Citation
The Tribune

Material Information

Title:
The Tribune
Uniform Title:
Tribune (Nassau, Bahamas)
Portion of title:
Nassau tribune
Place of Publication:
Nassau, Bahamas
Publisher:
Tribune
Publication Date:
Copyright Date:
2009
Frequency:
Daily, except Sunday
daily
normalized irregular
Language:
English
Physical Description:
v. : ill. ; 58 cm.

Subjects

Genre:
newspaper ( sobekcm )
newspaper ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage:
Bahamas

Notes

General Note:
Description based on: Vol. 79, no. 210 (Aug. 3, 1983); title from caption.

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Holding Location:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
This item was contributed to the Digital Library of the Caribbean (dLOC) by the source institution listed in the metadata. This item may or may not be protected by copyright in the country where it was produced. Users of this work have responsibility for determining copyright status prior to reusing, publishing or reproducing this item for purposes other than what is allowed by applicable law, including any applicable international copyright treaty or fair use or fair dealing statutes, which dLOC partners have explicitly supported and endorsed. Any reuse of this item in excess of applicable copyright exceptions may require permission. dLOC would encourage users to contact the source institution directly or dloc@fiu.edu to request more information about copyright status or to provide additional information about the item.
Resource Identifier:
09994850 ( OCLC )

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Full Text
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Mim blowin’ it

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The Tribune

=USA TODAY.

HIGH
LOW

AND BREEZY

Volume: 105 No.142




900 jolts wil

BAHAMAS EDITION

www.tribune242.com

THURSDAY, MAY 14, 2009

as resort closes

The Four Seasons at
Emerald Bay to shut
doors in two weeks

m@ By TANEKA THOMPSON
Tribune Staff Reporter
tthompson@tribunemedia.net

EXUMA'S economy is set to
receive a devastating blow when
the island's largest employer — the
Four Seasons Resort at Emerald
Bay — shuts its doors in a little
under two weeks, a move that will
place more than 500 workers on
the unemployment line.

"It's bad news for Exuma — as
you know that's an anchor project
in Exuma — and the government
will do anything in its power to
facilitate the re-opening of the
hotel," said Labour Minister Dion
Foulkes, adding that the receivers
for Emerald Bay said the closure
was a "temporary" measure until
they secure a new buyer for the
property.

Mr Foulkes, who said he was
informed of the decision on Tues-
day, said his ministry would work
to ensure that the redundant work-
ers are paid severance packages
and “any other legal entitlement."

"As Minister of Labour that's
one of the things that I'm con-
cerned about," he said.

Employees received a memo on
Tuesday asking them to convene



for a general meeting yesterday
where they were told that as of
May 26, the luxury resort would
be closing down, The Tribune
learned.

The workers — a number of
whom live on site in employee
housing — have until June, 15 to
leave the property, according to
employees.

Angry calls from the soon-to-be
redundant workers in Exuma
poured into The Tribune yester-
day, as disgruntled staff fumed at
what they called short notice of the
closure, coupled with the fact that
there were no government officials
at yesterday's meeting to represent
them.

"Someone needs to come in and
stand up for us Bahamians because
we were all in shock," said one
worker who dedicated two years
to the company. She is now hoping
family in Nassau can help find her
accommodations as she prepares
to return to the capital to look for
work.

Workers said although they were
promised severance pay they are
worried resort officials may not
make good on this pledge.

SEE page eight





Felipé Major/Tribune staff

PLP chairman calls for
transparent land policy

m@ By ALISON LOWE
Tribune Staff Reporter
alowe@tribunemedia.net

mitted to citizens in a way
that advances our national
development for the greater
good of our people. The
process should be fair and
transparent and conducted
in a considered and princi-
pled fashion, one which is

IF ANYTHING comes of
the “apparent debacle” cul-
minating in the resignation
of the director of Lands and
Surveys it should be a “clear- accessible to all Bahamians.
ly enunciated and transpar- GLENYS “There must now be a
ent policy relative to the HANNA-MARTIN Clearly articulated policy
grant of Bahamian land,” which reflects the modern
said PLP chairman Glenys Hanna- _needs and future progress of our

vee SEE page 10

“Crown land ought to be trans-



Bahamians reportedly among
group whose boat capsized

BAHAMIANS were reportedly among a group of Haitian migrants
whose boat capsized off the coast of Florida on Wednesday leaving as
many as 11 people dead.

According to the Associate Press, 21 people were pulled from the
water off Fort Lauderdale, seven of them were unresponsive. Those sev-
en were taken to hospital.

The boat capsized about 2 am, but the Coast Guard didn't learn
about it until another boater called more than 10 hours later.

It was unclear where the boat was coming from or how many people
might still be in the water.

Two helicopters, a jet and three boats were involved in the rescue.

WSS

Tm Sm
IN TODAY’S TRIBUNE









The family
of murdered
banker ‘have
clear idea of
his enemies’

Hywel Jones’ relatives speak





Hywel Jones, speaks to the
media yesterday at police
headquarters.





FNM BLAMED FOR
LETTING FULLY
FURNISHED CLINIC
SIT IDLE

TWO MEN AND BOY,
16, CHARGED WITH
MURDER

CYNTHIA PRATT YET 10
DECIDE ON POLITICAL
FUTURE

out at press conference

ILT JONES, the brother of







m@ By MEGAN REYNOLDS
Tribune Staff Reporter
mreynolds@
tribunemedia.net



THE family of murdered
investment banker Hywel
Jones announced at a press
conference yesterday that
they have a clear idea of who
his enemies were.

Mr Jones’ brother IIt
Jones, 49, said his brother was
liked and respected by almost
everyone he knew, and there-
fore police should have little
trouble identifying who may
have been in conflict with the
55-year-old businessman.

Assistant Commissioner
of Police Raymond Gibson
gave his assurance that the
police will follow every lead
and interview whoever they
may need to during the
course of the investigation.
Hywel Jones was shot in

SEE page 10


























Call for ‘meaningful’
Freedom of
Information Act in
light of land row

@ By ALISON LOWE
Tribune Staff Reporter
alowe@tribunemedia.net

A “MEANINGFUL” Freedom
of Information Act that would
allow the media and public access
to records kept by the government
and its agencies could have helped
prevent the circumstances that led
to the resignation of the Director
of Lands and Surveys on Monday,
a prominent lawyer said yesterday.

“A FOIA would’ve been helpful
in ensuring propriety (in the Tex
Turnquest situation),” said Fred
Smith, attorney with the law firm
Callenders and Co. and President
of the Grand Bahama Human
Rights Association.

“Information about who is
receiving Crown grants should be
readily available even as applica-
tions or requests are made so that
it is all transparent and above
board — after all although it’s

SEE page 10





NASSAU AND BAHAMEA

ISLANDS’ LEADING NEWSPAPER



PAGE 2, THURSDAY, MAY 14, 2009

THE TRIBUNE



LOCAL NEWS

Unused ... despite costing $1.3 million

FNM blamed for letting fully furnished clinic sit idle

SPACIOUS: The medical facility is unoccupied.



=

=

== =

i

THE FNM has allowed a $1.3
million clinic to sit idle and
unused, PLP Senator Jerome
Fitzgerald said yesterday.

Built by the National Insurance
Board in Grand Cay, Abaco, the
clinic was completed more than
two years ago and is fully fur-
nished.

But Mr Fitzgerald said patients
are forced to use the old clinic
while a modern state of the art
medical facility just sits unused.
He also said a fully furnished res-
idence for the doctor or nurse
also remains unoccupied.

“Here we are today speaking
about the wonderful changes tak-
ing place in communications, e-

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mails, e-health, e-education, etc,
and the Member of Parliament
for North Abaco and the Minister
Health both failed to discharge
this vital obligation to the people
of Grand Cay,” the senator said
yesterday during debate on the
Communications Bill in the Sen-
ate. Mr Fitzgerald said the Prime
Minister did the same thing in
South Andros when his party
came to office in 1992 and found
a brand new clinic in Johnson’s
South Andros, which he refused
to open and allowed the building
to sit and deteriorated for 10
years.

Rusted

“The standby generator sat and
rusted and it was a very costly
undertaking to refurbish the clin-
ic and replace the equipment. It
was another waste of public
funds. Are we seeing a repeat of
this on Grand Cay? This is con-
trary to what he said in the Trust
Manifesto of 2007,” he said.

He said this was yet another
example of poor management of
the nation’s affairs.

“This FNM Government; the
new Ministry of Housing and the
Bahamas Mortgage Building just
west of the Ministry Of Works,
JFK Drive, which was to be
equipped with the state of the art
communication.

“Here we are, Madam Presi-
dent, two years later and this vir-
tually completed building just sits
unoccupied. What a waste. Where
is the Trust, where is the account-
ability, where is the transparen-
cy?” Mr Fitzgerald asked. He

STATE OF THE ART FACILITY: Clinic (above and below) is unused.



said Bahamians will recall just
over two years ago the 2007 Gen-
eral Elections when the FNM
boasted of having tried and
proven leadership, if what was
just disclosed is a crowning exam-
ple of trusted, tried and proven
leadership then we all can appre-
ciate the very serious dilemma
the Bahamas now finds itself.

PLP chairman

‘embarrassed’ by
PM’s comments

OPPOSITION chairman
Glenys Hanna-Martin said that
she was “embarrassed” by
Prime Minister Hubert Ingra-
ham’s comments during a pre-
sentation at the first annual cus-
tomer service conference for
Immigration officers.

“While I agree wholeheart-
edly with the prime minister’s
message that there should be
institutionalised respect for all
peoples, it is a pity that he chose
to overshadow an otherwise
positive message with what I
would call most unfortunate
remarks,” she said.

Addressing claims that some
immigration officers use exces-
sive force during apprehension
and detention exercises, Prime
Minister Hubert Ingraham said
that his government does not
tolerate the abuse of detainees
or suspected illegal immigrants.

The prime minister also said
that the government will not
“look the other way” when evi-
dence supports allegations of
corruption in the public service.

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He focused on allegations of
immigration officials accepting
bribes at ports of entry or in
exchange for falsifying docu-
ments or speeding up work per-
mit and residence application
processes.

The keynote speaker at the
first annual customer service
conference for the Immigration
Department held at the Wynd-
ham Cable Beach Resort on
Monday, Mr _ Ingraham
expressed regret that a “pay to
play” culture has developed in
the country’s public sector.

Mrs Hanna-Martin said that
while she acknowledges that
there are some individuals in
all sectors of society — includ-
ing politics — who seek personal
advantage over and above
national interest”, she believes
that there are fine officers in
the Immigration Department.

“Immigration officers, in par-
ticular, are entrusted with the
protection of our borders,
sometimes at great personal risk
to their safety. That a person
no less than our prime minister
would see a gathering of such
Bahamians at an event designed
to enhance and improve their
profession as an opportunity to
negatively impugn them in such
a blanket fashion, is very unfor-
tunate and deeply offensive,”
Mrs Hanna-Martin said.

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‘YOUR VIEW”

To have your say on this or any
other issue, email The Tribune at:
letters@tribunemedia.net or
deliver your letter to The Tribune
on Shirley Street, P.O. Box N-3207

High utilities expenses
‘are not sustainable’

THE Bahamas’ extraordi-
narily high utilities expenses
are not sustainable and
threaten the viability of not
just tourism, but many of the
country’s important indus-
tries, chairman and CEO of
Baha Mar Resorts Sarkis
Izmirlian said.

In a op-ed appearing in
The Tribune today, Mr
Izmirlian said that in order
to be a leading vacation des-
tination, it is essential that
the Bahamas has modern
and effective telecommuni-
cations and energy infra-
structures in place.

“Guests must be able to
connect rapidly and reliably
for voice, data and multime-
dia content through fixed
and mobile phone lines.
Government and the private
sectors must develop cre-
ative solutions to meet our
energy needs in a low-cost
sustainable way, including
seriously assessing alterna-
tive sources like solar and
wind power, he said.

The move toward privati-
sation of BTC represents,
Mr Izmiralian said, an
important step in this direc-
tion.

“As Bahamians, we tradi-
tionally address adversity
with an optimistic, forward-
looking attitude — and
actions to match. It is critical,
therefore, that the actions
we take to minimise the
length and severity of the
current economic slowdown
also include longer term
strategic initiatives to posi-
tion the Bahamas to take full
advantage of a global eco-
nomic recovery. Strengthen-
ing our tourism industry now
and making the Bahamas
the top destination in the
Caribbean are key,” he said.

The CEO said tourism is
central to the long term eco-
nomic and social well-being
of the Bahamas. “Tourism
brings in capital, enhances
property values and stimu-
lates major economic devel-
opment at the community
level. Tourism means jobs.
Think of the thousands of
jobs in our country that have
been created by the busi-
nesses that directly and indi-
rectly support the tourist
trade,” he said.

“Since competition glob-
ally for tourist dollars is
fierce, it is imperative that
the Bahamas be viewed
around the world as the
vacation destination of
choice. Improving key infra-
structure, transportation,
service and technology com-
ponents is vital to this effort.
It is incumbent upon our pri-
vate sector to play an impor-
tant role both as responsi-
ble corporate,” Mr Izmi-
ralian said.

e SEE Mr Izmirlian’s full
statement on page nine.



THE TRIBUNE



LOCAL NEWS

THURSDAY, MAY 14, 2009, PAGE 3



0 In bri ef MAGISTRATE’S COURT

Drugs-for-
guns scheme:
no charges yet
after arresis

THE police in Portland are
yet to charge three fishermen
who were picked up on Sunday
off the coast of Long Bay in
connection with an ongoing
drugs-for-guns trade scheme.

Two of the men are
Jamaicans and the other is a
Bahamian.

The men were arrested on
Sunday afternoon during a joint
operation between the local
marine police and a team from
the Jamaica Defence Force
Coast Guard.

The police say the two
Jamaicans, who were under sur-
veillance for some time on sus-
picion of being involved in the
scheme — which operates
between Jamaica and Haiti -
were detained with the Bahami-
an when the three were spotted
aboard a 28-foot fibre glass fish-
ing boat. The police say the men
attempted to sail away when
approached by the joint
police/military team, which con-
ducted a search of the vessel,
but came up empty handed.

The men remain in custody at
a Port Antonio police detention
facility.

Immigration Dept
drafting customer
service blueprint

m@ BY LINDSAY THOMPSON

THE Immigration Depart-
ment is drafting a blueprint
outlining solutions to various
challenges it faces, Minister of
State Branville McCartney
said. The document, to be
completed by the end of June,
will outline policies and proce-
dures to be carried out by the
department in executing its
mandate.

Mr McCartney, who has
responsibility for immigration,
was speaking at the May 11-12
customer service training
workshop and motivational
seminar for Immigration offi-
cials. “Customer service is
most essential to all establish-
ments whether government or
private enterprise,” he said.

Earlier this year the Immi-
gration Department formed a
customer service committee to
review each individual unit
and determine how best the
department can be made more
efficient and a better provider
of quality customer service.

“The Immigration Depart-
ment provides a service to
Bahamians and visitors and
we must ensure that that ser-
vice is supreme,” Mr McCart-
ney said.

One objective of the semi-
nar was to help Immigration
officers appreciate that their
various responsibilities — to
guard, protect, welcome and
facilitate — are not mutually
exclusive. Participants includ-
ed those who will be at the
front lines during the FIFA
football conference this month
and the Miss Universe
Pageant in August. However,
Mr McCartney said, training
seminars like this one will
become “common practice” at
the department.

3 plead not
guilty in Nicole
Smith drug case
m LOS ANGELES

Anna Nicole Smith's lawyer-
turned-boyfriend and two doc-
tors pleaded not guilty Wednes-
day to charges they conspired to
provide thousands of prescrip-
tion pills to the former model
before her overdose death two
years ago.

The appearance of Howard K.
Stern and Drs. Khristine Ero-
shevich and Sandeep Kapoor in
Superior Court set the stage for
a preliminary hearing that all
parties said could last at least
two weeks. Deputy District
Attorney Renee Rose said there
are 1,400 pages of discovery in
the case, which was investigated
for two years before charges
were filed. Court Commissioner
Kristi Lousteau ordered docu-
ments in the case sealed,
although attorneys said that
about a quarter of the material
has already been made public.

The hearing was brief and
Smith's name was never men-
tioned. Stern, Eroshevich and
Kapoor stood before Lousteau
with their lawyers. The defen-
dants said "yes" when she asked
if they were pleading not guilty
and when they agreed to delay
the matter until June 8 for set-
ting of the preliminary hearing
date. They declined to comment
outside court.

Two men and boy,

16,

charged with murder

Trio not of required to enter plea

PHOTOS: Felipé Major/Tribune staff

ACCUSED: Blake Rahming, 22.

@ By NATARIO McKENZIE
Tribune Staff Reporter

TWO men and a 16-year-old boy were arraigned
in Magistrate’s Court yesterday on a murder charge.
Police have charged Ramal Colebrooke, 23, of
Nassau Village, Blake Rahming, 22, of Old Cedar
Street and a 16-year-old of Augusta Street with the

murder of Marc Estimable.

Mr Estimable, 29, was shot at his Gamble Heights
home around lam on Sunday, May 3.

Police think he was fatally wounded in the left side
of his body after answering the door to a man who
said he wanted to buy a phone card. A champagne
coloured Honda was reportedly seen leaving the

area after the weapon was fired.

Mr Estimable was taken to hospital, but died
after arrival. He was the 24th homicide victim of

the year.

The accused, who appeared before Chief Magis-
trate Roger Gomez in Court One, Bank Lane, were



ACCUSED: Ramal Colebrooke 23

not required to enter a plea to the murder charge.
Attorney Murrio Ducille asked Chief Magistrate
Gomez to make an order that his client be taken to

four days.

hospital for medical attention. According to Mr
Ducille, Colebrooke had been beaten while in police
custody. Mr Ducille also criticised police for what he
called the “vexing practice” of not allowing persons
in custody to see their attorneys.

Attorney Ian Cargill, who is representing the
juvenile, told the court police had punched his client
in the stomach several times in an effort to force him
to sign a document which he did not sign. He also
claimed his client had been in police custody for
more than 96 hours.

Attorney Edward Turner, who is representing
Rahming, said police had his client in custody for

Chief Magistrate Gomez ordered the accused be
taken to hospital for medical attention. The accused

have been remanded to Her Majesty’s Prison. The

case has been adjourned to May 18 and transferred
to Court 10, Nassau Street.

Pharmacy legislation welcomed

m@ By MEGAN REYNOLDS
Tribune Staff Reporter
mreynolds@tribunemedia.net

INNOVATIVE legislation
drafted “by pharmacists for phar-
macists” has been welcomed by
industry stakeholders across the
Bahamas who say it will open up
career opportunities and interna-
tional trade.

The Bahamas Pharmaceutical
Association (BPA) has been
pushing for an overhaul of out-
dated 1960s legislation for more
than 20 years, and worked with
Minister of Health Hubert Minnis
to develop the Pharmacy Act
2009.

Intensive research of pharma-
ceutical laws around the world
was carried out by members of
the BPA who also attended inter-

TROPICAL
EXTERMINATORS

eR
PHONE: 322-2157

=












national conferences, and sought
input from local pharmacists to
develop the new laws which not
only introduce standards for the
registration, importation and dis-
tribution of medicines, but also
establish education requirements
and improved licensing proce-
dures for professionals.

BPA president Philip Gray said
he particularly welcomes the
establishment of the Pharmacy
Council of the Bahamas, a regu-
latory body made up of pharma-
cists and individuals from the pri-
vate and public sector, which will
develop, update and enforce
national standards and regula-
tions.

Mr Gray said the council will
ensure there is greater account-
ability in the industry, and he
hopes the changes will give peo-
ple more confidence in the med-
ications they buy.

He said: “The act also seeks to
reinforce the patient-centred
practice of pharmacy that has
always been integral to the pro-
fession in the Bahamas.”

And the legislation will create a

i aT Te Ye

number of lucrative jobs for those
interested in pursuing careers as
pharmaceutical consultants or
teachers in the industry, Mr Gray
said.

BPA vice-president Mimi
Roberts, whose father Pedro
Roberts Jr pushed for new legis-
lation 20 years ago, is now cele-
brating the fruits of a generational
campaign.

She said: “It’s my dream that
the Bahamas will become more of
a transshipment point for the rest
of the Caribbean.

“It would be a nice place to
invest in, but to do that we have
to have legislation in place, and
this will allow us to be that type of
country where we have bigger
business.”

Chairman of the legislative
committee Dr Marvin Smith said:
“Pharmacists pushed for the bill
and it’s really the first time the
government has taken someone
else’s draft and said ‘we will work
with you’. The government has
done a good move in terms of
facilitating local input and needs
to be commended for that.”

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380-FLIX







PAGE 4, THURSDAY, MAY 14, 2009

EDITORIAL/LETTERS TO THE EDITOR

THE TRIBUNE





The Tribune Limited

NULLIUS ADDICTUS JURARE IN VERBA MAGISTRI
Being Bound to Swear to The Dogmas of No Master

LEON E. H. DUPUCH, Publisher/Editor 1903-1914

SIR ETIENNE DUPUCH, Kt, O.B.E., K.M., K.C.S.G.,

(Hon.) LL.D., D.Litt.

Publisher/Editor 1919-1972
Contributing Editor 1972-1991

EILEEN DUPUCH CARRON, C.M.G., M.S., B.A., LL.B.

Publisher/Editor 1972-

Published Daily Monday to Saturday

Shirley Street, RO. Box N-3207, Nassau, Bahamas
Insurance Management Building., P.O. F-485, Freeport, Grand Bahama

TELEPHONES
Switchboard (News, Circulation and Advertising) 322-1986
Advertising Manager - (242) 502-2352
Circulation Department - (242) 502-2387
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WEBSITE
www.tribune242.com — updated daily at 2pm

Judicial system in disarray

THE BAHAMAS has always prided itself
on having a stable government, and a judicial
system of the highest repute. As a matter of
fact it was two of this country’s top selling points
when trying to attract investors to the islands.

When there was debate on breaking away
from this country’s highest appeal court — the
Privy Council in London— the most telling
argument was that foreign investors would not
feel the same confidence with a Caribbean court
as a final court of appeal. In other words, the
high standing of our British-inherited courts
was considered one of our main attractions.

This is no longer so. Our court system has
been in decline for some years. It is now in free
fall. For a highly respected profession made
up of men and women who wore the wig and
gown with pride, about whom there was sel-
dom a breath of scandal, there is now only dis-
respect and suspicion.

Only yesterday two maids discussing crime
were convinced that people were now settling
their own disputes in the streets because they
can’t get into the courts and when they do they
often can’t find justice.

The Supreme Court, with important inter-
national cases pending, is now in a state of col-
lapse with the sudden resignation of senior jus-
tice John Lyons. Justice Lyons, who was hearing
most of the cases, was noted for his expert
knowledge and handling of commercial dis-
putes.

The Lyons matter came to a head when a
lawyer asked that the judge recuse himself from
hearing the Central Bank of Ecuador case,
because of the bias and animosity he had shown
toward the lawyer’s firm, Callender’s & Co.

The judge refused. The matter went to
appeal, and the judge’s attitude, bias against
the Callender firm, and his general behaviour
was the issue.

Justice Lyons’ perceived bias resulted from an
earlier case in which the Callender firm was
also involved. It was a case from which Justice
Lyons had earlier recused himself saying he did
not have enough time to hear it. The lot fell to
Justice Anita Allen. One of the issues in that
case was the appointment of an accountant
whose credentials were being questioned by
the litigants. Justice Allen wondered whether
she should also recuse herself because of the
details she had recently learned in connection
with that appointment. She was told that Mr
Lyons had forced the appointment on the com-
plainants, threatening to walk out of court if
they did not agree the accountant he had select-
ed. However, Justice Allen later learned that the

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accountant’s sister had “more than a friend-
ship” with the judge, and that the sister was
assisting her brother in his work. She had to
decide whether the accountant’s report, which
the litigants complained was not adequate,
should be approved. She wanted to be up front
with the court and inform them of the infor-
mation that had come to her attention.

At the time Justice Lyons was in Australia on
leave. He hurriedly returned to the Bahamas,
and when a Callender lawyer walked into his
court room in another case he saw “blood drip-
ping from them after the execution.”

And on April 17, before ordering another
Callender lawyer from his court room, he
announced that he was not going to deal with
any matters “with accounting and accountants
with your firm.” According to the lawyer the
judge grew angrier.

In a cooler moment, Mr Lyons admitted that
it was unwise of him to have undertaken active
court duties until his “emotions had fully set-
tled.” He said that his anger had “now dissi-
pated” and that there was no “real danger of
bias against any clients of Messrs Callenders.”

However, in addition to his detractors, the
judge had his defenders who felt he had cause
for frustration because, as he had himself said,
“the Supreme Court is a mess and in disarray”
and he was not going to cover for lawyers any-
more.

Former attorney general Alfred Sears
believed the judge “brought a level of efficien-
cy which helped to build the reputation of the
Bahamas as a financial centre and a place where
complex commercial matters could be speedily
adjudicated.” Many others agreed.

However, much blame lies with the system
itself. There really is no more time for finger
pointing. There is so much wrong that govern-
ment should take this opportunity to sweep
with a clean broom and start all over again. A
strong and determined Chief Justice should be
appointed who will bring life, direction and
reform to the system.

Lawyers who don’t participate in the func-
tions of the Bar Council and Association, failing,
for example, to show up to vote for strong and
capable officers are also to blame for deterio-
rating standards.

He spoke in the eighteenth century, but what
Edmund Burke said then carries the same Truth
today: “It is necessary only for the good man to
do nothing for evil to triumph.”
The trouble with this country is that too many
good men — and good women— say and do
nothing.



Attitude of
lawlessness
pervading
our schools

“THINGS FALL APART
THE CENTER CANNOT
HOLD.” Chinua Achebe

EDITOR, The Tribune.

Thank you for allowing me a
small space to express my views
in your esteemed publication.

For some time now I have
observed the behaviour of some
of our young men and decided
to make my views known pub-
licly. As a mother of boys, I do
not like what I see today in our
society with regard to our young
men.

To start with there is a serious
attitude of lawlessness that
seems to pervade our public and
private schools.

There is little or no respect
for teachers or peers and the
climate’s very “cool” for the
young men who choose not to
take that route.

Filthy, obscene language is
no longer a hidden pasttime, to
these young men, but is said
boldly within the hearing of
adults who they dare to com-
ment.

I ask myself over and over
where did this type of behav-
iour come from and, of course,
there are all sorts of answers.

The main one being these
young men are the offspring of

BaywIAS

letters@tribunemedia net



single mothers and a single par-
ent home. That excuse is and
has always been utter nonsense
as there are many single moth-
ers out there, inclusive of
myself, who are raising sons
alone, albeit with familial sup-
port, who are NOT behaving
like these young men.

Their inability to reason
shows extreme ignorance, which
is startling as most of these
young men are of school age
and should have the ability to
solve a problem without resort-
ing to using their fists or a lethal
weapon.

The level of this problem is
hightening as the murder rate
is climbing rapidly.

No one seems to have a
viable solution.

Many young men practically
speak another language besides
dialect.

They are hardly understood
when they speak.

They wear their trousers
bound tightly to their thighs by
belts, giving no regard to the
waist that their trousers are
made for. Their clothes are gen-

erally two and three sizes too
big. The scariest part of all of
this is the blatant disrespect for
our law enforcement officers.

They are shooting at our
police officers, cursing at them,
spitting at them and raising fists
at them. How should the offi-
cers respond to protect them-
selves?

How can our society truly
flourish?

Something is definitely wrong
and we, as a society, must
address this before we com-
pletely lose a generation. All
parents need to take the reins
and stop protecting their chil-
dren in wrong doing. Stop hid-
ing your sons when the law is
looking for them and stop
putting the lives of teachers in
danger because they discipline
your child for doing something
that is wrong and against the
school’s rules.

That’s a perfect place to start.

The problem starts at home
and the correction of the prob-
lem will have to begin in the
home but it will take national
participation to put our young
men back in order and on track
before it’s too late.

Elizabeth E.M. Thompson
Nassau,
May 12, 2009.

‘Native fish market’ had
tourists holding their noses

BAHAMAS QSR LIMITED

EDITOR, The Tribune.

A terrible odour is sickening motorists passing
the bush at the traffic light next to the Montagu
ramp. Some days it’s worse than others, but the
bush is clearly being used as an outdoor toilet
and it often stinks.

To my knowledge, there is no running water or
toilets at the ramp and this in itself is cause for
serious health concerns.

From time to time, the conch shells with rotting
matter still inside are left in the sun and this,
combined with the odour from the bush, is terri-
ble.

It’s bad enough for us locals, but I was embar-
rassed recently to see a small group of tourists
walk by holding their noses.

“Native fish market,” one commented.

The market, if it is allowed to continue to
exist, needs to be regulated and managed, and
running water needs to be put in place. It is not
clean.

As you know, it is also a traffic nightmare
because Bahamians seem to have a problem
pulling over in the parking area and walking a few

yards. They have to block the street on a major
traffic artery and, of course, the police are
nowhere to be seen.

Then there are the jet skis that block traffic
because of the ill-conceived idea of placing a
feeder road opposite the ramp that cuts right in
the middle of a main road.

There is actually lots of land to the west of the
ramp and this would be the logical place for a
feeder road.

The market has grown from a one man show
selling jacks from his dinghy into a free for all
where anyone can sell anything — T-shirts, hats,
seafood, fruit and vegetables — you name it.

It is doubtful that all of these people have
business licences. Do the police even check, or is
this just another example of selective law enforce-
ment?

A JOHNSON

Nassau,

May 13, 2009

(This area is a disgrace. It should never have
been allowed to exist. It certainly is an example of
selective law and a lack of political will. — Ed).

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THE TRIBUNE

THURSDAY, MAY 14, 2009, PAGE 5



LOCAL NEWS
ae. F

Cynthia Pratt yet to decide on political future

ase



@ By ALISON LOWE
Tribune Staff Reporter
alowe@tribunemedia.net

STILL in mourning, St Cecelia MP Cyn-
thia “Mother” Pratt yesterday said she has
not yet made up her mind about her politi-
cal future within the PLP, but will make an
announcement sometime after she returns
to parliament for the budget debate.

Hinting that her decision will rely upon
the will of PLP leader Perry Christie, she
said: “When I return to parliament I would
speak with the leader and see what’s going

on, and then I would make a statement at a
later date.

“You know, as with most of these things,
if there’s any changes it would be done at
the convention, and so nothing really would
happen before a convention - but I don’t
want to precede the leader and it’s fair for
me to speak to him to find out what went on
while I was out.”

The budget debate will take place at the
end of this month. It will be the first time
Mts Pratt attends parliament since the death
of her husband Joseph Pratt in early April.

The St Cecelia MP had previously indi-

cated her intention to step down as deputy
leader of the PLP and not run for the post at
a party convention expected to take place
towards the end of 2009.

However, it was in a press conference
called to thank well-wishers, friends, con-
stituents and loved-ones shortly after her
husband’s death that she first signalled that
she may not be so certain of her previous
decision.

Fuelling speculation, she told reporters
that she was not prepared to discuss her
political future within the party at that time,
but would make a statement shortly.

Woman police officer
‘feared for life’ after being
struck by shotgun pellets

m@ By NATARIO McKENZIE
Tribune Staff reporter

A WOMAN police officer testi-
fied in the Supreme Court yester-
day that she feared for her life after
being struck in the head with shot-
gun pellets during a hold-up at a
Scotiabank branch last July.

James Miller, Anthony Williams
and Janquo Mackey, are accused of
robbing the Soldier Road and East
Street South branch of Scotiabank
on July 2, 2008. They are also
accused of the attempted murder of
Corporal Natasha Black, causing
grievous harm; possession of a
firearm with intent to endanger the
life of another; possession of a
firearm with intent to resist lawful
arrest and causing harm.

Corporal Black testified yester-
day that on Wednesday, July 2, she
and another female officer left the
Wulff Road Police Station to make
inquiries in the East Street South
area. She said that while in the area
of Lil General Convenience Store,
they received information from the
police control room and as a result
headed to Scotiabank on East Street
South and Soldier Road.

Officer Black told the court that
she was unable to drive through the
western entrance of the bank’s park-
ing lot because traffic was backed
up. She said that while in traffic, she
noticed what appeared to be the fig-
ure of a man peeking through the
bottom portion of the bank’s glass
entrance door.

She told the court that after the
man left the bank, she noticed that
he was wearing a mask and had what
appeared to be a silver and black

Testimony given about

Scotiabank branch hold-up

shotgun in his hand.

She testified that the gunman
looked in the direction of the patrol
car and fired the weapon.

“Immediately I felt pain in the
left side of my head,” Ms Black told
the court.

She said blood began to pour
from the left side of her head and she
feared for her life. Corporal Black
told the court that when she looked
back she saw the man pointing the
gun in the direction of the patrol car
again.

While driving off, she said she
heard a second gun shot.

Officer Black then testified that
while driving south on East Street
she noticed several marked police
cars heading north to the scene of
the robbery.

She said that at that point she
stopped the patrol car, got out of
the driver’s seat and into the pas-
senger’s seat. She told the court that
she was then taken to the Princess
Margaret Hospital where she under-
went surgery.

Officer Black said that three shot-
gun pellets were removed from the
left side of her head and that she is
supposed to have a second surgery to
remove the remaining eight pellets.

Eileen Claire, senior manager
of field operations at Scotiabank,
told the court yesterday that she per-
formed a review of the Scotiabank
branch following the robbery to
determine how much money was

taken. She said that the money left in
the cashier’s till was balanced with
what had been computed in the
bank’s system and it was determined
that $21,344 had been taken.

Arnette Watson, manager of Sco-
tiabank’s East Street South and Sol-
dier Road branch, said that on the
afternoon of July 2, police returned
to the bank with a pillow case filled
with money. She said that the cash
was counted and it was determined
that there was $10,996 in the pillow
case.

The trial continues today before
Justice Jon Isaacs. The prosecution is
expected to call 31 witnesses. Mack-
ey is represented by attorney Murrio
Ducille, Williams is represented by
Dorsey McPhee and Miller is repre-
senting himself. Vernal Collie,
Ambrose Brown and Lennox Cole-
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PAGE 6, THURSDAY, MAY 14, 2009

THE TRIBUNE



Two Family Island resorts win

rave reviews on TripAdvisor

Association is formed to
protect couriers’ interests —

THE Bahamas Transshipment and Logistics Association has
been formed to protect the interests of courier companies in the
Bahamas.

Twenty-three companies, representing around 300 employees, are
charter members.

Walt Saunders of GWS Worldwide Express was elected presi-
dent.

Other BTLA executives are: Romell Knowles, vice president;
Tara Cartwright, secretary; Trevor Adderley, asst secretary;
Andrew Burrow, treasurer; Susan Kelly, asst treasurer and Lahore
Mackey, public relations officer.

The directors are Kieron Dixon, Wayne Bryan and Chris Bur-
rows.

According to Mr Saunders, BTLA’s mission is to promote and
advance the common interests of companies engaged in messenger-
courier industry in the Bahamas and in the region; to provide
information, education, referrals and the opportunity to network
in order to form logistical partnerships between carriers and ship-
pers; to co-operate with authorities in air cargo security and to edu-
cate the public on the importance of the industry to the smooth run-
ning of other businesses in the country.

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TWO boutique resorts in the Family
Islands — one in Exuma and the other in
South Andros — are winning rave reviews on
TripAdvisor.com, the user-generated des-
tination review website that is playing an
increasingly important role in shaping trav-
el decisions.

Visitors referred to one of the two resorts,
Emerald Palms in South Andros, as “a
home away from home without the hustle
and bustle associated with large, all-inclu-
sive resorts.” Other visitors called it a “par-
adise exceeding expectation,” in which
“quaint and rustic have been wonderfully
mastered.”

Of 56 reviews, 44 gave Emerald Palms a
five-star rating, making it the number one of
11 hotels in Andros on TripAdvisor's pop-
ularity index. Though the 18-club room,
22-villa resort on a stretch of unspoiled
beach with hundreds of palms is often
referred to as a romantic getaway or a div-
er or fisherman’s haven, guests recom-
mended it for families.

A Canadian couple travelling with their
11-month-old son describe Emerald Palms
as paradise, finding both peace and quiet in
its “out of the way" location, perfect for a
vacationing family.

Its pristine environment paired with
immaculate service, they said, sets the tone
for a calming and relaxing vacation. A cou-
ple from Ontario, who visited in February,
said the resort with complimentary kayaks,
bikes, and other non-motorised craft avail-
able for guest use, was an ideal place to
rejuvenate mind, body and soul while expe-
riencing one of the last great, untouched
destinations on Earth.

Equally rave reviews went to Grand Isle
Resort and Spa in Emerald Bay, Exuma,
which has been rated number one of nine
hotels in Exuma by TripAdvisor for the

PICTURED (top) is a view of Grand Isle Resort and Spa. Above is an interior from Emerald Palms.

past three years. Visitors to the resort
reported “personal service beyond expec-
tation” combined with luxuriously-appoint-
ed villas, infinity pool and deck overlooking
the bay and other amenities. One review
called Grand Isle “a new level of paradise in
exquisite surroundings.” Another noted its
“fantastic property.”



The praise for both boutique properties
bodes well for Family Island tourism. More
than 15 million hotel reviews are posted on
TripAdvisor.com, the nine-year old web-
site that is emerging as a powerful unpaid
tool driving business to or from one of the
212,000 hotels in 30,000 destinations includ-
ed on the site.

Caribbean urged to use IDB loans
for local government development

m By DENISE MAYCOCK
Tribune Freeport Reporter
dmaycock@tribunemedia.net

FREEPORT - Winston Cox,
executive director of the Inter-
American Development Bank for
the Caribbean, said that lending
to local government developments
has climbed significantly in the last
five years.

He told delegates on Tuesday at

the fifth Commonwealth Local
Government Conference that IDB
loans in support of sub-national
development represents a “sizable
portion” of the bank's portfolio
across the 48 member countries.

Mr Cox reported that since
1990, regional or local government
institutions have been either
executors, co-executors or direct
borrowers of an estimated 27.8 per
cent of the IDB’s lending volume,
equivalent to $28.5 billion.

“In three of the last five years,
the percentage has climbed to the
35 to 40 per cent range,” he said.

Mr Cox said that the Inter-
American Development Bank is a
very important financial institu-
tion for the western hemisphere.
He said its model has been copied

in other parts of the world, par-
ticularly Asia and Africa.

“Tt is the oldest of the regional
development banks, and we are
celebrating our 50th anniversary
this year,” he said.

IDB, he said, partners with
member countries to combat
poverty and promote social equity.
He said it works with governments
as well as with the private sector,
and seeks to achieve sustainable
economic growth and increase
competitiveness, modernise public
institutions, foster free trade, and
encourage regional integration.

Mr Cox said the bank lends to
national, provincial, state and
municipal governments as well as
autonomous public institutions.
He noted that civil society organ-

isations (CSOs) and private sec-
tor companies are also eligible for
IDB financing.

He listed some recent examples
of loans to CSOs in Guyana which
resulted in the strengthening of
civil society participation in pover-
ty reduction and development in
2008.

In Ecuador in 2007, lending
went towards occupational train-
ing and job creation for persons
with disabilities, and in Colombia
funds went toward strengthening
civil society in an effort to reduce
poverty.

Mr Cox represents the IDB in
five Caribbean countries — the
Bahamas, Barbados, Jamaica,
Guyana and Trinidad and
Tobago.

He said: “I have not provided
examples for the bank’s works in
the five Caribbean countries that
are members of the bank. I think
that is because emphasis of the
governments in this region has

Start looking for that Special Prom Dress
early and remember our flexible
sought to draw on other activities

layaway plan at
of the bank other than its activities

) in support of sub-national enti-
ties.”

“T hope that ... those of you

who are member countries of the

bank will recognise that the bank
can play a role in supporting local
government.

“How you achieve this is really
the challenge, but in many cases a
simple technique is for the minis-
ter responsible for local govern-
ment to bend the ear of the min-
ister of finance who is often the
country’s representative on the
board to these banks to tell them
that this is what you will like those
banks doing in our countries,” said
Mr Cox.

The IDB executive said that
most countries in the region have
committed to a model of decen-
tralised governance, in both the
political and fiscal policymaking
arenas.

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THE TRIBUNE

LOCAL NEWS

THURSDAY, MAY 14, 2009, PAGE 7


































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SENATOR FREDERICK MCALPINE

LEADING up to the last
general election, the PLP
had persons campaigning for
them on radio stations,
spreading the party’s “pro-
paganda” at the public’s
expense,” Senator Freder-
ick McAlpine said yesterday
during his contribution to
the Communications Bill.

“The Bahamian people
were the victims in this case.
How could you use the peo-
ple’s radio station to spread
political propaganda,” he
asked.

The importance of the
implementation of URCA
(Utilities Regulatory and
Competition Authority) is
becoming increasingly clear,
Rev McAlpine said.

The new legislation, he
said, will do great wonders
for the communications sec-
tor in the Bahamas.

“We’re on our way to
first-class status. It is time
we stepped up from the
archaic mode and become

Claim that PLP ‘propaganda’
was spread at public’s expense

Senator makes allegation during his
contribution to Communications Bill

modernised, not just in our
thinking and communica-
tion, but also in our legisla-
tion,” he said.

The FNM, he said,
widened democracy to the
extent that talk shows have
become the order of the
day.

“In my opinion, pre-1992
many felt that victimisation
and intimidation was the
order of the day. Even when

our predecessors returned
to office in 2002, the talk
shows were not as popular;
those who called often were
usually pro-PLP supporters.
Very little criticism was
heard on talk shows,
because most people were
intimidated and fearful of
victimisation,” Rev
McAlpine said.

The senator said that the
masses were fearful to speak

out while the PLP was in
government.

“Hence, very little true
feelings were expressed in
regards to their lack of per-
formance.

“But when we, the FNM,
are in office, all you could
hear is talk. People are free
to call the radio station of
their choice to talk for us or
against us. What a great
democracy,” he said.

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MAKING good on the promise to bring daily flights to Cat
Island, SkyBahamas Airlines, the Bahamian regional airline, will
be launching a daily service into New Bight on Tuesday, May 19.

In March of this year, the airline took a group of 19 persons
to New Bight and held a small ceremony at the Old Bight
Gospel Chapel Mission Home, which cares for 13 children.

It was then, that SkyBahamas Airlines announced plans to
begin daily services into New Bight, Cat Island.

SkyBahamas also adopted the home and celebrated with the
children by hosting a pizza party. The airline also supplied the
home with groceries and gave its commitment to ongoing mon-
etary donations.

It is now two-months later and the much anticipated services
to be operated by SkyBahamas Airlines into Cat Island are
finally here. The first official flight from the Lynden Pindling
International Airport in Nassau will commence with one flight
on Tuesday, May 19, at 10am into the New Bight Airport.

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PAGE 8, THURSDAY, MAY 14, 2009 THE TRIBUNE
Water managers approve: eT |
$533M Everglades deal

m@ WEST PALM BEACH, Fla.





SOUTH FLORIDA water managers have approved Gov. }
Charlie Crist’s deal to buy farmland from the U.S. Sugar Corp. for }
future use in Everglades restoration, according to Associated }
Press. i
The South Florida Water Management District voted 6-1 }
Wednesday to pay $536 million bill for 73,000 acres of land from }
the company. ;

U.S. Sugar is the nation’s largest cane sugar producer and }
owns a vast amount of land between Lake Okeechobee and the }
Everglades. i

An initial deal reached last year with the state would have }
cost $1.75 billion, but has twice since been revised to trim the price }
tag. i
The goal of the land purchase is to convert farm land into con- }
servation land, allowing water managers to create a system to }
clean and store water before sending it south into the Ever- ;
glades. i

ROYAL BANK OF CANADA TRUST COMPANY
(BAHAMAS) LIMITED
is considering suitable applications for the role of

Manager, Trust and
Corporate Services

Description of role and key responsibilities:

¢ Lead and manage a team of trust officers and other
staff: this includes providing advice in respect of clients
and cases, coaching staff and ensuring the effective
utilisation of other resources. Instrumental in developing
and implementing company procedures within
appropriate frameworks.
Possess a superior knowledge of Trust (complex and
simple), Company and Fiduciary structures, and tax
and legal issues affecting the administration of Trusts
and Companies.
Ensure that strong technical knowledge of all aspects
of trust and company administration is delivered: this
includes attending client meetings and
supervising/assisting in respect of the preparation of
accounting and investment information prior to
submission to clients
Experience with the preparation and presentation of
financial and estate planning proposals to high net
worth individuals
Providing assistance to increase profitability of the
company/shareholder value by identifying
opportunities to extend the trust services, and to use
the bank offering to implement solutions for clients
where appropriate
Proven superior sales acumen. With ability to attract,
build and strengthen relationships with key clients and
intermediaries and identify new ideas in relation to
products and services that may be offered by the
company

Core skills and knowledge:

¢ A University degree in business, accounting, or other
related discipline

* Aminimum of ten years' relevant experience

¢ Professionally qualified, e.g. accounting/finance
qualification, STEP ICSA, TER ACCA

¢ Self-motivation with excellent project management

¢ Demonstrably strong technical knowledge of all aspects
of trust and company administration, including the
nuances and statutory requirements of the major
offshore jurisdictions used in connection with clients’
structures

¢ Strong analytical and problem-solving skills

* Methodical, thorough and attentive to detail

¢ Strong supervisory skills coupled with the ability to lead
by example
Strong skills in time management and prioritisation
Excellent oral and written communication skills
Microsoft Office skills
Cultural awareness and sensitivity on both an individual
and corporate basis

Interested persons should apply by May 22, 2009 to:

Royal Bank of Canada Trust Company
(Bahamas) Limited
PO Box N-3024
Nassau, NP, Bahamas
Attention: Human Resource Manager
Via Email: paul.lewis @rbc.com or
elizabeth.dorsch@rbc.com

Only applications from suitabl ae candidates
will be acknowledged

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COURAGEOUS NERISS is doing very well and recuperating mean

Little cat’s incredible
survival at sea story

By TIP BURROWS

SATURDAY NIGHT, May 9,
when most people were eating din-
ner or getting ready for an evening
out, several Humane Society of
Grand Bahama staffers and volun-
teers were still hard at work along
with visiting veterinarian Dr Debra
Sonnen-Campbell of Boston, who
was in Freeport for a long week-
end to do volunteer work at the
Animal Welfare and Adoption
Centre.

With only five dog neuters to go,
everyone was anticipating being
home by 7.30pm after two long
days. The shelter phone rang at
6pm and the conversation that
ensued was surreal. The caller, a
concerned animal lover, said: “T just
saw the most horrifying thing on
the beach. My husband and I
noticed something far out to sea
which appeared to be a small ani-
mal swimming. We kept watching
and a few minutes later, a cat
dragged itself out of the surf and
collapsed on the beach. It appears
to have a badly broken leg, I can
see a bone sticking out, and it is

too weak to move.”

HSGB volunteer Ashley Mur-
phy took off immediately for Coral
Beach in Freeport, and by 6.45pm
was back at the shelter with the lit-
tle black and white female cat. The
cat was covered in sand and salt,
shocked, hypothermic, and her rear
left leg was injured beyond repair.
Dr Campbell sedated her in prepa-
ration for euthanasia but no one
present, least of all Dr Campbell,

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could stomach that prospect for an
animal who had shown such a
strong will to survive. The prepa-
rations quickly turned from
euthanasia to amputation of the
injured leg to try and save the cat’s
life.

Dr Campbell is an outstanding
veterinarian with a background in
shelter medicine and high volume
spay/neuter. She is not an orthope-
dic surgeon but wanted to give the

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cat a chance. She knew what to do,
theoretically and practically, but
had some concerns as the leg had
multiple severe fractures and there
was no x-ray machine to determine
the extent of the damage.

She decided to call a vet friend in
Boston who is an ortho specialist.

High drama ensued while she
tried to reach him. At 8pm on a
Saturday night, what were the
chances? Miraculously, her col-
league answered his phone, and Dr
Campbell got the answers to her
questions. Despite having been on
her feet doing surgeries since 8am,
she proceeded with the major pro-
cedure of amputating the cat’s dam-
aged leg.

At 11pm the surgery was fin-
ished. It was then a question of
whether the cat would survive the
night after all the shock and trauma
she had endured. As if Dr Camp-
bell wasn’t exhausted enough, she
took the little cat home with her
for the next two nights, with pain
and antibiotic medicines, to monitor
and keep her comfortable.

It confounds the imagination as
to how this little cat ended up in
this predicament but it can only be
reasonably assumed she either
jumped or was thrown off a boat.

How she was able to swim any
distance at all with such a badly
broken leg is astonishing.

How she sustained the broken
leg is unbearable to think about.
That she swam into a beach where
people saw her, who cared enough
to make a call, on an island where
there are miles and miles of desert-
ed beaches; that HSGB people
were at the shelter after hours to
answer the phone; that they were
able to react immediately and res-
cue the cat; and that a veterinarian
just happened to be standing at a
surgery table already; defies all
odds.

The courageous little cat has
been named Nerissa (daughter of
the sea) Phelps. She is doing very
well and recuperating nicely.

She will be available for adop-
tion in a few weeks. The HSGB
hopes to find an extra special home
for this incredible kitty, who may
well have used up many of her nine
lives already, but surely deserves
an exceptional home after her tena-
cious struggle to survive.

If you are the special someone
worthy of giving Nerissa a loving
and safe home, please send email
inquiries to info@hs-gb.org. Please
note Nerissa must be strictly an
indoor cat; no boats, please!

CYNDI LAUPER
MAY 23, 2009

CALL THE ATLANTIS LIVE BOX OFFICE
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THE TRIBUNE

THURSDAY, MAY 14, 2009, PAGE 9



@ By SARKIS IZMIRLIAN

AS BAHAMIANS, we tra-
ditionally address adversity with
an optimistic, forward-looking
attitude — and actions to
match. It is critical, therefore,
that the actions we take to min-
imise the length and severity of
the current economic slowdown
also include longer term strate-
gic initiatives to position the
Bahamas to take full advantage
of a global economic recovery.
Strengthening our tourism
industry now and making the
Bahamas the top destination in
the Caribbean are key.

Tourism is central to the long
term economic and social well-
being of the Bahamas. Tourism
brings in capital, enhances prop-
erty values and stimulates major
economic development at the
community level. Tourism
means jobs. Think of the thou-
sands of jobs in our country that
have been created by the busi-
nesses that directly and indi-
rectly support the tourist trade.

Since competition globally for
tourist dollars is fierce, it is
imperative that the Bahamas be
viewed around the world as the
vacation destination of choice.
Improving key infrastructure,
transportation, service and tech-
nology components is vital to
this effort. It is incumbent upon
our private sector to play an
important role both as respon-
sible corporate citizens and as
stakeholders to build the long
term economic well-being of
this country.

To our competitive advan-
tage, the Bahamas offers all the
basic defining elements of a
world class vacation destination.
It has beautiful beaches, friend-
ly people and a unique local cul-
ture that makes it all the more
memorable. It is ideal for trav-
ellers because its geographic
location makes it easily accessi-
ble from North and South
America and Europe. Are we
making the best of these in-built
advantages? I believe we
increasingly risk letting our-
selves down if we do not con-
stantly continue to evolve as a
destination. To secure our nat-
ural competitive edge, we must
address the following:



e Airport Efficiency

Lynden Pindling Internation-
al airport needs to be among
the friendliest and most efficient
in the world. Typically, visitors
only have precious few days to
spend on our islands. We must
become the easiest place in the
Caribbean to visit. Modernising
the airport structure is impor-
tant, but we must do more.
Among other initiatives, with-
out sacrificing security, our
Immigration and Customs must
be easier to navigate with far
fewer lines. Our departure
process today is characterised
by multi check points (two
stand-alone check points and
often another at the departure
gate), rather than the standard
one checkpoint and occasional
re-check at the gate. Countless
passengers grumble about hav-
ing to go through this highly
repetitive process and negative
experience. We also must assess
whether the costs for airlines to
use the Nassau airport are too
high and, if so, what we can do
to lower those costs and
increase the island’s tourism
potential. In short, we must
make sure the airport arrival
and departure experience is
more efficient and hassle free,
while upholding high safety
standards.

¢ Port and Downtown
Modernisation

Our cruise ship port and
downtown experience require
an immediate and meaningful

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injection of capital to modernise
them. Privatisation provides the
best course to achieve this
objective. The modernisation
should include attention to the
surrounding areas near the port.
It is disturbing that fewer than
50 per cent of all cruise line
guests leave the ship because of
a perception that there is noth-
ing for them to do! Whether it is
an organised tour or just an
opportunity for these guests to
explore the island in an invigo-
rating and compelling way, the
opportunities for business traf-
fic from passengers coming off
the ships for our retail, dining
and entertainment establish-
ments would be substantial. The
Downtown Revitalisation Pro-
ject is an excellent example of
what a partnership between the
government and private sector
can achieve for the Bahamas.

¢ Best In Class Guest
Experience

We need to ensure that all
businesses that cater to the
needs of guests provide best-in-
class service and guest experi-
ence. I like the term guest expe-
rience because it takes “cus-
tomer” to a more personal and
higher level. Whenever a guest
arrives in the Bahamas, our pri-
ority for the guest should be:
“You are a guest in my country
and home, how can I make you
a lifelong friend?” The arrival at
the airport, or port, the taxi ride,
hotel check-in and valet, the
interaction with Customs and

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other governmental authorities
— all should have as their over-
arching tenet maximising the
guest experience, designed to
turn the guest into lifelong, loy-
al, and repeat visitor. In order to
enhance our ability to achieve
this objective, we also must
invest in education and better
on-the-job training — a vital
component to implementing
strategies for a strong econom-
ic rebound geared to tourism.

¢ Modernisation Of
Telecommunications
and Energy

To be a leading vacation des-
tination, it is essential that we
have modern and effective
telecommunications and energy
infrastructures in place. Guests
must be able to connect rapidly
and reliably for voice, data and
multimedia content through
fixed and mobile phone lines.
The Bahamas’ extraordinarily
high utilities expenses are not
sustainable and threaten the
viability of — not just tourism
— but many of our other impor-
tant industries. Government
and the private sectors must
develop creative solutions to
meet our energy needs in a low-
cost sustainable way, including
seriously assessing alternative
sources like solar and wind
power. The current move
toward privatisation represents
an important step in this direc-
tion.

¢ New Tourism Initiatives To
Make The Bahamas Unique

We must constantly focus on
creating new strategic initiatives
to differentiate ourselves from
other island destinations in
order to build our reputation as
the vacation destination of
choice. Several ideas include:
1) developing of an annual sig-
nature event, for which the
Bahamas would be known
internationally; 2) updating our
Lotteries and Gaming Act and
regulations so that hotels and
resorts can create a more com-
petitive and modern gaming
environment, with expanding
games and a cutting-edge gam-
bling experience on par with
Las Vegas and Macau, if not in
sheer size, then certainly in
quality; 3) developing a tourism
campaign that stresses what
makes the Bahamas truly
unique, including the possible
creation of an efficient trans-
portation system that enables
guests to visit the New Provi-
dence Island and explore key
sites of interest, while also bet-
ter connecting key ‘out-islands’
of interest.

Maximising the ability of the
Bahamas to benefit from the
eventual recovery in the global
economy involves maximising
our strengths as a tourist desti-
nation. Working together, gov-
ernment and the private sectors
must plan ahead and make

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investments now so that as a
country we are the tourist des-
tination of choice. This year
marks my family’s 20th year
here in the Bahamas. During
this time, my commitment and
belief in this country have
grown stronger than ever. Why?
Two simple reasons: the endur-
ing qualities of the Bahamian
people and the country’s nat-
ural beauty have captured the
hearts of millions of people
from around the world, includ-
ing mine. The Bahamas has the
necessary resources and foun-
dations to enhance its tourism
appeal. I believe in the
Bahamas. By all of us being
engaged, we can shape for this
country a prosperous and pro-
ductive future.

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and CEO of Baha Mar
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PAGE 10, THURSDAY, MAY 14, 2009

THE TRIBUNE



LOCAL NEWS

FROM page one

country. And in this regard every
government who has trusteeship
over this process must be held
accountable,” said Ms Hanna Mar-
tin.

She said Mr Turnquest’s resigna-
tion “raises questions about the
granting of Crown land — a “valu-
able and finite resource that is part of
the Bahamian patrimony.”

Meanwhile, Fox Hill MP Fred
Mitchell said the turn of events, cul-
minating with the “mysterious” res-
ignation of Mr Turnquest on Mon-

PLP chairman

day, makes it now “more important
than ever” to allow his request for a
parliamentary select committee to
be formed to investigate the histori-
cal disposal of Crown land.

“Traised this matter in Parliament
because there is a legitimate con-
cern in the country about public
lands disposed of by the govern-
ment. The committee should be able
to determine the total inventory of
publicly owned lands, how they are
distributed and on what terms.

“Tf the present situation is inade-

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of

quate then there is a need to design
by legislation if necessary a system

that is fair, transparent and ratio- } =.
i called Crown land, it is really our
A requirement for annual report- land.”
ing to the Parliament on the dispo-

sition of public lands should be insti- | S0veTnment to honour its pre-elec-

tuted, he suggested. Director of } tion pledge and further promote

Lands and Surveys Tex Turnquest / ‘ansparency and democracy by

resigned after revelations in this ; Passing a FOIA,” he stated.
newspaper that his friends and fam-

ily benefitted significantly from } Tex Turnquest resigned this week

grants of prime beachfront Crown } after claims that during his tenure

: in office prime beachfront Crown
Having been granted five adja- } land in Exuma was granted to his
? friends and family, including his
four of the lots were “flipped” by ? mother-in-law, for nominal fees of

the same individuals within several | ©0¢ or two thousands dollars, only

years for an average of about i to be “flipped” several years later

i for hundreds of thousands of

nal,” he said.

land during his tenure in office.

cent lots on the Exuma waterfront,

$400,000 each.

FROM page one

“Once again I urge my FNM

Director of Lands and Surveys

‘Meaningful’ Act

dollars.

The exposé was based on infor-
mation found in official documents
leaked to this newspaper.

Bishop Simeon Hall, leader of
the New Covenant Baptist Church,
proposed that a FOIA would allow
the public to get the “full story
behind the headlines” in relation to
the Crown land situation that led
to Mr Turnquest’s resignation and
other matters.

“It’s difficult to know who’s
telling the truth in our society. I
think it’s time for the FNM to
make good on its promise of
putting information out and allow-

ing persons to make their deci-
sion.”

As for when FOIA legislation
might be drafted and made ready
for perusal by parliament, Attor-
ney General Michael Barnett yes-
terday said only that it is “under
active consideration.”

“Legislation doesn’t just pop up
— it has to be drafted and it has to
balance the need of the people for
information and other interests like
national security and things like
that,” he said.

Mr Barnett would not confirm
or deny reports that the Attorney
General’s office has launched an
investigation into activities at the
department in the wake of the alle-
gations.

FROM page one

the head by an unmasked man as he got out of
his car outside his Britannia Group Ltd office
near Compass Point, western New Provi-
dence, at around 9.30am on April 22. The
gunman then ran off towards Gambier Vil-
lage.

Tit Jones flew to Nassau from his home in
Los Angeles, California, to join his mother
Mildred, 82, as Hywel lay unconscious in Doc-
tor’s Hospital until he died on Friday.

Hywel Jones moved to the Bahamas in
1988 and is said to have lived a peaceful exis-
tence for 19 years, until he suffered two
attacks in the last two years in which he was
held at knifepoint in his West Bay Street
home and beaten up outside his property.

Mr Jones said: “He expressed concern to
me, but for the sake of my peace of mind,
and my mother’s, he was characteristically
vague and spared us the concern he knew
this would give me.

“He made them seem a mere trifle and, of
course, it’s become apparent they were more

Hywel Jones

serious.”

Mr Jones said his brother was well-known,
well-liked, admired and respected by both
his personal and professional associates.

Bahamas Institute of Financial Services
(BIFS) executive director Kim Bodie attested
to the Welsh native’s involvement in devel-
oping BIFS’s specialised banking education
programme and the setting up of a bache-
lor’s degree in banking and finance at the
College of the Bahamas.

Tit Jones said: “As has been widely report-
ed my brother was widely liked and wouldn’t
hurt a fly.

“He had no beef with anybody on the face
of the earth other than... this business conflict.”

Asst Comm Gibson said the investigation
is progressing and a number of people have
been interviewed, however no arrests have
been made.

Mr Jones said: “I have every confidence in
the police ability to follow this case.

“This is a country that relies on tourism

and the financial services
industry and for this to hap-
pen at all is bad for the
Bahamas, and for it to go
unsolved would be terrible.

“That expatriate bankers
could come here and then
be murdered is terrible, and
the police have given me
their assurance that they
will move mountains in 4
order to bring the person [AWITaENTe\ a5
responsible to justice.”

A $50,000 reward donated by friends and
associates of Hywel Jones has been posted
by Crime Stoppers for any information lead-
ing to the arrest and conviction of those
responsible for his murder.

Anyone with any information which may
assist investigations can call Crime Stoppers
toll-free on 328-TIPS (8477).

Calls will be answered by operators in the
United States who will ensure complete
anonymity. Alternatively call the incident
room at the Criminal Detective Unit on 502-
9942 or 502-9991.



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"This is a foreign company we're
dealing with — they could pull out
and we can get nothing. If they feel
they need to go, then they can go
but leave our money," said one
passionate worker who spent five
years in the hotel's Food and Bev-
erage Department.

More than 500 persons are cur-
rently employed at the hotel — 83
managers and 442 line staff, 26 of
whom are expatriates, according
to astatement released by govern-
ment yesterday.

While many of these employees
are Exuma natives a number of
them are from New Providence,
Grand Bahama and the family
islands — those who are not natives
of Exuma were promised plane
tickets to their home islands, said
employees.

Considering the depressed job
market in the country's tourism
sector many are concerned about
where this new round of redun-
dant workers will be absorbed.

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"Coming back to Nassau, you
have people there who already
looking for jobs — can you imagine
500 more people coming there?"
asked another employee who
worked for the hotel for four years.
"And now they expect us to give
150 per cent to the customers —
what kind of service do you think
we can give them now?"

The employees all spoke under
the condition of anonymity as they
had signed a confidentiality agree-
ment with their employment con-
tracts.

Member of Parliament for the
area Anthony Moss said the clo-
sure will undoubtedly "put a dent"
into Exuma's economy. With a
population of about 6,000, Mr Moss
fears that the closure and lack of
jobs will drain more persons from
Exuma — an island that has been
grappling with a softened econo-
my for more than a year, he said.

"You have to face the facts, with

the high cost of living it may affect
us to the point where you see a
number of persons leaving the
island of Exuma and returning to
their home island or other family
island.

"If you are looking at going
back into the same sort of service
orientated (hotel) jobs the outlook
is bleak on Exuma," he said.

A statement released by the
Cabinet office yesterday said Mit-
sui, receivers for the Emerald Bay
Development on Exuma, informed
government of the "difficult deci-
sion” to close the development.

The statement said the closure
of the development, including the
luxury hotel resort is expected to be
temporary while it is likely that the
resort will reopen under new own-
ership.

"During the past 14 months, the
receivers signed letters of intent
with one party and entered into
formal contract with two other par-
ties; none with success.

"The government has been
advised that Four Seasons, man-



agers of the resort hotel, will over-
see its orderly closing. The hotel
will close to guests on May 26 and
the majority of staff will leave with-
in the following 30 days.

The government has been
assured that all severance payments
due staff will be settled in accor-
dance with the law and employee
contracts," said the statement.

Some staff may be kept for the
transition period to new owner-
ship, it continued, adding that dur-
ing the temporary closed period,
critical amenities at the develop-
ment, such as the water plant oper-
ations, will continue unaffected.

"The receivers have advised that
they are already commencing con-
sultations with various parties that
had previously signalled an interest
in the development.

"The government is committed
to working with the receivers to
identify the best investor group to
acquire and reopen the hotel, golf
course and marina, and to com-
plete the full development planned
for the Emerald Bay site."

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PAGE 12, THURSDAY, MAY 14, 2009

SPORTS

TRIBUNE SPORTS





JURGEN Melz-
er of Austria
reacts during
the match
against Rafael
Nadal of Spain
at the Madrid
Open Tennis
in Madrid, on
Wednesday,
May 13, 2009.

Victor R. Caivano/AP Photo



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@ TENNIS
MADRID
Associated Press

RAFAEL NADAL powered
into the third round of the
Madrid Open on Wednesday
with a convincing 6-3, 6-1 win
over Jurgen Melzer of Austria.

The defending champion
made just three unforced errors
playing on his favored clay sur-
face in front of Spain’s Queen
Sofia, and converted all four of
his break points.

“It’s more difficult to play
here than on normal altitude
surfaces,” Nadal said of play-
ing 1,970 feet above sea level.
“You can do more with the ball
with less effort, but your oppo-
nent also does it.”

The only break in Nadal’s


































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concentration came when a ball
girl fainted and had to be car-
ried off the center court for
medical assistance in the sec-
ond set.

Earlier, Novak Djokovic
eased past Oscar Hernandez 6-
3, 6-3. The third-seeded Serb
fell awkwardly on his right knee
on the clay surface at Madrid’s
new “Magic Box” tennis center
in the second set, but was rarely
troubled by his Spanish oppo-
nent.

“IT was aware the court was
quite wet because I saw they
had watered it after the previ-
ous match. But I was lucky that
I fell in a good way so there is
no injury,” Djokovic said. “It
looked easy, but it wasn’t. I
played just well enough to win.”

Djokovic never faced a break
point in the match, while break-
ing Hernandez once in the first
set and twice in the second.

Djokovic recently fell from
third to fourth in the rankings,

Paul White/AP Photo

RAFAEL Nadal of Spain returns the ball to Jurgen Melzer of Austria during the Madrid Open Tennis
Tournament in Madrid, Wednesday May 13, 2009. Nadal; won the match 6-3, 6-1.

Nadal wins in front of
Queen Sofia in Madrid

surpassed by Andy Murray
despite winning the Serbia
Open last week — the country’s
first ATP Tour event that he
also helped organize.

“T try not to pay too much
attention to rankings,” he said.
“But I am motivated to win
back my third ranking posi-
tion.”

Nadal agreed with Djokovic
that the way the rankings are
calculated, players are forced
to play too many tournaments.

“The way things are now, you
can’t choose which events you
would like to focus on, you have
to play everything in order to
defend your position,” Nadal
said. “But it’s the same for
everyone.”

Nadal’s next opponent is
Phillipp Kohlschreiber, who
beat 13th-seeded Marin Cilic 6-
1, 6-7 (5), 7-6 (2).

“He hits the ball very hard
and cleanly, so I'd like to make
sure my serves are winners

Hundreds turn out to mourn
Hall of Fame coach Daly

@ BASKETBALL
TEQUESTA, Fla.
Associated Press

HUNDREDS of mourners filled
a South Florida church Wednesday
to say farewell to Hall of Fame coach

Chuck Daly.

Among those in attendance were
several members of his 1989-90
Detroit Pistons championship team,
close friends that included Rollie
Massimino and Billy Cunningham,
and Dallas coach Rick Carlisle —



He EY

who left immediately afterward to
join the Mavericks in Denver for a
playoff game Wednesday night.
Carlisle said that missing the funeral “was not an option.”
Daly led the Dream Team to the Olympic gold medal in
1992 after winning back-to-back NBA championships in
Detroit. He was diagnosed with pancreatic cancer earlier
this year and died Saturday at age 78 in Jupiter, Fla.

wa
ala;

Cavs star
James leats
All-NBA
first team

@ BASKETBALL
NEW YORK
Associated Press



LEBRON JAMES should
be getting used to sweeps by
now.

The Cavaliers star was a
unanimous selection to the
AlIl-NBA first team Wednes-
day, after leading his team to
a franchise-best regular-sea-
son record and a pair of play-
off sweeps of the Detroit Pis-
tons and Atlanta Hawks.

James was put on the first
team on every ballot of 122
sportswriters and broadcast-
ers who regularly cover the
league. Lakers star Kobe
Bryant finished second in
voting, making the first team
on 119 ballots, while Dwight
Howard of the Magic,
Dwyane Wade of the Heat
and Dirk Nowitzki of the
Mavericks rounded out the
first team.

James, the league’s MVP,
was a first-team selection for
the second straight season
after finishing second in the
NBA in scoring at 28.4 points
and ranking in the top 10 in
steals and assists. He led the
Cavaliers to a franchise-best
66-16 record, including a 39-2
mark at home, and the team’s
first top seed in the playoffs.

They’ve only been gaining
momentum since then.

The Cavaliers made it 8-
for-8 in the postseason Mon-
day night, completing a sec-
ond straight sweep with an
84-74 win over the Hawks.
Along with their dominant
sweep of Detroit, Cleveland
has won an NBA-record
eight consecutive playoff
games by double figures.

The Cavs should be well-
rested for the Eastern Con-
ference finals against Boston
or Orlando, a series the
Celtics lead 3-2 entering
Game 6 Thursday night.

Howard had 17 rebounds
but just 12 points while taking
only 10 shots in the Magic’s
92-88 loss Tuesday night, but
he’s the biggest reason Orlan-
do is still alive.

After becoming only the
fourth player to lead the
league in rebounding and
blocked shots since 1973-74,
when the block became an
official statistic, the 6-foot-11
forward has averaged 20
points and leads all players
with 16.1 rebounds in the
postseason.

Bryant finished third in the
league with 26.8 points, lead-
ing the Lakers to a Western
Conference-best 65-17 finish.

He needed only three
quarters to score 26 points
Tuesday night, when the Lak-
ers routed the Houston
Rockets 118-78 to take a 3-2
lead in their series. They play
Game 6 Thursday night.

Wade was a first-team
selection for the first time
after leading the league in
scoring at 30.2 points, finish-
ing second in steals and
eighth in assists. He also
became the fifth player in

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TRIBUNE SPORTS

THURSDAY, MAY 14, 2009, PAGE 13



SPORTS



wi
INBRIEF

NBA: ‘Matter
Is closed’ on
Mavs-Nuggets
incidents

@ BASKETBALL
DENVER
Associated Press



THE NBA won’t punish
anybody over the ugly inci-
dents that occurred on and
off the court in Games 3 and
4 of the series between the
Dallas Mavericks and Den-
ver Nuggets.

“Matter is closed,” league
spokesman Tim Frank told
The Associated Press via e-
mail Wednesday before
Game 5 tipped off in Denver.

The Nuggets captured
Game 3 on Saturday on
Carmelo Anthony’s 3-pointer
with a second left after a non-
call that the league later
admitted was a mistake.

The disputed ending trig-
gered a heated reaction after
the buzzer, with Dallas for-
ward Josh Howard being
restrained and Mavs owner
Mark Cuban expressing his
frustration and then telling
the mother of Nuggets for-
ward Kenyon Martin who
was seated nearby that her
son was a thug.

Martin had been fined ear-
lier in the series for a hard
foul on Dallas star Dirk Now-
itzki.

Cuban later said on his blog
that he was sorry for the way
Martin’s mother was treated.
The Nuggets viewed the apol-
ogy as disingenuous because
it contained an offer for their
family and friends to sit in
Cuban’s private suite “when
the series returns to Dallas.”

Cubans’ antics may have
incited fan misbehavior in
Game 4 on Monday night as
insults were hurled at Mart-
in’s girlfriend, rap star Trina,
and Martin’s mother.

Anthony’s fiance, LaLa
Vazquez of MTV fame, said
fans hurled racial slurs and
ice cubes at her during the
game and she had to send her
2-year-old son back to the
hotel early and was prepar-
ing to leave early herself
when she was pushed by a
fan.

“Obviously the playoffs
games bring out the best and
the worst in fans but what
happened on Monday night
with the racial slurs/threats,
verbal attacks on my son and
physical attacks to myself by
irate fans was unacceptable,”
Vazquez said in a statement.

ca

Get Prepared



Ben Margot/AP Photo

WASHINGTON Nationals’ Elijah Dukes (34) is tagged out on a steal-attempt by San Francisco Giants third baseman Pablo Sandoval, front left, during the fourth inning of a baseball
game Wednesday, May 13, 2009, in San Francisco.

Zimmerman’s hit streak

ends at 30, Nats top Giants

m@ BASEBALL
SAN FRANCISCO
Associated Press

RYAN ZIMMERMAN’S
30-game hitting streak ended
when he went 0 for 3 with two
walks, but Shairon Martis
allowed two hits over seven
sharp innings to remain unbeat-
en this season in the Washing-
ton Nationals’ 6-3 victory over
the San Francisco Giants on
Wednesday.

Zimmerman never got the
ball out of the infield, falling
just short of Vladimir Guer-
rero’s franchise-record streak
of 31 games for the Montreal
Expos in 1999. After two
groundouts and two walks
against Giants starter Barry
Zito, Zimmerman grounded
into a fielder’s choice against
reliever Pat Misch in the ninth.

San Francisco’s fans still gave
him a standing ovation, and
Zimmerman slid home with
Washington’s sixth run
moments later, beating a throw
from the infield.

Nick Johnson hit an RBI dou-

ble in the fifth and Elijah Dukes
drove in two runs with a bro-
ken-bat single in the seventh for
the Nationals, who avoided a
three-game sweep in San Fran-
cisco while snapping a nine-
game losing streak to the Giants.

Zimmerman’s streak ended
right before Washington
returned for a 10-game homes-
tand at Nationals Park, where
the club with the majors’ worst
record could have used some-
thing to celebrate.

Zimmerman grounded into a
double play in the first inning
and drew a walk in the third.
After grounding out to short-
stop in the fifth, he came up
with two runners on in the sev-
enth — but after Zito threw a
wild pitch allowing both run-
ners to advance, the Giants
elected to walk Zimmerman
intentionally.

Somebody in the Washing-
ton dugout appeared to throw
water onto the field after the
intentional walk. Zimmerman
then grounded to shortstop in
the ninth, ending the majors’
longest hitting streak since Moi-
ses Alou hit in 30 straight games

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for the Mets in 2007.

Martis (5-0), who walked four
batters and hit another but did-
n’t allow a run until the seventh,
is responsible for nearly half of
the Nationals’ 11 victories this
season. The former Giants
farmhand also doubled and
scored the game’s first run in
the fifth.

Kip Wells earned his second
career save.

Zito (1-3) gave up eight hits
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PAGE 14, THURSDAY, MAY 14, 2009

SPORTS

TRIBUNE SPORTS





out Police

St. Agnes defeat
Commonwealth

THE BAHAMAS
Cricket Association con-
tinued its league play with a
pair of games on its week-
end schedule featuring the
league’s top teams from the
2008 season.

In Saturday’s feature,
Dynasty Stars narrowly
escaped with a win over the
Police squad, taking the
match by one wicket.

The Police batted first
and posted 235 runs for the
loss of six wickets.

Members of the national
junior team, Marc Taylor
and Terran Brown led the
offensive attack with 95 and
38 runs respectively.

National team stalwart
Greg Taylor also chipped
in with 33 runs.

Antonio Hernandez took
two wickets, bowling for
the Stars.

The Stars responded with
a total of 236 runs for the
loss of nine wickets to take
the match by one wicket.

A balanced scoring
attack was led by Howard

Roye, 39 runs, Renford
Davson 37 runs, and Lee
Melville, 31 runs not out.

Bowling for the Police,
Jermaine Addeley and
Gary Armstrong took two
wickets each.

In Sunday’s feature St.
Agnes defeated Castrol
Commonwealth by a total
of seven wickets.

Castrol Commonwealth
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out for 123 runs.

Terry Seepersad scored
30 to lead Castrol.

Bowling for St. Agnes,
Omar James took four
wickets, Earl Thomas took
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In their turn at bat, St.
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Youth player Orlando
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THE BAHAMAS HUMANE SOCIETY



BARCELONA'S Thierry Henry, front, from France, jumps for the ball
with Athletico Bilbao's Fernando Llorente, centre, during the final of
the Copa del Rey soccer match.

Manu Fernandez/AP Photos





BARCELONA'S Lionel Messi, right, from Argentina, duels for the
ball with Athletico Bilbao's Pablo Orbaiz.

> BARCELONA WIN COPA DEL REY

FC Barcelona's Lionel Messi of Argentina reacts after scoring
against Athletic Biloao during their Copa del Rey final match at the
Mestalla stadium in Valencia, Wednesday, May 13, 2009.



BARCELONA'S
Samuel Eto'o,
right, from
Cameroon,
controls the ball
beside a player
of Athletico
Bilbao.

Knowles, Bhupathi knocked out in second round

FROM page 15

the tour, Mike and Bob Bryan
also fell in the second round fol-
lowing an opening round bye.

The Bryans, who have won
four titles this season and have
won 53 over the course of their
careers lost a three set thriller to
Simon Aspelin, Sweden, and
Wesley Moodie, South Africa,
7-6, 1-6, 11-9.

The win moved Aspelin and
Moodie, ranked 36 on the tour,

humane A

The Bahamas Humane Society

above the .500 mark for the first
time all season with a win loss
record of 4-3.

The Polish pair of Mariusz
Fyrstenberg and Marcin
Matowski, ranked sixth in the
draw was the third ranked team
of the day to be eliminated
when they lost Juan del Potro,
Argentina, and Mardy Fish,
United States, in straight sets
6-3, 6-4.

Fish and del Potro, unranked
on the ATP tour, ousted the
tour’s tenth ranked team who

have won eight career titles
together.

To complete the drought by
the draw’s top ranked teams,
seventh seeded Max Mirnyi,
Belarus, and Andy Ramm,
Israel, lost to the Spanish pair of
Marcel Granoller and Tommy
Robredo, 7-5, 2-6, 14-12.

Knowles’ former partner,
Daniel Nestor, Canada, remains
in contention as apart of the
tournament’s top seeded team.

Nestor and Nenad Zimonjic
are ranked second in the draw.

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THE TRIBUNE



lm By RENALDO DORSETT
Sports Reporter
rdorsett@tribunemedia.net

THE SECOND round of the
2009 Madrid Open featured a
plethora of shocking upsets as a
number of seeded teams failed
to advance, including Mark
Knowles and Mahesh Bhupathi.

Knowles and Bhupathi, the
tournament’s fourth ranked
seed in the draw were defeated
by the unranked pair of Stephen
Huss, Australia, and Ross
Hutchins, Great Britain, 6-4, 7-
5.

BOXING

e Bahamas Boxing Commis-
sion Chairman Pat Strachan, on
Tuesday, issued a strong state-
ment to the professional box-
ing community. It reads as fol-
lows: "It has come to the atten-
tion of the Bahamas Boxing
Commission that an announce-
ment of a series of exhibition
boxing matches between Ray
Minus Jr. and Quincy Pratt has
been made. It is direct conflict
with the rules and regulations
of the commission for anyone
to make such announcements
without first obtaining official
sanction. The commission is
mandated by the government
of The Bahamas to control and
monitor professional boxing.
We are responsible for the safe-
ty and the integrity of the sport
whether via exhibition bouts or
standard matches. We forbid
this kind of activity and offi-
cially state that the proposed
exhibitions have not been sanc-
tioned and will not be sanc-
tioned. Whether exhibitions or





PAGE 15



THURSDAY, MAY 14,

Indicative of the final score
in both sets, the match was
nearly statistically even, how-
ever Hutchins and Huss held a
slight edge.

They won 74 percent on ser-
vice, 33 percent on returns while
Knowles and Bhupathi won just
67 percent on service and 26
percent on returns.

In a match that took just over
82 minutes to complete
Knowles and Bhupathi record-
ed five aces and played nearly
error free with just one double
fault, but won just 1-4 break
points .

not, it is imperative that all box-
ers meet the required standards,
medical and otherwise. Any
member of the local pro box-
ing fraternity who ignores the
authority of the commission
runs the high risk of suspen-
sion."

The statement came in refer-
ence to Ray Minus and Quincy
Pratt anouncing their intentions
to engage in a series of exhibi-
tion matches as a fundraiser for
their respective clubs.

TENNIS
BRAJAXBA AGE GROUP SERIES
THREE ROUND ROBIN

Boys 16 Semifinals

Alexis Roberts d. Kevaughn
Ferguson, 6-1, 5-7, 10-8

Jody Turnquest d. Kazi Smith,
6-2, 6-2

Boys 14 Semifinals

Treajh Ferguson d. Lauren
Minns, 6-4, 6-1

Shariffe Rahminf d. Nicoy
Rolle, 6-3, 7-6

@: ARE Be FA J

Loe

ts

2009

The loss dropped the third
ranked duo on the ATP Dou-
bles tour to 16-9 on the year
while Huss and Hutchins,
ranked 31, improved to 6-7.

It was the second career loss
for Knowles and Bhupathi
against the pair who also defeat-
ed them in the opening round of
the 2008 French Open, 6-4, 6-4.

While the was rather unex-
pected it was far from the
biggest surprise of the day.

The top seeded team of the
draw and top ranked team of

SEE page 14

Girls 12 Semifinals

Raven Barry d. T’Shea Fergu-
son, 6-0, 6-0

Tesha Shepard d. Afrika
Smith, 6-2, 6-2

Mini Finals
Maya Weech d. Emma
Weech, 11-8

Short Court
D’Angelo Demeritte d.
Ramon 11-5, 11-7

SATURDAY’S SCHEDULE:

Boys 16 Finals

Jody Turnquest v. Alexis
Roberts

Boys 14 Finals
Treajh Ferguson v. Shariffe
Rahming

Boys 10 Semifinals
O’Neil Mortimer v. Cole Maura
Danny Wallace v. Cole Maura

Girls 12 Finals
Tesha Shepard v. Raven Barry

NOW WE ARE ONE.

Mark renee ;





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@ By NEIL HARTNELL
Tribune Business Editor

INVESTORS in City Mar-
kets’ majority shareholder have
“in principle all committed” to
injecting additional equity cap-
ital into the 12-store Bahamian
supermarket chain, Tribune
Business was told yesterday,
with receipt of that funding key
to getting the firm’s June 1
“relaunch” off the launching
pad.

Sunil Chatrani, chief execu-
tive of City Markets’ immedi-
ate holding company, Bahamas
Supermarkets, confirmed that
investors in the latter’s 78 per
cent majority shareholder, BSL
Holdings, were now discussing
with Royal Bank of Canada the
terms and arrangements for the
new capital injection - likely,
according to Tribune Business
sources, to be in the range of
$10 million.

Mr Chatrani, in an exclusive
interview with Tribune Busi-
ness, said he did not want to
commit to a figure for the new
capital injection because it was

Courier firms
enjoy second
WER IT
TES CUTE TT

@ By CHESTER
ROBARDS
Business Reporter
crobards@
tribunemedia.net

COURIER companies
yesterday received another
temporary reprieve from
impending Customs clear-
ance policy changes, the
Department saying it
intends to bring them into
effect by the end of May
rather than this Friday,
according to a representa-
tive of the newly-formed
Bahamas Transshipment
and Logistics Association
(BTLA).

Latore Mackey said the
BTLA met with new
comptroller of customs,
Glen Gomez, who yielded
to their requests for an
extension to the imple-
mentation of the new cus-
toms rules, which were to
come into effect on May
15.

Now, according to Mr
Mackey, the courier com-
panies have until the end
of May to get themeselves
ready for changes that
could cost some $15,000 to
$20,000 in bonds up front.

“This is the easiest way
for a courier service to
close down,” he said.

Mr Mackey said the
Government should be

SEE page 8B

The information contained is from a third
party and The Tribune can not be held
responsible for errors and/or omission
from the daily report.



THE TRIBUNE

U



THURSDAY,

SECTION B ¢ business@tribunemedia.net

Investors ‘commit’ to [Witor (BEART
bia Cs inenunta vearly losses sink

me



MAY

14,

* Bahamas Supermarkets chief says new equity
injection’s completion by May 31 vital to company’s

‘relaunch’ take-off

* Management realises $5.3m in annualised cost
savings as business stabilises, prior to receipt of
new funds to restart import programmes’

* Sales for fiscal 2009 likely to drop to $120-$125m
from $144m in ‘08, but latter figure caused by deep
discounting that sold products at loss

* Chief executive says company will take two-three
years to recover $8m profitability, but likely to be
back in black by July - first month of 2010

likely to be split.

Some financing would be
retained at the BSL Holdings
level, to deal with its financial
needs and debt repayments to
Royal Bank, while the remain-
der would be injected into
Bahamas Supermarkets as the
operating company.

However, Mr Chatrani told
Tribune Business that the new
financing needed to be
“finalised this month”, by May
31, 2009, if Bahamas Super-
markets was to move ahead on
target with its “relaunch”.

He explained that while the
company had been “stabilised”,
and some $5.3 million in annu-
alised savings realised, it could
go no further without the new
financing. Otherwise, manage-
ment would be left “twiddling
our thumbs” with little to do.

BSL Holdings and its

investors were now talking to
Royal Bank about “how the
things that need to be done are
put in place” in relation to the
new financing.

Mr Chatrani said that, after
receiving the business recovery
plan for Bahamas Supermar-
kets that was developed by him-
self and chief financial officer,
Evangeline Rahming, both the
bank and majority shareholder
were “committed to going for-
ward with this”.

The company, he added, had
proven itself to both the bank
and BSL Holdings by “hitting
Budget pretty much for the past
couple of months”, thus show-
ing its projection figures could
be relied upon and previous
inaccuracies in financial report-

SEE page 10B

City Markets
to close store

* Independence Drive store targeted for clo-
sure, but company hopes to absorb most of

affected 30 workers

* Shrinkage reduced by ‘0.5 per cent of sales’
* Financial woes cost grocery chain market
share, slipping from 21.4% in 2007 to 20.6%

in 2008

@ By NEIL HARTNELL
Tribune Business Editor

CITY MARKETS is plan-
ning to reduce its store portfolio
to 11 with the closure of its
Independence Drive outlet, Tri-
bune Business can reveal, with
the move set to happen once
the company receives new equi-
ty financing from its majority
shareholder.

Sunil Chatrani, chief execu-
tive of City Markets’ publicly-
traded parent, Bahamas Super-
markets, in an exclusive inter-
view with Tribune Business
declined to name the store ear-
marked for closure, but con-
firmed: “There is one store clo-
sure.”

Tribune Business, though,
can confirm that the store in
question is the one on Inde-
pendence Drive/Tonique
Williams-Darling Highway, as
the transformation of the High-
way into a dual-lane carriage-
way has hampered customer
access to the outlet.

However, Mr Chatrani told
Tribune Business that Bahamas
Supermarkets would look to
retain as many of the store’s 30-
strong staff as possible.

“We have some good staff
that we want to retain,” he
explained. “The majority of
staff can be absorbed.”

Mr Chatrani said the store
closure was “supposed to be
before the year end” around
June 30, 2009, but the actual
timing would depend on when
the company received the antic-
ipated capital injection from its
majority shareholder, BSL
Holdings, as this was needed to
meet severance pay.

Meanwhile, Mr Chatrani said
Bahamas Supermarkets, since
he assumed his new role in
October 20p08, had cut shrink-
age group-wide by “at least half
a percentage point of sales”.

SEE page 9B

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INVEST ix



2009



W. 1st

400-500 jobs

@ By NEIL HARTNELL
Tribune Business Editor

SOME 400-500 staff at the
Four Seasons Emerald Bay
Resort will lose their jobs
when the property closes on
May 26, 2009, its receiver
telling Tribune Business yes-
terday that the shutdown was
necessary to “curtail losses”
that in 2008 totalled around $5
million, after several potential
sales agreement fell through.

Russell Downs, a London-
based accountant with Price-
waterhouseCoopers (PwC),
who has been the Exuma-
based resort’s main receiver
since June 2007, said he was
hoping the closure would be
“temporary”, and that market
conditions and a new hotel
brand/operator to replace Four
Seasons might “get us over the
finishing line” in securing a
new owner.

Mr Downs confirmed that a
sales agreement to sell the
Four Seasons Emerald Bay
Resort to a consortium featur-
ing a Los Angeles-based real
estate/casino developer, Bar-
ry Silverton, and global real
estate broker/investment bank-

Vincent Vanderpool-Wallace

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* May 26, 2009, shut down of ‘anchor
property’ to have disastrous impact for
Exuma’s economy and wider tourism

industry

* Receiver says creditor had no option
but to ‘curtail losses’ that were
increasing, after fully funding Four
Seasons for 18 months

* Several buyer deals fall through,
including Silverton/Cushman Wakefield

and Arden Group

* Hopes that closure, and opportunity
for new hotel brand manager, ‘may get
us over the finish line’

* Government urged to use $3m unpaid

BEC bill to intervene

ing firm, Cushman & Wake-
field, had fallen through at the
end of March.

Tribune Business exclusive-
ly revealed that consortium’s
interest in the Exuma-based
property on February 5, 2009.



Subsequent to that, this news-
paper also revealed that the
Philadelphia-based real estate
group, the Arden Group, had
submitted a bit to acquire the

FROM page 5B

Minister ‘disappointed’ Emerald
Bay closing despite buyer interest

@ By NEIL HARTNELL
Tribune Business Editor

THE MINISTER OF
TOURISM and Aviation yes-
terday said he was especially
“disappointed” in the Four Sea-
sons Emerald Bay Resort’s clo-
sure because of the “high level”
of buyer interest in the proper-
ty, which he indicated should
have led to a sale concluding
before now.

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Exuma itself we are most con-
cerned about, and are quite dis-
appointed because of the high
level of interest expressed in the
property, and that there hasn’t
been a conclusion at this stage.”

When asked whether he
knew how many buyers there
were, with Tribune Business

SEE page 9B

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PAGE 2B, THURSDAY, MAY 14, 2009

THE TRIBUNE



Act for a company

m@ By TYRONE
FITZGERALD

A DIRECTOR is a
person appointed

by the shareholders to man-
age a company.

Two general types

of directors:

EXECUTIVE DIRECTOR
A director who works

full-time in a company and

is responsible for the daily

operations, strategic plan-

ning, management and busi-

ness development of a com-

pany.

NON-EXECUTIVE
DIRECTOR
A director who does not

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D

{n°



tive director. Both execu-
tive and non-executive
directors have the same
legal duties, responsibilities
and potential liabilities.
While the Companies Act
1992 (as amended) and the

jude

International Business
Companies Act 2000 (as
amended) do not specifical-
ly define a ‘director’, only
an ‘officer’ of a company,
both Acts do legislatively
reinforce the general fidu-
ciary duties of a director to
manage the company, act
honestly, in good faith, and
in the best interests of the
company, subject to a unan-
imous shareholder agree-
ment and/or the Memoran-
dum and Articles of Associ-
ation of the company.
Directors are also
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duty of care, diligence and
skill that a reasonably pru-
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responsible for the daily
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independently of the actu-
al day-to-day management
of the company.

As fiduciaries, directors
have a legal duty to act in
good faith, not make a prof-
it from their fiduciary posi-
tion, not place themselves
in positions where their
duties as directors conflict
with their interests, or act
for their own benefit or the
benefit of others without
clear, unequivocal consent
from the principals of the
company on whose behalf
they act. They must act in
accordance with the Memo-
randum and Articles of
Association of the compa-
ny, and deal with and treat
fairly the different classes
of shareholders.

RESPONSIBILITIES
OF THE BOARD OF
DIRECTORS

* Establish the vision,
mission, and values of the
company

* Determine the compa-
ny’s strategic objectives and
policies, and ensure their
effective and efficient
implementation in align-
ment with the vision, mis-
sion and values of the com-
pany

* Monitor the company’s
overall performance and
progress in achieving those
objectives and policies

* Create, manage, mea-
sure and oversee the corpo-
rate and compliance culture
of the organisation

* Select and appoint
members of senior manage-

on firm directions

ment

* Exercise transparency,
responsibility and account-
ability to the company’s
stakeholders, primarily its
shareholders, for the com-
pany’s financial perfor-
mance and progress

APPOINTMENT OF
DIRECTORS

The first Directors of a
company are appointed at
its incorporation, normally
by the subscribers to the
Memorandum and Articles
of Association

Subsequent appointments
of directors are governed by
and carried out in accor-
dance with the Articles of
Association of the compa-
ny. Shareholder agreements
should also be reviewed,
and the relevant provisions
of the shareholder agree-
ment applied as necessary.

The Articles of Associa-
tion normally specify how
and when a Board may fill a
vacancy for a director,
appoint additional directors
(up to a maximum number)
or remove a director.

On appointment, a new
director should sign to sig-
nify his or her consent to
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director service agreement,
obtain the relevant insur-
ances and indemnities, and
receive a copy of the corpo-
rate documents.

These include the Memo-
randum and Articles of
Association, details of the
business and financial
affairs of the company,
recent Board minutes and
management accounts, and
copies of the statutory

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THE TRIBUNE

THURSDAY, MAY 14, 2009, PAGE 3B



Act provides foundation
to grow pharmacy sector

m@ By CHESTER ROBARDS
Business Reporter
crobards@tribunemedia.net

THE PHARMACY Acct 2009,
which was recently passed by
Parliament, is expected to attract
more young pharmacists to the
industry and grow it year-on-
year, executive members of the
Bahamas Pharmaceutical Asso-
ciation said yesterday. The
amendments to the Act had been
in development for almost 20
years.

According to the chairman of
the Association’s legislative com-
mittee, Marvin Smith, the
changes will help to regulate the
sector, which had policed itself
for years.

He said patients had to trust
the integrity of their pharmacists
in the past, because holes in the
law allowed for almost total
autonomy in the sector.

Mr Smith said that despite
missing the legislation that would

keep pharmacists honest, the
Bahamas had the fewer viola-
tions in the industry than many
smaller countries in the
Caribbean.

Now, the law governing the
sector will allow for a regulatory
body to cite pharmacies for
any violations that might be
reported.

One of the most substantive
changes coming out of the legis-
lation is the curbing of the pro-
liferation of counterfeit pre-
scription drugs.

The Bahamas Pharmaceutical
Association’s president, Philip
Gray, said the new Act engen-
ders “new standards for
registration, importation and
distribution of all medicines to
combat against counterfeit prod-
ucts”.

Mr Gray said this new legisla-
tion marks the first major
amendment to the pharmacy leg-
islation since the 1960s.

“Tt also marks the commence-

ment of a new regulatory body to
be known as the Pharmacy
Council of the Bahamas,” he
said.

“It is a sentinel moment for
pharmacy professionals, and is
the result of the hard work of
our members, many of whom
pioneered changes in this pro-
fession for decades and have now
gone to their rest.”

The BPA’s vice-president,
Mimi Roberts, said the pharmcay
industry in the Bahamas had
grown substantially, and through
the new legislation it could
become a transshipment point
for multinational drug corpora-
tions distributing to the
Caribbean.

Mr Smith said the Act has now
opened the industry up to emerg-
ing nuances in the pharmaceuti-
cal field, which will encourage
the best and brightest Bahamians
who go abroad to study pharma-
cology and related fields to come
back home to practice.

Act for small firm survival

m@ By MARK A. TURNQUEST

“THE ONLY thing constant in life is
change”, and change is here for small and
medium-sized enterprises (SMEs). This glob-
al recession has taught government, the pri-
vate sector and businesses/organisations one
thing: “If you fail to plan then you plan to
fail”.

Even if there was a plan and you “fail to
plan how to execute your plan, you will also
fail”. The only way the Bahamas can miti-
gate against the negative impact from future
recessions is that there must be synergy
between all sectors of the country.

The National Small Business Economic
Summit’s focus is to bring SMEs, the Gov-
ernment and private sctors together under
one roof to formulate a National Strategic
Plan for SME development in the Bahamas.
This plan will assist stakeholders in the craft-
ing of the Small Business Act.

This Economic Summit is a non-profit
event and will be held for three hours a night
for eight nights during the period: May 21-
June 4, 2009 at the Holy Cross Anglican
Church Auditorium.

SME owners are urged to be a change
agent for their industries. A Representative
from the Ministry of Finance will be making
presentations on how individual industries
will be impacted by the Economic Partner-
ship Agreement (EPA).

The summit is a necessary step in the for-
mulation of a Small Business Act of the

Bahamas, because SME owners will have
an excellent chance to voice their opinion on
how to solve specific industry problems and
take advantage of specific opportunities. If
SME owners fail to participate in the sum-
mit, it will probably hinder the growth of
the SME sector for at least five to 10 years.
Remember, “none of us can do everything,
but all of us can do something”.

SME owners should only attend and par-
ticipate in the summit based on their specif-
ic product/service offerings: Business Pro-
fessional Services (May 21, 6pm-7.30pm)
Medical Professional Services (May 21, 7.30
pm- 9pm), Technical Services (May 25, 6pm
— 7.30 pm), Other Services (May 25, 7.30
pm -9pm), Manufacturing /Fashion Design
(May 26, 6pm — 9pm), Retailing (May 27,
6pm -7.30pm), Wholesaling (May 27, 7.30pm
-9pm), Land /Building Developers ( (May
28, 6pm -7.30pm), Land/Building Consul-
tants ( May 28, 7.30pm-9pm), Agriculture
(June 2, 6pm -7.30pm), Fisheries ( June 2,
7.30 pm-9pm), Tourism ( June 3, 6pm -
7.30pm), Hospitality (June 3, 7.30pm-9pm).
Everyone can attend the last session Gov-
ernment Depts /Financial Institutions (June
4, 6pm -9pm),

To participate in the The National Small
Business Economic Summit, contact Mark A.
Turnquest at tel: (242) 326-6748 / 427-3640,
email: markturnquest@consultant.com
or log on to web site:
markturnquestconsulting.com

CPA/ CERTIFIED PUBLIC ACCOUNTANT

Jeb Descriptions

Apo: principles of accounting 10 analyee financial information and prepare financial reports by

compiling Infirmalion, preparing, pralit and kes statements, and ulilizing appropeiiie accounting

control procedures.

Primary Hespomsibilities

|, Prepare profit and loss. statements and monthly chosing and cost accounting repoets,

2, Compile and analyze financial information to prepare entries in accounts, such as general ledper
accounts, and document business tranacthors.

3, Establish, maintain, and coordinate the implementation of accounting and accounting comrol

procedures.

4. Analyze and review budgets and expenditures for contracts.
5, Monitor and rewiew accounting and related system reports for accumey and completeness
6. Prepare and review bucket, revere, expense, payroll entries, imoices, and other accounting

documents.

7. Analy revenue and expenditare trends and recommend appropriate budget levels, and erune

expenditure conpal.

8, Expéain billing invoices and accounting poticies to stalf, vendors and clients

4. Resolve accounting discrepancees.

1d. Recommend, develop and maintain financial data bases, computer software svetems and manual

filing system:

11. Supervise the input and handleng of financial data and reports lor the companys aulomated

financial systems

12. Interact with audstars in completing audits if mecessary.

13. Other duties as assigned.

Additional Keoponsibilities

|. Develop the annual operating budget and consult with deparimental management on the fiscal
aspects of program planning, salary recommendations, and o¢her administrative actions:
2. Provide accounting policy orientation for new staf,

Skills Required::

Knowledge of finance, acocunting, budgetire, and cost conta principles including Generally Accepted

Accountieg Principles. Knowledge of financial and accounting software applications.
Quickbooks and Mircos software lnowledge a plus,

Employment Type: Full Time

Vearky Salary: Lnagecitied

Education & Experience

Level of Education: §=6College

Years of Work
Experience:

440 5 Years

Contact Information

Company: King’s Realty

Coatact Name: Lilith Postwick
Costact Phone: HT-3044597
Coatact Fax: 247-5944492
Contact E-mail:

Preferred Method
of Contact:

E-mail

Share your news

The Tribune wants to hear from
people who are making news in
their neighbourhoods. Perhaps

you are raising funds for a good
cause, campaigning for
improvements in the area or
have won an award.

If so, call us on 322-1986 and
share your story.



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BSI TRUST CORPORATION (BAHAMAS) LIMITED

is presently accepting applications for

COMPLIANCE AND INTERNAL CONTROLS OFFICER

The successful candidate for the position of Compliance and Internal Controls
Officer will monitor the regulatory framework and operational aspects of the Trust
in order to ensure compliance,

Qualifications:

* The candidate must have thorough knowledge of local legislation, regulatory &
statutory matters as well as intamational practicas as they relata to the Trust
Industry;

He/She should possess the Intemational Diploma Anti Money Laundering and
Compliance, bachelors degree; and

Minimum of 3-5 years working experience in the trust field. Preference will be
given to professionals with working experience for a Swiss Bank or Trust

Excellent organizational, communication and computer skills
Positive attitude and outlook

Problem-solving skills

Commitment to quality and service excellence

Ability to pariner with team members.



Responsibilities:
Ensure compliance of the Trust with local, intemational and internal group
regulations and standards in order to limit legal, requiatory and reputation risk
Ad-hoc research and analysis of compliance issues
Maintain a proper framework of internal control activities
Produce periodical reporting for the Audit Committee and Board of Directors
Liaise with Head Office and Bahamian regulators as applicable
Will report directly to the CEO,

Interested persons with such qualifications should submit their resume/curriculum
vitae to:

Human Resources Manager

BS! Trust Corporation (Bahamas) Limited

Bayside Executive Park

P.O, Box CB-10976

Nassau, Bahamas

Fax no. (242) 502-2310 or email: ruby.kerra@bsibank.com

(ABSOLUTELY NO PHONE CALLS PLEASE)
Only applicants having the above attributes will be contacted,



PAGE 4B, THURSDAY, MAY 14, 2009

THE TRIBUNE



FROM page two

reports/filings for at least
three to five years prior to
his or her appointment.

DIRECTOR’S
LEGAL DUTIES
Directors act as a fiducia-
ries for the shareholders of a
company and are custodians
of its assets. Therefore, cer-
tain legal and statutory
duties are imposed on them.
These are:

A DUTY TO ACTIN
GOOD FAITH

Avoidance of conflicts of
interest

Act for a company
on firm directions

Duty to manage the com-
pany

Duty to treat different
classes of shareholders fairly

Since Directors are gener-
ally responsible for the man-
agement, they may exercise
all the powers of the compa-
ny. However, directors do
not have unlimited powers
to run a company on behalf
of shareholders.

They can only exercise

MEDICAL SALES
REPRESENTATIVE

Brometing international pharmaceutical brands to the
RealiTAcare COMMUNITY in The Bahamas

Skills & Educational Requirements

Bachelor's degree in medical sciences, allied
health, or business administration
Effective communication and presentation

anes

Effective ime management, planning, and

organizing skills

Proficiency in a variety of computer apolications
SélF-motivated team player
Previous experience in pharmaceutical detailing

would be an asset

Candidates should possess a reliable motor vehicle, be

willing to travel to the Family islanes, the U5.,

other foreign countries

and

Please send application letter and resume by

May 27, 2009 to:

Medical Rep
P.O, Box N-7504
Nassau, Bahamas
Or Fax 393.0440

We thank all applicants for their interest, however,
only short-listed candidates will be contacted



MARK A. TURNQUEST

powers granted to them
either by general law or by
the Articles of Association
or Shareholders Agreement.

POWER AND
AUTHORITY

The ambit of a Director’s
authority may be restricted
by provisions of the Compa-
nies Act or International
Business Companies Act, the
Articles of Association (the
Articles of Association may
include provisions and
restrictions on borrowing by
the company) and the Share-
holders Agreement (where
applicable).

The Articles of Associa-
tion usually entitle the Board
of Directors to delegate pow-
ers to individual directors as
considered appropriate.
However, directors must act
collectively as a board to
bind the company.

Section 118 of the Compa-
nies Act 1992 allows a direc-
tor and his legal representa-
tive(s) to be indemnified by
the company against all
costs, charges and expenses
which may reasonably be
incurred by him in respect of
any civil, criminal or admin-
istrative action or proceed-
ing to which he is made a
party by reason of being - or
having been - a director of
that company.

Section 57 of the Interna-
tional Business Companies
Act 2000 allows a director
the same protection, subject
to any limitations in the com-
pany’s Memorandum or
Articles of Association, or in
any unanimous shareholder
agreement.

This statutory right to
indemnification is only per-
missible to directors and
their legal representatives for
both Companies Act compa-
nies and IBCs, provided such
directors acted honestly and
in good faith in the best
interests of the company.
They must also have had rea-
sonable grounds for believ-
ing that their conduct was
lawful in the case of a crimi-

& ASSOCIATE ORGANIZATIONS

PRESENT

NATIONAL SMALL BUSINESS ECONOMIC SUMMIT

Date:

Venue:

May 27st - June 4th, 2009, 6:00 pm — 9:00 pm
Holy Cross Anglican Church Auditorium, Soldier Road

Admission: Free (Business Owners are urged to attend the session on their industry)

Mission: To Formulate a Strategic Plan for SME Development

Attend and be a change agent for your industry

Thursday —May 21, 09

Session 1: Business Professional Services

ead
PROFESSIONAL SERVICES

Session 2 Medical Professional Senices

Monday =Kay 26, 09

TECHNICAL MOTHER SERVICES

Session 1: Techoical Services
Session? Olher Services

Tuesdays May 26,09

MANUFACTURING

Session 1: Manufacturing
Seasion 2: Fashion Design

Wednesday May 27, 09

MERCHANDISING

Session 1: Rated Merchandising
Session 2: Wholesale Merchandising

Thursday - May 28, 09

CONSTRUCTION

Session 1: Land! Building Developers
Session 2: Land / Buikding Consultants

Tuesday — June 2, 08

AGRICULTURE / FISHERIES

Session 1: Agricultura
Session 2: Fisheries

Wednesday —June 3, 09

TOURISM! HOSPITALITY

Session 1; Tourism
Session 2: Hospitality

Thursday —June 4, 09

Session 1; Government Banks & Depts
Session 2: Financal Institutions & NGOs

6:00 pen -7-30 pm
7:30 pm -9:00 pm

6:00 pen -7:30 pm
7:30 pen 2:00 pm

6:00 pm -7:30 pm
7:30 pm -2:00 pm

6:00 pm -7:30 pm
7:30 pen -feb0 pm

6:00 pm -7:30 pm
7:30 pm -fe00 pm

6:00 pm -?:30 pm
7:30 pen -So) pm

6:00 pm -7:20 pm
7:30 pm -$60) pm

GOVERNMENT | FINANCIAL INSTITUTIONS

6:00 pn -7-20 pm
7:30 pm $e) pm

A Representative from the Ministry of Finance will be making presentations on how
individual industries will be impacted by the Economic Partnership Agreement (E
Contact: Mark A. Turnquest
(242) 326-6748 / 427-3640
Email: markturnquest@consultant.com

iA RISO ewe rom en]

HOON ee PC he

nal or administrative action
or proceeding.

DIRECTOR’S AND
OFFICER’S LIABILITY
INSURANCE

Since directors and officers
may be personally liable to
any party that may have an
interest in the affairs of the
company for damages, legal
costs, and expenses in rela-
tion to a breach of director’s
duty, many of them seek the
protection of director’s and
officer’s liability insurance.

Directors and officers
insurance is designed to pro-
tect a director or officer
against claims that may be
made by a company, share-
holders or creditors.

Under Section 122 of the
Companies Act, a company
may purchase and maintain
insurance for the benefit of a
director against liability
incurred by him in his capac-
ity as a director of the com-
pany.

Section 58 of the IBC Act
also allows a company incor-
porated under that Act to
purchase and maintain insur-
ance for a director, regis-
tered agent, officer or liq-
uidator against liability
incurred in by such persons
acting in their capacity as
director, registered agent,
officer or liquidator.

Notwithstanding the pro-
visions and protections of
directors, and officers liabil-
ity insurance, it is important
that executive and non-exec-
utive directors ensure they
are properly and sufficiently
covered when agreeing to
accept and act in their capac-
ity as a company director.

Careful examination
should not only be made of
the coverage involved, but
the extent of such coverage
and the incidences and risks
that have been included and
excluded under such cover-
age.

Prospective and newly-
appointed directors would be
advised to seek independent
advice and a review of the
indemnification and insur-
ance coverage offered by
their companies, plus the
extent of their personal pro-
tection against claims,
actions,and proceedings
for litigious issues involving

the company.

Since directors and officers
cannot rely on the separate
legal personality of their
companies, as enunciated in

nification and insurance cov-
erage should be a primary
consideration in a director’s
exhaustive list of require-
ments from before deciding

Salomon v. Salomon, indem- to act as its director.

(c) 2009. Tyrone L. E. Fitzgerald. All rights reserved. NB:
The information contained in this article does not consti-
tute nor is it a substitute for legal advice. Persons reading this
article and/or column, generally, are encouraged to seek the
relevant legal advice and assistance regarding issues that
may affect them and may relate to the information present-
ed.
Tyrone L. E. Fitzgerald is an attorney with Fitzgerald &
Fitzgerald. Should you have any comments regarding this arti-
cle, you may contact Mr Fitzgerald at Suite 212, Lagoon
Court Building, Olde Towne Mall at Sandyport, West Bay St.,
P. O. Box CB-11173, Nassau, Bahamas or _ tyrone@tle-
fitzgeraldgroup.com.

IN THE MATTER OF THE LEGAL PROFESSION ACT, 1992
AND

IN THE MATTER OF A COMPLAINT AGAINST COUNSEL
AND ATTORNEY
BETWEEN

SOLOMON GUTSTEIN
Complainants
KENDALL KNOWLES

Respondent

NOTICE OF HEARING

TAKE NOTICE that the Disciplinary Tribunal shall

hear the subject Complaint on Wednesday the 20th day
of March, A.D., 2009 at 3:00 o’clock in the afternoon
before Her Ladyship The Honourable Mrs. Justice
Albury at 3rd Floor British American Building, George
Street, Nassau, The Bahamas.

AND FURTHER TAKE NOTICE that the Respondent,
Kendall Knowles, is required to produce to the Bahamas
Bar Council within seven (7) days from the date hereof,
an address to which the Decision may be sent by prepaid
Registered Post.

Dated the 14th day of May, A.D., 2009

Bahamas Bar Association
Elizabeth Avenue
Nassau, The Bahamas



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THE TRIBUNE

THURSDAY, MAY 14, 2009, PAGE 5B



FROM page one

Four Seasons Emerald Bay
Resort.

That deal, though, is also
understood to have gone
nowhere. Tribune Business
was informed that the
receivers questioned whether
Arden had the financial mus-
cle necessary to take the resort
forward, as it seemed to be
seeking joint venture partners
for its project.

Another potential bidder
involved the DeVos family,
the wealthy Amway Corpora-
tion founders who own the
Cape Eleuthera resort project.
But despite conducting due
diligence on the Four Seasons
Emerald Bay Resort, Tribune
Business can reveal that their
group declined to submit a for-
mal bid.

Mr Downs confirmed: “We
were under contract with one
party [the Silverton group],
and that unfortunately did not
reach the finish line. That
passed at the end of March.

“During April, we worked
to try and close with several
other parties. We’ve worked
with parties to try and close, in
a way that meant we would
not have to do what we’ve
done, but we’ve not been able
to do it with the speed we
wanted.”

As a result, Mr Downs said
he and fellow PwC receiver,
Clifford Johnson, had been
considering the Four Seasons
Emerald Bay Resort’s closure
as a “Plan B” option for “the
last couple of weeks.

Such a decision would also
have involved the Four Sea-
sons Emerald Bay Resort’s
main creditor, the London
office of Japanese insurer,
Mitsui, which insured the orig-
inal loan that financed the
Exuma property’s construc-
tion.

Mr Downs said Mitsui “had
to draw the line” on the sus-
tained heavy losses it was
incurring to keep the Four
Seasons Emerald Bay Resort
open.

“This receivership began in
2007. The expectation was that
it would be a relatively quick
transition,’ Mr Downs
explained. “Mitsui made it
clear the resort would be fully
funded, and they did until the
end of last year, when they
had to cut back with the mari-
na closure.”

While the Four Seasons
Emerald Bay Resort’s cost
base was “pretty much fixed”,
its net losses had been
increased by reduced revenues
as a result of the tourism fall-
off provoked by the global
recession.

“We probably lost in the
order of maybe somewhere
like $5 million last year, but
the losses this year and next
are possibly comparable to
that number as well,” the PwC
receiver added.

Describing the closure deci-
sion as “a difficult day for us”,
Mr Downs added: “We'll have
to try and make something
happen.”

Reviewing the so-far futile
search for a buyer, he said:
“The market outlook has just
got much worse, and we have
to think about ways to curtail
our losses. We’ve taken, with a
great deal of reluctance, and
ultimately, financial necessity,
the decision to close the resort,
although the great expectation
is that this will be for a tem-
porary basis.”

Emerald Bay:
5m yearly losses
sink 400-500 jobs

The last guest will leave the
Four Seasons Emerald Bay
Resort on May 26, 2009, with
staff redundancies beginning
the following day. Most of the
job losses will take place dur-
ing June, as different parts of
the resort are decommissioned
and stored for security.

“The staff are digesting the
announcement at the moment,
but with some strong leader-
ship from Four Seasons, we’ll
get through the next two
weeks,” Mr Downs added.

Tribune Business under-
stands that other businesses
on the Four Seasons Emerald
Bay property, such as the
resort’s John Bull store and
the Emerald Isles Shopping
Centre, have been given until
June 15, 2009, to leave. The
latter includes a Scotiabank
branch and businesses such as
Mail Boxes Etc.

As for why no buyer had
been found, Mr Downs said:
“We've done it at a very diffi-
cult time in the market. The
market moved against us at
some key points as well, and
made buyers quite jumpy in
terms of closing the deal. It
was a combination of factors,
quite frankly.”

He added that all potential
suitors still interested in
acquiring the Four Seasons
Emerald Bay Resort had been
informed of the closure deci-
sion, and the fact this might
give them the chance to
replace the Four Seasons
brand with a manager/opera-
tor of their own.

“We’ve hopefully passed the
bottom of the market, and
with a new manager hopefully
that will get us over the line,”
Mr Downs said. He acknowl-
edged that the price Mitsui
was seeking had been reduced,
but that it still expected to
conclude a transaction.

Sources have suggested to
Tribune Business that Mitsui
had dropped its price to as low
as $35-$50 million, after a suc-
cession of previous deals,
involving the likes of Ambrose
Holdings (UK) and Bahamas
resident Israeli commodities
dealer, Rami Weisfisch, had
fallen through. However, any
buyer will require another $50
million investment to upgrade
the Four Seasons Emerald
Bay to five-star status upon
taking possession.

The resort’s closure will
effectively leave the $100 mil-
lion Grand Isle Villas project,
which inhabits adjacent land,

on an island all by itself and
surrounded by a property that
will, if no buyer is found, quite
likely be to allowed to deteri-
orate.

Therefore, real estate val-
ues for not only Grand Isle
Villas, but all other property
owners at Emerald Bay, will
decline, and the ripple effect
will be widely felt by Exuma’s
real estate market.

One source, familiar with
the situation, yesterday blast-
ed the Government for allow-
ing the closure to happen.

Speaking on condition of
anonymity, they said the Gov-
ernment had failed to use the
leverage it possessed over Mit-
sui/PwC to compel them to
conclude a deal, arguing that
Prime Minister Hubert Ingra-
ham had adopted the position
that he could not interfere in a
private transaction.

Yet the source alleged that
the Government had strong
grounds for intervention, given
that the Four Seasons Emer-
ald Bay owed the Bahamas
Electricity Corporation (BEC)
an unpaid $3 million bill.

“How can the Government
allow this to happen,” the
source asked. “This act is
unconscionable. It sends a
very negative message to
investors in the Bahamas. It’s
time for the Government to
act.”

The impact for Exuma’s
own island economy is likely
to be disastrous, for it has
been re-tooled almost entirely
to support the Four Seasons
Emerald Bay Resort.

Apart from the direct loss
of hotel jobs, the amount of
money those people will have
to spend will also decline,
reducing profits and revenues
for other Exuma-based busi-
nesses. In turn, they will also
probably shed jobs, taking the
island’s economy, in the words
of one Bahamian born there,
“back to the 1980s”.

David Johnson, deputy direc-
tor-general in the Ministry of
Tourism with responsibility for
planning, investment and busi-
ness development, warned last
year that the Four Seasons
needed to become a sustainable,
profitable resort, and the
Bahamas could not afford for it
to fail.

He said then that factors such
as building costs being about 40
per cent higher per square foot
than they are in Nassau, had
retarded Emerald Bay’s growth
and kept it from reaching the

NOTICE

Anthony Hanna of No. 20 Prospero Apartment
#1, Prospero Drive Archer Forest, Freeport,

Grand Bahama is kindly asked to contact
the Bahamas Bar Association of Elizabeth
Avenue, P.O. Box N-4632, Nassau, Bahamas or
at Telephone numbers 326-3276, immediately.



ACANCY NOTIC

The Grand Bahama Power Company, Limited invites qualified applicants to apply for the
position of Technician | (Instrument), responsible for concucting calibrations, repairs, routine
checks and tests control instrumentation in #3 Generation Power Plant.

The successtul candidate is expected to lead instrament technicians in fault-finding,
troubleshooting and repairs, including analyses and calibration of all electronic and pneumatic

instrument and control systems,

Applicants must have a High School Diploma, BOCSE passes of C or better in Math, English
and a Technological Certificate in Electronics or its equivalent from an accredited institution.
Applicants must also have a minimum of five (3) years power station or equivalent industrial
experience or three (3) years at a Technician [I level in the Maintenance Department of an

industrial facility.

Applications with supporting documentation including a chan Police Certificate and proof of Bahamian
citizenship shoukl be sent to:

THE RECTOR OF HUNAN RESOURCES
CRAND BAHAMA POWER COMPANY, LIMIMED
eS ee tT
Freeport, Grand Bahama

Bahamas

ee ea

GRAND GAHAMA POWER COMPANY

Ye Se) ey

a i
met es i

Bahamas Law Enforcement
Co-operative Credit Union Ltd

development its owners had pre-
viously predicted.

Mr Johnson said of Emerald
Bay: “The property was con-
ceived to be a mixed-use pro-
ject, with 185 keys under the
Four Seasons brand. The vast
majority of the property was to
be for mixed-use, condos and
hundreds of lots sold for signif-
icant family homes.

“After four years of opera-
tion, they have developed very
little of the sold inventory.
There’s been a lot of trading of
the land by the owners, but the
cost of building is prohibitive.

“The buildings costs, the
numbers suggest, are in excess
of 40 per cent higher per square
foot to build.”

Costs to construct such prop-
erties in Nassau were $500 per
square foot, while in Exuma
the price was $800 per square
foot.

Mr Johnson also underlined
the impact the relatively high
building costs on Exuma, com-
pared to Nassau, were having
on Emerald Bay’s margins. He
pointed out that concrete there at
cost $200 per yard, whereas in
Nassau it cost $125 per yard.

“The hotel, with a golf course
and spa, as a 185-room resort of
Four Seasons’ calibre, can only
be profitable if it has a
much larger customer base out-
side those rooms,” Mr Johnson
said.

He added that the resort
needed to build out to 700-800
units to get close to profitability,
whereas it was currently closer
to 300-400 units.

NOTICE OF
ANNUAL GENERAL MEETING

THERE WILL NOT BE A SECOND
CALL AS PER THE CO-OPERATIVE
ACT 2005 SECTION 22

_ h ‘ : :
The 24" Annual General Meeting of the Bahamas
Law Enforcement Co-operative Credit Union Ltd will
be held on

Saturday, May 16", 2009

al

9:00 am

Paul H. Farquharson
Conference Centre
Police Headquarters

East Street

Refreshments will be provided















































Registering now for September, 2009

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TEL: (242) 364-7637

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NASSAU, BAHAMAS

LEASING
OPPORTUNITY

For Information, contact

W. Lory Roberts
T: 242.396.0026
roberts! bahomasrealty.bs

Donald Martinborough
T; 242.576,0028
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RENTABLE AREA: 14,710 - 16,287 SF (Divisible)

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THE TRIBUNE

THURSDAY, MAY 14, 2009, PAGE 7B

Retail sales dip
creates worries

m@ By MARTIN
CRUTSINGER
AP Economics Writer

WASHINGTON (AP) —
Retail sales fell in April for a
second straight month, dashing
hopes that consumer spending
was starting to revive and
would help end the recession.

Economists said families who
are worried about layoffs and
unpaid job furloughs are sav-
ing more and spending less,
delaying the start of a sustained
recovery.

The disappointing report
helped send stocks down on
Wall Street, where the Dow
Jones industrial average slid
184 points — more than 2 per-
cent. Other major indexes fell
even more sharply.

Retail sales fell 0.4 percent
last month, worse than the flat
performance many economists
had expected, the Commerce
Department reported Wednes-
day.

Retail sales had posted gains
in January and February after
falling for six straight months.
The gains had raised hopes that
the crucial consumer sector of
the economy might be stabiliz-
ing. But the setbacks in March
and April retail sales cast
doubts on that prospect.

“People are obviously still
very nervous and not spend-
ing,” said David Wyss, chief
economist at Standard & Poor’s
in New York. “The economy is
still in a recession, and I don’t
think we will hit bottom until
late summer or early fall.”

Analysts said the economy
should benefit in coming
months from the tax relief
included in the $787 billion
stimulus plan Congress passed
in February. But the extra $17 a
week that the average family
will receive won’t translate into
a major boost in spending.

Such modest relief is hardly
enough to negate the effects of
layoffs and employee furloughs,
shrunken retirement accounts

and home equity, and con-
sumers struggling to boost sav-
ings because of fears about the
future.

Mary Goodman has stopped
most of her extraneous spend-
ing — like meals out. She
reined in her spending habits
after March 1, when she was
laid off from her job as an office
manager at an online job post-
ing company in Milwaukee.

Now the 60-year-old Good-
man eats out just once a week
with a former co-worker, a trip
that included soup at an indoor
market on Wednesday after-
noon.

“Pm not doing any clothes
shopping,” she said. “I’m not
tempting myself by going into
the mall.”

Improvement

Anecdotal evidence had sig-
naled some improvement in
sales in recent weeks. But “to
offset the plunge in wealth, the
household saving rate still
needs to double from the cur-
rent rate of 4 percent,” Paul
Dales, U.S. economist with
Capital Economics in Toronto,
wrote in a research note.

“With falling employment
hitting incomes, this can only
be achieved by a further
retrenchment in spending.”

The savings rate, which was
hovering around zero a year
ago, has climbed to just above 4
percent. Many economists think
it will hit 6 percent or more this
year as workers anxious about
layoffs and depleted invest-
ments put away their credit
cards. The jobless rate rose to a
25-year high of 8.9 percent in
April, with a net total of
539,000 jobs lost during the
month.

The fall in retail sales in April
came even though car sales
posted a 0.2 percent increase.
Excluding autos, the drop in
retail sales would have been 0.5
percent — much worse than the
0.2 percent gain economists had

expected.

Sales other than autos
showed widespread weakness
last month. Demand at depart-
ment stores and general mer-
chandise stores fell 0.1 percent.
Sales at specialty clothing stores
dropped 0.5 percent.

Sales also fell in April at fur-
niture stores, electronic and
appliance stores, food and bev-
erage stores and gasoline sta-
tions, the Commerce Depart-
ment said.

The sales drop at department
stores and specialty clothing
stores came as a surprise since
the nation’s big chain stores had
reported better-than-expected
results for April. Same-store
sales rose 0.7 percent last
month compared with April
2008. It was the first overall
increase in six months, accord-
ing to the tally by Goldman
Sachs and the International
Council of Shopping Centers.

The two reports aren’t com-
parable, analysts noted.

The government figures, for
example, cover more stores and
are adjusted for seasonal varia-
tions.

Analysts said one reason the
consensus forecast may have
been too optimistic is that with
many stores closing, it’s been
difficult to estimate industry
figures accurately.

Department store operator
Macy’s Inc. on Wednesday
reported a wider loss for the
first quarter, due partly to
restructuring charges. Still, the
company expects to see an
improvement in sales from its
localization efforts beginning
in the fourth quarter of 2009,
and in the spring of 2010.

Liz Claiborne Inc. also
reported a first-quarter loss that
was worse than Wall Street
expected. The apparel maker
said its quarterly loss swelled
on restructuring charges and a
drop in same-store sales stem-
ming from lower consumer
spending and an extra week of
sales in the year-ago period.

Ministry of Public Works and Transport

PUBLIC NOTICE

TENDER FOR EXTERNAL PAINTING OF GOVERNMENT
BUILDINGS SITUATED AT BANK LANE NASSAU, THE BAHAMAS

The Government of The Bahamas, through the Ministry of Works and Transport,
is inviting Tenders from painting contractors to carry out external painting to the
House of Assembly, Senate Building, Hansard Building, courts #1-5 Building,
Courts # 6-8 Building and the Nassau Public Library situated at Shirley Street and
Bank Lane.

Schedule for Tender Opening

Companies interested in tendering may contact the Building Survey Section at
the Ministry of Public Works and Transport, (302-9502) for further information and
arrangement of site visit.

All tender bids should include the following:

* Complete Tender Document
* Copy of current Business License
¢ National Insurance Board letter of good standing

Tender Documents may be collected as of May 15th, 2009 from Ministry of Public
Works Building Survey Section.

Tenders must be submitted in sealed envelopes marked “Tender for External
Painting to the House of Assembly, Senate Building, Hansard Building, Courts
# 1-5 Building, Courts #6-8 Building and the Nassau Public Library, situated at
Shirley Street and Bank Lane, Nassau Bahamas” and delivered to:

Chairman
Tenders Board
Ministry of Finance
3rd Floor Reception Desk
Cecil Wallace-Whitfield Centre
P.O. Box N-3017, Cable Beach, West Bay Street
Nassau, The Bahamas
All Tenders must be received at the above address on or before
10:00 am Tuesday, 2nd June 2009.

All persons who submit bids are invited to attend the opening of Tenders at the
Ministry of Finance, 3rd Floor, Cecil Wallace-Whitfield Centre, Cable Beach, West
Bay Street, Nassau, The Bahamas at 10:00 am, on Tuesday, 2nd. June, 2009

The Ministry of Public Works and Transport reserves the right to reject any or all
Tenders.





PAGE 8B, THURSDAY, MAY 14, 2009

THE TRIBUNE



Courier firms enjoy second reprieve

FROM page one

working to empower small
businesses, but instead, he sug-
gested these new regulations
could cause some closures.

The new regulations, which
the Government believes will
help it capture millions of dol-
lars it was missing in revenues,
were scheduled to come into
effect last month. Protests
from owners of couriers ser-
vices caused the Customs
Department to move the
arrangement to the middle of
this month.

Mr Mackey said couriers
had previously asked for one
to two months to get their

businesses in order to seam-
lessly adapt to the changes.

“To abruptly change it [the
procedures] because a new
comptroller has been appoint-
ed is unfair,” he said.

Mr Mackey said the Govy-
ernment needs their services
as much as they need the Gov-
ernment to “respect” their
industry as one that brings in
millions of dollars per annum.

“We want to be respected
as an industry partner,” said

Mr Mackey.

He argued that the bonds
imposed on smaller courier
companies will render them
uncompetitive with larger
firms such as FedEx and UPS,
who can afford to post larger
bonds in order to clear the
items they import.

Though the BTLA won an
extension in the clearance pro-
cedure implementation, Mr
Mackey said they realised that
the Government is not willing

to offer them many conces-
sions to help manoevere
through the process when it is
in place.

He suggested that the
BTLA now have discussions
with the Customs Department
regarding procedures, in order
to figure out what is best for
each entity.

Mr Gomez recently told
Tribune Business that the pro-
cedures being amended by
Customs will capture millions






















OFFICE SPACE AVAILABLE
FOR RENT

3 Medical or dental office spaces in the
Cable Beach Area from July 2009

For further details please contact 376-7777
oT ANeT-T am male ee
10a.m. - 5p.m. Monday to Friday

NOTICE

NOTICE is hereby given that_LONA DUMOND HONORAT of #78
MARLEY DRIVE, FREEPORT, GRAND BAHAMA is applying
to the Minister responsible for Nationality and Citizenship,
for registration/naturalization as a citizen of The Bahamas,
and that any person who knows any reason why registration/
naturalization should not be granted, should send a written and
signed statement of the facts within twenty-eight days from the
14TH day of MAY, 2009 to the Minister responsible for Nationality

Bahamas Humane Society

wishes to inform the general public that
there will be NO Clinic on Saturday
16th May due to our Animal Fun Day.
We will have a late clinic
3pm-8pm on Friday 15th.

amr a ele

NOTICE

NOTICE is hereby given that ELIE RONY ETIENNE
of AUGUSTA STREET is applying to the Minister
responsible for Nationality and Citizenship, for registration/
naturalization as a citizen of The Bahamas, and that
any person who knows any reason why registration/
naturalization should not be granted, should send
a written and signed statement of the facts within
twenty-eight days from the 14" day of May, 2009 to the

of dollars in government rev-
enue lost since the early 1990s.
The new procedures will
also align the Bahamas’ stan-
dards with those of other
countries in the region who
export goods into the
Bahamas and who received
goods originating here.
Under the present system,
courier companies were
allowed to use the baggage
declaration form - the same
one as filled out by returning
residents - to clear goods and
other shipments. This enabled
them to lump together differ-
ent items that attracted the
same rate of duty, declaring
their quantity to Customs.
Customs now wants courier
firms to go back to using the
‘long forms’, which require all
imports to be broken down
into individual items.
Zhivargo Laing, minister of
state for finance, previously
told Tribune Business that the
present system - which
allowed courier companies
and other brokers to use the
baggage declaration form - the
same one as filled out by
returning residents - to clear
goods and other shipments
often meant that the appro-
priate duty rates were not

applied to every item, thus
costing the Government
much-needed revenue.

“The problem with the bag-
gage declaration form is that it
can cause, from the Customs
point of view, to not necessar-
ily have the appropriate rates
applied to items, because it
does not have the same level
of reporting that is required
under the long form for entry
declarations,” Mr Laing told
Tribune Business.

“It would clearly not have
the same level of specificity
and transparency required for
optimum Customs purposes.
The Government is not get-
ting the benefit of the proper
duty rate being applied,
because the specifics of the
item are not declared.”

As previously revealed by
Tribune Business, the Cus-
toms Department is propos-
ing that courier companies
with overnight deliveries, and
brokers wanting to clear ship-
ments, such as perishables, on
the same day, can clear these
imports immediately and then
come back to deal with the
entry declarations within 10
days - provided they lodge a
bond with the revenue collec-
tion agency.

FOR RENT

Minister responsible for nationality and Citizenship, P.O. Box
N-7147, Nassau, Bahamas.

ENERGY SAVING
CONSULTANTS Bf

Cut Your Electic
Up To 40%

* Tankless Water co

* Compact Fluorescent Bulbs

* Energy Saving Capacitors for
Motors, A/C, Pumps etc.

* Fridgi-tech oil additive to increase A/C
efficiency

and Citizenship, P.O.Box N-7147, Freeport, Bahamas.

NOTICE

The Department of Statistics will carry out its
Annual Household survey during the period of
May. Enumerators with offical identification cards
from the Department of Statistics will visit selected
household in New Providence, Grand Bahama,
Exuma and Long Island and will be calling upon
residents to complete the questionnaires honestly
and accurately. The information obtained will be
handled in the strictest confidence and will be used
to maintain essential statical data on our country.”

For more information or survey
Email: energysavingsconsultants @hotmail.com

Contact 326-6121 Qiieouesercir

Airborne Freight
& Cargo Services

Customs Air Freight Building, “48
Massau, Ralhamas

Phome: 242.437 7.0450/2

Pax: 242.35 7 7.0 S 1

242. 470-3038;

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Adnbomne's Rate perib & Fax: 205.685 85-14
Cell: 954.494.2203

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BAHAMAS FINANCIAL CENTRE

NASSAU, BAHAMAS

TOTAL RENTABLE AREA: 2,278 SI
SUBLEASE
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PREMISES: Thad Flexor

June 30, SOO? or sooner

AVAILABILITY:
TERM: Through December 30, 2011.

For information, contact:
Long tenn extension possible.

W. Larry Roberts
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CBRE

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$50 discount per month towards utilities, serious

enquires only please, 393-4326

NOTICE

NOTICE is hereby given that VERVENIK ELIZABETH RIGBY
MCKENZIE of UNION VILLAGE, NASSAU, BAHAMAS
is applying to the Minister responsible for Nationality and
Citizenship, for registration/naturalization as a citizen of The
Bahamas, and that any person who knows any reason why
registration/ naturalization should not be granted, should send a
written and signed statement of the facts within twenty-eight days
from the 7TH day of MAY, 2009 to the Minister responsible for
Nationality and Citizenship, PO.BoxN-7147, Freeport, Bahamas.

MEDICAL SUPPLIES
LIQUIDATION SALE

Combine Pad Abdominal Pad 5*9 inch
400/case $150.00
Dental Cotton Rolls Medium
20,000/case $60.00
XL Gloves Latex Powered
1000/case $40.00
Large Gloves latex (Powder Free)
1000/case $40.00
Large Gloves Vinyl (Latex Free)
1000/case $35.00
Insulin Syringe 100U/ml
3600/case $175.00
Nebulizer Mask Kit Adult 20/ml,
Child 6ml, Chamber

100/case $130.00
Needle Holders
1200/case $70.00
Nasal Cannula Adult
100/case $60.00
Oxygen Mask Adult Large
100/case $75.00
IML Syringe with 25G Needle
2400/case $100.00
3ML Syringe with 23G Needle
1500/case $100.00
SML Syringe with 21G Needle and 23G Needle
1200/case $100.00
10ML Syringe with 21G Needle
1200/case $100.00
Specimen Cups 40z Sterile
100/case $25.00
Sterile Surgical Gloves size 7 1/2, 8, 8 1/2,
600/case $55.00
Hypoallergenic Cloth Tape (Microspore Tape}

1 inch, 216/case

2 inch 108/case $100.00

Cash and Carry or Free Delivery Call
422-1457 - Ms. Miller





THE TRIBUNE

THURSDAY, MAY 14, 2009, PAGE 9B



City Markets

Minister ‘disappointed’ Emerald
Bay closing despite buyer interest



THE ANITQUITIES, MONUMENTS
and MUSEUM CORPORATION

to close store

FROM page one

“There is one other store
that was under watch, and
which had a gross profit mar-
gin of 11 per cent, and we
started a programme of stock
control,” Mr Chatrani
revealed.

“That gross profit margin
went from ranking tenth or
eleventh in terms of stores to
ranking sixth or seventh in
terms of stores. We’ve had
major lay-offs for fraud at a
senior level at that store, and
had significant improvements
since then.”

Mr Chatrani added that City
Markets had been overstaffed,
and its employee numbers had
been reduced from more than
850 in February 2008 to 700
without anyone’s employment
being severed.

“They’ve either left of their
own accord, and we’ve taken a
zero tolerance approach to

fraud, or suspected fraud.”

Mr Chatrani said that
Bahamas Supermarkets had
estimated it had lost market
share as a result of its finan-
cial woes in 2007-2008, its
share of the Bahamian pro-
duce market falling from 21.4
per cent in 2007 to 20.6 per
cent in 2008.

He acknowledged that there
was a perception among some
Bahamian consumers that the
company’s products were
over-priced and expensive in
relation to competitors’, but
the chain was targeting being
the least expensive for so-
called ‘breadbasket’ items.

Mr Chatrani also acknowl-
edged that the replacement of
former Winn-Dixie ‘own
brand’ products had not been
handled well, with Bahamian
consumers left confused over
their introduction as it had
not been dealt with through a
marketing campaign.

FROM page one

putting forward three names,
Mr Vanderpool-Wallace said:
“There was more than that.

“The level of interest in the
property was very high. I was
assured that it was easily multi-
ples of 10. It wasn’t a few. It’s a
gem of a property.”

The Minister added: “In this
business environment, you have
a whole variety of options peo-
ple are taking. That property is
a jewel in the crown of Bahami-
an tourism, and we hope it
remains open.

“That was the prime devel-
opment on Exuma, and brought
a high quality to the Exuma
brand. The size of the property,
the brand name of the property,
the assets and amenities, were
important to other people. We
hope for the shortest possible
interruption, and that the prop-
erty gets open as quickly as pos-
sible.”

The Four Seasons Emerald
Bay Resort has 500 staff, 83
managers and 442 line staff, 26

of whom are expatriates. Its clo-
sure has been decided by Japanese
insurer, Mitsui, the resort’s main
creditor, who placed it into
receivership under Pricewater-
houseCoopers (PwC) in June
2007.

The Government said yester-
day: “During the past 14
months, the receivers signed let-
ters of intent with one party and
entered into formal contract
with two other parties; none
with success.”

The Four Seasons Emerald
Bay Resort has acted as Exu-
ma’s main economic engine,
attracting additional foreign
direct investment to the island.
It employs almost 500 staff, and
features an 18-hole Greg Nor-
man Golf Course, two restau-
rants, three pools, spa, six meet-
ing rooms and 450-person
capacity ballroom.

A shopping complex has also
opened at Emerald Bay, the
anchor retailer being the Emer-
ald Isle supermarket. The com-
plex also includes businesses
such as Scotiabank and Mail
Boxes Etc.

The following vehicles are offered For Sale:-





1996 ISUZU BIG HORN
1995 ISUZU TROOPER
1986 SUBURBAU

1995 OR 1996 ISUZU BIG HORN

These vehicles can be viewed by contacting
Ms. Alcia Oxley at the Antiquities, Monuments
and Museum Corporation between the hours
of 8:00 and 4:00pm. Monday through Friday
at telephone number 326-2566 or 323-1925,
extension: 2128. Tenders may include bids for
the vehicle as viewed or for parts of the same.

















Sealed tenders are to be submitted no later
than 5 :00pm 22nd May 2009 and addressed to:









Tender For Vehicles





Director

Antiquities, Monuments and Museum Corporation.
Nassau, Bahamas







The Director reserves the right to reject any or all tenders.






NOTICE

NOTICE is hereby given that JEAN PIERRE JEFFREY of
KEY WEST STREET, NASSAU, BAHAMAS is applying to
the Minister responsible for Nationality and Citizenship, for
registration/naturalization as a citizen of The Bahamas, and
that any person who knows any reason why registration/
naturalization should not be granted, should send a written and
signed statement of the facts within twenty-eight days from the
7TH day of MAY, 2009 to the Minister responsible for Nationality
and Citizenship, P.O.Box N-7147, Freeport, Bahamas.

NOTICE

NOTICE is hereby given that HELTEN JACQUELI of BOWE
AVENUE, off MONTEL HEIGHTS, P.O.Box N-3331 is
applying to the Minister responsible for Nationality and
Citizenship, for registration/naturalization as a citizen of The
Bahamas, and that any person who knows any reason why
registration/naturalization should not be granted, should
send a written and signed statement of the facts within
twenty-eight days from the 14 day of May, 2009 to the
Minister responsible for nationality and Citizenship, P.O. Box
N-7147, Nassau, Bahamas.

Camperdown Riding Club
Prowvdly presents a
One Day Jumper Show

Sunday, May 77" 2009
9:00 am. — 3500 pont.
Concessian StendsHanbunpers | Hoddogs ! Pizza / Seams

Piease come out and support ws!

Adnssian is FREE!

Prove: 324-2065

ESSAY COMPETITION

TENTH ANNUAL PUBLIC SERVICE WEEK

The Department of Public Service will host an Essay
Competition as one of the activities for the Tenth Annual
Public Service Week. The Competition is open to Junior
and Senior Students in New Providence.

Additionally, this year, a speech competition will be
for schools in the Northern & Southern Bahamas,
respectively. Students interested in participating in the
Essay Competition should write a 250 - 300 words (Junior
High), and 450 - 500 words (Senior High), essay on the
topic: “ The Public Service-Striving for Excellence in
Customer Service.”

The deadlines for entries, which should be referred
to the attention of Mrs. Antoinette Thompson, Deputy
Permanent Secretary, Department of Public Service, is
Friday 24th July, 2009.

A Dell Desktop 2400 Computer System will be awarded to
the winner each category. The first runners-up for both the
Essay and Speech Competition in the Junior & Senior High
School category, will be awarded a $500 gift certificate.

The winners will be announced during the Tenth Annual
Public Service Week Awards Ceremony scheduled for
Saturday 10th October 2009.

Students interested in the Speech Competition for the
Northern and Southern Bahamas should contact their
Language Arts Teacher.

LEGAL NOTICE

NOTICE

INTERNATIONAL BUSINESS COMPANIES ACT
(No.45 of 2000)

In Voluntary Liquidation

Notice is hereby given in accordance with Section 138 (4) of
the International Business Companies Act, (No.45 of 2000),
CAPITAL HOTELS (ASIA PACIFIC) LIMITED is in dis-
solution. Alrena Moxey is the Liquidator and can be contacted
at The Winterbotham Trust Company Limited, Winter-
botham Place, Marlborough & Queen Streets, Nassau
Bahamas. All persons having claims against the above-named
company are required to send their names addresses and par-
ticulars of their debts or claims to the Liquidator before the
12th June, 2009.

NOTICE OF SALE

Rawson Court Condominium Owners Association
Pursuant to Section 71
Law of Property 4& Conveyancing (Condominium) Act
Invite tenders for the following:
1) Unit G03 Rawson Court, Cable Beach
3 Bedrooms, 3 1/2 Bathrooms
- Living Area 1,937 sq. feet
2) Unit GOS Rawson Court, Cable Beach
3 Bedrooms, 3 Bathrooms

- Living Area 2,295 aq. feet

Interested person should immediately
submit tenders to

The Manager,

P.O. Box N-1953
Nassau, Bahamas

RRO) ATL a:

Software Trainer

Are you an energetic Motivator,
an Excellent communicator with a passion
to work with a professional ‘Team?

lf we've piqued your interest, Let's Talk!

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Please submit your application by Mail pox
Director of Human Resources, The Plus Group
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or eMail: jobsttheplusgrp.com

We thank all applicant, however only chose
actected boar an imeery jew Ve ill be concacted,

Director Antiquities, Monuments and
Museum Corporation

COMMONWEALTH OF THE BAHAMAS 2008
IN THE SUPREME COURT CLE/qui/No.01550

Common Law and Equity Division

IN THE MATTER of The Quicting
Titles Act, 1959

AND

IN THE MATTER of ALL THAT piece
arcel or tract of land situate near Red
a m the vicmity of Baker’s Creek and
Loggerhead Point on the Island of Abaco
one of the Islands of the Commonwealth
of The Bahamas comprising Four and
Seven Thousandths (4.007) acres (bein
Grant pe 37 to James E. Weatherford
which said piece parcel or tract of land is
bounded on the NORTH by vacant Crown
Land and running thereon Six Hundred
and ‘Twenty-three and Seventy-three
Hundredths (623.73) Feet on the EAST
partly by land granted to L.B. Johnson
and partly by a Road Reservation and
running thereon One Hundred and Sixty-
four (164) Feet on the SOUTH by land
ranted to W. H. Weatherford and now
fe property of Dudley Higgs and runnin.
thereon Sixx Hundred and Fifty-nine an
‘Twelve Hundredths (659.12) Feet and on
the WEST by land originally granted to the
Estate of the late Henry A. Fisher but now
the property of Dudley Higgs and runnin:
hoe Pace a Ten and cae

eight Hundredths (410.68) feet.
AND

IN THE MATTER of the Petition of
Dudley Dean Higgs and Suzette Miranda
Higgs

NOTICE

THE PETITION OF Dudley Dean Higgs and Suzette
Miranda Higgs in respect of:-

“IN THEMATTERof ALLTHAT picce
arcel or tract of land situate near Red
bane m the vicmity of Baker’s Creek and
Loggerhead Point on the Island of Abaco
one of the Islands of the Commonwealth
of The Bahamas comprising Four and
Seven Thousandths (4.007) acres (bein
Grant Aes 37 to James E. Weatherford)
which said piece parcel or tract of land is
bounded.on the NORTH by vacant Crown
Land and running thereon Six Hundred
and Twenty-three and Seventy-three
Hundredths (623.73) Feet on the EAST
partly by land granted to L.B. Johnson
and partly by a Road Reservation and
running thereon One Hundred and Sixty-
four (164) Feet on the SOUTH by land
ranted to W. H. Weatherford and now
the property of Dudley Higgs and runnin:
thereon Sixx Hundred and Fifty-nine an
‘Twelve Hundredths (659.12) Feet and on
the WEST by land originally granted to the
Estate of the late Henry A. Fisher but now
the property of Dudley Higgs and runnin:
delete roa ane Ten and oe

eight Hundredths (410.68) feet.”

Dudley Dean Higgs and Suzette Miranda Higgs claim to be the
owners of the unmcumbered fee simple estate m possession of
the said land and have made application to the Supreme Court of
the Commonwealth of The Ba under Section Three CO of
the Quieting Titles Act, 1959 to have their title to the said land
mvestigated and the nature and extent thereof determmed and
declared in a Certificate of Title to be granted by the Court in
accordance with the provisions of the said Act.

Copies of the Amended Petition and the Amended Plan of the

said land may be mspected during normal office hours in the

following places:

1. The Registry of the Supreme Court, East Street North in the
City of Nassau, Bahamas; and

2. The Chambers of Lockhart & Munroe, #35 Buen Retiro
Road, off Shirley Street, Nassau, Bahamas.

NOTICE is hereby given that any person having dower or right
to dower or an Adverse Claim or a claim not recognized im the
Amended Petition shall on or before the expiration of Thirty
30) days after the final publication of these presents, file in the

upreme Court and serve on the Petitioners or the undersigned
a Statement of his claim in the prescribed form verified by an

affidavit to be filed therewith.
Failure of any such person to file and serve a Statement of his
Claim on or before the expiration of Thirty (30) days after the final
publication of these presents will operate as bar to such claim.
LOCKHART & MUNROE
Chambers
#35 Buen Retiro Road
Off Shirley Street
Nassau, Bahamas

Attorneys for the Petitioners



PAGE 10B, THURSDAY, MAY 14, 2009

THE TRIBUNE



erm ee S ne e e
Investors ‘commit’ to City Meat financing

FROM page one

ing were a thing of the past.
However, both sides wanted
to secure their interests as best
as possible. Royal Bank want-
ed the new capital to be inject-
ed in one go, rather than in
“dribs and drabs” as had hap-
pened in the past. Over the
past year, some $10 million
has been injected into
Bahamas Supermarkets and
BSL Holdings, in tranches of



$5 million, $3 million and $2
million.

For its part, BSL Holdings
wants to make sure that the
terms agreed with the bank
are as favourable as possible,
so they get “the best bang for
their dollar”.

“We almost feel like we’re

Legal Notice

NOTICE

INTERNATIONAL BUSINESS COMPANIES ACT
(No.45 of 2000)

TECH STREAM
INVESTMENT LIMITED

Notice is hereby given that in accordance with Section
137 (4) of the International Business Companies Act No.
45 of 2000, TECH STREAM INVESTMENTS LIMITED
has been dissolved and struck off the Register according
to the Certificate of Dissolution issued by the Registrar
General on the 20th day of April, 2009.

Michael Charles Russell
Waterloo House
Don Street
St. Helier, Jersey
Liquidator



Legal Notice

NOTICE

INTERNATIONAL BUSINESS COMPANIES ACT
(No.45 of 2000)
ALPHA MAIMA GROUP LTD.

In Voluntary liquidation

“Notice is hereby given that in accordance with Section
137 (4) of the International Business Companies Act
(No. 45 of 2000). ALPHA MAIMA GROUP LTD. is in

Dissolution.”

The date of commencement of dissolution is the 22nd

day of October, 2007.

Ziedonis Udris
Law Office Skudra & Udris
13/3 Marijas iela, Riga
Latvia
Liquidator

Legal Notice

NOTICE
GENERAL GROUP

HOLDINGS LTD

(In Voluntary Liquidation)

Notice is hereby given that the above-named
Company is in dissolution, which commenced
on the 7th day of May 2009. The Liquidator is
Argosa Corp. Inc., P.O. Box N-7757 Nassau,

Bahamas.

ARGOSA CORP. INC.
(Liquidator)

ROYAL = FIDELITY

Money at Work

sitting here twiddling our
thumbs, waiting for the funds,”
Mr Chatrani said. Completion
of the fiscal 2008 audit also
depends on the receipt of the
new equity capital, as exter-
nal auditors KPMG want to
see this before issuing an audit
opinion absent a ‘going con-
cern’ qualification.

The City Markets chief
executive explained that a
large portion of the new fund-
ing would be used to re-start
the supermarket chain’s
import programme, which in
turn would enhance gross
profits and margins, and pro-
vide Bahamian consumers
with an expanded, sought-after
product range on a consistent
basis.

“We probably support the
Bahamian wholesale, distribu-
tion association more than
anyone else,” Mr Chatrani
told Tribune Business. “Due
to tight cash flow, our imports
[of food products] have been
restricted.

“But we’re planning to
relaunch the company. It’s sta-
ble, money is coming in and
we’re going back to direct
import programmes. That
gives us better margins and
better pricing.”

City Markets’ financial woes
during its 2007 and 2008 finan-
cial years, and the fiscal 2009



first half, have left it strapped
for cash flow/liquidity, forcing
the supermarket chain to
increasingly rely on Bahamas-
based wholesalers for the bulk
of its supplies because it was
unable to tie-up large chunks
of cash in imports.

Mr Chatrani told Tribune
Business that Bahamas Super-
markets currently sources
“less than 10 per cent” of its
product inventory from
abroad “because we were fix-
ing the business”. Once the
financing comes in, this will
increase to 20 per cent of the
product mix.

“The funds coming in have
been specifically allocated for
the overseas import pro-
gramme,” he explained.
“Improving direct imports will
be the springboard for us at
this stage.

“We get these products, but
they’re not always available.
Sales will start to expand,
gross profits and margins will
increase, and costs are man-
aged. We can grow by direct
imports.”

Praising Bahamian whole-
salers and other vendors for
their “fantastic” support dur-
ing, Mr Chatrani said their
limited warehouse storage
space had impacted the con-
sistent availability, and vari-
ety, of high-end products such

Legal Notice

NOTICE
ORRSTOWN

INVESTMENT PTE. LTD.

(In Voluntary Liquidation)

Notice is hereby given that the above-named
Company is in dissolution, which commenced
on the 29th day of April 2009. The Liquidator is
Argosa Corp. Inc., P.O. Box N-7757 Nassau,

Bahamas.

ARGOSA CORP. INC.
(Liquidator)

Legal Notice

NOTICE
VINOPOLIS HOLDINGS LTD.

(In Voluntary Liquidation)

Notice is hereby given that the above-named
Company is in dissolution, which commenced
on the 27th day of April 2009. The Liquidator is
Argosa Corp. Inc., P.O. Box N-7757 Nassau,

Bahamas.

ARGOSA CORP. INC.
(Liquidator)

GY

cr A LL”

BISX LISTED & TRADED SECURITIES AS OF:

FG CAPITAL MARKETS

BEORERAGE & ADVISORY SERVICES

as the gourmet category. With
direct imports, some 2,900
SKUs (stock keeping units)
will “get back to us on the
shelves consistently”.

The City Markets chief
executive said the company’s
sales were likely to decline to
between $120-$125 million for
the 2009 fiscal year to end-
June 2009, due to a combina-
tion of the economic recession
and the company’s own inter-
nal issues.

While this represented a
decline of between 13.2-17 per
cent compared to the top-line
figure for 2008, Mr Chatrani
said that Bahamas Supermar-
kets had largely bought the
increased business that year
through deep discounts, which
left the company selling prod-
uct at a loss.

As a result, gross profit mar-
gins for that year fell to 17.8
per cent. Mr Chatrani said
these had recovered to 25.4
per cent within the past quar-
ter, and the company was
looking to get back to histori-
cal margins of 28 per cent plus
as soon as possible.

He added that managemen-
t’s projections were that
Bahamas Supermarkets would
again “break even” by the last
month of fiscal 2009, which is

June, and return to profitabil-
ity by July - the first month of
fiscal 2010. Everything,
though, hinged on the receipt
of the new capital, as the com-
pany had gone as far as it
could be taken in the current
circumstances.

Despite the $13.429 million
loss incurred in fiscal 2008, Mr
Chatrani expressed confidence
that City Markets would
return to the position it had
attained prior to BSL Hold-
ings’ $54 million purchase of
Winn-Dixie’s 78 per cent stake
in 2006, when it was churning
out consistent $8 million per
annum net profits.

“We can get back to where
we were before, but it will take
us two to three years to get to
that level,” he added.

Mr Chatrani said he and Ms
Rahming had already realised
$5.3 million in annualised cost
savings from the business, not
one-off items, through reduc-
ing costs tied-up in the likes
of shipping and cleaning con-
tracts.

Bahamas Supermarkets was
also saving money from having
imported produce shipped
directly to its three Grand
Bahama-based stores, rather
than to Nassau first, then to
Freeport.



NOTICE

NOTICE is hereby given that DARRELL SIMILIAN of
HARBOUR WEST, EIGHT MILE ROCK, FREEPORT, GRAND
BAHAMA is applying to the Minister responsible for Nationality
and Citizenship, for registration/naturalization as a citizen of
The Bahamas, and that any person who knows any reason why
registration/ naturalization should not be granted, should send a
written and signed statement of the facts within twenty-eight days
from the 14TH day of MAY, 2009 to the Minister responsible for
Nationality and Citizenship, P.O.Box N-7147, Freeport, Bahamas.

Legal Notice

NOTICE
RHUBARBE LTD.

— —

Notice is hereby given that in accordance with Section 138

(8) of the International Business Companies Act 2000, the
dissolution of RHUBARBE LTD. has been completed; a

Certificate of Dissolution has been issued and the Com-

pany has therefore been struck off the Register.

ARGOSA CORP. INC.
(Liquidator)

Legal Notice

NOTICE
YENLEY VIEW

INVESTMENTS LTD

(In Voluntary Liquidation)

Notice is hereby given that the above-named
Company is in dissolution, which commenced
on the 27th day of April 2009. The Liquidator is
Argosa Corp. Inc., P.O. Box N-7757 Nassau,

Bahamas.

TUESDAY, 12 MAY 2009
BISX ALL SHARE INDEX: CLOSE 1,613.91 | CHG 0.15 | %CHG 0.01 | YTD -98.45 | YTD % -5.75
FINDEX: CLOSE 797.33 | YTD -4.50% | 2008 -12.31%
WWW .BISXBAHAMAS.COM | TELEPHONE: 242-323-2330 | FACSIMILE: 242-323-2320

52wk-Low Securit y Previous Close Today's Close Change Daily Vol. EPS $ Div $ P/E

1.28 Abaco Markets 1.40 1.40 0.127

11.00 Bahamas Property Fund 11.00 11.00 0.992

6.95 Bank of Bahamas 6.95 6.95 0.244
Benchmark -0.877
Bahamas Waste 0.078
Fidelity Bank 0.055
Cable Bahamas 1.406
Colina Holdings 0.249
Commonwealth Bank (S1) 0.419
Consolidated Water BDRs
Doctor's Hospital
Famguard
Finco
FirstCaribbean Bank
Focol (S)
Focol Class B Preference
Freeport Concrete
ICD Utilities
J. S. Johnsen 10.50 10.50
Premier Real Estate 10.00 10.00

BISX LISTED DEBT SECURITIES - (Bonds trade on a Percentage Pricing bases)
Security Symbol Last Sale Change Daily Vol.

Fidelity Bank Note 17 (Series A) + 0.00 T%
Fidelity Bank Note 22 (Series B) + 0.00 Prime + 1.75%
Fidelity Bank Note 13 (Series C) + 0.00 8 7%
Fidelity Bank Note 15 (Series D) +

ARGOSA CORP. INC.
(Liquidator)

0.63
3.15
1.95
11.09
2.83
6.17
1.31
1.70
6.02
11.00
10.35
5.00

0.63
3.15
2.37
11.75
2.83
6.17
2.50
1.85
7.76
11.00
10.40
5.14

0.63
3.15
2.37
11.75
2.83
6.17
3.38
1.70
7.76
11.00
10.40
5.14

0.111
0.240
0.420
0.322
0.794
0.332
0.000
0.035
0.407
0.952
0.180

Legal Notice

NOTICE
MISTY INVESTMENT

GROUP LTD.

(In Voluntary Liquidation)

99909999009900000
29299023%090900009
665560H56556550654

1.00 N/M
0.30
5.50
8.60
10.00

1.00
0.30
5.59

1.00
0.30 a
5.59 13.7
11.0
55.6
S2wk-Hi 52wk-Low Interest
1000.00
1000.00
1000.00
1000.00

Maturity
19 October 2017
19 October 2022
30 May 2013
29 May 2015

FBB17
FBB22
FBB13 100.00
FBB15 100.00 0.00
Fidelity Over-The-Counter Securities
Bid $ Ask $ Last Price
14.60
4.00 6.25 6.00
0.35 0.40 0.35
Colina Over-The-Counter Securities
30.13 31.59 29.00
0.45 0.55 0.55
BISX Listed Mutual Funds
NA Vv YTD% Last 12 Months
1.3664 0.95 4.77
2.8962 -1.49 -3.35
1.4590 1.77 5.09
3.1964 -5.59 -13.64
12.7397 0.96 5.79
100.5606
96.4070
1.0000
9.1599
1.0440 0.80
1.0364 0.33
1.0452 0.76
MARKET TERMS
YIELD - last 12 month dividends divided by closing price
Bid $ - Buying price of Colin: nd Fidelity

100.00
100.00

Prime + 1.75%

EPS $
-0.041
0.000
0.001

Div $ P/E
0.300
0.480
0.000

52wk-Low Symbol
Bahamas Supermarkets
Caribbean Crossings (Pref)

RND Holdings

Weekly Vol.

f.92 8.42

Notice is hereby given that the above-named
Company is in dissolution, which commenced
on the 4th day of May 2009. The Liquidator is
Argosa Corp. Inc., P.O. Box N-7757 Nassau,

Bahamas.

4.540
0.002

0.000
0.000

ABDAB
RND Holdings

Fund Name Div $ Yield %
Colina Bond Fund
Colina MSI Preferred Fund
Colina Money Market Fund
Fidelity Bahamas G & I Fund
Fidelity Prime Income Fund
CFAL Global Bond Fund
CFAL Global Equity Fund
CFAL High Grade Bond Fund
Fidelity International Investment Fund
FG Financial Preferred Income Fund
FG Financial Growth Fund
FG Financial Diversified Fund

28-Feb-09
31-Mar-09
1-May-09
31-Mar-09
28-Feb-09
31-Dec-08
31-Dec-08
31-Dec-07
31-Mar-09
9-Feb-09
9-Feb-09
9-Feb-09

1.3041
2.9230
1.3883
3.1964
12.1564
100.0000
96.4070
1.0000
9.0950
1.0000
1.0000
1.0000

0.56
-3.59

0.00

0.71

0.56
-3.59
0.00
-12.76
4.40
3.64
4.40

BISX ALL SHARE INDEX - 19 Dec 02 = 1,000.00
52Wk-Hi - Highest closing price in last 52 weeks

ighted price for daily volume
Weekly Vol. - Tre

reported earings per share for the last 12 mths
NAV - Net Asset Value
N/M - Not Meanin gtul
FINDEX - The Fidelity Bahamas Stock Index. January 1, 1994 = 100

om day to day
traded today
he last 12 months
P/E - Closing price divided by the last 12 month earnin: gs
(S) - 4-for-1 Stock Split - Effective Date 8/8/2007
(S1) - 3-for-1 Stock Split - Effective Date 7/11/2007
TO TRADE CALL: COLINA 242-502-7010 | ROYALFIDELITY 242-356-7764 | FG CAPITAL MARKETS 242-396-4000 | COLONIAL 242-502-7525

ARGOSA CORP. INC.
(Liquidator)





PAGE 12B, THURSDAY, MAY 14, 2009

DEVELOPMENT FOR SALE
MARINA & SEAFOOD PROCESSING PLANT
ALLIGATOR BAY, NORTH LONG ISLAND

Approx. 6 acres of Waterfront property with a 152 feet wide canal.

Property comprises three buildings:

Building A: Seafood Processing Plant include a reception area, an
office, three bathrooms, a receiving room, a dressing room,
a packing room, a storage room, a laboratory and a
processing room, (3) 10 ft x 30 ft blast freezers, and (1)
15ft x 15 ftand (1) 10 ft x15 ft holding freezers.

Building B: Generator House

Building C: The Water Plant consists of a reverse osmosis water
system that converts salt water into drinking water with

a 10,000 storage capacity.

Interested persons should submit offers to:
The Manager, Credit Risk Management, P. O. Box N-7518,

Nassau, Bahamas

To reach us on or before June 12, 2009

For further information, please contact us at
502-0929, 356-1685 or 356-1608



Securities Dealers (NASD).

ment funds.”

m@ NEW YORK

A SLUMP in the stock mar-
ket helped drag energy prices
lower Wednesday despite data
showing U.S. crude supplies
shrank for the first time in 10
weeks, according to Associat-
ed Press.

Benchmark crude for June
delivery fell 83 cents to settle
at $58.02 a barrel on the New
York Mercantile Exchange.
In London, Brent prices
increased 36 cents to $58.30 a
barrel on the ICE Futures
exchange.

“T think a lot of people just
stepped back and looked at
the big picture,” Mike Zarem-
bski, senior commodity ana-
lyst at brokerage OptionsX-
press Inc.

Prices for retail gasoline

Attorney
successfully
completes
Series 6

AN ATTORNEY with Graham Thomp-
son & Company, Aliya G. Allen, has suc-
cessfully completed the Series 6 Exam in
Florida after studying at the Nassau-based
Securities Training Institute (STI).

The Series 6 qualifying exam is adminis-
tered by the New York Stock Exchange
(NYSE) and the National Association of

Ms. Albury, course administrator at STI,
said: “This internationally recognised qual-
ification equips Bahamian professionals
with the knowledge and skills necessary
to administer, manage and advise on invest-

Ms Allen is pictured (right)

have been rising across the
country and they did so again
overnight after the AAA
reported that more Americans
would hit the road this Memo-
rial Day. It would be the first
time that has happened in four
years.

Researchers say Americans
are taking advantage of com-
paratively cheap gasoline after
staying home in recent years
as prices surged. The national
average price for gasoline rose
nearly 87 percent between
2005 and 2008.

Retail gas prices rose to a
new national average of
$2.267 a gallon overnight,
according to auto club AAA,
Wright Express and Oil Price
Information Service. Prices
are still $1.465 a gallon cheap-
er than a year ago.



THE TRIBUNE



Oil prices fall despite
drop in US supplies

The enormous amount of
crude, gasoline and natural gas
in storage has kept prices in
check. Despite a drop of 4.7
million barrels last week,
crude in U.S. storage houses is
the most since 1990.

Meanwhile, U.S. refineries,
which make gasoline, pulled
back on production last week,
according to the government.
That has helped put a floor
under prices, which have tum-
bled because businesses and
consumers are spending much
less on energy this year.

In other Nymex trading,
gasoline for June delivery rose
2.31 cents to $1.691 a gallon
and heating oil was flat at
$1.5063 a gallon. Natural gas
for June delivery climbed 3.8
cents to $4.487 per 1,000 cubic
feet.

The Bahamas Institute of Financial Services

THEME:

Financial Services

BEYOND BORDERS

May 19 21, 2009

Sandals Royal Bahamian Resort & Spa, Cable Beach

ferodeteney,
MORMEMS: 20:00 LEA pen
“Hee Paar boo Bmod Biber Pel
Nnensed Cholkengee” THA & Ofome

Bo Biel eee. 14
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Ex Saupe ts oe wa Reamity?

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MRADMGe 20500 - Lso0 pen

“4 a umell rm ests Dovmlen) lie. a apace
Spanier

errr 2 =r. eT ai werd

BEE WEE

C. MAIN a =e . A ee

SLLE POLL 5

LUAICHEON: 12-30 2-00 pm

“Finns hal Beers. Baye Baal.”
Spcuker: Wondy Warren ThA. 4,

Le a es Pee

LURICHEON: 12:30 - 2900) pis
“Uri pee bce Toor eed Tnanool
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Tete SL

Ear ha:

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F ay





PAGE 2, THURSDAY, MAY 14, 2009

Card of Thanks for

Yhe Late dnita Elliott
1927-2009

Ie the famuly of te late Anita Elliott expresses our thanks to the
many rélaliver and friends for your prayers and support during our
fine of bereavement.

Your kindness is deeply abprectated and wall always be
remembered boy ws,

May (Cred condime to Bless yo!

The Family

THE RT.
REVEREND
WILLIAM
GRANT

First Jurisdictional Prelate of
The Church of God in Christ (COGIC)
Bahamas Jurisdiction

It has been one year although it seems as yesterday
yet you were missed everyday.
Our families love, special thanks, thoughts and prayers
goes out to all those who have been supportive and helpful to
us in any way during the past year in our immediate loss.

Bishop Charles E. Blake,

Presiding Bishop COGIC Inc. and the International Church,
Bishops Carlis Moody, Martin Luther Johnson and Matthew Williams;
Bishop Tony L. Hanna Current Bahamas Jurisdictional Prelate
of COGIC & Bahamas Jurisdiction

With special love
From: Mother Cynthia Grant
& The Family



THE TRIBUNE OBITUARIES

g st 14th, 1991

May I 2th, 2008

.
Khodee. ijeibeenrameamcince
you leroinedinssiulenenaday,
Jo behwithiooullaliakonenetjour
come ae
MecnInche ta nag nim aul e js
aOR ie He end ite
MS Fene ena inela hm OUIneMUGtie IOUT TE ee

OUI veep mC Ls hi ee
GEG Remedi chef oo Py 6 fea inal

, Ae

Born: October 20th, 1929
Died: May I3th, 2007

Gone bul not fergaien

Sadly missed by your loving wife, Maureen Rahming;
children, Roosevelt, Diane, Earl Augustus
and Monique Rahming; grandchildren, Earvin, Javon,
Cameron, Earl, Avery, Andre and Ennis Rahming
and Roniqu; daughters-in-law, sisters-in-law,
brothers-in-law, nieces and nephews
and other relatives.



THE TRIBUNE OBITUARIES

Card of Thanks for



Norma Brennen 1945 - 2008

Gone but not forgotten

Thank you and in loving memory
As we remember our mother, with the one
year anniversary of her passing we the
children and grandchildren of Norma
Brennen would like to express our most
heartfelt thanks.

We could not have endured the most
difficult point of time in our lives without
the love and support from all of our moth-

er's friends, church
families, neighbors, relatives and our dear
friends. It was your visits, prayers and
phone calls which made her passing
bearable. These acts of generosity and love
we will forever treasure in our hearts.

With great love, thank you.
May God continue to richly bless you all.

The Family

#2 Tonique Williams-Darling Highway
P.O, Box EE-16634 ° Tel: (242) 361-2569/361-8612 * Fax: (242) 361-1856
Mobile: (242) 457-1491 or (242) 477-2034 * Evening: 324-4687

ANGELA WRIGHT-
STUART, 90

of Williams Lane, off Kemp

Road and formerly of Barraterre,

Exuma who died on Sunday,

May 3rd, 2009 will be held on

Saturday, May 16th, 2009 at

10:00am at The New Mount Zion

Missionary Baptist Church, Blue

Hill Road, South. Officiating will |Â¥

be Bishop Andrew O. Stewart,

assisted by other Ministers. Interment will follow in the
Woodlawn Gardens Cemetery, Soldier Road.

Left to cherished memories are her Sister: Elder Edithmae
Taylor; (17) Nephews: Luther Sr., Vivian & Lawrence
Taylor Jr., Pastor Havard, Elder John Sr. & Jack Wright,
Leviticus Parton, Granville & Rolston McKenzie, Rev.
Alfred, Rev. Andrew & Rev. Timothy Stewart, Wellington,
Fredrick & Benjamin Stewart, Shervin & Steven Stuart;
(23) Nieces: Monica Taylor, Janice Rolle, Ravana
Duncombe, Myrtis Gibson, Maryann Sands, Emminitha &
Marina Burrows, Vernice Wright, Joycelyn Smith, Madelyn
Hanna, Inekah Finlayson, Euterpie & Addrianne Munroe,
Sylvia Swain, Brenda, Sylvia, Lisa & Sharon McKenzie,
Elder Alma Knowles, Susan Moss, Evelyn Adderley,
Laverne Stewart, Margaret & Louis Stuart; A host of other
relatives and friends including: Bradley & Gail Kemp,
Gregory Davis, Lisa Kemp, Linda Colebrooke, Nadine
Miller, Carla Charlton, Monique, Nicola, Nehemiah &
Shawn Davis, Debbieann Jones, Stanley Sturrup, Andrea
& Sharon Gibson, Debbie & Wendy Stubbs, Janice Stewart,
Elder Philip Sands, Pastor Philip Stubbs, George Gibson,
Lucy Wright, Thomasina Dean, the Twilight Home for the
elderly family, the officers and members of Corner Stone
Zion Church International, the officers and members of
Mount Zion Missionary Baptist Church, the entire Pinewood
Gardens & Williams Lane communities.

Viewing will be held on Friday, May 15th at Clarke’s
Funeral Home #10 Tonique Williams-Darling Highway
from 10:00am to 6:00pm and on Saturday at 9:00am until
service time.





PAGE 4, THURSDAY, MAY 14, 2009

THE TRIBUNE OBITUARIES

and Crematouum Limited

FREEPORT
11A East Coral Road, Freeport, G.B., Bahamas
P.O. Box F-42312
Telephone: (242) 373-1115 / (242) 373-1471
Pager: (242) 340-8043 « Fax: (242) 373-3005

NASSAU
Robinson and Soldier Roads, Nassau, N.P., Bahamas
P.O. Box CB-12072
Telephone: (242) 394-8043 / (242) 394-8047
Pager: (242) 340-8043 * Fax: (242) 340-8034

FUNERAL SERVICE FOR

| and Crematorium Limited, 11-A East Coral Road, Freeport, Grand Bahama
: on Friday from 10:00 a.m. to 6:00 p.m. and at the church on Saturday from
9:30 a.m. until service time.

LAWRENCE
SAUNDERS, 69

of #32 Abaco Drive, Hawksbill, Grand

Bahama will be held on Saturday, May 16,

2009 at 11:00 a.m. at St. John’s Jubilee :
Cathedral, Settler’s Way, Freeport, Grand
Bahama. Officiating will be Bishop Godfrey
Williams assisted by Rev. Godfrey Green. }
Interment will follow in the Grand Bahama

Memorial Park, Frobisher Drive, Freeport,
Grand Bahama.

Left to cherish his fond and precious memories are his wife: Martha Saunders;
sons: Lawrence, Jeremiah, and Wallace Saunders; daughters: Deborah
Saunders Delancy, Barbara Saunders Beckles, Cara and Jessica Saunders;
grandchildren: Kim and Karen Jones, Colin, Jamaal and Jamaine Delancy, ;

Renwood Rolle, Lenice, Lenette and Letoya Pinder, Lawrence Saunders Jr.,

Randy Darling, Lawrese, Owein and Walley Saunders, Jeremiah Saunders

Jr., Bianco, Gwendolyn and Britling Saunders, Malik Rigby, Jestina, Jesthea : ; 2 3 : ;
: : : . | Left to cherish his memories are his: adopted daughter: Natasha Davis;
and Kewnaiyl Bethan, Dinas 99 Beat, Garth Dain Gis EEamanies Wan; : Father: Benjamin B. Davis; two brothers: Joseph and Silvin Davis; four

3 : : . . : .” i sisters: Sandra McKenzie, Helen Forbes, Joy and Cecile Davis; adopted
De Mang Elete, Daskawn Delaney; anit’ Bole, corde Batis Pau i sister: Mavis Woods; seven aunts: Verlta Davis, Willimae Dawkins, Lorraine

. ‘ -. ¢ Farrington, Arementa McKenzie, Beverly Davis, Inez and Elise Knowles;
Burnell Wildgoose, Carnetta Allen, Janet Roberts, Bernadette Mitchell, Gloria | four uncles: Hershel Davis, Leonard Knowles, George Mok enzie and Benjani

: ? Dawkins; eleven nieces: Grethel and Tiffany Davis, Francesca Forbes, Keisha
Carolyn and Tiffany Strachan, Teon and Renae Butler, Latasha and Leresa : 2? ; : ae cee
Cochran and Janeva Roberts; nephews: Orthanell, Ashwell, Rev. Joel and : and Christine Davis, Sable Cox, Brittany Davis, Lasaha McKenzie, Kimberly

Harry Saunders, Rev. John McIntosh, Hubert and Trevor Butler, Chris, Bill Topeda, Dennis, ‘Tyrone and Silvin Davis Je., Richard Cox Jr., Denard Forbes

Ametrius, Nishka, and Kaydrie Wildgoose, Rose Kemp, La’Quay Kemp- ; and Tyler Humes; brothers-in-law: Sterlin McKenzie and Sherman Forbes;

Kelly, Deandre, Lecy and Delecia Roberts, Jakia Allen, Ashnell and Shanty

Saunders, Shany Gibson, Buffy Mitchell, Faith Saunders, Patrona, Johnette Tees : a
and Engue Melosh, Ronette; Tina and Tanya Roberts BngetsandLatanya | GeOTge and Ball Willnore Hendley and Dike, En, Mile and Roehl
Bemp; grandasphews? Wellitigvott (God sou); Wesley, Eval Rt ends ie Carey, Misty Davis, Keith, Kendal, Kirk, and Leonard Jr., Tamera Moss,

Mark, Jeremy and Joshua Saunders, Jahaze and Jamal Mitchell, Sidney and i Trinette Martin, Barbara Thurston, Porshca Rolle, Phillip, Davis, Michael and
Javaras McIntosh, Travas Saunders, Ludale Roberts and Ricardo Kelly; ; Pleasant Dawkins, Genevieve Simmis, Pastor Stephen Knowles and Judith
daughters-in-law: Nancy Solano Saunders and Janet Otize Saunders; sons- | 20d the congregation at Strong Tower Church and a host of other relatives
in-law: Boss Delancy and Leslie Beckles; sisters-in-law: Catherine McDonald | and friends including: Somia Miller, Jennifer Ingraham, Leonard Scott, John
and Essa Knight; brothers-in-law: Williams Humes, Glen Curry and Hansel pean Da sue eee oe ey tue i boone Sie ie
Kemp; nieces-in-law: Verdell and Abby Saunders Enett McIntosh, Eleanor : abies Major, Seroy Brawn Srinang Siler, parbara ane Jeriey Soul
Saunders; nephews-in-law: Rev. Huden Roberts, Marzel Kemp, Ruben : no Moss, ee eae eee ae ae on
: ‘ : ‘ i the congregation at Zion Baptist Cathedral Church, Murphy Town, Dundas
Wadgocse, Bany Allen, Ruben and Dayid Couper, 32 great prandilieces, i Town, Rev. Dr. Peter and Joyce Pinder and the entire congregation at Zion
A : . pee ? Baptist Church, Freeport, Grand Bahama. Special thanks to the Doctors, nurses

workers and a host of other relatives and friends including: the Saunders : and E.M.S. at the Rand Hospital and Princess Margaret Hospital, Grand

Water Cay and Turks and Caicos, the entire Hawksbill community, Hunter’s Bahama Taxi Union and Staff, The entire Staff at N.I-B and the city of Freeport.

Pentecostal Church of God family, Abundance Life Ministry family of Turks :
and Caicos, Cheryl Cole of Tampa, Fla., Giah Smith of Nassau, Barbara :
Adams of Turks and Caicos, the F.N.M. family. Special thanks to the Rand :
Memorial and Princess Margaret Hospital Medical and Surgical Team. :

i 8:30 a.m. until service time.

Viewing will be held in the “Perpetual Suite” of Restview Memorial Mortuary |

great grandchildren: Paul Cartwright, Renard Rolle, Je’?Cannya, Garland,
Williams Jr., Trevor Forbes, Gerrad Whylly Jr. and Adrian Lester; nieces:

Darville, Maggie McDonald, Anita Cooper, Essa Williams, Cindy Cooper,

and Kevin Humes, Don and Charles Strachan and Ferral Lewis; grandnieces:

Kemp, Ricky, Warren, Jerry and Mickey Saunders, Rev. Demetrius Wildgoose,

27 great grandnephew, 550 cousin, special friends: Ralph Black and co-

family of Bimini, Abaco, Andros, San Salvador, Eleuthera, Exuma, Nassau,

HILTON “Spy”
DAVIS, 54

of #431 Cove House, Freeport, Grand Bahama
and formerly of Murphy Town, Abaco will
be held on Saturday, May 16, 2009 at 10:00
a.m. at Zion Baptist Church, East Sunrise
Highway, Freeport, Grand Bahama.
Officiating will be Rev. Dr. Peter Pinder
assisted by Rev. Zendal Carey. Interment will
follow in the Grand Bahama Memorial Park
Section #2, Frobisher Drive, Freeport, Grand
Bahama.

Davis, Schumir McKenzie and Leanne Woodside; eight nephews: Rudy,

Sister-in-law: Addie Davis; Cousins: Ida Swain, Kenneth Knowles, Lena
Ferguson, Leta Dames, Fritz Bootle, Doriline Rolle, Judy Dawkins, Roswell,

Viewing will be held in the ilrenic Suitef of Restview Memorial Mortuary
and Crematorium Limited, 11-A East Coral Road, Freeport, Grand Bahama
on Friday from 10:00 a.m. to 6:00 p.m. and at the church on Saturday from





THE TRIBUNE OBITUARIES

and Crematouum Limiled

REEPORT
114A East — Koa, pg ot G.B., Bahamas

Ou Memorial Morluary

NASSAU
Robinson and a Roads, Nassau, N.P., Bahamas
‘ox CB-12072
Telephone: aah 304 8043 / (242) 394-8047

A inicarret on) um is s/t (042) 373-1471
Pager: (24. Pager: (242) 340-8043 ¢ Fax: (242) 340-8034

2) 340-8043 « Fax: (242) 373-3005

Funeral Service For

CLAUDIA VIRGINIA

COOPER-McNEILL,
The first Miss Grand Bahama, 62

of #102 Mustard Close, Freeport,
Grand Bahama will be held on
Saturday, May 16, 2009 at 11:00
a.m. at Faith National Church of
God, Lewis Yard, Grand Bahama.
Officiating will be Rev. Lenwood
Knowles. Interment will follow in
the Grand Bahama Memorial Park
Section #2, Frobisher Drive,
Freeport, Grand Bahama.

Left to cherish her memories are her 5 children: Craig Ash
of Greenacres, Florida, Shuna Ash of Chicago, Illinois, Dr.
Duranda Ash, Della McMillan of San Jose, California and
Chris Wells of Nassau, Bahamas; 3 grandchildren: Adonia
Ash, Eden Ash and Weston McMillan; adopted sister: Marie
Adderley; 3 brothers: Bennet and Joseph Cooper and Prince
Hall of Rock Sound, Eleuthera; 2 nieces: Diane Johnson of
Nassau and Emerald Cooper; 4 nephews: Randall,
Rueben, Lindberg and Ronnie Cooper; 2 aunts: Dolly Pople
and Lee Gloria Lesbotte; 1 uncle: Rod Hall of Abaco; daughter-
in-law: Jennie Ash; sons-in-law: Will Gay and Greg McMillan;
sister-in-law: Sheila Cooper; cousins: Dolores Sherman,
Lenora Elliot, Patricia Jarvis, Nurse Roseline Johnson, Anita
Cooper, Gurth Knowles, Dorothy Rodgers, Yvette Cambridge
and Patrick Murphy of Nassau, Margaret Mullings, Darlene
Boelke, Arlene and Michelle Spence, Salina Gibson, Rod
Hall, Denise Pinder, Dennis Britton, Hope Britton, Charlie and
Angela Burnside, Ketsie Burnside-Allen, Judy Britton-Curry,
Rudy Williams, Glenda Pople, Gilda Saunders, Denice
Thompson, Debbie Smith, Kendall Fowler, Jonathan Sweeting,
Emile and Adriann Lesbotte, Ricardo Pinder,
Veronique 'Nikki' Martin, Anaskha Dean, Chris and Mikey
Cartwright, Lisa Ferguson, Ralph, Terry, Dion & Louise
Hall, Nurse Sylvia Davis, Jonathan Davis, Shufel Russell, Dyce
Strachan, Kingsley Cooper, Gardenia Hepburn, Dorothy Cooper-
Knowles, Christopher Cooper, Stephanie Cooper, Arnold
Cooper, Pauline Cooper-Nairn, Rowena Cooper-Albury, Loftann
and Lofton Cooper Jr., Friends Nancy, Blanche Campbell,
Angie Cartwright, Minna Outten, Judy Wells, Irene Burrows,
Lillian Ferguson, and many of the staff of the Princess Casino.

Viewing will be held in the iSerenity Suitei of Restview
Memorial Mortuary and Crematorium Limited, 11-A East
Coral Road, Freeport, Grand Bahama on Friday from 10:00
a.m. to 6:00 p.m. and at the church on Saturday from 9:30 a.m.
until service time.

and Crematouum Limiled

FREEPORT NAESAL
C14 Foe itor gre i CA. Fariaians

Ot Memorial Moluary

Aobineon 2nd Scidler Adds, Maseau, MF, Bohm
Pack, Borg CH -1 202
Talaptraras: (22) HY Sat

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Prope Cd ck «Fas SS) an Bd

Teper: (iad) 4G. WH Tare: FE

en Notices For

Marine Mechanic of
the R.B.D.F
GIOVANEY

TRISTAN DEAL, 20

ot Coral Harbour, Coral
Tleights died at the Princess
Margaret Hospital on May
1th, 2009.

He is survived by his mother: Bridgette Coquillon Nee
Butler: father: George Deal; step father: Emmanuel:
stepmother: Nicolette Deal: brothers: Edward, Devante,
Elton: uncles: Franklyn Rolle, Anthony Rolle, Decosda
Rolle, Gadtrev lliggs, Vernon, Roy, Fred, Franklyn
Cox, Arthur, Edmund and Lincoln Deal: aunts:
Margaret, Marilyn, Juliet, Terry. Rochelle, Dimples,
Beatrice, Estelle Higgs, Beverley Lewis, Paula Leon,
Gertrude Wright, Gloria Cox, and Anna Storr.

Funeral Announcements will be announced at a later
date.

MS. MAYRICKA
FLOWERS, 51
Of Sandy Point, Abaco died at The Princess Margaret

Hospital, Nassau, New Providence on Monday, Muay
11, 2004,

Fiumeral arrangements will be announced ut u later date.

bay

ahs Is wees aN
open Ve Bae ao ee oS
ape va * wet





PAGE 6, THURSDAY, MAY 14, 2009

FREEPORT
114 Bost Cor! Rood, Freeport, &.8., Bahamas
P.O. Box Fed zal
Telophrone: (242) 373-1115 / (242) 373-1471
Pangan: (242) 340-6043 = Fox: (242) 373-3005

THE TRIBUNE OBITUARIES

NASSALI
Rabinson and Soldier Rood, Nossau, N.F., Boros
P.G. Bor CB-1 2OF2
Talaphone: (242) 394-8043 / (242) 394-8047
Poor: (242) MMO-8043 = Fem: (202) 340-6084

Oe 2 ICE FOR

Fall Military Funeral Service
for the late Police Constable 3124
RAYSHANO MARVIN

SMITH, 22

Davis assisted by Pastor Charles T-.

Dorsect and Father Stephen Davis, and :
Internment will follow in the Lakeview Memorial Gardens John F. :

Kenedy Drive,

Left to Cherish all the wonderful Memories are: Mother: Pauline
Bastian Smith Father: Domance Smith (Vre-Deceased) Father Figure
/ Mentor: Chief Tnspechar Tauther Smith Grandparents? Relired Police |

Inspector Anthony & Sheila [astian Isaac Sanith Loncles: Lathan,
Loxsley, Lynden and Lystra Bastian. Anthony, Maxwell, Angelo,

Kendrick and Marquis Smith. Lundy Robinson & Father Mervyn |
Johnson, and Alfred Taylor Aunts: Monique Clairol and Lesa Bastian, |
Eimberly Bastian Smith, Catherine Taylor, Ernestine Williams, Cora:
Johnson, Sharen Robinson, Gwenith and Chegera Smith, Veronica |

Moore,’ Michelle Butler and Elise Hall Grand aunts: Sheba Bowe,

Anloinciie Whitheld, Teresa Forbes, Jela Tumquest, Wiens, Pat ane
Glenor Darville, Eenily, Francis, Leeistine and Mujorie Dastian, Fululee |
ain Cirandtncles:? Sargent Robert and Enoch Garville, Reginald |
Forbes, Hayward Bowe, Fredrick Whitficld, Zebedee, Paul and |
| She survivesl by three suns, Osler Raytounyil, Taverne Pierry-Lauis,
Lysura Jr. Leslie, and Lanae Gasuan, Opal an Muniquekell Farnqubarseri

Nathaniel Bastian Cousins: Angelo, Tashan, Tasha, Tathaniel,t

and ‘Lakara € handler, Ednckat Simmons and Quinni Greene, Cryscal,

Waverley and Mario Bastian,* Irene, Dexter, Ruben, Ishmael, Martin,
Jill, Mageie, Judith, Fitika, Maree and Dennis Bain, Jana Bastian,
Linck, Niketa, Gurthand Chet Smoth, Paul Jr. and Shenique Bastian,
Kendnek, Jamal, and Telewia Darville, Alvarers Whitteld, Ratnern,
Delpurcder, Tuvia, Rodari, Puul, Inya, Desiree, Dashinku, Turrara,
Alvadoe, Pamenther. Laron. Leyan. Daniella. Rosie. Lianne. Christine,
Fran, (hare, Lasen, Shakesa, Reynaldo, Adssa, Momique Kain,

Toking, Kencon amd Tesmarnd Towler, Slicer. Wichelle anc A!
Kathe: One aunt Venise and a host of other family members and trends.
Ashley Wilkinson, Stephan Beachy, Kinnard and Stephan GrodMothers: :
Ingrid Hall & Christine Bain GodFathers: Phillip Bosfield & Trevor : ; | te :
Woods Other Relatives and Friends: Father Deangelo Bowe & Family, | Mortuary and Cremtomum Tel. Robinson and Sokher Raids on Satunuvy
[nga Bostwick & Fomily, Leslie Norville & Family, Barret hMeDonald |

& Family, Philip Brown & Family, Marvia GreensladefiRolle & ky service Lire,

Water ard a host of other relatives Special Friends: Sharon Cances,

: Pamly, Clorence Greenslade a& Turnily, Tynelle Tain & Tarnily,

lrskine Ciray & Marnily, Craye Bowe Ae b ‘amily, Kayla Neely d& Farnily,

: Reina Brown & Kamuly, Latoya Burrows & Family, St Augustines
: Colleges Graduating Class of 2004, Police Tounsm Unit, €. 1. Gibson
> Stall & Family, §, C McPherson Stall & Fanuly, The iD Squad (2006)
: & Family, Me. Frank Johnsen & Family, Dr. Clyde Munningst &
: Scaff, The Staff & Family of the Deparcment of Archives, Dr. Gail
© Saunders & Family, Mrs. Inez Smith & Family, Mrs. Edwina Brown
of Mannater Road vill be helelon Friday | & Tamily, Mrs. Lane Lavanty & Pamily, Mr, Reginald Taylor &
May 13th, 2009, 11am, at Zion South
Beach Baptist Church, Zion Boulevard. :
Officiating will be Bishop B. Wenith |

Viewing will he heli in the Seremily Sule al Resiview Mortuary aril

Farnily, Mr. army Thompson & Pianily, Coco, The Collere ol ihe
Bahamas Ataff d& Family.

Crematorium Lid. Rabinsan and Soldier Roads on Thursday tron
LODO am te 6:00) pm and at the Church on Friday from 9:30 am te

: service time.

MARICTA
PIERRE, 59

of Exuma &creer vill be held on Sunday
May I7lh 2009 ab 2:30 pm al Calvary
Haltian Baprist Church, Wese Avenue
Contreville, Oey will be Tx, Wenn
Cher Aime assisted bry Pastor Paul Justin
and Faslor Osler Raymanvil anal
Interment will follow in the Souchern
Cemetery, Conypen un] Spikenuri) Raids,

and Jadotre Pierre: one son-in-law, Clement Yinceot: one daughter

© Daniella Vincent; three daughter-in-lwess, Marie Raymoavil, Cametrice
Shalanda, Andrenique, lan. Stephan. Brandon, Brent and Aaron, Tyrek
Bain, Dairen, Delaney, Deanne. Dakera. Tanya. Maric, Maurice, :

Theree Louis, and Jenny Pierre: six arandsons. Jouvens Raymonvil,
Tavenson, Kensly, Caleb and Nathan Vincent, Jadette “Levi® Pierre;

elght sranddaushters, Nadeise, Shelda and shamyre Ravmonvil,
© Rosemaider, Nouchekuly, Kenedy, Rhonda “Wika”
© Wineenn two brothers. Fernand Pierre, Meret Dieu Echard: to sister
» Cereily Menelas, Mis Laroche; tea sister-in-laws, Ketia Pierre and
: Phanisia Jules; one brother-in-law, Menelas Deshommes ; nine nephews,
Perdinand, evin, Ti Jean, Jimmy, Waloens, Quelegran, Waban, Abner,
© Mathew, Thirteen nieces, Lamannoe. Lavene. Meriene. Merlankedna

~ dusarime, ama Pauline

Moslia, Anme-tose, Jaqueline, heruina, Neaths, Gerlangda, Practame ,

Viewlng will be feld in the Serenity Suite at Restvicw Memorial

from TUA00 am to ost) pm and at the church en Sunday from 1:30 am





THE TRIBUNE OBITUARIES

THURSDAY, MAY 14, 2009,

Bethel Brothers Morticians

Telephone: 322-4433, 326-7030
Nassau Street, P.O.Box N-1026

FUNERAL SERVICES FOR

Memorial Service for
Sybil E. Blyden, 90

of #42 Baldwin Avenue, will be held on Thursday, :
May 14, 7pm at St Michaels Methodist Church, |
| Churchill Avenue, Boyd Subdivision. Rev Philip A. :
Stubbs assisted by other ministers of the Gospel will :

officiate.

Funeral Service for Sybil E. Blyden, age |
| 90 years of#42 Baldwin Avenue, will be held on :
Saturday May 16h, 10.'00 a.m. at St. Michael's |
Methodist Church, Churchill Avenue, Boyd ;
Subdivision, Rev. Philip A. Stubbs assisted by other :
ministers of the Gospel will officiate. Interment will :

follow in the Western Cemetery, Nassau Street.

She is survived by her husband, Percy Blyden,Children: Veta Brown, Calliope Williams,
Persis Hepburn, Dr. Gershwin, Louise and John Blyden; Grandsons: William II, & John ;
Hepburn, Lamon Dean, Gerard Brown, Gershon, Percy & Prince Blyden. Granddaughters: ;
Gravette Brown & Johnneice Blyden, Great Grandchildren: Kyle & Katherine Hepburn; :
Sisters: Myrtle Hanna, Maria Turner, Eloise Saunders, Ruth Nottage, Irma Levarity Brothers: :
Leroy Nicholls, Wallace Nicholls (predeceased Kenneth and Eric Nicolls ) Sons-in-law: ;
Granville Brown, William Hepburn, Sr., Darwin Williams. Daughters-in-law: Princess & :
Donna Blyden. Sisters-in-law: Miriam Symonette, Bonnie Smith, Mary Saunders, Laverne
Smith, Maedon Roberts, Enel Culmer. Brother-in-law: Nathaniel Levarity. Nieces & :
Nephews: Children of Myrtle Hanna E Paul, Marie & Andrew. Children of Leroy Nicholls |
EEugene, Melvern, Sharon, Anthony. Children of Maria Turner, George, Charles, Philip, :
Andrea, Cleomie, Jesse & Karen. Tanya, daughter of Irma Levarity.. Children of the late
Kenneth Nicolls E Everette, Roman, Sheila & Marco. Children of the late Eric Nicolls E ;
Rose, Philip, Perry, Percy, Pam, Patricia, Prescola, Zelma, Janet, Children of the Late ;
Lorraine Saunders, Terrance, Sharon, Joanne, Antoinette, Laverne, Vansharee & Anthony. |
Children of the late Josephine Bain E Sunetta, Arnold, Rhonda, Gaylene, Emily, Patricia ;
& John; Wealthy McMillan, daughter of the late Evelyn Wood; Children of the late Wealthy :
Ellis -Vincent, Paul, Sharlene, Mavis, Nanette Children of the late Irene Ellis E Betsy,
Autrey, Ilene, Dee, Phyllis Letty, Pamula, Bercu, Challis, Tammy, Lonnie, Lathon, Devlon, ;
& Rumalo. Children of Laverne Smith - Tabatha, Carlesa and Carles Williams, Children ;
of Maedon Roberts ECottrice, Primo & Alexandra. Tyrone, Son of Mary Saunders. Children ;
of the Late Robert Smith E Barbara, Tangy & Kendra, Juanita, daughter of Ola Blyden;
Children of Cholesta Blyden E Brave, Genesta & Monique. Sharlene, Children of Miriam ;
Symonette EMichael, Marie-Ann, Alex, Brenda, Rosie, Philip, Peter & Frances. Children :
of the late Joseph Blyden: Charlene, Philip, Tyrone & Julian. Children of the late Wilmott
Blyden E Marilyn, Godwin, Alma, Judy; Pam, the daughter of the late Celcia Minnis, ;
Other Relatives & Friends including: Mr. Charles Rolle care giver, Patricia Archer, James |
& Lolita Nairn, Wenzel Nicholls & Family Christine Fountain, Emerald Winder, Nora }
Dorsett, Barbara and Neville Albury, Theodore & Sheila Lightbourne Gwen McDeigan, ;
Pat Jervis, Naomi Eneas, Mildred McNeil, Vernika Gibson, Iva Ingraham, Euda Poitier, |
Gwen Robertson of Maryland, Rosa Lockwood of Ohio, Patrick, Larry & James (former :
students of the Stapledon School), Jody Morris of Boston, Gloria Taylor and the Johnson;
family of Miami, Carol, Johnny, Saundra and Renee of New York, James & Janet Cartwright, ;

Sir Arlington & Sheila Butler, Pearl Rahming, Beryl Huyler, John & Dorie Bowleg, :
Sharon Sands, Susan & Eric Hepburn, the family of the late Eric Hepburn Sr., Marguerite :
Dahl & Family, Dr. Pandora Johnson, Dolores Hanna, Antoinette Weech, Creola Taylor, ;
Judy Miller, Isadora Moncur, Shirley Braynen, Neville Sawyer & Family, Delores Hanna, |
Gina & Henry Dean, Barbara & Gerald Sawyer, the Burnsides, the Hon. Alfred Sears :
Myrtle Foulkes, Hubert Chipman & Family, Linda Dean & Gary, Erskine Minus, Rodwell ;
Thompson, the families of Baldwin Avenue and Greater Chippingham, Rev. Philip Stubbs }
and the entire St. Michaelis family, Archdeacon I. Ranfurly Brown and the entire St. Agnes :
Church Family, .Fr. Colin Saunders and the entire St. Ambrose Church family, the staff ;
of Bahamasair, Public Hospitals Authority, Eugene Dupuch Law School, Parliamentary ;
Department, Checkcard, staff of the Office of Dr. Gershwin Blyden and the Pan American ;
Health Organization (PAHO),. Special Thanks to: Doctors Kirtland Culmer, Adrian Sawyer,
Merceline Dahl Regis, Karen Rowe, the Staff of the Private Medical and ICU, Accident ;
and Emergency, Emergency Medicine Services, Mrs. Coralie Adderley, Chief Hospital |
Administrator and Members of the Executive Management Committee and all the team ;

at the Princess Margaret Hospital.

Friends may pay their last respects at Bethel Brothers Morticians, #44 Nassau Street on
Friday from 10:00 a.m. to 6:00 p,m. and on Saturday at the’ church from 9:00 a,m. until
service time.

Charles Leon Johnson, 55

=~ of #4 High Vista Drive will be held on Wednesday
>) May 2nd, 11:00 am. at Sf. Anselm's Catholic Church,
-} Bernard Road, Fox Hill. Rev. Monsignor Preston
Moss, Fr. Noel Clarke, Fr. Reginald Demeritte and
Deacon Raymond Forbes will officiate. Interment

will follow in the Church's Cemetery.
He will forever remain in the hearts of: his loving
and devoted Wife, Eulease Stuart-Johnson; Children:
Primrose, Charles II, Crystal, Sanchez and Kristjan
Johnson; Siblings: Helen Johnson, Janet and Derek
Davis, Anthony and Keva McKinney, Andrew
McKinney, Alicia and Harold Brown, Vernita Wright,
Winifred and Michael Thompson, Chester and Gail
Johnson, Sherman and Solomon Johnson; Madison
and Aldece Turnquest, Cindy Major and Racine
Melfort Parents-in-law: Cleveland and Matilda
Stuart; Adopted Mother: Marjorie McKinney, In laws:
Ricardo and Carla Stuart, W. Renae McKay; Christine and Bishop Chadwick James II,
Lindburgh and Laura Stuart, Erica and Terrell Stuart, Effie Burrows, Deborah McKinney
and Janet Turnquest, Mr. and Mrs. Oral Newbold; Uncles: Sam and Madeline Basden and
family, Fr Rodney Burrows and family, Patrick Smith; Aunts: Gwendolyn Brice, Eulease,
Gwenith, Sylvia and Beverley Smith and Alice Stubbs; Nieces and Nephews: Jamal Davis
and family, Alexis and Krishelle McKinney, Val and Bill Wallace, Samantha and Lenny
Bannister, Amanda Johnson, Deandria Beckford, Roscoe, Derrick Johnson, Melvin Hall,
Dwayne and Denario Brown , Melissa Armaly, Greg and Stella Thompson, Angela
Thompson, Shelly Maccow, Tanya Bell, Nicoyas Hilbert, Brynae McKay, Chadwick II,
Chadwin and Chad- Vaughn James, Ricardo Jr. and Rickelle Stuart, Lindburgh Jr, and Linae
Stuart, Brittany, Kendal, Sherman Jr., Matthew, Elizabeth, Daniel, Jordan, Chester Jr,
Solomon Jr, Crystal, Michael, and Alberto Johnson, Extended family: Eugene Palacious
and family, Don and Kay Aranha and family, Hubert and Roxanne Chipman and family,
Lambert and Margaret Campbell and Family, Godwin and Michelle Cargill and family,
Algernon and Lamar Cargill and family, Roscoe and Fabianna Davis and family, Phillip
and Sharlamae Stubbs and family, Elijah and Sherry Brice and family, Melford Clarke
and family, Larry and Candy Farrington and family, Jeffrey and Corrine Major and family,
Eurick and Lisa Dean and family, John Williams and family, Leo Ferguson and family,
Mr and Mrs. Mosely, Whitfield and Cinderella Johnson and family, Afton and Shasta
Moxey and family, Cyril and Mary Taylor and family, Viola and Herbert Lightbourne and
family, Duke and Cynthia Stubbs, Curlene McQueen and family, Ashley Cargill and family,
Retired Supt. George Mortimer and family, Edwin and Timolyn Thompson and family,
Clinton Pearce and family, William @illyEBrown and family, Archdeacon James Palacious
and family, James Mackey and family, Wayne Edgecombe and family, Marina and Johnny
Young, Millie Young, Elsworth Turnquest and family, Monzell Turnquest and family,
Millie and Al Cartley, Quinton, Sharina Basden, the Young family, the Curtis family, the
Laramores, the Taylor family, the Smith family, the Brice Family; his Kwanis family, his
Fox Hill Community family including the PLP branch of the Fox Hill Constituency, the
Fox Hill Festival Committee; his adopted children: Edward Symonette, George Hayles,
Ronald Dean, Jacqueline Maxwell, Terran Munroe, Jovie Major, Michael Carroll, Kathleen
Smith, Ferdinand Agenor, Sharon Brown, Shane Vidal, Helen Storr, the staff of Johnsonis
Autobody Repair and Johnsonis Paint Supply, the staff of Shell Harold and Wulff Road
service stations; Special friends: Hon. Fred Mitchell, Senator Jacintha Higgs, Mr. Bismarck
Coakley, Patrick Ward, Anton Saunders, Anton Sealey, Keith Rolle, Marvin Bain, Philip
Taylor and Elsworth Rolle, Members of the Fund Raising Committee of St. Anselmis
Parish, the entire St. Anselmis Church family, members of the Progressive Liberal Party,
members of Bahamas Petroleum Retailers Association and numerous other family and

friends too numerous to mention.

Friends may pay their last respects at the P.L.P Headquarters, Sir Lynden Pindling Centre,
Farrington Road on Monday from 10:00 a.m. to 2:00 p.m. and on Tuesday at Bethel
Brothers Morticians, #44 Nassau Street from 10:00 a.m. to 5:00 p.m., and on Wednesday
at the church from 10:00 a.m. until se/Vice time.



PAGE 7



PAGE 8, THURSDAY, MAY 14, 2009

KEMP'S FUNERAL HOME LIMITED

22 Palmdale Avenue, Palmdale
Nassau, N.P., The Bahamas

MRS. FREDA MARY
RUSSELL, 97

passed away at
her home on
Lakeview Avenue,
Nassau, The
Bahamas” on
Sunday, 10th May,
2009.

A Funeral Service
will be held at St.
Andrew's Pres-
byterian Kirk, Princes' Street, Nassau on

Saturday, 23rd May, 2009 at 11:00 a.m.

Mrs. Russell was pre-deceased by her
husband, Mr. Charles Seighbert Russell
and is survived by her nephews and neices,
Terry Russell and his wife Kathy, Colleen
Springle and her husband, Ron, Don
Russell and his wife Joan and Tommy
Russell and his wife, Cynthia and other
relatives and many friends.

In lieu of flowers, donations may be made
to The Salvation Army, P.O.Box N.205,
Nassau in memory of MRS. FREDA M.
RUSSELL.

Arrangements by Kemp's Funeral Home
Limited, 22 Palmdale Avenue, Nassau,
N.P., The Bahamas.

THE TRIBUNE OBITUARIES

KEMP'S FUNERAL HOME LIMITED

22 Palmdale Avenue, Palmdale
Nassau, N.P., The Bahamas

A Funeral Service For

Mr. Harry Thomas Lloyd Albury

of Rock Sound,
Eleuthera, The
Bahamas, who died at
Doctor's Hospital,
Nassau on 10th May,
2009, after a long
illness, will be held at
the Rock Sound
Methodist Church,
Rock Sound, on
Saturday, 16th May,
2009 at 10:30 a.m.

Rev. Kenris L. Carey will officiate and interment
will follow in the Rock Sound Public Cemetery.

Mr. Albury was pre-deceased by his parents, John
I. Albury and Albertha J. Albury, his brothers-in-
law, Sylvester Cleare and Hanford W. Darville,
C.B.E., J.P., and his nephew, Steve Darville.

He is survived by his sisters, Ethelyn Darville,
Lauriette Albury and Eleanor Cleare; his nephews,
John and Robert Darville; a great niece, Caron
Watson and a great nephew, Jamie Darville and
many relatives and friends in Eleuthera and in
Nassau.

The family would like to thank Dr. Theodore
Turnquest and Dr. Duvaughn Curling and the Nurses
N.N.O.W. Limited for the care and kindness shown
to Harry Albury during his illness.

Instead of flowers, donations may be made to the
Cancer Society of The Bahamas, P.O.BOX SS.
6539, Nassau or The Bahamas Heart Association,
P.O.BOX N.8189, Nassau or the Rock Sound
Methodist Church,Rock Sound, Eleuthera, The
Bahamas, in Memory of Mr. Harry T. L. Albury.

Arrangements by Kemp's Funeral Home Limited,
22 Palmdale Avenue, Nassau, N.P., The Bahamas.





THE TRIBUNE OBITUARIES

KEMP’S FUNERAL HOME LIMITED

22 Palmdale Avenue, Palmdale
Nassau, N.P., The Bahamas

PM tears yd

MRS. VENA ISABELL
ALBURY, 85

of Blair Estates, Nassau, The
Bahamas, will be held at Ebenezer
Methodist Church, East Shirley Street,
Nassau, on Saturday, 16th May, 2009
at 4:00p.m.

Reverend Charles New will officiate
and interment will follow in Ebenezer
Methodist Cemetery, East Shirley
Street, Nassau.

Mrs. Albury was predeceased by her
husband, William Albury, her daughter,
Cynthia Gates and is survived by a
daughter, Belle Anne Pinder, grandson,
Durward Frederick Pinder, a sister,
Rosie Knowles, granddaughter-in-law,
Lisa Isabell Pinder, sisters-in-law, Edna
Albury, Belle Lowe and Moriah Lowe;
brother-in-law, Pat Knowles and many
other relatives and friends.

Instead of flowers the family request
that donations be sent to the Cancer
Society of the Bahamas, PO. Box S.S.
6539, Nassau, in memory of Mrs. Vena
|. Albury.

Arrangements by Kemp's Funeral
Home Limited.

THURSDAY, MAY 14, 2009, PAGE 9

Butler's Funeral Homes

& Crematorium

Telephone: 393-2822, York & Ernest Sts.
P.O. Box N-712, Nassau, Bahamas

FUNERAL SERVICE FOR

MRS. JANE
ELAINE
ROLLE, 69

of # 5 Damian Walk
off Jack Fish Drive,
will be held on
Saturday 16" April
2009 at 1:00 p.m. at
St. Francis Xavier
Cathedral, West
Street. Officiating will be Father Glen C. Nixon.
Interment will follow in Catholic Cemetery,
Infant View Road.

Precious memories will linger in the hearts of
her three daughters; Juliette Walkes, Sarah
Jane Pennerman and Estancia Rolle, three sons;
Tyrone, Christopher and Larry Walkes, eleven
grand daughters; nine grandsons; ten great
grand children;. two sisters; Mrs. Norma
Thurston and Mrs. Edna Miller two brothers;
George and Crosby Wilmore, two daughters-
in-law; a host of grand nieces and nephews
relatives and family including the Harbour Island
and Abaco Families and others too numerous
to mention. Special thanks to Pat and Linda
Butler, Mrs. Judy Morris, Cheryl Cartwright,
Nigel and Anne Smith, Cherry Ferguson and
Family, Mr. Boris Delancey and Nicole
McKenzie of White Plains, New York.

Friends may pay their last respects at Butlers’
Funeral Homes & Crematorium, Ernest & York
Streets on Friday from 10:00 a.m. until 5:00
p.m. and on Saturday at the church from 12:00
noon. until service time.





PAGE 10, THURSDAY, MAY 14, 2009

THE TRIBUNE OBITUARIES

Butler’s Funeral Aomes & Crematorium

Telephone: 393-2822, York & Ernest Sts.
P.O. Box N-712, Nassau, Bahamas

MEMORIAL ANNOUNCEMENT

(Jennie) G.

of Nassau and :
of:

formerly

Mangrove Bush:

Long Island, will be :

held on Friday May |

15t 2009 at 4:00p.m. at St George’s |

Anglican Church, Montrose Ave. 2
Officiating will be Rev. Fr. Kingsley |
Knowles, Rev. Fr. Kirkland Russell. and |

Rev. Fr. Roland Hamilton.

Left to cherish her fond memories are two | |

sons; Robert (Bobby) and Richard (Ricky) : A 4
Cartwright, two daughters-in- laws; Gail: (7
three: ~
grandchildren; Melanie and her husband |
Darren Obregon and Bobby and Alexia :
Cartwright. three great grandchildren; |
Lauren, Megan, and Jacob. five sisters; :
Essley Darville—Hall, Ann Carey, Martha :
Calbi, Keva Clark and Eva Knowles .two :
brother—in-laws; Douglas Carey and Mario :
Calbi, numerous nieces, nephews and host :
of relatives and friends too numerous to |

and Susan Cartwright.

: mention.
Mrs. Jeanette |
| Funeral Arrangement are being handled by
: Butlers’ Funeral Homes and Crematorium.

Cartwright, 75 Ernest and York Streets.

DEATH NOTICE

Mr. Harvey
Eldridge
Barry, 69

of Cable Beach,

died at Doctors

Hospital on
) Saturday May 9,
” 2009.

He 1s survived by his wife Wendy Barry,
two sons; Shaun and David Barry, two
grand daughters; Emily and Hanna Barry,
four sisters; Gladys, Joan, Brenda and
Theresa and numerous other relatives and
friends especially the Staff of Tropic
Seafood Limited and Bahamas Food
Services.





THE TRIBUNE OBITUARIES

Evergreen Mortuary:

EXCELLENT IN THE SERAICE WE PROVIDE

Fur all of wour Fuaenal Service hceds,
We will be pleaged to aarve you woth bauer.

“Da 28 2-ga rue
Pax: M2 ATS
24brme: 242-211-3704
or 322-F342
Celik 4 FSR

TAR ALPE ROPER A LORE,

Mockey Saad Syl
MANAG TNIVTLTITRAT. TR ict oR

(Opqeisite Minwe ‘ufflers Mosca, Rahanas

FUNERAL SERVICES FOR

Dwight Johnson Sands, 40

af Minnie Sireeh wil Be held an
Saturday at hew Covenant Baptist
Church, East’Weet Highewoy ot bb
Sam. afficiting will be Kew Dr.
Y Clemert M. Neeley. lilernent vill

r fe held in Southern Cemulery,

Cowpen & Spikenard Roads.

Lett io cherish fond memeries 1 his
wilt, Yuriel, children, Mveisht dr,
Binralre, Fantasia anal Lavren
Johnson: father, Felix Johnsen Sr;
| four (41 sisters, Deaconess Thurston,
Fivange lat hanantha Evans, Minister
Alyee Carey, Renee Johnson anne
Lider Patrice Ellis; graned-mother,
Marva SleSeecny: Brothers-ui-la’, Elder Arthur Evans, Harold
‘Lhursten, Denis Carey, Locrnzo & Reoscrelt Rolle. Howard Barr,
Bishi Niel Ella: sister-ii-law, Mildred & Michelle Johnson, Diana
Barr; mether-in-law. Sano Garr, aicles, Leorearal, Deer, Teske ard
Bradley Sauls, Pasar Chere Rovers, Deauun Enuss Dawkins: aunts,
Norma Dawkins. Janet & Blaine Sands, Pvannia Redgcrs and Kuarcn
Kahiming: nephews, Police Corporal 312 Trevor Johnson, Byron
‘Vinirsoon. Trevel & Arthar Evan, Dante Inhnson. Able Machanic
Nemeko Koeeeles: Pouneen d+) nieces. Reva Roneolwes, Cartlia,
Tiina &. Desires Cones, Alesana, Thurston, Artniell Tears, Sheaves,
Ivety & Rayebeie Jehoson, Ricard & Ashley Riley, Monies Barr,
Alicia Hinzey. Laurenzia ole. Racuel Johnson: (2) erand-nicces,
Dremecia Knowles & Azariah: (5) Crand-Nephewsa: Dontez Knowles,
Karan Williams, Trevan Reker. Trevin Dohosen and Caleb: Cinul-
Thher: Essig Har, Gaynel Sargent & Mag. Fulis ancl Gloria
Johnson, Deacon Enos and Nonna Deveking, Paster Arlington and
Karen Rahiming. Charles and ‘lavanna Kedacrs, Maria MeSwreney,
Mary Moxey aid family. Una Miller, veronica belle. Harold Mille:
aul Tamily, Tein Sands & Farviily, Tunicw Aaruls, Eelweard Teanes of
Mian, Florida, Cowisdlidve Albury & Tatnily, Catherine Wiouds &
family, Jack Davis. management & siaff of Public Mark:
Administration inclucling. statt of Public Market Administration, staff
ot Medical Reconds, Service Departments, Sandilands Rehabilitation
Centre St Luke DAsenostie Centre, Carimioicatiesnt Frernih, oa
Ruhamas Police: Fores, Ralph Carey & family, Leisure Travel and
Tours, Melonie Jelly, Herburt Wallace. Evangelist Marcia Martin &
family, Godfrey Saunders & family, Enecne lL oompsen & temily, vy
Smit & Smith, Cleciet Darling & Momiby, Relus Merny & larniby,
Marie Saunders dt lanily, Wiveel Fisher ae faintly, George Rolle dk
Tals, Alibew Gibsan & Gomly, the Seven Alls Community, Henman

& Shirley Wood, Wellington Bacwo, Pastor Samuel [ohnaen, Earnest
Barr. Jenifer anal Willan Raolle, Pastor Fler Plenttelt, Routes, Sarr
& Ruse Julinseo, Tubwarnl Evans & Cimily, Lane remc)e, Raye
Berguser, Murnclun Moss, Marvin Sven. John Gibsen de fami.y,
Shekinnah Kingdom Ministrics family. Magnol Walker. Revis Role
and other nimercis to mencian.

Relative and frends tiny jay their bash respect al Tverureent Murtiary,
Mackey Streelan Fraley from DO ua, - 6900 pom. sme! aegis
Saturday at the church from 10°00 a.m. until serviec time.

Kristoff Cooper, 22

a ot Willeicle Mark of Bernard ood vill
he Held cn Saturday at St. Margaret
Angheun Church, Kemp Rouil HI.
fp.m, Offisiating will be Father
Joseph Mycklewlrte. Loreriment will
tollaw in Woodlawn Carden
Cemetery. Soldier Raval.

Lett to ebensh fond memorics are his
parents: Phil & Agnes Cooper, Grand
motner: [larriet Conper siaters.
Phillipa Caper, Sharanla Davis.
Cindy Cooper, Tisiva Mlissich amd
Philcase Sands; brothers, Anteine,
(rales and Caleb Cooper, ains. Neva
Iehnann, Cnarlene Klurphy, Agatha, Getey, Sharin, Shun, Cienevs.
Julie, Renea, Marisia Choger Sanelra lohan Peri Cores, Sei
Oliver, Sedene T. Mioss. Ursula Kemp. auois, Mary. Oven, Rutha
from Atlanta Georgia and Moutha Rnovwles: uncles. Randolph of Ackantea
Georsia. Ervin, Ree snald anc Philip Knowles. Charles Jr, Paul, Joba
ancl Crary Comper. siter-in-law. Pawlet Ciameper: brother-in-law. Joel
Missick: umeles, Jellrey Dloyel Lene Johnson. Ploy Oliver Parry
Kdurplix, Tyrone Kass Philips “ier bun dun Readies: Parkes, Mumercus
Ticees end nephiws including. Gubnelly, Keshen, Autome Jr. Monti,
Dillon. larano & Vie. Belton, Lindsay. Lryvlan and Sharano: ether
relacives sad triends including, Sania¥ Lloyd, Kendra, Franklyn anc
Tony Adderley, Derek Iolinaen, Sheng, Johnathan, Tomotiy, Keysial.
Racquel, Ter Knowles. Randolph, Terie, Taree Rss. Territite.
Lalewe, Rose, Shekera, Siska, Derek, Devon, Charlisa am Raven
Johnsen, Daye and Duran Stuart. Limethy, Kasvmend. Maiderine,
Carlson. Stephanie, Demica. Yaphet. Sabena. Jonathan. Patrice. Lrenetris.
Javetle. Charles (11. June, Paula, Preston, Paul In, Peres, Tek.
Tivunonlo, Choely, Addding, Rashad, Kimberly, Ruwlney Ir, aryl,
Donoven, D Angelo. Pyrone Jn, Dyrell, Lestia, Nicholas, Javan, “Lory,
Mikhalia, Raven, Leoruurd Je, Lenen, Aisha, Geo di. Jae. Jin, Jari,
Dominic, khonene. Rhody, Rovlney I. Lateya Lareisha. Latrell, Casen.
‘Tonite. Tentne, Victor, Michelle ad Dehroal Adderley, Bula Jerse.
Bornil Munnings and Albun Rolle, Carla Newton, and Wicela Murptoy.
Tsabelly Thompson of Mivnn Florida, Mac Spencer Ruth McKinney,
Nell and Clair Snuth. Melvina, Edith anc Olive Cooper. Kenneta
‘Thompson. Carla Spencer, Leroy Smita ancl Tomas Cooper and Kevin
Vergusn, (lose Priencds: Jerricaine. Benes, Slellisa, Jule, Rayeler
an Theid Prath, Artome Conpur, Cnig Couper andl Caleb Cooper aad
Timath; Rnewles, Johnathin Sevmour, and Raydon and Richie (aod-
parcots: Sue eum, Yalerine LDeixon. Diane Whitfield: close nicehbours.
the Ramsey family, the Lockhart family. the Taylor farrile, ose de
larly, the Burnside Family and the Persusianm larnily.

Relatives and ficuds miry pay their hist respect at Dvergrecu Mertuary
Mackey Street on Friday from 100 acm. - O00 pum. anc again er the
Church on Saturday from Ton anti sereice lime.





PAGE 12, THURSDAY, MAY 14, 2009

Evergreen Mortuary
EXUSLLES'T IH TELE SERVICE WE DROIT
Fog adbal your Purkcral Strvie: Mads.
Wis will de plead bo saree pou wealbr lies.

Veh 292-404-708

Fas. 3d. V Hr

“Wins: 307-141-4710
wa 32-II942
Coll SAE W758

NER ALEE E. ENN CEO.

Wacky Sod South
MANAGING: TUNGRAL DIRECTOR

Oppusity Minule Muller Heeau, Dahomas

FUNERAL SERVICE

Rosemene Claccemus, 31

of Golden Isles Road
ott Carmichacl Road
and lormerly of Haiti
Will be held on
Saturday at Lbenezer
apiist Church,
Carmichael Read at
Spm. Ofticiatune will
be Pastor Luarent
Papouloute. loterment
will follow in Southern
Cometery, Cowpen anc
Spikenard Roads.

Left ta cherish tond memeries are her family.
Luciny Gedeon, Edrice Gedeon. Mdreluisecul
Milohse, Alesix Dadic Gedeon Screcs Gedeon
Screo Gedeon Charles Gedeon, Charlusima
Gedeon, Charluisma Gedeon Yhiase Gedcon.
Ithananvel Gedeon, Diedohhe Merohac, Juliaha
Gedeoan, Souhttahisse Claccemus, Rosemarie
Dedicuscul, Pierrro Maruis Claccemus Coha. Pierre
Luijcan. Doriduis Mdmazih,. Mdmahhot Samuil,
Gustave Danlich, Gustave Theedil, Gao: Onis,
Murrelih Amos, Rominis Carola, Grogas Alfredc.
Romaws Tirmituis, Gusatovr Soihtia, Caluscul
Manevhauole, Georges Dicuhel. Gustave Cheshel,
lhorcht Shemira, Gustave Jimura, Georges Siliahe
Marececlih.

Viewing will be held at Evergreen Mortuary.
Mackey Street on Friday from 10am -6pm and
agai on Saturday at the church Lrom 2pin unl
service 1m

THE TRIBUNE OBITUARIES

(3 Emerald Ridge Mortuary —

& Monument Company Ute. (@) Z
Mr. Wendell Gr. Lean II, t

tare
Prendeat/ Afar Papers! Drecior

Gur services Includes
Trettoral af Persamaland Funeral Serviers,
Cremstim, Oriel Courerkog, fural-As-Sea,
rer, ap them nl J Workheide Shigping, Laval and Long Mista
Haagurtae These nati Dil, Scemcwala: Mcuremesin, ‘elian’Uhitecionl eal
Cortese fae Pose ys cee ee Video Poste Tribaimeae (her Wielniteaad DVDS,

Se a es eee ee
eT UE aE a Loe ERR
Act ee amatuer a ig ela

Garnet Funeral Service
For

Deaconess Ruthmae Doreen
Sargent, 49

ot #1679 Walnut Street, Pinewood Gardens and

formerly of Pine Field, Acklins will be held on Sunday,

May 17, 2009 at 2pm at Trinity Full Gospel Baptist

Chorch, Marshall Road South Beach. Bishop Trevor

Sr. and Pastor Arlington Williamson will officiate and

or will be in Woodlavn Gardens Cemetery, Soldier
nad.

The Radiance of this “Carnet ofA Gem" will always
in the hearts of ler:

mmediate Family: Edley A. Sargent Jr., Carla and Rev. Kenneth Bain, Authorine and
Sammy Lawrore Sr. of West Palm Beach, Florida, Juliette, Romeka, Edley 11 and Krialyn
Sargent and Nicole Carey;
Twelve Grand Children: Kenneisha and Carlyn Bain, Sammy Jr., Caleb and Alethea
Laurore, Leroy, Lea, Lexicio, Lexicia and Leo Adderley, E-Jay Sargent and Kai Barnes;
Father: Eder King Williamson;
Three Brothers: Bishop Trevor Sr., Pastor Arlington and Antoine Williamson Sr.;
Two Sisters: Ministers Bettyann Ferguson and Genevieve Bullard;
Three Uneles: Enos Bain of Belle Glade, Florida, Evangeless and Clarence Williamaon;
Ten Aunts: Elder Queenie Rose, Cleomi Collie, Sylvia Gaitor, Joyce Higgins, Joyoelyn
Dacheos, Maria, Delroe, Almenica and Clethilda Willlamsoo and Harte Bain of Belle Glade,
Flankla:
One Grand Aunt: Daisy Jolson:
Numerous Nephews Including: Vereane Charlton, Navarro and *hivaga Henfield,
Shannen of Ailanta Gexrgia, Trevor Jr., Troy, Travis, Antoine, and Sheton Williamson,
Pastor Leonante Jones, Gregory Miller Jr. and DeNains Bullard, Shawn Newbold, Presley,
Aaron, Joshua, Kenny, fuvalledr., lin, Arie, Anthon ancl Marvin Sargent, Gilbert Black.Jr,
Charles and Sammy Clarke, Richard Jr, Anthony Jr. and Andrew Sands, Samuel Jr, and

Sanchez Thompeon;

Numerous Sieces Ineclodi hia Rolle, Carol, ¥vette and Muriel Moss, Candi and
Nadia Henfeld, Melderese Newbokl, Lavette and Lavella Ferguson, Katherine of Atlanta
Georgia, Latravia and Ashkey Williamson, Chrystal Clarke, Brianne Ballard, Mexandria
Woodside and Michelle Jones, Bridgette Farquharson, Christine Charlton, Bridgette
Farrington, Samantha Simmons. Vernica and Valencia Black, Vilda Chippman, Carmel
Moxey, Lakeria Bethel, Richae and Gladtonya Sands;

Mother-in-law: Hilda 7 a

Five Brothers-in-law: Milton Henfield, Pastor Lovell Ferguson, David Bullard, Acrville
Sr. and Alvin Sargent;

Fight Sisters-in-law: Samantha, Pastor Sharon and Pastor Betty Williamson, Gladys and
Doreen Sands, Daisy Thonspeon, Mildred Cooper and Viola Black:

Many other loving ‘and friends: Vanessa Rolle, Grace Dean, Lantamae Bootle,
Edwina Brown, Stella Miller, Wilma Dames, Sherelene and Zarria Mackey, a Sargent,
iGithert Black Sr_ Rev. Dr. Elkin Symonette, Saniuwel Thompeon, Anthony aed Richard Sands,
Leroy Adderley, Diamdra Davis, Florence Wright, Lillian Williamson, Mr. and Mra. Ivan
Sears, Rev. De. Robert and Tonka Colebrook, Nikoan Johneon, Marlo Tomer, Mae Knowles,
Minister M. Gordon, Minister.J. Deveaux, Lashelle, Thomas Fond, Carl Carey, Geargeann
Farquharson, The New St. Pan! Baptist Church, Trinity Poll Gospel Baptist Church, New
Bethel Fellowehip Ministries, Chapel On the Hill, Neighbors of Walnut Street, Pinewood
Gardens and the Lauwrorels of West Palm Beach Florida aod thelr Families;
Special Thanks To: [alysis Unit of the Princess Margaret Hospital, Or. Adrian Sawyer,
Dr. Norad Morgan, Dr. Gandel Deyd and The Soup Peaple.

Vistation will be in the “Emerald Suite” Emerald Ridge Mortuary & Monument Compan
Lid. #20 Claridge Road oo Satanday, May 06, 2009 fram ianeon to fpen and at Trinity Full
Gospel Aaptist Charch, Marshall Road South Beach on Sanday, May 17, 2009 from apm te
service time.

Visit our website: www.emeraldridgemortuary.com view video
tributes, sign guest book, send condolence, sympathy, share
memories and make funeral arrangements.





THE TRIBUNE OBITUARIES

THURSDAY, MAY 14, 2009, PAGE 13

Rock of Ages Funeral Chapel

Wulff Road & Pinedale
Tel: 323-3800 or 322-1431 ¢ Fax: 328-8852

FUNERAL SERVICES FOR

: FRIENDS MAY PAY THEIR RESPECTS AT ROCK OF AGES FUNERAL
i CHAPEL, WULFF ROAD & PINEDALE ON FRIDAY FROM 10 A.M. TO 1
: PM. AND AT CHURCH OF GOD OF PROPHECY, GAMBIER VILLAGE
i FROM 3 PM. TO 7 RM. AND ON STURDAY AT THE CHURCH FROM 9
i A.M. UNTIL SERVICE TIME.

MINISTER
GLORIA NAOMI
DELANCY, 75

of Garden Hills #2, will be held on |
Saturday May 16th, 2009 at 10 a.m. |
at C.0.G.O.P. Tabernacle, East Street. |
Officiating, Bishop Joseph Swann and _ :
Bishop Sterling Moss, assisted by, ;
Minister Gladstone Thurston, |;
internment: C.O.G.O.P. Church Yard; ;

Gambier Village

Left to cherish her memories are Two |
(2) Sons: Richard and Captain Borris
Delancy; Two (2) Grand Daughters: :
Nyeisha and Natalia Delancy; Six (6) Grand Sons: Deno, Ladon, Brandon, :
Richard Ill, Antonio, and Dylan Delancy. One (1) Step Daughter: Rosalie :
Minnis; One (1) Great Granddaughter: Tahj Blyden; Two (2) Sisters: Minister;
Mildred Dorsette, Jerry Thurston. Three (3) Brothers: Pastor Henry, Minister :
Alexander, and James Thurston. One (1) Stepbrother: Minister Neville ;
Seymour. Five (5) God children: Charles Rolle, James & Nicola Johnson, |

Charles Rolle, Valene Poitier. Two (2) Aunts: Grace Seymour, Ophelia : Grand-childran: Daniel Forbes Jeand Ludi ’ : }
: Pr ‘ nS - : : ydisha Knowles; daughter-in-law:
Hunter. Three (3) Uncles: Henry & Elijah Thurston, Uncle Harry “PAPA” | Torah Bowe. Sisters: Eliza Taylor, Malcolin Nouguez, Gelenia Johnson

Janet, Rhonda, Lovenia, Natasha, Shanna, Gillian, Laskica, Hudrea Step sisters: Artis Cox & Edna Walkine. Six (6) Brothers: Wilbert, Minister

Fernander Loretta, Crystal, Christian, Celeste, Leeckea, Leoche Gillian, Lerlean, Myrtella, Dorcas, Norma and Diane Cox. Numerous Nieces

: : . _ : including: Peralee Knight; Nyoka Bethel; Nina Nouguez; Wendy Kelly;
Lakeisha Tucker, Evang. Valencia Huyler, Derek & Patrice Dorsette, Alwrick ' Louise, Martha, Monamae, Eileen, Karen, Brenda, Pauline, Patricia, Davina,

‘ : i Michele, Salina, Donna and Advilda Cox; Pamela Young, Patrice Murphy;
Robert, Charles, Donald Femander, Everett, Runen, Nathan, Elgin, Adrian, : Zelma Bastian; Betty and Unamae Williams; Michelle Cox; Mamie and
James, Derek & Alwrick & Stephanie Dorsette Patrice Dorsette; Zene i fot ; ;
Delancy, Trevor Bethel. Numerous Grand Nieces including: Aaliyah, Joshua, | Udy Johnson; Christine Taylor, Eunice Johnson, Janice Curry, Brenda

Ys . g: yall, ? : Babbs, Shamelle McDonald, Halsie Dorsett; Sharon Henfield; Elizabeth

Ashley Dean, Christal, Jaden Tucker, Dahnique, Mona Lisa Rolle. Valletta and Shantell Telusma, Deborah Garvey and Donna ag ume yes
Arthur, Zenetta Fernander, Ron-X Huyler, Gazzyln, Carla Colebrooke, : Nephews including: Jehu, Kemuel, Rodger, Warren, Lionel, Derek, Gavin
, : ; : ’ + and Kendrick Cox; Basil Taylor; Donald, Eli and Renald Nouguez; Tyrone,

Manasseh Nerenal (André), Adassah Colebrooke (Carliecia Derek Dorsette bce ne oe Pvsoagily erry enneon ie eoate a
df. Mege| Dorsere, Dominique Darsette Erie Dorsette, Maxwell Russell, ! Glenn Telusma. Grand-nieces: Eldridge and Mark Taylor; Anya Johnson;
Dinae, Trenice Bethel. Numerous Cousins including: Muriel Albanard, | Andre Nouguez, Shavante; Numerous Grand-nephews including:

and Stanley Delancy; Sisters-in-law: Aretha, Adlin Thurston, Flossie Woodside;, Aldion Bethel; Talbert and Shaquille; Williams; Daquan Bethel;
Thurston, Easter Outen, Corelia, Monica, Tericta, Mavis Delancy, Merlene : ae oor
Seymour, Helen Missick. Step Grandchildren: Kissa Minnis, Donald, Hilary NUR ele Ce deine ine doing ae Here werd: ‘ng ce Gibson:
Delancy, Andrea Fernander, Zella & Jxoe Redhead, Edward & Emily Telcene Hepburn; Alreta Thurston; Velma Ferguson; Carry Walker; Cybil

Cunningham, Ramsey & family, Mr. Stubbs & family, Hastin, Linda & | and others. And a host other relatives & friends including: Edith McClain

. aaa : : & Family; Theresa & Latoya Archer & Family; Venal Kemp & Family, Philip
Godfery, Jeffrey and Charlene Bain, Gambier Village community, Church | & Shirley Lightbourne; Priscilla Dean; Dellarese McPhee & Family; Lionel
Bahamasair, Sonia Williamson, Angela Rickett, Juliet Holness, Levardo Bieler panel tatsel Nec Hemuele bods ris teteegl sued

and family, Sis. Albury and family, Sis. Victoria Beneby and family, Captain Shamari Hanna; Shakeem and The Reid Family. And a host of other

Harcourt, Fernander, Patrick and Jackie Wilson, Bishop Joseph Swann :

and family, Bishop Sterling Moss and Family, Min. Gladstone Thurston FRIENDS MAY PAY THEIR RESPECTS AT ROCK OF AGES FUNERAL

: CHAPEL; WULFF ROAD & PINEDALE ON FRIDAY FROM 10 A.M. TO 5
i PM. AND ON SATURDAY AT THE CHURCH FROM 10 A.M. UNTIL
i SERVICE TIME.

Wright; Numerous Nieces including: Helen Delancy Bastian, Susan Griffin,

Thurston, Denise Bethel, Lablourse, Lornctte, Preston Hanna, Holly Rolle,

& Stephanie Dorsette, Ashley Dorsette; Numerous Nephews including:

Nathan, Jasmine Bridgett, Tracy, Pachino, Omar, Robert Jr, Thurston.

Excie, Andrew Nerenal, Naasson Huyler, Jemma Huyler, Veranece Huyler,

Alonzo Huyler, Neville, Samuel, Kate Huyler, Two (2) Brothers in Law: Cecil

Fernander, And a host of other relatives and friends including: Karen

Brown, Blanch Stubbs and Family, Pastor Diana Culmer and family, Jason,
of God of Prophecy Gambier Village Family, Management & Staff at
Blyden, Helen Alleyne and Family, Dotlyn Bastian and family, Sis. Rolle

and family, Dr. Barbara F. Williams (Home Mission Director) and family,
Dr. Sandra Knowles and the St. Peter’s Baptist Church Family Gambier
and a host of other relatives and friends too numerous to mention.

ELIZABETH
GOULDIE
COX- MOSS, 67

of Lady Slipper Ave., Garden Hills #2
and Formerly of Snug Corner, Acklins;
will be held on Saturday, May 16th,
2009 at 11 a.m. at Christian Life
Church on #52 Sea Breeze Lane.
Officiating: Apostle Mitchel Jones,
assisted by Minister Leslie Knowles,
internment: Woodlawn Gardens,
Soldier Road.

Left to cherish her memories are her:
Four (4) Children: Lydia, Sonya and
Larry Bowe and Keno Moss. Two (2)

Kelson, Eleadon, Stephen, David and Rupert Cox. Five (5) Sisters-in-law:

Charles, Jonathan and Justin Cox; Cy and Devoire Young Jr.; Kurtisa

Pinder; Hilma Ferguson; Naomi Hanna; Errington Hanna and Duke Errold

relatives and friends too numerous to mention.





PAGE 14,

THURSDAY, MAY 14, 2009

wt bf,

THE TRIBUNE OBITUARIES

EAS EAST SUN @RISE MC ISE MORTUARY

——<=

oe

——

“A New Commitment to Serve”

FUNERAL SERVICES FOR

Martin ‘Papa Marty’ Bevans, 39

of Golden Gates #2 and formerly of Little |
Creek, South Andros will be held on |
Saturday at 10 a.m. at Church of God |
Temple, Coconut Grove Avenue. :
Officiating will be Pastor Roslyn Astwood :
assisted by Bishop Lindo Wallace. |
Interment will follow in the Southern :
Cemetery, Cowpen & Spikenard Road. |

He is survived by his son: Martin Jr.,

Parents: Minister Doreen Bevans- :

Campbell and Theodore Campbell;
Grandmother, Theadora Bevans;

Brothers: Corporal 2515 Theodore

Campbell Jr., and Dino Campbell; Sisters:

Calpurnia Campbell, Registered Nurse

Cyprianna Campbell and Crystallaire Campbell; one niece: Vanessa;

three nephews: Kaylen, Theo and Brandon Campbell; numerous uncles _:

including: Inspector Livingston Bevans, Sterling and Eddison Bevans,

ASP Ronald Campbell, Henry and Johnathon Campbell; aunts: Magnola_:

Forbes, Zelma and Pauline Bevans, Vernell Goodman, Maxine Miller,

Hazel Bevans, Deidre Bevans, Vaneria Rolle, Valeria Cash, Nurse |
Althameze Watson, Eureka Vixamar; numerous special relatives and |
cousins including: Sharon and Quincy McKinney, Sherine, Donathon |:
and Kevin Forbes, Tiffany Greene, Sheniqua Francis, Shukera Carrol :

and Shandira Campbell, Crysantha Bevans, Stephanie Williamson,
Vanessa Rolle Clarke, Tameka Johnson, Timone Humes, Latanya Rolle,
Nashwa Bevans, Edroy Wiliamson, Alan Knowles Jr., Tino, Vargo,

Lester, Javon, Lamont, Dalston, Lavano, Philander, Leonardo, Livingston |

Jr., and Lamar Bevans; and a host of other relatives and friends

including: Rev. Roslyn Astwood and St. Stephenis Church Family, :
Pastor Mark Bethel and BFM Praise Team Family, Kayla Butler, Iva |
Butler, Theresa Taylor, Neil Ricardo Brown, Eddie Cephas, Newman |
Bastian, Deidre Campbell, Dorith Dean Campbell, Little Creek |
Development Association, Bishop Lindo Wallace and Coconut Grove :
Temple Church of God. British American Insurance, (Staff 6 - Carmichael:

Rd.), Beulamae Burrows, Lesley Brown and Family, Samuel Brown and

Family, Maureen Symonette and Family, Arabelle Brown and Family :

and a host of other family and friends too many to mention.

Friends may pay their last respects at East Sunrise Mortuary, Rosetta :
Street, Palmdale from 10 a.m. to 6 p.m. on Friday and at the Church :

from 9 a.m. on Saturday until service time.

Jelita Myrtis Curtis, 90

of Pinewood Gardens and formerly of
George Town, Exuma will be held on
Saturday at 2 p.m. at First Baptist Church,
Market Street. Officiating will be Rev.
Dr. Earle Francis and interment will
follow in Old Trail Cemetery, Abundant
Life Road.

She is survived by 3 daughters:
Jacquelyn Forbes; Vera Ash & Andrea
aa Hanna; 2 Sons: Hubert Rolle & Eric
[2° S| Curtis; 2 Brothers: Alfred Cooper &
Mervin Cooper; 2 Sisters: Ena & Mildred
Mckinney; 1 son in law: Johnny Ash;
2 Daughters in law: Nellie Rolle & Janet
Curtis; Grandchildren: Shanique
' Adderley, Lakita Russell, Shannovon Russell, Frank Curtis, Bridget
| Brown, Bernadette Burrows, Vanessa Hall, Vanceil Brown, Cheryl Wallace,
| Allan, Lawrence & Ricardo Forbes; Erica, Darvon, Tamice & Eric Curtis;
' Shawn & Kevin Newbold; Rudolph Ward, Daisy Knowles, Bernard
: Beckford, Eugene Pinder, Kandice Hepburn, Eudell Kinteah, Ricardo
‘ King, Elicia Wright, Janet Williams, Alexio & Lakeisha Wright; Numerous
' great grandchildren: Cavansa Adderley, Cavann & Kahlil Russell; Jarett
' Bain, Amanda & Allantia Forbes; Britini Knowles, Adam Brown, Perez
: & Jeter Burrows; Jamal Ferguson, Ediqua Hall, Leroy, Tamika, Jamaal,
' Tico & Lantisha Brown; Latisha Cash, Thea Wallace, Jamie, Jameko &
| Theodore Ash; Tamica Johnson; Octavia, Cadron, & Tonya Ferguson;
: Kimalita Hilton, Shanise, Jamon & Jamaal Collie. Numerous great-great
' grandchildren: Cameron & Markell Bynoe. Elqinique Dames; Charlton
' Cash Jr.; Shaniah Pennerman; Terry] Stubbs; Charma & Tazia Brown;
' Isiah Camphell; Cordero, Jonathan, Theron, Shakeitha & Laura Johnson.
' Grand sons in law: Charles Adderley, Leroy Brown, Terrance Wallace,
‘ Linewood Brown, Edward Hall, Charlton Cash and George Burrows;
: Grand Daughter-in-law: Portia Forbes; Numerous Nieces & Nephews;
: and a host of Special friends & other relatives includig: Hon. Glenys
' Hanna Martin; Rev. R.E. Cooper; Min. Patricia Coakley- Deveaux &
' Family. David & Audrey Capron; Rubyann Cooper- Darling; Florence &
: Rose Curtis & Family; Dorothy Marshall & Family; The Rolle Family;
' Richeal Ferguson & Family; Veronica Rolle & Family; Unity House &
' Staff; Robinson Morris A.M.E Chapel; Seed Of Faith Family; & the First
| Baptist Family.

: Friends may pay their last respects at East Sunrise Mortuary, Rosetta
i Street, Palmdale from 10 a.m. to 6 p.m. on Friday and again from 10 a.m.
: to noon on Saturday and at the Church from 1 p.m. until service time.

EAST SUNRISE MORTUARY.

“A New Commitment To Service”

#27 Rosetta Street, P.O.Box C.B. 12248 / Palmdale, Nassau, Bahamas
Tel: (242) 323-EAST — (242) 326-4209 Fax: 356-2957

24 hrs. Emergency Service
Cell #: 357-9151 - Beeper: 380-1450 or 380-1117





THE TRIBUNE OBITUARIES

THURSDAY, MAY 14, 2009,

(Cedar Crest funeral Home

DIGNITY IN SERVICE
Robinson Road and First Street e PO.Box N-603 ¢ Nassau, N.P., Bahamas
Telephone: 1-242-325-5168/328-1944/393-1352

Funeral Services For

DEACONESS
ANGELA
ELIZABETH
FOWLER, 50

a resident of # 42 Antiqua }
Street, Golden Gates II will :
be held 2:00p.m. Sunday, :
May 17th, 2009 at Golden :
Gates World Outreach:
Ministries, Carmichael Road. :
Officiating will be Bishop :
Ross Davis, assisted by:
associate Pastors. Interment :
will be made in the Southern

Cemetery, Cowpen & Spiknard Roads.

Left with cherish memories are her sister, Jacqueline Fowler :
Allen; 1 brother, Phillip Thompson; 1 adopted sister, Deborah :
Lopez; 1 brother-in-law, Stephen Allen; 1 sister-in-law, Carol
Thompson; 1 Aunt, Idell Bain; numerous nieces and nephews :
including Michael Greene, Brian & Lynette Williams, Natasha, :
Laverdo and Aneisha Ellis, Amy & Steven Allen Jr, Phillip "Kenny" :
Jr, and Renaldo Thompson, Cachina Forbes, 1 niece-in-law, :
Christine "Tiny" Greene; 17 Grand nieces and nephews including :
Michael Jr, Anmad and Alicia Greene, Nelson and Terran Bevans, :
Travis Humes, Kadesha Bridgewater, Kieria Woodside, Vardajah, :
Ashanti and Joshua Ellis, Keneisha, Erin, Raynell Thompson, :
Mark, Garcheno and Garmargio Forbes; numerous cousins :
including Robert, Reginald, Rudolph, Cathy, and Roslynd Rolle :
of Umatilla, Florida, Kenneth and Donnie Saunders, Greta Brown; :
and a host of other relatives including Bishop Ross Davis and :
the entire Davis clan, Alva, Thelma, Creswall, Vielsa, Catherine :
& Maria Johnson, Sherry Poitier & family, Jaban "Bulla J" & :
Dorothy Bastian, & family, Terecita & family, Joe & Monica Martin :
of Queens, New York, Jennifer Rolle & family, Golden Gates II :
family, especially Hon. D. Shane Gibson & family, Rose McPhee :
& family, Bloneva Brice & family, Mr Williams & family, Idell :
Dorsette & family, Carla Cunningham & family, Florence Rodriquez :
& family, Eloise Woods & family, Luceta Fox & family, Rev Michael
Bullard & the Ambassador Chorale family, Anthony Lopez & :
family, Diane Johnson & family, Dewitt & Getrude Bastian & :
family, William & Grace Roberts & family, Levi & Melvern Gibson :
& family, Johnley and Carnetta Ferguson & family, Mabel Stubbs :
& family, Anya Symonette & family, Florence Ferguson & family, :
Dainette Clear & Daes Beauty Saloon family, Peterson James :
& family, Mary Canter & family, Andrew Campbell of Toronto, :
Canada, Nicola Symonette & family, the Whylly family, the entire :
Golden Gates World Outreach Ministries family, Bain Town, :
Wilson Tract and South Beach communities, Doctors & Nurses :
of Princess Margaret Hospital especially Dr Kevin Moss, Vincent :

Campbell and Nurse Darnell Johnson, the former staff of Bayside
Restaurant and others too numerous to mention.

Relatives and friends may pay their respects at Cedar Crest
Funeral Home, Robinson Road and First Street on Saturday
: from 10:00 a.m. to 6:00p.m. and on Sunday from 10:00a.m. to
; 12:00 noon and at the church from 12:30p.m. until service time.

TONY DELANO
PATRICK MILLER,
18

a resident of 2nd Street
Coconut Grove will be held
11:00a.m. Saturday, May
16th, 2009 at First Baptist
Church, Market Street and
Coconut Grove Avenue,
Officiating will be Rev Dr Earle
Francis, assisted by other
Ministers of Religion.

} Interment will be made in the

JY Old Trail Cemetery, Abundant
Life Road.

Precious memories will always live in the heart of his father, Tony
Miller Sr.; grandparents, Freeman and Esther Cartwright; 1 sister,
Darshanique; 1 brother, Tinwell; Great Grand mother, Esther
Henfield; 5 Uncles, Richard, Cpl1478 Halson Cartwright, Jeff
Roberts, Larry Albury and Glen Miller; 8 Aunts, Yuntalia Cartwright,
Mary Coleby, Madge Cox, Rose Cartwright, Gail Thompson,
Deborah Bowleg, Minease Rolle, Pamela Miller; Great Grand
Aunt, Brenetta Williams; Great Grand Uncle, Albert Williams; 2
Great Grand Aunts, Nurse Mary Deleveaux and Alice Williams;
3 Grand Uncles, Marvin Henfield, Luman Bodie, and Willard
Cartwright; God mother, Carla Lightbourne; his cousin, Halcyon
Cartwright and other relatives and friends including Rev Dr Earle
& Marjorie Francis and the First Baptist Church family, Bishop
Lawerence Rolle & family, Bishop lan Brithwaite and Holy Dove
Baptist Church family, Jermaine and Illaya Pratt, John Williams,
Kirkward Adderley, Franklie Wilchombe, Rachel Nabbie, Malcoln
Wright, Ashwood Turnquest, Marsha Thomson, Commonwealth
Mason family, Gladstone Francis & family, Felton Cox & family,
St Cecilia Branch of the Free National Movement, Dec Felix and
Gloria Johnson, Bridgewater family, and others too numerous
to mention.

Relatives and friends may pay their respects at Cedar Crest
Funeral Home, Robinson Road and First Street on Friday from
12:00 noon to 6:00p.m.

There will be no viewing.



PAGE 15



PAGE 16,

THURSDAY, MAY 14, 2009

THE TRIBUNE OBITUARIES

Yager funeral Home @ Crematorium

Queen’s Highway
PO. Box F-40288, Freeport, Grand Bahama, Bahamas
Tel: 352-8118 © Paging: 352-6222 #1724
Fax: 351-3301

SR a

BISHOP
WILLIAM ARTHUR
KNOWLES, 59

a resident of #16 Cutwater Lane, :
| Freeport and formerly of Tarpum Bay, :
} Eleuthera will be held on Saturday, }
| May 16, 2009 at 10:00 a.m. at Central :
| Church of God Coral Road and :
| Pioneeris Way, Freeport. Officiating :
will be Bishop John N. Humes and :
interment will follow in the Pinderis :

Point Cemetery.

Left to Cherish his memories are his devoted wife: Christine Knowles; :
two sons: Keith and Craig Knowles; one daughter: Heidi McPhee; one :
son-in-law Levar McPhee; two daughters-in-law: Antoinette and Natasha :
Knowles; four grandchildren: Daniel, Keiana, Kiya and Taylor Knowles; : |
stepmother: Ethel Knowles; adopted mother: Ruth Sands; 11 brothers: :
James Earl Bullard, Philip Hilton, Paul and Glen Knowles, Cleveland, :
William, Anderson, Fredrick, Talmage, Roylson and Kenneth Knowles; :

: Left to cherish his memories are his wife: Kenia Silver; former wife:
: Minerva Williams-Silver; children Brendalee Silver-Roker, Lucinda
: Seymour, George Silver Jr., Carolina Silver, Bernadette Silver-Rolle and
law: Mary and Marlyn Knowles, Lois Bullard, Joan Hilton, Hortense !
: Kino Rolle; five brothers: Miza, Joan, Eddy, Jean Willie and Clarnece
Selver; five sisters: Maud Selver of Ft. Lauderdale, Kathleen Selver of
: New York, Susan Selver of Turks and Caicos Islands, Beryl Adderley
: of Miami and Marietta Ferguson of Miami; grandchildren: Joseph,
: Mellissa, Gabriel and Felesha Silver, Herbert Seymour Jr., Roger Wright,
: Daniel Saunders, Shantily Seymour and Cordesha Wallace; great
: grandchildren: Andrielle Clarke, Jadan Silver and Jahmari Rolle; one
: uncle: James R. Selver of Grand Turk; three aunts: Kathleen Selver-
: Lanoix of New York, Sissy Selver and Ivy Miller; numerous cousins
: including: Jennifer Powell-Moss, Lloyd and Gilroy Powell, Marilyn
: Powell-Russell, Grace Farquharson, Manvella Pratt, Catherine Tinker,
: Keith Mullings, Linda Mullings Moxey, Clyde Daxon, Judith Brown
: Kermitt Mullings, Thomas Daxon Jr., Annie Swann-Bowleg, Carl, Audley
: and Walter Swann, Joe and Ben Smith, Sandra Dorsette, Lavern Miller,
: Carmen Robinson, Dorothy Clarke, Ellen Colebrooke, Gilbert and
: Clarence Selver, Anita Fulford of Miami and a host of other relatives
: and friends including: Forrester Carroll, Leslie Smith, Clifford, John
: Barr, Leslie Woodside, MaryAnn Culmer, Francita Brice, Ainslie Rolle,
* Anthony Smith, Donald Williams, Alicus Souffant (Chuck) Saint-Joy,
: Souffant (Tolo), Prosper Jean (Eric) Hiram Rahming, Charles Stubbs,
: Catherine Sands, Charles Fritz and George Butler.

and friends including: Bishop John N. Humes, Mark Moultrie, Mr. and

: Relatives and friends may pay their respects at Yager Funeral Home and
: Crematorium on Queens Highway on Friday 12:00 noon until 6:00 p.m.
: and on Saturday at the church from 9:30 a.m. until service time.
Followers of Faith Temple Church of God, Church of God, Grand Bahama :

eight sisters: Sharon Thompson, Marsha Carey, Clara McPhee, Eloise
Miller, Loletta Penn, Loretta Mackey, Gerena Albury and Genette Butler;
two brothers-in-law: Hiram Eden and Henderson Jones; six sisters-in-

Jones and Vernell Edden; one uncle: Donald Knowles; three aunts: Lillie
Carey, Jessie Fox and Shirley Smith; numerous nephews including:
Philip Jr., Ian and Sherwin Hilton, Marco and Ronald Carey Jr., Troy,
Dale and Alex Knowles, Larry and Tony Bullard, Perry and Bruce Sands,
Allen Washington, Henderson Jr., Whitfield, Cartwright, David, Thomas
and Oral Jones, Freazel and Rollington Cooper, Lionel and Wendell
Smith, Alexander, Marvin and Mark Lundy, Christopher Edden, Ronald,
Everett, Sidney, Harry and Windy Rolle, Cleveland Jr., Cordero, Endingo,
Lenardo, Hakeem, Giles, Alfredo, Fredrick, Fredrick Jr., Talson, Tagarren,
Kevin, Kencil and Kendrick McPhee, Lennardo, Lemorn and Levant
Miller, Kermit Jr., Kerlano, Kerry and Kerico Mackey, Nathan, Garvin
II, Ashad and Kia; numerous nieces including: Regina Ingraham, Natasha
Stubbs, Lavern Thompson, Joann Hilton, Melany and Regina Sands,
Ronique Carey, Glenda Bowleg, Rochelle and Shacara Knowles, Christine
Bullard, Ruth Roberts, Annette Bowleg, Hortense Seymour, Anamae
Nesbitt, Corey Cancino, Alicia McIntosh, Keisha McPhee, Lavell,
Kermarita, Alvia, Alvonae and Alvonique Penn, Taquisha, Takeita,
Zerasa, Zekinda, Kenatae, Nateisha, Nakyla and Natanya Butler, Ajia,
Alia, Chevaz, Bianca, Karissa, Ivanna, Latera, Raquel and Kemry;
numerous cousins including: Sheila Butterfield, Beverly Deveaux, Brenda
Martin, Franklyn Rolle and Herbert Allen and a host of other relatives

Mrs. Dewitt Carey, Florence Morley and Pastor Hilda Allen, Rodger
and Sharon Johnson, Phyllis Sullivan, Sheila Coke, Huel Williamson,
Mary Culmer and Gladstone Curry, Georgia Foster, Members and

: District and the Tarpum Bay Community.

Relatives and friends may pay their respects at Yager Funeral Home &
: Crematorium on Queens Highway on Friday from 12:00 noon until 6:00
: p.m. and on Saturday at the church from 9:00 a.m. until service time.

GEORGE
ALEXANDER
SILVER, 67

a resident of #10 Port of Call Drive,
Freeport and formerly of Grand Turk,
Turks Island will be held on Saturday,
May 16, 2009 at 11:00 a.m. at The
| Pro-Cathedral of Christ the King, East
Atlantic Drive and Pioneeris Way,
Freeport. Officiating will be Revid
Canon Harry Bain and interment will

JZ follow in the Grand Bahama Memorial
Park, Frobisher Drive.

Lemond Silver; three son-in-laws: Jason Roker, Herbert Seymour and





THE TRIBUNE OBITUARIES

al Chanel

areisdent of Hawksview, Grand Bahama
and formerly off Fox Hill will be held
on Saturday, 16th May, 2009 at 10:00
a.m. at St. Anneis Anglican Church, Fox
Hill Road; Officiating will be Fr. Crosley
Walking Jr. Assisted by Other Ministers
and Cremation will follow. Services
entrusted to Gateway Memorial Funeral
Chapel, Mount Royal Avenue and
Kenwood Street.

Cherished memories will forever linger
in the hearts of her husband, Carlyn
Russell; two sons, Yvon Morrison and
Ural Russell; two daughters, Darielle
McKinney and Aleah Butler; her
mother, Gina Craig; brothers, Kenneth
Morrison, Cyrano, Marvin and Sheham
Comarcho; sisters, Philomena Comarcho-Higgs, Metherenn Comarcho-
Smith, Pagnant Collins of Fort Lauderdale, Shanderia Comarcho and Susan
Haven; grand parents, Beryl White, Hubert and Pauline Craig; twenty-
three nieces and nephews, Kenneisha Morrison, Meshulum Stubbs, Jasine
and Jay Comarcho, Darcell, Andrea, Samantha and Chelsea Smith, Marvin
Jr., Mario, Marcin and Marick Comarcho, Rudolph II and Peter Williams,
Nikita, Mesha, Achara and Carle Comarcho,Darren Comarcho, Dorian Butler
and Marvinea Comarcho; mother-in-law, Diana Russell; father-in-law,
Carlin Russell, grand motheris-in-law, Inez Russell and Margaret Lewis;
grand father-in-law, Ural Russell; sister-in-law, Carlene Adderley; brothers-
in-law, Cagney Russell, Elton Saunders and Alberto Adderley; aunts:
Beatrice Beadle, Christabel Johnson, Wendy Graig, Carol Sandiford, Sharon
Campbell, Sybil Bullard, Catherine Craig, Trudy Patrick of Trinidad, Theresa
of Canada and Grefetta King of New York, Queenie Gibson, Euphemie and
Leona Russell, Claudine Laing, Estella Hield, Albertha Miller, Linda,
Anastacia, Diana and Bianca Lewis; uncles, Castell, Hugh, Keith and Eric
Morrison, Solomon Campbell and Steven Bullard, Anthony Graig and Eveton
Sandiford of Trinidad, Lloyd Cooper, Calaph, Tarell, Oliver and Amando
Russell, Anderson, Teddy, Nathanial and Robert Lewis, Jerome Miller,
Jackson Wilchcombe, Lucian Laing and Cedric Gibson; cousins:Mae, John,
Anthony and Ricardo Beadle, Lavaughn Smith, Monique Forbes, Jermaine
Johnson, Monique Williams, Dellarese and Wendal Morrison, Jasmine,
Jonathon and Javon Johnson, Cherise, Denitri, Alex, Lavaughn and Ashton
Forbes, Duran, Dominique and Jonique Beadle, Anisha Morrison, Kadesia,
Katesha and Antonio Smith Jr.; other relatives and friends including, The
Dames family, Gladys Dames and family, Hilda Douglas and family, Fr.
Mervyn Buck Johnson and family, Ruth Fernander and family, Vernal Mackey
and family, Thomas Smith and family, Vanessa Ferguson and family, Daryl
McKinney and family, Esther McKinney, Mrs. Gentle family, The Angelic
Baptist Church family, Lateka Makier, Makayla Russell, Domanick and
Venessa Pinder, Herlin, Angelo and Taylor, Bryan Taylor, Mrs. Carol, Leshae
Rolle, Theresa Johnson, Sasha, Kera Saunders, Vera Hield and family, Rev.
Velock and family, Rev. John Russell and family, Andrea Burrows and
family,Vernece Saunders and family, Eshmel Albury and family, Leroy
Cooper and family, Melcia Miller and family, Eddic Cooper and family,
Agetha Williams and family, Alfreda Rolle and family, Fred Cooper and
family and the entire community of Grand Cay Abaco.

Friends may pay their last respects at the Funeral Home on Friday, May
15th, 2009 from 11:00 a.m. to 6:00 p.m. and on Saturday, April 16th from
9:00 a.m. until service time at the church.

THURSDAY, MAY 14, 2009, PAGE 17

FUNERAL ANNOUNCEMENT

LESTER
TERRANCE
PRATT

of Cabbage Point, Long Island
will be held on Saturday, May
16th at 10 am at Our Lady Of
Mount Carmel Catholic Church
in Hamilton's. Officiating will be
Deacon Patrick Darville, Assisted
by Cathecists Brenda Major and
Paul Cartwright. Interment will
be in Immaculate Conception
Cemetery, Mortimer's.

Let to mourn are His Parents: Rudolph and Naomi Pratt; wife:
Carolyn; one daughter: Lesliann; two adopted daughters: Aniska
& Danielle Cartwright; three adopted sons: Lernado Pinder, Jamal
& Demal Cartwright; one grandson: Malcolm Missick;
grandmother: Fredricka Martinborough; one sister: Pamela
Rutherford; two brothers: Kevin Pratt & Denzil Gibson; two
adopted sisters: Bathsheba Fernander & Corrine Laing; four adopted
brothers: Bonaventure & Eric Uriah Turnquest, Baltron Major, &
Kemison Seymour; two sisters-in-law: Angela Pratt & Nekita
Gibson; one brother-in-law: Samson Heild; five nieces: Phylicia
& Krista Pratt, Gillian Mullings, Desiree Gibson & Lisa Heild; two
nephews: D'Angelo Pratt & Jonathan Taylor; twelve aunts: Martha
Turnquest, Doreen Russell, Nathalee Martinborough, Ena Robinson,
Margaret Major, Albertha Clincy, Felicity Walker, Mavis, Rhonda,
& Dilene Martinborough, Antonia & Sheena Pratt; eleven uncles:
Oswald, Vernal, Edwin, Warren & William Hayward Martinborough,
Kim, Leo, Edward & Chris Pratt, Ricky Robinson & Ambrose
Clincy; eight grandaunts: Joanna Allen, Susanna Martinborough,
Parnell Darville, Mavis Pratt, Catherine Knowles, Ezelia Carroll,
Lucy & Lorene Watson; three granduncles: James & Erwin Pratt,
& Thomas Watson; and a host of other relatives and friends
including: Drexel & Duvaughn Major, Dulcie Armbrister, Davina
Lewis, Adeleica Campbell, Patrick Fernander, Yamilka Turnquest,
Troy Laing, Daniel & Jennifer Cartwright, Nancy Arangel, Naomi
Major, Wendall Carroll & Family, Capt. John Pratt & Family,
Toinette Major, Julianna Bullard, McField Mortimer & Family, John
Major & Family, Sandra Russell, Donald Mortimer, David Dean &
Family, Bertram Smith & Family, The Burrows Family, The
Cartwright Family, The Watson Family, The entire Berry's
Community, Paul Carroll & Family, Lawrence Carroll & Family,
John Knowles & Family, Carlos Milander & Family, Stephen
Williams, Colleen & Ian Adderley, Cyril Jr. & Valence Turnquest,
Wesley Carroll, Annanias Mortimer, Florence Cartwright, Virgil
Cartwright, Lionel Smith, Daniel Dean, Pedro Turnquest, Rosalie
Adderley, Violet Major, Mary Lightbourne, Admiral Ferguson Jr.,
Ike Miller, Joey Smith, Anderson Adderley, Marilyn Burrows, Mr.
& Mrs. David Linclon, Emilio, Mabel, Orlando & Carmen Maria
of Cuba, his classmates of St. John's College and NGM Major High
School, The Holy Name Burial Society, Deacon Patrick Darville &
Family, Fr, Patrick Fanning, Fr. Ernest Pratt, The Doctor, Nurses
& the staff of the Health Centre in Deadman's Cay.

Viewing will be held at Vaughn O. Jones Memorial Centre, Wulff
Rd. on Thursday from Spm to 7pm and at the church in Long Island
on Friday from 4pm until service time on Saturday.





PAGE 18,

THURSDAY, MAY 14, 2009

THE TRIBUNE OBITUARIES

Bemeritte’ s Huneral Home

AHAMAS’ OLDEST MORTUARY
MARKET STREET e¢ P.O. BOX GT-2097 ¢ TEL: 323-5782

FUNERAL SERVICES FOR

Cedric Clifford,
"Merengue" Taylor, 69

a bexiralllbe 7 ey 2008 all Lockhart family, Charles Carter and family, St. Francis Xavier
be held at St. Francis Xavier :
Cathedral, West Hill Street, on |
Saturday at 9:45 a.m. Officiating :
will be Fr. Glen Nixon. Interment :

rouows In Gatnclie Cemetery, Friends may pay their last respects at Demeritte's Funeral

: Home, Market Street, from 10-6:00 p.m. on Friday & on

Left to praise and thank God for :
Clifford are one son: Scott Taylor ;
and his spouse Jackie; one adopted son: Christopher Davis; :
one adopted daughter: Christina Davis; two grand daughters: :
Shantese and Cheyenne Taylor; one brother: Fredrick "Blake" :

Infant View Road.

Taylor; one adopted brother and confidant: Philip "Brave"

Davis Member of Parliament; four sisters: Mary Laramore- }
Rolle, Alice Dean, Valencia Taylor-Smith and Frederica :
Lightbourne; One sister-in-law: Ann Marie Davis; two :
brothers-in-law: John Pickstock, and Wellington Lightbourne :
Sr.; fifteen nieces including: Gloria Sears, Cynthia Johnson, :
Hope Curry, Karen and Beverly Young, Joann White, Patricia :
Chisholm, Shalencia Major, Richardette Bredl of Vienna :
Austria, Elizabeth Bowe of South Carolina, Laurette Levy :
of Chicago, Illinois, Monique and Krista Taylor, and Joyann :
Dean; Fourteen nephews including, Theodore and Philip :
Laramore, Samuel Rolle, Paul, Kirby, Frankie and John :
Pickstock, Sean and Wellington Lightbourne, Patrick, and :
William Dean, Freddie Taylor and Sheldon Smith; host of :
other relatives and friends including, Denise Sears, Lorraine :
Bowleg, Shenique Taylor, Basil "Chubby" Sears, Shelayah :
and Shaniah Smith, Omar and Keliah Chisholm; Joey, :
Allison, Alease, Alisha, Alia and Dason Dean, Shadia and :
Cruz Major; Zhiva Thompson, Danae, Damian and Philecia :
Laramore, Dustin and Dareka Taylor, Brando Roberts, Kaliel :
Curry, Brian and Christian Culmer, Joey, Allison, Dason, :
Drazen, Lamado, Wishard, Antoinelle, Taniesha, Tameica, :
Anyahna, Lakeisha and William Dean Jr., Carolyn and }
Cranston Smith, Aretha and Gelisa Higgs, Andrea Johnson; :
Al and Gertston Swann; Basil Sears Sr., Aluis Bredl of :
Austria, Nurse Ruth Albury, Dorcas Bowler, Franklyn and :

Rhinehart Pearson, Dennis Brown and Regina Smith.

"Woody" Woodside, Brook Sherman,

: Cumberbatch, Alonzo Adams, Cessarina Francis, Marina
: and Betty Davis and family, Volodis Carey, Dale Munnings,
: Pamela Miller, Berkley Chisholm, Gilda Dean, the Pearson

family, Randolph Cleare family, the Fernander family, the

Church family, and the Augusta Street, Wilkinson Street,
and West Street neighbors, Dr. Duane Sands and the staff
of the Male Surgical Ward II, and others too numerous to
mention.

Saturday at the church from 8:45 a.m. until service time.

Mr. Chariton Anthony
Pinder, 27

a resident of Miami, Florida &
formerly of Nassau, who died on
30 April, 2009, will be held at
Transfiguration Baptist Church,
Market & Vesey Streets, on
Saturday at 11:00 a.m. Officiating
will be Rev'd. Dr. Stephen E.
Thompson, assisted by Rev'd
Basil Johnson. Interment follows
in Old Trail Cemetery, Old Trail
Road.

Cherished memories will always linger in the hearts of his
mother: Althea Fowler; father: William Pinder; step-father:
William Scott; four sisters: Laquell and Likisha Scott, Tommy
and Vernessa Pinder; five brothers: Earnest, Francisco,
Christopher, Renardo and Renaldo Pinder; one sister-in-
law: Monalisa Pinder; one nephew: Shaki Pinder; four aunts:
Cleon Johnson, Rev. Cassie Neely, Fredricka Johnson and
Susan McCardy; three uncles: Vincent Rolle, Thomas
Johnson and Bishop Illin Neely; thirty-six cousins: Dericka,
Steven, Naomi, Lisa, Monique, Stanley, Kino, Keyanna,
Qutel, Dominique, Deneko, Florance, Iris, Floitha, Manniel,
Harvey, Wilfred, Lucy, Carla, Tressie, Jack, Abby, William,
Doreen, Wilmore, Pauline, Deem Nonnie, Rona, Terry, Gland,

: Anique, Felisha, Harvey, Perry and Reuntis; other relatives
Wilmore, Whitia and Mia Bowe of South Carolina; Special :
friend and Advisor, Bradley B. Roberts former Minister of :
Works; personal friend Alphonso "Boogaloo" Elliott, Alfred :
Sears, Member of Parliament and family, Sir Arlington Butler, :
Valentine Grimes and family, Ronnie Armbrister, Eugene :
Delancy, Joseph "Doc" Dorsett, Oswald Greenslade, Al }
Sherman, Eneas Theophilis, Maxwell, Gregg and Eric :
Elsworth :

and friends including: his American Family, Martin Street
family, Hay and Taylor Street family, Lenneth Perpal and
family, Shedrick Ellis and family, The Transfiguration family.

Friends may pay their last respects at Demeritte's Funeral
Home, Market Street, from 10-6:00 p.m. on Friday & on
Saturday at the church from 10:00 a.m. until service time.





THE TRIBUNE OBITUARIES

THURSDAY, MAY 14, 2009,

Bemeritte’ s Huneral Home

AHAMAS’ OLDEST MORTUARY
MARKET STREET e PO. BOX GT-2097 ¢ TEL: 323-5782

FUNERAL SERVICES FOR

Mrs. Iva Elma
"Titty"
Hanna-Ferguson, 74

Spikenard Roads.

Left to mourn are two sons: PC 1288 Bernard Ferguson :
Sr., and Kevin Ferguson; one daughter: Rowena Johnson; :
eight (8) grandchildren: Samantha Wright, Jameco, }
Bernadette, Shakeva, Deangelo, Bernard Jr., Brian and :

Kayjah Ferguson; three great grandchildren: Desmond, :
Okia, and Cearia; five (5) brothers: Henry, Erington, Edniel, :
Preston and Curtis Hanna Sr.; five (6) sisters: lola Hanna- :
Lynes, Freda Hart and Naomi Marton, Louise Smith, :
Madlin Simms of Delray Beach, Fla; one aunt: Myrtle :
Mines; numerous nieces and nephews: Shirley, Beverly, : :
Isabell, Deiry of New Jersey, Stacy Hart and Telcle- Mae follow in Southern Cemetery, Cowpen & Spikenard Roads.
Joann Simms of :
Jacksonville Fla., Deidre McIntosh of Freeport, Judy, :
Rochelle, and Monique, Rudymae, Nikki, Violet, Unice, : ee :
Shirley, Lordell, Kelsey, Elva, Vernitta, Leola, Denise, : Bunches, Long Island; 6 sisters: Mrs. Viola Ferguson of
Barbara, Belinda, Joann, George Jr., Brian and Charles :

Se Sey ee oe ey ete ees i Flossie Taylor of Turn Bull, Long Island, Mrs. Vernie

Bonaby of West Palm Beach, FI.,

Henfiled, Huley Hanna, Demarco, Deangero, Ednal Jr.,

Curtis Jr., Nelson, Valentine, Brian, Stafford, Leslie, Milton, |
Thomas, Collin, Lionel, Ellis, James; one-daughter-in- :
law: Valdia Dean Ferguson; one son-in-law: Trevor :
Johnson; two brothers-in-law: Edward Bobby Glinton :
and James Ferguson; sisters-inlaw: Mavis Hanna, Vivian :
Johnson, Grace Ferguson, Mavis and Brenda Hanna and :
Joyce Turnquest, Yvonne Hanna, Olive and Mabel Hanna; :
other relatives and friends including: Yvonne Coakley :
Ferguson, Jocelyn Saunders, Beverly Cooper, David :
Cooper, Effie Cooper, Beatrice Cooper, Mich Heart, Mary :
Hanna, Lluma Rolle, Orie Hanna, Marina Hanna, Daisy :
Hanna,Lottason Miller, Stephanie Molly, Grace Colebrook, :
Littyetha, Ashley, Diane Burrows, Alvin Collie, King :
Deveaux, Deidre Deveaux and Family, Chief Supt. David :
and Wendall Deveaux of The Royal Bahamas Police :

: Force, Douglas Hanna, Lawrence McKinney, Lorraine
: Bastian, Karen Beckles of Miami, Fla, Wendal Jones and
: Family, Margarita Tynes and Family, Ted, Garland and
: Roy Cooper, Audrey, Brenda and Debra Cooper, Ernel

4 yesidenber Wilson Tract & : Heastie and Family, Ruby Percentie, Lethondor, Carl

formerly of Spring Point, :
Abaco, who died on 2 May, :
2009, will be held at Amazing :
Grace Baptist Church, Wilson :
ee as pe aae = 7 Saturday at the church from 10:00 a.m. until service time.
Officiating willbe PastorElvai ~~
Johnson, assisted by other :
Ministers of the Gospel. :
Interment follows in Southern Cemetery, Cowpen & :

Hanna, M.P. Alfred Gray, Bishop Carol Rolle and Family,
Dorey Cash and Family and Miss Cox.

Friends may pay their last respects at Demeritte's Funeral
Home, Market Street, from 10-6:00 p.m. on Friday & on

Lillian Butler, 86

a resident of Brougham
Street, & formerly of Turn Bull,
Long Island, who died on 1st
May, 2009, will be held at Our
Lady of the Holy Souls
Catholic Church, Deveaux
Street, on Saturday at 12:00
noon. Officiating will be Fr.
Michael Kelly, ss.cc., assisted
by Rev. Deacon Peter
Rahming & Rev. Deacon
Maxwell Johnson. Interment

Left to cherish her memories are her 1 daughter: Mrs.
Theresa Ferguson; 1 brother: Mr. Edward Gibson of

Nassau, Mrs. Dorine Armbrister of Ft. Lauderdale, Florida,
Mrs. Florence Taylor of Deadmans Cay, Long Island, Mrs.

Mackey and Ms. Rose Gibson of Nassau; 2 grandsons:
David and Herbert Ferguson; 5 grand daughters: Rose,
Freda, Monica, Debbie Pratt and Joanne; 1 grand
daughter-in-law: Shantell Ferguson; several great grand
children, numerous nieces and nephews and a host of
relatives and friends including: Our Lady Church family,
the Brougham Street family, Unity House family, Sarah
& family, the Sears family, Cypriana Rolle & family, the
Poitier family, Ed & family, Tomie & family, & Dorothy &
family.

Friends may pay their last respects at Demeritte's Funeral
Home, Market Street, from 10-6:00 a.m. on Friday & on
Saturday at the church from 11 :00 a.m. until service
time.



PAGE 19



PAGE 20,

THURSDAY, MAY 14, 2009

THE TRIBUNE OBITUARIES

Aemeritie’s Funeral Aome

BAHAMAS’ OLDEST MORTUARY
MARKET STREET ¢ P.O. BOX GT-2097 © TEL: 323-5782

Z RVICES FOR

OTS eS

Sharmaine Michelle
Hanna, 29

a resident of Bahama Avenue, who :
died on 4th May, 2009, will be held :
| at The Apostles of the End Time }
Church, West & Ferguson Streets, on :
Sunday at 11:00 a.m. Officiating will :
be Pastor Carlos Wallace, assisted :
| by other Ministers. Interment follows :
| in Lakeview Memorial Gardens, John :

F. Kennedy Drive.

Memories will always linger in the :

hearts of her loving parents: Keith :
and Adora; brother: Reginald; sisters: D'iavan Lauren, Sharone and :
Paige; sister-in-law: Renee; grandmothers: Joycelyn Nairn and Inez :
Boyd Carey; aunts: Rosemary, Shirleymae, Merlene and Judymae ;
Cole, Paige Boyd, Nina McBride, Sheena Cooper, Alice Dorsette, :
Patricia Bannister of Freeport, Beryl Huyler, Cherine Carey and Floramae :
Carey; uncles: Anthony and Samuel Cole, Vaughn, Wayne and Cordell :
Carey, Gaylene McBride, Garnett Dorsett, Wellington Cooper Sr., :
grandaunt: Berthmae Bowleg and Family of Freeport; Cousins: Monalisa :
Cole, Marine Seaman Corey Cole, Kevon, Desmond, Derrick and
Rodney Neymour, PC 2530 Dawkins, Gregory Dorsette, Kenrick, ;
Vernell and Cheryl Huyler, Shenique Thompson, Rodney Smith, Austin :
Cole, Sandra Anderson, Tamika and Eldon Johnson, Yovell Thompson,
Gaylene Cole, Quentin Scott, Akeem, Kanya, Adonis, Leonardo Carey, :
Jahson, Wayne Carey Jr., Gaynell Cole, Garbrielle McBride, Genae, :
Gianina McBride, Nicholas Jr., Cordell Carey Jr., Eric, Akilah Lightbourne, :
Ashante Cooper, Wellington Jr., Jewell, Terrell Carey, Vanessa Cole, :
Denise, Antoinette and Ricardo Bannister of Freeport, Nadine Cole, :
Marilyn Neymour and Nicole Dorsette; Special friends: Jermaine }
Edwards of Jamaica, Kareem and Felicia Hanna, Gia Burnside, Shakira ;
Dean, Javon Rolle, Indera, Vinette, Pierre, Feliciad, Genell, Mrs. :
Marcella, Staff and Students of Cameron University, Oklahoma. }
godchildren: Derrick Edgecombe, Karae Hanna, Dwayne Charles Jr., :
Kenneth Ferguson Jr.; other relatives and friends including: The Nairns, :
Rolle's, Stuarts of Freeport, Grand Bahama, Fowler, Harold and Mrs. :
Cole, Naomi Williams, Marjorie Johnson, Pratt's, Evans, Neely's, Coles :
and Pennerman families; Apostle and Mother Wallace, Pastor Carlos :
and Evangelist Allison Wallace, Pastor Benjamin and Mother Forbes, :
Apostle and Mother Duncombe (Andros), Mother Burrows, Pastor
Preston and Evangelist Collins, Pastor Johnny and Brenda Martin, :
WeeCare Committee, Youth Choir and Director Cherrine Hart, Missionary :
Department and the entire End Time Family, Priest Wellington Wallace :
and Family, Nathaniel and Winnifred Knowles, Mrs. Saunders, The :
Bowes and the Bahama Avenue Family, BCM of Lawton Ok., Donnahue :
and Sis. Mae and family, Romeo and family, Mr. & Mrs. LeGendre and :
family (Trinidad and Tobago), Patricia Sawyer and family, Denise }
Sawyer, Pastor of Towanda Methodist Church, Daisy Middleton, Sis. :
Burrows, Dwight and Miriam Charlow, Mrs. Okpuno, Aquinas Class :
of 1985, Alphonso and Willimae Smith, Mr. & Mrs. Edwards and Family :
of Jamaica, Kelly Hamilton, Janet Bain, Jerome Franks of Miami, Fla., :
and Courtnell Brown (Hairdresser). Special Thanks to S/N Kemp and :
Mrs. King, Dr. Dames and Family, Nursing Officers, S/N, TCN, Surgical :
Techs, Porters, Senior Clerk, Maids, Anaesthetic Associates of Main :
Operating Theatre, Sister Curry and Oliver, Dr. Farquharson and Staff :
of Bahamas Surgical Associates, Dr. Munroe, Dr. Barnett, Doctors :

and Nurses of ICU, Doctors and Nurses of Comanche and Norman
Regional Hospital especially 4 West, Rufus Pholemus, Doctors Moss,
Nwosa, Morgan, Lloyd, Burrows, T. Ferguson, Gynae Department,
Surgical and Vascular Team, Anaesthetic Department, Assist America
Insurance Company, the entire staff of PMH and all those whom
Sharmaine had impacted.

Friends may pay their lat respects at Demeritte's Funeral Home, Market
Street, from 10-6:00 p.m. on Saturday & on Sunday at the church
from 10:00 a.m. until service time.

Romeo
Bain, 30

a resident of Bowen Sound, Andros,
who died on 2nd may, 2009, will be
held at St. Peter's Anglican Church,
Bowen Sound, Andros, on Saturday
at 11:00 a.m. Officiating will be Rev.
Fr. Donald G. Kerr. Interment follows
in Fresh Creek, Andros.
Left to cherish his memories are his
wife: Vanessa Bain; his parents:
Sidney and Amanda Bain; six
brothers: Hermon, Dennis, Taras,
Raynor, Renardo and Dircris Bain;
six sisters: Beverly Clarke, Deborah Bomar, Patrice and Evangelist
Natasha Miller, Evangelist Kimberlyn Darville and Valencia Bain; father-
in-law: Vincent Symonette; mother-in-law: Jennifer Symonette; sisters-
in-law: Evangelist Antoinette, Terry, Tarama and Wonda Bain, Natasha,
Savannah and Mikiah Symonette, Tiffany Johnson and Tamara
Duncombe; brothers-in-law: Ron Bomar, Brian and Michael Miller,
Andre Darville, Vincent Jr. Symonette, Joel Johnson, Stephen Moultrie
and Latrell Symonette; nephews: Deneico, Desmond, Sidney, Derek,
Dennis Jr., Taras Jr., Nearo, Dashano and Renardo Jr. Bain, Livingston,
Rakeem and Kim Clarke, Hugh Edgecombe, Rickmon and Donniel
Deveaux, Shanard, Brian Jr., and Michael Jr. Miller, Ramon and Renard
Mackey, Doreen Bomar, Phillip and Donavon; nieces: D'Nash, Jqella,
Jessica, Rayana, Donnika, Shania and Suray Bain, Sinclear, Annyah,
Roshan and Alyssa Clarke, Britney and Demeteria Edgecombe,
Mataeyah Bomar, Desiray Deveaux, Angell Darville, Miacha Miller,
Dushinka, Daria and Darisha, Riche and Delia Symonette; uncles:
Rudolph, Pastor Thomas and Elder Nathaniel Mackey, Israel Bain,
Hubert Curtis, Bishop Ellis Farrington, Ernest Duncombe, Wellington
Burrows, Jason Smith and Lawrence Burrows; aunts: Bloomon Mackey,
Sis. Gertrude Newton, Catachist Aline Wilson, Mother Daisy Farrington,
Mother Beatrice Davis, Evangelist Gloria Curtis, Evangelist Madline
Mackey, Sis. Elizabeth, Paula Smith, Pearline Burrows and Christine
Smith; other relatives and friends including: The Bain's, Mackey's,
Duncombe's, Wilson's, Curtis, Nesbitt's, Farrington's, Neymour's,
Robinson's, Clarke's, Seymonette's, Davis's, Coakley's, Anderson's,
and Neely's families; the Doctor and Nurses of Fresh Creek Clinic,
other numerous friends and relatives and the Bowen Sound Prowlers.

Friends may pay their last respects at Demeritte's Funeral Home,
Market Street, from 10-6:00 p.m. on Thursday & on Friday at the
church in Andros from 5:00 p.m. until service time.





THE TRIBUNE OBITUARIES

Bemeritte’s Funeral Home

BAHAMAS’ OLDEST MORTUARY
MARKET STREET ¢ P.O. BOX GT-2097 ¢ TEL: 323-5782

FUNERAL SERVICE FOR

Retired Nurse Erna Mae
"Erns" Brown, 64

a resident of Soldier Road
& formerly of Clarks Town,
Jamaica, who died on the
30 April, 2009, will be held
at Abundant Life Bible
Chapel, Abundant Life
Road, on Saturday at
11:00 a.m. Officiating will
be Pastor Gil Maycock.
Interment follows in
Lakeview Memorial
Gardens, JFK Drive.

Left to mourn her loss but celebrate her
magnificent legacy are her husband of thirty-nine
years: Asbert Lionel Brown; three daughters:
Jacqueline, Angella and Yvette Michelle; one
grandson: Kidane Bell; one niece: Beverly White;
two nephews: Roy White and Anthony White;
four grandnieces: Beulah, Angella, Vanessa and
Tia; one grandnephew: Jerry; seven brothers-in-
law: Antonio, Godfrey, T. Carmichael, Locksley
Sr., Julian Brown Sr., Lincoln Forbes and Wilson
Kelly: six sisters-in-law: Elaine Forbes, Lorna
Greene, Vernice Brown, Marilyn and Arlene Brown
and Verneva Whyms; grand nephews: Terrance
Brown Jr., Jamaal, Locksley Jr., Audirio Sears,
Julian Jr., Travis Raker: six nieces-in-law; Sherry
Neely, Teryl, Lynette, Tamara and Kristen Brown
and, Chikera Greene and numerous other relatives
and friends including: Celestine Bootle, Cora
Jones, Katrinka Johnson, Kaylus Horton, Maurice
Ferguson, Dr. Conville Brown, Dr. lferenta, Doctors
& Nurses of ICU at Princess Margaret Hospital,
Erma Carey, Jacqueline Rolle, Valentino Bethel,
Dr. Sands, Abundant Life & BFM Prayer Warriors.

Friends may pay their last respects at Demeritte's
Funeral Home, Market Street, from 10-6:00 p.m.
on Friday & on Saturday at the church from 10:00
a.m. until service time.

THURSDAY, MAY 14, 2009,

Commonfuealth Huneral 4 one

& Independence Drive « Phone: 341-4055 a

FUNERAL SERVICE FOR

BENJAMIN FRANKLYN

WILSON, 33
Affectionately called “Big Griff’

of Wemyss Bight, Eleuthera,
will be held on Saturday
11:00 a.m. at Voice of
Deliverance Faith Ministries,
Wemyss Bight, Eleuthera.
Bishop Ernest Sweeting,
assisted by Pastor Paul
Thompson, Prophet Anthony
Miller and Rev. Cedric Hall
will officiate and interment
will follow in the Public
Cemetery, Wemyss Bight,
Eleuthera.

Left to cherish fond

memories are his mother,
Mary Wilson; father, Jimmy Wilson; three sisters, Helena Gibson,
Stephanie Johnson, Margaret Taylor; one stepsister, Erica Sands;
three brothers, Allen Wright, Jimmy Jr., and Timothy Wilson;
grandparents, Stafford and Catherine Sweeting and Margaret
Thompson; seven aunts, Ellen Mackey, Rosanna Cash, Geraldine,
Veronica, Nathalie and Lee Sweeting and Patricia Sands; six
uncles, Bishop Earnest Sweeting, George, Austin and Nelson
Sweeting, Anthony Cash and Jonathan Mackey; seven nieces,
Elgina, Tiffany, Brittney, Glendrea, Timmesha, Alena and Cornelle;
eleven nephews, Shavado, Shawn, Lanardo, Derrick, Bradley,
Glenroy Jr., Max, Miles, Elgin Jr., Javin and Allan; five grand
aunts, Dorcus Strachan, Vera Rolle, Mable Delancy, Sybil and
Agnes Sweeting; one granduncle, Gifford Sweeting; two sisters-
in-law, Claudia Wilson and Shera Wright; three brothers-in-law,
Allan Johnson, Elgin Gibson and Glenroy Taylor; one godfather,
John Pinder; one godmother, Val; six best friends, Carlin, Kevin,
Keno, Glen, Owen and Whoopi; a host of other relatives and
friends including, Mr. Oswald Ingraham, MP Rock Sound,
Eleuthera and family, the Wemyss Bight community, Mr James
Young and family, Mr Gary Sands and family, Abby and family,
Mark and family, the members of the Assemblies of God Church,
Retta and family, the staff from Princess Cay, Half-moon Cay,
Vernita Sweeting, Mr Paul Thompson and family, Mr Daniel
Nixon and family, and the Taylor family.

Relatives and friends may view the remains at THE CHAPEL
OF MEMORIES COMMONWEALTH FUNERAL HOME
INDEPENDENCE DRIVE on Thursday from 5:00 - 7:30 p.m.
on Friday from 10:00 - 11:30 a.m. and in Wemyss Bight, Eleuthera
on Friday at Assemblies of God from 7:30 p.m. and on Saturday
at Voice of Deliverance from 9:30 a.m. to service time.



PAGE 21



Full Text

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N N A A S S S S A A U U A A N N D D B B A A H H A A M M A A I I S S L L A A N N D D S S L L E E A A D D I I N N G G N N E E W W S S P P A A P P E E R R 500 jobs will go as r esort closes C M Y K C M Y K Volume: 105 No.142THURSDAY, MAY 14, 2009 PRICE – 75 (Abaco and Grand Bahama $1.25 WEATHER SUNSHINE ANDBREEZY HIGH 85F LOW 77F n By TANEKA THOMPSON Tribune Staff Reporter tthompson@tribunemedia.net EXUMA'S economy is set to receive a devastating blow when the island's largest employer the Four Seasons Resort at Emerald Bay shuts its doors in a little under two weeks, a move that will place more than 500 workers on the unemployment line. " It's bad news for Exuma as you know that's an anchor project i n Exuma and the government will do anything in its power to facilitate the re-opening of the hotel," said Labour Minister Dion Foulkes, adding that the receiversf or Emerald Bay said the closure was a "temporary" measure until they secure a new buyer for the property. Mr Foulkes, who said he was informed of the decision on Tuesday, said his ministry would work to ensure that the redundant work ers are paid severance packages and "any other legal entitlement." "As Minister of Labour that's one of the things that I'm concerned about," he said. Employees received a memo on Tuesday asking them to convene for a general meeting yesterday where they were told that as of May 26, the luxury resort would b e closing down, The Tribune learned. The workers a number of whom live on site in employee housing have until June, 15 to leave the property, according to employees. Angry calls from the soon-to-be redundant workers in Exuma poured into The Tribune yesterday, as disgruntled staff fumed at what they called short notice of the closure, coupled with the fact that there were no government officials at yesterday's meeting to represent them. "Someone needs to come in and stand up for us Bahamians because we were all in shock," said one worker who dedicated two years to the company. She is now hoping family in Nassau can help find her accommodations as she prepares to return to the capital to look for work. Workers said although they were promised severance pay they are worried resort officials may not make good on this pledge. The Four Seasons at Emerald Bay to shut doors in two weeks The Tribune ANYTIME ... ANYPLACE , WE RE #1 B AHAMASEDITION TRY OUR SOUTHERN CHICKEN BISCUIT www.tribune242.com I N S I D E CLASSIFIEDSTRADER CLASSIFIEDSTRADER I N S I D E CARS! CARS! CARS! OBITUARIES and RELIGION INTODAY’STRIBUNE JOBSAND HELPWANTED L L O O A A D D S S O O F F SEE page eight The family of murdered banker ‘have clear idea of his enemies’ n B y MEGAN REYNOLDS Tribune Staff Reporter mreynolds@ tribunemedia.net THE family of murdered investment banker Hywel J ones announced at a press conference yesterday that t hey have a clear idea of who his enemies were. Mr Jones’ brother Ilt Jones, 49, said his brother was liked and respected by almost everyone he knew, and therefore police should have little t rouble identifying who may have been in conflict with the 5 5-year-old businessman. Assistant Commissioner of Police Raymond Gibson gave his assurance that the police will follow every lead and interview whoever they may need to during the course of the investigation. Hywel Jones was shot in JONESFAMILYPRESSCONFERENCE ILT JONES , the brother of Hywel Jones, speaks to the media yesterday at police h eadquarters. Hywel Jones’ relatives speak out at press conference SEE page 10 F e l i p M a j o r / T r i b u n e s t a f f n By ALISON LOWE Tribune Staff Reporter alowe@tribunemedia.net IF ANYTHINGcomes of the “apparent debacle” culminating in the resignation of the director of Lands and Surveys it should be a “clearly enunciated and transpar ent policy relative to the grant of Bahamian land,” said PLP chairman Glenys HannaMartin. “Crown land ought to be transmitted to citizens in a way that advances our national development for the greater good of our people. The process should be fair and transparent and conducted in a considered and principled fashion, one which is accessible to all Bahamians. “There must now be a clearly articulated policy which reflects the modern needs and future progress of our PLP chair man calls for transparent land policy BAHAMIANS were reportedly among a group of Haitian migrants whose boat capsized off the coast of Florida on Wednesday leaving as many as 11 people dead. According to the Associate Press, 21 people were pulled from the water off Fort Lauderdale, seven of them were unresponsive. Those seven were taken to hospital. The boat capsized about 2 am, but the Coast Guard didn't learn about it until another boater called more than 10 hours later. It was unclear where the boat was coming from or how many people might still be in the water. Two helicopters, a jet and three boats were involved in the rescue. Bahamians r epor tedly among group whose boat capsized SEE page 10 GLENYS HANNA-MARTIN INSIDE FNM BL AMED F OR LETTING FULLY FURNISHED CLINIC SIT IDLE P AGETWO TWO MEN AND BOY, 16, CHARGED WITH MURDER PAGETHREE CYNTHIA PRATT YET TO DECIDE ON POLITICAL FUTURE PAGEFIVE n By ALISON LOWE Tribune Staff Reporter alowe@tribunemedia.net A “MEANINGFUL” Freedom of Information Act that would allow the media and public access to records kept by the government and its agencies could have helped prevent the circumstances that led to the resignation of the Director of Lands and Surveys on Monday, a prominent lawyer said yesterday. “A FOIA would’ve been helpful in ensuring propriety (in the Tex Turnquest situation),” said Fred Smith, attorney with the law firm Callenders and Co. and President of the Grand Bahama Human Rights Association. “Information about who is receiving Crown grants should be readily available even as applica tions or requests are made so that it is all transparent and above board after all although it’s Call for ‘meaningful’ Freedom of Information Act in light of land row SEE page 10

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OPPOSITION chairman Glenys Hanna-Martin said that she was “embarrassed” byP rime Minister Hubert Ingra ham’s comments during a pre sentation at the first annual customer service conference for Immigration officers. “While I agree wholeheart edly with the prime minister’s m essage that there should be institutionalised respect for all peoples, it is a pity that he chose to overshadow an otherwise positive message with what I would call most unfortunate remarks,” she said. Addressing claims that some immigration officers use excessive force during apprehension and detention exercises, Prime Minister Hubert Ingraham said that his government does not tolerate the abuse of detainees or suspected illegal immigrants. The prime minister also said that the government will not “look the other way” when evi dence supports allegations of corruption in the public service. He focused on allegations of immigration officials accepting bribes at ports of entry or ine xchange for falsifying docu ments or speeding up work per mit and residence application processes. The keynote speaker at the first annual customer service conference for the ImmigrationD epartment held at the Wyndham Cable Beach Resort on Monday, Mr Ingraham expressed regret that a “pay to play” culture has developed in the country’s public sector. Mrs Hanna-Martin said that while she acknowledges that there are some individuals in all sectors of society – includ ing politics – who seek personal advantage over and above national interest”, she believes that there are fine officers in the Immigration Department. “Immigration officers, in particular, are entrusted with the protection of our borders, sometimes at great personal risk to their safety. That a person no less than our prime minister would see a gathering of such Bahamians at an event designedto enhance and improve their profession as an opportunity to negatively impugn them in sucha blanket fashion, is very unfor tunate and deeply offensive,” Mrs Hanna-Martin said. THE FNM has allowed a $1.3 million clinic to sit idle and unused, PLP Senator JeromeF itzgerald said yesterday. Built by the National Insurance Board in Grand Cay, Abaco, the clinic was completed more than t wo years ago and is fully furnished. But Mr Fitzgerald said patients are forced to use the old clinic while a modern state of the artm edical facility just sits unused. He also said a fully furnished residence for the doctor or nurse also remains unoccupied. Here we are today speaking about the wonderful changes taking place in communications, emails, e-health, e-education, etc, and the Member of Parliament for North Abaco and the MinisterH ealth both failed to discharge this vital obligation to the people of Grand Cay,” the senator said yesterday during debate on the C ommunications Bill in the Senate. Mr Fitzgerald said the Prime Minister did the same thing in South Andros when his party came to office in 1992 and founda brand new clinic in Johnson’s South Andros, which he refused to open and allowed the building to sit and deteriorated for 10 y ears. Rusted “The standby generator sat and r usted and it was a very costly undertaking to refurbish the clinic and replace the equipment. It was another waste of public f unds. Are we seeing a repeat of this on Grand Cay? This is contrary to what he said in the Trust Manifesto of 2007,” he said. H e said this was yet another example of poor management of t he nation’s affairs. “This FNM Government; the n ew Ministry of Housing and the Bahamas Mortgage Building justw est of the Ministry Of Works, J FK Drive, which was to be e quipped with the state of the art c ommunication. “Here we are, Madam Presid ent, two years later and this virtually completed building just sits u noccupied. What a waste. Where is the Trust, where is the account-a bility, where is the transparency?” Mr Fitzgerald asked. He s aid Bahamians will recall just over two years ago the 2007 Gene ral Elections when the FNM boasted of having tried and p roven leadership, if what was just disclosed is a crowning exam-p le of trusted, tried and proven leadership then we all can apprec iate the very serious dilemma the Bahamas now finds itself. C M Y K C M Y K LOCAL NEWS PAGE 2, THURSDAY, MAY 14, 2009 THE TRIBUNE Nassau Collins Ave 242 322 2341 Thompson Blvd 242 325 8776 Soldier Rd North 242 393 6286 Family Islands Freeport 242 352 7119 Abaco 242 367 2688 Exuma 242 336 2420www.jsjohnson.com ADWORKS 2009Everything I own and love is insured with J.S. Johnson Peace of mind comes with knowing were all covered --no matter what THE Bahamas’ extraordinarily high utilities expenses are not sustainable and threaten the viability of not just tourism, but many of the country’s important industries, chairman and CEO of Baha Mar Resorts Sarkis Izmirlian said. In a op-ed appearing in The Tribune today, Mr Izmirlian said that in order to be a leading vacation des tination, it is essential that the Bahamas has modern and effective telecommuni cations and energy infra structures in place. “Guests must be able to connect rapidly and reliably for voice, data and multimedia content through fixed and mobile phone lines. Government and the private sectors must develop cre ative solutions to meet our energy needs in a low-cost sustainable way, including seriously assessing alternative sources like solar and wind power, he said. The move toward privati sation of BTC represents, Mr Izmiralian said, an important step in this direction. “As Bahamians, we traditionally address adversity with an optimistic, forwardlooking attitude and actions to match. It is critical, therefore, that the actions we take to minimise the length and severity of the current economic slowdown also include longer term strategic initiatives to posi tion the Bahamas to take full advantage of a global eco nomic recovery. Strengthen ing our tourism industry now and making the Bahamas the top destination in the Caribbean are key,” he said. The CEO said tourism is central to the long term eco nomic and social well-being of the Bahamas. “Tourism brings in capital, enhances property values and stimulates major economic development at the community level. Tourism means jobs. Think of the thousands of jobs in our country that have been created by the businesses that directly and indi rectly support the tourist trade,” he said. “Since competition globally for tourist dollars is fierce, it is imperative that the Bahamas be viewed around the world as the vacation destination of choice. Improving key infra structure, transportation, service and technology components is vital to this effort. It is incumbent upon our pri vate sector to play an important role both as responsible corporate,” Mr Izmi ralian said. SEE Mr Izmirlian’s full statement on page nine. Unused ... despite costing $1.3 million FNM blamed for letting fully furnished clinic sit idle PLP chairman ‘embarrassed’ by PM’s comments High utilities expenses ‘are not sustainable’ T o have your say on this or any other issue, email The Tribune at: l etters@tribunemedia.net or deliver your letter to The Tribune o n Shirley Street, P.O. Box N-3207 STATE OF THE ART FACILITY: Clinic (above and below SPACIOUS: The medical facility is unoccupied.

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n By MEGAN REYNOLDS Tribune Staff Reporter mreynolds@tribunemedia.net INNOVATIVE legislation d rafted “by pharmacists for pharmacists” has been welcomed by i ndustry stakeholders across the Bahamas who say it will open up career opportunities and interna tional trade. The Bahamas Pharmaceutical Association (BPA pushing for an overhaul of outdated 1960s legislation for more than 20 years, and worked with Minister of Health Hubert Minnis to develop the Pharmacy Act 2009. Intensive research of pharma ceutical laws around the world was carried out by members of the BPA who also attended international conferences, and sought input from local pharmacists to develop the new laws which not o nly introduce standards for the registration, importation and dis tribution of medicines, but also establish education requirements and improved licensing procedures for professionals. BPA president Philip Gray said he particularly welcomes the establishment of the Pharmacy C ouncil of the Bahamas, a regu latory body made up of pharmac ists and individuals from the private and public sector, which will develop, update and enforce national standards and regula tions. M r Gray said the council will ensure there is greater account ability in the industry, and he hopes the changes will give people more confidence in the medications they buy. He said: “The act also seeks to reinforce the patient-centred practice of pharmacy that has always been integral to the profession in the Bahamas.” And the legislation will create a number of lucrative jobs for those interested in pursuing careers as pharmaceutical consultants or t eachers in the industry, Mr Gray said. BPA vice-president Mimi Roberts, whose father Pedro Roberts Jr pushed for new legislation 20 years ago, is now cele brating the fruits of a generational campaign. She said: “It’s my dream that t he Bahamas will become more of a transshipment point for the rest o f the Caribbean. “It would be a nice place to invest in, but to do that we have to have legislation in place, and this will allow us to be that type ofc ountry where we have bigger business.” Chairman of the legislative committee Dr Marvin Smith said: “Pharmacists pushed for the bill and it’s really the first time the government has taken someone else’s draft and said ‘we will work with you’. The government has done a good move in terms of facilitating local input and needs to be commended for that.” C M Y K C M Y K LOCAL NEWS THE TRIBUNE THURSDAY, MAY 14, 2009, PAGE 3 Drugs-forguns scheme:n o charges yet after arrests I mmigration Dept drafting customer service blueprint 3 plead not guilty in Nicole Smith drug case In brief n By NATARIO McKENZIE Tribune Staff Reporter T WO men and a 16-year-old boy were arraigned in Magistrate’s Court yesterday on a murder charge. Police have charged Ramal Colebrooke, 23, of Nassau Village, Blake Rahming, 22, of Old Cedar Street and a 16-year-old of Augusta Street with the m urder of Marc Estimable. Mr Estimable, 29, was shot at his Gamble Heights home around 1am on Sunday, May 3. Police think he was fatally wounded in the left side of his body after answering the door to a man who s aid he wanted to buy a phone card. A champagne coloured Honda was reportedly seen leaving the area after the weapon was fired. Mr Estimable was taken to hospital, but died a fter arrival. He was the 24th homicide victim of t he year. The accused, who appeared before Chief Magistrate Roger Gomez in Court One, Bank Lane, were not required to enter a plea to the murder charge. Attorney Murrio Ducille asked Chief Magistrate Gomez to make an order that his client be taken to hospital for medical attention. According to Mr Ducille, Colebrooke had been beaten while in police custody. Mr Ducille also criticised police for what he called the “vexing practice” of not allowing persons in custody to see their attorneys. Attorney Ian Cargill, who is representing the juvenile, told the court police had punched his client in the stomach several times in an effort to force him t o sign a document which he did not sign. He also c laimed his client had been in police custody for m ore than 96 hours. Attorney Edward Turner, who is representing Rahming, said police had his client in custody for four days. Chief Magistrate Gomez ordered the accused be taken to hospital for medical attention. The accused h ave been remanded to Her Majesty’s Prison. The c ase has been adjourned to May 18 and transferred t o Court 10, Nassau Street. THE police in Portland are yet to charge three fishermen who were picked up on Sunday o ff the coast of Long Bay in connection with an ongoing drugs-for-guns trade scheme. Two of the men are Jamaicans and the other is aB ahamian. The men were arrested on Sunday afternoon during a joint operation between the local m arine police and a team from the Jamaica Defence Force Coast Guard. The police say the two Jamaicans, who were under sur-v eillance for some time on suspicion of being involved in the scheme – which operates between Jamaica and Haiti – w ere detained with the Bahamian when the three were spotted aboard a 28-foot fibre glass fishing boat. The police say the men attempted to sail away when approached by the joint p olice/military team, which conducted a search of the vessel, b ut came up empty handed. The men remain in custody at a Port Antonio police detention facility. n BY LINDSAY THOMPSON THE Immigration Department is drafting a blueprint outlining solutions to various challenges it faces, Minister of State Branville McCartney said. The document, to be completed by the end of June, will outline policies and procedures to be carried out by the department in executing its mandate. Mr McCartney, who has responsibility for immigration, was speaking at the May 11-12 customer service training workshop and motivational seminar for Immigration offi cials. “Customer service is most essential to all establishments whether government or private enterprise,” he said. Earlier this year the Immi gration Department formed a customer service committee toreview each individual unit and determine how best the department can be made moree fficient and a better provider of quality customer service. “The Immigration Depart ment provides a service to Bahamians and visitors andwe must ensure that that serv ice is supreme,” Mr McCartn ey said. One objective of the seminar was to help Immigration officers appreciate that their various responsibilities – to guard, protect, welcome and facilitate – are not mutually exclusive. Participants included those who will be at the front lines during the FIFA football conference this month and the Miss Universe Pageant in August. However,Mr McCartney said, training seminars like this one will become “common practice” at the department. Two men and boy, 16, charged with murder MAGISTRATE’SCOURT ACCUSED: Blake Rahming, 22. Trio not required to enter plea ACCUSED: Ramal Colebrooke 23 Pharmacy legislation welcomed P H O T O S : F e l i p M a j o r / T r i b u n e s t a f f n LOS ANGELES Anna Nicole Smith's lawyerturned-boyfriend and two doctors pleaded not guilty Wednesday to charges they conspired to provide thousands of prescription pills to the former model before her overdose death two years ago. The appearance of Howard K. Stern and Drs. Khristine Ero shevich and Sandeep Kapoor in Superior Court set the stage for a preliminary hearing that all parties said could last at least two weeks. Deputy District Attorney Renee Rose said there are 1,400 pages of discovery in the case, which was investigated for two years before charges were filed. Court Commissioner Kristi Lousteau ordered documents in the case sealed, although attorneys said that about a quarter of the material has already been made public. The hearing was brief and Smith's name was never mentioned. Stern, Eroshevich and Kapoor stood before Lousteau with their lawyers. The defendants said "yes" when she asked if they were pleading not guilty and when they agreed to delay the matter until June 8 for setting of the preliminary hearing date. They declined to comment outside court.

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“THINGS FALL APART THE CENTER CANNOT HOLD.” Chinua Achebe chebe EDITOR, The Tribune. Thank you for allowing me a small space to express my views in your esteemed publication. For some time now I have observed the behaviour of some of our young men and decided to make my views known pub licly. As a mother of boys, I do not like what I see today in our society with regard to our young men. To start with there is a serious attitude of lawlessness that seems to pervade our public and private schools. There is little or no respect for teachers or peers and the climate’s very "cool" for the young men who choose not to take that route. Filthy, obscene language is no longer a hidden pasttime, to these young men, but is said boldly within the hearing ofa dults who they dare to com ment. I ask myself over and over where did this type of behaviour come from and, of course, there are all sorts of answers. The main one being these y oung men are the offspring of single mothers and a single parent home. That excuse is and has always been utter nonsense as there are many single mothers out there, inclusive of myself, who are raising sons alone, albeit with familial support, who are NOT behaving like these young men. Their inability to reason shows extreme ignorance, which is startling as most of these young men are of school age and should have the ability to solve a problem without resorting to using their fists or a lethal weapon. The level of this problem is hightening as the murder rate is climbing rapidly. No one seems to have a v iable solution. Many young men practically speak another language besides dialect. They are hardly understood when they speak. They wear their trousers b ound tightly to their thighs by b elts, giving no regard to the waist that their trousers are made for. Their clothes are generally two and three sizes too big. The scariest part of all of this is the blatant disrespect for our law enforcement officers. They are shooting at our police officers, cursing at them, spitting at them and raising fistsat them. How should the officers respond to protect themselves? How can our society truly flourish? Something is definitely wrong and we, as a society, must address this before we completely lose a generation. All parents need to take the reins and stop protecting their children in wrong doing. Stop hid ing your sons when the law is looking for them and stop putting the lives of teachers in danger because they discipline your child for doing something that is wrong and against the school’s rules. That’s a perfect place to start. The problem starts at home and the correction of the problem will have to begin in theh ome but it will take national participation to put our young men back in order and on track before it’s too late. Elizabeth E.M. Thompson Nassau, M ay 12, 2009. C M Y K C M Y K EDITORIAL/LETTERS TO THE EDITOR PAGE 4, THURSDAY, MAY 14, 2009 THE TRIBUNE The Tribune Limited NULLIUS ADDICTUS JURARE IN VERBA MAGISTRI Being Bound to Swear to The Dogmas of No Master L EON E. H. DUPUCH, Publisher/Editor 1903-1914 S IR ETIENNE DUPUCH, Kt., O.B.E., K.M., K.C.S.G., (Hon. P ublisher/Editor 1919-1972 Contributing Editor 1972-1991 EILEEN DUPUCH CARRON, C.M.G., M.S., B.A., LL.B. P ublisher/Editor 1972Published Daily Monday to Saturday S hirley Street, P.O. Box N-3207, Nassau, Bahamas Insurance Management Building., P.O. F-485, Freeport, Grand Bahama T ELEPHONES Switchboard (News, Circulation and Advertising Advertising Manager (242 C irculation Department (242 N assau Fax: (242 Freeport, Grand Bahama: 1-(242 W EBSITE w ww.tribune242.com – updated daily at 2pm THE BAHAMAS has always prided itself on having a stable government, and a judicial system of the highest repute. As a matter off act it was two of this country’s top selling points when trying to attract investors to the islands. W hen there was debate on breaking away from this country’s highest appeal court the P rivy Council in London the most telling argument was that foreign investors would not feel the same confidence with a Caribbean court as a final court of appeal. In other words, theh igh standing of our British-inherited courts w as considered one of our main attractions. This is no longer so. Our court system has b een in decline for some years. It is now in free fall. For a highly respected profession made u p of men and women who wore the wig and gown with pride, about whom there was seldom a breath of scandal, there is now only disrespect and suspicion. Only yesterday two maids discussing crime were convinced that people were now settling their own disputes in the streets because they can’t get into the courts and when they do they often can’t find justice. T he Supreme Court, with important international cases pending, is now in a state of collapse with the sudden resignation of senior justice John Lyons. Justice Lyons, who was hearing most of the cases, was noted for his expert knowledge and handling of commercial disputes. The Lyons matter came to a head when a lawyer asked that the judge recuse himself from h earing the Central Bank of Ecuador case, because of the bias and animosity he had shown toward the lawyer’s firm, Callender’s & Co. The judge refused. The matter went to appeal, and the judge’s attitude, bias against the Callender firm, and his general behaviour was the issue. Justice Lyons’ perceived bias resulted from an earlier case in which the Callender firm was a lso involved. It was a case from which Justice Lyons had earlier recused himself saying he did n ot have enough time to hear it. The lot fell to Justice Anita Allen. One of the issues in that case was the appointment of an accountant whose credentials were being questioned by the litigants. Justice Allen wondered whethers he should also recuse herself because of the details she had recently learned in connection w ith that appointment. She was told that Mr Lyons had forced the appointment on the comp lainants, threatening to walk out of court if they did not agree the accountant he had selected. However, Justice Allen later learned that the accountant’s sister had “more than a friendship” with the judge, and that the sister was assisting her brother in his work. She had tod ecide whether the accountant’s report, which the litigants complained was not adequate,s hould be approved. She wanted to be up front with the court and inform them of the inform ation that had come to her attention. At the time Justice Lyons was in Australia on leave. He hurriedly returned to the Bahamas, and when a Callender lawyer walked into hisc ourt room in another case he saw “blood dripp ing from them after the execution.” And on April 17, before ordering another C allender lawyer from his court room, he announced that he was not going to deal with a ny matters “with accounting and accountants with your firm.” According to the lawyer the judge grew angrier. In a cooler moment, Mr Lyons admitted that it was unwise of him to have undertaken active court duties until his “emotions had fully settled.” He said that his anger had “now dissi pated” and that there was no “real danger of bias against any clients of Messrs Callenders.” H owever, in addition to his detractors, the judge had his defenders who felt he had cause for frustration because, as he had himself said, “the Supreme Court is a mess and in disarray” and he was not going to cover for lawyers any more. Former attorney general Alfred Sears believed the judge “brought a level of efficien cy which helped to build the reputation of the B ahamas as a financial centre and a place where complex commercial matters could be speedily adjudicated.” Many others agreed. However, much blame lies with the system itself. There really is no more time for finger pointing. There is so much wrong that government should take this opportunity to sweep with a clean broom and start all over again. A strong and determined Chief Justice should be a ppointed who will bring life, direction and reform to the system. L awyers who don’t participate in the functions of the Bar Council and Association, failing, for example, to show up to vote for strong and capable officers are also to blame for deterio rating standards. H e spoke in the eighteenth century, but what Edmund Burke said then carries the same Truth t oday: “It is necessary only for the good man to do nothing for evil to triumph.” T he trouble with this country is that too many good men and good women say and do nothing. Attitude of lawlessness pervading our schools LETTERS letters@tribunemedia.net Judicial system in disarray '(6,*1 (1*,1((5,1* &203(7,7,9(,&,1* $67%,'',1*,1)250$7,21 5RDGWR&LW\'XPSDIWHUUHPL[ (PDLOJJRQJRUD#FRUDOZDYHFRP EDITOR, The Tribune . A terrible odour is sickening motorists passing the bush at the traffic light next to the Montagu ramp. Some days it’s worse than others, but the bush is clearly being used as an outdoor toilet and it often stinks. To my knowledge, there is no running water or toilets at the ramp and this in itself is cause for serious health concerns. From time to time, the conch shells with rotting matter still inside are left in the sun and this, combined with the odour from the bush, is terri ble. It’s bad enough for us locals, but I was embar rassed recently to see a small group of tourists walk by holding their noses. “Native fish market,” one commented. The market, if it is allowed to continue to exist, needs to be regulated and managed, and running water needs to be put in place. It is not clean. As you know, it is also a traffic nightmare because Bahamians seem to have a problem pulling over in the parking area and walking a few yards. They have to block the street on a major traffic artery and, of course, the police are nowhere to be seen. Then there are the jet skis that block traffic because of the ill-conceived idea of placing a feeder road opposite the ramp that cuts right in the middle of a main road. There is actually lots of land to the west of the ramp and this would be the logical place for a feeder road. The market has grown from a one man show selling jacks from his dinghy into a free for all where anyone can sell anything – T-shirts, hats, seafood, fruit and vegetables – you name it. It is doubtful that all of these people have business licences. Do the police even check, or is this just another example of selective law enforce ment? A JOHNSON Nassau, May 13, 2009 (This area is a disgrace. It should never have been allowed to exist. It certainly is an example of selective law and a lack of political will. Ed). ‘Native fish market’ had tourists holding their noses

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n B y NATARIO McKENZIE Tribune Staff reporter A WOMANpolice officer testified in the Supreme Court yester-d ay that she feared for her life after being struck in the head with shotgun pellets during a hold-up at aS cotiabank branch last July. James Miller, Anthony Williams and Janquo Mackey, are accused of robbing the Soldier Road and EastS treet South branch of Scotiabank o n July 2, 2008. They are also accused of the attempted murder of Corporal Natasha Black, causing grievous harm; possession of a f irearm with intent to endanger the life of another; possession of a firearm with intent to resist lawful arrest and causing harm. C orporal Black testified yesterd ay that on Wednesday, July 2, she and another female officer left the Wulff Road Police Station to make inquiries in the East Street South a rea. She said that while in the area of Lil General Convenience Store, they received information from the police control room and as a result headed to Scotiabank on East Street S outh and Soldier Road. Officer Black told the court that s he was unable to drive through the western entrance of the bank’s parki ng lot because traffic was backed up. She said that while in traffic, she noticed what appeared to be the figure of a man peeking through the bottom portion of the bank’s glass e ntrance door. She told the court that after the m an left the bank, she noticed that he was wearing a mask and had what a ppeared to be a silver and black shotgun in his hand. She testified that the gunman l ooked in the direction of the patrol car and fired the weapon. “Immediately I felt pain in the left side of my head,” Ms Black told the court. S he said blood began to pour from the left side of her head and shef eared for her life. Corporal Black told the court that when she looked b ack she saw the man pointing the gun in the direction of the patrol car again. While driving off, she said she heard a second gun shot. O fficer Black then testified that while driving south on East Street she noticed several marked police cars heading north to the scene of t he robbery. She said that at that point she stopped the patrol car, got out of the driver’s seat and into the passenger’s seat. She told the court that she was then taken to the Princess Margaret Hospital where she under w ent surgery. Officer Black said that three shotg un pellets were removed from the left side of her head and that she is supposed to have a second surgery to remove the remaining eight pellets. Eileen Claire, senior manager of field operations at Scotiabank, told the court yesterday that she per formed a review of the Scotiabank branch following the robbery to d etermine how much money was taken. She said that the money left in the cashier’s till was balanced with w hat had been computed in the bank’s system and it was determined that $21,344 had been taken. Arnette Watson, manager of Scotiabank’s East Street South and Sol-d ier Road branch, said that on the afternoon of July 2, police returnedt o the bank with a pillow case filled with money. She said that the cash w as counted and it was determined that there was $10,996 in the pillow case. The trial continues today before Justice Jon Isaacs. The prosecution ise xpected to call 31 witnesses. Mackey is represented by attorney Murrio Ducille, Williams is represented by Dorsey McPhee and Miller is repres enting himself. Vernal Collie, Ambrose Brown and Lennox Coleby are prosecuting the case. C M Y K C M Y K LOCAL NEWS THE TRIBUNE THURSDAY, MAY 14, 2009, PAGE 5 R ATS, ANTS, TERMITES, ROACHES, FLIES, MOSQUITOES, TICKS & FLEAS PHONE: 327-6464WE SEND ‘EM PACKIN’!STRUCKUM(DF55 n By ALISON LOWE Tribune Staff Reporter alowe@tribunemedia.net S TILL in mourning, St Cecelia MP Cynthia “Mother” Pratt yesterday said she has not yet made up her mind about her political future within the PLP, but will make an a nnouncement sometime after she returns to parliament for the budget debate. Hinting that her decision will rely upon the will of PLP leader Perry Christie, she said: “When I return to parliament I woulds peak with the leader and see what’s going on, and then I would make a statement at a l ater date. “You know, as with most of these things, if there’s any changes it would be done at the convention, and so nothing really would h appen before a convention but I don’t w ant to precede the leader and it’s fair for me to speak to him to find out what went on while I was out.” The budget debate will take place at the e nd of this month. It will be the first time Mrs Pratt attends parliament since the death of her husband Joseph Pratt in early April. The St Cecelia MP had previously indicated her intention to step down as deputy l eader of the PLP and not run for the post at a party convention expected to take place towards the end of 2009. However, it was in a press conference c alled to thank well-wishers, friends, cons tituents and loved-ones shortly after her husband’s death that she first signalled that she may not be so certain of her previous decision. F uelling speculation, she told reporters that she was not prepared to discuss her political future within the party at that time, but would make a statement shortly. It is known that several individuals in the p arty have an interest in vying for the post of deputy leader, among them Cat Island MP Philip “Brave” Davis and St Cecelia hopeful Paul Moss. Y esterday, Mrs Pratt said she “doesn’t w ant to focus on anything other than her husband’s life at this time.” “I’m still picking up the pieces my husband left behind, dealing with all the pay-m ents for his funeral and other issues”, she said. “When I return I think I will be more equipped.” Cynthia Pratt yet to decide on political future CYNTHIA PRATT Woman police officer eared for life’ after being struck by shotgun pellets Testimony given about Scotiabank branch hold-up

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n B y DENISE MAYCOCK Tribune Freeport Reporter d maycock@tribunemedia.net FREEPORT Winston Cox, executive director of the InterAmerican Development Bank for t he Caribbean, said that lending to local government developmentsh as climbed significantly in the last five years. H e told delegates on Tuesday at the fifth Commonwealth Local Government Conference that IDB loans in support of sub-national d evelopment represents a “sizable portion” of the bank's portfolio a cross the 48 member countries. Mr Cox reported that since 1 990, regional or local government institutions have been either executors, co-executors or direct borrowers of an estimated 27.8 per cent of the IDB’s lending volume, equivalent to $28.5 billion. “In three of the last five years, t he percentage has climbed to the 35 to 40 per cent range,” he said. M r Cox said that the InterAmerican Development Bank is a very important financial institution for the western hemisphere. He said its model has been copied in other parts of the world, particularly Asia and Africa. “It is the oldest of the regional d evelopment banks, and we are celebrating our 50th anniversary t his year,” he said. IDB, he said, partners with m ember countries to combat poverty and promote social equity. He said it works with governments as well as with the private sector, and seeks to achieve sustainable economic growth and increase competitiveness, modernise publici nstitutions, foster free trade, and encourage regional integration. M r Cox said the bank lends to national, provincial, state and municipal governments as well as autonomous public institutions. He noted that civil society organisations (CSOs tor companies are also eligible for IDB financing. H e listed some recent examples of loans to CSOs in Guyana which r esulted in the strengthening of civil society participation in povert y reduction and development in 2008. In Ecuador in 2007, lending went towards occupational train ing and job creation for persons with disabilities, and in Colombia funds went toward strengtheningc ivil society in an effort to reduce poverty. M r Cox represents the IDB in five Caribbean countries – the Bahamas, Barbados, Jamaica, Guyana and Trinidad and Tobago. He said: “I have not provided examples for the bank’s works in the five Caribbean countries that are members of the bank. I think t hat is because emphasis of the governments in this region has s ought to draw on other activities of the bank other than its activities in support of sub-national entities.” “I hope that those of you w ho are member countries of the bank will recognise that the bank c an play a role in supporting local government. “How you achieve this is really the challenge, but in many cases a simple technique is for the minister responsible for local govern ment to bend the ear of the minister of finance who is often the country’s representative on the board to these banks to tell them that this is what you will like those banks doing in our countries,” said Mr Cox. The IDB executive said that most countries in the region have committed to a model of decentralised governance, in both the political and fiscal policymaking arenas. C M Y K C M Y K LOCAL NEWS PAGE 6, THURSDAY, MAY 14, 2009 THE TRIBUNE T HE Bahamas Transshipment and Logistics Association has been formed to protect the interests of courier companies in the Bahamas. Twenty-three companies, representing around 300 employees, are c harter members. Walt Saunders of GWS Worldwide Express was elected president. Other BTLA executives are: Romell Knowles, vice president; T ara Cartwright, secretary; Trevor Adderley, asst secretary; A ndrew Burrow, treasurer; Susan Kelly, asst treasurer and Lahore Mackey, public relations officer. The directors are Kieron Dixon, Wayne Bryan and Chris Burrows. A ccording to Mr Saunders, BTLA’s mission is to promote and advance the common interests of companies engaged in messengercourier industry in the Bahamas and in the region; to provide information, education, referrals and the opportunity to network i n order to form logistical partnerships between carriers and shipp ers; to co-operate with authorities in air cargo security and to educate the public on the importance of the industry to the smooth running of other businesses in the country. TWO boutique resorts in the Family Islands – one in Exuma and the other in South Andros – are winning rave reviews on TripAdvisor.com, the user-generated destination review website that is playing an increasingly important role in shaping travel decisions. Visitors referred to one of the two resorts, Emerald Palms in South Andros, as “a home away from home without the hustle and bustle associated with large, all-inclusive resorts." Other visitors called it a “paradise exceeding expectation,” in which “quaint and rustic have been wonderfully mastered.” Of 56 reviews, 44 gave Emerald Palms a five-star rating, making it the number one of 11 hotels in Andros on TripAdvisor's popularity index. Though the 18-club room, 22-villa resort on a stretch of unspoiled beach with hundreds of palms is often referred to as a romantic getaway or a diver or fisherman’s haven, guests recommended it for families. A Canadian couple travelling with their 11-month-old son describe Emerald Palms as paradise, finding both peace and quiet in its "out of the way" location, perfect for a vacationing family. Its pristine environment paired with immaculate service, they said, sets the tone for a calming and relaxing vacation. A couple from Ontario, who visited in February, said the resort with complimentary kayaks, bikes, and other non-motorised craft available for guest use, was an ideal place to rejuvenate mind, body and soul while experiencing one of the last great, untouched destinations on Earth. Equally rave reviews went to Grand Isle Resort and Spa in Emerald Bay, Exuma, which has been rated number one of nine hotels in Exuma by TripAdvisor for the past three years. Visitors to the resort reported “personal service beyond expectation” combined with luxuriously-appointed villas, infinity pool and deck overlooking the bay and other amenities. One review called Grand Isle “a new level of paradise in exquisite surroundings." Another noted its “fantastic property.” The praise for both boutique properties bodes well for Family Island tourism. More than 15 million hotel reviews are posted on TripAdvisor.com, the nine-year old website that is emerging as a powerful unpaid tool driving business to or from one of the 212,000 hotels in 30,000 destinations included on the site. Two Family Island resorts win rave reviews on TripAdvisor PICTURED (top Caribbean urged to use IDB loans for local government development Association is formed to protect couriers’ interests

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LEADING up to the last g eneral election, the PLP had persons campaigning for them on radio stations, spreading the party’s “propaganda” at the public’se xpense,” Senator Frederick McAlpine said yesterday during his contribution to the Communications Bill. “The Bahamian people w ere the victims in this case. H ow could you use the people’s radio station to spread political propaganda,” hea sked. The importance of the i mplementation of URCA (Utilities Regulatory and Competition Authority) isb ecoming increasingly clear, Rev McAlpine said. T he new legislation, he said, will do great wonders for the communications sector in the Bahamas. We’re on our way to first-class status. It is time we stepped up from thea rchaic mode and become modernised, not just in our thinking and communica-t ion, but also in our legislation,” he said. T he FNM, he said, widened democracy to the e xtent that talk shows have become the order of the day. In my opinion, pre-1992 many felt that victimisation a nd intimidation was the order of the day. Even when our predecessors returned to office in 2002, the talks hows were not as popular; those who called often were u sually pro-PLP supporters. Very little criticism was h eard on talk shows, because most people were intimidated and fearful ofv ictimisation,”Rev McAlpine said. T he senator said that the masses were fearful to speak out while the PLP was in government. Hence, very little true feelings were expressed in r egards to their lack of performance. But when we, the FNM, are in office, all you could hear is talk. People are freet o call the radio station of their choice to talk for us or a gainst us. What a great democracy,” he said. MAKING good on the promise to bring daily flights to Cat Island, SkyBahamas Airlines, the Bahamian regional airline, will be launching a daily service into New Bight on Tuesday, May 19. In March of this year, the airline took a group of 19 persons t o New Bight and held a small ceremony at the Old Bight Gospel Chapel Mission Home, which cares for 13 children. It was then, that SkyBahamas Airlines announced plans to begin daily services into New Bight, Cat Island. SkyBahamas also adopted the home and celebrated with the c hildren by hosting a pizza party. The airline also supplied the home with groceries and gave its commitment to ongoing mon etary donations. I t is now two-months later and the much anticipated services to be operated by SkyBahamas Airlines into Cat Island are f inally here. The first official flight from the Lynden Pindling International Airport in Nassau will commence with one flight on Tuesday, May 19, at 10am into the New Bight Airport. T he daily departure time from the New Bight flight will be 11am. C M Y K C M Y K THE TRIBUNE THURSDAY, MAY 14, 2009, PAGE 7 Prof. of Medical OncologyProf. Karol Sikora MA, MB BChir, PhD, FRCR, FRCP, FFPM Dean of the University of Buckingham School of Medicine Director of Medical Oncology The Cancer CentreFriday, May 29, 2009Starting at 10amAt The Centreville Medical Pavilion 72 Collins AveTelephone: 502-9610Open to The PublicProf. of Oncology The Hon. Prof. Arthur Porter PC, MD, MBA, FACR, FACRO, FRCPC Director General & CEO McGill University Health Centre Managing Director & Director of Radiation Oncology The Cancer CentreSaturday, May 16, 2009Starting at 10amTHE CANCER CENTREannouncesThe Specialists Cancer Clinics Unlimited Mileage + CDW + Free UpgradeBahama BrezeForreservations,aswellastermsand conditionspleasecontactDestinationsat (786245-0520orat1-800-468-3334. B esuretouseratecodeRC1 a ndcoupon codeAU2253VLS whenmakingthe reservation.Ratesincludeunlimited mileageandCDW. OffervalidthroughJune30th2009. alamo.comU S $4 5D a i l y / $ 1 8 0 w e e k l y w h e n u s i n g t h e u p g ra d e c o u p o nM i d s i z e i n F l o r i d a a s l o w a s Claim that PLP ‘propaganda’ was spread at public’s expense SkyBahamas introduces new service to Cat Island Senator makes allegation during his contribution to Communications Bill Share your news The Tribune wants to hear from people who arem aking news in their neighbourhoods. Perhaps you are raising funds for ag ood cause, campaigning for i mprovements in the area or h ave won an award. I f so, call us on 322-1986 a nd share your story. LOCAL NEWS SENATOR FREDERICK MCALPINE

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n B y TIP BURROWS S ATURDAY NIGHT, May 9, when most people were eating dinner or getting ready for an evening out, several Humane Society of Grand Bahama staffers and volun-t eers were still hard at work along with visiting veterinarian Dr DebraS onnen-Campbell of Boston, who was in Freeport for a long weeke nd to do volunteer work at the Animal Welfare and Adoption C entre. With only five dog neuters to go, everyone was anticipating being home by 7.30pm after two long days. The shelter phone rang at 6 pm and the conversation that ensued was surreal. The caller, a c oncerned animal lover, said: “I just saw the most horrifying thing ont he beach. My husband and I noticed something far out to sea w hich appeared to be a small ani mal swimming. We kept watching and a few minutes later, a cat dragged itself out of the surf and collapsed on the beach. It appears t o have a badly broken leg, I can see a bone sticking out, and it is t oo weak to move.” HSGB volunteer Ashley Murp hy took off immediately for Coral Beach in Freeport, and by 6.45pm was back at the shelter with the little black and white female cat. The cat was covered in sand and salt, shocked, hypothermic, and her rear left leg was injured beyond repair. Dr Campbell sedated her in prepa ration for euthanasia but no one p resent, least of all Dr Campbell, c ould stomach that prospect for an animal who had shown such a s trong will to survive. The prepa rations quickly turned from euthanasia to amputation of the injured leg to try and save the cat’s life. Dr Campbell is an outstanding veterinarian with a background in shelter medicine and high volume spay/neuter. She is not an orthoped ic surgeon but wanted to give the c at a chance. She knew what to do, theoretically and practically, buth ad some concerns as the leg had multiple severe fractures and there w as no x-ray machine to determine the extent of the damage. She decided to call a vet friend in Boston who is an ortho specialist. High drama ensued while she t ried to reach him. At 8pm on a Saturday night, what were the c hances? Miraculously, her col league answered his phone, and Dr Campbell got the answers to her questions. Despite having been on her feet doing surgeries since 8am, s he proceeded with the major procedure of amputating the cat’s dam a ged leg. At 11pm the surgery was fin i shed. It was then a question of whether the cat would survive the night after all the shock and trauma she had endured. As if Dr Campbell wasn’t exhausted enough, she t ook the little cat home with her for the next two nights, with pain a nd antibiotic medicines, to monitor and keep her comfortable. I t confounds the imagination as to how this little cat ended up in this predicament but it can only be reasonably assumed she either jumped or was thrown off a boat. H ow she was able to swim any distance at all with such a badly b roken leg is astonishing. How she sustained the broken l eg is unbearable to think about. That she swam into a beach where people saw her, who cared enough to make a call, on an island where there are miles and miles of deserted beaches; that HSGB people were at the shelter after hours toa nswer the phone; that they were able to react immediately and rescue the cat; and that a veterinarian just happened to be standing at as urgery table already; defies all odds. T he courageous little cat has been named Nerissa (daughter of the sea) Phelps. She is doing very well and recuperating nicely. She will be available for adoption in a few weeks. The HSGB hopes to find an extra special home for this incredible kitty, who may well have used up many of her nine lives already, but surely deserves an exceptional home after her tenacious struggle to survive. If you are the special someone worthy of giving Nerissa a loving and safe home, please send email inquiries to info@hs-gb.org. Please note Nerissa must be strictly an indoor cat; no boats, please! C M Y K C M Y K LOCAL NEWS PAGE 8, THURSDAY, MAY 14, 2009 THE TRIBUNE Little cat’s incredible survival at sea story COURAGEOUS NERISS is doing very well and recuperating nicely. n WEST PALM BEACH, Fla. SOUTH FLORIDA water managers have approved Gov. Charlie Crist’s deal to buy farmland from the U.S. Sugar Corp. for future use in Everglades restoration, according to Associated Press. The South Florida Water Management District voted 6-1 Wednesday to pay $536 million bill for 73,000 acres of land from the company. U.S. Sugar is the nation’s largest cane sugar producer and owns a vast amount of land between Lake Okeechobee and the Everglades. An initial deal reached last year with the state would have cost $1.75 billion, but has twice since been revised to trim the price tag. The goal of the land purchase is to convert farm land into conservation land, allowing water managers to create a system to clean and store water before sending it south into the Everglades. Water managers approve $533M Everglades deal

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n By SARKIS IZMIRLIAN AS BAHAMIANS, we traditionally address adversity with an optimistic, forward-looking attitude and actions to match. It is critical, therefore, that the actions we take to minimise the length and severity of the current economic slowdown also include longer term strategic initiatives to position the Bahamas to take full advantage of a global economic recovery. Strengthening our tourism industry now and making the Bahamas the top destination in the Caribbean are key. Tourism is central to the long term economic and social wellbeing of the Bahamas. Tourism brings in capital, enhances property values and stimulates major economic development at the community level. Tourism means jobs. Think of the thousands of jobs in our country that have been created by the businesses that directly and indirectly support the tourist trade. Since competition globally for tourist dollars is fierce, it is imperative that the Bahamas be v iewed around the world as the v acation destination of choice. I mproving key infrastructure, transportation, service and technology components is vital to this effort. It is incumbent upon our private sector to play an important role both as respon sible corporate citizens and as stakeholders to build the long term economic well-being of this country. To our competitive advantage, the Bahamas offers all the basic defining elements of a world class vacation destination. It has beautiful beaches, friend ly people and a unique local cul ture that makes it all the more memorable. It is ideal for trav-ellers because its geographic location makes it easily accessi ble from North and South America and Europe. Are we making the best of these in-built advantages? I believe we increasingly risk letting ourselves down if we do not constantly continue to evolve as a destination. To secure our natural competitive edge, we must address the following: Airport Efficiency Lynden Pindling International airport needs to be among the friendliest and most efficient in the world. Typically, visitors only have precious few days to spend on our islands. We must become the easiest place in the Caribbean to visit. Modernising the airport structure is important, but we must do more. Among other initiatives, without sacrificing security, our Immigration and Customs must b e easier to navigate with far f ewer lines. Our departure process today is characterised by multi check points (two stand-alone check points and often another at the departure gate), rather than the standard one checkpoint and occasional re-check at the gate. Countless passengers grumble about hav ing to go through this highly repetitive process and negative experience. We also must assess whether the costs for airlines to use the Nassau airport are too high and, if so, what we can do to lower those costs and increase the island’s tourism potential. In short, we must make sure the airport arrival and departure experience is more efficient and hassle free, while upholding high safety standards. Port and Downtown Modernisation Our cruise ship port and downtown experience require an immediate and meaningful injection of capital to modernise them. Privatisation provides the best course to achieve this objective. The modernisation should include attention to the surrounding areas near the port. It is disturbing that fewer than 50 per cent of all cruise line guests leave the ship because ofa perception that there is nothing for them to do! Whether it is an organised tour or just an opportunity for these guests to explore the island in an invigor ating and compelling way, the o pportunities for business traffic from passengers coming off the ships for our retail, dining and entertainment establishments would be substantial. The Downtown Revitalisation Project is an excellent example of what a partnership between the government and private sector can achieve for the Bahamas. Best In Class Guest Experience We need to ensure that all businesses that cater to the needs of guests provide best-inclass service and guest experience. I like the term guest experience because it takes “customer” to a more personal and higher level. Whenever a guest arrives in the Bahamas, our priority for the guest should be: “You are a guest in my country and home, how can I make you a lifelong friend?” The arrival at the airport, or port, the taxi ride, hotel check-in and valet, the interaction with Customs and other governmental authorities all should have as their overarching tenet maximising the guest experience, designed to turn the guest into lifelong, loyal, and repeat visitor. In order to enhance our ability to achieve this objective, we also must invest in education and better on-the-job training a vital component to implementing strategies for a strong economic rebound geared to tourism. Modernisation Of Telecommunications and Energy To be a leading vacation destination, it is essential that we have modern and effective telecommunications and energy infrastructures in place. Guests must be able to connect rapidly and reliably for voice, data and multimedia content through fixed and mobile phone lines. The Bahamas’ extraordinarily high utilities expenses are not sustainable and threaten the viability of not just tourism but many of our other important industries. Government and the private sectors must develop creative solutions to meet our energy needs in a lowcost sustainable way, including seriously assessing alternative sources like solar and wind power. The current move toward privatisation represents an important step in this direction. New Tourism Initiatives To Make The Bahamas Unique We must constantly focus on creating new strategic initiatives to differentiate ourselves from other island destinations in order to build our reputation as the vacation destination of choice. Several ideas include: 1) developing of an annual signature event, for which the Bahamas would be known internationally; 2) updating our Lotteries and Gaming Act and regulations so that hotels and resorts can create a more competitive and modern gaming environment, with expanding games and a cutting-edge gambling experience on par with Las Vegas and Macau, if not in sheer size, then certainly in quality; 3) developing a tourism campaign that stresses what makes the Bahamas truly unique, including the possible creation of an efficient transportation system that enables guests to visit the New Providence Island and explore key sites of interest, while also better connecting key ‘out-islands’ of interest. Maximising the ability of the Bahamas to benefit from the eventual recovery in the global economy involves maximising our strengths as a tourist destination. Working together, government and the private sectors must plan ahead and make investments now so that as a country we are the tourist destination of choice. This year marks my family’s 20th year here in the Bahamas. During this time, my commitment and belief in this country have grown stronger than ever. Why? Two simple reasons: the enduring qualities of the Bahamian people and the country’s natural beauty have captured the hearts of millions of people from around the world, including mine. The Bahamas has the necessary resources and foundations to enhance its tourism appeal. I believe in the Bahamas. By all of us being engaged, we can shape for this country a prosperous and productive future. Sarkis Izmirlian is chairman and CEO of Baha Mar Resorts Ltd C M Y K C M Y K THE TRIBUNE THURSDAY, MAY 14, 2009, PAGE 9 Sporty meets sophistication.It all starts the moment you set eyes on the new Mercedes-Benz CLC Sports Coup. Expressive styling and visible dynamism appeal to the heart, the mind and the eye in equal measure. Its distinctive wedge shaped design exudes energy and the desire to be on the move at all times. Its agile sportiness coupled with a high standard of comfort makes this Sports Coup heads and shoulders above the rest. Anyone opting for a CLC buys far more than just a car. You own engineering excellence. Come into Tyreflex Star Motors and test drive a MercedesBenz CLC-Class today.OUR PARTS DEPARTMENT IS FULLY STOCKED WITH EVERY COMPONENT NECESSARY TO ENSURE THAT YOUR MERCEDES RUNS TROUBLE FREE. TRAINED TECHNICIANS ON DUTY.TYREFLEX STAR MOTORSCall us today for your new Mercedes-Benz CLC-Class at 325.4961Wulff Road, P. O. Box N 9123, Nassau, The Bahamas Fax: 323.4667 7 SHQIURPXHVGD\WRDWXUGD\ Are we ready for the recovery? Y OUR S AY

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country. And in this regard every government who has trusteeship over this process must be held accountable,” said Ms Hanna Martin. S he said Mr Turnquest’s resignation “raises questions about the granting of Crown land a “valuable and finite resource that is part of the Bahamian patrimony.” Meanwhile, Fox Hill MP Fred Mitchell said the turn of events, culminating with the “mysterious” resignation of Mr Turnquest on Mond ay, makes it now “more important than ever” to allow his request for a parliamentary select committee to be formed to investigate the historic al disposal of Crown land. “I raised this matter in Parliament because there is a legitimate concern in the country about public lands disposed of by the govern-m ent.The committee should be able to determine the total inventory of publicly owned lands, how they are distributed and on what terms. If the present situation is inadequate then there is a need to design b y legislation if necessary a system that is fair, transparent and rational,” he said. A requirement for annual reporting to the Parliament on the dispo-s ition of public lands should be instituted, he suggested. Director of Lands and Surveys Tex Turnquest resigned after revelations in this n ewspaper that his friends and family benefitted significantly from grants of prime beachfront Crown land during his tenure in office. Having been granted five adjac ent lots on the Exuma waterfront, four of the lots were “flipped” by the same individuals within several years for an average of about $ 400,000 each. called Crown land, it is really our land.” “Once again I urge my FNM government to honour its pre-election pledge and further promote t ransparency and democracy by passing a FOIA,” he stated. Director of Lands and Surveys Tex Turnquest resigned this week after claims that during his tenure in office prime beachfront Crown land in Exuma was granted to his friends and family, including his mother-in-law, for nominal fees of o ne or two thousands dollars, only to be “flipped” several years later for hundreds of thousands of d ollars. The expos was based on information found in official documents leaked to this newspaper. Bishop Simeon Hall, leader of the New Covenant Baptist Church, proposed that a FOIA would allow the public to get the “full story behind the headlines” in relation to t he Crown land situation that led to Mr Turnquest’s resignation and other matters. “It’s difficult to know who’s telling the truth in our society. I think it’s time for the FNM to make good on its promise of putting information out and allowing persons to make their decis ion.” As for when FOIA legislation might be drafted and made ready for perusal by parliament, Attorney General Michael Barnett yes-t erday said only that it is “under active consideration.” “Legislation doesn’t just pop up it has to be drafted and it has to b alance the need of the people for information and other interests like national security and things like that,” he said. Mr Barnett would not confirm o r deny reports that the Attorney General’s office has launched an investigation into activities at the department in the wake of the alleg ations. the head by an unmasked man as he got out of h is car outside his Britannia Group Ltd office near Compass Point, western New Providence, at around 9.30am on April 22. The gunman then ran off towards Gambier Village. Ilt Jones flew to Nassau from his home in Los Angeles, California, to join his mother Mildred, 82, as Hywel lay unconscious in Doctor’s Hospital until he died on Friday. H ywel Jones moved to the Bahamas in 1988 and is said to have lived a peaceful existence for 19 years, until he suffered two attacks in the last two years in which he was held at knifepoint in his West Bay Street home and beaten up outside his property. Mr Jones said: “He expressed concern to me, but for the sake of my peace of mind, a nd my mother’s, he was characteristically vague and spared us the concern he knew t his would give me. “He made them seem a mere trifle and, of c ourse, it’s become apparent they were more serious.” M r Jones said his brother was well-known, well-liked, admired and respected by both his personal and professional associates. Bahamas Institute of Financial Services (BIFSt o the Welsh native’s involvement in developing BIFS’s specialised banking education programme and the setting up of a bachelor’s degree in banking and finance at the C ollege of the Bahamas. Ilt Jones said: “As has been widely reported my brother was widely liked and wouldn’t hurt a fly. “He had no beef with anybody on the face o f the earth other than... this business conflict.” A sst Comm Gibson said the investigation is progressing and a number of people have b een interviewed, however no arrests have been made. M r Jones said: “I have every confidence in the police ability to follow this case. This is a country that relies on tourism and the financial services industry and for this to happen at all is bad for the Bahamas, and for it to go unsolved would be terrible. “That expatriate bankers could come here and then be murdered is terrible, and t he police have given me their assurance that they will move mountains in order to bring the person responsible to justice.” A $50,000 reward donated by friends and associates of Hywel Jones has been posted by Crime Stoppers for any information leading to the arrest and conviction of those r esponsible for his murder. Anyone with any information which may assist investigations can call Crime Stoppers t oll-free on 328-TIPS (8477 Calls will be answered by operators in the U nited States who will ensure complete anonymity. Alternatively call the incident room at the Criminal Detective Unit on 5029942 or 502-9991. C M Y K C M Y K LOCAL NEWS PAGE 10, THURSDAY, MAY 14, 2009 THE TRIBUNE "This is a foreign company we're d ealing with they could pull out and we can get nothing. If they feelt hey need to go, then they can go but leave our money," said one p assionate worker who spent five years in the hotel's Food and Beverage Department. M ore than 500 persons are currently employed at the hotel 83 m anagers and 442 line staff, 26 of whom are expatriates, according t o a statement released by government yesterday. While many of these employees are Exuma natives a number of them are from New Providence, Grand Bahama and the family islands those who are not natives o f Exuma were promised plane tickets to their home islands, saide mployees. Considering the depressed job m arket in the country's tourism sector many are concerned about where this new round of redundant workers will be absorbed. "Coming back to Nassau, you have people there who already looking for jobs can you imagine 500 more people coming there?"a sked another employee who worked for the hotel for four years." And now they expect us to give 150 per cent to the customers w hat kind of service do you think we can give them now?" The employees all spoke under the condition of anonymity as they had signed a confidentiality agree m ent with their employment contracts. M ember of Parliament for the area Anthony Moss said the clo s ure will undoubtedly "put a dent" into Exuma's economy. With a p opulation of about 6,000, Mr Moss fears that the closure and lack of jobs will drain more persons from Exuma an island that has been grappling with a softened econom y for more than a year, he said. "You have to face the facts, with t he high cost of living it may affect us to the point where you see a n umber of persons leaving the island of Exuma and returning to their home island or other family island. "If you are looking at going b ack into the same sort of service orientated (hoteli s bleak on Exuma," he said. A statement released by the Cabinet office yesterday said Mitsui, receivers for the Emerald Bay Development on Exuma, informed g overnment of the "difficult decision” to close the development. T he statement said the closure of the development, including the l uxury hotel resort is expected to be temporary while it is likely that the resort will reopen under new ownership. "During the past 14 months, the r eceivers signed letters of intent with one party and entered into f ormal contract with two other par ties; none with success. " The government has been advised that Four Seasons, mana gers of the resort hotel, will over see its orderly closing. The hotel w ill close to guests on May 26 and the majority of staff will leave within the following 30 days. The government has been assured that all severance paymentsd ue staff will be settled in accordance with the law and employeec ontracts," said the statement. Some staff may be kept for the transition period to new ownership, it continued, adding that during the temporary closed period, c ritical amenities at the development, such as the water plant opera tions, will continue unaffected. "The receivers have advised that t hey are already commencing con sultations with various parties that had previously signalled an interest in the development. "The government is committed t o working with the receivers to identify the best investor group to a cquire and reopen the hotel, golf course and marina, and to comp lete the full development planned for the Emerald Bay site." FROM page one Four Seasons F ROM page one Hywel Jones PLP chairman F ROM page one HYWEL JONES F ROM page one ‘Meaningful’ Act

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n TENNIS M ADRID A ssociated Press R AFAEL NADALpowered into the third round of the Madrid Open on Wednesday with a convincing 6-3, 6-1 win over Jurgen Melzer of Austria. The defending champion made just three unforced errors p laying on his favored clay sur face in front of Spain’s Queen Sofia, and converted all four ofh is break points. “It’s more difficult to play here than on normal altitude surfaces,” Nadal said of play-i ng 1,970 feet above sea level. “You can do more with the ball with less effort, but your oppo n ent also does it.” The only break in Nadal’s concentration came when a ball girl fainted and had to be car-r ied off the center court for m edical assistance in the second set. Earlier, Novak Djokovic eased past Oscar Hernandez 63, 6-3. The third-seeded Serb fell awkwardly on his right kneeo n the clay surface at Madrid’s new “Magic Box” tennis center in the second set, but was rarely troubled by his Spanish oppo n ent. “I was aware the court was quite wet because I saw theyh ad watered it after the previous match. But I was lucky that I fell in a good way so there is n o injury,” Djokovic said. “It looked easy, but it wasn’t. I played just well enough to win.” Djokovic never faced a break p oint in the match, while break ing Hernandez once in the first set and twice in the second. D jokovic recently fell from third to fourth in the rankings, surpassed by Andy Murray despite winning the SerbiaO pen last week the country’s f irst ATP Tour event that he also helped organize. “I try not to pay too much attention to rankings,” he said. “But I am motivated to win back my third ranking posi t ion.” Nadal agreed with Djokovic that the way the rankings are calculated, players are forced t o play too many tournaments. “The way things are now, you can’t choose which events youw ould like to focus on, you have to play everything in order to defend your position,” Nadals aid. “But it’s the same for everyone.” Nadal’s next opponent is Phillipp Kohlschreiber, whob eat 13th-seeded Marin Cilic 61, 6-7 (52 “He hits the ball very hard a nd cleanly, so I’d like to make sure my serves are winners C M Y K C M Y K S PORTS PAGE 12, THURSDAY, MAY 14, 2009 TRIBUNE SPORTS SPORTS IN BRIEF n BASKETBALL N EW YORK A ssociated Press LEBRON JAMESshould be getting used to sweeps by now. The Cavaliers star was a unanimous selection to the All-NBA first team Wednesday, after leading his team toa franchise-best regular-season record and a pair of playoff sweeps of the Detroit Pistons and Atlanta Hawks. J ames was put on the first t eam on every ballot of 122 sportswriters and broadcaste rs who regularly cover the league. Lakers star Kobe Bryant finished second in voting, making the first team on 119 ballots, while DwightH oward of the Magic, Dwyane Wade of the Heat and Dirk Nowitzki of the Mavericks rounded out the first team. James, the league’s MVP, w as a first-team selection for t he second straight season after finishing second in the NBA in scoring at 28.4 pointsa nd ranking in the top 10 in steals and assists. He led the Cavaliers to a franchise-best 6 6-16 record, including a 39-2 m ark at home, and the team’s f irst top seed in the playoffs. They’ve only been gaining m omentum since then. The Cavaliers made it 8for-8 in the postseason Mon-d ay night, completing a second straight sweep with an 84-74 win over the Hawks.A long with their dominant sweep of Detroit, Cleveland has won an NBA-record eight consecutive playoffg ames by double figures. The Cavs should be wellrested for the Eastern Con f erence finals against Boston or Orlando, a series the Celtics lead 3-2 enteringG ame 6 Thursday night. H oward had 17 rebounds but just 12 points while taking only 10 shots in the Magic’s9 2-88 loss Tuesday night, but he’s the biggest reason Orlando is still alive. After becoming only the f ourth player to lead the league in rebounding and blocked shots since 1973-74,w hen the block became an official statistic, the 6-foot-11 forward has averaged 20p oints and leads all players with 16.1 rebounds in the postseason. Bryant finished third in the league with 26.8 points, leading the Lakers to a Western Conference-best 65-17 finish. He needed only three quarters to score 26 points Tuesday night, when the Lak ers routed the Houston Rockets 118-78 to take a 3-2 lead in their series. They play Game 6 Thursday night. Wade was a first-team selection for the first time after leading the league in scoring at 30.2 points, finish ing second in steals and eighth in assists. He also became the fifth player in Cavs star James leads All-NBA first team n BASKETBALL TEQUESTA, Fla. Associated Press HUNDREDS of mourners filled a South Florida church Wednesday to say farewell to Hall of Fame coach Chuck Daly. Among those in attendance were several members of his 1989-90 Detroit Pistons championship team, close friends that included Rollie Massimino and Billy Cunningham, and Dallas coach Rick Carlisle who left immediately afterward to join the Mavericks in Denver for a playoff game Wednesday night. Carlisle said that missing the funeral “was not an option.” Daly led the Dream Team to the Olympic gold medal in 1992 after winning back-to-back NBA championships in Detroit. He was diagnosed with pancreatic cancer earlier this year and died Saturday at age 78 in Jupiter, Fla. Hundreds turn out to mourn Hall of Fame coach Daly Chuck Daly Nadal wins in front of Queen Sofia in Madrid R AFAEL N adal of Spain returns the ball to Jurgen Melzer of Austria during the Madrid Open Tennis T ournament in Madrid, Wednesday May 13, 2009. Nadal; won the match 6-3, 6-1. P a u l W h i t e / A P P h o t o V i c t o r R . C a i v a n o / A P P h o t o JURGEN Melzer of Austria reacts during the match a gainst Rafael N adal of Spain at the Madrid Open Tennis in Madrid, on Wednesday, May 13, 2009.

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n B ASEBALL S AN FRANCISCO Associated Press R YAN ZIMMERMAN’S 30-game hitting streak ended when he went 0 for 3 with twow alks, but Shairon Martis allowed two hits over seven sharp innings to remain unbeat e n this season in the Washing ton Nationals’ 6-3 victory over the San Francisco Giants on Wednesday. Z immerman never got the ball out of the infield, falling just short of Vladimir Guerr ero’s franchise-record streak of 31 games for the Montreal Expos in 1999. After twog roundouts and two walks against Giants starter Barry Zito, Zimmerman grounded i nto a fielder’s choice against reliever Pat Misch in the ninth. San Francisco’s fans still gave him a standing ovation, andZ immerman slid home with Washington’s sixth run moments later, beating a throwf rom the infield. Nick Johnson hit an RBI double in the fifth and Elijah Dukes d rove in two runs with a brok en-bat single in the seventh for the Nationals, who avoided a three-game sweep in San Franc isco while snapping a ninegame losing streak to the Giants. Zimmerman’s streak ended r ight before Washington r eturned for a 10-game homes tand at Nationals Park, where the club with the majors’ worstr ecord could have used something to celebrate. Zimmerman grounded into a d ouble play in the first inning and drew a walk in the third. After grounding out to shortstop in the fifth, he came up w ith two runners on in the sev enth but after Zito threw a wild pitch allowing both runn ers to advance, the Giants elected to walk Zimmerman intentionally. S omebody in the Washington dugout appeared to throw water onto the field after thei ntentional walk. Zimmerman then grounded to shortstop in the ninth, ending the majors’ longest hitting streak since Moi-s es Alou hit in 30 straight games for the Mets in 2007. M artis (5-0 b atters and hit another but didn’t allow a run until the seventh, is responsible for nearly half of t he Nationals’ 11 victories this season. The former Giants farmhand also doubled ands cored the game’s first run in t he fifth. Kip Wells earned his second career save. Z ito (1-3 and four runs while pitching into the seventh, losing control of a tight game late in another t ough loss on his 31st birthday. T he Giants scored 20 runs in the series’ first two games, including Pablo Sandoval’s g ame-ending three-run homer on Tuesday night. San Francis co couldn’t score against Martis u ntil Rich Aurilia’s sacrifice fly i n the seventh. The Nationals’ bullpen strug gled yet again, however. Sandoval a dded an RBI single in the eighth off Joe Beimel, who allowed Sandoval’s homer the previous night. Nate Schierholtz then tripled and s cored in the ninth, but Wells e scaped trouble. NOTES: Giants OF Fred Lewis has a minor toe injury, but he drove home Schierholtz with a pinch-hit d ouble in the ninth. Adam Dunn wasn’t in Washingt on’s starting lineup, but he p opped out on one pitch as a pinch-hitter in the eighth. C M Y K C M Y K SPORTS TRIBUNE SPORTS THURSDAY, MAY 14, 2009, PAGE 13 Zimmerman’ s hit streak ends at 30, Nats top Giants SPORTS IN BRIEF B e n M a r g o t / A P P h o t o n BASKETBALL DENVER Associated Press THE NBA won’t punish anybody over the ugly incidents that occurred on and off the court in Games 3 and4 of the series between the D allas Mavericks and Denver Nuggets. “Matter is closed,” league spokesman Tim Frank told The Associated Press via em ail Wednesday before Game 5 tipped off in Denver. The Nuggets captured G ame 3 on Saturday on Carmelo Anthony’s 3-pointer with a second left after a noncall that the league later a dmitted was a mistake. The disputed ending triggered a heated reaction aftert he buzzer, with Dallas forw ard Josh Howard being restrained and Mavs owner Mark Cuban expressing his frustration and then telling t he mother of Nuggets forward Kenyon Martin who w as seated nearby that her son was a thug. Martin had been fined earlier in the series for a hard foul on Dallas star Dirk Nowi tzki. C uban later said on his blog t hat he was sorry for the way Martin’s mother was treated. The Nuggets viewed the apolo gy as disingenuous because it contained an offer for their family and friends to sit in Cuban’s private suite “whent he series returns to Dallas.” Cubans’ antics may have incited fan misbehavior in G ame 4 on Monday night as insults were hurled at Mart in’s girlfriend, rap star Trina, and Martin’s mother. A nthony’s fiance, LaLa Vazquez of MTV fame, said fans hurled racial slurs andi ce cubes at her during the g ame and she had to send her 2-year-old son back to the hotel early and was preparing to leave early herself when she was pushed by a fan. “Obviously the playoffs g ames bring out the best and the worst in fans but what happened on Monday night with the racial slurs/threats, verbal attacks on my son and physical attacks to myself by irate fans was unacceptable,” Vazquez said in a statement. WASHINGTON Nationals' Elijah Dukes (34 game Wednesday, May 13, 2009, in San Francisco. NBA: ’Matter is closed’ onM avs-Nuggets incidents

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C M Y K C M Y K S PORTS PAGE 14, THURSDAY, MAY 14, 2009 TRIBUNE SPORTS THE BAHAMAS Cricket Association continued its league play with a p air of games on its weeke nd schedule featuring the l eague’s top teams from the 2008 season. I n Saturday’s feature, D ynasty Stars narrowly e scaped with a win over the P olice squad, taking the m atch by one wicket. The Police batted first and posted 235 runs for thel oss of six wickets. Members of the national junior team, Marc Taylor and Terran Brown led the o ffensive attack with 95 and 38 runs respectively. National team stalwart G reg Taylor also chipped i n with 33 runs. A ntonio Hernandez took two wickets, bowling fort he Stars. T he Stars responded with a total of 236 runs for the loss of nine wickets to take the match by one wicket. A balanced scoring attack was led by Howard Roye, 39 runs, Renford Davson 37 runs, and Lee Melville, 31 runs not out. B owling for the Police, J ermaine Addeley and G ary Armstrong took two wickets each. I n Sunday’s feature St. A gnes defeated Castrol C ommonwealth by a total o f seven wickets. C astrol Commonwealth batted first and was bowled out for 123 runs. T erry Seepersad scored 30 to lead Castrol. Bowling for St. Agnes, Omar James took four w ickets, Earl Thomas took three wickets and Ray Haniff took two wickets. I n their turn at bat, St. A gnes scored 126 runs for t he loss of three wickets. Youth player Orlando S tewart scored 61 runs not o ut and Orville Grant added 50 runs to claim the status of top scorers. Bowling for Castrol, Sherwin Arthur took two wickets. the tour, Mike and Bob Bryan also fell in the second round following an opening round bye. The Bryans, who have won four titles this season and have won 53 over the course of their careers lost a three set thriller to Simon Aspelin, Sweden, and Wesley Moodie, South Africa, 7-6, 1-6, 11-9. The win moved Aspelin and Moodie, ranked 36 on the tour, above the .500 mark for the first time all season with a win loss record of 4-3. The Polish pair of Mariusz Fyrstenberg and Marcin Matowski, ranked sixth in the draw was the third ranked team of the day to be eliminated when they lost Juan del Potro, Argentina, and Mardy Fish, United States, in straight sets 6-3, 6-4. Fish and del Potro, unranked on the ATP tour, ousted the tour’s tenth ranked team who have won eight career titles together. To complete the drought by the draw’s top ranked teams, seventh seeded Max Mirnyi, Belarus, and Andy Ramm, Israel, lost to the Spanish pair of Marcel Granoller and Tommy Robredo, 7-5, 2-6, 14-12. Knowles’ former partner, Daniel Nestor, Canada, remains in contention as apart of the tournament’s top seeded team. Nestor and Nenad Zimonjic are ranked second in the draw. Knowles, Bhupathi knocked out in second round Stars edge out Police St. Agnes defeat Commonwealth FROM page 15 B ARCELONA'S T hierry Henry, front, from France, jumps for the ball with Athletico Bilbao's Fernando Llorente, centre, during the final oft he Copa del Rey soccer match. BARCELONA'S Lionel Messi, right, from Argentina, duels for the ball with Athletico Bilbao's Pablo Orbaiz. F C B arcelona's Lionel Messi of Argentina reacts after scoring against Athletic Bilbao during their Copa del Rey final match at theM estalla stadium in Valencia, Wednesday, May 13, 2009. B ARCELONA'S S amuel Eto'o, r ight, from Cameroon, controls the ballb eside a player of Athletico Bilbao. BARCELONA WIN COPA DEL REY M a n u F e r n a n d e z / A P P h o t o s

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C M Y K C M Y K THURSDAY, MAY 14, 2009 THETRIBUNE PAGE 15 INSIDE International sports news BOXING Bahamas Boxing Commiss ion Chairman Pat Strachan, on T uesday, issued a strong statement to the professional boxi ng community. It reads as follows: "It has come to the atten-t ion of the Bahamas Boxing C ommission that an announcement of a series of exhibition boxing matches between Ray Minus Jr. and Quincy Pratt has b een made. It is direct conflict with the rules and regulations of the commission for anyone t o make such announcements without first obtaining official sanction. The commission is mandated by the government o f The Bahamas to control and m onitor professional boxing. We are responsible for the safe t y and the integrity of the sport whether via exhibition bouts or standard matches. We forbid this kind of activity and offi c ially state that the proposed exhibitions have not been sanctioned and will not be sanctioned. Whether exhibitions or n ot, it is imperative that all boxers meet the required standards, medical and otherwise. Anym ember of the local pro boxi ng fraternity who ignores the authority of the commission runs the high risk of suspens ion." The statement came in reference to Ray Minus and QuincyP ratt anouncing their intentions t o engage in a series of exhibition matches as a fundraiser for their respective clubs. TENNIS BRAJAXBA AGE GROUP SERIES THREE ROUND ROBIN B B o o y y s s 1 1 6 6 S S e e m m i i f f i i n n a a l l s s A lexis Roberts d. Kevaughn Ferguson, 6-1, 5-7, 10-8 Jody Turnquest d. Kazi Smith,6 -2, 6-2 B B o o y y s s 1 1 4 4 S S e e m m i i f f i i n n a a l l s s Treajh Ferguson d. Lauren M inns, 6-4, 6-1 Shariffe Rahminf d. Nicoy Rolle, 6-3, 7-6 G G i i r r l l s s 1 1 2 2 S S e e m m i i f f i i n n a a l l s s Raven Barry d. T’Shea Fergus on, 6-0, 6-0 I esha Shepard d. Afrika Smith, 6-2, 6-2 M M i i n n i i F F i i n n a a l l s s Maya Weech d. Emma Weech, 11-8 S S h h o o r r t t C C o o u u r r t t D’Angelo Demeritte d. Ramon 11-5, 11-7 SATURDAY’S SCHEDULE: B B o o y y s s 1 1 6 6 F F i i n n a a l l s s Jody Turnquest v. Alexis R oberts B B o o y y s s 1 1 4 4 F F i i n n a a l l s s T reajh Ferguson v. Shariffe Rahming B B o o y y s s 1 1 0 0 S S e e m m i i f f i i n n a a l l s s O ’Neil Mortimer v. Cole Maura Danny Wallace v. Cole Maura G G i i r r l l s s 1 1 2 2 F F i i n n a a l l s s I esha Shepard v. Raven Barry SPORTS NOTES n By RENALDO DORSETT Sports Reporter rdorsett@tribunemedia.net THE SECOND round of the 2009 Madrid Open featured a plethora of shocking upsets as a number of seeded teams failed to advance, including Mark Knowles and Mahesh Bhupathi. K nowles and Bhupathi, the tournament’s fourth ranked s eed in the draw were defeated b y the unranked pair of Stephen Huss, Australia, and Ross Hutchins, Great Britain, 6-4, 75 . Indicative of the final score in both sets, the match was nearly statistically even, however Hutchins and Huss held a slight edge. T hey won 74 percent on serv ice, 33 percent on returns while Knowles and Bhupathi won just 67 percent on service and 26 percent on returns. In a match that took just over 8 2 minutes to complete Knowles and Bhupathi recorded five aces and played nearly e rror free with just one double f ault, but won just 1-4 break points . The loss dropped the third ranked duo on the ATP Doubles tour to 16-9 on the year while Huss and Hutchins, ranked 31, improved to 6-7. I t was the second career loss f or Knowles and Bhupathi against the pair who also defeated them in the opening round of the 2008 French Open, 6-4, 6-4. While the was rather unexp ected it was far from the biggest surprise of the day. The top seeded team of the d raw and top ranked team of Knowles, Bhupathi knocked out in second round SEE page 14 Mark Knowles Mahesh Bhupathi

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n By NEIL HARTNELL Tribune Business Editor CITY MARKETSis planning to reduce its store portfolio to 11 with the closure of its Independence Drive outlet, Tribune Business can reveal, with the move set to happen once the company receives new equity financing from its majority shareholder. Sunil Chatrani, chief executive of City Markets’ publiclytraded parent, Bahamas Super markets, in an exclusive interview with Tribune Business declined to name the store ear marked for closure, but confirmed: “There is one store closure.” Tribune Business, though, can confirm that the store in question is the one on Inde pendence Drive/Tonique Williams-Darling Highway, as the transformation of the High way into a dual-lane carriageway has hampered customer access to the outlet. However, Mr Chatrani told Tribune Business that Bahamas Supermarkets would look to retain as many of the store’s 30strong staff as possible. “We have some good staff that we want to retain,” he explained. “The majority of staff can be absorbed.” Mr Chatrani said the store closure was “supposed to be before the year end” around June 30, 2009, but the actual timing would depend on when the company received the antic ipated capital injection from its majority shareholder, BSL Holdings, as this was needed to meet severance pay. Meanwhile, Mr Chatrani said Bahamas Supermarkets, since he assumed his new role in October 20p08, had cut shrink age group-wide by “at least halfa percentage point of sales”. C M Y K C M Y K SECTIONB business@tribunemedia.net THURSDAY, MAY 14, 2009 THETRIBUNE $4. 68 $4. 51 $4. 69The information contained is from a third party and The Tribune can not be held responsible for errors and/or omission from the daily report.$ $3.53 $3.62 $3.48 n By NEIL HARTNELL Tribune Business Editor SOME400-500 staff at the Four Seasons Emerald Bay Resort will lose their jobs when the property closes on May 26, 2009, its receiver telling Tribune Business yesterday that the shutdown was necessary to “curtail losses” that in 2008 totalled around $5 m illion, after several potential s ales agreement fell through. R ussell Downs, a Londonbased accountant with PricewaterhouseCoopers (PwC who has been the Exumabased resort’s main receiver since June 2007, said he was hoping the closure would be “temporary”, and that market conditions and a new hotel brand/operator to replace Four Seasons might “get us over the finishing line” in securing a new owner. Mr Downs confirmed that a sales agreement to sell the Four Seasons Emerald Bay Resort to a consortium featuring a Los Angeles-based real estate/casino developer, Barry Silverton, and global real estate broker/investment banking firm, Cushman & Wakefield, had fallen through at the end of March. Tribune Business exclusively revealed that consortium’s interest in the Exuma-based property on February 5, 2009. Subsequent to that, this newspaper also revealed that the Philadelphia-based real estate group, the Arden Group, had submitted a bit to acquire the Emerald Bay: $5m yearly losses sink 400-500 jobs * May 26, 2009, shut down of ‘anchor property’ to have disastrous impact for Exuma’s economy and wider tourism industry * Receiver says creditor had no option but to ‘curtail losses’ that were increasing, after fully funding Four S easons for 18 months * Several buyer deals fall through, including Silverton/Cushman Wakefield and Arden Group * Hopes that c losur e, and opportunity for new hotel brand manager, ‘may get us over the finish line’ * Government urged to use $3m unpaid BEC bill to intervene FROM page 5B n By NEIL HARTNELL Tribune Business Editor INVESTORSin City Markets’ majority shareholder have “in principle all committed” to injecting additional equity capital into the 12-store Bahamian supermarket chain, Tribune Business was told yesterday, with receipt of that funding key to getting the firm’s June 1 “relaunch” off the launching pad. Sunil Chatrani, chief executive of City Markets’ immediate holding company, Bahamas Supermarkets, confirmed that investors in the latter’s 78 per cent majority shareholder, BSL Holdings, were now discussing with Royal Bank of Canada the terms and arrangements for the new capital injection likely, according to Tribune Business sources, to be in the range of $10 million. Mr Chatrani, in an exclusive interview with Tribune Business, said he did not want to commit to a figure for the new capital injection because it was likely to be split. Some financing would be retained at the BSL Holdings level, to deal with its financial needs and debt repayments to Royal Bank, while the remainder would be injected into Bahamas Supermarkets as the operating company. However, Mr Chatrani told Tribune Business that the new financing needed to be “finalised this month”, by May 31, 2009, if Bahamas Supermarkets was to move ahead on target with its “relaunch”. He explained that while the company had been “stabilised”, and some $5.3 million in annualised savings realised, it could go no further without the new financing. Otherwise, management would be left “twiddling our thumbs” with little to do. BSL Holdings and its investors were now talking to Royal Bank about “how the things that need to be done are put in place” in relation to the new financing. Mr Chatrani said that, after receiving the business recovery plan for Bahamas Supermarkets that was developed by himself and chief financial officer, Evangeline Rahming, both the bank and majority shareholder were “committed to going forward with this”. The company, he added, had proven itself to both the bank and BSL Holdings by “hitting Budget pretty much for the past couple of months”, thus showing its projection figures could be relied upon and previous inaccuracies in financial reportInvestors ‘commit’ to City Meat financing * Bahamas Supermarkets chief says new equity injection’s completion by May 31 vital to compans elaunch’ take-off * Management realises $5.3m in annualised cost savings as business stabilises, prior to receipt of new funds to restart import programmes’ * Sales for fiscal 2009 likely to drop to $120-$125m from $144m in , but latter figure caused by deep discounting that sold products at loss * Chief e xecutive says company will take two-three years to recover $8m profitability, but likely to be b ack in black by July first month of 2010 n By NEIL HARTNELL Tribune Business Editor THE MINISTER OF TOURISMand Aviation yesterday said he was especially “disappointed” in the Four Sea sons Emerald Bay Resort’s clo sure because of the “high level” of buyer interest in the property, which he indicated should have led to a sale concluding before now. Vincent Vanderpool-Wallace told Tribune Business: “It is Exuma itself we are most concerned about, and are quite disappointed because of the high level of interest expressed in thep roperty, and that there hasn’t b een a conclusion at this stage.” W hen asked whether he knew how many buyers there were, with Tribune Business n By CHESTER R OBARDS Business Reporter c robards@ tribunemedia.net C OURIER companies yesterday received another temporary reprieve from impending Customs clear ance policy changes, the D epartment saying it intends to bring them into effect by the end of May rather than this Friday, according to a representa tive of the newly-formed Bahamas Transshipment and Logistics Association (BTLA Latore Mackey said the BTLA met with new comptroller of customs, Glen Gomez, who yielded to their requests for an extension to the implementation of the new cus toms rules, which were to come into effect on May 15. Now, according to Mr Mackey, the courier companies have until the end of May to get themeselves ready for changes that could cost some $15,000 to $20,000 in bonds up front. “This is the easiest way for a courier service to close down,” he said. Mr Mackey said the Government should be SEE page 10B City Markets to c lose stor e * Independence Dr ive store targeted for closur e, but compan y hopes to a bsorb most of affected 30 workers * Shrinkage reduced by .5 per cent of sales’ * Financial woes cost grocery chain market shar e, slipping fr om 21.4% in 2007 to 20.6% in 2008 SEE page 9B Minister ‘disappointed’ Emerald Bay closing despite buyer interest Vincent Vanderpool-Wallace SEE page 9B Courier firms enjoy second r eprieve fr om Customs Dept SEE page 8B

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n By TYRONE FITZGERALD A DIRECTORis a person appointed by the shareholders to man-a ge a company. Two general types of directors: EXECUTIVE DIRECTOR A director who works f ull-time in a company and is responsible for the daily operations, strategic planning, management and business development of a company. NON-EXECUTIVE DIRECTOR A director who does not work full-time in a company but attends board meetings and gives advice to theB oard of Directors. There is no legal distinct ion between an executive director and a non-executive director. Both executive and non-executive directors have the samel egal duties, responsibilities and potential liabilities. W hile the Companies Act 1992 (as amended I nternational Business Companies Act 2000 (as amended) do not specifically define a ‘director’, only an ‘officer’ of a company,b oth Acts do legislatively reinforce the general fiduciary duties of a director to manage the company, act honestly, in good faith, andi n the best interests of the company, subject to a unanimous shareholder agreement and/or the Memorandum and Articles of Associ-a tion of the company. Directors are also required to exercise the duty of care, diligence ands kill that a reasonably prudent person would exercise in such a position, whethera s an executive director, r esponsible for the daily operation and management of the company, or as a nonexecutive director, acting independently of the actu-a l day-to-day management of the company. As fiduciaries, directors have a legal duty to act in good faith, not make a prof-i t from their fiduciary position, not place themselves in positions where their duties as directors conflict with their interests, or actf or their own benefit or the benefit of others without clear, unequivocal consent from the principals of thec ompany on whose behalf they act. They must act in accordance with the Memo-r andum and Articles of Association of the compan y, and deal with and treat fairly the different classes of shareholders. RESPONSIBILITIES O F THE BOARD OF DIRECTORS * Establish the vision, m ission, and values of the company * Determine the compan y’s strategic objectives and policies, and ensure their e ffective and efficient implementation in align ment with the vision, miss ion and values of the company * Monitor the company’s overall performance and progress in achieving thoseo bjectives and policies * Create, manage, meas ure and oversee the corpo rate and compliance culture of the organisation * Select and appoint members of senior managem ent * Exercise transparency, responsibility and accountability to the company’s stakeholders, primarily itss hareholders, for the company’s financial performance and progress APPOINTMENT OF D IRECTORS The first Directors of a company are appointed at its incorporation, normally by the subscribers to theM emorandum and Articles of Association Subsequent appointments of directors are governed bya nd carried out in accordance with the Articles of Association of the compa-n y. Shareholder agreements should also be reviewed, a nd the relevant provisions of the shareholder agreement applied as necessary. T he Articles of Association normally specify how a nd when a Board may fill a vacancy for a director, appoint additional directors( up to a maximum number) or remove a director. On appointment, a new d irector should sign to sig nify his or her consent to a ct as a director, execute a director service agreement, obtain the relevant insur-a nces and indemnities, and receive a copy of the corpo r ate documents. These include the Memorandum and Articles ofA ssociation, details of the business and financial a ffairs of the company, recent Board minutes and management accounts, andc opies of the statutory C M Y K C M Y K BUSINESS PAGE 2B, THURSDAY, MAY 14, 2009 THE TRIBUNE Premier HealthATLANTIC MEDICAL INSURANCE CO.LTD. Atlantic House,2nd Terrace & Collins Avenue,P.O.Box SS-5915,Nassau Tel.326-8191 Suite 5,Jasmine Corporate Center,East Sunrise Highway,P.O.Box F-42655,Freeport Tel.351-3960A member of Colonial Group International:Insurance,Health,Pensions,LifePremier Health is the market leading health plan because it offers the best care at the best possible price. 50,000 members create economies of scale allowing more benefits and more freedom of choice,placing the insured at the heart of the plan.It is supported by quality administration and services,which work as well for claims for minor cuts and bruises as for major catastrophic illnesses. If you expect the best in value for money from your health plan,ask for Premier Health.You can expect first-rate service and care from the best VALUE health plan. Colonial Group International is rated A-(Excellentby AM Best. Act for a company on firm directions Legal Ease By Tyrone Fitzgerald S EE page four

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C M Y K C M Y K BUSINESS THE TRIBUNE THURSDAY, MAY 14, 2009, PAGE 3B n By CHESTER ROBARDS Business Reporter crobards@tribunemedia.net THE PHARMACY Act 2009, which was recently passed by Parliament, is expected to attract more young pharmacists to the industry and grow it year-onyear, executive members of the Bahamas Pharmaceutical Association said yesterday. The amendments to the Act had been in development for almost 20 years. According to the chairman of the Association’s legislative committee, Marvin Smith, the changes will help to regulate the sector, which had policed itself for years. He said patients had to trust the integrity of their pharmacists in the past, because holes in the law allowed for almost total autonomy in the sector. Mr Smith said that despite missing the legislation that would k eep pharmacists honest, the B ahamas had the fewer violat ions in the industry than many smaller countries in the Caribbean. Now, the law governing the sector will allow for a regulatory body to cite pharmacies for any violations that might be reported. One of the most substantive changes coming out of the legislation is the curbing of the proliferation of counterfeit prescription drugs. T he Bahamas Pharmaceutical Association’s president, Philip Gray, said the new Act engenders “new standards for registration, importation and distribution of all medicines to combat against counterfeit products”. Mr Gray said this new legislation marks the first major amendment to the pharmacy leg islation since the 1960s. “It also marks the commencem ent of a new regulatory body to b e known as the Pharmacy C ouncil of the Bahamas,” he said. “It is a sentinel moment for pharmacy professionals, and is the result of the hard work of our members, many of whom pioneered changes in this profession for decades and have now gone to their rest.” The BPA’s vice-president, Mimi Roberts, said the pharmcay industry in the Bahamas had grown substantially, and through t he new legislation it could become a transshipment point for multinational drug corporations distributing to the Caribbean. Mr Smith said the Act has now opened the industry up to emerging nuances in the pharmaceutical field, which will encourage the best and brightest Bahamians who go abroad to study pharma cology and related fields to come back home to practice. Act provides foundation to grow pharmacy sector n ByMARK A. TURNQUEST “THE ONLY thing constant in life is c hange”, and change is here for small and medium-sized enterprises (SMEs al recession has taught government, the pri-v ate sector and businesses/organisations one thing: “If you fail to plan then you plan to fail”. E ven if there was a plan and you “fail to plan how to execute your plan, you will also fail”. The only way the Bahamas can miti g ate against the negative impact from future recessions is that there must be synergy b etween all sectors of the country. The National Small Business Economic Summit’s focus is to bring SMEs, the Gov-e rnment and private sctors together under one roof to formulate a National Strategic P lan for SME development in the Bahamas. This plan will assist stakeholders in the craft ing of the Small Business Act. T his Economic Summit is a non-profit event and will be held for three hours a night for eight nights during the period: May 21June 4, 2009 at the Holy Cross Anglican Church Auditorium. S ME owners are urged to be a change agent for their industries. A Representative from the Ministry of Finance will be making presentations on how individual industries will be impacted by the Economic Partner s hip Agreement (EPA The summit is a necessary step in the formulation of a Small Business Act of the Bahamas, because SME owners will have an excellent chance to voice their opinion onh ow to solve specific industry problems and take advantage of specific opportunities. If SME owners fail to participate in the sum-m it, it will probably hinder the growth of the SME sector for at least five to 10 years. R emember, “none of us can do everything, b ut all of us can do something”. SME owners should only attend and part icipate in the summit based on their specif ic product/service offerings: Business Professional Services (May 21, 6pm-7.30pmM edical Professional Services (May 21, 7.30 pm9pm), Technical Services (May 25, 6pm – 7.30 pm), Other Services (May 25, 7.30 pm -9pm), Manufacturing /Fashion Design (May 26, 6pm – 9pm), Retailing (May 27,6 pm -7.30pm), Wholesaling (May 27, 7.30pm -9pm), Land /Building Developers ( (May 28, 6pm -7.30pm), Land/Building Consultants ( May 28, 7.30pm-9pm (June 2, 6pm -7.30pm), Fisheries ( June 2,7 .30 pm-9pm), Tourism ( June 3, 6pm 7.30pm), Hospitality (June 3, 7.30pm-9pm). Everyone can attend the last session Gov e rnment Depts /Financial Institutions (June 4, 6pm -9pm), To participate in the The National Small Business Economic Summit, contact Mark A.T urnquest at tel: (242 email: markturnquest@consultant.com or log on to web site: markturnquestconsulting.com Act for small firm survival Share your news The Tribune wants to hear from people who are making news in t heir neighbourhoods. Perhaps y ou are raising funds for a good cause, campaigning for improvements in the area or have won an award. I f so, call us on 322-1986 and share your story.

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reports/filings for at least t hree to five years prior to his or her appointment. DIRECTOR’S LEGAL DUTIES Directors act as a fiduciar ies for the shareholders of a c ompany and are custodians of its assets. Therefore, certain legal and statutory d uties are imposed on them. These are: A DUTY TO ACT IN GOOD FAITH A voidance of conflicts of i nterest Duty to manage the company Duty to treat different c lasses of shareholders fairly Since Directors are generally responsible for the management, they may exercise all the powers of the compa-n y. However, directors do n ot have unlimited powers to run a company on behalf of shareholders. They can only exercise powers granted to them either by general law or by the Articles of Associationo r Shareholders Agreement. POWER AND AUTHORITY The ambit of a Director’s authority may be restrictedb y provisions of the Compan ies Act or International Business Companies Act, the Articles of Association (the Articles of Association may include provisions andr estrictions on borrowing by the company) and the Shareholders Agreement (wherea pplicable). T he Articles of Association usually entitle the Board o f Directors to delegate powers to individual directors as considered appropriate.H owever, directors must act collectively as a board to b ind the company. Section 118 of the Companies Act 1992 allows a direc-t or and his legal representative(s t he company against all costs, charges and expenses which may reasonably bei ncurred by him in respect of any civil, criminal or admini strative action or proceeding to which he is made a party by reason of being orh aving been a director of that company. Section 57 of the International Business Companies Act 2000 allows a directort he same protection, subject to any limitations in the com-p any’s Memorandum or Articles of Association, or in any unanimous shareholdera greement. This statutory right to i ndemnification is only permissible to directors and their legal representatives forb oth Companies Act companies and IBCs, provided such d irectors acted honestly and in good faith in the best interests of the company.T hey must also have had rea sonable grounds for believing that their conduct was lawful in the case of a crimi nal or administrative action or proceeding. DIRECTOR’S AND OFFICER’S LIABILITY INSURANCE Since directors and officers m ay be personally liable to any party that may have an interest in the affairs of the company for damages, legal costs, and expenses in relation to a breach of director’s d uty, many of them seek the p rotection of director’s and officer’s liability insurance. Directors and officers insurance is designed to pro-t ect a director or officer a gainst claims that may be made by a company, shareholders or creditors. Under Section 122 of the Companies Act, a company may purchase and maintaini nsurance for the benefit of a director against liability incurred by him in his capac-i ty as a director of the company. S ection 58 of the IBC Act also allows a company incorporated under that Act top urchase and maintain insurance for a director, regist ered agent, officer or liquidator against liability incurred in by such personsa cting in their capacity as director, registered agent, o fficer or liquidator. Notwithstanding the provisions and protections ofd irectors, and officers liability insurance, it is important that executive and non-executive directors ensure they are properly and sufficientlyc overed when agreeing to accept and act in their capacity as a company director. C areful examination should not only be made of the coverage involved, but the extent of such coveragea nd the incidences and risks that have been included and excluded under such cover-a ge. Prospective and newlya ppointed directors would be advised to seek independent advice and a review of thei ndemnification and insurance coverage offered by their companies, plus the extent of their personal protection against claims,a ctions,and proceedings for litigious issues involving the company. Since directors and officers c annot rely on the separate legal personality of their companies, as enunciated in Salomon v. Salomon, indemnification and insurance coverage should be a primaryc onsideration in a director’s exhaustive list of requirements from before deciding to act as its director. C M Y K C M Y K BUSINESS PAGE 4B, THURSDAY, MAY 14, 2009 THE TRIBUNE F ROM page two Act for a company on firm directions (c The information contained in this article does not consti-t ute nor is it a substitute for legal advice. Persons reading this article and/or column, generally, are encouraged to seek the relevant legal advice and assistance regarding issues that may affect them and may relate to the information presented. T yrone L. E. Fitzgerald is an attorney with Fitzgerald & Fitzgerald. Should you have any comments regarding this article, you may contact Mr Fitzgerald at Suite 212, Lagoon Court Building, Olde Towne Mall at Sandyport, West Bay St., P. O. Box CB-11173, Nassau, Bahamas or tyrone@tle-f itzgeraldgroup.com.

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Four Seasons Emerald Bay Resort. That deal, though, is also understood to have gone nowhere. Tribune Business was informed that the receivers questioned whether Arden had the financial muscle necessary to take the resort forward, as it seemed to be seeking joint venture partners for its project. Another potential bidder involved the DeVos family, the wealthy Amway Corporation founders who own the Cape Eleuthera resort project. But despite conducting due diligence on the Four Seasons Emerald Bay Resort, Tribune Business can reveal that their group declined to submit a for-mal bid. Mr Downs confirmed: “We were under contract with one party [the Silverton group], and that unfortunately did not reach the finish line. That passed at the end of March. “During April, we worked to try and close with several other parties. We’ve worked with parties to try and close, in a way that meant we would not have to do what we’ve done, but we’ve not been able to do it with the speed we wanted.” As a result, Mr Downs said he and fellow PwC receiver, Clifford Johnson, had been considering the Four Seasons Emerald Bay Resort’s closure as a “Plan B” option for “the last couple of weeks. Such a decision would also have involved the Four Seasons Emerald Bay Resort’s main creditor, the London office of Japanese insurer, Mitsui, which insured the original loan that financed the Exuma property’s construction. M r Downs said Mitsui “had to draw the line” on the sus tained heavy losses it was incurring to keep the Four Seasons Emerald Bay Resort open. “This receivership began in 2 007. The expectation was that i t would be a relatively quick transition,’ Mr Downs explained. “Mitsui made it clear the resort would be fully funded, and they did until the end of last year, when they had to cut back with the mari na closure.” While the Four Seasons Emerald Bay Resort’s cost base was “pretty much fixed”, its net losses had been increased by reduced revenues as a result of the tourism falloff provoked by the global recession. “We probably lost in the order of maybe somewhere like $5 million last year, but the losses this year and next are possibly comparable to that number as well,” the PwC receiver added. Describing the closure deci sion as “a difficult day for us”, Mr Downs added: “We’ll have to try and make something happen.” Reviewing the so-far futile search for a buyer, he said: “The market outlook has just got much worse, and we have to think about ways to curtail our losses. We’ve taken, with a great deal of reluctance, and ultimately, financial necessity, the decision to close the resort, although the great expectation is that this will be for a temporary basis.” The last guest will leave the Four Seasons Emerald Bay Resort on May 26, 2009, with staff redundancies beginning the following day. Most of the job losses will take place during June, as different parts of the resort are decommissioned and stored for security. “The staff are digesting the announcement at the moment, but with some strong leadership from Four Seasons, we’ll get through the next two weeks,” Mr Downs added. Tribune Business understands that other businesses on the Four Seasons Emerald Bay property, such as the resort’s John Bull store and the Emerald Isles Shopping Centre, have been given until June 15, 2009, to leave. The latter includes a Scotiabank branch and businesses such as Mail Boxes Etc. As for why no buyer had been found, Mr Downs said: “We’ve done it at a very difficult time in the market. The market moved against us at some key points as well, and made buyers quite jumpy in terms of closing the deal. It was a combination of factors, quite frankly.” He added that all potential suitors still interested in acquiring the Four Seasons Emerald Bay Resort had been informed of the closure deci sion, and the fact this might give them the chance to replace the Four Seasons brand with a manager/opera tor of their own. “We’ve hopefully passed the bottom of the market, and with a new manager hopefully that will get us over the line,”M r Downs said. He acknowledged that the price Mitsui was seeking had been reduced, but that it still expected to conclude a transaction. Sources have suggested to Tribune Business that Mitsuih ad dropped its price to as low a s $35-$50 million, after a succession of previous deals, involving the likes of Ambrose Holdings (UK resident Israeli commodities dealer, Rami Weisfisch, had fallen through. However, any buyer will require another $50 million investment to upgrade the Four Seasons Emerald Bay to five-star status upon taking possession. The resort’s closure will effectively leave the $100 million Grand Isle Villas project, which inhabits adjacent land, on an island all by itself and surrounded by a property that will, if no buyer is found, quite likely be to allowed to deteriorate. Therefore, real estate values for not only Grand Isle Villas, but all other property owners at Emerald Bay, will decline, and the ripple effect will be widely felt by Exuma’s real estate market. One source, familiar with the situation, yesterday blasted the Government for allowing the closure to happen. Speaking on condition of anonymity, they said the Government had failed to use the leverage it possessed over Mitsui/PwC to compel them to conclude a deal, arguing that Prime Minister Hubert Ingraham had adopted the position that he could not interfere in a private transaction. Yet the source alleged that the Government had strong grounds for intervention, given that the Four Seasons Emerald Bay owed the Bahamas Electricity Corporation (BEC an unpaid $3 million bill. “How can the Government allow this to happen,” the source asked. “This act is unconscionable. It sends a very negative message to investors in the Bahamas. It’s time for the Government to act.” The impact for Exuma’s own island economy is likely to be disastrous, for it has been re-tooled almost entirely to support the Four Seasons Emerald Bay Resort. Apart from the direct loss of hotel jobs, the amount of money those people will havet o spend will also decline, reducing profits and revenues for other Exuma-based busi nesses. In turn, they will also probably shed jobs, taking the island’s economy, in the words of one Bahamian born there, back to the 1980s”. David Johnson, deputy direct or-general in the Ministry of Tourism with responsibility for planning, investment and busi ness development, warned last year that the Four Seasons needed to become a sustainable, profitable resort, and the Bahamas could not afford for it to fail. H e said then that factors such as building costs being about 40 per cent higher per square foot than they are in Nassau, had retarded Emerald Bay’s growth and kept it from reaching the development its owners had prev iously predicted. Mr Johnson said of Emerald Bay: “The property was conceived to be a mixed-use project, with 185 keys under the F our Seasons brand. The vast majority of the property was tob e for mixed-use, condos and hundreds of lots sold for signifi cant family homes. “After four years of operation, they have developed very little of the sold inventory. There’s been a lot of trading of t he land by the owners, but the cost of building is prohibitive. The buildings costs, the numbers suggest, are in excess o f 40 per cent higher per square foot to build.” Costs to construct such properties in Nassau were $500 per square foot, while in Exuma the price was $800 per square foot. Mr Johnson also underlined the impact the relatively high building costs on Exuma, comp ared to Nassau, were having o n Emerald Bay’s margins. He p ointed out that concrete there cost $200 per yard, whereas in Nassau it cost $125 per yard. “The hotel, with a golf course and spa, as a 185-room resort of Four Seasons’ calibre, can only be profitable if it has a m uch larger customer base outs ide those rooms,” Mr Johnson s aid. H e added that the resort needed to build out to 700-800 units to get close to profitability, whereas it was currently closer to 300-400 units. C M Y K C M Y K BUSINESS THE TRIBUNE THURSDAY, MAY 14, 2009, PAGE 5B Emerald Bay: $5m yearly losses sink 400-500 jobs F ROM page one

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f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n By MARTIN CRUTSINGER AP Economics Writer WASHINGTON (AP Retail sales fell in April for a second straight month, dashing hopes that consumer spending was starting to revive and would help end the recession. Economists said families who are worried about layoffs and unpaid job furloughs are saving more and spending less, delaying the start of a sustained recovery. The disappointing report helped send stocks down on Wall Street, where the Dow Jones industrial average slid 184 points more than 2 perc ent. Other major indexes fell even more sharply. Retail sales fell 0.4 percent last month, worse than the flat performance many economists had expected, the Commerce Department reported Wednesday. Retail sales had posted gains in January and February after falling for six straight months. The gains had raised hopes that the crucial consumer sector of the economy might be stabilizing. But the setbacks in March and April retail sales cast doubts on that prospect. “People are obviously still very nervous and not spending,” said David Wyss, chief economist at Standard & Poor’s in New York. “The economy is still in a recession, and I don’t think we will hit bottom until late summer or early fall.” Analysts said the economy should benefit in coming months from the tax relief included in the $787 billion stimulus plan Congress passed in February. But the extra $17 a week that the average family will receive won’t translate intoa major boost in spending. Such modest relief is hardly enough to negate the effects of layoffs and employee furloughs, shrunken retirement accounts and home equity, and consumers struggling to boost savings because of fears about the future. Mary Goodman has stopped most of her extraneous spending like meals out. She reined in her spending habits after March 1, when she was laid off from her job as an office manager at an online job posti ng company in Milwaukee. N ow the 60-year-old Goodm an eats out just once a week with a former co-worker, a trip that included soup at an indoor market on Wednesday afternoon. “I’m not doing any clothes shopping,” she said. “I’m not tempting myself by going into the mall.” Improvement Anecdotal evidence had signaled some improvement in sales in recent weeks. But “to offset the plunge in wealth, the household saving rate still needs to double from the current rate of 4 percent,” Paul Dales, U.S. economist with Capital Economics in Toronto, wrote in a research note. “With falling employment hitting incomes, this can only be achieved by a further retrenchment in spending.” The savings rate, which was hovering around zero a year ago, has climbed to just above 4 percent. Many economists think it will hit 6 percent or more this year as workers anxious about layoffs and depleted investments put away their credit cards. The jobless rate rose to a 25-year high of 8.9 percent in April, with a net total of 539,000 jobs lost during the month. The fall in retail sales in April came even though car sales posted a 0.2 percent increase. Excluding autos, the drop in retail sales would have been 0.5 percent much worse than the 0.2 percent gain economists had expected. Sales other than autos showed widespread weakness last month. Demand at department stores and general merchandise stores fell 0.1 percent. Sales at specialty clothing stores dropped 0.5 percent. Sales also fell in April at furniture stores, electronic and appliance stores, food and beve rage stores and gasoline stat ions, the Commerce Departm ent said. The sales drop at department stores and specialty clothing stores came as a surprise since the nation’s big chain stores had reported better-than-expected results for April. Same-store sales rose 0.7 percent last month compared with April 2008. It was the first overall increase in six months, according to the tally by Goldman Sachs and the International Council of Shopping Centers. The two reports aren’t comparable, analysts noted. The government figures, for example, cover more stores and are adjusted for seasonal varia tions. Analysts said one reason the consensus forecast may have been too optimistic is that with many stores closing, it’s been difficult to estimate industry figures accurately. Department store operator Macy’s Inc. on Wednesday reported a wider loss for the first quarter, due partly to restructuring charges. Still, the company expects to see an improvement in sales from itsl ocalization efforts beginning in the fourth quarter of 2009, and in the spring of 2010. Liz Claiborne Inc. also reported a first-quarter loss that was worse than Wall Street expected. The apparel makers aid its quarterly loss swelled on restructuring charges and a drop in same-store sales stem ming from lower consumer spending and an extra week of sales in the year-ago period. Retail sales dip creates worries

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working to empower small b usinesses, but instead, he suggested these new regulations could cause some closures. The new regulations, which the Government believes will help it capture millions of doll ars it was missing in revenues, w ere scheduled to come into effect last month. Protests from owners of couriers serv ices caused the Customs Department to move the arrangement to the middle of this month. Mr Mackey said couriers h ad previously asked for one t o two months to get their businesses in order to seamlessly adapt to the changes. “To abruptly change it [the p rocedures] because a new comptroller has been appointed is unfair,” he said. Mr Mackey said the Government needs their servicesa s much as they need the Government to “respect” their industry as one that brings in millions of dollars per annum. “We want to be respected a s an industry partner,” said Mr Mackey. He argued that the bonds imposed on smaller courierc ompanies will render them uncompetitive with larger firms such as FedEx and UPS, who can afford to post larger bonds in order to clear thei tems they import. Though the BTLA won an extension in the clearance procedure implementation, Mr Mackey said they realised thatt he Government is not willing to offer them many concessions to help manoevere through the process when it isi n place. He suggested that the BTLA now have discussions with the Customs Department regarding procedures, in ordert o figure out what is best for each entity. Mr Gomez recently told Tribune Business that the procedures being amended byC ustoms will capture millions of dollars in government revenue lost since the early 1990s. The new procedures will a lso align the Bahamas’ standards with those of other countries in the region who export goods into the Bahamas and who receivedg oods originating here. Under the present system, courier companies were allowed to use the baggage declaration form the sameo ne as filled out by returning residents to clear goods and other shipments. This enabled them to lump together different items that attracted the same rate of duty, declaringt heir quantity to Customs. Customs now wants courier firms to go back to using the' long forms', which require all imports to be broken down i nto individual items. Zhivargo Laing, minister of state for finance, previouslyt old Tribune Business that the p resent system which allowed courier companies a nd other brokers to use the baggage declaration form the s ame one as filled out by returning residents to clear goods and other shipmentso ften meant that the appropriate duty rates were not applied to every item, thus costing the Government much-needed revenue. The problem with the baggage declaration form is that it can cause, from the Customs point of view, to not necessarily have the appropriate ratesa pplied to items, because it does not have the same level of reporting that is required under the long form for entry declarations,” Mr Laing toldT ribune Business. “It would clearly not have the same level of specificity and transparency required for optimum Customs purposes. The Government is not get-t ing the benefit of the proper duty rate being applied, because the specifics of thei tem are not declared.” As previously revealed by T ribune Business, the Customs Department is proposing that courier companiesw ith overnight deliveries, and b rokers wanting to clear shipments, such as perishables, on t he same day, can clear these imports immediately and then c ome back to deal with the entry declarations within 10 days provided they lodge ab ond with the revenue collection agency. C M Y K C M Y K BUSINESS PAGE 8B, THURSDAY, MAY 14, 2009 THE TRIBUNE 0HGLFDORUGHQWDORIFHVSDFHVLQWKH &DEOH%HDFK )RUIXUWKHUGHWDLOVSOHDVHFRQWDFW EHWZHHQWKHKRXUVRI /,48,'$7,21$/( &RPELQHDG$EGRPLQDODGrLQFK 'HQWDO&RWWRQROOVHGLXP ;/*ORYHV/DWH[RZHUHG /DUJH*ORYHVODWH[RZGHU)UHHf /DUJH*ORYHV9LQ\O/DWH[)UHHf ,QVXOLQ\ULQJHPO 1HEXOL]HUDVN.LW &KLOGPO &KDPEHU 1HHGOH+ROGHUV 1DVDO&DQQXOD$GXOW 2[\JHQDVN$GXOW/DUJH /\ULQJHZLWK*HHGOH /\ULQJHZLWK*HHGOH /\ULQJHZLWK*HHGOHDQG*HHGOH \ULQJHZLWK*HHGOH 6SHFLPHQ&XSVR]WHULOH 6WHULOHXU +\SRDOOHUJHQLF&ORWK7DSHLFURVSRUH7DSHf %DKDPDV+XPDQHRFLHW\Z LVKHVWRLQIRUPWKHJHQHUDOSXEOLFWKDW WKHUHZLOOEH 12 &OLQLF RQ 6DWXUGD\ $QLPDO)XQ'D\ : H ZLOO KDYHDODWHFOLQLF 7KDQN
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We’ve had major lay-offs for fraud at a senior level at that store, and had significant improvements since then.” Mr Chatrani added that City Markets had been overstaffed, and its employee numbers had been reduced from more than 850 in February 2008 to 700 without anyone’s employment being severed. “They’ve either left of their o wn accord, and we’ve taken a zero tolerance approach to fraud, or suspected fraud.” Mr Chatrani said that Bahamas Supermarkets had estimated it had lost market share as a result of its financial woes in 2007-2008, its share of the Bahamian produce market falling from 21.4 per cent in 2007 to 20.6 per cent in 2008. He acknowledged that there was a perception among some Bahamian consumers that the company’s products were over-priced and expensive in relation to competitors’, but the chain was targeting being the least expensive for socalled ‘breadbasket’ items. Mr Chatrani also acknowledged that the replacement of former Winn-Dixie ‘own brand’ products had not been handled well, with Bahamian consumers left confused over t heir introduction as it had not been dealt with through a marketing campaign. putting forward three names, Mr Vanderpool-Wallace said: “There was more than that. “The level of interest in the property was very high. I was assured that it was easily multiples of 10. It wasn’t a few. It’s a gem of a property.” The Minister added: “In this business environment, you havea whole variety of options people are taking. That property is a jewel in the crown of Bahamian tourism, and we hope it remains open. “That was the prime development on Exuma, and broughta high quality to the Exuma brand. The size of the property, the brand name of the property, the assets and amenities, were important to other people. We hope for the shortest possible interruption, and that the property gets open as quickly as possible.” The Four Seasons Emerald Bay Resort has 500 staff, 83 managers and 442 line staff, 26 of whom are expatriates. Its closure has been decided by Japanese insurer, Mitsui, the resort’s main creditor, who placed it into receivership under PricewaterhouseCoopers (PwC 2007. The Government said yesterday: “During the past 14 months, the receivers signed letters of intent with one party and entered into formal contract with two other parties; none with success.” The Four Seasons Emerald Bay Resort has acted as Exuma’s main economic engine, attracting additional foreign direct investment to the island. It employs almost 500 staff, and features an 18-hole Greg Norman Golf Course, two restaurants, three pools, spa, six meeting rooms and 450-person capacity ballroom. A shopping complex has also opened at Emerald Bay, the anchor retailer being the Emerald Isle supermarket. The complex also includes businesses such as Scotiabank and Mail Boxes Etc. City Markets to close store F ROM page one Minister ‘disappointed’ Emerald Bay closing despite buyer interest FROM page one

PAGE 23

ing were a thing of the past. However, both sides wanted to secure their interests as best as possible. Royal Bank wanted the new capital to be injected in one go, rather than in “dribs and drabs” as had happened in the past. Over the past year, some $10 million has been injected into Bahamas Supermarkets and BSL Holdings, in tranches of $5 million, $3 million and $2 million. For its part, BSL Holdings wants to make sure that the terms agreed with the bank are as favourable as possible, so they get “the best bang for their dollar”. “We almost feel like we’re sitting here twiddling our thumbs, waiting for the funds,” Mr Chatrani said. Completion of the fiscal 2008 audit also depends on the receipt of the new equity capital, as external auditors KPMG want to see this before issuing an audit opinion absent a ‘going concern’ qualification. The City Markets chief executive explained that a large portion of the new funding would be used to re-start the supermarket chain’s import programme, which in turn would enhance gross profits and margins, and provide Bahamian consumers with an expanded, sought-after product range on a consistent basis. “We probably support the Bahamian wholesale, distribution association more than anyone else,” Mr Chatrani told Tribune Business. ‘Due to tight cash flow, our imports [of food products] have been restricted. “But we’re planning to relaunch the company. It’s stable, money is coming in and we’re going back to direct import programmes. That gives us better margins and better pricing.” City Markets’ financial woes during its 2007 and 2008 financial years, and the fiscal 2009 first half, have left it strapped for cash flow/liquidity, forcing the supermarket chain to increasingly rely on Bahamasbased wholesalers for the bulk of its supplies because it was unable to tie-up large chunks of cash in imports. Mr Chatrani told Tribune Business that Bahamas Supermarkets currently sources “less than 10 per cent” of its product inventory from abroad “because we were fixing the business”. Once the financing comes in, this will increase to 20 per cent of the product mix. “The funds coming in have been specifically allocated for the overseas import programme,” he explained. “Improving direct imports will be the springboard for us at this stage. “We get these products, but they’re not always available. Sales will start to expand, gross profits and margins will increase, and costs are managed. We can grow by direct imports.” Praising Bahamian wholesalers and other vendors for their “fantastic” support during, Mr Chatrani said their limited warehouse storage space had impacted the consistent availability, and variety, of high-end products such as the gourmet category. With direct imports, some 2,900 SKUs (stock keeping units will “get back to us on the shelves consistently”. The City Markets chief executive said the company’s sales were likely to decline to between $120-$125 million for the 2009 fiscal year to endJune 2009, due to a combination of the economic recession and the company’s own internal issues. While this represented a decline of between 13.2-17 per cent compared to the top-line figure for 2008, Mr Chatrani said that Bahamas Supermarkets had largely bought the increased business that year through deep discounts, which left the company selling product at a loss. As a result, gross profit margins for that year fell to 17.8 per cent. Mr Chatrani said these had recovered to 25.4 per cent within the past quarter, and the company was looking to get back to historical margins of 28 per cent plus as soon as possible. He added that managemen t’s projections were that Bahamas Supermarkets would again “break even” by the last month of fiscal 2009, which is June, and return to profitability by July the first month of fiscal 2010. Everything, though, hinged on the receipt of the new capital, as the company had gone as far as it could be taken in the current circumstances. Despite the $13.429 million loss incurred in fiscal 2008, Mr Chatrani expressed confidence that City Markets would return to the position it had attained prior to BSL Holdings’ $54 million purchase of Winn-Dixie’s 78 per cent stake in 2006, when it was churning out consistent $8 million per annum net profits. “We can get back to where we were before, but it will take us two to three years to get to that level,” he added. Mr Chatrani said he and Ms Rahming had already realised $5.3 million in annualised cost savings from the business, not one-off items, through reducing costs tied-up in the likes of shipping and cleaning contracts. Bahamas Supermarkets was also saving money from having imported produce shipped directly to its three Grand Bahama-based stores, rather than to Nassau first, then to Freeport. C M Y K C M Y K BUSINESS PAGE 10B, THURSDAY, MAY 14, 2009 THE TRIBUNE 52wk-Hi52wk-LowSecurit y Previous CloseToday's CloseChangeDaily Vol.EPS $Div $P/EYield 1.951.28Abaco Markets1.401.400.000.1270.00011.00.00% 1 1.8011.00Bahamas Property Fund11.0011.000.000.9920.20011.11.82% 9.686.95Bank of Bahamas6.956.950.000.2440.26028.53.74% 0.900.63Benchmark0.630.630.00-0.8770.000N/M0.00% 3.743.15Bahamas Waste3.153.150.000.0780.09040.42.86% 2.601.95Fidelity Bank2.372.370.000.0550.04043.11.69% 14.1511.09Cable Bahamas11.7511.750.001.4060.2508.42.13%3 .142.83Colina Holdings2.832.830.000.2490.04011.41.41% 7.446.17Commonwealth Bank (S16.176.170.000.4190.05014.70.81% 3.381.31Consolidated Water BDRs2.503.380.880.1110.05230.51.54% 3 .001.70Doctor's Hospital1.851.70-0.151,5000.2400.0807.14.71% 8.106.02Famguard7.767.760.000.4200.30018.53.87% 12.5011.00Finco11.0011.000.000.3220.67034.26.09% 1 4.6610.35FirstCaribbean Bank10.4010.400.000.7940.40013.13.85% 5.555.00Focol (S5.145.140.000.3320.15015.52.92% 1.001.00Focol Class B Preference1.001.000.000.0000.000N/M0.00% 0.500.30Freeport Concrete0.300.300.000.0350.0008.60.00% 8.205.50ICD Utilities5.595.590.000.4070.50013.78.94% 12.508.60J. S. Johnson10.5010.500.000.9520.64011.06.10% 10.0010.00Premier Real Estate10.0010.000.000.1800.00055.60.00% 52wk-Hi52wk-LowSecuritySymbolLast SaleChangeDaily Vol. 1000.001000.00Fidelity Bank Note 17 (Series AFBB17100.000.00 1000.001000.00Fidelity Bank Note 22 (Series BFBB22100.000.00 1000.001000.00Fidelity Bank Note 13 (Series CFBB13100.000.008 1000.001000.00Fidelity Bank Note 15 (Series DFBB15100.000.00 52wk-Hi52wk-LowSymbolBid $ A sk $Last PriceWeekly Vol.EPS $Div $P/EYield 14.6014.25Bahamas Supermarkets7.928.4214.60-0.0410.300N/M2.05% 8.006.00Caribbean Crossings (Pref4.006.256.000.0000.480N/M7.80% 0.540.20RND Holdings0.350.400.350.0010.000256.60.00% 41.0029.00ABDAB30.1331.5929.004.5400.0009.030.00% 0.550.40RND Holdings0.450.550.550.0020.000261.900.00% 52wk-Hi52wk-LowFund NameNA V YTD%Last 12 MonthsDiv $Yield % 1.36641.3041Colina Bond Fund1.36640.954.77 3.03512.9230Colina MSI Preferred Fund2.8962-1.49-3.35 1.45901.3883Colina Money Market Fund1.45901.775.09 3.69603.1964Fidelity Bahamas G & I Fund3.1964-5.59-13.64 12.739712.1564Fidelity Prime Income Fund12.73970.965.79 100.5606100.0000CFAL Global Bond Fund100.56060.560.56 100.000096.4070CFAL Global Equity Fund96.4070-3.59-3.59 1.00001.0000CFAL High Grade Bond Fund1.00000.000.00 10.50009.0950Fidelity International Investment Fund9.15990.71-12.76 1.04401.0000FG Financial Preferred Income Fund1.04400.804.40 1.03641.0000FG Financial Growth Fund1.03640.333.64 1.04521.0000FG Financial Diversified Fund1.04520.764.40 BISX ALL SHARE INDEX 19 Dec 02 = 1,000.00YIELD last 12 month dividends divided by closing price 52wk-Hi Highest closing price in last 52 weeksBid $ Buying price of Colina and Fidelity 52wk-Low Lowest closing price in last 52 weeksAsk $ Selling price of Colina and fidelity Previous Close Previous day's weighted price for daily volumeLast Price Last traded over-the-counter price Today's Close Current day's weighted price for daily volumeWeekly Vol. Trading volume of the prior week Change Change in closing price from day to dayEPS $ A company's reported earnings per share for the last 12 mths Daily Vol. Number of total shares traded todayNAV Net Asset Value DIV $ Dividends per share paid in the last 12 monthsN/M Not Meaningful P/E Closing price divided by the last 12 month earningsFINDEX The Fidelity Bahamas Stock Index. January 1, 1994 = 100 (S (S1T T O O T T R R A A D D E E C C A A L L L L : : C C O O L L I I N N A A 2 24 4 2 2 5 5 0 0 2 27 70 0 1 1 0 0 | | R R O O Y Y A A L L F FI I D D E E L L I I T T Y Y 2 24 4 2 23 35 5 6 6 7 7 7 7 6 64 4 | | F FG G C C A A P P I I T T A A L L M M A A R R K K E E T T S S 2 2 4 4 2 23 3 9 9 6 64 40 0 0 00 0 | | C C O OL L O O N N I I A A L L 2 2 4 4 2 2 -5 50 02 2 -7 75 5 2 2 5 5FINDEX: CLOSE 797.33 | YTD -4.50% | 2008 -12.31%B ISX LISTED & TRADED SECURITIES AS OF: Fidelity Over-The-Counter Securities Colina Over-The-Counter Securities BISX Listed Mutual Funds MARKET TERMST UESDAY, 12 MAY 2009BISX ALL SHARE INDEX: CLOSE 1,613.91 | CHG 0.15 | %CHG 0.01 | YTD -98.45 | YTD % -5.75BISX LISTED DEBT SECURITIES (Bonds trade on a Percentage Pricing basesPrime + 1.75% Maturity 19 October 2017 19 October 2022 30 May 2013 29 May 2015 Interest 7% Prime + 1.75% 7% 28-Feb-09 31-Dec-08 31-Dec-07 31-Mar-09 9-Feb-09 9-Feb-09 W W W WW W . .B B I I S S X X B B A A H H A A M M A A S S . .C C O O M M | | T T E E L L E E P P H H O ON N E E : :2 2 4 4 2 2 -3 3 2 2 3 3 2 2 3 3 3 3 0 0 | | F FA A C C S S I I M M I I L L E E : : 2 2 4 4 2 2 -3 3 2 2 3 3 -2 23 3 2 2 0 0NAV Date 31-Mar-09 1-May-09 31-Mar-09 28-Feb-09 31-Dec-08 9-Feb-09 /HJDORWLFH 127,&( ROXQWDU\/LTXLGDWLRQf 1RWLFHLVKHUHE\JLYHQWKDWWKHDERYHQDPHG &RPSDQ\LVLQGLVVROXWLRQZKLFKFRPPHQFHG RQWKHGD\RI0D\ 7KH/LTXLGDWRULV $UJRVD&RUS1DVVDX %DKDPDV / HJDORWLFH 127,&( ROXQWDU\/LTXLGDWLRQf 1RWLFHLVKHUHE\JLYHQWKDWWKHDERYHQDPHG &RPSDQ\LVLQGLVVROXWLRQZKLFKFRPPHQFHG RQWKHGD\RI$SULO 7KH/LTXLGDWRULV $UJRVD&RUS1DVVDX %DKDPDV /HJDORWLFH 1 27,&( ,QROXQWDU\/LTXLGDWLRQf 1RWLFHLVKHUHE\JLYHQWKDWWKHDERYHQDPHG &RPSDQ\LVLQGLVVROXWLRQZKLFKFRPPHQFHG RQWKHGD\RI$SULO 7KH/LTXLGDWRULV $UJRVD&RUS1DVVDX %DKDPDV /HJDORWLFH 127,&( ROXQWDU\/LTXLGDWLRQf 1RWLFHLVKHUHE\JLYHQWKDWWKHDERYHQDPHG &RPSDQ\LVLQGLVVROXWLRQZKLFKFRPPHQFHG RQWKHGD\RI$SULO 7KH/LTXLGDWRULV $UJRVD&RUS1DVVDX %DKDPDV /HJDORWLFH 127,&( ROXQWDU\/LTXLGDWLRQf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tGULV / DWYLD /LTXLGDWRU Investors ‘commit’ to City Meat financing F ROM page one

PAGE 24

C M Y K C M Y K BUSINESS PAGE 12B, THURSDAY, MAY 14, 2009 THE TRIBUNE AN ATTORNEYwith Graham Thomps on & Company, Aliya G. Allen, has successfully completed the Series 6 Exam in Florida after studying at the Nassau-based Securities Training Institute (STI The Series 6 qualifying exam is administ ered by the New York Stock Exchange (NYSE S ecurities Dealers (NASD Ms. Albury, course administrator at STI, s aid: “This internationally recognised qualification equips Bahamian professionals with the knowledge and skills necessaryt o administer, manage and advise on investment funds.” M s Allen is pictured (right Attorney successfully completes Series 6 n NEW YORK A SLUMP in the stock market helped drag energy prices lower Wednesday despite datas howing U.S. crude supplies shrank for the first time in 10 w eeks, a ccording to Associated Press. Benchmark crude for June d elivery fell 83 cents to settle at $58.02 a barrel on the New Y ork Mercantile Exchange. In London, Brent prices increased 36 cents to $58.30 ab arrel on the ICE Futures exchange. “I think a lot of people just stepped back and looked at the big picture,” Mike Zarem b ski, senior commodity ana lyst at brokerage OptionsXpress Inc. Prices for retail gasoline h ave been rising across the country and they did so again o vernight after the AAA reported that more Americans would hit the road this Memo-r ial Day. It would be the first time that has happened in four years. R esearchers say Americans are taking advantage of comparatively cheap gasoline after staying home in recent years as prices surged. The nationala verage price for gasoline rose nearly 87 percent between 2005 and 2008. Retail gas prices rose to a new national average of$ 2.267 a gallon overnight, according to auto club AAA, Wright Express and Oil PriceI nformation Service. Prices are still $1.465 a gallon cheap e r than a year ago. T he enormous amount of crude, gasoline and natural gas i n storage has kept prices in check. Despite a drop of 4.7 million barrels last week,c rude in U.S. storage houses is the most since 1990. Meanwhile, U.S. refineries, w hich make gasoline, pulled back on production last week, according to the government. That has helped put a floor under prices, which have tum-b led because businesses and consumers are spending much less on energy this year. In other Nymex trading, gasoline for June delivery rose2 .31 cents to $1.691 a gallon and heating oil was flat at $1.5063 a gallon. Natural gasf or June delivery climbed 3.8 cents to $4.487 per 1,000 cubic f eet. Oil prices fall despite drop in US supplies

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Mim blowin’ it

SOF
71F

The Tribune

=USA TODAY.

HIGH
LOW

AND BREEZY

Volume: 105 No.142




900 jolts wil

BAHAMAS EDITION

www.tribune242.com

THURSDAY, MAY 14, 2009

as resort closes

The Four Seasons at
Emerald Bay to shut
doors in two weeks

m@ By TANEKA THOMPSON
Tribune Staff Reporter
tthompson@tribunemedia.net

EXUMA'S economy is set to
receive a devastating blow when
the island's largest employer — the
Four Seasons Resort at Emerald
Bay — shuts its doors in a little
under two weeks, a move that will
place more than 500 workers on
the unemployment line.

"It's bad news for Exuma — as
you know that's an anchor project
in Exuma — and the government
will do anything in its power to
facilitate the re-opening of the
hotel," said Labour Minister Dion
Foulkes, adding that the receivers
for Emerald Bay said the closure
was a "temporary" measure until
they secure a new buyer for the
property.

Mr Foulkes, who said he was
informed of the decision on Tues-
day, said his ministry would work
to ensure that the redundant work-
ers are paid severance packages
and “any other legal entitlement."

"As Minister of Labour that's
one of the things that I'm con-
cerned about," he said.

Employees received a memo on
Tuesday asking them to convene



for a general meeting yesterday
where they were told that as of
May 26, the luxury resort would
be closing down, The Tribune
learned.

The workers — a number of
whom live on site in employee
housing — have until June, 15 to
leave the property, according to
employees.

Angry calls from the soon-to-be
redundant workers in Exuma
poured into The Tribune yester-
day, as disgruntled staff fumed at
what they called short notice of the
closure, coupled with the fact that
there were no government officials
at yesterday's meeting to represent
them.

"Someone needs to come in and
stand up for us Bahamians because
we were all in shock," said one
worker who dedicated two years
to the company. She is now hoping
family in Nassau can help find her
accommodations as she prepares
to return to the capital to look for
work.

Workers said although they were
promised severance pay they are
worried resort officials may not
make good on this pledge.

SEE page eight





Felipé Major/Tribune staff

PLP chairman calls for
transparent land policy

m@ By ALISON LOWE
Tribune Staff Reporter
alowe@tribunemedia.net

mitted to citizens in a way
that advances our national
development for the greater
good of our people. The
process should be fair and
transparent and conducted
in a considered and princi-
pled fashion, one which is

IF ANYTHING comes of
the “apparent debacle” cul-
minating in the resignation
of the director of Lands and
Surveys it should be a “clear- accessible to all Bahamians.
ly enunciated and transpar- GLENYS “There must now be a
ent policy relative to the HANNA-MARTIN Clearly articulated policy
grant of Bahamian land,” which reflects the modern
said PLP chairman Glenys Hanna- _needs and future progress of our

vee SEE page 10

“Crown land ought to be trans-



Bahamians reportedly among
group whose boat capsized

BAHAMIANS were reportedly among a group of Haitian migrants
whose boat capsized off the coast of Florida on Wednesday leaving as
many as 11 people dead.

According to the Associate Press, 21 people were pulled from the
water off Fort Lauderdale, seven of them were unresponsive. Those sev-
en were taken to hospital.

The boat capsized about 2 am, but the Coast Guard didn't learn
about it until another boater called more than 10 hours later.

It was unclear where the boat was coming from or how many people
might still be in the water.

Two helicopters, a jet and three boats were involved in the rescue.

WSS

Tm Sm
IN TODAY’S TRIBUNE









The family
of murdered
banker ‘have
clear idea of
his enemies’

Hywel Jones’ relatives speak





Hywel Jones, speaks to the
media yesterday at police
headquarters.





FNM BLAMED FOR
LETTING FULLY
FURNISHED CLINIC
SIT IDLE

TWO MEN AND BOY,
16, CHARGED WITH
MURDER

CYNTHIA PRATT YET 10
DECIDE ON POLITICAL
FUTURE

out at press conference

ILT JONES, the brother of







m@ By MEGAN REYNOLDS
Tribune Staff Reporter
mreynolds@
tribunemedia.net



THE family of murdered
investment banker Hywel
Jones announced at a press
conference yesterday that
they have a clear idea of who
his enemies were.

Mr Jones’ brother IIt
Jones, 49, said his brother was
liked and respected by almost
everyone he knew, and there-
fore police should have little
trouble identifying who may
have been in conflict with the
55-year-old businessman.

Assistant Commissioner
of Police Raymond Gibson
gave his assurance that the
police will follow every lead
and interview whoever they
may need to during the
course of the investigation.
Hywel Jones was shot in

SEE page 10


























Call for ‘meaningful’
Freedom of
Information Act in
light of land row

@ By ALISON LOWE
Tribune Staff Reporter
alowe@tribunemedia.net

A “MEANINGFUL” Freedom
of Information Act that would
allow the media and public access
to records kept by the government
and its agencies could have helped
prevent the circumstances that led
to the resignation of the Director
of Lands and Surveys on Monday,
a prominent lawyer said yesterday.

“A FOIA would’ve been helpful
in ensuring propriety (in the Tex
Turnquest situation),” said Fred
Smith, attorney with the law firm
Callenders and Co. and President
of the Grand Bahama Human
Rights Association.

“Information about who is
receiving Crown grants should be
readily available even as applica-
tions or requests are made so that
it is all transparent and above
board — after all although it’s

SEE page 10





NASSAU AND BAHAMEA

ISLANDS’ LEADING NEWSPAPER
PAGE 2, THURSDAY, MAY 14, 2009

THE TRIBUNE



LOCAL NEWS

Unused ... despite costing $1.3 million

FNM blamed for letting fully furnished clinic sit idle

SPACIOUS: The medical facility is unoccupied.



=

=

== =

i

THE FNM has allowed a $1.3
million clinic to sit idle and
unused, PLP Senator Jerome
Fitzgerald said yesterday.

Built by the National Insurance
Board in Grand Cay, Abaco, the
clinic was completed more than
two years ago and is fully fur-
nished.

But Mr Fitzgerald said patients
are forced to use the old clinic
while a modern state of the art
medical facility just sits unused.
He also said a fully furnished res-
idence for the doctor or nurse
also remains unoccupied.

“Here we are today speaking
about the wonderful changes tak-
ing place in communications, e-

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Family Islands Freeport 242 352 7119 Abaco 24

mails, e-health, e-education, etc,
and the Member of Parliament
for North Abaco and the Minister
Health both failed to discharge
this vital obligation to the people
of Grand Cay,” the senator said
yesterday during debate on the
Communications Bill in the Sen-
ate. Mr Fitzgerald said the Prime
Minister did the same thing in
South Andros when his party
came to office in 1992 and found
a brand new clinic in Johnson’s
South Andros, which he refused
to open and allowed the building
to sit and deteriorated for 10
years.

Rusted

“The standby generator sat and
rusted and it was a very costly
undertaking to refurbish the clin-
ic and replace the equipment. It
was another waste of public
funds. Are we seeing a repeat of
this on Grand Cay? This is con-
trary to what he said in the Trust
Manifesto of 2007,” he said.

He said this was yet another
example of poor management of
the nation’s affairs.

“This FNM Government; the
new Ministry of Housing and the
Bahamas Mortgage Building just
west of the Ministry Of Works,
JFK Drive, which was to be
equipped with the state of the art
communication.

“Here we are, Madam Presi-
dent, two years later and this vir-
tually completed building just sits
unoccupied. What a waste. Where
is the Trust, where is the account-
ability, where is the transparen-
cy?” Mr Fitzgerald asked. He

STATE OF THE ART FACILITY: Clinic (above and below) is unused.



said Bahamians will recall just
over two years ago the 2007 Gen-
eral Elections when the FNM
boasted of having tried and
proven leadership, if what was
just disclosed is a crowning exam-
ple of trusted, tried and proven
leadership then we all can appre-
ciate the very serious dilemma
the Bahamas now finds itself.

PLP chairman

‘embarrassed’ by
PM’s comments

OPPOSITION chairman
Glenys Hanna-Martin said that
she was “embarrassed” by
Prime Minister Hubert Ingra-
ham’s comments during a pre-
sentation at the first annual cus-
tomer service conference for
Immigration officers.

“While I agree wholeheart-
edly with the prime minister’s
message that there should be
institutionalised respect for all
peoples, it is a pity that he chose
to overshadow an otherwise
positive message with what I
would call most unfortunate
remarks,” she said.

Addressing claims that some
immigration officers use exces-
sive force during apprehension
and detention exercises, Prime
Minister Hubert Ingraham said
that his government does not
tolerate the abuse of detainees
or suspected illegal immigrants.

The prime minister also said
that the government will not
“look the other way” when evi-
dence supports allegations of
corruption in the public service.

ee ee Bie
Fertilizer, Fungicide,
AOU AU)

Ue das
rear ALY |





He focused on allegations of
immigration officials accepting
bribes at ports of entry or in
exchange for falsifying docu-
ments or speeding up work per-
mit and residence application
processes.

The keynote speaker at the
first annual customer service
conference for the Immigration
Department held at the Wynd-
ham Cable Beach Resort on
Monday, Mr _ Ingraham
expressed regret that a “pay to
play” culture has developed in
the country’s public sector.

Mrs Hanna-Martin said that
while she acknowledges that
there are some individuals in
all sectors of society — includ-
ing politics — who seek personal
advantage over and above
national interest”, she believes
that there are fine officers in
the Immigration Department.

“Immigration officers, in par-
ticular, are entrusted with the
protection of our borders,
sometimes at great personal risk
to their safety. That a person
no less than our prime minister
would see a gathering of such
Bahamians at an event designed
to enhance and improve their
profession as an opportunity to
negatively impugn them in such
a blanket fashion, is very unfor-
tunate and deeply offensive,”
Mrs Hanna-Martin said.

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‘YOUR VIEW”

To have your say on this or any
other issue, email The Tribune at:
letters@tribunemedia.net or
deliver your letter to The Tribune
on Shirley Street, P.O. Box N-3207

High utilities expenses
‘are not sustainable’

THE Bahamas’ extraordi-
narily high utilities expenses
are not sustainable and
threaten the viability of not
just tourism, but many of the
country’s important indus-
tries, chairman and CEO of
Baha Mar Resorts Sarkis
Izmirlian said.

In a op-ed appearing in
The Tribune today, Mr
Izmirlian said that in order
to be a leading vacation des-
tination, it is essential that
the Bahamas has modern
and effective telecommuni-
cations and energy infra-
structures in place.

“Guests must be able to
connect rapidly and reliably
for voice, data and multime-
dia content through fixed
and mobile phone lines.
Government and the private
sectors must develop cre-
ative solutions to meet our
energy needs in a low-cost
sustainable way, including
seriously assessing alterna-
tive sources like solar and
wind power, he said.

The move toward privati-
sation of BTC represents,
Mr Izmiralian said, an
important step in this direc-
tion.

“As Bahamians, we tradi-
tionally address adversity
with an optimistic, forward-
looking attitude — and
actions to match. It is critical,
therefore, that the actions
we take to minimise the
length and severity of the
current economic slowdown
also include longer term
strategic initiatives to posi-
tion the Bahamas to take full
advantage of a global eco-
nomic recovery. Strengthen-
ing our tourism industry now
and making the Bahamas
the top destination in the
Caribbean are key,” he said.

The CEO said tourism is
central to the long term eco-
nomic and social well-being
of the Bahamas. “Tourism
brings in capital, enhances
property values and stimu-
lates major economic devel-
opment at the community
level. Tourism means jobs.
Think of the thousands of
jobs in our country that have
been created by the busi-
nesses that directly and indi-
rectly support the tourist
trade,” he said.

“Since competition glob-
ally for tourist dollars is
fierce, it is imperative that
the Bahamas be viewed
around the world as the
vacation destination of
choice. Improving key infra-
structure, transportation,
service and technology com-
ponents is vital to this effort.
It is incumbent upon our pri-
vate sector to play an impor-
tant role both as responsi-
ble corporate,” Mr Izmi-
ralian said.

e SEE Mr Izmirlian’s full
statement on page nine.
THE TRIBUNE



LOCAL NEWS

THURSDAY, MAY 14, 2009, PAGE 3



0 In bri ef MAGISTRATE’S COURT

Drugs-for-
guns scheme:
no charges yet
after arresis

THE police in Portland are
yet to charge three fishermen
who were picked up on Sunday
off the coast of Long Bay in
connection with an ongoing
drugs-for-guns trade scheme.

Two of the men are
Jamaicans and the other is a
Bahamian.

The men were arrested on
Sunday afternoon during a joint
operation between the local
marine police and a team from
the Jamaica Defence Force
Coast Guard.

The police say the two
Jamaicans, who were under sur-
veillance for some time on sus-
picion of being involved in the
scheme — which operates
between Jamaica and Haiti -
were detained with the Bahami-
an when the three were spotted
aboard a 28-foot fibre glass fish-
ing boat. The police say the men
attempted to sail away when
approached by the joint
police/military team, which con-
ducted a search of the vessel,
but came up empty handed.

The men remain in custody at
a Port Antonio police detention
facility.

Immigration Dept
drafting customer
service blueprint

m@ BY LINDSAY THOMPSON

THE Immigration Depart-
ment is drafting a blueprint
outlining solutions to various
challenges it faces, Minister of
State Branville McCartney
said. The document, to be
completed by the end of June,
will outline policies and proce-
dures to be carried out by the
department in executing its
mandate.

Mr McCartney, who has
responsibility for immigration,
was speaking at the May 11-12
customer service training
workshop and motivational
seminar for Immigration offi-
cials. “Customer service is
most essential to all establish-
ments whether government or
private enterprise,” he said.

Earlier this year the Immi-
gration Department formed a
customer service committee to
review each individual unit
and determine how best the
department can be made more
efficient and a better provider
of quality customer service.

“The Immigration Depart-
ment provides a service to
Bahamians and visitors and
we must ensure that that ser-
vice is supreme,” Mr McCart-
ney said.

One objective of the semi-
nar was to help Immigration
officers appreciate that their
various responsibilities — to
guard, protect, welcome and
facilitate — are not mutually
exclusive. Participants includ-
ed those who will be at the
front lines during the FIFA
football conference this month
and the Miss Universe
Pageant in August. However,
Mr McCartney said, training
seminars like this one will
become “common practice” at
the department.

3 plead not
guilty in Nicole
Smith drug case
m LOS ANGELES

Anna Nicole Smith's lawyer-
turned-boyfriend and two doc-
tors pleaded not guilty Wednes-
day to charges they conspired to
provide thousands of prescrip-
tion pills to the former model
before her overdose death two
years ago.

The appearance of Howard K.
Stern and Drs. Khristine Ero-
shevich and Sandeep Kapoor in
Superior Court set the stage for
a preliminary hearing that all
parties said could last at least
two weeks. Deputy District
Attorney Renee Rose said there
are 1,400 pages of discovery in
the case, which was investigated
for two years before charges
were filed. Court Commissioner
Kristi Lousteau ordered docu-
ments in the case sealed,
although attorneys said that
about a quarter of the material
has already been made public.

The hearing was brief and
Smith's name was never men-
tioned. Stern, Eroshevich and
Kapoor stood before Lousteau
with their lawyers. The defen-
dants said "yes" when she asked
if they were pleading not guilty
and when they agreed to delay
the matter until June 8 for set-
ting of the preliminary hearing
date. They declined to comment
outside court.

Two men and boy,

16,

charged with murder

Trio not of required to enter plea

PHOTOS: Felipé Major/Tribune staff

ACCUSED: Blake Rahming, 22.

@ By NATARIO McKENZIE
Tribune Staff Reporter

TWO men and a 16-year-old boy were arraigned
in Magistrate’s Court yesterday on a murder charge.
Police have charged Ramal Colebrooke, 23, of
Nassau Village, Blake Rahming, 22, of Old Cedar
Street and a 16-year-old of Augusta Street with the

murder of Marc Estimable.

Mr Estimable, 29, was shot at his Gamble Heights
home around lam on Sunday, May 3.

Police think he was fatally wounded in the left side
of his body after answering the door to a man who
said he wanted to buy a phone card. A champagne
coloured Honda was reportedly seen leaving the

area after the weapon was fired.

Mr Estimable was taken to hospital, but died
after arrival. He was the 24th homicide victim of

the year.

The accused, who appeared before Chief Magis-
trate Roger Gomez in Court One, Bank Lane, were



ACCUSED: Ramal Colebrooke 23

not required to enter a plea to the murder charge.
Attorney Murrio Ducille asked Chief Magistrate
Gomez to make an order that his client be taken to

four days.

hospital for medical attention. According to Mr
Ducille, Colebrooke had been beaten while in police
custody. Mr Ducille also criticised police for what he
called the “vexing practice” of not allowing persons
in custody to see their attorneys.

Attorney Ian Cargill, who is representing the
juvenile, told the court police had punched his client
in the stomach several times in an effort to force him
to sign a document which he did not sign. He also
claimed his client had been in police custody for
more than 96 hours.

Attorney Edward Turner, who is representing
Rahming, said police had his client in custody for

Chief Magistrate Gomez ordered the accused be
taken to hospital for medical attention. The accused

have been remanded to Her Majesty’s Prison. The

case has been adjourned to May 18 and transferred
to Court 10, Nassau Street.

Pharmacy legislation welcomed

m@ By MEGAN REYNOLDS
Tribune Staff Reporter
mreynolds@tribunemedia.net

INNOVATIVE legislation
drafted “by pharmacists for phar-
macists” has been welcomed by
industry stakeholders across the
Bahamas who say it will open up
career opportunities and interna-
tional trade.

The Bahamas Pharmaceutical
Association (BPA) has been
pushing for an overhaul of out-
dated 1960s legislation for more
than 20 years, and worked with
Minister of Health Hubert Minnis
to develop the Pharmacy Act
2009.

Intensive research of pharma-
ceutical laws around the world
was carried out by members of
the BPA who also attended inter-

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national conferences, and sought
input from local pharmacists to
develop the new laws which not
only introduce standards for the
registration, importation and dis-
tribution of medicines, but also
establish education requirements
and improved licensing proce-
dures for professionals.

BPA president Philip Gray said
he particularly welcomes the
establishment of the Pharmacy
Council of the Bahamas, a regu-
latory body made up of pharma-
cists and individuals from the pri-
vate and public sector, which will
develop, update and enforce
national standards and regula-
tions.

Mr Gray said the council will
ensure there is greater account-
ability in the industry, and he
hopes the changes will give peo-
ple more confidence in the med-
ications they buy.

He said: “The act also seeks to
reinforce the patient-centred
practice of pharmacy that has
always been integral to the pro-
fession in the Bahamas.”

And the legislation will create a

i aT Te Ye

number of lucrative jobs for those
interested in pursuing careers as
pharmaceutical consultants or
teachers in the industry, Mr Gray
said.

BPA vice-president Mimi
Roberts, whose father Pedro
Roberts Jr pushed for new legis-
lation 20 years ago, is now cele-
brating the fruits of a generational
campaign.

She said: “It’s my dream that
the Bahamas will become more of
a transshipment point for the rest
of the Caribbean.

“It would be a nice place to
invest in, but to do that we have
to have legislation in place, and
this will allow us to be that type of
country where we have bigger
business.”

Chairman of the legislative
committee Dr Marvin Smith said:
“Pharmacists pushed for the bill
and it’s really the first time the
government has taken someone
else’s draft and said ‘we will work
with you’. The government has
done a good move in terms of
facilitating local input and needs
to be commended for that.”

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PAGE 4, THURSDAY, MAY 14, 2009

EDITORIAL/LETTERS TO THE EDITOR

THE TRIBUNE





The Tribune Limited

NULLIUS ADDICTUS JURARE IN VERBA MAGISTRI
Being Bound to Swear to The Dogmas of No Master

LEON E. H. DUPUCH, Publisher/Editor 1903-1914

SIR ETIENNE DUPUCH, Kt, O.B.E., K.M., K.C.S.G.,

(Hon.) LL.D., D.Litt.

Publisher/Editor 1919-1972
Contributing Editor 1972-1991

EILEEN DUPUCH CARRON, C.M.G., M.S., B.A., LL.B.

Publisher/Editor 1972-

Published Daily Monday to Saturday

Shirley Street, RO. Box N-3207, Nassau, Bahamas
Insurance Management Building., P.O. F-485, Freeport, Grand Bahama

TELEPHONES
Switchboard (News, Circulation and Advertising) 322-1986
Advertising Manager - (242) 502-2352
Circulation Department - (242) 502-2387
Nassau Fax: - (242) 328-2398
Freeport, Grand Bahama: 1-(242)-352-6608

WEBSITE
www.tribune242.com — updated daily at 2pm

Judicial system in disarray

THE BAHAMAS has always prided itself
on having a stable government, and a judicial
system of the highest repute. As a matter of
fact it was two of this country’s top selling points
when trying to attract investors to the islands.

When there was debate on breaking away
from this country’s highest appeal court — the
Privy Council in London— the most telling
argument was that foreign investors would not
feel the same confidence with a Caribbean court
as a final court of appeal. In other words, the
high standing of our British-inherited courts
was considered one of our main attractions.

This is no longer so. Our court system has
been in decline for some years. It is now in free
fall. For a highly respected profession made
up of men and women who wore the wig and
gown with pride, about whom there was sel-
dom a breath of scandal, there is now only dis-
respect and suspicion.

Only yesterday two maids discussing crime
were convinced that people were now settling
their own disputes in the streets because they
can’t get into the courts and when they do they
often can’t find justice.

The Supreme Court, with important inter-
national cases pending, is now in a state of col-
lapse with the sudden resignation of senior jus-
tice John Lyons. Justice Lyons, who was hearing
most of the cases, was noted for his expert
knowledge and handling of commercial dis-
putes.

The Lyons matter came to a head when a
lawyer asked that the judge recuse himself from
hearing the Central Bank of Ecuador case,
because of the bias and animosity he had shown
toward the lawyer’s firm, Callender’s & Co.

The judge refused. The matter went to
appeal, and the judge’s attitude, bias against
the Callender firm, and his general behaviour
was the issue.

Justice Lyons’ perceived bias resulted from an
earlier case in which the Callender firm was
also involved. It was a case from which Justice
Lyons had earlier recused himself saying he did
not have enough time to hear it. The lot fell to
Justice Anita Allen. One of the issues in that
case was the appointment of an accountant
whose credentials were being questioned by
the litigants. Justice Allen wondered whether
she should also recuse herself because of the
details she had recently learned in connection
with that appointment. She was told that Mr
Lyons had forced the appointment on the com-
plainants, threatening to walk out of court if
they did not agree the accountant he had select-
ed. However, Justice Allen later learned that the

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accountant’s sister had “more than a friend-
ship” with the judge, and that the sister was
assisting her brother in his work. She had to
decide whether the accountant’s report, which
the litigants complained was not adequate,
should be approved. She wanted to be up front
with the court and inform them of the infor-
mation that had come to her attention.

At the time Justice Lyons was in Australia on
leave. He hurriedly returned to the Bahamas,
and when a Callender lawyer walked into his
court room in another case he saw “blood drip-
ping from them after the execution.”

And on April 17, before ordering another
Callender lawyer from his court room, he
announced that he was not going to deal with
any matters “with accounting and accountants
with your firm.” According to the lawyer the
judge grew angrier.

In a cooler moment, Mr Lyons admitted that
it was unwise of him to have undertaken active
court duties until his “emotions had fully set-
tled.” He said that his anger had “now dissi-
pated” and that there was no “real danger of
bias against any clients of Messrs Callenders.”

However, in addition to his detractors, the
judge had his defenders who felt he had cause
for frustration because, as he had himself said,
“the Supreme Court is a mess and in disarray”
and he was not going to cover for lawyers any-
more.

Former attorney general Alfred Sears
believed the judge “brought a level of efficien-
cy which helped to build the reputation of the
Bahamas as a financial centre and a place where
complex commercial matters could be speedily
adjudicated.” Many others agreed.

However, much blame lies with the system
itself. There really is no more time for finger
pointing. There is so much wrong that govern-
ment should take this opportunity to sweep
with a clean broom and start all over again. A
strong and determined Chief Justice should be
appointed who will bring life, direction and
reform to the system.

Lawyers who don’t participate in the func-
tions of the Bar Council and Association, failing,
for example, to show up to vote for strong and
capable officers are also to blame for deterio-
rating standards.

He spoke in the eighteenth century, but what
Edmund Burke said then carries the same Truth
today: “It is necessary only for the good man to
do nothing for evil to triumph.”
The trouble with this country is that too many
good men — and good women— say and do
nothing.



Attitude of
lawlessness
pervading
our schools

“THINGS FALL APART
THE CENTER CANNOT
HOLD.” Chinua Achebe

EDITOR, The Tribune.

Thank you for allowing me a
small space to express my views
in your esteemed publication.

For some time now I have
observed the behaviour of some
of our young men and decided
to make my views known pub-
licly. As a mother of boys, I do
not like what I see today in our
society with regard to our young
men.

To start with there is a serious
attitude of lawlessness that
seems to pervade our public and
private schools.

There is little or no respect
for teachers or peers and the
climate’s very “cool” for the
young men who choose not to
take that route.

Filthy, obscene language is
no longer a hidden pasttime, to
these young men, but is said
boldly within the hearing of
adults who they dare to com-
ment.

I ask myself over and over
where did this type of behav-
iour come from and, of course,
there are all sorts of answers.

The main one being these
young men are the offspring of

BaywIAS

letters@tribunemedia net



single mothers and a single par-
ent home. That excuse is and
has always been utter nonsense
as there are many single moth-
ers out there, inclusive of
myself, who are raising sons
alone, albeit with familial sup-
port, who are NOT behaving
like these young men.

Their inability to reason
shows extreme ignorance, which
is startling as most of these
young men are of school age
and should have the ability to
solve a problem without resort-
ing to using their fists or a lethal
weapon.

The level of this problem is
hightening as the murder rate
is climbing rapidly.

No one seems to have a
viable solution.

Many young men practically
speak another language besides
dialect.

They are hardly understood
when they speak.

They wear their trousers
bound tightly to their thighs by
belts, giving no regard to the
waist that their trousers are
made for. Their clothes are gen-

erally two and three sizes too
big. The scariest part of all of
this is the blatant disrespect for
our law enforcement officers.

They are shooting at our
police officers, cursing at them,
spitting at them and raising fists
at them. How should the offi-
cers respond to protect them-
selves?

How can our society truly
flourish?

Something is definitely wrong
and we, as a society, must
address this before we com-
pletely lose a generation. All
parents need to take the reins
and stop protecting their chil-
dren in wrong doing. Stop hid-
ing your sons when the law is
looking for them and stop
putting the lives of teachers in
danger because they discipline
your child for doing something
that is wrong and against the
school’s rules.

That’s a perfect place to start.

The problem starts at home
and the correction of the prob-
lem will have to begin in the
home but it will take national
participation to put our young
men back in order and on track
before it’s too late.

Elizabeth E.M. Thompson
Nassau,
May 12, 2009.

‘Native fish market’ had
tourists holding their noses

BAHAMAS QSR LIMITED

EDITOR, The Tribune.

A terrible odour is sickening motorists passing
the bush at the traffic light next to the Montagu
ramp. Some days it’s worse than others, but the
bush is clearly being used as an outdoor toilet
and it often stinks.

To my knowledge, there is no running water or
toilets at the ramp and this in itself is cause for
serious health concerns.

From time to time, the conch shells with rotting
matter still inside are left in the sun and this,
combined with the odour from the bush, is terri-
ble.

It’s bad enough for us locals, but I was embar-
rassed recently to see a small group of tourists
walk by holding their noses.

“Native fish market,” one commented.

The market, if it is allowed to continue to
exist, needs to be regulated and managed, and
running water needs to be put in place. It is not
clean.

As you know, it is also a traffic nightmare
because Bahamians seem to have a problem
pulling over in the parking area and walking a few

yards. They have to block the street on a major
traffic artery and, of course, the police are
nowhere to be seen.

Then there are the jet skis that block traffic
because of the ill-conceived idea of placing a
feeder road opposite the ramp that cuts right in
the middle of a main road.

There is actually lots of land to the west of the
ramp and this would be the logical place for a
feeder road.

The market has grown from a one man show
selling jacks from his dinghy into a free for all
where anyone can sell anything — T-shirts, hats,
seafood, fruit and vegetables — you name it.

It is doubtful that all of these people have
business licences. Do the police even check, or is
this just another example of selective law enforce-
ment?

A JOHNSON

Nassau,

May 13, 2009

(This area is a disgrace. It should never have
been allowed to exist. It certainly is an example of
selective law and a lack of political will. — Ed).

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THE TRIBUNE

THURSDAY, MAY 14, 2009, PAGE 5



LOCAL NEWS
ae. F

Cynthia Pratt yet to decide on political future

ase



@ By ALISON LOWE
Tribune Staff Reporter
alowe@tribunemedia.net

STILL in mourning, St Cecelia MP Cyn-
thia “Mother” Pratt yesterday said she has
not yet made up her mind about her politi-
cal future within the PLP, but will make an
announcement sometime after she returns
to parliament for the budget debate.

Hinting that her decision will rely upon
the will of PLP leader Perry Christie, she
said: “When I return to parliament I would
speak with the leader and see what’s going

on, and then I would make a statement at a
later date.

“You know, as with most of these things,
if there’s any changes it would be done at
the convention, and so nothing really would
happen before a convention - but I don’t
want to precede the leader and it’s fair for
me to speak to him to find out what went on
while I was out.”

The budget debate will take place at the
end of this month. It will be the first time
Mts Pratt attends parliament since the death
of her husband Joseph Pratt in early April.

The St Cecelia MP had previously indi-

cated her intention to step down as deputy
leader of the PLP and not run for the post at
a party convention expected to take place
towards the end of 2009.

However, it was in a press conference
called to thank well-wishers, friends, con-
stituents and loved-ones shortly after her
husband’s death that she first signalled that
she may not be so certain of her previous
decision.

Fuelling speculation, she told reporters
that she was not prepared to discuss her
political future within the party at that time,
but would make a statement shortly.

Woman police officer
‘feared for life’ after being
struck by shotgun pellets

m@ By NATARIO McKENZIE
Tribune Staff reporter

A WOMAN police officer testi-
fied in the Supreme Court yester-
day that she feared for her life after
being struck in the head with shot-
gun pellets during a hold-up at a
Scotiabank branch last July.

James Miller, Anthony Williams
and Janquo Mackey, are accused of
robbing the Soldier Road and East
Street South branch of Scotiabank
on July 2, 2008. They are also
accused of the attempted murder of
Corporal Natasha Black, causing
grievous harm; possession of a
firearm with intent to endanger the
life of another; possession of a
firearm with intent to resist lawful
arrest and causing harm.

Corporal Black testified yester-
day that on Wednesday, July 2, she
and another female officer left the
Wulff Road Police Station to make
inquiries in the East Street South
area. She said that while in the area
of Lil General Convenience Store,
they received information from the
police control room and as a result
headed to Scotiabank on East Street
South and Soldier Road.

Officer Black told the court that
she was unable to drive through the
western entrance of the bank’s park-
ing lot because traffic was backed
up. She said that while in traffic, she
noticed what appeared to be the fig-
ure of a man peeking through the
bottom portion of the bank’s glass
entrance door.

She told the court that after the
man left the bank, she noticed that
he was wearing a mask and had what
appeared to be a silver and black

Testimony given about

Scotiabank branch hold-up

shotgun in his hand.

She testified that the gunman
looked in the direction of the patrol
car and fired the weapon.

“Immediately I felt pain in the
left side of my head,” Ms Black told
the court.

She said blood began to pour
from the left side of her head and she
feared for her life. Corporal Black
told the court that when she looked
back she saw the man pointing the
gun in the direction of the patrol car
again.

While driving off, she said she
heard a second gun shot.

Officer Black then testified that
while driving south on East Street
she noticed several marked police
cars heading north to the scene of
the robbery.

She said that at that point she
stopped the patrol car, got out of
the driver’s seat and into the pas-
senger’s seat. She told the court that
she was then taken to the Princess
Margaret Hospital where she under-
went surgery.

Officer Black said that three shot-
gun pellets were removed from the
left side of her head and that she is
supposed to have a second surgery to
remove the remaining eight pellets.

Eileen Claire, senior manager
of field operations at Scotiabank,
told the court yesterday that she per-
formed a review of the Scotiabank
branch following the robbery to
determine how much money was

taken. She said that the money left in
the cashier’s till was balanced with
what had been computed in the
bank’s system and it was determined
that $21,344 had been taken.

Arnette Watson, manager of Sco-
tiabank’s East Street South and Sol-
dier Road branch, said that on the
afternoon of July 2, police returned
to the bank with a pillow case filled
with money. She said that the cash
was counted and it was determined
that there was $10,996 in the pillow
case.

The trial continues today before
Justice Jon Isaacs. The prosecution is
expected to call 31 witnesses. Mack-
ey is represented by attorney Murrio
Ducille, Williams is represented by
Dorsey McPhee and Miller is repre-
senting himself. Vernal Collie,
Ambrose Brown and Lennox Cole-
by are prosecuting the case.

















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Yesterday, Mrs Pratt said she “doesn’t
want to focus on anything other than her
husband’s life at this time.”

“T’m still picking up the pieces my hus-
band left behind, dealing with all the pay-
ments for his funeral and other issues”, she
said.

“When I return I think I will be more
equipped.”

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BAHAMAS

MONWEALTH BUILDING SUPPLIES
PAGE 6, THURSDAY, MAY 14, 2009

THE TRIBUNE



Two Family Island resorts win

rave reviews on TripAdvisor

Association is formed to
protect couriers’ interests —

THE Bahamas Transshipment and Logistics Association has
been formed to protect the interests of courier companies in the
Bahamas.

Twenty-three companies, representing around 300 employees, are
charter members.

Walt Saunders of GWS Worldwide Express was elected presi-
dent.

Other BTLA executives are: Romell Knowles, vice president;
Tara Cartwright, secretary; Trevor Adderley, asst secretary;
Andrew Burrow, treasurer; Susan Kelly, asst treasurer and Lahore
Mackey, public relations officer.

The directors are Kieron Dixon, Wayne Bryan and Chris Bur-
rows.

According to Mr Saunders, BTLA’s mission is to promote and
advance the common interests of companies engaged in messenger-
courier industry in the Bahamas and in the region; to provide
information, education, referrals and the opportunity to network
in order to form logistical partnerships between carriers and ship-
pers; to co-operate with authorities in air cargo security and to edu-
cate the public on the importance of the industry to the smooth run-
ning of other businesses in the country.

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TWO boutique resorts in the Family
Islands — one in Exuma and the other in
South Andros — are winning rave reviews on
TripAdvisor.com, the user-generated des-
tination review website that is playing an
increasingly important role in shaping trav-
el decisions.

Visitors referred to one of the two resorts,
Emerald Palms in South Andros, as “a
home away from home without the hustle
and bustle associated with large, all-inclu-
sive resorts.” Other visitors called it a “par-
adise exceeding expectation,” in which
“quaint and rustic have been wonderfully
mastered.”

Of 56 reviews, 44 gave Emerald Palms a
five-star rating, making it the number one of
11 hotels in Andros on TripAdvisor's pop-
ularity index. Though the 18-club room,
22-villa resort on a stretch of unspoiled
beach with hundreds of palms is often
referred to as a romantic getaway or a div-
er or fisherman’s haven, guests recom-
mended it for families.

A Canadian couple travelling with their
11-month-old son describe Emerald Palms
as paradise, finding both peace and quiet in
its “out of the way" location, perfect for a
vacationing family.

Its pristine environment paired with
immaculate service, they said, sets the tone
for a calming and relaxing vacation. A cou-
ple from Ontario, who visited in February,
said the resort with complimentary kayaks,
bikes, and other non-motorised craft avail-
able for guest use, was an ideal place to
rejuvenate mind, body and soul while expe-
riencing one of the last great, untouched
destinations on Earth.

Equally rave reviews went to Grand Isle
Resort and Spa in Emerald Bay, Exuma,
which has been rated number one of nine
hotels in Exuma by TripAdvisor for the

PICTURED (top) is a view of Grand Isle Resort and Spa. Above is an interior from Emerald Palms.

past three years. Visitors to the resort
reported “personal service beyond expec-
tation” combined with luxuriously-appoint-
ed villas, infinity pool and deck overlooking
the bay and other amenities. One review
called Grand Isle “a new level of paradise in
exquisite surroundings.” Another noted its
“fantastic property.”



The praise for both boutique properties
bodes well for Family Island tourism. More
than 15 million hotel reviews are posted on
TripAdvisor.com, the nine-year old web-
site that is emerging as a powerful unpaid
tool driving business to or from one of the
212,000 hotels in 30,000 destinations includ-
ed on the site.

Caribbean urged to use IDB loans
for local government development

m By DENISE MAYCOCK
Tribune Freeport Reporter
dmaycock@tribunemedia.net

FREEPORT - Winston Cox,
executive director of the Inter-
American Development Bank for
the Caribbean, said that lending
to local government developments
has climbed significantly in the last
five years.

He told delegates on Tuesday at

the fifth Commonwealth Local
Government Conference that IDB
loans in support of sub-national
development represents a “sizable
portion” of the bank's portfolio
across the 48 member countries.

Mr Cox reported that since
1990, regional or local government
institutions have been either
executors, co-executors or direct
borrowers of an estimated 27.8 per
cent of the IDB’s lending volume,
equivalent to $28.5 billion.

“In three of the last five years,
the percentage has climbed to the
35 to 40 per cent range,” he said.

Mr Cox said that the Inter-
American Development Bank is a
very important financial institu-
tion for the western hemisphere.
He said its model has been copied

in other parts of the world, par-
ticularly Asia and Africa.

“Tt is the oldest of the regional
development banks, and we are
celebrating our 50th anniversary
this year,” he said.

IDB, he said, partners with
member countries to combat
poverty and promote social equity.
He said it works with governments
as well as with the private sector,
and seeks to achieve sustainable
economic growth and increase
competitiveness, modernise public
institutions, foster free trade, and
encourage regional integration.

Mr Cox said the bank lends to
national, provincial, state and
municipal governments as well as
autonomous public institutions.
He noted that civil society organ-

isations (CSOs) and private sec-
tor companies are also eligible for
IDB financing.

He listed some recent examples
of loans to CSOs in Guyana which
resulted in the strengthening of
civil society participation in pover-
ty reduction and development in
2008.

In Ecuador in 2007, lending
went towards occupational train-
ing and job creation for persons
with disabilities, and in Colombia
funds went toward strengthening
civil society in an effort to reduce
poverty.

Mr Cox represents the IDB in
five Caribbean countries — the
Bahamas, Barbados, Jamaica,
Guyana and Trinidad and
Tobago.

He said: “I have not provided
examples for the bank’s works in
the five Caribbean countries that
are members of the bank. I think
that is because emphasis of the
governments in this region has

Start looking for that Special Prom Dress
early and remember our flexible
sought to draw on other activities

layaway plan at
of the bank other than its activities

) in support of sub-national enti-
ties.”

“T hope that ... those of you

who are member countries of the

bank will recognise that the bank
can play a role in supporting local
government.

“How you achieve this is really
the challenge, but in many cases a
simple technique is for the minis-
ter responsible for local govern-
ment to bend the ear of the min-
ister of finance who is often the
country’s representative on the
board to these banks to tell them
that this is what you will like those
banks doing in our countries,” said
Mr Cox.

The IDB executive said that
most countries in the region have
committed to a model of decen-
tralised governance, in both the
political and fiscal policymaking
arenas.

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THE TRIBUNE

LOCAL NEWS

THURSDAY, MAY 14, 2009, PAGE 7


































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SENATOR FREDERICK MCALPINE

LEADING up to the last
general election, the PLP
had persons campaigning for
them on radio stations,
spreading the party’s “pro-
paganda” at the public’s
expense,” Senator Freder-
ick McAlpine said yesterday
during his contribution to
the Communications Bill.

“The Bahamian people
were the victims in this case.
How could you use the peo-
ple’s radio station to spread
political propaganda,” he
asked.

The importance of the
implementation of URCA
(Utilities Regulatory and
Competition Authority) is
becoming increasingly clear,
Rev McAlpine said.

The new legislation, he
said, will do great wonders
for the communications sec-
tor in the Bahamas.

“We’re on our way to
first-class status. It is time
we stepped up from the
archaic mode and become

Claim that PLP ‘propaganda’
was spread at public’s expense

Senator makes allegation during his
contribution to Communications Bill

modernised, not just in our
thinking and communica-
tion, but also in our legisla-
tion,” he said.

The FNM, he said,
widened democracy to the
extent that talk shows have
become the order of the
day.

“In my opinion, pre-1992
many felt that victimisation
and intimidation was the
order of the day. Even when

our predecessors returned
to office in 2002, the talk
shows were not as popular;
those who called often were
usually pro-PLP supporters.
Very little criticism was
heard on talk shows,
because most people were
intimidated and fearful of
victimisation,” Rev
McAlpine said.

The senator said that the
masses were fearful to speak

out while the PLP was in
government.

“Hence, very little true
feelings were expressed in
regards to their lack of per-
formance.

“But when we, the FNM,
are in office, all you could
hear is talk. People are free
to call the radio station of
their choice to talk for us or
against us. What a great
democracy,” he said.

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SkyBahamas introduces
new service to Cat Island

MAKING good on the promise to bring daily flights to Cat
Island, SkyBahamas Airlines, the Bahamian regional airline, will
be launching a daily service into New Bight on Tuesday, May 19.

In March of this year, the airline took a group of 19 persons
to New Bight and held a small ceremony at the Old Bight
Gospel Chapel Mission Home, which cares for 13 children.

It was then, that SkyBahamas Airlines announced plans to
begin daily services into New Bight, Cat Island.

SkyBahamas also adopted the home and celebrated with the
children by hosting a pizza party. The airline also supplied the
home with groceries and gave its commitment to ongoing mon-
etary donations.

It is now two-months later and the much anticipated services
to be operated by SkyBahamas Airlines into Cat Island are
finally here. The first official flight from the Lynden Pindling
International Airport in Nassau will commence with one flight
on Tuesday, May 19, at 10am into the New Bight Airport.

The daily departure time from the New Bight flight will be
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PAGE 8, THURSDAY, MAY 14, 2009 THE TRIBUNE
Water managers approve: eT |
$533M Everglades deal

m@ WEST PALM BEACH, Fla.





SOUTH FLORIDA water managers have approved Gov. }
Charlie Crist’s deal to buy farmland from the U.S. Sugar Corp. for }
future use in Everglades restoration, according to Associated }
Press. i
The South Florida Water Management District voted 6-1 }
Wednesday to pay $536 million bill for 73,000 acres of land from }
the company. ;

U.S. Sugar is the nation’s largest cane sugar producer and }
owns a vast amount of land between Lake Okeechobee and the }
Everglades. i

An initial deal reached last year with the state would have }
cost $1.75 billion, but has twice since been revised to trim the price }
tag. i
The goal of the land purchase is to convert farm land into con- }
servation land, allowing water managers to create a system to }
clean and store water before sending it south into the Ever- ;
glades. i

ROYAL BANK OF CANADA TRUST COMPANY
(BAHAMAS) LIMITED
is considering suitable applications for the role of

Manager, Trust and
Corporate Services

Description of role and key responsibilities:

¢ Lead and manage a team of trust officers and other
staff: this includes providing advice in respect of clients
and cases, coaching staff and ensuring the effective
utilisation of other resources. Instrumental in developing
and implementing company procedures within
appropriate frameworks.
Possess a superior knowledge of Trust (complex and
simple), Company and Fiduciary structures, and tax
and legal issues affecting the administration of Trusts
and Companies.
Ensure that strong technical knowledge of all aspects
of trust and company administration is delivered: this
includes attending client meetings and
supervising/assisting in respect of the preparation of
accounting and investment information prior to
submission to clients
Experience with the preparation and presentation of
financial and estate planning proposals to high net
worth individuals
Providing assistance to increase profitability of the
company/shareholder value by identifying
opportunities to extend the trust services, and to use
the bank offering to implement solutions for clients
where appropriate
Proven superior sales acumen. With ability to attract,
build and strengthen relationships with key clients and
intermediaries and identify new ideas in relation to
products and services that may be offered by the
company

Core skills and knowledge:

¢ A University degree in business, accounting, or other
related discipline

* Aminimum of ten years' relevant experience

¢ Professionally qualified, e.g. accounting/finance
qualification, STEP ICSA, TER ACCA

¢ Self-motivation with excellent project management

¢ Demonstrably strong technical knowledge of all aspects
of trust and company administration, including the
nuances and statutory requirements of the major
offshore jurisdictions used in connection with clients’
structures

¢ Strong analytical and problem-solving skills

* Methodical, thorough and attentive to detail

¢ Strong supervisory skills coupled with the ability to lead
by example
Strong skills in time management and prioritisation
Excellent oral and written communication skills
Microsoft Office skills
Cultural awareness and sensitivity on both an individual
and corporate basis

Interested persons should apply by May 22, 2009 to:

Royal Bank of Canada Trust Company
(Bahamas) Limited
PO Box N-3024
Nassau, NP, Bahamas
Attention: Human Resource Manager
Via Email: paul.lewis @rbc.com or
elizabeth.dorsch@rbc.com

Only applications from suitabl ae candidates
will be acknowledged

www.rbcroyalbank.com/caribbean/bahamas

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Ny .of Canada

® Registered trade-mark of Royal Bank of Canada



COURAGEOUS NERISS is doing very well and recuperating mean

Little cat’s incredible
survival at sea story

By TIP BURROWS

SATURDAY NIGHT, May 9,
when most people were eating din-
ner or getting ready for an evening
out, several Humane Society of
Grand Bahama staffers and volun-
teers were still hard at work along
with visiting veterinarian Dr Debra
Sonnen-Campbell of Boston, who
was in Freeport for a long week-
end to do volunteer work at the
Animal Welfare and Adoption
Centre.

With only five dog neuters to go,
everyone was anticipating being
home by 7.30pm after two long
days. The shelter phone rang at
6pm and the conversation that
ensued was surreal. The caller, a
concerned animal lover, said: “T just
saw the most horrifying thing on
the beach. My husband and I
noticed something far out to sea
which appeared to be a small ani-
mal swimming. We kept watching
and a few minutes later, a cat
dragged itself out of the surf and
collapsed on the beach. It appears
to have a badly broken leg, I can
see a bone sticking out, and it is

too weak to move.”

HSGB volunteer Ashley Mur-
phy took off immediately for Coral
Beach in Freeport, and by 6.45pm
was back at the shelter with the lit-
tle black and white female cat. The
cat was covered in sand and salt,
shocked, hypothermic, and her rear
left leg was injured beyond repair.
Dr Campbell sedated her in prepa-
ration for euthanasia but no one
present, least of all Dr Campbell,

Fie sie pe er
all notified customers
Thee inte
rm TT

chee ese Lis

Teh ts ee



could stomach that prospect for an
animal who had shown such a
strong will to survive. The prepa-
rations quickly turned from
euthanasia to amputation of the
injured leg to try and save the cat’s
life.

Dr Campbell is an outstanding
veterinarian with a background in
shelter medicine and high volume
spay/neuter. She is not an orthope-
dic surgeon but wanted to give the

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cat a chance. She knew what to do,
theoretically and practically, but
had some concerns as the leg had
multiple severe fractures and there
was no x-ray machine to determine
the extent of the damage.

She decided to call a vet friend in
Boston who is an ortho specialist.

High drama ensued while she
tried to reach him. At 8pm on a
Saturday night, what were the
chances? Miraculously, her col-
league answered his phone, and Dr
Campbell got the answers to her
questions. Despite having been on
her feet doing surgeries since 8am,
she proceeded with the major pro-
cedure of amputating the cat’s dam-
aged leg.

At 11pm the surgery was fin-
ished. It was then a question of
whether the cat would survive the
night after all the shock and trauma
she had endured. As if Dr Camp-
bell wasn’t exhausted enough, she
took the little cat home with her
for the next two nights, with pain
and antibiotic medicines, to monitor
and keep her comfortable.

It confounds the imagination as
to how this little cat ended up in
this predicament but it can only be
reasonably assumed she either
jumped or was thrown off a boat.

How she was able to swim any
distance at all with such a badly
broken leg is astonishing.

How she sustained the broken
leg is unbearable to think about.
That she swam into a beach where
people saw her, who cared enough
to make a call, on an island where
there are miles and miles of desert-
ed beaches; that HSGB people
were at the shelter after hours to
answer the phone; that they were
able to react immediately and res-
cue the cat; and that a veterinarian
just happened to be standing at a
surgery table already; defies all
odds.

The courageous little cat has
been named Nerissa (daughter of
the sea) Phelps. She is doing very
well and recuperating nicely.

She will be available for adop-
tion in a few weeks. The HSGB
hopes to find an extra special home
for this incredible kitty, who may
well have used up many of her nine
lives already, but surely deserves
an exceptional home after her tena-
cious struggle to survive.

If you are the special someone
worthy of giving Nerissa a loving
and safe home, please send email
inquiries to info@hs-gb.org. Please
note Nerissa must be strictly an
indoor cat; no boats, please!

CYNDI LAUPER
MAY 23, 2009

CALL THE ATLANTIS LIVE BOX OFFICE
FOR TICKET INFORMATION 363-6601


THE TRIBUNE

THURSDAY, MAY 14, 2009, PAGE 9



@ By SARKIS IZMIRLIAN

AS BAHAMIANS, we tra-
ditionally address adversity with
an optimistic, forward-looking
attitude — and actions to
match. It is critical, therefore,
that the actions we take to min-
imise the length and severity of
the current economic slowdown
also include longer term strate-
gic initiatives to position the
Bahamas to take full advantage
of a global economic recovery.
Strengthening our tourism
industry now and making the
Bahamas the top destination in
the Caribbean are key.

Tourism is central to the long
term economic and social well-
being of the Bahamas. Tourism
brings in capital, enhances prop-
erty values and stimulates major
economic development at the
community level. Tourism
means jobs. Think of the thou-
sands of jobs in our country that
have been created by the busi-
nesses that directly and indi-
rectly support the tourist trade.

Since competition globally for
tourist dollars is fierce, it is
imperative that the Bahamas be
viewed around the world as the
vacation destination of choice.
Improving key infrastructure,
transportation, service and tech-
nology components is vital to
this effort. It is incumbent upon
our private sector to play an
important role both as respon-
sible corporate citizens and as
stakeholders to build the long
term economic well-being of
this country.

To our competitive advan-
tage, the Bahamas offers all the
basic defining elements of a
world class vacation destination.
It has beautiful beaches, friend-
ly people and a unique local cul-
ture that makes it all the more
memorable. It is ideal for trav-
ellers because its geographic
location makes it easily accessi-
ble from North and South
America and Europe. Are we
making the best of these in-built
advantages? I believe we
increasingly risk letting our-
selves down if we do not con-
stantly continue to evolve as a
destination. To secure our nat-
ural competitive edge, we must
address the following:



e Airport Efficiency

Lynden Pindling Internation-
al airport needs to be among
the friendliest and most efficient
in the world. Typically, visitors
only have precious few days to
spend on our islands. We must
become the easiest place in the
Caribbean to visit. Modernising
the airport structure is impor-
tant, but we must do more.
Among other initiatives, with-
out sacrificing security, our
Immigration and Customs must
be easier to navigate with far
fewer lines. Our departure
process today is characterised
by multi check points (two
stand-alone check points and
often another at the departure
gate), rather than the standard
one checkpoint and occasional
re-check at the gate. Countless
passengers grumble about hav-
ing to go through this highly
repetitive process and negative
experience. We also must assess
whether the costs for airlines to
use the Nassau airport are too
high and, if so, what we can do
to lower those costs and
increase the island’s tourism
potential. In short, we must
make sure the airport arrival
and departure experience is
more efficient and hassle free,
while upholding high safety
standards.

¢ Port and Downtown
Modernisation

Our cruise ship port and
downtown experience require
an immediate and meaningful

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injection of capital to modernise
them. Privatisation provides the
best course to achieve this
objective. The modernisation
should include attention to the
surrounding areas near the port.
It is disturbing that fewer than
50 per cent of all cruise line
guests leave the ship because of
a perception that there is noth-
ing for them to do! Whether it is
an organised tour or just an
opportunity for these guests to
explore the island in an invigo-
rating and compelling way, the
opportunities for business traf-
fic from passengers coming off
the ships for our retail, dining
and entertainment establish-
ments would be substantial. The
Downtown Revitalisation Pro-
ject is an excellent example of
what a partnership between the
government and private sector
can achieve for the Bahamas.

¢ Best In Class Guest
Experience

We need to ensure that all
businesses that cater to the
needs of guests provide best-in-
class service and guest experi-
ence. I like the term guest expe-
rience because it takes “cus-
tomer” to a more personal and
higher level. Whenever a guest
arrives in the Bahamas, our pri-
ority for the guest should be:
“You are a guest in my country
and home, how can I make you
a lifelong friend?” The arrival at
the airport, or port, the taxi ride,
hotel check-in and valet, the
interaction with Customs and

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other governmental authorities
— all should have as their over-
arching tenet maximising the
guest experience, designed to
turn the guest into lifelong, loy-
al, and repeat visitor. In order to
enhance our ability to achieve
this objective, we also must
invest in education and better
on-the-job training — a vital
component to implementing
strategies for a strong econom-
ic rebound geared to tourism.

¢ Modernisation Of
Telecommunications
and Energy

To be a leading vacation des-
tination, it is essential that we
have modern and effective
telecommunications and energy
infrastructures in place. Guests
must be able to connect rapidly
and reliably for voice, data and
multimedia content through
fixed and mobile phone lines.
The Bahamas’ extraordinarily
high utilities expenses are not
sustainable and threaten the
viability of — not just tourism
— but many of our other impor-
tant industries. Government
and the private sectors must
develop creative solutions to
meet our energy needs in a low-
cost sustainable way, including
seriously assessing alternative
sources like solar and wind
power. The current move
toward privatisation represents
an important step in this direc-
tion.

¢ New Tourism Initiatives To
Make The Bahamas Unique

We must constantly focus on
creating new strategic initiatives
to differentiate ourselves from
other island destinations in
order to build our reputation as
the vacation destination of
choice. Several ideas include:
1) developing of an annual sig-
nature event, for which the
Bahamas would be known
internationally; 2) updating our
Lotteries and Gaming Act and
regulations so that hotels and
resorts can create a more com-
petitive and modern gaming
environment, with expanding
games and a cutting-edge gam-
bling experience on par with
Las Vegas and Macau, if not in
sheer size, then certainly in
quality; 3) developing a tourism
campaign that stresses what
makes the Bahamas truly
unique, including the possible
creation of an efficient trans-
portation system that enables
guests to visit the New Provi-
dence Island and explore key
sites of interest, while also bet-
ter connecting key ‘out-islands’
of interest.

Maximising the ability of the
Bahamas to benefit from the
eventual recovery in the global
economy involves maximising
our strengths as a tourist desti-
nation. Working together, gov-
ernment and the private sectors
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here in the Bahamas. During
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belief in this country have
grown stronger than ever. Why?
Two simple reasons: the endur-
ing qualities of the Bahamian
people and the country’s nat-
ural beauty have captured the
hearts of millions of people
from around the world, includ-
ing mine. The Bahamas has the
necessary resources and foun-
dations to enhance its tourism
appeal. I believe in the
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country a prosperous and pro-
ductive future.

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PAGE 10, THURSDAY, MAY 14, 2009

THE TRIBUNE



LOCAL NEWS

FROM page one

country. And in this regard every
government who has trusteeship
over this process must be held
accountable,” said Ms Hanna Mar-
tin.

She said Mr Turnquest’s resigna-
tion “raises questions about the
granting of Crown land — a “valu-
able and finite resource that is part of
the Bahamian patrimony.”

Meanwhile, Fox Hill MP Fred
Mitchell said the turn of events, cul-
minating with the “mysterious” res-
ignation of Mr Turnquest on Mon-

PLP chairman

day, makes it now “more important
than ever” to allow his request for a
parliamentary select committee to
be formed to investigate the histori-
cal disposal of Crown land.

“Traised this matter in Parliament
because there is a legitimate con-
cern in the country about public
lands disposed of by the govern-
ment. The committee should be able
to determine the total inventory of
publicly owned lands, how they are
distributed and on what terms.

“Tf the present situation is inade-

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quate then there is a need to design
by legislation if necessary a system

that is fair, transparent and ratio- } =.
i called Crown land, it is really our
A requirement for annual report- land.”
ing to the Parliament on the dispo-

sition of public lands should be insti- | S0veTnment to honour its pre-elec-

tuted, he suggested. Director of } tion pledge and further promote

Lands and Surveys Tex Turnquest / ‘ansparency and democracy by

resigned after revelations in this ; Passing a FOIA,” he stated.
newspaper that his friends and fam-

ily benefitted significantly from } Tex Turnquest resigned this week

grants of prime beachfront Crown } after claims that during his tenure

: in office prime beachfront Crown
Having been granted five adja- } land in Exuma was granted to his
? friends and family, including his
four of the lots were “flipped” by ? mother-in-law, for nominal fees of

the same individuals within several | ©0¢ or two thousands dollars, only

years for an average of about i to be “flipped” several years later

i for hundreds of thousands of

nal,” he said.

land during his tenure in office.

cent lots on the Exuma waterfront,

$400,000 each.

FROM page one

“Once again I urge my FNM

Director of Lands and Surveys

‘Meaningful’ Act

dollars.

The exposé was based on infor-
mation found in official documents
leaked to this newspaper.

Bishop Simeon Hall, leader of
the New Covenant Baptist Church,
proposed that a FOIA would allow
the public to get the “full story
behind the headlines” in relation to
the Crown land situation that led
to Mr Turnquest’s resignation and
other matters.

“It’s difficult to know who’s
telling the truth in our society. I
think it’s time for the FNM to
make good on its promise of
putting information out and allow-

ing persons to make their deci-
sion.”

As for when FOIA legislation
might be drafted and made ready
for perusal by parliament, Attor-
ney General Michael Barnett yes-
terday said only that it is “under
active consideration.”

“Legislation doesn’t just pop up
— it has to be drafted and it has to
balance the need of the people for
information and other interests like
national security and things like
that,” he said.

Mr Barnett would not confirm
or deny reports that the Attorney
General’s office has launched an
investigation into activities at the
department in the wake of the alle-
gations.

FROM page one

the head by an unmasked man as he got out of
his car outside his Britannia Group Ltd office
near Compass Point, western New Provi-
dence, at around 9.30am on April 22. The
gunman then ran off towards Gambier Vil-
lage.

Tit Jones flew to Nassau from his home in
Los Angeles, California, to join his mother
Mildred, 82, as Hywel lay unconscious in Doc-
tor’s Hospital until he died on Friday.

Hywel Jones moved to the Bahamas in
1988 and is said to have lived a peaceful exis-
tence for 19 years, until he suffered two
attacks in the last two years in which he was
held at knifepoint in his West Bay Street
home and beaten up outside his property.

Mr Jones said: “He expressed concern to
me, but for the sake of my peace of mind,
and my mother’s, he was characteristically
vague and spared us the concern he knew
this would give me.

“He made them seem a mere trifle and, of
course, it’s become apparent they were more

Hywel Jones

serious.”

Mr Jones said his brother was well-known,
well-liked, admired and respected by both
his personal and professional associates.

Bahamas Institute of Financial Services
(BIFS) executive director Kim Bodie attested
to the Welsh native’s involvement in devel-
oping BIFS’s specialised banking education
programme and the setting up of a bache-
lor’s degree in banking and finance at the
College of the Bahamas.

Tit Jones said: “As has been widely report-
ed my brother was widely liked and wouldn’t
hurt a fly.

“He had no beef with anybody on the face
of the earth other than... this business conflict.”

Asst Comm Gibson said the investigation
is progressing and a number of people have
been interviewed, however no arrests have
been made.

Mr Jones said: “I have every confidence in
the police ability to follow this case.

“This is a country that relies on tourism

and the financial services
industry and for this to hap-
pen at all is bad for the
Bahamas, and for it to go
unsolved would be terrible.

“That expatriate bankers
could come here and then
be murdered is terrible, and
the police have given me
their assurance that they
will move mountains in 4
order to bring the person [AWITaENTe\ a5
responsible to justice.”

A $50,000 reward donated by friends and
associates of Hywel Jones has been posted
by Crime Stoppers for any information lead-
ing to the arrest and conviction of those
responsible for his murder.

Anyone with any information which may
assist investigations can call Crime Stoppers
toll-free on 328-TIPS (8477).

Calls will be answered by operators in the
United States who will ensure complete
anonymity. Alternatively call the incident
room at the Criminal Detective Unit on 502-
9942 or 502-9991.



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"This is a foreign company we're
dealing with — they could pull out
and we can get nothing. If they feel
they need to go, then they can go
but leave our money," said one
passionate worker who spent five
years in the hotel's Food and Bev-
erage Department.

More than 500 persons are cur-
rently employed at the hotel — 83
managers and 442 line staff, 26 of
whom are expatriates, according
to astatement released by govern-
ment yesterday.

While many of these employees
are Exuma natives a number of
them are from New Providence,
Grand Bahama and the family
islands — those who are not natives
of Exuma were promised plane
tickets to their home islands, said
employees.

Considering the depressed job
market in the country's tourism
sector many are concerned about
where this new round of redun-
dant workers will be absorbed.

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"Coming back to Nassau, you
have people there who already
looking for jobs — can you imagine
500 more people coming there?"
asked another employee who
worked for the hotel for four years.
"And now they expect us to give
150 per cent to the customers —
what kind of service do you think
we can give them now?"

The employees all spoke under
the condition of anonymity as they
had signed a confidentiality agree-
ment with their employment con-
tracts.

Member of Parliament for the
area Anthony Moss said the clo-
sure will undoubtedly "put a dent"
into Exuma's economy. With a
population of about 6,000, Mr Moss
fears that the closure and lack of
jobs will drain more persons from
Exuma — an island that has been
grappling with a softened econo-
my for more than a year, he said.

"You have to face the facts, with

the high cost of living it may affect
us to the point where you see a
number of persons leaving the
island of Exuma and returning to
their home island or other family
island.

"If you are looking at going
back into the same sort of service
orientated (hotel) jobs the outlook
is bleak on Exuma," he said.

A statement released by the
Cabinet office yesterday said Mit-
sui, receivers for the Emerald Bay
Development on Exuma, informed
government of the "difficult deci-
sion” to close the development.

The statement said the closure
of the development, including the
luxury hotel resort is expected to be
temporary while it is likely that the
resort will reopen under new own-
ership.

"During the past 14 months, the
receivers signed letters of intent
with one party and entered into
formal contract with two other par-
ties; none with success.

"The government has been
advised that Four Seasons, man-



agers of the resort hotel, will over-
see its orderly closing. The hotel
will close to guests on May 26 and
the majority of staff will leave with-
in the following 30 days.

The government has been
assured that all severance payments
due staff will be settled in accor-
dance with the law and employee
contracts," said the statement.

Some staff may be kept for the
transition period to new owner-
ship, it continued, adding that dur-
ing the temporary closed period,
critical amenities at the develop-
ment, such as the water plant oper-
ations, will continue unaffected.

"The receivers have advised that
they are already commencing con-
sultations with various parties that
had previously signalled an interest
in the development.

"The government is committed
to working with the receivers to
identify the best investor group to
acquire and reopen the hotel, golf
course and marina, and to com-
plete the full development planned
for the Emerald Bay site."

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PAGE 12, THURSDAY, MAY 14, 2009

SPORTS

TRIBUNE SPORTS





JURGEN Melz-
er of Austria
reacts during
the match
against Rafael
Nadal of Spain
at the Madrid
Open Tennis
in Madrid, on
Wednesday,
May 13, 2009.

Victor R. Caivano/AP Photo



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MADRID
Associated Press

RAFAEL NADAL powered
into the third round of the
Madrid Open on Wednesday
with a convincing 6-3, 6-1 win
over Jurgen Melzer of Austria.

The defending champion
made just three unforced errors
playing on his favored clay sur-
face in front of Spain’s Queen
Sofia, and converted all four of
his break points.

“It’s more difficult to play
here than on normal altitude
surfaces,” Nadal said of play-
ing 1,970 feet above sea level.
“You can do more with the ball
with less effort, but your oppo-
nent also does it.”

The only break in Nadal’s


































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concentration came when a ball
girl fainted and had to be car-
ried off the center court for
medical assistance in the sec-
ond set.

Earlier, Novak Djokovic
eased past Oscar Hernandez 6-
3, 6-3. The third-seeded Serb
fell awkwardly on his right knee
on the clay surface at Madrid’s
new “Magic Box” tennis center
in the second set, but was rarely
troubled by his Spanish oppo-
nent.

“IT was aware the court was
quite wet because I saw they
had watered it after the previ-
ous match. But I was lucky that
I fell in a good way so there is
no injury,” Djokovic said. “It
looked easy, but it wasn’t. I
played just well enough to win.”

Djokovic never faced a break
point in the match, while break-
ing Hernandez once in the first
set and twice in the second.

Djokovic recently fell from
third to fourth in the rankings,

Paul White/AP Photo

RAFAEL Nadal of Spain returns the ball to Jurgen Melzer of Austria during the Madrid Open Tennis
Tournament in Madrid, Wednesday May 13, 2009. Nadal; won the match 6-3, 6-1.

Nadal wins in front of
Queen Sofia in Madrid

surpassed by Andy Murray
despite winning the Serbia
Open last week — the country’s
first ATP Tour event that he
also helped organize.

“T try not to pay too much
attention to rankings,” he said.
“But I am motivated to win
back my third ranking posi-
tion.”

Nadal agreed with Djokovic
that the way the rankings are
calculated, players are forced
to play too many tournaments.

“The way things are now, you
can’t choose which events you
would like to focus on, you have
to play everything in order to
defend your position,” Nadal
said. “But it’s the same for
everyone.”

Nadal’s next opponent is
Phillipp Kohlschreiber, who
beat 13th-seeded Marin Cilic 6-
1, 6-7 (5), 7-6 (2).

“He hits the ball very hard
and cleanly, so I'd like to make
sure my serves are winners

Hundreds turn out to mourn
Hall of Fame coach Daly

@ BASKETBALL
TEQUESTA, Fla.
Associated Press

HUNDREDS of mourners filled
a South Florida church Wednesday
to say farewell to Hall of Fame coach

Chuck Daly.

Among those in attendance were
several members of his 1989-90
Detroit Pistons championship team,
close friends that included Rollie
Massimino and Billy Cunningham,
and Dallas coach Rick Carlisle —



He EY

who left immediately afterward to
join the Mavericks in Denver for a
playoff game Wednesday night.
Carlisle said that missing the funeral “was not an option.”
Daly led the Dream Team to the Olympic gold medal in
1992 after winning back-to-back NBA championships in
Detroit. He was diagnosed with pancreatic cancer earlier
this year and died Saturday at age 78 in Jupiter, Fla.

wa
ala;

Cavs star
James leats
All-NBA
first team

@ BASKETBALL
NEW YORK
Associated Press



LEBRON JAMES should
be getting used to sweeps by
now.

The Cavaliers star was a
unanimous selection to the
AlIl-NBA first team Wednes-
day, after leading his team to
a franchise-best regular-sea-
son record and a pair of play-
off sweeps of the Detroit Pis-
tons and Atlanta Hawks.

James was put on the first
team on every ballot of 122
sportswriters and broadcast-
ers who regularly cover the
league. Lakers star Kobe
Bryant finished second in
voting, making the first team
on 119 ballots, while Dwight
Howard of the Magic,
Dwyane Wade of the Heat
and Dirk Nowitzki of the
Mavericks rounded out the
first team.

James, the league’s MVP,
was a first-team selection for
the second straight season
after finishing second in the
NBA in scoring at 28.4 points
and ranking in the top 10 in
steals and assists. He led the
Cavaliers to a franchise-best
66-16 record, including a 39-2
mark at home, and the team’s
first top seed in the playoffs.

They’ve only been gaining
momentum since then.

The Cavaliers made it 8-
for-8 in the postseason Mon-
day night, completing a sec-
ond straight sweep with an
84-74 win over the Hawks.
Along with their dominant
sweep of Detroit, Cleveland
has won an NBA-record
eight consecutive playoff
games by double figures.

The Cavs should be well-
rested for the Eastern Con-
ference finals against Boston
or Orlando, a series the
Celtics lead 3-2 entering
Game 6 Thursday night.

Howard had 17 rebounds
but just 12 points while taking
only 10 shots in the Magic’s
92-88 loss Tuesday night, but
he’s the biggest reason Orlan-
do is still alive.

After becoming only the
fourth player to lead the
league in rebounding and
blocked shots since 1973-74,
when the block became an
official statistic, the 6-foot-11
forward has averaged 20
points and leads all players
with 16.1 rebounds in the
postseason.

Bryant finished third in the
league with 26.8 points, lead-
ing the Lakers to a Western
Conference-best 65-17 finish.

He needed only three
quarters to score 26 points
Tuesday night, when the Lak-
ers routed the Houston
Rockets 118-78 to take a 3-2
lead in their series. They play
Game 6 Thursday night.

Wade was a first-team
selection for the first time
after leading the league in
scoring at 30.2 points, finish-
ing second in steals and
eighth in assists. He also
became the fifth player in

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TRIBUNE SPORTS

THURSDAY, MAY 14, 2009, PAGE 13



SPORTS



wi
INBRIEF

NBA: ‘Matter
Is closed’ on
Mavs-Nuggets
incidents

@ BASKETBALL
DENVER
Associated Press



THE NBA won’t punish
anybody over the ugly inci-
dents that occurred on and
off the court in Games 3 and
4 of the series between the
Dallas Mavericks and Den-
ver Nuggets.

“Matter is closed,” league
spokesman Tim Frank told
The Associated Press via e-
mail Wednesday before
Game 5 tipped off in Denver.

The Nuggets captured
Game 3 on Saturday on
Carmelo Anthony’s 3-pointer
with a second left after a non-
call that the league later
admitted was a mistake.

The disputed ending trig-
gered a heated reaction after
the buzzer, with Dallas for-
ward Josh Howard being
restrained and Mavs owner
Mark Cuban expressing his
frustration and then telling
the mother of Nuggets for-
ward Kenyon Martin who
was seated nearby that her
son was a thug.

Martin had been fined ear-
lier in the series for a hard
foul on Dallas star Dirk Now-
itzki.

Cuban later said on his blog
that he was sorry for the way
Martin’s mother was treated.
The Nuggets viewed the apol-
ogy as disingenuous because
it contained an offer for their
family and friends to sit in
Cuban’s private suite “when
the series returns to Dallas.”

Cubans’ antics may have
incited fan misbehavior in
Game 4 on Monday night as
insults were hurled at Mart-
in’s girlfriend, rap star Trina,
and Martin’s mother.

Anthony’s fiance, LaLa
Vazquez of MTV fame, said
fans hurled racial slurs and
ice cubes at her during the
game and she had to send her
2-year-old son back to the
hotel early and was prepar-
ing to leave early herself
when she was pushed by a
fan.

“Obviously the playoffs
games bring out the best and
the worst in fans but what
happened on Monday night
with the racial slurs/threats,
verbal attacks on my son and
physical attacks to myself by
irate fans was unacceptable,”
Vazquez said in a statement.

ca

Get Prepared



Ben Margot/AP Photo

WASHINGTON Nationals’ Elijah Dukes (34) is tagged out on a steal-attempt by San Francisco Giants third baseman Pablo Sandoval, front left, during the fourth inning of a baseball
game Wednesday, May 13, 2009, in San Francisco.

Zimmerman’s hit streak

ends at 30, Nats top Giants

m@ BASEBALL
SAN FRANCISCO
Associated Press

RYAN ZIMMERMAN’S
30-game hitting streak ended
when he went 0 for 3 with two
walks, but Shairon Martis
allowed two hits over seven
sharp innings to remain unbeat-
en this season in the Washing-
ton Nationals’ 6-3 victory over
the San Francisco Giants on
Wednesday.

Zimmerman never got the
ball out of the infield, falling
just short of Vladimir Guer-
rero’s franchise-record streak
of 31 games for the Montreal
Expos in 1999. After two
groundouts and two walks
against Giants starter Barry
Zito, Zimmerman grounded
into a fielder’s choice against
reliever Pat Misch in the ninth.

San Francisco’s fans still gave
him a standing ovation, and
Zimmerman slid home with
Washington’s sixth run
moments later, beating a throw
from the infield.

Nick Johnson hit an RBI dou-

ble in the fifth and Elijah Dukes
drove in two runs with a bro-
ken-bat single in the seventh for
the Nationals, who avoided a
three-game sweep in San Fran-
cisco while snapping a nine-
game losing streak to the Giants.

Zimmerman’s streak ended
right before Washington
returned for a 10-game homes-
tand at Nationals Park, where
the club with the majors’ worst
record could have used some-
thing to celebrate.

Zimmerman grounded into a
double play in the first inning
and drew a walk in the third.
After grounding out to short-
stop in the fifth, he came up
with two runners on in the sev-
enth — but after Zito threw a
wild pitch allowing both run-
ners to advance, the Giants
elected to walk Zimmerman
intentionally.

Somebody in the Washing-
ton dugout appeared to throw
water onto the field after the
intentional walk. Zimmerman
then grounded to shortstop in
the ninth, ending the majors’
longest hitting streak since Moi-
ses Alou hit in 30 straight games

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for the Mets in 2007.

Martis (5-0), who walked four
batters and hit another but did-
n’t allow a run until the seventh,
is responsible for nearly half of
the Nationals’ 11 victories this
season. The former Giants
farmhand also doubled and
scored the game’s first run in
the fifth.

Kip Wells earned his second
career save.

Zito (1-3) gave up eight hits
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The Giants scored 20 runs in
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co couldn’t score against Martis
until Rich Aurilia’s sacrifice fly
in the seventh.

The Nationals’ bullpen strug-
gled yet again, however. Sandoval
added an RBI single in the eighth
off Joe Beimel, who allowed San-
doval’s homer the previous night.

Nate Schierholtz then tripled and
scored in the ninth, but Wells
escaped trouble.

¢ Giants OF Fred Lewis has a
minor toe injury, but he drove
home Schierholtz with a pinch-hit
double in the ninth.

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PAGE 14, THURSDAY, MAY 14, 2009

SPORTS

TRIBUNE SPORTS





out Police

St. Agnes defeat
Commonwealth

THE BAHAMAS
Cricket Association con-
tinued its league play with a
pair of games on its week-
end schedule featuring the
league’s top teams from the
2008 season.

In Saturday’s feature,
Dynasty Stars narrowly
escaped with a win over the
Police squad, taking the
match by one wicket.

The Police batted first
and posted 235 runs for the
loss of six wickets.

Members of the national
junior team, Marc Taylor
and Terran Brown led the
offensive attack with 95 and
38 runs respectively.

National team stalwart
Greg Taylor also chipped
in with 33 runs.

Antonio Hernandez took
two wickets, bowling for
the Stars.

The Stars responded with
a total of 236 runs for the
loss of nine wickets to take
the match by one wicket.

A balanced scoring
attack was led by Howard

Roye, 39 runs, Renford
Davson 37 runs, and Lee
Melville, 31 runs not out.

Bowling for the Police,
Jermaine Addeley and
Gary Armstrong took two
wickets each.

In Sunday’s feature St.
Agnes defeated Castrol
Commonwealth by a total
of seven wickets.

Castrol Commonwealth
batted first and was bowled
out for 123 runs.

Terry Seepersad scored
30 to lead Castrol.

Bowling for St. Agnes,
Omar James took four
wickets, Earl Thomas took
three wickets and Ray
Haniff took two wickets.

In their turn at bat, St.
Agnes scored 126 runs for
the loss of three wickets.

Youth player Orlando
Stewart scored 61 runs not
out and Orville Grant
added 50 runs to claim the
status of top scorers.

Bowling for Castrol,
Sherwin Arthur took two
wickets.

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BARCELONA'S Thierry Henry, front, from France, jumps for the ball
with Athletico Bilbao's Fernando Llorente, centre, during the final of
the Copa del Rey soccer match.

Manu Fernandez/AP Photos





BARCELONA'S Lionel Messi, right, from Argentina, duels for the
ball with Athletico Bilbao's Pablo Orbaiz.

> BARCELONA WIN COPA DEL REY

FC Barcelona's Lionel Messi of Argentina reacts after scoring
against Athletic Biloao during their Copa del Rey final match at the
Mestalla stadium in Valencia, Wednesday, May 13, 2009.



BARCELONA'S
Samuel Eto'o,
right, from
Cameroon,
controls the ball
beside a player
of Athletico
Bilbao.

Knowles, Bhupathi knocked out in second round

FROM page 15

the tour, Mike and Bob Bryan
also fell in the second round fol-
lowing an opening round bye.

The Bryans, who have won
four titles this season and have
won 53 over the course of their
careers lost a three set thriller to
Simon Aspelin, Sweden, and
Wesley Moodie, South Africa,
7-6, 1-6, 11-9.

The win moved Aspelin and
Moodie, ranked 36 on the tour,

humane A

The Bahamas Humane Society

above the .500 mark for the first
time all season with a win loss
record of 4-3.

The Polish pair of Mariusz
Fyrstenberg and Marcin
Matowski, ranked sixth in the
draw was the third ranked team
of the day to be eliminated
when they lost Juan del Potro,
Argentina, and Mardy Fish,
United States, in straight sets
6-3, 6-4.

Fish and del Potro, unranked
on the ATP tour, ousted the
tour’s tenth ranked team who

have won eight career titles
together.

To complete the drought by
the draw’s top ranked teams,
seventh seeded Max Mirnyi,
Belarus, and Andy Ramm,
Israel, lost to the Spanish pair of
Marcel Granoller and Tommy
Robredo, 7-5, 2-6, 14-12.

Knowles’ former partner,
Daniel Nestor, Canada, remains
in contention as apart of the
tournament’s top seeded team.

Nestor and Nenad Zimonjic
are ranked second in the draw.

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THE TRIBUNE



lm By RENALDO DORSETT
Sports Reporter
rdorsett@tribunemedia.net

THE SECOND round of the
2009 Madrid Open featured a
plethora of shocking upsets as a
number of seeded teams failed
to advance, including Mark
Knowles and Mahesh Bhupathi.

Knowles and Bhupathi, the
tournament’s fourth ranked
seed in the draw were defeated
by the unranked pair of Stephen
Huss, Australia, and Ross
Hutchins, Great Britain, 6-4, 7-
5.

BOXING

e Bahamas Boxing Commis-
sion Chairman Pat Strachan, on
Tuesday, issued a strong state-
ment to the professional box-
ing community. It reads as fol-
lows: "It has come to the atten-
tion of the Bahamas Boxing
Commission that an announce-
ment of a series of exhibition
boxing matches between Ray
Minus Jr. and Quincy Pratt has
been made. It is direct conflict
with the rules and regulations
of the commission for anyone
to make such announcements
without first obtaining official
sanction. The commission is
mandated by the government
of The Bahamas to control and
monitor professional boxing.
We are responsible for the safe-
ty and the integrity of the sport
whether via exhibition bouts or
standard matches. We forbid
this kind of activity and offi-
cially state that the proposed
exhibitions have not been sanc-
tioned and will not be sanc-
tioned. Whether exhibitions or





PAGE 15



THURSDAY, MAY 14,

Indicative of the final score
in both sets, the match was
nearly statistically even, how-
ever Hutchins and Huss held a
slight edge.

They won 74 percent on ser-
vice, 33 percent on returns while
Knowles and Bhupathi won just
67 percent on service and 26
percent on returns.

In a match that took just over
82 minutes to complete
Knowles and Bhupathi record-
ed five aces and played nearly
error free with just one double
fault, but won just 1-4 break
points .

not, it is imperative that all box-
ers meet the required standards,
medical and otherwise. Any
member of the local pro box-
ing fraternity who ignores the
authority of the commission
runs the high risk of suspen-
sion."

The statement came in refer-
ence to Ray Minus and Quincy
Pratt anouncing their intentions
to engage in a series of exhibi-
tion matches as a fundraiser for
their respective clubs.

TENNIS
BRAJAXBA AGE GROUP SERIES
THREE ROUND ROBIN

Boys 16 Semifinals

Alexis Roberts d. Kevaughn
Ferguson, 6-1, 5-7, 10-8

Jody Turnquest d. Kazi Smith,
6-2, 6-2

Boys 14 Semifinals

Treajh Ferguson d. Lauren
Minns, 6-4, 6-1

Shariffe Rahminf d. Nicoy
Rolle, 6-3, 7-6

@: ARE Be FA J

Loe

ts

2009

The loss dropped the third
ranked duo on the ATP Dou-
bles tour to 16-9 on the year
while Huss and Hutchins,
ranked 31, improved to 6-7.

It was the second career loss
for Knowles and Bhupathi
against the pair who also defeat-
ed them in the opening round of
the 2008 French Open, 6-4, 6-4.

While the was rather unex-
pected it was far from the
biggest surprise of the day.

The top seeded team of the
draw and top ranked team of

SEE page 14

Girls 12 Semifinals

Raven Barry d. T’Shea Fergu-
son, 6-0, 6-0

Tesha Shepard d. Afrika
Smith, 6-2, 6-2

Mini Finals
Maya Weech d. Emma
Weech, 11-8

Short Court
D’Angelo Demeritte d.
Ramon 11-5, 11-7

SATURDAY’S SCHEDULE:

Boys 16 Finals

Jody Turnquest v. Alexis
Roberts

Boys 14 Finals
Treajh Ferguson v. Shariffe
Rahming

Boys 10 Semifinals
O’Neil Mortimer v. Cole Maura
Danny Wallace v. Cole Maura

Girls 12 Finals
Tesha Shepard v. Raven Barry

NOW WE ARE ONE.

Mark renee ;





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@ By NEIL HARTNELL
Tribune Business Editor

INVESTORS in City Mar-
kets’ majority shareholder have
“in principle all committed” to
injecting additional equity cap-
ital into the 12-store Bahamian
supermarket chain, Tribune
Business was told yesterday,
with receipt of that funding key
to getting the firm’s June 1
“relaunch” off the launching
pad.

Sunil Chatrani, chief execu-
tive of City Markets’ immedi-
ate holding company, Bahamas
Supermarkets, confirmed that
investors in the latter’s 78 per
cent majority shareholder, BSL
Holdings, were now discussing
with Royal Bank of Canada the
terms and arrangements for the
new capital injection - likely,
according to Tribune Business
sources, to be in the range of
$10 million.

Mr Chatrani, in an exclusive
interview with Tribune Busi-
ness, said he did not want to
commit to a figure for the new
capital injection because it was

Courier firms
enjoy second
WER IT
TES CUTE TT

@ By CHESTER
ROBARDS
Business Reporter
crobards@
tribunemedia.net

COURIER companies
yesterday received another
temporary reprieve from
impending Customs clear-
ance policy changes, the
Department saying it
intends to bring them into
effect by the end of May
rather than this Friday,
according to a representa-
tive of the newly-formed
Bahamas Transshipment
and Logistics Association
(BTLA).

Latore Mackey said the
BTLA met with new
comptroller of customs,
Glen Gomez, who yielded
to their requests for an
extension to the imple-
mentation of the new cus-
toms rules, which were to
come into effect on May
15.

Now, according to Mr
Mackey, the courier com-
panies have until the end
of May to get themeselves
ready for changes that
could cost some $15,000 to
$20,000 in bonds up front.

“This is the easiest way
for a courier service to
close down,” he said.

Mr Mackey said the
Government should be

SEE page 8B

The information contained is from a third
party and The Tribune can not be held
responsible for errors and/or omission
from the daily report.



THE TRIBUNE

U



THURSDAY,

SECTION B ¢ business@tribunemedia.net

Investors ‘commit’ to [Witor (BEART
bia Cs inenunta vearly losses sink

me



MAY

14,

* Bahamas Supermarkets chief says new equity
injection’s completion by May 31 vital to company’s

‘relaunch’ take-off

* Management realises $5.3m in annualised cost
savings as business stabilises, prior to receipt of
new funds to restart import programmes’

* Sales for fiscal 2009 likely to drop to $120-$125m
from $144m in ‘08, but latter figure caused by deep
discounting that sold products at loss

* Chief executive says company will take two-three
years to recover $8m profitability, but likely to be
back in black by July - first month of 2010

likely to be split.

Some financing would be
retained at the BSL Holdings
level, to deal with its financial
needs and debt repayments to
Royal Bank, while the remain-
der would be injected into
Bahamas Supermarkets as the
operating company.

However, Mr Chatrani told
Tribune Business that the new
financing needed to be
“finalised this month”, by May
31, 2009, if Bahamas Super-
markets was to move ahead on
target with its “relaunch”.

He explained that while the
company had been “stabilised”,
and some $5.3 million in annu-
alised savings realised, it could
go no further without the new
financing. Otherwise, manage-
ment would be left “twiddling
our thumbs” with little to do.

BSL Holdings and its

investors were now talking to
Royal Bank about “how the
things that need to be done are
put in place” in relation to the
new financing.

Mr Chatrani said that, after
receiving the business recovery
plan for Bahamas Supermar-
kets that was developed by him-
self and chief financial officer,
Evangeline Rahming, both the
bank and majority shareholder
were “committed to going for-
ward with this”.

The company, he added, had
proven itself to both the bank
and BSL Holdings by “hitting
Budget pretty much for the past
couple of months”, thus show-
ing its projection figures could
be relied upon and previous
inaccuracies in financial report-

SEE page 10B

City Markets
to close store

* Independence Drive store targeted for clo-
sure, but company hopes to absorb most of

affected 30 workers

* Shrinkage reduced by ‘0.5 per cent of sales’
* Financial woes cost grocery chain market
share, slipping from 21.4% in 2007 to 20.6%

in 2008

@ By NEIL HARTNELL
Tribune Business Editor

CITY MARKETS is plan-
ning to reduce its store portfolio
to 11 with the closure of its
Independence Drive outlet, Tri-
bune Business can reveal, with
the move set to happen once
the company receives new equi-
ty financing from its majority
shareholder.

Sunil Chatrani, chief execu-
tive of City Markets’ publicly-
traded parent, Bahamas Super-
markets, in an exclusive inter-
view with Tribune Business
declined to name the store ear-
marked for closure, but con-
firmed: “There is one store clo-
sure.”

Tribune Business, though,
can confirm that the store in
question is the one on Inde-
pendence Drive/Tonique
Williams-Darling Highway, as
the transformation of the High-
way into a dual-lane carriage-
way has hampered customer
access to the outlet.

However, Mr Chatrani told
Tribune Business that Bahamas
Supermarkets would look to
retain as many of the store’s 30-
strong staff as possible.

“We have some good staff
that we want to retain,” he
explained. “The majority of
staff can be absorbed.”

Mr Chatrani said the store
closure was “supposed to be
before the year end” around
June 30, 2009, but the actual
timing would depend on when
the company received the antic-
ipated capital injection from its
majority shareholder, BSL
Holdings, as this was needed to
meet severance pay.

Meanwhile, Mr Chatrani said
Bahamas Supermarkets, since
he assumed his new role in
October 20p08, had cut shrink-
age group-wide by “at least half
a percentage point of sales”.

SEE page 9B

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2009



W. 1st

400-500 jobs

@ By NEIL HARTNELL
Tribune Business Editor

SOME 400-500 staff at the
Four Seasons Emerald Bay
Resort will lose their jobs
when the property closes on
May 26, 2009, its receiver
telling Tribune Business yes-
terday that the shutdown was
necessary to “curtail losses”
that in 2008 totalled around $5
million, after several potential
sales agreement fell through.

Russell Downs, a London-
based accountant with Price-
waterhouseCoopers (PwC),
who has been the Exuma-
based resort’s main receiver
since June 2007, said he was
hoping the closure would be
“temporary”, and that market
conditions and a new hotel
brand/operator to replace Four
Seasons might “get us over the
finishing line” in securing a
new owner.

Mr Downs confirmed that a
sales agreement to sell the
Four Seasons Emerald Bay
Resort to a consortium featur-
ing a Los Angeles-based real
estate/casino developer, Bar-
ry Silverton, and global real
estate broker/investment bank-

Vincent Vanderpool-Wallace

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* May 26, 2009, shut down of ‘anchor
property’ to have disastrous impact for
Exuma’s economy and wider tourism

industry

* Receiver says creditor had no option
but to ‘curtail losses’ that were
increasing, after fully funding Four
Seasons for 18 months

* Several buyer deals fall through,
including Silverton/Cushman Wakefield

and Arden Group

* Hopes that closure, and opportunity
for new hotel brand manager, ‘may get
us over the finish line’

* Government urged to use $3m unpaid

BEC bill to intervene

ing firm, Cushman & Wake-
field, had fallen through at the
end of March.

Tribune Business exclusive-
ly revealed that consortium’s
interest in the Exuma-based
property on February 5, 2009.



Subsequent to that, this news-
paper also revealed that the
Philadelphia-based real estate
group, the Arden Group, had
submitted a bit to acquire the

FROM page 5B

Minister ‘disappointed’ Emerald
Bay closing despite buyer interest

@ By NEIL HARTNELL
Tribune Business Editor

THE MINISTER OF
TOURISM and Aviation yes-
terday said he was especially
“disappointed” in the Four Sea-
sons Emerald Bay Resort’s clo-
sure because of the “high level”
of buyer interest in the proper-
ty, which he indicated should
have led to a sale concluding
before now.

nee

fa a ie & a iy ems (a) ir t
+ Paty eS : i
A ‘ i 4 FiNS) Ty
f , }
. haa
# Lt hg SAY pt 2 Fp AS et

YOUR

Rate

5.00% (prime -.5)
6.00% (prime +.50)
5.00% (prime -.S0]
6.00% (prime + 50)

Vincent Vanderpool-Wallace
told Tribune Business: “It is
Exuma itself we are most con-
cerned about, and are quite dis-
appointed because of the high
level of interest expressed in the
property, and that there hasn’t
been a conclusion at this stage.”

When asked whether he
knew how many buyers there
were, with Tribune Business

SEE page 9B

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PAGE 2B, THURSDAY, MAY 14, 2009

THE TRIBUNE



Act for a company

m@ By TYRONE
FITZGERALD

A DIRECTOR is a
person appointed

by the shareholders to man-
age a company.

Two general types

of directors:

EXECUTIVE DIRECTOR
A director who works

full-time in a company and

is responsible for the daily

operations, strategic plan-

ning, management and busi-

ness development of a com-

pany.

NON-EXECUTIVE
DIRECTOR
A director who does not

ISL

Automated Prir

ET a TOOL Tee To, ee)

INFORMATION SPECIALISTS LTD
weer = owww.islibahamas.com

By Tyrone Fitzgerald

work full-time in a company
but attends board mectings
and gives advice to the
Board of Directors.

There is no legal distinc-
tion between an executive
director and a non-execu-

D

{n°



tive director. Both execu-
tive and non-executive
directors have the same
legal duties, responsibilities
and potential liabilities.
While the Companies Act
1992 (as amended) and the

jude

International Business
Companies Act 2000 (as
amended) do not specifical-
ly define a ‘director’, only
an ‘officer’ of a company,
both Acts do legislatively
reinforce the general fidu-
ciary duties of a director to
manage the company, act
honestly, in good faith, and
in the best interests of the
company, subject to a unan-
imous shareholder agree-
ment and/or the Memoran-
dum and Articles of Associ-
ation of the company.
Directors are also
required to exercise the
duty of care, diligence and
skill that a reasonably pru-
dent person would exercise
in such a position, whether
as an executive director,

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responsible for the daily
operation and management
of the company, or as a non-
executive director, acting
independently of the actu-
al day-to-day management
of the company.

As fiduciaries, directors
have a legal duty to act in
good faith, not make a prof-
it from their fiduciary posi-
tion, not place themselves
in positions where their
duties as directors conflict
with their interests, or act
for their own benefit or the
benefit of others without
clear, unequivocal consent
from the principals of the
company on whose behalf
they act. They must act in
accordance with the Memo-
randum and Articles of
Association of the compa-
ny, and deal with and treat
fairly the different classes
of shareholders.

RESPONSIBILITIES
OF THE BOARD OF
DIRECTORS

* Establish the vision,
mission, and values of the
company

* Determine the compa-
ny’s strategic objectives and
policies, and ensure their
effective and efficient
implementation in align-
ment with the vision, mis-
sion and values of the com-
pany

* Monitor the company’s
overall performance and
progress in achieving those
objectives and policies

* Create, manage, mea-
sure and oversee the corpo-
rate and compliance culture
of the organisation

* Select and appoint
members of senior manage-

on firm directions

ment

* Exercise transparency,
responsibility and account-
ability to the company’s
stakeholders, primarily its
shareholders, for the com-
pany’s financial perfor-
mance and progress

APPOINTMENT OF
DIRECTORS

The first Directors of a
company are appointed at
its incorporation, normally
by the subscribers to the
Memorandum and Articles
of Association

Subsequent appointments
of directors are governed by
and carried out in accor-
dance with the Articles of
Association of the compa-
ny. Shareholder agreements
should also be reviewed,
and the relevant provisions
of the shareholder agree-
ment applied as necessary.

The Articles of Associa-
tion normally specify how
and when a Board may fill a
vacancy for a director,
appoint additional directors
(up to a maximum number)
or remove a director.

On appointment, a new
director should sign to sig-
nify his or her consent to
act as a director, execute a
director service agreement,
obtain the relevant insur-
ances and indemnities, and
receive a copy of the corpo-
rate documents.

These include the Memo-
randum and Articles of
Association, details of the
business and financial
affairs of the company,
recent Board minutes and
management accounts, and
copies of the statutory

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THE TRIBUNE

THURSDAY, MAY 14, 2009, PAGE 3B



Act provides foundation
to grow pharmacy sector

m@ By CHESTER ROBARDS
Business Reporter
crobards@tribunemedia.net

THE PHARMACY Acct 2009,
which was recently passed by
Parliament, is expected to attract
more young pharmacists to the
industry and grow it year-on-
year, executive members of the
Bahamas Pharmaceutical Asso-
ciation said yesterday. The
amendments to the Act had been
in development for almost 20
years.

According to the chairman of
the Association’s legislative com-
mittee, Marvin Smith, the
changes will help to regulate the
sector, which had policed itself
for years.

He said patients had to trust
the integrity of their pharmacists
in the past, because holes in the
law allowed for almost total
autonomy in the sector.

Mr Smith said that despite
missing the legislation that would

keep pharmacists honest, the
Bahamas had the fewer viola-
tions in the industry than many
smaller countries in the
Caribbean.

Now, the law governing the
sector will allow for a regulatory
body to cite pharmacies for
any violations that might be
reported.

One of the most substantive
changes coming out of the legis-
lation is the curbing of the pro-
liferation of counterfeit pre-
scription drugs.

The Bahamas Pharmaceutical
Association’s president, Philip
Gray, said the new Act engen-
ders “new standards for
registration, importation and
distribution of all medicines to
combat against counterfeit prod-
ucts”.

Mr Gray said this new legisla-
tion marks the first major
amendment to the pharmacy leg-
islation since the 1960s.

“Tt also marks the commence-

ment of a new regulatory body to
be known as the Pharmacy
Council of the Bahamas,” he
said.

“It is a sentinel moment for
pharmacy professionals, and is
the result of the hard work of
our members, many of whom
pioneered changes in this pro-
fession for decades and have now
gone to their rest.”

The BPA’s vice-president,
Mimi Roberts, said the pharmcay
industry in the Bahamas had
grown substantially, and through
the new legislation it could
become a transshipment point
for multinational drug corpora-
tions distributing to the
Caribbean.

Mr Smith said the Act has now
opened the industry up to emerg-
ing nuances in the pharmaceuti-
cal field, which will encourage
the best and brightest Bahamians
who go abroad to study pharma-
cology and related fields to come
back home to practice.

Act for small firm survival

m@ By MARK A. TURNQUEST

“THE ONLY thing constant in life is
change”, and change is here for small and
medium-sized enterprises (SMEs). This glob-
al recession has taught government, the pri-
vate sector and businesses/organisations one
thing: “If you fail to plan then you plan to
fail”.

Even if there was a plan and you “fail to
plan how to execute your plan, you will also
fail”. The only way the Bahamas can miti-
gate against the negative impact from future
recessions is that there must be synergy
between all sectors of the country.

The National Small Business Economic
Summit’s focus is to bring SMEs, the Gov-
ernment and private sctors together under
one roof to formulate a National Strategic
Plan for SME development in the Bahamas.
This plan will assist stakeholders in the craft-
ing of the Small Business Act.

This Economic Summit is a non-profit
event and will be held for three hours a night
for eight nights during the period: May 21-
June 4, 2009 at the Holy Cross Anglican
Church Auditorium.

SME owners are urged to be a change
agent for their industries. A Representative
from the Ministry of Finance will be making
presentations on how individual industries
will be impacted by the Economic Partner-
ship Agreement (EPA).

The summit is a necessary step in the for-
mulation of a Small Business Act of the

Bahamas, because SME owners will have
an excellent chance to voice their opinion on
how to solve specific industry problems and
take advantage of specific opportunities. If
SME owners fail to participate in the sum-
mit, it will probably hinder the growth of
the SME sector for at least five to 10 years.
Remember, “none of us can do everything,
but all of us can do something”.

SME owners should only attend and par-
ticipate in the summit based on their specif-
ic product/service offerings: Business Pro-
fessional Services (May 21, 6pm-7.30pm)
Medical Professional Services (May 21, 7.30
pm- 9pm), Technical Services (May 25, 6pm
— 7.30 pm), Other Services (May 25, 7.30
pm -9pm), Manufacturing /Fashion Design
(May 26, 6pm — 9pm), Retailing (May 27,
6pm -7.30pm), Wholesaling (May 27, 7.30pm
-9pm), Land /Building Developers ( (May
28, 6pm -7.30pm), Land/Building Consul-
tants ( May 28, 7.30pm-9pm), Agriculture
(June 2, 6pm -7.30pm), Fisheries ( June 2,
7.30 pm-9pm), Tourism ( June 3, 6pm -
7.30pm), Hospitality (June 3, 7.30pm-9pm).
Everyone can attend the last session Gov-
ernment Depts /Financial Institutions (June
4, 6pm -9pm),

To participate in the The National Small
Business Economic Summit, contact Mark A.
Turnquest at tel: (242) 326-6748 / 427-3640,
email: markturnquest@consultant.com
or log on to web site:
markturnquestconsulting.com

CPA/ CERTIFIED PUBLIC ACCOUNTANT

Jeb Descriptions

Apo: principles of accounting 10 analyee financial information and prepare financial reports by

compiling Infirmalion, preparing, pralit and kes statements, and ulilizing appropeiiie accounting

control procedures.

Primary Hespomsibilities

|, Prepare profit and loss. statements and monthly chosing and cost accounting repoets,

2, Compile and analyze financial information to prepare entries in accounts, such as general ledper
accounts, and document business tranacthors.

3, Establish, maintain, and coordinate the implementation of accounting and accounting comrol

procedures.

4. Analyze and review budgets and expenditures for contracts.
5, Monitor and rewiew accounting and related system reports for accumey and completeness
6. Prepare and review bucket, revere, expense, payroll entries, imoices, and other accounting

documents.

7. Analy revenue and expenditare trends and recommend appropriate budget levels, and erune

expenditure conpal.

8, Expéain billing invoices and accounting poticies to stalf, vendors and clients

4. Resolve accounting discrepancees.

1d. Recommend, develop and maintain financial data bases, computer software svetems and manual

filing system:

11. Supervise the input and handleng of financial data and reports lor the companys aulomated

financial systems

12. Interact with audstars in completing audits if mecessary.

13. Other duties as assigned.

Additional Keoponsibilities

|. Develop the annual operating budget and consult with deparimental management on the fiscal
aspects of program planning, salary recommendations, and o¢her administrative actions:
2. Provide accounting policy orientation for new staf,

Skills Required::

Knowledge of finance, acocunting, budgetire, and cost conta principles including Generally Accepted

Accountieg Principles. Knowledge of financial and accounting software applications.
Quickbooks and Mircos software lnowledge a plus,

Employment Type: Full Time

Vearky Salary: Lnagecitied

Education & Experience

Level of Education: §=6College

Years of Work
Experience:

440 5 Years

Contact Information

Company: King’s Realty

Coatact Name: Lilith Postwick
Costact Phone: HT-3044597
Coatact Fax: 247-5944492
Contact E-mail:

Preferred Method
of Contact:

E-mail

Share your news

The Tribune wants to hear from
people who are making news in
their neighbourhoods. Perhaps

you are raising funds for a good
cause, campaigning for
improvements in the area or
have won an award.

If so, call us on 322-1986 and
share your story.



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BSI TRUST CORPORATION (BAHAMAS) LIMITED

is presently accepting applications for

COMPLIANCE AND INTERNAL CONTROLS OFFICER

The successful candidate for the position of Compliance and Internal Controls
Officer will monitor the regulatory framework and operational aspects of the Trust
in order to ensure compliance,

Qualifications:

* The candidate must have thorough knowledge of local legislation, regulatory &
statutory matters as well as intamational practicas as they relata to the Trust
Industry;

He/She should possess the Intemational Diploma Anti Money Laundering and
Compliance, bachelors degree; and

Minimum of 3-5 years working experience in the trust field. Preference will be
given to professionals with working experience for a Swiss Bank or Trust

Excellent organizational, communication and computer skills
Positive attitude and outlook

Problem-solving skills

Commitment to quality and service excellence

Ability to pariner with team members.



Responsibilities:
Ensure compliance of the Trust with local, intemational and internal group
regulations and standards in order to limit legal, requiatory and reputation risk
Ad-hoc research and analysis of compliance issues
Maintain a proper framework of internal control activities
Produce periodical reporting for the Audit Committee and Board of Directors
Liaise with Head Office and Bahamian regulators as applicable
Will report directly to the CEO,

Interested persons with such qualifications should submit their resume/curriculum
vitae to:

Human Resources Manager

BS! Trust Corporation (Bahamas) Limited

Bayside Executive Park

P.O, Box CB-10976

Nassau, Bahamas

Fax no. (242) 502-2310 or email: ruby.kerra@bsibank.com

(ABSOLUTELY NO PHONE CALLS PLEASE)
Only applicants having the above attributes will be contacted,
PAGE 4B, THURSDAY, MAY 14, 2009

THE TRIBUNE



FROM page two

reports/filings for at least
three to five years prior to
his or her appointment.

DIRECTOR’S
LEGAL DUTIES
Directors act as a fiducia-
ries for the shareholders of a
company and are custodians
of its assets. Therefore, cer-
tain legal and statutory
duties are imposed on them.
These are:

A DUTY TO ACTIN
GOOD FAITH

Avoidance of conflicts of
interest

Act for a company
on firm directions

Duty to manage the com-
pany

Duty to treat different
classes of shareholders fairly

Since Directors are gener-
ally responsible for the man-
agement, they may exercise
all the powers of the compa-
ny. However, directors do
not have unlimited powers
to run a company on behalf
of shareholders.

They can only exercise

MEDICAL SALES
REPRESENTATIVE

Brometing international pharmaceutical brands to the
RealiTAcare COMMUNITY in The Bahamas

Skills & Educational Requirements

Bachelor's degree in medical sciences, allied
health, or business administration
Effective communication and presentation

anes

Effective ime management, planning, and

organizing skills

Proficiency in a variety of computer apolications
SélF-motivated team player
Previous experience in pharmaceutical detailing

would be an asset

Candidates should possess a reliable motor vehicle, be

willing to travel to the Family islanes, the U5.,

other foreign countries

and

Please send application letter and resume by

May 27, 2009 to:

Medical Rep
P.O, Box N-7504
Nassau, Bahamas
Or Fax 393.0440

We thank all applicants for their interest, however,
only short-listed candidates will be contacted



MARK A. TURNQUEST

powers granted to them
either by general law or by
the Articles of Association
or Shareholders Agreement.

POWER AND
AUTHORITY

The ambit of a Director’s
authority may be restricted
by provisions of the Compa-
nies Act or International
Business Companies Act, the
Articles of Association (the
Articles of Association may
include provisions and
restrictions on borrowing by
the company) and the Share-
holders Agreement (where
applicable).

The Articles of Associa-
tion usually entitle the Board
of Directors to delegate pow-
ers to individual directors as
considered appropriate.
However, directors must act
collectively as a board to
bind the company.

Section 118 of the Compa-
nies Act 1992 allows a direc-
tor and his legal representa-
tive(s) to be indemnified by
the company against all
costs, charges and expenses
which may reasonably be
incurred by him in respect of
any civil, criminal or admin-
istrative action or proceed-
ing to which he is made a
party by reason of being - or
having been - a director of
that company.

Section 57 of the Interna-
tional Business Companies
Act 2000 allows a director
the same protection, subject
to any limitations in the com-
pany’s Memorandum or
Articles of Association, or in
any unanimous shareholder
agreement.

This statutory right to
indemnification is only per-
missible to directors and
their legal representatives for
both Companies Act compa-
nies and IBCs, provided such
directors acted honestly and
in good faith in the best
interests of the company.
They must also have had rea-
sonable grounds for believ-
ing that their conduct was
lawful in the case of a crimi-

& ASSOCIATE ORGANIZATIONS

PRESENT

NATIONAL SMALL BUSINESS ECONOMIC SUMMIT

Date:

Venue:

May 27st - June 4th, 2009, 6:00 pm — 9:00 pm
Holy Cross Anglican Church Auditorium, Soldier Road

Admission: Free (Business Owners are urged to attend the session on their industry)

Mission: To Formulate a Strategic Plan for SME Development

Attend and be a change agent for your industry

Thursday —May 21, 09

Session 1: Business Professional Services

ead
PROFESSIONAL SERVICES

Session 2 Medical Professional Senices

Monday =Kay 26, 09

TECHNICAL MOTHER SERVICES

Session 1: Techoical Services
Session? Olher Services

Tuesdays May 26,09

MANUFACTURING

Session 1: Manufacturing
Seasion 2: Fashion Design

Wednesday May 27, 09

MERCHANDISING

Session 1: Rated Merchandising
Session 2: Wholesale Merchandising

Thursday - May 28, 09

CONSTRUCTION

Session 1: Land! Building Developers
Session 2: Land / Buikding Consultants

Tuesday — June 2, 08

AGRICULTURE / FISHERIES

Session 1: Agricultura
Session 2: Fisheries

Wednesday —June 3, 09

TOURISM! HOSPITALITY

Session 1; Tourism
Session 2: Hospitality

Thursday —June 4, 09

Session 1; Government Banks & Depts
Session 2: Financal Institutions & NGOs

6:00 pen -7-30 pm
7:30 pm -9:00 pm

6:00 pen -7:30 pm
7:30 pen 2:00 pm

6:00 pm -7:30 pm
7:30 pm -2:00 pm

6:00 pm -7:30 pm
7:30 pen -feb0 pm

6:00 pm -7:30 pm
7:30 pm -fe00 pm

6:00 pm -?:30 pm
7:30 pen -So) pm

6:00 pm -7:20 pm
7:30 pm -$60) pm

GOVERNMENT | FINANCIAL INSTITUTIONS

6:00 pn -7-20 pm
7:30 pm $e) pm

A Representative from the Ministry of Finance will be making presentations on how
individual industries will be impacted by the Economic Partnership Agreement (E
Contact: Mark A. Turnquest
(242) 326-6748 / 427-3640
Email: markturnquest@consultant.com

iA RISO ewe rom en]

HOON ee PC he

nal or administrative action
or proceeding.

DIRECTOR’S AND
OFFICER’S LIABILITY
INSURANCE

Since directors and officers
may be personally liable to
any party that may have an
interest in the affairs of the
company for damages, legal
costs, and expenses in rela-
tion to a breach of director’s
duty, many of them seek the
protection of director’s and
officer’s liability insurance.

Directors and officers
insurance is designed to pro-
tect a director or officer
against claims that may be
made by a company, share-
holders or creditors.

Under Section 122 of the
Companies Act, a company
may purchase and maintain
insurance for the benefit of a
director against liability
incurred by him in his capac-
ity as a director of the com-
pany.

Section 58 of the IBC Act
also allows a company incor-
porated under that Act to
purchase and maintain insur-
ance for a director, regis-
tered agent, officer or liq-
uidator against liability
incurred in by such persons
acting in their capacity as
director, registered agent,
officer or liquidator.

Notwithstanding the pro-
visions and protections of
directors, and officers liabil-
ity insurance, it is important
that executive and non-exec-
utive directors ensure they
are properly and sufficiently
covered when agreeing to
accept and act in their capac-
ity as a company director.

Careful examination
should not only be made of
the coverage involved, but
the extent of such coverage
and the incidences and risks
that have been included and
excluded under such cover-
age.

Prospective and newly-
appointed directors would be
advised to seek independent
advice and a review of the
indemnification and insur-
ance coverage offered by
their companies, plus the
extent of their personal pro-
tection against claims,
actions,and proceedings
for litigious issues involving

the company.

Since directors and officers
cannot rely on the separate
legal personality of their
companies, as enunciated in

nification and insurance cov-
erage should be a primary
consideration in a director’s
exhaustive list of require-
ments from before deciding

Salomon v. Salomon, indem- to act as its director.

(c) 2009. Tyrone L. E. Fitzgerald. All rights reserved. NB:
The information contained in this article does not consti-
tute nor is it a substitute for legal advice. Persons reading this
article and/or column, generally, are encouraged to seek the
relevant legal advice and assistance regarding issues that
may affect them and may relate to the information present-
ed.
Tyrone L. E. Fitzgerald is an attorney with Fitzgerald &
Fitzgerald. Should you have any comments regarding this arti-
cle, you may contact Mr Fitzgerald at Suite 212, Lagoon
Court Building, Olde Towne Mall at Sandyport, West Bay St.,
P. O. Box CB-11173, Nassau, Bahamas or _ tyrone@tle-
fitzgeraldgroup.com.

IN THE MATTER OF THE LEGAL PROFESSION ACT, 1992
AND

IN THE MATTER OF A COMPLAINT AGAINST COUNSEL
AND ATTORNEY
BETWEEN

SOLOMON GUTSTEIN
Complainants
KENDALL KNOWLES

Respondent

NOTICE OF HEARING

TAKE NOTICE that the Disciplinary Tribunal shall

hear the subject Complaint on Wednesday the 20th day
of March, A.D., 2009 at 3:00 o’clock in the afternoon
before Her Ladyship The Honourable Mrs. Justice
Albury at 3rd Floor British American Building, George
Street, Nassau, The Bahamas.

AND FURTHER TAKE NOTICE that the Respondent,
Kendall Knowles, is required to produce to the Bahamas
Bar Council within seven (7) days from the date hereof,
an address to which the Decision may be sent by prepaid
Registered Post.

Dated the 14th day of May, A.D., 2009

Bahamas Bar Association
Elizabeth Avenue
Nassau, The Bahamas



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THE TRIBUNE

THURSDAY, MAY 14, 2009, PAGE 5B



FROM page one

Four Seasons Emerald Bay
Resort.

That deal, though, is also
understood to have gone
nowhere. Tribune Business
was informed that the
receivers questioned whether
Arden had the financial mus-
cle necessary to take the resort
forward, as it seemed to be
seeking joint venture partners
for its project.

Another potential bidder
involved the DeVos family,
the wealthy Amway Corpora-
tion founders who own the
Cape Eleuthera resort project.
But despite conducting due
diligence on the Four Seasons
Emerald Bay Resort, Tribune
Business can reveal that their
group declined to submit a for-
mal bid.

Mr Downs confirmed: “We
were under contract with one
party [the Silverton group],
and that unfortunately did not
reach the finish line. That
passed at the end of March.

“During April, we worked
to try and close with several
other parties. We’ve worked
with parties to try and close, in
a way that meant we would
not have to do what we’ve
done, but we’ve not been able
to do it with the speed we
wanted.”

As a result, Mr Downs said
he and fellow PwC receiver,
Clifford Johnson, had been
considering the Four Seasons
Emerald Bay Resort’s closure
as a “Plan B” option for “the
last couple of weeks.

Such a decision would also
have involved the Four Sea-
sons Emerald Bay Resort’s
main creditor, the London
office of Japanese insurer,
Mitsui, which insured the orig-
inal loan that financed the
Exuma property’s construc-
tion.

Mr Downs said Mitsui “had
to draw the line” on the sus-
tained heavy losses it was
incurring to keep the Four
Seasons Emerald Bay Resort
open.

“This receivership began in
2007. The expectation was that
it would be a relatively quick
transition,’ Mr Downs
explained. “Mitsui made it
clear the resort would be fully
funded, and they did until the
end of last year, when they
had to cut back with the mari-
na closure.”

While the Four Seasons
Emerald Bay Resort’s cost
base was “pretty much fixed”,
its net losses had been
increased by reduced revenues
as a result of the tourism fall-
off provoked by the global
recession.

“We probably lost in the
order of maybe somewhere
like $5 million last year, but
the losses this year and next
are possibly comparable to
that number as well,” the PwC
receiver added.

Describing the closure deci-
sion as “a difficult day for us”,
Mr Downs added: “We'll have
to try and make something
happen.”

Reviewing the so-far futile
search for a buyer, he said:
“The market outlook has just
got much worse, and we have
to think about ways to curtail
our losses. We’ve taken, with a
great deal of reluctance, and
ultimately, financial necessity,
the decision to close the resort,
although the great expectation
is that this will be for a tem-
porary basis.”

Emerald Bay:
5m yearly losses
sink 400-500 jobs

The last guest will leave the
Four Seasons Emerald Bay
Resort on May 26, 2009, with
staff redundancies beginning
the following day. Most of the
job losses will take place dur-
ing June, as different parts of
the resort are decommissioned
and stored for security.

“The staff are digesting the
announcement at the moment,
but with some strong leader-
ship from Four Seasons, we’ll
get through the next two
weeks,” Mr Downs added.

Tribune Business under-
stands that other businesses
on the Four Seasons Emerald
Bay property, such as the
resort’s John Bull store and
the Emerald Isles Shopping
Centre, have been given until
June 15, 2009, to leave. The
latter includes a Scotiabank
branch and businesses such as
Mail Boxes Etc.

As for why no buyer had
been found, Mr Downs said:
“We've done it at a very diffi-
cult time in the market. The
market moved against us at
some key points as well, and
made buyers quite jumpy in
terms of closing the deal. It
was a combination of factors,
quite frankly.”

He added that all potential
suitors still interested in
acquiring the Four Seasons
Emerald Bay Resort had been
informed of the closure deci-
sion, and the fact this might
give them the chance to
replace the Four Seasons
brand with a manager/opera-
tor of their own.

“We’ve hopefully passed the
bottom of the market, and
with a new manager hopefully
that will get us over the line,”
Mr Downs said. He acknowl-
edged that the price Mitsui
was seeking had been reduced,
but that it still expected to
conclude a transaction.

Sources have suggested to
Tribune Business that Mitsui
had dropped its price to as low
as $35-$50 million, after a suc-
cession of previous deals,
involving the likes of Ambrose
Holdings (UK) and Bahamas
resident Israeli commodities
dealer, Rami Weisfisch, had
fallen through. However, any
buyer will require another $50
million investment to upgrade
the Four Seasons Emerald
Bay to five-star status upon
taking possession.

The resort’s closure will
effectively leave the $100 mil-
lion Grand Isle Villas project,
which inhabits adjacent land,

on an island all by itself and
surrounded by a property that
will, if no buyer is found, quite
likely be to allowed to deteri-
orate.

Therefore, real estate val-
ues for not only Grand Isle
Villas, but all other property
owners at Emerald Bay, will
decline, and the ripple effect
will be widely felt by Exuma’s
real estate market.

One source, familiar with
the situation, yesterday blast-
ed the Government for allow-
ing the closure to happen.

Speaking on condition of
anonymity, they said the Gov-
ernment had failed to use the
leverage it possessed over Mit-
sui/PwC to compel them to
conclude a deal, arguing that
Prime Minister Hubert Ingra-
ham had adopted the position
that he could not interfere in a
private transaction.

Yet the source alleged that
the Government had strong
grounds for intervention, given
that the Four Seasons Emer-
ald Bay owed the Bahamas
Electricity Corporation (BEC)
an unpaid $3 million bill.

“How can the Government
allow this to happen,” the
source asked. “This act is
unconscionable. It sends a
very negative message to
investors in the Bahamas. It’s
time for the Government to
act.”

The impact for Exuma’s
own island economy is likely
to be disastrous, for it has
been re-tooled almost entirely
to support the Four Seasons
Emerald Bay Resort.

Apart from the direct loss
of hotel jobs, the amount of
money those people will have
to spend will also decline,
reducing profits and revenues
for other Exuma-based busi-
nesses. In turn, they will also
probably shed jobs, taking the
island’s economy, in the words
of one Bahamian born there,
“back to the 1980s”.

David Johnson, deputy direc-
tor-general in the Ministry of
Tourism with responsibility for
planning, investment and busi-
ness development, warned last
year that the Four Seasons
needed to become a sustainable,
profitable resort, and the
Bahamas could not afford for it
to fail.

He said then that factors such
as building costs being about 40
per cent higher per square foot
than they are in Nassau, had
retarded Emerald Bay’s growth
and kept it from reaching the

NOTICE

Anthony Hanna of No. 20 Prospero Apartment
#1, Prospero Drive Archer Forest, Freeport,

Grand Bahama is kindly asked to contact
the Bahamas Bar Association of Elizabeth
Avenue, P.O. Box N-4632, Nassau, Bahamas or
at Telephone numbers 326-3276, immediately.



ACANCY NOTIC

The Grand Bahama Power Company, Limited invites qualified applicants to apply for the
position of Technician | (Instrument), responsible for concucting calibrations, repairs, routine
checks and tests control instrumentation in #3 Generation Power Plant.

The successtul candidate is expected to lead instrament technicians in fault-finding,
troubleshooting and repairs, including analyses and calibration of all electronic and pneumatic

instrument and control systems,

Applicants must have a High School Diploma, BOCSE passes of C or better in Math, English
and a Technological Certificate in Electronics or its equivalent from an accredited institution.
Applicants must also have a minimum of five (3) years power station or equivalent industrial
experience or three (3) years at a Technician [I level in the Maintenance Department of an

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Applications with supporting documentation including a chan Police Certificate and proof of Bahamian
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THE RECTOR OF HUNAN RESOURCES
CRAND BAHAMA POWER COMPANY, LIMIMED
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Bahamas Law Enforcement
Co-operative Credit Union Ltd

development its owners had pre-
viously predicted.

Mr Johnson said of Emerald
Bay: “The property was con-
ceived to be a mixed-use pro-
ject, with 185 keys under the
Four Seasons brand. The vast
majority of the property was to
be for mixed-use, condos and
hundreds of lots sold for signif-
icant family homes.

“After four years of opera-
tion, they have developed very
little of the sold inventory.
There’s been a lot of trading of
the land by the owners, but the
cost of building is prohibitive.

“The buildings costs, the
numbers suggest, are in excess
of 40 per cent higher per square
foot to build.”

Costs to construct such prop-
erties in Nassau were $500 per
square foot, while in Exuma
the price was $800 per square
foot.

Mr Johnson also underlined
the impact the relatively high
building costs on Exuma, com-
pared to Nassau, were having
on Emerald Bay’s margins. He
pointed out that concrete there at
cost $200 per yard, whereas in
Nassau it cost $125 per yard.

“The hotel, with a golf course
and spa, as a 185-room resort of
Four Seasons’ calibre, can only
be profitable if it has a
much larger customer base out-
side those rooms,” Mr Johnson
said.

He added that the resort
needed to build out to 700-800
units to get close to profitability,
whereas it was currently closer
to 300-400 units.

NOTICE OF
ANNUAL GENERAL MEETING

THERE WILL NOT BE A SECOND
CALL AS PER THE CO-OPERATIVE
ACT 2005 SECTION 22

_ h ‘ : :
The 24" Annual General Meeting of the Bahamas
Law Enforcement Co-operative Credit Union Ltd will
be held on

Saturday, May 16", 2009

al

9:00 am

Paul H. Farquharson
Conference Centre
Police Headquarters

East Street

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THE TRIBUNE

THURSDAY, MAY 14, 2009, PAGE 7B

Retail sales dip
creates worries

m@ By MARTIN
CRUTSINGER
AP Economics Writer

WASHINGTON (AP) —
Retail sales fell in April for a
second straight month, dashing
hopes that consumer spending
was starting to revive and
would help end the recession.

Economists said families who
are worried about layoffs and
unpaid job furloughs are sav-
ing more and spending less,
delaying the start of a sustained
recovery.

The disappointing report
helped send stocks down on
Wall Street, where the Dow
Jones industrial average slid
184 points — more than 2 per-
cent. Other major indexes fell
even more sharply.

Retail sales fell 0.4 percent
last month, worse than the flat
performance many economists
had expected, the Commerce
Department reported Wednes-
day.

Retail sales had posted gains
in January and February after
falling for six straight months.
The gains had raised hopes that
the crucial consumer sector of
the economy might be stabiliz-
ing. But the setbacks in March
and April retail sales cast
doubts on that prospect.

“People are obviously still
very nervous and not spend-
ing,” said David Wyss, chief
economist at Standard & Poor’s
in New York. “The economy is
still in a recession, and I don’t
think we will hit bottom until
late summer or early fall.”

Analysts said the economy
should benefit in coming
months from the tax relief
included in the $787 billion
stimulus plan Congress passed
in February. But the extra $17 a
week that the average family
will receive won’t translate into
a major boost in spending.

Such modest relief is hardly
enough to negate the effects of
layoffs and employee furloughs,
shrunken retirement accounts

and home equity, and con-
sumers struggling to boost sav-
ings because of fears about the
future.

Mary Goodman has stopped
most of her extraneous spend-
ing — like meals out. She
reined in her spending habits
after March 1, when she was
laid off from her job as an office
manager at an online job post-
ing company in Milwaukee.

Now the 60-year-old Good-
man eats out just once a week
with a former co-worker, a trip
that included soup at an indoor
market on Wednesday after-
noon.

“Pm not doing any clothes
shopping,” she said. “I’m not
tempting myself by going into
the mall.”

Improvement

Anecdotal evidence had sig-
naled some improvement in
sales in recent weeks. But “to
offset the plunge in wealth, the
household saving rate still
needs to double from the cur-
rent rate of 4 percent,” Paul
Dales, U.S. economist with
Capital Economics in Toronto,
wrote in a research note.

“With falling employment
hitting incomes, this can only
be achieved by a further
retrenchment in spending.”

The savings rate, which was
hovering around zero a year
ago, has climbed to just above 4
percent. Many economists think
it will hit 6 percent or more this
year as workers anxious about
layoffs and depleted invest-
ments put away their credit
cards. The jobless rate rose to a
25-year high of 8.9 percent in
April, with a net total of
539,000 jobs lost during the
month.

The fall in retail sales in April
came even though car sales
posted a 0.2 percent increase.
Excluding autos, the drop in
retail sales would have been 0.5
percent — much worse than the
0.2 percent gain economists had

expected.

Sales other than autos
showed widespread weakness
last month. Demand at depart-
ment stores and general mer-
chandise stores fell 0.1 percent.
Sales at specialty clothing stores
dropped 0.5 percent.

Sales also fell in April at fur-
niture stores, electronic and
appliance stores, food and bev-
erage stores and gasoline sta-
tions, the Commerce Depart-
ment said.

The sales drop at department
stores and specialty clothing
stores came as a surprise since
the nation’s big chain stores had
reported better-than-expected
results for April. Same-store
sales rose 0.7 percent last
month compared with April
2008. It was the first overall
increase in six months, accord-
ing to the tally by Goldman
Sachs and the International
Council of Shopping Centers.

The two reports aren’t com-
parable, analysts noted.

The government figures, for
example, cover more stores and
are adjusted for seasonal varia-
tions.

Analysts said one reason the
consensus forecast may have
been too optimistic is that with
many stores closing, it’s been
difficult to estimate industry
figures accurately.

Department store operator
Macy’s Inc. on Wednesday
reported a wider loss for the
first quarter, due partly to
restructuring charges. Still, the
company expects to see an
improvement in sales from its
localization efforts beginning
in the fourth quarter of 2009,
and in the spring of 2010.

Liz Claiborne Inc. also
reported a first-quarter loss that
was worse than Wall Street
expected. The apparel maker
said its quarterly loss swelled
on restructuring charges and a
drop in same-store sales stem-
ming from lower consumer
spending and an extra week of
sales in the year-ago period.

Ministry of Public Works and Transport

PUBLIC NOTICE

TENDER FOR EXTERNAL PAINTING OF GOVERNMENT
BUILDINGS SITUATED AT BANK LANE NASSAU, THE BAHAMAS

The Government of The Bahamas, through the Ministry of Works and Transport,
is inviting Tenders from painting contractors to carry out external painting to the
House of Assembly, Senate Building, Hansard Building, courts #1-5 Building,
Courts # 6-8 Building and the Nassau Public Library situated at Shirley Street and
Bank Lane.

Schedule for Tender Opening

Companies interested in tendering may contact the Building Survey Section at
the Ministry of Public Works and Transport, (302-9502) for further information and
arrangement of site visit.

All tender bids should include the following:

* Complete Tender Document
* Copy of current Business License
¢ National Insurance Board letter of good standing

Tender Documents may be collected as of May 15th, 2009 from Ministry of Public
Works Building Survey Section.

Tenders must be submitted in sealed envelopes marked “Tender for External
Painting to the House of Assembly, Senate Building, Hansard Building, Courts
# 1-5 Building, Courts #6-8 Building and the Nassau Public Library, situated at
Shirley Street and Bank Lane, Nassau Bahamas” and delivered to:

Chairman
Tenders Board
Ministry of Finance
3rd Floor Reception Desk
Cecil Wallace-Whitfield Centre
P.O. Box N-3017, Cable Beach, West Bay Street
Nassau, The Bahamas
All Tenders must be received at the above address on or before
10:00 am Tuesday, 2nd June 2009.

All persons who submit bids are invited to attend the opening of Tenders at the
Ministry of Finance, 3rd Floor, Cecil Wallace-Whitfield Centre, Cable Beach, West
Bay Street, Nassau, The Bahamas at 10:00 am, on Tuesday, 2nd. June, 2009

The Ministry of Public Works and Transport reserves the right to reject any or all
Tenders.


PAGE 8B, THURSDAY, MAY 14, 2009

THE TRIBUNE



Courier firms enjoy second reprieve

FROM page one

working to empower small
businesses, but instead, he sug-
gested these new regulations
could cause some closures.

The new regulations, which
the Government believes will
help it capture millions of dol-
lars it was missing in revenues,
were scheduled to come into
effect last month. Protests
from owners of couriers ser-
vices caused the Customs
Department to move the
arrangement to the middle of
this month.

Mr Mackey said couriers
had previously asked for one
to two months to get their

businesses in order to seam-
lessly adapt to the changes.

“To abruptly change it [the
procedures] because a new
comptroller has been appoint-
ed is unfair,” he said.

Mr Mackey said the Govy-
ernment needs their services
as much as they need the Gov-
ernment to “respect” their
industry as one that brings in
millions of dollars per annum.

“We want to be respected
as an industry partner,” said

Mr Mackey.

He argued that the bonds
imposed on smaller courier
companies will render them
uncompetitive with larger
firms such as FedEx and UPS,
who can afford to post larger
bonds in order to clear the
items they import.

Though the BTLA won an
extension in the clearance pro-
cedure implementation, Mr
Mackey said they realised that
the Government is not willing

to offer them many conces-
sions to help manoevere
through the process when it is
in place.

He suggested that the
BTLA now have discussions
with the Customs Department
regarding procedures, in order
to figure out what is best for
each entity.

Mr Gomez recently told
Tribune Business that the pro-
cedures being amended by
Customs will capture millions






















OFFICE SPACE AVAILABLE
FOR RENT

3 Medical or dental office spaces in the
Cable Beach Area from July 2009

For further details please contact 376-7777
oT ANeT-T am male ee
10a.m. - 5p.m. Monday to Friday

NOTICE

NOTICE is hereby given that_LONA DUMOND HONORAT of #78
MARLEY DRIVE, FREEPORT, GRAND BAHAMA is applying
to the Minister responsible for Nationality and Citizenship,
for registration/naturalization as a citizen of The Bahamas,
and that any person who knows any reason why registration/
naturalization should not be granted, should send a written and
signed statement of the facts within twenty-eight days from the
14TH day of MAY, 2009 to the Minister responsible for Nationality

Bahamas Humane Society

wishes to inform the general public that
there will be NO Clinic on Saturday
16th May due to our Animal Fun Day.
We will have a late clinic
3pm-8pm on Friday 15th.

amr a ele

NOTICE

NOTICE is hereby given that ELIE RONY ETIENNE
of AUGUSTA STREET is applying to the Minister
responsible for Nationality and Citizenship, for registration/
naturalization as a citizen of The Bahamas, and that
any person who knows any reason why registration/
naturalization should not be granted, should send
a written and signed statement of the facts within
twenty-eight days from the 14" day of May, 2009 to the

of dollars in government rev-
enue lost since the early 1990s.
The new procedures will
also align the Bahamas’ stan-
dards with those of other
countries in the region who
export goods into the
Bahamas and who received
goods originating here.
Under the present system,
courier companies were
allowed to use the baggage
declaration form - the same
one as filled out by returning
residents - to clear goods and
other shipments. This enabled
them to lump together differ-
ent items that attracted the
same rate of duty, declaring
their quantity to Customs.
Customs now wants courier
firms to go back to using the
‘long forms’, which require all
imports to be broken down
into individual items.
Zhivargo Laing, minister of
state for finance, previously
told Tribune Business that the
present system - which
allowed courier companies
and other brokers to use the
baggage declaration form - the
same one as filled out by
returning residents - to clear
goods and other shipments
often meant that the appro-
priate duty rates were not

applied to every item, thus
costing the Government
much-needed revenue.

“The problem with the bag-
gage declaration form is that it
can cause, from the Customs
point of view, to not necessar-
ily have the appropriate rates
applied to items, because it
does not have the same level
of reporting that is required
under the long form for entry
declarations,” Mr Laing told
Tribune Business.

“It would clearly not have
the same level of specificity
and transparency required for
optimum Customs purposes.
The Government is not get-
ting the benefit of the proper
duty rate being applied,
because the specifics of the
item are not declared.”

As previously revealed by
Tribune Business, the Cus-
toms Department is propos-
ing that courier companies
with overnight deliveries, and
brokers wanting to clear ship-
ments, such as perishables, on
the same day, can clear these
imports immediately and then
come back to deal with the
entry declarations within 10
days - provided they lodge a
bond with the revenue collec-
tion agency.

FOR RENT

Minister responsible for nationality and Citizenship, P.O. Box
N-7147, Nassau, Bahamas.

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and Citizenship, P.O.Box N-7147, Freeport, Bahamas.

NOTICE

The Department of Statistics will carry out its
Annual Household survey during the period of
May. Enumerators with offical identification cards
from the Department of Statistics will visit selected
household in New Providence, Grand Bahama,
Exuma and Long Island and will be calling upon
residents to complete the questionnaires honestly
and accurately. The information obtained will be
handled in the strictest confidence and will be used
to maintain essential statical data on our country.”

For more information or survey
Email: energysavingsconsultants @hotmail.com

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BAHAMAS FINANCIAL CENTRE

NASSAU, BAHAMAS

TOTAL RENTABLE AREA: 2,278 SI
SUBLEASE
OPPORTUNITY

PREMISES: Thad Flexor

June 30, SOO? or sooner

AVAILABILITY:
TERM: Through December 30, 2011.

For information, contact:
Long tenn extension possible.

W. Larry Roberts
T: 242 576.0026
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242 574,0028
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Fully furnished town house in private area on

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burglar bars, A/C & C/A asking $1,050 per month,
$50 discount per month towards utilities, serious

enquires only please, 393-4326

NOTICE

NOTICE is hereby given that VERVENIK ELIZABETH RIGBY
MCKENZIE of UNION VILLAGE, NASSAU, BAHAMAS
is applying to the Minister responsible for Nationality and
Citizenship, for registration/naturalization as a citizen of The
Bahamas, and that any person who knows any reason why
registration/ naturalization should not be granted, should send a
written and signed statement of the facts within twenty-eight days
from the 7TH day of MAY, 2009 to the Minister responsible for
Nationality and Citizenship, PO.BoxN-7147, Freeport, Bahamas.

MEDICAL SUPPLIES
LIQUIDATION SALE

Combine Pad Abdominal Pad 5*9 inch
400/case $150.00
Dental Cotton Rolls Medium
20,000/case $60.00
XL Gloves Latex Powered
1000/case $40.00
Large Gloves latex (Powder Free)
1000/case $40.00
Large Gloves Vinyl (Latex Free)
1000/case $35.00
Insulin Syringe 100U/ml
3600/case $175.00
Nebulizer Mask Kit Adult 20/ml,
Child 6ml, Chamber

100/case $130.00
Needle Holders
1200/case $70.00
Nasal Cannula Adult
100/case $60.00
Oxygen Mask Adult Large
100/case $75.00
IML Syringe with 25G Needle
2400/case $100.00
3ML Syringe with 23G Needle
1500/case $100.00
SML Syringe with 21G Needle and 23G Needle
1200/case $100.00
10ML Syringe with 21G Needle
1200/case $100.00
Specimen Cups 40z Sterile
100/case $25.00
Sterile Surgical Gloves size 7 1/2, 8, 8 1/2,
600/case $55.00
Hypoallergenic Cloth Tape (Microspore Tape}

1 inch, 216/case

2 inch 108/case $100.00

Cash and Carry or Free Delivery Call
422-1457 - Ms. Miller


THE TRIBUNE

THURSDAY, MAY 14, 2009, PAGE 9B



City Markets

Minister ‘disappointed’ Emerald
Bay closing despite buyer interest



THE ANITQUITIES, MONUMENTS
and MUSEUM CORPORATION

to close store

FROM page one

“There is one other store
that was under watch, and
which had a gross profit mar-
gin of 11 per cent, and we
started a programme of stock
control,” Mr Chatrani
revealed.

“That gross profit margin
went from ranking tenth or
eleventh in terms of stores to
ranking sixth or seventh in
terms of stores. We’ve had
major lay-offs for fraud at a
senior level at that store, and
had significant improvements
since then.”

Mr Chatrani added that City
Markets had been overstaffed,
and its employee numbers had
been reduced from more than
850 in February 2008 to 700
without anyone’s employment
being severed.

“They’ve either left of their
own accord, and we’ve taken a
zero tolerance approach to

fraud, or suspected fraud.”

Mr Chatrani said that
Bahamas Supermarkets had
estimated it had lost market
share as a result of its finan-
cial woes in 2007-2008, its
share of the Bahamian pro-
duce market falling from 21.4
per cent in 2007 to 20.6 per
cent in 2008.

He acknowledged that there
was a perception among some
Bahamian consumers that the
company’s products were
over-priced and expensive in
relation to competitors’, but
the chain was targeting being
the least expensive for so-
called ‘breadbasket’ items.

Mr Chatrani also acknowl-
edged that the replacement of
former Winn-Dixie ‘own
brand’ products had not been
handled well, with Bahamian
consumers left confused over
their introduction as it had
not been dealt with through a
marketing campaign.

FROM page one

putting forward three names,
Mr Vanderpool-Wallace said:
“There was more than that.

“The level of interest in the
property was very high. I was
assured that it was easily multi-
ples of 10. It wasn’t a few. It’s a
gem of a property.”

The Minister added: “In this
business environment, you have
a whole variety of options peo-
ple are taking. That property is
a jewel in the crown of Bahami-
an tourism, and we hope it
remains open.

“That was the prime devel-
opment on Exuma, and brought
a high quality to the Exuma
brand. The size of the property,
the brand name of the property,
the assets and amenities, were
important to other people. We
hope for the shortest possible
interruption, and that the prop-
erty gets open as quickly as pos-
sible.”

The Four Seasons Emerald
Bay Resort has 500 staff, 83
managers and 442 line staff, 26

of whom are expatriates. Its clo-
sure has been decided by Japanese
insurer, Mitsui, the resort’s main
creditor, who placed it into
receivership under Pricewater-
houseCoopers (PwC) in June
2007.

The Government said yester-
day: “During the past 14
months, the receivers signed let-
ters of intent with one party and
entered into formal contract
with two other parties; none
with success.”

The Four Seasons Emerald
Bay Resort has acted as Exu-
ma’s main economic engine,
attracting additional foreign
direct investment to the island.
It employs almost 500 staff, and
features an 18-hole Greg Nor-
man Golf Course, two restau-
rants, three pools, spa, six meet-
ing rooms and 450-person
capacity ballroom.

A shopping complex has also
opened at Emerald Bay, the
anchor retailer being the Emer-
ald Isle supermarket. The com-
plex also includes businesses
such as Scotiabank and Mail
Boxes Etc.

The following vehicles are offered For Sale:-





1996 ISUZU BIG HORN
1995 ISUZU TROOPER
1986 SUBURBAU

1995 OR 1996 ISUZU BIG HORN

These vehicles can be viewed by contacting
Ms. Alcia Oxley at the Antiquities, Monuments
and Museum Corporation between the hours
of 8:00 and 4:00pm. Monday through Friday
at telephone number 326-2566 or 323-1925,
extension: 2128. Tenders may include bids for
the vehicle as viewed or for parts of the same.

















Sealed tenders are to be submitted no later
than 5 :00pm 22nd May 2009 and addressed to:









Tender For Vehicles





Director

Antiquities, Monuments and Museum Corporation.
Nassau, Bahamas







The Director reserves the right to reject any or all tenders.






NOTICE

NOTICE is hereby given that JEAN PIERRE JEFFREY of
KEY WEST STREET, NASSAU, BAHAMAS is applying to
the Minister responsible for Nationality and Citizenship, for
registration/naturalization as a citizen of The Bahamas, and
that any person who knows any reason why registration/
naturalization should not be granted, should send a written and
signed statement of the facts within twenty-eight days from the
7TH day of MAY, 2009 to the Minister responsible for Nationality
and Citizenship, P.O.Box N-7147, Freeport, Bahamas.

NOTICE

NOTICE is hereby given that HELTEN JACQUELI of BOWE
AVENUE, off MONTEL HEIGHTS, P.O.Box N-3331 is
applying to the Minister responsible for Nationality and
Citizenship, for registration/naturalization as a citizen of The
Bahamas, and that any person who knows any reason why
registration/naturalization should not be granted, should
send a written and signed statement of the facts within
twenty-eight days from the 14 day of May, 2009 to the
Minister responsible for nationality and Citizenship, P.O. Box
N-7147, Nassau, Bahamas.

Camperdown Riding Club
Prowvdly presents a
One Day Jumper Show

Sunday, May 77" 2009
9:00 am. — 3500 pont.
Concessian StendsHanbunpers | Hoddogs ! Pizza / Seams

Piease come out and support ws!

Adnssian is FREE!

Prove: 324-2065

ESSAY COMPETITION

TENTH ANNUAL PUBLIC SERVICE WEEK

The Department of Public Service will host an Essay
Competition as one of the activities for the Tenth Annual
Public Service Week. The Competition is open to Junior
and Senior Students in New Providence.

Additionally, this year, a speech competition will be
for schools in the Northern & Southern Bahamas,
respectively. Students interested in participating in the
Essay Competition should write a 250 - 300 words (Junior
High), and 450 - 500 words (Senior High), essay on the
topic: “ The Public Service-Striving for Excellence in
Customer Service.”

The deadlines for entries, which should be referred
to the attention of Mrs. Antoinette Thompson, Deputy
Permanent Secretary, Department of Public Service, is
Friday 24th July, 2009.

A Dell Desktop 2400 Computer System will be awarded to
the winner each category. The first runners-up for both the
Essay and Speech Competition in the Junior & Senior High
School category, will be awarded a $500 gift certificate.

The winners will be announced during the Tenth Annual
Public Service Week Awards Ceremony scheduled for
Saturday 10th October 2009.

Students interested in the Speech Competition for the
Northern and Southern Bahamas should contact their
Language Arts Teacher.

LEGAL NOTICE

NOTICE

INTERNATIONAL BUSINESS COMPANIES ACT
(No.45 of 2000)

In Voluntary Liquidation

Notice is hereby given in accordance with Section 138 (4) of
the International Business Companies Act, (No.45 of 2000),
CAPITAL HOTELS (ASIA PACIFIC) LIMITED is in dis-
solution. Alrena Moxey is the Liquidator and can be contacted
at The Winterbotham Trust Company Limited, Winter-
botham Place, Marlborough & Queen Streets, Nassau
Bahamas. All persons having claims against the above-named
company are required to send their names addresses and par-
ticulars of their debts or claims to the Liquidator before the
12th June, 2009.

NOTICE OF SALE

Rawson Court Condominium Owners Association
Pursuant to Section 71
Law of Property 4& Conveyancing (Condominium) Act
Invite tenders for the following:
1) Unit G03 Rawson Court, Cable Beach
3 Bedrooms, 3 1/2 Bathrooms
- Living Area 1,937 sq. feet
2) Unit GOS Rawson Court, Cable Beach
3 Bedrooms, 3 Bathrooms

- Living Area 2,295 aq. feet

Interested person should immediately
submit tenders to

The Manager,

P.O. Box N-1953
Nassau, Bahamas

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or eMail: jobsttheplusgrp.com

We thank all applicant, however only chose
actected boar an imeery jew Ve ill be concacted,

Director Antiquities, Monuments and
Museum Corporation

COMMONWEALTH OF THE BAHAMAS 2008
IN THE SUPREME COURT CLE/qui/No.01550

Common Law and Equity Division

IN THE MATTER of The Quicting
Titles Act, 1959

AND

IN THE MATTER of ALL THAT piece
arcel or tract of land situate near Red
a m the vicmity of Baker’s Creek and
Loggerhead Point on the Island of Abaco
one of the Islands of the Commonwealth
of The Bahamas comprising Four and
Seven Thousandths (4.007) acres (bein
Grant pe 37 to James E. Weatherford
which said piece parcel or tract of land is
bounded on the NORTH by vacant Crown
Land and running thereon Six Hundred
and ‘Twenty-three and Seventy-three
Hundredths (623.73) Feet on the EAST
partly by land granted to L.B. Johnson
and partly by a Road Reservation and
running thereon One Hundred and Sixty-
four (164) Feet on the SOUTH by land
ranted to W. H. Weatherford and now
fe property of Dudley Higgs and runnin.
thereon Sixx Hundred and Fifty-nine an
‘Twelve Hundredths (659.12) Feet and on
the WEST by land originally granted to the
Estate of the late Henry A. Fisher but now
the property of Dudley Higgs and runnin:
hoe Pace a Ten and cae

eight Hundredths (410.68) feet.
AND

IN THE MATTER of the Petition of
Dudley Dean Higgs and Suzette Miranda
Higgs

NOTICE

THE PETITION OF Dudley Dean Higgs and Suzette
Miranda Higgs in respect of:-

“IN THEMATTERof ALLTHAT picce
arcel or tract of land situate near Red
bane m the vicmity of Baker’s Creek and
Loggerhead Point on the Island of Abaco
one of the Islands of the Commonwealth
of The Bahamas comprising Four and
Seven Thousandths (4.007) acres (bein
Grant Aes 37 to James E. Weatherford)
which said piece parcel or tract of land is
bounded.on the NORTH by vacant Crown
Land and running thereon Six Hundred
and Twenty-three and Seventy-three
Hundredths (623.73) Feet on the EAST
partly by land granted to L.B. Johnson
and partly by a Road Reservation and
running thereon One Hundred and Sixty-
four (164) Feet on the SOUTH by land
ranted to W. H. Weatherford and now
the property of Dudley Higgs and runnin:
thereon Sixx Hundred and Fifty-nine an
‘Twelve Hundredths (659.12) Feet and on
the WEST by land originally granted to the
Estate of the late Henry A. Fisher but now
the property of Dudley Higgs and runnin:
delete roa ane Ten and oe

eight Hundredths (410.68) feet.”

Dudley Dean Higgs and Suzette Miranda Higgs claim to be the
owners of the unmcumbered fee simple estate m possession of
the said land and have made application to the Supreme Court of
the Commonwealth of The Ba under Section Three CO of
the Quieting Titles Act, 1959 to have their title to the said land
mvestigated and the nature and extent thereof determmed and
declared in a Certificate of Title to be granted by the Court in
accordance with the provisions of the said Act.

Copies of the Amended Petition and the Amended Plan of the

said land may be mspected during normal office hours in the

following places:

1. The Registry of the Supreme Court, East Street North in the
City of Nassau, Bahamas; and

2. The Chambers of Lockhart & Munroe, #35 Buen Retiro
Road, off Shirley Street, Nassau, Bahamas.

NOTICE is hereby given that any person having dower or right
to dower or an Adverse Claim or a claim not recognized im the
Amended Petition shall on or before the expiration of Thirty
30) days after the final publication of these presents, file in the

upreme Court and serve on the Petitioners or the undersigned
a Statement of his claim in the prescribed form verified by an

affidavit to be filed therewith.
Failure of any such person to file and serve a Statement of his
Claim on or before the expiration of Thirty (30) days after the final
publication of these presents will operate as bar to such claim.
LOCKHART & MUNROE
Chambers
#35 Buen Retiro Road
Off Shirley Street
Nassau, Bahamas

Attorneys for the Petitioners
PAGE 10B, THURSDAY, MAY 14, 2009

THE TRIBUNE



erm ee S ne e e
Investors ‘commit’ to City Meat financing

FROM page one

ing were a thing of the past.
However, both sides wanted
to secure their interests as best
as possible. Royal Bank want-
ed the new capital to be inject-
ed in one go, rather than in
“dribs and drabs” as had hap-
pened in the past. Over the
past year, some $10 million
has been injected into
Bahamas Supermarkets and
BSL Holdings, in tranches of



$5 million, $3 million and $2
million.

For its part, BSL Holdings
wants to make sure that the
terms agreed with the bank
are as favourable as possible,
so they get “the best bang for
their dollar”.

“We almost feel like we’re

Legal Notice

NOTICE

INTERNATIONAL BUSINESS COMPANIES ACT
(No.45 of 2000)

TECH STREAM
INVESTMENT LIMITED

Notice is hereby given that in accordance with Section
137 (4) of the International Business Companies Act No.
45 of 2000, TECH STREAM INVESTMENTS LIMITED
has been dissolved and struck off the Register according
to the Certificate of Dissolution issued by the Registrar
General on the 20th day of April, 2009.

Michael Charles Russell
Waterloo House
Don Street
St. Helier, Jersey
Liquidator



Legal Notice

NOTICE

INTERNATIONAL BUSINESS COMPANIES ACT
(No.45 of 2000)
ALPHA MAIMA GROUP LTD.

In Voluntary liquidation

“Notice is hereby given that in accordance with Section
137 (4) of the International Business Companies Act
(No. 45 of 2000). ALPHA MAIMA GROUP LTD. is in

Dissolution.”

The date of commencement of dissolution is the 22nd

day of October, 2007.

Ziedonis Udris
Law Office Skudra & Udris
13/3 Marijas iela, Riga
Latvia
Liquidator

Legal Notice

NOTICE
GENERAL GROUP

HOLDINGS LTD

(In Voluntary Liquidation)

Notice is hereby given that the above-named
Company is in dissolution, which commenced
on the 7th day of May 2009. The Liquidator is
Argosa Corp. Inc., P.O. Box N-7757 Nassau,

Bahamas.

ARGOSA CORP. INC.
(Liquidator)

ROYAL = FIDELITY

Money at Work

sitting here twiddling our
thumbs, waiting for the funds,”
Mr Chatrani said. Completion
of the fiscal 2008 audit also
depends on the receipt of the
new equity capital, as exter-
nal auditors KPMG want to
see this before issuing an audit
opinion absent a ‘going con-
cern’ qualification.

The City Markets chief
executive explained that a
large portion of the new fund-
ing would be used to re-start
the supermarket chain’s
import programme, which in
turn would enhance gross
profits and margins, and pro-
vide Bahamian consumers
with an expanded, sought-after
product range on a consistent
basis.

“We probably support the
Bahamian wholesale, distribu-
tion association more than
anyone else,” Mr Chatrani
told Tribune Business. “Due
to tight cash flow, our imports
[of food products] have been
restricted.

“But we’re planning to
relaunch the company. It’s sta-
ble, money is coming in and
we’re going back to direct
import programmes. That
gives us better margins and
better pricing.”

City Markets’ financial woes
during its 2007 and 2008 finan-
cial years, and the fiscal 2009



first half, have left it strapped
for cash flow/liquidity, forcing
the supermarket chain to
increasingly rely on Bahamas-
based wholesalers for the bulk
of its supplies because it was
unable to tie-up large chunks
of cash in imports.

Mr Chatrani told Tribune
Business that Bahamas Super-
markets currently sources
“less than 10 per cent” of its
product inventory from
abroad “because we were fix-
ing the business”. Once the
financing comes in, this will
increase to 20 per cent of the
product mix.

“The funds coming in have
been specifically allocated for
the overseas import pro-
gramme,” he explained.
“Improving direct imports will
be the springboard for us at
this stage.

“We get these products, but
they’re not always available.
Sales will start to expand,
gross profits and margins will
increase, and costs are man-
aged. We can grow by direct
imports.”

Praising Bahamian whole-
salers and other vendors for
their “fantastic” support dur-
ing, Mr Chatrani said their
limited warehouse storage
space had impacted the con-
sistent availability, and vari-
ety, of high-end products such

Legal Notice

NOTICE
ORRSTOWN

INVESTMENT PTE. LTD.

(In Voluntary Liquidation)

Notice is hereby given that the above-named
Company is in dissolution, which commenced
on the 29th day of April 2009. The Liquidator is
Argosa Corp. Inc., P.O. Box N-7757 Nassau,

Bahamas.

ARGOSA CORP. INC.
(Liquidator)

Legal Notice

NOTICE
VINOPOLIS HOLDINGS LTD.

(In Voluntary Liquidation)

Notice is hereby given that the above-named
Company is in dissolution, which commenced
on the 27th day of April 2009. The Liquidator is
Argosa Corp. Inc., P.O. Box N-7757 Nassau,

Bahamas.

ARGOSA CORP. INC.
(Liquidator)

GY

cr A LL”

BISX LISTED & TRADED SECURITIES AS OF:

FG CAPITAL MARKETS

BEORERAGE & ADVISORY SERVICES

as the gourmet category. With
direct imports, some 2,900
SKUs (stock keeping units)
will “get back to us on the
shelves consistently”.

The City Markets chief
executive said the company’s
sales were likely to decline to
between $120-$125 million for
the 2009 fiscal year to end-
June 2009, due to a combina-
tion of the economic recession
and the company’s own inter-
nal issues.

While this represented a
decline of between 13.2-17 per
cent compared to the top-line
figure for 2008, Mr Chatrani
said that Bahamas Supermar-
kets had largely bought the
increased business that year
through deep discounts, which
left the company selling prod-
uct at a loss.

As a result, gross profit mar-
gins for that year fell to 17.8
per cent. Mr Chatrani said
these had recovered to 25.4
per cent within the past quar-
ter, and the company was
looking to get back to histori-
cal margins of 28 per cent plus
as soon as possible.

He added that managemen-
t’s projections were that
Bahamas Supermarkets would
again “break even” by the last
month of fiscal 2009, which is

June, and return to profitabil-
ity by July - the first month of
fiscal 2010. Everything,
though, hinged on the receipt
of the new capital, as the com-
pany had gone as far as it
could be taken in the current
circumstances.

Despite the $13.429 million
loss incurred in fiscal 2008, Mr
Chatrani expressed confidence
that City Markets would
return to the position it had
attained prior to BSL Hold-
ings’ $54 million purchase of
Winn-Dixie’s 78 per cent stake
in 2006, when it was churning
out consistent $8 million per
annum net profits.

“We can get back to where
we were before, but it will take
us two to three years to get to
that level,” he added.

Mr Chatrani said he and Ms
Rahming had already realised
$5.3 million in annualised cost
savings from the business, not
one-off items, through reduc-
ing costs tied-up in the likes
of shipping and cleaning con-
tracts.

Bahamas Supermarkets was
also saving money from having
imported produce shipped
directly to its three Grand
Bahama-based stores, rather
than to Nassau first, then to
Freeport.



NOTICE

NOTICE is hereby given that DARRELL SIMILIAN of
HARBOUR WEST, EIGHT MILE ROCK, FREEPORT, GRAND
BAHAMA is applying to the Minister responsible for Nationality
and Citizenship, for registration/naturalization as a citizen of
The Bahamas, and that any person who knows any reason why
registration/ naturalization should not be granted, should send a
written and signed statement of the facts within twenty-eight days
from the 14TH day of MAY, 2009 to the Minister responsible for
Nationality and Citizenship, P.O.Box N-7147, Freeport, Bahamas.

Legal Notice

NOTICE
RHUBARBE LTD.

— —

Notice is hereby given that in accordance with Section 138

(8) of the International Business Companies Act 2000, the
dissolution of RHUBARBE LTD. has been completed; a

Certificate of Dissolution has been issued and the Com-

pany has therefore been struck off the Register.

ARGOSA CORP. INC.
(Liquidator)

Legal Notice

NOTICE
YENLEY VIEW

INVESTMENTS LTD

(In Voluntary Liquidation)

Notice is hereby given that the above-named
Company is in dissolution, which commenced
on the 27th day of April 2009. The Liquidator is
Argosa Corp. Inc., P.O. Box N-7757 Nassau,

Bahamas.

TUESDAY, 12 MAY 2009
BISX ALL SHARE INDEX: CLOSE 1,613.91 | CHG 0.15 | %CHG 0.01 | YTD -98.45 | YTD % -5.75
FINDEX: CLOSE 797.33 | YTD -4.50% | 2008 -12.31%
WWW .BISXBAHAMAS.COM | TELEPHONE: 242-323-2330 | FACSIMILE: 242-323-2320

52wk-Low Securit y Previous Close Today's Close Change Daily Vol. EPS $ Div $ P/E

1.28 Abaco Markets 1.40 1.40 0.127

11.00 Bahamas Property Fund 11.00 11.00 0.992

6.95 Bank of Bahamas 6.95 6.95 0.244
Benchmark -0.877
Bahamas Waste 0.078
Fidelity Bank 0.055
Cable Bahamas 1.406
Colina Holdings 0.249
Commonwealth Bank (S1) 0.419
Consolidated Water BDRs
Doctor's Hospital
Famguard
Finco
FirstCaribbean Bank
Focol (S)
Focol Class B Preference
Freeport Concrete
ICD Utilities
J. S. Johnsen 10.50 10.50
Premier Real Estate 10.00 10.00

BISX LISTED DEBT SECURITIES - (Bonds trade on a Percentage Pricing bases)
Security Symbol Last Sale Change Daily Vol.

Fidelity Bank Note 17 (Series A) + 0.00 T%
Fidelity Bank Note 22 (Series B) + 0.00 Prime + 1.75%
Fidelity Bank Note 13 (Series C) + 0.00 8 7%
Fidelity Bank Note 15 (Series D) +

ARGOSA CORP. INC.
(Liquidator)

0.63
3.15
1.95
11.09
2.83
6.17
1.31
1.70
6.02
11.00
10.35
5.00

0.63
3.15
2.37
11.75
2.83
6.17
2.50
1.85
7.76
11.00
10.40
5.14

0.63
3.15
2.37
11.75
2.83
6.17
3.38
1.70
7.76
11.00
10.40
5.14

0.111
0.240
0.420
0.322
0.794
0.332
0.000
0.035
0.407
0.952
0.180

Legal Notice

NOTICE
MISTY INVESTMENT

GROUP LTD.

(In Voluntary Liquidation)

99909999009900000
29299023%090900009
665560H56556550654

1.00 N/M
0.30
5.50
8.60
10.00

1.00
0.30
5.59

1.00
0.30 a
5.59 13.7
11.0
55.6
S2wk-Hi 52wk-Low Interest
1000.00
1000.00
1000.00
1000.00

Maturity
19 October 2017
19 October 2022
30 May 2013
29 May 2015

FBB17
FBB22
FBB13 100.00
FBB15 100.00 0.00
Fidelity Over-The-Counter Securities
Bid $ Ask $ Last Price
14.60
4.00 6.25 6.00
0.35 0.40 0.35
Colina Over-The-Counter Securities
30.13 31.59 29.00
0.45 0.55 0.55
BISX Listed Mutual Funds
NA Vv YTD% Last 12 Months
1.3664 0.95 4.77
2.8962 -1.49 -3.35
1.4590 1.77 5.09
3.1964 -5.59 -13.64
12.7397 0.96 5.79
100.5606
96.4070
1.0000
9.1599
1.0440 0.80
1.0364 0.33
1.0452 0.76
MARKET TERMS
YIELD - last 12 month dividends divided by closing price
Bid $ - Buying price of Colin: nd Fidelity

100.00
100.00

Prime + 1.75%

EPS $
-0.041
0.000
0.001

Div $ P/E
0.300
0.480
0.000

52wk-Low Symbol
Bahamas Supermarkets
Caribbean Crossings (Pref)

RND Holdings

Weekly Vol.

f.92 8.42

Notice is hereby given that the above-named
Company is in dissolution, which commenced
on the 4th day of May 2009. The Liquidator is
Argosa Corp. Inc., P.O. Box N-7757 Nassau,

Bahamas.

4.540
0.002

0.000
0.000

ABDAB
RND Holdings

Fund Name Div $ Yield %
Colina Bond Fund
Colina MSI Preferred Fund
Colina Money Market Fund
Fidelity Bahamas G & I Fund
Fidelity Prime Income Fund
CFAL Global Bond Fund
CFAL Global Equity Fund
CFAL High Grade Bond Fund
Fidelity International Investment Fund
FG Financial Preferred Income Fund
FG Financial Growth Fund
FG Financial Diversified Fund

28-Feb-09
31-Mar-09
1-May-09
31-Mar-09
28-Feb-09
31-Dec-08
31-Dec-08
31-Dec-07
31-Mar-09
9-Feb-09
9-Feb-09
9-Feb-09

1.3041
2.9230
1.3883
3.1964
12.1564
100.0000
96.4070
1.0000
9.0950
1.0000
1.0000
1.0000

0.56
-3.59

0.00

0.71

0.56
-3.59
0.00
-12.76
4.40
3.64
4.40

BISX ALL SHARE INDEX - 19 Dec 02 = 1,000.00
52Wk-Hi - Highest closing price in last 52 weeks

ighted price for daily volume
Weekly Vol. - Tre

reported earings per share for the last 12 mths
NAV - Net Asset Value
N/M - Not Meanin gtul
FINDEX - The Fidelity Bahamas Stock Index. January 1, 1994 = 100

om day to day
traded today
he last 12 months
P/E - Closing price divided by the last 12 month earnin: gs
(S) - 4-for-1 Stock Split - Effective Date 8/8/2007
(S1) - 3-for-1 Stock Split - Effective Date 7/11/2007
TO TRADE CALL: COLINA 242-502-7010 | ROYALFIDELITY 242-356-7764 | FG CAPITAL MARKETS 242-396-4000 | COLONIAL 242-502-7525

ARGOSA CORP. INC.
(Liquidator)


PAGE 12B, THURSDAY, MAY 14, 2009

DEVELOPMENT FOR SALE
MARINA & SEAFOOD PROCESSING PLANT
ALLIGATOR BAY, NORTH LONG ISLAND

Approx. 6 acres of Waterfront property with a 152 feet wide canal.

Property comprises three buildings:

Building A: Seafood Processing Plant include a reception area, an
office, three bathrooms, a receiving room, a dressing room,
a packing room, a storage room, a laboratory and a
processing room, (3) 10 ft x 30 ft blast freezers, and (1)
15ft x 15 ftand (1) 10 ft x15 ft holding freezers.

Building B: Generator House

Building C: The Water Plant consists of a reverse osmosis water
system that converts salt water into drinking water with

a 10,000 storage capacity.

Interested persons should submit offers to:
The Manager, Credit Risk Management, P. O. Box N-7518,

Nassau, Bahamas

To reach us on or before June 12, 2009

For further information, please contact us at
502-0929, 356-1685 or 356-1608



Securities Dealers (NASD).

ment funds.”

m@ NEW YORK

A SLUMP in the stock mar-
ket helped drag energy prices
lower Wednesday despite data
showing U.S. crude supplies
shrank for the first time in 10
weeks, according to Associat-
ed Press.

Benchmark crude for June
delivery fell 83 cents to settle
at $58.02 a barrel on the New
York Mercantile Exchange.
In London, Brent prices
increased 36 cents to $58.30 a
barrel on the ICE Futures
exchange.

“T think a lot of people just
stepped back and looked at
the big picture,” Mike Zarem-
bski, senior commodity ana-
lyst at brokerage OptionsX-
press Inc.

Prices for retail gasoline

Attorney
successfully
completes
Series 6

AN ATTORNEY with Graham Thomp-
son & Company, Aliya G. Allen, has suc-
cessfully completed the Series 6 Exam in
Florida after studying at the Nassau-based
Securities Training Institute (STI).

The Series 6 qualifying exam is adminis-
tered by the New York Stock Exchange
(NYSE) and the National Association of

Ms. Albury, course administrator at STI,
said: “This internationally recognised qual-
ification equips Bahamian professionals
with the knowledge and skills necessary
to administer, manage and advise on invest-

Ms Allen is pictured (right)

have been rising across the
country and they did so again
overnight after the AAA
reported that more Americans
would hit the road this Memo-
rial Day. It would be the first
time that has happened in four
years.

Researchers say Americans
are taking advantage of com-
paratively cheap gasoline after
staying home in recent years
as prices surged. The national
average price for gasoline rose
nearly 87 percent between
2005 and 2008.

Retail gas prices rose to a
new national average of
$2.267 a gallon overnight,
according to auto club AAA,
Wright Express and Oil Price
Information Service. Prices
are still $1.465 a gallon cheap-
er than a year ago.



THE TRIBUNE



Oil prices fall despite
drop in US supplies

The enormous amount of
crude, gasoline and natural gas
in storage has kept prices in
check. Despite a drop of 4.7
million barrels last week,
crude in U.S. storage houses is
the most since 1990.

Meanwhile, U.S. refineries,
which make gasoline, pulled
back on production last week,
according to the government.
That has helped put a floor
under prices, which have tum-
bled because businesses and
consumers are spending much
less on energy this year.

In other Nymex trading,
gasoline for June delivery rose
2.31 cents to $1.691 a gallon
and heating oil was flat at
$1.5063 a gallon. Natural gas
for June delivery climbed 3.8
cents to $4.487 per 1,000 cubic
feet.

The Bahamas Institute of Financial Services

THEME:

Financial Services

BEYOND BORDERS

May 19 21, 2009

Sandals Royal Bahamian Resort & Spa, Cable Beach

ferodeteney,
MORMEMS: 20:00 LEA pen
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Nnensed Cholkengee” THA & Ofome

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Chel Baraid. 11 =,
ihe Won Fry. Ban

dal oma
| ewan Pode 22re, =

Bel ei con

Ex Saupe ts oe wa Reamity?

cobs Cees Pee

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=

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Fhersasctons

MRADMGe 20500 - Lso0 pen

“4 a umell rm ests Dovmlen) lie. a apace
Spanier

errr 2 =r. eT ai werd

BEE WEE

C. MAIN a =e . A ee

SLLE POLL 5

LUAICHEON: 12-30 2-00 pm

“Finns hal Beers. Baye Baal.”
Spcuker: Wondy Warren ThA. 4,

Le a es Pee

LURICHEON: 12:30 - 2900) pis
“Uri pee bce Toor eed Tnanool
Beez
sees: Thee Aen ¥ince nt eee

be alla Lt see 2 t:

LUNCHECRE 12:20 - 2500 pen
heel eee ee el Pee
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AFTRA: 2230 - 4:30 pin
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F ay


PAGE 2, THURSDAY, MAY 14, 2009

Card of Thanks for

Yhe Late dnita Elliott
1927-2009

Ie the famuly of te late Anita Elliott expresses our thanks to the
many rélaliver and friends for your prayers and support during our
fine of bereavement.

Your kindness is deeply abprectated and wall always be
remembered boy ws,

May (Cred condime to Bless yo!

The Family

THE RT.
REVEREND
WILLIAM
GRANT

First Jurisdictional Prelate of
The Church of God in Christ (COGIC)
Bahamas Jurisdiction

It has been one year although it seems as yesterday
yet you were missed everyday.
Our families love, special thanks, thoughts and prayers
goes out to all those who have been supportive and helpful to
us in any way during the past year in our immediate loss.

Bishop Charles E. Blake,

Presiding Bishop COGIC Inc. and the International Church,
Bishops Carlis Moody, Martin Luther Johnson and Matthew Williams;
Bishop Tony L. Hanna Current Bahamas Jurisdictional Prelate
of COGIC & Bahamas Jurisdiction

With special love
From: Mother Cynthia Grant
& The Family



THE TRIBUNE OBITUARIES

g st 14th, 1991

May I 2th, 2008

.
Khodee. ijeibeenrameamcince
you leroinedinssiulenenaday,
Jo behwithiooullaliakonenetjour
come ae
MecnInche ta nag nim aul e js
aOR ie He end ite
MS Fene ena inela hm OUIneMUGtie IOUT TE ee

OUI veep mC Ls hi ee
GEG Remedi chef oo Py 6 fea inal

, Ae

Born: October 20th, 1929
Died: May I3th, 2007

Gone bul not fergaien

Sadly missed by your loving wife, Maureen Rahming;
children, Roosevelt, Diane, Earl Augustus
and Monique Rahming; grandchildren, Earvin, Javon,
Cameron, Earl, Avery, Andre and Ennis Rahming
and Roniqu; daughters-in-law, sisters-in-law,
brothers-in-law, nieces and nephews
and other relatives.
THE TRIBUNE OBITUARIES

Card of Thanks for



Norma Brennen 1945 - 2008

Gone but not forgotten

Thank you and in loving memory
As we remember our mother, with the one
year anniversary of her passing we the
children and grandchildren of Norma
Brennen would like to express our most
heartfelt thanks.

We could not have endured the most
difficult point of time in our lives without
the love and support from all of our moth-

er's friends, church
families, neighbors, relatives and our dear
friends. It was your visits, prayers and
phone calls which made her passing
bearable. These acts of generosity and love
we will forever treasure in our hearts.

With great love, thank you.
May God continue to richly bless you all.

The Family

#2 Tonique Williams-Darling Highway
P.O, Box EE-16634 ° Tel: (242) 361-2569/361-8612 * Fax: (242) 361-1856
Mobile: (242) 457-1491 or (242) 477-2034 * Evening: 324-4687

ANGELA WRIGHT-
STUART, 90

of Williams Lane, off Kemp

Road and formerly of Barraterre,

Exuma who died on Sunday,

May 3rd, 2009 will be held on

Saturday, May 16th, 2009 at

10:00am at The New Mount Zion

Missionary Baptist Church, Blue

Hill Road, South. Officiating will |Â¥

be Bishop Andrew O. Stewart,

assisted by other Ministers. Interment will follow in the
Woodlawn Gardens Cemetery, Soldier Road.

Left to cherished memories are her Sister: Elder Edithmae
Taylor; (17) Nephews: Luther Sr., Vivian & Lawrence
Taylor Jr., Pastor Havard, Elder John Sr. & Jack Wright,
Leviticus Parton, Granville & Rolston McKenzie, Rev.
Alfred, Rev. Andrew & Rev. Timothy Stewart, Wellington,
Fredrick & Benjamin Stewart, Shervin & Steven Stuart;
(23) Nieces: Monica Taylor, Janice Rolle, Ravana
Duncombe, Myrtis Gibson, Maryann Sands, Emminitha &
Marina Burrows, Vernice Wright, Joycelyn Smith, Madelyn
Hanna, Inekah Finlayson, Euterpie & Addrianne Munroe,
Sylvia Swain, Brenda, Sylvia, Lisa & Sharon McKenzie,
Elder Alma Knowles, Susan Moss, Evelyn Adderley,
Laverne Stewart, Margaret & Louis Stuart; A host of other
relatives and friends including: Bradley & Gail Kemp,
Gregory Davis, Lisa Kemp, Linda Colebrooke, Nadine
Miller, Carla Charlton, Monique, Nicola, Nehemiah &
Shawn Davis, Debbieann Jones, Stanley Sturrup, Andrea
& Sharon Gibson, Debbie & Wendy Stubbs, Janice Stewart,
Elder Philip Sands, Pastor Philip Stubbs, George Gibson,
Lucy Wright, Thomasina Dean, the Twilight Home for the
elderly family, the officers and members of Corner Stone
Zion Church International, the officers and members of
Mount Zion Missionary Baptist Church, the entire Pinewood
Gardens & Williams Lane communities.

Viewing will be held on Friday, May 15th at Clarke’s
Funeral Home #10 Tonique Williams-Darling Highway
from 10:00am to 6:00pm and on Saturday at 9:00am until
service time.


PAGE 4, THURSDAY, MAY 14, 2009

THE TRIBUNE OBITUARIES

and Crematouum Limited

FREEPORT
11A East Coral Road, Freeport, G.B., Bahamas
P.O. Box F-42312
Telephone: (242) 373-1115 / (242) 373-1471
Pager: (242) 340-8043 « Fax: (242) 373-3005

NASSAU
Robinson and Soldier Roads, Nassau, N.P., Bahamas
P.O. Box CB-12072
Telephone: (242) 394-8043 / (242) 394-8047
Pager: (242) 340-8043 * Fax: (242) 340-8034

FUNERAL SERVICE FOR

| and Crematorium Limited, 11-A East Coral Road, Freeport, Grand Bahama
: on Friday from 10:00 a.m. to 6:00 p.m. and at the church on Saturday from
9:30 a.m. until service time.

LAWRENCE
SAUNDERS, 69

of #32 Abaco Drive, Hawksbill, Grand

Bahama will be held on Saturday, May 16,

2009 at 11:00 a.m. at St. John’s Jubilee :
Cathedral, Settler’s Way, Freeport, Grand
Bahama. Officiating will be Bishop Godfrey
Williams assisted by Rev. Godfrey Green. }
Interment will follow in the Grand Bahama

Memorial Park, Frobisher Drive, Freeport,
Grand Bahama.

Left to cherish his fond and precious memories are his wife: Martha Saunders;
sons: Lawrence, Jeremiah, and Wallace Saunders; daughters: Deborah
Saunders Delancy, Barbara Saunders Beckles, Cara and Jessica Saunders;
grandchildren: Kim and Karen Jones, Colin, Jamaal and Jamaine Delancy, ;

Renwood Rolle, Lenice, Lenette and Letoya Pinder, Lawrence Saunders Jr.,

Randy Darling, Lawrese, Owein and Walley Saunders, Jeremiah Saunders

Jr., Bianco, Gwendolyn and Britling Saunders, Malik Rigby, Jestina, Jesthea : ; 2 3 : ;
: : : . | Left to cherish his memories are his: adopted daughter: Natasha Davis;
and Kewnaiyl Bethan, Dinas 99 Beat, Garth Dain Gis EEamanies Wan; : Father: Benjamin B. Davis; two brothers: Joseph and Silvin Davis; four

3 : : . . : .” i sisters: Sandra McKenzie, Helen Forbes, Joy and Cecile Davis; adopted
De Mang Elete, Daskawn Delaney; anit’ Bole, corde Batis Pau i sister: Mavis Woods; seven aunts: Verlta Davis, Willimae Dawkins, Lorraine

. ‘ -. ¢ Farrington, Arementa McKenzie, Beverly Davis, Inez and Elise Knowles;
Burnell Wildgoose, Carnetta Allen, Janet Roberts, Bernadette Mitchell, Gloria | four uncles: Hershel Davis, Leonard Knowles, George Mok enzie and Benjani

: ? Dawkins; eleven nieces: Grethel and Tiffany Davis, Francesca Forbes, Keisha
Carolyn and Tiffany Strachan, Teon and Renae Butler, Latasha and Leresa : 2? ; : ae cee
Cochran and Janeva Roberts; nephews: Orthanell, Ashwell, Rev. Joel and : and Christine Davis, Sable Cox, Brittany Davis, Lasaha McKenzie, Kimberly

Harry Saunders, Rev. John McIntosh, Hubert and Trevor Butler, Chris, Bill Topeda, Dennis, ‘Tyrone and Silvin Davis Je., Richard Cox Jr., Denard Forbes

Ametrius, Nishka, and Kaydrie Wildgoose, Rose Kemp, La’Quay Kemp- ; and Tyler Humes; brothers-in-law: Sterlin McKenzie and Sherman Forbes;

Kelly, Deandre, Lecy and Delecia Roberts, Jakia Allen, Ashnell and Shanty

Saunders, Shany Gibson, Buffy Mitchell, Faith Saunders, Patrona, Johnette Tees : a
and Engue Melosh, Ronette; Tina and Tanya Roberts BngetsandLatanya | GeOTge and Ball Willnore Hendley and Dike, En, Mile and Roehl
Bemp; grandasphews? Wellitigvott (God sou); Wesley, Eval Rt ends ie Carey, Misty Davis, Keith, Kendal, Kirk, and Leonard Jr., Tamera Moss,

Mark, Jeremy and Joshua Saunders, Jahaze and Jamal Mitchell, Sidney and i Trinette Martin, Barbara Thurston, Porshca Rolle, Phillip, Davis, Michael and
Javaras McIntosh, Travas Saunders, Ludale Roberts and Ricardo Kelly; ; Pleasant Dawkins, Genevieve Simmis, Pastor Stephen Knowles and Judith
daughters-in-law: Nancy Solano Saunders and Janet Otize Saunders; sons- | 20d the congregation at Strong Tower Church and a host of other relatives
in-law: Boss Delancy and Leslie Beckles; sisters-in-law: Catherine McDonald | and friends including: Somia Miller, Jennifer Ingraham, Leonard Scott, John
and Essa Knight; brothers-in-law: Williams Humes, Glen Curry and Hansel pean Da sue eee oe ey tue i boone Sie ie
Kemp; nieces-in-law: Verdell and Abby Saunders Enett McIntosh, Eleanor : abies Major, Seroy Brawn Srinang Siler, parbara ane Jeriey Soul
Saunders; nephews-in-law: Rev. Huden Roberts, Marzel Kemp, Ruben : no Moss, ee eae eee ae ae on
: ‘ : ‘ i the congregation at Zion Baptist Cathedral Church, Murphy Town, Dundas
Wadgocse, Bany Allen, Ruben and Dayid Couper, 32 great prandilieces, i Town, Rev. Dr. Peter and Joyce Pinder and the entire congregation at Zion
A : . pee ? Baptist Church, Freeport, Grand Bahama. Special thanks to the Doctors, nurses

workers and a host of other relatives and friends including: the Saunders : and E.M.S. at the Rand Hospital and Princess Margaret Hospital, Grand

Water Cay and Turks and Caicos, the entire Hawksbill community, Hunter’s Bahama Taxi Union and Staff, The entire Staff at N.I-B and the city of Freeport.

Pentecostal Church of God family, Abundance Life Ministry family of Turks :
and Caicos, Cheryl Cole of Tampa, Fla., Giah Smith of Nassau, Barbara :
Adams of Turks and Caicos, the F.N.M. family. Special thanks to the Rand :
Memorial and Princess Margaret Hospital Medical and Surgical Team. :

i 8:30 a.m. until service time.

Viewing will be held in the “Perpetual Suite” of Restview Memorial Mortuary |

great grandchildren: Paul Cartwright, Renard Rolle, Je’?Cannya, Garland,
Williams Jr., Trevor Forbes, Gerrad Whylly Jr. and Adrian Lester; nieces:

Darville, Maggie McDonald, Anita Cooper, Essa Williams, Cindy Cooper,

and Kevin Humes, Don and Charles Strachan and Ferral Lewis; grandnieces:

Kemp, Ricky, Warren, Jerry and Mickey Saunders, Rev. Demetrius Wildgoose,

27 great grandnephew, 550 cousin, special friends: Ralph Black and co-

family of Bimini, Abaco, Andros, San Salvador, Eleuthera, Exuma, Nassau,

HILTON “Spy”
DAVIS, 54

of #431 Cove House, Freeport, Grand Bahama
and formerly of Murphy Town, Abaco will
be held on Saturday, May 16, 2009 at 10:00
a.m. at Zion Baptist Church, East Sunrise
Highway, Freeport, Grand Bahama.
Officiating will be Rev. Dr. Peter Pinder
assisted by Rev. Zendal Carey. Interment will
follow in the Grand Bahama Memorial Park
Section #2, Frobisher Drive, Freeport, Grand
Bahama.

Davis, Schumir McKenzie and Leanne Woodside; eight nephews: Rudy,

Sister-in-law: Addie Davis; Cousins: Ida Swain, Kenneth Knowles, Lena
Ferguson, Leta Dames, Fritz Bootle, Doriline Rolle, Judy Dawkins, Roswell,

Viewing will be held in the ilrenic Suitef of Restview Memorial Mortuary
and Crematorium Limited, 11-A East Coral Road, Freeport, Grand Bahama
on Friday from 10:00 a.m. to 6:00 p.m. and at the church on Saturday from


THE TRIBUNE OBITUARIES

and Crematouum Limiled

REEPORT
114A East — Koa, pg ot G.B., Bahamas

Ou Memorial Morluary

NASSAU
Robinson and a Roads, Nassau, N.P., Bahamas
‘ox CB-12072
Telephone: aah 304 8043 / (242) 394-8047

A inicarret on) um is s/t (042) 373-1471
Pager: (24. Pager: (242) 340-8043 ¢ Fax: (242) 340-8034

2) 340-8043 « Fax: (242) 373-3005

Funeral Service For

CLAUDIA VIRGINIA

COOPER-McNEILL,
The first Miss Grand Bahama, 62

of #102 Mustard Close, Freeport,
Grand Bahama will be held on
Saturday, May 16, 2009 at 11:00
a.m. at Faith National Church of
God, Lewis Yard, Grand Bahama.
Officiating will be Rev. Lenwood
Knowles. Interment will follow in
the Grand Bahama Memorial Park
Section #2, Frobisher Drive,
Freeport, Grand Bahama.

Left to cherish her memories are her 5 children: Craig Ash
of Greenacres, Florida, Shuna Ash of Chicago, Illinois, Dr.
Duranda Ash, Della McMillan of San Jose, California and
Chris Wells of Nassau, Bahamas; 3 grandchildren: Adonia
Ash, Eden Ash and Weston McMillan; adopted sister: Marie
Adderley; 3 brothers: Bennet and Joseph Cooper and Prince
Hall of Rock Sound, Eleuthera; 2 nieces: Diane Johnson of
Nassau and Emerald Cooper; 4 nephews: Randall,
Rueben, Lindberg and Ronnie Cooper; 2 aunts: Dolly Pople
and Lee Gloria Lesbotte; 1 uncle: Rod Hall of Abaco; daughter-
in-law: Jennie Ash; sons-in-law: Will Gay and Greg McMillan;
sister-in-law: Sheila Cooper; cousins: Dolores Sherman,
Lenora Elliot, Patricia Jarvis, Nurse Roseline Johnson, Anita
Cooper, Gurth Knowles, Dorothy Rodgers, Yvette Cambridge
and Patrick Murphy of Nassau, Margaret Mullings, Darlene
Boelke, Arlene and Michelle Spence, Salina Gibson, Rod
Hall, Denise Pinder, Dennis Britton, Hope Britton, Charlie and
Angela Burnside, Ketsie Burnside-Allen, Judy Britton-Curry,
Rudy Williams, Glenda Pople, Gilda Saunders, Denice
Thompson, Debbie Smith, Kendall Fowler, Jonathan Sweeting,
Emile and Adriann Lesbotte, Ricardo Pinder,
Veronique 'Nikki' Martin, Anaskha Dean, Chris and Mikey
Cartwright, Lisa Ferguson, Ralph, Terry, Dion & Louise
Hall, Nurse Sylvia Davis, Jonathan Davis, Shufel Russell, Dyce
Strachan, Kingsley Cooper, Gardenia Hepburn, Dorothy Cooper-
Knowles, Christopher Cooper, Stephanie Cooper, Arnold
Cooper, Pauline Cooper-Nairn, Rowena Cooper-Albury, Loftann
and Lofton Cooper Jr., Friends Nancy, Blanche Campbell,
Angie Cartwright, Minna Outten, Judy Wells, Irene Burrows,
Lillian Ferguson, and many of the staff of the Princess Casino.

Viewing will be held in the iSerenity Suitei of Restview
Memorial Mortuary and Crematorium Limited, 11-A East
Coral Road, Freeport, Grand Bahama on Friday from 10:00
a.m. to 6:00 p.m. and at the church on Saturday from 9:30 a.m.
until service time.

and Crematouum Limiled

FREEPORT NAESAL
C14 Foe itor gre i CA. Fariaians

Ot Memorial Moluary

Aobineon 2nd Scidler Adds, Maseau, MF, Bohm
Pack, Borg CH -1 202
Talaptraras: (22) HY Sat

lebquaere: tics os 7 [ rain 2147) ay
Prope Cd ck «Fas SS) an Bd

Teper: (iad) 4G. WH Tare: FE

en Notices For

Marine Mechanic of
the R.B.D.F
GIOVANEY

TRISTAN DEAL, 20

ot Coral Harbour, Coral
Tleights died at the Princess
Margaret Hospital on May
1th, 2009.

He is survived by his mother: Bridgette Coquillon Nee
Butler: father: George Deal; step father: Emmanuel:
stepmother: Nicolette Deal: brothers: Edward, Devante,
Elton: uncles: Franklyn Rolle, Anthony Rolle, Decosda
Rolle, Gadtrev lliggs, Vernon, Roy, Fred, Franklyn
Cox, Arthur, Edmund and Lincoln Deal: aunts:
Margaret, Marilyn, Juliet, Terry. Rochelle, Dimples,
Beatrice, Estelle Higgs, Beverley Lewis, Paula Leon,
Gertrude Wright, Gloria Cox, and Anna Storr.

Funeral Announcements will be announced at a later
date.

MS. MAYRICKA
FLOWERS, 51
Of Sandy Point, Abaco died at The Princess Margaret

Hospital, Nassau, New Providence on Monday, Muay
11, 2004,

Fiumeral arrangements will be announced ut u later date.

bay

ahs Is wees aN
open Ve Bae ao ee oS
ape va * wet


PAGE 6, THURSDAY, MAY 14, 2009

FREEPORT
114 Bost Cor! Rood, Freeport, &.8., Bahamas
P.O. Box Fed zal
Telophrone: (242) 373-1115 / (242) 373-1471
Pangan: (242) 340-6043 = Fox: (242) 373-3005

THE TRIBUNE OBITUARIES

NASSALI
Rabinson and Soldier Rood, Nossau, N.F., Boros
P.G. Bor CB-1 2OF2
Talaphone: (242) 394-8043 / (242) 394-8047
Poor: (242) MMO-8043 = Fem: (202) 340-6084

Oe 2 ICE FOR

Fall Military Funeral Service
for the late Police Constable 3124
RAYSHANO MARVIN

SMITH, 22

Davis assisted by Pastor Charles T-.

Dorsect and Father Stephen Davis, and :
Internment will follow in the Lakeview Memorial Gardens John F. :

Kenedy Drive,

Left to Cherish all the wonderful Memories are: Mother: Pauline
Bastian Smith Father: Domance Smith (Vre-Deceased) Father Figure
/ Mentor: Chief Tnspechar Tauther Smith Grandparents? Relired Police |

Inspector Anthony & Sheila [astian Isaac Sanith Loncles: Lathan,
Loxsley, Lynden and Lystra Bastian. Anthony, Maxwell, Angelo,

Kendrick and Marquis Smith. Lundy Robinson & Father Mervyn |
Johnson, and Alfred Taylor Aunts: Monique Clairol and Lesa Bastian, |
Eimberly Bastian Smith, Catherine Taylor, Ernestine Williams, Cora:
Johnson, Sharen Robinson, Gwenith and Chegera Smith, Veronica |

Moore,’ Michelle Butler and Elise Hall Grand aunts: Sheba Bowe,

Anloinciie Whitheld, Teresa Forbes, Jela Tumquest, Wiens, Pat ane
Glenor Darville, Eenily, Francis, Leeistine and Mujorie Dastian, Fululee |
ain Cirandtncles:? Sargent Robert and Enoch Garville, Reginald |
Forbes, Hayward Bowe, Fredrick Whitficld, Zebedee, Paul and |
| She survivesl by three suns, Osler Raytounyil, Taverne Pierry-Lauis,
Lysura Jr. Leslie, and Lanae Gasuan, Opal an Muniquekell Farnqubarseri

Nathaniel Bastian Cousins: Angelo, Tashan, Tasha, Tathaniel,t

and ‘Lakara € handler, Ednckat Simmons and Quinni Greene, Cryscal,

Waverley and Mario Bastian,* Irene, Dexter, Ruben, Ishmael, Martin,
Jill, Mageie, Judith, Fitika, Maree and Dennis Bain, Jana Bastian,
Linck, Niketa, Gurthand Chet Smoth, Paul Jr. and Shenique Bastian,
Kendnek, Jamal, and Telewia Darville, Alvarers Whitteld, Ratnern,
Delpurcder, Tuvia, Rodari, Puul, Inya, Desiree, Dashinku, Turrara,
Alvadoe, Pamenther. Laron. Leyan. Daniella. Rosie. Lianne. Christine,
Fran, (hare, Lasen, Shakesa, Reynaldo, Adssa, Momique Kain,

Toking, Kencon amd Tesmarnd Towler, Slicer. Wichelle anc A!
Kathe: One aunt Venise and a host of other family members and trends.
Ashley Wilkinson, Stephan Beachy, Kinnard and Stephan GrodMothers: :
Ingrid Hall & Christine Bain GodFathers: Phillip Bosfield & Trevor : ; | te :
Woods Other Relatives and Friends: Father Deangelo Bowe & Family, | Mortuary and Cremtomum Tel. Robinson and Sokher Raids on Satunuvy
[nga Bostwick & Fomily, Leslie Norville & Family, Barret hMeDonald |

& Family, Philip Brown & Family, Marvia GreensladefiRolle & ky service Lire,

Water ard a host of other relatives Special Friends: Sharon Cances,

: Pamly, Clorence Greenslade a& Turnily, Tynelle Tain & Tarnily,

lrskine Ciray & Marnily, Craye Bowe Ae b ‘amily, Kayla Neely d& Farnily,

: Reina Brown & Kamuly, Latoya Burrows & Family, St Augustines
: Colleges Graduating Class of 2004, Police Tounsm Unit, €. 1. Gibson
> Stall & Family, §, C McPherson Stall & Fanuly, The iD Squad (2006)
: & Family, Me. Frank Johnsen & Family, Dr. Clyde Munningst &
: Scaff, The Staff & Family of the Deparcment of Archives, Dr. Gail
© Saunders & Family, Mrs. Inez Smith & Family, Mrs. Edwina Brown
of Mannater Road vill be helelon Friday | & Tamily, Mrs. Lane Lavanty & Pamily, Mr, Reginald Taylor &
May 13th, 2009, 11am, at Zion South
Beach Baptist Church, Zion Boulevard. :
Officiating will be Bishop B. Wenith |

Viewing will he heli in the Seremily Sule al Resiview Mortuary aril

Farnily, Mr. army Thompson & Pianily, Coco, The Collere ol ihe
Bahamas Ataff d& Family.

Crematorium Lid. Rabinsan and Soldier Roads on Thursday tron
LODO am te 6:00) pm and at the Church on Friday from 9:30 am te

: service time.

MARICTA
PIERRE, 59

of Exuma &creer vill be held on Sunday
May I7lh 2009 ab 2:30 pm al Calvary
Haltian Baprist Church, Wese Avenue
Contreville, Oey will be Tx, Wenn
Cher Aime assisted bry Pastor Paul Justin
and Faslor Osler Raymanvil anal
Interment will follow in the Souchern
Cemetery, Conypen un] Spikenuri) Raids,

and Jadotre Pierre: one son-in-law, Clement Yinceot: one daughter

© Daniella Vincent; three daughter-in-lwess, Marie Raymoavil, Cametrice
Shalanda, Andrenique, lan. Stephan. Brandon, Brent and Aaron, Tyrek
Bain, Dairen, Delaney, Deanne. Dakera. Tanya. Maric, Maurice, :

Theree Louis, and Jenny Pierre: six arandsons. Jouvens Raymonvil,
Tavenson, Kensly, Caleb and Nathan Vincent, Jadette “Levi® Pierre;

elght sranddaushters, Nadeise, Shelda and shamyre Ravmonvil,
© Rosemaider, Nouchekuly, Kenedy, Rhonda “Wika”
© Wineenn two brothers. Fernand Pierre, Meret Dieu Echard: to sister
» Cereily Menelas, Mis Laroche; tea sister-in-laws, Ketia Pierre and
: Phanisia Jules; one brother-in-law, Menelas Deshommes ; nine nephews,
Perdinand, evin, Ti Jean, Jimmy, Waloens, Quelegran, Waban, Abner,
© Mathew, Thirteen nieces, Lamannoe. Lavene. Meriene. Merlankedna

~ dusarime, ama Pauline

Moslia, Anme-tose, Jaqueline, heruina, Neaths, Gerlangda, Practame ,

Viewlng will be feld in the Serenity Suite at Restvicw Memorial

from TUA00 am to ost) pm and at the church en Sunday from 1:30 am


THE TRIBUNE OBITUARIES

THURSDAY, MAY 14, 2009,

Bethel Brothers Morticians

Telephone: 322-4433, 326-7030
Nassau Street, P.O.Box N-1026

FUNERAL SERVICES FOR

Memorial Service for
Sybil E. Blyden, 90

of #42 Baldwin Avenue, will be held on Thursday, :
May 14, 7pm at St Michaels Methodist Church, |
| Churchill Avenue, Boyd Subdivision. Rev Philip A. :
Stubbs assisted by other ministers of the Gospel will :

officiate.

Funeral Service for Sybil E. Blyden, age |
| 90 years of#42 Baldwin Avenue, will be held on :
Saturday May 16h, 10.'00 a.m. at St. Michael's |
Methodist Church, Churchill Avenue, Boyd ;
Subdivision, Rev. Philip A. Stubbs assisted by other :
ministers of the Gospel will officiate. Interment will :

follow in the Western Cemetery, Nassau Street.

She is survived by her husband, Percy Blyden,Children: Veta Brown, Calliope Williams,
Persis Hepburn, Dr. Gershwin, Louise and John Blyden; Grandsons: William II, & John ;
Hepburn, Lamon Dean, Gerard Brown, Gershon, Percy & Prince Blyden. Granddaughters: ;
Gravette Brown & Johnneice Blyden, Great Grandchildren: Kyle & Katherine Hepburn; :
Sisters: Myrtle Hanna, Maria Turner, Eloise Saunders, Ruth Nottage, Irma Levarity Brothers: :
Leroy Nicholls, Wallace Nicholls (predeceased Kenneth and Eric Nicolls ) Sons-in-law: ;
Granville Brown, William Hepburn, Sr., Darwin Williams. Daughters-in-law: Princess & :
Donna Blyden. Sisters-in-law: Miriam Symonette, Bonnie Smith, Mary Saunders, Laverne
Smith, Maedon Roberts, Enel Culmer. Brother-in-law: Nathaniel Levarity. Nieces & :
Nephews: Children of Myrtle Hanna E Paul, Marie & Andrew. Children of Leroy Nicholls |
EEugene, Melvern, Sharon, Anthony. Children of Maria Turner, George, Charles, Philip, :
Andrea, Cleomie, Jesse & Karen. Tanya, daughter of Irma Levarity.. Children of the late
Kenneth Nicolls E Everette, Roman, Sheila & Marco. Children of the late Eric Nicolls E ;
Rose, Philip, Perry, Percy, Pam, Patricia, Prescola, Zelma, Janet, Children of the Late ;
Lorraine Saunders, Terrance, Sharon, Joanne, Antoinette, Laverne, Vansharee & Anthony. |
Children of the late Josephine Bain E Sunetta, Arnold, Rhonda, Gaylene, Emily, Patricia ;
& John; Wealthy McMillan, daughter of the late Evelyn Wood; Children of the late Wealthy :
Ellis -Vincent, Paul, Sharlene, Mavis, Nanette Children of the late Irene Ellis E Betsy,
Autrey, Ilene, Dee, Phyllis Letty, Pamula, Bercu, Challis, Tammy, Lonnie, Lathon, Devlon, ;
& Rumalo. Children of Laverne Smith - Tabatha, Carlesa and Carles Williams, Children ;
of Maedon Roberts ECottrice, Primo & Alexandra. Tyrone, Son of Mary Saunders. Children ;
of the Late Robert Smith E Barbara, Tangy & Kendra, Juanita, daughter of Ola Blyden;
Children of Cholesta Blyden E Brave, Genesta & Monique. Sharlene, Children of Miriam ;
Symonette EMichael, Marie-Ann, Alex, Brenda, Rosie, Philip, Peter & Frances. Children :
of the late Joseph Blyden: Charlene, Philip, Tyrone & Julian. Children of the late Wilmott
Blyden E Marilyn, Godwin, Alma, Judy; Pam, the daughter of the late Celcia Minnis, ;
Other Relatives & Friends including: Mr. Charles Rolle care giver, Patricia Archer, James |
& Lolita Nairn, Wenzel Nicholls & Family Christine Fountain, Emerald Winder, Nora }
Dorsett, Barbara and Neville Albury, Theodore & Sheila Lightbourne Gwen McDeigan, ;
Pat Jervis, Naomi Eneas, Mildred McNeil, Vernika Gibson, Iva Ingraham, Euda Poitier, |
Gwen Robertson of Maryland, Rosa Lockwood of Ohio, Patrick, Larry & James (former :
students of the Stapledon School), Jody Morris of Boston, Gloria Taylor and the Johnson;
family of Miami, Carol, Johnny, Saundra and Renee of New York, James & Janet Cartwright, ;

Sir Arlington & Sheila Butler, Pearl Rahming, Beryl Huyler, John & Dorie Bowleg, :
Sharon Sands, Susan & Eric Hepburn, the family of the late Eric Hepburn Sr., Marguerite :
Dahl & Family, Dr. Pandora Johnson, Dolores Hanna, Antoinette Weech, Creola Taylor, ;
Judy Miller, Isadora Moncur, Shirley Braynen, Neville Sawyer & Family, Delores Hanna, |
Gina & Henry Dean, Barbara & Gerald Sawyer, the Burnsides, the Hon. Alfred Sears :
Myrtle Foulkes, Hubert Chipman & Family, Linda Dean & Gary, Erskine Minus, Rodwell ;
Thompson, the families of Baldwin Avenue and Greater Chippingham, Rev. Philip Stubbs }
and the entire St. Michaelis family, Archdeacon I. Ranfurly Brown and the entire St. Agnes :
Church Family, .Fr. Colin Saunders and the entire St. Ambrose Church family, the staff ;
of Bahamasair, Public Hospitals Authority, Eugene Dupuch Law School, Parliamentary ;
Department, Checkcard, staff of the Office of Dr. Gershwin Blyden and the Pan American ;
Health Organization (PAHO),. Special Thanks to: Doctors Kirtland Culmer, Adrian Sawyer,
Merceline Dahl Regis, Karen Rowe, the Staff of the Private Medical and ICU, Accident ;
and Emergency, Emergency Medicine Services, Mrs. Coralie Adderley, Chief Hospital |
Administrator and Members of the Executive Management Committee and all the team ;

at the Princess Margaret Hospital.

Friends may pay their last respects at Bethel Brothers Morticians, #44 Nassau Street on
Friday from 10:00 a.m. to 6:00 p,m. and on Saturday at the’ church from 9:00 a,m. until
service time.

Charles Leon Johnson, 55

=~ of #4 High Vista Drive will be held on Wednesday
>) May 2nd, 11:00 am. at Sf. Anselm's Catholic Church,
-} Bernard Road, Fox Hill. Rev. Monsignor Preston
Moss, Fr. Noel Clarke, Fr. Reginald Demeritte and
Deacon Raymond Forbes will officiate. Interment

will follow in the Church's Cemetery.
He will forever remain in the hearts of: his loving
and devoted Wife, Eulease Stuart-Johnson; Children:
Primrose, Charles II, Crystal, Sanchez and Kristjan
Johnson; Siblings: Helen Johnson, Janet and Derek
Davis, Anthony and Keva McKinney, Andrew
McKinney, Alicia and Harold Brown, Vernita Wright,
Winifred and Michael Thompson, Chester and Gail
Johnson, Sherman and Solomon Johnson; Madison
and Aldece Turnquest, Cindy Major and Racine
Melfort Parents-in-law: Cleveland and Matilda
Stuart; Adopted Mother: Marjorie McKinney, In laws:
Ricardo and Carla Stuart, W. Renae McKay; Christine and Bishop Chadwick James II,
Lindburgh and Laura Stuart, Erica and Terrell Stuart, Effie Burrows, Deborah McKinney
and Janet Turnquest, Mr. and Mrs. Oral Newbold; Uncles: Sam and Madeline Basden and
family, Fr Rodney Burrows and family, Patrick Smith; Aunts: Gwendolyn Brice, Eulease,
Gwenith, Sylvia and Beverley Smith and Alice Stubbs; Nieces and Nephews: Jamal Davis
and family, Alexis and Krishelle McKinney, Val and Bill Wallace, Samantha and Lenny
Bannister, Amanda Johnson, Deandria Beckford, Roscoe, Derrick Johnson, Melvin Hall,
Dwayne and Denario Brown , Melissa Armaly, Greg and Stella Thompson, Angela
Thompson, Shelly Maccow, Tanya Bell, Nicoyas Hilbert, Brynae McKay, Chadwick II,
Chadwin and Chad- Vaughn James, Ricardo Jr. and Rickelle Stuart, Lindburgh Jr, and Linae
Stuart, Brittany, Kendal, Sherman Jr., Matthew, Elizabeth, Daniel, Jordan, Chester Jr,
Solomon Jr, Crystal, Michael, and Alberto Johnson, Extended family: Eugene Palacious
and family, Don and Kay Aranha and family, Hubert and Roxanne Chipman and family,
Lambert and Margaret Campbell and Family, Godwin and Michelle Cargill and family,
Algernon and Lamar Cargill and family, Roscoe and Fabianna Davis and family, Phillip
and Sharlamae Stubbs and family, Elijah and Sherry Brice and family, Melford Clarke
and family, Larry and Candy Farrington and family, Jeffrey and Corrine Major and family,
Eurick and Lisa Dean and family, John Williams and family, Leo Ferguson and family,
Mr and Mrs. Mosely, Whitfield and Cinderella Johnson and family, Afton and Shasta
Moxey and family, Cyril and Mary Taylor and family, Viola and Herbert Lightbourne and
family, Duke and Cynthia Stubbs, Curlene McQueen and family, Ashley Cargill and family,
Retired Supt. George Mortimer and family, Edwin and Timolyn Thompson and family,
Clinton Pearce and family, William @illyEBrown and family, Archdeacon James Palacious
and family, James Mackey and family, Wayne Edgecombe and family, Marina and Johnny
Young, Millie Young, Elsworth Turnquest and family, Monzell Turnquest and family,
Millie and Al Cartley, Quinton, Sharina Basden, the Young family, the Curtis family, the
Laramores, the Taylor family, the Smith family, the Brice Family; his Kwanis family, his
Fox Hill Community family including the PLP branch of the Fox Hill Constituency, the
Fox Hill Festival Committee; his adopted children: Edward Symonette, George Hayles,
Ronald Dean, Jacqueline Maxwell, Terran Munroe, Jovie Major, Michael Carroll, Kathleen
Smith, Ferdinand Agenor, Sharon Brown, Shane Vidal, Helen Storr, the staff of Johnsonis
Autobody Repair and Johnsonis Paint Supply, the staff of Shell Harold and Wulff Road
service stations; Special friends: Hon. Fred Mitchell, Senator Jacintha Higgs, Mr. Bismarck
Coakley, Patrick Ward, Anton Saunders, Anton Sealey, Keith Rolle, Marvin Bain, Philip
Taylor and Elsworth Rolle, Members of the Fund Raising Committee of St. Anselmis
Parish, the entire St. Anselmis Church family, members of the Progressive Liberal Party,
members of Bahamas Petroleum Retailers Association and numerous other family and

friends too numerous to mention.

Friends may pay their last respects at the P.L.P Headquarters, Sir Lynden Pindling Centre,
Farrington Road on Monday from 10:00 a.m. to 2:00 p.m. and on Tuesday at Bethel
Brothers Morticians, #44 Nassau Street from 10:00 a.m. to 5:00 p.m., and on Wednesday
at the church from 10:00 a.m. until se/Vice time.



PAGE 7
PAGE 8, THURSDAY, MAY 14, 2009

KEMP'S FUNERAL HOME LIMITED

22 Palmdale Avenue, Palmdale
Nassau, N.P., The Bahamas

MRS. FREDA MARY
RUSSELL, 97

passed away at
her home on
Lakeview Avenue,
Nassau, The
Bahamas” on
Sunday, 10th May,
2009.

A Funeral Service
will be held at St.
Andrew's Pres-
byterian Kirk, Princes' Street, Nassau on

Saturday, 23rd May, 2009 at 11:00 a.m.

Mrs. Russell was pre-deceased by her
husband, Mr. Charles Seighbert Russell
and is survived by her nephews and neices,
Terry Russell and his wife Kathy, Colleen
Springle and her husband, Ron, Don
Russell and his wife Joan and Tommy
Russell and his wife, Cynthia and other
relatives and many friends.

In lieu of flowers, donations may be made
to The Salvation Army, P.O.Box N.205,
Nassau in memory of MRS. FREDA M.
RUSSELL.

Arrangements by Kemp's Funeral Home
Limited, 22 Palmdale Avenue, Nassau,
N.P., The Bahamas.

THE TRIBUNE OBITUARIES

KEMP'S FUNERAL HOME LIMITED

22 Palmdale Avenue, Palmdale
Nassau, N.P., The Bahamas

A Funeral Service For

Mr. Harry Thomas Lloyd Albury

of Rock Sound,
Eleuthera, The
Bahamas, who died at
Doctor's Hospital,
Nassau on 10th May,
2009, after a long
illness, will be held at
the Rock Sound
Methodist Church,
Rock Sound, on
Saturday, 16th May,
2009 at 10:30 a.m.

Rev. Kenris L. Carey will officiate and interment
will follow in the Rock Sound Public Cemetery.

Mr. Albury was pre-deceased by his parents, John
I. Albury and Albertha J. Albury, his brothers-in-
law, Sylvester Cleare and Hanford W. Darville,
C.B.E., J.P., and his nephew, Steve Darville.

He is survived by his sisters, Ethelyn Darville,
Lauriette Albury and Eleanor Cleare; his nephews,
John and Robert Darville; a great niece, Caron
Watson and a great nephew, Jamie Darville and
many relatives and friends in Eleuthera and in
Nassau.

The family would like to thank Dr. Theodore
Turnquest and Dr. Duvaughn Curling and the Nurses
N.N.O.W. Limited for the care and kindness shown
to Harry Albury during his illness.

Instead of flowers, donations may be made to the
Cancer Society of The Bahamas, P.O.BOX SS.
6539, Nassau or The Bahamas Heart Association,
P.O.BOX N.8189, Nassau or the Rock Sound
Methodist Church,Rock Sound, Eleuthera, The
Bahamas, in Memory of Mr. Harry T. L. Albury.

Arrangements by Kemp's Funeral Home Limited,
22 Palmdale Avenue, Nassau, N.P., The Bahamas.


THE TRIBUNE OBITUARIES

KEMP’S FUNERAL HOME LIMITED

22 Palmdale Avenue, Palmdale
Nassau, N.P., The Bahamas

PM tears yd

MRS. VENA ISABELL
ALBURY, 85

of Blair Estates, Nassau, The
Bahamas, will be held at Ebenezer
Methodist Church, East Shirley Street,
Nassau, on Saturday, 16th May, 2009
at 4:00p.m.

Reverend Charles New will officiate
and interment will follow in Ebenezer
Methodist Cemetery, East Shirley
Street, Nassau.

Mrs. Albury was predeceased by her
husband, William Albury, her daughter,
Cynthia Gates and is survived by a
daughter, Belle Anne Pinder, grandson,
Durward Frederick Pinder, a sister,
Rosie Knowles, granddaughter-in-law,
Lisa Isabell Pinder, sisters-in-law, Edna
Albury, Belle Lowe and Moriah Lowe;
brother-in-law, Pat Knowles and many
other relatives and friends.

Instead of flowers the family request
that donations be sent to the Cancer
Society of the Bahamas, PO. Box S.S.
6539, Nassau, in memory of Mrs. Vena
|. Albury.

Arrangements by Kemp's Funeral
Home Limited.

THURSDAY, MAY 14, 2009, PAGE 9

Butler's Funeral Homes

& Crematorium

Telephone: 393-2822, York & Ernest Sts.
P.O. Box N-712, Nassau, Bahamas

FUNERAL SERVICE FOR

MRS. JANE
ELAINE
ROLLE, 69

of # 5 Damian Walk
off Jack Fish Drive,
will be held on
Saturday 16" April
2009 at 1:00 p.m. at
St. Francis Xavier
Cathedral, West
Street. Officiating will be Father Glen C. Nixon.
Interment will follow in Catholic Cemetery,
Infant View Road.

Precious memories will linger in the hearts of
her three daughters; Juliette Walkes, Sarah
Jane Pennerman and Estancia Rolle, three sons;
Tyrone, Christopher and Larry Walkes, eleven
grand daughters; nine grandsons; ten great
grand children;. two sisters; Mrs. Norma
Thurston and Mrs. Edna Miller two brothers;
George and Crosby Wilmore, two daughters-
in-law; a host of grand nieces and nephews
relatives and family including the Harbour Island
and Abaco Families and others too numerous
to mention. Special thanks to Pat and Linda
Butler, Mrs. Judy Morris, Cheryl Cartwright,
Nigel and Anne Smith, Cherry Ferguson and
Family, Mr. Boris Delancey and Nicole
McKenzie of White Plains, New York.

Friends may pay their last respects at Butlers’
Funeral Homes & Crematorium, Ernest & York
Streets on Friday from 10:00 a.m. until 5:00
p.m. and on Saturday at the church from 12:00
noon. until service time.


PAGE 10, THURSDAY, MAY 14, 2009

THE TRIBUNE OBITUARIES

Butler’s Funeral Aomes & Crematorium

Telephone: 393-2822, York & Ernest Sts.
P.O. Box N-712, Nassau, Bahamas

MEMORIAL ANNOUNCEMENT

(Jennie) G.

of Nassau and :
of:

formerly

Mangrove Bush:

Long Island, will be :

held on Friday May |

15t 2009 at 4:00p.m. at St George’s |

Anglican Church, Montrose Ave. 2
Officiating will be Rev. Fr. Kingsley |
Knowles, Rev. Fr. Kirkland Russell. and |

Rev. Fr. Roland Hamilton.

Left to cherish her fond memories are two | |

sons; Robert (Bobby) and Richard (Ricky) : A 4
Cartwright, two daughters-in- laws; Gail: (7
three: ~
grandchildren; Melanie and her husband |
Darren Obregon and Bobby and Alexia :
Cartwright. three great grandchildren; |
Lauren, Megan, and Jacob. five sisters; :
Essley Darville—Hall, Ann Carey, Martha :
Calbi, Keva Clark and Eva Knowles .two :
brother—in-laws; Douglas Carey and Mario :
Calbi, numerous nieces, nephews and host :
of relatives and friends too numerous to |

and Susan Cartwright.

: mention.
Mrs. Jeanette |
| Funeral Arrangement are being handled by
: Butlers’ Funeral Homes and Crematorium.

Cartwright, 75 Ernest and York Streets.

DEATH NOTICE

Mr. Harvey
Eldridge
Barry, 69

of Cable Beach,

died at Doctors

Hospital on
) Saturday May 9,
” 2009.

He 1s survived by his wife Wendy Barry,
two sons; Shaun and David Barry, two
grand daughters; Emily and Hanna Barry,
four sisters; Gladys, Joan, Brenda and
Theresa and numerous other relatives and
friends especially the Staff of Tropic
Seafood Limited and Bahamas Food
Services.


THE TRIBUNE OBITUARIES

Evergreen Mortuary:

EXCELLENT IN THE SERAICE WE PROVIDE

Fur all of wour Fuaenal Service hceds,
We will be pleaged to aarve you woth bauer.

“Da 28 2-ga rue
Pax: M2 ATS
24brme: 242-211-3704
or 322-F342
Celik 4 FSR

TAR ALPE ROPER A LORE,

Mockey Saad Syl
MANAG TNIVTLTITRAT. TR ict oR

(Opqeisite Minwe ‘ufflers Mosca, Rahanas

FUNERAL SERVICES FOR

Dwight Johnson Sands, 40

af Minnie Sireeh wil Be held an
Saturday at hew Covenant Baptist
Church, East’Weet Highewoy ot bb
Sam. afficiting will be Kew Dr.
Y Clemert M. Neeley. lilernent vill

r fe held in Southern Cemulery,

Cowpen & Spikenard Roads.

Lett io cherish fond memeries 1 his
wilt, Yuriel, children, Mveisht dr,
Binralre, Fantasia anal Lavren
Johnson: father, Felix Johnsen Sr;
| four (41 sisters, Deaconess Thurston,
Fivange lat hanantha Evans, Minister
Alyee Carey, Renee Johnson anne
Lider Patrice Ellis; graned-mother,
Marva SleSeecny: Brothers-ui-la’, Elder Arthur Evans, Harold
‘Lhursten, Denis Carey, Locrnzo & Reoscrelt Rolle. Howard Barr,
Bishi Niel Ella: sister-ii-law, Mildred & Michelle Johnson, Diana
Barr; mether-in-law. Sano Garr, aicles, Leorearal, Deer, Teske ard
Bradley Sauls, Pasar Chere Rovers, Deauun Enuss Dawkins: aunts,
Norma Dawkins. Janet & Blaine Sands, Pvannia Redgcrs and Kuarcn
Kahiming: nephews, Police Corporal 312 Trevor Johnson, Byron
‘Vinirsoon. Trevel & Arthar Evan, Dante Inhnson. Able Machanic
Nemeko Koeeeles: Pouneen d+) nieces. Reva Roneolwes, Cartlia,
Tiina &. Desires Cones, Alesana, Thurston, Artniell Tears, Sheaves,
Ivety & Rayebeie Jehoson, Ricard & Ashley Riley, Monies Barr,
Alicia Hinzey. Laurenzia ole. Racuel Johnson: (2) erand-nicces,
Dremecia Knowles & Azariah: (5) Crand-Nephewsa: Dontez Knowles,
Karan Williams, Trevan Reker. Trevin Dohosen and Caleb: Cinul-
Thher: Essig Har, Gaynel Sargent & Mag. Fulis ancl Gloria
Johnson, Deacon Enos and Nonna Deveking, Paster Arlington and
Karen Rahiming. Charles and ‘lavanna Kedacrs, Maria MeSwreney,
Mary Moxey aid family. Una Miller, veronica belle. Harold Mille:
aul Tamily, Tein Sands & Farviily, Tunicw Aaruls, Eelweard Teanes of
Mian, Florida, Cowisdlidve Albury & Tatnily, Catherine Wiouds &
family, Jack Davis. management & siaff of Public Mark:
Administration inclucling. statt of Public Market Administration, staff
ot Medical Reconds, Service Departments, Sandilands Rehabilitation
Centre St Luke DAsenostie Centre, Carimioicatiesnt Frernih, oa
Ruhamas Police: Fores, Ralph Carey & family, Leisure Travel and
Tours, Melonie Jelly, Herburt Wallace. Evangelist Marcia Martin &
family, Godfrey Saunders & family, Enecne lL oompsen & temily, vy
Smit & Smith, Cleciet Darling & Momiby, Relus Merny & larniby,
Marie Saunders dt lanily, Wiveel Fisher ae faintly, George Rolle dk
Tals, Alibew Gibsan & Gomly, the Seven Alls Community, Henman

& Shirley Wood, Wellington Bacwo, Pastor Samuel [ohnaen, Earnest
Barr. Jenifer anal Willan Raolle, Pastor Fler Plenttelt, Routes, Sarr
& Ruse Julinseo, Tubwarnl Evans & Cimily, Lane remc)e, Raye
Berguser, Murnclun Moss, Marvin Sven. John Gibsen de fami.y,
Shekinnah Kingdom Ministrics family. Magnol Walker. Revis Role
and other nimercis to mencian.

Relative and frends tiny jay their bash respect al Tverureent Murtiary,
Mackey Streelan Fraley from DO ua, - 6900 pom. sme! aegis
Saturday at the church from 10°00 a.m. until serviec time.

Kristoff Cooper, 22

a ot Willeicle Mark of Bernard ood vill
he Held cn Saturday at St. Margaret
Angheun Church, Kemp Rouil HI.
fp.m, Offisiating will be Father
Joseph Mycklewlrte. Loreriment will
tollaw in Woodlawn Carden
Cemetery. Soldier Raval.

Lett to ebensh fond memorics are his
parents: Phil & Agnes Cooper, Grand
motner: [larriet Conper siaters.
Phillipa Caper, Sharanla Davis.
Cindy Cooper, Tisiva Mlissich amd
Philcase Sands; brothers, Anteine,
(rales and Caleb Cooper, ains. Neva
Iehnann, Cnarlene Klurphy, Agatha, Getey, Sharin, Shun, Cienevs.
Julie, Renea, Marisia Choger Sanelra lohan Peri Cores, Sei
Oliver, Sedene T. Mioss. Ursula Kemp. auois, Mary. Oven, Rutha
from Atlanta Georgia and Moutha Rnovwles: uncles. Randolph of Ackantea
Georsia. Ervin, Ree snald anc Philip Knowles. Charles Jr, Paul, Joba
ancl Crary Comper. siter-in-law. Pawlet Ciameper: brother-in-law. Joel
Missick: umeles, Jellrey Dloyel Lene Johnson. Ploy Oliver Parry
Kdurplix, Tyrone Kass Philips “ier bun dun Readies: Parkes, Mumercus
Ticees end nephiws including. Gubnelly, Keshen, Autome Jr. Monti,
Dillon. larano & Vie. Belton, Lindsay. Lryvlan and Sharano: ether
relacives sad triends including, Sania¥ Lloyd, Kendra, Franklyn anc
Tony Adderley, Derek Iolinaen, Sheng, Johnathan, Tomotiy, Keysial.
Racquel, Ter Knowles. Randolph, Terie, Taree Rss. Territite.
Lalewe, Rose, Shekera, Siska, Derek, Devon, Charlisa am Raven
Johnsen, Daye and Duran Stuart. Limethy, Kasvmend. Maiderine,
Carlson. Stephanie, Demica. Yaphet. Sabena. Jonathan. Patrice. Lrenetris.
Javetle. Charles (11. June, Paula, Preston, Paul In, Peres, Tek.
Tivunonlo, Choely, Addding, Rashad, Kimberly, Ruwlney Ir, aryl,
Donoven, D Angelo. Pyrone Jn, Dyrell, Lestia, Nicholas, Javan, “Lory,
Mikhalia, Raven, Leoruurd Je, Lenen, Aisha, Geo di. Jae. Jin, Jari,
Dominic, khonene. Rhody, Rovlney I. Lateya Lareisha. Latrell, Casen.
‘Tonite. Tentne, Victor, Michelle ad Dehroal Adderley, Bula Jerse.
Bornil Munnings and Albun Rolle, Carla Newton, and Wicela Murptoy.
Tsabelly Thompson of Mivnn Florida, Mac Spencer Ruth McKinney,
Nell and Clair Snuth. Melvina, Edith anc Olive Cooper. Kenneta
‘Thompson. Carla Spencer, Leroy Smita ancl Tomas Cooper and Kevin
Vergusn, (lose Priencds: Jerricaine. Benes, Slellisa, Jule, Rayeler
an Theid Prath, Artome Conpur, Cnig Couper andl Caleb Cooper aad
Timath; Rnewles, Johnathin Sevmour, and Raydon and Richie (aod-
parcots: Sue eum, Yalerine LDeixon. Diane Whitfield: close nicehbours.
the Ramsey family, the Lockhart family. the Taylor farrile, ose de
larly, the Burnside Family and the Persusianm larnily.

Relatives and ficuds miry pay their hist respect at Dvergrecu Mertuary
Mackey Street on Friday from 100 acm. - O00 pum. anc again er the
Church on Saturday from Ton anti sereice lime.


PAGE 12, THURSDAY, MAY 14, 2009

Evergreen Mortuary
EXUSLLES'T IH TELE SERVICE WE DROIT
Fog adbal your Purkcral Strvie: Mads.
Wis will de plead bo saree pou wealbr lies.

Veh 292-404-708

Fas. 3d. V Hr

“Wins: 307-141-4710
wa 32-II942
Coll SAE W758

NER ALEE E. ENN CEO.

Wacky Sod South
MANAGING: TUNGRAL DIRECTOR

Oppusity Minule Muller Heeau, Dahomas

FUNERAL SERVICE

Rosemene Claccemus, 31

of Golden Isles Road
ott Carmichacl Road
and lormerly of Haiti
Will be held on
Saturday at Lbenezer
apiist Church,
Carmichael Read at
Spm. Ofticiatune will
be Pastor Luarent
Papouloute. loterment
will follow in Southern
Cometery, Cowpen anc
Spikenard Roads.

Left ta cherish tond memeries are her family.
Luciny Gedeon, Edrice Gedeon. Mdreluisecul
Milohse, Alesix Dadic Gedeon Screcs Gedeon
Screo Gedeon Charles Gedeon, Charlusima
Gedeon, Charluisma Gedeon Yhiase Gedcon.
Ithananvel Gedeon, Diedohhe Merohac, Juliaha
Gedeoan, Souhttahisse Claccemus, Rosemarie
Dedicuscul, Pierrro Maruis Claccemus Coha. Pierre
Luijcan. Doriduis Mdmazih,. Mdmahhot Samuil,
Gustave Danlich, Gustave Theedil, Gao: Onis,
Murrelih Amos, Rominis Carola, Grogas Alfredc.
Romaws Tirmituis, Gusatovr Soihtia, Caluscul
Manevhauole, Georges Dicuhel. Gustave Cheshel,
lhorcht Shemira, Gustave Jimura, Georges Siliahe
Marececlih.

Viewing will be held at Evergreen Mortuary.
Mackey Street on Friday from 10am -6pm and
agai on Saturday at the church Lrom 2pin unl
service 1m

THE TRIBUNE OBITUARIES

(3 Emerald Ridge Mortuary —

& Monument Company Ute. (@) Z
Mr. Wendell Gr. Lean II, t

tare
Prendeat/ Afar Papers! Drecior

Gur services Includes
Trettoral af Persamaland Funeral Serviers,
Cremstim, Oriel Courerkog, fural-As-Sea,
rer, ap them nl J Workheide Shigping, Laval and Long Mista
Haagurtae These nati Dil, Scemcwala: Mcuremesin, ‘elian’Uhitecionl eal
Cortese fae Pose ys cee ee Video Poste Tribaimeae (her Wielniteaad DVDS,

Se a es eee ee
eT UE aE a Loe ERR
Act ee amatuer a ig ela

Garnet Funeral Service
For

Deaconess Ruthmae Doreen
Sargent, 49

ot #1679 Walnut Street, Pinewood Gardens and

formerly of Pine Field, Acklins will be held on Sunday,

May 17, 2009 at 2pm at Trinity Full Gospel Baptist

Chorch, Marshall Road South Beach. Bishop Trevor

Sr. and Pastor Arlington Williamson will officiate and

or will be in Woodlavn Gardens Cemetery, Soldier
nad.

The Radiance of this “Carnet ofA Gem" will always
in the hearts of ler:

mmediate Family: Edley A. Sargent Jr., Carla and Rev. Kenneth Bain, Authorine and
Sammy Lawrore Sr. of West Palm Beach, Florida, Juliette, Romeka, Edley 11 and Krialyn
Sargent and Nicole Carey;
Twelve Grand Children: Kenneisha and Carlyn Bain, Sammy Jr., Caleb and Alethea
Laurore, Leroy, Lea, Lexicio, Lexicia and Leo Adderley, E-Jay Sargent and Kai Barnes;
Father: Eder King Williamson;
Three Brothers: Bishop Trevor Sr., Pastor Arlington and Antoine Williamson Sr.;
Two Sisters: Ministers Bettyann Ferguson and Genevieve Bullard;
Three Uneles: Enos Bain of Belle Glade, Florida, Evangeless and Clarence Williamaon;
Ten Aunts: Elder Queenie Rose, Cleomi Collie, Sylvia Gaitor, Joyce Higgins, Joyoelyn
Dacheos, Maria, Delroe, Almenica and Clethilda Willlamsoo and Harte Bain of Belle Glade,
Flankla:
One Grand Aunt: Daisy Jolson:
Numerous Nephews Including: Vereane Charlton, Navarro and *hivaga Henfield,
Shannen of Ailanta Gexrgia, Trevor Jr., Troy, Travis, Antoine, and Sheton Williamson,
Pastor Leonante Jones, Gregory Miller Jr. and DeNains Bullard, Shawn Newbold, Presley,
Aaron, Joshua, Kenny, fuvalledr., lin, Arie, Anthon ancl Marvin Sargent, Gilbert Black.Jr,
Charles and Sammy Clarke, Richard Jr, Anthony Jr. and Andrew Sands, Samuel Jr, and

Sanchez Thompeon;

Numerous Sieces Ineclodi hia Rolle, Carol, ¥vette and Muriel Moss, Candi and
Nadia Henfeld, Melderese Newbokl, Lavette and Lavella Ferguson, Katherine of Atlanta
Georgia, Latravia and Ashkey Williamson, Chrystal Clarke, Brianne Ballard, Mexandria
Woodside and Michelle Jones, Bridgette Farquharson, Christine Charlton, Bridgette
Farrington, Samantha Simmons. Vernica and Valencia Black, Vilda Chippman, Carmel
Moxey, Lakeria Bethel, Richae and Gladtonya Sands;

Mother-in-law: Hilda 7 a

Five Brothers-in-law: Milton Henfield, Pastor Lovell Ferguson, David Bullard, Acrville
Sr. and Alvin Sargent;

Fight Sisters-in-law: Samantha, Pastor Sharon and Pastor Betty Williamson, Gladys and
Doreen Sands, Daisy Thonspeon, Mildred Cooper and Viola Black:

Many other loving ‘and friends: Vanessa Rolle, Grace Dean, Lantamae Bootle,
Edwina Brown, Stella Miller, Wilma Dames, Sherelene and Zarria Mackey, a Sargent,
iGithert Black Sr_ Rev. Dr. Elkin Symonette, Saniuwel Thompeon, Anthony aed Richard Sands,
Leroy Adderley, Diamdra Davis, Florence Wright, Lillian Williamson, Mr. and Mra. Ivan
Sears, Rev. De. Robert and Tonka Colebrook, Nikoan Johneon, Marlo Tomer, Mae Knowles,
Minister M. Gordon, Minister.J. Deveaux, Lashelle, Thomas Fond, Carl Carey, Geargeann
Farquharson, The New St. Pan! Baptist Church, Trinity Poll Gospel Baptist Church, New
Bethel Fellowehip Ministries, Chapel On the Hill, Neighbors of Walnut Street, Pinewood
Gardens and the Lauwrorels of West Palm Beach Florida aod thelr Families;
Special Thanks To: [alysis Unit of the Princess Margaret Hospital, Or. Adrian Sawyer,
Dr. Norad Morgan, Dr. Gandel Deyd and The Soup Peaple.

Vistation will be in the “Emerald Suite” Emerald Ridge Mortuary & Monument Compan
Lid. #20 Claridge Road oo Satanday, May 06, 2009 fram ianeon to fpen and at Trinity Full
Gospel Aaptist Charch, Marshall Road South Beach on Sanday, May 17, 2009 from apm te
service time.

Visit our website: www.emeraldridgemortuary.com view video
tributes, sign guest book, send condolence, sympathy, share
memories and make funeral arrangements.


THE TRIBUNE OBITUARIES

THURSDAY, MAY 14, 2009, PAGE 13

Rock of Ages Funeral Chapel

Wulff Road & Pinedale
Tel: 323-3800 or 322-1431 ¢ Fax: 328-8852

FUNERAL SERVICES FOR

: FRIENDS MAY PAY THEIR RESPECTS AT ROCK OF AGES FUNERAL
i CHAPEL, WULFF ROAD & PINEDALE ON FRIDAY FROM 10 A.M. TO 1
: PM. AND AT CHURCH OF GOD OF PROPHECY, GAMBIER VILLAGE
i FROM 3 PM. TO 7 RM. AND ON STURDAY AT THE CHURCH FROM 9
i A.M. UNTIL SERVICE TIME.

MINISTER
GLORIA NAOMI
DELANCY, 75

of Garden Hills #2, will be held on |
Saturday May 16th, 2009 at 10 a.m. |
at C.0.G.O.P. Tabernacle, East Street. |
Officiating, Bishop Joseph Swann and _ :
Bishop Sterling Moss, assisted by, ;
Minister Gladstone Thurston, |;
internment: C.O.G.O.P. Church Yard; ;

Gambier Village

Left to cherish her memories are Two |
(2) Sons: Richard and Captain Borris
Delancy; Two (2) Grand Daughters: :
Nyeisha and Natalia Delancy; Six (6) Grand Sons: Deno, Ladon, Brandon, :
Richard Ill, Antonio, and Dylan Delancy. One (1) Step Daughter: Rosalie :
Minnis; One (1) Great Granddaughter: Tahj Blyden; Two (2) Sisters: Minister;
Mildred Dorsette, Jerry Thurston. Three (3) Brothers: Pastor Henry, Minister :
Alexander, and James Thurston. One (1) Stepbrother: Minister Neville ;
Seymour. Five (5) God children: Charles Rolle, James & Nicola Johnson, |

Charles Rolle, Valene Poitier. Two (2) Aunts: Grace Seymour, Ophelia : Grand-childran: Daniel Forbes Jeand Ludi ’ : }
: Pr ‘ nS - : : ydisha Knowles; daughter-in-law:
Hunter. Three (3) Uncles: Henry & Elijah Thurston, Uncle Harry “PAPA” | Torah Bowe. Sisters: Eliza Taylor, Malcolin Nouguez, Gelenia Johnson

Janet, Rhonda, Lovenia, Natasha, Shanna, Gillian, Laskica, Hudrea Step sisters: Artis Cox & Edna Walkine. Six (6) Brothers: Wilbert, Minister

Fernander Loretta, Crystal, Christian, Celeste, Leeckea, Leoche Gillian, Lerlean, Myrtella, Dorcas, Norma and Diane Cox. Numerous Nieces

: : . _ : including: Peralee Knight; Nyoka Bethel; Nina Nouguez; Wendy Kelly;
Lakeisha Tucker, Evang. Valencia Huyler, Derek & Patrice Dorsette, Alwrick ' Louise, Martha, Monamae, Eileen, Karen, Brenda, Pauline, Patricia, Davina,

‘ : i Michele, Salina, Donna and Advilda Cox; Pamela Young, Patrice Murphy;
Robert, Charles, Donald Femander, Everett, Runen, Nathan, Elgin, Adrian, : Zelma Bastian; Betty and Unamae Williams; Michelle Cox; Mamie and
James, Derek & Alwrick & Stephanie Dorsette Patrice Dorsette; Zene i fot ; ;
Delancy, Trevor Bethel. Numerous Grand Nieces including: Aaliyah, Joshua, | Udy Johnson; Christine Taylor, Eunice Johnson, Janice Curry, Brenda

Ys . g: yall, ? : Babbs, Shamelle McDonald, Halsie Dorsett; Sharon Henfield; Elizabeth

Ashley Dean, Christal, Jaden Tucker, Dahnique, Mona Lisa Rolle. Valletta and Shantell Telusma, Deborah Garvey and Donna ag ume yes
Arthur, Zenetta Fernander, Ron-X Huyler, Gazzyln, Carla Colebrooke, : Nephews including: Jehu, Kemuel, Rodger, Warren, Lionel, Derek, Gavin
, : ; : ’ + and Kendrick Cox; Basil Taylor; Donald, Eli and Renald Nouguez; Tyrone,

Manasseh Nerenal (André), Adassah Colebrooke (Carliecia Derek Dorsette bce ne oe Pvsoagily erry enneon ie eoate a
df. Mege| Dorsere, Dominique Darsette Erie Dorsette, Maxwell Russell, ! Glenn Telusma. Grand-nieces: Eldridge and Mark Taylor; Anya Johnson;
Dinae, Trenice Bethel. Numerous Cousins including: Muriel Albanard, | Andre Nouguez, Shavante; Numerous Grand-nephews including:

and Stanley Delancy; Sisters-in-law: Aretha, Adlin Thurston, Flossie Woodside;, Aldion Bethel; Talbert and Shaquille; Williams; Daquan Bethel;
Thurston, Easter Outen, Corelia, Monica, Tericta, Mavis Delancy, Merlene : ae oor
Seymour, Helen Missick. Step Grandchildren: Kissa Minnis, Donald, Hilary NUR ele Ce deine ine doing ae Here werd: ‘ng ce Gibson:
Delancy, Andrea Fernander, Zella & Jxoe Redhead, Edward & Emily Telcene Hepburn; Alreta Thurston; Velma Ferguson; Carry Walker; Cybil

Cunningham, Ramsey & family, Mr. Stubbs & family, Hastin, Linda & | and others. And a host other relatives & friends including: Edith McClain

. aaa : : & Family; Theresa & Latoya Archer & Family; Venal Kemp & Family, Philip
Godfery, Jeffrey and Charlene Bain, Gambier Village community, Church | & Shirley Lightbourne; Priscilla Dean; Dellarese McPhee & Family; Lionel
Bahamasair, Sonia Williamson, Angela Rickett, Juliet Holness, Levardo Bieler panel tatsel Nec Hemuele bods ris teteegl sued

and family, Sis. Albury and family, Sis. Victoria Beneby and family, Captain Shamari Hanna; Shakeem and The Reid Family. And a host of other

Harcourt, Fernander, Patrick and Jackie Wilson, Bishop Joseph Swann :

and family, Bishop Sterling Moss and Family, Min. Gladstone Thurston FRIENDS MAY PAY THEIR RESPECTS AT ROCK OF AGES FUNERAL

: CHAPEL; WULFF ROAD & PINEDALE ON FRIDAY FROM 10 A.M. TO 5
i PM. AND ON SATURDAY AT THE CHURCH FROM 10 A.M. UNTIL
i SERVICE TIME.

Wright; Numerous Nieces including: Helen Delancy Bastian, Susan Griffin,

Thurston, Denise Bethel, Lablourse, Lornctte, Preston Hanna, Holly Rolle,

& Stephanie Dorsette, Ashley Dorsette; Numerous Nephews including:

Nathan, Jasmine Bridgett, Tracy, Pachino, Omar, Robert Jr, Thurston.

Excie, Andrew Nerenal, Naasson Huyler, Jemma Huyler, Veranece Huyler,

Alonzo Huyler, Neville, Samuel, Kate Huyler, Two (2) Brothers in Law: Cecil

Fernander, And a host of other relatives and friends including: Karen

Brown, Blanch Stubbs and Family, Pastor Diana Culmer and family, Jason,
of God of Prophecy Gambier Village Family, Management & Staff at
Blyden, Helen Alleyne and Family, Dotlyn Bastian and family, Sis. Rolle

and family, Dr. Barbara F. Williams (Home Mission Director) and family,
Dr. Sandra Knowles and the St. Peter’s Baptist Church Family Gambier
and a host of other relatives and friends too numerous to mention.

ELIZABETH
GOULDIE
COX- MOSS, 67

of Lady Slipper Ave., Garden Hills #2
and Formerly of Snug Corner, Acklins;
will be held on Saturday, May 16th,
2009 at 11 a.m. at Christian Life
Church on #52 Sea Breeze Lane.
Officiating: Apostle Mitchel Jones,
assisted by Minister Leslie Knowles,
internment: Woodlawn Gardens,
Soldier Road.

Left to cherish her memories are her:
Four (4) Children: Lydia, Sonya and
Larry Bowe and Keno Moss. Two (2)

Kelson, Eleadon, Stephen, David and Rupert Cox. Five (5) Sisters-in-law:

Charles, Jonathan and Justin Cox; Cy and Devoire Young Jr.; Kurtisa

Pinder; Hilma Ferguson; Naomi Hanna; Errington Hanna and Duke Errold

relatives and friends too numerous to mention.


PAGE 14,

THURSDAY, MAY 14, 2009

wt bf,

THE TRIBUNE OBITUARIES

EAS EAST SUN @RISE MC ISE MORTUARY

——<=

oe

——

“A New Commitment to Serve”

FUNERAL SERVICES FOR

Martin ‘Papa Marty’ Bevans, 39

of Golden Gates #2 and formerly of Little |
Creek, South Andros will be held on |
Saturday at 10 a.m. at Church of God |
Temple, Coconut Grove Avenue. :
Officiating will be Pastor Roslyn Astwood :
assisted by Bishop Lindo Wallace. |
Interment will follow in the Southern :
Cemetery, Cowpen & Spikenard Road. |

He is survived by his son: Martin Jr.,

Parents: Minister Doreen Bevans- :

Campbell and Theodore Campbell;
Grandmother, Theadora Bevans;

Brothers: Corporal 2515 Theodore

Campbell Jr., and Dino Campbell; Sisters:

Calpurnia Campbell, Registered Nurse

Cyprianna Campbell and Crystallaire Campbell; one niece: Vanessa;

three nephews: Kaylen, Theo and Brandon Campbell; numerous uncles _:

including: Inspector Livingston Bevans, Sterling and Eddison Bevans,

ASP Ronald Campbell, Henry and Johnathon Campbell; aunts: Magnola_:

Forbes, Zelma and Pauline Bevans, Vernell Goodman, Maxine Miller,

Hazel Bevans, Deidre Bevans, Vaneria Rolle, Valeria Cash, Nurse |
Althameze Watson, Eureka Vixamar; numerous special relatives and |
cousins including: Sharon and Quincy McKinney, Sherine, Donathon |:
and Kevin Forbes, Tiffany Greene, Sheniqua Francis, Shukera Carrol :

and Shandira Campbell, Crysantha Bevans, Stephanie Williamson,
Vanessa Rolle Clarke, Tameka Johnson, Timone Humes, Latanya Rolle,
Nashwa Bevans, Edroy Wiliamson, Alan Knowles Jr., Tino, Vargo,

Lester, Javon, Lamont, Dalston, Lavano, Philander, Leonardo, Livingston |

Jr., and Lamar Bevans; and a host of other relatives and friends

including: Rev. Roslyn Astwood and St. Stephenis Church Family, :
Pastor Mark Bethel and BFM Praise Team Family, Kayla Butler, Iva |
Butler, Theresa Taylor, Neil Ricardo Brown, Eddie Cephas, Newman |
Bastian, Deidre Campbell, Dorith Dean Campbell, Little Creek |
Development Association, Bishop Lindo Wallace and Coconut Grove :
Temple Church of God. British American Insurance, (Staff 6 - Carmichael:

Rd.), Beulamae Burrows, Lesley Brown and Family, Samuel Brown and

Family, Maureen Symonette and Family, Arabelle Brown and Family :

and a host of other family and friends too many to mention.

Friends may pay their last respects at East Sunrise Mortuary, Rosetta :
Street, Palmdale from 10 a.m. to 6 p.m. on Friday and at the Church :

from 9 a.m. on Saturday until service time.

Jelita Myrtis Curtis, 90

of Pinewood Gardens and formerly of
George Town, Exuma will be held on
Saturday at 2 p.m. at First Baptist Church,
Market Street. Officiating will be Rev.
Dr. Earle Francis and interment will
follow in Old Trail Cemetery, Abundant
Life Road.

She is survived by 3 daughters:
Jacquelyn Forbes; Vera Ash & Andrea
aa Hanna; 2 Sons: Hubert Rolle & Eric
[2° S| Curtis; 2 Brothers: Alfred Cooper &
Mervin Cooper; 2 Sisters: Ena & Mildred
Mckinney; 1 son in law: Johnny Ash;
2 Daughters in law: Nellie Rolle & Janet
Curtis; Grandchildren: Shanique
' Adderley, Lakita Russell, Shannovon Russell, Frank Curtis, Bridget
| Brown, Bernadette Burrows, Vanessa Hall, Vanceil Brown, Cheryl Wallace,
| Allan, Lawrence & Ricardo Forbes; Erica, Darvon, Tamice & Eric Curtis;
' Shawn & Kevin Newbold; Rudolph Ward, Daisy Knowles, Bernard
: Beckford, Eugene Pinder, Kandice Hepburn, Eudell Kinteah, Ricardo
‘ King, Elicia Wright, Janet Williams, Alexio & Lakeisha Wright; Numerous
' great grandchildren: Cavansa Adderley, Cavann & Kahlil Russell; Jarett
' Bain, Amanda & Allantia Forbes; Britini Knowles, Adam Brown, Perez
: & Jeter Burrows; Jamal Ferguson, Ediqua Hall, Leroy, Tamika, Jamaal,
' Tico & Lantisha Brown; Latisha Cash, Thea Wallace, Jamie, Jameko &
| Theodore Ash; Tamica Johnson; Octavia, Cadron, & Tonya Ferguson;
: Kimalita Hilton, Shanise, Jamon & Jamaal Collie. Numerous great-great
' grandchildren: Cameron & Markell Bynoe. Elqinique Dames; Charlton
' Cash Jr.; Shaniah Pennerman; Terry] Stubbs; Charma & Tazia Brown;
' Isiah Camphell; Cordero, Jonathan, Theron, Shakeitha & Laura Johnson.
' Grand sons in law: Charles Adderley, Leroy Brown, Terrance Wallace,
‘ Linewood Brown, Edward Hall, Charlton Cash and George Burrows;
: Grand Daughter-in-law: Portia Forbes; Numerous Nieces & Nephews;
: and a host of Special friends & other relatives includig: Hon. Glenys
' Hanna Martin; Rev. R.E. Cooper; Min. Patricia Coakley- Deveaux &
' Family. David & Audrey Capron; Rubyann Cooper- Darling; Florence &
: Rose Curtis & Family; Dorothy Marshall & Family; The Rolle Family;
' Richeal Ferguson & Family; Veronica Rolle & Family; Unity House &
' Staff; Robinson Morris A.M.E Chapel; Seed Of Faith Family; & the First
| Baptist Family.

: Friends may pay their last respects at East Sunrise Mortuary, Rosetta
i Street, Palmdale from 10 a.m. to 6 p.m. on Friday and again from 10 a.m.
: to noon on Saturday and at the Church from 1 p.m. until service time.

EAST SUNRISE MORTUARY.

“A New Commitment To Service”

#27 Rosetta Street, P.O.Box C.B. 12248 / Palmdale, Nassau, Bahamas
Tel: (242) 323-EAST — (242) 326-4209 Fax: 356-2957

24 hrs. Emergency Service
Cell #: 357-9151 - Beeper: 380-1450 or 380-1117


THE TRIBUNE OBITUARIES

THURSDAY, MAY 14, 2009,

(Cedar Crest funeral Home

DIGNITY IN SERVICE
Robinson Road and First Street e PO.Box N-603 ¢ Nassau, N.P., Bahamas
Telephone: 1-242-325-5168/328-1944/393-1352

Funeral Services For

DEACONESS
ANGELA
ELIZABETH
FOWLER, 50

a resident of # 42 Antiqua }
Street, Golden Gates II will :
be held 2:00p.m. Sunday, :
May 17th, 2009 at Golden :
Gates World Outreach:
Ministries, Carmichael Road. :
Officiating will be Bishop :
Ross Davis, assisted by:
associate Pastors. Interment :
will be made in the Southern

Cemetery, Cowpen & Spiknard Roads.

Left with cherish memories are her sister, Jacqueline Fowler :
Allen; 1 brother, Phillip Thompson; 1 adopted sister, Deborah :
Lopez; 1 brother-in-law, Stephen Allen; 1 sister-in-law, Carol
Thompson; 1 Aunt, Idell Bain; numerous nieces and nephews :
including Michael Greene, Brian & Lynette Williams, Natasha, :
Laverdo and Aneisha Ellis, Amy & Steven Allen Jr, Phillip "Kenny" :
Jr, and Renaldo Thompson, Cachina Forbes, 1 niece-in-law, :
Christine "Tiny" Greene; 17 Grand nieces and nephews including :
Michael Jr, Anmad and Alicia Greene, Nelson and Terran Bevans, :
Travis Humes, Kadesha Bridgewater, Kieria Woodside, Vardajah, :
Ashanti and Joshua Ellis, Keneisha, Erin, Raynell Thompson, :
Mark, Garcheno and Garmargio Forbes; numerous cousins :
including Robert, Reginald, Rudolph, Cathy, and Roslynd Rolle :
of Umatilla, Florida, Kenneth and Donnie Saunders, Greta Brown; :
and a host of other relatives including Bishop Ross Davis and :
the entire Davis clan, Alva, Thelma, Creswall, Vielsa, Catherine :
& Maria Johnson, Sherry Poitier & family, Jaban "Bulla J" & :
Dorothy Bastian, & family, Terecita & family, Joe & Monica Martin :
of Queens, New York, Jennifer Rolle & family, Golden Gates II :
family, especially Hon. D. Shane Gibson & family, Rose McPhee :
& family, Bloneva Brice & family, Mr Williams & family, Idell :
Dorsette & family, Carla Cunningham & family, Florence Rodriquez :
& family, Eloise Woods & family, Luceta Fox & family, Rev Michael
Bullard & the Ambassador Chorale family, Anthony Lopez & :
family, Diane Johnson & family, Dewitt & Getrude Bastian & :
family, William & Grace Roberts & family, Levi & Melvern Gibson :
& family, Johnley and Carnetta Ferguson & family, Mabel Stubbs :
& family, Anya Symonette & family, Florence Ferguson & family, :
Dainette Clear & Daes Beauty Saloon family, Peterson James :
& family, Mary Canter & family, Andrew Campbell of Toronto, :
Canada, Nicola Symonette & family, the Whylly family, the entire :
Golden Gates World Outreach Ministries family, Bain Town, :
Wilson Tract and South Beach communities, Doctors & Nurses :
of Princess Margaret Hospital especially Dr Kevin Moss, Vincent :

Campbell and Nurse Darnell Johnson, the former staff of Bayside
Restaurant and others too numerous to mention.

Relatives and friends may pay their respects at Cedar Crest
Funeral Home, Robinson Road and First Street on Saturday
: from 10:00 a.m. to 6:00p.m. and on Sunday from 10:00a.m. to
; 12:00 noon and at the church from 12:30p.m. until service time.

TONY DELANO
PATRICK MILLER,
18

a resident of 2nd Street
Coconut Grove will be held
11:00a.m. Saturday, May
16th, 2009 at First Baptist
Church, Market Street and
Coconut Grove Avenue,
Officiating will be Rev Dr Earle
Francis, assisted by other
Ministers of Religion.

} Interment will be made in the

JY Old Trail Cemetery, Abundant
Life Road.

Precious memories will always live in the heart of his father, Tony
Miller Sr.; grandparents, Freeman and Esther Cartwright; 1 sister,
Darshanique; 1 brother, Tinwell; Great Grand mother, Esther
Henfield; 5 Uncles, Richard, Cpl1478 Halson Cartwright, Jeff
Roberts, Larry Albury and Glen Miller; 8 Aunts, Yuntalia Cartwright,
Mary Coleby, Madge Cox, Rose Cartwright, Gail Thompson,
Deborah Bowleg, Minease Rolle, Pamela Miller; Great Grand
Aunt, Brenetta Williams; Great Grand Uncle, Albert Williams; 2
Great Grand Aunts, Nurse Mary Deleveaux and Alice Williams;
3 Grand Uncles, Marvin Henfield, Luman Bodie, and Willard
Cartwright; God mother, Carla Lightbourne; his cousin, Halcyon
Cartwright and other relatives and friends including Rev Dr Earle
& Marjorie Francis and the First Baptist Church family, Bishop
Lawerence Rolle & family, Bishop lan Brithwaite and Holy Dove
Baptist Church family, Jermaine and Illaya Pratt, John Williams,
Kirkward Adderley, Franklie Wilchombe, Rachel Nabbie, Malcoln
Wright, Ashwood Turnquest, Marsha Thomson, Commonwealth
Mason family, Gladstone Francis & family, Felton Cox & family,
St Cecilia Branch of the Free National Movement, Dec Felix and
Gloria Johnson, Bridgewater family, and others too numerous
to mention.

Relatives and friends may pay their respects at Cedar Crest
Funeral Home, Robinson Road and First Street on Friday from
12:00 noon to 6:00p.m.

There will be no viewing.



PAGE 15
PAGE 16,

THURSDAY, MAY 14, 2009

THE TRIBUNE OBITUARIES

Yager funeral Home @ Crematorium

Queen’s Highway
PO. Box F-40288, Freeport, Grand Bahama, Bahamas
Tel: 352-8118 © Paging: 352-6222 #1724
Fax: 351-3301

SR a

BISHOP
WILLIAM ARTHUR
KNOWLES, 59

a resident of #16 Cutwater Lane, :
| Freeport and formerly of Tarpum Bay, :
} Eleuthera will be held on Saturday, }
| May 16, 2009 at 10:00 a.m. at Central :
| Church of God Coral Road and :
| Pioneeris Way, Freeport. Officiating :
will be Bishop John N. Humes and :
interment will follow in the Pinderis :

Point Cemetery.

Left to Cherish his memories are his devoted wife: Christine Knowles; :
two sons: Keith and Craig Knowles; one daughter: Heidi McPhee; one :
son-in-law Levar McPhee; two daughters-in-law: Antoinette and Natasha :
Knowles; four grandchildren: Daniel, Keiana, Kiya and Taylor Knowles; : |
stepmother: Ethel Knowles; adopted mother: Ruth Sands; 11 brothers: :
James Earl Bullard, Philip Hilton, Paul and Glen Knowles, Cleveland, :
William, Anderson, Fredrick, Talmage, Roylson and Kenneth Knowles; :

: Left to cherish his memories are his wife: Kenia Silver; former wife:
: Minerva Williams-Silver; children Brendalee Silver-Roker, Lucinda
: Seymour, George Silver Jr., Carolina Silver, Bernadette Silver-Rolle and
law: Mary and Marlyn Knowles, Lois Bullard, Joan Hilton, Hortense !
: Kino Rolle; five brothers: Miza, Joan, Eddy, Jean Willie and Clarnece
Selver; five sisters: Maud Selver of Ft. Lauderdale, Kathleen Selver of
: New York, Susan Selver of Turks and Caicos Islands, Beryl Adderley
: of Miami and Marietta Ferguson of Miami; grandchildren: Joseph,
: Mellissa, Gabriel and Felesha Silver, Herbert Seymour Jr., Roger Wright,
: Daniel Saunders, Shantily Seymour and Cordesha Wallace; great
: grandchildren: Andrielle Clarke, Jadan Silver and Jahmari Rolle; one
: uncle: James R. Selver of Grand Turk; three aunts: Kathleen Selver-
: Lanoix of New York, Sissy Selver and Ivy Miller; numerous cousins
: including: Jennifer Powell-Moss, Lloyd and Gilroy Powell, Marilyn
: Powell-Russell, Grace Farquharson, Manvella Pratt, Catherine Tinker,
: Keith Mullings, Linda Mullings Moxey, Clyde Daxon, Judith Brown
: Kermitt Mullings, Thomas Daxon Jr., Annie Swann-Bowleg, Carl, Audley
: and Walter Swann, Joe and Ben Smith, Sandra Dorsette, Lavern Miller,
: Carmen Robinson, Dorothy Clarke, Ellen Colebrooke, Gilbert and
: Clarence Selver, Anita Fulford of Miami and a host of other relatives
: and friends including: Forrester Carroll, Leslie Smith, Clifford, John
: Barr, Leslie Woodside, MaryAnn Culmer, Francita Brice, Ainslie Rolle,
* Anthony Smith, Donald Williams, Alicus Souffant (Chuck) Saint-Joy,
: Souffant (Tolo), Prosper Jean (Eric) Hiram Rahming, Charles Stubbs,
: Catherine Sands, Charles Fritz and George Butler.

and friends including: Bishop John N. Humes, Mark Moultrie, Mr. and

: Relatives and friends may pay their respects at Yager Funeral Home and
: Crematorium on Queens Highway on Friday 12:00 noon until 6:00 p.m.
: and on Saturday at the church from 9:30 a.m. until service time.
Followers of Faith Temple Church of God, Church of God, Grand Bahama :

eight sisters: Sharon Thompson, Marsha Carey, Clara McPhee, Eloise
Miller, Loletta Penn, Loretta Mackey, Gerena Albury and Genette Butler;
two brothers-in-law: Hiram Eden and Henderson Jones; six sisters-in-

Jones and Vernell Edden; one uncle: Donald Knowles; three aunts: Lillie
Carey, Jessie Fox and Shirley Smith; numerous nephews including:
Philip Jr., Ian and Sherwin Hilton, Marco and Ronald Carey Jr., Troy,
Dale and Alex Knowles, Larry and Tony Bullard, Perry and Bruce Sands,
Allen Washington, Henderson Jr., Whitfield, Cartwright, David, Thomas
and Oral Jones, Freazel and Rollington Cooper, Lionel and Wendell
Smith, Alexander, Marvin and Mark Lundy, Christopher Edden, Ronald,
Everett, Sidney, Harry and Windy Rolle, Cleveland Jr., Cordero, Endingo,
Lenardo, Hakeem, Giles, Alfredo, Fredrick, Fredrick Jr., Talson, Tagarren,
Kevin, Kencil and Kendrick McPhee, Lennardo, Lemorn and Levant
Miller, Kermit Jr., Kerlano, Kerry and Kerico Mackey, Nathan, Garvin
II, Ashad and Kia; numerous nieces including: Regina Ingraham, Natasha
Stubbs, Lavern Thompson, Joann Hilton, Melany and Regina Sands,
Ronique Carey, Glenda Bowleg, Rochelle and Shacara Knowles, Christine
Bullard, Ruth Roberts, Annette Bowleg, Hortense Seymour, Anamae
Nesbitt, Corey Cancino, Alicia McIntosh, Keisha McPhee, Lavell,
Kermarita, Alvia, Alvonae and Alvonique Penn, Taquisha, Takeita,
Zerasa, Zekinda, Kenatae, Nateisha, Nakyla and Natanya Butler, Ajia,
Alia, Chevaz, Bianca, Karissa, Ivanna, Latera, Raquel and Kemry;
numerous cousins including: Sheila Butterfield, Beverly Deveaux, Brenda
Martin, Franklyn Rolle and Herbert Allen and a host of other relatives

Mrs. Dewitt Carey, Florence Morley and Pastor Hilda Allen, Rodger
and Sharon Johnson, Phyllis Sullivan, Sheila Coke, Huel Williamson,
Mary Culmer and Gladstone Curry, Georgia Foster, Members and

: District and the Tarpum Bay Community.

Relatives and friends may pay their respects at Yager Funeral Home &
: Crematorium on Queens Highway on Friday from 12:00 noon until 6:00
: p.m. and on Saturday at the church from 9:00 a.m. until service time.

GEORGE
ALEXANDER
SILVER, 67

a resident of #10 Port of Call Drive,
Freeport and formerly of Grand Turk,
Turks Island will be held on Saturday,
May 16, 2009 at 11:00 a.m. at The
| Pro-Cathedral of Christ the King, East
Atlantic Drive and Pioneeris Way,
Freeport. Officiating will be Revid
Canon Harry Bain and interment will

JZ follow in the Grand Bahama Memorial
Park, Frobisher Drive.

Lemond Silver; three son-in-laws: Jason Roker, Herbert Seymour and


THE TRIBUNE OBITUARIES

al Chanel

areisdent of Hawksview, Grand Bahama
and formerly off Fox Hill will be held
on Saturday, 16th May, 2009 at 10:00
a.m. at St. Anneis Anglican Church, Fox
Hill Road; Officiating will be Fr. Crosley
Walking Jr. Assisted by Other Ministers
and Cremation will follow. Services
entrusted to Gateway Memorial Funeral
Chapel, Mount Royal Avenue and
Kenwood Street.

Cherished memories will forever linger
in the hearts of her husband, Carlyn
Russell; two sons, Yvon Morrison and
Ural Russell; two daughters, Darielle
McKinney and Aleah Butler; her
mother, Gina Craig; brothers, Kenneth
Morrison, Cyrano, Marvin and Sheham
Comarcho; sisters, Philomena Comarcho-Higgs, Metherenn Comarcho-
Smith, Pagnant Collins of Fort Lauderdale, Shanderia Comarcho and Susan
Haven; grand parents, Beryl White, Hubert and Pauline Craig; twenty-
three nieces and nephews, Kenneisha Morrison, Meshulum Stubbs, Jasine
and Jay Comarcho, Darcell, Andrea, Samantha and Chelsea Smith, Marvin
Jr., Mario, Marcin and Marick Comarcho, Rudolph II and Peter Williams,
Nikita, Mesha, Achara and Carle Comarcho,Darren Comarcho, Dorian Butler
and Marvinea Comarcho; mother-in-law, Diana Russell; father-in-law,
Carlin Russell, grand motheris-in-law, Inez Russell and Margaret Lewis;
grand father-in-law, Ural Russell; sister-in-law, Carlene Adderley; brothers-
in-law, Cagney Russell, Elton Saunders and Alberto Adderley; aunts:
Beatrice Beadle, Christabel Johnson, Wendy Graig, Carol Sandiford, Sharon
Campbell, Sybil Bullard, Catherine Craig, Trudy Patrick of Trinidad, Theresa
of Canada and Grefetta King of New York, Queenie Gibson, Euphemie and
Leona Russell, Claudine Laing, Estella Hield, Albertha Miller, Linda,
Anastacia, Diana and Bianca Lewis; uncles, Castell, Hugh, Keith and Eric
Morrison, Solomon Campbell and Steven Bullard, Anthony Graig and Eveton
Sandiford of Trinidad, Lloyd Cooper, Calaph, Tarell, Oliver and Amando
Russell, Anderson, Teddy, Nathanial and Robert Lewis, Jerome Miller,
Jackson Wilchcombe, Lucian Laing and Cedric Gibson; cousins:Mae, John,
Anthony and Ricardo Beadle, Lavaughn Smith, Monique Forbes, Jermaine
Johnson, Monique Williams, Dellarese and Wendal Morrison, Jasmine,
Jonathon and Javon Johnson, Cherise, Denitri, Alex, Lavaughn and Ashton
Forbes, Duran, Dominique and Jonique Beadle, Anisha Morrison, Kadesia,
Katesha and Antonio Smith Jr.; other relatives and friends including, The
Dames family, Gladys Dames and family, Hilda Douglas and family, Fr.
Mervyn Buck Johnson and family, Ruth Fernander and family, Vernal Mackey
and family, Thomas Smith and family, Vanessa Ferguson and family, Daryl
McKinney and family, Esther McKinney, Mrs. Gentle family, The Angelic
Baptist Church family, Lateka Makier, Makayla Russell, Domanick and
Venessa Pinder, Herlin, Angelo and Taylor, Bryan Taylor, Mrs. Carol, Leshae
Rolle, Theresa Johnson, Sasha, Kera Saunders, Vera Hield and family, Rev.
Velock and family, Rev. John Russell and family, Andrea Burrows and
family,Vernece Saunders and family, Eshmel Albury and family, Leroy
Cooper and family, Melcia Miller and family, Eddic Cooper and family,
Agetha Williams and family, Alfreda Rolle and family, Fred Cooper and
family and the entire community of Grand Cay Abaco.

Friends may pay their last respects at the Funeral Home on Friday, May
15th, 2009 from 11:00 a.m. to 6:00 p.m. and on Saturday, April 16th from
9:00 a.m. until service time at the church.

THURSDAY, MAY 14, 2009, PAGE 17

FUNERAL ANNOUNCEMENT

LESTER
TERRANCE
PRATT

of Cabbage Point, Long Island
will be held on Saturday, May
16th at 10 am at Our Lady Of
Mount Carmel Catholic Church
in Hamilton's. Officiating will be
Deacon Patrick Darville, Assisted
by Cathecists Brenda Major and
Paul Cartwright. Interment will
be in Immaculate Conception
Cemetery, Mortimer's.

Let to mourn are His Parents: Rudolph and Naomi Pratt; wife:
Carolyn; one daughter: Lesliann; two adopted daughters: Aniska
& Danielle Cartwright; three adopted sons: Lernado Pinder, Jamal
& Demal Cartwright; one grandson: Malcolm Missick;
grandmother: Fredricka Martinborough; one sister: Pamela
Rutherford; two brothers: Kevin Pratt & Denzil Gibson; two
adopted sisters: Bathsheba Fernander & Corrine Laing; four adopted
brothers: Bonaventure & Eric Uriah Turnquest, Baltron Major, &
Kemison Seymour; two sisters-in-law: Angela Pratt & Nekita
Gibson; one brother-in-law: Samson Heild; five nieces: Phylicia
& Krista Pratt, Gillian Mullings, Desiree Gibson & Lisa Heild; two
nephews: D'Angelo Pratt & Jonathan Taylor; twelve aunts: Martha
Turnquest, Doreen Russell, Nathalee Martinborough, Ena Robinson,
Margaret Major, Albertha Clincy, Felicity Walker, Mavis, Rhonda,
& Dilene Martinborough, Antonia & Sheena Pratt; eleven uncles:
Oswald, Vernal, Edwin, Warren & William Hayward Martinborough,
Kim, Leo, Edward & Chris Pratt, Ricky Robinson & Ambrose
Clincy; eight grandaunts: Joanna Allen, Susanna Martinborough,
Parnell Darville, Mavis Pratt, Catherine Knowles, Ezelia Carroll,
Lucy & Lorene Watson; three granduncles: James & Erwin Pratt,
& Thomas Watson; and a host of other relatives and friends
including: Drexel & Duvaughn Major, Dulcie Armbrister, Davina
Lewis, Adeleica Campbell, Patrick Fernander, Yamilka Turnquest,
Troy Laing, Daniel & Jennifer Cartwright, Nancy Arangel, Naomi
Major, Wendall Carroll & Family, Capt. John Pratt & Family,
Toinette Major, Julianna Bullard, McField Mortimer & Family, John
Major & Family, Sandra Russell, Donald Mortimer, David Dean &
Family, Bertram Smith & Family, The Burrows Family, The
Cartwright Family, The Watson Family, The entire Berry's
Community, Paul Carroll & Family, Lawrence Carroll & Family,
John Knowles & Family, Carlos Milander & Family, Stephen
Williams, Colleen & Ian Adderley, Cyril Jr. & Valence Turnquest,
Wesley Carroll, Annanias Mortimer, Florence Cartwright, Virgil
Cartwright, Lionel Smith, Daniel Dean, Pedro Turnquest, Rosalie
Adderley, Violet Major, Mary Lightbourne, Admiral Ferguson Jr.,
Ike Miller, Joey Smith, Anderson Adderley, Marilyn Burrows, Mr.
& Mrs. David Linclon, Emilio, Mabel, Orlando & Carmen Maria
of Cuba, his classmates of St. John's College and NGM Major High
School, The Holy Name Burial Society, Deacon Patrick Darville &
Family, Fr, Patrick Fanning, Fr. Ernest Pratt, The Doctor, Nurses
& the staff of the Health Centre in Deadman's Cay.

Viewing will be held at Vaughn O. Jones Memorial Centre, Wulff
Rd. on Thursday from Spm to 7pm and at the church in Long Island
on Friday from 4pm until service time on Saturday.


PAGE 18,

THURSDAY, MAY 14, 2009

THE TRIBUNE OBITUARIES

Bemeritte’ s Huneral Home

AHAMAS’ OLDEST MORTUARY
MARKET STREET e¢ P.O. BOX GT-2097 ¢ TEL: 323-5782

FUNERAL SERVICES FOR

Cedric Clifford,
"Merengue" Taylor, 69

a bexiralllbe 7 ey 2008 all Lockhart family, Charles Carter and family, St. Francis Xavier
be held at St. Francis Xavier :
Cathedral, West Hill Street, on |
Saturday at 9:45 a.m. Officiating :
will be Fr. Glen Nixon. Interment :

rouows In Gatnclie Cemetery, Friends may pay their last respects at Demeritte's Funeral

: Home, Market Street, from 10-6:00 p.m. on Friday & on

Left to praise and thank God for :
Clifford are one son: Scott Taylor ;
and his spouse Jackie; one adopted son: Christopher Davis; :
one adopted daughter: Christina Davis; two grand daughters: :
Shantese and Cheyenne Taylor; one brother: Fredrick "Blake" :

Infant View Road.

Taylor; one adopted brother and confidant: Philip "Brave"

Davis Member of Parliament; four sisters: Mary Laramore- }
Rolle, Alice Dean, Valencia Taylor-Smith and Frederica :
Lightbourne; One sister-in-law: Ann Marie Davis; two :
brothers-in-law: John Pickstock, and Wellington Lightbourne :
Sr.; fifteen nieces including: Gloria Sears, Cynthia Johnson, :
Hope Curry, Karen and Beverly Young, Joann White, Patricia :
Chisholm, Shalencia Major, Richardette Bredl of Vienna :
Austria, Elizabeth Bowe of South Carolina, Laurette Levy :
of Chicago, Illinois, Monique and Krista Taylor, and Joyann :
Dean; Fourteen nephews including, Theodore and Philip :
Laramore, Samuel Rolle, Paul, Kirby, Frankie and John :
Pickstock, Sean and Wellington Lightbourne, Patrick, and :
William Dean, Freddie Taylor and Sheldon Smith; host of :
other relatives and friends including, Denise Sears, Lorraine :
Bowleg, Shenique Taylor, Basil "Chubby" Sears, Shelayah :
and Shaniah Smith, Omar and Keliah Chisholm; Joey, :
Allison, Alease, Alisha, Alia and Dason Dean, Shadia and :
Cruz Major; Zhiva Thompson, Danae, Damian and Philecia :
Laramore, Dustin and Dareka Taylor, Brando Roberts, Kaliel :
Curry, Brian and Christian Culmer, Joey, Allison, Dason, :
Drazen, Lamado, Wishard, Antoinelle, Taniesha, Tameica, :
Anyahna, Lakeisha and William Dean Jr., Carolyn and }
Cranston Smith, Aretha and Gelisa Higgs, Andrea Johnson; :
Al and Gertston Swann; Basil Sears Sr., Aluis Bredl of :
Austria, Nurse Ruth Albury, Dorcas Bowler, Franklyn and :

Rhinehart Pearson, Dennis Brown and Regina Smith.

"Woody" Woodside, Brook Sherman,

: Cumberbatch, Alonzo Adams, Cessarina Francis, Marina
: and Betty Davis and family, Volodis Carey, Dale Munnings,
: Pamela Miller, Berkley Chisholm, Gilda Dean, the Pearson

family, Randolph Cleare family, the Fernander family, the

Church family, and the Augusta Street, Wilkinson Street,
and West Street neighbors, Dr. Duane Sands and the staff
of the Male Surgical Ward II, and others too numerous to
mention.

Saturday at the church from 8:45 a.m. until service time.

Mr. Chariton Anthony
Pinder, 27

a resident of Miami, Florida &
formerly of Nassau, who died on
30 April, 2009, will be held at
Transfiguration Baptist Church,
Market & Vesey Streets, on
Saturday at 11:00 a.m. Officiating
will be Rev'd. Dr. Stephen E.
Thompson, assisted by Rev'd
Basil Johnson. Interment follows
in Old Trail Cemetery, Old Trail
Road.

Cherished memories will always linger in the hearts of his
mother: Althea Fowler; father: William Pinder; step-father:
William Scott; four sisters: Laquell and Likisha Scott, Tommy
and Vernessa Pinder; five brothers: Earnest, Francisco,
Christopher, Renardo and Renaldo Pinder; one sister-in-
law: Monalisa Pinder; one nephew: Shaki Pinder; four aunts:
Cleon Johnson, Rev. Cassie Neely, Fredricka Johnson and
Susan McCardy; three uncles: Vincent Rolle, Thomas
Johnson and Bishop Illin Neely; thirty-six cousins: Dericka,
Steven, Naomi, Lisa, Monique, Stanley, Kino, Keyanna,
Qutel, Dominique, Deneko, Florance, Iris, Floitha, Manniel,
Harvey, Wilfred, Lucy, Carla, Tressie, Jack, Abby, William,
Doreen, Wilmore, Pauline, Deem Nonnie, Rona, Terry, Gland,

: Anique, Felisha, Harvey, Perry and Reuntis; other relatives
Wilmore, Whitia and Mia Bowe of South Carolina; Special :
friend and Advisor, Bradley B. Roberts former Minister of :
Works; personal friend Alphonso "Boogaloo" Elliott, Alfred :
Sears, Member of Parliament and family, Sir Arlington Butler, :
Valentine Grimes and family, Ronnie Armbrister, Eugene :
Delancy, Joseph "Doc" Dorsett, Oswald Greenslade, Al }
Sherman, Eneas Theophilis, Maxwell, Gregg and Eric :
Elsworth :

and friends including: his American Family, Martin Street
family, Hay and Taylor Street family, Lenneth Perpal and
family, Shedrick Ellis and family, The Transfiguration family.

Friends may pay their last respects at Demeritte's Funeral
Home, Market Street, from 10-6:00 p.m. on Friday & on
Saturday at the church from 10:00 a.m. until service time.


THE TRIBUNE OBITUARIES

THURSDAY, MAY 14, 2009,

Bemeritte’ s Huneral Home

AHAMAS’ OLDEST MORTUARY
MARKET STREET e PO. BOX GT-2097 ¢ TEL: 323-5782

FUNERAL SERVICES FOR

Mrs. Iva Elma
"Titty"
Hanna-Ferguson, 74

Spikenard Roads.

Left to mourn are two sons: PC 1288 Bernard Ferguson :
Sr., and Kevin Ferguson; one daughter: Rowena Johnson; :
eight (8) grandchildren: Samantha Wright, Jameco, }
Bernadette, Shakeva, Deangelo, Bernard Jr., Brian and :

Kayjah Ferguson; three great grandchildren: Desmond, :
Okia, and Cearia; five (5) brothers: Henry, Erington, Edniel, :
Preston and Curtis Hanna Sr.; five (6) sisters: lola Hanna- :
Lynes, Freda Hart and Naomi Marton, Louise Smith, :
Madlin Simms of Delray Beach, Fla; one aunt: Myrtle :
Mines; numerous nieces and nephews: Shirley, Beverly, : :
Isabell, Deiry of New Jersey, Stacy Hart and Telcle- Mae follow in Southern Cemetery, Cowpen & Spikenard Roads.
Joann Simms of :
Jacksonville Fla., Deidre McIntosh of Freeport, Judy, :
Rochelle, and Monique, Rudymae, Nikki, Violet, Unice, : ee :
Shirley, Lordell, Kelsey, Elva, Vernitta, Leola, Denise, : Bunches, Long Island; 6 sisters: Mrs. Viola Ferguson of
Barbara, Belinda, Joann, George Jr., Brian and Charles :

Se Sey ee oe ey ete ees i Flossie Taylor of Turn Bull, Long Island, Mrs. Vernie

Bonaby of West Palm Beach, FI.,

Henfiled, Huley Hanna, Demarco, Deangero, Ednal Jr.,

Curtis Jr., Nelson, Valentine, Brian, Stafford, Leslie, Milton, |
Thomas, Collin, Lionel, Ellis, James; one-daughter-in- :
law: Valdia Dean Ferguson; one son-in-law: Trevor :
Johnson; two brothers-in-law: Edward Bobby Glinton :
and James Ferguson; sisters-inlaw: Mavis Hanna, Vivian :
Johnson, Grace Ferguson, Mavis and Brenda Hanna and :
Joyce Turnquest, Yvonne Hanna, Olive and Mabel Hanna; :
other relatives and friends including: Yvonne Coakley :
Ferguson, Jocelyn Saunders, Beverly Cooper, David :
Cooper, Effie Cooper, Beatrice Cooper, Mich Heart, Mary :
Hanna, Lluma Rolle, Orie Hanna, Marina Hanna, Daisy :
Hanna,Lottason Miller, Stephanie Molly, Grace Colebrook, :
Littyetha, Ashley, Diane Burrows, Alvin Collie, King :
Deveaux, Deidre Deveaux and Family, Chief Supt. David :
and Wendall Deveaux of The Royal Bahamas Police :

: Force, Douglas Hanna, Lawrence McKinney, Lorraine
: Bastian, Karen Beckles of Miami, Fla, Wendal Jones and
: Family, Margarita Tynes and Family, Ted, Garland and
: Roy Cooper, Audrey, Brenda and Debra Cooper, Ernel

4 yesidenber Wilson Tract & : Heastie and Family, Ruby Percentie, Lethondor, Carl

formerly of Spring Point, :
Abaco, who died on 2 May, :
2009, will be held at Amazing :
Grace Baptist Church, Wilson :
ee as pe aae = 7 Saturday at the church from 10:00 a.m. until service time.
Officiating willbe PastorElvai ~~
Johnson, assisted by other :
Ministers of the Gospel. :
Interment follows in Southern Cemetery, Cowpen & :

Hanna, M.P. Alfred Gray, Bishop Carol Rolle and Family,
Dorey Cash and Family and Miss Cox.

Friends may pay their last respects at Demeritte's Funeral
Home, Market Street, from 10-6:00 p.m. on Friday & on

Lillian Butler, 86

a resident of Brougham
Street, & formerly of Turn Bull,
Long Island, who died on 1st
May, 2009, will be held at Our
Lady of the Holy Souls
Catholic Church, Deveaux
Street, on Saturday at 12:00
noon. Officiating will be Fr.
Michael Kelly, ss.cc., assisted
by Rev. Deacon Peter
Rahming & Rev. Deacon
Maxwell Johnson. Interment

Left to cherish her memories are her 1 daughter: Mrs.
Theresa Ferguson; 1 brother: Mr. Edward Gibson of

Nassau, Mrs. Dorine Armbrister of Ft. Lauderdale, Florida,
Mrs. Florence Taylor of Deadmans Cay, Long Island, Mrs.

Mackey and Ms. Rose Gibson of Nassau; 2 grandsons:
David and Herbert Ferguson; 5 grand daughters: Rose,
Freda, Monica, Debbie Pratt and Joanne; 1 grand
daughter-in-law: Shantell Ferguson; several great grand
children, numerous nieces and nephews and a host of
relatives and friends including: Our Lady Church family,
the Brougham Street family, Unity House family, Sarah
& family, the Sears family, Cypriana Rolle & family, the
Poitier family, Ed & family, Tomie & family, & Dorothy &
family.

Friends may pay their last respects at Demeritte's Funeral
Home, Market Street, from 10-6:00 a.m. on Friday & on
Saturday at the church from 11 :00 a.m. until service
time.



PAGE 19
PAGE 20,

THURSDAY, MAY 14, 2009

THE TRIBUNE OBITUARIES

Aemeritie’s Funeral Aome

BAHAMAS’ OLDEST MORTUARY
MARKET STREET ¢ P.O. BOX GT-2097 © TEL: 323-5782

Z RVICES FOR

OTS eS

Sharmaine Michelle
Hanna, 29

a resident of Bahama Avenue, who :
died on 4th May, 2009, will be held :
| at The Apostles of the End Time }
Church, West & Ferguson Streets, on :
Sunday at 11:00 a.m. Officiating will :
be Pastor Carlos Wallace, assisted :
| by other Ministers. Interment follows :
| in Lakeview Memorial Gardens, John :

F. Kennedy Drive.

Memories will always linger in the :

hearts of her loving parents: Keith :
and Adora; brother: Reginald; sisters: D'iavan Lauren, Sharone and :
Paige; sister-in-law: Renee; grandmothers: Joycelyn Nairn and Inez :
Boyd Carey; aunts: Rosemary, Shirleymae, Merlene and Judymae ;
Cole, Paige Boyd, Nina McBride, Sheena Cooper, Alice Dorsette, :
Patricia Bannister of Freeport, Beryl Huyler, Cherine Carey and Floramae :
Carey; uncles: Anthony and Samuel Cole, Vaughn, Wayne and Cordell :
Carey, Gaylene McBride, Garnett Dorsett, Wellington Cooper Sr., :
grandaunt: Berthmae Bowleg and Family of Freeport; Cousins: Monalisa :
Cole, Marine Seaman Corey Cole, Kevon, Desmond, Derrick and
Rodney Neymour, PC 2530 Dawkins, Gregory Dorsette, Kenrick, ;
Vernell and Cheryl Huyler, Shenique Thompson, Rodney Smith, Austin :
Cole, Sandra Anderson, Tamika and Eldon Johnson, Yovell Thompson,
Gaylene Cole, Quentin Scott, Akeem, Kanya, Adonis, Leonardo Carey, :
Jahson, Wayne Carey Jr., Gaynell Cole, Garbrielle McBride, Genae, :
Gianina McBride, Nicholas Jr., Cordell Carey Jr., Eric, Akilah Lightbourne, :
Ashante Cooper, Wellington Jr., Jewell, Terrell Carey, Vanessa Cole, :
Denise, Antoinette and Ricardo Bannister of Freeport, Nadine Cole, :
Marilyn Neymour and Nicole Dorsette; Special friends: Jermaine }
Edwards of Jamaica, Kareem and Felicia Hanna, Gia Burnside, Shakira ;
Dean, Javon Rolle, Indera, Vinette, Pierre, Feliciad, Genell, Mrs. :
Marcella, Staff and Students of Cameron University, Oklahoma. }
godchildren: Derrick Edgecombe, Karae Hanna, Dwayne Charles Jr., :
Kenneth Ferguson Jr.; other relatives and friends including: The Nairns, :
Rolle's, Stuarts of Freeport, Grand Bahama, Fowler, Harold and Mrs. :
Cole, Naomi Williams, Marjorie Johnson, Pratt's, Evans, Neely's, Coles :
and Pennerman families; Apostle and Mother Wallace, Pastor Carlos :
and Evangelist Allison Wallace, Pastor Benjamin and Mother Forbes, :
Apostle and Mother Duncombe (Andros), Mother Burrows, Pastor
Preston and Evangelist Collins, Pastor Johnny and Brenda Martin, :
WeeCare Committee, Youth Choir and Director Cherrine Hart, Missionary :
Department and the entire End Time Family, Priest Wellington Wallace :
and Family, Nathaniel and Winnifred Knowles, Mrs. Saunders, The :
Bowes and the Bahama Avenue Family, BCM of Lawton Ok., Donnahue :
and Sis. Mae and family, Romeo and family, Mr. & Mrs. LeGendre and :
family (Trinidad and Tobago), Patricia Sawyer and family, Denise }
Sawyer, Pastor of Towanda Methodist Church, Daisy Middleton, Sis. :
Burrows, Dwight and Miriam Charlow, Mrs. Okpuno, Aquinas Class :
of 1985, Alphonso and Willimae Smith, Mr. & Mrs. Edwards and Family :
of Jamaica, Kelly Hamilton, Janet Bain, Jerome Franks of Miami, Fla., :
and Courtnell Brown (Hairdresser). Special Thanks to S/N Kemp and :
Mrs. King, Dr. Dames and Family, Nursing Officers, S/N, TCN, Surgical :
Techs, Porters, Senior Clerk, Maids, Anaesthetic Associates of Main :
Operating Theatre, Sister Curry and Oliver, Dr. Farquharson and Staff :
of Bahamas Surgical Associates, Dr. Munroe, Dr. Barnett, Doctors :

and Nurses of ICU, Doctors and Nurses of Comanche and Norman
Regional Hospital especially 4 West, Rufus Pholemus, Doctors Moss,
Nwosa, Morgan, Lloyd, Burrows, T. Ferguson, Gynae Department,
Surgical and Vascular Team, Anaesthetic Department, Assist America
Insurance Company, the entire staff of PMH and all those whom
Sharmaine had impacted.

Friends may pay their lat respects at Demeritte's Funeral Home, Market
Street, from 10-6:00 p.m. on Saturday & on Sunday at the church
from 10:00 a.m. until service time.

Romeo
Bain, 30

a resident of Bowen Sound, Andros,
who died on 2nd may, 2009, will be
held at St. Peter's Anglican Church,
Bowen Sound, Andros, on Saturday
at 11:00 a.m. Officiating will be Rev.
Fr. Donald G. Kerr. Interment follows
in Fresh Creek, Andros.
Left to cherish his memories are his
wife: Vanessa Bain; his parents:
Sidney and Amanda Bain; six
brothers: Hermon, Dennis, Taras,
Raynor, Renardo and Dircris Bain;
six sisters: Beverly Clarke, Deborah Bomar, Patrice and Evangelist
Natasha Miller, Evangelist Kimberlyn Darville and Valencia Bain; father-
in-law: Vincent Symonette; mother-in-law: Jennifer Symonette; sisters-
in-law: Evangelist Antoinette, Terry, Tarama and Wonda Bain, Natasha,
Savannah and Mikiah Symonette, Tiffany Johnson and Tamara
Duncombe; brothers-in-law: Ron Bomar, Brian and Michael Miller,
Andre Darville, Vincent Jr. Symonette, Joel Johnson, Stephen Moultrie
and Latrell Symonette; nephews: Deneico, Desmond, Sidney, Derek,
Dennis Jr., Taras Jr., Nearo, Dashano and Renardo Jr. Bain, Livingston,
Rakeem and Kim Clarke, Hugh Edgecombe, Rickmon and Donniel
Deveaux, Shanard, Brian Jr., and Michael Jr. Miller, Ramon and Renard
Mackey, Doreen Bomar, Phillip and Donavon; nieces: D'Nash, Jqella,
Jessica, Rayana, Donnika, Shania and Suray Bain, Sinclear, Annyah,
Roshan and Alyssa Clarke, Britney and Demeteria Edgecombe,
Mataeyah Bomar, Desiray Deveaux, Angell Darville, Miacha Miller,
Dushinka, Daria and Darisha, Riche and Delia Symonette; uncles:
Rudolph, Pastor Thomas and Elder Nathaniel Mackey, Israel Bain,
Hubert Curtis, Bishop Ellis Farrington, Ernest Duncombe, Wellington
Burrows, Jason Smith and Lawrence Burrows; aunts: Bloomon Mackey,
Sis. Gertrude Newton, Catachist Aline Wilson, Mother Daisy Farrington,
Mother Beatrice Davis, Evangelist Gloria Curtis, Evangelist Madline
Mackey, Sis. Elizabeth, Paula Smith, Pearline Burrows and Christine
Smith; other relatives and friends including: The Bain's, Mackey's,
Duncombe's, Wilson's, Curtis, Nesbitt's, Farrington's, Neymour's,
Robinson's, Clarke's, Seymonette's, Davis's, Coakley's, Anderson's,
and Neely's families; the Doctor and Nurses of Fresh Creek Clinic,
other numerous friends and relatives and the Bowen Sound Prowlers.

Friends may pay their last respects at Demeritte's Funeral Home,
Market Street, from 10-6:00 p.m. on Thursday & on Friday at the
church in Andros from 5:00 p.m. until service time.


THE TRIBUNE OBITUARIES

Bemeritte’s Funeral Home

BAHAMAS’ OLDEST MORTUARY
MARKET STREET ¢ P.O. BOX GT-2097 ¢ TEL: 323-5782

FUNERAL SERVICE FOR

Retired Nurse Erna Mae
"Erns" Brown, 64

a resident of Soldier Road
& formerly of Clarks Town,
Jamaica, who died on the
30 April, 2009, will be held
at Abundant Life Bible
Chapel, Abundant Life
Road, on Saturday at
11:00 a.m. Officiating will
be Pastor Gil Maycock.
Interment follows in
Lakeview Memorial
Gardens, JFK Drive.

Left to mourn her loss but celebrate her
magnificent legacy are her husband of thirty-nine
years: Asbert Lionel Brown; three daughters:
Jacqueline, Angella and Yvette Michelle; one
grandson: Kidane Bell; one niece: Beverly White;
two nephews: Roy White and Anthony White;
four grandnieces: Beulah, Angella, Vanessa and
Tia; one grandnephew: Jerry; seven brothers-in-
law: Antonio, Godfrey, T. Carmichael, Locksley
Sr., Julian Brown Sr., Lincoln Forbes and Wilson
Kelly: six sisters-in-law: Elaine Forbes, Lorna
Greene, Vernice Brown, Marilyn and Arlene Brown
and Verneva Whyms; grand nephews: Terrance
Brown Jr., Jamaal, Locksley Jr., Audirio Sears,
Julian Jr., Travis Raker: six nieces-in-law; Sherry
Neely, Teryl, Lynette, Tamara and Kristen Brown
and, Chikera Greene and numerous other relatives
and friends including: Celestine Bootle, Cora
Jones, Katrinka Johnson, Kaylus Horton, Maurice
Ferguson, Dr. Conville Brown, Dr. lferenta, Doctors
& Nurses of ICU at Princess Margaret Hospital,
Erma Carey, Jacqueline Rolle, Valentino Bethel,
Dr. Sands, Abundant Life & BFM Prayer Warriors.

Friends may pay their last respects at Demeritte's
Funeral Home, Market Street, from 10-6:00 p.m.
on Friday & on Saturday at the church from 10:00
a.m. until service time.

THURSDAY, MAY 14, 2009,

Commonfuealth Huneral 4 one

& Independence Drive « Phone: 341-4055 a

FUNERAL SERVICE FOR

BENJAMIN FRANKLYN

WILSON, 33
Affectionately called “Big Griff’

of Wemyss Bight, Eleuthera,
will be held on Saturday
11:00 a.m. at Voice of
Deliverance Faith Ministries,
Wemyss Bight, Eleuthera.
Bishop Ernest Sweeting,
assisted by Pastor Paul
Thompson, Prophet Anthony
Miller and Rev. Cedric Hall
will officiate and interment
will follow in the Public
Cemetery, Wemyss Bight,
Eleuthera.

Left to cherish fond

memories are his mother,
Mary Wilson; father, Jimmy Wilson; three sisters, Helena Gibson,
Stephanie Johnson, Margaret Taylor; one stepsister, Erica Sands;
three brothers, Allen Wright, Jimmy Jr., and Timothy Wilson;
grandparents, Stafford and Catherine Sweeting and Margaret
Thompson; seven aunts, Ellen Mackey, Rosanna Cash, Geraldine,
Veronica, Nathalie and Lee Sweeting and Patricia Sands; six
uncles, Bishop Earnest Sweeting, George, Austin and Nelson
Sweeting, Anthony Cash and Jonathan Mackey; seven nieces,
Elgina, Tiffany, Brittney, Glendrea, Timmesha, Alena and Cornelle;
eleven nephews, Shavado, Shawn, Lanardo, Derrick, Bradley,
Glenroy Jr., Max, Miles, Elgin Jr., Javin and Allan; five grand
aunts, Dorcus Strachan, Vera Rolle, Mable Delancy, Sybil and
Agnes Sweeting; one granduncle, Gifford Sweeting; two sisters-
in-law, Claudia Wilson and Shera Wright; three brothers-in-law,
Allan Johnson, Elgin Gibson and Glenroy Taylor; one godfather,
John Pinder; one godmother, Val; six best friends, Carlin, Kevin,
Keno, Glen, Owen and Whoopi; a host of other relatives and
friends including, Mr. Oswald Ingraham, MP Rock Sound,
Eleuthera and family, the Wemyss Bight community, Mr James
Young and family, Mr Gary Sands and family, Abby and family,
Mark and family, the members of the Assemblies of God Church,
Retta and family, the staff from Princess Cay, Half-moon Cay,
Vernita Sweeting, Mr Paul Thompson and family, Mr Daniel
Nixon and family, and the Taylor family.

Relatives and friends may view the remains at THE CHAPEL
OF MEMORIES COMMONWEALTH FUNERAL HOME
INDEPENDENCE DRIVE on Thursday from 5:00 - 7:30 p.m.
on Friday from 10:00 - 11:30 a.m. and in Wemyss Bight, Eleuthera
on Friday at Assemblies of God from 7:30 p.m. and on Saturday
at Voice of Deliverance from 9:30 a.m. to service time.



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