Citation
The Tribune

Material Information

Title:
The Tribune
Uniform Title:
Tribune (Nassau, Bahamas)
Portion of title:
Nassau tribune
Place of Publication:
Nassau, Bahamas
Publisher:
Tribune
Publication Date:
Copyright Date:
2009
Frequency:
Daily, except Sunday
daily
normalized irregular
Language:
English
Physical Description:
v. : ill. ; 58 cm.

Subjects

Genre:
newspaper ( sobekcm )
newspaper ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage:
Bahamas

Notes

General Note:
Description based on: Vol. 79, no. 210 (Aug. 3, 1983); title from caption.

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Holding Location:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
This item was contributed to the Digital Library of the Caribbean (dLOC) by the source institution listed in the metadata. This item may or may not be protected by copyright in the country where it was produced. Users of this work have responsibility for determining copyright status prior to reusing, publishing or reproducing this item for purposes other than what is allowed by applicable law, including any applicable international copyright treaty or fair use or fair dealing statutes, which dLOC partners have explicitly supported and endorsed. Any reuse of this item in excess of applicable copyright exceptions may require permission. dLOC would encourage users to contact the source institution directly or dloc@fiu.edu to request more information about copyright status or to provide additional information about the item.
Resource Identifier:
09994850 ( OCLC )

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Volume: 105 No.144

Minister visits

OES,

STAPLEDON SCHOOL ADDS NEW $1.5M WING



Pratt: ‘I might
have been dead
without prayer’

= By PAUL G
TURNQUEST
Tribune Staff Reporter
pturnquest@tribunemedia.net

FORMER Deputy Prime
Minister Cynthia Pratt has told
how the prayers of Reverend
Dr Inez Rolle saved her life
during a brazen daylight bank
robbery.

“Mother” Pratt was a cus-
tomer in Scotiabank’s Wulff
Road and East Street branch
when the early morning hold-
up took place yesterday.

Still shaken by the ordeal,
Mrs Pratt said she didn’t realise
that the man who walked in the
branch behind her had come to
rob the bank.

Retailer’s
Sei MOL
PLM ELK
salaries

= By TANEKA
THOMPSON
Tribune Staff
Reporter
tthompson@tribunemedia.net

DISGRUNTLED staff
from luxury retailer
Solomon's Mines claim they
are again burdened with late
salary payments, this time
dating back four weeks.

Several employees told
The Tribune they were sup-
posed to be paid yesterday
but the money never came.
With mortgage or rent and
other bills piling up, they
are calling on executives to
make good on the overdue
earnings.

"We have not been paid
in over a month," said a sin-
gle mother-of-four who has
dedicated more than five
years of service to the chain.
"Everybody is frustrated
because there is no money
and we have needs and
commitments. It’s a strug-
gle".

Another employee, who
claimed some staff members
are owed for the pay period

SEE page 7



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Noting that the bank was
almost completely empty, Mrs
Pratt said she stopped for a
moment to speak with the secu-
rity guard at the front door
before making her way to the
female teller.

However, as she approached
the woman, the male teller
motioned to her to come to his
station instead.

“When I went to the teller he
was talking to me and I noticed
how the people were starting to
act strange. I didn’t know it was
a robbery until I noticed every-
one going to the back and I said
to the young man, what is going
on. Then the young man said
to me, ‘Mother, we just got
robbed!?’ And I said, what?
And the (robber) was right next
to the next teller and I didn’t
know.

“Only after the police showed
up did I take with the shakes. It
all happened so fast. I could
have been gone as quickly as
that. It was a matter of sec-
onds,” she said. The robbery
took place at about 11am.

Early yesterday morning, Mrs
Pratt said Dr Rolle the pastor of
Wings of the Eagle Redemp-
tion Ministries, phoned her and
asked her to allow her to “cov-
er her” that morning in prayer.
It is these prayers, she said, that
protected her throughout the
harrowing ordeal.

“And I thank God for that
prayer this morning because if it
wasn’t for that I might have
been dead,” she said.

According to information
reaching The Tribune, the lone
gunman entered the bank and
presented himself as a customer
to a woman clerk. Producing
what is believed to be a weapon,
the robber was able to make

SEE page 7



=USA TODAY.

BAHAMAS EDITION

www.tribune242.com

SATURDAY, MAY 16, 2009



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LOCK DOWN: The Wulff Road and East Street branch of Scotiabank was closed yesterday follow





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Mother tells son
not to return

Tim Clarke/Tribune staff

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armed robbery that took place while ex-deputy prime minister Cynthia Pratt was there.

Haitian-Bahamian
led capsized boat

= By ALISON LOWE
Tribune Staff Reporter
alowe@tribunemedia.net

A HAITIAN-BAHAMIAN man is now
believed to have captained the boat that capsized
on its way to Florida killing at least nine people,
including a child.

According to reports in The Miami Herald,
the 24 known passengers on the vessel, all Haitian
migrants, told authorities they were in The
Bahamas for a month before they left for Florida.

Yesterday the United States Coast Guard
called off its search for survivors, which had
spanned 31-hours and 100 miles of Florida.

In addition to the nine bodies recovered since
the vessel sank at around 2am Wednesday,16
people were rescued alive.

Irvin McMphee, Chief Immigration Office on
Bimini, said the first his office heard about Bimi-
ni being the launching point for the ill-fated voy-
age was when he saw it on television on Wednes-

day.
Hiding

He does not believe the group could have spent
the entire month prior to leaving the Bahamas in
Bimini as they would likely have been discoy-
ered. ‘There are no Haitians in Bimini,” he stat-
ed.

However, he suggested that if the migrants
were in Bimini, it is likely that they were hidden
in the bushes in the more sparsely populated
southern part of the island.

‘What I understand is that they come out of
Nassau, and for some reason during their trans-
portation they stop here, and then they go before





Perilous toe ETE mtlenis (file photo)

we find them,” said Mr McPhee. “They wouldn’t
just be here walking around waiting to catch a
boat.”

Speaking to The Miami Herald from her
Bahamas home, Madeline Desir, the mother of
twin daughters who disappeared from the cap-
sized vessel, claimed she paid $3,000 to the Hait-
ian-Bahamian man for her daughters to be
brought from Haiti to Florida.

SEE page 7



NASSAU AND BAHAMA

ISLANDS’ LEADING NEWSPAPER



(V\

Pade ed a

PRICE —75¢ (Abaco and Grand Bahama $1.25)

a “-
Foreign teams in Nassau tourney

Two students
‘stabbed’ at
CC Sweeting

= By MEGAN
REYNOLDS
Tribune Staff
Reporter
mereynolds@tribunemedia.net

VIOLENCE at CC Sweet-
ing Senior High School cul-
minated in the stabbing of two
students this week, it has been
claimed.

A 32-year-old mother of a
grade 10 student told The Tri-
bune a grade 12 pupil and
another boy were injured in
a knife fight on Tuesday.

She also understands anoth-
er violent scuffle took place
in the school yard the follow-
ing day.

Police were unable to con-
firm or deny the alleged stab-
bing before The Tribune
went to press yesterday, and
school principal Mrs Delores
Ingraham failed to return our
calls.

Parents have alleged there
are five to seven gangs in the
school, and boys are taking
knuckle-dusters, cutlasses,
knives and even guns to the
campus in College Avenue.

The 32-year-old mother of
two ordered her 15-year-old
son not to return to CC
Sweeting after he was threat-
ened by a group of boys last
month.

Fears

The worried mother said:
“Pm not going to wait for
them to touch my child or
someone else’s child.

“These things happen and
I’m scared. He’s afraid for his
life and the other students
involved are too.

“People pick on the little
boys who look soft and my
boy looks soft. He’s quiet.”

The mother is distressed her
son is Missing out on vital
classes as his end-of-year
exams approach in June, but
she would rather he sacrifice
his education than be hurt or
killed.

She has asked for her son
to be transferred to a different
school, but has not yet been
accommodated.

She said: “They call him sis-
sy because he reported it to
the office, and to the parents,
and to the police, so now the
gang and everybody have him
for that.

“He wanted to go back this
week because he wants to do
his exams, but I said he can’t
go back. I don’t want him to
go back to that school.

“A lot of people are scared,
and their children don’t go
there, they try to get trans-
ferred, but they’re told they
can’t.

“IT know there is crime
everywhere, and all schools
have gangs, but it disturbs me
that they didn’t even try to

SEE page 7





PAGE 2, SATURDAY, MAY 16, 2009

THE TRIBUNE



LOCAL NEWS



Work on Grand
Cay Clinic being
re-evaluated

MAIN/SPORTS SECTION
Local News ala mon Om aml
Editorial/Letters. ...........:cccccecceeeceeeeeeeceeeeeeees P4

CLASSIFIED SECTION 36 PAGES

USA TODAY WEEKENDER 8 PAGES

BUTCH



THE WORK needed to ready
the Grand Cay Clinic for open-
ing is being re-evaluated and it is
hoped that construction will be
completed within the next 45
days, Algernon Cargill, director
of the National Insurance Board
(NIB), said yesterday.

Mr Cargill issued a press state-
ment in response to remarks
made by Senator Jerome Fitzger-



ald on the status of Grand Cay
Clinic during the senator’s con-
tribution to the Communications
Bill.

Mr Fitzgerald had criticised
the government for leaving the
$1.3 million clinic unused,
although it was apparently ready
for opening.

However, Mr Cargill said that
the building still needs some
remedial work and that NIB is
working “feverishly” to open it
to the public as soon as possible.

Since 1988, the NIB has been
engaged in a social investment
programme aimed at assisting
with the development and exten-
sion of health infrastructure in
the Bahamas, Mr Cargill said.

“The programme entails not
only the constructing, but also
the equipping, furnishing and in
some cases the maintaining of
quality health care facilities that
improve the quality and accessi-
bility of health care services for
insured persons and other resi-
dents throughout the country,”
he said.

To date, NIB has constructed
and furnished 18 such facilities
throughout the Bahamas.

According the NIB director,
the Grand Cay Clinic, currently
under construction and funded
by the National Insurance Board,
is not included in the 18 com-
pleted clinics because it is not
quite ready for occupation.

Mr Cargill explained that NIB
entered into a contract with
Island Bay Front Ltd, owned by
Roosevelt Curry, on May 1, 2002,
to construct a clinic on the island
of Grand Cay.

Three months later, construc-
tion was suspended and subse-
quently, the contract was termi-
nated.



MR Algernon Cargill said that the clinic still needs some remedial
work and that NIB is working “feverishly” to open it to the public

as soon as possible.

“On July 26, 2005, a contract
was awarded to Tony Rolle Con-
struction, with a completion date
projected at November 2006.
This work has not progressed
according to schedule, but
through consistent discussion and
dialogue with the contractor, and
in some cases direct financing of
the project due to challenges
experienced by the contractor,
the National Insurance Board
has been able to advance con-
struction to the current level of
95 per cent completion.

“Notwithstanding the con-
struction delays, the National
Insurance Board proceeded to
procure the medical and dental
equipment at the clinic. Two
Bahamian companies were
selected and the equipment
installation was completed two
weeks ago,” Mr Cargill said

He assured the public that
NIB is working “feverishly” with
the contractor to correct the

KERZNER

SUMMIT FOUNDATION

SKYCLIMBERS

OPEN HOUSE SATURDAYS

Phone number 363-0626

Ages 7-18 years.

Parents must accompany

under 14 years

Hours of operation

Tuesday-Saturday 9-5pm

Parents must sign waiver

for all climbers

Donation of $5.00 per person
and
ALL ages can come participate.



remedial work and complete the
clinic.

“We recognise the impor-
tance of this facility to the peo-
ple of Grand Cay and would not
deliberately delay the construc-
tion and/or transfer of this facil-
ity to the Ministry of Health.
The challenges experienced
were outside of the direct con-
trol of the National Insurance
Board and while we could have
rightfully terminated the con-
tractor, our focus has been to
provide him with the resources
and cash needed during con-
struction although he did not
meet the contract terms,” Mr
Cargill said.

The National Insurance
Board, the director said, has set-
tled all of its contractual obliga-
tions to the contractor and
remains committed to ensuring
that Mr Rolle completes the
contract according to the speci-
fications.





THE RESIDENCES
ATLANTIS

NASSAU
HARBOUR

THE COVE
ATLANTIS



TURN LEFT OFF OF THE ON-BRIDGE AND CONTINUE WEST THROUGH THE TUNNEL
UNTIL YOU ARRIVE AT THE TENNIS CENTER FOR PARKING.





THE TRIBUNE

LOCAL NEWS

SATURDAY, MAY 16, 2009, PAGE 3





School
ANCONA
its 40th
LPM AIOE AY

@ By DENISE
MAYCOCK
Tribune Freeport
Reporter
dmaycock@tribunemedia.net

FREEPORT - The Mar-
tin Town Primary School
will be celebrating 40 years
of primary education at
Eight Mile Rock, where a
number of activities have
been planned for former
and current students, teach-
ers and administrators.

Principal Mary Russell
said activities will kick-off
tomorrow, with a church
service at Mount Zion Bap-
tist Church in Jones Town,
Eight Mile Rock.

“We are calling on former
students, teachers, princi-
pals, and well-wishers to join
us in this service of thanks-
giving,” she said.

Under the theme, ‘Cele-
brate the Past, Embrace the
Future,’ Ms Russell said
activities have been planned
to commemorate the
school’s 40 years of exis-
tence on the island.

The activities planned are
as follows:

e Children’s programme
at the school at 10am on
Tuesday, May 26.

e History Day on the
school grounds on Thurs-
day, May 28.

e Grand celebration at
3pm on Monday, June 1.

Ms Russell said several
individuals will be honoured
during the grand celebra-
tion, including Victoria
Wright for being the longest
serving principal. She served
for 21 years.

Also being honoured are
Elcott Johnson, former prin-
cipal; Mrytle Carrol, a
teacher of 23 years; Carmie
Ferguson, a long-time jani-
tor, and Melvese Henly, a
former tuck shop operator
who provided food for
under-privileged students.

Insurance executive
David Wallace, a former
student, said they are
expecting about 2,500 for-
mer students to support the
event.

“We also want former
teachers, principals, and for-
mer parents to join in this
wonderful celebration. We
believe this is a wonderful
way to pay tribute to edu-
cators, students, and exist-
ing teachers who have
impacted many students’
lives,” he said.

Mr Wallace is urging for-
mer students to donate $40
which represents one dollar
for each year. The funds, he
said, will be used for the
establishment of a computer
lab and a new water foun-
tain at the school.

Mr Wallace said three top
bands are lined up for the
grand celebration, which will
commence with a parade
from the old Friendship
Shopping Centre to Sunset
Village.

Tamara Litton, a former
student, highlighted some
significant achievements of
the Martin Town Primary
School. “I attended MTPS
from 1968 to 1974 and the
MTPS was the leading
school in the Music Arts
Festival in the Caribbean.

“The teachers that passed
throughout that era — Mrs
Lopez, Vicky Martell,
Dorothy Lightbourne, Mr
Fernander, and Mr and Mrs
Gibbs — left a great impact
on our lives, they assisted in
rearing us to be the individ-
uals we are today.”

Ms Russell said there are
many accomplishments the
school can boast about.

Some of the achievements
include:

e Teacher Mildred
Roberts who was named the
National Teacher of the
Year for the Bahamas.

e The school placed first
in the National Arts Festival
in the Bahamian singing and
Gospel singing categories.

e The school is the cur-
rent winner of the 2008-2009
Junior Junkanoo Primary A
Division.

e The school also placed
4th out of 23 schools in the
Social Studies Competition.

¢ Two students were hon-
oured in the GLAT pro-
gramme by the Ministry of
Education.



Gap between murder
and trial causes worry

= By MEGAN REYNOLDS
Tribune Staff Reporter
mreynolds@tribunemedia.net

THE significant gap in the
number of murders reported
every year and the number of
murder trials filed in the
Supreme Court requires urgent
attention, president of the Bar
Association Wayne Munroe
said yesterday.

Although 72 murders were
reported to police in 2008, fol-
lowing 78 in 2007, just 17 mur-
der trials were filed in the
Supreme Court last year, and
the number of cases heard could
be even less, Mr Munroe told
The Tribune.

Even more disturbing are the
statistics for armed robbery
which show a whopping 782
incidents reported to police in
2008, and 820 in 2007, while
only 19 armed robbery cases
were filed in the Supreme Court
last year.

A total of 114 rapes were
reported to police in 2008, 136
in 2007. Only 14 rape cases were
filed in the Supreme Court in

Bar president says proposed
court reforms ‘went either
on a shelf or in a dust bin’

2008. Manslaughter appears to
be the only serious crime filed
in the Supreme Court at the
same rate of incidents.

Three reports of manslaugh-
ter were received by police in
2008 and four cases were filed in
the Supreme Court registry last
year.

Magistrates Court records
show 8,994 criminal cases were
heard in 2008 — 1,793 were com-
pleted and 6,167 adjourned.

Just 13 cases were transferred
to the Supreme Court.

Mr Munroe said: “The fig-
ures speak for themselves. This
doesn’t tell us the number of
cases that are heard in the
Supreme Court, but if you have
72 murders and 17 are tried,
that leaves 55 over.

“At that rate you won’t get
to try some of those people for

five years, but nobody can sug-
gest we can remand somebody
for five years. You wouldn’t
want 55 innocent people in
prison for that long.”

A leading defence attorney,
Mr Munroe was part of a task
force made up of lawyers, two
Supreme Court judges, magis-
trates, prosecutors, registrars
and police officers which looked
into the court system under
Dame Joan Sawyer’s rule as
Chief Justice in the 1990s.

The task force was mandated
with identifying the problems
and finding ways to make the
court system work more effi-
ciently.

Mr Munroe said the team
gave their time freely and found
a number of areas in need of
improvement, and devised a
number of simple, cost-free

solutions which were detailed
in a report presented to the pre-
vious FNM administration.

But Mr Munroe says the
report sat untouched under that
FNM government, continued to
be ignored by the PLP, and is
still being disregarded by the
current government.

“Tt went either on a shelf or in
a dustbin and nothing has hap-
pened and in the meantime the
situation gets worse,” he said.

The team found individual
defendant cases took 18 to 26
months for a trial to get to the
Supreme Court, and they
looked at the process step-by-
step to identify the reasons for
delay.

Mr Munroe said the number
of judges is not a problem as
judges sitting in the courts were
not being used when cases were
not brought before them.

He also maintains juries are
not hard to find. Mr Munroe
said the delays come from long
preliminary inquiries, a high
acquittal rate meaning few
defendants enter guilty pleas,
slow transportation of prison-

ers, and difficulty producing wit-
nesses. The task force’s sugges-
tions included devising a listing
system for people to check on
the progress of cases; a system
to ensure defence attorneys are
not double-booked; holding
plea and directions hearings to
ascertain admissible evidence
before the jury is called to court;
plea bargaining and holding
prisoners in cells at the courts
before the courts open.

Mr Munroe said: “They (the
measures) are very simple, most
of them cost no money, but
nothing has happened other
than trying to blame the per-
sons who have nothing to do
with it, which is the courts.

“The courts are there, the
judges sit every day, but when
only 60 per cent of their time is
used you can’t blame them
because cases aren’t before
them.

“Tt’s very possible to have 70
trials a year. A murder trial
takes five to seven days, so I
can’t understand why these tri-
als run for a whole month,” he
said.



CLOSE INSPECTION: Carl Bethel (second left, foreground), minister of education, examines construc-
tion work at the Stapledon School on Dolphin Drive

MINISTER of Education Carl Bethel was
escorted on a tour of the $1.5 million, state-of-the-
art wing of the Stapledon School on Dolphin

Drive.

The tour of the wing, still under construction,
was led by Lowell Mortimer, president of the
Bahamas Association for the Mentally Disabled,
which is spearheading and funding the project.

Mr Mortimer updated education officials on
the progress of the work stating that he is pleased
with the efforts of architect Anthony Jervis and
contractor Alder Minus. The building is expected
to be completed in early fall, 2009

Mr Bethel thanked Mr Mortimer and his asso-
ciation, noting that the construction of the new
facility is an excellent example of a public-private
partnership which benefits students and this par-
ticular case, the mentally challenged.

He further commended the BAMD for build-
ing the existing Stapledon School, which has been

on the current site since 1979,



Mr Bethel revealed that the ministry will be
responsible for furnishing and maintaining the
building once it is completed.

The new complex will house 12 multi-purpose

rooms and bathrooms and will be named in hon-
our of Sybil Blyden, the school’s first Bahamian
principal and a strong supporter of the mentally
challenged in the Bahamas.

Minister Bethel said he was delighted that Mrs
Blyden had a chance to learn that the structure
was being named in her honour, as she passed
away just as work began on the new building.

Anthony Jervis, architect for the project,

revealed that the building will have universal
access for persons with special needs and when
completed will be connected to the existing school
by a covered porch, steps and walkway.

The facility will also be air-conditioned with
sliding acoustic partitioned-walls and the com-
plex will accommodate the school’s auditorium
and art centre.

Defence Force to commission planes

THE ROYAL Bahamas
Defence Force is commissioning
two new aircraft at the Lynden
Pindling Airport on Monday.

Minister of National Security
and Immigration Tommy Turn-
quest will deliver the keynote
address at the service of dedica-
tion for the two new aircraft — a
Vulcan Air P68C Observer and a
Cessna 208B Grand Caravan
Aircraft.

The Observer aircraft was

Motorists
warned

ROAD works have started
on Atlantic Drive — the road
that runs past the Supervalue
food store, south of the second
round-about off West Bay
Street.

“We advise motorists to exer-
cise caution as they travel this
area over the next few weeks,
and to please slow down and be
patient around road workers,” a
release from Killarney MP Dr
Hubert Minnis said.

Dr Minnis said that while the
road works can be an inconve-
nience, the Ministry of Works is
working hard to provide a bet-
ter road system for the commu-
nity.

built in Naples, Italy, and dis-
tributed by the Orlando Sanford
Aircraft Sales in Sanford, Flori-
da. The Cessna Grand Caravan
was manufactured by Cessna in
Wichita, Kansas. Both aircraft,
along with the existing King Air
350, will improve the Defence
Force’s capability in patrolling
the country’s borders and
become valuable assets in the
fight against illegal maritime
activities in Bahamian waters.

They are equipped with state-of-
the-art communication equip-
ment to conduct the multifac-
eted duties that will be required
of the Defence Force.



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Minister tours
school’s $1.5m
wing expansion

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Cultural awareness and sensitivity on both an individual

and corporate basis

Interested persons should apply by May 22, 2009 to:

Royal Bank of Canada Trust Company
(Bahamas) Limited
PO Box N-3024
Nassau, NP Bahamas
Attention: Human Resource Manager
Via Email: paul.lewis @rbc.com or
elizabeth.dorsch@rbc.com

Only applications from suitably qualified candidates
will be acknowledged

www.rbcroyalbank.com/carlbbean/bahamas

NS Neen Ik
Royal Ban
.of Canada

Ce ee Tue ue ec)





PAGE 4, SATURDAY, MAY 16, 2009 THE TRIBUNE



EDITORIAL/LETTERS TO THE EDITOR

Unnerved by
new breed



The Tribune Limited

NULLIUS ADDICTUS JURARE IN VERBA MAGISTRI
Being Bound to Swear to The Dogmas of No Master

LEON E. H. DUPUCH, Publisher/Editor 1903-1914

SIR ETIENNE DUPUCH, Kt, O.B.E., K.M., K.CS.G.,
(Hon.) LL.D., D.Litt.

Publisher/Editor 1919-1972
Contributing Editor 1972-1991

EILEEN DUPUCH CARRON, C.M.G., M.S. B.A., LL.B.

Publisher/Editor 1972-

Published Daily Monday to Saturday

Shirley Street, RO. Box N-3207, Nassau, Bahamas
Insurance Management Building., P.O. F-485, Freeport, Grand Bahama

TELEPHONES
Switchboard (News, Circulation and Advertising) 322-1986
Advertising Manager - (242) 502-2352
Circulation Department - (242) 502-2387
Nassau Fax: - (242) 328-2398
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Freeport fax: (242) 352-9348

WEBSITE
www.tribune242.com — updated daily at 2pm

Fiscal suicide ahead for US?

BARACK OBAMA came to office with a
theory. He believed that the country was in des-
perate need of new investments in education,
energy and many other areas. He also saw that
the nation faced a long term-fiscal crisis caused
by rising health care and entitlement costs. His
theory was that he could spend now and save lat-
er. He could fund his agenda with debt now
and then solve the long-term fiscal crisis by con-
trolling health care and entitlement costs later
on. In essence, health care became the bank
out of which he could fund the bulk of his agen-
da. By squeezing inefficiencies out of the health
care system, he could have his New New Deal
and restore the nation to long-term fiscalbal-
ance.

This theory justified the tremendous ramp-up
of spending we’ve seen over the last several
months. Obama inherited a $1.2 trillion deficit
and has quickly pushed it up to $1.8 trillion, a
whopping 13 percent of GDP. The new debt
will continue to mount after the economy recov-
ers. The national debt will nearly double over
the next decade. Annual deficits will still hover
around 5 percent or 6 percent of GDP in 2019.
By that year, interest payments alone on the
debt are projected to be $806 billion annually,
according to the Congressional Budget Office.

Obama believes these deficit levels are toler-
able if he can fix the long-term fiscal situation,
but he hasn’t been happy about them. He’s been
prowling around the White House prodding his
staff to find budget cuts. Some of the ideas they
have produced have been significant (Medicare
reforms), some have been purely political (ask-
ing Cabinet secretaries to cut $100 million in
waste, fraud and abuse), and many have been
gutted on Capitol Hill (cap and trade, proposed
changes in charitable deductions, proposed
changes to the estate tax).

In any case, these stabs at fiscal discipline
haven’t come close to keeping up with the explo-
sion in spending. The government now borrows
$1 for every $2 it spends. A Treasury bond auc-
tion earlier this month went poorly, suggesting
the world’s hunger for U.S. debt is not limitless.

Obama has been thrown back on his original
theory. If he is going to sustain his agenda, if he
is going to prevent national insolvency, he has to
control health care costs. Health care costs are
now the crucial issue of his whole presidency.

Obama and his aides seem to understand this.
They have gone out of their way to emphasize
the importance of restraining costs. The presi-
dent has held headline-grabbing summits with

business and union leaders. Unlike just about
every other Democrat on the planet, he empha-
sizes cost control as much as expanding health
coverage. So what exactly is the president
proposing to help him realize hundreds of bil-
lions of dollars a year in savings?

Obama aides talk about “game-changers.”
These include improving health information
technology, expanding wellness programs,
expanding preventive medicine, changing reim-
bursement policies so hospitals are penalized
for poor outcomes, and instituting comparative
effectiveness measures.

Nearly everybody believes these are good
ideas. The first problem is that most experts,
with a notable exception of David Cutler of
Harvard, don’t believe they will produce much
in the way of cost savings over the next 10 years.
They are expensive to set up and even if they
work, it would take a long time for cumulative
efficiencies to have much effect. That means
that from today until the time Obama is, say, 60,
the US. will get no fiscal relief.

The second problem is that nobody is sure
that they will ever produce significant savings.
The Congressional Budget Office can’t really
project savings because there’s no hard evi-
dence they will produce any and no way to mea-
sure how much.

If you read the Congressional Budget Office
testimony and talk to enough experts, you come
away with a stark conclusion: There are deep
structural forces, both in Medicare and the pri-
vate insurance market, that have driven the
explosion in health costs. It is nearly impossible
to put together a majority coalition for a bill
that challenges those essential structures. There-
fore, the leading proposals on Capitol Hill do
not directly address the structural problems.
They are a collection of worthy but speculative
ideas designed to possibly mitigate their effects.

The likely outcome of this year’s health care
push is that we will get a medium-size bill that
expands coverage to some groups but does rel-
atively little to control costs. In normal condi-
tions, that would be a legislative achievement.

But Obama needs those cuts for his whole
strategy to work. Right now, his spending plans
are concrete and certain. But his health care
savings, which make those spending plans
affordable, are distant, amorphous and uncer-
tain. Without serious health cost cuts, this burst
of activism will hasten fiscal suicide.

(This article was written by David Brooks-

c.2009 New York Times News Service).



of ‘pot hole’

LETTERS

EDITOR, The Tribune.

I find it almost unnerving to
drive out West these days as at
the junction of West Bay Street
and Blake Road as many peo-
ple know there is a “pot hole”
not to be confused with a “pot
cake.” Asa pothole it certain-
ly rates as one of the giants of
the breed and in fact if you were
to unfortunately fall into it you
might reach Australia. This hole
has been in existence for at least
a month and was at one point
filled with rocks which did little
to make it look like a piece of
road, and a well used road at
that. The unnerving part about
the whole thing is that there
must be members of the Min-
istry of Works that pass by and
even perhaps Cabinet Ministers

letters@tribunemedia net



who must notice that all is not
well with the tarmac below
them. But then the ministers
are not driving. However, I
wonder if after passing it a cou-
ple of times they say “oops, that
hole is still there, maybe we
should do something about it”
and tie a knot in their handker-
chiefs to remind them to have
their assistants call their col-
league the Minister of Works.
On the other hand maybe
they don’t carry handkerchiefs,
and have poor memories. Per-
haps the minister of traffic lights
who I think announced the oth-

er day that seven traffic lights
had stopped working and
should be fixed might redeem
himself by fixing the pothole.
Has this particular minister not
noticed that traffic lights have
not been working for ten years
and the count is way over seven.

However, I think the traffic in
most cases flows more smooth-
ly without them although it is a
pity to waste the new ones that
were installed not too long ago
but fail to function properly.
Probably in these hard times
ministers should return to rais-
ing their goats and the rest of us
can worry about the potholes
and traffic lights.

PATRICK H THOMSON
Nassau,
May 6 2009.

Why we Bahamians
are ready for change

EDITOR, The Tribune.

Why Bahamians are ready for change in the
Bahamas? The reason is the bad economy, high
unemployment, high rate of crime, high cost of liv-
ing, an economy build only on Banking and
Tourism, lack of vision, ideas and leadership for
the Bahamas and the Bahamian people. This is
why the Bahamas and the Bahamian people are
hungry, ready, and prepared for change, because
they are finding it hard to find jobs, buy gro-
ceries for family, pay electrical bill, rent or mort-

some Bahamians, who are tired waiting for
change in the Bahamas. However this also show

in advance.

gage and private school fees for children.

The recent events of Haitians and Bahamians
leaving Bimini by boat to go to Florida illegally,
is a clear sign how ready, hungry and prepared

Nassau,

May 14, 2009.

the dramatic need for change, that the young
generation of Bahamians will change Bahamas
politic in the next general election ages 18-45.
Change is happening in the hearts and minds of
the Bahamian people who want real change in
their lives, children and their country for a better
future. Change and help is soon on it way for
our Bahamaland. Would be grateful to have this
letter in your valuable newspaper, thanking you

PEDRO SMITH

A new day dawns with
Obama’s foreign policy

EDITOR, The Tribune.

On April 7, 2009, President
Obama made a surprise visit to
Baghdad. It made a fitting con-
clusion to an unusually long and
varied presidential tour. It was a
tour, moreover, on which the
novice US leader was rarely less
than pitch-perfect. For hopeful
Europeans, as for Turkey,
George Bush’s problematic
eight years in the White House
were thoroughly laid to rest.

It was re-engagement with
America's old friends and allies
that the new president was
after, he was amply rewarded,
but only because, in his phrase,

PUBLIC NOTICE

INTENT TO CHANGE NAME BY DEED POLL

The Public is hereby advised that |, ALEXANDRA ANGEL
BROOKE SHERMAN of Nassau, Bahamas, intend to my
name to ANGEL ALEXANDRA BROOKE SHERMAN, If
there are any objections to this change of name by Deed Poll,
you may write such objections to the Chief Passport Officer,
P.O.Box N-742, Nassau, Bahamas no later than thirty (30)
days after the date of publication of this notice.

eee hee

Leon Byron Arthur Well

retired science teacher, formerly of Grenada who died at
Doctor’s Hospital on 12th May 2009, will be held at Holy
Cross Anglican Church Highbury Park, New Providence,
The Bahamas, on Saturday 16th May 2009 at 5 p.m.

Mr. Wells has taught natural sciences in The Bahamas
since 1968 at; St. Augustine’s College, C.C. Sweeting Se-
nior High School, and H.O. Nash Junior High.

Mr. Wells leaves to mourn his sister, Mrs. Elsa Wells
Schioler (Denmark) and brother Mr. Alleyne Leslie Wells
(Trinidad and Tobago), and many other family members
and friends.

PUBLIC NOTICE

INTENT TQ CHANGE NAME BY DEED POLL

The Public is hereby advised that |, PRINISCA S. MCKINNEY
of New Providence, the biological mother of GHITA CARLEE
LOUISE LOCHAN TAYLOR intend to my daughter's name to
GHITA CARLEE LOUISE LOCHAN MCKINNEY, If there are
any objections to this change of name by Deed Poll, you may
write such objections to the Chief Passport Officer, P.O.Box
N-742, Nassau, Bahamas no later than thirty (30) days after
the date of publication of this notice.

Call For Registration Details

324-7770

Success Training College is registered with the Minis-
try of Education and approved by the Department of
Public Personnel Credits earned at Sueeess are trans-
forable to Nova Southeastern University. Graduates
may also transfer to other colleges and universities in
Canada, the USA, the UR and the Caribbean, Call
Suecess now for program and registration informa
tion,

aK
BANK TELLER

If you want to pursue a career in the banking field start by enrolling
in Success Training College's Paralegal Diploma program, Suc-
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NOTICE

NOTICE is hereby given that ROSELANDE
DUVERSONNE of STEP STREET, FOXHILL,NASSAU,
BAHAMAS is applying to the Minister responsible
for Nationality and Citizenship, for registration/

naturalization as a citizen of The Bahamas, and that
any person who knows any reason why registration/
naturalization should not be granted, should send a
written and signed statement of the facts within twenty-
eight days from the 9 day of May, 2009 to the Minister
responsible for nationality and Citizenship, P.O. Box
N-7147, Nassau, Bahamas.



he arrived with hands out-
stretched. We cannot know
what took place behind closed
doors, but we can judge, from
the smiles of such stoney-faced
characters as the Russian Pres-
ident Dmitry Medvedev, and
China’s President Hu Jintao,
that a new day has dawned.

The G-20 London summit
may have produced more style
than substance. But style and,
above all, tone are not to be dis-
counted in international rela-
tions. Getting such things right
is something many new nation-
al leaders have to learn and
some never master. President
Obama, and, it must be said, his
wife Michelle, are naturals.

For any national leader, even
one who has triumphed in a
marathon US presidential cam-
paign, this would have been an
exhausting tour, demanding a
different approach, and differ-
ent expertise, at every stop. Yet
President Obama seemed to
draw new strength from each
encounter. The bigger and more
engaged the audience, the more
energised he seemed to be.

In London there was the eco-
nomic crises, high diplomacy
and protocol. In Strasbourg
there was the finely balanced
French-German duo to please,
and the NATO allies to be
cajoled over Afghanistan. In
Prague, President Obama met
“new” Europe face to face and
set out his vision for a world
with far fewer, and eventually
no, nuclear weapons, even as
North Korea conducted its lat-
est abortive rocket test.

He arrived in Turkey with the
message that the US was not
“at war with Islam” and that its
relations with the Muslim world
would not be defined by oppo-
sition to al-Qa’ida. In Istanbul,
he pressed home his ecumenical
theme by meeting leaders of all
the city’s main religions. And

thence to Baghdad, as Com-
mander-in-Chief, to address the
servicemen whose eventual
withdrawal he had announced
as one of his first presidential
acts.

To pull all this off and leave
so few dissatisfied in his wake is
a considerable feat. Not for the
first time, we have to go back as
far as JFK for comparisons. If
President Obama’s main objec-
tive was to cast the United
States as a different type of
global player, more culturally
sensitive, more collegiate, then
he succeeded. To demand more
of a relatively young President
in office would be unreason-
able. Yet what was, without
doubt, a personal and political
triumph leaves two questions.

The low-key geniality
favoured by President Obama
was of a piece with his early
pledges to listen. But a time will
surely come when listening
must give way to doing, and
then it will be harder to please
everyone. We are certainly
watching an accomplished
politician and orator, but were
we watching a world leader in
the making?

The second question is as
much about America as its pres-
ident. Even before he set off,
some erstwhile supporters were
already voicing disappointment
that he had not been more rad-
ical. Others, still, argued that
he should be devoting all his
time to the US economy rather
than traipsing around foreign
parts. In any event, President
Obama will soon learn what
many a US president learned
before him: acclaim abroad
rarely translates into higher
approval at home.

JERRY ROKER
Nassau,
May 13, 2009.

PUBLIC NOTICE

INTENT TO CHANGE NAME BY DEED POLL

The Public is hereby advised that |, BRITTANY TONESHA
TEARDROP PEARCE of BLUEBIRD CRESSENT,

MONESTARY PARK, NEW PROVIDENCE, intend to my

name to BRITTANY TONESHA TEARDROP WILSON. If
there are any objections to this change of name by Deed Poll,
you may write such objections to the Chief Passport Officer,
P.O.Box N-742, Nassau, Bahamas no later than thirty (30)
days after the date of publication of this notice.





THE TRIBUNE

SATURDAY, MAY 16, 2009, PAGE 5



LOCAL NEWS





rR

m@ By TANEKA THOMPSON
Tribune Staff Reporter

"T vex at all these people on

brake on the four way stop!

- MAD MOTORIST.

and butter to our country. Don't
y'all realise that these people }
only worried about making }
money and as soon as things go }
sour they will push out and }
move on to the next best thing? }
The only way to ensure our }
country's viability is to grow }
more entrepreneurs and busi- }
ness minded folks instead of :
breeding hospitality geared peo- :

ple to serve the foreign elite.”

- "GET IT TOGETHER, PEOPLE,"

FOX HILL ENTREPRENEUR.

"Boy, I is so vex that them : |
politicians who sign all them for-
eign treaties abroad on political }
asylum an’ tings without we peo-
ple knowing. Them politicians ;
don't have enough common
sense ta know that we have to }
give 4,999,999, or less than half of
the 10 million-Haitian popula- }
tion, who never agree with they
own government in Haiti, politi-
cal asylum in we Bahamas if they
come over an' ask for it. And we
250,000 Bahamians ga' have to }

live with it, that's they law."

- CONCERNED CITIZEN.

* Are you vex? Send your com-
plaints to whyouvex@tribuneme- :

dia.net.

WSC: Odour in Straw
Market downtown
hot from sewer



THE Water and Sewerage i
Corporation ash said the odour : |
emanating from the area of the :
downtown Straw Market is not ;
related to the sewerage system. }

Management personnel from
the Corporation visited the }
Straw Market on Thursday
where they met with Ministry :
of Public Works officials who ;

were investigating he odour : life.

complaint.

is planning corrective action.

i ing and Allied
i Union’s (BHCAWU) executive
; board is urging all members to
i operate with “calmness”
i cially when vying for leadership
: positions in the upcoming union

whyyouvex@tribunemedia.net E elections.

BHCAWU members ecouraged
to ‘operate with calmness’

THE Bahamas Hotel Cater-
Workers

, espe-

This statement by the

: : BHCAWU comes after a fight
ee toa wite musey buy Tee broke at during last week’s
licenses because they is be acting }

like they ain' know how to use } 7. ; diff, t fact
the round-about or a four-way } ee
stop. I tired of all these biggety
no good drivers who Iswear ona } tals ne? cola &
vendetta to either mash up my } astrteny oe a
nice car or kill me - people y'all aaa ane
need to learn how to yield for } ecrerdawcnial
traffic on the round-about and y y :

leno ychow to a) least pretend ie vidual should reflect the quali-

"Tam advocating that at least ties of a true leader. We remind
every five years people take a } :
refresher course in driving before panee ph our cleeems anne
they can get their license ; which the union stands upon.”
renewed because this reckless- ee

2 tod . .
ness on the streets is deplorable! union premises on (May 4), the

i executive officers kept calm,
: and conducted lawful nomina-

"| vex tliat Bahamians ain' pet tions for the sake of the union

it through their heads yet that }
we can't rely on foreign }
investors to supply the bread }

nomination process between the
Labour Minister Dion
Foulkes described the incident
The statement by the board

“The temperament of an indi-

all and sundry of the impor-
honour the strong traditions of

“Despite the uproar on our

members. The executive offi-

Fight erupts between the
union’s different factions

cers paid respect to all mem-
bers and followed the rules as
decided by the members.”

Kirk Wilson was one of the
candidates who was unsuccess-
ful in securing a nomination.
Therefore, his team dismantled,
and several members nominat-
ed themselves as independent
candidates.

Tyrone Morris was also
unsuccessful in his nomination
bid.

The nominees for the execu-
tive offices of the BHCAWU
are as follows:

e President: Roy Colebrooke
— Justice Team; Nicole Martin —
A Team; Abraham Smith —
Hands Team; Tyrone Butler —
M Team

e Vice-president: Godfrey
Brice — A Team; Lionel Miller —
Hands Team; Sidney Rolle —
Justice Team; Oratio Whylly —
M Team

e Second vice-president:
Shamala McPhee — Justice
Team; Estella Pratt — Hands
Team; Anderson Sands — M
Team; Eliott Thompson — A
Team

e Third vice-president: Pan-
dora McKenzie — Hands Team;
Felix Munroe — Justice Team;
Carol Thompson — M Team;
Harrison Williams — A Team

¢ General Secretary: Hasten
Charlton — M Team; Leo A.
Douglas — Justice Team; Geno
Longley — Hands Team; Dar-
rin Woods — A Team

e Assistant General Secre-
tary: Kevin Gardiner — Justice
Team; Hanna Elisabeth — M
Team; Veronica Nesbitt —
Hands Team; Hubert Saunders
—-A Team

e Treasurer: Carolyn Dorsett
— A Team; Lolita Forde — M
Team; Samantha Gray-Francis
— Deliverance Team; Nevolia

Johnson — Hands Team; Basil
McKenzie — Justice Team

e Assistant Treasurer: Flo-
rence Knowles — Justice Team;
Patricia S. Mortimer — inde-
pendent; Samantha Ryan —
Hands Team; Joanne Sears —-M
Team; Sheila Taylor —- A Team

¢ Trustees: Karen Bastian —
Justice Team; Cheryl Beneby —
independent; Wilbert Collie —
Hands Team; Pearl Henfield —
Hands Team; Rose Musgrove
— Justice Team; Maria Roberts
—A Team; Lisa Robinson-Davis
—A Team; Lielin Thompaon —
M Team

¢ Council members: Max
Altidor — Hands Team; Ruth
Hanna — Hands Team: Ricar-
do Hepburn — A Team; Roberts
Coakley -— Justice Team;
Rodger Knowles — Justice
Team; Whitney Thompson —M
Team

The Ministry of Labour is
now preparing to assist with
elections on May 28 and the
arrangements being made for
Family Island members to par-
ticipate.



MINISTER Dion Foulkes described
the incident as an “embarrassing”
display by the union members.

“We support and reiterate
Minister Foulkes’ assertions
that all candidates on the list
act with due diligence, and cam-
paign in good faith, reminding
themselves of the purpose for
the elections,” the union’s exec-
utive board said.

HELPING HANDS 2



































THE family and friends of
murdered expatriate business-
man Hywel Jones are to hold a
celebration in honour of his

The event is scheduled to be

It has been determined that held at the New Providence

the unpleasant smell is coming }
from four storm drains in the :
market. The Ministry of Works }

Community Centre on Blake
Road on May 22, starting at
Spm.

Mr Jones became the 26th

; murder victim for the year



when he died at the Princess
Margaret Hospital from
injuries he received when he
was shot in the head by an
unknown assassin more than
three weeks ago.

He was shot at least twice
in the head and body as he
was getting out of his car in
his office car park near Com-
pass Point on West Bay Street
at around 10am on April 22.

A banker by profession, Mr
Jones was just 55.

Born in North Wales, Mr
Jones worked in the financial
services sectors in the United
Kingdom, Jamaica and the
Bahamas. He was the former
director of the Bankers’ Asso-
ciation of the Bahamas and

Catholic procession for Mary



the Bahamas Institute of
Bankers.

Mr Jones had lived in the
Bahamas for more than 20
years and had been an adviser
to the government on banking
legislation on several occa-
sions. His shooting, in broad
daylight, has yet to be solved.

A $50,000 reward, posted in
the local press last week for
information that might lead to
the arrest or conviction of
those responsible for his mur-
der, still stands.

Hywel Jones’ brother, IIt
Jones, has vowed to remain in
the Bahamas until whoever is
responsible for the banker’s
execution-style shooting has
been brought to justice.



m@ By DENISE MAYCOCK
Tribune Freeport
Reporter
dmaycock@tribunemedia.net

FREEPORT - Catholics on Grand
Bahama will take to the streets for the
annual Catholic May Procession tomor-
row in honour of the Virgin Mary.

Greg Christie, district deputy of the
Knights of Columbus and coordinator
of the procession, said the five Catholic
parishes on island will participate in
the procession, which starts at Mary,
Star of the Sea Parish at 5.30pm.

He said all church ministries and
organisations as well as Catholic stu-
dents and those attending other
schools are asked to assemble with a
banner, if available, at the church by
5.15pm.

“Catholics will come together to
honour in songs and anthems, and the
praying of the rosary the Blessed Vir-
gin Mary as our mother,” he said.

Mr Christie said during the month of
May - a month both named for and

dedicated to the mother of Jesus -
Catholics have long honoured Mary in
a procession with prayers and song,
and by placing a crown of flowers on
her image during a service following
the procession.

During the procession, he said, a spe-
cial recitation of the rosary will be held
at the church for those not be able to
join the procession around the area. It
will also begin at 5.30 pm.

“The tradition in the Bahamas and in
many other countries has been for
school children to have a ‘may crown-
ing’ ceremony, with a procession, pret-
ty dresses and a wreath of fresh flowers
that one child gets to place on the stat-
ue. A song for these events, ‘Bring
Flowers of the Fairest’ — with its refrain
‘O Mary, we crown thee with blossoms
today, Queen of the Angels, Queen of
the May’ — has been a familiar
favourite for generations,” said Mr
Christie.

Mr Christie said the Knights of
Columbus are inviting the Catholic
Church and school families from
throughout Grand Bahama to partici-

pate as Catholics honour the Blessed
Mother with the annual procession.

The route of procession will travel
from Mary, Star of the Sea Church east
to East Beach Drive, north on to Poin-
ciana Drive, west on Poinciana Drive
to East Atlantic Drive, and South on
East Atlantic Drive to East Sunrise
Highway, and east on Sunrise Highway
back to the parish where the benedic-
tion and evening service will be held
together with the crowning of a statue
of Mary.

During the procession, parishes will
alternate praying the rosary, the Joyful
Mysteries, and together sing Marion
Hymns.

“We invite and urge everyone to
make a sacrificial and special effort to
participate in this May Procession and
together plead for our Blessed Moth-
er’s intercession, her continuing love,
and to pray for peace in the world,” Mr
Christie said.

“Each time our Blessed Mother has
appeared on this earth she asked us to
make sacrifices in reparation to God
for our sins and to pray for the world.”









THE Englerston Urban Renewal
Livable Neighbourhood Pro-
gramme, in conjunction with the
grade 10 class of the Lyford Cay
International School and the
Englerston pastoral community,
provided grocery items to fami-
lies in the community on Satur-
day, May 2.

Dennis Dames, manager of the
programme said that the partici-
pants “exercised a spirit of com-
munity service by walking
through the community distrib-
uting boxes and bags of gro-
ceries to needy families, as a
response to the community’s
need for recession relief.”
Among those pictured are Mr
Dames, Pastor Greg Chisholm
of New Beginning Ministries
(front row) and Laurette Lock-
hart of the Englerston Urban
Renewal Programme, and
Natasha Arthur, Lekeisha
Chisholm and Helene DeJong,
all of Lyford Cay International.

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PAGE 6, SATURDAY, MAY 16, 2009

THE TRIBUNE



LOCAL NEWS



New entrep

SEVENTY new entrepre-
neurs will now be entering the
Bahamian business scene fol-
lowing a graduation ceremony
at the College of the Bahamas
last weekend.

They were participants in the
Bahamas Agricultural and
Industrial Corporation's 12-
week business empowerment
lecture series held in conjunc-
tion with the College's School
of Business, headed by Remil-
da Moxey.

"An army of entrepreneurs
who will transform the eco-
nomic landscape by establish-
ing sustainable business enter-
prises throughout our country
has been launched," said
BAIC's deputy general man-
ager Don Major.

Hosted by BAIC's Business
Services Department, the sem-
inar featured successful busi-
ness persons who shared with
participants proven business
techniques.

"It allowed participants to
avoid the pitfalls of those who

failed," said Mr Major, "and
acquire the knowledge and
expertise that successful busi-











THE GRADUATING class of the business empowerment lecture series is

pictured with College of the Bahamas vice-president Dr Rhonda Chipman-
Johnson, BAIC executive chairman Edison Key and BAIC officials.

ness persons have discovered.
"BAIC exists in order to pro-
vide entrepreneurs the option



of avoiding travelling by the
seats of their pants - the pain
and terror of learning by trial

Young tourism ambassadors of LIS

FREEPORT, GRAND
BAHAMA - Students of the
year two class of Lucaya Inter-
national School (LIS) became
true tourism ambassadors this
week as they created unique
posters to welcome the Com-
monwealth Local Government
delegates and regular tourists to
Grand Bahama.

The welcome presentation
was the brainchild of Ina
LeBlanc, the children’s class
teacher at LIS.

“This term’s unit of inquiry
was about tourism, how it relates
to us everyday and how impor-
tant it is. I thought it would be a
great idea for our students to
create an original flyer or poster
to tell tourists what they can do
in Grand Bahama and maybe
ask tourism to display them,”
Ms LeBlanc said. ‘Homeroom
mom’, Sarah Kirkby, suggested
that the school speak to the Min-
istry of Tourism and Grand
Bahama Airport Company to
ask them about displaying the
children’s work at the airport.

From there the project took
on a life of its own as Sherry
Rodgers Brookes, corporate
affairs manager of the Grand
Bahama Airport Company, and
Kendra Swain, an executive at
the Grand Bahama Tourism
Board, joined the team to make
the concept happen.

“Ms LeBlanc and Ms Kirkby
invited me into the school to
have a meeting to discuss their

ideas. I met the children and
talked to them about the impor-
tance of tourism in all our lives,”
said Ms Swain.

“During our discussions I
thought how appropriate it
would be to have these chil-
dren’s original designs up and
ready for our visiting delegates.”

Once permission had been
granted to display the children’s
work, Ms LeBlanc worked with
the students and parents to cre-
ate their own posters.

“IT wanted the kids to lead this
project, they decided on a sub-
ject for their poster and they




















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9.45 a.m.

WEDNESDAY at 7:30 p.m.

Selective Bible Teaching
Royal Rangers (Boys Club) 4-16 yrs.
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Erik J Russell/ KeeniMedia Photo

LUCAYA International School year two students show acting director
of LIS Nigel Kirkby the posters they designed for their inquiry unit on
tourism. The idea of displaying the children's work at the airport
came from Ms Ina LeBlanc, the students’ teacher.

worked with their parents for
their homework creating their
own posters to be displayed’”
said Ms LeBlanc. “And I want to
stress we were very firm that it
had to be child-led and created
too.”

As an added bonus the year
two students also spent an after-
noon at Billy Joe’s beach at Our
Lucaya taking class pictures and
individual ‘tourist’ pictures with
another year two parent Dave
Mackey.

Once the work was finished it
was then agreed that the posters
would be displayed at the
Tourism Welcome Centre in the
International Terminal.

To make it extra special for
the students, Senator Kay Smith
of the Prime Minister’s Office

and Terrance Roberts, director ;
of Business Development at the }
Tourism Ministry were invited ;

to judge the posters.

Last Friday, the project all

came together and the students,

Ms LeBlanc and LIS acting
director Nigel Kirkby went on }
a field trip to the airport to dis- }

play the work.
While they put up their work,

Senator Smith and Mr Roberts
viewed all the displays and chose }
Arabella Ferguson’s poster as }

the best one.
“All the work was impressive,

the students did not miss an }
activity, but for us Ms Fergu- }
son’s exuberance in her poster }
and the big Grand Bahama she }

created, really stood out,” said }
Senator Smith.
Mr Roberts added, “our :

beaches are our number one i T h ] ill
sand castle and day at the beach ec no OSy Wl Open
represents what our tourists long : ld f °

come her world of opporunity,

e work displayed showcas- }
es everything you can do on } ld
“hinekinacwine StUGents are to

scuba diving, shopping, horse- }
back riding, fishing, riding a jet- ;

resource, and Arabella’s fun

to come here for.”

Grand Bahama Island including

ski and more.

“T am so proud of my students
work,” said Ms LeBlanc, “
honest, creative and fun and

for the Bahamas.”

BAPTIST BIBLE CHURCH
SOLDIER ROAD & OLD TRAIL

Surctisy & Eesha:
Preaching
Redia Biole Hour:

oo

Sundey Bp - 2hS 2

1am

Weel. Prayer & Praise 3st

FUNDAMENTAL || __
Pam & 7:20pe EVANGELISTIC

Pascoe H. fills

“Preaching the Bible as is, to men as they ener
| Pazcor: H. Mils # Prone: 38340593 ® Sox h-Sb22

CENTRAL GOSPEL CHAPEL
CHRISTIE & DOWDESWELL STREETS ° Tel: 325-2921
SUNDAY, MAY 17TH, 2009

11:30 a.m. Speaker:
ELDER BRENTFORD ISAACS

Bible Class: 9:45 a.m. ¢ Breaking of Bread Service: 10:45 a.m.
¢ Community Outreach: 11:30 a.m. ¢ Evening Service: 7:00 p.m.
¢ Midweek Service 7:30 p.m. (Wednesdays)
¢ Sisters’ Prayer Meeting: 10:00 a.m. (2nd Thursday of each month)

Grace and Peace Wesleyan Church
A Society of The Free Methodist Church of
North America

WHERE GOD IS ADORED AND EVERYONE IS AFFIRMED

Y

Worship Time: Lla.m.

Prayer Time: 10:15a.m.

Church School during Worship Service

Place: Twynam Heights
off Prince Charles Drive

Minister: Rev. Henley Perry

P.O. Box SS-5631
Telephone number: 324-2538
Telefax number: 324-2587

COME TO WORSHIP, LEAVE TO SERVE

reneurs take their places

to provide you with all that you
need to start and run a busi-
ness successfully,” he said.

BAIC's executive chairman
Edison Key encouraged grad-
uates to take advantage of mul-
ti-million-dollar opportunities
in agriculture and souvenir pro-
duction.

He said BAIC can facilitate
that by allowing them to use of
tens of thousands of acres of
land BAIC owns and controls
in North Andros, Abaco and
Eleuthera.

College vice-president Dr
Chipman-Johnson underscored
the importance of being cre-
ative and versatile in the
approach to employment.

"Your presence at this semi-
nar is evidence that you are
prepared to meet the challenge
of helping to stimulate our
economy by engaging in some
kind of business activity,” said
Dr Chipman-Johnson. "We
need to increase the number
of citizens who are willing to
create employment."

and error. We provide training
opportunities and a myriad of
other services that are geared



Derek Smith/BIS Photo

DORIS Johnson senior Reubendero Gibson and principal Linda
Major present gifts of appreciation to Tourism Minister Vincent

i Vanderpool-Wallace.

MINISTER of Tourism and Aviation Vincent Vanderpool-

: Wallace encouraged seniors of Doris Johnson High School to
its i

develop career skills and market them worldwide, taking full

and } advantage of technology and the elements of globalisation.
they have had such a great time }
ees abou! eee eee i their Seniors Retreat at British Colonial Hilton, just weeks

ate Tope now Is tna’ “US | before they leave the haven of high school and begin careers.
concept can grow or expand to }

other schools and students. }

Tourism is everyone’s job and | Bahamas,” he said. “Your skill sets can be applied anywhere

if we can teach our children this ; 1 the world, and that’s something we are trying to get the peo-
early it can only enhance what ; ple at the Ministry of Tourism to understand very clearly.”
ambassadors they will become
? customers who can only be served while in the Bahamas. He

’ said technology should be used to engage non-Bahamians at all

Minister Vanderpool-Wallace addressed the students at

“Your skill sets do not have to reside only within the

Mr Vanderpool-Wallace said visitors should not be seen as

times, before and after they visit the country.

Almost every vocation has a tourism sector link, the minister
said. He urged future architects to design hotels that take
advantage of the natural environment and minimise energy
costs. He challenged future software designers to create a
programme that would allow yachtsmen to book specific mari-
na slips in advance of travel.

“And how about selling that software once you are finished
to anybody in the world, not just to me,” he said. “There is an
opportunity for you to do those kinds of things, and that is part
of tourism too.”

Minister Vanderpool-Wallace told the students that their
skills and talents will only be developed through hard work and
constant practice.

Grant’s Town Wesley Methodist

(Baillou Hill Rd & Chapel Street) RO.Box CB-13046

The Holy Ghost Prayer-Line number is 326-7427
(www.gtwesley.org)

SUNDAY, MAY 17TH, 2009
7:00 a.m. Rev. Mark Carey/Bro. Franklyn Bethel

11:00 a.m. Rev. Carla Culmer/Lay Preachers
7:00 a.m. Bro.Sidney Pinder/Men’s Fellowship

Theme: “ But As For Me And My Household, We Will Serve the Lord”

=m LIGHT AND LIFE COMMUNITY CHURCH

ces Grounded In The Past &
B.. Geared To The Future

Worship time: Llam & 7pm
Sunday School: 9:45am
Prayer time: 6:30pm
Place:

The Madeira
Shopping Center

Rev. Dr. Franklin Knowles

ALL ARE WELCOME TO ATTEND

Pastor: Rev. Dr Franklin Knowles

P.O.Box EE-16807
Telephone number 325-5712
EMAIL - lynnk@ batelnet.bs



THE TRIBUNE

SATURDAY, MAY 16, 2009, PAGE 7



LOCAL NEWS



Conference closes

FREEPORT - The fifth
Commonwealth Local Gov-
ernment Forum (CLGF)
closed on Thursday with a
farewell celebration at Port
Lucaya Marketplace for the
600 delegates from 46 Com-
monwealth nations.

A junkanoo rush-out was
held at the Count Basie
Square at 7.30pm to mark the
end of the three-day confer-
ence at the Westin Resort in
Lucaya.

Prime Minister Hubert
Ingraham and Jamaican
Prime Minister Bruce Gold-
ing attended the conference
and delivered remarks.

Patrick Manning, Prime
Minister for Trinidad and
Tobago, was unable to attend,
but a brief recorded audio
message was delivered at the
conference.

This is the first time that
the conference was held in the
Caribbean.



Families fear the
worst for migrants
on capsized boat

FROM page one

“When I saw the news and
saw all of those people, my
heart sank. I didn’t know,”
Desir said. “He told me only
five people were going (on the
boat).”

Mrs Desir said the boat cap-
tain promised her the vessel was
a “big boat, not a wooden ves-
sel.”

The mother said she agreed
to pay for the trip for her
daughters out of a sense of
hopelessness about their lives
in Haiti.

“They could not go to school.
I could not help them. They
said, ‘Mummy, see if you can
do something for us’,” Mrs
Desir said.

Another relative who spoke
with the Florida newspaper,
Ermanie Lubin, 47, said she was
desperately hoping her 28-year-
old nephew was not on the boat

after seeing the television news
on Wednesday.

He had been deported from
Florida to Haiti in 2007 after
being denied political asylum.
Married with a four-year old
son, he left his family behind.

“The last time I spoke to
him, he said, ‘Auntie, I can't
take it anymore. I just want to
die,’”’ said his aunt.

Her nephew had been Iving
in Port-de-Paix, a city in north-
west Haiti that was hit by three
consecutive hurricanes last sum-
mer.

After travelling to The
Bahamas several months ago to
escape the situation, his wife
received a call on Monday that
saw him tell her he was on a
small island and could not real-
ly talk.

He had also called an aunt,
telling her that he planned to
take a boat to the United States.
She warned him against mak-
ing the voyage.

Solomon’s Mines staff
reveal their frustration

FROM page one

of April 15 to May 15, suggest-
ed that employers at least pay a
portion of what is due so she
can put a dent in the mounting
bills.

"It's very frustrating because
you have a lot of people that
are single parents and everyone
has some form of commitment
whether it's mortgage or car
payments. There are persons
who are not working in the
tourism sector that are not feel-
ing the effects of the downturn
and landlords can say ‘Well if
someone else can pay why can't
you? of

While stating that the current
claims are "not true” company
head Mark Finlayson said while
in the past staff have sometimes
been paid late they are eventu-
ally paid.

"T have said (before) that the
company is definitely going
through difficult times. We are
not the only ones in the luxury
goods area who are going
through tough times. We are
not the only ones who are pay-
ing people sometimes later than
they should.

"Everybody has always been
paid (eventually) and I think in
economic times like these, it is

very important to have a job
and to get paid. I myself am the
last person to get paid in this
company,” he said.

Bearing in mind the harsh
economic realities hitting the
chain — evident in recent store
closures — executives met with
staff last September and asked if
they would prefer downsizing
or weather the economic storm.

Mr Finlayson said the group
chose the latter option.

Since 2006 the company has
cut staff by a third fluctuating
between 240 to 250 employees
at 18 locations.

He added that he has made
the decision to keep employees
on staff instead of further down-
sizing, who are paid "as cash
flow allows."

Yesterday Minister of Labour
Dion Foulkes said as far as he
was aware no such complaints
have been lodged at the depart-
ment of labour but said if one
were the agency would investi-
gate the claims.

He said if found guilty of such
an offence, the matter could be
pursued in the courts and would
be subject to a fine.

Earlier this year, fed up staff
from Solomon's Mines com-
plained that they had been paid
late on numerous occasions.

ROYAL FIDELITY

‘stonew at work

EE LETED = TRAD

Tourist recovers
from shark attack

A 48-year-old man is recovering at Jack-
son Memorial Hospital in Miami after fam-
ily members said he was attacked by a shark

while fishing in the Bahamas.

The shark reportedly bit the man under

his elbow.

According to the Sun Sentinel, Luis Her-

nandez of Deerfield Beach was spear fish-
ing off Exuma on May 6 when he noticed a
seven-foot bull shark swimming nearby.
The attack apparently took place after
Mr Hernandez speared a grouper.
He was brought to a clinic in the Exumas
for initial treatment, then flown to Nassau

and finally, on May 8, to Jackson Memori-
al, where hospital officials confirmed he
has been for the last week.

"At the beginning, doctors were con-
cerned that he might lose his right arm,” the
victim’s daughter, Fabiola Hernandez, told
the Sun Sentinel.

Britain rocked by MPs’ expenses scandal

By PAISLEY DODDS
Associated Press Writer

LONDON (AP) — Britain
has seen its share of sex and
sleaze scandals over the years,
but few have tarnished all three
of the country’s main political
parties in a single stroke.

Leaked lawmaker expenses
for chandeliers, pornography,
moat upkeep on country estates
and other claims have enraged
voters — many of whom have
lost jobs and homes during
Britain’s deepening recession.

Talk show lines buzzed Fri-
day with irate callers. Web sites
flashed reader comments com-
paring politicians to greedy
bankers. And commuters
clenched newspapers with such
headlines as: “Parliament’s
Darkest Day” and “House of
Ill Repute.” Many politicians
were being heckled during
events that had been scheduled
long before the leak.

“Tt’s not just one or two rot-
ten apples, it’s the whole lot,”
said Randy Wallace, 41, an
unemployed London electri-
cian. “Our Parliament used to
be the envy of the world. Now,
it’s a laughing stock.”

Thousands of pages of
expense claims were leaked to
the Daily Telegraph more than
a week ago. Although around
80 of the 646 House of Com-
mons lawmakers have been
named so far, the newspaper
says it will continue to roll out
details as it plows through the
rest of the documents. The
Labour Party, Conservatives
and Liberal Democrats have all
been damaged by the data.

A poll released Friday

showed that 65 percent of the
population want early elections
because of the expense scandal,
while 64 percent want some
lawmakers to resign. Commis-
sioned by the BBC, the Lon-
don-based polling company
ComRes conducted the tele-
phone poll of 1,011 voters
Wednesday and Thursday.
There was a margin of error of
3 percentage points.

Labour lawmaker Shahid
Malik stepped down as justice
minister early Friday after data
showed that he claimed more
than 65,000 pounds ($98,000) in
housing costs over three years
despite having discounted rent.

Brown’s aide on climate
change, Elliot Morley, was also
suspended after he billed tax-
payers’ 16,000 pounds ($24,000)
for mortgage interest payments
on a loan that had already been
paid off. Morley says he’s now
paid the money back.

The latest revelation came
late Friday with another Labour
lawmaker claiming thousands
of pounds (dollars) of taxpayer
money for interest on a non-
existent mortgage. David Chay-
tor said he would pay back
13,000 pounds ($18,000) after
continuing to submit bills on his
paid mortgage.

“In respect of mortgage inter-
est payments, there has been an
unforgivable error in my
accounting procedures for
which I apologize unreserved-
ly,” Chaytor said. “I will act
immediately to ensure repay-
ment.”

For the Conservatives, law-
maker Andrew Mackay quit his
post as an aide to party leader
David Cameron after he said

Ex-DPM’s fears

for the Bahamas

FROM page one



good his escape with an undetermined amount of cash.

As the former Minister of National Security, Mrs Pratt said she
had an opportunity to speak with the police when they arrived at the
scene. One of the officers, she said, credited her presence at the
bank as the reason why the robbery did not turn out as gruesome

as it possibly could have.

“This country gone,” Mrs Pratt said, “God knows it. You could
see the jitteriness in those tellers and now I know why. Nobody
escapes this. No one is free from this. You are no different from
anyone else but yet we get so busy playing politics.”

Sending a sharp message to those in authority, Mrs Pratt said that
the country has to work on the children in the primary schools now
as those harden criminals on the streets today are almost beyond

reach.

“If we don’t work on those primary school children now, you
can’t imagine what we will reap in 10 years. We have to focus on
those young ones down there because these harden criminals the
only thing that can save them is death,” she said.

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he’d been guilty of errors over
his expenses claims. The party
published expense claims by
senior members online Friday
under new transparency rules
imposed by Cameron.

Police and prosecutors were
meeting to decide what, if any,
action should be taken against
lawmakers who misused parlia-
mentary expenses. No charges
had been filed.

“As our concern about what’s
been claimed has grown, our
horror of how (lawmakers) are
trying to slip out of this sticky
situation has grown,” said Mark
Wallace, spokesman for the
Taxpayers’ Alliance, which set
up a fund to pay for any public
prosecutions that could come
from the scandal.

Prime Minister Gordon
Brown’s Labour-led govern-
ment has steadily lost parlia-
mentary seats since it led calls
for Britain to join the war in
Traq. Most expect the Conserv-
ative Party will win the next
general election, which has to
be called by mid-2010 and
would end more than a decade
of Labour Party rule if predic-
tions hold.

Built on a political system
that historically favored land
owners, Britain lacks a system
of proportional representation
so it is unlikely that smaller par-
ties would make significant
gains in the next election.

Low voter turnout is more
likely, said Steven Fielding of
the Center for British Politics
at Nottingham University.

“It will probably further
depress the Labour vote and it
will give the Conservatives
some gains, but the thing is that
everyone has been tarred by
this information,” Fielding said.

“There has also been this tra-
ditional historical myth that we
have the mother of all Parlia-
ments ... few have stepped up
to say that our political system is
flawed because one party or the



other has benefited from it over
the years.”

Lawmakers scheduled meet-
ings with voters over the week-
end to address anger and an
immediate threat — that small-
er far-right parties could make
significant gains in the June 4
elections for seats in the Euro-
pean parliament. Parties such
as the UK Independence Party
and the British National Party
have long campaigned against
Britain’s entrenched political
system and its traditional par-
ties.

Dozens of lawmakers have
apologized and pledged to
return more than 125,000
pounds ($190,000).

Other scandals have rocked
Britain’s politician system in
recent history — British Cabi-
net minister John Profumo’s
liaison with a prostitute almost
brought down the government
after it was revealed the woman
was also linked to a Soviet spy
— but few have shaken all main
political parties.

Expense rules are laid out in
the 66-page Green Book — a
guide sent to every legislator.
It sets limits on expense claims,
such as a 25 pound ($38) cap
on eating out when away from
home and how much can be
claimed toward a second home,
usually a residence in London.

Though the guidelines don’t
ban any specific items, the rules
say expenses should relate to
parliamentary work and should-
n’t damage the Parliament’s
reputation.

The leaked data was due to
have been made public in July
after Britain’s High Court
quashed a legal attempt by the
House of Commons to keep the
details secret. Some of the data
in that disclosure, however, was
to be redacted.

“We need our own Barack
Obama,” said Francis O’Hara,
24, a student. “This country
needs a change.”

Parents concerned
for children’s safety

FROM page one

deal with it. If they’re not dealing with the problem it doesn’t
make sense for him to stay, if the school is not defending him.”

Mrs Ingraham has not yet spoken to the newspaper about alle-
gations of violence at CC Sweeting Senior High School which
have been published in The Tribune over last two weeks.

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THE TRIBUNE

S]





SATURDAY, MAY 16,



UE SeT Tm sxe) im (Vea)

Bolt in
BMW
crash

MANCHESTER, England
(AP) — Usain Bolt says his
outlook on life has changed
following a car crash in
Jamaica.

The triple Olympic gold
medallist crashed his BMW
into a ditch along a highway
last month. He required
minor surgery on his left foot
after stepping onto thorns
while getting out of the
wreckage.

With the stitches removed,
Bolt returns to action Sunday
in a 150-meter street race in
Manchester.

Bolt said Friday: "After
something like that you look
at life through and over, and
look at what has gone wrong
— where you should improve
or should be careful.”

Bolt set world records in
the 100 and 200 meters and
sprint relay in Beijing.

Michael Phelps (AP)



Phelps
cruises to
two finals
In return

to pool

m@ By PAUL NEWBERRY
AP National Writer

CHARLOTTE, N.C. (AP) —
Michael Phelps is back.

The Olympic champion easily
qualified for the finals of two
events Friday morning at the
Charlotte Ultraswim, his first
meet since winning eight gold
medals in Beijing.

Phelps touched second in the
last heat of the 200-meter
freestyle at 1 minute, 50.46 sec-
onds, and came back about an
hour later to win the final heat
of the 100 butterfly in 53.41. In
both events, he had the third-
fastest time overall, advancing to
the evening "A" finals.

This is the first meet for which
Phelps was eligible since com-
pleting a three-month suspension.
He was disciplined by USA
Swimming after he was pho-
tographed using a marijuana pipe.

2009








Rughy Sevens tourney
to feature US, UK teams

lm By RENALDO DORSETT
Sports Reporter
rdorsett@tribunemedia.net

s the profile of

local rugby
continues to
grow, the

sport’s govern-
ing body in the Bahamas looks
to increase its stature regional-
ly by hosting teams from around
the world.

The Bahamas Rugby Foot-
ball Union (BRFU) is sched-
uled to host the US and
Bahamas Rugby Sevens Tour-
nament llam to 7pm May 23
at the Winton Rugby Pitch.

The tournament, sponsored
by SG Private Bank, is expected
to feature 12 teams — six from
the US, one from England, four
from New Providence and one
from Grand Bahama — who will
battle for the cash prize of
$1,000 for the winner.

Elystan Miles, director of the
BRFU, said the union has plans
to make this tournament the
most prestigious Sevens tour-
nament in the Caribbean.

“We have been trying to
make it the biggest Caribbean
Rugby tournament in the area,
right now we are about second
or third. We are basically try-
ing to get ourselves recognised
regionally for our clubs as well
as for the national team,” he
said.

“The Cayman Islands had the
biggest tournament a few years
ago, but they lost their spon-
sorship so that collapse left a
gap and everyone wants to
come to the Caribbean so we
saw it as an opportunity to fill
that void. We could not afford
to do what we do without great
sponsorship...SG has been with
us since this tournament’s
inception and now recently



THE RUGBY tournament is expected to feature 12 teams, including six from

the US and one from England...

Sand’s has come onboard.
“Trinidad still has the biggest
tournament in the region every
December. This is just our third
year and we are ahead of the
schedule so in five years we are
looking to have the best and

(AP Photo)

most competitive tournament
in the region.”

The Bahamas has hosted the
North American and West
Indies Rugby Association tour-
nament for the past two years
which has generated a great

interest in the game locally and
has increased the Bahamas’
profile internationally as a
prime rugby venue.

“Sevens Rugby which is a
faster, quicker version of the
game and the idea behind this
was to get teams to come down
for the weekend as somewhat
of a trial run and eventually
have their full teams, Fifteens,
to come town during the winter
for a longer stay. We are trying
to make Bahamas Rugby
appealing for foreign teams,”
Miles said.

“Rugby has been a pretty qui-
et sport over the years but we
have been building a profile.
These types of things are gen-
erally better internationally
because the foreign teams bring
their press coverage and it
spreads the word and lets peo-
ple know the Bahamas is a great
venue for rugby.”

Miles said the hosting of
international tournaments is just
one of the BRFU’s initiatives
which has increased the expo-
sure of the game locally over
the past few years.

“The biggest push has always
been with the youth. Now we
have coaches in most of the
government senior high schools
and a few of the private ones.
The other big thing for us is the
Defence Force. They have been
working for the past few months
and they are going to field a
team for this tournament, which
is huge.

“If the Defence Force starts
taking the game seriously then
automatically you have a large
pool of players to choose from,”
he said.

“We are actually quite strong
now locally with a few hundred
active players now whereas four
or five years ago we had less
than one hundred.”

Rockets force
Gm 7 with 95-
80 win over

the Lakers...
See page 10



Under 19
cricket team
getting ready
for Toronto
tournament

lm By RENALDO DORSETT
Sports Reporter
rdorsett@trib unemedia.net

THE Bahamas’ under-19
cricket team has been in train-
ing under coach Mohamed
Allie for the past several
months in preparation for the
International Cricket Council’s
Under 19 Cricket Tournament,
set for July in Toronto, Canada.

It will be the team’s second
visit to the tournament, which
includes teams from the
Caribbean and the Americas.

The team participated in the
2007 tournament in Toronto,
losing very close matches to the
Cayman Islands and Argenti-
na.
The team was judged to be
the most improved team in the
tournament and was the recipi-
ent of a trophy for that award.

The team also received com-
mendations for exemplary con-
duct, good sportsmanship and
discipline.

Some of the players from that
team who were just 15 years old
at the time are returning, mak-
ing this an older and more expe-
rienced squad.

To support the team’s
expenses, the local cricket com-
munity is set to host a fundrais-
ing steak-out on May 30 at
Windsor Park where the team
hosts most of its training ses-
sions.

On Whit Monday the under-
19 team is scheduled to play a
match against a selected team of
British ex-pats at Haynes Oval
in preparation for the tourna-
ment.

The match is being billed as
England vs. the Bahamas Youth
Team and is being played as a
memorial to the late Hywel
Jones, who supported the game
here in the Bahamas as a fan
and sponsor.

Federer, Nadal and Djokovic reach semis

@ By PAUL LOGOTHETIS
AP Sports Writer

MADRID (AP) — Roger Fed-
erer's dominance of Andy Rod-
dick continued on clay by 7-5, 6-7
(5), 6-1, while Rafael Nadal
stayed perfect against Fernando
Verdasco with a 6-4, 7-5 victory to
also reach the Madrid Open semi-
finals on Friday.

Federer improved to 18-2
against Roddick after their first
career meeting on dirt.

"His game translates well to
most anything,” said the sixth-
seeded Roddick.

Nadal's 32nd straight clay win
improved him to 9-0 against Ver-
dasco, with three of those victo-
ries coming this year.

Nadal will play Novak
Djokovic, another regular foe,
after the third-seeded Serb dis-
patched wild card Ivan Ljubicic 6-
4, 6-4.

"The more matches that I play
against him, the more chances I
have to prove something more to
myself and to everybody else,”
said Djokovic, who has lost to
Nadal three times this year. "I
know that just a couple of points
here or there will decide the win-
ner."



ROGER FEDERER returns a shot yesterday during his quarterfinals match against Andy Roddick at Madrid Open...
(AP Photo: Andres Kudacki)

Top-ranked Dinara Safina
advanced to the women's semifi-
nals with a 6-4, 6-3 win over
Ukrainian Alona Bondarenko,
and will play Switzerland's Patty
Schnyder, who beat fourth-seed-
ed Jelena Jankovic 7-6 (6), 6-3.

Amelie Mauresmo will face
Denmark's Caroline Wozniacki
in the other semi.

Federer, who won here in 2006
when the tournament was played
indoors on a hard court, broke
Roddick for the second time in
the 11th game before serving out
the first set.

Roddick saved three break
points in the ninth game of the
second set to hold on for a
tiebreaker, where the American

rallied from 3-0 down to even the
match.

Federer stopped Roddick's
momentum with an early break in
the third set and used his serve
to hold on for the win.

"It was a close match. I
bounced back well in the third
(set)," said Federer, who had 15
aces. "I feel I have decent con-

trol over the ball this week."

Fourth-seeded Andy Murray
was playing No. 5 Juan Martin
del Potro later to decide Federer's
next opponent.

After taking the first set, Nadal
fell behind 4-0 before rallying to
4-4 with the help of Verdasco's
seven double-faults.

Nadal smacked a cross-court
winner to hold his serve after a
back-and-forth 11th game and,
after breaking Verdasco for the
fourth time, improved to 149-4
on clay since 2005.

Safina overcame a letdown
after a blazing start against 46th-
ranked Bondarenko and took the
opening set with a break in the
10th game.

"T had a bad call from the
umpire and I lost a little bit of
concentration," Safina said of
blowing a 3-0 lead. "But I found
my game and I'm playing every
match better and better."

Schnyder's high balls troubled
Jankovic. The fourth-ranked Serb
committed 35 unforced errors
while Schnyder hit 29 winners.

Mauresmo rallied for a 5-7, 6-1,
6-1 win over Agnes Szavay of
Hungary, while the ninth-seeded
Wozniacki beat Russian qualifier
Vera Dushevina 6-0, 6-4.

Man U hoping to win record-equaling title

@ By ROB HARRIS
AP Sports Writer

MANCHESTER, England (AP) —
While Manchester United only needs a
point Saturday to match Liverpool's
record haul of 18 English league titles,
Arsenal has a point to prove in the next
to last round of the Premier League sea-
son.

The Gunners haven't won the league
for five years and will add to an already
disappointing season if they hand the
title to Man United at Old Trafford.

United manager Alex Ferguson is
wary of Arsenal crashing the party at
home and leaving United to earn that
point on the road next weekend against

a Hull side battling relegation. That
match is just three days before the
Champions League final against
Barcelona.

"What we want to try and do is win
the league tomorrow, the European Cup
final is 10 days away after tomorrow,"
Ferguson said on Friday. "We've got to
concentrate on winning the league and,
by doing that, we have to achieve that
the best way. ...

"A point is always a dangerous game
to play, thinking that a draw is enough.
We have to go for a win.”

United defender Rio Ferdinand is urg-
ing his teammates not to be complacent
despite overwhelming Arsenal in the
Champions League semifinals with a 4-

1 aggregate win.

"Our performances in both legs of the
semifinal were two of the best of the
season,” said the England center back,
who will be sidelined Saturday with calf
problems. "But it can sometimes be a
dangerous situation when you beat a
team fairly convincingly and play them
again soon after, because they'll proba-
bly feel they have something to prove."

While Arsenal was once United's
main title adversary, Liverpool is now
the greater threat after pushing them
hard all season.

Ferguson can win an 11th Premier
League title on Saturday. But before
1993, when he delivered United's first
league title for 26 years, the head-to-

head record with Liverpool stood at 18-
7 and the Scot never envisaged such a
reversal of dominance.

"My intention was to win the first one
and try and break the stranglehold Liv-
erpool had on the title at that time,” said
Ferguson, who took charge in 1986.
"You don't think about that opening the
door for you, but that was the big chal-
lenge to win it once."

Trailing United by six points in the
title race, Liverpool's slim hopes rest on
United losing to Arsenal and Hull and it
beating West Bromwich Albion and Tot-
tenham to edge the Red Devils on goal
difference.

"What ever happens, I am really
pleased that we are in this position at

at home

the end of the season,” Liverpool man-
ager Rafa Benitez said. "But I am cer-
tainly not giving up on the title, we must
always be positive.”

For Arsenal, the mission is about
building for the future. Arsene Wenger's
team can only finish fourth in the stand-
ings, forcing the Gunners to play a qual-
ifying match early next season to get
into the group stage of the Champions
League.

"Arsenal will want to do well because
they've been under a bit of criticism
recently ... (and) register their abilities on
a day when everyone expects United to
win the title," Ferguson said. "They are
a good side with great potential in the
team and you can't dismiss it.”



PAGE 10B, SATURDAY, MAY 16, 2009

TRIBUNE SPORTS



SPORTS



Voy keyZ(29y

@ By The Associated
Press

SCOREBOARD

Saturday, May 16

No games scheduled. There
are two Game 7s on Sunday,
with Houston visiting the Los
Angeles Lakers, and Boston
hosting Orlando.

STARS

Wednesday

—Dwight Howard, Magic,
had 23 points and 22 rebounds
to lead Orlando to an 83-75
victory over Boston in Game
6.

—Aaron Brooks and Luis
Scola, Rockets. Brooks scored
26 points and Scola had 24
points and 12 rebounds as
Houston forced a Game 7 in
Los Angeles on Sunday with a
95-80 victory over the Lakers.

GO THE DISTANCE

For the second straight year,
the Boston Celtics have gone
the distance in two series in
the playoffs. After surviving
their first-round thriller against
Chicago, Boston lost Game 6
in Orlando on Thursday. Last
season, the Celtics won the
decisive games against Atlanta
and Cleveland on the way to
their NBA-best 17th champi-
onship.

STRONG IN DEFEAT

Rajon Rondo had 19 points,
16 rebounds and six assists in
Boston's 83-75 loss to Orlando
in Game 6. Kobe Bryant
scored 32 points, but the Lak-
ers were forced to a Game 7
with a 95-80 defeat in Hous-
ton.

LET'S GO TO THE

VIDEO TAPE?

NBA commissioner David
Stern wants to see an expan-
sion of the use of instant
replay and is disappointed that
the league's competition com-
mittee hasn't been "bolder"
in that regard. Speaking in
Houston before the Rockets
hosted the Lakers, Stern said
he could envision a system
where challenges are used at
the end of games, though he
offered no specifics, adding
that he expected the idea to
get voted down.

BOSTON'S BLUES

Thursday was a tough night
for Boston, which saw its
teams go 0-3. The Celtics lost
83-75 in Orlando in Game 6
of their series, while the Bru-
ins were eliminated from the
NHL playoffs with a 3-2 loss
to Carolina and the Red Sox
were beaten 5-4 by the Los
Angeles Angels. The Celtics
were the only ones to lose in
regular time; the Bruins’ loss
went to overtime and the Red
Sox fell in 12 innings. Bean-
town teams had gone 3-0 on
Sunday and Tuesday.

SPEAKING

"For the last two days, all
I've heard is that we weren't
going back to L.A. Our guys in
the locker room didn't believe
that."

— Houston coach Rick
Adelman after the Rockets
forced Game 7 against the
Lakers with a 95-80 victory

"T guess Dwight Howard
was right. My gosh. He was
unbelievable."

— Celtics coach Doc Rivers
on the Magic center, who had
23 points and 22 rebounds in
an 83-75 Game 6 victory after
demanding he be given the ball
more

m By CHRIS DUNCAN
AP Sports Writer

HOUSTON (AP) — Kobe Bryant relishes
Game 7s, but this is one he probably didn't
expect to be playing.

Aaron Brooks scored 26 points, Luis Scola
added 24 points and 12 rebounds, and the scrap-
py, undermanned Houston Rockets pushed the
Los Angeles Lakers to the limit in their Western
Conference semifinal series with a 95-80 win in
Game 6 on Thursday night.

Reserve Carl Landry scored 15 as the Rockets
built another huge lead in the first half, then
fought off a Lakers rally to force a winner-take-
all showdown on Sunday at the Staples Center.

Bryant scored 32 points for Los Angeles,
which lost for only the third time in the last 18
games when it had a chance to close out a series.

"T knew it was going to be a dogfight,” Bryant
said. "So here it is. Game 7, there's nothing else
to do but go out and compete. This is what we do
so it should be fun.”

Houston has managed to win two of the last
three games in the series since Yao Ming went
out with a broken left foot. And after losing by
40 points in Game 5, even fans calling into sports
radio talk shows in Houston on Thursday were
ready to write off their team.

Rockets force Gm 7
with 95-80 win
over the Lakers

RON ARTEST drives to the
basket past Kobe Bryant
during second half of Game
6 in Houston...

(AP Photo: Pat Sullivan)

"For the last two days, all I've heard is that we
weren't going back to L.A.," said Houston coach
Rick Adelman. "Our guys in the locker room
didn't believe that."

Sunday's winner will play the Denver Nuggets,
who get an extended rest after finishing off Dal-
las on Wednesday night.

"T think it's fun," Brooks said. "We enjoy it.
We got them on their heels a little bit. The pres-
sure's on them.”

The Rockets put together a near carbon copy
of the first half of Game 4, when they seemed to
hit every open shot and smothered the Lakers on
defense.

Los Angeles opened the second half with a 16-
2 spurt to cut the deficit to two, but Landry con-
verted a three-point play to break the Lakers'
momentum.

The Rockets hit their last eight shots in the
third quarter and took a 75-65 lead into the
fourth.

"I've stopped trying to figure this team out,"
Battier said.

"Just when you think we're down and out,
this team comes with an unbelievable effort.
We may not have the most talented team, but
there's not a team with more heart in this entire
league. We've shown it again and again and
again."





x

DWIGHT HOWARD and Kendrick Perkins try to get position under the basket
for a rebound during the first half of a second-round playoff game in Orlando,

Florida...

(AP Photo: Phelan M Ebenhack)

Defending champs
face Magic in yet
another Game 7

@ By ANTONIO GONZALEZ
Associated Press Writer

ORLANDO, Fla. (AP) — The
Boston Celtics are headed home
for a do-or-die game after failing
to wrap up a series in Game 6.

They're getting used to that
pattern.

Dwight Howard had 23 points
and 22 rebounds, and the Orlan-
do Magic overcame a poor shoot-
ing night to beat the Celtics 83-75
on Thursday and force a decisive
game in the Eastern Conference
semifinals.

The Celtics also failed to close
out Chicago in Game 6 of their
first-round series, a triple-over-
time epic, but they never were in
trouble in Game 7. Boston will
now go the distance in each of its
first two series for the second
straight year.

"We're comfortable with
Game 7s," forward Paul Pierce
said. "A lot of players in this
league have never played a Game
7 in this league, knowing that you
if you lose, you go home. We're a
confident group. But we're not
an overconfident group, because
you have to go out there and play
the game."

The Celtics are 32-0 in seven-
game series when they have held
a 3-2 lead, and they are 17-3 in
Game 7s on their home floor
heading into Sunday.

"You can't lean on a Game 7
being at home," Boston coach
Doc Rivers said. "You have to
go play. Just because you're in
Boston doesn't mean you're
going to win the game."

Magic coach Stan Van Gundy
doesn't believe in most records.
He even threw out something
familiar to Boston fans: The Red
Sox's historic comeback from a
3-0 deficit to win the AL champi-
onship series over the Yankees
in 2004.

"IT don't think it means any-
thing,” he said. "In other words, I
know it was a different sport, but
when it was Yankees-Red Sox,
nobody had ever come back from
3-0 before."

Rajon Rondo finished with 19
points, 16 rebounds and six
assists, and Pierce scored 17 for
the Celtics, who led by 10 points
in the second half before falling
apart.

The two days off before Game
7 should give an older, worn out
Boston team a chance to rest its
tired legs. It's still not enough for
Rivers.

"I would take a week off and
do it like the Super Bowl,” Rivers

joked. "That would be terrific.
But that's not going to happen.”

Boston had its chances.

The Celtics held the Magic
scoreless for more than five min-
utes to start the third quarter,
building a 10-point lead on a
jumper by Glen "Big Baby"
Davis. The Magic shot just 37 per-
cent to the Celtics’ 42 percent for
the game.

But Howard led the Magic
back, with a backspin alley-oop
from Turkoglu that highlighted a
spurt to end the third quarter.
Orlando took its first lead with
8:38 remaining in the fourth.

Pierce hit three straight
jumpers to give Boston a 73-72
lead with about four minutes to
play, but the Celtics were done
in by their 3-for-18 shooting from
3-point range and 19 turnovers.
Ray Allen missed all seven
attempts from behind the arc.

"The offense definitely strug-
gled,” Pierce said. "But we still
played enough defense to win the
game. We turned the ball over
too much."

Howard blamed Van Gundy
for not getting the ball more after
the Magic's Game 5 collapse,
when they blew a 14-point lead in
the fourth quarter. "You've got a
dominant player, let him be dom-
inant," Howard said.

He came out trying to back up
his strong words, scoring the first
eight points of the game for the
Magic, including a pair of dunks
that pumped some life into the
home crowd. He finished 9-for-
16 shooting.

Orlando's do-it-all center said
he thought little of his comments
before Game 6.

"Coach said, 'Give all you got
tonight, because we're going to
have tomorrow off,'" Howard
said, laughing. "I was thinking
about that."

Van Gundy said he didn't
change his strategy at all, and
compared Howard's comments
to an argument between himself
and his wife.

"When she gets on me for
something, my first reaction is to
blame someone else," Van
Gundy said.

"To make an excuse. To do
something else, because I don't
like being criticized. And I think
when Dwight gets into a game,
his first thing is, 'I don't want the
blame.’ This is just my guess.

"But when you step back and
look at it, I usually realize the
person who's been on me has a
point. And then it's time to step
up and do the job.”

Mets steal team-record 7 bases in win over Giants

SAN FRANCISCO (AP) — David
Wright felt the circumstances were per-
fect for adding some finesse to New
York's power game.

Wright recorded four of the Mets’
franchise-record seven stolen bases and
hit a tiebreaking RBI single in the ninth
inning in a 7-4 victory over the San Fran-
cisco Giants on Thursday night.

"We have to pick up the slack with
the guys that are in the lineup when the
everyday guys are out,” Wright said. "If
it means you have to steal a few extra
bases, play solid defense, or bearing down
and being a situational style of hitter, so
be it.”

Wright had three hits and drove in two
runs.

"Jerry (Manuel) has preached aggres-
siveness on the basepaths all year,"
Wright said of his manager. "I got a few
opportunities early. I like putting pres-
sure on the defense, and I like to keep
the pitcher on his toes to make him focus
on the baserunners."

Gary Sheffield and Carlos Beltran each
had two hits and Ramon Castro had two
RBIs for New York, which has won nine
of 11.

Sheffield, Beltran and Alex Cora also
stole a base for the Mets, who ran wild
without speedy shortstop Jose Reyes,
who sat out with a stiff right calf.

"Sometimes you're going to have to
steal bases to win games,” Beltran said.
"I'm trying to pick up the spot and David
got the big hit."

Wright tied a club mark for steals in a
game set twice by Vince Coleman and

equaled by Roger Cedeno in 1999. The
team had previously swiped six bags in
four games, the last time on Sept. 15,
2007, against Philadelphia.

"T think we've been aggressive in late
inning situations," Mets manager Jerry
Manuel said.

New York also was without reliever
J.J. Putz and first baseman Carlos Del-

RBI single in the sixth for a 5-3 lead.
Bush (2-0) struck out seven and gave
up two earned runs in seven innings.
Astros 5, Rockies 3
At Denver, Wandy Rodriguez struck
out a career-high 11 and Michael Bourn
stole home on the back end of a double
steal to lead Houston.
Bourn tied a career high with four hits

gado. Putz had a cortisone shot to alle-
viate inflammation in his right elbow,
and Delgado's ailing hip again kept him
out of the lineup.

Bobby Parnell (2-0), subbing for Putz
in the eighth inning, gave up run-scoring
hits to Jose Uribe and Edgar Renteria,
leaving the game tied at 4.

The Mets responded with three runs in
the ninth. Beltran hit a one-out double
off Brian Wilson (2-1) and stole third.
After Sheffield walked, Wright lined his
RBI single into right field.

"That was a close call at third and it
went their way," Giants manager Bruce
Bochy said. "Still, we have to do a better
job."

Dodgers 5, Phillies 3, 10 innings

At Philadelphia, Russell Martin hit a
tiebreaking double in the 10th inning and
Matt Kemp tacked on an RBI double to
lead Los Angeles.

The Dodgers, minus the suspended
Manny Ramirez, won two of three in a
rematch of last season's NLCS.

Jonathan Broxton (4-0) earned the win
despite blowing a two-run lead with two
outs in the ninth. Ramon Troncoso
pitched a scoreless 10th to earn his sec-
ond save.



DAVID WRIGHT singles off San Francisco Giants starting pitcher Jonathan Sanchez in the first

inning of a game in San Francisco...

Cubs 11, Padres 3

At Chicago, Bobby Scales hit a pair
of two-run doubles and the Cubs took
advantage of 10 walks.

Adrian Gonzalez homered for the
fourth consecutive game but couldn't
prevent San Diego from losing its 11th
straight on the road, its longest skid in 38
years.

Ryan Dempster (3-2) allowed two runs
and three hits over seven innings. He
also drove in two runs with a double and
a single as the Cubs completed their first
three-game sweep of the Padres at home
since 1999.

San Diego was outscored 42-18 dur-
ing an 0-6 road trip.

(AP Photo: Marcio Jose Sanchez)

Chad Gaudin (0-3) issued seven walks
in 4 1-3 innings for the Padres.

Brewers 5, Marlins 3

At Milwaukee, Prince Fielder hit a go-
ahead homer and Dave Bush turned in
another strong start to help the Brewers
complete a three-game sweep.

Trevor Hoffman earned his eighth save
and has yet to give up a run in nine
innings this season for Milwaukee, which
has won nine of 11.

It was the fourth straight loss for the
Marlins and a short afternoon for Josh
Johnson, who walked five in only four
innings.

Fielder connected in the fifth off Burke
Badenhop (2-2). J.J. Hardy added an

and finished with two stolen bases. Car-
los Lee homered for the Astros.

Rodriguez (4-2) allowed two earned
runs in seven innings, raising his ERA to
1.90 — still among the lowest in the
majors. Chris Sampson worked a perfect
eighth and LaTroy Hawkins got his fifth
save,

The Rockies committed three errors
behind starter Jason Hammel (0-2), who
gave up four runs — one earned — in 5
1-3 innings.

Cardinals 5, Pirates 1

At Pittsburgh, Colby Rasmus hit a
two-run homer and the Cardinals avoid-
ed a sweep against the last-place Pirates.

The Cardinals had lost five consecutive
games in Pittsburgh and were in jeop-
ardy of being swept in a three-game
series for the first time since Sept. 12-
14, also at PNC Park. Depleted by
injuries, St. Louis had lost four of five
and seven of 10.

Trever Miller (1-0) escaped a bases-
loaded jam in the fifth to earn the win.

Albert Pujols had a two-run single for
St. Louis.

Pittsburgh's Jeff Karstens (1-2) gave
up three runs and seven hits in six
innings.












THE TRIBUNE

ORLANDO




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re sem c >. thunderstorm. couple of t-storms. couple of t-storms. of t-storms. t-storms possible. t-storms possible. greater the need for eye and skin protection.
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a @ Cl _ elevation on the human body—everything that effects how warm or cold a person feels. Temperatures reflect the high and the low for the day. 1:36pm. 23 7:46pm. 06
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fh ABACO Temperature ¥ 3:25pm. 24 9:46pm. 05
x : = High: 84° F/29° C High Hanutietiadaaen Lede NaReEuaNdaecheEr ancialemEte 86" F/30° C Tuesday 352 am. 23 057am. 0.23
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Low: 74° F/23°C a Low: 74° F/23° C
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Low: 75° F/24 E Low: 71° F/22°C
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highs and tonights's lows. High: 85° F/29° C — -
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LONG ISLAND
Low: 76° F/24°C ——
Today Sunday Today Sunday Today Sunday i. r a MAYAGUANA
High Low W High Low W High Low W High Low W High Low W High Low W all High: 84° F/29° C
FIC FC FIC FC FIC FC FIC FC FC FC FIC FC me Low: 73° F/23° C
Albuquerque 78/25 54/12 t 84/28 58/14 s Indianapolis 70/21 43/6 t 65/18 41/5 s Philadelphia 76/24 58/14 t 63/17 45/7 sh
Anchorage 59/15 41/5 s 62/16 42/5 sg Jacksonville 83/28 66/18 t 83/28 62/16 t Phoenix 102/38 76/24 s 105/40 77/25 s CROOKED ISLAND / ACKLINS
Atlanta 82/27 62/16 t 66/18 49/9 t KansasCity 67/19 44/6 s 68/20 49/9 s Pittsburgh 76/24 46/7 t 61/16 38/3 po RAGGEDISLAND — Tigh:86°F/30"c
Atlantic City 74/23 50415 t 6447 40/4 sh LasVegas 100/37 71/21 s 103/39 78/25 s Portland,OR 82/27 52/11 pc 78/25 58/12 pe High: 82° F/28° C Low:77°F/25°C
Baltimore 78/25 59/15 t 64/17 44/6 sh Little Rock 78/25 54/12 t 73/22 49/9 pc Raleigh-Durham 81/27 66/18 t 72/22 48/8 t Low: 75°F/24°C en.
Boston 64/17 53/11 po 62/16 44/6 sh Los Angeles 84/28 62/16 pc 86/30 62/16 s St. Louis 68/20 48/8 t 69/20 47/8 s .
Buffalo 70/21 40/4 r 57/13 36/2 pe Louisville 76/24 49/9 t 69/20 45/7 pe Salt Lake City 77/25 53/11 s 85/29 58/14 s GREATINAGUA — acta —
Charleston,SC 84/28 68/20 t 80/26 53/11 t Memphis 78/25 56/13 t 70/21 52/11 pe San Antonio 86/30 65/18 t 80/26 59/15 t High: 86° F/30° C
Chicago 62/16 39/3 s 57/13 41/5 s Miami 84/28 73/22 t 83/28 72/22 t San Diego 76/24 61/16 p 77/25 61/16 pe Low. 78° F26°C
Cleveland 72/22 43/6 t 58/14 37/2 pe Minneapolis 56/13 35/1 pe 64/17 48/8 s San Francisco 77/25 54/12 s 78/25 55/12 s z
Dallas 76/24 56/13 t 77/25 5442 pe Nashville 78/25 53/11 t 69/20 46/7 pc Seattle 70/21 49/9 p 69/20 52/11 pe
Denver 64/17 44/6 pe 81/27 52/11 s New Orleans 84/28 69/20 t 83/28 61/16 t Tallahassee 86/30 65/18 t 85/29 59/15 t in
Detroit 68/20 41/5 t 58/14 40/4 pe New York 71/21 57/13 t 71/21 49/9 sh Tampa 88/31 71/21 t 88/31 72/22 t —_
Honolulu 85/29 71/21 s 85/29 70/21 sh Oklahoma City 69/20 51/10 t 72/22 49/9 § Tucson 100/37 66/18 s 100/37 70/21 s a
Houston 87/30 68/20 t 81/27 60/15 t Orlando 87/30 70/21 t 86/30 68/20 t Washington, DC 80/26 61/16 t 68/20 47/8 sh



Acapulco
Amsterdam
Ankara, Turkey
Athens
Auckland
Bangkok
Barbados
Barcelona
Beijing
Beirut
Belgrade
Berlin
Bermuda
Bogota
Brussels
Budapest
Buenos Aires
Cairo
Calcutta
Calgary
Cancun
Caracas
Casablanca
Copenhagen
Dublin
Frankfurt
Geneva
Halifax
Havana
Helsinki
Hong Kong
Islamabad
Istanbul
Jerusalem
Johannesburg
Kingston
Lima
London
Madrid
Manila
Mexico City
Monterrey
Montreal
Moscow
Munich
Nairobi
New Delhi
Oslo

Paris
Prague

Rio de Janeiro
Riyadh
Rome

St. Thomas
San Juan
San Salvador
Santiago
Santo Domingo
Sao Paulo
Seoul
Stockholm
Sydney
Taipei

Tokyo
Toronto
Trinidad
Vancouver
Vienna
Warsaw
Winnipeg

High
F/C
91/32
61/16
82/27
81/27
65/18
90/32
85/29
67/19
82/27
78/25
84/28
63/17
74/23
65/18
63/17
81/27
66/18
96/35
97/36
69/20
88/31
82/27
74/23
57/13
55/12
64/17
73/22
54/12
83/28
57/13
88/31
112/44
86/30
78/25
59/15
86/30
77/25
59/15
17/25
87/30
79/26
91/32
64/17
52/11
69/20
80/26
111/43
61/16
61/16
68/20
75/23
99/37
80/26
85/29
81/27
86/30
63/17
82/27
68/20
68/20
59/15
70/21
90/32
66/18
66/18
81/27
64/17
72/22
68/20
51/10

= fil

Today

Low
F/C
75/23
51/10
50/10
63/17
58/14
80/26
76/24
55/12
60/15
64/17
61/16
49/9
66/18
43/8
43/8
57/13
52/11
71/21
80/26
42/5
75/23
71/21

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pc
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sh
sh
sh

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pc
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45/7
46/7
45/7
54/12
46/7
69/20
36/2
77/25
73/22
70/21
62/16
48/8
76/24
60/15
46/7
52/11
78/25
54/12
68/20
41
39/3
50/10
64/17
85/29
41
50/10
48/8
67/19
78/25
60/15
76/24
45/7
70/21
46/7
72/22
57/13
50/10
39/3
47/8
75/23
61/16
39/3
64/17
54/12
56/13
45/7
35/1

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High
F/C
88/31
57/13
82/27
80/26
63/17
90/32
85/29
65/18
86/30
79/26
85/29
71/21
74/23
66/18
61/16
85/29
66/18
100/37
94/34
70/21
90/32
81/27
72/22
55/12
57/13
70/21
78/25
55/12
84/28
57/13
88/31
114/45
85/29
84/28
59/15
86/30
76/24
61/16
75/23
88/31
78/25
83/28
57/13
55/12
80/26
81/27
114/45
59/15
61/16
76/24
75/23
100/37
79/26
85/29
74/23
84/28
59/15
82/27
71/21
71/21
61/16
70/21
83/28
72/22
61/16
82/27
65/18
79/26
66/18
62/16

Sunday

Low
F/C
74/23
47/8
53/11
67/19
53/11
78/25
77/25
57/13
63/17
74/23
61/16
59/15
68/20
49/9
52/11
55/12
52/11
75/23
80/26
38/3
71/21
71/21
57/13
53/11
46/7
52/11
56/13
47/8
67/19
39/3
76/24
75/23
70/21
62/16
34/1
77/25
60/15
48/8
50/10
77/25
52/11
64/17
34/1
41/5
55/12
65/18
86/30
46/7
52/11
56/13
66/18
79/26
62/16
76/24
38/3
73/22
39/3
71/21
57/13
48/8
41/5
52/11
74/23
63/17
38/3
64/17
54/12
61/16
43/8
43/6




INSURANCE MANAGEMENT

(BAHAMAS) LIMITED. INSURANCE BROKERS & AGENTS

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SATURDAY, MAY 16TH, 2009 PAGE 11



MARINE FORECAST



WINDS WAVES VISIBILITY WATER TEMPS.
NASSAU Today: E at 15-25 Knots 2-4 Feet 10-20 Miles 77°F
Sunday: E at 15-25 Knots 3-5 Feet 10-20 Miles 77°F
FREEPORT Today: E at 15-25 Knots 1-3 Feet 10-20 Miles 76° F
Sunday: E at 15-25 Knots 2-4 Feet 10-20 Miles 77°F
ABACO Today: E at 15-25 Knots 1-3 Feet 10-20 Miles 76° F
Sunday: E at 15-25 Knots 2-4 Feet 10-20 Miles Tk



0) Van EN ge

Aan
(encex’y 9p)»
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56/35,

62/39

Miami
Showers 84/73
T-storms
[oad Rain
Flurries
Snow

[v=] Ice

Os |05) 10s 20s (303i) 40s

Fronts
Cold

War fiinflienille

Stationary Monge

Shown are noon positions of weather systems and
precipitation. Temperature bands are highs for the day.
Forecast high/low temperatures are for selected cities.



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PAGE 12, SATURDAY, MAY 16, 2009 THE TRIBUNE
LOCAL NEWS





by Franklyn G Ferguson, JP

thescene

NASSAU EVENTS CAPTURED ON CAMERA








Pe RGU aU
CHAPTER OF THE BAHAMAS

THE District Grand Royal Arch Chapter of the Bahamas Scot-
tish Constitution Holding of the Supreme Grand Royal Arch
Chapter of Scotland was recently dedicated and consecrated on a
visit to the Bahamas by Most Excellent Companion Charles Wol-
rige Gordon of Esslemont, First Grand Principal of the Supreme
Grand Royal Arch Freemasons of Scotland. On this occasion Most
Excellent Companion Arthur R Chase was installed as the district’s
first Grand Superintendent.

This event was significant as the Scottish Royal Arch Freemasons
in the Bahamas are now able to chart their own course under the
direct supervision of The Supreme Grand Royal Arch Chapter
of Scotland. The new Grand Superintendent and Office Bearers are
now fully responsible for administration of all Scottish Royal Arch
Chapters, Lodges, Councils and Cryptic Councils in the Bahamas.

It is to be noted that Scottish Royal Arch Freemasonry existed
in the Bahamas since 1978 with the dedication and consecration of
the Saint Michael Royal Arch Chapter No 850. The First Principal
of the Chapter was MEC James Wildgoose. The Chapter was then
attached to the District Grand Royal Arch Chapter of Jamaica and
the Bahamas. In April 2004 the chapters and councils in the
Bahamas come under the direct supervision of Most Excellent
Companion Arthur R Chase on his appointment as Grand Super-
visor for Scottish Royal Arch Freemasonry of the Bahamas, there-
by severing ties with the District Grand Royal Arch Chapter of
Jamaica. However, records of Royal Arch Freemasonry in the
Bahamas goes back to an earlier date of 1951 with the consecration
of the Royal Victoria Chapter No 443 of the English Constitution
the First Principal was Howard McKinney.

The following now constitute the new Scottish Royal Arch District
Grand Chapters of the Bahamas:

Saint Michael Royal Arch Chapter No 850
Saint Andrew Royal Arch Chapter No 877
Ivan A Hanna Royal Arch Chapter No 885
Saint Anne’s Royal Arch Chapter No 887
Saint Gregory Royal Arch Chapter No 890
Saint Michael Lodge and Council No 850
Saint Michael Cryptic Council No 850



Pictured on arrival at the Lynden Pindling Airport the First Grand Prin-
cipal of the Supreme Grand Royal Arch Chapter of Scotland MEC Charles
Wolrige Gordon of Esslemont, being met by MEC Arthur R Chase, Grand
Superintendent Designate for the District Grand Royal Chapter of the
Bahamas.

Meeting with the Governor General of the Bahamas Arthur D Hanna (cen-
re) from left to right: L Edgar Moxey, Third District Principal of the
Bahamas; Thomas Frost, Past Deputy First Principal for Scotland; Arthur
R Chase, Grand Superintendent of the Bahamas; Charles Wolrige Gordon
of Esslemont, First Grand Principal for Scotland; Grahame Smith, Grand
Scribe E; and James R Bain, Grand Superintendent of the Bahamas and
Turks and Caicos.

Meeting at the VP Lounge with Brendon C Watson, Deputy Grand
uperintendent of the Bahamas; Grahame Smith, Grand Scribe E; Thomas
Frost, Past Deputy First Grand Principal for Scotland; Charles Wolrige Gor-
don of Esslemont, First Grand Principal for Scotland; Arthur R Charles,
Grand Superintendent of the Bahamas; Michael G Lloyd, First District Grand
Standard-Bearer of the Bahamas; L Edgar Moxey, Third Grand Principal
of the Bahamas and Joseph R Curry, First District Grand Sojourner of the
Bahamas.

PAlottice Bearers of the district. Seated left to right: Brendon C Watson,

Deputy Grand Superintendent, Leroy N Thompson, Second District Grand
Principal; Arthur R Chase, Grand Superintendent; L Edgar Moxey, Third Dis-
trict Grand Principal; and Roger G Brown, Grand Scribe E. Standing left to
right: Anthony H R Richardson, District Grand Director of Ceremonies;
Mitchell A Thurston, District Grand Janitor; James A Carey, Third District
Grand Sojourner; Duncan DeBarros, Second District Grand Sojourner;
Eugene Toote Jr, District Grand Steward; L Alexander Roberts, District
Grand Scribe N; Dr Julian A Stewart, District Grand Steward; Bernard K
Bonamy, District Grand Sword-Bearer; K Peter Turnquest, District Grand
Treasurer; Justice Emmanuel E Osadebay, Second District Grand Standard-
Bearer; and Prince A Bonamy, Deputy District Grand Director of Cere-
monies.

Visiting Deputations GE Trevor Jones, Grand Superintendent of Jamaica;

wen Springer, Grand Superintendent of Barbados; Thomas Frost, Past
Deputy First Grand Principal for Scotland; Leroy N Thompson, Second Dis-
trict Grand Principal of the Bahamas; Charles Wolrige Gordon of Esslemont,
First Grand Principal for Scotland; Arthur R Chase, Grand Superintendent
of the Bahamas; L Edgar Moxey, Third District Grand Principal of the
Bahamas; James R Bain, Grand Superintendent of the Bahamas and
Turks; Keith Scott, Past Grand Superintendent of Jamaica; Brendon C Wat-
son, Deputy Grand Superintendent of the Bahamas and Grahame Smith,
Grand Scribe E.

Fy James R Bain, Grand Superintendent of the Bahamas and Turks,
greets Charles Wolrige Gordon of Esslemont, First Grand Principal of Scot-
land.

At the banquet, left to right: Roger G Brown, Grand Scribe E; Peter D
ole, Past Grand Superintendent of the District Grand Chapter of the
Bahamas and Turks; John Fuller, District Grand Officer, District Grand
Chapter of the Bahamas and Turks; James A Carey, Third District Grand
Sojourner of the Bahamas and Justice Emmanuel E Osadebay, Second Dis-
trict Grand Standard-Bearer of the Bahamas.

Feet the future: Grahame Smith, Grand Scribe E; Gustavaus S$ Fergu-
son, Mark Master Mason, St Michael Royal Arch Chapter No. 850 and
Charles Wolrige Gordon of Esslemont, First Grand Principal for Scotland.







Full Text

PAGE 1

FORMER Deputy Prime M inister Cynthia Pratt has told how the prayers of Reverend Dr Inez Rolle saved her life during a brazen daylight bank robbery. “Mother” Pratt was a cus tomer in Scotiabank’s Wulff R oad and East Street branch when the early morning holdup took place yesterday. Still shaken by the ordeal, Mrs Pratt said she didn’t realise that the man who walked in the branch behind her had come to rob the bank. Noting that the bank was almost completely empty, Mrs Pratt said she stopped for a moment to speak with the security guard at the front door before making her way to the female teller. However, as she approached the woman, the male teller motioned to her to come to his station instead. “When I went to the teller he was talking to me and I noticed how the people were starting to act strange. I didn’t know it was a robbery until I noticed every one going to the back and I said to the young man, what is going on. Then the young man said to me, ‘Mother, we just got robbed!?’ And I said, what? And the (robber to the next teller and I didn’t know. “Only after the police showed up did I take with the shakes. It all happened so fast. I could have been gone as quickly as that. It was a matter of seconds,” she said. The robbery took place at about 11am. Early yesterday morning, Mrs Pratt said Dr Rolle the pastor of Wings of the Eagle Redemp tion Ministries, phoned her and asked her to allow her to “cover her” that morning in prayer. It is these prayers, she said, that protected her throughout the harrowing ordeal. “And I thank God for that prayer this morning because if it wasn’t for that I might have been dead,” she said. According to information reaching The Tribune, the lone gunman entered the bank and presented himself as a customer to a woman clerk. Producing what is believed to be a weapon, the robber was able to make N N A A S S S S A A U U A A N N D D B B A A H H A A M M A A I I S S L L A A N N D D S S L L E E A A D D I I N N G G N N E E W W S S P P A A P P E E R R Ex-DPM caught in bank robbery C M Y K C M Y K V olume: 105 No.144SATURDAY, MAY 16, 2009 PRICE – 75 (Abaco and Grand Bahama $1.25) WEATHER Cloudy with Storms HIGH 91F LOW 74F N E W S S TAPLEDON SCHOOL ADDS NEW $1.5M WING S P O R T S Minister visits Foreign teams in Nassau tourney Expansion Rugby Sevens N E W S Over hotel union elections Call for CALM Pratt: ‘I might have been dead without prayer’ The Tribune ANYTIME ... ANYPLACE , WE RE #1 BAHAMASEDITION TRY OUR SOUTHERN CHICKEN BISCUIT www.tribune242.com Two students ‘stabbed’ at CC Sweeting VIOLENCE at CC Sweet i ng Senior High School cul minated in the stabbing of two students this week, it has been claimed. A 32-year-old mother of a grade 10 student told The Tri b une a grade 12 pupil and another boy were injured in a knife fight on Tuesday. She also understands anoth e r violent scuffle took place in the school yard the following day. Police were unable to con firm or deny the alleged stabbing before The Tribune went to press yesterday, and s chool principal Mrs Delores Ingraham failed to return our calls. P arents have alleged there are five to seven gangs in the school, and boys are taking knuckle-dusters, cutlasses, k nives and even guns to the campus in College Avenue. The 32-year-old mother of t wo ordered her 15-year-old son not to return to CC Sweeting after he was threatened by a group of boys last month. F ear s The worried mother said: “I’m not going to wait for them to touch my child or someone else’s child. “These things happen and I’m scared. He’s afraid for his life and the other students involved are too. “People pick on the little boys who look soft and my boy looks soft. He’s quiet.” The mother is distressed her son is missing out on vital classes as his end-of-year exams approach in June, but she would rather he sacrifice his education than be hurt or killed. She has asked for her son to be transferred to a different school, but has not yet been accommodated. She said: “They call him sissy because he reported it to the office, and to the parents, and to the police, so now the gang and everybody have him for that. “He wanted to go back this week because he wants to do his exams, but I said he can’t go back. I don’t want him to go back to that school. “A lot of people are scared, and their children don’t go there, they try to get trans ferred, but they’re told they can’t. “I know there is crime everywhere, and all schools have gangs, but it disturbs me that they didn’t even try to Mother tells son not to r eturn n B y MEGAN REYNOLDS Tribune Staff Reporter mereynolds@tribunemedia.net n By PAUL G TURNQUEST Tribune Staff Reporter p turnquest@tribunemedia.net A HAITIAN-BAHAMIANman is now believed to have captained the boat that capsized on its way to Florida killing at least nine people, including a child. According to reports in The Miami Herald, the 24 known passengers on the vessel, all Haitian migrants, told authorities they were in The Bahamas for a month before they left for Florida. Yesterday the United States Coast Guard called off its search for survivors, which had spanned 31-hours and 100 miles of Florida. In addition to the nine bodies recovered since the vessel sank at around 2am Wednesday,16 people were rescued alive. Irvin McMphee, Chief Immigration Office on Bimini, said the first his office heard about Bimi ni being the launching point for the ill-fated voyage was when he saw it on television on Wednes day. Hiding He does not believe the group could have spent the entire month prior to leaving the Bahamas in Bimini as they would likely have been discovered. “There are no Haitians in Bimini,” he stat ed. However, he suggested that if the migrants were in Bimini, it is likely that they were hidden in the bushes in the more sparsely populated southern part of the island. “What I understand is that they come out of Nassau, and for some reason during their transportation they stop here, and then they go before we find them,” said Mr McPhee. “They wouldn’t just be here walking around waiting to catch a boat.” Speaking to The Miami Herald from her Bahamas home, Madeline Desir, the mother of twin daughters who disappeared from the capsized vessel, claimed she paid $3,000 to the Haitian-Bahamian man for her daughters to be brought from Haiti to Florida. SEE page 7 DISGRUNTLED staff from luxury retailer Solomon's Mines claim they are again burdened with late salary payments, this time dating back four weeks. Several employees told The Tribune they were supposed to be paid yesterday but the money never came. With mortgage or rent and other bills piling up, they are calling on executives to make good on the overdue earnings. "We have not been paid in over a month," said a sin gle mother-of-four who has dedicated more than five years of service to the chain. "Everybody is frustrated because there is no money and we have needs and commitments. It's a strug gle". Another employee, who claimed some staff members are owed for the pay period SEE page 7 SEE page 7 CYNTHIA PRATT LOCK DOWN: The Wulff Road and East Street branch of Scotiabank was closed yesterday following an armed robbery that took place while ex-deputy prime minister Cynthia Pratt was there . Haitian-Bahamian led capsized boat n By ALISON LOWE Tribune Staff Reporter alowe@tribunemedia.net SEE page 7 Retailer s staff hit at late salaries n By TANEKA THOMPSON Tribune Staff Reporter tthompson@tribunemedia.net Perilous Journey: Haitian migrants (file photo T i m C l a r k e / T r i b u n e s t a f f

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THE WORK needed to ready the Grand Cay Clinic for opening is being re-evaluated and it is h oped that construction will be c ompleted within the next 45 days, Algernon Cargill, director of the National Insurance Board (NIB Mr Cargill issued a press statement in response to remarks made by Senator Jerome Fitzgerald on the status of Grand Cay Clinic during the senator’s contribution to the Communications Bill. Mr Fitzgerald had criticised the government for leaving the $1.3 million clinic unused, although it was apparently ready for opening. However, Mr Cargill said that the building still needs some remedial work and that NIB is working “feverishly” to open it to the public as soon as possible. Since 1988, the NIB has been e ngaged in a social investment programme aimed at assisting with the development and extension of health infrastructure in the Bahamas, Mr Cargill said. “The programme entails not only the constructing, but also the equipping, furnishing and in some cases the maintaining of quality health care facilities that improve the quality and accessi b ility of health care services for insured persons and other residents throughout the country,” he said. To date, NIB has constructed and furnished 18 such facilities throughout the Bahamas. According the NIB director, the Grand Cay Clinic, currently under construction and funded by the National Insurance Board, i s not included in the 18 comp leted clinics because it is not quite ready for occupation. Mr Cargill explained that NIB entered into a contract with Island Bay Front Ltd, owned by Roosevelt Curry, on May 1, 2002, to construct a clinic on the island of Grand Cay. Three months later, construction was suspended and subse q uently, the contract was termi n ated. “On July 26, 2005, a contract was awarded to Tony Rolle Construction, with a completion date projected at November 2006. This work has not progressed a ccording to schedule, but through consistent discussion and dialogue with the contractor, and in some cases direct financing of the project due to challenges experienced by the contractor, the National Insurance Board has been able to advance construction to the current level of 95 per cent completion. Notwithstanding the cons truction delays, the National Insurance Board proceeded to procure the medical and dental equipment at the clinic. Two Bahamian companies were selected and the equipment installation was completed two weeks ago,” Mr Cargill said He assured the public that NIB is working “feverishly” with the contractor to correct the remedial work and complete the clinic. “We recognise the importance of this facility to the people of Grand Cay and would not d eliberately delay the construction and/or transfer of this facil ity to the Ministry of Health. The challenges experienced were outside of the direct control of the National Insurance Board and while we could have rightfully terminated the contractor, our focus has been to provide him with the resources a nd cash needed during cons truction although he did not meet the contract terms,” Mr Cargill said. The National Insurance Board, the director said, has set tled all of its contractual obligations to the contractor and remains committed to ensuring that Mr Rolle completes the contract according to the speci fications. C M Y K C M Y K L OCAL NEWS PAGE 2, SATURDAY, MAY 16, 2009 THE TRIBUNE INDEX M AIN/SPOR T S SECTION Local News.............................P1,2,3,5,6,7,12 Editorial/Letters..........................................P4 C omics ........................................................ P 8 Sports....................................................P9,10 Weather.....................................................P11 CLASSIFIED SECTION 36 P AGES U SA TODA Y WEEKENDER 8 P A GES Work on Grand Cay Clinic being re-evaluated MR Algernon Cargill said that the clinic still needs some remedial work and that NIB is working “feverishly” to open it to the public as soon as possible.

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THE ROYAL Bahamas Defence Force is commissioning two new aircraft at the Lynden Pindling Airport on Monday. Minister of National Security and Immigration Tommy Turnquest will deliver the keynote address at the service of dedica tion for the two new aircraft – a Vulcan Air P68C Observer and a Cessna 208B Grand Caravan Aircraft. The Observer aircraft was built in Naples, Italy, and dis tributed by the Orlando Sanford Aircraft Sales in Sanford, Florida. The Cessna Grand Caravan was manufactured by Cessna in Wichita, Kansas. Both aircraft, along with the existing King Air 350, will improve the Defence Force’s capability in patrolling the country’s borders and become valuable assets in the fight against illegal maritime activities in Bahamian waters. They are equipped with state-ofthe-art communication equipment to conduct the multifaceted duties that will be required of the Defence Force. C M Y K C M Y K LOCAL NEWS THE TRIBUNE SATURDAY, MAY 16, 2009, PAGE 3 THE significant gap in the number of murders reported e very year and the number of m urder trials filed in the Supreme Court requires urgent attention, president of the Bar Association Wayne Munroe said yesterday. A lthough 72 murders were reported to police in 2008, fol-l owing 78 in 2007, just 17 murder trials were filed in the Supreme Court last year, and the number of cases heard couldb e even less, Mr Munroe told The Tribune . E ven more disturbing are the statistics for armed robbery which show a whopping 782 incidents reported to police in 2 008, and 820 in 2007, while o nly 19 armed robbery cases were filed in the Supreme Court last year. A total of 114 rapes were reported to police in 2008, 136 in 2007. Only 14 rape cases were filed in the Supreme Court in 2008. Manslaughter appears to be the only serious crime filed in the Supreme Court at the same rate of incidents. T hree reports of manslaught er were received by police in 2008 and four cases were filed in the Supreme Court registry last year. Magistrates Court records s how 8,994 criminal cases were heard in 2008 – 1,793 were completed and 6,167 adjourned. J ust 13 cases were transferred t o the Supreme Court. Mr Munroe said: “The fig ures speak for themselves. This d oesn’t tell us the number of cases that are heard in the S upreme Court, but if you have 7 2 murders and 17 are tried, that leaves 55 over. At that rate you won’t get to try some of those people for five years, but nobody can suggest we can remand somebody for five years. You wouldn’t want 55 innocent people in p rison for that long.” A leading defence attorney, Mr Munroe was part of a task force made up of lawyers, two Supreme Court judges, magistrates, prosecutors, registrarsa nd police officers which looked into the court system under Dame Joan Sawyer’s rule as C hief Justice in the 1990s. T he task force was mandated with identifying the problems and finding ways to make thec ourt system work more effi ciently. M r Munroe said the team g ave their time freely and found a number of areas in need of i mprovement, and devised a number of simple, cost-free solutions which were detailed in a report presented to the previous FNM administration. But Mr Munroe says the report sat untouched under that FNM government, continued to b e ignored by the PLP, and is still being disregarded by the current government. “It went either on a shelf or in a dustbin and nothing has happ ened and in the meantime the situation gets worse,” he said. T he team found individual defendant cases took 18 to 26 months for a trial to get to the Supreme Court, and they looked at the process step-bystep to identify the reasons for delay. M r Munroe said the number of judges is not a problem as judges sitting in the courts were n ot being used when cases were n ot brought before them. H e also maintains juries are not hard to find. Mr Munroe s aid the delays come from long preliminary inquiries, a high acquittal rate meaning fewd efendants enter guilty pleas, slow transportation of prisoners, and difficulty producing witnesses. The task force’s suggestions included devising a listing system for people to check on the progress of cases; a system to ensure defence attorneys are n ot double-booked; holding plea and directions hearings to ascertain admissible evidence before the jury is called to court; plea bargaining and holdingp risoners in cells at the courts before the courts open. M r Munroe said: “They (the measures) are very simple, most of them cost no money, but nothing has happened other than trying to blame the persons who have nothing to do with it, which is the courts. The courts are there, the judges sit every day, but when only 60 per cent of their time is u sed you can’t blame them b ecause cases aren’t before t hem. “It’s very possible to have 70 t rials a year. A murder trial takes five to seven days, so I can’t understand why these tri-a ls run for a whole month,” he said. Gap between murder and trial causes worry n By MEGAN REYNOLDS Tribune Staff Reporter mreynolds@tribunemedia.net School enjoys its 40th birthday FREEPORT The Martin Town Primary Schoolw ill be celebrating 40 years of primary education at Eight Mile Rock, where a number of activities have been planned for former and current students, teachers and administrators. P rincipal Mary Russell s aid activities will kick-off t omorrow, with a church s ervice at Mount Zion Baptist Church in Jones Town, Eight Mile Rock. We are calling on former students, teachers, principals, and well-wishers to joinu s in this service of thanksgiving,” she said. Under the theme, ‘Celeb rate the Past, Embrace the Future,’ Ms Russell said activities have been planned t o commemorate the s chool’s 40 years of existence on the island. The activities planned are a s follows: Children’s programme at the school at 10am on T uesday, May 26. History Day on the school grounds on Thursday, May 28. Grand celebration at 3pm on Monday, June 1. M s Russell said several i ndividuals will be honoured during the grand celebra tion, including Victoria W right for being the longest serving principal. She served for 21 years. A lso being honoured are Elcott Johnson, former principal; Mrytle Carrol, a teacher of 23 years; Carmie F erguson, a long-time jani tor, and Melvese Henly, a former tuck shop operator w ho provided food for under-privileged students. Insurance executive D avid Wallace, a former student, said they are expecting about 2,500 former students to support thee vent. “We also want former teachers, principals, and for-m er parents to join in this wonderful celebration. We believe this is a wonderfulw ay to pay tribute to edu cators, students, and existing teachers who have impacted many students’ lives,” he said. Mr Wallace is urging for mer students to donate $40 which represents one dollar for each year. The funds, he said, will be used for the establishment of a computer lab and a new water fountain at the school. Mr Wallace said three top bands are lined up for the grand celebration, which will commence with a parade from the old Friendship Shopping Centre to Sunset Village. Tamara Litton, a former student, highlighted some significant achievements of the Martin Town Primary School. “I attended MTPS from 1968 to 1974 and the MTPS was the leading school in the Music Arts Festival in the Caribbean. “The teachers that passed throughout that era – Mrs Lopez, Vicky Martell, Dorothy Lightbourne, Mr Fernander, and Mr and Mrs Gibbs – left a great impact on our lives, they assisted in rearing us to be the individuals we are today.” Ms Russell said there are many accomplishments the school can boast about. Some of the achievements include: Teacher Mildred Roberts who was named the National Teacher of the Year for the Bahamas. The school placed first in the National Arts Festival in the Bahamian singing and Gospel singing categories. The school is the current winner of the 2008-2009 Junior Junkanoo Primary A Division. The school also placed 4th out of 23 schools in the Social Studies Competition. Two students were honoured in the GLAT pro gramme by the Ministry of Education. B B a a r r p p r r e e s s i i d d e e n n t t s s a a y y s s p p r r o o p p o o s s e e d d c c o o u u r r t t r r e e f f o o r r m m s s w w e e n n t t e e i i t t h h e e r r o o n n a a s s h h e e l l f f o o r r i i n n a a d d u u s s t t b b i i n n MINISTERof Education Carl Bethel was e scorted on a tour of the $1.5 million, state-of-theart wing of the Stapledon School on Dolphin Drive. The tour of the wing, still under construction, w as led by Lowell Mortimer, president of the Bahamas Association for the Mentally Disabled, which is spearheading and funding the project. M r Mortimer updated education officials on the progress of the work stating that he is pleased with the efforts of architect Anthony Jervis and contractor Alder Minus. The building is expected to be completed in early fall, 2009 Mr Bethel thanked Mr Mortimer and his asso ciation, noting that the construction of the new facility is an excellent example of a public-private partnership which benefits students and this particular case, the mentally challenged. He further commended the BAMD for building the existing Stapledon School, which has been on the current site since 1979. Mr Bethel revealed that the ministry will be r esponsible for furnishing and maintaining the building once it is completed. The new complex will house 12 multi-purpose rooms and bathrooms and will be named in hon o ur of Sybil Blyden, the school’s first Bahamian principal and a strong supporter of the mentally challenged in the Bahamas. M inister Bethel said he was delighted that Mrs Blyden had a chance to learn that the structure was being named in her honour, as she passed away just as work began on the new building. Anthony Jervis, architect for the project, revealed that the building will have universal access for persons with special needs and when completed will be connected to the existing school by a covered porch, steps and walkway. The facility will also be air-conditioned with sliding acoustic partitioned-walls and the complex will accommodate the school’s auditorium and art centre. Minister tours school’s $1.5m wing expansion n By DENISE MAYCOCK Tribune Freeport Reporter dmaycock@tribunemedia.net C LOSE INSPECTION:Carl Bethel (second left, foreground tion work at the Stapledon School on Dolphin Drive Defence Force to commission planes ROAD works have started on Atlantic Drive – the road that runs past the Supervalue food store, south of the second round-about off West Bay Street. “We advise motorists to exer cise caution as they travel this area over the next few weeks, and to please slow down and be patient around road workers,” a release from Killarney MP Dr Hubert Minnis said. Dr Minnis said that while the road works can be an inconvenience, the Ministry of Works is working hard to provide a bet ter road system for the commu nity. Motorists w ar ned In brief

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EDITOR, The Tribune. On April 7, 2009, President Obama made a surprise visit to Baghdad. It made a fitting con clusion to an unusually long and varied presidential tour. It was a tour, moreover, on which then ovice US leader was rarely less than pitch-perfect. For hopeful Europeans, as for Turkey, George Bush’s problematic eight years in the White House were thoroughly laid to rest. It was re-engagement with America's old friends and allies that the new president was after, he was amply rewarded, but only because, in his phrase, he arrived with hands out stretched. We cannot know what took place behind closed doors, but we can judge, from the smiles of such stoney-faced characters as the Russian President Dmitry Medvedev, and China’s President Hu Jintao,t hat a new day has dawned. The G-20 London summit may have produced more style than substance. But style and, above all, tone are not to be dis counted in international relations. Getting such things right is something many new nation al leaders have to learn and some never master. President Obama, and, it must be said, his wife Michelle, are naturals. For any national leader, even one who has triumphed in a marathon US presidential campaign, this would have been an exhausting tour, demanding a different approach, and different expertise, at every stop. Yet President Obama seemed to draw new strength from each encounter. The bigger and more engaged the audience, the more energised he seemed to be. In London there was the economic crises, high diplomacy and protocol. In Strasbourg there was the finely balanced French-German duo to please, and the NATO allies to be cajoled over Afghanistan. In Prague, President Obama met “new” Europe face to face and set out his vision for a world with far fewer, and eventually no, nuclear weapons, even as North Korea conducted its lat est abortive rocket test. He arrived in Turkey with the message that the US was not “at war with Islam” and that its relations with the Muslim world would not be defined by opposition to al-Qa’ida. In Istanbul, he pressed home his ecumenical theme by meeting leaders of all the city’s main religions. And thence to Baghdad, as Com mander-in-Chief, to address the servicemen whose eventual withdrawal he had announced as one of his first presidential acts. To pull all this off and leave so few dissatisfied in his wake isa considerable feat. Not for the first time, we have to go back as far as JFK for comparisons. If President Obama’s main objective was to cast the United States as a different type of global player, more culturally sensitive, more collegiate, then he succeeded. To demand more of a relatively young President in office would be unreasonable. Yet what was, without doubt, a personal and political triumph leaves two questions. The low-key geniality favoured by President Obama was of a piece with his early pledges to listen. But a time will surely come when listening must give way to doing, and then it will be harder to please everyone. We are certainly watching an accomplished politician and orator, but were we watching a world leader in the making? The second question is as much about America as its pres ident. Even before he set off, some erstwhile supporters were already voicing disappointment that he had not been more radical. Others, still, argued that he should be devoting all his time to the US economy rather than traipsing around foreign parts. In any event, President Obama will soon learn what many a US president learned before him: acclaim abroad rarely translates into higher approval at home. JERRY ROKER Nassau, May 13, 2009. E DITOR, The Tribune. I find it almost unnerving to drive out West these days as at the junction of West Bay Street and Blake Road as many people know there is a “pot hole”n ot to be confused with a “pot c ake.” As a pothole it certainly rates as one of the giants of the breed and in fact if you were to unfortunately fall into it you might reach Australia. This holeh as been in existence for at least a month and was at one point filled with rocks which did little t o make it look like a piece of r oad, and a well used road at t hat. The unnerving part about the whole thing is that there must be members of the Ministry of Works that pass by and even perhaps Cabinet Ministers who must notice that all is not well with the tarmac below them. But then the ministersa re not driving. However, I wonder if after passing it a couple of times they say “oops, that hole is still there, maybe wes hould do something about it” a nd tie a knot in their handkerchiefs to remind them to have their assistants call their colleague the Minister of Works. O n the other hand maybe they don’t carry handkerchiefs, a nd have poor memories. Perhaps the minister of traffic lights who I think announced the othe r day that seven traffic lights h ad stopped working and s hould be fixed might redeem himself by fixing the pothole. Has this particular minister not noticed that traffic lights have not been working for ten yearsa nd the count is way over seven. H owever, I think the traffic in most cases flows more smoothly without them although it is a pity to waste the new ones that were installed not too long agob ut fail to function properly. Probably in these hard times ministers should return to raisi ng their goats and the rest of us c an worry about the potholes a nd traffic lights. PATRICK H THOMSON Nassau, May 6 2009. C M Y K C M Y K E DITORIAL/LETTERS TO THE EDITOR PAGE 4, SATURDAY, MAY 16, 2009 THE TRIBUNE The Tribune Limited NULLIUS ADDICTUS JURARE IN VERBA MAGISTRI Being Bound to Swear to The Dogmas of No Master LEON E. H. DUPUCH, Publisher/Editor 1903-1914 SIR ETIENNE DUPUCH, Kt., O.B.E., K.M., K.C.S.G., ( Hon.) LL.D., D.Litt . P ublisher/Editor 1919-1972 Contributing Editor 1972-1991 EILEEN DUPUCH CARRON, C.M.G., M.S., B.A., LL.B. Publisher/Editor 1972Published Daily Monday to Saturday Shirley Street, P.O. Box N-3207, Nassau, Bahamas Insurance Management Building., P.O. F-485, Freeport, Grand Bahama TELEPHONES Switchboard (News, Circulation and Advertising A dvertising Manager (242 Circulation Department (242 Nassau Fax: (242 Freeport, Grand Bahama: 1-(242 Freeport fax: (242 WEBSITE w ww.tribune242.com – updated daily at 2pm BARACK OBAMA came to office with a theory. He believed that the country was in desperate need of new investments in education, energy and many other areas. He also saw that the nation faced a long term-fiscal crisis causedby rising health care and entitlement costs. His theory was that he could spend now and save later. He could fund his agenda with debt now and then solve the long-term fiscal crisis by controlling health care and entitlement costs later on. In essence, health care became the bank out of which he could fund the bulk of his agenda. By squeezing inefficiencies out of the health care system, he could have his New New Deal and restore the nation to long-term fiscalbalance. This theory justified the tremendous ramp-up of spending we’ve seen over the last several months. Obama inherited a $1.2 trillion deficit and has quickly pushed it up to $1.8 trillion, a whopping 13 percent of GDP. The new debt will continue to mount after the economy recovers. The national debt will nearly double over the next decade. Annual deficits will still hover around 5 percent or 6 percent of GDP in 2019. By that year, interest payments alone on the debt are projected to be $806 billion annually, according to the Congressional Budget Office. Obama believes these deficit levels are tolerable if he can fix the long-term fiscal situation, but he hasn’t been happy about them. He’s been prowling around the White House prodding his staff to find budget cuts. Some of the ideas they have produced have been significant (Medicare reforms), some have been purely political (ask ing Cabinet secretaries to cut $100 million in waste, fraud and abuse), and many have been gutted on Capitol Hill (cap and trade, proposed changes in charitable deductions, proposed changes to the estate tax). In any case, these stabs at fiscal discipline haven’t come close to keeping up with the explosion in spending. The government now borrows $1 for every $2 it spends. A Treasury bond auction earlier this month went poorly, suggesting the world’s hunger for U.S. debt is not limitless. Obama has been thrown back on his original theory. If he is going to sustain his agenda, if he is going to prevent national insolvency, he has to control health care costs. Health care costs are now the crucial issue of his whole presidency. Obama and his aides seem to understand this. They have gone out of their way to emphasize the importance of restraining costs. The presi dent has held headline-grabbing summits with business and union leaders. Unlike just about every other Democrat on the planet, he emphasizes cost control as much as expanding health coverage. So what exactly is the president proposing to help him realize hundreds of billions of dollars a year in savings? Obama aides talk about “game-changers.” These include improving health information technology, expanding wellness programs, expanding preventive medicine, changing reimbursement policies so hospitals are penalized for poor outcomes, and instituting comparative effectiveness measures. Nearly everybody believes these are good ideas. The first problem is that most experts, with a notable exception of David Cutler of Harvard, don’t believe they will produce much in the way of cost savings over the next 10 years. They are expensive to set up and even if they work, it would take a long time for cumulative efficiencies to have much effect. That means that from today until the time Obama is, say, 60, the U.S. will get no fiscal relief. The second problem is that nobody is sure that they will ever produce significant savings. The Congressional Budget Office can’t really project savings because there’s no hard evi dence they will produce any and no way to measure how much. If you read the Congressional Budget Office testimony and talk to enough experts, you come away with a stark conclusion: There are deep structural forces, both in Medicare and the private insurance market, that have driven the explosion in health costs. It is nearly impossible to put together a majority coalition for a bill that challenges those essential structures. There fore, the leading proposals on Capitol Hill do not directly address the structural problems. They are a collection of worthy but speculative ideas designed to possibly mitigate their effects. The likely outcome of this year’s health care push is that we will get a medium-size bill that expands coverage to some groups but does relatively little to control costs. In normal condi tions, that would be a legislative achievement. But Obama needs those cuts for his whole strategy to work. Right now, his spending plans are concrete and certain. But his health care savings, which make those spending plans affordable, are distant, amorphous and uncer tain. Without serious health cost cuts, this burst of activism will hasten fiscal suicide. (This article was written by David Brooksc.2009 New York Times News Service). Unnerved by new breed of ‘pot hole’ LETTERS l etters@tribunemedia.net Fiscal suicide ahead for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C M Y K C M Y K LOCAL NEWS T HE TRIBUNE SATURDAY, MAY 16, 2009, PAGE 5 THE Bahamas Hotel Catering and Allied Workers Union’s (BHCAWU board is urging all members too perate with “calmness”, especially when vying for leadership positions in the upcoming union elections. This statement by the BHCAWU comes after a fight broke at during last week’sn omination process between the u nion’s different factions. Labour Minister Dion Foulkes described the incident as an “embarrassing” display by the union members. The statement by the board y esterday said: “The temperament of an indiv idual should reflect the qualit ies of a true leader. We remind all and sundry of the importance of our elections and we honour the strong traditions of w hich the union stands upon.” Despite the uproar on our u nion premises on (May 4 executive officers kept calm, and conducted lawful nomina-t ions for the sake of the union members. The executive officers paid respect to all members and followed the rules as decided by the members.” K irk Wilson was one of the candidates who was unsuccessful in securing a nomination. Therefore, his team dismantled, and several members nominated themselves as independent candidates. T yrone Morris was also unsuccessful in his nomination b id. The nominees for the execut ive offices of the BHCAWU are as follows: President: Roy Colebrooke Justice Team; Nicole Martin – A Team; Abraham Smith – H ands Team; Tyrone Butler – M Team Vice-president: Godfrey Brice – A Team; Lionel Miller – Hands Team; Sidney Rolle – Justice Team; Oratio Whylly – M Team Second vice-president: Shamala McPhee – Justice Team; Estella Pratt – HandsT eam; Anderson Sands – M Team; Eliott Thompson – A Team Third vice-president: Pandora McKenzie – Hands Team; Felix Munroe – Justice Team; Carol Thompson – M Team;H arrison Williams – A Team General Secretary: Hasten C harlton – M Team; Leo A. Douglas – Justice Team; Geno L ongley – Hands Team; Darrin Woods – A Team Assistant General Secretary: Kevin Gardiner – Justice T eam; Hanna Elisabeth – M T eam; Veronica Nesbitt – Hands Team; Hubert Saunders A Team Treasurer: Carolyn Dorsett A Team; Lolita Forde – M Team; Samantha Gray-Francis Deliverance Team; Nevolia Johnson – Hands Team; Basil McKenzie – Justice Team Assistant Treasurer: Florence Knowles – Justice Team;P atricia S. Mortimer – independent; Samantha Ryan – Hands Team; Joanne Sears – M Team; Sheila Taylor – A Team Trustees: Karen Bastian – Justice Team; Cheryl Beneby – independent; Wilbert Collie –H ands Team; Pearl Henfield – H ands Team; Rose Musgrove Justice Team; Maria Roberts A Team; Lisa Robinson-Davis A Team; Lielin Thompaon – M Team Council members: Max A ltidor – Hands Team; Ruth Hanna – Hands Team; Ricard o Hepburn – A Team; Roberts C oakley – Justice Team; Rodger Knowles – Justice Team; Whitney Thompson – M Team T he Ministry of Labour is n ow preparing to assist with elections on May 28 and the arrangements being made forF amily Island members to par ticipate. We support and reiterate Minister Foulkes’ assertions that all candidates on the list act with due diligence, and camp aign in good faith, reminding t hemselves of the purpose for the elections,” the union’s execu tive board said. BHCAWU members ecouraged to ‘operate with calmness’ Fight erupts between the union’s different factions n By TANEKA THOMPSON Tribune Staff Reporter whyyouvex@tribunemedia.net "I vex at all these people on the road who mussy buy their licenses because they is be acting like they ain' know how to uset he round-about or a four-way stop. I tired of all these biggety no good drivers who I swear on a vendetta to either mash up my nice car or kill me people y'all need to learn how to yield fort raffic on the round-about and know how to at least pretend to brake on the four way stop! " I am advocating that at least e very five years people take a r efresher course in driving before they can get their license renewed because this recklessness on the streets is deplorable!" MAD MOTORIST. " I vex that Bahamians ain' get it through their heads yet thatwe can't rely on foreign i nvestors to supply the bread a nd butter to our country. Don't y'all realise that these people only worried about making m oney and as soon as things go sour they will push out and move on to the next best thing?T he only way to ensure our c ountry's viability is to grow more entrepreneurs and business minded folks instead of breeding hospitality geared people to serve the foreign elite.” "GET IT TOGETHER, PEOPLE," FOX HILL ENTREPRENEUR. " Boy, I is so vex that them p oliticians who sign all them for eign treaties abroad on political asylum an' tings without we peo p le knowing. Them politicians don't have enough common sense ta know that we have tog ive 4,999,999, or less than half of the 10 million-Haitian population, who never agree with they own government in Haiti, politi c al asylum in we Bahamas if they come over an' ask for it. And we 250,000 Bahamians ga' have to l ive with it, that's they law." CONCERNED CITIZEN. Are you vex? Send your complaints to whyouvex@tribuneme dia.net. WHY YOU VEX? n By DENISE MAYCOCK Tribune Freeport Reporter dmaycock@tribunemedia.net FREEPORT Catholics on Grand Bahama will take to the streets for theannual Catholic May Procession tomorrow in honour of the Virgin Mary. Greg Christie, district deputy of the Knights of Columbus and coordinator of the procession, said the five Catholic parishes on island will participate in the procession, which starts at Mary, Star of the Sea Parish at 5.30pm. He said all church ministries and organisations as well as Catholic stu dents and those attending other schools are asked to assemble with abanner, if available, at the church by 5.15pm. “Catholics will come together to honour in songs and anthems, and the praying of the rosary the Blessed Vir gin Mary as our mother,” he said. Mr Christie said during the month of May a month both named for and dedicated to the mother of Jesus Catholics have long honoured Mary ina procession with prayers and song, and by placing a crown of flowers on her image during a service following the procession. During the procession, he said, a spe cial recitation of the rosary will be held at the church for those not be able to join the procession around the area. It will also begin at 5.30 pm. “The tradition in the Bahamas and in many other countries has been for school children to have a ‘may crown ing’ ceremony, with a procession, pret ty dresses and a wreath of fresh flowers that one child gets to place on the statue. A song for these events, ‘Bring Flowers of the Fairest’ – with its refrain ‘O Mary, we crown thee with blossoms today, Queen of the Angels, Queen of the May’ – has been a familiar favourite for generations,” said Mr Christie. Mr Christie said the Knights of Columbus are inviting the Catholic Church and school families from throughout Grand Bahama to participate as Catholics honour the Blessed Mother with the annual procession. The route of procession will travel from Mary, Star of the Sea Church east to East Beach Drive, north on to Poin ciana Drive, west on Poinciana Drive to East Atlantic Drive, and South on East Atlantic Drive to East Sunrise Highway, and east on Sunrise Highway back to the parish where the benediction and evening service will be held together with the crowning of a statue of Mary. During the procession, parishes will alternate praying the rosary, the Joyful Mysteries, and together sing Marion Hymns. “We invite and urge everyone to make a sacrificial and special effort to participate in this May Procession and together plead for our Blessed Mother’s intercession, her continuing love, and to pray for peace in the world,” Mr Christie said. “Each time our Blessed Mother has appeared on this earth she asked us to make sacrifices in reparation to God for our sins and to pray for the world.” Catholic procession for Mary THE Water and Sewerage Corporation ash said the odour emanating from the area of the downtown Straw Market is not related to the sewerage system. Management personnel from the Corporation visited the Straw Market on Thursday where they met with Ministry of Public Works officials who were investigating he odour complaint. It has been determined that the unpleasant smell is coming from four storm drains in the market. The Ministry of Worksis planning corrective action. WSC: Odour in Straw Market downtown not fr om sewer THE family and friends of murdered expatriate businessman Hywel Jones are to hold a celebration in honour of his life. The event is scheduled to be held at the New Providence Community Centre on Blake Road on May 22, starting at 5pm. Mr Jones became the 26th murder victim for the year when he died at the Princess Margaret Hospital from injuries he received when he was shot in the head by an unknown assassin more than three weeks ago. He was shot at least twice in the head and body as he was getting out of his car in his office car park near Compass Point on West Bay Street at around 10am on April 22. A banker by profession, Mr Jones was just 55. Born in North Wales, Mr Jones worked in the financial services sectors in the United Kingdom, Jamaica and the Bahamas. He was the former director of the Bankers’ Association of the Bahamas and the Bahamas Institute of Bankers. Mr Jones had lived in the Bahamas for more than 20 years and had been an adviser to the government on banking legislation on several occasions. His shooting, in broad daylight, has yet to be solved. A $50,000 reward, posted in the local press last week for information that might lead to the arrest or conviction of those responsible for his mur der, still stands. Hywel Jones’ brother, Ilt Jones, has vowed to remain in the Bahamas until whoever is responsible for the banker’s execution-style shooting has been brought to justice. M INISTER D ion Foulkes described the incident as an “embarrassing” d isplay by the union members. T HE Englerston Urban Renewal Livable Neighbourhood Programme, in conjunction with the grade 10 class of the Lyford Cay International School and theE nglerston pastoral community, provided grocery items to families in the community on Satur-d ay, May 2. Dennis Dames, manager of the programme said that the partici pants “exercised a spirit of com munity service by walking through the community distrib uting boxes and bags of groceries to needy families, as a response to the community’s need for recession relief.” A mong those pictured are Mr Dames, Pastor Greg Chisholm of New Beginning Ministries (front rowhart of the Englerston Urban Renewal Programme, andN atasha Arthur, Lekeisha C hisholm and Helene DeJong, all of Lyford Cay International. F F a a m m i i l l y y a a n n d d f f r r i i e e n n d d s s h h o o n n o o u u r r H H y y w w e e l l J J o o n n e e s s HELPING HANDS

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FREEPORT, GRAND BAHAMA –Students of the year two class of Lucaya International School (LIS true tourism ambassadors thisw eek as they created unique p osters to welcome the Commonwealth Local Government d elegates and regular tourists to Grand Bahama. T he welcome presentation w as the brainchild of Ina LeBlanc, the children’s class teacher at LIS. “This term’s unit of inquiry was about tourism, how it relatest o us everyday and how important it is. I thought it would be a great idea for our students to c reate an original flyer or poster t o tell tourists what they can do in Grand Bahama and maybea sk tourism to display them,” Ms LeBlanc said. ‘Homeroom mom’, Sarah Kirkby, suggested t hat the school speak to the Ministry of Tourism and Grand Bahama Airport Company to ask them about displaying the children’s work at the airport. From there the project took on a life of its own as Sherry Rodgers Brookes, corporatea ffairs manager of the Grand Bahama Airport Company, and Kendra Swain, an executive att he Grand Bahama Tourism Board, joined the team to make the concept happen. “Ms LeBlanc and Ms Kirkby invited me into the school to have a meeting to discuss their ideas. I met the children and talked to them about the impor tance of tourism in all our lives,” said Ms Swain. “During our discussions I thought how appropriate it would be to have these chil d ren’s original designs up and r eady for our visiting delegates.” O nce permission had been granted to display the children’s work, Ms LeBlanc worked with the students and parents to cre ate their own posters. “I wanted the kids to lead this project, they decided on a subject for their poster and they worked with their parents for their homework creating their own posters to be displayed’” said Ms LeBlanc. “And I want to stress we were very firm that it had to be child-led and created too.” A s an added bonus the year t wo students also spent an after n oon at Billy Joe’s beach at Our Lucaya taking class pictures and individual ‘tourist’ pictures with another year two parent Dave Mackey. Once the work was finished it was then agreed that the posters would be displayed at theT ourism Welcome Centre in the International Terminal. To make it extra special for t he students, Senator Kay Smith of the Prime Minister’s Office and Terrance Roberts, director of Business Development at the Tourism Ministry were invited to judge the posters. Last Friday, the project all c ame together and the students, M s LeBlanc and LIS acting director Nigel Kirkby went on a field trip to the airport to dis play the work. W hile they put up their work, S enator Smith and Mr Roberts viewed all the displays and chose Arabella Ferguson’s poster as the best one. “All the work was impressive, t he students did not miss an activity, but for us Ms Fergu son’s exuberance in her poster a nd the big Grand Bahama she c reated, really stood out,” said Senator Smith. M r Roberts added, “our beaches are our number one resource, and Arabella’s fun s and castle and day at the beach represents what our tourists long to come here for.” The work displayed showcas es everything you can do on Grand Bahama Island including scuba diving, shopping, horse back riding, fishing, riding a jets ki and more. “I am so proud of my students work,” said Ms LeBlanc, “itsh onest, creative and fun and they have had such a great time learning about tourism too. What I hope now is that this concept can grow or expand to other schools and students. Tourism is everyone’s job and if we can teach our children this early it can only enhance what ambassadors they will becomef or the Bahamas.” MINISTER of Tourism and Aviation Vincent VanderpoolW allace encouraged seniors of Doris Johnson High School to develop career skills and market them worldwide, taking full advantage of technology and the elements of globalisation. Minister Vanderpool-Wallace addressed the students at t heir Seniors Retreat at British Colonial Hilton, just weeks before they leave the haven of high school and begin careers. “Your skill sets do not have to reside only within the Bahamas,” he said. “Your skill sets can be applied anywhere in the world, and that’s something we are trying to get the people at the Ministry of Tourism to understand very clearly.” Mr Vanderpool-Wallace said visitors should not be seen as c ustomers who can only be served while in the Bahamas. He said technology should be used to engage non-Bahamians at all times, before and after they visit the country. Almost every vocation has a tourism sector link, the minister said. He urged future architects to design hotels that take advantage of the natural environment and minimise energy costs. He challenged future software designers to create a programme that would allow yachtsmen to book specific mari na slips in advance of travel. “And how about selling that software once you are finished to anybody in the world, not just to me,” he said. “There is an opportunity for you to do those kinds of things, and that is part of tourism too.” Minister Vanderpool-Wallace told the students that their skills and talents will only be developed through hard work and constant practice. C M Y K C M Y K LOCAL NEWS PAGE 6, SATURDAY, MAY 16, 2009 THE TRIBUNE S EVENTY new entrepreneurs will now be entering the Bahamian business scene following a graduation ceremony a t the College of the Bahamas last weekend. They were participants in the Bahamas Agricultural and Industrial Corporation's 12week business empowerment lecture series held in conjunction with the College's School of Business, headed by Remilda Moxey. " An army of entrepreneurs who will transform the economic landscape by establishing sustainable business enterp rises throughout our country has been launched," said BAIC's deputy general manager Don Major. H osted by BAIC's Business Services Department, the sem-i nar featured successful business persons who shared with participants proven business techniques. " It allowed participants to a void the pitfalls of those who f ailed," said Mr Major, "and acquire the knowledge and expertise that successful busin ess persons have discovered. "BAIC exists in order to prov ide entrepreneurs the option o f avoiding travelling by the seats of their pants the pain and terror of learning by trial a nd error. We provide training opportunities and a myriad of other services that are geared t o provide you with all that you need to start and run a business successfully,” he said. B AIC's executive chairman E dison Key encouraged gradu ates to take advantage of mult i-million-dollar opportunities in agriculture and souvenir production. He said BAIC can facilitate that by allowing them to use of t ens of thousands of acres of l and BAIC owns and controls i n North Andros, Abaco and Eleuthera. C ollege vice-president Dr C hipman-Johnson underscored t he importance of being crea tive and versatile in the a pproach to employment. "Your presence at this seminar is evidence that you arep repared to meet the challenge o f helping to stimulate our economy by engaging in some kind of business activity," said Dr Chipman-Johnson. "We need to increase the number of citizens who are willing to create employment." N N e e w w e e n n t t r r e e p p r r e e n n e e u u r r s s t t a a k k e e t t h h e e i i r r p p l l a a c c e e s s THE GRADUATING class of the business empowerment lecture series is pictured with College of the Bahamas vice-president Dr Rhonda ChipmanJohnson, BAIC executive chairman Edison Key and BAIC officials. Technology will open world of opporunity, students are told D ORIS J ohnson senior Reubendero Gibson and principal Linda Major present gifts of appreciation to Tourism Minister Vincent Vanderpool-Wallace. Derek Smith/ BIS Photo Young tourism ambassadors of LIS LUCAYA International School year two students show acting director of LIS Nigel Kirkby the posters they designed for their inquiry unit ont ourism. The idea of displaying the children's work at the airport came from Ms Ina LeBlanc, the students’ teacher. E r i k J R u s s e l l / K e e n i M e d i a P h o t o

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By PAISLEY DODDS Associated Press Writer LONDON (AP has seen its share of sex and sleaze scandals over the years, but few have tarnished all three of the country’s main political p arties in a single stroke. Leaked lawmaker expenses f or chandeliers, pornography, m oat upkeep on country estates and other claims have enraged v oters many of whom have l ost jobs and homes during Britain’s deepening recession. T alk show lines buzzed Friday with irate callers. Web sites flashed reader comments comparing politicians to greedy b ankers. And commuters c lenched newspapers with such headlines as: “Parliament’s D arkest Day” and “House of Ill Repute.” Many politicians were being heckled during events that had been scheduled long before the leak. It’s not just one or two rotten apples, it’s the whole lot,” s aid Randy Wallace, 41, an u nemployed London electri cian. “Our Parliament used to be the envy of the world. Now, it’s a laughing stock.” Thousands of pages of expense claims were leaked tot he Daily Telegraph more than a week ago. Although around 80 of the 646 House of Com mons lawmakers have been named so far, the newspaper says it will continue to roll out details as it plows through ther est of the documents. The Labour Party, Conservatives and Liberal Democrats have all been damaged by the data. A poll released Friday showed that 65 percent of the population want early electionsb ecause of the expense scandal, while 64 percent want some lawmakers to resign. Commissioned by the BBC, the London-based polling company ComRes conducted the telep hone poll of 1,011 voters Wednesday and Thursday. T here was a margin of error of 3 percentage points. Labour lawmaker Shahid M alik stepped down as justice m inister early Friday after data showed that he claimed more t han 65,000 pounds ($98,000 housing costs over three years despite having discounted rent. Brown’s aide on climate c hange, Elliot Morley, was also s uspended after he billed taxpayers’ 16,000 pounds ($24,000 f or mortgage interest payments on a loan that had already been paid off. Morley says he’s now paid the money back. The latest revelation came l ate Friday with another Labour lawmaker claiming thousands o f pounds (dollars m oney for interest on a nonexistent mortgage. David Chaytor said he would pay back 13,000 pounds ($18,000 continuing to submit bills on his paid mortgage. In respect of mortgage intere st payments, there has been an unforgivable error in my accounting procedures for which I apologize unreservedly,” Chaytor said. “I will act immediately to ensure repay m ent.” For the Conservatives, lawmaker Andrew Mackay quit his post as an aide to party leader D avid Cameron after he said he’d been guilty of errors over his expenses claims. The partyp ublished expense claims by senior members online Friday under new transparency rules imposed by Cameron. Police and prosecutors were meeting to decide what, if any, a ction should be taken against lawmakers who misused parlia m entary expenses. No charges h ad been filed. “As our concern about what’s b een claimed has grown, our h orror of how (lawmakers trying to slip out of this sticky s ituation has grown,” said Mark Wallace, spokesman for the Taxpayers’ Alliance, which set up a fund to pay for any public p rosecutions that could come f rom the scandal. Prime Minister Gordon B rown’s Labour-led government has steadily lost parliamentary seats since it led calls for Britain to join the war in Iraq. Most expect the Conserva tive Party will win the next general election, which has to b e called by mid-2010 and w ould end more than a decade of Labour Party rule if predictions hold. Built on a political system that historically favored land owners, Britain lacks a systemo f proportional representation s o it is unlikely that smaller parties would make significant gains in the next election. Low voter turnout is more likely, said Steven Fielding of the Center for British Politicsa t Nottingham University. “It will probably further depress the Labour vote and it will give the Conservatives s ome gains, but the thing is that everyone has been tarred by this information,” Fielding said. There has also been this tra ditional historical myth that we have the mother of all Parlia m ents ... few have stepped up t o say that our political system is flawed because one party or the other has benefited from it over the years.” L awmakers scheduled meetings with voters over the weekend to address anger and an immediate threat that smaller far-right parties could make significant gains in the June 4 e lections for seats in the European parliament. Parties such a s the UK Independence Party a nd the British National Party have long campaigned against B ritain’s entrenched political s ystem and its traditional parties. D ozens of lawmakers have apologized and pledged to return more than 125,000 pounds ($190,000 O ther scandals have rocked B ritain’s politician system in recent history British Cabi n et minister John Profumo’s liaison with a prostitute almost brought down the government after it was revealed the woman was also linked to a Soviet spy but few have shaken all main political parties. E xpense rules are laid out in t he 66-page Green Book a guide sent to every legislator. It sets limits on expense claims, such as a 25 pound ($38 on eating out when away from home and how much can bec laimed toward a second home, u sually a residence in London. Though the guidelines don’t ban any specific items, the rules say expenses should relate to parliamentary work and should n’t damage the Parliament’s r eputation. The leaked data was due to have been made public in July after Britain’s High Court q uashed a legal attempt by the House of Commons to keep the details secret. Some of the data i n that disclosure, however, was to be redacted. “We need our own Barack O bama,” said Francis O’Hara, 2 4, a student. “This country needs a change.” C M Y K C M Y K LOCAL NEWS THE TRIBUNE SATURDAY, MAY 16, 2009, PAGE 7 g ood his escape with an undetermined amount of cash. As the former Minister of National Security, Mrs Pratt said she had an opportunity to speak with the police when they arrived at thes cene. One of the officers, she said, credited her presence at the bank as the reason why the robbery did not turn out as gruesome as it possibly could have. “This country gone,” Mrs Pratt said, “God knows it. You could see the jitteriness in those tellers and now I know why. Nobody escapes this. No one is free from this. You are no different from anyone else but yet we get so busy playing politics.” Sending a sharp message to those in authority, Mrs Pratt said that the country has to work on the children in the primary schools now as those harden criminals on the streets today are almost beyond reach. “If we don’t work on those primary school children now, you can’t imagine what we will reap in 10 years. We have to focus on those young ones down there because these harden criminals the only thing that can save them is death,” she said. o f April 15 to May 15, suggest ed that employers at least pay a portion of what is due so she can put a dent in the mounting bills. "It's very frustrating because you have a lot of people that a re single parents and everyone has some form of commitment whether it's mortgage or carp ayments. There are persons who are not working in the tourism sector that are not feel-i ng the effects of the downturn a nd landlords can say 'Well if someone else can pay why can't you?’" W hile stating that the current claims are "not true" company head Mark Finlayson said whilei n the past staff have sometimes been paid late they are eventually paid. "I have said (before company is definitely going through difficult times. We are not the only ones in the luxury goods area who are going through tough times. We are not the only ones who are paying people sometimes later than they should. "Everybody has always been paid (eventually economic times like these, it is very important to have a job a nd to get paid. I myself am the last person to get paid in this company," he said. B earing in mind the harsh e conomic realities hitting the chain evident in recent store closures executives met with staff last September and asked if they would prefer downsizing or weather the economic storm. Mr Finlayson said the group chose the latter option. Since 2006 the company has cut staff by a third fluctuating between 240 to 250 employees at 18 locations. He added that he has made the decision to keep employees on staff instead of further downs izing, who are paid "as cash flow allows." Yesterday Minister of Labour D ion Foulkes said as far as he was aware no such complaints have been lodged at the department of labour but said if one were the agency would investi gate the claims. He said if found guilty of such an offence, the matter could be pursued in the courts and would be subject to a fine. Earlier this year, fed up staff from Solomon's Mines com plained that they had been paid late on numerous occasions. deal with it. If they’re not dealing with the problem it doesn’t make sense for him to stay, if the school is not defending him.” Mrs Ingraham has not yet spoken to the newspaper about allegations of violence at CC Sweeting Senior High School which have been published in The Tribune over last two weeks. When I saw the news and s aw all of those people, my heart sank. I didn’t know,” Desir said. “He told me only five people were going (on the b oat).” M rs Desir said the boat captain promised her the vessel was a “big boat, not a wooden vessel.” The mother said she agreed to pay for the trip for her daughters out of a sense of h opelessness about their lives in Haiti. They could not go to school. I could not help them. They said, ‘Mummy, see if you can do something for us’,” Mrs Desir said. A nother relative who spoke with the Florida newspaper, Ermanie Lubin, 47, said she wasd esperately hoping her 28-yearold nephew was not on the boat a fter seeing the television news on Wednesday. H e had been deported from Florida to Haiti in 2007 after being denied political asylum.M arried with a four-year old s on, he left his family behind. “The last time I spoke to h im, he said, ‘Auntie, I can't take it anymore. I just want to die,’” said his aunt. H er nephew had been lving i n Port-de-Paix, a city in northwest Haiti that was hit by three consecutive hurricanes last sum-m er. After travelling to The Bahamas several months ago to e scape the situation, his wife r eceived a call on Monday that saw him tell her he was on a small island and could not reall y talk. He had also called an aunt, telling her that he planned tot ake a boat to the United States. S he warned him against making the voyage. FROM page one Solomon’ s Mines staf f reveal their frustration FROM page one Families fear the worst for migrants on capsized boat FROM page one Ex-DPM’s fears for the Bahamas FROM page one Par ents concerned for childr en’ s safety Tourist recovers from shark attack A 48-year-old man is recovering at Jackson Memorial Hospital in Miami after family members said he was attacked by a sharkw hile fishing in the Bahamas. The shark reportedly bit the man under h is elbow. According to the Sun Sentinel, Luis Hernandez of Deerfield Beach was spear fishing off Exuma on May 6 when he noticed a seven-foot bull shark swimming nearby. T he attack apparently took place after Mr Hernandez speared a grouper. H e was brought to a clinic in the Exumas for initial treatment, then flown to Nassau and finally, on May 8, to Jackson Memorial, where hospital officials confirmed he has been for the last week. " At the beginning, doctors were concerned that he might lose his right arm," thev ictim’s daughter, Fabiola Hernandez, told the Sun Sentinel. FREEPORT – The fifth C ommonwealth Local Government Forum (CLGF c losed on Thursday with a farewell celebration at Port Lucaya Marketplace for the 600 delegates from 46 Commonwealth nations. A junkanoo rush-out was held at the Count Basie Square at 7.30pm to mark the end of the three-day conference at the Westin Resort in Lucaya. Prime Minister Hubert I ngraham and Jamaican Prime Minister Bruce Goldi ng attended the conference and delivered remarks. Patrick Manning, Prime Minister for Trinidad and Tobago, was unable to attend,b ut a brief recorded audio message was delivered at the conference. This is the first time that the conference was held in the Caribbean. Conference closes Britain rocked by MPs’ expenses scandal

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n By RENALDO DORSETT Sports Reporter rdorsett@tribunemedia.net A s the profile of local rugby c ontinues to grow, the sport’s governing body in the Bahamas looks to increase its stature regionally by hosting teams from around the world. T he Bahamas Rugby Football Union (BRFU uled to host the US and Bahamas Rugby Sevens Tour nament 11am to 7pm May 23 at the Winton Rugby Pitch. The tournament, sponsored b y SG Private Bank, is expected to feature 12 teams – six from the US, one from England, four from New Providence and one from Grand Bahama – who will battle for the cash prize of $1,000 for the winner. Elystan Miles, director of the BRFU, said the union has plans to make this tournament the most prestigious Sevens tour nament in the Caribbean. “We have been trying to make it the biggest Caribbean Rugby tournament in the area, right now we are about second or third. We are basically tryi ng to get ourselves recognised regionally for our clubs as well as for the national team,” he said. “The Cayman Islands had the biggest tournament a few years ago, but they lost their spon s orship so that collapse left a gap and everyone wants to come to the Caribbean so we saw it as an opportunity to fill that void. We could not afford to do what we do without great sponsorship...SG has been with u s since this tournament’s inception and now recently Sand’s has come onboard. “Trinidad still has the biggest tournament in the region every December. This is just our third year and we are ahead of the schedule so in five years we are looking to have the best and most competitive tournament in the region.” The Bahamas has hosted the North American and West Indies Rugby Association tour nament for the past two years which has generated a great interest in the game locally and has increased the Bahamas’ profile internationally as a prime rugby venue. “Sevens Rugby which is a faster, quicker version of theg ame and the idea behind this was to get teams to come down for the weekend as somewhat of a trial run and eventually have their full teams, Fifteens, to come town during the winter for a longer stay. We are trying t o make Bahamas Rugby appealing for foreign teams,” Miles said. “Rugby has been a pretty qui et sport over the years but we have been building a profile. These types of things are gene rally better internationally because the foreign teams bring their press coverage and it spreads the word and lets people know the Bahamas is a great venue for rugby.” Miles said the hosting of international tournaments is just one of the BRFU’s initiatives which has increased the expo sure of the game locally over the past few years. “The biggest push has always been with the youth. Now we have coaches in most of the government senior high schools and a few of the private ones.T he other big thing for us is the Defence Force. They have been working for the past few months and they are going to field a team for this tournament, which is huge. “If the Defence Force starts t aking the game seriously then automatically you have a large pool of players to choose from,” he said. “We are actually quite strong now locally with a few hundred active players now whereas four o r five years ago we had less than one hundred.” n By RENALDO DORSETT Sports Reporter r dorsett@tribunemedia.net THE Bahamas’ under-19 cricket team has been in training under coach Mohamed Allie for the past several m onths in preparation for the International Cricket Council’s Under 19 Cricket Tournament, set for July in Toronto, Canada. It will be the team’s second visit to the tournament, which includes teams from the Caribbean and the Americas. The team participated in the 2007 tournament in Toronto, losing very close matches to the Cayman Islands and Argentina. The team was judged to be the most improved team in the tournament and was the recipient of a trophy for that award. T he team also received commendations for exemplary con duct, good sportsmanship and discipline. Some of the players from that team who were just 15 years old at the time are returning, mak i ng this an older and more experienced squad. To support the team’s expenses, the local cricket com munity is set to host a fundrais ing steak-out on May 30 at Windsor Park where the team h osts most of its training sessions. On Whit Monday the under19 team is scheduled to play a match against a selected team of British ex-pats at Haynes Oval in preparation for the tourna ment. The match is being billed as England vs. the Bahamas Youth Team and is being played as a memorial to the late Hywel Jones, who supported the game here in the Bahamas as a fan and sponsor. n By PAUL NEWBERRY AP National Writer CHARLOTTE, N.C. (AP Michael Phelps is back. The Olympic champion easily qualified for the finals of two events Friday morning at the Charlotte Ultraswim, his first meet since winning eight gold medals in Beijing. Phelps touched second in the last heat of the 200-meter freestyle at 1 minute, 50.46 seconds, and came back about an hour later to win the final heat of the 100 butterfly in 53.41. In both events, he had the thirdfastest time overall, advancing to the evening "A'' finals. This is the first meet for which Phelps was eligible since completing a three-month suspension. He was disciplined by USA Swimming after he was photographed using a marijuana pipe. Bolt in BMW crash C M Y K C M Y K SATURDAY, MAY 16, 2009 T HETRIBUNE PAGE 9 PAGE 10 Mets steal team-record 7 bases in win over Giants... Phelps cr uises to two finals in return to pool n By ROB HARRIS AP Sports Writer MANCHESTER, England (AP While Manchester United only needs a point Saturday to match Liverpool's record haul of 18 English league titles, Arsenal has a point to prove in the next to last round of the Premier League sea son. The Gunners haven't won the league for five years and will add to an already disappointing season if they hand the title to Man United at Old Trafford. United manager Alex Ferguson is wary of Arsenal crashing the party at home and leaving United to earn that point on the road next weekend against a Hull side battling relegation. That match is just three days before the Champions League final against Barcelona. "What we want to try and do is win the league tomorrow, the European Cup final is 10 days away after tomorrow," Ferguson said on Friday. "We've got to concentrate on winning the league and, by doing that, we have to achieve that the best way. ... "A point is always a dangerous game to play, thinking that a draw is enough. We have to go for a win." United defender Rio Ferdinand is urging his teammates not to be complacent despite overwhelming Arsenal in the Champions League semifinals with a 41 aggregate win. "Our performances in both legs of the semifinal were two of the best of the season," said the England center back, who will be sidelined Saturday with calf problems. "But it can sometimes be a dangerous situation when you beat a team fairly convincingly and play them again soon after, because they'll proba bly feel they have something to prove." While Arsenal was once United's main title adversary, Liverpool is now the greater threat after pushing them hard all season. Ferguson can win an 11th Premier League title on Saturday. But before 1993, when he delivered United's first league title for 26 years, the head-tohead record with Liverpool stood at 187 and the Scot never envisaged such a reversal of dominance. "My intention was to win the first one and try and break the stranglehold Liv erpool had on the title at that time," said Ferguson, who took charge in 1986. "You don't think about that opening the door for you, but that was the big chal lenge to win it once." Trailing United by six points in the title race, Liverpool's slim hopes rest on United losing to Arsenal and Hull and it beating West Bromwich Albion and Tot tenham to edge the Red Devils on goal difference. "What ever happens, I am really pleased that we are in this position at the end of the season," Liverpool manager Rafa Benitez said. "But I am cer tainly not giving up on the title, we must always be positive." For Arsenal, the mission is about building for the future. Arsene Wenger's team can only finish fourth in the stand ings, forcing the Gunners to play a qualifying match early next season to get into the group stage of the Champions League. "Arsenal will want to do well because they've been under a bit of criticism recently ... (and a day when everyone expects United to win the title," Ferguson said. "They are a good side with great potential in the team and you can't dismiss it." Man U hoping to win record-equaling title at home MANCHESTER, England (AP outlook on life has changed following a car crash in J amaica. The triple Olympic gold medallist crashed his BMWi nto a ditch along a highway last month. He required minor surgery on his left foota fter stepping onto thorns while getting out of the wreckage. W ith the stitches removed, Bolt returns to action Sundayin a 150-meter street race in Manchester. Bolt said Friday: "After something like that you look at life through and over, and look at what has gone wrong where you should improve or should be careful." Bolt set world records in the 100 and 200 meters and sprint relay in Beijing. Rockets force G m 7 with 9580 win over the Lakers... S ee page 10 n By PAUL LOGOTHETIS AP Sports Writer MADRID (AP erer's dominance of Andy Roddick continued on clay by 7-5, 6-7 (5 stayed perfect against Fernando Verdasco with a 6-4, 7-5 victory to also reach the Madrid Open semi finals on Friday. Federer improved to 18-2 against Roddick after their first career meeting on dirt. "His game translates well to most anything," said the sixthseeded Roddick. Nadal's 32nd straight clay win improved him to 9-0 against Verdasco, with three of those victories coming this year. Nadal will play Novak Djokovic, another regular foe, after the third-seeded Serb dis patched wild card Ivan Ljubicic 64, 6-4. "The more matches that I play against him, the more chances I have to prove something more to myself and to everybody else," said Djokovic, who has lost to Nadal three times this year. "I know that just a couple of points here or there will decide the winner." Top-ranked Dinara Safina advanced to the women's semifinals with a 6-4, 6-3 win over Ukrainian Alona Bondarenko, and will play Switzerland's Patty Schnyder, who beat fourth-seeded Jelena Jankovic 7-6 (6 Amelie Mauresmo will face Denmark's Caroline Wozniacki in the other semi. Federer, who won here in 2006 when the tournament was played indoors on a hard court, broke Roddick for the second time in the 11th game before serving out the first set. Roddick saved three break points in the ninth game of the second set to hold on for a tiebreaker, where the American rallied from 3-0 down to even the match. Federer stopped Roddick's momentum with an early break in the third set and used his serve to hold on for the win. "It was a close match. I bounced back well in the third (set aces. "I feel I have decent control over the ball this week." Fourth-seeded Andy Murray was playing No. 5 Juan Martin del Potro later to decide Federer's next opponent. After taking the first set, Nadal fell behind 4-0 before rallying to 4-4 with the help of Verdasco's seven double-faults. Nadal smacked a cross-court winner to hold his serve after a back-and-forth 11th game and, after breaking Verdasco for the fourth time, improved to 149-4 on clay since 2005. Safina overcame a letdown after a blazing start against 46thranked Bondarenko and took the opening set with a break in the 10th game. "I had a bad call from the umpire and I lost a little bit of concentration," Safina said of blowing a 3-0 lead. "But I found my game and I'm playing every match better and better." Schnyder's high balls troubled Jankovic. The fourth-ranked Serb committed 35 unforced errors while Schnyder hit 29 winners. Mauresmo rallied for a 5-7, 6-1, 6-1 win over Agnes Szavay of Hungary, while the ninth-seeded Wozniacki beat Russian qualifier Vera Dushevina 6-0, 6-4. Federer, Nadal and Djokovic reach semis Usain Bolt (AP Michael Phelps (AP ROGER FEDERER returns a shot yesterday during his quarterfinals match against Andy Roddick at Madrid Open... (AP Photo: Andres Kudacki Under 19 cricket team getting ready for Toronto tournament Rugby Sevens tourney to feature US, UK teams THE RUGBY tournament is expected to feature 12 teams, including six from the US and one from England... (AP Photo

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C M Y K C M Y K SPORTS PAGE 10B, SATURDAY, MAY 16, 2009 TRIBUNE SPORTS n By ANTONIO GONZALEZ A ssociated Press Writer ORLANDO, Fla. (AP Boston Celtics are headed home for a do-or-die game after failing to wrap up a series in Game 6. They're getting used to that pattern. Dwight Howard had 23 points and 22 rebounds, and the Orlan do Magic overcame a poor shooting night to beat the Celtics 83-75 on Thursday and force a decisive game in the Eastern Conference semifinals. The Celtics also failed to close out Chicago in Game 6 of their first-round series, a triple-overtime epic, but they never were in trouble in Game 7. Boston will now go the distance in each of its first two series for the second straight year. "We're comfortable with Game 7s," forward Paul Pierce said. "A lot of players in thisl eague have never played a Game 7 in this league, knowing that you if you lose, you go home. We're a c onfident group. But we're not an overconfident group, because you have to go out there and play t he game." The Celtics are 32-0 in sevengame series when they have helda 3-2 lead, and they are 17-3 in Game 7s on their home floor heading into Sunday. "You can't lean on a Game 7 being at home," Boston coach Doc Rivers said. "You have to go play. Just because you're in Boston doesn't mean you're going to win the game." Magic coach Stan Van Gundy doesn't believe in most records. He even threw out something familiar to Boston fans: The Red Sox's historic comeback from a 3-0 deficit to win the AL championship series over the Yankees in 2004. "I don't think it means any thing," he said. "In other words, I know it was a different sport, but when it was Yankees-Red Sox, nobody had ever come back from 3-0 before." Rajon Rondo finished with 19 points, 16 rebounds and six assists, and Pierce scored 17 for the Celtics, who led by 10 points in the second half before falling apart. The two days off before Game 7 should give an older, worn out Boston team a chance to rest its tired legs. It's still not enough for Rivers. "I would take a week off and do it like the Super Bowl," Rivers joked. "That would be terrific. But that's not going to happen." Boston had its chances. The Celtics held the Magic scoreless for more than five minutes to start the third quarter, building a 10-point lead on a jumper by Glen "Big Baby" D avis. The Magic shot just 37 percent to the Celtics' 42 percent for the game. B ut Howard led the Magic back, with a backspin alley-oop from Turkoglu that highlighted as purt to end the third quarter. Orlando took its first lead with 8:38 remaining in the fourth. P ierce hit three straight jumpers to give Boston a 73-72 lead with about four minutes to p lay, but the Celtics were done in by their 3-for-18 shooting from 3-point range and 19 turnovers. Ray Allen missed all seven attempts from behind the arc. "The offense definitely struggled," Pierce said. "But we still played enough defense to win the game. We turned the ball over too much." Howard blamed Van Gundy for not getting the ball more after the Magic's Game 5 collapse, when they blew a 14-point lead in the fourth quarter. "You've got a dominant player, let him be dominant," Howard said. He came out trying to back up his strong words, scoring the first eight points of the game for the Magic, including a pair of dunks that pumped some life into the home crowd. He finished 9-for16 shooting. Orlando's do-it-all center said he thought little of his comments before Game 6. "Coach said, 'Give all you got tonight, because we're going toh ave tomorrow off,'" Howard said, laughing. "I was thinking about that." V an Gundy said he didn't change his strategy at all, and compared Howard's comments to an argument between himself and his wife. "When she gets on me for something, my first reaction is to blame someone else," Van Gundy said. "To make an excuse. To do something else, because I don't like being criticized. And I think when Dwight gets into a game, his first thing is, 'I don't want the blame.' This is just my guess. "But when you step back and look at it, I usually realize the person who's been on me has a point. And then it's time to step up and do the job." Defending champs face Magic in yet another Game 7 Rockets force Gm 7 with 95-80 win over the Lakers SAN FRANCISCO (AP Wright felt the circumstances were perfect for adding some finesse to New York's power game. Wright recorded four of the Mets' franchise-record seven stolen bases and hit a tiebreaking RBI single in the ninth inning in a 7-4 victory over the San Francisco Giants on Thursday night. "We have to pick up the slack with the guys that are in the lineup when the everyday guys are out," Wright said. "If it means you have to steal a few extra bases, play solid defense, or bearing down and being a situational style of hitter, so be it." Wright had three hits and drove in two runs. "Jerry (Manuel siveness on the basepaths all year," Wright said of his manager. "I got a few opportunities early. I like putting pressure on the defense, and I like to keep the pitcher on his toes to make him focus on the baserunners." Gary Sheffield and Carlos Beltran each had two hits and Ramon Castro had two RBIs for New York, which has won nine of 11. Sheffield, Beltran and Alex Cora also stole a base for the Mets, who ran wild without speedy shortstop Jose Reyes,who sat out with a stiff right calf. "Sometimes you're going to have to steal bases to win games," Beltran said. "I'm trying to pick up the spot and David got the big hit." Wright tied a club mark for steals in a game set twice by Vince Coleman and equaled by Roger Cedeno in 1999. The team had previously swiped six bags in four games, the last time on Sept. 15, 2007, against Philadelphia. "I think we've been aggressive in late inning situations," Mets manager Jerry Manuel said. New York also was without reliever J.J. Putz and first baseman Carlos Delgado. Putz had a cortisone shot to alleviate inflammation in his right elbow, and Delgado's ailing hip again kept him out of the lineup. Bobby Parnell (2-0 in the eighth inning, gave up run-scoring hits to Jose Uribe and Edgar Renteria, leaving the game tied at 4. The Mets responded with three runs in the ninth. Beltran hit a one-out double off Brian Wilson (2-1 After Sheffield walked, Wright lined his RBI single into right field. "That was a close call at third and it went their way," Giants manager Bruce Bochy said. "Still, we have to do a better job." Dodgers 5, Phillies 3, 10 innings At Philadelphia, Russell Martin hit a tiebreaking double in the 10th inning and Matt Kemp tacked on an RBI double to lead Los Angeles. The Dodgers, minus the suspended Manny Ramirez, won two of three in a rematch of last season's NLCS. Jonathan Broxton (4-0 despite blowing a two-run lead with two outs in the ninth. Ramon Troncoso pitched a scoreless 10th to earn his second save. Cubs 11, Padres 3 At Chicago, Bobby Scales hit a pair of two-run doubles and the Cubs took advantage of 10 walks. Adrian Gonzalez homered for the fourth consecutive game but couldn't prevent San Diego from losing its 11th straight on the road, its longest skid in 38 years. Ryan Dempster (3-2 and three hits over seven innings. He also drove in two runs with a double and a single as the Cubs completed their first three-game sweep of the Padres at home since 1999. San Diego was outscored 42-18 dur ing an 0-6 road trip. Chad Gaudin (0-3 in 4 1-3 innings for the Padres. Brewers 5, Marlins 3 At Milwaukee, Prince Fielder hit a goahead homer and Dave Bush turned in another strong start to help the Brewers complete a three-game sweep. Trevor Hoffman earned his eighth save and has yet to give up a run in nine innings this season for Milwaukee, which has won nine of 11. It was the fourth straight loss for the Marlins and a short afternoon for Josh Johnson, who walked five in only four innings. Fielder connected in the fifth off Burke Badenhop (2-2 RBI single in the sixth for a 5-3 lead. Bush (2-0 up two earned runs in seven innings. Astros 5, Rockies 3 At Denver, Wandy Rodriguez struck out a career-high 11 and Michael Bourn stole home on the back end of a double steal to lead Houston. Bourn tied a career high with four hits and finished with two stolen bases. Carlos Lee homered for the Astros. Rodriguez (4-2 runs in seven innings, raising his ERA to 1.90 still among the lowest in the majors. Chris Sampson worked a perfect eighth and LaTroy Hawkins got his fifth save. The Rockies committed three errors behind starter Jason Hammel (0-2 gave up four runs one earned in 5 1-3 innings. Cardinals 5, Pirates 1 At Pittsburgh, Colby Rasmus hit a two-run homer and the Cardinals avoided a sweep against the last-place Pirates. The Cardinals had lost five consecutive games in Pittsburgh and were in jeopardy of being swept in a three-game series for the first time since Sept. 1214, also at PNC Park. Depleted by injuries, St. Louis had lost four of five and seven of 10. Trever Miller (1-0 loaded jam in the fifth to earn the win. Albert Pujols had a two-run single for St. Louis. Pittsburgh's Jeff Karstens (1-2 up three runs and seven hits in six innings. Mets steal team-record 7 bases in win over Giants n By The Associated Press S S C C O O R R E E B B O O A A R R D D Saturday, May 16 N o games scheduled. There are two Game 7s on Sunday, with Houston visiting the Los Angeles Lakers, and Boston hosting Orlando. S S T T A A R R S S Wednesday Dwight Howard, Magic, had 23 points and 22 rebounds to lead Orlando to an 83-75 victory over Boston in Game 6. Aaron Brooks and Luis Scola, Rockets. Brooks scored 26 points and Scola had 24 points and 12 rebounds as Houston forced a Game 7 in Los Angeles on Sunday with a 95-80 victory over the Lakers. G G O O T T H H E E D D I I S S T T A A N N C C E E For the second straight year, the Boston Celtics have gone the distance in two series in the playoffs. After surviving their first-round thriller against Chicago, Boston lost Game 6 in Orlando on Thursday. Last season, the Celtics won the decisive games against Atlanta and Cleveland on the way to their NBA-best 17th championship. S S T T R R O O N N G G I I N N D D E E F F E E A A T T Rajon Rondo had 19 points, 16 rebounds and six assists in Boston's 83-75 loss to Orlando in Game 6. Kobe Bryant scored 32 points, but the Lakers were forced to a Game 7 with a 95-80 defeat in Houston. L L E E T T ' ' S S G G O O T T O O T T H H E E V V I I D D E E O O T T A A P P E E ? ? NBA commissioner David S tern wants to see an expansion of the use of instant replay and is disappointed that t he league's competition committee hasn't been "bolder" in that regard. Speaking inH ouston before the Rockets hosted the Lakers, Stern said he could envision a system where challenges are used at the end of games, though he offered no specifics, adding that he expected the idea to get voted down. B B O O S S T T O O N N ' ' S S B B L L U U E E S S Thursday was a tough night for Boston, which saw its teams go 0-3. The Celtics lost 83-75 in Orlando in Game 6 of their series, while the Bruins were eliminated from the NHL playoffs with a 3-2 loss to Carolina and the Red Sox were beaten 5-4 by the Los Angeles Angels. The Celtics were the only ones to lose in regular time; the Bruins' loss went to overtime and the Red Sox fell in 12 innings. Beantown teams had gone 3-0 on Sunday and Tuesday. S S P P E E A A K K I I N N G G "For the last two days, all I 've heard is that we weren't going back to L.A. Our guys in the locker room didn't believe t hat." Houston coach Rick Adelman after the Rockets f orced Game 7 against the Lakers with a 95-80 victory "I guess Dwight Howard was right. My gosh. He was unbelievable." Celtics coach Doc Rivers on the Magic center, who had 23 points and 22 rebounds in an 83-75 Game 6 victory after demanding he be given the ball more NBA Today DAVID WRIGHT singles off San Francisco Giants starting pitcher Jonathan Sanchez in the first inning of a game in San Francisco... (AP Photo: Marcio Jose Sanchez DWIGHT HOWARD and Kendrick Perkins try to get position under the basket for a rebound during the first half of a second-round playoff game in Orlando, Florida... (AP Photo: Phelan M Ebenhack R ON ARTEST drives to the basket past Kobe Bryant during second half of Game 6 in Houston... (AP Photo: Pat Sullivan n By CHRIS DUNCAN AP Sports Writer HOUSTON (AP Game 7s, but this is one he probably didn't expect to be playing. Aaron Brooks scored 26 points, Luis Scola added 24 points and 12 rebounds, and the scrappy, undermanned Houston Rockets pushed the Los Angeles Lakers to the limit in their Western Conference semifinal series with a 95-80 win in Game 6 on Thursday night. Reserve Carl Landry scored 15 as the Rockets built another huge lead in the first half, then fought off a Lakers rally to force a winner-takeall showdown on Sunday at the Staples Center. Bryant scored 32 points for Los Angeles, which lost for only the third time in the last 18 games when it had a chance to close out a series. "I knew it was going to be a dogfight," Bryant said. "So here it is. Game 7, there's nothing else to do but go out and compete. This is what we do so it should be fun." Houston has managed to win two of the last three games in the series since Yao Ming went out with a broken left foot. And after losing by 40 points in Game 5, even fans calling into sports radio talk shows in Houston on Thursday were ready to write off their team. "For the last two days, all I've heard is that we weren't going back to L.A.," said Houston coach Rick Adelman. "Our guys in the locker room didn't believe that." S unday's winner will play the Denver Nuggets, who get an extended rest after finishing off Dal las on Wednesday night. " I think it's fun," Brooks said. "We enjoy it. We got them on their heels a little bit. The pressure's on them." T he Rockets put together a near carbon copy of the first half of Game 4, when they seemed to hit every open shot and smothered the Lakers on defense. Los Angeles opened the second half with a 162 spurt to cut the deficit to two, but Landry converted a three-point play to break the Lakers' momentum. The Rockets hit their last eight shots in the third quarter and took a 75-65 lead into the fourth. "I've stopped trying to figure this team out," Battier said. "Just when you think we're down and out, this team comes with an unbelievable effort. We may not have the most talented team, but there's not a team with more heart in this entire league. We've shown it again and again and again."

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ANDROS CAT ISLAND ELEUTHERA MAYAGUANA SAN SAL V ADOR GREAT INAGUA GREAT EXUMA CROOKED ISLAND / ACKLINS LONG ISLAND ABACO Shown is today's weather . T emperatures are today's highs and tonights's lows. KEY WEST WEST PALM BEACH FT. LAUDERDALE TAMPA ORLANDO Low: 70F/21C Low: 71F/22C Low: 75F/24C Low: 74F/23C Low: 73 F/23 C Low: 75F/24C Low: 77 F/25 C Low: 74 F/23 C High: 87F/31C High: 88F/31C High: 85 F/29 C High: 84 F/29 C High: 84F/29C High: 84 F/29C High: 83F/28C Low: 74F/23C High: 84F/29C Low: 76 F/24 C High: 87F/31C RAGGED ISLAND Low: 75F/24C High: 82 F/28 C Low: 73F/23C High: 80 F/27 Low: 71F/22C High: 83F/28C Low: 73 F/23C High: 86F/30C Low: 77 F/25 C High: 86F/30C Low: 76 F/24 C High: 83F/28C Low: 73 F/23 C High: 84F/29C Low: 78F/26C High: 86 F/30 C Low: 79F/26C High: 85F/29C High: 83 F/28 C FREEPORT NASSAU MIAMI THE TRIBUNE SATURDAY, MAY 16 TH , 2009 PAGE 11 THE WEATHER REPORT 5-D AY F ORECAST A spotty shower or thunderstorm. Partly cloudy, a couple of t-storms. Mostly cloudy, a couple of t-storms. Cloudy with a couple of t-storms. Mostly cloudy, t-storms possible. High: 83 Low: 77 High: 84 High: 82 High: 86 A ccuWeather RealFeel A ccuWeather RealFeel A ccuWeather RealFeel A ccuWeather RealFeel A ccuWeather RealFeel Rather cloudy, t-storms possible. High: 85 Low: 75 Low: 75 Low: 75 AccuWeather RealFeel 91F T he exclusive AccuWeather RealFeel Temperature i s an index that combines the effects of temperature, wind, humidity, sunshine intensity, cloudiness, precipitation, pressure, and e levation on the human bodyeverything that effects how warm or cold a person feels. Temperatures reflect the high and the low for the day. 74F 85-80F 87-74F 97-73F 90-77F Low: 77 TODAYTONIGHTSUNDAYMONDAYTUESDAYWEDNESDAY A LMANAC High ..................................................86F/30C Low ....................................................77F/25C Normal high ......................................84F/29C Normal low ........................................71F/22C Last year's high .................................. 84 F/29C Last year's low .................................. 70 F/21C As of 2 p.m. yesterday ..................................trace Year to date ..................................................2.21" Normal year to date ......................................9.59" Statistics are for Nassau through 2 p.m. yesterday Temperature Precipitation S UN AND M OON T IDESFOR N ASSAU Last New First Full May 17 May 24May 30Jun. 7 Sunrise . . . . . . 6:25 a.m. Sunset . . . . . . . 7:48 p.m. Moonrise . . . . . 1:07 a.m. Moonset . . . . 12:29 p.m. Today Sunday Monday Tuesday HighHt.(ft.LowHt.(ft. 1:12 a.m.2.47:31 a.m.0.5 1:36 p.m.2.37:46 p.m.0.6 2:02 a.m.2.38:18 a.m.0.4 2:30 p.m.2.38:45 p.m.0.6 2:56 a.m.2.39:07 a.m.0.4 3:25 p.m.2.49:46 p.m.0.5 3:52 a.m.2.39:57 a.m.0.3 4:19 p.m.2.610:44 p.m.0.4 W ORLD C ITIES Acapulco91/3275/23pc88/3174/23c Amsterdam61/1651/10sh57/1347/8sh Ankara, Turkey82/2750/10pc82/2753/11c Athens81/2763/17pc80/2667/19c Auckland65/1858/14sh63/1753/11r Bangkok90/3280/26sh90/3278/25r Barbados85/2976/24sh85/2977/25sh Barcelona67/1955/12s65/1857/13s Beijing82/2760/15pc86/3063/17s Beirut78/2564/17pc79/2674/23s Belgrade84/2861/16pc85/2961/16s Berlin63/1749/9c71/2159/15c Bermuda74/2366/18s74/2368/20s Bogota65/1848/8sh66/1849/9sh Brussels63/1748/8c61/1652/11sh Budapest81/2757/13pc85/2955/12s Buenos Aires66/1852/11pc66/1852/11pc Cairo96/3571/21s100/3775/23s Calcutta97/3680/26t94/3480/26t Calgary69/2042/5pc70/2138/3c Cancun88/3175/23pc90/3271/21sh Caracas82/2771/21t81/2771/21t Casablanca74/2357/13s72/2257/13pc Copenhagen57/1345/7r55/1253/11r Dublin55/1246/7r57/1346/7r Frankfurt64/1745/7s70/2152/11sh Geneva 73/22 54/12 s 78/2556/13pc Halifax 54/12 46/7 s 55/12 47/8 sh Havana 83/28 69/20 r 84/28 67/19 r Helsinki 57/13 36/2s57/1339/3s Hong Kong 88/31 77/25 pc 88/31 76/24c Islamabad 112/44 73/22 s 114/45 75/23 s Istanbul86/3070/21c85/2970/21pc Jerusalem 78/25 62/16pc84/2862/16s Johannesburg 59/1548/8c59/1534/1s Kingston 86/3076/24sh86/3077/25r Lima77/2560/15pc76/2460/15pc London59/1546/7sh61/1648/8pc Madrid77/2552/11pc75/2350/10pc Manila87/3078/25s88/3177/25sh Mexico City79/2654/12t78/2552/11t Monterrey91/3268/20t83/2864/17t Montreal64/1741/5t57/1334/1pc Moscow52/1139/3sh55/1241/5pc Munich69/2050/10pc80/2655/12t Nairobi80/2664/17t81/2765/18t New Delhi 111/4385/29pc114/4586/30pc Oslo61/1641/5pc59/1546/7c Paris61/1650/10pc61/1652/11r Prague 68/20 48/8 r 76/24 56/13 pc Rio de Janeiro75/2367/19pc75/2366/18s Riyadh99/3778/25s100/3779/26s Rome 80/26 60/15 s 79/26 62/16 s St. Thomas85/2976/24pc85/2976/24c San Juan81/2745/7s74/2338/3pc San Salvador 86/30 70/21 t 84/28 73/22 t Santiago 63/1746/7pc59/1539/3c Santo Domingo82/2772/22t82/2771/21r Sao Paulo 68/20 57/13 s 71/21 57/13s Seoul68/2050/10r71/2148/8pc Stockholm 59/15 39/3 s 61/16 41/5 s Sydney 70/21 47/8 s70/2152/11s Taipei90/3275/23s83/2874/23sh T okyo 66/18 61/16 c 72/22 63/17 r T oronto 66/1839/3r61/1638/3pc Trinidad81/2764/17pc82/2764/17pc V ancouver 64/17 54/12 sh 65/1854/12c Vienna 72/2256/13c79/2661/16s W arsaw 68/20 45/7 r 66/18 48/8 pc Winnipeg 51/10 35/1 s 62/1643/6pc H ighLowWHighLowW F/CF/CF/CF/C T odaySunday Weather (Ws -sunny, pc -partly cloudy, c -cloudy, sh -showers, t -thunderstorms, r -rain, sf -snow flurries, sn -snow, i -ice, Prcp-precipitation, Tr -trace T ODAY ' S U.S. F ORECAST M ARINE F ORECAST WINDSWAVESVISIBILITYWATER TEMPS. NASSAU FREEPORT ABACO Today:E at 15-25 Knots2-4 Feet10-20 Miles77F Sunday:E at 15-25 Knots3-5 Feet10-20 Miles77F Today:E at 15-25 Knots1-3 Feet10-20 Miles76F Sunday:E at 15-25 Knots2-4 Feet10-20 Miles77F Today:E at 15-25 Knots1-3 Feet10-20 Miles76F Sunday:E at 15-25 Knots2-4 Feet10-20 Miles77F U.S. C ITIES Albuquerque78/2554/12t84/2858/14s Anchorage59/1541/5s62/1642/5s Atlanta82/2762/16t66/1849/9t Atlantic City74/2359/15t64/1740/4sh Baltimore78/2559/15t64/1744/6sh Boston64/1753/11pc62/1644/6sh Buffalo70/2140/4r57/1336/2pc Charleston, SC84/2868/20t80/2653/11t Chicago62/1639/3s57/1341/5s Cleveland72/2243/6t58/1437/2pc Dallas76/2456/13t77/2554/12pc Denver64/1744/6pc81/2752/11s Detroit68/2041/5t58/1440/4pc Honolulu85/2971/21s85/2970/21sh Houston87/3068/20t81/2760/15t HighLowWHighLowW F/CF/CF/CF/C HighLowWHighLowW F/CF/CF/CF/C HighLowWHighLowW F/CF/CF/CF/C T odaySunday TodaySundayTodaySunday Indianapolis70/2143/6t65/1841/5s Jacksonville83/2866/18t83/2862/16t Kansas City67/1944/6s68/2049/9s Las Vegas100/3771/21s103/3978/25s Little Rock78/2554/12t73/2249/9pc Los Angeles84/2862/16pc86/3062/16s Louisville76/2449/9t69/2045/7pc Memphis78/2556/13t70/2152/11pc Miami84/2873/22t83/2872/22t Minneapolis56/1335/1pc64/1748/8s Nashville78/2553/11t69/2046/7pc New Orleans84/2869/20t83/2861/16t New York71/2157/13t71/2149/9sh Oklahoma City69/2051/10t72/2249/9s Orlando87/3070/21t86/3068/20t Philadelphia76/2458/14t63/1745/7sh Phoenix 102/38 76/24 s 105/4077/25s Pittsburgh76/2446/7t61/1638/3pc Portland, OR 82/2752/11pc78/2555/12pc Raleigh-Durham 81/27 66/18 t 72/22 48/8 t St. Louis68/2048/8t69/2047/8s Salt Lake City 77/25 53/11 s 85/2958/14s San Antonio 86/30 65/18 t 80/26 59/15 t San Diego76/2461/16pc77/2561/16pc San Francisco 77/25 54/12 s 78/2555/12s Seattle70/2149/9pc69/2052/11pc T allahassee 86/3065/18t85/2959/15t T ampa 88/31 71/21 t 88/31 72/22t Tucson100/3766/18s100/3770/21s W ashington, DC 80/26 61/16t68/2047/8sh UV I NDEX T ODAY T he higher the A ccuWeather UV Index T M n umber, the greater the need for eye and skin protection. Forecasts and graphics provided by AccuWeather, Inc. Cold Warm Stationary Fronts Shown are noon positions of weather systems and precipitation. T emperature bands are highs for the day . Forecast high/low temperatures are for selected cities. 1 1 0 0 s s 0 0 s s 0 0 s s 1 1 0 0 s s 2 2 0 0 s s 3 3 0 0 s s 4 4 0 0 s s 5 5 0 0 s s 6 6 0 0 s s 7 7 0 0 s s 8 8 0 0 s s 9 9 0 0 s s 1 1 0 0 0 0 s s 1 1 1 1 0 0 s s Showers T-storms Rain Flurries Snow Ice AccuW eather .com

PAGE 11

T HE D istrict Grand Royal Arch Chapter of the Bahamas Scottish Constitution Holding of the Supreme Grand Royal Arch Chapter of Scotland was recently dedicated and consecrated on a visit to the Bahamas by Most Excellent Companion Charles Wolrige Gordon of Esslemont, First Grand Principal of the Supreme Grand Royal Arch Freemasons of Scotland. On this occasion Most E xcellent Companion Arthur R Chase was installed as the district’s first Grand Superintendent. T his event was significant as the Scottish Royal Arch Freemasons i n the Bahamas are now able to chart their own course under the direct supervision of The Supreme Grand Royal Arch Chapter o f Scotland. The new Grand Superintendent and Office Bearers are n ow fully responsible for administration of all Scottish Royal Arch Chapters, Lodges, Councils and Cryptic Councils in the Bahamas. I t is to be noted that Scottish Royal Arch Freemasonry existed in the Bahamas since 1978 with the dedication and consecration of the Saint Michael Royal Arch Chapter No 850. The First Principal of the Chapter was MEC James Wildgoose. The Chapter was then a ttached to the District Grand Royal Arch Chapter of Jamaica and t he Bahamas. In April 2004 the chapters and councils in the Bahamas come under the direct supervision of Most Excellent C ompanion Arthur R Chase on his appointment as Grand Supervisor for Scottish Royal Arch Freemasonry of the Bahamas, thereby severing ties with the District Grand Royal Arch Chapter of Jamaica. However, records of Royal Arch Freemasonry in the Bahamas goes back to an earlier date of 1951 with the consecration o f the Royal Victoria Chapter No 443 of the English Constitution the First Principal was Howard McKinney. T he following now constitute the new Scottish Royal Arch District G rand Chapters of the Bahamas: Saint Michael Royal Arch Chapter No 850 Saint Andrew Royal Arch Chapter No 877 Ivan A Hanna Royal Arch Chapter No 885 Saint Anne’s Royal Arch Chapter No 887 Saint Gregory Royal Arch Chapter No 890S aint Michael Lodge and Council No 850 S aint Michael Cryptic Council No 850 1 Pictured on arrival at the Lynden Pindling Airport the First Grand Prin cipal of the Supreme Grand Royal Arch Chapter of Scotland MEC Charles Wolrige Gordon of Esslemont, being met by MEC Arthur R Chase, Grand Superintendent Designate for the District Grand Royal Chapter of theB ahamas. 2 Meeting with the Governor General of the Bahamas Arthur D Hanna (cen tre) from left to right: L Edgar Moxey, Third District Principal of the B ahamas; Thomas Frost, Past Deputy First Principal for Scotland; Arthur R Chase, Grand Superintendent of the Bahamas; Charles Wolrige Gordon of Esslemont, First Grand Principal for Scotland; Grahame Smith, Grand S cribe E; and James R Bain, Grand Superintendent of the Bahamas and Turks and Caicos. 3 M eeting at the VP Lounge with Brendon C Watson, Deputy Grand S uperintendent of the Bahamas; Grahame Smith, Grand Scribe E; Thomas Frost, Past Deputy First Grand Principal for Scotland; Charles Wolrige Gordon of Esslemont, First Grand Principal for Scotland; Arthur R Charles, Grand Superintendent of the Bahamas; Michael G Lloyd, First District Grand Standard-Bearer of the Bahamas; L Edgar Moxey, Third Grand Principal of the Bahamas and Joseph R Curry, First District Grand Sojourner of the Bahamas. 4 Office Bearers of the district. Seated left to right: Brendon C Watson, Deputy Grand Superintendent, Leroy N Thompson, Second District GrandP rincipal; Arthur R Chase, Grand Superintendent; L Edgar Moxey, Third District Grand Principal; and Roger G Brown, Grand Scribe E. Standing left to right: Anthony H R Richardson, District Grand Director of Ceremonies; Mitchell A Thurston, District Grand Janitor; James A Carey, Third District Grand Sojourner; Duncan DeBarros, Second District Grand Sojourner; Eugene Toote Jr, District Grand Steward; L Alexander Roberts, District Grand Scribe N; Dr Julian A Stewart, District Grand Steward; Bernard K Bonamy, District Grand Sword-Bearer; K Peter Turnquest, District Grand Treasurer; Justice Emmanuel E Osadebay, Second District Grand StandardBearer; and Prince A Bonamy, Deputy District Grand Director of Cere monies. 5 Visiting Deputations GE Trevor Jones, Grand Superintendent of Jamaica; Owen Springer, Grand Superintendent of Barbados; Thomas Frost, Past Deputy First Grand Principal for Scotland; Leroy N Thompson, Second District Grand Principal of the Bahamas; Charles Wolrige Gordon of Esslemont, First Grand Principal for Scotland; Arthur R Chase, Grand Superintendent of the Bahamas; L Edgar Moxey, Third District Grand Principal of the Bahamas; James R Bain, Grand Superintendent of the Bahamas and Turks; Keith Scott, Past Grand Superintendent of Jamaica; Brendon C Wat son, Deputy Grand Superintendent of the Bahamas and Grahame Smith, Grand Scribe E. 6 James R Bain, Grand Superintendent of the Bahamas and Turks, greets Charles Wolrige Gordon of Esslemont, First Grand Principal of Scot land. 7 At the banquet, left to right: Roger G Brown, Grand Scribe E; Peter D Cole, Past Grand Superintendent of the District Grand Chapter of the Bahamas and Turks; John Fuller, District Grand Officer, District Grand Chapter of the Bahamas and Turks; James A Carey, Third District Grand Sojourner of the Bahamas and Justice Emmanuel E Osadebay, Second District Grand Standard-Bearer of the Bahamas. 8 Meet the future: Grahame Smith, Grand Scribe E; Gustavaus S Fergu son, Mark Master Mason, St Michael Royal Arch Chapter No. 850 and Charles Wolrige Gordon of Esslemont, First Grand Principal for Scotland. C M Y K C M Y K L OCAL NEWS P AGE 12, SATURDAY, MAY 16, 2009 THE TRIBUNE the scene N A SSAU E V ENTS C A PTURED O N C A MERA b y Franklyn G Ferguson, J P DEDICATION AND CONSECRATION OF DISTRICT GRAND ROYAL ARCH CHAPTER OF THE BAHAMAS




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Pt boevinr if

91F
74F

McOQonald’s downtewn

drive-thru is now open

24 hours

Ei eee Bi

HIGH
LOW

Cloudy with
“ey Storms

Volume: 105 No.144

Minister visits

OES,

STAPLEDON SCHOOL ADDS NEW $1.5M WING



Pratt: ‘I might
have been dead
without prayer’

= By PAUL G
TURNQUEST
Tribune Staff Reporter
pturnquest@tribunemedia.net

FORMER Deputy Prime
Minister Cynthia Pratt has told
how the prayers of Reverend
Dr Inez Rolle saved her life
during a brazen daylight bank
robbery.

“Mother” Pratt was a cus-
tomer in Scotiabank’s Wulff
Road and East Street branch
when the early morning hold-
up took place yesterday.

Still shaken by the ordeal,
Mrs Pratt said she didn’t realise
that the man who walked in the
branch behind her had come to
rob the bank.

Retailer’s
Sei MOL
PLM ELK
salaries

= By TANEKA
THOMPSON
Tribune Staff
Reporter
tthompson@tribunemedia.net

DISGRUNTLED staff
from luxury retailer
Solomon's Mines claim they
are again burdened with late
salary payments, this time
dating back four weeks.

Several employees told
The Tribune they were sup-
posed to be paid yesterday
but the money never came.
With mortgage or rent and
other bills piling up, they
are calling on executives to
make good on the overdue
earnings.

"We have not been paid
in over a month," said a sin-
gle mother-of-four who has
dedicated more than five
years of service to the chain.
"Everybody is frustrated
because there is no money
and we have needs and
commitments. It’s a strug-
gle".

Another employee, who
claimed some staff members
are owed for the pay period

SEE page 7



a Nas) Vai



Noting that the bank was
almost completely empty, Mrs
Pratt said she stopped for a
moment to speak with the secu-
rity guard at the front door
before making her way to the
female teller.

However, as she approached
the woman, the male teller
motioned to her to come to his
station instead.

“When I went to the teller he
was talking to me and I noticed
how the people were starting to
act strange. I didn’t know it was
a robbery until I noticed every-
one going to the back and I said
to the young man, what is going
on. Then the young man said
to me, ‘Mother, we just got
robbed!?’ And I said, what?
And the (robber) was right next
to the next teller and I didn’t
know.

“Only after the police showed
up did I take with the shakes. It
all happened so fast. I could
have been gone as quickly as
that. It was a matter of sec-
onds,” she said. The robbery
took place at about 11am.

Early yesterday morning, Mrs
Pratt said Dr Rolle the pastor of
Wings of the Eagle Redemp-
tion Ministries, phoned her and
asked her to allow her to “cov-
er her” that morning in prayer.
It is these prayers, she said, that
protected her throughout the
harrowing ordeal.

“And I thank God for that
prayer this morning because if it
wasn’t for that I might have
been dead,” she said.

According to information
reaching The Tribune, the lone
gunman entered the bank and
presented himself as a customer
to a woman clerk. Producing
what is believed to be a weapon,
the robber was able to make

SEE page 7



=USA TODAY.

BAHAMAS EDITION

www.tribune242.com

SATURDAY, MAY 16, 2009



rc
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EX-DPM caught
ronbery

i te oe un Sd a i ‘i. =" or en = FPS ae A
LOCK DOWN: The Wulff Road and East Street branch of Scotiabank was closed yesterday follow





a

Mother tells son
not to return

Tim Clarke/Tribune staff

ing an



armed robbery that took place while ex-deputy prime minister Cynthia Pratt was there.

Haitian-Bahamian
led capsized boat

= By ALISON LOWE
Tribune Staff Reporter
alowe@tribunemedia.net

A HAITIAN-BAHAMIAN man is now
believed to have captained the boat that capsized
on its way to Florida killing at least nine people,
including a child.

According to reports in The Miami Herald,
the 24 known passengers on the vessel, all Haitian
migrants, told authorities they were in The
Bahamas for a month before they left for Florida.

Yesterday the United States Coast Guard
called off its search for survivors, which had
spanned 31-hours and 100 miles of Florida.

In addition to the nine bodies recovered since
the vessel sank at around 2am Wednesday,16
people were rescued alive.

Irvin McMphee, Chief Immigration Office on
Bimini, said the first his office heard about Bimi-
ni being the launching point for the ill-fated voy-
age was when he saw it on television on Wednes-

day.
Hiding

He does not believe the group could have spent
the entire month prior to leaving the Bahamas in
Bimini as they would likely have been discoy-
ered. ‘There are no Haitians in Bimini,” he stat-
ed.

However, he suggested that if the migrants
were in Bimini, it is likely that they were hidden
in the bushes in the more sparsely populated
southern part of the island.

‘What I understand is that they come out of
Nassau, and for some reason during their trans-
portation they stop here, and then they go before





Perilous toe ETE mtlenis (file photo)

we find them,” said Mr McPhee. “They wouldn’t
just be here walking around waiting to catch a
boat.”

Speaking to The Miami Herald from her
Bahamas home, Madeline Desir, the mother of
twin daughters who disappeared from the cap-
sized vessel, claimed she paid $3,000 to the Hait-
ian-Bahamian man for her daughters to be
brought from Haiti to Florida.

SEE page 7



NASSAU AND BAHAMA

ISLANDS’ LEADING NEWSPAPER



(V\

Pade ed a

PRICE —75¢ (Abaco and Grand Bahama $1.25)

a “-
Foreign teams in Nassau tourney

Two students
‘stabbed’ at
CC Sweeting

= By MEGAN
REYNOLDS
Tribune Staff
Reporter
mereynolds@tribunemedia.net

VIOLENCE at CC Sweet-
ing Senior High School cul-
minated in the stabbing of two
students this week, it has been
claimed.

A 32-year-old mother of a
grade 10 student told The Tri-
bune a grade 12 pupil and
another boy were injured in
a knife fight on Tuesday.

She also understands anoth-
er violent scuffle took place
in the school yard the follow-
ing day.

Police were unable to con-
firm or deny the alleged stab-
bing before The Tribune
went to press yesterday, and
school principal Mrs Delores
Ingraham failed to return our
calls.

Parents have alleged there
are five to seven gangs in the
school, and boys are taking
knuckle-dusters, cutlasses,
knives and even guns to the
campus in College Avenue.

The 32-year-old mother of
two ordered her 15-year-old
son not to return to CC
Sweeting after he was threat-
ened by a group of boys last
month.

Fears

The worried mother said:
“Pm not going to wait for
them to touch my child or
someone else’s child.

“These things happen and
I’m scared. He’s afraid for his
life and the other students
involved are too.

“People pick on the little
boys who look soft and my
boy looks soft. He’s quiet.”

The mother is distressed her
son is Missing out on vital
classes as his end-of-year
exams approach in June, but
she would rather he sacrifice
his education than be hurt or
killed.

She has asked for her son
to be transferred to a different
school, but has not yet been
accommodated.

She said: “They call him sis-
sy because he reported it to
the office, and to the parents,
and to the police, so now the
gang and everybody have him
for that.

“He wanted to go back this
week because he wants to do
his exams, but I said he can’t
go back. I don’t want him to
go back to that school.

“A lot of people are scared,
and their children don’t go
there, they try to get trans-
ferred, but they’re told they
can’t.

“IT know there is crime
everywhere, and all schools
have gangs, but it disturbs me
that they didn’t even try to

SEE page 7


PAGE 2, SATURDAY, MAY 16, 2009

THE TRIBUNE



LOCAL NEWS



Work on Grand
Cay Clinic being
re-evaluated

MAIN/SPORTS SECTION
Local News ala mon Om aml
Editorial/Letters. ...........:cccccecceeeceeeeeeeceeeeeeees P4

CLASSIFIED SECTION 36 PAGES

USA TODAY WEEKENDER 8 PAGES

BUTCH



THE WORK needed to ready
the Grand Cay Clinic for open-
ing is being re-evaluated and it is
hoped that construction will be
completed within the next 45
days, Algernon Cargill, director
of the National Insurance Board
(NIB), said yesterday.

Mr Cargill issued a press state-
ment in response to remarks
made by Senator Jerome Fitzger-



ald on the status of Grand Cay
Clinic during the senator’s con-
tribution to the Communications
Bill.

Mr Fitzgerald had criticised
the government for leaving the
$1.3 million clinic unused,
although it was apparently ready
for opening.

However, Mr Cargill said that
the building still needs some
remedial work and that NIB is
working “feverishly” to open it
to the public as soon as possible.

Since 1988, the NIB has been
engaged in a social investment
programme aimed at assisting
with the development and exten-
sion of health infrastructure in
the Bahamas, Mr Cargill said.

“The programme entails not
only the constructing, but also
the equipping, furnishing and in
some cases the maintaining of
quality health care facilities that
improve the quality and accessi-
bility of health care services for
insured persons and other resi-
dents throughout the country,”
he said.

To date, NIB has constructed
and furnished 18 such facilities
throughout the Bahamas.

According the NIB director,
the Grand Cay Clinic, currently
under construction and funded
by the National Insurance Board,
is not included in the 18 com-
pleted clinics because it is not
quite ready for occupation.

Mr Cargill explained that NIB
entered into a contract with
Island Bay Front Ltd, owned by
Roosevelt Curry, on May 1, 2002,
to construct a clinic on the island
of Grand Cay.

Three months later, construc-
tion was suspended and subse-
quently, the contract was termi-
nated.



MR Algernon Cargill said that the clinic still needs some remedial
work and that NIB is working “feverishly” to open it to the public

as soon as possible.

“On July 26, 2005, a contract
was awarded to Tony Rolle Con-
struction, with a completion date
projected at November 2006.
This work has not progressed
according to schedule, but
through consistent discussion and
dialogue with the contractor, and
in some cases direct financing of
the project due to challenges
experienced by the contractor,
the National Insurance Board
has been able to advance con-
struction to the current level of
95 per cent completion.

“Notwithstanding the con-
struction delays, the National
Insurance Board proceeded to
procure the medical and dental
equipment at the clinic. Two
Bahamian companies were
selected and the equipment
installation was completed two
weeks ago,” Mr Cargill said

He assured the public that
NIB is working “feverishly” with
the contractor to correct the

KERZNER

SUMMIT FOUNDATION

SKYCLIMBERS

OPEN HOUSE SATURDAYS

Phone number 363-0626

Ages 7-18 years.

Parents must accompany

under 14 years

Hours of operation

Tuesday-Saturday 9-5pm

Parents must sign waiver

for all climbers

Donation of $5.00 per person
and
ALL ages can come participate.



remedial work and complete the
clinic.

“We recognise the impor-
tance of this facility to the peo-
ple of Grand Cay and would not
deliberately delay the construc-
tion and/or transfer of this facil-
ity to the Ministry of Health.
The challenges experienced
were outside of the direct con-
trol of the National Insurance
Board and while we could have
rightfully terminated the con-
tractor, our focus has been to
provide him with the resources
and cash needed during con-
struction although he did not
meet the contract terms,” Mr
Cargill said.

The National Insurance
Board, the director said, has set-
tled all of its contractual obliga-
tions to the contractor and
remains committed to ensuring
that Mr Rolle completes the
contract according to the speci-
fications.





THE RESIDENCES
ATLANTIS

NASSAU
HARBOUR

THE COVE
ATLANTIS



TURN LEFT OFF OF THE ON-BRIDGE AND CONTINUE WEST THROUGH THE TUNNEL
UNTIL YOU ARRIVE AT THE TENNIS CENTER FOR PARKING.


THE TRIBUNE

LOCAL NEWS

SATURDAY, MAY 16, 2009, PAGE 3





School
ANCONA
its 40th
LPM AIOE AY

@ By DENISE
MAYCOCK
Tribune Freeport
Reporter
dmaycock@tribunemedia.net

FREEPORT - The Mar-
tin Town Primary School
will be celebrating 40 years
of primary education at
Eight Mile Rock, where a
number of activities have
been planned for former
and current students, teach-
ers and administrators.

Principal Mary Russell
said activities will kick-off
tomorrow, with a church
service at Mount Zion Bap-
tist Church in Jones Town,
Eight Mile Rock.

“We are calling on former
students, teachers, princi-
pals, and well-wishers to join
us in this service of thanks-
giving,” she said.

Under the theme, ‘Cele-
brate the Past, Embrace the
Future,’ Ms Russell said
activities have been planned
to commemorate the
school’s 40 years of exis-
tence on the island.

The activities planned are
as follows:

e Children’s programme
at the school at 10am on
Tuesday, May 26.

e History Day on the
school grounds on Thurs-
day, May 28.

e Grand celebration at
3pm on Monday, June 1.

Ms Russell said several
individuals will be honoured
during the grand celebra-
tion, including Victoria
Wright for being the longest
serving principal. She served
for 21 years.

Also being honoured are
Elcott Johnson, former prin-
cipal; Mrytle Carrol, a
teacher of 23 years; Carmie
Ferguson, a long-time jani-
tor, and Melvese Henly, a
former tuck shop operator
who provided food for
under-privileged students.

Insurance executive
David Wallace, a former
student, said they are
expecting about 2,500 for-
mer students to support the
event.

“We also want former
teachers, principals, and for-
mer parents to join in this
wonderful celebration. We
believe this is a wonderful
way to pay tribute to edu-
cators, students, and exist-
ing teachers who have
impacted many students’
lives,” he said.

Mr Wallace is urging for-
mer students to donate $40
which represents one dollar
for each year. The funds, he
said, will be used for the
establishment of a computer
lab and a new water foun-
tain at the school.

Mr Wallace said three top
bands are lined up for the
grand celebration, which will
commence with a parade
from the old Friendship
Shopping Centre to Sunset
Village.

Tamara Litton, a former
student, highlighted some
significant achievements of
the Martin Town Primary
School. “I attended MTPS
from 1968 to 1974 and the
MTPS was the leading
school in the Music Arts
Festival in the Caribbean.

“The teachers that passed
throughout that era — Mrs
Lopez, Vicky Martell,
Dorothy Lightbourne, Mr
Fernander, and Mr and Mrs
Gibbs — left a great impact
on our lives, they assisted in
rearing us to be the individ-
uals we are today.”

Ms Russell said there are
many accomplishments the
school can boast about.

Some of the achievements
include:

e Teacher Mildred
Roberts who was named the
National Teacher of the
Year for the Bahamas.

e The school placed first
in the National Arts Festival
in the Bahamian singing and
Gospel singing categories.

e The school is the cur-
rent winner of the 2008-2009
Junior Junkanoo Primary A
Division.

e The school also placed
4th out of 23 schools in the
Social Studies Competition.

¢ Two students were hon-
oured in the GLAT pro-
gramme by the Ministry of
Education.



Gap between murder
and trial causes worry

= By MEGAN REYNOLDS
Tribune Staff Reporter
mreynolds@tribunemedia.net

THE significant gap in the
number of murders reported
every year and the number of
murder trials filed in the
Supreme Court requires urgent
attention, president of the Bar
Association Wayne Munroe
said yesterday.

Although 72 murders were
reported to police in 2008, fol-
lowing 78 in 2007, just 17 mur-
der trials were filed in the
Supreme Court last year, and
the number of cases heard could
be even less, Mr Munroe told
The Tribune.

Even more disturbing are the
statistics for armed robbery
which show a whopping 782
incidents reported to police in
2008, and 820 in 2007, while
only 19 armed robbery cases
were filed in the Supreme Court
last year.

A total of 114 rapes were
reported to police in 2008, 136
in 2007. Only 14 rape cases were
filed in the Supreme Court in

Bar president says proposed
court reforms ‘went either
on a shelf or in a dust bin’

2008. Manslaughter appears to
be the only serious crime filed
in the Supreme Court at the
same rate of incidents.

Three reports of manslaugh-
ter were received by police in
2008 and four cases were filed in
the Supreme Court registry last
year.

Magistrates Court records
show 8,994 criminal cases were
heard in 2008 — 1,793 were com-
pleted and 6,167 adjourned.

Just 13 cases were transferred
to the Supreme Court.

Mr Munroe said: “The fig-
ures speak for themselves. This
doesn’t tell us the number of
cases that are heard in the
Supreme Court, but if you have
72 murders and 17 are tried,
that leaves 55 over.

“At that rate you won’t get
to try some of those people for

five years, but nobody can sug-
gest we can remand somebody
for five years. You wouldn’t
want 55 innocent people in
prison for that long.”

A leading defence attorney,
Mr Munroe was part of a task
force made up of lawyers, two
Supreme Court judges, magis-
trates, prosecutors, registrars
and police officers which looked
into the court system under
Dame Joan Sawyer’s rule as
Chief Justice in the 1990s.

The task force was mandated
with identifying the problems
and finding ways to make the
court system work more effi-
ciently.

Mr Munroe said the team
gave their time freely and found
a number of areas in need of
improvement, and devised a
number of simple, cost-free

solutions which were detailed
in a report presented to the pre-
vious FNM administration.

But Mr Munroe says the
report sat untouched under that
FNM government, continued to
be ignored by the PLP, and is
still being disregarded by the
current government.

“Tt went either on a shelf or in
a dustbin and nothing has hap-
pened and in the meantime the
situation gets worse,” he said.

The team found individual
defendant cases took 18 to 26
months for a trial to get to the
Supreme Court, and they
looked at the process step-by-
step to identify the reasons for
delay.

Mr Munroe said the number
of judges is not a problem as
judges sitting in the courts were
not being used when cases were
not brought before them.

He also maintains juries are
not hard to find. Mr Munroe
said the delays come from long
preliminary inquiries, a high
acquittal rate meaning few
defendants enter guilty pleas,
slow transportation of prison-

ers, and difficulty producing wit-
nesses. The task force’s sugges-
tions included devising a listing
system for people to check on
the progress of cases; a system
to ensure defence attorneys are
not double-booked; holding
plea and directions hearings to
ascertain admissible evidence
before the jury is called to court;
plea bargaining and holding
prisoners in cells at the courts
before the courts open.

Mr Munroe said: “They (the
measures) are very simple, most
of them cost no money, but
nothing has happened other
than trying to blame the per-
sons who have nothing to do
with it, which is the courts.

“The courts are there, the
judges sit every day, but when
only 60 per cent of their time is
used you can’t blame them
because cases aren’t before
them.

“Tt’s very possible to have 70
trials a year. A murder trial
takes five to seven days, so I
can’t understand why these tri-
als run for a whole month,” he
said.



CLOSE INSPECTION: Carl Bethel (second left, foreground), minister of education, examines construc-
tion work at the Stapledon School on Dolphin Drive

MINISTER of Education Carl Bethel was
escorted on a tour of the $1.5 million, state-of-the-
art wing of the Stapledon School on Dolphin

Drive.

The tour of the wing, still under construction,
was led by Lowell Mortimer, president of the
Bahamas Association for the Mentally Disabled,
which is spearheading and funding the project.

Mr Mortimer updated education officials on
the progress of the work stating that he is pleased
with the efforts of architect Anthony Jervis and
contractor Alder Minus. The building is expected
to be completed in early fall, 2009

Mr Bethel thanked Mr Mortimer and his asso-
ciation, noting that the construction of the new
facility is an excellent example of a public-private
partnership which benefits students and this par-
ticular case, the mentally challenged.

He further commended the BAMD for build-
ing the existing Stapledon School, which has been

on the current site since 1979,



Mr Bethel revealed that the ministry will be
responsible for furnishing and maintaining the
building once it is completed.

The new complex will house 12 multi-purpose

rooms and bathrooms and will be named in hon-
our of Sybil Blyden, the school’s first Bahamian
principal and a strong supporter of the mentally
challenged in the Bahamas.

Minister Bethel said he was delighted that Mrs
Blyden had a chance to learn that the structure
was being named in her honour, as she passed
away just as work began on the new building.

Anthony Jervis, architect for the project,

revealed that the building will have universal
access for persons with special needs and when
completed will be connected to the existing school
by a covered porch, steps and walkway.

The facility will also be air-conditioned with
sliding acoustic partitioned-walls and the com-
plex will accommodate the school’s auditorium
and art centre.

Defence Force to commission planes

THE ROYAL Bahamas
Defence Force is commissioning
two new aircraft at the Lynden
Pindling Airport on Monday.

Minister of National Security
and Immigration Tommy Turn-
quest will deliver the keynote
address at the service of dedica-
tion for the two new aircraft — a
Vulcan Air P68C Observer and a
Cessna 208B Grand Caravan
Aircraft.

The Observer aircraft was

Motorists
warned

ROAD works have started
on Atlantic Drive — the road
that runs past the Supervalue
food store, south of the second
round-about off West Bay
Street.

“We advise motorists to exer-
cise caution as they travel this
area over the next few weeks,
and to please slow down and be
patient around road workers,” a
release from Killarney MP Dr
Hubert Minnis said.

Dr Minnis said that while the
road works can be an inconve-
nience, the Ministry of Works is
working hard to provide a bet-
ter road system for the commu-
nity.

built in Naples, Italy, and dis-
tributed by the Orlando Sanford
Aircraft Sales in Sanford, Flori-
da. The Cessna Grand Caravan
was manufactured by Cessna in
Wichita, Kansas. Both aircraft,
along with the existing King Air
350, will improve the Defence
Force’s capability in patrolling
the country’s borders and
become valuable assets in the
fight against illegal maritime
activities in Bahamian waters.

They are equipped with state-of-
the-art communication equip-
ment to conduct the multifac-
eted duties that will be required
of the Defence Force.



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Minister tours
school’s $1.5m
wing expansion

ROYAL BANK OF CANADA TRUST COMPANY
OSS E NB RN LIEU sD)
is considering suitable applications for the role of

Manager, Trust and
Corporate Services

Description of role and key responsibilities:

¢ Lead and manage a team of trust officers and other
staff: this includes providing advice in respect of clients
and cases, coaching staff and ensuring the effective
utilisation of other resources. Instrumental in developing
and implementing company procedures within

appropriate frameworks.

Possess a superior knowledge of Trust (complex and
simple), Company and Fiduciary structures, and tax
and legal issues affecting the administration of Trusts

and Companies.

Ensure that strong technical knowledge of all aspects
of trust and compan y administration is delivered: this

includes attending cli

ent meetings and

supervising/assisting in respect of the preparation of
accounting and investment information prior to

submission to clients

Experience with the preparation and presentation of
financial and estate planning proposals to high net

worth individuals

Providing assistance to increase profitability of the
company/shareholder value by identifying
opportunities to extend the trust services, and to use
the bank offering to implement solutions for clients

where appropriate

Proven superior sales acumen. With ability to attract,
build and strengthen relationships with key clients and
intermediaries and identify new ideas in relation to
products and services that may be offered by the

company

Core skills and knowledge:

* A University degree in business, accounting, or other

related discipline

¢ Aminimum of ten years’ relevant experience
Professionally qualified, e.g. accounting/finance
qualification, STEP ICSA, TER ACCA
Self-motivation with excellent project management
Demonstrably strong technical knowledge of all aspects
of trust and company administration, including the
nuances and statutory requirements of the major
offshore jurisdictions used in connection with clients'

structures

Strong analytical and problem-solving skills
Methodical, thorough and attentive to detail
Strong supervisory skills coupled with the ability to lead

by example

Strong skills in time management and prioritisation
Excellent oral and written communication skills

Microsoft Office skills

Cultural awareness and sensitivity on both an individual

and corporate basis

Interested persons should apply by May 22, 2009 to:

Royal Bank of Canada Trust Company
(Bahamas) Limited
PO Box N-3024
Nassau, NP Bahamas
Attention: Human Resource Manager
Via Email: paul.lewis @rbc.com or
elizabeth.dorsch@rbc.com

Only applications from suitably qualified candidates
will be acknowledged

www.rbcroyalbank.com/carlbbean/bahamas

NS Neen Ik
Royal Ban
.of Canada

Ce ee Tue ue ec)


PAGE 4, SATURDAY, MAY 16, 2009 THE TRIBUNE



EDITORIAL/LETTERS TO THE EDITOR

Unnerved by
new breed



The Tribune Limited

NULLIUS ADDICTUS JURARE IN VERBA MAGISTRI
Being Bound to Swear to The Dogmas of No Master

LEON E. H. DUPUCH, Publisher/Editor 1903-1914

SIR ETIENNE DUPUCH, Kt, O.B.E., K.M., K.CS.G.,
(Hon.) LL.D., D.Litt.

Publisher/Editor 1919-1972
Contributing Editor 1972-1991

EILEEN DUPUCH CARRON, C.M.G., M.S. B.A., LL.B.

Publisher/Editor 1972-

Published Daily Monday to Saturday

Shirley Street, RO. Box N-3207, Nassau, Bahamas
Insurance Management Building., P.O. F-485, Freeport, Grand Bahama

TELEPHONES
Switchboard (News, Circulation and Advertising) 322-1986
Advertising Manager - (242) 502-2352
Circulation Department - (242) 502-2387
Nassau Fax: - (242) 328-2398
Freeport, Grand Bahama: 1-(242)-352-6608
Freeport fax: (242) 352-9348

WEBSITE
www.tribune242.com — updated daily at 2pm

Fiscal suicide ahead for US?

BARACK OBAMA came to office with a
theory. He believed that the country was in des-
perate need of new investments in education,
energy and many other areas. He also saw that
the nation faced a long term-fiscal crisis caused
by rising health care and entitlement costs. His
theory was that he could spend now and save lat-
er. He could fund his agenda with debt now
and then solve the long-term fiscal crisis by con-
trolling health care and entitlement costs later
on. In essence, health care became the bank
out of which he could fund the bulk of his agen-
da. By squeezing inefficiencies out of the health
care system, he could have his New New Deal
and restore the nation to long-term fiscalbal-
ance.

This theory justified the tremendous ramp-up
of spending we’ve seen over the last several
months. Obama inherited a $1.2 trillion deficit
and has quickly pushed it up to $1.8 trillion, a
whopping 13 percent of GDP. The new debt
will continue to mount after the economy recov-
ers. The national debt will nearly double over
the next decade. Annual deficits will still hover
around 5 percent or 6 percent of GDP in 2019.
By that year, interest payments alone on the
debt are projected to be $806 billion annually,
according to the Congressional Budget Office.

Obama believes these deficit levels are toler-
able if he can fix the long-term fiscal situation,
but he hasn’t been happy about them. He’s been
prowling around the White House prodding his
staff to find budget cuts. Some of the ideas they
have produced have been significant (Medicare
reforms), some have been purely political (ask-
ing Cabinet secretaries to cut $100 million in
waste, fraud and abuse), and many have been
gutted on Capitol Hill (cap and trade, proposed
changes in charitable deductions, proposed
changes to the estate tax).

In any case, these stabs at fiscal discipline
haven’t come close to keeping up with the explo-
sion in spending. The government now borrows
$1 for every $2 it spends. A Treasury bond auc-
tion earlier this month went poorly, suggesting
the world’s hunger for U.S. debt is not limitless.

Obama has been thrown back on his original
theory. If he is going to sustain his agenda, if he
is going to prevent national insolvency, he has to
control health care costs. Health care costs are
now the crucial issue of his whole presidency.

Obama and his aides seem to understand this.
They have gone out of their way to emphasize
the importance of restraining costs. The presi-
dent has held headline-grabbing summits with

business and union leaders. Unlike just about
every other Democrat on the planet, he empha-
sizes cost control as much as expanding health
coverage. So what exactly is the president
proposing to help him realize hundreds of bil-
lions of dollars a year in savings?

Obama aides talk about “game-changers.”
These include improving health information
technology, expanding wellness programs,
expanding preventive medicine, changing reim-
bursement policies so hospitals are penalized
for poor outcomes, and instituting comparative
effectiveness measures.

Nearly everybody believes these are good
ideas. The first problem is that most experts,
with a notable exception of David Cutler of
Harvard, don’t believe they will produce much
in the way of cost savings over the next 10 years.
They are expensive to set up and even if they
work, it would take a long time for cumulative
efficiencies to have much effect. That means
that from today until the time Obama is, say, 60,
the US. will get no fiscal relief.

The second problem is that nobody is sure
that they will ever produce significant savings.
The Congressional Budget Office can’t really
project savings because there’s no hard evi-
dence they will produce any and no way to mea-
sure how much.

If you read the Congressional Budget Office
testimony and talk to enough experts, you come
away with a stark conclusion: There are deep
structural forces, both in Medicare and the pri-
vate insurance market, that have driven the
explosion in health costs. It is nearly impossible
to put together a majority coalition for a bill
that challenges those essential structures. There-
fore, the leading proposals on Capitol Hill do
not directly address the structural problems.
They are a collection of worthy but speculative
ideas designed to possibly mitigate their effects.

The likely outcome of this year’s health care
push is that we will get a medium-size bill that
expands coverage to some groups but does rel-
atively little to control costs. In normal condi-
tions, that would be a legislative achievement.

But Obama needs those cuts for his whole
strategy to work. Right now, his spending plans
are concrete and certain. But his health care
savings, which make those spending plans
affordable, are distant, amorphous and uncer-
tain. Without serious health cost cuts, this burst
of activism will hasten fiscal suicide.

(This article was written by David Brooks-

c.2009 New York Times News Service).



of ‘pot hole’

LETTERS

EDITOR, The Tribune.

I find it almost unnerving to
drive out West these days as at
the junction of West Bay Street
and Blake Road as many peo-
ple know there is a “pot hole”
not to be confused with a “pot
cake.” Asa pothole it certain-
ly rates as one of the giants of
the breed and in fact if you were
to unfortunately fall into it you
might reach Australia. This hole
has been in existence for at least
a month and was at one point
filled with rocks which did little
to make it look like a piece of
road, and a well used road at
that. The unnerving part about
the whole thing is that there
must be members of the Min-
istry of Works that pass by and
even perhaps Cabinet Ministers

letters@tribunemedia net



who must notice that all is not
well with the tarmac below
them. But then the ministers
are not driving. However, I
wonder if after passing it a cou-
ple of times they say “oops, that
hole is still there, maybe we
should do something about it”
and tie a knot in their handker-
chiefs to remind them to have
their assistants call their col-
league the Minister of Works.
On the other hand maybe
they don’t carry handkerchiefs,
and have poor memories. Per-
haps the minister of traffic lights
who I think announced the oth-

er day that seven traffic lights
had stopped working and
should be fixed might redeem
himself by fixing the pothole.
Has this particular minister not
noticed that traffic lights have
not been working for ten years
and the count is way over seven.

However, I think the traffic in
most cases flows more smooth-
ly without them although it is a
pity to waste the new ones that
were installed not too long ago
but fail to function properly.
Probably in these hard times
ministers should return to rais-
ing their goats and the rest of us
can worry about the potholes
and traffic lights.

PATRICK H THOMSON
Nassau,
May 6 2009.

Why we Bahamians
are ready for change

EDITOR, The Tribune.

Why Bahamians are ready for change in the
Bahamas? The reason is the bad economy, high
unemployment, high rate of crime, high cost of liv-
ing, an economy build only on Banking and
Tourism, lack of vision, ideas and leadership for
the Bahamas and the Bahamian people. This is
why the Bahamas and the Bahamian people are
hungry, ready, and prepared for change, because
they are finding it hard to find jobs, buy gro-
ceries for family, pay electrical bill, rent or mort-

some Bahamians, who are tired waiting for
change in the Bahamas. However this also show

in advance.

gage and private school fees for children.

The recent events of Haitians and Bahamians
leaving Bimini by boat to go to Florida illegally,
is a clear sign how ready, hungry and prepared

Nassau,

May 14, 2009.

the dramatic need for change, that the young
generation of Bahamians will change Bahamas
politic in the next general election ages 18-45.
Change is happening in the hearts and minds of
the Bahamian people who want real change in
their lives, children and their country for a better
future. Change and help is soon on it way for
our Bahamaland. Would be grateful to have this
letter in your valuable newspaper, thanking you

PEDRO SMITH

A new day dawns with
Obama’s foreign policy

EDITOR, The Tribune.

On April 7, 2009, President
Obama made a surprise visit to
Baghdad. It made a fitting con-
clusion to an unusually long and
varied presidential tour. It was a
tour, moreover, on which the
novice US leader was rarely less
than pitch-perfect. For hopeful
Europeans, as for Turkey,
George Bush’s problematic
eight years in the White House
were thoroughly laid to rest.

It was re-engagement with
America's old friends and allies
that the new president was
after, he was amply rewarded,
but only because, in his phrase,

PUBLIC NOTICE

INTENT TO CHANGE NAME BY DEED POLL

The Public is hereby advised that |, ALEXANDRA ANGEL
BROOKE SHERMAN of Nassau, Bahamas, intend to my
name to ANGEL ALEXANDRA BROOKE SHERMAN, If
there are any objections to this change of name by Deed Poll,
you may write such objections to the Chief Passport Officer,
P.O.Box N-742, Nassau, Bahamas no later than thirty (30)
days after the date of publication of this notice.

eee hee

Leon Byron Arthur Well

retired science teacher, formerly of Grenada who died at
Doctor’s Hospital on 12th May 2009, will be held at Holy
Cross Anglican Church Highbury Park, New Providence,
The Bahamas, on Saturday 16th May 2009 at 5 p.m.

Mr. Wells has taught natural sciences in The Bahamas
since 1968 at; St. Augustine’s College, C.C. Sweeting Se-
nior High School, and H.O. Nash Junior High.

Mr. Wells leaves to mourn his sister, Mrs. Elsa Wells
Schioler (Denmark) and brother Mr. Alleyne Leslie Wells
(Trinidad and Tobago), and many other family members
and friends.

PUBLIC NOTICE

INTENT TQ CHANGE NAME BY DEED POLL

The Public is hereby advised that |, PRINISCA S. MCKINNEY
of New Providence, the biological mother of GHITA CARLEE
LOUISE LOCHAN TAYLOR intend to my daughter's name to
GHITA CARLEE LOUISE LOCHAN MCKINNEY, If there are
any objections to this change of name by Deed Poll, you may
write such objections to the Chief Passport Officer, P.O.Box
N-742, Nassau, Bahamas no later than thirty (30) days after
the date of publication of this notice.

Call For Registration Details

324-7770

Success Training College is registered with the Minis-
try of Education and approved by the Department of
Public Personnel Credits earned at Sueeess are trans-
forable to Nova Southeastern University. Graduates
may also transfer to other colleges and universities in
Canada, the USA, the UR and the Caribbean, Call
Suecess now for program and registration informa
tion,

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NOTICE

NOTICE is hereby given that ROSELANDE
DUVERSONNE of STEP STREET, FOXHILL,NASSAU,
BAHAMAS is applying to the Minister responsible
for Nationality and Citizenship, for registration/

naturalization as a citizen of The Bahamas, and that
any person who knows any reason why registration/
naturalization should not be granted, should send a
written and signed statement of the facts within twenty-
eight days from the 9 day of May, 2009 to the Minister
responsible for nationality and Citizenship, P.O. Box
N-7147, Nassau, Bahamas.



he arrived with hands out-
stretched. We cannot know
what took place behind closed
doors, but we can judge, from
the smiles of such stoney-faced
characters as the Russian Pres-
ident Dmitry Medvedev, and
China’s President Hu Jintao,
that a new day has dawned.

The G-20 London summit
may have produced more style
than substance. But style and,
above all, tone are not to be dis-
counted in international rela-
tions. Getting such things right
is something many new nation-
al leaders have to learn and
some never master. President
Obama, and, it must be said, his
wife Michelle, are naturals.

For any national leader, even
one who has triumphed in a
marathon US presidential cam-
paign, this would have been an
exhausting tour, demanding a
different approach, and differ-
ent expertise, at every stop. Yet
President Obama seemed to
draw new strength from each
encounter. The bigger and more
engaged the audience, the more
energised he seemed to be.

In London there was the eco-
nomic crises, high diplomacy
and protocol. In Strasbourg
there was the finely balanced
French-German duo to please,
and the NATO allies to be
cajoled over Afghanistan. In
Prague, President Obama met
“new” Europe face to face and
set out his vision for a world
with far fewer, and eventually
no, nuclear weapons, even as
North Korea conducted its lat-
est abortive rocket test.

He arrived in Turkey with the
message that the US was not
“at war with Islam” and that its
relations with the Muslim world
would not be defined by oppo-
sition to al-Qa’ida. In Istanbul,
he pressed home his ecumenical
theme by meeting leaders of all
the city’s main religions. And

thence to Baghdad, as Com-
mander-in-Chief, to address the
servicemen whose eventual
withdrawal he had announced
as one of his first presidential
acts.

To pull all this off and leave
so few dissatisfied in his wake is
a considerable feat. Not for the
first time, we have to go back as
far as JFK for comparisons. If
President Obama’s main objec-
tive was to cast the United
States as a different type of
global player, more culturally
sensitive, more collegiate, then
he succeeded. To demand more
of a relatively young President
in office would be unreason-
able. Yet what was, without
doubt, a personal and political
triumph leaves two questions.

The low-key geniality
favoured by President Obama
was of a piece with his early
pledges to listen. But a time will
surely come when listening
must give way to doing, and
then it will be harder to please
everyone. We are certainly
watching an accomplished
politician and orator, but were
we watching a world leader in
the making?

The second question is as
much about America as its pres-
ident. Even before he set off,
some erstwhile supporters were
already voicing disappointment
that he had not been more rad-
ical. Others, still, argued that
he should be devoting all his
time to the US economy rather
than traipsing around foreign
parts. In any event, President
Obama will soon learn what
many a US president learned
before him: acclaim abroad
rarely translates into higher
approval at home.

JERRY ROKER
Nassau,
May 13, 2009.

PUBLIC NOTICE

INTENT TO CHANGE NAME BY DEED POLL

The Public is hereby advised that |, BRITTANY TONESHA
TEARDROP PEARCE of BLUEBIRD CRESSENT,

MONESTARY PARK, NEW PROVIDENCE, intend to my

name to BRITTANY TONESHA TEARDROP WILSON. If
there are any objections to this change of name by Deed Poll,
you may write such objections to the Chief Passport Officer,
P.O.Box N-742, Nassau, Bahamas no later than thirty (30)
days after the date of publication of this notice.


THE TRIBUNE

SATURDAY, MAY 16, 2009, PAGE 5



LOCAL NEWS





rR

m@ By TANEKA THOMPSON
Tribune Staff Reporter

"T vex at all these people on

brake on the four way stop!

- MAD MOTORIST.

and butter to our country. Don't
y'all realise that these people }
only worried about making }
money and as soon as things go }
sour they will push out and }
move on to the next best thing? }
The only way to ensure our }
country's viability is to grow }
more entrepreneurs and busi- }
ness minded folks instead of :
breeding hospitality geared peo- :

ple to serve the foreign elite.”

- "GET IT TOGETHER, PEOPLE,"

FOX HILL ENTREPRENEUR.

"Boy, I is so vex that them : |
politicians who sign all them for-
eign treaties abroad on political }
asylum an’ tings without we peo-
ple knowing. Them politicians ;
don't have enough common
sense ta know that we have to }
give 4,999,999, or less than half of
the 10 million-Haitian popula- }
tion, who never agree with they
own government in Haiti, politi-
cal asylum in we Bahamas if they
come over an' ask for it. And we
250,000 Bahamians ga' have to }

live with it, that's they law."

- CONCERNED CITIZEN.

* Are you vex? Send your com-
plaints to whyouvex@tribuneme- :

dia.net.

WSC: Odour in Straw
Market downtown
hot from sewer



THE Water and Sewerage i
Corporation ash said the odour : |
emanating from the area of the :
downtown Straw Market is not ;
related to the sewerage system. }

Management personnel from
the Corporation visited the }
Straw Market on Thursday
where they met with Ministry :
of Public Works officials who ;

were investigating he odour : life.

complaint.

is planning corrective action.

i ing and Allied
i Union’s (BHCAWU) executive
; board is urging all members to
i operate with “calmness”
i cially when vying for leadership
: positions in the upcoming union

whyyouvex@tribunemedia.net E elections.

BHCAWU members ecouraged
to ‘operate with calmness’

THE Bahamas Hotel Cater-
Workers

, espe-

This statement by the

: : BHCAWU comes after a fight
ee toa wite musey buy Tee broke at during last week’s
licenses because they is be acting }

like they ain' know how to use } 7. ; diff, t fact
the round-about or a four-way } ee
stop. I tired of all these biggety
no good drivers who Iswear ona } tals ne? cola &
vendetta to either mash up my } astrteny oe a
nice car or kill me - people y'all aaa ane
need to learn how to yield for } ecrerdawcnial
traffic on the round-about and y y :

leno ychow to a) least pretend ie vidual should reflect the quali-

"Tam advocating that at least ties of a true leader. We remind
every five years people take a } :
refresher course in driving before panee ph our cleeems anne
they can get their license ; which the union stands upon.”
renewed because this reckless- ee

2 tod . .
ness on the streets is deplorable! union premises on (May 4), the

i executive officers kept calm,
: and conducted lawful nomina-

"| vex tliat Bahamians ain' pet tions for the sake of the union

it through their heads yet that }
we can't rely on foreign }
investors to supply the bread }

nomination process between the
Labour Minister Dion
Foulkes described the incident
The statement by the board

“The temperament of an indi-

all and sundry of the impor-
honour the strong traditions of

“Despite the uproar on our

members. The executive offi-

Fight erupts between the
union’s different factions

cers paid respect to all mem-
bers and followed the rules as
decided by the members.”

Kirk Wilson was one of the
candidates who was unsuccess-
ful in securing a nomination.
Therefore, his team dismantled,
and several members nominat-
ed themselves as independent
candidates.

Tyrone Morris was also
unsuccessful in his nomination
bid.

The nominees for the execu-
tive offices of the BHCAWU
are as follows:

e President: Roy Colebrooke
— Justice Team; Nicole Martin —
A Team; Abraham Smith —
Hands Team; Tyrone Butler —
M Team

e Vice-president: Godfrey
Brice — A Team; Lionel Miller —
Hands Team; Sidney Rolle —
Justice Team; Oratio Whylly —
M Team

e Second vice-president:
Shamala McPhee — Justice
Team; Estella Pratt — Hands
Team; Anderson Sands — M
Team; Eliott Thompson — A
Team

e Third vice-president: Pan-
dora McKenzie — Hands Team;
Felix Munroe — Justice Team;
Carol Thompson — M Team;
Harrison Williams — A Team

¢ General Secretary: Hasten
Charlton — M Team; Leo A.
Douglas — Justice Team; Geno
Longley — Hands Team; Dar-
rin Woods — A Team

e Assistant General Secre-
tary: Kevin Gardiner — Justice
Team; Hanna Elisabeth — M
Team; Veronica Nesbitt —
Hands Team; Hubert Saunders
—-A Team

e Treasurer: Carolyn Dorsett
— A Team; Lolita Forde — M
Team; Samantha Gray-Francis
— Deliverance Team; Nevolia

Johnson — Hands Team; Basil
McKenzie — Justice Team

e Assistant Treasurer: Flo-
rence Knowles — Justice Team;
Patricia S. Mortimer — inde-
pendent; Samantha Ryan —
Hands Team; Joanne Sears —-M
Team; Sheila Taylor —- A Team

¢ Trustees: Karen Bastian —
Justice Team; Cheryl Beneby —
independent; Wilbert Collie —
Hands Team; Pearl Henfield —
Hands Team; Rose Musgrove
— Justice Team; Maria Roberts
—A Team; Lisa Robinson-Davis
—A Team; Lielin Thompaon —
M Team

¢ Council members: Max
Altidor — Hands Team; Ruth
Hanna — Hands Team: Ricar-
do Hepburn — A Team; Roberts
Coakley -— Justice Team;
Rodger Knowles — Justice
Team; Whitney Thompson —M
Team

The Ministry of Labour is
now preparing to assist with
elections on May 28 and the
arrangements being made for
Family Island members to par-
ticipate.



MINISTER Dion Foulkes described
the incident as an “embarrassing”
display by the union members.

“We support and reiterate
Minister Foulkes’ assertions
that all candidates on the list
act with due diligence, and cam-
paign in good faith, reminding
themselves of the purpose for
the elections,” the union’s exec-
utive board said.

HELPING HANDS 2



































THE family and friends of
murdered expatriate business-
man Hywel Jones are to hold a
celebration in honour of his

The event is scheduled to be

It has been determined that held at the New Providence

the unpleasant smell is coming }
from four storm drains in the :
market. The Ministry of Works }

Community Centre on Blake
Road on May 22, starting at
Spm.

Mr Jones became the 26th

; murder victim for the year



when he died at the Princess
Margaret Hospital from
injuries he received when he
was shot in the head by an
unknown assassin more than
three weeks ago.

He was shot at least twice
in the head and body as he
was getting out of his car in
his office car park near Com-
pass Point on West Bay Street
at around 10am on April 22.

A banker by profession, Mr
Jones was just 55.

Born in North Wales, Mr
Jones worked in the financial
services sectors in the United
Kingdom, Jamaica and the
Bahamas. He was the former
director of the Bankers’ Asso-
ciation of the Bahamas and

Catholic procession for Mary



the Bahamas Institute of
Bankers.

Mr Jones had lived in the
Bahamas for more than 20
years and had been an adviser
to the government on banking
legislation on several occa-
sions. His shooting, in broad
daylight, has yet to be solved.

A $50,000 reward, posted in
the local press last week for
information that might lead to
the arrest or conviction of
those responsible for his mur-
der, still stands.

Hywel Jones’ brother, IIt
Jones, has vowed to remain in
the Bahamas until whoever is
responsible for the banker’s
execution-style shooting has
been brought to justice.



m@ By DENISE MAYCOCK
Tribune Freeport
Reporter
dmaycock@tribunemedia.net

FREEPORT - Catholics on Grand
Bahama will take to the streets for the
annual Catholic May Procession tomor-
row in honour of the Virgin Mary.

Greg Christie, district deputy of the
Knights of Columbus and coordinator
of the procession, said the five Catholic
parishes on island will participate in
the procession, which starts at Mary,
Star of the Sea Parish at 5.30pm.

He said all church ministries and
organisations as well as Catholic stu-
dents and those attending other
schools are asked to assemble with a
banner, if available, at the church by
5.15pm.

“Catholics will come together to
honour in songs and anthems, and the
praying of the rosary the Blessed Vir-
gin Mary as our mother,” he said.

Mr Christie said during the month of
May - a month both named for and

dedicated to the mother of Jesus -
Catholics have long honoured Mary in
a procession with prayers and song,
and by placing a crown of flowers on
her image during a service following
the procession.

During the procession, he said, a spe-
cial recitation of the rosary will be held
at the church for those not be able to
join the procession around the area. It
will also begin at 5.30 pm.

“The tradition in the Bahamas and in
many other countries has been for
school children to have a ‘may crown-
ing’ ceremony, with a procession, pret-
ty dresses and a wreath of fresh flowers
that one child gets to place on the stat-
ue. A song for these events, ‘Bring
Flowers of the Fairest’ — with its refrain
‘O Mary, we crown thee with blossoms
today, Queen of the Angels, Queen of
the May’ — has been a familiar
favourite for generations,” said Mr
Christie.

Mr Christie said the Knights of
Columbus are inviting the Catholic
Church and school families from
throughout Grand Bahama to partici-

pate as Catholics honour the Blessed
Mother with the annual procession.

The route of procession will travel
from Mary, Star of the Sea Church east
to East Beach Drive, north on to Poin-
ciana Drive, west on Poinciana Drive
to East Atlantic Drive, and South on
East Atlantic Drive to East Sunrise
Highway, and east on Sunrise Highway
back to the parish where the benedic-
tion and evening service will be held
together with the crowning of a statue
of Mary.

During the procession, parishes will
alternate praying the rosary, the Joyful
Mysteries, and together sing Marion
Hymns.

“We invite and urge everyone to
make a sacrificial and special effort to
participate in this May Procession and
together plead for our Blessed Moth-
er’s intercession, her continuing love,
and to pray for peace in the world,” Mr
Christie said.

“Each time our Blessed Mother has
appeared on this earth she asked us to
make sacrifices in reparation to God
for our sins and to pray for the world.”









THE Englerston Urban Renewal
Livable Neighbourhood Pro-
gramme, in conjunction with the
grade 10 class of the Lyford Cay
International School and the
Englerston pastoral community,
provided grocery items to fami-
lies in the community on Satur-
day, May 2.

Dennis Dames, manager of the
programme said that the partici-
pants “exercised a spirit of com-
munity service by walking
through the community distrib-
uting boxes and bags of gro-
ceries to needy families, as a
response to the community’s
need for recession relief.”
Among those pictured are Mr
Dames, Pastor Greg Chisholm
of New Beginning Ministries
(front row) and Laurette Lock-
hart of the Englerston Urban
Renewal Programme, and
Natasha Arthur, Lekeisha
Chisholm and Helene DeJong,
all of Lyford Cay International.

Bahamas Bus & Truck Co., Ltd,

Montrose Avenue
Phone:322-1722 * Fax: 326-7452

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PAGE 6, SATURDAY, MAY 16, 2009

THE TRIBUNE



LOCAL NEWS



New entrep

SEVENTY new entrepre-
neurs will now be entering the
Bahamian business scene fol-
lowing a graduation ceremony
at the College of the Bahamas
last weekend.

They were participants in the
Bahamas Agricultural and
Industrial Corporation's 12-
week business empowerment
lecture series held in conjunc-
tion with the College's School
of Business, headed by Remil-
da Moxey.

"An army of entrepreneurs
who will transform the eco-
nomic landscape by establish-
ing sustainable business enter-
prises throughout our country
has been launched," said
BAIC's deputy general man-
ager Don Major.

Hosted by BAIC's Business
Services Department, the sem-
inar featured successful busi-
ness persons who shared with
participants proven business
techniques.

"It allowed participants to
avoid the pitfalls of those who

failed," said Mr Major, "and
acquire the knowledge and
expertise that successful busi-











THE GRADUATING class of the business empowerment lecture series is

pictured with College of the Bahamas vice-president Dr Rhonda Chipman-
Johnson, BAIC executive chairman Edison Key and BAIC officials.

ness persons have discovered.
"BAIC exists in order to pro-
vide entrepreneurs the option



of avoiding travelling by the
seats of their pants - the pain
and terror of learning by trial

Young tourism ambassadors of LIS

FREEPORT, GRAND
BAHAMA - Students of the
year two class of Lucaya Inter-
national School (LIS) became
true tourism ambassadors this
week as they created unique
posters to welcome the Com-
monwealth Local Government
delegates and regular tourists to
Grand Bahama.

The welcome presentation
was the brainchild of Ina
LeBlanc, the children’s class
teacher at LIS.

“This term’s unit of inquiry
was about tourism, how it relates
to us everyday and how impor-
tant it is. I thought it would be a
great idea for our students to
create an original flyer or poster
to tell tourists what they can do
in Grand Bahama and maybe
ask tourism to display them,”
Ms LeBlanc said. ‘Homeroom
mom’, Sarah Kirkby, suggested
that the school speak to the Min-
istry of Tourism and Grand
Bahama Airport Company to
ask them about displaying the
children’s work at the airport.

From there the project took
on a life of its own as Sherry
Rodgers Brookes, corporate
affairs manager of the Grand
Bahama Airport Company, and
Kendra Swain, an executive at
the Grand Bahama Tourism
Board, joined the team to make
the concept happen.

“Ms LeBlanc and Ms Kirkby
invited me into the school to
have a meeting to discuss their

ideas. I met the children and
talked to them about the impor-
tance of tourism in all our lives,”
said Ms Swain.

“During our discussions I
thought how appropriate it
would be to have these chil-
dren’s original designs up and
ready for our visiting delegates.”

Once permission had been
granted to display the children’s
work, Ms LeBlanc worked with
the students and parents to cre-
ate their own posters.

“IT wanted the kids to lead this
project, they decided on a sub-
ject for their poster and they




















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9.45 a.m.

WEDNESDAY at 7:30 p.m.

Selective Bible Teaching
Royal Rangers (Boys Club) 4-16 yrs.
Missionettes (Girls Club) 4-16 yrs.

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Erik J Russell/ KeeniMedia Photo

LUCAYA International School year two students show acting director
of LIS Nigel Kirkby the posters they designed for their inquiry unit on
tourism. The idea of displaying the children's work at the airport
came from Ms Ina LeBlanc, the students’ teacher.

worked with their parents for
their homework creating their
own posters to be displayed’”
said Ms LeBlanc. “And I want to
stress we were very firm that it
had to be child-led and created
too.”

As an added bonus the year
two students also spent an after-
noon at Billy Joe’s beach at Our
Lucaya taking class pictures and
individual ‘tourist’ pictures with
another year two parent Dave
Mackey.

Once the work was finished it
was then agreed that the posters
would be displayed at the
Tourism Welcome Centre in the
International Terminal.

To make it extra special for
the students, Senator Kay Smith
of the Prime Minister’s Office

and Terrance Roberts, director ;
of Business Development at the }
Tourism Ministry were invited ;

to judge the posters.

Last Friday, the project all

came together and the students,

Ms LeBlanc and LIS acting
director Nigel Kirkby went on }
a field trip to the airport to dis- }

play the work.
While they put up their work,

Senator Smith and Mr Roberts
viewed all the displays and chose }
Arabella Ferguson’s poster as }

the best one.
“All the work was impressive,

the students did not miss an }
activity, but for us Ms Fergu- }
son’s exuberance in her poster }
and the big Grand Bahama she }

created, really stood out,” said }
Senator Smith.
Mr Roberts added, “our :

beaches are our number one i T h ] ill
sand castle and day at the beach ec no OSy Wl Open
represents what our tourists long : ld f °

come her world of opporunity,

e work displayed showcas- }
es everything you can do on } ld
“hinekinacwine StUGents are to

scuba diving, shopping, horse- }
back riding, fishing, riding a jet- ;

resource, and Arabella’s fun

to come here for.”

Grand Bahama Island including

ski and more.

“T am so proud of my students
work,” said Ms LeBlanc, “
honest, creative and fun and

for the Bahamas.”

BAPTIST BIBLE CHURCH
SOLDIER ROAD & OLD TRAIL

Surctisy & Eesha:
Preaching
Redia Biole Hour:

oo

Sundey Bp - 2hS 2

1am

Weel. Prayer & Praise 3st

FUNDAMENTAL || __
Pam & 7:20pe EVANGELISTIC

Pascoe H. fills

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CENTRAL GOSPEL CHAPEL
CHRISTIE & DOWDESWELL STREETS ° Tel: 325-2921
SUNDAY, MAY 17TH, 2009

11:30 a.m. Speaker:
ELDER BRENTFORD ISAACS

Bible Class: 9:45 a.m. ¢ Breaking of Bread Service: 10:45 a.m.
¢ Community Outreach: 11:30 a.m. ¢ Evening Service: 7:00 p.m.
¢ Midweek Service 7:30 p.m. (Wednesdays)
¢ Sisters’ Prayer Meeting: 10:00 a.m. (2nd Thursday of each month)

Grace and Peace Wesleyan Church
A Society of The Free Methodist Church of
North America

WHERE GOD IS ADORED AND EVERYONE IS AFFIRMED

Y

Worship Time: Lla.m.

Prayer Time: 10:15a.m.

Church School during Worship Service

Place: Twynam Heights
off Prince Charles Drive

Minister: Rev. Henley Perry

P.O. Box SS-5631
Telephone number: 324-2538
Telefax number: 324-2587

COME TO WORSHIP, LEAVE TO SERVE

reneurs take their places

to provide you with all that you
need to start and run a busi-
ness successfully,” he said.

BAIC's executive chairman
Edison Key encouraged grad-
uates to take advantage of mul-
ti-million-dollar opportunities
in agriculture and souvenir pro-
duction.

He said BAIC can facilitate
that by allowing them to use of
tens of thousands of acres of
land BAIC owns and controls
in North Andros, Abaco and
Eleuthera.

College vice-president Dr
Chipman-Johnson underscored
the importance of being cre-
ative and versatile in the
approach to employment.

"Your presence at this semi-
nar is evidence that you are
prepared to meet the challenge
of helping to stimulate our
economy by engaging in some
kind of business activity,” said
Dr Chipman-Johnson. "We
need to increase the number
of citizens who are willing to
create employment."

and error. We provide training
opportunities and a myriad of
other services that are geared



Derek Smith/BIS Photo

DORIS Johnson senior Reubendero Gibson and principal Linda
Major present gifts of appreciation to Tourism Minister Vincent

i Vanderpool-Wallace.

MINISTER of Tourism and Aviation Vincent Vanderpool-

: Wallace encouraged seniors of Doris Johnson High School to
its i

develop career skills and market them worldwide, taking full

and } advantage of technology and the elements of globalisation.
they have had such a great time }
ees abou! eee eee i their Seniors Retreat at British Colonial Hilton, just weeks

ate Tope now Is tna’ “US | before they leave the haven of high school and begin careers.
concept can grow or expand to }

other schools and students. }

Tourism is everyone’s job and | Bahamas,” he said. “Your skill sets can be applied anywhere

if we can teach our children this ; 1 the world, and that’s something we are trying to get the peo-
early it can only enhance what ; ple at the Ministry of Tourism to understand very clearly.”
ambassadors they will become
? customers who can only be served while in the Bahamas. He

’ said technology should be used to engage non-Bahamians at all

Minister Vanderpool-Wallace addressed the students at

“Your skill sets do not have to reside only within the

Mr Vanderpool-Wallace said visitors should not be seen as

times, before and after they visit the country.

Almost every vocation has a tourism sector link, the minister
said. He urged future architects to design hotels that take
advantage of the natural environment and minimise energy
costs. He challenged future software designers to create a
programme that would allow yachtsmen to book specific mari-
na slips in advance of travel.

“And how about selling that software once you are finished
to anybody in the world, not just to me,” he said. “There is an
opportunity for you to do those kinds of things, and that is part
of tourism too.”

Minister Vanderpool-Wallace told the students that their
skills and talents will only be developed through hard work and
constant practice.

Grant’s Town Wesley Methodist

(Baillou Hill Rd & Chapel Street) RO.Box CB-13046

The Holy Ghost Prayer-Line number is 326-7427
(www.gtwesley.org)

SUNDAY, MAY 17TH, 2009
7:00 a.m. Rev. Mark Carey/Bro. Franklyn Bethel

11:00 a.m. Rev. Carla Culmer/Lay Preachers
7:00 a.m. Bro.Sidney Pinder/Men’s Fellowship

Theme: “ But As For Me And My Household, We Will Serve the Lord”

=m LIGHT AND LIFE COMMUNITY CHURCH

ces Grounded In The Past &
B.. Geared To The Future

Worship time: Llam & 7pm
Sunday School: 9:45am
Prayer time: 6:30pm
Place:

The Madeira
Shopping Center

Rev. Dr. Franklin Knowles

ALL ARE WELCOME TO ATTEND

Pastor: Rev. Dr Franklin Knowles

P.O.Box EE-16807
Telephone number 325-5712
EMAIL - lynnk@ batelnet.bs
THE TRIBUNE

SATURDAY, MAY 16, 2009, PAGE 7



LOCAL NEWS



Conference closes

FREEPORT - The fifth
Commonwealth Local Gov-
ernment Forum (CLGF)
closed on Thursday with a
farewell celebration at Port
Lucaya Marketplace for the
600 delegates from 46 Com-
monwealth nations.

A junkanoo rush-out was
held at the Count Basie
Square at 7.30pm to mark the
end of the three-day confer-
ence at the Westin Resort in
Lucaya.

Prime Minister Hubert
Ingraham and Jamaican
Prime Minister Bruce Gold-
ing attended the conference
and delivered remarks.

Patrick Manning, Prime
Minister for Trinidad and
Tobago, was unable to attend,
but a brief recorded audio
message was delivered at the
conference.

This is the first time that
the conference was held in the
Caribbean.



Families fear the
worst for migrants
on capsized boat

FROM page one

“When I saw the news and
saw all of those people, my
heart sank. I didn’t know,”
Desir said. “He told me only
five people were going (on the
boat).”

Mrs Desir said the boat cap-
tain promised her the vessel was
a “big boat, not a wooden ves-
sel.”

The mother said she agreed
to pay for the trip for her
daughters out of a sense of
hopelessness about their lives
in Haiti.

“They could not go to school.
I could not help them. They
said, ‘Mummy, see if you can
do something for us’,” Mrs
Desir said.

Another relative who spoke
with the Florida newspaper,
Ermanie Lubin, 47, said she was
desperately hoping her 28-year-
old nephew was not on the boat

after seeing the television news
on Wednesday.

He had been deported from
Florida to Haiti in 2007 after
being denied political asylum.
Married with a four-year old
son, he left his family behind.

“The last time I spoke to
him, he said, ‘Auntie, I can't
take it anymore. I just want to
die,’”’ said his aunt.

Her nephew had been Iving
in Port-de-Paix, a city in north-
west Haiti that was hit by three
consecutive hurricanes last sum-
mer.

After travelling to The
Bahamas several months ago to
escape the situation, his wife
received a call on Monday that
saw him tell her he was on a
small island and could not real-
ly talk.

He had also called an aunt,
telling her that he planned to
take a boat to the United States.
She warned him against mak-
ing the voyage.

Solomon’s Mines staff
reveal their frustration

FROM page one

of April 15 to May 15, suggest-
ed that employers at least pay a
portion of what is due so she
can put a dent in the mounting
bills.

"It's very frustrating because
you have a lot of people that
are single parents and everyone
has some form of commitment
whether it's mortgage or car
payments. There are persons
who are not working in the
tourism sector that are not feel-
ing the effects of the downturn
and landlords can say ‘Well if
someone else can pay why can't
you? of

While stating that the current
claims are "not true” company
head Mark Finlayson said while
in the past staff have sometimes
been paid late they are eventu-
ally paid.

"T have said (before) that the
company is definitely going
through difficult times. We are
not the only ones in the luxury
goods area who are going
through tough times. We are
not the only ones who are pay-
ing people sometimes later than
they should.

"Everybody has always been
paid (eventually) and I think in
economic times like these, it is

very important to have a job
and to get paid. I myself am the
last person to get paid in this
company,” he said.

Bearing in mind the harsh
economic realities hitting the
chain — evident in recent store
closures — executives met with
staff last September and asked if
they would prefer downsizing
or weather the economic storm.

Mr Finlayson said the group
chose the latter option.

Since 2006 the company has
cut staff by a third fluctuating
between 240 to 250 employees
at 18 locations.

He added that he has made
the decision to keep employees
on staff instead of further down-
sizing, who are paid "as cash
flow allows."

Yesterday Minister of Labour
Dion Foulkes said as far as he
was aware no such complaints
have been lodged at the depart-
ment of labour but said if one
were the agency would investi-
gate the claims.

He said if found guilty of such
an offence, the matter could be
pursued in the courts and would
be subject to a fine.

Earlier this year, fed up staff
from Solomon's Mines com-
plained that they had been paid
late on numerous occasions.

ROYAL FIDELITY

‘stonew at work

EE LETED = TRAD

Tourist recovers
from shark attack

A 48-year-old man is recovering at Jack-
son Memorial Hospital in Miami after fam-
ily members said he was attacked by a shark

while fishing in the Bahamas.

The shark reportedly bit the man under

his elbow.

According to the Sun Sentinel, Luis Her-

nandez of Deerfield Beach was spear fish-
ing off Exuma on May 6 when he noticed a
seven-foot bull shark swimming nearby.
The attack apparently took place after
Mr Hernandez speared a grouper.
He was brought to a clinic in the Exumas
for initial treatment, then flown to Nassau

and finally, on May 8, to Jackson Memori-
al, where hospital officials confirmed he
has been for the last week.

"At the beginning, doctors were con-
cerned that he might lose his right arm,” the
victim’s daughter, Fabiola Hernandez, told
the Sun Sentinel.

Britain rocked by MPs’ expenses scandal

By PAISLEY DODDS
Associated Press Writer

LONDON (AP) — Britain
has seen its share of sex and
sleaze scandals over the years,
but few have tarnished all three
of the country’s main political
parties in a single stroke.

Leaked lawmaker expenses
for chandeliers, pornography,
moat upkeep on country estates
and other claims have enraged
voters — many of whom have
lost jobs and homes during
Britain’s deepening recession.

Talk show lines buzzed Fri-
day with irate callers. Web sites
flashed reader comments com-
paring politicians to greedy
bankers. And commuters
clenched newspapers with such
headlines as: “Parliament’s
Darkest Day” and “House of
Ill Repute.” Many politicians
were being heckled during
events that had been scheduled
long before the leak.

“Tt’s not just one or two rot-
ten apples, it’s the whole lot,”
said Randy Wallace, 41, an
unemployed London electri-
cian. “Our Parliament used to
be the envy of the world. Now,
it’s a laughing stock.”

Thousands of pages of
expense claims were leaked to
the Daily Telegraph more than
a week ago. Although around
80 of the 646 House of Com-
mons lawmakers have been
named so far, the newspaper
says it will continue to roll out
details as it plows through the
rest of the documents. The
Labour Party, Conservatives
and Liberal Democrats have all
been damaged by the data.

A poll released Friday

showed that 65 percent of the
population want early elections
because of the expense scandal,
while 64 percent want some
lawmakers to resign. Commis-
sioned by the BBC, the Lon-
don-based polling company
ComRes conducted the tele-
phone poll of 1,011 voters
Wednesday and Thursday.
There was a margin of error of
3 percentage points.

Labour lawmaker Shahid
Malik stepped down as justice
minister early Friday after data
showed that he claimed more
than 65,000 pounds ($98,000) in
housing costs over three years
despite having discounted rent.

Brown’s aide on climate
change, Elliot Morley, was also
suspended after he billed tax-
payers’ 16,000 pounds ($24,000)
for mortgage interest payments
on a loan that had already been
paid off. Morley says he’s now
paid the money back.

The latest revelation came
late Friday with another Labour
lawmaker claiming thousands
of pounds (dollars) of taxpayer
money for interest on a non-
existent mortgage. David Chay-
tor said he would pay back
13,000 pounds ($18,000) after
continuing to submit bills on his
paid mortgage.

“In respect of mortgage inter-
est payments, there has been an
unforgivable error in my
accounting procedures for
which I apologize unreserved-
ly,” Chaytor said. “I will act
immediately to ensure repay-
ment.”

For the Conservatives, law-
maker Andrew Mackay quit his
post as an aide to party leader
David Cameron after he said

Ex-DPM’s fears

for the Bahamas

FROM page one



good his escape with an undetermined amount of cash.

As the former Minister of National Security, Mrs Pratt said she
had an opportunity to speak with the police when they arrived at the
scene. One of the officers, she said, credited her presence at the
bank as the reason why the robbery did not turn out as gruesome

as it possibly could have.

“This country gone,” Mrs Pratt said, “God knows it. You could
see the jitteriness in those tellers and now I know why. Nobody
escapes this. No one is free from this. You are no different from
anyone else but yet we get so busy playing politics.”

Sending a sharp message to those in authority, Mrs Pratt said that
the country has to work on the children in the primary schools now
as those harden criminals on the streets today are almost beyond

reach.

“If we don’t work on those primary school children now, you
can’t imagine what we will reap in 10 years. We have to focus on
those young ones down there because these harden criminals the
only thing that can save them is death,” she said.

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he’d been guilty of errors over
his expenses claims. The party
published expense claims by
senior members online Friday
under new transparency rules
imposed by Cameron.

Police and prosecutors were
meeting to decide what, if any,
action should be taken against
lawmakers who misused parlia-
mentary expenses. No charges
had been filed.

“As our concern about what’s
been claimed has grown, our
horror of how (lawmakers) are
trying to slip out of this sticky
situation has grown,” said Mark
Wallace, spokesman for the
Taxpayers’ Alliance, which set
up a fund to pay for any public
prosecutions that could come
from the scandal.

Prime Minister Gordon
Brown’s Labour-led govern-
ment has steadily lost parlia-
mentary seats since it led calls
for Britain to join the war in
Traq. Most expect the Conserv-
ative Party will win the next
general election, which has to
be called by mid-2010 and
would end more than a decade
of Labour Party rule if predic-
tions hold.

Built on a political system
that historically favored land
owners, Britain lacks a system
of proportional representation
so it is unlikely that smaller par-
ties would make significant
gains in the next election.

Low voter turnout is more
likely, said Steven Fielding of
the Center for British Politics
at Nottingham University.

“It will probably further
depress the Labour vote and it
will give the Conservatives
some gains, but the thing is that
everyone has been tarred by
this information,” Fielding said.

“There has also been this tra-
ditional historical myth that we
have the mother of all Parlia-
ments ... few have stepped up
to say that our political system is
flawed because one party or the



other has benefited from it over
the years.”

Lawmakers scheduled meet-
ings with voters over the week-
end to address anger and an
immediate threat — that small-
er far-right parties could make
significant gains in the June 4
elections for seats in the Euro-
pean parliament. Parties such
as the UK Independence Party
and the British National Party
have long campaigned against
Britain’s entrenched political
system and its traditional par-
ties.

Dozens of lawmakers have
apologized and pledged to
return more than 125,000
pounds ($190,000).

Other scandals have rocked
Britain’s politician system in
recent history — British Cabi-
net minister John Profumo’s
liaison with a prostitute almost
brought down the government
after it was revealed the woman
was also linked to a Soviet spy
— but few have shaken all main
political parties.

Expense rules are laid out in
the 66-page Green Book — a
guide sent to every legislator.
It sets limits on expense claims,
such as a 25 pound ($38) cap
on eating out when away from
home and how much can be
claimed toward a second home,
usually a residence in London.

Though the guidelines don’t
ban any specific items, the rules
say expenses should relate to
parliamentary work and should-
n’t damage the Parliament’s
reputation.

The leaked data was due to
have been made public in July
after Britain’s High Court
quashed a legal attempt by the
House of Commons to keep the
details secret. Some of the data
in that disclosure, however, was
to be redacted.

“We need our own Barack
Obama,” said Francis O’Hara,
24, a student. “This country
needs a change.”

Parents concerned
for children’s safety

FROM page one

deal with it. If they’re not dealing with the problem it doesn’t
make sense for him to stay, if the school is not defending him.”

Mrs Ingraham has not yet spoken to the newspaper about alle-
gations of violence at CC Sweeting Senior High School which
have been published in The Tribune over last two weeks.

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THE TRIBUNE

S]





SATURDAY, MAY 16,



UE SeT Tm sxe) im (Vea)

Bolt in
BMW
crash

MANCHESTER, England
(AP) — Usain Bolt says his
outlook on life has changed
following a car crash in
Jamaica.

The triple Olympic gold
medallist crashed his BMW
into a ditch along a highway
last month. He required
minor surgery on his left foot
after stepping onto thorns
while getting out of the
wreckage.

With the stitches removed,
Bolt returns to action Sunday
in a 150-meter street race in
Manchester.

Bolt said Friday: "After
something like that you look
at life through and over, and
look at what has gone wrong
— where you should improve
or should be careful.”

Bolt set world records in
the 100 and 200 meters and
sprint relay in Beijing.

Michael Phelps (AP)



Phelps
cruises to
two finals
In return

to pool

m@ By PAUL NEWBERRY
AP National Writer

CHARLOTTE, N.C. (AP) —
Michael Phelps is back.

The Olympic champion easily
qualified for the finals of two
events Friday morning at the
Charlotte Ultraswim, his first
meet since winning eight gold
medals in Beijing.

Phelps touched second in the
last heat of the 200-meter
freestyle at 1 minute, 50.46 sec-
onds, and came back about an
hour later to win the final heat
of the 100 butterfly in 53.41. In
both events, he had the third-
fastest time overall, advancing to
the evening "A" finals.

This is the first meet for which
Phelps was eligible since com-
pleting a three-month suspension.
He was disciplined by USA
Swimming after he was pho-
tographed using a marijuana pipe.

2009








Rughy Sevens tourney
to feature US, UK teams

lm By RENALDO DORSETT
Sports Reporter
rdorsett@tribunemedia.net

s the profile of

local rugby
continues to
grow, the

sport’s govern-
ing body in the Bahamas looks
to increase its stature regional-
ly by hosting teams from around
the world.

The Bahamas Rugby Foot-
ball Union (BRFU) is sched-
uled to host the US and
Bahamas Rugby Sevens Tour-
nament llam to 7pm May 23
at the Winton Rugby Pitch.

The tournament, sponsored
by SG Private Bank, is expected
to feature 12 teams — six from
the US, one from England, four
from New Providence and one
from Grand Bahama — who will
battle for the cash prize of
$1,000 for the winner.

Elystan Miles, director of the
BRFU, said the union has plans
to make this tournament the
most prestigious Sevens tour-
nament in the Caribbean.

“We have been trying to
make it the biggest Caribbean
Rugby tournament in the area,
right now we are about second
or third. We are basically try-
ing to get ourselves recognised
regionally for our clubs as well
as for the national team,” he
said.

“The Cayman Islands had the
biggest tournament a few years
ago, but they lost their spon-
sorship so that collapse left a
gap and everyone wants to
come to the Caribbean so we
saw it as an opportunity to fill
that void. We could not afford
to do what we do without great
sponsorship...SG has been with
us since this tournament’s
inception and now recently



THE RUGBY tournament is expected to feature 12 teams, including six from

the US and one from England...

Sand’s has come onboard.
“Trinidad still has the biggest
tournament in the region every
December. This is just our third
year and we are ahead of the
schedule so in five years we are
looking to have the best and

(AP Photo)

most competitive tournament
in the region.”

The Bahamas has hosted the
North American and West
Indies Rugby Association tour-
nament for the past two years
which has generated a great

interest in the game locally and
has increased the Bahamas’
profile internationally as a
prime rugby venue.

“Sevens Rugby which is a
faster, quicker version of the
game and the idea behind this
was to get teams to come down
for the weekend as somewhat
of a trial run and eventually
have their full teams, Fifteens,
to come town during the winter
for a longer stay. We are trying
to make Bahamas Rugby
appealing for foreign teams,”
Miles said.

“Rugby has been a pretty qui-
et sport over the years but we
have been building a profile.
These types of things are gen-
erally better internationally
because the foreign teams bring
their press coverage and it
spreads the word and lets peo-
ple know the Bahamas is a great
venue for rugby.”

Miles said the hosting of
international tournaments is just
one of the BRFU’s initiatives
which has increased the expo-
sure of the game locally over
the past few years.

“The biggest push has always
been with the youth. Now we
have coaches in most of the
government senior high schools
and a few of the private ones.
The other big thing for us is the
Defence Force. They have been
working for the past few months
and they are going to field a
team for this tournament, which
is huge.

“If the Defence Force starts
taking the game seriously then
automatically you have a large
pool of players to choose from,”
he said.

“We are actually quite strong
now locally with a few hundred
active players now whereas four
or five years ago we had less
than one hundred.”

Rockets force
Gm 7 with 95-
80 win over

the Lakers...
See page 10



Under 19
cricket team
getting ready
for Toronto
tournament

lm By RENALDO DORSETT
Sports Reporter
rdorsett@trib unemedia.net

THE Bahamas’ under-19
cricket team has been in train-
ing under coach Mohamed
Allie for the past several
months in preparation for the
International Cricket Council’s
Under 19 Cricket Tournament,
set for July in Toronto, Canada.

It will be the team’s second
visit to the tournament, which
includes teams from the
Caribbean and the Americas.

The team participated in the
2007 tournament in Toronto,
losing very close matches to the
Cayman Islands and Argenti-
na.
The team was judged to be
the most improved team in the
tournament and was the recipi-
ent of a trophy for that award.

The team also received com-
mendations for exemplary con-
duct, good sportsmanship and
discipline.

Some of the players from that
team who were just 15 years old
at the time are returning, mak-
ing this an older and more expe-
rienced squad.

To support the team’s
expenses, the local cricket com-
munity is set to host a fundrais-
ing steak-out on May 30 at
Windsor Park where the team
hosts most of its training ses-
sions.

On Whit Monday the under-
19 team is scheduled to play a
match against a selected team of
British ex-pats at Haynes Oval
in preparation for the tourna-
ment.

The match is being billed as
England vs. the Bahamas Youth
Team and is being played as a
memorial to the late Hywel
Jones, who supported the game
here in the Bahamas as a fan
and sponsor.

Federer, Nadal and Djokovic reach semis

@ By PAUL LOGOTHETIS
AP Sports Writer

MADRID (AP) — Roger Fed-
erer's dominance of Andy Rod-
dick continued on clay by 7-5, 6-7
(5), 6-1, while Rafael Nadal
stayed perfect against Fernando
Verdasco with a 6-4, 7-5 victory to
also reach the Madrid Open semi-
finals on Friday.

Federer improved to 18-2
against Roddick after their first
career meeting on dirt.

"His game translates well to
most anything,” said the sixth-
seeded Roddick.

Nadal's 32nd straight clay win
improved him to 9-0 against Ver-
dasco, with three of those victo-
ries coming this year.

Nadal will play Novak
Djokovic, another regular foe,
after the third-seeded Serb dis-
patched wild card Ivan Ljubicic 6-
4, 6-4.

"The more matches that I play
against him, the more chances I
have to prove something more to
myself and to everybody else,”
said Djokovic, who has lost to
Nadal three times this year. "I
know that just a couple of points
here or there will decide the win-
ner."



ROGER FEDERER returns a shot yesterday during his quarterfinals match against Andy Roddick at Madrid Open...
(AP Photo: Andres Kudacki)

Top-ranked Dinara Safina
advanced to the women's semifi-
nals with a 6-4, 6-3 win over
Ukrainian Alona Bondarenko,
and will play Switzerland's Patty
Schnyder, who beat fourth-seed-
ed Jelena Jankovic 7-6 (6), 6-3.

Amelie Mauresmo will face
Denmark's Caroline Wozniacki
in the other semi.

Federer, who won here in 2006
when the tournament was played
indoors on a hard court, broke
Roddick for the second time in
the 11th game before serving out
the first set.

Roddick saved three break
points in the ninth game of the
second set to hold on for a
tiebreaker, where the American

rallied from 3-0 down to even the
match.

Federer stopped Roddick's
momentum with an early break in
the third set and used his serve
to hold on for the win.

"It was a close match. I
bounced back well in the third
(set)," said Federer, who had 15
aces. "I feel I have decent con-

trol over the ball this week."

Fourth-seeded Andy Murray
was playing No. 5 Juan Martin
del Potro later to decide Federer's
next opponent.

After taking the first set, Nadal
fell behind 4-0 before rallying to
4-4 with the help of Verdasco's
seven double-faults.

Nadal smacked a cross-court
winner to hold his serve after a
back-and-forth 11th game and,
after breaking Verdasco for the
fourth time, improved to 149-4
on clay since 2005.

Safina overcame a letdown
after a blazing start against 46th-
ranked Bondarenko and took the
opening set with a break in the
10th game.

"T had a bad call from the
umpire and I lost a little bit of
concentration," Safina said of
blowing a 3-0 lead. "But I found
my game and I'm playing every
match better and better."

Schnyder's high balls troubled
Jankovic. The fourth-ranked Serb
committed 35 unforced errors
while Schnyder hit 29 winners.

Mauresmo rallied for a 5-7, 6-1,
6-1 win over Agnes Szavay of
Hungary, while the ninth-seeded
Wozniacki beat Russian qualifier
Vera Dushevina 6-0, 6-4.

Man U hoping to win record-equaling title

@ By ROB HARRIS
AP Sports Writer

MANCHESTER, England (AP) —
While Manchester United only needs a
point Saturday to match Liverpool's
record haul of 18 English league titles,
Arsenal has a point to prove in the next
to last round of the Premier League sea-
son.

The Gunners haven't won the league
for five years and will add to an already
disappointing season if they hand the
title to Man United at Old Trafford.

United manager Alex Ferguson is
wary of Arsenal crashing the party at
home and leaving United to earn that
point on the road next weekend against

a Hull side battling relegation. That
match is just three days before the
Champions League final against
Barcelona.

"What we want to try and do is win
the league tomorrow, the European Cup
final is 10 days away after tomorrow,"
Ferguson said on Friday. "We've got to
concentrate on winning the league and,
by doing that, we have to achieve that
the best way. ...

"A point is always a dangerous game
to play, thinking that a draw is enough.
We have to go for a win.”

United defender Rio Ferdinand is urg-
ing his teammates not to be complacent
despite overwhelming Arsenal in the
Champions League semifinals with a 4-

1 aggregate win.

"Our performances in both legs of the
semifinal were two of the best of the
season,” said the England center back,
who will be sidelined Saturday with calf
problems. "But it can sometimes be a
dangerous situation when you beat a
team fairly convincingly and play them
again soon after, because they'll proba-
bly feel they have something to prove."

While Arsenal was once United's
main title adversary, Liverpool is now
the greater threat after pushing them
hard all season.

Ferguson can win an 11th Premier
League title on Saturday. But before
1993, when he delivered United's first
league title for 26 years, the head-to-

head record with Liverpool stood at 18-
7 and the Scot never envisaged such a
reversal of dominance.

"My intention was to win the first one
and try and break the stranglehold Liv-
erpool had on the title at that time,” said
Ferguson, who took charge in 1986.
"You don't think about that opening the
door for you, but that was the big chal-
lenge to win it once."

Trailing United by six points in the
title race, Liverpool's slim hopes rest on
United losing to Arsenal and Hull and it
beating West Bromwich Albion and Tot-
tenham to edge the Red Devils on goal
difference.

"What ever happens, I am really
pleased that we are in this position at

at home

the end of the season,” Liverpool man-
ager Rafa Benitez said. "But I am cer-
tainly not giving up on the title, we must
always be positive.”

For Arsenal, the mission is about
building for the future. Arsene Wenger's
team can only finish fourth in the stand-
ings, forcing the Gunners to play a qual-
ifying match early next season to get
into the group stage of the Champions
League.

"Arsenal will want to do well because
they've been under a bit of criticism
recently ... (and) register their abilities on
a day when everyone expects United to
win the title," Ferguson said. "They are
a good side with great potential in the
team and you can't dismiss it.”
PAGE 10B, SATURDAY, MAY 16, 2009

TRIBUNE SPORTS



SPORTS



Voy keyZ(29y

@ By The Associated
Press

SCOREBOARD

Saturday, May 16

No games scheduled. There
are two Game 7s on Sunday,
with Houston visiting the Los
Angeles Lakers, and Boston
hosting Orlando.

STARS

Wednesday

—Dwight Howard, Magic,
had 23 points and 22 rebounds
to lead Orlando to an 83-75
victory over Boston in Game
6.

—Aaron Brooks and Luis
Scola, Rockets. Brooks scored
26 points and Scola had 24
points and 12 rebounds as
Houston forced a Game 7 in
Los Angeles on Sunday with a
95-80 victory over the Lakers.

GO THE DISTANCE

For the second straight year,
the Boston Celtics have gone
the distance in two series in
the playoffs. After surviving
their first-round thriller against
Chicago, Boston lost Game 6
in Orlando on Thursday. Last
season, the Celtics won the
decisive games against Atlanta
and Cleveland on the way to
their NBA-best 17th champi-
onship.

STRONG IN DEFEAT

Rajon Rondo had 19 points,
16 rebounds and six assists in
Boston's 83-75 loss to Orlando
in Game 6. Kobe Bryant
scored 32 points, but the Lak-
ers were forced to a Game 7
with a 95-80 defeat in Hous-
ton.

LET'S GO TO THE

VIDEO TAPE?

NBA commissioner David
Stern wants to see an expan-
sion of the use of instant
replay and is disappointed that
the league's competition com-
mittee hasn't been "bolder"
in that regard. Speaking in
Houston before the Rockets
hosted the Lakers, Stern said
he could envision a system
where challenges are used at
the end of games, though he
offered no specifics, adding
that he expected the idea to
get voted down.

BOSTON'S BLUES

Thursday was a tough night
for Boston, which saw its
teams go 0-3. The Celtics lost
83-75 in Orlando in Game 6
of their series, while the Bru-
ins were eliminated from the
NHL playoffs with a 3-2 loss
to Carolina and the Red Sox
were beaten 5-4 by the Los
Angeles Angels. The Celtics
were the only ones to lose in
regular time; the Bruins’ loss
went to overtime and the Red
Sox fell in 12 innings. Bean-
town teams had gone 3-0 on
Sunday and Tuesday.

SPEAKING

"For the last two days, all
I've heard is that we weren't
going back to L.A. Our guys in
the locker room didn't believe
that."

— Houston coach Rick
Adelman after the Rockets
forced Game 7 against the
Lakers with a 95-80 victory

"T guess Dwight Howard
was right. My gosh. He was
unbelievable."

— Celtics coach Doc Rivers
on the Magic center, who had
23 points and 22 rebounds in
an 83-75 Game 6 victory after
demanding he be given the ball
more

m By CHRIS DUNCAN
AP Sports Writer

HOUSTON (AP) — Kobe Bryant relishes
Game 7s, but this is one he probably didn't
expect to be playing.

Aaron Brooks scored 26 points, Luis Scola
added 24 points and 12 rebounds, and the scrap-
py, undermanned Houston Rockets pushed the
Los Angeles Lakers to the limit in their Western
Conference semifinal series with a 95-80 win in
Game 6 on Thursday night.

Reserve Carl Landry scored 15 as the Rockets
built another huge lead in the first half, then
fought off a Lakers rally to force a winner-take-
all showdown on Sunday at the Staples Center.

Bryant scored 32 points for Los Angeles,
which lost for only the third time in the last 18
games when it had a chance to close out a series.

"T knew it was going to be a dogfight,” Bryant
said. "So here it is. Game 7, there's nothing else
to do but go out and compete. This is what we do
so it should be fun.”

Houston has managed to win two of the last
three games in the series since Yao Ming went
out with a broken left foot. And after losing by
40 points in Game 5, even fans calling into sports
radio talk shows in Houston on Thursday were
ready to write off their team.

Rockets force Gm 7
with 95-80 win
over the Lakers

RON ARTEST drives to the
basket past Kobe Bryant
during second half of Game
6 in Houston...

(AP Photo: Pat Sullivan)

"For the last two days, all I've heard is that we
weren't going back to L.A.," said Houston coach
Rick Adelman. "Our guys in the locker room
didn't believe that."

Sunday's winner will play the Denver Nuggets,
who get an extended rest after finishing off Dal-
las on Wednesday night.

"T think it's fun," Brooks said. "We enjoy it.
We got them on their heels a little bit. The pres-
sure's on them.”

The Rockets put together a near carbon copy
of the first half of Game 4, when they seemed to
hit every open shot and smothered the Lakers on
defense.

Los Angeles opened the second half with a 16-
2 spurt to cut the deficit to two, but Landry con-
verted a three-point play to break the Lakers'
momentum.

The Rockets hit their last eight shots in the
third quarter and took a 75-65 lead into the
fourth.

"I've stopped trying to figure this team out,"
Battier said.

"Just when you think we're down and out,
this team comes with an unbelievable effort.
We may not have the most talented team, but
there's not a team with more heart in this entire
league. We've shown it again and again and
again."





x

DWIGHT HOWARD and Kendrick Perkins try to get position under the basket
for a rebound during the first half of a second-round playoff game in Orlando,

Florida...

(AP Photo: Phelan M Ebenhack)

Defending champs
face Magic in yet
another Game 7

@ By ANTONIO GONZALEZ
Associated Press Writer

ORLANDO, Fla. (AP) — The
Boston Celtics are headed home
for a do-or-die game after failing
to wrap up a series in Game 6.

They're getting used to that
pattern.

Dwight Howard had 23 points
and 22 rebounds, and the Orlan-
do Magic overcame a poor shoot-
ing night to beat the Celtics 83-75
on Thursday and force a decisive
game in the Eastern Conference
semifinals.

The Celtics also failed to close
out Chicago in Game 6 of their
first-round series, a triple-over-
time epic, but they never were in
trouble in Game 7. Boston will
now go the distance in each of its
first two series for the second
straight year.

"We're comfortable with
Game 7s," forward Paul Pierce
said. "A lot of players in this
league have never played a Game
7 in this league, knowing that you
if you lose, you go home. We're a
confident group. But we're not
an overconfident group, because
you have to go out there and play
the game."

The Celtics are 32-0 in seven-
game series when they have held
a 3-2 lead, and they are 17-3 in
Game 7s on their home floor
heading into Sunday.

"You can't lean on a Game 7
being at home," Boston coach
Doc Rivers said. "You have to
go play. Just because you're in
Boston doesn't mean you're
going to win the game."

Magic coach Stan Van Gundy
doesn't believe in most records.
He even threw out something
familiar to Boston fans: The Red
Sox's historic comeback from a
3-0 deficit to win the AL champi-
onship series over the Yankees
in 2004.

"IT don't think it means any-
thing,” he said. "In other words, I
know it was a different sport, but
when it was Yankees-Red Sox,
nobody had ever come back from
3-0 before."

Rajon Rondo finished with 19
points, 16 rebounds and six
assists, and Pierce scored 17 for
the Celtics, who led by 10 points
in the second half before falling
apart.

The two days off before Game
7 should give an older, worn out
Boston team a chance to rest its
tired legs. It's still not enough for
Rivers.

"I would take a week off and
do it like the Super Bowl,” Rivers

joked. "That would be terrific.
But that's not going to happen.”

Boston had its chances.

The Celtics held the Magic
scoreless for more than five min-
utes to start the third quarter,
building a 10-point lead on a
jumper by Glen "Big Baby"
Davis. The Magic shot just 37 per-
cent to the Celtics’ 42 percent for
the game.

But Howard led the Magic
back, with a backspin alley-oop
from Turkoglu that highlighted a
spurt to end the third quarter.
Orlando took its first lead with
8:38 remaining in the fourth.

Pierce hit three straight
jumpers to give Boston a 73-72
lead with about four minutes to
play, but the Celtics were done
in by their 3-for-18 shooting from
3-point range and 19 turnovers.
Ray Allen missed all seven
attempts from behind the arc.

"The offense definitely strug-
gled,” Pierce said. "But we still
played enough defense to win the
game. We turned the ball over
too much."

Howard blamed Van Gundy
for not getting the ball more after
the Magic's Game 5 collapse,
when they blew a 14-point lead in
the fourth quarter. "You've got a
dominant player, let him be dom-
inant," Howard said.

He came out trying to back up
his strong words, scoring the first
eight points of the game for the
Magic, including a pair of dunks
that pumped some life into the
home crowd. He finished 9-for-
16 shooting.

Orlando's do-it-all center said
he thought little of his comments
before Game 6.

"Coach said, 'Give all you got
tonight, because we're going to
have tomorrow off,'" Howard
said, laughing. "I was thinking
about that."

Van Gundy said he didn't
change his strategy at all, and
compared Howard's comments
to an argument between himself
and his wife.

"When she gets on me for
something, my first reaction is to
blame someone else," Van
Gundy said.

"To make an excuse. To do
something else, because I don't
like being criticized. And I think
when Dwight gets into a game,
his first thing is, 'I don't want the
blame.’ This is just my guess.

"But when you step back and
look at it, I usually realize the
person who's been on me has a
point. And then it's time to step
up and do the job.”

Mets steal team-record 7 bases in win over Giants

SAN FRANCISCO (AP) — David
Wright felt the circumstances were per-
fect for adding some finesse to New
York's power game.

Wright recorded four of the Mets’
franchise-record seven stolen bases and
hit a tiebreaking RBI single in the ninth
inning in a 7-4 victory over the San Fran-
cisco Giants on Thursday night.

"We have to pick up the slack with
the guys that are in the lineup when the
everyday guys are out,” Wright said. "If
it means you have to steal a few extra
bases, play solid defense, or bearing down
and being a situational style of hitter, so
be it.”

Wright had three hits and drove in two
runs.

"Jerry (Manuel) has preached aggres-
siveness on the basepaths all year,"
Wright said of his manager. "I got a few
opportunities early. I like putting pres-
sure on the defense, and I like to keep
the pitcher on his toes to make him focus
on the baserunners."

Gary Sheffield and Carlos Beltran each
had two hits and Ramon Castro had two
RBIs for New York, which has won nine
of 11.

Sheffield, Beltran and Alex Cora also
stole a base for the Mets, who ran wild
without speedy shortstop Jose Reyes,
who sat out with a stiff right calf.

"Sometimes you're going to have to
steal bases to win games,” Beltran said.
"I'm trying to pick up the spot and David
got the big hit."

Wright tied a club mark for steals in a
game set twice by Vince Coleman and

equaled by Roger Cedeno in 1999. The
team had previously swiped six bags in
four games, the last time on Sept. 15,
2007, against Philadelphia.

"T think we've been aggressive in late
inning situations," Mets manager Jerry
Manuel said.

New York also was without reliever
J.J. Putz and first baseman Carlos Del-

RBI single in the sixth for a 5-3 lead.
Bush (2-0) struck out seven and gave
up two earned runs in seven innings.
Astros 5, Rockies 3
At Denver, Wandy Rodriguez struck
out a career-high 11 and Michael Bourn
stole home on the back end of a double
steal to lead Houston.
Bourn tied a career high with four hits

gado. Putz had a cortisone shot to alle-
viate inflammation in his right elbow,
and Delgado's ailing hip again kept him
out of the lineup.

Bobby Parnell (2-0), subbing for Putz
in the eighth inning, gave up run-scoring
hits to Jose Uribe and Edgar Renteria,
leaving the game tied at 4.

The Mets responded with three runs in
the ninth. Beltran hit a one-out double
off Brian Wilson (2-1) and stole third.
After Sheffield walked, Wright lined his
RBI single into right field.

"That was a close call at third and it
went their way," Giants manager Bruce
Bochy said. "Still, we have to do a better
job."

Dodgers 5, Phillies 3, 10 innings

At Philadelphia, Russell Martin hit a
tiebreaking double in the 10th inning and
Matt Kemp tacked on an RBI double to
lead Los Angeles.

The Dodgers, minus the suspended
Manny Ramirez, won two of three in a
rematch of last season's NLCS.

Jonathan Broxton (4-0) earned the win
despite blowing a two-run lead with two
outs in the ninth. Ramon Troncoso
pitched a scoreless 10th to earn his sec-
ond save.



DAVID WRIGHT singles off San Francisco Giants starting pitcher Jonathan Sanchez in the first

inning of a game in San Francisco...

Cubs 11, Padres 3

At Chicago, Bobby Scales hit a pair
of two-run doubles and the Cubs took
advantage of 10 walks.

Adrian Gonzalez homered for the
fourth consecutive game but couldn't
prevent San Diego from losing its 11th
straight on the road, its longest skid in 38
years.

Ryan Dempster (3-2) allowed two runs
and three hits over seven innings. He
also drove in two runs with a double and
a single as the Cubs completed their first
three-game sweep of the Padres at home
since 1999.

San Diego was outscored 42-18 dur-
ing an 0-6 road trip.

(AP Photo: Marcio Jose Sanchez)

Chad Gaudin (0-3) issued seven walks
in 4 1-3 innings for the Padres.

Brewers 5, Marlins 3

At Milwaukee, Prince Fielder hit a go-
ahead homer and Dave Bush turned in
another strong start to help the Brewers
complete a three-game sweep.

Trevor Hoffman earned his eighth save
and has yet to give up a run in nine
innings this season for Milwaukee, which
has won nine of 11.

It was the fourth straight loss for the
Marlins and a short afternoon for Josh
Johnson, who walked five in only four
innings.

Fielder connected in the fifth off Burke
Badenhop (2-2). J.J. Hardy added an

and finished with two stolen bases. Car-
los Lee homered for the Astros.

Rodriguez (4-2) allowed two earned
runs in seven innings, raising his ERA to
1.90 — still among the lowest in the
majors. Chris Sampson worked a perfect
eighth and LaTroy Hawkins got his fifth
save,

The Rockies committed three errors
behind starter Jason Hammel (0-2), who
gave up four runs — one earned — in 5
1-3 innings.

Cardinals 5, Pirates 1

At Pittsburgh, Colby Rasmus hit a
two-run homer and the Cardinals avoid-
ed a sweep against the last-place Pirates.

The Cardinals had lost five consecutive
games in Pittsburgh and were in jeop-
ardy of being swept in a three-game
series for the first time since Sept. 12-
14, also at PNC Park. Depleted by
injuries, St. Louis had lost four of five
and seven of 10.

Trever Miller (1-0) escaped a bases-
loaded jam in the fifth to earn the win.

Albert Pujols had a two-run single for
St. Louis.

Pittsburgh's Jeff Karstens (1-2) gave
up three runs and seven hits in six
innings.









THE TRIBUNE

ORLANDO




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re sem c >. thunderstorm. couple of t-storms. couple of t-storms. of t-storms. t-storms possible. t-storms possible. greater the need for eye and skin protection.
\ ‘tale . High: 84° High: 82° High: 86° High: 85°
© y f High: 83° Low: 77° Low: 75° Low: 75° Low: 75° Low: 77° see EE
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High: 88° F/31°C ie ee High _HiL(f.) Low _HE(ft
Low: 71° F/22°C ; -, = The SG neater an index that combines o effects of temperature, wind, humidity, sunshine intensity, cloudiness, precipitation, pressure, and Today 1:12 a.m. 24 7:31am. 05
a @ Cl _ elevation on the human body—everything that effects how warm or cold a person feels. Temperatures reflect the high and the low for the day. 1:36pm. 23 7:46pm. 06
>a 2:02am. 23 8:18am. 04
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2 FARK. Statistics are for Nassau through 2 p.m. yesterday Monda 6am. 03 O07am. 04
fh ABACO Temperature ¥ 3:25pm. 24 9:46pm. 05
x : = High: 84° F/29° C High Hanutietiadaaen Lede NaReEuaNdaecheEr ancialemEte 86" F/30° C Tuesday 352 am. 23 057am. 0.23
Y a . Low: 74° F/23°C rae wiieativesensiaieh Ls F/25° C 419p.m. 26 10:44pm. 04
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Low: 74° F/23°C a Low: 74° F/23° C
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Low: 75° F/24 E Low: 71° F/22°C
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Today Sunday Today Sunday Today Sunday i. r a MAYAGUANA
High Low W High Low W High Low W High Low W High Low W High Low W all High: 84° F/29° C
FIC FC FIC FC FIC FC FIC FC FC FC FIC FC me Low: 73° F/23° C
Albuquerque 78/25 54/12 t 84/28 58/14 s Indianapolis 70/21 43/6 t 65/18 41/5 s Philadelphia 76/24 58/14 t 63/17 45/7 sh
Anchorage 59/15 41/5 s 62/16 42/5 sg Jacksonville 83/28 66/18 t 83/28 62/16 t Phoenix 102/38 76/24 s 105/40 77/25 s CROOKED ISLAND / ACKLINS
Atlanta 82/27 62/16 t 66/18 49/9 t KansasCity 67/19 44/6 s 68/20 49/9 s Pittsburgh 76/24 46/7 t 61/16 38/3 po RAGGEDISLAND — Tigh:86°F/30"c
Atlantic City 74/23 50415 t 6447 40/4 sh LasVegas 100/37 71/21 s 103/39 78/25 s Portland,OR 82/27 52/11 pc 78/25 58/12 pe High: 82° F/28° C Low:77°F/25°C
Baltimore 78/25 59/15 t 64/17 44/6 sh Little Rock 78/25 54/12 t 73/22 49/9 pc Raleigh-Durham 81/27 66/18 t 72/22 48/8 t Low: 75°F/24°C en.
Boston 64/17 53/11 po 62/16 44/6 sh Los Angeles 84/28 62/16 pc 86/30 62/16 s St. Louis 68/20 48/8 t 69/20 47/8 s .
Buffalo 70/21 40/4 r 57/13 36/2 pe Louisville 76/24 49/9 t 69/20 45/7 pe Salt Lake City 77/25 53/11 s 85/29 58/14 s GREATINAGUA — acta —
Charleston,SC 84/28 68/20 t 80/26 53/11 t Memphis 78/25 56/13 t 70/21 52/11 pe San Antonio 86/30 65/18 t 80/26 59/15 t High: 86° F/30° C
Chicago 62/16 39/3 s 57/13 41/5 s Miami 84/28 73/22 t 83/28 72/22 t San Diego 76/24 61/16 p 77/25 61/16 pe Low. 78° F26°C
Cleveland 72/22 43/6 t 58/14 37/2 pe Minneapolis 56/13 35/1 pe 64/17 48/8 s San Francisco 77/25 54/12 s 78/25 55/12 s z
Dallas 76/24 56/13 t 77/25 5442 pe Nashville 78/25 53/11 t 69/20 46/7 pc Seattle 70/21 49/9 p 69/20 52/11 pe
Denver 64/17 44/6 pe 81/27 52/11 s New Orleans 84/28 69/20 t 83/28 61/16 t Tallahassee 86/30 65/18 t 85/29 59/15 t in
Detroit 68/20 41/5 t 58/14 40/4 pe New York 71/21 57/13 t 71/21 49/9 sh Tampa 88/31 71/21 t 88/31 72/22 t —_
Honolulu 85/29 71/21 s 85/29 70/21 sh Oklahoma City 69/20 51/10 t 72/22 49/9 § Tucson 100/37 66/18 s 100/37 70/21 s a
Houston 87/30 68/20 t 81/27 60/15 t Orlando 87/30 70/21 t 86/30 68/20 t Washington, DC 80/26 61/16 t 68/20 47/8 sh



Acapulco
Amsterdam
Ankara, Turkey
Athens
Auckland
Bangkok
Barbados
Barcelona
Beijing
Beirut
Belgrade
Berlin
Bermuda
Bogota
Brussels
Budapest
Buenos Aires
Cairo
Calcutta
Calgary
Cancun
Caracas
Casablanca
Copenhagen
Dublin
Frankfurt
Geneva
Halifax
Havana
Helsinki
Hong Kong
Islamabad
Istanbul
Jerusalem
Johannesburg
Kingston
Lima
London
Madrid
Manila
Mexico City
Monterrey
Montreal
Moscow
Munich
Nairobi
New Delhi
Oslo

Paris
Prague

Rio de Janeiro
Riyadh
Rome

St. Thomas
San Juan
San Salvador
Santiago
Santo Domingo
Sao Paulo
Seoul
Stockholm
Sydney
Taipei

Tokyo
Toronto
Trinidad
Vancouver
Vienna
Warsaw
Winnipeg

High
F/C
91/32
61/16
82/27
81/27
65/18
90/32
85/29
67/19
82/27
78/25
84/28
63/17
74/23
65/18
63/17
81/27
66/18
96/35
97/36
69/20
88/31
82/27
74/23
57/13
55/12
64/17
73/22
54/12
83/28
57/13
88/31
112/44
86/30
78/25
59/15
86/30
77/25
59/15
17/25
87/30
79/26
91/32
64/17
52/11
69/20
80/26
111/43
61/16
61/16
68/20
75/23
99/37
80/26
85/29
81/27
86/30
63/17
82/27
68/20
68/20
59/15
70/21
90/32
66/18
66/18
81/27
64/17
72/22
68/20
51/10

= fil

Today

Low
F/C
75/23
51/10
50/10
63/17
58/14
80/26
76/24
55/12
60/15
64/17
61/16
49/9
66/18
43/8
43/8
57/13
52/11
71/21
80/26
42/5
75/23
71/21

Ww

pc

pc
pc
sh
sh
sh

pe
pc
pe

sh
pc
pc

Ss

pc
pc

57/13 s

45/7
46/7
45/7
54/12
46/7
69/20
36/2
77/25
73/22
70/21
62/16
48/8
76/24
60/15
46/7
52/11
78/25
54/12
68/20
41
39/3
50/10
64/17
85/29
41
50/10
48/8
67/19
78/25
60/15
76/24
45/7
70/21
46/7
72/22
57/13
50/10
39/3
47/8
75/23
61/16
39/3
64/17
54/12
56/13
45/7
35/1

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High
F/C
88/31
57/13
82/27
80/26
63/17
90/32
85/29
65/18
86/30
79/26
85/29
71/21
74/23
66/18
61/16
85/29
66/18
100/37
94/34
70/21
90/32
81/27
72/22
55/12
57/13
70/21
78/25
55/12
84/28
57/13
88/31
114/45
85/29
84/28
59/15
86/30
76/24
61/16
75/23
88/31
78/25
83/28
57/13
55/12
80/26
81/27
114/45
59/15
61/16
76/24
75/23
100/37
79/26
85/29
74/23
84/28
59/15
82/27
71/21
71/21
61/16
70/21
83/28
72/22
61/16
82/27
65/18
79/26
66/18
62/16

Sunday

Low
F/C
74/23
47/8
53/11
67/19
53/11
78/25
77/25
57/13
63/17
74/23
61/16
59/15
68/20
49/9
52/11
55/12
52/11
75/23
80/26
38/3
71/21
71/21
57/13
53/11
46/7
52/11
56/13
47/8
67/19
39/3
76/24
75/23
70/21
62/16
34/1
77/25
60/15
48/8
50/10
77/25
52/11
64/17
34/1
41/5
55/12
65/18
86/30
46/7
52/11
56/13
66/18
79/26
62/16
76/24
38/3
73/22
39/3
71/21
57/13
48/8
41/5
52/11
74/23
63/17
38/3
64/17
54/12
61/16
43/8
43/6




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Weather (W): s-sunny, pe-partly cloudy, c-cloudy, sh-showers, t-thunder-
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SATURDAY, MAY 16TH, 2009 PAGE 11



MARINE FORECAST



WINDS WAVES VISIBILITY WATER TEMPS.
NASSAU Today: E at 15-25 Knots 2-4 Feet 10-20 Miles 77°F
Sunday: E at 15-25 Knots 3-5 Feet 10-20 Miles 77°F
FREEPORT Today: E at 15-25 Knots 1-3 Feet 10-20 Miles 76° F
Sunday: E at 15-25 Knots 2-4 Feet 10-20 Miles 77°F
ABACO Today: E at 15-25 Knots 1-3 Feet 10-20 Miles 76° F
Sunday: E at 15-25 Knots 2-4 Feet 10-20 Miles Tk



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56/35,

62/39

Miami
Showers 84/73
T-storms
[oad Rain
Flurries
Snow

[v=] Ice

Os |05) 10s 20s (303i) 40s

Fronts
Cold

War fiinflienille

Stationary Monge

Shown are noon positions of weather systems and
precipitation. Temperature bands are highs for the day.
Forecast high/low temperatures are for selected cities.



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(BAHAMAS) LIMITED. INSURANCE BROKERS & AGENTS

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PAGE 12, SATURDAY, MAY 16, 2009 THE TRIBUNE
LOCAL NEWS





by Franklyn G Ferguson, JP

thescene

NASSAU EVENTS CAPTURED ON CAMERA








Pe RGU aU
CHAPTER OF THE BAHAMAS

THE District Grand Royal Arch Chapter of the Bahamas Scot-
tish Constitution Holding of the Supreme Grand Royal Arch
Chapter of Scotland was recently dedicated and consecrated on a
visit to the Bahamas by Most Excellent Companion Charles Wol-
rige Gordon of Esslemont, First Grand Principal of the Supreme
Grand Royal Arch Freemasons of Scotland. On this occasion Most
Excellent Companion Arthur R Chase was installed as the district’s
first Grand Superintendent.

This event was significant as the Scottish Royal Arch Freemasons
in the Bahamas are now able to chart their own course under the
direct supervision of The Supreme Grand Royal Arch Chapter
of Scotland. The new Grand Superintendent and Office Bearers are
now fully responsible for administration of all Scottish Royal Arch
Chapters, Lodges, Councils and Cryptic Councils in the Bahamas.

It is to be noted that Scottish Royal Arch Freemasonry existed
in the Bahamas since 1978 with the dedication and consecration of
the Saint Michael Royal Arch Chapter No 850. The First Principal
of the Chapter was MEC James Wildgoose. The Chapter was then
attached to the District Grand Royal Arch Chapter of Jamaica and
the Bahamas. In April 2004 the chapters and councils in the
Bahamas come under the direct supervision of Most Excellent
Companion Arthur R Chase on his appointment as Grand Super-
visor for Scottish Royal Arch Freemasonry of the Bahamas, there-
by severing ties with the District Grand Royal Arch Chapter of
Jamaica. However, records of Royal Arch Freemasonry in the
Bahamas goes back to an earlier date of 1951 with the consecration
of the Royal Victoria Chapter No 443 of the English Constitution
the First Principal was Howard McKinney.

The following now constitute the new Scottish Royal Arch District
Grand Chapters of the Bahamas:

Saint Michael Royal Arch Chapter No 850
Saint Andrew Royal Arch Chapter No 877
Ivan A Hanna Royal Arch Chapter No 885
Saint Anne’s Royal Arch Chapter No 887
Saint Gregory Royal Arch Chapter No 890
Saint Michael Lodge and Council No 850
Saint Michael Cryptic Council No 850



Pictured on arrival at the Lynden Pindling Airport the First Grand Prin-
cipal of the Supreme Grand Royal Arch Chapter of Scotland MEC Charles
Wolrige Gordon of Esslemont, being met by MEC Arthur R Chase, Grand
Superintendent Designate for the District Grand Royal Chapter of the
Bahamas.

Meeting with the Governor General of the Bahamas Arthur D Hanna (cen-
re) from left to right: L Edgar Moxey, Third District Principal of the
Bahamas; Thomas Frost, Past Deputy First Principal for Scotland; Arthur
R Chase, Grand Superintendent of the Bahamas; Charles Wolrige Gordon
of Esslemont, First Grand Principal for Scotland; Grahame Smith, Grand
Scribe E; and James R Bain, Grand Superintendent of the Bahamas and
Turks and Caicos.

Meeting at the VP Lounge with Brendon C Watson, Deputy Grand
uperintendent of the Bahamas; Grahame Smith, Grand Scribe E; Thomas
Frost, Past Deputy First Grand Principal for Scotland; Charles Wolrige Gor-
don of Esslemont, First Grand Principal for Scotland; Arthur R Charles,
Grand Superintendent of the Bahamas; Michael G Lloyd, First District Grand
Standard-Bearer of the Bahamas; L Edgar Moxey, Third Grand Principal
of the Bahamas and Joseph R Curry, First District Grand Sojourner of the
Bahamas.

PAlottice Bearers of the district. Seated left to right: Brendon C Watson,

Deputy Grand Superintendent, Leroy N Thompson, Second District Grand
Principal; Arthur R Chase, Grand Superintendent; L Edgar Moxey, Third Dis-
trict Grand Principal; and Roger G Brown, Grand Scribe E. Standing left to
right: Anthony H R Richardson, District Grand Director of Ceremonies;
Mitchell A Thurston, District Grand Janitor; James A Carey, Third District
Grand Sojourner; Duncan DeBarros, Second District Grand Sojourner;
Eugene Toote Jr, District Grand Steward; L Alexander Roberts, District
Grand Scribe N; Dr Julian A Stewart, District Grand Steward; Bernard K
Bonamy, District Grand Sword-Bearer; K Peter Turnquest, District Grand
Treasurer; Justice Emmanuel E Osadebay, Second District Grand Standard-
Bearer; and Prince A Bonamy, Deputy District Grand Director of Cere-
monies.

Visiting Deputations GE Trevor Jones, Grand Superintendent of Jamaica;

wen Springer, Grand Superintendent of Barbados; Thomas Frost, Past
Deputy First Grand Principal for Scotland; Leroy N Thompson, Second Dis-
trict Grand Principal of the Bahamas; Charles Wolrige Gordon of Esslemont,
First Grand Principal for Scotland; Arthur R Chase, Grand Superintendent
of the Bahamas; L Edgar Moxey, Third District Grand Principal of the
Bahamas; James R Bain, Grand Superintendent of the Bahamas and
Turks; Keith Scott, Past Grand Superintendent of Jamaica; Brendon C Wat-
son, Deputy Grand Superintendent of the Bahamas and Grahame Smith,
Grand Scribe E.

Fy James R Bain, Grand Superintendent of the Bahamas and Turks,
greets Charles Wolrige Gordon of Esslemont, First Grand Principal of Scot-
land.

At the banquet, left to right: Roger G Brown, Grand Scribe E; Peter D
ole, Past Grand Superintendent of the District Grand Chapter of the
Bahamas and Turks; John Fuller, District Grand Officer, District Grand
Chapter of the Bahamas and Turks; James A Carey, Third District Grand
Sojourner of the Bahamas and Justice Emmanuel E Osadebay, Second Dis-
trict Grand Standard-Bearer of the Bahamas.

Feet the future: Grahame Smith, Grand Scribe E; Gustavaus S$ Fergu-
son, Mark Master Mason, St Michael Royal Arch Chapter No. 850 and
Charles Wolrige Gordon of Esslemont, First Grand Principal for Scotland.







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