Citation
The Tribune

Material Information

Title:
The Tribune
Uniform Title:
Tribune (Nassau, Bahamas)
Portion of title:
Nassau tribune
Place of Publication:
Nassau, Bahamas
Publisher:
Tribune
Publication Date:
Copyright Date:
2009
Frequency:
Daily, except Sunday
daily
normalized irregular
Language:
English
Physical Description:
v. : ill. ; 58 cm.

Subjects

Genre:
newspaper ( sobekcm )
newspaper ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage:
Bahamas

Notes

General Note:
Description based on: Vol. 79, no. 210 (Aug. 3, 1983); title from caption.

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Holding Location:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
This item was contributed to the Digital Library of the Caribbean (dLOC) by the source institution listed in the metadata. This item may or may not be protected by copyright in the country where it was produced. Users of this work have responsibility for determining copyright status prior to reusing, publishing or reproducing this item for purposes other than what is allowed by applicable law, including any applicable international copyright treaty or fair use or fair dealing statutes, which dLOC partners have explicitly supported and endorsed. Any reuse of this item in excess of applicable copyright exceptions may require permission. dLOC would encourage users to contact the source institution directly or dloc@fiu.edu to request more information about copyright status or to provide additional information about the item.
Resource Identifier:
09994850 ( OCLC )

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Full Text
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BAHAMAS EDITION

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FRIDAY, MAY 15, 2009

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EXUNA BCONOMY |
‘expected to crasit

MP speaks out over
Four Seasons closure

m@ By TANEKA
THOMPSON
Tribune Staff
Reporter
tthompson@
tribunemedia.net

BUSINESSES in
Exuma are bracing for
an economic crash fol-
lowing the announce-
ment of the closure of
the island's largest
employer, the Four
Seasons at Emerald
Bay, according
Anthony Moss, MP for the
area.

"Without a doubt, it will cer-
tainly affect the economy of
Exuma to the point where I can
say it will be devastated,” he
said. “When you look at the
persons who have rental prop-
erties, those person are going
to lose their clients, transporta-
tion provided by taxi drivers is
going to be affected, even the
small business people, people
who have grocery stores are
going to be affected.

"If you have a population of
6,000 on the island and if you
lose 500 jobs the effects are
going to trickle down to small
businesses, beauty salons, food-
stores — people are going to
feel it.

A day after news broke that
the luxury development would

Whopper Jr.

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Prete mea Cel ety

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ANTHONY MOSS



"temporarily" shut its
doors on May 26 —
leaving about 500 peo-
ple jobless — Mr
Moss said people on
the island are putting
up a brave front.

"Some people are
saying they are ready
for it,” he said, liken-
ing the blow to the
closure of the Out
Island Inn in the 1980s
which drove many
from Exuma in search

or work.

Melanie Morley, co-owner of
Charlie's Restaurant and Bar
at Exuma's Fish Fry, said while
she anticipates some knock off
effects to her business from the
closure, she is going to remain
optimistic.

"Behind every dark cloud is a
silver lining so I'm just waiting
to see where the silver lining of
this is, but of course the hotel's
closing will have a trickle down
effect on everything, but I'm
optimistic,” she said, adding that
she is hoping the hotel will soon
attract a new buyer.

The establishment, which
serves local fare, routinely
attracts guests and staff from
the nearby Four Seasons resort,
said Ms Morley.

A manager of a car rental

SEE page eight

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in his
Exuma’s second
largest employer

airlifted to Nassau

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A POLICE OFFICER search- |};
es bushes in the Marshall
Road area for suspected |
illegal immigrants yester- [o"
day.





IMMIGRATION offi-
cials were busy yesterday
capturing more than 20






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& | Branville McCartney, led to ‘intimidation
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= | the area conducting an = Tibline Start eporar MURDERED MAN ‘DID NOT
= | early morning raid when . ! i
they received a tip that alowe@tribunemedia.net QUALIFY AS REFUGEE
another group of :
migrants had landed in FOLICE and businesses [77
the area. eee lay Bes ee
Capturing an estimated ip Dewars alter Many Crain they
20 Beene Mi McCart- were hit with unexpected GB COMPANY EMPLOYEES
ney said that officers demands for thousands of dollars FACE UNCERTAIN FUTURE
were still busy yesterday after receiving an unsolicited
searching the surround- phone call from a foreign com-
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sled” and “intimidate or
Pe Alera months by representatives of OUTLAWING SEA TURTLE
naeed report on this Island Yellow Pages, who told HARVESTING PUT ON HOLD

them they had entered into a

SEE page 10

raid as early as this morn-

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Businessman
sunned down

home

m@ By TANEKA
THOMPSON
Tribune Staff
Reporter
tthompson@
tribunemedia.net

THE quiet community of
Hooper's Bay, Exuma,
was in shock yesterday
when news spread that one
of the area’s well-known
businessmen had been shot
and was in hospital in seri-
ous condition.

Police said 36-year-old
Rodney Burrows, a promi-
nent contractor originally
from Long Island, was held
up by a masked gunman
who shot him multiple
times at his home, on the
second floor of the build-
ing which houses his com-
pany, Burrows Develop-
ment Limited. The shoot-
ing took place around 2am
yesterday.

According to a report by
Assistant Superintendent
Walter Evans, Mr Burrows
was accosted in his home
by a dark complexioned
man who ordered him to
lie on the floor.

The assailant, who stood
5' 9" and was dressed in
brown trousers and brown

SEE page eight

Bishop Fraser
retrial expected
to continue

THE retrial of Bishop Earl
Randy Fraser, who is accused of
having a sexual relationship with
a 16-year-old girl, is expected to
continue in Magistrate’s Court,
the Tribune has learned.

According to sources close to
the matter, Chief Justice Sir Bur-
ton Hall has returned the matter
to Magistrate Carolita Bethel for
the continuation of the retrial,
having not been satisfied that the
challenge launched by Fraser’s
attorney Wayne Munroe should
be heard in the Supreme Court.

Fraser’s retrial, which began
last Monday, was halted after his
attorneys filed a constitutional
application. Fraser, who is on
$10,000 bail, is accused of having
a sexual relationship with a 16-
year-old girl between July 2005
and February 2006. So far five

SEE page eight

Some Of The Finest Cement Tools In The Industry!



PAGE 2, FRIDAY, MAY 15, 2009

THE TRIBUNE



LOCAL NEWS



ru) EE REPLACES TRICYCLE, di abt

Felipé Major/Tribune staff [iy

WENTWORTH SEARS, 40, yesterday expressed his gratitude
to the good Samaritan who purchased a new tricycle and
walking apparatus for him.

An article in Wednesday’s Tribune explained that the items
had been stolen from his Market Street home on Monday
night.

Mr Sears, who makes his living selling T-shirts to tourists in
the downtown area, said: “I just want to thank the person
who donated the brand new bike and walker.

“| just want to show my gratitude and to say that there are
still some good people out there, so from the bottom of my
heart, thank you whoever you are.”

Mr Sears suffers from cerebral palsy and cannot earn a
living without both the walker and the tricycle.

Sam Williams, President of the Bahamas Loving Care Asso-
ciation, said that someone had initially gone to make a down
payment on the bicycle only to return and discover that it had
already been paid for.

“We have good people out there in the community, all is not
lost,” Mr Williams said.



PU ee a er | pithy | ee held

is Comsidering suitable apnlications for the rale of

Manager, Trust and
Corporate Services

Description of role and key responsibilities:
* Lead and manage a team of trust officers and other

staff this includes providing advice in respect of clients
and cases, coaching staff and ensuring the effective
utilisation of olber resources. Instrumental in developing
and implementing company procedures within
appropriate frameworks.

Possess a superior knowledge of Trust (complex and
simple), Company and Fiduciary structures, and tax
and legal issues affecting the administration of Trusts
and Companies.

Ensure that strong technical knowledge of all aspects
of trust and company administration is delivered: this
includes attending client meetings and
supervising! assisting in respect of the preparation of
accounting and investment information prior to
submission to clients

Experience with the preparation and presentation of
financial and estate planning proposals to high net
worth individuals

Providing assistance to increase profitability of the
company/ shareholder value by identifying
opportunities to extend the trust services, and to use
the bank offering to implement solutions for clients
where appropriate

Proven superior sales acumen. With ability to attract,
build anc strengthen relationships with key clients and
intermediaries and identify mew ideas in relation to
products and services that may be offered by the
company

Core skills and knowled

A University degree in business, accounting, or other
relatect discipline

Aminimum of ten years' relevant experience
Professionally qualified, e.g. accounting) finance
qualification, STEP ICSA, TER ACCA

self-motivation with excellent project management
Demonstrbly strong technical knowledge of all aspects
of trust and company administration, including
nuances and statutory requirements of the major
offshore jurisdictions used in connection with clients’
structures

* Strong analytical and problem-solving skills

Methodical, thorough and attentive to detail

Strong superisory skills coupled with the ability to lead
by example

Strong skills in time management and prioritisation
Excellent oral and written communication skills
Microsoft Office skills

Cultural awareness and sensitivity on both an individual
and corporate basis

Interested persons should apply by May 22, 2009 to:

Royal Bank of Canada Trust Company
(Bahamas) Limited
PO Box N-3024
Nassau, WE Bahamas
Abtention: Human Resource Manager
Via Email: paul.lewis @rbc_.com or
elizabeth.dorsch@rbec.com

Only applications from suitably qualified candidates
will be acknowtbed ped

el
ps Meee BLS
ic eee Ce



Murdered man ‘did
not qualify as refugee’

President of Haitian Bahamian
Society calls for review of policies

m@ By MEGAN REYNOLDS
Tribune Staff Reporter
mreynolds@tribunemedia.net

THE Haitian man murdered
in Santo Domingo after he was
refused political asylum in
Grand Bahama did not qualify
for refugee status under normal
protocol, the Immigration
Department said.

But president of the Haitian
Bahamian Society of the
Bahamas Jetta Baptiste is calling
for a review of current policies
as she said Anderson Pierre told
the Immigration Department his
family was in hiding and feared
for their lives in his first appli-
cation for refugee status in May
2007.

Mr Pierre, 37, was forced to
leave the country when a sec-
ond review of his application for
political asylum was refused by
the Immigration Department in
September 2008. As a result he
set off to find a new home for his
wife, Paulette, and newborn son
in the Dominican Republic in
February this year. He was then
shot dead by unknown gunmen
on April 24.

Mrs Baptiste said Mr Pierre
informed Immigration in his first
application of armed men ran-
sacking his home in Port-au-
Prince in April 2007 and that his
family were in hiding.

And she has called for gov-
ernment to urgently review the
current immigration policies as
Mr Pierre’s young family await
the results of their applications
for political asylum in Freeport.

Mrs Baptiste said: “If some-
one tells you they are afraid to
return home because they ‘will

TROPICAL
EUS)

tee ba
PHONE: 322-2157



be killed’, I don't know what
else that can be said to justify a
denial of such an urgent plea for
‘help’.

“T know exactly what hap-
pened, and I am waiting to see if
and when Immigration will
admit that they were wrong in
this and other decisions they
have made.”

The Immigration Department
maintains Mr Pierre failed to
qualify for refugee status under
the United Nations 1951 Con-
vention relating to the status of
Refugees and its 1967 Protocol.
And that records show Mr
Pierre arrived in Grand Bahama
on May 6, 2007, was awarded
visitor’s status for 14 days, and
subsequently applied for an
extension. The extension was
refused. Further investigation
revealed that Mr Pierre’s visa to
enter the Bahamas was obtained
by fraudulent means, the depart-
ment claimed.

Arrest

The father-of-four then
applied for political asylum on
May 29, 2007 and informed
Immigration he had been a
bodyguard and chauffeur for a
Haitian Commissioner under
Jean-Bertrand Aristide’s rule.
When Aristide was forced into
exile, the commissioner was
placed under arrest for more
than a year and then lived in the
Dominican Republic.

The director of Immigration
requested a further review of Mr
Pierre’s application when he saw
it in June 2007.

But the second review was
unsuccessful and Mr Pierre was
instructed to “wind-up his
affairs” and leave the country
within 21 days of September 5,
2008. He received his refugee
refusal letter on September 29,
2008.

Mrs Baptiste maintains Mr
Pierre left Freeport for Cap Hai-
tien in February to find a new

MANGOS

Anderson Pierre



home for his family, and was
killed within weeks of his arrival.

However, a statement from
the Bahamas Immigration
Department claims it has been
unable to confirm Mr Pierre’s
murder, but “wishes to convey
the Pierre family its sincere and
heartfelt condolences on the
alleged passing of their beloved
husband and father.”

Mrs Baptiste said the system
failed Mr Pierre and his family
and called for those making
decisions over applications to
consider them more carefully.

She said: “I am sure the few
good people who are in a posi-
tion to make a decision con-
cerning these types of cases,
would look into them more
closely, and truly help those who
genuinely need it.

“What status will the Immi-
gration department afford to his
wife and child in view of this sad
situation?

“What is going to happen to
all the other political asylum
request that were denied? Are
these cases going to be revisited,
reconsidered and_ given
favourable consideration?

“Life is precious, but the
Bahamas should know by now,
that not all of the persons who
come to these shores come here
for economic reasons.”

Amnesty International has
called for a thorough investiga-
tion of the matter.

Monday through Saturday for lunch
Wednesday through Saturday for dinner

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CAVES VILLAGE, WEST BAY STREET

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EMAIL MANGOSCAFE@CORALWAVE.COM





Jetta Baptiste

Minister of Health
lenies claims of
‘abandoned clinic’

m@ By ALISON LOWE
Tribune Staff Reporter
alowe@tribunemedia.net

FOLLOWING allegations that
the FNM has “wastefully”
allowed a brand new $1.3 million
medical clinic to go unused for
years, Health Minister Hubert
Minnis yesterday said PLP Sena-
tor Jerome Fitzgerald should
“check his facts.”

During Wednesday’s Senate
session, Mr Fitzgerald said that
the clinic in Grand Cay, Abaco,
was “completed and fully fur-
nished” more than two years ago.
He said the fact that it remains
unused is yet another example of
poor management of the nation’s
affairs by the government.

Yesterday, Dr Minnis denied
that two years have passed since
the building was completed,
telling The Tribune that it was
“scheduled” to open on April 24,
2009, but this was postponed as
there are still some landscaping
works and other “minor prob-
lems” to be dealt with.

Stating that the new, modern
facility should be open to the pub-
lic within two months, the minis-
ter emphasised that “no Bahami-
an’s health has been compro-
mised” as a result of the delay in
opening the clinic.

Dr Minnis said he feared that if
certain things were not finished
before the clinic opens to the pub-
lic, they “would never be done.”

Completing the work before
the opening, he said, will help
ensure that the new clinic has “an
environment and ambiance con-
ducive to public health.”

Hitting back at the Opposition,
the Health Minister alluded to
problems experienced by many
people who moved into low-cost
government-built homes under
the former PLP administration.

“This clinic will be open in very
short order and when you see
landscaping and everything done
properly you will ask, “Why can’t
we do every clinic and building
like this?’ We want to make sure
that people don’t move into
buildings, into homes, where
things aren’t complete, where
there’s landscaping still to do in
the yard, plastering — we need to
stop homes being built like that.”

Dr Myles Munroe
alldresses first Gospel
Complex for Education and
Preservation Conference

DR MYLES MUNROE,
founder and president of
Bahamas Faith Ministries Inter-
national, addressed the Ministry
of Tourism and Aviation-spon-
sored first annual Gospel Com-
plex for Education and Preserva-
tion Conference in Florida last
week.

“Embracing the Future
Through Creative Arts” served
as the theme of this year’s con-
ference, which included work-
shops and seminars that focused
on the creative arts and the role
that gospel music has played in
the history of American music.

The four-day event featured
some of gospel music’s premier
recording artists, including Smok-
ie Norful and Dorinda Clark Cole.

Dr Munroe’s speech highlight-
ed the similarities in history and
culture of Bahamians and African
Americans in relation to the
gospel music experience. He also
noted that “God lives in the
Bahamas” and that the Gospel
Complex should not be created
without including the Bahamas
since Miami and Fort Lauderdale
are “the northern Bahamas.”

The Gospel Complex is a non-
profit organisation whose mission
it is to promote, preserve, and per-
petuate the evolving history of
gospel music through
education and economic empow-
erment.



THE TRIBUNE

FRIDAY, MAY 15, 2009, PAGE 3



LOCAL NEWS



0 In brief

Court system ‘in
deplorable state’

THE Bahamas court system is
in a deplorable state, Bishop Sime-
on Hall said in a statement yester-
day.

“Our judiciary is in trouble and
should be beyond aspirations and
odium,” Bishop Hall said.

He said that a national review of
the judicial system is urgent and
imperative.

“More lawyers must come for-
ward and show their patriotism
and loyalty to the state. It is time
more Bahamian lawyers place the
glory of service beyond personal
monetary gluttony,” Bishop Hall
said.

Three men plead not
guilty to possession
of marijuana

THREE men have been grant-
ed $7,500 bail after pleading not
guilty to a marijuana possession
charge on Wednesday.

James Ivan Gaitor, 28, of
Domingo Heights; Samuel Gaitor,
18, of Baillou Hill Road South;
and Akeem Saunders, 19, of Bail-
lou Hill Road South, pleaded not
guilty to the charge of possession of
marijuana with intent to supply.

It is alleged that on Monday,
May 11, the accused were found
in possession of one pound of mar-
yuana that authorities believed
they intended to supply to another.

The men appeared before Mag-
istrate Carolita Bethel at Court 8,
Bank Lane. The case has been
adjourned to September 9.

Chamber of Commerce
to hold election at AGM

ELECTIONS for a new presi-
dent, directors and officers will be
held at the Bahamas Chamber of
Commerce’s 2009 General Meet-
ing (AGM) on Wednesday, May
27, beginning at 12.30pm, at the
British Colonial Hilton. Chairman
and CEO of the Baha Mar Resorts
Sarkis Izmirhan will be the keynote
speaker at the meeting and will
address the topic, “Are We Ready
For The Recovery.”

Mr Izmirlian will share a pri-
vate investor’s view of doing busi-
ness in the Bahamas and his per-
spectives on preparing for a suc-
cessful economic recovery.

Election of officers and direc-
tors for the Chamber’s 2009-2010
administrative year will be held
during the AGM. The meeting is
open to both members and non-
members of the Chamber.

“We expect a good turn-out of
members, not just because we’re
set to elect a new slate of officers
and directors, but it’s sort of an
official farewell for outgoing pres-
ident (Dionisio) D’Aguilar, who
has made an outstanding contri-
bution to the organisation these
past two years,” said Philip Simon,
the Chamber’s executive director.

“Certainly, the Chamber has
seen significant growth during his
tenure and the association 1s posi-
tioned to excel even further,” Mr
Simon said. Mr D’Aguilar said it is
paramount for the Chamber to
remain a strong voice for the busi-
ness community.

“As president, I wanted to
ensure the Chamber took the lead
on everyday issues affecting the
way we do business in the
Bahamas and I am confident that
we will maintain that position of
influence for our members with
the incoming president and offi-
cers,” he said. During his tenure as
President D’Aguilar was very
vocal about the Baha Mar project
and expressed pleasure that Mr
Izmirlian had decided to address
the Chamber’s AGM.

“While Mr Izmirlian will cer-
tainly share insights on what it will
take for a Bahamian business to
recover from this economic crisis,
I look forward to learning about
the status of that project and the
opportunities for Bahamian busi-
nesses to participate in the rede-
velopment of Cable Beach.”

New
Arrival®

GB company employees
face uncertain future

Reports of staff aged 60 and over being laid off

THERE are concerns for 14
employees of a Grand Bahama
company, who claim they are
being laid off because they are 60
years and older.

These concerns were outlined
in a statement issued to the press
late yesterday evening when it
was reported that they were
called to a meeting on April 24
and presented with retirement
packages.

They were told to take the
packages home to discuss with
their families.

If the offer were acceptable, it
should be signed and returned to
Human Resources by May 1.

However, it was reported that
after 13 of the employees had
signed the offer, the company
allegedly changed the terms of
the agreement and offered a new



“lower” pro-
posal.
“How can a

company offer
its employees a
package, have
them sign and
accept the
package and
return it to
them, and then
the following day say they are not
honouring that contract any
longer and give them a new con-
tract to sign. Why are they
allowed to breach their contract
like that?” the statement asked.

Yesterday, PLP MP for West
End and Bimini Obie Wilch-
combe wanted to know when
government was going to inter-
vene to secure the future of these
and other Bahamians who are

Mneneenile

being terminated throughout the
country. “The Bahamas is in deep
do-do and the Bahamian people
are sinking in it,” he said.
“Whether it is in Grand Bahama,
New Providence, or Exuma,
where is the government to pro-
tect these employees? Every com-
pany can do what they want to
do, but who is coming to the res-
cue of the Bahamian people?”
Mr Wilchcombe asked.

The employees who were
offered early retirement also
claim that the expatriate director
of the firm told them that “either
they take the packages or leave
it.”

“Like others before,” said the
statement, “he came into this
country and decided that he will
treat and talk to Bahamians any-
way he would like to.”

Motorists complain about
‘hazardous’ Bay Street trench

MOTORISTS complained yes-
terday about the trench being dug
by BTC workers through the mid-
dle of Bay Street, calling it an
eye-sore and a driving hazard.

One Nassau resident who
works in the area expressed con-
cern about safety on the island’s
busiest street — especially at night
when the wide trenches are more
difficult to see.

Another motorist complained
about the duration of the trench-
ing — which precedes a repaving
exercise as part of plans to spruce
up downtown ahead of the Miss
Universe Pageant in August —
saying it is inconveniencing fre-
quent users of the street.

Yesterday, BTC officials said
the trenching is "going according
to schedule” and should soon be
completed. "That work is drawing
toaclose," said Marlon Johnson,
BTC's vice-president for market-
ing and sales. He said the compa-
ny is laying conduits along Bay
Street to carry fibre optic cables
that will permit BTC to provide
more communications services to
the area. Mr Johnson also reject-
ed claims that the trenching had
been prolonged because of a dis-
pute between BTC and sub-con-
tractors hired to carry out the
work.

"I'm not aware of any of that
information, certainly nothing has
been brought to my attention
about any discrepancy with any of
our sub contractors,” he said.

Director of Works Gordon
Major said the ministry plans to
begin paving West Bay Street,
starting near Goodman's Bay,
tonight. Meanwhile, Ministry of
Works officials are set to meet
with representatives of the Water
and Sewage Corporation to deter-
mine what other work must be
done ahead of the repaving.

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>| THE PUBLIC

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about ditches

| from road-
works on Bay
Street, saying
they are an
eyesore for

| tourists and a

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Fashion

Finds $10.00

And up



CARICOM ‘still facing
challenges of regional

Causey

@ By DENISE MAYCOCK
Tribune Freeport Reporter
dmaycock@tribunemedia.net

FREEPORT - Jamaican Prime
Minister Bruce Golding said
CARICOM is still facing chal-
lenges of regional integration of
economies and people.

“The world is being reconfig-
ured into regional groupings. We
are having that in terms of trade,
we are having that in terms of... if
you look at the European Union,
and for that reason CARICOM
as a major integration effort is
important,” said Mr Golding.

The Jamaican Prime Minister
was in Grand Bahama attending
the fifth Commonwealth Local
Government Conference at the
Westin Resort. Before deliver-
ing his keynote address to con-
ference delegates, he met with
the press Thursday morning.

Mr Golding noted that while
CARICOM is facing difficulties
“that are most pragmatic as well
as historical and emotional, it is
working through those difficul-
ties. “Integration has to integrate
not just economies, it has to inte-
grate people,” he said.

The CARICOM Single Mar-
ket and Economy is intended to
benefit the people of the region
by providing more and better
opportunities to produce and sell
our goods and services and to
attract investment. It will create
one large market among the par-
ticipating member states.

Mr Golding said that with a
single economic space, the objec-
tive and the obligation is that
there must be free movement of
goods, free movement of capital,
and ultimately free movement of
people.

“T (have) consistently argued
that you can’t have a common
market where goods and capital
can move free, but people can-
not move freely. People move in
the European Union freely — so
that’s the goal, but the practical
difficulty we face is that we are
small island states,” he explained.

Mr Golding stated that islands
with smaller populations would
be more severely impacted than
those with larger populations.

“Tf you take a country like
Antigua with a population of just
under 50,000, or take a country
like the Bahamas for example, if
there were free movement of peo-
ple how many Haitians would the
Bahamas have to accommodate,
so these are some real practical
difficulties. “For countries with

Cb

— Jamaica PM



relatively large populations like
Jamaica with 2.7 million, it does
not impact us severely, but for
islands with smaller populations,
it is a major challenge and these
are the things we have to work
through,” Mr Golding said.

Mr Golding said that certain
restrictions may have to be imple-
mented so that countries can con-
tinue to maintain their domestic
national interest. He believes that
the dream of Chaguarmas will be
realised someday. “With every
advance we make we are closer to
fulfilling the dream, but it is going
to take years, perhaps even gen-
erations before we get to that
point,” he said.

Relationship

Mr Golding said the Bahamas
and Jamaica share a very good
relationship and collaborate on a
wide range of issues affecting
both countries, including drug
trafficking.

He said both the Bahamas and
Jamaica are located on the Cen-
tral Caribbean route, which is
widely used for narcotics traf-
ficking. Mr Golding expressed
concern about the United States
shifting its focus from the region
to the Pacific route. “For both
(the Bahamas and Jamaica) we
are exposed and we have been
collaborating to counter the cor-
rosive impact of narcotics traf-
ficking. It is one of the issues that
we raised with President Obama
when we met with him in Port of
Spain last month.

“We are not happy about the
fact that the focus of the United
States, having shifted toward
Pacific route as it has through the
Marine Initiative, that this route
has been left exposed that nei-
ther the Bahamas, nor Jamaica
has the capabilities to maintain
the surveillance it requires.

“And we are asking the US to
be more engaged with us on this
issue that I expect we will discuss
when we meet with him again in
Washington in July. On that one
we are going to forge a working
relationship between the US and
the Caribbean,” he said.











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380-FLIX



PAGE 4, FRIDAY, MAY 15, 2009

THE TRIBUNE



EDITORIAL/LETTERS TO THE EDITOR

The Tribune Limited

NULLIUS ADDICTUS JURARE IN VERBA MAGISTRI
Being Bound to Swear to The Dogmas of No Master

LEON E. H. DUPUCH, Publisher/Editor 1903-1914

SIR ETIENNE DUPUCH, Kt, O.B.E., K.M., K.CS.G.,

(Hon.) LL.D., D.Litt.

Publisher/Editor 1919-1972
Contributing Editor 1972-199]

EILEEN DUPUCH CARRON, C.M.G., M.S. B.A., LL.B.

Publisher/Editor 1972-

Published Daily Monday to Saturday

Shirley Street, RO. Box N-3207, Nassau, Bahamas
Insurance Management Building., P.O. F-485, Freeport, Grand Bahama

TELEPHONES
Switchboard (News, Circulation and Advertising) 322-1986
Advertising Manager - (242) 502-2352
Circulation Department - (242) 502-2387
Nassau Fax: - (242) 328-2398
Freeport, Grand Bahama: 1-(242)-352-6608
Freeport fax: (242) 352-9348

WEBSITE
www.tribune242.com — updated daily at 2pm

The long shadows of the British Empire

WASHINGTON — The British are handy.
You can blame nearly anything you want on
them.

Corruption in Kenya? Blame it on the
British and the psychological damage of colo-
nialism.

The partition of Cyprus? Step forward the
social engineers in London, who underesti-
mated the depth of feeling in the Turkish
minority when the British were finally forced
out.

When it comes to the Middle East, one
can really get exercised about “Perfidious
Albion.” The Brits had their fingers in every
territorial dispute; created whole countries
where none had been; and, with the help of
the French, imposed borders from Morocco
to China where none had existed.

Trouble with Iran? Even before the CIA
started meddling there in 1953, it was Win-
ston Churchill who, as First Sea Lord in 1913,
decided the Royal Navy would move faster,
cleaner and have greater range if it switched
from coal to oil. So he partially nationalized
the Anglo-Persian Oil Company, the fore-
runner of BP, to exploit the newly discov-
ered oil fields in Iran. Later, this led to a
surge in Iranian nationalism and the CIA
plot to restore the Shah.

On to Pakistan and the British legacy in the
autonomous tribal lands, now home to the
Taliban and al-Qaeda. Put the British colonial
administration of the 18th, 19th and 20th cen-
turies in the dock. Yes, three centuries of
British commission and omission.

The British interest in Afghanistan, which
they failed to subdue in a series of wars, was
largely as a buffer between British India and
the growing territorial interests of the Russ-
ian Empire. It was here that The Great Game
was played: the romanticized espionage that
flourished in the region.

The British divided the traditional Pashtun
lands with the Durand Treaty of 1893, creat-
ing a northwestern border for British India, a
region that later became Pakistan.
Afghanistan was on the other side of the line.

It amounted to a land grab. However, the
British did recognize the separateness of the
people in the Northwest Territories and left
them to their tribal and religious ways.

With independence and the partition of
India in 1947, the incoming Pakistani gov-

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ernment had enough problems without
encouraging ethnic strife between the large-
ly Punjabi Pakistanis and their difficult Pash-
tun brothers in the territories. So the gov-
ernment in Islamabad continued the British
policy of benign indifference to the Pash-
tuns, with which they were more closely
linked by religion than ethnicity or politics.
Yet, the border dispute smouldered and peri-
odically erupted. Kabul and Islamabad do
not agree, both blaming the border drawn
by the British.

What neither the British nor the Pakistanis
wanted was a strong movement for a Pashtun
state that would carve out territory from
Afghanistan, as well as the tribal territories in
Pakistan. There was a failed attempt to bring
this about in 1949.

Segments of the Pakistani army and the
intelligentsia have feared this ever since.

The message is that simply being Muslim
does not wipe out tribal and ethnic identity
any more than borders drawn by others cre-
ate a new identity.

Ifit were so, Cyprus would not be divided,
Yugoslavia would have held together, as
would have Czechoslovakia, and Britain
would not be considering the possibility of an
independent Scotland one day — that after
300 years of union.

The current hostilities in the Pakistani trib-
al areas, U.S. drone strikes on suspected Tal-
iban strongholds and renewed determination
from the Pakistani army to crush extremists in
the region could renew a sense of nation-
hood among the Pashtuns, and a movement
toward the creation of Pashtunistan across
the British-drawn border between Pakistan
and Afghanistan.

In the long reaches of the night President
Obama’s special envoy to the region, Richard
Holbrooke, may wish one of the following
had happened in the days of the British Raj:
1. the British had stayed home; 2. the British
had insisted the Pashtuns submit to central
authority; 3. the British had created a new
country, Pashtunistan; or 4. the British had
never created that troublesome border.

One way or the other, he can blame the

(This article was written by Llewllyn King -
c.2009 Hearst Newspapers).



Enraged by
nepotism claims
Over granting of

Crown land

EDITOR, The Tribune.

The recent claims of nepo-
tism in the granting of Crown
land in the Lands and Surveys
department really gets my goat!

I am, you see, a young
Bahamian educator who is
hardworking, determined, and
dedicated to helping the youth
of our nation succeed.

This is evidenced in my
“Above Average - Outstand-
ing” yearly appraisals, my punc-
tuality, my rare absenteeism,
and my devotion to my stu-
dents.

Teaching, for me, is not sim-
ply a means of earning a wage,
but it is a job that I love whole-

heartedly.
A few years ago, as a mile-
stone birthday rapidly

approached, I decided it was
time to look into home owner-
ship. I literally visited every
bank, company, and union that
I could think of that might be of
assistance to me.

I was surprised to learn that
my salary was insufficient to
enable a single woman to own
her own home. I was told time
and time again that I needed a
co-signer and at one point was

LETTERS

letters@tribunemedia net



even told, “You don’t have no
husband? Get your boyfriend
to sign.” My name has been
added to lists at not just the
Bahamas Union of Teachers
(BUT) when they started their
housing campaign, which I
guess has been discontinued,
but also at the Department of
Housing.

Unfortunately, I have never
heard anything more from
either place and my attempts to
keep updated have been often
rudely squashed.

Now, don’t get me wrong... I
am well aware of the promised
changes that are to come with
regards to housing.

Perhaps, one would consider
me a pessimist because until I
see such changes implemented,
I don’t really believe the hype.
After all, I am still waiting for
the implementation of a nation-
al health plan. Sigh.

If there is indeed nepotism in
the Lands and Surveys depart-

ment, those guilty should be
ashamed.

This is what has held this
country back for so long.

But then again, I might have
been a homeowner by now if I
had gone looking for my aunty
brother cousin friend-in-law. It
is because of things like this that
has prohibited an honest, but
single woman of realising her
dream.

Finally, I cannot even begin
to fathom how difficult the task
of running this country must be
when I too, sometimes have dif-
ficulty managing the thirty-two
fourth graders that I teach. I
applaud our Prime Minister and
other government leaders for
their tireless efforts and keep
them all constantly in my
prayers.

Please Mr Ingraham, in your
efforts to clean up the civil ser-
vice, remember that there are a
great many of us who want to
work and who love our jobs.
God’s blessings on you and
yours.

BAHAMIAN
EDUCATOR
Nassau,

May 13, 2009.

The importance of the Haitian
Flag Day celebration in Bahamas

EDITOR, The Tribune.

In the Bahamas the Haitian
community celebrates their her-
itage by holding a Haitian Flag
Day celebration. The first initial
Haitian Flag Day celebration in
the Bahamas was on 18th, May,
1958. This event was held by a
group of young British subjects
at that time, who are now
Bahamians after the Bahamas
had gained independence on
the 10th, July, 1973. This event
was also supported alongside
with them a group of aristo-
cratic young professionals out
of Haiti who held professions
such as doctors; lawyers; teach-
ers and businessmen in the
Bahamas. Most of these pro-
fessionals left the Bahamas and
sought to launch their careers
elsewhere throughout the
world.

The Haitian flag was launch
to symbolise the freedom of
independence in Haiti from the
French colonisation. In 1803
during battle, Dessaline realises

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that he doesn’t have a flag to
wave in battle to distinguish
friend or foe while on the bat-
tlefields. After hearing this, his
goddaughter, Catherine Flon
took the French flag and tore
it down the middle removing
the white part of the flag. She
then attached the red and blue
together by sewing it with her
long hair as thread to knit it in.
After which there it had
appeared that Haitian Flag Day
was Officially coined as a symbol
of recognition; freedom and cel-
ebration on the 18th, May, 1803,
whereas the birth of a new
nation was found on the Ist,
January, 1804.

Despite the acts of this glory;
the French colonist refuses to
recognize Haiti as an indepen-
dent state. Whereas, they
released a charge against Haiti
in damages and arrears due to
the casualties of war; that Haiti
had to make payments to
France in the sum of 90 to 120
francs which is estimated in the
millions of dollars today. This
brought a terrible blow to the
Haitian treasury at that time;
needless to say it was for the
sake of being accepted and
recognised at international
meetings as an independent
country. At these meetings
Haiti represented every coun-
try that was afflicted by the
transatlantic slave trade by

appealing to the colonial powers
to allow their colonies to be set
free from oppression and sup-
pression.

Today, the celebration of
Haitian Flag and University
Day continues to take place in
the Bahamas.

The Bahamas has always
been a supporter at interna-
tional arenas and meetings in
appealing to world leaders to
assist with the state matters in
Haiti.

The celebration of Haiti’s
Flag Day in the Bahamas is to
introduce to the Bahamian soci-
ety about the high end fine
detail lifestyle of Haiti and the
possible opportunities it has to
offer to potential interested per-
sons who will like to pursue
futuristic ventures in the upris-
ing abilities of this country.

This event this year on Sat-
urday, 16th, May, will take place
at the Queen of Peace Catholic
Church located on Faith
Avenue off Carmichael Road
beginning at 12 noon.

An invitation is extended to
the Bahamian community in all
due respects as a nation which
has been dammed as a leading
Caribbean nation to attend this
event.

MARK DESMANGLES
Nassau,
May, 2009

The divine right of kings has descended on politicians

EDITOR, The Tribune.

I was surprised at Dr Sweeting’s surprise, re-letter May 12th. Was
he not aware that the divine right of kings has descended upon
politicians, and don’t worry, not only Bahamians? George Bush,
Gordon Brown, Hugo Chavez are prime examples. If they are
questioned, heads with roll, fortunately today seldom literally.
People will not vote for a “humble politician” (an oxymoron?).
Politicians can be voted out for being too bombastic, but if voted
back few have learnt their lesson, as is so apparent in the Bahamas.
I know it is very exasperating, but perhaps God has allowed them
to see the whole picture, we are but mice!

WALTER GRATTAN
Nassau,
May 13, 2009.

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THE TRIBUNE

FRIDAY, MAY 15, 2009, PAGE 5



° mbrief Outrage as legislation outlawing

Haitian art
available to
buy in auction

OVER 100 pieces of
Haitian art will be avail-
able to buy for under $100
each in an auction at the
British Colonial Hilton
this evening.

Art lovers are invited to
attend a cocktail reception
at 6.30pm and participate
in the auction of five to
seven artworks which will
be auctioned off at 7pm.

Guests of the event at
the British Colonial are
asked to make a $20 dona-
tion to cover valet parking
and two drinks.

All proceeds from the
event will go to the United
Haitian Association of the
Bahamas’ community
emergency fund.

$ea Turtle
Conservation
Group seeks
donations

THE Bahamas Sea Turtle }
Conservation Group is appeal- :
ing for donations to assist with
the cause of preserving the }

endangered sea turtle.

The BSTCG hopes to bring }
sea turtle expert Dr Alan :
Bolton to Nassau to speak ata }
town meeting and print 1,000
brochures and educational :
materials for the general public. }

Donations may also be used }
to print T-shirts to sell and raise }

further funds.

Co-chairwoman Kim Aran- }
ha said: “We want to teach peo- }
ple the importance of eco- }
tourism. You can kill a turtle :
once. You can photograph and :
swim with the same turtle 365 }

days a year.

“If you could send a dona- :
tion to us we would be enor-

mously grateful.”

Cheques should be made out }
to ‘The Bahamas Sea Turtle }
Conservation Group’ and }
mailed to PO Box CB 11099, :

Nassau.

Otherwise, donations can be }
given to Kim Aranha at The }
Bahamas Humane Society }
or arrangements for:
collections can be made by
sending an email to bahamas- i

turtles@gmail.com

Events planned by the }
BSTCG include a candlelight :
vigil in Rawson Square at 7pm }
on June 8, a town meeting at }
the College of the Bahamas on }
Thompson Boulevard at 6pm
on June 10, and a turtle art }
show at Doongalik Studios in }
Marina Village, Paradise Island, }
to coimcide with the Miss Uni- }

verse Pageant in August.

e SEE STORY THIS PAGE :

Florida residents:

told to prepare
for hurricanes

m FORT LAUDERDALE, Fla.

GOV. CHARLIE CRIST
on Thursday urged Floridians
to be prepared and have a
plan for this hurricane season,
which begins June 1 and runs
through November, according
to Associated Press.

Crist said the beginning of
hurricane season is near and
this is the time to get ready.

“The real strength of Flori-
da is our ability to work
together whether its at the
federal level, the state level or
the local level,” Crist said.

He said every Floridian
should have at least three
days worth of bottled water
and canned food. He remind-
ed residents to have batteries,
radios and flashlights.

“Every Florida family
should be prepared, should
have a plan and be on guard,”
he said during a luncheon at
the Governor’s Hurricane
Conference in Fort Laud-
erdale.

“T think that the obvious
thing is: Just be ready,” he
said.

Crist also congratulated
Craig Fugate on his promo-
tion to head of the Federal
Emergency Management
Agency.

m@ By MEGAN REYNOLDS
Tribune Staff Reporter
mreynolds@tribunemedia.net

CONSERVATIONISTS are outraged
legislation to outlaw sea turtle harvesting
due to be passed last month has been put on
hold for further public consultation.

The Bahamas Sea Turtle Conservation
Group (BSTCG) has been campaigning for
updated legislation to protect endangered
sea turtles for around 15 years, and mem-
bers fear the latest delay will allow another
season of turtle hunting to commence on
August 1.

Minister of Agriculture and Marine
Resources said he hopes the consultation
will be complete in June in order for legis-
lation to be viewed by the Cabinet and
Attorney General’s office in time to be
passed before August 1.

The BSTCG maintains the majority of
people want more protection for sea tur-
tles and the group gathered 5,000 signa-
tures in support of the new legislation.

New laws have also gained support from
the Bahamas National Trust, the Nature
Conservancy, BREEF, the Bahamas
Humane Society, Advocates for Animal
Rights and others.

The Department of Marine Resources
has received hundreds of letters in support
of the ban, but director Michael Braynen
said his department has now been instruct-
ed to reach out to those who have not yet
spoken up.

Meetings have been held in various loca-

sea turtle harvesting put on hold




tions to discuss the bill, and Mr Cartwright
said they will continue to meet with fishing
communities in the Family Islands.

But the department is also exploring new
ways of reaching out to people as a recent
meeting in Exuma proved how those direct-
ly involved in the turtle trade are often
reluctant to attend.

Mr Braynen said: “People who are in
support will come to the meetings and peo-
ple who have contrary views may feel intim-
idated. This is why we are looking at other
ways of getting people to respond to us.”

An online response forum will soon be
available on the government’s website for
people throughout the Bahamas to freely
express their views.

Mr Braynen said: “We know there are
people who are very interested and have
very strong views, but if you have expressed
your views already we have recorded it.

“We want to hear from people we haven’t
heard from already . . . those people who
grumble but don’t express their views — they
need to be heard.”

The BSTCG maintains the Bahamas is
committed to the ban as itis a signatory to
CITES (Convention in International Trade
in Endangered Species), and the Depart-
ment of Marine Resources has advised gov-
ernment to increase protection for the
threatened marine species.

Government announced in October the
legislation would be passed on April 1, and

PASSERS-BY were horrified to see a turtle
condemned to a slow and painful death at
Montagu Ramp (left) earlier this year and paid
hundreds of dollars in an attempt to save it, but
it was too late. Pictured above are the remains
of a sea turtle on a table near the ramp.



BSTCG members are now disappointed the
promise has been broken.

Co-chairwoman Jane Mather said: “I
think it’s disgraceful because the minister of
agriculture promised us that by April 1 that
would be the end of killing of turtles, and it’s
going on and on.

“T hope it will be enacted as soon as pos-
sible so we don’t have to go through anoth-
er season of people killing as many as they
want.

“We are one of the few countries left
without these laws, and I can’t believe that
we, as a ‘civilised’ country, allow this.”

Members of the public can share their
thoughts on the proposed legislation by vis-
iting: www.bahamas.gov.bs.

Draft outline of regional policy to be presented to CARICOM leaders

mw By DENISE MAYCOCK
Tribune Freeport Reporter
dmaycock@tribunemedia.net

FREEPORT - Edwin Carring-
ton, CARICOM Secretary-Gen-
eral, announced that a draft out-
line of regional policy and a co-
operation framework for enhancing
local democracy has been ratified
and is expected to be transmitted to
CARICOM Heads of Government
this year for adoption.

“Once adopted, the outline of
the Regional Policy and Coopera-
tion Framework is expected to be
used as a negotiating position with
international aid agencies to sup-
port the work of local governance
in the region,” he told delegates at
the fifth Commonwealth Local
Government Conference in
Freeport.

The Heads of Government
Meeting for the 53-member Com-
monwealth will be held in Port of
Spain, Trinidad, in November.

Mr Carrington said that the draft
outline document will be presented
to the respective member states
before transmission to Common-
wealth Heads of Government for
adoption.

“T am pleased to indicate that
the draft outline of the regional
policy and cooperation framework,
produced with the help of the
Commonwealth expert was rati-
fied at the second meeting of the
CFLGM held in December 2008
after much regional consultation,”
he said.

He stated that in 2006, the Min-
istry of Local Government,
Trinidad and Tobago with support
from the CLGF, along with other
organisations, held a Conference
under the theme “Deepening Local
Governance and Participation in

CARICOM States.” At
that conference the Port
of Spain Accord was
issued, he said.

The Accord, he said,
spoke clearly with
regard to the need to
build on previous poli-
cy recommendations,
notably the 2004 Mon-
tego Bay Action Pro-
gramme and the 2005
Aberdeen Agenda:
Commonwealth Princi-
ples on Good Practice
for Local Democracy
and Good Governance. He said
these included:

¢ Promoting local democracy
and good governance;

¢ Effective service delivery for
all; and

¢ Regional policy and coopera-
tion framework for enhancing local
democracy.

Mr Carrington noted that there
has been recent progress in the
development of local government
systems in the Caribbean Commu-
nity as a result of external assis-
tance and the collaboration it has
received.

In 2002, in collaboration with
the United States Agency for Inter-
national Development (USAID), a
Conference on Local Government
and Decentralisation was held in
Guyana.

And, in 2004, with the assistance
of the Commonwealth, a sympo-
sium was held in Jamaica under
the theme “Local Democracy and
Good Governance in the
Caribbean.”

Mr Carrington explained that it
was at that symposium that the
Caribbean Ministers with respon-
sibility for Local Government
decided to establish a Caribbean

FUNERAL SERVICE FOR

retired science teacher, formerly of Grenada who died at
Doctor’s Hospital on 12th May 2009, will be held at Holy
Cross Anglican Church Highbury Park, New Providence,
The Bahamas, on Saturday 16th May 2009 at 5 p.m.

Mr. Wells has taught natural sciences in The Bahamas
since 1968 at; St. Augustine’s College, C.C. Sweeting Se-
nior High School, and H.O. Nash Junior High.

Mr. Wells leaves to mourn his sister, Mrs. Elsa Wells
Schioler (Denmark) and brother Mr. Alleyne Leslie Wells
(Trinidad and Tobago), and many other family members

and friends.



Edwin Carrington



Forum of Ministers
(CFM) to facilitate a
more coordinated
regional organisation.

He said the Forum
was assisted by an expert
provided by the Com-
monwealth to review
local democracy and
decentralisation in the
region as well as to
develop a regional policy
and cooperation frame-
| work.

The outcomes of the
fifth CLGF in Freeport
also will be transmitted to Com-
monwealth Heads of Government
meeting in Trinidad for policy
endorsements, ongoing policy mak-
ing, and political processes at the
highest level, according to CLGF
Secretary General Carl Wright.

Mr Carrington expressed appre-

ciation to the Commonwealth
Local Government Forum,
(CLGF) particularly its Secretary-
General Mr. Carl Wright, and to
the Bahamas government.

“T am particularly pleased to
have been invited to participate in
this important conference. I see
this Conference as the ideal coun-
terpoit, orienting and emphasising
as it does the essential role of local
government in our societies,” he
said.

Speaking on the topic, “Region-
al Integration and the Role for
Local Government”, Mr Carring-
ton said the integration arrange-
ment in the Caribbean Communi-
ty (CARICOM) is based on four
pillars — economic integration, for-
eign policy co-ordination, func-
tional co-operation and security
co-operation.

“Soon to be 36 years old and

comprising 15 Member States and
five Associate Members, CARI-
COM is the longest surviving inte-
gration movement among devel-
oping countries.

“Like all others, it is presently
struggling in the face of the cur-
rent global financial and economic
crisis as it strives to advance from a
Community and Common Market
to a Community including a Sin-
gle Market and Economy, better
known by its acronym CSME.

“For our Caribbean countries,
most of them small by any stan-
dards, regional integration is the
glue that binds them together and
in that process Local Government
has special significance. Historical-
ly it is in that mode of governance
that many of our legislators first
wet their feet in the art of repre-
sentative governance,” he
explained.

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PAGE 6, FRIDAY, MAY 15, 2009

THE TRIBUNE



TRIAL: ARMED HOLD-UP OF SCOTIABANK BRANCH

Jurors watch video of alleged
robbers being detained by police

Prosecutors call on local cameraman to give testimony

Tourism Minister touts
benefits of improved
communications sector

m@ BY BETTY VEDRINE

THE PROPOSED legislation to upgrade the commu-
nications sector will give the Bahamas the competitive
edge it needs, Minister of Tourism, Senator Vincent Van-
derpool-Wallace said.

“Efficient communications systems are fundamental to
a modern society and to modern commerce,” he said.

And getting the fundamentals right is “vital” to the
continued success of the tourism product, he said.

“Just yesterday, we completed our test in the Ministry
of Tourism to see what would happen if we restored the
proximity advantage of the
Bahamas from New York,”

Mr Vanderpool-Wallace said.

Making a comparison in
ticket sales out of New York
during May 2008 when there
was no recession to the same
period this year during a full
recession, the minister said
that just by focusing on fun- ff
damentals, the tourism prod-
uct was boosted by 150 per
cent.

One thousand tickets were |
sold to the Bahamas out of [Ft
New York in May last year . z
and 2,604 were sold in May So ae
this year.

“We can communicate everything in the world to our
prospective customers, but especially in this environment,
if we don’t get the fundamentals right, we do not restore
our competitive edge,” he said.

Although Bahamians may wonder about the need to lib-
eralise electronic communications, Mr Vanderpool-Wal-
lace said the obvious answer is that monopolies do not
always provide the best service.

“Monopolies or near monopolies tend to care little
about costs because if you want the service you take what
I have and you pay what I require,” he said. “That’s how
they make a profit.”

The Family Islands, in particular, would finally be able
to reach their full economic potential as a result of
improved communications, he said.

“It has been said that the development of the Family
Islands will come only when we solve the transportation,
distribution and communication issues,” he said.

“Whenever anyone on our Family Islands can get in and
out inexpensively and frequently, and when they can send
or receive any kind of electronic communication with
high reliability and low cost, we will see the kind of growth
that we have been expecting of those islands for more than
a decade.”

The proposed amendments “promise to deliver on the
communication piece of this triangle.”



EARNBONJS

INTEREST WITH THE
SCOTIABANK SAVINGS

@ By NATARIO McKENZIE
Tribune Staff Reporter



THE trial of three men charged in the
armed hold-up of a Scotiabank branch
continued in the Supreme Court yester-
day as jurors watched footage showing
the accused being detained by police.

Prosecutors yesterday called a local
cameraman to testify at the trial of James
Miller, 25, Janquo Mackey, 22, and
Anthony Williams, 34.

The men are accused of robbing the
Soldier Road and East Street South
branch of Scotiabank on July 2, 2008.

They are also accused of the attempted
murder of Police Corporal Natasha Black.

The cameraman — who told the press
he is concerned for his safety and asked
for his name to be withheld — testified
that on Wednesday, July 2, he received an
anonymous call.

As a result he went to the Voice of
Deliverance Church. There, he said, he
saw three men being detained by police.
The witness said that he took out his cam-
era and began filming.

The video that was played to the

Megha si

jurors showed Miller lying on a stretcher
being tended to by medical personnel
with a bandage around his right leg.
Williams was also seen in the footage
wearing a black shirt, standing hand-
cuffed.

The witness told the court that a third
man was lying on the ground.

The cameraman said that the man lying
on the ground was later taken away by
ambulance.

Cartridges

He testified that there were several
spent shotgun cartridges in the area as
well as a Windom car.

Craig Taylor, a fisherman, testified
yesterday that he left home on the morn-
ing of July 2, 2008, only to return later
that afternoon to discover that his white
Windom was missing.

Taylor told the court that he always
left his car unlocked and left the keys
under a car mat.

During cross-examination by attorney
Murrio Ducille, who is representing

Se

b+! Wi
| ” 1.

accused Janquo Mackey, Taylor admitted
that he had been a suspect in the case
and had been held on remand for two
and a half months on a conspiracy charge.

Taylor also told the court that Mackey
was his cousin.

He denied the suggestion by Mr Ducille
that he had given Mackey the keys to his
car on the morning of July 2, 2008, so
that he could pick up a friend.

Taylor also denied the suggestion that
he told police that someone had stolen his
car “to save his hide.”

Miller, who is representing himself,
suggested to Taylor that on the morning
of July 2, he had asked him to give hima
ride, but that Taylor had told him that
he was busy. Taylor denied this. He also
denied the suggestion that he had thrown
Mackey the keys and told him to give
Miller a ride.

The trial continues before Justice Jon
Isaacs today. Mackey is represented by
attorney Murrio Ducille, Williams is repre-
sented by Dorsey McPhee and Miller is rep-
resenting himself. Vernal Collie, Ambrose
Brown and Lennox Coleby are prosecuting
the case.

THIS CAR has
been left for
over a month
on Coral
Harbour Road.
Since being
abandoned it
has been
stripped of
wheels and
some
windows.

Felipé Major/
Tribune staff



Colinalmperial

The following individuals are asked to contact Mrs. Kimley Saunders
(396-2047) or Ms. Kayshonta Smith (396-2031) at Colinalmperial
Insurance Ltd:

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' SAVE REGULARLY - AND REWARD YOUR GOOD HABITS!

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BSO7IOS

Princess Butler
P.O. Box ES-6069
Nassau, Bahamas

Eddison Paul Sweeting Jr.
Nassau Bahamas

Michelle Sweeting

Brendilee Rolle
P.O. Box 7290
Pine Barron Road
Nassau, Bahamas

Tamika Williams
P.O. Box F 42299
Freeport, Bahamas

Nassau Bahamas

Christon Mackey
Nassau, Bahamas

Terasean Sweeting
P.O. Box CR 56708
Sunset Park

Nassau, Bahamas

Tiffany Rolle
P.O. Box GT 2395
Nassau, Bahamas

Kemuel Delancey
P.O. Box CR 56708

Sunset Park

Tanya Rolle
P.O. Box GT 2395
Nassau, Bahamas

Nassau, Bahamas

Terry Sweeting

P.O. Box CR 56708

Bridgette Hog
P.O. Box GT 2395
Nassau, Bahamas

Sunset Park
Nassau, Bahamas

James Wallace

Theresa Deleveaux
P.O. Box N 732
Nassau, Bahamas

Nassau, Bahamas

Stafford Bullard

P.O. Box N 3730

Albert Smith
P.O. Box SS-6104
Nassau, Bahamas

Nassau, Bahamas

Larado D. Evans

P.O. Box N 3730

Granville Neville Williams
485 Inagua Avenue,
Freeport, Grand Bahama

Nassau, Bahamas

Francis Roberts

P.O. Box $$5175

Ms. Alquennia Rolle-Cunningham
General Delivery
Moore's Island, Abaco

Nassau, Bahamas

Mr. Godfrey Roberts

Freeport, Grand Bahama

Charlissa C.D. Poitier
P.O. Box N-978
Nassau Bahamas





PAGE 8, FRIDAY, MAY 15, 2009

THE TRIBUNE



LOCAL NEWS

Castro defends
Cuba’s response
to flu outbreak

m@ HAVANA

FIDEL CASTRO defended Havana’s response to the swine
flu outbreak, including suspension of direct flights with Mexico,
saying Thursday that Cuba is especially vulnerable to an epi-
demic because the U.S. embargo prevents it from buying med-
icine and diagnostic equipment, according to Associated Press.

Hours later Cuba confirmed two new cases of swine flu ina
group of Mexican students, bringing the island’s total cases to
three. A Public Health Ministry statement said 11 of 15 students
in the group were found to be healthy and released from a
hospital in central Cuba.

Cuba has not said whether it has access to Tamiflu.

But the World Health Organization says it sent 2.4 million
treatments of the anti-flu treatment to 72 developing countries
last week.

Essay

“What does one of these epidemics mean to Cuba?” Castro
said in an essay read on state television. “Our country has no
access to buy whatever medicine, raw materials or equipment or
components for diagnostic equipment produced by U.S. transna-
tional companies.”

Mexican authorities were offended when Castro accused
Mexico of waiting to disclose the epidemic until after President
Barack Obama visited in mid-April — even though Canadian
and U.S. scientists did not identify the virus in Mexican patients
until a week later.

Mexican President Felipe Calderon has said he may cancel a
planned a trip to Cuba this year because the island grounded
flights to and from Mexico.

“Why accuse us of being enemies of the Mexican people
when we adopt measures that have been put together before-
hand to protect our people?” Castro asked.

More than 6,600 cases of swine flu have been reported in 33
countries worldwide, with 69 deaths.

‘SS Bethel Brothers Morticians

: Telephone: 322-4433, 326-7030
Nassau Street, P.O.Box N-1026

FUNERAL SERVICE FOR

Charles Leon
Johnson, 55

| of #4 High Vista Drive will be
held on Wednesday May 20th,
11:00 a.m. at Sf. Anselm's
Catholic Church, Bernard
Road, Fox Hill. Rev.
Monsignor Preston Moss, Fr.
Noel Clarke, Fr. Reginald
Demeritte and Deacon
Raymond Forbes will officiate.
Interment will follow in the
Church's Cemetery.
He will forever remain in the
hearts of: his loving and
devoted Wife, Eulease Stuart-Johnson; Children: Primrose, Charles
II, Crystal, Sanchez and Kristjan Johnson; Siblings: Helen Johnson,
Janet and Derek Davis, Anthony and Keva McKinney, Andrew
McKinney, Alicia and Harold Brown, Vernita Wright, Winifred
and Michael Thompson, Chester and Gail Johnson, Sherman and
Solomon Johnson; Madison and Aldece Turnquest, Cindy Major
and Racine Melfort Parents-in-law: Cleveland and Matilda Stuart;
Adopted Mother: Marjorie McKinney, In laws: Ricardo and Carla
Stuart, W. Renae McKay; Christine and Bishop Chadwick James
II, Lindburgh and Laura Stuart, Erica and Terrell Stuart, Effie
Burrows, Deborah McKinney and Janet Turnquest, Mr. and Mrs.
Oral Newbold; Uncles: Sam and Madeline Basden and family,
Fr Rodney Burrows and family, Patrick Smith; Aunts: Gwendolyn
Brice, Eulease, Gwenith, Sylvia and Beverley Smith and Alice
Stubbs; Nieces and Nephews: Jamal Davis and family, Alexis
and Krishelle McKinney, Val and Bill Wallace, Samantha and
Lenny Bannister, Amanda Johnson, Deandria Beckford, Roscoe,
Derrick Johnson, Melvin Hall, Dwayne and Denario Brown ,
Melissa Armaly, Greg and Stella Thompson, Angela Thompson,
Shelly Maccow, Tanya Bell, Nicoyas Hilbert, Brynae McKay,
Chadwick II, Chadwin and Chad- Vaughn James, Ricardo Jr. and
Rickelle Stuart, Lindburgh Jr, and Linae Stuart, Brittany, Kendal,
Sherman Jr., Matthew, Elizabeth, Daniel, Jordan, Chester Jr,
Solomon Jr, Crystal, Michael, and Alberto Johnson, Extended
family: Eugene Palacious and family, Don and Kay Aranha and
family, Hubert and Roxanne Chipman and family, Lambert and
Margaret Campbell and Family, Godwin and Michelle Cargill
and family, Algernon and Lamar Cargill and family, Roscoe and
Fabianna Davis and family, Phillip and Sharlamae Stubbs and
family, Elijah and Sherry Brice and family, Melford Clarke and
family, Larry and Candy Farrington and family, Jeffrey and
Corrine Major and family, Eurick and Lisa Dean and family,
John Williams and family, Leo Ferguson and family, Mr and Mrs.
Mosely, Whitfield and Cinderella Johnson and family, Afton and
Shasta Moxey and family, Cyril and Mary Taylor and family,
Viola and Herbert Lightbourne and family, Duke and Cynthia
Stubbs, Curlene McQueen and family, Ashley Cargill and family,
Retired Supt. George Mortimer and family, Edwin and Timolyn_
Thompson and family, Clinton Pearce and family, William BillyE
Brown and family, Archdeacon James Palacious and family,
James Mackey and family, Wayne Edgecombe and family, Marina
and Johnny Young, Millie Young, Elsworth Turnquest and family,
Monzell Turnquest and family, Millie and Al Cartley, Quinton,
Sharina Basden, the Young family, the Curtis family, the Laramores,
the Taylor family, the Smith family, the Brice Family; his Kwanis
family, his Fox Hill Community family including the PLP branch
of the Fox Hill Constituency, the Fox Hill Festival Committee;
his adopted children: Edward Symonette, George Hayles, Ronald
Dean, Jacqueline Maxwell, Terran Munroe, Jovie Major, Michael
Carroll, Kathleen Smith, Ferdinand Agenor, Sharon Brown, Shane
Vidal, Helen Storr, the staff of Johnsonis Autobody Repair and
Johnsonis Paint Supply, the staff of Shell Harold and Wulff Road
service stations; Special friends: Hon. Fred Mitchell, Senator
Jacintha Higgs, Mr. Bismarck Coakley, Patrick Ward, Anton
Saunders, Anton Sealey, Keith Rolle, Marvin Bain, Philip Taylor
and Elsworth Rolle, Members of the Fund Raising Committee
of St. Anselmis Parish, the entire St. Anselmis Church family,
members of the Progressive Liberal Party, members of Bahamas
Petroleum Retailers Association and numerous other family and
friends too numerous to mention.

Friends may pay their last respects at the P-L.P Headquarters, Sir
Lynden Pindling Centre, Farrington Road on Tuesday from
10:00a.m. to 5:00p.m. and on Wednesday at the church from
10:00am until service time.



FROM page one

; shirt, robbed the victim of watch and
? wallet which contained personal items.

"Before leaving and escaping through

a hole in a fence, the gunman fired shots
? from a weapon hitting the victim about
i the body," said ASP Evans.

Reports reaching The Tribune indi-

? cate that at some point during the ordeal
? the gunman demanded the keys to the
? victim's vehicle. It is understood that at
? that point Mr Burrows put up a fight
? and was shot in the arm.

These reports were not confirmed by

police.

Mr Burrows was taken to a local clin-

? ic and after examination was flown by
? air ambulance yesterday to a Nassau hos-
? pital, where he remained up to press
? time.

In the last few months Burrows Devel-

: opment Limited, the island's second

largest employer after the soon-to-be
closed Four Seasons resort, laid off about
20 of its more than 106 staff.

Yesterday Assistant Commissioner of
Police Hulan Hanna, who heads the
Family Island district, said police had
"no reason" to connect the shooting to
any recent lay offs.

ACP Hanna said that police had not
established a motive for the shooting,
nor was a suspect in custody up to press
time.

"At this point (we have) nothing," he
told The Tribune.

One of Mr Burrows’ employees, who
spoke to The Tribune from Exuma yes-
terday, said the contractor was the victim
of a housebreaking about two weeks ago
when thieves stole televisions and jew-
ellery from the home.

When asked if he thought the shooting
could be retaliation by a former dis-
gruntled worker, the employee said any-
thing was possible.

Businessman gunned
~ down in his home

"At this moment, yes we are afraid
because I don't know if its random — it
looked like it was staged directly to him,
but I don't know if it was isolated, maybe
someone was just watching him."

The employee, who spoke on condi-
tion of anonymity, said the community
was dumbfounded over the shooting.

"The whole community knows him,
he's a down-to-earth person, he gets
along with everybody," said the employ-
ee. “(We never expected this) not in a
million years, not in Exuma, that's what
took us by shock."

This news, compounded with Wednes-
day's news of the impending closure of
the Four Seasons at Emerald Bay, Exu-
ma's largest employer, was "back-to-
back bad news", he said.

Mr Burrows described as a "down-to-
earth” person is married with children,
who live in his hometown of Long Island.

Exuma police have mounted an inten-
sive investigation into this incident.

Bishop Fraser

retrial expected

to continue

FROM page one

i witnesses, including the virtual
: complainant, have testified.

: The young woman, who is
? now 20-years-old testified that
: she and Fraser had sex on an
? average of 12 times a month at
? his home and office at Pilgrim
: Baptist Temple. Mr Munroe
: had made an application to have
i the case referred to the
? Supreme Court.

i The application arose follow-
? ing testimony by Woman Police
? Corporal Sheria King, a forensic
: expert.

: Mr Munroe had contended
? that during the course of her
testimony at the retrial she had
? varied her opinion given in the
: first trial in 2006.

? Mr Munroe had argued that
: he had not been informed in
: advance of her present opinion.
i Magistrate Bethel adjourned
? the case to May 21 for a status
: hearing on the application.

i Fraser was initially charged
? in 2006, but discharged in 2007
: after then Magistrate Marilyn
i Meeres ruled that there was no
: physical evidence to link him to
: the alleged offence.

: The Court of Appeal, how-
? ever, overturned that decision
i and ordered a retrial.

Bishop Earl Randy Fraser

IN LOVING MEMORY



PATRICIAL L. WALKINE-SMITH
SUNRISE: JANUARY 16th 1946
SUNSET: MAY 15th 2008

MOM IT'S BEEN ONE YEAR SINCE FOU'VE BEEN GONE
A FEAR OF PAIN, SADNESS, MISSING FOL,
LOVING YOU, AUT MOST OF ALL HOPE
HOPE THAT ONE DAY WE WILE SEE FOU AGAIN

MOM IF TEARS COULD BUILD A HIGHWAY A
AD MEMORIES BUILD A LANE
WE WOULD WALK RIGA OP To WEAVEN
AND BRING FOU SACK WOME AGAIN

MOM FOU WILE NEVER BE FORGOTTEN
WE PLEDCED TO YOu THAT DAF
AAHOLCOWED PLACE WITHIN OUR HEARTS
if WHERE FOU! WILL ACWATS STAF

Sadly missed by: Children: Debbic, Bobby, Kim,
Shevaughn, Miko & Eddie; Grandchildren, Great
grandchildren & a host of relatives & friends



company on the island, who
spoke on condition of
anonymity, said business from
the Four Seasons accounts for
"about 50 per cent" of their
revenue.

With little time to feel sorry
about the turn of events man-
agement has decided to
aggressively slash rates in the
hope of attracting more
clients.

"What we are trying to do
now is lowering our rates and
trying to attract more cus-
tomers that way," said the
manager who said if things get
worse, the company would
consider reduced work weeks
for its seven-member staff.

On Wednesday, staff at the
Four Seasons were convened
for a general meeting when
they were told that as of May
26 the hotel would be closed.

But the receivers for the

CEU aC

FROM page one

haemorrhaging property,
which went into receivership
in mid-2007, said the resort
lost about $5 million annually
for the last two years. While
closing the property "tem-
porarily” was a "difficult"
decision, they said they were
hopeful they could secure a
new buyer soon.

Although employees can
stay on site until June 15,
some have already packed
their bags and headed to the
capital and other islands in
search of work, according to
reports.

Mr Moss said about 30 Four
Seasons workers attended a
local job fair at a school on
Exuma yesterday, however he
advised out of work Exumi-
ans to branch out into entre-
preneurial areas.

He also said he plans to set
up a meeting between the dis-
placed workers and members
of the Opposition before the
resort's last day of operation.



KEMPS FUNERAL HOME LIMITED

22 Palmdale Avenue, Palmdale
Nassau, N.P., The Bahamas

A Funeral Service For

Colyn Thomas Albert Rees, 55

of Bahama Palm
Shores, Abaco, The
Bahamas, passed away
at Doctor’s Hospital,
Nassau on Monday
11th May, 2009 after a
sudden illness.

He was the son of the
late Colyn L. Rees and
Helen E.I Rees. He is
survived by his loving

wife, Melanie Rees; two sons, David Jonathan
Rees and Christopher Colyn Rees; two
brothers, Robert Alday Rees and William James
Alexander Rees and their wives Kimberly Yvette
Rees and Donna Elizabeth Rees; mother-in-
law, Jean Walker of Toronto, Canada, in-laws,
John and Gwen Johnson, Penny Sharman and
Francine Winkley of Toronto Canada and
Lorraine and Guillermo Huamali and Archie
and Michele Varga of Vancouver, Canada;
nieces and nephews, Adam and Emily Rees,
James Rees II and Michelle Rees, Stephanie
and Kayla Johnson, Kyle and Caitlin Sharman,
Max Winkley, Nicholas and Chantel Varga, and
Conner, Jarred and Tatianna Huamali; very
special friends Albert and Jackie Albury and
Patricia May Albury. The family would like to
thank his many friends too numerous to mention
who gave so much support during his short

illness.

A memorial service will be held in Abaco at a

later date.

Instead of flowers the family request that
donations may be made in Colyn’s memory to
Bahamas Air Sea Rescue (BASRA), P.O. Box
S.S. 6248, Nassau or to the Bahamas Humane
Society, P.O. Box N. 242, Nassau.

Arrangements by Kemp's Funeral Home
Limited.





PAGE 10, FRIDAY, MAY 15, 2009 THE TRIBUNE

LOCAL NEWS

LEFT: SARAH JERNELL cele-
brates her 80th birthday by
joining the rake n’ scrape band
with Chippie and the Boys, Min-
istry of Tourism and Aviation
executives and her daughters.

RIGHT: SARAH JERNELL with
legendary entertainer Count
Bernardino.

Longtime visitor celebrates
milestone in the Bahamas

SARAH Jernell of Poquoson, Virginia, continued a four-
decade friendship with the Bahamas by spending her 80th birth-
day in Nassau.

Ms Jernell, who first visited the Bahamas in 1968, developed
a lasting friendship with Cacique Award winner and public
service driver Romeo Farrington.

Ministry of Tourism officials and veteran entertainer John
“Chippie” Chipman gave Ms Jernell a grand welcome at Festi-
val Place when she arrived on a cruise with her daughters — Eva
Brewster and Mae Whitehurst.

The family was met with music and dancing at New Bight
Square, Festival Place, and the Ministry of Tourism’s permanent
secretary Hyacinth Pratt and deputy permanent secretary Shel-
don Beneby thanked Ms Jernell for her commitment to the
Bahamas.

They also presented her with an authentic Bahamian handbag
before she spent the day in the care of Mr Farrington.

Businesses claim phone
call from foreign company

led to ‘intimidation’

FROM page one

“verbal contract” over the phone
for advertising services which
would cost them around $1,000.

Shavarra Glinton, an assistant
at the See Saw Christian Acade-
my, said: “It was non-stop tor-
ture. It got to the point that I felt
like pulling out my hair!”

Owner of the U S Virgin
Islands-based company, David
Phillips, emphatically denied
wrongdoing yesterday, telling The
Tribune “the only scam here is
that people want to get advertis-
ing and then they don’t want to
pay.”

But Dr Dean Tserotopoulos of
the Bahamas Heart Institute at
Lyford Cay Hospital said he was
never interested in the advertising
offered and that was the start of
the problem.

“Last week Thursday they
called us. Friday they threatened
us. Monday I e-mailed them say-
ing ‘This is a scam’, and then
Tuesday I got the e-mail from the
collection agency demanding pay-
ment.” The agency demanded
$1,144.80.

“They try to scare you, they
say they’re going to sue you. I
understand it is happening all
over the Caribbean,” he said.

Each company interviewed by
The Tribune described receiving a
phone call from Island Yellow
Pages within the last year which
invariably involved a representa-
tive requesting basic details about
their operation.

Before they realised what they
were getting into, they claim, the
USVI-based company was
demanding payment for their
“advertising services.”

When met with objections,
Island Yellow Pages told the com-
panies that they had entered into
a verbal contract, that there was a
recording of their conversation,
and that if they failed to pay, they
would be met with a legal action,
companies said.

“When they said ‘Island Yel-
low Pages’, the first thing that
came to my mind was that it was
the local Yellow Pages,” said Mel-
la Rolle, manager of Traveller’s
Rest Restaurant on West Bay
Street.

“They asked me for all my con-
tact details, what was my posi-
tion, my location, what we serve.
I gave them the information.

“Then when they said they
were sending a bill for some ad or
something there was a big con-
frontation between me and them
on the phone. I hung up, but they
kept calling religiously after that.
They said we have lawyers who
we can have make you pay.

“These American people think
they can take advantage of us
island people!” she exclaimed.

See Saw Christian academy
was first contacted in June 2008.

“They asked about the school,
school fees, contact information
and so on. And then I told them if
they wanted anything else they’d
have to speak with my boss. Then
the next day they sent us an e-
mail telling us we owe them $900.
I was like, ‘What do we owe them
$900 for?’”

She said the company stopped
calling in October 2008.

“Tt made me so scared because
it got to the point where they
found out my cellphone and they
called it and threatened me. I
don’t know how they got the
number. They were telling me
that ’'d have to pay $500 to them
if my boss wasn’t going to,”
claimed Ms Glinton.

Meanwhile, Joseph Lewis,
owner of Lewis Orthopaedics,
willingly entered into a $900 plus
annual contract with the compa-
ny, but felt that they misrepre-
sented their product.

“They said they wanted to
build a website for me, advertis-
ing the office, the whole nine
yards. I gave them a lot of infor-
mation. What I didn’t like was
that there was a web space but it
wasn’t constructed the way we’d
talk about. The whole year went
by and I got no hits.”

But Mr Phillips, whose website
is www.cbt.cc, told The Tribune
that the company has many satis-
fied customers all over the
Caribbean, and “would not have
been in business for nine years if
it was scamming people.”

“We are providing a great ser-
vice to these businesses. We are
the largest online directory, and
the only way we can do it is over
the telephone. We use recorded
verification.”

He claimed company repre-
sentatives make it clear from an
early stage who the company is,
what the cost will be, and that a
verbal contract is involved.

“There are several points at
which they can say ‘Look, we’re
not interested,” said Mr Phillips.

Assistant Commissioner of
Police Hulan Hanna urged com-
panies to be careful what infor-
mation they transmit over the
phone to “complete strangers.”

Meanwhile, the senior officer
told anyone affected to contact
police as they would be interested
in probing the matter further.

“Clearly what is being
described sounds like some kind
of scam. If businesses want to
share the information, they
should come and bring it to us,”
he said.





THE TRIBUNE





iar
FRIDAY, MAY 15,



PAGE 11



2009







Eric Rose/BIS Photo

THE FEDERATION of International Football Association (FIFA) congress 2009, will be held June 2-3 at the Atlantis Resort, Paradise Island. Pictured above, Minister of Youth, Sports
and Culture the Hon. Desmond Bannister and Government and private sector stakeholders meet in preparation for the event.

BFA getting set for FIFA Congress

lm By RENALDO DORSETT
Sports Reporter
rdorsett@tribunemedia.net

WITH just under two weeks
remaining before the interna-
tional governing body for soc-
cer hosts its bi-annual meet-
ing in the Bahamas, the gov-
ernment and the Bahamas
Football Association continue
to diligently prepare for the
event.

Minister of Youth, Sports
and Culture, Desmond Ban-
nister recently met with stake-
holders from the public and
private sector to discuss final
planning for the event.

“This year the Bahamas has
a historic opportunity — we are

Ministry donates $48,000
to aid in the preparation

hosting the FIFA Congress. It
is the most prestigious organi-
sation in the world and the
Ministry of Youth Sports and
Culture is very conscious of
our commitment to helping
the development of soccer in
the Bahamas and I will do all
we can to help the improve-
ment of the facilities the BFA
has been developing,” Ban-
nister said, “The Ministry is
pleased to support organisa-
tions like the BFA who go out
and do so many things on their

own and so when they do
come to us for assistance we
are more than happy to do
whatever we can.”

The government has worked
hand in hand with the BFA to
ensure organisation of the
event remains a priority of the
highest order, highlighted by
a £48,000 donation to improve
facilities at the BFA’s field at
the Blue Hills Sporting Com-
plex.

BFA Secretary General,
Lionel Haven said improve-

Ue ere



track success

m@ By RENALDO DORSETT
Sports Reporter
rdorsett@tribunemedia.net

WITH the success of Jamaica
and concurrently, the entire
region at the 2008 Beijing
Olympic games, many have
sought the secret to the
Jamaican’s success in the sprints,
while two of its most successful
sprinters on the junior and
senior level offer solutions.

Veronica Campbell-Brown
and Dexter Lee, two of the most
well-known names in Jamaican
track and field, agree that an

intergral part of the country’s
continued success is the bridging
of the gap between varying gen-
erations.

Campbell-Brown is already
one of the most decorated
female sprinters of all time. At
26, she is a five time Olympic
medallist wich succesive gold
medals in the 200m in 2004 and
2008 and a gold in the 400m
relay.

She is also the reigning World
Champion in he 100m and was
the first female to win the sprint
double at the IAAF World
Junior Championships.

VERONICA
Campbell-Brown
(r) the double
Olympic and
World champion
sprinter poses
for a portrait
with Dexter Lee
(I) the World
Youth and
Junior sprint
champion before
a training ses-
sion at the Her-
bert Morrison
school during
the ‘laaf Day in
the Life’ on May

4, 2009 in Mon-
ae §6tego Bay,
| Jamaica.

Lee, at just 18-years-old, has
started down a path similar to
Campell-Brown with world suc-
cess at the junior level interna-
tionally.

Lee has captured gold medals
in the 100m at the World Youth
Championships and World
Junior Championships in 2007
and 2008 respectively.

The duo came together for a
training session at Lee’s Her-
bert Morrison Tech in Montego
Bay, Jamaica to discuss the
model of Jamaican athletics.

SEE page 12

ment of the facility is integral
in the growth of the local
game which in time will pro-
duce greater dividends inter-
nationally.

“A big part of the assistance
we are going to receive from
the Ministry is going towards
the development of that facil-
ity, such as the instillation of
lights. It is a small part of what
we would like to do but again
we are grateful for the help we
have received,” he said. “The
Federation has been working
on our development program
and we need to continuously
improve our facilities so we
can develop these programs,”
he said, “The game continues
to grow locally and In our

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expected to provide represen-
tation.

According to the organisa-
tion’s website “The Congress
makes decisions relating to
FIFA's governing statutes and
the method by which they are
implemented and applied. It
also approves the annual
report, decides on the accep-
tance of new national associa-
tions and holds elections, most
notably for the FIFA presi-
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PAGE 12, FRIDAY, MAY 15, 2009 TRIBUNE SPORTS

The secret to |
track success

FROM page 11



Lee, who began his career in junior high school just
five years ago, credited Campbell-Brown and other
elite level Jamaican sprinters for providing an inspi-
ration and blueprint to success in the sport.

“When I was in primary school I tried cricket and
football but I switched to track and field in first form
because I wanted to follow my brother and all the
other great sprinters I looked up to like Veronica
who we saw winning all the time,” he said. “I feel
good at what I have achieved so far and working
with Veronica and looking up to her I hope to have
the same type of career. So in the future I hope to be
a world champion, I hope to make the World Cham-
pionship team this year but I will definitely look at
the London Olympics in 2016.”

Goals my % : :
Along with his World Championship aspirations a 7 DEXTER Lee of Jamaica the
this summer, Lee said he has the Jamaican junior be a World Youth and Junior
national record in his sights before possibly attending ey : = : sprint champion at the Her-

college in the United States to further his education.

The 6 foot 2 inch sprinter who many compare
physically to Usain Bolt but tempermentally to Asafa
Powell, said he is a fan of both athletes and their
advice has been vital to his career thus far.

“T knew I could be special when I was in second
form and I won at the boys championship at 14. I like
both Usain and Asafa because they have always told
me to go out there and do my best all the time. I
dream of bringing glory to myself and my country like
the people like them that came before me.

Campbell-Brown said she sees the possibility of
Lee’s career following a similar pattern to her own
beginning with international success at the junior
level.

“Tt is easy, when you have people like Dexter wait-
ing in the wings ready to do big things on the nation-
al stage. He has a very very humble nature and he
works as hard or harder than anyone else to get
where he has gotten so far in his young career,” she
said. “He has the potential to be one of the best
sprinters not only in Jamaican history but in the
world, and people have begun to recognise that.”

bert Morrison school.

Mentors

As a high school student, Campbell-Brown was
called up to compete in the finals of the silver medal
winning 400m relay team and was mentored by
many of the senior athletes on that team in her first
Olympic appearance.

“T think it is important for the senior athletes like
myself to have working relationships with the junior
athletes because it does so much for their confi-
dence to have athletes that have achived so much
readily accesible to them. In the same way I looked
up to and worked with Merlene [Ottey] and it did
wonders for my confidence,” Campbell-Brown said.
“Tt also exposed me at an early age to the type of
training and dedication to succes that you would
need to have to win on the national stage. It is one
of those things in Jamaican track and field where it
is almost a sense of national pride that compels you VERONICA Campbell-Brown of Jamaica the VERONICA Campbell-Brown (I) the double Olympic and World champion sprinter poses for a portrait
to work with the younger generation to see the lega- double Olympic and World champion sprinter. with Dexter Lee (r) the World Youth and Junior sprint champion before a training session at the Her-
cy continue.” bert Morrison school during the 'laaf Day in the Life’ on May 4, 2009 in Montego Bay, Jamaica.



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TRIBUNE SPORTS

FRIDAY, MAY 15, 2009, PAGE 13



SPORTS



YANKEES 8, BLUE JAYS 2

¢ At Toronto, Brett Gardner hit his first
major league homer and drove in three :
runs, and Andy Pettitte won for the first

time in four starts for the Yankees.

The Yankees had eight extra-base hits
and improved to 11-0 when holding their :

opponent to three runs or less.
Gardner also tripled and scored twice,

and Mark Teixeira finished 2 for 4 with

two RBIs, raising his average to .202.

RAYS 8, ORIOLES 6

¢ At Baltimore, Willie Aybar hit a i
tiebreaking RBI single in the sixth inning to :
lift the Rays, who scored four times inthe :
ninth off Bob McCrory and held on after the :

Orioles rallied in the bottom half.

Jason Bartlett homered and Dioner

Navarro had two RBIs for the Rays.

Jeff Niemann (3-3) picked up his third
victory in four decisions. The right-hander ;
allowed two runs and eight hits. J.P. How- :
ell got the final two outs for his first save. :

Ty Wigginton homered for the Orioles.
RANGERS 6, MARINERS 5

11 innings

¢ At Arlington, Texas, Hank Blalock hit a
two-run double in the 11th inning off :
Mariners closer Brandon Morrow (0-2) to ;

lift the Rangers.

Wladimir Balentien’s RBI double in the
top of the 11th had given the Mariners a 5- ;

4 lead.

Russell Branyan homered for the Mariners,
who have lost eight of nine.

ANGELS 8, RED SOX 4

¢ At Anaheim, Calif., Matt Palmer over-
came a shaky start before retiring the last :

19 batters to lead the Angels.

Mike Napoli hit a go-ahead three-run Joe Crede provided the relief.
homer and Torii Hunter also went deep :

against knuckleballer Tim Wakefield (4- :
2

out eight and walked two.

ATHLETICS 7, ROYALS 2

the A’s.

time this season.

Peirsol ready to take on
Phelps in 100 backstroke

SWIMMING
CHARLOTTE, N.C.
Associated Press

AARON Peirsol can’t
remember the last time he lost
in a final of the 100-meter back-
stroke.

He thinks it was 2002. Maybe
03.

Whatever the case, Peirsol
appears to have an intriguing
new rival in his signature event.

Michael Phelps.

The winningest Olympian is
planning to try out some new
events as he looks ahead to
2012, a plan that puts him on a
collision course with Peirsol,
world record-holder in the 100
back and winner of the event
at both the Athens and Beijing
games.

“Mike will do well, no doubt
about it,” Peirsol told The Asso-
ciated Press in a telephone
interview from his home in
Austin, Texas. “He’s already
been very, very fast and he has-
n’t even scratched the surface
of his potential in that event.”

Peirsol isn’t backing down
from the challenge, however. In
fact, he welcomes the chance to
go against the world’s greatest
swimmer — and perhaps be one
of the few to beat him on the
Olympic stage. Others are clos-
ing fast, too, including Japan’s
Ryosuke Irie, who nearly broke
Peirsol’s record of 52.54 at a
meet in Australia on Sunday.

“T welcome the competition,”
Peirsol said. “For a long time,
it’s been kind of stagnant in that
event. I need it. I think it’s going

C.J. Wilson (2-2) pitched two innings of
relief as Texas won for the ninth time in 11 :
games. Adrian Beltre, Kenji Johjima and :

Jim Mone/AP Photo

DETROIT Tigers’ Jeff Larish, left, scores on a two-run single by Adam Everett in the fourth inning of a baseball game Wednesday, May 13, 2009 in Minneapolis. Minnesota
? Twins catcher Mike Redmond bobbled the ball and was charged with an error.

Crede’s slam in 13th lifts
Twins past Tigers 14-10

| BASEBALL

MINNEAPOLIS
Associated Press

AFTER Minnesota’s bullpen sprung more leaks,

It took 13 innings, four hours and 48 minutes, but

; Crede’s two-out, two-strike grand slam gave the
: ; ; : Twins a 14-10 victory over the Tigers just before
Palmer (4-0) allowed five hits, struck : midnight Wednesday — long after Dontrelle Willis

; made his first start of the season for Detroit.

After relievers Luis Ayala and Matt Guerrier let

? the Tigers take a 9-7 lead in a four-run seventh,
? Twins manager Ron Gardenhire could only shake his

* Ay Oakland, Calif., Jack Cust’s three- ;
run double broke open a close game and :
Josh Outman (1-0) allowed just three hits :
and a run in six innings in his first win for ;

head after Crede’s seventh career slam.
“Everybody needed that ... except maybe the oth-
er side,” said Gardenhire.
It has taken him about a month to get going, but

: Crede is feeling comfortable with his new team. He’s

Outman walked two while striking out :
four as Oakland swept the two-game ;
series. Brian Bannister (3-1) gave up two :
runs in 5 2-3 innings and lost for the first

hitting .237, but he’s fitting in just fine.

“These guys have been great so far this year. It’s
going to be fun to see what this team can do,” said
Crede, who has 15 hits, 10 RBIs and four homers in

i his last 12 games.



Itsuo Inouye/AP Photo

IN THIS Aug. 17, 2008 file photo, Aaron Peirsol, left, and Michael
Phelps, of the United States, celebrate after winning the gold medal in
the men's 4x100-meter medley relay final at the Beijing 2008 Olympics
in Beijing. Peirsol can't remember the last time he lost in a final of the

Matt Tolbert’s single that Josh Anderson nearly
caught but trapped in left field tied it at 10 against
Brandon Lyon (1-3), who walked Michael Cuddyer
before Crede came up. He almost ended the game in
the 12th against Lyon, but that drive was caught by
Curtis Granderson with his shoulder against the wall
in center field. Lyon threw 60 pitches over 2 2-3
innings.

“T think it just shows the character of this team,”
said Denard Span, who hit a two-run triple to give the
‘Twins the lead in the sixth. “We do this once a week,
it seems like.”

The super-speedy Granderson helped Detroit take
a 10-9 lead in the top half of the 13th with a little
trickery on the bases. He tripled with one out before
Jesse Crain (2-1) retired Placido Polanco on a flyball
too shallow to score on.

With Anderson batting, Granderson faked a break
for home as if he were going to steal. Crain flinched,
and the right-hander brought his throwing hand out
of his glove before starting his motion — thus the
balk call. Fans booed, but the Twins didn’t argue.

Lost in all of the late drama was Willis, who gave
up eight hits, four runs and two walks in 4 2-3 innings.

It was a decent start considering all he’s come back
from. He was sent to Class A last year to work on his
control, and he had been on the disabled list this
spring due to an anxiety disorder.

“T thought he showed pretty good composure,”
manager Jim Leyland said. “I was actually pleased.”

The lively lefty with the sharp, sweeping delivery
looked like his usual self, bouncing around the mound
between at-bats and pointing encouraging fingers
toward his infielders.

“Allin all [felt good. I really had a good time out
there,” Willis said.

Indians 4, White Sox 0

At Cleveland, Cliff Lee outpitched Mark Buehrle,
throwing sharp seven innings as the Indians took
two of three in the series.

Last-place Cleveland had not shut out an opponent
since Lee did it with a complete game against the
White Sox on Sept. 1.

Victor Martinez homered and Ryan Garko added
a two-run blast in the fourth to give Lee (2-5) his first
victory in nearly a month. Lee entered the day tied
for the league lead in losses despite a 1.70 ERA in his
last five starts.

— THINKING ABOUT

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to help me. It would be much
more fulfilling to win against
those guys than to win by a cou-

100-meter backstroke. However, Peirsol appears to have an intriguing

new rival in his signature event. Michael Phelps. a Yeats OF 30 SOU miles warranty, 3 years rwadalds

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ple of seconds.”

The two American stars are
set to go head-to-head at the
Charlotte Ultraswim, which
begins Thursday and will be
Phelps’ first meet since he won
eight gold medals in Beijing,
breaking Mark Spitz’s Holy
Grail of Olympic records.

The event is drawing much
more attention than usual in this
non-Olympic year, largely
because of Phelps’ out-of-the-
pool troubles. A picture of him
inhaling from a marijuana pipe
while attending a party in not-

so-far-away South Carolina
landed on the cover of a British
tabloid, prompting USA Swim-
ming to hand down a three-
month suspension from compe-
tition.

The ban ended last week, and
Phelps will be back in the pool
for the first of three meets he
plans to swim leading into the
national championships in early
July and the world champi-
onships in Rome later that
month. In addition to the 100
backstroke, he’s also entered in

the 50, 100 and 200 freestyle, as
well as the 100 butterfly.

Peirsol will be swimming his
two signature events, the 100
and 200 back, as well as a few
other races just for fun. This
will be the first meet the 25-
year-old California native has
fully trained for since Beijing,
which puts him on an even keel
with Phelps. (Peirsol did com-
pete at Austin in March, but he
wasn’t in top shape and only
took part because it was in his
adopted home.)



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PAGE 14, FRIDAY, MAY 15, 2009 TRIBUNE SPORTS

SPORTS





MANCHESTER United's Cris-
tiano Ronaldo (right) goes
down under a challenge from
Wigan Athletic's Lee Catter-
mole during their English Pre-
Alten ce: COLUL eM NEN COLNE MMAR
Stadium, Wigan, England,
Wednesday May 13, 2009.
United won 2-1.

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Combine all that with a
blazing bench that features }
Chris “Birdman” Andersen’s }
energy, J.R. Smith’s athletic :
artfulness and Anthony:
Carter’s cunning along with }
a rejuvenated coach in:
George Karl and NBA insid- }
ers are starting to tout the }
Nuggets as championship :
contenders. ;

Charles Barkley, a long- }
time critic of Denver’s play, :
is among those singing the ;
Nuggets’ praises now and the }
chorus is growing louder }
across the league. i

“These guys are legit. }
They’ve got a legitimate }
championship-caliber team,” }
Mavericks coach Ricki
Carlisle said after Denver’s }
series-clinching 124-110 win
Wednesday night, the:
Nuggets’ seventh double-dig- }
it victory in the postseason. }

“They have great balance. :
Their activity and athleticism }
and ability to generate sec- }
ond-chance opportunities is ;
a huge factor. This building }
is a great building and a:
great homecourt advantage, }
especially when you factor }
in the altitude. So, they’ve }
got the pieces. They really ;
do,” Carlisle said. “And :
they’ve got an experienced }
coach that’s been down that }
road and gotten to the finals. ;
They’ve got a great shot.”

Since Billups’ arrival, the :
Nuggets are 61-27. They tied
their franchise record with }
54 regular-season wins and }
advanced past the first round }
of the playoffs for the first } A
time since 1994 and into the } 5 " : TNH asa aia}
conference championship for } wr WaliNem Oat Titel

the first time in 24 years. eNom ELM UIeM er

For all those expecting a } pene
Kobe Bryant-LeBron James MANCHESTER United's Se eae
tussle for the title next} Dimitar Berbatov, right, fuer r Ferrata Sata

takes the ball away from e

month, hold up, Dallas guard : Leaque soccer match
Jason Terry said. : Wigan's Michael Brown. gu /









WIGAN'S Hugo , : 7 Eee
Ia eloFcUI exo cea evi te, : United's Cris-
1i(O]ASncOlanagls Fi tiano Ronaldo
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chester United's ; ; * being awarded
Park Ji-Sung. one EW 46

ENGLISH
MeO ea
JA OANCLOD



Jon Super/AP Photos

&..humane Animal Fun Day Program

@Se
Bye humane
Time Event

THE BAHAMAS HUMANE SOCIETY





12.00 PM Gates open
Yas. ee 12.10 Fun with your dog. Beginner Obedience Class
HO XY 42.30 Police K9 Unit Display Team
1.00 Fun with your dog. Beginner Agility Class
cure O¢ 1.30 1** Dog Show Class — Best Costume
( \s '
q =

1.45 2™? Dog Show Class — Best Junior Handler/Owner under 8yrs
a Best Junior Handler/Owner 8 to 16yrs

2.00 3 Dog Show Class - Best Kisser

2.15 4" Dog Show Class - Best Owner Dog Look a Like

2.30 Police K9 Unit Display Team

2.45 5 Dog Show Class — Waggiest Tail

3.00 6. Dog Show Class — Best Senior Citizen (dogs 7 and older)

3.15 7 Dog Show Class — Prettiest Dog

3.30 Follow the leader Obedience and Agility Demo

3.45 8 Dog Show Class — Handsomest Dog

4.00 9" Dog Show Class — Fastest Retrieve

4.15 10" Dog Show Class — Most Obedient Dog

4.30 11 Most Unusual Dog

Sat 16th May 12noon - Gpm
Botanical Gardens
wri ma your cebhilid rem to the fai re 5.00 Follow The leader Obedience and Agility Demo
Bring your dog to the dog showv. 5.15 13" Dog Show Class — Best of Adopted/ Rescued Dogs

4.45 12" Dog Show Class - Best Trick

14° Dog Show Class — Best in Show — All Dogs

ev 17S 7 5.30
Sponsored by Pedigree & Lightbourn 5.50 Announcements / Raffle Winners
CSR: Trading Co Ltd en

Close









PAGE 16, FRIDAY, MAY 15, 2009

THE TRIBUNE



LOCAL NEWS





Bahamas-bound passengers get
spectacular view of space shuttle

SPACE SHUTTLE SHOOTS BY: As photographer Helene Seligman flew into Nassau
from New York Monday she caught this shot of the space shuttle Atlantis with its sev-
en crew members on its way to outer space to repair NASA’s 19-year-old Hubble
Space Telescope. ‘How lucky the passengers on our plane were ...
NASA space shuttle zoom up through the clouds - it was an incredible sight!’ she said
as she snapped this shot from her aircraft as it prepared for landing in Nassau.

showcase latest jewellery collection

JOHN Hardy, a designer
whose inspiration is derived
from nature and Balinese cul-
ture, will showcase his latest
jewellery collection in a trunk
show event at Little Switzer-
land on Bay Street from May
18 through May 25.

“The entire store will be set
in a tropical Balinese setting
by Munroe Landscaping,” said
Deirdree Andrews, market-
ing manager for Little Switzer-
land.

“The setting ties in very well
with the style of (designer)
John Hardy as his jewelry is
very nature inspired. You can
see the quality of craftsman-
ship that goes into every piece
of his work. We are encour-



aging persons to think green
with this event. John Hardy is
an environmentalist so it is
only fitting with this show to
encourage persons to give
back to nature from where the
inspiration of these designs
originate.”

With the purchase of any
John Hardy piece guests will
be asked to make a donation
to adopt a tree as a part of the
tree planting initiative by the
Ministry of Agriculture in
their quest to plant one mil-
lion trees in the Bahamas.

Guests will also have the
opportunity to win John
Hardy jewellery from Little
Switzerland during the pro-
motion.

we watched the

Photo: Helene Seligman

Naturally-inspired designer set to










Sun Tee EmbroidMe supporting
the Bahamas Real Estate Expo

SUN TEE EMBROIDME
was one of scores of local
companies lending its support
to organisers of the second
annual Bahamas Real Estate
Expo, held May 2 and 3 at
the Wyndham Nassau Resort.

Sun Tee EmbroidMe’s
president Scott Farrington

MACKEY ST STORE ONLY

OIDEWALR SALE

a

WILLIAM TENAJ CARTWRIGHT [5 AM ELEVENTH
GRADE STUDENT AT PACE CHRISTIAN ACADEMY,

However at 17 years of age. William Carteright, other

wise kn is Mape Don 6.one of the hottest Ba-
Taman hip-hop Sensations bo shake the rust:

neistry to date. With heart-felt, power-packed par
FOMTENCES. Sure to raltie the ice off arty Mic

Aun has opened concerts for map boss Rick Reis anc
Riegqar superstar Colle Bud while also appearing
Winn AMeNCan QoG (4 Sensations Canton kanes, _)
Moss, Kirk Frontlin, Yolanda Adams. Fred Hammond
and Bahenian gospel meqqae ae Monty G, He
hin abo 7 app ae ¢ on — pre es wotn Junior Reed

” Me air: ¢ Dun first appears an the entertainment
sane 23 Li T al the age of nine with a rag group
Caled OCS, God's Chosen Three”. Twa wars laler. he
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fer étona! ancl, Majie Dun hes iavdied near and
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Mew fork while ao touring throughout Alanis, Fharicks
and Canada, this young master af the mic is
Lp things wherever he goes
Najie Dun is a bon again believer with a passion for

Promo pisaliv Cy 1 Inst and enpower Bahanrian
yout. Despite his. minist Yin churches: here and

00d. Maje Dun's Guteeach ratends into various Secu
af Events Such as mignon and parties in order to
nspire Nope and Chany in others. His Songs Fae
been in hay rotation Throughout varios kacal
and Rernational radio Stations which inclucda
"Pray for you". “Wan take hfe" ad "King's kid?
His QUITENT Single, featuring Bahamian super
Star Midiess. called “Tings. gen't binges" is alo
Sat to Fit (he ainwaves a5 the album's release
dite approaches

Presently. (his uniquely talenied rapper
S.s0 the record meecutive of his oan
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5 SLE bo Peat

donated specially designed
eco-friendly bags for the two-
day event, which provided
hundreds of persons with an
opportunity to receive first
hand information on invest-
ing in real estate from some
of the country’s leading pro-
fessional real estate and
financial companies.

“Sun Tee EmbroidMe is
really happy to partner with
the Bahamas Real Estate
Expo on such a very impor-
tant event to help promote
our local economy and to
help local people do what
they need to do to achieve,
especially in today’s econo-
my,” said Mr Farrington.

“We are excited about the
whole venture and we defi-
nitely would like to thank Sun
Tee for assisting us in this
venture with the eco-friendly
bags,” said Pedro Young,
president and founder of the
Bahamas Real Estate Expo.

Ernesto Gongora, co-
founder and vice president of
technical support of the

ae



SCOTT FARRINGTON, president of Sun Tee EmbroidMe (at centre)
with Pedro Young (left) president and founder of the Bahamas Real
Estate Expo, and Ernesto Gongora (right), co-founder and vice

president of technical support.

Bahamas Real Estate Expo
expressed similar sentiments.
“We are extremely pleased.
We were contacted by Mr
Scott Farrington and we were
delighted that he took the ini-
tiative to partner with us and



we hope that this will be a
partnership that is going to
last for many years to come.”

Part proceeds from the
expo will be donated to
the Ranfurly Home for Chil-
dren.

iB
O'S.
de | |

BUTLER & SANDS
GROUNDS, JFK









City Markets
BYE Corer]

tightrope’
Comiterd tan)

Firm looking at
bakeries, pharmacies
in-store, and
opening hours

@ By NEIL HARTNELL
Tribune Business Editor

City Markets “walked a
tightrope” to get back on a sta-
ble financial footing, its chief
executive has told Tribune Busi-
ness, carrying no more than one
week’s worth of inventory for
its stores after guaranteeing
Bahamian wholesalers/distrib-
utors would receive payments
for supplies on a weekly basis.

Sunil Chatrani, who heads the
12-store supermarket chain’s
publicly-listed holding company,
Bahamas Supermarkets, said
that after taking over his post in
October 2008, he asked the
company’s vendors - at one of
his first meetings - to set aside
the accounts payables owed to
them by City Markets.

“We guarantee, on a weekly
basis, to pay you what we owe
you, and to pay some of the bal-
ance,” was the message Mr
Chatrani delivered to them.

He told Tribune Business this
week: “We stuck with it. It was
walking a tightrope - we had no
more than one week’s invento-
ry in-store.

“Tt was very tight. We had to
make sure we fixed the busi-
ness first before new funds
came into the company. We
walked a tightrope.”

The City Markets chief exec-
utive added that “while still
tight” on liquidity/cash flow, the
company had been able to meet
all its commitments.

Mr Chatrani praised the sup-
port City Markets received
from its Bahamian whole-
sale/distributor suppliers as
“fantastic”, adding: “They’ve
really helped us, I can tell you.”
Evangeline Rahming, Bahamas
Supermarkets’ chief financial
officer, added: “They [the
wholesalers] didn’t want City
Markets to fail.”

Refit

Vendors had helped to refit
and reset City Markets’ produce
department, putting in new
equipment, while freezers not
working had been replaced.

Tribune Business yesterday
exclusively revealed that
investors in BSL Holdings, the
78 per cent majority Bahamas
Supermarkets shareholder, had
committed ‘in principle’ to
injecting additional equity cap-
ital into the company to enable
it to “relaunch” by June 1, 2009,
and restart its imported produce
programme to generate
increased sales, gross margins
and higher consumer volume
and per capita spend.

“We’re ahead of the projec-
tions,” Mr Chatrani said.
“We’ve reached the stage
where, once this programme
kicks in, it’s a matter of con-
stant refining. We’re looking at
putting bakeries, pharmacies in
the stores. We’re looking at
opening hours to see what
makes sense, what doesn’t
make sense.”

Mr Chatrani added that City
Markets management “feel
strongly we are going to hit and
better” the financial targets the
company has set for its turn-
around, and urged the compa-
ny’s 22 per cent minority share-
holders - some of whom are
contemplating legal action
against the firm and its Board of
Directors over the destruction
of shareholder value - to be
patient as the only way was ‘up’.

“The value of the shares, as
we know, has declined signifi-
cantly, but the value is going to
be on the future cash flows,”
Mr Chatrani said.

“T would say the message is to
be patient. The worst is behind

SEE page 5B

THE TRIBUNE

ISIC



FRIDAY,

MAY

iMag)



2009

SECTION B « business@tribunemedia.net

FAMILY GUARDIAN

INSURANCE COMPANY LIMITED



Water Corp top Bahamas most

loser at $24.1

Overtakes Bahamasair as biggest drain with 26.7% net loss rise,
as union proposal advocates subsidy elimination by 2103 with
$4m per year reduction
WH Former Blue Hills bidder Biwater union’s selected
operating/management partner

@ By NEIL HARTNELL
Tribune Business Editor

The Water & Sewerage
Corporation’s $20 million-plus
per annum subsidies could be
eliminated over a five-year
period to 2013 by reducing
them by $4 million every year,
a management/operating
agreement proposal is argu-
ing, with the Corporation hav-
ing now overtaken Bahama-
sair as the Government’s
heaviest loss maker.

The proposal submitted to
the Government by the
BUSAWJU, the union that
represents the Corporation’s
line workers, a copy of which
has been seen by Tribune
Business, revealed that in 2007

- the last year for which the
Water & Sewerage Corpora-
tion’s financials were available
- its net loss increased by 26.7
per cent, from $19.021 million
to $24.107 million.

Coupled with the $30 mil-
lion taxpayer subsidy it has
received in the 2008-2009
Budget year, the net loss
makes the Water & Sewerage
Corporation the Governmen-
t’s largest-loss making Corpo-
ration - something the union’s
president believes their pro-
posal an reverse.

Carmen Munnings-Kemp
told Tribune Business yester-
day that the union was still
awaiting the Government’s
formal response to a proposal
that a ‘strategic partner’ take

Financial industry
faces ‘most severe
challenge’ ever

* Senior attorney calls for new business model to
ensure long-term survival, as current one ‘largely

redundant’

* Moree says government needs different approach to
TIEA talks, urging creation of National Plan and
Ministry of Financial Services to combat G-20/0ECD

* Bahamas needs alliances and to avoid ‘knee jerk’
reactions to OECD-type initiatives

Brian Moree



@ By NEIL HARTNELL
Tribune Business Editor

The Bahamas must develop
a “new business model” and
proactive National Plan to
ensure its financial services
industry survives the “most
severe challenge” it has ever
faced, a senior attorney said yes-
terday, as he urged the Gov-
ernment to adopt a “different
approach” to complying with
tax transparency demands.

Brian Moree, senior partner
at McKinney, Bancroft &
Hughes, called on the Govern-
ment to develop a long-term
strategy that would enable the
Bahamas to avoid a “knee-jerk
reaction” every time the Organ-
isation for Economic Coopera-
tion and Development (OECD)
and its contemporaries unveiled
a new initiative attacking inter-
national financial centres.

And he urged the Govern-
ment to create a standalone
Ministry of Financial Services
to give the Bahamas’ second
largest industry its own ministry,
much like how tourism had the
Ministry of Tourism.

SEE page 4B

FG FINANCIAL

PENSIONS & INVESTMENTS

(roup pensions

over management/operation
of the Water & Sewerage Cor-
poration, bringing with it the
expertise, technical capability
and ability to access “hun-
dreds of millions” of dollars
in financing to upgrade its
infrastructure and operations.
The BUSAWU document
revealed that the proposed
strategic partner is UK-head-
quartered Biwater Plc and its
subsidiary, Cascal, two com-
panies that should be very
familiar with the Bahamas and
the Corporation’s problems.
For Biwater was the runner-
up to Consolidated Water in
the bidding for the Blue Hills

SEE page 6B

2S

The information contained is from a third
party and The Tribune can not be held
responsible for errors and/or omission
from the daily report.



call us today at 396-4000

: NASSAU | FREEPORT | ABACO | ELEUTHERA | EXUMA | CORPORATE CENTRE: EAST

m vulnerable to

economic storm

* Storm and sea surges to knock
almost $50m off Bahamian GDP,
World Bank predicts

* Nation ranked as world’s most
vulnerable in three out of six World

Bank categories

m@ By CHESTER ROBARDS

Business Reporter

crobards@tribunemedia.net

A WORLD Bank study has predicted that the
Bahamas could lose US $48.92 million in gross domes-
tic product (GDP) as a result of increased storm surges,
with this country ranked in three out of six categories as
the nation worst impacted by Sea Level Rise (SLR)
brought on by global warming..

According to the findings, an estimated 1,517 square
miles of Bahamian coastline could be impacted over a
number of years as global sea levels rise, representing
54.67 per cent of the nation’s total coastline.

SEE page 2B



Government urged: ‘Finish
reqguiatory consolidation job’

@ By NEIL HARTNELL
Tribune Business Editor

The Government was yester-
day urged to “finish the job” of
financial services regulatory
consolidation by merging the
existing supervisory into either
a single ‘super regulator’ or the
‘Twin Peaks’ model, a senior
attorney saying it would be “a
mistake to stop” after moving
most into one building.

Brian Moree, senior partner
at McKinney, Bancroft &
Hughes, told Tribune Business
that while he “applauded” the
decision to move all financial
services regulators bar the Cen-

Bahamas ‘not there’
in terms of time to
hear and dispose of
commercial cases

tral Bank’s supervision depart-
ment under one roof, the Gov-
ernment needed to go further
than simply physical consolida-
tion.

The Securities Commission
of the Bahamas has taken on

SEE page 5B

[attract the cream of the crop
[= keep present employees happy
[4 guarantee staff retirement savings

all of the above

A SUBSIDIARY C





PAGE 2B, FRIDAY, MAY 15, 2009

THE TRIBUNE





Port Board meets on) Bahamas most
government's terms

otis S10

tli

BISCUI

try it for B



m@ By CHESTER
ROBARDS
Business Reporter
crobards@tribunemedia.net

The private company devel-
oping the Arawak Cay port
was yesterday said by sources
to have held a Board meeting
earlier this week to discuss the
Government’s final terms for
the project as outlined in a let-
ter sent to the directors by
Prime Minister Hubert Ingra-
ham.

It is unknown what was
included in the letter, but one
source close to developments,
who asked not to be named, as
Board members have appar-
ently been warned by the
Prime Minister not to speak
publicly about the deal, could
only say: “We are moving in
the right direction.”

When asked by Tribune
Business what the right direc-
tion might be for the Arawak
Cay port, the source suggested
that no more could be
revealed.

Not a whisper has left the
Prime Minister’s Office
recently about the relocation
of the container shipping facil-
ities from Downtown Nassau
to Arawak Cay, and for
months speculation over why
the Government has been so
tightlipped over the project
has increased.

PLP senator Jerome
Fitzgerald this month berated
the Government for its “veil
of secrecy” over the proposed
Arawak Cay port, and called
for “full and proper disclo-
sure” of all developments con-
nected with the plan to move
the container shipping facili-
ties.

In a study done on the port
relocation for the former
Christie government by the
Dutch consultants, Ecorys,

DEVELOPMENT FOR SALE
MARINA & SEAFOOD PROCESSING PLANT
ALLIGATOR BAY, NORTH LONG ISLAND

Approx. 6 acres of Waterfront property with a 152 feet wide canal.

Property comprises three buildings:

Building A: Seafood Processing Plant include a reception area, an
office, three bathrooms, a receiving room, a dressing room,
a packing room, a storage room, a laboratory and a
processing room, (3) 10 ft x 30 ft blast freezers, and (1)
15ft x 15 ft and (1) 10 ft x15 ft holding freezers.

Building B: Generator House

Building C: The Water Plant consists of a reverse osmosis water
system that converts salt water into drinking water with

a 10,000 storage capacity.

Interested persons should submit offers to:
The Manager, Credit Risk Management, P. O. Box N-7518,

Nassau, Bahamas

To reach us on or before June 12, 2009

For further information, please contact us at
502-0929, 356-1685 or 356-1608



Arawak Cay was found to be
the sixth-best site to redevelop
a container port from an envi-
ronmental perspective, falling
one behind the option to leave
it in its current position in
Downtown Nassau.

It has been suggested that
the long-awaited revitalisation
of Bay Street cannot begin in
earnest until the port facilities
are removed from the down-
town area.

The former PLP govern-
ment suggested that the port
be move to southwest New
Providence, near Clifton Cay.
However, the present govern-
ment found this option to be
too costly and subsequently
scrapped the idea.

Option

Now, plans to build a man-
made island west of Arawak
Cay to house the container
port seem to be an option for
the relocation. The fill
removed during the harbour
dredging this year to accom-
modate the first of the Gene-
sis Class cruise ships is slated to
be used to extend the wharf
along Bay Street and construct
the man-made island, accord-
ing to sources.

A thoroughfare being con-
structed from John F Kennedy
Drive to Saunders Beach is
suspected to be a part of the
new Arawak Cay container
port’s proposed road infra-
structure, which will link to a
causeway connecting with the
75 acre man made island.

However, Deputy Prime
Minister Brent Symonette said
this new road was simply
another corridor planned as a
part of the Government’s $120
million New Providence Road
improvement project being
constructed by the Argentine
firm Jose Cartellone Con-
struction Company (JCCC).

A recent town meeting con-
firmed that the port will be
moved to Arawak Cay.

However, the Government
is still being quiet about the
deal, having placed a virtual
gag order on all investors
related to the relocation of the
port.

Some suggest that it is
because Arawak Cay will be
back in the hands of those
who once operated there
when it was known as Kelly
Island.

BANQUE PRIVEE

vulnerable to
economic storm

FROM page 1B

As a result, the World Bank estimates 3,711 Bahamians could
be impacted over the same period of time, representing 73.03 per
cent of the total population living on coastline that could possibly
be affected.

The Bahamas has long been thought to be at high risk of
water inundation due to incremental seal level rises, as a vast
majority of the islands are only a few feet above sea level.

In a list of 10 countries most at risk for serious damage as
storm surges intensify, the Bahamas tops the list three times.

With 73 per cent of the coastal population threatened by
intensifying storm surges, the Bahamas ranks number one
above Kuwait, Dijibouti and the United Arab Emirates (UAE).

The Bahamas outranks all others as the country most likely to
lose a mass amount of coastal GDP at 65.7 per cent.

The study also suggests that the Bahamas is at risk of losing
94.1 per cent of its urban coastal areas to intense storm surges.

Those incrementally increasing surges are predicted to affect
54.7 per cent of the total coastal land area and 71.4 per cent of
coastal wetlands. The only category in which the Bahamas is not
expected to be gravely affected is in coastal agricultural land —
maybe because there is not much to lose.

Scientists and environmentalists have been having a great
debate for years over the state of global temperatures.

However, one constant that
cannot be denied is the direct cor- .
relation between ocean tempera-. “The destructive
ture and the intensity of hurri- impact will
ae and cyclones. : generally be

“An increase in sea surface
temperature is strongly evident greater when
at all latitudes and in ali oceans,” | Storm surges are
the study read. accompanied by

“The scientific evidence indi- strong winds and
cates that increased surface tem- | Jarge onshore
perature will intensify cyclone waves.”
activity and heighten storm .
surges. These surges will, in turn,
create more damaging flood con-
ditions in coastal zones and adjoining low-lying areas.

“The destructive impact will generally be greater when storm
surges are accompanied by strong winds and large onshore
waves.”

The Bahamas has moved forward in the endeavour to lower
carbon emissions, which are almost wholly blamed for global
temperature increases.

And as a country geographically susceptible to hurricanes
that develop in the Atlantic and in the Gulf of Mexico, the
Bahamas must depend on industrialised nations such as China,
India and the US to mitigate their carbon emissiona in order to
curb the effects of global warming.

“The International Workshop on Tropical Cyclones (IWTC)
has recently noted that “if the projected rise in sea level due to
global warming occurs, then the vulnerability to tropical cyclone
storm surge flooding would increase” and “it is likely that some
increase in tropical cyclone peak wind-speed and rainfall will
occur if the climate continues to warm,” the study continued.

According to the World Bank, hurricanes and cyclones have
been occurring in areas that have previously not been frequent.

The findings suggest that as these former anomalies become
commonplace due to the state or the global environment, poor
communities in low lying coastal areas will be affected.

Several low-lying Pacific islands are already thought to have
been inundated by abnormally high sea levels. The island states
reported about 100 metres (328.1ft) of coastline swept over by
sea water.

“A particularly striking finding is the concentration of high-
ly vulnerable large cities at the low end of the international
income distribution. We believe that these large, globally per-
vasive potential impacts further strengthen the case for rapid
action to protect endangered coastal populations,” the study con-
cluded.

EDMOND DE ROTHSCHILD LTD
LCF ROTHSCHILD GROUP

In order to strengthen our team in Nassau, we have an employment opportunity fora

Qualified Accountant

Responsibilities include :

Accounts Payable functions

Spreadsheet analysis

Monthly and quarterly reporting

Bank reconciliations

Recording of general joumal entries

Minimum requirements :

Bachelor's Degree in Accounting or Finance

Cormiputer literacy with proficiency in MS Excel

Excellent verbal and written communication skills

Ability to work with minimum supervision

Must possess a high level of integrity and professionalism
Three years of professional axpenance

The ideal candidate must possess strong analytical skills, and have a working
knowledge of IFRS and Basel | banking regulations.

Salary is commensurate with experience and qualifications.

Interested persons may submit their resume by email only to: bperaicoralwave.com

with reference "Accountant® , no later than 30’

May 2009.





THE TRIBUNE

FRIDAY, MAY 15, 2009, PAGE 3B



Law enforcement notable by absence

| was a beautiful Sunday
past. A little work and
play made quite an evening. But
this drive made me wonder
whether our lovely little island
of New Providence is safe or
just lawless.

What’s the difference, you
may ask? Well, the reliable
Webster defines “safe” as being
“free from harm or risk” or
“secure from threat of danger,
harm, or loss”. Lawless means
“not regulated by or based on
law” and “not restrained or con-
trolled by law”

This was my debate back and
forth with myself as I drove
from the Carmichael area into
Coral Harbour, on to Adelaide
Road and on to the New
Albany divide, passing a New
Providence Development Com-
pany security patrol way. Then
it hit me; I have not seen any
police patrols.

So I continue my drive, pass-
ing Clifton Pier and the Clifton
Heritage Site, Jaws Beach,
Lyford Cay, still no police. Pass-
ing an old favourite haunt, and
also a new one, I find myself
now near Nirvana Beach and
guess what? Still no police.
There are pedestrians, cyclists,
foot and motor driven, beach
goers with families having pic-
nics, ‘just chilling on de island’.
As I drive, not one policeman in
sight.

Now by the ever popular
Goodman’s Bay, where are the
police? Getting a bit concerned
after visiting another new

US housing plan
off to slow start

@ By ALAN ZIBEL
AP Real Estate Writer

With less than 24 hours on the
clock, Rose Inman’s foreclosure
was postponed late Thursday for
60 days. But after spending hun-
dreds of dollars she couldn’t
afford to find an apartment and
pack her things, the last-minute
gesture comes too late — she is
moving out of her house over-
looking Seattle’s Puget Sound.

For the past two months she
had hoped to benefit from Presi-
dent Barack Obama’s plan to
help homeowners avoid foreclo-
sure. Despite numerous calls, e-
mails and letters to Aurora Loan
Services, she was only able to
have one phone conversation
with a company representative.

“It’s like this huge, concrete
thick wall that you cannot get
through,” said Inman, 58, who is
working as a human resources
consultant, but making much less
than she was before she was laid
off by the City of Seattle.

On Thursday, the Obama
administration said its bold mort-
gage assistance program launched
in March is helping thousands of
borrowers, though some lenders
are working faster than others.
So far, participating mortgage
companies have made more than
55,000 offers to modify borrow-
ers’ loans, but officials could not
say how many of those home-
owners had in fact been helped.

And knowing that many trou-
bled homeowners can’t be, the
Obama administration expanded
its $50 billion mortgage aid pro-
gram, announcing new measures
that would help homeowners
avoid a foreclosure if they don’t
qualify for other assistance.

The initiatives are intended to
streamline the process of selling a
home that is worth less than the
mortgage, or transfer ownership
of a home to the lender. Both
options will still ding the home-
owner’s credit score, but less than
a foreclosure.

So far, 14 companies — includ-
ing Aurora Loan Services, Wells
Fargo, and JPMorgan Chase —
have signed up and will be paid
for each loan they modify. And to
further entice mortgage compa-
nies to participate, the govern-
ment is offering payments totaling
up to $10 billion to compensate
them for the risk of falling home
prices. “The basic problem is that
the program is very complicated
and involved to set up,” said Guy
Cecala, publisher of trade publi-
cation Inside Mortgage Finance.
He doesn’t expect to see large
volumes of loan modifications
before July or August.

While some mortgage compa-
nies have added staff and made
preparations for the program,
others are apparently lagging
behind. Many housing counselors
across the country complain that
the program has been slow get-
ting off the ground.

“Our experience at the ground
level has been, so far, frustrat-
ing,” said Michael van Zalingen,
director of homeownership at
Neighborhood Housing Services
of Chicago, a counseling group.
Entry-level employees at mort-
gage companies, he said, are
either steering borrowers away
from the plan or are entirely
unaware of it.

Safe &

Secure

Aer NCO se 4

favourite, I still see no police.
Of course, I remind myself from
my days on the force that this is
Sunday, and our police too need
some time to relax.

But if there are no police out
keeping us safe, why are there
so many people out having,
from what I can see and hear,
such a good ole time, so to
speak. They must be mad,
because as some would have us
believe, Nassau is not a safe
place to be. Well, obviously
these folks have not gotten the
memo.

By now I am passing Arawak
Cay, and still no police pres-
ence, only the police atation
erected at the site.

So what is it with Sunday?
Well, I introduced you to the
concept of ‘selective enforce-
ment’. Of which, as I stated, our
police force is very good at,
Well, with Sunday’s enforce-
ment level the police are obvi-
ously going for a combination of
the Oscars, Grammy and
Cacique awards. The now obvi-



ous, I am certain, practice of
reduced coverage on Sunday
must mean that the potential
for crime is reduced during
these hours. Or is it?

Remember those motorbikes;
none of them had helmets on.
Many of the cars, if not speed-
ing, are doubled parked and
parked on the grass or wherev-
er, music, of course, loud.

No police, not even on Bay
Street, at which point I decided
to take a break from this long
drive and observe a bit more
critically the absence or lack of
officers. So downtown Nassau,
at about S5pm-5.30pm, with not
one footpatrol.

The time now is nearly after
6pm by now. Maybe I am too
early. But seriously, folks, it has
been about three-and-a-half
hours and not a single police
patrol.

Maybe this selective enforce-
ment needs to be revisited.
Maybe a review of this man-
agement style, as the safe envi-
ronment which exists has

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We

become a fertile ground for law-
less behavior. The law break-
ers, regardless of the infraction,
feel safe. Hence, the speeding,
illegal parking and loud music
have become, as one eyewitness
to the raid on a local alleged
numbers house said, part of our
culture. Now this is not the first
Sunday where this has been not-
ed. In fact, this is the norm, but
a dangerous one at that.

Alas, our police are caught in
a quandry, as from personal
experience I have seen where
the police presence causes some
young, lost youth to act out.
When the police are seen, in an
effort to show themselves off,
they must now be louder and

















Rt. Hon. Hubert A. Ingraham

more vulgar, as if to dare the
police to take action. So what
do you do. Hopefully not stay
away from such events and
gatherings, but rather you
develop new strategies of man-
aging them without being seen
as oppressive.

Yes, I would be the first to
say easier said than done, but
it has to be done.

So if just by chance, on one of
these beautiful Sunday after-
noons, the police select a rarely
enforced item from the law
books to enforce, be ready.
Nevertheless, we will here the
outcry form the arrested per-
son, that they are being vic-
timised, and unfairly targeted

by the police. Go catch some
real criminals.

NB: Gamal Newry is the
president of Preventative Mea-
sures, a loss Pprevention and
asset protection training and
consulting company, speciali-
aing in policy and procedure
development, business security
reviews and audits, and emer-
gency and crisis management.
Comments can be sent to PO
Box N-3154 Nassau, Bahamas
or, e-mail gnewry@gmail.com
or Visit us at www.preventa-
tivemeasures.net or visit
http://newrypreventativemea-
sures.blogspot.com/

PROCLAMATION
OF NURSES’ MONTH BY PRIME MINISTER







WHEREAS, in 1947 the Nurses’ Association of The Commonwealth of The
Bahamas (NACB), an independent, non-political, non-governmental organization of
nurses, was founded primarily to represent the interest of nurses practicing in The
Bahamas, nationally, regionally and internationally;




AND WHEREAS, the Nurses’ Association encourages the professional and
educational advancement of nurses and promotes the highest possible standard of quality
nursing, irrespective of nationality, race, colour or social origin;

AND WHEREAS, professional nurses are committed and dedicated to
providing quality nursing care with sensitivity to sick, infirmed and handicapped persons;

AND WHEREAS, in addition to the promotion of excellence in the
nursing profession, the vision of the Nurses’ Association of the Commonwealth of
The Bahamas is to network locally, regionally and internationally in order to provide
best practices and advice on policy matters relating to and impacting the profession;

AND WHEREAS, the Nurses’ Association of The Commonwealth of The

Bahamas is celebrating the 61st Anniversary of its existence;

AND WHEREAS, as an Association, NACB is called upon from time to time to
represent the nursing profession in The Bahamas nationally, regionally and internationally;

AND WHEREAS, in countries around the world, the month of May is set
aside as a time to give focus to the critical roles performed by nurses worldwide;

AND WHEREAS, in 2009, International Nurses’ Day will be celebrated on May
12th, and will be marked by events, activities and ceremonies that will give world-wide
recognition to the contribution nurses make to humanity through the healing process;

AND WHEREAS, during the

month of May 2009, the

Nurses’

Association of The Commonwealth of the Bahamas plans to undertake various activities,
inclusive of a church service, an appreciation luncheon and a symposium, to promote the
International Council of Nurses’ theme: “Delivering Quality, Serving Communities:
Nurses Leading Care Innovations’;

NOW, THEREFORE, I, Hubert A. Ingraham, Prime Minister of the
Commonwealth of The Bahamas, do hereby proclaim the month of May, 2009 as

‘National Nurses’ Month’’.

and locks

Cloth or leather interiar
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Shirley Street

Tal: (242) 328-2285 + Fax: (242) 323-7272

IN WITNESS WHEREOF,
I have hereunto set my Hand
and Seal this 12th day of May, 2009

Moshe f) Sade

HUBERT A. INGRAHAM
PRIME MINISTER




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PAGE 4B, FRIDAY, MAY 15, 2009

THE TRIBUNE



————S—————S——E————————=——_E_— SSS
Financial industry faces ‘most severe challenge’ ever

FROM page 1B

Mr Moree told a Rotary Club
of West Nassau luncheon that
while the former Christie
administration had “taken a
step in the right direction” when
it created the Ministry of Finan-
cial Services and Investments
between 2002-2007, it did not
get it “quite right” because its
remit also included investments
- something that should have
been excluded as this was “a
massive portfolio by itself”.

The McKinney, Bancroft &
Hughes senior partner said the
Ministry of Financial Services
should be headed by a full-time
director of financial services,
the post having the same status
as the director-general of
tourism.

The salary for such a post
needed to be sufficiently high
to attract top talent from the
private sector, and Mr Moree
added: “There are at least four
or five people who I think,
across the board, would be
acknowledged as suitable for
this position.

“Tf I was Prime Minister, I
would take five minutes to
appoint Wendy Warren [the
Bahamas Financial Services
Board’s chief executive and
executive director] as director
of financial services.”

Speaking to Tribune Business





“I don’t think there’s any
need to panic or that our
industry is in danger of
collapsing in the short-term.”



later, Mr Moree said the
Bahamas needed to be “ahead
of the curve” if it was to sur-
vive the multitude of attacks
launched against it by the G-
20/OECD ‘blacklist’, the Oba-
ma administration and other
agencies and global regulatory
bodies.

“T don’t think there’s any
need to panic or that our indus-
try is in danger of collapsing in
the short-term,” Mr Moree told
Tribune Business.

“However, having said that,
some people have said putting
the Bahamas on the [G-
20/OECD ] ‘grey list’ will not
have a significant impact. But
my own sources have indicated
that in the case of certain Euro-
pean banks there is very much a
wait and see attitude, and we’re
going to have to see how that
develops in conjunction with
the various initiatives Gordon
Brown [the UK prime minister]

LEGALNOTICE

NOTICE

INTERNATIONAL BUSINESS COMPANIES ACT
(No.45 of 2000)

FARRINGDON
INVESTMENTS LID.



















Notice is hereby given that in accordance with Section
138 (8) of the International Business Companies Act,
No. 45 of 2000, the Dissolution of FARRINGDON IN-
VESTMENTS LTD. has been completed, a Certificate of
Dissolution has been issued and the Company has there-
fore been struck off the Register. The date of completion
of the dissolution was the 29th day of April, 2009.







df

fA
| if
nif ‘
hl
aLREKA Moy
Wina Doe

Legal Notice

NOTICE

INTERNATIONAL BUSINESS COMPANIES ACT
(No.45 of 2000)

MOUNTAIN ASH
PROPERTIES LIMITED

In Voluntary liquidation

“Notice is hereby given that in accordance with Section
137 (4) of the International Business Companies Act
(No. 45 of 2000). MOUNTAIN PROPERTIES ASH

LIMITED is in Dissolution.”

The date of commencement of dissolution is the

13th day of May, 2009.

Paco Carrera
of Clle Villas Tropical Km 14.5 Lte,
Zona Hotelera, Cancun Qui 77500 Mexico

Liquidator

Securit y

Abaco Markets

ROYAL = FIDELITY

Money at Work

Brian Moree

was talking about. I don’t think
that impact has been profound
yet, but these are very serious
challenges that have to be prop-
erly and ably managed over the
next few months to minimise
their impact. Our industry has
been resilient, and will continue
to be so, but it has never quite
faced the severity of the chal-
lenge it is facing.

“Given proper initiatives and
a National Plan to respond to
these issues we can secure the
future of this industry, although
we have to radically change our
business model. Therein lies the
challenge for the private and
public sectors.”

This will likely mean that the
Bahamas may, eventually, have
to consider introducing some
form of minimal income tax,
such as a corporate tax (via
conversion of the business
licence fee into this) or taxes
on the profits, revenues or
assets under management of
international clients.

Such a tax, which has been
urged by many industry partic-
ipants, would enable the
Bahamas to negotiate double
tax treaties with other nations.

Mr Motee told Tribune Busi-
ness: “The current model has
served us well for the past 40
years, but it’s now becoming
largely redundant and will have
to be replaced with a new one -
a new business model with
regard to what is happening

around us.” He urged the Govy-
ernment to adopt a different
approach to the OECD’s
demands that this nation have
at least 12 Tax Information
Exchange Agreements (TIEAs)
with other countries to show its
commitment to tax transparen-
cy.

Prime Minister Hubert Ingra-
ham has indicated that, while
the Bahamas has one such
agreement with the US, it is
likely to commence talks with
Canada over its second TIEA.

But Mr Moree said the
Bahamas should follow the lead
established by the Cayman
Islands, which when confronted
with the OECD demands,
promptly went out and signed
multiple TIEAs with five to sev-
en Nordic countries. It did this
safe in the knowledge that its
financial services sector had no
clients or assets from those
nations, meaning the industry
would suffer no fallout from
OECD compliance.

“The amount of money com-
ing into Cayman from those
countries probably could not
buy you a suit, Mr Moree said.
Turning to the Bahamas’
approach to TIEAs, with Cana-
da next in line, he added: “I
would have suggested a differ-
ent approach, going after the
low hanging fruit before the
high hanging fruit, knocking off
seven to eight countries that do
not have money here.”

The leading attorney also
urged the Government to con-
tinue lobbying the Obama
administration in order to safe-
guard the Bahamian financial
services industry, as many were
“scratching heads” as to what
more this nation could do to
comply with its demands given
the TIEA’s existence.

The Bahamas, Mr Moree
said, had been "
very cooperative and support-

Bahamas Humane Society

wishes to inform the general public that
there will be NO Clinic on Saturday
16th May due to our Animal Fun Day.
We will have a late clinic
3pm-8pm on Friday 15th.

amr adele

Legal Notice

NOTICE

INTERNATIONAL BUSINESS COMPANIES ACT
(No.45 of 2000)
INTERNATIONAL HOST LIMITED

In Voluntary liquidation

“Notice is hereby given that in accordance with Section
137 (4) of the International Business Companies Act
(No. 45 of 2000). INTERNATIONAL HOST LIMITED is

in Dissolution.”

The date of commencement of dissolution is the

13th day of May, 2009.

Paco Carrera
of Clle Villas Tropical Km 14.5 Lte,
Zona Hotelera, Cancun Qui 77500 Mexico

Liquidator

BISX LISTED & TRADED SECURITIES AS OF:
THURSDAY, 14 MAY 2009

BISX ALL SHARE INDEX: CLOSE 1,607.86 | CHG -5.66 | %CHG -0.35 | YTD -104.50 | YTD % -6.10

FINDEX: CLOSE 797.42 | YTD -4.49% | 2008 -12.31%

WWW .BISXBAHAMAS.COM | TELEPHONE:242-323-2330 | FACSIMILE: 242-323-2320

Bahamas Property Fund

Bank of Bahamas

Benchmark

Bahamas Waste

Fidelity Bank

Cable Bahamas

Colina Holdings

Commonwealth Bank ($1)
Consolidated Water BDRs

Doctor's Hospital

Famguard
Finco

FirstCaribbean Bank

Focol (S)

Focol Class B Preference

Freeport Concrete

ICD Utilities
J. S. Johnson

Securi
Fidelity Bank Note 17 (Series A) +
Fidelity Bank Note 22 (Series B) +
Fidelity Bank Note 13 (Series C) +

1000.00

52wk-Low

Fidelity Bank Note 15 (Series D) +

Previous Close Today's Close

Change Daily Vol.

Daily Vol.

Prime + 1.75%
7%
Prime + 1.75%

Fidelity Over-The-Counter Securities

Symbol

Bahamas Supermarkets
Caribbean Crossings (Pref)

RND Holdings

ABDAB
RND Holdings

Ask $

0.55

Last Price Weekly Vol.

29.00
0.55

BISX Listed Mutual Funds

Fund Name

Colina Bond Fund

Colina MSI Preferred Fund
Colina Money Market Fund
Fidelity Bahamas G & 1 Fund
Fidelity Prime Income Fund

100.0000
96.4070
1.0000
9.0950
1.0000
1.0000
1.0000

BISX ALL SHARE INDEX - 19 Dec 02 = 1,000.00
52Wk-Hi - Highest closing price in last 52 weeks.

CFAL Global Bond Fund

CFAL Global Equity Fund

CFAL High Grade Bond Fund
Fidelity International Investment Fund
FG Financial Preferred Income Fund
FG Financial Growth Fund

FG Financial Diversified Fund

Last 12 Months Div $

4.40

YIELD - last 12 month dividends divided by closing price
Bid $ - Buying price of Colina and Fidelity

day's weighted price for daily volume

Today's i ted price for daily volume

co
Change - Ch trom day to day
Daily Vol. -N traded today

DIV $ - Div

(S) - 4-for-1 Stook Split - Effective Date 8/8/2007

(S1) - 3-for-1 Stock Split - Effective Date 7/11/2007

nds per share paid in the last 12 months
P/E - Closing price divided by the last 12 month earnings

Weekly Vol. - Trading vol

NAV - Net Asset Value
N/M - Not Meaningful

ricing bases)
il

EPS $

FG CAPITAL MARKETS

BROKERAGE & ADVISORY SERYVIC-ES

P/E

19 October 2017
19 October 2022
30 May 2013
29 May 2015

Div $ P/E
0.300
0.480
0.000

0.000
0.001

4.540
0.002

0.000
0.000

Yield %

week
EPS $ - A company’s reported earnings per share for the last 12 mths

FINDEX - The Fidelity Bahamas Stock Index. January 1, 1994 = 100

TG TRADE CALL: COLINA 242-502-7010 | ROYALFIDELITY 242-356-7764 | FG CAPITAL MARKETS 242-396-4000 | COLONIAL 242-502-7525

ive” of the US, and should
receive something in return.
“As far as I know, there are no
serious complaints or objections
about how this treaty is work-
ing,” he added. “We have a
TIEA, we have transparency
and have an obligation to pro-
vide appropriate information.
We are doing everything we can
with the US at the moment.”

The G-20/OECD and other
initiatives targeting interna-
tional financial centres were dri-
ven by “good, old-fashioned
competition. Old fashioned,
hardball competition”, Mr
Moree said. G-20 and OECD
members were targeting inter-
national financial centres in the
mistaken belief that they would
be able to prevent the leakage
of tax revenues needed to shore
up expensive welfare states. But
Mr Moree said the Bahamas
had exited business relying on
tax evasion “25 years ago”, and
its business model was based on
tax compliant money.

In response, he urged: “We
need to develop a National
Plan. This is essential. We can’t
have this knee-jerk, ad-hoc
reaction. We need to engage
central government in bench-
marking competitive jurisdic-
tions, and engage our diplo-
matic offices abroad [to lobby
other governments]. There has
to be effective dialogue at many
different levels to make our
case. We need to get out in
front of the game.”

Mr Moree also called on the
Bahamas to “forge alliances”
with other international finan-
cial centres under attack, as they
shared common interests and
there was strength in numbers.

Unlike Guernsey, Jersey,
Bermuda and the Cayman
Islands, which enjoyed UK pro-
tection, and Hong Kong and
Macau, which have China, the
Bahamas as a sovereign nation
does not have a ‘big brother’ to
watch over it, making alliances
crucial. Mr Moree also ques-
tioned why the Bahamas had a
Ministry of Agriculture and

Fisheries, but no Ministry of
Financial Services, when the
economic contribution of the
latter dwarfed both sectors.

“Does it make sense to you?
I don’t understand that,” he
said, arguing that the Ministry
of Finance could not adequate-
ly promote financial services
because it had a “plethora of
other responsibilities and oblig-
ations” that did not allow it to
allocate the necessary resources.

Urging all Bahamians to
become more educated and
informed on issues impacting
the financial services industry,
and the sector’s importance, Mr
Moree said a collective influ-
ence was needed to ensure the
Government pursued “thought-
ful, sensible policies” that pro-
tected the sector’s interests.

“Given the competition, the
ferocity and sustained nature of
the attack, we will not survive
unless we get ahead of it,” Mr
Moree explained. “We don’t
want to wake up and find,
though our silence, that some-
thing has happened to our qual-
ity of life and the country we’re
going to be turning over to our
children.

“The very survival of the
financial services industry as we
know it, the second pillar of our
economy, is under direct threat
from a number of external
forces. That in itself should be a
wake-up call. What happens to
the Bahamas if the sector is sub-
stantially reduced in size? How
would it affect you and your
family, your quality of life?

“If we’re going to have a
chance to survive and grow the
industry, we need to have
strategies and take action
against the external agencies
attacking our industry.

“Otherwise we’re all going to
wake up one day and find major
changes have been imposed that
adversely affect the financial
services industry in this coun-
try, and then we realise it’s too
late to address the problems
with which we are confronted.”

NOTICE

NOTICE is hereby given that ERONNE LUBIN is applying
to the Minister responsible for Nationality and Citizenship,
for registration/naturalization as a citizen of The Bahamas,
and that any person who knows any reason why
registration/naturalization should not be granted, should
send a written and signed statement of the facts within
twenty-eight days from the 15" day of May, 2009 to the
Minister responsible for nationality and Citizenship, P.O. Box

N-7147, Nassau, Bahamas.

PUBLIC NOTICE

INTENT TO CHANGE NAME BY DEED POLL

The Public is hereby advised that |, GODFREY MATTHEW
NEWBOLD of the city of Freeport on the Island of Grand
Bahama, intend to my name to GODFREY MATTHEW
THURSTON BSRMA NEWBOLD. If there are any objections
to this change of name by Deed Poll, you may write such
objections to the Chief Passport Officer, P.O.Box N-742,
Nassau, Bahamas no later than thirty (30) days after the date

of publication of this notice.

NOTICE

NOTICE is hereby given that RICHEMOND JASON of
DAVIS STREET, FOX HILL, P.O. BOX CR-54802, is
applying to the Minister responsible for Nationality and
Citizenship, for registration/naturalization as a citizen of The
Bahamas, and that any person who knows any reason why
registration/naturalization should not be granted, should
send a written and signed statement of the facts within
twenty-eight days from the 15" day of May, 2009 to the
Minister responsible for nationality and Citizenship, P.O. Box

N-7147, Nassau, Bahamas.

COMMONWEALTH OF THE BAHAMAS

IN THE SUPREME COURT

FAMILY DIVISION

BETWEEN: -

2007/FamDiv/FP/No.148

BENJAMIN BENEBY

Petitioner

AND

FERRYLYN O. BENEBY (nee) GUERRERO

Respondent

PETITION

In The Supreme Court of the Commonwealth of the

Bahamas.

By: The Firm, Attorney at Law, Marsh Harbour, P.O. Box
AB20191 Abaco, Bahamas. (242) 367-3572 ph/fax





THE TRIBUNE

FRIDAY, MAY 15, 2009, PAGE 5B





job and end up with one or two

in commercial cases in a rea-

City Markets | Government urged: ‘Finish regulatory consolidation jot

FROM page 1B

the regulatory responsibility of
the Inspector of Financial and
Corporate Services Providers,
while both the Compliance
Commission and Registrar of
Insurance Companies have
moved into the same premises
as the Commission - Charlotte
House.

However, Mr Moree yester-
day encouraged the Govern-
ment to complete the regulato-
ry consolidation by merging all
supervisory bodies - including
the Bank Supervision Depart-
ment - into one ‘super regula-
tor’, along the lines of the UK’s
Financial Services Authority
(FSA), or creating two regula-
tory bodies by merging all bar
the Central Bank department.

“We need to seriously look
at the resources of the major
regulators, and in this regard
the central government has to
realise and understand that cre-
ating a regulator is a relatively
easy thing to do,” Mr Moree
told Tribune Business.

“Funding it, staffing it and
resourcing it is more difficult,
and this is where the real
resolve of the Government is
tested.

“We need to seriously review
the current resources made
available to the regulators, with
the exception of the Central
Bank, which generates its
income from bank licence fees.
In my view, almost all the other
regulators are underresourced
and understaffed.”

Turning to regulatory con-
solidation, Mr Moree added: “I
think it is vitally important for
us not to simply acknowledge
a consolidation of operations.

“While I applaud that devel-
opment as a first step, putting
them in the same building,
establishing protocols among
the regulatory bodies to min-
imise duplication, streamlining
procedures and_ sharing
resources, and achieving a high-

‘walked
a tightrope’
to health

FROM page 1B

us. Hang in there and watch the share value grow again.”

He added that “every decision made has been in the best inter-
ests of the company, including the minority shareholders”.

Mr Chatrani himself is effectively a corporate troubleshooter,
parachuted into City Markets by the largest shareholder in that
company and BSL Holdings, Trinidad-based Neal & Massey, in a
bid to sort out its financial woes.

“My job is to restructure it, settle it, get it back to profitability and
then leave,” Mr Chatrani said, once a long-term management
team had been identified.

He added that the information systems weaknesses that had
played a key role in City Markets’ recent woes had all been
addressed, and accurate financial information was available in
real-time to management.

Bahamas Supermarkets suffered a fiscal 2008 net loss of $13.429
million, with 2009 half-year losses standing at $3.527 million and the
firm then suffering from a $2 million-plus solvency deficiency.

Accounts

In addition, as at January 27, 2009, the unaudited management
accounts show that while Bahamas Supermarkets had current
assets of at least $21.37 million, its liabilities exceeded this by just
over $2 million, standing at $23.46 million.

Since it acquired Bahamas Supermarkets for $54 million in sum-
mer 2006, BSL Holdings and its investors have presided over a spec-
tacular destruction of shareholder value, producing an almost-$20
million swing into technical insolvency.

As at year-end 2007, Bahamas Supermarkets had net share-
holder equity of $17.615 million.

That had reduced to $1.427 million as at year-end 2008, and at
the 2009 half-year, this was at a negative $2.09 million.

In tandem, retained earnings have shrunk from $12.874 million
as at year-end 2007 to a position in the red of $3.304 million at year-
end 2008.

By the 2009 half-year point, that accumulated deficit had reached
$6.831 million.

BSi

BSI TRUST CORPORATION (BAHAMAS) LIMITED

is presently accepting applications for

COMPLIANCE AND INTERNAL CONTROLS OFFICER

The successful candidate for the position of Compliance and Internal Controls
Officer will monitor the regulatory framework and operational aspects of the Trust
in order to ensure compliance.

Qualifications:

* The candidate must have thorough knowledge of local legislation, regulatory &
statutory matters as well as international practices as they relate to the Trust
Industry;

He/She should possess the Intemational Diploma Anti Money Laundering and
Compliance, bachelors degree: and

Minimum of 3 -— § years working experience in the trust field. Preference will be
given to professionals with working experience for a Swiss Bank or Trust.

Personal qualities:

Excellent organizational, communication and computer skills
Positive attitude and outlook

Problem-solving skills

Commitment to quality and service excellence

Ability to partner with team members.

Responsibilities:
Ensure compliance of the Trust with local, international and internal group
raguiations and standards in order to limit legal, regulatory and reputation risk
Ad-hoc research and analysis of compliance issues
Maintain a proper framework of intemal control activities
Produce periodical reporting for the Audit Committee and Board of Directors
Liaise with Head Office and Bahamian reguiators as applicable
Will raport directly to the CEQ,

Interested persons with such qualifications should submit their resume/curriculum
vitae to:

Human Resources Manager

BS! Trust Corporation (Bahamas) Limited

Bayside Executive Park

P. 0. Box CB-10976

Nassau, Bahamas

Fax no. (242) §02-2310 or email: ruby.kerr@bsibank.com

(ABSOLUTELY NO PHONE CALLS PLEASE)
Only applicants having the above attributes will be contacted.

NMC SALES, SERVICE and PARTS
All for One NEW NUMBER

Distributors for Honda, Chevrolet, Cadillac and ACDelco Parts | Shirley Street, Nassau

“We need to
seriously look at
the resources of
the major
regulators.”



Brian Moree

er level of operational consoli-
dation, in my view it would be a
major mistake to stop at that
stage and not proceed with what
we were previously told was
going to happen - consolidating
those regulators into one super
regulator or two under the
“Twin Pillars’ model.

“T think it would be a great
mistake to stop, because what
we to do to finish the job is to
not only achieve physical con-
solidation under one roof, but
eliminate some of those regu-
lators by consolidating into one
or two. They’ve got to finish the



























regulators.”

Meanwhile, Mr Moree reit-
erated his call for a dedicated
commercial court in the
Bahamas, telling Tribune Busi-
ness that currently the Bahami-
an judicial system was largely
not disposing of complex com-
mercial cases within the 18-24
month timeframe widely
regarded as an international
benchmark.

“We need to establish a com-
mercial court. There has been
some debate in certain circles
as to whether there is enough
commercial work to justify a
commercial court,” he said,
describing this as a “chicken
and egg” situation.

Mr Moree added: “There is
wide consensus at the Bar, and
in the local and international
business community, that giv-
en our status as a major finan-
cial centre, and given our claim
to be a significant player in
banking and commerce, we
need to be able to deliver justice

THE AIRPORT AUTHORITY

Wier Her presence is ONG awaited ;

sonable period of time, and with
judges who are clearly seen by
the public as capable and expe-
rienced in those areas.”

Mr Moree said that setting
aside simple and highly com-
plex cases, most commercial
cases should make their way
through the court system by 18-
24 months. The Bahamas,
though, was “not there at the
moment”.

Apart from judges and a
properly-equipped physical
premises, Mr Moree said a com-
mercial court would need to be
fully equipped with a full staff
complement, including a regis-
trar, court reporters and clerks.

He added: “It is a fact that
Justice Lyons did an enormous
volume of commercial work,
and his resignation will put a
heavy burden on the Judicial
and Legal Services Commission
to ensure there are sufficient
justices with commercial expe-
rience to be able to deal with

these cases.”
rey? ae

The newest Junkanoo

singer/song writer to beat your eardrum:

}

comiirig) Me [OF 4

re I

LYNDEN PINDLING INTERNATIONAL AIRPORT

P.O. BOX AP-59222

NASSAU, BAHAMAS

REQUEST FOR PROPOSALS (RFP)

FOR FIRE TRUCK

The Airport Authority invites bids for the acquisition of a modern
fire engine for its Crash Fire Rescue operations at the Lynden
Pindling International Airport.

Specifications can be collected from the Executive Offices of the
Airport Authority, Lynden Pindling International Airport during
normal working hours at any time after the appearance of this RFP.
Bids must meet all specifications.

Bids not in compliance with the specifications will be rejected.
Bids must be signed by an individual duly authorized to bind the
bidder to the terms of a contract. Price must include any and all
shipping charges associated with delivery of the apparatus to
Nassau, The Bahamas.

Bids must be submitted by 30th June, 2009 at 11:00am at the men-

tioned address:

General Manager
Executive Offices
Airport Authority
Lynden Pindling International Airport
Nassau, Bahamas

and must be marked:
BIDS FOR FIRE TRUCK

2-0130 Kenxmc





PAGE 6B, FRIDAY, MAY 15, 2009

THE TRIBUNE



Water Corp top loser at $24.1m

FROM page 1B

reverse osmosis plant contract.
Tribune Business revealed sev-
eral years ago that Biwater

Blue Hills contract via an
agreement in principle, but
this was rescinded and the
deal awarded to Consolidat-
ed Water, triggering legal
action in the Bahamian courts.

was originally awarded the

SUGAR-CANE INVESTMENTS LTD.

(Company number 154,779B)

An International Business Company
(In Voluntary Liquidation)

Pursuant to Section 137(4) of the International
Business Companies Act, 2000 notice is hereby
given that the voluntary winding-up and dissolution
of the Company commenced on the 14th day of
May, 2009 and that Pine Limited of Devonshire
House, Queen Street, P.O. Box N-8176 Nassau,
Bahamas has been appointed Liquidator.

Dated this 14th day of May, 2009

Pine Limited
Liquidator

NOTICE
CHELSEA PROPERTIES
HOLDINGS LIMITED

In Voluntary Liquidation

Notice is hereby given that the above-named Company is in
dissolution, commencing on the 15" day of May, 2009. Articles
of dissolution have been duly registered by the Registrar. The
Liquidator is Kyrene Kelty of Nassau, Bahamas. All persons
having claims against the above-named Company are required
on or before the 29" day of May, 2009 to send their names
and addresses and particulars of their debts or claims to the
Liquidator of the Company, or in default thereof they may be
excluded from the benefit of any distribution made before such
debts are proved.

Dated this 15" day of May, 2009

Kyrene Kelty
Liquidator

MEDICAL SUPPLIES
LIQUIDATION SALE

Combine Pad Abdominal Pad 5*9 inch
400/case $150.00
Dental Cotton Rolls Medium
20,000/case $60.00
XL Gloves Latex Powered
1000/case $40.00
Large Gloves latex (Powder Free)
1000/case $40.00
Large Gloves Vinyl (Latex Free)
1000/case $35.00
Insulin Syringe 100U/ml
3600/case $175.00
Nebulizer Mask Kit Adult 20/ml,
Child 6ml, Chamber

100/case $130.00
Needle Holders
1200/case $70.00
Nasal Cannula Adult
100/case $60.00
Oxygen Mask Adult Large
100/case $75.00
1ML Syringe with 25G Needle
2400/case $100.00
3ML Syringe with 23G Needle
1500/case $100.00
SML Syringe with 21G Needle and 23G Needle
1200/case $100.00
10ML Syringe with 21G Needle
1200/case $100.00
Specimen Cups 40z Sterile
100/case $25.00
Sterile Surgical Gloves size 7 1/2, 8, 8 1/2,
600/case $55.00
Hypoallergenic Cloth Tape (Microspore Tape)

1 inch, 216/case

2 inch 108/case $100.00

Cash and Carry or Free Delivery Call
422-1457 - Ms. Miller



That case is before the Privy
Council, but Ms Munnings-
Kemp told Tribune Business:
“On a matter of principle,
they said they had to put that
in court, but no matter the
outcome, if this [proposal]
comes through that will be
negotiated away.”

When asked why the
BUSAWU had selected Biwa-
ter as the best strategic partner
for the Water & Sewerage
Corporation, she explained:
“Biwater has been here
before. We met with other
water companies and groups,
and felt Biwater was by far
the one with the most exper-
tise, knowledge and ability to
acquire the financing neces-
sary at the Water & Sewerage
Corporation.”

Ms Munnings-Kemp
declined to put a figure on the
likely investment any strate-
gic partner would need to
bring to the Water & Sewer-
age Corporation, as the
union/Biwater needed to con-

duct a more detailed inspec-
tion of its assets and opera-
tions once the Government
agreed to their proposal.

“Tm still waiting for a for-
mal response,” she added, the
union having presented its
proposal to Dr Earl Deveaux,
minister of the environment,
and Phenton Neymour, min-
ister of state for the environ-
ment and who has ultimate
responsibility for the Water &
Sewerage Corporation, in
February 2009.

In its plan, which is seeking
a 25-30 year management con-
cession for a strategic partner,
the union said that among the
Water & Sewerage Corpora-
tion’s greatest problems were
the fact that more than 53 per
cent of the water produced in
New Providence was lost via
leaks from its distribution sys-
tem.

Other issues were “wide-
spread customer dissatisfac-
tion” that the union’s plan
pegged at 68 per cent, and

Share your news

The Tribune wants to hear
from people who are
making news in their
neighbourhoods. Perhaps

you are raising funds for a
good cause, campaigning
for improvements in the
area or have won an
award.

If so, call us on 322-1986
and share your story.



NOTICE

“They have the
experience, the
technical capa-
bility and by
partnering with
an entity like
that, maybe we
can solve the
problems”



Munnings-Kemp

perceptions among 79 per cent
of customers that the Water
& Sewerage Corporation
delivered “low value for mon-
ey.

Apart from the fact that the
Water & Sewerage Corpora-
tion was delivering “no
return” on the Government’s
substantial investment in it,
the other issues included its
“low market penetration”,
with only 30 per cent of New
Providence residents taking
its supply.

At the end of its 2007 fiscal
year, while possessing fixed
assets valued at $171.656 mil-
lion, the Water & Sewerage
Corporation’s current assets
of just $4.196 million were
dwarfed by $71.137 million in
current liabilities.

Operating revenues fell
year-over-year compared to
2006, dropping 10.7 per cent to

stand at $38.236 million com-
pared to $42.813 million, while
operating expenses rose to
$53.009 million from $51.407
million.

As a result, the Water &
Sewerage Corporation’s oper-
ating loss increased by 34.4
per cent to $21.327 million,
compared to $15.684 million
in 2006.

Ms Munnings-Kemp said
that, as a result of the Water
& Sewerage Corporation
being forced to sell water at
below the cost it took to pur-
chase or produce it, “we're
taking a big hit all around. We
can’t continue taking that hit”.

She added: “Right now
there is a world of problems at
the Water & Sewerage Cor-
poration, and us being the
employees, we’re quite knowl-
edgeable about the problems.

“We have not been in a
position to do anything,
because we do not do the
funding. We have to rely on
the Government, so all deci-
sions are made for us. We
realise what all the problems
are, and why we need to finda
strategic partner like Biwater,
which has all the water ven-
tures around the world.

“They have the experience,
the technical capability and by
partnering with an entity like
that, maybe we can solve the
problems. Our hands have
been tied because we’ve not
been able to do anything
about it. We may not have all
the solutions, but let us make
the effort to get the organisa-
tion back on track.”

NOTICE
GREGORY, ELEUTHERA, BAHAMAS is applying to the

Minister responsible for Nationality and Citizenship, for

registration/naturalization as a citizen of The Bahamas,
and that any person who knows any reason why
registration/naturalization should not be granted, should
send a written and signed statement of the facts within
twenty-eight days from the 15 day of May, 2009 to the
Minister responsible for nationality and Citizenship, P.O. Box
N-7147, Nassau, Bahamas.

NOTICE

NOTICE is hereby given that FREDLEANE DELVA of
GOVERNOR’S HARBOUR, ELEUTHERA, BAHAMAS is applying
to the Minister responsible for Nationality and Citizenship, for
registration/naturalization as a citizen of The Bahamas, and that
any person who knows any reason why registration/naturalization
should not be granted, should send a written and signed statement
of the facts within twenty-eight days from the 8" day of May, 2009
to the Minister responsible for nationality and Citizenship, P.O. Box
N-7147, Nassau, Bahamas.

NOTICE

MAERSK BAHAMAS LTD.
(IN VOLUNTARY LIQUIDATION)

Creditors having debts or claims against the
above-named Company are required to send particulars
thereof to the undersigned at 35A Regent Street,
Belize City, Belize on or before the 12th of June
2009. In default thereof they will be excluded from
the benefit of any distribution made by the Liquidator.

Dated this thirteenth day of May 2009.

INTERNATIONAL LIQUIDATORS SERVICES
LIMITED
Liquidator
Of
MAERSK BAHAMAS LTD.

Notice

FANCI HILLS LID.
In Voluntary Liquidation

Notice is hereby given that in accordance with Section
138(4) of the International Business Companies Act.
FANCI HILLS LTD. is in dissolution as of

2000,
May 13, 2009.

International Liquidator Services Inc. situated at 35A
Regent Street, PO. Box 1777, Belize City, Belize is

the Liquidator.

LIQUIDATOR

is hereby given that ANDRE JULIEN of

NOTICE is hereby given that KERLINE ESTIME of
BAHAMA AVE., BLUE HILL ROAD, P.O. BOX N-
4922, NASSAU, BAHAMAS is applying to the Minister
responsible for Nationality and Citizenship, for registration/
naturalization as a citizen of The Bahamas, and that
any person who knows any reason why registration/
naturalization should not be granted, should send a
written and signed statement of the facts within twenty-
eight days from the 8 day of May, 2009 to the Minister
responsible for nationality and Citizenship, P.O. Box
N-7147, Nassau, Bahamas.

NOTICE

NOTICE is hereby given that GLORIA FRANCIS of
CARMICHAEL ROAD, is applying to the Minister
responsible for Nationality and Citizenship, for registration/
naturalization as a citizen of The Bahamas, and that
any person who knows any reason why registration/
naturalization should not be granted, should send
a written and signed statement of the facts within
twenty-eight days from the 15 day of May, 2009 to the
Minister responsible for nationality and Citizenship, P.O. Box
N-7147, Nassau, Bahamas.

NOTICE
INTERNATIONAL BUSINESS COMPANIES ACT
No. 45 of 2000

FINENZ S.A.

Notice is hereby given that in accordance with Section
137 of The International Business Companies Act
No. 45 of 2000, FINENZ S.A. is in dissolution. The
date of commencement of dissolution was the 16th
day of April, 2009. Dillon Dean of Nassau, Bahamas
is the Liquidator of FINENZ S.A.

Dillon Dean
LIQUIDATOR

NOTICE

WINBURY ENTERPRISES LTD.
In Voluntary Liquidation

Notice is hereby given that in accordance
with Section 138(4) of the International Business
Companies Act. 2000, WINBURY ENTERPRISES
LTD. is in dissolution as of May 13, 2009.

Mark Kardonski situated at Durango
Colorado is the Liquidator.

LIQUIDATOR





Full Text
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=USA TODAY.

BAHAMAS EDITION

www.tribune242.com

FRIDAY, MAY 15, 2009

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EXUNA BCONOMY |
‘expected to crasit

MP speaks out over
Four Seasons closure

m@ By TANEKA
THOMPSON
Tribune Staff
Reporter
tthompson@
tribunemedia.net

BUSINESSES in
Exuma are bracing for
an economic crash fol-
lowing the announce-
ment of the closure of
the island's largest
employer, the Four
Seasons at Emerald
Bay, according
Anthony Moss, MP for the
area.

"Without a doubt, it will cer-
tainly affect the economy of
Exuma to the point where I can
say it will be devastated,” he
said. “When you look at the
persons who have rental prop-
erties, those person are going
to lose their clients, transporta-
tion provided by taxi drivers is
going to be affected, even the
small business people, people
who have grocery stores are
going to be affected.

"If you have a population of
6,000 on the island and if you
lose 500 jobs the effects are
going to trickle down to small
businesses, beauty salons, food-
stores — people are going to
feel it.

A day after news broke that
the luxury development would

Whopper Jr.

Double
Cheeseburger

BLT & Cheese

Prete mea Cel ety

5pc Tenders

ANTHONY MOSS



"temporarily" shut its
doors on May 26 —
leaving about 500 peo-
ple jobless — Mr
Moss said people on
the island are putting
up a brave front.

"Some people are
saying they are ready
for it,” he said, liken-
ing the blow to the
closure of the Out
Island Inn in the 1980s
which drove many
from Exuma in search

or work.

Melanie Morley, co-owner of
Charlie's Restaurant and Bar
at Exuma's Fish Fry, said while
she anticipates some knock off
effects to her business from the
closure, she is going to remain
optimistic.

"Behind every dark cloud is a
silver lining so I'm just waiting
to see where the silver lining of
this is, but of course the hotel's
closing will have a trickle down
effect on everything, but I'm
optimistic,” she said, adding that
she is hoping the hotel will soon
attract a new buyer.

The establishment, which
serves local fare, routinely
attracts guests and staff from
the nearby Four Seasons resort,
said Ms Morley.

A manager of a car rental

SEE page eight

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Village Rd. Roundabout * Harold Rd. * Prince Charles * Frederick Street North * Cable Beach



e e

in his
Exuma’s second
largest employer

airlifted to Nassau

ee oe ser irs
A POLICE OFFICER search- |};
es bushes in the Marshall
Road area for suspected |
illegal immigrants yester- [o"
day.





IMMIGRATION offi-
cials were busy yesterday
capturing more than 20






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= | early morning raid when . ! i
they received a tip that alowe@tribunemedia.net QUALIFY AS REFUGEE
another group of :
migrants had landed in FOLICE and businesses [77
the area. eee lay Bes ee
Capturing an estimated ip Dewars alter Many Crain they
20 Beene Mi McCart- were hit with unexpected GB COMPANY EMPLOYEES
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were still busy yesterday after receiving an unsolicited
searching the surround- phone call from a foreign com-
ing area as they are cer- ee snes a sapiens seecanecsnsssesssesseetecsssenssnnrennesenesersonesenecees
tai more persons were . :
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sled” and “intimidate or
Pe Alera months by representatives of OUTLAWING SEA TURTLE
naeed report on this Island Yellow Pages, who told HARVESTING PUT ON HOLD

them they had entered into a

SEE page 10

raid as early as this morn-

ing.
tt

US

Pe ey eT
The Premier Line

Wulff Road Opposite Mackey Street
Tel: 393-0512, 393-8006, 393-3513
MOE OO EMC IEC Seeley

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NASSAU AND BAHAME:

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Businessman
sunned down

home

m@ By TANEKA
THOMPSON
Tribune Staff
Reporter
tthompson@
tribunemedia.net

THE quiet community of
Hooper's Bay, Exuma,
was in shock yesterday
when news spread that one
of the area’s well-known
businessmen had been shot
and was in hospital in seri-
ous condition.

Police said 36-year-old
Rodney Burrows, a promi-
nent contractor originally
from Long Island, was held
up by a masked gunman
who shot him multiple
times at his home, on the
second floor of the build-
ing which houses his com-
pany, Burrows Develop-
ment Limited. The shoot-
ing took place around 2am
yesterday.

According to a report by
Assistant Superintendent
Walter Evans, Mr Burrows
was accosted in his home
by a dark complexioned
man who ordered him to
lie on the floor.

The assailant, who stood
5' 9" and was dressed in
brown trousers and brown

SEE page eight

Bishop Fraser
retrial expected
to continue

THE retrial of Bishop Earl
Randy Fraser, who is accused of
having a sexual relationship with
a 16-year-old girl, is expected to
continue in Magistrate’s Court,
the Tribune has learned.

According to sources close to
the matter, Chief Justice Sir Bur-
ton Hall has returned the matter
to Magistrate Carolita Bethel for
the continuation of the retrial,
having not been satisfied that the
challenge launched by Fraser’s
attorney Wayne Munroe should
be heard in the Supreme Court.

Fraser’s retrial, which began
last Monday, was halted after his
attorneys filed a constitutional
application. Fraser, who is on
$10,000 bail, is accused of having
a sexual relationship with a 16-
year-old girl between July 2005
and February 2006. So far five

SEE page eight

Some Of The Finest Cement Tools In The Industry!
PAGE 2, FRIDAY, MAY 15, 2009

THE TRIBUNE



LOCAL NEWS



ru) EE REPLACES TRICYCLE, di abt

Felipé Major/Tribune staff [iy

WENTWORTH SEARS, 40, yesterday expressed his gratitude
to the good Samaritan who purchased a new tricycle and
walking apparatus for him.

An article in Wednesday’s Tribune explained that the items
had been stolen from his Market Street home on Monday
night.

Mr Sears, who makes his living selling T-shirts to tourists in
the downtown area, said: “I just want to thank the person
who donated the brand new bike and walker.

“| just want to show my gratitude and to say that there are
still some good people out there, so from the bottom of my
heart, thank you whoever you are.”

Mr Sears suffers from cerebral palsy and cannot earn a
living without both the walker and the tricycle.

Sam Williams, President of the Bahamas Loving Care Asso-
ciation, said that someone had initially gone to make a down
payment on the bicycle only to return and discover that it had
already been paid for.

“We have good people out there in the community, all is not
lost,” Mr Williams said.



PU ee a er | pithy | ee held

is Comsidering suitable apnlications for the rale of

Manager, Trust and
Corporate Services

Description of role and key responsibilities:
* Lead and manage a team of trust officers and other

staff this includes providing advice in respect of clients
and cases, coaching staff and ensuring the effective
utilisation of olber resources. Instrumental in developing
and implementing company procedures within
appropriate frameworks.

Possess a superior knowledge of Trust (complex and
simple), Company and Fiduciary structures, and tax
and legal issues affecting the administration of Trusts
and Companies.

Ensure that strong technical knowledge of all aspects
of trust and company administration is delivered: this
includes attending client meetings and
supervising! assisting in respect of the preparation of
accounting and investment information prior to
submission to clients

Experience with the preparation and presentation of
financial and estate planning proposals to high net
worth individuals

Providing assistance to increase profitability of the
company/ shareholder value by identifying
opportunities to extend the trust services, and to use
the bank offering to implement solutions for clients
where appropriate

Proven superior sales acumen. With ability to attract,
build anc strengthen relationships with key clients and
intermediaries and identify mew ideas in relation to
products and services that may be offered by the
company

Core skills and knowled

A University degree in business, accounting, or other
relatect discipline

Aminimum of ten years' relevant experience
Professionally qualified, e.g. accounting) finance
qualification, STEP ICSA, TER ACCA

self-motivation with excellent project management
Demonstrbly strong technical knowledge of all aspects
of trust and company administration, including
nuances and statutory requirements of the major
offshore jurisdictions used in connection with clients’
structures

* Strong analytical and problem-solving skills

Methodical, thorough and attentive to detail

Strong superisory skills coupled with the ability to lead
by example

Strong skills in time management and prioritisation
Excellent oral and written communication skills
Microsoft Office skills

Cultural awareness and sensitivity on both an individual
and corporate basis

Interested persons should apply by May 22, 2009 to:

Royal Bank of Canada Trust Company
(Bahamas) Limited
PO Box N-3024
Nassau, WE Bahamas
Abtention: Human Resource Manager
Via Email: paul.lewis @rbc_.com or
elizabeth.dorsch@rbec.com

Only applications from suitably qualified candidates
will be acknowtbed ped

el
ps Meee BLS
ic eee Ce



Murdered man ‘did
not qualify as refugee’

President of Haitian Bahamian
Society calls for review of policies

m@ By MEGAN REYNOLDS
Tribune Staff Reporter
mreynolds@tribunemedia.net

THE Haitian man murdered
in Santo Domingo after he was
refused political asylum in
Grand Bahama did not qualify
for refugee status under normal
protocol, the Immigration
Department said.

But president of the Haitian
Bahamian Society of the
Bahamas Jetta Baptiste is calling
for a review of current policies
as she said Anderson Pierre told
the Immigration Department his
family was in hiding and feared
for their lives in his first appli-
cation for refugee status in May
2007.

Mr Pierre, 37, was forced to
leave the country when a sec-
ond review of his application for
political asylum was refused by
the Immigration Department in
September 2008. As a result he
set off to find a new home for his
wife, Paulette, and newborn son
in the Dominican Republic in
February this year. He was then
shot dead by unknown gunmen
on April 24.

Mrs Baptiste said Mr Pierre
informed Immigration in his first
application of armed men ran-
sacking his home in Port-au-
Prince in April 2007 and that his
family were in hiding.

And she has called for gov-
ernment to urgently review the
current immigration policies as
Mr Pierre’s young family await
the results of their applications
for political asylum in Freeport.

Mrs Baptiste said: “If some-
one tells you they are afraid to
return home because they ‘will

TROPICAL
EUS)

tee ba
PHONE: 322-2157



be killed’, I don't know what
else that can be said to justify a
denial of such an urgent plea for
‘help’.

“T know exactly what hap-
pened, and I am waiting to see if
and when Immigration will
admit that they were wrong in
this and other decisions they
have made.”

The Immigration Department
maintains Mr Pierre failed to
qualify for refugee status under
the United Nations 1951 Con-
vention relating to the status of
Refugees and its 1967 Protocol.
And that records show Mr
Pierre arrived in Grand Bahama
on May 6, 2007, was awarded
visitor’s status for 14 days, and
subsequently applied for an
extension. The extension was
refused. Further investigation
revealed that Mr Pierre’s visa to
enter the Bahamas was obtained
by fraudulent means, the depart-
ment claimed.

Arrest

The father-of-four then
applied for political asylum on
May 29, 2007 and informed
Immigration he had been a
bodyguard and chauffeur for a
Haitian Commissioner under
Jean-Bertrand Aristide’s rule.
When Aristide was forced into
exile, the commissioner was
placed under arrest for more
than a year and then lived in the
Dominican Republic.

The director of Immigration
requested a further review of Mr
Pierre’s application when he saw
it in June 2007.

But the second review was
unsuccessful and Mr Pierre was
instructed to “wind-up his
affairs” and leave the country
within 21 days of September 5,
2008. He received his refugee
refusal letter on September 29,
2008.

Mrs Baptiste maintains Mr
Pierre left Freeport for Cap Hai-
tien in February to find a new

MANGOS

Anderson Pierre



home for his family, and was
killed within weeks of his arrival.

However, a statement from
the Bahamas Immigration
Department claims it has been
unable to confirm Mr Pierre’s
murder, but “wishes to convey
the Pierre family its sincere and
heartfelt condolences on the
alleged passing of their beloved
husband and father.”

Mrs Baptiste said the system
failed Mr Pierre and his family
and called for those making
decisions over applications to
consider them more carefully.

She said: “I am sure the few
good people who are in a posi-
tion to make a decision con-
cerning these types of cases,
would look into them more
closely, and truly help those who
genuinely need it.

“What status will the Immi-
gration department afford to his
wife and child in view of this sad
situation?

“What is going to happen to
all the other political asylum
request that were denied? Are
these cases going to be revisited,
reconsidered and_ given
favourable consideration?

“Life is precious, but the
Bahamas should know by now,
that not all of the persons who
come to these shores come here
for economic reasons.”

Amnesty International has
called for a thorough investiga-
tion of the matter.

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Jetta Baptiste

Minister of Health
lenies claims of
‘abandoned clinic’

m@ By ALISON LOWE
Tribune Staff Reporter
alowe@tribunemedia.net

FOLLOWING allegations that
the FNM has “wastefully”
allowed a brand new $1.3 million
medical clinic to go unused for
years, Health Minister Hubert
Minnis yesterday said PLP Sena-
tor Jerome Fitzgerald should
“check his facts.”

During Wednesday’s Senate
session, Mr Fitzgerald said that
the clinic in Grand Cay, Abaco,
was “completed and fully fur-
nished” more than two years ago.
He said the fact that it remains
unused is yet another example of
poor management of the nation’s
affairs by the government.

Yesterday, Dr Minnis denied
that two years have passed since
the building was completed,
telling The Tribune that it was
“scheduled” to open on April 24,
2009, but this was postponed as
there are still some landscaping
works and other “minor prob-
lems” to be dealt with.

Stating that the new, modern
facility should be open to the pub-
lic within two months, the minis-
ter emphasised that “no Bahami-
an’s health has been compro-
mised” as a result of the delay in
opening the clinic.

Dr Minnis said he feared that if
certain things were not finished
before the clinic opens to the pub-
lic, they “would never be done.”

Completing the work before
the opening, he said, will help
ensure that the new clinic has “an
environment and ambiance con-
ducive to public health.”

Hitting back at the Opposition,
the Health Minister alluded to
problems experienced by many
people who moved into low-cost
government-built homes under
the former PLP administration.

“This clinic will be open in very
short order and when you see
landscaping and everything done
properly you will ask, “Why can’t
we do every clinic and building
like this?’ We want to make sure
that people don’t move into
buildings, into homes, where
things aren’t complete, where
there’s landscaping still to do in
the yard, plastering — we need to
stop homes being built like that.”

Dr Myles Munroe
alldresses first Gospel
Complex for Education and
Preservation Conference

DR MYLES MUNROE,
founder and president of
Bahamas Faith Ministries Inter-
national, addressed the Ministry
of Tourism and Aviation-spon-
sored first annual Gospel Com-
plex for Education and Preserva-
tion Conference in Florida last
week.

“Embracing the Future
Through Creative Arts” served
as the theme of this year’s con-
ference, which included work-
shops and seminars that focused
on the creative arts and the role
that gospel music has played in
the history of American music.

The four-day event featured
some of gospel music’s premier
recording artists, including Smok-
ie Norful and Dorinda Clark Cole.

Dr Munroe’s speech highlight-
ed the similarities in history and
culture of Bahamians and African
Americans in relation to the
gospel music experience. He also
noted that “God lives in the
Bahamas” and that the Gospel
Complex should not be created
without including the Bahamas
since Miami and Fort Lauderdale
are “the northern Bahamas.”

The Gospel Complex is a non-
profit organisation whose mission
it is to promote, preserve, and per-
petuate the evolving history of
gospel music through
education and economic empow-
erment.
THE TRIBUNE

FRIDAY, MAY 15, 2009, PAGE 3



LOCAL NEWS



0 In brief

Court system ‘in
deplorable state’

THE Bahamas court system is
in a deplorable state, Bishop Sime-
on Hall said in a statement yester-
day.

“Our judiciary is in trouble and
should be beyond aspirations and
odium,” Bishop Hall said.

He said that a national review of
the judicial system is urgent and
imperative.

“More lawyers must come for-
ward and show their patriotism
and loyalty to the state. It is time
more Bahamian lawyers place the
glory of service beyond personal
monetary gluttony,” Bishop Hall
said.

Three men plead not
guilty to possession
of marijuana

THREE men have been grant-
ed $7,500 bail after pleading not
guilty to a marijuana possession
charge on Wednesday.

James Ivan Gaitor, 28, of
Domingo Heights; Samuel Gaitor,
18, of Baillou Hill Road South;
and Akeem Saunders, 19, of Bail-
lou Hill Road South, pleaded not
guilty to the charge of possession of
marijuana with intent to supply.

It is alleged that on Monday,
May 11, the accused were found
in possession of one pound of mar-
yuana that authorities believed
they intended to supply to another.

The men appeared before Mag-
istrate Carolita Bethel at Court 8,
Bank Lane. The case has been
adjourned to September 9.

Chamber of Commerce
to hold election at AGM

ELECTIONS for a new presi-
dent, directors and officers will be
held at the Bahamas Chamber of
Commerce’s 2009 General Meet-
ing (AGM) on Wednesday, May
27, beginning at 12.30pm, at the
British Colonial Hilton. Chairman
and CEO of the Baha Mar Resorts
Sarkis Izmirhan will be the keynote
speaker at the meeting and will
address the topic, “Are We Ready
For The Recovery.”

Mr Izmirlian will share a pri-
vate investor’s view of doing busi-
ness in the Bahamas and his per-
spectives on preparing for a suc-
cessful economic recovery.

Election of officers and direc-
tors for the Chamber’s 2009-2010
administrative year will be held
during the AGM. The meeting is
open to both members and non-
members of the Chamber.

“We expect a good turn-out of
members, not just because we’re
set to elect a new slate of officers
and directors, but it’s sort of an
official farewell for outgoing pres-
ident (Dionisio) D’Aguilar, who
has made an outstanding contri-
bution to the organisation these
past two years,” said Philip Simon,
the Chamber’s executive director.

“Certainly, the Chamber has
seen significant growth during his
tenure and the association 1s posi-
tioned to excel even further,” Mr
Simon said. Mr D’Aguilar said it is
paramount for the Chamber to
remain a strong voice for the busi-
ness community.

“As president, I wanted to
ensure the Chamber took the lead
on everyday issues affecting the
way we do business in the
Bahamas and I am confident that
we will maintain that position of
influence for our members with
the incoming president and offi-
cers,” he said. During his tenure as
President D’Aguilar was very
vocal about the Baha Mar project
and expressed pleasure that Mr
Izmirlian had decided to address
the Chamber’s AGM.

“While Mr Izmirlian will cer-
tainly share insights on what it will
take for a Bahamian business to
recover from this economic crisis,
I look forward to learning about
the status of that project and the
opportunities for Bahamian busi-
nesses to participate in the rede-
velopment of Cable Beach.”

New
Arrival®

GB company employees
face uncertain future

Reports of staff aged 60 and over being laid off

THERE are concerns for 14
employees of a Grand Bahama
company, who claim they are
being laid off because they are 60
years and older.

These concerns were outlined
in a statement issued to the press
late yesterday evening when it
was reported that they were
called to a meeting on April 24
and presented with retirement
packages.

They were told to take the
packages home to discuss with
their families.

If the offer were acceptable, it
should be signed and returned to
Human Resources by May 1.

However, it was reported that
after 13 of the employees had
signed the offer, the company
allegedly changed the terms of
the agreement and offered a new



“lower” pro-
posal.
“How can a

company offer
its employees a
package, have
them sign and
accept the
package and
return it to
them, and then
the following day say they are not
honouring that contract any
longer and give them a new con-
tract to sign. Why are they
allowed to breach their contract
like that?” the statement asked.

Yesterday, PLP MP for West
End and Bimini Obie Wilch-
combe wanted to know when
government was going to inter-
vene to secure the future of these
and other Bahamians who are

Mneneenile

being terminated throughout the
country. “The Bahamas is in deep
do-do and the Bahamian people
are sinking in it,” he said.
“Whether it is in Grand Bahama,
New Providence, or Exuma,
where is the government to pro-
tect these employees? Every com-
pany can do what they want to
do, but who is coming to the res-
cue of the Bahamian people?”
Mr Wilchcombe asked.

The employees who were
offered early retirement also
claim that the expatriate director
of the firm told them that “either
they take the packages or leave
it.”

“Like others before,” said the
statement, “he came into this
country and decided that he will
treat and talk to Bahamians any-
way he would like to.”

Motorists complain about
‘hazardous’ Bay Street trench

MOTORISTS complained yes-
terday about the trench being dug
by BTC workers through the mid-
dle of Bay Street, calling it an
eye-sore and a driving hazard.

One Nassau resident who
works in the area expressed con-
cern about safety on the island’s
busiest street — especially at night
when the wide trenches are more
difficult to see.

Another motorist complained
about the duration of the trench-
ing — which precedes a repaving
exercise as part of plans to spruce
up downtown ahead of the Miss
Universe Pageant in August —
saying it is inconveniencing fre-
quent users of the street.

Yesterday, BTC officials said
the trenching is "going according
to schedule” and should soon be
completed. "That work is drawing
toaclose," said Marlon Johnson,
BTC's vice-president for market-
ing and sales. He said the compa-
ny is laying conduits along Bay
Street to carry fibre optic cables
that will permit BTC to provide
more communications services to
the area. Mr Johnson also reject-
ed claims that the trenching had
been prolonged because of a dis-
pute between BTC and sub-con-
tractors hired to carry out the
work.

"I'm not aware of any of that
information, certainly nothing has
been brought to my attention
about any discrepancy with any of
our sub contractors,” he said.

Director of Works Gordon
Major said the ministry plans to
begin paving West Bay Street,
starting near Goodman's Bay,
tonight. Meanwhile, Ministry of
Works officials are set to meet
with representatives of the Water
and Sewage Corporation to deter-
mine what other work must be
done ahead of the repaving.

15% XS
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CARICOM ‘still facing
challenges of regional

Causey

@ By DENISE MAYCOCK
Tribune Freeport Reporter
dmaycock@tribunemedia.net

FREEPORT - Jamaican Prime
Minister Bruce Golding said
CARICOM is still facing chal-
lenges of regional integration of
economies and people.

“The world is being reconfig-
ured into regional groupings. We
are having that in terms of trade,
we are having that in terms of... if
you look at the European Union,
and for that reason CARICOM
as a major integration effort is
important,” said Mr Golding.

The Jamaican Prime Minister
was in Grand Bahama attending
the fifth Commonwealth Local
Government Conference at the
Westin Resort. Before deliver-
ing his keynote address to con-
ference delegates, he met with
the press Thursday morning.

Mr Golding noted that while
CARICOM is facing difficulties
“that are most pragmatic as well
as historical and emotional, it is
working through those difficul-
ties. “Integration has to integrate
not just economies, it has to inte-
grate people,” he said.

The CARICOM Single Mar-
ket and Economy is intended to
benefit the people of the region
by providing more and better
opportunities to produce and sell
our goods and services and to
attract investment. It will create
one large market among the par-
ticipating member states.

Mr Golding said that with a
single economic space, the objec-
tive and the obligation is that
there must be free movement of
goods, free movement of capital,
and ultimately free movement of
people.

“T (have) consistently argued
that you can’t have a common
market where goods and capital
can move free, but people can-
not move freely. People move in
the European Union freely — so
that’s the goal, but the practical
difficulty we face is that we are
small island states,” he explained.

Mr Golding stated that islands
with smaller populations would
be more severely impacted than
those with larger populations.

“Tf you take a country like
Antigua with a population of just
under 50,000, or take a country
like the Bahamas for example, if
there were free movement of peo-
ple how many Haitians would the
Bahamas have to accommodate,
so these are some real practical
difficulties. “For countries with

Cb

— Jamaica PM



relatively large populations like
Jamaica with 2.7 million, it does
not impact us severely, but for
islands with smaller populations,
it is a major challenge and these
are the things we have to work
through,” Mr Golding said.

Mr Golding said that certain
restrictions may have to be imple-
mented so that countries can con-
tinue to maintain their domestic
national interest. He believes that
the dream of Chaguarmas will be
realised someday. “With every
advance we make we are closer to
fulfilling the dream, but it is going
to take years, perhaps even gen-
erations before we get to that
point,” he said.

Relationship

Mr Golding said the Bahamas
and Jamaica share a very good
relationship and collaborate on a
wide range of issues affecting
both countries, including drug
trafficking.

He said both the Bahamas and
Jamaica are located on the Cen-
tral Caribbean route, which is
widely used for narcotics traf-
ficking. Mr Golding expressed
concern about the United States
shifting its focus from the region
to the Pacific route. “For both
(the Bahamas and Jamaica) we
are exposed and we have been
collaborating to counter the cor-
rosive impact of narcotics traf-
ficking. It is one of the issues that
we raised with President Obama
when we met with him in Port of
Spain last month.

“We are not happy about the
fact that the focus of the United
States, having shifted toward
Pacific route as it has through the
Marine Initiative, that this route
has been left exposed that nei-
ther the Bahamas, nor Jamaica
has the capabilities to maintain
the surveillance it requires.

“And we are asking the US to
be more engaged with us on this
issue that I expect we will discuss
when we meet with him again in
Washington in July. On that one
we are going to forge a working
relationship between the US and
the Caribbean,” he said.











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380-FLIX
PAGE 4, FRIDAY, MAY 15, 2009

THE TRIBUNE



EDITORIAL/LETTERS TO THE EDITOR

The Tribune Limited

NULLIUS ADDICTUS JURARE IN VERBA MAGISTRI
Being Bound to Swear to The Dogmas of No Master

LEON E. H. DUPUCH, Publisher/Editor 1903-1914

SIR ETIENNE DUPUCH, Kt, O.B.E., K.M., K.CS.G.,

(Hon.) LL.D., D.Litt.

Publisher/Editor 1919-1972
Contributing Editor 1972-199]

EILEEN DUPUCH CARRON, C.M.G., M.S. B.A., LL.B.

Publisher/Editor 1972-

Published Daily Monday to Saturday

Shirley Street, RO. Box N-3207, Nassau, Bahamas
Insurance Management Building., P.O. F-485, Freeport, Grand Bahama

TELEPHONES
Switchboard (News, Circulation and Advertising) 322-1986
Advertising Manager - (242) 502-2352
Circulation Department - (242) 502-2387
Nassau Fax: - (242) 328-2398
Freeport, Grand Bahama: 1-(242)-352-6608
Freeport fax: (242) 352-9348

WEBSITE
www.tribune242.com — updated daily at 2pm

The long shadows of the British Empire

WASHINGTON — The British are handy.
You can blame nearly anything you want on
them.

Corruption in Kenya? Blame it on the
British and the psychological damage of colo-
nialism.

The partition of Cyprus? Step forward the
social engineers in London, who underesti-
mated the depth of feeling in the Turkish
minority when the British were finally forced
out.

When it comes to the Middle East, one
can really get exercised about “Perfidious
Albion.” The Brits had their fingers in every
territorial dispute; created whole countries
where none had been; and, with the help of
the French, imposed borders from Morocco
to China where none had existed.

Trouble with Iran? Even before the CIA
started meddling there in 1953, it was Win-
ston Churchill who, as First Sea Lord in 1913,
decided the Royal Navy would move faster,
cleaner and have greater range if it switched
from coal to oil. So he partially nationalized
the Anglo-Persian Oil Company, the fore-
runner of BP, to exploit the newly discov-
ered oil fields in Iran. Later, this led to a
surge in Iranian nationalism and the CIA
plot to restore the Shah.

On to Pakistan and the British legacy in the
autonomous tribal lands, now home to the
Taliban and al-Qaeda. Put the British colonial
administration of the 18th, 19th and 20th cen-
turies in the dock. Yes, three centuries of
British commission and omission.

The British interest in Afghanistan, which
they failed to subdue in a series of wars, was
largely as a buffer between British India and
the growing territorial interests of the Russ-
ian Empire. It was here that The Great Game
was played: the romanticized espionage that
flourished in the region.

The British divided the traditional Pashtun
lands with the Durand Treaty of 1893, creat-
ing a northwestern border for British India, a
region that later became Pakistan.
Afghanistan was on the other side of the line.

It amounted to a land grab. However, the
British did recognize the separateness of the
people in the Northwest Territories and left
them to their tribal and religious ways.

With independence and the partition of
India in 1947, the incoming Pakistani gov-

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ernment had enough problems without
encouraging ethnic strife between the large-
ly Punjabi Pakistanis and their difficult Pash-
tun brothers in the territories. So the gov-
ernment in Islamabad continued the British
policy of benign indifference to the Pash-
tuns, with which they were more closely
linked by religion than ethnicity or politics.
Yet, the border dispute smouldered and peri-
odically erupted. Kabul and Islamabad do
not agree, both blaming the border drawn
by the British.

What neither the British nor the Pakistanis
wanted was a strong movement for a Pashtun
state that would carve out territory from
Afghanistan, as well as the tribal territories in
Pakistan. There was a failed attempt to bring
this about in 1949.

Segments of the Pakistani army and the
intelligentsia have feared this ever since.

The message is that simply being Muslim
does not wipe out tribal and ethnic identity
any more than borders drawn by others cre-
ate a new identity.

Ifit were so, Cyprus would not be divided,
Yugoslavia would have held together, as
would have Czechoslovakia, and Britain
would not be considering the possibility of an
independent Scotland one day — that after
300 years of union.

The current hostilities in the Pakistani trib-
al areas, U.S. drone strikes on suspected Tal-
iban strongholds and renewed determination
from the Pakistani army to crush extremists in
the region could renew a sense of nation-
hood among the Pashtuns, and a movement
toward the creation of Pashtunistan across
the British-drawn border between Pakistan
and Afghanistan.

In the long reaches of the night President
Obama’s special envoy to the region, Richard
Holbrooke, may wish one of the following
had happened in the days of the British Raj:
1. the British had stayed home; 2. the British
had insisted the Pashtuns submit to central
authority; 3. the British had created a new
country, Pashtunistan; or 4. the British had
never created that troublesome border.

One way or the other, he can blame the

(This article was written by Llewllyn King -
c.2009 Hearst Newspapers).



Enraged by
nepotism claims
Over granting of

Crown land

EDITOR, The Tribune.

The recent claims of nepo-
tism in the granting of Crown
land in the Lands and Surveys
department really gets my goat!

I am, you see, a young
Bahamian educator who is
hardworking, determined, and
dedicated to helping the youth
of our nation succeed.

This is evidenced in my
“Above Average - Outstand-
ing” yearly appraisals, my punc-
tuality, my rare absenteeism,
and my devotion to my stu-
dents.

Teaching, for me, is not sim-
ply a means of earning a wage,
but it is a job that I love whole-

heartedly.
A few years ago, as a mile-
stone birthday rapidly

approached, I decided it was
time to look into home owner-
ship. I literally visited every
bank, company, and union that
I could think of that might be of
assistance to me.

I was surprised to learn that
my salary was insufficient to
enable a single woman to own
her own home. I was told time
and time again that I needed a
co-signer and at one point was

LETTERS

letters@tribunemedia net



even told, “You don’t have no
husband? Get your boyfriend
to sign.” My name has been
added to lists at not just the
Bahamas Union of Teachers
(BUT) when they started their
housing campaign, which I
guess has been discontinued,
but also at the Department of
Housing.

Unfortunately, I have never
heard anything more from
either place and my attempts to
keep updated have been often
rudely squashed.

Now, don’t get me wrong... I
am well aware of the promised
changes that are to come with
regards to housing.

Perhaps, one would consider
me a pessimist because until I
see such changes implemented,
I don’t really believe the hype.
After all, I am still waiting for
the implementation of a nation-
al health plan. Sigh.

If there is indeed nepotism in
the Lands and Surveys depart-

ment, those guilty should be
ashamed.

This is what has held this
country back for so long.

But then again, I might have
been a homeowner by now if I
had gone looking for my aunty
brother cousin friend-in-law. It
is because of things like this that
has prohibited an honest, but
single woman of realising her
dream.

Finally, I cannot even begin
to fathom how difficult the task
of running this country must be
when I too, sometimes have dif-
ficulty managing the thirty-two
fourth graders that I teach. I
applaud our Prime Minister and
other government leaders for
their tireless efforts and keep
them all constantly in my
prayers.

Please Mr Ingraham, in your
efforts to clean up the civil ser-
vice, remember that there are a
great many of us who want to
work and who love our jobs.
God’s blessings on you and
yours.

BAHAMIAN
EDUCATOR
Nassau,

May 13, 2009.

The importance of the Haitian
Flag Day celebration in Bahamas

EDITOR, The Tribune.

In the Bahamas the Haitian
community celebrates their her-
itage by holding a Haitian Flag
Day celebration. The first initial
Haitian Flag Day celebration in
the Bahamas was on 18th, May,
1958. This event was held by a
group of young British subjects
at that time, who are now
Bahamians after the Bahamas
had gained independence on
the 10th, July, 1973. This event
was also supported alongside
with them a group of aristo-
cratic young professionals out
of Haiti who held professions
such as doctors; lawyers; teach-
ers and businessmen in the
Bahamas. Most of these pro-
fessionals left the Bahamas and
sought to launch their careers
elsewhere throughout the
world.

The Haitian flag was launch
to symbolise the freedom of
independence in Haiti from the
French colonisation. In 1803
during battle, Dessaline realises

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that he doesn’t have a flag to
wave in battle to distinguish
friend or foe while on the bat-
tlefields. After hearing this, his
goddaughter, Catherine Flon
took the French flag and tore
it down the middle removing
the white part of the flag. She
then attached the red and blue
together by sewing it with her
long hair as thread to knit it in.
After which there it had
appeared that Haitian Flag Day
was Officially coined as a symbol
of recognition; freedom and cel-
ebration on the 18th, May, 1803,
whereas the birth of a new
nation was found on the Ist,
January, 1804.

Despite the acts of this glory;
the French colonist refuses to
recognize Haiti as an indepen-
dent state. Whereas, they
released a charge against Haiti
in damages and arrears due to
the casualties of war; that Haiti
had to make payments to
France in the sum of 90 to 120
francs which is estimated in the
millions of dollars today. This
brought a terrible blow to the
Haitian treasury at that time;
needless to say it was for the
sake of being accepted and
recognised at international
meetings as an independent
country. At these meetings
Haiti represented every coun-
try that was afflicted by the
transatlantic slave trade by

appealing to the colonial powers
to allow their colonies to be set
free from oppression and sup-
pression.

Today, the celebration of
Haitian Flag and University
Day continues to take place in
the Bahamas.

The Bahamas has always
been a supporter at interna-
tional arenas and meetings in
appealing to world leaders to
assist with the state matters in
Haiti.

The celebration of Haiti’s
Flag Day in the Bahamas is to
introduce to the Bahamian soci-
ety about the high end fine
detail lifestyle of Haiti and the
possible opportunities it has to
offer to potential interested per-
sons who will like to pursue
futuristic ventures in the upris-
ing abilities of this country.

This event this year on Sat-
urday, 16th, May, will take place
at the Queen of Peace Catholic
Church located on Faith
Avenue off Carmichael Road
beginning at 12 noon.

An invitation is extended to
the Bahamian community in all
due respects as a nation which
has been dammed as a leading
Caribbean nation to attend this
event.

MARK DESMANGLES
Nassau,
May, 2009

The divine right of kings has descended on politicians

EDITOR, The Tribune.

I was surprised at Dr Sweeting’s surprise, re-letter May 12th. Was
he not aware that the divine right of kings has descended upon
politicians, and don’t worry, not only Bahamians? George Bush,
Gordon Brown, Hugo Chavez are prime examples. If they are
questioned, heads with roll, fortunately today seldom literally.
People will not vote for a “humble politician” (an oxymoron?).
Politicians can be voted out for being too bombastic, but if voted
back few have learnt their lesson, as is so apparent in the Bahamas.
I know it is very exasperating, but perhaps God has allowed them
to see the whole picture, we are but mice!

WALTER GRATTAN
Nassau,
May 13, 2009.

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THE TRIBUNE

FRIDAY, MAY 15, 2009, PAGE 5



° mbrief Outrage as legislation outlawing

Haitian art
available to
buy in auction

OVER 100 pieces of
Haitian art will be avail-
able to buy for under $100
each in an auction at the
British Colonial Hilton
this evening.

Art lovers are invited to
attend a cocktail reception
at 6.30pm and participate
in the auction of five to
seven artworks which will
be auctioned off at 7pm.

Guests of the event at
the British Colonial are
asked to make a $20 dona-
tion to cover valet parking
and two drinks.

All proceeds from the
event will go to the United
Haitian Association of the
Bahamas’ community
emergency fund.

$ea Turtle
Conservation
Group seeks
donations

THE Bahamas Sea Turtle }
Conservation Group is appeal- :
ing for donations to assist with
the cause of preserving the }

endangered sea turtle.

The BSTCG hopes to bring }
sea turtle expert Dr Alan :
Bolton to Nassau to speak ata }
town meeting and print 1,000
brochures and educational :
materials for the general public. }

Donations may also be used }
to print T-shirts to sell and raise }

further funds.

Co-chairwoman Kim Aran- }
ha said: “We want to teach peo- }
ple the importance of eco- }
tourism. You can kill a turtle :
once. You can photograph and :
swim with the same turtle 365 }

days a year.

“If you could send a dona- :
tion to us we would be enor-

mously grateful.”

Cheques should be made out }
to ‘The Bahamas Sea Turtle }
Conservation Group’ and }
mailed to PO Box CB 11099, :

Nassau.

Otherwise, donations can be }
given to Kim Aranha at The }
Bahamas Humane Society }
or arrangements for:
collections can be made by
sending an email to bahamas- i

turtles@gmail.com

Events planned by the }
BSTCG include a candlelight :
vigil in Rawson Square at 7pm }
on June 8, a town meeting at }
the College of the Bahamas on }
Thompson Boulevard at 6pm
on June 10, and a turtle art }
show at Doongalik Studios in }
Marina Village, Paradise Island, }
to coimcide with the Miss Uni- }

verse Pageant in August.

e SEE STORY THIS PAGE :

Florida residents:

told to prepare
for hurricanes

m FORT LAUDERDALE, Fla.

GOV. CHARLIE CRIST
on Thursday urged Floridians
to be prepared and have a
plan for this hurricane season,
which begins June 1 and runs
through November, according
to Associated Press.

Crist said the beginning of
hurricane season is near and
this is the time to get ready.

“The real strength of Flori-
da is our ability to work
together whether its at the
federal level, the state level or
the local level,” Crist said.

He said every Floridian
should have at least three
days worth of bottled water
and canned food. He remind-
ed residents to have batteries,
radios and flashlights.

“Every Florida family
should be prepared, should
have a plan and be on guard,”
he said during a luncheon at
the Governor’s Hurricane
Conference in Fort Laud-
erdale.

“T think that the obvious
thing is: Just be ready,” he
said.

Crist also congratulated
Craig Fugate on his promo-
tion to head of the Federal
Emergency Management
Agency.

m@ By MEGAN REYNOLDS
Tribune Staff Reporter
mreynolds@tribunemedia.net

CONSERVATIONISTS are outraged
legislation to outlaw sea turtle harvesting
due to be passed last month has been put on
hold for further public consultation.

The Bahamas Sea Turtle Conservation
Group (BSTCG) has been campaigning for
updated legislation to protect endangered
sea turtles for around 15 years, and mem-
bers fear the latest delay will allow another
season of turtle hunting to commence on
August 1.

Minister of Agriculture and Marine
Resources said he hopes the consultation
will be complete in June in order for legis-
lation to be viewed by the Cabinet and
Attorney General’s office in time to be
passed before August 1.

The BSTCG maintains the majority of
people want more protection for sea tur-
tles and the group gathered 5,000 signa-
tures in support of the new legislation.

New laws have also gained support from
the Bahamas National Trust, the Nature
Conservancy, BREEF, the Bahamas
Humane Society, Advocates for Animal
Rights and others.

The Department of Marine Resources
has received hundreds of letters in support
of the ban, but director Michael Braynen
said his department has now been instruct-
ed to reach out to those who have not yet
spoken up.

Meetings have been held in various loca-

sea turtle harvesting put on hold




tions to discuss the bill, and Mr Cartwright
said they will continue to meet with fishing
communities in the Family Islands.

But the department is also exploring new
ways of reaching out to people as a recent
meeting in Exuma proved how those direct-
ly involved in the turtle trade are often
reluctant to attend.

Mr Braynen said: “People who are in
support will come to the meetings and peo-
ple who have contrary views may feel intim-
idated. This is why we are looking at other
ways of getting people to respond to us.”

An online response forum will soon be
available on the government’s website for
people throughout the Bahamas to freely
express their views.

Mr Braynen said: “We know there are
people who are very interested and have
very strong views, but if you have expressed
your views already we have recorded it.

“We want to hear from people we haven’t
heard from already . . . those people who
grumble but don’t express their views — they
need to be heard.”

The BSTCG maintains the Bahamas is
committed to the ban as itis a signatory to
CITES (Convention in International Trade
in Endangered Species), and the Depart-
ment of Marine Resources has advised gov-
ernment to increase protection for the
threatened marine species.

Government announced in October the
legislation would be passed on April 1, and

PASSERS-BY were horrified to see a turtle
condemned to a slow and painful death at
Montagu Ramp (left) earlier this year and paid
hundreds of dollars in an attempt to save it, but
it was too late. Pictured above are the remains
of a sea turtle on a table near the ramp.



BSTCG members are now disappointed the
promise has been broken.

Co-chairwoman Jane Mather said: “I
think it’s disgraceful because the minister of
agriculture promised us that by April 1 that
would be the end of killing of turtles, and it’s
going on and on.

“T hope it will be enacted as soon as pos-
sible so we don’t have to go through anoth-
er season of people killing as many as they
want.

“We are one of the few countries left
without these laws, and I can’t believe that
we, as a ‘civilised’ country, allow this.”

Members of the public can share their
thoughts on the proposed legislation by vis-
iting: www.bahamas.gov.bs.

Draft outline of regional policy to be presented to CARICOM leaders

mw By DENISE MAYCOCK
Tribune Freeport Reporter
dmaycock@tribunemedia.net

FREEPORT - Edwin Carring-
ton, CARICOM Secretary-Gen-
eral, announced that a draft out-
line of regional policy and a co-
operation framework for enhancing
local democracy has been ratified
and is expected to be transmitted to
CARICOM Heads of Government
this year for adoption.

“Once adopted, the outline of
the Regional Policy and Coopera-
tion Framework is expected to be
used as a negotiating position with
international aid agencies to sup-
port the work of local governance
in the region,” he told delegates at
the fifth Commonwealth Local
Government Conference in
Freeport.

The Heads of Government
Meeting for the 53-member Com-
monwealth will be held in Port of
Spain, Trinidad, in November.

Mr Carrington said that the draft
outline document will be presented
to the respective member states
before transmission to Common-
wealth Heads of Government for
adoption.

“T am pleased to indicate that
the draft outline of the regional
policy and cooperation framework,
produced with the help of the
Commonwealth expert was rati-
fied at the second meeting of the
CFLGM held in December 2008
after much regional consultation,”
he said.

He stated that in 2006, the Min-
istry of Local Government,
Trinidad and Tobago with support
from the CLGF, along with other
organisations, held a Conference
under the theme “Deepening Local
Governance and Participation in

CARICOM States.” At
that conference the Port
of Spain Accord was
issued, he said.

The Accord, he said,
spoke clearly with
regard to the need to
build on previous poli-
cy recommendations,
notably the 2004 Mon-
tego Bay Action Pro-
gramme and the 2005
Aberdeen Agenda:
Commonwealth Princi-
ples on Good Practice
for Local Democracy
and Good Governance. He said
these included:

¢ Promoting local democracy
and good governance;

¢ Effective service delivery for
all; and

¢ Regional policy and coopera-
tion framework for enhancing local
democracy.

Mr Carrington noted that there
has been recent progress in the
development of local government
systems in the Caribbean Commu-
nity as a result of external assis-
tance and the collaboration it has
received.

In 2002, in collaboration with
the United States Agency for Inter-
national Development (USAID), a
Conference on Local Government
and Decentralisation was held in
Guyana.

And, in 2004, with the assistance
of the Commonwealth, a sympo-
sium was held in Jamaica under
the theme “Local Democracy and
Good Governance in the
Caribbean.”

Mr Carrington explained that it
was at that symposium that the
Caribbean Ministers with respon-
sibility for Local Government
decided to establish a Caribbean

FUNERAL SERVICE FOR

retired science teacher, formerly of Grenada who died at
Doctor’s Hospital on 12th May 2009, will be held at Holy
Cross Anglican Church Highbury Park, New Providence,
The Bahamas, on Saturday 16th May 2009 at 5 p.m.

Mr. Wells has taught natural sciences in The Bahamas
since 1968 at; St. Augustine’s College, C.C. Sweeting Se-
nior High School, and H.O. Nash Junior High.

Mr. Wells leaves to mourn his sister, Mrs. Elsa Wells
Schioler (Denmark) and brother Mr. Alleyne Leslie Wells
(Trinidad and Tobago), and many other family members

and friends.



Edwin Carrington



Forum of Ministers
(CFM) to facilitate a
more coordinated
regional organisation.

He said the Forum
was assisted by an expert
provided by the Com-
monwealth to review
local democracy and
decentralisation in the
region as well as to
develop a regional policy
and cooperation frame-
| work.

The outcomes of the
fifth CLGF in Freeport
also will be transmitted to Com-
monwealth Heads of Government
meeting in Trinidad for policy
endorsements, ongoing policy mak-
ing, and political processes at the
highest level, according to CLGF
Secretary General Carl Wright.

Mr Carrington expressed appre-

ciation to the Commonwealth
Local Government Forum,
(CLGF) particularly its Secretary-
General Mr. Carl Wright, and to
the Bahamas government.

“T am particularly pleased to
have been invited to participate in
this important conference. I see
this Conference as the ideal coun-
terpoit, orienting and emphasising
as it does the essential role of local
government in our societies,” he
said.

Speaking on the topic, “Region-
al Integration and the Role for
Local Government”, Mr Carring-
ton said the integration arrange-
ment in the Caribbean Communi-
ty (CARICOM) is based on four
pillars — economic integration, for-
eign policy co-ordination, func-
tional co-operation and security
co-operation.

“Soon to be 36 years old and

comprising 15 Member States and
five Associate Members, CARI-
COM is the longest surviving inte-
gration movement among devel-
oping countries.

“Like all others, it is presently
struggling in the face of the cur-
rent global financial and economic
crisis as it strives to advance from a
Community and Common Market
to a Community including a Sin-
gle Market and Economy, better
known by its acronym CSME.

“For our Caribbean countries,
most of them small by any stan-
dards, regional integration is the
glue that binds them together and
in that process Local Government
has special significance. Historical-
ly it is in that mode of governance
that many of our legislators first
wet their feet in the art of repre-
sentative governance,” he
explained.

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PAGE 6, FRIDAY, MAY 15, 2009

THE TRIBUNE



TRIAL: ARMED HOLD-UP OF SCOTIABANK BRANCH

Jurors watch video of alleged
robbers being detained by police

Prosecutors call on local cameraman to give testimony

Tourism Minister touts
benefits of improved
communications sector

m@ BY BETTY VEDRINE

THE PROPOSED legislation to upgrade the commu-
nications sector will give the Bahamas the competitive
edge it needs, Minister of Tourism, Senator Vincent Van-
derpool-Wallace said.

“Efficient communications systems are fundamental to
a modern society and to modern commerce,” he said.

And getting the fundamentals right is “vital” to the
continued success of the tourism product, he said.

“Just yesterday, we completed our test in the Ministry
of Tourism to see what would happen if we restored the
proximity advantage of the
Bahamas from New York,”

Mr Vanderpool-Wallace said.

Making a comparison in
ticket sales out of New York
during May 2008 when there
was no recession to the same
period this year during a full
recession, the minister said
that just by focusing on fun- ff
damentals, the tourism prod-
uct was boosted by 150 per
cent.

One thousand tickets were |
sold to the Bahamas out of [Ft
New York in May last year . z
and 2,604 were sold in May So ae
this year.

“We can communicate everything in the world to our
prospective customers, but especially in this environment,
if we don’t get the fundamentals right, we do not restore
our competitive edge,” he said.

Although Bahamians may wonder about the need to lib-
eralise electronic communications, Mr Vanderpool-Wal-
lace said the obvious answer is that monopolies do not
always provide the best service.

“Monopolies or near monopolies tend to care little
about costs because if you want the service you take what
I have and you pay what I require,” he said. “That’s how
they make a profit.”

The Family Islands, in particular, would finally be able
to reach their full economic potential as a result of
improved communications, he said.

“It has been said that the development of the Family
Islands will come only when we solve the transportation,
distribution and communication issues,” he said.

“Whenever anyone on our Family Islands can get in and
out inexpensively and frequently, and when they can send
or receive any kind of electronic communication with
high reliability and low cost, we will see the kind of growth
that we have been expecting of those islands for more than
a decade.”

The proposed amendments “promise to deliver on the
communication piece of this triangle.”



EARNBONJS

INTEREST WITH THE
SCOTIABANK SAVINGS

@ By NATARIO McKENZIE
Tribune Staff Reporter



THE trial of three men charged in the
armed hold-up of a Scotiabank branch
continued in the Supreme Court yester-
day as jurors watched footage showing
the accused being detained by police.

Prosecutors yesterday called a local
cameraman to testify at the trial of James
Miller, 25, Janquo Mackey, 22, and
Anthony Williams, 34.

The men are accused of robbing the
Soldier Road and East Street South
branch of Scotiabank on July 2, 2008.

They are also accused of the attempted
murder of Police Corporal Natasha Black.

The cameraman — who told the press
he is concerned for his safety and asked
for his name to be withheld — testified
that on Wednesday, July 2, he received an
anonymous call.

As a result he went to the Voice of
Deliverance Church. There, he said, he
saw three men being detained by police.
The witness said that he took out his cam-
era and began filming.

The video that was played to the

Megha si

jurors showed Miller lying on a stretcher
being tended to by medical personnel
with a bandage around his right leg.
Williams was also seen in the footage
wearing a black shirt, standing hand-
cuffed.

The witness told the court that a third
man was lying on the ground.

The cameraman said that the man lying
on the ground was later taken away by
ambulance.

Cartridges

He testified that there were several
spent shotgun cartridges in the area as
well as a Windom car.

Craig Taylor, a fisherman, testified
yesterday that he left home on the morn-
ing of July 2, 2008, only to return later
that afternoon to discover that his white
Windom was missing.

Taylor told the court that he always
left his car unlocked and left the keys
under a car mat.

During cross-examination by attorney
Murrio Ducille, who is representing

Se

b+! Wi
| ” 1.

accused Janquo Mackey, Taylor admitted
that he had been a suspect in the case
and had been held on remand for two
and a half months on a conspiracy charge.

Taylor also told the court that Mackey
was his cousin.

He denied the suggestion by Mr Ducille
that he had given Mackey the keys to his
car on the morning of July 2, 2008, so
that he could pick up a friend.

Taylor also denied the suggestion that
he told police that someone had stolen his
car “to save his hide.”

Miller, who is representing himself,
suggested to Taylor that on the morning
of July 2, he had asked him to give hima
ride, but that Taylor had told him that
he was busy. Taylor denied this. He also
denied the suggestion that he had thrown
Mackey the keys and told him to give
Miller a ride.

The trial continues before Justice Jon
Isaacs today. Mackey is represented by
attorney Murrio Ducille, Williams is repre-
sented by Dorsey McPhee and Miller is rep-
resenting himself. Vernal Collie, Ambrose
Brown and Lennox Coleby are prosecuting
the case.

THIS CAR has
been left for
over a month
on Coral
Harbour Road.
Since being
abandoned it
has been
stripped of
wheels and
some
windows.

Felipé Major/
Tribune staff



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Nassau Bahamas

Michelle Sweeting

Brendilee Rolle
P.O. Box 7290
Pine Barron Road
Nassau, Bahamas

Tamika Williams
P.O. Box F 42299
Freeport, Bahamas

Nassau Bahamas

Christon Mackey
Nassau, Bahamas

Terasean Sweeting
P.O. Box CR 56708
Sunset Park

Nassau, Bahamas

Tiffany Rolle
P.O. Box GT 2395
Nassau, Bahamas

Kemuel Delancey
P.O. Box CR 56708

Sunset Park

Tanya Rolle
P.O. Box GT 2395
Nassau, Bahamas

Nassau, Bahamas

Terry Sweeting

P.O. Box CR 56708

Bridgette Hog
P.O. Box GT 2395
Nassau, Bahamas

Sunset Park
Nassau, Bahamas

James Wallace

Theresa Deleveaux
P.O. Box N 732
Nassau, Bahamas

Nassau, Bahamas

Stafford Bullard

P.O. Box N 3730

Albert Smith
P.O. Box SS-6104
Nassau, Bahamas

Nassau, Bahamas

Larado D. Evans

P.O. Box N 3730

Granville Neville Williams
485 Inagua Avenue,
Freeport, Grand Bahama

Nassau, Bahamas

Francis Roberts

P.O. Box $$5175

Ms. Alquennia Rolle-Cunningham
General Delivery
Moore's Island, Abaco

Nassau, Bahamas

Mr. Godfrey Roberts

Freeport, Grand Bahama

Charlissa C.D. Poitier
P.O. Box N-978
Nassau Bahamas


PAGE 8, FRIDAY, MAY 15, 2009

THE TRIBUNE



LOCAL NEWS

Castro defends
Cuba’s response
to flu outbreak

m@ HAVANA

FIDEL CASTRO defended Havana’s response to the swine
flu outbreak, including suspension of direct flights with Mexico,
saying Thursday that Cuba is especially vulnerable to an epi-
demic because the U.S. embargo prevents it from buying med-
icine and diagnostic equipment, according to Associated Press.

Hours later Cuba confirmed two new cases of swine flu ina
group of Mexican students, bringing the island’s total cases to
three. A Public Health Ministry statement said 11 of 15 students
in the group were found to be healthy and released from a
hospital in central Cuba.

Cuba has not said whether it has access to Tamiflu.

But the World Health Organization says it sent 2.4 million
treatments of the anti-flu treatment to 72 developing countries
last week.

Essay

“What does one of these epidemics mean to Cuba?” Castro
said in an essay read on state television. “Our country has no
access to buy whatever medicine, raw materials or equipment or
components for diagnostic equipment produced by U.S. transna-
tional companies.”

Mexican authorities were offended when Castro accused
Mexico of waiting to disclose the epidemic until after President
Barack Obama visited in mid-April — even though Canadian
and U.S. scientists did not identify the virus in Mexican patients
until a week later.

Mexican President Felipe Calderon has said he may cancel a
planned a trip to Cuba this year because the island grounded
flights to and from Mexico.

“Why accuse us of being enemies of the Mexican people
when we adopt measures that have been put together before-
hand to protect our people?” Castro asked.

More than 6,600 cases of swine flu have been reported in 33
countries worldwide, with 69 deaths.

‘SS Bethel Brothers Morticians

: Telephone: 322-4433, 326-7030
Nassau Street, P.O.Box N-1026

FUNERAL SERVICE FOR

Charles Leon
Johnson, 55

| of #4 High Vista Drive will be
held on Wednesday May 20th,
11:00 a.m. at Sf. Anselm's
Catholic Church, Bernard
Road, Fox Hill. Rev.
Monsignor Preston Moss, Fr.
Noel Clarke, Fr. Reginald
Demeritte and Deacon
Raymond Forbes will officiate.
Interment will follow in the
Church's Cemetery.
He will forever remain in the
hearts of: his loving and
devoted Wife, Eulease Stuart-Johnson; Children: Primrose, Charles
II, Crystal, Sanchez and Kristjan Johnson; Siblings: Helen Johnson,
Janet and Derek Davis, Anthony and Keva McKinney, Andrew
McKinney, Alicia and Harold Brown, Vernita Wright, Winifred
and Michael Thompson, Chester and Gail Johnson, Sherman and
Solomon Johnson; Madison and Aldece Turnquest, Cindy Major
and Racine Melfort Parents-in-law: Cleveland and Matilda Stuart;
Adopted Mother: Marjorie McKinney, In laws: Ricardo and Carla
Stuart, W. Renae McKay; Christine and Bishop Chadwick James
II, Lindburgh and Laura Stuart, Erica and Terrell Stuart, Effie
Burrows, Deborah McKinney and Janet Turnquest, Mr. and Mrs.
Oral Newbold; Uncles: Sam and Madeline Basden and family,
Fr Rodney Burrows and family, Patrick Smith; Aunts: Gwendolyn
Brice, Eulease, Gwenith, Sylvia and Beverley Smith and Alice
Stubbs; Nieces and Nephews: Jamal Davis and family, Alexis
and Krishelle McKinney, Val and Bill Wallace, Samantha and
Lenny Bannister, Amanda Johnson, Deandria Beckford, Roscoe,
Derrick Johnson, Melvin Hall, Dwayne and Denario Brown ,
Melissa Armaly, Greg and Stella Thompson, Angela Thompson,
Shelly Maccow, Tanya Bell, Nicoyas Hilbert, Brynae McKay,
Chadwick II, Chadwin and Chad- Vaughn James, Ricardo Jr. and
Rickelle Stuart, Lindburgh Jr, and Linae Stuart, Brittany, Kendal,
Sherman Jr., Matthew, Elizabeth, Daniel, Jordan, Chester Jr,
Solomon Jr, Crystal, Michael, and Alberto Johnson, Extended
family: Eugene Palacious and family, Don and Kay Aranha and
family, Hubert and Roxanne Chipman and family, Lambert and
Margaret Campbell and Family, Godwin and Michelle Cargill
and family, Algernon and Lamar Cargill and family, Roscoe and
Fabianna Davis and family, Phillip and Sharlamae Stubbs and
family, Elijah and Sherry Brice and family, Melford Clarke and
family, Larry and Candy Farrington and family, Jeffrey and
Corrine Major and family, Eurick and Lisa Dean and family,
John Williams and family, Leo Ferguson and family, Mr and Mrs.
Mosely, Whitfield and Cinderella Johnson and family, Afton and
Shasta Moxey and family, Cyril and Mary Taylor and family,
Viola and Herbert Lightbourne and family, Duke and Cynthia
Stubbs, Curlene McQueen and family, Ashley Cargill and family,
Retired Supt. George Mortimer and family, Edwin and Timolyn_
Thompson and family, Clinton Pearce and family, William BillyE
Brown and family, Archdeacon James Palacious and family,
James Mackey and family, Wayne Edgecombe and family, Marina
and Johnny Young, Millie Young, Elsworth Turnquest and family,
Monzell Turnquest and family, Millie and Al Cartley, Quinton,
Sharina Basden, the Young family, the Curtis family, the Laramores,
the Taylor family, the Smith family, the Brice Family; his Kwanis
family, his Fox Hill Community family including the PLP branch
of the Fox Hill Constituency, the Fox Hill Festival Committee;
his adopted children: Edward Symonette, George Hayles, Ronald
Dean, Jacqueline Maxwell, Terran Munroe, Jovie Major, Michael
Carroll, Kathleen Smith, Ferdinand Agenor, Sharon Brown, Shane
Vidal, Helen Storr, the staff of Johnsonis Autobody Repair and
Johnsonis Paint Supply, the staff of Shell Harold and Wulff Road
service stations; Special friends: Hon. Fred Mitchell, Senator
Jacintha Higgs, Mr. Bismarck Coakley, Patrick Ward, Anton
Saunders, Anton Sealey, Keith Rolle, Marvin Bain, Philip Taylor
and Elsworth Rolle, Members of the Fund Raising Committee
of St. Anselmis Parish, the entire St. Anselmis Church family,
members of the Progressive Liberal Party, members of Bahamas
Petroleum Retailers Association and numerous other family and
friends too numerous to mention.

Friends may pay their last respects at the P-L.P Headquarters, Sir
Lynden Pindling Centre, Farrington Road on Tuesday from
10:00a.m. to 5:00p.m. and on Wednesday at the church from
10:00am until service time.



FROM page one

; shirt, robbed the victim of watch and
? wallet which contained personal items.

"Before leaving and escaping through

a hole in a fence, the gunman fired shots
? from a weapon hitting the victim about
i the body," said ASP Evans.

Reports reaching The Tribune indi-

? cate that at some point during the ordeal
? the gunman demanded the keys to the
? victim's vehicle. It is understood that at
? that point Mr Burrows put up a fight
? and was shot in the arm.

These reports were not confirmed by

police.

Mr Burrows was taken to a local clin-

? ic and after examination was flown by
? air ambulance yesterday to a Nassau hos-
? pital, where he remained up to press
? time.

In the last few months Burrows Devel-

: opment Limited, the island's second

largest employer after the soon-to-be
closed Four Seasons resort, laid off about
20 of its more than 106 staff.

Yesterday Assistant Commissioner of
Police Hulan Hanna, who heads the
Family Island district, said police had
"no reason" to connect the shooting to
any recent lay offs.

ACP Hanna said that police had not
established a motive for the shooting,
nor was a suspect in custody up to press
time.

"At this point (we have) nothing," he
told The Tribune.

One of Mr Burrows’ employees, who
spoke to The Tribune from Exuma yes-
terday, said the contractor was the victim
of a housebreaking about two weeks ago
when thieves stole televisions and jew-
ellery from the home.

When asked if he thought the shooting
could be retaliation by a former dis-
gruntled worker, the employee said any-
thing was possible.

Businessman gunned
~ down in his home

"At this moment, yes we are afraid
because I don't know if its random — it
looked like it was staged directly to him,
but I don't know if it was isolated, maybe
someone was just watching him."

The employee, who spoke on condi-
tion of anonymity, said the community
was dumbfounded over the shooting.

"The whole community knows him,
he's a down-to-earth person, he gets
along with everybody," said the employ-
ee. “(We never expected this) not in a
million years, not in Exuma, that's what
took us by shock."

This news, compounded with Wednes-
day's news of the impending closure of
the Four Seasons at Emerald Bay, Exu-
ma's largest employer, was "back-to-
back bad news", he said.

Mr Burrows described as a "down-to-
earth” person is married with children,
who live in his hometown of Long Island.

Exuma police have mounted an inten-
sive investigation into this incident.

Bishop Fraser

retrial expected

to continue

FROM page one

i witnesses, including the virtual
: complainant, have testified.

: The young woman, who is
? now 20-years-old testified that
: she and Fraser had sex on an
? average of 12 times a month at
? his home and office at Pilgrim
: Baptist Temple. Mr Munroe
: had made an application to have
i the case referred to the
? Supreme Court.

i The application arose follow-
? ing testimony by Woman Police
? Corporal Sheria King, a forensic
: expert.

: Mr Munroe had contended
? that during the course of her
testimony at the retrial she had
? varied her opinion given in the
: first trial in 2006.

? Mr Munroe had argued that
: he had not been informed in
: advance of her present opinion.
i Magistrate Bethel adjourned
? the case to May 21 for a status
: hearing on the application.

i Fraser was initially charged
? in 2006, but discharged in 2007
: after then Magistrate Marilyn
i Meeres ruled that there was no
: physical evidence to link him to
: the alleged offence.

: The Court of Appeal, how-
? ever, overturned that decision
i and ordered a retrial.

Bishop Earl Randy Fraser

IN LOVING MEMORY



PATRICIAL L. WALKINE-SMITH
SUNRISE: JANUARY 16th 1946
SUNSET: MAY 15th 2008

MOM IT'S BEEN ONE YEAR SINCE FOU'VE BEEN GONE
A FEAR OF PAIN, SADNESS, MISSING FOL,
LOVING YOU, AUT MOST OF ALL HOPE
HOPE THAT ONE DAY WE WILE SEE FOU AGAIN

MOM IF TEARS COULD BUILD A HIGHWAY A
AD MEMORIES BUILD A LANE
WE WOULD WALK RIGA OP To WEAVEN
AND BRING FOU SACK WOME AGAIN

MOM FOU WILE NEVER BE FORGOTTEN
WE PLEDCED TO YOu THAT DAF
AAHOLCOWED PLACE WITHIN OUR HEARTS
if WHERE FOU! WILL ACWATS STAF

Sadly missed by: Children: Debbic, Bobby, Kim,
Shevaughn, Miko & Eddie; Grandchildren, Great
grandchildren & a host of relatives & friends



company on the island, who
spoke on condition of
anonymity, said business from
the Four Seasons accounts for
"about 50 per cent" of their
revenue.

With little time to feel sorry
about the turn of events man-
agement has decided to
aggressively slash rates in the
hope of attracting more
clients.

"What we are trying to do
now is lowering our rates and
trying to attract more cus-
tomers that way," said the
manager who said if things get
worse, the company would
consider reduced work weeks
for its seven-member staff.

On Wednesday, staff at the
Four Seasons were convened
for a general meeting when
they were told that as of May
26 the hotel would be closed.

But the receivers for the

CEU aC

FROM page one

haemorrhaging property,
which went into receivership
in mid-2007, said the resort
lost about $5 million annually
for the last two years. While
closing the property "tem-
porarily” was a "difficult"
decision, they said they were
hopeful they could secure a
new buyer soon.

Although employees can
stay on site until June 15,
some have already packed
their bags and headed to the
capital and other islands in
search of work, according to
reports.

Mr Moss said about 30 Four
Seasons workers attended a
local job fair at a school on
Exuma yesterday, however he
advised out of work Exumi-
ans to branch out into entre-
preneurial areas.

He also said he plans to set
up a meeting between the dis-
placed workers and members
of the Opposition before the
resort's last day of operation.



KEMPS FUNERAL HOME LIMITED

22 Palmdale Avenue, Palmdale
Nassau, N.P., The Bahamas

A Funeral Service For

Colyn Thomas Albert Rees, 55

of Bahama Palm
Shores, Abaco, The
Bahamas, passed away
at Doctor’s Hospital,
Nassau on Monday
11th May, 2009 after a
sudden illness.

He was the son of the
late Colyn L. Rees and
Helen E.I Rees. He is
survived by his loving

wife, Melanie Rees; two sons, David Jonathan
Rees and Christopher Colyn Rees; two
brothers, Robert Alday Rees and William James
Alexander Rees and their wives Kimberly Yvette
Rees and Donna Elizabeth Rees; mother-in-
law, Jean Walker of Toronto, Canada, in-laws,
John and Gwen Johnson, Penny Sharman and
Francine Winkley of Toronto Canada and
Lorraine and Guillermo Huamali and Archie
and Michele Varga of Vancouver, Canada;
nieces and nephews, Adam and Emily Rees,
James Rees II and Michelle Rees, Stephanie
and Kayla Johnson, Kyle and Caitlin Sharman,
Max Winkley, Nicholas and Chantel Varga, and
Conner, Jarred and Tatianna Huamali; very
special friends Albert and Jackie Albury and
Patricia May Albury. The family would like to
thank his many friends too numerous to mention
who gave so much support during his short

illness.

A memorial service will be held in Abaco at a

later date.

Instead of flowers the family request that
donations may be made in Colyn’s memory to
Bahamas Air Sea Rescue (BASRA), P.O. Box
S.S. 6248, Nassau or to the Bahamas Humane
Society, P.O. Box N. 242, Nassau.

Arrangements by Kemp's Funeral Home
Limited.


PAGE 10, FRIDAY, MAY 15, 2009 THE TRIBUNE

LOCAL NEWS

LEFT: SARAH JERNELL cele-
brates her 80th birthday by
joining the rake n’ scrape band
with Chippie and the Boys, Min-
istry of Tourism and Aviation
executives and her daughters.

RIGHT: SARAH JERNELL with
legendary entertainer Count
Bernardino.

Longtime visitor celebrates
milestone in the Bahamas

SARAH Jernell of Poquoson, Virginia, continued a four-
decade friendship with the Bahamas by spending her 80th birth-
day in Nassau.

Ms Jernell, who first visited the Bahamas in 1968, developed
a lasting friendship with Cacique Award winner and public
service driver Romeo Farrington.

Ministry of Tourism officials and veteran entertainer John
“Chippie” Chipman gave Ms Jernell a grand welcome at Festi-
val Place when she arrived on a cruise with her daughters — Eva
Brewster and Mae Whitehurst.

The family was met with music and dancing at New Bight
Square, Festival Place, and the Ministry of Tourism’s permanent
secretary Hyacinth Pratt and deputy permanent secretary Shel-
don Beneby thanked Ms Jernell for her commitment to the
Bahamas.

They also presented her with an authentic Bahamian handbag
before she spent the day in the care of Mr Farrington.

Businesses claim phone
call from foreign company

led to ‘intimidation’

FROM page one

“verbal contract” over the phone
for advertising services which
would cost them around $1,000.

Shavarra Glinton, an assistant
at the See Saw Christian Acade-
my, said: “It was non-stop tor-
ture. It got to the point that I felt
like pulling out my hair!”

Owner of the U S Virgin
Islands-based company, David
Phillips, emphatically denied
wrongdoing yesterday, telling The
Tribune “the only scam here is
that people want to get advertis-
ing and then they don’t want to
pay.”

But Dr Dean Tserotopoulos of
the Bahamas Heart Institute at
Lyford Cay Hospital said he was
never interested in the advertising
offered and that was the start of
the problem.

“Last week Thursday they
called us. Friday they threatened
us. Monday I e-mailed them say-
ing ‘This is a scam’, and then
Tuesday I got the e-mail from the
collection agency demanding pay-
ment.” The agency demanded
$1,144.80.

“They try to scare you, they
say they’re going to sue you. I
understand it is happening all
over the Caribbean,” he said.

Each company interviewed by
The Tribune described receiving a
phone call from Island Yellow
Pages within the last year which
invariably involved a representa-
tive requesting basic details about
their operation.

Before they realised what they
were getting into, they claim, the
USVI-based company was
demanding payment for their
“advertising services.”

When met with objections,
Island Yellow Pages told the com-
panies that they had entered into
a verbal contract, that there was a
recording of their conversation,
and that if they failed to pay, they
would be met with a legal action,
companies said.

“When they said ‘Island Yel-
low Pages’, the first thing that
came to my mind was that it was
the local Yellow Pages,” said Mel-
la Rolle, manager of Traveller’s
Rest Restaurant on West Bay
Street.

“They asked me for all my con-
tact details, what was my posi-
tion, my location, what we serve.
I gave them the information.

“Then when they said they
were sending a bill for some ad or
something there was a big con-
frontation between me and them
on the phone. I hung up, but they
kept calling religiously after that.
They said we have lawyers who
we can have make you pay.

“These American people think
they can take advantage of us
island people!” she exclaimed.

See Saw Christian academy
was first contacted in June 2008.

“They asked about the school,
school fees, contact information
and so on. And then I told them if
they wanted anything else they’d
have to speak with my boss. Then
the next day they sent us an e-
mail telling us we owe them $900.
I was like, ‘What do we owe them
$900 for?’”

She said the company stopped
calling in October 2008.

“Tt made me so scared because
it got to the point where they
found out my cellphone and they
called it and threatened me. I
don’t know how they got the
number. They were telling me
that ’'d have to pay $500 to them
if my boss wasn’t going to,”
claimed Ms Glinton.

Meanwhile, Joseph Lewis,
owner of Lewis Orthopaedics,
willingly entered into a $900 plus
annual contract with the compa-
ny, but felt that they misrepre-
sented their product.

“They said they wanted to
build a website for me, advertis-
ing the office, the whole nine
yards. I gave them a lot of infor-
mation. What I didn’t like was
that there was a web space but it
wasn’t constructed the way we’d
talk about. The whole year went
by and I got no hits.”

But Mr Phillips, whose website
is www.cbt.cc, told The Tribune
that the company has many satis-
fied customers all over the
Caribbean, and “would not have
been in business for nine years if
it was scamming people.”

“We are providing a great ser-
vice to these businesses. We are
the largest online directory, and
the only way we can do it is over
the telephone. We use recorded
verification.”

He claimed company repre-
sentatives make it clear from an
early stage who the company is,
what the cost will be, and that a
verbal contract is involved.

“There are several points at
which they can say ‘Look, we’re
not interested,” said Mr Phillips.

Assistant Commissioner of
Police Hulan Hanna urged com-
panies to be careful what infor-
mation they transmit over the
phone to “complete strangers.”

Meanwhile, the senior officer
told anyone affected to contact
police as they would be interested
in probing the matter further.

“Clearly what is being
described sounds like some kind
of scam. If businesses want to
share the information, they
should come and bring it to us,”
he said.


THE TRIBUNE





iar
FRIDAY, MAY 15,



PAGE 11



2009







Eric Rose/BIS Photo

THE FEDERATION of International Football Association (FIFA) congress 2009, will be held June 2-3 at the Atlantis Resort, Paradise Island. Pictured above, Minister of Youth, Sports
and Culture the Hon. Desmond Bannister and Government and private sector stakeholders meet in preparation for the event.

BFA getting set for FIFA Congress

lm By RENALDO DORSETT
Sports Reporter
rdorsett@tribunemedia.net

WITH just under two weeks
remaining before the interna-
tional governing body for soc-
cer hosts its bi-annual meet-
ing in the Bahamas, the gov-
ernment and the Bahamas
Football Association continue
to diligently prepare for the
event.

Minister of Youth, Sports
and Culture, Desmond Ban-
nister recently met with stake-
holders from the public and
private sector to discuss final
planning for the event.

“This year the Bahamas has
a historic opportunity — we are

Ministry donates $48,000
to aid in the preparation

hosting the FIFA Congress. It
is the most prestigious organi-
sation in the world and the
Ministry of Youth Sports and
Culture is very conscious of
our commitment to helping
the development of soccer in
the Bahamas and I will do all
we can to help the improve-
ment of the facilities the BFA
has been developing,” Ban-
nister said, “The Ministry is
pleased to support organisa-
tions like the BFA who go out
and do so many things on their

own and so when they do
come to us for assistance we
are more than happy to do
whatever we can.”

The government has worked
hand in hand with the BFA to
ensure organisation of the
event remains a priority of the
highest order, highlighted by
a £48,000 donation to improve
facilities at the BFA’s field at
the Blue Hills Sporting Com-
plex.

BFA Secretary General,
Lionel Haven said improve-

Ue ere



track success

m@ By RENALDO DORSETT
Sports Reporter
rdorsett@tribunemedia.net

WITH the success of Jamaica
and concurrently, the entire
region at the 2008 Beijing
Olympic games, many have
sought the secret to the
Jamaican’s success in the sprints,
while two of its most successful
sprinters on the junior and
senior level offer solutions.

Veronica Campbell-Brown
and Dexter Lee, two of the most
well-known names in Jamaican
track and field, agree that an

intergral part of the country’s
continued success is the bridging
of the gap between varying gen-
erations.

Campbell-Brown is already
one of the most decorated
female sprinters of all time. At
26, she is a five time Olympic
medallist wich succesive gold
medals in the 200m in 2004 and
2008 and a gold in the 400m
relay.

She is also the reigning World
Champion in he 100m and was
the first female to win the sprint
double at the IAAF World
Junior Championships.

VERONICA
Campbell-Brown
(r) the double
Olympic and
World champion
sprinter poses
for a portrait
with Dexter Lee
(I) the World
Youth and
Junior sprint
champion before
a training ses-
sion at the Her-
bert Morrison
school during
the ‘laaf Day in
the Life’ on May

4, 2009 in Mon-
ae §6tego Bay,
| Jamaica.

Lee, at just 18-years-old, has
started down a path similar to
Campell-Brown with world suc-
cess at the junior level interna-
tionally.

Lee has captured gold medals
in the 100m at the World Youth
Championships and World
Junior Championships in 2007
and 2008 respectively.

The duo came together for a
training session at Lee’s Her-
bert Morrison Tech in Montego
Bay, Jamaica to discuss the
model of Jamaican athletics.

SEE page 12

ment of the facility is integral
in the growth of the local
game which in time will pro-
duce greater dividends inter-
nationally.

“A big part of the assistance
we are going to receive from
the Ministry is going towards
the development of that facil-
ity, such as the instillation of
lights. It is a small part of what
we would like to do but again
we are grateful for the help we
have received,” he said. “The
Federation has been working
on our development program
and we need to continuously
improve our facilities so we
can develop these programs,”
he said, “The game continues
to grow locally and In our

i>

KIA MOTORS

The Power to Surprise”

youth league we have 14 clubs
and about eight age divisions
and over 2000 participants.”

The FIFA Congress takes
place June 2-3 at the Atlantis
Resort, Paradise Island with
over 200 member federations
expected to provide represen-
tation.

According to the organisa-
tion’s website “The Congress
makes decisions relating to
FIFA's governing statutes and
the method by which they are
implemented and applied. It
also approves the annual
report, decides on the accep-
tance of new national associa-
tions and holds elections, most
notably for the FIFA presi-
dency.”

C Oly
Kes,

SDOTTS
OME

} e Senior Baseball is

alive and well on the

i island of Grand Bahama.

i Grand Bahama Ama-

i teur Baseball Association

: (Member of the Bahamas

: Baseball Federation)

i opened its 23rd Consecu-

: tive Senior League Season
? on Thursday May 7th

: 2009.

: The 2008 Champions:

} Vopak Panthers defeated

} Grand Bahama Port

: Authority Regulators (8 -

: 1).
: Winning Pitcher:

: Desmond Russell - 11

i Strike-outs

i Losing Pitcher: Ricardo
} Rolle — 10 Strike-outs

: Offensively: Panthers

: were lead by brothers Lar-
: ry & Desmond Russell

? with Two Hits each.
Players are preparing

: for the upcoming 7th

: Annual Andre Rodgers

} National Baseball Cham-

} pionship on June 4th thru
: 7th 2009 — (High School or
Collegiate Divisions) &

i selection to TEAM

i BAHAMAS National

i Team -— will be competing
: in the upcoming World

: Baseball Challenge from

: July 16th - 26th 2009.





: © Wednesday May 13th

} — Mid week Track Cycling
: Series starting 6pm

: Starting positions will be
drawn — 6 lap pursuit.

: Saturday 16th — Road
Race, 50 miles. Jaws

i Beach area.

: Starting 7:20am $5.00

i registration fee.

: Categories: Masters,

: Juniors, Seniors, Open

: Woman.

i Spot prizes in each cate-
E gory.
i Sunday 17th — Ist
: duathlon starting 7;35am

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PAGE 12, FRIDAY, MAY 15, 2009 TRIBUNE SPORTS

The secret to |
track success

FROM page 11



Lee, who began his career in junior high school just
five years ago, credited Campbell-Brown and other
elite level Jamaican sprinters for providing an inspi-
ration and blueprint to success in the sport.

“When I was in primary school I tried cricket and
football but I switched to track and field in first form
because I wanted to follow my brother and all the
other great sprinters I looked up to like Veronica
who we saw winning all the time,” he said. “I feel
good at what I have achieved so far and working
with Veronica and looking up to her I hope to have
the same type of career. So in the future I hope to be
a world champion, I hope to make the World Cham-
pionship team this year but I will definitely look at
the London Olympics in 2016.”

Goals my % : :
Along with his World Championship aspirations a 7 DEXTER Lee of Jamaica the
this summer, Lee said he has the Jamaican junior be a World Youth and Junior
national record in his sights before possibly attending ey : = : sprint champion at the Her-

college in the United States to further his education.

The 6 foot 2 inch sprinter who many compare
physically to Usain Bolt but tempermentally to Asafa
Powell, said he is a fan of both athletes and their
advice has been vital to his career thus far.

“T knew I could be special when I was in second
form and I won at the boys championship at 14. I like
both Usain and Asafa because they have always told
me to go out there and do my best all the time. I
dream of bringing glory to myself and my country like
the people like them that came before me.

Campbell-Brown said she sees the possibility of
Lee’s career following a similar pattern to her own
beginning with international success at the junior
level.

“Tt is easy, when you have people like Dexter wait-
ing in the wings ready to do big things on the nation-
al stage. He has a very very humble nature and he
works as hard or harder than anyone else to get
where he has gotten so far in his young career,” she
said. “He has the potential to be one of the best
sprinters not only in Jamaican history but in the
world, and people have begun to recognise that.”

bert Morrison school.

Mentors

As a high school student, Campbell-Brown was
called up to compete in the finals of the silver medal
winning 400m relay team and was mentored by
many of the senior athletes on that team in her first
Olympic appearance.

“T think it is important for the senior athletes like
myself to have working relationships with the junior
athletes because it does so much for their confi-
dence to have athletes that have achived so much
readily accesible to them. In the same way I looked
up to and worked with Merlene [Ottey] and it did
wonders for my confidence,” Campbell-Brown said.
“Tt also exposed me at an early age to the type of
training and dedication to succes that you would
need to have to win on the national stage. It is one
of those things in Jamaican track and field where it
is almost a sense of national pride that compels you VERONICA Campbell-Brown of Jamaica the VERONICA Campbell-Brown (I) the double Olympic and World champion sprinter poses for a portrait
to work with the younger generation to see the lega- double Olympic and World champion sprinter. with Dexter Lee (r) the World Youth and Junior sprint champion before a training session at the Her-
cy continue.” bert Morrison school during the 'laaf Day in the Life’ on May 4, 2009 in Montego Bay, Jamaica.



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TRIBUNE SPORTS

FRIDAY, MAY 15, 2009, PAGE 13



SPORTS



YANKEES 8, BLUE JAYS 2

¢ At Toronto, Brett Gardner hit his first
major league homer and drove in three :
runs, and Andy Pettitte won for the first

time in four starts for the Yankees.

The Yankees had eight extra-base hits
and improved to 11-0 when holding their :

opponent to three runs or less.
Gardner also tripled and scored twice,

and Mark Teixeira finished 2 for 4 with

two RBIs, raising his average to .202.

RAYS 8, ORIOLES 6

¢ At Baltimore, Willie Aybar hit a i
tiebreaking RBI single in the sixth inning to :
lift the Rays, who scored four times inthe :
ninth off Bob McCrory and held on after the :

Orioles rallied in the bottom half.

Jason Bartlett homered and Dioner

Navarro had two RBIs for the Rays.

Jeff Niemann (3-3) picked up his third
victory in four decisions. The right-hander ;
allowed two runs and eight hits. J.P. How- :
ell got the final two outs for his first save. :

Ty Wigginton homered for the Orioles.
RANGERS 6, MARINERS 5

11 innings

¢ At Arlington, Texas, Hank Blalock hit a
two-run double in the 11th inning off :
Mariners closer Brandon Morrow (0-2) to ;

lift the Rangers.

Wladimir Balentien’s RBI double in the
top of the 11th had given the Mariners a 5- ;

4 lead.

Russell Branyan homered for the Mariners,
who have lost eight of nine.

ANGELS 8, RED SOX 4

¢ At Anaheim, Calif., Matt Palmer over-
came a shaky start before retiring the last :

19 batters to lead the Angels.

Mike Napoli hit a go-ahead three-run Joe Crede provided the relief.
homer and Torii Hunter also went deep :

against knuckleballer Tim Wakefield (4- :
2

out eight and walked two.

ATHLETICS 7, ROYALS 2

the A’s.

time this season.

Peirsol ready to take on
Phelps in 100 backstroke

SWIMMING
CHARLOTTE, N.C.
Associated Press

AARON Peirsol can’t
remember the last time he lost
in a final of the 100-meter back-
stroke.

He thinks it was 2002. Maybe
03.

Whatever the case, Peirsol
appears to have an intriguing
new rival in his signature event.

Michael Phelps.

The winningest Olympian is
planning to try out some new
events as he looks ahead to
2012, a plan that puts him on a
collision course with Peirsol,
world record-holder in the 100
back and winner of the event
at both the Athens and Beijing
games.

“Mike will do well, no doubt
about it,” Peirsol told The Asso-
ciated Press in a telephone
interview from his home in
Austin, Texas. “He’s already
been very, very fast and he has-
n’t even scratched the surface
of his potential in that event.”

Peirsol isn’t backing down
from the challenge, however. In
fact, he welcomes the chance to
go against the world’s greatest
swimmer — and perhaps be one
of the few to beat him on the
Olympic stage. Others are clos-
ing fast, too, including Japan’s
Ryosuke Irie, who nearly broke
Peirsol’s record of 52.54 at a
meet in Australia on Sunday.

“T welcome the competition,”
Peirsol said. “For a long time,
it’s been kind of stagnant in that
event. I need it. I think it’s going

C.J. Wilson (2-2) pitched two innings of
relief as Texas won for the ninth time in 11 :
games. Adrian Beltre, Kenji Johjima and :

Jim Mone/AP Photo

DETROIT Tigers’ Jeff Larish, left, scores on a two-run single by Adam Everett in the fourth inning of a baseball game Wednesday, May 13, 2009 in Minneapolis. Minnesota
? Twins catcher Mike Redmond bobbled the ball and was charged with an error.

Crede’s slam in 13th lifts
Twins past Tigers 14-10

| BASEBALL

MINNEAPOLIS
Associated Press

AFTER Minnesota’s bullpen sprung more leaks,

It took 13 innings, four hours and 48 minutes, but

; Crede’s two-out, two-strike grand slam gave the
: ; ; : Twins a 14-10 victory over the Tigers just before
Palmer (4-0) allowed five hits, struck : midnight Wednesday — long after Dontrelle Willis

; made his first start of the season for Detroit.

After relievers Luis Ayala and Matt Guerrier let

? the Tigers take a 9-7 lead in a four-run seventh,
? Twins manager Ron Gardenhire could only shake his

* Ay Oakland, Calif., Jack Cust’s three- ;
run double broke open a close game and :
Josh Outman (1-0) allowed just three hits :
and a run in six innings in his first win for ;

head after Crede’s seventh career slam.
“Everybody needed that ... except maybe the oth-
er side,” said Gardenhire.
It has taken him about a month to get going, but

: Crede is feeling comfortable with his new team. He’s

Outman walked two while striking out :
four as Oakland swept the two-game ;
series. Brian Bannister (3-1) gave up two :
runs in 5 2-3 innings and lost for the first

hitting .237, but he’s fitting in just fine.

“These guys have been great so far this year. It’s
going to be fun to see what this team can do,” said
Crede, who has 15 hits, 10 RBIs and four homers in

i his last 12 games.



Itsuo Inouye/AP Photo

IN THIS Aug. 17, 2008 file photo, Aaron Peirsol, left, and Michael
Phelps, of the United States, celebrate after winning the gold medal in
the men's 4x100-meter medley relay final at the Beijing 2008 Olympics
in Beijing. Peirsol can't remember the last time he lost in a final of the

Matt Tolbert’s single that Josh Anderson nearly
caught but trapped in left field tied it at 10 against
Brandon Lyon (1-3), who walked Michael Cuddyer
before Crede came up. He almost ended the game in
the 12th against Lyon, but that drive was caught by
Curtis Granderson with his shoulder against the wall
in center field. Lyon threw 60 pitches over 2 2-3
innings.

“T think it just shows the character of this team,”
said Denard Span, who hit a two-run triple to give the
‘Twins the lead in the sixth. “We do this once a week,
it seems like.”

The super-speedy Granderson helped Detroit take
a 10-9 lead in the top half of the 13th with a little
trickery on the bases. He tripled with one out before
Jesse Crain (2-1) retired Placido Polanco on a flyball
too shallow to score on.

With Anderson batting, Granderson faked a break
for home as if he were going to steal. Crain flinched,
and the right-hander brought his throwing hand out
of his glove before starting his motion — thus the
balk call. Fans booed, but the Twins didn’t argue.

Lost in all of the late drama was Willis, who gave
up eight hits, four runs and two walks in 4 2-3 innings.

It was a decent start considering all he’s come back
from. He was sent to Class A last year to work on his
control, and he had been on the disabled list this
spring due to an anxiety disorder.

“T thought he showed pretty good composure,”
manager Jim Leyland said. “I was actually pleased.”

The lively lefty with the sharp, sweeping delivery
looked like his usual self, bouncing around the mound
between at-bats and pointing encouraging fingers
toward his infielders.

“Allin all [felt good. I really had a good time out
there,” Willis said.

Indians 4, White Sox 0

At Cleveland, Cliff Lee outpitched Mark Buehrle,
throwing sharp seven innings as the Indians took
two of three in the series.

Last-place Cleveland had not shut out an opponent
since Lee did it with a complete game against the
White Sox on Sept. 1.

Victor Martinez homered and Ryan Garko added
a two-run blast in the fourth to give Lee (2-5) his first
victory in nearly a month. Lee entered the day tied
for the league lead in losses despite a 1.70 ERA in his
last five starts.

— THINKING ABOUT

Ulan

YOU'LL FIND

Uinls BSsu
UTR, OWT
Win Siri

is right in front of your face.

Li GETTING A TRUCK?

EINK

aboutathissone:

Get in it. Touch it. Feel it.

to help me. It would be much
more fulfilling to win against
those guys than to win by a cou-

100-meter backstroke. However, Peirsol appears to have an intriguing

new rival in his signature event. Michael Phelps. a Yeats OF 30 SOU miles warranty, 3 years rwadalds

assistant, 3 years rust protections warranty and
licensed and inspected up to birthday.

4.6L, V8 Engine with automatic Transmission,
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ple of seconds.”

The two American stars are
set to go head-to-head at the
Charlotte Ultraswim, which
begins Thursday and will be
Phelps’ first meet since he won
eight gold medals in Beijing,
breaking Mark Spitz’s Holy
Grail of Olympic records.

The event is drawing much
more attention than usual in this
non-Olympic year, largely
because of Phelps’ out-of-the-
pool troubles. A picture of him
inhaling from a marijuana pipe
while attending a party in not-

so-far-away South Carolina
landed on the cover of a British
tabloid, prompting USA Swim-
ming to hand down a three-
month suspension from compe-
tition.

The ban ended last week, and
Phelps will be back in the pool
for the first of three meets he
plans to swim leading into the
national championships in early
July and the world champi-
onships in Rome later that
month. In addition to the 100
backstroke, he’s also entered in

the 50, 100 and 200 freestyle, as
well as the 100 butterfly.

Peirsol will be swimming his
two signature events, the 100
and 200 back, as well as a few
other races just for fun. This
will be the first meet the 25-
year-old California native has
fully trained for since Beijing,
which puts him on an even keel
with Phelps. (Peirsol did com-
pete at Austin in March, but he
wasn’t in top shape and only
took part because it was in his
adopted home.)



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PAGE 14, FRIDAY, MAY 15, 2009 TRIBUNE SPORTS

SPORTS





MANCHESTER United's Cris-
tiano Ronaldo (right) goes
down under a challenge from
Wigan Athletic's Lee Catter-
mole during their English Pre-
Alten ce: COLUL eM NEN COLNE MMAR
Stadium, Wigan, England,
Wednesday May 13, 2009.
United won 2-1.

INBRIEF

Nuggets reach |
1st conference |
finals since
1985



@ BASKETBALL
DENVER :
Associated Press :

THE DENVER Nuggets }
are collecting converts across
the country with their :
uncommon blend of freakish }
athleticism, superb strength :
and unparalleled speed, qual-
ities that might very well }
deliver this band of former }
malcontents and misfits to i
their first NBA finals. :

The Nuggets earned their
first trip to the Western Con- :
ference championship series :
in 24 years by dispatching the :
Dallas Mavericks in five }
games. i

They blitzed the Mavs the }
same way they did the New }
Orleans Hornets in Round }
1, with a dizzying array of }
Chauncey Billups’ leader- }
ship, Carmelo Anthony’s :
clutch play, Nene’s:
unmatched post presence, }
Kenyon Martin’s toughness :
and Dahntay Jones’ peski- }
ness. :
Combine all that with a
blazing bench that features }
Chris “Birdman” Andersen’s }
energy, J.R. Smith’s athletic :
artfulness and Anthony:
Carter’s cunning along with }
a rejuvenated coach in:
George Karl and NBA insid- }
ers are starting to tout the }
Nuggets as championship :
contenders. ;

Charles Barkley, a long- }
time critic of Denver’s play, :
is among those singing the ;
Nuggets’ praises now and the }
chorus is growing louder }
across the league. i

“These guys are legit. }
They’ve got a legitimate }
championship-caliber team,” }
Mavericks coach Ricki
Carlisle said after Denver’s }
series-clinching 124-110 win
Wednesday night, the:
Nuggets’ seventh double-dig- }
it victory in the postseason. }

“They have great balance. :
Their activity and athleticism }
and ability to generate sec- }
ond-chance opportunities is ;
a huge factor. This building }
is a great building and a:
great homecourt advantage, }
especially when you factor }
in the altitude. So, they’ve }
got the pieces. They really ;
do,” Carlisle said. “And :
they’ve got an experienced }
coach that’s been down that }
road and gotten to the finals. ;
They’ve got a great shot.”

Since Billups’ arrival, the :
Nuggets are 61-27. They tied
their franchise record with }
54 regular-season wins and }
advanced past the first round }
of the playoffs for the first } A
time since 1994 and into the } 5 " : TNH asa aia}
conference championship for } wr WaliNem Oat Titel

the first time in 24 years. eNom ELM UIeM er

For all those expecting a } pene
Kobe Bryant-LeBron James MANCHESTER United's Se eae
tussle for the title next} Dimitar Berbatov, right, fuer r Ferrata Sata

takes the ball away from e

month, hold up, Dallas guard : Leaque soccer match
Jason Terry said. : Wigan's Michael Brown. gu /









WIGAN'S Hugo , : 7 Eee
Ia eloFcUI exo cea evi te, : United's Cris-
1i(O]ASncOlanagls Fi tiano Ronaldo
OU TVA Ela a : reacts after not
chester United's ; ; * being awarded
Park Ji-Sung. one EW 46

ENGLISH
MeO ea
JA OANCLOD



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PAGE 16, FRIDAY, MAY 15, 2009

THE TRIBUNE



LOCAL NEWS





Bahamas-bound passengers get
spectacular view of space shuttle

SPACE SHUTTLE SHOOTS BY: As photographer Helene Seligman flew into Nassau
from New York Monday she caught this shot of the space shuttle Atlantis with its sev-
en crew members on its way to outer space to repair NASA’s 19-year-old Hubble
Space Telescope. ‘How lucky the passengers on our plane were ...
NASA space shuttle zoom up through the clouds - it was an incredible sight!’ she said
as she snapped this shot from her aircraft as it prepared for landing in Nassau.

showcase latest jewellery collection

JOHN Hardy, a designer
whose inspiration is derived
from nature and Balinese cul-
ture, will showcase his latest
jewellery collection in a trunk
show event at Little Switzer-
land on Bay Street from May
18 through May 25.

“The entire store will be set
in a tropical Balinese setting
by Munroe Landscaping,” said
Deirdree Andrews, market-
ing manager for Little Switzer-
land.

“The setting ties in very well
with the style of (designer)
John Hardy as his jewelry is
very nature inspired. You can
see the quality of craftsman-
ship that goes into every piece
of his work. We are encour-



aging persons to think green
with this event. John Hardy is
an environmentalist so it is
only fitting with this show to
encourage persons to give
back to nature from where the
inspiration of these designs
originate.”

With the purchase of any
John Hardy piece guests will
be asked to make a donation
to adopt a tree as a part of the
tree planting initiative by the
Ministry of Agriculture in
their quest to plant one mil-
lion trees in the Bahamas.

Guests will also have the
opportunity to win John
Hardy jewellery from Little
Switzerland during the pro-
motion.

we watched the

Photo: Helene Seligman

Naturally-inspired designer set to










Sun Tee EmbroidMe supporting
the Bahamas Real Estate Expo

SUN TEE EMBROIDME
was one of scores of local
companies lending its support
to organisers of the second
annual Bahamas Real Estate
Expo, held May 2 and 3 at
the Wyndham Nassau Resort.

Sun Tee EmbroidMe’s
president Scott Farrington

MACKEY ST STORE ONLY

OIDEWALR SALE

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WILLIAM TENAJ CARTWRIGHT [5 AM ELEVENTH
GRADE STUDENT AT PACE CHRISTIAN ACADEMY,

However at 17 years of age. William Carteright, other

wise kn is Mape Don 6.one of the hottest Ba-
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neistry to date. With heart-felt, power-packed par
FOMTENCES. Sure to raltie the ice off arty Mic

Aun has opened concerts for map boss Rick Reis anc
Riegqar superstar Colle Bud while also appearing
Winn AMeNCan QoG (4 Sensations Canton kanes, _)
Moss, Kirk Frontlin, Yolanda Adams. Fred Hammond
and Bahenian gospel meqqae ae Monty G, He
hin abo 7 app ae ¢ on — pre es wotn Junior Reed

” Me air: ¢ Dun first appears an the entertainment
sane 23 Li T al the age of nine with a rag group
Caled OCS, God's Chosen Three”. Twa wars laler. he
FRlensed his first single, “Demons” which sparked ir
fer étona! ancl, Majie Dun hes iavdied near and
far, Spreading his message of haps and positivity
IAith scorching hot perforrances in Los Anggks and

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hie MC &
rallied © for content that will lew you breathless, Majie

Mew fork while ao touring throughout Alanis, Fharicks
and Canada, this young master af the mic is
Lp things wherever he goes
Najie Dun is a bon again believer with a passion for

Promo pisaliv Cy 1 Inst and enpower Bahanrian
yout. Despite his. minist Yin churches: here and

00d. Maje Dun's Guteeach ratends into various Secu
af Events Such as mignon and parties in order to
nspire Nope and Chany in others. His Songs Fae
been in hay rotation Throughout varios kacal
and Rernational radio Stations which inclucda
"Pray for you". “Wan take hfe" ad "King's kid?
His QUITENT Single, featuring Bahamian super
Star Midiess. called “Tings. gen't binges" is alo
Sat to Fit (he ainwaves a5 the album's release
dite approaches

Presently. (his uniquely talenied rapper
S.s0 the record meecutive of his oan
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father Wilkam ‘Mark’ Canteright sl
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and fis. new albu Relentless

Purs It & sain bal lo be released Au
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5 SLE bo Peat

donated specially designed
eco-friendly bags for the two-
day event, which provided
hundreds of persons with an
opportunity to receive first
hand information on invest-
ing in real estate from some
of the country’s leading pro-
fessional real estate and
financial companies.

“Sun Tee EmbroidMe is
really happy to partner with
the Bahamas Real Estate
Expo on such a very impor-
tant event to help promote
our local economy and to
help local people do what
they need to do to achieve,
especially in today’s econo-
my,” said Mr Farrington.

“We are excited about the
whole venture and we defi-
nitely would like to thank Sun
Tee for assisting us in this
venture with the eco-friendly
bags,” said Pedro Young,
president and founder of the
Bahamas Real Estate Expo.

Ernesto Gongora, co-
founder and vice president of
technical support of the

ae



SCOTT FARRINGTON, president of Sun Tee EmbroidMe (at centre)
with Pedro Young (left) president and founder of the Bahamas Real
Estate Expo, and Ernesto Gongora (right), co-founder and vice

president of technical support.

Bahamas Real Estate Expo
expressed similar sentiments.
“We are extremely pleased.
We were contacted by Mr
Scott Farrington and we were
delighted that he took the ini-
tiative to partner with us and



we hope that this will be a
partnership that is going to
last for many years to come.”

Part proceeds from the
expo will be donated to
the Ranfurly Home for Chil-
dren.

iB
O'S.
de | |

BUTLER & SANDS
GROUNDS, JFK






City Markets
BYE Corer]

tightrope’
Comiterd tan)

Firm looking at
bakeries, pharmacies
in-store, and
opening hours

@ By NEIL HARTNELL
Tribune Business Editor

City Markets “walked a
tightrope” to get back on a sta-
ble financial footing, its chief
executive has told Tribune Busi-
ness, carrying no more than one
week’s worth of inventory for
its stores after guaranteeing
Bahamian wholesalers/distrib-
utors would receive payments
for supplies on a weekly basis.

Sunil Chatrani, who heads the
12-store supermarket chain’s
publicly-listed holding company,
Bahamas Supermarkets, said
that after taking over his post in
October 2008, he asked the
company’s vendors - at one of
his first meetings - to set aside
the accounts payables owed to
them by City Markets.

“We guarantee, on a weekly
basis, to pay you what we owe
you, and to pay some of the bal-
ance,” was the message Mr
Chatrani delivered to them.

He told Tribune Business this
week: “We stuck with it. It was
walking a tightrope - we had no
more than one week’s invento-
ry in-store.

“Tt was very tight. We had to
make sure we fixed the busi-
ness first before new funds
came into the company. We
walked a tightrope.”

The City Markets chief exec-
utive added that “while still
tight” on liquidity/cash flow, the
company had been able to meet
all its commitments.

Mr Chatrani praised the sup-
port City Markets received
from its Bahamian whole-
sale/distributor suppliers as
“fantastic”, adding: “They’ve
really helped us, I can tell you.”
Evangeline Rahming, Bahamas
Supermarkets’ chief financial
officer, added: “They [the
wholesalers] didn’t want City
Markets to fail.”

Refit

Vendors had helped to refit
and reset City Markets’ produce
department, putting in new
equipment, while freezers not
working had been replaced.

Tribune Business yesterday
exclusively revealed that
investors in BSL Holdings, the
78 per cent majority Bahamas
Supermarkets shareholder, had
committed ‘in principle’ to
injecting additional equity cap-
ital into the company to enable
it to “relaunch” by June 1, 2009,
and restart its imported produce
programme to generate
increased sales, gross margins
and higher consumer volume
and per capita spend.

“We’re ahead of the projec-
tions,” Mr Chatrani said.
“We’ve reached the stage
where, once this programme
kicks in, it’s a matter of con-
stant refining. We’re looking at
putting bakeries, pharmacies in
the stores. We’re looking at
opening hours to see what
makes sense, what doesn’t
make sense.”

Mr Chatrani added that City
Markets management “feel
strongly we are going to hit and
better” the financial targets the
company has set for its turn-
around, and urged the compa-
ny’s 22 per cent minority share-
holders - some of whom are
contemplating legal action
against the firm and its Board of
Directors over the destruction
of shareholder value - to be
patient as the only way was ‘up’.

“The value of the shares, as
we know, has declined signifi-
cantly, but the value is going to
be on the future cash flows,”
Mr Chatrani said.

“T would say the message is to
be patient. The worst is behind

SEE page 5B

THE TRIBUNE

ISIC



FRIDAY,

MAY

iMag)



2009

SECTION B « business@tribunemedia.net

FAMILY GUARDIAN

INSURANCE COMPANY LIMITED



Water Corp top Bahamas most

loser at $24.1

Overtakes Bahamasair as biggest drain with 26.7% net loss rise,
as union proposal advocates subsidy elimination by 2103 with
$4m per year reduction
WH Former Blue Hills bidder Biwater union’s selected
operating/management partner

@ By NEIL HARTNELL
Tribune Business Editor

The Water & Sewerage
Corporation’s $20 million-plus
per annum subsidies could be
eliminated over a five-year
period to 2013 by reducing
them by $4 million every year,
a management/operating
agreement proposal is argu-
ing, with the Corporation hav-
ing now overtaken Bahama-
sair as the Government’s
heaviest loss maker.

The proposal submitted to
the Government by the
BUSAWJU, the union that
represents the Corporation’s
line workers, a copy of which
has been seen by Tribune
Business, revealed that in 2007

- the last year for which the
Water & Sewerage Corpora-
tion’s financials were available
- its net loss increased by 26.7
per cent, from $19.021 million
to $24.107 million.

Coupled with the $30 mil-
lion taxpayer subsidy it has
received in the 2008-2009
Budget year, the net loss
makes the Water & Sewerage
Corporation the Governmen-
t’s largest-loss making Corpo-
ration - something the union’s
president believes their pro-
posal an reverse.

Carmen Munnings-Kemp
told Tribune Business yester-
day that the union was still
awaiting the Government’s
formal response to a proposal
that a ‘strategic partner’ take

Financial industry
faces ‘most severe
challenge’ ever

* Senior attorney calls for new business model to
ensure long-term survival, as current one ‘largely

redundant’

* Moree says government needs different approach to
TIEA talks, urging creation of National Plan and
Ministry of Financial Services to combat G-20/0ECD

* Bahamas needs alliances and to avoid ‘knee jerk’
reactions to OECD-type initiatives

Brian Moree



@ By NEIL HARTNELL
Tribune Business Editor

The Bahamas must develop
a “new business model” and
proactive National Plan to
ensure its financial services
industry survives the “most
severe challenge” it has ever
faced, a senior attorney said yes-
terday, as he urged the Gov-
ernment to adopt a “different
approach” to complying with
tax transparency demands.

Brian Moree, senior partner
at McKinney, Bancroft &
Hughes, called on the Govern-
ment to develop a long-term
strategy that would enable the
Bahamas to avoid a “knee-jerk
reaction” every time the Organ-
isation for Economic Coopera-
tion and Development (OECD)
and its contemporaries unveiled
a new initiative attacking inter-
national financial centres.

And he urged the Govern-
ment to create a standalone
Ministry of Financial Services
to give the Bahamas’ second
largest industry its own ministry,
much like how tourism had the
Ministry of Tourism.

SEE page 4B

FG FINANCIAL

PENSIONS & INVESTMENTS

(roup pensions

over management/operation
of the Water & Sewerage Cor-
poration, bringing with it the
expertise, technical capability
and ability to access “hun-
dreds of millions” of dollars
in financing to upgrade its
infrastructure and operations.
The BUSAWU document
revealed that the proposed
strategic partner is UK-head-
quartered Biwater Plc and its
subsidiary, Cascal, two com-
panies that should be very
familiar with the Bahamas and
the Corporation’s problems.
For Biwater was the runner-
up to Consolidated Water in
the bidding for the Blue Hills

SEE page 6B

2S

The information contained is from a third
party and The Tribune can not be held
responsible for errors and/or omission
from the daily report.



call us today at 396-4000

: NASSAU | FREEPORT | ABACO | ELEUTHERA | EXUMA | CORPORATE CENTRE: EAST

m vulnerable to

economic storm

* Storm and sea surges to knock
almost $50m off Bahamian GDP,
World Bank predicts

* Nation ranked as world’s most
vulnerable in three out of six World

Bank categories

m@ By CHESTER ROBARDS

Business Reporter

crobards@tribunemedia.net

A WORLD Bank study has predicted that the
Bahamas could lose US $48.92 million in gross domes-
tic product (GDP) as a result of increased storm surges,
with this country ranked in three out of six categories as
the nation worst impacted by Sea Level Rise (SLR)
brought on by global warming..

According to the findings, an estimated 1,517 square
miles of Bahamian coastline could be impacted over a
number of years as global sea levels rise, representing
54.67 per cent of the nation’s total coastline.

SEE page 2B



Government urged: ‘Finish
reqguiatory consolidation job’

@ By NEIL HARTNELL
Tribune Business Editor

The Government was yester-
day urged to “finish the job” of
financial services regulatory
consolidation by merging the
existing supervisory into either
a single ‘super regulator’ or the
‘Twin Peaks’ model, a senior
attorney saying it would be “a
mistake to stop” after moving
most into one building.

Brian Moree, senior partner
at McKinney, Bancroft &
Hughes, told Tribune Business
that while he “applauded” the
decision to move all financial
services regulators bar the Cen-

Bahamas ‘not there’
in terms of time to
hear and dispose of
commercial cases

tral Bank’s supervision depart-
ment under one roof, the Gov-
ernment needed to go further
than simply physical consolida-
tion.

The Securities Commission
of the Bahamas has taken on

SEE page 5B

[attract the cream of the crop
[= keep present employees happy
[4 guarantee staff retirement savings

all of the above

A SUBSIDIARY C


PAGE 2B, FRIDAY, MAY 15, 2009

THE TRIBUNE





Port Board meets on) Bahamas most
government's terms

otis S10

tli

BISCUI

try it for B



m@ By CHESTER
ROBARDS
Business Reporter
crobards@tribunemedia.net

The private company devel-
oping the Arawak Cay port
was yesterday said by sources
to have held a Board meeting
earlier this week to discuss the
Government’s final terms for
the project as outlined in a let-
ter sent to the directors by
Prime Minister Hubert Ingra-
ham.

It is unknown what was
included in the letter, but one
source close to developments,
who asked not to be named, as
Board members have appar-
ently been warned by the
Prime Minister not to speak
publicly about the deal, could
only say: “We are moving in
the right direction.”

When asked by Tribune
Business what the right direc-
tion might be for the Arawak
Cay port, the source suggested
that no more could be
revealed.

Not a whisper has left the
Prime Minister’s Office
recently about the relocation
of the container shipping facil-
ities from Downtown Nassau
to Arawak Cay, and for
months speculation over why
the Government has been so
tightlipped over the project
has increased.

PLP senator Jerome
Fitzgerald this month berated
the Government for its “veil
of secrecy” over the proposed
Arawak Cay port, and called
for “full and proper disclo-
sure” of all developments con-
nected with the plan to move
the container shipping facili-
ties.

In a study done on the port
relocation for the former
Christie government by the
Dutch consultants, Ecorys,

DEVELOPMENT FOR SALE
MARINA & SEAFOOD PROCESSING PLANT
ALLIGATOR BAY, NORTH LONG ISLAND

Approx. 6 acres of Waterfront property with a 152 feet wide canal.

Property comprises three buildings:

Building A: Seafood Processing Plant include a reception area, an
office, three bathrooms, a receiving room, a dressing room,
a packing room, a storage room, a laboratory and a
processing room, (3) 10 ft x 30 ft blast freezers, and (1)
15ft x 15 ft and (1) 10 ft x15 ft holding freezers.

Building B: Generator House

Building C: The Water Plant consists of a reverse osmosis water
system that converts salt water into drinking water with

a 10,000 storage capacity.

Interested persons should submit offers to:
The Manager, Credit Risk Management, P. O. Box N-7518,

Nassau, Bahamas

To reach us on or before June 12, 2009

For further information, please contact us at
502-0929, 356-1685 or 356-1608



Arawak Cay was found to be
the sixth-best site to redevelop
a container port from an envi-
ronmental perspective, falling
one behind the option to leave
it in its current position in
Downtown Nassau.

It has been suggested that
the long-awaited revitalisation
of Bay Street cannot begin in
earnest until the port facilities
are removed from the down-
town area.

The former PLP govern-
ment suggested that the port
be move to southwest New
Providence, near Clifton Cay.
However, the present govern-
ment found this option to be
too costly and subsequently
scrapped the idea.

Option

Now, plans to build a man-
made island west of Arawak
Cay to house the container
port seem to be an option for
the relocation. The fill
removed during the harbour
dredging this year to accom-
modate the first of the Gene-
sis Class cruise ships is slated to
be used to extend the wharf
along Bay Street and construct
the man-made island, accord-
ing to sources.

A thoroughfare being con-
structed from John F Kennedy
Drive to Saunders Beach is
suspected to be a part of the
new Arawak Cay container
port’s proposed road infra-
structure, which will link to a
causeway connecting with the
75 acre man made island.

However, Deputy Prime
Minister Brent Symonette said
this new road was simply
another corridor planned as a
part of the Government’s $120
million New Providence Road
improvement project being
constructed by the Argentine
firm Jose Cartellone Con-
struction Company (JCCC).

A recent town meeting con-
firmed that the port will be
moved to Arawak Cay.

However, the Government
is still being quiet about the
deal, having placed a virtual
gag order on all investors
related to the relocation of the
port.

Some suggest that it is
because Arawak Cay will be
back in the hands of those
who once operated there
when it was known as Kelly
Island.

BANQUE PRIVEE

vulnerable to
economic storm

FROM page 1B

As a result, the World Bank estimates 3,711 Bahamians could
be impacted over the same period of time, representing 73.03 per
cent of the total population living on coastline that could possibly
be affected.

The Bahamas has long been thought to be at high risk of
water inundation due to incremental seal level rises, as a vast
majority of the islands are only a few feet above sea level.

In a list of 10 countries most at risk for serious damage as
storm surges intensify, the Bahamas tops the list three times.

With 73 per cent of the coastal population threatened by
intensifying storm surges, the Bahamas ranks number one
above Kuwait, Dijibouti and the United Arab Emirates (UAE).

The Bahamas outranks all others as the country most likely to
lose a mass amount of coastal GDP at 65.7 per cent.

The study also suggests that the Bahamas is at risk of losing
94.1 per cent of its urban coastal areas to intense storm surges.

Those incrementally increasing surges are predicted to affect
54.7 per cent of the total coastal land area and 71.4 per cent of
coastal wetlands. The only category in which the Bahamas is not
expected to be gravely affected is in coastal agricultural land —
maybe because there is not much to lose.

Scientists and environmentalists have been having a great
debate for years over the state of global temperatures.

However, one constant that
cannot be denied is the direct cor- .
relation between ocean tempera-. “The destructive
ture and the intensity of hurri- impact will
ae and cyclones. : generally be

“An increase in sea surface
temperature is strongly evident greater when
at all latitudes and in ali oceans,” | Storm surges are
the study read. accompanied by

“The scientific evidence indi- strong winds and
cates that increased surface tem- | Jarge onshore
perature will intensify cyclone waves.”
activity and heighten storm .
surges. These surges will, in turn,
create more damaging flood con-
ditions in coastal zones and adjoining low-lying areas.

“The destructive impact will generally be greater when storm
surges are accompanied by strong winds and large onshore
waves.”

The Bahamas has moved forward in the endeavour to lower
carbon emissions, which are almost wholly blamed for global
temperature increases.

And as a country geographically susceptible to hurricanes
that develop in the Atlantic and in the Gulf of Mexico, the
Bahamas must depend on industrialised nations such as China,
India and the US to mitigate their carbon emissiona in order to
curb the effects of global warming.

“The International Workshop on Tropical Cyclones (IWTC)
has recently noted that “if the projected rise in sea level due to
global warming occurs, then the vulnerability to tropical cyclone
storm surge flooding would increase” and “it is likely that some
increase in tropical cyclone peak wind-speed and rainfall will
occur if the climate continues to warm,” the study continued.

According to the World Bank, hurricanes and cyclones have
been occurring in areas that have previously not been frequent.

The findings suggest that as these former anomalies become
commonplace due to the state or the global environment, poor
communities in low lying coastal areas will be affected.

Several low-lying Pacific islands are already thought to have
been inundated by abnormally high sea levels. The island states
reported about 100 metres (328.1ft) of coastline swept over by
sea water.

“A particularly striking finding is the concentration of high-
ly vulnerable large cities at the low end of the international
income distribution. We believe that these large, globally per-
vasive potential impacts further strengthen the case for rapid
action to protect endangered coastal populations,” the study con-
cluded.

EDMOND DE ROTHSCHILD LTD
LCF ROTHSCHILD GROUP

In order to strengthen our team in Nassau, we have an employment opportunity fora

Qualified Accountant

Responsibilities include :

Accounts Payable functions

Spreadsheet analysis

Monthly and quarterly reporting

Bank reconciliations

Recording of general joumal entries

Minimum requirements :

Bachelor's Degree in Accounting or Finance

Cormiputer literacy with proficiency in MS Excel

Excellent verbal and written communication skills

Ability to work with minimum supervision

Must possess a high level of integrity and professionalism
Three years of professional axpenance

The ideal candidate must possess strong analytical skills, and have a working
knowledge of IFRS and Basel | banking regulations.

Salary is commensurate with experience and qualifications.

Interested persons may submit their resume by email only to: bperaicoralwave.com

with reference "Accountant® , no later than 30’

May 2009.


THE TRIBUNE

FRIDAY, MAY 15, 2009, PAGE 3B



Law enforcement notable by absence

| was a beautiful Sunday
past. A little work and
play made quite an evening. But
this drive made me wonder
whether our lovely little island
of New Providence is safe or
just lawless.

What’s the difference, you
may ask? Well, the reliable
Webster defines “safe” as being
“free from harm or risk” or
“secure from threat of danger,
harm, or loss”. Lawless means
“not regulated by or based on
law” and “not restrained or con-
trolled by law”

This was my debate back and
forth with myself as I drove
from the Carmichael area into
Coral Harbour, on to Adelaide
Road and on to the New
Albany divide, passing a New
Providence Development Com-
pany security patrol way. Then
it hit me; I have not seen any
police patrols.

So I continue my drive, pass-
ing Clifton Pier and the Clifton
Heritage Site, Jaws Beach,
Lyford Cay, still no police. Pass-
ing an old favourite haunt, and
also a new one, I find myself
now near Nirvana Beach and
guess what? Still no police.
There are pedestrians, cyclists,
foot and motor driven, beach
goers with families having pic-
nics, ‘just chilling on de island’.
As I drive, not one policeman in
sight.

Now by the ever popular
Goodman’s Bay, where are the
police? Getting a bit concerned
after visiting another new

US housing plan
off to slow start

@ By ALAN ZIBEL
AP Real Estate Writer

With less than 24 hours on the
clock, Rose Inman’s foreclosure
was postponed late Thursday for
60 days. But after spending hun-
dreds of dollars she couldn’t
afford to find an apartment and
pack her things, the last-minute
gesture comes too late — she is
moving out of her house over-
looking Seattle’s Puget Sound.

For the past two months she
had hoped to benefit from Presi-
dent Barack Obama’s plan to
help homeowners avoid foreclo-
sure. Despite numerous calls, e-
mails and letters to Aurora Loan
Services, she was only able to
have one phone conversation
with a company representative.

“It’s like this huge, concrete
thick wall that you cannot get
through,” said Inman, 58, who is
working as a human resources
consultant, but making much less
than she was before she was laid
off by the City of Seattle.

On Thursday, the Obama
administration said its bold mort-
gage assistance program launched
in March is helping thousands of
borrowers, though some lenders
are working faster than others.
So far, participating mortgage
companies have made more than
55,000 offers to modify borrow-
ers’ loans, but officials could not
say how many of those home-
owners had in fact been helped.

And knowing that many trou-
bled homeowners can’t be, the
Obama administration expanded
its $50 billion mortgage aid pro-
gram, announcing new measures
that would help homeowners
avoid a foreclosure if they don’t
qualify for other assistance.

The initiatives are intended to
streamline the process of selling a
home that is worth less than the
mortgage, or transfer ownership
of a home to the lender. Both
options will still ding the home-
owner’s credit score, but less than
a foreclosure.

So far, 14 companies — includ-
ing Aurora Loan Services, Wells
Fargo, and JPMorgan Chase —
have signed up and will be paid
for each loan they modify. And to
further entice mortgage compa-
nies to participate, the govern-
ment is offering payments totaling
up to $10 billion to compensate
them for the risk of falling home
prices. “The basic problem is that
the program is very complicated
and involved to set up,” said Guy
Cecala, publisher of trade publi-
cation Inside Mortgage Finance.
He doesn’t expect to see large
volumes of loan modifications
before July or August.

While some mortgage compa-
nies have added staff and made
preparations for the program,
others are apparently lagging
behind. Many housing counselors
across the country complain that
the program has been slow get-
ting off the ground.

“Our experience at the ground
level has been, so far, frustrat-
ing,” said Michael van Zalingen,
director of homeownership at
Neighborhood Housing Services
of Chicago, a counseling group.
Entry-level employees at mort-
gage companies, he said, are
either steering borrowers away
from the plan or are entirely
unaware of it.

Safe &

Secure

Aer NCO se 4

favourite, I still see no police.
Of course, I remind myself from
my days on the force that this is
Sunday, and our police too need
some time to relax.

But if there are no police out
keeping us safe, why are there
so many people out having,
from what I can see and hear,
such a good ole time, so to
speak. They must be mad,
because as some would have us
believe, Nassau is not a safe
place to be. Well, obviously
these folks have not gotten the
memo.

By now I am passing Arawak
Cay, and still no police pres-
ence, only the police atation
erected at the site.

So what is it with Sunday?
Well, I introduced you to the
concept of ‘selective enforce-
ment’. Of which, as I stated, our
police force is very good at,
Well, with Sunday’s enforce-
ment level the police are obvi-
ously going for a combination of
the Oscars, Grammy and
Cacique awards. The now obvi-



ous, I am certain, practice of
reduced coverage on Sunday
must mean that the potential
for crime is reduced during
these hours. Or is it?

Remember those motorbikes;
none of them had helmets on.
Many of the cars, if not speed-
ing, are doubled parked and
parked on the grass or wherev-
er, music, of course, loud.

No police, not even on Bay
Street, at which point I decided
to take a break from this long
drive and observe a bit more
critically the absence or lack of
officers. So downtown Nassau,
at about S5pm-5.30pm, with not
one footpatrol.

The time now is nearly after
6pm by now. Maybe I am too
early. But seriously, folks, it has
been about three-and-a-half
hours and not a single police
patrol.

Maybe this selective enforce-
ment needs to be revisited.
Maybe a review of this man-
agement style, as the safe envi-
ronment which exists has

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We

become a fertile ground for law-
less behavior. The law break-
ers, regardless of the infraction,
feel safe. Hence, the speeding,
illegal parking and loud music
have become, as one eyewitness
to the raid on a local alleged
numbers house said, part of our
culture. Now this is not the first
Sunday where this has been not-
ed. In fact, this is the norm, but
a dangerous one at that.

Alas, our police are caught in
a quandry, as from personal
experience I have seen where
the police presence causes some
young, lost youth to act out.
When the police are seen, in an
effort to show themselves off,
they must now be louder and

















Rt. Hon. Hubert A. Ingraham

more vulgar, as if to dare the
police to take action. So what
do you do. Hopefully not stay
away from such events and
gatherings, but rather you
develop new strategies of man-
aging them without being seen
as oppressive.

Yes, I would be the first to
say easier said than done, but
it has to be done.

So if just by chance, on one of
these beautiful Sunday after-
noons, the police select a rarely
enforced item from the law
books to enforce, be ready.
Nevertheless, we will here the
outcry form the arrested per-
son, that they are being vic-
timised, and unfairly targeted

by the police. Go catch some
real criminals.

NB: Gamal Newry is the
president of Preventative Mea-
sures, a loss Pprevention and
asset protection training and
consulting company, speciali-
aing in policy and procedure
development, business security
reviews and audits, and emer-
gency and crisis management.
Comments can be sent to PO
Box N-3154 Nassau, Bahamas
or, e-mail gnewry@gmail.com
or Visit us at www.preventa-
tivemeasures.net or visit
http://newrypreventativemea-
sures.blogspot.com/

PROCLAMATION
OF NURSES’ MONTH BY PRIME MINISTER







WHEREAS, in 1947 the Nurses’ Association of The Commonwealth of The
Bahamas (NACB), an independent, non-political, non-governmental organization of
nurses, was founded primarily to represent the interest of nurses practicing in The
Bahamas, nationally, regionally and internationally;




AND WHEREAS, the Nurses’ Association encourages the professional and
educational advancement of nurses and promotes the highest possible standard of quality
nursing, irrespective of nationality, race, colour or social origin;

AND WHEREAS, professional nurses are committed and dedicated to
providing quality nursing care with sensitivity to sick, infirmed and handicapped persons;

AND WHEREAS, in addition to the promotion of excellence in the
nursing profession, the vision of the Nurses’ Association of the Commonwealth of
The Bahamas is to network locally, regionally and internationally in order to provide
best practices and advice on policy matters relating to and impacting the profession;

AND WHEREAS, the Nurses’ Association of The Commonwealth of The

Bahamas is celebrating the 61st Anniversary of its existence;

AND WHEREAS, as an Association, NACB is called upon from time to time to
represent the nursing profession in The Bahamas nationally, regionally and internationally;

AND WHEREAS, in countries around the world, the month of May is set
aside as a time to give focus to the critical roles performed by nurses worldwide;

AND WHEREAS, in 2009, International Nurses’ Day will be celebrated on May
12th, and will be marked by events, activities and ceremonies that will give world-wide
recognition to the contribution nurses make to humanity through the healing process;

AND WHEREAS, during the

month of May 2009, the

Nurses’

Association of The Commonwealth of the Bahamas plans to undertake various activities,
inclusive of a church service, an appreciation luncheon and a symposium, to promote the
International Council of Nurses’ theme: “Delivering Quality, Serving Communities:
Nurses Leading Care Innovations’;

NOW, THEREFORE, I, Hubert A. Ingraham, Prime Minister of the
Commonwealth of The Bahamas, do hereby proclaim the month of May, 2009 as

‘National Nurses’ Month’’.

and locks

Cloth or leather interiar
* Front, side & side curtain airbags

Shirley Street

Tal: (242) 328-2285 + Fax: (242) 323-7272

IN WITNESS WHEREOF,
I have hereunto set my Hand
and Seal this 12th day of May, 2009

Moshe f) Sade

HUBERT A. INGRAHAM
PRIME MINISTER




2. + ©

contrats

Pesos tits They eat

* 768-hp, V-6 engine.

* Comfortably seats five

* Air conditioning & filtration system
* Power windows, door mirrors

Immobilizer theft-deterrent system
Remote entry system

6-dise CD player

Steering wheel-mounted audio





PAGE 4B, FRIDAY, MAY 15, 2009

THE TRIBUNE



————S—————S——E————————=——_E_— SSS
Financial industry faces ‘most severe challenge’ ever

FROM page 1B

Mr Moree told a Rotary Club
of West Nassau luncheon that
while the former Christie
administration had “taken a
step in the right direction” when
it created the Ministry of Finan-
cial Services and Investments
between 2002-2007, it did not
get it “quite right” because its
remit also included investments
- something that should have
been excluded as this was “a
massive portfolio by itself”.

The McKinney, Bancroft &
Hughes senior partner said the
Ministry of Financial Services
should be headed by a full-time
director of financial services,
the post having the same status
as the director-general of
tourism.

The salary for such a post
needed to be sufficiently high
to attract top talent from the
private sector, and Mr Moree
added: “There are at least four
or five people who I think,
across the board, would be
acknowledged as suitable for
this position.

“Tf I was Prime Minister, I
would take five minutes to
appoint Wendy Warren [the
Bahamas Financial Services
Board’s chief executive and
executive director] as director
of financial services.”

Speaking to Tribune Business





“I don’t think there’s any
need to panic or that our
industry is in danger of
collapsing in the short-term.”



later, Mr Moree said the
Bahamas needed to be “ahead
of the curve” if it was to sur-
vive the multitude of attacks
launched against it by the G-
20/OECD ‘blacklist’, the Oba-
ma administration and other
agencies and global regulatory
bodies.

“T don’t think there’s any
need to panic or that our indus-
try is in danger of collapsing in
the short-term,” Mr Moree told
Tribune Business.

“However, having said that,
some people have said putting
the Bahamas on the [G-
20/OECD ] ‘grey list’ will not
have a significant impact. But
my own sources have indicated
that in the case of certain Euro-
pean banks there is very much a
wait and see attitude, and we’re
going to have to see how that
develops in conjunction with
the various initiatives Gordon
Brown [the UK prime minister]

LEGALNOTICE

NOTICE

INTERNATIONAL BUSINESS COMPANIES ACT
(No.45 of 2000)

FARRINGDON
INVESTMENTS LID.



















Notice is hereby given that in accordance with Section
138 (8) of the International Business Companies Act,
No. 45 of 2000, the Dissolution of FARRINGDON IN-
VESTMENTS LTD. has been completed, a Certificate of
Dissolution has been issued and the Company has there-
fore been struck off the Register. The date of completion
of the dissolution was the 29th day of April, 2009.







df

fA
| if
nif ‘
hl
aLREKA Moy
Wina Doe

Legal Notice

NOTICE

INTERNATIONAL BUSINESS COMPANIES ACT
(No.45 of 2000)

MOUNTAIN ASH
PROPERTIES LIMITED

In Voluntary liquidation

“Notice is hereby given that in accordance with Section
137 (4) of the International Business Companies Act
(No. 45 of 2000). MOUNTAIN PROPERTIES ASH

LIMITED is in Dissolution.”

The date of commencement of dissolution is the

13th day of May, 2009.

Paco Carrera
of Clle Villas Tropical Km 14.5 Lte,
Zona Hotelera, Cancun Qui 77500 Mexico

Liquidator

Securit y

Abaco Markets

ROYAL = FIDELITY

Money at Work

Brian Moree

was talking about. I don’t think
that impact has been profound
yet, but these are very serious
challenges that have to be prop-
erly and ably managed over the
next few months to minimise
their impact. Our industry has
been resilient, and will continue
to be so, but it has never quite
faced the severity of the chal-
lenge it is facing.

“Given proper initiatives and
a National Plan to respond to
these issues we can secure the
future of this industry, although
we have to radically change our
business model. Therein lies the
challenge for the private and
public sectors.”

This will likely mean that the
Bahamas may, eventually, have
to consider introducing some
form of minimal income tax,
such as a corporate tax (via
conversion of the business
licence fee into this) or taxes
on the profits, revenues or
assets under management of
international clients.

Such a tax, which has been
urged by many industry partic-
ipants, would enable the
Bahamas to negotiate double
tax treaties with other nations.

Mr Motee told Tribune Busi-
ness: “The current model has
served us well for the past 40
years, but it’s now becoming
largely redundant and will have
to be replaced with a new one -
a new business model with
regard to what is happening

around us.” He urged the Govy-
ernment to adopt a different
approach to the OECD’s
demands that this nation have
at least 12 Tax Information
Exchange Agreements (TIEAs)
with other countries to show its
commitment to tax transparen-
cy.

Prime Minister Hubert Ingra-
ham has indicated that, while
the Bahamas has one such
agreement with the US, it is
likely to commence talks with
Canada over its second TIEA.

But Mr Moree said the
Bahamas should follow the lead
established by the Cayman
Islands, which when confronted
with the OECD demands,
promptly went out and signed
multiple TIEAs with five to sev-
en Nordic countries. It did this
safe in the knowledge that its
financial services sector had no
clients or assets from those
nations, meaning the industry
would suffer no fallout from
OECD compliance.

“The amount of money com-
ing into Cayman from those
countries probably could not
buy you a suit, Mr Moree said.
Turning to the Bahamas’
approach to TIEAs, with Cana-
da next in line, he added: “I
would have suggested a differ-
ent approach, going after the
low hanging fruit before the
high hanging fruit, knocking off
seven to eight countries that do
not have money here.”

The leading attorney also
urged the Government to con-
tinue lobbying the Obama
administration in order to safe-
guard the Bahamian financial
services industry, as many were
“scratching heads” as to what
more this nation could do to
comply with its demands given
the TIEA’s existence.

The Bahamas, Mr Moree
said, had been "
very cooperative and support-

Bahamas Humane Society

wishes to inform the general public that
there will be NO Clinic on Saturday
16th May due to our Animal Fun Day.
We will have a late clinic
3pm-8pm on Friday 15th.

amr adele

Legal Notice

NOTICE

INTERNATIONAL BUSINESS COMPANIES ACT
(No.45 of 2000)
INTERNATIONAL HOST LIMITED

In Voluntary liquidation

“Notice is hereby given that in accordance with Section
137 (4) of the International Business Companies Act
(No. 45 of 2000). INTERNATIONAL HOST LIMITED is

in Dissolution.”

The date of commencement of dissolution is the

13th day of May, 2009.

Paco Carrera
of Clle Villas Tropical Km 14.5 Lte,
Zona Hotelera, Cancun Qui 77500 Mexico

Liquidator

BISX LISTED & TRADED SECURITIES AS OF:
THURSDAY, 14 MAY 2009

BISX ALL SHARE INDEX: CLOSE 1,607.86 | CHG -5.66 | %CHG -0.35 | YTD -104.50 | YTD % -6.10

FINDEX: CLOSE 797.42 | YTD -4.49% | 2008 -12.31%

WWW .BISXBAHAMAS.COM | TELEPHONE:242-323-2330 | FACSIMILE: 242-323-2320

Bahamas Property Fund

Bank of Bahamas

Benchmark

Bahamas Waste

Fidelity Bank

Cable Bahamas

Colina Holdings

Commonwealth Bank ($1)
Consolidated Water BDRs

Doctor's Hospital

Famguard
Finco

FirstCaribbean Bank

Focol (S)

Focol Class B Preference

Freeport Concrete

ICD Utilities
J. S. Johnson

Securi
Fidelity Bank Note 17 (Series A) +
Fidelity Bank Note 22 (Series B) +
Fidelity Bank Note 13 (Series C) +

1000.00

52wk-Low

Fidelity Bank Note 15 (Series D) +

Previous Close Today's Close

Change Daily Vol.

Daily Vol.

Prime + 1.75%
7%
Prime + 1.75%

Fidelity Over-The-Counter Securities

Symbol

Bahamas Supermarkets
Caribbean Crossings (Pref)

RND Holdings

ABDAB
RND Holdings

Ask $

0.55

Last Price Weekly Vol.

29.00
0.55

BISX Listed Mutual Funds

Fund Name

Colina Bond Fund

Colina MSI Preferred Fund
Colina Money Market Fund
Fidelity Bahamas G & 1 Fund
Fidelity Prime Income Fund

100.0000
96.4070
1.0000
9.0950
1.0000
1.0000
1.0000

BISX ALL SHARE INDEX - 19 Dec 02 = 1,000.00
52Wk-Hi - Highest closing price in last 52 weeks.

CFAL Global Bond Fund

CFAL Global Equity Fund

CFAL High Grade Bond Fund
Fidelity International Investment Fund
FG Financial Preferred Income Fund
FG Financial Growth Fund

FG Financial Diversified Fund

Last 12 Months Div $

4.40

YIELD - last 12 month dividends divided by closing price
Bid $ - Buying price of Colina and Fidelity

day's weighted price for daily volume

Today's i ted price for daily volume

co
Change - Ch trom day to day
Daily Vol. -N traded today

DIV $ - Div

(S) - 4-for-1 Stook Split - Effective Date 8/8/2007

(S1) - 3-for-1 Stock Split - Effective Date 7/11/2007

nds per share paid in the last 12 months
P/E - Closing price divided by the last 12 month earnings

Weekly Vol. - Trading vol

NAV - Net Asset Value
N/M - Not Meaningful

ricing bases)
il

EPS $

FG CAPITAL MARKETS

BROKERAGE & ADVISORY SERYVIC-ES

P/E

19 October 2017
19 October 2022
30 May 2013
29 May 2015

Div $ P/E
0.300
0.480
0.000

0.000
0.001

4.540
0.002

0.000
0.000

Yield %

week
EPS $ - A company’s reported earnings per share for the last 12 mths

FINDEX - The Fidelity Bahamas Stock Index. January 1, 1994 = 100

TG TRADE CALL: COLINA 242-502-7010 | ROYALFIDELITY 242-356-7764 | FG CAPITAL MARKETS 242-396-4000 | COLONIAL 242-502-7525

ive” of the US, and should
receive something in return.
“As far as I know, there are no
serious complaints or objections
about how this treaty is work-
ing,” he added. “We have a
TIEA, we have transparency
and have an obligation to pro-
vide appropriate information.
We are doing everything we can
with the US at the moment.”

The G-20/OECD and other
initiatives targeting interna-
tional financial centres were dri-
ven by “good, old-fashioned
competition. Old fashioned,
hardball competition”, Mr
Moree said. G-20 and OECD
members were targeting inter-
national financial centres in the
mistaken belief that they would
be able to prevent the leakage
of tax revenues needed to shore
up expensive welfare states. But
Mr Moree said the Bahamas
had exited business relying on
tax evasion “25 years ago”, and
its business model was based on
tax compliant money.

In response, he urged: “We
need to develop a National
Plan. This is essential. We can’t
have this knee-jerk, ad-hoc
reaction. We need to engage
central government in bench-
marking competitive jurisdic-
tions, and engage our diplo-
matic offices abroad [to lobby
other governments]. There has
to be effective dialogue at many
different levels to make our
case. We need to get out in
front of the game.”

Mr Moree also called on the
Bahamas to “forge alliances”
with other international finan-
cial centres under attack, as they
shared common interests and
there was strength in numbers.

Unlike Guernsey, Jersey,
Bermuda and the Cayman
Islands, which enjoyed UK pro-
tection, and Hong Kong and
Macau, which have China, the
Bahamas as a sovereign nation
does not have a ‘big brother’ to
watch over it, making alliances
crucial. Mr Moree also ques-
tioned why the Bahamas had a
Ministry of Agriculture and

Fisheries, but no Ministry of
Financial Services, when the
economic contribution of the
latter dwarfed both sectors.

“Does it make sense to you?
I don’t understand that,” he
said, arguing that the Ministry
of Finance could not adequate-
ly promote financial services
because it had a “plethora of
other responsibilities and oblig-
ations” that did not allow it to
allocate the necessary resources.

Urging all Bahamians to
become more educated and
informed on issues impacting
the financial services industry,
and the sector’s importance, Mr
Moree said a collective influ-
ence was needed to ensure the
Government pursued “thought-
ful, sensible policies” that pro-
tected the sector’s interests.

“Given the competition, the
ferocity and sustained nature of
the attack, we will not survive
unless we get ahead of it,” Mr
Moree explained. “We don’t
want to wake up and find,
though our silence, that some-
thing has happened to our qual-
ity of life and the country we’re
going to be turning over to our
children.

“The very survival of the
financial services industry as we
know it, the second pillar of our
economy, is under direct threat
from a number of external
forces. That in itself should be a
wake-up call. What happens to
the Bahamas if the sector is sub-
stantially reduced in size? How
would it affect you and your
family, your quality of life?

“If we’re going to have a
chance to survive and grow the
industry, we need to have
strategies and take action
against the external agencies
attacking our industry.

“Otherwise we’re all going to
wake up one day and find major
changes have been imposed that
adversely affect the financial
services industry in this coun-
try, and then we realise it’s too
late to address the problems
with which we are confronted.”

NOTICE

NOTICE is hereby given that ERONNE LUBIN is applying
to the Minister responsible for Nationality and Citizenship,
for registration/naturalization as a citizen of The Bahamas,
and that any person who knows any reason why
registration/naturalization should not be granted, should
send a written and signed statement of the facts within
twenty-eight days from the 15" day of May, 2009 to the
Minister responsible for nationality and Citizenship, P.O. Box

N-7147, Nassau, Bahamas.

PUBLIC NOTICE

INTENT TO CHANGE NAME BY DEED POLL

The Public is hereby advised that |, GODFREY MATTHEW
NEWBOLD of the city of Freeport on the Island of Grand
Bahama, intend to my name to GODFREY MATTHEW
THURSTON BSRMA NEWBOLD. If there are any objections
to this change of name by Deed Poll, you may write such
objections to the Chief Passport Officer, P.O.Box N-742,
Nassau, Bahamas no later than thirty (30) days after the date

of publication of this notice.

NOTICE

NOTICE is hereby given that RICHEMOND JASON of
DAVIS STREET, FOX HILL, P.O. BOX CR-54802, is
applying to the Minister responsible for Nationality and
Citizenship, for registration/naturalization as a citizen of The
Bahamas, and that any person who knows any reason why
registration/naturalization should not be granted, should
send a written and signed statement of the facts within
twenty-eight days from the 15" day of May, 2009 to the
Minister responsible for nationality and Citizenship, P.O. Box

N-7147, Nassau, Bahamas.

COMMONWEALTH OF THE BAHAMAS

IN THE SUPREME COURT

FAMILY DIVISION

BETWEEN: -

2007/FamDiv/FP/No.148

BENJAMIN BENEBY

Petitioner

AND

FERRYLYN O. BENEBY (nee) GUERRERO

Respondent

PETITION

In The Supreme Court of the Commonwealth of the

Bahamas.

By: The Firm, Attorney at Law, Marsh Harbour, P.O. Box
AB20191 Abaco, Bahamas. (242) 367-3572 ph/fax


THE TRIBUNE

FRIDAY, MAY 15, 2009, PAGE 5B





job and end up with one or two

in commercial cases in a rea-

City Markets | Government urged: ‘Finish regulatory consolidation jot

FROM page 1B

the regulatory responsibility of
the Inspector of Financial and
Corporate Services Providers,
while both the Compliance
Commission and Registrar of
Insurance Companies have
moved into the same premises
as the Commission - Charlotte
House.

However, Mr Moree yester-
day encouraged the Govern-
ment to complete the regulato-
ry consolidation by merging all
supervisory bodies - including
the Bank Supervision Depart-
ment - into one ‘super regula-
tor’, along the lines of the UK’s
Financial Services Authority
(FSA), or creating two regula-
tory bodies by merging all bar
the Central Bank department.

“We need to seriously look
at the resources of the major
regulators, and in this regard
the central government has to
realise and understand that cre-
ating a regulator is a relatively
easy thing to do,” Mr Moree
told Tribune Business.

“Funding it, staffing it and
resourcing it is more difficult,
and this is where the real
resolve of the Government is
tested.

“We need to seriously review
the current resources made
available to the regulators, with
the exception of the Central
Bank, which generates its
income from bank licence fees.
In my view, almost all the other
regulators are underresourced
and understaffed.”

Turning to regulatory con-
solidation, Mr Moree added: “I
think it is vitally important for
us not to simply acknowledge
a consolidation of operations.

“While I applaud that devel-
opment as a first step, putting
them in the same building,
establishing protocols among
the regulatory bodies to min-
imise duplication, streamlining
procedures and_ sharing
resources, and achieving a high-

‘walked
a tightrope’
to health

FROM page 1B

us. Hang in there and watch the share value grow again.”

He added that “every decision made has been in the best inter-
ests of the company, including the minority shareholders”.

Mr Chatrani himself is effectively a corporate troubleshooter,
parachuted into City Markets by the largest shareholder in that
company and BSL Holdings, Trinidad-based Neal & Massey, in a
bid to sort out its financial woes.

“My job is to restructure it, settle it, get it back to profitability and
then leave,” Mr Chatrani said, once a long-term management
team had been identified.

He added that the information systems weaknesses that had
played a key role in City Markets’ recent woes had all been
addressed, and accurate financial information was available in
real-time to management.

Bahamas Supermarkets suffered a fiscal 2008 net loss of $13.429
million, with 2009 half-year losses standing at $3.527 million and the
firm then suffering from a $2 million-plus solvency deficiency.

Accounts

In addition, as at January 27, 2009, the unaudited management
accounts show that while Bahamas Supermarkets had current
assets of at least $21.37 million, its liabilities exceeded this by just
over $2 million, standing at $23.46 million.

Since it acquired Bahamas Supermarkets for $54 million in sum-
mer 2006, BSL Holdings and its investors have presided over a spec-
tacular destruction of shareholder value, producing an almost-$20
million swing into technical insolvency.

As at year-end 2007, Bahamas Supermarkets had net share-
holder equity of $17.615 million.

That had reduced to $1.427 million as at year-end 2008, and at
the 2009 half-year, this was at a negative $2.09 million.

In tandem, retained earnings have shrunk from $12.874 million
as at year-end 2007 to a position in the red of $3.304 million at year-
end 2008.

By the 2009 half-year point, that accumulated deficit had reached
$6.831 million.

BSi

BSI TRUST CORPORATION (BAHAMAS) LIMITED

is presently accepting applications for

COMPLIANCE AND INTERNAL CONTROLS OFFICER

The successful candidate for the position of Compliance and Internal Controls
Officer will monitor the regulatory framework and operational aspects of the Trust
in order to ensure compliance.

Qualifications:

* The candidate must have thorough knowledge of local legislation, regulatory &
statutory matters as well as international practices as they relate to the Trust
Industry;

He/She should possess the Intemational Diploma Anti Money Laundering and
Compliance, bachelors degree: and

Minimum of 3 -— § years working experience in the trust field. Preference will be
given to professionals with working experience for a Swiss Bank or Trust.

Personal qualities:

Excellent organizational, communication and computer skills
Positive attitude and outlook

Problem-solving skills

Commitment to quality and service excellence

Ability to partner with team members.

Responsibilities:
Ensure compliance of the Trust with local, international and internal group
raguiations and standards in order to limit legal, regulatory and reputation risk
Ad-hoc research and analysis of compliance issues
Maintain a proper framework of intemal control activities
Produce periodical reporting for the Audit Committee and Board of Directors
Liaise with Head Office and Bahamian reguiators as applicable
Will raport directly to the CEQ,

Interested persons with such qualifications should submit their resume/curriculum
vitae to:

Human Resources Manager

BS! Trust Corporation (Bahamas) Limited

Bayside Executive Park

P. 0. Box CB-10976

Nassau, Bahamas

Fax no. (242) §02-2310 or email: ruby.kerr@bsibank.com

(ABSOLUTELY NO PHONE CALLS PLEASE)
Only applicants having the above attributes will be contacted.

NMC SALES, SERVICE and PARTS
All for One NEW NUMBER

Distributors for Honda, Chevrolet, Cadillac and ACDelco Parts | Shirley Street, Nassau

“We need to
seriously look at
the resources of
the major
regulators.”



Brian Moree

er level of operational consoli-
dation, in my view it would be a
major mistake to stop at that
stage and not proceed with what
we were previously told was
going to happen - consolidating
those regulators into one super
regulator or two under the
“Twin Pillars’ model.

“T think it would be a great
mistake to stop, because what
we to do to finish the job is to
not only achieve physical con-
solidation under one roof, but
eliminate some of those regu-
lators by consolidating into one
or two. They’ve got to finish the



























regulators.”

Meanwhile, Mr Moree reit-
erated his call for a dedicated
commercial court in the
Bahamas, telling Tribune Busi-
ness that currently the Bahami-
an judicial system was largely
not disposing of complex com-
mercial cases within the 18-24
month timeframe widely
regarded as an international
benchmark.

“We need to establish a com-
mercial court. There has been
some debate in certain circles
as to whether there is enough
commercial work to justify a
commercial court,” he said,
describing this as a “chicken
and egg” situation.

Mr Moree added: “There is
wide consensus at the Bar, and
in the local and international
business community, that giv-
en our status as a major finan-
cial centre, and given our claim
to be a significant player in
banking and commerce, we
need to be able to deliver justice

THE AIRPORT AUTHORITY

Wier Her presence is ONG awaited ;

sonable period of time, and with
judges who are clearly seen by
the public as capable and expe-
rienced in those areas.”

Mr Moree said that setting
aside simple and highly com-
plex cases, most commercial
cases should make their way
through the court system by 18-
24 months. The Bahamas,
though, was “not there at the
moment”.

Apart from judges and a
properly-equipped physical
premises, Mr Moree said a com-
mercial court would need to be
fully equipped with a full staff
complement, including a regis-
trar, court reporters and clerks.

He added: “It is a fact that
Justice Lyons did an enormous
volume of commercial work,
and his resignation will put a
heavy burden on the Judicial
and Legal Services Commission
to ensure there are sufficient
justices with commercial expe-
rience to be able to deal with

these cases.”
rey? ae

The newest Junkanoo

singer/song writer to beat your eardrum:

}

comiirig) Me [OF 4

re I

LYNDEN PINDLING INTERNATIONAL AIRPORT

P.O. BOX AP-59222

NASSAU, BAHAMAS

REQUEST FOR PROPOSALS (RFP)

FOR FIRE TRUCK

The Airport Authority invites bids for the acquisition of a modern
fire engine for its Crash Fire Rescue operations at the Lynden
Pindling International Airport.

Specifications can be collected from the Executive Offices of the
Airport Authority, Lynden Pindling International Airport during
normal working hours at any time after the appearance of this RFP.
Bids must meet all specifications.

Bids not in compliance with the specifications will be rejected.
Bids must be signed by an individual duly authorized to bind the
bidder to the terms of a contract. Price must include any and all
shipping charges associated with delivery of the apparatus to
Nassau, The Bahamas.

Bids must be submitted by 30th June, 2009 at 11:00am at the men-

tioned address:

General Manager
Executive Offices
Airport Authority
Lynden Pindling International Airport
Nassau, Bahamas

and must be marked:
BIDS FOR FIRE TRUCK

2-0130 Kenxmc


PAGE 6B, FRIDAY, MAY 15, 2009

THE TRIBUNE



Water Corp top loser at $24.1m

FROM page 1B

reverse osmosis plant contract.
Tribune Business revealed sev-
eral years ago that Biwater

Blue Hills contract via an
agreement in principle, but
this was rescinded and the
deal awarded to Consolidat-
ed Water, triggering legal
action in the Bahamian courts.

was originally awarded the

SUGAR-CANE INVESTMENTS LTD.

(Company number 154,779B)

An International Business Company
(In Voluntary Liquidation)

Pursuant to Section 137(4) of the International
Business Companies Act, 2000 notice is hereby
given that the voluntary winding-up and dissolution
of the Company commenced on the 14th day of
May, 2009 and that Pine Limited of Devonshire
House, Queen Street, P.O. Box N-8176 Nassau,
Bahamas has been appointed Liquidator.

Dated this 14th day of May, 2009

Pine Limited
Liquidator

NOTICE
CHELSEA PROPERTIES
HOLDINGS LIMITED

In Voluntary Liquidation

Notice is hereby given that the above-named Company is in
dissolution, commencing on the 15" day of May, 2009. Articles
of dissolution have been duly registered by the Registrar. The
Liquidator is Kyrene Kelty of Nassau, Bahamas. All persons
having claims against the above-named Company are required
on or before the 29" day of May, 2009 to send their names
and addresses and particulars of their debts or claims to the
Liquidator of the Company, or in default thereof they may be
excluded from the benefit of any distribution made before such
debts are proved.

Dated this 15" day of May, 2009

Kyrene Kelty
Liquidator

MEDICAL SUPPLIES
LIQUIDATION SALE

Combine Pad Abdominal Pad 5*9 inch
400/case $150.00
Dental Cotton Rolls Medium
20,000/case $60.00
XL Gloves Latex Powered
1000/case $40.00
Large Gloves latex (Powder Free)
1000/case $40.00
Large Gloves Vinyl (Latex Free)
1000/case $35.00
Insulin Syringe 100U/ml
3600/case $175.00
Nebulizer Mask Kit Adult 20/ml,
Child 6ml, Chamber

100/case $130.00
Needle Holders
1200/case $70.00
Nasal Cannula Adult
100/case $60.00
Oxygen Mask Adult Large
100/case $75.00
1ML Syringe with 25G Needle
2400/case $100.00
3ML Syringe with 23G Needle
1500/case $100.00
SML Syringe with 21G Needle and 23G Needle
1200/case $100.00
10ML Syringe with 21G Needle
1200/case $100.00
Specimen Cups 40z Sterile
100/case $25.00
Sterile Surgical Gloves size 7 1/2, 8, 8 1/2,
600/case $55.00
Hypoallergenic Cloth Tape (Microspore Tape)

1 inch, 216/case

2 inch 108/case $100.00

Cash and Carry or Free Delivery Call
422-1457 - Ms. Miller



That case is before the Privy
Council, but Ms Munnings-
Kemp told Tribune Business:
“On a matter of principle,
they said they had to put that
in court, but no matter the
outcome, if this [proposal]
comes through that will be
negotiated away.”

When asked why the
BUSAWU had selected Biwa-
ter as the best strategic partner
for the Water & Sewerage
Corporation, she explained:
“Biwater has been here
before. We met with other
water companies and groups,
and felt Biwater was by far
the one with the most exper-
tise, knowledge and ability to
acquire the financing neces-
sary at the Water & Sewerage
Corporation.”

Ms Munnings-Kemp
declined to put a figure on the
likely investment any strate-
gic partner would need to
bring to the Water & Sewer-
age Corporation, as the
union/Biwater needed to con-

duct a more detailed inspec-
tion of its assets and opera-
tions once the Government
agreed to their proposal.

“Tm still waiting for a for-
mal response,” she added, the
union having presented its
proposal to Dr Earl Deveaux,
minister of the environment,
and Phenton Neymour, min-
ister of state for the environ-
ment and who has ultimate
responsibility for the Water &
Sewerage Corporation, in
February 2009.

In its plan, which is seeking
a 25-30 year management con-
cession for a strategic partner,
the union said that among the
Water & Sewerage Corpora-
tion’s greatest problems were
the fact that more than 53 per
cent of the water produced in
New Providence was lost via
leaks from its distribution sys-
tem.

Other issues were “wide-
spread customer dissatisfac-
tion” that the union’s plan
pegged at 68 per cent, and

Share your news

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from people who are
making news in their
neighbourhoods. Perhaps

you are raising funds for a
good cause, campaigning
for improvements in the
area or have won an
award.

If so, call us on 322-1986
and share your story.



NOTICE

“They have the
experience, the
technical capa-
bility and by
partnering with
an entity like
that, maybe we
can solve the
problems”



Munnings-Kemp

perceptions among 79 per cent
of customers that the Water
& Sewerage Corporation
delivered “low value for mon-
ey.

Apart from the fact that the
Water & Sewerage Corpora-
tion was delivering “no
return” on the Government’s
substantial investment in it,
the other issues included its
“low market penetration”,
with only 30 per cent of New
Providence residents taking
its supply.

At the end of its 2007 fiscal
year, while possessing fixed
assets valued at $171.656 mil-
lion, the Water & Sewerage
Corporation’s current assets
of just $4.196 million were
dwarfed by $71.137 million in
current liabilities.

Operating revenues fell
year-over-year compared to
2006, dropping 10.7 per cent to

stand at $38.236 million com-
pared to $42.813 million, while
operating expenses rose to
$53.009 million from $51.407
million.

As a result, the Water &
Sewerage Corporation’s oper-
ating loss increased by 34.4
per cent to $21.327 million,
compared to $15.684 million
in 2006.

Ms Munnings-Kemp said
that, as a result of the Water
& Sewerage Corporation
being forced to sell water at
below the cost it took to pur-
chase or produce it, “we're
taking a big hit all around. We
can’t continue taking that hit”.

She added: “Right now
there is a world of problems at
the Water & Sewerage Cor-
poration, and us being the
employees, we’re quite knowl-
edgeable about the problems.

“We have not been in a
position to do anything,
because we do not do the
funding. We have to rely on
the Government, so all deci-
sions are made for us. We
realise what all the problems
are, and why we need to finda
strategic partner like Biwater,
which has all the water ven-
tures around the world.

“They have the experience,
the technical capability and by
partnering with an entity like
that, maybe we can solve the
problems. Our hands have
been tied because we’ve not
been able to do anything
about it. We may not have all
the solutions, but let us make
the effort to get the organisa-
tion back on track.”

NOTICE
GREGORY, ELEUTHERA, BAHAMAS is applying to the

Minister responsible for Nationality and Citizenship, for

registration/naturalization as a citizen of The Bahamas,
and that any person who knows any reason why
registration/naturalization should not be granted, should
send a written and signed statement of the facts within
twenty-eight days from the 15 day of May, 2009 to the
Minister responsible for nationality and Citizenship, P.O. Box
N-7147, Nassau, Bahamas.

NOTICE

NOTICE is hereby given that FREDLEANE DELVA of
GOVERNOR’S HARBOUR, ELEUTHERA, BAHAMAS is applying
to the Minister responsible for Nationality and Citizenship, for
registration/naturalization as a citizen of The Bahamas, and that
any person who knows any reason why registration/naturalization
should not be granted, should send a written and signed statement
of the facts within twenty-eight days from the 8" day of May, 2009
to the Minister responsible for nationality and Citizenship, P.O. Box
N-7147, Nassau, Bahamas.

NOTICE

MAERSK BAHAMAS LTD.
(IN VOLUNTARY LIQUIDATION)

Creditors having debts or claims against the
above-named Company are required to send particulars
thereof to the undersigned at 35A Regent Street,
Belize City, Belize on or before the 12th of June
2009. In default thereof they will be excluded from
the benefit of any distribution made by the Liquidator.

Dated this thirteenth day of May 2009.

INTERNATIONAL LIQUIDATORS SERVICES
LIMITED
Liquidator
Of
MAERSK BAHAMAS LTD.

Notice

FANCI HILLS LID.
In Voluntary Liquidation

Notice is hereby given that in accordance with Section
138(4) of the International Business Companies Act.
FANCI HILLS LTD. is in dissolution as of

2000,
May 13, 2009.

International Liquidator Services Inc. situated at 35A
Regent Street, PO. Box 1777, Belize City, Belize is

the Liquidator.

LIQUIDATOR

is hereby given that ANDRE JULIEN of

NOTICE is hereby given that KERLINE ESTIME of
BAHAMA AVE., BLUE HILL ROAD, P.O. BOX N-
4922, NASSAU, BAHAMAS is applying to the Minister
responsible for Nationality and Citizenship, for registration/
naturalization as a citizen of The Bahamas, and that
any person who knows any reason why registration/
naturalization should not be granted, should send a
written and signed statement of the facts within twenty-
eight days from the 8 day of May, 2009 to the Minister
responsible for nationality and Citizenship, P.O. Box
N-7147, Nassau, Bahamas.

NOTICE

NOTICE is hereby given that GLORIA FRANCIS of
CARMICHAEL ROAD, is applying to the Minister
responsible for Nationality and Citizenship, for registration/
naturalization as a citizen of The Bahamas, and that
any person who knows any reason why registration/
naturalization should not be granted, should send
a written and signed statement of the facts within
twenty-eight days from the 15 day of May, 2009 to the
Minister responsible for nationality and Citizenship, P.O. Box
N-7147, Nassau, Bahamas.

NOTICE
INTERNATIONAL BUSINESS COMPANIES ACT
No. 45 of 2000

FINENZ S.A.

Notice is hereby given that in accordance with Section
137 of The International Business Companies Act
No. 45 of 2000, FINENZ S.A. is in dissolution. The
date of commencement of dissolution was the 16th
day of April, 2009. Dillon Dean of Nassau, Bahamas
is the Liquidator of FINENZ S.A.

Dillon Dean
LIQUIDATOR

NOTICE

WINBURY ENTERPRISES LTD.
In Voluntary Liquidation

Notice is hereby given that in accordance
with Section 138(4) of the International Business
Companies Act. 2000, WINBURY ENTERPRISES
LTD. is in dissolution as of May 13, 2009.

Mark Kardonski situated at Durango
Colorado is the Liquidator.

LIQUIDATOR








PAGE 1

N N A A S S S S A A U U A A N N D D B B A A H H A A M M A A I I S S L L A A N N D D S S L L E E A A D D I I N N G G N N E E W W S S P P A A P P E E R R Exuma economy is ‘expected to crash’ C M Y K C M Y K Volume: 105 No.143FRIDAY, MAY 15, 2009 PRICE – 75 (Abaco and Grand Bahama $1.25 WEATHER SUNSHINE ANDBREEZY HIGH 86F LOW 76F SEEBUSINESSFRONT S P O R T S SEETHISSECTIONPAGEELEVEN Water Corp top loser at $24.1m BFA getting set for FIFA Congress n By TANEKA THOMPSON Tribune Staff Reporter tthompson@ tribunemedia.net BUSINESSES in Exuma are bracing for an economic crash following the announce ment of the closure of the island's largest employer, the Four Seasons at Emerald Bay, according Anthony Moss, MP for the area. "Without a doubt, it will cer tainly affect the economy of Exuma to the point where I can say it will be devastated,” he said. “When you look at the persons who have rental properties, those person are going to lose their clients, transporta tion provided by taxi drivers is going to be affected, even the small business people, people who have grocery stores are going to be affected. "If you have a population of 6,000 on the island and if you lose 500 jobs the effects are going to trickle down to small businesses, beauty salons, foodstores people are going to feel it. A day after news broke that the luxury development would "temporarily" shut its doors on May 26 leaving about 500 people jobless Mr Moss said people on the island are putting up a brave front. "Some people are saying they are ready for it," he said, likening the blow to thec losure of the Out Island Inn in the 1980s which drove many from Exuma in search for work. Melanie Morley, co-owner of Charlie's Restaurant and Bara t Exuma's Fish Fry, said while she anticipates some knock off effects to her business from the closure, she is going to remain optimistic. "Behind every dark cloud is a silver lining so I'm just waiting to see where the silver lining of this is, but of course the hotel's closing will have a trickle down effect on everything, but I'm optimistic," she said, adding that she is hoping the hotel will soon attract a new buyer. The establishment, which serves local fare, routinely attracts guests and staff from the nearby Four Seasons resort, said Ms Morley. A manager of a car rental MP speaks out over Four Seasons closure The Tribune ANYTIME ... ANYPLACE , WE RE #1 B AHAMASEDITION TRY OUR SOUTHERN CHICKEN BISCUIT www.tribune242.com Businessman gunned down in his home BAHAMASBIGGEST CARSFORSALE, HELPWANTED ANDREALESTATE I N S I D E n By TANEKA THOMPSON Tribune Staff Reporter tthompson@ tribunemedia.net THE quiet community of Hooper's Bay, Exuma, was in shock yesterday when news spread that one of the area’s well-known businessmen had been shot and was in hospital in serious condition. Police said 36-year-old Rodney Burrows, a promi nent contractor originally from Long Island, was held up by a masked gunman who shot him multiple times at his home, on the second floor of the building which houses his company, Burrows Development Limited. The shoot ing took place around 2am yesterday. According to a report by Assistant Superintendent Walter Evans, Mr Burrows was accosted in his home by a dark complexioned man who ordered him to lie on the floor. The assailant, who stood 5' 9" and was dressed in brown trousers and brown Exuma’s second largest employer airlifted to Nassau SEE page eight IMMIGRA TION RAID SEE page eight ANTHONY MOSS C M Y K C M Y K S E C T I O N B b u s i n e s s @ t r i b u n e m e d i a . n e t F R I D A Y , M A Y 1 5 , 2 0 0 9 T H E T R I B U N E $ 4 .6 8$ 4 .5 1$ 4 .6 9T h e i n f o r m a t i o n c o n t a i n e d i s f r o m a t h i r d p a r t y a n d T h e T r i b u n e c a n n o t b e h e l d r e s p o n s i b l e f o r e r r o r s a n d / o r o m i s s i o n f r o m t h e d a i l y r e p o r t . $ 3 . 5 3 $ 3 . 6 2 $ 3 . 4 8 g r o u p p e n s i o n s a t t r a c t t h e c r e a m o f t h e c r o p k e e p p r e s e n t e m p l o y e e s h a p p y g u a r a n t e e s t a f f r e t i r e m e n t s a v i n g sa l l o f t h e a b o v ec a l l u s t o d a y a t 3 9 6 4 0 0 0S A L E S O F F I C E S : N A S S A U I F R E E P O R T I A B A C O I E L E U T H E R A I E X U M A I C O R P O R A T E C E N T R E : E A S T B A Y S T R E E T I w w w . f a m g u a r d b a h a m a s . c o m A S U B S I D I A R Y O F B a h a m a s m o s t v u l n e r a b l e t o e c o n o m i c s t o r m C i t y M a r k e t s w a l k e d a t i g h t r o p e t o h e a l t h nB y N E I L H A R T N E L L T r i b u n e B u s i n e s s E d i t o r T h e B a h a m a s m u s t d e v e l o p a n e w b u s i n e s s m o d e l a n d p r o a c t i v e N a t i o n a l P l a n t o e n s u r e i t s f i n a n c i a l s e r v i c e s i n d u s t r y s u r v i v e s t h e m o s t s e v e r e c h a l l e n g e i t h a s e v e r f a c e d , a s e n i o r a t t o r n e y s a i d y e s t e r d a y , a s h e u r g e d t h e G o v e r n m e n t t o a d o p t a d i f f e r e n t a p p r o a c h t o c o m p l y i n g w i t h t a x t r a n s p a r e n c y d e m a n d s . B r i a n M o r e e , s e n i o r p a r t n e r a t M c K i n n e y , B a n c r o f t & H u g h e s , c a l l e d o n t h e G o v e r n m e n t t o d e v e l o p a l o n g t e r m s t r a t e g y t h a t w o u l d e n a b l e t h e B a h a m a s t o a v o i d a k n e e j e r k r e a c t i o n e v e r y t i m e t h e O r g a n i s a t i o n f o r E c o n o m i c C o o p e r a t i o n a n d D e v e l o p m e n t ( O E C D ) a n d i t s c o n t e m p o r a r i e s u n v e i l e d a n e w i n i t i a t i v e a t t a c k i n g i n t e r n a t i o n a l f i n a n c i a l c e n t r e s . A n d h e u r g e d t h e G o v e r n m e n t t o c r e a t e a s t a n d a l o n e M i n i s t r y o f F i n a n c i a l S e r v i c e s t o g i v e t h e B a h a m a s s e c o n d l a r g e s t i n d u s t r y i t s o w n m i n i s t r y , m u c h l i k e h o w t o u r i s m h a d t h e M i n i s t r y o f T o u r i s m . F i n a n c i a l i n d u s t r y f a c e s m o s t s e v e r e c h a l l e n g e e v e r * S e n i o r a t t o r n e y c a l l s f o r n e w b u s i n e s s m o d e l t o e n s u r e l o n g t e r m s u r v i v a l , a s c u r r e n t o n e l a r g e l y r e d u n d a n t * M o r e e s a y s g o v e r n m e n t n e e d s d i f f e r e n t a p p r o a c h t o T I E A t a l k s , u r g i n g c r e a t i o n o f N a t i o n a l P l a n a n d M i n i s t r y o f F i n a n c i a l S e r v i c e s t o c o m b a t G 2 0 / O E C D * B a h a m a s n e e d s a l l i a n c e s a n d t o a v o i d k n e e j e r k r e a c t i o n s t o O E C D t y p e i n i t i a t i v e sS E E p a g e 4 B B r i a n M o r e e nB y N E I L H A R T N E L L T r i b u n e B u s i n e s s E d i t o r T h e G o v e r n m e n t w a s y e s t e r d a y u r g e d t o f i n i s h t h e j o b o f f i n a n c i a l s e r v i c e s r e g u l a t o r y c o n s o l i d a t i o n b y m e r g i n g t h e e x i s t i n g s u p e r v i s o r y i n t o e i t h e r a s i n g l e s u p e r r e g u l a t o r o r t h e T w i n P e a k s m o d e l , a s e n i o r a t t o r n e y s a y i n g i t w o u l d b e a m i s t a k e t o s t o p a f t e r m o v i n g m o s t i n t o o n e b u i l d i n g . B r i a n M o r e e , s e n i o r p a r t n e r a t M c K i n n e y , B a n c r o f t & H u g h e s , t o l d T r i b u n e B u s i n e s s t h a t w h i l e h e a p p l a u d e d t h e d e c i s i o n t o m o v e a l l f i n a n c i a l s e r v i c e s r e g u l a t o r s b a r t h e C e n t r a l B a n k s s u p e r v i s i o n d e p a r t m e n t u n d e r o n e r o o f , t h e G o v e r n m e n t n e e d e d t o g o f u r t h e r t h a n s i m p l y p h y s i c a l c o n s o l i d a t i o n . T h e S e c u r i t i e s C o m m i s s i o n o f t h e B a h a m a s h a s t a k e n o n G o v e r n m e n t u r g e d : F i n i s h r e g u l a t o r y c o n s o l i d a t i o n j o b B a h a m a s n o t t h e r e i n t e r m s o f t i m e t o h e a r a n d d i s p o s e o f c o m m e r c i a l c a s e s S E E p a g e 5 B nB y N E I L H A R T N E L L T r i b u n e B u s i n e s s E d i t o r C i t y M a r k e t s w a l k e d a t i g h t r o p e t o g e t b a c k o n a s t a b l e f i n a n c i a l f o o t i n g , i t s c h i e f e x e c u t i v e h a s t o l d T r i b u n e B u s i n e s s , c a r r y i n g n o m o r e t h a n o n e w e e k s w o r t h o f i n v e n t o r y f o r i t s s t o r e s a f t e r g u a r a n t e e i n g B a h a m i a n w h o l e s a l e r s / d i s t r i b u t o r s w o u l d r e c e i v e p a y m e n t s f o r s u p p l i e s o n a w e e k l y b a s i s . S u n i l C h a t r a n i , w h o h e a d s t h e 1 2 s t o r e s u p e r m a r k e t c h a i n s p u b l i c l y l i s t e d h o l d i n g c o m p a n y , B a h a m a s S u p e r m a r k e t s , s a i d t h a t a f t e r t a k i n g o v e r h i s p o s t i n O c t o b e r 2 0 0 8 , h e a s k e d t h e c o m p a n y s v e n d o r s a t o n e o f h i s f i r s t m e e t i n g s t o s e t a s i d e t h e a c c o u n t s p a y a b l e s o w e d t o t h e m b y C i t y M a r k e t s . W e g u a r a n t e e , o n a w e e k l y b a s i s , t o p a y y o u w h a t w e o w e y o u , a n d t o p a y s o m e o f t h e b a l a n c e , w a s t h e m e s s a g e M r C h a t r a n i d e l i v e r e d t o t h e m . H e t o l d T r i b u n e B u s i n e s s t h i s w e e k : W e s t u c k w i t h i t . I t w a s w a l k i n g a t i g h t r o p e w e h a d n o m o r e t h a n o n e w e e k s i n v e n t o r y i n s t o r e . I t w a s v e r y t i g h t . W e h a d t o m a k e s u r e w e f i x e d t h e b u s i n e s s f i r s t b e f o r e n e w f u n d s c a m e i n t o t h e c o m p a n y . W e w a l k e d a t i g h t r o p e . T h e C i t y M a r k e t s c h i e f e x e c u t i v e a d d e d t h a t w h i l e s t i l l t i g h t o n l i q u i d i t y / c a s h f l o w , t h e c o m p a n y h a d b e e n a b l e t o m e e t a l l i t s c o m m i t m e n t s . M r C h a t r a n i p r a i s e d t h e s u p p o r t C i t y M a r k e t s r e c e i v e d f r o m i t s B a h a m i a n w h o l e s a l e / d i s t r i b u t o r s u p p l i e r s a s f a n t a s t i c , a d d i n g : T h e y v e r e a l l y h e l p e d u s , I c a n t e l l y o u . E v a n g e l i n e R a h m i n g , B a h a m a s S u p e r m a r k e t s c h i e f f i n a n c i a l o f f i c e r , a d d e d : T h e y [ t h e w h o l e s a l e r s ] d i d n t w a n t C i t y M a r k e t s t o f a i l . R e f i tV e n d o r s h a d h e l p e d t o r e f i t a n d r e s e t C i t y M a r k e t s p r o d u c e d e p a r t m e n t , p u t t i n g i n n e w e q u i p m e n t , w h i l e f r e e z e r s n o t w o r k i n g h a d b e e n r e p l a c e d . T r i b u n e B u s i n e s s y e s t e r d a y e x c l u s i v e l y r e v e a l e d t h a t i n v e s t o r s i n B S L H o l d i n g s , t h e 7 8 p e r c e n t m a j o r i t y B a h a m a s S u p e r m a r k e t s s h a r e h o l d e r , h a d c o m m i t t e d i n p r i n c i p l e t o i n j e c t i n g a d d i t i o n a l e q u i t y c a p i t a l i n t o t h e c o m p a n y t o e n a b l e i t t o r e l a u n c h b y J u n e 1 , 2 0 0 9 , a n d r e s t a r t i t s i m p o r t e d p r o d u c e p r o g r a m m e t o g e n e r a t e i n c r e a s e d s a l e s , g r o s s m a r g i n s a n d h i g h e r c o n s u m e r v o l u m e a n d p e r c a p i t a s p e n d . W e r e a h e a d o f t h e p r o j e c t i o n s , M r C h a t r a n i s a i d . W e v e r e a c h e d t h e s t a g e w h e r e , o n c e t h i s p r o g r a m m e k i c k s i n , i t s a m a t t e r o f c o n s t a n t r e f i n i n g . W e r e l o o k i n g a t p u t t i n g b a k e r i e s , p h a r m a c i e s i n t h e s t o r e s . W e r e l o o k i n g a t o p e n i n g h o u r s t o s e e w h a t m a k e s s e n s e , w h a t d o e s n t m a k e s e n s e . M r C h a t r a n i a d d e d t h a t C i t y M a r k e t s m a n a g e m e n t f e e l s t r o n g l y w e a r e g o i n g t o h i t a n d b e t t e r t h e f i n a n c i a l t a r g e t s t h e c o m p a n y h a s s e t f o r i t s t u r n a r o u n d , a n d u r g e d t h e c o m p a n y s 2 2 p e r c e n t m i n o r i t y s h a r e h o l d e r s s o m e o f w h o m a r e c o n t e m p l a t i n g l e g a l a c t i o n a g a i n s t t h e f i r m a n d i t s B o a r d o f D i r e c t o r s o v e r t h e d e s t r u c t i o n o f s h a r e h o l d e r v a l u e t o b e p a t i e n t a s t h e o n l y w a y w a s u p . T h e v a l u e o f t h e s h a r e s , a s w e k n o w , h a s d e c l i n e d s i g n i f i c a n t l y , b u t t h e v a l u e i s g o i n g t o b e o n t h e f u t u r e c a s h f l o w s , M r C h a t r a n i s a i d . I w o u l d s a y t h e m e s s a g e i s t o b e p a t i e n t . T h e w o r s t i s b e h i n d F i r m l o o k i n g a t b a k e r i e s , p h a r m a c i e s i n s t o r e , a n d o p e n i n g h o u r sS E E p a g e 5 B * S t o r m a n d s e a s u r g e s t o k n o c k a l m o s t $ 5 0 m o f f B a h a m i a n G D P , W o r l d B a n k p r e d i c t s * N a t i o n r a n k e d a s w o r l d s m o s t v u l n e r a b l e i n t h r e e o u t o f s i x W o r l d B a n k c a t e g o r i e snB y C H E S T E R R O B A R D S B u s i n e s s R e p o r t e r c r o b a r d s @ t r i b u n e m e d i a . n e t A W O R L D B a n k s t u d y h a s p r e d i c t e d t h a t t h e B a h a m a s c o u l d l o s e U S $ 4 8 . 9 2 m i l l i o n i n g r o s s d o m e s t i c p r o d u c t ( G D P ) a s a r e s u l t o f i n c r e a s e d s t o r m s u r g e s , w i t h t h i s c o u n t r y r a n k e d i n t h r e e o u t o f s i x c a t e g o r i e s a s t h e n a t i o n w o r s t i m p a c t e d b y S e a L e v e l R i s e ( S L R ) b r o u g h t o n b y g l o b a l w a r m i n g . . A c c o r d i n g t o t h e f i n d i n g s , a n e s t i m a t e d 1 , 5 1 7 s q u a r e m i l e s o f B a h a m i a n c o a s t l i n e c o u l d b e i m p a c t e d o v e r a n u m b e r o f y e a r s a s g l o b a l s e a l e v e l s r i s e , r e p r e s e n t i n g 5 4 . 6 7 p e r c e n t o f t h e n a t i o n s t o t a l c o a s t l i n e . S E E p a g e 2 B nB y N E I L H A R T N E L L T r i b u n e B u s i n e s s E d i t o r T h e W a t e r & S e w e r a g e C o r p o r a t i o n s $ 2 0 m i l l i o n p l u s p e r a n n u m s u b s i d i e s c o u l d b e e l i m i n a t e d o v e r a f i v e y e a r p e r i o d t o 2 0 1 3 b y r e d u c i n g t h e m b y $ 4 m i l l i o n e v e r y y e a r , a m a n a g e m e n t / o p e r a t i n g a g r e e m e n t p r o p o s a l i s a r g u i n g , w i t h t h e C o r p o r a t i o n h a v i n g n o w o v e r t a k e n B a h a m a s a i r a s t h e G o v e r n m e n t s h e a v i e s t l o s s m a k e r . T h e p r o p o s a l s u b m i t t e d t o t h e G o v e r n m e n t b y t h e B U S A W U , t h e u n i o n t h a t r e p r e s e n t s t h e C o r p o r a t i o n s l i n e w o r k e r s , a c o p y o f w h i c h h a s b e e n s e e n b y T r i b u n e B u s i n e s s , r e v e a l e d t h a t i n 2 0 0 7 t h e l a s t y e a r f o r w h i c h t h e W a t e r & S e w e r a g e C o r p o r a t i o n s f i n a n c i a l s w e r e a v a i l a b l e i t s n e t l o s s i n c r e a s e d b y 2 6 . 7 p e r c e n t , f r o m $ 1 9 . 0 2 1 m i l l i o n t o $ 2 4 . 1 0 7 m i l l i o n . C o u p l e d w i t h t h e $ 3 0 m i l l i o n t a x p a y e r s u b s i d y i t h a s r e c e i v e d i n t h e 2 0 0 8 2 0 0 9 B u d g e t y e a r , t h e n e t l o s s m a k e s t h e W a t e r & S e w e r a g e C o r p o r a t i o n t h e G o v e r n m e n t s l a r g e s t l o s s m a k i n g C o r p o r a t i o n s o m e t h i n g t h e u n i o n s p r e s i d e n t b e l i e v e s t h e i r p r o p o s a l a n r e v e r s e . C a r m e n M u n n i n g s K e m p t o l d T r i b u n e B u s i n e s s y e s t e r d a y t h a t t h e u n i o n w a s s t i l l a w a i t i n g t h e G o v e r n m e n t s f o r m a l r e s p o n s e t o a p r o p o s a l t h a t a s t r a t e g i c p a r t n e r t a k e o v e r m a n a g e m e n t / o p e r a t i o n o f t h e W a t e r & S e w e r a g e C o r p o r a t i o n , b r i n g i n g w i t h i t t h e e x p e r t i s e , t e c h n i c a l c a p a b i l i t y a n d a b i l i t y t o a c c e s s h u n d r e d s o f m i l l i o n s o f d o l l a r s i n f i n a n c i n g t o u p g r a d e i t s i n f r a s t r u c t u r e a n d o p e r a t i o n s . T h e B U S A W U d o c u m e n t r e v e a l e d t h a t t h e p r o p o s e d s t r a t e g i c p a r t n e r i s U K h e a d q u a r t e r e d B i w a t e r P l c a n d i t s s u b s i d i a r y , C a s c a l , t w o c o m p a n i e s t h a t s h o u l d b e v e r y f a m i l i a r w i t h t h e B a h a m a s a n d t h e C o r p o r a t i o n s p r o b l e m s . F o r B i w a t e r w a s t h e r u n n e r u p t o C o n s o l i d a t e d W a t e r i n t h e b i d d i n g f o r t h e B l u e H i l l s W a t e r C o r p t o p l o s e r a t $ 2 4 . 1 m O v e r t a k e s B a h a m a s a i r a s b i g g e s t d r a i n w i t h 2 6 . 7 % n e t l o s s r i s e , a s u n i o n p r o p o s a l a d v o c a t e s s u b s i d y e l i m i n a t i o n b y 2 1 0 3 w i t h $ 4 m p e r y e a r r e d u c t i o n F o r m e r B l u e H i l l s b i d d e r B i w a t e r u n i o n s s e l e c t e d o p e r a t i n g / m a n a g e m e n t p a r t n e r S E E p a g e 6 B B U S I N E S S IMMIGRATION offi cials were busy yesterday capturing more than 20 suspected illegal immigrants during an early morning raid in the Mar shall Road area. According to Immigration State Minister Branville McCartney, officers were already in the area conducting an early morning raid when they received a tip that another group of migrants had landed in the area. Capturing an estimated 20 persons, Mr McCart ney said that officers were still busy yesterday searching the surrounding area as they are certain more persons were concealed in the bushes. The Department expects to release an updated report on this raid as early as this morning. A POLICE OFFICER searches bushes in the Marshall Road area for suspected illegal immigrants yesterday. T i m C l a r k e / T r i b u n e s t a f f n By ALISON LOWE Tribune Staff Reporter alowe@tribunemedia.net POLICE and businesses nation-wide are warning people to beware after many claim they were hit with unexpected demands for thousands of dollars after receiving an unsolicited phone call from a foreign com pany. Owners and their employees yesterday described being “has sled” and “intimidated” for months by representatives of Island Yellow Pages, who told them they had entered into a Businesses claim phone call from foreign company led to ‘intimidation’ SEE page 10 INSIDE MURDERED MAN ‘DID NOT QUALIFY AS REFUGEE’ P A GE TWO GB COMPANY EMPLOYEES FACE UNCERTAIN FUTURE PAGETHREE OUTRAGE AS LEGISLATION OUTL AWING SEA TURTLE HAR VES TING PUT ON HOLD P A GE FIVE THE retrial of Bishop Earl Randy Fraser, who is accused of having a sexual relationship with a 16-year-old girl, is expected to continue in Magistrate’s Court, the Tribune has learned. According to sources close to the matter, Chief Justice Sir Burton Hall has returned the matter to Magistrate Carolita Bethel for the continuation of the retrial, having not been satisfied that the challenge launched by Fraser’s attorney Wayne Munroe should be heard in the Supreme Court. Fraser’s retrial, which began last Monday, was halted after his attorneys filed a constitutional application. Fraser, who is on $10,000 bail, is accused of having a sexual relationship with a 16year-old girl between July 2005 and February 2006. So far five Bishop Fraser retrial expected to continue SEE page eight

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C M Y K C M Y K LOCAL NEWS PAGE 2, FRIDAY, MAY 15, 2009 THE TRIBUNE n By MEGAN REYNOLDS Tribune Staff Reporter m reynolds@tribunemedia.net THE Haitian man murdered in Santo Domingo after he wasr efused political asylum in Grand Bahama did not qualify for refugee status under normal protocol, the Immigration D epartment said. But president of the Haitian Bahamian Society of the Bahamas Jetta Baptiste is calling for a review of current policiesa s she said Anderson Pierre told the Immigration Department his family was in hiding and feared for their lives in his first application for refugee status in May 2007. M r Pierre, 37, was forced to leave the country when a seco nd review of his application for political asylum was refused by the Immigration Department in September 2008. As a result he set off to find a new home for hisw ife, Paulette, and newborn son in the Dominican Republic inF ebruary this year. He was then shot dead by unknown gunmen o n April 24. Mrs Baptiste said Mr Pierre informed Immigration in his first application of armed men ransacking his home in Port-au-P rince in April 2007 and that his family were in hiding. A nd she has called for government to urgently review the c urrent immigration policies as Mr Pierre’s young family await t he results of their applications for political asylum in Freeport. Mrs Baptiste said: “If someone tells you they are afraid to return home because they ‘will be killed’, I don't know what else that can be said to justify a denial of such an urgent plea for ‘help’. “I know exactly what happened, and I am waiting to see if and when Immigration will admit that they were wrong in t his and other decisions they have made.” The Immigration Department maintains Mr Pierre failed to qualify for refugee status under the United Nations 1951 Convention relating to the status of Refugees and its 1967 Protocol. And that records show Mr P ierre arrived in Grand Bahama on May 6, 2007, was awarded visitor’s status for 14 days, and s ubsequently applied for an extension. The extension wasr efused. Further investigation revealed that Mr Pierre’s visa to e nter the Bahamas was obtained by fraudulent means, the department claimed. Arrest The father-of-four then applied for political asylum on May 29, 2007 and informed I mmigration he had been a bodyguard and chauffeur for a Haitian Commissioner under Jean-Bertrand Aristide’s rule.W hen Aristide was forced into exile, the commissioner was placed under arrest for more than a year and then lived in the Dominican Republic. T he director of Immigration requested a further review of MrP ierre’s application when he saw it in June 2007. B ut the second review was unsuccessful and Mr Pierre was instructed to “wind-up his affairs” and leave the country within 21 days of September 5, 2 008. He received his refugee refusal letter on September 29,2 008. Mrs Baptiste maintains Mr P ierre left Freeport for Cap Hai tien in February to find a new home for his family, and was killed within weeks of his arrival. However, a statement from the Bahamas Immigration Department claims it has been unable to confirm Mr Pierre’s murder, but “wishes to conveyt he Pierre family its sincere and heartfelt condolences on thea lleged passing of their beloved husband and father.” M rs Baptiste said the system failed Mr Pierre and his family and called for those making decisions over applications to consider them more carefully. S he said: “I am sure the few good people who are in a posi-t ion to make a decision concerning these types of cases, w ould look into them more closely, and truly help those who genuinely need it. “What status will the Immi gration department afford to his w ife and child in view of this sad situation? What is going to happen to all the other political asylum r equest that were denied? Are these cases going to be revisited, reconsidered and given favourable consideration? “Life is precious, but the B ahamas should know by now, that not all of the persons whoc ome to these shores come here for economic reasons.” A mnesty International has called for a thorough investigation of the matter. Murdered man ‘did not qualify as refugee’ Anderson Pierre Jetta Baptiste President of Haitian Bahamian Society calls for review of policies n By ALISON LOWE T ribune Staff Reporter alowe@tribunemedia.net FOLLOWING allegations that the FNM has “wastefully” allowed a brand new $1.3 million medical clinic to go unused fory ears, Health Minister Hubert Minnis yesterday said PLP Sena-t or Jerome Fitzgerald should “check his facts.” D uring Wednesday’s Senate session, Mr Fitzgerald said that t he clinic in Grand Cay, Abaco, was “completed and fully furnished” more than two years ago. He said the fact that it remains unused is yet another example of p oor management of the nation’s affairs by the government. Y esterday, Dr Minnis denied that two years have passed since t he building was completed, telling The Tribune that it was “scheduled” to open on April 24, 2009, but this was postponed as there are still some landscaping works and other “minor problems” to be dealt with. S tating that the new, modern facility should be open to the publ ic within two months, the minis ter emphasised that “no Bahamian’s health has been compro mised” as a result of the delay in opening the clinic. Dr Minnis said he feared that if certain things were not finished b efore the clinic opens to the public, they “would never be done.” C ompleting the work before the opening, he said, will help ensure that the new clinic has “an environment and ambiance con ducive to public health.” Hitting back at the Opposition, the Health Minister alluded to problems experienced by many people who moved into low-cost government-built homes under the former PLP administration. “This clinic will be open in very short order and when you see landscaping and everything done properly you will ask, ‘Why can’t we do every clinic and building like this?’ We want to make sure that people don’t move into buildings, into homes, where things aren’t complete, where there’s landscaping still to do in the yard, plastering – we need to stop homes being built like that.” Minister of Health denies claims of ‘abandoned clinic’ DR MYLES MUNROE , founder and president of Bahamas Faith MinistriesInternational, addressed the Ministry of Tourism and Aviation-sponsored first annual Gospel Complex for Education and Preserva tion Conference in Florida last week. “Embracing the Future Through Creative Arts” served as the theme of this year’s conference, which included work shops and seminars that focused on the creative arts and the role that gospel music has played in the history of American music. The four-day event featured some of gospel music’s premier recording artists, including Smokie Norful and Dorinda Clark Cole. Dr Munroe’s speech highlight ed the similarities in history and culture of Bahamians and African Americans in relation to the gospel music experience. He also noted that “God lives in the Bahamas” and that the Gospel Complex should not be created without including the Bahamas since Miami and Fort Lauderdale are “the northern Bahamas.” The Gospel Complex is a nonprofit organisation whose mission it is to promote, preserve, and perpetuate the evolving history of gospel music through education and economic empow erment. Dr Myles Munr oe addr esses first Gospel Complex for Education and Pr eser vation Confer ence WENTWORTH SEARS , 40, yesterday expressed his gratitude to the good Samaritan who purchased a new tricycle and walking apparatus for him. An article in Wednesday’s Tribune explained that the items had been stolen from his Market Street home on Monday night. Mr Sears, who makes his living selling T-shirts to tourists in the downtown area, said: “I just want to thank the person who donated the brand new bike and walker. “I just want to show my gratitude and to say that there are still some good people out there, so from the bottom of my h eart, thank you whoever you are.” M r Sears suffers from cerebral palsy and cannot earn a living without both the walker and the tricycle. Sam Williams, President of the Bahamas Loving Care Asso ciation, said that someone had initially gone to make a down payment on the bicycle only to return and discover that it had already been paid for. “We have good people out there in the community, all is not lost,” Mr Williams said. GOOD SAMARITAN REPLACESTRICYCLE, WALKINGAPPARATUS F e l i p M a j o r / T r i b u n e s t a f f

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n By DENISE MAYCOCK Tribune Freeport Reporter dmaycock@tribunemedia.net FREEPORT Jamaican Prime Minister Bruce Golding said CARICOM is still facing chall enges of regional integration of e conomies and people. “The world is being reconfigured into regional groupings. We are having that in terms of trade, w e are having that in terms of if you look at the European Union, and for that reason CARICOM as a major integration effort is i mportant,” said Mr Golding. T he Jamaican Prime Minister was in Grand Bahama attending the fifth Commonwealth Local Government Conference at the W estin Resort. Before delivering his keynote address to conference delegates, he met with the press Thursday morning. M r Golding noted that while C ARICOM is facing difficulties “that are most pragmatic as well as historical and emotional, it is working through those difficulties. “Integration has to integrate n ot just economies, it has to inte grate people,” he said. T he CARICOM Single Market and Economy is intended to benefit the people of the region by providing more and better opportunities to produce and sello ur goods and services and to attract investment. It will createo ne large market among the par ticipating member states. M r Golding said that with a single economic space, the objec tive and the obligation is that there must be free movement of goods, free movement of capital,a nd ultimately free movement of people. I (have that you can’t have a common m arket where goods and capital can move free, but people can not move freely. People move in the European Union freely so that’s the goal, but the practical d ifficulty we face is that we are small island states,” he explained. M r Golding stated that islands with smaller populations would b e more severely impacted than those with larger populations. “If you take a country like Antigua with a population of just under 50,000, or take a country l ike the Bahamas for example, if there were free movement of peop le how many Haitians would the Bahamas have to accommodate, s o these are some real practical difficulties. “For countries with relatively large populations like J amaica with 2.7 million, it does not impact us severely, but for islands with smaller populations, it is a major challenge and these a re the things we have to work through,” Mr Golding said. Mr Golding said that certain restrictions may have to be implemented so that countries can con-t inue to maintain their domestic national interest. He believes that the dream of Chaguarmas will be realised someday. “With every a dvance we make we are closer to fulfilling the dream, but it is going to take years, perhaps even generations before we get to that point,” he said. R elationship Mr Golding said the Bahamas and Jamaica share a very good r elationship and collaborate on a wide range of issues affecting both countries, including drug trafficking. He said both the Bahamas and J amaica are located on the Cent ral Caribbean route, which is widely used for narcotics traff icking. Mr Golding expressed concern about the United Statess hifting its focus from the region to the Pacific route. “For both ( the Bahamas and Jamaica) we are exposed and we have been collaborating to counter the corrosive impact of narcotics trafficking. It is one of the issues thatw e raised with President Obama when we met with him in Port ofS pain last month. “We are not happy about the f act that the focus of the United States, having shifted toward Pacific route as it has through the M arine Initiative, that this route has been left exposed that neit her the Bahamas, nor Jamaica has the capabilities to maintain t he surveillance it requires. “And we are asking the US to be more engaged with us on this issue that I expect we will discuss when we meet with him again in W ashington in July. On that one we are going to forge a working r elationship between the US and the Caribbean,” he said. C M Y K C M Y K LOCAL NEWS THE TRIBUNE FRIDAY, MAY 15, 2009, PAGE 3 THREE men have been granted $7,500 bail after pleading not guilty to a marijuana possession c harge on Wednesday. James Ivan Gaitor, 28, of Domingo Heights; Samuel Gaitor, 18, of Baillou Hill Road South;a nd Akeem Saunders, 19, of Baillou Hill Road South, pleaded notg uilty to the charge of possession of marijuana with intent to supply. I t is alleged that on Monday, May 11, the accused were found i n possession of one pound of marijuana that authorities believedt hey intended to supply to another. T he men appeared before Magistrate Carolita Bethel at Court 8,B ank Lane. The case has been adjourned to September 9. C ourt system ‘in d eplorable state’ In brief ELECTIONS for a new president, directors and officers will be held at the Bahamas Chamber of Commerce’s 2009 General Meeting (AGM 27, beginning at 12.30pm, at the British Colonial Hilton. Chairman and CEO of the Baha Mar Resorts Sarkis Izmirlian will be the keynote speaker at the meeting and will address the topic, “Are We Ready For The Recovery.” Mr Izmirlian will share a private investor’s view of doing busi ness in the Bahamas and his perspectives on preparing for a successful economic recovery. Election of officers and direc tors for the Chamber’s 2009-2010 administrative year will be held during the AGM. The meeting is open to both members and nonmembers of the Chamber. “We expect a good turn-out of members, not just because we’re set to elect a new slate of officers and directors, but it’s sort of an official farewell for outgoing president (Dionisio has made an outstanding contri bution to the organisation these past two years,” said Philip Simon, the Chamber’s executive director. “Certainly, the Chamber has seen significant growth during his tenure and the association is posi tioned to excel even further,” Mr Simon said. Mr D’Aguilar said it is paramount for the Chamber to remain a strong voice for the business community. “As president, I wanted to ensure the Chamber took the lead on everyday issues affecting the way we do business in the Bahamas and I am confident that we will maintain that position of influence for our members with the incoming president and officers,” he said. During his tenure as President D’Aguilar was very vocal about the Baha Mar project and expressed pleasure that Mr Izmirlian had decided to address the Chamber’s AGM. “While Mr Izmirlian will certainly share insights on what it will take for a Bahamian business to recover from this economic crisis,I look forward to learning about the status of that project and the opportunities for Bahamian businesses to participate in the rede velopment of Cable Beach.” THE Bahamas court system is in a deplorable state, Bishop Simeo n Hall said in a statement yesterd ay. “Our judiciary is in trouble and should be beyond aspirations and odium,” Bishop Hall said. H e said that a national review of the judicial system is urgent and imperative. “More lawyers must come forw ard and show their patriotism a nd loyalty to the state. It is time more Bahamian lawyers place the glory of service beyond personal monetary gluttony,” Bishop Hall s aid. T hree men plead not g uilty to possession o f marijuana Chamber of Commerce to hold election at AGM MOTORISTS complained yesterday about the trench being dug by BTC workers through the middle of Bay Street, calling it an eye-sore and a driving hazard. One Nassau resident who w orks in the area expressed concern about safety on the island’s busiest street – especially at night when the wide trenches are more difficult to see. Another motorist complained about the duration of the trenching – which precedes a repaving exercise as part of plans to spruce up downtown ahead of the Miss Universe Pageant in August – saying it is inconveniencing frequent users of the street. Yesterday, BTC officials said the trenching is "going according to schedule" and should soon be completed. "That work is drawing to a close," said Marlon Johnson, BTC's vice-president for market ing and sales. He said the company is laying conduits along Bay Street to carry fibre optic cables that will permit BTC to provide more communications services to the area. Mr Johnson also reject ed claims that the trenching had been prolonged because of a dispute between BTC and sub-con tractors hired to carry out the work. "I'm not aware of any of that information, certainly nothing has been brought to my attention about any discrepancy with any of our sub contractors,” he said. Director of Works Gordon Major said the ministry plans to begin paving West Bay Street, starting near Goodman's Bay, tonight. Meanwhile, Ministry of Works officials are set to meet with representatives of the Water and Sewage Corporation to deter mine what other work must be done ahead of the repaving. T HERE are concerns for 14 e mployees of a Grand Bahama company, who claim they are being laid off because they are 60 years and older. T hese concerns were outlined in a statement issued to the press late yesterday evening when it was reported that they were c alled to a meeting on April 24 a nd presented with retirement packages. They were told to take the packages home to discuss witht heir families. If the offer were acceptable, it should be signed and returned to Human Resources by May 1. H owever, it was reported that a fter 13 of the employees had signed the offer, the company allegedly changed the terms of the agreement and offered a new lower” prop osal. “How can a company offer its employees ap ackage, have them sign and accept the package and r eturn it to t hem, and then the following day say they are not honouring that contract any longer and give them a new con-t ract to sign. Why are they allowed to breach their contract like that?” the statement asked. Yesterday, PLP MP for West E nd and Bimini Obie Wilchc ombe wanted to know when government was going to intervene to secure the future of these and other Bahamians who are b eing terminated throughout the c ountry. “The Bahamas is in deep do-do and the Bahamian people are sinking in it,” he said. “Whether it is in Grand Bahama,N ew Providence, or Exuma, where is the government to protect these employees? Every company can do what they want to d o, but who is coming to the resc ue of the Bahamian people?” Mr Wilchcombe asked. The employees who were offered early retirement alsoc laim that the expatriate director of the firm told them that “either they take the packages or leave it.” Like others before,” said the s tatement, “he came into this country and decided that he will treat and talk to Bahamians anyway he would like to.” GB company employees face uncertain future CARICOM ‘still facing challenges of regional integration’ – Jamaica PM Reports of staff aged 60 and over being laid off Motorists complain about ‘hazardous’ Bay Street trench THE PUBLIC is concerned about ditches from road works on Bay Street, saying they are an eyesore for tourists and a traffic hazard for motorists. PHOTOS: Tim Clarke /Tribune staff Wilchcombe

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EDITOR, The Tribune. In the Bahamas the Haitian community celebrates their heritage by holding a Haitian Flag Day celebration. The first initial Haitian Flag Day celebration in the Bahamas was on 18th, May,1 958. This event was held by a group of young British subjects at that time, who are now Bahamians after the Bahamas had gained independence on the 10th, July, 1973. This event was also supported alongsidew ith them a group of aristo cratic young professionals out of Haiti who held professions such as doctors; lawyers; teachers and businessmen in the Bahamas. Most of these professionals left the Bahamas and s ought to launch their careers elsewhere throughout the world. The Haitian flag was launch to symbolise the freedom of independence in Haiti from the French colonisation. In 1803 during battle, Dessaline realises that he doesn’t have a flag to wave in battle to distinguish friend or foe while on the battlefields. After hearing this, his goddaughter, Catherine Flon took the French flag and tore it down the middle removing the white part of the flag. Shet hen attached the red and blue together by sewing it with her long hair as thread to knit it in. After which there it had appeared that Haitian Flag Day was officially coined as a symbol of recognition; freedom and cel e bration on the 18th, May, 1803, whereas the birth of a new nation was found on the 1st, January, 1804. Despite the acts of this glory; the French colonist refuses to recognize Haiti as an indepen d ent state. Whereas, they released a charge against Haiti in damages and arrears due to the casualties of war; that Haiti had to make payments to France in the sum of 90 to 120 francs which is estimated in the millions of dollars today. This brought a terrible blow to the Haitian treasury at that time; needless to say it was for the sake of being accepted and recognised at international meetings as an independent country. At these meetings Haiti represented every country that was afflicted by the transatlantic slave trade by appealing to the colonial powers to allow their colonies to be set free from oppression and suppression. Today, the celebration of Haitian Flag and University Day continues to take place in the Bahamas. T he Bahamas has always been a supporter at interna tional arenas and meetings in appealing to world leaders to assist with the state matters in Haiti. The celebration of Haiti’s F lag Day in the Bahamas is to introduce to the Bahamian soci ety about the high end fine detail lifestyle of Haiti and the possible opportunities it has to offer to potential interested persons who will like to pursue f uturistic ventures in the uprising abilities of this country. This event this year on Sat urday, 16th, May, will take place at the Queen of Peace Catholic Church located on Faith Avenue off Carmichael Road beginning at 12 noon. An invitation is extended to the Bahamian community in all due respects as a nation which has been dammed as a leading Caribbean nation to attend this event. MARK DESMANGLES Nassau, May, 2009 EDITOR, The Tribune. The recent claims of nepotism in the granting of Crown land in the Lands and Surveys department really gets my goat! I am, you see, a young B ahamian educator who is hardworking, determined, and d edicated to helping the youth of our nation succeed. This is evidenced in my “Above Average Outstanding” yearly appraisals, my punctuality, my rare absenteeism, and my devotion to my students. Teaching, for me, is not simply a means of earning a wage, but it is a job that I love wholeheartedly. A few years ago, as a milestone birthday rapidly approached, I decided it was time to look into home ownership. I literally visited every b ank, company, and union that I could think of that might be of assistance to me. I was surprised to learn that my salary was insufficient to enable a single woman to own her own home. I was told timea nd time again that I needed a co-signer and at one point was even told, “You don’t have no husband? Get your boyfriendto sign.” My name has been added to lists at not just the Bahamas Union of Teachers (BUT housing campaign, which I guess has been discontinued, but also at the Department of Housing. Unfortunately, I have never heard anything more from either place and my attempts to keep updated have been often rudely squashed. Now, don’t get me wrong I am well aware of the promised changes that are to come with regards to housing. P erhaps, one would consider me a pessimist because until I see such changes implemented,I don’t really believe the hype. After all, I am still waiting for the implementation of a nation a l health plan. Sigh. If there is indeed nepotism in the Lands and Surveys department, those guilty should be ashamed. This is what has held this country back for so long. But then again, I might have been a homeowner by now if I had gone looking for my aunty brother cousin friend-in-law. It is because of things like this that has prohibited an honest, but single woman of realising her dream. Finally, I cannot even begin to fathom how difficult the task of running this country must be when I too, sometimes have difficulty managing the thirty-two fourth graders that I teach. I applaud our Prime Minister and other government leaders for their tireless efforts and keep them all constantly in my prayers. Please Mr Ingraham, in your efforts to clean up the civil service, remember that there are a great many of us who want to work and who love our jobs. God’s blessings on you and yours. BAHAMIAN EDUCATOR Nassau, May 13, 2009. C M Y K C M Y K EDITORIAL/LETTERS TO THE EDITOR PAGE 4, FRIDAY, MAY 15, 2009 THE TRIBUNE The Tribune Limited NULLIUS ADDICTUS JURARE IN VERBA MAGISTRI Being Bound to Swear to The Dogmas of No Master L EON E. H. DUPUCH, Publisher/Editor 1903-1914 S IR ETIENNE DUPUCH, Kt., O.B.E., K.M., K.C.S.G., (Hon. P ublisher/Editor 1919-1972 Contributing Editor 1972-1991 EILEEN DUPUCH CARRON, C.M.G., M.S., B.A., LL.B. P ublisher/Editor 1972Published Daily Monday to Saturday S hirley Street, P.O. Box N-3207, Nassau, Bahamas Insurance Management Building., P.O. F-485, Freeport, Grand Bahama T ELEPHONES Switchboard (News, Circulation and Advertising Advertising Manager (242 C irculation Department (242 N assau Fax: (242 Freeport, Grand Bahama: 1-(242 F reeport fax: (242 W EBSITE www.tribune242.com – updated daily at 2pm WASHINGTON The British are handy. You can blame nearly anything you want on them. Corruption in Kenya? Blame it on the British and the psychological damage of colonialism. The partition of Cyprus? Step forward the social engineers in London, who underestimated the depth of feeling in the Turkish minority when the British were finally forced out. When it comes to the Middle East, one can really get exercised about “Perfidious Albion.” The Brits had their fingers in every territorial dispute; created whole countries where none had been; and, with the help of the French, imposed borders from Morocco to China where none had existed. Trouble with Iran? Even before the CIA started meddling there in 1953, it was Winston Churchill who, as First Sea Lord in 1913, decided the Royal Navy would move faster, cleaner and have greater range if it switched from coal to oil. So he partially nationalized the Anglo-Persian Oil Company, the forerunner of BP, to exploit the newly discovered oil fields in Iran. Later, this led to a surge in Iranian nationalism and the CIA plot to restore the Shah. On to Pakistan and the British legacy in the autonomous tribal lands, now home to the Taliban and al-Qaeda. Put the British colonial administration of the 18th, 19th and 20th centuries in the dock. Yes, three centuries of British commission and omission. The British interest in Afghanistan, which they failed to subdue in a series of wars, was largely as a buffer between British India and the growing territorial interests of the Russ ian Empire. It was here that The Great Game was played: the romanticized espionage that flourished in the region. The British divided the traditional Pashtun lands with the Durand Treaty of 1893, creat ing a northwestern border for British India, a region that later became Pakistan.A fghanistan was on the other side of the line. It amounted to a land grab. However, the British did recognize the separateness of the people in the Northwest Territories and left them to their tribal and religious ways. With independence and the partition of India in 1947, the incoming Pakistani gov ernment had enough problems without encouraging ethnic strife between the largely Punjabi Pakistanis and their difficult Pashtun brothers in the territories. So the government in Islamabad continued the British policy of benign indifference to the Pashtuns, with which they were more closely linked by religion than ethnicity or politics. Yet, the border dispute smouldered and periodically erupted. Kabul and Islamabad do not agree, both blaming the border drawn by the British. What neither the British nor the Pakistanis wanted was a strong movement for a Pashtun state that would carve out territory from Afghanistan, as well as the tribal territories in Pakistan. There was a failed attempt to bring this about in 1949. Segments of the Pakistani army and the intelligentsia have feared this ever since. The message is that simply being Muslim does not wipe out tribal and ethnic identity any more than borders drawn by others cre ate a new identity. If it were so, Cyprus would not be divided, Yugoslavia would have held together, as would have Czechoslovakia, and Britain would not be considering the possibility of an independent Scotland one day that after 300 years of union. The current hostilities in the Pakistani trib al areas, U.S. drone strikes on suspected Tal iban strongholds and renewed determination from the Pakistani army to crush extremists in the region could renew a sense of nationhood among the Pashtuns, and a movement toward the creation of Pashtunistan across the British-drawn border between Pakistan and Afghanistan. In the long reaches of the night President Obama’s special envoy to the region, Richard Holbrooke, may wish one of the following had happened in the days of the British Raj: 1. the British had stayed home; 2. the British had insisted the Pashtuns submit to central authority; 3. the British had created a newc ountry, Pashtunistan; or 4. the British had never created that troublesome border. One way or the other, he can blame the Brits. (This article was written by Llewllyn King c.2009 Hearst Newspapers). Enraged by nepotism claims over granting of Crown land LETTERS letters@tribunemedia.net The long shadows of the British Empire The importance of the Haitian Flag Day celebration in Bahamas EDITOR, The Tribune. I was surprised at Dr Sweeting’s surprise, re-letter May 12th. Was he not aware that the divine right of kings has descended upon politicians, and don’t worry, not only Bahamians? George Bush, Gordon Brown, Hugo Chavez are prime examples. If they are questioned, heads with roll, fortunately today seldom literally. People will not vote for a “humble politician” (an oxymoron? Politicians can be voted out for being too bombastic, but if voted back few have learnt their lesson, as is so apparent in the Bahamas. I know it is very exasperating, but perhaps God has allowed them to see the whole picture, we are but mice! WALTER GRATTAN Nassau, May 13, 2009. The divine right of kings has descended on politicians

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T HE Bahamas Sea Turtle Conservation Group is appeal-i ng for donations to assist with the cause of preserving the e ndangered sea turtle. The BSTCG hopes to bring sea turtle expert Dr Alan Bolton to Nassau to speak at a town meeting and print 1,000b rochures and educational materials for the general public. D onations may also be used to print T-shirts to sell and raise further funds. Co-chairwoman Kim Aranha said: “We want to teach peop le the importance of ecotourism. You can kill a turtleo nce. You can photograph and swim with the same turtle 365 d ays a year. “If you could send a donation to us we would be enormously grateful.” Cheques should be made out t o ‘The Bahamas Sea Turtle Conservation Group’ andm ailed to PO Box CB 11099, Nassau. O therwise, donations can be given to Kim Aranha at The Bahamas Humane Society orarrangementsfor collections can be made by s ending an email to bahamasturtles@gmail.com E vents planned by the BSTCG include a candlelight v igil in Rawson Square at 7pm on June 8, a town meeting at the College of the Bahamas on Thompson Boulevard at 6pm on June 10, and a turtle art s how at Doongalik Studios in Marina Village, Paradise Island,t o coincide with the Miss Uni verse Pageant in August. SEESTORYTHISPAGE n By DENISE MAYCOCK Tribune Freeport Reporter dmaycock@tribunemedia.net F REEPORT – Edwin Carrington, CARICOM Secretary-Gen-e ral, announced that a draft outline of regional policy and a coo peration framework for enhancing local democracy has been ratified and is expected to be transmitted to CARICOM Heads of Government this year for adoption. Once adopted, the outline of the Regional Policy and Coopera-t ion Framework is expected to be used as a negotiating position with i nternational aid agencies to sup port the work of local governance in the region,” he told delegates at the fifth Commonwealth Local Government Conference in F reeport. The Heads of Government M eeting for the 53-member Commonwealth will be held in Port of S pain, Trinidad, in November. Mr Carrington said that the draft outline document will be presented to the respective member states before transmission to Commonwealth Heads of Government for adoption. I am pleased to indicate that the draft outline of the regional p olicy and cooperation framework, produced with the help of the Commonwealth expert was ratified at the second meeting of the CFLGM held in December 2008 after much regional consultation,” he said. He stated that in 2006, the Min istry of Local Government, T rinidad and Tobago with support from the CLGF, along with other o rganisations, held a Conference under the theme “Deepening Local Governance and Participation in C ARICOM States.” At that conference the Porto f Spain Accord was issued, he said. T he Accord, he said, spoke clearly with regard to the need to build on previous policy recommendations, n otably the 2004 Montego Bay Action Pro g ramme and the 2005 Aberdeen Agenda: C ommonwealth Principles on Good Practice for Local Democracy and Good Governance. He said these included: Promoting local democracy and good governance; Effective service delivery for all; and Regional policy and cooperation framework for enhancing local democracy. Mr Carrington noted that there has been recent progress in the development of local government systems in the Caribbean Commu nity as a result of external assistance and the collaboration it has r eceived. In 2002, in collaboration with the United States Agency for International Development (USAID Conference on Local Government and Decentralisation was held in Guyana. And, in 2004, with the assistance of the Commonwealth, a symposium was held in Jamaica under the theme “Local Democracy and Good Governance in the Caribbean.” Mr Carrington explained that it was at that symposium that the Caribbean Ministers with respon sibility for Local Government decided to establish a Caribbean F orum of Ministers (CFMm ore coordinated regional organisation. H e said the Forum was assisted by an expert provided by the Commonwealth to review local democracy and d ecentralisation in the region as well as to d evelop a regional policy and cooperation framew ork. The outcomes of the fifth CLGF in Freeport also will be transmitted to Commonwealth Heads of Government m eeting in Trinidad for policy endorsements, ongoing policy mak i ng, and political processes at the highest level, according to CLGF S ecretary General Carl Wright. Mr Carrington expressed appre c iation to the Commonwealth Local Government Forum,( CLGF) particularly its SecretaryGeneral Mr. Carl Wright, and to t he Bahamas government. “I am particularly pleased to have been invited to participate in this important conference. I see this Conference as the ideal coun t erpoint, orienting and emphasising as it does the essential role of local g overnment in our societies,” he said. S peaking on the topic, “Regional Integration and the Role for Local Government”, Mr Carrington said the integration arrangement in the Caribbean Communi t y (CARICOM pillars – economic integration, for e ign policy co-ordination, functional co-operation and security c o-operation. “Soon to be 36 years old and c omprising 15 Member States and five Associate Members, CARI-C OM is the longest surviving inte gration movement among develo ping countries. “Like all others, it is presently struggling in the face of the current global financial and economic crisis as it strives to advance from a C ommunity and Common Market to a Community including a Sin g le Market and Economy, better known by its acronym CSME. For our Caribbean countries, most of them small by any stan dards, regional integration is the glue that binds them together and in that process Local Government h as special significance. Historically it is in that mode of governance t hat many of our legislators first wet their feet in the art of repres entative governance,” he explained. C M Y K C M Y K LOCAL NEWS THE TRIBUNE FRIDAY, MAY 15, 2009, PAGE 5 677 1111 nassau 688 1111 freeport www.indigonetworks.com purchase your home phone line and receiveFREE local number FREE Local and long distance calling for one month* FREE inter-island calls to onephone customers FREE activationwhat you need to use onephoneunlimited broadband internet a one onephone telephone adapter a touch tone telephone*certain restrictions applyget your onephone at O VER 100 pieces of H aitian art will be available to buy for under $100 each in an auction at the British Colonial Hiltont his evening. Art lovers are invited to attend a cocktail reception at 6.30pm and participate in the auction of five tos even artworks which will be auctioned off at 7pm. Guests of the event at the British Colonial area sked to make a $20 donation to cover valet parking a nd two drinks. All proceeds from the event will go to the UnitedH aitian Association of the Bahamas’ community emergency fund. n By MEGAN REYNOLDS Tribune Staff Reporter mreynolds@tribunemedia.net CONSERVATIONISTS are outraged legislation to outlaw sea turtle harvesting due to be passed last month has been put on h old for further public consultation. T he Bahamas Sea Turtle Conservation Group (BSTCG updated legislation to protect endangered sea turtles for around 15 years, and memb ers fear the latest delay will allow another season of turtle hunting to commence on August 1. Minister of Agriculture and Marine R esources said he hopes the consultation w ill be complete in June in order for legislation to be viewed by the Cabinet and Attorney General’s office in time to be passed before August 1. T he BSTCG maintains the majority of people want more protection for sea turtles and the group gathered 5,000 signatures in support of the new legislation. N ew laws have also gained support from t he Bahamas National Trust, the Nature Conservancy, BREEF, the Bahamas Humane Society, Advocates for Animal Rights and others. The Department of Marine Resources h as received hundreds of letters in support of the ban, but director Michael Braynen s aid his department has now been instructed to reach out to those who have not yet spoken up. Meetings have been held in various locations to discuss the bill, and Mr Cartwright said they will continue to meet with fishing c ommunities in the Family Islands. But the department is also exploring new ways of reaching out to people as a recent meeting in Exuma proved how those directly involved in the turtle trade are oftenr eluctant to attend. Mr Braynen said: “People who are in support will come to the meetings and people who have contrary views may feel intimidated. This is why we are looking at other ways of getting people to respond to us.” A n online response forum will soon be available on the government’s website forp eople throughout the Bahamas to freely express their views. Mr Braynen said: “We know there are people who are very interested and have v ery strong views, but if you have expressed your views already we have recorded it. “We want to hear from people we haven’t heard from already . . . those people who grumble but don’t express their views – theyn eed to be heard.” The BSTCG maintains the Bahamas is committed to the ban as it is a signatory to CITES (Convention in International Trade in Endangered Species), and the Department of Marine Resources has advised gov e rnment to increase protection for the threatened marine species. G overnment announced in October the legislation would be passed on April 1, and BSTCG members are now disappointed the promise has been broken. Co-chairwoman Jane Mather said: “I think it’s disgraceful because the minister of agriculture promised us that by April 1 that w ould be the end of killing of turtles, and it’s going on and on. “I hope it will be enacted as soon as possible so we don’t have to go through another season of people killing as many as they w ant. “We are one of the few countries left without these laws, and I can’t believe that we, as a ‘civilised’ country, allow this.” M embers of the public can share their t houghts on the proposed legislation by visiting: www.bahamas.gov.bs. Outrage as legislation outlawing sea turtle harvesting put on hold PASSERS-BY were horrified to see a turtle condemned to a slow and painful death at Montagu Ramp (left hundreds of dollars in an attempt to save it, but it was too late. Pictured above are the remains of a sea turtle on a table near the ramp. Draft outline of regional policy to be presented to CARICOMleaders Haitian art available tob uy in auction Sea Turtle Conservation Group seeks donations In brief n FORT LAUDERDALE, Fla. GOV. CHARLIE CRIST on Thursday urged Floridians to be prepared and have a plan for this hurricane season, which begins June 1 and runs through November, according to Associated Press. Crist said the beginning of hurricane season is near and this is the time to get ready. “The real strength of Florida is our ability to work together whether its at the federal level, the state level or the local level,” Crist said. He said every Floridian should have at least three days worth of bottled water and canned food. He reminded residents to have batteries, radios and flashlights. “Every Florida family should be prepared, should have a plan and be on guard,” he said during a luncheon at the Governor’s Hurricane Conference in Fort Lauderdale. “I think that the obvious thing is: Just be ready,” he said. Crist also congratulated Craig Fugate on his promotion to head of the Federal Emergency Management Agency. Florida residents told to prepare for hurricanes E dwin Carrington

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C M Y K C M Y K LOCAL NEWS PAGE 6, FRIDAY, MAY 15, 2009 THE TRIBUNE Princess Butler P.O. Box ES-6069 Nassau, Bahamas Brendilee Rolle P.O. Box 7290 Pine Barron Road Nassau, Bahamas Tamika Williams P.O. Box F 42299 Freeport, Bahamas Tiffany Rolle P.O. Box GT 2395 Nassau, Bahamas Tanya Rolle P.O. Box GT 2395 Nassau, Bahamas Bridgette Hog P.O. Box GT 2395 Nassau, Bahamas Theresa Deleveaux P.O. Box N 732 Nassau, Bahamas Albert Smith P.O. Box SS-6104 Nassau, Bahamas Granville Neville Williams 485 Inagua Avenue, Freeport, Grand Bahama Ms. Alquennia Rolle-Cunningham General Delivery Moore's Island, Abaco Charlissa C.D. Poitier P.O. Box N-978 Nassau Bahamas Eddison Paul Sweeting Jr. Nassau Bahamas Michelle Sweeting Nassau Bahamas Christon Mackey Nassau, Bahamas Terasean Sweeting P.O. Box CR 56708 Sunset Park Nassau, Bahamas Kemuel Delancey P.O. Box CR 56708 Sunset Park Nassau, Bahamas Terry Sweeting P.O. Box CR 56708 Sunset Park Nassau, Bahamas James Wallace Nassau, Bahamas Stafford Bullard P.O. Box N 3730 Nassau, Bahamas Larado D. Evans P.O. Box N 3730 Nassau, Bahamas Francis Roberts P.O. Box SS5175 Nassau, Bahamas Mr. Godfrey Roberts Freeport, Grand Bahama The following individuals are asked to contact Mrs. KimleySaunders (396-2047) or Ms. Kayshonta Smith (396-2031) at ColinaImperial Insurance Ltd: n BY BETTY VEDRINE THE PROPOSED legislation to upgrade the communications sector will give the Bahamas the competitive edge it needs, Minister of Tourism, Senator Vincent Van-d erpool-Wallace said. Efficient communications systems are fundamental to a modern society and to modern commerce,” he said. And getting the fundamentals right is “vital” to the continued success of the tourism product, he said. “Just yesterday, we completed our test in the Ministry o f Tourism to see what would happen if we restored the p roximity advantage of the Bahamas from New York,” Mr Vanderpool-Wallace said. M aking a comparison in ticket sales out of New York d uring May 2008 when there was no recession to the same period this year during a fullr ecession, the minister said that just by focusing on fund amentals, the tourism product was boosted by 150 per cent. O ne thousand tickets were sold to the Bahamas out of N ew York in May last year and 2,604 were sold in May this year. We can communicate everything in the world to our prospective customers, but especially in this environment, if we don’t get the fundamentals right, we do not restore our competitive edge,” he said. Although Bahamians may wonder about the need to libe ralise electronic communications, Mr Vanderpool-Wallace said the obvious answer is that monopolies do not always provide the best service. Monopolies or near monopolies tend to care little about costs because if you want the service you take what I have and you pay what I require,” he said. “That’s how they make a profit.” The Family Islands, in particular, would finally be able t o reach their full economic potential as a result of improved communications, he said. It has been said that the development of the Family Islands will come only when we solve the transportation, distribution and communication issues,” he said. Whenever anyone on our Family Islands can get in and out inexpensively and frequently, and when they can send or receive any kind of electronic communication with high reliability and low cost, we will see the kind of growth that we have been expecting of those islands for more thana decade.” The proposed amendments “promise to deliver on the communication piece of this triangle.” n By NATARIO McKENZIE Tribune Staff Reporter THE trial of three men charged in the armed hold-up of a Scotiabank branch c ontinued in the Supreme Court yesterday as jurors watched footage showing the accused being detained by police. Prosecutors yesterday called a local cameraman to testify at the trial of James Miller, 25, Janquo Mackey, 22, and Anthony Williams, 34. The men are accused of robbing the Soldier Road and East Street South branch of Scotiabank on July 2, 2008. T hey are also accused of the attempted murder of Police Corporal Natasha Black. T he cameraman – who told the press he is concerned for his safety and asked f or his name to be withheld – testified that on Wednesday, July 2, he received an a nonymous call. As a result he went to the Voice of Deliverance Church. There, he said, he saw three men being detained by police. The witness said that he took out his cam-e ra and began filming. The video that was played to the j urors showed Miller lying on a stretcher being tended to by medical personnel with a bandage around his right leg. Williams was also seen in the footage wearing a black shirt, standing handcuffed. The witness told the court that a third m an was lying on the ground. The cameraman said that the man lying o n the ground was later taken away by ambulance. Cartridges He testified that there were several spent shotgun cartridges in the area as well as a Windom car. Craig Taylor, a fisherman, testified y esterday that he left home on the morni ng of July 2, 2008, only to return later t hat afternoon to discover that his white W indom was missing. Taylor told the court that he always left his car unlocked and left the keys u nder a car mat. D uring cross-examination by attorney Murrio Ducille, who is representing a ccused Janquo Mackey, Taylor admitted that he had been a suspect in the case and had been held on remand for two and a half months on a conspiracy charge. Taylor also told the court that Mackey was his cousin. He denied the suggestion by Mr Ducille that he had given Mackey the keys to his car on the morning of July 2, 2008, so that he could pick up a friend. T aylor also denied the suggestion that he told police that someone had stolen hisc ar “to save his hide.” M iller, who is representing himself, suggested to Taylor that on the morning o f July 2, he had asked him to give him a r ide, but that Taylor had told him that h e was busy. Taylor denied this. He also d enied the suggestion that he had thrown Mackey the keys and told him to give M iller a ride. T he trial continues before Justice Jon Isaacs today. Mackey is represented by a ttorney Murrio Ducille, Williams is repres ented by Dorsey McPhee and Miller is representing himself. Vernal Collie, AmbroseB rown and Lennox Coleby are prosecuting t he case. Jurors watch video of alleged robbers being detained by police Tourism Minister touts benefits of improved communications sector TRIAL: ARMEDHOLD-UPOFSCOTIABANK BRANCH Prosecutors call on local cameraman to give testimony Vanderpool-Wallace ABANDONEDON CORALHARBOURROAD Felip Major / Tribune staff THIS CAR has been left for over a month on Coral Harbour Road. Since being abandoned it has been stripped of wheels and some windows.

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C M Y K C M Y K LOCAL NEWS PAGE 8, FRIDAY, MAY 15, 2009 THE TRIBUNE company on the island, who spoke on condition of anonymity, said business from the Four Seasons accounts for "about 50 per cent" of their revenue. With little time to feel sorry about the turn of events management has decided to aggressively slash rates in the hope of attracting more clients. "What we are trying to do now is lowering our rates and trying to attract more cus-t omers that way," said the m anager who said if things get worse, the company would consider reduced work weeks for its seven-member staff. On Wednesday, staff at the Four Seasons were convened for a general meeting whent hey were told that as of May 26 the hotel would be closed. But the receivers for the haemorrhaging property, which went into receivership in mid-2007, said the resort lost about $5 million annually for the last two years. While closing the property "temporarily" was a "difficult" decision, they said they were hopeful they could secure a new buyer soon. A lthough employees can stay on site until June 15, some have already packed their bags and headed to the capital and other islands in search of work, according to reports. Mr Moss said about 30 Four Seasons workers attended a local job fair at a school on Exuma yesterday, however he advised out of work Exumians to branch out into entrepreneurial areas. He also said he plans to set up a meeting between the dis placed workers and members of the Opposition before the resort's last day of operation. s hirt, robbed the victim of watch and w allet which contained personal items. "Before leaving and escaping through a hole in a fence, the gunman fired shots from a weapon hitting the victim about the body," said ASP Evans. Reports reaching The Tribune indicate that at some point during the ordeal the gunman demanded the keys to the victim's vehicle. It is understood that at that point Mr Burrows put up a fight and was shot in the arm. These reports were not confirmed by police. Mr Burrows was taken to a local clinic and after examination was flown by air ambulance yesterday to a Nassau hospital, where he remained up to press time. In the last few months Burrows Development Limited, the island's second largest employer after the soon-to-be closed Four Seasons resort, laid off about 20 of its more than 106 staff. Yesterday Assistant Commissioner of Police Hulan Hanna, who heads the Family Island district, said police had "no reason" to connect the shooting to any recent lay offs. ACP Hanna said that police had not established a motive for the shooting, nor was a suspect in custody up to press time. "At this point (we have told The Tribune . One of Mr Burrows’ employees, who spoke to The Tribune from Exuma yesterday, said the contractor was the victim of a housebreaking about two weeks ago w hen thieves stole televisions and jewellery from the home. When asked if he thought the shooting could be retaliation by a former disgruntled worker, the employee said anything was possible. "At this moment, yes we are afraid because I don't know if its random it looked like it was staged directly to him, but I don't know if it was isolated, maybe someone was just watching him." The employee, who spoke on condition of anonymity, said the community was dumbfounded over the shooting. "The whole community knows him, he's a down-to-earth person, he gets along with everybody," said the employee. “(We never expected this million years, not in Exuma, that's what took us by shock." This news, compounded with Wednesday's news of the impending closure of the Four Seasons at Emerald Bay, Exuma's largest employer, was "back-tob ack bad news", he said. Mr Burrows described as a "down-toearth" person is married with children, who live in his hometown of Long Island. Exuma police have mounted an intensive investigation into this incident. witnesses, including the virtual complainant, have testified. The young woman, who is now 20-years-old testified that she and Fraser had sex on an average of 12 times a month at his home and office at Pilgrim Baptist Temple. Mr Munroe had made an application to have the case referred to the Supreme Court. The application arose follow ing testimony by Woman Police Corporal Sheria King, a forensic expert. Mr Munroe had contended that during the course of her testimony at the retrial she had varied her opinion given in the first trial in 2006. Mr Munroe had argued that he had not been informed in advance of her present opinion. Magistrate Bethel adjourned the case to May 21 for a status hearing on the application. Fraser was initially charged in 2006, but discharged in 2007 after then Magistrate Marilyn Meeres ruled that there was no physical evidence to link him to the alleged offence. The Court of Appeal, however, overturned that decision and ordered a retrial. Businessman gunned down in his home Bishop Earl Randy Fraser Bishop Fraser retrial expected to continue FROM page one Exuma economy is ‘expected to crash’ F ROM page one FROM page one n HAVANA FIDEL CASTROdefended Havana’s response to the swine flu outbreak, including suspension of direct flights with Mexico,s aying Thursday that Cuba is especially vulnerable to an epidemic because the U.S. embargo prevents it from buying medicine and diagnostic equipment, according to Associated Press. Hours later Cuba confirmed two new cases of swine flu in a group of Mexican students, bringing the island’s total cases tot hree. A Public Health Ministry statement said 11 of 15 students i n the group were found to be healthy and released from a hospital in central Cuba. Cuba has not said whether it has access to Tamiflu. B ut the World Health Organization says it sent 2.4 million treatments of the anti-flu treatment to 72 developing countries l ast week. Essay “What does one of these epidemics mean to Cuba?” Castro s aid in an essay read on state television. “Our country has no access to buy whatever medicine, raw materials or equipment or components for diagnostic equipment produced by U.S. transna t ional companies.” Mexican authorities were offended when Castro accused M exico of waiting to disclose the epidemic until after President Barack Obama visited in mid-April even though Canadian and U.S. scientists did not identify the virus in Mexican patientsu ntil a week later. Mexican President Felipe Calderon has said he may cancel a planned a trip to Cuba this year because the island grounded flights to and from Mexico. “Why accuse us of being enemies of the Mexican people w hen we adopt measures that have been put together beforehand to protect our people?” Castro asked. More than 6,600 cases of swine flu have been reported in 33 c ountries worldwide, with 69 deaths. Castro defends Cuba’s response to flu outbreak

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C M Y K C M Y K LOCAL NEWS PAGE 10, FRIDAY, MAY 15, 2009 THE TRIBUNE SARAH Jernell of Poquoson, Virginia, continued a fourd ecade friendship with the Bahamas by spending her 80th birth day in Nassau. M s Jernell, who first visited the Bahamas in 1968, developed a lasting friendship with Cacique Award winner and public service driver Romeo Farrington. M inistry of Tourism officials and veteran entertainer John “Chippie” Chipman gave Ms Jernell a grand welcome at Festi v al Place when she arrived on a cruise with her daughters – Eva Brewster and Mae Whitehurst. The family was met with music and dancing at New Bight S quare, Festival Place, and the Ministry of Tourism’s permanent secretary Hyacinth Pratt and deputy permanent secretary Sheldon Beneby thanked Ms Jernell for her commitment to the Bahamas. They also presented her with an authentic Bahamian handbag b efore she spent the day in the care of Mr Farrington. LEFT: SARAH JERNELLceleb rates her 80th birthday by joining the rake n’ scrape band with Chippie and the Boys, Ministry of Tourism and Aviation executives and her daughters. RIGHT: SARAH JERNELLwith legendary entertainer Count B ernardino. Longtime visitor celebrates milestone in the Bahamas “verbal contract” over the phone f or advertising services which would cost them around $1,000. S havarra Glinton, an assistant at the See Saw Christian Acade my, said: “It was non-stop torture. It got to the point that I felt like pulling out my hair!” Owner of the U S Virgin Islands-based company, DavidP hillips, emphatically denied wrongdoing yesterday, telling The Tribune “the only scam here is that people want to get advertising and then they don’t want top ay.” But Dr Dean Tserotopoulos of the Bahamas Heart Institute at Lyford Cay Hospital said he was never interested in the advertising offered and that was the start of the problem. “Last week Thursday they called us. Friday they threatened us. Monday I e-mailed them saying ‘This is a scam’, and then Tuesday I got the e-mail from the collection agency demanding payment.” The agency demanded$1,144.80. “They try to scare you, they say they’re going to sue you. I understand it is happening all over the Caribbean,” he said. Each company interviewed by The Tribune described receiving a phone call from Island Yellow Pages within the last year which invariably involved a representative requesting basic details about their operation. Before they realised what they were getting into, they claim, the USVI-based company was demanding payment for their “advertising services.” When met with objections, Island Yellow Pages told the companies that they had entered into a verbal contract, that there was a recording of their conversation, and that if they failed to pay, they would be met with a legal action, companies said. “When they said ‘Island Yellow Pages’, the first thing that came to my mind was that it was the local Yellow Pages,” said Mel la Rolle, manager of Traveller’s Rest Restaurant on West Bay Street. “They asked me for all my contact details, what was my position, my location, what we serve. I gave them the information. “Then when they said they were sending a bill for some ad or something there was a big confrontation between me and them on the phone. I hung up, but they kept calling religiously after that. They said we have lawyers who we can have make you pay. “These American people think t hey can take advantage of us island people!” she exclaimed. S ee Saw Christian academy was first contacted in June 2008. They asked about the school, school fees, contact information and so on. And then I told them if they wanted anything else they’d have to speak with my boss. Then the next day they sent us an email telling us we owe them $900.I was like, ‘What do we owe them $900 for?’” She said the company stopped calling in October 2008. “It made me so scared because i t got to the point where they found out my cellphone and they c alled it and threatened me. I don’t know how they got the number. They were telling me that I’d have to pay $500 to them if my boss wasn’t going to,” claimed Ms Glinton. Meanwhile, Joseph Lewis, owner of Lewis Orthopaedics, willingly entered into a $900 plus annual contract with the company, but felt that they misrepre sented their product. “They said they wanted to build a website for me, advertising the office, the whole nine yards. I gave them a lot of information. What I didn’t like was that there was a web space but it wasn’t constructed the way we’d talk about. The whole year went by and I got no hits.” But Mr Phillips, whose website is www.cbt.cc, told The Tribune that the company has many satis fied customers all over the Caribbean, and “would not have been in business for nine years if it was scamming people.” “We are providing a great ser vice to these businesses. We are the largest online directory, and the only way we can do it is over the telephone. We use recorded verification.” He claimed company repre sentatives make it clear from an early stage who the company is, what the cost will be, and that a verbal contract is involved. “There are several points at which they can say ‘Look, we’re not interested,” said Mr Phillips. Assistant Commissioner of Police Hulan Hanna urged com panies to be careful what information they transmit over the phone to “complete strangers.” Meanwhile, the senior officer told anyone affected to contact police as they would be interested in probing the matter further. “Clearly what is being described sounds like some kind of scam. If businesses want to share the information, they should come and bring it to us,” he said. Businesses claim phone call from foreign company led to ‘intimidation’ FROM page one

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C M Y K C M Y K FRIDAY, MAY 15, 2009 THETRIBUNE PAGE 11 I NSIDE International sports news BASEBALL Senior Baseball is alive and well on the island of Grand Bahama. G rand Bahama Amateur Baseball Association (Member of the Bahamas B aseball Federation) o pened its 23rd Consecutive Senior League Season o n Thursday May 7th 2 009. T T h h e e 2 2 0 0 0 0 8 8 C C h h a a m m p p i i o o n n s s : : V opak Panthers defeated Grand Bahama PortA uthority Regulators (8 1 ). W W i i n n n n i i n n g g P P i i t t c c h h e e r r : : D esmond Russell – 11 Strike-outs L L o o s s i i n n g g P P i i t t c c h h e e r r : : Ricardo R olle – 10 Strike-outs O O f f f f e e n n s s i i v v e e l l y y : : Panthers were lead by brothers Larry & Desmond Russell w ith Two Hits each. Players are preparing f or the upcoming 7th Annual Andre Rodgers National Baseball Cham-p ionship on June 4th thru 7th 2009 – (High School or Collegiate Divisions) & selection to TEAM BAHAMAS National Team – will be competingi n the upcoming World Baseball Challenge from J uly 16th 26th 2009. CYCLING Wednesday May 13th – Mid week Track Cycling Series starting 6pm S tarting positions will be drawn – 6 lap pursuit. Saturday 16th – Road Race, 50 miles. Jaws Beach area. Starting 7:20am $5.00 r egistration fee. C C a a t t e e g g o o r r i i e e s s : : Masters, Juniors, Seniors, Open Woman. Spot prizes in each category. Sunday 17th – 1st duathlon starting 7;35am Start/finish Coral Harbour roundabout. Bike 6 miles, run 2 miles, bike 10 miles, registration $5.00. sports NOTES n By RENALDO DORSETT Sports Reporter r dorsett@tribunemedia.net W ITH just under two weeks remaining before the international governing body for soc-c er hosts its bi-annual meet ing in the Bahamas, the gov ernment and the Bahamas Football Association continue to diligently prepare for thee vent. Minister of Youth, Sports and Culture, Desmond Ban nister recently met with stakeholders from the public and private sector to discuss final planning for the event. “This year the Bahamas has a historic opportunity – we are hosting the FIFA Congress. It is the most prestigious organi sation in the world and the M inistry of Youth Sports and Culture is very conscious of o ur commitment to helping the development of soccer in the Bahamas and I will do all we can to help the improvement of the facilities the BFA has been developing,” Bannister said, “The Ministry is pleased to support organisa tions like the BFA who go out and do so many things on their own and so when they do come to us for assistance we are more than happy to dow hatever we can.” The government has worked h and in hand with the BFA to ensure organisation of the event remains a priority of the highest order, highlighted by a $48,000 donation to improve facilities at the BFA’s field at the Blue Hills Sporting Complex. BFA Secretary General, Lionel Haven said improvem ent of the facility is integral in the growth of the local game which in time will produce greater dividends internationally. A big part of the assistance we are going to receive from the Ministry is going towardst he development of that facility, such as the instillation of lights. It is a small part of what w e would like to do but again we are grateful for the help we have received,” he said. “The Federation has been working on our development program and we need to continuously improve our facilities so we can develop these programs,” he said, “The game continues to grow locally and In our y outh league we have 14 clubs and about eight age divisions and over 2000 participants.” The FIFA Congress takes place June 2-3 at the AtlantisR esort, Paradise Island with over 200 member federations expected to provide represen t ation. According to the organisation’s website “The Congress m akes decisions relating to FIFA's governing statutes and the method by which they are implemented and applied. It also approves the annual report, decides on the acceptance of new national associa tions and holds elections, most notably for the FIFA presidency.” THE FEDERATION of International Football Association (FIFA and Culture the Hon. Desmond Bannister and Government and private sector stakeholders meet in preparation for the event. BFA getting set for FIFACongress Eric Rose/ BIS Photo Ministr y donates $48,000 to aid in the preparation n By RENALDO DORSETT Sports Reporter rdorsett@tribunemedia.net WITHthe success of Jamaica and concurrently, the entire region at the 2008 Beijing Olympic games, many have sought the secret to the Jamaican’s success in the sprints, while two of its most successful sprinters on the junior and senior level offer solutions. Veronica Campbell-Brown and Dexter Lee, two of the most well-known names in Jamaican track and field, agree that an intergral part of the country’s continued success is the bridging of the gap between varying gen erations. Campbell-Brown is already one of the most decorated female sprinters of all time. At 26, she is a five time Olympic medallist wich succesive gold medals in the 200m in 2004 and 2008 and a gold in the 400m relay. She is also the reigning World Champion in he 100m and was the first female to win the sprint double at the IAAF World Junior Championships. Lee, at just 18-years-old, has started down a path similar to Campell-Brown with world suc cess at the junior level internationally. Lee has captured gold medals in the 100m at the World Youth Championships and World Junior Championships in 2007 and 2008 respectively. The duo came together for a training session at Lee’s Her bert Morrison Tech in Montego Bay, Jamaica to discuss the model of Jamaican athletics. The secret to track success SPORTS SPECIAL VERONICA Campbell-Brown (r Olympic and World champion sprinter poses for a portrait with Dexter Lee (l Youth and Junior sprint champion before a training session at the Herbert Morrison school during the 'Iaaf Day in the Life' on May 4, 2009 in Mon tego Bay, Jamaica. SEE page 12

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C M Y K C M Y K SPORTS PAGE 12, FRIDAY, MAY 15, 2009 TRIBUNE SPORTS AUTHORISED TOYOTADEALER Available in Grand Bahama at Quality Auto Sales (Freeport) Queens Hwy, 352-6122 Abaco Motor Mall, Don MacKay Blvd, 367-2916Parts and service guaranteed Auto Mall, Shirley Street (opp. St. Matthew’s Church) Open Mon to Fri 8am 5:30pm Sat 8am 12noon Tel:397-1700E-mail: execmotor@batelnet.bs Lee, who began his career in junior high school just five years ago, credited Campbell-Brown and other e lite level Jamaican sprinters for providing an inspir ation and blueprint to success in the sport. “When I was in primary school I tried cricket and football but I switched to track and field in first form because I wanted to follow my brother and all the other great sprinters I looked up to like Veronica who we saw winning all the time,” he said. “I feel good at what I have achieved so far and working with Veronica and looking up to her I hope to have the same type of career. So in the future I hope to bea world champion, I hope to make the World Championship team this year but I will definitely look at the London Olympics in 2016.” G G o o a a l l s s Along with his World Championship aspirations this summer, Lee said he has the Jamaican junior national record in his sights before possibly attending college in the United States to further his education. The 6 foot 2 inch sprinter who many compare physically to Usain Bolt but tempermentally to Asafa Powell, said he is a fan of both athletes and their advice has been vital to his career thus far. “I knew I could be special when I was in second form and I won at the boys championship at 14. I like both Usain and Asafa because they have always told me to go out there and do my best all the time. I dream of bringing glory to myself and my country like the people like them that came before me. Campbell-Brown said she sees the possibility of L ee’s career following a similar pattern to her own beginning with international success at the junior l evel. “It is easy, when you have people like Dexter waiting in the wings ready to do big things on the national stage. He has a very very humble nature and he works as hard or harder than anyone else to get where he has gotten so far in his young career,” she said. “He has the potential to be one of the best sprinters not only in Jamaican history but in the world, and people have begun to recognise that.” M M e e n n t t o o r r s s As a high school student, Campbell-Brown was called up to compete in the finals of the silver medal winning 400m relay team and was mentored by many of the senior athletes on that team in her first Olympic appearance. “I think it is important for the senior athletes like myself to have working relationships with the junior athletes because it does so much for their confi dence to have athletes that have achived so much readily accesible to them. In the same way I looked up to and worked with Merlene [Ottey] and it did wonders for my confidence,” Campbell-Brown said. “It also exposed me at an early age to the type of training and dedication to succes that you would need to have to win on the national stage. It is one of those things in Jamaican track and field where it is almost a sense of national pride that compels you to work with the younger generation to see the legacy continue.” The secret to track success FROM page 11 VERONICA Campbell-Brown (l with Dexter Lee (r b ert Morrison school during the 'Iaaf Day in the Life' on May 4, 2009 in Montego Bay, Jamaica. VERONICA Campbell-Brown of Jamaica the double Olympic and World champion sprinter. DEXTER Lee of Jamaica the World Youth and Junior sprint champion at the Herbert Morrison school.

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YANKEES 8, BLUE JAYS 2 At Toronto, Brett Gardner hit his first major league homer and drove in three runs, and Andy Pettitte won for the first time in four starts for the Yankees. The Yankees had eight extra-base hits and improved to 11-0 when holding their opponent to three runs or less. Gardner also tripled and scored twice, and Mark Teixeira finished 2 for 4 with two RBIs, raising his average to .202. R AYS 8, ORIOLES 6 At Baltimore, Willie Aybar hit a tiebreaking RBI single in the sixth inning to lift the Rays, who scored four times in the ninth off Bob McCrory and held on after the Orioles rallied in the bottom half. Jason Bartlett homered and Dioner Navarro had two RBIs for the Rays. Jeff Niemann (3-3 v ictory in four decisions. The right-hander a llowed two runs and eight hits. J.P. Howe ll got the final two outs for his first save. Ty Wigginton homered for the Orioles. R ANGERS 6, MARINERS 5 11 innings At Arlington, Texas, Hank Blalock hit a two-run double in the 11th inning off Mariners closer Brandon Morrow (0-2 lift the Rangers. Wladimir Balentien’s RBI double in the top of the 11th had given the Mariners a 54 lead. C.J. Wilson (2-2 relief as Texas won for the ninth time in 11 games. Adrian Beltre, Kenji Johjima and Russell Branyan homered for the Mariners, who have lost eight of nine. A NGELS 8, RED SOX 4 At Anaheim, Calif., Matt Palmer overcame a shaky start before retiring the last 19 batters to lead the Angels. Mike Napoli hit a go-ahead three-run homer and Torii Hunter also went deep against knuckleballer Tim Wakefield (4-2). Palmer (4-0 out eight and walked two. ATHLETICS 7, ROYALS 2 Ay Oakland, Calif., Jack Cust’s threerun double broke open a close game and Josh Outman (1-0 and a run in six innings in his first win for the A’s. Outman walked two while striking out four as Oakland swept the two-game series. Brian Bannister (3-1runs in 5 2-3 innings and lost for the first time this season. C M Y K C M Y K SPORTS TRIBUNE SPORTS FRIDAY, MAY 15, 2009, PAGE 13 n SWIMMING CHARLOTTE, N.C. Associated Press AARON Peirsol can’t remember the last time he lost in a final of the 100-meter back stroke. He thinks it was 2002. Maybe . Whatever the case, Peirsol appears to have an intriguing new rival in his signature event. Michael Phelps. The winningest Olympian is planning to try out some new events as he looks ahead to 2012, a plan that puts him on a collision course with Peirsol, world record-holder in the 100 back and winner of the event at both the Athens and Beijing games. “Mike will do well, no doubt about it,” Peirsol told The Asso ciated Press in a telephone interview from his home in Austin, Texas. “He’s alreadybeen very, very fast and he hasn’t even scratched the surface of his potential in that event.” Peirsol isn’t backing down from the challenge, however. In fact, he welcomes the chance to go against the world’s greatest swimmer and perhaps be one of the few to beat him on the Olympic stage. Others are closing fast, too, including Japan’s Ryosuke Irie, who nearly broke Peirsol’s record of 52.54 at a meet in Australia on Sunday. “I welcome the competition,” Peirsol said. “For a long time, it’s been kind of stagnant in that event. I need it. I think it’s goingto help me. It would be much more fulfilling to win against those guys than to win by a cou-ple of seconds.” The two American stars are set to go head-to-head at the Charlotte Ultraswim, which begins Thursday and will be Phelps’ first meet since he won eight gold medals in Beijing, breaking Mark Spitz’s Holy Grail of Olympic records. The event is drawing much more attention than usual in this non-Olympic year, largely because of Phelps’ out-of-thepool troubles. A picture of him inhaling from a marijuana pipe while attending a party in notso-far-away South Carolina landed on the cover of a British tabloid, prompting USA Swimming to hand down a threemonth suspension from competition. The ban ended last week, and Phelps will be back in the pool for the first of three meets he plans to swim leading into the national championships in early July and the world championships in Rome later that month. In addition to the 100 backstroke, he’s also entered in the 50, 100 and 200 freestyle, as well as the 100 butterfly. Peirsol will be swimming his two signature events, the 100 and 200 back, as well as a few other races just for fun. This will be the first meet the 25year-old California native has fully trained for since Beijing, which puts him on an even keel with Phelps. (Peirsol did compete at Austin in March, but he wasn’t in top shape and only took part because it was in his adopted home.) Peirsol ready to take on Phelps in 100 backstroke IN THIS Aug. 17, 2008 file photo, Aaron Peirsol, left, and Michael Phelps, of the United States, celebrate after winning the gold medal in the men's 4x100-meter medley relay final at the Beijing 2008 Olympics in Beijing. Peirsol can't remember the last time he lost in a final of the 100-meter backstroke. However, Peirsol appears to have an intriguing new rival in his signature event. Michael Phelps. Itsuo Inouye /AP Photo n BASEBALL MINNEAPOLIS Associated Press AFTER Minnesota’s bullpen sprung more leaks, Joe Crede provided the relief. It took 13 innings, four hours and 48 minutes, but Crede’s two-out, two-strike grand slam gave the Twins a 14-10 victory over the Tigers just before midnight Wednesday long after Dontrelle Willis made his first start of the season for Detroit. After relievers Luis Ayala and Matt Guerrier let the Tigers take a 9-7 lead in a four-run seventh, Twins manager Ron Gardenhire could only shake his head after Crede’s seventh career slam. “Everybody needed that ... except maybe the other side,” said Gardenhire. It has taken him about a month to get going, but Crede is feeling comfortable with his new team. He’s hitting .237, but he’s fitting in just fine. “These guys have been great so far this year. It’s going to be fun to see what this team can do,” said Crede, who has 15 hits, 10 RBIs and four homers in his last 12 games. Matt Tolbert’s single that Josh Anderson nearly caught but trapped in left field tied it at 10 against Brandon Lyon (1-3 before Crede came up. He almost ended the game in the 12th against Lyon, but that drive was caught by Curtis Granderson with his shoulder against the wall in center field. Lyon threw 60 pitches over 2 2-3 innings. “I think it just shows the character of this team,” said Denard Span, who hit a two-run triple to give the Twins the lead in the sixth. “We do this once a week, it seems like.” The super-speedy Granderson helped Detroit take a 10-9 lead in the top half of the 13th with a littlet rickery on the bases. He tripled with one out before Jesse Crain (2-1 too shallow to score on. With Anderson batting, Granderson faked a break for home as if he were going to steal. Crain flinched, and the right-hander brought his throwing hand out of his glove before starting his motion thus theb alk call. Fans booed, but the Twins didn’t argue. Lost in all of the late drama was Willis, who gave up eight hits, four runs and two walks in 4 2-3 innings. It was a decent start considering all he’s come back from. He was sent to Class A last year to work on his control, and he had been on the disabled list this spring due to an anxiety disorder. “I thought he showed pretty good composure,” manager Jim Leyland said. “I was actually pleased.” The lively lefty with the sharp, sweeping delivery looked like his usual self, bouncing around the mound between at-bats and pointing encouraging fingers toward his infielders. “All in all I felt good. I really had a good time out there,” Willis said. Indians 4, White Sox 0 At Cleveland, Cliff Lee outpitched Mark Buehrle, t hrowing sharp seven innings as the Indians took two of three in the series. Last-place Cleveland had not shut out an opponent since Lee did it with a complete game against the White Sox on Sept. 1. Victor Martinez homered and Ryan Garko added a two-run blast in the fourth to give Lee (2-5v ictory in nearly a month. Lee entered the day tied for the league lead in losses despite a 1.70 ERA in his last five starts. baseball BRIEFS Crede’s slam in 13th lifts Twins past Tigers 14-10 DETROIT Tigers' Jeff Larish, left, scores on a two-run single by Adam Everett in the fourth inning of a baseball game Wednesday, May 13, 2009 in Minneapolis. Minnesota Twins catcher Mike Redmond bobbled the ball and was charged with an error. J i m M o n e / A P P h o t o

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C M Y K C M Y K SPORTS PAGE 14, FRIDAY, MAY 15, 2009 TRIBUNE SPORTS n BASKETBALL DENVER Associated Press THE DENVER Nuggets are collecting converts across the country with their uncommon blend of freakish athleticism, superb strength and unparalleled speed, qualities that might very well deliver this band of former malcontents and misfits to their first NBA finals. The Nuggets earned their first trip to the Western Conference championship series in 24 years by dispatching the Dallas Mavericks in five games. T hey blitzed the Mavs the same way they did the New O rleans Hornets in Round 1, with a dizzying array of Chauncey Billups’ leadership, Carmelo Anthony’s clutch play, Nene’s unmatched post presence, Kenyon Martin’s toughness and Dahntay Jones’ peskiness. Combine all that with a blazing bench that featuresC hris “Birdman” Andersen’s energy, J.R. Smith’s athletic a rtfulness and Anthony Carter’s cunning along with a rejuvenated coach in George Karl and NBA insid ers are starting to tout the Nuggets as championship contenders. Charles Barkley, a longtime critic of Denver’s play, is among those singing theNuggets’ praises now and the chorus is growing louder across the league. “These guys are legit. They’ve got a legitimate championship-caliber team,” Mavericks coach Rick Carlisle said after Denver’s series-clinching 124-110 win Wednesday night, the Nuggets’ seventh double-dig it victory in the postseason. “They have great balance. Their activity and athleticism and ability to generate sec ond-chance opportunities is a huge factor. This building is a great building and a great homecourt advantage, especially when you factorin the altitude. So, they’ve got the pieces. They really do,” Carlisle said. “And they’ve got an experienced coach that’s been down that road and gotten to the finals. They’ve got a great shot.” Since Billups’ arrival, the Nuggets are 61-27. They tied their franchise record with 54 regular-season wins and advanced past the first round of the playoffs for the firsttime since 1994 and into the conference championship for the first time in 24 years. For all those expecting a Kobe Bryant-LeBron James tussle for the title next month, hold up, Dallas guard Jason Terry said. Nuggets reach 1st conference finals since1985 SPORTS IN BRIEF MANCHESTER United's Cristiano Ronaldo (right down under a challenge fromW igan Athletic's Lee Cattermole during their English Premier League match at the JJB Stadium, Wigan, England, Wednesday May 13, 2009.U nited won 2-1. MANCHESTER United's Cristiano Ronaldor eacts after not being awarded a free kick. WIGAN'S Hugo R odallega, left, fights for the ball with Man c hester United's Park Ji-Sung. MANCHESTER United's Cristiano Ronaldo takes the ball away from Wigan's Michael Brown during their English Premier League soccer match. MANCHESTER United's Dimitar Berbatov, right, takes the ball away from Wigan's Michael Brown. ENGLISH PREMIER LEAGUE Jon Super /AP Photos

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SUN TEE EMBROIDME was one of scores of local companies lending its supportt o organisers of the second annual Bahamas Real Estate Expo, held May 2 and 3 att he Wyndham Nassau Resort. Sun Tee EmbroidMe’s president Scott Farrington donated specially designed eco-friendly bags for the twoday event, which providedh undreds of persons with an opportunity to receive first hand information on invest-i ng in real estate from some of the country’s leading pro fessional real estate and financial companies. “Sun Tee EmbroidMe is r eally happy to partner with the Bahamas Real Estate Expo on such a very important event to help promote our local economy and to help local people do what they need to do to achieve, especially in today’s economy,” said Mr Farrington. “We are excited about the whole venture and we definitely would like to thank Sun Tee for assisting us in this venture with the eco-friendly bags,” said Pedro Young, president and founder of the Bahamas Real Estate Expo. Ernesto Gongora, cofounder and vice president of technical support of the Bahamas Real Estate Expo expressed similar sentiments. “We are extremely pleased. We were contacted by Mr Scott Farrington and we were delighted that he took the initiative to partner with us and we hope that this will be a partnership that is going to last for many years to come.” Part proceeds from the expo will be donated to the Ranfurly Home for Children. C M Y K C M Y K LOCAL NEWS PAGE 16, FRIDAY, MAY 15, 2009 THE TRIBUNE JOHN Hardy, a designer whose inspiration is derived from nature and Balinese cul-t ure, will showcase his latest jewellery collection in a trunk show event at Little Switzer-l and on Bay Street from May 18 through May 25. “The entire store will be set in a tropical Balinese setting b y Munroe Landscaping,” said Deirdree Andrews, marketi ng manager for Little Switzerland. “The setting ties in very well w ith the style of (designer John Hardy as his jewelry is v ery nature inspired. You can see the quality of craftsmanship that goes into every pieceo f his work. We are encouraging persons to think green with this event. John Hardy is an environmentalist so it iso nly fitting with this show to encourage persons to give back to nature from where thei nspiration of these designs originate.” With the purchase of any John Hardy piece guests will b e asked to make a donation to adopt a tree as a part of the t ree planting initiative by the Ministry of Agriculture in their quest to plant one mil-l ion trees in the Bahamas. Guests will also have the o pportunity to win John Hardy jewellery from Little Switzerland during the pro-m otion. Sun Tee EmbroidMe supporting the Bahamas Real Estate Expo SCOTT FARRINGTON, president of Sun Tee EmbroidMe (at centre with Pedro Young (left Estate Expo, and Ernesto Gongora (right president of technical support. A n a s t a s i a S t u b b s / V i s i o n a i r e M a r k e t i n g SPACE SHUTTLE SHOOTS BY: As photographer Helene Seligman flew into Nassau from New York Monday she caught this shot of the space shuttle Atlantis with its seven crew members on its way to outer space to repair NASA’s 19-year-old Hubble Space Telescope. ‘How lucky the passengers on our plane were ... we watched the NASA space shuttle zoom up through the clouds it was an incredible sight!’ she said as she snapped this shot from her aircraft as it prepared for landing in Nassau. Photo: Helene Seligman Bahamas-bound passengers get spectacular view of space shuttle Naturally-inspired designer set to showcase latest jewellery collection

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C M Y K C M Y K SECTIONB business@tribunemedia.net FRIDAY, MAY 15, 2009 THETRIBUNE $4. 68 $4. 51 $4. 69The information contained is from a third p arty and The Tribune can not be held r esponsible for errors and/or omission from the daily report.$ $3.53 $3.62 $3.48 group pensions attract the cream of the crop keep present employees happy guarantee staff retirement savingsall of the abovecall us today at 396-4000 SALES OFFICES: NASSAU I FREEPORT I ABACO I ELEUTHERA I EXUMA I CORPORATE CENTRE: EAST BAY STREET I www.famguardbahamas.com A SUBSIDIARY OF Bahamas most vulnerable to economic storm City Markets ‘walked a tightrope’ to health n By NEIL HARTNELL Tribune Business Editor The Bahamas must develop a “new business model” and proactive National Plan to ensure its financial services industry survives the “most severe challenge” it has ever faced, a senior attorney said yesterday, as he urged the Government to adopt a “different approach” to complying with tax transparency demands. Brian Moree, senior partner at McKinney, Bancroft & Hughes, called on the Government to develop a long-term strategy that would enable the Bahamas to avoid a “knee-jerk reaction” every time the Organ isation for Economic Cooperation and Development (OECD and its contemporaries unveiled a new initiative attacking international financial centres. And he urged the Govern ment to create a standalone Ministry of Financial Services to give the Bahamas’ second largest industry its own ministry, much like how tourism had the Ministry of Tourism. Financial industry faces ‘most severe challenge’ ever * Senior attorney calls for new business model to ensure long-term survival, as current one ‘largely redundant’ * Moree says government needs different approach to TIEA talks, urging creation of National Plan and Ministry of Financial Services to combat G-20/OECD * Bahamas needs alliances and to avoid ‘knee jerk’ reactions to OECD-type initiatives SEE page 4B Brian Moree n By NEIL HARTNELL Tribune Business Editor The Government was yesterday urged to “finish the job” of financial services regulatory consolidation by merging the existing supervisory into either a single ‘super regulator’ or the ‘Twin Peaks’ model, a senior attorney saying it would be “a mistake to stop” after moving most into one building. Brian Moree, senior partner at McKinney, Bancroft & Hughes, told Tribune Business that while he “applauded” the decision to move all financial services regulators bar the Central Bank’s supervision depart ment under one roof, the Government needed to go further than simply physical consolidation. The Securities Commission of the Bahamas has taken on Government urged: ‘Finish regulatory consolidation job’ Bahamas ‘not there’ in terms of time to hear and dispose of commercial cases SEE page 5B n By NEIL HARTNELL Tribune Business Editor City Markets “walked a tightrope” to get back on a stable financial footing, its chief executive has told Tribune Business , carrying no more than one week’s worth of inventory for its stores after guaranteeing Bahamian wholesalers/distrib utors would receive payments for supplies on a weekly basis. Sunil Chatrani, who heads the 12-store supermarket chain’s publicly-listed holding company, Bahamas Supermarkets, said that after taking over his post in October 2008, he asked the company’s vendors at one of his first meetings to set aside the accounts payables owed to them by City Markets. “We guarantee, on a weekly basis, to pay you what we owe you, and to pay some of the balance,” was the message MrC hatrani delivered to them. He told Tribune Business this week: “We stuck with it. It was walking a tightrope we had no more than one week’s inventory in-store. “It was very tight. We had to m ake sure we fixed the busin ess first before new funds came into the company. We walked a tightrope.” The City Markets chief exec utive added that “while still tight” on liquidity/cash flow, the company had been able to meet all its commitments. Mr Chatrani praised the sup port City Markets received from its Bahamian whole sale/distributor suppliers as “fantastic”, adding: “They’ve really helped us, I can tell you.” Evangeline Rahming, Bahamas Supermarkets’ chief financial officer, added: “They [the wholesalers] didn’t want City Markets to fail.” Refit Vendors had helped to refit and reset City Markets’ produce department, putting in new equipment, while freezers not working had been replaced. Tribune Business yesterday exclusively revealed that investors in BSL Holdings, the 78 per cent majority Bahamas Supermarkets shareholder, had committed ‘in principle’ to injecting additional equity cap ital into the company to enable it to “relaunch” by June 1, 2009, and restart its imported produce programme to generate increased sales, gross margins and higher consumer volume and per capita spend. “We’re ahead of the projections,” Mr Chatrani said. “We’ve reached the stage where, once this programme kicks in, it’s a matter of constant refining. We’re looking at putting bakeries, pharmacies in the stores. We’re looking at opening hours to see what makes sense, what doesn’t make sense.” Mr Chatrani added that City Markets management “feel strongly we are going to hit and better” the financial targets the company has set for its turnaround, and urged the compa ny’s 22 per cent minority share holders some of whom are contemplating legal action against the firm and its Board of Directors over the destruction of shareholder value to be patient as the only way was ‘up’. “The value of the shares, as we know, has declined signifi cantly, but the value is going to be on the future cash flows,” Mr Chatrani said. “I would say the message is to be patient. The worst is behind Firm looking at bakeries, pharmacies in-store, and opening hours SEE page 5B * Storm and sea surges to knock almost $50m off Bahamian GDP,W orld Bank predicts * Nation ranked as world’s most vulnerable in three out of six World Bank categories n By CHESTER ROBARDS Business Reporter crobards@tribunemedia.net A WORLD Bank study has predicted that the Bahamas could lose US $48.92 million in gross domestic product (GDP with this country ranked in three out of six categories as the nation worst impacted by Sea Level Rise (SLRb rought on by global warming.. According to the findings, an estimated 1,517 square miles of Bahamian coastline could be impacted over an umber of years as global sea levels rise, representing 54.67 per cent of the nation’s total coastline. S EE page 2B n By NEIL HARTNELL Tribune Business Editor The Water & Sewerage C orporation’s $20 million-plus per annum subsidies could be eliminated over a five-yearp eriod to 2013 by reducing them by $4 million every year, a management/operating agreement proposal is arguing, with the Corporation hav-i ng now overtaken Bahamasair as the Government’s heaviest loss maker. T he proposal submitted to the Government by the BUSAWU, the union that represents the Corporation’s line workers, a copy of whichh as been seen by Tribune Business, revealed that in 2007 the last year for which the Water & Sewerage Corporation’s financials were availableits net loss increased by 26.7 per cent, from $19.021 million t o $24.107 million. Coupled with the $30 million taxpayer subsidy it hasr eceived in the 2008-2009 Budget year, the net loss makes the Water & Sewerage Corporation the Government’s largest-loss making Corpo-r ation something the union’s president believes their prop osal an reverse. Carmen Munnings-Kemp told Tribune Business yester-d ay that the union was still awaiting the Government’s f ormal response to a proposal that a ‘strategic partner’ take o ver management/operation of the Water & Sewerage Corporation, bringing with it thee xpertise, technical capability and ability to access “hund reds of millions” of dollars in financing to upgrade its infrastructure and operations. T he BUSAWU document revealed that the proposed strategic partner is UK-headquartered Biwater Plc and its subsidiary, Cascal, two com-p anies that should be very familiar with the Bahamas and t he Corporation’s problems. For Biwater was the runnerup to Consolidated Water int he bidding for the Blue Hills Water Corp top loser at $24.1m Overtakes Bahamasair as biggest drain with 26.7% net loss rise, as union proposal advocates subsidy elimination by 2103 with $4m per year reductionF ormer Blue Hills bidder Biwater union’s selected operating/management partner S EE page 6B

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n By CHESTER ROBARDSB usiness Reporter crobards@tribunemedia.net The private company develo ping the Arawak Cay port was yesterday said by sources to have held a Board meetinge arlier this week to discuss the Government’s final terms for the project as outlined in a lett er sent to the directors by P rime Minister Hubert Ingrah am. It is unknown what was i ncluded in the letter, but one s ource close to developments, who asked not to be named, as B oard members have apparently been warned by the Prime Minister not to speak publicly about the deal, couldo nly say: “We are moving in t he right direction.” W hen asked by Tribune B usiness what the right direct ion might be for the Arawak Cay port, the source suggested that no more could be r evealed. N ot a whisper has left the Prime Minister’s Office r ecently about the relocation of the container shipping facilities from Downtown Nassaut o Arawak Cay, and for months speculation over why the Government has been so tightlipped over the project h as increased. PLP senator Jerome Fitzgerald this month berated the Government for its “veilo f secrecy” over the proposed Arawak Cay port, and called for “full and proper disclo-s ure” of all developments connected with the plan to move t he container shipping facili ties. In a study done on the port r elocation for the former Christie government by the D utch consultants, Ecorys, Arawak Cay was found to be the sixth-best site to redevelop a container port from an environmental perspective, falling one behind the option to leave i t in its current position in Downtown Nassau. It has been suggested that t he long-awaited revitalisation o f Bay Street cannot begin in earnest until the port facilities are removed from the downtown area. The former PLP government suggested that the port b e move to southwest New Providence, near Clifton Cay. However, the present government found this option to be too costly and subsequently scrapped the idea. Option Now, plans to build a manm ade island west of Arawak C ay to house the container port seem to be an option for t he relocation. The fill removed during the harbour d redging this year to accomm odate the first of the Gene s is class cruise ships is slated to be used to extend the wharf a long Bay Street and construct the man-made island, accordi ng to sources. A thoroughfare being con structed from John F Kennedy Drive to Saunders Beach is s uspected to be a part of the new Arawak Cay container p ort’s proposed road infrastructure, which will link to a causeway connecting with the 75 acre man made island. H owever, Deputy Prime Minister Brent Symonette saidt his new road was simply another corridor planned as a part of the Government’s $120 m illion New Providence Road improvement project being constructed by the Argentine firm Jose Cartellone Con struction Company (JCCC A recent town meeting conf irmed that the port will be moved to Arawak Cay. However, the Government is still being quiet about the deal, having placed a virtual g ag order on all investors related to the relocation of the port. S ome suggest that it is because Arawak Cay will be back in the hands of those who once operated there when it was known as Kelly Island. A s a result, the World Bank estimates 3,711 Bahamians could be impacted over the same period of time, representing 73.03 per cent of the total population living on coastline that could possibly be affected. The Bahamas has long been thought to be at high risk of w ater inundation due to incremental seal level rises, as a vast majority of the islands are only a few feet above sea level. In a list of 10 countries most at risk for serious damage as storm surges intensify, the Bahamas tops the list three times. W ith 73 per cent of the coastal population threatened by intensifying storm surges, the Bahamas ranks number one a bove Kuwait, Dijibouti and the United Arab Emirates (UAE The Bahamas outranks all others as the country most likely to lose a mass amount of coastal GDP at 65.7 per cent. T he study also suggests that the Bahamas is at risk of losing 94.1 per cent of its urban coastal areas to intense storm surges. Those incrementally increasing surges are predicted to affect 5 4.7 per cent of the total coastal land area and 71.4 per cent of coastal wetlands. The only category in which the Bahamas is not e xpected to be gravely affected is in coastal agricultural land – maybe because there is not much to lose. Scientists and environmentalists have been having a great d ebate for years over the state of global temperatures. However, one constant that c annot be denied is the direct correlation between ocean temperature and the intensity of hurri-c anes and cyclones. “An increase in sea surface t emperature is strongly evident at all latitudes and in all oceans,” the study read. The scientific evidence indicates that increased surface temperature will intensify cyclone activity and heighten storm surges. These surges will, in turn,c reate more damaging flood conditions in coastal zones and adjoining low-lying areas. “The destructive impact will generally be greater when storm s urges are accompanied by strong winds and large onshore waves.” T he Bahamas has moved forward in the endeavour to lower carbon emissions, which are almost wholly blamed for global temperature increases. A nd as a country geographically susceptible to hurricanes that develop in the Atlantic and in the Gulf of Mexico, the B ahamas must depend on industrialised nations such as China, India and the US to mitigate their carbon emissiona in order to curb the effects of global warming. The International Workshop on Tropical Cyclones (IWTC has recently noted that “if the projected rise in sea level due to global warming occurs, then the vulnerability to tropical cyclone storm surge flooding would increase” and “it is likely that some increase in tropical cyclone peak wind-speed and rainfall willo ccur if the climate continues to warm,” the study continued. According to the World Bank, hurricanes and cyclones have been occurring in areas that have previously not been frequent. T he findings suggest that as these former anomalies become commonplace due to the state or the global environment, poor communities in low lying coastal areas will be affected. S everal low-lying Pacific islands are already thought to have been inundated by abnormally high sea levels. The island states reported about 100 metres (328.1ft sea water. “A particularly striking finding is the concentration of highly vulnerable large cities at the low end of the international income distribution. We believe that these large, globally pervasive potential impacts further strengthen the case for rapid action to protect endangered coastal populations,” the study concluded. C M Y K C M Y K BUSINESS PAGE 2B, FRIDAY, MAY 15, 2009 THE TRIBUNE F ROM page 1B “The destructive impact will g enerally be greater when storm surges are accompanied by strong winds and large onshore waves.” Bahamas most vulnerable to economic storm Port Board meets on government’s terms

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I t was a beautiful Sunday past. A little work and play made quite an evening. But this drive made me wonder whether our lovely little island of New Providence is safe or just lawless. What’s the difference, you may ask? Well, the reliable Webster defines “safe” as being “free from harm or risk” or “secure from threat of danger, harm, or loss”. Lawless means “not regulated by or based on law” and “not restrained or controlled by law” This was my debate back and forth with myself as I drove from the Carmichael area into Coral Harbour, on to Adelaide Road and on to the New Albany divide, passing a New Providence Development Company security patrol way. Thenit hit me; I have not seen any police patrols. So I continue my drive, passing Clifton Pier and the Clifton Heritage Site, Jaws Beach, Lyford Cay, still no police. Pass ing an old favourite haunt, and also a new one, I find myself now near Nirvana Beach and guess what? Still no police. There are pedestrians, cyclists, foot and motor driven, beach goers with families having picnics, ‘just chilling on de island’. As I drive, not one policeman in sight. Now by the ever popular Goodman’s Bay, where are the police? Getting a bit concerned after visiting another new favourite, I still see no police. Of course, I remind myself from my days on the force that this is Sunday, and our police too need some time to relax. But if there are no police out keeping us safe, why are there so many people out having, from what I can see and hear, such a good ole time, so to speak. They must be mad, because as some would have us believe, Nassau is not a safe place to be. Well, obviously these folks have not gotten the memo. By now I am passing Arawak Cay, and still no police presence, only the police atation e rected at the site. S o what is it with Sunday? W ell, I introduced you to the concept of ‘selective enforcement’. Of which, as I stated, our police force is very good at, Well, with Sunday’s enforcement level the police are obviously going for a combination of the Oscars, Grammy and Cacique awards. The now obvious, I am certain, practice of reduced coverage on Sunday must mean that the potential for crime is reduced during these hours. Or is it? Remember those motorbikes; none of them had helmets on. Many of the cars, if not speeding, are doubled parked and parked on the grass or wherever, music, of course, loud. No police, not even on Bay Street, at which point I decided to take a break from this long drive and observe a bit more critically the absence or lack of officers. So downtown Nassau, at about 5pm-5.30pm, with not one footpatrol. T he time now is nearly after 6 pm by now. Maybe I am too e arly. But seriously, folks, it has been about three-and-a-half hours and not a single police patrol. Maybe this selective enforcement needs to be revisited. Maybe a review of this management style, as the safe environment which exists has b ecome a fertile ground for lawless behavior. The law breakers, regardless of the infraction, feel safe. Hence, the speeding, illegal parking and loud music have become, as one eyewitness to the raid on a local alleged numbers house said, part of our culture. Now this is not the first Sunday where this has been noted. In fact, this is the norm, but a dangerous one at that. Alas, our police are caught in a quandry, as from personal experience I have seen where the police presence causes some young, lost youth to act out. When the police are seen, in an effort to show themselves off, they must now be louder and m ore vulgar, as if to dare the police to take action. So what do you do. Hopefully not stay away from such events and gatherings, but rather you develop new strategies of managing them without being seen as oppressive. Yes, I would be the first to say easier said than done, but it has to be done. So if just by chance, on one of these beautiful Sunday afternoons, the police select a rarely enforced item from the law books to enforce, be ready. Nevertheless, we will here the outcry form the arrested person, that they are being victimised, and unfairly targeted b y the police. Go catch some real criminals. NB: Gamal Newry is the president of Preventative Measures, a loss Pprevention and asset protection training and consulting company, specialiaing in policy and procedure development, business security reviews and audits, and emergency and crisis management. Comments can be sent to PO Box N-3154 Nassau, Bahamas or, e-mail gnewry@gmail.com or visit us at www.preventativemeasures.net or visit http://newrypreventativemeasures.blogspot.com/ C M Y K C M Y K BUSINESS THE TRIBUNE FRIDAY, MAY 15, 2009, PAGE 3B Safe & Secure B y Gamal Newry Law enforcement notable by absence n By ALAN ZIBEL A P Real Estate Writer With less than 24 hours on the clock, Rose Inman’s foreclosure was postponed late Thursday for 60 days. But after spending hun dreds of dollars she couldn’t a fford to find an apartment and pack her things, the last-minuteg esture comes too late she is moving out of her house over l ooking Seattle’s Puget Sound. For the past two months she had hoped to benefit from President Barack Obama’s plan to help homeowners avoid foreclos ure. Despite numerous calls, emails and letters to Aurora LoanS ervices, she was only able to have one phone conversation w ith a company representative. “It’s like this huge, concrete thick wall that you cannot get through,” said Inman, 58, who is working as a human resources c onsultant, but making much less than she was before she was laid o ff by the City of Seattle. On Thursday, the Obama administration said its bold mortgage assistance program launched in March is helping thousands ofb orrowers, though some lenders are working faster than others. S o far, participating mortgage companies have made more than 5 5,000 offers to modify borrowers’ loans, but officials could not say how many of those homeowners had in fact been helped. And knowing that many troubled homeowners can’t be, the Obama administration expanded its $50 billion mortgage aid program, announcing new measures that would help homeowners avoid a foreclosure if they don’t qualify for other assistance. The initiatives are intended to streamline the process of selling a home that is worth less than the mortgage, or transfer ownership of a home to the lender. Both options will still ding the homeowner’s credit score, but less than a foreclosure. So far, 14 companies including Aurora Loan Services, Wells Fargo, and JPMorgan Chase have signed up and will be paid for each loan they modify. And to further entice mortgage companies to participate, the government is offering payments totaling up to $10 billion to compensate them for the risk of falling home prices. “The basic problem is that the program is very complicated and involved to set up,” said Guy Cecala, publisher of trade publi cation Inside Mortgage Finance. He doesn’t expect to see large volumes of loan modifications before July or August. While some mortgage companies have added staff and made preparations for the program, others are apparently lagging behind. Many housing counselors across the country complain that the program has been slow getting off the ground. “Our experience at the ground level has been, so far, frustrating,” said Michael van Zalingen, director of homeownership at Neighborhood Housing Services of Chicago, a counseling group. Entry-level employees at mortgage companies, he said, are either steering borrowers away from the plan or are entirely unaware of it. US housing plan off to slow start

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Mr Moree told a Rotary Club of West Nassau luncheon that while the former Christie administration had “taken a step in the right direction” when it created the Ministry of Financial Services and Investments between 2002-2007, it did not get it “quite right” because its remit also included investmentssomething that should have been excluded as this was “a massive portfolio by itself”. The McKinney, Bancroft & Hughes senior partner said the Ministry of Financial Services should be headed by a full-time director of financial services, the post having the same status as the director-general of tourism. The salary for such a post needed to be sufficiently high to attract top talent from the private sector, and Mr Moree added: “There are at least four or five people who I think, across the board, would be acknowledged as suitable for this position. “If I was Prime Minister, I would take five minutes to appoint Wendy Warren [the Bahamas Financial Services Board’s chief executive and executive director] as director of financial services.” Speaking to Tribune Business later, Mr Moree said the Bahamas needed to be “ahead o f the curve” if it was to surv ive the multitude of attacks l aunched against it by the G20/OECD ‘blacklist’, the Obama administration and other agencies and global regulatory bodies. “I don’t think there’s any need to panic or that our industry is in danger of collapsing in the short-term,” Mr Moree told Tribune Business . “However, having said that, some people have said putting the Bahamas on the [G20/OECD] ‘grey list’ will not have a significant impact. But my own sources have indicated that in the case of certain European banks there is very much a wait and see attitude, and we’re going to have to see how that develops in conjunction with the various initiatives Gordon Brown [the UK prime minister] was talking about. I don’t think that impact has been profound y et, but these are very serious c hallenges that have to be prope rly and ably managed over the next few months to minimise their impact. Our industry has been resilient, and will continue to be so, but it has never quite faced the severity of the challenge it is facing. “Given proper initiatives and a National Plan to respond to these issues we can secure the future of this industry, although we have to radically change our business model. Therein lies the challenge for the private and public sectors.” This will likely mean that the Bahamas may, eventually, have to consider introducing some form of minimal income tax, such as a corporate tax (via conversion of the business licence fee into this) or taxes on the profits, revenues or assets under management of international clients. Such a tax, which has been urged by many industry participants, would enable the Bahamas to negotiate double tax treaties with other nations. Mr Moree told Tribune Busin ess : “The current model has s erved us well for the past 40 y ears, but it’s now becoming largely redundant and will have to be replaced with a new one -a new business model with regard to what is happening around us.” He urged the Government to adopt a different approach to the OECD’s demands that this nation have at least 12 Tax Information Exchange Agreements (TIEAs with other countries to show its commitment to tax transparency. Prime Minister Hubert Ingraham has indicated that, while the Bahamas has one such agreement with the US, it is likely to commence talks with Canada over its second TIEA. But Mr Moree said the Bahamas should follow the lead established by the Cayman Islands, which when confronted with the OECD demands, p romptly went out and signed multiple TIEAs with five to seven Nordic countries. It did this safe in the knowledge that its financial services sector had no clients or assets from those nations, meaning the industry would suffer no fallout from OECD compliance. “The amount of money coming into Cayman from those countries probably could not buy you a suit, Mr Moree said. Turning to the Bahamas’ approach to TIEAs, with Canada next in line, he added: “I would have suggested a different approach, going after the low hanging fruit before the high hanging fruit, knocking off seven to eight countries that do not have money here.” T he leading attorney also urged the Government to continue lobbying the Obama administration in order to safeguard the Bahamian financial services industry, as many were “scratching heads” as to what more this nation could do to comply with its demands given the TIEA’s existence. The Bahamas, Mr Moree said, had been “ very cooperative and supportive” of the US, and should receive something in return. “As far as I know, there are no serious complaints or objections about how this treaty is working,” he added. “We have a TIEA, we have transparency and have an obligation to provide appropriate information. We are doing everything we can with the US at the moment.” The G-20/OECD and other i nitiatives targeting international financial centres were driven by “good, old-fashioned competition. Old fashioned, hardball competition”, Mr Moree said. G-20 and OECD members were targeting international financial centres in the mistaken belief that they would be able to prevent the leakage of tax revenues needed to shore up expensive welfare states. But Mr Moree said the Bahamas had exited business relying on tax evasion years ago”, and its business model was based on tax compliant money. In response, he urged: “We n eed to develop a National Plan. This is essential. We can’t have this knee-jerk, ad-hoc reaction. We need to engage central government in benchmarking competitive jurisdictions, and engage our diplomatic offices abroad [to lobby other governments]. There has to be effective dialogue at many different levels to make our case. We need to get out in front of the game.” M r Moree also called on the Bahamas to “forge alliances” with other international financial centres under attack, as they shared common interests and there was strength in numbers. Unlike Guernsey, Jersey, Bermuda and the Cayman Islands, which enjoyed UK protection, and Hong Kong and Macau, which have China, the Bahamas as a sovereign nation does not have a ‘big brother’ to watch over it, making alliances crucial. Mr Moree also ques tioned why the Bahamas had a M inistry of Agriculture and Fisheries, but no Ministry of Financial Services, when the economic contribution of the latter dwarfed both sectors. “Does it make sense to you? I don’t understand that,” he said, arguing that the Ministry of Finance could not adequately promote financial services because it had a “plethora of other responsibilities and obligations” that did not allow it to allocate the necessary resources. Urging all Bahamians to become more educated and informed on issues impacting the financial services industry, and the sector’s importance, Mr Moree said a collective influence was needed to ensure the Government pursued “thoughtful, sensible policies” that protected the sector’s interests. “Given the competition, the ferocity and sustained nature of the attack, we will not survive unless we get ahead of it,” Mr Moree explained. “We don’t want to wake up and find, though our silence, that something has happened to our quality of life and the country we’re going to be turning over to our c hildren. “The very survival of the financial services industry as we know it, the second pillar of our economy, is under direct threat from a number of external forces. That in itself should be a wake-up call. What happens to the Bahamas if the sector is substantially reduced in size? How would it affect you and your family, your quality of life? “If we’re going to have a chance to survive and grow thei ndustry, we need to have strategies and take action a gainst the external agencies attacking our industry. “Otherwise we’re all going to wake up one day and find major changes have been imposed that adversely affect the financial services industry in this country, and then we realise it’s too late to address the problems with which we are confronted.” C M Y K C M Y K BUSINESS PAGE 4B, FRIDAY, MAY 15, 2009 THE TRIBUNE 52wk-Hi52wk-LowSecurit y Previous CloseToday's CloseChangeDaily Vol.EPS $Div $P/EYield 1.951.28Abaco Markets1.401.400.000.1270.00011.00.00% 1 1.8011.00Bahamas Property Fund11.0011.000.000.9920.20011.11.82% 9.686.95Bank of Bahamas6.956.950.000.2440.26028.53.74% 0.900.63Benchmark0.630.630.00-0.8770.000N/M0.00% 3.743.15Bahamas Waste3.153.150.000.0780.09040.42.86% 2.601.95Fidelity Bank2.372.370.000.0550.04043.11.69% 14.1511.09Cable Bahamas11.7511.750.001.4060.2508.42.13% 3.142.83Colina Holdings2.832.830.000.2490.04011.41.41% 7.446.06Commonwealth Bank (S16.176.06-0.116,5070.4190.05014.50.83% 3 .381.31Consolidated Water BDRs3.012.91-0.100.1110.05226.21.79% 3.001.70Doctor's Hospital1.701.700.000.2400.0807.14.71% 8.106.02Famguard7.767.760.000.4200.30018.53.87% 12.5011.00Finco11.0011.000.000.3220.67034.26.09% 14.6610.35FirstCaribbean Bank10.4010.400.000.7940.40013.13.85% 5.555.00Focol (S5.145.140.000.3320.15015.52.92%1 .001.00Focol Class B Preference1.001.000.000.0000.000N/M0.00% 0.500.30Freeport Concrete0.300.300.000.0350.0008.60.00% 8.205.50ICD Utilities5.595.590.000.4070.50013.78.94% 12.508.60J. S. Johnson10.5010.500.000.9520.64011.06.10% 10.0010.00Premier Real Estate10.0010.000.000.1800.00055.60.00% 52wk-Hi52wk-LowSecuritySymbolLast SaleChangeDaily Vol. 1000.001000.00Fidelity Bank Note 17 (Series AFBB17100.000.00 1000.001000.00Fidelity Bank Note 22 (Series BFBB22100.000.00 1000.001000.00Fidelity Bank Note 13 (Series CFBB13100.000.00 1000.001000.00Fidelity Bank Note 15 (Series DFBB15100.000.00 52wk-Hi52wk-LowSymbolBid $ A sk $Last PriceWeekly Vol.EPS $Div $P/EYield 14.6014.25Bahamas Supermarkets7.928.4214.60-0.0410.300N/M2.05% 8.006.00Caribbean Crossings (Pref4.006.256.000.0000.480N/M7.80% 0.540.20RND Holdings0.350.400.350.0010.000256.60.00% 41.0029.00ABDAB30.1331.5929.004.5400.0009.030.00% 0.550.40RND Holdings0.450.550.550.0020.000261.900.00% 52wk-Hi52wk-LowFund NameNA V YTD%Last 12 MonthsDiv $Yield % 1.36641.3041Colina Bond Fund1.36640.954.77 3.03512.9230Colina MSI Preferred Fund2.8962-1.49-3.35 1.45901.3883Colina Money Market Fund1.45901.775.09 3.69603.1964Fidelity Bahamas G & I Fund3.1964-5.59-13.64 12.739712.1564Fidelity Prime Income Fund12.73970.965.79 100.5606100.0000CFAL Global Bond Fund100.56060.560.56 100.000096.4070CFAL Global Equity Fund96.4070-3.59-3.59 1.00001.0000CFAL High Grade Bond Fund1.00000.000.00 10.50009.0950Fidelity International Investment Fund9.15990.71-12.76 1.04401.0000FG Financial Preferred Income Fund1.04400.804.40 1.03641.0000FG Financial Growth Fund1.03640.333.64 1.04521.0000FG Financial Diversified Fund1.04520.764.40 BISX ALL SHARE INDEX 19 Dec 02 = 1,000.00YIELD last 12 month dividends divided by closing price 52wk-Hi Highest closing price in last 52 weeksBid $ Buying price of Colina and Fidelity 52wk-Low Lowest closing price in last 52 weeksAsk $ Selling price of Colina and fidelity Previous Close Previous day's weighted price for daily volumeLast Price Last traded over-the-counter price Today's Close Current day's weighted price for daily volumeWeekly Vol. Trading volume of the prior week Change Change in closing price from day to dayEPS $ A company's reported earnings per share for the last 12 mths Daily Vol. Number of total shares traded todayNAV Net Asset Value DIV $ Dividends per share paid in the last 12 monthsN/M Not Meaningful P/E Closing price divided by the last 12 month earningsFINDEX The Fidelity Bahamas Stock Index. January 1, 1994 = 100 (S (S1T T O O T T R R A A D D E E C C A A L L L L : : C C O O L L I I N N A A 2 24 4 2 2 5 5 0 0 2 2 7 70 0 1 10 0 | | R R O O Y Y A A L LF F I I D D E E L LI I T T Y Y 2 2 4 42 2 3 35 5 6 67 7 7 7 6 64 4 | | F FG G C C A A P P I I T T A A L L M M A A R R K K E E T T S S 2 24 4 2 2 3 3 9 9 6 64 40 0 0 00 0 | | C C O OL LO O N N I I A A L L 2 24 4 2 25 5 0 02 27 75 52 2 5 5FINDEX: CLOSE 797.42 | YTD -4.49% | 2008 -12.31%BISX LISTED & TRADED SECURITIES AS OF: Fidelity Over-The-Counter Securities Colina Over-The-Counter Securities BISX Listed Mutual Funds MARKET TERMSTHURSDAY, 14 MAY 2009B ISX ALL SHARE INDEX: CLOSE 1,607.86 | CHG -5.66 | %CHG -0.35 | YTD -104.50 | YTD % -6.10BISX LISTED DEBT SECURITIES (Bonds trade on a Percentage Pricing basesPrime + 1.75% Maturity 19 October 2017 19 October 2022 30 May 2013 29 May 2015 Interest 7% Prime + 1.75% 7% 28-Feb-09 31-Dec-08 31-Dec-07 31-Mar-09 9-Feb-09 9-Feb-09 W W W W W W. . B B I I S S X X B B A A H H A A M M A A S S . .C C O O M M | | T T E E L L E E P P H H O O N NE E : :2 24 4 2 2 -3 32 2 3 3-2 23 3 3 3 0 0 | | F F A A C C S S I I M M I I L L E E : : 2 2 4 4 2 2 -3 3 2 2 3 3-2 23 3 2 20 0NAV Date 31-Mar-09 1-May-09 31-Mar-09 28-Feb-09 31-Dec-08 9-Feb-09 %DKDPDV+XPDQHRFLHW\ZLVKHVWRLQIRUPWKHJHQHUDOSXEOLFWKDW WKHUHZLOOEH 12&OLQLF RQ 6DWXUGD\ $QLPDO)XQ'D\ :HZLOOKDYHDODWHFOLQLF 7KDQN
PAGE 18

the regulatory responsibility of the Inspector of Financial and Corporate Services Providers, while both the Compliance Commission and Registrar of Insurance Companies have moved into the same premises as the Commission Charlotte House. However, Mr Moree yesterday encouraged the Government to complete the regulatory consolidation by merging all supervisory bodies including the Bank Supervision Department into one ‘super regulator’, along the lines of the UK’s Financial Services Authority (FSA tory bodies by merging all bar the Central Bank department. “We need to seriously look at the resources of the major regulators, and in this regard the central government has to realise and understand that creating a regulator is a relatively easy thing to do,” Mr Moree told Tribune Business . “Funding it, staffing it and resourcing it is more difficult, and this is where the real resolve of the Government is tested. “We need to seriously review the current resources made available to the regulators, with the exception of the Central Bank, which generates its income from bank licence fees. In my view, almost all the other regulators are underresourced and understaffed.” Turning to regulatory consolidation, Mr Moree added: “I think it is vitally important for us not to simply acknowledgea consolidation of operations. “While I applaud that development as a first step, putting them in the same building, establishing protocols among the regulatory bodies to minimise duplication, streamlining procedures and sharing resources, and achieving a high er level of operational consolidation, in my view it would be a major mistake to stop at that stage and not proceed with what we were previously told was going to happen consolidating those regulators into one super regulator or two under the ‘Twin Pillars’ model. “I think it would be a great mistake to stop, because what we to do to finish the job is to not only achieve physical consolidation under one roof, but eliminate some of those regul ators by consolidating into one o r two. They’ve got to finish the job and end up with one or two regulators.” Meanwhile, Mr Moree reiterated his call for a dedicated commercial court in the Bahamas, telling Tribune Business that currently the Bahamian judicial system was largely not disposing of complex commercial cases within the 18-24 month timeframe widely regarded as an international benchmark. “We need to establish a commercial court. There has been some debate in certain circles as to whether there is enough commercial work to justify a commercial court,” he said, describing this as a “chicken and egg” situation. Mr Moree added: “There is wide consensus at the Bar, and in the local and international business community, that given our status as a major financial centre, and given our claim to be a significant player in banking and commerce, we need to be able to deliver justice in commercial cases in a reasonable period of time, and with judges who are clearly seen by the public as capable and experienced in those areas.” Mr Moree said that setting aside simple and highly complex cases, most commercial cases should make their way through the court system by 1824 months. The Bahamas, though, was “not there at the moment”. Apart from judges and a properly-equipped physical premises, Mr Moree said a commercial court would need to be fully equipped with a full staff complement, including a registrar, court reporters and clerks. He added: “It is a fact that Justice Lyons did an enormous volume of commercial work, and his resignation will put a heavy burden on the Judicial and Legal Services Commission to ensure there are sufficient justices with commercial experience to be able to deal with these cases.” C M Y K C M Y K BUSINESS THE TRIBUNE FRIDAY, MAY 15, 2009, PAGE 5B Government urged: ‘Finish regulatory consolidation job’ F ROM page 1B e need to seriously look at the resources oft he major regulators.” B rian Moree us. Hang in there and watch the share value grow again.” He added that “every decision made has been in the best interests of the company, including the minority shareholders”. Mr Chatrani himself is effectively a corporate troubleshooter, parachuted into City Markets by the largest shareholder in that company and BSL Holdings, Trinidad-based Neal & Massey, in a bid to sort out its financial woes. “My job is to restructure it, settle it, get it back to profitability and then leave,” Mr Chatrani said, once a long-term management team had been identified. He added that the information systems weaknesses that had played a key role in City Markets’ recent woes had all been addressed, and accurate financial information was available in real-time to management. Bahamas Supermarkets suffered a fiscal 2008 net loss of $13.429 million, with 2009 half-year losses standing at $3.527 million and the firm then suffering from a $2 million-plus solvency deficiency. Accounts In addition, as at January 27, 2009, the unaudited management accounts show that while Bahamas Supermarkets had current assets of at least $21.37 million, its liabilities exceeded this by just over $2 million, standing at $23.46 million. Since it acquired Bahamas Supermarkets for $54 million in summer 2006, BSL Holdings and its investors have presided over a spectacular destruction of shareholder value, producing an almost-$20 million swing into technical insolvency. As at year-end 2007, Bahamas Supermarkets had net share holder equity of $17.615 million. That had reduced to $1.427 million as at year-end 2008, and at the 2009 half-year, this was at a negative $2.09 million. In tandem, retained earnings have shrunk from $12.874 million as at year-end 2007 to a position in the red of $3.304 million at yearend 2008. By the 2009 half-year point, that accumulated deficit had reached $6.831 million. City Markets ‘walked a tightrope’ to health FROM page 1B

PAGE 19

reverse osmosis plant contract. Tribune Business revealed several years ago that Biwaterwas originally awarded the Blue Hills contract via an agreement in principle, but this was rescinded and thed eal awarded to Consolidated Water, triggering legal action in the Bahamian courts. That case is before the Privy Council, but Ms MunningsKemp told Tribune Business: On a matter of principle, they said they had to put that in court, but no matter the outcome, if this [proposal] comes through that will ben egotiated away.” When asked why the BUSAWU had selected Biwater as the best strategic partner for the Water & SewerageC orporation, she explained: “Biwater has been here before. We met with other water companies and groups,a nd felt Biwater was by far the one with the most expert ise, knowledge and ability to a cquire the financing necessary at the Water & Sewerage C orporation.” Ms Munnings-Kemp declined to put a figure on thel ikely investment any strategic partner would need to b ring to the Water & Sewerage Corporation, as the union/Biwater needed to conduct a more detailed inspection of its assets and operations once the Governmenta greed to their proposal. “I’m still waiting for a formal response,” she added, the union having presented its proposal to Dr Earl Deveaux,m inister of the environment, and Phenton Neymour, minister of state for the environment and who has ultimate responsibility for the Water &S ewerage Corporation, in February 2009. In its plan, which is seeking a 25-30 year management conc ession for a strategic partner, the union said that among the W ater & Sewerage Corporat ion’s greatest problems were the fact that more than 53 per c ent of the water produced in New Providence was lost via leaks from its distribution sys-t em. Other issues were “wides pread customer dissatisfaction” that the union’s plan pegged at 68 per cent, and perceptions among 79 per cent o f customers that the Water & Sewerage Corporation d elivered “low value for money”. Apart from the fact that the W ater & Sewerage Corporation was delivering “no r eturn” on the Government’s substantial investment in it, the other issues included its low market penetration”, with only 30 per cent of New P rovidence residents taking its supply. At the end of its 2007 fiscal y ear, while possessing fixed assets valued at $171.656 million, the Water & SewerageC orporation’s current assets of just $4.196 million were d warfed by $71.137 million in current liabilities. Operating revenues fell y ear-over-year compared to 2006, dropping 10.7 per cent to stand at $38.236 million compared to $42.813 million, while operating expenses rose to$ 53.009 million from $51.407 million. As a result, the Water & Sewerage Corporation’s operating loss increased by 34.4p er cent to $21.327 million, compared to $15.684 million in 2006. Ms Munnings-Kemp said that, as a result of the Water& Sewerage Corporation being forced to sell water at below the cost it took to purchase or produce it, “we’ret aking a big hit all around. We can’t continue taking that hit”. S he added: “Right now t here is a world of problems at the Water & Sewerage Corp oration, and us being the employees, we’re quite knowledgeable about the problems. We have not been in a position to do anything, b ecause we do not do the funding. We have to rely on the Government, so all deci-s ions are made for us. We realise what all the problems a re, and why we need to find a strategic partner like Biwater, which has all the water ven-t ures around the world. “They have the experience, t he technical capability and by partnering with an entity like that, maybe we can solve thep roblems. Our hands have been tied because we’ve not been able to do anything about it. We may not have all the solutions, but let us maket he effort to get the organisation back on track.”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rLQFK 'HQWDO&RWWRQROOVHGLXP ;/*ORYHV/DWH[RZHUHG /DUJH*ORYHVODWH[RZGHU)UHHf /DUJH*ORYHV9LQ\O/DWH[)UHHf ,QVXOLQ\ULQJHPO 1HEXOL]HUDVN.LW &KLOGPO &KDPEHU 1HHGOH+ROGHUV 1DVDO&DQQXOD$GXOW 2[\JHQDVN$GXOW/DUJH /\ULQJHZLWK*HHGOH /\ULQJHZLWK*HHGOH /\ULQJHZLWK*HHGOHDQG*HHGOH \ULQJHZLWK*HHGOH 6SHFLPHQ&XSVR]WHULOH 6WHULOHXU +\SRDOOHUJHQLF&ORWK7DSHLFURVSRUH7DSHf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