoev-
er — despite the outrage of his col-
league just a year earlier.

In response to a request for
information, The Tribune sent
Mr Turnquest 11 e-mails con-
taining photos, articles and official
statements on the Vallejo case.
The minister never responded.

FNM officials have occasion-
ally complained that there is an
unjustified tendency among jour-
nalists to tar the new administra-
tion with the brush of corruption
and negligence which stained the
PLP during its time in power.

The FNM would do well to
come to terms with the fact that
until cases like that of Mario
Vallejo are properly investigated
— and, if it is warranted, brought
before the courts — the media will
continue to be sceptical. After all,
as far as the public knows, the
officers alleged to have been
involved in the beating are still
collecting government pay
cheques.

It is always inconvenient for a
new government to investigate
allegations ignored by its prede-
cessor, as it risks falling out of
favour with friends, relatives and
colleagues of the accused — not
to mention the signal it would
send to anyone else who is up to

PUBLIC NOTICE

MINISTER of State Branville McCartney



»



(left) and Immigration Director Jack

Thompson (centre) listen as detainees voice their concerns in response
to allegations of inhumane treatment reported in 7he Tribune...

no good. And at the end of the
day, politics is a popularity con-
test.

Then there is the risk that a
key supporter, financier or party
boss might one day be implicated
in wrongdoing. Or worse, that a



rival party, once in power, might
use the precedent to instigate a
political witch hunt. All in all, jus-
tice is a tricky business for politi-
cians.

But if the rule of law is to con-
form to political term limits, we

Legal Notice

NOTICE
NOME BEACH LTD.

(In Voluntary Liquidation)














FOLLOWING claims of insufficient
and poor quality food, Mr McCart-
ney and Mr Thompson partake of a
meal at the Detention Centre...

are obliged to open the gates of
Her Majesty's Prison and release
everyone on remand awaiting tri-
al. While we are at it, we might as
well cancel the tens of thousands
of arrest warrants, dating back
years, which the police have yet to
serve on suspected criminals.

MS: QUESTIONS LINGER

At least partially driving the
reluctance to take decisive action
on the abuse of immigration
detainees — a feature of succes-
sive governments — is the unfor-
tunate tendency of many Bahami-
ans to ignore injustices suffered
by foreigners. Officials feel no
real domestic pressure to take a
hard line, and probably feel a cos-
metic approach will eventually
appease international observers.

Unfortunately, the reality is
that just as it inherits the conse-
quences of its predecessor's eco-
nomic and social decisions, each
new government is lumped with
allegations of prior wrongdoing
— and will ultimately suffer the
consequences of failing to deal
with them.

If the FNM is really interested
in putting an end to human rights
abuses once and for all, it must
ensure that justice is served in
every instance.

What do you think?

pnunez@tribunemedia.net

Legal Notice

NOTICE
QUANTUM PLACE INC.

(In Voluntary Liquidation)

Notice is hereby given that the above-named
Company is in dissolution, which commenced on
the 17th day of February 2009. The Liquidator is
Argosa Corp. Inc., P.O. Box N-7757 Nassau,

Bahamas.

Notice is hereby given that the above-named
Company is in dissolution, which commenced
on the 22nd day of April 2009. The Liquidator
is Argosa Corp. Inc., P. O. Box N-7757 Nassau,

Bahamas.





INTENT TO CHANGE NAME BY DEED POLL

The Public is hereby advised that |, MARVA EMMERITHA
GIBSON of Marathon Estates, New Providence, Bahamas
intend to change my daughter's name from KIRSTY DANIELLE
GIBSON to KIRSTY DANIELLE NEWBOLD. If there are any
objections to this change of name by Deed Poll, you may
write such objections to the Chief Passport Officer, P.O.Box
N-742, Nassau, Bahamas no later than thirty (30) days after the

ARGOSA CORP. INC.
(Liquidator)

ARGOSA CORP. INC.
(Liquidator)

date of publication of this notice.

Legal Notice
NOTICE

NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN as follows:

(a) FFORDO OVERSEAS LTD. is in dissolution under the provisions of the
International Business Companies Act 2000.

(b) The Dissolution of said Company commenced on May 15, 2009 when
its Articles of Dissolution were submitted and registered by the Registrar
General.



(c) The Liquidator of the said company is Lakeisha Collie of 2nd Terrace
West, Centreville, Nassau, Bahamas.

(d) All persons having Claims against the above-named Company are required
on or before the 15th day of June, 2009 to send their names and addresses and
particulars of their debts or claims to the Liquidator of the company or, in de-
fault thereof, they may be excluded from the benefit of any distribution made
before such debts are proved.
MAY 18, 2009
LAKEISHA COLLIE

LIQUIDATOR OF THE ABOVE-NAMED COMPANY

Legal Notice

NOTICE
LENORE INC.

(In Voluntary Liquidation)

Notice is hereby given that the above-named
Company is in dissolution, which commenced
on the 14th day of May 2009. The Liquidator is
Argosa Corp. Inc., P.O. Box N-7757 Nassau,

Bahamas.

ARGOSA CORP. INC.
(Liquidator)

Legal Notice

NOTICE
SAVIESE MEADOWS INC.

(In Voluntary Liquidation)

Notice is hereby given that the above-named
Company is in dissolution, which commenced
on the 14th day of May 2009. The Liquidator is
Argosa Corp. Inc., P.O. Box N-7757 Nassau,

Bahamas.

ARGOSA CORP. INC.
(Liquidator)

Legal Notice

NOTICE
JATTMORE LTD.

(In Voluntary Liquidation)

Notice is hereby given that the above-named
Company is in dissolution, which commenced on
the 11th day of December 2008. The Liquidator
is Argosa Corp. Inc., P. O. Box N-7757 Nassau,

Bahamas.

ARGOSA CORP. INC.
(Liquidator)

Legal Notice

NOTICE
TITUSEDEN LTD.

(In Voluntary Liquidation)

Notice is hereby given that the above-named
Company is in dissolution, which commenced
on the 14th day of May 2009. The Liquidator is
Argosa Corp. Inc., P.O. Box N-7757 Nassau,

Bahamas.

ARGOSA CORP. INC.
(Liquidator)

Legal Notice

NOTICE
GABRIEL INVESTMENTS

GROUP LTD.

(In Voluntary Liquidation)

Notice is hereby given that the above-named
Company is in dissolution, which commenced
on the 14th day of May 2009. The Liquidator is
Argosa Corp. Inc., P.O. Box N-7757 Nassau,

Bahamas.

ARGOSA CORP. INC.
(Liquidator)

Legal Notice

NOTICE
VIOLET LIGHT INC.

(In Voluntary Liquidation)

Notice is hereby given that the above-named
Company is in dissolution, which commenced on
the 16th day of December 2008. The Liquidator
is Argosa Corp. Inc., P. O. Box N-7757 Nassau,

Bahamas.

ARGOSA CORP. INC.
(Liquidator)

Legal Notice

NOTICE
PRIMROSE HILLS INC.

(In Voluntary Liquidation)

Notice is hereby given that the above-named
Company is in dissolution, which commenced
on the 30th day of April 2009. The Liquidator is
Argosa Corp. Inc., P.O. Box N-7757 Nassau,

Bahamas.

ARGOSA CORP. INC.
(Liquidator)

Legal Notice

NOTICE
JAY VALLEY LIMITED

(In Voluntary Liquidation)

Notice is hereby given that the above-named
Company is in dissolution, which commenced on
the 30th day of December 2008. The Liquidator
is Argosa Corp. Inc., P. O. Box N-7757 Nassau,

Bahamas.

ARGOSA CORP. INC.
(Liquidator)





PAGE 10B, MONDAY, MAY 18, 2009

THE TRIBUNE



INSIGHT

See
Allegations of abuse at Detention Centre, as documented in The Tribune

FROM page 12B

their relatives.

¢ Three US Congressmen sent
letters to Secretary of State Con-
doleezza Rice requesting an
investigation into the Vallejo case.

¢ A group of 750 Latin Ameri-
can businessmen cancelled a trip
to the Bahamas to protest the
alleged attack.

¢ Amid ongoing demonstra-
tions outside the Bahamas con-
sulate in Miami over the Vallejo
case, the consulate received a
bomb threat. A woman was
arrested in connection with the
incident the next day.

e Then FNM chairman
Desmond Bannister condemned
the PLP government for ignor-
ing the beating of Mario Vallejo
saying the Bahamas’ image has
been affected.

¢ Officials from the Ministry
of National Security said they
have received an interim report
on the alleged beating of the Mia-
mi reporter. However, they
stressed that “due to the sensitiv-
ity" of the contents, further infor-

mation will not be made avail-
able until a comprehensive report
is released — “early next week".
Then Minister of Foreign Affairs
Fred Mitchell warned that
Bahamians may be in danger of
“retaliatory action” following the
Vallejo incident.

¢ Florida Governor Jeb Bush
said he was “satisfied” with the
investigation into the alleged
beating.

August

Deputy Prime Minister Cyn-
thia Pratt admitted she has “no
idea” what is happening with the
investigation the government
promised.

2007

January

Despite earlier assurances,
there has still been no update on
the investigation into the Vallejo
incident. Chief Superintendent of
Police Hulan Hanna said: “The
matter is pretty much at the fore-
front and I’m hoping that it is
only a matter of time before the
public and principals involved
would know how the matter is to
be fully and finally determined.
It is not out of sight and not out of



MR VALLEJO being escorted to a waiting ambulance by paramedics out-

side the Detention Centre...

mind,” he said.

March

Concerns about the harsh con-
ditions and overcrowding at Fox
Hill Prison and the Carmichael
Road Detention Centre and alle-
gations of abuse by guards is fea-
tured in the US State Depart-
ment’s annual country report on
the Bahamas.

2008

July

New Minister of National Secu-

BAHAMAS DEVELOPMENT BANK
Cable Beach, West Bay Street,
P.O.Box W-3034
Pisusscuun, Desa tisuriss
Tel:(242) 327-57RIWN327T S793 <6
Fax:i(242) 327-5047, 327-1258
www. bahamasdevelopmentbank.com

The general public is invited to attend Bahamas
Development Bank’s sale of repossessed assets.

Electronic Equipment

(1) Compaq Presario Computer Tower

ASSETS

Tables.

(1) Canon Canoscan N640D EX Scanner

(1) Digital Scale (New)
(1) Whirl Microwave
(1)Tec Cash Register

(1) Epson Stylus Pro 9600 Print Engine
(1) HP DeskJet 656c Printer (Desktop)

(1) Monitor

(1) 1520 Epson Stylus Color Printer

* (1) Marble Table (Rectangle)

Cooler/Freezers

* (1) Two Door Chest Freezer
* (1) Ice Cream Cooler

* (1) Single Door Cooler

* (1) 8’ Walk-in Freezer

rity and Immigration Tommy
Turnquest — who is in charge of
the police, the Defence Force and
the Immigration Department —
claimed he has never heard about
the case of Mario Vallejo. Mr
Turnquest said there was “no
investigation” into the matter.

e The Tribune sent Mr Turn-
quest 11 e-mails containing pho-
tos, articles and official articles
on the case. He did not respond.

September

FNM Minister of State for
Immigration Branville McCart-
ney completely denied allegations
of a hunger strike among Cuban
detainees protesting conditions
at the centre. However, when it
was pointed out that the chief
officer at the centre had con-
firmed the strike, Mr McCartney
said he had heard something
about threats of a strike but that
nothing had been confirmed.

¢ Mr McCartney said that alle-
gations of hunger strikes at the

Detention Centre are under
investigation. No more was heard
about the matter for several
months.

2009

February

A detainee at the centre, who
allegedly was beaten so badly by
officers that he lost fingernails,
announced that he was starting a
hunger strike with other Cubans
at the facility.

¢ The Immigration Depart-
ment issued a statement denying
the abuse claims. However,
Amnesty International called for
an independent inquiry.

¢ The US State Department’s
2008 Human Rights Report said
human rights groups are con-
cerned that the latest investiga-
tion had been handled internally,
without independent oversight.
The Tribune interviewed 10
detainees at the centre who all
claimed conditions at the facility
are terrible and that three Cuban
men have stopped eating in
protest.

e¢ A Dominican man claimed
he was beaten repeatedly by
guards who were attempting to
extract “some information” from
him. The claim was corroborat-
ed by several of his fellow
detainee.

¢ Minister McCartney said he is
open to an independent investi-
gation into the Detention Cen-
tre.

March

Senior Immigration and
Defence Force officials visit the
Detention Centre accompanied
by social services personnel and

local clergy, in an effort to
demonstrate that the facility is
being operated with transparency.

¢ Amnesty International reit-
erated its concern for the safety of
the detainees at the centre and
urged the international commu-
nity to flood the government with
appeals. Dozens of letters were
sent to senior officials and copied
to The Tribune in the following
weeks.

¢ The findings of an investiga-
tion into the living conditions at
the centre were withheld from
the press. Immigration officials
also denied The Tribune’s request
to tour the facility. However,
Director of Immigration Jack
Thompson said the reports
included no evidence to substan-
tiate the claims of violence, sexu-
al favours for privileges or insuf-
ficient food. He added that
notwithstanding this, certain rec-
ommendations on the living con-
ditions will be implemented, such
as diversifying the menu and
replacing broken mattresses.

¢ Minister McCartney said he
has “no difficulty” releasing the
report and allowing the press to
tour the facility, but said the
report must first be seen by Cab-
inet.

May

Detainees said their living con-
ditions have improved greatly.
Minister McCartney said he was
“pleasantly surprised” when he
visited the Detention Centre. The
calls for press access to the facili-
ty, for an independent investiga-
tion and for the report to be
released continue to be ignored.

ACANCY NOTIC

The Grand Bahama Power Company, Limited invites qualified applicants to apply for the
peaition of Technician | (Instrument), responsible for conducting calibrations, repairs, routine
checks and tests contral instrumentation in #3 Generation Power Flant.

The successful candidate is expected to lead instrament technicians in fault-finding,
trovbbeshooting and repairs, including analyses and calibration of all electronic and pneumatic

instrument and control systems.

Applicants must have a High School Diploma, BOCSE passes of C or better in Math, English

wCompressor (New)
(1) Keyboard & Mouse Beaut lon Equipment
(1) Brothers Printer * (3) Nail Tables
(1) Samsung Digital Camcorder * (7) Facial Machine
(1) Dell Scanner & Printer * (2) Nail Stools

and a Technological Certificate in Electronics or its equivalent from an accredited institution.
Applicants must also have a minimum of five (3) years power station or equivalent industrial
expenence or three (3) years at a Technician Ul level in the Maintenance Department of an
industrial facility.

Machinery
(1) Chrome Juice Filler
(1) Multi Fruit Juicer
(1) Quilting Sewing Machine
(1) Deli Showcase
(1) Singer Sewing Machine
(1) Janome Monogram/Embroidery Sewing Machine
(1) Singer Quantum XL150 Sewing Machine with Serger
(1) Meat Saw (New)
(1) Deli Selection (Minor 2000 MT-SE) (New)

Applications with supporting documentation including a ckan Police Certificate and proof of Bahamian
citizenship shoukl be sent ti:

ne
CRAND BAHAMA POWER COMPANY, LIMMED
OX F-40888
Freeport, Grand Bahama
PETE ey

a ee ea ea

Aero Motive Equipment
* (2) Tech Work Benches
* (1) Alternator Test Bench
* (1) Paint Booth

(1) Rivet Machine

(1) 6” Storage Cabinet

(1) 4” Craftsman Tool Cabinet

Brake Washer
Sand Blaster
Vari-Drive

Assortment of Items

* Cooking Utensils Pots, Pans & Plates
* (2) Breakfast Nooks

* Air Hockey Game

* (1) Yamaha Wave Runner

&
GRAND BAHAMA POWER COMPANY

ea eee ‘ey Aa

eb
a ee Pes |

Location: Inland Steel, Sumner Street off Solider Rd.Nassau, Bahamas

Directions: Exit Abundant Life Road turn right onto Solider Road then the first left
onto Sumner Street tenth two storey white & blue building on the left

Date & Time: 10:00a.m. — 3:00p.m. — Saturday May 23, 2009

All assets are sold as is where is for cash, cashier’s cheque. No purchase(s) will be released
until paid in full.

NOTICE

The general public is invited to attend Bahamas Development Bank’s sale of repossessed Vehicles
Senet creer The payment of Long-Term Benefits and Assistance in New Providence for May 2009 will

be made 5 follows:

2003 Dodge Caravan

2002 Hyundai H-1 Van SUX

1997 Double Axle Mack Dump Truck
1997 Dodge Stratus

1982 GMC Brigadier Drill Truck
2001 Kia Pregio Van

1989 Ford L8000 Drill Truck (Green)

2001 Hyundai H-1 Van SUX
2006 Mitsubishi Canter Truck
1996 Ford Explorer

2000 Ford Ranger Truck
1999 Ford F-250 Truck

2006 Hyundai H-1 SVX Van

i) On Tuesday, May 19, 2009, for pensioners whose funds are deposited to their bank
accounts: and

il) Beginning Thursday, May 21, 2009, at the following Officas: Fox Hill, Wulff Road and
the Sir Clifford Darling Complex (NIB's Headquarters). Cheques may be collected
from these offices between the hours of 9:00 a.m. and 4:00 p.m

fee Pensioners and/or their representatives are required to produce proper identification in

20’ Robolo Vessel (1996) with Evinrude Outboard Engine order to collect their cheques
19’ Fiberglass Sports Vessel (1989) Hull Only

21 Seacraft Vessel (1974) with 140 HP Yamaha Outboard Engine

19’ Spanish Wells Runabout Vessel (1991) with 115 HP Mercury Outboard Engine

20’ Abaco Skiff (1997) with 115 HP Mercury Outboard Engine

Acceptable forms of identification for Pensioners are the National Insurance Registration
Card, tagather with any one of the following:

1. A Passport:

2. A Voter's Card; of

Location: ,
3. Any other document which establishes, conclusively, the identity of the claimant

Internal Security Division Compound, Thompson Blvd
Nassau, Bahamas

Date & Time: 10:00a.m. — 3:00p.m. — Saturday May 23, 2009

Where the Pensioner is sending a Representative to collect hissher cheque, the Repre-
sentative should present an Authorization Form, completed by the Pensioner, or a letter
from the Pensioner authorizing the Board to release his/her cheque. Additionally, the
Representative should present any one of the above-listed items to identify himselffher-
self. Cheques will not be released to Representatives who fail to provide satisfactory iden-
tifying documents.

For additional information telephone 327-5780.

The public is invited to come and view the aforementioned assets on the date and time indicated.
After which you may submit Sealed bids marked “TENDER-EQUIPMENT” to Bahamas

Development Bank, PO. Box N-3034, Nassau, Bahamas. A representative will be on the
compound from 10:00am to 3:00pm to collect and secure all offers, which will be opened on May
25, 2009. Please note that all bids on the aforementioned assets should be received by 3:00 pm
May 23, 2009. The Bahamas Development Bank reserves the right to reject any or all offers. All
assets are sold as is.

Please Note: Pensioners born in May and November are now due for Verification,

Failure to be verified on-time, will result in the suspension of payments,













































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} = 352am. 23 957am. 0.3
’ Tuesd
a ia CC meV 49pm. 26 10:44pm. 04
J EY a Statistics are for Nassau through 2 p.m. yesterday Wednesday447 am. 23 1t04deam. 02
i * 4 ———— ABACO Temperature 5:12pm. 28 11:40pm. 03
: 7, ; High: 83° F/28° C 7 eenceen nee . ee Thursday 7 a a 11:36am. 0.1
- cst ——— Low: 77° F/25°C Normal high... gar rage
' . a Normal low 71° F/22° C
d Shes @ WEST PALMBEACH t- Last year's high ese ea SUN AND IMIOON
4 a High: 83° F/28° C Last year's lOW oer 74° F/23° C
— Low: 72° F/22°C a 7 Precipitation Sunrise... ... 6:24 am. Moonrise. .... 2:12 am.
ss -. As of 2 p.m. yesterday ....cccccssssssssscsssssseeen 0.01" Sunset....... 7:49 p.m. Moonset... .. 2:15 p.m.
all is FT. LAUDERDALE FREEPORT as Year to date : New First Full Last
High: 82° F/28° C @ High: 81° F/27° C Normal year to date ooo... ccccccccccsccsecseeseenees 9.87" : =~ a
Low: 72° F/22°C Low: 75° F/24°C a e i.
AccuWeather.com —- @&
a. @ Forecasts and graphics provided by a
~
a — MIAMI ELEUTHERA AccuWeather, Inc. ©2009 May 24 = May 30 Jun. 7 Jun. 15
a High: 84° F/29° C High: 85° F/29° C
Caras Low: 73° F/23° C NASSAU a -79° iE 6°C
High: 84° F/29°C ow: 79° F/2
= Low: 77° F/25°C
a a . —
KEY WEST 1 “ ~—__sCGATISLAND
High: 84° F/29°C / of High: 81° F/27°C
Low: 73°F/23°G ye Low: 75° F/24°C
rr
a GREATEXUMA th
iy HEAT EXUN SAN SALVADOR
a High: 80 F/27 C High: 84° F/29°C
; ANDROS of Low: 74° F/23° C Low: 78° F/26° c
Shown is today's weather. Temperatures are today's . aan =<
highs and tonights's lows. High: 83° F/28° C ——- >a
Low:81°F/27°C ” i
oR om
LONGISLAND
Low: 79° F/26°C —
Today Tuesday Today Tuesday Today Tuesday - MAYAGUANA
High Low W High Low W High Low W High Low W High Low W High Low W on High: 82° F/28° C
Fic FIC Fic FIC Fic FIC Fic FIC FC FIC Fic FIC heey Low: 78° F/26° C
Albuquerque 88/31 59/15 pce 87/380 59/15 pc Indianapolis 69/20 47/8 s 76/24 55/12 s Philadelphia 65/18 46/7 s 74/23 52/11 s
Anchorage 62/16 42/5 s 63/17 42/5 s Jacksonville 68/20 58/14 r 73/22 63/17 1 Phoenix 107/41 78/25 pce 103/389 78/25 pc CROOKED ISLAND / ACKLINS
Atlanta 70/21 45/7 s 74/23 54/12 s Kansas City 76/24 54/12 s 81/27 GING s Pittsburgh 63/17 36/2 s 74/23 47/8 s RAGGEDISLAND — igh:85°F/29°c
Atlantic City 62/16 39/3 s 72/22 48/8 s LasVegas 103/39 74/23 pc 97/36 74/23 s Portland,OR 78/25 54/12 pe 61/16 45/7 c High: 82° F/28° C Low:81°F/27°C
Baltimore 67/19 39/3 s 74/23 50/10 s Little Rock 76/24 48/8 s 81/27 53/11 s Raleigh-Durham 67/19 41/5 po 74/23 52/11 s Low: 76°F/24°C —
Boston 58/14 44/6 s 68/20 50/10 s Los Angeles 82/27 60/15 pce 80/26 60/15 pc St. Louis 72/22 54/12 s 81/27 58/14 s . ae
Buffalo 63/17 41/5 s 63/17 44/6 t Louisville 71/21 48/8 s 80/26 53/11 s Salt Lake City 90/32 62/16 s 90/32 60/15 pc GREATINAGUA
Charleston,SC 64/17 50/10 r 73/22 60/15 sh Memphis 75/23 53/11 s 80/26 58/14 s San Antonio 84/28 56/13 s 84/28 58/14 s High: 85° F/29° C
Chicago 70/21 50/10 s 70/21 53/11 t Miami 84/28 73/22 t 83/28 71/21 Fr San Diego 71/21 63/17 pe 71/21 61/16 pc Low. 79°F/26°C
Cleveland 6317 44/6 s 68/20 49/9 pc Minneapolis 75/23, 49/9 pce 65/18 58/14 sh San Francisco 68/20 53/11 s 63/17 50/10 s .
Dallas 77/25 55/12 s 82/27 57/13 s Nashville 71/21 44/6 s 80/26 52/11 s Seattle 70/21 50/10 pe 58/14 45/7 sh i
Denver 94/34 54/12 pe 91/82 55/12 pc New Orleans 77/25 60/15 $s 80/26 62/16 s Tallahassee 71/21 56/13 + 76/24 59/15 1 hn. *
Detroit 66/18 46/7 s 68/20 47/8 t New York 63/17 50/10 s 73/22 54/12 s Tampa 81/27 66/18 t 79/26 66/18 t ‘ KK
Honolulu 82/27 68/20 sh 83/28 68/20 pc Oklahoma City 77/25 52/11 s 80/26 55/12 s Tucson 101/38 71/21 pce 98/386 70/21 pc WW \“\°
Houston 82/27 56/13 s 84/28 60/15 s Orlando 82/27 67/19 t 77/25 68/20 t Washington, DC 64/17 45/7 s 76/24 55/12 s









AY] rn CN,

Acapulco
Amsterdam
Ankara, Turkey
Athens
Auckland
Bangkok
Barbados
Barcelona
Beijing
Beirut
Belgrade
Berlin
Bermuda
Bogota
Brussels
Budapest
Buenos Aires
Cairo
Calcutta
Calgary
Cancun
Caracas
Casablanca
Copenhagen
Dublin
Frankfurt
Geneva
Halifax
Havana
Helsinki
Hong Kong
Islamabad
Istanbul
Jerusalem
Johannesburg
Kingston
Lima
London
Madrid
Manila
Mexico City
Monterrey
Montreal
Moscow
Munich
Nairobi
New Delhi
Oslo

Paris
Prague

Rio de Janeiro
Riyadh
Rome

St. Thomas
San Juan
San Salvador
Santiago
Santo Domingo
Sao Paulo
Seoul
Stockholm
Sydney
Taipei

Tokyo
Toronto
Trinidad
Vancouver
Vienna
Warsaw
Winnipeg

High
F/C
87/30
62/16
84/28
82/27
59/15
91/32
86/30
70/21
93/33
91/32
89/31
65/18
76/24
65/18
63/17
86/30
67/19
104/40
95/35
46/7
89/31
82/27
75/23
64/17
57/13
68/20
71/21
51/10
84/28
63/17
84/28
104/40
80/26
91/32
68/20
85/29
75/23
62/16
81/27
93/33
70/21
93/33
54/12
57/13
67/19
82/27
108/42
55/12
65/18
69/20
17/25
102/38
79/26
83/28
69/20
86/30
70/21
82/27
76/24
73/22
55/12
66/18
81/27
79/26
56/13
82/27
65/18
75/23
15/23
57/13

Today

Low
F/C
78/25
51/10
54/12
66/18
52/11
77/25
77/25
57/13
63/17
70/21
67/19
49/9
70/21
48/8
45/7
63/17
43/8
70/21
79/26
35/1
65/18
72/22
55/12
51/10
46/7
50/10
52/11
41/5
69/20
45/7
75/23
73/22
67/19
65/18
43/6
78/25
61/16
50/10
43/8
79/26
49/9
65/18
41/5
41/5
52/11
64/17
84/28
49/9
52/11
54/12
66/18
79/26
58/14
76/24
40/4
74/23
45/7
72/22
56/13
50/10
45/7
57/13
74/23
63/17
44/6
67/19
51/10
61/16
58/14
30/-1

|




sh
sh
pc

sh
sh
pc

High
F/C
88/31
64/17
84/28
73/22
61/16
93/33
85/29
70/21
95/35
77/25
91/32
70/21
76/24
65/18
66/18
71/21
66/18
93/33
93/33
59/15
87/30
82/27
77/25
64/17
55/12
75/23
76/24
54/12
83/28
54/12
86/30
116/46
78/25
78/25
66/18
85/29
76/24
61/16
86/30
91/32
71/21
95/35
61/16
61/16
74/23
79/26
108/42
58/14
70/21
72/22
75/23
104/40
80/26
84/28
17/25
87/30
72/22
83/28
72/22
79/26
63/17
68/20
83/28
82/27
59/15
80/26
59/15
74/23
66/18
52/11

Tuesday
Low
F/C
79/26
54/12
52/11
65/18
46/7
79/26
77/25
58/14
64/17
73/22
64/17
52/11
70/21

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$

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Weather (W): s-sunny, pe-partly cloudy, c-cloudy, sh-showers, t-thunder-
storms, r-rain, sf-snow flurries, sn-snow, i-ice, Prcp- precipitation, Tr-trace

MARINE FORECAST

DUN Me i

INSURANCE MANAGEMENT

(BAHAMAS) LIMITED, INSURANCE BROKERS &



& AGENTS







WINDS WAVES VISIBILITY WATER TEMPS.
NASSAU Today: E at 15-20 Knots 3-6 Feet 5-10 Miles 77°F
Tuesday: SSE at 15-25 Knots 3-6 Feet 5-10 Miles 77°F
FREEPORT Today: E at 15-20 Knots 3-6 Feet 5-10 Miles 76° F
Tuesday: E at 15-25 Knots 3-6 Feet 5-10 Miles 77°F
ABACO Today: E at 15-20 Knots 3-6 Feet 5-10 Miles 76° F
Tuesday: E at 15-25 Knots 3-6 Feet 5-10 Miles Tk



Topay's U.S. FORECAST

\VosyAngeles:

82/60

‘. = Showers
T-storms

» Rain

Flurries
Snow

Ice









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MONDAY, MAY 18, 2009

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The stories behind the news



DETAINEE ABUSE GLAIMS:
QUESTIONS LINGER

The Immigration Detention Centre has undergone a
makeover, but the government will not shake off the
spectre of abuse allegations until it ensures that
justice is done. INSIGHT reports...

m By PACO NUNEZ
Tribune News Editor

mmigration officials are no

doubt congratulating them-

selves on a job well done in

their handling of the latest alle-

gations of abuse and inhumane
conditions at the Carmichael Road
Detention Centre.

After all, the once miserable
detainees are now singing the Immigra-
tion Department's praises. They say the
facility, formerly an unendurable hell-
hole, is now close to being what it should
—a temporary holding facility for those
who, despite being denied entry into
the Bahamas for whatever reason, have
been convicted of no crime and remain
innocent until proven guilty under
Bahamian law.

Finding themselves in something of a
thorny predicament when the allega-
tions of beatings and neglect first sur-
faced in The Tribune several months
ago, new immigration bosses director
Jack Thompson and Minister of State
Branville McCartney seem to have
pulled off a considerable public rela-
tions coup.

They tackled the situation head on,
ordering several changes at the centre,
convening an expert committee, visit-
ing the detainees and even sitting down
to lunch to test claims of insufficient,
poor quality food.

Detainees report that threadbare mat-
tresses have been replaced, toilets have
been fixed, walls painted, access to clean
clothes provided, and best of all, once
cruel and violent guards seem to have
undergone a conversion to pacifism.

Why then, has the champagne not
been popped? Where is the public back-
patting session? Those who opt for a
career in public life are seldom timid
when it comes to self promotion, and
as it happens, there are good reasons
for their silence in this case.

The first is that, generally, it is quite
difficult to claim responsibility for fixing
a problem you maintain never existed in
the first place. When the allegations sur-
faced, the department issued a blanket
denial almost immediately — in just over
24 hours in fact. This was the result of an
investigation which, depending on one's
perspective, was either a model of swift
efficiency or a feeble attempt to distract
the public.

As one detainee told me last week:
“Obviously what you printed was true,
because they gave us everything we
asked for after the articles came out. I
don’t know how they could deny it.
There are many witnesses to what took
place, and there are medical records
that prove there were beatings.”

The second reason for not drawing
too much attention to the matter is that,
having claimed their internal inquiry
found nothing wrong, the department
refused to allow anyone else to investi-
gate.

The press have been denied access
to the facility and have been barred
from visiting detainees. A report com-
piled by psychologists and government
social workers has been kept from the
public. The department's explanation
is that the report has yet to be seen by
Cabinet, but this seems unlikely con-
sidering Prime Minister Hubert Ingra-
ham's warning to immigration officers
last week.

Mr Ingraham said: “I want to be clear:
abuse of detained persons whether in
their homes, at a work site, on an immi-
gration bus or at the Carmichael Road
Detention Centre is contrary to the law.
Everyone must be treated with respect
and dignity at all times; that is the poli-
cy of the government which I head.”

Yet calls by Amnesty International



MIAMI-BASED reporter Mario Vallejo, who was allegedly beaten by guards outside the Carmichael Road Detention Centre in 2006...

for a full and independent investigation
have been ignored. One senior official
dismissed the idea of inviting Amnesty
to tour the centre on the curious logic
that Standard and Poor's, an interna-
tional agency, had given the Bahamas
economy an unfair evaluation. His argu-
ment was that all international agencies
are equal, and therefore Amnesty will
also do the country an injustice. Never
mind that S&P's practices have been
highlighted as one of the prime causes of
the global economic crisis, while
Amnesty is widely respected for its pio-
neering work in the promotion of
human rights and the rule of law.

The third reason for government's
silence is that while Mr Ingraham's
statements were meant to send a clear
signal that the FNM wants to put an
end to lawlessness in the public service
(he also spoke out against the taking
and soliciting of bribes), senior officials
must know that this effort will fail unless
offenders are punished.

Beyond the obvious point that threats
to deal with wayward public servants
will be ignored if there is no follow-
through, the reluctance of a government
to bring its own officers to justice hints
at a lack of sufficient commitment to
upholding the rule of law.

Take the case of Mario Vallejo, an
Miami-based reporter for Univision,
who was in Nassau with his TV crew in
February 2006 to film the reunion of
seven Cuban refugees who had been
stranded at Elbow Cay.



&







The Tribune

IU 2b UE
ANY TIME...ANY PLACE, WE'RE #1

FRUT AMT im
werent
GH a



BAHAMAS EDITION
ee bure2i2 ork









Three detainees
On hunger sve

ubans launch protest,
tibune interviews 10 men
bt the Detention Centre

gegen!



THE FRONT PAGE of The Tribune, Feb-
ruary 27, 2009, in which allegations of
brutality were levelled by 10 detainees in
an exclusive interview...

When another journalist attempted
to capture the reunion on film and was
detained for his trouble, Mr Vallejo is
said to have stepped away from the
Detention Centre gate to make a phone
call, presumably to inform his superi-
ors that a fellow journalist had been
taken into custody. It is alleged that at
this point, Defence Force guards, appar-
ently irritated that Mr Vallejo had the
audacity to inform on them, savagely
attacked the reporter, throwing him to
the ground and then against a car, split-
ting his head open. I and two colleagues
arrived on the scene just as paramedics

were treating the bloodied Mr Vallejo.

The fallout from this incident was
considerable. Protests were held out-
side Bahamas government offices in
Florida. Three Congressmen called for
the US to launch an investigation into
the matter. Hundreds of Americans can-
celled their plans to visit the country in
protest. And at the height of the con-
troversy, a bomb scare was called in to
the Bahamas Consulate in Miami.

Despite the calls for justice, the PLP,
the party in power, did nothing and was
duly condemned by the opposition.
Then FNM chairman Desmond Ban-
nister, now a Cabinet minister, said: “It
is hard to see how they have done any-
thing about it that would be considered
appropriate in the circumstances and if
they have, they ought to let the Bahami-
an people know what has been done
and how they intend to deal with the
matter."

Far from dealing with the matter, the
PLP soon contracted a case of collective
amnesia, forgetting about the incident
completely. Despite repeated promises
that an inquiry would be held, six
months after the incident deputy prime
minister Cynthia Pratt, who had respon-
sibility for the police and the security
forces, admitted she had “no idea” what
was happening to the case.

This amnesia seems to have been con-
tagious and no respecter of party lines,

See page 9B

Allegations of abuse
at Detention Centre,

as documented
in The Tribune



2004

October

Amnesty International condemned the
Carmichael Road Detention Centre and
called for a full investigation into claims of
abuse and torture.

December

Then Immigration minister, PLP MP Vin-
cent Peet, said an investigation found no
evidence to substantiate the abuse claims.

¢ Cuban detainees rioted and set fire to a
dormitory at the centre.

¢ Cuban-Americans hold a number of

anti-Bahamas demonstrations outside the
Bahamas Consulate in Miami.

¢ Tribune Managing Editor John Marquis
writes an Insight article detailing the case
of 27-year-old Jamaican Omar Jones, who
claimed he was reduced to a state of tempo-
rary disability after repeated beatings at the
hands of officers at the centre. Commenting
on the government's response, Mr Marquis
wrote: “It was the same old story of official
silence in the face of compelling and deeply
disturbing evidence.”

2005

January

The Miami Herald published a front page
article detailing allegations that immigrants
have been abused at Her Majesty’s Prison
and the Carmichael Road Detention Centre.
The article followed exclusive reports in The
Tribune in which detainees claimed they
were tortured and humiliated. The Miami
Herald article said detainees claimed to have
been deprived of soap and drinking water,
beaten, subjected to mock executions and
in some cases raped by guards.

¢ Minister Peet announced the appoint-
ment of an inter-ministerial task force to
look into the allegations, but said he was
disappointed with the “unbalanced report-
ing” in The Miami Herald. A government
statement read: “The article in The Miami
Herald of Sunday 23, January is not an accu-
rate description of what happens at the
Detention Centre, nor at the prison. The
government is to convene an inter-minister-
ial task force to consider a proper response.”

e Mr Peet said he wished that those who
constantly criticise the conditions at the cen-
tre would “put their money where their
mouth is” and help with much needed
repairs.

eTourism Minister Obie Wilchcombe said
the negative press had the potential to dam-
age the country’s tourism industry, particu-
larly when it contradicts what the country
tells the world.

February

Edwin Culmer, newly appointed officer
in charge of the Detention Centre, said the
rules governing the facility should be
reviewed in light of repeated abuse claims.
He said the first thing he would do is look at
the rules to “see if they correspond with
Amnesty International and other human
rights laws.”

March

The US Embassy donates $20,000 to
improve water and sanitation at the Deten-
tion Centre.

May

Amnesty International condemns the
Bahamas for violating international law by
repatriating Haitians and Cubans before
actually determining if they are political
refugees.

July

A Cuban refugee claimed he was beaten
and shot twice with rubber bullets by two
Defence Force officers.

2006

February

Miami-based American TV reporter
Mario Vallejo was allegedly beaten by a
Defence Force officer outside the
Carmichael Road Detention Centre while
attempting to document the reunion between
seven Cubans rescued from Elbow Cay and

See page 10B

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Full Text

PAGE 1

N N A A S S S S A A U U A A N N D D B B A A H H A A M M A A I I S S L L A A N N D D S S L L E E A A D D I I N N G G N N E E W W S S P P A A P P E E R R Fake bottled water sparks disease fear C M Y K C M Y K V olume: 105 No.145MONDAY, MAY 18, 2009 PRICE – 75 (Abaco and Grand Bahama $1.25 WEATHER CLOUDY, T-STORMS HIGH 84F LOW 77F SEEINSIGHTFRONT S P O R T S SEEPAGEFIFTEEN Pitch perfect n B y TANEKA THOMPSON Tribune Staff Reporter tthompson@tribunemedia.net SEVERAL imposter bottles bearing the Aquapure labelh ave been confiscated from an independent depot and found to have off-the-chart levels of disease-causing and potential l y-deadly bacteria. The company was tipped off to the fake products being p assed off as demineralised water after suspicious looking red-capped bottles were spot ted by an Aquapure employee a t an independent depot in central New Providence. The five bottles were seized b y police, tested by company lab technicians and found to be "heavily contaminated" with coliform bacteria, indicators of d isease-causing organisms, and fecal bacteria, due to fecal waste contamination. The bottles in question were outfitted with used labels, were not stamped with a bottling date and did not have the company's embossed logo. It is suspected that used bottles collected at the depot were re-filled with foreign, contaminated water in order to cash in on the demand for the more expensive demineralised brand. Company president Alex Knowles told The Tribune : "The problem we have is to police this. It is kind of difficult." During a visit to his Bernard Road plant on Saturday to inspect the results, Mr Knowles called on environmental health officials to vigorously monitor small depots and to crackdown on the problem. He also demanded government legislation to allow for the prosecution of persons found Imposter products ‘heavily contaminated’ The Tribune ANYTIME ... ANYPLACE , WE RE #1 BAHAMASEDITION TRY OUR SOUTHERN CHICKEN BISCUIT www.tribune242.com I N S I G H T Detainee abuse claims: questions linger I N S I D E SECTIONINSIDE Real Estate Teenager shot dead in 28th homicide of the year A 18-YEAR-OLD youth was killed on Saturday after being gunned down in an inner-city community. T he young man, a resident of Nassau Village, was walking in the Lifebouy Streeta rea shortly before midnight when a SUV pulled up alongside him. T he occupants got out of the car and started firing shots in the direction of the victim, press liaison officerA ssistant Superintendent Walter Evans reported. Police rushed to the scene to find the man lying on the ground in a vacant lot. He had sustained gunshot wounds to his chest and hisa nkles. He was dressed in a white T-shirt, blue jeans and brown shoes at the time ofh is death. P olice recovered a .380 handgun with three live rounds of ammunition from the area where the victim w as found. The Central Detective Unit said yesterday t hat details are still very sketchy. The victim had not been p ositively identified up until press time last night, and police had not determined a motive for the shooting. T he CDU did not wish to speculate if the murder – the country’s 28th homicide for the year – could have been gang or drug related. Police could also not ver ify if the victim had been s pecifically targeted by the gunmen. Investigations into the m atter are continuing. Nassau V illage resident is fired on by SUV occupants SEE page nine CHARLENE SMITH ,quality control manager at Aquapure, tests thei mposter water for bacteria. F e l i p M a j o r / T r i b u n e s t a f f TEN-YEAR-OLD potcake Wraf wins the best dressed dog category on Saturday at the Humane Society’s Animal Fun Day. The annual event was held at the Botanical Gardens. Keep an eye out for a picture special of the event in this week’s Tribune. DRESSEDFORSUCCESSATANIMALFUNDAY F e l i p M a j o r / T r i b u n e s t a f f n By DENISE MAYCOCK Tribune Freeport Reporter dmaycock@tribunemedia.net FREEPORT – A 19-year-old youth died and a female passenger was detained in hospital in serious condition following a traffic accident early Sunday morning on Grand Bahama. Asst Supt Welbourne Bootle said the accident occurred around 3.55am at Pinta Avenue near Bahamia Arms. The identities of the victims have not been released. The young man’s death pushes the island traffic fatality count to six for the year. ASP Bootle said police received a call about an acci dent in the Bahamia area and went to investigate. When officers arrived they found a young driver pinned between the vehicle and a lamp pole protector. The female passenger, who is also 19, had been ejected from the vehicle. Y outh killed, passenger injured in traffic accident SEE page 10 THE body of a man was found floating in waters east of the Bahamas Air and Sea Rescue Association (BASRA Street yesterday morning. Assistant Superintendent Walter Evans said police received a report of the startling find around 10 am. The body was removed from the water and upon an initial examination police found no visible signs of injury that would suggest foul play, said ASP Evans. Body found floating in waters near BASRA SEE page nine n By KARIN HERIG Tribune Staff Reporter kherig@tribunemedia.net A NEW JOINT VENTURE has been established between a Norwegian company and BPC Limited for the first major oil exploration project in Bahamian waters in 23 years. Both companies said they believe there is a high potential for valuable oil and gas pro Joint venture for major oil exploration in Bahamas SEE page 10 INSIDE SHOOTING, ARMED R OBBERY AND STABBINGS IN GRAND BAHAMA PAGETWO MAN QUES TIONED OVER B ANK R OBBER Y PAGETHREE RETAILERS ‘NEED MORE OF THE DOMESTIC MARKET ’ T O S T A Y AFLOAT P A GE FIVE

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n By DENISE MAYCOCK Tribune Freeport Reporter dmaycock@tribunemedia.net F REEPORT – Grand Bahama Police are investigating a shooting, armed robbery, and two stabbing incidents that occurred over the weekend. Asst Supt Welbourne Bootle said a 33-year-old man was shot at Pinder’s Point early Saturday morning. A ccording to reports, at about 3am police received reports of gunshots in the area of the 313 nightclub, where a man was discovered suffering from apparent gunshot injuries to both thighs. The victim was taken to Rand Memorial Hospital, where he is being treated. A SP Bootle said the shooter was armed with a handgun and escaped in a brown-coloured Cavalier. He was wearing a dark coloured mask, blue shirt, and black pants. n ARMED ROBBERY THE Hawksbill Service Station w as robbed of an undetermined amount of cash on Saturday evening by three armed suspects. According to reports, three masked men entered the service station around 8.30pm. They held up and robbed a cashier of cash. One man was armed with a high-powered weapon and anothe r with a crow bar. The suspects wore dark clothing and escaped ina champagne or green-coloured Ford Taurus, license 23303. Anyone with information that can assist police with their investigation is asked to contact the police. n S TABBING A 21-year-old man was stabbed during an altercation at the Grand Bahama Taxi Union Hall on Saturday evening. Asst Supt Welbourne Bootle reported that sometime around 8 .25pm several persons were involved in a fight at the taxi union hall where a function was being held. A 21-year-old waiter, who was working at the event, was stabbed in the back with a sharp object. He is detained in hospital. G rand Bahama Police are also investigating a stabbing which occurred at Worker’s House early Sunday morning. A 33-year-old man of Yeoman Wood told police that around 12.40am on Sunday he was a ttacked by three men who beat him about the body and stabbed him in the back with a sharp instrument. As a result of information received from the victim, police went to Pinder’s Point around 1.10pm and arrested a 19-yearold male resident for possession o f a .44 Magnum revolver with one .44 bullet. C M Y K C M Y K LOCAL NEWS PAGE 2, MONDAY, MAY 18, 2009 THE TRIBUNE I NDEX M AIN/SPORTS SECTION L ocal News.............P1,2,3,5,6,7,8,9,10,16,17 E ditorial/Letters..........................................P4 A dvt ...............................................P11,18,19 Sports........................................P12,13,14,15C omics......................................................P20 B USINESS/INSIGHT SECTION Business................................P1,2,3,4,5,6,7,8 I nsight...............................................P9,10,12 W eather.....................................................P11 C LASSIFIED SECTION 40 PAGES REAL ESTATE GUIDE 24 PAGES USA TODAY MAIN SECTION 12 PAGES POLICE are asking the public for assistance i n the apprehension of 24-year-oldDavid Daniel Mettulus who is wanted in connection with an armed robbery. An all-points bulletin has been issued for Mettulus, describing him as “armed and dangerous.” H islastknown address was Ridgeland Park West in New Providence. Mettulus is described as being of slim build, 5” tall, weighing approximatel y 180lbs. Anyone with information regarding the suspect’s whereabouts is asked to contact the police emergency hotline at 919 or 911; the Central Detective Unit at 502-9930/9991; the P olice Control Room at 322-3333; Crime Stoppers at 328-8477 or the nearest police station. David Daniel Mettulus 24-year-old wanted by police in connection with armed robbery Shooting, armed robbery and stabbings in Grand Bahama M EMBERS OF THE SHELL SAXONS SUPERSTARS t ook to t he streets of Nassau on Saturday to mark their victory in the N ew Year’s Junkanoo parade. Delighted tourists were caught up in the event some thinking it was a regular occurrence. Saxons celebrate on the streets of Nassau Felip Major /Tribune staff

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n B y TANEKA THOMPSON Tribune Staff Reporter tthompson@tribunemedia.net POLICE are questioning a man connection with the daylight armed robbery of the Sco-t ia Bank on Wulff Road and East Street. The suspect, who is 37 and lives at Peter Street, was arrested at around 5pm on Saturday, a day after the incidento ccurred. P olice began their hunt after a man entered the bank alone a round 10 am and presented himself as a customer to a w oman bank teller. He made g estures towards "an object" used in the hold-up, before making good his escape with a n undetermined amount of c ash. C ynthia 'Mother' Pratt, deputy leader of the Opposit ion and MP for St Cecilia, was among the few customers i n the bank at the time. S he credited the prayers of h er pastor for getting her out of a what could have been a deadly situation. Speaking to The Tribune , M rs Pratt said she had no idea t he man who followed her into t he bank was about to rob it. S till shaken by the harrowing events, she recounted how t he bank was nearly empty when she entered. She said she stopped briefly t o speak with the security guard at the front door, before making her way to the female teller but as she approached the woman a nearby male teller motioned for her to come to his station instead. “When I went to the teller he was talking to me and In oticed how the people were s tarting to act strange. “I didn’t know it was a robbery until I noticed everyoneg oing to the back and I said to t he young man, what is going on. “Then the young man said to me, ‘Mother, we just got robbed!?’ And I said, what? “And the (robber n ext to the next teller and I didn’t know. “Only after the police showed up did I take with the shakes. It all happened so fast. “I could have been gone as q uickly as that. It was a matter o f seconds,” Mrs Pratt told T he Tribune just hours after the ordeal. E arly Friday morning Dr I nez Rolle, pastor of Wings of the Eagle Redemption Ministries, phoned her and asked her to allow her to cover her that morning in prayer. These prayers, said 'Mother' Pratt, kept her safet hroughout the agonizing o rdeal. ". . .If it wasn’t for that I might have been dead," thef ormer national security mini ster said, adding that officers on the scene credited her presence as the reason why the robbery did not turn deadly. C M Y K C M Y K LOCAL NEWS THE TRIBUNE MONDAY, MAY 18, 2009, PAGE 3 3 pc Queen Sleigh Bed 3 pc Queen Sleigh Bed 1 pc Dresser 1 pc Dresser 1 pc Mirror 1 pc Mirror 2 pc Nightstands 2 pc Nightstands 1 pc 5 Drawer Chest 1 pc 5 Drawer Chest Queen 8 Pc Queen 8 Pc $3,730 $3,730 King 8 Pc Set King 8 Pc Set $3,940 $3,940Solid Wood Solid WoodT T h h e e T T h h e e J J a a v v a a G G a a l l l l e e r r y y J J a a v v a a G G a a l l l l e e r r y yWong’s Plaza Wong’s Plaza Madeira Street Madeira Street (242 (242 2335 2335Financing Available Through Commonwealth Bank L L a a F F r r o o n n t t e e r r a a L L a a F F r r o o n n t t e e r r a a POLICE seized 15 packets of cocaine while searching a house in the Kemp R oad area. A SP Walter Evans said o fficers made the discovery as they executed a search warrant at a home through Williams Lane, off Kemp Road, around 9pm Thursday. A 39-year-old man was arrested. n FIREARM RECOVERED PUBLIC assistance led to the discovery of a .38 hand-g un with six rounds of ammunition concealed in a bushy area off Kemp Road. Acting on a tip, officers f rom the Wulff Road Police S tation found the illegal firearm and related parap hernalia shortly after n oon on Friday. P olice investigations continue. FEATUREDin today's Tribune on pages 18 and 19 a re Bahamas Customs officers recently promoted within the senior ranks of the D epartment. The two-page spread features senior officers, 95 per cent of whom having received promotions including Glenn Gomez to the post of Acting Comptroller of Customs and Earl Seym our to the post of Deputy Comptroller of Customs. Glenn Gomez was appointed to act as Comp-t roller of Customs on April 15, 2009, upon the retirement of former Comptroller o f Customs Anthony Adder ley. Mr. Gomez joined the P ublic Service in 1967 and w as promoted through the ranks to the post of Superin tendent in the Customs D epartment in 1993. He attended numerous courses both locally and internation ally, and in 1994 was afforded the opportunity to partici pate in a nine-week Crown A gent Course in London, England. U pon successful completion he returned to the Customs Department before being transferred to the Revenue Section of the Ministryof Finance where he remained until his promotion to Deputy Comptrollero f Customs. Earl Seymour has been employed with the Customs Department for more than 40 years. His earlier years widely exposed him to both theory and application of Customs Laws, which served as a sound foundation for additional local and international exposure. In 1980 upon his return from Treasure Cay, Abaco to Headquarters in New Providence, Mr. Seymour was promoted to the post of Senior Customs Officer and continued to ascend through the ranks of the Customs Department. He was appointed Assis tant Comptroller of Customs in 1997 where he remained until his promotion to the post of Deputy Comptrollerof Customs on April 1, 2009. Man questioned over bank robbery CYNTHIA PRATT was among the customers in Scotia Bank on Wulff Road (right Arrest after hold up in front of PLP deputy leader Fifteen packets of cocaine foundin house search Bahamas Customs officers promotions featured in special two-page spread

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EDITOR, The Tribune. Please publish this open letter to the local community for their support in the preservation of the endangered sea turtle. The Bahamas Sea Turtle Conservation Group Dear Friends, I once again write to you, cap in hand, begging for help. I actually do feel very guilty coming to you for help but this is ad ire situation; it always is, isn’t it? I don’t know if you have noticed that there is a reasonably fierce battle raging over the Sea Turtles in the Bahamas. There are huge numbers of people in this country who feel that the only responsible thing to do is to have a total ban on the harvesting and killing of all sea turtles in order to preserve them for generations to come. Unfor tunately we are still meeting s ome resistance to the Bill. It is d ifficult for me to understand why people are not unanimous in the passing of the turtle ban, however they are not, in spite of knowing that every sea turtle in the world is on the threatened list, and some are already on the endangered list. Last October the Bahamas Government offered a partial ban by December 31, 2008, and a TOTAL ban by April 1, 2009. Perhaps it was an April Fools joke because those dates have been and gone and we are no closer to protecting the Sea Turtles than we were a year ago. The environmental impact is huge, we will gradually lose the sea turtle as we have already lost so many other species, they will became a rarity in the lives of our children and grandchildren. How unbelievably sad that would be. I am asking for help as we, the Bahamas Sea Turtle Conservation Group, are planning to print 1000 brochures laying out why it is important to preserve the Sea Turtle, we are flying in Dr. Alan Bolton, who is an expert on Sea Turtles to speak at a town meting. He will stay at my house, but we need to pay for his ticket. We plan to print more educational mate rials for the general public and would also like to have funds to be able to print t-shirts that we could sell to raise even more money for this cause. We wantt o teach people the importance of Eco tourism. You can kill a turtle ONCE you can photo graph and swim with the same turtle 365 days a year. If you could send a donation to us we would be enormously grateful. Cheques should be made out to “the Bahamas Sea Turtle Conservation Group”, they can be mailed to P.O. Box CB 11099, Nassau. They can be dropped to The Bahamas Humane Society c/o Kim Aranha. You can email us at bahamasturtles@gmail.com and we can pick your donation up. We would be grateful for anything, it is never too small,s mall donations when put together equal a large donation.I know it’s a lousy time but if you can spare $5.00 or more Please, please help us do the right thing here. We plan to have a candlelight vigil on June 8th, at 7pm at Rawson Square, and on June 10th we are having a town meeting at COB at 6pm. In August there will be a wonderful Turtle Art Show at Doon galik Studios at Marina Village, P aradise Island, to coincide with T he Miss Universe Pageant. Thank you for reading this long letter. KIM ARANHA The Bahamas Sea Turtle Conservation Group Nassau, May 14, 2009 EDITOR, The Tribune. More and more every day we see signs of the fallout from the world’s economic troubles. Locally we read of more layoffs, and business people are now openly discussing their "drastic measures list" if things continue to worsen. At the same time, there are calls for the government to do more. These are tough times for sure, but if we are realistic, how can the government do any more without burdening future generations with more debt and a heavier tax burden? Government is being called upon for more help, while it's desperately looking for cash flow for current commitments, all at a time when it might be nearing borrowing limits. There is one clear message from all of this and Gerald Ford, the 38th President of the US was right when he said in a speech to Congress in 1974 that: "A government big enough to give you everything you want is a government big enough to take from you everything you have". The Bahamas Government must take deliberate steps to reduce its size and the scope of services it supposedly offers if we are to survive this economic downturn without taking more drastic measures, that will wreak more hardship on the "small man" and everyone else. Otherwise, they will have to continue to raise taxes and debt levels any way they can, which will only stifle the economy even more. As a friend commented recently: "Years of profligacy has left the country in financial jeopardy. It did not have to happen. Both political parties chose potential bankruptcy over conservative, disciplined spending." "The seeds have been sown – it is left now to reap the whirlwind." Let's work together to figure out how we can reduce the government. Not call on it to do more harmful things to us. Of course I shouldn't say The Nassau Institute was right all along about the size of our government, but...the reality is, it is self evident now...isn't it? RICK LOWE Nassau, May 17, 2009 C M Y K C M Y K EDITORIAL/LETTERS TO THE EDITOR PAGE 4, MONDAY, MAY 18, 2009 THE TRIBUNE The Tribune Limited NULLIUS ADDICTUS JURARE IN VERBA MAGISTRI Being Bound to Swear to The Dogmas of No Master L EON E. H. DUPUCH, Publisher/Editor 1903-1914 S IR ETIENNE DUPUCH, Kt., O.B.E., K.M., K.C.S.G., (Hon. P ublisher/Editor 1919-1972 Contributing Editor 1972-1991 EILEEN DUPUCH CARRON, C.M.G., M.S., B.A., LL.B. P ublisher/Editor 1972Published Daily Monday to Saturday S hirley Street, P.O. Box N-3207, Nassau, Bahamas Insurance Management Building., P.O. F-485, Freeport, Grand Bahama T ELEPHONES Switchboard (News, Circulation and Advertising Advertising Manager (242 C irculation Department (242 N assau Fax: (242 Freeport, Grand Bahama: 1-(242 F reeport fax: (242 W EBSITE www.tribune242.com – updated daily at 2pm JOSEPH-MARIE, comte de Maistre, French a mbassador to Russia in the nineteenth century once remarked that if you “scratch a Russiany ou wound a Tartar.” The same observation can be made of the B ahamas’ tourism industry. If you scratch a tourist you wound this country’s bread and butter tourism. And as for the murder of a well-known and liked banker, the repercussions can forever tar n ish the image of the Bahamas as an important financial centre. I n other words it will get out that it is neither safe nor desirable to do business in this country. On April 22 Hywel Jones, 55, of Peterstonsuper-Ely, near Cardiff, Wales, president of Britannia Investment Group in Nassau, stepped f rom his car and started to walk towards his West Bay Street office when he fell to theg round in a pool of blood. He had been shot twice, once straight through t he head. He fought for his life for three weeks while a policeman stood guard at his hospital door. Police classified his killing as a “hit job.” It was a bold killing. The unmasked gunman is reported to have walked up to him about 1 0 o’clock that Wednesday morning, fired directly at his head, jumped on a motorcycle a nd sped off towards Gambier Village. Of course, this is now a high profile case, not b ecause as suggested by an article sent to us anonymously last week he is a white man, but because he is a foreign banker, the Bahamas is an important financial centre, and the foreign press is now on the trail, asking the usual ques t ions, and pressing for answers. His younger brother, has flown in from Los A ngeles, California, and vows not to leave until Hywel Jones’ killer is found. Friends have put u p a $50,000 reward for information that will result in the arrest and conviction of whoever is responsible. Hywel Jones settled in the Bahamas in 1988. Up until two years ago he lived a peaceful lifea conscientious banker by day; a man who enjoyed his discos at night. H owever, all that changed about two years ago when he had two unpleasant experiences once when he was held up at knifepoint in his West Bay Street home, and on another occasionw hen he was beaten up and threatened. He filed a criminal complaint, and hired a p rivate investigator. Information was given to the police, but apparently nothing was done. It is understood that this file, which could not be found immediately after his murder, has since been located and presumably will now be i nvestigated. About this time a dispute arose between Mr J ones and an associate when they severed their business relations and went their separate ways. A case was pending and was due for hearing about a week before Mr Jones was murdered. In fact there are two cases one civil and one criminal. As is the wont with sip-sip in Nassau, arm c hair sleuths are muddying the waters, mixing everything together, probably arriving at wrong c onclusions, and possibly unfairly sullying the reputations of others along the way. We understand that all the statements, and affidavits have been sworn and filed and ready for prosecution in these cases. I t would probably be advisable for the police to proceed with the criminal case and get thatb ehind them, so that full concentration can be given to solving the murder. I t is understood that Mr Jones’ family is giv ing their full support to our Bahamian police, but if the foreign press keep pushing and questions are asked at the Foreign Office in London, Scotland Yard, may be the next on the scene. W e are equally concerned about all the Bahamians being murdered in what, in some c ases, also appear to be “hit jobs.” Eventually these killings will also affect our t ourist industry should they result in a travel advisory listing this country among those con sidered “unsafe for travel.” However, a high profile banker can have this result overnight. T hat is why it is important that no stone be left unturned in solving his murder. D on’t forget Aruba and the disappearance and presumed murder of Natalee Holloway, an A merican high school student, who disappeared from a class trip to that island in June, 2005. Aruba has never recovered from that publicity. In February this year it was reported that Aruba’s tourism was down between 15 and 20 per cent “and still falling even in high season.” Already the Bahamas is in economic trouble. T herefore, it is in every Bahamian’s interest to have Hywel Jones’ murder solved as quickly as possible. And so if anyone has any information that w ould help they should call Crime Stoppers toll-free at 328-8477 . T hese calls will be answered by operators in the United States who will ensure complete anonymity. Otherwise call the Criminal Detective Unit at 502-9942 or 502-9991 . Please help our efforts to preserve sea turtles LETTERS letters@tribunemedia.net This murder needs to be solved Government doing more is not the answer

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n B y TANEKA THOMPSON T ribune Staff Reporter tthompson@tribunemedia.net WITH lackluster business in the capital's downtown hub not e xpected to turnaround until at l east early 2010, a prominent B ay Street merchant said retailers must snag more of the domestic market in order to stay afloat. Mark Finlayson president of l uxury retail chain Solomon's M ines said the recent closure of once robust stores at the eastern end of Bay Street were a long time coming, because of a failure to court Bahamian customers, compounded with a s oftened tourism industry. " I think we've got a rough ride into January or February of next year. I think all of us have to be innovative and findn ew ways in order to keep t hings going, but I think it's going to be very, very rough for everybody, for all sectors," said Mr Finlayson. "High rent is part of it (Bay Street store closures) but them ain reason is we haven't s haped ourselves up in terms of t he product we are delivering to t ourists but also we are shortchanging ourselves in terms of the product we are delivering to Bahamians. "One of the things I see in t erms of revitalisation of any area is bringing local clientele back to these areas it's absolutely essential but somehow we have not managed to focus ourselves enough on getting Bahamians," he said. A crucial part of attracting m ore local consumers downtown, said Mr Finlayson, is the creation of more tiered parking areas and the installation of metres for short-term parkers. P lans for a downtown revit alisation have been years in the m aking most recently with the formation of the Downtown Nassau Partnership (DNP which earlier this month said the public will soon “see many visible improvements to the city”. A t a recent town meeting held a t the British Colonial Hilton D NP managing director Vaughn R oberts said some of the various improvements to be pushed by the DNP over the next few months are: Cleaning and sani-t ation, beautification, reducing congestion, increasing the availability of parking options, undertaking streetscaping, maintaining buildings and sidewalks andc reating new entertainment possibilities. C M Y K C M Y K LOCAL NEWS THE TRIBUNE MONDAY, MAY 18, 2009, PAGE 5 RATS, ANTS, TERMITES, ROACHES, FLIES, MOSQUITOES, TICKS & FLEAS P HONE: 327-6464W E SEND ‘EM PACKIN’!STRUCKUM(DF55 R ECENT reports of violence and s exual abuse in the country’s schools have sparked renewed calls for police officers to be stationed on campuses. T he Bahamas Against Crime organisation said recent reports are only the “tip of the iceberg” of prob-l ems plaguing the nation’s education s ystem. In the wake of accusations of sexual abuse of students at Eight Mile Rock High in Grand Bahama and unconfirmed reports of gang violence at C C Sweeting in New Providence,t he anti-crime organisation’s executive director Rev C B Moss is demanding immediate action to address the problems and consider r einstating police officers on campuses. “These reports, as horrible as they are, are but the tip of the iceberg. Our schools are in deep t rouble and require urgent and critical attention,” he said. Rev Moss said that each day information comes i nto Bahamas Against Crime whichis cause for a larm “even among the most hardened of us.” The organisation’s statement released yesterday calls for the Ministry of Education and the g overnment “to arise from what appears to be a state of paralysis and implement action to halt the r ot and decay occurring in our s chools.” “In spite of its policy against putting police officers on campuses, t he current situation may warrant and justify deploying police officers to bring the schools under control,”h e said. B ahamas Against Crime is also challenging parents to wake up and protect their children as it is their responsibility, not the government’s. “These parents may want to note that for the most part, the children oft he education and government officials do not attend the violence riddled schools that their children attend. This alone demands some r esponse from them.” The non-profit organisation is further challenging the wider society to demand immediate a nd drastic changes in the way the country’s schools are being operated. “We cannot continue to produce ill-educated, v iolence-prone, exploited and damaged children i n our schools and then dump them upon a soci ety that is already incapable of accommodating them. This is a recipe for disaster, and we are very near the tipping point,” said Rev Moss. Retailers ‘need more of the domestic market’ to stay afloat M ARK FINLAYSON Renewed calls for police on school campuses REV C B MOSS

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C M Y K C M Y K LOCAL NEWS PAGE 6, MONDAY, MAY 18, 2009 THE TRIBUNE n By KATHRYN CAMPBELL Bahamas Information Services M INISTER of Public Works and T ransport Neko Grant said he is satisfied with the progress of the administration complex, technical block and restores presently under construction at the Abaco Central High School. He and a team of ministry officials toured the facilities during a visit to Abac o last week. “I am very pleased with the progress of the new additions to Abaco Central High,” he said. District Superintendent for Abaco schools Lenora Black said the administ ration building is almost ready for occupancy. Last October, the government signed c ontracts totaling $900,000 with Jones C onstruction and Williams and Sons C onstruction to build the additions. T he new administration building i ncludes a reception area, offices for the p rincipal and viceprincipal, student sick bay, staff lounge, rest rooms, clerical space and kitchenette. The technical block and restrooms comprise some 4,049 square feet and include three classrooms and male and female restrooms. M INISTER OF PUBLIC WORKS a nd Transport Neko Grant inspects the new technical block at Abaco Central High S chool’s newly constructed technical b lock. Pictured behind Mr Grant is Cephas C ooper, Administrator for the Central A baco District. n By ALISON LOWE Tribune Staff Reporter alowe@tribunemedia.net D O YOUthink your MP g ives excellent service to the c ommunity, or just idles his or h er electoral responsibility a way? If so a new online survey wants Bahamians to spill the beans and mark the members from an A plus, to an F minus. The Prime Minister, his Cabinet colleagues and MPs have u ntil June 15 to find out their fate, when the results of the online survey are published. E ach voter also has the opport unity to write brief comments a bout the elected officials, with the caveat from the site’s creators that they hope any criti-c ism or suggestions are “con structive.” By not allowing any individual to vote more than once fromt he same computer, the creators hope to reduce the possibility for the results being unfairly skewed. You can find it at: h ttps://grade.speedsurvey.com/ survey.aspx?u=4E6C3747&do_not _copy_this_link. A chance to mark your MPs’ performances Minister of Works tours new facilities at Abaco Central High PUBLIC WORKS and Transport Minister Neko Grant (right is pictured with Permanent Secretary Colin Higgs and Lenora Black, District Superintendent for Abaco schools, at the Central Abaco High School.

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n BySIR RONALD SANDERS (The writer is a Consultant and former Caribbean d iplomat) T HE government of the Dominican Republic (DR member of the Caribbean Community and Common Market ( Caricom) and heads of government of the regional organisation will consider the application at their meeting in July. T here is not much to consider. C aricom countries along with t he DR form CARIFORUM and last year they each signed an Economic Partnership Agreement (EPA European Union (EUo vertakes the objectives of Caricom’s slow-paced Single Market and Economy in many aspects. Professor Norman Girvan has pointed out that “the EPA defines the Dominican Republic a s part of the ‘region’: the DR h as an economy that is larger than that of any single Caricom country and the equivalent of 64p er cent of the combined size of all 14 Caricom economies. The existing Caricom-Dominic an Republic free trade agreem ent covers only goods, has not yet been extended to services, and does not contemplate extens ion to trade-related issues. “The EPA’s Regional Preference clause obliges Cariforums tates to extend to each other the same treatment they extend to the EU. CSME countries will,t herefore, liberalise goods, ser vices and investment with regard to non-CSME Caricom countries and to the Dominican Republica t the same rate as to the EU”. Therefore, from the DR’s standpoint since it has entered a game, it makes sense to help make the rules. The DR is already an elephant i n the Caricom room that cannot b e ignored – its participation in CARIFORUM and the terms of the EPA with the EU make it ab ig player. Things have changed appreciably. T he English-speaking count ries of Caricom no longer inhabit an exclusive neighbourhood. They have to concede they ares mall players, and acknowledge that only cohesive action will pre serve their identity, their culture, t heir language – and a meaningful place in the Caribbean economic space. It is significant that the EU u rged the DR’s inclusion in CARIFORUM and it had to be accepted by Caricom as a neces sary condition of the EPA. From the EU standpoint, the DR’s inclusion in the EPA made sense since its population of 9.6 million constitutes a market that is almost twice the size of CARICOM, and the EU is interested in larger markets for its goods and services to help preserve and advance the standard of living in its own member states. Undoubtedly, if Cuba were not subject to a US trade embargo, the EU might also have insisted that Cuba with a population of 11.4 million be part of the EPA. By any objective analysis, the US embargo of Cuba will be lift ed within the next decade. The burning desire by the private sector in many States in theUS to do business with Cuba is pushing change. US companies want a significant piece of the Cuban action which they now see going toEuropean and Canadian companies, and increasingly to China and Russia. When the embargo is lifted, the Caribbean will be a very different place. It would be one in which its two largest countries in popula tion terms would be Spanishspeaking and of far greater importance to the global community than the little countries of Caricom. It is only the US trade embargo against Cuba that now pre vents an integrated relationship between Cuba and the Domini can Republic in the Caribbean that would dwarf CARICOM. Then, there is Puerto Rico – another island territory in the Caribbean with a population of 3.9 million that is Spanish-speaking. Even if Puerto Rico does not seek separation from the US, once the embargo on Cuba is lifted, the deepening of economic relations between Puerto Rico, C uba and the Dominican Republ ic would make perfect sense. The Caribbean will then be dominated by these “big three” –w ith markets and investment opportunities far greater than all the CARICOM countries. C aricom countries would d elude themselves if they believe that with their individual small markets, high investment costs, h igh costs of doing business and vulnerabilities both to natural disasters and external economics hocks – such as the current global financial meltdown – they could each operate successfully in the global market place in c ompetition with the “big three.” Caricom governments would do well to bolster their economies a nd their capacity for dealing with their Caribbean neighbours and the international community by urgently completing the a rrangements for implementing their own Single Market. They should also swiftly reform theg overnance of Caricom which sorely needs overhaul. Against this background, roles f or the media in Caricom countries begin to emerge. Umbrella organizations such as the Caribbean Media Corpo-r ation (CMC Broadcasting Union (CBU should be geared for: (a development of a capability to deliver CARICOM information into the DR, Cuba and PuertoR ico in Spanish; and to deliver information from these countries into CARICOM in English; (b the development of relations with media in the DR, Cuba and Puer to Rico who would purchase and market information from CARI COM delivered in Spanish; and (c delivering such information as widely as possible. Having served on the first Board of Directors of CMC (then known as the Caribbean News Agency) and as President of the Caribbean Broadcasting Union, I am painfully aware that neither of the two institutions have fully fulfilled the objectives for which they were intended – that is to knit the Caribbean peoples into a single community through the spread of information and knowl edge. This is not the fault of the talented journalists and broadcast ers who have served the organizations for more than three decades; they have been constrained by the lack of financialr esources to do their jobs. E xpecting the financially under-resourced CMC and CBU t o take on the task of information f low between English-speaking CARICOM countries and their S panish-speaking partners – espec ially now the Dominican Republic – is almost certainly impossible, unless the two organizations get external help. S uch help should come from t hree sources. F irst, the governments of C ARICOM and the DR should make a “no-strings attached” s ubvention to the two organizations to undertake the necessaryi nformation flow between their c ountries. Second, the EU should be asked to provide the budgetary support which CMC and the C BU would require to undertake t he project. After all, the DR is part of CARIFORUM and will i n time become a member of CARICOM – largely due to the EU’s insistence. And, recognizing that this proj ect should not be limited to the D R alone, but should include Cuba and Puerto Rico, the third s ource of financing should be UNESCO which should be approached to provide funding for a communication infrastruc t ure that promotes greater cohesion and understandingamong Caribbean peoples who, though geographically close, have beens eparated politically and eco nomically in service to coloniz ing nations. ( This is an abridged version of a paper delivered to a UNESCO sponsored CaribbeanM edia Conference in Grenada o n May 14, 2009). Responses to: ronaldsanders29@hotmail.com C M Y K C M Y K T HE TRIBUNE MONDAY, MAY 18, 2009, PAGE 7 The big three and little CARICOM in the Caribbean WORLDVIEW SIRRONALD SANDERS I I t t i i s s o o n n l l y y t t h h e e U U S S t t r r a a d d e e e e m m b b a a r r g g o o a a g g a a i i n n s s t t C C u u b b a a t t h h a a t t n n o o w w p p r r e e v v e e n n t t s s a a n n i i n n t t e e g g r r a a t t e e d d r r e e l l a a t t i i o o n n s s h h i i p p b b e e t t w w e e e e n n C C u u b b a a a a n n d d t t h h e e D D o o m m i i n n i i c c a a n n R R e e p p u u b b l l i i c c i i n n t t h h e e C C a a r r i i b b b b e e a a n n t t h h a a t t w w o o u u l l d d d d w w a a r r f f C C A A R R I I C C O O M M . .

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C M Y K C M Y K LOCA L NEWS PAGE 8, MONDAY, MAY 18, 2009 THE TRIBUNE NASSAU LISTINGS DEVELOPED RESIDENTIAL & COMMERCIAL VACANT LOTS P R O P E R T I E S F O R S A L E 1.BERNARD TERRACE SUBDIVISION LOT NO. 14SouthernMoiety PROPERTY DESCRIPTION: Multi-FamilyResidentialLot PROPERTY SIZE: 5,700sq.ft. withfoundation LOCATION: Travelingeaston BernardRoad,takethe1st cornerontherightpastWindsor Terrace.Thevacantlotisthe4th ontheleft. APPRAISEDVALUE: $85,0002.CARMICHAELVILLAGE LOT NO. PROPERTY DESCRIPTION: SinglefamilyResidentialLot PROPERTY SIZE: 4,650sq.ft. LOCATION: Travelingwest onAvocadoRoadfromFaith Avenue,turnthroughthe1st graveledcornerontheleft.The vacantlotisthe2ndontheleft, enclosedwithchainlinkfence andfruittrees. APPRAISEDVALUE: $51,000 3.KOOLACRES SUBDIVISION LOT NO. 46Parcel PROPERTY DESCRIPTION: Multi/SingleFamilyResidential PROPERTY SIZE: 7,604sq.ft. LOCATION: Travelingsouth onFoxHillRoadfromJoe FarringtonRoad,takethe2nd cornerleft-oppositeGuana CayAvenue-ontoKoolAcres SubdivisionRoad.Thevacantlot is1stontheleft;directlyonthe cornerofFoxHillRoadandKool AcresSubdivisionRoad. APPRAISEDVALUE: $84,0004.SEA GULL GARDEN SUBDIVISIONLOT NO. 33 PROPERTY DESCRIPTION: Multi -FamilyResidentialLot BeachFront PROPERTY SIZE: 14,723sq.ft. LOCATION: OnFlemmingRoad. APPRAISEDVALUE: $200,000 5.SOUTH OCEANESTATES SUBDIVISION LOT NO. 1Block5 PROPERTY DESCRIPTION: Multi-familyResidentialLot PROPERTY SIZE: 11,566sq.ft. LOCATION: Travelingsouthof LyfordCay,immediatelypass MountPleasantturnlefton SouthOceanBoulevardtoNew SouthOceanEstates.Thevacant lotisthe1stontheright. APPRAISEDVALUE: $110,0006.SOUTHERNSHORES SUBDIVISION LOT NO. 4parceloflot24 PROPERTY DESCRIPTION: Multi-FamilyResidentialLot PROPERTY SIZE: 7,706sq.ft. LOCATION: Thevacant lotisonthewestsideofa roadreservationnearly400 feetsouthofMarshallRoad. APPRAISEDVALUE: $77,000 8.BEL-AIRESTATES – CARMICHAEL ROAD LOT NO. 259 PROPERTY DESCRIPTION: S ingle-storeyResidence, 3 beds/2baths PROPERTY SIZE: 6,000sq.ft. LOCATION: Travelingeaston C armichaelRoadfromFaith Avenue,takethe4thcornerright (TurtleDrive).Thepropertyisthe 4thhouseontheright. A PPRAISEDVALUE: $186,000 9.CHIPPINGHAMSUBDIVISION L OT NO. 17 PROPERTY DESCRIPTION: Single-storeyResidence, 2beds/1bath PROPERTY SIZE: 6,375sq.ft. LOCATION: Travelingweston QuarryMissionRoadoffNassau S treet,thepropertyislocatedon thenorthernside(approximately 500ft.fromNassauStreet). APPRAISEDVALUE: $120,000 10.ENGLERSTONSUBDIVISION LOT NO. 4Block7 PROPERTY DESCRIPTION: TriplexApartmentbuilding PROPERTY SIZE: 7,000sq.ft. LOCATION: Travelingeaston C ordeauxAvenuefromEast Street,takethe2ndright(Key WestStreet)andheadsouth.The propertyisthe6thbuildingonthe left. APPRAISEDVALUE: $243,000 11. GOLDEN ISLES ROAD LOT NO. P ROPERTY DESCRIPTION: TriplexApartmentComplex P ROPERTY SIZE: 7,203sq.ft. LOCATION: Travelingnorthon G oldenIslesRoadfromCowpen Road,afterthe1stpavedroad o nleft;thepropertyisthe2nd buildingontheleft. APPRAISEDVALUE: $333,000 12.MARSHALL ROAD LOT NO. 17D P ROPERTY DESCRIPTION: TriplexApartment-One2bedroom/2-bath&Two2bedroom/1-bath PROPERTY SIZE: 10,000sq.ft. LOCATION: Travelingweston MarshallRoadfromSouthBeach R oad,takethe1stcornerright (TiaoEndRoad).Thepropertyis the4thbuildingontheleft. APPRAISEDVALUE: $288,000 13.MARSHALL ROAD LOT NO. 52 P ROPERTY DESCRIPTION: Single-storeyResidence3beds/ 2baths PROPERTY SIZE: 37,550sq.ft. LOCATION: TravelingonMarshall RoadfromBlueHillRoad,turn leftatjunction,thenright.The propertyisthe5thontheright,to therear. APPRAISEDVALUE: $345,000 14.PINEWOOD GARDENS SUBDIVISION LOT NO. 13 P ROPERTY DESCRIPTION: Single-storeyResidence, 3beds/2baths PROPERTY SIZE: 7,191sq.ft. LOCATION: Travelingeaston SapodillaBoulevardfromEast Street,takethe1stleft(Thatch P almAvenue)andheadnorth tothejunction.Takealeft (MahoganyStreet);thepropertyis the2ndontheright. A PPRAISEDVALUE: $148,000 15.SANDILANDS VILLAGE L OT NOS. 7and8 PROPERTY DESCRIPTION: Single-storeyResidence With3apartmentsunder c onstruction PROPERTY SIZE: Lot7:7,970 sq.ft,Lot8:8,419sq.ft. LOCATION: Travelingweston SandilandsVillageRoadfrom FoxHillRoad,turnthroughthe 9thpavedroadonleft(Vanessa C lose).Thepropertiesarelocated onthenorthwesternsideofthe street. APPRAISEDVALUE: $277,000 16.SANDILANDS VILLAGE LOT NO. P ROPERTY DESCRIPTION: DuplexApartmentComplex P ROPERTY SIZE: 5,500sq.ft. LOCATION: Travelingweston S andilandsVillageRoadfrom FoxHillRoad,turnthroughthe 2 ndpavedroadontheleft.The propertyisthe5thontheleft. APPRAISEDVALUE: $219,000 INTERESTED PARTIES SHOULD SUBMIT OFFERS INCLUSIVEOF TELEPHONE CONTACT AND POSTAL ADDRESS TO: CB DISTRESSEDPROPERTIES, CREDIT RISK MANAGEMENT DEPARTMENT, P.O BOX SS-6263 NASSAU, BAHAMAS OR EMAIL USAT: DISTRESSED.PROPERTIES@COMBANKLTD.COM* WE RESERVE THE RIGHTTO REJECT ANY OR ALL OFFERS. 3.GAMBLE HEIGHTS SUBDIVISION LOT NO. ParcelofLand P ROPERTY DESCRIPTION: SplitLevelResidencewithTwo 1 bed/1bathApartmentUnits u nderconstruction P ROPERTY SIZE: 7,141sq.ft. LOCATION: Travelingsouthon BlueHillRoadfromFaith UnitedWay,takethe1stcorner left(SunriseRoad)andhead south;takethe5thcorner leftandheadeasttothe1st cornerright.Thepropertyis the7thhouseontheright. APPRAISEDVALUE: $150,000 5.CENTERVILLE LOT NO. 5Block14 PROPERTY DESCRIPTION:S ingle-storeyCommercial Building P ROPERTY SIZE: 5,000sq.ft. L OCATION: MadeiraStreet b etweenMontroseAvenueand Mt.RoyalAvenue APPRAISEDVALUE: $302,000 7.WINTON MEADOWS ESTATES SUBDIVISION I LOT NO. 115 P ROPERTY DESCRIPTION: Single-storeyResidence3beds / 2baths P ROPERTY SIZE: 8,000sq.ft. L OCATION: Travelingeast onPrinceCharlesDrivefor CulbertsHill,takethe1stcorner right(JasmineDrive)andhead south;turnthrough2ndcorner ontheright(VioletteDrive).The propertyisthe4thhouseonthe left. APPRAISEDVALUE: $274,000 1.CANTERBURY PARKESTATES L OT NO. 13 PROPERTY DESCRIPTION: Single-storeyResidence 3Beds/21/2Baths P ROPERTY SIZE: 8,086sq.ft. LOCATION: Travelingeast onPrinceCharlesDrive,turn throughcornerontheright( oppositeSt.Augustine’sRoad) andheadsoutharoundthe curvetotheright.Theproperty isthe2ndtothelasthouseont heleft. APPRAISEDVALUE: $283,000 2. COLLEGE GARDENS SUBDIVISION LOT NO. 5 PROPERTY DESCRIPTION: Single-storeyDuplexApartment 2 Beds/1Batheach PROPERTY SIZE: 5,976sq.ft. LOCATION: Travelingeastalong P rinceCharlesDriveforSt. Augustine’sRoad,takethe2nd cornerright(CollegeGardens Road)andheadsouthtothe junction;turnontoPineBarrenR oad.Headingwest,turnthrough 2ndpavedroadonleft.The p ropertyisthe5thbuildingonthe r ight. APPRAISEDVALUE: $209,000 4.PINEWOOD GARDENS SUBDIVISION LOT NO. 1714 P ROPERTY DESCRIPTION: Single-storeyResidence P ROPERTY SIZE: 5,000sq.ft. LOCATION: Travelingeastonto B ambooBoulevardfromEast Street,takethe3rdcornerright ( ThatchPalmAvenue)andtravel south,turnthrough2ndcorner o ntheleft(AvocadoStreet).The propertyisthe17thhouseon theleft. APPRAISEDVALUE: $137,000 6.SIR LYNDENPINDLING ESTATES SUBDIVISION LOT NO. 3014/15 P ROPERTY DESCRIPTION: Single-familyResidence 3 beds/2baths PROPERTY SIZE: 5,000sq.ft. L OCATION: Travelingeast onBambooBoulevardtothe r oundabout,continuetraveling eastwardonC.W.Saunders H ighway.Takethe2ndright(Lady PindlingAvenue)andheadsouth tothe1stpavedcornerontheleft (LaurenStreet);turnthrough2nd cornerleft(PearTreeAvenue). Thepropertyisthe6thhouseon theleft. A PPRAISEDVALUE: $145,000 DESPITE the current economic crisis, nominat ions are pouring in for this y ear’s Annual Business A wards. Every year, the Chamber of Commerce honours the contributions of outstanding Bahamian businesses and executives to the business community. This year will be no different, as Bahamian businesspersons will vie for the distinguished titles of Outstanding Businessperson of the Year and Developing E ntrepreneur of the Year. T wo leading Bahamian businesses will be designate d Company of the Year, w hich is awarded in two categories, businesses with o ver fifty employees and t hose with less. L ast year’s prestigious Business Person of theY ear Award went to Eileen Carron, CEO of the Trib une Media Group. A leading businesswoman, Mrs C arron was recognised for building a successful media empire and her immense contributions to journalism in the Bahamas. T he Tribune Media G roup owns T he Tribune and 100 Jamz and also mana ges three other radio stat ions. Mrs Carron was also t he first woman CEO of a radio station in the Bahamas and theC aribbean. Said the Chamber’s executive director Philip Simon: “This year presents a very unique situation as Bahamian businesses have had to respond to the current econ omic crisis; for many, this i s the very first time they are dealing with a market slowdown. Innovation andc reativity have been key for those businesses that have shown growth and remained profitable and wel ook forward to recognising t he efforts of those busi nesses and individuals that continue to make meaning-f ul contributions to our economy.” The Developing Entre preneur Award salutes the b usiness pioneer who has established a business in the private sector within the past five years with atl east one full year of operation. Last year, this award went to Christian Sawyer, president of Sunryse Shredding Services, the first doc ument destruction companyt o be established in the B ahamas. John Bull was presented with the Chamber’s 2008 Business of the Year Award Category A (51 or more employees The Chamber’s Category B 2008 Business of the Year Award went to the Eagle Electrical Supplies and Lighting Centre. The Chamber’s coveted 2008 Lifetime Achievement Award was presented to leading businessman, Franklyn Wilson, CMG, chairman of Sunshine Holdings Group of Companies and a chartered accountant by profession. Mr Wilson was recognised for his efforts towards the development of the local business community. Successful businesses and businesspersons who are growing and excelling and meet the judging criteria are eligible for nomination. Nominations are being accepted through May 22 and information is available through the Chamber of Commerce. The Annual Business Awards will be presented during the Chamber’s 38th Annual Awards Banquet and Silent Auction scheduled for Saturday, June 27, at Sandals Royal Bahami an. The banquet marks the culmination of Chamber Week, which begins on June 22. The week’s events also include the highly anticipated business-networking event Mix N Mingle on Tuesday, June 23, and the Meet the Ministers forum on Thursday, June 25. The Chamber of Commerce is a non-profit organisation, which represents a wide cross-section of pri vate sector businesses in the Bahamas. Chamber of Commerce to award outstanding businessperson of year

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b ottling or selling impostor water. No arrests were made but Mr Knowles said officials at the Department of Environmental Health were informed and are looking at ways to pursue them atter in civil court. While the depot manager claimed the water was deliveredfrom an Aquapure truck, Mr Knowles said he failed to produce an invoice and the driver f or that route said he had not d elivered that brand of water to the depot in a year. Demineralised water has been a company best seller. It is distributed to local hospitals andc linics due to its low sodium content. Charlene Smith, Aquapure's q uality control manager, said t he bacteria found in the impostor water can be fatal in elderly people, infants or anyone with ac ompromised immune system stemming from diabetes, canc er or kidney disease. I f ingested, the bacteria could induce vomiting, hepatitis, diarr hea, intestinal infections and possible death in vulnerable people, she added. "The water sample in question was found to have bacteriap resent which was too numerous to count (which it exceeded 500 colonies. And fecal coliform bacteria fecal contamination is disease causing the level we found again was t oo numerous to count," she s aid. "The total dissolved solids the mineral content of the (teste d) water was 17 parts per million and for demineralised or dionised water it should not h ave exceeded 10 parts per mil lion". To date, company officials s aid they had no report of cons umers ingesting the contami nated water. Meanwhile, Mr Knowles said w ater bottled at the plant is subjected to a rigorous multiplestep filtering process and everym orning the water towers are tested for possible contamination and again every half an hour until shutdown. As a further precaution, bottles are machine-washed at at emperature of 150 degrees and a re not handled by hand before t hey are filled. Company officials are advising people to ensure that any bottles bearing the Aquapure logo are date stamped, have an embossed company logo orb ought from an Aquapure dist ribution centre to ensure a uthenticity. C M Y K C M Y K LOCAL NEWS T HE TRIBUNE MONDAY, MAY 18, 2009, PAGE 9 YOURFUTUREISABOUTTOGETBRIGHTERNovaSoutheasternUniversityadmitsstudentsofanyrace,color,sexualorientation,andnationalorethnicorigin.NovaSoutheasternUniversityisaccreditedbytheCommissiononCollegesoftheSouthernAssociationofCollegesandSchools(1866SouthernLane,Decatur,Georgia30033-4097,Telephonenumber:404679-4501)toawardassociate’s,bachelor’s,master’s,educationalspecialist,anddoctoraldegrees.R R S S V V P P 3 3 6 6 4 4 . . 6 6 7 7 6 6 6 6 nova.edu/bahamas COMESPEAKTOTHEEXPERTSEarnyourbachelor’s,mastersordoctoraldegreebytakingclasses atnight,onweekendsoronline.It’sabrilliantwaytoadvanceyour careerwithoutinterruptingyourlife.NovaSoutheasternUniversity isFlorida’slargest,independentnot-for-profit,universitywith distinguishedfacultyandstate-of-the-artfacilities.Joinustofind outaboutourflexibledegreeprograms andlearn about scholarships andgovernment financial aid.BACHELOR’S:EDUCATION MANAGEMENT BUSINESSADMINISTRATION MASTER’S:EDUCATIONSPECIALIZATION IN TEACHING&LEARNING BUSINESSADMINISTRATION BUSINESSADMINISTRATION FINANCE HUMANRESOURCEMANAGEMENT DOCTOR OF EDUCATION Thursday,May21st at 6:00p.m. DISCOVERNSU:INFORMATIONMEETINGc/o BahamasBaptistCommunityCollege 8JeanStreet.N Police believe the man had been in the water about 12 hours before his body was discovered. Up to press time the man's identity w as unknown and police appealed for m embers of the public with missing relatives to contact police. ASP Evans said the deceased has a l ight complexion, is about six feet two i nches tall and was found wearing dark coloured shorts and brown sandals. At this stage police said they do not suspect any foul play but are awaiting results of an autopsy report to confirm t he cause of death. E arlier this month, a man who worked in the area stumbled upon the gruesome discovery of a lifeless body bobbing near a barge behind the Harbour Moon Hotel on East Bay Street. L ike yesterday's discovery, police said there were no signs of trauma on the body or signs of foul play it was suspected the man somehow fell into the water. T he man, believed to be in his late 20s to early 30s, was dressed i n a white T-shirt and blue shorts when his body was found. He has n ot been identified by police. Fake bottled water sparks disease fear FROM page one Body found floating in waters near BASRA F ROM page one A SP WALTER EVANS

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C M Y K C M Y K LOCAL NEWS PAGE 10, MONDAY, MAY 18, 2009 THE TRIBUNE SHARING LOVE’S MESSAGESILENTAUCTION AND RAFFLE LOTSOF FANTASTICPRIZES WENEEDYOURSUPPORTMAY30,2009 WYNDHAMNASSAURESORT CABLEBEACH COCKTAILS7:00P.M. DINNER8:00P.M. UNDERTHEDISTINGUISHEDPATRONAGE OFHISEXCELLENCYARTHURD.HANNA GOVERNORGENERALOF THECOMMONWEALTHOFTHEBAHAMAS ANDMRSHANNA FORMOREINFORMATION& TICKETSCONTACT THECANCERSOCIETYOFTHEBAHAMAS CENTREVILLE NASSAUN.P.THEBAHAMAS TELEPHONE323-4482323-4441 FAX323-4475 DONATION$200LOVE GIVESLOVE LAUGHS LOVE SHARES LOVE SPREADSSUPPORTTHE8THANNUAL BALLTHECANCERSOCIETYOFTHEBAHAMAS duction in the southwest B ahamas which will benefit the local population. The partnership agreement between the Norway-based StatoilHydro and the energy exploration company BPC was signed on May 12, and the official announcement was expected to be made in London at 8am today. Based on research so far, StatoilHydro said there could be as many as 500 MMBOE (Million Barrels of Oil Equivalent) oil fields in the areas identified by BPC in the southern Bahamas. However, as the licences for exploration included in this joint venture agreement are new licence areas for BPC in the southwest of the Bahamas, they are still under application pending the approval of the Bahamian government, a joint press statement from StatoilHydro and BPC said yesterday. The two companies said they hope the licenses will be approved and processed before the end of this year. BPC’s chairman Alan Burns said:“We are delighted to partner with a respected industry leader like StatoilHydro. It is testament to the prospects of the southern Bahamas and to BPC’s contacts and commitment to the region that a large business such as StatoilHydro sees it as an important addition to their exploration portfolio. The terms of this agreement will strengthen BPC’s capital position and eliminate the need for nearterm fresh capital funding for the (joint venture BPC principals said they are confident the partnership with StatoilHydro will produce successful benefits for the company and for the Bahamas. “BPC is highly encouraged by the results of the exploratory work undertaken in the Bahamas which indicates that there is high potential for successful and valuable oil and gas production within the territorial waters of the Bahamas, and in order to move the project to the next stage, an association with a reputable drilling company had to be developed. BPC therefore considers itself fortunate to have attracted StatoilHydro for involvement in its operations in the Bahamas,” BPC’s resident manager in the Bahamas Idris Reid said. BPC was granted five licenses for oil and gas exploration in five areas in the south central Bahamas in April, 2007. Since then, the company has carried out the background work including the collection and evaluation of scientific data and samples from previous exercises, the company said. “The next stages of work to be undertaken will involve seismic evaluations, and ultimately, drilling. In that context and following examination of proposals sought from various companies, BPC has selected StatoilHydro of Norway as its partner in the ventures being proposed for the future,” Mr Reid said. Both companies assured the public that they are committed to the preservation of the environ ment during all phases of exploration and development. StatoilHydro is considered to be a world leader in integrated technology-based, international energy company. The Norwegian government is a majority shareholder in the company. BPC is registered in the Falkland Islands, but its main country of operation is the Bahamas. The company was formed to invest in an offshore oil exploration programme in licence areas in the ter ritorial waters of the Bahamas. According to reports, the deceased was driving a Dodge Ram 1 500 truck, license T-7150, west on Pinta Avenue when he lost control while trying to manoeuvre around a curve. Mr Bootle said the vehicle travelled 350 feet and knocked down a lamp pole. It continued for an additional 120ft, overturned, and crashed into a pole protector. T he vehicle was extensively damaged and the victims were taken to Rand Memorial Hospital, where the man was pronounced d ead on arrival. The woman is still in hospital with serious injuries. Mr Bootle said police are urging motorists to drive with extreme caution and care on the street. “We are warning the public to please slow down and obey safet y rules of the road, and to remember that speed kills. One life lost is one too many and we are asking drivers to be c autious and courteous and to adhere to road signs,” he said. FROM page one Joint venture for major oil exploration in Bahamas FROM page one Youth killed, passenger injured in traffic accident

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C M Y K C M Y K INTERNATIONAL SPORTS PAGE 12, MONDAY, MAY 18, 2009 TRIBUNE SPORTS Jon Super /AP Photo MANCHESTER UNITED'S Carlos Tevez, centre right, lifts the English Premier League trophy alongside teammate Park Ji-Sung, left, as the team celebrate winning the league after their 0-0 draw against Arsenal at Old Trafford Stadium, Manchester, England, on Saturday . n LONDON Manchester United clinched i ts third consecutive English Premier League title on Satur-d ay while Inter Milan won its fourth straight Serie A title in I taly and Barcelona earned La Liga’s championship in Spain for the first time in three years, according to Associated Press . Saturday’s results left only G ermany and France undecided among the five major European l eagues. Manchester United matched Liverpool’s mark of 18 l eague championships with a 0-0 tie Saturday against visiting Arsenal. In a poorly played game between two of England’s glamour clubs, United won their 1 1th league title in 17 seasons. All came under manager Alex F erguson, who has major 25 tro phies in his 23 years at Old Traf f ord. Amid the celebrations, A rgentina striker Carlos Tevez appeared to wave farewell to the fans in his last home game with his loan deal two weeks from ending. More than a thous and United fans converged on the directors’ exit and players’t unnel, demanding that the team keep him. Yesterday West B rom were relegated after los ing 0-2 at home to Liverpool. Middlesbrough has little chance of survival after it threw away a lead and was held to a 11 draw at home by Aston Villa. Newcastle slipped back into ther elegation zone after a 1-0 defeat at home to Fulham. Hull moved out of the zone with a 11 draw at Bolton. The final round of games is May 24. H ull has 35 points, Newcastle 34, Middlesbrough 32 and West B rom 31, with three teams to go down. Sunderland, which visits P ortsmouth on Monday, is not out of danger with 36 points. n MADRID Barcelona clinched La Liga when Real Madrid lost 3-2 at Villarreal. Barcelona has 86 points with three games left. Madrid has 78 with two to play. This was the 19th Spanish league title for Barcelona, which completed its first domestic double in 11 years. The team won the Copa del Rey last Wednesday. Next up for Barcelona is Premier League champ Manchester United in the Champions League final May 27. It is trying to become the first Spanish team to win the three trophies in one season. Barcelona, which plays at Mallorca on Sunday, has 86 points with three games left, while Madrid has 78 with two to play. The 19th title in Barcelona’s history was a triumph for 38year-old coach Pep Guardiola, the club’s former midfielder who was in his first season in charge. n MILAN Inter Milan clinched its 17th Serie A title when AC Milan lost 2-1 to Udinese. Going into the match, AC Milan needed to win, but knew Inter could still take the title if it won its match with Siena on Sunday night. The result left AC Milan with 71 points, seven behind its cross-city rival with two matches remaining follow ing this weekend. Gaetano D’Agostino opened the scoring with a penalty in the first half after Antonio Floro Flores was brought down by Paolo Maldini. Cristian Zapata doubled Udinese’s lead two minutes into the second half to settle the tie. Milan threw men forward, but Massimo Ambrosini’s header came to late to have any effect. Inter Milan became the first club in more than 50 years to win four successive Serie A titles. The Serie A title was its 17th overall. M an United, Inter and Barcelona win their leagues Euro soccer roundup BOLT’S RECORD RUN Jon Super /AP Photo J AMAICAN athlete Usain Bolt, right, races ahead of British sprinter Rikki Fifton to win a 150m street race in central Manchester, Manchester, England, Sunday, May 17, 2009. Bolt won with a world record time of 14.35 seconds. C RICKET WEST INDIES Ramnaresh Sarwan, right, hits a ball bowled by England's Graham Onions during the 4th day of the second test match at the Riverside's cricket ground, Chester-le-Street, England, Sunday May 17, 2009. WEST INDIES Denesh Ramdin, celebrates reaching 50 during the 4th day of the second test match against England at the Riverside's cricket ground, Chester-le-Street, England, Sunday May 17, 2009. England have put thems elves in a winning position a gainst West Indies. Now they s ay they are determined to be ruthless in pursuit of a 2-0 npower series success on Monday. Stuart Broad, who took two of the biggest wickets among the ten England chiselled out on the fourth day of the second Test at Riverside, is confident they have it in them to take another seven on the final day. West Indies closed on 115 for three, still 144 runs short of making England bat again to take the Wisden Trophy in style, and were most indebted to Ramnaresh Sarwan (100 and Denesh Ramdin (55 their first innings and captain Chris Gayle (54 ing on. England in winning position against the West Indies S c o t t H e p p e l l / A P P h o t o S c o t t H e p p e l l / A P P h o t o

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n by RENALDO DORSETT Sports Reporter rdorsett@tribunemedia.net A fter trailing for much of the contest, the New Breed took control late in the game and was able to withstand a late rally to hold on for their first win of the season. The New Breed held on late in the seventh inning and al ate strikeout by Eugene Pratt preserved a 14-13 win over M organ’s Buccaneers. In a high scoring affair, both teams came out aggressively o n the offensive end with the Bucs taking a 3-2 lead after the first inning. M organ’s top of the lineup, P rescott Wilson, Caurdero P inder and Angelo Dilate e ach scored runs while New Breed reached the scoreboard with runs from Ashton Lewis a nd Ken Wood. The Bucs added another r un in the second while Dilett k ept the New Breed lineup at bay striking out two in the i nning to maintain a 4-2 lead. Both teams added three runs apiece and the Bucs took a 7-5 lead into the third Outscored A fter chipping away for the entire game the New Breed t ook the lead in the fourth inning when they outscored the Bucs 4-1 to grab a 9-8 lead. While they managed to s core a run each in the fifth and sixth innings, the Bucs g ame up two runs apiece in both inning and failed to cut i nto the deficit. Wood capped the scoring f or the New Breed with his fourth run of the game in the s eventh inning to give his team a 14-10 lead. The Bucs staged a late c omeback in the bottom of the seventh with three runs but feel just short. D ilett, Kristofer Turnquest and Dino Sweeting brought t he Bucs within a single run, however with two outs, Pratt struck out Kendal Knowles toc linch the win for the New Breed. O ffensively for the winners Rigby was 2-4 with one run and two RBI, Lewis was 1-3w ith two runs, Wood was 2-4 with four runs and one RBI, Prat wass 1-4 with one run and three RBI and Addie Finley was 2-2 with two runs. F or the Buccaneers, Wilson was 3-4 with four runs, Dilett was 1-1 with three runs ando ne RBI, Ron Pinder was 1-1 with one run and one RBI. C M Y K C M Y K SPORTS PAGE 14, MONDAY, MAY 18, 2009 TRIBUNE SPORTS SOFTBALL New Breed hold on for first win of the season Late strikeout by Eugene Pratt preserves 14-13 win over Morgan’s Buccaneers ROGER FEDERER of Switzerland returns a shot during the final match against Rafael Nadal of Spain at the Madrid Open Tennis in Madrid, Sunday, May 17, 2009. OVERSEASTENNIS Federer beats Nadal for the Madrid title A n d r e s K u d a c k i / A P P h o t o n By PAUL LOGOTHETIS AP Sports Writer MADRID Roger Federer got a badly needed confidence boost ahead of the French Open, beating top-r anked Rafael Nadal 6-4, 6-4 on Sunday to win his first title of the season at the Madrid Open, according to Associated Press . The second-ranked Federer broke a sluggish Nadal once in both sets before firing his sixth ace to win his 15th Masters Series title on the second match point. Federer also won here in 2006 when the event was played indoors on a hard court. “There are no positives, there is little to analyze,” said Nadal, the 2005 champion. “He broke and broke and I went home.” It was only the second victory Federer has on clay against his top rival, with the other coming at the Hamburg final two years ago. The win also ended Federer’s five-match losing streak to Nadal, a stretch that included losses in the finals at Roland Garros, Wimbledon and Australia. Federer called his first win over Nadal since the 2007 Masters Cup “very satisfying.” Especially after being left in tears in February following his defeat to Nadal at Melbourne. “I thought I took all the right decisions today. In the end it was a perfect game for me,” the Swiss player said after drawing even with Nadal in Masters titles. “(You got the win I needed badly.” Earlier, top-ranked Dinara Safina of Russia won her second straight title on clay by beating Danish teenager Caroline Woz niacki 6-2, 6-4 in the women’s final. Federer also ended Nadal’s 33-match clay winning streak. The Spaniard will be going for a fifth straight title at the French Open beginning on May 25. “I don’t think he’s going to take any damage away from this,” Federer said. “I’m sure he’s going to be rock solid in Paris again.” Nadal sounded so after only a fifth loss in his last 155 matches on clay. “To me, this tournament has nothing to do with Paris. This tournament is practically another surface compared to Paris,” said Nadal.

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n by RENALDO DORSETT Sports Reporter rdorsett@tribunemedia.net The pennant winners and defending league runners-up look to return to the statusnear the league’s leaderboard a nd appear to be well on their way early in the NPSA season. T he Pineapple Air Wildcats pulled away in the final inning a nd doubled up the Boomer G Swingers, 14-7 for their second win of the season. M ary Edgecombe-Sweeting struck out four batters and at the plate she went 3-4 with three runs and two RBI to led the Wildcats. T he Wildcats took an early 2 run lead in the top half of the opening inning, but the S wingers responded with the equalizing runs in the bottom half of the second. The Wildcats regained the lead in the third, outscoring the Swingers 3-2 to take a 5-4 lead heading into the fourth inning. Pineapple Air repeated the feat, outscoring the Swingers 3-2 in the inning to increase their lead by a one run. A fter both teams scored a single run in the fifth, the W ildcats separated themselves with a decisive final inning when they scored five runs fort he game’s final margin. The Wildcats generally high scoring lineup cemented the win in the sixth with runs from Christine Edmund, DornetteE dwards, Edgecombe-Sweeting, Jeanette Hilton and Mar vell Miller. Edmund went 2-4 with three runs and two RBI,E dwards went 3-4 with two runs and two RBI, Hilton went 3-5 with two runs and two RBI. Dorothy Marshall went 2-4 w ith one run and two RBI and Theresa Miller went 2-2 with one run. E dgecombe Sweeting pitched four innings and got the win while Desiree Coakley was tagged with the loss. C M Y K C M Y K SPORTS TRIBUNE SPORTS MONDAY, MAY 18, 2009, PAGE 13 SOFTBALL Wildcats show their claws Pennant winners pull away in final inning to topple Boomer G Swingers STRIKINGOUT: Mary Edgecombe-Sweeting (above four batters. Pictured right is Wildcats’ Hyacinth Farrington. n BOSTON Boston Celtics legend Larry Bird and film director Steven Spielberg were feted Sunday at Boston University with honorary degrees, according to Associated Press . Bird, who played for the Celtics for 13 seasons and was enshrined in basketball’s Hall of Fame, is now president of basketball operations for the Indiana Pacers. Spielberg has made classic movies such as “Jaws” and “Raiders of the Lost Ark.” He recently directed “Indiana Jones and the Kingdom of the Crystal Skull.” U.S. Rep. Michael Capuano delivered the commencement address and received an honorary doctor of laws degree. Zhang Yimou, the Chinese filmmaker who produced the opening and closing ceremonies at the Beijing Olympics, also received an honorary degree at the school’s 136th graduation. He didn’t attend the commencement ceremonies. Zhang will start shooting a new movie in late May or June, his assistant told The Associated Press last month, marking the “Raise the Red Lantern” director’s first project since designing the Beijing Olympics ceremonies. Bir d, Spielber g honour ed at Boston University commencement In brief

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n by RENALDO DORSETT Sports Reporter rdorsett@tribunemedia.net W ith arguably the most dominant pitcher in the country on them ound, the Heavylift Dorsey Park Boys are staking a claim as one of the early contenders for the New Providence Softball Association title. Edny Bethel delivered a overpowering performance from the mound to lead their Dorsey Park Boys to their second consecutive win of the young season, 9-2 over the Robin Hood Hitmen. Bethel pitched a complete game and in seven innings gave up just a single hit and recorded 16 strikeouts. The Dorsey Park Boys scored the opening run of the game and took a 1-0 lead after the first inning. In a duel between pitchers, the Hitmen's Alcott Forbes was brilliant over the first two innings, striking out two hitters in the opening inning and striking out the side in the second inning as his team scored the equalizing run in the second. Dorsey Park added a pair of runs in the third, courtesy of Kevin Helley and Mario Ford. Bethel kept the Hitmen at bay by striking out six batters over the course of the next three scoreless innings. Dorsey Park took a 3-1 lead heading into the fifth before they decisively added to their margin. They had their most productive inning in the sixth with four runs scored in the inning to take a commanding 7-1 advantage. Sigmund Bethel, Lorenzo Carter, Desmond Rolle and Oracho Greene. The Hitmen responded with just a single run in the bottom half of the sixth when Adrian Pinder crossed home plate. Dorsey Park added another pair of runs in the seventh inning for the game's final score and improve to 2-0 while the Hitmen fell to 0-2. In a losing effort Forbes also pitched a complete game with eight strikeouts. At the plate, Dwayne Pratt led the charge offensively for Dorsey Park with a productive 2-4 night, which included three RBI and one stolen base. Helley and Edny Bethel were both1-2 with one run apiece, Mario Ford was 1-2 with one run and Carter was 1-1 with one run and two RBI. For the Hitmen, Pinder was 1-3 with one run while William Delancey added another run. C M Y K C M Y K MONDAY, MAY 18, 2009 THETRIBUNE PAGE 15 I NSIDE Roger Federer triumphs in Madrid Golfers are invited. Championship golf from $30 per person* S OFTBALL: N ew Providence Softball Association championship PITCHPERFECT! Edny Bethel in dominant form as Heavylift Dorsey Park Boys stake early claim to title OVERPOWERING PERFORMANCE: Edny Bethel PITCHING DUEL: Alcott Forbes was brilliant in first two innings.

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C M Y K C M Y K LOCAL NEWS PAGE 16, MONDAY, MAY 18, 2009 THE TRIBUNE HARBOUR Island Artisans on the island have joined the growing number of Bahamians who are tapping into the multimillion-dollar souvenir market. With assistance from the Bahamas Agricultural and Industrial Corporation (BAIC taking advantage of lucrative linkages in tourism. Forty participants in BAIC's shell and straw craft training programmes received their official certification during an awards ceremony last week in Dunmore Town. "I applaud you graduates for having the wisdom to view the handicraft industry as a significant income generator and an industry in which one can find job satisfaction," said BAIC executive chairman Edison Key. Using sea shells and combinations of ingredients found commonly on the island, participants created a variety of intricately designed products jewellery, hats, bags, tableware. "This programme has empowered the unemployed in Harbour Island to become future entrepreneurs and allowed some participants to create and enter full-time careers," said Mr Key. Speaking of the steps BAIC has taken to develop the handicraft industry, he said: "We have plotted a new path to bring to fruition the hopes and dreams and aspirations of the Bahamian people in accordance with our mandate. "I am of the firm view that through BAIC we can significantly impact unemployment and increase the standard of living in the Bahamas.” The handicraft industry provides substantial linkages to tourism and the means to diversify within the tourism product, thereby providing the means to keepa significant portion of the tourism dollar in the econ omy, Mr Key noted. "The estimated millions we use to import items are a good indication of what can be earned, and a good indication of the impact the handicraft industry can h ave on the economy if we seize the opportunities that exist," he said. The response to BAIC's handicraft programmes has been "significant," he said, "proving there is a growing belief that handicraft can become an estab lished and vibrant industry in the Bahamian economy." "I charge you to strive to apply ingenuity in establishing a niche in the domestic market by offering products of excellence which are competitively priceda nd of good quality and standards," he said. Mr Key was joined in Harbour Island by BAIC's assistant general manager Donnalee Bowe, board members Sonny Russell and Lonnie Rolle, domestic investment officer Joan Stubbs along with trainers April Martin-Fox of New Providence and Emily Munnings of Eleuthera. BAIC encourages Briland artisans LEFT: Sea shells were used to create a varietyo f useful items. RIGHT: Showing o ff their c ertificates, Harbour Island craft graduates are pictured with executive c hairman Edison K ey and other B AIC officials. G l a d s t o n e T h u r s t o n / B I S B AIC EXECUTIVE CHAIRMAN E dison Key and board member Lonnie Rolle admire this intricate piece by Audrey Curry.

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C M Y K C M Y K SECTIONB business@tribunemedia.net MONDAY, MAY 18, 2009 THETRIBUNE $4. 68 $4. 51 $4. 69T he information contained is from a third party and The Tribune can not be held responsible for errors and/or omission f rom the daily report.$ $3.53 $3.62 $3.48 t t n n r r t t !!! b nrfr "f" !"'"# !#!"'(! #&# #! #! !" b n t t r t r r r t f r t r r r t n By NEIL HARTNELL Tribune Business Editor T he Government is on “a collision course” with the Bahamian insurance industry over reforms to the Domestic Insurance Act, Tribune Business can reveal, the sector believing it has “overreacted” to CLICO (Bahamas unfettered powers it proposes to give the regulator and company administrator he appoints. Timothy Ingraham, the Bahamas General Insurance Association’s (BGIA man, confirmed to this newspa per that the industry was “very disappointed” that its recommendations on the proposed amendments – due to be debated in the House of Assembly this week – “seem to have beeni gnored or not taken into account”. The BGIA had previously threatened to mount a Supreme Court challenge to the amendments, which give the InsuranceC ommissioner (the Registrar of I nsurance’s successor under the Act), the power to appoint a ‘statutory administrator’ for any insurer carrier or broker/agent without first obtaining the court’s permission. Mr Ingraham said the BGIA “will certainly look at the options” if the proposeda mendments tabled in the House of Assembly some 10 days ago remain as they are, refusing to rule out a court challenge. The Bahamian insurance sector is especially concerned that the Commissioner’s reasons for appointing an administrator seem vague and subjective, with the latter appointed purely according to one person’s judgment. The company concerned has no ability to challenge thea dministrator’s appointment until after the event, creating fears that ‘the damage will already have been done’, not just to the firm’s reputation but also to its operational, manage ment and business affairs. Mr Ingraham told Tribune Business: “We were very disappointed that some recommendations we have made, and some concerns we expressed,s eem to have been ignored or not taken into account. “The things we expressed concern about were still tabled in the versions in the House. We’re quite concerned about that, and are still in ongoing dialogue with the Registrar of Insurance’s Office over the issue.” The BGIA chairman said the “concern is mainly over the powers they gave the Commissioner”. The amendments, he added, gave the regulator “fair l y wide powers” to appoint an administrator if, in his judgment, an insurance company “should be closed down” or it was “not doing things the way he thinks they should be done”. Mr Ingraham, though, said the BGIA’s position was that the appointment of an insurance company administrator should still go through – and be ratified – by the Supreme Court. We feel it’s putting a lot of power in the hands of one person,” he explained. “The powers vested in the Commissioner and the administrator seem to be purely in that person’s judgment. It’s always a concern when someone comes in and takes over a business, and what they’re likely to do with it. We’re still in discussions with the Registrar of Insurance, and making our voices heard.” A copy of the Domestic I nsurance Act amendments that have been tabled in Parliament, and obtained by Tribune Busi ness, show that the Insurance Government on ‘collision course’ with insurance * South Riding Point still locked in $2.7m contractorc laim, plus government tax claim * Freeport-based tug boat business sees first quarter revenues rise 7% n By NEIL HARTNELL Tribune Business Editor A GRAND Bahama-based bulk storage terminal saw its revenues more than double dur ing the 2009 first quarter, increasing by $4.491 million or 105 per cent, due to a capacity increase of 1.5 million barrels. World Point Terminals, the Canadian parent for South Riding Point, said the revenue increase for the three months to March 31, 2009, was due to “both higher storage and marine revenues” at the Grand Bahama operation. “Storage revenues increased due to 1.5 million barrels of new storage coming into service in the third and fourth quarters of 2008,” World Pint said of South Riding Point in its first quarter results statement. “While the company anticiGrand Bahama firm’s revenues increase 105% * $6.7m expected total payout to those registered with unemployment scheme by May 2 * 4,334 cheques disbursed to date, with 1,335 of 7,078 applicants turned down * Minister says two major Bay Street businesses r efusing to lay-off staff despite ‘significant losses’ * 1,900 job losses needed for 1% unemployment rate increase n By NEIL HARTNELL Tribune Business Editor SOME 130-140 Bahamians per day are signing up to claim unemployment benefit, the minister of labour and social devel opment has told Tribune Business, with the Government expecting to pay out a total $6.7 million to those who registered – and were approved – by May 2, 2009. Dion Foulkes said the National Insurance Board (NIB 130-140 Bahamians per day signing up for jobless benefits n By NEIL HARTNELL Tribune Business Editor THE Water & Sewerage Corporation could be generating $20.2 million in net income and $68.2 million in operating revenue in its 2012 financial year, if the proposals contained in a 10year business recovery plan are implemented. Yet the reforms contained in the Corporation’s 2002-2012 Corporate Business Plan, produced by the consulting arm of UK water utility, Thames Water, in May 2002, have seemingly never been implemented by either the former Christie government or the current Ingraham administrationt o date. The plan, which has been obtained by Tribune Business, lays-out a -year vision” designed to position the Water & Sewerage Corporation “as a highly-regarded, self-financing service provider” rather than the $24.107 million net loss making burden it had become by fiscal 2007. This has left the Corporation as the biggest loss-making government agency, ahead of Bahamasair, and the greatest burden on Bahamian taxpayers, costing them $30 million in the 2008-2009 Budget year. The Corporate Business Plan said the goals it set out for the Water & Sewerage Corporation were “quite feasible given effective management of the organisation, associated with a greater independence from the direct influence of government”. Plan to make Water Corp a $20.2m profit maker ignored S S e e e e p p a a g g e e 7 7 B B S S e e e e p p a a g g e e 6 6 B B S S e e e e p p a a g g e e 9 9 B B * Industry ‘very disappointed’ concerns over Act reforms ‘seem to have been ignored’ * Fears centre on ‘draconian powers’ given to regulator and company administrators * General insurers keeping options, including court action, open * ColinaImperial likely to take on CLICO (Bahamas In Tribune Business’s joint lead article on the Four Seasons Emerald Bay Resort’s closure on Thursday, May 14, it was reported that the near by Emerald Isle Shopping Centre on Exuma was also due to close on June 15, 2009. This is not correct. The shopping centre is unconnected to the resort and its closure, and both it and its business tenants will remain open with no change to their operations. Tribune Business apologises for the error. Emerald Isle correction n By NEIL HARTNELL Tribune Business Editor FOUR small to mediumsized Bahamian companies have been going out of business every week since September 2008, a consultant to the sector has warned, again calling for the Government to develop a Small Business Act to “save honest businesses”. Mark Turnquest, of Mark Turnquest Consulting, said per cent” of his customer base was struggling to survive amid the deepening recession, with the remaining 10 per cent only faring better because they had back-up assets and collateral to fall back on. Speaking ahead of his upcoming National Small Business Summit, which starts on May 21, Mr Turnquest said: “A cou ple of months ago, beginning in September 2008, you were look ing at four businesses going out of business every week. “Ninety per cent of my clients are doing bad. The other 10 per cent, the only reason they’re doing well is because they have Four firms failing per week since September S S e e e e p p a a g g e e 5 5 B B S S e e e e p p a a g g e e 4 4 B B DION FOULKES

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n By RoyalFidelity Capital Markets THERE was an increase in trading activity last week in the Bahamian market, with investors trading in seven out of the 24 listed securities, of which three declined and four remained unchanged. E E Q Q U U I I T T Y Y M M A A R R K K E E T T A total of 58,767 shares changed hands last week, representing an increase of 43,778 shares compared to the previous week’s week's trading volume of 14,989 shares. Commonwealth Bank (CBL led the volume for a fourth consecutive week with 34,088 shares trading, its stock falling by $0.28 end the week at $6.11. Doctors Hospital Health Systems (DHS er, its stock price falling by $0.33 to a new 52-week low of $1.53 on a volume of 14,000 shares. ICD Utilities (ICD 10,268 shares trade, its stock price falling by $0.09 to end the week at $5.50. B B O O N N D D M M A A R R K K E E T T Investors traded $8,000 (par value) Fidelity Bank (Bahamas) Notes C Notes (FBB13 2013, and $18,000 (par value Fidelity Bank (Bahamas D Notes (FBB15 C C O O M M P P A A N N Y Y N N E E W W S S E E a a r r n n i i n n g g s s R R e e l l e e a a s s e e s s : : Consolidated Water Company (CWCO dited financial results for the quarter ending March 31, 2009. CWCO reported net income of $2.6 million, an increase of $1 million or 65 per cent compared to $1.7 million in the same period last year. Income from operations stood at $3.5 million, up by $1.4 million or 68 per cent. Total revenues totalled $15.9 million, which rose by 11 per cent from the 2008 first quarter, while costs of revenues of $9.9 million increased by $128,000 or 1.31 per cent. Other expenses stood at $832,000, up by $364,000 over the same period in 2008. Total assets were $155.5 million, which rose by $860,000 or 0.56 per cent, while total liabilities totalled $30.2 million, representing an average of $951,000 or 3 per cent from year-end 2008. Doctors Hospital Health Systems (DHS results for the year ended January 31, 2009. DHS reported a net income of $3.8 million, an increase of $411,000 or 12 per cent compared to $3.4 million at year-end 2008. Total revenues stood at $43.1 million, up $985,000 or 2 per cent from $42.1 million for the same 12-month period in 2008, while total expenses increased by $749,000 or 2 per cent to total $38.8 million. Management indicated that a change in the mix of patients produced an increase in net revenues, while increases in expenses were due to challenges with staff compensation and increased utility rates. Earnings per common share stood at $0.38, representing an increase of 12 per cent from $0.34 in 2008. Total assets and liabilities stood at $31.8 million and $8.6 million respectively, compared to $31.3 million and $11.5 million at year-end 2008. Cable Bahamas (CAB released its unaudited financial results for the quarter ending March 31, 2009. Net income increased by 35 per cent to $7.4 million, compared to $5.5 million in the 2008 first quarter. Net income per ordinary share stood at $0.38, up 36 per cent from $0.28 for the 2008 first quarter. CAB reported revenues of $21.1 million, an increase of $1 million or 5 per cent from $20 million in 2008. Cable television accounted for the bulk of the quarter's revenues at $11.2 million, followed by Data at $3.3 million and Internet at $6.5 million. Operating income of $8 million grew by $821,000 or 11 per cent from $7.2 million in 2008. Operating expenses remained relatively flat at $9.8 million versus $9.7 million in the 2008 first quarter. ICD Utilities (ICD its audited financial results for the year ended December 31, 2008. Net income rose to $4.9 million, up $1.9 million or 68 per cent compared to $2.9 million at year-end 2008. ICD reported revenues of $5 million and expenses of $76,000, compared to $3 million and $67,000 in fiscal 2007. Total assets and liabilities stood at $76.3 million and $5,700 respectively, versus $76.8 million and $2,700 in fiscal 2007. D D i i v v i i d d e e n n d d N N o o t t e e s s : : Famguard Corporation (FAM of $0.06 per share, payable on May 18, 2009, to all shareholders of record date May 11, 2009. Doctors Hospital Health Systems (DHS extraordinary dividend of $0.04 per share, payable on May 21, 2009, to all shareholders of record date May 7, 2009. A A n n n n u u a a l l G G e e n n e e r r a a l l M M e e e e t t i i n n g g ( ( A A G G M M ) ) N N o o t t e e s s : : Commonwealth Bank (CBL announced that it will be holding its Annual General Meeting on Wednesday, May 20, 2009, at 5pm at Superclubs Breezes, West Bay Street,C able Beach, New Providence, the Bahamas. Consolidated Water Company (CWCB will be holding its Annual General Meeting on Wednesday,M ay 20, 2009, at 10am at the Grand Cayman Marriott Hotel in Grand Cayman. Shareholders of record as of March 18, 2009, will be qualified to vote in per son or by proxy at the Annual Meeting. Colina Holdings (CHL announced that it will be holding itsAnnual General Meeting on Thursday May 28, 2009, at 5.30pm at the J. W. Pinder Building, ColinaImperial Insurance, Collins Avenue. Share holders of record as of April 24, 2009, will be qualified to vote at the Annual Meeting. C M Y K C M Y K BUSINESS PAGE 2B, MONDAY, MAY 18, 2009 THE TRIBUNE The Bahamian Stock Market F F I I N N D D E E X X 7 7 9 9 5 5 . . 4 4 6 6 ( ( 4 4 . . 7 7 2 2 % % ) ) Y Y T T D D B B I I S S X X C C L L O O S S I I N N G G C C H H A A N N G G E E V V O O L L U U M M E E Y Y T T D D P P R R I I C C E E S S Y Y M M B B O O L L P P R R I I C C E E C C H H A A N N G G E E AML$1.40 $-0-18.13% BBL$0.63 $-0-4.55% BOB$6.95 $-0-9.03% BPF$11.00 $-0-6.78% BSL$7.92 $-0-22.28% BWL$3.15 $-00.00% CAB$11.75$-0-16.25% CBL$6.11 $-0.28 34,088-12.71% CHL$2.83 $-1610.00% CIB$10.40 $-0-0.48% CWCB$2.91 $0.32029.33% DHS$1.53 $-0.3314,000-40.00% FAM$7.76 $-0-0.51% FBB$2.37 $-00.00% FCC$0.30 $-00.00% FCL$5.14 $-0-0.58% FCLB$1.00 $-00.00% FIN$11.00$-250-7.33% ICD$5.50 $-0.0910,268-10.28% JSJ$10.50 $-0-5.41% PRE$10.00 $-00.00% INSIGHT For the stories behind the news, read Insight on Mondays ROYAL FIDELITY MARKETWRAP

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C M Y K C M Y K BUSINESS THE TRIBUNE MONDAY, MAY 18, 2009, PAGE 3B Vacation in Paradise.Only $69*per person double occupancy.Minimum 2-night stay. Bahamas residents only. Full use of all Atlantis facilities. Plus: Limited-time offer! Reserve today !BSP Job #: CTS-9-N003 JM# 8634 Client: Comfort Suites Description: Stay In Paradise 1/4 pg Bleed: non Color: 1C Black Specs: PDFX1A Mech #3 Date: 2/25/2009 Time: 1:30 Mech Person: GUDimensions: 5.75in x 10.5 in Issue: Nassau Tribune 3/2/2009 Closing: 2/26/09 *$69 per person double occupancy per night Sun. – Wed. Add $20 pp for Thurs. – Sat. Maximum four persons per room. Rates effective through December 15. Additional fees apply for mandatory taxes, mandatory housekeeping gratuities and utility service fees. Rates quoted are based on standard room category and are subject to availability. Cancellations must be received 48 hours prior to arrival or a one night penalty will apply. G u s U g a r t e 2 / 2 5 4 p m CTS-9-N003_NassauGuardian.indd 2 2/25/09 4:14:07 PM n B y CHESTER ROBARDS Business Reporter crobards@tribunemedia.net BAHAMASAIR is in the process ofreassembling the t hird of its Dash-8 aircraft to be completely overhauled locally, according to its director of maintenance and engineer-i ng, saving the airline more t han $200,000 as opposed to s ending it abroad. T racey Cooper said it was a n exciting day when Bahamasair received the go-ahead to completely overhaul its entiref leet of Dash-8 aircraft at its h angar in the Lynden Pindling International Airport. T he move, which could save the airline almost $1.4 million this year, was done in response t o the increasing value of the C anadian dollar. T he Dash-8s were originally f lown to Canada, where they w ould be handed over to a C anadian firm to be over h auled. Bahamasair spent over $800,000 per plane contracting t he overhauling of the aircraft out to the Canadian company,w hereas in their own hangar it i s done for closer to $600,000 per plane. According to Mr Cooper, t he airline would then also incur fuel costs, crew costs and the cost of the overhaul itself.S ometimes, the aircraft would take more than its scheduled one-day trip to Canada, due tow eather and other unforeseen hold-ups. When in the company’s h angar, Mr Cooper said the aircraft would be one among many being repaired and refitted. Here in Bahamasair’sh angar, a dedicated crew works on the Dash-8s. “They are dedicated to this aircraft,” Mr Cooper said. “They come back after a night and start where they left off. I n essence, we’re producing a better product because we’re putting the kind of care into it t hat others might not feel “To them, this is just another plane coming in. For us this is a product we want to put out there to impress the customers at the end of the day.” The planes are stripped d own to their bare bones in the hangar. Seats are removed, overhead b ins are pulled down, the p lane’s engines are taken off and even the cockpit windows a re replaced. According to Mr Cooper, a s taff of about 20 workers, i ncluding some expert foreign labour, is used to completely gut and restock the aircraft. H e said that in order for Bahamasair to receive approval to work on its aircraft i tself, the regulators had to e nsure the airline had sufficient skilled labour and the t ools necessary to complete the job. “Some of the guys here k now the plane like the back of t heir hand and have been working on them for 20 years,”M r Cooper said. H e added that Bahamasair has also saved 50 per cent on l abour costs, as Canadian workers demand $45 to $50 an hour, whereas Bahamian workers are paid $20 to $24 an hour. This type of complete serv ice, as a cost-saving initiative, is done every two-and-a-half years. Mr Cooper said thei nspection done on the first Dash-8 that was completely overhauled locally was the most difficult. However, no problems were found with the completed aircraft. H e said the aircraft undergoes rigorous inspections during its overhaul, as every p rocess and part is logged and filed in an organized mountain of paperwork. “In aviation everything must be signed off on,” Mr Cooper said. The airline also dedicated o ne section of its parts warehouse to components for the Dash-8. Mr Cooper said B ahamasair will overhaul their f ourth airplane sometime this year. ‘Dash’ for local service saving $200k per plane Share your news The Tribune wants to hear fr om people who ar e making news in their neighbourhoods. Perhaps you are raising funds for a good cause, campaigning for improvements in the ar ea or have won an award. If so, call us on 322-1986 and share your story.

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A nalysing the Water & Sewerage Corporation’s problems, the report’s findings are as applicable now as they were then in May 2002. “At present, the Water & Sewerage Corporation is not well placed to take advantage of the opportunities that are open to it,” the Corporate Business Plan said. “Water & Sewerage Corporation is not a monopoly supplier, and to a large extent is o perating in an open market, whilst having statutory responsibilities to supply water and provide sewerage services. “Consequently, only about one-third of the residents of New Providence take their daily water supplies from the Water & Sewerage Corporation. The remainder make their own provisions. This includes large commercial users, such as hotels, and residents with individual bore holes alike. The provision of sewerage services is limited to some 6,000 dwellings. Competition is increasing, and over the past few years the t rend is towards an overall loss o f market share.” T o deal with this situation, the Corporate Business Plan said the Water & Sewerage Corporation would need to increase market share by increasing the number of water customers it served from 20,000 to 34,000 by end-2005, and to 55,000 by end-2012. It also needed to raise the number of sewage customers from 6,000 to 20,000 by 2012. It was also recommended that the Water & Sewerage Corporation be reduced in size by 117 staff, with a new management struc ture put in place under the leadership of a chief executive. Apart from reducing the Government’s annual subsidy, efficiency savings and an increased capital investment programme were necessary, the Corporate Business Plan said, with economic regulation of the water sector by the Public Utilities Commission (PUC ommended to start in 2004. T his, though, has never happened, and has now been overtaken by the liberalization of the communications sector, with the Utilities Regulation and Competition Authority (URCA PUC. On the tariff front, the Corporate Business Plan recommended that while there be no changes for the period 20022005, amendments were required to enable the Water& Sewerage Corporation to “recover its costs in a more costreflective and equitable manner”. There is an urgent need to p ut the financial relationship w ith the Government on a sound footing,” the report said. “The changes proposed need not increase the overall tariff burden on customers, but will enable Water & Sewerage Corporation to better manage its income, and will position it for its future role as a regulated operator.” The Corporate Business Plan said a financial restructuring was also imperative, especially when it came to reducing the Water & Sewerage Corporation’s existing indebtedness. A “due allowance” was needed for water revenues owed by government departments, the sustainability of the Corpora tion’s pension fund needed to be accounted for, and income to cover the full costs of operations generated. If all the recommendations had been implemented, the Corporate Business Plan had projected that the Water & S ewerage Corporation would generate $2 million in net income in its 2005 fiscal year, based on $40 million worth of operating revenues and $28.8 million in operational spending. This, it forecast, would increase to a $10.8 million net profit for 2008 (unlikely, given the $24.107 million loss in 2007), generated by $54.8 million in revenues and $32.7 million in operational spending. This would have created $20.2 million in operating income, with the net profit achieved from allowances of $9.6 million for depreciation; $2.4 million in f inancing expenses; and $2.4 m illion in government subsidies. F or 2012, the projection, which now looks unrealistic, was that $68.2 million in operating revenues and $36.5 million in capital spending, would generate $31.7 million in operating income and $20.2 million in net profit. This allowed for $11.9 million in depreciation, $1.9 million in financing costs, and a $2.4 million government subsidy. “On the basis of the achievement of the recommended efficiency savings being made, anda successful marketing cam paign to win customers back as reliability and quality improve, the plan will result in Water & Sewerage Corporation reach ing a break even operating situation during the fiscal year 2004, with a net surplus in 2005,”the Corporate Business Plan predicted optimistically. “Thereafter, income generated should be sufficient to cover operating expenses and provide funds for capital investment.” If no action was taken, the Corporate Business Plan pre dicted that the Water & Sewerage Corporation would continue to be a perennial lossmaker, incurring a $5.9 million loss in 2008 and $4.9 million loss in 2012. Yet even this could not have envisaged the scale of the losses now being incurred. “In the Plan, we have stressed the need for investment in the service infrastructure in order to improve the levels of service that are currently being provid ed,” the Corporate Business Plan said. “This, we believe, is essential for recovery and for a sustainable long-term business. Currently, the level of investment in maintaining and enhancing the systems in New Providence is inadequate, the infrastructure is running down and services are suffering. A backlog of investment to bring the systems up to the required standards is accumulating.” C M Y K C M Y K BUSINESS PAGE 4B, MONDAY, MAY 18, 2009 THE TRIBUNE LifeChoicesATLANTIC MEDICAL INSURANCE CO.LTD. Atlantic House,2nd Terrace & Collins Avenue,P.O.Box SS-5915,Nassau Tel.356-5433A member of Colonial Group International:Insurance,Health,Pensions,LifeIf you could secure $300,000 family protection for the price of a daily coffee,with no medical required,would you do it? Would you invest in $300,000 family financial security,if it included a free and confidential financial review with a professional adviser? Were hoping the answer is yes,because you could have this cover,for a little less caffeine,from just $9 per week*.You’ll certainly sleep a little easier! *rates vary,applies to male age 30CALL 356-LIFEor visit www.cgigroup.bmFor the price of a coffee,you can take care of something priceless.$300,000 life cover for the price of a coffee per day! Colonial Group International is rated A-(Excellentby AM Best. Bright +Effective 322-2188/9 You’ll wonder how you ever got along without it. Long life Spiral lamps 2 0 0 8 C r e a t i v e R e l a t i o n s . n e t Teachers & Salaried Workers Co-operative Credit Union Limited Lenn King SecretaryNOTICE OF ANNUAL GENERAL MEETING TO: All Members of Teachers and Salaried Workers Co-operative Credit Union Limited East Street South and Independence Drive Notice is hereby given that the Thirty-Second (32ndeachers & Salaried Workers Co-operative Credit Union Limited will be held at the British Colonial Hilton Hotel located on Bay Street, on Saturday May 23, 2009 commencing at 8:00 a.m. for the following purposes: To receive the Report of the Board of Directors for 2008. To receive the Audited Accounts for 2008. To elect members of the Board of Directors. To elect members of the Supervisory Committee To discuss and approve the Budget for 2009. To take action on such matters as may come beforethe meeting. Plan to make Water Corp a $20.2m profit maker ignored F F R R O O M M p p a a g g e e 1 1 B B

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back-up systems in terms of collateral. The businesses that are in business now will survive. They are the ones that have adjusted their plans and have been battle tested. “The economy as it relates to small business is in a devastating way. This Summit is going to change the future of the country. We cannot move forward unless we have a Small Business Act. You have to have programmes that protect the economy as it relates to small business development.” Small businesses and entrepreneurship are regarded in many circles as the ‘magic ingredient’ driving much economic growth. All large, successful corporations trace their roots to this sector, and it is the risk-taking approach of these companies’ owners, and their willingness to hire persons, that take economies forward. Mr Turnquest said he hoped his proposed Small Business Act could be crafted and taken to Parliament by 2010, describing it as something that would “practically shape everything that happens in the economy”. One of its key roles, he indicated, would be to ensure the Government and commercial banks worked together to help rescue floundering Bahamian small businesses during timesof economic recession, especially those that hitherto hadbeen paying all their taxes and bills on time. “If a business was paying its taxes and bills, hired 25 persons and comes on hard times, the Government and financial sector would come together and save the business, protect the business,” Mr Turnquest explained. “The Act will save businesses that are honest.” This was preferable, he added, to allowing companies to fail and employees to lose their jobs, leaving the latter claiming unemployment benefit. When the economy picked back up, Mr Turnquest said it would be far more difficult for a failed business to return to operations, hence the need to keep them operating and staff employed. No one, including the Government, would be able to absorb all laid-off employees during a recession. “In order to develop the economy, the small businessman must be working, must employ people, and be profitable. Otherwise, there’s no incentive for him to carry on,” Mr Turnquest said. “We need this Act to help future generations.” There had been a lack of synergy and co-operation between different sectors of the Bahamian economy, Mr Turnquest said, and he urged: “My advice to the private sector is to come and work together. There’s strength in numbers, identify the root causes of the problems, and this Small Business Act will work.” The National Small Business Summit would aim to identify difficulties in all industries, Mr Turnquest said, and the information it collected would be used to develop a strategic plan that all organisations, such as the Bahamas Chamber of Commerce and the Government, would have input into. He also urged the commercial banking industry to develop more imaginative policies when it came to small business lending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t&R &KDPEHUV 'HOYHVW+RXVH (DVWKLUOH\WUHHW+LJKODQGHUUDFH 1DVVDXKH%DKDPDV $WWRUQH\VIRUWKHHWLWLRQHU7+(0$77(5$//7+$7 SLHFH SDUFHORUWUDFWRIODQGFRQWDLQLQJ6HYHQ 7 KRXVDQG)RXU+XQGUHGDQG)LIWHHQ VTXDUHIHHWEHLQJ/RW1XPEHU VLWXDWHDSSUR[LPDWHO\IHHW6RXWK R I 0HDGRZV6WUHHWDQG(DVW6LGHRI + XWFKLQVRQ6WUHHWLQWKH6RXWKHUQ'LVWULFW RIWKH,VODQGRI1HZ3URYLGHQFHZKLFK V DLGSLHFHSDUFHORUORWRIODQGLVERXQGHG R Q WKH 1257+ ODQGQRZRUIRUPHUO\WKH S URSHUW\RI-RKQ&DUH\6UDQGUXQQLQJ W KHUHRQ(LJKW\DQG)RUW\QH + XQGUHGWK IHHW RQ WKH ($67 E\ O DQGQRZRUIRUPHUO\WKHSURSHUW\RI$QQLH . QRZOHVDQGUXQQLQJWKHUHRQ1LQHW\QH D QG)LIW\ZR+XQGUHGWK IHHW RQ W KH 6287+ ODQGQRZRUIRUPHUO\WKH S URSHUW\RI0HUOHQH%HWKHODQGUXQQLQJ W KHUHRQ6HYHQW\L[DQG1LQHW\)LYH + XQGUHGWK IHHW DQGRQWKH :(67 +XWFKLQVRQ6WUHHWDQGUXQQLQJWKHUHRQ1 LQHW\QHDQG7KLUW\(LJKW+XQGUHGWK IHHWZKLFKVDLGSDUFHORIODQG LVUHFRUGHGLQWKH'HSDUWPHQWRI/DQGV DQG6XUYH\VLQWKH&RPPRQZHDOWKRI7 KH%DKDPDVDV 3ODQ1 DQG LV WKHUHRQFRORXUHGSLQN 127,&(,17+((67$RI85%$16,1&/$,50,//(5 ODWHRIWKH6RXWKHUQ'LVWULFWRIWKH,VODQGRI1HZ 3URYLGHQFHRQHRIWKH,VODQGVRI7KH&RPPRQZHDOWK RI7KH%DKDPDVGHFHDVHG 1RWLFHLVKHUHE\JLYHQWKDWDOOSHUVRQVKDYLQJDQ\FODLP RUGHPDQGDJDLQVWWKHDERYH(VWDWHDUHUHTXLUHGWR VHQGWKHLUQDPHVDGGUHVVHVDQGSDUWLFXODUVRIWKHVDPH FHUWLHGLQZULWLQJWRWKHXQGHUVLJQHGRQRUEHIRUHWKH GD\0D\DQGLIUHTXLUHGSURYHVXFKGHEWV RUFODLPVRULQGHIDXOWEHH[FOXGHGIURQ^DQ\GLVWULEXWLRQ DIWHUWKHDERYHGDWHWKHDVVHWVZLOOEHGLVWULEXWHGKDYLQJ UHJDUGRQO\WRWKHSURYHGGHEWVRUFODLPVRIZKLFKWKH $GPLQLVWUDWRUVKDOOKDYHKDGRWLFH $QG1RWLFHLVKHUHE\JLYHQWKDWDOOSHUVRQVLQGHEWHGWRWKH VDLG(VWDWHDUHUHTXHVWHGWRPDNHIXOOVHWWOHPHQWRQRU EHIRUHWKHDIRUHPHQWLRQHGGDWH 0,&+$(/ $WWRUQH\VIRUWKH$GPLQLVWUDWRU$OYHUQLD&RXUW 'RZGHVZHOOWUHHW 3 1DVVDXKH%DKDPDV THE COLLEGE OF THE BAHAMASVisit our website at www.cob.edu.bs /,48,'$7,21$/( & RPELQHDG$EGRPLQDODGrLQFK 'HQWDO&RWWRQROOVHGLXP ;/*ORYHV/DWH[RZHUHG /DUJH*ORYHVODWH[RZGHU)UHHf / DUJH*ORYHV9LQ\O/DWH[)UHHf , QVXOLQ\ULQJHPO 1HEXOL]HUDVN.LW &KLOGPO &KDPEHU 1HHGOH+ROGHUV 1 DVDO&DQQXOD$GXOW 2[\JHQDVN$GXOW/DUJH /\ULQJHZLWK*HHGOH 0/\ULQJHZLWK*HHGOH /\ULQJHZLWK*HHGOHDQG*HHGOH \ULQJHZLWK*HHGOH 6SHFLPHQ&XSVR]WHULOH 6 WHULOHXU +\SRDOOHUJHQLF&ORWK7DSHLFURVSRUH7DSHf Four firms failing per week since September F F R R O O M M p p a a g g e e 1 1 B B

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Commission (the successor to the Registrar of Insurance) “may appoint an administrator who shall seize the management and control of a company, or any part of the insurance business of the company”, in various situations. Among the seemingly subjective situations for doing so are if an asset on the insurance company’s books, “in the opinion of the Commission”, is “not satisfactorily accounted for; “where, in the opinion of the Commission”, the company’s affairs are such that they could prejudice policyholders, creditors or asset owners; and “where, in the opinion of the Commission”, the insurance carrier, intermediary or person “is committing or about to commit” an unsafe or unsound business practice, or pursue such a course. Other reasons for the administrator’s appointment, such as the company’s failure to meet or pay its liabilities; the value of its assets being less than its liabilities or placing policyholders in jeopardy; a significant erosion in the value of the company’s assets; and the conduct of business in a manner that is detrimental to policyholders, seem more valid. But again, if “in the opinion of the Commission” a company is likely to be unable to meet i ts liabilities, an administrator c an be summoned. M r Ingraham, though, said these powers went too far, implying there was a danger of ‘throwing the baby out with the bath water’ in the Government and regulators’ haste to respond and be seen to be doing something – in the CLICO (Bahamas uncommon for Bahamian regulators, having been caught napping, to overreact. “I feel that’s the case here. It’s a bit of an overreaction,” Mr Ingraham told Tribune Business. “We feel it might have gone too far the other way. We can understand them wanting to go in, but the current system can still work. “Go in, get court orders done. Have a judge look at them, and decide if a reasonable request is being made, rather than someone deciding to go in and do this, possibly without the company having a chance to explain itself. By then, the damage is done. There is no recourse.” In the CLICO (Bahamas uation, Mr Ingraham added: “The system should have worked. No two situations are the same. If the Registrar had had more powers to go in early on, and the ability to apply sanctions, I don’t think the situation would have got to where it got to.” Chairman The BGIA chairman said his organisation would “certainly look at the options” open to it if the legislation remained unchanged, as it had to protect its members’ interests and prevent them from becoming e xposed to future problems. O nce appointed, the admini strator has, under the current proposed reforms, “the exclusive powers to manage and control the company’s affairs”. He can discontinue its operations, stop or limit payment of its obligations, and re-organise the company. In doing the latter, the administrator can appoint new officers and directors, and also consummate the sale or merger of the insurance company to others if he so chooses. One insurance industry source, who requested anonymity, told Tribune Business: “I’ve never seen such a strong reaction from the industry. They are furious. The pow ers given the administrator far exceed those given to any regulator anywhere else. They can come in and take control, fire the Board and fire the executives.” The source added: “By simply going ahead with the initial wording almost intact, the Government is clearly putting itself on a collision course with the insurance industry. This is very disappointing bearing in mind that it has always been the Government's stance that it would not put forward insurance legislation that was not supported by the majority of the industry. :”It may be the Government's position that the industry messed up with CLICO and should now therefore be dictated to. If so, this is entirely misconceived the CLICO debacle was more accurately encouraged by the failure of the regulators and respective governments. “They have also included i ntermediaries in these draconi an provisions. One is at a loss t o understand why. Intermediaries had nothing to do with the CLICO scandal.” * Talking of CLICO (Bahamas Hubert Ingraham is due to make a statement on the insurer’s collapse in the House of Assembly today. Hopes are high that he may announce that the Government has decided to make good the potential loss suffered by the company’s policyholders and annuity depositors by taking over the $57 million guarantee previously held by CL Financial. That is uncertain. But informed sources have told Tribune Business that the Prime Minister may also announce the transfer of CLICO (Bahamas life and health insurance policy portfolio to another company, with ColinaImperial Insurance Company said to be the preferred option. Tribune Business understands that ColinaImperial and FamGuard Corporation, BISXlisted parent of Family Guardian, are the two leading candidates to take on the CLICO (Bahamas what will initially be an administration agreement, the transfer of policies taking place later. Two previous candidates, British American Financial and Atlantic Medical, are no longer thought to be in the running, the latter having withdrawn its initial interest. Sources suggested that ColinaImperial was likely to be the preferred choice of liquidator Craig ‘Tony’ Gomez because of its stronger balance sheet, and s urplus of assets over liabilities. T his would enable it to find a ssets to match CLICO (Bahamas liabilities, which stand at around $11-$12 million. One source told Tribune Business: “ColinaImperial probably have the most financial might and infrastructure to really deal with it. They have a strong balance sheet and good rating from A. M. Best.” The likely selection of ColinaImperial will have to be ratified by both the Registrar of Insurance and the Supreme Court. Critics are likely to argue that transferring CLICO (Bahamas to ColinaImperial will further increase the latter’s dominant position in the Bahamian life insurance market, but the book of business it could gain will be relatively small and make minimal difference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overnment on ‘collision course’ with insurance F F R R O O M M p p a a g g e e 1 1 B B

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pates revenues from marine activity [at South Riding Point]will remain strong throughout 2009, these revenues are difficult to predict as they fluctuate based on the business decisions of the company’s customers, and general market conditions.” World Point said the increase in marine activity at South Riding Point had helped to gener-ate extra port revenue fees. This, coupled with the increased storage capacity at the Grand Bahama operation, had helped to increase the company’s overall 2009 first quarter revenue by 29 per cent year-over-year, rising from $18.666 million to $24.055 million. Meanwhile, Freepoint, the Grand Bahama-based tug boat fleet that World Point owns in a 50/50 joint venture, saw its 2009 first quarter revenues increase by $53,000 or 7 per cent, due to fuel surcharges and rate increases. Freepoint handles most of the tug boat work at the Freeport Container Port and Freeport Harbour Company. Elsewhere, South Riding Point is dealing with two other pressing matters. World Point said the company had been contacted by the Bahamian government last year over the alleged “non-payment of a local revenue based tax”. The World Point statement did not identify the tax in question, and no alleged amount owed had been submitted to it. Therefore, South Riding Point was unable to assess the extent of the liability in question, but warned that if a tax claim was made, “the amount may be significant”. World Point added: “South Riding Point is in the process of evaluating the claim.” The Grand Bahama operation also remains locked in a $2.7 million dispute with an unnamed contractor over repair work done to its offshore jetties in the aftermath of the 2004 hurricane season. The repair contract, executed on September 14, 2005, was for $7.853 million, and some $3.574 million of this sum will not be reimbursed by reinsurance as South Riding Point chose to complete other projects while contractors were being mobilized. World Point said in a statement: “In June 2007, South Riding Point terminated the contractor on the jetty repair contract and hired a new contractor. In 2008, the new contractor completed the hurricane repairs to the offshore jetty. “South Riding Point is now in an arbitration proceeding with the original contractor it hired to restore and repair the offshore jetty. Both South Riding Point and the original contractor are seeking damages against each other. The contractor has claimed damages of $2.7 million. “South Riding Point is vigorously contesting this claim and, in the process, continues to significantly incur legal expenses associated with this matter.” C M Y K C M Y K BUSINESS THE TRIBUNE MONDAY, MAY 18, 2009, PAGE 7B THE COLLEGE OFTHE BAHAMASVisit our website at www.cob.edu.bs F F R R O O M M p p a a g g e e 1 1 B B Grand Bahama firm’s revenues increase 105 per cent

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the unemployment benefit scheme, had paid out a total 4,334 cheques to jobless Bahamians as of Thursday, May 14. Most cheques, some 3,089,had not surprisingly been paid out to applicants in New Providence, with a further 1,069 issued on Grand Bahama. “The total amount of claims we had received up until yesterday [Thursday, May 14] was 7,078, and the total amount of cheques issued 4,334,” Mr Foulkes told Tribune Business. “We’ve been averaging 130-140 persons per day in terms of new persons claiming.” Funds Mr Foulkes said the total amount of funds issued to unemployed Bahamians – those persons who had registered and been approved up until May 2, 2009 – totalled more than $1.2 million. For the 13-week period those same registrants will be eligible to claim unemployment benefit, their total claims have been pegged at $6.7 million. However, Mr Foulkes pointed out that not all of the 7.078 who had applied for unemployment benefit had been approved, with some 1,335 of that number disqualified for a variety of reasons. Of those whose unemployment benefit claims had been disallowed or were pending, the most common reason for this was that additional NIB contribution records were still required. This applied to 668 of the applications disqualified or pending. Some 39 unemployment benefit applications were rejected because the claimant was still working; another 19 were turned down because they were self-employed; and 79 claimants had last been employed prior to July 1, 2004, the date the scheme had been made retroactive to. Another 11 claimants had been rejected because their employer was not registered with NIB; 12 because the company had closed; 47 because they were in receipt of other NIB benefits and assistance; and 61 because they had yet to confirm their last work date. “The actuary had estimated, at this instance, that 7,000 people would be eligible for that benefit,” Mr Foulkes said. “I think the actuary was correct in his estimates. It is right on target.” The minister added that the unemployment benefit’s funding pool would “remain healthy for quite some time, as we have $20 million allocated”. Those funds have been allocated from NIB’s medical benefits branch, and once they are exhausted, the unemployment benefit will be funded by a combination of employer and employee contributions, each paying the equivalent of 0.5 per cent of an employee’s salary. Labour Meanwhile, Mr Foulkes said the Department of Labour had not experienced an increase in labour-related disputes filed with it, despite the expectation that the economic recession and increasing number of redundancies would provoke such a rise. “Surprisingly, we have not,” Mr Foulkes replied, when asked whether there had been an increase in the filing of labourrelated disputes. “We have noticed that we have the same rate, the same number of persons who are filing trade disputes. Employers, employees, and particularly the unions, at this time are doing whatever they can to cope with the downturn. “I know of two businesses, two major businesses, on Bay Street that have decided, notwithstanding significant losses over the last quarter, not to lay-off people and put them on reduced work weeks. “We’ve been encouraging businesses to do that, and encouraging employees to accept reduced hours and reduced rates of pay. At the end of the day, we know the economy will turn around. There’s no doubt about that. What I’m very pleased about is that most employers are doing whatever they can to keep Bahamians working.” The impending closure of the Four Seasons Emerald Bay Resort on May 26 will leave a further 500 Bahamians out of work on Exuma, with the ripple effects likely to impact jobs in other businesses, plus the selfemployed. Mr Foulkes said he was less worried about a further increase in the unemployment statistics than the direct impact on the 500 Four Seasons employees and their families, and what it meant for the wider Exuma community. He added that with the Bahamian workforce estimated to be 190,000-strong, some 1,900 job losses were necessary to provoke a 1 per cent increase in the unemployment rate. The total Four Seasons jobs losses were around 1/3 of 1 per cent. Minister “The Prime Minister indicated that he anticipated that the unemployment rate would increase,” Mr Foulkes said. “To what extent, we are not certain. As you know, in order for the unemployment rate to move by 1 per cent, about 1900 Bahamians have to lose their jobs. That’s based on a workforce of 190,000.” Mr Foulkes added that he was more concerned about the impact on the lives of those employed at the Four Seasons Emerald Bay Resort. “Exuma is such a small community, and it’s going to have a devastating effect on many persons on the island and in the business community,” he added. Explaining that the loss of 50 jobs at that resort would be bad enough, Mr Foulkes said: “We are going to do all we can to ease the burden, and make it easier for those persons being laid-off to make a transition to another job,. All of them will probably qualify for the unemployment benefit programme, and the social assistance programmes we have also apply to Exuma. “Out of the $20 million we have allocated for the unemployment benefit, we have sufficient funding to assist with the added demand. I spoke to [NIB director Algernon] Cargill today, and there is sufficient funding to accommodate the added demand.” C M Y K C M Y K BUSINESS PAGE 8B, MONDAY, MAY 18, 2009 THE TRIBUNE 52wk-Hi52wk-LowSecurit y Previous CloseToday's CloseChangeDaily Vol.EPS $Div $P/EYield 1.951.28Abaco Markets1.401.400.000.1270.00011.00.00% 11.8011.00Bahamas Property Fund11.0011.000.000.9920.20011.11.82% 9.686.95Bank of Bahamas6.956.950.000.2440.26028.53.74% 0.900.63Benchmark0.630.630.00-0.8770.000N/M0.00% 3.743.15Bahamas Waste3.153.150.000.0780.09040.42.86% 2.601.95Fidelity Bank2.372.370.000.0550.04043.11.69% 14.1511.09Cable Bahamas11.7511.750.001.4060.2508.42.13% 3.142.83Colina Holdings2.832.830.000.2490.04011.41.41% 7 .446.06Commonwealth Bank (S16.176.06-0.116,5070.4190.05014.50.83% 3.381.31Consolidated Water BDRs3.012.91-0.100.1110.05226.21.79% 3.001.70Doctor's Hospital1.701.700.000.2400.0807.14.71% 8.106.02Famguard7.767.760.000.4200.30018.53.87% 12.5011.00Finco11.0011.000.000.3220.67034.26.09% 14.6610.35FirstCaribbean Bank10.4010.400.000.7940.40013.13.85% 5.555.00Focol (S5.145.140.000.3320.15015.52.92% 1.001.00Focol Class B Preference1.001.000.000.0000.000N/M0.00% 0.500.30Freeport Concrete0.300.300.000.0350.0008.60.00% 8.205.50ICD Utilities5.595.590.000.4070.50013.78.94% 12.508.60J. S. Johnson10.5010.500.000.9520.64011.06.10% 10.0010.00Premier Real Estate10.0010.000.000.1800.00055.60.00% 52wk-Hi52wk-LowSecuritySymbolLast SaleChangeDaily Vol. 1000.001000.00Fidelity Bank Note 17 (Series AFBB17100.000.00 1000.001000.00Fidelity Bank Note 22 (Series BFBB22100.000.00 1000.001000.00Fidelity Bank Note 13 (Series CFBB13100.000.00 1000.001000.00Fidelity Bank Note 15 (Series DFBB15100.000.00 52wk-Hi52wk-LowSymbolBid $ A sk $Last PriceWeekly Vol.EPS $Div $P/EYield 14.6014.25Bahamas Supermarkets7.928.4214.60-0.0410.300N/M2.05% 8.006.00Caribbean Crossings (Pref4.006.256.000.0000.480N/M7.80% 0.540.20RND Holdings0.350.400.350.0010.000256.60.00% 41.0029.00ABDAB30.1331.5929.004.5400.0009.030.00% 0.550.40RND Holdings0.450.550.550.0020.000261.900.00% 52wk-Hi52wk-LowFund NameNA V YTD%Last 12 MonthsDiv $Yield % 1.36641.3041Colina Bond Fund1.36640.954.77 3.03512.9230Colina MSI Preferred Fund2.8962-1.49-3.35 1.45901.3883Colina Money Market Fund1.45901.775.09 3.69603.1964Fidelity Bahamas G & I Fund3.1964-5.59-13.64 12.739712.1564Fidelity Prime Income Fund12.73970.965.79 100.5606100.0000CFAL Global Bond Fund100.56060.560.56 100.000096.4070CFAL Global Equity Fund96.4070-3.59-3.59 1.00001.0000CFAL High Grade Bond Fund1.00000.000.00 10.50009.0950Fidelity International Investment Fund9.15990.71-12.76 1.04401.0000FG Financial Preferred Income Fund1.04400.804.40 1.03641.0000FG Financial Growth Fund1.03640.333.64 1.04521.0000FG Financial Diversified Fund1.04520.764.40 BISX ALL SHARE INDEX 19 Dec 02 = 1,000.00YIELD last 12 month dividends divided by closing price 52wk-Hi Highest closing price in last 52 weeksBid $ Buying price of Colina and Fidelity 52wk-Low Lowest closing price in last 52 weeksAsk $ Selling price of Colina and fidelity Previous Close Previous day's weighted price for daily volumeLast Price Last traded over-the-counter price Today's Close Current day's weighted price for daily volumeWeekly Vol. Trading volume of the prior week Change Change in closing price from day to dayEPS $ A company's reported earnings per share for the last 12 mths Daily Vol. Number of total shares traded todayNAV Net Asset Value DIV $ Dividends per share paid in the last 12 monthsN/M Not Meaningful P/E Closing price divided by the last 12 month earningsFINDEX The Fidelity Bahamas Stock Index. January 1, 1994 = 100 (S (S1T T O O T T R R A A D D E E C C A A L L L L : : C C O O L LI I N N A A 2 24 4 2 2 5 5 0 0 2 2 7 70 0 1 10 0 | | R R O O Y Y A A L L F F I I D D E E L LI I T T Y Y 2 2 4 42 2 -3 35 5 6 67 7 7 7 6 64 4 | | F FG G C C A A P P I I T T A A L L M M A A R R K K E E T T S S 2 24 4 2 2 3 3 9 9 6 6 -4 40 0 0 00 0 | | C C O O L L O O N N I I A A L L 2 2 4 4 2 2 5 50 0 2 2 -7 75 5 2 2 5 5FINDEX: CLOSE 797.42 | YTD -4.49% | 2008 -12.31%BISX LISTED & TRADED SECURITIES AS OF: Fidelity Over-The-Counter Securities Colina Over-The-Counter Securities BISX Listed Mutual Funds MARKET TERMST HURSDAY, 14 MAY 2009BISX ALL SHARE INDEX: CLOSE 1,607.86 | CHG -5.66 | %CHG -0.35 | YTD -104.50 | YTD % -6.10BISX LISTED DEBT SECURITIES (Bonds trade on a Percentage Pricing basesPrime + 1.75% Maturity 19 October 2017 19 October 2022 30 May 2013 29 May 2015 Interest 7% Prime + 1.75% 7% 28-Feb-09 31-Dec-08 31-Dec-07 31-Mar-09 9-Feb-09 9-Feb-09 W W W WW W . .B B I I S S X X B B A A H H A A M M A A S S . .C C O O M M | | T T E E L L E E P P H HO ON N E E : :2 24 4 2 2 -3 3 2 2 3 3 -2 23 3 3 3 0 0 | | F F A A C C S S I I M M I I L L E E : : 2 2 4 4 2 2 -3 3 2 2 3 3 -2 23 3 2 2 0 0NAV Date 31-Mar-09 1-May-09 31-Mar-09 28-Feb-09 31-Dec-08 9-Feb-09 /HJDORWLFH 127,&( ROXQWDU\/LTXLGDWLRQf 1RWLFHLVKHUHE\JLYHQWKDWWKHDERYHQDPHG &RPSDQ\LVLQGLVVROXWLRQZKLFKFRPPHQFHG RQWKHGD\RI$SULO 7KH/LTXLGDWRULV $UJRVD&RUS1DVVDX %DKDPDV /HJDORWLFH 127,&( ROXQWDU\/LTXLGDWLRQf 1RWLFHLVKHUHE\JLYHQWKDWWKHDERYHQDPHG &RPSDQ\LVLQGLVVROXWLRQZKLFKFRPPHQFHG RQWKHGD\RI$SULO 7KH/LTXLGDWRULV $UJRVD&RUS1DVVDX %DKDPDV /HJDORWLFH 127,&( ROXQWDU\/LTXLGDWLRQf 1RWLFHLVKHUHE\JLYHQWKDWWKHDERYHQDPHG &RPSDQ\LVLQGLVVROXWLRQZKLFKFRPPHQFHG RQWKHGD\RI$SULO 7KH/LTXLGDWRULV $UJRVD&RUS1DVVDX %DKDPDV /HJDORWLFH 127,&( ,QROXQWDU\/LTXLGDWLRQf 1 RWLFHLVKHUHE\JLYHQWKDWWKHDERYHQDPHG &RPSDQ\LVLQGLVVROXWLRQZKLFKFRPPHQFHG RQWKHGD\RI0D\ 7KH/LTXLGDWRULV $UJRVD&RUS1DVVDX %DKDPDV /HJDORWLFH 127,&( ROXQWDU\/LTXLGDWLRQf 1RWLFHLVKHUHE\JLYHQWKDWWKHDERYHQDPHG &RPSDQ\LVLQGLVVROXWLRQZKLFKFRPPHQFHG RQWKHGD\RI0D\ 7KH/LTXLGDWRULV $UJRVD&RUS1DVVDX %DKDPDV /HJDORWLFH 1 27,&( ROXQWDU\/LTXLGDWLRQf 1RWLFHLVKHUHE\JLYHQWKDWWKHDERYHQDPHG & RPSDQ\LVLQGLVVROXWLRQZKLFKFRPPHQFHG RQWKHGD\RI0D\ 7KH/LTXLGDWRULV $UJRVD&RUS1DVVDX %DKDPDV /HJDORWLFH 127,&( ROXQWDU\/LTXLGDWLRQf 1RWLFHLVKHUHE\JLYHQWKDWWKHDERYHQDPHG &RPSDQ\LVLQGLVVROXWLRQZKLFKFRPPHQFHG RQWKHGD\RI0D\ 7KH/LTXLGDWRULV $UJRVD&RUS1DVVDX %DKDPDV /HJDORWLFH 127,&( ROXQWDU\/LTXLGDWLRQf 1RWLFHLVKHUHE\JLYHQWKDWWKHDERYHQDPHG &RPSDQ\LVLQGLVVROXWLRQZKLFKFRPPHQFHG RQWKHGD\RI0D\ 7KH/LTXLGDWRULV $UJRVD&RUS1DVVDX %DKDPDV 130-140 Bahamians per day signing up for jobless benefits F F R R O O M M p p a a g g e e 1 1 B B

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as after the FNM came to power i n 2007, the new national security minister, Tommy Turnquest, told The Tribune he had never heard about the matter and that there w as “no investigation” whatsoever – despite the outrage of his colleague just a year earlier. In response to a request for information, The Tribune sentM r Turnquest 11 e-mails containing photos, articles and official statements on the Vallejo case. The minister never responded. F NM officials have occasionally complained that there is an unjustified tendency among journalists to tar the new administration with the brush of corruptiona nd negligence which stained the PLP during its time in power. The FNM would do well to come to terms with the fact that u ntil cases like that of Mario Vallejo are properly investigated and, if it is warranted, brought before the courts – the media will continue to be sceptical. After all,a s far as the public knows, the officers alleged to have been involved in the beating are still collecting government pay c heques. It is always inconvenient for a new government to investigate a llegations ignored by its predec essor, as it risks falling out of favour with friends, relatives and c olleagues of the accused – not to mention the signal it would s end to anyone else who is up to n o good. And at the end of the day, politics is a popularity contest. Then there is the risk that a k ey supporter, financier or party b oss might one day be implicated in wrongdoing. Or worse, that a r ival party, once in power, might use the precedent to instigate a political witch hunt. All in all, justice is a tricky business for politic ians. B ut if the rule of law is to conform to political term limits, we are obliged to open the gates of Her Majesty's Prison and release everyone on remand awaiting tria l. While we are at it, we might as well cancel the tens of thousands of arrest warrants, dating back years, which the police have yet to serve on suspected criminals. At least partially driving the reluctance to take decisive action o n the abuse of immigration detainees – a feature of successive governments – is the unfortunate tendency of many Bahamians to ignore injustices sufferedb y foreigners. Officials feel no real domestic pressure to take a hard line, and probably feel a cosmetic approach will eventually a ppease international observers. Unfortunately, the reality is that just as it inherits the consequences of its predecessor's economic and social decisions, eachn ew government is lumped with allegations of prior wrongdoing and will ultimately suffer the consequences of failing to deal w ith them. If the FNM is really interested in putting an end to human rights abuses once and for all, it must ensure that justice is served ine very instance. What do you think? pnunez@tribunemedia.net C M Y K C M Y K INSIGHT THE TRIBUNE MONDAY, MAY 18, 2009, PAGE 9B 7KH3XEOLFLVKHUHE\DGYLVHGWKDW0$59$(00(5,7+$ * ,%621RI0DUDWKRQ(VWDWHV1HZ3URYLGHQFH%DKDPDV L QWHQGWRFKDQJHGDXJKWHUQDPHIURP .,567<'$1,(//( *,%621WR.,567<'$1,(//(1(:%2/' ,I WKHUHDUHDQ\ R EMHFWLRQVWRWKLVFKDQJHRIQDPH'HHG3ROO\RXPD\ ZULWHVXFKREMHFWLRQVWRWKH&KLHI3DVVSRUW2IFHU3 1 1DVVDX%DKDPDVQRODWHUWKDQWKLUW\GD\VDIWHUWKH GDWHRISXEOLFDWLRQRIWKLVQRWLFH /HJDORWLFH 1 27,&( ,QROXQWDU\/LTXLGDWLRQf 1 RWLFHLVKHUHE\JLYHQWKDWWKHDERYHQDPHG &RPSDQ\LVLQGLVVROXWLRQZKLFKFRPPHQFHG RQWKHGD\RI$SULO 7KH/LTXLGDWRU $UJRVD&RUS1DVVDX %DKDPDV / HJDORWLFH 1 27,&( ,QROXQWDU\/LTXLGDWLRQf 1RWLFHLVKHUHE\JLYHQWKDWWKHDERYHQDPHG &RPSDQ\LVLQGLVVROXWLRQZKLFKFRPPHQFHGRQ WKHGD\RI)HEUXDU\ 7KH/LTXLGDWRULV $UJRVD&RUS1DVVDX %DKDPDV /HJDORWLFH 127,&( ROXQWDU\/LTXLGDWLRQf 1RWLFHLVKHUHE\JLYHQWKDWWKHDERYHQDPHG &RPSDQ\LVLQGLVVROXWLRQZKLFKFRPPHQFHGRQ WKHGD\RI'HFHPEHU 7KH/LTXLGDWRU $UJRVD&RUS1DVVDX %DKDPDV /HJDORWLFH 127,&( ROXQWDU\/LTXLGDWLRQf 1RWLFHLVKHUHE\JLYHQWKDWWKHDERYHQDPHG &RPSDQ\LVLQGLVVROXWLRQZKLFKFRPPHQFHG RQWKHGD\RI$SULO 7KH/LTXLGDWRULV $UJRVD&RUS1DVVDX %DKDPDV /HJDORWLFH 127,&( ROXQWDU\/LTXLGDWLRQf 1RWLFHLVKHUHE\JLYHQWKDWWKHDERYHQDPHG &RPSDQ\LVLQGLVVROXWLRQZKLFKFRPPHQFHGRQ WKHGD\RI'HFHPEHU 7KH/LTXLGDWRU $UJRVD&RUS1DVVDX %DKDPDV /HJDORWLFH 127,&( ,QROXQWDU\/LTXLGDWLRQf 1 RWLFHLVKHUHE\JLYHQWKDWWKHDERYHQDPHG &RPSDQ\LVLQGLVVROXWLRQZKLFKFRPPHQFHGRQ WKHGD\RI'HFHPEHU 7KH/LTXLGDWRU $UJRVD&RUS1DVVDX %DKDPDV /HJDORWLFH 127,&( ROXQWDU\/LTXLGDWLRQf 1RWLFHLVKHUHE\JLYHQWKDWWKHDERYHQDPHG &RPSDQ\LVLQGLVVROXWLRQZKLFKFRPPHQFHG RQWKHGD\RI0D\ 7KH/LTXLGDWRULV $UJRVD&RUS1DVVDX %DKDPDV /HJDORWLFH 127,&( ROXQWDU\/LTXLGDWLRQf 1RWLFHLVKHUHE\JLYHQWKDWWKHDERYHQDPHG &RPSDQ\LVLQGLVVROXWLRQZKLFKFRPPHQFHG RQWKHGD\RI0D\ 7KH/LTXLGDWRULV $UJRVD&RUS1DVVDX %DKDPDV /HJDORWLFH 127,&( ROXQWDU\/LTXLGDWLRQf 1RWLFHLVKHUHE\JLYHQWKDWWKHDERYHQDPHG &RPSDQ\LVLQGLVVROXWLRQZKLFKFRPPHQFHG RQWKHGD\RI0D\ 7KH/LTXLGDWRULV $UJRVD&RUS1DVVDX %DKDPDV /HJDORWLFH 127,&( ROXQWDU\/LTXLGDWLRQf 1RWLFHLVKHUHE\JLYHQWKDWWKHDERYHQDPHG &RPSDQ\LVLQGLVVROXWLRQZKLFKFRPPHQFHG RQWKHGD\RI0D\ 7KH/LTXLGDWRULV $UJRVD&RUS1DVVDX %DKDPDV Prime Minister Hubert Ingraham said last week: “I want to be clear: abuseof detained persons whether in their homes, ata work site, on an immigration bus or at the Carmichael Road Detention Centre is contrary to the law. Everyone must be treated with respect at all times; that is the law and that is the policy of the government which I head.” “We expect immigration officers to respect the protocols called for by (international human rights) conventions and by our own laws and constitution which guarantee respect for human rights of all individuals in the Bahamas regardless of their immigration status. And, I may add, this includes the obligation of immigration officers to relay claims from illegal immigrants of any fear of persecution expressed by an illegal immigrant/potential refugee on return to his or her country of origin.” PM’s words Ingraham DETAINEE ABUSE CLAIMS: QUESTIONS LINGER MINISTER of State Branville McCartney (left Thompson (centre to allegations of inhumane treatment reported in The Tribune ... FOLLOWING claims of insufficient and poor quality food, Mr McCartney and Mr Thompson partake of a meal at the Detention Centre... F F R R O O M M p p a a g g e e 1 1 2 2 B B

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their relatives. Three US Congressmen sent letters to Secretary of State Condoleezza Rice requesting an investigation into the Vallejo case. A group of 750 Latin Americ an businessmen cancelled a trip to the Bahamas to protest the alleged attack. Amid ongoing demonstrat ions outside the Bahamas consulate in Miami over the Vallejo case, the consulate received a bomb threat. A woman was arrested in connection with thei ncident the next day. Then FNM chairman Desmond Bannister condemned the PLP government for ignori ng the beating of Mario Vallejo saying the Bahamas’ image has been affected. Officials from the Ministry of National Security said they h ave received an interim report on the alleged beating of the Miami reporter. However, they stressed that “due to the sensitivi ty" of the contents, further inform ation will not be made available until a comprehensive report is released – “early next week". Then Minister of Foreign Affairs Fred Mitchell warned thatB ahamians may be in danger of “retaliatory action” following the Vallejo incident. Florida Governor Jeb Bush s aid he was “satisfied” with the investigation into the alleged beating. August Deputy Prime Minister Cynt hia Pratt admitted she has “no idea” what is happening with the investigation the government promised. 2 2 0 0 0 0 7 7 January Despite earlier assurances, there has still been no update on the investigation into the Vallejoi ncident. Chief Superintendent of Police Hulan Hanna said: “The matter is pretty much at the forefront and I’m hoping that it is o nly a matter of time before the public and principals involved would know how the matter is to be fully and finally determined. It is not out of sight and not out of mind,” he said. M arch Concerns about the harsh conditions and overcrowding at Fox Hill Prison and the Carmichael Road Detention Centre and alle-g ations of abuse by guards is featured in the US State Department’s annual country report on the Bahamas. 2 2 0 0 0 0 8 8 July New Minister of National Security and Immigration Tommy T urnquest – who is in charge of the police, the Defence Force and the Immigration Department – claimed he has never heard about the case of Mario Vallejo. MrT urnquest said there was “no investigation” into the matter. The Tribune sent Mr Turnquest 11 e-mails containing phot os, articles and official articles on the case. He did not respond. September FNM Minister of State for Immigration Branville McCart-n ey completely denied allegations of a hunger strike among Cuban detainees protesting conditionsa t the centre. However, when it was pointed out that the chiefo fficer at the centre had conf irmed the strike, Mr McCartney s aid he had heard something a bout threats of a strike but that nothing had been confirmed. Mr McCartney said that allegations of hunger strikes at the D etention Centre are under investigation. No more was heard about the matter for several months. 2 2 0 0 0 0 9 9 February A detainee at the centre, who allegedly was beaten so badly by o fficers that he lost fingernails, announced that he was starting a hunger strike with other Cubans at the facility. The Immigration Departm ent issued a statement denying the abuse claims. However, Amnesty International called for an independent inquiry. The US State Department’s 2008 Human Rights Report said human rights groups are concerned that the latest investigation had been handled internally,w ithout independent oversight. The Tribune interviewed 10 detainees at the centre who all claimed conditions at the facility a re terrible and that three Cuban men have stopped eating in protest. A Dominican man claimed he was beaten repeatedly byg uards who were attempting to extract “some information” from him. The claim was corroborated by several of his fellow d etainee. Minister McCartney said he is o pen to an independent investig ation into the Detention Cent re. March S enior Immigration and Defence Force officials visit the D etention Centre accompanied by social services personnel and l ocal clergy, in an effort to demonstrate that the facility is being operated with transparency. Amnesty International reiterated its concern for the safety oft he detainees at the centre and urged the international community to flood the government with appeals. Dozens of letters were s ent to senior officials and copied to The Tribune in the following weeks. The findings of an investigation into the living conditions att he centre were withheld from the press. Immigration officials also denied The Tribune’s request to tour the facility. However, D irector of Immigration Jack Thompson said the reports included no evidence to substantiate the claims of violence, sexual favours for privileges or insuf-f icient food. He added that notwithstanding this, certain recommendations on the living conditions will be implemented, such a s diversifying the menu and replacing broken mattresses. Minister McCartney said he has “no difficulty” releasing the report and allowing the press tot our the facility, but said the report must first be seen by Cabinet. M ay D etainees said their living cond itions have improved greatly. M inister McCartney said he was pleasantly surprised” when he visited the Detention Centre. The c alls for press access to the facility, for an independent investiga t ion and for the report to be released continue to be ignored. C M Y K C M Y K INSIGHT PAGE 10B, MONDAY, MAY 18, 2009 THE TRIBUNE Allegations of abuse at Detention Centre, as documented in The Tribune MR VALLEJO being escorted to a waiting ambulance by paramedics outside the Detention Centre... F F R R O O M M p p a a g g e e 1 1 2 2 B B

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ANDROS CAT ISLAND ELEUTHERA MAYAGUANA SAN SAL V ADOR GREAT INAGUA GREAT EXUMA CROOKED ISLAND / ACKLINS LONG ISLAND ABACO Shown is today's weather . T emperatures are today's highs and tonights's lows. KEY WEST WEST PALM BEACH FT. LAUDERDALE TAMPA ORLANDO Low: 67F/19C Low: 66F/19C Low: 72F/22C Low: 72F/22C Low: 73 F/23 C Low: 73F/23C Low: 77 F/25 C Low: 75 F/24 C High: 82F/28C High: 81F/27C High: 83 F/28 C High: 82 F/28 C High: 84F/29C High: 84 F/29C High: 84F/29C Low: 77F/25C High: 83F/28C Low: 79 F/26 C High: 85F/29C RAGGED ISLAND Low: 76F/24C High: 82 F/28 C Low: 74F/23C High: 80 F/27 Low: 75F/24C High: 81F/27C Low: 78 F/26C High: 84F/29C Low: 81 F/27 C High: 85F/29C Low: 79 F/26 C High: 82F/28C Low: 78 F/26 C High: 82F/28C Low: 79F/26C High: 85 F/29 C Low: 81F/27C High: 83F/28C High: 81 F/27 C FREEPORT NASSAU MIAMI THE TRIBUNE MONDAY, MAY 18 TH , 2009, PAGE 11B THE WEATHER REPORT 5-D AY F ORECAST Mostly cloudy, a couple of t-storms. Mostly cloudy with thunderstorms. Rather cloudy, a couple of t-storms. Breezy with rain and a thunderstorm. Mostly cloudy, chance for rain. High: 84 Low: 77 High: 83 High: 85 High: 89 A ccuWeather RealFeel A ccuWeather RealFeel A ccuWeather RealFeel A ccuWeather RealFeel A ccuWeather RealFeel Mostly cloudy, a t-storm possible. High: 86 Low: 75 Low: 77 Low: 77 AccuWeather RealFeel 85F T he exclusive AccuWeather RealFeel Temperature i s an index that combines the effects of temperature, wind, humidity, sunshine intensity, cloudiness, precipitation, pressure, and e levation on the human bodyeverything that effects how warm or cold a person feels. Temperatures reflect the high and the low for the day. 74F 89-79F 98-83F 105-84F 94-85F Low: 77 TODAYTONIGHTTUESDAYWEDNESDAYTHURSDAYFRIDAY A LMANAC High ..................................................84F/29C Low ....................................................75F/24C Normal high ......................................84F/29C Normal low ........................................71F/22C Last year's high .................................. 91 F/33C Last year's low .................................. 74 F/23C As of 2 p.m. yesterday ..................................0.01" Year to date ..................................................2.22" Normal year to date ......................................9.87" Statistics are for Nassau through 2 p.m. yesterday Temperature Precipitation S UN AND M OON T IDESFOR N ASSAU New First Full Last May 24 May 30Jun. 7Jun. 15 Sunrise . . . . . . 6:24 a.m. Sunset . . . . . . . 7:49 p.m. Moonrise . . . . . 2:12 a.m. Moonset . . . . . 2:15 p.m. Today Tuesday Wednesday Thursday HighHt.(ft.LowHt.(ft. 2:56 a.m.2.39:07 a.m.0.4 3:25 p.m.2.49:46 p.m.0.5 3:52 a.m.2.39:57 a.m.0.3 4:19 p.m.2.610:44 p.m.0.4 4:47 a.m.2.310:46 a.m.0.2 5:12 p.m.2.811:40 p.m.0.3 5:41 a.m.2.311:36 a.m.0.1 6:04 p.m.3.0----W ORLD C ITIES Acapulco87/3078/25pc88/3179/26pc Amsterdam62/1651/10sh64/1754/12sh Ankara, Turkey84/2854/12pc84/2852/11s Athens82/2766/18t73/2265/18sh Auckland59/1552/11r61/1646/7s Bangkok91/3277/25t93/3379/26t Barbados86/3077/25pc85/2977/25pc Barcelona70/2157/13pc70/2158/14s Beijing93/3363/17s95/3564/17pc Beirut91/3270/21s77/2573/22s Belgrade89/3167/19s91/3264/17pc Berlin65/1849/9sh70/2152/11pc Bermuda76/2470/21s76/2470/21s Bogota65/1848/8r65/1848/8sh Brussels63/1745/7sh66/1846/7sh Budapest86/3063/17s71/2160/15pc Buenos Aires67/1948/8sh66/1853/11pc Cairo104/4070/21s93/3366/18s Calcutta95/3579/26t93/3375/23t Calgary46/735/1sh59/1536/2pc Cancun89/3165/18sh87/3062/16pc Caracas82/2772/22t82/2773/22t Casablanca75/2355/12s77/2569/20s Copenhagen64/1751/10pc64/1754/12s Dublin57/1346/7r55/1245/7r Frankfurt68/2050/10pc75/2354/12s Geneva 71/21 52/11 sh 76/2454/12s Halifax 51/10 41/5 c 54/12 38/3 s Havana 84/28 69/20 t 83/28 68/20 r Helsinki 63/17 45/7pc54/1243/6r Hong Kong 84/28 75/23 t 86/30 77/25t Islamabad 104/40 73/22 s 116/46 79/26 pc Istanbul80/2667/19pc78/2565/18c Jerusalem 91/32 65/18s78/2558/14s Johannesburg 68/2043/6s66/1846/7s Kingston 85/2978/25r85/2978/25sh Lima75/2361/16pc76/2462/16s London62/1650/10sh61/1651/10sh Madrid81/2748/8s86/3052/11s Manila93/3379/26pc91/3277/25t Mexico City70/2149/9pc71/2146/7pc Monterrey93/3365/18s95/3566/18s Montreal54/1241/5pc61/1637/2c Moscow57/1341/5c61/1649/9s Munich67/1952/11sh74/2349/9s Nairobi82/2764/17t79/2664/17t New Delhi 108/4284/28s108/4286/30s Oslo55/1249/9r58/1448/8sh Paris65/1852/11sh70/2156/13pc Prague 69/20 54/12 sh 72/22 52/11 sh Rio de Janeiro77/2566/18pc75/2366/18s Riyadh102/3879/26s104/4082/27s Rome 79/26 58/14 t 80/26 58/14 s St. Thomas83/2876/24r84/2877/25r San Juan69/2040/4pc77/2544/6pc San Salvador 86/30 74/23 t 87/30 74/23 t Santiago 70/2145/7pc72/2245/7s Santo Domingo82/2772/22sh83/2873/22r Sao Paulo 76/24 56/13 pc 72/22 57/13pc Seoul73/2250/10s79/2655/12s Stockholm 55/12 45/7 r 63/17 50/10 pc Sydney 66/18 57/13 pc68/2055/12sh Taipei81/2774/23r83/2876/24r T okyo 79/26 63/17 pc 82/27 63/17 s T oronto 56/1344/6s59/1542/5c Trinidad82/2767/19r80/2666/18sh V ancouver 65/18 51/10 c 59/1548/8r Vienna 75/2361/16sh74/2357/13pc W arsaw 75/23 58/14 sh 66/18 50/10 sh Winnipeg 57/13 30/-1 pc 52/1139/3pc H ighLowWHighLowW F/CF/CF/CF/C T odayTuesday Weather (Ws -sunny, pc -partly cloudy, c -cloudy, sh -showers, t -thunderstorms, r -rain, sf -snow flurries, sn -snow, i -ice, Prcp-precipitation, Tr -trace T ODAY ' S U.S. F ORECAST M ARINE F ORECAST WINDSWAVESVISIBILITYWATER TEMPS. NASSAU FREEPORT ABACO Today:E at 15-20 Knots3-6 Feet5-10 Miles77F Tuesday:SSE at 15-25 Knots3-6 Feet5-10 Miles77F Today:E at 15-20 Knots3-6 Feet5-10 Miles76F Tuesday:E at 15-25 Knots3-6 Feet5-10 Miles77F Today:E at 15-20 Knots3-6 Feet5-10 Miles76F Tuesday:E at 15-25 Knots3-6 Feet5-10 Miles77F U.S. C ITIES Albuquerque88/3159/15pc87/3059/15pc Anchorage62/1642/5s63/1742/5s Atlanta70/2145/7s74/2354/12s Atlantic City62/1639/3s72/2248/8s Baltimore67/1939/3s74/2350/10s Boston58/1444/6s68/2050/10s Buffalo63/1741/5s63/1744/6t Charleston, SC64/1750/10r73/2260/15sh Chicago70/2150/10s70/2153/11t Cleveland63/1744/6s68/2049/9pc Dallas77/2555/12s82/2757/13s Denver94/3454/12pc91/3255/12pc Detroit66/1846/7s68/2047/8t Honolulu82/2768/20sh83/2868/20pc Houston82/2756/13s84/2860/15s HighLowWHighLowW F/CF/CF/CF/C HighLowWHighLowW F/CF/CF/CF/C HighLowWHighLowW F/CF/CF/CF/C T odayTuesday TodayTuesdayTodayTuesday Indianapolis69/2047/8s76/2455/12s Jacksonville68/2058/14r73/2263/17r Kansas City76/2454/12s81/2761/16s Las Vegas103/3974/23pc97/3674/23s Little Rock76/2448/8s81/2753/11s Los Angeles82/2760/15pc80/2660/15pc Louisville71/2148/8s80/2653/11s Memphis75/2353/11s80/2658/14s Miami84/2873/22t83/2871/21r Minneapolis75/2349/9pc65/1858/14sh Nashville71/2144/6s80/2652/11s New Orleans77/2560/15s80/2662/16s New York63/1750/10s73/2254/12s Oklahoma City77/2552/11s80/2655/12s Orlando82/2767/19t77/2568/20t Philadelphia65/1846/7s74/2352/11s Phoenix 107/41 78/25 pc 103/3978/25pc Pittsburgh63/1736/2s74/2347/8s Portland, OR 78/2554/12pc61/1645/7c Raleigh-Durham 67/19 41/5 pc 74/23 52/11 s St. Louis72/2254/12s81/2758/14s Salt Lake City 90/32 62/16 s 90/3260/15pc San Antonio 84/28 56/13 s 84/28 58/14 s San Diego71/2163/17pc71/2161/16pc San Francisco 68/20 53/11 s 63/1750/10s Seattle70/2150/10pc58/1445/7sh T allahassee 71/2156/13r76/2459/15r T ampa 81/27 66/18 t 79/26 66/18t Tucson101/3871/21pc98/3670/21pc W ashington, DC 64/17 45/7s76/2455/12s UV I NDEX T ODAY T he higher the A ccuWeather UV Index T M n umber, the greater the need for eye and skin protection. Forecasts and graphics provided by AccuWeather, Inc. Cold Warm Stationary Fronts Shown are noon positions of weather systems and precipitation. Temperature bands are highs for the day. Forecast high/low temperatures are for selected cities. 1 1 0 0 s s 0 0 s s 0 0 s s 1 1 0 0 s s 2 2 0 0 s s 3 3 0 0 s s 4 4 0 0 s s 5 5 0 0 s s 6 6 0 0 s s 7 7 0 0 s s 8 8 0 0 s s 9 9 0 0 s s 1 1 0 0 0 0 s s 1 1 1 1 0 0 s s Showers T -storms Rain Flurries Snow Ice AccuW eather .com

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INSIGHT C M Y K C M Y K The Tribune INSIGHT M ONDAY, MAY 18, 2009 The stories behind the news n By PACO NUNEZ Tribune News Editor I mmigration officials are no d oubt congratulating themselves on a job well done in their handling of the latest allegations of abuse and inhumane conditions at the Carmichael RoadD etention Centre. After all, the once miserable d etainees are now singing the Immigra tion Department's praises. They say the f acility, formerly an unendurable hellhole, is now close to being what it should – a temporary holding facility for those who, despite being denied entry into the Bahamas for whatever reason, haveb een convicted of no crime and remain innocent until proven guilty under B ahamian law. Finding themselves in something of a t horny predicament when the allegations of beatings and neglect first surfaced in The Tribune several months ago, new immigration bosses director Jack Thompson and Minister of State B ranville McCartney seem to have pulled off a considerable public rela t ions coup. They tackled the situation head on, o rdering several changes at the centre, convening an expert committee, visit ing the detainees and even sitting down to lunch to test claims of insufficient, poor quality food. Detainees report that threadbare mattresses have been replaced, toilets haveb een fixed, walls painted, access to clean clothes provided, and best of all, once c ruel and violent guards seem to have undergone a conversion to pacifism. Why then, has the champagne not been popped? Where is the public backpatting session? Those who opt for a career in public life are seldom timid when it comes to self promotion, and as it happens, there are good reasons for their silence in this case. T he first is that, generally, it is quite difficult to claim responsibility for fixing a problem you maintain never existed in the first place. When the allegations sur faced, the department issued a blanket denial almost immediately – in just over 24 hours in fact. This was the result of an investigation which, depending on one's perspective, was either a model of swift efficiency or a feeble attempt to distract the public. As one detainee told me last week: “Obviously what you printed was true, because they gave us everything we asked for after the articles came out. I don’t know how they could deny it. There are many witnesses to what took place, and there are medical records that prove there were beatings.” The second reason for not drawing too much attention to the matter is that, having claimed their internal inquiry found nothing wrong, the department refused to allow anyone else to investigate. The press have been denied access to the facility and have been barred from visiting detainees. A report compiled by psychologists and government social workers has been kept from the public. The department's explanation is that the report has yet to be seen by Cabinet, but this seems unlikely considering Prime Minister Hubert Ingra ham's warning to immigration officers last week. Mr Ingraham said: “I want to be clear: abuse of detained persons whether in their homes, at a work site, on an immigration bus or at the Carmichael Road Detention Centre is contrary to the law. Everyone must be treated with respect and dignity at all times; that is the poli cy of the government which I head.” Yet calls by Amnesty International for a full and independent investigation have been ignored. One senior official dismissed the idea of inviting Amnesty to tour the centre on the curious logict hat Standard and Poor's, an international agency, had given the Bahamas economy an unfair evaluation. His argument was that all international agencies are equal, and therefore Amnesty will also do the country an injustice. Never mind that S&P's practices have been highlighted as one of the prime causes of the global economic crisis, while Amnesty is widely respected for its pioneering work in the promotion of human rights and the rule of law. The third reason for government's silence is that while Mr Ingraham's statements were meant to send a clear signal that the FNM wants to put an end to lawlessness in the public service (he also spoke out against the taking and soliciting of bribes), senior officials must know that this effort will fail unless offenders are punished. Beyond the obvious point that threats to deal with wayward public servants will be ignored if there is no followthrough, the reluctance of a government to bring its own officers to justice hints at a lack of sufficient commitment to upholding the rule of law. Take the case of Mario Vallejo, an Miami-based reporter for Univisi—n, who was in Nassau with his TV crew in February 2006 to film the reunion of seven Cuban refugees who had been stranded at Elbow Cay. When another journalist attempted to capture the reunion on film and was detained for his trouble, Mr Vallejo is said to have stepped away from the Detention Centre gate to make a phone call, presumably to inform his superiors that a fellow journalist had been taken into custody. It is alleged that at this point, Defence Force guards, apparently irritated that Mr Vallejo had the audacity to inform on them, savagely attacked the reporter, throwing him to the ground and then against a car, split ting his head open. I and two colleagues arrived on the scene just as paramedics were treating the bloodied Mr Vallejo. The fallout from this incident was considerable. Protests were held out side Bahamas government offices in F lorida. Three Congressmen called for the US to launch an investigation into the matter. Hundreds of Americans cancelled their plans to visit the country in protest. And at the height of the con troversy, a bomb scare was called in to the Bahamas Consulate in Miami. Despite the calls for justice, the PLP, the party in power, did nothing and was duly condemned by the opposition. Then FNM chairman Desmond Ban nister, now a Cabinet minister, said: “It is hard to see how they have done anything about it that would be considered appropriate in the circumstances and if they have, they ought to let the Bahamian people know what has been done and how they intend to deal with the matter." Far from dealing with the matter, the PLP soon contracted a case of collective amnesia, forgetting about the incident completely. Despite repeated promises that an inquiry would be held, six months after the incident deputy prime minister Cynthia Pratt, who had responsibility for the police and the security forces, admitted she had “no idea” what was happening to the case. This amnesia seems to have been contagious and no respecter of party lines, DETAINEE ABUSE CLAIMS: QUESTIONS LINGER 2 2 0 0 0 0 4 4 October A mnesty International condemned the Carmichael Road Detention Centre and called for a full investigation into claims of abuse and torture. December T hen Immigration minister, PLP MP Vincent Peet, said an investigation found no e vidence to substantiate the abuse claims. Cuban detainees rioted and set fire to a dormitory at the centre. Cuban-Americans hold a number of anti-Bahamas demonstrations outside theB ahamas Consulate in Miami. Tribune Managing Editor John Marquis w rites an Insight article detailing the case of 27-year-old Jamaican Omar Jones, who c laimed he was reduced to a state of temporary disability after repeated beatings at the hands of officers at the centre. Commenting on the government's response, Mr Marquis wrote: “It was the same old story of officials ilence in the face of compelling and deeply disturbing evidence.” 2 2 0 0 0 0 5 5 J anuary The Miami Herald published a front page a rticle detailing allegations that immigrants have been abused at Her Majesty’s Prison and the Carmichael Road Detention Centre. The article followed exclusive reports in The Tribune in which detainees claimed they w ere tortured and humiliated. The Miami Herald article said detainees claimed to have b een deprived of soap and drinking water, beaten, subjected to mock executions and i n some cases raped by guards. Minister Peet announced the appoint ment of an inter-ministerial task force to look into the allegations, but said he was disappointed with the “unbalanced report ing” in The Miami Herald. A government statement read: “The article in The Miami Herald of Sunday 23, January is not an accu rate description of what happens at the D etention Centre, nor at the prison. The government is to convene an inter-minister ial task force to consider a proper response.” Mr Peet said he wished that those who constantly criticise the conditions at the centre would “put their money where their mouth is” and help with much needed repairs. Tourism Minister Obie Wilchcombe said the negative press had the potential to dam age the country’s tourism industry, particularly when it contradicts what the country tells the world. February Edwin Culmer, newly appointed officer in charge of the Detention Centre, said the rules governing the facility should be reviewed in light of repeated abuse claims. He said the first thing he would do is look at the rules to “see if they correspond with Amnesty International and other human rights laws.” March The US Embassy donates $20,000 to improve water and sanitation at the Detention Centre. May Amnesty International condemns the Bahamas for violating international law by repatriating Haitians and Cubans before actually determining if they are political refugees. July A Cuban refugee claimed he was beaten and shot twice with rubber bullets by two Defence Force officers. 2 2 0 0 0 0 6 6 February Miami-based American TV reporter Mario Vallejo was allegedly beaten by a Defence Force officer outside the Carmichael Road Detention Centre while attempting to document the reunion between seven Cubans rescued from Elbow Cay and The Immigration Detention Centre has undergone a makeover, but the government will not shake off the spectre of abuse allegations until it ensures that justice is done. INSIGHT reports... Allegations of abuse at Detention Centre, as documented in The Tribune n B y P A C O N U N E Z T r i b u n e N e w s E d i t o r p n u n e z @ t r i b u n e m e d i a . n e t T H R E E C u b a n m e n a t t h e I m m i g r a t i o n D e t e n t i o n C e n t r e s a y t h e y h a v e b e e n o n h u n g e r s t r i k e f o r t w o d a y s i n p r o t e s t a g a i n s t t h e d e p l o r a b l e c o n d i t i o n s t h e y a n d h u n d r e d s o f o t h e r s a r e f o r c e d t o e n d u r e a t t h e f a c i l i t y . T h e m e n s a y t h e y h a v e n o t e a t e n s i n c e 8 a m o n W e d n e s d a y a n d d o n o t p l a n t o u n t i l t h e i r c o n c e r n s a r e a d d r e s s e d . T h e h e a l t h o f o n e o f t h e m , a n e p i l e p t i c , h a s d e t e r i o r a t e d s e v e r e l y b u t h e i s r e a d y t o d i e , o n e o f h i s c o m p a t r i o t s s a i d . T h e T r i b u n e s p o k e t o t w o o f t h e h u n g e r s t r i k e r s a n d e i g h t o t h e r d e t a i n e e s f r o m v a r i o u s c o u n t r i e s a n d b a c k g r o u n d s , w h o a l l s u p p o r t e d t h e m e n s c l a i m s o f a b u s e a n d s u b h u m a n c o n d i t i o n s a t t h e c e n t r e . T h e y s a i d o t h e r s w a n t t o j o i n t h e h u n g e r s t r i k e , b u t a r e a f r a i d o f r e p r i s a l s f r o m g u a r d s . I n t h e f a c e o f c a l l s f r o m i n t e r n a t i o n a l h u m a n r i g h t s a c t i v i s t s f o r a n i n d e p e n d e n t i n v e s t i g a t i o n , g o v e r n m e n t o f f i c i a l s h a v e d e n i e d t h a t t h e r e h a v e b e e n a n y b e a t i n g s a t t h e c e n t r e , a n d s a y t h e y k n o w n o t h i n g a b o u t t h e h u n g e r s t r i k e . A l l t h e d e t a i n e e s w h o s p o k e t o T h e T r i b u n e y e s t e r d a y r e a c t e d w i t h a n g e r u p o n h e a r i n g t h i s , c l a i m i n g t h e a u t h o r i t i e s k n o w e v e r y t h i n g t h a t i s g o i n g o n . O n e o f t h e h u n g e r s t r i k e r s c a l l e d o n C o m m i s s i o n e r o f P o l i c e R e g i n a l d F e r g u s o n t o p a y a s u r p r i s e v i s i t t o t h e c e n t r e a n d i n t e r v i e w t h e m , n o t i n t h e a i r c o n d i t i o n e d f r o n t o f f i c e , b u t b a c k h e r e , w h e r e w e l i v e . T h e a l l e g a t i o n s h a v e b e e n m o u n t i n g s i n c e M o n d a y , w h e n T h e T r i b u n e r e c e i v e d i n f o r m a t i o n a b o u t a n a l l e g e d s e v e r e b e a t i n g a t t h e c e n t r e i n w h i c h t h e v i c t i m l o s t s e v e r a l f i n g e r n a i l s . Y e s t e r d a y , t h e m a n w h o s a y s h e w a s t h e v i c t i m o f t h a t a t t a c k e x p l a i n e d t h a t i t t o o k p l a c e a y e a r a g o . A f t e r h a v i n g b e e n a t t h e c e n t r e f o r s e v e r a l m o n t h s , h e s a i d , h e b e g a n t o a s k t h e g u a r d s f o r i n f o r m a t i o n a b o u t t h e s t a t u s o f h i s c a s e , p e r s i s t i n g u n t i l t h e y b e c a m e f e d u p w i t h h i m . H e c l a i m s t h a t o n e d a y , a g r o u p o f g u a r d s t o o k h i m i n t o a r o o m C u b a n s l a u n c h p r o t e s t ; T r i b u n e i n t e r v i e w s 1 0 m e n a t t h e D e t e n t i o n C e n t r e N A S S A U A N D B A H A M A I S L A N D S L E A D I N G N E W S P A P E R T h r e e d e t a i n e e s o n h u n g e r s t r i k e C M Y K C M Y KV o l u m e : 1 0 5 N o . 8 0 F R I D A Y , F E B R U A R Y 2 7 , 2 0 0 9 P R I C E 7 5 W E A T H E R S U N S H I N E H I G H 8 0 F L O W 6 8 F B U S I N E S SS E E B U S I N E S S F R O N T P A G E S P O R T SM o t o r d e a l e r i n $ 7 0 0 k e x p a n s i o nS E E P A G E F I F T E E NK n i g h t s t o pS t i n g r a y sT h e T r i b u n eA N Y T I M E. . .A N Y P L A C E, W ER E# 1 B A H A M A S E D I T I O N F R U I T & N U T M c F L U R R Y nB y C H E S T E R R O B A R D S B u s i n e s s R e p o r t e r A $ 1 . 3 m i l l i o n G R A N D B a h a m a p i g f a r m p r o j e c t i s w a i t i n g o n f i n a l a p p r o v a l s f r o m g o v e r n m e n t b e f o r e i t o p e n s a s t h e l a r g e s t s o w f a r m i n t h e B a h a m a s , w i t h 6 0 0 p i g s b e i n g r a i s e d f o r B a h a m i a n c o n s u m p t i o n a n d e x p o r t . M i c h a e l D o u g l a s , d i r e c t o r o f b u s i n e s s d e v e l o p m e n t f o r R o s e F a r m l a n d L t d , t o l d T r i b u n e B u s i n e s s y e s t e r d a y t h a t t h e f a r m w i l l i n i t i a l l y o p e r a t e a t a l o s s f o r a b o u t t h r e e y e a r s b e f o r e b e c o m i n g s i g n i f i c a n t l y p r o f i t a b l e . T h e f i r s t t h r e e y e a r s i s a l w a y s h a r d i n a n y b u s i n e s s , a n d w e a r e t o b e o p e r a t i n g a t a n t t h e e k e e p p r o f i t m a r g i n s h i g h , i n t e g r a t e d i t s o w n s l a u g h t e r a n d p a c k i n g h o u s e s i n t o t h e b u s i n e s s m o d e l , a n d i n t e n d s t o g r o w d e d i c a t e d f o o d c r o p s f o r f e e d , w h i c h r e p r e s e n t s a l a r g e o v e r h e a d c o s t . I n t h i s v e n t u r e w e o w n t h e f a r m , w e o w n t h e s l a u g h t e r a n d p a c k a g i n g h o u s e t h e y r e v e r t i c a l l y i n t e g r a t e d s o w e r e g o i n g t o b e s u p p l y i n g o u r s e l v e s w i t h p i g s a t a r a t e t h a t i s n e c e s s a r y s o t h a t w e c a n m a r k e t t h e m , s a i d M r D o u g l a s . H e s a i d a b o u t 6 0 p e r c e n t o f f a r m c o s t s c o m e f r o m f e e d p u r S E C T I O N B b u s i n e s s @ t r i b u n e m e d i a . n e t F R I D A Y , F E B R U A R Y 2 7 , 2 0 0 9 T H E T R I B U N E $ 4 . 6 8 $ 4 . 5 1 $ 4 . 6 9T h e i n f o r m a t i o n c o n t a i n e d i s f r o m a t h i r d p a r t y a n d T h e T r i b u n e c a n n o t b e h e l d r e s p o n s i b l e f o r e r r o r s a n d / o r o m i s s i o n f r o m t h e d a i l y r e p o r t $ 3 . 3 4 $ 3 . 5 6 $ 3 . 3 6 b t t r l i f eP E N S I O N M a n y C L I C O c l i e n t s u n l i k e l y t o r e c o v e r 1 0 0 % o f i n v e s t m e n t s nB y N E I L H A R T N E L L T r i b u n e B u s i n e s s E d i t o r T h e N a t i o n a l I n s u r a n c e B o a r d ( N I B ) h a s r e c o m m e n d e d i n c r e a s i n g t h e i n s u r a b l e w a g e c e i l i n g b y 5 0 p e r c e n t f r o m $ 4 0 0 t o $ 6 0 0 a s a w a y t o e n s u r e i t s l o n g t e r m s u s t a i n a b i l i t y , i t s d i r e c t o r w a r n i n g y e s t e r d a y t h a t t h e s c h e m e f a c e d s e v e r e d e p l e t i o n b y 2 0 3 2 i f n o t h i n g h a p p e n s . A l g e r n o n C a r g i l l , a d d r e s s i n g t h e R o t a r y C l u b o f W e s t N a s s a u , s a i d t h e p r o p o s e d $ 2 0 0 i n c r e a s e i n t h e c e i l i n g f o r t h e i n s u r a b l e w a g e t h e p o r t i o n o f e m p l o y e e i n c o m e o n w h i c h N I B c o n t r i b u t i o n s i s c a l c u l a t e d w a s o n l y a n i n i t i a l s t e p , t h e r e c o m m e n d a t i o n b e i n g t h a t i t c o n t i n u e t o b e r a i s e d i n l i n e w i t h i n c r e a s e s i n t h e a v e r a g e n a t i o n a l w a g e .R R e e v v i i e e w wT h e r e c o m m e n d a t i o n w a s f a s l e w m a d e i n t h e w a k e v w 5 0 % i n c r e a s e t o N I B w a g e c e i l i n g i s r e c o m m e n d e d * I n c l u s i o n o f g r a t u i t i e s / t i p s i n w a g e d e f i n i t i o n ; r a i s i n g p e n s i o n v e s t i n g p e r i o d f r o m t h r e e y e a r s t o 1 0 ; a n d l i n k i n g p e n s i o n s t o i n f l a t i o n a m o n g p r o p o s a l s t o e n s u r e N I B s s u s t a i n a b i l i t y * D i r e c t o r w a r n s i f n o t h i n g d o n e , N I B t o f a c e s e r i o u s c h a l l e n g e s c o m e 2 0 3 2 * H i g h p r o f i l e b u s i n e s s e s p r o s e c u t e d f o r n o n p a y m e n t * B u s i n e s s e s r e q u i r e d b y l a w t o k e e p a l l N I B r e c o r d s i n d e f i n i t e l y nB y N E I L H A R T N E L L T r i b u n e B u s i n e s s E d i t o r M a n y C L I C O ( B a h a m a s ) c r e d i t o r s a r e u n l i k e l y t o r e c o v e r 1 0 0 p e r c e n t o f t h e i r i n v e s t m e n t s i f t h e c o m p a n y g o e s i n t o f u l l l i q u i d a t i o n , a f o r m e r g o v e r n m e n t m i n i s t e r s a i d y e s t e r d a y , a s i t s N a s s a u b a s e d b r a n c h o f f i c e s w e r e c l o s e d i n d e f i n i t e l y , a n d t h e s a l e s a g e n c y f o r c e t o l d t o s t a y a t h o m e u n t i l f u r t h e r n o t i c e . J a m e s S m i t h , m i n i s t e r o f s t a t e f o r f i n a n c e i n t h e f o r m e r C h r i s t i e a d m i n i s t r a t i o n , d e s c r i b e d t h e m o v e t o l i q u i d a t i o n a s a v e r y s e r i o u s , s w i f t m o v e , s o t h e G o v e r n m e n t m u s t h a v e c o m e u n d e r s o m e s e r i o u s t e c h n i c a l a d v i s e m e n t . H e s u g g e s t e d , t h o u g h , t h a t b e f o r e t h e G o v e r n m e n t m o v e t o f u l l y w i n d u p C L I C O ( B a h a m a s ) a n d p l a c e i t i n t o f u l l l i q u i d a t i o n , t h a t t h e c o m p a n y b e g i v e n o n e l a s t c h a n c e t o c o m e u p w i t h a p l a n t o s a t i s f y i t s c r e d i t o r s i n t h i s c a s e , i t s a n n u i t y d e p o s i t o r s , a n d t h e l i f e a n d h e a l t h i n s u r a n c e p o l i c y h o l d e r s . I f t h e y c o m e u p w i t h a p l a n , t h e c h a n c e s o f t h e c r e d i t o r s , t h e p o l i c y h o l d e r s , g e t t i n g 1 0 0 p e r c e n t o n t h e d o l l a r i s b e t t e r , b u t i f t h e y g o i n t o f u l l l i q u i d a t i o n , t h e y w i l l g e t a p e r c e n t a g e o n t h e d o l l a r a n d w i l l h a v e t o p a y t h e f e e s o f t h e l i q u i d a t o r , M r S m i t h e x p l a i n e d . * A l l N a s s a u o f f i c e s c l o s e , a n d s a l e s a g e n c y f o r c e t o l d t o s t a y a t h o m e u n t i l f u r t h e r n o t i c e * S e v e r a l p o t e n t i a l b u y e r s c i r c l e i n s u r a n c e b o o k o f b u s i n e s s A S E C U R I T Y O F F I C E R a t C L I C O s h o w s c u s t o m e r s w h e r e t o g o . F e l i p M a j o r / T r i b u n e s t a f f S E E p a g e 3 B $ 1 . 3 m p i g f a r m e y e d f o r G r a n d B a h a m a S E E p a g e 6 B nB y N E I L H A R T N E L L T r i b u n e B u s i n e s s E d i t o r T h e N a s s a u M o t o r C o m p a n y ( N M C ) y e s t e r d a y s a i d i t c o u l d u l t i m a t e l y i n v e s t u p t o $ 6 0 0 , $ 7 0 0 , 0 0 0 i n a f o u r p h a s e e x p a n s i o n d e s i g n e d t o e n h a n c e e f f i c i e n c y i n i t s s e r v i c e d e p a r t m e n t , w i t h t h e f i r s t s t a g e t h e c o n s t r u c t i o n o f f i v e n e w b a y s w i t h h y d r a u l i c l i f t s s e t t o b e c o m p l e t e d a n d o p e r a t i o n a l w i t h i n t h e n e x t t w o w e e k s . R i c k L o w e , N a s s a u M o t o r C o m p a n y s o p e r a t i o n s m a n a g e r , t o l d T r i b u n e B u s i n e s s t h a t t h e c o n s t r u c t i o n o f t h e f i v e n e w s e r v i c e b a y s a t i t s h e a d q u a r t e r s , s a n d w i c h e d b e t w e e n S h i r l e y & D e v e a u x S t r e e t s , w a s a p l a n w e d b e e n t r y i n g t o i m p l e m e n t f o r a c o u p l e o f y e a r s . I t s a c t u a l l y t h e f i r s t p h a s e o f a f o u r p h a s e p l a n , M r L o w e e x p l a i n e d . W e r e r e n o v a t i n g o u r s e r v i c e d e p a r t m e n t t o m a k e i t m o r e e f f i c i e n t . W e r e p u t t i n g n e w l i f t s i n f i v e o f o u r b a y s . H o p e f u l l y , o u r t e c h n i c i a n s w i l l b e m o r e e f f i c i e n t , a n d i t w i l l m a k e t h i n g s j u s t a l i t t l e e a s i e r f o r o u r s e r v i c e c u s t o m e r s . I t w i l l a l s o b e a b e t t e r e n v i r o n m e n t f o r o u r t e c h n i c i a n s . H H y y d d r r a a u u l l i i c cM r L o w e s a i d t h e f i v e n e w s e r v i c e b a y s , e a c h w i t h t h e i r o w n h y d r a u l i c l i f t s t o r a i s e u p v e h i c l e s , w o u l d e n a b l e N a s s a u M o t o r C o m p a n y t o r e p l a c e f i v e o l d b a y s . T h e c o m p a n y n o w h a d 2 0 b a y s i n w h i c h t o s e r v i c e c l i e n t s v e h i c l e s . H e a d d e d t h a t t h e s e c o n d p h a s e o f t h e p r o j e c t , w h e n e v e r N a s s a u M o t o r C o m p a n y i n i t i a t e d i t , w o u l d i n v o l v e k n o c k i n g d o w n t h e e x i s t i n g c l i e n t r e c e p t i o n b u i l d i n g a n d r e p l a c i n g i t w i t h a n e w p r o p e r t y . T h e r e c e p t i o n o f f i c e s m o v e w o u l d c r e a t e t w o a d d i t i o n a l s e r v i c e b a y s , g i v i n g N a s s a u M o t o r C o m p a n y t w o m o r e s e r v i c e b a y s t h a n i t c u r r e n t l y h a s . I f i t a l l c o m e s t o g e t h e r , i t w i l l p r o b a b l y b e i n e x c e s s o f $ 5 0 0 , 0 0 0 , m a y b e a s h i g h a s $ 6 0 0 , 0 0 0 $ 7 0 0 , 0 0 0 , M r L o w e s a i d o f t h e c o m p a n y s i n v e s t m e n t . N a s s a u M o t o r C o m p a n y s w i l l i n g n e s s t o i n v e s t , e v e n i n a t r o u b l e d e c o n o m y w h e r e n e w c a r s a l e s h a v e p l u m m e t e d , d r o p p i n g b y a r o u n d 3 0 p e r c e n t i n d u s t r y w i d e l a s t y e a r , p r o v i d e s h o p e t h a t t h e B a h a m a s w i l l e v e n t u a l l y p u l l o u t o f r e c e s s i o n t h r o u g h t h e e f f o r t s o f B a h a m i a n o w n e d b u s i n e s s e s . 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T h e i n f a n t s g r a n d m o t h e r a n d m o t h e r o f A u g u s t i n e w e p t l o u d l y o n B a n k L a n e y e s t e r d a y a s t h e a c c u s e d w e r e e s c o r t e d t o c o u r t b y T R I B U N E E X C L U S I V E S E E p a g e 1 0P R I M E M I N I S T E R H u b e r t I n g r a h a m a l o n g w i t h E d i s o n K e y , E x e c u t i v e C h a i r m a n o f t h e B a h a m a s A g r i c u l t u r a l a n d I n d u s t r i a l C o r p o r a t i o n , l o o k s a t B a h a m i a n g r o w n p r o d u c e o n d i s p l a y y e s t e r d a y a t t h e o p e n i n g o f t h e A g r i c u l t u r a l , M a r i n e R e s o u r c e s a n d A g r i b u s i n e s s E x p o . S E E P A G E S E V E N B A H A M I A N G R O W N P R O D U C E O N D I S P L A Y F O R P MF e l i p M a j o r / T r i b u n e s t a f f F a r a h A u g u s t i n e T e d d y T h a d d e u s C h a r l t o nS E E p a g e e i g h tF e l i p M a j o r / T r i b u n e s t a f fnB y M E G A N R E Y N O L D S T r i b u n e S t a f f R e p o r t e r m r e y n o l d s @ t r i b u n e m e d i a . n e t E M P L O Y E R S w h o i l l e g a l l y h i r e f o r e i g n w o r k e r s s h o u l d b e f o r c e d t o p a y a n i n c r e a s e d f i n e o f $ 1 0 , 0 0 0 f o r c o n t r a v e n i n g t h e I m m i g r a t i o n A c t , M i n i s t e r B r a n v i l l e M c C a r t n e y s a i d y e s t e r d a y . S p e a k i n g a t a s e n i o r m a n a g e r s c o n f e r e n c e a t t h e B r e e z e s h o t e l i n C a b l e B e a c h , t h e M i n i s t e r o f I m m i g r a t i o n s a i d B a h a m i a n s w h o e m p l o y i l l e g a l i m m i g r a n t s w h o h a v e n o r i g h t t o w o r k o r l i v e i n t h e c o u n t r y s h o u l d b e h i t w i t h f i n e s s e r i o u s e n o u g h t o a f f e c t b u s i n e s s e s t h a t b r e a k t h e l a w . I w o u l d l i k e t o s e e t h e f i n e i n c r e a s e t o $ 1 0 , 0 0 0 , a n d i f t h e y a r e c a u g h t t h e y w o u l d f e e l i t i n t h e i r p o c k e t s , h e s a i d . W e h a v e a n i l l e g a l p r o b l e m a n d i f w e a r e s e r i o u s a b o u t a d d r e s s i n g t h e i l l e g a l p r o b l e m l e t s s t o p f a c i l i t a t i n g p e o p l e f r o m c o m i n g o v e r . 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A s h e w e l c o m e d I m m i g r a t i o n c h i e f s t o a d a y d e d i c a t e d t o t h e r e v i e w o f l e g i s l a t i v e a m e n d -E m p l o y e r s i l l e g a l l y h i r i n g f o r e i g n w o r k e r s s h o u l d p a y $ 1 0 , 0 0 0 f i n e B r a n v i l l e M c C a r t n e yS E E p a g e 1 1nB y R U P E R T M I S S I C K J r C h i e f R e p o r t e r r m i s s i c k @ t r i b u n e m e d i a . n e t H U M A N r i g h t s g r o u p s h a v e e x p r e s s e d c o n c e r n t h a t i n v e s t i g a t i o n s c o n d u c t e d b y t h e D e p a r t m e n t o f I m m i g r a t i o n w e r e h a n d l e d i n t e r n a l l y w i t h o u t i n d e p e n d e n t r e v i e w a n d o v e r s i g h t , t h e 2 0 0 8 H u m a n R i g h t s R e p o r t f o r t h e B a h a m a s c o n d u c t e d b y t h e U S S t a t e D e p a r t m e n t s a i d y e s t e r d a y . A t t h e t i m e o f t h e r e p o r t t h e C a r m i c h a e l R o a d I m m i g r a n t D e t e n t i o n C e n t r e h e l d u p t o 5 0 0 d e t a i n e e s l a s t y e a r ( w i t h t e n t s p a c e f o r a n a d d i t i o n a l 5 0 0 ) , a n d w o m e n a n d m e n w e r e h e l d s e p a r a t e l y . H a i t i a n s a n d J a m a i c a n s w e r e t h e m o s t c o m m o n l y i n t e r d i c t e d m i g r a n t s a n d t h e h i g h e s t o c c u p a n c y d u r i n g t h e y e a r w a sC o n c e r n o v e r D e p a r t m e n t o f I m m i g r a t i o n i n v e s t i g a t i o n sS E E p a g e e i g h t P L E A S E N O T E T H A T , D U E T O S P A C E R E S T R I C T I O N S , T H E C O M I C S P A G E I S A G A I N N O T I N T O D A Y S T R I B U N E . T H E P A G E W I L L , H O W E V E R , R E T U R N T O M O R R O W . w w w . t r i b u n e 2 4 2 . c o m S S e e e e p p a a g g e e 1 1 0 0 B B S S e e e e p p a a g g e e 9 9 B B MIAMI-BASED reporter Mario Vallejo, who was allegedly beaten by guards outside the Carmichael Road Detention Centre in 2006... THE FRONT PAGE of The Tribune, Feb ruary 27, 2009, in which allegations of brutality were levelled by 10 detainees in an exclusive interview...


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Volume: 105 No.145

ST



m@ By TANEKA THOMPSON
Tribune Staff Reporter
tthompson@tribunemedia.net

SEVERAL imposter bottles
bearing the Aquapure label
have been confiscated from an
independent depot and found
to have off-the-chart levels of
disease-causing and potential-
ly-deadly bacteria.

The company was tipped off
to the fake products - being
passed off as demineralised
water - after suspicious looking
red-capped bottles were spot-
ted by an Aquapure employee
at an independent depot in cen-
tral New Providence.

The five bottles were seized
by police, tested by company
lab technicians and found to be
"heavily contaminated" with
coliform bacteria, indicators of
disease-causing organisms, and
fecal bacteria, due to fecal waste
contamination.

The bottles in question were
outfitted with used labels, were
not stamped with a bottling date
and did not have the company's
embossed logo.

It is suspected that used bot-
tles collected at the depot were
re-filled with foreign, contami-
nated water in order to cash in
on the demand for the more
expensive demineralised brand.

Company president Alex
Knowles told The Tribune:
"The problem we have is to

Sale Ends
May 30th

FSTORMS

eT
LUN Hs
juestions linger

SEE INSIGHT FRONT

c.



CM cu AAMAS RSIESUIE

CHARLENE SMITH, quality control
manager at Aquapure, tests the
imposter water for bacteria.

police this. It is kind of diffi-
cult."

During a visit to his Bernard
Road plant on Saturday to
inspect the results, Mr Knowles
called on environmental health
officials to vigorously monitor
small depots and to crackdown
on the problem.

He also demanded govern-
ment legislation to allow for the
prosecution of persons found

SEE page nine

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The Tribune

=USA TODAY.

BAHAMAS EDITION

www.tribune242.com

MONDAY, MAY 18, 2009



TS

Fake bottled wate
sparks disease fear

Imposter products
‘heavily contaminated’

Felipé Major/Tribune staff

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TEN-YEAR-OLD potca

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he best dressed dog category on

Saturday at the Humane Society’s Animal Fun Day. The annual event
was held at the Botanical Gardens. Keep an eye out for a picture
special of the event in this week’s Tribune.

Youth killed, passenger
injured in traffic accident

@ By DENISE MAYCOCK
Tribune Freeport
Reporter
dmaycock@tribunemedia.net

FREEPORT - A 19-year-old
youth died and a female pas-
senger was detained in hospital
in serious condition following a
traffic accident early Sunday
morning on Grand Bahama.

Asst Supt Welbourne Bootle
said the accident occurred
around 3.55am at Pinta Avenue
near Bahamia Arms.

The identities of the victims

have not been released. The
young man’s death pushes the
island traffic fatality count to
six for the year.

ASP Bootle said police
received a call about an acci-
dent in the Bahamia area and
went to investigate.

When officers arrived they
found a young driver pinned
between the vehicle and a lamp
pole protector. The female pas-
senger, who is also 19, had been
ejected from the vehicle.

SEE page 10





SEE PAGE FIFTEEN

Teenager shot
dead in 28th
homicide
of the year

Nassau Village resident is
fired on by SUV occupants

A 18-YEAR-OLD youth
was killed on Saturday after
being gunned down in an
inner-city community.

The young man, a resident
of Nassau Village, was walk-
ing in the Lifebouy Street
area shortly before midnight
when a SUV pulled up
alongside him.

The occupants got out of
the car and started firing
shots in the direction of the
victim, press liaison officer
Assistant Superintendent
Walter Evans reported.

Police rushed to the scene
to find the man lying on the
ground in a vacant lot.

He had sustained gunshot
wounds to his chest and his
ankles. He was dressed in a
white T-shirt, blue jeans and
brown shoes at the time of
his death.



Police recovered a .380
handgun with three live
rounds of ammunition from
the area where the victim
was found.

The Central Detective
Unit said yesterday
that details are still very
sketchy.

The victim had not been
positively identified up until
press time last night, and
police had not determined
a motive for the shooting.

The CDU did not wish to
speculate if the murder — the
country’s 28th homicide for
the year — could have been
gang or drug related.

Police could also not ver-
ify if the victim had been
specifically targeted by the
gunmen.

Investigations into the
matter are continuing.

Body found floating
in waters near BASRA

THE body of a man was found floating in waters east of the
Bahamas Air and Sea Rescue Association (BASRA) on East Bay

Street yesterday morning.

Assistant Superintendent Walter Evans said police received a
report of the startling find around 10 am.

The body was removed from the water and upon an initial exam-
ination police found no visible signs of injury that would suggest foul

play, said ASP Evans.
SEE page nine



SHOOTING, ARMED
ROBBERY AND STABBINGS
IN GRAND BAHAMA

MAN QUESTIONED OVER
BANK ROBBERY

RETAILERS ‘NEED MORE
OF THE DOMESTIC
MARKET’ TO STAY AFLOAT

Joint venture

for major oil
exploration
in Bahamas

@ By KARIN HERIG
Tribune Staff Reporter
kherig@tribunemedia.net

ANEW JOINT VENTURE
has been established between a
Norwegian company and BPC
Limited for the first major oil
exploration project in Bahami-
an waters in 23 years.

Both companies said they
believe there is a high potential
for valuable oil and gas pro-

SEE page 10

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SG) | necrmco
Sy

as i


PAGE 2, MONDAY, MAY 18, 2009

THE TRIBUNE



LOCAL NEWS



24-year-old wanted by police in.
connection with armed robbery |

of slim build, 5°10” tall, :
weighing approximate- }
ly 180lbs. i

Anyone with infor- }
mation regarding the }
suspect’s whereabouts is
asked to contact the }
police emergency hot- }
line at 919 or 911; the :
Central Detective Unit }
at 502-9930/9991; the i
Police Control Room at }
322-3333; Crime Stop- }
pers at 328-8477 or the nearest }
police station. ;

POLICE are asking
the public for assistance
in the apprehension of
24-year-old David
Daniel Mettulus who is
wanted in connection
with an armed robbery.

An all-points bulletin
has been issued for Met-
tulus, describing him as
“armed and dangerous.”

His last known
address was Ridgeland
Park West in New Providence.

Mettulus is described as being



David Daniel
Mettulus
























MAIN/SPORTS SECTION

Local News Pl ype fonler elensh, MOL Weil %

Eqitonialy betters cus et eee P4
P11,18,19

Comics

BUSINESS/INSIGHT SECTION

Business P1,2,3,4,5,6,7,8
Insight

Weather

CLASSIFIED SECTION 40 PAGES

REAL ESTATE GUIDE 24 PAGES

USA TODAY MAIN SECTION 12 PAGES

and

Shooting, armed robbery and
stabbings in Grand Bahama

@ By DENISE MAYCOCK
Tribune Freeport Reporter
dmaycock@tribunemedia.net

FREEPORT - Grand Bahama
Police are investigating a shoot-
ing, armed robbery, and two stab-
bing incidents that occurred over
the weekend.

Asst Supt Welbourne Bootle
said a 33-year-old man was shot at
Pinder’s Point early Saturday
morning.

According to reports, at about
3am police received reports of
gunshots in the area of the 313
nightclub, where a man was dis-
covered suffering from apparent
gunshot injuries to both thighs.

The victim was taken to Rand
Memorial Hospital, where he is
being treated.

ASP Bootle said the shooter
was armed with a handgun and
escaped in a brown-coloured Cav-
alier. He was wearing a dark
coloured mask, blue shirt, and
black pants.

m ARMED ROBBERY
THE Hawksbill Service Station
was robbed of an undetermined
amount of cash on Saturday
evening by three armed suspects.
According to reports, three

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PHONE: 322-2157

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FOOTLONGS ”

masked men entered the service
station around 8.30pm. They held
up and robbed a cashier of cash.

One man was armed with a
high-powered weapon and anoth-
er with a crow bar. The suspects
wore dark clothing and escaped in
a champagne or green-coloured
Ford Taurus, license 23303.

Anyone with information that
can assist police with their inves-
tigation is asked to contact the
police.

@ STABBING
A 21-year-old man was stabbed





=,
lt

Felipé Major/Tribune staff

= Tr sass

Saxons celebrate on
the streets of Nassau

MEMBERS OF THE SHELL SAXONS SUPERSTARS took to
the streets of Nassau on Saturday to mark their victory in the
New Year’s Junkanoo parade. Delighted tourists were caught
up in the event - some thinking it was a regular occurrence.

during an altercation at the
Grand Bahama Taxi Union Hall
on Saturday evening.

Asst Supt Welbourne Bootle
reported that sometime around
8.25pm several persons were
involved in a fight at the taxi
union hall where a function was
being held.

A 21-year-old waiter, who
was working at the event, was
stabbed in the back with a
sharp object. He is detained in
hospital.

Grand Bahama Police are also
investigating a stabbing which

aa





occurred at Worker’s House ear-
ly Sunday morning.

A 33-year-old man of Yeoman
Wood told police that around
12.40am on Sunday he was
attacked by three men who beat
him about the body and stabbed
him in the back with a sharp
instrument.

As a result of information
received from the victim, police
went to Pinder’s Point around
1.10pm and arrested a 19-year-
old male resident for possession
of a 44 Magnum revolver with
one .44 bullet.





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THE TRIBUNE

MONDAY, MAY 18, 2009, PAGE 3



Man questioned over bank robbery

Fifteen packets |

in house search

POLICE seized 15 pack-

ets of cocaine while search- }

ing a house in the Kemp
Road area.
ASP Walter Evans said

officers made the discovery }

as they executed a search
warrant at a home through
Williams Lane, off Kemp
Road, around 9pm Thurs-
day.

A 39-year-old man was
arrested.

g FIREARM
RECOVERED

PUBLIC assistance led to
the discovery of a .38 hand- :

gun with six rounds of
ammunition concealed ina

bushy area off Kemp Road.

Acting on a tip, officers

from the Wulff Road Police i

Station found the illegal
firearm and related para-
phernalia shortly after
noon on Friday.

tinue.

officers promotions

featured in special
two-page spread

FEATURED in today’s
Tribune on pages 18 and 19
are Bahamas Customs offi-

cers recently promoted with- ;

in the senior ranks of the
Department. The two-page
spread features senior offi-
cers, 95 per cent of whom
having received promotions
including Glenn Gomez to

the post of Acting Comptrol-
ler of Customs and Earl Sey- :

mour to the post of Deputy
Comptroller of Customs.
Glenn Gomez was
appointed to act as Comp-
troller of Customs on April
15, 2009, upon the retire-
ment of former Comptroller

ley.

Mr. Gomez joined the
Public Service in 1967 and
was promoted through the
ranks to the post of Superin-
tendent in the Customs
Department in 1993. He
attended numerous courses
both locally and internation-
ally, and in 1994 was afford-

ed the opportunity to partici- :

pate in a nine-week Crown
Agent Course in London,
England.

Upon successful comple-
tion he returned to the Cus-
toms Department before

being transferred to the Rev- i

enue Section of the Ministry
of Finance where he
remained until his promo-
tion to Deputy Comptroller
of Customs.

Earl Seymour has been
employed with the Customs
Department for more than
AO years. His earlier years
widely exposed him to both
theory and application of

Customs Laws, which served :

as a sound foundation for
additional local and interna-
tional exposure.

In 1980 upon his return
from Treasure Cay, Abaco
to Headquarters in New
Providence, Mr. Seymour
was promoted to the post of
Senior Customs Officer and
continued to ascend through
the ranks of the Customs
Department.

He was appointed Assis-

tant Comptroller of Customs :

in 1997 where he remained
until his promotion to the
post of Deputy Comptroller
of Customs on April 1,
2009.

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m@ By TANEKA THOMPSON
Tribune Staff Reporter
tthompson@tribunemedia.net

POLICE are questioning a
man connection with the day-
light armed robbery of the Sco-
tia Bank on Wulff Road and
East Street.

The suspect, who is 37 and
lives at Peter Street, was
arrested at around 5pm on Sat-
urday, a day after the incident
occurred.

Police began their hunt after
a man entered the bank alone
around 10 am and presented
himself as a customer to a
woman bank teller. He made
gestures towards "an object"
used in the hold-up, before
making good his escape with
an undetermined amount of
cash.

Cynthia ‘Mother’ Pratt,
deputy leader of the Opposi-
tion and MP for St Cecilia,
was among the few customers
in the bank at the time.

She credited the prayers of
her pastor for getting her out







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CYNTHIA PRATT was among the
customers in Scotia Bank on Wulff
Road (right) during Friday’s robbery.

of a what could have been a
deadly situation.

Speaking to The Tribune,
Mrs Pratt said she had no idea
the man who followed her into
the bank was about to rob it.

Still shaken by the harrow-
ing events, she recounted how
the bank was nearly empty
when she entered.

She said she stopped briefly
to speak with the security
guard at the front door, before
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come to his station instead.

“When I went to the teller
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bery until I noticed everyone
going to the back and I said to
the young man, what is going
on.

“Then the young man said
to me, ‘Mother, we just got
robbed!?’? And I said, what?

“And the (robber) was right
next to the next teller and I
didn’t know.

“Only after the police
showed up did I take with the



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shakes. It all happened so
fast.

“T could have been gone as
quickly as that. It was a matter
of seconds,” Mrs Pratt told The
Tribune just hours after the
ordeal.

Early Friday morning Dr
Inez Rolle, pastor of Wings of
the Eagle Redemption Min-
istries, phoned her and asked
her to allow her to cover her

that morning in prayer.
These prayers, said 'Moth-

er' Pratt, kept her safe
throughout the agonizing
ordeal.

. .[f it wasn’t for that I
might have been dead,” the
former national security min-
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robbery did not turn deadly.

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PAGE 4, MONDAY, MAY 18, 2009

EDITORIAL/LETTERS TO THE EDITOR

THE TRIBUNE





The Tribune Limited

NULLIUS ADDICTUS JURARE IN VERBA MAGISTRI
Being Bound to Swear to The Dogmas of No Master

LEON E. H. DUPUCH, Publisher/Editor 1903-1914

SIR ETIENNE DUPUCH, Kt, O.B.E., K.M., K.C.S.G.,

(Hon.) LL.D., D.Litt.

Publisher/Editor 1919-1972
Contributing Editor 1972-1991

EILEEN DUPUCH CARRON, C.M.G., M.S. B.A., LL.B.

Publisher/Editor 1972-

Published Daily Monday to Saturday

Shirley Street, RO. Box N-3207, Nassau, Bahamas
Insurance Management Building., P.O. F-485, Freeport, Grand Bahama

TELEPHONES
Switchboard (News, Circulation and Advertising) 322-1986
Advertising Manager - (242) 502-2352
Circulation Department - (242) 502-2387
Nassau Fax: - (242) 328-2398
Freeport, Grand Bahama: 1-(242)-352-6608
Freeport fax: (242) 352-9348

WEBSITE
www.tribune242.com — updated daily at 2pm

This murder needs to be solved

JOSEPH-MARIE, comte de Maistre, French
ambassador to Russia in the nineteenth centu-
ry once remarked that if you “scratch a Russian
you wound a Tartar.”

The same observation can be made of the
Bahamas’ tourism industry. If you scratch a
tourist you wound this country’s bread and but-
ter — tourism.

And as for the murder of a well-known and
liked banker, the repercussions can forever tar-
nish the image of the Bahamas as an impor-
tant financial centre.

In other words it will get out that it is neither
safe nor desirable to do business in this country.

On April 22 Hywel Jones, 55, of Peterston-
super-Ely, near Cardiff, Wales, president of
Britannia Investment Group in Nassau, stepped
from his car and started to walk towards his
West Bay Street office when he fell to the
ground in a pool of blood.

He had been shot twice, once straight through
the head. He fought for his life for three weeks
while a policeman stood guard at his hospital
door. Police classified his killing as a “hit job.”

It was a bold killing. The unmasked gun-
man is reported to have walked up to him about
10 o’clock that Wednesday morning, fired
directly at his head, jumped on a motorcycle
and sped off towards Gambier Village.

Of course, this is now a high profile case, not
because— as suggested by an article sent to us
anonymously last week — he is a white man, but
because he is a foreign banker, the Bahamas is
an important financial centre, and the foreign
press is now on the trail, asking the usual ques-
tions, and pressing for answers.

His younger brother, has flown in from Los
Angeles, California, and vows not to leave until
Hywel Jones’ killer is found. Friends have put
up a $50,000 reward for information that will
result in the arrest and conviction of whoever is
responsible.

Hywel Jones settled in the Bahamas in 1988.
Up until two years ago he lived a peaceful life—
a conscientious banker by day; a man who
enjoyed his discos at night.

However, all that changed about two years
ago when he had two unpleasant experiences —
once when he was held up at knifepoint in his
West Bay Street home, and on another occasion
when he was beaten up and threatened.

He filed a criminal complaint, and hired a
private investigator. Information was given to
the police, but apparently nothing was done.

It is understood that this file, which could
not be found immediately after his murder, has

since been located and presumably will now be
investigated.

About this time a dispute arose between Mr
Jones and an associate when they severed their
business relations and went their separate ways.
A case was pending and was due for hearing
about a week before Mr Jones was murdered. In
fact there are two cases — one civil and one
criminal.

As is the wont with sip-sip in Nassau, arm-
chair sleuths are muddying the waters, mixing
everything together, probably arriving at wrong
conclusions, and possibly unfairly sullying the
reputations of others along the way.

We understand that all the statements, and
affidavits have been sworn and filed and ready
for prosecution in these cases.

It would probably be advisable for the police
to proceed with the criminal case and get that
behind them, so that full concentration can be
given to solving the murder.

It is understood that Mr Jones’ family is giv-
ing their full support to our Bahamian police,
but if the foreign press keep pushing and ques-
tions are asked at the Foreign Office in London,
Scotland Yard, may be the next on the scene.

We are equally concerned about all the
Bahamians being murdered in what, in some
cases, also appear to be “hit jobs.”

Eventually these killings will also affect our
tourist industry should they result in a travel
advisory listing this country among those con-
sidered “unsafe for travel.”

However, a high profile banker can have this
result overnight.

That is why it is important that no stone be
left unturned in solving his murder.

Don’t forget Aruba and the disappearance
and presumed murder of Natalee Holloway, an
American high school student, who disappeared
from a class trip to that island in June, 2005.

Aruba has never recovered from that pub-
licity. In February this year it was reported that
Aruba’s tourism was down between 15 and 20
per cent “and still falling even in high season.”

Already the Bahamas is in economic trouble.
Therefore, it is in every Bahamian’s interest to
have Hywel Jones’ murder solved as quickly
as possible.

And so if anyone has any information that
would help they should call Crime Stoppers
toll-free at 328-8477.

These calls will be answered by operators in
the United States who will ensure complete
anonymity. Otherwise call the Criminal Detec-
tive Unit at 502-9942 or 502-9991.



Please help
our efforts
to preserve
sea turtles

EDITOR, The Tribune.

Please publish this open letter
to the local community for their
support in the preservation of
the endangered sea turtle.

The Bahamas Sea Turtle
Conservation Group

Dear Friends,

I once again write to you,
cap in hand, begging for help. I
actually do feel very guilty com-
ing to you for help but this is a
dire situation; it always is, isn’t
it?

I don’t know if you have
noticed that there is a reason-
ably fierce battle raging over
the Sea Turtles in the Bahamas.
There are huge numbers of peo-
ple in this country who feel that
the only responsible thing to do
is to have a total ban on the har-
vesting and killing of all sea tur-
tles in order to preserve them
for generations to come. Unfor-
tunately we are still meeting
some resistance to the Bill. It is
difficult for me to understand
why people are not unanimous
in the passing of the turtle ban,
however they are not, in spite of
knowing that every sea turtle
in the world is on the threat-
ened list, and some are already
on the endangered list.

Last October the Bahamas
Government offered a partial

LETTERS

letters@triounemedia net



ban by December 31, 2008, and
a TOTAL ban by April 1, 2009.
Perhaps it was an April Fools
joke because those dates have
been and gone and we are no
closer to protecting the Sea Tur-
tles than we were a year ago.
The environmental impact is
huge, we will gradually lose the
sea turtle as we have already
lost so many other species, they
will became a rarity in the lives
of our children and grandchil-
dren. How unbelievably sad
that would be.

I am asking for help as we,
the Bahamas Sea Turtle Con-
servation Group, are planning
to print 1000 brochures laying
out why it is important to pre-
serve the Sea Turtle, we are fly-
ing in Dr. Alan Bolton, who is
an expert on Sea Turtles to
speak at a town meting. He will
stay at my house, but we need
to pay for his ticket. We plan
to print more educational mate-
rials for the general public and
would also like to have funds
to be able to print t-shirts that
we could sell to raise even more
money for this cause. We want
to teach people the importance
of Eco tourism. You can kill a
turtle ONCE you can photo-

graph and swim with the same
turtle 365 days a year.

If you could send a donation
to us we would be enormously
grateful. Cheques should be
made out to “the Bahamas Sea
Turtle Conservation Group”,
they can be mailed to P.O. Box
CB 11099, Nassau. They can be
dropped to The Bahamas
Humane Society c/o Kim Aran-
ha. You can email us at
bahamasturtles@gmail.com and
we can pick your donation up.

We would be grateful for
anything, it is never too small,
small donations when put
together equal a large donation.
I know it’s a lousy time but if
you can spare $5.00 or more
Please, please help us do the
right thing here.

We plan to have a candle-
light vigil on June 8th, at 7pm
at Rawson Square, and on June
10th we are having a town
meeting at COB at 6pm. In
August there will be a wonder-
ful Turtle Art Show at Doon-
galik Studios at Marina Village,
Paradise Island, to coincide with
The Miss Universe Pageant.

Thank you for reading this
long letter.

KIM ARANHA
The Bahamas Sea Turtle
Conservation Group

Nassau,
May 14, 2009

Government doing more is not the answer

EDITOR, The Tribune.

More and more every day we see signs of the
fallout from the world’s economic troubles.

Locally we read of more layoffs, and business
people are now openly discussing their "drastic
measures list" if things continue to worsen.

At the same time, there are calls for the gov-
ernment to do more.

These are tough times for sure, but if we are
realistic, how can the government do any more
without burdening future generations with more
debt and a heavier tax burden?

Government is being called upon for more
help, while it's desperately looking for cash flow
for current commitments, all at a time when it
might be nearing borrowing limits.

There is one clear message from all of this
and Gerald Ford, the 38th President of the US
was right when he said in a speech to Congress in
1974 that: "A government big enough to give you
everything you want is a government big enough to
take from you everything you have".

The Bahamas Government must take delib-
erate steps to reduce its size and the scope of

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this economic downturn without taking more
drastic measures, that will wreak more hardship
on the "small man" and everyone else.

Otherwise, they will have to continue to raise
taxes and debt levels any way they can, which
will only stifle the economy even more.

As a friend commented recently:

"Years of profligacy has left the country in
financial jeopardy. It did not have to happen. Both
political parties chose potential bankruptcy over
conservative, disciplined spending."

"The seeds have been sown — it is left now to
reap the whirlwind."

Let's work together to figure out how we can
reduce the government. Not call on it to do more
harmful things to us.

Of course I shouldn't say The Nassau Institute
was right all along about the size of our govern-
ment, but...the reality is, it is self evident
now...isn't it?

RICK LOWE
Nassau,
May 17, 2009

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THE TRIBUNE

MONDAY, MAY 18, 2009, PAGE 5



LOCAL NEWS



Retailers ‘need more of the
domestic market to stay afloat

m@ By TANEKA THOMPSON
Tribune Staff Reporter
tthompson@tribunemedia.net

WITH lackluster business in
the capital's downtown hub not
expected to turnaround until at
least early 2010, a prominent
Bay Street merchant said retail-
ers must snag more of the
domestic market in order to stay
afloat.

Mark Finlayson - president of
luxury retail chain Solomon's
Mines - said the recent closure
of once robust stores at the east-
ern end of Bay Street were a
long time coming, because of a
failure to court Bahamian cus-
tomers, compounded with a
softened tourism industry.

"IT think we've got a rough
ride into January or February
of next year. I think all of us
have to be innovative and find
new ways in order to keep
things going, but I think it's
going to be very, very rough for



MARK FINLAYSON

everybody, for all sectors,"
said Mr Finlayson.

"High rent is part of it (Bay
Street store closures) but the
main reason is we haven't
shaped ourselves up in terms of
the product we are delivering to
tourists but also we are short-
changing ourselves in terms of

the product we are delivering to
Bahamians.

"One of the things I see in
terms of revitalisation of any
area is bringing local clientele
back to these areas it's absolute-
ly essential but somehow we
have not managed to focus our-
selves enough on getting
Bahamians," he said.

A crucial part of attracting
more local consumers down-
town, said Mr Finlayson, is the
creation of more tiered parking
areas and the installation of
metres for short-term parkers.

Plans for a downtown revi-
talisation have been years in the
making - most recently with the
formation of the Downtown
Nassau Partnership (DNP)
which earlier this month said the
public will soon “see many visi-
ble improvements to the city”.

At arecent town meeting held
at the British Colonial Hilton
DNP managing director Vaughn
Roberts said some of the vari-

ous improvements to be pushed
by the DNP over the next few
months are: Cleaning and sani-
tation, beautification, reducing
congestion, increasing the avail-

ability of parking options, under-
taking streetscaping, maintain-
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creating new entertainment pos-
sibilities.

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re



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2004 Hondas

Renewed calls for police on school campuses

RECENT reports of violence and
sexual abuse in the country’s schools

have sparked renewed calls for police |:

officers to be stationed on campuses.

The Bahamas Against Crime
organisation said recent reports are
only the “tip of the iceberg” of prob-
lems plaguing the nation’s education
system.

In the wake of accusations of sex-
ual abuse of students at Eight Mile
Rock High in Grand Bahama and
unconfirmed reports of gang violence
at C C Sweeting in New Providence,
the anti-crime organisation’s execu-
tive director Rev C B Moss is
demanding immediate action to
address the problems and consider

reinstating police officers on campuses.

“These reports, as horrible as they are, are but
the tip of the iceberg. Our schools are in deep
trouble and require urgent and critical attention,”

he said.

Rev Moss said that each day information comes
into Bahamas Against Crime which is cause for
alarm “even among the most hardened of us.”

The organisation’s statement released yesterday
calls for the Ministry of Education and the them.
government “to arise from what appears to be a
state of paralysis and implement action to halt the

REV C B MOSS



rot and decay occurring in our
schools.”

“In spite of its policy against
putting police officers on campuses,

) the current situation may warrant

and justify deploying police officers
to bring the schools under control,”
he said.

Bahamas Against Crime is also
challenging parents to wake up and
protect their children as it is their
responsibility, not the government’s.
“These parents may want to note
that for the most part, the children of
the education and government offi-
cials do not attend the violence rid-
dled schools that their children
attend. This alone demands some

response from them.”

The non-profit organisation is further chal-
lenging the wider society to demand immediate
and drastic changes in the way the country’s

schools are being operated.

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ety that is already incapable of accommodating

“This is a recipe for disaster, and we are very
near the tipping point,” said Rev Moss.

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PAGE 6, MONDAY, MAY 18, 2009 THE TRIBUNE

Minister of Works tours new | | anspor Minster

facilities at Abaco Central High

Neko Grant (right)
@ By KATHRYN CAMPBELL

is pictured with
Caves Village Professional Bahamas Information Services _

Permanent Secretary
Colin Higgs and Lenora
Black, District Superin-
tendent for Abaco
schools, at the Central
= = MINISTER of Public Works and
ay iC Office TT Cet wi AAT Transport Neko Grant said he is satisfied
with the progress of the administration
7 J . . . complex, technical block and restores
The premier choice for serious business” presently under construction at the Aba-



Abaco High School.
co Central High School.

1,661 sq. ft. $5,813.50 p. month incl. CAM Fees He and a team of ministry officials
toured the facilities during a visit to Aba-
co last week.

includes a reception area, offices for the
principal and vice- principal, student sick
bay, staff lounge, rest rooms, clerical
space and kitchenette.

1,083 sq. ft. $3,790.00 p. month incl. CAM Fees
839 sq. ft. $2,936.50 p. month incl. CAM Fees “Tam very pleased with the progress of = “" THs technical block and restrooms

th dditions to Abaco Central
850 sq. ft. $2,975.00 p. month incl. CAMFees | Hioh*hesaid.

District Superintendent for Abaco

comprise some 4,049 square feet and
include three classrooms and male and
female restrooms.



Contact Mr. Simon Chappell on schools Lenora Black said the adminis-
327-1575 or 477-7610 tration building is almost ready for occu- MINISTER OF PUBLIC WORKS and
Email: sj @ heish pancy. ; Transport Neko Grant inspects the new
mail: simon @cavesheights.com Last October, the government signed technical block at Abaco Central High
contracts totaling $900,000 with Jones School’s newly constructed technical
Construction and Williams and Sons block. Pictured behind Mr Grant is Cephas
Construction to build the additions. Cooper, Administrator for the Central
The new administration building Abaco District.




ara p Use IT) Pants ausodbaabiasusonseaasuseasuasasoussideadpassisoad scdsusendanesdeaevaasiesadsanpusensoacensnashacadcanssnbeusuasuass)snadacacscasdssnd shestavadbaubsssaeuasisansanapannaseaodiondiaaenteaupasassadessaadoautoasadoaavbsousenesnsasupanssonssnsassendbaasicosauaeadsandousbasessiacs

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THE TRIBUNE

MONDAY, MAY 18, 2009, PAGE 7



Pe
The big three and little
CARICOM in the Caribbean

= i
+ - _ ——" -

WORLD VIEW,

m By SIR RONALD
SANDERS

(The writer is a Consultant
and former Caribbean
diplomat)

"Le government of the
Dominican Republic
(DR) has applied to become a
member of the Caribbean Com-
munity and Common Market
(Caricom) and heads of govern-
ment of the regional organisa-
tion will consider the application
at their meeting in July.

There is not much to consider.

Caricom countries along with
the DR form CARIFORUM
and last year they each signed an
Economic Partnership Agree-
ment (EPA) with the 27-nation
European Union (EU) which
overtakes the objectives of Cari-
com’s slow-paced Single Market
and Economy in many aspects.

Professor Norman Girvan has
pointed out that “the EPA
defines the Dominican Republic
as part of the ‘region’: the DR
has an economy that is larger
than that of any single Caricom
country and the equivalent of 64
per cent of the combined size of
all 14 Caricom economies.

The existing Caricom-Domini-
can Republic free trade agree-
ment covers only goods, has not
yet been extended to services,
and does not contemplate exten-
sion to trade-related issues.

“The EPA’s Regional Prefer-
ence clause obliges Cariforum
states to extend to each other the
same treatment they extend to
the EU. CSME countries will,
therefore, liberalise goods, ser-
vices and investment with regard
to non-CSME Caricom countries
and to the Dominican Republic
at the same rate as to the EU”.

Therefore, from the DR’s
standpoint since it has entered a
game, it makes sense to help
make the rules.

The DR is already an elephant
in the Caricom room that cannot
be ignored — its participation in
CARIFORUM and the terms of
the EPA with the EU make it a
big player.

Things have changed appre-
ciably.

The English-speaking coun-
tries of Caricom no longer inhab-
it an exclusive neighbourhood.
They have to concede they are
small players, and acknowledge
that only cohesive action will pre-
serve their identity, their culture,
their language — and a meaningful
place in the Caribbean economic
space.

It is significant that the EU
urged the DR’s inclusion in
CARIFORUM and it had to be
accepted by Caricom as a neces-
sary condition of the EPA.

From the EU standpoint, the
DR’s inclusion in the EPA made
sense since its population of 9.6
million constitutes a market that
is almost twice the size of CARI-
COM, and the EU is interested in
larger markets for its goods and
services to help preserve and
advance the standard of living in
its own member states.

Undoubtedly, if Cuba were not
subject to a US trade embargo,
the EU might also have insisted
that Cuba with a population of
11.4 million be part of the EPA.

By any objective analysis, the
US embargo of Cuba will be lift-
ed within the next decade.

The burning desire by the pri-
vate sector in many States in the
US to do business with Cuba is
pushing change.

US companies want a signifi-
cant piece of the Cuban action
which they now see going to
European and Canadian compa-
nies, and increasingly to China
and Russia.

When the embargo is lifted,
the Caribbean will be a very dif-
ferent place.

It would be one in which its
two largest countries in popula-
tion terms would be Spanish-
speaking and of far greater
importance to the global com-
munity than the little countries
of Caricom.

It is only the US trade embar-
go against Cuba that now pre-
vents an integrated relationship
between Cuba and the Domini-
can Republic in the Caribbean
that would dwarf CARICOM.

Then, there is Puerto Rico —
another island territory in the
Caribbean with a population of
3.9 million that is Spanish-speak-
ing.

Even if Puerto Rico does not
seek separation from the US,
once the embargo on Cuba is lift-
ed, the deepening of economic
relations between Puerto Rico,



nt

“It is only
the US trade

embargo against
Cuba that now

prevents an
integrated
relationship
between

Cuba and the
Dominican
Republic in the
Caribbean that
would dwarf
CARICOM.”

Cuba and the Dominican Repub-
lic would make perfect sense.

The Caribbean will then be
dominated by these “big three” —
with markets and investment
opportunities far greater than all
the CARICOM countries.

Caricom countries would
delude themselves if they believe
that with their individual small
markets, high investment costs,
high costs of doing business and
vulnerabilities both to natural dis-
asters and external economic
shocks — such as the current glob-
al financial meltdown — they
could each operate successfully
in the global market place in
competition with the “big three.”

Caricom governments would
do well to bolster their economies
and their capacity for dealing
with their Caribbean neighbours
and the international community
by urgently completing the
arrangements for implementing
their own Single Market. They
should also swiftly reform the
governance of Caricom which
sorely needs overhaul.

Against this background, roles
for the media in Caricom coun-
tries begin to emerge.

Umbrella organizations such
as the Caribbean Media Corpo-
ration (CMC) and the Caribbean
Broadcasting Union (CBU)
should be geared for: (a) the
development of a capability to
deliver CARICOM information
into the DR, Cuba and Puerto
Rico in Spanish; and to deliver
information from these countries
into CARICOM in English; (b)
the development of relations with
media in the DR, Cuba and Puer-
to Rico who would purchase and
market information from CARI-
COM delivered in Spanish; and
(c) establishing the mechanics of
delivering such information as
widely as possible.

Having served on the first
Board of Directors of CMC (then
known as the Caribbean News
Agency) and as President of the
Caribbean Broadcasting Union, I
am painfully aware that neither
of the two institutions have fully
fulfilled the objectives for which
they were intended — that is to
knit the Caribbean peoples into a
single community through the
spread of information and knowl-
edge.

This is not the fault of the tal-
ented journalists and broadcast-
ers who have served the organi-
zations for more than three





yl

SIR RONALD SANDERS



decades; they have been con-
strained by the lack of financial
resources to do their jobs.

Expecting the financially
under-resourced CMC and CBU
to take on the task of information
flow between English-speaking
CARICOM countries and their
Spanish-speaking partners — espe-
cially now the Dominican Repub-
lic — is almost certainly impossi-
ble, unless the two organizations
get external help.

Such help should come from
three sources.

First, the governments of
CARICOM and the DR should
make a “no-strings attached”
subvention to the two organiza-
tions to undertake the necessary
information flow between their
countries.

Second, the EU should be
asked to provide the budgetary
support which CMC and the
CBU would require to undertake
the project. After all, the DR is
part of CARIFORUM and will
in time become a member of
CARICOM - largely due to the
EU’s insistence.

And, recognizing that this pro-
ject should not be limited to the
DR alone, but should include
Cuba and Puerto Rico, the third
source of financing should be
UNESCO which should be
approached to provide funding
for a communication infrastruc-
ture that promotes greater cohe-
sion and understanding among
Caribbean peoples who, though
geographically close, have been
separated politically and eco-
nomically in service to coloniz-
ing nations.

(This is an abridged version
of a paper delivered to a
UNESCO sponsored Caribbean
Media Conference in Grenada
on May 14, 2009).

Responses to:
ronaldsanders29@hotmail.com

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PAGE 8, MONDAY, MAY 18, 2009

1. CANTERBURY PARK ESTATES
LOT NO. 13
PROPERTY DESCRIPTION:
Single-storey Residence
3 Beds / 2 1/2 Baths
PROPERTY SIZE: 8,086 sq. ft.
LOCATION: Traveling east
on Prince Charles Drive, turn
through corner on the right
(opposite St. Augustine’s Road)
and head south around the
curve to the right. The property
is the 2nd to the last house on
the left.
APPRAISED VALUE: $283,000

2. COLLEGE GARDENS
SUBDIVISION
LOT NO. 5
PROPERTY DESCRIPTION:
Single-storey Duplex Apartment
2 Beds /1 Bath each
PROPERTY SIZE: 5,976 sq. ft.
LOCATION: Traveling east along
Prince Charles Drive for St.
Augustine’s Road, take the 2nd
corner right (College Gardens
Road) and head south to the “T”
junction; turn onto Pine Barren
Road. Heading west, turn through
2nd paved road on left. The
property is the 5th building on the
right.
APPRAISED VALUE: $209,000

. BEL-AIR ESTATES —
CARMICHAEL ROAD
LOT NO. 259
PROPERTY DESCRIPTION:
Single-storey Residence,
3 beds / 2 baths
PROPERTY SIZE: 6,000 sq. ft.
LOCATION: Traveling east on
Carmichael Road from Faith
Avenue, take the 4th corner right
(Turtle Drive). The property is the
4th house on the right.
APPRAISED VALUE: $186,000

. CHIPPINGHAM SUBDIVISION
LOT NO. 17
PROPERTY DESCRIPTION:
Single-storey Residence,
2 beds / 1 bath
PROPERTY SIZE: 6,375 sq. ft.
LOCATION: Traveling west on
Quarry Mission Road off Nassau
Street, the property is located on
the northern side (approximately
500 ft. from Nassau Street).
APPRAISED VALUE: $120,000

10. ENGLERSTON SUBDIVISION
LOT NO. 4 Block 7
PROPERTY DESCRIPTION:
Triplex Apartment building
PROPERTY SIZE: 7,000 sq. ft.
LOCATION: Traveling east on
Cordeaux Avenue from East
Street, take the 2nd right (Key
West Street) and head south. The
property is the 6th building on the
left.
APPRAISED VALUE: $243,000

. BERNARD TERRACE
SUBDIVISION
LOT NO. 14 - Southern Moiety
PROPERTY DESCRIPTION:
Multi-Family Residential Lot
PROPERTY SIZE: 5,700 sq. ft.
with foundation
LOCATION: Traveling east on
Bernard Road, take the 1st
corner on the right past Windsor
Terrace. The vacant lot is the 4th
on the left.
APPRAISED VALUE: $85,000

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. CARMICHAEL VILLAGE
LOT NO. “A”
PROPERTY DESCRIPTION:
Single family Residential Lot
PROPERTY SIZE: 4,650 sq. ft.
LOCATION: Traveling west
on Avocado Road from Faith
Avenue, turn through the 1st
graveled corner on the left. The
vacant lot is the 2nd on the left,
enclosed with chain link fence
and fruit trees.
APPRAISED VALUE: $51,000

3.

. GAMBLE HEIGHTS

SUBDIVISION

LOT NO. Parcel of Land
PROPERTY DESCRIPTION:
Split Level Residence with Two
1 bed/1 bath Apartment Units
under construction
PROPERTY SIZE: 7,141 sq. ft.
LOCATION: Traveling south on
Blue Hill Road from Faith
United Way, take the 1st corner
left (Sunrise Road) and head
south; take the 5th corner

left and head east to the 1st
corner right. The property is
the 7th house on the right.
APPRAISED VALUE: $150,000

. PINEWOOD GARDENS

SUBDIVISION

LOT NO. 1714

PROPERTY DESCRIPTION:
Single-storey Residence
PROPERTY SIZE: 5,000 sq. ft.
LOCATION: Traveling east onto
Bamboo Boulevard from East
Street, take the 3rd corner right
(Thatch Palm Avenue) and travel
south, turn through 2nd corner
on the left (Avocado Street). The
property is the 17th house on
the left.

APPRAISED VALUE: $137,000

. GOLDEN ISLES ROAD

LOT NO. “B”

PROPERTY DESCRIPTION:
Triplex Apartment Complex
PROPERTY SIZE: 7,203 sq. ft.
LOCATION: Traveling north on
Golden Isles Road from Cowpen
Road, after the 1st paved road
on left; the property is the 2nd
building on the left.
APPRAISED VALUE: $333,000

12. MARSHALL ROAD

LOT NO. 17D

PROPERTY DESCRIPTION:
Triplex Apartment-One 2-
bedroom/ 2-bath & Two 2-
bedroom /1-bath

PROPERTY SIZE: 10,000 sq. ft.
LOCATION: Traveling west on
Marshall Road from South Beach
Road, take the 1st corner right
(Tiao End Road). The property is
the 4th building on the left.
APPRAISED VALUE: $288,000

13. MARSHALL ROAD

LOT NO. 52

PROPERTY DESCRIPTION:
Single-storey Residence 3 beds /
2 baths

PROPERTY SIZE: 37,550 sq. ft.
LOCATION: Traveling on Marshall
Road from Blue Hill Road, turn
left at “T” junction, then right. The
property is the 5th on the right, to
the rear.

APPRAISED VALUE: $345,000

. KOOL ACRES SUBDIVISION

LOT NO. 46 Parcel ‘C”
PROPERTY DESCRIPTION:
Multi / Single Family Residential
PROPERTY SIZE: 7,604 sq. ft.
LOCATION: Traveling south

on Fox Hill Road from Joe
Farrington Road, take the 2nd
corner left - opposite Guana
Cay Avenue - on to Kool Acres
Subdivision Road. The vacant lot
is 1st on the left; directly on the
corner of Fox Hill Road and Kool
Acres Subdivision Road.
APPRAISED VALUE: $84,000

4. SEA GULL GARDEN

SUBDIVISION

LOT NO. 33

PROPERTY DESCRIPTION: Multi
- Family Residential Lot

Beach Front

PROPERTY SIZE: 14,723 sq. ft.
LOCATION: On Flemming Road.
APPRAISED VALUE: $200,000

\

DEVELOPED RESIDENTIAL & COMMERCIAL

5. CENTERVILLE

LOT NO. 5 Block 14
PROPERTY DESCRIPTION:
Single-storey Commercial
Building

PROPERTY SIZE: 5,000 sq. ft.
LOCATION: Madeira Street
between Montrose Avenue and
Mt. Royal Avenue
APPRAISED VALUE: $302,000

6. _ SIR LYNDEN PINDLING

ESTATES SUBDIVISION

LOT NO. 3014/15

PROPERTY DESCRIPTION:
Single-family Residence

3 beds / 2 baths

PROPERTY SIZE: 5,000 sq. ft.
LOCATION: Traveling east

on Bamboo Boulevard to the
roundabout, continue traveling
eastward on C.W. Saunders
Highway. Take the 2nd right (Lady
Pindling Avenue) and head south
to the 1st paved corner on the left
(Lauren Street); turn through 2nd
corner left (Pear Tree Avenue).
The property is the 6th house on
the left.

APPRAISED VALUE: $145,000

14. PINEWOOD GARDENS

SUBDIVISION

LOT NO. 13

PROPERTY DESCRIPTION:
Single-storey Residence,

3 beds / 2 baths

PROPERTY SIZE: 7,191 sq. ft.
LOCATION: Traveling east on
Sapodilla Boulevard from East
Street, take the 1st left (Thatch
Palm Avenue) and head north
to the “T” junction. Take a left

(Mahogany Street); the property is

the 2nd on the right.
APPRAISED VALUE: $148,000

15. SANDILANDS VILLAGE

LOT NOS. 7 and 8
PROPERTY DESCRIPTION:
Single-storey Residence

With 3 apartments under
construction

PROPERTY SIZE: Lot 7: 7,970
sq. ft, Lot 8:8,419 sq. ft.
LOCATION: Traveling west on
Sandilands Village Road from
Fox Hill Road, turn through the
9th paved road on left (Vanessa

Close). The properties are located

on the northwestern side of the
street.
APPRAISED VALUE: $277,000

._ SOUTH OCEAN ESTATES

SUBDIVISION

LOT NO. 1 Block 5

PROPERTY DESCRIPTION:
Multi-family Residential Lot
PROPERTY SIZE: 11,566 sq. ft.
LOCATION: Traveling south of
Lyford Cay, immediately pass
Mount Pleasant turn left on
South Ocean Boulevard to New
South Ocean Estates. The vacant
lot is the 1st on the right.
APPRAISED VALUE: $110,000

6. SOUTHERN SHORES

SUBDIVISION

LOT NO. 4 parcel of lot 24
PROPERTY DESCRIPTION:
Multi - Family Residential Lot
PROPERTY SIZE: 7,706 sq. ft.
LOCATION: The vacant

lot is on the west side of a
road reservation nearly 400
feet south of Marshall Road.
APPRAISED VALUE: $77,000

vt

7. WINTON MEADOWS ESTATES

SUBDIVISION |

LOT NO. 115

PROPERTY DESCRIPTION:
Single-storey Residence 3 beds
/ 2 baths

PROPERTY SIZE: 8,000 sq. ft.
LOCATION: Traveling east

on Prince Charles Drive for
Culberts Hill, take the 1st corner
right (Jasmine Drive) and head
south; turn through 2nd corner
on the right (Violette Drive). The
property is the 4th house on the
left.

APPRAISED VALUE: $274,000

16. SANDILANDS VILLAGE

LOT NO. “E”

PROPERTY DESCRIPTION:
Duplex Apartment Complex
PROPERTY SIZE: 5,500 sq. ft.
LOCATION: Traveling west on
Sandilands Village Road from
Fox Hill Road, turn through the
2nd paved road on the left. The
property is the 5th on the left.
APPRAISED VALUE: $219,000

VACANT LOTS

INTERESTED PARTIES SHOULD SUBMIT OFFERS INCLUSIVE OF TELEPHONE CONTACT AND POSTAL ADDRESS
TO: CB DISTRESSED PROPERTIES, CREDIT RISK MANAGEMENT DEPARTMENT, P.O BOX - SS-6263 NASSAU, BAHAMAS OR
EMAIL US AT: DISTRESSED.PROPERTIES@COMBANKLTD.COM * WE RESERVE THE RIGHT TO REJECT ANY OR ALL OFFERS.



THE TRIBUNE

Chamber of Commerce
to award outstanding
businessperson of year

DESPITE the current
economic crisis, nomina-
tions are pouring in for this
year’s Annual Business
Awards. Every year, the
Chamber of Commerce
honours the contributions
of outstanding Bahamian
businesses and executives
to the business community.
This year will be no differ-
ent, as Bahamian busi-
nesspersons will vie for the
distinguished titles of Out-
standing Businessperson of
the Year and Developing
Entrepreneur of the Year.
Two leading Bahamian
businesses will be designat-
ed Company of the Year,
which is awarded in two
categories, businesses with
over fifty employees and
those with less.

Last year’s prestigious
Business Person of the
Year Award went to Eileen
Carron, CEO of the Tri-
bune Media Group. A lead-
ing businesswoman, Mrs
Carron was recognised for
building a successful media
empire and her immense
contributions to journalism
in the Bahamas.

The Tribune Media
Group owns The Tribune
and 100 Jamz and also man-
ages three other radio sta-
tions. Mrs Carron was also
the first woman CEO of a
radio station in the
Bahamas and the
Caribbean.

Said the Chamber’s exec-
utive director Philip Simon:
“This year presents a very
unique situation as Bahami-
an businesses have had to
respond to the current eco-
nomic crisis; for many, this
is the very first time they
are dealing with a market
slowdown. Innovation and
creativity have been key for
those businesses that have
shown growth and
remained profitable and we
look forward to recognising
the efforts of those busi-
nesses and individuals that
continue to make meaning-
ful contributions to our
economy.”

The Developing Entre-
preneur Award salutes the
business pioneer who has
established a business in
the private sector within
the past five years with at
least one full year of opera-
tion.

Last year, this award
went to Christian Sawyer,
president of Sunryse Shred-
ding Services, the first doc-
ument destruction company
to be established in the
Bahamas. John Bull was
presented with the Cham-
ber’s 2008 Business of the
Year Award Category A
(51 or more employees).
The Chamber’s Category B
2008 Business of the Year
Award went to the Eagle
Electrical Supplies and
Lighting Centre.

The Chamber’s coveted
2008 Lifetime Achievement
Award was presented to
leading businessman,
Franklyn Wilson, CMG,
chairman of Sunshine
Holdings Group of Compa-
nies and a chartered
accountant by profession.
Mr Wilson was recognised
for his efforts towards the
development of the local
business community.

Successful businesses and
businesspersons who are
growing and excelling and
meet the judging criteria
are eligible for nomination.
Nominations are being
accepted through May 22
and information is available
through the Chamber of
Commerce.

The Annual Business
Awards will be presented
during the Chamber’s 38th
Annual Awards Banquet
and Silent Auction sched-
uled for Saturday, June 27,
at Sandals Royal Bahami-
an.

The banquet marks the
culmination of Chamber
Week, which begins on
June 22. The week’s events
also include the highly
anticipated business-net-
working event Mix N Min-
gle on Tuesday, June 23,
and the Meet the Ministers
forum on Thursday, June
25.

The Chamber of Com-
merce is a non-profit organ-
isation, which represents a
wide cross-section of pri-
vate sector businesses in
the Bahamas.


THE TRIBUNE



LOCAL NEWS

Fake bottled water
sparks disease fear

FROM page one

bottling or selling impostor
water.

No arrests were made but Mr
Knowles said officials at the
Department of Environmental
Health were informed and are
looking at ways to pursue the
matter in civil court.

While the depot manager
claimed the water was delivered
from an Aquapure truck, Mr
Knowles said he failed to pro-
duce an invoice and the driver
for that route said he had not
delivered that brand of water
to the depot in a year.

Demineralised water has
been a company best seller. It is
distributed to local hospitals and
clinics due to its low sodium
content.

Charlene Smith, Aquapure's
quality control manager, said
the bacteria found in the impos-
tor water can be fatal in elderly
people, infants or anyone with a
compromised immune system
stemming from diabetes, can-
cer or kidney disease.

If ingested, the bacteria could
induce vomiting, hepatitis, diar-
rhea, intestinal infections and
possible death in vulnerable
people, she added.

"The water sample in ques-
tion was found to have bacteria
present which was too numer-
ous to count (which) means that
it exceeded 500 colonies. And
fecal coliform bacteria - fecal
contamination is disease causing
- the level we found again was
too numerous to count," she
said.

"The total dissolved solids -
the mineral content of the (test-
ed) water - was 17 parts per mil-
lion and for demineralised or
dionised water it should not
have exceeded 10 parts per mil-
lion".

To date, company officials
said they had no report of con-
sumers ingesting the contami-
nated water.

Meanwhile, Mr Knowles said
water bottled at the plant is sub-
jected to a rigorous multiple-
step filtering process and every
morning the water towers are

YOUR FUTURE

IS ABOUT TO GET BRIGHTER

tested for possible contamina-
tion and again every half an
hour until shutdown.

As a further precaution, bot-
tles are machine-washed at a
temperature of 150 degrees and
are not handled by hand before
they are filled.

Company officials are advis-
ing people to ensure that any
bottles bearing the Aquapure
logo are date stamped, have an
embossed company logo or
bought from an Aquapure dis-
tribution centre to ensure
authenticity.

Body found floating
in waters near BASRA

FROM page one

Police believe the man had been in
the water about 12 hours before his

body was discovered.

Up to press time the man's identity
was unknown and police appealed for
members of the public with missing rel-

atives to contact police.

ASP Evans said the deceased has a [J
light complexion, is about six feet two
inches tall and was found wearing dark
coloured shorts and brown sandals.

At this stage police said they do not
suspect any foul play but are awaiting
results of an autopsy report to confirm

the cause of death.

ASP WALTER EVANS

Earlier this month, a man who worked in the area stumbled
upon the gruesome discovery of a lifeless body bobbing near a barge
behind the Harbour Moon Hotel on East Bay Street.

Like yesterday's discovery, police said there were no signs of trau-
ma on the body or signs of foul play — it was suspected the man

somehow fell into the water.

The man, believed to be in his late 20s to early 30s, was dressed
in a white T-shirt and blue shorts when his body was found. He has

not been identified by police.

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MONDAY, MAY 18, 2009, PAGE 9

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PAGE 10, MONDAY, MAY 18, 2009

THE TRIBUNE



BAHAMAS REAL ESTATE ASSOCIATION
Se

Ue A tele

Sy

“REAL ESTATE WEEK”

Sunday, May 24"
Opening Church Service
St Francis Xavier Parish Centre
Tie eis

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ale eh

Friday, May 29"
BREA Black-Tie Gala
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Cocktails 7:00PM-8:00PM
Gala 8:00PM-12:00AM
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TO RESERVE YOUR TICKETS CONTACT:
June: junebrea@coralwave.com
The Bahamas Real Estate Association
ieee he i
Tek (242) 356-4503
Fax: (242) 356-5401

Joint venture for major oil

exploration in Bahamas

FROM page one

duction in the southwest
Bahamas which will benefit the
local population.

The partnership agreement
between the Norway-based Sta-
toilHydro and the energy explo-
ration company BPC was signed
on May 12, and the official
announcement was expected to be
made in London at 8am today.

Based on research so far, Sta-
toilHydro said there could be as
many as 500 MMBOE (Million
Barrels of Oil Equivalent) oil fields
in the areas identified by BPC in
the southern Bahamas.

However, as the licences for
exploration included in this joint
venture agreement are new licence
areas for BPC in the southwest of
the Bahamas, they are still under
application pending the approval
of the Bahamian government, a
joint press statement from Statoil-

Hydro and BPC said yesterday.

The two companies said they
hope the licenses will be approved
and processed before the end of
this year.

BPC’s chairman Alan Burns
said:‘“We are delighted to partner
with a respected industry leader
like StatoilHydro. It is testament to
the prospects of the southern
Bahamas and to BPC’s contacts
and commitment to the region that
a large business such as StatoilHy-
dro sees it as an important addition
to their exploration portfolio. The
terms of this agreement will
strengthen BPC’s capital position
and eliminate the need for near-
term fresh capital funding for the
(joint venture).”

BPC principals said they are
confident the partnership with Sta-
toilHydro will produce successful
benefits for the company and for
the Bahamas.

“BPC is highly encouraged by
the results of the exploratory work

Youth killed, passenger
injured in traffic accident

FROM page one

According to reports, the deceased was driving a Dodge Ram
1500 truck, license T-7150, west on Pinta Avenue when he lost con-
trol while trying to manoeuvre around a curve.

Mr Bootle said the vehicle travelled 350 feet and knocked down
a lamp pole. It continued for an additional 120ft, overturned, and

crashed into a pole protector.

The vehicle was extensively damaged and the victims were tak-
en to Rand Memorial Hospital, where the man was pronounced

dead on arrival.

The woman is still in hospital with serious injuries.
Mr Bootle said police are urging motorists to drive with extreme

caution and care on the street.

“We are warning the public to please slow down and obey safe-
ty rules of the road, and to remember that speed kills.

“One life lost is one too many and we are asking drivers to be
cautious and courteous and to adhere to road signs,” he said.

undertaken in the Bahamas which
indicates that there is high poten-
tial for successful and valuable oil
and gas production within the ter-
ritorial waters of the Bahamas, and
in order to move the project to the
next stage, an association with a
reputable drilling company had to
be developed. BPC therefore con-
siders itself fortunate to have
attracted StatoilHydro for involve-
ment in its operations in the
Bahamas,” BPC’s resident man-
ager in the Bahamas Idris Reid
said.

BPC was granted five licenses
for oil and gas exploration in five
areas in the south central Bahamas
in April, 2007. Since then, the com-
pany has carried out the back-
ground work including the collec-
tion and evaluation of scientific
data and samples from previous
exercises, the company said. “The
next stages of work to be under-
taken will involve seismic evalua-
tions, and ultimately, drilling. In
that context and following exami-
nation of proposals sought from
various companies, BPC has select-
ed StatoilHydro of Norway as its
partner in the ventures being pro-
posed for the future,” Mr Reid
said.

Both companies assured the
public that they are committed to
the preservation of the environ-
ment during all phases of explo-
ration and development.

StatoilHydro is considered to be
a world leader in integrated tech-
nology-based, international energy
company. The Norwegian govern-
ment is a majority shareholder in
the company.

BPC is registered in the Falk-
land Islands, but its main country
of operation is the Bahamas. The
company was formed to invest in
an offshore oil exploration pro-
gramme in licence areas in the ter-
ritorial waters of the Bahamas.

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PAGE 12, MONDAY, MAY 18, 2009

TRIBUNE SPORTS



INTERNATIONAL SPORTS

























BOLT'S |
RECORD

JAMAICAN
athlete Usain
Bolt, right, races
ahead of British
sprinter Rikki
Fifton to win a
150m street race
in central
Manchester,
Manchester,
England, Sun-
day, May 17,
2009. Bolt won
with a world
record time of
14.35 seconds.

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England in winning position
against the West Indies

England have put them-
selves in a winning position
against West Indies. Now they
say they are determined to be
ruthless in pursuit of a 2-0
npower series success on Mon-
day.

Stuart Broad, who took two
of the biggest wickets among
the ten England chiselled out
on the fourth day of the sec-
ond Test at Riverside, is confi-
dent they have it in them to
take another seven on the
final day.

West Indies closed on 115
for three, still 144 runs short
of making England bat again
to take the Wisden Trophy in
style, and were most indebted
to Ramnaresh Sarwan (100)
and Denesh Ramdin (55) in
their first innings and captain
Chris Gayle (54) after follow-
ing on.



Scott Heppell/AP Photo

WEST INDIES Denesh Ramain, cel-
ebrates reaching 50 during the 4th
day of the second test match
against England at the Riverside's
cricket ground, Chester-le-Street,
England, Sunday May 17, 2009.






WEST INDIES Ramnaresh Sarwan, right, hits a ball bowled by Eng-
land's Graham Onions during the 4th day of the second test match at
the Riverside's cricket ground, Chester-le-Street, England, Sunday May
17, 2009.

SG Bethel Brothers Morticians

Telephone: 322-4433, 326-7030
Nassau Street, P.O.Box N-1026

FUNERAL SERVICE FOR

7 oe =

Charles Leon
Johnson, 55

| of #4 High Vista Drive will be
held on Wednesday May 20th,
11:00 a.m. at Sf. Anselm's
Catholic Church, Bernard
Road, Fox Hill. Rev.
Monsignor Preston Moss, Fr.
Noel Clarke, Fr. Reginald
Demeritte and Deacon
Raymond Forbes will officiate.
Interment will follow in the
Church's Cemetery.
He will forever remain in the
hearts of: his loving and
devoted Wife, Eulease Stuart-Johnson; Children: Primrose, Charles
I, Crystal, Sanchez and Kristjan Johnson; Siblings: Helen Johnson,
Janet and Derek Davis, Anthony and Keva McKinney, Andrew
McKinney, Alicia and Harold Brown, Vernita Wright, Winifred
and Michael Thompson, Chester and Gail Johnson, Sherman and
Solomon Johnson; Madison and Aldece Turnquest, Cindy Major
and Racine Melfort Parents-in-law: Cleveland and Matilda Stuart;
Adopted Mother: Marjorie McKinney, In laws: Ricardo and Carla
Stuart, W. Renae McKay; Christine and Bishop Chadwick James
II, Lindburgh and Laura Stuart, Erica and Terrell Stuart, Effie
Burrows, Deborah McKinney and Janet Turnquest, Mr. and Mrs.
Oral Newbold; Uncles: Sam and Madeline Basden and family,
Fr Rodney Burrows and family, Patrick Smith; Aunts: Gwendolyn
Brice, Eulease, Gwenith, Sylvia and Beverley Smith and Alice
Stubbs; Nieces and Nephews: Jamal Davis and family, Alexis
and Krishelle McKinney, Val and Bill Wallace, Samantha and
Lenny Bannister, Amanda Johnson, Deandria Beckford, Roscoe,
Derrick Johnson, Melvin Hall, Dwayne and Denario Brown ,
Melissa Armaly, Greg and Stella Thompson, Angela Thompson,
Shelly Maccow, Tanya Bell, Nicoyas Hilbert, Brynae McKay,
Chadwick II, Chadwin and Chad-Vaughn James, Ricardo Jr. and
Rickelle Stuart, Lindburgh Jr, and Linae Stuart, Brittany, Kendal,
Sherman Jr., Matthew, Elizabeth, Daniel, Jordan, Chester Jr,
Solomon Jr, Crystal, Michael, and Alberto Johnson, Extended
family: Eugene Palacious and family, Don and Kay Aranha and
family, Hubert and Roxanne Chipman and family, Lambert and
Margaret Campbell and Family, Godwin and Michelle Cargill
and family, Algernon and Lamar Cargill and family, Roscoe and
Fabianna Davis and family, Phillip and Sharlamae Stubbs and
family, Elijah and Sherry Brice and family, Melford Clarke and
family, Larry and Candy Farrington and family, Jeffrey and
Corrine Major and family, Eurick and Lisa Dean and family,
John Williams and family, Leo Ferguson and family, Mr and Mrs.
Mosely, Whitfield and Cinderella Johnson and family, Afton and
Shasta Moxey and family, Cyril and Mary Taylor and family,
Viola and Herbert Lightbourne and family, Duke and Cynthia
Stubbs, Curlene McQueen and family, Ashley Cargill and family,
Retired Supt. George Mortimer and family, Edwin and Timolyn_
Thompson and family, Clinton Pearce and family, William BillyE
Brown and family, Archdeacon James Palacious and family,
James Mackey and family, Wayne Edgecombe and family, Marina
and Johnny Young, Millie Young, Elsworth Turnquest and family,
Monzell Turnquest and family, Millie and Al Cartley, Quinton,
Sharina Basden, the Young family, the Curtis family, the Laramores,
the Taylor family, the Smith family, the Brice Family; his Kwanis
family, his Fox Hill Community family including the PLP branch
of the Fox Hill Constituency, the Fox Hill Festival Committee;
his adopted children: Edward Symonette, George Hayles, Ronald
Dean, Jacqueline Maxwell, Terran Munroe, Jovie Major, Michael
Carroll, Kathleen Smith, Ferdinand Agenor, Sharon Brown, Shane
Vidal, Helen Storr, the staff of Johnsonis Autobody Repair and
Johnsonis Paint Supply, the staff of Shell Harold and Wulff Road
service stations; Special friends: Hon. Fred Mitchell, Senator
Jacintha Higgs, Mr. Bismarck Coakley, Patrick Ward, Anton
Saunders, Anton Sealey, Keith Rolle, Marvin Bain, Philip Taylor
and Elsworth Rolle, Members of the Fund Raising Committee
of St. Anselmis Parish, the entire St. Anselmfs Church family,
members of the Progressive Liberal Party, members of Bahamas
Petroleum Retailers Association and numerous other family and
friends too numerous to mention.

Friends may pay their last respects at the P.L.P Headquarters, Sir
Lynden Pindling Centre, Farrington Road on Tuesday from
10:00a.m. to 5:00p.m. and on Wednesday at the church from
10:00am until service time.

Scott Heppell/AP Photo

Ouro soccer
roundup

Man United,
Inter and

Barcelona win
their leagues



Jon Super/AP Photo

MANCHESTER UNITED'S Carlos
Tevez, centre right, lifts the English
Premier League trophy alongside
teammate Park Ji-Sung, left, as the
team celebrate winning the league
after their 0-0 draw against Arsenal
at Old Trafford Stadium, Manches-
ter, England, on Saturday.

m LONDON

Manchester United clinched
its third consecutive English
Premier League title on Satur-
day while Inter Milan won its
fourth straight Serie A title in
Italy and Barcelona earned La
Liga’s championship in Spain
for the first time in three years,
according to Associated Press.

Saturday’s results left only
Germany and France undecided
among the five major European
leagues. Manchester United
matched Liverpool’s mark of 18
league championships with a 0-0
tie Saturday against visiting
Arsenal. In a poorly played
game between two of England’s
glamour clubs, United won their
11th league title in 17 seasons.
All came under manager Alex
Ferguson, who has major 25 tro-
phies in his 23 years at Old Traf-
ford.

Amid the celebrations,
Argentina striker Carlos Tevez
appeared to wave farewell to
the fans in his last home game
with his loan deal two weeks
from ending. More than a thou-
sand United fans converged on
the directors’ exit and players’
tunnel, demanding that the
team keep him. Yesterday West
Brom were relegated after los-
ing 0-2 at home to Liverpool.

Middlesbrough has little
chance of survival after it threw
away a lead and was held to a 1-
1 draw at home by Aston Villa.
Newcastle slipped back into the
relegation zone after a 1-0
defeat at home to Fulham. Hull
moved out of the zone with a 1-
1 draw at Bolton. The final
round of games is May 24.

Hull has 35 points, Newcastle
34, Middlesbrough 32 and West
Brom 31, with three teams to go
down. Sunderland, which visits
Portsmouth on Monday, is not
out of danger with 36 points.



m MADRID - Barcelona
clinched La Liga when Real
Madrid lost 3-2 at Villarreal.
Barcelona has 86 points with
three games left. Madrid has 78
with two to play.

This was the 19th Spanish
league title for Barcelona, which
completed its first domestic
double in 11 years. The team
won the Copa del Rey last
Wednesday. Next up for
Barcelona is Premier League
champ Manchester United in
the Champions League final
May 27. It is trying to become
the first Spanish team to win the
three trophies in one season.

Barcelona, which plays at
Mallorca on Sunday, has 86
points with three games left,
while Madrid has 78 with two to
play. The 19th title in Barcelon-
a’s history was a triumph for 38-
year-old coach Pep Guardiola,
the club’s former midfielder
who was in his first season in
charge.



@ MILAN — Inter Milan clinched
its 17th Serie A title when AC
Milan lost 2-1 to Udinese.
Going into the match, AC
Milan needed to win, but knew
Inter could still take the title if it
won its match with Siena on
Sunday night. The result left
AC Milan with 71 points, seven
behind its cross-city rival with
two matches remaining follow-
ing this weekend. Gaetano
D’ Agostino opened the scoring
with a penalty in the first half
after Antonio Floro Flores was
brought down by Paolo Maldini.

Cristian Zapata doubled Udi-
nese’s lead two minutes into the
second half to settle the tie.
Milan threw men forward, but
Massimo Ambrosini’s header
came to late to have any effect.

Inter Milan became the first
club in more than 50 years to
win four successive Serie A
titles.

The Serie A title was its 17th
overall.
TRIBUNE SPORTS

SPORTS

MONDAY, MAY 18, 2009, PAGE 13



OTE TLE

Wilticats show thei

STRIKING OUT: Mary Edgecombe-Sweeting (above), who struck out
four batters. Pictured right is Wildcats’ Hyacinth Farrington.





Pennant winners pull away SL. lutions Ltd.

in final inning to topple L|ST@ Ck UP

Boomer G Swingers On xerox ¢) paper

@ by RENALDO DORSETT
Sports Reporter
rdorsett@tribunemedia.net

The pennant winners and
defending league runners-up
look to return to the status
near the league’s leaderboard
and appear to be well on their
way early in the NPSA sea-
son.

The Pineapple Air Wildcats
pulled away in the final inning
and doubled up the Boomer
G Swingers, 14-7 for their sec-
ond win of the season.

Mary Edgecombe-Sweeting
struck out four batters and at
the plate she went 3-4 with
three runs and two RBI to led
the Wildcats.

The Wildcats took an early
2 run lead in the top half of
the opening inning, but the
Swingers responded with the
equalizing runs in the bottom
half of the second.

The Wildcats regained the
lead in the third, outscoring
the Swingers 3-2 to take a 5-4
lead heading into the fourth
inning.

Pineapple Air repeated the
feat, outscoring the Swingers
3-2 in the inning to increase
their lead by a one run.

© In brief

Bird, Spielherg
honoured at
Boston University
commencement

m BOSTON

Boston Celtics legend Larry
Bird and film director Steven
Spielberg were feted Sunday at
Boston University with honorary
degrees, according to Associated
Press.

Bird, who played for the Celtics
for 13 seasons and was enshrined
in basketball’s Hall of Fame, is
now president of basketball oper-
ations for the Indiana Pacers.

Spielberg has made classic
movies such as “Jaws” and
“Raiders of the Lost Ark.” He
recently directed “Indiana Jones
and the Kingdom of the Crystal
Skull.”

U.S. Rep. Michael Capuano
delivered the commencement
address and received an honorary
doctor of laws degree.

Zhang Yimou, the Chinese
filmmaker who produced the
opening and closing ceremonies
at the Beijing Olympics, also
received an honorary degree at
the school’s 136th graduation. He
didn’t attend the commencement
ceremonies. Zhang will start
shooting a new movie in late May
or June, his assistant told The
Associated Press last month,
marking the “Raise the Red
Lantern” director’s first project
since designing the Beijing
Olympics ceremonies.





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PAGE 14, MONDAY, MAY 18, 2009

SPORTS

TRIBUNE SPORTS





SOFTBALL

The Bahamas Electricity Corporation

Tender

Wilson City Road Grading & Transmission
Circuit Easement Clearing
Wilson City, Abaco, The Bahamas

The Bahamas Electricity Corporation
invites tenders for the above named services.

Bidders are required ta collect packages from the
Corporation's Administration Office, Blue Hill & Tucker Roads

Contact: Mrs. Delmeta Seymour at telephone 302-1158

Tenders are to be addressed to:
Mr. Kevin Basden
General Manager
Bahamas Electricity Corporation
Executive Offices - Blue Hill & Tucker Roads
Nassau, Bahamas

Deadline for delivery to BEC: on of before
ind June 2009
no later than 4:00 p.m,

Submissions should be marked as follows
Tender No. 705/09
WILSOM CITY ROAD GRADING AND
TRANSMISSION CIRCUIT EASEMENT CLEARING
WILSOW CITY, ABACO, THE BAHAMAS

The Corporation reserves the right to
accept or reject any or all proposals.

For all enquiries regarding the tenders and site visits, contact

Mr. Clark Allem at telephone 302-1212.



ROYAL BANK OF CANADA TRUST COMPANY
OSS E NR AI IE UD)
is considering suitable applications for the role of



Manager, Trust and
Corporate Services

Description of role and key responsibilities:

¢ Lead and manage a team of trust officers and other
staff: this includes providing advice in respect of clients
and cases, coaching staff and ensuring the effective
utilisation of other resources. Instrumental in developing
and implementing company procedures within
appropriate frameworks.
Possess a superior knowledge of Trust (complex and
simple), Company and Fiduciary structures, and tax
and legal issues affecting the administration of Trusts
and Companies.
Ensure that strong technical knowledge of all aspects
of trust and company administration is delivered: this
includes attending client meetings and
supervising/assisting in respect of the preparation of
accounting and investment information prior to
submission to clients
Experience with the preparation and presentation of
financial and estate planning proposals to high net
worth individuals
Providing assistance to increase profitability of the
company/shareholder value by identifying
opportunities to extend the trust services, and to use
the bank offering to implement solutions for clients
where appropriate
Proven superior sales acumen. With ability to attract,
build and strengthen relationships with key clients and
intermediaries and identify new ideas in relation to
products and services that may be offered by the
company

Core skills and knowledge:

¢ A University degree in business, accounting, or other
related discipline

* Aminimum of ten years’ relevant experience

¢ Professionally qualified, e.g. accounting/finance
qualification, STEP ICSA, TER ACCA

* Self-motivation with excellent project management

¢ Demonstrably strong technical knowledge of all aspects
of trust and company administration, including the
nuances and statutory requirements of the major
offshore jurisdictions used in connection with clients’
structures

* Strong analytical and problem-solving skills

¢ Methodical, thorough and attentive to detail

* Strong supervisory skills coupled with the ability to lead
by example

¢ Strong skills in time management and prioritisation

¢ Excellent oral and written communication skills

* Microsoft Office skills

¢ Cultural awareness and sensitivity on both an individual
and corporate basis

Interested persons should apply by May 22, 2009 to:

Royal Bank of Canada Trust Company
(Bahamas) Limited
PO Box N-3024
Nassau, NP Bahamas
Attention: Human Resource Manager
Via Email: paul.lewis @rbc.com or
elizabeth.dorsch@rbc.com

Only applications from suitably qualified candidates
will be acknowledged

RBC
Royal Bank
RBC), of Canada

www.rbcroyalbank.com/caribbean/bahamas

Cee ue SUS etc)

New Breed hold on for
first win of the season

@ by RENALDO DORSETT
Sports Reporter
rdorsett@tribunemedia.net

After trailing for much of
the contest, the New Breed
took control late in the game
and was able to withstand a
late rally to hold on for their
first win of the season.

The New Breed held on late
in the seventh inning and a
late strikeout by Eugene Pratt
preserved a 14-13 win over
Morgan’s Buccaneers.

In a high scoring affair, both

QONVENIENT








Late strikeout by Eugene Pratt preserves
14-13 win over Morgan’s Buccaneers

teams came out aggressively
on the offensive end with the
Bucs taking a 3-2 lead after
the first inning.

Morgan’s top of the lineup,
Prescott Wilson, Caurdero
Pinder and Angelo Dilate
each scored runs while New
Breed reached the scoreboard

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The Bucs added another
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inning to maintain a 4-2 lead.

Both teams added three
runs apiece and the Bucs took
a 7-5 lead into the third

Outscored

After chipping away for the
entire game the New Breed
took the lead in the fourth
inning when they outscored
the Bucs 4-1 to grab a 9-8 lead.

While they managed to
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fourth run of the game in the
seventh inning to give his team
a 14-10 lead.

The Bucs staged a late
comeback in the bottom of the
seventh with three runs but
feel just short.

Dilett, Kristofer Turnquest
and Dino Sweeting brought
the Bucs within a single run,
however with two outs, Pratt
struck out Kendal Knowles to
clinch the win for the New
Breed.

Offensively for the winners
Rigby was 2-4 with one run
and two RBI, Lewis was 1-3
with two runs, Wood was 2-4
with four runs and one RBI,
Prat wass 1-4 with one run and
three RBI and Addie Finley
was 2-2 with two runs.

For the Buccaneers, Wilson
was 3-4 with four runs, Dilett
was 1-1 with three runs and
one RBI, Ron Pinder was 1-1
with one run and one RBI.

Andres Kudacki/AP Photo

ROGER FEDERER of Switzerland
returns a shot during the final
match against Rafael Nadal of
Spain at the Madrid Open Tennis in
Madrid, Sunday, May 17, 2009.

Federer beats
Nadal for the
Madrid title

m@ By PAUL LOGOTHETIS
AP Sports Writer
MADRID

Roger Federer got a badly
needed confidence boost ahead
of the French Open, beating top-
ranked Rafael Nadal 6-4, 6-4 on
Sunday to win his first title of the
season at the Madrid Open,
according to Associated Press.

The second-ranked Federer
broke a sluggish Nadal once in
both sets before firing his sixth
ace to win his 15th Masters Series
title on the second match point.
Federer also won here in 2006
when the event was played
indoors on a hard court.

“There are no positives, there
is little to analyze,” said Nadal,
the 2005 champion. “He broke
and broke and I went home.”

It was only the second victory
Federer has on clay against his
top rival, with the other coming at
the Hamburg final two years ago.
The win also ended Federer’s
five-match losing streak to Nadal,
a stretch that included losses in
the finals at Roland Garros, Wim-
bledon and Australia.

Federer called his first win over
Nadal since the 2007 Masters Cup
“very satisfying.” Especially after
being left in tears in February fol-
lowing his defeat to Nadal at Mel-
bourne. “T thought I took all the
right decisions today. In the end it
was a perfect game for me,” the
Swiss player said after drawing
even with Nadal in Masters titles.
“(You) stay positive and I did. I
got the win I needed badly.”

Earlier, top-ranked Dinara
Safina of Russia won her second
straight title on clay by beating
Danish teenager Caroline Woz-
niacki 6-2, 6-4 in the women’s
final. Federer also ended Nadal’s
33-match clay winning streak. The
Spaniard will be going for a fifth
straight title at the French Open
beginning on May 25.

“T don’t think he’s going to
take any damage away from this,”
Federer said. “I’m sure he’s going
to be rock solid in Paris again.”

Nadal sounded so after only a
fifth loss in his last 155 matches
on clay. “To me, this tournament
has nothing to do with Paris. This
tournament is practically another
surface compared to Paris,” said
Nadal.
THE TRIBUNE PAGE 15

§



r = rT
\ q
q y 7
: /

MONDAY, MAY 18, 2009 -_ A bi





New Providence Softball Association championship







OVERPOWERING PERFORMANCE: Edny Bethel

m@ by RENALDO DORSETT

spore report... Edny Bethel in dominant
Wie seuss ne form as Heavylift Dorsey Park
Boys stake early claim to title

pitcher in the country on the
mound, the Heavylift Dorsey
Park Boys are staking a claim as
one of the early contenders for
the New Providence Softball
Association title.

Edny Bethel delivered a
overpowering performance
from the mound to lead their
Dorsey Park Boys to their sec-
ond consecutive win of the
young season, 9-2 over the
Robin Hood Hitmen.

Bethel pitched a complete
game and in seven innings gave
up just a single hit and recorded
16 strikeouts. The Dorsey Park
Boys scored the opening run of
the game and took a 1-0 lead
ee. TO Maia nora sck UCM CUM ORL

In a duel between pitchers,
the Hitmen's Alcott Forbes was run and two RBI. For the Hit- = run while William Delancey
brilliant over the first two men, Pinder was 1-3 with one added another run.
innings, striking out two hitters
in the opening inning and strik-
ing out the side in the second
inning as his team scored the
equalizing run in the second.

Dorsey Park added a pair of
runs in the third, courtesy of
Kevin Helley and Mario Ford.

Bethel kept the Hitmen at
bay by striking out six batters
over the course of the next
three scoreless innings.

Dorsey Park took a 3-1 lead
heading into the fifth before
they decisively added to their
margin.

They had their most produc-
tive inning in the sixth with four
runs scored in the inning to take
a commanding 7-1 advantage.

Sigmund Bethel, Lorenzo
Carter, Desmond Rolle and
Oracho Greene.

The Hitmen responded with
just a single run in the bottom
half of the sixth when Adrian
Pinder crossed home plate.

Dorsey Park added another
pair of runs in the seventh
inning for the game's final score
and improve to 2-0 while the
Hitmen fell to 0-2.

In a losing effort Forbes also
pitched a complete game with
eight strikeouts.

At the plate, Dwayne Pratt
led the charge offensively for
Dorsey Park with a productive

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PAGE 16, MONDAY, MAY 18, 2009

THE TRIBUNE



LEFT: Sea shells
were used to

Lh ;

create a variety
of useful items.



RIGHT: Showing
off their
certificates,
Harbour Island
craft graduates
are pictured with
executive
chairman Edison
Key and other
BAIC officials.



Gladstone Thurston/BIS

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BAIC encourages
Briland artisans

HARBOUR Island - Artisans on the island have
joined the growing number of Bahamians who are
tapping into the multimillion-dollar souvenir market.

With assistance from the Bahamas Agricultural and
Industrial Corporation (BAIC), more Bahamians are
taking advantage of lucrative linkages in tourism.

Forty participants in BAIC's shell and straw craft
training programmes received their official certification
during an awards ceremony last week in Dunmore
Town.

"TL applaud you graduates for having the wisdom to
view the handicraft industry as a significant income gen-
erator and an industry in which one can find job satis-
faction,” said BAIC executive chairman Edison Key.

Using sea shells and combinations of ingredients
found commonly on the island, participants created a
variety of intricately designed products - jewellery,
hats, bags, tableware.

"This programme has empowered the unemployed
in Harbour Island to become future entrepreneurs
and allowed some participants to create and enter
full-time careers," said Mr Key.

Speaking of the steps BAIC has taken to develop the
handicraft industry, he said:

"We have plotted a new path to bring to fruition the
hopes and dreams and aspirations of the Bahamian
people in accordance with our mandate.

"Tam of the firm view that through BAIC we can
significantly impact unemployment and increase the
standard of living in the Bahamas.”

The handicraft industry provides substantial linkages
to tourism and the means to diversify within the
tourism product, thereby providing the means to keep
a significant portion of the tourism dollar in the econ-
omy, Mr Key noted.

"The estimated millions we use to import items are
a good indication of what can be earned, and a good
indication of the impact the handicraft industry can





BAIC EXECUTIVE CHAIRMAN Edison Key and board
member Lonnie Rolle admire this intricate piece by
Audrey Curry.

have on the economy if we seize the opportunities
that exist," he said.

The response to BAIC's handicraft programmes
has been "significant," he said, "proving there is a
growing belief that handicraft can become an estab-
lished and vibrant industry in the Bahamian economy."

"I charge you to strive to apply ingenuity in estab-
lishing a niche in the domestic market by offering
products of excellence which are competitively priced
and of good quality and standards,” he said.

Mr Key was joined in Harbour Island by BAIC's
assistant general manager Donnalee Bowe, board
members Sonny Russell and Lonnie Rolle, domestic
investment officer Joan Stubbs along with trainers
April Martin-Fox of New Providence and Emily
Munnings of Eleuthera.

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Sa
WS a
THE TRIBUNE



ine

MONDAY,

MAY

18,



2009

SECTION B ¢ business@tribunemedia.net

S

Colinalmperial.

Confidence For Life





SL

DLO) OL O) Aste)



130-140
Bahamians
per day signing
up for jobless
benefits

* $6.7m expected total
payout to those registered
with unemployment
scheme by May 2

* 4,334 cheques disbursed
to date, with 1,335 of 7,078
applicants turned down

* Minister says two major
Bay Street businesses
refusing to lay-off staff
despite ‘significant losses’

* 1,900 job losses needed
for 1% unemployment
rate increase

@ By NEIL HARTNELL

Tribune Business Editor

SOME 130-140 Bahamians
per day are signing up to claim
unemployment benefit, the min-
ister of labour and social devel-
opment has told Tribune Busi-
ness, with the Government
expecting to pay out a total $6.7
million to those who registered
—and were approved — by May
2, 2009.

Dion Foulkes said the
National Insurance Board
(NIB), which is administering

See page 9B

Emerald Isle
correction

In Tribune Business’s joint
lead article on the Four Sea-
sons Emerald Bay Resort’s
closure on Thursday, May 14,
it was reported that the near-
by Emerald Isle Shopping
Centre on Exuma was also
due to close on June 15, 2009.

This is not correct. The
shopping centre is uncon-
nected to the resort and its
closure, and both it and its
business tenants will remain
open with no change to their
operations. Tribune Business
apologises for the error.



Government on ‘collision
course’ with insurance

@ By NEIL HARTNELL
Tribune Business Editor

he Government is
on “a collision
course” with the
Bahamian insur-
ance industry over
reforms to the Domestic Insur-
ance Act, Tribune Business can
reveal, the sector believing it
has “overreacted” to CLICO
(Bahamas) collapse through the
unfettered powers it proposes
to give the regulator and com-
pany administrator he appoints.

Timothy Ingraham, the
Bahamas General Insurance
Association’s (BGIA) chair-
man, confirmed to this newspa-
per that the industry was “very
disappointed” that its recom-
mendations on the proposed
amendments — due to be debat-
ed in the House of Assembly
this week — “seem to have been
ignored or not taken into
account”.

The BGIA had previously
threatened to mount a Supreme
Court challenge to the amend-
ments, which give the Insurance
Commissioner (the Registrar of
Insurance’s successor under the
Act), the power to appoint a
‘statutory administrator’ for any

Four firms
failing per
week since
September

@ By NEIL HARTNELL
Tribune Business Editor

FOUR small to medium-
sized Bahamian companies
have been going out of business
every week since September
2008, a consultant to the sector
has warned, again calling for
the Government to develop a
Small Business Act to “save
honest businesses”.

Mark Turnquest, of Mark
Turnquest Consulting, said “90
per cent” of his customer base
was struggling to survive amid
the deepening recession, with
the remaining 10 per cent only
faring better because they had
back-up assets and collateral to
fall back on.

Speaking ahead of his upcom-
ing National Small Business
Summit, which starts on May
21, Mr Turnquest said: “A cou-
ple of months ago, beginning in
September 2008, you were look-
ing at four businesses going out
of business every week.

“Ninety per cent of my clients
are doing bad. The other 10 per
cent, the only reason they’re
doing well is because they have

See page 5B

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* Industry ‘very disappointed’ concerns over Act reforms ‘seem to have been ignored’
* Fears centre on ‘draconian powers’ given to regulator and company administrators
* General insurers keeping options, including court action, open

* Colinalmperial likely to take on CLICO (Bahamas) portfolio, sources say

insurer carrier or broker/agent
without first obtaining the
court’s permission.

Mr Ingraham said the BGIA
“will certainly look at the
options” if the proposed
amendments tabled in the
House of Assembly some 10
days ago remain as they are,
refusing to rule out a court chal-
lenge.

The Bahamian insurance sec-
tor is especially concerned that
the Commissioner’s reasons for
appointing an administrator
seem vague and subjective, with
the latter appointed purely
according to one person’s judg-
ment.

The company concerned has
no ability to challenge the
administrator’s appointment
until after the event, creating
fears that ‘the damage will
already have been done’, not
just to the firm’s reputation but
also to its operational, manage-

ment and business affairs.

Mr Ingraham told Tribune
Business: “We were very disap-
pointed that some recommen-
dations we have made, and
some concerns we expressed,
seem to have been ignored or
not taken into account.

“The things we expressed
concern about were still tabled
in the versions in the House.
We’re quite concerned about
that, and are still in ongoing dia-
logue with the Registrar of
Insurance’s Office over the
issue.”

The BGIA chairman said the
“concern is mainly over the
powers they gave the Commis-
sioner”. The amendments, he
added, gave the regulator “fair-
ly wide powers” to appoint an
administrator if, in his judg-
ment, an insurance company
“should be closed down” or it
was “not doing things the way
he thinks they should be done”.

Mr Ingraham, though, said
the BGIA’s position was that
the appointment of an insur-
ance company administrator
should still go through — and be
ratified — by the Supreme Court.
“We feel it’s putting a lot of
power in the hands of one per-
son,” he explained.

“The powers vested in the
Commissioner and the admin-
istrator seem to be purely in
that person’s judgment. It’s
always a concern when some-
one comes in and takes over a
business, and what they’re like-
ly to do with it. We’re still in
discussions with the Registrar
of Insurance, and making our
voices heard.”

A copy of the Domestic
Insurance Act amendments that
have been tabled in Parliament,
and obtained by Tribune Busi-
ness, show that the Insurance

See page 6B

Plan to make Water Corp a
$20.2m profit maker ignored

B By NEIL HARTNELL
Tribune Business Editor

THE Water & Sewerage Corporation could
be generating $20.2 million in net income and
$68.2 million in operating revenue in its 2012
financial year, if the proposals contained in a 10-
year business recovery plan are implemented.

Yet the reforms contained in the Corporation’s
2002-2012 Corporate Business Plan, produced
by the consulting arm of UK water utility, Thames
Water, in May 2002, have seemingly never been
implemented by either the former Christie gov-
ernment or the current Ingraham administration

to date.

position the Water & Sewerage Corporation “as
a highly-regarded, self-financing service provider”
rather than the $24.107 million net loss making

ernment”.

The plan, which has been obtained by Tribune

Business, lays-out a “10-year vision” designed to

See page 4B

burden it had become by fiscal 2007.

This has left the Corporation as the biggest
loss-making government agency, ahead of
Bahamasair, and the greatest burden on Bahami-
an taxpayers, costing them $30 million in the
2008-2009 Budget year.

The Corporate Business Plan said the goals it
set out for the Water & Sewerage Corporation
were “quite feasible given effective management
of the organisation, associated with a greater
independence from the direct influence of gov-

medical emergencies

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Grand Bahama
firm's revenues
increase 105%

* South Riding Point still
locked in $2.7m contractor
claim, plus government
tax claim

* Freeport-based tug boat
business sees first quarter
revenues rise 7%

@ By NEIL HARTNELL
Tribune Business Editor

A GRAND Bahama-based
bulk storage terminal saw its
revenues more than double dur-
ing the 2009 first quarter,
increasing by $4.491 million or
105 per cent, due to a capacity
increase of 1.5 million barrels.

World Point Terminals, the
Canadian parent for South Rid-
ing Point, said the revenue
increase for the three months
to March 31, 2009, was due to
“both higher storage and
marine revenues” at the Grand
Bahama operation.

“Storage revenues increased
due to 1.5 million barrels of new
storage coming into service in
the third and fourth quarters of
2008,” World Pint said of South
Riding Point in its first quarter
results statement.

“While the company antici-

See page 7B

responsi or
from the daily report,
=



ColinaImperial.


PAGE 2B, MONDAY, MAY 18, 2009

THE TRIBUNE





Sa

The Bahamian Stock Market

FINDEX 795.46 (-4.72%) YTD
a ; . . : . BISX CLOSING CHANGE VOLUME YTD PRICE
Bf By RoyalFidelity Capital tems (DHS) was the big declin- | CWCO reported net income of Doctors Hospital Health Sys- SYMBOL PRICE CHANGE
Markets er, its stock price falling by $0.33 $2.6 million, an increase of $1 tems (DHS) released unaudited AML $1.40 $- 0 -18.13%
to a new 52-week low of $1.53 million or 65 per cent compared results for the year ended Jan- BBL $0.63 ce -4.55%
THERE was an increase in ona volume of 14,000 shares. to $1.7 million in the same peri- — uary 31, 2009. DHS reported a BOB $6.95 Ve 0 -9.03%
trading activity last week in the ICD Utilities (CD) saw od last year. net income of $3.8 million, an BPF $11.00 cs 0 -6.78%
Bahamian market, with 10,268 shares trade, its stock Income from operations increase of $411,000 or 12 per BSL $7.92 ce 0 -22.28%
investors trading in seven out price falling by $0.09 toend the — stood at $3.5 million, up by $1.4 — cent compared to $3.4 million at BWL $3.15 $- 0. 0.00%
of the 24 listed securities, of | week at $5.50. million or 68 per cent. Total rev- year-end 2008. CAB $11.75 ie 0 -16.25%
which three declined and four enues totalled $15.9 million, Total revenues stood at $43.1 CBL $6.11 $-0.28 34,088 -12.71%
remained unchanged. BOND MARKET which rose by 11 per cent from million, up $985,000 or 2 per CHL $2.83 ce 161 0.00%
Investors traded $8,000 (par the 2008 first quarter, while cent from $42.1 million for the CIB $10.40 $- 0 -0.48%
EQUITY MARKET value) Fidelity Bank (Bahamas) costs of revenues of $9.9 mil- same 12-month period in 2008, CWCB © $2.91 $0.32 0 29.33%
A total of 58,767 shares Notes C Notes (FBB13) Due _ lion increased by $128,000 or while total expenses increased DHS $1.53 $-0.33 14,000 -40.00%
changed hands last week, rep- 2013, and $18,000 (par value) 1.31 per cent. by $749,000 or 2 per cent to FAM $7.76 Ve 0 -0.51%
resenting an increase of 43,778 Fidelity Bank (Bahamas) Series Other expenses stood at total $38.8 million. FBB $2.37 ce 0. 0.00%
shares compared to the previ- D Notes (FBB15) Due 2015. $832,000, up by $364,000 over Management indicated that FCC $0.30 $- 0 0.00%
ous week’s week's trading vol- the same period in 2008. a change in the mix of patients FCL $5.14 ve 0 -0.58%
ume of 14,989 shares. COMPANY NEWS Total assets were $155.5 mil- _ produced an increase in net rev- FCLB $1.00 ce 0. 0.00%
Commonwealth Bank (CBL) lion, which rose by $860,000 or enues, while increases in FIN $11.00 $- 250 -7.33%
led the volume for a fourth con- Earnings Releases: 0.56 per cent, while total liabil- | expenses were due to challenges ICD $5.50 $-0.09 10,268 -10.28%
secutive week with 34,088 Consolidated Water Compa- __ ities totalled $30.2 million, rep- with staff compensation and JSJ $10.50 - 5.41%
shares trading, its stock falling ny (CWCO) released its unau- resenting an average of increased utility rates. PRE $10.00 ice 0. 0.00%

dited financial results for the
quarter ending March 31, 2009.

by $0.28 end the week at $6.11.
Doctors Hospital Health Sys-

$951,000 or 3 per cent from
year-end 2008.

Earnings per common share
stood at $0.38, representing an

Vie PLAT RES

built-In Tariff

increase of 12 per cent from
$0.34 in 2008. Total assets and
liabilities stood at $31.8 million
and $8.6 million respectively,
compared to $31.3 million and
$11.5 million at year-end 2008.

Cable Bahamas (CAB)
released its unaudited financial
results for the quarter ending
March 31, 2009. Net income
increased by 35 per cent to $7.4
million, compared to $5.5 mil-
lion in the 2008 first quarter.

Net income per ordinary
share stood at $0.38, up 36 per
cent from $0.28 for the 2008 first
quarter. CAB reported rev-
enues of $21.1 million, an
increase of $1 million or 5 per
cent from $20 million in 2008.

Cable television accounted
for the bulk of the quarter's rev-
enues at $11.2 million, followed
by Data at $3.3 million and
Internet at $6.5 million. Oper-
ating income of $8 million grew
by $821,000 or 11 per cent from
$7.2 million in 2008. Operating
expenses remained relatively
flat at $9.8 million versus $9.7

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million in the 2008 first quar-
ter.

ICD Utilities (CD) released
its audited financial results for
the year ended December 31,
2008. Net income rose to $4.9
million, up $1.9 million or 68
per cent compared to $2.9 mil-
lion at year-end 2008.

ICD reported revenues of $5
million and expenses of $76,000,
compared to $3 million and
$67,000 in fiscal 2007. Total
assets and liabilities stood at
$76.3 million and $5,700 respec-
tively, versus $76.8 million and
$2,700 in fiscal 2007.

Dividend Notes:

Famguard Corporation
(FAM) has declared a dividend
of $0.06 per share, payable on
May 18, 2009, to all sharehold-
ers of record date May 11, 2009.

Doctors Hospital Health Sys-
tems (DHS) has declared an
extraordinary dividend of $0.04
per share, payable on May 21,
2009, to all shareholders of
record date May 7, 2009.

Annual General Meeting
(AGM) Notes:

Commonwealth Bank (CBL)
announced that it will be hold-
ing its Annual General Meet-
ing on Wednesday, May 20,
2009, at 5pm at Superclubs
Breezes, West Bay Street,
Cable Beach, New Providence,
the Bahamas.

Consolidated Water Compa-
ny (CWCB) announced that it
will be holding its Annual Gen-
eral Meeting on Wednesday,
May 20, 2009, at 10am at the
Grand Cayman Marriott Hotel
in Grand Cayman. Shareholders
of record as of March 18, 2009,
will be qualified to vote in per-
son or by proxy at the Annual
Meeting.

Colina Holdings (CHL)
announced that it will be hold-
ing itsAnnual General Meeting
on Thursday May 28, 2009, at
5.30pm at the J. W. Pinder
Building, Colinalmperial Insur-
ance, Collins Avenue. Share-
holders of record as of April 24,
2009, will be qualified to vote
at the Annual Meeting.

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THE TRIBUNE

MONDAY, MAY 18, 2009, PAGE 3B



‘Dash’ for local

Service saving
$200k per plane

m@ By CHESTER ROBARDS
Business Reporter
crobards@tribunemedia.net

BAHAMASAIR is in the
process of reassembling the
third of its Dash-8 aircraft to
be completely overhauled
locally, according to its director
of maintenance and engineer-
ing, saving the airline more
than $200,000 as opposed to
sending it abroad.

Tracey Cooper said it was
an exciting day when Bahama-
sair received the go-ahead to
completely overhaul its entire
fleet of Dash-8 aircraft at its
hangar in the Lynden Pindling
International Airport.

The move, which could save
the airline almost $1.4 million
this year, was done in response
to the increasing value of the
Canadian dollar.

The Dash-8s were originally
flown to Canada, where they
would be handed over to a
Canadian firm to be over-
hauled.

Bahamasair spent over
$800,000 per plane contracting
the overhauling of the aircraft
out to the Canadian company,
whereas in their own hangar it
is done for closer to $600,000
per plane.

According to Mr Cooper,
the airline would then also
incur fuel costs, crew costs and
the cost of the overhaul itself.
Sometimes, the aircraft would
take more than its scheduled
one-day trip to Canada, due to
weather and other unforeseen
hold-ups.

When in the company’s
hangar, Mr Cooper said the
aircraft would be one among
many being repaired and refit-
ted. Here in Bahamasair’s
hangar, a dedicated crew

works on the Dash-8s.

“They are dedicated to this
aircraft,” Mr Cooper said.
“They come back after a night
and start where they left off.
In essence, we’re producing a
better product because we’re
putting the kind of care into it
that others might not feel

“To them, this is yust anoth-
er plane coming in. For us this
is a product we want to put out
there to impress the customers
at the end of the day.”

The planes are stripped
down to their bare bones in
the hangar.

Seats are removed, overhead
bins are pulled down, the
plane’s engines are taken off
and even the cockpit windows
are replaced.

According to Mr Cooper, a
staff of about 20 workers,
including some expert foreign
labour, is used to completely
gut and restock the aircraft.

He said that in order for
Bahamasair to receive
approval to work on its aircraft
itself, the regulators had to
ensure the airline had suffi-
cient skilled labour and the
tools necessary to complete the
job.

“Some of the guys here
know the plane like the back of
their hand and have been
working on them for 20 years,”
Mr Cooper said.

He added that Bahamasair
has also saved 50 per cent on
labour costs, as Canadian
workers demand $45 to $50 an
hour, whereas Bahamian
workers are paid $20 to $24 an
hour.

This type of complete ser-
vice, as a cost-saving initiative,
is done every two-and-a-half
years. Mr Cooper said the
inspection done on the first

Dash-8 that was completely
overhauled locally was the
most difficult. However, no
problems were found with the
completed aircraft.

He said the aircraft under-
goes rigorous inspections dur-
ing its overhaul, as every
process and part is logged and
filed in an organized mountain
of paperwork.

“Tn aviation everything must
be signed off on,” Mr Cooper
said.

The airline also dedicated
one section of its parts ware-
house to components for the
Dash-8. Mr Cooper said
Bahamasair will overhaul their
fourth airplane sometime this
year.

The Tribune wants to hear
from people who are
making news in their
neighbourhoods. Perhaps
you are raising funds for a
good cause, campaigning
for improvements in the
area or have won an
award.

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and share your story.

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THE TRIBUNE





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BIND

Plan to make Water
orp a $20.2m profit
maker ignored

FROM page 1B

Analysing the Water & Sew-
erage Corporation’s problems,
the report’s findings are as
applicable now as they were
then in May 2002. “At present,
the Water & Sewerage Corpo-

Teachers & Salaried Workers Co-operative
Credit Union Limited

NOTICE OF

ANNUAL GENERAL MEETING

TO: All Members of Teachers and Salaried Workers
Co-operative Credit Union Limited
East Street South and Independence Drive

Notice is hereby given that the Thirty-Second
(32nd) Annual Meeting of Teachers & Salaried
Workers Co-operative Credit Union Limited will be
held at the British Colonial Hilton Hotel located on
Bay Street, on Saturday May 23, 2009 commencing
at 8:00 a.m. for the following purposes:

To receive the Report of the Board of

Directors for 2008.

To receive the Audited Accounts for 2008.
To elect members of the Board of Directors.
To elect members of the Supervisory

Committee

To discuss and approve the Budget for 2009.
To take action on such matters as may come

before the meeting.

Lenn King
Secretary



ration is not well placed to take
advantage of the opportunities
that are open to it,” the Corpo-
rate Business Plan said.

“Water & Sewerage Corpo-
ration is not a monopoly sup-
plier, and to a large extent is
operating in an open market,
whilst having statutory respon-
sibilities to supply water and
provide sewerage services.

“Consequently, only about
one-third of the residents of
New Providence take their dai-
ly water supplies from the
Water & Sewerage Corpora-
tion. The remainder make their
own provisions. This includes
large commercial users, such as
hotels, and residents with indi-
vidual bore holes alike. The
provision of sewerage services is
limited to some 6,000 dwellings.
Competition is increasing, and
over the past few years the
trend is towards an overall loss
of market share.”

To deal with this situation,
the Corporate Business Plan
said the Water & Sewerage
Corporation would need to
increase market share by
increasing the number of water
customers it served from 20,000
to 34,000 by end-2005, and to
55,000 by end-2012.

It also needed to raise the
number of sewage customers
from 6,000 to 20,000 by 2012. It
was also recommended that the
Water & Sewerage Corporation
be reduced in size by 117 staff,
with a new management struc-
ture put in place under the lead-
ership of a chief executive.

Apart from reducing the
Government’s annual subsidy,
efficiency savings and an

increased capital investment
programme were necessary, the
Corporate Business Plan said,
with economic regulation of the
water sector by the Public Util-
ities Commission (PUC) rec-
ommended to start in 2004.
This, though, has never hap-
pened, and has now been over-
taken by the liberalization of
the communications sector, with
the Utilities Regulation and
Competition Authority
(URCA) set to replace the
PUC.

On the tariff front, the Cor-
porate Business Plan recom-
mended that while there be no
changes for the period 2002-
2005, amendments were
required to enable the Water
& Sewerage Corporation to
“recover its costs in a more cost-
reflective and equitable man-
ner”.

“There is an urgent need to
put the financial relationship
with the Government on a
sound footing,” the report said.
“The changes proposed need
not increase the overall tariff
burden on customers, but will
enable Water & Sewerage Cor-
poration to better manage its
income, and will position it for
its future role as a regulated
operator.”

The Corporate Business Plan
said a financial restructuring
was also imperative, especially
when it came to reducing the
Water & Sewerage Corpora-
tion’s existing indebtedness. A
“due allowance” was needed
for water revenues owed by
government departments, the
sustainability of the Corpora-
tion’s pension fund needed to

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be accounted for, and income
to cover the full costs of opera-
tions generated.

If all the recommendations
had been implemented, the
Corporate Business Plan had
projected that the Water &
Sewerage Corporation would
generate $2 million in net
income in its 2005 fiscal year,
based on $40 million worth of
operating revenues and $28.8
million in operational spending.

This, it forecast, would
increase to a $10.8 million net
profit for 2008 (unlikely, given
the $24.107 million loss in 2007),
generated by $54.8 million in
revenues and $32.7 million in
operational spending. This
would have created $20.2 mil-
lion in operating income, with
the net profit achieved from
allowances of $9.6 million for
depreciation; $2.4 million in
financing expenses; and $2.4
million in government subsidies.

For 2012, the projection,
which now looks unrealistic,
was that $68.2 million in oper-
ating revenues and $36.5 mil-
lion in capital spending, would
generate $31.7 million in oper-
ating income and $20.2 million
in net profit. This allowed for
$11.9 million in depreciation,
$1.9 million in financing costs,
and a $2.4 million government
subsidy.

“On the basis of the achieve-
ment of the recommended effi-
ciency savings being made, and
a successful marketing cam-
paign to win customers back as
reliability and quality improve,
the plan will result in Water &
Sewerage Corporation reach-
ing a break even operating sit-
uation during the fiscal year
2004, with a net surplus in
2005,” the Corporate Business
Plan predicted optimistically.

“Thereafter, income generat-
ed should be sufficient to cover
operating expenses and provide
funds for capital investment.”

If no action was taken, the
Corporate Business Plan pre-
dicted that the Water & Sew-
erage Corporation would con-
tinue to be a perennial loss-
maker, incurring a $5.9 million
loss in 2008 and $4.9 million loss
in 2012. Yet even this could not
have envisaged the scale of the
losses now being incurred.

“In the Plan, we have stressed
the need for investment in the
service infrastructure in order
to improve the levels of service
that are currently being provid-
ed,” the Corporate Business
Plan said.

“This, we believe, is essential
for recovery and for a sustain-
able long-term business. Cur-
rently, the level of investment in
maintaining and enhancing the
systems in New Providence is
inadequate, the infrastructure
is running down and services
are suffering. A backlog of
investment to bring the systems
up to the required standards is
accumulating.”

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THE TRIBUNE



MONDAY, MAY 18, 2009, PAGE 5B



Four firms failing
per week since
September

FROM page 1B

back-up systems in terms of col-
lateral. The businesses that are
in business now will survive.
They are the ones that have
adjusted their plans and have
been battle tested.

“The economy as it relates to
small business is in a devastating
way. This Summit is going to
change the future of the coun-
try. We cannot move forward
unless we have a Small Busi-
ness Act. You have to have pro-
grammes that protect the econ-
omy as it relates to small busi-
ness development.”

Small businesses and entre-
preneurship are regarded in
many circles as the ‘magic ingre-
dient’ driving much economic
growth. All large, successful cor-
porations trace their roots to
this sector, and it is the risk-tak-
ing approach of these compa-
nies’ owners, and their willing-
ness to hire persons, that take
economies forward.

Mr Turnquest said he hoped
his proposed Small Business
Act could be crafted and taken
to Parliament by 2010, describ-
ing it as something that would
“practically shape everything
that happens in the economy”.

One of its key roles, he indi-
cated, would be to ensure the
Government and commercial
banks worked together to help
rescue floundering Bahamian
small businesses during times
of economic recession, espe-
cially those that hitherto had
been paying all their taxes and
bills on time.

“Tf a business was paying its

taxes and bills, hired 25 persons
and comes on hard times, the
Government and financial sec-
tor would come together and
save the business, protect the
business,” Mr Turnquest
explained. “The Act will save
businesses that are honest.”

This was preferable, he
added, to allowing companies
to fail and employees to lose
their jobs, leaving the latter
claiming unemployment benefit.

When the economy picked
back up, Mr Turnquest said it
would be far more difficult for a
failed business to return to
operations, hence the need to
keep them operating and staff
employed. No one, including
the Government, would be able
to absorb all laid-off employ-
ees during a recession.

“In order to develop the
economy, the small business-
man must be working, must
employ people, and be prof-
itable. Otherwise, there’s no
incentive for him to carry on,”
Mr Turnquest said. “We need
this Act to help future genera-
tions.”

There had been a lack of syn-
ergy and co-operation between
different sectors of the Bahami-
an economy, Mr Turnquest
said, and he urged: “My advice
to the private sector is to come
and work together. There’s
strength in numbers, identify
the root causes of the problems,
and this Small Business Act will
work.”

The National Small Business
Summit would aim to identify
difficulties in all industries, Mr
Turnquest said, and the infor-
mation it collected would be

NOTICE
THE COMPANIES ACT, 1992, CHAPTER 308
NOTICE OF APPOINTMENT OF RECEIVER-MANAGER
Pursuant to Section 139

The New South Ocean Development Company limited.

used to develop a strategic plan
that all organisations, such as
the Bahamas Chamber of Com-
merce and the Government,
would have input into.

MEDICAL

He also urged the commer-
cial banking industry to develop
more imaginative policies when
it came to small business lend-
ing.

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$150.00

$60.00

$40.00

Large Gloves latex (Powder Free)

1000/case

$40.00

Large Gloves Vinyl (Latex Free)

1000/case

Insulin Syringe 100U/ml
3600/case

$35.00

$175.00

Nebulizer Mask Kit Adult 20/ml,

Child 6ml, Chamber
100/case

Needle Holders
1200/case

Nasal Cannula Adult
100/case

Oxygen Mask Adult Large
100/case

IML Syringe with 25G Needle
2400/case

3ML Syringe with 23G Needle
1500/case

$130.00

$70.00

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$75.00

$100.00

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S5ML Syringe with 21G Needle and 23G Needle

1200/case

10ML Syringe with 21G Needle

$100.00















































COMMONWEATH OF THE BAHAMAS

2008

IN THE SUPREME COURT CLE/qui/01815

IN THE MATTER of the Quieting Titles Act, 1959
AND
IN THE MATTER of The Petition of Mary Wilson

NOTICE OF PETITION

NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that Mary Wilson presently
of the Settlement of Love Hill on the Island of Andros one
of the Islands of the Commonwealth of The Bahamas, is
applying to the Supreme Court of the Commonwealth of
The Bahamas to have his title investigated determined and

declared under the Quieting Titles Act, 1959 (Ch. 393) in

respect of the land hereafter described, that is to say:

“IN THE MATTER OF ALL THAT piece
pe or tract of land containing Seven
housand Four Hundred and Fifteen
{F 415) square feet being Lot Number
7) situate approximately 205 feet South
of Meadows Street and East Side of
Hutchinson Street in the Southern District
of the Island of New Providence which
said piece parcel or lot of land is bounded
on the NORTH by land now or formerly the
property of John S. Carey, Sr. and running
thereon Ejighty-Five and _ Forty-One
Hundredth (85.41) feet on the EAST by
land now or formerly the property of Annie
Knowles and running thereon Ninety-One
and Fifty-Two Hundredth (91.52) feet on
the SOUTH by land now or formerly the
property of Merlene Bethel and running
thereon Scare aia and _ Ninety-Five
Hundredth (76.95) feet and on the WEST
by Hutchinson Street and running thereon

nO te and Thirty-Eight Hundredth
(91.38) feet which said parcel of land
is recorded in the Department of Lands
and Surveys in the Commonwealth of
The Bahamas as Plan 3614 N.P. and is
thereon coloured pink.”

AND TAKE NOTICE that copies of the Petition and the

Plan of the said land may be inspected during normal
office hours at the following places:

Supreme Court Registry, Ansbacher House, East Street North,
New Providence, The Bahamas.

Sharon Wilson & Co., Chambers, East Shirley Street, Highland
Terrace, New Providence, The Bahamas.

AND FURTHER TAKE NOTICE that any person
having dower or right to dower, an adverse claim or a claim not
recognized in the Petition shall on or before the 29 June A.D.,
2009 file in the Supreme Court and serve on the Petition or his
attorney an Adverse Claim in the prescribed form supported by
Affidavit.

FAILURE OF ANY PERSON to file and serve an
Adverse Claim on or before 29" June A.D., 2009 date will operate

Take Notice that an Order was granted by His Lordship, the
Honourable Mr. Justice Neville Adderley, Justice of the Supreme
Court of The Commonwealth of The Bahamas on the 30th day of
April, A.D., 2009 appointing Mr. Anthony Kikivarakis of Deloitte
& Touche Chartered Accountants and Management Consultants
of 2nd Terrace West, Centreville P.O. Box N-7120, Nassau, The
Bahamas as Receiver-Manager of all of the assets and properties
of The New South Ocean Development Company Limited
charged by the Supplemental Debentures and Legal Mortgages
both dated the 12th day of February, 2008 in the amounts of
$US50 million and US$22.5 million respectively in favour of |.F.
Propco Holdings (Ontario) 39 Ltd., and recorded in the Registry of
Records in the City of Nassau, in the Island of New Providence,
The Bahamas in Volume 10480 at pages 185 to 256 and Volume
10480 at pages 97 to 169.

Sears & Co.
Counsel and Attorneys-at-Law Chambers
No. 10 Market Street North,
Nassau, The Bahaams
Attorneys for |.F. Propco Holdings (Ontario) 39 Ltd

Dated the 13th day of May, 2009.

NOTICE

IN THE ESTATE of URBAN SINCLAIR MILLER
JR. late of the Southern District of the Island of New
Providence, one of the Islands of The Commonwealth
of The Bahamas, deceased.

Notice is hereby given that all persons having any claim
or demand against the above Estate are required to
send their names, addresses and particulars of the same
certified in writing to the undersigned on or before the 28th
day May A. D., 2009, and if required, prove such debts
or claims, or in default be excluded fron{ any distribution;
after the above date the assets will be distributed having
regard only to the proved debts or claims of which the
Administrator shall have had Notice.

And Notice is hereby given that all persons indebted to the
said Estate are requested to make full settlement on or
before the aforementioned date.

MICHAEL A. DEAN & CO.,
Attorneys for the Administrator Alvernia Court, 94
Dowdeswell Street
P.O. Box N-3114
Nassau, The Bahamas



as a bar to such claim.

1200/case $100.00

Dated this 21° day of April A.D., 2009
Sharon Wilson & Co.
Chambers

Specimen Cups 40z Sterile
100/case $25.00
Sterile Surgical Gloves size 7 1/2, 8, 8 1/2,

600/case $55.00 Delvest House

Hypoallergenic Cloth Tape (Microspore Tape) East Shirley Street, Highland Terrace

1 inch, 216/case

i each 10@/eaxe Nassau, N.P., The Bahamas

$100.00

Cash and Carry or Free Delivery Call MeOIney ener tie Peunener

422-1457 - Ms. Miller

THE COLLEGE OF THE BAHAMAS

Visit our website at www.cob.edu.bs

CENTRE FOR CONTINUING EDUCATION
AND EXTENSION SERVICES

PERSONAL DEVELOPMENT - SUMMER SEMESTER 022009

COURSE SECT | COURSE

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ee
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DANCE
6:40pm
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‘ENQUIRIES: Contact the Co-ordinator at Tel: (242) 325-5714 / (242) 328-0093 /
328-1936 / 302-4300 ext. 5202 or email prevsdev@cob.edu.bs

DANCeO 1 BALLROOM DANCING 20-May | Bwke S275







All fees are included with the exception of the application fee of $40.00 (one time).
CEES reserves the right to change Tuition, Fees, Course Content, Course Schedule and
Course Materials.

Ravised
May] ath2009


PAGE 6B, MONDAY, MAY 18, 2009

THE TRIBUNE





Government on ‘collision
course’ with insurance

FROM page 1B

Commission (the successor to
the Registrar of Insurance)
“may appoint an administrator
who shall seize the management
and control of a company, or
any part of the insurance busi-
ness of the company”, in various
situations.

aN
NAD

Nassau Airport
Developenomt Company

Among the seemingly sub-
jective situations for doing so
are if an asset on the insurance
company’s books, “in the opin-
ion of the Commission”, is “not
satisfactorily accounted for;
“where, in the opinion of the
Commission”, the company’s
affairs are such that they could

C-120 Airside Civil and

C-130 Landside Civil, Stage 1

Nassay Arpon Develooment Company (MAD) & pleased io
ainaunce (he release of Tender C-120 Airside Cid and
6-130 Landside Coal for Stage 1 of the Lynden Pincling

infemational Airport Expansion. MAD) intends to enter inio
one contrac Tor the campletion of lhese wark packages, The

Scone of Work includes

-Gigniicant sarthmoving, drainage and utility works
bolh arse and landside:

-Fioedveay, paring lot and apron construction
exceeding 50,000 tors. of asphalt paving

Signage and bohting for roadways, parking lols
Aprons and taxnways; and

-Instalation of hard and soll lancside landscaping and

imgakon

The (0-120 Airside Civil and C-130 Landside Civil, Stage 7
Terminal Expansion Project Tender Documents will be

available for pick up or @ectronic distribution afer
2:00pm, April 16th, 2009. 4 bidders mesting wil
be hekl at 1:00am, Tuesday April 28th,
2008. Please contact Traci Bristy to register at the MAD
Project Office

prejudice policyholders, credi-
tors or asset owners; and
“where, in the opinion of the
Commission”, the insurance
carrier, intermediary or person
“is committing or about to com-
mit” an unsafe or unsound busi-
ness practice, or pursue such a
course.

Other reasons for the admin-
istrator’s appointment, such as
the company’s failure to meet
or pay its liabilities; the value
of its assets being less than its
liabilities or placing policyhold-
ers in jeopardy; a significant
erosion in the value of the com-
pany’s assets; and the conduct
of business in a manner that is
detrimental to policyholders,
seem more valid.

But again, if “in the opinion
of the Commission” a company
is likely to be unable to meet
its liabilities, an administrator
can be summoned.

Mr Ingraham, though, said
these powers went too far,
implying there was a danger of
‘throwing the baby out with the
bath water’ in the Government
and regulators’ haste to respond
— and be seen to be doing some-
thing - in the CLICO
(Bahamas) matter. It is not
uncommon for Bahamian regu-
lators, having been caught nap-
ping, to overreact.

“T feel that’s the case here.
It’s a bit of an overreaction,”
Mr Ingraham told Tribune
Business. “We feel it might have
gone too far the other way. We
can understand them wanting
to go in, but the current system
can still work.

“Go in, get court orders done.
Have a judge look at them, and
decide if a reasonable request is
being made, rather than some-
one deciding to go in and do

this, possibly without the com-
pany having a chance to explain
itself. By then, the damage is
done. There is no recourse.”

In the CLICO (Bahamas) sit-
uation, Mr Ingraham added:
“The system should have
worked. No two situations are
the same. If the Registrar had
had more powers to go in early
on, and the ability to apply sanc-
tions, I don’t think the situation
would have got to where it got
to.”

Chairman

The BGIA chairman said his
organisation would “certainly
look at the options” open to it if
the legislation remained
unchanged, as it had to protect
its members’ interests and pre-
vent them from becoming
exposed to future problems.

Once appointed, the admin-
istrator has, under the current
proposed reforms, “the exclu-
sive powers to manage and con-
trol the company’s affairs”. He
can discontinue its operations,
stop or limit payment of its
obligations, and re-organise the
company. In doing the latter,
the administrator can appoint
new officers and directors, and
also consummate the sale or
merger of the insurance com-
pany to others if he so chooses.

One insurance industry
source, who requested
anonymity, told Tribune Busi-
ness: “I’ve never seen such a
strong reaction from the indus-
try. They are furious. The pow-
ers given the administrator far
exceed those given to any regu-
lator anywhere else. They can
come in and take control, fire
the Board and fire the execu-
tives.”

The source added: “By sim-
ply going ahead with the initial
wording almost intact, the Govy-
ernment is clearly putting itself
on a collision course with the
insurance industry.

This is very disappointing
bearing in mind that it has
always been the Government's
stance that it would not put for-
ward insurance legislation that
was not supported by the major-
ity of the industry.

:"It may be the Government's
position that the industry
messed up with CLICO and
should now therefore be dictat-
ed to. If so, this is entirely mis-
conceived - the CLICO deba-
cle was more accurately encour-
aged by the failure of the regu-
lators and respective govern-
ments.

“They have also included
intermediaries in these dracon-
ian provisions. One is at a loss
to understand why. Intermedi-
aries had nothing to do with the
CLICO scandal.”

* Talking of CLICO
(Bahamas), Prime Minister
Hubert Ingraham is due to
make a statement on the insur-
er’s collapse in the House of
Assembly today. Hopes are
high that he may announce that
the Government has decided to
make good the potential loss
suffered by the company’s pol-
icyholders and annuity deposi-
tors by taking over the $57 mil-
lion guarantee previously held
by CL Financial.

That is uncertain. But
informed sources have told Tri-
bune Business that the Prime
Minister may also announce the
transfer of CLICO (Bahamas)
life and health insurance policy
portfolio to another company,

with Colinalmperial Insurance
Company said to be the pre-
ferred option.

Tribune Business under-
stands that Colinalmperial and
FamGuard Corporation, BISX-
listed parent of Family
Guardian, are the two leading
candidates to take on the CLI-
CO (Bahamas) portfolio under
what will initially be an admin-
istration agreement, the transfer
of policies taking place later.

Two previous candidates,
British American Financial and
Atlantic Medical, are no longer
thought to be in the running,
the latter having withdrawn its
initial interest.

Sources suggested that Coli-
nalmperial was likely to be the
preferred choice of liquidator
Craig “Tony’ Gomez because of
its stronger balance sheet, and
surplus of assets over liabilities.
This would enable it to find
assets to match CLICO
(Bahamas) insurance portfolio
liabilities, which stand at around
$11-$12 million.

One source told Tribune
Business: “Colinalmperial prob-
ably have the most financial
might and infrastructure to real-
ly deal with it. They have a
strong balance sheet and good
rating from A. M. Best.”

The likely selection of Coli-
nalmperial will have to be rati-
fied by both the Registrar of
Insurance and the Supreme
Court. Critics are likely to argue
that transferring CLICO
(Bahamas) insurance portfolio
to Colinalmperial will further
increase the latter’s dominant
position in the Bahamian life
insurance market, but the book
of business it could gain will be
relatively small and make min-
imal difference.

Conmact TRAD ERSEY

Gontracts and Procurement Manager

Phe (242) PO2-10686 | Fam: (242) 2117
PO Geo AP 9 Nessa Bahamas
Erral: traci brebyiiines b=

COMMONWEALTH OF THE BAHAMAS

IN THE SUPREME COURT No. 00219

2006

PUBLIC NOTICE

INTENT TO CHANGE NAME BY DEED POLL

The Publicis hereby advised that], DAPHNE KETURAMcKENZIE
the mother of JAYDE DENIQUA McKENZIE intend to change the
surname of my said daughter from McKENZIE to SMITH. If there
are any objections to this change of name by Deed Poll, you
may write such objections to the Chief Passport Officer, PO.Box
N-742, Nassau, Bahamas no later than thirty (30) days after the

PUBLIC NOTICE

INTENT TO CHANGE NAME BY DEED POLL

The Public is hereby advised that |, MYRON MATSON
DELANCEY of P.O. Box F-44804, Nassau, Bahamas,
intend to my name to MYRON MATTHIAS MARTIN.
lf there are any objections to this change of name by
Deed Poll, you may write such objections to the Chief
Passport Officer, P.O.Box N-742, Nassau, Bahamas no
later than thirty (30) days after the date of publication of

Equity Side this notice.

NOTICE OF SALE

Rawson Court Condominium Owners Association
Pursuant to Section 21
Law of Property & Conveyancing (Condominium) Act
Invite tenders for the following:

date of publication of this notice.

NOTICE

NOTICE is hereby given that LOVENCENT CLECIDOR of
JOHNSON ROAD, FOX HILL, P.O. Box FH-14412, Nassau,
Bahamas is applying to the Minister responsible for Nationality
and Citizenship, for registration/naturalization as a citizen of
The Bahamas, and that any person who knows any reason
why registration/naturalization should not be granted, should
send a written and signed statement of the facts within
twenty-eight days from the 18 day of May, 2009 to the
Minister responsible for nationality and Citizenship, P.O. Box
N-7147, Nassau, Bahamas.

IN THE MATTER OF ALL THAT piece parcel
or lot of land containing 20,283 sq. ft. situate on
the southwestern side of Queen’s Highway in the
settlement of Doctors Creek in the island of Long Island
in the Commonwealth of the Bahamas.
AND
IN THE MATTER of the Quieting Titles Act, 1959.
AND
IN THE MATTER of the Petition of Leonard Knowles and
Patrice Knowles.

NOTICE 1) Unit G03 Rawson Court, Cable Beach
3 Bedrooms, 3 1/2 Bathrooms

The Petition of Leonard Knowles and Patrice Knowles ; a :
- Living Area 1,937 sq. feet

in respect of all that piece parcel or lot of land containing 20, 283
sq. ft. sttuate on the southwestern side of Queen’s Highway in the
settlement of Doctors Creek in the island of Long Island in the
Commonwealth of the Bahamas, which said piece parcel or lot
of land is bounded on the NORTHWEST by land said to be the
property of Antonette Beckford running thereon One hundred and
Seventy-five (175) feet thereon. One hundred and Fifty and Three
hundredths (150.03) feet SOUTHWEST by land the property of
Llewolyn Knowles and running thereon One hundred and Forty-
five and Twenty-two hundredths (145.22) feet on the Southwest by
the sea and running thereon One hundred and Ten and Sixty-four
hundredths (110.64) feet which said piece parcel or lot of land has
the dwelling home of the Petitioner upon it and is more particularly
described by the Amended Plan filed herewith and is thereon
coloured PINK.

2) Unit GOS Rawson Court, Cable Beach
| a 3 Bedrooms, 3 Bathrooms
~~ - Living Area 2,795 sq. feet

Nassau Airport
Devslopmont Company

Interested person should immediately
submit tenders to

The Manager,
FO. Box N-1953
Nassau, Bahamas

P-130 Supply & Delivery of

Chillers and Heat Exchangers

COMMONWEALTH OF THE BAHAMAS == 2007/FamDiv/FP/No.148

The Petitioners, Leonard and Patrice Knowles, claim to be the legal
and beneficial owners of the fee simple estate in possession of the
piece parcel or lot of land hereinbefore described and the Petitioners
have made application to the Supreme Court of the Commonwealth
of The Bahamas under Section 3 of the Quieting Titles Act, 1959,
to have their title to the said lot of land investigated.

Nassau Arport Development Gampany (MAD) has a
requirement for the Supely and Delivery af four, (Oty, 4), 650 IN THE SUPREME COURT
fan chillers and four, (Oty. 4), heal exchangers in
accordance with the required schedule and specficaiona FAMILY DIVISION
for complebon of Stage 1 and Stage 2 of the LPIA Expansion
Project, Thess sa Supoly and Delivery only contract

BETWEEN: -

Copies of the filed plan may be inspected during normal working
hours at:-

(a) The Registry of the Supreme Court, Second Floor, Ansbacher
House, East Street, Nassau, The Bahamas.

BENJAMIN BENEBY
Price Inquiry Packages will be available for pick up after Petitioner
1:00 pm, cn Wednesday, May 6th, 2009,
(b) The Chambers of Martin, Martin and Co., Second Floor, Pond AND

Plaza, East Bay and Ernest Streets, Nassau N.P., The Bahamas. Price Inquiry closing is Thursday, June 11th, 2009 at

3:00 pm Bahamas Time

FERRYLYN O. BENEBY (nee) GUERRERO
Respondent

PETITION

In The Supreme Court of the Commonwealth of the
Bahamas.

Notice is hereby given that any person having dower or right to
dower or any adverse claim/s not recognized 1n the Petition shall on
or before the 15th. day of July, A.D., 2009, file in the Registry of
the Supreme Court and serve on the Petitioner or the undersigned
a statement of such claim 1n the prescribed form and verified by an
affidavit to be filed therewith. Failure of any such person to file and
serve a statement of such claim on or before the aforementioned

date will operate as a bar to such claim.
Contact Traci Arraby

(Contract & Procurement Manager

LPLA Eepacenn Prog eact

Ph: (242) FOE OOGE | Frum: (242) STFS
PO. Boo AP S825, Mersey, Bahamas
Emal trac brebyiiires bs

MARTIN, MARTIN & CO.
Chambers, Second Floor, Pond Plaza
East Bay and Emest Streets
Nassau, N.P., The Bahamas

ATTORNEYS FOR THE PETITONERS

By: The Firm, Attorney at Law, Marsh Harbour, P.O. Box
AB20191 Abaco, Bahamas. (242) 367-3572 ph/fax


THE TRIBUNE

MONDAY, MAY 18, 2009, PAGE 7B





Grand Bahama firm’s revenues

increase 105 per cent

FROM page 1B

pates revenues from marine
activity [at South Riding Point]
will remain strong throughout
2009, these revenues are diffi-
cult to predict as they fluctuate
based on the business decisions
of the company’s customers,
and general market conditions.”

World Point said the increase
in marine activity at South Rid-
ing Point had helped to gener-
ate extra port revenue fees.
This, coupled with the increased
storage capacity at the Grand
Bahama operation, had helped
to increase the company’s over-
all 2009 first quarter revenue
by 29 per cent year-over-year,

rising from $18.666 million to
$24.055 million.

Meanwhile, Freepoint, the
Grand Bahama-based tug boat
fleet that World Point owns in a
50/50 joint venture, saw its 2009
first quarter revenues increase
by $53,000 or 7 per cent, due to
fuel surcharges and rate increas-
es.
Freepoint handles most of the
tug boat work at the Freeport
Container Port and Freeport
Harbour Company.

Elsewhere, South Riding
Point is dealing with two other
pressing matters. World Point
said the company had been con-
tacted by the Bahamian gov-

ernment last year over the
alleged “non-payment of a local
revenue based tax”.

The World Point statement
did not identify the tax in ques-
tion, and no alleged amount
owed had been submitted to it.
Therefore, South Riding Point
was unable to assess the extent
of the liability in question, but
warned that if a tax claim was
made, “the amount may be sig-
nificant”.

World Point added: “South
Riding Point is in the process
of evaluating the claim.”

The Grand Bahama opera-
tion also remains locked in a
$2.7 million dispute with an

COMMUNITY ANNOUNCEMENT

WATER CONVERSATION MEASURES

The Water and Sewerage Corporation wishes to advise its customers
in New Providence that the Corporation is presently experiencing
water supply challenges. The Corporation will be implementing

water conservation efforts that may result in periods of reduced
water supply. Customers are asked to conserve their water usage

where possible,

The Corporation sincerely apologizes for any inconvenience caused
and will do its endeavor best to limit the severity and duration of
these conservation measures. Customers with specific complaints
are urged to call the Corporation’s Call Center at 302-5599 or 325-

0505."

MANAGEMENT

WATER AND SEWERAGE COPORATION

NOTICE



The National Insurance Board

will conduct free

Seminars for Employers & Self-Employed Persons
for the remainder of 2009 as follows:

Wednesday, May 27

Wednésday, September 30

unnamed contractor over repair
work done to its offshore jet-
ties in the aftermath of the 2004
hurricane season.

The repair contract, executed
on September 14, 2005, was for
$7.853 million, and some $3.574
million of this sum will not be
reimbursed by reinsurance as
South Riding Point chose to
complete other projects while
contractors were being mobi-

lized.

World Point said in a state-
ment: “In June 2007, South Rid-
ing Point terminated the con-
tractor on the jetty repair con-
tract and hired a new contrac-
tor. In 2008, the new contrac-
tor completed the hurricane
repairs to the offshore jetty.

“South Riding Point is now
in an arbitration proceeding
with the original contractor it

hired to restore and repair the
offshore jetty. Both South Rid-
ing Point and the original con-
tractor are seeking damages
against each other. The con-
tractor has claimed damages of
$2.7 million.

“South Riding Point is vigor-
ously contesting this claim and,
in the process, continues to sig-
nificantly incur legal expenses
associated with this matter.”

THE COLLEGE OF THE BAHAMAS

Visit our website at www.cob.edu.bs

Last Samet
Ape

Emergency Comtact Name

Cabeneryt

lS and imder| | lfels | |

Sand under[ |] lf-25 |] ]

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The College of The Bahansas
SPORTS & WELLNESS INSTITUTE

WELLNESS APPLICATION FORM

FUN BUNS ALUK - Samurclay Mhay 23rd, Dee

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MALE| | FEMALE |

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Deliver to: Wellness Centre, Oakes Field Campus

Telephone: 1245949

FUN RUMW ALR START TIME: &: (Mita. im.

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DESC LAMUER: 1 dertere and aftr chat om @inewelhy fits partripes ia The Cobege of The Meena: Spee A Wellness leerinae's Pa

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oor any atl: of Tee dbo The Metis coe, Pie eh A Aelies iedilabe, adept eee relish any ioper canter oo keheg Cres Vee may
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MINISTRY OF HEALTH

GHEAT PRIZES.



CPA/ CERTIFIED PUBLIC ACCOUNTANT

deb Deseripiion:

Apply principles of accounting to amalyae financial information and prepare financial reports by

compiling information, preparing profit and Inss statements, and wtilizing appropriate accounting

coma! procedures

Primary Responsibilities
|. Prepare profit and hoes statements and monthly chsing and cost accounting reports.

2 Compele and analyae fnancal information i prepare enies to aocounts, such a general ledger
accounts, and document business transactions.
1. Establish, maintain, and coordinate the implemestation of acceanting and accounting contral

procedures.

4. Analyze ond review badgets and expenditures for contracts

§. Monitor and review accounting and relaled system reports for accuracy and completeness.
4. Prepare and review budpet, reverie, expense, payed) entries, imoices, and other aconunting

documents.

7. Analyze pevenuc and expenditure trends and recommend appropriate budget lewels, and ensure
expenditure comirol,
& Explam balling invaices and accounting palicses to stall, vender: and clienes.
9. Resolve accounting discrepancies
10. Recommend, develop and maintam financial data bases, computer sodiwane systems and manual

filing systems.

11. Sapendse the input and handling of financial data and reports for the company’s automated
firtamcial systems.

12. brteract with auditors in completing audits if necessary.

13. Other duties a3 aed

Wednesday, June 24 Wednesday, October 28
Wednesday, November 25

Sessions will be held trom 8:30 aim. to 1200) pam. in the Training Room of
\ 1 = 7 Te : 1 Additional Ries ponsibilities
5 Z { * + F F fy . 2 SEE me P ' -
NBs Wultt Road C1 mmplex, Wultt Road at Minnie Street |. Develop the annual operating budget.and consul with departmental management on the fiscal
aspects of program planning, salary recommendations, and other administrative actions,

' I ‘ mo j 2 Provide accounting policy onentation for mew stall.
| SORES Ue be Seed

Skills Required: Knowledge of finance, accounting, badgeting, and cost comin principles including Generally Accepted
Accounting Principles. Keowledge of financial and accounting sofware applications.
Quickbooks and Mircos software knowledge a pele

Seminar Description












For everyone - fraey the sel-enploped berton inhe monks alone, lo the eebloyer af a




Emplovment Type: = Full Time



few persons, fo the berren reshonsiile for the peperent af COMPPUAAORLD OF De



an employer of fbonsandr The Seaunar nel! ove an overview af the National Yearly Salary: Unspecified

vee of is benefits ana aststance proernameres, and



fassmance programe, inc

Education & Experience



5 * i ® i : f 1 7
eghore the scope and imembact of fhe National Inserance Fund on the econanzy af Level of Education: College

al .
foe COMM

Years of Work
Experience:

4005 Years



Contact Information

Ovestions and or concerns abot the monthly hayaent af conteibations or ather
!



Company:

aff, Harry f atte ui! ef nee vy ie eet E Cie, nit aly be ade i eee i Allie a Realty

Contact Name: Lilith Bostwick

Contact Phone: 242-384-4597

Persons interested in attending a Seminar

4 . . 1 +44 TO aay
should reserve a space by calling the Contact Fax: 242-4

Board’s Public Relations Department Contact E-maik:

a at peck ae
at 356-2070, ext. 256/254 352

lillithiikingsrealty.com | bahamas kingsrealn. com

Proferred “ethene
of Contact:

E-maal


PAGE 8B, MONDAY, MAY 18, 2009

THE TRIBUNE



USI ee
130-140 Bahamians per day signing up for jobless benefits

FROM page 1B

the unemployment benefit
scheme, had paid out a total
4,334 cheques to jobless
Bahamians as of Thursday, May
14. Most cheques, some 3,089,
had not surprisingly been paid

out to applicants in New Provi-
dence, with a further 1,069
issued on Grand Bahama.
“The total amount of claims
we had received up until yes-
terday [Thursday, May 14] was
7,078, and the total amount of
cheques issued 4,334,” Mr
Foulkes told Tribune Business.




Legal Notice



NOTICE




MADERA LINBO S.A.




(In Voluntary Liquidation)






Notice is hereby given that the above-named




Company is in dissolution, which commenced



on the 14th day of May 2009. The Liquidator is



Argosa Corp. Inc., P.O. Box N-7757 Nassau,












Bahamas.

ARGOSA CORP. INC.




(Liquidator)






Legal Notice

“We’ve been averaging 130-140
persons per day in terms of new
persons claiming.”

Funds

Mr Foulkes said the total
amount of funds issued to
unemployed Bahamians — those
persons who had registered and
been approved up until May 2,
2009 — totalled more than $1.2
million.

For the 13-week period those
same registrants will be eligible
to claim unemployment bene-
fit, their total claims have been
pegged at $6.7 million. Howev-
er, Mr Foulkes pointed out that
not all of the 7.078 who had
applied for unemployment ben-
efit had been approved, with
some 1,335 of that number dis-
qualified for a variety of rea-
sons.

Of those whose unemploy-
ment benefit claims had been
disallowed or were pending, the
most common reason for this
was that additional NIB contri-
bution records were still
required. This applied to 668 of
the applications disqualified or
pending.

Some 39 unemployment ben-
efit applications were rejected
because the claimant was still
working; another 19 were
turned down because they were
self-employed; and 79 claimants

had last been employed prior
to July 1, 2004, the date the
scheme had been made retroac-
tive to.

Another 11 claimants had
been rejected because their
employer was not registered
with NIB; 12 because the com-
pany had closed; 47 because
they were in receipt of other
NIB benefits and assistance;
and 61 because they had yet to
confirm their last work date.

“The actuary had estimated,
at this instance, that 7,000 peo-
ple would be eligible for that
benefit,” Mr Foulkes said. “I
think the actuary was correct in
his estimates. It is right on tar-
get.”

The minister added that the
unemployment benefit’s fund-
ing pool would “remain healthy
for quite some time, as we have
$20 million allocated”. Those
funds have been allocated from
NIB’s medical benefits branch,
and once they are exhausted,
the unemployment benefit will
be funded by a combination of
employer and employee contri-
butions, each paying the equiv-
alent of 0.5 per cent of an
employee’s salary.

Labour

Meanwhile, Mr Foulkes said
the Department of Labour had
not experienced an increase in

Legal Notice




NOTICE

NOTICE




SCHONE MIRIAM LTD.

TROON INC.




(In Voluntary Liquidation)

(In Voluntary Liquidation)






Notice is hereby given that the above-named

Notice is hereby given that the above-named



Company is in dissolution, which commenced

Company is in dissolution, which commenced



on the 6th day of April 2009. The Liquidator is
Argosa Corp. Inc., P.O. Box N-7757 Nassau,

Bahamas.

ARGOSA CORP. INC.
(Liquidator)

Legal Notice

NOTICE
CANIS MAJOR LTD.

(In Voluntary Liquidation)

Notice is hereby given that the above-named
Company is in dissolution, which commenced
on the 14th day of May 2009. The Liquidator is
Argosa Corp. Inc., P.O. Box N-7757 Nassau,

Bahamas.

ARGOSA CORP. INC.
(Liquidator)

ROYAL = FIDELITY

Momey at Work

on the 14th day of May 2009. The Liquidator is
Argosa Corp. Inc., P.O. Box N-7757 Nassau,

Bahamas.

ARGOSA CORP. INC.
(Liquidator)

Legal Notice

NOTICE
MAYASOMARIK INC.

(In Voluntary Liquidation)

Notice is hereby given that the above-named
Company is in dissolution, which commenced
on the 16th day of April 2009. The Liquidator is
Argosa Corp. Inc., P.O. Box N-7757 Nassau,

Bahamas.

ARGOSA CORP. INC.
(Liquidator)

G

cr A Ll”

BISX LISTED & TRADED SECURITIES AS OF:

FG CAPITAL MARKETS

labour-related disputes filed
with it, despite the expectation
that the economic recession and
increasing number of redun-
dancies would provoke such a
rise.

“Surprisingly, we have not,”
Mr Foulkes replied, when asked
whether there had been an
increase in the filing of labour-
related disputes.

“We have noticed that we
have the same rate, the same
number of persons who are fil-
ing trade disputes. Employers,
employees, and particularly the
unions, at this time are doing
whatever they can to cope with
the downturn.

“I know of two businesses,
two major businesses, on Bay
Street that have decided,
notwithstanding significant loss-
es over the last quarter, not to
lay-off people and put them on
reduced work weeks.

“We've been encouraging
businesses to do that, and
encouraging employees to
accept reduced hours and
reduced rates of pay. At the end
of the day, we know the econo-
my will turn around. There’s no
doubt about that. What ’m
very pleased about is that most
employers are doing whatever
they can to keep Bahamians
working.”

The impending closure of the
Four Seasons Emerald Bay
Resort on May 26 will leave a
further 500 Bahamians out of
work on Exuma, with the ripple
effects likely to impact jobs in
other businesses, plus the self-
employed.

Mr Foulkes said he was less
worried about a further increase
in the unemployment statistics
than the direct impact on the
500 Four Seasons employees
and their families, and what it
meant for the wider Exuma
community.

He added that with the
Bahamian workforce estimat-
ed to be 190,000-strong, some
1,900 job losses were necessary
to provoke a | per cent increase
in the unemployment rate. The
total Four Seasons jobs losses
were around 1/3 of 1 per cent.

Minister

“The Prime Minister indicat-
ed that he anticipated that the
unemployment rate would
increase,” Mr Foulkes said. “To
what extent, we are not certain.
As you know, in order for the
unemployment rate to move by
1 per cent, about 1900 Bahami-
ans have to lose their jobs.
That’s based on a workforce of
190,000.”

Mr Foulkes added that he
was more concerned about the
impact on the lives of those
employed at the Four Seasons
Emerald Bay Resort.

“Exuma is such a small com-
munity, and it’s going to have a
devastating effect on many per-
sons on the island and in the
business community,” he added.

Explaining that the loss of 50
jobs at that resort would be bad
enough, Mr Foulkes said: “We
are going to do all we can to
ease the burden, and make it
easier for those persons being
laid-off to make a transition to
another job,. All of them will
probably qualify for the unem-
ployment benefit programme,
and the social assistance pro-
grammes we have also apply to
Exuma.

“Out of the $20 million we
have allocated for the unem-
ployment benefit, we have suf-
ficient funding to assist with the
added demand. I spoke to [NIB
director Algernon] Cargill
today, and there is sufficient
funding to accommodate the
added demand.”

Legal Notice

NOTICE
PARAGON RIVER CORP.

(In Voluntary Liquidation)

Notice is hereby given that the above-named
Company is in dissolution, which commenced
on the 14th day of May 2009. The Liquidator is
Argosa Corp. Inc., P.O. Box N-7757 Nassau,

Bahamas.

ARGOSA CORP. INC.
(Liquidator)

Legal Notice

NOTICE
LA SARRAZ S.A.

(In Voluntary Liquidation)

Notice is hereby given that the above-named
Company is in dissolution, which commenced
on the 14th day of May 2009. The Liquidator is
Argosa Corp. Inc., P.O. Box N-7757 Nassau,

Bahamas.

THURSDAY, 14 MAY 2009
BISX ALL SHARE INDEX: CLOSE 1,607.86 | CHG -5.66 | %CHG -0.35 | YTD -104.50 | YTD % -6.10
FINDEX: CLOSE 797.42 | YTD -4.49% | 2008 -12.31%

WWW .BISXBAHAMAS.COM | TELEPHONE:242-323-2330 | FACSIMILE: 242-323-2320
52wk-Low Securit y Previous Close Today's Close Change Daily Vol. EPS $ Div $ P/E
1.28 Abaco Markets 1.40 1.40
11.00 Bahamas Property Fund 11.00 11.00
6.95 Bank of Bahamas 6.95 6.95
0.63 Benchmark
3.15 Bahamas Waste
1.95 Fidelity Bank
11.09 Cable Bahamas
Colina Holdings
Commonwealth Bank ($1)
Consolidated Water BDRs
Doctor's Hospital
Famguard
Finco
FirstCaribbean Bank
Focol (S)
Focol Class B Preference
Freeport Concrete
ICD Utilities
J. S. Johnsen 10.50 10.50
Premier Real Estate 10.00 10.00 a
BISX LISTED DEBT SECURITIES - (Bonds trade on a Percentage Pricing bases)
Securi Last Sale
Fidelity Bank Note 17 (Series A) + zl x 7%
Fidelity Bank Note 22 (Series B) + FBB22 0.00 Prime + 1.75%
Fidelity Bank Note 13 (Series C) + FBB13 100.00 0.00 T%
Fidelity Bank Note 15 (Series D) + FBB15 100.00 0.00 Prime + 1.75%
Fidelity Over-The-Counter Securities
Bid $ Ask $ Last Price
¢.92 8.42 14.60
4.00 6.25 6.00
0.35 0.40 0.35
Colina Over-The-Counter Securities
30.13 31.59 29.00
0.45 0.55 0.55
BISX Listed Mutual Funds
YTD% Last 12 Months
0.95 4.77
-1.49 -3.35
1.77 5.09
-5.59 -13.64
0.96 5.79

0.127
0.992
0.244
-0.877
0.078
0.055
1.406
0.249
0.419
0.111
0.240
0.420
0.322
0.794
0.332
0.000
0.035
0.407
0.952
0.180

ARGOSA CORP. INC.
(Liquidator)

0.63
3.15
2.37
11.75
2.83
6.17
3.01
1.70
7.76
11.00
10.40
5.14

0.63
3.15
2.37
11.75
2.83
6.06
2.91
1.70
7.76
11.00
10.40
5.14

2.83
6.06
1.31
1.70
6.02
11.00
10.35
5.00

Legal Notice

NOTICE
PRIMROSE HILLS INC.

(In Voluntary Liquidation)

1.00
0.30
5.50
8.60
10.00

1.00
0.30
5.59

1.00
0.30
5.59

oog9g99995599090009
eceooceosesoo0e0e0eooo
ecooocoocescoc“eoooga

S2wk-Hi S2wk-Low
1000.00
1000.00
1000.00
1000.00

Interest
19 October 2017
19 October 2022
30 May 2013
29 May 2015
S2wk-Low Symbol Yield
Bahamas Supermarkets
Caribbean Crossings (Pref)
RND Holdings

Weekly Vol. EPS $ P/E
-0.041
0.000

0.001

Div $
0.300
0.480
0.000

Notice is hereby given that the above-named
Company is in dissolution, which commenced
on the 30th day of April 2009. The Liquidator is
Argosa Corp. Inc., P.O. Box N-7757 Nassau,

Bahamas.

ABDAB
RND Holdings

4.540
0.002

0.000
0.000

NA Vv
1.3664
2.8962
1.4590
3.1964

12.7397
100.5606
96.4070

1.0000
9.1599
1.0440
1.0364 0.33
1.0452 0.76

MARKET TERMS
YIELD - last 12 month dividends divided by closing price
Bid $ - Buying price of Colina and Fidelity
Ask $ - Selling price of Coli

Fund Name Div $ Yiela %
Colina Bond Fund

Colina MSI Preferred Fund

Colina Money Market Fund
Fidelity Bahamas G & I Fund
Fidelity Prime Income Fund

CFAL Global Bond Fund

CFAL Global Equity Fund

CFAL High Grade Bond Fund
Fidelity International Investment Fund
FG Financial Preferred Income Fund
FG Financial Growth Fund

FG Financial Diversified Fund

28-Feb-09
31-Mar-09

1.3041
2.9230
1.3883
3.1964
12.1564
100.0000
96.4070
1.0000
9.0950
1.0000
1.0000
1.0000

11-May-09
31-Mar-09
28-Feb-09
31-Dec-08
31-Dec-08
31-Dec-07
31-Mar-09
9-Feb-09
9-Feb-09
9-Feb-09

0.56
-3.59
0.00
0.71
0.80

0.56
-3.59
0.00
-12.76
4.40
3.64
4.40

BISX ALL SHARE INDEX - 19 Dec 02 = 1,000.00

S52wk-Hi - Highest closing price in last 52 weeks

last 52 weeks

ighted price for daily volume

and fidelity
Previous Close
Today's Close - hted price for daily volume
om day to day

raded today

olume of the prior week
reported earnings per share for the last 12 mths.

ARGOSA CORP. INC.
(Liquidator)

he last 12 months
ide st 12 month earnings
Effective Date 8/8/2007
(S41) - 3-for-1 Stock Split - Effective Date 7/11/2007
TO TRADE CALL: COLINA 242-502-7010 | ROYALFIDELITY 242-356-7764 | FG CAPITAL MARKETS 242-396-4000 | COLONIAL 242-502-7525

FINDEX - The Fidelity Bahamas Stock Index. January 1, 1994 = 100


THE TRIBUNE

MONDAY, MAY 18, 2009, PAGE 9B



INSIGHT

PM’s words

Prime Minis-
ter Hubert
Ingraham said
last week:

¢ “T want to
be clear: abuse
of detained per-
sons whether in
their homes, at
a work site, on
an immigration bus or at the
Carmichael Road Detention
Centre is contrary to the law.
Everyone must be treated
with respect at all times; that
is the law and that is the pol-
icy of the government which
Thead.”

Ingraham

e “We expect immigration
officers to respect the pro-
tocols called for by (interna-
tional human rights) con-
ventions and by our own
laws and constitution which
guarantee respect for human
rights of all individuals in the
Bahamas regardless of their
immigration status. And, I
may add, this includes the
obligation of immigration
officers to relay claims from
illegal immigrants of any
fear of persecution
expressed by an illegal immi-
grant/potential refugee on
return to his or her country
of origin.”



DETAINEE ABUSE CLAI

FROM page 12B

as after the FNM came to power
in 2007, the new national security
minister, Tommy Turnquest, told
The Tribune he had never heard
about the matter and that there
was “no investigation” whatsoev-
er — despite the outrage of his col-
league just a year earlier.

In response to a request for
information, The Tribune sent
Mr Turnquest 11 e-mails con-
taining photos, articles and official
statements on the Vallejo case.
The minister never responded.

FNM officials have occasion-
ally complained that there is an
unjustified tendency among jour-
nalists to tar the new administra-
tion with the brush of corruption
and negligence which stained the
PLP during its time in power.

The FNM would do well to
come to terms with the fact that
until cases like that of Mario
Vallejo are properly investigated
— and, if it is warranted, brought
before the courts — the media will
continue to be sceptical. After all,
as far as the public knows, the
officers alleged to have been
involved in the beating are still
collecting government pay
cheques.

It is always inconvenient for a
new government to investigate
allegations ignored by its prede-
cessor, as it risks falling out of
favour with friends, relatives and
colleagues of the accused — not
to mention the signal it would
send to anyone else who is up to

PUBLIC NOTICE

MINISTER of State Branville McCartney



»



(left) and Immigration Director Jack

Thompson (centre) listen as detainees voice their concerns in response
to allegations of inhumane treatment reported in 7he Tribune...

no good. And at the end of the
day, politics is a popularity con-
test.

Then there is the risk that a
key supporter, financier or party
boss might one day be implicated
in wrongdoing. Or worse, that a



rival party, once in power, might
use the precedent to instigate a
political witch hunt. All in all, jus-
tice is a tricky business for politi-
cians.

But if the rule of law is to con-
form to political term limits, we

Legal Notice

NOTICE
NOME BEACH LTD.

(In Voluntary Liquidation)














FOLLOWING claims of insufficient
and poor quality food, Mr McCart-
ney and Mr Thompson partake of a
meal at the Detention Centre...

are obliged to open the gates of
Her Majesty's Prison and release
everyone on remand awaiting tri-
al. While we are at it, we might as
well cancel the tens of thousands
of arrest warrants, dating back
years, which the police have yet to
serve on suspected criminals.

MS: QUESTIONS LINGER

At least partially driving the
reluctance to take decisive action
on the abuse of immigration
detainees — a feature of succes-
sive governments — is the unfor-
tunate tendency of many Bahami-
ans to ignore injustices suffered
by foreigners. Officials feel no
real domestic pressure to take a
hard line, and probably feel a cos-
metic approach will eventually
appease international observers.

Unfortunately, the reality is
that just as it inherits the conse-
quences of its predecessor's eco-
nomic and social decisions, each
new government is lumped with
allegations of prior wrongdoing
— and will ultimately suffer the
consequences of failing to deal
with them.

If the FNM is really interested
in putting an end to human rights
abuses once and for all, it must
ensure that justice is served in
every instance.

What do you think?

pnunez@tribunemedia.net

Legal Notice

NOTICE
QUANTUM PLACE INC.

(In Voluntary Liquidation)

Notice is hereby given that the above-named
Company is in dissolution, which commenced on
the 17th day of February 2009. The Liquidator is
Argosa Corp. Inc., P.O. Box N-7757 Nassau,

Bahamas.

Notice is hereby given that the above-named
Company is in dissolution, which commenced
on the 22nd day of April 2009. The Liquidator
is Argosa Corp. Inc., P. O. Box N-7757 Nassau,

Bahamas.





INTENT TO CHANGE NAME BY DEED POLL

The Public is hereby advised that |, MARVA EMMERITHA
GIBSON of Marathon Estates, New Providence, Bahamas
intend to change my daughter's name from KIRSTY DANIELLE
GIBSON to KIRSTY DANIELLE NEWBOLD. If there are any
objections to this change of name by Deed Poll, you may
write such objections to the Chief Passport Officer, P.O.Box
N-742, Nassau, Bahamas no later than thirty (30) days after the

ARGOSA CORP. INC.
(Liquidator)

ARGOSA CORP. INC.
(Liquidator)

date of publication of this notice.

Legal Notice
NOTICE

NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN as follows:

(a) FFORDO OVERSEAS LTD. is in dissolution under the provisions of the
International Business Companies Act 2000.

(b) The Dissolution of said Company commenced on May 15, 2009 when
its Articles of Dissolution were submitted and registered by the Registrar
General.



(c) The Liquidator of the said company is Lakeisha Collie of 2nd Terrace
West, Centreville, Nassau, Bahamas.

(d) All persons having Claims against the above-named Company are required
on or before the 15th day of June, 2009 to send their names and addresses and
particulars of their debts or claims to the Liquidator of the company or, in de-
fault thereof, they may be excluded from the benefit of any distribution made
before such debts are proved.
MAY 18, 2009
LAKEISHA COLLIE

LIQUIDATOR OF THE ABOVE-NAMED COMPANY

Legal Notice

NOTICE
LENORE INC.

(In Voluntary Liquidation)

Notice is hereby given that the above-named
Company is in dissolution, which commenced
on the 14th day of May 2009. The Liquidator is
Argosa Corp. Inc., P.O. Box N-7757 Nassau,

Bahamas.

ARGOSA CORP. INC.
(Liquidator)

Legal Notice

NOTICE
SAVIESE MEADOWS INC.

(In Voluntary Liquidation)

Notice is hereby given that the above-named
Company is in dissolution, which commenced
on the 14th day of May 2009. The Liquidator is
Argosa Corp. Inc., P.O. Box N-7757 Nassau,

Bahamas.

ARGOSA CORP. INC.
(Liquidator)

Legal Notice

NOTICE
JATTMORE LTD.

(In Voluntary Liquidation)

Notice is hereby given that the above-named
Company is in dissolution, which commenced on
the 11th day of December 2008. The Liquidator
is Argosa Corp. Inc., P. O. Box N-7757 Nassau,

Bahamas.

ARGOSA CORP. INC.
(Liquidator)

Legal Notice

NOTICE
TITUSEDEN LTD.

(In Voluntary Liquidation)

Notice is hereby given that the above-named
Company is in dissolution, which commenced
on the 14th day of May 2009. The Liquidator is
Argosa Corp. Inc., P.O. Box N-7757 Nassau,

Bahamas.

ARGOSA CORP. INC.
(Liquidator)

Legal Notice

NOTICE
GABRIEL INVESTMENTS

GROUP LTD.

(In Voluntary Liquidation)

Notice is hereby given that the above-named
Company is in dissolution, which commenced
on the 14th day of May 2009. The Liquidator is
Argosa Corp. Inc., P.O. Box N-7757 Nassau,

Bahamas.

ARGOSA CORP. INC.
(Liquidator)

Legal Notice

NOTICE
VIOLET LIGHT INC.

(In Voluntary Liquidation)

Notice is hereby given that the above-named
Company is in dissolution, which commenced on
the 16th day of December 2008. The Liquidator
is Argosa Corp. Inc., P. O. Box N-7757 Nassau,

Bahamas.

ARGOSA CORP. INC.
(Liquidator)

Legal Notice

NOTICE
PRIMROSE HILLS INC.

(In Voluntary Liquidation)

Notice is hereby given that the above-named
Company is in dissolution, which commenced
on the 30th day of April 2009. The Liquidator is
Argosa Corp. Inc., P.O. Box N-7757 Nassau,

Bahamas.

ARGOSA CORP. INC.
(Liquidator)

Legal Notice

NOTICE
JAY VALLEY LIMITED

(In Voluntary Liquidation)

Notice is hereby given that the above-named
Company is in dissolution, which commenced on
the 30th day of December 2008. The Liquidator
is Argosa Corp. Inc., P. O. Box N-7757 Nassau,

Bahamas.

ARGOSA CORP. INC.
(Liquidator)


PAGE 10B, MONDAY, MAY 18, 2009

THE TRIBUNE



INSIGHT

See
Allegations of abuse at Detention Centre, as documented in The Tribune

FROM page 12B

their relatives.

¢ Three US Congressmen sent
letters to Secretary of State Con-
doleezza Rice requesting an
investigation into the Vallejo case.

¢ A group of 750 Latin Ameri-
can businessmen cancelled a trip
to the Bahamas to protest the
alleged attack.

¢ Amid ongoing demonstra-
tions outside the Bahamas con-
sulate in Miami over the Vallejo
case, the consulate received a
bomb threat. A woman was
arrested in connection with the
incident the next day.

e Then FNM chairman
Desmond Bannister condemned
the PLP government for ignor-
ing the beating of Mario Vallejo
saying the Bahamas’ image has
been affected.

¢ Officials from the Ministry
of National Security said they
have received an interim report
on the alleged beating of the Mia-
mi reporter. However, they
stressed that “due to the sensitiv-
ity" of the contents, further infor-

mation will not be made avail-
able until a comprehensive report
is released — “early next week".
Then Minister of Foreign Affairs
Fred Mitchell warned that
Bahamians may be in danger of
“retaliatory action” following the
Vallejo incident.

¢ Florida Governor Jeb Bush
said he was “satisfied” with the
investigation into the alleged
beating.

August

Deputy Prime Minister Cyn-
thia Pratt admitted she has “no
idea” what is happening with the
investigation the government
promised.

2007

January

Despite earlier assurances,
there has still been no update on
the investigation into the Vallejo
incident. Chief Superintendent of
Police Hulan Hanna said: “The
matter is pretty much at the fore-
front and I’m hoping that it is
only a matter of time before the
public and principals involved
would know how the matter is to
be fully and finally determined.
It is not out of sight and not out of



MR VALLEJO being escorted to a waiting ambulance by paramedics out-

side the Detention Centre...

mind,” he said.

March

Concerns about the harsh con-
ditions and overcrowding at Fox
Hill Prison and the Carmichael
Road Detention Centre and alle-
gations of abuse by guards is fea-
tured in the US State Depart-
ment’s annual country report on
the Bahamas.

2008

July

New Minister of National Secu-

BAHAMAS DEVELOPMENT BANK
Cable Beach, West Bay Street,
P.O.Box W-3034
Pisusscuun, Desa tisuriss
Tel:(242) 327-57RIWN327T S793 <6
Fax:i(242) 327-5047, 327-1258
www. bahamasdevelopmentbank.com

The general public is invited to attend Bahamas
Development Bank’s sale of repossessed assets.

Electronic Equipment

(1) Compaq Presario Computer Tower

ASSETS

Tables.

(1) Canon Canoscan N640D EX Scanner

(1) Digital Scale (New)
(1) Whirl Microwave
(1)Tec Cash Register

(1) Epson Stylus Pro 9600 Print Engine
(1) HP DeskJet 656c Printer (Desktop)

(1) Monitor

(1) 1520 Epson Stylus Color Printer

* (1) Marble Table (Rectangle)

Cooler/Freezers

* (1) Two Door Chest Freezer
* (1) Ice Cream Cooler

* (1) Single Door Cooler

* (1) 8’ Walk-in Freezer

rity and Immigration Tommy
Turnquest — who is in charge of
the police, the Defence Force and
the Immigration Department —
claimed he has never heard about
the case of Mario Vallejo. Mr
Turnquest said there was “no
investigation” into the matter.

e The Tribune sent Mr Turn-
quest 11 e-mails containing pho-
tos, articles and official articles
on the case. He did not respond.

September

FNM Minister of State for
Immigration Branville McCart-
ney completely denied allegations
of a hunger strike among Cuban
detainees protesting conditions
at the centre. However, when it
was pointed out that the chief
officer at the centre had con-
firmed the strike, Mr McCartney
said he had heard something
about threats of a strike but that
nothing had been confirmed.

¢ Mr McCartney said that alle-
gations of hunger strikes at the

Detention Centre are under
investigation. No more was heard
about the matter for several
months.

2009

February

A detainee at the centre, who
allegedly was beaten so badly by
officers that he lost fingernails,
announced that he was starting a
hunger strike with other Cubans
at the facility.

¢ The Immigration Depart-
ment issued a statement denying
the abuse claims. However,
Amnesty International called for
an independent inquiry.

¢ The US State Department’s
2008 Human Rights Report said
human rights groups are con-
cerned that the latest investiga-
tion had been handled internally,
without independent oversight.
The Tribune interviewed 10
detainees at the centre who all
claimed conditions at the facility
are terrible and that three Cuban
men have stopped eating in
protest.

e¢ A Dominican man claimed
he was beaten repeatedly by
guards who were attempting to
extract “some information” from
him. The claim was corroborat-
ed by several of his fellow
detainee.

¢ Minister McCartney said he is
open to an independent investi-
gation into the Detention Cen-
tre.

March

Senior Immigration and
Defence Force officials visit the
Detention Centre accompanied
by social services personnel and

local clergy, in an effort to
demonstrate that the facility is
being operated with transparency.

¢ Amnesty International reit-
erated its concern for the safety of
the detainees at the centre and
urged the international commu-
nity to flood the government with
appeals. Dozens of letters were
sent to senior officials and copied
to The Tribune in the following
weeks.

¢ The findings of an investiga-
tion into the living conditions at
the centre were withheld from
the press. Immigration officials
also denied The Tribune’s request
to tour the facility. However,
Director of Immigration Jack
Thompson said the reports
included no evidence to substan-
tiate the claims of violence, sexu-
al favours for privileges or insuf-
ficient food. He added that
notwithstanding this, certain rec-
ommendations on the living con-
ditions will be implemented, such
as diversifying the menu and
replacing broken mattresses.

¢ Minister McCartney said he
has “no difficulty” releasing the
report and allowing the press to
tour the facility, but said the
report must first be seen by Cab-
inet.

May

Detainees said their living con-
ditions have improved greatly.
Minister McCartney said he was
“pleasantly surprised” when he
visited the Detention Centre. The
calls for press access to the facili-
ty, for an independent investiga-
tion and for the report to be
released continue to be ignored.

ACANCY NOTIC

The Grand Bahama Power Company, Limited invites qualified applicants to apply for the
peaition of Technician | (Instrument), responsible for conducting calibrations, repairs, routine
checks and tests contral instrumentation in #3 Generation Power Flant.

The successful candidate is expected to lead instrament technicians in fault-finding,
trovbbeshooting and repairs, including analyses and calibration of all electronic and pneumatic

instrument and control systems.

Applicants must have a High School Diploma, BOCSE passes of C or better in Math, English

wCompressor (New)
(1) Keyboard & Mouse Beaut lon Equipment
(1) Brothers Printer * (3) Nail Tables
(1) Samsung Digital Camcorder * (7) Facial Machine
(1) Dell Scanner & Printer * (2) Nail Stools

and a Technological Certificate in Electronics or its equivalent from an accredited institution.
Applicants must also have a minimum of five (3) years power station or equivalent industrial
expenence or three (3) years at a Technician Ul level in the Maintenance Department of an
industrial facility.

Machinery
(1) Chrome Juice Filler
(1) Multi Fruit Juicer
(1) Quilting Sewing Machine
(1) Deli Showcase
(1) Singer Sewing Machine
(1) Janome Monogram/Embroidery Sewing Machine
(1) Singer Quantum XL150 Sewing Machine with Serger
(1) Meat Saw (New)
(1) Deli Selection (Minor 2000 MT-SE) (New)

Applications with supporting documentation including a ckan Police Certificate and proof of Bahamian
citizenship shoukl be sent ti:

ne
CRAND BAHAMA POWER COMPANY, LIMMED
OX F-40888
Freeport, Grand Bahama
PETE ey

a ee ea ea

Aero Motive Equipment
* (2) Tech Work Benches
* (1) Alternator Test Bench
* (1) Paint Booth

(1) Rivet Machine

(1) 6” Storage Cabinet

(1) 4” Craftsman Tool Cabinet

Brake Washer
Sand Blaster
Vari-Drive

Assortment of Items

* Cooking Utensils Pots, Pans & Plates
* (2) Breakfast Nooks

* Air Hockey Game

* (1) Yamaha Wave Runner

&
GRAND BAHAMA POWER COMPANY

ea eee ‘ey Aa

eb
a ee Pes |

Location: Inland Steel, Sumner Street off Solider Rd.Nassau, Bahamas

Directions: Exit Abundant Life Road turn right onto Solider Road then the first left
onto Sumner Street tenth two storey white & blue building on the left

Date & Time: 10:00a.m. — 3:00p.m. — Saturday May 23, 2009

All assets are sold as is where is for cash, cashier’s cheque. No purchase(s) will be released
until paid in full.

NOTICE

The general public is invited to attend Bahamas Development Bank’s sale of repossessed Vehicles
Senet creer The payment of Long-Term Benefits and Assistance in New Providence for May 2009 will

be made 5 follows:

2003 Dodge Caravan

2002 Hyundai H-1 Van SUX

1997 Double Axle Mack Dump Truck
1997 Dodge Stratus

1982 GMC Brigadier Drill Truck
2001 Kia Pregio Van

1989 Ford L8000 Drill Truck (Green)

2001 Hyundai H-1 Van SUX
2006 Mitsubishi Canter Truck
1996 Ford Explorer

2000 Ford Ranger Truck
1999 Ford F-250 Truck

2006 Hyundai H-1 SVX Van

i) On Tuesday, May 19, 2009, for pensioners whose funds are deposited to their bank
accounts: and

il) Beginning Thursday, May 21, 2009, at the following Officas: Fox Hill, Wulff Road and
the Sir Clifford Darling Complex (NIB's Headquarters). Cheques may be collected
from these offices between the hours of 9:00 a.m. and 4:00 p.m

fee Pensioners and/or their representatives are required to produce proper identification in

20’ Robolo Vessel (1996) with Evinrude Outboard Engine order to collect their cheques
19’ Fiberglass Sports Vessel (1989) Hull Only

21 Seacraft Vessel (1974) with 140 HP Yamaha Outboard Engine

19’ Spanish Wells Runabout Vessel (1991) with 115 HP Mercury Outboard Engine

20’ Abaco Skiff (1997) with 115 HP Mercury Outboard Engine

Acceptable forms of identification for Pensioners are the National Insurance Registration
Card, tagather with any one of the following:

1. A Passport:

2. A Voter's Card; of

Location: ,
3. Any other document which establishes, conclusively, the identity of the claimant

Internal Security Division Compound, Thompson Blvd
Nassau, Bahamas

Date & Time: 10:00a.m. — 3:00p.m. — Saturday May 23, 2009

Where the Pensioner is sending a Representative to collect hissher cheque, the Repre-
sentative should present an Authorization Form, completed by the Pensioner, or a letter
from the Pensioner authorizing the Board to release his/her cheque. Additionally, the
Representative should present any one of the above-listed items to identify himselffher-
self. Cheques will not be released to Representatives who fail to provide satisfactory iden-
tifying documents.

For additional information telephone 327-5780.

The public is invited to come and view the aforementioned assets on the date and time indicated.
After which you may submit Sealed bids marked “TENDER-EQUIPMENT” to Bahamas

Development Bank, PO. Box N-3034, Nassau, Bahamas. A representative will be on the
compound from 10:00am to 3:00pm to collect and secure all offers, which will be opened on May
25, 2009. Please note that all bids on the aforementioned assets should be received by 3:00 pm
May 23, 2009. The Bahamas Development Bank reserves the right to reject any or all offers. All
assets are sold as is.

Please Note: Pensioners born in May and November are now due for Verification,

Failure to be verified on-time, will result in the suspension of payments,










































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~ @ if = elevation on the human body—everything that effects how warm or cold a person feels. Temperatures reflect the high and the low for the day. 3:25pm. 24 9:46pm. 05
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: 7, ; High: 83° F/28° C 7 eenceen nee . ee Thursday 7 a a 11:36am. 0.1
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ss -. As of 2 p.m. yesterday ....cccccssssssssscsssssseeen 0.01" Sunset....... 7:49 p.m. Moonset... .. 2:15 p.m.
all is FT. LAUDERDALE FREEPORT as Year to date : New First Full Last
High: 82° F/28° C @ High: 81° F/27° C Normal year to date ooo... ccccccccccsccsecseeseenees 9.87" : =~ a
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a High: 84° F/29° C High: 85° F/29° C
Caras Low: 73° F/23° C NASSAU a -79° iE 6°C
High: 84° F/29°C ow: 79° F/2
= Low: 77° F/25°C
a a . —
KEY WEST 1 “ ~—__sCGATISLAND
High: 84° F/29°C / of High: 81° F/27°C
Low: 73°F/23°G ye Low: 75° F/24°C
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iy HEAT EXUN SAN SALVADOR
a High: 80 F/27 C High: 84° F/29°C
; ANDROS of Low: 74° F/23° C Low: 78° F/26° c
Shown is today's weather. Temperatures are today's . aan =<
highs and tonights's lows. High: 83° F/28° C ——- >a
Low:81°F/27°C ” i
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LONGISLAND
Low: 79° F/26°C —
Today Tuesday Today Tuesday Today Tuesday - MAYAGUANA
High Low W High Low W High Low W High Low W High Low W High Low W on High: 82° F/28° C
Fic FIC Fic FIC Fic FIC Fic FIC FC FIC Fic FIC heey Low: 78° F/26° C
Albuquerque 88/31 59/15 pce 87/380 59/15 pc Indianapolis 69/20 47/8 s 76/24 55/12 s Philadelphia 65/18 46/7 s 74/23 52/11 s
Anchorage 62/16 42/5 s 63/17 42/5 s Jacksonville 68/20 58/14 r 73/22 63/17 1 Phoenix 107/41 78/25 pce 103/389 78/25 pc CROOKED ISLAND / ACKLINS
Atlanta 70/21 45/7 s 74/23 54/12 s Kansas City 76/24 54/12 s 81/27 GING s Pittsburgh 63/17 36/2 s 74/23 47/8 s RAGGEDISLAND — igh:85°F/29°c
Atlantic City 62/16 39/3 s 72/22 48/8 s LasVegas 103/39 74/23 pc 97/36 74/23 s Portland,OR 78/25 54/12 pe 61/16 45/7 c High: 82° F/28° C Low:81°F/27°C
Baltimore 67/19 39/3 s 74/23 50/10 s Little Rock 76/24 48/8 s 81/27 53/11 s Raleigh-Durham 67/19 41/5 po 74/23 52/11 s Low: 76°F/24°C —
Boston 58/14 44/6 s 68/20 50/10 s Los Angeles 82/27 60/15 pce 80/26 60/15 pc St. Louis 72/22 54/12 s 81/27 58/14 s . ae
Buffalo 63/17 41/5 s 63/17 44/6 t Louisville 71/21 48/8 s 80/26 53/11 s Salt Lake City 90/32 62/16 s 90/32 60/15 pc GREATINAGUA
Charleston,SC 64/17 50/10 r 73/22 60/15 sh Memphis 75/23 53/11 s 80/26 58/14 s San Antonio 84/28 56/13 s 84/28 58/14 s High: 85° F/29° C
Chicago 70/21 50/10 s 70/21 53/11 t Miami 84/28 73/22 t 83/28 71/21 Fr San Diego 71/21 63/17 pe 71/21 61/16 pc Low. 79°F/26°C
Cleveland 6317 44/6 s 68/20 49/9 pc Minneapolis 75/23, 49/9 pce 65/18 58/14 sh San Francisco 68/20 53/11 s 63/17 50/10 s .
Dallas 77/25 55/12 s 82/27 57/13 s Nashville 71/21 44/6 s 80/26 52/11 s Seattle 70/21 50/10 pe 58/14 45/7 sh i
Denver 94/34 54/12 pe 91/82 55/12 pc New Orleans 77/25 60/15 $s 80/26 62/16 s Tallahassee 71/21 56/13 + 76/24 59/15 1 hn. *
Detroit 66/18 46/7 s 68/20 47/8 t New York 63/17 50/10 s 73/22 54/12 s Tampa 81/27 66/18 t 79/26 66/18 t ‘ KK
Honolulu 82/27 68/20 sh 83/28 68/20 pc Oklahoma City 77/25 52/11 s 80/26 55/12 s Tucson 101/38 71/21 pce 98/386 70/21 pc WW \“\°
Houston 82/27 56/13 s 84/28 60/15 s Orlando 82/27 67/19 t 77/25 68/20 t Washington, DC 64/17 45/7 s 76/24 55/12 s









AY] rn CN,

Acapulco
Amsterdam
Ankara, Turkey
Athens
Auckland
Bangkok
Barbados
Barcelona
Beijing
Beirut
Belgrade
Berlin
Bermuda
Bogota
Brussels
Budapest
Buenos Aires
Cairo
Calcutta
Calgary
Cancun
Caracas
Casablanca
Copenhagen
Dublin
Frankfurt
Geneva
Halifax
Havana
Helsinki
Hong Kong
Islamabad
Istanbul
Jerusalem
Johannesburg
Kingston
Lima
London
Madrid
Manila
Mexico City
Monterrey
Montreal
Moscow
Munich
Nairobi
New Delhi
Oslo

Paris
Prague

Rio de Janeiro
Riyadh
Rome

St. Thomas
San Juan
San Salvador
Santiago
Santo Domingo
Sao Paulo
Seoul
Stockholm
Sydney
Taipei

Tokyo
Toronto
Trinidad
Vancouver
Vienna
Warsaw
Winnipeg

High
F/C
87/30
62/16
84/28
82/27
59/15
91/32
86/30
70/21
93/33
91/32
89/31
65/18
76/24
65/18
63/17
86/30
67/19
104/40
95/35
46/7
89/31
82/27
75/23
64/17
57/13
68/20
71/21
51/10
84/28
63/17
84/28
104/40
80/26
91/32
68/20
85/29
75/23
62/16
81/27
93/33
70/21
93/33
54/12
57/13
67/19
82/27
108/42
55/12
65/18
69/20
17/25
102/38
79/26
83/28
69/20
86/30
70/21
82/27
76/24
73/22
55/12
66/18
81/27
79/26
56/13
82/27
65/18
75/23
15/23
57/13

Today

Low
F/C
78/25
51/10
54/12
66/18
52/11
77/25
77/25
57/13
63/17
70/21
67/19
49/9
70/21
48/8
45/7
63/17
43/8
70/21
79/26
35/1
65/18
72/22
55/12
51/10
46/7
50/10
52/11
41/5
69/20
45/7
75/23
73/22
67/19
65/18
43/6
78/25
61/16
50/10
43/8
79/26
49/9
65/18
41/5
41/5
52/11
64/17
84/28
49/9
52/11
54/12
66/18
79/26
58/14
76/24
40/4
74/23
45/7
72/22
56/13
50/10
45/7
57/13
74/23
63/17
44/6
67/19
51/10
61/16
58/14
30/-1

|




sh
sh
pc

sh
sh
pc

High
F/C
88/31
64/17
84/28
73/22
61/16
93/33
85/29
70/21
95/35
77/25
91/32
70/21
76/24
65/18
66/18
71/21
66/18
93/33
93/33
59/15
87/30
82/27
77/25
64/17
55/12
75/23
76/24
54/12
83/28
54/12
86/30
116/46
78/25
78/25
66/18
85/29
76/24
61/16
86/30
91/32
71/21
95/35
61/16
61/16
74/23
79/26
108/42
58/14
70/21
72/22
75/23
104/40
80/26
84/28
17/25
87/30
72/22
83/28
72/22
79/26
63/17
68/20
83/28
82/27
59/15
80/26
59/15
74/23
66/18
52/11

Tuesday
Low
F/C
79/26
54/12
52/11
65/18
46/7
79/26
77/25
58/14
64/17
73/22
64/17
52/11
70/21

WwW

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s
S$
$
$
t
pc
s

pc
$

pc
pc
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sh
sh
pc
pc
S$

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Weather (W): s-sunny, pe-partly cloudy, c-cloudy, sh-showers, t-thunder-
storms, r-rain, sf-snow flurries, sn-snow, i-ice, Prcp- precipitation, Tr-trace

MARINE FORECAST

DUN Me i

INSURANCE MANAGEMENT

(BAHAMAS) LIMITED, INSURANCE BROKERS &



& AGENTS







WINDS WAVES VISIBILITY WATER TEMPS.
NASSAU Today: E at 15-20 Knots 3-6 Feet 5-10 Miles 77°F
Tuesday: SSE at 15-25 Knots 3-6 Feet 5-10 Miles 77°F
FREEPORT Today: E at 15-20 Knots 3-6 Feet 5-10 Miles 76° F
Tuesday: E at 15-25 Knots 3-6 Feet 5-10 Miles 77°F
ABACO Today: E at 15-20 Knots 3-6 Feet 5-10 Miles 76° F
Tuesday: E at 15-25 Knots 3-6 Feet 5-10 Miles Tk



Topay's U.S. FORECAST

\VosyAngeles:

82/60

‘. = Showers
T-storms

» Rain

Flurries
Snow

Ice









SATSMNINE Wit 10

When it comes to Auto Insurance,

Shown are noon positions of weather systems and
precipitation. Temperature bands are highs for the day.
Forecast high/low temperatures are for selected cities.

â„¢ gar7a

Fronts

Cold
War Miemfliieile

Stationary Meug~eafi

Wijre ReUne

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remember the smart choice is

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Gord Daman

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Insurance Management.
Smart people you can trust.

INSURANCE MANAGEMENT

CAAT AY AS LIM EEE GSAS RRGRIEEES & AGENTS

Elevtherw
| 330-4



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MONDAY, MAY 18, 2009

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The stories behind the news



DETAINEE ABUSE GLAIMS:
QUESTIONS LINGER

The Immigration Detention Centre has undergone a
makeover, but the government will not shake off the
spectre of abuse allegations until it ensures that
justice is done. INSIGHT reports...

m By PACO NUNEZ
Tribune News Editor

mmigration officials are no

doubt congratulating them-

selves on a job well done in

their handling of the latest alle-

gations of abuse and inhumane
conditions at the Carmichael Road
Detention Centre.

After all, the once miserable
detainees are now singing the Immigra-
tion Department's praises. They say the
facility, formerly an unendurable hell-
hole, is now close to being what it should
—a temporary holding facility for those
who, despite being denied entry into
the Bahamas for whatever reason, have
been convicted of no crime and remain
innocent until proven guilty under
Bahamian law.

Finding themselves in something of a
thorny predicament when the allega-
tions of beatings and neglect first sur-
faced in The Tribune several months
ago, new immigration bosses director
Jack Thompson and Minister of State
Branville McCartney seem to have
pulled off a considerable public rela-
tions coup.

They tackled the situation head on,
ordering several changes at the centre,
convening an expert committee, visit-
ing the detainees and even sitting down
to lunch to test claims of insufficient,
poor quality food.

Detainees report that threadbare mat-
tresses have been replaced, toilets have
been fixed, walls painted, access to clean
clothes provided, and best of all, once
cruel and violent guards seem to have
undergone a conversion to pacifism.

Why then, has the champagne not
been popped? Where is the public back-
patting session? Those who opt for a
career in public life are seldom timid
when it comes to self promotion, and
as it happens, there are good reasons
for their silence in this case.

The first is that, generally, it is quite
difficult to claim responsibility for fixing
a problem you maintain never existed in
the first place. When the allegations sur-
faced, the department issued a blanket
denial almost immediately — in just over
24 hours in fact. This was the result of an
investigation which, depending on one's
perspective, was either a model of swift
efficiency or a feeble attempt to distract
the public.

As one detainee told me last week:
“Obviously what you printed was true,
because they gave us everything we
asked for after the articles came out. I
don’t know how they could deny it.
There are many witnesses to what took
place, and there are medical records
that prove there were beatings.”

The second reason for not drawing
too much attention to the matter is that,
having claimed their internal inquiry
found nothing wrong, the department
refused to allow anyone else to investi-
gate.

The press have been denied access
to the facility and have been barred
from visiting detainees. A report com-
piled by psychologists and government
social workers has been kept from the
public. The department's explanation
is that the report has yet to be seen by
Cabinet, but this seems unlikely con-
sidering Prime Minister Hubert Ingra-
ham's warning to immigration officers
last week.

Mr Ingraham said: “I want to be clear:
abuse of detained persons whether in
their homes, at a work site, on an immi-
gration bus or at the Carmichael Road
Detention Centre is contrary to the law.
Everyone must be treated with respect
and dignity at all times; that is the poli-
cy of the government which I head.”

Yet calls by Amnesty International



MIAMI-BASED reporter Mario Vallejo, who was allegedly beaten by guards outside the Carmichael Road Detention Centre in 2006...

for a full and independent investigation
have been ignored. One senior official
dismissed the idea of inviting Amnesty
to tour the centre on the curious logic
that Standard and Poor's, an interna-
tional agency, had given the Bahamas
economy an unfair evaluation. His argu-
ment was that all international agencies
are equal, and therefore Amnesty will
also do the country an injustice. Never
mind that S&P's practices have been
highlighted as one of the prime causes of
the global economic crisis, while
Amnesty is widely respected for its pio-
neering work in the promotion of
human rights and the rule of law.

The third reason for government's
silence is that while Mr Ingraham's
statements were meant to send a clear
signal that the FNM wants to put an
end to lawlessness in the public service
(he also spoke out against the taking
and soliciting of bribes), senior officials
must know that this effort will fail unless
offenders are punished.

Beyond the obvious point that threats
to deal with wayward public servants
will be ignored if there is no follow-
through, the reluctance of a government
to bring its own officers to justice hints
at a lack of sufficient commitment to
upholding the rule of law.

Take the case of Mario Vallejo, an
Miami-based reporter for Univision,
who was in Nassau with his TV crew in
February 2006 to film the reunion of
seven Cuban refugees who had been
stranded at Elbow Cay.



&







The Tribune

IU 2b UE
ANY TIME...ANY PLACE, WE'RE #1

FRUT AMT im
werent
GH a



BAHAMAS EDITION
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Three detainees
On hunger sve

ubans launch protest,
tibune interviews 10 men
bt the Detention Centre

gegen!



THE FRONT PAGE of The Tribune, Feb-
ruary 27, 2009, in which allegations of
brutality were levelled by 10 detainees in
an exclusive interview...

When another journalist attempted
to capture the reunion on film and was
detained for his trouble, Mr Vallejo is
said to have stepped away from the
Detention Centre gate to make a phone
call, presumably to inform his superi-
ors that a fellow journalist had been
taken into custody. It is alleged that at
this point, Defence Force guards, appar-
ently irritated that Mr Vallejo had the
audacity to inform on them, savagely
attacked the reporter, throwing him to
the ground and then against a car, split-
ting his head open. I and two colleagues
arrived on the scene just as paramedics

were treating the bloodied Mr Vallejo.

The fallout from this incident was
considerable. Protests were held out-
side Bahamas government offices in
Florida. Three Congressmen called for
the US to launch an investigation into
the matter. Hundreds of Americans can-
celled their plans to visit the country in
protest. And at the height of the con-
troversy, a bomb scare was called in to
the Bahamas Consulate in Miami.

Despite the calls for justice, the PLP,
the party in power, did nothing and was
duly condemned by the opposition.
Then FNM chairman Desmond Ban-
nister, now a Cabinet minister, said: “It
is hard to see how they have done any-
thing about it that would be considered
appropriate in the circumstances and if
they have, they ought to let the Bahami-
an people know what has been done
and how they intend to deal with the
matter."

Far from dealing with the matter, the
PLP soon contracted a case of collective
amnesia, forgetting about the incident
completely. Despite repeated promises
that an inquiry would be held, six
months after the incident deputy prime
minister Cynthia Pratt, who had respon-
sibility for the police and the security
forces, admitted she had “no idea” what
was happening to the case.

This amnesia seems to have been con-
tagious and no respecter of party lines,

See page 9B

Allegations of abuse
at Detention Centre,

as documented
in The Tribune



2004

October

Amnesty International condemned the
Carmichael Road Detention Centre and
called for a full investigation into claims of
abuse and torture.

December

Then Immigration minister, PLP MP Vin-
cent Peet, said an investigation found no
evidence to substantiate the abuse claims.

¢ Cuban detainees rioted and set fire to a
dormitory at the centre.

¢ Cuban-Americans hold a number of

anti-Bahamas demonstrations outside the
Bahamas Consulate in Miami.

¢ Tribune Managing Editor John Marquis
writes an Insight article detailing the case
of 27-year-old Jamaican Omar Jones, who
claimed he was reduced to a state of tempo-
rary disability after repeated beatings at the
hands of officers at the centre. Commenting
on the government's response, Mr Marquis
wrote: “It was the same old story of official
silence in the face of compelling and deeply
disturbing evidence.”

2005

January

The Miami Herald published a front page
article detailing allegations that immigrants
have been abused at Her Majesty’s Prison
and the Carmichael Road Detention Centre.
The article followed exclusive reports in The
Tribune in which detainees claimed they
were tortured and humiliated. The Miami
Herald article said detainees claimed to have
been deprived of soap and drinking water,
beaten, subjected to mock executions and
in some cases raped by guards.

¢ Minister Peet announced the appoint-
ment of an inter-ministerial task force to
look into the allegations, but said he was
disappointed with the “unbalanced report-
ing” in The Miami Herald. A government
statement read: “The article in The Miami
Herald of Sunday 23, January is not an accu-
rate description of what happens at the
Detention Centre, nor at the prison. The
government is to convene an inter-minister-
ial task force to consider a proper response.”

e Mr Peet said he wished that those who
constantly criticise the conditions at the cen-
tre would “put their money where their
mouth is” and help with much needed
repairs.

eTourism Minister Obie Wilchcombe said
the negative press had the potential to dam-
age the country’s tourism industry, particu-
larly when it contradicts what the country
tells the world.

February

Edwin Culmer, newly appointed officer
in charge of the Detention Centre, said the
rules governing the facility should be
reviewed in light of repeated abuse claims.
He said the first thing he would do is look at
the rules to “see if they correspond with
Amnesty International and other human
rights laws.”

March

The US Embassy donates $20,000 to
improve water and sanitation at the Deten-
tion Centre.

May

Amnesty International condemns the
Bahamas for violating international law by
repatriating Haitians and Cubans before
actually determining if they are political
refugees.

July

A Cuban refugee claimed he was beaten
and shot twice with rubber bullets by two
Defence Force officers.

2006

February

Miami-based American TV reporter
Mario Vallejo was allegedly beaten by a
Defence Force officer outside the
Carmichael Road Detention Centre while
attempting to document the reunion between
seven Cubans rescued from Elbow Cay and

See page 10B

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