Citation
The Tribune

Material Information

Title:
The Tribune
Uniform Title:
Tribune (Nassau, Bahamas)
Portion of title:
Nassau tribune
Place of Publication:
Nassau, Bahamas
Publisher:
Tribune
Publication Date:
Copyright Date:
2009
Frequency:
Daily, except Sunday
daily
normalized irregular
Language:
English
Physical Description:
v. : ill. ; 58 cm.

Subjects

Genre:
newspaper ( sobekcm )
newspaper ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage:
Bahamas

Notes

General Note:
Description based on: Vol. 79, no. 210 (Aug. 3, 1983); title from caption.

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Holding Location:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
This item was contributed to the Digital Library of the Caribbean (dLOC) by the source institution listed in the metadata. This item may or may not be protected by copyright in the country where it was produced. Users of this work have responsibility for determining copyright status prior to reusing, publishing or reproducing this item for purposes other than what is allowed by applicable law, including any applicable international copyright treaty or fair use or fair dealing statutes, which dLOC partners have explicitly supported and endorsed. Any reuse of this item in excess of applicable copyright exceptions may require permission. dLOC would encourage users to contact the source institution directly or dloc@fiu.edu to request more information about copyright status or to provide additional information about the item.
Resource Identifier:
09994850 ( OCLC )

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Full Text
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Pim blowin’ it

S6F
TIF

PARTLY
SUNNY

Volume: 105 No.141

ee

The Tribune

=USA TODAY.

BAHAMAS EDITION

www.tribune242.com

WEDNESDAY, MAY 13, 2009

CARS FOR SALE,
a
AND REAL a

BAHAMAS BIGGEST

HIGH
LOW

a oe,



Na Te

aU

Cla esa)

Lands and —



Emerald Bay

Resort subject
of ‘$35m bid’

flirector resigns

Tex Turnquest steps
down as nepotism
and corruption
claims take toll

on govt department

Lands and Surveys
Director speaks out

0 SMe
Raper



THE TRIBUNE has published a
series of articles on the subject.

m@ By PAUL G TURNQUEST
Tribune Staff Reporter
pturnquest@tribunemedia.net

FOLLOWING a series of
explosive articles in The Tri-
bune over the past few weeks
the director of Lands and Sur-
veys Tex Turnquest resigned
from his post yesterday as
reports of nepotism and cor-





FIREFIGHTERS had to be
called early yesterday
morning to the new road
near to the Albany project,

ruption continue to take its toll
on this government department.

It was claimed that relatives
of the director, including his
mother-in-law were granted
prime beachfront Crown land

after a truck carrying
propane tanks turned over
hitting a similar vehicle.
Neither driver was seri-
ously injured.






Philippines warns of
Filipinos being illegally
trafficked in the
Bahamas, Caribhean





US company
seeking to

buy hotel









m@ By PAUL G
TURNQUEST
Tribune Staff Reporter
pturnquest@
tribunemedia. net

AMWAY Corporation, a
Michigan based company
that owns the Cape at
Eleuthera resort, have made
a bid to the Mitsui Corpo-
ration of Japan for the pur-
chase of the Emerald Bay
Resort in Great Exuma.

According to sources
close to the sale, Amway
Corporation has placed a
$35 million bid with the
understanding that it would
assume all the hotel’s out-
standing debts during its
years in operation.

Clifford Johnson, senior
partner of Pricewater-
HouseCoopers, said his
firm, which has been
appointed receivers for the
insurance giant Mitsui Cor-
poration will release a state-
ment today on the matter.
Mr Johnson confirmed that
there has been fairly signifi-
cant discussions held thus
far, but stressed that a sale
has yet to be completed.

Noting these reports, the
former Member of Parlia-
ment for Exuma, George
Smith said that Exumians
would welcome the news of
some form of development
at the Emerald Bay proper-
ty. However, he said that as
the principals of Amway
have yet to make significant
improvements to their prop-

SEE page 16



Appointment of Justice Lyons

‘may have been a mistake’

THE appointment of
Senior Supreme Court

take. Almost from his
appointment he made

in Exuma for less than $2,500. Felipé Major/ CONTRACTS SIGNED Justice John Lyons may 1 it known that having
i have been a mistake in decided to adopt a

SEE page 16 Tubinessta m@ By TANEKA THOMPSON FOR COMPLETION OF the first place, accord- J Bahamian lifestyle and
Tribune Staff Reporter ing to veteran lawyer J make the Bahamas his

tthompson@tribunemedia.net ABACO AIRPORT Lionel Levine. home he wanted to

AUTO INSURANCE

THE Philippines’ Department
of Foreign Affairs has warned
its citizens of a rising trend of
Filipinos being illegally trafficked
in the Bahamas and other coun-

WATER SUPPLY IS AT

In a statement on
Justice Lyon's unex-
pected resignation from
the bench last week, Mr
Levine said that almost
from the start of his



Wy retire here and carry on
the profession of law
after his retirement as
judge.

"Such talk made him
the prey of ambitious

tries in the Caribbean region, ‘CRITICALLY LOW’ Saar yaaa ae in a with political
: ; the Bahamas, Justice John Lyons ambitions.
r r ae a ee LEVELS Lyons made known his s “T know as I was the
eC V € S ad y QO ul Cian the Philippines’ intent to retire in this country and victim of such predation and the
i: 8. HH ae fh pursue a more lucrative post asa ramifications continue," said Mr
aac a se a ae : acsecadscvazesssnsaususansssansuscstasssavasuasanbasaass local attorney. Levine.
ee enone i os ae This admission may have made Justice Lyons made headlines
: Justice Lyons the target of fellow after his fellow justice, Anita Allen
than a year of human traffick- OPINION DIVIDED ON members of the legal fraternity recently criticised him for appoint-
Ww h : ng, he Havana as a transit CONTAINER SHIPPING with lofty ambitions, he said. ing Daniel Ferguson, an accoun-
1 » : pont. . . "Justice Lyons may have done tant, to work on a recent case
ve it comes to The latest incident involved FACILITIES RELOCATION much good work in dealing expe- knowing that he shared “more

Auto Insurance,
remember the smart choice is
Insurance Management.
Smart people you can trust.

F/|INSURANCE MANAGEMENT

(BAHAMAS) LIMTED, INSURANCE BROKERS & AGENTS

Hey Peden | Grond bctna Fi
ES WA) eM) SFN



eT

TINO S400 (a 4) 08) | STAI

two Filipino citizens who were

SEE page 16

British
American

ditiously with the commercial busi-
ness in recent years, but his
appointment proved to be a mis-



IVa Notes \LUl

ND BAHAMA,

ISLANDS’ LEADING NEWSPAPER

SEE page 16

SEU Lake
a ge
RL CL Las
HEALTH INSURANCE

Pa ak
& PENSION PLANS

ae ee
Pee a





PAGE 2, WEDNESDAY, MAY 13, 2009 THE TRIBUNE
LOCAL NEWS

MW MARSH HARBOUR INTERNATIONAL AIRPORT PROJECT —
Contracts signed for completion of Abaco Airport

@ By Kathryn Campbell





MARSH HARBOUR,
ABACO - Public Works and
Transport Minister Neko
Grant and officials from his
Ministry signed various con-
tracts to complete the Marsh
Harbour International Air-
port air-side project.

“Tt is our intent to enhance
the capacity of the Marsh
Harbour airport facility to
provide quality services to the
public,” said Mr Grant dur-

ing the signing ceremony at JERRY WALKER of Jeppesen signs a contract with the Ministry of Pub-
the Ministry of Education’s — |j¢ Works and Transport for the redesign and publication of instrument
conference room last week- flight procedures at Marsh Harbour International Airport. Pictured from left
end. , are MP for South Abaco Edison Key, Public Works and Transport Minis-
Among the signings was a ter Neko Grant, director of the Department of Civil Aviation Captain
$2,241,487 change order to an Patrick Rolle, Mr Walker, and permanent secretary Colin Higgs.
existing contract with
Bahamas Hot Mix for com-
pletion of the lighting, and
s = procurement of runway and
NEKO GRANT, Minister of Public Works and Transport, along with MP for South Abaco Edison Key and other _‘ taxi way lighting at a cost of
officials inspect conditions at the Marsh Harbour International Airport runway. $566,387.
The Minister also signed a

: $390,552 tract with
BIS Photos/Letisha Henderson Freeport Nursery and Garden
Company for hydro-seeding,

and a $114,083 contract with
US-based company Jeppesen
for redesign and publication









of instrument flight proce- asi a AX
dures. PUBLIC WORKS and Transport Minister Neko Grant and Ebbie Sadie of
Visual Bahamas Hot Mix seal the deal with a handshake following the signing of

a contract that provides additional funding for lighting of the Marsh Har-

« bour International Airport. Pictured from left are Cubel Davis, chief coun-
The works to be under- cillor; Rosco Thompson, chairman of the Township Committee; MP for
taken will reduce negative — South Abaco Edison Key; Minister Grant; Mr Sadie; John Schaeffer, Min-
visual impact and minimise istry of Works’ area representative; Colin Higgs, permanent secretary;
dust interference by the place- Cephas Cooper, Central Abaco Administrator, and Gordon Major, acting
ment of hydro-seeding on side _ director of Works.
slopes along drainage ditch-
es," said Mr Grant. "The con-
tract will entail the hydro-seed



positive impact” on its econo-

my.
installation and maintenance.” “The works to be Mr Grant said he will return
a ee of the ie undertaken will soon to advise of plans for a

arbour air-side operations . new terminal and tower con-
began March 2007 with the reduce negative trol and to receive input on











grant of a $3,068,470 contract visual impact and those plans.
KNOX RUSSELL of Freeport Nursery and Garden Company Limited to Bahamas Hot Mix to con- minimise dust The minister’s team includ-

iia et receives a contract from Public Works and Transport Minister Neko — struct a new taxi-way andre- | ed permanent secretary Colin
Sa eCity Grant for the installation and maintenance of hydro-seeding forthe Marsh = surface the existing runway, interference by Higgs; acting director of
Harbour International Airport project. Pictured from left are Chief Coun- = Mr Grant explained. the placement of Worle Gordon Major; the

cillor Cubel Davis; chairman of the Township Committee Rosco Thomp- It subsequently became : a , .
Di son; Edison Key, MP for South Abaco; Minister Grant; Mr Russell; per- apparent belete aa was a Nydro-seeding on MGR OE WOE aa ene



ng ime for Abaco John Schaefer.
- - manent secretary Colin Higgs; Central Abaco administrator Cephas Coop- ~—s peed to revise the original ‘ re i i ,
eet er, and acting director of Works Gordon Major. plans eae side slopes along as ue ea ee
to $8,209,091. he said drainage ditches.” ee ee
407,071, : Civil Aviation. They were
ee 7 We accompanied by senior
Slt y ' oe on : € administrator for the Central
ember of Parliament for Abaco District, Cephas Coop-
South Abaco and executive N eko Grant er.

chairman of Bahamas Agri-

cultural an Industrial Corpo- ae : cg MREESEN RRA RRSeRNCanensennconannsene ones esensoanensennseneeene®
ration (BAIC). and Chict facility is completed, he said,

C ‘flor Cubel Davi Abaco can look forward to ‘VO VIEW?
oe eee more second homeowners
Mr Key said Abaco is coming oi a
7 ey . : o have your say on this or any
ae oT yas eae Mr Davis said the new alrf- other issue, email The Tribune at:
port facilities are “very impor- letters@tribunemedia.net or

because of its yachting and tant to Abaco’s growth and deliver your letter to The Tribune

second-homeownership indus- development and will have “a on Shirley Street, P.O. Box N-3207
tries. When the new airport

eet
PE tt he

PUNISHABLE BY
TWO YEARS IN ing Editor John Marquis wat

. hailed as a “defender of the
ma poor” during a special retire-
J Al L A N D / O R ment reception hosted by the
Workers’ Party on Monday

A $2000 FINE.
. Members of the party, for-

mer deputy prime minister

| Frank Watson and College of
? the Bahamas lecturer Felix
Bethel were among those in

Ss attendance at the Bay Side
Hut, Arawak Cay.
aes: Workers Party leader Rod-

ney Moncur, the host of the



Former Tribune Managing Editor

hailed as ‘defender of the poor’



ad



reception, thanked Mr Mar- ; ; ;
ie : : : FROM L-R: Workers Party member, Neil Stubbs; Former Tribune managing
2 - i meneame lan se: Pees Editor John Marquis; Brian Smith, Workers Party Secretary General; COB
ig: ' e wy ou We Pay {0 eentur Britich eliicidm lecturer Felix Bethel; Allen Strachan, Workers Party Chairman; Jeffery
Py ail Le eee J a fila Williams, owner and proprietor of Bayside Hut; and Workers Party Leader

thropist William Sar aa Rodney Moncur; at a retirement reception Monday night.
ré 0 ri ant The former deputy prime
minister thanked Mr Marquis
for his work as an investigative
era ica e iS journalist, saying that his

brand of reporting contributes

I to the development of democ-
crime ru ns racy and ensures that govern-
ments act responsibly and are
" held accountable for their
actions. Mr Marquis thanked
those in attendance for com-

ing to bid him farewell.

The party dined on grilled
lobster, grouper, Black Vil-
lage peas and grits, and stir
fried vegetables.

The gathering was the sec-
ond farewell reception held
for The Tribune’s outgoing
managing editor, who leaves



the Bahamas this week. outstanding journalistic the mid-60s, Mr Marquis

{ ‘08 On Saturday, friends, fami- career which spanned almost held a number of top posts at

rT med. Confider if fe lislaitctet ly and colleagues gathered at 50 years — 11 of them with various newspapers in Eng-
econ "rae tus at k 4 @ 4130 iB nie ; the Breeze’s Bahamas Resort The Tribune. land before returning in 1999

to present Mr Marquis with After working as a_ to take The Tribune’s top
gifts and pay tribute to his reporter in the Bahamas in post.



THE TRIBUNE

WEDNESDAY, MAY 13, 2009, PAGE 3



LOCAL NEWS



0 In brief

Disabled
man robbed
of tricycle

A severely disabled down-
town vendor is appealing to
the public for assistance after
his only mode of transporta-
tion was stolen from his home
on Monday.

Wentworth Sears, 40, who
suffers from cerebral palsy, is
a well-known sight on Bay
Street, selling T-shirts to both
tourists and Bahamians.

Because of his disability, Mr
Sears uses either a walker or a
tricycle to get around.

After he finished work on
Monday, Mr Sears said, both
his walker and his tricycle
were stolen from his home
some time during the evening.

The vendor has reported the
incident to police, who have
assured him that they are
investigating the matter.

Speaking on behalf of Mr
Sears, Jerome “JT” Thomp-
son, a disability advocate and
friend of the vendor, said that
just a day after the robbery, a
“kind-hearted private citizen”
donated a walker to Mr Sears.

Another concerned citizen
has also set up an account at
Cycles Unlimited on Mackey
Street, which will be used to
buy Mr Sears a new tricycle.

Mr Thompson said his
friend has had “issues” with
the bus system in the past
because of his disability and
has found that the easiest
method of transportation is a
three-wheeled vehicle. He
appealed to members of the
public to donate to the Cycles
Unlimited account, so that Mr
Sears can once again have
transportation and continue to
make a living.

Police name
Stabbing
death victim

POLICE have identified
the man found stabbed to
death behind a Baillou Hill
Road building on Monday as
27-year-old Vernon Christ-
ian Rolle.

Rolle, a resident of Baillou
Hill Road, was the country’s
27th homicide victim. He
had been stabbed several
times in the chest.

Police received a call from
someone who discovered the
body at around 6.40am and
were led to the back of a
building opposite the Baillou
Hill Road clinic. They found
Rolle dressed in a plaid shirt
and dark trousers.

Superintendent Ellsworth
Moss, head of the Central
Detective Unit, said that
police have spoken toa
number of persons regarding
Rolle’s death and have now
detained someone for ques-
tioning.

Kiwanis clutt
meeting to he
held on Thursiay

THE Kiwanis Club of
Over-The-Hill’s weekly
meeting will be held on
Thursday, May 14, at 8pm at
Holy Cross Community Cen-
tre on Soldier Road.

Ryan Antonio, Lt Gover-
nor Elect of all Kiwanis
Clubs in the Bahamas, will
address the club.

He will speak on member-
ship growth and retention.

All Kiwanians are wel-
come to attend and bring
guests.

Animal Fun Day on
Saturday at the
Botanical Gardens

THE Bahamas Humane
Society will host its annual
Animal Fun Day this coming
Saturday at the Botanical
Gardens.

Because of the event, the
BHS will not hold a clinic
that day, however, there will
be a late clinic on Friday
from 3pm to 8pm.

Water supply is at
critically low levels

Corporation ‘trying its best to limit
severity’ of conservation measures

@ By ALISON LOWE
Tribune Staff Reporter
alowe @tribunemedia.net

THE Water and Sewerage
Corporation yesterday admit-
ted that the rationing of water
to homes in New Providence —
which has caused major incon-
venience to many residents —
comes as the supply of water
stored by the corporation has
reached “critically low levels.”

Robert Deal, Assistant
General Manager at the WSC,
said the corporation is “trying
its best to limit the severity
and duration of these conser-
vation measures (initiated
April 29, 2009) and hopes to
be in a position to relax them
in the next several days.”

Meanwhile, frustrated resi-
dents continue to contact The
Tribune to complain that the
inadequate water supply and
pressure levels have thrown
them into a bygone age, when
water had to be stored in
buckets.

Now, they say, having a
shower or doing laundry in a
rush is a luxury they can only
dream of.

A 59-year-old man, who
wished to remain anonymous,
told this newspaper on Mon-
day that the second and third
floors of the Chertsey Apart-
ments on Cable Beach, which
contain around 40 units, had
not had “a drop of water”
since last Thursday.

“It’s bloody ridiculous. I
have had to go to Bally’s
(gym) to take a shower and
when I’ve had morning meet-

Around $1.5m paid out under
jobless benefit scheme so far

@ By NATARIO McKENZIE
Tribune Staff Reporter

SO far, the National Insur-
ance Board has paid out
around $1.5 million under the
unemployment benefit
scheme, NIB director Alger-
non Cargill said.

NIB began issuing unem-
ployment benefit cheques last
Monday.

“T would say about 3,600
persons have collected their
cheques so far,” Mr Cargill
told The Tribune yesterday.
“We have paid out about a
million and a half dollars so
far.”

Mr Cargill said that NIB is
still receiving claims under the
unemployment benefit
scheme.

“Registration continues and
as of Friday of last week we
received 6,490 claims. Off
those claims approximately
4,000 have been approved so
far,” he said.

“Quite a few people are
coming in every day to regis-
ter. We receive about 100
applications every day,” Mr
Cargill said.

The unemployment benefit,
which will be funded to the
tune of $20 million from the
Medical Benefits Fund of the
National Insurance Board, is



“For cooking and
washing dishes we
have to use
drinking water.
Those tenants who
had guests staying
have been forced
to have them go
and stay in hotels.
It doesn’t give
Nassau a good
name.”



ings, I have had to cancel
them,” said the resident.

“For cooking and washing
dishes we have to use drinking
water. Those tenants who had
guests staying have been
forced to have them go and
stay in hotels. It doesn’t give
Nassau a good name,” he
added.

Experience

His experience mirrored
that of Winton resident Sam-
my Ferguson, who said his
apartment building located
near the Sea Grape Plaza on
Prince Charles Drive was
without water for a similar
period two weeks ago, and
that of a Camperdown resi-
dent, who claims water pres-
sure in her neighbourhood has
been virtually non-existent for
months.

In all three instances, the

Pr

Fae dk

Algernon Cargill



primarily for unemployed per-
sons who made National
Insurance contributions while
they were employed.

Maximum

The benefit provides a max-
imum of $200 per week for a
maximum of 13 weeks at a
time.

The unemployment benefit

MAIN/SPORTS SECTION

Local News

Editorial/Letters. ..........

Sports

Fees, 5 OGoue

Seeaece sere ea eee rss P4

ean deae
P13,14,15

BUSINESS/ARTS SECTION

CLASSIFIED SECTION 40 PAGES

USA TODAY MAIN SECTION 12 PAGES



MiNi baile

in international
bribery inquiry


































































THE Bahamas is home to at least one company accused of
being involved in an international bribery scheme.

According to the news website www.monstersandcrit-
ics.com, the German government is looking into allegations
that payoffs were handed out to promote the sale of certain
German-made trucks and buses in several nations, and pros-
ecutors have identified more than 100 suspects.

The report said the suspects are thought to have “fun-
nelled the money through front companies in Malta, the
Bahamas, the British Virgin Islands, Cyprus, London and
New York or paid cash to crooked buyers to induce orders
for the German buses and trucks.”

It said: “The bribes, often paid to relatives or friends of pur-
chasing executives, were apparently aimed at securing sales
to big organisations that buy large fleets of heavy vehicles.”

So far, none of the front companies has been named.

The payments abroad are thought to have been worth 13
million euros, or $18 million.

None of the suspected buyers have yet been confirmed as
having been on the take, as investigators are still checking the
legitimacy of each payment, the report said.

The evidence so far suggests the scheme has been operat-
ing since 2002 and ended this year.

individuals complained that
attempts to reach the WSC by
phone were either fruitless, or
did not leave them feeling sat-
isfied as to what the problem
might be and when it might
be remedied.

Meanwhile, Mr Deal put
the cause of the problems in
all three cases down to loca-
tion -— rather than general
water supply shortages.

However, with the number
of complaints registered
island-wide growing, this is a
suggestion of which residents
are increasingly sceptical.

In the case of Chertsey
apartments, a statement sent
to this newspaper by the WSC
on Monday said an investiga-
tion revealed the “service lat-
erals” servicing the building
were experiencing “a partial
blockage.”

“The building superinten-
dent was informed and we are
making arrangements to clear
the service lateral in the morn-
ing (yesterday),” said Mr
Deal, adding that the corpo-
ration “sincerely apologises”
to the Chertsey tenants.

Anyone experiencing water
supply issues is encouraged to
contact the WSC at 302-5599
or 325-0505.

‘YOUR VIEW’

To have your say on this or any
other issue, email The Tribune at:
letters@tribunemedia.net or
deliver your letter to The Tribune
on Shirley Street, P.O. Box N-3207

Share your news

The Tribune wants to hear
from people who are
making news in their
neighbourhoods. Perhaps
you are raising funds for a
good cause, campaigning
for improvements in the
area or have won an
award.

If so, call us on 322-1986
and share your story.

Great Selection of:
Swim Trunks,
Shorts,

Pants,

Polos & Tees

and so much more!



is being implemented in two
phases. During the first phase,
benefits are to be financed
from the $20 million trans-
ferred out of the Medical Ben-
efits Fund.

Phase II of the programme
will establish a fund into which
all employers and employces
will pay a contribution — 1 per
cent of each employee’s insur-
able wage.

Applicants are eligible for
the benefit if they are cur-
rently unemployed; under the
age of 65; not self employed;
able and willing to work; were
last employed on or after July
1, 2004; not receiving other
NIB benefits other than dis-
ability or survivors benefits;
and have made a certain num-
ber of contributions to NIB.

vineyard vines’ |i
martha’s vineyard - y

MORLEY
For &

MEN nm.

Harbour Green Shops at Lyford Cay
Telephone: (242) 362-6654/6
Bayparl! Building, Parliament Street
Telephone: (242) 323-8240 ¢ Fax: (242) 326-9953
P.O. Box N-121, Nassau, N.P., Bahamas
e-mail: info@colesofnassau.com

FOR 3 IN 1 LAWN SERVICE
Oe Lae
SAO EU)

Bat gee
322-2157

Umbrellas
Loungers
Drinks Trolleys
Coffee Tables

and durable Diversatexâ„¢
ushion is fade and mildew
resistant and is available in
blue, green or terracotta



PAGE 4, WEDNESDAY, MAY 13, 2009

EDITORIAL/LETTERS TO THE EDITOR

THE TRIBUNE





The Tribune Limited

NULLIUS ADDICTUS JURARE IN VERBA MAGISTRI
Being Bound to Swear to The Dogmas of No Master

LEON E. H. DUPUCH, Publisher/Editor 1903-1914

SIR ETIENNE DUPUCH, Kt, O.B.E., K.M., K.CS.G.,

(Hon.) LL.D., D.Litt.

Publisher/Editor 1919-1972
Contributing Editor 1972-199]

EILEEN DUPUCH CARRON, C.M.G., M.S. B.A., LL.B.

Publisher/Editor 1972-

Published Daily Monday to Saturday

Shirley Street, RO. Box N-3207, Nassau, Bahamas
Insurance Management Building., P.O. F-485, Freeport, Grand Bahama

TELEPHONES
Switchboard (News, Circulation and Advertising) 322-1986
Advertising Manager - (242) 502-2352
Circulation Department - (242) 502-2387
Nassau Fax: - (242) 328-2398
Freeport, Grand Bahama: 1-(242)-352-6608
Freeport fax: (242) 352-9348

WEBSITE
www.tribune242.com — updated daily at 2pm

Space exploration and elusive ‘wow’ factor

EVEN THOUGH the space shuttle fleet
has been given a pink slip, Monday’s launch
of the space shuttle Atlantis to repair the
Hubble Space Telescope is enough to for-
get for a moment all that plagues us.

The astronauts will look down upon a
planet from which they cannot detect war,
pollution, fraud, or swine flu.

They will attempt to repair that amazing
machine that got off to a miserable, defec-
tive start, but now has given us images that
both expands our knowledge of the uni-
verse and moves us to consider our utter
insignificance in it.

Our astronauts are the 20th-century’s
icon of the human conundrum. They sym-
bolize our status as the supreme sentient
and courageous power on this particular
planet.

Yet we so often do not have their back.
As they help us peer into the galaxies, the
rest of us keep getting sucked into black
holes of selfishness and pettiness.

Atlantis lifted off Monday, in the sec-
ond-to-last year before the shuttle fleet is
scheduled to be retired.

Its mission is to attempt the most com-
plex repairs ever on the telescope, to give it
a few more years of life, with the best
*sight” it ever had.

Though the shuttle programme long ago
ceased to captivate our daily imagination,
this “mere” service call is no less majestic
and dangerous.

The whole mission could be wasted if
but one tiny screw floats away and lodges in
the wrong place.

The astronauts will be replacing razor-
sharp circuit boards that could mortally
slice their space suits.

Veteran Hubble repair astronaut John
Grunsfeld told the St. Petersburg Times,
“You climb on top of 4F million pounds of
explosive fuel, and if you don’t think that
that’s a hazardous thing to do, then you
probably are in the wrong line of business.
We do space flight because we think it’s
important.

”We’re curious and we have a drive to
explore. That’s why we’ve occupied all the

an

|

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What will you do with your new KA Picanto?

The fun size, big little car

gage:
aap
il

i
Re

niches on planet Earth and we’re kind of
filling up the planet ... Ultimately, we’d
better leave planet Earth or we’re all going
to cease to exist. And this is the very lead-
ing edge of that. In all of my experience, I
feel that Hubble is by far the most impor-
tant project that I have worked on. And
obviously I think it’s worth risking my life
for, or I wouldn’t be doing it.”

The repair is happening as the new Star
Trek movie opened at number one at the
box office and President Obama mulls
whether to take us where we have never
gone before. Space still captivates the imag-
ination, but it has not inspired a national
vision ever since Apollo. In the short term,
Obama proposes to boost NASA funding
and has ordered an outside review of the
human spaceflight programme. But he has
yet to select a new administrator for the
agency.

In a speech two weeks ago to the Nation-
al Academy of Sciences, Obama repeat-
edly praised the Apollo programme for
expanding America’s prominence in sci-
ence and technology.

It will be interesting to see how much
of NASA’s resources can go to space explo-
ration when he also has rightfully declared
climate change and energy to be “this gen-
eration’s great project.” It is also sobering
to consider that one of the risks the shuttle
astronauts face in this week’s mission is
orbiting space trash that has accumulated in
our half-century of sending objects up
there. Space is nowhere close to “leave-
no-trace” camping.

But explore we should. Astronomer Ken
Sembach of the Space Telescope Science
Institute told the Washington Post that
images from a repaired Hubble should pro-
duce a “wow factor.” Hopefully Obama
can rebuild NASA into the organisation
that helps us say “wow” all over again,
about the here and now, and the great

(This article was written by Derrick Z.
Jackson
c. 2009 The Boston Globe).






i






Molestation
claims made
before FNM

came to power

LETTERS

EDITOR, The Tribune.

All of the allegations of sex-
ual molestation made against a
foreign teacher at the Eight
Mile Rock High School hap-
pened before May 2, 2007 when
the FNM came to power. The
feeble attempt by the Chairman
of the PLP, Glenis Hanna-Mar-
tin to bring pressure on the pre-
sent Minister of Education Carl
Bethel is not only unfair, but in
my opinion wicked. It is
designed to switch the blame
away from the PLP.

In spite of the knowledge of
the PLP about this incident and
their attempt to make it look
like the FNM is irresponsible,
cannot be left alone, and espe-
cially because the then minis-
ter of Education and Attorney
General Alfred Sears must have
known, but did not want to pub-
licly address it.

This then brings me to the
point that the “sweeping under
the carpet” the scorn of the inci-
dent of molestation should have
struck a nerve with the former
minister especially since he pub-
licly confessed of his own expe-
riences many times. Had he
become more involved, maybe
just maybe these hideous inci-
dences would not have hap-
pened.

This incident in particular, is
serious because there are many
other children who have in the
last many years, especially when
Mr Sears was minister, been
molested by not only their
teacher, but by employers, their

letters@tribunemedia net



pastor, father, uncle, cousins,
brother, friends and others in
authority.

To deviate ever so slightly,
these patterns of behaviour
have been in our country for far
too long. Too many people of
influence have been given the
proverbial slap on the wrist for
similar behaviour. The short
sentences given to sexual
abusers are an indication that
the judicial does not appear to
be serious about the severity of
molestation. No one seems to
understand the psychological
destruction done. No one seems
to give a hoot.

All of the cleaning and sani-
tising agents were employed
when allegations of molesta-
tions of parliamentarians were
made. The country was more
concerned of saving their polit-
ical reputation as opposed to
listening to a young man’s cry
for help. The more he screamed
at the top of his voice for some-
one to listen to him, the more
he was ignored and the more
they covered up. This alleged
despicable act will have reper-
cussions to the third and fourth
generation. People, who have
children, must not do things to
other people’s children, because
the chickens must come home
to roost.

How come a man who should
have grandchildren be given
three years for the molestation
of a five year old and the rape
of an adult is given 10 years and
recently life? How come our
children are not given the pro-
tection and support by the
state? In my opinion that alone
is a crime and someone should
pay for that.

We are simply not serious
about the preservation of our
youth or the future of this coun-
try. We must move with haste to
determine how and why the
consequences do not fit the seri-
ousness of the crime. Molesta-
tion of a child destroys the life
of the child forever, so why
should the consequences not be
designed to destroy the life or
the molester forever too.

We had better not allow the
children who will be “running
things” in the not too distant
future, see that we failed them
now. This is a warning and must
not be taken lightly.

Finally, any parent, teacher
or any adult who withholds
information from the authori-
ties related to the molestation,
should be given harsh penalties.
If the molester be given life for
molestation, then the person
helping the molester should get
at least 10 years for helping to
destroy our children, and pro-
tecting the criminal. It is time
for the playing field to level.

IVOINE W INGRAHAM
Nassau,
May, 2009.

Dismayed by garbage washing in with tide

EDITOR, The Tribune.

I humbly beseech you to print
the following in your newspa-
per as I have tried to forward
this information on to organi-
sations that should be con-
cerned, but apparently are not.

It is my nature to walk the
beach and in doing so, I am dis-
mayed by the amount of
garbage that washes in with the
tide — either from ships or the
construction workers in the area
— or is left behind by very
uncaring individuals. The list of
articles lying on our shores and
the daily volume is unbeliev-
able, and no one, repeat — no
one seems to be responsible for
cleaning up or monitoring the
state of our beaches and canals
on a regular basis.

Coincidentally, a large party
was held this past weekend at
the beach by the canal to

Sandyport. The next day when I
walked the beach, I could not
believe the amount of garbage
that these people left behind.
Red drinking cups, Styrofoam
plates, paper plates, plastic
utensils, food, paper, soiled dia-
pers, beer and soda bottles, san-
dals, towels and even articles of
clothing, all of which lined the
beach. Some of it was even
shoved in between the rocks, as
if this was the ideal place to hide
the evidence! It was truly a dis-
grace.

With a little investigation, I
was able to confirm with the
manager of a nearby establish-
ment that they did indeed spon-
sor a party, and therefore were
the filthy culprits. Before I state
their name, I would like to point
out that these messy individuals
are not alone in their wrong
doings, as others take advan-
tage of the beach and leave

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behind their garbage, and again,
no one takes responsibility for
either properly discarding the
garbage, or maintaining the
beach on an ongoing basis.
Having spoken to Sandyport
Management regarding the
SuperValue party and the
everyday occurrence of trash
on the beach and near the canal,
Sandyport has agreed to place
two garbage receptacles in the
area, with the hopes that they
will not be removed by thieves.
This maybe a solution, but in
no way does it excuse Super-
Value’s party-going staff and
friends for trashing the beach,
or anyone else, for that matter!
And, I believe that it would still
be prudent, should you decide
that this article is valuable to
your readers, to mention this
update in your fine newspaper.

J LSANDS
Nassau,
May 7, 2009.

Why doesn’t ZNS
use current titles?

EDITOR, The Tribune.

Why is it that ZNS reporters
refer to the Opposition as “for-
mer PM”; “former Deputy
PM”: “former Minister of For-
eign Affairs” etc instead of the
current titles held by the Oppo-
sition eg “Opposition Leader”,
“Opposition Member”? The
appellation “former” applies
when the person has retired
from office. However, these
Opposition members assumed
new titles when they opted to
remain in Parliament, and they
should not be confused with
members of the Government.
On this morning’s newscast, the
reporter even referred to Mr
Christie as “Minister Christie.”

The other mistake often
made by the ZNS reporters is
an omission.

In this morning’s newscast
(April 7), the reporter while
reading the same paragraph
referred to the Opposition
Leader as the “Right Hon-
ourable” but referred to the
Prime Minister only as “Mr”.
For her information, the Prime
Minister was awarded “Right
Honourable” status ever since
his first administration which
began in 1992.

I hope the above errors are
not intentional.

ZNS LISTENER
Nassau,
April 7, 2009



THE TRIBUNE

WEDNESDAY, MAY 13, 2009, PAGE 5



LOCAL NEWS



0 In brief

Body of man
found after
hoat capsizes

THE body of a boat cap-
tain was pulled from the water
off the coast of Harbour
Island after his boat capsized
near the North Eleuthera
island.

Terry Roberts Junior, 27,
had 14 passengers on a 17 ft
Boston Whaler when the boat
flipped over at around 8pm
on Sunday.

The passengers swam to
shore and all survived but Mr
Roberts, police say.

Friends and relatives of the
boat captain searched for him
throughout the night. Mr
Roberts’ father, Terry
Roberts Senior, reportedly
found his son’s body at the
bottom of the ocean at
around 9am on Monday.

A witness claimed Mr
Roberts had attempted to
swim for his life, but appeared
to have suffered lacerations
to his head.

Police press liaison officer
Assistant Superintendent
Walter Evans said police
believe the Harbour Island
man had drowned.

His body was flown to New
Providence on Monday where
an autopsy will be performed
to determine the cause of
death.

Emealio Russell



Police release
correct photo

m By DENISE MAYCOCK
Tribune Freeport
Reporter
dmaycock@
tribunemedia.net

FREEPORT - Grand
Bahama Police have
announced that a photograph
which was recently released
of a man wanted for ques-
tioning in connection with
fraud was incorrect.

Asst Supt Welbourne Boo-
tle said the photograph of
another man with a similar
name was inadvertently
attached to a wanted poster
of Emealio Russell, aka Emil
Russell, and published in the
media.

Mr Bootle said police have
released the correct photo-
graph of Russell, who was
charged in Magistrate’s Court
on Friday.

Russell is charged with
fraud by false pretences. He
pleaded not guilty to the
charge and was granted $5,000
bail with two sureties. The
case was adjourned to Sep-
tember 15.

Mr Bootle said the police
apologised for any inconve-
nience and/or embarrassment
the incorrect photo might
have caused.

students to get
tourism training

A SELECT group of stu-
dents will get formal train-
ing in the nation’s number
one economic sector
through the Ministry of
Tourism and Aviation’s
summer internship pro-
gramme.

High school valedictori-
ans, college students and
junior ministers of tourism
from Family Island high
schools are eligible for the
programme. Those select-
ed as interns will partici-
pate in projects, meetings
with industry partners and
field trips. They will get
first-hand experience in
tourism dynamics and
learn the far-reaching
effects of the tourism sec-
tor.

With this internship pro-
gramme, the ministry
intends to mould profes-
sionals to be the next
developers of the
Bahamas. The programme
will also cultivate a student
tourism talent pool for
future recruitment purpos-
es, contribute to building a
solid foundation for career
development of Bahamian
students, positively influ-
ence students who are con-
templating tourism and
create tourism advocates.

Opinion divided on container
shipping facilities relocation

@ By ALISON LOWE
Tribune Staff Reporter
alowe@tribunemedia.net

TOURISM stakeholders
are divided on the question
of whether the plan to relo-
cate container shipping facili-
ties to Arawak Cay is a good
idea.

Some believe the move is
as likely to hinder future
tourism development as it is
to boost downtown Nassau’s
revitalisation, but others claim
that recent “political rhetoric”
criticising the move has
ignored key factors in its
favour.

Most prominent among
these factors, supporters of
the plan say, is the “overriding
consideration” that it would
allow the removal of the facil-
ities — a critical element of the
enhancement of downtown
Nassau — to be concluded
more quickly and cheaply
than if the southwest New
Providence alternative were
chosen.

The cost would be lower
not only in terms of initial
capital outlay, but also for
Bahamians and tourists in the
long-term, as a more costly
port relocation would see
costs passed on to consumers
in the form of more expen-

Obie Wilchcombe



sive goods for years to come.
“What does it (moving the
port to southwest of the
island) do to the cost of a
weekly grocery shop, or to the
cost of a meal for a tourist?
That’s the question to be
asked,” said an informed
tourism source, who supports
the Arawak Cay option.
Meanwhile, The Tribune
has been told that although
Arawak Cay was ranked sixth
on a study of the best poten-
tial sites for the port — even
behind its present location —
other mitigating elements that

Freeport still plagued
by power outages

@ By DENISE MAYCOCK

Tribune Freeport Reporter

dmaycock@tribunemedia.net

FREEPORT - The City of Freeport continues to be plagued
by ongoing power outages due to equipment failure at the
Grand Bahama Power Company.

The interruption of power on Tuesday morning affected
many businesses in the downtown Freeport area, lasting for

three and a half hours.

Power was restored at 12.30pm at the Insurance Manage-
ment Building, where The Tribune/100 JAMZ office is located.

In a press release, GBPC officials reported that at about
7.40am on Tuesday, Unit 13 developed a boiler tube leak that
forced the unit to be taken offline for repairs.

The loss of the unit resulted in disruption of service to approx-

imately 7,000 customers.

Although the company reported that service was fully restored
by 8am, the Insurance Management Building remained without
power for another four and a half hours.

The Power Company said that repairs are expected to be
completed within the next 48 hours.

Based on the current load forecast, GBPC said that it is able
to meet the peak demand and continue to provide service to all

customers.

However, the company continues to request the assistance of
the public to conserve energy by only using necessary lights,
restricting the use of dryers, washing machines and irons, and
turning off water heaters and/or air-condition units.

GBPC apologised for any inconvenience caused.

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have come into play since the
study have enhanced its
attractiveness.

Its low ranking was based
in large part on “the poten-
tial for it to cause more traffic
congestion and for it to be a
visual blight”, said a source
acquainted with the study.

Review

But consultants who con-
ducted the review of poten-
tial sites did not take into con-
sideration the impact of the
New Providence Road
Improvement Project which
will see road corridors con-
structed and adjusted to ease
the flow of traffic in the area,
it has been claimed.

Additionally, The Tribune
has been told, suggestions by
critics that the extension of
Arawak Cay to accommodate
the facilities would contribute
to environmental damage in
the area do not reflect the evi-
dence in the consultant’s
study.

Although placing Arawak
Cay sixth overall, it in fact

ranked it one of the options
least likely to damage the
environment, based on a pre-
liminary review.

On top of these factors,
interest in financing the “$200
million plus” southwestern
port “wasn’t there” when ini-
tial inquiries were made, a
source said. The same private
sector interests which initially
supported a move to south-
west New Providence, after
having “looked at the eco-
nomics”, switched to the
Arawak Cay plan.

“While they conceptually
agreed, they started saying
‘Geez, this thing is going to
cost a fortune, so it just does-
n’t make sense from an eco-
nomics point of view. This is
the perspective that the public
doesn’t have on the whole
thing,” said the supportive
tourism sector source.

However, echoing PLP Sen-
ator Jerome Fitzgerald, for-
mer minister of tourism Obie
Wilchcombe said choosing
Arawak Cay as the new site
would represent a “big mis-
take.”

“We need to think this
thing through as opposed to
moving in a knee-jerk way
and looking out for some spe-
cial interest,” he said.

Such a move would restrict
the potential for Arawak Cay
to be developed into a major
tourist attraction, for down-
town to be expanded in time
as it may need to be and for
more employment opportu-
nities for Bahamians to be
created, suggested the ex-
tourism minister

“Our problem is we’re pen-
ny wise and pound foolish —
sometimes you have to spend
money to cause develop-
ment,” said Mr Wilchcombe.

His sentiments echo those
expressed by a member of the

MANGOS

‘YOUR VIEW’

To have your say on this or any
other issue, email The Tribune at:
letters@tribunemedia.net or
deliver your letter to The Tribune
on Shirley Street, P.O. Box N-3207



public at a town meeting host-
ed by the Downtown Nassau
Partnership (DNP) on the
subject of the city’s revitali-
sation last Wednesday.

The man, addressing the
panel of tourism stakehold-
ers, including Nassau Tourism
Development Board director
Frank Comito, DNP co-chairs
Charles Klonaris and Tourism
director general Vernice
Walkine, said he felt it was
illogical for an industrial facil-
ity like a shipping port to be
placed in a location so near
the country’s tourism hub,
where it would blight the
landscape for arriving cruise
visitors, among others.

Point

To this, Ms Walkine
answered that the man’s point
was “very well taken” but did
not comment further.

Yesterday, a separate
tourism source said that he
and others in the industry are
“certainly concerned about
the impact such a port (at
Arawak Cay) would have” —
environmentally and other-
wise.

However, he suggested that
the government appears to
have not yet to finalised its
plans in the long term, leaving
open the possibility that
another location could be
found eventually.

“T know they will take it
there, but whether that’s
where it will remain is the
question,” he said.

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PAGE 6, WEDNESDAY, MAY 13, 2009

THE TRIBUNE



LOCAL NEWS



Former manager at Sandals
questions timing of revelations

A FORMER manager at
Sandals is questioning the tim-
ing of revelations of an alleged
multi-million dollar embezzle-
ment scheme at the resort.

Details of the scheme -
which is said to have robbed
Sandals of $2.5 million over 13
years — were disclosed in a front
page article in The Tribune last
week.

The source said he suspects
there may be an “ulterior
motive” behind the allegations
being made public at this time —
and feels they might have been
leaked by the resort itself.

“Why now? If it’s been going
on for so many years, they must
have known something,” he
said.

The former manager, who
wished to be identified only as
the receiving supervisor, was
among a group of managers
laid off at Sandals just over two
weeks ago.

Lay-offs

Sandals said it let go five
managers as part of a restruc-
turing exercise aimed at stream-
lining operations, but the for-
mer manager fears the lay-offs
and the embezzlement scheme
have become linked in the pub-
lic consciousness.

He denied any wrong doing,
and does not believe the resort
is attempting to implicate the
former managers. But he does
think Sandals might have
leaked the allegations to
“change the conversation” and
thereby deflect any bad public-
ity as a result of the lay-offs.

“Last year they laid off 150
workers. They said that was it.




#

Bahamas

Now they wanted to release i
some more persons, and sud-
denly this story comes out }
about $2.5 million, and takes
attention from the lay-offs. It }
is convenient that this informa- }

tion was released,” he said.

Speaking to The Tribune yes- }
terday, a Sandals representa-
tive dismissed as utterly base- ;
less the claim that the resort i

had released the information.

In last week’s article, it was }
reported that the embezzle- :
ment scheme is thought to have }
involved a small group of }
employees and two tellers ata }

local bank.

Sandals admitted the compa-
ny has uncovered some finan- }
cial irregularities, but declined ;
to comment further as “the }

matter is with the authorities.”

According to a well placed
source, the scheme involved the
submission of grossly exagger-
ated supply bills to manage- }
ment. Once cheques were }

issued for the inflated sums,

one of the conspirators would i
take them to a particular bank }
branch, where a teller complic- i
it in the scheme would deposit }
the cheques in an account cre- }
ated for the express purpose of :

hiding the funds.

A second ploy reportedly i
involved generating fake petty ;
cash slips for various depart- }
ments using a counterfeit stamp
bearing the name of a senior }

resort official.

The amounts often substan- }
tially exceeded the limits set by }
Sandals management for petty }
cash payments, the source said. }

The matter has not yet been }
brought to the attention of the }
police, according to a repre-

sentative of the force.

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Call for more research into narcotics
supply and demand in the Bahamas

m@ By K QUINCY PARKER
Press/Cultural Attaché
Embassy of The Bahamas

THERE is an “urgent need for more
research” into the dynamics of narcotics
supply and demand in the Bahamas.

This was one of the conclusions of the
Bahamas’ representatives at the Organisa-
tion of American States (OAS) conference
in Washington, DC, this week.

The need to use the data provided by
anti-drug research to drive policy and leg-
islation, dominated discussions over the
first two days of discussions as OAS mem-
ber states — including the Bahamas — gath-
ered for anti-drug talks.

Deputy Director of the National Anti-
Drug Secretariat (NADS) Terrence Foun-
tain and Supply Reduction Officer Shervin
Lloyd represented the Bahamas at the 45th
Regular Session of the Inter-American
Drug Abuse Control Commission
(CICAD), held at the OAS from May 6
through May 8.

Mr Fountain said that during a discus-
sion with OAS Secretary General Dr José
Miguel Insulza about the new challenges
facing CICAD, many of the representa-
tives stressed the importance of the scien-
tific approach to anti-drug policy-making,
urging governments in the hemisphere to
make use of the research that has already
been done in the area.

In the case of the Bahamas, Mr Foun-
tain said, the drug research that has been
undertaken must lead to concrete pro-
grammes and must guide government pol-
icymakers as they tackle the thorny prob-
lem.

He argued that there was a great need for
more research into drug supply and demand
to be done in the Bahamas.

“Not for academic purposes,” he stressed,
“but research to drive policy and action.
This is what everyone (at the meeting) is
crying for. We have got to have a renewed
focus on data collection and data analysis.”

Mr Lloyd added that CICAD members
are increasingly moving away from “crimi-
nalising” drug addiction. The Bahamas and
the other CICAD members, he said, are
seeing the problem as a sickness.

“Tt must be dealt with as a health prob-
lem, but not ignoring national security con-
cerns,” Mr Lloyd said.

ANTI-DRUG STRATEGY

Another major area of concentration at
the conference was the review of the Anti-
Drug Strategy in the Hemisphere, Mr Foun-
tain reported. The talks resulted in a draft
resolution, in which it is proposed — among
other things — that the OAS General
Assembly invite all member states to con-
tribute to and participate in the process of
review and update through CICAD.

The draft resolution also proposed to
accept the government of Brazil’s offer to
be the headquarters for the Working Group





K Quincy Parker

BAHAMAS National Anti-Drug Secretariat Deputy nipsctar Tenens Fountain and Supply Reduc-
tion Officer Shervin Lloyd attended the 45th Regular Session of the Inter-American Drug Abuse

Control Commission (CICAD) in Washington, DC.

meetings and coordinate the review and
updating process up to and until the pre-
sentation of the results at CICAD’s next
regular session.

“We need to realise the interconnected-
ness of all countries, because the whole
drug business looks for weaknesses across
borders to exploit,” he said.

Mr Fountain said that National Security
Minister Tommy Turnquest had asked for a
Bahamas National Anti-Drug Policy to be
drafted, and that there was a strong desire
in the Bahamas and throughout the hemi-
sphere to harmonise national anti-drug
strategies with both the United Nations’
Global Anti-Drug Strategy agreed to in
Vienna and the OAS’ strategy.

He pointed out that the Caribbean Com-
munity (CARICOM) had recently worked
on its own sub-regional strategy. He said the
Bahamas’ goal is to create a matrix that
takes the areas in which these disparate
strategies are in harmony and design an
effective national strategy based on that
matrix.

CICAD members also produced a draft
resolution on the body’s Multilateral Eval-
uation Mechanism (MEM).

MUTLILATERAL

EVALUATION MECHANISM

Mr Fountain explained that in response
to a shared desire for fair and objective
evaluation of hemispheric anti-drug mea-
sures, the OAS decided ten years ago to
adopt the MEM.

Each member state must complete exten-
sive questionnaires in three-year cycles.
CICAD - as the accepted competent



authority — takes the information and pro-
duces both a country report and a set of
recommendations. Later, a follow-up eval-
uation occurs, aimed at determining the
extent to which the recommendations have
been implemented.

The NADS director urged that the ques-
tionnaires not be seen as “just another nui-
sance questionnaire,” but as something that
should be used by Bahamian authorities as
indicators to drive policy for specific insti-
tutions.

Mr Fountain noted that the final draft
report on the Bahamas from the fourth
round of the MEM, which contained
CICAD’s evaluation of the Bahamas’
implementation of its recommendations,
had just come out. It evaluated the
Bahamas’ progress on implementation of 14
recommendations, including ratification of
certain multilateral conventions and imple-
mentation of recommendations reiterated
from earlier cycles.

POLITICAL WILL

Mr Lloyd, the Supply Reduction Officer,
noted that another major theme of the con-
ference was the importance of political will.
He said that CICAD members seemed to
believe the right political leadership is
required for successful anti-drug policies
to succeed.

He said that having been exposed to the
scope of the drug problem in other coun-
tries, the Bahamas does not face as severe a
challenge as some, but that political will is
still critical to implement the strategies that
would allow the country to effectively com-
bat the scourge.



PM opens Commonwealth Local Govt Conference



ae
oe

m@ By DENISE MAYCOCK
Tribune Freeport Reporter
dmaycock@tribunemedia.net

FREEPORT - Prime Minis-
ter Hubert Ingraham officially
opened the Commonwealth
Local Government’s Confer-
ence this week on Grand
Bahama, welcoming 600 dele-
gates who were hosted to a cul-
tural extravaganza.

The Grand Bahama Youth
Choir — under the direction of
Kevin Tomilson — dazzled dele-
gates with a musical perfor-
mance during its debut appear-
ance.

The delegates also got a taste
of a more refined, but lively
junkanoo rush-out, and were
entertained by a culturally-
inspired dance ensemble.

The show climaxed with a
showing of the historic Golden
Girls Olympic 4x400 Relay win
at the 2000 Sydney Olympic
Games. Applause filled the con-
ference as the race was dis-
played on two huge display
screens.

During his welcome address,
Minister of State for Local Gov-
ernment Byran Woodside noted
that the Bahamas is the first
country in the Caribbean to host
CLGC.

Prime Minister Hubert Ingra-
ham introduced local govern-
ment in the Bahamas in 1996 to
bring governance closer to the
people. There are a total of 32
local government districts in the

Bahamas.

The Bahamas
won the bid to host
the conference two
years ago. Delegates
from 46 Common-
wealth nations have
travelled to Freeport
for the conference.

In his remarks,
Mr Ingraham wel-
comed Secretary
General of the Com-
monwealth
Kamalesh Sharma
and his wife, and
CARICOM Secre-
tary General Edwin
Carrington to the Bahamas.

“T am especially happy to
welcome you to the City of
Freeport, Lucaya, and Grand
Bahama and trust that your
brief stay will afford you some
time to enjoy the attractions of
this special island.

Celebrating

“We are especially pleased
to host the event during this
year when we are celebrating
the 60th anniversary of the
Commonwealth, that unique
group of nations that had its
beginning with the transforma-
tion of the old colonial order,”
he said.

He noted that Freeport has
the most effective system of
local government in the entire
Bahamas.

Mr Ingraham explained that

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Hubert Ingraham



under provisions
agreed in the 1950’s
between the govern-
ment and a private
company, the Grand
Bahama Port
Authority, manage-
ment of the city of
Freeport was dele-
gated to the Port
Authority for a peri-
od of 99-years.

He pointed out
that the infrastruc-
ture of the city,
including its airport,
harbour and port
facilities are private-
ly owned and operated.

Mr Ingraham said that the
Port Authority is charged with
the economic development of
Freeport. He told delegates that
50 years ago Freeport was a sim-
ple pine yard.

“Freeport’s governing system
has worked well for Freeport.
It is not, however, without its
own tensions between governor
and governed.

“Freeport’s reality is that a
small logging settlement on this
large Family Island in the mid-
dle of the last century has
become the second largest pop-
ulation centre in The Bahamas
today, the industrial hub of The
Bahamas, an employment cen-
tre and host to one of the deep-
est container transshipment
ports in our region,” the Prime
Minister said.

Prime Minister Ingraham
said that central government
continues to control immigra-
tion and foreign direct invest-
ment as it does in all other
islands of The Bahamas.

He said it retains responsi-
bility for the operation of the
public hospital, the government-
operated school system and cer-
tain public sporting and recre-
ational facilities.

Medical, accounting, legal
and other professionals practis-
ing in Freeport are required to
be licensed and regulated in
accordance with the national
laws and their respective pro-
fessional bodies.

Hotels and casinos operate
in accordance with the provi-
sions of national legislation, and
industries are subject to nation-
al environmental and public
health standards.

Mr Ingraham said that a par-
ticular idiosyncrasy of local gov-
ernment administration in The
Bahamas is its absence from the
island of New Providence, the
capital City of Nassau where
three quarters of our national
population lives.

He said that calls for some
form of municipal government
for the City of Nassau have
become urgent.

“Already a Nassau Develop-
ment Board, formed during one
of my earlier terms in office, has
presented proposals for the cre-
ation of a management office
for the city.

Development

“The dramatic population
and commercial growth into the
suburbs of the City of Nassau
have already resulted in the
development of important city
centres in the outlying districts
of the island that would benefit
from the institution of local city
councils or town committees to
manage a myriad of matters
impacting the lives of residents,
including matters relating to
environmental control, local
traffic problems, improved col-
lection and disposal of solid
waste and maintenance of

neighbourhoods, schools,
libraries, streets and parks, for
example.

“T have no doubt that those
delegates from our central gov-
ernment agencies attending this
week’s conference will be espe-
cially anxious to garner from
your discussions, ideas of local
government administration
which might be successfully
introduced to our capital city
and its suburbs,” said Mr Ingra-
ham.

He said that the CLGC dis-
cussions will provide useful
opportunities for delegates to
learn from one another the vari-
ations that have evolved and
continue to evolve in local gov-
ernment systems around the
Commonwealth.

“T take this opportunity to
emphasize to all of you gath-
ered here under the theme
‘Improving Local Government,
the Commonwealth Vision’ that
local government and democra-
cy are all about working for the
common good. ”



THE TRIBUNE

WEDNESDAY, MAY 13, 2009, PAGE 7





The history of Green Turtle Cay
TOUGH CALL

Cys Turtle Cay's
annual Island Roots

Festival bills itself as a celebra-
tion of European as well as
African heritage. That's because
— unlike most Abaco settlements
— both blacks and whites have
lived together here from the ear-
liest days, in close proximity if not
always in perfect harmony.

This unusual historical context
provides the backdrop for one of
the country's most successful her-
itage events. It all began 33 years
ago with a conversation between
New Plymouth artist Alton Lowe
and Key West librarian Betty
Bruce at the opening of the little
museum in Green Turtle Cay
named after Alton's father, Albert
Lowe.

"Betty asked me what else
could be done to promote
Bahamian heritage and I suggest-
ed that New Plymouth should
become the sister city of Key
West, which has deep Bahamian
roots," Alton told me. "She imme-
diately invited me to Key West
to help set the wheels in motion."

Later, Alton met with officials
in Nassau who helped him organ-
ise the first Island Roots Festival
in 1978. The guest of honour at
that inaugural event was none
other than deputy prime minister
(and now governor-general)
Arthur Hanna. And performances
were given by the Royal Bahamas
Police Force Band as well as a
folklore troupe led by Kayla
Lockhart Edwards and Clement
Bethel (both now dead). Key
West went on to stage similar her-
itage events.

But interest waned after a few
seasons, and the formal activities
were replaced by private visits
between residents of the two com-
munities, and others with family
ties. In 2004 a revival was sug-
gested by the Ministry of Tourism
and the festival has continued
every year since, to rave reviews.
In fact, some 4,000 people attend-
ed this year's event, and GTC's
harbour was crammed with visit-
ing yachts.

Tough Call was among those
thousands on the weekend of May
1-3, and in addition to macaroni
and cheese, cracked lobster and
crab and rice, I was able to sample
some uncommon intellectual fare.
Among the treats were perfor-
mances of Sandra Riley's histori-
cal plays by the Miami-based
Crystal Parrot Players; and pre-
sentations by Florida archaeolo-
gist Bob Carr, Grand Bahama his-

tory buff Darius Williams, Nancy
Albury of the Antiquities, Monu-
ments & Museums Corporation,
and local genealogist Joy Lowe
Jossi.

Most of the Abaco cays were
exclusively white settlements
founded at the end of the loyalist
influx after Britain's loss of the
American colonies in the 1780s,
while most of the settlements in
North Abaco were exclusively
black. According to Alton Lowe,
Green Turtle Cay is a prime
example of good racial relations in
the Bahamas: "When I was grow-
ing up we all depended on each
other, and the town's population
of about 500 is equally divided
between white and black."

Grand Bahama engineer Dar-
ius Williams (who published a
book on the history of railways
and locomotives in the Bahamas
two years ago) delved a little
deeper into this subject in a talk
he gave at the island's adminis-
trative centre. Williams derived
GTC's African population from
a variety of historical records,
beginning with the "list of negroes
and loyalist veterans" who emi-
grated from New York to the
Abacos after the American War
of Independence.

These earliest African settlers
were either free blacks or former
American slaves who had sup-
ported the British in return for
their freedom. But most were
assigned or indentured to white
loyalists for resettlement in the
Bahamas. This naturally led to
resentment, protests, and eventu-
ally to a small insurrection on
Abaco in the mid-1780s.

As one contemporary account
put it, "These unhappy people,
after being drawn from their mas-
ters by promises of freedom and
the king's protection, are every
day stolen away." As a result, the
British governor of the time
reported that, ""Numbers of the
outlaying negroes went about with
muskets and fixed bayonets, rob-
bing and plundering."

Williams drew more informa-
tion on Green Turtle's African
population from slave registers as
well as from the reports of spe-

- THE AIRPORT AUTHORITY



cial justices assigned by the British
to supervise the four-year eman-
cipation process in the colonies.
There were also official reports
on the settlement of liberated
Africans after the British abol-
ished the international slave trade
in 1807 — some 6,000 Africans
were released in the Bahamas
from 35 slave ships in the years
leading up to 1860.

According to Williams, Green
Turtle was one of the first areas to
be surveyed for the resettlement
of liberated Africans and emanci-
pated slaves in the northern
Bahamas in 1835, along with
Mcleans Town on Grand
Bahama. "We know this from
town extension surveys,” he said.
"They were also settled on sev-
eral other islands, including the
Berries, Bimini, and Red Bays,
Andros, in addition to New Prov-
idence."

H: also referred to news-
paper accounts of the

resettlement of American slaves
shipwrecked in Bahamian waters
(slavery did not end in the United
States until 1865). The island of
Abaco bounded one of the main
shipping routes for vessels going
from the Atlantic Seaboard to
American ports in the Gulf of
Mexico, and the fringing reefs
along the island's eastern coast
are treacherous.

The eventual collapse of the
Bahamian plantation economy
from insect pests and soil exhaus-
tion led many loyalists to desert
Abaco for other islands and terri-
tories. By 1805 the population of
Green Turtle Cay was said to
have been employed in the tradi-
tional activities of woodcutting,
turtling and wrecking, with only
15 slaves reported. This indicat-
ed that those hardy loyalists who
remained had adapted to the
“conch” way of life of the original
settlers, which focused on the sea
rather than on large-scale agri-
culture.

But after a major hurricane in
1806 devastated their homes,
many Harbour Islanders from
Eleuthera moved to Abaco to

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Bids must meet all specifications.

Bids not in compliance with the specifications will be rejected.
Bids must be signed by an individual duly authorized to bind the
bidder to the terms of a contract. Price must include any and all

“Green Turtle's
Island Roots
Festival is perhaps
the best organised

and most
entertaining event

of its kind in the
Bahamas, with

a good mix of
activities to satisfy
the mind as well
as the appetite.”



intermarry with the remaining loy-
alists on three principal settle-
ments — New Plymouth, Man-o-
War and Hope Town. The popu-
lation began to grow, and by 1815
there were 193 people on Green
Turtle Cay.

"When emancipation was pro-
claimed in 1834 there were about
300 slaves and 16 liberated
Africans on Green Turtle Cay out
of a total population of 800, and a
total Abaco population of 1800,"
Williams said. "We don't have any
information about free blacks at
this time, but there were 39 fami-
ly head applications for land on
the cay in 1835. The cost of quar-
ter-acre town lots and 5-acre pro-
vision grounds for these former
slaves was about 10 days labour
laying out roads for the settle-
ment.”

There was much opposition
from the white population at this
time to resettling Africans recov-
ered from foreign slave ships by
the British navy. As Sandra Riley
wrote in her history of Abaco
(Homeward Bound): "Planters
strained under the necessity of
caring for the free African inden-
tures left in the colony as the
result of wrecks or seizures, and
they could not afford the high
prices of labourers after the inden-
tures had expired."

Following emancipation, there
was similar resistance to taking in
shipwrecked American slaves, and
numerous reports that Bahami-
ans were “conveying away
Africans for the atrocious pur-
pose of again selling them into
slavery in Florida and elsewhere."
Many white Abaconians left the
Bahamas at this time for America.
In fact, during the 1840s one
British governor reported that

Key West owed two thirds of its
population to this exodus.

But the feelings were clearly
mutual. As Steve Dodge pointed
out in his short history of Abaco,
"once freed many former slaves
moved away from the white set-
tlements and established new
towns...purposely isolating them-
selves from the whites." These
settlements included places like
Cedar Harbour, Cornish Town,
Bluff Point, Crossing Rocks and
Sandy Point. Almost exclusively
black, they survived by themselves
on subsistence farming and fishing
until well into the 20th century.

Eventually, the old emnities
subsided, and blacks and whites
drew close together in a more
even relationship. In the 1940s
many of those who lived in the
northern African settlements
moved to the new Marsh Harbour
subdivisions of Dundas Town and
Murphy Town that had been laid
out by the colonial government.
And in the 1960s the growth of
tourism brought prosperity to the
Abaco cays. The advent of major-
ity rule in 1967 followed by Inde-
pendence six years later has unal-
terably changed the mental land-
scape of the Bahamas. And to cap
it all off, a former barefoot boy
from Cooper's Town sits in the
prime minister's office today.

Green Turtle's Island Roots
Festival is perhaps the best organ-
ised and most entertaining event
of its kind in the Bahamas, with a
good mix of activities to satisfy
the mind as well as the appetite. It
should be a model for the devel-
opment of heritage tourism
throughout the islands. And it all
began with the conversion of a
wooden shack into a museum and
a casual chat about family ties.

The Antiquities Corporation
in Nassau participates in these
events on a regular basis. It also
undertakes archaeological
research and supports cultural and
historical initiatives throughout
the country. These have included
the South Eleuthera Mission
House at Rock Sound, the Free-
town Historical Project on Grand
Bahama, the Long Island Muse-
um at Buckley's, and the North
Abaco Historical Foundation,
which is now in the process of reg-
istering as a non-profit organisa-
tion.

The foundation is the brain-
child of two Murphy Town resi-
dents — Millie Dawkins of the
Abaco Ministry of Tourism, and
Mirella Santillo, a French immi-
grant who writes for the Abacon-

ae

Colina Imperial

ian newspaper. "We both have a
strong interest in the history of
Abaco," Santillo told me. "I want-
ed to find the location of a
rumoured French settlement dat-
ing to the late 1500s or early
1600s. Millie wanted to locate for-
mer African settlements in the
north to collect data for a museum
and for incorporation into the
local school curriculum."

Prienes after the South
Eleuthera Mission House
at Rock Sound, the North Abaco
Historical Foundation is working
with Dr Keith Tinker of the
Antiquities Corporation to rede-
velop a building that once was the
home of renowned Abaco head
teacher Sherlyn Bootle. The Rock
Sound Mission House dates back
two centuries, and has recently
been restored as a museum,
library and community centre by
local residents who set up a foun-
dation to support the project.

North Abaco's proposed her-
itage centre will also house a
museum, library and computer
lab. And the foundation's long-
term goal is to set up similar her-
itage centres and restore historic
buildings in other areas. "We want
to tie in the African heritage of
Abaco," Dawkins said," and take
an inventory of historical
resources for education, to create
jobs and to attract visitors to the
northern communities.” This is
the same path that Green Turtle
Cay embarked upon decades ago.

Heritage tourism offers a
unique way to break the isolation
and enliven the economy of small
communities. The trick is to find
the right hook and develop some-
thing more than just a macaroni
and beer event. As broadcaster
Charles Carter told me in New
Plymouth a few days ago, if the
Andros Crab Fest could be re-
organised and re-branded as the
Joseph Spence Cultural Festival
the promotional opportunities and
economic spin-offs would be
unlimited.

And if you don't know who
Joseph Spence was, you are part
of the problem.

http://en.wikipedia.org/
wiki/Joseph_Spence_(musician)

What do you think?

Send comments to
larry@tribunemedia.net

Or visit www.bahamapundit.com

The following individuals are asked to contact Mrs. Kimley Saunders

(396-2047) or Ms. Kayshonta Smith

Insurance Ltd:

Princess Butler
P.O. Box ES-6069
Nassau, Bahamas

Brendilee Rolle
P.O. Box 7290
Pine Barron Road
Nassau, Bahamas

Tamika Williams
P.O. Box F 42299

Freeport, Bahamas

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P.O. Box GT 2395
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Sunset Park

Nassau, Bahamas

James Wallace
Nassau, Bahamas

shipping charges associated with delivery of the apparatus to
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P.O. Box N 732
Nassau, Bahamas Stafford Bullard
P.O. Box N 3730
Albert Smith Nassau, Bahamas
P.O. Box SS-6104

Nassau, Bahamas

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PAGE 8, WEDNESDAY, MAY 13, 2009

THE TRIBUNE





Evaluating the FNM Cabinet

YOUNG MAN’s VIEW

Young Man’s View
continues the
evaluation of the
nation’s executive
branch two years into
the FNM’s tenure.

@ By ADRIAN GIBSON
ajoahama@hotmail.com

Loceera BUT-
LER-TURNER, the
Minister of State for Social
Development, seems to be a
ministerial misfit who can
hardly earn more than an F-
plus grade.

Mrs Turner appears to
emit sound and fury, but little
substance and no new initia-
tives or policies. Under the
minister, programmes relat-
ing to drug treatment and
rehab are underfunded; child
protection legislation remains
outstanding and sexual abuse
legislation sat on the back-
burner for a while before
being passed.

Social workers continue to
complain about a lack of
resources and long waits to
be reimbursed for monies
spent putting gas in their pri-
vate vehicles to do the
department’s work.

Although the minister has
attempted to address some
concerns at the Boys and
Girls Industrial Schools,
much more can be done. At
present, any evaluation of
Mrs Turner gives one the
impression that she has mere-
ly been running through the
daisies, catching butterflies,
but little else!

The Urban Renewal pro-
gramme was also scrapped
under the Social Services
minister, only to have to be
reinstate it in certain districts.
Mrs Turner does not appear
to have an appreciable under-
standing of her ministry, fre-
quently going on the defen-
sive and constantly remind-
ing people that she is the min-
ister (for eg, during Parlia-
mentary proceedings).

The minister should not
pay too much attention to
some of the unschooled reli-
gious leaders who are tact-
lessly advising her. She
should seck to increase the
manpower at her ministry
and launch campaigns to
address teenage pregnancy
and the high levels of illegiti-
macy in Bahamian soci-
ety. The minister must also
address the growing presence
of homeless people on the
streets and seek to enlist tru-
ancy officers to apprehend
the growing number of chil-

7a) DS ee) ae

dren drifting about during
school hours.

Charles Maynard, the
chubby Minister of State for
Culture, earns a D-minus. It
is a disgrace to hear informed
cultural icons suggest that the
Bahamas may once again not
host Carifesta, particularly
when the country appears to
be in a slump in terms of the
arts.

In 2005, the late Winston
Saunders was dispatched to
receive the instruments sig-
nifying that the Bahamas was
prepared to host Carifesta.
However, as was felt when
the Bahamas withdrew for its
hosting duties in 2008, the
cultural community seems set
for another devastating blow
and if it is entirely true that
the Bahamas will not host the
upcoming event, it will leave
the country with a black eye
and the impression that it is a
culturally impotent state unfit
to host international events.
At present, there are various
sites such as gymnasiums,
large church halls/Loyola
Hall, hotel ballrooms, per-
forming arts centres such as
the National Centre for the
Performing Arts, Fort Char-
lotte and open spaces and
facilities throughout the Fam-
ily Islands that could have
made the hosting of this event
possible. Surely Mr Maynard
and the Cabinet must know
that with the Bahamas being
a tourism-based economy, in
addition to the exposure this
event could bring to the Fam-
ily Islands, there would not
be any problems with accom-
modations because of the
availability of adequate hotel
rooms and our proximity to
the US would also possibly
attract visitors interested in
seeing the event who would
not have otherwise travelled
to South America or to an
eastern Caribbean country.
Hosting this cultural event
would be a needed economic
boost for the islands!

It appears that Mr May-
nard is stuck on the idea that
culture begins and ends with
junkanoo. It is great that the
minister likes junkanoo, but
why hasn’t there been any
moves to develop it into a
year-round, cultural industry
that could be a cultural
export taken worldwide with
persons who could legiti-

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mately describe their occu-
pation as being a junkanooer.

The culture minister inher-
ited a lot of good projects for
whom credit should go to Dr
Keith Tinker and the Antiq-
uities, Monuments and Muse-
ums Corporation. While Mr
Maynard is enjoying his trav-
els to various events and cre-
ating the illusion of hard
work, it appears that local
playwrights, folklorists/story-
tellers, artists, writers, poets
and painters are receiving lit-
tle by way of support. There
is a need to focus on devel-
oping the stories of the
Bahamas that form our iden-
tity and have yet to be prop-
erly appreciated or recorded.
Why isn’t locally created art
placed in all Bahamian
embassies and government
offices?

Minister Maynard has not
demonstrated his ability to
bring new ideas or be respon-
sible for the contribution of
new policies to the overall
cultural development of the
Bahamas. I do credit Mr
Maynard with the opening of
Clifton—for which I was
proud to see that he engaged
former Prime Minister Perry
Christie who was once at the
forefront of the movement to
save the site—and for the
movement to develop Collins
House into a national muse-
um. As a resident of Mr May-
nard’s constituency, he earns
an F for his performance as
an MP.



i

Dion Foulkes, the Minister
of Labour and Social Devel-
opment, earns a B-plus. Mr
Foulkes is a savvy politician
who has mediated and dif-
fused several attempts by
unions to commence indus-
trial action.

The minister can partly be
credited with the unemploy-
ment benefit scheme and for
establishing what I’m told is a
more civilized atmosphere
when negotiating industrial
agreements. However, Mr




Foulkes must seek to squash
the uncivilized union infight-
ing, which has now elevated
to actual blows being
exchanged when attorney and
former MP Keod Smith was
allegedly smacked in the face
while serving court orders on
Monday. It appears that some
labour leaders in the
Bahamas are hardly con-
cerned about unionized work-
ers, but more about power
and their political/financial
standing.

The labour unions are
holding the country to ran-
som and if allowed to go
unchecked, the unions—par-
ticularly those of the utility
companies—will be too
strong for the government.
There must be policy set forth
to damper the power of reck-
less union leaders, otherwise
we will have a situation where
“the tail wags the dog.”

Furthermore, Senator
Foulkes has ensured that the
consumer affairs aspect of his
ministry is efficiently and con-
stantly visible. The rights of
consumers, who are subjected
to price gouging in food/gen-
eral stores and gas stations
and in some instances are
sold outdated items, must be
protected and I’m told that
the minister is set to take
legal action against certain
unscrupulous business own-
ers.

Hubert Minnis, the Minis-
ter of Health, earns a B-plus.

Dr Minnis has said that he
is actively working to improve
the communication between
staff and patients at the
Princess Margaret Hospital,
secking to resolve complaints
about long lines at clinics,
attempting to ensure that the
hospital and polyclinics
throughout the islands are
operated by highly skilled and
professional staff. He has said
that he is initiating means to
ensure that doctors and staff
are more Service-oriented and
accountable.

In addition to initiating the
e-medicine programme, the
health minister has proposed
to develop a programme that
would require newly return-
ing doctors to be deployed
and exposed to work on the
Family Islands.

However, Dr Minnis’ min-
istry is faced with a myriad
of problems ranging from
inadequate hospital beds and
the unsanitary conditions at
the hospital (dirty elevators,
unusable bathrooms, etc); the
need for a change of the
dreadful, indifferent man-
agement at the hospital, who
should be replaced by an
experienced and insightful
administrative grouping fea-
turing Bahamians who would
have worked in a manage-
ment capacity at a hospital
overseas; claims of malprac-
tice; the need for a new hos-
pital and laboratories; a need
to address the issues arising
about the acceptance of
degrees from Cuba and the

NOTICE

NOTICE

is hereby given that MARTIN JERMAINE

McGREGOR OF #25 DIAMOND DRIVE, P.O. BOX F-44900,
GRAND BAHAMA, BAHAMAS is applying to the Minister
responsible for Nationality and Citizenship, for registration’
naluralzation as a citizen of The Bahamas, and thal any
person whoknows any reason why ragistration/ naturalization
should not be granted, should send a written and signed
Statement of the facts within twenty-eight days from the 17th
day of APRIL, 2009 to the Minister responsible for Nationality
and Citizenship, FO.Box N-7147, Freeport, Bahamas.

NOTICE

NOTICE is hereby given that JOY CYNTHIA TILBAYNE of
WOOD BURN ESTATE, P.O, BOX N-4303, NASSAU, BAHAMAS,
is applying to the Minister responsible for Nationality and Citizenship,
for registration/naturalization as a citizen of The Bahamas, and that
any person who knows any reason why registration/naturalization
should not be granted, should send a written and signed statement
of the facts within twenty-eight days from the 6â„¢ day of May, 2009
to the Minister responsible for nationality and Citizenship, PO. Box

N-7147, Nassau, Bahamas.

PUBLIC NOTICE

INTENT TO CHANGE NAME BY DEED POLL

The Public is hereby advised that |, LESLIE BUTLER nee
MUSGROVE of 23 Saint Georges Drive, Richmond Arms
North Bahamia of the Island of Freeport, Grand Bahama,
intend ta change my name son's name from RAYMOND



there are any objections to this change of name by Deed
Poll, you may write such objections to the Chief Passport
Officer, POBox N-T42, Nassau, Bahamas no later than
thirty (30) days after the date of publication of this notice.

presence of some physicians
who seem to be more con-
cerned with making loads of
money rather than health-
care. Frankly, Dr Minnis is
also hampered by the institu-
tional bureaucracy of a
healthcare system tinkering
on the brink of collapse when
he was assigned his portfolio.

Dr Minnis appears to be
proactive in approach and has
also speedily addressed any
crisis at the hospital or alarm-
ing healthcare issues with a
view to constantly updating
and informing the public. He
is also rated highly as an MP,
running what Sidney Blu-
menthal describes in his 1980
book as the ‘Permanent Cam-
paign,’ engaging his con-
stituents and their concerns.



Neko Grant, the Minister
of Works and Transport,
earns a D. Mr Grant appears
to be lost in the middle of a
jigsaw puzzle, failing to time-
ly negotiate even the most
basic of maintenance con-
tracts, which would have
avoided much of the chaos
caused when nearly all street
lights in New Providence
were wildly flashing.

Mr Grant must address the
traffic congestion on New
Providence, further engage
those in public transport and
resolve the apparent discon-
nect between the ministry of
works and the utility compa-
nies by requiring all to coor-
dinate the installation of
equipment as opposed to
uprooting newly paved roads
when they desire, and also
address the concerns of citi-
zens about the surveying of
property and the untimely
approach taken to granting
approval for architectural/
construction plans.

Thus far, the construction
of sea walls and roads under
the minister is a step in the
right direction; however,
infrastructural upgrades must
also be taken at the various
government offices through-
out the islands, at parks (eg,
RM Bailey), government-ini-
tiated cemeteries and recre-
ational areas.

Hubert Ingraham, the
Prime Minister and Minister
of Finance, earns a B—the

average of all his ministers.
In this instance, the PM can
only be as strong as the weak-
est link in his Cabinet—and
there are quite a few. How-
ever, in terms of his own abil-
ities, the Prime Minister earns
an A-minus.

Prime Minister Ingraham
is the ultimate leader, steadi-
ly steering the country
through these tough econom-
ic times.

The PM continues to live
up to the mantra of “saying
what he means and meaning
what he says.” As a policy-
maker, he should—in con-
junction with the Opposi-
tion—strive to make provi-
sions for a national plan for
the governance of the
Bahamas even 20 years from
today—that is, in terms of the
development of our people.
Mr Ingraham’s political
genius is demonstrated by his
firm, decisive leadership and
his coordination and disci-
pline of his Cabinet.

However, the PM must
increasingly promote and
encourage the local entre-
preneurial spirit through eco-
nomic initiatives and should
strongly consider including
the gambling issue on his leg-
islative agenda, whether by
appointing a commission with
a timeframe or having a ref-
erendum.

The FNM government
must recognize the need for
reform in order to foster a
free market, entrepreneur-
ship, a stronger private sec-
tor and also eliminate all
government/private monop-
olies.

There are also a few Cabi-
net ministers who should do
the populace a favour and
request a return to the back-
benches.

There are still some mem-
bers of the Cabinet—who can
hardly be considered among
the FNM’s brain trust—
whose behaviour is compara-
ble to that of ostriches, which
are known to see danger but
instead of looking for safety
or making an attempt to
defend against their attack-
er, they become contented
with sticking their heads into
sand, assuming that the prob-
lem will just go away. Space
must be for new faces—per-
sons even outside of the polit-
ical realm—who have specif-
ic knowledge about a min-
istry, to serve at a higher lev-
el.

Finally, the FNM must
constantly employ trans-
parency and accountability in
the signing of contracts and
agreements/treaties and seek
to draft and permit the pas-
sage of a Freedom of Infor-
mation Act because, to use
the words of Charles Grassley
(senior Republican on the US
Congress’ Senate Finance
Committee), “sunshine is the
best disinfectant.”

In their second year, the
FNM government earns a B-
minus.

NOTICE

NOTICE is hereby given that BOLIE EDWARD LLOYD of
ST. ANDREW BEACH ESTATES, P.O. BOX EE-17773,
is applying to the Minister responsible for Nationality and
Citizenship, for registration/naturalization as a citizen of The
Bahamas, and that any person who knows any reason why
registration/naturalization should not be granted, should
send a written and signed statement of the facts within
twenty-eight days from the 13 day of May, 2009 to the
Minister responsible for nationality and Citizenship, P.O. Box

N-7147, Nassau, Bahamas.

PUBLIC NOTICE

INTENT TO CHANGE NAME BY DEED POLL
The Public is hereby advised that |, SHAMICKA

P.O. BOX GT-2121, NASSAU, BAHAMAS intend

to my name to SHAMICKA FREDRICKA NORTH, If
there are any objections to this change of name by
Deed Poll, you may write such objections to the Chief
Passport Officer, P:O.Box N-742, Nassau, Bahamas no
later than thirty (30) days after the date of publication

NOTICE

NOTICE is hereby given that CURRY VALBRUN OF
EXUMA STREET OFF ANDROS AVENUE, P.O. BOX
EE-15093, is applying to the Minister responsible

of this notice.

for Mationality

and Citizenship, for

registrations

naturalization as a citizen of The Bahamas, and thal
any person who knows any reason why registration!
naturalization should not be granted, should send
a written and signed statement of the facts within
twenty-eight days from the 12° day of May, 2008 to the
Minister responsible for nationality and Citimenship,
PO. Box N-7147, Nassau, Bahamas.





TRIBUNE SPORTS

WEDNESDAY, MAY 13, 2009, PAGE 13



Nowitzki helps Mavs avoid
sweep at hands of Nuggets

NBA Today

By The Associated
Press

Dallas at Denver (9pm
EDT). The Nuggets try
again to close out the
series and advance to the
Western Conference semi-
finals after the Mavericks
forced Game 5 with a 119-
117 victory Monday night.

STARS

Monday

—Dirk Nowitzki, Mav-
ericks, scored 19 of his 44
points in the fourth quar-
ter, including a high-arch-
ing shot with 1:05 left that
put Dallas ahead for good
in its 119-117 victory over
Denver.

—Josh Howard, Maver-
icks, had 21 points and 11
rebounds to help prevent
Dallas from being swept.

—LeBron James, Cava-
liers, had 27 points, eight
rebounds and eight assists
in a series-clinching 84-84
victory over Atlanta.

STRONG IN DEFEAT

Carmelo Anthony
scored a career playoff-
best 41 points in Denver's
119-117 loss to Dallas.

UNBEATEN AND

UNCHALLENGED

Cleveland made it an
NBA-record eight straight
wins by double digits with
an 84-74 victory over
Atlanta to advance to the
Eastern Conference finals.
The Cavaliers became the
second team to sweep the
first two rounds of the
playoffs since the NBA
expanded the first round
to best-of-seven in 2003.
The Miami Heat started
with sweeps of New Jer-
sey and Washington in the
2005 playoffs before los-
ing to Detroit in the East
finals.

SWEEPS STOPPED

Dallas avoided a pair of
sweeps with its 119-117 vic-
tory over Denver in Game
4 of the Western Confer-
ence semifinals. Besides
being swept in the series,
the Mavericks avoided

dropping every game this

season against the
Nuggets. Denver won all
four meetings in the regu-
lar season.

COACHING

CAROUSEL

Jay Triano is keeping his
job and Tony DiLeo is
returning to his old one.
Triano signed a three-year
contract Monday to coach
the Toronto Raptors,
dropping the interim tag
after taking over the team
during the season. DiLeo
withdrew his name from
consideration for the
76ers’ permanent coaching
job and will go back to his
old job in the front office,
citing family reasons. Gen-
eral manager Ed Stefanski
said the search for a
replacement will begin
immediately.

SPEAKING

"Why should we cele-
brate? We're playing for a
championship. An advance
is an advance. It doesn't
matter if you win in four
games or you win Game 7.
We're happy that we're
playing great basketball ...
but we're not taking for
granted what we're doing
right now."

— LeBron James after
Cleveland completed a
sweep of Atlanta and
advanced to the Eastern
Conference finals with an
84-74 victory in Game 4





DELONTE WEST scores as Josh Smith looks on in the third quarter of
Game 4 of the Eastern Conference semifinals playoffs in Atlanta Monday
night. Cleveland won 84-74 and swept the series 4-0.

(AP Photo: John Bazemore)

Get out the brooms: Cavs
complete sweep of Hawks

lm By PAUL NEWBERRY
AP Sports Writer

ATLANTA (AP) — LeBron
James knew the routine.
Exchange a few handshakes.
Knock out a few interviews.
Start getting ready for Cleve-
land's next series.

This wasn't a time to cele-
brate.

"Why should we celebrate?"
James said. "We're playing for a
championship."

The Cavaliers made it 8-for-8
in the postseason, completing a
second straight sweep with an
84-74 win over the Atlanta
Hawks on Monday night. But
Cleveland had barely walked
off the court at Philips Arena
when the focus shifted to the
Eastern Conference finals.

Clearly, this team won't be
satisfied unless it's lifting a tro-
phy after the final game.

"An advance is an advance,"
said James, who scored 27
points after finishing with 47 in
Game 3. "It doesn't matter if
you win in four games or you
win Game 7. We're happy that
we're playing great basketball

.. but we're not taking for
granted what we're doing right
now."

Delonte West and Mo
Williams showed Cleveland
isn't just a one-man squad, hit-
ting huge shots down the stretch
as the Cavaliers extended their
NBA-record streak of double-
digit playoff wins to eight.
Zydrunas Ilgauskas and Ander-
son Varejao pounded the
boards, leading the Cavaliers to
another big rebounding edge.

"I've got trust in every last
one of our guys,” James said.

Cleveland, which also swept
Detroit in the opening round,
will face either Boston or Orlan-
do in the Eastern Conference
finals.

No matter the opponent, the
Cavaliers will be a lot more rest-
ed. The Celtics-Magic series is
tied 2-all and will last at least
through Thursday, while the top
seed heads back to Ohio to
relax for a few days before
opening the next round at

home.

"We're glad to finish this
series off," reserve Wally
Szczerbiak said. "Now it's time
to go get our rest and get ready
for the next series. We have
some bumps and bruises to heal
from in this series."

So do the Hawks, but they've
got all summer. Joe Johnson,
Al Horford and Marvin
Williams were all hobbled by
injuries, which eliminated any
chance of fourth-seeded Atlanta
giving the Cavaliers a serious
challenge.

Josh Smith led Atlanta with
26 points, but the Hawks shot
23-of-73 from the field to fin-
ish at 31.5 percent. Johnson
added 18 points but shot 7-of-
18. Mike Bibby scored his only
points on a 3-pointer in the final
quarter. Flip Murray kept
putting it up, but made only
four of 15 for 14 points.

"It's hard to judge this team
because we really weren't
healthy in this series," said
Hawks coach Mike Woodson,
whose team made the second
round of the playoffs for the
first time in a decade, just four
seasons removed from a 13-69
debacle.

"We have to get better per-
sonnel-wise, but I couldn't be
more proud of the guys than I
am. We made some major
strides this season.”

The Cavaliers became the
second team to sweep the first
two rounds of the playoffs since
the NBA expanded the first
round to best-of-seven in 2003.
The Miami Heat started with
sweeps of New Jersey and
Washington in 2005 before los-
ing to Detroit in the East finals.

West scored 21 points, while
Williams scored his 12 on four
3-pointers. Ilgauskas had 14
points and 10 rebounds, while
Varejao grabbed seven of his
11 rebounds at the offensive
end to help Cleveland pick up
15 second-chance points.

"You know LeBron is going
to be there, but you don't know
who else is going to be there,"
Woodson moaned. "They've
got weapons around LeBron."

Granger is Most Improved Player

@ By CLIFF BRUNT
AP Sports Writer

INDIANAPOLIS (AP) —
Indiana Pacers forward Danny
Granger was named the NBA's
Most Improved Player on Tues-
day after averaging a career-
best 25.8 points a game this sea-
son.

Granger edged New Jersey
Nets guard Devin Harris 364-
339 in voting from a panel of
121 journalists.

"I can honestly say it really
did come as a surprise," he said.
"T really had it out of my mind
for a while. I was on vacation,
enjoying Italy, and all of a sud-
den, I'm winning the award."

Granger was selected to the
All-Star team this year for the



Granger (AP)

first time and improved his scor-
ing average by at least five
points in each of the past three
seasons. He averaged 7.5 points
as a rookie, then 13.9 in his sec-
ond season and 19.6 in 2007-08.

Granger had the NBA's fifth-
highest scoring average this sea-
son.

"T think in my fourth year, I
just had the experience of play-
ing a lot of minutes,” he said. "I
could read defenses a lot bet-
ter. I could get my shot a lot
easier than what I had in the
past. I think I just thought my
way through the game a little
more than I had previously."

Granger also has been invited
to participate in a USA Bas-
ketball training camp this sum-
mer, the first phase in selecting
the squad for the 2012 Olympics
in London. He said Tuesday he
has accepted the offer.

Granger elevated his game in
January. He averaged 34.7
points and shot 49 percent over
a six-game stretch against West-
ern Conference teams that
began on Jan. 3.

@ By JAIME ARON
AP Sports Writer

DALLAS (AP) — Down by
14 and playing listlessly, the
Dallas Mavericks sure looked
ready to call it a season.

Then Carmelo Anthony
threw a jab, and everything
changed.

Dirk Nowitzki and the Mavs
awoke from their early-game
slumber with rally after rally,
getting close or even tied yet
unable to get ahead until the
former MVP made a tough,
high-arching shot with 1:05 left.
Having worked so hard for the
lead, they weren't about to give
it back, pulling out a 119-117
victory over the Denver
Nuggets on Monday night to
avoid being swept.

Anthony scored a career
playoff-best 41 points and
snagged five steals. He was the
one turning away most Dallas
rallies and made a 3-pointer
with 3.1 seconds left that got
Denver within a point. Yet
when Mavericks guard Jason
Terry intentionally missed a
free throw with 1.1 ticks left,
Anthony was out of answers.
He got the rebound, but could-
n't stop the clock and didn't
even have time to try a 90-foot
heave.

The buzzer sounded and con-
fetti fell as the teams left the
court knowing they will meet
again Wednesday night in Den-
ver.

"It was an unbelievable
game,” said Nowitzki, who
scored 19 of his 44 points in the
fourth quarter. "We were down
the whole game, but were able
to come back and win and
we've been doing that all season
long. ... We've got to go back
to Denver and let it all hang out
again."

The Mavs lost all four regu-
lar-season games against the
Nuggets and the first three of
this series, but all along felt they
were close. The scoreboard
showed it, too, as Denver's mar-
gin shrunk from 14 in the open-
er to 12 then to one in Game
3, which also needed a mistaken
no-call and a 3-pointer by
Anthony with a second left.

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1



KENYON MARTIN gets a hand on

the ball as Dirk Nowitzki takes a

shot in second half of Game 4...
(AP Photo: Donna McWilliam)

"We've been fighting and
fighting this whole series,” said
Mavs forward Josh Howard,
who had 21 points and 11
rebounds on two bad ankles.
"The end of Game 3 gave us a
lot of willpower for this game."

It sure didn't look like it the
first 13 minutes.

Anthony and the Nuggets
were scoring at will and the
Mavericks were doing little to
stop them. On one possession,
Anthony turned, saw no one
between him and the basket
and soared for a dunk so easy it
could've been preseason.

But then Anthony and Dal-
las' Antoine Wright — the com-
batants from the Game 3 finish
— got their arms tangled. Once
untangled, Anthony's open
hand smacked Wright in the
shoulder. Officials called Wright
for a loose-ball foul, hit Antho-
ny with a technical and watched
a video replay to make sure
they were right.

Nothing was the same after
that. The intensity ratcheted to
Game 7 proportions, with a
total of seven technical fouls
and two flagrants. It spilled into
the stands, too, with security
guards removing Anthony's
girlfriend, LaLa Vazquez of
MTV fame, for her safety and

with extra protection around
the mother of Kenyon Martin,
who had a brief exchange with
Mavs owner Mark Cuban after
Game 3.

"They're allowed to be fans,
but when it gets personal, it
goes over the top,” said Den-
ver's Chauncey Billups, who
had 24 points and seven assists.

Added Nuggets coach
George Karl: "I would probably
use an uglier word than hostile,
but I'm not going to do that
right now. I don't think it was
very classy."

The postgame scene was a lit-
tle calmer than after Game 3,
although it may also wind up
getting reviewed by the league
office because Martin and
Cuban clearly exchanged words.

Alas, Denver fans won't get
their chance for revenge on
Cuban. He's skipping Game 5
to be at an awards ceremony in
Las Vegas, keeping a promise
he made to his wife six months
ago.

Nuggets fans will have plenty
to scream about anyway. Their
club is 5-0 at home this post-
season and can clinch their first
trip to the conference finals
since 1985.

"We're still in control,"
Anthony said. "We'll be ready."

Mavericks coach Rick
Carlisle wasn't surprised his
team played so well because
that's been their pattern this
season — bouncing back strong
after hitting rock bottom. He
probably would've preferred
they didn't get so far behind so
quickly at the start, but Now-
itzki refused to let them stay
down for long.

"There are very few guys I
have been around in this league
that are as strong-willed as
him," Carlisle said.

Nowitzki, who also is dealing
with off-court troubles involving
a girlfriend, was 14-of-25. He
made 16 of 17 free throws and
grabbed 13 rebounds.

"We showed character and
fought,” said Dallas’ Jason
Kidd, who had 13 points, 10
rebounds and six assists. "The
pressure is on them to win the
series. We don't have any pres-
sure."

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PAGE 14, WEDNESDAY, MAY 13, 2009

TRIBUNE SPORTS



Federer opens with victory

Japan cancels
US soccer
tour due to
swine flu

TOKYO (AP) — The
Japanese women's soccer team
canceled a tour in the United
States on Tuesday because of
the swine flu outbreak.

The team was scheduled to
play the U.S. team on May 20
in Frisco, Texas, and May 23
in Sandy, Utah. The team was
to travel to Canada for a match
in Toronto on May 25.

Japan's health ministry con-
firmed the fourth case of swine
flu on Sunday, a day after the
country's first three were
reported. The ministry said the
fourth case is a teenager who
recently returned from Canada
on a high school trip with the
three others.

The Japan Football Associa-
tion, which announced the
decision, said it may have to
pay damages for breach of con-
tract.

"This is an unfortunate situ-
ation, but one that we had
absolutely no control over,"
said U.S. Soccer president Sunil
Gulati. "We have been assured
that the risk to the participating
teams is exceptionally low, but
we accept the Japanese Feder-
ation's decision not to travel."

Also Tuesday, Malaysian
soccer officials canceled next
month's Intercontinental Cup
under-23 tournament because
of the threat of swine flu.

The Football Association of
Malaysia canceled the ecight-
team tournament after con-
sulting with the nation's Health
Ministry, the New Straits Times
reported.

Among the teams that had
been expected to play in the
June 1-14 tournament were
Brazil, Mexico and South
Korea, which have each con-
firmed cases of swine flu.

The number of countries
reporting swine flu cases stands
at 31, with the World Health
Organization confirming about
4,800 cases. At least 61 people
have been killed by swine flu
around the world: 56 in Mexi-
co, three in the U.S., one in
Canada and one in Costa Rica.

a

ad

m@ By PAUL LOGOTHETIS
AP Sports Writer

MADRID (AP) — Roger
Federer began his final warmup
for the French Open with a 6-1,
7-5 win over Robin Soderling
at the Madrid Open on Tues-
day.

The Swiss star had 24 win-
ners and took advantage of the
Swedish player's 25 unforced
errors to capture four break
points. Federer fired 11 aces,
including on the final point to
clinch his spot in the third
round.

Federer, who had a bye for
the first round, could lose his
No. 2 position in the rankings to
Andy Murray or Novak
Djokovic without a good show-
ing at the joint ATP and WTA
event.

Earlier, James Blake of the
United States defeated Victor
Hanescu 6-2, 6-4 for his first vic-
tory in the Spanish capital after
six appearances.

"My curse was broken and
all it took was moving to my
least favorite surface," Blake
said.

Blake next plays Ivo
Karlovic, with the winner facing
Federer.

Ivan Ljubicic scored the first
upset after defeating ninth-seed-
ed Jo-Wilfried Tsonga 6-4, 7-5.

The Croatian wild card broke
the ninth-ranked Tsonga three
times, with two of those coming



ROGER FEDERER returns the ball to Robin Soderling yesterday during the

Madrid Open...

in the second set when Ljubi-
cic rallied from 5-2 down.

Ljubicic joined seventh-seed-
ed Fernando Verdasco and No.
16 Tommy Robredo in the third
round.

NFL is considering second
regular-season game overseas

@ By MIKE CRANSTON
AP Sports Writer

CHARLOTTE, N.C. (AP)
— After seeing fans jam Lon-
don’s Wembley Stadium to
watch the NFL the past two
years, the league is considering
adding a second regular-season
game overseas in time for the
2010 season.

Commissioner Roger Good-
ell said Tuesday the second
game could also be played in
London or another location in
the United Kingdom. The issue









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will be discussed at next week’s
league meetings, and could be
included in a larger plan to add
up to two regular-season games
to the NFL schedule. “The fan
reaction we’ve had in London
has been extraordinary. We
would like to feed that passion,”
Goodell said after speaking at
the Charlotte Touchdown Club.
“We have a great fan base in
the UK. There have been dis-
cussions of taking the second
game and playing it in another
market in the UK. That’s some-
thing that we’ll evaluate.”

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Verdasco beat Juan Carlos
Ferrero 6-3, 6-2 in an all-Span-
ish match, while Robredo ral-
lied to defeat Mardy Fish of the
United States 3-6, 7-6 (5), 6-2.
He'll play either Murray or

Simone Bolelli.

Madrid's conversion from a
fast-playing hardcourt to a clay
surface looked to benefit Blake.
Hanescu hit 27 unforced errors
with most coming on his sec-
ond serve where he scored only
six of 18 points and hit three
double faults.

The 16th-ranked American
player seemed to carry over his
good form from his runner-up
finish at the Estoril Open on
Sunday.

"T just started playing my
game instead of just trying to
be a clay courter,” Blake said.
"T've got to play my style and
play aggressive when I get the
chance."

In other first round matches,
10th-seeded Nikolay Davy-
denko defeated Viktor Troicki
6-2, 6-2. Also, No. 13 Marin Cil-
ic held off Marcel Granollers 6-
2, 6-7 (4), 6-1.

On the women's side, fourth-
seeded Jelena Jankovic over-
came a stubborn challenge from
Daniela Hantuchova to win 7-5,
6-2. Jankovic will play Elena
Vesnina.

In other second-round match-
es, ninth-seeded Caroline Woz-
niacki beat Varvara Lepchenko
of the United States 6-3, 6-1.
She will play either Venus
Williams or Alisa Kleybanova.

Amelie Mauresmo will play
third-seeded Elena Dementieva
after a 6-2, 7-5 win over Jie
Zheng.

Jaguars sign Bouman

IN THIS August 28, 2008 file photo, Jaguars quarterback Todd
Bouman passes against the Washington Redskins during an NFL
preseason game, in Landover, Md. The Jaguars signed Bouman on
Tuesday, giving Cleo Lemon competition for the backup position.
Lemon beat out Bouman for the spot during training camp last year,
but he struggled during the team's minicamp earlier this month.

(AP Photo: Nick Wass)



Williams gets two
years probation for
cocaine possession

HOUSTON (AP) — NEL receiver Reggie Williams must serve
two years of probation for cocaine possession in a case in which a

‘Taser was used to subdue him.

Williams on Monday pleaded guilty to possession of a controlled

substance. A judge sentenced the 25-year-old unrestricted free
agent to deferred adjudication and fined Williams $200.

District attorney's office spokeswoman Donna Hawkins told
The Associated Press that Williams will face random drug testing

in Harris County. Hawkins says Williams will not have a felony con-
viction on his record if he successfully completes probation.
Williams, who played for the Jacksonville last year, was arrested

in April when he allegedly refused to leave a bar. An off-duty

police officer used a Taser on Williams.

Williams was the ninth player picked in the 2004 NFL draft
after playing at the University of Washington and Lakes High

School in Lakewood, Wash.

Mutray first
British player
to break into

top three

MADRID (AP) — Andy
Murray is paying little atten-
tion to the world rankings
despite becoming the first
British player to break into the
top three.

The 21-year-old Murray
moved ahead of Novak
Djokovic in Monday's ATP
rankings, leaving him behind
only No. 1 Rafael Nadal and
Roger Federer.

But Murray trails the lead-
ing pair by a considerable
amount and says he is focused
only on adding to the three
titles he has already won this
year, starting with his defense
of the Madrid Open this week.

"It's one of those things that
if you start focusing on the
rankings or on what another
player is doing, you kind of take
your eye off the ball a little bit,”
Murray said Monday. "You
need to focus on your own
matches and try and keep win-
ning.

"The important thing is to
concentrate on playing well and
not the ranking."

Tim Henman and Greg
Rusedski had been Britain's
highest-ranked players since the
rankings began in 1973, both
reaching the No. 4 position
Murray had occupied for eight
months until Monday.

With 8,990 points, Murray is
still significantly behind Feder-
er (10,170) and nowhere near
Nadal (15,360).

Federer and Nadal have won
19 Grand Slam titles between
them, while Murray can count
only an appearance in last
year's U.S. Open final as his
biggest Grand Slam success.

"To get close to those two or
in between Roger and Rafa is a
tough thing to do," Murray
said. "They are probably two
of the best players ever and it
wouldn't surprise me if they
went down as that."

Murray's chances of trim-
ming the gap this week look
slim anyway since the Madrid
tournament has been switched
from hard courts to clay at the
new La Caja Magica complex.

The surface is Nadal's tradi-
tional favorite and Murray lost
his last match on clay 1-6, 6-3, 7-
5 to Juan Monaco in the sec-
ond round of the Rome Mas-
ters two weeks ago. Nadal, Fed-
erer and Djokovic are all play-
ing in Madrid this week.

"The surface was obviously
better for me last year," Murray
said. "I just want to try and win
my first match and take each
match as they come."

Murray had a first-round bye
and will meet Simone Bolelli
in his opener.

"I don't play on this surface
well enough yet to think past
my first match and I play the
winner of two very solid clay
courters, so I'm not going to
think past them,” Murray said.

Murray only needs to look at
Nadal for an example of how
to improve on an initially
unfavoured surface.

The clay-court specialist
worked hard on grass until he
reached the final of Wimble-
don in 2006 and 2007, and even-
tually won it last year.

"I'm obviously impressed
with what he has done on clay,
but what he's done on grass is a
great motivation for me," Mur-
ray said. "I feel I can obviously
get better on clay and learn
how to play better and get onto
the second week and go deep at
the French Open.

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See page 15

‘Building hodles with a positive mind

22nd annual Jeff Rodgers summer basketball camp set for July

m@ By RENALDO DORSETT
Sports Reporter
rdorsett@tribunemedia.net

ummer months usually

bring about a plethora of

basketball camps and one

of the Bahamas’ most well

known franchises officially
announced the launch of another edi-
tion.

The Jeff Rodgers Basketball Camp
is gearing up to enter its 22nd year
under the theme “Building Bodies
with a Positive Mind.”

The camp, scheduled for July 6-31
in H D Colburn Gymatorium at
Bahamas Academy, is again expected
to host hundreds of aspiring players
between the ages of five and 19.

Over the years, the camp has served
as a rite of passage for many local
players through the high school ranks
with a number of them progressing
to basketball careers in colleges
throughout the US.

Jeff Rodgers, camp director, said
the event continues to hold true to
the ideals established since its incep-
tion, building players of great talent
and character.

“The Jeff Rodgers Basketball
Camp is dedicated to the enrichment
of our youth. We believe in inspiring
our campers to be the best that they



FORMER NBA player Mark Jackson, who used to play for Indiana Pacers, greets young-
sters at the 21st Jeff Rodgers summer basketball camp in this 2008 file photo. This year,
a number of NBA players and coaches are expected to attend the annual event...

can be. We assist in posi-
tive character building,
good sportsmanship and
teamwork while develop-
ing the sound fundamen-
tals of basketball,” he said.

“Our programme will
expose the campers to tal-
ented instructors, inspiring
guest speakers, skilled col-
lege coaches, and NBA
personalities who will
interact and perform with
the campers.”

Several NBA personali-
ties, which the Bahamian
public has become well accustomed
to, are expected to headline the list of
celebrities at this year’s camp.

Retired players Tyrone “Muggsy”
Bogues, Scott Burrell, head coach of
the New Orleans Hornets, Byron
Scott, ABC/ESPN commentator
Mark Jackson, two- time all star Chris
Paul, and two players from the
Atlanta Hawks organisation are all
scheduled to attend.

“What keeps it going is God giv-
ing me the strength to continue. This
is something I have accepted as my
ministry, my calling, everybody has a
calling in life and I feel as if once you
are accepting and committed to it you
will always be willing to make the
necessary sacrifices to see it succeed.

Jeff Rodg



This is an opportunity to
give something back to the
community and my church
in a very positive way.”
Rodgers said.

“The parents have sup-
ported the camp for so
many years. Every parent
wonders where they can
put their child in the sum-
mertime, and they want to
put them in a place that is

af, safe, positive, and where
TR

they can learn some skills
and life lessons and think
our track record speaks
for itself. We have some of the finest
local instructors along with interna-
tional instructors and guests to create
one of the best programmes around.”

There is an admission fee for the
camp and the application forms and
fees can be returned at the Bahamas
Conference of Seventh Day Adven-
tists’ main office or at Bahamas Acad-
emy.

Rodgers also credited his wide
range of sponsors which include Sco-
tiabank, Jewel’s Party Supplies, Robin
Hood, Coca Cola, Vitamalt, RBC,
Royal Brittania, CIBC, BTC, Wynd-
ham Nassau resort, Colina Imperial
and Freddie’s Barber Shop.

Registration for the camp remains
open until Friday July 22.

Rodgers hosts US scouts, coaches to check out local ballers’ talent

m@ By RENALDO DORSETT
Sports Reporter
rdorsett@tribunemedia.net

TO compliment his efforts
with his annual summer bas-
ketball camp, basketball enthu-
siast Jeff Rodgers has made
the first initiative in shifting his
focus towards garnering schol-
arship opportunities for local
players.

Rodgers hosted a pair of
scouts and coaches from uni-
versities in the United States
headlined by Aaron Griess,
head coach of Augusburg Col-
lege in Minneapolis, Minneso-
ta.

Originally, the coaches were
scheduled to attend the camp
this summer but were forced
to re-schedule. Rodgers saw
this as a blessing to the players
who will now have two oppor-
tunities to impress the coaching
staffs.

weeks. They came down to
watch a few scrimmages and
have a look at some of the
senior high school guys and
look at the possibility of them
giving out a few scholarships
to their schools.

“We have other coaches
coming into town who will be
here for the camp in July,” he
said.

“The feedback was great,
they said they saw a couple of
guys and they want to make
return trips this summer to get
a better look and spend more
time scouting the guys and
making sure they get the total
picture.

“Another thing they told me
is that they wanted to see them
more in game situations to get
a greater feel for the funda-
mentals so it works out well
that the guys will have another
opportunity to play before
them.”



JEFF RODGERS (holding ball) can be seen with the scouts and coaches from the US and some local players...

(Photo: Felipé Major/Tribune staff)

“Because of scheduling con- Approximately 25 high “Some of the positive traits tion, athletic ability and good ~=see how we can help the bigger to continue the sport at uni-
flicts we were forced to move — school players competed inthe they said they noticed in the attitudes,” Rodgers said. ““We _ kids, the seniors to see if they _ versities in the United States
that training session up afew — exhibition. kids was a drive, determina- really want to focus a lot and = can acquire some scholarships and further their education.”

ome hil Single “Sour Vibes" which streamed the air-
waves Tor multiple weeks in the number ane spot an
100 Jann’ Bahama Hot Ones Gaunt Down

He was the fest Bahamian Artist to be feahyred on
JCM with their Debut of “A Gay in The Life" apd being
the featured Artist thastitie most fittingbecams, “A Day
In the Lite of Puzete, Puzzle’s career has alforded him

“PUZZLE" 15 A WATIVE OF THE BEAUTIFUL 15-
LAND OF WASSAU, BAHAMAS. BEING BORW IN
AM ISLAND OF UNIQUE, TRANQUIL BEAUTY:
PUZZLE'S INSPIRATION SURROUNDS HIM ane! he :
is without a doubt the Country's bast kapt secret The OPPOnUNity to perfor his music anckhcnancase

Since the tender ag¢ of five, Puzzle has been in- fis. exhilarating talent cwir the Bahamas and the
volved in church sanging and playing warlous in- world.

Strumenis andhas developed a passion dor music With his new Hit Single This Is Wrong’, Puazle has
ofall ganres. This passion has allotted him the ONCE ADaIN PROVEN his amazing talent, capturing the
ability and enhanced his lowe for songwriting hearts and minds of his tars through his uniqueness
singing and producing musi¢ for himself and vari- of storytelling.

Cus artists Mow gearing for his three (3) month tou ln Eu-

Purvie's collaborations has landed him record- rope, Pure will work with some of the biggest
ings and remixing at the Hit Factory Criteria in Artists that UK has to offer and prone to the world
Miarni; warking with professionals of the fiald and why hig was tha Bahamas’ bes! kept secret.

Leniy Kravite's go to man, Matt Knobel far his sin- Purvie has toured and pertoemed wath Tempo's

gle Animal’ he also worked witht Mian hasad ‘Badass Outta Sta" School Tour and Tempo Turns
producer SugarDip om "Hispanic Girls" and Jim Three, in Nassau, Bahamas

Lolis of Zolis Audio Sounds in Tororo, Canada on Pyezle’s dedication to ihe art enchants the amdi-
the final version of his Debut Album ‘Pieces Bnce and through his contribution to the marsic incus-

Puzzle captivated the Country valth his number ry he siries to be a giant piece of the puzele

MAY 16, ec00g
BUTLER & SANDS
GROUNDS, JFK





PAGE 16, WEDNESDAY, MAY 13, 2009

THE TRIBUNE



LOCAL NEWS



Investment bank denies.
unfairness |

m@ By MEGAN REYNOLDS
Tribune Staff Reporter
mreynolds@tribunemedia.net

STAFF at an investment bank
are being forced to suffer hard-
ships while expatriate employees
continue to receive thousands
of dollars in expenses and bene-
fits, sources claim.

However, the bank has
denied all of the allegations.

A source claims that foreign
workers at Royal Bank of Cana-
da (RBC) Trust Company
(Bahamas) Ltd live in luxury
accommodation and send their
children to expensive private
schools at the cost of the com-
pany, one month after a
Bahamian mother was let go to
cut costs in a challenging eco-
nomic climate.

Expenses paid for foreign
workers include a $15,000
monthly rental payment for an
expatriate’s home in Lyford
Cay, and the $29,000 cost of
bringing an foreigner’s Corvette
to the country, the sources claim.

It is further alleged that staff
are being pressured to take two
weeks of unpaid leave to help
balance the books in hard eco-
nomic times, while a foreign
employee is being excused from
the sacrifice, Tribune sources
alleged.

But RBC managing director
Elizabeth Dorsch denied all of
the allegations, adding that
employees only volunteer to
take time off and will not be
penalised if they choose not to.

She declined to comment fur-
ther as the managing director
said: “It is our policy not to com-
ment on specifics concerning
employee matters due to priva-
cy concerns.”

Sources say an expatriate will
typically be paid an annual
salary of $80,000 for doing the

Emerald Bay Resort

FROM page one

same job for which a Bahami-
an with the same level of expe-
rience would only be paid |
$60,000.

And they maintain the cot
expats are preventing experi-

enced and capable Bahamians
from progressing to fillthe more

senior roles.

“The overall atmosphere is :
discouragement among the }

staff,” a source claimed.

“The staff are made to feel
like they are just getting the ;
scraps while they live off the :

high horse.”

One disgruntled employee is
reportedly leaving the Nassau :
office. It is alleged a foreign staff i

member will fill the vacancy.

Sources maintain there are :
two senior employees with }
around 30 years combined expe- i
rience, but it is expected they }
will be overlooked in favour of }
an expat with foreign language i

skills.

A source said: “They have i
these seniors who are capable :
of handling the position without i
hesitation, but I can guarantee }
you they’re going to have some- }
one come in and use the lan- }

guage thing.

“It’s not necessary because :
staff rarely speak to clients, and
the people they deal with speak

English.

“They are doing the work :
and then the expatriates come in i

and are fully compensated.

“It’s unfair treatment and yet i
they insist on doing it,” the }

source complained.

Ms Dorsch denied the alle-

gation. She said RBC Wealth

Management currently employs

35 persons in the Bahamas,
three are expatriates.
She maintains there has been

one redundancy this year while ‘
no further redundancies are

planned.

erty in Eleuthera, he was concerned whether they would be willing
to invest the additional $75 million required to bring Emerald Bay

up to par.

“T question their willingness to do this because it seems as if they
are unwilling to do the same on their property at Cape Eleuthera.
The reality is if they do not invest the money to correct the flaws in
the entrance to the marina, build a marina village, complete some

road diversions, and put the utilities underground at the golf course :

they will not have the atmosphere of an upscale resort,” he said.
Mr Smith hoped that if the property incorporates a marina village,

the franchises at the marina will be offered to residents of Exuma.
“But it will be a sad day if Four Seasons has to leave Exuma,” he

said.

As revealed by previous reports in Tribune Business, Mitsui has
been rather flexible on the purchase price of the property, coming
down from its initial $125-$130 million target to as low as $35 million.

The Japanese insurer is said to be thoroughly sick of the entire sit-
uation, and wants to get out as quickly as possible, after the resort was
put into receivership in mid-June of 2007.

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Lands and Surveys
- director resigns

FROM page one

However, Mr Turnquest denied
having any direct involvement
with the properties which were
“flipped” a few years later and
sold for more than $550,000.

At that time, Mr Turnquest
said, the final authority for the
sale of the properties rested not
with him, but with the Prime
Minister who had to sign off on
the sales as the Minister respon-
sible for Crown Land.

However, Mr Turnquest got a
rude awakening Monday morn-
ing when he returned to work to
discover that the locks to his
office had been changed.

According to sources deep
within the department, officials
were inside his office busy
securing files and documenta-
tion that officers at the Attor-
ney General’s office feared
could have been destroyed or
“misplaced” if swift action had
not been taken.

The government is also
reportedly in the process of
implementing significant
changes to the law to ensure
that abuses of Crown land, as



B By PAULG
TURNGUEST

Tribune Staff Reporter

urnigQuestatriluwne

AS THE furesre
to mount «
HOCUS

A SERIES of articles on the topic
have been published in The Tribune

not happen again.

Yesterday when The Tribune
contacted the Department of
Lands to speak with Mr Turn-
quest, his secretary reported
that he was not in office, nor
did she know when he would
return.

Mr Turnquest’s removal from
the department comes at a time
when the Opposition has
already started a motion in the
House of Assembly calling for a
Select Committee to review all
Crown land grants issued by
government since the early
1990’s.

This committee will review
all Crown grants issued to indi-
viduals or entities since 1992 up
until the present date along with
all outstanding applications that
have yet to receive final
approval.

The committee will also
ascertain a list of all public ser-
vants and retired public servants
who have received grants, along
with government’s official posi-
tion on its policy in relation to
the disposition of publicly held
lands generally; as well as the
government’s policy in relation
to granting lands to employees
of the government or their rel-
atives.

Since the revelations of the
transactions relating to Mr
Turnquest’s relatives, and
claims that other civil servants
were able to secure substantial

grants of Crown land, several
upset individuals have come for-
ward claiming many years of
abuse they have had to endure
at the hands of this department.
Among these individuals was
PLP general Ezra Russell, who
complained of having to wait
over 12 years to get final
approval to purchase some 34
acres of Crown land in Foun-
tain Bay, Cat Island.

During Prime Minister
Hubert Ingraham’s first term in
office, Mr Turnquest was
appointed Director of Lands
and Surveys. After winning the
government in 2002, former
Prime Minister Perry Christie
removed Mr Turnquest from
this department in 2005 and
transferred him to the office of
the Prime Minister.

However, upon Mr Ingra-
ham’s return to government in
2007, Mr Turnquest was
returned to head Lands and
Surveys.

Attempts to reach the Min-
ister of Lands Byran Woodside
for comment on the matter
were unsuccessful up to press
time last night.

coastcanbbeanimages L-

model search

yOu mah by email to:

=; "Bahamas Model Search"

reported in The Tribune, will
FROM page one

than a friendship” with Mr Ferguson’s sister.

While some called his departure a shock,
which reverberated throughout the legal com-
munity, Mr Levine said he saw it as a forseeable
development.

"The judge had been openly stating that a
committee had been formed for his removal
and he would probably resign before he was
ousted," he said.

Justice Lyons’ retirement takes effect on
August 1, until then he will take pre-retire-
ment leave effective from May 11.

Now, said Mr Levine, the Judicial and Legal
Service Commission already faced with the
task of appointing additional judges, has the
daunting task of appointing a suitable judge
— well-versed in commercial legal matters —
to replace Justice Lyons.

"The Commission knows the problem as
well and in the absence of obvious Bahamian
lawyers to replace Justice Lyons, they will be
struggling with the problem of avoiding this
recurring problem of appointing foreign
lawyers as judges who would rather be in more
lucrative practice more at the Bar," he said.

To mitigate this, he suggested the appoint-
ment of McKinney, Bancroft and Hughes
senior partner Brian Moree — a name men-
tioned by various sources within the legal com-
munity as fit for the post — to be appointed to
the vacancy.

However, he said — as noted by Bar Coun-
cil President Wayne Munroe — Mr Moree
may not be keen to take the hefty pay cut
which comes with the Supreme Court appoint-
ment. He suggested that the prime minister
make a more attractive offer to Mr Moree —
that of chief justice — a move he believes will
solidify confidence of foreign investors in the
local judicial system.

"Everyone agrees that Mr Moree is the only
practitioner at the Bar who has the knowledge
and other qualities to undertake the role of
commercial judge. He has also the reputation
for hard work that Justice Lyons had. His
apparent qualifications exceed those of any
other existing Supreme Court justice as the
replacement commercial judge.

"Of course the offer of a judgeship to the
senior partner of a large Bahamian law firm
creates difficulties of its own. Mr Moree has the
reputation of bringing in the lion’s share of
the profit costs of the firm and the offer might
therefore well be refused on that ground
alone."

"An alternative open to the prime minister
after consultation with the leader of the Oppo-
sition is to offer to Mr Moree the office of
chief justice of the Bahamas. Mr Moree might
find such an offer an honour not capable of
refusal. . there are many who would say that
both amongst the Bar and the amongst the
members of the Bench there is no one who
enjoys a greater reputation for integrity than
Mr Moree.

"Most significantly, Mr Moree enjoys the

Appointment of Justice Lyons
‘may have been a mistake’

confidence of sophisticated foreign investors,
banks and corporations and their worldwide
network of lawyers and advisers. There is no
group amongst whom respect for the Bahami-
an legal system, including the court system,
has suffered a greater decline. Such an appoint-
ment would help re-establish the Bahamas as a
financial centre which I know is close to the
heart of the government as well as Mr Moree,”
said Mr Levine.

He also said that two areas "threatening to
destroy the administration of justice in this
country” are the widespread belief of corrup-
tion among lawyers and the suspicion that polit-
ical influence sways matters before the bench.

"The public believe there are problems with
the legal profession generally by which they
mean that the lawyers are no longer members
of a profession but business men of the worst
sort who in substantial numbers cheat their
clients and who as a profession will prevent
any complaint from the public against any
established attorney for the worst offence from
making any progress under the Legal Profes-
sion Act.

"There is also a suspicion that the justices
lack the independence and the overriding desire
to see justice done, particularly if an attorney
with political influence is appearing against
them.

"The irony is that no judge more than Justice
Lyons would openly criticize an attorney for his
pursuing a case without merit, and no Judge
was more efficient in dealing with court busi-
ness than Justice Lyons, and it was Justice
Lyons who openly criticised the attorney gen-
eral of the day for directing him in how to con-
duct his court and interfering with his judicial
independence.

He also claimed that the government by fail-
ing to pay the judges the remuneration and
pensions to which they were entitled had
brought about a Constitutional crisis.

"The public’s suspicion about the legal sys-
tem means today that most members of the
public would not pay a lawyer to take a matter
to court because they have no faith between the
failings and lassitude of the Bar and Bench
that there will ever be a trial to give them rec-
ompense."

Mr Levine noted that while Attorney Gen-
eral Michael Barnett recently announced gov-
ernment's intent to introduce legislation to
ensure the independence of the judiciary, the
constitution currently allows for this indepen-
dence.

"Tam not sure what other legislation is nec-
essary to ensure to the judiciary that indepen-
dence, if the judges other than the departed Jus-
tice Lyons do not already respect the reality of
their own independence.

"It is as regards these matters Mr Moree as
Chief Justice would bring into the equation

qualifications that would go a long way to
resolving these problems without fanfare and
without unnecessary legislation, which might
resolve nothing," he said.

This appointment would signal the appoint-
ment of a "non-political animal” as chief justice
"with no real ties or obligations to either polit-
ical party” said Mr Levine.

"In this manner largely by the appointment
of a competent and intelligent lawyer as Chief
Justice who respects the law and has no need
for political patronage, the prime minister can
restore the standing of the judiciary, restore
the standing of the Bar Association and solve
himself two big political problems that his
Attorney General with all the proposed legis-
lation cannot do for him.

"The Judiciary would have an effective Chief
Justice having the stature to represent the judi-
clary in standing up to the Mr Michael Barnett
or whoever was the Attorney General of the
day wrongly to influence the judicial function or
discretion of all the judges or any one of them.

"It would not be left to the now departed
Justice Lyons as it was some years ago to speak
out about the political influence being exerted.

"The public can be satisfied that Mr Brian
Moree does not represent the establishment
of the Bar Association whose present conduct
is being publicly decried. Only a year or so ago
T attended the Bar Association Annual Meet-
ing and surprisingly found Mr Moree present.
He had been persuaded to put his name into
contention in the election of the President of
the Bar Association. I know he had been per-
suaded to do so out of a sense of duty to try to
make the Bar Council adopt a new and respon-
sible course that would restore credit to the
Bar Association. However the incumbent Pres-
ident was not one of those persuaded that Mr
Moree should replace him.”

According to Mr Levine the incumbent Bar
Association president decided to run again and
with the benefit of a large number of proxies
was successful in defeating Mr Moree.

"The Prime Minister knows that Mr. Barnett
is not the person to restore the public confi-
dence in the standing of the judges or the cred-
ibility of the lawyers in this country,” said Mr
Levine. “Without that respect being restored to
the Bench and Bar it is difficult to fight crime.
On the other hand if Mr. Moree can be per-
suaded to accept office he may by his standing
and recognized integrity more than anyone
else be able to turn things round and restore the
expectations of both the lay public in the
Bahamas.

"I may be wrong about this and it may be too
much to expect from Mr Moree. But if I am
wrong I can think of no other answer because
the decay has gone on for too long.

"The alternative is the free fall continuing,"
said Mr Levine.

Philippines warns of Filipinos being illegally trafficked in the Baltamas, Caribbean

4,

reportedly victimised by a man identified as Leonid
‘Ned’ Pascual, who is already implicated in previ-
ous cases of human trafficking and currently includ-
ed on Cuba’s immigration blacklist, according to
the DFA in the Philippines.

The two Filipinos were unwittingly taken to
Havana where they were shocked to find the
promised jobs were nothing more than a fabrica-
tion, according to the DFA's press release.

"The two unsuspecting victims paid more than
P500,000 each to Pascual to bring them to the
Bahamas where they were supposed to be
employed with a salary of US$5,000 a month.

"Upon their arrival in Havana, the victims dis-
covered that the jobs promised them were non-
existent and found themselves stranded in the
Cuban capital,” said the DFA.

Local foreign affairs officials said while the plight
of human trafficking is a global concern, the min-
istry was not aware of a proliferation of Filipinos
being trafficked illegally into this country.

"I was not aware that this was an issue for us —
perhaps Immigration (officials) might have noticed
a trend but the ministry of foreign affairs hasn't
been made aware of any trend in that regard,"
said Deputy Permanent Secretary at the Ministry
of Foreign Affairs Donna Knowles-Lowe.

FROM page one

Attempts to reach Immigration officials for

comment yesterday were unsuccessful up to press

time.

The Philippine embassy in Havana provided
the "stranded" Filipinos with food and housing
until it could arrange for their return to the Philip-
pines, according to the statement.

Yesterday, the Department of Foreign Affairs in
the Philippines urged its citizens to be wary of
illicit job recruiters who promise advantageous
work opportunities overseas and to confirm these
Openings to avoid being hoodwinked.

According to the website humantrafficking.org,
the southeast Asian country is a "source, transit,
and destination" point for human trafficking with
an estimated number of 300,000 to 400,000 traf-
ficked women and 60,000 to 100,000 trafficked
children for labour and sexual exploitation.

The website also reported that many Filipino
adults voluntarily immigrate to work overseas,
but are later "coerced into exploitative condi-
tions."

In December, 2008 the Bahamas enacted the
Trafficking in Persons (Prevention and Suppres-
sion) Act to allow for stiff penalties for persons
found guilty of human trafficking.

Attempts to reach officials at the Philippines’
embassy in Havana were unsuccessful up to press
time.





THE TRIBUNE

sine

WEDNESDAY,

MAY

ilies ee



2009

SECTION B ¢ business@tribunemedia.net

ROYAL FIDELITY



Company’s fury over
Albany contract loss

@ By CHESTER ROBARDS
Business Reporter
crobards@tribunemedia.net

Bahamas-based cabinet
An yesterday react-
ed with fury after his
company lost a kitchen-fitting
contract by the $1.4 billion Albany
project, after being paid a $15,000
retainer, in favour of a competitor
that opened its showroom in New
Providence only last week.

Mark Moyle told Tribune Busi-
ness that his company, Craftman’s
Kitchen Ltd, was given a mone-
tary retainer fee by Albany two
years ago to design and install
kitchens for the development’s
townhouses.

However, last week he was
informed that Albany had opted
to go with Canada-based
Downsview Kitchens instead, and
said it was strange for the project
to make such a brisk reversal of its
previous decision.

Mr Moyle claimed that
Downsview’s design consultant,

Chris Anand



Gary Stannis, had been operating
in the Bahamas without proper
documentation for almost 10
years. “For years, Gary would fly
in as a tourist, place magnetic
‘Downsview’ signs on a rental car
and cruise around like he owned
the place,” Mr Moyle told Tri-
bune Business. “Construction con-

sultants would literally, overnight,
stop accepting bids from any local
cabinet sources.”

Mr Stannis, though, yesterday
denied Mr Moyle’s claims and
said he had complied with all
Bahamian laws.

He told Tribune Business that
he had applied for several work
permits that were being blocked
by Mr Moyle’s objections to the
Department of Immigration. He
said he was even turned away at
Lynden Pindling International
Airport (LPIA) once when try-
ing to enter the Bahamas.

Mr Stannis said he has visited
the Bahamas many times to speak
to potential clients, who eventu-
ally make the trip to Downsview’s
Florida showroom, where they
purchase their kitchens.

Mr Moyle, though, said he was
baffled as to why Albany would
consider a product 40 per cent
more costly than his own.

But Albany’s managing part-
ner, Chris Anand, said they simply
went with a slightly more superior

product. He said the project’s
investors, The Tavistock Group,
Tiger Woods and Ernie Els, were
investing hundreds of millions of
dollars in the project, and decided
to go with a distributor “that gives
us a lot of confidencee”.

Mr Moyle was allowed to keep
the retainer fee he was paid to
produce drawings and design
work. “That’s relatively unheard
of,” said Mr Anand.

Mr Stannis said it was not
uncommon for a large project
such as Albany to change con-
tractors, even after paying a
retainer, which he thought to be
around $15,000. “It has happened
to Downsview, too,” he said. “We
lose jobs.”

Mr Stannis said Albany will be
purchasing all of its kitchens
directly through Downsview’s
Bahamian partner, Caribbean
Construction and Management
Services (CCMS). He said Mr
Moyle, who was a distributor for

SEE page 2B

Water Corp’s ‘major arrears’ for whole year

@ By NEIL HARTNELL
Tribune Business Editor

THE Water & Sewerage Cor-
poration “expects to continue to
be significantly in arrears on its
payments” to BISX-listed Con-
solidated Water throughout 2009,
it was revealed yesterday, despite
having already paid down $4.35
million on its $9.5 million
accounts receivables balance.

Consolidated Water’s 10-Q
statement, filed with the Securi-
ties & Exchange Commission
(SEC) as it released its 2009 first
quarter results, further highlight-
ed the continuing financial weak-
ness of the Water & Sewerage
Corporation, as the sums owed
for reverse osmosis water sup-
plied by the BISX-listed entity
had further ballooned by $1.4 mil-
lion since year-end 2008.

And while a further $4.35 mil-
lion payment was expected from
the Water & Sewerage Corpora-
tion before June 30, 2009, in addi-
tion to the $4.35 million payment
already received, the likelihood
of a continuing accounts receiv-

* Accounts payables woes to BISX-listed Consolidated Water to run for whole year,
despite $4.35m payment in April and another $4.35m due before June
* Consolidated Water settles $950,000 legal action with $480,000 payment out-of-court

ables issue shows that the extra
$11 million allocated to it in the
2008-2009 Mid-Term Budget is
still not enough to cover the Cor-
poration’s cash flow issues.

Meanwhile, Consolidated
Water said it had settled for
$480,000 with Gruppozecca
Bahamas over a legal action in
the Bahamian Supreme Court
relating to a dispute over the con-
struction of the former’s Blue
Hills reverse osmosis plant.

Gruppozecca Bahamas had
sought $950,000 damages over an
alleged breach of obligations by
Consolidated Water. But the
action was settled out of court on
April 2, 2009, with all claims set-
tled in exchange for “a final
progress payment under the con-
struction agreement” between the
parties.

Consolidated Water, in its 10-
Q, said that the Water & Sewer-

Bahama Rock aggregate
loss ‘catastrophic’

@ By NEIL HARTNELL
Tribune Business Editor

THE Bahamian Contractors
Association’s (BCA) president
yesterday said “huge catastroph-
ic problems” would arise for the
construction industry if it lost its
home-grown aggregate materials
supply through Bahama Rock’s
departure, with cost increases
impacting the economy’s com-
petitiveness.

Stephen Wrinkle, who runs his
own construction business, Wrin-
kle Development, said it was
“critical” for the industry and
Bahamian policymakers to deter-
mine the long-term solution for
aggregate supply, given that
Bahama Rock - which supplied
almost 100 per cent of the sec-
tor’s current needs - was eventu-
ally likely to leave Grand
Bahama.

The information contained is from a third
party and The Tribune can not be held
responsible for errors and/or omission
from the daily report.



* Contractors head says loss
of local supply would impact
costs, supply chain continuity
and convenience for Bahamian
construction industry

* Bahamas’ ability to attract
foreign direct investment
would also be impaired if no
domestically-produced
ageregate available

That, Mr Wrinkle explained,
would force the construction
industry to either stockpile huge
amounts of aggregate or import it
from the US and other Caribbean
countries.

Not only would this increase
the outflow of US dollars and for-
eign currency, impacting the
Bahamas’ external reserves, but it
would give the likes of Jamaica,
Cuba and the Dominican Repub-
lic - the Bahamas’ major tourism
competitors, who all have their
own aggregate material supplies -
a competitive cost advantage
when it came to attract foreign
real estate developers.

The Environmental Impact
Assessment (EIA) carried out for
the proposed area 4 Freeport
Harbour expansion warned that if
the project did not go ahead,
there would likely be a 300 per
cent increase in aggregate mater-
ial prices, which would raise
Bahamian construction industry
costs by $15 million per annum.

Mr Wrinkle said that while he
could not comment on the fig-
ures, as he was not up to date
with international aggregate
prices, he recalled that his com-
pany imported large quantities
from Jamaica when it was work-
ing on a Family Island project and

SEE page 2B

age Corporation’s delay in paying
bills had increased the accounts
receivables balance for its
Bahamian subsidiary by a further
$1.4 million to $9.5 million since
year-end 2008.

The company added: “Since
early 2008, Consolidated Water-
Bahamas has experienced signif-
icant delays in the receipt of pay-
ments on its outstanding accounts
receivable from the Water and
Sewerage Corporation of the
Bahamas.

“As of March 31, 2009, Con-
solidated Water-Bahamas was
due approximately $9.5 million
from the Water and Sewerage
Corporation. During April 2009,
Water and Sewerage Corporation
paid $4.35 million on these receiv-
ables.

“We have met with represen-
tatives of the Water and Sewer-
age Corporation and Bahamas

government (most recently on
May 1, 2009) to inquire as to the
reasons for the delinquency in
their accounts receivables pay-
ments. We have been informed
by these government representa-
tives that the Water and Sewer-
age Corporation’s payment delin-
quencies are due to operating
issues within the Water and Sew-
erage Corporation; that such
delinquencies do not reflect any
type of dispute with Consolidated
Water-Bahamas with respect to
the amounts owed; and the
amounts will ultimately be paid in
full.”

Consolidated Water said: “We
have been informed by these rep-
resentatives that another payment
from the Water and Sewerage
Corporation of $4.35 million will
be forthcoming prior to June 30,

SEE page 2B

Make it a reality.

Money at Work

NASSAU OFFICE
(242) 356-9801

FREEPORT OFFICE

(242) 351-3010



A BAHAMASAIR aircraft can be seen in this file photo...

Aircraft overhauls
to save Bahamasair
$1.4m per annum

lm By CHESTER ROBARDS
Business Reporter
crobards@tribunemedia. net

BAHAMASAIR’s managing
director yesterday said the nation-
al flag carrier has undertaken
numerous cost-saving measures,
including one that could save the
national flag carrier almost $1.4
million this year.

Henry Woods told Tribune
Business that Bahamasair had
received approval to overhaul
three of its Dash-8 airplanes local-
ly at the Lynden Pindling Inter-
national Airport (LPIA).

He explained that previously
the airplanes were sent to Cana-
da for renovations, where they
would have had to undergo
inspections priced at $450,000

* Airline passes IATA and
FAA inspections with
‘flying colours’

* Only five inconsistencies
uncovered by FAA that
are now corrected

* Only 41 of 2,300 IATA
checklist items an issue,
and all now in
compliance

each upon completion.
However, the Government had

SEE page 2B

Bahamas plant improvements
boost company margins by 7%

mw By NEIL HARTNELL
Tribune Business Editor

BISX-listed Consolidated Water yesterday said 2009 first quarter
gross margins had increased from 15 per cent to 22 per cent for its bulk
water segment due to “improved energy and other operational effi-
ciencies” at its two New Providence-based reverse osmosis plants, a
trend expected to continue for the remainder of 2009.

David Sasnett, Consolidated Water’s chief financial officer, told
Wall Street analysts during a conference call that the Windsor plant’s
feed water system had been improved to “eliminate ongoing chronic
fouling problems” that had impacted the profitability and margins of

its Bahamian assets.

With that work now completed, Consolidated Water was set to
enjoy lower maintenance costs and “better energy efficiencies”, Mr Sas-

nett added.

He said the company was also likely to experience further energy effi-

ciencies, “although not to the same
extent”, with the replacement of

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PAGE 2B, WEDNESDAY, MAY 13, 2009

THE TRIBUNE





Company’s fury over
Albany contract loss

FROM page 1B

Crystal Cabinets, is just a middle-
man.

Mr Moyle, though, claimed that
Mr Stannis had sought to elude
the attention of the Customs and
Immigration departments by con-
signing kitchen shipments to his
client’s names and not
Downsview.

However, Mr Stannis said the

BANQUE PRIVEE

ty

o

kitchens, which are manufactured
in Toronto, Canada, are shipped
to Downsview’s location in Flori-
da, and the purchasers are then
responsible for shipment to the
final destination. He said that
even though Downsview now has
a showroom in the Bahamas, he
will visit on occasions as he always
has.

“People will come to the States
to buy the kitchen,” he said.

EDMOND DE ROTHSCHILD LTD
LCF ROTHSCHILD GROUP

Aircraft overhauls
to save Bahamasair
$1.4m per annum

FROM page 1B

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TUESDAY, 12 MAY 2009
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WWW.BISXBAHAMAS.COM | TELEPHONE:242-323-2330 | FACSIMILE: 242-323-2320

1.40
11.00
6.95
0.63
3.15
2.37
11.75
2.83
6.17
2.50
1.85
7.76
11.00
10.40
5.14
1.00
0.30
5.59
10.50
10.00

Fund

Previous Close Today's Close

1.40
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6.95
0.63
3.15
2.37
11.75
2.83
6.17
3.38
1.70
7.76
11.00
10.40
5.14
1.00
0.30
5.59
10.50
10.00

S2wk-Hi _52wk-Low
1000.00
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Change

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Daily Vol.

EPS $

pursued the approvals necessary
to have Bahamian technicians
completely overhaul the planes.

“Bahamians are getting the
money, and local technicians are
getting the experience,” said Mr
Woods.

Bahamasair’s Dash-8 savings
come as the national airline
received exemplary operational
performance marks from the Fed-
eral Aviation Administration
(FAA) and the International Air
Transport Association (IATA).

Mr Woods said Bahamasair
underwent two extensive back-
to-back audits with the two
organisations, passing both with
“flying colours”.

In December, IATA audited
Bahamasair using a 2,300 item
checklist, of which only 41 items
were found to be inconsistent
with standard regulations. None
were safety-related.

Mr Woods said those inconsis-
tencies have since been corrected,

and the airline is preparing to turn
those corrections over to IATA.

Bahamasair underwent a sec-
ond audit in January 2009 by the
FAA.

According to Mr Woods, a
five-man team of US auditors
scrutinised Bahamasair’s opera-
tional and technical departments
for one week, after which the air-
line was given a “clean bill of

health”.
Audit

He said there only five incon-
sistencies discovered by the audit,
which the airline corrected with-
in 30 days.

“Their initial feedback was that
they were most pleased with
Bahamasair,” said Mr Woods said
of the FAA and IATA.

He said the travelling public
has developed high expectations
of Bahamasair, more so than ever
before, and that in some regards

they are far ahead of other air-
lines that operate out of LPIA in
terms of operational perfor-
mance.

“The proof is in the pudding,”
said Mr Woods. “Our daily oper-
ations have much improved, and
recently we have been receiving
much positive comments.”

He said the Bahamasair staff
were somewhat uplifted because
of the changes in the company
and are “highly motivated”.

Mr Woods said one of the
biggest challenges for the airline
was still the cost of fuel. He said
Bahamasair was engaged in
aggressive fuel management pro-
jects in order to further increase
the airline’s bottom line.

“The present management
team is taking a lot of initiative in
the cost management area and
keeping the money in the coun-
try.

“Bahamasair’s bottom line is
looking a bit better,” he said.

Water Corp’s ‘major arrears’ for whole year

FROM page 1B

2009. Based upon these commu-
nications, we believe that the
accounts receivable from the
Water and Sewerage Corporation
are fully collectible and therefore
have not provided any allowance
for possible non-payment of these
receivables as of March 31, 2009.

“However, we have been
informed by these representatives
that the Water and Sewerage
Corporation expects to continue
to be significantly in arrears on
its payments to Consolidated
Water-Bahamas for the remain-
der of 2009.”

And the BISX-listed company
warned: “Consolidated Water-
Bahamas derives substantially all
of its revenues from its contract
with the Water and Sewerage
Corporation, and is dependent
upon timely collection of its
accounts receivable to fund its
operations.

“If the Water and Sewerage
Corporation does not improve
the timeliness and/or increase the

FG CAPITAL MARKETS

BROKERAGE & ADVISORY SERVICES

zi

COLONTAL

Div $ P/E
11.0
11.1
28.5

N/M

0.127
0.992
0.244
-0.877
0.078 40.4
0.055 43.1
1.406 8.4
0.249 11.4
0.419 14.7
0.111 30.5
0.240 7.1
0.420 18.5
0.322 34.2
0.794 13.1
0.332 15.5
0.000 N/M
0.035 8.6
0.407 13.7
0.952 11.0
0.180 55.6

BISX LISTED DEBT SECURITIES - (Bonds trade on a Percentage Pricing bases)
Daily Vol.

Security
Fidelity Bank Note 17 (Series A) +
Fidelity Bank Note 22 (Series B) +
Fidelity Bank Note 13 (Series C) +
Fidelity Bank Note 15 (Series D) +

Symbol

14.25 Bahamas Supermarkets
6.00 Caribbean Crossings (Pref)
0.20 RND Holdings

29.00 ABDAB
0.40 RND Holdings

52wk-Low
1.3041
2.9230
1.3883
3.1964
12.1564
100.0000
96.4070
1.0000
9.0950
1.0000
1.0000
1.0000

Fund Name
Colina Bond Fund
Colina MSI Preferred Fund
Colina Money Market Fund
Fidelity Bahamas G & | Fund
Fidelity Prime Income Fund
CFAL Global Bond Fund
CFAL Global Equity Fund
CFAL High Grade Bond Fund
Fidelity International Investment Fund
FG Financial Preferred Income Fund
FG Financial Growth Fund
FG Financial Diversified Fund

BISX ALL SHARE INDEX - 19 Dec 02 = 1,000.00
52wk-Hi - Highest closing price in last 52 weeks
52wk-Low - Lowest closing price in last 52 weeks
Previous Close - Previous day's weighted price for daily volume
Today's Close - Current day's weighted price for daily volume
Change - Change in closing price from day to day
Daily Vol. - Number of total shares traded today
DIV § - Dividends per share paid in the last 12 months
P/E - Closing price divided by the last 12 month earnings
) - 4-for-1 Stock Split - Effective Date 8/8/2007
) - 3-for-1 Stock Split - Effective Date 7/11/2007
TO TRADE CALL: COLINA 242-502-7010 | ROYALFIDELITY 242-356-7764 | FG CAPITAL MARKETS 242-396-4000 | COLONIAL 242-502-7525

Symbol
FBB17
FBB22
FBB13
FBB15

Last Sale
100.00
100.00
100.00
100.00

Change
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00

Fidelity Over-The-Counter Securities
Last Price

Bid $
7.92
4.00
0.35

Ask $
8.42
6.25
0.40

14.60
6.00
0.35

Colina Over-The-Counter Securities

30.13
0.45

31.59
0.55

29.00
0.55

BISX Listed Mutual Funds
Last 12 Months

NA V
1.3664
2.8962
1.4590
3.1964

12.7397
100.5606
96.4070

1.0000
9.1599
1.0440
1.0364
1.0452

MARKET TERMS
YIELD - last 12 month dividends divided by closing price

YTD%

0.95
-1.49
1.77
-5.59
0.96
0.56
-3.59
0.00
0.71

0.80
0.33
0.76

4.77
-3.35
5.09
-13.64
5.79
0.56
-3.59
0.00
-12.76
4.40
3.64
4.40

Bid $ - Buying price of Colina and Fidelity
Ask § - Selling price of Colina and fidelity

Last Price - Last traded over-the-counter price

Weekly Vol.

Div $

Weekly Vol. - Trading volume of the prior week
EPS $ - Acompany's reported earnings per share for the last 12 mths
NAV - Net Asset Value
N/M - Not Meaningful

FINDEX - The Fidelity Bahamas Stock Index. January 1, 1994 = 100

Interest
7%
Prime + 1.75%
8 7%
Prime + 1.75%
EPS $ Div $
0.300
0.480
0.000

0.000
0.000

Yield %

Maturity
19 October 2017
19 October 2022
30 May 2013
29 May 2015

P/E

N/M
N/M
256.6

9.03
261.90

NAV Date
28-Feb-09
31-Mar-09
1-May-09
31-Mar-09
28-Feb-09
31-Dec-08
31-Dec-08
31-Dec-07
31-Mar-09
9-Feb-09
9-Feb-09
9-Feb-09



amounts of its payments to Con-
solidated Water-Bahamas, this
subsidiary may not have sufficient
liquidity to adequately fund its
operations. If this occurs, Con-
solidated Water-Bahamas may be
required to decrease the amount
of water it supplies the Water and
Sewerage Corporation to the
minimum required amount under
the contract or, if liquidity prob-
lems become too severe, cease its
production of water altogether.”
The Water & Sewerage Cor-
poration’s financial difficulties
will come as a surprise to no one,
given that it has surpassed
Bahamasair in becoming the pub-
lic sector agency that is the largest
drain on the Public Treasury and
Bahamian taxpayer to the tune
of $30 million this Budget year.
Apart from consumer prices
failing to rise in line with infla-
tion and cover water production
costs, the Water & Sewerage Cor-
poration is also plagued by inef-
ficiency, poor service, low quality
water (especially in eastern New
Providence), losses from its dis-
tribution system that run as high
as 50 per cent of water produced;
and the fact that only 30 per cent
of New Providence residences
and businesses use its services,

the rest preferring private wells.

Phenton Neymour, minister of
state for the environment, in his
mid-term Budget address, said
the Corporation’s cost of water
purchases now equalled 57 per
cent of revenues, compared to
just 19 per cent in 2004, as a result
of increasing reliance on reverse
osmosis suppliers such as Con-
solidated Water.

Mr Neymour said that in 2004,
the Water & Sewerage Corpora-
tion’s revenues were $31 million,
and reverse osmosis purchases $6
million. But between then and
2008, while water sales increased
by a collective $22.7 million,
water purchase costs increased
over the same period by $41.5
million.

The Inter-American Develop-
ment Bank (IDB), which is
proposing a $300,000 project to
tackle water resources manage-
ment and economic regulation of
the sector in the Bahamas, said
the “likelihood of backtracking”
by the Government on the need
for an independent water sector
regulator was “low, given the
large annual subsidies that the
Government currently provides
to the Water & Sewerage Corpo-
ration.

Bahama Rock aggregate
loss ‘catastrophic’

FROM page 1B

found the price “comparable” to
Bahama Rock’s.

“But there’s no substitute for
home-produced aggregate,” Mr
Wrinkle said. “It’s always avail-
able, in stock and the price is fair-
ly consistent.

“We can pay in Bahamian dol-
lars. There are substantial conve-
niences to the industry of having
it [Bahama Rock’s aggregate
plant] here. It keeps the dollars
here, and that’s important.”

The EIA had warned that a
failure to approve the project
would remove a “no cost” har-
bour construction operation, and
also lead to Bahama Rock’s ear-
lier departure from the Bahamas
- a development that could cost
Freeport’s economy $64.168 mil-
lion in the nine years to 2018.

If the Freeport Harbour area 4
expansion was approved, Bahama
Rock was “expected to extend
operations” until at least 2018,
thus maintaining its position as
“the largest supplier of construc-
tion grade aggregate in the
Bahamas”.

And the report added: “An
important long-term government
policy question will be raised
sooner rather than later if
Bahama Rock reduces aggregate
supply.

“Bahama Rock supplies New
Providence, through an agree-
ment with a Nassau-based con-
tractor, with 100 per cent of all
coarse aggregate needs. Taking a
long-term viewpoint, the Bahama
Rock operation is finite, and once
the harbour expansion ceases,
Bahama Rock will depart.

“The future availability of a
domestic supply of aggregate, or
conversely, importation, is an
issue needing further evaluation
by policymakers and those in the
construction industry.”

Backing those conclusions, Mr
Wrinkle said both the Bahamian
construction industry and the
Government needed to look at
aggregate supply “with a long-
term view”.

“This could potentially take a
natural resource, like rock, out

of the system. It’s going to burden
the contractors, the suppliers and
the block makers - everyone in
the system,” the BCA president
said.

“T think it’s very important for
us. It’s essential to maintain con-
tinuity of the aggregate supply
chain. Otherwise, we’d have to
stockpile a tremendous amount
of aggregate, and the costs are
going to up. That will be a nation-
al concern of disruption to the
construction industry supply
chain.”

He added: “You're talking
about stockpiling huge amounts
of aggregate and importing from
elsewhere - Jamaica, Cuba, the
Dominican Republic. The logis-
tics to do that are very expensive
and complicated. It’s the cost, the
continuity and the convenience
of local supply - the three criti-
cal factors.

“They’ve [Bahama Rock] been
providing such a solid product for
so long a time that it’s been taken
for granted. This is a wake-up
call.”

Any impact for the Bahamian
construction industry from a
Bahama Rock pull-out will rever-
berate among foreign direct
investment projects and real
estate developers.

“There are the logistics of car-
rying out the project,” Mr Wrin-
kle told Tribune Business. Every
time you take an integral compo-
nent of a successful project out
of the picture, you take one
chance of success away.”

He explained that domestically-
produced, lower cost building
materials and aggregate “lends a
certain amount of advantage” to
those nations who had this fea-
ture.

The Bahamas was already
competing against the likes of
Cuba, Jamaica and the Domini-
can Republic for tourism-related
foreign direct investment, and all
had this quality, whereas this
nation would not if it lost Bahama
Rock.

Bahamian ready-mix concrete
suppliers, too, were also reliant
on Bahama Rock supplies for
their product.



THE TRIBUNE

WEDNESDAY, MAY 13, 2009, PAGE 3B



‘Don’t throw fiscal caution to the wind’

@ By NEIL HARTNELL
Tribune Business Editor

THE Government should not
“throw fiscal caution to the wind”
to save the Bahamian economy
from recession, a leading Nassau
Institute member has argued,
calling for ‘less government’ in a
bid to reduce a national debt that
has increased by 244.8 per cent in
18 years.

Rick Lowe, in an address to
the Rotary Club of East Nassau,
said that what he found “most
disturbing” was that successive
Bahamian governments had com-
mitted to erther reducing or elim-
inating the Budgetary fiscal
deficit, and lowering the $3.2 bil-
lion national debt, yet had failed
to achieve these objectives.

“At the Nassau Institute we
might be considered fiscal con-
servatives, but I prefer to think it
is better for government to spend
within its means than burden
future generations, yet unborn,
with deficits and debt that we will
never repay in most of our life-
times,” Mr Lowe said.

“What I find most disturbing is
successive governments have

Reduction in size of government, rather than expanded spending, urged to save

Bahamas from national debt that has risen 244.8% in 18 years or $118m per year

committed to bringing the debt
and deficits under control, yet
year after year, with the odd
exception, the deficits and debt
increase.”

Referring to the Government’s
proposed infrastructure invest-
ments and expanded capital
works programmes, in a bid to
mitigate the economic downturn,
Mr Lowe went against conven-
tional economic wisdom by call-
ing for “the opposite approach
for our national economic plan”.

Accepted logic is that govern-
ments should loosen the fiscal
purse strings and increase spend-
ing during recessions to stimu-
late economic activity and limit
jobs losses - classic Keynesian
economics.

But Mr Lowe said that while
many felt the Government
“should throw caution to the
wind and do whatever it takes to
save us from this market correc-

200-strong law
seminar to boost
tourism sector

THE Bahamian tourism and
hotel industries will receive a
welcome boost when 200 attor-
neys converge on Nassau for the
Inter-American Bar Association
(IABA) Conference at the
Wyndham Crystal Palace Resort
from June 30 to July 4, 2009.

The conference will cover
major hemispheric, regional and
local issues under the theme:
The World Financial Crisis:
What Does the Future Hold?

Chairman of the organizing
committee for the IABA XLV
Conference is Dr Peter May-
nard of the Bahamas Bar Asso-
ciation. He said that given the
present state of the global econ-
omy, the conference is both
timely and topical.

“The IABA conference pro-
vides a unique opportunity for
trading information and views
with the preeminent lawyers and
luminaries of the hemisphere -
from Canada to Argentina and
almost every country in between
- and elsewhere, on an excep-
tional range of key issues,” Dr
Maynards said. “These extend
from our future as a financial
centre to our prospects as an
arbitration and maritime cen-
tre, from Madoff to CLICO,
from domestic violence to the
death penalty, from indepen-
dence of the judiciary to the
Caribbean Court of Justice, and
many other issues.”

Dr Maynard said the Bahami-
an Host Committee specifically
asked for the conference to be



eee BD |

terlin

open to the general public -
and to be affordable.

“This is a chance that every-
one should take advantage of,”
he said. “You do not have to go
abroad for a first class confer-
ence on matters that affect you.
You will have it right here. The
community has responded
through generous sponsorship.
We are also confident that our
visitors for the event will be
impressed by the extraordinary
hospitality and warmth of the
Bahamian people.”

The (IABA) XLV Confer-
ence is the largest conference
ever to be co-sponsored by the
Bahamas Bar. It has also attract-
ed the co-sponsorship of the
Organisation of Commonwealth
Caribbean Bar Associations.

The Bahamas Financial Ser-
vices Board (BFSB) is a silver
sponsor of the IABA XVL Con-
ference. Its chief executive and
executive director, Wendy War-
ren, said: “We believe that con-
ferences of this nature hold sig-
nificant latent opportunity that
can be extracted through the
support — both through spon-
sorship and registration — of the
Bahamian private sector.”

The Washington-based
IABA, founded on May 16,
1940, represents a permanent
forum for the exchange of pro-
fessional views and information
for lawyers to promote the rule
of law and protect the democ-
ratic institutions in the Americ-
as.

oOTERLING

= ee eee)
* PERSUASIVE

* PERSISTENT

* PROFESSIONAL

Sine

erates ate D a

Webnwww.sterlinecollectionslid.com

tion we call a recession”, in his
opinion it needed to pay more
attention to fiscal prudence.

This was due to the “mind bog-
gling” increase in the Bahamas’
national debt over an 18-year
period from 1991 to present. Mr
Lowe said the nation’s total debt
had risen from $870 million to
more than $2.3 billion, a “stag-
gering” increase of 244.8 per cent
or $118 million per year.

“The only national economic
plan we should be setting is for
government to start to downsize
immediately by privatising or
shutting down whatever agency
or department they can,” Mr
Lowe urged.

“TI challenge anyone in this
room to name 10 government
agencies, departments or min-
istries, out of the 173 services list-
ed in the phone book, that do
their job efficiently and effec-
tively.”

He questioned whether there
was any need for the Hotel Cor-
poration of the Bahamas, the
Price Control Department and
ZNS, and called on the Govern-
ment to also privatise the Water
& Sewerage Corporation,
Bahamasair and BEC.

Mr Lowe also recalled Nassau
Institute reports on the poor
return the Bahamian taxpayer
was receiving from the Govern-
ment’s investment in the Bahami-
an education system.

Some $480 million was spent
on the public education system
over a nine-year period between
1992-2001, yet the consistent
mean grade average produced by
graduating students was a ‘D’,
“which in the real world is a fail-
ing grade”.

“T sincerely believe the goal of
downsizing government is a much
more worthy national economic
plan than encouraging more

failed government planning,” Mr
Lowe said.

“After all, a government does
not an economy make...... And I
don’t know about you, but I trust
myself to make my personal deci-
sions rather than something or
someone called the Government.

“Besides, Bahamians can ill-
afford the taxation to come in an
effort to support the leviathan
we call the Bahamas’ govern-
ment, as it is presently structured.
And more government planning
means more costs to the taxpay-
er, and possibly to the economy.

“The unintended conse-
quences from government plan-
ning agencies brings the risk of
them becoming the Bahamas’
biggest growth industry. You can
bet they would convince us that
they are even more relevant in
tough economic times, in an
attempt to justify even larger
budgets.”



Mr Lowe said the Govern-
ment’s attempts at economic
planning, involving publicly-run
entities such as the produce
exchanges and packing houses,
had all “ended in abject failure,
leaving piles of debt for future
generations”.

He also criticised the newly-
introduced Unemployment Ben-
efit, warning that government
handouts - even if well-inten-
tioned - “create black holes for
taxpayers’ hard earned money”.

Mr Lowe said that apart from
requiring all Bahamian compa-
nies to change their computer
payroll systems, the length of
time that people were eligible to
receive benefits for could be
extended arbitrarily by the min-
ister responsible.

“This represents a tax increase
at the worst possible time, with-
out a corresponding decrease to
compensate,” Mr Lowe added.

Bahamas plant improvements boost company margins by 7%

FROM page 1B

the reverse osmosis membranes
on two of Windsor’s four pro-
duction trains. That work was set
to be completed in the 2009 sec-
ond quarter.

Turning to the Blue Hills,
reverse osmosis plant, Mr Sasnett
said Consolidated Water had
upgraded its diesel engine cooling
system, reducing energy con-
sumption and “operating cost
reductions starting in the 2009
second quarter”.

The Consolidated Water exec-
utive added that the improve-
ments to the Bahamian reverse
osmosis plants should result in
“consistently higher margins” for
its Nassau-based and overall bulk
water segment in 2009, compared
to the prior year.

“T can’t say it will be exactly
22 per cent, but we believe that
with recent investments in the
Bahamas at both the Windsor
and Blue Hills plants, we should
see consistently higher margins
than last year. But the proof will
be in the pudding,” Mr Sasnett
said.

Consolidated Water saw gross
profits for its bulk water segment,
in dollar terms, increase by 38 per
cent during the 2009 first quarter
to $1.42 million, compared to
$1.028 million the year before.

For the three months to March
31, 2009, the company’s net
income available to common
shareholders increased by 52 per
cent to $2.55 million or $0.18 per
diluted share, compared to $1.674
million or $0.12 per diluted share
in the same period during 2008.

“Our 52 per cent increase in
net income attributable to com-

Legal Notice

NOTICE

NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN as follows:

(a) BLACKHORSE FUND LIMITED is in dissolution under the
provisions of the International Business Companies Act 2000.

(b) The Dissolution of said Company commenced on May 12, 2009
when its Articles of Dissolution were submitted and registered by

the Registrar General.

(c) The Liquidator of the said company is Lakeisha Collie of 2nd
Terrace West, Centreville, Nassau, Bahamas.

All persons having Claims against the above-named Company
are required on or before the 10th day of June, 2009 to send their
names and addresses and particulars of their debts or claims to the
Liquidator of the company or, in default thereof, they may be
excluded from the benefit of any distribution made before such

debts are proved.

MAY 13, 2009

LAKEISHA COLLIE

LIQUIDATOR OF THE ABOVE-NAMED COMPANY



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mon shareholders in the first
quarter of 2009 was driven pri-
marily by improvements in gross
profit margins,” said Rick McTag-
gart, Consolidated Water’s chief
executive said.

"In particular, gross margins in
our bulk water segment expanded
significantly, from 15 per cent of
revenues in last year's first quar-
ter to 22 per cent in the most
recent quarter, primarily due to

efficiency improvements in our
Bahamas operations.

“These improvements were the
result of capital projects that we
completed at the Windsor plant
last October, and we expect to
improve efficiencies further when
we complete the replacement of
reverse osmosis membranes on
the last two production units at
the Windsor plant during the sec-
ond quarter of 2009."

COMMONWEALTH OF THE BAHAMAS 2008
IN THE SUPREME COURT CLE/QUI/OO 1134
Common Law and Equity Division

IN THE MATTER OF ALL THAT piece parcel or
lot of land containing Three thousand and Fifty-six
(3,056) square feet situate in the Settlement of Great
Guana Cay one of the Abaco chain of cays in the
Commonwealth of The Bahamas bounded on the
North by land now or formerly the property of Lewis
Roberts and running thereon Sixty (60) feet on the
East by land the property of Alrob (Thomas Roberts)
but now the property of William Doyle Watson and
Frederik F. Gottlieb running thereon Fifty-five and
Ninety-three hundredths (55.93) feet on the South by
the Main Public Road (known as “Front Street”) and
running thereon Seventy (70) feet or less and on the
West by a Three (3) feet wide public reservation and
running thereon Sixty (60) feet

AND

IN THE MATTER OF THE QUIETING TITLES ACT,
1959, CHAPTER 393 OF THE STATUTE LAWS OF
THE COMMONWEALTH OF THE BAHAMAS

AND

IN THE MATTER OF THE PETITION OF WILLIAM
DOYLE WATSON and FREDERIK F. GOTTLIEB
NOTICE OF PETITION

WILLIAM DOYLE WATSON of St. Simon’s Island in
the State of Georgia one of the states of the United
States of America and FREDERIK F. GOTTLIEB of
the Town of Marsh Harbour in the Island of Abaco
one of the Islands of the Commonwealth of The
Bahamas claim to be the owners in fee simple in
possession of all that piece parcel or lot of land
hereinbefore described free from encumbrances.
AND the Petitioners have made application to
the Supreme Court of the Commonwealth of The
Bahamas under Section 3 of the Quieting Titles Act,
1959 Chapter 393 of the Statute Laws of the said
Commonwealth, in the above action, to have their
title to the said land investigated and the nature
and extent thereof determined and declared in a
Certificate of Title to be granted in accordance with
the provisions of the said Act.

Notice is hereby given to any person having
a dower or right of dower or an adverse claim or
a claim not recognized in the Petition shall on or
before the expiration of thirty (30) days after the final
publication of these presents filed in the Registry
of the Supreme Court and serve on the Petitioner
or the undersigned a statement of his claim in the
prescribed form verified by an Affidavit to be filed
therewith. Failure of any such person to file and serve
a statement on or before the expiration of thirty (30)
days after the final publication of these presents shall
operate as a bar to such claims.

Copies of the said plan may be inspected
during normal hours at the Registry of the
Supreme Court, East Street North, City of Nassau,
New Providence, The Bahamas and the Office
of the Administrator in the Township of Marsh
Harbour, Abaco, The Bahamas.

Dated this 2nd day of December, A.D., 2008

SYDBRI LEGAL SERVICES
Chambers
Naomi House
No.19, Ninth Terrace & West Court
Centreville
New Providence, The Bahamas
Attorneys for the Petitioners





PAGE 8B, WEDNESDAY, MAY 13, 2009

THE TRIBUNE







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Acuta

@ By LLOYD ALLEN
Tribune Features Reporter
lallen@tribunemedia.net

TUCKED away amidst the dozens
of local restaurants at the fish fry, is
one that has risen above the rest in
offering the same dishes, in a total-
ly unique way.

Native Way restaurant, located at the eastern
end of Arawak Cay, is now under new manage-
ment, and has made the grade in spicing up their
menu, while staying true to giving customers an all
Bahamian experience.

During a recent review of the restaurant, Tribune
Taste was pleasantly surprised by the array of bev-
erages and dishes available, with the first being
its unique preparation of mojitos, made like none
other.

According to manager and co-owner Shelly
Lockhart-Smith, in addition to the regular ingre-
dients of white rum, sugar, lime, carbonated water
and pureed mint leaves, the beverage is frozen
and then served in a daiquiri form, a presentation
and flavour that not only ups the ante when it
comes to mojitos, but one that is sure to keep their
guest coming back for more.

In addition the mojito, the restaurant also has
another signature drink- the Over The Rainbow or
Sumi Sucka, a mix of several Bacardi rums blend-
ed to have the appearance of fruit punch.

The drink has a hint of sweetness, but be warned,
because after having about two rounds, you can
count driving yourself home good-bye.

Native Way also offers the traditional home-
made switcher, a Bahamian style lemonade made
with freshly picked limes, with just the right amount
of sugar, and added pulp for an extra zing.

Apart from the various beverages, the restaurant
offers an all original cast of appetizers, prepared
just right for that customer looking for the perfect
treat.

BSi

in order to ensure compliance.

Qualifications:

Industry;

Personal qualities:

* Positive attitude and outlook
* Problem-solving skills

Responsibilities:

¢ Will report directly to the CEO.

vitae to:
Human Resources Manager

Bayside Executive Park
P. O. Box CB-10976
Nassau, Bahamas



bove ther

BSI TRUST CORPORATION (BAHAMAS) LIMITED

is presently accepting applications for

COMPLIANCE AND INTERNAL CONTROLS OFFICER

The successful candidate for the position of Compliance and Internal Controls
Officer will monitor the regulatory framework and operational aspects of the Trust

¢ The candidate must have thorough knowledge of local legislation, regulatory &
statutory matters as well as international practices as they relate to the Trust

* He/She should possess the International Diploma Anti Money Laundering and
Compliance, bachelors degree; and

¢ Minimum of 3 - 5 years working experience in the trust field. Preference will be
given to professionals with working experience for a Swiss Bank or Trust.

* Excellent organizational, communication and computer skills

* Commitment to quality and service excellence
* Ability to partner with team members.

¢ Ensure compliance of the Trust with local, international and internal group
regulations and standards in order to limit legal, regulatory and reputation risk

¢ Ad-hoc research and analysis of compliance issues

¢ Maintain a proper framework of internal control activities

¢ Produce periodical reporting for the Audit Committee and Board of Directors

* Liaise with Head Office and Bahamian regulators as applicable

Interested persons with such qualifications should submit their resume/curriculum

BSI Trust Corporation (Bahamas) Limited

Fax no. (242) 502-2310 or email: ruby.kerr@bsibank.com

(ABSOLUTELY NO PHONE CALLS PLEASE)
Only applicants having the above attributes will be contacted.

est



SMOKED Salmon served with cheesy macaroni, cole
slaw, peas and rice, and a tall glass of mojito.

Instead of offering regular conch fritters, the
restaurant offers seafood fritters made with plen-
ty of conch, lobster, shrimp, and coconut. Of course
many may wonder why the coconut, but trust me,
it adds an entirely new dimension to fritter.

The restaurant also specialises in a diverse menu
including fried, steamed, and sautéed lobster,
conch, grouper, snapper, and even salmon.

Mrs Lockhart-Smith added: “For someone who
is either a vegetarian or vegan, I can prepare a
special salad, vegetarian patties, veggie burgers, or
sautéed greens for them. These are made with all
natural products, and we can also provide tofu if
requested in advance.”

Mrs Lockhart-Smith said what makes her dish-
es special is the time taken to first spice them up
and also the serving sizes of the meals that many
customers have now grown to expect.

The owners of the restaurant say despite the
changes in the economy that have forced many
to cut back on eating out, their choice of giving
clients more for their money will in the end only
add to the success of their business.

Operating from Tuesday to Sunday, and soon to
introduce a breakfast menu, this island restaurant
is helping to remind both locals and visitors why it
is so much better to eat and live in the Bahamas.





= THE ORIGINAL Native Way Mojito with pureed
mint leaves, and Served in a daiquiri form.



Chefs providing
hands for hunger!

@ By LLOYD ALLEN
Tribune Features Reporter

lallen@tribunemedia.net

WITH the first annual Paradise
Plates fast approaching, there
remains much anticipation regard-
ing the fine gourmet foods and
treats, wine, and live entertain-
ment all expected to decorate the
anti-hunger charity event.

Continuing with our weekly
feature of some of the chefs slated
to display their talents during the
event, this week we introduce you
to Freddy Van Breugel of Van
Breugel’s restaurant and Bar on
Charlotte Street, along with
British Colonial Hilton Executive
Chefs Kabuti Lockhart and Peter
Major, and Pia Farmer from the
Mendosa wine company.

The newly opened Van
Breugel’s is located in the heart of
downtown, and according to its
owner is the perfect lunch or hap-
py hour spot for busy profession-
als of that district.

“Apart from the appeal to
many professionals, the building is
one of the old historical buildings
of the Bahamas, and is more than
225-years-old and is the old Mal-
one house,” he said.

Apart from the great atmos-
phere, Mr Van Breugel said his
vast knowledge in experiencing
many cultures throughout the
globe has added to the diversity at
his restaurant.

Born in Holland, he said he
received most of his education in
Belgium, then worked in Spain,
the US, and then the Bahamas,
where he owned a number of
restaurants and various business-
es.

Mr Van Breugel said there are
several food choices available at
his restaurant including burgers,
red and white meats, salads, fresh
Mahi-Mahi, salmon, tuna, and a
fantastic list of side orders.

During the Paradise Plates
event, Mr Van Breugel said he
will be providing Tuna Tartare - a
type of sushi role made with tuna,
soy-wasabi, and several herbs.

This mini dish which goes well
with most wines, Mr Van Breugel
explained will probably excite sev-
eral tastes buds with an ultimate
sense of freshness.

Mr Van Breugel said being a
mentor to more than a dozen
underprivileged children through-
out the community, this cause is
very dear to him, and he hopes in
the future to continue to be
involved in similar initiatives.

Over at the Hilton Hotel, chefs
Lockhart and Major explain that



on the night of the event, guest
can expect an “Island Snow Fan-
tasy” as they will attempt to mes-
morize them through their sour-
sop inspired ice cream.

Chef Lockhart explained: “We
have several dishes compiled
around soursop ice cream, then
we will infuse that with a number
of sauces and ingredients includ-
ing the guava sauce, peanut brittle,
coconut cream toplets, raspberry
sauce, all served in a martini glass.

“It’s going to be very smooth,
and the different flavors are real-
ly going to play with your taste
buds,” he said.

With both of these chefs having
had a love for food their entire
lives, this charity is important to
them and they are simply excited
to do their part in assisting those
throughout the community in
need of food.

Chef Lockhart expressed:
“This is our opportunity to con-
tribute back to the community,
and far so often I turn on the TV
to see many people starving
abroad, but there are those local-
ly that are hungry and go days
without a healthy meal.

“That’s in our power and con-
trol, so it’s good when you could
help with giving something to
someone that really needs it, and
me along with my staff are ready
to do our part in this endeavor,”
he said.

All proceeds from the event
are slated for Hands for Hunger
and its food rescue programmes.

Last but not least is Pia Farmer,
the proprietor of Mendoza
Imports. She brings in wines from
western Argentina, an area
known as one of the best wine
areas of the world.

Mrs Farmers said for the past
three years, she has imported the

FROM left to
right - chef
Peter Major,
Kabuti Lock-
hartchefs at
the British
Colonial
Hilton.

exclusive brand - Noble - and will
be serving a 2006 label during the
Hands for Hunger event.

She explained: “One of which
will be the chardonnay, and the
other is going to be the Mal-
bec(Red), which is the most well
known variety from Argentina.

“Tt’s my pleasure to support this
fabulous fund raising idea, also
the whole concept of Hands for
Hunger.”

Mrs Farmer explained that over
the years while she had the oppor-
tunity to work within the hotel
sector, she witnessed on several
occasion good food going to
waste, while many homeless and
less fortunate persons are in con-
stant need of a good meal.

She said for a long time she had
searched for the perfect connec-
tion to bring together available
food and the people who were
hungry and needing it, and said
that she is happy to know that
Hands for Hunger has been suc-
cessful in bridging that gap.

Focusing on the charity event
slated for later this month, Mrs
Farmer explained that supporters
can expect an Argentinean spe-
cific flavor, but added that it has a
taste reminiscent of wines from
places like France, Italy, and most
parts of Europe because of their
close relations.

“Argentinean wines tend to be
particularly red ones, full bodied,
full flavoured, best suited to have
with meat or roasted or barbe-
cued foods.

“It’s not a weakling, and the
one that will be served is a 2006
Malbec, which happens to be very
nice and fruity, and besides 2006
was a very good year in Argentina
for wines that are made for open-
ing and drinking,” she said.



THE TRIBUNE

WEDNESDAY, MAY 13, 2009, PAGE 9B





The Tribune



m@ By LLOYD ALLEN
Tribune Features
Reporter i
lallen@tribunemedia.net :

THIS weekend there’s aclash
of the cultures, as spontaneous :
events throughout the island use :
diversity as the source for their i
inspiration. Fusing French, ;
Argentinean, Italian, Haitian, :
Bahamian, and so many other :
cultures, this week’s Things 2
Do packs a punch of multicul- :

tural proportions.

41. The Heineken Green Hype
is only three days away, and
already its excitement has
reached platinum status, as it
is among one of the most
talked about events within

Bahamian online entertainment :

networks including Facebook,
MySpace, YouTube and Twit-
ter. This event is bringing to
one stage 15 of the hypest
names in local non-traditional
Bahamian entertainment
including El Pedrino, SO$A
Man, Chris ‘Sketch’ Carey,
Ricardo Clarke, Jah Nyne, Fry-
deh, Club SuperDeath, and
others. Unfolding at the But-
lers and Sands ground, the
event is set to kick off at 69m
until. There will also be a
Heineken special of six for
$10. Tickets are $5 before
8pm, and $10 after.

2. The Burns House Group of
Companies will be featured at
the Poop Deck restaurant
Sandyport this Saturday for its
fourth annual Wine, Art & Jazz
Festival. The event which will
feature a long list of wines
from places like Argentina,
Chile, Australia, France and
Italy, will also showcase can-
vassed art from some of the
country’s most renowned
artist. This will include the
work of Antonius Roberts,

John Cox, Willicey Tynes, Clive : ,
: ers allow us to enjoy. This

: year, the fabulous ladies of

: the Carver Garden Club will
i be hosting a Spring Sensa-

i tion Flower Show May 16

: and 17 at the Doris Johnson
: Senior High School.

Stuart, and Malcolm Rae.
Starting at 3pm, there will be
simultaneous activities includ-
ing wine sampling comple-
mented with hors d’oeuvres ,
live caricatures, live entertain-
ment (provided by the G-Note
All Stars), and much more.
Generally admission for the
event is $20, and wine club
members get in at $15, and all
children under 12 are free.

3. Step Up Entertainment
along with Mr Malik events
present Unity Jam, the first
annual Haitian Bahamian Flag
Day celebration. Celebrating
205 years of freedom for Haiti,

this event will feature music by |

Selector Chronic, DJ Clean
Cut, and DJ Runks, along with
a special appearance by popu-
lar Haitian Bahamian music
group Broken Mics. The venue
for the event is Workers
House, and starting time is
8.30pm. Tickets are priced at
$10, and security will be
enforced.

4. The Bahamas Humane
Society is scheduled to have
its third annual Whe Let The
Dogs Out fun-day this Satur-
day at the Botanical Gardens.
This family event - including
your canine family members -
will run from noon until 6pm,
and will include many mini-

competitions including the dog
with the waggiest tail, the most :

unusual dog, the dog with the
best trick, the best junior han-
dler, the prettiest dog, the old-
est dog, and so much more.
Entrance fees are $3 adults, $1
for kids, and $1 for dogs. Pro-
ceeds for this event are in aid
of the many adopted and
needy animals at the centre.

5. This Friday, an all gospel
entertainment showdown is
set to unfold at the Bahamas
Christian Fellowship Church,
where artist Heavy Metal is
launching his new self titled
project with the help of some

his Christian sisters and broth-
ers. These include DJ Counsel-

lor, Cream, Ricardo Clarke, Mr
Lynx, Vandera, Rudell Capron,
and others. Showtime begins
at 7.30pm, with the event
expected to last until 11pm.
Admission for the event $5,
and it promises to be a good
show for the family.

: plants ata
? recent club
i meeting.



MEMBERS
of the Carver
Garden Club
showcase
some of their

ml By ALEX MISSICK

Tribune Features Reporter
amissick@tribunemedia.net

THERE is no better way to

celebrate spring than to
: enjoy the beauty of nature
i and the sweet smelling aro-

mas hundred of glorious flow-

The show which is being held

i under the patronage of Governor

? General, Sir Arthur Hanna will be
: open to the public from 3-7pm on

i Saturday and 3-6 on Sunday.

The show is divided into two cate-

gories: Horticulture and Design. The

[WO new faces have been selected as

the new “Supermode]” title holders for
: the Bahamas. Twenty- year old Kendra
: Beneby and 17 -year old Philip Penner-
i man were recently selected the winners.
: The competition started with 42 contes-
: tants and as the weeks went by, contes-
i tants were eliminated one by one in order
: to select the strongest for the finals.

Mr OilinSha Coakley hand picked

horticulture division has 18 classes
which range from the Adeniums
(desert roses) to the Zingiberaceae
(ginger lilly).

The design division has nine classes
and will showcase the artistic side of
the club members. The ladies will use
space as their canvas and plant mate-
rial as their medium. They will also
be challenged to interpret themes
such as Mother Nature’s Garden,
Everything’s Coming Up Roses, Let’s
Celebrate Spring, and many more.
Flower design divas such as Ann
Garraway, Isle Dean, Elva Rolle, and
Rhona Douglas-Sands are amongst
the designers to beat this year.

President of the club, Peggy
Knowles, said members have been
planning the show for several
months. Mrs Knowles said although
there has been a lack of spring rain,
she is optimistic that the public will
be dazzled by the beauty of the
plants that will be on display.

Show Chairperson, Cynthia Gibbs
has been encouraging members to
enter as many plants as possible. The

KENDRA BENEBY 2009 Supermodel of
the Bahamas.

New faces for Supermodel of the Bahamas

_ MBy ALEX MISSICK
: Tribune Features Reporter
amissick@tribunemedia.net

judges who have made a successful career
for themselves in the international fash-
ion and music arena. Philip McGowen
(Agent of Naomi Campbell - Kate Moss
- Alek Wek - Giselle - Heidi Klum and
more Supermodels); Kendell Monroe
(manages the careers and organises
shows for Michael Jackson, Usher and
more); Natalie Duhaney, a New York
designer who designs for Claibourne,
Tommy Hillfiger and Boss Elite men's
line; Beth Sobol, Ceo/Founder of Miami
Fashion Week and Romea Gordan who
is the managing director of Pulse Models







SOME of the plants being prepared for this weekend’s show.

public can expect to see hundreds of
beautifully grown plants, many that
are quite rare and unusual.

Plant lovers and those curious
about gardening and flowers, can
expect to enjoy a relaxed atmosphere
and fun filled afternoon complete
with tasty catered dishes and music.
Plant lovers and serious collectors
will be able to take advantage of sev-



Jamaica where they manage such Super-
models such as Jeneil McKenzie.

The final lineup for Supermodel of the
Bahamas took place at the British Colo-
nial Hilton Hotel, where all of the
Bahamian hopefuls from many family
islands including Eleuthera, Grand
Bahama, Bimini, Andros and New Prov-
idence displayed top designer wear from
international designer Natalie Duhaney,
and top Bahamian designers, Cedric
Bernard, Percy Wallace and Ms New-
ton.

Ceo and founder of Supermodel of

eral vendors who will be in atten-
dance at the show including The Pot-
ting Shed, Green House Nursery and
Marina Greaves.

The Carver Garden Club Show
promises to be an unforgettable
afternoon as guests will be able to
enjoy the handiwork of flower lovers
and the colorful creations of nature.
Admission each day is $5.

KENDRA BENEBY posing on the beach.

the Bahamas, Mr OilinSha Coakley said
he is very pleased with the winners and
said this is only the beginning for their
careers as his agency now markets
Bahamian models to an international
client base. The 2008 contestants and
winners Omar Francis 8, Anwar Mackey
and Lithera Capron, have already been
booked and worked for Miami Fashion
Week, Islands of the World Fashion
Week and BK New York Fashion Week.
The winners for the Commercial divi-
sion in this year’s competition were
Mikell Clarke and Andrew Newton.



PAGE 10B, WEDNESDAY, MAY 13, 2009 THE TRIBUNE

ARTS

DEL UNITED NATIONS Session

Pry oti Sens erg ie,



aa Aa yi

a" Rojary dlubdol Nene a eo

ot i

eal
;



WINNERS of the 11 annual debate championship Michelle Greene, Giovano Bow, and Danya Farrington seen

overjoyed after receiving several awards and prizes.



aaa i
aa ae
Ff —
i [
|

@ By LLOYD ALLEN
Tribune Features Reporter
lallen@tribunemedia.net

IN recent weeks, many students
throughout the country have been
making their mark in public debate
and speaking, focusing on several
national and global issues spanning
from healthier living, to the impor-
tance of environmental preservation

and the economy.

The first event was the 11th annual Ministry of
Education (MOE) debate championship, held at
the Rainforest theater Cable Beach, on April 23.

According to Eula Gaitor - Supervisor of Student
services at MOE and coordinator for the event - this
competition which was first started back in 1998,
was developed to highlight the speaking abilities of
high school seniors throughout the country. Now in
its eleventh season, she is particularly pleased with
the performance of students particularly from the
family islands.

Mrs Gaitor explained: “The family islands have
been doing really well in recent times, last year
Cat Island won, this year they’ve won again along
with San Salvador and Bimini.

“The family islanders are really excited about it
all, and this year we took the competition up a
notch by bringing in the Mangrove Cay High school
band to have more students from the family island
featured.”

She said this year’s topic was: Be it resolved that
the economic development of the Bahamas is more
important than the protection of the environment.

Family islands

The winners 14-year-old Michelle Greene (10th
Grader from San Salvador High), 15-year-old Gio-
vano Bowe (11th Grader from Old Bight High, Cat
Island), and 15-year-old Danya Farrington (11th
Grader from Arthur’s Town High, Bimini) were
smiling from ear to ear as they received the even-
t’s floating trophy along with several other awards
along with one of their coaches Trenton Burant.

Coming from the out island environment, the
trio said they thoroughly researched their topic
which supported environmental preservation, how-
ever agreed that overall both topics rely in some
way with the other, and adding that ultimate bal-
ance can only be achieved when both are given
equal attention.

Later that day, there was a speech competion
held by the Ministry of Health in conjunction with
MOE and Toastmasters International themed
‘Eating Well On A Tight Budget.’



MOVIEREVIEW



ae. | rn”

uth destined for



With more than several dozen students and
schools taking part in the preliminary segment of
the event, the finals consisted of about 20 students
participating either in the junior or senior divi-
sion.

Debating on the same topic, most students pro-
vided a list of healthy and economical food pur-
chasing and preparation options in the reality of a
constricted economy.

Many suggested shopping around the perimeter
of supermarkets rather than in the middle, having
a home garden as opposed to always purchasing
vegetable supplies, and purchasing meats rotis-
serie style rather than in portions, all of which
could in the long run reduce the overall cost of
food.

Although all of the presentations were amazing,
there were only two winners in the end.

Junior division

In the junior division, Deokin-nique Strachan
from LW Young won first place receiving a num-
ber of prizes, with Tryker Smith from St Andrews
in at second, and Tenesha Anderson from LW
Young at third.

In the senior division, Kendra Stuart from CC
Sweeting was victorious, with Robert Farquhar-
son from St Andrews trailing at second, and Joy
Archer from St Francis de Sales High in Abaco
placing third.

Next there was the Model United Nations Ses-
sion (MUNS) that took place at the Workers
House meeting hall on April 27.

This event exposed students to the framework
by which member countries of the organisation
meet to discuss various issues.

According to MUNS 2009 chairman Reverend
Samuel Bootle, the competition is a debate where
six students from each school are designated to a
country, and given a topic to research where they
are later expected to make several presentations
and recommendations.

He explained: “MUNS has now been active
for the past 11 years, a combination of the Rotary
club of the Bahamas, and the Ministry of Foreign
Affairs, we work in conjunction to produce this
programme.

“This year we have 13 schools participating,
under the topic of global climate change, and
how each nation is affected.”

This year, students from the Sunland Baptist
Academy (representing Brazil) in Freeport took
first place, all receiving a Lap top, and trip later
this year to the United Nations head office in
New York accompanied by the Deputy Prime
Minister Brent Symonette and staff. In second
place was RM Bailey (representing the UK), and
in third was Doris Johnson (representing Gam-
bia).

Star Trek

mg By JASON DONALD

STARRING: Chris Pine,
Zachary Quinto, Eric Bana

WHEN Gene Roddenberry hatched
the idea for a science fiction TV series
in the early sixties he could never have
realised the legacy it would have.

The original programme (which was
cancelled, ironically, after only three
seasons) went on to be reinvented in

multiple movies, revamped TV shows
and even a short-lived cartoon, all while
maintaining its incredibly loyal fanbase.

In fact, such is the level of commit-
ment from the “Trekkies”, as the fans
are known, that the rest of us can be
forgiven for feeling slightly excluded
from the party.

That is all about to change, however,
with this latest addition to the Star Trek
canon - a bright, energetic and grandly
entertaining reboot from director JJ
Abrams.

To help the converts-in-waiting, the
story starts virtually from scratch, with
James T Kirk a young tearaway and
Spock teased by classmates on his home

planet of Vulcan for being half-human.
Both of them eventually meet at
Starfleet Academy and clash almost
immediately.

Relations between the pair become
even more strained when, onboard the
USS Enterprise, they are forced to con-
front a threat to Vulcan that puts the
lives of millions in danger.

Once it gets going, the film rarely
stops for a breath. As Abrams already
showed with Mission Impossible IIT and
Cloverfield, he has an eye for the action
sequence and we are treated to a whole
host of great set pieces here - all in stun-
ningly rendered CGI.

But what sets Stark Trek apart from

= . TRS

STUDENTS from the Sunland Baptist Academy in Freeport who won the 11th annual Model United Nations
Session late last month. The student represented the South American country of Brazil.

| IN THIS film

| publicity image
released by Para-
mount Pictures,
from left, Anton
Yelchin as
Chekov, Chis
Pine as James T.
Kirk, Simon
Pegg as Scotty,
Karl Urban as

as Sulu and Zoe

Saldana as Ohu-

ra are shown ina
scene from "Star
Trek."

Paramount Picture

/AP Photo

the usual special effects bonanza is the
strength of the characters. Kirk, Spock,
Dr McCoy and Uhura are recognisable
but skewed versions of their original
incarnations and play their part to give
the film a human centre.

It’s Kirk and Spock that steal the

helps to bring out the best laughs in the

script and the most emotional moments. Salli he able 4a doll ae-comne

: point be at a standard that they
? can sell it. I have assisted with so
i many projects in this country
Star Trek has set the bar for this sum- } Sie al ee NS
? invest in the youth of the nation
: so that they can someday be self
; sustainable.”

Hard core fans may quibble over the
lighter tone, but, if you’re going to
make a fresh start, this is the way to do
it

mer’s big releases and I, for one, can’t
wait for a sequel.







WINNERS of the Ministry of Health’s Nutrition month speech competion Kendra Stuart from CC Sweeting
Senior and Deokin-nique Strachan from LW Young pictured with Toastmaster and host Sherelle Barr.

lz

‘Architect in art

FROM page 12

; include hands on exercises
? where individual creative talents
are produced with the assistance
? of volunteer professionals and
: guest artists. Students will be
: involved in the production of oil
? and acrylic paintings of land and
: seascapes, portraits, sculpturing,

Bories, John Clio Junkanoo art and handicrafts.

“T would like the programme

? to be conducted on Saturdays at
: Gibralter Square Studios on
? Yamacraw Hill Road which was
: designed by myself, providing
} art materials, instruction and
? lunch to children who are inca-
: pable of such an experience due
? to their economic situation. The
? children can even learn how to
? draw using a computer, using
: AutoCAD, Computer inter
: drafting, or just to develop a skill
? or craft to use in the future,” Mr
i Miller said.

He hopes to target youngsters

? between the ages of 11-15. How-
? ever, to jump start such an
? endeavor, Mr Miller said the
? costs would be around $15,000 to
? $20,000, He said that while he
: has approached the government
: for assistance, he is also appeal-

show though - their mutual direspespect ing to the Bahamian public.

“The work that the students






WEDNESDAY, MAY 13, 2009

@ By ALEX MISSICK
Tribune Features Reporter
amissick@tribunemedia.net

Ei exploration of art in other
professions is not uncommon in

Bahamian society, for example,
how does an architect go from
sketching a dream home, to sketch-
ing the vibrancy and colours of a
Junkanoo performer? Alex Miller,
an architectural engineer and tech-
nician, said he hopes Bahamian
society especially the youth of the
nation, accept that art can come
from anywhere and from any expe-
rience, no matter what profession.

Mr Miller said although he loves art and
would love to do it full time, he still works in
the construction world because of the need to
survive.

“You can’t survive just on paintings alone in
the Bahamas. You have to be versatile. My
painting started out from high school because I
was always interested in it. I never had formal
training for it but I studied fine art on my own
and the works of famous painters like Picasso.”

Mr Miller said he knows how important the
arts are in the Bahamas and has seen a number
of talented young artists in the country. This
has prompted him to develop an avenue for
budding young Bahamian artists.

“T know what the struggle was all about for
me but I had some help along the way in the
field of engineering. I want to pass on the
knowledge that I have about art to underprivi-
leged kids. I am developing a nonprofit organi-
sation since 2004 that I want to be dedicated to
the development of the youth here in the
Bahamas. My goal is to identify young talent in
the visual arts and assist in nurturing and
developing them to achieve gainful employ-
ment or assistance in furthering their educa-
tion,” Mr Miller said.

The programmes for the organisation will

SEE page 10

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N N A A S S S S A A U U A A N N D D B B A A H H A A M M A A I I S S L L A A N N D D S S L L E E A A D D I I N N G G N N E E W W S S P P A A P P E E R R Lands and Surveys director resigns C M Y K C M Y K V olume: 105 No.141WEDNESDAY, MAY 13, 2009 PRICE – 75 (Abaco and Grand Bahama $1.25 WEATHER PARTLY SUNNY HIGH 86F LOW 77F F E A T U R E S SEE ‘THEARTS’ SECTION S P O R T S Architect inart SEEPAGEFIFTEEN Jeff Rodgers basketball camp n By PAUL G TURNQUEST T ribune Staff Reporter pturnquest@tribunemedia.net FOLLOWING a series of explosive articles in The Tribune over the past few weeks the director of Lands and Surveys Tex Turnquest resigned from his post yesterday as reports of nepotism and corruption continue to take its toll on this government department. It was claimed that relatives of the director, including his mother-in-law were granted prime beachfront Crown land in Exuma for less than $2,500. T ex T urnquest steps down as nepotism and corruption claims take toll on govt department The Tribune ANYTIME ... ANYPLACE , WE RE #1 BAHAMASEDITION TRY OUR SOUTHERN CHICKEN BISCUIT www.tribune242.com B AHAMASBIGGEST CARSFORSALE, HELPWANTED ANDREALESTATE I N S I D E THETRIBUNE has published a series of articles on the subject. SEE page 16 Emerald Bay Resort subject of ‘$35m bid’ n By PAUL G TURNQUEST Tribune Staff Reporter pturnquest@ tribunemedia.net AMWAY Corporation, a Michigan based company that owns the Cape at Eleuthera resort, have made a bid to the Mitsui Corpo ration of Japan for the purchase of the Emerald Bay Resort in Great Exuma. According to sources close to the sale, Amway Corporation has placed a $35 million bid with the understanding that it would assume all the hotel’s out standing debts during its years in operation. Clifford Johnson, senior partner of Pricewater H ouseCoopers, said his firm, which has been appointed receivers for the insurance giant Mitsui Cor poration will release a statement today on the matter. Mr Johnson confirmed that there has been fairly significant discussions held thus f ar, but stressed that a sale has yet to be completed. Noting these reports, the former Member of Parliament for Exuma, George Smith said that Exumians would welcome the news of some form of development at the Emerald Bay property. However, he said that as the principals of Amway have yet to make significant improvements to their prop UScompany seeking to buy hotel THE appointment of Senior Supreme Court Justice John Lyons may have been a mistake in the first place, according to veteran lawyer Lionel Levine. In a statement on Justice Lyon's unex pected resignation from the bench last week, Mr Levine said that almost from the start of his controversial tenure in the Bahamas, Justice Lyons made known his intent to retire in this country and pursue a more lucrative post as a local attorney. This admission may have made Justice Lyons the target of fellow members of the legal fraternity with lofty ambitions, he said. "Justice Lyons may have done much good work in dealing expeditiously with the commercial busi ness in recent years, but his appointment proved to be a mistake. Almost from his appointment he made it known that having decided to adopt a Bahamian lifestyle and make the Bahamas his home he wanted to retire here and carry on the profession of law after his retirement as judge. "Such talk made him the prey of ambitious lawyers with political ambitions. “I know as I was the victim of such predation and the ramifications continue," said Mr Levine. Justice Lyons made headlines after his fellow justice, Anita Allen recently criticised him for appointing Daniel Ferguson, an accoun tant, to work on a recent case knowing that he shared “more SEE page 16 Appointment of Justice Lyons ‘may have been a mistake’ SEE page 16 FIREFIGHTERS had to be called early yesterday morning to the new road near to the Albany project, after a truck carrying propane tanks turned over hitting a similar vehicle. Neither driver was seri ously injured. Felip Major / Tribune staff TRUCKSCARRYINGPROPANETANKSCOLLIDE n By TANEKA THOMPSON Tribune Staff Reporter tthompson@tribunemedia.net THE Philippines' Department of Foreign Affairs has warned its citizens of a rising trend of Filipinos being illegally trafficked in the Bahamas and other coun tries in the Caribbean region, according to a statement on its website. Citing the Philippines' embassy in Havana, Cuba, the Philippines' DFA reported that there were four attempts in less than a year of human traffick ing, using Havana as a transit point. The latest incident involved two Filipino citizens who were John Lyons Philippines warns of Filipinos being illegally traf ficked in the Bahamas, Caribbean SEE page 16 INSIDE CONTRACTS SIGNED FOR COMPLETION OF AB ACO AIRPORT P AGETWO W ATER SUPPLY IS AT ‘CRITICALLY LOW LEVELS PAGETHREE OPINION DIVIDED ON CONTAINER SHIPPINGF A CILITIES RELOC A TION PAGEFIVE

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C M Y K C M Y K LOCAL NEWS PAGE 2, WEDNESDAY, MAY 13, 2009 THE TRIBUNE n By Kathryn Campbell MARSH HARBOUR, A BACO Public Works and T ransport Minister Neko G rant and officials from his Ministry signed various contracts to complete the Marsh Harbour International Airport air-side project. It is our intent to enhance t he capacity of the Marsh Harbour airport facility to provide quality services to thep ublic,” said Mr Grant during the signing ceremony att he Ministry of Education’s c onference room last weekend. Among the signings was a $2,241,487 change order to an existing contract with Bahamas Hot Mix for completion of the lighting, and p rocurement of runway and t axi way lighting at a cost of $ 566,387. The Minister also signed a $390,552 contract with F reeport Nursery and Garden C ompany for hydro-seeding, a nd a $114,083 contract with US-based company Jeppesenf or redesign and publication o f instrument flight procedures. Visual “The works to be undertaken will reduce negative v isual impact and minimise d ust interference by the place ment of hydro-seeding on sides lopes along drainage ditche s," said Mr Grant. "The con t ract will entail the hydro-seed installation and maintenance.” The upgrading of the Marsh H arbour air-side operations began March 2007 with the grant of a $3,068,470 contractt o Bahamas Hot Mix to construct a new taxi-way and resurface the existing runway, Mr Grant explained. I t subsequently became a pparent that there was a need to revise the original plans which increased the costt o $8,209,091, he said. The contracts were wel comed by Edison Key, the Member of Parliament forS outh Abaco and executive chairman of Bahamas Agricultural an Industrial Corporation (BAIC C ouncillor Cubel Davis. Mr Key said Abaco is unique among the other i slands in the Bahamas b ecause of its yachting and s econd-homeownership industries. When the new airport f acility is completed, he said, Abaco can look forward to more second homeowners c oming. M r Davis said the new air port facilities are “very important” to Abaco’s growth and development and will have “a positive impact” on its economy. Mr Grant said he will return soon to advise of plans for an ew terminal and tower con trol and to receive input on those plans. The minister’s team includ e d permanent secretary Colin Higgs; acting director of Works Gordon Major; the Ministry of Works’ area engi n eer for Abaco John Schaefer, and Captain Patrick Rolle, director of the Department ofC ivil Aviation. They were a ccompanied by senior administrator for the Central Abaco District, Cephas Cooper. FORMER Tribune Manag ing Editor John Marquis was hailed as a “defender of the poor” during a special retire ment reception hosted by the Workers’ Party on Monday night. Members of the party, for mer deputy prime minister Frank Watson and College of the Bahamas lecturer Felix Bethel were among those in attendance at the Bay Side Hut, Arawak Cay. Workers Party leader Rod ney Moncur, the host of the reception, thanked Mr Marquis for defending the rights of the poor, likening him to 19th century British politician, social reformer and philan thropist William Wilberforce. The former deputy prime minister thanked Mr Marquis for his work as an investigative journalist, saying that his brand of reporting contributes to the development of democracy and ensures that governments act responsibly and are held accountable for their actions. Mr Marquis thanked those in attendance for coming to bid him farewell. The party dined on grilled lobster, grouper, Black Vil lage peas and grits, and stir fried vegetables. The gathering was the sec ond farewell reception held for The Tribune’s outgoing managing editor, who leaves the Bahamas this week. On Saturday, friends, fami ly and colleagues gathered at the Breeze’s Bahamas Resort to present Mr Marquis with gifts and pay tribute to his outstanding journalistic career which spanned almost 50 years 11 of them with The Tribune . After working as a reporter in the Bahamas in the mid-60s, Mr Marquis held a number of top posts at various newspapers in Eng land before returning in 1999 to take The Tribune’s top post . Contracts signed for completion of Abaco Airport MARSH HARBOUR INTERNATIONAL AIRPORT PROJECT K NOX RUSSELL o f Freeport Nursery and Garden Company Limited receives a contract from Public Works and Transport Minister Neko Grant for the installation and maintenance of hydro-seeding for the Marsh Harbour International Airport project. Pictured from left are Chief Coun-c illor Cubel Davis; chairman of the Township Committee Rosco Thompson; Edison Key, MP for South Abaco; Minister Grant; Mr Russell; permanent secretary Colin Higgs; Central Abaco administrator Cephas Coop e r, and acting director of Works Gordon Major. NEKO GRANT , Minister of Public Works and Transport, along with MP for South Abaco Edison Key and other o fficials inspect conditions at the Marsh Harbour International Airport runway. J ERRY WALKER o f Jeppesen signs a contract with the Ministry of Publ ic Works and Transport for the redesign and publication of instrument flight procedures at Marsh Harbour International Airport. Pictured from left are MP for South Abaco Edison Key, Public Works and Transport Minister Neko Grant, director of the Department of Civil Aviation Captain Patrick Rolle, Mr Walker, and permanent secretary Colin Higgs. P UBLIC WORKS a nd Transport Minister Neko Grant and Ebbie Sadie of Bahamas Hot Mix seal the deal with a handshake following the signing of a contract that provides additional funding for lighting of the Marsh Har bour International Airport. Pictured from left are Cubel Davis, chief councillor; Rosco Thompson, chairman of the Township Committee; MP forS outh Abaco Edison Key; Minister Grant; Mr Sadie; John Schaeffer, Ministry of Works’ area representative; Colin Higgs, permanent secretary; Cephas Cooper, Central Abaco Administrator, and Gordon Major, acting director of Works. “The works to be undertaken will reduce negative visual impact and minimise dust interference by the placement of hydro-seeding on side slopes along drainage ditches.” Nek o Grant To have your say on this or any other issue, email The Tribune at: letters@tribunemedia.net or deliver your letter to The Tribune on Shirley Street, P.O. Box N-3207 BIS Photos /Letisha Henderson Former Tribune Managing Editor hailed as ‘defender of the poor’ FROM L-R: Workers Party member, Neil Stubbs; Former Tribune managing Editor John Marquis; Brian Smith, Workers Party Secretary General; COB lecturer Felix Bethel; Allen Strachan, Workers Party Chairman; Jeffery Williams, owner and proprietor of Bayside Hut; and Workers Party Leader Rodney Moncur; at a retirement reception Monday night. JOHN MARQUIS speaks to guests.

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n By NATARIO McKENZIE Tribune Staff Reporter SO far, the National Insur ance Board has paid out around $1.5 million under the unemployment benefit scheme, NIB director Algernon Cargill said. N IB began issuing unemp loyment benefit cheques last Monday. “I would say about 3,600 persons have collected their cheques so far,” Mr Cargill told The Tribune yesterday. “We have paid out about a million and a half dollars so far.” Mr Cargill said that NIB is still receiving claims under the unemployment benefit scheme. “Registration continues and as of Friday of last week we received 6,490 claims. Off those claims approximately 4,000 have been approved so far,” he said. “Quite a few people are coming in every day to register. We receive about 100 applications every day,” Mr Cargill said. The unemployment benefit, which will be funded to the tune of $20 million from the Medical Benefits Fund of the National Insurance Board, is primarily for unemployed persons who made National Insurance contributions while they were employed. Maxim um The benefit provides a maximum of $200 per week for a maximum of 13 weeks at a time. The unemployment benefit is being implemented in two p hases. During the first phase, benefits are to be financed from the $20 million transferred out of the Medical Benefits Fund. Phase II of the programme will establish a fund into which a ll employers and employees w ill pay a contribution – 1 per c ent of each employee’s insurable wage. Applicants are eligible for the benefit if they are currently unemployed; under the age of 65; not self employed; able and willing to work; were last employed on or after July 1, 2004; not receiving other NIB benefits other than disability or survivors benefits; and have made a certain num ber of contributions to NIB. C M Y K C M Y K L OCAL NEWS T HE TRIBUNE WEDNESDAY, MAY 13, 2009, PAGE 3 T T h h e e J J a a v v a a G G a a l l l l e e r r y y T T h h e e J J a a v v a a G G a a l l l l e e r r y yWongs Plaza • Madeira St. Wong’s Plaza • Madeira St. Tel: (242 Tel: (242 2335 2335 Soft and durable Diversatex Soft and durable DiversatexTM TMcushion is fade and mildew cushion is fade and mildew resistant and is available in resistant and is available in blue, green or terracotta blue, green or terracotta x xChairs Chairsx xTables Tablesx xBenches Benchesx xUmbrellas Umbrellasx xLoungers Loungersx xDrinks Trolleys Drinks Trolleysx xCoffee Tables Coffee Tablesx xEnd Tables End Tablesx xCushions CushionsOutdoor Elegance Outdoor Elegance INDEX MAIN/SPORTS SECTION Local News ..........................P1,2,3,5,6,7,8,16 Editorial/Letters. ......................................... P4 Advts ...........................................P9,10,11,12 Sports ............................................. P13,14,15 BUSINESS/AR TS SECTION Business ...............................................P1,2,3 Advts.....................................................P4,5,6 Comics........................................................P7 Taste........................................................P8,9 Arts......................................................P10,12W eather.....................................................P11 CLASSIFIED SECTION 40 PAGES USA TODAY MAIN SECTION 12 PAGES THE Bahamas Humane Society will host its annual Animal Fun Day this coming Saturday at the Botanical Gardens. Because of the event, the BHS will not hold a clinic that day, however, there will be a late clinic on Friday from 3pm to 8pm. Disabled man robbed of tricycle Police name stabbing death victim Kiwanis club meeting to be held on Thursday Animal Fun Day on Saturday at the Botanical Gardens In brief n By ALISON LOWE T ribune Staff Reporter a lowe@tribunemedia.net THE Water and Sewerage C orporation yesterday admitt ed that the rationing of water t o homes in New Providence – w hich has caused major inconvenience to many residents – comes as the supply of water stored by the corporation has reached “critically low levels.” Robert Deal, Assistant General Manager at the WSC, s aid the corporation is “trying i ts best to limit the severity and duration of these conserv ation measures (initiated A pril 29, 2009) and hopes to b e in a position to relax them in the next several days.” Meanwhile, frustrated resid ents continue to contact T he Tribune to complain that the inadequate water supply and pressure levels have thrown t hem into a bygone age, when water had to be stored in buckets. N ow, they say, having a s hower or doing laundry in a r ush is a luxury they can only dream of. A 59-year-old man, who w ished to remain anonymous, told this newspaper on Monday that the second and third floors of the Chertsey Apart-m ents on Cable Beach, which contain around 40 units, had not had “a drop of water”s ince last Thursday. It’s bloody ridiculous. I have had to go to Bally’s (gym when I’ve had morning meet ings, I have had to cancel t hem,” said the resident. “For cooking and washing d ishes we have to use drinking water. Those tenants who had g uests staying have been f orced to have them go and stay in hotels. It doesn’t give N assau a good name,” he added. Experience H is experience mirrored that of Winton resident Samm y Ferguson, who said his apartment building located near the Sea Grape Plaza on P rince Charles Drive was without water for a similar period two weeks ago, and that of a Camperdown resi d ent, who claims water press ure in her neighbourhood has been virtually non-existent form onths. I n all three instances, the individuals complained that attempts to reach the WSC by phone were either fruitless, or did not leave them feeling satisfied as to what the problemm ight be and when it might be remedied. Meanwhile, Mr Deal put the cause of the problems in all three cases down to location – rather than general water supply shortages. H owever, with the number o f complaints registered island-wide growing, this is a s uggestion of which residents a re increasingly sceptical. I n the case of Chertsey apartments, a statement sent to this newspaper by the WSC o n Monday said an investigation revealed the “service late rals” servicing the building were experiencing “a partial blockage.” The building superintendent was informed and we are m aking arrangements to clear the service lateral in the morni ng (yesterday Deal, adding that the corporation “sincerely apologises” t o the Chertsey tenants. Anyone experiencing water supply issues is encouraged to contact the WSC at 302-5599 or 325-0505 . A severely disabled downtown vendor is appealing to the public for assistance after h is only mode of transportat ion was stolen from his home o n Monday. Wentworth Sears, 40, who suffers from cerebral palsy, isa well-known sight on Bay Street, selling T-shirts to botht ourists and Bahamians. B ecause of his disability, Mr Sears uses either a walker or a tricycle to get around. After he finished work on Monday, Mr Sears said, both his walker and his tricycle were stolen from his homes ome time during the evening. T he vendor has reported the i ncident to police, who have a ssured him that they are investigating the matter. S peaking on behalf of Mr Sears, Jerome “JT” Thompson, a disability advocate andf riend of the vendor, said that j ust a day after the robbery, a “kind-hearted private citizen” donated a walker to Mr Sears. Another concerned citizen has also set up an account at Cycles Unlimited on MackeyS treet, which will be used to buy Mr Sears a new tricycle. Mr Thompson said his friend has had “issues” with the bus system in the past because of his disability and h as found that the easiest m ethod of transportation is a three-wheeled vehicle. He appealed to members of thep ublic to donate to the Cycles Unlimited account, so that Mr Sears can once again have t ransportation and continue to make a living. THE Kiwanis Club of Over-The-Hill’s weekly meeting will be held on Thursday, May 14, at 8pm at Holy Cross Community Centre on Soldier Road. Ryan Antonio, Lt Gover nor Elect of all Kiwanis Clubs in the Bahamas, will address the club. He will speak on membership growth and retention. All Kiwanians are wel come to attend and bring guests. P OLICE have identified the man found stabbed to death behind a Baillou Hill Road building on Monday as2 7-year-old Vernon Christi an Rolle. Rolle, a resident of Baillou Hill Road, was the country’s 27th homicide victim. He had been stabbed several times in the chest. Police received a call from someone who discovered the body at around 6.40am andwere led to the back of a building opposite the Baillou Hill Road clinic. They found Rolle dressed in a plaid shirt and dark trousers. Superintendent Ellsworth Moss, head of the Central Detective Unit, said that police have spoken to a number of persons regarding Rolle’s death and have now detained someone for ques tioning. THE Bahamas is home to at least one company accused of being involved in an international bribery scheme. According to the news website www.monstersandcritics.com, the German government is looking into allegations that payoffs were handed out to promote the sale of certain German-made trucks and buses in several nations, and prosecutors have identified more than 100 suspects. The report said the suspects are thought to have “funn elled the money through front companies in Malta, the B ahamas, the British Virgin Islands, Cyprus, London and New York or paid cash to crooked buyers to induce orders f or the German buses and trucks.” I t said: “The bribes, often paid to relatives or friends of purchasing executives, were apparently aimed at securing sales t o big organisations that buy large fleets of heavy vehicles.” S o far, none of the front companies has been named. T he payments abroad are thought to have been worth 13 million euros, or $18 million. N one of the suspected buyers have yet been confirmed as h aving been on the take, as investigators are still checking the legitimacy of each payment, the report said. The evidence so far suggests the scheme has been operat ing since 2002 and ended this year. Water supply is at ‘critically low’ levels Bahamas named in international bribery inquiry Share your news The Tribune wants to hear from people who are making news in their neighbourhoods. Perhaps you are raising funds for a good cause, campaigning for improvements in the area or have won an a ward. If so, call us on 322-1986 and share your story. Corporation ‘trying its best to limit severity’ of conservation measures For cooking and washing dishes we have to use drinking water. Those tenants who h ad guests staying have been forced to have them go a nd stay in hotels. It doesn’t give Nassau a good name.” To have your say on this or any other issue, email The Tribune at: letters@tribunemedia.net or deliver your letter to The Tribune on Shirley Street, P.O. Box N-3207 Around $1.5m paid out under jobless benefit scheme so far Algernon Cargill

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EDITOR, The Tribune. I humbly beseech you to print the following in your newspa per as I have tried to forward t his information on to organi sations that should be con cerned, but apparently are not. I t is my nature to walk the b each and in doing so, I am dismayed by the amount of garbage that washes in with thet ide – either from ships or the construction workers in the area or is left behind by very u ncaring individuals. The list of articles lying on our shores and the daily volume is unbelievable, and no one, repeat no one seems to be responsible for cleaning up or monitoring the state of our beaches and canals on a regular basis. Coincidentally, a large party was held this past weekend at the beach by the canal to Sandyport. The next day when I w alked the beach, I could not believe the amount of garbage that these people left behind. Red drinking cups, Styrofoamp lates, paper plates, plastic utensils, food, paper, soiled dia pers, beer and soda bottles, san d als, towels and even articles of c lothing, all of which lined the beach. Some of it was even shoved in between the rocks, asi f this was the ideal place to hide the evidence! It was truly a dis grace. W ith a little investigation, I was able to confirm with the manager of a nearby establishment that they did indeed sponsor a party, and therefore were the filthy culprits. Before I state their name, I would like to point out that these messy individuals are not alone in their wrong doings, as others take advan tage of the beach and leave behind their garbage, and again, n o one takes responsibility for either properly discarding the garbage, or maintaining the beach on an ongoing basis. H aving spoken to Sandyport Management regarding the SuperValue party and the e veryday occurrence of trash o n the beach and near the canal, Sandyport has agreed to place two garbage receptacles in thea rea, with the hopes that they will not be removed by thieves. This maybe a solution, but inn o way does it excuse SuperValue’s party-going staff and friends for trashing the beach, or anyone else, for that matter! And, I believe that it would still be prudent, should you decide that this article is valuable to your readers, to mention this update in your fine newspaper. J L SANDS Nassau, May 7, 2009. EDITOR, The Tribune. A ll of the allegations of sexu al molestation made against a foreign teacher at the Eight Mile Rock High School happened before May 2, 2007 when the FNM came to power. The f eeble attempt by the Chairman of the PLP, Glenis Hanna-Martin to bring pressure on the pre-s ent Minister of Education Carl B ethel is not only unfair, but in m y opinion wicked. It is designed to switch the blame away from the PLP. I n spite of the knowledge of the PLP about this incident and their attempt to make it look l ike the FNM is irresponsible, cannot be left alone, and espe-c ially because the then minister of Education and Attorney General Alfred Sears must have k nown, but did not want to publicly address it. T his then brings me to the point that the “sweeping under t he carpet” the scorn of the incident of molestation should have struck a nerve with the former m inister especially since he publicly confessed of his own experiences many times. Had he become more involved, maybe just maybe these hideous incid ences would not have happ ened. T his incident in particular, is s erious because there are many other children who have in the last many years, especially when Mr Sears was minister, been m olested by not only their t eacher, but by employers, their pastor, father, uncle, cousins, brother, friends and others in authority. T o deviate ever so slightly, these patterns of behaviour have been in our country for fart oo long. Too many people of influence have been given the proverbial slap on the wrist for similar behaviour. The short s entences given to sexual abusers are an indication that the judicial does not appear tob e serious about the severity of m olestation. No one seems to understand the psychological destruction done. No one seems to give a hoot. All of the cleaning and sanitising agents were employedw hen allegations of molestations of parliamentarians were made. The country was more concerned of saving their political reputation as opposed to listening to a young man’s cry f or help. The more he screamed a t the top of his voice for someone to listen to him, the more he was ignored and the moret hey covered up. This alleged despicable act will have repercussions to the third and fourth generation. People, who havec hildren, must not do things to other people’s children, because the chickens must come home t o roost. How come a man who should have grandchildren be given t hree years for the molestation o f a five year old and the rape of an adult is given 10 years and recently life? How come our children are not given the protection and support by the s tate? In my opinion that alone is a crime and someone should pay for that. W e are simply not serious a bout the preservation of our y outh or the future of this country. We must move with haste to determine how and why thec onsequences do not fit the seriousness of the crime. Molestation of a child destroys the life o f the child forever, so why should the consequences not bed esigned to destroy the life or the molester forever too. We had better not allow the c hildren who will be “running things” in the not too distantf uture, see that we failed them now. This is a warning and must n ot be taken lightly. Finally, any parent, teacher or any adult who withholds i nformation from the authorities related to the molestation, should be given harsh penalties. If the molester be given life for molestation, then the person h elping the molester should get a t least 10 years for helping to d estroy our children, and prot ecting the criminal. It is time for the playing field to level. IVOINE W INGRAHAM N assau, M ay, 2009. C M Y K C M Y K E DITORIAL/LETTERS TO THE EDITOR PAGE 4, WEDNESDAY, MAY 13, 2009 THE TRIBUNE The Tribune Limited NULLIUS ADDICTUS JURARE IN VERBA MAGISTRI Being Bound to Swear to The Dogmas of No Master LEON E. H. DUPUCH, Publisher/Editor 1903-1914 SIR ETIENNE DUPUCH, Kt., O.B.E., K.M., K.C.S.G., ( Hon.) LL.D., D.Litt . P ublisher/Editor 1919-1972 Contributing Editor 1972-1991 EILEEN DUPUCH CARRON, C.M.G., M.S., B.A., LL.B. Publisher/Editor 1972Published Daily Monday to Saturday Shirley Street, P.O. Box N-3207, Nassau, Bahamas Insurance Management Building., P.O. F-485, Freeport, Grand Bahama TELEPHONES Switchboard (News, Circulation and Advertising A dvertising Manager (242 Circulation Department (242 Nassau Fax: (242 Freeport, Grand Bahama: 1-(242 Freeport fax: (242 WEBSITE w ww.tribune242.com – updated daily at 2pm EVEN THOUGH the space shuttle fleet has been given a pink slip, Monday’s launcho f the space shuttle Atlantis to repair the Hubble Space Telescope is enough to forg et for a moment all that plagues us. The astronauts will look down upon a planet from which they cannot detect war, p ollution, fraud, or swine flu. They will attempt to repair that amazing m achine that got off to a miserable, defective start, but now has given us images that both expands our knowledge of the univ erse and moves us to consider our utter insignificance in it. O ur astronauts are the 20th-century’s i con of the human conundrum. They sym bolize our status as the supreme sentient and courageous power on this particular planet. Y et we so often do not have their back. A s they help us peer into the galaxies, the rest of us keep getting sucked into black holes of selfishness and pettiness. A tlantis lifted off Monday, in the sec ond-to-last year before the shuttle fleet is scheduled to be retired. Its mission is to attempt the most comp lex repairs ever on the telescope, to give it a few more years of life, with the best ”sight” it ever had. Though the shuttle programme long ago c eased to captivate our daily imagination, this “mere” service call is no less majestic and dangerous. T he whole mission could be wasted if b ut one tiny screw floats away and lodges in the wrong place. The astronauts will be replacing razorsharp circuit boards that could mortally slice their space suits. Veteran Hubble repair astronaut John Grunsfeld told the St. Petersburg Times, “You climb on top of 4F million pounds of explosive fuel, and if you don’t think that that’s a hazardous thing to do, then you probably are in the wrong line of business. We do space flight because we think it’s important. ”We’re curious and we have a drive to explore. That’s why we’ve occupied all the niches on planet Earth and we’re kind of filling up the planet ... Ultimately, we’db etter leave planet Earth or we’re all going to cease to exist. And this is the very leadi ng edge of that. In all of my experience, I feel that Hubble is by far the most important project that I have worked on. And o bviously I think it’s worth risking my life for, or I wouldn’t be doing it.” T he repair is happening as the new Star Trek movie opened at number one at the box office and President Obama mulls w hether to take us where we have never gone before. Space still captivates the imagi nation, but it has not inspired a national v ision ever since Apollo. In the short term, Obama proposes to boost NASA funding and has ordered an outside review of the human spaceflight programme. But he hasy et to select a new administrator for the a gency. In a speech two weeks ago to the National Academy of Sciences, Obama repeat e dly praised the Apollo programme for expanding America’s prominence in science and technology. It will be interesting to see how much o f NASA’s resources can go to space explo ration when he also has rightfully declared climate change and energy to be “this gen eration’s great project.” It is also sobering t o consider that one of the risks the shuttle astronauts face in this week’s mission is orbiting space trash that has accumulated ino ur half-century of sending objects up t here. Space is nowhere close to “leaveno-trace” camping. But explore we should. Astronomer Ken Sembach of the Space Telescope Science Institute told the Washington Post that images from a repaired Hubble should pro duce a “wow factor.” Hopefully Obama can rebuild NASA into the organisation that helps us say “wow” all over again, about the here and now, and the great beyond. (This article was written by Derrick Z. Jackson c. 2009 The Boston Globe). Molestation claims made before FNM came to power LETTERS l etters@tribunemedia.net Space exploration and elusive ‘wow’ factor Dismayed by garbage washing in with tide EDITOR, The Tribune. Why is it that ZNS reporters refer to the Opposition as “for mer PM”; “former Deputy PM”; “former Minister of For eign Affairs” etc instead of the current titles held by the Opposition eg “Opposition Leader”, “Opposition Member”? The appellation “former” applies when the person has retired from office. However, these Opposition members assumed new titles when they opted to remain in Parliament, and they should not be confused with members of the Government. On this morning’s newscast, the reporter even referred to Mr Christie as “Minister Christie.” The other mistake often made by the ZNS reporters is an omission. In this morning’s newscast (April 7 reading the same paragraph referred to the Opposition Leader as the “Right Honourable” but referred to the Prime Minister only as “Mr”. For her information, the Prime Minister was awarded “Right Honourable” status ever since his first administration which began in 1992. I hope the above errors are not intentional. ZNS LISTENER Nassau, April 7, 2009 Why doesn’t ZNS use current titles?

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n By ALISON LOWE Tribune Staff Reporter alowe@tribunemedia.net TOURISM stakeholders a re divided on the question o f whether the plan to reloc ate container shipping facilities to Arawak Cay is a good idea. Some believe the move is a s likely to hinder future t ourism development as it is t o boost downtown Nassau’s revitalisation, but others claimt hat recent “political rhetoric” c riticising the move has ignored key factors in its favour. Most prominent among these factors, supporters of the plan say, is the “overriding consideration” that it would a llow the removal of the facili ties – a critical element of the e nhancement of downtown N assau – to be concluded m ore quickly and cheaply t han if the southwest New Providence alternative were chosen. The cost would be lower not only in terms of initial capital outlay, but also for Bahamians and tourists in the l ong-term, as a more costly port relocation would see costs passed on to consumers i n the form of more expensive goods for years to come. “What does it (moving the port to southwest of the i sland) do to the cost of a weekly grocery shop, or to the cost of a meal for a tourist? T hat’s the question to be a sked,” said an informed t ourism source, who supports the Arawak Cay option. M eanwhile, T he Tribune h as been told that although Arawak Cay was ranked sixth on a study of the best potential sites for the port – even behind its present location – other mitigating elements that have come into play since the study have enhanced its attractiveness. I ts low ranking was based in large part on “the potential for it to cause more traffic c ongestion and for it to be a v isual blight”, said a source a cquainted with the study. Review But consultants who cond ucted the review of potential sites did not take into consideration the impact of the New Providence Road Improvement Project which will see road corridors con structed and adjusted to easet he flow of traffic in the area, i t has been claimed. Additionally, The Tribune has been told, suggestions by c ritics that the extension of Arawak Cay to accommodate the facilities would contribute to environmental damage int he area do not reflect the evid ence in the consultant’s study. Although placing Arawak Cay sixth overall, it in fact r anked it one of the options least likely to damage the environment, based on a preliminary review. On top of these factors, interest in financing the “$200 million plus” southwestern p ort “wasn’t there” when initial inquiries were made, a source said. The same private sector interests which initially supported a move to southwest New Providence, after having “looked at the economics”, switched to the Arawak Cay plan. While they conceptually a greed, they started saying Geez, this thing is going to c ost a fortune, so it just doesn ’t make sense from an econ omics point of view. This is the perspective that the public doesn’t have on the whole thing,” said the supportive tourism sector source. However, echoing PLP Senator Jerome Fitzgerald, form er minister of tourism Obie Wilchcombe said choosing Arawak Cay as the new site w ould represent a “big mist ake.” We need to think this thing through as opposed tom oving in a knee-jerk way a nd looking out for some special interest,” he said. Such a move would restrict the potential for Arawak Cay to be developed into a major tourist attraction, for downtown to be expanded in time as it may need to be and form ore employment opportunities for Bahamians to be created, suggested the ex-t ourism minister Our problem is we’re pen ny wise and pound foolish – sometimes you have to spend money to cause develop m ent,” said Mr Wilchcombe. His sentiments echo those expressed by a member of the public at a town meeting hoste d by the Downtown Nassau P artnership (DNP s ubject of the city’s revitalis ation last Wednesday. T he man, addressing the panel of tourism stakeholders, including Nassau Tourism Development Board director Frank Comito, DNP co-chairs Charles Klonaris and Tourism director general Vernice W alkine, said he felt it was i llogical for an industrial facil ity like a shipping port to be placed in a location so near the country’s tourism hub, w here it would blight the l andscape for arriving cruise visitors, among others. Point To this, Ms Walkine answered that the man’s point was “very well taken” but did n ot comment further. Yesterday, a separate tourism source said that he a nd others in the industry are certainly concerned about t he impact such a port (at Arawak Cay) would have” – environmentally and other-w ise. However, he suggested that the government appears to have not yet to finalised itsp lans in the long term, leaving o pen the possibility that another location could be found eventually. I know they will take it there, but whether that’s where it will remain is the question,” he said. C M Y K C M Y K LOCAL NEWS T HE TRIBUNE WEDNESDAY, MAY 13, 2009, PAGE 5 Opinion divided on container shipping facilities relocation n By DENISE MAYCOCK Tribune Freeport Reporter dmaycock@ tribunemedia.net FREEPORT Grand Bahama P olicehave announced that a photograph which was recently released of a man wanted for questioning in connection with fraud was incorrect. Asst Supt Welbourne Boo t le said the photograph of another man with a similar name was inadvertently attached to a wanted poster of Emealio Russell, aka Emil Russell, and published in the media. Mr Bootle said police have released the correct photo g raph of Russell, who was charged in Magistrate’s Courton Friday. Russell is charged with fraud by false pretences. He pleaded not guilty to the charge and was granted $5,000 bail with two sureties. The case was adjourned to September 15. Mr Bootle said the police apologised for any inconvenience and/or embarrassment the incorrect photo might have caused. THE body of a boat captain was pulled from the water off the coast of Harbour Island after his boat capsized near the North Eleuthera island. Terry Roberts Junior, 27, had 14 passengers on a 17 ft Boston Whaler when the boat flipped over at around 8pm on Sunday. The passengers swam to shore and all survived but Mr Roberts, police say. Friends and relatives of the boat captain searched for him throughout the night. Mr Roberts’ father, Terry Roberts Senior, reportedly found his son’s body at the bottom of the ocean at around 9am on Monday. A witness claimed Mr Roberts had attempted to swim for his life, but appeared to have suffered lacerations to his head. Police press liaison officer Assistant Superintendent Walter Evans said police believe the Harbour Island man had drowned. His body was flown to New Providence on Monday where an autopsy will be performed to determine the cause of death. A SELECT group of students will get formal training in the nation’s number one economic sector through the Ministry of Tourism and Aviation’s summer internship pro gramme. High school valedictori ans, college students and junior ministers of tourism from Family Island high schools are eligible for the programme. Those selected as interns will participate in projects, meetings with industry partners and field trips. They will get first-hand experience in tourism dynamics and learn the far-reaching effects of the tourism sector. With this internship pro gramme, the ministry intends to mould profes sionals to be the next developers of the Bahamas. The programme will also cultivate a student tourism talent pool for future recruitment purpos es, contribute to building a solid foundation for career development of Bahamian students, positively influence students who are con templating tourism and create tourism advocates. n By DENISE MAYCOCK T ribune Freeport Reporter d maycock@tribunemedia.net FREEPORT – The City of Freeport continues to be plagued b y ongoing power outages due to equipment failure at the Grand Bahama Power Company. The interruption of power on Tuesday morning affected many businesses in the downtown Freeport area, lasting fort hree and a half hours. Power was restored at 12.30pm at the Insurance Management Building, where The Tribune/100 JAMZ office is located. In a press release, GBPC officials reported that at about 7.40am on Tuesday, Unit 13 developed a boiler tube leak that forced the unit to be taken offline for repairs. The loss of the unit resulted in disruption of service to approx i mately 7,000 customers. A lthough the company reported that service was fully restored b y 8am, the Insurance Management Building remained without power for another four and a half hours. The Power Company said that repairs are expected to be c ompleted within the next 48 hours. Based on the current load forecast, GBPC said that it is able to meet the peak demand and continue to provide service to all customers. However, the company continues to request the assistance of the public to conserve energy by only using necessary lights, restricting the use of dryers, washing machines and irons, and turning off water heaters and/or air-condition units. GBPC apologised for any inconvenience caused. O bie Wilchcombe V ernice Walkine Freeport still plagued by power outages To have your say on this or any other issue, email The Tribune at: letters@tribunemedia.net or deliver your letter to The Tribune on Shirley Street, P.O. Box N-3207 Body of man found after boat capsizes Police r elease cor r ect photo In brief E mealioRussell Students to get tourism training

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n By DENISE MAYCOCK Tribune Freeport Reporter dmaycock@tribunemedia.net FREEPORT – Prime Minister Hubert Ingraham officially opened the Commonwealth Local Government’s Conference this week on Grand Bahama, welcoming 600 delegates who were hosted to a cul tural extravaganza. The Grand Bahama Youth Choir – under the direction of Kevin Tomilson – dazzled delegates with a musical perfor mance during its debut appearance. The delegates also got a taste of a more refined, but lively junkanoo rush-out, and were entertained by a culturallyinspired dance ensemble. The show climaxed with a showing of the historic Golden Girls Olympic 4x400 Relay win at the 2000 Sydney Olympic Games. Applause filled the con ference as the race was displayed on two huge display screens. During his welcome address, Minister of State for Local Government Byran Woodside noted that the Bahamas is the first country in the Caribbean to host CLGC. Prime Minister Hubert Ingraham introduced local govern ment in the Bahamas in 1996 to bring governance closer to the people. There are a total of 32 local government districts in the Bahamas. The Bahamas won the bid to host the conference two years ago. Delegates from 46 Commonwealth nations have travelled to Freeport for the conference. In his remarks, Mr Ingraham welcomed Secretary General of the Commonwealth Kamalesh Sharma and his wife, and CARICOM Secre tary General Edwin Carrington to the Bahamas. “I am especially happy to welcome you to the City of Freeport, Lucaya, and Grand Bahama and trust that your brief stay will afford you some time to enjoy the attractions of this special island. Celebrating “We are especially pleased to host the event during this year when we are celebrating the 60th anniversary of the Commonwealth, that unique group of nations that had its beginning with the transformation of the old colonial order,” he said. He noted that Freeport has the most effective system of local government in the entire Bahamas. Mr Ingraham explained that under provisions agreed in the 1950’s between the govern ment and a private company, the Grand Bahama Port Authority, management of the city of Freeport was delegated to the Port Authority for a period of 99-years. He pointed out that the infrastruc ture of the city, including its airport, harbour and port facilities are privately owned and operated. Mr Ingraham said that the Port Authority is charged with the economic development of Freeport. He told delegates that 50 years ago Freeport was a simple pine yard. “Freeport’s governing system has worked well for Freeport. It is not, however, without its own tensions between governor and governed. “Freeport’s reality is that a small logging settlement on this large Family Island in the mid dle of the last century has become the second largest population centre in The Bahamas today, the industrial hub of The Bahamas, an employment centre and host to one of the deep est container transshipment ports in our region,” the Prime Minister said. Prime Minister Ingraham said that central government continues to control immigration and foreign direct investment as it does in all other islands of The Bahamas. He said it retains responsibility for the operation of the public hospital, the governmentoperated school system and certain public sporting and recre ational facilities. Medical, accounting, legal and other professionals practising in Freeport are required to be licensed and regulated in accordance with the national laws and their respective pro fessional bodies. Hotels and casinos operate in accordance with the provisions of national legislation, and industries are subject to national environmental and public health standards. Mr Ingraham said that a particular idiosyncrasy of local gov ernment administration in The Bahamas is its absence from the island of New Providence, the capital City of Nassau where three quarters of our national population lives. He said that calls for some form of municipal government for the City of Nassau have become urgent. “Already a Nassau Development Board, formed during one of my earlier terms in office, has presented proposals for the cre ation of a management office for the city. Development “The dramatic population and commercial growth into the suburbs of the City of Nassau have already resulted in the development of important city centres in the outlying districts of the island that would benefit from the institution of local city councils or town committees to manage a myriad of matters impacting the lives of residents, including matters relating to environmental control, local traffic problems, improved col lection and disposal of solid waste and maintenance of neighbourhoods, schools, libraries, streets and parks, for example. “I have no doubt that those delegates from our central gov ernment agencies attending this week’s conference will be espe cially anxious to garner from your discussions, ideas of local government administration which might be successfully introduced to our capital city and its suburbs,” said Mr Ingraham. He said that the CLGC discussions will provide useful opportunities for delegates to learn from one another the vari ations that have evolved and continue to evolve in local gov ernment systems around the Commonwealth. “I take this opportunity to emphasize to all of you gathered here under the theme ‘Improving Local Government, the Commonwealth Vision’ that local government and democracy are all about working for the common good. ” C M Y K C M Y K L OCAL NEWS PAGE 6, WEDNESDAY, MAY 13, 2009 THE TRIBUNE A FORMER manager at Sandals is questioning the timing of revelations of an alleged multi-million dollar embezzlement scheme at the resort. Details of the scheme – which is said to have robbed Sandals of $2.5 million over 13 years – were disclosed in a front page article in TheTribune last week. The source said he suspects there may be an “ulterior motive” behind the allegations being made public at this time – and feels they might have been leaked by the resort itself. “Why now? If it’s been going on for so many years, they must have known something,” he said. The former manager, who wished to be identified only as the receiving supervisor, was among a group of managers laid off at Sandals just over two weeks ago. Lay-offs Sandals said it let go five managers as part of a restructuring exercise aimed at streamlining operations, but the for mer manager fears the lay-offs and the embezzlement scheme have become linked in the public consciousness. He denied any wrong doing, and does not believe the resort is attempting to implicate the former managers. But he does think Sandals might have leaked the allegations to “change the conversation” and thereby deflect any bad publicity as a result of the lay-offs. “Last year they laid off 150 workers. They said that was it. Now they wanted to release some more persons, and suddenly this story comes out about $2.5 million, and takes attention from the lay-offs. It is convenient that this information was released,” he said. Speaking to The Tribune yesterday, a Sandals representative dismissed as utterly baseless the claim that the resort had released the information. In last week’s article, it was reported that the embezzlement scheme is thought to have involved a small group of employees and two tellers at a local bank. Sandals admitted the company has uncovered some financial irregularities, but declined to comment further as “the matter is with the authorities.” According to a well placed source, the scheme involved the submission of grossly exaggerated supply bills to management. Once cheques were issued for the inflated sums, one of the conspirators would take them to a particular bank branch, where a teller complicit in the scheme would deposit the cheques in an account created for the express purpose ofh iding the funds. A second ploy reportedly involved generating fake petty cash slips for various depart ments using a counterfeit stamp bearing the name of a senior resort official. The amounts often substantially exceeded the limits set by S andals management for petty cash payments, the source said. The matter has not yet been brought to the attention of the police, according to a representative of the force. n ByK QUINCY PARKER Press/Cultural Attach Embassy of The Bahamas THERE is an “urgent need for more r esearch” into the dynamics of narcotics supply and demand in the Bahamas. This was one of the conclusions of the Bahamas’ representatives at the Organisation of American States (OAS in Washington, DC, this week. The need to use the data provided by a nti-drug research to drive policy and legi slation, dominated discussions over the first two days of discussions as OAS member states – including the Bahamas – gathered for anti-drug talks. Deputy Director of the National AntiD rug Secretariat (NADS tain and Supply Reduction Officer ShervinL loydrepresented the Bahamas at the 45th Regular Session of the Inter-American Drug Abuse Control Commission (CICADt hrough May 8. Mr Fountain said that during a discus s ion with OAS Secretary General Dr Jos Miguel Insulza about the new challenges facing CICAD, many of the representatives stressed the importance of the scient ific approach to anti-drug policy-making, u rging governments in the hemisphere to make use of the research that has already been done in the area. I n the case of the Bahamas, Mr Fountain said, the drug research that has been undertaken must lead to concrete prog rammes and must guide government poli cymakers as they tackle the thorny probl em. He argued that there was a great need for m ore research into drug supply and demand to be done in the Bahamas. “Not for academic purposes,” he stressed, but research to drive policy and action. T his is what everyone (at the meeting crying for. We have got to have a renewed focus on data collection and data analysis.” Mr Lloyd added that CICAD members are increasingly moving away from “criminalising” drug addiction. The Bahamas andt he other CICAD members, he said, are seeing the problem as a sickness. “It must be dealt with as a health prob l em, but not ignoring national security con cerns,” Mr Lloyd said. ANTI-DRUG STRATEGY A nother major area of concentration at the conference was the review of the AntiDrug Strategy in the Hemisphere, Mr Foun-t ain reported. The talks resulted in a draft resolution, in which it is proposed – among other things – that the OAS GeneralA ssembly invite all member states to contribute to and participate in the process of review and update through CICAD. The draft resolution also proposed to a ccept the government of Brazil’s offer to be the headquarters for the Working Group meetings and coordinate the review and updating process up to and until the presentation of the results at CICAD’s next regular session. “We need to realise the interconnectedness of all countries, because the wholed rug business looks for weaknesses across borders to exploit,” he said. Mr Fountain said that National Security Minister Tommy Turnquest had asked for a Bahamas National Anti-Drug Policy to be drafted, and that there was a strong desire i n the Bahamas and throughout the hemis phere to harmonise national anti-drug strategies with both the United Nations’ Global Anti-Drug Strategy agreed to inV ienna and the OAS’ strategy. He pointed out that the Caribbean Community (CARICOM on its own sub-regional strategy. He said the B ahamas’ goal is to create a matrix that takes the areas in which these disparate strategies are in harmony and design an e ffective national strategy based on that matrix. CICAD members also produced a draft r esolution on the body’s Multilateral Eval u ation Mechanism (MEM MUTLILATERAL E VALUATION MECHANISM Mr Fountain explained that in response to a shared desire for fair and objective e valuation of hemispheric anti-drug measures, the OAS decided ten years ago to adopt the MEM. Each member state must complete exten s ive questionnaires in three-year cycles. CICAD – as the accepted competent authority – takes the information and produces both a country report and a set of recommendations. Later, a follow-up evaluation occurs, aimed at determining the extent to which the recommendations have been implemented. T he NADS director urged that the questionnaires not be seen as “just another nuisance questionnaire,” but as something that should be used by Bahamian authorities as indicators to drive policy for specific institutions. M r Fountain noted that the final draft r eport on the Bahamas from the fourth round of the MEM, which contained CICAD’s evaluation of the Bahamas’i mplementation of its recommendations, had just come out. It evaluated the Bahamas’ progress on implementation of 14 recommendations, including ratification of c ertain multilateral conventions and implementation of recommendations reiterated from earlier cycles. POLITICAL WILL Mr Lloyd, the Supply Reduction Officer, n oted that another major theme of the con f erence was the importance of political will. He said that CICAD members seemed to believe the right political leadership isr equired for successful anti-drug policies to succeed. He said that having been exposed to the s cope of the drug problem in other countries, the Bahamas does not face as severe a challenge as some, but that political will is still critical to implement the strategies that w ould allow the country to effectively com bat the scourge. Call for more research into narcotics supply and demand in the Bahamas B AHAMAS N ational Anti-Drug Secretariat Deputy Director Terrence Fountain and Supply Reduction Officer Shervin Lloyd attended the 45th Regular Session of the Inter-American Drug Abuse Control Commission (CICAD K Q u i n c y P a r k e r PM opens Commonwealth Local Govt Conference Hubert Ingraham Former manager at Sandals questions timing of revelations

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C M Y K C M Y K T HE TRIBUNE WEDNESDAY, MAY 13, 2009, PAGE 7 Princess Butler P.O. Box ES-6069 Nassau, Bahamas Brendilee Rolle P.O. Box 7290 Pine Barron Road Nassau, Bahamas Tamika Williams P.O. Box F 42299 Freeport, Bahamas Tiffany Rolle P.O. Box GT 2395 Nassau, Bahamas Tanya Rolle P.O. Box GT 2395 Nassau, Bahamas Bridgette Hog P.O. Box GT 2395 Nassau, Bahamas Theresa Deleveaux P.O. Box N 732 Nassau, Bahamas Albert Smith P.O. Box SS-6104 Nassau, Bahamas Granville Neville Williams 485 Inagua Avenue, Freeport, Grand Bahama Ms. Alquennia Rolle-Cunningham General Delivery Moore's Island, Abaco Charlissa C.D. Poitier P.O. Box N-978 Nassau Bahamas Eddison Paul Sweeting Jr. Nassau Bahamas Michelle Sweeting Nassau Bahamas Christon Mackey Nassau, Bahamas Terasean Sweeting P.O. Box CR 56708 Sunset Park Nassau, Bahamas Kemuel Delancey P.O. Box CR 56708 Sunset Park Nassau, Bahamas Terry Sweeting P.O. Box CR 56708 Sunset Park Nassau, Bahamas James Wallace Nassau, Bahamas Stafford Bullard P.O. Box N 3730 Nassau, Bahamas Larado D. Evans P.O. Box N 3730 Nassau, Bahamas Francis Roberts P.O. Box SS5175 Nassau, Bahamas Mr. Godfrey Roberts Freeport, Grand Bahama The following individuals are asked to contact Mrs. KimleySaunders (396-2047) or Ms. Kayshonta Smith (396-2031) at ColinaImperial Insurance Ltd: G REEN Turtle Cay's annual Island Roots Festival bills itself as a celebration of European as well as African heritage. That's because unlike most Abaco settlements both blacks and whites have lived together here from the earliest days, in close proximity if not always in perfect harmony. This unusual historical context provides the backdrop for one of the country's most successful heritage events. It all began 33 years ago with a conversation between New Plymouth artist Alton Lowe and Key West librarian Betty Bruce at the opening of the little museum in Green Turtle Cay named after Alton's father, Albert Lowe. "Betty asked me what else could be done to promote Bahamian heritage and I suggested that New Plymouth should become the sister city of Key West, which has deep Bahamian roots," Alton told me. "She immediately invited me to Key West to help set the wheels in motion." Later, Alton met with officials in Nassau who helped him organise the first Island Roots Festival in 1978. The guest of honour at that inaugural event was none other than deputy prime minister (and now governor-general Arthur Hanna. And performances were given by the Royal Bahamas Police Force Band as well as a folklore troupe led by Kayla Lockhart Edwards and Clement Bethel (both now dead West went on to stage similar heritage events. But interest waned after a few seasons, and the formal activities were replaced by private visits between residents of the two com munities, and others with family ties. In 2004 a revival was suggested by the Ministry of Tourism and the festival has continued every year since, to rave reviews. In fact, some 4,000 people attend-ed this year's event, and GTC's harbour was crammed with visit ing yachts. Tough Call was among those thousands on the weekend of May 1-3, and in addition to macaroni and cheese, cracked lobster and crab and rice, I was able to sample some uncommon intellectual fare. Among the treats were perfor mances of Sandra Riley's histori cal plays by the Miami-based Crystal Parrot Players; and presentations by Florida archaeologist Bob Carr, Grand Bahama his tory buff Darius Williams, Nancy Albury of the Antiquities, Monum ents & Museums Corporation, and local genealogist Joy Lowe Jossi. Most of the Abaco cays were exclusively white settlements founded at the end of the loyalist influx after Britain's loss of the American colonies in the 1780s, while most of the settlements in N orth Abaco were exclusively black. According to Alton Lowe, Green Turtle Cay is a prime example of good racial relations in the Bahamas: "When I was growing up we all depended on each other, and the town's population of about 500 is equally divided between white and black." G rand Bahama engineer Dar ius Williams (who published a book on the history of railways and locomotives in the Bahamas two years ago) delved a little deeper into this subject in a talk he gave at the island's adminis trative centre. Williams derived GTC's African population froma variety of historical records, b eginning with the "list of negroes and loyalist veterans" who emigrated from New York to the Abacos after the American War of Independence. These earliest African settlers were either free blacks or former American slaves who had supported the British in return for t heir freedom. But most were assigned or indentured to white loyalists for resettlement in the Bahamas. This naturally led to resentment, protests, and eventually to a small insurrection on Abaco in the mid-1780s. As one contemporary account put it, "These unhappy people, a fter being drawn from their mas ters by promises of freedom and the king's protection, are every day stolen away." As a result, the British governor of the time reported that, ""Numbers of the outlaying negroes went about with muskets and fixed bayonets, rob bing and plundering." W illiams drew more information on Green Turtle's African population from slave registers as well as from the reports of special justices assigned by the British to supervise the four-year emanc ipation process in the colonies. There were also official reports on the settlement of liberated Africans after the British abolished the international slave trade in 1807 some 6,000 Africans were released in the Bahamas from 35 slave ships in the years leading up to 1860. A ccording to Williams, Green Turtle was one of the first areas to be surveyed for the resettlement of liberated Africans and emancipated slaves in the northern Bahamas in 1835, along with Mcleans Town on Grand Bahama. "We know this from town extension surveys," he said. " They were also settled on sev eral other islands, including the Berries, Bimini, and Red Bays, Andros, in addition to New Providence." H e also referred to newspaper accounts of the resettlement of American slaves s hipwrecked in Bahamian waters (slavery did not end in the United States until 1865). The island of Abaco bounded one of the main shipping routes for vessels going from the Atlantic Seaboard to American ports in the Gulf of Mexico, and the fringing reefs along the island's eastern coast a re treacherous. The eventual collapse of the Bahamian plantation economy from insect pests and soil exhaustion led many loyalists to desert Abaco for other islands and terri tories. By 1805 the population of Green Turtle Cay was said to have been employed in the tradit ional activities of woodcutting, turtling and wrecking, with only 15 slaves reported. This indicated that those hardy loyalists who remained had adapted to the “conch” way of life of the original settlers, which focused on the sea rather than on large-scale agri culture. B ut after a major hurricane in 1806 devastated their homes, many Harbour Islanders from Eleuthera moved to Abaco to intermarry with the remaining loyalists on three principal settlements New Plymouth, Man-oWar and Hope Town. The population began to grow, and by 1815 there were 193 people on Green Turtle Cay. "When emancipation was proclaimed in 1834 there were about 300 slaves and 16 liberated Africans on Green Turtle Cay out of a total population of 800, and a total Abaco population of 1800," Williams said. "We don't have any information about free blacks at this time, but there were 39 family head applications for land on the cay in 1835. The cost of quarter-acre town lots and 5-acre pro vision grounds for these former slaves was about 10 days labour laying out roads for the settlement." There was much opposition from the white population at this time to resettling Africans recovered from foreign slave ships by the British navy. As Sandra Riley wrote in her history of Abaco (Homeward Bound strained under the necessity of caring for the free African indentures left in the colony as the result of wrecks or seizures, and they could not afford the high prices of labourers after the indentures had expired." Following emancipation, there was similar resistance to taking in shipwrecked American slaves, and numerous reports that Bahamians were "conveying away Africans for the atrocious pur pose of again selling them into slavery in Florida and elsewhere." Many white Abaconians left the Bahamas at this time for America. In fact, during the 1840s one British governor reported that Key West owed two thirds of its population to this exodus. But the feelings were clearly mutual. As Steve Dodge pointed out in his short history of Abaco, "once freed many former slaves moved away from the white settlements and established new towns...purposely isolating themselves from the whites." These settlements included places like Cedar Harbour, Cornish Town, Bluff Point, Crossing Rocks and Sandy Point. Almost exclusively black, they survived by themselves on subsistence farming and fishing until well into the 20th century. Eventually, the old emnities subsided, and blacks and whites drew close together in a more even relationship. In the 1940s many of those who lived in the northern African settlements moved to the new Marsh Harbour subdivisions of Dundas Town and Murphy Town that had been laid out by the colonial government. And in the 1960s the growth of tourism brought prosperity to the Abaco cays. The advent of majority rule in 1967 followed by Independence six years later has unalterably changed the mental land scape of the Bahamas. And to cap it all off, a former barefoot boy from Cooper's Town sits in the prime minister's office today. Green Turtle's Island Roots Festival is perhaps the best organ ised and most entertaining event of its kind in the Bahamas, with a good mix of activities to satisfy the mind as well as the appetite. It should be a model for the development of heritage tourism throughout the islands. And it all began with the conversion of a wooden shack into a museum anda casual chat about family ties. The Antiquities Corporation in Nassau participates in these events on a regular basis. It also undertakes archaeological research and supports cultural and historical initiatives throughout the country. These have included the South Eleuthera Mission House at Rock Sound, the Freetown Historical Project on Grand Bahama, the Long Island Museum at Buckley's, and the North Abaco Historical Foundation, which is now in the process of registering as a non-profit organisa tion. The foundation is the brain child of two Murphy Town resi dents Millie Dawkins of the Abaco Ministry of Tourism, and Mirella Santillo, a French immigrant who writes for the Abaconian newspaper. "We both have a strong interest in the history of Abaco," Santillo told me. "I wanted to find the location of a rumoured French settlement dating to the late 1500s or early 1600s. Millie wanted to locate former African settlements in the north to collect data for a museum and for incorporation into the local school curriculum." P atterned after the South Eleuthera Mission House at Rock Sound, the North Abaco Historical Foundation is working with Dr Keith Tinker of the Antiquities Corporation to redevelop a building that once was the home of renowned Abaco head teacher Sherlyn Bootle. The Rock Sound Mission House dates back two centuries, and has recently been restored as a museum, library and community centre by local residents who set up a foundation to support the project. North Abaco's proposed heritage centre will also house a museum, library and computer lab. And the foundation's longterm goal is to set up similar her itage centres and restore historic buildings in other areas. "We want to tie in the African heritage of Abaco," Dawkins said,"and take an inventory of historical resources for education, to create jobs and to attract visitors to the northern communities." This is the same path that Green Turtle Cay embarked upon decades ago. Heritage tourism offers a unique way to break the isolation and enliven the economy of small communities. The trick is to find the right hook and develop something more than just a macaroni and beer event. As broadcaster Charles Carter told me in New Plymouth a few days ago, if the Andros Crab Fest could be reorganised and re-branded as the Joseph Spence Cultural Festival the promotional opportunities and economic spin-offs would be unlimited. And if you don't know who Joseph Spence was, you are part of the problem. http://en.wikipedia.org/ wiki/Joseph_Spence_(musician What do you think? Send comments to larry@tribunemedia.net Or visit www.bahamapundit.com The history of Green Turtle Cay G G r r e e e e n n T T u u r r t t l l e e ' ' s s I I s s l l a a n n d d R R o o o o t t s s F F e e s s t t i i v v a a l l i i s s p p e e r r h h a a p p s s t t h h e e b b e e s s t t o o r r g g a a n n i i s s e e d d a a n n d d m m o o s s t t e e n n t t e e r r t t a a i i n n i i n n g g e e v v e e n n t t o o f f i i t t s s k k i i n n d d i i n n t t h h e e B B a a h h a a m m a a s s , , w w i i t t h h a a g g o o o o d d m m i i x x o o f f a a c c t t i i v v i i t t i i e e s s t t o o s s a a t t i i s s f f y y t t h h e e m m i i n n d d a a s s w w e e l l l l a a s s t t h h e e a a p p p p e e t t i i t t e e . .

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n By ADRIAN GIBSON ajbahama@hotmail.com L O RETTA BUTL ER-TURNER, the Minister of State for Social Development, seems to be a ministerial misfit who can hardly earn more than an Fp lus grade. Mrs Turner appears to emit sound and fury, but little s ubstance and no new initiat ives or policies. Under the m inister, programmes relati ng to drug treatment and r ehab are underfunded; child p rotection legislation remains outstanding and sexual abuse legislation sat on the backburner for a while before being passed. Social workers continue to complain about a lack of r esources and long waits to b e reimbursed for monies spent putting gas in their priv ate vehicles to do the d epartment’s work. A lthough the minister has attempted to address some concerns at the Boys andG irls Industrial Schools, much more can be done. At present, any evaluation of Mrs Turner gives one the impression that she has merely been running through the daisies, catching butterflies, b ut little else! T he Urban Renewal prog ramme was also scrapped under the Social Servicesm inister, only to have to be r einstate it in certain districts. Mrs Turner does not appear to have an appreciable understanding of her ministry, fre-q uently going on the defen sive and constantly reminding people that she is the min i ster (for eg, during Parlia mentary proceedings). The minister should not pay too much attention tos ome of the unschooled relig ious leaders who are tact lessly advising her. She should seek to increase the manpower at her ministrya nd launch campaigns to address teenage pregnancy and the high levels of illegitimacy in Bahamian soci ety. The minister must also address the growing presence of homeless people on the s treets and seek to enlist truancy officers to apprehend the growing number of chil dren drifting about during school hours. Charles Maynard , the chubby Minister of State for Culture, earns a D-minus. It i s a disgrace to hear informed c ultural icons suggest that the B ahamas may once again not h ost Carifesta, particularly w hen the country appears to b e in a slump in terms of the a rts. I n 2005, the late Winston S aunders was dispatched to receive the instruments signifying that the Bahamas wasp repared to host Carifesta. However, as was felt when the Bahamas withdrew for its hosting duties in 2008, the c ultural community seems set for another devastating blow and if it is entirely true that t he Bahamas will not host the u pcoming event, it will leave t he country with a black eye and the impression that it is ac ulturally impotent state unfit t o host international events. At present, there are various sites such as gymnasiums, large church halls/Loyola Hall, hotel ballrooms, performing arts centres such as the National Centre for the P erforming Arts, Fort Charl otte and open spaces and facilities throughout the Fami ly Islands that could have m ade the hosting of this event p ossible. Surely Mr Maynard and the Cabinet must know that with the Bahamas beinga tourism-based economy, in addition to the exposure this event could bring to the Fam i ly Islands, there would not be any problems with accommodations because of the availability of adequate hotel rooms and our proximity tot he US would also possibly attract visitors interested in seeing the event who would not have otherwise travelled to South America or to an eastern Caribbean country. Hosting this cultural eventw ould be a needed economic b oost for the islands! It appears that Mr May nard is stuck on the idea that c ulture begins and ends with junkanoo. It is great that the minister likes junkanoo, but why hasn’t there been any m oves to develop it into a y ear-round, cultural industry that could be a cultural export taken worldwide with persons who could legiti mately describe their occupation as being a junkanooer. The culture minister inherited a lot of good projects for whom credit should go to Dr K eith Tinker and the Antiqu ities, Monuments and Museu ms Corporation. While Mr M aynard is enjoying his trave ls to various events and crea ting the illusion of hard w ork, it appears that local p laywrights, folklorists/story t ellers, artists, writers, poets and painters are receiving little by way of support. Therei s a need to focus on developing the stories of the Bahamas that form our iden tity and have yet to be prop-e rly appreciated or recorded. Why isn’t locally created art placed in all Bahamian e mbassies and government o ffices? M inister Maynard has not demonstrated his ability tob ring new ideas or be respons ible for the contribution of new policies to the overall cultural development of the Bahamas. I do credit Mr Maynard with the opening of Cliftonfor which I was proud to see that he engaged f ormer Prime Minister Perry C hristie who was once at the forefront of the movement to s ave the siteand for the m ovement to develop Collins H ouse into a national museum. As a resident of Mr Maynard’s constituency, he earnsa n F for his performance as an MP. D ion Foulkes , the Minister of Labour and Social Devel opment, earns a B-plus. Mr Foulkes is a savvy politician who has mediated and diffused several attempts by unions to commence indus trial action. The minister can partly be credited with the unemploy ment benefit scheme and for establishing what I’m told is a more civilized atmosphere when negotiating industrial agreements. However, Mr Foulkes must seek to squash the uncivilized union infighting, which has now elevated t o actual blows being exchanged when attorney and former MP Keod Smith was allegedly smacked in the face while serving court orders on Monday. It appears that some l abour leaders in the B ahamas are hardly conc erned about unionized workers, but more about power and their political/financial standing. The labour unions are holding the country to ran-s om and if allowed to go unchecked, the unionsparticularly those of the utilityc ompanieswill be too strong for the government. There must be policy set forth to damper the power of reckl ess union leaders, otherwise we will have a situation where “the tail wags the dog.” F urthermore, Senator F oulkes has ensured that the c onsumer affairs aspect of his ministry is efficiently and con-s tantly visible. The rights of c onsumers, who are subjected to price gouging in food/general stores and gas stations and in some instances are sold outdated items, must be protected and I’m told that the minister is set to take l egal action against certain u nscrupulous business owners. H ubert Minnis , the Minist er of Health, earns a B-plus. D r Minnis has said that he is actively working to improve the communication between staff and patients at the Princess Margaret Hospital, seeking to resolve complaints about long lines at clinics,a ttempting to ensure that the hospital and polyclinics throughout the islands are operated by highly skilled andp rofessional staff. He has said that he is initiating means to ensure that doctors and staff are more service-oriented and accountable. In addition to initiating the e-medicine programme, theh ealth minister has proposed t o develop a programme that would require newly return ing doctors to be deployed and exposed to work on the Family Islands. However, Dr Minnis’ min istry is faced with a myriado f problems ranging from i nadequate hospital beds and the unsanitary conditions at the hospital (dirty elevators, unusable bathrooms, etc); the need for a change of the dreadful, indifferent man agement at the hospital, who should be replaced by an experienced and insightful administrative grouping featuring Bahamians who would have worked in a manage ment capacity at a hospital overseas; claims of malpractice; the need for a new hospital and laboratories; a need to address the issues arising about the acceptance of degrees from Cuba and the presence of some physicians who seem to be more concerned with making loads of m oney rather than healthcare. Frankly, Dr Minnis is also hampered by the institutional bureaucracy of a healthcare system tinkering on the brink of collapse when h e was assigned his portfolio. D r Minnis appears to be p roactive in approach and has also speedily addressed any crisis at the hospital or alarming healthcare issues with a view to constantly updating and informing the public. Hei s also rated highly as an MP, running what Sidney Blumenthal describes in his 1980b ook as the ‘Permanent Campaign,’ engaging his constituents and their concerns. Neko Grant , the Minister of Works and Transport, earns a D. Mr Grant appears to be lost in the middle of a jigsaw puzzle, failing to time-l y negotiate even the most basic of maintenance con tracts, which would have avoided much of the chaosc aused when nearly all street lights in New Providence were wildly flashing. Mr Grant must address the traffic congestion on New Providence, further engage those in public transport andr esolve the apparent disconn ect between the ministry of works and the utility compa nies by requiring all to coordinate the installation of equipment as opposed to uprooting newly paved roads when they desire, and alsoa ddress the concerns of citi z ens about the surveying of property and the untimely approach taken to granting approval for architectural/ construction plans. Thus far, the construction of sea walls and roads under the minister is a step in the right direction; however, infrastructural upgrades must also be taken at the various government offices through out the islands, at parks (eg, RM Bailey), government-initiated cemeteries and recreational areas. Hubert Ingraham , the Prime Minister and Minister of Finance, earns a Bthe average of all his ministers. In this instance, the PM can only be as strong as the weake st link in his Cabinetand there are quite a few. However, in terms of his own abilities, the Prime Minister earns an A-minus. Prime Minister Ingraham i s the ultimate leader, steadil y steering the country t hrough these tough economic times. The PM continues to live up to the mantra of “saying what he means and meaning what he says.” As a policy-m aker, he shouldin conjunction with the Oppositionstrive to make provi-s ions for a national plan for the governance of the Bahamas even 20 years from todaythat is, in terms of the d evelopment of our people. Mr Ingraham’s political genius is demonstrated by his f irm, decisive leadership and h is coordination and discip line of his Cabinet. However, the PM must i ncreasingly promote and e ncourage the local entrepreneurial spirit through economic initiatives and should strongly consider including the gambling issue on his legislative agenda, whether by appointing a commission with a timeframe or having a refe rendum. The FNM government m ust recognize the need for r eform in order to foster a f ree market, entrepreneurship, a stronger private sector and also eliminate all government/private monopolies. There are also a few Cabinet ministers who should dot he populace a favour and request a return to the back benches. There are still some mem b ers of the Cabinetwho can hardly be considered among the FNM’s brain trust whose behaviour is compara ble to that of ostriches, which are known to see danger but instead of looking for safetyo r making an attempt to d efend against their attack er, they become contented with sticking their heads into sand, assuming that the prob lem will just go away. Space must be for new facesper sons even outside of the polit i cal realmwho have specif i c knowledge about a ministry, to serve at a higher level. Finally, the FNM must constantly employ transparency and accountability in the signing of contracts and agreements/treaties and seek to draft and permit the passage of a Freedom of Information Act because, to use the words of Charles Grassley (senior Republican on the US Congress’ Senate Finance Committee), “sunshine is the best disinfectant.” In their second year, the FNM government earns a Bminus. C M Y K C M Y K PAGE 8, WEDNESDAY, MAY 13, 2009 THE TRIBUNE NOTICE is hereby given that JOYCYNTHIATILBAYNE of WOOD BURN ESTATE, P.O. BOX N-4303, NASSAU, BAHAMAS , is applying to the Minister responsible for Nationality and Citizenship, for registration/naturalization as a citizen of The Bahamas, and that any person who knows any reason why registration/naturalization should not be granted, should send a written and signed statement of the facts within twenty-eight days from the 6TH day of May, 2009 to the Minister responsible for nationality and Citizenship, P.O. Box N-7147, Nassau, Bahamas.NOTICE EMPLOYMENT OPPORTUNITYYou are invited to apply for the following position currently available.Assistant Marketing ManagerKey Requirements worth clients business to the attention of: hr@ 127,&(LVKHUHE\JLYHQWKDW %2/,((':$5'//2<' RI 67$1'5(:%($&+(67$3%2; LVDSSO\LQJWRWKH0LQLVWHUUHVSRQVLEOHIRU1DWLRQDOLW\DQG &LWL]HQVKLSIRUUHJLVWUDWLRQQDWXUDOL]DWLRQDVFLWL]HQRI7KH %DKDPDVDQGWKDWDQ\SHUVRQZKRNQRZVDQ\UHDVRQZK\ UHJLVWUDWLRQQDWXUDOL]DWLRQVKRXOGQRWEHJUDQWHGVKRXOG VHQGZULWWHQDQGVLJQHGVWDWHPHQWRIWKHIDFWVZLWKLQ WZHQW\HLJKWGD\VIURPWKH WKGD\ RI 0D\ WR WKH 0LQLVWHUUHVSRQVLEOHIRUQDWLRQDOLW\DQG&LWL]HQVKLS3%R[ 127,&( Evaluating the FNMCabinet Y OUNG M AN S V IEW A DRIANGIBSON Young Man’s View continuesthe evaluationofthen ation’sexecutive branch two years into the FNM’s tenure.

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C M Y K C M Y K SPORTS TRIBUNE SPORTS WEDNESDAY, MAY 13, 2009, PAGE 13 n By CLIFF BRUNT AP Sports Writer INDIANAPOLIS (AP Indiana Pacers forward Danny Granger was named the NBA's Most Improved Player on Tues day after averaging a careerbest 25.8 points a game this season. Granger edged New Jersey Nets guard Devin Harris 364339 in voting from a panel of 121 journalists. "I can honestly say it really did come as a surprise," he said. "I really had it out of my mind for a while. I was on vacation, enjoying Italy, and all of a sud den, I'm winning the award." Granger was selected to the All-Star team this year for the first time and improved his scoring average by at least five points in each of the past three seasons. He averaged 7.5 points as a rookie, then 13.9 in his sec ond season and 19.6 in 2007-08. Granger had the NBA's fifthhighest scoring average this season. "I think in my fourth year, I just had the experience of play ing a lot of minutes," he said. "I could read defenses a lot better. I could get my shot a lot easier than what I had in the past. I think I just thought my way through the game a little more than I had previously." Granger also has been invited to participate in a USA Bas ketball training camp this summer, the first phase in selecting the squad for the 2012 Olympics in London. He said Tuesday he has accepted the offer. Granger elevated his game in January. He averaged 34.7 points and shot 49 percent overa six-game stretch against West ern Conference teams that began on Jan. 3. Granger is Most Improved Player n By The Associated P ress Dallas at Denver (9pm E DT). The Nuggets try again to close out the series and advance to the Western Conference semifinals after the Mavericks forced Game 5 with a 119117 victory Monday night. S S T T A A R R S S Monday Dirk Nowitzki, Mave ricks, scored 19 of his 44 points in the fourth quarter, including a high-archi ng shot with 1:05 left that put Dallas ahead for good in its 119-117 victory over D enver. Josh Howard, Mavericks, had 21 points and 11 rebounds to help preventD allas from being swept. LeBron James, Cavaliers, had 27 points, eightr ebounds and eight assists in a series-clinching 84-84 victory over Atlanta. S S T T R R O O N N G G I I N N D D E E F F E E A A T T C armelo Anthony s cored a career playoffbest 41 points in Denver's 1 19-117 loss to Dallas. U U N N B B E E A A T T E E N N A A N N D D U U N N C C H H A A L L L L E E N N G G E E D D C leveland made it an N BA-record eight straight w ins by double digits with a n 84-74 victory over A tlanta to advance to the E astern Conference finals. T he Cavaliers became the s econd team to sweep the first two rounds of thep layoffs since the NBA expanded the first round to best-of-seven in 2003.T he Miami Heat started w ith sweeps of New Jer sey and Washington in the 2 005 playoffs before los i ng to Detroit in the East finals. S S W W E E E E P P S S S S T T O O P P P P E E D D Dallas avoided a pair of sweeps with its 119-117 vic-t ory over Denver in Game 4 of the Western Conference semifinals. Besides being swept in the series, the Mavericks avoided d ropping every game this season against the Nuggets. Denver won all four meetings in the regu-l ar season. C C O O A A C C H H I I N N G G C C A A R R O O U U S S E E L L Jay Triano is keeping his job and Tony DiLeo is returning to his old one. Triano signed a three-yearc ontract Monday to coach t he Toronto Raptors, dropping the interim tag after taking over the team during the season. DiLeo withdrew his name from consideration for the 76ers' permanent coaching job and will go back to his old job in the front office, citing family reasons. General manager Ed Stefanski said the search for a replacement will begin immediately. S S P P E E A A K K I I N N G G "Why should we celebrate? We're playing for a championship. An advance is an advance. It doesn't matter if you win in four games or you win Game 7. We're happy that we're playing great basketball ... but we're not taking for granted what we're doing right now." LeBron James after Cleveland completed a sweep of Atlanta and advanced to the Eastern Conference finals with an 84-74 victory in Game 4 NBA Today n By JAIME ARON AP Sports Writer DALLAS (AP 14 and playing listlessly, the Dallas Mavericks sure looked ready to call it a season. Then Carmelo Anthony threw a jab, and everything changed. Dirk Nowitzki and the Mavs awoke from their early-game slumber with rally after rally, getting close or even tied yet unable to get ahead until the former MVP made a tough, high-arching shot with 1:05 left. Having worked so hard for the lead, they weren't about to give it back, pulling out a 119-117 victory over the Denver Nuggets on Monday night to avoid being swept. Anthony scored a career playoff-best 41 points and snagged five steals. He was the one turning away most Dallas rallies and made a 3-pointer with 3.1 seconds left that got Denver within a point. Yet when Mavericks guard Jason Terry intentionally missed a free throw with 1.1 ticks left, Anthony was out of answers. He got the rebound, but couldn't stop the clock and didn't even have time to try a 90-foot heave. The buzzer sounded and confetti fell as the teams left the court knowing they will meet again Wednesday night in Denver. "It was an unbelievable game," said Nowitzki, who scored 19 of his 44 points in the fourth quarter. "We were down the whole game, but were able to come back and win and we've been doing that all season long. ... We've got to go back to Denver and let it all hang out again." The Mavs lost all four regu lar-season games against the Nuggets and the first three of this series, but all along felt they were close. The scoreboard showed it, too, as Denver's margin shrunk from 14 in the opener to 12 then to one in Game 3, which also needed a mistaken no-call and a 3-pointer by Anthony with a second left. " We've been fighting and fighting this whole series," said M avs forward Josh Howard, who had 21 points and 11 rebounds on two bad ankles. "The end of Game 3 gave us a lot of willpower for this game." It sure didn't look like it the first 13 minutes. Anthony and the Nuggets were scoring at will and the Mavericks were doing little to stop them. On one possession,A nthony turned, saw no one between him and the basket and soared for a dunk so easy it could've been preseason. But then Anthony and Dallas' Antoine Wright the combatants from the Game 3 finish got their arms tangled. Once untangled, Anthony's open hand smacked Wright in the shoulder. Officials called Wright for a loose-ball foul, hit Anthony with a technical and watched a video replay to make sure they were right. Nothing was the same after that. The intensity ratcheted to Game 7 proportions, with a total of seven technical fouls and two flagrants. It spilled into the stands, too, with security guards removing Anthony's girlfriend, LaLa Vazquez of MTV fame, for her safety and with extra protection around the mother of Kenyon Martin, who had a brief exchange with Mavs owner Mark Cuban after Game 3. "They're allowed to be fans, but when it gets personal, it goes over the top," said Denver's Chauncey Billups, who had 24 points and seven assists. Added Nuggets coach George Karl: "I would probably use an uglier word than hostile, but I'm not going to do that right now. I don't think it was very classy." The postgame scene was a little calmer than after Game 3, although it may also wind up getting reviewed by the league office because Martin and Cuban clearly exchanged words. Alas, Denver fans won't get their chance for revenge on Cuban. He's skipping Game 5 to be at an awards ceremony in Las Vegas, keeping a promise he made to his wife six months ago. Nuggets fans will have plenty to scream about anyway. Their club is 5-0 at home this postseason and can clinch their first trip to the conference finals since 1985. "We're still in control," Anthony said. "We'll be ready." Mavericks coach Rick Carlisle wasn't surprised his team played so well because that's been their pattern this season bouncing back strong after hitting rock bottom. He probably would've preferred they didn't get so far behind so quickly at the start, but Nowitzki refused to let them stay down for long. "There are very few guys I have been around in this league that are as strong-willed as him," Carlisle said. Nowitzki, who also is dealing with off-court troubles involving a girlfriend, was 14-of-25. He made 16 of 17 free throws and grabbed 13 rebounds. "We showed character and fought," said Dallas' Jason Kidd, who had 13 points, 10 rebounds and six assists. "The pressure is on them to win the series. We don't have any pres sure." Nowitzki helps Mavs avoid sweep at hands of Nuggets n By PAUL NEWBERRY AP Sports Writer ATLANTA (AP James knew the routine. Exchange a few handshakes. Knock out a few interviews. Start getting ready for Cleve land's next series. This wasn't a time to celebrate. "Why should we celebrate?" James said. "We're playing for a championship." The Cavaliers made it 8-for-8 in the postseason, completing a second straight sweep with an 84-74 win over the Atlanta Hawks on Monday night. But Cleveland had barely walked off the court at Philips Arena when the focus shifted to the Eastern Conference finals. C learly, this team won't be satisfied unless it's lifting a tro phy after the final game. "An advance is an advance," said James, who scored 27 points after finishing with 47 in Game 3. "It doesn't matter if you win in four games or you win Game 7. We're happy that we're playing great basketball ... but we're not taking for granted what we're doing right now." Delonte West and Mo Williams showed Cleveland isn't just a one-man squad, hitting huge shots down the stretch as the Cavaliers extended their NBA-record streak of doubledigit playoff wins to eight. Zydrunas Ilgauskas and Ander son Varejao pounded the boards, leading the Cavaliers to another big rebounding edge. "I've got trust in every last one of our guys," James said. Cleveland, which also swept Detroit in the opening round, will face either Boston or Orlando in the Eastern Conference finals. No matter the opponent, the Cavaliers will be a lot more rested. The Celtics-Magic series is tied 2-all and will last at least through Thursday, while the top seed heads back to Ohio to relax for a few days before opening the next round at home. "We're glad to finish this series off," reserve Wally Szczerbiak said. "Now it's time to go get our rest and get ready for the next series. We have some bumps and bruises to heal from in this series." So do the Hawks, but they've got all summer. Joe Johnson, Al Horford and Marvin Williams were all hobbled by injuries, which eliminated any chance of fourth-seeded Atlanta giving the Cavaliers a serious challenge. Josh Smith led Atlanta with 26 points, but the Hawks shot 23-of-73 from the field to fin ish at 31.5 percent. Johnson added 18 points but shot 7-of18. Mike Bibby scored his only points on a 3-pointer in the final quarter. Flip Murray kept putting it up, but made only four of 15 for 14 points. "It's hard to judge this team because we really weren't healthy in this series," said Hawks coach Mike Woodson, whose team made the second round of the playoffs for the first time in a decade, just four seasons removed from a 13-69 debacle. "We have to get better personnel-wise, but I couldn't be more proud of the guys than I am. We made some major strides this season." The Cavaliers became the second team to sweep the first two rounds of the playoffs since the NBA expanded the first round to best-of-seven in 2003. The Miami Heat started with sweeps of New Jersey and Washington in 2005 before losing to Detroit in the East finals. West scored 21 points, while Williams scored his 12 on four 3-pointers. Ilgauskas had 14 points and 10 rebounds, while Varejao grabbed seven of his 11 rebounds at the offensive end to help Cleveland pick up 15 second-chance points. "You know LeBron is going to be there, but you don't know who else is going to be there," Woodson moaned. "They've got weapons around LeBron." Get out the brooms: Cavs complete sweep of Hawks Granger (AP DELONTE WEST scores as Josh Smith looks on in the third quarter of Game 4 of the Eastern Conference semifinals playoffs in Atlanta Monday n ight. Cleveland won 84-74 and swept the series 4-0. (AP Photo: John Bazemore KENYON MARTIN gets a hand on the ball as Dirk Nowitzki takes a shot in second half of Game 4... (AP Photo: Donna McWilliam

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n B y PAUL LOGOTHETIS AP Sports Writer M ADRID (AP Federer began his final warmup for the French Open with a 6-1,7 -5 win over Robin Soderling at the MadridOpen on Tuesd ay. T he Swiss star had 24 winners and took advantage of the S wedish player's 25 unforced e rrors to capture four break points. Federer fired 11 aces, i ncluding on the final point to c linch his spot in the third r ound. F ederer, who had a bye for t he first round, could lose his N o. 2 position in the rankings to A ndy Murray or Novak D jokovic without a good showi ng at the joint ATP and WTA e vent. E arlier, James Blake of the United States defeated Victor Hanescu 6-2, 6-4 for his first victory in the Spanish capital after six appearances. "My curse was broken and all it took was moving to my least favorite surface," Blake s aid. B lake next plays Ivo Karlovic, with the winner facing F ederer. I van Ljubicic scored the first upset after defeating ninth-seede d Jo-Wilfried Tsonga 6-4, 7-5. T he Croatian wild card broke the ninth-ranked Tsonga three times, with two of those coming in the second set when Ljubic ic rallied from 5-2 down. Ljubicic joined seventh-seeded Fernando Verdasco and No. 1 6 Tommy Robredo in the third r ound. Verdasco beat Juan Carlos F errero 6-3, 6-2 in an all-Spanish match, while Robredo rallied to defeat Mardy Fish of the U nited States 3-6, 7-6 (5 H e'll play either Murray or Simone Bolelli. Madrid's conversion from a f ast-playing hardcourt to a clay surface looked to benefit Blake. Hanescu hit 27 unforced errors with most coming on his second serve where he scored only six of 18 points and hit three double faults. The 16th-ranked American player seemed to carry over his good form from his runner-up finish at the Estoril Open on Sunday. "I just started playing my game instead of just trying to be a clay courter," Blake said. "I've got to play my style and play aggressive when I get the chance." In other first round matches, 10th-seeded Nikolay Davydenko defeated Viktor Troicki 6-2, 6-2. Also, No. 13 Marin Cilic held off Marcel Granollers 62, 6-7 (4 On the women's side, fourthseeded Jelena Jankovic overcame a stubborn challenge from Daniela Hantuchova to win 7-5, 6-2. Jankovic will play Elena Vesnina. In other second-round matches, ninth-seeded Caroline Wozniacki beat Varvara Lepchenko of the United States 6-3, 6-1. She will play either Venus Williams or Alisa Kleybanova. Amelie Mauresmo will play third-seeded Elena Dementieva after a 6-2, 7-5 win over Jie Zheng. C M Y K C M Y K SPORTS PAGE 14, WEDNESDAY, MAY 13, 2009 TRIBUNE SPORTS THE COLLEGE OFTHE BAHAMASVisit our website at www.cob.edu.bs M ADRID (AP Murray is paying little attention to the world rankings d espite becoming the first British player to break into the top three. The 21-year-old Murray moved ahead of Novak Djokovic in Monday's ATP rankings, leaving him behind only No. 1 Rafael Nadal and Roger Federer. But Murray trails the leading pair by a considerable amount and says he is focused only on adding to the three titles he has already won this year, starting with his defense of the Madrid Open this week. "It's one of those things that if you start focusing on the rankings or on what another player is doing, you kind of take your eye off the ball a little bit," Murray said Monday. "You need to focus on your own matches and try and keep winning. "The important thing is to concentrate on playing well and not the ranking." Tim Henman and Greg Rusedski had been Britain's highest-ranked players since the rankings began in 1973, both reaching the No. 4 position M urray had occupied for eight months until Monday. With 8,990 points, Murray is s till significantly behind Federer (10,170 Nadal (15,360 F ederer and Nadal have won 19 Grand Slam titles between them, while Murray can count only an appearance in last year's U.S. Open final as his biggest Grand Slam success. "To get close to those two or in between Roger and Rafa is a tough thing to do," Murray said. "They are probably two o f the best players ever and it wouldn't surprise me if they went down as that." M urray's chances of trim ming the gap this week look slim anyway since the Madrid tournament has been switched from hard courts to clay at the new La Caja Magica complex. The surface is Nadal's traditional favorite and Murray lost his last match on clay 1-6, 6-3, 75 to Juan Monaco in the sec ond round of the Rome Masters two weeks ago. Nadal, Federer and Djokovic are all playing in Madrid this week. "The surface was obviously better for me last year," Murray s aid. "I just want to try and win my first match and take each match as they come." Murray had a first-round bye and will meet Simone Bolelli in his opener. "I don't play on this surface well enough yet to think past my first match and I play the winner of two very solid clay courters, so I'm not going to think past them," Murray said. Murray only needs to look at Nadal for an example of how to improve on an initially unfavoured surface. The clay-court specialist worked hard on grass until he reached the final of Wimble don in 2006 and 2007, and eventually won it last year. "I'm obviously impressed with what he has done on clay, but what he's done on grass is a great motivation for me," Murray said. "I feel I can obviously get better on clay and learn how to play better and get onto the second week and go deep at the French Open. M urray first British player to break into t op three TOKYO (AP Japanese women's soccer team canceled a tour in the United States on Tuesday because oft he swine flu outbreak. The team was scheduled to play the U.S. team on May 20 in Frisco, Texas, and May 23in Sandy, Utah. The team was to travel to Canada for a match in Toronto on May 25. J apan's health ministry confirmed the fourth case of swine flu on Sunday, a day after the country's first three were reported. The ministry said the fourth case is a teenager who recently returned from Canada on a high school trip with thet hree others. The Japan Football Association, which announced the decision, said it may have to pay damages for breach of contract. "This is an unfortunate situ a tion, but one that we had absolutely no control over," said U.S. Soccer president SunilG ulati. "We have been assured that the risk to the participating teams is exceptionally low, but we accept the Japanese Federation's decision not to travel." Also Tuesday, Malaysian soccer officials canceled next month's Intercontinental Cup under-23 tournament becauseo f the threat of swine flu. The Football Association of Malaysia canceled the eight-t eam tournament after consulting with the nation's Health Ministry, the New Straits Times reported. Among the teams that had been expected to play in the June 1-14 tournament were B razil, Mexico and South Korea, which have each con firmed cases of swine flu. The number of countries reporting swine flu cases stands at 31, with the World Health Organization confirming about 4,800 cases. At least 61 people have been killed by swine flu around the world: 56 in Mexic o, three in the U.S., one in Canada and one in Costa Rica. Japan cancels US soccer tour due to swine flu HOUSTON (AP two years of probation for cocaine possession in a case in which a Taser was used to subdue him. Williams on Monday pleaded guilty to possession of a controlled substance. A judge sentenced the 25-year-old unrestricted free agent to deferred adjudication and fined Williams $200. District attorney's office spokeswoman Donna Hawkins told The Associated Press that Williams will face random drug testing in Harris County. Hawkins says Williams will not have a felony conviction on his record if he successfully completes probation. Williams, who played for the Jacksonville last year, was arrested in April when he allegedly refused to leave a bar. An off-duty police officer used a Taser on Williams. Williams was the ninth player picked in the 2004 NFL draft after playing at the University of Washington and Lakes High School in Lakewood, Wash. Williams gets two years pr obation for cocaine possession Jaguars sign Bouman IN THIS August 28, 2008 file photo, Jaguars quarterback Todd Bouman passes against the Washington Redskins during an NFL preseason game, in Landover, Md. The Jaguars signed Bouman on Tuesday, giving Cleo Lemon competition for the backup position. Lemon beat out Bouman for the spot during training camp last year, but he struggled during the team's minicamp earlier this month. (AP Photo: Nick Wass n By MIKE CRANSTON AP Sports Writer CHARLOTTE, N.C. (AP After seeing fans jam London’s Wembley Stadium to watch the NFL the past two years, the league is considering adding a second regular-season game overseas in time for the 2010 season. Commissioner Roger Good ell said Tuesday the second game could also be played in London or another location in the United Kingdom. The issue w ill be discussed at next week’s l eague meetings, and could be included in a larger plan to add up to two regular-season games to the NFL schedule. “The fan reaction we’ve had in London has been extraordinary. We would like to feed that passion,”G oodell said after speaking at the Charlotte Touchdown Club. “We have a great fan base in the UK. There have been dis cussions of taking the second game and playing it in another market in the UK. That’s something that we’ll evaluate.” NFL is considering second regular-season game overseas Federer opens with victory ROGER FEDERER returns the ball to Robin Soderling yesterday during the Madrid Open... (AP Photo: Daniel Ochoa de Olza

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n B y RENALDO DORSETT Sports Reporter r dorsett@tribunemedia.net S ummer months usually b ring about a plethora of basketball camps and oneo f the Bahamas’ most well known franchises officially a nnounced the launch of another edition. T he Jeff Rodgers Basketball Camp is gearing up to enter its 22nd year under the theme “Building Bodies w ith a Positive Mind.” The camp, scheduled for July 6-31 i n H D Colburn Gymatorium at Bahamas Academy, is again expected t o host hundreds of aspiring players between the ages of five and 19. O ver the years, the camp has served as a rite of passage for many local p layers through the high school ranks with a number of them progressing to basketball careers in colleges t hroughout the US. Jeff Rodgers, camp director, said t he event continues to hold true to the ideals established since its incept ion, building players of great talent and character. “The Jeff Rodgers Basketball Camp is dedicated to the enrichment of our youth. We believe in inspiring o ur campers to be the best that they c an be. We assist in positive character building, good sportsmanship and t eamwork while developing the sound fundamen-t als of basketball,” he said. “Our programme will e xpose the campers to talented instructors, inspiring g uest speakers, skilled college coaches, and NBA personalities who willi nteract and perform with the campers.” S everal NBA personalities, which the Bahamian p ublic has become well accustomed to, are expected to headline the list of c elebrities at this year’s camp. Retired players Tyrone “Muggsy” B ogues, Scott Burrell, head coach of the New Orleans Hornets, Byron Scott, ABC/ESPN commentatorM ark Jackson, twotime all star Chris Paul, and two players from the A tlanta Hawks organisation are all scheduled to attend. What keeps it going is God giving me the strength to continue. This i s something I have accepted as my ministry, my calling, everybody has a calling in life and I feel as if once you are accepting and committed to it you will always be willing to make then ecessary sacrifices to see it succeed. T his is an opportunity to give something back to the community and my church i n a very positive way.” Rodgers said. The parents have supported the camp for so m any years. Every parent wonders where they can p ut their child in the summertime, and they want to put them in a place that iss afe, positive, and where they can learn some skills a nd life lessons and think our track record speaks f or itself. We have some of the finest local instructors along with internat ional instructors and guests to create one of the best programmes around.” T here is an admission fee for the camp and the application forms and fees can be returned at the BahamasC onference of Seventh Day Adventists’ main office or at Bahamas Acade my. Rodgers also credited his wide r ange of sponsors which include Scotiabank, Jewel’s Party Supplies, Robin H ood, Coca Cola, Vitamalt, RBC, Royal Brittania, CIBC, BTC, Wyndham Nassau resort, Colina Imperial and Freddie’s Barber Shop. Registration for the camp remains o pen until Friday July 22. C M Y K C M Y K WEDNESDAY, MAY 13, 2009 T HETRIBUNE PAGE 15 PAGE 13 Granger is Most Improved Player... Cavaliers completes weep of the Hawks... S ee page 13 ‘Building bodies with a positive mind’ FORMER NBA player Mark Jackson, who used to play for Indiana Pacers, greets young sters at the 21st Jeff Rodgers summer basketball camp in this 2008 file photo. This year, a number of NBA players and coaches are expected to attend the annual event... 22nd annual Jeff Rodgers summer basketball camp set for July Jeff Rodgers n By RENALDO DORSETT Sports Reporter r dorsett@tribunemedia.net T O compliment his efforts with his annual summer bas k etball camp, basketball enthu siast Jeff Rodgers has made the first initiative in shifting his focus towards garnering schol arship opportunities for local players. Rodgers hosted a pair of s couts and coaches from universities in the United Statesh eadlined by Aaron Griess, head coach of Augusburg College in Minneapolis, Minneso ta. Originally, the coaches were scheduled to attend the camp this summer but were forced to re-schedule. Rodgers saw this as a blessing to the players who will now have two opportunities to impress the coaching staffs. “Because of scheduling conflicts we were forced to move that training session up a few weeks. They came down to watch a few scrimmages and h ave a look at some of the senior high school guys and l ook at the possibility of them giving out a few scholarships t o their schools. “We have other coaches coming into town who will be here for the camp in July,” he said. The feedback was great, they said they saw a couple of g uys and they want to make return trips this summer to geta better look and spend more time scouting the guys and making sure they get the total picture. “Another thing they told me is that they wanted to see them more in game situations to get a greater feel for the fundamentals so it works out well that the guys will have another opportunity to play before them.” Approximately 25 high school players competed in the exhibition. “Some of the positive traits they said they noticed in the kids was a drive, determination, athletic ability and good attitudes,” Rodgers said. “We really want to focus a lot and see how we can help the bigger kids, the seniors to see if they can acquire some scholarships to continue the sport at universities in the United States and further their education.” Rodgers hosts US scouts, coaches to check out local ballers’ talent JEFF RODGERS (holding ball (Photo: Felip Major/Tribune staff

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C M Y K C M Y K L OCAL NEWS P AGE 16, WEDNESDAY, MAY 13, 2009 THE TRIBUNE n By MEGAN REYNOLDS Tribune Staff Reporter mreynolds@tribunemedia.net STAFF at an investment bank are being forced to suffer hardships while expatriate employees continue to receive thousands of dollars in expenses and benefits,sources claim. However, the bank has denied all of the allegations. A source claims that foreign workers at Royal Bank of Canada (RBC (Bahamas accommodation and send their children to expensive private schools at the cost of the company, one month after a Bahamian mother was let go to cut costs in a challenging economic climate. Expenses paid for foreign workers include a $15,000 monthly rental payment for an expatriate’s home in Lyford Cay, and the $29,000 cost of bringing an foreigner’s Corvette to the country, the sources claim. It is further alleged that staff are being pressured to take two weeks of unpaid leave to help balance the books in hard economic times, while a foreign employee is being excused from the sacrifice, Tribune sources alleged. But RBC managing director Elizabeth Dorsch denied all of the allegations, adding that employees only volunteer to take time off and will not be penalised if they choose not to. She declined to comment further as the managing directorsaid: “It is our policy not to comment on specifics concerning employee matters due to privacy concerns.” Sources say an expatriate will typically be paid an annual salary of $80,000 for doing the same job for which a Bahamian with the same level of experience would only be paid $60,000. And they maintain the costly expats are preventing experienced and capable Bahamians from progressing to fill the more senior roles. “The overall atmosphere is discouragement among the staff,” a source claimed. “The staff are made to feel like they are just getting the scraps while they live off the high horse.” One disgruntled employee is reportedly leaving the Nassau office. It is alleged a foreign staff member will fill the vacancy. Sources maintain there are two senior employees with around 30 years combined experience, but it is expected they will be overlooked in favour of an expat with foreign language skills. A source said: “They have these seniors who are capable of handling the position without hesitation, but I can guarantee you they’re going to have someone come in and use the language thing. “It’s not necessary because staff rarely speak to clients, and the people they deal with speak English. “They are doing the work and then the expatriates come in and are fully compensated. “It’s unfair treatment and yet they insist on doing it,” the source complained. Ms Dorsch denied the allegation. She said RBC Wealth Management currently employs 35 persons in the Bahamas, three are expatriates. She maintains there has been one redundancy this year while no further redundancies are planned. However, Mr Turnquest denied having any direct involvementw ith the properties which were “flipped” a few years later and sold for more than $550,000. At that time, Mr Turnquest said, the final authority for the sale of the properties rested not with him, but with the PrimeM inister who had to sign off on the sales as the Minister responsible for Crown Land. However, Mr Turnquest got a rude awakening Monday morning when he returned to work tod iscover that the locks to his office had been changed. A ccording to sources deep w ithin the department, officials were inside his office busy securing files and documentat ion that officers at the Attorn ey General’s office feared could have been destroyed or “misplaced” if swift action hadn ot been taken. The government is also reportedly in the process of i mplementing significant c hanges to the law to ensure that abuses of Crown land, as reported in The Tribune , will n ot happen again. Yesterday when The Tribune contacted the Department of Lands to speak with Mr Turnquest, his secretary reported t hat he was not in office, nor did she know when he would r eturn. M r Turnquest’s removal from t he department comes at a time w hen the Opposition has already started a motion in the House of Assembly calling for a Select Committee to review all Crown land grants issued byg overnment since the early 1 990’s. This committee will review all Crown grants issued to individuals or entities since 1992 up until the present date along with all outstanding applications thath ave yet to receive final a pproval. The committee will also ascertain a list of all public servants and retired public servantsw ho have received grants, along w ith government’s official position on its policy in relation to the disposition of publicly held l ands generally; as well as the government’s policy in relationt o granting lands to employees o f the government or their rela tives. Since the revelations of the transactions relating to Mr T urnquest’s relatives, and claims that other civil servants were able to secure substantial g rants of Crown land, several u pset individuals have come forw ard claiming many years of abuse they have had to endure at the hands of this department. Among these individuals was PLP general Ezra Russell, whoc omplained of having to wait o ver 12 years to get final approval to purchase some 34 acres of Crown land in Fountain Bay, Cat Island. During Prime Minister Hubert Ingraham’s first term ino ffice, Mr Turnquest was a ppointed Director of Lands and Surveys. After winning the government in 2002, former Prime Minister Perry Christier emoved Mr Turnquest from t his department in 2005 and transferred him to the office of the Prime Minister. H owever, upon Mr Ingraham’s return to government in2 007, Mr Turnquest was r eturned to head Lands and S urveys. Attempts to reach the Minister of Lands Byran Woodside f or comment on the matter were unsuccessful up to press time last night. erty in Eleuthera, he was concerned whether they would be willing to invest the additional $75 million required to bring Emerald Bayup to par. “I question their willingness to do this because it seems as if they are unwilling to do the same on their property at Cape Eleuthera. The reality is if they do not invest the money to correct the flaws in the entrance to the marina, build a marina village, complete some road diversions, and put the utilities underground at the golf course they will not have the atmosphere of an upscale resort,” he said. Mr Smith hoped that if the property incorporates a marina village, the franchises at the marina will be offered to residents of Exuma. “But it will be a sad day if Four Seasons has to leave Exuma,” he said. A s revealed by previous reports in T ribune Business , Mitsui has been rather flexible on the purchase price of the property, coming down from its initial $125-$130 million target to as low as $35 million. The Japanese insurer is said to be thoroughly sick of the entire sit uation, and wants to get out as quickly as possible, after the resort was put into receivership in mid-June of 2007. than a friendship” with Mr Ferguson’s sister. While some called his departure a shock, which reverberated throughout the legal community, Mr Levine said he saw it as a forseeable development. "The judge had been openly stating that a committee had been formed for his removal and he would probably resign before he was ousted," he said. Justice Lyons' retirement takes effect on August 1, until then he will take pre-retire ment leave effective from May 11. Now, said Mr Levine, the Judicial and Legal Service Commission already faced with the task of appointing additional judges, has the daunting task of appointing a suitable judge well-versed in commercial legal matters to replace Justice Lyons. "The Commission knows the problem as well and in the absence of obvious Bahamian lawyers to replace Justice Lyons, they will be struggling with the problem of avoiding this recurring problem of appointing foreign lawyers as judges who would rather be in more lucrative practice more at the Bar," he said. To mitigate this, he suggested the appoint ment of McKinney, Bancroft and Hughes senior partner Brian Moree a name mentioned by various sources within the legal com munity as fit for the post to be appointed to the vacancy. However, he said as noted by Bar Coun cil President Wayne Munroe Mr Moree may not be keen to take the hefty pay cut which comes with the Supreme Court appointment. He suggested that the prime minister make a more attractive offer to Mr Moree that of chief justice a move he believes will solidify confidence of foreign investors in the local judicial system. "Everyone agrees that Mr Moree is the only practitioner at the Bar who has the knowledge and other qualities to undertake the role of commercial judge. He has also the reputation for hard work that Justice Lyons had. His apparent qualifications exceed those of any other existing Supreme Court justice as the replacement commercial judge. "Of course the offer of a judgeship to the senior partner of a large Bahamian law firm creates difficulties of its own. Mr Moree has the reputation of bringing in the lion’s share of the profit costs of the firm and the offer might therefore well be refused on that ground alone." "An alternative open to the prime minister after consultation with the leader of the Opposition is to offer to Mr Moree the office of chief justice of the Bahamas. Mr Moree might find such an offer an honour not capable of refusal. . .there are many who would say that both amongst the Bar and the amongst the members of the Bench there is no one who enjoys a greater reputation for integrity than Mr Moree. "Most significantly, Mr Moree enjoys the confidence of sophisticated foreign investors, banks and corporations and their worldwide network of lawyers and advisers. There is no group amongst whom respect for the Bahamian legal system, including the court system, has suffered a greater decline. Such an appointment would help re-establish the Bahamas as a financial centre which I know is close to the heart of the government as well as Mr Moree," said Mr Levine. He also said that two areas "threatening to destroy the administration of justice in this country" are the widespread belief of corruption among lawyers and the suspicion that polit ical influence sways matters before the bench. "The public believe there are problems with the legal profession generally by which they mean that the lawyers are no longer members of a profession but business men of the worst sort who in substantial numbers cheat their clients and who as a profession will prevent any complaint from the public against any established attorney for the worst offence from making any progress under the Legal Profes sion Act. "There is also a suspicion that the justices lack the independence and the overriding desire to see justice done, particularly if an attorney with political influence is appearing against them. "The irony is that no judge more than Justice Lyons would openly criticize an attorney for his pursuing a case without merit, and no Judge was more efficient in dealing with court busi ness than Justice Lyons, and it was Justice Lyons who openly criticised the attorney gen eral of the day for directing him in how to con duct his court and interfering with his judicial independence. He also claimed that the government by failing to pay the judges the remuneration and pensions to which they were entitled had brought about a Constitutional crisis. "The public’s suspicion about the legal system means today that most members of the public would not pay a lawyer to take a matter to court because they have no faith between the failings and lassitude of the Bar and Bench that there will ever be a trial to give them recompense." Mr Levine noted that while Attorney General Michael Barnett recently announced government's intent to introduce legislation to ensure the independence of the judiciary, the constitution currently allows for this independence. "I am not sure what other legislation is nec essary to ensure to the judiciary that independence, if the judges other than the departed Jus tice Lyons do not already respect the reality of their own independence. "It is as regards these matters Mr Moree as Chief Justice would bring into the equation qualifications that would go a long way to resolving these problems without fanfare and without unnecessary legislation, which might resolve nothing," he said. This appointment would signal the appointment of a "non-political animal" as chief justice "with no real ties or obligations to either political party" said Mr Levine. "In this manner largely by the appointment of a competent and intelligent lawyer as Chief Justice who respects the law and has no need for political patronage, the prime minister can restore the standing of the judiciary, restore the standing of the Bar Association and solve himself two big political problems that his Attorney General with all the proposed legis lation cannot do for him. "The Judiciary would have an effective Chief Justice having the stature to represent the judiciary in standing up to the Mr Michael Barnett or whoever was the Attorney General of the day wrongly to influence the judicial function or discretion of all the judges or any one of them. "It would not be left to the now departed Justice Lyons as it was some years ago to speak out about the political influence being exerted. "The public can be satisfied that Mr Brian Moree does not represent the establishment of the Bar Association whose present conduct is being publicly decried. Only a year or so ago I attended the Bar Association Annual Meeting and surprisingly found Mr Moree present. He had been persuaded to put his name into contention in the election of the President of the Bar Association. I know he had been per suaded to do so out of a sense of duty to try to make the Bar Council adopt a new and respon sible course that would restore credit to the Bar Association. However the incumbent Pres ident was not one of those persuaded that Mr Moree should replace him.” According to Mr Levine the incumbent Bar Association president decided to run again and with the benefit of a large number of proxies was successful in defeating Mr Moree. "The Prime Minister knows that Mr. Barnett is not the person to restore the public confi dence in the standing of the judges or the cred ibility of the lawyers in this country,” said Mr Levine. “Without that respect being restored to the Bench and Bar it is difficult to fight crime. On the other hand if Mr. Moree can be persuaded to accept office he may by his standing and recognized integrity more than anyone else be able to turn things round and restore the expectations of both the lay public in the Bahamas. "I may be wrong about this and it may be too much to expect from Mr Moree. But if I am wrong I can think of no other answer because the decay has gone on for too long. "The alternative is the free fall continuing," said Mr Levine. reportedly victimised by a man identified as Leonid ‘Ned’ Pascual, who is already implicated in previ ous cases of human trafficking and currently included on Cuba’s immigration blacklist, according to the DFA in the Philippines. The two Filipinos were unwittingly taken to Havana where they were shocked to find the promised jobs were nothing more than a fabrication, according to the DFA's press release. "The two unsuspecting victims paid more than P500,000 each to Pascual to bring them to the Bahamas where they were supposed to be employed with a salary of US$5,000 a month. "Upon their arrival in Havana, the victims dis covered that the jobs promised them were nonexistent and found themselves stranded in the Cuban capital," said the DFA. Local foreign affairs officials said while the plight of human trafficking is a global concern, the ministry was not aware of a proliferation of Filipinos being trafficked illegally into this country. "I was not aware that this was an issue for us perhaps Immigration (officials a trend but the ministry of foreign affairs hasn't been made aware of any trend in that regard," said Deputy Permanent Secretary at the Ministry of Foreign Affairs Donna Knowles-Lowe. Attempts to reach Immigration officials for comment yesterday were unsuccessful up to press time. The Philippine embassy in Havana provided the "stranded" Filipinos with food and housing until it could arrange for their return to the Philip pines, according to the statement. Yesterday, the Department of Foreign Affairs in the Philippines urged its citizens to be wary of illicit job recruiters who promise advantageous work opportunities overseas and to confirm these openings to avoid being hoodwinked. According to the website humantrafficking.org, the southeast Asian country is a "source, transit, and destination" point for human trafficking with an estimated number of 300,000 to 400,000 trafficked women and 60,000 to 100,000 trafficked children for labour and sexual exploitation. The website also reported that many Filipino adults voluntarily immigrate to work overseas, but are later "coerced into exploitative conditions." In December, 2008 the Bahamas enacted the Trafficking in Persons (Prevention and Suppres sion) Act to allow for stiff penalties for persons found guilty of human trafficking. Attempts to reach officials at the Philippines' embassy in Havana were unsuccessful up to press time. Lands and Surveys director resigns A S ERIES of articles on the topic have been published in The Tribune FROM page one FROM page one FROM page one Emerald Bay Resort Investment bank denies unfairness allegations Philippines war ns of Filipinos being illegally traf ficked in the Bahamas, Caribbean Appointment of Justice Lyons ‘may have been a mistake’ FROM page one

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n By CHESTER ROBARDS Business Reporter crobards@tribunemedia.net BAHAMASAIR’s managing d irector yesterday said the national flag carrier has undertakenn umerous cost-saving measures, including one that could save the n ational flag carrier almost $1.4 million this year. Henry Woods told Tribune Business that Bahamasair had received approval to overhault hree of its Dash-8 airplanes locally at the Lynden Pindling Intern ational Airport (LPIA He explained that previously the airplanes were sent to Canada for renovations, where they would have had to undergo i nspections priced at $450,000 each upon completion. H owever, the Government had Company’s fury over Albany contract loss n By CHESTER ROBARDS Business Reporter crobards@tribunemedia.net A Bahamas-based cabinet maker yesterday reacted with fury after his company lost a kitchen-fitting contract by the $1.4 billion Albany project, after being paid a $15,000 retainer, in favour of a competitor that opened its showroom in New Providence only last week. Mark Moyle told Tribune Business that his company, Craftman’s Kitchen Ltd, was given a monetary retainer fee by Albany two y ears ago to design and install kitchens for the development’s townhouses. H owever, last week he was informed that Albany had opted to go with Canada-based Downsview Kitchens instead, and said it was strange for the project to make such a brisk reversal of its previous decision. M r Moyle claimed that D ownsview’s design consultant, Gary Stannis, had been operating in the Bahamas without proper documentation for almost 10 years. “For years, Gary would fly in as a tourist, place magnetic ‘Downsview’ signs on a rental car and cruise around like he owned the place,” Mr Moyle told Tribune Business. “Construction consultants would literally, overnight, stop accepting bids from any local cabinet sources.” Mr Stannis, though, yesterday denied Mr Moyle’s claims and said he had complied with all Bahamian laws. He told Tribune Business that h e had applied for several work permits that were being blocked b y Mr Moyle’s objections to the Department of Immigration. He s aid he was even turned away at Lynden Pindling International Airport (LPIA ing to enter the Bahamas. Mr Stannis said he has visited the Bahamas many times to speak t o potential clients, who eventu a lly make the trip to Downsview’s F lorida showroom, where they purchase their kitchens. Mr Moyle, though, said he was baffled as to why Albany would c onsider a product 40 per cent more costly than his own. B ut Albany’s managing partner, Chris Anand, said they simply went with a slightly more superior product. He said the project’s investors, The Tavistock Group, Tiger Woods and Ernie Els, were investing hundreds of millions of dollars in the project, and decided to go with a distributor “that gives us a lot of confidencee”. Mr Moyle was allowed to keep t he retainer fee he was paid to produce drawings and design w ork. “That’s relatively unheard of,” said Mr Anand. M r Stannis said it was not uncommon for a large project such as Albany to change contractors, even after paying a retainer, which he thought to be around $15,000. “It has happened t o Downsview, too,” he said. “We l ose jobs.” M r Stannis said Albany will be purchasing all of its kitchens directly through Downsview’s Bahamian partner, Caribbean C onstruction and Management Services (CCMS M oyle, who was a distributor for n By NEIL HARTNELL Tribune Business Editor THE Bahamian Contractors Association’s (BCA yesterday said “huge catastrophic problems” would arise for the construction industry if it lost its home-grown aggregate materials supply through Bahama Rock’s departure, with cost increases impacting the economy’s com petitiveness. Stephen Wrinkle, who runs his own construction business, Wrinkle Development, said it was “critical” for the industry and Bahamian policymakers to determine the long-term solution for aggregate supply, given that Bahama Rock which supplied almost 100 per cent of the sector’s current needs was eventually likely to leave Grand Bahama. That, Mr Wrinkle explained, would force the construction industry to either stockpile huge amounts of aggregate or import it from the US and other Caribbean countries. Not only would this increase the outflow of US dollars and foreign currency, impacting the Bahamas’ external reserves, but it would give the likes of Jamaica, Cuba and the Dominican Repub lic the Bahamas’ major tourism competitors, who all have their own aggregate material supplies a competitive cost advantage when it came to attract foreign real estate developers. The Environmental Impact Assessment (EIA the proposed area 4 Freeport Harbour expansion warned that if the project did not go ahead, there would likely be a 300 per cent increase in aggregate mater ial prices, which would raise Bahamian construction industry costs by $15 million per annum. Mr Wrinkle said that while he could not comment on the fig ures, as he was not up to date with international aggregate prices, he recalled that his company imported large quantities from Jamaica when it was work ing on a Family Island project and C M Y K C M Y K SECTIONB business@tribunemedia.net WEDNESDAY, MAY 13, 2009 THETRIBUNE $4. 68 $4. 51 $4. 69The information contained is from a third party and The Tribune can not be held responsible for errors and/or omission from the daily report.$4.29 $4.29 $4.29The information contained is from a third party and The Tribune can not be held responsible for errors and/or omission from the daily report. $3.53 $3.62 $3.48 Bahama Rock aggregate loss ‘catastrophic’ * Contractors head says loss of local supply would impact costs, supply chain continuity and convenience for Bahamian construction industry * Bahamas’ ability to attract foreign direct investment would also be impaired if no domestically-produced aggregate available S S E E E E p p a a g g e e 2 2 B B n B y NEIL HARTNELL Tribune Business Editor THE Water & Sewerage Corp oration “expects to continue to be significantly in arrears on its payments” to BISX-listed Consolidated Water throughout 2009, it was revealed yesterday, despite h aving already paid down $4.35 million on its $9.5 million a ccounts receivables balance. Consolidated Water’s 10-Q s tatement, filed with the Securities & Exchange Commission (SEC quarter results, further highlighted the continuing financial weak ness of the Water & Sewerage Corporation, as the sums owed f or reverse osmosis water sup plied by the BISX-listed entityh ad further ballooned by $1.4 mil lion since year-end 2008. A nd while a further $4.35 mil lion payment was expected from the Water & Sewerage Corporation before June 30, 2009, in addition to the $4.35 million payment already received, the likelihood of a continuing accounts receivables issue shows that the extra $11 million allocated to it in the 2 008-2009 Mid-Term Budget is still not enough to cover the Corp oration’s cash flow issues. Meanwhile, Consolidated W ater said it had settled for $480,000 with Gruppozecca Bahamas over a legal action in the Bahamian Supreme Court relating to a dispute over the con struction of the former’s Blue Hills reverse osmosis plant. G ruppozecca Bahamas had sought $950,000 damages over ana lleged breach of obligations by Consolidated Water. But the a ction was settled out of court on April 2, 2009, with all claims set tled in exchange for “a final progress payment under the construction agreement” between thep arties. Consolidated Water, in its 10Q , said that the Water & Sewerage Corporation’s delay in paying bills had increased the accounts r eceivables balance for its Bahamian subsidiary by a further $ 1.4 million to $9.5 million since year-end 2008. T he company added: “Since early 2008, Consolidated WaterBahamas has experienced significant delays in the receipt of pay ments on its outstanding accounts receivable from the Water and Sewerage Corporation of the B ahamas. “As of March 31, 2009, Con s olidated Water-Bahamas was due approximately $9.5 million f rom the Water and Sewerage Corporation. During April 2009, Water and Sewerage Corporation paid $4.35 million on these receivables. We have met with representatives of the Water and Sewera ge Corporation and Bahamas government (most recently on May 1, 2009) to inquire as to the r easons for the delinquency in their accounts receivables paym ents. We have been informed by these government representat ives that the Water and Sewerage Corporation’s payment delin quencies are due to operating issues within the Water and Sew erage Corporation; that such delinquencies do not reflect any type of dispute with Consolidated W ater-Bahamas with respect to the amounts owed; and thea mounts will ultimately be paid in full.” C onsolidated Water said: “We have been informed by these rep resentatives that another payment from the Water and Sewerage Corporation of $4.35 million willb e forthcoming prior to June 30, W ater Corp’ s ‘major ar r ear s’ f or whole y ear * Accounts payables woes to BISX-listed Consolidated Water to run for whole year, d espite $4.35m payment in April and another $4.35m due before June * Consolidated Water settles $950,000 legal action with $480,000 payment out-of-court S S E E E E p p a a g g e e 2 2 B B S S E E E E p p a a g g e e 2 2 B B S S E E E E p p a a g g e e 2 2 B B n B y NEIL HARTNELL Tribune Business Editor BISX-listed Consolidated Water yesterday said 2009 first quarter g ross margins had increased from 15 per cent to 22 per cent for its bulk water segment due to “improved energy and other operational effi ciencies” at its two New Providence-based reverse osmosis plants, a trend expected to continue for the remainder of 2009. David Sasnett, Consolidated Water’s chief financial officer, told W all Street analysts during a conference call that the Windsor plant’s feed water system had been improved to “eliminate ongoing chronic f ouling problems” that had impacted the profitability and margins of its Bahamian assets. W ith that work now completed, Consolidated Water was set to enjoy lower maintenance costs and “better energy efficiencies”, Mr Sasnett added. He said the company was also likely to experience further energy efficiencies, “although not to the same e xtent”, with the replacement of Bahamas plant improvements boost company margins by 7% A A i i r r c c r r a a f f t t o o v v e e r r h h a a u u l l s s t t o o s s a a v v e e B B a a h h a a m m a a s s a a i i r r $ $ 1 1 . . 4 4 m m p p e e r r a a n n n n u u m m A BAHAMASAIR aircraft can be seen in this file photo... S S E E E E p p a a g g e e 3 3 B B Chris Anand * Airline passes IA T A and FAA inspections with ‘flying colours’ * Only five inconsistencies u ncovered by FAA that are now corrected * Only 41 of 2,300 IATA checklist items an issue, and all now in compliance

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pursued the approvals necessary to have Bahamian technicians completely overhaul the planes. “Bahamians are getting the m oney, and local technicians are getting the experience,” said Mr Woods. Bahamasair’s Dash-8 savings c ome as the national airline received exemplary operational performance marks from the Federal Aviation Administration (FAAT ransport Association (IATA Mr Woods said Bahamasair underwent two extensive backto-back audits with the two o rganisations, passing both with “flying colours”. In December, IATA audited Bahamasair using a 2,300 item c hecklist, of which only 41 items were found to be inconsistent w ith standard regulations. None were safety-related. M r Woods said those inconsistencies have since been corrected, and the airline is preparing to turn those corrections over to IATA. Bahamasair underwent a second audit in January 2009 by theF AA. According to Mr Woods, a five-man team of US auditors scrutinised Bahamasair’s operat ional and technical departments for one week, after which the airline was given a “clean bill of health”. A udit He said there only five inconsistencies discovered by the audit, w hich the airline corrected within 30 days. “Their initial feedback was that they were most pleased with B ahamasair,” said Mr Woods said of the FAA and IATA. H e said the travelling public has developed high expectations o f Bahamasair, more so than ever before, and that in some regards they are far ahead of other airlines that operate out of LPIA in terms of operational performance. The proof is in the pudding,” said Mr Woods. “Our daily operations have much improved, and recently we have been receiving m uch positive comments.” He said the Bahamasair staff were somewhat uplifted because of the changes in the company and are “highly motivated”. M r Woods said one of the biggest challenges for the airline was still the cost of fuel. He said Bahamasair was engaged in a ggressive fuel management projects in order to further increase the airline’s bottom line. “The present management t eam is taking a lot of initiative in the cost management area and k eeping the money in the country. Bahamasair’s bottom line is looking a bit better,” he said. 2009. Based upon these communications, we believe that the accounts receivable from the Water and Sewerage Corporationa re fully collectible and therefore have not provided any allowance f or possible non-payment of these receivables as of March 31, 2009. “However, we have been informed by these representatives that the Water and Sewerage C orporation expects to continue to be significantly in arrears oni ts payments to Consolidated Water-Bahamas for the remain d er of 2009.” And the BISX-listed company warned: “Consolidated WaterBahamas derives substantially all of its revenues from its contract w ith the Water and Sewerage Corporation, and is dependentu pon timely collection of its accounts receivable to fund its o perations. “If the Water and Sewerage Corporation does not improve the timeliness and/or increase the amounts of its payments to Cons olidated Water-Bahamas, this subsidiary may not have sufficient liquidity to adequately fund its operations. If this occurs, Consolidated Water-Bahamas may ber equired to decrease the amount of water it supplies the Water and S ewerage Corporation to the minimum required amount under the contract or, if liquidity problems become too severe, cease its production of water altogether.” T he Water & Sewerage Corporation’s financial difficultiesw ill come as a surprise to no one, given that it has surpassed B ahamasair in becoming the pub lic sector agency that is the largest drain on the Public Treasury and Bahamian taxpayer to the tune of $30 million this Budget year. A part from consumer prices failing to rise in line with infla t ion and cover water production costs, the Water & Sewerage Cor p oration is also plagued by inefficiency, poor service, low quality water (especially in eastern New Providence), losses from its distribution system that run as high a s 50 per cent of water produced; and the fact that only 30 per cent o f New Providence residences and businesses use its services, the rest preferring private wells. P henton Neymour, minister of state for the environment, in his mid-term Budget address, said the Corporation’s cost of water purchases now equalled 57 perc ent of revenues, compared to just 19 per cent in 2004, as a result o f increasing reliance on reverse osmosis suppliers such as Consolidated Water. Mr Neymour said that in 2004, the Water & Sewerage Corporat ion’s revenues were $31 million, and reverse osmosis purchases $6m illion. But between then and 2008, while water sales increased b y a collective $22.7 million, water purchase costs increased over the same period by $41.5 million. The Inter-American Developm ent Bank (IDB proposing a $300,000 project to t ackle water resources manage ment and economic regulation of t he sector in the Bahamas, said the “likelihood of backtracking” by the Government on the need for an independent water sector regulator was “low, given the l arge annual subsidies that the Government currently provides t o the Water & Sewerage Corpo ration. C M Y K C M Y K BUSINESS PAGE 2B, WEDNESDAY, MAY 13, 2009 THE TRIBUNE 5 2wk-Hi52wk-LowSecurit y P revious CloseToday's CloseChangeDaily Vol.EPS $Div $P/EYield 1.951.28Abaco Markets1.401.400.000.1270.00011.00.00% 1 1.8011.00Bahamas Property Fund11.0011.000.000.9920.20011.11.82% 9.686.95Bank of Bahamas6.956.950.000.2440.26028.53.74% 0.900.63Benchmark0.630.630.00-0.8770.000N/M0.00% 3.743.15Bahamas Waste3.153.150.000.0780.09040.42.86% 2.601.95Fidelity Bank2.372.370.000.0550.04043.11.69% 1 4.1511.09Cable Bahamas11.7511.750.001.4060.2508.42.13% 3.142.83Colina Holdings2.832.830.000.2490.04011.41.41% 7.446.17Commonwealth Bank (S16.176.170.000.4190.05014.70.81% 3.381.31Consolidated Water BDRs2.503.380.880.1110.05230.51.54% 3.001.70Doctor's Hospital1.851.70-0.151,5000.2400.0807.14.71% 8 .106.02Famguard7.767.760.000.4200.30018.53.87% 12.5011.00Finco11.0011.000.000.3220.67034.26.09% 14.6610.35FirstCaribbean Bank10.4010.400.000.7940.40013.13.85% 5.555.00Focol (S5.145.140.000.3320.15015.52.92% 1.001.00Focol Class B Preference1.001.000.000.0000.000N/M0.00% 0.500.30Freeport Concrete0.300.300.000.0350.0008.60.00% 8.205.50ICD Utilities5.595.590.000.4070.50013.78.94% 12.508.60J. S. Johnson10.5010.500.000.9520.64011.06.10% 10.0010.00Premier Real Estate10.0010.000.000.1800.00055.60.00% 52wk-Hi52wk-LowSecuritySymbolLast SaleChangeDaily Vol. 1000.001000.00Fidelity Bank Note 17 (Series AFBB17100.000.00 1000.001000.00Fidelity Bank Note 22 (Series BFBB22100.000.00 1000.001000.00Fidelity Bank Note 13 (Series CFBB13100.000.008 1000.001000.00Fidelity Bank Note 15 (Series DFBB15100.000.00 52wk-Hi52wk-LowSymbolBid $ A sk $Last PriceWeekly Vol.EPS $Div $P/EYield 14.6014.25Bahamas Supermarkets7.928.4214.60-0.0410.300N/M2.05% 8.006.00Caribbean Crossings (Pref4.006.256.000.0000.480N/M7.80% 0.540.20RND Holdings0.350.400.350.0010.000256.60.00% 41.0029.00ABDAB30.1331.5929.004.5400.0009.030.00% 0.550.40RND Holdings0.450.550.550.0020.000261.900.00% 52wk-Hi52wk-LowFund NameNA V YTD%Last 12 MonthsDiv $Yield % 1.36641.3041Colina Bond Fund1.36640.954.77 3.03512.9230Colina MSI Preferred Fund2.8962-1.49-3.35 1.45901.3883Colina Money Market Fund1.45901.775.09 3.69603.1964Fidelity Bahamas G & I Fund3.1964-5.59-13.64 12.739712.1564Fidelity Prime Income Fund12.73970.965.79 100.5606100.0000CFAL Global Bond Fund100.56060.560.56 100.000096.4070CFAL Global Equity Fund96.4070-3.59-3.59 1.00001.0000CFAL High Grade Bond Fund1.00000.000.00 10.50009.0950Fidelity International Investment Fund9.15990.71-12.76 1.04401.0000FG Financial Preferred Income Fund1.04400.804.40 1.03641.0000FG Financial Growth Fund1.03640.333.64 1.04521.0000FG Financial Diversified Fund1.04520.764.40 BISX ALL SHARE INDEX 19 Dec 02 = 1,000.00YIELD last 12 month dividends divided by closing price 52wk-Hi Highest closing price in last 52 weeksBid $ Buying price of Colina and Fidelity 52wk-Low Lowest closing price in last 52 weeksAsk $ Selling price of Colina and fidelity Previous Close Previous day's weighted price for daily volumeLast Price Last traded over-the-counter price Today's Close Current day's weighted price for daily volumeWeekly Vol. Trading volume of the prior week Change Change in closing price from day to dayEPS $ A company's reported earnings per share for the last 12 mths Daily Vol. Number of total shares traded todayNAV Net Asset Value DIV $ Dividends per share paid in the last 12 monthsN/M Not Meaningful P/E Closing price divided by the last 12 month earningsFINDEX The Fidelity Bahamas Stock Index. January 1, 1994 = 100 (S (S1T T O O T T R R A A D D E E C C A A L L L L : : C C O O L L I I N N A A 2 24 4 2 2 5 5 0 0 2 2 7 70 0 1 1 0 0 | | R R O O Y Y A A L LF F I I D D E E L LI I T T Y Y 2 24 4 2 23 35 5 6 6 7 7 7 7 6 6 4 4 | | F FG G C C A A P P I I T T A A L L M M A A R R K KE E T T S S 2 2 4 4 2 23 3 9 9 6 64 40 0 0 00 0 | | C C O O L L O ON N I I A A L L 2 24 4 2 2 -5 50 02 2 7 7 5 5 2 2 5 5FINDEX: CLOSE 797.33 | YTD -4.50% | 2008 -12.31%BISX LISTED & TRADED SECURITIES AS OF: Fidelity Over-The-Counter Securities Colina Over-The-Counter Securities BISX Listed Mutual Funds MARKET TERMSTUESDAY, 12 MAY 2009B ISX ALL SHARE INDEX: CLOSE 1,613.91 | CHG 0.15 | %CHG 0.01 | YTD -98.45 | YTD % -5.75BISX LISTED DEBT SECURITIES (Bonds trade on a Percentage Pricing basesPrime + 1.75% Maturity 19 October 2017 19 October 2022 30 May 2013 29 May 2015 Interest 7% Prime + 1.75% 7% 28-Feb-09 31-Dec-08 31-Dec-07 31-Mar-09 9-Feb-09 9-Feb-09 W W W WW W . .B B I I S S X X B B A A H H A A M M A A S S . .C C O O M M | | T T E E L L E E P P H HO ON N E E : :2 2 4 4 2 2 -3 32 2 3 3 -2 23 3 3 3 0 0 | | F F A A C C S S I I M M I I L L E E : : 2 2 4 42 2 -3 3 2 2 3 3 -2 23 3 2 2 0 0NAV Date 31-Mar-09 1-May-09 31-Mar-09 28-Feb-09 31-Dec-08 9-Feb-09 Bahama Rock aggregate loss ‘catastrophic’ found the price “comparable” to B ahama Rock’s. “But there’s no substitute for home-produced aggregate,” Mr Wrinkle said. “It’s always available, in stock and the price is fairly consistent. “We can pay in Bahamian dollars. There are substantial conve niences to the industry of having it [Bahama Rock’s aggregate plant] here. It keeps the dollars here, and that’s important.” The EIA had warned that a failure to approve the project would remove a “no cost” har bour construction operation, and also lead to Bahama Rock’s ear lier departure from the Bahamas a development that could cost Freeport’s economy $64.168 mil lion in the nine years to 2018. If the Freeport Harbour area 4 expansion was approved, Bahama Rock was “expected to extend operations” until at least 2018, thus maintaining its position as “the largest supplier of construction grade aggregate in the Bahamas”. And the report added: “An important long-term government policy question will be raised sooner rather than later if Bahama Rock reduces aggregate supply. “Bahama Rock supplies New Providence, through an agreement with a Nassau-based con tractor, with 100 per cent of all coarse aggregate needs. Taking a long-term viewpoint, the Bahama Rock operation is finite, and once the harbour expansion ceases, Bahama Rock will depart. “The future availability of a domestic supply of aggregate, or conversely, importation, is an issue needing further evaluation by policymakers and those in the construction industry.” Backing those conclusions, Mr Wrinkle said both the Bahamian construction industry and the Government needed to look at aggregate supply “with a longterm view”. “This could potentially take a natural resource, like rock, out of the system. It’s going to burden t he contractors, the suppliers and the block makers everyone in the system,” the BCA president said. “I think it’s very important for us. It’s essential to maintain continuity of the aggregate supply chain. Otherwise, we’d have to stockpile a tremendous amount of aggregate, and the costs are going to up. That will be a nation al concern of disruption to the construction industry supply chain.” He added: “You’re talking about stockpiling huge amounts of aggregate and importing from elsewhere Jamaica, Cuba, the Dominican Republic. The logis tics to do that are very expensive and complicated. It’s the cost, the continuity and the convenience of local supply the three critical factors. “They’ve [Bahama Rock] been providing such a solid product for so long a time that it’s been taken for granted. This is a wake-up call.” Any impact for the Bahamian construction industry from a Bahama Rock pull-out will reverberate among foreign direct investment projects and real estate developers. “There are the logistics of carrying out the project,” Mr Wrin kle told Tribune Business. Every time you take an integral component of a successful project out of the picture, you take one chance of success away.” He explained that domesticallyproduced, lower cost building materials and aggregate “lends a certain amount of advantage” to those nations who had this fea ture. The Bahamas was already competing against the likes of Cuba, Jamaica and the Dominican Republic for tourism-related foreign direct investment, and all had this quality, whereas this nation would not if it lost Bahama Rock. Bahamian ready-mix concrete suppliers, too, were also reliant on Bahama Rock supplies for their product. F F R R O O M M p p a a g g e e 1 1 B B Water Corp’s ‘major arrears’ for whole year F F R R O O M M p p a a g g e e 1 1 B B F F R R O O M M p p a a g g e e 1 1 B B Aircraft overhauls to save Bahamasair $1.4m per annum Company’s fury over Albany contract loss Crystal Cabinets, is just a middleman. Mr Moyle, though, claimed that Mr Stannis had sought to elude the attention of the Customs and Immigration departments by consigning kitchen shipments to his client’s names and not Downsview. However, Mr Stannis said the kitchens, which are manufactured in Toronto, Canada, are shipped to Downsview’s location in Florida, and the purchasers are then responsible for shipment to the final destination. He said that even though Downsview now has a showroom in the Bahamas, he will visit on occasions as he always has. People will come to the States to buy the kitchen,” he said. F F R R O O M M p p a a g g e e 1 1 B B

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t he reverse osmosis membranes o n two of Windsor’s four production trains. That work was set t o be completed in the 2009 second quarter. T urning to the Blue Hills, reverse osmosis plant, Mr Sasnetts aid Consolidated Water had upgraded its diesel engine cooling system, reducing energy consumption and “operating cost reductions starting in the 2009 s econd quarter”. The Consolidated Water execu tive added that the improve ments to the Bahamian reverse o smosis plants should result in “consistently higher margins” for i ts Nassau-based and overall bulk water segment in 2009, compared to the prior year. “I can’t say it will be exactly 2 2 per cent, but we believe that with recent investments in the B ahamas at both the Windsor and Blue Hills plants, we should see consistently higher margins than last year. But the proof will be in the pudding,” Mr Sasnetts aid. Consolidated Water saw gross p rofits for its bulk water segment, in dollar terms, increase by 38 per cent during the 2009 first quarter to $1.42 million, compared to $1.028 million the year before. F or the three months to March 31, 2009, the company’s neti ncome available to common shareholders increased by 52 per c ent to $2.55 million or $0.18 per diluted share, compared to $1.674 million or $0.12 per diluted share in the same period during 2008. “Our 52 per cent increase in n et income attributable to common shareholders in the first q uarter of 2009 was driven pri marily by improvements in gross p rofit margins," said Rick McTaggart, Consolidated Water’s chief executive said. "In particular, gross margins in our bulk water segment expandeds ignificantly, from 15 per cent of revenues in last year's first quar-t er to 22 per cent in the most recent quarter, primarily due to efficiency improvements in our B ahamas operations. “These improvements were the r esult of capital projects that we completed at the Windsor plant last October, and we expect to improve efficiencies further when we complete the replacement ofr everse osmosis membranes on the last two production units att he Windsor plant during the sec ond quarter of 2009." THE Bahamian tourism and h otel industries will receive a w elcome boost when 200 attor n eys converge on Nassau for the I nter-American Bar Association ( IABA) Conference at the Wyndham Crystal Palace Resort from June 30 to July 4, 2009. T he conference will cover m ajor hemispheric, regional and l ocal issues under the theme: T he World Financial Crisis: W hat Does the Future Hold? Chairman of the organizing committee for the IABA XLV Conference is Dr Peter May nard of the Bahamas Bar Association. He said that given the present state of the global economy, the conference is both timely and topical. “The IABA conference provides a unique opportunity for trading information and views with the preeminent lawyers and luminaries of the hemisphere from Canada to Argentina and almost every country in betweenand elsewhere, on an excep t ional range of key issues,” Dr Maynards said. “Theseextendf rom our future as a financial c entre to our prospects as an a rbitration and maritime centre, from Madoff to CLICO, from domestic violence to the death penalty, from independence of the judiciary to the C aribbean Court of Justice, and many other issues.” Dr Maynard said the BahamianHostCommittee specifically asked for the conference to be open to the general public a ndto be affordable. This is a chance that every o ne should take advantage of,” h e said. “You do not have to go a broad for a first class confer ence on matters that affect you. You will have it right here. The c ommunity has responded t hrough generous sponsorship. W e are also confident that our v isitors for the event will be i mpressed by the extraordinary hospitality and warmth of the Bahamian people.” The (IABA ence is the largest conference ever to be co-sponsored by the Bahamas Bar. It has also attracted the co-sponsorship of the Organisation of Commonwealth Caribbean Bar Associations. The Bahamas Financial Services Board (BFSB a silver sponsor of the IABA XVL Conference. Its chief executive and executive director, Wendy Warren, said: “We believe that conferences of this nature hold sig n ificant latent opportunity that can be extracted through thes upport – both through spons orship and registration – of the B ahamian private sector.” The Washington-based IABA, founded on May 16, 1940, represents a permanent forum for the exchange of prof essional views and information for lawyers to promote the rule of law and protect the democratic institutions in the Americas. C M Y K C M Y K BUSINESS THE TRIBUNE WEDNESDAY, MAY 13, 2009, PAGE 3B Legal NoticeNOTICENOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN as follows:MAY 13, 2009 LAKEISHA COLLIE LIQUIDATOR OFTHE ABOVE-NAMED COMPANYBLACKHORSE FUND LIMITED is in dissolution under the provisions of the International Business Companies Act 2000. The Dissolution of said Company commenced on May 12, 2009 when its Articles of Dissolution were submitted and registered by the Registrar General. The Liquidator of the said company is Lakeisha Collie of 2nd Terrace West, Centreville, Nassau, Bahamas. All persons having Claims against the above-named Company are required on or before the 10th day of June, 2009 to send their names and addresses and particulars of their debts or claims to the Liquidator of the company or, in default thereof, they may be excluded from the benet of any distribution made before such debts are proved.(a (b (c (d &20021:($/ , 1 7+( 6835(0(&2857& RPPRQ/DZDQG(TXLW\'LYLVLRQ , 1 7+( 0$77(5$//7+$7 SLHFH SDUFHORU ORWRIODQGFRQWDLQLQJ7KUHHWKRXVDQGDQG)LIW\VL[ VTXDUHIHHWVLWXDWHLQWKH6HWWOHPHQWRI*UHDW * XDQD&D\RQHRIWKH$EDFRFKDLQRIFD\VLQWKH &RPPRQZHDOWKRI7KH%DKDPDVERXQGHGRQWKH 1 RUWKODQGQRZRUIRUPHUO\WKHSURSHUW\RI/HZLV 5 REHUWVDQGUXQQLQJWKHUHRQ6L[W\IHHWRQWKH (DVWODQGWKHSURSHUW\RI$OUREKRPDV5REHUWVf E XWQRZWKHSURSHUW\RI:LOOLDP'R\OH:DWVRQDQG ) UHGHULN)*RWWOLHEUXQQLQJWKHUHRQDQG 1LQHW\WKUHHKXQGUHGWKVIHHWRQWKH6RXWK WKH0DLQ3XEOLF5RDGNQRZQDV)URQW6WUHHWfDQGU XQQLQJWKHUHRQ6HYHQW\IHHWRUOHVVDQGRQWKH :HVW7KUHHIHHWZLGHSXEOLFUHVHUYDWLRQDQG UXQQLQJWKHUHRQL[W\fIHHW $1' ,1+($77(5)+(,(7,1*,7/(6$&7 $787(/$ 7+(&20021:($/7+)+(%$+$0$6 $1' ,1+($77(5)+((7,7,21):,//,$0 '2
PAGE 16

n B y LLOYD ALLEN Tribune Features Reporter l allen@tribunemedia.net WITH the first annual Paradise P lates fast approaching, there r emains much anticipation regarding the fine gourmet foods and treats, wine, and live entertain ment all expected to decorate the anti-hunger charity event. Continuing with our weekly feature of some of the chefs slated to display their talents during the event, this week we introduce you to Freddy Van Breugel of Van Breugel’s restaurant and Bar on Charlotte Street, along with British Colonial Hilton Executive Chefs Kabuti Lockhart and Peter Major, and Pia Farmer from the Mendosa wine company. The newly opened Van Breugel’s is located in the heart of downtown, and according to its owner is the perfect lunch or hap py hour spot for busy professionals of that district. “Apart from the appeal to many professionals, the building is one of the old historical buildings of the Bahamas, and is more than 225-years-old and is the old Malone house,” he said. Apart from the great atmosphere, Mr Van Breugel said his vast knowledge in experiencing many cultures throughout the globe has added to the diversity at his restaurant. Born in Holland, he said he received most of his education in Belgium, then worked in Spain, the US, and then the Bahamas, where he owned a number of restaurants and various businesses. Mr Van Breugel said there are several food choices available at his restaurant including burgers, red and white meats, salads, fresh Mahi-Mahi, salmon, tuna, and a fantastic list of side orders. During the Paradise Plates event, Mr Van Breugel said he will be providing Tuna Tartare a type of sushi role made with tuna, soy-wasabi, and several herbs. This mini dish which goes well with most wines, Mr Van Breugel explained will probably excite several tastes buds with an ultimate sense of freshness. Mr Van Breugel said being a mentor to more than a dozen underprivileged children throughout the community, this cause is very dear to him, and he hopes in the future to continue to be involved in similar initiatives. Over at the Hilton Hotel, chefs Lockhart and Major explain that on the night of the event, guest can expect an “Island Snow Fantasy” as they will attempt to mesmorize them through their soursop inspired ice cream. Chef Lockhart explained: “We have several dishes compiled around soursop ice cream, then we will infuse that with a number of sauces and ingredients including the guava sauce, peanut brittle, coconut cream toplets, raspberry sauce, all served in a martini glass. “It’s going to be very smooth, and the different flavors are really going to play with your taste buds,” he said. With both of these chefs having had a love for food their entire lives, this charity is important to them and they are simply excited to do their part in assisting those throughout the community in need of food. Chef Lockhart expressed: “This is our opportunity to con tribute back to the community, and far so often I turn on the TV to see many people starving abroad, but there are those locally that are hungry and go days without a healthy meal. “That’s in our power and con trol, so it’s good when you could help with giving something to someone that really needs it, and me along with my staff are ready to do our part in this endeavor,” he said. All proceeds from the event are slated for Hands for Hunger and its food rescue programmes. Last but not least is Pia Farmer, the proprietor of Mendoza Imports. She brings in wines from western Argentina, an area known as one of the best wine areas of the world. Mrs Farmers said for the past three years, she has imported the exclusive brand Noble and will be serving a 2006 label during the Hands for Hunger event. She explained: “One of which will be the chardonnay, and the other is going to be the Malbec(Red known variety from Argentina. “It’s my pleasure to support this fabulous fund raising idea, also the whole concept of Hands for Hunger.” Mrs Farmer explained that over the years while she had the opportunity to work within the hotel sector, she witnessed on several occasion good food going to waste, while many homeless and less fortunate persons are in constant need of a good meal. She said for a long time she had searched for the perfect connec tion to bring together available food and the people who were hungry and needing it, and said that she is happy to know that Hands for Hunger has been suc cessful in bridging that gap. Focusing on the charity event slated for later this month, Mrs Farmer explained that supporters can expect an Argentinean specific flavor, but added that it has a taste reminiscent of wines from places like France, Italy, and most parts of Europe because of their close relations. “Argentinean wines tend to be particularly red ones, full bodied, full flavoured, best suited to have with meat or roasted or barbecued foods. “It’s not a weakling, and the one that will be served is a 2006 Malbec, which happens to be very nice and fruity, and besides 2006 was a very good year in Argentina for wines that are made for opening and drinking,” she said. C M Y K C M Y K TASTE PAGE 8B, WEDNESDAY, MAY 13, 2009 THE TRIBUNE T h e T r i b u n e Chefs providing hands for hunger! NATIVE WAY A cut above the rest n By LLOYD ALLEN T ribune Features Reporter lallen@tribunemedia.net TUCKED away amidst the dozens of local restaurants at the fish fry, is o ne that has risen above the rest in offering the same dishes, in a totally unique way. Native Way restaurant, located at the eastern end of Arawak Cay, is now under new management, and has made the grade in spicing up their menu, while staying true to giving customers an all Bahamian experience. During a recent review of the restaurant, Tribune Taste was pleasantly surprised by the array of beverages and dishes available, with the first being its unique preparation of mojitos, made like none other. According to manager and co-owner Shelly Lockhart-Smith, in addition to the regular ingredients of white rum, sugar, lime, carbonated water and pureed mint leaves, the beverage is frozen and then served in a daiquiri form, a presentation and flavour that not only ups the ante when itc omes to mojitos, but one that is sure to keep their guest coming back for more. In addition the mojito, the restaurant also has another signature drinkthe Over The Rainbow or Sumi Sucka, a mix of several Bacardi rums blended to have the appearance of fruit punch. The drink has a hint of sweetness, but be warned, b ecause after having about two rounds, you can c ount driving yourself home good-bye. Native Way also offers the traditional homemade switcher, a Bahamian style lemonade made with freshly picked limes, with just the right amount of sugar, and added pulp for an extra zing. Apart from the various beverages, the restaurant offers an all original cast of appetizers, preparedj ust right for that customer looking for the perfect treat. Instead of offering regular conch fritters, the restaurant offers seafood fritters made with plenty of conch, lobster, shrimp, and coconut. Of course many may wonder why the coconut, but trust me, it adds an entirely new dimension to fritter. The restaurant also specialises in a diverse menu including fried, steamed, and sauted lobster, conch, grouper, snapper, and even salmon. Mrs Lockhart-Smith added: “For someone who is either a vegetarian or vegan, I can prepare a special salad, vegetarian patties, veggie burgers, or sauted greens for them. These are made with all natural products, and we can also provide tofu if requested in advance.” Mrs Lockhart-Smith said what makes her dish es special is the time taken to first spice them up and also the serving sizes of the meals that many customers have now grown to expect. The owners of the restaurant say despite the changes in the economy that have forced manyt o cut back on eating out, their choice of giving clients more for their money will in the end only add to the success of their business. Operating from Tuesday to Sunday, and soon to introduce a breakfast menu, this island restaurant is helping to remind both locals and visitors why it is so much better to eat and live in the Bahamas. FROM left to right chef Peter Major, Kabuti Lock hartchefs at the British Colonial Hilton. SMOKED Salmon served with cheesy macaroni, cole slaw, peas and rice, and a tall glass of mojito. THE ORIGINAL Native Way Mojito with pureed mint leaves, and served in a daiquiri form.

PAGE 17

C M Y K C M Y K TASTE THE TRIBUNE WEDNESDAY, MAY 13, 2009, PAGE 9B things 2 DO n By LLOYD ALLEN Tribune Features Reporter lallen@tribunemedia.net THIS weekend there’s a clash of the cultures, as spontaneous events throughout the island use diversity as the source for their inspiration. Fusing French, Argentinean, Italian, Haitian, Bahamian, and so many other cultures, this week’s Things 2 D o packs a punch of multicultural proportions. 1. The Heineken Green Hype is only three days away, and already its excitement has reached platinum status, as it is among one of the most talked about events within Bahamian online entertainment networks including Facebook, MySpace, YouTube and Twitter. This event is bringing to one stage 15 of the hypest names in local non-traditional Bahamian entertainment including El Pedrino, SO$AM an, Chris ‘Sketch’ Carey, Ricardo Clarke, Jah Nyne, Frydeh, Club SuperDeath, and others. Unfolding at the Butlers and Sands ground, the event is set to kick off at 6pm until. There will also be a Heineken special of six for $10. Tickets are $5 before 8pm, and $10 after. 2. The Burns House Group of Companies will be featured at the Poop Deck restaurant Sandyport this Saturday for its fourth annual Wine, Art & Jazz Festival. The event which will feature a long list of wines from places like Argentina, Chile, Australia, France and Italy, will also showcase canvassed art from some of the country’s most renowned artist. This will include the work of Antonius Roberts, John Cox, Willicey Tynes, Clive Stuart, and Malcolm Rae. Starting at 3pm, there will bes imultaneous activities includ ing wine sampling comple mented with hors d’oeuvres , live caricatures, live entertainment (provided by the G-Note All Stars), and much more. Generally admission for the event is $20, and wine club members get in at $15, and all children under 12 are free. 3. Step Up Entertainment along with Mr Malik events present Unity Jam, the first annual Haitian Bahamian Flag Day celebration. Celebrating 205 years of freedom for Haiti, this event will feature music by Selector Chronic, DJ Clean Cut, and DJ Runks, along witha special appearance by popu lar Haitian Bahamian music group Broken Mics. The venue for the event is Workers House, and starting time is 8.30pm. Tickets are priced at $10, and security will be enforced. 4. The Bahamas Humane Society is scheduled to have its third annual Who Let The Dogs Out fun-day this Saturday at the Botanical Gardens. This family event including your canine family members will run from noon until 6pm, and will include many minicompetitions including the dog with the waggiest tail, the most unusual dog, the dog with the best trick, the best junior handler, the prettiest dog, the old est dog, and so much more. Entrance fees are $3 adults, $1for kids, and $1 for dogs. Proceeds for this event are in aid of the many adopted and needy animals at the centre. 5. This Friday, an all gospel entertainment showdown is set to unfold at the Bahamas Christian Fellowship Church, where artist Heavy Metal is launching his new self titled project with the help of some his Christian sisters and brothers. These include DJ Counsellor, Cream, Ricardo Clarke, Mr Lynx, Vandera, Rudell Capron, and others. Showtime begins at 7.30pm, with the event expected to last until 11pm. Admission for the event $5, and it promises to be a good show for the family. n By ALEX MISSICK Tribune Features Reporter amissick@tribunemedia.net TWO new faces have been selected as the new “Supermodel” title holders for the Bahamas. Twentyyear old Kendra Beneby and 17 -year old Philip Pennerman were recently selected the winners. The competition started with 42 contestants and as the weeks went by, contes tants were eliminated one by one in order to select the strongest for the finals. Mr OilinSha Coakley hand picked judges who have made a successful career for themselves in the international fashion and music arena. Philip McGowen (Agent of Naomi Campbell Kate Moss Alek Wek Giselle Heidi Klum and more Supermodels); Kendell Monroe (manages the careers and organises shows for Michael Jackson, Usher and more); Natalie Duhaney, a New York designer who designs for Claibourne, Tommy Hillfiger and Boss Elite men's line; Beth Sobol, Ceo/Founder of Miami Fashion Week and Romea Gordan who is the managing director of Pulse Models Jamaica where they manage such Supermodels such as Jeneil McKenzie. The final lineup for Supermodel of the Bahamas took place at the British Colonial Hilton Hotel, where all of the Bahamian hopefuls from many family islands including Eleuthera, Grand Bahama, Bimini, Andros and New Providence displayed top designer wear from international designer Natalie Duhaney, and top Bahamian designers, Cedric Bernard, Percy Wallace and Ms New ton. Ceo and founder of Supermodel of the Bahamas, Mr OilinSha Coakley said he is very pleased with the winners and said this is only the beginning for their careers as his agency now markets Bahamian models to an international client base. The 2008 contestants and winners Omar Francis 8, Anwar Mackey and Lithera Capron, have already been booked and worked for Miami Fashion Week, Islands of the World Fashion Week and BK New York Fashion Week. The winners for the Commercial divi sion in this year’s competition were Mikell Clarke and Andrew Newton. New faces for Supermodel of the Bahamas T h e T r i b u n e n By ALEX MISSICK Tribune Features Reporter amissick@tribunemedia.net THERE is no better way to c elebrate spring than to enjoy the beauty of nature and t h e sw ee t smelling ar omas hundred of glorious flowers allo w us to enjoy. This year, the fabulous ladies of the Carver Garden Club will be hosting a Spring Sensation Flo wer Show May 16 and 17 at the Doris Johnson Senior High Sc hool. The show which is being held u nder the patronage of Governor General, Sir Arthur Hanna will be open to the public from 3-7pm on Saturday and 3-6 on Sunday. The show is divided into two categories: Horticulture and Design. The horticulture division has 18 classes which range from the Adeniums( desert roses) to the Zingiberaceae (ginger lilly The design division has nine classes and will showcase the artistic side of the club members. The ladies will use space as their canvas and plant mate rial as their medium. They will also be challenged to interpret themes such as Mother Nature’s Garden, Everything’s Coming Up Roses, Let’s Celebrate Spring, and many more. Flower design divas such as Ann Garraway, Isle Dean, Elva Rolle, and Rhona Douglas-Sands are amongst the designers to beat this year. President of the club, Peggy Knowles, said members have been planning the show for several months. Mrs Knowles said although there has been a lack of spring rain, she is optimistic that the public will be dazzled by the beauty of the plants that will be on display. Show Chairperson, Cynthia Gibbs has been encouraging members to enter as many plants as possible. The public can expect to see hundreds of beautifully grown plants, many that are quite rare and unusual. Plant lovers and those curious about gardening and flowers, cane xpect to enjoy a relaxed atmosphere and fun filled afternoon complete with tasty catered dishes and music. Plant lovers and serious collectors will be able to take advantage of several vendors who will be in atten dance at the show including The Pot ting Shed, Green House Nursery and Marina Greaves. The Carver Garden Club Show p romises to be an unforgettable afternoon as guests will be able to enjoy the handiwork of flower lovers and the colorful creations of nature. Admission each day is $5. PHILIP PENNERMAN Male winner for 2009 Supermodel of the Bahamas. KENDRA BENEBY Female winner for 2009 Supermodel of the Bahamas. KENDRA BENEBY 2009 Supermodel of the Bahamas. KENDRA BENEBY posing on the beach. Carver Garden Club abloom S OME o f the plants being prepared for this weekend’s show. MEMBERS of the Carver Garden Clubs howcase some of their plants at a recent club meeting.

PAGE 18

n By JASON DONALD STARRING: Chris Pine, Zachary Quinto, Eric Bana WHEN Gene Roddenberry hatched the idea for a science fiction TV series in the early sixties he could never have realised the legacy it would have. The original programme (which was cancelled, ironically, after only three seasons) went on to be reinvented in multiple movies, revamped TV shows and even a short-lived cartoon, all while maintaining its incredibly loyal fanbase. In fact, such is the level of commitment from the “Trekkies”, as the fans are known, that the rest of us can be forgiven for feeling slightly excluded from the party. That is all about to change, however, with this latest addition to the Star Trek canon a bright, energetic and grandly entertaining reboot from director JJ Abrams. To help the converts-in-waiting, the story starts virtually from scratch, with James T Kirk a young tearaway and Spock teased by classmates on his home planet of Vulcan for being half-human. Both of them eventually meet at Starfleet Academy and clash almost immediately. Relations between the pair become even more strained when, onboard the USS Enterprise, they are forced to confront a threat to Vulcan that puts the lives of millions in danger. Once it gets going, the film rarely stops for a breath. As Abrams already showed with Mission Impossible III and Cloverfield, he has an eye for the action sequence and we are treated to a whole host of great set pieces here all in stun ningly rendered CGI. But what sets Stark Trek apart from the usual special effects bonanza is the strength of the characters. Kirk, Spock, Dr McCoy and Uhura are recognisable but skewed versions of their original incarnations and play their part to give the film a human centre. It’s Kirk and Spock that steal the show though their mutual direspespect helps to bring out the best laughs in the script and the most emotional moments. Hard core fans may quibble over the lighter tone, but, if you’re going to make a fresh start, this is the way to do it. Star Trek has set the bar for this sum mer’s big releases and I, for one, can’t wait for a sequel. C M Y K C M Y K ARTS PAGE 10B, WEDNESDAY, MAY 13, 2009 THE TRIBUNE include hands on exercises where individual creative talents are produced with the assistance of volunteer professionals and guest artists. Students will be involved in the production of oil and acrylic paintings of land and seascapes, portraits, sculpturing, Junkanoo art and handicrafts. “I would like the programme to be conducted on Saturdays at Gibralter Square Studios on Yamacraw Hill Road which was designed by myself, providing art materials, instruction and lunch to children who are incapable of such an experience due to their economic situation. The children can even learn how to draw using a computer, using AutoCAD, Computer inter drafting, or just to develop a skill or craft to use in the future,” Mr Miller said. He hopes to target youngsters between the ages of 11-15. However, to jump start such an endeavor, Mr Miller said the costs would be around $15,000 to $20,000, He said that while he has approached the government for assistance, he is also appealing to the Bahamian public. The work that the students will be able to do will at some point be at a standard that they can sell it. I have assisted with so many projects in this country that I just want to give back and invest in the youth of the nation so that they can someday be self sustainable.” Star Trek MOVIE REVIEW Architect in art FROM page 12 IN THIS film publicity image released by Paramount Pictures, from left, Anton Yelchin as Chekov, Chis Pine as James T. Kirk, Simon Pegg as Scotty, Karl Urban as Bones, John Cho as Sulu and Zoe Saldana as Ohu ra are shown in a scene from "Star Trek." P a r a m o u n t P i c t u r e / A P P h o t o n By LLOYD ALLEN Tribune Features Reporter l allen@tribunemedia.net IN recent weeks, many students throughout the country have been m aking their mark in public debate and speaking, focusing on several national and global issues spanningf rom healthier living, to the importance of environmental preservation and the economy. The first event was the 11th annual Ministry of Education (MOE the Rainforest theater Cable Beach, on April 23. According to Eula Gaitor Supervisor of Student services at MOE and coordinator for the event this competition which was first started back in 1998, was developed to highlight the speaking abilities ofh igh school seniors throughout the country. Now in i ts eleventh season, she is particularly pleased with the performance of students particularly from the family islands. Mrs Gaitor explained: “The family islands have been doing really well in recent times, last year Cat Island won, this year they’ve won again along with San Salvador and Bimini. The family islanders are really excited about it all, and this year we took the competition up a notch by bringing in the Mangrove Cay High school band to have more students from the family island featured.” She said this year’s topic was: Be it resolved that the economic development of the Bahamas is morei mportant than the protection of the environment. Family islands The winners 14-year-old Michelle Greene (10th Grader from San Salvador High), 15-year-old Giovano Bowe (11th Grader from Old Bight High, Cat Island), and 15-year-old Danya Farrington (11th Grader from Arthur’s Town High, Bimini) were smiling from ear to ear as they received the even t’s floating trophy along with several other awards along with one of their coaches Trenton Burant. Coming from the out island environment, the trio said they thoroughly researched their topic which supported environmental preservation, however agreed that overall both topics rely in some way with the other, and adding that ultimate bal ance can only be achieved when both are given equal attention. Later that day, there was a speech competion held by the Ministry of Health in conjunction with MOE and Toastmasters International themed ‘Eating Well On A Tight Budget.’ With more than several dozen students and schools taking part in the preliminary segment of the event, the finals consisted of about 20 students participating either in the junior or senior division. Debating on the same topic, most students provided a list of healthy and economical food purchasing and preparation options in the reality of a constricted economy. Many suggested shopping around the perimeter of supermarkets rather than in the middle, having a home garden as opposed to always purchasing vegetable supplies, and purchasing meats rotisserie style rather than in portions, all of which could in the long run reduce the overall cost of food. Although all of the presentations were amazing, there were only two winners in the end. Junior division In the junior division, Deokin-nique Strachan from LW Young won first place receiving a number of prizes, with Tryker Smith from St Andrewsi n at second, and Tenesha Anderson from LW Young at third. In the senior division, Kendra Stuart from CC Sweeting was victorious, with Robert Farquhar son from St Andrews trailing at second, and Joy Archer from St Francis de Sales High in Abaco placing third. N ext there was the Model United Nations Sess ion (MUNS House meeting hall on April 27. This event exposed students to the framework by which member countries of the organisation meet to discuss various issues. According to MUNS 2009 chairman Reverend Samuel Bootle, the competition is a debate wheres ix students from each school are designated to a country, and given a topic to research where they are later expected to make several presentations and recommendations. He explained: “MUNS has now been active for the past 11 years, a combination of the Rotary club of the Bahamas, and the Ministry of Foreign Affairs, we work in conjunction to produce this programme. “This year we have 13 schools participating, under the topic of global climate change, and how each nation is affected.” This year, students from the Sunland Baptist Academy (representing Brazil first place, all receiving a Lap top, and trip later this year to the United Nations head office in New York accompanied by the Deputy Prime Minister Brent Symonette and staff. In second place was RM Bailey (representing the UK in third was Doris Johnson (representing Gambia). Youth destined for success STUDENTS from the Sunland Baptist Academy in Freeport who won the 11th annual Model United Nations Session late last month. The student represented the South American country of Brazil. WINNERS of the Ministry of Health’s Nutrition month speech competion Kendra Stuart from CC Sweeting Senior and Deokin-nique Strachan from LW Young pictured with Toastmaster and host Sherelle Barr. WINNERS of the 11 annual debate championship Michelle Greene, Giovano Bow, and Danya Farrington seen overjoyed after receiving several awards and prizes.

PAGE 19

C M Y K C M Y K I N S I D E Carver Garden Club abloom See page nine WEDNESDAY, MAY 13, 2009 Chefs providing hands for hunger See page eight n By ALEX MISSICK Tribune Features Reporter amissick@tribunemedia.net THE exploration of art in other professions is not uncommon in Bahamian socie ty , f or e xample, how does an architect go from sketching a dream home, to sketching t he vibr ancy and colours of a Junk anoo per former? Alex Miller, an architectural engineer and technician, said he hopes Bahamian society especially the youth of the nation, accept that art can come fr om an ywher e and fr om any experience, no matter what profession. Architect art in Mr Miller said although he loves art and would love to do it full time, he still works in the construction world because of the need to survive. “You can’t survive just on paintings alone in the Bahamas. You have to be versatile. My painting started out from high school because I was always interested in it. I never had formal training for it but I studied fine art on my own and the works of famous painters like Picasso.” Mr Miller said he knows how important the arts are in the Bahamas and has seen a number of talented young artists in the country. This has prompted him to develop an avenue for budding young Bahamian artists. “I know what the struggle was all about for me but I had some help along the way in the field of engineering. I want to pass on the knowledge that I have about art to underprivileged kids. I am developing a nonprofit organisation since 2004 that I want to be dedicated to the development of the youth here in the Bahamas. My goal is to identify young talent in the visual arts and assist in nurturing and developing them to achieve gainful employment or assistance in furthering their educa tion,” Mr Miller said. The programmes for the organisation will SEE page 10 JUNKANOO BOY GROUPER JUNKANOO KING NEL SON MANDEL A PORTRAIT The Tribune SECTIONB


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Volume: 105 No.141

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=USA TODAY.

BAHAMAS EDITION

www.tribune242.com

WEDNESDAY, MAY 13, 2009

CARS FOR SALE,
a
AND REAL a

BAHAMAS BIGGEST

HIGH
LOW

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Lands and —



Emerald Bay

Resort subject
of ‘$35m bid’

flirector resigns

Tex Turnquest steps
down as nepotism
and corruption
claims take toll

on govt department

Lands and Surveys
Director speaks out

0 SMe
Raper



THE TRIBUNE has published a
series of articles on the subject.

m@ By PAUL G TURNQUEST
Tribune Staff Reporter
pturnquest@tribunemedia.net

FOLLOWING a series of
explosive articles in The Tri-
bune over the past few weeks
the director of Lands and Sur-
veys Tex Turnquest resigned
from his post yesterday as
reports of nepotism and cor-





FIREFIGHTERS had to be
called early yesterday
morning to the new road
near to the Albany project,

ruption continue to take its toll
on this government department.

It was claimed that relatives
of the director, including his
mother-in-law were granted
prime beachfront Crown land

after a truck carrying
propane tanks turned over
hitting a similar vehicle.
Neither driver was seri-
ously injured.






Philippines warns of
Filipinos being illegally
trafficked in the
Bahamas, Caribhean





US company
seeking to

buy hotel









m@ By PAUL G
TURNQUEST
Tribune Staff Reporter
pturnquest@
tribunemedia. net

AMWAY Corporation, a
Michigan based company
that owns the Cape at
Eleuthera resort, have made
a bid to the Mitsui Corpo-
ration of Japan for the pur-
chase of the Emerald Bay
Resort in Great Exuma.

According to sources
close to the sale, Amway
Corporation has placed a
$35 million bid with the
understanding that it would
assume all the hotel’s out-
standing debts during its
years in operation.

Clifford Johnson, senior
partner of Pricewater-
HouseCoopers, said his
firm, which has been
appointed receivers for the
insurance giant Mitsui Cor-
poration will release a state-
ment today on the matter.
Mr Johnson confirmed that
there has been fairly signifi-
cant discussions held thus
far, but stressed that a sale
has yet to be completed.

Noting these reports, the
former Member of Parlia-
ment for Exuma, George
Smith said that Exumians
would welcome the news of
some form of development
at the Emerald Bay proper-
ty. However, he said that as
the principals of Amway
have yet to make significant
improvements to their prop-

SEE page 16



Appointment of Justice Lyons

‘may have been a mistake’

THE appointment of
Senior Supreme Court

take. Almost from his
appointment he made

in Exuma for less than $2,500. Felipé Major/ CONTRACTS SIGNED Justice John Lyons may 1 it known that having
i have been a mistake in decided to adopt a

SEE page 16 Tubinessta m@ By TANEKA THOMPSON FOR COMPLETION OF the first place, accord- J Bahamian lifestyle and
Tribune Staff Reporter ing to veteran lawyer J make the Bahamas his

tthompson@tribunemedia.net ABACO AIRPORT Lionel Levine. home he wanted to

AUTO INSURANCE

THE Philippines’ Department
of Foreign Affairs has warned
its citizens of a rising trend of
Filipinos being illegally trafficked
in the Bahamas and other coun-

WATER SUPPLY IS AT

In a statement on
Justice Lyon's unex-
pected resignation from
the bench last week, Mr
Levine said that almost
from the start of his



Wy retire here and carry on
the profession of law
after his retirement as
judge.

"Such talk made him
the prey of ambitious

tries in the Caribbean region, ‘CRITICALLY LOW’ Saar yaaa ae in a with political
: ; the Bahamas, Justice John Lyons ambitions.
r r ae a ee LEVELS Lyons made known his s “T know as I was the
eC V € S ad y QO ul Cian the Philippines’ intent to retire in this country and victim of such predation and the
i: 8. HH ae fh pursue a more lucrative post asa ramifications continue," said Mr
aac a se a ae : acsecadscvazesssnsaususansssansuscstasssavasuasanbasaass local attorney. Levine.
ee enone i os ae This admission may have made Justice Lyons made headlines
: Justice Lyons the target of fellow after his fellow justice, Anita Allen
than a year of human traffick- OPINION DIVIDED ON members of the legal fraternity recently criticised him for appoint-
Ww h : ng, he Havana as a transit CONTAINER SHIPPING with lofty ambitions, he said. ing Daniel Ferguson, an accoun-
1 » : pont. . . "Justice Lyons may have done tant, to work on a recent case
ve it comes to The latest incident involved FACILITIES RELOCATION much good work in dealing expe- knowing that he shared “more

Auto Insurance,
remember the smart choice is
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Smart people you can trust.

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(BAHAMAS) LIMTED, INSURANCE BROKERS & AGENTS

Hey Peden | Grond bctna Fi
ES WA) eM) SFN



eT

TINO S400 (a 4) 08) | STAI

two Filipino citizens who were

SEE page 16

British
American

ditiously with the commercial busi-
ness in recent years, but his
appointment proved to be a mis-



IVa Notes \LUl

ND BAHAMA,

ISLANDS’ LEADING NEWSPAPER

SEE page 16

SEU Lake
a ge
RL CL Las
HEALTH INSURANCE

Pa ak
& PENSION PLANS

ae ee
Pee a


PAGE 2, WEDNESDAY, MAY 13, 2009 THE TRIBUNE
LOCAL NEWS

MW MARSH HARBOUR INTERNATIONAL AIRPORT PROJECT —
Contracts signed for completion of Abaco Airport

@ By Kathryn Campbell





MARSH HARBOUR,
ABACO - Public Works and
Transport Minister Neko
Grant and officials from his
Ministry signed various con-
tracts to complete the Marsh
Harbour International Air-
port air-side project.

“Tt is our intent to enhance
the capacity of the Marsh
Harbour airport facility to
provide quality services to the
public,” said Mr Grant dur-

ing the signing ceremony at JERRY WALKER of Jeppesen signs a contract with the Ministry of Pub-
the Ministry of Education’s — |j¢ Works and Transport for the redesign and publication of instrument
conference room last week- flight procedures at Marsh Harbour International Airport. Pictured from left
end. , are MP for South Abaco Edison Key, Public Works and Transport Minis-
Among the signings was a ter Neko Grant, director of the Department of Civil Aviation Captain
$2,241,487 change order to an Patrick Rolle, Mr Walker, and permanent secretary Colin Higgs.
existing contract with
Bahamas Hot Mix for com-
pletion of the lighting, and
s = procurement of runway and
NEKO GRANT, Minister of Public Works and Transport, along with MP for South Abaco Edison Key and other _‘ taxi way lighting at a cost of
officials inspect conditions at the Marsh Harbour International Airport runway. $566,387.
The Minister also signed a

: $390,552 tract with
BIS Photos/Letisha Henderson Freeport Nursery and Garden
Company for hydro-seeding,

and a $114,083 contract with
US-based company Jeppesen
for redesign and publication









of instrument flight proce- asi a AX
dures. PUBLIC WORKS and Transport Minister Neko Grant and Ebbie Sadie of
Visual Bahamas Hot Mix seal the deal with a handshake following the signing of

a contract that provides additional funding for lighting of the Marsh Har-

« bour International Airport. Pictured from left are Cubel Davis, chief coun-
The works to be under- cillor; Rosco Thompson, chairman of the Township Committee; MP for
taken will reduce negative — South Abaco Edison Key; Minister Grant; Mr Sadie; John Schaeffer, Min-
visual impact and minimise istry of Works’ area representative; Colin Higgs, permanent secretary;
dust interference by the place- Cephas Cooper, Central Abaco Administrator, and Gordon Major, acting
ment of hydro-seeding on side _ director of Works.
slopes along drainage ditch-
es," said Mr Grant. "The con-
tract will entail the hydro-seed



positive impact” on its econo-

my.
installation and maintenance.” “The works to be Mr Grant said he will return
a ee of the ie undertaken will soon to advise of plans for a

arbour air-side operations . new terminal and tower con-
began March 2007 with the reduce negative trol and to receive input on











grant of a $3,068,470 contract visual impact and those plans.
KNOX RUSSELL of Freeport Nursery and Garden Company Limited to Bahamas Hot Mix to con- minimise dust The minister’s team includ-

iia et receives a contract from Public Works and Transport Minister Neko — struct a new taxi-way andre- | ed permanent secretary Colin
Sa eCity Grant for the installation and maintenance of hydro-seeding forthe Marsh = surface the existing runway, interference by Higgs; acting director of
Harbour International Airport project. Pictured from left are Chief Coun- = Mr Grant explained. the placement of Worle Gordon Major; the

cillor Cubel Davis; chairman of the Township Committee Rosco Thomp- It subsequently became : a , .
Di son; Edison Key, MP for South Abaco; Minister Grant; Mr Russell; per- apparent belete aa was a Nydro-seeding on MGR OE WOE aa ene



ng ime for Abaco John Schaefer.
- - manent secretary Colin Higgs; Central Abaco administrator Cephas Coop- ~—s peed to revise the original ‘ re i i ,
eet er, and acting director of Works Gordon Major. plans eae side slopes along as ue ea ee
to $8,209,091. he said drainage ditches.” ee ee
407,071, : Civil Aviation. They were
ee 7 We accompanied by senior
Slt y ' oe on : € administrator for the Central
ember of Parliament for Abaco District, Cephas Coop-
South Abaco and executive N eko Grant er.

chairman of Bahamas Agri-

cultural an Industrial Corpo- ae : cg MREESEN RRA RRSeRNCanensennconannsene ones esensoanensennseneeene®
ration (BAIC). and Chict facility is completed, he said,

C ‘flor Cubel Davi Abaco can look forward to ‘VO VIEW?
oe eee more second homeowners
Mr Key said Abaco is coming oi a
7 ey . : o have your say on this or any
ae oT yas eae Mr Davis said the new alrf- other issue, email The Tribune at:
port facilities are “very impor- letters@tribunemedia.net or

because of its yachting and tant to Abaco’s growth and deliver your letter to The Tribune

second-homeownership indus- development and will have “a on Shirley Street, P.O. Box N-3207
tries. When the new airport

eet
PE tt he

PUNISHABLE BY
TWO YEARS IN ing Editor John Marquis wat

. hailed as a “defender of the
ma poor” during a special retire-
J Al L A N D / O R ment reception hosted by the
Workers’ Party on Monday

A $2000 FINE.
. Members of the party, for-

mer deputy prime minister

| Frank Watson and College of
? the Bahamas lecturer Felix
Bethel were among those in

Ss attendance at the Bay Side
Hut, Arawak Cay.
aes: Workers Party leader Rod-

ney Moncur, the host of the



Former Tribune Managing Editor

hailed as ‘defender of the poor’



ad



reception, thanked Mr Mar- ; ; ;
ie : : : FROM L-R: Workers Party member, Neil Stubbs; Former Tribune managing
2 - i meneame lan se: Pees Editor John Marquis; Brian Smith, Workers Party Secretary General; COB
ig: ' e wy ou We Pay {0 eentur Britich eliicidm lecturer Felix Bethel; Allen Strachan, Workers Party Chairman; Jeffery
Py ail Le eee J a fila Williams, owner and proprietor of Bayside Hut; and Workers Party Leader

thropist William Sar aa Rodney Moncur; at a retirement reception Monday night.
ré 0 ri ant The former deputy prime
minister thanked Mr Marquis
for his work as an investigative
era ica e iS journalist, saying that his

brand of reporting contributes

I to the development of democ-
crime ru ns racy and ensures that govern-
ments act responsibly and are
" held accountable for their
actions. Mr Marquis thanked
those in attendance for com-

ing to bid him farewell.

The party dined on grilled
lobster, grouper, Black Vil-
lage peas and grits, and stir
fried vegetables.

The gathering was the sec-
ond farewell reception held
for The Tribune’s outgoing
managing editor, who leaves



the Bahamas this week. outstanding journalistic the mid-60s, Mr Marquis

{ ‘08 On Saturday, friends, fami- career which spanned almost held a number of top posts at

rT med. Confider if fe lislaitctet ly and colleagues gathered at 50 years — 11 of them with various newspapers in Eng-
econ "rae tus at k 4 @ 4130 iB nie ; the Breeze’s Bahamas Resort The Tribune. land before returning in 1999

to present Mr Marquis with After working as a_ to take The Tribune’s top
gifts and pay tribute to his reporter in the Bahamas in post.
THE TRIBUNE

WEDNESDAY, MAY 13, 2009, PAGE 3



LOCAL NEWS



0 In brief

Disabled
man robbed
of tricycle

A severely disabled down-
town vendor is appealing to
the public for assistance after
his only mode of transporta-
tion was stolen from his home
on Monday.

Wentworth Sears, 40, who
suffers from cerebral palsy, is
a well-known sight on Bay
Street, selling T-shirts to both
tourists and Bahamians.

Because of his disability, Mr
Sears uses either a walker or a
tricycle to get around.

After he finished work on
Monday, Mr Sears said, both
his walker and his tricycle
were stolen from his home
some time during the evening.

The vendor has reported the
incident to police, who have
assured him that they are
investigating the matter.

Speaking on behalf of Mr
Sears, Jerome “JT” Thomp-
son, a disability advocate and
friend of the vendor, said that
just a day after the robbery, a
“kind-hearted private citizen”
donated a walker to Mr Sears.

Another concerned citizen
has also set up an account at
Cycles Unlimited on Mackey
Street, which will be used to
buy Mr Sears a new tricycle.

Mr Thompson said his
friend has had “issues” with
the bus system in the past
because of his disability and
has found that the easiest
method of transportation is a
three-wheeled vehicle. He
appealed to members of the
public to donate to the Cycles
Unlimited account, so that Mr
Sears can once again have
transportation and continue to
make a living.

Police name
Stabbing
death victim

POLICE have identified
the man found stabbed to
death behind a Baillou Hill
Road building on Monday as
27-year-old Vernon Christ-
ian Rolle.

Rolle, a resident of Baillou
Hill Road, was the country’s
27th homicide victim. He
had been stabbed several
times in the chest.

Police received a call from
someone who discovered the
body at around 6.40am and
were led to the back of a
building opposite the Baillou
Hill Road clinic. They found
Rolle dressed in a plaid shirt
and dark trousers.

Superintendent Ellsworth
Moss, head of the Central
Detective Unit, said that
police have spoken toa
number of persons regarding
Rolle’s death and have now
detained someone for ques-
tioning.

Kiwanis clutt
meeting to he
held on Thursiay

THE Kiwanis Club of
Over-The-Hill’s weekly
meeting will be held on
Thursday, May 14, at 8pm at
Holy Cross Community Cen-
tre on Soldier Road.

Ryan Antonio, Lt Gover-
nor Elect of all Kiwanis
Clubs in the Bahamas, will
address the club.

He will speak on member-
ship growth and retention.

All Kiwanians are wel-
come to attend and bring
guests.

Animal Fun Day on
Saturday at the
Botanical Gardens

THE Bahamas Humane
Society will host its annual
Animal Fun Day this coming
Saturday at the Botanical
Gardens.

Because of the event, the
BHS will not hold a clinic
that day, however, there will
be a late clinic on Friday
from 3pm to 8pm.

Water supply is at
critically low levels

Corporation ‘trying its best to limit
severity’ of conservation measures

@ By ALISON LOWE
Tribune Staff Reporter
alowe @tribunemedia.net

THE Water and Sewerage
Corporation yesterday admit-
ted that the rationing of water
to homes in New Providence —
which has caused major incon-
venience to many residents —
comes as the supply of water
stored by the corporation has
reached “critically low levels.”

Robert Deal, Assistant
General Manager at the WSC,
said the corporation is “trying
its best to limit the severity
and duration of these conser-
vation measures (initiated
April 29, 2009) and hopes to
be in a position to relax them
in the next several days.”

Meanwhile, frustrated resi-
dents continue to contact The
Tribune to complain that the
inadequate water supply and
pressure levels have thrown
them into a bygone age, when
water had to be stored in
buckets.

Now, they say, having a
shower or doing laundry in a
rush is a luxury they can only
dream of.

A 59-year-old man, who
wished to remain anonymous,
told this newspaper on Mon-
day that the second and third
floors of the Chertsey Apart-
ments on Cable Beach, which
contain around 40 units, had
not had “a drop of water”
since last Thursday.

“It’s bloody ridiculous. I
have had to go to Bally’s
(gym) to take a shower and
when I’ve had morning meet-

Around $1.5m paid out under
jobless benefit scheme so far

@ By NATARIO McKENZIE
Tribune Staff Reporter

SO far, the National Insur-
ance Board has paid out
around $1.5 million under the
unemployment benefit
scheme, NIB director Alger-
non Cargill said.

NIB began issuing unem-
ployment benefit cheques last
Monday.

“T would say about 3,600
persons have collected their
cheques so far,” Mr Cargill
told The Tribune yesterday.
“We have paid out about a
million and a half dollars so
far.”

Mr Cargill said that NIB is
still receiving claims under the
unemployment benefit
scheme.

“Registration continues and
as of Friday of last week we
received 6,490 claims. Off
those claims approximately
4,000 have been approved so
far,” he said.

“Quite a few people are
coming in every day to regis-
ter. We receive about 100
applications every day,” Mr
Cargill said.

The unemployment benefit,
which will be funded to the
tune of $20 million from the
Medical Benefits Fund of the
National Insurance Board, is



“For cooking and
washing dishes we
have to use
drinking water.
Those tenants who
had guests staying
have been forced
to have them go
and stay in hotels.
It doesn’t give
Nassau a good
name.”



ings, I have had to cancel
them,” said the resident.

“For cooking and washing
dishes we have to use drinking
water. Those tenants who had
guests staying have been
forced to have them go and
stay in hotels. It doesn’t give
Nassau a good name,” he
added.

Experience

His experience mirrored
that of Winton resident Sam-
my Ferguson, who said his
apartment building located
near the Sea Grape Plaza on
Prince Charles Drive was
without water for a similar
period two weeks ago, and
that of a Camperdown resi-
dent, who claims water pres-
sure in her neighbourhood has
been virtually non-existent for
months.

In all three instances, the

Pr

Fae dk

Algernon Cargill



primarily for unemployed per-
sons who made National
Insurance contributions while
they were employed.

Maximum

The benefit provides a max-
imum of $200 per week for a
maximum of 13 weeks at a
time.

The unemployment benefit

MAIN/SPORTS SECTION

Local News

Editorial/Letters. ..........

Sports

Fees, 5 OGoue

Seeaece sere ea eee rss P4

ean deae
P13,14,15

BUSINESS/ARTS SECTION

CLASSIFIED SECTION 40 PAGES

USA TODAY MAIN SECTION 12 PAGES



MiNi baile

in international
bribery inquiry


































































THE Bahamas is home to at least one company accused of
being involved in an international bribery scheme.

According to the news website www.monstersandcrit-
ics.com, the German government is looking into allegations
that payoffs were handed out to promote the sale of certain
German-made trucks and buses in several nations, and pros-
ecutors have identified more than 100 suspects.

The report said the suspects are thought to have “fun-
nelled the money through front companies in Malta, the
Bahamas, the British Virgin Islands, Cyprus, London and
New York or paid cash to crooked buyers to induce orders
for the German buses and trucks.”

It said: “The bribes, often paid to relatives or friends of pur-
chasing executives, were apparently aimed at securing sales
to big organisations that buy large fleets of heavy vehicles.”

So far, none of the front companies has been named.

The payments abroad are thought to have been worth 13
million euros, or $18 million.

None of the suspected buyers have yet been confirmed as
having been on the take, as investigators are still checking the
legitimacy of each payment, the report said.

The evidence so far suggests the scheme has been operat-
ing since 2002 and ended this year.

individuals complained that
attempts to reach the WSC by
phone were either fruitless, or
did not leave them feeling sat-
isfied as to what the problem
might be and when it might
be remedied.

Meanwhile, Mr Deal put
the cause of the problems in
all three cases down to loca-
tion -— rather than general
water supply shortages.

However, with the number
of complaints registered
island-wide growing, this is a
suggestion of which residents
are increasingly sceptical.

In the case of Chertsey
apartments, a statement sent
to this newspaper by the WSC
on Monday said an investiga-
tion revealed the “service lat-
erals” servicing the building
were experiencing “a partial
blockage.”

“The building superinten-
dent was informed and we are
making arrangements to clear
the service lateral in the morn-
ing (yesterday),” said Mr
Deal, adding that the corpo-
ration “sincerely apologises”
to the Chertsey tenants.

Anyone experiencing water
supply issues is encouraged to
contact the WSC at 302-5599
or 325-0505.

‘YOUR VIEW’

To have your say on this or any
other issue, email The Tribune at:
letters@tribunemedia.net or
deliver your letter to The Tribune
on Shirley Street, P.O. Box N-3207

Share your news

The Tribune wants to hear
from people who are
making news in their
neighbourhoods. Perhaps
you are raising funds for a
good cause, campaigning
for improvements in the
area or have won an
award.

If so, call us on 322-1986
and share your story.

Great Selection of:
Swim Trunks,
Shorts,

Pants,

Polos & Tees

and so much more!



is being implemented in two
phases. During the first phase,
benefits are to be financed
from the $20 million trans-
ferred out of the Medical Ben-
efits Fund.

Phase II of the programme
will establish a fund into which
all employers and employces
will pay a contribution — 1 per
cent of each employee’s insur-
able wage.

Applicants are eligible for
the benefit if they are cur-
rently unemployed; under the
age of 65; not self employed;
able and willing to work; were
last employed on or after July
1, 2004; not receiving other
NIB benefits other than dis-
ability or survivors benefits;
and have made a certain num-
ber of contributions to NIB.

vineyard vines’ |i
martha’s vineyard - y

MORLEY
For &

MEN nm.

Harbour Green Shops at Lyford Cay
Telephone: (242) 362-6654/6
Bayparl! Building, Parliament Street
Telephone: (242) 323-8240 ¢ Fax: (242) 326-9953
P.O. Box N-121, Nassau, N.P., Bahamas
e-mail: info@colesofnassau.com

FOR 3 IN 1 LAWN SERVICE
Oe Lae
SAO EU)

Bat gee
322-2157

Umbrellas
Loungers
Drinks Trolleys
Coffee Tables

and durable Diversatexâ„¢
ushion is fade and mildew
resistant and is available in
blue, green or terracotta
PAGE 4, WEDNESDAY, MAY 13, 2009

EDITORIAL/LETTERS TO THE EDITOR

THE TRIBUNE





The Tribune Limited

NULLIUS ADDICTUS JURARE IN VERBA MAGISTRI
Being Bound to Swear to The Dogmas of No Master

LEON E. H. DUPUCH, Publisher/Editor 1903-1914

SIR ETIENNE DUPUCH, Kt, O.B.E., K.M., K.CS.G.,

(Hon.) LL.D., D.Litt.

Publisher/Editor 1919-1972
Contributing Editor 1972-199]

EILEEN DUPUCH CARRON, C.M.G., M.S. B.A., LL.B.

Publisher/Editor 1972-

Published Daily Monday to Saturday

Shirley Street, RO. Box N-3207, Nassau, Bahamas
Insurance Management Building., P.O. F-485, Freeport, Grand Bahama

TELEPHONES
Switchboard (News, Circulation and Advertising) 322-1986
Advertising Manager - (242) 502-2352
Circulation Department - (242) 502-2387
Nassau Fax: - (242) 328-2398
Freeport, Grand Bahama: 1-(242)-352-6608
Freeport fax: (242) 352-9348

WEBSITE
www.tribune242.com — updated daily at 2pm

Space exploration and elusive ‘wow’ factor

EVEN THOUGH the space shuttle fleet
has been given a pink slip, Monday’s launch
of the space shuttle Atlantis to repair the
Hubble Space Telescope is enough to for-
get for a moment all that plagues us.

The astronauts will look down upon a
planet from which they cannot detect war,
pollution, fraud, or swine flu.

They will attempt to repair that amazing
machine that got off to a miserable, defec-
tive start, but now has given us images that
both expands our knowledge of the uni-
verse and moves us to consider our utter
insignificance in it.

Our astronauts are the 20th-century’s
icon of the human conundrum. They sym-
bolize our status as the supreme sentient
and courageous power on this particular
planet.

Yet we so often do not have their back.
As they help us peer into the galaxies, the
rest of us keep getting sucked into black
holes of selfishness and pettiness.

Atlantis lifted off Monday, in the sec-
ond-to-last year before the shuttle fleet is
scheduled to be retired.

Its mission is to attempt the most com-
plex repairs ever on the telescope, to give it
a few more years of life, with the best
*sight” it ever had.

Though the shuttle programme long ago
ceased to captivate our daily imagination,
this “mere” service call is no less majestic
and dangerous.

The whole mission could be wasted if
but one tiny screw floats away and lodges in
the wrong place.

The astronauts will be replacing razor-
sharp circuit boards that could mortally
slice their space suits.

Veteran Hubble repair astronaut John
Grunsfeld told the St. Petersburg Times,
“You climb on top of 4F million pounds of
explosive fuel, and if you don’t think that
that’s a hazardous thing to do, then you
probably are in the wrong line of business.
We do space flight because we think it’s
important.

”We’re curious and we have a drive to
explore. That’s why we’ve occupied all the

an

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What will you do with your new KA Picanto?

The fun size, big little car

gage:
aap
il

i
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niches on planet Earth and we’re kind of
filling up the planet ... Ultimately, we’d
better leave planet Earth or we’re all going
to cease to exist. And this is the very lead-
ing edge of that. In all of my experience, I
feel that Hubble is by far the most impor-
tant project that I have worked on. And
obviously I think it’s worth risking my life
for, or I wouldn’t be doing it.”

The repair is happening as the new Star
Trek movie opened at number one at the
box office and President Obama mulls
whether to take us where we have never
gone before. Space still captivates the imag-
ination, but it has not inspired a national
vision ever since Apollo. In the short term,
Obama proposes to boost NASA funding
and has ordered an outside review of the
human spaceflight programme. But he has
yet to select a new administrator for the
agency.

In a speech two weeks ago to the Nation-
al Academy of Sciences, Obama repeat-
edly praised the Apollo programme for
expanding America’s prominence in sci-
ence and technology.

It will be interesting to see how much
of NASA’s resources can go to space explo-
ration when he also has rightfully declared
climate change and energy to be “this gen-
eration’s great project.” It is also sobering
to consider that one of the risks the shuttle
astronauts face in this week’s mission is
orbiting space trash that has accumulated in
our half-century of sending objects up
there. Space is nowhere close to “leave-
no-trace” camping.

But explore we should. Astronomer Ken
Sembach of the Space Telescope Science
Institute told the Washington Post that
images from a repaired Hubble should pro-
duce a “wow factor.” Hopefully Obama
can rebuild NASA into the organisation
that helps us say “wow” all over again,
about the here and now, and the great

(This article was written by Derrick Z.
Jackson
c. 2009 The Boston Globe).






i






Molestation
claims made
before FNM

came to power

LETTERS

EDITOR, The Tribune.

All of the allegations of sex-
ual molestation made against a
foreign teacher at the Eight
Mile Rock High School hap-
pened before May 2, 2007 when
the FNM came to power. The
feeble attempt by the Chairman
of the PLP, Glenis Hanna-Mar-
tin to bring pressure on the pre-
sent Minister of Education Carl
Bethel is not only unfair, but in
my opinion wicked. It is
designed to switch the blame
away from the PLP.

In spite of the knowledge of
the PLP about this incident and
their attempt to make it look
like the FNM is irresponsible,
cannot be left alone, and espe-
cially because the then minis-
ter of Education and Attorney
General Alfred Sears must have
known, but did not want to pub-
licly address it.

This then brings me to the
point that the “sweeping under
the carpet” the scorn of the inci-
dent of molestation should have
struck a nerve with the former
minister especially since he pub-
licly confessed of his own expe-
riences many times. Had he
become more involved, maybe
just maybe these hideous inci-
dences would not have hap-
pened.

This incident in particular, is
serious because there are many
other children who have in the
last many years, especially when
Mr Sears was minister, been
molested by not only their
teacher, but by employers, their

letters@tribunemedia net



pastor, father, uncle, cousins,
brother, friends and others in
authority.

To deviate ever so slightly,
these patterns of behaviour
have been in our country for far
too long. Too many people of
influence have been given the
proverbial slap on the wrist for
similar behaviour. The short
sentences given to sexual
abusers are an indication that
the judicial does not appear to
be serious about the severity of
molestation. No one seems to
understand the psychological
destruction done. No one seems
to give a hoot.

All of the cleaning and sani-
tising agents were employed
when allegations of molesta-
tions of parliamentarians were
made. The country was more
concerned of saving their polit-
ical reputation as opposed to
listening to a young man’s cry
for help. The more he screamed
at the top of his voice for some-
one to listen to him, the more
he was ignored and the more
they covered up. This alleged
despicable act will have reper-
cussions to the third and fourth
generation. People, who have
children, must not do things to
other people’s children, because
the chickens must come home
to roost.

How come a man who should
have grandchildren be given
three years for the molestation
of a five year old and the rape
of an adult is given 10 years and
recently life? How come our
children are not given the pro-
tection and support by the
state? In my opinion that alone
is a crime and someone should
pay for that.

We are simply not serious
about the preservation of our
youth or the future of this coun-
try. We must move with haste to
determine how and why the
consequences do not fit the seri-
ousness of the crime. Molesta-
tion of a child destroys the life
of the child forever, so why
should the consequences not be
designed to destroy the life or
the molester forever too.

We had better not allow the
children who will be “running
things” in the not too distant
future, see that we failed them
now. This is a warning and must
not be taken lightly.

Finally, any parent, teacher
or any adult who withholds
information from the authori-
ties related to the molestation,
should be given harsh penalties.
If the molester be given life for
molestation, then the person
helping the molester should get
at least 10 years for helping to
destroy our children, and pro-
tecting the criminal. It is time
for the playing field to level.

IVOINE W INGRAHAM
Nassau,
May, 2009.

Dismayed by garbage washing in with tide

EDITOR, The Tribune.

I humbly beseech you to print
the following in your newspa-
per as I have tried to forward
this information on to organi-
sations that should be con-
cerned, but apparently are not.

It is my nature to walk the
beach and in doing so, I am dis-
mayed by the amount of
garbage that washes in with the
tide — either from ships or the
construction workers in the area
— or is left behind by very
uncaring individuals. The list of
articles lying on our shores and
the daily volume is unbeliev-
able, and no one, repeat — no
one seems to be responsible for
cleaning up or monitoring the
state of our beaches and canals
on a regular basis.

Coincidentally, a large party
was held this past weekend at
the beach by the canal to

Sandyport. The next day when I
walked the beach, I could not
believe the amount of garbage
that these people left behind.
Red drinking cups, Styrofoam
plates, paper plates, plastic
utensils, food, paper, soiled dia-
pers, beer and soda bottles, san-
dals, towels and even articles of
clothing, all of which lined the
beach. Some of it was even
shoved in between the rocks, as
if this was the ideal place to hide
the evidence! It was truly a dis-
grace.

With a little investigation, I
was able to confirm with the
manager of a nearby establish-
ment that they did indeed spon-
sor a party, and therefore were
the filthy culprits. Before I state
their name, I would like to point
out that these messy individuals
are not alone in their wrong
doings, as others take advan-
tage of the beach and leave

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Email: humanresouroes@restauranishs.com





behind their garbage, and again,
no one takes responsibility for
either properly discarding the
garbage, or maintaining the
beach on an ongoing basis.
Having spoken to Sandyport
Management regarding the
SuperValue party and the
everyday occurrence of trash
on the beach and near the canal,
Sandyport has agreed to place
two garbage receptacles in the
area, with the hopes that they
will not be removed by thieves.
This maybe a solution, but in
no way does it excuse Super-
Value’s party-going staff and
friends for trashing the beach,
or anyone else, for that matter!
And, I believe that it would still
be prudent, should you decide
that this article is valuable to
your readers, to mention this
update in your fine newspaper.

J LSANDS
Nassau,
May 7, 2009.

Why doesn’t ZNS
use current titles?

EDITOR, The Tribune.

Why is it that ZNS reporters
refer to the Opposition as “for-
mer PM”; “former Deputy
PM”: “former Minister of For-
eign Affairs” etc instead of the
current titles held by the Oppo-
sition eg “Opposition Leader”,
“Opposition Member”? The
appellation “former” applies
when the person has retired
from office. However, these
Opposition members assumed
new titles when they opted to
remain in Parliament, and they
should not be confused with
members of the Government.
On this morning’s newscast, the
reporter even referred to Mr
Christie as “Minister Christie.”

The other mistake often
made by the ZNS reporters is
an omission.

In this morning’s newscast
(April 7), the reporter while
reading the same paragraph
referred to the Opposition
Leader as the “Right Hon-
ourable” but referred to the
Prime Minister only as “Mr”.
For her information, the Prime
Minister was awarded “Right
Honourable” status ever since
his first administration which
began in 1992.

I hope the above errors are
not intentional.

ZNS LISTENER
Nassau,
April 7, 2009
THE TRIBUNE

WEDNESDAY, MAY 13, 2009, PAGE 5



LOCAL NEWS



0 In brief

Body of man
found after
hoat capsizes

THE body of a boat cap-
tain was pulled from the water
off the coast of Harbour
Island after his boat capsized
near the North Eleuthera
island.

Terry Roberts Junior, 27,
had 14 passengers on a 17 ft
Boston Whaler when the boat
flipped over at around 8pm
on Sunday.

The passengers swam to
shore and all survived but Mr
Roberts, police say.

Friends and relatives of the
boat captain searched for him
throughout the night. Mr
Roberts’ father, Terry
Roberts Senior, reportedly
found his son’s body at the
bottom of the ocean at
around 9am on Monday.

A witness claimed Mr
Roberts had attempted to
swim for his life, but appeared
to have suffered lacerations
to his head.

Police press liaison officer
Assistant Superintendent
Walter Evans said police
believe the Harbour Island
man had drowned.

His body was flown to New
Providence on Monday where
an autopsy will be performed
to determine the cause of
death.

Emealio Russell



Police release
correct photo

m By DENISE MAYCOCK
Tribune Freeport
Reporter
dmaycock@
tribunemedia.net

FREEPORT - Grand
Bahama Police have
announced that a photograph
which was recently released
of a man wanted for ques-
tioning in connection with
fraud was incorrect.

Asst Supt Welbourne Boo-
tle said the photograph of
another man with a similar
name was inadvertently
attached to a wanted poster
of Emealio Russell, aka Emil
Russell, and published in the
media.

Mr Bootle said police have
released the correct photo-
graph of Russell, who was
charged in Magistrate’s Court
on Friday.

Russell is charged with
fraud by false pretences. He
pleaded not guilty to the
charge and was granted $5,000
bail with two sureties. The
case was adjourned to Sep-
tember 15.

Mr Bootle said the police
apologised for any inconve-
nience and/or embarrassment
the incorrect photo might
have caused.

students to get
tourism training

A SELECT group of stu-
dents will get formal train-
ing in the nation’s number
one economic sector
through the Ministry of
Tourism and Aviation’s
summer internship pro-
gramme.

High school valedictori-
ans, college students and
junior ministers of tourism
from Family Island high
schools are eligible for the
programme. Those select-
ed as interns will partici-
pate in projects, meetings
with industry partners and
field trips. They will get
first-hand experience in
tourism dynamics and
learn the far-reaching
effects of the tourism sec-
tor.

With this internship pro-
gramme, the ministry
intends to mould profes-
sionals to be the next
developers of the
Bahamas. The programme
will also cultivate a student
tourism talent pool for
future recruitment purpos-
es, contribute to building a
solid foundation for career
development of Bahamian
students, positively influ-
ence students who are con-
templating tourism and
create tourism advocates.

Opinion divided on container
shipping facilities relocation

@ By ALISON LOWE
Tribune Staff Reporter
alowe@tribunemedia.net

TOURISM stakeholders
are divided on the question
of whether the plan to relo-
cate container shipping facili-
ties to Arawak Cay is a good
idea.

Some believe the move is
as likely to hinder future
tourism development as it is
to boost downtown Nassau’s
revitalisation, but others claim
that recent “political rhetoric”
criticising the move has
ignored key factors in its
favour.

Most prominent among
these factors, supporters of
the plan say, is the “overriding
consideration” that it would
allow the removal of the facil-
ities — a critical element of the
enhancement of downtown
Nassau — to be concluded
more quickly and cheaply
than if the southwest New
Providence alternative were
chosen.

The cost would be lower
not only in terms of initial
capital outlay, but also for
Bahamians and tourists in the
long-term, as a more costly
port relocation would see
costs passed on to consumers
in the form of more expen-

Obie Wilchcombe



sive goods for years to come.
“What does it (moving the
port to southwest of the
island) do to the cost of a
weekly grocery shop, or to the
cost of a meal for a tourist?
That’s the question to be
asked,” said an informed
tourism source, who supports
the Arawak Cay option.
Meanwhile, The Tribune
has been told that although
Arawak Cay was ranked sixth
on a study of the best poten-
tial sites for the port — even
behind its present location —
other mitigating elements that

Freeport still plagued
by power outages

@ By DENISE MAYCOCK

Tribune Freeport Reporter

dmaycock@tribunemedia.net

FREEPORT - The City of Freeport continues to be plagued
by ongoing power outages due to equipment failure at the
Grand Bahama Power Company.

The interruption of power on Tuesday morning affected
many businesses in the downtown Freeport area, lasting for

three and a half hours.

Power was restored at 12.30pm at the Insurance Manage-
ment Building, where The Tribune/100 JAMZ office is located.

In a press release, GBPC officials reported that at about
7.40am on Tuesday, Unit 13 developed a boiler tube leak that
forced the unit to be taken offline for repairs.

The loss of the unit resulted in disruption of service to approx-

imately 7,000 customers.

Although the company reported that service was fully restored
by 8am, the Insurance Management Building remained without
power for another four and a half hours.

The Power Company said that repairs are expected to be
completed within the next 48 hours.

Based on the current load forecast, GBPC said that it is able
to meet the peak demand and continue to provide service to all

customers.

However, the company continues to request the assistance of
the public to conserve energy by only using necessary lights,
restricting the use of dryers, washing machines and irons, and
turning off water heaters and/or air-condition units.

GBPC apologised for any inconvenience caused.

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have come into play since the
study have enhanced its
attractiveness.

Its low ranking was based
in large part on “the poten-
tial for it to cause more traffic
congestion and for it to be a
visual blight”, said a source
acquainted with the study.

Review

But consultants who con-
ducted the review of poten-
tial sites did not take into con-
sideration the impact of the
New Providence Road
Improvement Project which
will see road corridors con-
structed and adjusted to ease
the flow of traffic in the area,
it has been claimed.

Additionally, The Tribune
has been told, suggestions by
critics that the extension of
Arawak Cay to accommodate
the facilities would contribute
to environmental damage in
the area do not reflect the evi-
dence in the consultant’s
study.

Although placing Arawak
Cay sixth overall, it in fact

ranked it one of the options
least likely to damage the
environment, based on a pre-
liminary review.

On top of these factors,
interest in financing the “$200
million plus” southwestern
port “wasn’t there” when ini-
tial inquiries were made, a
source said. The same private
sector interests which initially
supported a move to south-
west New Providence, after
having “looked at the eco-
nomics”, switched to the
Arawak Cay plan.

“While they conceptually
agreed, they started saying
‘Geez, this thing is going to
cost a fortune, so it just does-
n’t make sense from an eco-
nomics point of view. This is
the perspective that the public
doesn’t have on the whole
thing,” said the supportive
tourism sector source.

However, echoing PLP Sen-
ator Jerome Fitzgerald, for-
mer minister of tourism Obie
Wilchcombe said choosing
Arawak Cay as the new site
would represent a “big mis-
take.”

“We need to think this
thing through as opposed to
moving in a knee-jerk way
and looking out for some spe-
cial interest,” he said.

Such a move would restrict
the potential for Arawak Cay
to be developed into a major
tourist attraction, for down-
town to be expanded in time
as it may need to be and for
more employment opportu-
nities for Bahamians to be
created, suggested the ex-
tourism minister

“Our problem is we’re pen-
ny wise and pound foolish —
sometimes you have to spend
money to cause develop-
ment,” said Mr Wilchcombe.

His sentiments echo those
expressed by a member of the

MANGOS

‘YOUR VIEW’

To have your say on this or any
other issue, email The Tribune at:
letters@tribunemedia.net or
deliver your letter to The Tribune
on Shirley Street, P.O. Box N-3207



public at a town meeting host-
ed by the Downtown Nassau
Partnership (DNP) on the
subject of the city’s revitali-
sation last Wednesday.

The man, addressing the
panel of tourism stakehold-
ers, including Nassau Tourism
Development Board director
Frank Comito, DNP co-chairs
Charles Klonaris and Tourism
director general Vernice
Walkine, said he felt it was
illogical for an industrial facil-
ity like a shipping port to be
placed in a location so near
the country’s tourism hub,
where it would blight the
landscape for arriving cruise
visitors, among others.

Point

To this, Ms Walkine
answered that the man’s point
was “very well taken” but did
not comment further.

Yesterday, a separate
tourism source said that he
and others in the industry are
“certainly concerned about
the impact such a port (at
Arawak Cay) would have” —
environmentally and other-
wise.

However, he suggested that
the government appears to
have not yet to finalised its
plans in the long term, leaving
open the possibility that
another location could be
found eventually.

“T know they will take it
there, but whether that’s
where it will remain is the
question,” he said.

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PAGE 6, WEDNESDAY, MAY 13, 2009

THE TRIBUNE



LOCAL NEWS



Former manager at Sandals
questions timing of revelations

A FORMER manager at
Sandals is questioning the tim-
ing of revelations of an alleged
multi-million dollar embezzle-
ment scheme at the resort.

Details of the scheme -
which is said to have robbed
Sandals of $2.5 million over 13
years — were disclosed in a front
page article in The Tribune last
week.

The source said he suspects
there may be an “ulterior
motive” behind the allegations
being made public at this time —
and feels they might have been
leaked by the resort itself.

“Why now? If it’s been going
on for so many years, they must
have known something,” he
said.

The former manager, who
wished to be identified only as
the receiving supervisor, was
among a group of managers
laid off at Sandals just over two
weeks ago.

Lay-offs

Sandals said it let go five
managers as part of a restruc-
turing exercise aimed at stream-
lining operations, but the for-
mer manager fears the lay-offs
and the embezzlement scheme
have become linked in the pub-
lic consciousness.

He denied any wrong doing,
and does not believe the resort
is attempting to implicate the
former managers. But he does
think Sandals might have
leaked the allegations to
“change the conversation” and
thereby deflect any bad public-
ity as a result of the lay-offs.

“Last year they laid off 150
workers. They said that was it.




#

Bahamas

Now they wanted to release i
some more persons, and sud-
denly this story comes out }
about $2.5 million, and takes
attention from the lay-offs. It }
is convenient that this informa- }

tion was released,” he said.

Speaking to The Tribune yes- }
terday, a Sandals representa-
tive dismissed as utterly base- ;
less the claim that the resort i

had released the information.

In last week’s article, it was }
reported that the embezzle- :
ment scheme is thought to have }
involved a small group of }
employees and two tellers ata }

local bank.

Sandals admitted the compa-
ny has uncovered some finan- }
cial irregularities, but declined ;
to comment further as “the }

matter is with the authorities.”

According to a well placed
source, the scheme involved the
submission of grossly exagger-
ated supply bills to manage- }
ment. Once cheques were }

issued for the inflated sums,

one of the conspirators would i
take them to a particular bank }
branch, where a teller complic- i
it in the scheme would deposit }
the cheques in an account cre- }
ated for the express purpose of :

hiding the funds.

A second ploy reportedly i
involved generating fake petty ;
cash slips for various depart- }
ments using a counterfeit stamp
bearing the name of a senior }

resort official.

The amounts often substan- }
tially exceeded the limits set by }
Sandals management for petty }
cash payments, the source said. }

The matter has not yet been }
brought to the attention of the }
police, according to a repre-

sentative of the force.

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Call for more research into narcotics
supply and demand in the Bahamas

m@ By K QUINCY PARKER
Press/Cultural Attaché
Embassy of The Bahamas

THERE is an “urgent need for more
research” into the dynamics of narcotics
supply and demand in the Bahamas.

This was one of the conclusions of the
Bahamas’ representatives at the Organisa-
tion of American States (OAS) conference
in Washington, DC, this week.

The need to use the data provided by
anti-drug research to drive policy and leg-
islation, dominated discussions over the
first two days of discussions as OAS mem-
ber states — including the Bahamas — gath-
ered for anti-drug talks.

Deputy Director of the National Anti-
Drug Secretariat (NADS) Terrence Foun-
tain and Supply Reduction Officer Shervin
Lloyd represented the Bahamas at the 45th
Regular Session of the Inter-American
Drug Abuse Control Commission
(CICAD), held at the OAS from May 6
through May 8.

Mr Fountain said that during a discus-
sion with OAS Secretary General Dr José
Miguel Insulza about the new challenges
facing CICAD, many of the representa-
tives stressed the importance of the scien-
tific approach to anti-drug policy-making,
urging governments in the hemisphere to
make use of the research that has already
been done in the area.

In the case of the Bahamas, Mr Foun-
tain said, the drug research that has been
undertaken must lead to concrete pro-
grammes and must guide government pol-
icymakers as they tackle the thorny prob-
lem.

He argued that there was a great need for
more research into drug supply and demand
to be done in the Bahamas.

“Not for academic purposes,” he stressed,
“but research to drive policy and action.
This is what everyone (at the meeting) is
crying for. We have got to have a renewed
focus on data collection and data analysis.”

Mr Lloyd added that CICAD members
are increasingly moving away from “crimi-
nalising” drug addiction. The Bahamas and
the other CICAD members, he said, are
seeing the problem as a sickness.

“Tt must be dealt with as a health prob-
lem, but not ignoring national security con-
cerns,” Mr Lloyd said.

ANTI-DRUG STRATEGY

Another major area of concentration at
the conference was the review of the Anti-
Drug Strategy in the Hemisphere, Mr Foun-
tain reported. The talks resulted in a draft
resolution, in which it is proposed — among
other things — that the OAS General
Assembly invite all member states to con-
tribute to and participate in the process of
review and update through CICAD.

The draft resolution also proposed to
accept the government of Brazil’s offer to
be the headquarters for the Working Group





K Quincy Parker

BAHAMAS National Anti-Drug Secretariat Deputy nipsctar Tenens Fountain and Supply Reduc-
tion Officer Shervin Lloyd attended the 45th Regular Session of the Inter-American Drug Abuse

Control Commission (CICAD) in Washington, DC.

meetings and coordinate the review and
updating process up to and until the pre-
sentation of the results at CICAD’s next
regular session.

“We need to realise the interconnected-
ness of all countries, because the whole
drug business looks for weaknesses across
borders to exploit,” he said.

Mr Fountain said that National Security
Minister Tommy Turnquest had asked for a
Bahamas National Anti-Drug Policy to be
drafted, and that there was a strong desire
in the Bahamas and throughout the hemi-
sphere to harmonise national anti-drug
strategies with both the United Nations’
Global Anti-Drug Strategy agreed to in
Vienna and the OAS’ strategy.

He pointed out that the Caribbean Com-
munity (CARICOM) had recently worked
on its own sub-regional strategy. He said the
Bahamas’ goal is to create a matrix that
takes the areas in which these disparate
strategies are in harmony and design an
effective national strategy based on that
matrix.

CICAD members also produced a draft
resolution on the body’s Multilateral Eval-
uation Mechanism (MEM).

MUTLILATERAL

EVALUATION MECHANISM

Mr Fountain explained that in response
to a shared desire for fair and objective
evaluation of hemispheric anti-drug mea-
sures, the OAS decided ten years ago to
adopt the MEM.

Each member state must complete exten-
sive questionnaires in three-year cycles.
CICAD - as the accepted competent



authority — takes the information and pro-
duces both a country report and a set of
recommendations. Later, a follow-up eval-
uation occurs, aimed at determining the
extent to which the recommendations have
been implemented.

The NADS director urged that the ques-
tionnaires not be seen as “just another nui-
sance questionnaire,” but as something that
should be used by Bahamian authorities as
indicators to drive policy for specific insti-
tutions.

Mr Fountain noted that the final draft
report on the Bahamas from the fourth
round of the MEM, which contained
CICAD’s evaluation of the Bahamas’
implementation of its recommendations,
had just come out. It evaluated the
Bahamas’ progress on implementation of 14
recommendations, including ratification of
certain multilateral conventions and imple-
mentation of recommendations reiterated
from earlier cycles.

POLITICAL WILL

Mr Lloyd, the Supply Reduction Officer,
noted that another major theme of the con-
ference was the importance of political will.
He said that CICAD members seemed to
believe the right political leadership is
required for successful anti-drug policies
to succeed.

He said that having been exposed to the
scope of the drug problem in other coun-
tries, the Bahamas does not face as severe a
challenge as some, but that political will is
still critical to implement the strategies that
would allow the country to effectively com-
bat the scourge.



PM opens Commonwealth Local Govt Conference



ae
oe

m@ By DENISE MAYCOCK
Tribune Freeport Reporter
dmaycock@tribunemedia.net

FREEPORT - Prime Minis-
ter Hubert Ingraham officially
opened the Commonwealth
Local Government’s Confer-
ence this week on Grand
Bahama, welcoming 600 dele-
gates who were hosted to a cul-
tural extravaganza.

The Grand Bahama Youth
Choir — under the direction of
Kevin Tomilson — dazzled dele-
gates with a musical perfor-
mance during its debut appear-
ance.

The delegates also got a taste
of a more refined, but lively
junkanoo rush-out, and were
entertained by a culturally-
inspired dance ensemble.

The show climaxed with a
showing of the historic Golden
Girls Olympic 4x400 Relay win
at the 2000 Sydney Olympic
Games. Applause filled the con-
ference as the race was dis-
played on two huge display
screens.

During his welcome address,
Minister of State for Local Gov-
ernment Byran Woodside noted
that the Bahamas is the first
country in the Caribbean to host
CLGC.

Prime Minister Hubert Ingra-
ham introduced local govern-
ment in the Bahamas in 1996 to
bring governance closer to the
people. There are a total of 32
local government districts in the

Bahamas.

The Bahamas
won the bid to host
the conference two
years ago. Delegates
from 46 Common-
wealth nations have
travelled to Freeport
for the conference.

In his remarks,
Mr Ingraham wel-
comed Secretary
General of the Com-
monwealth
Kamalesh Sharma
and his wife, and
CARICOM Secre-
tary General Edwin
Carrington to the Bahamas.

“T am especially happy to
welcome you to the City of
Freeport, Lucaya, and Grand
Bahama and trust that your
brief stay will afford you some
time to enjoy the attractions of
this special island.

Celebrating

“We are especially pleased
to host the event during this
year when we are celebrating
the 60th anniversary of the
Commonwealth, that unique
group of nations that had its
beginning with the transforma-
tion of the old colonial order,”
he said.

He noted that Freeport has
the most effective system of
local government in the entire
Bahamas.

Mr Ingraham explained that

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Hubert Ingraham



under provisions
agreed in the 1950’s
between the govern-
ment and a private
company, the Grand
Bahama Port
Authority, manage-
ment of the city of
Freeport was dele-
gated to the Port
Authority for a peri-
od of 99-years.

He pointed out
that the infrastruc-
ture of the city,
including its airport,
harbour and port
facilities are private-
ly owned and operated.

Mr Ingraham said that the
Port Authority is charged with
the economic development of
Freeport. He told delegates that
50 years ago Freeport was a sim-
ple pine yard.

“Freeport’s governing system
has worked well for Freeport.
It is not, however, without its
own tensions between governor
and governed.

“Freeport’s reality is that a
small logging settlement on this
large Family Island in the mid-
dle of the last century has
become the second largest pop-
ulation centre in The Bahamas
today, the industrial hub of The
Bahamas, an employment cen-
tre and host to one of the deep-
est container transshipment
ports in our region,” the Prime
Minister said.

Prime Minister Ingraham
said that central government
continues to control immigra-
tion and foreign direct invest-
ment as it does in all other
islands of The Bahamas.

He said it retains responsi-
bility for the operation of the
public hospital, the government-
operated school system and cer-
tain public sporting and recre-
ational facilities.

Medical, accounting, legal
and other professionals practis-
ing in Freeport are required to
be licensed and regulated in
accordance with the national
laws and their respective pro-
fessional bodies.

Hotels and casinos operate
in accordance with the provi-
sions of national legislation, and
industries are subject to nation-
al environmental and public
health standards.

Mr Ingraham said that a par-
ticular idiosyncrasy of local gov-
ernment administration in The
Bahamas is its absence from the
island of New Providence, the
capital City of Nassau where
three quarters of our national
population lives.

He said that calls for some
form of municipal government
for the City of Nassau have
become urgent.

“Already a Nassau Develop-
ment Board, formed during one
of my earlier terms in office, has
presented proposals for the cre-
ation of a management office
for the city.

Development

“The dramatic population
and commercial growth into the
suburbs of the City of Nassau
have already resulted in the
development of important city
centres in the outlying districts
of the island that would benefit
from the institution of local city
councils or town committees to
manage a myriad of matters
impacting the lives of residents,
including matters relating to
environmental control, local
traffic problems, improved col-
lection and disposal of solid
waste and maintenance of

neighbourhoods, schools,
libraries, streets and parks, for
example.

“T have no doubt that those
delegates from our central gov-
ernment agencies attending this
week’s conference will be espe-
cially anxious to garner from
your discussions, ideas of local
government administration
which might be successfully
introduced to our capital city
and its suburbs,” said Mr Ingra-
ham.

He said that the CLGC dis-
cussions will provide useful
opportunities for delegates to
learn from one another the vari-
ations that have evolved and
continue to evolve in local gov-
ernment systems around the
Commonwealth.

“T take this opportunity to
emphasize to all of you gath-
ered here under the theme
‘Improving Local Government,
the Commonwealth Vision’ that
local government and democra-
cy are all about working for the
common good. ”
THE TRIBUNE

WEDNESDAY, MAY 13, 2009, PAGE 7





The history of Green Turtle Cay
TOUGH CALL

Cys Turtle Cay's
annual Island Roots

Festival bills itself as a celebra-
tion of European as well as
African heritage. That's because
— unlike most Abaco settlements
— both blacks and whites have
lived together here from the ear-
liest days, in close proximity if not
always in perfect harmony.

This unusual historical context
provides the backdrop for one of
the country's most successful her-
itage events. It all began 33 years
ago with a conversation between
New Plymouth artist Alton Lowe
and Key West librarian Betty
Bruce at the opening of the little
museum in Green Turtle Cay
named after Alton's father, Albert
Lowe.

"Betty asked me what else
could be done to promote
Bahamian heritage and I suggest-
ed that New Plymouth should
become the sister city of Key
West, which has deep Bahamian
roots," Alton told me. "She imme-
diately invited me to Key West
to help set the wheels in motion."

Later, Alton met with officials
in Nassau who helped him organ-
ise the first Island Roots Festival
in 1978. The guest of honour at
that inaugural event was none
other than deputy prime minister
(and now governor-general)
Arthur Hanna. And performances
were given by the Royal Bahamas
Police Force Band as well as a
folklore troupe led by Kayla
Lockhart Edwards and Clement
Bethel (both now dead). Key
West went on to stage similar her-
itage events.

But interest waned after a few
seasons, and the formal activities
were replaced by private visits
between residents of the two com-
munities, and others with family
ties. In 2004 a revival was sug-
gested by the Ministry of Tourism
and the festival has continued
every year since, to rave reviews.
In fact, some 4,000 people attend-
ed this year's event, and GTC's
harbour was crammed with visit-
ing yachts.

Tough Call was among those
thousands on the weekend of May
1-3, and in addition to macaroni
and cheese, cracked lobster and
crab and rice, I was able to sample
some uncommon intellectual fare.
Among the treats were perfor-
mances of Sandra Riley's histori-
cal plays by the Miami-based
Crystal Parrot Players; and pre-
sentations by Florida archaeolo-
gist Bob Carr, Grand Bahama his-

tory buff Darius Williams, Nancy
Albury of the Antiquities, Monu-
ments & Museums Corporation,
and local genealogist Joy Lowe
Jossi.

Most of the Abaco cays were
exclusively white settlements
founded at the end of the loyalist
influx after Britain's loss of the
American colonies in the 1780s,
while most of the settlements in
North Abaco were exclusively
black. According to Alton Lowe,
Green Turtle Cay is a prime
example of good racial relations in
the Bahamas: "When I was grow-
ing up we all depended on each
other, and the town's population
of about 500 is equally divided
between white and black."

Grand Bahama engineer Dar-
ius Williams (who published a
book on the history of railways
and locomotives in the Bahamas
two years ago) delved a little
deeper into this subject in a talk
he gave at the island's adminis-
trative centre. Williams derived
GTC's African population from
a variety of historical records,
beginning with the "list of negroes
and loyalist veterans" who emi-
grated from New York to the
Abacos after the American War
of Independence.

These earliest African settlers
were either free blacks or former
American slaves who had sup-
ported the British in return for
their freedom. But most were
assigned or indentured to white
loyalists for resettlement in the
Bahamas. This naturally led to
resentment, protests, and eventu-
ally to a small insurrection on
Abaco in the mid-1780s.

As one contemporary account
put it, "These unhappy people,
after being drawn from their mas-
ters by promises of freedom and
the king's protection, are every
day stolen away." As a result, the
British governor of the time
reported that, ""Numbers of the
outlaying negroes went about with
muskets and fixed bayonets, rob-
bing and plundering."

Williams drew more informa-
tion on Green Turtle's African
population from slave registers as
well as from the reports of spe-

- THE AIRPORT AUTHORITY



cial justices assigned by the British
to supervise the four-year eman-
cipation process in the colonies.
There were also official reports
on the settlement of liberated
Africans after the British abol-
ished the international slave trade
in 1807 — some 6,000 Africans
were released in the Bahamas
from 35 slave ships in the years
leading up to 1860.

According to Williams, Green
Turtle was one of the first areas to
be surveyed for the resettlement
of liberated Africans and emanci-
pated slaves in the northern
Bahamas in 1835, along with
Mcleans Town on Grand
Bahama. "We know this from
town extension surveys,” he said.
"They were also settled on sev-
eral other islands, including the
Berries, Bimini, and Red Bays,
Andros, in addition to New Prov-
idence."

H: also referred to news-
paper accounts of the

resettlement of American slaves
shipwrecked in Bahamian waters
(slavery did not end in the United
States until 1865). The island of
Abaco bounded one of the main
shipping routes for vessels going
from the Atlantic Seaboard to
American ports in the Gulf of
Mexico, and the fringing reefs
along the island's eastern coast
are treacherous.

The eventual collapse of the
Bahamian plantation economy
from insect pests and soil exhaus-
tion led many loyalists to desert
Abaco for other islands and terri-
tories. By 1805 the population of
Green Turtle Cay was said to
have been employed in the tradi-
tional activities of woodcutting,
turtling and wrecking, with only
15 slaves reported. This indicat-
ed that those hardy loyalists who
remained had adapted to the
“conch” way of life of the original
settlers, which focused on the sea
rather than on large-scale agri-
culture.

But after a major hurricane in
1806 devastated their homes,
many Harbour Islanders from
Eleuthera moved to Abaco to

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NASSAU, BAHAMAS

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normal working hours at any time after the appearance of this RFP.

Bids must meet all specifications.

Bids not in compliance with the specifications will be rejected.
Bids must be signed by an individual duly authorized to bind the
bidder to the terms of a contract. Price must include any and all

“Green Turtle's
Island Roots
Festival is perhaps
the best organised

and most
entertaining event

of its kind in the
Bahamas, with

a good mix of
activities to satisfy
the mind as well
as the appetite.”



intermarry with the remaining loy-
alists on three principal settle-
ments — New Plymouth, Man-o-
War and Hope Town. The popu-
lation began to grow, and by 1815
there were 193 people on Green
Turtle Cay.

"When emancipation was pro-
claimed in 1834 there were about
300 slaves and 16 liberated
Africans on Green Turtle Cay out
of a total population of 800, and a
total Abaco population of 1800,"
Williams said. "We don't have any
information about free blacks at
this time, but there were 39 fami-
ly head applications for land on
the cay in 1835. The cost of quar-
ter-acre town lots and 5-acre pro-
vision grounds for these former
slaves was about 10 days labour
laying out roads for the settle-
ment.”

There was much opposition
from the white population at this
time to resettling Africans recov-
ered from foreign slave ships by
the British navy. As Sandra Riley
wrote in her history of Abaco
(Homeward Bound): "Planters
strained under the necessity of
caring for the free African inden-
tures left in the colony as the
result of wrecks or seizures, and
they could not afford the high
prices of labourers after the inden-
tures had expired."

Following emancipation, there
was similar resistance to taking in
shipwrecked American slaves, and
numerous reports that Bahami-
ans were “conveying away
Africans for the atrocious pur-
pose of again selling them into
slavery in Florida and elsewhere."
Many white Abaconians left the
Bahamas at this time for America.
In fact, during the 1840s one
British governor reported that

Key West owed two thirds of its
population to this exodus.

But the feelings were clearly
mutual. As Steve Dodge pointed
out in his short history of Abaco,
"once freed many former slaves
moved away from the white set-
tlements and established new
towns...purposely isolating them-
selves from the whites." These
settlements included places like
Cedar Harbour, Cornish Town,
Bluff Point, Crossing Rocks and
Sandy Point. Almost exclusively
black, they survived by themselves
on subsistence farming and fishing
until well into the 20th century.

Eventually, the old emnities
subsided, and blacks and whites
drew close together in a more
even relationship. In the 1940s
many of those who lived in the
northern African settlements
moved to the new Marsh Harbour
subdivisions of Dundas Town and
Murphy Town that had been laid
out by the colonial government.
And in the 1960s the growth of
tourism brought prosperity to the
Abaco cays. The advent of major-
ity rule in 1967 followed by Inde-
pendence six years later has unal-
terably changed the mental land-
scape of the Bahamas. And to cap
it all off, a former barefoot boy
from Cooper's Town sits in the
prime minister's office today.

Green Turtle's Island Roots
Festival is perhaps the best organ-
ised and most entertaining event
of its kind in the Bahamas, with a
good mix of activities to satisfy
the mind as well as the appetite. It
should be a model for the devel-
opment of heritage tourism
throughout the islands. And it all
began with the conversion of a
wooden shack into a museum and
a casual chat about family ties.

The Antiquities Corporation
in Nassau participates in these
events on a regular basis. It also
undertakes archaeological
research and supports cultural and
historical initiatives throughout
the country. These have included
the South Eleuthera Mission
House at Rock Sound, the Free-
town Historical Project on Grand
Bahama, the Long Island Muse-
um at Buckley's, and the North
Abaco Historical Foundation,
which is now in the process of reg-
istering as a non-profit organisa-
tion.

The foundation is the brain-
child of two Murphy Town resi-
dents — Millie Dawkins of the
Abaco Ministry of Tourism, and
Mirella Santillo, a French immi-
grant who writes for the Abacon-

ae

Colina Imperial

ian newspaper. "We both have a
strong interest in the history of
Abaco," Santillo told me. "I want-
ed to find the location of a
rumoured French settlement dat-
ing to the late 1500s or early
1600s. Millie wanted to locate for-
mer African settlements in the
north to collect data for a museum
and for incorporation into the
local school curriculum."

Prienes after the South
Eleuthera Mission House
at Rock Sound, the North Abaco
Historical Foundation is working
with Dr Keith Tinker of the
Antiquities Corporation to rede-
velop a building that once was the
home of renowned Abaco head
teacher Sherlyn Bootle. The Rock
Sound Mission House dates back
two centuries, and has recently
been restored as a museum,
library and community centre by
local residents who set up a foun-
dation to support the project.

North Abaco's proposed her-
itage centre will also house a
museum, library and computer
lab. And the foundation's long-
term goal is to set up similar her-
itage centres and restore historic
buildings in other areas. "We want
to tie in the African heritage of
Abaco," Dawkins said," and take
an inventory of historical
resources for education, to create
jobs and to attract visitors to the
northern communities.” This is
the same path that Green Turtle
Cay embarked upon decades ago.

Heritage tourism offers a
unique way to break the isolation
and enliven the economy of small
communities. The trick is to find
the right hook and develop some-
thing more than just a macaroni
and beer event. As broadcaster
Charles Carter told me in New
Plymouth a few days ago, if the
Andros Crab Fest could be re-
organised and re-branded as the
Joseph Spence Cultural Festival
the promotional opportunities and
economic spin-offs would be
unlimited.

And if you don't know who
Joseph Spence was, you are part
of the problem.

http://en.wikipedia.org/
wiki/Joseph_Spence_(musician)

What do you think?

Send comments to
larry@tribunemedia.net

Or visit www.bahamapundit.com

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PAGE 8, WEDNESDAY, MAY 13, 2009

THE TRIBUNE





Evaluating the FNM Cabinet

YOUNG MAN’s VIEW

Young Man’s View
continues the
evaluation of the
nation’s executive
branch two years into
the FNM’s tenure.

@ By ADRIAN GIBSON
ajoahama@hotmail.com

Loceera BUT-
LER-TURNER, the
Minister of State for Social
Development, seems to be a
ministerial misfit who can
hardly earn more than an F-
plus grade.

Mrs Turner appears to
emit sound and fury, but little
substance and no new initia-
tives or policies. Under the
minister, programmes relat-
ing to drug treatment and
rehab are underfunded; child
protection legislation remains
outstanding and sexual abuse
legislation sat on the back-
burner for a while before
being passed.

Social workers continue to
complain about a lack of
resources and long waits to
be reimbursed for monies
spent putting gas in their pri-
vate vehicles to do the
department’s work.

Although the minister has
attempted to address some
concerns at the Boys and
Girls Industrial Schools,
much more can be done. At
present, any evaluation of
Mrs Turner gives one the
impression that she has mere-
ly been running through the
daisies, catching butterflies,
but little else!

The Urban Renewal pro-
gramme was also scrapped
under the Social Services
minister, only to have to be
reinstate it in certain districts.
Mrs Turner does not appear
to have an appreciable under-
standing of her ministry, fre-
quently going on the defen-
sive and constantly remind-
ing people that she is the min-
ister (for eg, during Parlia-
mentary proceedings).

The minister should not
pay too much attention to
some of the unschooled reli-
gious leaders who are tact-
lessly advising her. She
should seck to increase the
manpower at her ministry
and launch campaigns to
address teenage pregnancy
and the high levels of illegiti-
macy in Bahamian soci-
ety. The minister must also
address the growing presence
of homeless people on the
streets and seek to enlist tru-
ancy officers to apprehend
the growing number of chil-

7a) DS ee) ae

dren drifting about during
school hours.

Charles Maynard, the
chubby Minister of State for
Culture, earns a D-minus. It
is a disgrace to hear informed
cultural icons suggest that the
Bahamas may once again not
host Carifesta, particularly
when the country appears to
be in a slump in terms of the
arts.

In 2005, the late Winston
Saunders was dispatched to
receive the instruments sig-
nifying that the Bahamas was
prepared to host Carifesta.
However, as was felt when
the Bahamas withdrew for its
hosting duties in 2008, the
cultural community seems set
for another devastating blow
and if it is entirely true that
the Bahamas will not host the
upcoming event, it will leave
the country with a black eye
and the impression that it is a
culturally impotent state unfit
to host international events.
At present, there are various
sites such as gymnasiums,
large church halls/Loyola
Hall, hotel ballrooms, per-
forming arts centres such as
the National Centre for the
Performing Arts, Fort Char-
lotte and open spaces and
facilities throughout the Fam-
ily Islands that could have
made the hosting of this event
possible. Surely Mr Maynard
and the Cabinet must know
that with the Bahamas being
a tourism-based economy, in
addition to the exposure this
event could bring to the Fam-
ily Islands, there would not
be any problems with accom-
modations because of the
availability of adequate hotel
rooms and our proximity to
the US would also possibly
attract visitors interested in
seeing the event who would
not have otherwise travelled
to South America or to an
eastern Caribbean country.
Hosting this cultural event
would be a needed economic
boost for the islands!

It appears that Mr May-
nard is stuck on the idea that
culture begins and ends with
junkanoo. It is great that the
minister likes junkanoo, but
why hasn’t there been any
moves to develop it into a
year-round, cultural industry
that could be a cultural
export taken worldwide with
persons who could legiti-

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mately describe their occu-
pation as being a junkanooer.

The culture minister inher-
ited a lot of good projects for
whom credit should go to Dr
Keith Tinker and the Antiq-
uities, Monuments and Muse-
ums Corporation. While Mr
Maynard is enjoying his trav-
els to various events and cre-
ating the illusion of hard
work, it appears that local
playwrights, folklorists/story-
tellers, artists, writers, poets
and painters are receiving lit-
tle by way of support. There
is a need to focus on devel-
oping the stories of the
Bahamas that form our iden-
tity and have yet to be prop-
erly appreciated or recorded.
Why isn’t locally created art
placed in all Bahamian
embassies and government
offices?

Minister Maynard has not
demonstrated his ability to
bring new ideas or be respon-
sible for the contribution of
new policies to the overall
cultural development of the
Bahamas. I do credit Mr
Maynard with the opening of
Clifton—for which I was
proud to see that he engaged
former Prime Minister Perry
Christie who was once at the
forefront of the movement to
save the site—and for the
movement to develop Collins
House into a national muse-
um. As a resident of Mr May-
nard’s constituency, he earns
an F for his performance as
an MP.



i

Dion Foulkes, the Minister
of Labour and Social Devel-
opment, earns a B-plus. Mr
Foulkes is a savvy politician
who has mediated and dif-
fused several attempts by
unions to commence indus-
trial action.

The minister can partly be
credited with the unemploy-
ment benefit scheme and for
establishing what I’m told is a
more civilized atmosphere
when negotiating industrial
agreements. However, Mr




Foulkes must seek to squash
the uncivilized union infight-
ing, which has now elevated
to actual blows being
exchanged when attorney and
former MP Keod Smith was
allegedly smacked in the face
while serving court orders on
Monday. It appears that some
labour leaders in the
Bahamas are hardly con-
cerned about unionized work-
ers, but more about power
and their political/financial
standing.

The labour unions are
holding the country to ran-
som and if allowed to go
unchecked, the unions—par-
ticularly those of the utility
companies—will be too
strong for the government.
There must be policy set forth
to damper the power of reck-
less union leaders, otherwise
we will have a situation where
“the tail wags the dog.”

Furthermore, Senator
Foulkes has ensured that the
consumer affairs aspect of his
ministry is efficiently and con-
stantly visible. The rights of
consumers, who are subjected
to price gouging in food/gen-
eral stores and gas stations
and in some instances are
sold outdated items, must be
protected and I’m told that
the minister is set to take
legal action against certain
unscrupulous business own-
ers.

Hubert Minnis, the Minis-
ter of Health, earns a B-plus.

Dr Minnis has said that he
is actively working to improve
the communication between
staff and patients at the
Princess Margaret Hospital,
secking to resolve complaints
about long lines at clinics,
attempting to ensure that the
hospital and polyclinics
throughout the islands are
operated by highly skilled and
professional staff. He has said
that he is initiating means to
ensure that doctors and staff
are more Service-oriented and
accountable.

In addition to initiating the
e-medicine programme, the
health minister has proposed
to develop a programme that
would require newly return-
ing doctors to be deployed
and exposed to work on the
Family Islands.

However, Dr Minnis’ min-
istry is faced with a myriad
of problems ranging from
inadequate hospital beds and
the unsanitary conditions at
the hospital (dirty elevators,
unusable bathrooms, etc); the
need for a change of the
dreadful, indifferent man-
agement at the hospital, who
should be replaced by an
experienced and insightful
administrative grouping fea-
turing Bahamians who would
have worked in a manage-
ment capacity at a hospital
overseas; claims of malprac-
tice; the need for a new hos-
pital and laboratories; a need
to address the issues arising
about the acceptance of
degrees from Cuba and the

NOTICE

NOTICE

is hereby given that MARTIN JERMAINE

McGREGOR OF #25 DIAMOND DRIVE, P.O. BOX F-44900,
GRAND BAHAMA, BAHAMAS is applying to the Minister
responsible for Nationality and Citizenship, for registration’
naluralzation as a citizen of The Bahamas, and thal any
person whoknows any reason why ragistration/ naturalization
should not be granted, should send a written and signed
Statement of the facts within twenty-eight days from the 17th
day of APRIL, 2009 to the Minister responsible for Nationality
and Citizenship, FO.Box N-7147, Freeport, Bahamas.

NOTICE

NOTICE is hereby given that JOY CYNTHIA TILBAYNE of
WOOD BURN ESTATE, P.O, BOX N-4303, NASSAU, BAHAMAS,
is applying to the Minister responsible for Nationality and Citizenship,
for registration/naturalization as a citizen of The Bahamas, and that
any person who knows any reason why registration/naturalization
should not be granted, should send a written and signed statement
of the facts within twenty-eight days from the 6â„¢ day of May, 2009
to the Minister responsible for nationality and Citizenship, PO. Box

N-7147, Nassau, Bahamas.

PUBLIC NOTICE

INTENT TO CHANGE NAME BY DEED POLL

The Public is hereby advised that |, LESLIE BUTLER nee
MUSGROVE of 23 Saint Georges Drive, Richmond Arms
North Bahamia of the Island of Freeport, Grand Bahama,
intend ta change my name son's name from RAYMOND



there are any objections to this change of name by Deed
Poll, you may write such objections to the Chief Passport
Officer, POBox N-T42, Nassau, Bahamas no later than
thirty (30) days after the date of publication of this notice.

presence of some physicians
who seem to be more con-
cerned with making loads of
money rather than health-
care. Frankly, Dr Minnis is
also hampered by the institu-
tional bureaucracy of a
healthcare system tinkering
on the brink of collapse when
he was assigned his portfolio.

Dr Minnis appears to be
proactive in approach and has
also speedily addressed any
crisis at the hospital or alarm-
ing healthcare issues with a
view to constantly updating
and informing the public. He
is also rated highly as an MP,
running what Sidney Blu-
menthal describes in his 1980
book as the ‘Permanent Cam-
paign,’ engaging his con-
stituents and their concerns.



Neko Grant, the Minister
of Works and Transport,
earns a D. Mr Grant appears
to be lost in the middle of a
jigsaw puzzle, failing to time-
ly negotiate even the most
basic of maintenance con-
tracts, which would have
avoided much of the chaos
caused when nearly all street
lights in New Providence
were wildly flashing.

Mr Grant must address the
traffic congestion on New
Providence, further engage
those in public transport and
resolve the apparent discon-
nect between the ministry of
works and the utility compa-
nies by requiring all to coor-
dinate the installation of
equipment as opposed to
uprooting newly paved roads
when they desire, and also
address the concerns of citi-
zens about the surveying of
property and the untimely
approach taken to granting
approval for architectural/
construction plans.

Thus far, the construction
of sea walls and roads under
the minister is a step in the
right direction; however,
infrastructural upgrades must
also be taken at the various
government offices through-
out the islands, at parks (eg,
RM Bailey), government-ini-
tiated cemeteries and recre-
ational areas.

Hubert Ingraham, the
Prime Minister and Minister
of Finance, earns a B—the

average of all his ministers.
In this instance, the PM can
only be as strong as the weak-
est link in his Cabinet—and
there are quite a few. How-
ever, in terms of his own abil-
ities, the Prime Minister earns
an A-minus.

Prime Minister Ingraham
is the ultimate leader, steadi-
ly steering the country
through these tough econom-
ic times.

The PM continues to live
up to the mantra of “saying
what he means and meaning
what he says.” As a policy-
maker, he should—in con-
junction with the Opposi-
tion—strive to make provi-
sions for a national plan for
the governance of the
Bahamas even 20 years from
today—that is, in terms of the
development of our people.
Mr Ingraham’s political
genius is demonstrated by his
firm, decisive leadership and
his coordination and disci-
pline of his Cabinet.

However, the PM must
increasingly promote and
encourage the local entre-
preneurial spirit through eco-
nomic initiatives and should
strongly consider including
the gambling issue on his leg-
islative agenda, whether by
appointing a commission with
a timeframe or having a ref-
erendum.

The FNM government
must recognize the need for
reform in order to foster a
free market, entrepreneur-
ship, a stronger private sec-
tor and also eliminate all
government/private monop-
olies.

There are also a few Cabi-
net ministers who should do
the populace a favour and
request a return to the back-
benches.

There are still some mem-
bers of the Cabinet—who can
hardly be considered among
the FNM’s brain trust—
whose behaviour is compara-
ble to that of ostriches, which
are known to see danger but
instead of looking for safety
or making an attempt to
defend against their attack-
er, they become contented
with sticking their heads into
sand, assuming that the prob-
lem will just go away. Space
must be for new faces—per-
sons even outside of the polit-
ical realm—who have specif-
ic knowledge about a min-
istry, to serve at a higher lev-
el.

Finally, the FNM must
constantly employ trans-
parency and accountability in
the signing of contracts and
agreements/treaties and seek
to draft and permit the pas-
sage of a Freedom of Infor-
mation Act because, to use
the words of Charles Grassley
(senior Republican on the US
Congress’ Senate Finance
Committee), “sunshine is the
best disinfectant.”

In their second year, the
FNM government earns a B-
minus.

NOTICE

NOTICE is hereby given that BOLIE EDWARD LLOYD of
ST. ANDREW BEACH ESTATES, P.O. BOX EE-17773,
is applying to the Minister responsible for Nationality and
Citizenship, for registration/naturalization as a citizen of The
Bahamas, and that any person who knows any reason why
registration/naturalization should not be granted, should
send a written and signed statement of the facts within
twenty-eight days from the 13 day of May, 2009 to the
Minister responsible for nationality and Citizenship, P.O. Box

N-7147, Nassau, Bahamas.

PUBLIC NOTICE

INTENT TO CHANGE NAME BY DEED POLL
The Public is hereby advised that |, SHAMICKA

P.O. BOX GT-2121, NASSAU, BAHAMAS intend

to my name to SHAMICKA FREDRICKA NORTH, If
there are any objections to this change of name by
Deed Poll, you may write such objections to the Chief
Passport Officer, P:O.Box N-742, Nassau, Bahamas no
later than thirty (30) days after the date of publication

NOTICE

NOTICE is hereby given that CURRY VALBRUN OF
EXUMA STREET OFF ANDROS AVENUE, P.O. BOX
EE-15093, is applying to the Minister responsible

of this notice.

for Mationality

and Citizenship, for

registrations

naturalization as a citizen of The Bahamas, and thal
any person who knows any reason why registration!
naturalization should not be granted, should send
a written and signed statement of the facts within
twenty-eight days from the 12° day of May, 2008 to the
Minister responsible for nationality and Citimenship,
PO. Box N-7147, Nassau, Bahamas.


TRIBUNE SPORTS

WEDNESDAY, MAY 13, 2009, PAGE 13



Nowitzki helps Mavs avoid
sweep at hands of Nuggets

NBA Today

By The Associated
Press

Dallas at Denver (9pm
EDT). The Nuggets try
again to close out the
series and advance to the
Western Conference semi-
finals after the Mavericks
forced Game 5 with a 119-
117 victory Monday night.

STARS

Monday

—Dirk Nowitzki, Mav-
ericks, scored 19 of his 44
points in the fourth quar-
ter, including a high-arch-
ing shot with 1:05 left that
put Dallas ahead for good
in its 119-117 victory over
Denver.

—Josh Howard, Maver-
icks, had 21 points and 11
rebounds to help prevent
Dallas from being swept.

—LeBron James, Cava-
liers, had 27 points, eight
rebounds and eight assists
in a series-clinching 84-84
victory over Atlanta.

STRONG IN DEFEAT

Carmelo Anthony
scored a career playoff-
best 41 points in Denver's
119-117 loss to Dallas.

UNBEATEN AND

UNCHALLENGED

Cleveland made it an
NBA-record eight straight
wins by double digits with
an 84-74 victory over
Atlanta to advance to the
Eastern Conference finals.
The Cavaliers became the
second team to sweep the
first two rounds of the
playoffs since the NBA
expanded the first round
to best-of-seven in 2003.
The Miami Heat started
with sweeps of New Jer-
sey and Washington in the
2005 playoffs before los-
ing to Detroit in the East
finals.

SWEEPS STOPPED

Dallas avoided a pair of
sweeps with its 119-117 vic-
tory over Denver in Game
4 of the Western Confer-
ence semifinals. Besides
being swept in the series,
the Mavericks avoided

dropping every game this

season against the
Nuggets. Denver won all
four meetings in the regu-
lar season.

COACHING

CAROUSEL

Jay Triano is keeping his
job and Tony DiLeo is
returning to his old one.
Triano signed a three-year
contract Monday to coach
the Toronto Raptors,
dropping the interim tag
after taking over the team
during the season. DiLeo
withdrew his name from
consideration for the
76ers’ permanent coaching
job and will go back to his
old job in the front office,
citing family reasons. Gen-
eral manager Ed Stefanski
said the search for a
replacement will begin
immediately.

SPEAKING

"Why should we cele-
brate? We're playing for a
championship. An advance
is an advance. It doesn't
matter if you win in four
games or you win Game 7.
We're happy that we're
playing great basketball ...
but we're not taking for
granted what we're doing
right now."

— LeBron James after
Cleveland completed a
sweep of Atlanta and
advanced to the Eastern
Conference finals with an
84-74 victory in Game 4





DELONTE WEST scores as Josh Smith looks on in the third quarter of
Game 4 of the Eastern Conference semifinals playoffs in Atlanta Monday
night. Cleveland won 84-74 and swept the series 4-0.

(AP Photo: John Bazemore)

Get out the brooms: Cavs
complete sweep of Hawks

lm By PAUL NEWBERRY
AP Sports Writer

ATLANTA (AP) — LeBron
James knew the routine.
Exchange a few handshakes.
Knock out a few interviews.
Start getting ready for Cleve-
land's next series.

This wasn't a time to cele-
brate.

"Why should we celebrate?"
James said. "We're playing for a
championship."

The Cavaliers made it 8-for-8
in the postseason, completing a
second straight sweep with an
84-74 win over the Atlanta
Hawks on Monday night. But
Cleveland had barely walked
off the court at Philips Arena
when the focus shifted to the
Eastern Conference finals.

Clearly, this team won't be
satisfied unless it's lifting a tro-
phy after the final game.

"An advance is an advance,"
said James, who scored 27
points after finishing with 47 in
Game 3. "It doesn't matter if
you win in four games or you
win Game 7. We're happy that
we're playing great basketball

.. but we're not taking for
granted what we're doing right
now."

Delonte West and Mo
Williams showed Cleveland
isn't just a one-man squad, hit-
ting huge shots down the stretch
as the Cavaliers extended their
NBA-record streak of double-
digit playoff wins to eight.
Zydrunas Ilgauskas and Ander-
son Varejao pounded the
boards, leading the Cavaliers to
another big rebounding edge.

"I've got trust in every last
one of our guys,” James said.

Cleveland, which also swept
Detroit in the opening round,
will face either Boston or Orlan-
do in the Eastern Conference
finals.

No matter the opponent, the
Cavaliers will be a lot more rest-
ed. The Celtics-Magic series is
tied 2-all and will last at least
through Thursday, while the top
seed heads back to Ohio to
relax for a few days before
opening the next round at

home.

"We're glad to finish this
series off," reserve Wally
Szczerbiak said. "Now it's time
to go get our rest and get ready
for the next series. We have
some bumps and bruises to heal
from in this series."

So do the Hawks, but they've
got all summer. Joe Johnson,
Al Horford and Marvin
Williams were all hobbled by
injuries, which eliminated any
chance of fourth-seeded Atlanta
giving the Cavaliers a serious
challenge.

Josh Smith led Atlanta with
26 points, but the Hawks shot
23-of-73 from the field to fin-
ish at 31.5 percent. Johnson
added 18 points but shot 7-of-
18. Mike Bibby scored his only
points on a 3-pointer in the final
quarter. Flip Murray kept
putting it up, but made only
four of 15 for 14 points.

"It's hard to judge this team
because we really weren't
healthy in this series," said
Hawks coach Mike Woodson,
whose team made the second
round of the playoffs for the
first time in a decade, just four
seasons removed from a 13-69
debacle.

"We have to get better per-
sonnel-wise, but I couldn't be
more proud of the guys than I
am. We made some major
strides this season.”

The Cavaliers became the
second team to sweep the first
two rounds of the playoffs since
the NBA expanded the first
round to best-of-seven in 2003.
The Miami Heat started with
sweeps of New Jersey and
Washington in 2005 before los-
ing to Detroit in the East finals.

West scored 21 points, while
Williams scored his 12 on four
3-pointers. Ilgauskas had 14
points and 10 rebounds, while
Varejao grabbed seven of his
11 rebounds at the offensive
end to help Cleveland pick up
15 second-chance points.

"You know LeBron is going
to be there, but you don't know
who else is going to be there,"
Woodson moaned. "They've
got weapons around LeBron."

Granger is Most Improved Player

@ By CLIFF BRUNT
AP Sports Writer

INDIANAPOLIS (AP) —
Indiana Pacers forward Danny
Granger was named the NBA's
Most Improved Player on Tues-
day after averaging a career-
best 25.8 points a game this sea-
son.

Granger edged New Jersey
Nets guard Devin Harris 364-
339 in voting from a panel of
121 journalists.

"I can honestly say it really
did come as a surprise," he said.
"T really had it out of my mind
for a while. I was on vacation,
enjoying Italy, and all of a sud-
den, I'm winning the award."

Granger was selected to the
All-Star team this year for the



Granger (AP)

first time and improved his scor-
ing average by at least five
points in each of the past three
seasons. He averaged 7.5 points
as a rookie, then 13.9 in his sec-
ond season and 19.6 in 2007-08.

Granger had the NBA's fifth-
highest scoring average this sea-
son.

"T think in my fourth year, I
just had the experience of play-
ing a lot of minutes,” he said. "I
could read defenses a lot bet-
ter. I could get my shot a lot
easier than what I had in the
past. I think I just thought my
way through the game a little
more than I had previously."

Granger also has been invited
to participate in a USA Bas-
ketball training camp this sum-
mer, the first phase in selecting
the squad for the 2012 Olympics
in London. He said Tuesday he
has accepted the offer.

Granger elevated his game in
January. He averaged 34.7
points and shot 49 percent over
a six-game stretch against West-
ern Conference teams that
began on Jan. 3.

@ By JAIME ARON
AP Sports Writer

DALLAS (AP) — Down by
14 and playing listlessly, the
Dallas Mavericks sure looked
ready to call it a season.

Then Carmelo Anthony
threw a jab, and everything
changed.

Dirk Nowitzki and the Mavs
awoke from their early-game
slumber with rally after rally,
getting close or even tied yet
unable to get ahead until the
former MVP made a tough,
high-arching shot with 1:05 left.
Having worked so hard for the
lead, they weren't about to give
it back, pulling out a 119-117
victory over the Denver
Nuggets on Monday night to
avoid being swept.

Anthony scored a career
playoff-best 41 points and
snagged five steals. He was the
one turning away most Dallas
rallies and made a 3-pointer
with 3.1 seconds left that got
Denver within a point. Yet
when Mavericks guard Jason
Terry intentionally missed a
free throw with 1.1 ticks left,
Anthony was out of answers.
He got the rebound, but could-
n't stop the clock and didn't
even have time to try a 90-foot
heave.

The buzzer sounded and con-
fetti fell as the teams left the
court knowing they will meet
again Wednesday night in Den-
ver.

"It was an unbelievable
game,” said Nowitzki, who
scored 19 of his 44 points in the
fourth quarter. "We were down
the whole game, but were able
to come back and win and
we've been doing that all season
long. ... We've got to go back
to Denver and let it all hang out
again."

The Mavs lost all four regu-
lar-season games against the
Nuggets and the first three of
this series, but all along felt they
were close. The scoreboard
showed it, too, as Denver's mar-
gin shrunk from 14 in the open-
er to 12 then to one in Game
3, which also needed a mistaken
no-call and a 3-pointer by
Anthony with a second left.

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KENYON MARTIN gets a hand on

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"We've been fighting and
fighting this whole series,” said
Mavs forward Josh Howard,
who had 21 points and 11
rebounds on two bad ankles.
"The end of Game 3 gave us a
lot of willpower for this game."

It sure didn't look like it the
first 13 minutes.

Anthony and the Nuggets
were scoring at will and the
Mavericks were doing little to
stop them. On one possession,
Anthony turned, saw no one
between him and the basket
and soared for a dunk so easy it
could've been preseason.

But then Anthony and Dal-
las' Antoine Wright — the com-
batants from the Game 3 finish
— got their arms tangled. Once
untangled, Anthony's open
hand smacked Wright in the
shoulder. Officials called Wright
for a loose-ball foul, hit Antho-
ny with a technical and watched
a video replay to make sure
they were right.

Nothing was the same after
that. The intensity ratcheted to
Game 7 proportions, with a
total of seven technical fouls
and two flagrants. It spilled into
the stands, too, with security
guards removing Anthony's
girlfriend, LaLa Vazquez of
MTV fame, for her safety and

with extra protection around
the mother of Kenyon Martin,
who had a brief exchange with
Mavs owner Mark Cuban after
Game 3.

"They're allowed to be fans,
but when it gets personal, it
goes over the top,” said Den-
ver's Chauncey Billups, who
had 24 points and seven assists.

Added Nuggets coach
George Karl: "I would probably
use an uglier word than hostile,
but I'm not going to do that
right now. I don't think it was
very classy."

The postgame scene was a lit-
tle calmer than after Game 3,
although it may also wind up
getting reviewed by the league
office because Martin and
Cuban clearly exchanged words.

Alas, Denver fans won't get
their chance for revenge on
Cuban. He's skipping Game 5
to be at an awards ceremony in
Las Vegas, keeping a promise
he made to his wife six months
ago.

Nuggets fans will have plenty
to scream about anyway. Their
club is 5-0 at home this post-
season and can clinch their first
trip to the conference finals
since 1985.

"We're still in control,"
Anthony said. "We'll be ready."

Mavericks coach Rick
Carlisle wasn't surprised his
team played so well because
that's been their pattern this
season — bouncing back strong
after hitting rock bottom. He
probably would've preferred
they didn't get so far behind so
quickly at the start, but Now-
itzki refused to let them stay
down for long.

"There are very few guys I
have been around in this league
that are as strong-willed as
him," Carlisle said.

Nowitzki, who also is dealing
with off-court troubles involving
a girlfriend, was 14-of-25. He
made 16 of 17 free throws and
grabbed 13 rebounds.

"We showed character and
fought,” said Dallas’ Jason
Kidd, who had 13 points, 10
rebounds and six assists. "The
pressure is on them to win the
series. We don't have any pres-
sure."

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PAGE 14, WEDNESDAY, MAY 13, 2009

TRIBUNE SPORTS



Federer opens with victory

Japan cancels
US soccer
tour due to
swine flu

TOKYO (AP) — The
Japanese women's soccer team
canceled a tour in the United
States on Tuesday because of
the swine flu outbreak.

The team was scheduled to
play the U.S. team on May 20
in Frisco, Texas, and May 23
in Sandy, Utah. The team was
to travel to Canada for a match
in Toronto on May 25.

Japan's health ministry con-
firmed the fourth case of swine
flu on Sunday, a day after the
country's first three were
reported. The ministry said the
fourth case is a teenager who
recently returned from Canada
on a high school trip with the
three others.

The Japan Football Associa-
tion, which announced the
decision, said it may have to
pay damages for breach of con-
tract.

"This is an unfortunate situ-
ation, but one that we had
absolutely no control over,"
said U.S. Soccer president Sunil
Gulati. "We have been assured
that the risk to the participating
teams is exceptionally low, but
we accept the Japanese Feder-
ation's decision not to travel."

Also Tuesday, Malaysian
soccer officials canceled next
month's Intercontinental Cup
under-23 tournament because
of the threat of swine flu.

The Football Association of
Malaysia canceled the ecight-
team tournament after con-
sulting with the nation's Health
Ministry, the New Straits Times
reported.

Among the teams that had
been expected to play in the
June 1-14 tournament were
Brazil, Mexico and South
Korea, which have each con-
firmed cases of swine flu.

The number of countries
reporting swine flu cases stands
at 31, with the World Health
Organization confirming about
4,800 cases. At least 61 people
have been killed by swine flu
around the world: 56 in Mexi-
co, three in the U.S., one in
Canada and one in Costa Rica.

a

ad

m@ By PAUL LOGOTHETIS
AP Sports Writer

MADRID (AP) — Roger
Federer began his final warmup
for the French Open with a 6-1,
7-5 win over Robin Soderling
at the Madrid Open on Tues-
day.

The Swiss star had 24 win-
ners and took advantage of the
Swedish player's 25 unforced
errors to capture four break
points. Federer fired 11 aces,
including on the final point to
clinch his spot in the third
round.

Federer, who had a bye for
the first round, could lose his
No. 2 position in the rankings to
Andy Murray or Novak
Djokovic without a good show-
ing at the joint ATP and WTA
event.

Earlier, James Blake of the
United States defeated Victor
Hanescu 6-2, 6-4 for his first vic-
tory in the Spanish capital after
six appearances.

"My curse was broken and
all it took was moving to my
least favorite surface," Blake
said.

Blake next plays Ivo
Karlovic, with the winner facing
Federer.

Ivan Ljubicic scored the first
upset after defeating ninth-seed-
ed Jo-Wilfried Tsonga 6-4, 7-5.

The Croatian wild card broke
the ninth-ranked Tsonga three
times, with two of those coming



ROGER FEDERER returns the ball to Robin Soderling yesterday during the

Madrid Open...

in the second set when Ljubi-
cic rallied from 5-2 down.

Ljubicic joined seventh-seed-
ed Fernando Verdasco and No.
16 Tommy Robredo in the third
round.

NFL is considering second
regular-season game overseas

@ By MIKE CRANSTON
AP Sports Writer

CHARLOTTE, N.C. (AP)
— After seeing fans jam Lon-
don’s Wembley Stadium to
watch the NFL the past two
years, the league is considering
adding a second regular-season
game overseas in time for the
2010 season.

Commissioner Roger Good-
ell said Tuesday the second
game could also be played in
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Verdasco beat Juan Carlos
Ferrero 6-3, 6-2 in an all-Span-
ish match, while Robredo ral-
lied to defeat Mardy Fish of the
United States 3-6, 7-6 (5), 6-2.
He'll play either Murray or

Simone Bolelli.

Madrid's conversion from a
fast-playing hardcourt to a clay
surface looked to benefit Blake.
Hanescu hit 27 unforced errors
with most coming on his sec-
ond serve where he scored only
six of 18 points and hit three
double faults.

The 16th-ranked American
player seemed to carry over his
good form from his runner-up
finish at the Estoril Open on
Sunday.

"T just started playing my
game instead of just trying to
be a clay courter,” Blake said.
"T've got to play my style and
play aggressive when I get the
chance."

In other first round matches,
10th-seeded Nikolay Davy-
denko defeated Viktor Troicki
6-2, 6-2. Also, No. 13 Marin Cil-
ic held off Marcel Granollers 6-
2, 6-7 (4), 6-1.

On the women's side, fourth-
seeded Jelena Jankovic over-
came a stubborn challenge from
Daniela Hantuchova to win 7-5,
6-2. Jankovic will play Elena
Vesnina.

In other second-round match-
es, ninth-seeded Caroline Woz-
niacki beat Varvara Lepchenko
of the United States 6-3, 6-1.
She will play either Venus
Williams or Alisa Kleybanova.

Amelie Mauresmo will play
third-seeded Elena Dementieva
after a 6-2, 7-5 win over Jie
Zheng.

Jaguars sign Bouman

IN THIS August 28, 2008 file photo, Jaguars quarterback Todd
Bouman passes against the Washington Redskins during an NFL
preseason game, in Landover, Md. The Jaguars signed Bouman on
Tuesday, giving Cleo Lemon competition for the backup position.
Lemon beat out Bouman for the spot during training camp last year,
but he struggled during the team's minicamp earlier this month.

(AP Photo: Nick Wass)



Williams gets two
years probation for
cocaine possession

HOUSTON (AP) — NEL receiver Reggie Williams must serve
two years of probation for cocaine possession in a case in which a

‘Taser was used to subdue him.

Williams on Monday pleaded guilty to possession of a controlled

substance. A judge sentenced the 25-year-old unrestricted free
agent to deferred adjudication and fined Williams $200.

District attorney's office spokeswoman Donna Hawkins told
The Associated Press that Williams will face random drug testing

in Harris County. Hawkins says Williams will not have a felony con-
viction on his record if he successfully completes probation.
Williams, who played for the Jacksonville last year, was arrested

in April when he allegedly refused to leave a bar. An off-duty

police officer used a Taser on Williams.

Williams was the ninth player picked in the 2004 NFL draft
after playing at the University of Washington and Lakes High

School in Lakewood, Wash.

Mutray first
British player
to break into

top three

MADRID (AP) — Andy
Murray is paying little atten-
tion to the world rankings
despite becoming the first
British player to break into the
top three.

The 21-year-old Murray
moved ahead of Novak
Djokovic in Monday's ATP
rankings, leaving him behind
only No. 1 Rafael Nadal and
Roger Federer.

But Murray trails the lead-
ing pair by a considerable
amount and says he is focused
only on adding to the three
titles he has already won this
year, starting with his defense
of the Madrid Open this week.

"It's one of those things that
if you start focusing on the
rankings or on what another
player is doing, you kind of take
your eye off the ball a little bit,”
Murray said Monday. "You
need to focus on your own
matches and try and keep win-
ning.

"The important thing is to
concentrate on playing well and
not the ranking."

Tim Henman and Greg
Rusedski had been Britain's
highest-ranked players since the
rankings began in 1973, both
reaching the No. 4 position
Murray had occupied for eight
months until Monday.

With 8,990 points, Murray is
still significantly behind Feder-
er (10,170) and nowhere near
Nadal (15,360).

Federer and Nadal have won
19 Grand Slam titles between
them, while Murray can count
only an appearance in last
year's U.S. Open final as his
biggest Grand Slam success.

"To get close to those two or
in between Roger and Rafa is a
tough thing to do," Murray
said. "They are probably two
of the best players ever and it
wouldn't surprise me if they
went down as that."

Murray's chances of trim-
ming the gap this week look
slim anyway since the Madrid
tournament has been switched
from hard courts to clay at the
new La Caja Magica complex.

The surface is Nadal's tradi-
tional favorite and Murray lost
his last match on clay 1-6, 6-3, 7-
5 to Juan Monaco in the sec-
ond round of the Rome Mas-
ters two weeks ago. Nadal, Fed-
erer and Djokovic are all play-
ing in Madrid this week.

"The surface was obviously
better for me last year," Murray
said. "I just want to try and win
my first match and take each
match as they come."

Murray had a first-round bye
and will meet Simone Bolelli
in his opener.

"I don't play on this surface
well enough yet to think past
my first match and I play the
winner of two very solid clay
courters, so I'm not going to
think past them,” Murray said.

Murray only needs to look at
Nadal for an example of how
to improve on an initially
unfavoured surface.

The clay-court specialist
worked hard on grass until he
reached the final of Wimble-
don in 2006 and 2007, and even-
tually won it last year.

"I'm obviously impressed
with what he has done on clay,
but what he's done on grass is a
great motivation for me," Mur-
ray said. "I feel I can obviously
get better on clay and learn
how to play better and get onto
the second week and go deep at
the French Open.

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Cavaliers
complete
sweep of
the Hawks...

See page 15

‘Building hodles with a positive mind

22nd annual Jeff Rodgers summer basketball camp set for July

m@ By RENALDO DORSETT
Sports Reporter
rdorsett@tribunemedia.net

ummer months usually

bring about a plethora of

basketball camps and one

of the Bahamas’ most well

known franchises officially
announced the launch of another edi-
tion.

The Jeff Rodgers Basketball Camp
is gearing up to enter its 22nd year
under the theme “Building Bodies
with a Positive Mind.”

The camp, scheduled for July 6-31
in H D Colburn Gymatorium at
Bahamas Academy, is again expected
to host hundreds of aspiring players
between the ages of five and 19.

Over the years, the camp has served
as a rite of passage for many local
players through the high school ranks
with a number of them progressing
to basketball careers in colleges
throughout the US.

Jeff Rodgers, camp director, said
the event continues to hold true to
the ideals established since its incep-
tion, building players of great talent
and character.

“The Jeff Rodgers Basketball
Camp is dedicated to the enrichment
of our youth. We believe in inspiring
our campers to be the best that they



FORMER NBA player Mark Jackson, who used to play for Indiana Pacers, greets young-
sters at the 21st Jeff Rodgers summer basketball camp in this 2008 file photo. This year,
a number of NBA players and coaches are expected to attend the annual event...

can be. We assist in posi-
tive character building,
good sportsmanship and
teamwork while develop-
ing the sound fundamen-
tals of basketball,” he said.

“Our programme will
expose the campers to tal-
ented instructors, inspiring
guest speakers, skilled col-
lege coaches, and NBA
personalities who will
interact and perform with
the campers.”

Several NBA personali-
ties, which the Bahamian
public has become well accustomed
to, are expected to headline the list of
celebrities at this year’s camp.

Retired players Tyrone “Muggsy”
Bogues, Scott Burrell, head coach of
the New Orleans Hornets, Byron
Scott, ABC/ESPN commentator
Mark Jackson, two- time all star Chris
Paul, and two players from the
Atlanta Hawks organisation are all
scheduled to attend.

“What keeps it going is God giv-
ing me the strength to continue. This
is something I have accepted as my
ministry, my calling, everybody has a
calling in life and I feel as if once you
are accepting and committed to it you
will always be willing to make the
necessary sacrifices to see it succeed.

Jeff Rodg



This is an opportunity to
give something back to the
community and my church
in a very positive way.”
Rodgers said.

“The parents have sup-
ported the camp for so
many years. Every parent
wonders where they can
put their child in the sum-
mertime, and they want to
put them in a place that is

af, safe, positive, and where
TR

they can learn some skills
and life lessons and think
our track record speaks
for itself. We have some of the finest
local instructors along with interna-
tional instructors and guests to create
one of the best programmes around.”

There is an admission fee for the
camp and the application forms and
fees can be returned at the Bahamas
Conference of Seventh Day Adven-
tists’ main office or at Bahamas Acad-
emy.

Rodgers also credited his wide
range of sponsors which include Sco-
tiabank, Jewel’s Party Supplies, Robin
Hood, Coca Cola, Vitamalt, RBC,
Royal Brittania, CIBC, BTC, Wynd-
ham Nassau resort, Colina Imperial
and Freddie’s Barber Shop.

Registration for the camp remains
open until Friday July 22.

Rodgers hosts US scouts, coaches to check out local ballers’ talent

m@ By RENALDO DORSETT
Sports Reporter
rdorsett@tribunemedia.net

TO compliment his efforts
with his annual summer bas-
ketball camp, basketball enthu-
siast Jeff Rodgers has made
the first initiative in shifting his
focus towards garnering schol-
arship opportunities for local
players.

Rodgers hosted a pair of
scouts and coaches from uni-
versities in the United States
headlined by Aaron Griess,
head coach of Augusburg Col-
lege in Minneapolis, Minneso-
ta.

Originally, the coaches were
scheduled to attend the camp
this summer but were forced
to re-schedule. Rodgers saw
this as a blessing to the players
who will now have two oppor-
tunities to impress the coaching
staffs.

weeks. They came down to
watch a few scrimmages and
have a look at some of the
senior high school guys and
look at the possibility of them
giving out a few scholarships
to their schools.

“We have other coaches
coming into town who will be
here for the camp in July,” he
said.

“The feedback was great,
they said they saw a couple of
guys and they want to make
return trips this summer to get
a better look and spend more
time scouting the guys and
making sure they get the total
picture.

“Another thing they told me
is that they wanted to see them
more in game situations to get
a greater feel for the funda-
mentals so it works out well
that the guys will have another
opportunity to play before
them.”



JEFF RODGERS (holding ball) can be seen with the scouts and coaches from the US and some local players...

(Photo: Felipé Major/Tribune staff)

“Because of scheduling con- Approximately 25 high “Some of the positive traits tion, athletic ability and good ~=see how we can help the bigger to continue the sport at uni-
flicts we were forced to move — school players competed inthe they said they noticed in the attitudes,” Rodgers said. ““We _ kids, the seniors to see if they _ versities in the United States
that training session up afew — exhibition. kids was a drive, determina- really want to focus a lot and = can acquire some scholarships and further their education.”

ome hil Single “Sour Vibes" which streamed the air-
waves Tor multiple weeks in the number ane spot an
100 Jann’ Bahama Hot Ones Gaunt Down

He was the fest Bahamian Artist to be feahyred on
JCM with their Debut of “A Gay in The Life" apd being
the featured Artist thastitie most fittingbecams, “A Day
In the Lite of Puzete, Puzzle’s career has alforded him

“PUZZLE" 15 A WATIVE OF THE BEAUTIFUL 15-
LAND OF WASSAU, BAHAMAS. BEING BORW IN
AM ISLAND OF UNIQUE, TRANQUIL BEAUTY:
PUZZLE'S INSPIRATION SURROUNDS HIM ane! he :
is without a doubt the Country's bast kapt secret The OPPOnUNity to perfor his music anckhcnancase

Since the tender ag¢ of five, Puzzle has been in- fis. exhilarating talent cwir the Bahamas and the
volved in church sanging and playing warlous in- world.

Strumenis andhas developed a passion dor music With his new Hit Single This Is Wrong’, Puazle has
ofall ganres. This passion has allotted him the ONCE ADaIN PROVEN his amazing talent, capturing the
ability and enhanced his lowe for songwriting hearts and minds of his tars through his uniqueness
singing and producing musi¢ for himself and vari- of storytelling.

Cus artists Mow gearing for his three (3) month tou ln Eu-

Purvie's collaborations has landed him record- rope, Pure will work with some of the biggest
ings and remixing at the Hit Factory Criteria in Artists that UK has to offer and prone to the world
Miarni; warking with professionals of the fiald and why hig was tha Bahamas’ bes! kept secret.

Leniy Kravite's go to man, Matt Knobel far his sin- Purvie has toured and pertoemed wath Tempo's

gle Animal’ he also worked witht Mian hasad ‘Badass Outta Sta" School Tour and Tempo Turns
producer SugarDip om "Hispanic Girls" and Jim Three, in Nassau, Bahamas

Lolis of Zolis Audio Sounds in Tororo, Canada on Pyezle’s dedication to ihe art enchants the amdi-
the final version of his Debut Album ‘Pieces Bnce and through his contribution to the marsic incus-

Puzzle captivated the Country valth his number ry he siries to be a giant piece of the puzele

MAY 16, ec00g
BUTLER & SANDS
GROUNDS, JFK


PAGE 16, WEDNESDAY, MAY 13, 2009

THE TRIBUNE



LOCAL NEWS



Investment bank denies.
unfairness |

m@ By MEGAN REYNOLDS
Tribune Staff Reporter
mreynolds@tribunemedia.net

STAFF at an investment bank
are being forced to suffer hard-
ships while expatriate employees
continue to receive thousands
of dollars in expenses and bene-
fits, sources claim.

However, the bank has
denied all of the allegations.

A source claims that foreign
workers at Royal Bank of Cana-
da (RBC) Trust Company
(Bahamas) Ltd live in luxury
accommodation and send their
children to expensive private
schools at the cost of the com-
pany, one month after a
Bahamian mother was let go to
cut costs in a challenging eco-
nomic climate.

Expenses paid for foreign
workers include a $15,000
monthly rental payment for an
expatriate’s home in Lyford
Cay, and the $29,000 cost of
bringing an foreigner’s Corvette
to the country, the sources claim.

It is further alleged that staff
are being pressured to take two
weeks of unpaid leave to help
balance the books in hard eco-
nomic times, while a foreign
employee is being excused from
the sacrifice, Tribune sources
alleged.

But RBC managing director
Elizabeth Dorsch denied all of
the allegations, adding that
employees only volunteer to
take time off and will not be
penalised if they choose not to.

She declined to comment fur-
ther as the managing director
said: “It is our policy not to com-
ment on specifics concerning
employee matters due to priva-
cy concerns.”

Sources say an expatriate will
typically be paid an annual
salary of $80,000 for doing the

Emerald Bay Resort

FROM page one

same job for which a Bahami-
an with the same level of expe-
rience would only be paid |
$60,000.

And they maintain the cot
expats are preventing experi-

enced and capable Bahamians
from progressing to fillthe more

senior roles.

“The overall atmosphere is :
discouragement among the }

staff,” a source claimed.

“The staff are made to feel
like they are just getting the ;
scraps while they live off the :

high horse.”

One disgruntled employee is
reportedly leaving the Nassau :
office. It is alleged a foreign staff i

member will fill the vacancy.

Sources maintain there are :
two senior employees with }
around 30 years combined expe- i
rience, but it is expected they }
will be overlooked in favour of }
an expat with foreign language i

skills.

A source said: “They have i
these seniors who are capable :
of handling the position without i
hesitation, but I can guarantee }
you they’re going to have some- }
one come in and use the lan- }

guage thing.

“It’s not necessary because :
staff rarely speak to clients, and
the people they deal with speak

English.

“They are doing the work :
and then the expatriates come in i

and are fully compensated.

“It’s unfair treatment and yet i
they insist on doing it,” the }

source complained.

Ms Dorsch denied the alle-

gation. She said RBC Wealth

Management currently employs

35 persons in the Bahamas,
three are expatriates.
She maintains there has been

one redundancy this year while ‘
no further redundancies are

planned.

erty in Eleuthera, he was concerned whether they would be willing
to invest the additional $75 million required to bring Emerald Bay

up to par.

“T question their willingness to do this because it seems as if they
are unwilling to do the same on their property at Cape Eleuthera.
The reality is if they do not invest the money to correct the flaws in
the entrance to the marina, build a marina village, complete some

road diversions, and put the utilities underground at the golf course :

they will not have the atmosphere of an upscale resort,” he said.
Mr Smith hoped that if the property incorporates a marina village,

the franchises at the marina will be offered to residents of Exuma.
“But it will be a sad day if Four Seasons has to leave Exuma,” he

said.

As revealed by previous reports in Tribune Business, Mitsui has
been rather flexible on the purchase price of the property, coming
down from its initial $125-$130 million target to as low as $35 million.

The Japanese insurer is said to be thoroughly sick of the entire sit-
uation, and wants to get out as quickly as possible, after the resort was
put into receivership in mid-June of 2007.

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Lands and Surveys
- director resigns

FROM page one

However, Mr Turnquest denied
having any direct involvement
with the properties which were
“flipped” a few years later and
sold for more than $550,000.

At that time, Mr Turnquest
said, the final authority for the
sale of the properties rested not
with him, but with the Prime
Minister who had to sign off on
the sales as the Minister respon-
sible for Crown Land.

However, Mr Turnquest got a
rude awakening Monday morn-
ing when he returned to work to
discover that the locks to his
office had been changed.

According to sources deep
within the department, officials
were inside his office busy
securing files and documenta-
tion that officers at the Attor-
ney General’s office feared
could have been destroyed or
“misplaced” if swift action had
not been taken.

The government is also
reportedly in the process of
implementing significant
changes to the law to ensure
that abuses of Crown land, as



B By PAULG
TURNGUEST

Tribune Staff Reporter

urnigQuestatriluwne

AS THE furesre
to mount «
HOCUS

A SERIES of articles on the topic
have been published in The Tribune

not happen again.

Yesterday when The Tribune
contacted the Department of
Lands to speak with Mr Turn-
quest, his secretary reported
that he was not in office, nor
did she know when he would
return.

Mr Turnquest’s removal from
the department comes at a time
when the Opposition has
already started a motion in the
House of Assembly calling for a
Select Committee to review all
Crown land grants issued by
government since the early
1990’s.

This committee will review
all Crown grants issued to indi-
viduals or entities since 1992 up
until the present date along with
all outstanding applications that
have yet to receive final
approval.

The committee will also
ascertain a list of all public ser-
vants and retired public servants
who have received grants, along
with government’s official posi-
tion on its policy in relation to
the disposition of publicly held
lands generally; as well as the
government’s policy in relation
to granting lands to employees
of the government or their rel-
atives.

Since the revelations of the
transactions relating to Mr
Turnquest’s relatives, and
claims that other civil servants
were able to secure substantial

grants of Crown land, several
upset individuals have come for-
ward claiming many years of
abuse they have had to endure
at the hands of this department.
Among these individuals was
PLP general Ezra Russell, who
complained of having to wait
over 12 years to get final
approval to purchase some 34
acres of Crown land in Foun-
tain Bay, Cat Island.

During Prime Minister
Hubert Ingraham’s first term in
office, Mr Turnquest was
appointed Director of Lands
and Surveys. After winning the
government in 2002, former
Prime Minister Perry Christie
removed Mr Turnquest from
this department in 2005 and
transferred him to the office of
the Prime Minister.

However, upon Mr Ingra-
ham’s return to government in
2007, Mr Turnquest was
returned to head Lands and
Surveys.

Attempts to reach the Min-
ister of Lands Byran Woodside
for comment on the matter
were unsuccessful up to press
time last night.

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reported in The Tribune, will
FROM page one

than a friendship” with Mr Ferguson’s sister.

While some called his departure a shock,
which reverberated throughout the legal com-
munity, Mr Levine said he saw it as a forseeable
development.

"The judge had been openly stating that a
committee had been formed for his removal
and he would probably resign before he was
ousted," he said.

Justice Lyons’ retirement takes effect on
August 1, until then he will take pre-retire-
ment leave effective from May 11.

Now, said Mr Levine, the Judicial and Legal
Service Commission already faced with the
task of appointing additional judges, has the
daunting task of appointing a suitable judge
— well-versed in commercial legal matters —
to replace Justice Lyons.

"The Commission knows the problem as
well and in the absence of obvious Bahamian
lawyers to replace Justice Lyons, they will be
struggling with the problem of avoiding this
recurring problem of appointing foreign
lawyers as judges who would rather be in more
lucrative practice more at the Bar," he said.

To mitigate this, he suggested the appoint-
ment of McKinney, Bancroft and Hughes
senior partner Brian Moree — a name men-
tioned by various sources within the legal com-
munity as fit for the post — to be appointed to
the vacancy.

However, he said — as noted by Bar Coun-
cil President Wayne Munroe — Mr Moree
may not be keen to take the hefty pay cut
which comes with the Supreme Court appoint-
ment. He suggested that the prime minister
make a more attractive offer to Mr Moree —
that of chief justice — a move he believes will
solidify confidence of foreign investors in the
local judicial system.

"Everyone agrees that Mr Moree is the only
practitioner at the Bar who has the knowledge
and other qualities to undertake the role of
commercial judge. He has also the reputation
for hard work that Justice Lyons had. His
apparent qualifications exceed those of any
other existing Supreme Court justice as the
replacement commercial judge.

"Of course the offer of a judgeship to the
senior partner of a large Bahamian law firm
creates difficulties of its own. Mr Moree has the
reputation of bringing in the lion’s share of
the profit costs of the firm and the offer might
therefore well be refused on that ground
alone."

"An alternative open to the prime minister
after consultation with the leader of the Oppo-
sition is to offer to Mr Moree the office of
chief justice of the Bahamas. Mr Moree might
find such an offer an honour not capable of
refusal. . there are many who would say that
both amongst the Bar and the amongst the
members of the Bench there is no one who
enjoys a greater reputation for integrity than
Mr Moree.

"Most significantly, Mr Moree enjoys the

Appointment of Justice Lyons
‘may have been a mistake’

confidence of sophisticated foreign investors,
banks and corporations and their worldwide
network of lawyers and advisers. There is no
group amongst whom respect for the Bahami-
an legal system, including the court system,
has suffered a greater decline. Such an appoint-
ment would help re-establish the Bahamas as a
financial centre which I know is close to the
heart of the government as well as Mr Moree,”
said Mr Levine.

He also said that two areas "threatening to
destroy the administration of justice in this
country” are the widespread belief of corrup-
tion among lawyers and the suspicion that polit-
ical influence sways matters before the bench.

"The public believe there are problems with
the legal profession generally by which they
mean that the lawyers are no longer members
of a profession but business men of the worst
sort who in substantial numbers cheat their
clients and who as a profession will prevent
any complaint from the public against any
established attorney for the worst offence from
making any progress under the Legal Profes-
sion Act.

"There is also a suspicion that the justices
lack the independence and the overriding desire
to see justice done, particularly if an attorney
with political influence is appearing against
them.

"The irony is that no judge more than Justice
Lyons would openly criticize an attorney for his
pursuing a case without merit, and no Judge
was more efficient in dealing with court busi-
ness than Justice Lyons, and it was Justice
Lyons who openly criticised the attorney gen-
eral of the day for directing him in how to con-
duct his court and interfering with his judicial
independence.

He also claimed that the government by fail-
ing to pay the judges the remuneration and
pensions to which they were entitled had
brought about a Constitutional crisis.

"The public’s suspicion about the legal sys-
tem means today that most members of the
public would not pay a lawyer to take a matter
to court because they have no faith between the
failings and lassitude of the Bar and Bench
that there will ever be a trial to give them rec-
ompense."

Mr Levine noted that while Attorney Gen-
eral Michael Barnett recently announced gov-
ernment's intent to introduce legislation to
ensure the independence of the judiciary, the
constitution currently allows for this indepen-
dence.

"Tam not sure what other legislation is nec-
essary to ensure to the judiciary that indepen-
dence, if the judges other than the departed Jus-
tice Lyons do not already respect the reality of
their own independence.

"It is as regards these matters Mr Moree as
Chief Justice would bring into the equation

qualifications that would go a long way to
resolving these problems without fanfare and
without unnecessary legislation, which might
resolve nothing," he said.

This appointment would signal the appoint-
ment of a "non-political animal” as chief justice
"with no real ties or obligations to either polit-
ical party” said Mr Levine.

"In this manner largely by the appointment
of a competent and intelligent lawyer as Chief
Justice who respects the law and has no need
for political patronage, the prime minister can
restore the standing of the judiciary, restore
the standing of the Bar Association and solve
himself two big political problems that his
Attorney General with all the proposed legis-
lation cannot do for him.

"The Judiciary would have an effective Chief
Justice having the stature to represent the judi-
clary in standing up to the Mr Michael Barnett
or whoever was the Attorney General of the
day wrongly to influence the judicial function or
discretion of all the judges or any one of them.

"It would not be left to the now departed
Justice Lyons as it was some years ago to speak
out about the political influence being exerted.

"The public can be satisfied that Mr Brian
Moree does not represent the establishment
of the Bar Association whose present conduct
is being publicly decried. Only a year or so ago
T attended the Bar Association Annual Meet-
ing and surprisingly found Mr Moree present.
He had been persuaded to put his name into
contention in the election of the President of
the Bar Association. I know he had been per-
suaded to do so out of a sense of duty to try to
make the Bar Council adopt a new and respon-
sible course that would restore credit to the
Bar Association. However the incumbent Pres-
ident was not one of those persuaded that Mr
Moree should replace him.”

According to Mr Levine the incumbent Bar
Association president decided to run again and
with the benefit of a large number of proxies
was successful in defeating Mr Moree.

"The Prime Minister knows that Mr. Barnett
is not the person to restore the public confi-
dence in the standing of the judges or the cred-
ibility of the lawyers in this country,” said Mr
Levine. “Without that respect being restored to
the Bench and Bar it is difficult to fight crime.
On the other hand if Mr. Moree can be per-
suaded to accept office he may by his standing
and recognized integrity more than anyone
else be able to turn things round and restore the
expectations of both the lay public in the
Bahamas.

"I may be wrong about this and it may be too
much to expect from Mr Moree. But if I am
wrong I can think of no other answer because
the decay has gone on for too long.

"The alternative is the free fall continuing,"
said Mr Levine.

Philippines warns of Filipinos being illegally trafficked in the Baltamas, Caribbean

4,

reportedly victimised by a man identified as Leonid
‘Ned’ Pascual, who is already implicated in previ-
ous cases of human trafficking and currently includ-
ed on Cuba’s immigration blacklist, according to
the DFA in the Philippines.

The two Filipinos were unwittingly taken to
Havana where they were shocked to find the
promised jobs were nothing more than a fabrica-
tion, according to the DFA's press release.

"The two unsuspecting victims paid more than
P500,000 each to Pascual to bring them to the
Bahamas where they were supposed to be
employed with a salary of US$5,000 a month.

"Upon their arrival in Havana, the victims dis-
covered that the jobs promised them were non-
existent and found themselves stranded in the
Cuban capital,” said the DFA.

Local foreign affairs officials said while the plight
of human trafficking is a global concern, the min-
istry was not aware of a proliferation of Filipinos
being trafficked illegally into this country.

"I was not aware that this was an issue for us —
perhaps Immigration (officials) might have noticed
a trend but the ministry of foreign affairs hasn't
been made aware of any trend in that regard,"
said Deputy Permanent Secretary at the Ministry
of Foreign Affairs Donna Knowles-Lowe.

FROM page one

Attempts to reach Immigration officials for

comment yesterday were unsuccessful up to press

time.

The Philippine embassy in Havana provided
the "stranded" Filipinos with food and housing
until it could arrange for their return to the Philip-
pines, according to the statement.

Yesterday, the Department of Foreign Affairs in
the Philippines urged its citizens to be wary of
illicit job recruiters who promise advantageous
work opportunities overseas and to confirm these
Openings to avoid being hoodwinked.

According to the website humantrafficking.org,
the southeast Asian country is a "source, transit,
and destination" point for human trafficking with
an estimated number of 300,000 to 400,000 traf-
ficked women and 60,000 to 100,000 trafficked
children for labour and sexual exploitation.

The website also reported that many Filipino
adults voluntarily immigrate to work overseas,
but are later "coerced into exploitative condi-
tions."

In December, 2008 the Bahamas enacted the
Trafficking in Persons (Prevention and Suppres-
sion) Act to allow for stiff penalties for persons
found guilty of human trafficking.

Attempts to reach officials at the Philippines’
embassy in Havana were unsuccessful up to press
time.


THE TRIBUNE

sine

WEDNESDAY,

MAY

ilies ee



2009

SECTION B ¢ business@tribunemedia.net

ROYAL FIDELITY



Company’s fury over
Albany contract loss

@ By CHESTER ROBARDS
Business Reporter
crobards@tribunemedia.net

Bahamas-based cabinet
An yesterday react-
ed with fury after his
company lost a kitchen-fitting
contract by the $1.4 billion Albany
project, after being paid a $15,000
retainer, in favour of a competitor
that opened its showroom in New
Providence only last week.

Mark Moyle told Tribune Busi-
ness that his company, Craftman’s
Kitchen Ltd, was given a mone-
tary retainer fee by Albany two
years ago to design and install
kitchens for the development’s
townhouses.

However, last week he was
informed that Albany had opted
to go with Canada-based
Downsview Kitchens instead, and
said it was strange for the project
to make such a brisk reversal of its
previous decision.

Mr Moyle claimed that
Downsview’s design consultant,

Chris Anand



Gary Stannis, had been operating
in the Bahamas without proper
documentation for almost 10
years. “For years, Gary would fly
in as a tourist, place magnetic
‘Downsview’ signs on a rental car
and cruise around like he owned
the place,” Mr Moyle told Tri-
bune Business. “Construction con-

sultants would literally, overnight,
stop accepting bids from any local
cabinet sources.”

Mr Stannis, though, yesterday
denied Mr Moyle’s claims and
said he had complied with all
Bahamian laws.

He told Tribune Business that
he had applied for several work
permits that were being blocked
by Mr Moyle’s objections to the
Department of Immigration. He
said he was even turned away at
Lynden Pindling International
Airport (LPIA) once when try-
ing to enter the Bahamas.

Mr Stannis said he has visited
the Bahamas many times to speak
to potential clients, who eventu-
ally make the trip to Downsview’s
Florida showroom, where they
purchase their kitchens.

Mr Moyle, though, said he was
baffled as to why Albany would
consider a product 40 per cent
more costly than his own.

But Albany’s managing part-
ner, Chris Anand, said they simply
went with a slightly more superior

product. He said the project’s
investors, The Tavistock Group,
Tiger Woods and Ernie Els, were
investing hundreds of millions of
dollars in the project, and decided
to go with a distributor “that gives
us a lot of confidencee”.

Mr Moyle was allowed to keep
the retainer fee he was paid to
produce drawings and design
work. “That’s relatively unheard
of,” said Mr Anand.

Mr Stannis said it was not
uncommon for a large project
such as Albany to change con-
tractors, even after paying a
retainer, which he thought to be
around $15,000. “It has happened
to Downsview, too,” he said. “We
lose jobs.”

Mr Stannis said Albany will be
purchasing all of its kitchens
directly through Downsview’s
Bahamian partner, Caribbean
Construction and Management
Services (CCMS). He said Mr
Moyle, who was a distributor for

SEE page 2B

Water Corp’s ‘major arrears’ for whole year

@ By NEIL HARTNELL
Tribune Business Editor

THE Water & Sewerage Cor-
poration “expects to continue to
be significantly in arrears on its
payments” to BISX-listed Con-
solidated Water throughout 2009,
it was revealed yesterday, despite
having already paid down $4.35
million on its $9.5 million
accounts receivables balance.

Consolidated Water’s 10-Q
statement, filed with the Securi-
ties & Exchange Commission
(SEC) as it released its 2009 first
quarter results, further highlight-
ed the continuing financial weak-
ness of the Water & Sewerage
Corporation, as the sums owed
for reverse osmosis water sup-
plied by the BISX-listed entity
had further ballooned by $1.4 mil-
lion since year-end 2008.

And while a further $4.35 mil-
lion payment was expected from
the Water & Sewerage Corpora-
tion before June 30, 2009, in addi-
tion to the $4.35 million payment
already received, the likelihood
of a continuing accounts receiv-

* Accounts payables woes to BISX-listed Consolidated Water to run for whole year,
despite $4.35m payment in April and another $4.35m due before June
* Consolidated Water settles $950,000 legal action with $480,000 payment out-of-court

ables issue shows that the extra
$11 million allocated to it in the
2008-2009 Mid-Term Budget is
still not enough to cover the Cor-
poration’s cash flow issues.

Meanwhile, Consolidated
Water said it had settled for
$480,000 with Gruppozecca
Bahamas over a legal action in
the Bahamian Supreme Court
relating to a dispute over the con-
struction of the former’s Blue
Hills reverse osmosis plant.

Gruppozecca Bahamas had
sought $950,000 damages over an
alleged breach of obligations by
Consolidated Water. But the
action was settled out of court on
April 2, 2009, with all claims set-
tled in exchange for “a final
progress payment under the con-
struction agreement” between the
parties.

Consolidated Water, in its 10-
Q, said that the Water & Sewer-

Bahama Rock aggregate
loss ‘catastrophic’

@ By NEIL HARTNELL
Tribune Business Editor

THE Bahamian Contractors
Association’s (BCA) president
yesterday said “huge catastroph-
ic problems” would arise for the
construction industry if it lost its
home-grown aggregate materials
supply through Bahama Rock’s
departure, with cost increases
impacting the economy’s com-
petitiveness.

Stephen Wrinkle, who runs his
own construction business, Wrin-
kle Development, said it was
“critical” for the industry and
Bahamian policymakers to deter-
mine the long-term solution for
aggregate supply, given that
Bahama Rock - which supplied
almost 100 per cent of the sec-
tor’s current needs - was eventu-
ally likely to leave Grand
Bahama.

The information contained is from a third
party and The Tribune can not be held
responsible for errors and/or omission
from the daily report.



* Contractors head says loss
of local supply would impact
costs, supply chain continuity
and convenience for Bahamian
construction industry

* Bahamas’ ability to attract
foreign direct investment
would also be impaired if no
domestically-produced
ageregate available

That, Mr Wrinkle explained,
would force the construction
industry to either stockpile huge
amounts of aggregate or import it
from the US and other Caribbean
countries.

Not only would this increase
the outflow of US dollars and for-
eign currency, impacting the
Bahamas’ external reserves, but it
would give the likes of Jamaica,
Cuba and the Dominican Repub-
lic - the Bahamas’ major tourism
competitors, who all have their
own aggregate material supplies -
a competitive cost advantage
when it came to attract foreign
real estate developers.

The Environmental Impact
Assessment (EIA) carried out for
the proposed area 4 Freeport
Harbour expansion warned that if
the project did not go ahead,
there would likely be a 300 per
cent increase in aggregate mater-
ial prices, which would raise
Bahamian construction industry
costs by $15 million per annum.

Mr Wrinkle said that while he
could not comment on the fig-
ures, as he was not up to date
with international aggregate
prices, he recalled that his com-
pany imported large quantities
from Jamaica when it was work-
ing on a Family Island project and

SEE page 2B

age Corporation’s delay in paying
bills had increased the accounts
receivables balance for its
Bahamian subsidiary by a further
$1.4 million to $9.5 million since
year-end 2008.

The company added: “Since
early 2008, Consolidated Water-
Bahamas has experienced signif-
icant delays in the receipt of pay-
ments on its outstanding accounts
receivable from the Water and
Sewerage Corporation of the
Bahamas.

“As of March 31, 2009, Con-
solidated Water-Bahamas was
due approximately $9.5 million
from the Water and Sewerage
Corporation. During April 2009,
Water and Sewerage Corporation
paid $4.35 million on these receiv-
ables.

“We have met with represen-
tatives of the Water and Sewer-
age Corporation and Bahamas

government (most recently on
May 1, 2009) to inquire as to the
reasons for the delinquency in
their accounts receivables pay-
ments. We have been informed
by these government representa-
tives that the Water and Sewer-
age Corporation’s payment delin-
quencies are due to operating
issues within the Water and Sew-
erage Corporation; that such
delinquencies do not reflect any
type of dispute with Consolidated
Water-Bahamas with respect to
the amounts owed; and the
amounts will ultimately be paid in
full.”

Consolidated Water said: “We
have been informed by these rep-
resentatives that another payment
from the Water and Sewerage
Corporation of $4.35 million will
be forthcoming prior to June 30,

SEE page 2B

Make it a reality.

Money at Work

NASSAU OFFICE
(242) 356-9801

FREEPORT OFFICE

(242) 351-3010



A BAHAMASAIR aircraft can be seen in this file photo...

Aircraft overhauls
to save Bahamasair
$1.4m per annum

lm By CHESTER ROBARDS
Business Reporter
crobards@tribunemedia. net

BAHAMASAIR’s managing
director yesterday said the nation-
al flag carrier has undertaken
numerous cost-saving measures,
including one that could save the
national flag carrier almost $1.4
million this year.

Henry Woods told Tribune
Business that Bahamasair had
received approval to overhaul
three of its Dash-8 airplanes local-
ly at the Lynden Pindling Inter-
national Airport (LPIA).

He explained that previously
the airplanes were sent to Cana-
da for renovations, where they
would have had to undergo
inspections priced at $450,000

* Airline passes IATA and
FAA inspections with
‘flying colours’

* Only five inconsistencies
uncovered by FAA that
are now corrected

* Only 41 of 2,300 IATA
checklist items an issue,
and all now in
compliance

each upon completion.
However, the Government had

SEE page 2B

Bahamas plant improvements
boost company margins by 7%

mw By NEIL HARTNELL
Tribune Business Editor

BISX-listed Consolidated Water yesterday said 2009 first quarter
gross margins had increased from 15 per cent to 22 per cent for its bulk
water segment due to “improved energy and other operational effi-
ciencies” at its two New Providence-based reverse osmosis plants, a
trend expected to continue for the remainder of 2009.

David Sasnett, Consolidated Water’s chief financial officer, told
Wall Street analysts during a conference call that the Windsor plant’s
feed water system had been improved to “eliminate ongoing chronic
fouling problems” that had impacted the profitability and margins of

its Bahamian assets.

With that work now completed, Consolidated Water was set to
enjoy lower maintenance costs and “better energy efficiencies”, Mr Sas-

nett added.

He said the company was also likely to experience further energy effi-

ciencies, “although not to the same
extent”, with the replacement of

Brokerage Accounts

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ROYAL FIDELITY

Money at Work

An RBC / Fidelity Joint Venture Company


PAGE 2B, WEDNESDAY, MAY 13, 2009

THE TRIBUNE





Company’s fury over
Albany contract loss

FROM page 1B

Crystal Cabinets, is just a middle-
man.

Mr Moyle, though, claimed that
Mr Stannis had sought to elude
the attention of the Customs and
Immigration departments by con-
signing kitchen shipments to his
client’s names and not
Downsview.

However, Mr Stannis said the

BANQUE PRIVEE

ty

o

kitchens, which are manufactured
in Toronto, Canada, are shipped
to Downsview’s location in Flori-
da, and the purchasers are then
responsible for shipment to the
final destination. He said that
even though Downsview now has
a showroom in the Bahamas, he
will visit on occasions as he always
has.

“People will come to the States
to buy the kitchen,” he said.

EDMOND DE ROTHSCHILD LTD
LCF ROTHSCHILD GROUP

Aircraft overhauls
to save Bahamasair
$1.4m per annum

FROM page 1B

In order to strengthen our team in Nassau, we have an employment opportunity for a

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Responsibilities include :

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with reference ‘Accountant’ ,

52wk-Low
1.28
11.00
6.95
0.63
3.15
1.95
11.09
2.83
6.17
1.31
1.70
6.02
11.00
10.35
5.00
1.00
0.30
5.50
8.60
10.00

Abaco Markets
Bahamas Property
Bank of Bahamas
Benchmark
Bahamas Waste
Fidelity Bank
Cable Bahamas
Colina Holdings

Doctor's Hospital
Famguard
Finco

Focol (S)
Freeport Concrete

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J. S. Johnson

Securit y

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Consolidated Water BDRs

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Focol Class B Preference

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experience and qualifications,

no later than 30" May 2009.

ROYAL FIDELITY

Money at Work

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BISX LISTED & TRADED SECURITIES AS OF:

TUESDAY, 12 MAY 2009
BISX ALL SHARE INDEX: CLOSE 1,613.91 | CHG 0.15 | %CHG 0.01 | YTD -98.45 | YTD % -5.75
FINDEX: CLOSE 797.33 | YTD -4.50% | 2008 -12.31%

WWW.BISXBAHAMAS.COM | TELEPHONE:242-323-2330 | FACSIMILE: 242-323-2320

1.40
11.00
6.95
0.63
3.15
2.37
11.75
2.83
6.17
2.50
1.85
7.76
11.00
10.40
5.14
1.00
0.30
5.59
10.50
10.00

Fund

Previous Close Today's Close

1.40
11.00
6.95
0.63
3.15
2.37
11.75
2.83
6.17
3.38
1.70
7.76
11.00
10.40
5.14
1.00
0.30
5.59
10.50
10.00

S2wk-Hi _52wk-Low
1000.00
1000.00
1000.00

1000.00

52wk-Low

Change

0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.88

-0.15

0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00



Daily Vol.

EPS $

pursued the approvals necessary
to have Bahamian technicians
completely overhaul the planes.

“Bahamians are getting the
money, and local technicians are
getting the experience,” said Mr
Woods.

Bahamasair’s Dash-8 savings
come as the national airline
received exemplary operational
performance marks from the Fed-
eral Aviation Administration
(FAA) and the International Air
Transport Association (IATA).

Mr Woods said Bahamasair
underwent two extensive back-
to-back audits with the two
organisations, passing both with
“flying colours”.

In December, IATA audited
Bahamasair using a 2,300 item
checklist, of which only 41 items
were found to be inconsistent
with standard regulations. None
were safety-related.

Mr Woods said those inconsis-
tencies have since been corrected,

and the airline is preparing to turn
those corrections over to IATA.

Bahamasair underwent a sec-
ond audit in January 2009 by the
FAA.

According to Mr Woods, a
five-man team of US auditors
scrutinised Bahamasair’s opera-
tional and technical departments
for one week, after which the air-
line was given a “clean bill of

health”.
Audit

He said there only five incon-
sistencies discovered by the audit,
which the airline corrected with-
in 30 days.

“Their initial feedback was that
they were most pleased with
Bahamasair,” said Mr Woods said
of the FAA and IATA.

He said the travelling public
has developed high expectations
of Bahamasair, more so than ever
before, and that in some regards

they are far ahead of other air-
lines that operate out of LPIA in
terms of operational perfor-
mance.

“The proof is in the pudding,”
said Mr Woods. “Our daily oper-
ations have much improved, and
recently we have been receiving
much positive comments.”

He said the Bahamasair staff
were somewhat uplifted because
of the changes in the company
and are “highly motivated”.

Mr Woods said one of the
biggest challenges for the airline
was still the cost of fuel. He said
Bahamasair was engaged in
aggressive fuel management pro-
jects in order to further increase
the airline’s bottom line.

“The present management
team is taking a lot of initiative in
the cost management area and
keeping the money in the coun-
try.

“Bahamasair’s bottom line is
looking a bit better,” he said.

Water Corp’s ‘major arrears’ for whole year

FROM page 1B

2009. Based upon these commu-
nications, we believe that the
accounts receivable from the
Water and Sewerage Corporation
are fully collectible and therefore
have not provided any allowance
for possible non-payment of these
receivables as of March 31, 2009.

“However, we have been
informed by these representatives
that the Water and Sewerage
Corporation expects to continue
to be significantly in arrears on
its payments to Consolidated
Water-Bahamas for the remain-
der of 2009.”

And the BISX-listed company
warned: “Consolidated Water-
Bahamas derives substantially all
of its revenues from its contract
with the Water and Sewerage
Corporation, and is dependent
upon timely collection of its
accounts receivable to fund its
operations.

“If the Water and Sewerage
Corporation does not improve
the timeliness and/or increase the

FG CAPITAL MARKETS

BROKERAGE & ADVISORY SERVICES

zi

COLONTAL

Div $ P/E
11.0
11.1
28.5

N/M

0.127
0.992
0.244
-0.877
0.078 40.4
0.055 43.1
1.406 8.4
0.249 11.4
0.419 14.7
0.111 30.5
0.240 7.1
0.420 18.5
0.322 34.2
0.794 13.1
0.332 15.5
0.000 N/M
0.035 8.6
0.407 13.7
0.952 11.0
0.180 55.6

BISX LISTED DEBT SECURITIES - (Bonds trade on a Percentage Pricing bases)
Daily Vol.

Security
Fidelity Bank Note 17 (Series A) +
Fidelity Bank Note 22 (Series B) +
Fidelity Bank Note 13 (Series C) +
Fidelity Bank Note 15 (Series D) +

Symbol

14.25 Bahamas Supermarkets
6.00 Caribbean Crossings (Pref)
0.20 RND Holdings

29.00 ABDAB
0.40 RND Holdings

52wk-Low
1.3041
2.9230
1.3883
3.1964
12.1564
100.0000
96.4070
1.0000
9.0950
1.0000
1.0000
1.0000

Fund Name
Colina Bond Fund
Colina MSI Preferred Fund
Colina Money Market Fund
Fidelity Bahamas G & | Fund
Fidelity Prime Income Fund
CFAL Global Bond Fund
CFAL Global Equity Fund
CFAL High Grade Bond Fund
Fidelity International Investment Fund
FG Financial Preferred Income Fund
FG Financial Growth Fund
FG Financial Diversified Fund

BISX ALL SHARE INDEX - 19 Dec 02 = 1,000.00
52wk-Hi - Highest closing price in last 52 weeks
52wk-Low - Lowest closing price in last 52 weeks
Previous Close - Previous day's weighted price for daily volume
Today's Close - Current day's weighted price for daily volume
Change - Change in closing price from day to day
Daily Vol. - Number of total shares traded today
DIV § - Dividends per share paid in the last 12 months
P/E - Closing price divided by the last 12 month earnings
) - 4-for-1 Stock Split - Effective Date 8/8/2007
) - 3-for-1 Stock Split - Effective Date 7/11/2007
TO TRADE CALL: COLINA 242-502-7010 | ROYALFIDELITY 242-356-7764 | FG CAPITAL MARKETS 242-396-4000 | COLONIAL 242-502-7525

Symbol
FBB17
FBB22
FBB13
FBB15

Last Sale
100.00
100.00
100.00
100.00

Change
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00

Fidelity Over-The-Counter Securities
Last Price

Bid $
7.92
4.00
0.35

Ask $
8.42
6.25
0.40

14.60
6.00
0.35

Colina Over-The-Counter Securities

30.13
0.45

31.59
0.55

29.00
0.55

BISX Listed Mutual Funds
Last 12 Months

NA V
1.3664
2.8962
1.4590
3.1964

12.7397
100.5606
96.4070

1.0000
9.1599
1.0440
1.0364
1.0452

MARKET TERMS
YIELD - last 12 month dividends divided by closing price

YTD%

0.95
-1.49
1.77
-5.59
0.96
0.56
-3.59
0.00
0.71

0.80
0.33
0.76

4.77
-3.35
5.09
-13.64
5.79
0.56
-3.59
0.00
-12.76
4.40
3.64
4.40

Bid $ - Buying price of Colina and Fidelity
Ask § - Selling price of Colina and fidelity

Last Price - Last traded over-the-counter price

Weekly Vol.

Div $

Weekly Vol. - Trading volume of the prior week
EPS $ - Acompany's reported earnings per share for the last 12 mths
NAV - Net Asset Value
N/M - Not Meaningful

FINDEX - The Fidelity Bahamas Stock Index. January 1, 1994 = 100

Interest
7%
Prime + 1.75%
8 7%
Prime + 1.75%
EPS $ Div $
0.300
0.480
0.000

0.000
0.000

Yield %

Maturity
19 October 2017
19 October 2022
30 May 2013
29 May 2015

P/E

N/M
N/M
256.6

9.03
261.90

NAV Date
28-Feb-09
31-Mar-09
1-May-09
31-Mar-09
28-Feb-09
31-Dec-08
31-Dec-08
31-Dec-07
31-Mar-09
9-Feb-09
9-Feb-09
9-Feb-09



amounts of its payments to Con-
solidated Water-Bahamas, this
subsidiary may not have sufficient
liquidity to adequately fund its
operations. If this occurs, Con-
solidated Water-Bahamas may be
required to decrease the amount
of water it supplies the Water and
Sewerage Corporation to the
minimum required amount under
the contract or, if liquidity prob-
lems become too severe, cease its
production of water altogether.”
The Water & Sewerage Cor-
poration’s financial difficulties
will come as a surprise to no one,
given that it has surpassed
Bahamasair in becoming the pub-
lic sector agency that is the largest
drain on the Public Treasury and
Bahamian taxpayer to the tune
of $30 million this Budget year.
Apart from consumer prices
failing to rise in line with infla-
tion and cover water production
costs, the Water & Sewerage Cor-
poration is also plagued by inef-
ficiency, poor service, low quality
water (especially in eastern New
Providence), losses from its dis-
tribution system that run as high
as 50 per cent of water produced;
and the fact that only 30 per cent
of New Providence residences
and businesses use its services,

the rest preferring private wells.

Phenton Neymour, minister of
state for the environment, in his
mid-term Budget address, said
the Corporation’s cost of water
purchases now equalled 57 per
cent of revenues, compared to
just 19 per cent in 2004, as a result
of increasing reliance on reverse
osmosis suppliers such as Con-
solidated Water.

Mr Neymour said that in 2004,
the Water & Sewerage Corpora-
tion’s revenues were $31 million,
and reverse osmosis purchases $6
million. But between then and
2008, while water sales increased
by a collective $22.7 million,
water purchase costs increased
over the same period by $41.5
million.

The Inter-American Develop-
ment Bank (IDB), which is
proposing a $300,000 project to
tackle water resources manage-
ment and economic regulation of
the sector in the Bahamas, said
the “likelihood of backtracking”
by the Government on the need
for an independent water sector
regulator was “low, given the
large annual subsidies that the
Government currently provides
to the Water & Sewerage Corpo-
ration.

Bahama Rock aggregate
loss ‘catastrophic’

FROM page 1B

found the price “comparable” to
Bahama Rock’s.

“But there’s no substitute for
home-produced aggregate,” Mr
Wrinkle said. “It’s always avail-
able, in stock and the price is fair-
ly consistent.

“We can pay in Bahamian dol-
lars. There are substantial conve-
niences to the industry of having
it [Bahama Rock’s aggregate
plant] here. It keeps the dollars
here, and that’s important.”

The EIA had warned that a
failure to approve the project
would remove a “no cost” har-
bour construction operation, and
also lead to Bahama Rock’s ear-
lier departure from the Bahamas
- a development that could cost
Freeport’s economy $64.168 mil-
lion in the nine years to 2018.

If the Freeport Harbour area 4
expansion was approved, Bahama
Rock was “expected to extend
operations” until at least 2018,
thus maintaining its position as
“the largest supplier of construc-
tion grade aggregate in the
Bahamas”.

And the report added: “An
important long-term government
policy question will be raised
sooner rather than later if
Bahama Rock reduces aggregate
supply.

“Bahama Rock supplies New
Providence, through an agree-
ment with a Nassau-based con-
tractor, with 100 per cent of all
coarse aggregate needs. Taking a
long-term viewpoint, the Bahama
Rock operation is finite, and once
the harbour expansion ceases,
Bahama Rock will depart.

“The future availability of a
domestic supply of aggregate, or
conversely, importation, is an
issue needing further evaluation
by policymakers and those in the
construction industry.”

Backing those conclusions, Mr
Wrinkle said both the Bahamian
construction industry and the
Government needed to look at
aggregate supply “with a long-
term view”.

“This could potentially take a
natural resource, like rock, out

of the system. It’s going to burden
the contractors, the suppliers and
the block makers - everyone in
the system,” the BCA president
said.

“T think it’s very important for
us. It’s essential to maintain con-
tinuity of the aggregate supply
chain. Otherwise, we’d have to
stockpile a tremendous amount
of aggregate, and the costs are
going to up. That will be a nation-
al concern of disruption to the
construction industry supply
chain.”

He added: “You're talking
about stockpiling huge amounts
of aggregate and importing from
elsewhere - Jamaica, Cuba, the
Dominican Republic. The logis-
tics to do that are very expensive
and complicated. It’s the cost, the
continuity and the convenience
of local supply - the three criti-
cal factors.

“They’ve [Bahama Rock] been
providing such a solid product for
so long a time that it’s been taken
for granted. This is a wake-up
call.”

Any impact for the Bahamian
construction industry from a
Bahama Rock pull-out will rever-
berate among foreign direct
investment projects and real
estate developers.

“There are the logistics of car-
rying out the project,” Mr Wrin-
kle told Tribune Business. Every
time you take an integral compo-
nent of a successful project out
of the picture, you take one
chance of success away.”

He explained that domestically-
produced, lower cost building
materials and aggregate “lends a
certain amount of advantage” to
those nations who had this fea-
ture.

The Bahamas was already
competing against the likes of
Cuba, Jamaica and the Domini-
can Republic for tourism-related
foreign direct investment, and all
had this quality, whereas this
nation would not if it lost Bahama
Rock.

Bahamian ready-mix concrete
suppliers, too, were also reliant
on Bahama Rock supplies for
their product.
THE TRIBUNE

WEDNESDAY, MAY 13, 2009, PAGE 3B



‘Don’t throw fiscal caution to the wind’

@ By NEIL HARTNELL
Tribune Business Editor

THE Government should not
“throw fiscal caution to the wind”
to save the Bahamian economy
from recession, a leading Nassau
Institute member has argued,
calling for ‘less government’ in a
bid to reduce a national debt that
has increased by 244.8 per cent in
18 years.

Rick Lowe, in an address to
the Rotary Club of East Nassau,
said that what he found “most
disturbing” was that successive
Bahamian governments had com-
mitted to erther reducing or elim-
inating the Budgetary fiscal
deficit, and lowering the $3.2 bil-
lion national debt, yet had failed
to achieve these objectives.

“At the Nassau Institute we
might be considered fiscal con-
servatives, but I prefer to think it
is better for government to spend
within its means than burden
future generations, yet unborn,
with deficits and debt that we will
never repay in most of our life-
times,” Mr Lowe said.

“What I find most disturbing is
successive governments have

Reduction in size of government, rather than expanded spending, urged to save

Bahamas from national debt that has risen 244.8% in 18 years or $118m per year

committed to bringing the debt
and deficits under control, yet
year after year, with the odd
exception, the deficits and debt
increase.”

Referring to the Government’s
proposed infrastructure invest-
ments and expanded capital
works programmes, in a bid to
mitigate the economic downturn,
Mr Lowe went against conven-
tional economic wisdom by call-
ing for “the opposite approach
for our national economic plan”.

Accepted logic is that govern-
ments should loosen the fiscal
purse strings and increase spend-
ing during recessions to stimu-
late economic activity and limit
jobs losses - classic Keynesian
economics.

But Mr Lowe said that while
many felt the Government
“should throw caution to the
wind and do whatever it takes to
save us from this market correc-

200-strong law
seminar to boost
tourism sector

THE Bahamian tourism and
hotel industries will receive a
welcome boost when 200 attor-
neys converge on Nassau for the
Inter-American Bar Association
(IABA) Conference at the
Wyndham Crystal Palace Resort
from June 30 to July 4, 2009.

The conference will cover
major hemispheric, regional and
local issues under the theme:
The World Financial Crisis:
What Does the Future Hold?

Chairman of the organizing
committee for the IABA XLV
Conference is Dr Peter May-
nard of the Bahamas Bar Asso-
ciation. He said that given the
present state of the global econ-
omy, the conference is both
timely and topical.

“The IABA conference pro-
vides a unique opportunity for
trading information and views
with the preeminent lawyers and
luminaries of the hemisphere -
from Canada to Argentina and
almost every country in between
- and elsewhere, on an excep-
tional range of key issues,” Dr
Maynards said. “These extend
from our future as a financial
centre to our prospects as an
arbitration and maritime cen-
tre, from Madoff to CLICO,
from domestic violence to the
death penalty, from indepen-
dence of the judiciary to the
Caribbean Court of Justice, and
many other issues.”

Dr Maynard said the Bahami-
an Host Committee specifically
asked for the conference to be



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terlin

open to the general public -
and to be affordable.

“This is a chance that every-
one should take advantage of,”
he said. “You do not have to go
abroad for a first class confer-
ence on matters that affect you.
You will have it right here. The
community has responded
through generous sponsorship.
We are also confident that our
visitors for the event will be
impressed by the extraordinary
hospitality and warmth of the
Bahamian people.”

The (IABA) XLV Confer-
ence is the largest conference
ever to be co-sponsored by the
Bahamas Bar. It has also attract-
ed the co-sponsorship of the
Organisation of Commonwealth
Caribbean Bar Associations.

The Bahamas Financial Ser-
vices Board (BFSB) is a silver
sponsor of the IABA XVL Con-
ference. Its chief executive and
executive director, Wendy War-
ren, said: “We believe that con-
ferences of this nature hold sig-
nificant latent opportunity that
can be extracted through the
support — both through spon-
sorship and registration — of the
Bahamian private sector.”

The Washington-based
IABA, founded on May 16,
1940, represents a permanent
forum for the exchange of pro-
fessional views and information
for lawyers to promote the rule
of law and protect the democ-
ratic institutions in the Americ-
as.

oOTERLING

= ee eee)
* PERSUASIVE

* PERSISTENT

* PROFESSIONAL

Sine

erates ate D a

Webnwww.sterlinecollectionslid.com

tion we call a recession”, in his
opinion it needed to pay more
attention to fiscal prudence.

This was due to the “mind bog-
gling” increase in the Bahamas’
national debt over an 18-year
period from 1991 to present. Mr
Lowe said the nation’s total debt
had risen from $870 million to
more than $2.3 billion, a “stag-
gering” increase of 244.8 per cent
or $118 million per year.

“The only national economic
plan we should be setting is for
government to start to downsize
immediately by privatising or
shutting down whatever agency
or department they can,” Mr
Lowe urged.

“TI challenge anyone in this
room to name 10 government
agencies, departments or min-
istries, out of the 173 services list-
ed in the phone book, that do
their job efficiently and effec-
tively.”

He questioned whether there
was any need for the Hotel Cor-
poration of the Bahamas, the
Price Control Department and
ZNS, and called on the Govern-
ment to also privatise the Water
& Sewerage Corporation,
Bahamasair and BEC.

Mr Lowe also recalled Nassau
Institute reports on the poor
return the Bahamian taxpayer
was receiving from the Govern-
ment’s investment in the Bahami-
an education system.

Some $480 million was spent
on the public education system
over a nine-year period between
1992-2001, yet the consistent
mean grade average produced by
graduating students was a ‘D’,
“which in the real world is a fail-
ing grade”.

“T sincerely believe the goal of
downsizing government is a much
more worthy national economic
plan than encouraging more

failed government planning,” Mr
Lowe said.

“After all, a government does
not an economy make...... And I
don’t know about you, but I trust
myself to make my personal deci-
sions rather than something or
someone called the Government.

“Besides, Bahamians can ill-
afford the taxation to come in an
effort to support the leviathan
we call the Bahamas’ govern-
ment, as it is presently structured.
And more government planning
means more costs to the taxpay-
er, and possibly to the economy.

“The unintended conse-
quences from government plan-
ning agencies brings the risk of
them becoming the Bahamas’
biggest growth industry. You can
bet they would convince us that
they are even more relevant in
tough economic times, in an
attempt to justify even larger
budgets.”



Mr Lowe said the Govern-
ment’s attempts at economic
planning, involving publicly-run
entities such as the produce
exchanges and packing houses,
had all “ended in abject failure,
leaving piles of debt for future
generations”.

He also criticised the newly-
introduced Unemployment Ben-
efit, warning that government
handouts - even if well-inten-
tioned - “create black holes for
taxpayers’ hard earned money”.

Mr Lowe said that apart from
requiring all Bahamian compa-
nies to change their computer
payroll systems, the length of
time that people were eligible to
receive benefits for could be
extended arbitrarily by the min-
ister responsible.

“This represents a tax increase
at the worst possible time, with-
out a corresponding decrease to
compensate,” Mr Lowe added.

Bahamas plant improvements boost company margins by 7%

FROM page 1B

the reverse osmosis membranes
on two of Windsor’s four pro-
duction trains. That work was set
to be completed in the 2009 sec-
ond quarter.

Turning to the Blue Hills,
reverse osmosis plant, Mr Sasnett
said Consolidated Water had
upgraded its diesel engine cooling
system, reducing energy con-
sumption and “operating cost
reductions starting in the 2009
second quarter”.

The Consolidated Water exec-
utive added that the improve-
ments to the Bahamian reverse
osmosis plants should result in
“consistently higher margins” for
its Nassau-based and overall bulk
water segment in 2009, compared
to the prior year.

“T can’t say it will be exactly
22 per cent, but we believe that
with recent investments in the
Bahamas at both the Windsor
and Blue Hills plants, we should
see consistently higher margins
than last year. But the proof will
be in the pudding,” Mr Sasnett
said.

Consolidated Water saw gross
profits for its bulk water segment,
in dollar terms, increase by 38 per
cent during the 2009 first quarter
to $1.42 million, compared to
$1.028 million the year before.

For the three months to March
31, 2009, the company’s net
income available to common
shareholders increased by 52 per
cent to $2.55 million or $0.18 per
diluted share, compared to $1.674
million or $0.12 per diluted share
in the same period during 2008.

“Our 52 per cent increase in
net income attributable to com-

Legal Notice

NOTICE

NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN as follows:

(a) BLACKHORSE FUND LIMITED is in dissolution under the
provisions of the International Business Companies Act 2000.

(b) The Dissolution of said Company commenced on May 12, 2009
when its Articles of Dissolution were submitted and registered by

the Registrar General.

(c) The Liquidator of the said company is Lakeisha Collie of 2nd
Terrace West, Centreville, Nassau, Bahamas.

All persons having Claims against the above-named Company
are required on or before the 10th day of June, 2009 to send their
names and addresses and particulars of their debts or claims to the
Liquidator of the company or, in default thereof, they may be
excluded from the benefit of any distribution made before such

debts are proved.

MAY 13, 2009

LAKEISHA COLLIE

LIQUIDATOR OF THE ABOVE-NAMED COMPANY



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mon shareholders in the first
quarter of 2009 was driven pri-
marily by improvements in gross
profit margins,” said Rick McTag-
gart, Consolidated Water’s chief
executive said.

"In particular, gross margins in
our bulk water segment expanded
significantly, from 15 per cent of
revenues in last year's first quar-
ter to 22 per cent in the most
recent quarter, primarily due to

efficiency improvements in our
Bahamas operations.

“These improvements were the
result of capital projects that we
completed at the Windsor plant
last October, and we expect to
improve efficiencies further when
we complete the replacement of
reverse osmosis membranes on
the last two production units at
the Windsor plant during the sec-
ond quarter of 2009."

COMMONWEALTH OF THE BAHAMAS 2008
IN THE SUPREME COURT CLE/QUI/OO 1134
Common Law and Equity Division

IN THE MATTER OF ALL THAT piece parcel or
lot of land containing Three thousand and Fifty-six
(3,056) square feet situate in the Settlement of Great
Guana Cay one of the Abaco chain of cays in the
Commonwealth of The Bahamas bounded on the
North by land now or formerly the property of Lewis
Roberts and running thereon Sixty (60) feet on the
East by land the property of Alrob (Thomas Roberts)
but now the property of William Doyle Watson and
Frederik F. Gottlieb running thereon Fifty-five and
Ninety-three hundredths (55.93) feet on the South by
the Main Public Road (known as “Front Street”) and
running thereon Seventy (70) feet or less and on the
West by a Three (3) feet wide public reservation and
running thereon Sixty (60) feet

AND

IN THE MATTER OF THE QUIETING TITLES ACT,
1959, CHAPTER 393 OF THE STATUTE LAWS OF
THE COMMONWEALTH OF THE BAHAMAS

AND

IN THE MATTER OF THE PETITION OF WILLIAM
DOYLE WATSON and FREDERIK F. GOTTLIEB
NOTICE OF PETITION

WILLIAM DOYLE WATSON of St. Simon’s Island in
the State of Georgia one of the states of the United
States of America and FREDERIK F. GOTTLIEB of
the Town of Marsh Harbour in the Island of Abaco
one of the Islands of the Commonwealth of The
Bahamas claim to be the owners in fee simple in
possession of all that piece parcel or lot of land
hereinbefore described free from encumbrances.
AND the Petitioners have made application to
the Supreme Court of the Commonwealth of The
Bahamas under Section 3 of the Quieting Titles Act,
1959 Chapter 393 of the Statute Laws of the said
Commonwealth, in the above action, to have their
title to the said land investigated and the nature
and extent thereof determined and declared in a
Certificate of Title to be granted in accordance with
the provisions of the said Act.

Notice is hereby given to any person having
a dower or right of dower or an adverse claim or
a claim not recognized in the Petition shall on or
before the expiration of thirty (30) days after the final
publication of these presents filed in the Registry
of the Supreme Court and serve on the Petitioner
or the undersigned a statement of his claim in the
prescribed form verified by an Affidavit to be filed
therewith. Failure of any such person to file and serve
a statement on or before the expiration of thirty (30)
days after the final publication of these presents shall
operate as a bar to such claims.

Copies of the said plan may be inspected
during normal hours at the Registry of the
Supreme Court, East Street North, City of Nassau,
New Providence, The Bahamas and the Office
of the Administrator in the Township of Marsh
Harbour, Abaco, The Bahamas.

Dated this 2nd day of December, A.D., 2008

SYDBRI LEGAL SERVICES
Chambers
Naomi House
No.19, Ninth Terrace & West Court
Centreville
New Providence, The Bahamas
Attorneys for the Petitioners


PAGE 8B, WEDNESDAY, MAY 13, 2009

THE TRIBUNE







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Acuta

@ By LLOYD ALLEN
Tribune Features Reporter
lallen@tribunemedia.net

TUCKED away amidst the dozens
of local restaurants at the fish fry, is
one that has risen above the rest in
offering the same dishes, in a total-
ly unique way.

Native Way restaurant, located at the eastern
end of Arawak Cay, is now under new manage-
ment, and has made the grade in spicing up their
menu, while staying true to giving customers an all
Bahamian experience.

During a recent review of the restaurant, Tribune
Taste was pleasantly surprised by the array of bev-
erages and dishes available, with the first being
its unique preparation of mojitos, made like none
other.

According to manager and co-owner Shelly
Lockhart-Smith, in addition to the regular ingre-
dients of white rum, sugar, lime, carbonated water
and pureed mint leaves, the beverage is frozen
and then served in a daiquiri form, a presentation
and flavour that not only ups the ante when it
comes to mojitos, but one that is sure to keep their
guest coming back for more.

In addition the mojito, the restaurant also has
another signature drink- the Over The Rainbow or
Sumi Sucka, a mix of several Bacardi rums blend-
ed to have the appearance of fruit punch.

The drink has a hint of sweetness, but be warned,
because after having about two rounds, you can
count driving yourself home good-bye.

Native Way also offers the traditional home-
made switcher, a Bahamian style lemonade made
with freshly picked limes, with just the right amount
of sugar, and added pulp for an extra zing.

Apart from the various beverages, the restaurant
offers an all original cast of appetizers, prepared
just right for that customer looking for the perfect
treat.

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P. O. Box CB-10976
Nassau, Bahamas



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SMOKED Salmon served with cheesy macaroni, cole
slaw, peas and rice, and a tall glass of mojito.

Instead of offering regular conch fritters, the
restaurant offers seafood fritters made with plen-
ty of conch, lobster, shrimp, and coconut. Of course
many may wonder why the coconut, but trust me,
it adds an entirely new dimension to fritter.

The restaurant also specialises in a diverse menu
including fried, steamed, and sautéed lobster,
conch, grouper, snapper, and even salmon.

Mrs Lockhart-Smith added: “For someone who
is either a vegetarian or vegan, I can prepare a
special salad, vegetarian patties, veggie burgers, or
sautéed greens for them. These are made with all
natural products, and we can also provide tofu if
requested in advance.”

Mrs Lockhart-Smith said what makes her dish-
es special is the time taken to first spice them up
and also the serving sizes of the meals that many
customers have now grown to expect.

The owners of the restaurant say despite the
changes in the economy that have forced many
to cut back on eating out, their choice of giving
clients more for their money will in the end only
add to the success of their business.

Operating from Tuesday to Sunday, and soon to
introduce a breakfast menu, this island restaurant
is helping to remind both locals and visitors why it
is so much better to eat and live in the Bahamas.





= THE ORIGINAL Native Way Mojito with pureed
mint leaves, and Served in a daiquiri form.



Chefs providing
hands for hunger!

@ By LLOYD ALLEN
Tribune Features Reporter

lallen@tribunemedia.net

WITH the first annual Paradise
Plates fast approaching, there
remains much anticipation regard-
ing the fine gourmet foods and
treats, wine, and live entertain-
ment all expected to decorate the
anti-hunger charity event.

Continuing with our weekly
feature of some of the chefs slated
to display their talents during the
event, this week we introduce you
to Freddy Van Breugel of Van
Breugel’s restaurant and Bar on
Charlotte Street, along with
British Colonial Hilton Executive
Chefs Kabuti Lockhart and Peter
Major, and Pia Farmer from the
Mendosa wine company.

The newly opened Van
Breugel’s is located in the heart of
downtown, and according to its
owner is the perfect lunch or hap-
py hour spot for busy profession-
als of that district.

“Apart from the appeal to
many professionals, the building is
one of the old historical buildings
of the Bahamas, and is more than
225-years-old and is the old Mal-
one house,” he said.

Apart from the great atmos-
phere, Mr Van Breugel said his
vast knowledge in experiencing
many cultures throughout the
globe has added to the diversity at
his restaurant.

Born in Holland, he said he
received most of his education in
Belgium, then worked in Spain,
the US, and then the Bahamas,
where he owned a number of
restaurants and various business-
es.

Mr Van Breugel said there are
several food choices available at
his restaurant including burgers,
red and white meats, salads, fresh
Mahi-Mahi, salmon, tuna, and a
fantastic list of side orders.

During the Paradise Plates
event, Mr Van Breugel said he
will be providing Tuna Tartare - a
type of sushi role made with tuna,
soy-wasabi, and several herbs.

This mini dish which goes well
with most wines, Mr Van Breugel
explained will probably excite sev-
eral tastes buds with an ultimate
sense of freshness.

Mr Van Breugel said being a
mentor to more than a dozen
underprivileged children through-
out the community, this cause is
very dear to him, and he hopes in
the future to continue to be
involved in similar initiatives.

Over at the Hilton Hotel, chefs
Lockhart and Major explain that



on the night of the event, guest
can expect an “Island Snow Fan-
tasy” as they will attempt to mes-
morize them through their sour-
sop inspired ice cream.

Chef Lockhart explained: “We
have several dishes compiled
around soursop ice cream, then
we will infuse that with a number
of sauces and ingredients includ-
ing the guava sauce, peanut brittle,
coconut cream toplets, raspberry
sauce, all served in a martini glass.

“It’s going to be very smooth,
and the different flavors are real-
ly going to play with your taste
buds,” he said.

With both of these chefs having
had a love for food their entire
lives, this charity is important to
them and they are simply excited
to do their part in assisting those
throughout the community in
need of food.

Chef Lockhart expressed:
“This is our opportunity to con-
tribute back to the community,
and far so often I turn on the TV
to see many people starving
abroad, but there are those local-
ly that are hungry and go days
without a healthy meal.

“That’s in our power and con-
trol, so it’s good when you could
help with giving something to
someone that really needs it, and
me along with my staff are ready
to do our part in this endeavor,”
he said.

All proceeds from the event
are slated for Hands for Hunger
and its food rescue programmes.

Last but not least is Pia Farmer,
the proprietor of Mendoza
Imports. She brings in wines from
western Argentina, an area
known as one of the best wine
areas of the world.

Mrs Farmers said for the past
three years, she has imported the

FROM left to
right - chef
Peter Major,
Kabuti Lock-
hartchefs at
the British
Colonial
Hilton.

exclusive brand - Noble - and will
be serving a 2006 label during the
Hands for Hunger event.

She explained: “One of which
will be the chardonnay, and the
other is going to be the Mal-
bec(Red), which is the most well
known variety from Argentina.

“Tt’s my pleasure to support this
fabulous fund raising idea, also
the whole concept of Hands for
Hunger.”

Mrs Farmer explained that over
the years while she had the oppor-
tunity to work within the hotel
sector, she witnessed on several
occasion good food going to
waste, while many homeless and
less fortunate persons are in con-
stant need of a good meal.

She said for a long time she had
searched for the perfect connec-
tion to bring together available
food and the people who were
hungry and needing it, and said
that she is happy to know that
Hands for Hunger has been suc-
cessful in bridging that gap.

Focusing on the charity event
slated for later this month, Mrs
Farmer explained that supporters
can expect an Argentinean spe-
cific flavor, but added that it has a
taste reminiscent of wines from
places like France, Italy, and most
parts of Europe because of their
close relations.

“Argentinean wines tend to be
particularly red ones, full bodied,
full flavoured, best suited to have
with meat or roasted or barbe-
cued foods.

“It’s not a weakling, and the
one that will be served is a 2006
Malbec, which happens to be very
nice and fruity, and besides 2006
was a very good year in Argentina
for wines that are made for open-
ing and drinking,” she said.
THE TRIBUNE

WEDNESDAY, MAY 13, 2009, PAGE 9B





The Tribune



m@ By LLOYD ALLEN
Tribune Features
Reporter i
lallen@tribunemedia.net :

THIS weekend there’s aclash
of the cultures, as spontaneous :
events throughout the island use :
diversity as the source for their i
inspiration. Fusing French, ;
Argentinean, Italian, Haitian, :
Bahamian, and so many other :
cultures, this week’s Things 2
Do packs a punch of multicul- :

tural proportions.

41. The Heineken Green Hype
is only three days away, and
already its excitement has
reached platinum status, as it
is among one of the most
talked about events within

Bahamian online entertainment :

networks including Facebook,
MySpace, YouTube and Twit-
ter. This event is bringing to
one stage 15 of the hypest
names in local non-traditional
Bahamian entertainment
including El Pedrino, SO$A
Man, Chris ‘Sketch’ Carey,
Ricardo Clarke, Jah Nyne, Fry-
deh, Club SuperDeath, and
others. Unfolding at the But-
lers and Sands ground, the
event is set to kick off at 69m
until. There will also be a
Heineken special of six for
$10. Tickets are $5 before
8pm, and $10 after.

2. The Burns House Group of
Companies will be featured at
the Poop Deck restaurant
Sandyport this Saturday for its
fourth annual Wine, Art & Jazz
Festival. The event which will
feature a long list of wines
from places like Argentina,
Chile, Australia, France and
Italy, will also showcase can-
vassed art from some of the
country’s most renowned
artist. This will include the
work of Antonius Roberts,

John Cox, Willicey Tynes, Clive : ,
: ers allow us to enjoy. This

: year, the fabulous ladies of

: the Carver Garden Club will
i be hosting a Spring Sensa-

i tion Flower Show May 16

: and 17 at the Doris Johnson
: Senior High School.

Stuart, and Malcolm Rae.
Starting at 3pm, there will be
simultaneous activities includ-
ing wine sampling comple-
mented with hors d’oeuvres ,
live caricatures, live entertain-
ment (provided by the G-Note
All Stars), and much more.
Generally admission for the
event is $20, and wine club
members get in at $15, and all
children under 12 are free.

3. Step Up Entertainment
along with Mr Malik events
present Unity Jam, the first
annual Haitian Bahamian Flag
Day celebration. Celebrating
205 years of freedom for Haiti,

this event will feature music by |

Selector Chronic, DJ Clean
Cut, and DJ Runks, along with
a special appearance by popu-
lar Haitian Bahamian music
group Broken Mics. The venue
for the event is Workers
House, and starting time is
8.30pm. Tickets are priced at
$10, and security will be
enforced.

4. The Bahamas Humane
Society is scheduled to have
its third annual Whe Let The
Dogs Out fun-day this Satur-
day at the Botanical Gardens.
This family event - including
your canine family members -
will run from noon until 6pm,
and will include many mini-

competitions including the dog
with the waggiest tail, the most :

unusual dog, the dog with the
best trick, the best junior han-
dler, the prettiest dog, the old-
est dog, and so much more.
Entrance fees are $3 adults, $1
for kids, and $1 for dogs. Pro-
ceeds for this event are in aid
of the many adopted and
needy animals at the centre.

5. This Friday, an all gospel
entertainment showdown is
set to unfold at the Bahamas
Christian Fellowship Church,
where artist Heavy Metal is
launching his new self titled
project with the help of some

his Christian sisters and broth-
ers. These include DJ Counsel-

lor, Cream, Ricardo Clarke, Mr
Lynx, Vandera, Rudell Capron,
and others. Showtime begins
at 7.30pm, with the event
expected to last until 11pm.
Admission for the event $5,
and it promises to be a good
show for the family.

: plants ata
? recent club
i meeting.



MEMBERS
of the Carver
Garden Club
showcase
some of their

ml By ALEX MISSICK

Tribune Features Reporter
amissick@tribunemedia.net

THERE is no better way to

celebrate spring than to
: enjoy the beauty of nature
i and the sweet smelling aro-

mas hundred of glorious flow-

The show which is being held

i under the patronage of Governor

? General, Sir Arthur Hanna will be
: open to the public from 3-7pm on

i Saturday and 3-6 on Sunday.

The show is divided into two cate-

gories: Horticulture and Design. The

[WO new faces have been selected as

the new “Supermode]” title holders for
: the Bahamas. Twenty- year old Kendra
: Beneby and 17 -year old Philip Penner-
i man were recently selected the winners.
: The competition started with 42 contes-
: tants and as the weeks went by, contes-
i tants were eliminated one by one in order
: to select the strongest for the finals.

Mr OilinSha Coakley hand picked

horticulture division has 18 classes
which range from the Adeniums
(desert roses) to the Zingiberaceae
(ginger lilly).

The design division has nine classes
and will showcase the artistic side of
the club members. The ladies will use
space as their canvas and plant mate-
rial as their medium. They will also
be challenged to interpret themes
such as Mother Nature’s Garden,
Everything’s Coming Up Roses, Let’s
Celebrate Spring, and many more.
Flower design divas such as Ann
Garraway, Isle Dean, Elva Rolle, and
Rhona Douglas-Sands are amongst
the designers to beat this year.

President of the club, Peggy
Knowles, said members have been
planning the show for several
months. Mrs Knowles said although
there has been a lack of spring rain,
she is optimistic that the public will
be dazzled by the beauty of the
plants that will be on display.

Show Chairperson, Cynthia Gibbs
has been encouraging members to
enter as many plants as possible. The

KENDRA BENEBY 2009 Supermodel of
the Bahamas.

New faces for Supermodel of the Bahamas

_ MBy ALEX MISSICK
: Tribune Features Reporter
amissick@tribunemedia.net

judges who have made a successful career
for themselves in the international fash-
ion and music arena. Philip McGowen
(Agent of Naomi Campbell - Kate Moss
- Alek Wek - Giselle - Heidi Klum and
more Supermodels); Kendell Monroe
(manages the careers and organises
shows for Michael Jackson, Usher and
more); Natalie Duhaney, a New York
designer who designs for Claibourne,
Tommy Hillfiger and Boss Elite men's
line; Beth Sobol, Ceo/Founder of Miami
Fashion Week and Romea Gordan who
is the managing director of Pulse Models







SOME of the plants being prepared for this weekend’s show.

public can expect to see hundreds of
beautifully grown plants, many that
are quite rare and unusual.

Plant lovers and those curious
about gardening and flowers, can
expect to enjoy a relaxed atmosphere
and fun filled afternoon complete
with tasty catered dishes and music.
Plant lovers and serious collectors
will be able to take advantage of sev-



Jamaica where they manage such Super-
models such as Jeneil McKenzie.

The final lineup for Supermodel of the
Bahamas took place at the British Colo-
nial Hilton Hotel, where all of the
Bahamian hopefuls from many family
islands including Eleuthera, Grand
Bahama, Bimini, Andros and New Prov-
idence displayed top designer wear from
international designer Natalie Duhaney,
and top Bahamian designers, Cedric
Bernard, Percy Wallace and Ms New-
ton.

Ceo and founder of Supermodel of

eral vendors who will be in atten-
dance at the show including The Pot-
ting Shed, Green House Nursery and
Marina Greaves.

The Carver Garden Club Show
promises to be an unforgettable
afternoon as guests will be able to
enjoy the handiwork of flower lovers
and the colorful creations of nature.
Admission each day is $5.

KENDRA BENEBY posing on the beach.

the Bahamas, Mr OilinSha Coakley said
he is very pleased with the winners and
said this is only the beginning for their
careers as his agency now markets
Bahamian models to an international
client base. The 2008 contestants and
winners Omar Francis 8, Anwar Mackey
and Lithera Capron, have already been
booked and worked for Miami Fashion
Week, Islands of the World Fashion
Week and BK New York Fashion Week.
The winners for the Commercial divi-
sion in this year’s competition were
Mikell Clarke and Andrew Newton.
PAGE 10B, WEDNESDAY, MAY 13, 2009 THE TRIBUNE

ARTS

DEL UNITED NATIONS Session

Pry oti Sens erg ie,



aa Aa yi

a" Rojary dlubdol Nene a eo

ot i

eal
;



WINNERS of the 11 annual debate championship Michelle Greene, Giovano Bow, and Danya Farrington seen

overjoyed after receiving several awards and prizes.



aaa i
aa ae
Ff —
i [
|

@ By LLOYD ALLEN
Tribune Features Reporter
lallen@tribunemedia.net

IN recent weeks, many students
throughout the country have been
making their mark in public debate
and speaking, focusing on several
national and global issues spanning
from healthier living, to the impor-
tance of environmental preservation

and the economy.

The first event was the 11th annual Ministry of
Education (MOE) debate championship, held at
the Rainforest theater Cable Beach, on April 23.

According to Eula Gaitor - Supervisor of Student
services at MOE and coordinator for the event - this
competition which was first started back in 1998,
was developed to highlight the speaking abilities of
high school seniors throughout the country. Now in
its eleventh season, she is particularly pleased with
the performance of students particularly from the
family islands.

Mrs Gaitor explained: “The family islands have
been doing really well in recent times, last year
Cat Island won, this year they’ve won again along
with San Salvador and Bimini.

“The family islanders are really excited about it
all, and this year we took the competition up a
notch by bringing in the Mangrove Cay High school
band to have more students from the family island
featured.”

She said this year’s topic was: Be it resolved that
the economic development of the Bahamas is more
important than the protection of the environment.

Family islands

The winners 14-year-old Michelle Greene (10th
Grader from San Salvador High), 15-year-old Gio-
vano Bowe (11th Grader from Old Bight High, Cat
Island), and 15-year-old Danya Farrington (11th
Grader from Arthur’s Town High, Bimini) were
smiling from ear to ear as they received the even-
t’s floating trophy along with several other awards
along with one of their coaches Trenton Burant.

Coming from the out island environment, the
trio said they thoroughly researched their topic
which supported environmental preservation, how-
ever agreed that overall both topics rely in some
way with the other, and adding that ultimate bal-
ance can only be achieved when both are given
equal attention.

Later that day, there was a speech competion
held by the Ministry of Health in conjunction with
MOE and Toastmasters International themed
‘Eating Well On A Tight Budget.’



MOVIEREVIEW



ae. | rn”

uth destined for



With more than several dozen students and
schools taking part in the preliminary segment of
the event, the finals consisted of about 20 students
participating either in the junior or senior divi-
sion.

Debating on the same topic, most students pro-
vided a list of healthy and economical food pur-
chasing and preparation options in the reality of a
constricted economy.

Many suggested shopping around the perimeter
of supermarkets rather than in the middle, having
a home garden as opposed to always purchasing
vegetable supplies, and purchasing meats rotis-
serie style rather than in portions, all of which
could in the long run reduce the overall cost of
food.

Although all of the presentations were amazing,
there were only two winners in the end.

Junior division

In the junior division, Deokin-nique Strachan
from LW Young won first place receiving a num-
ber of prizes, with Tryker Smith from St Andrews
in at second, and Tenesha Anderson from LW
Young at third.

In the senior division, Kendra Stuart from CC
Sweeting was victorious, with Robert Farquhar-
son from St Andrews trailing at second, and Joy
Archer from St Francis de Sales High in Abaco
placing third.

Next there was the Model United Nations Ses-
sion (MUNS) that took place at the Workers
House meeting hall on April 27.

This event exposed students to the framework
by which member countries of the organisation
meet to discuss various issues.

According to MUNS 2009 chairman Reverend
Samuel Bootle, the competition is a debate where
six students from each school are designated to a
country, and given a topic to research where they
are later expected to make several presentations
and recommendations.

He explained: “MUNS has now been active
for the past 11 years, a combination of the Rotary
club of the Bahamas, and the Ministry of Foreign
Affairs, we work in conjunction to produce this
programme.

“This year we have 13 schools participating,
under the topic of global climate change, and
how each nation is affected.”

This year, students from the Sunland Baptist
Academy (representing Brazil) in Freeport took
first place, all receiving a Lap top, and trip later
this year to the United Nations head office in
New York accompanied by the Deputy Prime
Minister Brent Symonette and staff. In second
place was RM Bailey (representing the UK), and
in third was Doris Johnson (representing Gam-
bia).

Star Trek

mg By JASON DONALD

STARRING: Chris Pine,
Zachary Quinto, Eric Bana

WHEN Gene Roddenberry hatched
the idea for a science fiction TV series
in the early sixties he could never have
realised the legacy it would have.

The original programme (which was
cancelled, ironically, after only three
seasons) went on to be reinvented in

multiple movies, revamped TV shows
and even a short-lived cartoon, all while
maintaining its incredibly loyal fanbase.

In fact, such is the level of commit-
ment from the “Trekkies”, as the fans
are known, that the rest of us can be
forgiven for feeling slightly excluded
from the party.

That is all about to change, however,
with this latest addition to the Star Trek
canon - a bright, energetic and grandly
entertaining reboot from director JJ
Abrams.

To help the converts-in-waiting, the
story starts virtually from scratch, with
James T Kirk a young tearaway and
Spock teased by classmates on his home

planet of Vulcan for being half-human.
Both of them eventually meet at
Starfleet Academy and clash almost
immediately.

Relations between the pair become
even more strained when, onboard the
USS Enterprise, they are forced to con-
front a threat to Vulcan that puts the
lives of millions in danger.

Once it gets going, the film rarely
stops for a breath. As Abrams already
showed with Mission Impossible IIT and
Cloverfield, he has an eye for the action
sequence and we are treated to a whole
host of great set pieces here - all in stun-
ningly rendered CGI.

But what sets Stark Trek apart from

= . TRS

STUDENTS from the Sunland Baptist Academy in Freeport who won the 11th annual Model United Nations
Session late last month. The student represented the South American country of Brazil.

| IN THIS film

| publicity image
released by Para-
mount Pictures,
from left, Anton
Yelchin as
Chekov, Chis
Pine as James T.
Kirk, Simon
Pegg as Scotty,
Karl Urban as

as Sulu and Zoe

Saldana as Ohu-

ra are shown ina
scene from "Star
Trek."

Paramount Picture

/AP Photo

the usual special effects bonanza is the
strength of the characters. Kirk, Spock,
Dr McCoy and Uhura are recognisable
but skewed versions of their original
incarnations and play their part to give
the film a human centre.

It’s Kirk and Spock that steal the

helps to bring out the best laughs in the

script and the most emotional moments. Salli he able 4a doll ae-comne

: point be at a standard that they
? can sell it. I have assisted with so
i many projects in this country
Star Trek has set the bar for this sum- } Sie al ee NS
? invest in the youth of the nation
: so that they can someday be self
; sustainable.”

Hard core fans may quibble over the
lighter tone, but, if you’re going to
make a fresh start, this is the way to do
it

mer’s big releases and I, for one, can’t
wait for a sequel.







WINNERS of the Ministry of Health’s Nutrition month speech competion Kendra Stuart from CC Sweeting
Senior and Deokin-nique Strachan from LW Young pictured with Toastmaster and host Sherelle Barr.

lz

‘Architect in art

FROM page 12

; include hands on exercises
? where individual creative talents
are produced with the assistance
? of volunteer professionals and
: guest artists. Students will be
: involved in the production of oil
? and acrylic paintings of land and
: seascapes, portraits, sculpturing,

Bories, John Clio Junkanoo art and handicrafts.

“T would like the programme

? to be conducted on Saturdays at
: Gibralter Square Studios on
? Yamacraw Hill Road which was
: designed by myself, providing
} art materials, instruction and
? lunch to children who are inca-
: pable of such an experience due
? to their economic situation. The
? children can even learn how to
? draw using a computer, using
: AutoCAD, Computer inter
: drafting, or just to develop a skill
? or craft to use in the future,” Mr
i Miller said.

He hopes to target youngsters

? between the ages of 11-15. How-
? ever, to jump start such an
? endeavor, Mr Miller said the
? costs would be around $15,000 to
? $20,000, He said that while he
: has approached the government
: for assistance, he is also appeal-

show though - their mutual direspespect ing to the Bahamian public.

“The work that the students



WEDNESDAY, MAY 13, 2009

@ By ALEX MISSICK
Tribune Features Reporter
amissick@tribunemedia.net

Ei exploration of art in other
professions is not uncommon in

Bahamian society, for example,
how does an architect go from
sketching a dream home, to sketch-
ing the vibrancy and colours of a
Junkanoo performer? Alex Miller,
an architectural engineer and tech-
nician, said he hopes Bahamian
society especially the youth of the
nation, accept that art can come
from anywhere and from any expe-
rience, no matter what profession.

Mr Miller said although he loves art and
would love to do it full time, he still works in
the construction world because of the need to
survive.

“You can’t survive just on paintings alone in
the Bahamas. You have to be versatile. My
painting started out from high school because I
was always interested in it. I never had formal
training for it but I studied fine art on my own
and the works of famous painters like Picasso.”

Mr Miller said he knows how important the
arts are in the Bahamas and has seen a number
of talented young artists in the country. This
has prompted him to develop an avenue for
budding young Bahamian artists.

“T know what the struggle was all about for
me but I had some help along the way in the
field of engineering. I want to pass on the
knowledge that I have about art to underprivi-
leged kids. I am developing a nonprofit organi-
sation since 2004 that I want to be dedicated to
the development of the youth here in the
Bahamas. My goal is to identify young talent in
the visual arts and assist in nurturing and
developing them to achieve gainful employ-
ment or assistance in furthering their educa-
tion,” Mr Miller said.

The programmes for the organisation will

SEE page 10

Carver
Garden



v

sUilombulnibste SECTION Be

TU



Chefs providing

hands for hunger
See page eight



eT