Citation
The Tribune

Material Information

Title:
The Tribune
Uniform Title:
Tribune (Nassau, Bahamas)
Portion of title:
Nassau tribune
Place of Publication:
Nassau, Bahamas
Publisher:
Tribune
Publication Date:
Copyright Date:
2009
Frequency:
Daily, except Sunday
daily
normalized irregular
Language:
English
Physical Description:
v. : ill. ; 58 cm.

Subjects

Genre:
newspaper ( sobekcm )
newspaper ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage:
Bahamas

Notes

General Note:
Description based on: Vol. 79, no. 210 (Aug. 3, 1983); title from caption.

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Holding Location:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
This item was contributed to the Digital Library of the Caribbean (dLOC) by the source institution listed in the metadata. This item may or may not be protected by copyright in the country where it was produced. Users of this work have responsibility for determining copyright status prior to reusing, publishing or reproducing this item for purposes other than what is allowed by applicable law, including any applicable international copyright treaty or fair use or fair dealing statutes, which dLOC partners have explicitly supported and endorsed. Any reuse of this item in excess of applicable copyright exceptions may require permission. dLOC would encourage users to contact the source institution directly or dloc@fiu.edu to request more information about copyright status or to provide additional information about the item.
Resource Identifier:
09994850 ( OCLC )

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This item has the following downloads:


Full Text
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FORMER MP Keod Smith speaks to the press yesterday.

Keod Smith struck
while serving orders
to union members

m@ By MEGAN REYNOLDS
Tribune Staff Reporter
mreynolds@tribunemedia.net

FORMER MP Keod Smith
was hit in the face as he served
orders to members of the
Bahamas Hotel Catering and
Allied Workers Union’s execu-
tive council yesterday.

The attorney told The Tribune
he was acting in his power as offi-
cer of the court and legal repre-
sentative for the BHCAWU exec-
utive council as he served orders
issued by Justice Claire Hepburn
on Friday to each council member
at Worker’s House on Harrold



Road yesterday morning.

The orders prohibited any
member of the council from pre-
venting any other executive mem-
ber from attending a full meeting
of the council for election nomi-
nations, Mr Smith said.

But as he served the order to
one of the executive members Mr
Smith said he was smacked in the
face.

The attorney said: “I dropped it
in front of him as he was turning
away from me, and as I turned
away from him I was struck in the
face. Then I realised it was him.

SEE page eight

The Taste

on

Tuesdays!!

The Tribune

=USA TODAY.

BAHAMAS EDITION

www.tribune242.com

TUESDAY, MAY 12, 2009
|

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ea!
AND REAL 2 a

SPENT Sy




m@ By MEGAN REYNOLDS
Tribune Staff Reporter
mreynolds@
tribunemedia.net





a THIS SECTION PAGE 15



PRICE —75¢ (Abaco and Grand Bahama $1.25)




Brother of slain
banker:
until killer is
brought to justice

Pil stay

Ilt Jones to assist
police investigation

HYWEL Jones’ brother has vowed
to remain in the Bahamas until whoever
is responsible for the banker’s execu-
tion-style shooting has been brought to

justice.



Ilt Jones said he will remain in Nassau

for “as long as it takes” to assist police

HYWEL JONES

with their investigation after his broth-

er’s death on Friday night.

Hywel Jones, 55, president of the Britannia Consultancy
Group, was shot at least twice in the head and body as he was
getting out of his car in his office car park near Compass Point
in West Bay Street at around 10am on April 22.

After the shooting the slim, dark, and unmasked gunman
took off on a motorcycle towards Gambier Village.

Police launched an island-wide search for the attacker and a
$50,000 reward was posted last week for information that
might lead to the arrest or conviction of those responsible.

Mr Jones, a British citizen who lived in the Bahamas for 21
years was a permanent resident. His mother was living with him

on West Bay Street.

His brother, a location manager on Hollywood films, said he

SEE page eight




m@ By PAUL G TURNQUEST
Tribune Staff Reporter
pturnquest@tribunemedia.net

A MAN, believed to be in his
mid to late 30’s, became the
country’s latest homicide when
his body was discovered off
Blue Hill Road with multiple

VILERINE HENFIELD, sister of
the late Able Seaman Fenrick
Sturrup, puts a wreath over-
board yesterday in observance
of the 29th anniversary of the
HMBS Flamingo sinking.



Stabbing victim is the
nation’s latest homicide

oj sJellate)s & Nget Co ave
[Btop ping) ae Losey

potential replacements, The Tri-
bune has learned.

Mr Hanna took up the posi-
tion under the former PLP gov-

comment on anything in the
world” as his position places him

SEE page eight

e SEE PAGE 16 SPECIAL REPORT:
. PLANS FOR RELOCATION
Suggestion made that Governor See
General will soon step down

cor ee caeearo ence, fmmens a epee zoe ne aa On
down from the post —<-with Sx government-clected in May 2007, THE OTHER WAY
ree dihbees mae a Seria atl pera FROM CORRUPTION
Allen, Lynn Holowesko an o speak with The Tribune abou
Janet Bostwick all suggested as his eae he ee ALLEGATIONS

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stab wounds to the chest.
Receiving a call around
6.40am yesterday, police were
led to an area opposite the Blue
Hill Road clinic where the body
of the man was found at the
rear of a business establishment.
Wearing a plaid shirt and
dark trousers, the victim, whose
identity is yet to be released by
police, is described as being of

SEE page eight

Appeal for
recusal of Justice
Lyons from civil
case is allowed

@ By NATARIO MCKENZIE
Tribune Staff Reporter

THE Court of Appeal yester-
day allowed the appeal for the
recusal of Senior Justice John
Lyons from a civil case involving
the Central Bank of Ecuador.

Justice Lyons who tendered his
resignation from the bench last
Thursday has recused himself

SEE page eight

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NASSAU AND BAHAMA ISLANDS” LEADING NEWSPAPER



PAGE 2, TUESDAY, MAY 12, 2009

THE TRIBUNE



LOCAL NEWS



RBC supports the Downtown
Nassau Partnership with

THE Royal Bank of Canada
cemented its support for the revi-
talisation of the city of Nassau
with a commitment of $25,000
over the next two years.

This pledge, along with finan-
cial contributions from public and
private stakeholders, will support
the efforts of the Downtown Nas-
sau Partnership (DNP) to over-
haul the capital as a tourist attrac-
tion.

“Royal Bank has had a contin-
uous presence on Bay Street since
1917 when we constructed our
first branch building in the
Bahamas. This branch was the
first modern bank building in the
Bahamas and today is still a land-
mark on Bay Street. Since then,
RBC has been present throughout
many changes and improvements
on Bay Street and we are proud to
support this current revitalisation
of downtown Nassau," said
Nathaniel Beneby Jr, vice presi-
dent and country head for RBC.

“We are pleased to have RBC
Royal Bank as the first financial
institution to support the Down-
town Nassau Partnership.

“The revitalisation of down-
town Nassau is a very important
national priority and we hope that
other private sector stakeholders
will offer assistance. The economic

Former president of Petroleum Retailer's

benefits from a thriving down- :
town will be substantial,” said ;
Vaughn Roberts, managing direc- }

tor of the DNP.

Public and private sector fund- }
ing will be used to cover the cost }
of detailed planning, technical and }
legal consultants and staffing, }
as well as certain short-term pro- }

jects.

term improvement projects.

Guided by an 11-member }
board with public and private sec- i
tor representation, the DNP }
employs a full-time, professional :
management team to coordinate }
the revitalisation efforts untilsuch :
time as a business improvement }

district is legislated.

Association Charles Johnson dies

CHARLES Johnson, former president of the Petroleum Retailer’s

Association, died on Sunday.

Mr Johnson was also chairman of the Fox Hill Festival Commit- :
tee and a well-known Bahamian businessman of Fox Hill origin in his }

own right.

Mr Johnson was the third Fox Hill festival chairman to die with-
in the last year, the others being Eric Wilmott and William Rahming. }

All of these men died at relatively young ages.
Said Fox Hill MP Fred Mitchell in a statement yesterday:

“Mr Johnson’s death adds to the deficit of knowledge and expe-
rience of the culture and traditions of Fox Hill as a community. }
The community mourns his passing and will miss his presence. His }

death has stunned us all.

“In addition, I know that he will be particularly missed by the i
Roman Catholic community in the Bahamas, both at St Anselm’sin
Fox Hill and by the wider Catholic community which he served asa i

fundraiser with distinction.

“On behalf of the Fox Hill constituency and in particular the vil-
lage of Fox Hill, I wish to extend condolences to his widow Eulise and;

his children,” he said.

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The government has indicated i
its support for the revitalisation — :
committing to relocate the com- }
mercial shipping port; putting in i
place incentives to stimulate }
mvestments under the 2008 City :
of Nassau Revitalisation Act; con- }
tracting for major dredging of }
Nassau Harbour with the fill to
be used to extend the water’s edge :
from East Street to Armstrong }
Street; committing to a process }
that will produce draft legislation ;
for a downtown business improve- :
ment district or similar mecha- }
nism; and undertaking with the }
private sector a number of short-















TROPICAL
EXTERMINATORS
Te
a mira a LY |



comtceiltoeerimesctâ„¢

PHASE I (top)

1 Liberty Class Cruise Ship Dock
2 Island Bulkhead

3 Improve Downtown Circulation
4 Create an Intermodal Terminal
5 Downtown Parking

PHASE II (second from top)

1 Open Space and Initial Infill

2 Marina

3 Bay Street Infill

4 Paradise Island Gateway Park

office@ooastcaribbeanimages.com by May 15, 2009 with subject ine: "Bahamas Model Search®

ae yal)

iO) O eee ee hele eee)

Original Fameus Bowl

Plans for relocation

$25,000 two year commitment |

oe

PHASE III (above)
1 Relocate Commercial Shipping to

southwest of the Island (not illustrated)
2 Construct Bulkhead Mixed Use Development
3 Marina Village



PHASE IV (page opposite top right)

1 Infill between Bay Street and
Woodes Rogers Road

2 Bulkhead Marina





THE TRIBUNE

TUESDAY, MAY 12, 2009, PAGE 3



LOCAL NEWS

of the container ports

Current financial crisis
‘pushes realisation of
idea into the future’

THE economic environ-
ment may favour the con-
tainer ports remaining in
their current position in the
immediate future rather than
being transplanted to
Arawak Cay or the south-
west New Providence,
according to John Bethell,
president of Bethell Estates
Limited.

Mr Bethell has made a
proposal which consists of a
phased removal of the port
from Bay Street to southwest
New Providence, leaving
downtown Nassau with a
new high-end residential and
shopping area.

In 2003, a special commis-
sion was organised to advise
government on the steps nec-
essary to improve, revitalise
and transform the city of
Nassau, including its harbour
area, surrounding areas and
scenic routes which link it to
the airport.

Suggestions

In 2004, the consulting firm
of EDAW was hired to cre-
ate a master plan incorpo-
rating suggestions for these
areas. The plan called for the
removal of commercial ship-
ping from East Bay Street.

In 2007, the Dutch firm of
ECORYS was retained to
prepare a business plan for a
new port at the southwest
end of the island near the
Clifton Heritage Park.

The construction of this
new port — proposed ina
much more robust economic
climate — would require sig-
nificant environmental
review and public investment
estimated at as much as $350
to $400 million.

The plan would also
require the private shippers
currently operating on New
Providence to move their
facilities to a new location.

“Furthermore, shipping
costs for goods to local busi-
nesses would increase due to
the additional travel time
from the port to major busi-
nesses on the island,” Mr
Bethell said.

He said even if this
remains the optimum solu-
tion to New Providence’s
shipping needs, the current
financial crisis pushes the
realisation of this idea into
the future. It is also likely
that the fiscal priorities of

ation of a new port, Mr
Bethell said.

The primary objective of
the relocation was to remove
traffic and shipping from
East Bay Street and thus
encourage the redevelop-
ment of the former shipping
facilities into lodging, retail
and other tourism based
facilities.

One alternative location
for the port is Arawak Cay,
and the government and
stakeholders are said to be
finalising the details of this
move.

However, Mr Bethell said
that significant investment —
as much as $50 to $80 mil-
lion — and a considerable
amount of time would be
required for the construction
of new facilities.

“Major public investment
for the improvement of sur-
rounding roadways would
also be required.

“Private shipping compa-
nies currently located on
East Bay Street would be
required to relocate to the
new facility.

“Business operations of
both the shippers and their
clients would be disrupted
during a fragile economic cli-
mate,” he said.

Apart from these costs of
relocation, several other
challenges are presented by
the Arawak Cay proposal,
Mr Bethell said.

“Shipping would be placed
at the entry to the Nassau
Harbour in plain sight of
arriving cruise ships and oth-
er ocean going visitors.

“The use of Arawak Cay
for lodging retail and other
tourism or civic uses would
be compromised by the
introduction of this new
industrial use onto the
island,” he said.

Instead, Mr Bethell pro-
poses the redevelopment of
shipping facilities in their cur-
rent location, on a new bulk-
head or strip of land
reclaimed from the harbour,
behind the existing shipping
houses.

The plan would allow for
the development of “retail
continuously along Bay
Street” and with one entrance
and exit for container trucks —
rather than the current seven
— would achieve the aim of
greatly improving traffic flow.

Later, when the economic
outlook has improved, the

SPECIAL
REPO







dem parking |
2 he

Stylish
in a
Michelle
Obama
Dress
as seen

THE FINAL PHASE of redevelopment will support the infrastructure
created during the previous phases. Specifically, parking structures
wrapped with commercial buildings will be constructed between Bay
Street and the Woodes Rogers Road expansion to further increase the
density of the centre. The continued infill and increasing will prompt
an additional demand for private boat docks which will be provided
adjacent to the mixed use development on the expanded bulkhead.

Established in 1956 by an old Bahamian family

Parliament Street (near Bay St.) Tel: 322-8393 or 328-7157
* Fax: 326-9953

Crystal Court at Atlantis, Paradise Island Tel: 363-4161/2

Lyford Cay (Harbour Green Shops at Lyford Cay)
a Tel: 362-5235 a

Bay Street could be redevel- ra 4
oped to accommodate har- V EW
bour front residential proper- OUR VI

ties, a marina and marina vil- To have your say on this ot any

government will lie with
more pressing social con-
cerns than that of the cre-

port could be moved to south-
west New Providence and the
extended bulkhead behind

Man leads police
on car chase before
crashing into house

m@ By TANEKA THOMPSON
Tribune Staff Reporter
tthompson@tribunemedia.net

POLICE are searching for a man who led officers on
a high speed chase through Yellow Elder Gardens
before crashing into a house.

At around 6pm on Saturday, Mobile Division officers
on patrol in Yellow Elder Gardens stopped a Buick Le
Sabre near Government High School.

The male driver and a female front seat passenger
both got out of the car.

However, a man who had been sitting in
the back seat jumped into the driver’s seat and sped off
with the officers giving chase, ASP Walter Evans
said.

The car ran into a house on Graham Drive before the
driver jumped out and escaped on foot.

When the officers searched the vehicle, they found
half pound of marijuana concealed in a bag.

Two Grand Bahama residents are being questioned
in connection with the matter.

In other crime news, police also detained three peo-
ple for questioning after officers executed a search
warrant at a home in South Beach Estates around
10.30pm on Friday.

ASP Evans said that as officers approached the
house, a man was seen throwing a bag onto the roof.

The bag was retrieved and a brown package contain-
ing three pounds of marijuana, with a street value of
$3,000, was found inside.

As aresult three men were arrested and are in cus-
tody.

lage, a multi-storey parking
facility and a performing arts
centre, according to the pro-
posal.

other issue, email The Tribune at:
letters@tribunemedia.net or

deliver your letter to The Tribune

on Shirley Street, P.O. Box N-3207

e-mail: info@colesofnassau.com
www.colesofnassau.com * P.O. Box N-121



FOR ALL YOUR DECORATING as

“Lowest Prices On The Island”

404-Nautical B

FREE DELIVERY ANY WHERE IN NASSAU AND TO THE MAIL BOAT

¢ E-Z CREDIT TERMS AVAILABLE

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STORE HOURS:
Monday - Saturday
8:30am - 5:30pm

BILLY’S DREAM
STILL ALIVE

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SIXTH TERRACE CENTREVILLE TEL: 322-1731 OR 322-3875





PAGE 4, TUESDAY, MAY 12, 2009

THE TRIBUNE



From whence cometh

The Tribune Limited

NULLIUS ADDICTUS JURARE IN VERBA MAGISTRI
Being Bound to Swear to The Dogmas of No Master

LEON E. H. DUPUCH, Publisher/Editor 1903-1914

SIR ETIENNE DUPUCH, Kt, O.B.E., K.M., K.C.S.G.,

(Hon.) LL.D., D.Litt.

Publisher/Editor 1919-1972
Contributing Editor 1972-199]

EILEEN DUPUCH CARRON, C.M.G., M.S. B.A., LL.B.

Publisher/Editor 1972-

Published Daily Monday to Saturday

Shirley Street, RO. Box N-3207, Nassau, Bahamas
Insurance Management Building., P.O. F-485, Freeport, Grand Bahama

TELEPHONES
Switchboard (News, Circulation and Advertising) 322-1986
Advertising Manager - (242) 502-2352
Circulation Department - (242) 502-2387

WEBSITE
www.tribune242.com — updated daily at 2pm

Will health care

WASHINGTON — The White House trum-
peted the news: health care providers taking a $2
trillion scalpel to their costs and pushing the
U.S. toward Barack Obama's vision of health
coverage for all. But don't line up yet for those
insurance cards.

First, a reality check for the nation's 50 mil-
lion uninsured.

Medical providers have a long track record of
avoiding fiscal constraints, as witnessed by the
government's efforts to tamp down Medicare
costs.

And none of the groups that went to the
White House can actually dictate prices to their
members. Doctors in New York or hospitals in
Los Angeles are free to charge what the market
can bear.

There's one more catch: Even if every penny
of the promised savings shows up, not all of it
would be used to help cover uninsured Ameri-
cans. Actual savings to the government are all
that can be counted as Congress tries to pay
for subsidies that will be needed to help make
health insurance affordable for everyone.

The medical groups’ pledge is "a very hope-
ful sign,” said economist Robert Reischauer,
head of the Urban Institute. "But when we get
down to hammering out the details, health care
reform remains both complex and philosophi-
cally and politically difficult to accomplish.”

Costs could still turn out to be the greatest
obstacle to Obama's health care plan.

Outside experts estimate the taxpayers’ tab
could total between $1.2 trillion and $1.5 trillion
over 10 years. Some go as high as $1.7 trillion.
Obama's budget proposal includes a down pay-
ment that may cover less than half the bill.

Pledging restraint on costs Monday at the
White House were groups representing hospi-
tals, doctors, drug makers, medical device man-
ufacturers and a major health care labour union
—a Who's Who of health care interests. The
president posed proudly with them and called it
"a watershed event.”

Obama wants to build on the current system
in which most people get coverage through pri-
vate insurers. But he wants to change the rules
so the sick can't be turned down. And he wants
to provide subsidies to help low-wage workers
and even some in the middle class afford their
premiums. House Republican leader John
Boehner of Ohio isn't impressed. "Today's
announcement promises savings with no con-
crete plan to achieve them and no enforcement
mechanism if they don't,” he said Monday.

Indeed, it's too early to tell whether the
White House meeting will be remembered as a
turning point or as a political mirage. The
administration is projecting an image of a new
coalition for health care, with Obama and most

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ahamas
a UAW KO) aD

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savings add up?

of the health care industry and consumer inter-
est groups claiming the political centre.

Left out, for now, are conservative Republi-
cans, who oppose Obama's direction but have
yet to articulate their own vision, and liberal
Democrats who have been hoping to move
toward a nationalized system like Medicare for
all. As the debate heats up, the voices from
both ends of the political divide will get louder
— and the pressure on the centre will increase.

Still, the sight of health care industry leaders
volunteering to hold back spending is pretty
unusual. By joining Obama, providers are
acknowledging at least some responsibility for a
bloated and dysfunctional system that econo-
mists say is unaffordable.

In the 1990s, when President Bill Clinton
attempted to overhaul health care, the battle
lines quickly hardened. Obama, who has gone
out of his way to woo the interest groups,
praised their willingness to sacrifice on Monday.

The groups don't just have the national inter-
est in mind. Industry is worried that Congress
will create a government health plan to compete
with private insurers. Such a plan would quick-
ly become the biggest in the country and could
use its power to set lower payment rates, driving
costs down on the backs of medical providers.

"T think the reason all these groups want to
actively participate in the process is they don't
want to see a blunt instrument used to get
spending down," said Mark McClellan, who
ran Medicare for President George W. Bush.
"This is an opportunity to get everyone behind
a better approach to improve the way health
care works."

That's just what the groups say they want to
do. Their proposals include coordinating care
for people with chronic illnesses, rewarding
quality not quantity, and using technology to
root out waste and prevent errors that get
patients sicker.

But it's hard to put numbers next to any of
those ideas. For example, what if better care for
chronically ill patients turns out to increase
costs? None of the groups has set a target for
how much its members should have to pony
up. Congress is going to need hard numbers to
pass Obama's plan this year.

Robert Laszewski, a former health insur-
ance executive turned policy consultant, said
he's betting the consensus won't last.

"When Congress comes up with mechanisms
to reduce costs that actually take money out of
the hands of doctors, hospitals and insurance
companies, that's when we're going to find out
if things are really different this time," he said.

(This article was written by Ricardo Alonso-
Saldivar of the Associated Press).



feria

the arrogance in the
Bahamas political class?

EDITOR, The Tribune.

It has always been a puzzle
to me why our Government,
FNM or PLP, appear to resent
any advice from anyone who is
not in the inner circle. It makes
one wonder if each Minister,
when presented with his arti-
cles of office, is then declared to
be omniscient.

I will point to three glaring
examples.

1. For many years education
has been in a free fall and is
now a national disaster yet each
successive Government pontif-
icates on their plans for educa-
tion and they end up tweeking
this and tweeking that and their
"grand" plans end up being tan-
tamount to rearranging the
deck chairs on the Titanic. The
country is now blessed with hav-
ing Mr. Ralph Massey living in
the Bahamas and he has done
an exhaustive study on the
country's educational system
and, as a result, has made some
brilliant suggestions for
improvement in the education
plans. Anyone who really cares
about the future of our children
would like to believe that our
Government would be anxious
to at least listen to what he has

LETTERS

letters@tribunemedia net



to say. Is it arrogance that pre-
vents them from doing so?

2. In the latter days of the
last administration a bill was
passed in

the House of Assembly to
allow the introduction of a
National Health

Plan. After the FNM become
the Government there has been
indications that they will imple-
ment the Plan. The Nassau
Institute hosted a symposium
shortly after the election and
one of the featured speakers
was Dr. Michael Walker of
Canada's Fraser Institute whose
topic was Lessons From Global
Experience For Canadian
Health Care Reform.

Arrangements were made
for Dr. Walker to meet with the
new Minister of Health, Dr.
Hubert Minnis. I had the privi-
lege to escort Dr. Walker to the
meeting and he kindly asked
that I go in with him. Before
we arrived there I was thinking
of what a great opportunity it
was for the Minister to be able

to meet someone who had stud-
ied health plans all over the
world. At some point during the
meeting Dr. Walker offered to
come to the Bahamas, at his
own expense, to help in any way
he can with the proposed
National Health Plan.

The Minister said nothing in
reply. The silence was deafen-
ing.

I have been reliably informed
that at a subsequent open meet-
ing the Minister was asked why
he did not accept the offer of
Dr. Walker.

He is alleged to have replied
that the Bahamas does not need
the help of anyone outside our
country.

3. It was recently reported on
www.weblogbahamas.com that
our

Government was offered the
help of a young lawyer who has
a wealth of knowledge in US
tax laws and he had offered his
help virtually free of charge and
it was refused. It is well known
that his family is of a different
political persuasion.

So, I ask again. Why the
arrogance and to what purpose?

SIDNEY SWEETING, DDS

BAHAMAS QSR LIMITED

NOW HIRING

www.weblogbahamas.com

Punch editor prints misleading headline

EDITOR, The Tribune.

My article was recognised as the Letter of the
Week in The Punch for Thursday, May 7th,
2009. It was quite interesting how the content
was skimmed and slimmed by the newspaper’s
writers to suit the editor’s headline — arresting
people for buying numbers is out of order!

Firstly, the original piece was written based
on the content of the headline story of The
Punch of Thursday, April 30, 2009.

The Punch’s rewrite is careful to make no
mention of this and, while much of the content
printed is gleaned from the article, it is skilful-
ly manipulated to send a message that really
isn’t there — arresting people for “breaking the
law” is out of order!

I did imply that the practice of arresting peo-
ple for playing number bodes well in the realm
of ridicule as police officers in our country
have more pressing issues to attend to and
more extreme matters in which to focus their
manpower.

Add to that, the fact that the already over-
whelmed court system doesn’t need to be bur-
dened with issues that don’t threaten life, limb,
property or lead to extreme degradation of
the general public.

I did not, however, say that the police officers
doing their jobs and arresting persons for
breaking a legitimate law in The Bahamas were
out of order. I did describe the policies regard-
ing the “playing-number” dilemma as anti-
quated, barbaric and primitive.

I indicated that the continued enforcement
thereof was based on outdated laws that need-
ed to be revamped.

I suggested that choosing to play numbers
was less of a threat than choosing to drink
alcohol. I did, however, point out that our laws
are our laws and until such time as there is a

change in the law it must be carried out. If I had
said or written that “arresting people for buy-
ing numbers was out of order” then I would
have been out of order!

In referencing The Punch’s article of Thurs-
day, April 30, 2009, I took issue with the Min-
ister of National Security chastising the Com-
missioner of Police for organising and con-
ducting the operation against the perpetrators
with the strictest confidentiality.

I also congratulated the Commissioner of
Police and his team for a job well done with
regard to resulting arrests and arraignments
relative thereto. None of this, however, was
mentioned in the rewrite printed in The Punch.

I was careful to post the original letter online
at BahamasIssues.com and BahamasB2B.com
before copying it from one of these websites
and forwarding it to the news media.

While I was quite pleased that it got recog-
nition as the Letter of the week under Punch-
Lines I was disappointed at how it was reduced
to support a view held by the Editor and not by
me.

Finally, my position was and still is that I
have no problems with people who play num-
bers.

Iam not, however, not going to encourage
anyone to break the law no matter how ancient
or obsolete.

The police have a job to do and part of that
is to arrest people for criminal infractions such
as illegal gambling.

Until such time as new legislation passes
changing the process of the present system
arresting people for buying numbers is quite in
order!

MARVIN RZ GIBSON
Nassau,
May 8, 2009.

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THE TRIBUNE

TUESDAY, MAY 12, 2009, PAGE 5



LOCAL NEWS



PM: govt does
hot tolerate
abuse of
lletainees

m@ By KARIN HERIG
Tribune Staff Reporter

kherig@tribunemedia.net

ADDRESSING claims
that some immigration offi-
cers use excessive force
during apprehension and
detention exercises, Prime
Minister Hubert Ingraham
yesterday stressed that his
government does not toler-
ate the abuse of detainees
or suspected illegal immi-
grants.

“T want to be clear: abuse

of detained persons
whether in their homes, at
a work site, on an immigra-
tion bus or at the
Carmichael Road Deten-
tion Centre is contrary to
the law. Everyone must be
treated with respect and
with dignity at all times;
that is the law and that is
the policy of the govern-
ment which I head,” he
said.

Speaking to officers at
the first annual customer
service conference for the
Immigration Department
at the Wyndham Cable
Beach Resort yesterday
morning, Mr Ingraham said
they should all keep in
mind that the Bahamas is
party to international
human rights conventions,
including those related to
the rights of refugees and
other persons held in
detention.

“We expect immigration
officers to respect the pro-
tocols called for by those
conventions and by our
own laws and constitution

which guarantee respect for

the human rights of all
individuals in the Bahamas

regardless of their immigra-

tion status. And, I may add,
this includes the obligation
of immigration officers to
relay claims from illegal
immigrants of any fear of
persecution expressed by
an illegal immigrant/poten-
tial refugee on return to his
or her country of origin,”
he said.

Mr Ingraham’s state-
ments come just days after
detainees at the
Carmichael Road Deten-

tion Centre announced that

their living conditions have
improved greatly following
a series of Tribune articles
detailing claims of chronic
abuse and neglect at the
facility .

Immigration Minister
Branville McCartney said
he was “pleasantly sur-
prised” when he toured the
centre with immigration
bosses last week.

The Immigration Depart-

ment recently appointed a
fact-finding committee
comprised of psychologist

Dr David Allen, Social Ser-
vices director Mellany Zon- i

icle, Archdeacon James
Palacious, and Immigration
director Jack Thompson.

The committee toured
the Detention Centre and
spoke with the detainees in
March. However, their
report has yet to be made
public and The Tribune’s
request to tour the facility
has not been granted.

Red Bays to
host its annual
cultural festival

RED Bays, North Andros
will host its sixth annual cul-
tural festival, homecoming }
and snapper fishing tourna- i

ment on May 14 to 16.

Alphonso Smith, snapper }
tournament co-ordinator, said }
this year’s event will be held in }
honour of Frank Hanna, who }
has been a participant and }
sponsor of the event since the i

beginning.

Fifteen boats, each manned
by four fishermen, are expect- }
ed to participate in the tour- }
nament, which starts at 8am }
and ends at 4pm on Saturday, :

May 16.

Mr Smith says fishing
enthusiasts are coming from :
New Providence, Abaco, Exu- }

ma and Grand Bahama.

Only snappers will be
counted and the winner will }
be the boat with the largest

catch.
The prizes are:
¢ First — $1,500
¢ Second — $1,000
¢ Third — $750

e Fourth — $300

Govt won't ‘look the other way’
from corruption allegations

PM addresses claims of immigration officials accepting bribes

@ By KARIN HERIG
Tribune Staff Reporter
kherig@tribunemedia.net

THE Government will not “look the oth-
er way” where evidence supports allega-
tions of corruption in the public service,
Prime Minister Hubert Ingraham has
warned

He particularly addressed allegations of
immigration officials accepting bribes at
ports of entry or in exchange for falsifying
documents or speeding up work permit and
residence application processes.

The keynote speaker at the first annual
customer service conference for the Immi-
gration Department held at the Wyndham
Cable Beach Resort yesterday morning, Mr
Ingraham expressed regret that a “pay to
play” culture has developed in the country’s
public sector.

Reminding those attending the two-day
training conference that bribery of a public
officer is an offence, the prime minister said
that persons applying to the Department of
Immigration should not be treated as ene-
mies of the state nor should they be milked
for money.

“Regrettably, some public officers, assist-
ed, indeed abetted by some members of the
public, have fallen prey to a ‘pay to play’
culture. At the Immigration Department, it
has led to allegations that for a price, some

officers ‘look the other way’ at
ports of entry.

“Other allegations suggest
that applications submitted for
consideration at the depart-
ment can be accelerated, or
falsified supporting documents
overlooked, to assist a ‘pay-
ing’ customer.

Persons making applica-
tions for work permits or for
permanent residence or for
registration as a national are
not enemies of the state, nor
are they ‘patsies’ to be hit
upon for tips. They are clients
or customers seeking a service
that the Department of Immi-
gration and its officers have been engaged to
facilitate,” he said.

Mr Ingraham said he wants to assure the
department’s staff that government is firm-
ly committed to advancing the pace of mod-
ernisation in the public service.

“We will not rest until we have achieved a
sustained level of improved efficiency and
productivity in every department,” he said.

The prime minister said that members of
the public often complain of inefficiencies
experienced at the hands of the Department
of Immigration.

“Individuals submitting applications to
the department whether for a work permit,

LUMO UeUN



a certificate of permanent res-
idency or for nationalisation
should not be required to
resubmit documents because
they have been mis-filed and
or lost by the department.

Letters written to the
department ought to be
acknowledged and respond-
ed to in a reasonable period of
time — not six months or a year
later — or not at all,’ Mr Ingra-
ham said.

The prime minister also
made a point to assure immi-
gration officers that individ-
ual performance and service
standards will impact the
career advancement of public officers.

“For too long now, I think, public service
training policies have disproportionately
placed the greatest emphasis on ‘qualifica-
tions’ as a primary basis for advancement in
the public service. This has been second only
to ‘experience’ which translates into length of
service, as the basis for promotion,” he said.

As a result of these policies, Mr Ingra-
ham said, the Bahamas’ “culture of service”
has diminished over the years.

“Careers in the public sector became more
about personal advancement and less about
the delivery of effective, cost-efficient service
to the public. Some very good people got

trapped in what has become a poor system of
management and administration. And, as a
result we are not receiving from our public
employees the best that they are able to
produce,” he said.

“Very importantly, this training confer-
ence places the emphasis where it rightly
belongs — on customer service. What we
seek to achieve is a re-orientation to new
modes of conduct. We want to improve ser-
vice standards by increasing the level of pro-
fessionalism and customer focus to public
service management. We want to improve
accessibility to government services, expedite
delivery timelines and promote high stan-
dards. We seek to build capacity and set
and regulate standards of performance so as
to make best practices become common
practice.”

Mtr Ingraham said that his government is
working on change “department by depart-
ment and ministry by ministry throughout
the public service.”

To have your say on this or any other
issue, email Tbe Tribune at:
letters@tribunemedia.net or deliver your
letter to The Tribune on Shirley Street,
P.O. Box N-3207

m@ By KARIN HERIG
Tribune Staff Reporter
kherig@tribunemedia.net

PRIME Minister Hubert Ingra-
ham took the Department of
Immigration to task for instances
of “insolent and rude” behaviour
toward local and international
travellers — especially Jamaicans —
arriving at the Lynden Pindling
International Airport.

Mr Ingraham was speaking at
the first annual customer service
conference for the Immigration
Department held at the Wynd-
ham Cable Beach Resort yester-
day morning.

The prime minister highlight-
ed the offensive behaviour to
which Jamaican nationals are fre-
quently exposed to upon arrival at
Bahamian ports of entry and par-
ticularly at LPIA.

“Not all Jamaican nationals
arriving in the Bahamas intend to
overstay their allotted time. Not
all Jamaican nationals arriving in
the Bahamas have police records,
nor are they engaged in illegal
activity. Yet far too many
Bahamian immigration officers
greet Jamaican nationals arriving
in the Bahamas as if they were
known criminals. This is not
acceptable; it must stop regard-
less to the nationality of the arriv-
ing passenger,” he said.

He said that persons who do
not appear to satisfy entry
requirements for the Bahamas
should be spoken to in a courte-
ous and respectful manner.

“May I also remind immigra-
tion officers that Bahamians have
a right to leave and re-enter the
Bahamas. Unless there is reason-
able cause to support a fraudu-

INTERNATIONAL AIRPORT

lent document, Bahamians’ entry
to our country ought to be expe-
dited without bureaucracy,” he
said.

Mr Ingraham further said that
persons who sponsor visits by
Jamaicans for other than bonafide
purposes must know that all immi-
gration officers operate from the
same remit — “no facilitation, no
accommodation, no tip, no bribe
to permit persons to enter the
Bahamas who are reasonably sus-
pected of coming here to work
legitimately or illegitimately.”

Upon arrival at the country’s
airports or ports of entry, the
prime minister said, persons sus-
pected of illegal activity should to
be invited to move to a quiet, pri-
vate area for further screening.
“If they are in fact innocent of
any wrong doing, no unnecessary
embarrassment will have been
experienced,” he said.

Mr Ingraham also addressed
the staffing problems at the air-
port’s immigration hall.

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“T believe that the Immigration
Department is aware of the arrival
schedule of inbound aircraft. Yet,
it never ceases to amaze me that
upon entry into the immigration
hall most booths are unattended,
the assigned officers gradually
making an appearance as the hall
fills with passengers waiting to be
cleared. This attitude is not what
we are all about. I look forward






































NASSAU'S

Premier

Le



therefore, to a change in that
behaviour,” he said.

Mr Ingraham said that this
points to another obvious prob-
lem requiring attention by the
department — the fact that immi-
gration officers are generally
scheduled to work a 9am to Spm
shift, irrespective of the schedule
of flight and charter arrivals.

“Much better value would be
had if only skeleton staffs were
deployed over the usual work day
— 9am to Spm — with the remain-
der or bulk of staff scheduled to
be at their stations at the peak
hours of business.

“That would permit a full con-
tingent of officers to be on the job
and in their booths when the
largest numbers of passengers
arrive at a port of entry,” he said.

RISTORAWNTE



Yesterday’s inaugural event
was billed as a refresher pro-
gramme to prepare immigration
officers who will be on the front
line during two major events
being hosted in Nassau this year —
the FIFA Conference later this
month, and the Miss Universe
Pageant to be held in August, the
prime minister said.

He commended the manage-
ment of the department for their
pro-active stance.

One of the objectives of the
training conference, Mr Ingraham
said, is “to assist immigration offi-
cers to recognise that their differ-
ing responsibilities — to guard and
protect and to welcome and facil-
itate — are not mutually exclusive.
This is an especially important
objective.”

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PAGE 6, TUESDAY, MAY 12, 2009

THE TRIBUNE



LOCAL NEWS



Grading the performance of Government ministers
YOUNG Man’s VIEW

Yesterday's Young Man’s View
evaluated the performance of
Deputy Prime Minister Brent
Symonette (C-), Minister of the
Environment Earl Deveaux (B+),
State Minister for Immigration
Branville McCartney (B-) and
Minister of National Security
Tommy Turnquest (F+). Today,
the column continues its analysis
of the nation’s executive branch
two years into the FNM’s tenure.

@ By ADRIAN GIBSON
ajbahama@hotmail.com

/ hivargo Laing, the thin-

ly gilded golden boy and
Minister of State for Finance,
earns a C-plus. During his tenure,
he has attempted to stabilize the
financial status of the country
while dealing with a multitude of
controversial issues (Clico, Glob-
al United, matters related to trade
policy, etc). Early on in the glob-
al economic downturn, Mr Laing
recklessly dug in with an eco-
nomic forecast that was erroneous
even though reputable interna-
tional economic forecasters and
publications had rightly predicted
an economic slump.

Although he has at times been
accused of being insufferably
pompous and increasingly more
reactive than proactive, there is
no one better at diffusing contro-
versial political issues, explaining
issues in a manner that average
Bahamians can grasp and/or
offering thinly veiled excuses.

Thus far, although the
Bahamas has signed on to the
EPA, Mr Laing has done little to
meet its requirements of estab-
lishing a Standards Bureau, which
would deal with imports and be
tasked with ensuring the health
and safety of the Bahamas; Cus-
toms Reform, which calls for a
rules of origin regime; Govern-
ment Procurement, which calls
for transparency relative to gov-
ernment-issued contracts and the
advertisement of all government
purchases; and the Single Admin-
istrative Form, set to bring sim-
plification and lucidity to the
process when making declarations
on imported items. Huge legisla-
tive and policy reforms are need-
ed to meet the requirements of
the EPA and Mr Laing has yet
to explain how the money will be
generated or procured to imple-
ment the agreement. I have also
been reliably informed that the
Bahamas’ service offer relative
to the services aspect of the EPA
has not been accepted.

ADRIAN



As it relates to the Bahamas,
how does the country fare in what
is rapidly appearing to be a glob-
al agreement to rein in tax
havens? Furthermore, what is the
Bahamas’ role in the context of
world trade talks?

Carl Bethel, the bright but
sometimes ostentatious Minister
of Education, earns a B.
Although I have previously criti-
cised the minister for his belli-
cose grandstanding on certain
issues, it’s clear
that he is ham-
pered by bureau-
cracy, inter-min-
istry politics and
challenges in his
ministry that are
institutional.
Although Mr
Bethel’s ministry
had appeared to slowly react to
charges of molestation against
teachers, I have been reliably
informed that there is evidence
showing where the Department
of Education attempted to sup-
press complaints against accused
persons long before Mr Bethel
entered the hot seat. I’m told that
under the PLP, an unqualified,
accused person was appointed to
a senior position, contrary to the
advice of the Public Service Com-
mission.

Of late, the minister has moved
to bring about sweeping changes
and focus in the structure of the
Department of Education, is
launching an educational reform
council, has implemented a rapid
reaction team that is directly
accountable to him and has
pushed for the presence of study
halls in schools throughout the
Family Islands and a learn-to-
earn programme. He is the only
minister, in recent time, to have
ensured the smooth, timely open-
ing of schools for two years run-
ning. With that said, there is also
an urgent need for curriculum
reform, which should properly
reflect the historical/cultural ele-
ments of the Bahamas.

The Ministry of Education
must take a cue from regional
neighbours such as Trinidad and
Tobago that have made Spanish a
mandatory component of the cur-



Colina Imperial

G IBS ON

riculum and proposes to have a
bilingual society by 2020, partic-
ularly in consideration of its close
proximity to South America.
Implementing mandatory foreign
language classes into our overall
development plan would be one
of many forward thinking
approaches to our
educational/social development,
especially since students at local
schools are not effectively taught
conversational Spanish/French
but instead are merely taught to
remember sight words. Sadly,
because we are incapable of
meeting the need locally, the
Bahamas will have to import for-
eign language translators for the
Miss Universe pageant.

A new approach must be taken
to reform education, as each year
nearly a third of the graduating
students are functional illiterates.
While Mr Bethel is an astute
politician who appears to take his
job seriously, it is clear that some
of his officers/educators are not
serving him well. I also credit Mr
Bethel for his maintenance of his
constituency office, which I know
firsthand, is opened on a daily
basis.

Michael Barnett, the Attorney
General and Minister of Legal
Affairs, earns an I for incomplete
or a OF for what’s appearing to
have been a quick failure. Mr
Barnett reminds me of the invisi-
ble man. Under his tenure, there
has been no improvement in the
infrastructure or administration
of the justice/legal system, there
appears to be no initiative relating
to the tenure and payment of
judges, no new hiring and recruit-
ment of attorneys to the AG’s
office to deal with issues such as
trade reform and criminal mat-
ters and little efforts to incentivize
lawyers to leave their practices
and sit on the bench. Mr Barnett
appears to have fallen asleep at
the wheel, so someone should
tickle him.

As the chief minister of justice,
Mr Barnett has done little to con-
front the deficiencies of the justice
system and show that justice in
the Bahamas is transparent. He
has also said little about the
charges and accusations levelled

The following individuals are asked to contact Mrs. Kimley Saunders

(396-2047) or Ms. Kayshonta Smith

Insurance Ltd:

Princess Butler
P.O. Box ES-6069
Nassau, Bahamas

Brendilee Rolle
P.O. Box 7290
Pine Barron Road
Nassau, Bahamas

Tamika Williams
P.O. Box F 42299

Freeport, Bahamas

Tiffany Rolle
P.O. Box GT 2395
Nassau, Bahamas

Tanya Rolle
P.O. Box GT 2395
Nassau, Bahamas

Bridgette Hog
P.O. Box GT 2395
Nassau, Bahamas

Theresa Deleveaux

P.O. Box N 732
Nassau, Bahamas

Albert Smith
P.O. Box SS-6104
Nassau, Bahamas

Granville Neville Williams

(396-2031) at Colinalmperial

Eddison Paul Sweeting Jr.
Nassau Bahamas

Michelle Sweeting
Nassau Bahamas

Christon Mackey
Nassau, Bahamas

Terasean Sweeting
P.O. Box CR 56708

Sunset Park

Nassau, Bahamas

Kemuel Delancey
P.O. Box CR 56708

Sunset Park

Nassau, Bahamas

Terry Sweeting

P.O. Box CR 56708

Sunset Park

Nassau, Bahamas

James Wallace

Nassau, Bahamas

Stafford Bullard

P.O. Box N 3730
Nassau, Bahamas

Larado D. Evans
P.O. Box N 3730

485 Inagua Avenue,

Freeport, Grand Bahama

Ms. Alquennia Rolle-Cunningham

General Delivery

Moore's Island, Abaco

Francis Roberts

Nassau, Bahamas

P.O. Box $S5175

Nassau, Bahamas

Mr. Godfrey Roberts

Freeport, Grand Bahama

Charlissa C.D. Poitier

P.O. Box N-978
Nassau Bahamas

at certain members of the judi-
ciary. Frankly, Mr Barnett
reminds me of a partygoer who is
still at a stag party with a wed-
ding ceremony having been long
completed. He has hardly made
the public aware of any amend-
ments to laws or the introduction
of bills to confront 21st century
criminals. The justice minister,
who seems quite reactive, must
also seek to push for disciplinary
action to be taken against corrupt
attorneys, bring in special prose-
cutors and provide the police
prosecutors with additional
resources. As it stands, Mr Bar-
nett’s performance has been so
abysmal that in my opinion he
should leave his cheque at the
Treasury or donate it to the con-
stituents of Fort Charlotte.

Byran Woodside, the Minister
of State for Lands and Local
Government, appears to only be a
minister in name, since there is
no such thing as a minister of
lands when it is really the Cabinet
and the Prime Minister who col-
lectively decide on the issuance
of Crown land. In the granting of
land, Mr Woodside doesn’t have
the power to make much happen
beyond maybe a strong promise!

Minister Woodside has
dropped off the scene since he
won his election court case, mere-
ly appearing to be serving as the
PM’s eyes and ears and “pushing
paper” at the PM’s office. The
minister and others at the Depart-
ment of Lands and Surveys
should set out to create a web-
site pertaining to the available
Crown land on each island, sim-
plify the process so that more
Bahamians can qualify for grants,
revise policies governing land
grants, reform the land registra-
tion process and amend the Qui-
eting of Titles Act, which encour-
ages land grabs. Mr Woodside,
who is drifting right along, earns a
C for being present.

Kenneth Russell, the Minister
of Housing who is off to a late
start, earns a B-minus for having
rescued his ministry from the
brink of bankruptcy. Mr Russell
has set out promoting homeown-
ership and the assistance of
throngs of low-to-middle-class
Bahamians in their pursuit of
home ownership. In his attempt
to fulfil his pledge to build a
record number of houses before
the end of his term, the minister
has already initiated the con-
struction of subdivisions such as
Ardastra Estates and Dignity
Gardens II, has sought and over-
seen the passage of legislation



reducing the down payment for
government-initiated houses, has
expanded the construction of
affordable housing to the Family
Islands and has proposed to con-
struct better quality houses—of
various designs—in accordance
with the country’s building codes.

Vincent Vanderpool-Wallace,
the Minister of Tourism and Avi-
ation, has not successfully applied
himself to the task of differenti-
ating and reinvigorating our
tourism product and our market-
ing approach.
Frankly, Mr Van-
derpool-Wallace—
who was promot-
ed as the visionary
guru of tourism—
has been a disap-
pointment.

The tourism
minister has not
affirmed the country’s position as
a tourist destination, has yet to
propose new ideas for the diver-
sification of our tourism product
and has not extended the Bahama
Host programme or implemented
any much-needed training
requirements for line staff at
tourism-related properties. The
ministry has not made the dis-
tinction between the Bahamas
and any other country in the
wider Caribbean in terms of
indigenous local tours, using
junkanoo in more substantive
forms, tapping into the promo-
tion of historical preservation and
heritage tourism and supporting
small Bahamian boutique resorts
(eg, bed and breakfast, bonefish
lodges). Thus far, room capacity
in the Bahamas has been reduced
from about 14,000 to 10,000 while
the Dominican Republic has
30,000 rooms and Cuba’s tourism
market is coming online.

With declining tourist arrivals,
how is Mr Vanderpool-Wallace
going to respond to Cuba’s possi-
ble opening or the United States’
slackening of travel restrictions?
The tourism minister is of to a
slow start and earns a miserable
C-minus.

Desmond Bannister, the Min-
ister of Youth, Sports and Cul-
ture, seems to have been engaged
and appears to be creating a coali-
tion with the movers and shak-
ers of the sporting world to jump
start some of the various sporting
disciplines that have been dor-
mant for years.

However, there is a need for
youth development programmes.

Mr Bannister has also gained
the reputation of a hardworking
MP, whose’ efforts in

Carmichael—inclusive of the
recently installed community
benches alongside the road — is
laudable. As the substantive min-
ister, he appears to have not done
well with his mentorship of
Charles Maynard. Overall, he
earns a B.

Phenton Neymour, the Min-
ister of State with oversight of
public utilities, earns an unim-
pressive D-plus.

While Mr Neymour seems lim-
ited in his capacity, Bahamians
continue to receive appalling ser-
vice from government corpora-
tions and are time and again sub-
jected to power cuts and over-
priced services. Mr Neymour
seems to be a reactionary minister
and since he usually doesn’t
appear to be either here or there
on some issues, he is credited with
being a good communicator with
lots of speeches.

Larry Cartwright, the Minister
of Agriculture and Marine
Resources, earns a B-plus. While
it does appear that Mr Cartwright
has done well, he must be careful
not to be seen to be maintaining
the status quo.

Of late, the minister has been
placing heavy emphasis on agri-
culture while promoting the con-
cept of self-sufficiency. Howev-
er, the government must help to
diversify the agricultural output of
the Bahamas, encouraging local
markets and endorsing the pur-
chase of more Bahamian-grown
crops.

As minister, Mr Cartwright
must see to it that greater techni-
cal assistance is provided to farm-
ers, he must reassure Family
Island farmers of their capacity
to market and export and he must
assist in the movement of local
farming from a labour intensive
setup to a scientific, 21st century
operation (duty-free, hybrid
seeds, etc).

Furthermore, although fisher-
men are in need of tremendous
support, the marine resources
department seemingly lacks
vision and innovation and is one
of the few government depart-
ments that actually sends money
back to the government during
each annual budget.

The duo of Mr Cartwright and
Edison Key has recently con-
ducted a successful agricultural
fair and appears to be reviving
an interest in farming for the first
time in years.

¢ The final lineup in Adrian
Gibson’s evaluation of Cabinet
ministers/the government will be
published tomorrow.

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THE TRIBUNE

TUESDAY, MAY 12, 2009, PAGE 7



LOCAL NEWS

COMMONWEALTH HEADS OF GOVERNMENT MEETING
Bahamas in talks over helping Trinidad for November meeting

Call for change
to rules on
appeal justices
appointments

@ By TANEKA THOMPSON
Tribune Staff Reporter
tthompson@tribunemedia.net

IN an effort to avoid any
future impropriety, president
of the Bahamas Bar Council
Wayne Munroe is calling for
a change in the law which
allows the prime minister to
appoint justices to the Court
of Appeal without consulting
members of the legal frater-
nity.

He suggested the rules be
changed to include a provi-
sion allowing for consulta-
tion with the bar council
first, so potential justices can
be vetted before appoint-
ment.

"We take things too nar-
rowly politically — right now
you have a Judicial Legal
Services Commission where
two lawyers are appointed.
Unfortunately they're
appointed by the prime min-
ister.

“There's no reason under
the sun why the prime minis-
ter should appoint people
who you have thought would
have been representing the
bar," said Mr Munroe.

"And so all you need is for
it to be changed to ‘appoint-
ed by the prime minister
under the direction of the
bar council’ and there you
have provisions for consulta-
tion of the profession.
Unfortunately the appoint-
ments to the Court of
Appeal are wholly done by
the prime minister; we just
need to remove that type of
apparent, even if not real,
ability to do something unto-
ward.

"Because all you need is
one ambitious prime minis-
ter who might try it,” he said.

Constitution

Under the country's con-
stitution, the president of the
Court of Appeal and other
justices of appeal are
appointed by the governor-
general after recommenda-
tion by the prime minister,
and consultation with the
leader of the opposition.

The constitution also says
that the appointment of the
chief justice must follow the
same procedure.

The justices of the
Supreme Court are appoint-
ed by the governor-general
acting on the advice of the
Judicial and Legal Service
Commission — a five member
group chaired by the chief
justice.

Although he has no legal
obligation to do so, current
member of the commission
Lester Mortimer — whose
appointment is set to expire
next year — informs the bar
council about impending
judicial appointments, Mr
Munroe said.

He argued that if Mr Mor-
timer's replacement does not
see fit to continue this cour-
tesy, the bar council may be
forced to publicly criticise
any selections it believes are
unfit.

"There's going to come a
time — and it would appear
from what I'm hearing, very
soon — that the bar council,
after a judicial appointment
is made, is going to have to
publicly say the profession
does not feel that this person
is qualified to be a judge.

“We would hope that that
doesn't have to happen
because it would tend to
scandalise someone on the
bench and that would not be
good for the administration
of justice.

"If they continue not to
properly take our views
onboard, and the minute
that they appoint somebody
who falls so low below the
standard that we don't think
they ought to be in that posi-
tion, then we would have to
say it. And all of that can be
avoided by canvassing us,"
he said.

INSIGHT

For the stories

behind the news,
read Insight
on Mondays



;

Brent Symonette



m@ By TANEKA THOMPSON
Tribune Staff Reporter
tthompson@tribunemedia.net

"a work in progress" Mr Symonette said
that issues such as climate change, regional
security and the future role of the Com-
monwealth are likely to be topmost on the

THE Bahamas is in discussions with Com- __ list.

monwealth Secretary General Kamalesh
Sharma to determine the extent of assis-

tance it will offer Trinidad for the Com-

monwealth Heads of Government Meeting
in November. Minister of Foreign Affairs
and Deputy Prime Minister Brent Symon-
ette, who spoke to The Tribune from Grand
Bahama yesterday, said he expected to meet
with Mr Sharma yesterday afternoon to iron

out the CHOGM agenda.

While the agenda for the meeting is still

issue," he said.

Lyons asked to resign ‘after
criticising Chief Justice’

LEGAL sources close to for-
mer Justice John Lyons suggested
yesterday that the senior judge
had been asked to resign earlier
this year over an incident involv-
ing Chief Justice Sir Burton Hall,
and not, as believed, because of a
later incident in which he was crit-
icised by Justice Anita Allen.

His resignation, according to
sources, was only being
announced now after Justice
Allen made accusations against
him involving the appointment of
an accountant in another case and
questioned whether she should
recuse herself from the case
because of her background
knowledge of that appointment.

Speaking on condition of
anonymity, a lawyer told The Tri-
bune that Chief Justice Sir Burton
Hall was “infuriated” over a rul-
ing in January this year by Mr
Lyons, which suggested that he
and the Attorney General had
“colluded in a conspiracy” by
their alleged actions over the cer-
tification of court transcripts by
Magistrate Linda Virgil.

“They called Justice Lyons in
over that and what I understood
was that he had tendered his res-
ignation from then, but that it
may only have been made public
last week,” said the lawyer, who is
a friend of Mr Lyons.

Retirement

Yesterday a clerk in the Chief
Justice’s office told The Tribune
that Sir Burton was not taking
press inquiries on the subject of
Mr Lyon’s retirement.

This comes as several legal
insiders suggested that Mr Lyon’s
departure was not of his own voli-
tion, but instead, demanded in a
letter from the Chief Justice.

While the judge had come
under fire in recent months
because of his handling of certain
cases over which he presided,
numerous lawyers have spoken
out since his departure to com-
mend his “industrious” work eth-
ic and valuable expertise in the
field of commercial law.

Others complimented him on
the stand he took on the inde-
pendence of the judiciary in 2006
while still a judge in Freeport.

Yesterday Bar Association
President Wayne Munroe sug-
gested that the authorities may
have difficulty finding a suitable
replacement for Mr Lyons as
numerous lawyers have said it



must be done
expeditiously.
Referring
specifically to
the suggestion
that McKin-
} ney, Bancroft
and Hughes
senior partner
Brian Moree
may take up
the vacancy,
Mr Munroe
said the lawyer “might well be a
good addition,” but added that
he “can’t see” him accepting.

“(He would be required) to
take a monstrous cut in pay and
have to sit in substandard and
uninhabitable buildings, put up
with the nonsense of dealing with
the executive branch of govern-
ment and the fact that any idiot
can say whatever they wish about
you and you can’t defend your-
self.”

The attorney said being a judge
takes “superhuman self control.”

“As somebody who has judi-
cial ambitions myself, this is what

John Lyons



“They called
Justice Lyons in
over that and what I
understood was that
he had tendered his
resignation from
then, but that it may
only have been
made public last
week”



Lawyer friend of Lyons

causes me to think well I really
wouldn’t follow through with it
because I’m not sure I have the
ability when people talk foolish-
ness, to hold my hand (in terms of
not sending someone to court for
contempt when they come before
you)”.

A message left for Mr Moree
was not returned up to press time.

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ESSAY COMPETITION

TENTH ANNUAL PUBLIC SERVICE WEEK

The Department of Public Service will host an Essay
Competition as one of the activities for the Tenth Annual
Public Service Week. The Competition is open to Junior
and Senior High Students in New Providence.

Additionally, this year, a speech competition will be
held for schools in the Northern & Southern Bahamas,
respectively. Students interested in participating in the
Essay Competition should write a 250 - 300 words (Junior
High), and 450 - 500 words (Senior High), essay on the
topic: “ The Public Service-Striving for Excellence in

Customer Service.”

The deadlines for entries, which should be referred
to the attention of Ms. Antoinette Thompson, Deputy
Permanent Secretary, Department of Public Service, is

Friday 24th July, 2009.

A Dell Desktop 2400 Computer System will be awarded
to the winner in each category. The first runners-up for
both the Essay and Speech Competition in the Junior &
Senior High School category, will be awarded a $500 gift

certificate.

The winners will be announced during the Tenth Annual
Public Service Week Awards Ceremony scheduled for

Saturday 10th October 2009.

Students interested in the Speech Competition for the
Northern and Southern Bahamas should contact their

Language Arts Teacher.

Agenda

"The prime minister will be going to that
meeting and we'll be bringing up the agen-
da very shortly. .. That meeting is not until
November so we're still discussing the whole

Mr Symonette said it was too early to say

what level of support this country will offer
Trinidad. "We haven't finalised that yet.

‘KEMP'S FUNERAL HOME LIMITED



I'm not sure for instance whether we'll be
sending Defence Force officers. “Those
things haven't been nailed down yet.

“T don't want to say that we're going to be
doing ‘x, y, z' and that’s not the case, but
we'll obviously try and assist as best we
can," said Mr Symonette.

Trinidad will host its second major inter-
national summit in November; the country
recently hosted the Summit of the Americ-
as in April, attended by several world lead-
ers including US President Barack Obama.

The Bahamas hosted the CHOGM in
2006 and should be able to offer Trinidad
advice on preparing for the prestigious
meeting.

2? Palmdale Avenue, Palmdale
Nassau, N.P., The Bahamas

CR ee
Mr. Harry Thomas Lloyd Albury

of Rock Sound,
Eleuthera, The
Bahamas, Who died at
Doctor's Hospital,
Nassau on 10th May,
2009, after a long
ness, will be held at
the Rock Sound
Methodist Church,
Rock Sound, on
Saturday, 16th May,
2009 at 10:30 a.m.

Rev. Kendris Carey will officiate and interment
will follow in the Rock Sound Public Cemetery.

Mr. Albury was pre-deceased by his parents,
John |, Albury and Albertha J. Albury, his
brothers-in-law, Sylvester Cleare and Hanford
W. Darville, C.B.E., J.P., and his nephew, Steve
Darville.

He is survived by his sisters, Ethelyn Darville,
Lauriette Albury and Eleanor Cleare; his
nephews, John and Robert Darville; a great niece,
Caron Watson and a great nephew, Jamie Darville
and many relatives and friends in Eleuthera and
in Nassau,

The family would like to thank Dr. Theodore
Turnquest and Dr. Duvaughn Curling and the
Nurses N.N.O.W. Limited for the care and
kindness shown to Harry Albury during his
illness.

Instead of flowers, donations may be made to
the Cancer Society of The Bahamas, PO.BOX
5.5. 6559, Nassau or The Bahamas Heart
Association, PO.BOX N.8189, Nassau or the
Rock Sound Methodist Church,Rock Sound,
Eleuthera, The Bahamas, in Memory of Mr.
Harry T. L. Albury.

Arrangements by Kemp's Funeral Home
Limited, 22 Palmdale Avenue, Nassau, N.P.,
The Bahamas.

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PAGE 8, TUESDAY, MAY 12, 2009

THe TRIBUNE



City Lumber on Marathon

Road is still in business

CITY Lumber, an 83-year-old
business, founded by the late Sir
George Roberts, is still very
much in business on Marathon
Road.

In Tribune Business on Mon-
day it was reported that “the old
City Lumberyard, which met its
end by fire several years ago,
has recetved more than a $15
million makeover from its new
owners who are developing the
almost 12-acre property into
Builder’s Mall.”

This was incorrect. The ref-
erence was to a fire that
destroyed the old Bahamian
Lumber Company, which was
located on Wulff Road.

This property has since been
purchased by Mr Mark Roberts
for his newly created Builder’s
Mall.

Bahamian Lumber was start-
ed in 1959 by the three sons of
the late Ronald Albury —
David, Jimmy, and Billy.

It was purchased by Messrs
David Thompson and Samuel
Sawyer, directors of Pioneer
Shipping, around 1979 and
operated until the September 7,
1990 fire.

About three years ago the
almost 12-acre property was
purchased by Mr Mark Roberts
and turned into a large Builder’s
Mall.

“The idea behind Builder’s
Mall is that we would like to
create a facility that makes it
easy to come and do a lot of

construction-oriented business,”

said the young businessman.

(See correction on page 1 of i

today’s Business section).

Located at Builder’s Mall will
be four businesses owned by Mr
Roberts, in addition to two inde- }
pendent businesses whose own- }
ers are leasing space from him.

Mr Robert’s Tile King, which
specialises in tile, granite, and i
natural stone, has moved to the }
Mall from its Palmdale location. }
Also located at the Mall is Mr
Robert’s newest business, Fix }
Your Place (FYP), which sells }
lumber, hardware and building }
materials, and the Paint Centre, i
which offers a wide range of i

paints.

Mr Roberts is now working
on plans for manufacturing large ;
slabs of marble and granite for }
counter tops and custom-made :
granite and marble products. It }
will be a separate granite-marble

centre.

Also located at Builder’s Mall i
is the business of M.R. Higgs, }
owned by Mr Andrew Higgs, }
which specialises in awnings, i
shutters and window treatment. }

And Tamboura Coleby’s :
Freedom Appliances and Elec- }
tronics, which carries a wide }
range of appliances and elec- }
tronic equipment, is also to be :

found at the Mall.

In the meantime Mr Roberts’
Tile King premises in Palmdale }
is listed for sale with Bahamas :

Realty.

Stabbing victim is the

nation’s latest homicide |

FROM page one

slim build, five feet nine inches tall, and weighing an estimated 165

pounds.

Described as having “uncombed” hair, the police are uncertain
of the victim’s occupation and are appealing for anyone with ;
information to contact them at 911, 919, or their nearest police sta- ;

tion.

In other police news, a 26-year-old resident of Harbour Island ;
drowned over the weekend after taking a group of 14 persons out }

in his 17-foot Boston Whaler.

According to police press liaison officer Walter Evans, some- i
time around 8 o’clock Sunday night, the 26-year-old man left Har- :

bour Island in the Boston Whaler with 14 passengers onboard.

The vessel experienced some difficulties sometime later and the

14 passengers were able to swim to safety.

However, sometime around 9am yesterday, the body of the
man was discovered floating in waters around Harbour island in :

a “motionless state.”

While the police believe he may have drowned, an autopsy is

being performed to determine the exact cause of death.

Former kindergarten teacher

Freda Russell dies age 97

i
MRS FREDA RUSSELL



MRS FREDA RUSSELL
had been out of education for
many years, but her impact on
Nassau society will be felt for a
long time to come.

Mrs Russell, who was 97, had
a significant impact on the many
children who had her as a
kindergarten teacher at Queen’s
College, including many
Bahamians who over the years
have held leading positions in
government and the communi-
ty.

She was described by many
who knew her as a “remarkable
woman” who worked tirelessly
in her field of education — so
much so that she was honoured
with a British Empire Medal in
2002.

Born in Bangalore, India in
1911 where her father had tak-

en up a post with the Methodist
Church, Mrs Russell returned
to England in 1921 and entered
a local boarding school. She
came to the Bahamas on Octo-
ber 24, 1932 with her parents
when her father was appointed
chairman of the Methodist
church here.

In 1933 Mrs Russell started
her career as Queen’s College’s
kindergarten teacher after
accepting the post which was
offered her by QC headmaster
Rev RP Dyer while she was still
at school in England. Mrs Rus-
sell taught at Queen’s College
until 1964.

Marrying Mr Seighbert Rus-
sell, brother of the founder of
the Stop ’N Shop, a well known
Bay Street store, in the late
1930’s, Mrs Russell never had

any children of her own, but
loved her nieces, nephews and
young students dearly. Her hus-
band died in August 1992.

A great reader, Mrs Russell
had a sharp mind and was able
to recall the names and anec-
dotal stories about her students
whenever she met them around
town.

In her retired years, said a
niece, Mrs Russell enjoyed her
dogs and roses very much and
was a great lover of chocolate in
any form.

Suffering from a stroke in
December of last year, Mrs
Russell has been bedridden
since. She died peacefully on
Sunday at 1.30pm at her Lake-
side Road home.

Funeral arrangements will be
announced at a later date.

Brother of slain banker

FROM page one

will remain in the Bahamas until
justice has been served.

Speaking out yesterday, IIt
Jones said: “I wish to make this
statement on behalf of Hywel’s
family following his tragic death
on Friday, May 8, following his
cowardly shooting on April 22.

“We have been assured by the
Royal Bahamas Police Force that
investigations into the shooting
are ongoing and that all lines of
inquiry will be thoroughly inves-
tigated.

“Although for obvious reasons
the police have not always been
able to share details of the lines of
inquiry they are following, we
have been assured that progress
has been made.

“A reward of $50,000 has been
posted through Crime Stoppers
for information that leads to the
prosecution of those behind the
shooting.

“We urge anyone who knows
anything that may assist the police
in their investigations to call 328-
8477 in Nassau or 242-300-8476
for the Family Islands. The
caller’s identity will remain
anonymous.

“My mother and I would like
to pass on our heartfelt thanks
for all the sympathy and messages
of support and goodwill that we
have received following the
shooting and Hywel’s death.

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“We have been moved by the
affection for Hywel expressed by
people from all levels of Bahami-
an society.

“That Hywel has touched the
lives of so many is reflected by
the incredible response to the
appeal for blood donors at Doc-
tor’s Hospital.

“Through his charitable work
and significant contribution to
banking education in this country
Hywel made a very positive con-
tribution to the Bahamian nation.

“Tt’s hard for our family to look
beyond the pain we are suffering.

“But Hywel’s shooting affects
every Bahamian. That a promi-
nent and respected member of
the Bahamian financial services

FROM page one

sector has been gunned down in
broad daylight outside his office
in a popular tourist area in what
appears to be a ‘hit’ has already
been widely reported around the
world.

“In a country so reliant on
financial services and to which its
image as a safe and friendly
tourist destination is so impor-
tant, it’s vital to the very well
being of the Bahamian economy
that the person or persons behind
the killing are swiftly brought to
justice.”

The $50,000 reward posted by
Crime Stoppers is made up of
donations from friends of Hywel
Jones and well-wishers all over
the world.

Ilt Jones will meet with police
tomorrow to further assist inves-
tigations, and said he will remain
in the Bahamas for as long as nec-
essary.

He said: “I intend to stay as
long as it takes to help the police
bring whoever it is to justice and
provide them with any informa-
tion they may need.”

Hywel Jones’ body will be tak-
en to South Wales for burial, and
a funeral service will be held for
his many friends in Nassau on
Saturday, May 23.

Ilt Jones said: “He was very
fun-loving and well liked so I’m
keen for it to be more of a cele-
bration of his life than a memor-
ial and I’m encouraging people
to submit funny anecdotes and
memories of Hywel to compile in
a booklet for the service.”

“He hit me on the right side of my face, knocked
my glasses off, and the person escorting me through
the building grabbed me and stood between us until
he walked away.”

Mr Smith said he is not bruised but his glasses
have been broken and he will press charges and seek
damages for the $600 spectacles.

The court orders came after union executives split
over which day to hold nominations for the council
elections.

Union general secretary Leo Douglas called a
meeting for nominations on Monday, May 4, but
current first vice-president and presidential hopeful
Kirk Wilson refused to nominate himself last week as
he maintained the legitimate nomination day was
scheduled for May 11.

Mr Smith, who claims to represent six out of the 10
union executives, including Mr Wilson, said May 11
is the correct nomination day, which was decided at
the last meeting of the full executive council on April
22.

He said: “The executive council is the supreme
authority on the union and in the circumstances a
meeting was duly called, duly held today and the
people nominated were duly nominated today.

“The meeting on May 4 was of no significance.”

Mr Smith maintains three parties and one inde-
pendent candidate including Kirk Wilson and Tyrone
‘Rock’ Morris representing the Unity party were

FROM page one

Former MP is punched in face

legitimately nominated yesterday.

However, Mr Douglas insists only the May 4 nom-
inations are valid.

The general secretary said: “Keod Smith cannot
speak on behalf of this union. I’m responsible for the
running of the day-to-day business of the union and
official communication.

“We have already written to the registrar of trade
unions in relation to the Industrial Relations Act to
inform them they are required to conduct a poll on
May 28.

“We haven’t seen any other nominations and if
they bring anything to me I will throw it in the
garbage.”

Mr Douglas maintains another attorney repre-
sents the majority of council members, including
himself, president Roy Colebrook, and four others
who make up six out of 11 on the board.

But it was Mr Smith who found himself at the
centre of the row yesterday.

He said: “T have been an activist for a great part of
my adult life so I have been boxed around and
pushed about before. I am not delicate and I am
one who believes you can’t expect to be in the box-
ing ring saying you are a boxer and not expect to be
hit, literally or figuratively.

“T am not bruised, the biggest difficulty is that my
glasses were destroyed,” he said.

Agreeing with the political

“above” such matters, and a
source close to him said they
“hadn’t heard anything” about
him relinquishing the post, other
political commentators said his
time may soon be up.

“I have heard the Governor
General may be stepping down,”
said one political observer.

However, both this observer and
another political source expressed
surprise at the suggestion made on
a political blog that senate presi-
dent Lynn Holowesko may be
appointed in place of Mr Hanna —
one source even going so far as to
suggest that such a move by the
Prime Minister would “cause a
number of (FNMs) to be unhap-
Peed the same observer
conceded that Mrs Holowesko
shares a “very special relationship”

Governor General

with the Prime Minister.

“Although it comes as a sur-
prise, it may well be something
which the Prime Minister does,”
the commentator added.

The current senate president,
an avid supporter of the FNM, is
said to have made “a lot of sacri-
fices” for the party.

The second political source told
this newspaper that he would be
“surprised if Janet Bostwick was
overlooked” for the post, should
the Prime Minister replace the cur-
rent Governor General and be dis-
posed to appoint a woman to the
top job.

“She has given distinguished ser-
vice to the country that would
make her worthy of consideration
for the post,” said the source,
adding that “everyone knows (she)
has been waiting in the wings.”

observer, who said the names of
Sir Arthur Foulkes and former
minister of finance Sir William
Allen “in particular” had been
mentioned in replacing the Gov-
ernor-General, the Opposition
source noted that Sir Arthur has a
“similar legacy” to the Governor-
General.

Contacted yesterday for com-
ment, former prime minister and
opposition leader Perry Christie
told The Tribune he “has not been
consulted with respect to anything”
in relation to the replacement of
Mr Hanna.

Meanwhile, Mrs Bostwick said
she “definitely has not” been
approached to take up the job
since 2002 when she had agreed
to run for the party in that year’s
elections.

A message left for Mrs
Holowesko was not returned up
to press time.

FROM page one

from hearing all matters before him. The case involv-
ing The Central Bank of Ecuador against Conticorp
SA and Luis and Jaime Ortega was expected to start
this week. Justice Lyons’ resignation is expected to
take effect in August.

Last week lawyer Fred Smith, a partner in the firm
Callenders and Co appealed Justice Lyons’ decision
not to recuse himself from the case. Callenders rep-
resents Conticorp, the defendant in the case.

Mr Smith had contended that Justice Lyons had
demonstrated hostility towards lawyers of the Cal-
lenders’ firm on three separate occasions last month
and that his statements from the bench created a
perceived bias against Callenders. Mr Smith had
made the application for recusal before Justice Lyons
on April 20, however the judge refused to step down
from the case. In his ruling on the issue on April
30, Justice Lyons had admitted that he been angry
over the controversy that had stemmed from anoth-
er civil case but that his anger by then had dissipat-
ed. He said that he did not believe that an objective
observer would conclude that he would be biased
towards Callenders and its clients. Mr Smith sub-
mitted to the appellate court last week, however,
that it was clear to an objective observer that the
judge had directed his anger towards the Callen-
ders’ firm.

The ruling handed down by Court of Appeal
President Dame Joan Sawyer stated, “It is clear from
the notes Mr Smith read into the record of this court
of what transpired on April 20, 2009 that the learned
judge conducted the case management conference

Appeal for recusal

with his usual aplomb and that Mr Smith had no
real apprehension that the learned judge harboured
any animosity towards him as counsel or the law
firm of which he is a partner. However, the objective
observer would not necessarily be fixed with any
knowledge of the learned judge’s character.”

The ruling further stated, “The objective observ-
er would be expected to have no personal knowledge
of any of the parties or of the judge. The court must
therefore ask itself what an objective and fair mind-
ed observer with knowledge of all the circumstances
as shown on the evidence, would have any doubt
that the judge on that day would have been impartial
in his treatment.”

“Applying this test to the circumstances of this
appeal, we consider this case to be a borderline one
because we cannot say that such an observer would
not have had doubt about the emotional state of the
judge on that date. For that reason and that alone, we
allow the appeal.”

Justice Lyons made headlines last month after
Senior Justice Anita Allen questioned his appoint-
ment of Daniel Ferguson, an accountant, to work on
a recent case knowing full well that he shared “more
than a friendship” with Mr Ferguson’s sister. Mr
Ferguson’s sister also assisted her brother with
preparing documents for the case, said Justice Allen
as she decided whether or not to recuse herself from
hearing the matter “on the ground of apparent bias”
because of her knowledge of this matter. This dis-
closure prompted calls for Justice's Lyons resignation.



TRIBUNE SPORTS

TUESDAY, MAY 12, 2009, PAGE 13



SPORTS



Gasquet suspended after testing positive for cocaine

Hm By STUART CONDIE
AP Sports Writer

LONDON (AP) — French
tennis player Richard Gasquet
was suspended Monday follow-
ing a positive cocaine test and
will not play in the French
Open.

The International Tennis
Federation expects to have a
panel in place within 60 days
for a hearing. Gasquet could
face a two-year ban if found
guilty.

The 22-year-old player said
he is gathering evidence to
prove his innocence despite two
samples testing positive. He said
a separate test of his hair sam-
ples May 7 showed no trace of
cocaine. Cocaine traces were
found in Gasquet's urine sam-
ple at the Sony Ericsson Open,
in Key Biscayne, Fla., in March.

The French Open, the year’s
second major, begins May 24
and tournament director
Gilbert Ysern withdrew Gas-
quet's name after the provi-
sional suspension.

"He's suspended until the
end of the hearing," ITF
spokesman Neil Robinson said.
"We're now assembling an anti-
doping tribunal. The ideal time
frame is within 60 days, but peo-



IN THIS Thursday, October 16, 2008 file photo, Richard Gasquet serves the ball to Rafael Nadal during a match

at the Madrid Masters.

ple have to fly in from all over
the world for it.”

Gasquet was ranked No. 7 in
July 2007 but has since slipped
to No. 21. He has played just

five matches since pulling out
of the Key Biscayne event
before his second-round match
against Albert Montanes of
Spain.

(AP Photo: Daniel Ochoa de Olza)

Gasquet cited a right shoul-
der injury for the withdrawal
and has since returned to play in
Barcelona and at the Rome
Masters, where he lost in the

Barcelona favourite to lift Copa

lm By STEPHEN MACKEY
Associated Press Writer

MADRID (AP) —
Barcelona hopes Wednesday's
Copa del Rey final against
underdog Athletic Bilbao at
Mestalla Stadium runs more
smoothly than its recent games
as it bids to win the trophy for a
record 25th time.

The Catalan team, which last
won Spain's knockout competi-
tion 11 years ago at the same
Valencia venue, has endured
some high drama in an attempt
to become the first Spanish
team to win the league, cup and
Champions League in a single
season.

Last Wednesday, Andres Ini-
esta's injury-time goal earned
Barcelona a 1-1 draw at
Chelsea's Stamford Bridge and
passage into the Champions
League final.

Four days later, Barcelona
came within three minutes of
winning the Spanish league title
at its Camp Nou stadium only
for Villarreal to equalize in a 3-
3 draw that keeps coach Pep
Guardiola's team waiting for at
least another week.

Guardiola hopes victory
against Bilbao will help banish
the memory of Sunday's disap-
pointment and act as the pre-
lude to title celebrations next
weekend, setting up the sea-
son's finale when it plays Man-



ANDRES INIESTA (center) falls as he vies for the ball with Gonzalo
Rodriguez (bottom) as Sebastian Eguren (right) and Diego Godin (left) look
on during their Spanish La Liga match at Camp Nou stadium in Barcelona,

Spain, on Sunday...

chester United in Rome on May
21.

"Now, we have to raise our-
selves quickly and put a smile
on our faces. It's been a long
time since Barcelona played in a
Copa del Rey final and we have
to win it," Guardiola said.

Barcelona's situation con-

(AP Photo: Manu Fernandez)

trasts greatly with that of Bil-
bao, which hasn't won any
major silverware since it won
the Copa del Rey by beating
Barcelona 1-0 at Santiago Bern-
abeu Stadium 25 years ago.
However, Bilbao remains his-
torically one of Spain's most
successful teams and will be bid-

Iniesta expects to play in
Champions League final

BARCELONA, Spain (AP) — Barcelona mid-
fielder Andres Iniesta believes he will overcome
his right thigh muscle injury and play in the
Champions League final against Manchester

United.

Iniesta reportedly said after undergoing tests on
Monday — his 25th birthday — that his injury
during Barcelona's 3-3 draw the previous day
with Villarreal was only “a small tear."

Measuring the tear at 2 centimeters (0.8 inches)
in length, Barcelona would only say that "doctors
will be working to get Iniesta fit for the final.”

ic Bilbao.

The club had already said Iniesta will miss
Wednesday's Copa del Rey final against Athlet-

Iniesta scored Barcelona's late equalizer last

Wednesday to earn Barcelona a 1-1 draw at

Chelsea and passage into the Champions League
final in Rome on May 27.

Barcelona is expected to face defending cham-
pion United without suspended defenders Eric
Abidal and Daniel Alves together with injured
Rafael Marquez, while striker Thierry Henry is
doubtful with a right knee injury.

UEFA rejects Manchester



United, Barcelona appeals

NYON, Switzerland (AP) —
UEFA on Monday upheld the
refereeing decisions that rule
out Darren Fletcher of Man-
chester United and Barcelon-
a's Eric Abidal and Dani Alves
from playing in the Champions
League final.

UEFA's disciplinary com-
mittee rejected both clubs’
appeals to let the suspended
players take part in the May 27
final in Rome.

UEFA said in a statement
that both clubs missed their
deadline to appeal within 24
hours of their semifinals match-
es played last week.

However, UEFA said even
prompt appeals "would have
been rejected as unfounded as
there were no grounds for con-
testing the referees’ original
decisions.

"All three players are there-
fore suspended for one UEFA

club competition match and will
serve their suspensions ... in the
UEFA Champions League
final," the statement said.

Neither club expected suc-
cess in their appeals because
UEFA tules allow for field of
play decisions to be overturned
only in cases of mistaken iden-
tity.

Fletcher was sent off after
tackling Arsenal's Cesc Fabre-
gas in last Tuesday's semifinal
second leg. Fletcher connected
with the ball first but his
momentum brought down the
Spaniard.

Abidal was sent off when
Chelsea's Nicolas Anelka went
down after a challenge last
Wednesday, though TV replays
suggested there was no contact.

Alves received a yellow card
that activated a ban because of
his past disciplinary record.

Alex Ferguson, the United

manager, said last Friday that
the club wrote UEFA a "com-
passionate letter” on Fletcher's
behalf.

"We understand the system
and I honestly believe that the
referee made the right decision
at the time. I thought it was a
penalty,” Ferguson said.

Abidal’s red card was one of
several disputed decisions made
by Norwegian referee Tom
Henning Ovrebo, who angered
Chelsea players after he turned
down a series of penalty
appeals.

Didier Drogba and Michael
Ballack were among the
Chelsea players who confronted
the referee, and defender Jose
Boswinga later used the word
"thief" in referring to Ovrebo.

UEFA is currently consider-
ing what disciplinary action to
take against Chelsea players
and the club.

ding to win the Copa del Rey
for the 24th time, which would
lift it level with Barcelona as
record winner.

The Basque team would even
consider a triumph as its 25th
in Spain's knockout competi-
tion as it also claims the very
first Copa del Rey in 1902,
which was won by Vizcaya, a
representative team comprising
some Bilbao players.

Bilbao fans are so excited
about the long-awaited final
that about 20,000 of them
watched the team's final train-
ing session at its San Mames
stadium on Sunday.

Bilbao captain Joseba Etxe-
berria is optimistic, even though
he accepts that Barcelona will
start as favorites to win the
fourth final of six played

third round to Fernando Ver-
dasco on May 1.

Gasquet lost to Roger Fed-
erer in the semifinals at Wim-
bledon in 2007. He was consid-
ered a future star when he first
arrived on tour with a one-
handed backhand widely con-
sidered among the best in the
game.

Martina Hingis was banned
for two years early last year
after testing positive for cocaine
at Wimbledon. The five-time
Grand Slam champion and for-
mer top-ranked player failed a
test after losing to Laura
Granville in 2007.

Hingis, who has since retired,
became the second WTA play-
er suspended for cocaine after
Lourdes Dominguez Lino of
Spain was banned for three
months in 2002.

Former top-ranked men's
player Mats Wilander and Karel
Novacek had positive tests for
cocaine at the 1995 French
Open. That was before the
introduction of rules to auto-
matically suspend players fol-
lowing a positive second test.
Both continued playing before
they were banned for three
months and ordered to return
prize money and forfeit rank-
ings points.

(lel Rey

between the teams.

"A single match at a neutral
ground, and with both teams at
the same strength — anything
can happen. And when it's Ath-
letic, even more so. We cer-
tainly don't rule out a victory
and bringing the Cup to Bil-
bao,” Etxeberria said.

A Bilbao win would repre-
sent a triumph for its policy of
selecting Basque-born players,
the only exceptions being play-
ers from the bordering region
of Navarre or those who have
passed through its junior teams.

Barcelona has been hit by
injuries and will be without Ini-
esta, striker Thierry Henry and
defender Rafael Marquez,
together with center back Gabi
Milito, a long-term casualty.

"Even without Rafa, Titi



Cc
te

SERENA WILLIAMS speaks during

a press conference after retiring

with an injury on her right leg dur-
ing the Madrid Open...

(AP Photo: Daniel

Ochoa de Olza)

Serena
Williams
injured

MADRID (AP) — Serena
Williams is out of the Madrid
Open after aggravating a leg
injury in a first-round match
against Francesca Schiavone.

The second-ranked Williams
retired after losing the first set
6-4 Monday.

She says her movement was
hindered by a a recurring injury
to her right leg.

Williams would not comment
on the extent of the injury or
whether it would keep her out
of the upcoming French Open.

(Henry) or Andres we will lift
ourselves and we'll carry on
with what we have got,"
Guardiola said. "And if we
don't have 11 players, we'll use
the junior team."

Young striker Bojan Krkic,
who has led the Barcelona
attack in this season's Copa del
Rey games, is expected to start
the game.

Bilbao has no injury worries,
with coach Joaquin Caparros
resting more than half his team
in Saturday's league game
against Real Betis. The deplet-
ed team won 1-0 to ensure its
record of never having been rel-
egated will continue for anoth-
er season.

The Burns House Group
presents

16,

Poop Deck, Sandyport
3-7pm

Entertainment by:

The G-Nofte All Stars

Admission: General Public $20

Artists include:

Antonius Roberts

Ale] sam ete) 4
Willicey Tynes
eu Talis lai
Malcolm Rae





PAGE 14, TUESDAY, MAY 12, 2009

TRIBUNE SPORTS



SPORTS



Rockets defeat the Lakers
without Yao, even series

@ By The Associated Press

Denver at Dallas (9:30pm EDT). The
Nuggets can reach the Western Confer-
ence finals by completing a sweep of the
Mavericks. Denver leads the series 3-0 after
winning all four games during the regular
season.

STARS

Sunday

—Aaron Brooks, Rockets, scored a
career-high 34 points as Houston beat the
Los Angeles Lakers 99-87 to even their
Western Conference semifinal at two
games apiece.

—Paul Pierce, Celtics, scored 27 points in
Boston's 95-94 victory over Orlando as the
defending NBA champs tied the series 2-2.

OH, BABY!

Glen Davis made a 21-foot jumper as
time expired to help the Boston Celtics
hold off a furious rally and defeat the
Orlando Magic 95-94 on Sunday night to
even their Eastern Conference semifinal
at two games apiece. Davis’ jumper fol-
lowed a pair of free throws by Rashard
Lewis that put the Magic ahead with 11.3
seconds to play. Davis also hit a 15-foot
jumper in the final minute and finished
with 21 points.

STRONG IN DEFEAT

Dwight Howard had 23 points and 17
rebounds in Orlando's 95-94 loss to Boston
on Sunday. ... Pau Gasol scored 30 points as
the Los Angeles Lakers lost to Houston
99-87.

SHARPSHOOTER

Shane Battier sank five 3-pointers and
finished with 23 points as the Rockets beat
the Lakers 99-87 on Sunday to even their
Western Conference semifinal at two
games apiece. Battier was 5 of 10 from 3-
point range.

BANGED UP

Los Angeles' Lamar Odom drove into
Houston's Shane Battier, hit the floor hard,
limped to the bench and went to the lock-
er room with back spasms in the third quar-
ter of the Lakers’ 99-87 loss Sunday night.
Odom was called for a charge on the play
and didn't return. He'll have tests Mon-
day and will sit out practice.

SPEAKING

"T think everyone but us got the memo
that we weren't supposed to show up today
without Yao."

— Houston's Shane Battier after the
Rockets topped the Los Angeles Lakers 99-
87 on Sunday night to even their Western
Conference semifinal at two games apiece.
The win came without Yao Ming, who
broke his left foot in the Lakers’ victory in
Game 3

@ By CHRIS DUNCAN
AP Sports Writer

HOUSTON (AP) — With Yao
Ming out, the Houston Rockets had
no chance to beat the Los Angeles
Lakers. Right?

Wrong.

Aaron Brooks scored a career-high
34, Shane Battier sank five 3-pointers
and added 23 and the Rockets beat
the Lakers 99-87 on Sunday to even
their Western Conference semifinal
at two games apiece.

"T think everyone but us got the
memo that we weren't supposed to
show up today without Yao,” Battier
said.

Luis Scola had 11 points and 14
rebounds as the Rockets got exactly
the team effort they needed after Yao
broke his left foot in the Lakers’ win
in Game 3.

Game 5 is Tuesday night in Los
Angeles, and anyone who thought the
Rockets were finished without their
best player only needed to watch the
first quarter on Sunday, when Hous-
ton built a 29-16 lead.

The Rockets never trailed and led
by as many as 29 before the Lakers
made the score respectable toward
the end.

"I'm not surprised," said Battier.
"It almost sounds cliche, but we're a
resilent group. We talk about bounc-
ing back. Through adversity, through
lineup changes, through trades,
through injuries, we've never quit and
we've never stopped believing.”

Brooks, in his second NBA season,
became Houston's starting point
guard when the team dealt Rafer
Alston to Orlando at the trade dead-
line.

He faced countless questions about
his inexperience before the postseason
began, but keeps showing skeptics
that he can handle the job. He scored
27 points in Houston's Game 1 win in
Portland and had 14 points in the sec-
ond half of the Rockets’ 100-92 vic-
tory in the opener of this series.

Brooks deflected credit to his team-
mates after this one.

"T'm lucky to have these guys," he
said. "It makes it a lot easier on me."

Pau Gasol scored 30 points and
Kobe Bryant had a quiet 15 for Los
Angeles.



AARON BROOKS drives to the basket during the first quarter of Game 4 of a second-
round Western Conference playoff game against the Lakers in Houston, Sunday.
Brooks scored a career-high 34. Houston won 99-87...

Lakers coach Phil Jackson warned
his team about taking the Rockets
too lightly after hearing about Yao's
injury. But the Lakers looked lethar-
gic from the start, giving away careless
turnovers and playing lax defense.

"They didn't anticipate the energy
that they were going to come with,"
Jackson said. "But you say as much as
you can as a coach and then the play-
ers have to execute and do it on the
floor."

The Rockets opened the game with

(AP Photo: Eric Gay)

a 22-7 run, starting 4-of-5 from 3-point
range. Bryant scored the Lakers’ first
three baskets, but the rest of the team
missed its first seven shots.

Houston led 54-36 at the break. The
Lakers grabbed only two offensive
rebounds and generated only four
fast-break points in their lowest-scor-
ing half of the season. Battier had 15
points at halftime, two more than
Bryant.

"T just don't think we started the
game with the right energy or the

right focus or sense of urgency,"
Bryant said.

Los Angeles didn't start the second
half too well, either.

The Rockets outscored Los Ange-
les 29-18 in the decisive third quar-
ter, led by Brooks’ 17 points. The
speedy, 6-foot guard finished the
quarter by catching a midcourt pass by
Ron Artest and putting in a layup just
before the buzzer.

Yao, dressed in a dark suit, wore a
broad grin and applauded when
Brooks sprinted off the floor after the
improbable basket.

The 7-foot-6 Yao is out for the rest
of the playoffs, but the Rockets never
doubted they could beat the Lakers
without him.

"This was the effort we expected,"
said Battier. "I don't know about the
result, but it was the effort that we
expected. There was a different look
to our team today."

Lamar Odom, who scored 16 points
in Game 3, drove into Battier and was
called for a charge midway through
the quarter. He hit the floor hard,
limped to the bench and went to the
locker room with back spasms. He
did not return.

Odom will have tests on Monday
and said he'll sit out practice.

The Rockets led by 27 when Odom
was hurt, and when Brooks complet-
ed the last-second alley-oop, Artest
smacked his hands on the scorers’
table and smiled to the roaring crowd,
in seeming disbelief about how things
were going.

Artest scored only eight points, but
had 10 rebounds and six assists.

Bryant returned from a long rest
with 5:41 left in the game and the Lak-
ers cut the deficit to 10. But it was
too late by then and Brooks fittingly
scored Houston's last two points on
free throws in the final minute.

Notes:@ Scola recorded his fifth
career postseason double-double.
Bryant was held under 30 points for
the first time in four games at the Toy-
ota Center this season. Artest sported a
new mohawk hairdo, similar to the
one he had before the series began.
This time, 'Houston' was shaved on
one side and a Rockets' logo adorned
the other side. The team winning after
the opening quarter has won all 10 of
the Rockets' playoff games.

‘Big Baby’ shot steals
the Magic for Celtics

@ By ANTONIO GONZALEZ
Associated Press Writer

ORLANDO, Fla. (AP) —
Glen Davis never thought he
could replace the "Big Ticket,"
merely hoping to fill in for
injured All-Star Kevin Garnett.

Known as "Big Baby" since
his college days at LSU, Davis
even teased that he was the
"Ticket Stub" compared to
Garnett.

Now he may have another
nickname.

Davis made a 21-foot jumper
as time expired to help the
Boston Celtics hold off a furious
rally and defeat the Orlando
Magic 95-94 on Sunday night to
even their Eastern Conference
semifinal at two games apiece.

"Big-shot Baby Davis,"
Orlando's Dwight Howard said,
shaking his head in disbelief.

Davis took the pass on the
wing from Paul Pierce, made
the jumper and ran to half-
court. He was mobbed by team-
mates, waving his hands in the
air and leaving the Orlando
home crowd silenced, a play
even he couldn't have imagined
until Garnett went down with
a season-ending knee injury
months ago.

"Every time I shoot, I kind
of feel myself making game-
winning shots all the time,”
Davis said. "You always have
to see it. If you see it, you will
believe it."

Believe this: The Celtics are
back in the series.

Falling behind 3-1 would
have been devastating for the
defending champions. Only
eight NBA teams have ever
come back from that deficit.

Boston far outplayed Orlan-
do for most of Game 4, shoot-
ing 52.8 percent from the floor
compared to just 40 percent for
the Magic. But without the final
shot, an otherwise strong per-
formance would have been a
waste.

Davis’ jumper followed a pair
of free throws by Rashard
Lewis that put the Magic ahead
with 11.3 seconds to play. Davis
also hit a 15-foot jumper in the
final minute and finished with
21 points.

Dwight Howard had 23



GLEN DAVIS (center) is congratulated by teammate Bill Walker (right) as
J R Giddens celebrates after Davis made a game-winning shot with time
running out during the second half of a second-round playoff game in
Orlando, Florida, on Sunday. The Celtics won 95-94.

(AP Photo: Phelan M Ebenhack)

points and 17 rebounds, and
Lewis scored 22 for the Magic.
Game 5 is Tuesday in Boston.

"It's going to be difficult,"
Lewis said. "A lot of guys are
upset in the locker room. But
we can't hang our heads too
long.”

Perhaps the only downside
on a series-changing win for
Boston was that center
Kendrick Perkins said he aggra-
vated a left shoulder injury. He
didn't know when it happened
and said he would have it eval-
uated Monday.

The Celtics went ahead by
nine points with about five min-
utes remaining in the third quar-
ter on a 3-pointer by Pierce.
Boston's All-Star forward had
27 points, but would battle foul
trouble the rest of the way,
helping Orlando trim the lead
slowly.

But it was the final play that
changed the series.

Magic coach Stan Van Gundy
said his players carried out the
last play defensively exactly
how he had designed, taking the
ball out of the hands of Pierce
and Ray Allen, and put the
responsibility for his team's fail-
ures on himself.

"The only guy who made a

mistake on the last play was
me,” Van Gundy said.

He's got bigger concerns
moving forward.

Orlando's starting backcourt
of Rafer Alston and J.J. Redick
were downright dreadful. The
pair combined to make just 2
of 14 shots from the floor, with
the Celtics clogging the middle
and practically daring them to
shoot.

"You never want to turn
down good shots,” Alston said.
"T think if we make some of
them, we can force them not to
double-team Dwight."

Van Gundy had cautioned his
team about feeling satisfied with
its Game 3 blowout victory,
even reminding players with a
message at the team's practice
facility that they were in the
same position Philadelphia was
in their first-round series. The
76ers went up 2-1, then lost in
six games.

Davis' shot now puts the
Magic on the same path.

"It really hurts,” Orlando for-
ward Hedo Turkoglu said.
"Especially this kind of a game.
But no matter what, we still
have to go up to Boston. We're
young. We're hungry. We'll
bounce back strong."

Dawson unanimously
outpoints Tarver

LAS VEGAS (AP) — Chad
Dawson successfully defended
his IBF and IBO light heavy-
weight titles Saturday night,
unanimously outpointing Anto-
nio Tarver in a rematch of their
October fight.

The undefeated Dawson,
who looked lackadaisical at
times in fighting off several
impressive combinations from
the 40-year-old Tarver, had win-
ning scores of 116-112, 117-111
and 117-111 from the three
judges.

Unlike their bout last fall,
when the fast-handed left-han-
der dominated in a 118-109,
117-110 and 117-110 victory,
Saturday's fight at the Hard
Rock Hotel and Casino pro-
duced plenty of back-and-forth
action from start to finish.

"He put up a hell of a fight,"
said Dawson, 28-0 with 17
knockouts. "He definitely took
me off my game. My hats off to
Antonio Tarver."

Dawson landed most of sig-
nificant punches in the final four
rounds, including a flurry of
punches at the end of the ninth
round — arguably his most
impressive round.

Tarver was the clear aggres-
sor, throwing 749 punches to
Dawson's 677. But the 26-year-
old Dawson had a 62-14 advan-
tage in punches that connected
with the body and connected
on 31 percent of his punches.
Tarver only landed 16 percent
of his punches.



DAWSON poses after the fight...





ABOVE AND LEFT — Chad Dawson (right) lands a punch to Antonio
Tarver during the fifth round of their IBF light heavyweight championship
match at the Hard Rock Hotel & Casino, on Saturday in Las Vegas. Tarv-
er won by unanimous decision...

"He pushed the fight and
took my off my game plan,”
Dawson said. "He threw a lot of
punches, but I was catching
most of them."

Gary Shaw, Dawson's pro-
moter, said Tarver gave his
fighter everything he could han-
dle.

"T don't know how everyone
else felt but I was scared in
every round,” Shaw said.

Dawson, who was in the first
fight of a two-fight contract with
HBO, said he doesn't know
who he will fight next. An ideal
possibility is Bernard Hopkins,
but Shaw said there has been
little contact with Hopkins’
camp.

"T will fight whoever they
throw in front of me," Dawson
said. "I'm glad I got this
rematch out of the way so I
could get the fights I deserve."

Regardless of the next oppo-
nent, Dawson knows he needs
to improve. Another perfor-
mance like Saturday could
equal his first loss.

"IT know I didn't have my best
night," Dawson said. "I know
it wasn't it my best perfor-
mance. I don't know how much
of that had to do with Tarver
having a good night."

Despite the lopsided outcome

(AP Photos)

in the first meeting, Tarver was
confident he would win the
rematch. He had also lost to
Roy Jones Jr., Glen Johnson
and Eric Harding during his
career, but avenged all three
loses in rematches.

He was almost right. Tarver,
nicknamed the "Magic Man,"
believes he proved he still has
some magic left in his hands.

Tarver, a significant under-
dog, pieced together successful
combinations especially in the
earlier rounds the showed the
veteran champion wasn't going
to be an easy opponent.

"T don't feel like a loser up
here tonight. I truly don't,”
Tarver said. "I fought 12 hard
rounds and I was in it every
round. Let my hands go, and
when I like my hands go, I can
compete with anyone in the
world. I showed that tonight."

He definitely surprised Daw-
son's camp.

"You showed tonight what a
champions heart is made off,”
Dawson's trainer, Eddie
Muhammad, told Tarver in the
post-fight news conference.

Hopkins said he isn't sure
what the future holds, but could
easily see himself returning.

"T just went 12 rounds and
feel great,” he said.



THE TRIBUNE

Dorsett
elected BSF
president

m@ By RENALDO DORSETT
Sports Reporter
rdorsett@tribunemedia. net

AFTER serv-
ing as softball
administrator for
more than three
decades, Burket
Dorsett will head
the country’s
national govern-
ing body.

Dorsett was |
elected as presi-
dent of the
Bahamas Softball
Federation after serving as the
first vice president for nine years
under Romell Knowles.

Dorsett, who officially began
his three- year term this week-
end by delivering the keynote
address on the New Providence
Softball Association’s opening
night, said he looks to continue
the path set forth by Knowles.

“T have accepted the responsi-
bility with great pride and hon-
our, the confidence the federa-
tion has expressed in me is great-
ly appreciated as I seek to serve
with sincerity, commitment and
dedication,” he said. “His tena-
cious leadership style has elevat-
ed this federation second to none
in this country. His passion for
the sport of softball has brought a
new dimension to the BSF. We
salute you president Knowles and
say thank you very much for the
stellar leadership. As a part of his
team for the last nine years I
know of his passion and legacy. I
share in them and I am willing to
carry on with them.”

One of the most experienced
administrators in the local game,
Dorsett outlined several initia-
tives which he and his new admin-
istration set to put in place.

“T have spent my last 33 years
in the administration of softball,
slow pitch, fast pitch and modified
pitch. Over the last nine years in
our administration we have made
great strides in the improvement
of the game on and off the field.
We can only improve with the
practices this administration put
in place. I have a number of ini-
tiatives I plan to set in place as the
BSF plans to move forward over
the course of the next three years
and beyond,” he said. “Firstly we
look to establish a debt free fed-
eration spearheaded by a dynam-
ic national fundraising commit-
tee. We also look to appoint 10
influential distinguished softball
ambassadors, establish a national
season-ending awards banquet,
create an active junior league in
all associations, further technical
assistance fund to help with
equipment, training of officials,
coaches and players, more lucra-
tive prizes for championships,
profit sharing for the National
Round Robin Tournament, and
remember how heroes of yester-
year through several ventures
including a garden of remem-
brance and a “Recognition Day”
to recognise the stalwarts of the
association.”



MAW

IN 2007, ANEW ARTIST HAMED SOSA CAME
ON THE SCEWE AND QUICKLY BECAME ONE OF
THE MOST PROLIFIC MCS IN THE BAHAMAS. His

SB and raspy voice made his style nique and

Scribes Soda a5 “one of, # not the hottest ME an
the land. Most al you know him because of his.
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-
rs

Sp

TUESDAY, MAY 12,

PAGE 1



Minus Jr vs Pratt will b

m@ By RENALDO DORSETT
Sports Reporter
rdorsett@tribunemedia.net

erhaps the most storied

boxing rivalry in the

Bahamas will add

another chapter to its
legacy, this time not for a cham-
pionship title or bragging rights,
but to help the development of
the sport in their local communi-
ties.

Ray Minus Jr and Quincy Pratt
will resurrect their memorable
matches with a series of exhibi-
tion bouts to raise funds for both
Pratt’s Eastside Amateur Boxing
Club and Minus Jr’s Champion
Amateur Boxing Club.

The exhibitions will take a best
of seven series format with
venues alternating between both
fighters’ home training grounds.

Minus won the trilogy of fights
early in their careers — by TKO in
the sixth round in 1992, by a split
decision in 1999 and by a seventh
round TKO in 2000.

The series of four-round exhi-
bitions will begin on Saturday,
May 16, at the CABC training
grounds with the following fights
taking place in two week inter-
vals.

Well beyond their fighting days
and into their 40s (Minus-45,
Pratt-40), both fighters indicate
that they are in fighting shape and
are preparing to treat fans and
boxing enthusiasts to a new edi-
tion of the showdown, while

‘ts

2009



Felipé Major/Tribune staff

QUINCY PRATT (left) and RAY MINUS JR face off yesterday...

simultaneously assisting their pro-
grammes.

Pratt, who just recently estab-
lished his club in January, saw the
exhibition as an opportunity to
fund equipment after months of
frustrating organising ventures.

“T have not been able to get
any help from anyone, including
the Ministry of Youth Sports and
Culture so Ray and I decided to
come together to stage this best
out of seven showdown to raise
money to buy equipment for both
our clubs,” he said. “Every two
weeks we will host a four-round
exhibition. Our three historic bat-
tles will not be counted in this,
because I lost all three of them, so
they do not count. We know how
to fight boxers never lose their
fighting ability, we just lose con-
ditioning.”

Pratt says he looks forward to

Golfers are invited.

putting on a show for his home
crowd in the Fox Hill community
and his approximately 140 fight-
ers who have yet to see him apply
his craft.

“When we fight in Fox Hill it is
going to be a blockbuster. They
may cheat on Wulff Road, but in
Fox Hill they will not have a
chance, because for the first time
my people to see their hometown
boy fight, so I intend to show
them my best,” he said. “If I raise
enough money in Fox Hill I might
end the battle there, but if not I
will take him in four. The most
important thing is that these fights
are for a worthy cause and that is
to raise money for the youth of
this nation. Most of the guys I
train are excited because they
have never seen me fight, and
they are extremely geared up for
it.”



.

Pratt, who hosts his fighters at
the Urban Renewal building in
Fox Hill, said his ultimate goal is
to help many of the young men in
his community to find discipline
and purpose.

“It is heartbreaking to see the
disappointment in the guys some-
times. I started the club from
scratch. I have been scrambling
trying to find a place to set my
club up, but I need help. We need
assistance to save these young
men and get these young men in
Fox Hill off the park. On the park
we...cursing and all sorts of nega-
tive things going on and I just
want to do all I can to help these
guys. But I will not be discour-
aged, I'll just take it out on Minus
Saturday night,” he said. “This is
all about raising money for my
club. This is the first fight in the
Bahamas for a worthy cause, it is
for the youth and for their
growth. Every time we have
fought the places have been jam-
packed and if we can get half of
that and some financial support it
would go a long way. I had a hard
upbringing and boxing saved my
life, [just want to pass that along
to these young guys. I tell them
boxing is a way out, sports is a
way out. If you take a bad guy
and give them some discipline
and a vision there is no telling
how far they can go.”

Minus Jr said that the four
round exhibition will not have the
intensity of their previous encoun-
ters and both he and Pratt are

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Tampa, FL. In 2008, Sofa released the album ‘tty Cam
Palgn and embarked on a successful 5 show music se

fies resembling tha MTV Unplugged setting ower the
Summer im the Bahamas. In total SoS has sold &

distributed ower S000 albums and have packed
Guts an the Bahamas, United 5 :
‘while producing & organizing ewer 20

COmcerl panty events to promote his independ -

& Canada

ant releases. Locally So$a has revitalized the

region's independant musi
ing the first rap artist in fis. couniry to re
cave video play on Tempe. In 2007, Stypr
Production & Development Growp signed
Saga toa development contract. During
2008, STypz group has taken Sosa to

industry becom-

RYOSUKE IRIE leaves the blocks in the mens
4X100m medley relay during the 2009
Japan/Australia Duel in the Pool, at the Aus-
tralian Institute of Sport in Canberra, Australia
Sunday, May 10, 2009. Irie broke a world record
and set a time of one minute, 52.86 seconds,
beating the previous record, held by American
Ryan Lochte, by 1.08 seconds.

(AP Image: Mark Graham)

ready and in shape and set to put
on a show worthy of their legacy.

“T always stay in shape with the
guys I train so it keeps me in a bit
of shape. Of course I am not as
focused as I am when I was a
champion defending my title or
fighting for a title, but the expe-
rience is there. I believe that I
still can go in there and pull off a
win,” he said. “The three previous
times we fought we were sched-
uled for 12 rounds, now that we
are in a four rounder I have to
try to figure out how do I beat
Quincy down early, so I know it’s
a challenge. Both of us are excit-
ed, we are doing it for a good
cause and we want the public’s
support in coming out and sup-
porting us and the young boxers.”

Minus Jr said that while he
identifies with Pratt’s struggle in
beginning a club with little to no
support, he and the remainder of
the boxing community will do
their part to assist.

“My advice to Quincy was to
let us concentrate on what we can
do to make it better. Then if so
we will knock out doors to take it
further. We feel with the support
of the general public, knowing
the history of what we share, and
to bring that back we feel like it
will bring great funding and great
support with the promotion and
funding,” he said.

“It is a struggle getting a club
off the ground but I wanted the
community and Quincy to know
that they have help.”



Mees ei cia
3 ¢2 carved eatra cold |

=

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has been featiered ewer 20 times in local

newspapers, appeared on all of the popular
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local radip Stations. So$a is gearing up bor

witty dalwary and Swapger.” (Nassau, Bahanes
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So$a entered the music industry in the Bahamas
in 2006, Stabkshing a truly independent environ
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MAY 16, ©OO0S
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= ‘ |





PAGE 16, TUESDAY, MAY 12, 2009





OFFICERS MARCH to pay respect to the four Royal Bahamas Defence Force Marines who died in the incident.

Ceremony held to
remember HMBS
Flamingo marines

IN OBSERVANCE of the 29th
anniversary of the sinking of the HMBS
Flamingo by Cuban fighter jets, family
members of the four Royal Bahamas
Defence Force Marines who died in the
incident gathered yesterday for a brief
commemorative ceremony at the Coral
Harbour base.

Following the service, the families were
taken out by a Defence Force craft for
the laying of a wreath at sea in memory
of the vessel and her fallen crew.

On May 10, 1980, reports came from
Ragged Island that Cuban military jets
had sunk the 103-foot Marlin class
Defence Force vessel.

The four marines killed as a result of
the attack were Fenrick Sturrup, Austin
Smith, David Tucker and Edward
Williams.

The tragic incident unfolded after a
group of Cuban fishermen were stopped
by the crew of the Flamingo on suspi-
cion of illegally fishing in Bahamian
waters.

In the wake of the sinking, the Cuban
government said the pilots mistook the
Flamingo for a pirate ship harassing
Cuban fishermen.

Following the tragic incident, Cuba
offered an apology and agreed to pay
$5.4 million in compensation for the sink-
ing of the vessel and the death of the
four marines.

Speaking at the special ceremony,
Minister of Education Carl Bethel
described the sinking of the Flamingo as
a “momentous event” which left a lasting
mark on the Bahamas’ history.

Minister Bethel said: “No doubt the
greatest tragedy in the sinking of the

for a better life





DEFENCE FORCE COMMODORE Clifford Scavella with Minister of Education Carl Bethel

at the memorial.

HMBS Flamingo was the death of our
four marines. Commodore (Clifford)
Scavella, senior officers and officers and
marines of all ranks of the Defence
Force, we all join you in tribute to the
contribution made by the crew of the
Flamingo, those who survived the attack,
and those that did not.”

“Tt is now for us to etch them in our
recollection, as a family members, as col-
leagues, as friends, in our homes, in our
schools, in our institutions, and particu-
larly in the Royal Bahamas Defence
Force. We remember them as patriotic
Bahamians that gave their lives in service
of their country, and that will remain a
part of our history, both oral and writ-
ten.”

CALENDAR CONTEST

acelebration of nature —
45th anniversary calendar

CONTEST RULES

LOCAL NEWS

While Commodore Scavella said that
the Defence Force has been fortunate
not to have encountered any more direct
confrontations in the years following the
sinking of the Flamingo, Mr Bethel said
that the risk to the force has not dimin-
ished.

“Now, the threat to the Defence Force
and the Bahamas comes from predomi-
nantly trans-national criminal activity,
including illicit drugs and arms traffick-
ing, illegal immigration, and yes, poach-
ing in Bahamian waters, the problem that
gave rise to the Flamingo incident,” the
minister said.

Eight Cuban fishermen involved in the
incident were convicted of poaching in

1980. THE FAMILIES watch from onboard the Defence Force craft for the laying of a wreath at sea.

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THE TRIBUNE

MINISTER OF EDUCATION Carl ‘Bethel ene at the wall of remembrance at the
Defence Force base.

Wal

aed style

Srey

try i i=l * hem:












































Felipé Major/Tribune staff



ROYAL FIDELITY

Money at Work



THE TRIBUNE

isiness

2009

SECTION B « business@tribunemedia.net

$15m building cost hike if project not approved

m@ By NEIL HARTNELL

NASSAU OFFICE

(242) 356-9801

FREEPORT OFFICE

TUESDAY, (242) 351-3010

MAY 12,





* Agoregate prices for Bahamian construction industry to rise 300% if Bahama Rock’s area 4 Freeport harbour expansion fails to go ahead

Tribune Business Editor

likely 300 per cent increase in
aggregate material prices,
which would raise Bahamian

construction industry costs by $15 mil-
lion per annum, will be experienced if

* Non-approval would accelerate company’s departure from Bahamas, costing economy $64.168m over nine year's

Freeport Harbour’s proposed Area 4
expansion does not proceed, the projec-

t’s Environmental Impact Assessment

(EIA) has warned.

The study, prepared for Bahama Rock
by Freeport-based Envirologic Interna-
tional and a host of foreign consulting
firms, also warned that a failure to
approve the project would remove a “no

cost” harbour construction operation and
also lead to the company’s earlier depar-
ture from the Bahamas - a development
that could cost Freeport’s economy
$64.168 million in the nine years to 2018.

The EIA, a copy of which has been
obtained by Tribune Business, said that if

the Freeport Harbour area 4 expansion
was approved, Bahama Rock was
“expected to extend operations” until at
least 2018, thus maintaining its position as
“the largest supplier of construction
grade aggregate in the Bahamas”.
“Other economic impacts absent

Bahama Rock include a significant cost
escalation in providing construction grade
aggregates throughout the Common-
wealth of the Bahamas for all major
developments,”

“An estimated 300 per cent increase in
local Bahamian aggregate pricing could

the EIA said.

‘Too many’ firms lack $163.4m spending boost for Freeport
financial controls

m@ By NEIL HARTNELL
Tribune Business Editor

“TOO many” |#
Bahamian com-
panies - private as
well as public -
have failed to
provide the
resources and
infrastructure to
enable them to
produce timely
internal financial
reports, a leading
accountant charged yesterday, as
he told Tribune Business that his
company would have “no prob-
lem” meeting the draft Securities
Industry Act’s tighter reporting
deadlines once their clients were
up to speed.

Raymond Winder, Deloitte &
Touche (Bahamas) managing
partner, told Tribune Business:
“For too long, too many organi-
sations have not put in place the
resources and infrastructure that
gives them the ability to produce
quality financial statements. We
have not given it the attention
that we ought to have given it.”



Senior accountant says ‘no
problem’ meeting revised
Securities Act reporting
deadlines once quality, timely
internal systems in place

As a result, there were
Bahamian companies that were
simply unable to produce “quali-
ty financial statements on a time-
ly basis” because the internal sys-
tems - both personnel and infra-
structure - were either inefficient
or not up to par.

This, in turn, impacted the abil-
ity of external auditors to turn
around the audit and sign-off on a
company’s accounts, complete
with audit opinion, in a rapid
fashion.

“For too long, we’ve tolerated
and put up with accountants not
making the effort,” Mr Winder
told Tribune Business. In addi-
tion to putting the necessary
resources in place, he urged
Bahamian companies to replace

SEE page 4B

Bahamian visits to US grow 54%

m@ By CHESTER ROBARDS
Business Reporter
crobards@tribunemedia.net

BAHAMIAN visits to the US
increased by 54 per cent in Feb-
ruary 2009 compared to the same
month last year, and were up 68
per cent for the first two months,
according to statistics from the
US Department of Commerce
released yesterday.

These recent numbers have
some Bahamian travel agents per-
plexed, as they have not seen a
decrease in travel, but also have
not noticed a significant increase.

The data showed that the
Bahamas represented the largest
increase in visitor arrivals to the
US, making it the “top visitation
market from the Caribbean
region”.

According to the Department’s
release, the US saw a 12 per cent
decline in international visitations
in February this year, compared
to 2008 figures for the same peri-
od. They also realized $10.1 bil-
lion in visitor spending in Febru-
ary 2009, down 13 per cent from

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Some Bahamian travel agents
say they are not quite sure of the
accuracy of the numbers, as they
have seen a steady flow of busi-
ness - but not a huge jump in
demand.

General Manager of Premier
Travel, Joy Burrows, said the
answer to the high number of
Bahamian travellers could be that
the economic downturn has not
been as bad as previously pre-
dicted.

She said price competition
between the airlines, especially
those that fly to Florida, were
keeping fares within reach of the
average Bahamian.

“They might not go to New
York or Boston, but they can
afford to go to Florida,” said Ms
Burrows. “Though people are out
of jobs, not the entire Bahamas is
suffering.”

SEE page 3B

craly decorated and re

5.410 aq, &, hoene features apacious verandahs, c-

@ By NEIL HARTNELL
Tribune Business Editor

SOME $163.4 million in total
spending will flow into the Grand
Bahama economy over a nine-
year period until 2018, the Envi-
ronmental Impact Assessment
(EIA) for the Freeport Harbour
area 4 expansion project has
revealed, with Bahama Rock’s
payroll expanding by $22.8 mil-
lion to $58 million if the devel-
opment is approved.

The EIA study said the projec-
t’s go-ahead would extend
Bahama Rock’s stay in Grand
Bahama until 2018, securing its
85 jobs for at least that period.
The company’s current annual
payroll was $5.8 million, while 30
indirect employees whose jobs
relied on the Martin Marietta
subsidiary received a further $1.1
million in combined annual
salaries.

However, the study said that if
the area 4 expansion was not
approved, Bahama Rock would
have to remove its large electrical
dragline from Grand Bahama and
redeploy it within the Martin
Marietta infrastructure within two
years.

This would reduce Bahama
Rock’s aggregate production by
35 per cent immediately, and
result in falling employment, with
all 85 direct jobs eliminated by
2016.

“It is estimated that Bahama
Rock’s annual expenditures rep-
resent almost 1 per cent of total
gross domestic product (GDP)
for the Bahamas as a whole, when
excluding tourism and the finan-
cial services,” the EJA said. For
2007, it reported that the compa-
ny had injected $16.211 million

Make ita

* Pension Plans

* Mutual Funds

Study’s go-ahead to generate $50m for Grand
Bahama Power, $24.6m for FOCOL

into the Freeport economy.

“Bahama Rock is the third
largest consumer of power in
Grand Bahama, and is responsi-
ble for approximately 10 per cent
of Grand Bahama Power Com-
pany’s revenue,” the ETA added.

“Bahama Rock spent $5.131
million in 2006, $4.927 million in
2007 for power consumption and
energy, and is estimated to exceed
$6 million in 2008.”

With the rock plant and large
dragline accounting for 96 per
cent of Bahama Rock’s electrical
consumption, the study said that
if area 4 was approved and exca-
vation continued at the present
pace, its energy needs would
remain constant until at least
2018.

“One of the main recipients of
Bahama Rock spending, Grand
Bahama Power, would continue
to bill approximately $5-$6 mil-
lion per year, totalling in excess of
$50 million in revenue over the
10-year period,” the EIA found.

“The Freeport Oil Company
would likewise receive $24.4 mil-
lion of revenue over the same 10-
year period, based on 2007 pric-
ing.”

"and the study added: “To date,
Bahama Rock has provided
equivalent harbour construction
dredge value of approximately
$750 million.

“The harbour would simply not
exist as a large and modern deep-
water port without the win-win
arrangement currently in place
with Bahama Rock. It is also esti-

reality.

* Stock Brokerage

* Corporate Finance

* Investment Management

* Trusts & Estate Planning

° Personal Pension Plan Accounts

* Education Investment Accounts

mated that area 3, area 4 and the
West Channel development
would contribute an additional
$750 million in conventional
dredge value.

“To the community, area 4 pro-
vides potential increases in real
estate values, reductions in traffic
congestion and direct spending
benefits to Grand Bahama Island
of an additional $64.2 million,
including 334 additional man
years of direct employment, and
an estimated $6.3 million in infra-
structure improvements over the
10-year period ending in 2018.”

Bahama Rock had invested
over $100 million in Freeport
since 2001, and failing to approve
the area 4 expansion would leave
it unable “to sustain minimum
economic production levels for
the advancement and completion
of the Freeport Harbour Master
Plan.

“This expansion and excava-
tion will increase harbour capac-
ity and contribute to increased
business activity. The area 4
basin, with harbour connection,
will transform a terrestrial envi-
ronment into valuable waterfront
property. The potential develop-
ment will enable small business
persons and pleasure craft owners
access for the first time through a
private harbour, while entitled to
all the benefits derived from Port
Authority licensing.”

A $1.428 million highway rate
of way would also be constructed
through Bahama Rock’s proper-

ty.

* Foreign developers would be hit, as firm supplies aggregate for all major projects, including 100% of New Providence’s needs
* ‘The future availability of a domestic supply of aggregate, or conversely, importation, is an issue needing further evaluation
by policymakers and those in the construction industry’

be expected, and would add approxi-
mately $15 million to the annual con-
struction sector costs.

“Finally, the excavation and expan-
sion of the harbour would likely cease.

SEE page 4B

Correction

IN the lead story in Mon-
day’s Business section,
“$15m makeover builds key
business location”, read
that “The Old city lumber
yard, which met its end by
fire several years ago....”
The Lumberyard which
met its end was the old
Bahamian Lumberyard.

In the same story, it was
said that a donation of 14
Dialysis machines was
made to Doctor’s Hospital.

The 14 Dialysis machines
were, in fact, donated to the
Princess Margaret Hospi-



The information contained is from a third
party and The Tribune can not be held
responsible for errors and/or omission
from the daily report.



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PAGE 2B, TUESDAY, MAY 12, 2009

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THE TRIBUNE

Mind the ‘brain drain’
costs for our economy

THE ‘graduation season’ is
upon us once again, with thou-
sands of newly-minted high
school graduates and college
graduates (from both domestic
and foreign institutions) set to
descend upon the fragile job mar-
ket seeking employment oppor-
tunities. Notwithstanding the del-
uge of potential workers from
which to choose, I still hear busi-
ness owners complain that they
cannot find qualified applicants
from among whom they can hire
new employees.

Quantity versus Quality

There is certainly a paradox
existing in our labour markets,
where we seemingly have a
detachment between quantity and
quality. I know for a fact that
there are thousands of young
Bahamians looking for employ-
ment but, sadly, many are not
even qualified for the most basic
entry-level jobs. Many of our
youngsters lack communication
skills (basic reading, writing and
speaking skills), basic mathemat-
ical skills and, finally, social skills.

On the other side of the ledger,
one must ask the logical question:
“What about our college gradu-
ates?” It seems like growing num-
bers of our students studying
abroad are happy to remain
abroad indefinitely. This is the so
called ‘brain drain’ effect, which
in a more precise way is defined
as: “The loss of skilled intellec-
tual and technical labour through
the movement of such labour to
more favourable geographic, eco-
nomic or professional environ-
ments”.

Brain drain, fact or fiction

In January 2006, the IMF pub-
lished a working paper entitled
Emigration and Brain Drain: Evi-
dence from the Caribbean. This
study indicated that between 1965
and 2000, approximately 58 per
cent of Bahamians educated at
college level migrated to the US.
When the list of countries was
expanded to include member
countries of the Organisation for
Economic Cooperation and
Development (OECD), the
Bahamas’ number grew to 61 per
cent.

Is it really as much
as 61 per cent?
I must admit that I found this

Financial
Focus

statistic to be shocking because
my perception (and the percep-
tion of persons with whom I inter-
act regularly) was that while there
is undoubtedly a growing num-
ber of Bahamians remaining
abroad after completing college,
the majority still return home to
build their future.

I graduated from St Anne’s
High School in 1975, and I believe
that I can readily account for
about 95 per cent of my graduat-
ing year (those who came back
home after completing their ter-
tiary education and/or profes-
sional qualifications). A colleague
of mine, who graduated from high
school in 1987, estimated that
some 15 per cent of her graduat-
ing year remained abroad.

Finally, in an attempt to get a
more current feel for the situa-
tion, I talked to several of my
peers who have children in uni-
versities abroad. The consensus
was that in the best case scenario,
they seemed to be very ‘open-
minded’ about the prospects of
settling and working abroad. In
the worst case scenario, many had
no intention of returning home
in the foreseeable future. The lat-
ter view especially applied to
graduates in technical, scientific
and specialised fields, where they
indicate that they have little real
alternative but to consider emi-
gration as there are no job oppor-
tunities available - now or in the
foreseeable future - in the
Bahamas in those fields.

While the above observations
are not scientific but purely anec-
dotal, I began to come to grips
with the possibility that 58 per
cent may indeed be a reasonable
number.

The costs of Emigration

Most of the tertiary-educated
Bahamians are trained abroad,
mainly in the United States and
Canada. The majority of the
direct costs are borne by a com-
bination of family; government
scholarships and loans; and pri-
vate scholarships. If we assume

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that the average cost of a four-
year college/university pro-
gramme is about $80,000 to
$100,000, for an economy like the
Bahamas to lose 58 per cent of
this category of future workers is
most significant indeed. From a
macroeconomic standpoint, this
significant investment in educa-
tion is yielding a less than opti-
mum return for the Bahamas.

Furthermore, if the majority of
our immigrant population is
unskilled it is no wonder that we
seem to be in a perpetual open-
ended training mode.

Clearly, this is not a sustain-
able position for the country, as it
implies that we are paying twice
for the same skilled labour — the
cost of educating our children,
and the relatively higher cost of
expatriate labor (which often
includes housing, transportation
and children’s education costs).

Could this promote

mediocrity?

Another fundamental question
we must ask ourselves is: If we
are losing about 60 per cent of
our most highly-trained citizens,
are we setting ourselves up to
allow mediocrity to rise to the
top, as emigration weakens com-
petition and perhaps robs us of
some of our brighter students? I
do not know the answer to these
questions, but it must be placed
on the table for discussion.

The long-term implications of
the IMF study, as it relates to the
Bahamas, suggest that in addition
to a brain drain we will be in a
constant cycle of importing peo-
ple with technical/specialist skills.
To continuously encourage new
investment and maintain the lev-
el of investment that has already
occurred, it is most important that
we have a well-trained, globally-
competitive, indigenous work-
force — both technical and non-
technical.

The great contradiction

At the bottom end, we have a
secondary school education sys-
tem producing graduates pos-
sessing a D+ average in national
BGCSE examinations and, at the
top end, creditable studies tell us
that roughly 60 per cent of our
top and best-trained students may
not return home. We are being

SEE page 4B

FIRSTCARIBBEAN

INTERNATIONAL BANK

GET THERE. TOGETHER.

FirstCaribbean International Bank is a member of the CIBC Group.





THE TRIBUNE



TUESDAY, MAY 12, 2009, PAGE 3B



Film maker says
four productions
yet to turn profit

lm By CHESTER ROBARDS
Business Reporter
crobards@tribunemedia.net

BAHAMIAN filmmaker Celi
Moss is pushing ahead with two
new productions slated to pre-
mier at this year’s Bahamas Film
Festival, despite four unprofitable
films, including one entitled ‘Balls



Real Estate |}

Alley’, which cost an estimated
$50,000 to make and brought him
local acclaim.

One of the films, which is in its
pre-production stages, called ‘My
MP’, will feature a Member of
Parliament called Mr Brown -
loosely based on Immigration
Minister Branville McCArtney -
“who has sought to represent his

constituents in a proper manner.”.

According to Mr Moss, the
main character in the movie
wants to show the Bahamian peo-
ple and his colleagues what true
representation is.

The production of the film is
being underwritten by Mr Moss’s
production company, Yeah Man
Entertainment, while the script

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TAX & THE CHANGING
GLOBAL LANDSCAPE

The Bahamas Financial Service Board (BFSB) has
undertaken an examination of the impact of tax on
the financial services industry, and to assist in the
formulation of a strategic response to developments in
the marketplace.

BFSB invites financial institutions, professional services firms and
industry associations to a presentation on a no-direct tax model

and a direct tax model and to participate in a discussion on the
benefits that can accrue to the industry from warious tax, trade

A WORKSHOP ON



and investment arrangements.

We encourage all industry stakenolders to attend this important
meeting to make yourself aware of the various options and to
engape in this dialogue on sustainable development of our sector.

Date:
Time:
Location:
Cost:

Please confirm attendance by contacting BFSB at
info@bfsb-bahamas.com, or by calling our office at 326 7001.

Friday, May 15, 2009
12:00 p.m. - 4:00 p.m.

British Colonial Hilton Hotel

$40 (including lunch)



is being written by members of
The Bamboo Town Film Club
(TBTFC).

Mr Moss said he hopes this
movie, the first of its kind in the
Bahamas, will inspire young film-
makers to bring their ideas to
fruition.

“T’m interested in using it as
vehicle to get more drama into
schools,” he said. “If you don’t
have positive programmes you'll
have negative energy. It’s all
about moulding new minds.”

According to him, the film
industry in the Bahamas is con-
tinuing to grow, and he insists
that government should get film-
making into different constituen-
cies and schools.

“T would like to see other con-
stituencies start their own film
clubs,” Mr Moss said.

TBTFC hopes to have their
movie complete by November.
Mr Moss said an open casting call
held last Saturday was not well
attended. However, he said as a
filmmaker he works with the cast
he is given.

According to him, because
there is typically little to no mon-
ey put into his movies, all of the
cast members own the film and
will receive royalties should the
film turn a profit.

“Everybody who is a part of
the movie is part owner,” Mr
Moss said.

He lamented that “none have
paid any bills yet”.

‘My MP’ is to expected to
include cameos by several actual
MPs and an appearance by radio
talk show host Ortland Bodie.

Mr Moss is confident that the
film will be well received by view-
ers, as well as his other film now
in production, ‘Dear Mama’,
which is about a mother advocat-
ing for justice when her son’s
killer gets out on bail.

“T want to deal with the crime
situation,” he said.

Bahamian visits to US grow 54%

FROM page 1B

She said US Commerce
Department figures were col-
lected during a traditionally
slow month for Bahamian trav-
el, but she was eager to see
what the busy summer months
will bring.

Ms Burrows said Bahamians
have recently been purchasing
vacations last minute, a trend
that seems to have been born
out of the financial crisis, and
has made hotel and airline
occupancies virtually unpre-
dictable.

“The Easter run was a lot of

—_
NAD

Nassau Airport
Dovelapmont Company

last minute bookings,” she said.
“We always encourage people
to book early, otherwise you
get stuck with a high air fare.”
Ms Burrows said individuals
still come to travel agencies for
vacation bookings, and con-
tends that 70 per cent of
Bahamian travellers purchase
fights through a travel agent.
She said that although ticket
purchases on the Internet was a
growing trend, especially with
young adults, older persons still
trust the expertise and experi-
ence of a travel agent when
planning a trip. “People can
even call us at home to sort
them out,” said Ms Burrows.

PRICE INQUIRY

P-130 Supply & Delivery of
Chillers and Heat Exchangers

Nassau Arport Development Company (NAD has a
requirement for the Supely and Delivery of four, (Gy. 4), 850
fon chillers and four, (by. 4), heal exchangers in
accordance with the required schedule and specifications

tor complebon of Stage

Vand Stage 2 of the LPIA Expansion

Project. Thes is a Supply and Delivery only contract.

Price Inquiry Packages will be available fer pick up after
1:00 pm, on Wedneeday, May 6th, 2008.

Price Inquiry closing is Thursday, June 11th, 2009 at
3:00 pm Bahamas Time

THE AIRPORT AUTHORITY

(ontact: Tres rea
(Contract & Procurement Manager

LIPLA Exepameaon Prey eact

Ph: (242) TOE-0086 | Fem: (242) S772
PC) Bo AP SS229, Messe, Bahamas
Gena: traci brshyiiires bs



LYNDEN PINDLING INTERNATIONAL ATRPORT

P.O. BOX AP-59222

NASSAU, BAHAMAS

REQUEST FOR PROPOSALS (RFP)

FOR FIRE TRUCK

The Airport Authority invites bids for the acquisition of a modem

fire engine for its Crash

Pindling International Airport.

Fire Rescue operations at the Lynden

Specifications can be collected from the Executive Offices of the
Airport Authority, Lynden Pindling International Airport during
normal working hours at any time after the appearance of this RFP

Bids must meet all specifications.

Bids not in compliance with the specifications will be rejected.
Bids must be signed by an individual duly authorized to bind the
bidder to the terms of a contract. Price must include any and all
shipping charges associated with delivery of the apparatus to

Nassau, The Bahamas.

Bids must be submitted by 30th June, 2009 at 11:00am at the men-
tioned address:

General Manager
Executive Offices
Airport Authority
Lynden Pindling International Airport
Nassau, Bahamas

+ BAHAMAS
SN FINANCIAL
SERVICES BOARD

and must be marked:
BIDS FOR FIRE TRUCK







PAGE 4B, TUESDAY, MAY 12, 2009

THE TRIBUNE



SSS SSS ————— Ee
$15m building cost hike if project not approved

Mind the ‘brain
‘drain’ costs for

our economy
FROM page 1B

greatly disadvantaged at both
ends of the spectrum.

Does this reality require a
national bipartisan approach to
finding a solution? I certainly sub-
mit, along with most ‘right think-
ing’ Bahamians, that it does. We
simply cannot build a new
Bahamas that can compete in
today’s world with a substandard
work force.

Conclusion

We need to move with haste
to establish a National Labour
Needs Assessment Bank
(NLNAB) that will assist us with
future planning. We need to
know how many trained persons
we have by skill category, how
many are in the training pipeline
and, most importantly, how many
are we anticipating that we will
need within the next 10 and 15
years, respectively.

The results from the NLNAB
will allow us to direct future grad-
uates towards areas of need, and
to retain a higher percentage of
our graduates if they can be
assured of job opportunities.
Finally, it should aid in helping
to raise the overall level of pro-
ductivity in the workplace.

Until next week...

NB: Larry R. Gibson, a Char-
tered Financial Analyst, is vice-
president - pensions, Colonial
Pensions Services (Bahamas), a
wholly-owned subsidiary of Colo-
nial Group International, which
owns Atlantic Medical Insurance
and is a major shareholder of
Security & General Insurance
Company in the Bahamas.

The views expressed are those
of the author and do not neces-
sarily represent those of Colonial
Group International or any of its
subsidiary and/or affiliated com-
panies. Please direct any ques-
tions or comments to rlgib-
son@atlantichouse.com.bs

FROM page 1B

Conventional dredging can cost
more than $30 per cubic yard, and
require specialised environmental
containment. Bahama Rock is a
‘no cost’ harbour operation with-
out the added problem of dredge
spoils storage and disposal. The
expectation is that Freeport Har-
bour would not likely be enlarged
beyond the current size due to
these issues.”

And the report added: “An
important long-term government
policy question will be raised
sooner rather than later if
Bahama Rock reduces aggregate
supply.

“Bahama Rock supplies New
Providence, through an agree-
ment with a Nassau-based con-
tractor, with 100 per cent of all
coarse aggregate needs. Taking a
long-term viewpoint, the Bahama
Rock operation is finite, and once
the harbour expansion ceases,
Bahama Rock will depart.

“The future availability of a
domestic supply of aggregate, or

FIRMS, from 1B

internal accountants that were
not doing their job.

“As an audit firm, we do not
have a problem meeting these
[Securities Industry Act] stan-
dards once the quality internal
financial data are up to standard,”
Mr Winder said.

His comments came in
response to Tribune Business
questions over the revised pub-
lic company financial reporting
timeframes unveiled in the draft
Securities Industry Act regula-
tion, which were released to the
sector and general public for con-
sultation on Friday.

The draft regulations require
public companies to file their
audited financial statements with
the Securities Commission some
90 days after the relevant year-
end. That makes for a tighter
deadline than the present 120
days allowed for publication

it

NOTICE is hereby given

that KERLINE SAMA of

NASSAU VILLAGE, P.O. BOX SS-19753, NASSAU, BAHAMAS, is
applying to the Minister responsible for Nationality and Citizenship,
for registration/naturalization as a citizen of The Bahamas, and that
any person who knows any reason why registration/naturalization
should not be granted, should send a written and signed statement
of the facts within twenty-eight days from the 5" day of May, 2009
to the Minister responsible for nationality and Citizenship, P.O. Box

N-7147, Nassau, Bahamas.

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Sterile Surgical Gloves size 7 1/2, 8, 8 1/2,

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conversely, importation, is an
issue needing further evaluation
by policymakers and those in the
construction industry.”

Bahama Rock, which is a
Bahamian subsidiary of US
aggregate/quarrying materials
giant, Martin Marietta, was said
by the EIA to produce five mil-
lion tonnes of aggregate per year
- some 20 times’ the next avail-
able supply.

It supplied the Bahamian con-
struction industry with some
812,364 tonnes of aggregate in
2006, with some 218,983 tonnes
of that used in Grand Bahama.

“Bahama Rock supplies all
construction grade aggregate for
Bahamian anchor projects, and
has supplied 100 per cent of mate-
rials for all three phases of the
Paradise Island Atlantis develop-
ment,” the EJA said.

“As other anchor projects are
scheduled to come online in
Grand Bahama and New Provi-
dence in the future, Bahama
Rock will be the key supplier of
low cost, high quality construc-

under BISX rules.

Furthermore, public companies
will have only 45 days from the
relevant period’s end to file their
unaudited interim financial state-
ments. This will be 50 per cent
less time than the current 90 days
they are allowed. Annual reports,
including management’s discus-
sion and analysis, must also be
filed with the Securities Commis-
sion some 90 days after year-end.

The Bahamas International
Securities Exchange (BISX) had
previously proposed changes to
filing deadlines in its own BISX
Rules, seeking to reduce the time-
lines for full year and interim
financial publication from 120
days and 90 days, to 90 days ands
60 days, respectively.

These BISX Rules changes
have yet to be approved, and it is
likely they will now take a back
seat to the Securities Industries
Act and regulations reforms, fol-
lowing them.



tion aggregate and marine rock
armour. This is particularly rele-
vant if the approved projects are
in construction simultaneously.”

The EIA referred to a Febru-
ary 18, 2008, letter from the
Mosko Group, which detailed
“the importance of having a high
quality supply of domestic aggre-
gates available to meet the con-
struction needs in Nassau and
throughout the Bahamas”.

Therefore, failure to approve
the 192-acre Freeport Harbour
expansion would have an
extremely negative impact for
both the Bahamian construction
industry and this nation’s ability
to attract foreign direct invest-
ment from real estate develop-
ers, given the likely increase in
building costs.

The EIA said: “Area 4 will
allow Bahama Rock to continue
to provide a reliable, convenient
and economic supply of building
materials, which are key to the
Bahamian residential and com-
mercial construction industry.”

It listed the company’s ability

In its explanation of the
reforms, the Securities Commis-
sion said the “continuous disclo-
sure requirements for listed com-
panies” on BISX were being
expanded to “all public compa-
nies”, meaning that firms such as
Bahamas Supermarkets - listed
on the over-the-counter market
- would also be expected to toe
the line.

Franklyn Wilson, chairman of
Arawak Homes and Sunshine
Holdings, and the largest investor
in BISX-listed FOCOL Holdings,
yesterday suggested to Tribune
Business that the proposed Secu-
rities Industry Act amendments
would lay down a “challenge” to
his previous profession - the
accountants.

“Can they deliver the [audit-
ed] accounts in time,” he ques-
tioned. “T think it’s going to put
more pressure on the accounting
profession. All I get is a sense
that they are pressured. I get the

Legal Notice

NOTICE
PINK SHELLS HOLDINGS LTD.

(In Voluntary Liquidation)





Notice is hereby given that the above-named
Company is in dissolution, which commenced
on the 29th day of April 2009. The Liquidator is
Argosa Corp. Inc., P.O. Box N-7757 Nassau,

Bahamas.

ARGOSA CORP. INC.
(Liquidator)

we

Bakers Dan

EMPLOYMENT OPPORTUNITY

You are invited to apply for the following position
currently available.

Assistant Marketing Manager

Key Requirements

* Ademonstrated track record of sales to high net

worth clients

Extensive experience maintaining strong long term

customer relationships with significant add-on/repeat

business

A strong existing network with high net worth clients in
the U.S.A. , Europe and The Bahamas
Ability to develop and implement marketing

campaigns to high net worth clients

Qualifications

Bachelor’s degree in Sales, Marketing or related

subject; professional certifications

Minimum five (5) years experience in high net worth

real estate promotions

Must be proficient in C2C software, ACT, Power

Point, Microsoft Word, Excel and Asset Manager

Must be innovative, demonstrate strong leadership

and customer relations skills

Must have excellent written and verbal

communication skills

The successful candidate will have the opportunity to work
in a growing and dynamic organization and must be a self-

to “provide continuous supply of
high quality and low cost aggre-
gates for nearly 100 per cent of all
new construction requirements
for the Commonwealth of the
Bahamas.

“The existence of Bahama
Rock allows for the preservation
of the natural relief in New Prov-
idence and the Family Islands as
the affordable, convenient, sin-
gle source Bahamian aggregate
supplier.”

The area 4 expansion, already
agreed via a Memorandum of
Understanding (MoU) between
Bahama Rock and the Freeport
Harbour Company, the latter of
which is owned 50/50 by Port
Group Ltd and Hutchison
Whampoa, will create a 135-acre
excavated basin immediately to
the west of the Freeport Con-
tainer Port and Bahama Cement
property.

Land usage, the EIA said,
would be altered through the
area’s transformation into a mari-
na, recreational areas with a boat
launch, bridge view and highway

impression things are not easy for
them. As a client, the problem of
turnover of staff is an issue for
them. I get the impression it’s not
easy.”

The proposed deadlines were
not “unreasonable”, Mr Wilson
added, explaining: “Investors
need the numbers in a timely
manner. The utility of them
decreases with every passing day,
week, month.”

He said, though, that the 90-
day deadline for filing annual
reports, complete with manage-
ment discussion and analysis,
“may not be realistic”, given the
need for external auditors to com-
plete and the two-to-three weeks
to get the document printed.

Mr Winder, though, said: “The
deadline is not an onerous prob-
lem for the profession, once an
organisation has proper internal
controls and its internal accounts
are being prepared on a timely
basis.”

If external auditors had to
make numerous adjustments to
the internal accounts they were
presented with, the audit time and
costs would increase.

overlook.

The Bahama Rock proposal,
the study said, would enable the
Freeport Harbour - and the busi-
nesses it supports, such as the
Container Port and Grand
Bahama Shipyard, to match the
depths currently being dug in the
Panama Canal expansion and its
addition of a third lock system.

“The Bahama Rock operation
presents an advantage to Grand
Bahama over competing ports by
matching these depths at ‘no
cost’,” the EJA said.

“The advantage would be the
ability to receive post-Panamex
vessels by the Container Port
along the west channel, allowing
the next generation of 18-metre
draft vessels to utilise Freeport
Harbour. This has the potential to
position Grand Bahama for fur-
ther economic growth over the
next 50 years, facilitating possi-
ble mega-port status.

“If area 4 expansion is
approved, Bahama Rock is
expected to extend operations
through at least 2018.”

Mr Winder, though, urged
Bahamian accountants and their
firms to “make tremendous
efforts to produce quality finan-
cial statements on a timely basis”
and match - even exceed - global
best practices and standards.

He added that the Organisa-
tion for Economic Co-Operation
and Development (OECD), in its
demands for greater “transparen-
cy’ from international financial
centres, was looking at their abil-
ity to produce quality accounting
information.

“As more and more organisa-
tions look at the Bahamas as a
place to reside, and for them to
have some aspect of their back
office operations here - the
invoicing and accounting - the
accounts have to come up to stan-
dard, or the work will switch to
other jurisdictions,” Mr Winder
said.

As a result, he urged compa-
nies not to hold on to accountants
who did not want to have the job,
as there were “lots of bright
young people in the pipeline;
young Bahamians waiting in the
wings”.

NOTICE

NOTICE is hereby given that BOLIE EDWARD LLOYD of
ST. ANDREW BEACH ESTATES, P.O. BOX EE-17273,
is applying to the Minister responsible for Nationality and
Citizenship, for registration/naturalization as a citizen of The
Bahamas, and that any person who knows any reason why
registration/naturalization should not be granted, should
send a written and signed statement of the facts within
twenty-eight days from the 12° day of May, 2009 to the
Minister responsible for nationality and Citizenship, P.O. Box

N-7147, Nassau, Bahamas.

NOTICE is hereby given that MARCNER IZMA of PINEDALE,
EIGHT MILE ROCK, GRAND BAHAMA, BAHAMAS P.O. BOX
F2197 is applying to the Minister responsible for Nationality and
Citizenship, for registration/naturalization as a citizen of The
Bahamas, and that any person who knows any reason why
registration/ naturalization should not be granted, should send a
written and signed statement of the facts within twenty-eight days
from the 4TH day of MAY, 2009 to the Minister responsible for
Nationality and Citizenship, PO.BoxN-7147, Freeport, Bahamas.

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performance, and meet deadlines. If you are progressive
and prepared to advance your career, submit your resume
to the attention of:The Director of HR & Training, hr@
bakersbayclub.com or by fax at 242-367-0613

Deadline for Application/resume is May 18th, 2009

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PAGE 6B, TUESDAY, MAY 12, 2009

THE TRIBUNE







The Tribune

B

O Di

A N D



©

coe! N OD



ith





@ By ALEX MISSICK
Tribune Features Reporter
amissick@tribunemedia.net

BEAUTY and self confidence
are attributes that are
extremely important to a
woman living in the 21st cen-
tury involving everything from
the latest makeup craze, to
the shaping and sculpting of
what they feel is the perfect
body including breast size.

Many women feel that having
smaller breasts limits their sex
appeal and choices in the clothes
they wear.

Bahamian men do not make hav-
ing smaller busts any easier on the
women because most of them gener-
ally prefer a voluptuous, busty
woman. This has led some women
here in the Bahamas, to go under the
knife and have a Breast Augmenta-
tion- surgically getting implants to
increase bust size.

The procedure is used to enlarge a
naturally small breast most common-
ly the result or heredity, to restore
breast volume lost following preg-
nancy as a result of breast feeding or
weight loss or to achieve better sym-
metry when breasts are moderately
disproportionate in size and shape
health officials say.

Board Certified Plastic Surgeon,
Doctor Gregory Neil, said the vast
majority of his patients have already
had children who breastfed, or they
always had very small breasts and

a

want to fill out their breasts.

“They are very well adjusted, suc-
cessful, intelligent ladies who want a
little improvement of how their
clothes fit. The vast majority of these
women take very good care of them-
selves and are fit as a fiddle. They
work out, are not run down, over-
weight and are toned, but they just
need their breasts taken care of,” Dr
Neil said.

Perfect candidates

He said that a candidate for
surgery would be a woman that is
physically in tuned, spiritually, emo-
tionally settled with a good support
system and a certain level of under-
standing about the procedure.

“The Bahamian population at
most is very sophisticated and almost
everything new in plastic surgery
they have done their research. So
when they come in, they know most
of what they need to know and my
job is just to talk to them about the
options, weighing the risks and bene-
fits. If the benefits outweighs the
risks then we go ahead with the
surgery,” Dr Neil said.

Dr Neil said during the procedure,
he tries not to put any scarring on
the breasts to achieve the most nat-
ural effect.

“T put a half an inch incision under
the arm and go underneath the pec-
toral muscle- God put a space there
for plastic surgery and that’s where
we place the implant. I roll the emp-
ty implant into the shape of a ciga-
rette, slip it underneath the muscle
and then inflate it. It is the best tech-
nique because there is no scaring of
the breast. We use the best implants

a

Theep

MK sKelE





SIZC

because I think if you are going to
have the procedure done you should
use the best so that it can last you a
lifetime. A breast implant should
look and feel natural. If you want to
get pregnant, it should not impair
your ability to breast feed,” Dr Neil
said.

Personal account

Twenty one year old Katrina
Scott*, said although it seems to be
‘taboo’ for most women in the
Bahamas to talk about the proce-
dure and why they had it done, she
knew having a breast augmentation
would help with her self esteem and
was a priority at that time in her life.

“T got my implants at the age of 17
because I had asymmetrical breasts.
This means that one of my breasts
developed faster than the other and
it became noticeable. The doctors
had been observing the development
since puberty and realised that the
smaller one would never catch up in
size to the other. I wore artificial
inserts in my bra for years and
changed the size to balance it out.
The doctor said that at age 18 or
when I was mentally ready for the
surgery he would doit. At 17, I was
ready so he made the exception after
much consultation. I then had to
have one breast reduced and
implanted and the small breast just
implanted. The reason for the
reduction was to ensure that later on
that the natural drop of one breast
would not be so noticeable as the
implanted breast would always be
perky,” Ms Scott said.

Ms Scott said after the surgery,
her breasts were painful and limited

her from doing anything with her
arms. Her mother did everything for
her including giving her baths. It
was important that she remained
immobile to ensure proper healing.
Ms Scott wore a special bra for
almost 6 months after so that the
implants would sit in the right place.

“As my implants were considered
medically necessary because it hada
psychological effect on me, there
were few cons. My surgery was
more involved because of the reduc-
tion of one and as a result the nip-
ples had to be repositioned. The
doctor gave comprehensive explana-
tions using charts and drawings to
explain what would happen. He also
demonstrated the strength of the
implant to guarantee no leaking and
the size of the implants are a C cup.
The size of the breasts are fine as it
may fluctuate as I gain or loose
weight. I also now have a lifetime
warranty with serial numbers in the
event that anything goes wrong,” Ms
Scott said.

Ms Scott said her parents support-
ed her 100 per cent as it took two
operations and two summers to com-
plete the procedure.

“They Gmplants) make me feel a
lot better. As I became aware of my
body the problem affected me.
Being self conscious of my breasts
even affected my posture as I tried
to divert the attention from my
imperfect chest. So it was a neces-
sary procedure for my mental well
being,” Ms Scott said.

Dr Neil said the cost of implants
can fluctuate depending on the pro-
cedure.

“Tf you do not fall into the catego-
ry of a certain patient, then your cost



|

The Bahamian
population at most is
very sophisticated

and almost everything
new in plastic surgery
they have done their
research. So when
they come in, they
know most of what they
need to know and my
job is just to talk to
them about the options,
weighing the risks

and benefits.

| DR GREGORY NEIL

can differ. The implants alone can
cost a little more than $1,000. For
persons who only need a breast
implant, they can look to spend less
then $5,000 for everything,” Dr Neil
said.

Ms Scott said she wants young
girls in the Bahamas to embrace
what they have in terms of their bod-
ies.

“T don’t feel that small breasts is a
good reason for such an invasive
procedure. However, if it becomes a
situation that affects how you func-
tion in your day to day life then cor-
rect it. Mental well being is impor-
tant to living the best life you can,”
she said.

* Name has been changed

Your body’s talking... Are you listening?

AN AMERICAN special-
ist in massage therapy will be
visiting the Bahamas to offer
free classes for “non-invasive,
scientifically based energy
healthcare” called the
BodyTalk System.

Licensed massage therapist,
certified neuromuscular ther-
apist and Reiki master Jeanne
Ellis of Palm Beach will be in
the Nassau next month to
teach classes which she says
are designed to improve the
quality of life for participants.

According to practitioners,
the BodyTalk System, devel-
oped by Dr John Veltheim,
follows the body’s guidance
directly to the place that needs

attention. “The body has its
own intelligence which coor-
dinates thousands of simulta-
neously occurring functions,
organising the organs,
endocrines, and other major
systems. You don't run your
body, this intelligence does,” a
recent press release stated.

“A BodyTalk Practitioner
can communicate with this
innate wisdom and ‘remind’
the body what needs to hap-
pen in order to heal. The body
also knows when it is no
longer able to heal on its own,
and can alert a practitioner
when medical attention is
needed.”

Ms Ellis said she learnt

about the BodyTalk System
in 1996 and has since been
dedicated to sharing the pro-
gramme’s methods.

Prior to discovering
BodyTalk, she said she knew
that other healthcare pro-
gramme’s were not address-
ing areas such as digestive
issues, fears and phobias, emo-
tions, endocrine imbalances,
belief systems and many other
possibly sub-conscious issues
that needed attention for the
client to truly heal and most
importantly have a long last-
ing result.

“There are 100,000 chemical
reactions every second, 20 mil-
lion red blood cells alone

replaced every second, 40 bil-
lion bits of information
processed in the brain every
second.”

The BodyTalk System inte-
grates well with all other
modalities including Western

Medicine. Doctors, chiro-
practors, massage therapists,
psychologists, and people who
just want to help their family
and loved ones are becoming
Certified BodyTalk Practi-
tioners. It has grown quickly in
the last twelve years because
of good results, and is now
taught in over 30 countries
around the world. ACCESS
is being taught to school chil-
dren with amazing results on

grades, attention spans and
behaviour, the release also
stated.

Ms Ellis has previously
taught BodyTalk methods in
Nassau, with local students
saying that have seen tremen-
dous health improvements.

Ms Ellis will be back in Nas-
sau on June 4 for a free intro-
duction lecture and demo, and
she will teach modules one
and two of the BodyTalk Sys-
tem on June 5 - 8.

For more information on
the Bodytalk system and
upcoming seminars in Nassau
and other international class-
es, visit www.bodytalkcen-
terofpalmbeach.com.



Jeanne Ellis



THE TRIBUNE

TUESDAY, MAY 12, 2009, PAGE 7B





@x

Dating in the Jungle

DATING in the jungle seems heavy
going at times with hungry predators,
slithering snakes creeping up unex-
pectedly and cute clingy furry animals
with big dewy eyes. Manouvering
through the undergrowth can be
exhausting and discouraging particu-
larly when you feel you are making
slow progress. It takes a lot of energy
just to go out and try and survive. So
if it is that difficult, why do we keep
going back again and again? Is it the
vision of the cool, tranquil watering
spot at the end of the journey? That
place of peace when you find a person
who accepts and loves you for who
you are. To be in the comforting arms
that help heal the pain and make us
feel so secure; the reward.

For those of us who suddenly find
ourselves single again, perhaps due
to divorce, death or the end of a long
relationship it can be overwhelming.
Conversations inevitably return to the
same question, ‘Where can you meet
someone decent?’ 'All the good ones

LOVING RELATIONSHPS



BY MAGGIE
i, AUN

are married', and 'No one is serious
anymore. They only want to have a
good time.’ Yes, re-entering the dating
world will most certainly be different
each time and with each decade in
our lives. We do not remain the same
person as the years pass because we
change and grow with all life's expe-
riences. Our expectations change so it
is important to be open to the con-
cept of change. Take time to really
think about the things you do want
and the things that you could not tol-
erate. Be yourself and do not be dis-
couraged by people telling you what
you should or should not be doing. If



this imposed single hood is due to a
failed romance then look within your-
self honestly and try and see how you
played a part in the demise.

Fear of starting again can immo-
bilise us but it is important to under-
stand that everyone has fears. Some of
the most common fears that we bring
from childhood are fear of being
rejected, abandoned, ignored, embar-
rassed, smothered, and of course con-
trolled. When your particular fear
button has been pushed it is vital to
remember that this is probably not
real but a trigger from an old deep
rooted memory. The urge to protect
ourselves from the imaginary pain can
be very strong and we may run and
not deal with problems, or we may
just go quiet and switch off. Alterna-
tively we may stay and fight and argue
and possibly get more and more
angry. These are all behaviours to pro-
tect ourselves from the ensuing pain.
We imagine this pain both physical
and to our egos. As hard as we try, our



triggers will get pushed and the only
way to deal with them is to talk and
explain our fears and anxieties. Shar-
ing these fears with those closest to us
will allow them to know us better and
appreciate our tender areas. If how-
ever we chose to have secrets and
withhold information then our inten-
tion is to create just the right amount
of distance to keep others from know-
ing the real us and in this way gener-
ate a mask or disguise.

The problem with disguises is that
they can be so easy to put on and all
too often it is even difficult for us to
see our true selves. The only effec-
tive road to true intimacy is to learn
how to be transparent and honest.
Being transparent and honest is a very
attractive quality and for most peo-
ple draws us closer to them. Most peo-
ple think that telling the hard truth
will drive people away but we know
for a fact that this is not true. Remem-
ber that even in healthy relationships
people get their feelings hurt at times.



It is impossible not to get hurt because
we are human and life is coming at
us from all angles.

Knowing all these things and still
wanting to have someone close in our
lives is the driving force that sends us
out in to the jungle. Leave home
armed with knowledge and confidence
that everyone is experiencing the same
difficulties as yourself. Relax, enjoy
yourself and try not to worry about
success on any given day. The expres-
sion 'Like attracts like’ is a truism and
one that epitomises the need to work
on producing a positive aura that will
in turn draw the right person to you.

¢ Margaret Bain is an Individual and
Couples Relationship Therapist. She is a
Registered Nurse and a Certified Clinical
Sex Therapist. For appointments call
535-7456 or e-mail her at relateba-
hamas@yahoo.com or www.relateba-
hamas.blogspot.com. She is also avail-
able for speaking engagements.

GREEN SCENE

@x

ATYPICAL scene in the
Sierra Maestra surrounding
Santiago de Cuba.





The other

side of Cuba

OVER the Easter holidays I took my first
trip to Cuba, one of a party of ten. We stayed
in Havana two nights but our main destina-
tion was Santiago de Cuba, over 500 miles
from Havana in the southeast of the country.

Santiago is a city with character. Yes, it
has its old tumbledown buildings in the his-
toric areas but the city is clean and very proud
of its heritage — which is considerable.

Santiago de Cuba was established in 1515,
the same year as Havana, and for a while
was the capital of the Spanish colony.
Although situated on the Caribbean coast
the city is completely surrounded by moun-
tains. Wherever you look the Sierra Maestra
forms a backdrop.

One cannot write about Cuba without men-
tioning the transportation. There are many
modern European and Asian vehicles, from
private cars to luxury buses, but what catch-
es the eye are the pre-1960 US cars that
anachronistically run their appointed rounds
like dinosaurs among cattle. Detroit must
have made solid cars in those days for the
more recent Lada cars from the Soviet Union
all seem on their last legs (wheels?) Add to
these the three-wheeled rickshaws operated
by motorcycle or pedal power, hundreds of
motorcycles, and the great number of horse-
drawn vehicles and you have all the makings
of an eclectic traffic jam.

Cuba has good, dark volcanic soil and the

trees seem to grow far larger than in The
Bahamas. The broad avenues of Santiago
are lined with flowering Yellow Poinciana
and Woman’s Tongue while bare Royal Poin-
ciana trees await their turn to bloom. There
was Bougainvillea everywhere, almost to the
exclusion of other shrubs. I noticed lots of
hibiscus in Havana but virtually none in San-
tiago.

I found it interesting that all of the Frangi-
pani were mature trees.

Here in The Bahamas our Frangipanis top
out as shrubs at 10 to 12 feet with only a few
becoming trees.

When you move into the foothills of the
mountains, the scenery — and flora changes
drastically. There are still Yellow Poincianas
by the roadside in places but the eye roams to
the 100-feet tall mango trees laden with fruit.

We were in Cuba during the dry season
and saw many stream and riverbeds without
water. When the rains come these will be
added attractions to an already lovely region.

Along the roads, sometimes forming nat-
ural fences, were bromeliads our tour guide
told me were called Maya. There were thou-
sands of them and each one could have sold
for $30 or more in Nassau.

The most striking images I will retain from
the mountain tours are of the stately Cuban
Royal Palms (Roystonea regia) which fea-
ture prominently on the Cuban coat of arms.

Reducing redness





BY GARDENER JACK





BROMELIADS abound by the mountain roadsides near
Santiago de Cuba.

We only see Royal Palms in Nassau as a cen-
terpiece for massive lawns or as avenue sen-
tinels, planted at precise distances from each
other. It was distinctly odd to see two or three
randomly growing in a cow field but beautiful
to see groves of them climbing the steep
mountainsides.

The mangoes we ate were obviously of an
early variety. They were quite compact and
had a lovely apricot hue. We also tasted
cashews and a variety of sapodilla that was
torpedo shaped and had orange flesh.

Thad the privilege of being entertained in
five Cuban homes while on vacation. None of
the dwellings had a traditional yard but every
owner grew ornamentals in pots — philoden-
drons, bromeliads and ferns among them.

Every member of the group agreed that
Santiago de Cuba was a far superior tourism
destination to Havana. There were many
attractions to be enjoyed both within the city
and in the nearby countryside. Perhaps, com-
ing from The Bahamas, it was the magic of
the mountains that made the difference.

e j.hardy@coralwave.com





; Tracheal
Collapse



TRACHEAL Collapse is a syndrome charac-

: terised by dorso ventral flattering of the tracheal
: rings with laxity or the dorsal tracheal membrane.
? The syndrome is associated with clinical signs of
? cough and varying degrees of dyspnea (difficult
? breathing) and is most frequently encountered
? in middle — aged to old toy or miniature dogs.
: Considerable controversy surrounds the precise
: cause of the syndrome; consequently there is still
: little agreement concerning the most effective
? approach to its management. The condition occurs
? more frequently in dogs that are obese and in
? those with heart disease or other lung diseases
i such as chronic bronchitis.

The Yorkshire terrier is the most commonly

affected breed followed by the miniature poo-
: dle, Chihuahua and Pomeranian.

Tracheal Collapse syndrome is characterised

? by a chronic paroxysmal cough that is precipitat-
| } ed by excitement, anxiety or pulling on the leash.
? The cough is typically harsh, dry and non-pro-
: ductive and is easily elicited on tracheal palpation.

Diagnosis is confirmed by a combination of

} ? things - eg a positive cough reflex on palpitation
? of the trachea and preferably a positive endo-
i scopic examination that demonstrates intratra-
? cheal changes. However, because of

exorbitant cost of veterinary endoscopes, few

? vets in the Bahamas are equipped with them.
? Therefore the diagnosis is sometimes missed and
: a dog is treated for a chronic respiratory aliment
i instead of tracheal collapse.

Treatment

The practicing vet must be prepared to pursue

? several therapeutic avenues in the management of
? the individual dog to deal with the complex and
? multifactorial etiologies of this syndrome. Suc-
? cessful long term medical management is possible
? for the majority of patients provided the initiating
? factor or factors can be identified. This route
: should always be investigated before a surgical
? solution is considered. If the dog is seen to be in
? respiratory distress, the dog should be stabilised
: firstly. The dog should be sedated and should not
i be stressed. If possible, some oxygen therapy
? should be administered. Some form of cough sup-
} pressant should be given as well.

Weight reduction should be pursued aggres-

i sively in all overweight animals to

improve respiratory function. The daily caloric

; intake should be reduced

significantly.
Respiratory infections should be treated by

i appropriate antibacterial therapy such as antibi-
? otics. The antibiotics Doxycycline, Amoxicillin
? and Cephalexin are commonly used.

The use of collars should be discouraged

? because repeated external pressure on the tra-
? chea may initiate mucosal irritation and promote
? coughing. Body harnesses are an alternative
? means to securing your dog.

? have been numerous complications resulting from
? surgery.

Surgery is an option that should only be con-
sidered after all medical options have been tried
and failed. However, from my experience there

WHETHER genetic or envi-
ronmental, you may not be able
to completely banish redness,
but you can take steps to help
control it.

Wear a sunscreen daily: look
for one containing calming
ingredients like Green Tea and
Licorice to help soothe and con-
trol flare-ups. Choose mois-
turisers containing green natur-
al mineral tint (not an artificial
colour!) to help cancel out visi-
ble redness.

Be mindful of what goes in
your body. Smoking is some-

BY SARAH
BEEK



what like

suffocating the skin from the
inside: it inhibits the body's
ability to provide oxygen and
nutrients to skin while restrict-
ing blood vessels. Excessive
intake of alcoholic beverages
and certain medications (such
as nasal decongestants) can also

contribute to dry skin, leaving
skin more susceptible to sensi-
tivity.

Don't over shower or over-
scrub: The loss of existing oil is
commonly caused by excessive
bathing or showering, or the use
of harsh soaps that dissolve the
protective layer of oil.

Never ever shave without a
protective medium. Using dull
razors can also weaken the
skin's barrier function, leaving
it exposed to environmental
assaults.

Take note of what triggers

the “red” reaction in your skin:
certain foods such as artificial
sweeteners or spices can bring
on the flush look. Also be
aware of your hormones, stress
levels, physical exertion, and
adrenal shifts.

¢ Sarah Beek is a skin care thera-
pist at the Dermal Clinic. Visit her
and her team of skin and body ther-
apists at One Sandyport Plaza (the
same building as Bally’s Gym). For
more information visit www.dermal-
clinic.com or call 327.6788.

Tracheal
Collapse

is most
frequently
encountered
in middle —
aged to old
toy or minia-
ture dogs.





PAGE 8B, TUESDAY, MAY 12, 2009

BARBERSHOP

THE TRIBUNE



Days gone by

@ By LLOYD ALLEN
Tribune Features Reporter
lallen@tribunemedia.net

FOR many men who would have grown up
and experienced most of their youth during the
1960s through to the 1980, the transition of what
the ‘original’ barbershop was, to what it is today,
has in many ways changed dramatically.

Despite the comforts- air conditioning, five
minute cuts, and a myriad of personalised services
-available in barber shops today, one can only
imagine how the barber shop experience was in
years gone by.

This is where barber 69-year-old Eleazor John-
son, from Johnson and Johnson Barber and Beau-
ty salon Fox Hill comes in as he is considered one
of the last remnants of the traditional barber,
with a career spanning more than 50 years.

Reflecting on his early days as a budding coif-
feur, Mr Johnson said a weekly visit to the barber
was a way of life for many young men, an expe-
rience which not only gave them a clean look for
the new work or school week, but also for their
appearance at one or more of the night clubs fre-
quented during that time.

Mr Johnson explained: “At that time we had
places like the Cat and The Fiddle, ZanZa Bar,
The Bloom Night Club, Lemon Tree, Banana
Boat, and so many others.

“Tn one night you and your girlfriend or whom
ever could visit up to five clubs, so visiting the bar-
ber early Saturday morning around 6am or 7am
was the thing to do.”

He said during the sixties, there were dozens of
barbershops all over the island, “there was
Sawyers on Plantol Street, there was Rodney
Darling, Josey’s, Kings Men, and then Cliffie’s on
Farm Road, it was so many of them.”

He explained, one of the most popular bar-
bershop at that time was the Saxony Hotel bar-
bershop located on East Street.

The Saxony had set the standard for what a
barbershop should be, because on the inside there
were several barbers who were always dressed in
their white coats, their hair always trimmed right,
and the interior always kept in tip top shape.

As men would come there sometimes with
their sons to get their cuts, while waiting they
could opt to get their shoes polished by the shoe
shine boys on the outside, or get their cars
washed.

When it comes to the hair cuts, Mr Johnson said

same.

“Back then we had simpler models, but the
machines haven’t changed much. We use to use
the long metal razors ‘the ones that you sharpen
with leather’ they don’t use them anymore, the
tube liner which just come on stream to do a
shape up, we didn’t have them.”

He said unlike today where barbers cut hair
with a cap on, with loud music, or allowing cus-
tomers to drink in their shops, that was not per-
mitted.

He said the Bahamas Barbers Association
(BBA) formed and overseen by the late Barber
Josey enforced uniformity amongst the barbers of
his day.

The association made Wednesday a day of
rest for barbers, and also helped to make hair
cutting a respectable career.

Today, Mr Johnson said he has lost respect for
many in his profession, who he said are in the
business for a ‘quick buck’ rather than developing
their talent and providing a comfortable envi-
ronment for customers.

“There are so many young men who come into
this industry just because they’ve cut one or two
heads, but barbering is so much more than that, it
involves being a people’s person and knowing
your skill,” he said.

Describing himself as a jack of many trades ,
Mr Johnson attributed his success to being able
to multi-task.

Apart from barbering, one of his passions is
boating, an activity he has enjoyed since child-
hood. Although he is no longer a crew member,
Mr Johnson is the proud owner of well known
regatta icon The Lady Natalie.

Named after his mother, the regatta champion
has taken part in dozens of local regattas since the
late 80s, and has racked-up numerous top awards
including Ist place in the 87’ Montagu regatta, 2nd
place in the Exuma B-class in 87’, and first place
wins in Bimini, Grand Bahama, Andros, Ack-
lins, Eleuthera, Cat Island, and Abaco B-class
events.

Nicknamed “The Sailing Barber,’ Mr Johnson
said he has also helped to promote the sport of
sailing throughout many islands, and looks for-
ward to this year’s events.

Two of his four sons have followed in his foot-
steps and Mr Johnson said although he has
accepted that the barbershop experience has gone
through many irreversible changes, he hopes that
those who are coming into it as a profession will

63-YEAR-OLD Barber Eleazor Johnson still has the right touch, seen cutting the hair of a youngste





although the trends have changed over the years, _ take the time to learn its history, and discover its | SHOWING offa picture taken during the 70s where he shaped-up an afro for Bahamian photographer Bob
the equipment for the most part has remained the true potential. Thompson.





The Emperor's new clothes

IN 1837, Hans Christian Andersen wrote
a fable about an emperor that is very simi-
lar to interpersonal dynamics you can wit-
ness in today's work place. In the story,
the emperor was deceived by two salesmen
who convinced him that they would make
him clothing that only persons of an ele-
vated status will be able to appreciate.
Everyone, including the emperor, saw that
they were being deceived but no one said
anything for fear of being labeled low in
status, incompetent, ignorant or stupid.

Now let's fast forward to the present.
Think about your organisation. Are there
managers around you, or, are you a man-
ager who sets the stage so employees will
say what you want to hear for fear of being
labeled?

This can happen for a number of rea-
sons. For instance, some managers think
like President Bush who once said “You
are either for us or against us”. Managers
who think this way feel that everything that
happens falls within a zone of two possi-
bilities. They fail to recognise that there are
so many other possibilities that they don't
even consider them. Consequently, employ-
ees in this kind of environment are afraid to
say anything that can lead the manager to
think the employee is against them.

Another variation on this theme occurs
when employees are negatively labeled
because they have a different point of view.
In cases like this, when employees have
another point of view, the manager decides
the employee either doesn't understand, is
wrong, is not a team player, is incompetent
or is unsupportive. This way of thinking
tends to short circuit any attempts by
employees to communicate their ideas for
fear of the backlash.

From a performance management per-
spective, managers avoid telling employ-
ees about their true performance because
they want to keep the peace and avoid con-
frontation when appraisals are completed.
Therefore, a company can end up with
increasing staff costs through merit increas-
es and bonuses that are rewarding margin-
al performance. In these cases, the man-
agers see what is really going on but again,
they want to avoid conflict.

Managers aren't the only employees who
demonstrate “emperor” behaviour. There
are some co-workers who appear to be
untouchable because of their connections.
Co-workers refrain from saying anything
that can potentially upset or frustrate them
for fear of the potential ramifications. This
happens in highly political office environ-
ments and whittles away at trust and integri-
ty within the team.

Impact on Your Business

In Hans Christian Andersen's story “The
Emperor's New Clothes”, it was clear that
everyone, including the emperor, knew
what was really going on but because they
would be viewed as incompetent, no-one
said anything except an innocent child.
Interestingly enough, when the child blew
the whistle on the staged effort, everyone



continued to pretend that it was business as
usual.

In your organisation, if everyone turns a
blind eye to executive, manager or employ-
ee dysfunction there can be an impact on
the performance of your company or organ-
isation. One of the negative effects can be
on employee morale and productivity.

Let us take a deeper look at this. Ifa
manager is known to be arrogant and not
open to other opinions he will feel threat-
ened when an idea isn't his and so he will
find ways to discourage input by suggesting
that you don't understand the situation or
process.

What is really happening is that he is
destabilised by your idea because he thinks
the best ideas should come from him.
Therefore, instead of supporting your inge-
nuity, and seeking to integrate your sug-
gestion, he seeks to hold onto his sense of
security by trying to dismiss your idea, use
it as his own or convince you into thinking
you are making a mistake. As a result of
this type of behaviour, employees back off,
entering into an apathetic mode. This can
be costly because when things go wrong
employees will hide bad news, system inef-
ficiencies or recommendations because they
want to avoid the perceived consequences.

Why Does this Happen?

When employees perceive they are
unable to be authentic without suffering
some sort of consequence an elaborate sys-
tem of avoidance will inevitably result. On
one hand, there are managers or employees
in survival mode, trying to maintain the
facade of power and status and they are
willing to do what it takes to keep their
power alive by feeding fear within the work
environment.

On the other hand, employees are in
another type of survival mode. They want
peace and harmony and so they create a
fagade of harmony, productivity and com-
petence which they protect at all costs.
Sometimes this protective mode becomes
evident when newcomers join the team.
Newcomers generally want to impress the
boss because they are on probation so they
inadvertently upstage existing employees.
Team members naturally want to avoid the
implications of disrupting the system of
false harmony so they influence the new-
comer into changing his or her behaviours.
Managers often assume that employees
pressure new employees to reduce their
performance levels because of laziness.

However, as managers we need to ask our-

Earth angels
unmasked

selves if the apparent laziness is a cause or }

effect. Is it an unwanted bye-product of }
an elaborate system of behaviour we helped }

to create?

What You Can Do About It
e In environments where authenticity is

non-existent, so is trust. So rebuilding the }

team becomes a trust building exercise.

This is a difficult process because most }
times, an entire system of behaviours sup- i

ported the “Emperor's” behaviours.

There are a few options you have if you
are a primary decision maker and you want }
to turn this around. You can attempt to }
rehabilitate the “emperor” through training }

FROM page 10

? to environmental preservation.

? With a long list of sponsors including The Broadcasting Corpo-
? ration of the Bahamas, Baha Mar Resorts, Sky Bahamas, and the
i Beauty Shack, and a host of other sponsors, this year’s event is noth-
ing short of a community project and is expected to be one of the
? most spectacular events ever, organisers said.

The beauty who wins the crown, will also receive a Diamond’s
International crown, a chance to compete in the Miss World com-
? petition, Miss Tourism Queen International, and Miss Interconti-
nental pageants. Apart from those initial prizes, the girl who is most
successful in the runway segment of the preliminaries, will be cho-
sen to represent the Bahamas in next year’s Top Model of the
World competition.

and coaching and if they don't respond, a ;

restructuring exercise can be considered.

e Another way to build trust and authen-
ticity is to develop the ability to encourage ;

>> 18-year-old SHAVONNE MCKENZIE
Height: 5’6”
Career goal: Forensic Pathologist

and integrate diverse points of view. Diver- }

sity conscious behaviours can improve team

performance significantly because it cre- }
ates a safe space where different points will ;
be heard and used to create holistic solu- :

tions.

Your ultimate goal is to rebuild the team ;
and trust building can take time, particularly }
if the “emperor” is going to undergo a reha- }

bilitative process.

The other thing to remember is that one
person doesn't create the system of behav- }
iour so the team should be a part of the }

| > 20-year-old SWANIQUE SAWYER
Height: 59”
Career goal: Pediatrician

>> 22-year-old MICHAELA FERGUSON
Height: 5’7”
Career goal: Literary Advocate

>> 17-year-old JOANNA BROWN

Height: 6’0”
Career goal: Entrepreneur/Physiologist

rehabilitative effort to make the changes }

stick.

¢ Yvette Bethel is CEO of Organizational

Soul, a company that offers Business Consult- i

ing and Leadership Development services. If
you are interested in creating authentic
change at your organisation, her contact
details can be found at www.orgsoul.com.

In your
organisation,
if everyone turns
a blind eye to
executive, manager
or employee
dystunction there
can be an impact on
the pertormance otf
your company or
organisation.

>> 23-year-old LLATETRA LAING
Height: 5’7”
Career goal: Nurse/Entrepreneur

: >> 18-year-old GABRIELLE MAJOR
i Height: 56”
Career goal: Tourism Marketing & Development

>> 20-year-old EMILY DARVILLE
i Height: 5’9”
Career goal: Culinary Professional

»> 19-year-old DEVERA PINDER
i Height: 5°10”
Career goal: Prime Minister of The Bahamas

' 9} 20-year-old DASHANIQUE POITIER
: Height: 5’8”
Career goal: Journalist/Entrepreneur

>> 20-year-old DANIELLE MORLEY
i Height: 56”
Career goal: Architect/Evangelist

! >> 23-year-old CHANNA CIUS
; Height: 5’8”
Career goal: Interior Designer/Fashion Icon

: »> 20-year-old KENDRA WILKINSON
i Height: 6’0”
Career goal: Dentist
>> 21-year-old MCCHENIER JOHNSON
Height: 59”
Career goal: Photographer/Educator



THE TRIBUNE

‘man TUESDAY, MAY 12 2009





UNMASKED

@ By LLOYD ALLEN
Tribune Features Reporter
lallen@tribunemedia.net

IN an environment where it seems there are as many
beauty contest as there are islands throughout our country,
many may find it difficult to determine a clear distinction
between each one.



Coy de ee ci

>

However the members of this year’s Miss
Bahamas World (MBW) committee have upped
the ante with their pageant, not only producing
their usual TV series Backstage Pass, but also
inviting the general public to be a part of the judg-
ing process for the event through their website
www.tnissbahamas.net.

Organisers officially launched the pageant with
a Go Green reception held at Bahamas National
Trust’s (BNT) Village Road retreat last Monday.
Attendants were mesmerised with an exciting dis-
play of the lucky thirteen who are scheduled to take
part in a long list of activities leading up to the
competition on May 31, at the Wyndham Rain-
forest Theater.

Adding to the growing list of organisations cen-
tered on green living, MBW has already con-
tributed more than $1,200 to its partner BNT,
and during the competition will have the contes-
tants make several visits to Bahamian national
parks while learning about BNT’s contributions

SEE page eight

rilea

eee ete a

Distributed by: BWA, East West Highway « 394-1759












Full Text

PAGE 1

N N A A S S S S A A U U A A N N D D B B A A H H A A M M A A I I S S L L A A N N D D S S L L E E A A D D I I N N G G N N E E W W S S P P A A P P E E R R C M Y K C M Y K Volume: 105 No.140TUESDAY, MAY 12, 2009 PRICE – 75 (Abaco and Grand Bahama $1.25 WEATHER PLENTYOF SUNSHINE HIGH 85F LOW 76F F E A T U R E S SEEWOMANSECTION S P O R T S Earth angels unmasked Fox Hill ‘blockbuster’ n By MEGAN REYNOLDS Tribune Staff Reporter mreynolds@tribunemedia.net FORMER MP Keod Smith was hit in the face as he served orders to members of the Bahamas Hotel Catering and Allied Workers Union’s execu tive council yesterday. The attorney told The Tribune he was acting in his power as officer of the court and legal repre sentativeforthe BHCAWU executive council as he served orders issued by Justice Claire Hepburn on Friday to each council member at Worker’s House on Harrold Road yesterday morning. T he orders prohibited any member of the council from prev enting any other executive mem ber from attending a full meeting of the council for election nomi nations, Mr Smith said. But as he served the order to one of the executive members Mr Smith said he was smacked in the face. The attorney said: “I dropped it in front of him as he was turning away from me, and as I turned away from him I was struck in the face. Then I realised it was him. The Tribune ANYTIME ... ANYPLACE , WE RE #1 B AHAMASEDITION TRY OUR SOUTHERN CHICKEN BISCUIT www.tribune242.com Switch to Fidelity products they have built-in savings plans:It’s not too late to build yours...Weather the storm with Fidelity. Former MP is punched in face BAHAMASBIGGEST CARSFORSALE, HELPWANTED ANDREALESTATE I N S I D E SEETHISSECTIONPAGE15 K eod Smith str uck while ser ving or der s to union members n By MEGAN REYNOLDS T ribune Staff Reporter mreynolds@ t ribunemedia.net HYWEL Jones’ brother has vowed to remain in the Bahamas until whoever is responsible for the banker’s execut ion-style shooting has been brought to justice. I lt Jones said he will remain in Nassau for “as long as it takes” to assist police w ith their investigation after his broth er’s death on Friday night. Hywel Jones, 55, president of the Britannia Consultancy Group, was shot at least twice in the head and body as he was getting out of his car in his office car park near Compass Point i n West Bay Street at around 10am on April 22. After the shooting the slim, dark, and unmasked gunman t ook off on a motorcycle towards Gambier Village. Police launched an island-wide search for the attacker and a $ 50,000 reward was posted last week for information that might lead to the arrest or conviction of those responsible. Mr Jones, a British citizen who lived in the Bahamas for 21 years was a permanent resident. His mother was living with him on West Bay Street. His brother, a location manager on Hollywood films, said he Brother of slain banker:I’ll stay until killer is brought to justice Ilt J ones to assist police investigation REMEMBERING HMBSFLAMINGOMARINES SEE page eight SEE page eight VILERINE HENFIELD , sister of the late Able Seaman Fenrick Sturrup, puts a wreath overboard yesterday in observance of the 29th anniversary of the HMBS Flamingo sinking. SEEPAGE16 HYWEL JONES n By PAUL G TURNQUEST Tribune Staff Reporter pturnquest@tribunemedia.net A MAN, believed to be in his mid to late 30’s, became the country’s latest homicide when his body was discovered off Blue Hill Road with multiple stab wounds to the chest. Receiving a call around 6.40am yesterday, police were led to an area opposite the Blue Hill Road clinic where the body of the man was found at the rear of a business establishment. Wearing a plaid shirt and dark trousers, the victim, whose identity is yet to be released by police, is described as being of THERE is talk in political cir cles that Governor General Arthur Hanna will soon step down from the post with Sir Arthur Foulkes, Sir William Allen, Lynn Holowesko and Janet Bostwick all suggested as potential replacements, The Tribune has learned. Mr Hanna took up the posi tion under the former PLP government in February 2006. He has now served more than two years in the post under the FNM government, elected in May 2007. While His Excellency declined to speak with The Tribune about his future, stating he “doesn’t comment on anything in the world” as his position places him Suggestion made that Governor General will soon step down SEE page eight n By NATARIO MCKENZIE Tribune Staff Reporter THE Court of Appeal yesterday allowed the appeal for the recusal of Senior Justice John Lyons from a civil case involving the Central Bank of Ecuador. Justice Lyons who tendered his resignation from the bench last Thursday has recused himself Appeal for recusal of Justice L yons from civil case is allowed SEE page eight Stabbing victim is the nation’ s latest homicide INSIDE SPECIAL REPOR T: PL ANS F OR RELOC ATION OF THE CONTAINER PORTS P A GES T W O/THREE GOVT WON’T ‘LOOK THE OTHER WAY FR OM C ORRUPTION ALLEGATIONS P A GE FIVE SEE page eight FORMER MP Keod Smith speaks to the press yesterday. F e l i p M a j o r / T r i b u n e s t a f f F e l i p M a j o r / T r i b u n e s t a f f

PAGE 2

C M Y K C M Y K LOCAL NEWS PAGE 2, TUESDAY, MAY 12, 2009 THE TRIBUNE Plans for relocation of the container ports THE Royal Bank of Canada c emented its support for the revitalisation of the city of Nassau with a commitment of $25,000 over the next two years. This pledge, along with financ ial contributions from public and private stakeholders, will support the efforts of the Downtown Nassau Partnership (DNP h aul the capital as a tourist attraction. “Royal Bank has had a continuous presence on Bay Street since 1917 when we constructed ourf irst branch building in the Bahamas. This branch was the first modern bank building in the Bahamas and today is still a landm ark on Bay Street. Since then, RBC has been present throughout many changes and improvements on Bay Street and we are proud to support this current revitalisationo f downtown Nassau," said Nathaniel Beneby Jr, vice president and country head for RBC. “We are pleased to have RBC R oyal Bank as the first financial institution to support the Downtown Nassau Partnership. The revitalisation of downt own Nassau is a very important national priority and we hope that o ther private sector stakeholders will offer assistance. The economic benefits from a thriving downt own will be substantial,” said Vaughn Roberts, managing director of the DNP. Public and private sector funding will be used to cover the costo f detailed planning, technical and legal consultants and staffing, as well as certain short-term projects. T he government has indicated its support for the revitalisation – committing to relocate the commercial shipping port; putting in place incentives to stimulatei nvestments under the 2008 City of Nassau Revitalisation Act; contracting for major dredging of Nassau Harbour with the fill to b e used to extend the water’s edge from East Street to Armstrong Street; committing to a process that will produce draft legislation for a downtown business improve-m ent district or similar mechanism; and undertaking with the private sector a number of shortterm improvement projects. G uided by an 11-member board with public and private sector representation, the DNP e mploys a full-time, professional m anagement team to coordinate the revitalisation efforts until such t ime as a business improvement district is legislated. PHASE I (top 1 Liberty Class Cruise Ship Dock 2 Island Bulkhead 3 Improve Downtown Circulation 4 Create an Intermodal Terminal 5 Downtown Parking PHASE II (second from top 1 Open Space and Initial Infill 2 Marina 3 Bay Street Infill 4 Paradise Island Gateway Park PHASE III (above 1 Relocate Commercial Shipping to southwest of the Island (not illustrated 2 Construct Bulkhead Mixed Use Development 3 Marina Village PHASE IV (page opposite top right 1 Infill between Bay Street and Woodes Rogers Road 2 Bulkhead Marina C HARLES Johnson, former president of the Petroleum Retailer’s Association, died on Sunday. M r Johnson was also chairman of the Fox Hill Festival Commit tee and a well-known Bahamian businessman of Fox Hill origin in his o wn right. Mr Johnson was the third Fox Hill festival chairman to die with in the last year, the others being Eric Wilmott and William Rahming. All of these men died at relatively young ages. Said Fox Hill MP Fred Mitchell in a statement yesterday: Mr Johnson’s death adds to the deficit of knowledge and experience of the culture and traditions of Fox Hill as a community. T he community mourns his passing and will miss his presence. His death has stunned us all. In addition, I know that he will be particularly missed by the Roman Catholic community in the Bahamas, both at St Anselm’s in Fox Hill and by the wider Catholic community which he served as a fundraiser with distinction. “On behalf of the Fox Hill constituency and in particular the vill age of Fox Hill, I wish to extend condolences to his widow Eulise and his children,” he said. RBC supports the Downtown Nassau Partnership with $25,000 two year commitment 1 4 3 2 5 3 4 2 3 Former president of Petroleum Retailer’s Association Charles Johnson dies 4 3 2 5 1 3 2 4 2 3

PAGE 3

T HE economic environment may favour the container ports remaining in their current position in the immediate future rather thanb eing transplanted to A rawak Cay or the southwest New Providence, according to John Bethell,p resident of Bethell Estates Limited. M r Bethell has made a p roposal which consists of a phased removal of the port f rom Bay Street to southwest New Providence, leaving downtown Nassau with an ew high-end residential and shopping area. I n 2003, a special commission was organised to advise government on the steps nec-e ssary to improve, revitalise and transform the city of N assau, including its harbour area, surrounding areas and scenic routes which link it tot he airport. Suggestions In 2004, the consulting firm o f EDAW was hired to create a master plan incorpor ating suggestions for these areas. The plan called for the removal of commercial ship p ing from East Bay Street. In 2007, the Dutch firm of ECORYS was retained to prepare a business plan for a new port at the southweste nd of the island near the Clifton Heritage Park. The construction of this new port – proposed in a much more robust economicc limate – would require significant environmental review and public investmente stimated at as much as $350 to $400 million. T he plan would also require the private shippers currently operating on NewP rovidence to move their facilities to a new location. “Furthermore, shipping costs for goods to local busi nesses would increase due to t he additional travel time from the port to major busi nesses on the island,” Mr Bethell said. He said even if this r emains the optimum solution to New Providence’s shipping needs, the current financial crisis pushes the realisation of this idea into the future. It is also likely that the fiscal priorities of government will lie with more pressing social concerns than that of the cre a tion of a new port, Mr Bethell said. The primary objective of the relocation was to remove traffic and shipping fromE ast Bay Street and thus e ncourage the redevelopment of the former shipping facilities into lodging, retaila nd other tourism based facilities. O ne alternative location f or the port is Arawak Cay, and the government and s takeholders are said to be finalising the details of this move. H owever, Mr Bethell said that significant investment – a s much as $50 to $80 million – and a considerable amount of time would ber equired for the construction of new facilities. Major public investment for the improvement of surrounding roadways woulda lso be required. “Private shipping companies currently located on East Bay Street would be required to relocate to then ew facility. “Business operations of both the shippers and their clients would be disrupted during a fragile economic cli-m ate,” he said. Apart from these costs of relocation, several otherc hallenges are presented by the Arawak Cay proposal, M r Bethell said. “Shipping would be placed at the entry to the NassauH arbour in plain sight of arriving cruise ships and other ocean going visitors. “The use of Arawak Cay for lodging retail and othert ourism or civic uses would be compromised by the introduction of this new industrial use onto the island,” he said. Instead, Mr Bethell prop oses the redevelopment of shipping facilities in their cur r ent location, on a new bulk head or strip of land reclaimed from the harbour,b ehind the existing shipping houses. The plan would allow for the development of “retail continuously along Bay Street” and with one entrance and exit for container trucks – rather than the current seven would achieve the aim of greatly improving traffic flow. Later, when the economic outlook has improved, the port could be moved to southwest New Providence and the extended bulkhead behind Bay Street could be redeveloped to accommodate har bour front residential properties, a marina and marina village, a multi-storey parking facility and a performing arts centre, according to the proposal. C M Y K C M Y K LOCAL NEWS THE TRIBUNE TUESDAY, MAY 12, 2009, PAGE 3 n of the container ports n By TANEKA THOMPSON Tribune Staff Reporter tthompson@tribunemedia.net POLICE are searching for a man who led officers on a high speed chase through Yellow Elder Gardens before crashing into a house. At around 6pm on Saturday, Mobile Division officers on patrol in Yellow Elder Gardens stopped a Buick Le Sabre near Government High School. The male driver and a female front seat passenger both got out of the car. However, a man who had been sitting in the back seat jumped into the driver’s seat and sped off with the officers giving chase, ASP Walter Evans said. The car ran into a house on Graham Drive before the driver jumped out and escaped on foot. When the officers searched the vehicle, they found half pound of marijuana concealed in a bag. Two Grand Bahama residents are being questioned in connection with the matter. In other crime news, police also detained three peo ple for questioning after officers executed a search warrant at a home in South Beach Estates around 10.30pm on Friday. ASP Evans said that as officers approached the house, a man was seen throwing a bag onto the roof. The bag was retrieved and a brown package contain ing three pounds of marijuana, with a street value of $3,000, was found inside. As a result three men were arrested and are in cus tody. 2 Man leads police on car chase before crashing into house THE FINAL PHASE of redevelopment will support the infrastructure created during the previous phases. Specifically, parking structures wrapped with commercial buildings will be constructed between Bay Street and the Woodes Rogers Road expansion to further increase the density of the centre. The continued infill and increasing will prompt an additional demand for private boat docks which will be provided adjacent to the mixed use development on the expanded bulkhead. Current financial crisis ‘pushes realisation of idea into the future’ T o have your say on this or any other issue, email The Tribune at: l etters@tribunemedia.net or deliver your letter to The Tribune on Shirley Street, P.O. Box N-3207 1 2

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EDITOR, The Tribune . It has always been a puzzle to me why our Government, FNM or PLP, appear to resent any advice from anyone who is n ot in the inner circle. It makes one wonder if each Minister, when presented with his articles of office, is then declared to be omniscient. I will point to three glaring examples. 1. For many years education has been in a free fall and is n ow a national disaster yet each successive Government pontificates on their plans for educa-t ion and they end up tweeking this and tweeking that and their "grand" plans end up being tantamount to rearranging the deck chairs on the Titanic. The country is now blessed with hav ing Mr. Ralph Massey living in the Bahamas and he has done an exhaustive study on the country's educational system and, as a result, has made some brilliant suggestions for improvement in the education plans. Anyone who really cares about the future of our children would like to believe that our Government would be anxious to at least listen to what he has to say. Is it arrogance that prev ents them from doing so? 2. In the latter days of the last administration a bill was passed in the House of Assembly to allow the introduction of a National Health Plan. After the FNM become t he Government there has been indications that they will implement the Plan. The Nassau Institute hosted a symposium shortly after the election and one of the featured speakers was Dr. Michael Walker of Canada's Fraser Institute whose topic was Lessons From Global Experience For Canadian Health Care Reform. Arrangements were made for Dr. Walker to meet with the n ew Minister of Health, Dr. Hubert Minnis. I had the privil ege to escort Dr. Walker to the meeting and he kindly asked that I go in with him. Before we arrived there I was thinking of what a great opportunity it was for the Minister to be able to meet someone who had studied health plans all over the world. At some point during the meeting Dr. Walker offered to come to the Bahamas, at his own expense, to help in any way h e can with the proposed National Health Plan. The Minister said nothing in reply. The silence was deafening. I have been reliably informed that at a subsequent open meeting the Minister was asked why he did not accept the offer of D r. Walker. He is alleged to have replied that the Bahamas does not needt he help of anyone outside our country. 3. It was recently reported on www.weblogbahamas.com that our Government was offered the help of a young lawyer who has a wealth of knowledge in US tax laws and he had offered his help virtually free of charge and it was refused. It is well known that his family is of a different political persuasion. So, I ask again. Why the arrogance and to what purpose? SIDNEY SWEETING, DDS www.weblogbahamas.com C M Y K C M Y K EDITORIAL/LETTERS TO THE EDITOR PAGE 4, TUESDAY, MAY 12, 2009 THE TRIBUNE The Tribune Limited NULLIUS ADDICTUS JURARE IN VERBA MAGISTRI Being Bound to Swear to The Dogmas of No Master L EON E. H. DUPUCH, Publisher/Editor 1903-1914 S IR ETIENNE DUPUCH, Kt., O.B.E., K.M., K.C.S.G., (Hon. P ublisher/Editor 1919-1972 Contributing Editor 1972-1991 EILEEN DUPUCH CARRON, C.M.G., M.S., B.A., LL.B. P ublisher/Editor 1972Published Daily Monday to Saturday S hirley Street, P.O. Box N-3207, Nassau, Bahamas Insurance Management Building., P.O. F-485, Freeport, Grand Bahama T ELEPHONES Switchboard (News, Circulation and Advertising Advertising Manager (242 C irculation Department (242 WEBSITE w ww.tribune242.com – updated daily at 2pm W ASHINGTON The White House trumpeted the news: health care providers taking a $2 t rillion scalpel to their costs and pushing the U.S. toward Barack Obama's vision of health c overage for all. But don't line up yet for those insurance cards. First, a reality check for the nation's 50 million uninsured. Medical providers have a long track record of a voiding fiscal constraints, as witnessed by the government's efforts to tamp down Medicarec osts. And none of the groups that went to the W hite House can actually dictate prices to their members. Doctors in New York or hospitals in L os Angeles are free to charge what the market can bear. There's one more catch: Even if every penny of the promised savings shows up, not all of it would be used to help cover uninsured Americ ans. Actual savings to the government are all that can be counted as Congress tries to pay f or subsidies that will be needed to help make health insurance affordable for everyone. T he medical groups' pledge is "a very hope ful sign," said economist Robert Reischauer, head of the Urban Institute. "But when we get down to hammering out the details, health care reform remains both complex and philosophic ally and politically difficult to accomplish." Costs could still turn out to be the greatest o bstacle to Obama's health care plan. Outside experts estimate the taxpayers' tab c ould total between $1.2 trillion and $1.5 trillion over 10 years. Some go as high as $1.7 trillion. Obama's budget proposal includes a down pay ment that may cover less than half the bill. Pledging restraint on costs Monday at the W hite House were groups representing hospitals, doctors, drug makers, medical device manu facturers and a major health care labour union Who's Who of health care interests. The p resident posed proudly with them and called it "a watershed event." Obama wants to build on the current system in which most people get coverage through pri vate insurers. But he wants to change the ruless o the sick can't be turned down. And he wants to provide subsidies to help low-wage workers a nd even some in the middle class afford their premiums. House Republican leader John B oehner of Ohio isn't impressed. "Today's announcement promises savings with no conc rete plan to achieve them and no enforcement mechanism if they don't," he said Monday. Indeed, it's too early to tell whether the White House meeting will be remembered as a turning point or as a political mirage. The administration is projecting an image of a new coalition for health care, with Obama and most o f the health care industry and consumer interest groups claiming the political centre. L eft out, for now, are conservative Republicans, who oppose Obama's direction but have y et to articulate their own vision, and liberal Democrats who have been hoping to move toward a nationalized system like Medicare for all. As the debate heats up, the voices from both ends of the political divide will get louder and the pressure on the centre will increase. Still, the sight of health care industry leaders v olunteering to hold back spending is pretty unusual. By joining Obama, providers are a cknowledging at least some responsibility for a bloated and dysfunctional system that econom ists say is unaffordable. In the 1990s, when President Bill Clinton attempted to overhaul health care, the battle lines quickly hardened. Obama, who has gone out of his way to woo the interest groups, p raised their willingness to sacrifice on Monday. The groups don't just have the national intere st in mind. Industry is worried that Congress will create a government health plan to compete w ith private insurers. Such a plan would quick ly become the biggest in the country and could use its power to set lower payment rates, driving costs down on the backs of medical providers. "I think the reason all these groups want to a ctively participate in the process is they don't want to see a blunt instrument used to get s pending down," said Mark McClellan, who ran Medicare for President George W. Bush. " This is an opportunity to get everyone behind a better approach to improve the way health care works." That's just what the groups say they want to do. Their proposals include coordinating care f or people with chronic illnesses, rewarding quality not quantity, and using technology to r oot out waste and prevent errors that get patients sicker. B ut it's hard to put numbers next to any of those ideas. For example, what if better care for chronically ill patients turns out to increase costs? None of the groups has set a target for how much its members should have to pony u p. Congress is going to need hard numbers to pass Obama's plan this year. R obert Laszewski, a former health insurance executive turned policy consultant, said h e's betting the consensus won't last. "When Congress comes up with mechanisms t o reduce costs that actually take money out of the hands of doctors, hospitals and insurance companies, that's when we're going to find out if things are really different this time," he said. (This article was written by Ricardo AlonsoSaldivar of the Associated Press). From whence cometh the arrogance in the Bahamas political class? LETTERS letters@tribunemedia.net Will health care savings add up? EDITOR, The Tribune. My article was recognised as the Letter of the Week in The Punch for Thursday, May 7th,2 009. It was quite interesting how the content was skimmed and slimmed by the newspaper’s writers to suit the editor’s headline arrestingp eople for buying numbers is out of order! Firstly, the original piece was written based o n the content of the headline story of The Punch of Thursday, April 30, 2009. The Punch’s rewrite is careful to make no m ention of this and, while much of the content printed is gleaned from the article, it is skilfull y manipulated to send a message that really isn’t there – arresting people for “breaking the law” is out of order! I did imply that the practice of arresting people for playing number bodes well in the realm of ridicule as police officers in our country have more pressing issues to attend to and more extreme matters in which to focus theirm anpower. Add to that, the fact that the already overwhelmed court system doesn’t need to be bur dened with issues that don’t threaten life, limb, property or lead to extreme degradation oft he general public. I did not, however, say that the police officers doing their jobs and arresting persons for breaking a legitimate law in The Bahamas were out of order. I did describe the policies regarding the “playing-number” dilemma as anti quated, barbaric and primitive. I indicated that the continued enforcement thereof was based on outdated laws that need ed to be revamped. I suggested that choosing to play numbers was less of a threat than choosing to drink alcohol. I did, however, point out that our laws are our laws and until such time as there is a change in the law it must be carried out. If I had said or written that “arresting people for buy ing numbers was out of order” then I would have been out of order! I n referencing The Punch’s article of Thursday, April 30, 2009, I took issue with the Minister of National Security chastising the Com-m issioner of Police for organising and conducting the operation against the perpetrators w ith the strictest confidentiality. I also congratulated the Commissioner of Police and his team for a job well done withr egard to resulting arrests and arraignments relative thereto. None of this, however, was m entioned in the rewrite printed in The Punch. I was careful to post the original letter online at BahamasIssues.com and BahamasB2B.comb efore copying it from one of these websites and forwarding it to the news media. While I was quite pleased that it got recognition as the Letter of the week under PunchLines I was disappointed at how it was reducedt o support a view held by the Editor and not by me. Finally, my position was and still is that I have no problems with people who play num bers. I am not, however, not going to encourage anyone to break the law no matter how ancient or obsolete. The police have a job to do and part of that is to arrest people for criminal infractions such as illegal gambling. Until such time as new legislation passes changing the process of the present system arresting people for buying numbers is quite in order! MARVIN RZ GIBSON Nassau, May 8, 2009. Punch editor prints misleading headline

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n B y KARIN HERIG Tribune Staff Reporter k herig@tribunemedia.net PRIME Minister Hubert Ingrah am took the Department of Immigration to task for instanceso f “insolent and rude” behaviour toward local and international t ravellers – especially Jamaicans – arriving at the Lynden Pindling International Airport. Mr Ingraham was speaking at the first annual customer service c onference for the Immigration Department held at the Wynd-h am Cable Beach Resort yesterday morning. T he prime minister highlight ed the offensive behaviour to which Jamaican nationals are frequently exposed to upon arrival at Bahamian ports of entry and part icularly at LPIA. “Not all Jamaican nationals a rriving in the Bahamas intend to overstay their allotted time. Not a ll Jamaican nationals arriving in the Bahamas have police records, nor are they engaged in illegal activity. Yet far too many Bahamian immigration officers greet Jamaican nationals arriving in the Bahamas as if they were known criminals. This is not acceptable; it must stop regardl ess to the nationality of the arriving passenger,” he said. H e said that persons who do not appear to satisfy entry requirements for the Bahamass hould be spoken to in a courteous and respectful manner. May I also remind immigra tion officers that Bahamians have a right to leave and re-enter the Bahamas. Unless there is reason able cause to support a fraudulent document, Bahamians’ entry t o our country ought to be expedited without bureaucracy,” he s aid. Mr Ingraham further said that persons who sponsor visits by Jamaicans for other than bonafide purposes must know that all immi g ration officers operate from the same remit – “no facilitation, no a ccommodation, no tip, no bribe to permit persons to enter the B ahamas who are reasonably suspected of coming here to work legitimately or illegitimately.” Upon arrival at the country’s airports or ports of entry, the prime minister said, persons sus pected of illegal activity should to b e invited to move to a quiet, private area for further screening. If they are in fact innocent of any wrong doing, no unnecessary e mbarrassment will have been experienced,” he said. Mr Ingraham also addressed the staffing problems at the airport’s immigration hall. “I believe that the Immigration D epartment is aware of the arrival schedule of inbound aircraft. Yet, i t never ceases to amaze me that upon entry into the immigration hall most booths are unattended, the assigned officers gradually making an appearance as the hall f ills with passengers waiting to be cleared. This attitude is not what w e are all about. I look forward t herefore, to a change in that behaviour,” he said. M r Ingraham said that this points to another obvious prob lem requiring attention by the department – the fact that immigration officers are generally s cheduled to work a 9am to 5pm shift, irrespective of the schedule o f flight and charter arrivals. “Much better value would be h ad if only skeleton staffs were deployed over the usual work day 9am to 5pm – with the remainder or bulk of staff scheduled to be at their stations at the peak h ours of business. “That would permit a full cont ingent of officers to be on the job and in their booths when the l argest numbers of passengers arrive at a port of entry,” he said. Y esterday’s inaugural event was billed as a refresher prog ramme to prepare immigration officers who will be on the front line during two major events being hosted in Nassau this year – the FIFA Conference later this m onth, and the Miss Universe Pageant to be held in August, the p rime minister said. He commended the managem ent of the department for their pro-active stance. One of the objectives of the training conference, Mr Ingraham said, is “to assist immigration offic ers to recognise that their differing responsibilities – to guard and p rotect and to welcome and facil itate – are not mutually exclusive. T his is an especially important objective.” C M Y K C M Y K LOCAL NEWS THE TRIBUNE TUESDAY, MAY 12, 2009, PAGE 5 n By KARIN HERIG Tribune Staff Reporter kherig@tribunemedia.net THE Government will not “look the other way” where evidence supports allegations of corruption in the public service, Prime Minister Hubert Ingraham has warned He particularly addressed allegations of immigration officials accepting bribes at ports of entry or in exchange for falsifying d ocuments or speeding up work permit and residence application processes. The keynote speaker at the first annual customer service conference for the Immigration Department held at the Wyndham Cable Beach Resort yesterday morning, Mr Ingraham expressed regret that a “pay to play” culture has developed in the country’s public sector. R eminding those attending the two-day training conference that bribery of a public officer is an offence, the prime minister said t hat persons applying to the Department of Immigration should not be treated as enem ies of the state nor should they be milked for money. “Regrettably, some public officers, assisted, indeed abetted by some members of the public, have fallen prey to a ‘pay to play’c ulture. At the Immigration Department, it has led to allegations that for a price, some officers ‘look the other way’ at p orts of entry. “Other allegations suggest that applications submitted for consideration at the departm ent can be accelerated, or f alsified supporting documents overlooked, to assist a ‘paying’ customer. Persons making applicat ions for work permits or for permanent residence or for registration as a national are not enemies of the state, nor a re they ‘patsies’ to be hit upon for tips. They are clients or customers seeking a service that the Department of Immigration and its officers have been engaged to f acilitate,” he said. Mr Ingraham said he wants to assure the department’s staff that government is firmly committed to advancing the pace of mode rnisation in the public service. “We will not rest until we have achieved a sustained level of improved efficiency and productivity in every department,” he said. T he prime minister said that members of the public often complain of inefficienciese xperienced at the hands of the Department of Immigration. Individuals submitting applications to the department whether for a work permit, a certificate of permanent resi dency or for nationalisation should not be required to resubmit documents because they have been mis-filed and o r lost by the department. L etters written to the department ought to be acknowledged and responded to in a reasonable period of t ime – not six months or a year later – or not at all,” Mr Ingraham said. The prime minister also m ade a point to assure immigration officers that individual performance and service standards will impact the career advancement of public officers. For too long now, I think, public service training policies have disproportionately placed the greatest emphasis on ‘qualifications’ as a primary basis for advancement in t he public service. This has been second only to ‘experience’ which translates into length of service, as the basis for promotion,” he said. As a result of these policies, Mr Ingrah am said, the Bahamas’ “culture of service” has diminished over the years. Careers in the public sector became more about personal advancement and less about t he delivery of effective, cost-efficient service to the public. Some very good people got trapped in what has become a poor system of m anagement and administration. And, as a result we are not receiving from our public employees the best that they are able to produce,” he said. Very importantly, this training confere nce places the emphasis where it rightly belongs – on customer service. What we seek to achieve is a re-orientation to new modes of conduct. We want to improve serv ice standards by increasing the level of professionalism and customer focus to public service management. We want to improve accessibility to government services, expedite d elivery timelines and promote high standards. We seek to build capacity and set and regulate standards of performance so as to make best practices become common practice.” M r Ingraham said that his government is working on change “department by department and ministry by ministry throughout the public service.” RED Bays, North Andros will host its sixth annual cultural festival, homecoming and snapper fishing tournament on May 14 to 16. Alphonso Smith, snapper tournament co-ordinator, said this year’s event will be held in honour of Frank Hanna, who has been a participant and sponsor of the event since the beginning. Fifteen boats, each manned by four fishermen, are expected to participate in the tournament, which starts at 8am and ends at 4pm on Saturday, May 16. Mr Smith says fishing enthusiasts are coming from New Providence, Abaco, Exu ma and Grand Bahama. Only snappers will be counted and the winner will be the boat with the largest catch. The prizes are: First – $1,500 Second – $1,000 Third – $750 Fourth – $300 n By KARIN HERIG Tribune Staff Reporter kherig@tribunemedia.net ADDRESSING claims that some immigration officers use excessive force during apprehension and detention exercises, Prime Minister Hubert Ingraham yesterday stressed that his government does not tolerate the abuse of detainees or suspected illegal immigrants. “I want to be clear: abuse of detained persons whether in their homes, at a work site, on an immigration bus or at the Carmichael Road Detention Centre is contrary to the law. Everyone must be treated with respect andwith dignity at all times; that is the law and that is the policy of the government which I head,” he said. Speaking to officers at the first annual customer service conference for the Immigration Department at the Wyndham Cable Beach Resort yesterday morning, Mr Ingraham said they should all keep in mind that the Bahamas is party to international human rights conventions, including those related to the rights of refugees and other persons held in detention. “We expect immigration officers to respect the protocols called for by those conventions and by our own laws and constitution which guarantee respect for the human rights of all individuals in the Bahamas regardless of their immigra tion status. And, I may add, this includes the obligationof immigration officers to relay claims from illegal immigrants of any fear of persecution expressed byan illegal immigrant/potential refugee on return to his or her country of origin,” he said. Mr Ingraham’s state ments come just days after detainees at theC armichael Road Deten tion Centre announced that their living conditions have improved greatly followinga series of Tribune articles detailing claims of chronic abuse and neglect at thef acility . Immigration Minister Branville McCartney said he was “pleasantly surprised” when he toured the centre with immigration b osses last week. The Immigration Department recently appointed a fact-finding committee comprised of psychologist Dr David Allen, Social Services director Mellany Zon icle, Archdeacon James Palacious, and Immigration director Jack Thompson. The committee toured the Detention Centre and spoke with the detainees in March. However, their report has yet to be made public and The Tribune’s request to tour the facility has not been granted. Govt won’t ‘look the other way’ from corruption allegations PM speaks out over ‘insolent behaviour’ by Immigration Dept PM addresses claims of immigration officials accepting bribes T o have your say on this or any other issue, email The Tribune at: l etters@tribunemedia.net or deliver your l etter to The Tribune on Shirley Street, P .O. Box N-3207 PM:govt does not tolerate abuse of detainees Red Bays to host its annual cultural festival Hubert Ingraham

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C M Y K C M Y K LOCAL NEWS PAGE 6, TUESDAY, MAY 12, 2009 THE TRIBUNE Princess Butler P.O. Box ES-6069 Nassau, Bahamas Brendilee Rolle P.O. Box 7290 Pine Barron Road Nassau, Bahamas Tamika Williams P.O. Box F 42299 Freeport, Bahamas Tiffany Rolle P.O. Box GT 2395 Nassau, Bahamas Tanya Rolle P.O. Box GT 2395 Nassau, Bahamas Bridgette Hog P.O. Box GT 2395 Nassau, Bahamas Theresa Deleveaux P.O. Box N 732 Nassau, Bahamas Albert Smith P.O. Box SS-6104 Nassau, Bahamas Granville Neville Williams 485 Inagua Avenue, Freeport, Grand Bahama Ms. Alquennia Rolle-Cunningham General Delivery Moore's Island, Abaco Charlissa C.D. Poitier P.O. Box N-978 Nassau Bahamas Eddison Paul Sweeting Jr. Nassau Bahamas Michelle Sweeting Nassau Bahamas Christon Mackey Nassau, Bahamas Terasean Sweeting P.O. Box CR 56708 Sunset Park Nassau, Bahamas Kemuel Delancey P.O. Box CR 56708 Sunset Park Nassau, Bahamas Terry Sweeting P.O. Box CR 56708 Sunset Park Nassau, Bahamas James Wallace Nassau, Bahamas Stafford Bullard P.O. Box N 3730 Nassau, Bahamas Larado D. Evans P.O. Box N 3730 Nassau, Bahamas Francis Roberts P.O. Box SS5175 Nassau, Bahamas Mr. Godfrey Roberts Freeport, Grand Bahama The following individuals are asked to contact Mrs. KimleySaunders (396-2047) or Ms. Kayshonta Smith (396-2031) at ColinaImperial Insurance Ltd: Yesterday’s Young Man’s View evaluated the performance of Deputy Prime Minister Brent Symonette (CEnvironment Earl Deveaux (B+ State Minister for Immigration Branville McCartney (BM inister of National Security Tommy Turnquest (F+ the column continues its analysis of the nation’s executive branchtwo years into the FNM’s tenure. n By ADRIAN GIBSON ajbahama@hotmail.com Z hivargo Laing, the thinly gilded golden boy and Minister of State for Finance, earns a C-plus. During his tenure, he has attempted to stabilize the financial status of the country while dealing with a multitude of controversial issues (Clico, Globa l United, matters related to trade policy, etc). Early on in the global economic downturn, Mr Laing recklessly dug in with an economic forecast that was erroneous even though reputable international economic forecasters and publications had rightly predicted an economic slump. A lthough he has at times been a ccused of being insufferably pompous and increasingly morer eactive than proactive, there is no one better at diffusing controv ersial political issues, explaining issues in a manner that average Bahamians can grasp and/or offering thinly veiled excuses. Thus far, although the B ahamas has signed on to the EPA, Mr Laing has done little tom eet its requirements of establishing a Standards Bureau, which w ould deal with imports and be tasked with ensuring the health and safety of the Bahamas; Customs Reform, which calls for a rules of origin regime; Govern m ent Procurement, which calls for transparency relative to gove rnment-issued contracts and the advertisement of all government purchases; and the Single Administrative Form, set to bring simplification and lucidity to the p rocess when making declarations on imported items. Huge legisla t ive and policy reforms are needed to meet the requirements of t he EPA and Mr Laing has yet to explain how the money will be generated or procured to implement the agreement. I have also been reliably informed that the B ahamas’ service offer relative to the services aspect of the EPA h as not been accepted. As it relates to the Bahamas, how does the country fare in what i s rapidly appearing to be a global agreement to rein in tax havens? Furthermore, what is the Bahamas’ role in the context of world trade talks? Carl Bethel , the bright but sometimes ostentatious Minister of Education, earns a B. Although I have previously critic ised the minister for his bellicose grandstanding on certain issues, it’s clear that he is hampered by bureaucracy, inter-ministry politics and challenges in his ministry that are i nstitutional. Although Mr Bethel’s ministry had appeared to slowly react to charges of molestation against teachers, I have been reliably i nformed that there is evidence showing where the Department o f Education attempted to suppress complaints against accused p ersons long before Mr Bethel entered the hot seat. I’m told thatu nder the PLP, an unqualified, a ccused person was appointed to a senior position, contrary to thea dvice of the Public Service Commission. O f late, the minister has moved to bring about sweeping changes a nd focus in the structure of the Department of Education, isl aunching an educational reform council, has implemented a rapid reaction team that is directlya ccountable to him and has pushed for the presence of study h alls in schools throughout the Family Islands and a learn-toe arn programme. He is the only minister, in recent time, to have e nsured the smooth, timely opening of schools for two years running. With that said, there is also an urgent need for curriculum reform, which should properly r eflect the historical/cultural elements of the Bahamas. T he Ministry of Education must take a cue from regional n eighbours such as Trinidad and Tobago that have made Spanish a mandatory component of the curriculum and proposes to have a bilingual society by 2020, particu larly in consideration of its close proximity to South America. Implementing mandatory foreign language classes into our overall development plan would be one of many forward thinking approaches to our educational/social development, especially since students at local s chools are not effectively taught conversational Spanish/French but instead are merely taught to remember sight words. Sadly, because we are incapable of meeting the need locally, the Bahamas will have to import foreign language translators for the Miss Universe pageant. A new approach must be taken to reform education, as each year nearly a third of the graduating students are functional illiterates. While Mr Bethel is an astute politician who appears to take his j ob seriously, it is clear that some of his officers/educators are not s erving him well. I also credit Mr Bethel for his maintenance of his c onstituency office, which I know firsthand, is opened on a dailyb asis. M ichael Barnett , the Attorney General and Minister of LegalA ffairs, earns an I for incomplete or a QF for what’s appearing to h ave been a quick failure. Mr Barnett reminds me of the invisi b le man. Under his tenure, there has been no improvement in thei nfrastructure or administration of the justice/legal system, there appears to be no initiative relatingt o the tenure and payment of judges, no new hiring and recruitm ent of attorneys to the AG’s office to deal with issues such as t rade reform and criminal mat ters and little efforts to incentivize l awyers to leave their practices and sit on the bench. Mr Barnett appears to have fallen asleep at the wheel, so someone should tickle him. A s the chief minister of justice, Mr Barnett has done little to con f ront the deficiencies of the justice system and show that justice in t he Bahamas is transparent. He has also said little about the charges and accusations levelled at certain members of the judiciary. Frankly, Mr Barnett reminds me of a partygoer who is still at a stag party with a wedding ceremony having been long completed. He has hardly made the public aware of any amendm ents to laws or the introduction of bills to confront 21st century criminals. The justice minister, who seems quite reactive, must also seek to push for disciplinary action to be taken against corrupt attorneys, bring in special prosecutors and provide the police prosecutors with additional r esources. As it stands, Mr Barnett’s performance has been so abysmal that in my opinion he should leave his cheque at the Treasury or donate it to the constituents of Fort Charlotte. Byran Woodside , the Minister of State for Lands and Local Government, appears to only be a m inister in name, since there is no such thing as a minister of lands when it is really the Cabinet and the Prime Minister who collectively decide on the issuance of Crown land. In the granting of land, Mr Woodside doesn’t have the power to make much happen beyond maybe a strong promise! M inister Woodside has d ropped off the scene since he won his election court case, mere-l y appearing to be serving as the PM’s eyes and ears and “pushing p aper” at the PM’s office. The minister and others at the Department of Lands and Surveys should set out to create a website pertaining to the availableC rown land on each island, simplify the process so that moreB ahamians can qualify for grants, revise policies governing land g rants, reform the land registration process and amend the Quieting of Titles Act, which encourages land grabs. Mr Woodside, who is drifting right along, earns a C for being present. Kenneth Russell , the Minister o f Housing who is off to a late start, earns a B-minus for having rescued his ministry from the brink of bankruptcy. Mr Russell has set out promoting homeown e rship and the assistance of throngs of low-to-middle-class B ahamians in their pursuit of home ownership. In his attempt t o fulfil his pledge to build a record number of houses before the end of his term, the minister has already initiated the con struction of subdivisions such asA rdastra Estates and Dignity Gardens II, has sought and overs een the passage of legislation reducing the down payment for government-initiated houses, has expanded the construction of affordable housing to the Family Islands and has proposed to construct better quality housesof various designsin accordance w ith the country’s building codes. Vincent Vanderpool-Wallace , the Minister of Tourism and Aviation, has not successfully applied himself to the task of differentiating and reinvigorating our tourism product and our marketing approach. Frankly, Mr Vand erpool-Wallace who was promoted as the visionary guru of tourism has been a disappointment. The tourism minister has not affirmed the country’s position as a tourist destination, has yet to propose new ideas for the diversification of our tourism product and has not extended the Bahama Host programme or implemented any much-needed training requirements for line staff at tourism-related properties. The ministry has not made the dist inction between the Bahamas a nd any other country in the wider Caribbean in terms ofi ndigenous local tours, using junkanoo in more substantive f orms, tapping into the promotion of historical preservation and heritage tourism and supporting small Bahamian boutique resorts (eg, bed and breakfast, bonefishl odges). Thus far, room capacity in the Bahamas has been reducedf rom about 14,000 to 10,000 while the Dominican Republic has 3 0,000 rooms and Cuba’s tourism market is coming online. With declining tourist arrivals, how is Mr Vanderpool-Wallace going to respond to Cuba’s possi b le opening or the United States’ slackening of travel restrictions? T he tourism minister is of to a slow start and earns a miserable C-minus. Desmond Bannister , the Minister of Youth, Sports and Cul t ure, seems to have been engaged and appears to be creating a coali t ion with the movers and shakers of the sporting world to jump s tart some of the various sporting disciplines that have been dor mant for years. However, there is a need for youth development programmes. M r Bannister has also gained the reputation of a hardworking M P, whose efforts in Carmichaelinclusive of the recently installed community benches alongside the road is laudable. As the substantive minister, he appears to have not done well with his mentorship of Charles Maynard. Overall, he e arns a B. Phenton Neymour , the Minister of State with oversight of public utilities, earns an unimpressive D-plus. While Mr Neymour seems limited in his capacity, Bahamians continue to receive appalling service from government corporat ions and are time and again subjected to power cuts and overpriced services. Mr Neymour seems to be a reactionary minister and since he usually doesn’t appear to be either here or there on some issues, he is credited with being a good communicator with lots of speeches. L arry Cartwright , the Minister of Agriculture and Marine Resources, earns a B-plus. While it does appear that Mr Cartwright has done well, he must be careful not to be seen to be maintaining the status quo. Of late, the minister has been placing heavy emphasis on agric ulture while promoting the conc ept of self-sufficiency. However, the government must help tod iversify the agricultural output of the Bahamas, encouraging local m arkets and endorsing the purchase of more Bahamian-grown crops. As minister, Mr Cartwright must see to it that greater techni c al assistance is provided to farmers, he must reassure FamilyI sland farmers of their capacity to market and export and he must a ssist in the movement of local farming from a labour intensive setup to a scientific, 21st century operation (duty-free, hybrid seeds, etc). F urthermore, although fishermen are in need of tremendous s upport, the marine resources department seemingly lacks vision and innovation and is one of the few government departments that actually sends money b ack to the government during each annual budget. T he duo of Mr Cartwright and Edison Key has recently cond ucted a successful agricultural fair and appears to be reviving an interest in farming for the first time in years. The final lineup in Adrian G ibson’s evaluation of Cabinet ministers/the government will be p ublished tomorrow. Grading the performance of Government ministers Y OUNG M AN S V IEW ADRIANGIBSON

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LEGAL sources close to former Justice John Lyons suggested yesterday that the senior judge h ad been asked to resign earlier t his year over an incident involving Chief Justice Sir Burton Hall, and not, as believed, because of a l ater incident in which he was crit icised by Justice Anita Allen. H is resignation, according to sources, was only being announced now after Justice Allen made accusations against him involving the appointment ofa n accountant in another case and questioned whether she shouldr ecuse herself from the case because of her background k nowledge of that appointment. Speaking on condition of anonymity, a lawyer told The Tribune that Chief Justice Sir Burton Hall was “infuriated” over a rul i ng in January this year by Mr Lyons, which suggested that he a nd the Attorney General had “colluded in a conspiracy” by t heir alleged actions over the certification of court transcripts by Magistrate Linda Virgil. “They called Justice Lyons in over that and what I understood w as that he had tendered his resignation from then, but that it m ay only have been made public last week,” said the lawyer, who isa friend of Mr Lyons. Retir ement Yesterday a clerk in the Chief Justice’s office told The Tribune that Sir Burton was not taking p ress inquiries on the subject of Mr Lyon’s retirement. T his comes as several legal insiders suggested that Mr Lyon’s d eparture was not of his own voli tion, but instead, demanded in a letter from the Chief Justice. While the judge had come under fire in recent months b ecause of his handling of certain cases over which he presided,n umerous lawyers have spoken out since his departure to comm end his “industrious” work eth ic and valuable expertise in the field of commercial law. O thers complimented him on the stand he took on the indep endence of the judiciary in 2006 while still a judge in Freeport. Y esterday Bar Association President Wayne Munroe suggested that the authorities may have difficulty finding a suitable replacement for Mr Lyons as numerous lawyers have said it must be done expeditiously. Referring s pecifically to t he suggestion that McKinney, Bancroft a nd Hughes senior partner B rian Moree may take up the vacancy, Mr Munroe said the lawyer “might well be ag ood addition,” but added that he “can’t see” him accepting. (He would be required take a monstrous cut in pay and h ave to sit in substandard and uninhabitable buildings, put up with the nonsense of dealing with the executive branch of government and the fact that any idiotc an say whatever they wish about you and you can’t defend your s elf.” The attorney said being a judge t akes “superhuman self control.” “As somebody who has judicial ambitions myself, this is what c auses me to think well I really wouldn’t follow through with it because I’m not sure I have the ability when people talk foolishness, to hold my hand (in terms of n ot sending someone to court for contempt when they come before y ou)”. A message left for Mr Moree w as not returned up to press time. C M Y K C M Y K LOCAL NEWS THE TRIBUNE TUESDAY, MAY 12, 2009, PAGE 7 '(6,*1 (1*,1((5,1* &203(7,7,9(,&,1* )$67%,'',1*,1)250$7,21 5RDGWR&LW\'XPSDIWHUUHPL[ (PDLOJJRQJRUD#FRUDOZDYHFRP n B y TANEKA THOMPSON T ribune Staff Reporter t thompson@tribunemedia.net THE Bahamas is in discussions with Commonwealth Secretary General Kamalesh Sharma to determine the extent of assistance it will offer Trinidad for the Commonwealth Heads of Government Meeting in November. Minister of Foreign Affairs and Deputy Prime Minister Brent Symonette, who spoke to The Tribune from Grand Bahama yesterday, said he expected to meet with Mr Sharma yesterday afternoon to iron out the CHOGM agenda. While the agenda for the meeting is still "a work in progress" Mr Symonette said that issues such as climate change, regional security and the future role of the Commonwealth are likely to be topmost on the list. Agenda "The prime minister will be going to that meeting and we'll be bringing up the agenda very shortly. . . That meeting is not until November so we're still discussing the whole issue," he said. Mr Symonette said it was too early to say what level of support this country will offer Trinidad. "We haven't finalised that yet. I'm not sure for instance whether we'll be sending Defence Force officers. “Those things haven't been nailed down yet. “I don't want to say that we're going to be doing 'x, y, z' and that's not the case, but we'll obviously try and assist as best we can," said Mr Symonette. Trinidad will host its second major international summit in November; the country recently hosted the Summit of the Americas in April, attended by several world leaders including US President Barack Obama. The Bahamas hosted the CHOGM in 2006 and should be able to offer Trinidad advice on preparing for the prestigious meeting. n By TANEKA THOMPSON Tribune Staff Reporter t thompson@tribunemedia.net IN an effort to avoid any future impropriety, president of the Bahamas Bar CouncilW ayne Munroe is calling for a change in the law which allows the prime minister to appoint justices to the Courto f Appeal without consulting members of the legal fratern ity. He suggested the rules be changed to include a provi-s ion allowing for consultation with the bar council first, so potential justices canb e vetted before appointment. " We take things too narrowly politically – right now you have a Judicial LegalS ervices Commission where two lawyers are appointed. U nfortunately they're appointed by the prime minister. There's no reason under the sun why the prime minist er should appoint people who you have thought would have been representing theb ar," said Mr Munroe. "And so all you need is for it to be changed to ‘appointed by the prime minister under the direction of theb ar council’ and there you have provisions for consultat ion of the profession. Unfortunately the appointments to the Court of Appeal are wholly done by the prime minister; we justn eed to remove that type of apparent, even if not real, ability to do something unto-w ard. "Because all you need is o ne ambitious prime minister who might try it," he said. Constitution Under the country's constitution, the president of the Court of Appeal and otherj ustices of appeal are appointed by the governorgeneral after recommendation by the prime minister,and consultation with the l eader of the opposition. The constitution also says that the appointment of the c hief justice must follow the same procedure. The justices of the S upreme Court are appointed by the governor-general acting on the advice of the Judicial and Legal Service Commission – a five member group chaired by the chief justice. Although he has no legal obligation to do so, current member of the commission Lester Mortimer – whose appointment is set to expire next year – informs the bar council about impending judicial appointments, Mr Munroe said. He argued that if Mr Mortimer's replacement does not see fit to continue this courtesy, the bar council may be forced to publicly criticise any selections it believes are unfit. "There's going to come a time – and it would appear from what I'm hearing, very soon – that the bar council, after a judicial appointment is made, is going to have to publicly say the profession does not feel that this personis qualified to be a judge. “We would hope that that doesn't have to happen because it would tend to scandalise someone on the bench and that would not be good for the administration of justice. "If they continue not to properly take our views onboard, and the minute that they appoint somebody who falls so low below the standard that we don't think they ought to be in that position, then we would have tosay it. And all of that can be avoided by canvassing us," he said. Call for change to rules on a ppeal justices appointments In brief C OMMONWEALTH HEADS OF GOVERNMENT MEETING Brent Symonette Lyons asked to resign ‘after criticising Chief Justice’ John Lyons Bahamas in talks over helping Trinidad for November meeting I I N N S S I I G G H H T T F o o r r t t h h e e s s t t o o r r i i e e s s b b e e h h i i n n d d t t h h e e n n e e w w s s , , r r e e a a d d I I n n s s i i g g h h t t o o n n M M o o n n d d a a y y s s “They called Justice Lyons in o ver that and what I u nderstood was that h e had tendered his resignation from then, but that it may only have been m ade public last w eek” L awyer friend of Lyons

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C M Y K C M Y K LOCALNEWS PAGE 8, TUESDAY, MAY 12, 2009 THE TRIBUNE “above” such matters, and a source close to him said they “hadn’t heard anything” about him relinquishing the post, other political commentators said his time may soon be up. “I have heard the Governor General may be stepping down,” said one political observer. However, both this observer and another political source expressed surprise at the suggestion made on a political blog that senate president Lynn Holowesko may be appointed in place of Mr Hanna one source even going so far as to suggest that such a move by the Prime Minister would “cause a number of (FNMs py.” However, the same observer conceded that Mrs Holowesko shares a “very special relationship” w ith the Prime Minister. “Although it comes as a surp rise, it may well be something which the Prime Minister does,” the commentator added. The current senate president, an avid supporter of the FNM, is said to have made “a lot of sacri fices” for the party. The second political source told this newspaper that he would be “surprised if Janet Bostwick was overlooked” for the post, should the Prime Minister replace the current Governor General and be disposed to appoint a woman to the top job. “She has given distinguished service to the country that would make her worthy of consideration for the post,” said the source, adding that “everyone knows (she has been waiting in the wings.” Agreeing with the political o bserver, who said the names of Sir Arthur Foulkes and former m inister of finance Sir William Allen “in particular” had been mentioned in replacing the Governor-General, the Opposition source noted that Sir Arthur has a “similar legacy” to the GovernorGeneral. Contacted yesterday for comment, former prime minister and opposition leader Perry Christie told The Tribune he “has not been consulted with respect to anything” in relation to the replacement of Mr Hanna. Meanwhile, Mrs Bostwick said she “definitely has not” been approached to take up the job since 2002 when she had agreed to run for the party in that year’s elections. A message left for Mrs Holowesko was not returned up to press time. will remain in the Bahamas until justice has been served. S peaking out yesterday, Ilt Jones said: “I wish to make this s tatement on behalf of Hywel’s family following his tragic deatho n Friday, May 8, following his c owardly shooting on April 22. We have been assured by the R oyal Bahamas Police Force that investigations into the shooting a re ongoing and that all lines of inquiry will be thoroughly inves t igated. “Although for obvious reasons t he police have not always been able to share details of the lines of i nquiry they are following, we have been assured that progress has been made. A reward of $50,000 has been posted through Crime Stoppers f or information that leads to the prosecution of those behind the s hooting. “We urge anyone who knows a nything that may assist the police in their investigations to call 3288477 in Nassau or 242-300-8476 for the Family Islands. The caller’s identity will remain a nonymous. “My mother and I would like t o pass on our heartfelt thanks for all the sympathy and messages o f support and goodwill that we have received following the shooting and Hywel’s death. “We have been moved by the affection for Hywel expressed by people from all levels of Bahami-a n society. “That Hywel has touched the l ives of so many is reflected by the incredible response to the a ppeal for blood donors at Doctor’s Hospital. “Through his charitable work and significant contribution to banking education in this countryH ywel made a very positive contribution to the Bahamian nation. It’s hard for our family to look beyond the pain we are suffering. But Hywel’s shooting affects every Bahamian. That a promin ent and respected member of the Bahamian financial services sector has been gunned down in broad daylight outside his office in a popular tourist area in whata ppears to be a ‘hit’ has already been widely reported around thew orld. “In a country so reliant on f inancial services and to which its image as a safe and friendly tourist destination is so important, it’s vital to the very well being of the Bahamian economyt hat the person or persons behind the killing are swiftly brought toj ustice.” The $50,000 reward posted by C rime Stoppers is made up of donations from friends of Hywel J ones and well-wishers all over the world. Ilt Jones will meet with police t omorrow to further assist investigations, and said he will remain in the Bahamas for as long as nece ssary. H e said: “I intend to stay as long as it takes to help the police bring whoever it is to justice and provide them with any informat ion they may need.” Hywel Jones’ body will be take n to South Wales for burial, and a funeral service will be held for h is many friends in Nassau on S aturday, May 23. Ilt Jones said: “He was very fun-loving and well liked so I’m keen for it to be more of a celeb ration of his life than a memorial and I’m encouraging peoplet o submit funny anecdotes and memories of Hywel to compile in a booklet for the service.” slim build, five feet nine inches tall, and weighing an estimated 165 pounds. Described as having “uncombed” hair, the police are uncertain of the victim’s occupation and are appealing for anyone with information to contact them at 911, 919 , or their nearest police station. In other police news, a 26-year-old resident of Harbour Island drowned over the weekend after taking a group of 14 persons out in his 17-foot Boston Whaler. According to police press liaison officer Walter Evans, some time around 8 o’clock Sunday night, the 26-year-old man left Harbour Island in the Boston Whaler with 14 passengers onboard. The vessel experienced some difficulties sometime later and the 14 passengers were able to swim to safety. However, sometime around 9am yesterday, the body of the man was discovered floating in waters around Harbour island ina “motionless state.” While the police believe he may have drowned, an autopsy is being performed to determine the exact cause of death. from hearing all matters before him. The case involving The Central Bank of Ecuador against Conticorp SA and Luis and Jaime Ortega was expected to start this week. Justice Lyons’ resignation is expected to take effect in August. Last week lawyer Fred Smith, a partner in the firm Callenders and Co appealed Justice Lyons’ decision not to recuse himself from the case. Callenders represents Conticorp, the defendant in the case. Mr Smith had contended that Justice Lyons had demonstrated hostility towards lawyers of the Callenders’ firm on three separate occasions last month and that his statements from the bench created a perceived bias against Callenders. Mr Smith had made the application for recusal before Justice Lyons on April 20, however the judge refused to step down from the case. In his ruling on the issue on April 30, Justice Lyons had admitted that he been angry over the controversy that had stemmed from another civil case but that his anger by then had dissipated. He said that he did not believe that an objective observer would conclude that he would be biased towards Callenders and its clients. Mr Smith submitted to the appellate court last week, however, that it was clear to an objective observer that the judge had directed his anger towards the Callenders’ firm. The ruling handed down by Court of Appeal President Dame Joan Sawyer stated, “It is clear from the notes Mr Smith read into the record of this court of what transpired on April 20, 2009 that the learned judge conducted the case management conference with his usual aplomb and that Mr Smith had no real apprehension that the learned judge harboured any animosity towards him as counsel or the law firm of which he is a partner. However, the objective observer would not necessarily be fixed with any knowledge of the learned judge’s character.” The ruling further stated, “The objective observ er would be expected to have no personal knowledge of any of the parties or of the judge. The court must therefore ask itself what an objective and fair minded observer with knowledge of all the circumstances as shown on the evidence, would have any doubt that the judge on that day would have been impartial in his treatment.” “Applying this test to the circumstances of this appeal, we consider this case to be a borderline one because we cannot say that such an observer would not have had doubt about the emotional state of the judge on that date. For that reason and that alone, we allow the appeal.” Justice Lyons made headlines last month after Senior Justice Anita Allen questioned his appointment of Daniel Ferguson, an accountant, to work on a recent case knowing full well that he shared “more than a friendship” with Mr Ferguson’s sister. Mr Ferguson’s sister also assisted her brother with preparing documents for the case, said Justice Allen as she decided whether or not to recuse herself from hearing the matter “on the ground of apparent bias” because of her knowledge of this matter. This dis closure prompted calls for Justice's Lyons resignation. CITY Lumber, an 83-year-old b usiness, founded by the late Sir G eorge Roberts, is still very much in business on Marathon Road. In Tribune Business on Mond ay it was reported that “the old City Lumberyard, which met its end by fire several years ago, has received more than a $15 m illion makeover from its new o wners who are developing the almost 12-acre property into Builder’s Mall.” This was incorrect. The refe rence was to a fire that destroyed the old Bahamian Lumber Company, which was located on Wulff Road. T his property has since been p urchased by Mr Mark Roberts for his newly created Builder’s Mall. Bahamian Lumber was starte d in 1959 by the three sons of the late Ronald Albury David, Jimmy, and Billy. It was purchased by Messrs D avid Thompson and Samuel S awyer, directors of Pioneer Shipping, around 1979 and operated until the September 7, 1990 fire. A bout three years ago the a lmost 12-acre property was purchased by Mr Mark Roberts a nd turned into a large Builder’s Mall. “The idea behind Builder’s Mall is that we would like to create a facility that makes ite asy to come and do a lot of construction-oriented business,” s aid the young businessman. ( See correction on page 1 of today’s Business section). Located at Builder’s Mall will be four businesses owned by Mr R oberts, in addition to two independent businesses whose owners are leasing space from him. Mr Robert’s Tile King, which s pecialises in tile, granite, and n atural stone, has moved to the Mall from its Palmdale location. Also located at the Mall is Mr Robert’s newest business, Fix Y our Place (FYP lumber, hardware and building materials, and the Paint Centre, which offers a wide range of p aints. M r Roberts is now working on plans for manufacturing large slabs of marble and granite for counter tops and custom-made g ranite and marble products. It will be a separate granite-marble centre. Also located at Builder’s Mall i s the business of M.R. Higgs, o wned by Mr Andrew Higgs, which specialises in awnings, shutters and window treatment. And Tamboura Coleby’s F reedom Appliances and Elect ronics, which carries a wide range of appliances and elect ronic equipment, is also to be found at the Mall. In the meantime Mr Roberts’ Tile King premises in Palmdale is listed for sale with BahamasR ealty. MRS FREDA RUSSELL had been out of education for many years, but her impact on Nassau society will be felt for a long time to come. Mrs Russell, who was 97, had a significant impact on the many children who had her as a kindergarten teacher at Queen’s College, including many Bahamians who over the years have held leading positions in government and the community. She was described by many who knew her as a “remarkable woman” who worked tirelessly in her field of education so much so that she was honoured with a British Empire Medal in 2002. Born in Bangalore, India in 1911 where her father had taken up a post with the Methodist Church, Mrs Russell returned to England in 1921 and entered a local boarding school. She came to the Bahamas on October 24, 1932 with her parents when her father was appointed chairman of the Methodist church here. In 1933 Mrs Russell started her career as Queen’s College’s kindergarten teacher after accepting the post which was offered her by QC headmaster Rev RP Dyer while she was still at school in England. Mrs Russell taught at Queen’s College until 1964. Marrying Mr Seighbert Russell, brother of the founder of the Stop ’N Shop, a well known Bay Street store, in the late 1930’s, Mrs Russell never had any children of her own, but loved her nieces, nephews and young students dearly. Her husband died in August 1992. A great reader, Mrs Russell had a sharp mind and was able to recall the names and anecdotal stories about her students whenever she met them around town. In her retired years, said a niece, Mrs Russell enjoyed her dogs and roses very much and was a great lover of chocolate in any form. Suffering from a stroke in December of last year, Mrs Russell has been bedridden since. She died peacefully on Sunday at 1.30pm at her Lakeside Road home. Funeral arrangements will be announced at a later date. City Lumber on Marathon Road is still in business Stabbing victim is the nation’s latest homicide FROM page one Former kindergarten teacher Freda Russell dies age 97 MRS FREDA RUSSELL He hit me on the right side of my face, knocked my glasses off, and the person escorting me through t he building grabbed me and stood between us until he walked away.” M r Smith said he is not bruised but his glasses have been broken and he will press charges and seek d amages for the $600 spectacles. The court orders came after union executives split over which day to hold nominations for the council elections. Union general secretary Leo Douglas called a m eeting for nominations on Monday, May 4, but current first vice-president and presidential hopefulK irk Wilson refused to nominate himself last week as he maintained the legitimate nomination day was s cheduled for May 11. Mr Smith, who claims to represent six out of the 10 union executives, including Mr Wilson, said May 11 is the correct nomination day, which was decided at the last meeting of the full executive council on April 2 2. He said: “The executive council is the supreme a uthority on the union and in the circumstances a meeting was duly called, duly held today and the p eople nominated were duly nominated today. “The meeting on May 4 was of no significance.” Mr Smith maintains three parties and one indep endent candidate including Kirk Wilson and Tyrone ‘Rock’ Morris representing the Unity party were legitimately nominated yesterday. However, Mr Douglas insists only the May 4 nom i nations are valid. The general secretary said: “Keod Smith cannot s peak on behalf of this union. I’m responsible for the running of the day-to-day business of the union ando fficial communication. “We have already written to the registrar of trade u nions in relation to the Industrial Relations Act to inform them they are required to conduct a poll on May 28. “We haven’t seen any other nominations and if they bring anything to me I will throw it in the g arbage.” Mr Douglas maintains another attorney repre s ents the majority of council members, including himself, president Roy Colebrook, and four others w ho make up six out of 11 on the board. But it was Mr Smith who found himself at the centre of the row yesterday. He said: “I have been an activist for a great part of my adult life so I have been boxed around and p ushed about before. I am not delicate and I am one who believes you can’t expect to be in the box-i ng ring saying you are a boxer and not expect to be hit, literally or figuratively. I am not bruised, the biggest difficulty is that my glasses were destroyed,” he said. F ROM page one Brother of slain banker FROM page one Former MP is punched in face FROM page one Governor General Appeal for recusal FROM page one

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n By STEPHEN MACKEY Associated Press Writer MADRID (AP B arcelona hopes Wednesday's C opa del Rey final against u nderdog Athletic Bilbao at Mestalla Stadium runs more smoothly than its recent gamesas it bids to win the trophy for a record 25th time. The Catalan team, which last won Spain's knockout competition 11 years ago at the same Valencia venue, has endured some high drama in an attempt to become the first Spanish team to win the league, cup and Champions League in a single season. Last Wednesday, Andres Iniesta's injury-time goal earned Barcelona a 1-1 draw at Chelsea's Stamford Bridge and passage into the Champions League final. Four days later, Barcelona came within three minutes of winning the Spanish league titleat its Camp Nou stadium only for Villarreal to equalize in a 3-3 draw that keeps coach Pep Guardiola's team waiting for at least another week. Guardiola hopes victory against Bilbao will help banish the memory of Sunday's disappointment and act as the pre lude to title celebrations next weekend, setting up the sea-son's finale when it plays Manchester United in Rome on May 27. "Now, we have to raise our selves quickly and put a smile on our faces. It's been a long time since Barcelona played in a Copa del Rey final and we have to win it," Guardiola said. Barcelona's situation contrasts greatly with that of Bilbao, which hasn't won any major silverware since it won the Copa del Rey by beating Barcelona 1-0 at Santiago Bernabeu Stadium 25 years ago. However, Bilbao remains his torically one of Spain's most successful teams and will be bidding to win the Copa del Rey for the 24th time, which would lift it level with Barcelona as record winner. The Basque team would even consider a triumph as its 25th in Spain's knockout competi tion as it also claims the very first Copa del Rey in 1902, which was won by Vizcaya, a representative team comprising some Bilbao players. Bilbao fans are so excited a bout the long-awaited final that about 20,000 of them watched the team's final train ing session at its San Mames stadium on Sunday. Bilbao captain Joseba Etxeberria is optimistic, even thoughh e accepts that Barcelona will s tart as favorites to win the fourth final of six played between the teams. "A single match at a neutral ground, and with both teams at the same strength anything can happen. And when it's Athletic, even more so. We certainly don't rule out a victory and bringing the Cup to Bil bao," Etxeberria said. A Bilbao win would represent a triumph for its policy of selecting Basque-born players, the only exceptions being play e rs from the bordering region of Navarre or those who have passed through its junior teams. Barcelona has been hit by injuries and will be without Iniesta, striker Thierry Henry and defender Rafael Marquez,t ogether with center back Gabi M ilito, a long-term casualty. "Even without Rafa, Titi (Henry ourselves and we'll carry on with what we have got," Guardiola said. "And if we don't have 11 players, we'll use the junior team." Young striker Bojan Krkic, who has led the Barcelona attack in this season's Copa del Rey games, is expected to startt he game. Bilbao has no injury worries, with coach Joaquin Caparros resting more than half his team in Saturday's league game against Real Betis. The depleted team won 1-0 to ensure itsr ecord of never having been rele gated will continue for anoth er season. BARCELONA, Spain (AP fielder Andres Iniesta believes he will overcome his right thigh muscle injury and play in the Champions League final against Manchester United. Iniesta reportedly said after undergoing tests on Monday his 25th birthday that his injury during Barcelona's 3-3 draw the previous day with Villarreal was only "a small tear." Measuring the tear at 2 centimeters (0.8 inches in length, Barcelona would only say that "doctors will be working to get Iniesta fit for the final." The club had already said Iniesta will miss Wednesday's Copa del Rey final against Athletic Bilbao. Iniesta scored Barcelona's late equalizer last Wednesday to earn Barcelona a 1-1 draw at Chelsea and passage into the Champions League final in Rome on May 27. Barcelona is expected to face defending champion United without suspended defenders Eric Abidal and Daniel Alves together with injured Rafael Marquez, while striker Thierry Henry is doubtful with a right knee injury. n By STUART CONDIE AP Sports Writer LONDON (AP tennis player Richard Gasquet was suspended Monday following a positive cocaine test and will not play in the French Open. The International Tennis Federation expects to have a panel in place within 60 days for a hearing. Gasquet could face a two-year ban if found guilty. The 22-year-old player said he is gathering evidence to prove his innocence despite two samples testing positive. He saida separate test of his hair samples May 7 showed no trace of cocaine. Cocaine traces were found in Gasquet's urine sample at the Sony Ericsson Open, in Key Biscayne, Fla., in March. The French Open, the year's second major, begins May 24 and tournament director Gilbert Ysern withdrew Gasquet's name after the provisional suspension. "He's suspended until the end of the hearing," ITF spokesman Neil Robinson said. "We're now assembling an antidoping tribunal. The ideal time frame is within 60 days, but people have to fly in from all over t he world for it." G asquet was ranked No. 7 in July 2007 but has since slipped t o No. 21. He has played just five matches since pulling out o f the Key Biscayne event b efore his second-round match against Albert Montanes of S pain. Gasquet cited a right should er injury for the withdrawal a nd has since returned to play in Barcelona and at the Rome M asters, where he lost in the third round to Fernando Verdasco on May 1. Gasquet lost to Roger Federer in the semifinals at Wimbledon in 2007. He was considered a future star when he first arrived on tour with a onehanded backhand widely considered among the best in the game. Martina Hingis was banned for two years early last year after testing positive for cocaine at Wimbledon. The five-time Grand Slam champion and former top-ranked player failed a test after losing to Laura Granville in 2007. Hingis, who has since retired, b ecame the second WTA player suspended for cocaine after Lourdes Dominguez Lino of Spain was banned for three months in 2002. Former top-ranked men's player Mats Wilander and Karel Novacek had positive tests for cocaine at the 1995 French Open. That was before the introduction of rules to automatically suspend players following a positive second test. Both continued playing before they were banned for three months and ordered to return prize money and forfeit rankings points. C M Y K C M Y K SPORTS TRIBUNE SPORTS TUESDAY, MAY 12, 2009, PAGE 13 Gasquet suspended after testing positive for cocaine MADRID (AP Williams is out of the Madrid Open after aggravating a leg injury in a first-round match against Francesca Schiavone. The second-ranked Williams retired after losing the first set 6 -4 Monday. S he says her movement was h indered by a a recurring injury to her right leg. Williams would not comment on the extent of the injury or whether it would keep her out of the upcoming French Open. Serena Williams injured NYON, Switzerland (AP UEFA on Monday upheld the refereeing decisions that rule out Darren Fletcher of Man chester United and Barcelona's Eric Abidal and Dani Alves from playing in the Champions League final. UEFA's disciplinary committee rejected both clubs' appeals to let the suspended players take part in the May 27 final in Rome. UEFA said in a statement that both clubs missed their deadline to appeal within 24 hours of their semifinals matches played last week. However, UEFA said even prompt appeals "would have been rejected as unfounded as there were no grounds for con testing the referees' original decisions. "All three players are therefore suspended for one UEFA club competition match and will serve their suspensions ... in the UEFA Champions League final," the statement said. Neither club expected success in their appeals because UEFA rules allow for field of play decisions to be overturned only in cases of mistaken identity. Fletcher was sent off after tackling Arsenal's Cesc Fabregas in last Tuesday's semifinal second leg. Fletcher connected with the ball first but his momentum brought down the Spaniard. Abidal was sent off when Chelsea's Nicolas Anelka went down after a challenge last Wednesday, though TV replays suggested there was no contact. Alves received a yellow card that activated a ban because of his past disciplinary record. Alex Ferguson, the United manager, said last Friday that the club wrote UEFA a "compassionate letter" on Fletcher's behalf. "We understand the system and I honestly believe that the referee made the right decision at the time. I thought it was a penalty," Ferguson said. Abidal's red card was one of several disputed decisions made by Norwegian referee Tom Henning Ovrebo, who angered Chelsea players after he turned down a series of penalty appeals. Didier Drogba and Michael Ballack were among the Chelsea players who confronted the referee, and defender Jose Boswinga later used the word "thief" in referring to Ovrebo. UEFA is currently considering what disciplinary action to take against Chelsea players and the club. UEF A rejects Manchester United, Bar celona appeals Iniesta e xpects to pla y in Champions League final Barcelona favourite to lift Copa del Rey IN THIS Thursday, October 16, 2008 file photo, Richard Gasquet serves the ball to Rafael Nadal during a match at the Madrid Masters. (AP Photo: Daniel Ochoa de Olza SERENA WILLIAMS speaks during a press conference after retiring with an injury on her right leg during the Madrid Open... (AP Photo: Daniel Ochoa de Olza) ANDRES INIESTA (center Rodriguez (bottomrightleft on during their Spanish La Liga match at Camp Nou stadium in Barcelona, Spain, on Sunday... (AP Photo: Manu Fernandez

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LAS VEGAS (AP Dawson successfully defended his IBF and IBO light heavyweight titles Saturday night, unanimously outpointing Antonio Tarver in a rematch of their October fight. The undefeated Dawson, who looked lackadaisical at times in fighting off several impressive combinations from the 40-year-old Tarver, had winning scores of 116-112, 117-111 and 117-111 from the three judges. Unlike their bout last fall, when the fast-handed left-hander dominated in a 118-109, 117-110 and 117-110 victory, Saturday's fight at the Hard Rock Hotel and Casino produced plenty of back-and-forth action from start to finish. "He put up a hell of a fight," said Dawson, 28-0 with 17 knockouts. "He definitely took me off my game. My hats off to Antonio Tarver." Dawson landed most of significant punches in the final four rounds, including a flurry of punches at the end of the ninth round arguably his most impressive round. Tarver was the clear aggressor, throwing 749 punches to Dawson's 677. But the 26-yearold Dawson had a 62-14 advantage in punches that connected with the body and connected on 31 percent of his punches. Tarver only landed 16 percent of his punches. "He pushed the fight and took my off my game plan," Dawson said. "He threw a lot of punches, but I was catching most of them." Gary Shaw, Dawson's pro moter, said Tarver gave his fighter everything he could handle. "I don't know how everyone else felt but I was scared in every round," Shaw said. Dawson, who was in the first fight of a two-fight contract with HBO, said he doesn't know who he will fight next. An ideal possibility is Bernard Hopkins, but Shaw said there has been little contact with Hopkins' camp. "I will fight whoever they throw in front of me," Dawson said. "I'm glad I got this rematch out of the way so I could get the fights I deserve." Regardless of the next oppo nent, Dawson knows he needs to improve. Another perfor mance like Saturday could equal his first loss. "I know I didn't have my best night," Dawson said. "I know it wasn't it my best perfor mance. I don't know how much of that had to do with Tarver having a good night." Despite the lopsided outcome in the first meeting, Tarver was confident he would win the rematch. He had also lost to Roy Jones Jr., Glen Johnson and Eric Harding during his career, but avenged all three loses in rematches. He was almost right. Tarver, nicknamed the "Magic Man," believes he proved he still has some magic left in his hands. Tarver, a significant underdog, pieced together successful combinations especially in the earlier rounds the showed the veteran champion wasn't going to be an easy opponent. "I don't feel like a loser up here tonight. I truly don't," Tarver said. "I fought 12 hard rounds and I was in it every round. Let my hands go, and when I like my hands go, I can compete with anyone in the world. I showed that tonight." He definitely surprised Daw son's camp. "You showed tonight what a champions heart is made off," Dawson's trainer, Eddie Muhammad, told Tarver in the post-fight news conference. Hopkins said he isn't sure what the future holds, but could easily see himself returning. "I just went 12 rounds and feel great," he said. Dawson unanimously outpoints T arver C M Y K C M Y K SPORTS PAGE 14, TUESDAY, MAY 12, 2009 TRIBUNE SPORTS DAWSON poses after the fight... ABOVE AND LEFT Chad Dawson (right Tarver during the fifth round of their IBF light heavyweight championship match at the Hard Rock Hotel & Casino, on Saturday in Las Vegas. Tarver won by unanimous decision... (AP Photos n By CHRIS DUNCAN AP Sports Writer HOUSTON (AP Ming out, the Houston Rockets had no chance to beat the Los Angeles Lakers. Right? Wrong. Aaron Brooks scored a career-high 34, Shane Battier sank five 3-pointers and added 23 and the Rockets beat the Lakers 99-87 on Sunday to even their Western Conference semifinal at two games apiece. "I think everyone but us got the memo that we weren't supposed to show up today without Yao," Battier said. Luis Scola had 11 points and 14 rebounds as the Rockets got exactly the team effort they needed after Yao broke his left foot in the Lakers' win in Game 3. Game 5 is Tuesday night in Los Angeles, and anyone who thought the Rockets were finished without their best player only needed to watch the first quarter on Sunday, when Houston built a 29-16 lead. The Rockets never trailed and led by as many as 29 before the Lakers made the score respectable toward t he end. " I'm not surprised," said Battier. " It almost sounds cliche, but we're a resilent group. We talk about bouncing back. Through adversity, through lineup changes, through trades, through injuries, we've never quit and we've never stopped believing." Brooks, in his second NBA season, became Houston's starting point guard when the team dealt Rafer Alston to Orlando at the trade deadline. He faced countless questions about his inexperience before the postseason began, but keeps showing skeptics that he can handle the job. He scored 27 points in Houston's Game 1 win in Portland and had 14 points in the sec ond half of the Rockets' 100-92 vic tory in the opener of this series. Brooks deflected credit to his teammates after this one. "I'm lucky to have these guys," he said. "It makes it a lot easier on me." Pau Gasol scored 30 points and Kobe Bryant had a quiet 15 for Los Angeles. Lakers coach Phil Jackson warned his team about taking the Rockets too lightly after hearing about Yao's injury. But the Lakers looked lethargic from the start, giving away careless turnovers and playing lax defense. "They didn't anticipate the energy that they were going to come with," Jackson said. "But you say as much as you can as a coach and then the players have to execute and do it on the floor." The Rockets opened the game with a 22-7 run, starting 4-of-5 from 3-point range. Bryant scored the Lakers' first three baskets, but the rest of the team missed its first seven shots. Houston led 54-36 at the break. The Lakers grabbed only two offensive rebounds and generated only four fast-break points in their lowest-scoring half of the season. Battier had 15 points at halftime, two more than Bryant. "I just don't think we started the game with the right energy or the right focus or sense of urgency," Bryant said. Los Angeles didn't start the second half too well, either. The Rockets outscored Los Angeles 29-18 in the decisive third quarter, led by Brooks' 17 points. The speedy, 6-foot guard finished the quarter by catching a midcourt pass by Ron Artest and putting in a layup just before the buzzer. Yao, dressed in a dark suit, wore a broad grin and applauded when Brooks sprinted off the floor after the improbable basket. The 7-foot-6 Yao is out for the rest of the playoffs, but the Rockets never doubted they could beat the Lakers without him. "This was the effort we expected," said Battier. "I don't know about the result, but it was the effort that we expected. There was a different look to our team today." Lamar Odom, who scored 16 points in Game 3, drove into Battier and was called for a charge midway through the quarter. He hit the floor hard, limped to the bench and went to the locker room with back spasms. He did not return. Odom will have tests on Monday and said he'll sit out practice. The Rockets led by 27 when Odom was hurt, and when Brooks completed the last-second alley-oop, Artest smacked his hands on the scorers' table and smiled to the roaring crowd, in seeming disbelief about how things were going. Artest scored only eight points, but had 10 rebounds and six assists. Bryant returned from a long rest with 5:41 left in the game and the Lakers cut the deficit to 10. But it was too late by then and Brooks fittingly scored Houston's last two points on free throws in the final minute. Notes:@ Scola recorded his fifth career postseason double-double. Bryant was held under 30 points for the first time in four games at the Toyota Center this season. Artest sported a new mohawk hairdo, similar to the one he had before the series began. This time, 'Houston' was shaved on one side and a Rockets' logo adorned the other side. The team winning after the opening quarter has won all 10 of t he Rockets' playoff games. Rockets defeat the Lakers without Yao, even series n By The Associated Press Denver at Dallas (9:30pm EDT Nuggets can reach the Western Conference finals by completing a sweep of the Mavericks. Denver leads the series 3-0 after winning all four games during the regular season. S S T T A A R R S S Sunday Aaron Brooks, Rockets, scored a career-high 34 points as Houston beat the Los Angeles Lakers 99-87 to even their Western Conference semifinal at two g ames apiece. Paul Pierce, Celtics, scored 27 points in B oston's 95-94 victory over Orlando as the defending NBA champs tied the series 2-2. O O H H , , B B A A B B Y Y ! ! Glen Davis made a 21-foot jumper as time expired to help the Boston Celtics hold off a furious rally and defeat the Orlando Magic 95-94 on Sunday night to even their Eastern Conference semifinal at two games apiece. Davis' jumper followed a pair of free throws by Rashard Lewis that put the Magic ahead with 11.3 seconds to play. Davis also hit a 15-foot jumper in the final minute and finished with 21 points. S S T T R R O O N N G G I I N N D D E E F F E E A A T T Dwight Howard had 23 points and 17 rebounds in Orlando's 95-94 loss to Boston on Sunday. ... Pau Gasol scored 30 points as the Los Angeles Lakers lost to Houston 99-87. S S H H A A R R P P S S H H O O O O T T E E R R Shane Battier sank five 3-pointers and finished with 23 points as the Rockets beat the Lakers 99-87 on Sunday to even their Western Conference semifinal at two games apiece. Battier was 5 of 10 from 3point range. B B A A N N G G E E D D U U P P L os Angeles' Lamar Odom drove into H ouston's Shane Battier, hit the floor hard, limped to the bench and went to the locker room with back spasms in the third quar ter of the Lakers' 99-87 loss Sunday night. Odom was called for a charge on the play and didn't return. He'll have tests Mon d ay and will sit out practice. S S P P E E A A K K I I N N G G "I think everyone but us got the memo that we weren't supposed to show up today without Yao." Houston's Shane Battier after the R ockets topped the Los Angeles Lakers 998 7 on Sunday night to even their Western Conference semifinal at two games apiece. The win came without Yao Ming, who broke his left foot in the Lakers' victory in Game 3 NBA Today AARON BROOKS drives to the basket during the first quarter of Game 4 of a secondround Western Conference playoff game against the Lakers in Houston, Sunday. Brooks scored a career-high 34. Houston won 99-87... (AP Photo: Eric Gay n By ANTONIO GONZALEZ Associated Press Writer ORLANDO, Fla. (AP Glen Davis never thought he could replace the "Big Ticket," merely hoping to fill in for injured All-Star Kevin Garnett. Known as "Big Baby" since his college days at LSU, Davis even teased that he was the "Ticket Stub" compared to Garnett. Now he may have another nickname. Davis made a 21-foot jumper as time expired to help the Boston Celtics hold off a furious rally and defeat the Orlando Magic 95-94 on Sunday night to even their Eastern Conference semifinal at two games apiece. "Big-shot Baby Davis," Orlando's Dwight Howard said, shaking his head in disbelief. Davis took the pass on the wing from Paul Pierce, made the jumper and ran to halfcourt. He was mobbed by teammates, waving his hands in the air and leaving the Orlando home crowd silenced, a play even he couldn't have imagined until Garnett went down with a season-ending knee injury months ago. "Every time I shoot, I kind of feel myself making gamewinning shots all the time," Davis said. "You always have to see it. If you see it, you will believe it." Believe this: The Celtics are back in the series. Falling behind 3-1 would have been devastating for the defending champions. Only eight NBA teams have ever come back from that deficit. Boston far outplayed Orlando for most of Game 4, shooting 52.8 percent from the floor compared to just 40 percent for the Magic. But without the final shot, an otherwise strong performance would have been a waste. Davis' jumper followed a pair of free throws by Rashard Lewis that put the Magic ahead with 11.3 seconds to play. Davis also hit a 15-foot jumper in the final minute and finished with 21 points. Dwight Howard had 23 points and 17 rebounds, and Lewis scored 22 for the Magic. Game 5 is Tuesday in Boston. "It's going to be difficult," Lewis said. "A lot of guys are upset in the locker room. But we can't hang our heads too long." Perhaps the only downside on a series-changing win for Boston was that center Kendrick Perkins said he aggravated a left shoulder injury. He didn't know when it happened and said he would have it eval uated Monday. The Celtics went ahead by nine points with about five minutes remaining in the third quarter on a 3-pointer by Pierce. Boston's All-Star forward had 27 points, but would battle foul trouble the rest of the way, helping Orlando trim the lead slowly. But it was the final play that changed the series. Magic coach Stan Van Gundy said his players carried out the last play defensively exactly how he had designed, taking the ball out of the hands of Pierce and Ray Allen, and put the responsibility for his team's fail ures on himself. "The only guy who made a mistake on the last play was me," Van Gundy said. He's got bigger concerns moving forward. Orlando's starting backcourt of Rafer Alston and J.J. Redick were downright dreadful. The pair combined to make just 2 of 14 shots from the floor, with the Celtics clogging the middle and practically daring them to shoot. "You never want to turn down good shots," Alston said. "I think if we make some of them, we can force them not to double-team Dwight." Van Gundy had cautioned his team about feeling satisfied with its Game 3 blowout victory, even reminding players with a message at the team's practice facility that they were in the same position Philadelphia was in their first-round series. The 76ers went up 2-1, then lost in six games. Davis' shot now puts the Magic on the same path. "It really hurts," Orlando forward Hedo Turkoglu said. "Especially this kind of a game. But no matter what, we still have to go up to Boston. We're young. We're hungry. We'll bounce back strong." ‘Big Baby’ shot steals the Magic for Celtics GLEN DAVIS (centerright J R Giddens celebrates after Davis made a game-winning shot with time running out during the second half of a second-round playoff game in Orlando, Florida, on Sunday. The Celtics won 95-94. (AP Photo: Phelan M Ebenhack

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n B y RENALDO DORSETT S ports Reporter rdorsett@tribunemedia.net AFTER servi ng as softball administrator formore than three decades, Burket D orsett will head t he country’s national governing body. Dorsett was e lected as presid ent of the Bahamas Softball Federation after serving as the first vice president for nine years under Romell Knowles. D orsett, who officially began his threeyear term this weeke nd by delivering the keynote address on the New Providence S oftball Association’s opening night, said he looks to continue the path set forth by Knowles. “I have accepted the responsibility with great pride and hon-o ur, the confidence the federation has expressed in me is greatl y appreciated as I seek to serve with sincerity, commitment and d edication,” he said. “His tenacious leadership style has elevate d this federation second to none in this country. His passion for the sport of softball has brought a new dimension to the BSF. We salute you president Knowles and s ay thank you very much for the stellar leadership. As a part of hist eam for the last nine years I know of his passion and legacy. I s hare in them and I am willing to carry on with them.” One of the most experienced administrators in the local game, Dorsett outlined several initiat ives which he and his new administration set to put in place. I have spent my last 33 years in the administration of softball, s low pitch, fast pitch and modified pitch. Over the last nine years inour administration we have made great strides in the improvementof the game on and off the field. W e can only improve with the practices this administration put i n place. I have a number of ini tiatives I plan to set in place as the B SF plans to move forward over the course of the next three years and beyond,” he said. “Firstly we look to establish a debt free federation spearheaded by a dynami c national fundraising committee. We also look to appoint 10 i nfluential distinguished softball ambassadors, establish a national s eason-ending awards banquet, create an active junior league in a ll associations, further technical assistance fund to help with equipment, training of officials, coaches and players, more lucrative prizes for championships, profit sharing for the National Round Robin Tournament, and remember how heroes of yesteryear through several ventures including a garden of remembrance and a “Recognition Day”to recognise the stalwarts of the association.” C M Y K C M Y K TUESDAY, MAY 12, 2009 THETRIBUNE PAGE 15 P AGE 13 Serena Williams injured... Golfers are invited. Championship golf from $30 per person* RYOSUKE IRIE leaves the blocks in the mens 4X100m medley relay during the 2009J apan/Australia Duel in the Pool, at the Aust ralian Institute of Sport in Canberra, Australia S unday, May 10, 2009. Irie broke a world record and set a time of one minute, 52.86 seconds, beating the previous record, held by American Ryan Lochte, by 1.08 seconds. (AP Image: Mark Graham Irie breaks world record Minus Jr vs Pratt will be Fox Hill ‘blockbuster’ n By RENALDO DORSETT Sports Reporter rdorsett@tribunemedia.net P e rhaps the most storied boxing rivalry in the Bahamas will add another chapter to its l egacy, this time not for a championship title or bragging rights, but to help the development of the sport in their local communit ies. R ay Minus Jr and Quincy Pratt will resurrect their memorable matches with a series of exhibition bouts to raise funds for bothP ratt’s Eastside Amateur Boxing Club and Minus Jr’s Champion Amateur Boxing Club. The exhibitions will take a best of seven series format with venues alternating between bothf ighters’ home training grounds. Minus won the trilogy of fights e arly in their careers – by TKO in the sixth round in 1992, by a split d ecision in 1999 and by a seventh round TKO in 2000. The series of four-round exhibitions will begin on Saturday, May 16, at the CABC trainingg rounds with the following fights taking place in two week inter-v als. Well beyond their fighting days a nd into their 40s (Minus-45, Pratt-40), both fighters indicate t hat they are in fighting shape and are preparing to treat fans and boxing enthusiasts to a new edition of the showdown, while simultaneously assisting their pro grammes. Pratt, who just recently established his club in January, saw thee xhibition as an opportunity to fund equipment after months off rustrating organising ventures. “I have not been able to get a ny help from anyone, including the Ministry of Youth Sports and Culture so Ray and I decided to come together to stage this best out of seven showdown to raisem oney to buy equipment for both our clubs,” he said. “Every twow eeks we will host a four-round exhibition. Our three historic batt les will not be counted in this, because I lost all three of them, so t hey do not count. We know how to fight boxers never lose their fighting ability, we just lose conditioning.” Pratt says he looks forward to putting on a show for his home crowd in the Fox Hill community and his approximately 140 fighters who have yet to see him applyh is craft. “When we fight in Fox Hill it is g oing to be a blockbuster. They may cheat on Wulff Road, but in F ox Hill they will not have a chance, because for the first time my people to see their hometown boy fight, so I intend to show them my best,” he said. “If I raisee nough money in Fox Hill I might end the battle there, but if not Iw ill take him in four. The most important thing is that these fights a re for a worthy cause and that is to raise money for the youth of t his nation. Most of the guys I train are excited because they have never seen me fight, and they are extremely geared up for it.” Pratt, who hosts his fighters at t he Urban Renewal building in Fox Hill, said his ultimate goal is to help many of the young men in his community to find discipline and purpose. It is heartbreaking to see the disappointment in the guys sometimes. I started the club from scratch. I have been scrambling t rying to find a place to set my club up, but I need help. We need assistance to save these young men and get these young men in Fox Hill off the park. On the parkw e...cursing and all sorts of negative things going on and I just want to do all I can to help these guys. But I will not be discouraged, I’ll just take it out on Minus S aturday night,” he said. “This is a ll about raising money for my c lub. This is the first fight in the B ahamas for a worthy cause, it is for the youth and for their g rowth. Every time we have fought the places have been jamp acked and if we can get half of that and some financial support itw ould go a long way. I had a hard upbringing and boxing saved my l ife, I just want to pass that along to these young guys. I tell them boxing is a way out, sports is a way out. If you take a bad guy and give them some disciplinea nd a vision there is no telling how far they can go.” M inus Jr said that the four round exhibition will not have the intensity of their previous encounters and both he and Pratt are ready and in shape and set to put o n a show worthy of their legacy. “I always stay in shape with the guys I train so it keeps me in a bit of shape. Of course I am not as focused as I am when I was ac hampion defending my title or fighting for a title, but the experience is there. I believe that I still can go in there and pull off a w in,” he said. “The three previous times we fought we were scheduled for 12 rounds, now that we are in a four rounder I have to try to figure out how do I beatQ uincy down early, so I know it’s a challenge. Both of us are excited, we are doing it for a good cause and we want the public’s support in coming out and supp orting us and the young boxers.” M inus Jr said that while he i dentifies with Pratt’s struggle in b eginning a club with little to no support, he and the remainder of t he boxing community will do their part to assist. My advice to Quincy was to let us concentrate on what we cand o to make it better. Then if so we will knock out doors to take it f urther. We feel with the support of the general public, knowing the history of what we share, and to bring that back we feel like it will bring great funding and greats upport with the promotion and funding,” he said. It is a struggle getting a club off the ground but I wanted the community and Quincy to know that they have help.” QUINCY PRATT (left RAY MINUS JR face off yesterday... F e l i p M a j o r / T r i b u n e s t a f f Dorsett elected BSF president Dorsett

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C M Y K C M Y K LOCAL NEWS PAGE 16, TUESDAY, MAY 12, 2009 THE TRIBUNE IN OBSERVANCEof the 29th anniversary of the sinking of the HMBS Flamingo by Cuban fighter jets, familym embers of the four Royal Bahamas Defence Force Marines who died in the i ncident gathered yesterday for a brief commemorative ceremony at the Coral Harbour base. Following the service, the families were taken out by a Defence Force craft for t he laying of a wreath at sea in memory of the vessel and her fallen crew. O n May 10, 1980, reports came from Ragged Island that Cuban military jets h ad sunk the 103-foot Marlin class Defence Force vessel. The four marines killed as a result of the attack were Fenrick Sturrup, Austin Smith, David Tucker and Edward W illiams. The tragic incident unfolded after a g roup of Cuban fishermen were stopped by the crew of the Flamingo on suspic ion of illegally fishing in Bahamian waters. In the wake of the sinking, the Cuban government said the pilots mistook the Flamingo for a pirate ship harassing Cuban fishermen. Following the tragic incident, Cuba o ffered an apology and agreed to pay $5.4 million in compensation for the sink i ng of the vessel and the death of the four marines. S peaking at the special ceremony, Minister of Education Carl Bethel described the sinking of the Flamingo as a “momentous event” which left a lasting mark on the Bahamas’ history. M inister Bethel said: “No doubt the greatest tragedy in the sinking of the HMBS Flamingo was the death of our f our marines. Commodore (Clifford Scavella, senior officers and officers and m arines of all ranks of the Defence Force, we all join you in tribute to the contribution made by the crew of the Flamingo, those who survived the attack, and those that did not.” “It is now for us to etch them in our recollection, as a family members, as colleagues, as friends, in our homes, in our schools, in our institutions, and particul arly in the Royal Bahamas Defence Force. We remember them as patriotic B ahamians that gave their lives in service of their country, and that will remain a part of our history, both oral and written.” While Commodore Scavella said that t he Defence Force has been fortunate not to have encountered any more direct c onfrontations in the years following the sinking of the Flamingo, Mr Bethel said that the risk to the force has not diminished. “Now, the threat to the Defence Force and the Bahamas comes from predominantly trans-national criminal activity, including illicit drugs and arms traffick ing, illegal immigration, and yes, poachi ng in Bahamian waters, the problem that gave rise to the Flamingo incident,” the m inister said. Eight Cuban fishermen involved in the incident were convicted of poaching in 1980. Ceremony held to remember HMBS Flamingo marines M INISTER OF EDUCATION C arl Bethel looks at the wall of remembrance at the Defence Force base. OFFICERS MARCH to pay respect to the four Royal Bahamas Defence Force Marines who died in the incident. T HE FAMILIES w atch from onboard the Defence Force craft for the laying of a wreath at sea. DEFENCEFORCECOMMODORE Clifford Scavella with Minister of Education Carl Bethel at the memorial. F e l i p M a j o r / T r i b u n e s t a f f

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C M Y K C M Y K SECTIONB business@tribunemedia.net TUESDAY, MAY 12, 2009 THETRIBUNE $4. 68 $4. 51 $4. 69The information contained is from a third p arty and The Tribune can not be held r esponsible for errors and/or omission from the daily report.$ $3.53 $3.62 $3.48 n B y NEIL HARTNELL Tribune Business Editor A likely 300 per cent increase in a ggregate material prices, which would raise Bahamian construction industry costs by $15 million per annum, will be experienced if F reeport Harbour’s proposed Area 4 e xpansion does not proceed, the project’s Environmental Impact Assessment (EIA The study, prepared for Bahama Rock b y Freeport-based Envirologic International and a host of foreign consulting firms, also warned that a failure to approve the project would remove a “no cost” harbour construction operation and also lead to the company’s earlier depart ure from the Bahamas a development t hat could cost Freeport’s economy $64.168 million in the nine years to 2018. The EIA, a copy of which has been obtained by Tribune Business, said that if the Freeport Harbour area 4 expansion was approved, Bahama Rock was expected to extend operations” until at l east 2018, thus maintaining its position as “the largest supplier of construction grade aggregate in the Bahamas”. “Other economic impacts absent Bahama Rock include a significant cost escalation in providing construction grade a ggregates throughout the Commonw ealth of the Bahamas for all major developments,” the EIA said. “An estimated 300 per cent increase in local Bahamian aggregate pricing could be expected, and would add approximately $15 million to the annual cons truction sector costs. Finally, the excavation and expansion of the harbour would likely cease. $15m building cost hike if project not approved * Aggregate prices for Bahamian construction industry to rise 300% if Bahama Rock’s area 4 Freeport harbour expansion fails to go ahead * Non-approval would accelerate company’s departure from Bahamas, costing economy $64.168m over nine years * Foreign developers would be hit, as firm supplies aggregate for all major projects, including 100% of New Providence’s needs * ‘The future availability of a domestic supply of aggregate, or conversely, importation, is an issue needing further evaluation by policymakers and those in the construction industry’ S S E E E E p p a a g g e e 4 4 B B n By NEIL HARTNELL T ribune Business Editor TOO many” Bahamian comp anies private as well as public have failed to provide the resources and infrastructure to enable them to p roduce timely internal financialr eports, a leading accountant charged yesterday, as h e told Tribune Business that his company would have “no problem” meeting the draft Securities Industry Act’s tighter reporting deadlines once their clients were u p to speed. Raymond Winder, Deloitte & T ouche (Bahamas partner, told Tribune Business: For too long, too many organi sations have not put in place the resources and infrastructure that gives them the ability to produce quality financial statements. We h ave not given it the attention that we ought to have given it.” As a result, there were B ahamian companies that were simply unable to produce “quality financial statements on a timely basis” because the internal sys tems both personnel and infras tructure were either inefficient or not up to par. T his, in turn, impacted the ability of external auditors to turn a round the audit and sign-off on a company’s accounts, complete with audit opinion, in a rapid fashion. “For too long, we’ve tolerated and put up with accountants not making the effort,” Mr Winder t old Tribune Business. In addition to putting the necessary r esources in place, he urged Bahamian companies to replace oo many’ firms lack financial controls Senior accountant says ‘no problem’ meeting revised S ecurities Act reporting deadlines once quality, timely internal systems in place IN the lead story in Monday’s Business section, “$15m makeover builds key business location”, read that “The Old city lumber yard, which met its end by fire several years ago....” The Lumberyard which met its end was the old Bahamian Lumberyard. In the same story, it was said that a donation of 14 Dialysis machines was made to Doctor’s Hospital. The 14 Dialysis machines were, in fact, donated to the Princess Margaret Hospital. Corr ection S S E E E E p p a a g g e e 4 4 B B Winder n B y NEIL HARTNELL Tribune Business Editor SOME $163.4 million in total spending will flow into the Grand Bahama economy over a nineyear period until 2018, the Envi-r onmental Impact Assessment (EIAa rea 4 expansion project has revealed, with Bahama Rock’s p ayroll expanding by $22.8 million to $58 million if the develo pment is approved. The EIA study said the project’s go-ahead would extend Bahama Rock’s stay in Grand Bahama until 2018, securing its 8 5 jobs for at least that period. The company’s current annualp ayroll was $5.8 million, while 30 indirect employees whose jobs r elied on the Martin Marietta subsidiary received a further $1.1 million in combined annual salaries. However, the study said that if t he area 4 expansion was not approved, Bahama Rock would h ave to remove its large electrical dragline from Grand Bahama and r edeploy it within the Martin Marietta infrastructure within two years. This would reduce Bahama Rock’s aggregate production by 3 5 per cent immediately, and result in falling employment, with a ll 85 direct jobs eliminated by 2016. It is estimated that Bahama Rock’s annual expenditures rep resent almost 1 per cent of total gross domestic product (GDP for the Bahamas as a whole, when e xcluding tourism and the financial services,” the EIA said. For 2 007, it reported that the company had injected $16.211 million into the Freeport economy. “Bahama Rock is the third l argest consumer of power in Grand Bahama, and is responsi-b le for approximately 10 per cent of Grand Bahama Power Comp any’s revenue,” the EIA added. “Bahama Rock spent $5.131 m illion in 2006, $4.927 million in 2007 for power consumption and energy, and is estimated to exceed $6 million in 2008.” With the rock plant and large d ragline accounting for 96 per cent of Bahama Rock’s electricalc onsumption, the study said that if area 4 was approved and excav ation continued at the present pace, its energy needs would remain constant until at least 2018. “One of the main recipients of Bahama Rock spending, Grand Bahama Power, would continue t o bill approximately $5-$6 million per year, totalling in excess of $ 50 million in revenue over the 10-year period,” the EIA found. “The Freeport Oil Company would likewise receive $24.4 mil lion of revenue over the same 10year period, based on 2007 pricing.” A nd the study added: “To date, Bahama Rock has provided e quivalent harbour construction dredge value of approximately $750 million. “The harbour would simply not exist as a large and modern deepwater port without the win-win arrangement currently in place with Bahama Rock. It is also estimated that area 3, area 4 and the West Channel developmentw ould contribute an additional $750 million in conventionald redge value. “To the community, area 4 prov ides potential increases in real estate values, reductions in traffic c ongestion and direct spending benefits to Grand Bahama Island of an additional $64.2 million, including 334 additional man years of direct employment, and a n estimated $6.3 million in infra structure improvements over the1 0-year period ending in 2018.” Bahama Rock had invested o ver $100 million in Freeport since 2001, and failing to approve the area 4 expansion would leave it unable “to sustain minimum economic production levels for the advancement and completion of the Freeport Harbour Master P lan. “This expansion and excavat ion will increase harbour capac ity and contribute to increased business activity. The area 4 basin, with harbour connection, will transform a terrestrial environment into valuable waterfront property. The potential developm ent will enable small business persons and pleasure craft owners a ccess for the first time through a private harbour, while entitled to all the benefits derived from Port Authority licensing.” A $1.428 million highway rate of way would also be constructed through Bahama Rock’s property. $163.4m spending boost for Freeport Studs go-ahead to generate $50m for Grand B ahama Power, $24.6m for FOCOL n B y CHESTER ROBARDS Business Reporter c robards@tribunemedia.net BAHAMIAN visits to the US increased by 54 per cent in February 2009 compared to the same month last year, and were up 68 per cent for the first two months, according to statistics from the US Department of Commercer eleased yesterday. These recent numbers have s ome Bahamian travel agents perplexed, as they have not seen a decrease in travel, but also have not noticed a significant increase. The data showed that the Bahamas represented the largest increase in visitor arrivals to the US, making it the “top visitation market from the Caribbean region”. According to the Department’s release, the US saw a 12 per cent decline in international visitations in February this year, compared to 2008 figures for the same period. They also realized $10.1 billion in visitor spending in February 2009, down 13 per cent from February 2008. S ome Bahamian travel agents say they are not quite sure of the accuracy of the numbers, as they have seen a steady flow of busi-n ess but not a huge jump in demand. General Manager of Premier Travel, Joy Burrows, said the answer to the high number of Bahamian travellers could be that the economic downturn has not been as bad as previously predicted. She said price competition between the airlines, especially those that fly to Florida, were keeping fares within reach of the average Bahamian. “They might not go to New York or Boston, but they can afford to go to Florida,” said Ms Burrows. “Though people are out of jobs, not the entire Bahamas is suffering.” Bahamian visits to US grow 54% Travel agents baffled by rise, as own figures do not match S S E E E E p p a a g g e e 3 3 B B

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C M Y K C M Y K BUSINESS PAGE 2B, TUESDAY, MAY 12, 2009 THE TRIBUNE THE ‘graduation season’ is upon us once again, with thou-s ands of newly-minted high school graduates and college graduates (from both domestic and foreign institutions) set to d escend upon the fragile job market seeking employment opportunities. Notwithstanding the deluge of potential workers from which to choose, I still hear busi-n ess owners complain that they cannot find qualified applicants from among whom they can hire new employees. Q Q u u a a n n t t i i t t y y v v e e r r s s u u s s Q Q u u a a l l i i t t y y There is certainly a paradox existing in our labour markets, where we seemingly have ad etachment between quantity and quality. I know for a fact that there are thousands of young Bahamians looking for employm ent but, sadly, many are not even qualified for the most basic entry-level jobs. Many of our youngsters lack communication skills (basic reading, writing ands peaking skills), basic mathemati cal skills and, finally, social skills. On the other side of the ledger, o ne must ask the logical question: “What about our college gradu-a tes?” It seems like growing num bers of our students studying a broad are happy to remain a broad indefinitely. This is the so called ‘brain drain’ effect, which i n a more precise way is defined as: “The loss of skilled intellec t ual and technical labour through the movement of such labour tom ore favourable geographic, eco nomic or professional environm ents”. B B r r a a i i n n d d r r a a i i n n , , f f a a c c t t o o r r f f i i c c t t i i o o n n I n January 2006, the IMF published a working paper entitledE migration and Brain Drain: Evidence from the Caribbean. This s tudy indicated that between 1965 and 2000, approximately 58 per cent of Bahamians educated at college level migrated to the US. When the list of countries was e xpanded to include member countries of the Organisation forE conomic Cooperation and Development (OECD B ahamas’ number grew to 61 per cent. I I s s i i t t r r e e a a l l l l y y a a s s m m u u c c h h a a s s 6 6 1 1 p p e e r r c c e e n n t t ? ? I must admit that I found this statistic to be shocking because my perception (and the perception of persons with whom I intera ct regularly) was that while there i s undoubtedly a growing number of Bahamians remaining abroad after completing college, the majority still return home tob uild their future. I graduated from St Anne’s High School in 1975, and I believe that I can readily account for a bout 95 per cent of my graduati ng year (those who came back home after completing their tertiary education and/or professional qualifications). A colleagueo f mine, who graduated from high school in 1987, estimated that some 15 per cent of her graduating year remained abroad. F inally, in an attempt to get a more current feel for the situat ion, I talked to several of my peers who have children in uni-v ersities abroad. The consensus was that in the best case scenario, t hey seemed to be very ‘openminded’ about the prospects of settling and working abroad. In the worst case scenario, many had no intention of returning homei n the foreseeable future. The latter view especially applied tog raduates in technical, scientific and specialised fields, where they i ndicate that they have little real alternative but to consider emigration as there are no job opportunities available now or in the foreseeable future in the Bahamas in those fields. While the above observations a re not scientific but purely anecdotal, I began to come to grips w ith the possibility that 58 per cent may indeed be a reasonable n umber. T T h h e e c c o o s s t t s s o o f f E E m m i i g g r r a a t t i i o o n n Most of the tertiary-educated Bahamians are trained abroad, m ainly in the United States and Canada. The majority of the d irect costs are borne by a com bination of family; government s cholarships and loans; and private scholarships. If we assume that the average cost of a fouryear college/university pro-g ramme is about $80,000 to $100,000, for an economy like the Bahamas to lose 58 per cent of this category of future workers is m ost significant indeed. From a macroeconomic standpoint, this significant investment in education is yielding a less than optimum return for the Bahamas. F urthermore, if the majority of our immigrant population is unskilled it is no wonder that we seem to be in a perpetual opene nded training mode. Clearly, this is not a sustainable position for the country, as it implies that we are paying twice for the same skilled labour – thec ost of educating our children, and the relatively higher cost of expatriate labor (which often includes housing, transportation a nd children’s education costs). C C o o u u l l d d t t h h i i s s p p r r o o m m o o t t e e m m e e d d i i o o c c r r i i t t y y ? ? Another fundamental question w e must ask ourselves is: If we a re losing about 60 per cent of our most highly-trained citizens, a re we setting ourselves up to allow mediocrity to rise to thet op, as emigration weakens com petition and perhaps robs us of s ome of our brighter students? I d o not know the answer to these questions, but it must be placed o n the table for discussion. The long-term implications of t he IMF study, as it relates to the Bahamas, suggest that in additiont o a brain drain we will be in a constant cycle of importing peop le with technical/specialist skills. To continuously encourage new investment and maintain the leve l of investment that has already occurred, it is most important thatw e have a well-trained, globallycompetitive, indigenous work f orce – both technical and nontechnical. T T h h e e g g r r e e a a t t c c o o n n t t r r a a d d i i c c t t i i o o n n At the bottom end, we have a s econdary school education system producing graduates pos s essing a D+ average in national BGCSE examinations and, at the t op end, creditable studies tell us that roughly 60 per cent of our top and best-trained students may not return home. We are being Mind the ‘brain drain’ costs for our economy F inancial Focus By Larry Gibson S S E E E E p p a a g g e e 4 4 B B

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Bahamian visits to US grow 54% C M Y K C M Y K BUSINESS THE TRIBUNE TUESDAY, MAY 12, 2009, PAGE 3B n By CHESTER ROBARDS Business Reporter crobards@tribunemedia.net BAHAMIAN filmmaker Celi Moss is pushing ahead with two n ew productions slated to premier at this year’s Bahamas Film Festival, despite four unprofitable films, including one entitled ‘Balls Alley’, which cost an estimated $ 50,000 to make and brought him local acclaim. One of the films, which is in its pre-production stages, called ‘My MP’, will feature a Member ofP arliament called Mr Brown loosely based on Immigration Minister Branville McCArtney - “who has sought to represent his constituents in a proper manner.”. A ccording to Mr Moss, the main character in the movie wants to show the Bahamian people and his colleagues what true representation is. T he production of the film is being underwritten by Mr Moss’s production company, Yeah Man Entertainment, while the script is being written by members of T he Bamboo Town Film Club (TBTFC Mr Moss said he hopes this movie, the first of its kind in the Bahamas, will inspire young film-m akers to bring their ideas to fruition. “I’m interested in using it as vehicle to get more drama into s chools,” he said. “If you don’t have positive programmes you’ll have negative energy. It’s all about moulding new minds.” According to him, the film i ndustry in the Bahamas is continuing to grow, and he insists that government should get film m aking into different constituencies and schools. I would like to see other con s tituencies start their own film c lubs,” Mr Moss said. T BTFC hopes to have their movie complete by November. M r Moss said an open casting call held last Saturday was not well a ttended. However, he said as a filmmaker he works with the casth e is given. According to him, because t here is typically little to no money put into his movies, all of the cast members own the film and will receive royalties should the film turn a profit. Everybody who is a part of the movie is part owner,” Mr M oss said. He lamented that “none have paid any bills yet”. ‘My MP’ is to expected to include cameos by several actual M Ps and an appearance by radio talk show host Ortland Bodie. M r Moss is confident that the film will be well received by view e rs, as well as his other film now in production, ‘Dear Mama’, which is about a mother advocating for justice when her son’s killer gets out on bail. I want to deal with the crime situation,” he said. Film maker says four productions yet to turn profit She said US Commerce Department figures were coll ected during a traditionally slow month for Bahamian travel, but she was eager to see what the busy summer months will bring. Ms Burrows said Bahamians have recently been purchasing vacations last minute, a trend that seems to have been born o ut of the financial crisis, and has made hotel and airline occupancies virtually unpredictable. “The Easter run was a lot of last minute bookings,” she said. “We always encourage people to book early, otherwise you get stuck with a high air fare.” M s Burrows said individuals still come to travel agencies for vacation bookings, and contends that 70 per cent of B ahamian travellers purchase fights through a travel agent. She said that although ticket purchases on the Internet was a growing trend, especially withy oung adults, older persons still trust the expertise and experience of a travel agent when planning a trip. “People can e ven call us at home to sort them out,” said Ms Burrows. F F R R O O M M p p a a g g e e 1 1 B B

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internal accountants that were not doing their job. “As an audit firm, we do not have a problem meeting these [Securities Industry Act] standards once the quality internalf inancial data are up to standard,” Mr Winder said. H is comments came in response to Tribune Business q uestions over the revised public company financial reporting timeframes unveiled in the draft Securities Industry Act regulation, which were released to thes ector and general public for consultation on Friday. T he draft regulations require public companies to file their a udited financial statements with the Securities Commission some 90 days after the relevant yearend. That makes for a tighter deadline than the present 120 d ays allowed for publication under BISX rules. Furthermore, public companies will have only 45 days from the r elevant period’s end to file their unaudited interim financial statem ents. This will be 50 per cent less time than the current 90 days t hey are allowed. Annual reports, including management’s discus-s ion and analysis, must also be filed with the Securities Commiss ion some 90 days after year-end. The Bahamas International Securities Exchange (BISX p reviously proposed changes to filing deadlines in its own BISX R ules, seeking to reduce the timelines for full year and interimf inancial publication from 120 days and 90 days, to 90 days ands 6 0 days, respectively. These BISX Rules changes have yet to be approved, and it is l ikely they will now take a back seat to the Securities IndustriesA ct and regulations reforms, following them. In its explanation of the reforms, the Securities Commission said the “continuous disclos ure requirements for listed companies” on BISX were being e xpanded to “all public companies”, meaning that firms such as B ahamas Supermarkets listed on the over-the-counter marketwould also be expected to toe the line. F ranklyn Wilson, chairman of Arawak Homes and Sunshine Holdings, and the largest investor i n BISX-listed FOCOL Holdings, yesterday suggested to Tribune B usiness that the proposed Securities Industry Act amendmentsw ould lay down a “challenge” to his previous profession the a ccountants. “Can they deliver the [audited] accounts in time,” he quest ioned. “I think it’s going to put more pressure on the accountingp rofession. All I get is a sense that they are pressured. I get the impression things are not easy for them. As a client, the problem of turnover of staff is an issue for t hem. I get the impression it’s not easy.” T he proposed deadlines were not “unreasonable”, Mr Wilson a dded, explaining: “Investors need the numbers in a timelym anner. The utility of them decreases with every passing day, w eek, month.” He said, though, that the 90day deadline for filing annual r eports, complete with management discussion and analysis, may not be realistic”, given the need for external auditors to com-p lete and the two-to-three weeks to get the document printed. M r Winder, though, said: “The deadline is not an onerous problem for the profession, once an o rganisation has proper internal controls and its internal accountsa re being prepared on a timely basis.” I f external auditors had to make numerous adjustments to the internal accounts they were presented with, the audit time and costs would increase. Mr Winder, though, urged Bahamian accountants and their firms to “make tremendous e fforts to produce quality financial statements on a timely basis” a nd match even exceed global best practices and standards. H e added that the Organisation for Economic Co-Operationa nd Development (OECD demands for greater ‘transparenc y’ from international financial centres, was looking at their ability to produce quality accounting i nformation. “As more and more organisa t ions look at the Bahamas as a place to reside, and for them toh ave some aspect of their back office operations here the i nvoicing and accounting the accounts have to come up to standard, or the work will switch to o ther jurisdictions,” Mr Winder said. A s a result, he urged companies not to hold on to accountants w ho did not want to have the job, as there were “lots of bright young people in the pipeline; young Bahamians waiting in the wings”. Conventional dredging can cost m ore than $30 per cubic yard, and require specialised environmental containment. Bahama Rock is a ‘no cost’ harbour operation without the added problem of dredge spoils storage and disposal. The expectation is that Freeport Harbour would not likely be enlarged beyond the current size due to t hese issues.” And the report added: “An important long-term government policy question will be raised sooner rather than later if Bahama Rock reduces aggregate supply. “Bahama Rock supplies New Providence, through an agreem ent with a Nassau-based contractor, with 100 per cent of all coarse aggregate needs. Taking a long-term viewpoint, the Bahama Rock operation is finite, and once the harbour expansion ceases, Bahama Rock will depart. “The future availability of a domestic supply of aggregate, or conversely, importation, is an issue needing further evaluationb y policymakers and those in the construction industry.” Bahama Rock, which is a Bahamian subsidiary of US a ggregate/quarrying materials giant, Martin Marietta, was said by the EIA to produce five million tonnes of aggregate per year some 20 times’ the next availa ble supply. It supplied the Bahamian construction industry with some 812,364 tonnes of aggregate in 2 006, with some 218,983 tonnes of that used in Grand Bahama. “Bahama Rock supplies all construction grade aggregate for Bahamian anchor projects, andh as supplied 100 per cent of materials for all three phases of the Paradise Island Atlantis development,” the EIA said. As other anchor projects are scheduled to come online in Grand Bahama and New Providence in the future, Bahama Rock will be the key supplier ofl ow cost, high quality construction aggregate and marine rock armour. This is particularly rele-v ant if the approved projects are in construction simultaneously.” The EIA referred to a February 18, 2008, letter from the M osko Group, which detailed “the importance of having a high quality supply of domestic aggregates available to meet the construction needs in Nassau andt hroughout the Bahamas”. Therefore, failure to approve the 192-acre Freeport Harbour expansion would have an e xtremely negative impact for both the Bahamian construction industry and this nation’s ability to attract foreign direct investment from real estate develop-e rs, given the likely increase in building costs. The EIA said: “Area 4 will allow Bahama Rock to continue t o provide a reliable, convenient and economic supply of building materials, which are key to the Bahamian residential and commercial construction industry.” I t listed the company’s ability to “provide continuous supply of high quality and low cost aggre-g ates for nearly 100 per cent of all new construction requirements for the Commonwealth of the Bahamas. The existence of Bahama Rock allows for the preservation of the natural relief in New Providence and the Family Islands as the affordable, convenient, sin-g le source Bahamian aggregate supplier.” The area 4 expansion, already agreed via a Memorandum of U nderstanding (MoU Bahama Rock and the Freeport Harbour Company, the latter of which is owned 50/50 by Port Group Ltd and HutchisonW hampoa, will create a 135-acre excavated basin immediately to the west of the Freeport Container Port and Bahama Cement p roperty. Land usage, the EIA said, would be altered through the area’s transformation into a marina, recreational areas with a boatl aunch, bridge view and highway overlook. The Bahama Rock proposal, t he study said, would enable the Freeport Harbour and the businesses it supports, such as the Container Port and Grand B ahama Shipyard, to match the depths currently being dug in the Panama Canal expansion and its addition of a third lock system. “The Bahama Rock operation p resents an advantage to Grand Bahama over competing ports by matching these depths at ‘no cost’,” the EIA said. The advantage would be the ability to receive post-Panamex vessels by the Container Port along the west channel, allowing the next generation of 18-metred raft vessels to utilise Freeport Harbour. This has the potential to position Grand Bahama for further economic growth over the n ext 50 years, facilitating possible mega-port status. “If area 4 expansion is approved, Bahama Rock is expected to extend operationst hrough at least 2018.” C M Y K C M Y K BUSINESS PAGE 4B, TUESDAY, MAY 12, 2009 THE TRIBUNE NOTICE is hereby given that KERLINE SAMA of N ASSAU VILLAGE, P.O. BOX SS-19753, NASSAU, BAHAMAS , is applying to the Minister responsible for Nationality and Citizenship, f or registration/naturalization as a citizen of The Bahamas, and that any person who knows any reason why registration/naturalization should not be granted, should send a written and signed statement of the facts within twenty-eight days from the 5T Hday of May, 2009 to the Minister responsible for nationality and Citizenship, P.O. Box N -7147, Nassau, Bahamas.NOTICE EMPLOYMENT OPPORTUNITYYou are invited to apply for the following position currently available.Assistant Marketing ManagerKey Requirements worth clients business to the attention of: hr@ 127,&(LVKHUHE\JLYHQWKDW %2/,((':$5'//2<' RI 67$1'5(:%($&+(67$3%2; L V DSSO\LQJWRWKH0LQLVWHUUHVSRQVLEOHIRU1DWLRQDOLW\DQG & LWL]HQVKLSIRUUHJLVWUDWLRQQDWXUDOL]DWLRQDVFLWL]HQRI7KH % DKDPDVDQGWKDWDQ\SHUVRQZKRNQRZVDQ\UHDVRQZK\ UHJLVWUDWLRQQDWXUDOL]DWLRQVKRXOGQRWEHJUDQWHGVKRXOG VHQGZULWWHQDQGVLJQHGVWDWHPHQWRIWKHIDFWVZLWKLQ WZHQW\HLJKWGD\VIURPWKH WK GD\ RI 0D\ WRWKH 0LQLVWHUUHVSRQVLEOHIRUQDWLRQDOLW\DQG&LWL]HQVKLS3%R[ 127,&( /,48,'$7,21$/( &RPELQHDG$EGRPLQDODGrLQFK 'HQWDO&RWWRQROOVHGLXP ;/*ORYHV/DWH[RZHUHG /DUJH*ORYHVODWH[RZGHU)UHHf /DUJH*ORYHV9LQ\O/DWH[)UHHf ,QVXOLQ\ULQJHPO 1HEXOL]HUDVN.LW &KLOGPO &KDPEHU 1HHGOH+ROGHUV 1DVDO&DQQXOD$GXOW 2[\JHQDVN$GXOW/DUJH /\ULQJHZLWK*HHGOH /\ULQJHZLWK*HHGOH /\ULQJHZLWK*HHGOHDQG*HHGOH \ULQJHZLWK*HHGOH 6SHFLPHQ&XSVR]WHULOH 6WHULOHXU +\SRDOOHUJHQLF&ORWK7DSHLFURVSRUH7DSHf / HJDORWLFH 127,&( ROXQWDU\/LTXLGDWLRQf 1RWLFHLVKHUHE\JLYHQWKDWWKHDERYHQDPHG &RPSDQ\LVLQGLVVROXWLRQZKLFKFRPPHQFHG RQWKHGD\RI$SULO 7KH/LTXLGDWRULV $UJRVD&RUS1DVVDX %DKDPDV greatly disadvantaged at both ends of the spectrum. D oes this reality require a national bipartisan approach to finding a solution? I certainly submit, along with most ‘right thinking’ Bahamians, that it does. Wes imply cannot build a new Bahamas that can compete in today’s world with a substandard work force. Conclusion We need to move with haste to establish a National Labour Needs Assessment Bank( NLNAB) that will assist us with future planning. We need to know how many trained personswe have by skill category, how m any are in the training pipeline and, most importantly, how many are we anticipating that we will need within the next 10 and 15 years, respectively. T he results from the NLNAB will allow us to direct future graduates towards areas of need, and to retain a higher percentage of o ur graduates if they can be assured of job opportunities. F inally, it should aid in helping t o raise the overall level of prod uctivity in the workplace. Until next week N N B B : : L L a a r r r r y y R R . . G G i i b b s s o o n n , , a a C C h h a a r r t t e e r r e e d d F F i i n n a a n n c c i i a a l l A A n n a a l l y y s s t t , , i i s s v v i i c c e e p p r r e e s s i i d d e e n n t t p p e e n n s s i i o o n n s s , , C C o o l l o o n n i i a a l l P P e e n n s s i i o o n n s s S S e e r r v v i i c c e e s s ( ( B B a a h h a a m m a a s s ) ) , , a a w w h h o o l l l l y y o o w w n n e e d d s s u u b b s s i i d d i i a a r r y y o o f f C C o o l l o o n n i i a a l l G G r r o o u u p p I I n n t t e e r r n n a a t t i i o o n n a a l l , , w w h h i i c c h h o o w w n n s s A A t t l l a a n n t t i i c c M M e e d d i i c c a a l l I I n n s s u u r r a a n n c c e e a a n n d d i i s s a a m m a a j j o o r r s s h h a a r r e e h h o o l l d d e e r r o o f f S S e e c c u u r r i i t t y y & & G G e e n n e e r r a a l l I I n n s s u u r r a a n n c c e e C C o o m m p p a a n n y y i i n n t t h h e e B B a a h h a a m m a a s s . . T T h h e e v v i i e e w w s s e e x x p p r r e e s s s s e e d d a a r r e e t t h h o o s s e e o o f f t t h h e e a a u u t t h h o o r r a a n n d d d d o o n n o o t t n n e e c c e e s s s s a a r r i i l l y y r r e e p p r r e e s s e e n n t t t t h h o o s s e e o o f f C C o o l l o o n n i i a a l l G G r r o o u u p p I I n n t t e e r r n n a a t t i i o o n n a a l l o o r r a a n n y y o o f f i i t t s s s s u u b b s s i i d d i i a a r r y y a a n n d d / / o o r r a a f f f f i i l l i i a a t t e e d d c c o o m m p p a a n n i i e e s s . . P P l l e e a a s s e e d d i i r r e e c c t t a a n n y y q q u u e e s s t t i i o o n n s s o o r r c c o o m m m m e e n n t t s s t t o o r r l l g g i i b b s s o o n n @ @ a a t t l l a a n n t t i i c c h h o o u u s s e e . . c c o o m m . . b b s s Mind the ‘brain ‘drain’ costs for o ur economy F F R R O O M M p p a a g g e e 1 1 B B $15m building cost hike if project not approved F F R R O O M M p p a a g g e e 1 1 B B F F I I R R M M S S , , f f r r o o m m 1 1 B B

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Many women feel that having smaller breasts limits their sex appeal and choices in the clothes they wear. Bahamian men do not make having smaller busts any easier on the women because most of them generally prefer a voluptuous, busty woman. This has led some women here in the Bahamas, to go under the knife and have a Breast Augmentationsurgically getting implants to increase bust size. The procedure is used to enlarge a naturally small breast most commonly the result or heredity, to restore breast volume lost following pregnancy as a result of breast feeding or weight loss or to achieve better sym metry when breasts are moderately disproportionate in size and shape health officials say. Board Certified Plastic Surgeon, Doctor Gregory Neil, said the vast majority of his patients have already had children who breastfed, or they always had very small breasts and want to fill out their breasts. “They are very well adjusted, successful, intelligent ladies who want a little improvement of how their clothes fit. The vast majority of these women take very good care of them selves and are fit as a fiddle. They work out, are not run down, overweight and are toned, but they just need their breasts taken care of,” Dr Neil said. Per fect candidates H e said that a candidate for surgery would be a woman that is physically in tuned, spiritually, emotionally settled with a good support system and a certain level of understanding about the procedure. “The Bahamian population at most is very sophisticated and almost everything new in plastic surgery they have done their research. So when they come in, they know most of what they need to know and my job is just to talk to them about the options, weighing the risks and benefits. If the benefits outweighs the risks then we go ahead with the surgery,” Dr Neil said. Dr Neil said during the procedure, he tries not to put any scarring on the breasts to achieve the most natural effect. “I put a half an inch incision under the arm and go underneath the pectoral muscleGod put a space there for plastic surgery and that’s where we place the implant. I roll the empty implant into the shape of a ciga rette, slip it underneath the muscle and then inflate it. It is the best technique because there is no scaring of the breast. We use the best implants because I think if you are going to have the procedure done you should use the best so that it can last you a lifetime. A breast implant should look and feel natural. If you want to get pregnant, it should not impair your ability to breast feed,” Dr Neil said. Personal account Twenty one year old Katrina Scott*, said although it seems to be ‘taboo’ for most women in the B ahamas to talk about the procedure and why they had it done, she knew having a breast augmentation would help with her self esteem and was a priority at that time in her life. “I got my implants at the age of 17 because I had asymmetrical breasts. This means that one of my breasts developed faster than the other and it became noticeable. The doctors had been observing the development since puberty and realised that the smaller one would never catch up in size to the other. I wore artificial inserts in my bra for years and changed the size to balance it out. The doctor said that at age 18 or when I was mentally ready for the surgery he would do it. At 17, I was ready so he made the exception after much consultation. I then had to have one breast reduced and implanted and the small breast just implanted. The reason for the reduction was to ensure that later on that the natural drop of one breast would not be so noticeable as the implanted breast would always be perky,” Ms Scott said. Ms Scott said after the surgery, her breasts were painful and limited her from doing anything with her arms. Her mother did everything for her including giving her baths. It was important that she remained immobile to ensure proper healing. Ms Scott wore a special bra for almost 6 months after so that the implants would sit in the right place. “As my implants were considered medically necessary because it had a psychological effect on me, there were few cons. My surgery was more involved because of the reduc tion of one and as a result the nipples had to be repositioned. The doctor gave comprehensive explanations using charts and drawings to explain what would happen. He also demonstrated the strength of the implant to guarantee no leaking and the size of the implants are a C cup. The size of the breasts are fine as it may fluctuate as I gain or loose weight. I also now have a lifetime warranty with serial numbers in the event that anything goes wrong,” Ms Scott said. Ms Scott said her parents supported her 100 per cent as it took two operations and two summers to complete the procedure. “They (implants lot better. As I became aware of my body the problem affected me. Being self conscious of my breasts even affected my posture as I tried to divert the attention from my imperfect chest. So it was a neces sary procedure for my mental well being,” Ms Scott said. Dr Neil said the cost of implants can fluctuate depending on the pro cedure. “If you do not fall into the catego ry of a certain patient, then your cost can differ. The implants alone can cost a little more than $1,000. For persons who only need a breast implant, they can look to spend less then $5,000 for everything,” Dr Neil said. Ms Scott said she wants young girls in the Bahamas to embrace what they have in terms of their bodies. “I don’t feel that small breasts is a good reason for such an invasive procedure. However, if it becomes a situation that affects how you func tion in your day to day life then correct it. Mental well being is important to living the best life you can,” she said. * Name has been changed C M Y K C M Y K WOMAN PAGE 6B, TUESDAY, MAY 12, 2009 THE TRIBUNE health BODYANDMIND T h e T r i b u n e n By ALEX MISSICK Tribune Features Reporter amissick@tribunemedia.net BEAUTY and self confidence are attributes that aree xtremely important to a woman living in the 21st centur y in v olving everything from t he lat est mak eup craze, to the shaping and sculpting of what they feel is the perfect body including breast size. size Theperfect The Bahamian population at most is very sophisticated and almost everything new in plastic surgery they have done their research. So when they come in, they know most of what they need to know and my job is just to talk to them about the options, weighing the risks and benefits. DR GREGORY NEIL AN AMERICAN special ist in massage therapy will be visiting the Bahamas to offer free classes for “non-invasive, scientifically based energy healthcare” called the BodyTalk System. Licensed massage therapist, certified neuromuscular therapist and Reiki master Jeanne Ellis of Palm Beach will be in the Nassau next month to teach classes which she says are designed to improve the quality of life for participants. According to practitioners, the BodyTalk System, devel oped by Dr John Veltheim, follows the body’s guidance directly to the place that needs attention. “The body has its own intelligence which coor dinates thousands of simultaneously occurring functions, organising the organs, endocrines, and other major systems. You don't run your body, this intelligence does,” a recent press release stated. “A BodyTalk Practitioner can communicate with this innate wisdom and ‘remind’ the body what needs to hap pen in order to heal. The body also knows when it is no longer able to heal on its own, and can alert a practitioner when medical attention is needed.” Ms Ellis said she learnt about the BodyTalk System in 1996 and has since been dedicated to sharing the programme’s methods. Prior to discovering BodyTalk, she said she knew that other healthcare pro gramme’s were not address ing areas such as digestive issues, fears and phobias, emo tions, endocrine imbalances, belief systems and many other possibly sub-conscious issues that needed attention for the client to truly heal and most importantly have a long last ing result. “There are 100,000 chemical reactions every second, 20 mil lion red blood cells alone replaced every second, 40 bil lion bits of information processed in the brain every second.” The BodyTalk System inte grates well with all other modalities including Western Medicine. Doctors, chiro practors, massage therapists, psychologists, and people who just want to help their family and loved ones are becoming Certified BodyTalk Practi tioners. It has grown quickly in the last twelve years because of good results, and is now taught in over 30 countries around the world. ACCESS is being taught to school chil dren with amazing results on grades, attention spans and behaviour, the release also stated. Ms Ellis has previously taught BodyTalk methods in Nassau, with local students saying that have seen tremen dous health improvements. Ms Ellis will be back in Nassau on June 4 for a free intro duction lecture and demo, and she will teach modules one and two of the BodyTalk Sys tem on June 5 8. For more information on the Bodytalk system and upcoming seminars in Nassau and other international classes, visit www.bodytalkcen terofpalmbeach.com. Your body’s talking Are you listening? Jeanne Ellis

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SKIN CARE WHETHER genetic or envi ronmental, you may not be able to completely banish redness, but you can take steps to help control it. Wear a sunscreen daily: look for one containing calming ingredients like Green Tea and Licorice to help soothe and con trol flare-ups. Choose moisturisers containing green natural mineral tint (not an artificial colour!) to help cancel out visi ble redness. Be mindful of what goes in your body. Smoking is some what like suffocating the skin from the inside: it inhibits the body's ability to provide oxygen and nutrients to skin while restricting blood vessels. Excessive intake of alcoholic beverages and certain medications (such as nasal decongestants) can also contribute to dry skin, leaving skin more susceptible to sensitivity. Don't over shower or overscrub: The loss of existing oil is commonly caused by excessive bathing or showering, or the use of harsh soaps that dissolve the protective layer of oil. Never ever shave without a protective medium. Using dull razors can also weaken the skin's barrier function, leaving it exposed to environmental assaults. Take note of what triggers the “red” reaction in your skin: certain foods such as artificial sweeteners or spices can bring on the flush look. Also be aware of your hormones, stress levels, physical exertion, and adrenal shifts. Sarah Beek is a skin care therapist at the Dermal Clinic. Visit her and her team of skin and body therapists at One Sandyport Plaza (the same building as Bally’s Gym). For more information visit www.dermalclinic.com or call 327.6788. C M Y K C M Y K WOMAN THE TRIBUNE TUESDAY, MAY 12, 2009, PAGE 7B DATINGin the jungle seems heavy going at times with hungry predators, slithering snakes creeping up unexpectedly and cute clingy furry animals with big dewy eyes. Manouvering through the undergrowth can be exhausting and discouraging particularly when you feel you are making slow progress. It takes a lot of energy just to go out and try and survive. So if it is that difficult, why do we keep going back again and again? Is it the vision of the cool, tranquil watering spot at the end of the journey? That place of peace when you find a person who accepts and loves you for who you are. To be in the comforting arms that help heal the pain and make us feel so secure; the reward. For those of us who suddenly find ourselves single again, perhaps due to divorce, death or the end of a long relationship it can be overwhelming. Conversations inevitably return to the same question, 'Where can you meet someone decent?' 'All the good ones are married', and 'No one is serious anymore. They only want to have a good time.’ Yes, re-entering the dating world will most certainly be different each time and with each decade in our lives. We do not remain the same person as the years pass because we change and grow with all life's experiences. Our expectations change so it is important to be open to the concept of change. Take time to really think about the things you do want and the things that you could not tolerate. Be yourself and do not be discouraged by people telling you what you should or should not be doing. If this imposed single hood is due to a failed romance then look within yourself honestly and try and see how you played a part in the demise. Fear of starting again can immobilise us but it is important to understand that everyone has fears. Some of the most common fears that we bring from childhood are fear of being rejected, abandoned, ignored, embarrassed, smothered, and of course controlled. When your particular fear button has been pushed it is vital to remember that this is probably not real but a trigger from an old deep rooted memory. The urge to protect ourselves from the imaginary pain can be very strong and we may run and not deal with problems, or we may just go quiet and switch off. Alternatively we may stay and fight and argue and possibly get more and more angry. These are all behaviours to protect ourselves from the ensuing pain. We imagine this pain both physical and to our egos. As hard as we try, our triggers will get pushed and the only way to deal with them is to talk and explain our fears and anxieties. Sharing these fears with those closest to us will allow them to know us better and appreciate our tender areas. If however we chose to have secrets and withhold information then our intention is to create just the right amount of distance to keep others from knowing the real us and in this way generate a mask or disguise. The problem with disguises is that they can be so easy to put on and all too often it is even difficult for us to see our true selves. The only effective road to true intimacy is to learn how to be transparent and honest. Being transparent and honest is a very attractive quality and for most people draws us closer to them. Most people think that telling the hard truth will drive people away but we know for a fact that this is not true. Remember that even in healthy relationships people get their feelings hurt at times. It is impossible not to get hurt because we are human and life is coming at us from all angles. Knowing all these things and still wanting to have someone close in our lives is the driving force that sends us out in to the jungle. Leave home armed with knowledge and confidence that everyone is experiencing the same difficulties as yourself. Relax, enjoy yourself and try not to worry about success on any given day. The expression 'Like attracts like' is a truism and one that epitomises the need to work on producing a positive aura that will in turn draw the right person to you. Margaret Bain is an Individual and Couples Relationship Therapist. She is a Registered Nurse and a Certified Clinical Sex Therapist. For appointments call 535-7456 or e-mail her at relatebahamas@yahoo.com or www.relatebahamas.blogspot.com. She is also available for speaking engagements. Dating in the Jungle L OVING RELATIONSHPS B Y MAGGIE B AIN TRACHEAL Collapse is a syndrome characterised by dorso ventral flattering of the tracheal rings with laxity or the dorsal tracheal membrane. The syndrome is associated with clinical signs of cough and varying degrees of dyspnea (difficult breathing) and is most frequently encountered in middle – aged to old toy or miniature dogs. Considerable controversy surrounds the precise cause of the syndrome; consequently there is still little agreement concerning the most effective approach to its management. The condition occurs more frequently in dogs that are obese and int hose with heart disease or other lung diseases s uch as chronic bronchitis. The Yorkshire terrier is the most commonly affected breed followed by the miniature poodle, Chihuahua and Pomeranian. Tracheal Collapse syndrome is characterised by a chronic paroxysmal cough that is precipitated by excitement, anxiety or pulling on the leash.T he cough is typically harsh, dry and non-pro ductive and is easily elicited on tracheal palpation. Diagnosis is confirmed by a combination of things eg a positive cough reflex on palpitation of the trachea and preferably a positive endoscopic examination that demonstrates intratra cheal changes. However, because of exorbitant cost of veterinary endoscopes, few vets in the Bahamas are equipped with them. Therefore the diagnosis is sometimes missed and a dog is treated for a chronic respiratory aliment instead of tracheal collapse. Treatment The practicing vet must be prepared to pursue several therapeutic avenues in the management of the individual dog to deal with the complex and multifactorial etiologies of this syndrome. Successful long term medical management is possible for the majority of patients provided the initiating factor or factors can be identified. This route should always be investigated before a surgical solution is considered. If the dog is seen to be in respiratory distress, the dog should be stabilised firstly. The dog should be sedated and should not be stressed. If possible, some oxygen therapy should be administered. Some form of cough suppressant should be given as well. Weight reduction should be pursued aggressively in all overweight animals to improve respiratory function. The daily caloric intake should be reduced significantly. Respiratory infections should be treated by appropriate antibacterial therapy such as antibiotics. The antibiotics Doxycycline, Amoxicillin and Cephalexin are commonly used. The use of collars should be discouraged because repeated external pressure on the trachea may initiate mucosal irritation and promote coughing. Body harnesses are an alternative means to securing your dog. Surgery is an option that should only be considered after all medical options have been tried and failed. However, from my experience there have been numerous complications resulting from surgery. Tracheal Collapse By D R BASIL SANDS Tracheal Collapse is most frequently encountered in middle – aged to old toy or minia ture dogs. Reducing redness BY SARAH BEEK OVERthe Easter holidays I took my first trip to Cuba, one of a party of ten. We stayed in Havana two nights but our main destination was Santiago de Cuba, over 500 miles from Havana in the southeast of the country. Santiago is a city with character. Yes, it has its old tumbledown buildings in the historic areas but the city is clean and very proud of its heritage – which is considerable. Santiago de Cuba was established in 1515, the same year as Havana, and for a while was the capital of the Spanish colony. Although situated on the Caribbean coast the city is completely surrounded by mountains. Wherever you look the Sierra Maestra forms a backdrop. One cannot write about Cuba without mentioning the transportation. There are many modern European and Asian vehicles, from private cars to luxury buses, but what catch es the eye are the pre-1960 US cars that anachronistically run their appointed rounds like dinosaurs among cattle. Detroit must have made solid cars in those days for the more recent Lada cars from the Soviet Union all seem on their last legs (wheels? these the three-wheeled rickshaws operated by motorcycle or pedal power, hundreds of motorcycles, and the great number of horsedrawn vehicles and you have all the makings of an eclectic traffic jam. Cuba has good, dark volcanic soil and the trees seem to grow far larger than in The Bahamas. The broad avenues of Santiago are lined with flowering Yellow Poinciana and Woman’s Tongue while bare Royal Poin ciana trees await their turn to bloom. There was Bougainvillea everywhere, almost to the exclusion of other shrubs. I noticed lots of hibiscus in Havana but virtually none in Santiago. I found it interesting that all of the Frangipani were mature trees. Here in The Bahamas our Frangipanis top out as shrubs at 10 to 12 feet with only a few becoming trees. When you move into the foothills of the mountains, the scenery – and flora changes drastically. There are still Yellow Poincianas by the roadside in places but the eye roams to the 100-feet tall mango trees laden with fruit. We were in Cuba during the dry season and saw many stream and riverbeds without water. When the rains come these will be added attractions to an already lovely region. Along the roads, sometimes forming natural fences, were bromeliads our tour guide told me were called Maya. There were thou sands of them and each one could have sold for $30 or more in Nassau. The most striking images I will retain from the mountain tours are of the stately Cuban Royal Palms (Roystonea regia ture prominently on the Cuban coat of arms. We only see Royal Palms in Nassau as a centerpiece for massive lawns or as avenue sentinels, planted at precise distances from each other. It was distinctly odd to see two or three randomly growing in a cow field but beautiful to see groves of them climbing the steep mountainsides. The mangoes we ate were obviously of an early variety. They were quite compact and had a lovely apricot hue. We also tasted cashews and a variety of sapodilla that was torpedo shaped and had orange flesh. I had the privilege of being entertained in five Cuban homes while on vacation. None of the dwellings had a traditional yard but every owner grew ornamentals in pots – philodendrons, bromeliads and ferns among them. Every member of the group agreed that Santiago de Cuba was a far superior tourism destination to Havana. There were many attractions to be enjoyed both within the city and in the nearby countryside. Perhaps, coming from The Bahamas, it was the magic of the mountains that made the difference. j.hardy@coralwave.com GREEN SCENE BY GARDENER JACK The other side of Cuba BROMELIADS abound by the mountain roadsides near Santiago de Cuba. A TYPICAL scene in the S ierra Maestra surrounding Santiago de Cuba.

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IN 1837, Hans Christian Andersen wrote a fable about an emperor that is very simi lar to interpersonal dynamics you can witn ess in today's work place. In the story, t he emperor was deceived by two salesmen who convinced him that they would make him clothing that only persons of an ele vated status will be able to appreciate. Everyone, including the emperor, saw that they were being deceived but no one said anything for fear of being labeled low in status, incompetent, ignorant or stupid. Now let's fast forward to the present. Think about your organisation. Are there managers around you, or, are you a man ager who sets the stage so employees will say what you want to hear for fear of being labeled? This can happen for a number of reasons. For instance, some managers think like President Bush who once said “You are either for us or against us”. Managers who think this way feel that everything that happens falls within a zone of two possi bilities. They fail to recognise that there are so many other possibilities that they don't even consider them. Consequently, employees in this kind of environment are afraid to say anything that can lead the manager to think the employee is against them. Another variation on this theme occurs when employees are negatively labeled because they have a different point of view. In cases like this, when employees have another point of view, the manager decides the employee either doesn't understand, is wrong, is not a team player, is incompetent or is unsupportive. This way of thinking tends to short circuit any attempts by employees to communicate their ideas for fear of the backlash. From a performance management perspective, managers avoid telling employees about their true performance because they want to keep the peace and avoid con frontation when appraisals are completed. Therefore, a company can end up with increasing staff costs through merit increas es and bonuses that are rewarding marginal performance. In these cases, the man agers see what is really going on but again, they want to avoid conflict. Managers aren't the only employees who demonstrate “emperor” behaviour. There are some co-workers who appear to be untouchable because of their connections. Co-workers refrain from saying anything that can potentially upset or frustrate them for fear of the potential ramifications. This happens in highly political office environments and whittles away at trust and integrity within the team. Impact on Your Business In Hans Christian Andersen's story “The Emperor's New Clothes”, it was clear that everyone, including the emperor, knew what was really going on but because they would be viewed as incompetent, no-one said anything except an innocent child. Interestingly enough, when the child blew the whistle on the staged effort, everyone continued to pretend that it was business as usual. In your organisation, if everyone turns a blind eye to executive, manager or employ ee dysfunction there can be an impact on the performance of your company or organisation. One of the negative effects can be on employee morale and productivity. Let us take a deeper look at this. If a manager is known to be arrogant and not open to other opinions he will feel threat ened when an idea isn't his and so he will find ways to discourage input by suggesting that you don't understand the situation or process. What is really happening is that he is destabilised by your idea because he thinks the best ideas should come from him. Therefore, instead of supporting your ingenuity, and seeking to integrate your sug gestion, he seeks to hold onto his sense of security by trying to dismiss your idea, use it as his own or convince you into thinking you are making a mistake. As a result of this type of behaviour, employees back off, entering into an apathetic mode. This can be costly because when things go wrong employees will hide bad news, system inefficiencies or recommendations because they want to avoid the perceived consequences. Why Does this Happen? When employees perceive they are unable to be authentic without suffering some sort of consequence an elaborate sys tem of avoidance will inevitably result. On one hand, there are managers or employees in survival mode, trying to maintain the faade of power and status and they are willing to do what it takes to keep their power alive by feeding fear within the work environment. On the other hand, employees are in another type of survival mode. They want peace and harmony and so they create a faade of harmony, productivity and competence which they protect at all costs. Sometimes this protective mode becomes evident when newcomers join the team. Newcomers generally want to impress the boss because they are on probation so they inadvertently upstage existing employees. Team members naturally want to avoid the implications of disrupting the system of false harmony so they influence the newcomer into changing his or her behaviours. Managers often assume that employees pressure new employees to reduce their performance levels because of laziness. However, as managers we need to ask ourselves if the apparent laziness is a cause or effect. Is it an unwanted bye-product ofa n elaborate system of behaviour we helped t o create? What You Can Do About It In environments where authenticity is non-existent, so is trust. So rebuilding the team becomes a trust building exercise. This is a difficult process because most times, an entire system of behaviours sup ported the “Emperor's” behaviours. There are a few options you have if you are a primary decision maker and you want to turn this around. You can attempt to rehabilitate the “emperor” through training and coaching and if they don't respond, a restructuring exercise can be considered. Another way to build trust and authenticity is to develop the ability to encourage and integrate diverse points of view. Diversity conscious behaviours can improve team performance significantly because it cre ates a safe space where different points will be heard and used to create holistic solutions. Your ultimate goal is to rebuild the team and trust building can take time, particularly if the “emperor” is going to undergo a reha bilitative process. The other thing to remember is that one person doesn't create the system of behaviour so the team should be a part of the rehabilitative effort to make the changes stick. Yvette Bethel is CEO of Organizational Soul, a company that offers Business Consulting and Leadership Development services. If you are interested in creating authentic change at your organisation, her contact details can be found at www.orgsoul.com . C M Y K C M Y K WOMAN PAGE 8B, TUESDAY, MAY 12, 2009 THE TRIBUNE n B y LLOYD ALLEN Tribune Features Reporter l allen@tribunemedia.net FOR many men who would have grown up and experienced most of their youth during the 1960s through to the 1980, the transition of what the ‘original’ barbershop was, to what it is today, has in many ways changed dramatically. Despite the comfortsair conditioning, five minute cuts, and a myriad of personalised services -available in barber shops today, one can only imagine how the barber shop experience was in years gone by. T his is where barber 69-year-old Eleazor Johnson, from Johnson and Johnson Barber and Beauty salon Fox Hill comes in as he is considered oneof the last remnants of the traditional barber, with a career spanning more than 50 years. Reflecting on his early days as a budding coiffeur, Mr Johnson said a weekly visit to the barber was a way of life for many young men, an experience which not only gave them a clean look for the new work or school week, but also for their appearance at one or more of the night clubs frequented during that time. Mr Johnson explained: “At that time we had places like the Cat and The Fiddle, ZanZa Bar, The Bloom Night Club, Lemon Tree, Banana Boat , and so many others. “In one night you and your girlfriend or whom ever could visit up to five clubs, so visiting the barber early Saturday morning around 6am or 7am was the thing to do.” He said during the sixties, there were dozens of barbershops all over the island, “there was Sawyers on Plantol Street, there was Rodney Darling, Josey’s, Kings Men, and then Cliffie’s onFarm Road, it was so many of them.” He explained, one of the most popular barbershop at that time was the Saxony Hotel barbershop located on East Street. The Saxony had set the standard for what a barbershop should be, because on the inside there were several barbers who were always dressed in their white coats, their hair always trimmed right, and the interior always kept in tip top shape. As men would come there sometimes with their sons to get their cuts, while waiting they could opt to get their shoes polished by the shoe shine boys on the outside, or get their cars washed. When it comes to the hair cuts, Mr Johnson said although the trends have changed over the years,t he equipment for the most part has remained the same. “Back then we had simpler models, but the machines haven’t changed much. We use to use the long metal razors ‘the ones that you sharpen with leather’ they don’t use them anymore, the tube liner which just come on stream to do a shape up, we didn’t have them.” He said unlike today where barbers cut hair with a cap on, with loud music, or allowing customers to drink in their shops, that was not permitted. He said the Bahamas Barbers Association (BBA Josey enforced uniformity amongst the barbers of his day. The association made Wednesday a day of rest for barbers, and also helped to make hair cutting a respectable career. Today, Mr Johnson said he has lost respect for many in his profession, who he said are in the business for a ‘quick buck’ rather than developing their talent and providing a comfortable environment for customers. “There are so many young men who come into t his industry just because they’ve cut one or two h eads, but barbering is so much more than that, it i nvolves being a people’s person and knowing your skill,” he said. Describing himself as a jack of many trades , Mr Johnson attributed his success to being able to multi-task. Apart from barbering, one of his passions is boating, an activity he has enjoyed since childhood. Although he is no longer a crew member, Mr Johnson is the proud owner of well known regatta icon The Lady Natalie . Named after his mother, the regatta champion has taken part in dozens of local regattas since the late 80s, and has racked-up numerous top awards including 1st place in the 87’ Montagu regatta, 2nd place in the Exuma B-class in 87’, and first place wins in Bimini, Grand Bahama, Andros, Acklins, Eleuthera, Cat Island, and Abaco B-class events. Nicknamed ‘The Sailing Barber,’ Mr Johnson said he has also helped to promote the sport of sailing throughout many islands, and looks forward to this year’s events. Two of his four sons have followed in his foot steps and Mr Johnson said although he has accepted that the barbershop experience has gone through many irreversible changes, he hopes that those who are coming into it as a profession will take the time to learn its history, and discover its true potential. Days gone by B ARBERSHOP SHOWING off a picture taken during the 70s where he shaped-up an afro for Bahamian photographer Bob Thompson. 63-YEAR-OLD Barber Eleazor Johnson still has the right touch, seen cutting the hair of a youngster in his Fox Hill Road shop. to environmental preservation. With a long list of sponsors including The Broadcasting Corporation of the Bahamas, Baha Mar Resorts, Sky Bahamas, and the Beauty Shack, and a host of other sponsors, this year’s event is nothing short of a community project and is expected to be one of the most spectacular events ever, organisers said. The beauty who wins the crown, will also receive a Diamond’s International crown, a chance to compete in the Miss World com petition, Miss Tourism Queen International, and Miss Intercontinental pageants. Apart from those initial prizes, the girl who is most successful in the runway segment of the preliminaries, will be chosen to represent the Bahamas in next year’s Top Model of the World competition. 18-year-old SHAVONNE MCKENZIE Height: 5” Career goal: Forensic Pathologist 20-year-old SWANIQUE SAWYER Height: 5” Career goal: Pediatrician 22-year-old MICHAELA FERGUSON Height: 5” Career goal: Literary Advocate 17-year-old JOANNA BROWN Height: 6” Career goal: Entrepreneur/Physiologist 23-year-old LLATETRA LAING Height: 5” Career goal: Nurse/Entrepreneur 18-year-old GABRIELLE MAJOR Height: 5” Career goal: Tourism Marketing & Development 20-year-old EMILY DARVILLE Height: 5” Career goal: Culinary Professional 19-year-old DEVERA PINDER Height: 5” Career goal: Prime Minister of The Bahamas 20-year-old DASHANIQUE POITIER Height: 5” Career goal: Journalist/Entrepreneur 20-year-old DANIELLE MORLEY Height: 5” Career goal: Architect/Evangelist 23-year-old CHANNA CIUS Height: 5” Career goal: Interior Designer/Fashion Icon 20-year-old KENDRA WILKINSON Height: 6” Career goal: Dentist 21-year-old MCCHENIER JOHNSON Height: 5” Career goal: Photographer/Educator FROM page 10 Earth angels unmasked By YVETTE BETHEL The Emperor’s new clothes In your organisation, if everyone turns a blind eye to executive, manager or employee dysfunction there can be an impact on the performance of your company or organisation.

PAGE 20

C M Y K C M Y K THETRIBUNE SECTIONB HEALTH: Body and mind T UESDAY, MAY 12, 2009 EARTH ANGELS However the members of this year’s Miss Bahamas World (MBW the ante with their pageant, not only producing their usual TV series Backstage Pass, but also inviting the general public to be a part of the judging process for the event through their website www.missbahamas.net. Organisers officially launched the pageant with a Go Green reception held at Bahamas National Trust’s (BNT Attendants were mesmerised with an exciting dis play of the lucky thirteen who are scheduled to take p art in a long list of activities leading up to the c ompetition on May 31, at the Wyndham Rain forest Theater. Adding to the growing list of organisations centered on green living, MBW has already contributed more than $1,200 to its partner BNT, and during the competition will have the contestants make several visits to Bahamian nationalp arks while learning about BNT’s contributions SEE page eight n By LLOYD ALLEN Tribune Features Reporter lallen@tribunemedia.net IN an en vir onment where it seems there are as many beauty contest as there are islands throughout our country, many may find it difficult to determine a clear distinction between each one. UNMASKED SHAVONNE MCKENZIE JOANNA BROWN DEVERA PINDER DASHANIQUE POITIER DANIELLE MORLEY LLATETRA L AING GABRIELLE MAJOR EMILY DARVILLE SWANIQUE SAWYER CHANNA CIUS KENDRA WILKINSON MCCHENIER JOHNSON MICHAELA FERGUSON


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unmasked

SEE WOMAN SECTION

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Felipé Major/Tribune staff



FORMER MP Keod Smith speaks to the press yesterday.

Keod Smith struck
while serving orders
to union members

m@ By MEGAN REYNOLDS
Tribune Staff Reporter
mreynolds@tribunemedia.net

FORMER MP Keod Smith
was hit in the face as he served
orders to members of the
Bahamas Hotel Catering and
Allied Workers Union’s execu-
tive council yesterday.

The attorney told The Tribune
he was acting in his power as offi-
cer of the court and legal repre-
sentative for the BHCAWU exec-
utive council as he served orders
issued by Justice Claire Hepburn
on Friday to each council member
at Worker’s House on Harrold



Road yesterday morning.

The orders prohibited any
member of the council from pre-
venting any other executive mem-
ber from attending a full meeting
of the council for election nomi-
nations, Mr Smith said.

But as he served the order to
one of the executive members Mr
Smith said he was smacked in the
face.

The attorney said: “I dropped it
in front of him as he was turning
away from me, and as I turned
away from him I was struck in the
face. Then I realised it was him.

SEE page eight

The Taste

on

Tuesdays!!

The Tribune

=USA TODAY.

BAHAMAS EDITION

www.tribune242.com

TUESDAY, MAY 12, 2009
|

eS
ea!
AND REAL 2 a

SPENT Sy




m@ By MEGAN REYNOLDS
Tribune Staff Reporter
mreynolds@
tribunemedia.net





a THIS SECTION PAGE 15



PRICE —75¢ (Abaco and Grand Bahama $1.25)




Brother of slain
banker:
until killer is
brought to justice

Pil stay

Ilt Jones to assist
police investigation

HYWEL Jones’ brother has vowed
to remain in the Bahamas until whoever
is responsible for the banker’s execu-
tion-style shooting has been brought to

justice.



Ilt Jones said he will remain in Nassau

for “as long as it takes” to assist police

HYWEL JONES

with their investigation after his broth-

er’s death on Friday night.

Hywel Jones, 55, president of the Britannia Consultancy
Group, was shot at least twice in the head and body as he was
getting out of his car in his office car park near Compass Point
in West Bay Street at around 10am on April 22.

After the shooting the slim, dark, and unmasked gunman
took off on a motorcycle towards Gambier Village.

Police launched an island-wide search for the attacker and a
$50,000 reward was posted last week for information that
might lead to the arrest or conviction of those responsible.

Mr Jones, a British citizen who lived in the Bahamas for 21
years was a permanent resident. His mother was living with him

on West Bay Street.

His brother, a location manager on Hollywood films, said he

SEE page eight




m@ By PAUL G TURNQUEST
Tribune Staff Reporter
pturnquest@tribunemedia.net

A MAN, believed to be in his
mid to late 30’s, became the
country’s latest homicide when
his body was discovered off
Blue Hill Road with multiple

VILERINE HENFIELD, sister of
the late Able Seaman Fenrick
Sturrup, puts a wreath over-
board yesterday in observance
of the 29th anniversary of the
HMBS Flamingo sinking.



Stabbing victim is the
nation’s latest homicide

oj sJellate)s & Nget Co ave
[Btop ping) ae Losey

potential replacements, The Tri-
bune has learned.

Mr Hanna took up the posi-
tion under the former PLP gov-

comment on anything in the
world” as his position places him

SEE page eight

e SEE PAGE 16 SPECIAL REPORT:
. PLANS FOR RELOCATION
Suggestion made that Governor See
General will soon step down

cor ee caeearo ence, fmmens a epee zoe ne aa On
down from the post —<-with Sx government-clected in May 2007, THE OTHER WAY
ree dihbees mae a Seria atl pera FROM CORRUPTION
Allen, Lynn Holowesko an o speak with The Tribune abou
Janet Bostwick all suggested as his eae he ee ALLEGATIONS

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stab wounds to the chest.
Receiving a call around
6.40am yesterday, police were
led to an area opposite the Blue
Hill Road clinic where the body
of the man was found at the
rear of a business establishment.
Wearing a plaid shirt and
dark trousers, the victim, whose
identity is yet to be released by
police, is described as being of

SEE page eight

Appeal for
recusal of Justice
Lyons from civil
case is allowed

@ By NATARIO MCKENZIE
Tribune Staff Reporter

THE Court of Appeal yester-
day allowed the appeal for the
recusal of Senior Justice John
Lyons from a civil case involving
the Central Bank of Ecuador.

Justice Lyons who tendered his
resignation from the bench last
Thursday has recused himself

SEE page eight

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NASSAU AND BAHAMA ISLANDS” LEADING NEWSPAPER
PAGE 2, TUESDAY, MAY 12, 2009

THE TRIBUNE



LOCAL NEWS



RBC supports the Downtown
Nassau Partnership with

THE Royal Bank of Canada
cemented its support for the revi-
talisation of the city of Nassau
with a commitment of $25,000
over the next two years.

This pledge, along with finan-
cial contributions from public and
private stakeholders, will support
the efforts of the Downtown Nas-
sau Partnership (DNP) to over-
haul the capital as a tourist attrac-
tion.

“Royal Bank has had a contin-
uous presence on Bay Street since
1917 when we constructed our
first branch building in the
Bahamas. This branch was the
first modern bank building in the
Bahamas and today is still a land-
mark on Bay Street. Since then,
RBC has been present throughout
many changes and improvements
on Bay Street and we are proud to
support this current revitalisation
of downtown Nassau," said
Nathaniel Beneby Jr, vice presi-
dent and country head for RBC.

“We are pleased to have RBC
Royal Bank as the first financial
institution to support the Down-
town Nassau Partnership.

“The revitalisation of down-
town Nassau is a very important
national priority and we hope that
other private sector stakeholders
will offer assistance. The economic

Former president of Petroleum Retailer's

benefits from a thriving down- :
town will be substantial,” said ;
Vaughn Roberts, managing direc- }

tor of the DNP.

Public and private sector fund- }
ing will be used to cover the cost }
of detailed planning, technical and }
legal consultants and staffing, }
as well as certain short-term pro- }

jects.

term improvement projects.

Guided by an 11-member }
board with public and private sec- i
tor representation, the DNP }
employs a full-time, professional :
management team to coordinate }
the revitalisation efforts untilsuch :
time as a business improvement }

district is legislated.

Association Charles Johnson dies

CHARLES Johnson, former president of the Petroleum Retailer’s

Association, died on Sunday.

Mr Johnson was also chairman of the Fox Hill Festival Commit- :
tee and a well-known Bahamian businessman of Fox Hill origin in his }

own right.

Mr Johnson was the third Fox Hill festival chairman to die with-
in the last year, the others being Eric Wilmott and William Rahming. }

All of these men died at relatively young ages.
Said Fox Hill MP Fred Mitchell in a statement yesterday:

“Mr Johnson’s death adds to the deficit of knowledge and expe-
rience of the culture and traditions of Fox Hill as a community. }
The community mourns his passing and will miss his presence. His }

death has stunned us all.

“In addition, I know that he will be particularly missed by the i
Roman Catholic community in the Bahamas, both at St Anselm’sin
Fox Hill and by the wider Catholic community which he served asa i

fundraiser with distinction.

“On behalf of the Fox Hill constituency and in particular the vil-
lage of Fox Hill, I wish to extend condolences to his widow Eulise and;

his children,” he said.

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The government has indicated i
its support for the revitalisation — :
committing to relocate the com- }
mercial shipping port; putting in i
place incentives to stimulate }
mvestments under the 2008 City :
of Nassau Revitalisation Act; con- }
tracting for major dredging of }
Nassau Harbour with the fill to
be used to extend the water’s edge :
from East Street to Armstrong }
Street; committing to a process }
that will produce draft legislation ;
for a downtown business improve- :
ment district or similar mecha- }
nism; and undertaking with the }
private sector a number of short-















TROPICAL
EXTERMINATORS
Te
a mira a LY |



comtceiltoeerimesctâ„¢

PHASE I (top)

1 Liberty Class Cruise Ship Dock
2 Island Bulkhead

3 Improve Downtown Circulation
4 Create an Intermodal Terminal
5 Downtown Parking

PHASE II (second from top)

1 Open Space and Initial Infill

2 Marina

3 Bay Street Infill

4 Paradise Island Gateway Park

office@ooastcaribbeanimages.com by May 15, 2009 with subject ine: "Bahamas Model Search®

ae yal)

iO) O eee ee hele eee)

Original Fameus Bowl

Plans for relocation

$25,000 two year commitment |

oe

PHASE III (above)
1 Relocate Commercial Shipping to

southwest of the Island (not illustrated)
2 Construct Bulkhead Mixed Use Development
3 Marina Village



PHASE IV (page opposite top right)

1 Infill between Bay Street and
Woodes Rogers Road

2 Bulkhead Marina


THE TRIBUNE

TUESDAY, MAY 12, 2009, PAGE 3



LOCAL NEWS

of the container ports

Current financial crisis
‘pushes realisation of
idea into the future’

THE economic environ-
ment may favour the con-
tainer ports remaining in
their current position in the
immediate future rather than
being transplanted to
Arawak Cay or the south-
west New Providence,
according to John Bethell,
president of Bethell Estates
Limited.

Mr Bethell has made a
proposal which consists of a
phased removal of the port
from Bay Street to southwest
New Providence, leaving
downtown Nassau with a
new high-end residential and
shopping area.

In 2003, a special commis-
sion was organised to advise
government on the steps nec-
essary to improve, revitalise
and transform the city of
Nassau, including its harbour
area, surrounding areas and
scenic routes which link it to
the airport.

Suggestions

In 2004, the consulting firm
of EDAW was hired to cre-
ate a master plan incorpo-
rating suggestions for these
areas. The plan called for the
removal of commercial ship-
ping from East Bay Street.

In 2007, the Dutch firm of
ECORYS was retained to
prepare a business plan for a
new port at the southwest
end of the island near the
Clifton Heritage Park.

The construction of this
new port — proposed ina
much more robust economic
climate — would require sig-
nificant environmental
review and public investment
estimated at as much as $350
to $400 million.

The plan would also
require the private shippers
currently operating on New
Providence to move their
facilities to a new location.

“Furthermore, shipping
costs for goods to local busi-
nesses would increase due to
the additional travel time
from the port to major busi-
nesses on the island,” Mr
Bethell said.

He said even if this
remains the optimum solu-
tion to New Providence’s
shipping needs, the current
financial crisis pushes the
realisation of this idea into
the future. It is also likely
that the fiscal priorities of

ation of a new port, Mr
Bethell said.

The primary objective of
the relocation was to remove
traffic and shipping from
East Bay Street and thus
encourage the redevelop-
ment of the former shipping
facilities into lodging, retail
and other tourism based
facilities.

One alternative location
for the port is Arawak Cay,
and the government and
stakeholders are said to be
finalising the details of this
move.

However, Mr Bethell said
that significant investment —
as much as $50 to $80 mil-
lion — and a considerable
amount of time would be
required for the construction
of new facilities.

“Major public investment
for the improvement of sur-
rounding roadways would
also be required.

“Private shipping compa-
nies currently located on
East Bay Street would be
required to relocate to the
new facility.

“Business operations of
both the shippers and their
clients would be disrupted
during a fragile economic cli-
mate,” he said.

Apart from these costs of
relocation, several other
challenges are presented by
the Arawak Cay proposal,
Mr Bethell said.

“Shipping would be placed
at the entry to the Nassau
Harbour in plain sight of
arriving cruise ships and oth-
er ocean going visitors.

“The use of Arawak Cay
for lodging retail and other
tourism or civic uses would
be compromised by the
introduction of this new
industrial use onto the
island,” he said.

Instead, Mr Bethell pro-
poses the redevelopment of
shipping facilities in their cur-
rent location, on a new bulk-
head or strip of land
reclaimed from the harbour,
behind the existing shipping
houses.

The plan would allow for
the development of “retail
continuously along Bay
Street” and with one entrance
and exit for container trucks —
rather than the current seven
— would achieve the aim of
greatly improving traffic flow.

Later, when the economic
outlook has improved, the

SPECIAL
REPO







dem parking |
2 he

Stylish
in a
Michelle
Obama
Dress
as seen

THE FINAL PHASE of redevelopment will support the infrastructure
created during the previous phases. Specifically, parking structures
wrapped with commercial buildings will be constructed between Bay
Street and the Woodes Rogers Road expansion to further increase the
density of the centre. The continued infill and increasing will prompt
an additional demand for private boat docks which will be provided
adjacent to the mixed use development on the expanded bulkhead.

Established in 1956 by an old Bahamian family

Parliament Street (near Bay St.) Tel: 322-8393 or 328-7157
* Fax: 326-9953

Crystal Court at Atlantis, Paradise Island Tel: 363-4161/2

Lyford Cay (Harbour Green Shops at Lyford Cay)
a Tel: 362-5235 a

Bay Street could be redevel- ra 4
oped to accommodate har- V EW
bour front residential proper- OUR VI

ties, a marina and marina vil- To have your say on this ot any

government will lie with
more pressing social con-
cerns than that of the cre-

port could be moved to south-
west New Providence and the
extended bulkhead behind

Man leads police
on car chase before
crashing into house

m@ By TANEKA THOMPSON
Tribune Staff Reporter
tthompson@tribunemedia.net

POLICE are searching for a man who led officers on
a high speed chase through Yellow Elder Gardens
before crashing into a house.

At around 6pm on Saturday, Mobile Division officers
on patrol in Yellow Elder Gardens stopped a Buick Le
Sabre near Government High School.

The male driver and a female front seat passenger
both got out of the car.

However, a man who had been sitting in
the back seat jumped into the driver’s seat and sped off
with the officers giving chase, ASP Walter Evans
said.

The car ran into a house on Graham Drive before the
driver jumped out and escaped on foot.

When the officers searched the vehicle, they found
half pound of marijuana concealed in a bag.

Two Grand Bahama residents are being questioned
in connection with the matter.

In other crime news, police also detained three peo-
ple for questioning after officers executed a search
warrant at a home in South Beach Estates around
10.30pm on Friday.

ASP Evans said that as officers approached the
house, a man was seen throwing a bag onto the roof.

The bag was retrieved and a brown package contain-
ing three pounds of marijuana, with a street value of
$3,000, was found inside.

As aresult three men were arrested and are in cus-
tody.

lage, a multi-storey parking
facility and a performing arts
centre, according to the pro-
posal.

other issue, email The Tribune at:
letters@tribunemedia.net or

deliver your letter to The Tribune

on Shirley Street, P.O. Box N-3207

e-mail: info@colesofnassau.com
www.colesofnassau.com * P.O. Box N-121



FOR ALL YOUR DECORATING as

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PAGE 4, TUESDAY, MAY 12, 2009

THE TRIBUNE



From whence cometh

The Tribune Limited

NULLIUS ADDICTUS JURARE IN VERBA MAGISTRI
Being Bound to Swear to The Dogmas of No Master

LEON E. H. DUPUCH, Publisher/Editor 1903-1914

SIR ETIENNE DUPUCH, Kt, O.B.E., K.M., K.C.S.G.,

(Hon.) LL.D., D.Litt.

Publisher/Editor 1919-1972
Contributing Editor 1972-199]

EILEEN DUPUCH CARRON, C.M.G., M.S. B.A., LL.B.

Publisher/Editor 1972-

Published Daily Monday to Saturday

Shirley Street, RO. Box N-3207, Nassau, Bahamas
Insurance Management Building., P.O. F-485, Freeport, Grand Bahama

TELEPHONES
Switchboard (News, Circulation and Advertising) 322-1986
Advertising Manager - (242) 502-2352
Circulation Department - (242) 502-2387

WEBSITE
www.tribune242.com — updated daily at 2pm

Will health care

WASHINGTON — The White House trum-
peted the news: health care providers taking a $2
trillion scalpel to their costs and pushing the
U.S. toward Barack Obama's vision of health
coverage for all. But don't line up yet for those
insurance cards.

First, a reality check for the nation's 50 mil-
lion uninsured.

Medical providers have a long track record of
avoiding fiscal constraints, as witnessed by the
government's efforts to tamp down Medicare
costs.

And none of the groups that went to the
White House can actually dictate prices to their
members. Doctors in New York or hospitals in
Los Angeles are free to charge what the market
can bear.

There's one more catch: Even if every penny
of the promised savings shows up, not all of it
would be used to help cover uninsured Ameri-
cans. Actual savings to the government are all
that can be counted as Congress tries to pay
for subsidies that will be needed to help make
health insurance affordable for everyone.

The medical groups’ pledge is "a very hope-
ful sign,” said economist Robert Reischauer,
head of the Urban Institute. "But when we get
down to hammering out the details, health care
reform remains both complex and philosophi-
cally and politically difficult to accomplish.”

Costs could still turn out to be the greatest
obstacle to Obama's health care plan.

Outside experts estimate the taxpayers’ tab
could total between $1.2 trillion and $1.5 trillion
over 10 years. Some go as high as $1.7 trillion.
Obama's budget proposal includes a down pay-
ment that may cover less than half the bill.

Pledging restraint on costs Monday at the
White House were groups representing hospi-
tals, doctors, drug makers, medical device man-
ufacturers and a major health care labour union
—a Who's Who of health care interests. The
president posed proudly with them and called it
"a watershed event.”

Obama wants to build on the current system
in which most people get coverage through pri-
vate insurers. But he wants to change the rules
so the sick can't be turned down. And he wants
to provide subsidies to help low-wage workers
and even some in the middle class afford their
premiums. House Republican leader John
Boehner of Ohio isn't impressed. "Today's
announcement promises savings with no con-
crete plan to achieve them and no enforcement
mechanism if they don't,” he said Monday.

Indeed, it's too early to tell whether the
White House meeting will be remembered as a
turning point or as a political mirage. The
administration is projecting an image of a new
coalition for health care, with Obama and most

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savings add up?

of the health care industry and consumer inter-
est groups claiming the political centre.

Left out, for now, are conservative Republi-
cans, who oppose Obama's direction but have
yet to articulate their own vision, and liberal
Democrats who have been hoping to move
toward a nationalized system like Medicare for
all. As the debate heats up, the voices from
both ends of the political divide will get louder
— and the pressure on the centre will increase.

Still, the sight of health care industry leaders
volunteering to hold back spending is pretty
unusual. By joining Obama, providers are
acknowledging at least some responsibility for a
bloated and dysfunctional system that econo-
mists say is unaffordable.

In the 1990s, when President Bill Clinton
attempted to overhaul health care, the battle
lines quickly hardened. Obama, who has gone
out of his way to woo the interest groups,
praised their willingness to sacrifice on Monday.

The groups don't just have the national inter-
est in mind. Industry is worried that Congress
will create a government health plan to compete
with private insurers. Such a plan would quick-
ly become the biggest in the country and could
use its power to set lower payment rates, driving
costs down on the backs of medical providers.

"T think the reason all these groups want to
actively participate in the process is they don't
want to see a blunt instrument used to get
spending down," said Mark McClellan, who
ran Medicare for President George W. Bush.
"This is an opportunity to get everyone behind
a better approach to improve the way health
care works."

That's just what the groups say they want to
do. Their proposals include coordinating care
for people with chronic illnesses, rewarding
quality not quantity, and using technology to
root out waste and prevent errors that get
patients sicker.

But it's hard to put numbers next to any of
those ideas. For example, what if better care for
chronically ill patients turns out to increase
costs? None of the groups has set a target for
how much its members should have to pony
up. Congress is going to need hard numbers to
pass Obama's plan this year.

Robert Laszewski, a former health insur-
ance executive turned policy consultant, said
he's betting the consensus won't last.

"When Congress comes up with mechanisms
to reduce costs that actually take money out of
the hands of doctors, hospitals and insurance
companies, that's when we're going to find out
if things are really different this time," he said.

(This article was written by Ricardo Alonso-
Saldivar of the Associated Press).



feria

the arrogance in the
Bahamas political class?

EDITOR, The Tribune.

It has always been a puzzle
to me why our Government,
FNM or PLP, appear to resent
any advice from anyone who is
not in the inner circle. It makes
one wonder if each Minister,
when presented with his arti-
cles of office, is then declared to
be omniscient.

I will point to three glaring
examples.

1. For many years education
has been in a free fall and is
now a national disaster yet each
successive Government pontif-
icates on their plans for educa-
tion and they end up tweeking
this and tweeking that and their
"grand" plans end up being tan-
tamount to rearranging the
deck chairs on the Titanic. The
country is now blessed with hav-
ing Mr. Ralph Massey living in
the Bahamas and he has done
an exhaustive study on the
country's educational system
and, as a result, has made some
brilliant suggestions for
improvement in the education
plans. Anyone who really cares
about the future of our children
would like to believe that our
Government would be anxious
to at least listen to what he has

LETTERS

letters@tribunemedia net



to say. Is it arrogance that pre-
vents them from doing so?

2. In the latter days of the
last administration a bill was
passed in

the House of Assembly to
allow the introduction of a
National Health

Plan. After the FNM become
the Government there has been
indications that they will imple-
ment the Plan. The Nassau
Institute hosted a symposium
shortly after the election and
one of the featured speakers
was Dr. Michael Walker of
Canada's Fraser Institute whose
topic was Lessons From Global
Experience For Canadian
Health Care Reform.

Arrangements were made
for Dr. Walker to meet with the
new Minister of Health, Dr.
Hubert Minnis. I had the privi-
lege to escort Dr. Walker to the
meeting and he kindly asked
that I go in with him. Before
we arrived there I was thinking
of what a great opportunity it
was for the Minister to be able

to meet someone who had stud-
ied health plans all over the
world. At some point during the
meeting Dr. Walker offered to
come to the Bahamas, at his
own expense, to help in any way
he can with the proposed
National Health Plan.

The Minister said nothing in
reply. The silence was deafen-
ing.

I have been reliably informed
that at a subsequent open meet-
ing the Minister was asked why
he did not accept the offer of
Dr. Walker.

He is alleged to have replied
that the Bahamas does not need
the help of anyone outside our
country.

3. It was recently reported on
www.weblogbahamas.com that
our

Government was offered the
help of a young lawyer who has
a wealth of knowledge in US
tax laws and he had offered his
help virtually free of charge and
it was refused. It is well known
that his family is of a different
political persuasion.

So, I ask again. Why the
arrogance and to what purpose?

SIDNEY SWEETING, DDS

BAHAMAS QSR LIMITED

NOW HIRING

www.weblogbahamas.com

Punch editor prints misleading headline

EDITOR, The Tribune.

My article was recognised as the Letter of the
Week in The Punch for Thursday, May 7th,
2009. It was quite interesting how the content
was skimmed and slimmed by the newspaper’s
writers to suit the editor’s headline — arresting
people for buying numbers is out of order!

Firstly, the original piece was written based
on the content of the headline story of The
Punch of Thursday, April 30, 2009.

The Punch’s rewrite is careful to make no
mention of this and, while much of the content
printed is gleaned from the article, it is skilful-
ly manipulated to send a message that really
isn’t there — arresting people for “breaking the
law” is out of order!

I did imply that the practice of arresting peo-
ple for playing number bodes well in the realm
of ridicule as police officers in our country
have more pressing issues to attend to and
more extreme matters in which to focus their
manpower.

Add to that, the fact that the already over-
whelmed court system doesn’t need to be bur-
dened with issues that don’t threaten life, limb,
property or lead to extreme degradation of
the general public.

I did not, however, say that the police officers
doing their jobs and arresting persons for
breaking a legitimate law in The Bahamas were
out of order. I did describe the policies regard-
ing the “playing-number” dilemma as anti-
quated, barbaric and primitive.

I indicated that the continued enforcement
thereof was based on outdated laws that need-
ed to be revamped.

I suggested that choosing to play numbers
was less of a threat than choosing to drink
alcohol. I did, however, point out that our laws
are our laws and until such time as there is a

change in the law it must be carried out. If I had
said or written that “arresting people for buy-
ing numbers was out of order” then I would
have been out of order!

In referencing The Punch’s article of Thurs-
day, April 30, 2009, I took issue with the Min-
ister of National Security chastising the Com-
missioner of Police for organising and con-
ducting the operation against the perpetrators
with the strictest confidentiality.

I also congratulated the Commissioner of
Police and his team for a job well done with
regard to resulting arrests and arraignments
relative thereto. None of this, however, was
mentioned in the rewrite printed in The Punch.

I was careful to post the original letter online
at BahamasIssues.com and BahamasB2B.com
before copying it from one of these websites
and forwarding it to the news media.

While I was quite pleased that it got recog-
nition as the Letter of the week under Punch-
Lines I was disappointed at how it was reduced
to support a view held by the Editor and not by
me.

Finally, my position was and still is that I
have no problems with people who play num-
bers.

Iam not, however, not going to encourage
anyone to break the law no matter how ancient
or obsolete.

The police have a job to do and part of that
is to arrest people for criminal infractions such
as illegal gambling.

Until such time as new legislation passes
changing the process of the present system
arresting people for buying numbers is quite in
order!

MARVIN RZ GIBSON
Nassau,
May 8, 2009.

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THE TRIBUNE

TUESDAY, MAY 12, 2009, PAGE 5



LOCAL NEWS



PM: govt does
hot tolerate
abuse of
lletainees

m@ By KARIN HERIG
Tribune Staff Reporter

kherig@tribunemedia.net

ADDRESSING claims
that some immigration offi-
cers use excessive force
during apprehension and
detention exercises, Prime
Minister Hubert Ingraham
yesterday stressed that his
government does not toler-
ate the abuse of detainees
or suspected illegal immi-
grants.

“T want to be clear: abuse

of detained persons
whether in their homes, at
a work site, on an immigra-
tion bus or at the
Carmichael Road Deten-
tion Centre is contrary to
the law. Everyone must be
treated with respect and
with dignity at all times;
that is the law and that is
the policy of the govern-
ment which I head,” he
said.

Speaking to officers at
the first annual customer
service conference for the
Immigration Department
at the Wyndham Cable
Beach Resort yesterday
morning, Mr Ingraham said
they should all keep in
mind that the Bahamas is
party to international
human rights conventions,
including those related to
the rights of refugees and
other persons held in
detention.

“We expect immigration
officers to respect the pro-
tocols called for by those
conventions and by our
own laws and constitution

which guarantee respect for

the human rights of all
individuals in the Bahamas

regardless of their immigra-

tion status. And, I may add,
this includes the obligation
of immigration officers to
relay claims from illegal
immigrants of any fear of
persecution expressed by
an illegal immigrant/poten-
tial refugee on return to his
or her country of origin,”
he said.

Mr Ingraham’s state-
ments come just days after
detainees at the
Carmichael Road Deten-

tion Centre announced that

their living conditions have
improved greatly following
a series of Tribune articles
detailing claims of chronic
abuse and neglect at the
facility .

Immigration Minister
Branville McCartney said
he was “pleasantly sur-
prised” when he toured the
centre with immigration
bosses last week.

The Immigration Depart-

ment recently appointed a
fact-finding committee
comprised of psychologist

Dr David Allen, Social Ser-
vices director Mellany Zon- i

icle, Archdeacon James
Palacious, and Immigration
director Jack Thompson.

The committee toured
the Detention Centre and
spoke with the detainees in
March. However, their
report has yet to be made
public and The Tribune’s
request to tour the facility
has not been granted.

Red Bays to
host its annual
cultural festival

RED Bays, North Andros
will host its sixth annual cul-
tural festival, homecoming }
and snapper fishing tourna- i

ment on May 14 to 16.

Alphonso Smith, snapper }
tournament co-ordinator, said }
this year’s event will be held in }
honour of Frank Hanna, who }
has been a participant and }
sponsor of the event since the i

beginning.

Fifteen boats, each manned
by four fishermen, are expect- }
ed to participate in the tour- }
nament, which starts at 8am }
and ends at 4pm on Saturday, :

May 16.

Mr Smith says fishing
enthusiasts are coming from :
New Providence, Abaco, Exu- }

ma and Grand Bahama.

Only snappers will be
counted and the winner will }
be the boat with the largest

catch.
The prizes are:
¢ First — $1,500
¢ Second — $1,000
¢ Third — $750

e Fourth — $300

Govt won't ‘look the other way’
from corruption allegations

PM addresses claims of immigration officials accepting bribes

@ By KARIN HERIG
Tribune Staff Reporter
kherig@tribunemedia.net

THE Government will not “look the oth-
er way” where evidence supports allega-
tions of corruption in the public service,
Prime Minister Hubert Ingraham has
warned

He particularly addressed allegations of
immigration officials accepting bribes at
ports of entry or in exchange for falsifying
documents or speeding up work permit and
residence application processes.

The keynote speaker at the first annual
customer service conference for the Immi-
gration Department held at the Wyndham
Cable Beach Resort yesterday morning, Mr
Ingraham expressed regret that a “pay to
play” culture has developed in the country’s
public sector.

Reminding those attending the two-day
training conference that bribery of a public
officer is an offence, the prime minister said
that persons applying to the Department of
Immigration should not be treated as ene-
mies of the state nor should they be milked
for money.

“Regrettably, some public officers, assist-
ed, indeed abetted by some members of the
public, have fallen prey to a ‘pay to play’
culture. At the Immigration Department, it
has led to allegations that for a price, some

officers ‘look the other way’ at
ports of entry.

“Other allegations suggest
that applications submitted for
consideration at the depart-
ment can be accelerated, or
falsified supporting documents
overlooked, to assist a ‘pay-
ing’ customer.

Persons making applica-
tions for work permits or for
permanent residence or for
registration as a national are
not enemies of the state, nor
are they ‘patsies’ to be hit
upon for tips. They are clients
or customers seeking a service
that the Department of Immi-
gration and its officers have been engaged to
facilitate,” he said.

Mr Ingraham said he wants to assure the
department’s staff that government is firm-
ly committed to advancing the pace of mod-
ernisation in the public service.

“We will not rest until we have achieved a
sustained level of improved efficiency and
productivity in every department,” he said.

The prime minister said that members of
the public often complain of inefficiencies
experienced at the hands of the Department
of Immigration.

“Individuals submitting applications to
the department whether for a work permit,

LUMO UeUN



a certificate of permanent res-
idency or for nationalisation
should not be required to
resubmit documents because
they have been mis-filed and
or lost by the department.

Letters written to the
department ought to be
acknowledged and respond-
ed to in a reasonable period of
time — not six months or a year
later — or not at all,’ Mr Ingra-
ham said.

The prime minister also
made a point to assure immi-
gration officers that individ-
ual performance and service
standards will impact the
career advancement of public officers.

“For too long now, I think, public service
training policies have disproportionately
placed the greatest emphasis on ‘qualifica-
tions’ as a primary basis for advancement in
the public service. This has been second only
to ‘experience’ which translates into length of
service, as the basis for promotion,” he said.

As a result of these policies, Mr Ingra-
ham said, the Bahamas’ “culture of service”
has diminished over the years.

“Careers in the public sector became more
about personal advancement and less about
the delivery of effective, cost-efficient service
to the public. Some very good people got

trapped in what has become a poor system of
management and administration. And, as a
result we are not receiving from our public
employees the best that they are able to
produce,” he said.

“Very importantly, this training confer-
ence places the emphasis where it rightly
belongs — on customer service. What we
seek to achieve is a re-orientation to new
modes of conduct. We want to improve ser-
vice standards by increasing the level of pro-
fessionalism and customer focus to public
service management. We want to improve
accessibility to government services, expedite
delivery timelines and promote high stan-
dards. We seek to build capacity and set
and regulate standards of performance so as
to make best practices become common
practice.”

Mtr Ingraham said that his government is
working on change “department by depart-
ment and ministry by ministry throughout
the public service.”

To have your say on this or any other
issue, email Tbe Tribune at:
letters@tribunemedia.net or deliver your
letter to The Tribune on Shirley Street,
P.O. Box N-3207

m@ By KARIN HERIG
Tribune Staff Reporter
kherig@tribunemedia.net

PRIME Minister Hubert Ingra-
ham took the Department of
Immigration to task for instances
of “insolent and rude” behaviour
toward local and international
travellers — especially Jamaicans —
arriving at the Lynden Pindling
International Airport.

Mr Ingraham was speaking at
the first annual customer service
conference for the Immigration
Department held at the Wynd-
ham Cable Beach Resort yester-
day morning.

The prime minister highlight-
ed the offensive behaviour to
which Jamaican nationals are fre-
quently exposed to upon arrival at
Bahamian ports of entry and par-
ticularly at LPIA.

“Not all Jamaican nationals
arriving in the Bahamas intend to
overstay their allotted time. Not
all Jamaican nationals arriving in
the Bahamas have police records,
nor are they engaged in illegal
activity. Yet far too many
Bahamian immigration officers
greet Jamaican nationals arriving
in the Bahamas as if they were
known criminals. This is not
acceptable; it must stop regard-
less to the nationality of the arriv-
ing passenger,” he said.

He said that persons who do
not appear to satisfy entry
requirements for the Bahamas
should be spoken to in a courte-
ous and respectful manner.

“May I also remind immigra-
tion officers that Bahamians have
a right to leave and re-enter the
Bahamas. Unless there is reason-
able cause to support a fraudu-

INTERNATIONAL AIRPORT

lent document, Bahamians’ entry
to our country ought to be expe-
dited without bureaucracy,” he
said.

Mr Ingraham further said that
persons who sponsor visits by
Jamaicans for other than bonafide
purposes must know that all immi-
gration officers operate from the
same remit — “no facilitation, no
accommodation, no tip, no bribe
to permit persons to enter the
Bahamas who are reasonably sus-
pected of coming here to work
legitimately or illegitimately.”

Upon arrival at the country’s
airports or ports of entry, the
prime minister said, persons sus-
pected of illegal activity should to
be invited to move to a quiet, pri-
vate area for further screening.
“If they are in fact innocent of
any wrong doing, no unnecessary
embarrassment will have been
experienced,” he said.

Mr Ingraham also addressed
the staffing problems at the air-
port’s immigration hall.

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“T believe that the Immigration
Department is aware of the arrival
schedule of inbound aircraft. Yet,
it never ceases to amaze me that
upon entry into the immigration
hall most booths are unattended,
the assigned officers gradually
making an appearance as the hall
fills with passengers waiting to be
cleared. This attitude is not what
we are all about. I look forward






































NASSAU'S

Premier

Le



therefore, to a change in that
behaviour,” he said.

Mr Ingraham said that this
points to another obvious prob-
lem requiring attention by the
department — the fact that immi-
gration officers are generally
scheduled to work a 9am to Spm
shift, irrespective of the schedule
of flight and charter arrivals.

“Much better value would be
had if only skeleton staffs were
deployed over the usual work day
— 9am to Spm — with the remain-
der or bulk of staff scheduled to
be at their stations at the peak
hours of business.

“That would permit a full con-
tingent of officers to be on the job
and in their booths when the
largest numbers of passengers
arrive at a port of entry,” he said.

RISTORAWNTE



Yesterday’s inaugural event
was billed as a refresher pro-
gramme to prepare immigration
officers who will be on the front
line during two major events
being hosted in Nassau this year —
the FIFA Conference later this
month, and the Miss Universe
Pageant to be held in August, the
prime minister said.

He commended the manage-
ment of the department for their
pro-active stance.

One of the objectives of the
training conference, Mr Ingraham
said, is “to assist immigration offi-
cers to recognise that their differ-
ing responsibilities — to guard and
protect and to welcome and facil-
itate — are not mutually exclusive.
This is an especially important
objective.”

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PAGE 6, TUESDAY, MAY 12, 2009

THE TRIBUNE



LOCAL NEWS



Grading the performance of Government ministers
YOUNG Man’s VIEW

Yesterday's Young Man’s View
evaluated the performance of
Deputy Prime Minister Brent
Symonette (C-), Minister of the
Environment Earl Deveaux (B+),
State Minister for Immigration
Branville McCartney (B-) and
Minister of National Security
Tommy Turnquest (F+). Today,
the column continues its analysis
of the nation’s executive branch
two years into the FNM’s tenure.

@ By ADRIAN GIBSON
ajbahama@hotmail.com

/ hivargo Laing, the thin-

ly gilded golden boy and
Minister of State for Finance,
earns a C-plus. During his tenure,
he has attempted to stabilize the
financial status of the country
while dealing with a multitude of
controversial issues (Clico, Glob-
al United, matters related to trade
policy, etc). Early on in the glob-
al economic downturn, Mr Laing
recklessly dug in with an eco-
nomic forecast that was erroneous
even though reputable interna-
tional economic forecasters and
publications had rightly predicted
an economic slump.

Although he has at times been
accused of being insufferably
pompous and increasingly more
reactive than proactive, there is
no one better at diffusing contro-
versial political issues, explaining
issues in a manner that average
Bahamians can grasp and/or
offering thinly veiled excuses.

Thus far, although the
Bahamas has signed on to the
EPA, Mr Laing has done little to
meet its requirements of estab-
lishing a Standards Bureau, which
would deal with imports and be
tasked with ensuring the health
and safety of the Bahamas; Cus-
toms Reform, which calls for a
rules of origin regime; Govern-
ment Procurement, which calls
for transparency relative to gov-
ernment-issued contracts and the
advertisement of all government
purchases; and the Single Admin-
istrative Form, set to bring sim-
plification and lucidity to the
process when making declarations
on imported items. Huge legisla-
tive and policy reforms are need-
ed to meet the requirements of
the EPA and Mr Laing has yet
to explain how the money will be
generated or procured to imple-
ment the agreement. I have also
been reliably informed that the
Bahamas’ service offer relative
to the services aspect of the EPA
has not been accepted.

ADRIAN



As it relates to the Bahamas,
how does the country fare in what
is rapidly appearing to be a glob-
al agreement to rein in tax
havens? Furthermore, what is the
Bahamas’ role in the context of
world trade talks?

Carl Bethel, the bright but
sometimes ostentatious Minister
of Education, earns a B.
Although I have previously criti-
cised the minister for his belli-
cose grandstanding on certain
issues, it’s clear
that he is ham-
pered by bureau-
cracy, inter-min-
istry politics and
challenges in his
ministry that are
institutional.
Although Mr
Bethel’s ministry
had appeared to slowly react to
charges of molestation against
teachers, I have been reliably
informed that there is evidence
showing where the Department
of Education attempted to sup-
press complaints against accused
persons long before Mr Bethel
entered the hot seat. I’m told that
under the PLP, an unqualified,
accused person was appointed to
a senior position, contrary to the
advice of the Public Service Com-
mission.

Of late, the minister has moved
to bring about sweeping changes
and focus in the structure of the
Department of Education, is
launching an educational reform
council, has implemented a rapid
reaction team that is directly
accountable to him and has
pushed for the presence of study
halls in schools throughout the
Family Islands and a learn-to-
earn programme. He is the only
minister, in recent time, to have
ensured the smooth, timely open-
ing of schools for two years run-
ning. With that said, there is also
an urgent need for curriculum
reform, which should properly
reflect the historical/cultural ele-
ments of the Bahamas.

The Ministry of Education
must take a cue from regional
neighbours such as Trinidad and
Tobago that have made Spanish a
mandatory component of the cur-



Colina Imperial

G IBS ON

riculum and proposes to have a
bilingual society by 2020, partic-
ularly in consideration of its close
proximity to South America.
Implementing mandatory foreign
language classes into our overall
development plan would be one
of many forward thinking
approaches to our
educational/social development,
especially since students at local
schools are not effectively taught
conversational Spanish/French
but instead are merely taught to
remember sight words. Sadly,
because we are incapable of
meeting the need locally, the
Bahamas will have to import for-
eign language translators for the
Miss Universe pageant.

A new approach must be taken
to reform education, as each year
nearly a third of the graduating
students are functional illiterates.
While Mr Bethel is an astute
politician who appears to take his
job seriously, it is clear that some
of his officers/educators are not
serving him well. I also credit Mr
Bethel for his maintenance of his
constituency office, which I know
firsthand, is opened on a daily
basis.

Michael Barnett, the Attorney
General and Minister of Legal
Affairs, earns an I for incomplete
or a OF for what’s appearing to
have been a quick failure. Mr
Barnett reminds me of the invisi-
ble man. Under his tenure, there
has been no improvement in the
infrastructure or administration
of the justice/legal system, there
appears to be no initiative relating
to the tenure and payment of
judges, no new hiring and recruit-
ment of attorneys to the AG’s
office to deal with issues such as
trade reform and criminal mat-
ters and little efforts to incentivize
lawyers to leave their practices
and sit on the bench. Mr Barnett
appears to have fallen asleep at
the wheel, so someone should
tickle him.

As the chief minister of justice,
Mr Barnett has done little to con-
front the deficiencies of the justice
system and show that justice in
the Bahamas is transparent. He
has also said little about the
charges and accusations levelled

The following individuals are asked to contact Mrs. Kimley Saunders

(396-2047) or Ms. Kayshonta Smith

Insurance Ltd:

Princess Butler
P.O. Box ES-6069
Nassau, Bahamas

Brendilee Rolle
P.O. Box 7290
Pine Barron Road
Nassau, Bahamas

Tamika Williams
P.O. Box F 42299

Freeport, Bahamas

Tiffany Rolle
P.O. Box GT 2395
Nassau, Bahamas

Tanya Rolle
P.O. Box GT 2395
Nassau, Bahamas

Bridgette Hog
P.O. Box GT 2395
Nassau, Bahamas

Theresa Deleveaux

P.O. Box N 732
Nassau, Bahamas

Albert Smith
P.O. Box SS-6104
Nassau, Bahamas

Granville Neville Williams

(396-2031) at Colinalmperial

Eddison Paul Sweeting Jr.
Nassau Bahamas

Michelle Sweeting
Nassau Bahamas

Christon Mackey
Nassau, Bahamas

Terasean Sweeting
P.O. Box CR 56708

Sunset Park

Nassau, Bahamas

Kemuel Delancey
P.O. Box CR 56708

Sunset Park

Nassau, Bahamas

Terry Sweeting

P.O. Box CR 56708

Sunset Park

Nassau, Bahamas

James Wallace

Nassau, Bahamas

Stafford Bullard

P.O. Box N 3730
Nassau, Bahamas

Larado D. Evans
P.O. Box N 3730

485 Inagua Avenue,

Freeport, Grand Bahama

Ms. Alquennia Rolle-Cunningham

General Delivery

Moore's Island, Abaco

Francis Roberts

Nassau, Bahamas

P.O. Box $S5175

Nassau, Bahamas

Mr. Godfrey Roberts

Freeport, Grand Bahama

Charlissa C.D. Poitier

P.O. Box N-978
Nassau Bahamas

at certain members of the judi-
ciary. Frankly, Mr Barnett
reminds me of a partygoer who is
still at a stag party with a wed-
ding ceremony having been long
completed. He has hardly made
the public aware of any amend-
ments to laws or the introduction
of bills to confront 21st century
criminals. The justice minister,
who seems quite reactive, must
also seek to push for disciplinary
action to be taken against corrupt
attorneys, bring in special prose-
cutors and provide the police
prosecutors with additional
resources. As it stands, Mr Bar-
nett’s performance has been so
abysmal that in my opinion he
should leave his cheque at the
Treasury or donate it to the con-
stituents of Fort Charlotte.

Byran Woodside, the Minister
of State for Lands and Local
Government, appears to only be a
minister in name, since there is
no such thing as a minister of
lands when it is really the Cabinet
and the Prime Minister who col-
lectively decide on the issuance
of Crown land. In the granting of
land, Mr Woodside doesn’t have
the power to make much happen
beyond maybe a strong promise!

Minister Woodside has
dropped off the scene since he
won his election court case, mere-
ly appearing to be serving as the
PM’s eyes and ears and “pushing
paper” at the PM’s office. The
minister and others at the Depart-
ment of Lands and Surveys
should set out to create a web-
site pertaining to the available
Crown land on each island, sim-
plify the process so that more
Bahamians can qualify for grants,
revise policies governing land
grants, reform the land registra-
tion process and amend the Qui-
eting of Titles Act, which encour-
ages land grabs. Mr Woodside,
who is drifting right along, earns a
C for being present.

Kenneth Russell, the Minister
of Housing who is off to a late
start, earns a B-minus for having
rescued his ministry from the
brink of bankruptcy. Mr Russell
has set out promoting homeown-
ership and the assistance of
throngs of low-to-middle-class
Bahamians in their pursuit of
home ownership. In his attempt
to fulfil his pledge to build a
record number of houses before
the end of his term, the minister
has already initiated the con-
struction of subdivisions such as
Ardastra Estates and Dignity
Gardens II, has sought and over-
seen the passage of legislation



reducing the down payment for
government-initiated houses, has
expanded the construction of
affordable housing to the Family
Islands and has proposed to con-
struct better quality houses—of
various designs—in accordance
with the country’s building codes.

Vincent Vanderpool-Wallace,
the Minister of Tourism and Avi-
ation, has not successfully applied
himself to the task of differenti-
ating and reinvigorating our
tourism product and our market-
ing approach.
Frankly, Mr Van-
derpool-Wallace—
who was promot-
ed as the visionary
guru of tourism—
has been a disap-
pointment.

The tourism
minister has not
affirmed the country’s position as
a tourist destination, has yet to
propose new ideas for the diver-
sification of our tourism product
and has not extended the Bahama
Host programme or implemented
any much-needed training
requirements for line staff at
tourism-related properties. The
ministry has not made the dis-
tinction between the Bahamas
and any other country in the
wider Caribbean in terms of
indigenous local tours, using
junkanoo in more substantive
forms, tapping into the promo-
tion of historical preservation and
heritage tourism and supporting
small Bahamian boutique resorts
(eg, bed and breakfast, bonefish
lodges). Thus far, room capacity
in the Bahamas has been reduced
from about 14,000 to 10,000 while
the Dominican Republic has
30,000 rooms and Cuba’s tourism
market is coming online.

With declining tourist arrivals,
how is Mr Vanderpool-Wallace
going to respond to Cuba’s possi-
ble opening or the United States’
slackening of travel restrictions?
The tourism minister is of to a
slow start and earns a miserable
C-minus.

Desmond Bannister, the Min-
ister of Youth, Sports and Cul-
ture, seems to have been engaged
and appears to be creating a coali-
tion with the movers and shak-
ers of the sporting world to jump
start some of the various sporting
disciplines that have been dor-
mant for years.

However, there is a need for
youth development programmes.

Mr Bannister has also gained
the reputation of a hardworking
MP, whose’ efforts in

Carmichael—inclusive of the
recently installed community
benches alongside the road — is
laudable. As the substantive min-
ister, he appears to have not done
well with his mentorship of
Charles Maynard. Overall, he
earns a B.

Phenton Neymour, the Min-
ister of State with oversight of
public utilities, earns an unim-
pressive D-plus.

While Mr Neymour seems lim-
ited in his capacity, Bahamians
continue to receive appalling ser-
vice from government corpora-
tions and are time and again sub-
jected to power cuts and over-
priced services. Mr Neymour
seems to be a reactionary minister
and since he usually doesn’t
appear to be either here or there
on some issues, he is credited with
being a good communicator with
lots of speeches.

Larry Cartwright, the Minister
of Agriculture and Marine
Resources, earns a B-plus. While
it does appear that Mr Cartwright
has done well, he must be careful
not to be seen to be maintaining
the status quo.

Of late, the minister has been
placing heavy emphasis on agri-
culture while promoting the con-
cept of self-sufficiency. Howev-
er, the government must help to
diversify the agricultural output of
the Bahamas, encouraging local
markets and endorsing the pur-
chase of more Bahamian-grown
crops.

As minister, Mr Cartwright
must see to it that greater techni-
cal assistance is provided to farm-
ers, he must reassure Family
Island farmers of their capacity
to market and export and he must
assist in the movement of local
farming from a labour intensive
setup to a scientific, 21st century
operation (duty-free, hybrid
seeds, etc).

Furthermore, although fisher-
men are in need of tremendous
support, the marine resources
department seemingly lacks
vision and innovation and is one
of the few government depart-
ments that actually sends money
back to the government during
each annual budget.

The duo of Mr Cartwright and
Edison Key has recently con-
ducted a successful agricultural
fair and appears to be reviving
an interest in farming for the first
time in years.

¢ The final lineup in Adrian
Gibson’s evaluation of Cabinet
ministers/the government will be
published tomorrow.

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THE TRIBUNE

TUESDAY, MAY 12, 2009, PAGE 7



LOCAL NEWS

COMMONWEALTH HEADS OF GOVERNMENT MEETING
Bahamas in talks over helping Trinidad for November meeting

Call for change
to rules on
appeal justices
appointments

@ By TANEKA THOMPSON
Tribune Staff Reporter
tthompson@tribunemedia.net

IN an effort to avoid any
future impropriety, president
of the Bahamas Bar Council
Wayne Munroe is calling for
a change in the law which
allows the prime minister to
appoint justices to the Court
of Appeal without consulting
members of the legal frater-
nity.

He suggested the rules be
changed to include a provi-
sion allowing for consulta-
tion with the bar council
first, so potential justices can
be vetted before appoint-
ment.

"We take things too nar-
rowly politically — right now
you have a Judicial Legal
Services Commission where
two lawyers are appointed.
Unfortunately they're
appointed by the prime min-
ister.

“There's no reason under
the sun why the prime minis-
ter should appoint people
who you have thought would
have been representing the
bar," said Mr Munroe.

"And so all you need is for
it to be changed to ‘appoint-
ed by the prime minister
under the direction of the
bar council’ and there you
have provisions for consulta-
tion of the profession.
Unfortunately the appoint-
ments to the Court of
Appeal are wholly done by
the prime minister; we just
need to remove that type of
apparent, even if not real,
ability to do something unto-
ward.

"Because all you need is
one ambitious prime minis-
ter who might try it,” he said.

Constitution

Under the country's con-
stitution, the president of the
Court of Appeal and other
justices of appeal are
appointed by the governor-
general after recommenda-
tion by the prime minister,
and consultation with the
leader of the opposition.

The constitution also says
that the appointment of the
chief justice must follow the
same procedure.

The justices of the
Supreme Court are appoint-
ed by the governor-general
acting on the advice of the
Judicial and Legal Service
Commission — a five member
group chaired by the chief
justice.

Although he has no legal
obligation to do so, current
member of the commission
Lester Mortimer — whose
appointment is set to expire
next year — informs the bar
council about impending
judicial appointments, Mr
Munroe said.

He argued that if Mr Mor-
timer's replacement does not
see fit to continue this cour-
tesy, the bar council may be
forced to publicly criticise
any selections it believes are
unfit.

"There's going to come a
time — and it would appear
from what I'm hearing, very
soon — that the bar council,
after a judicial appointment
is made, is going to have to
publicly say the profession
does not feel that this person
is qualified to be a judge.

“We would hope that that
doesn't have to happen
because it would tend to
scandalise someone on the
bench and that would not be
good for the administration
of justice.

"If they continue not to
properly take our views
onboard, and the minute
that they appoint somebody
who falls so low below the
standard that we don't think
they ought to be in that posi-
tion, then we would have to
say it. And all of that can be
avoided by canvassing us,"
he said.

INSIGHT

For the stories

behind the news,
read Insight
on Mondays



;

Brent Symonette



m@ By TANEKA THOMPSON
Tribune Staff Reporter
tthompson@tribunemedia.net

"a work in progress" Mr Symonette said
that issues such as climate change, regional
security and the future role of the Com-
monwealth are likely to be topmost on the

THE Bahamas is in discussions with Com- __ list.

monwealth Secretary General Kamalesh
Sharma to determine the extent of assis-

tance it will offer Trinidad for the Com-

monwealth Heads of Government Meeting
in November. Minister of Foreign Affairs
and Deputy Prime Minister Brent Symon-
ette, who spoke to The Tribune from Grand
Bahama yesterday, said he expected to meet
with Mr Sharma yesterday afternoon to iron

out the CHOGM agenda.

While the agenda for the meeting is still

issue," he said.

Lyons asked to resign ‘after
criticising Chief Justice’

LEGAL sources close to for-
mer Justice John Lyons suggested
yesterday that the senior judge
had been asked to resign earlier
this year over an incident involv-
ing Chief Justice Sir Burton Hall,
and not, as believed, because of a
later incident in which he was crit-
icised by Justice Anita Allen.

His resignation, according to
sources, was only being
announced now after Justice
Allen made accusations against
him involving the appointment of
an accountant in another case and
questioned whether she should
recuse herself from the case
because of her background
knowledge of that appointment.

Speaking on condition of
anonymity, a lawyer told The Tri-
bune that Chief Justice Sir Burton
Hall was “infuriated” over a rul-
ing in January this year by Mr
Lyons, which suggested that he
and the Attorney General had
“colluded in a conspiracy” by
their alleged actions over the cer-
tification of court transcripts by
Magistrate Linda Virgil.

“They called Justice Lyons in
over that and what I understood
was that he had tendered his res-
ignation from then, but that it
may only have been made public
last week,” said the lawyer, who is
a friend of Mr Lyons.

Retirement

Yesterday a clerk in the Chief
Justice’s office told The Tribune
that Sir Burton was not taking
press inquiries on the subject of
Mr Lyon’s retirement.

This comes as several legal
insiders suggested that Mr Lyon’s
departure was not of his own voli-
tion, but instead, demanded in a
letter from the Chief Justice.

While the judge had come
under fire in recent months
because of his handling of certain
cases over which he presided,
numerous lawyers have spoken
out since his departure to com-
mend his “industrious” work eth-
ic and valuable expertise in the
field of commercial law.

Others complimented him on
the stand he took on the inde-
pendence of the judiciary in 2006
while still a judge in Freeport.

Yesterday Bar Association
President Wayne Munroe sug-
gested that the authorities may
have difficulty finding a suitable
replacement for Mr Lyons as
numerous lawyers have said it



must be done
expeditiously.
Referring
specifically to
the suggestion
that McKin-
} ney, Bancroft
and Hughes
senior partner
Brian Moree
may take up
the vacancy,
Mr Munroe
said the lawyer “might well be a
good addition,” but added that
he “can’t see” him accepting.

“(He would be required) to
take a monstrous cut in pay and
have to sit in substandard and
uninhabitable buildings, put up
with the nonsense of dealing with
the executive branch of govern-
ment and the fact that any idiot
can say whatever they wish about
you and you can’t defend your-
self.”

The attorney said being a judge
takes “superhuman self control.”

“As somebody who has judi-
cial ambitions myself, this is what

John Lyons



“They called
Justice Lyons in
over that and what I
understood was that
he had tendered his
resignation from
then, but that it may
only have been
made public last
week”



Lawyer friend of Lyons

causes me to think well I really
wouldn’t follow through with it
because I’m not sure I have the
ability when people talk foolish-
ness, to hold my hand (in terms of
not sending someone to court for
contempt when they come before
you)”.

A message left for Mr Moree
was not returned up to press time.

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ESSAY COMPETITION

TENTH ANNUAL PUBLIC SERVICE WEEK

The Department of Public Service will host an Essay
Competition as one of the activities for the Tenth Annual
Public Service Week. The Competition is open to Junior
and Senior High Students in New Providence.

Additionally, this year, a speech competition will be
held for schools in the Northern & Southern Bahamas,
respectively. Students interested in participating in the
Essay Competition should write a 250 - 300 words (Junior
High), and 450 - 500 words (Senior High), essay on the
topic: “ The Public Service-Striving for Excellence in

Customer Service.”

The deadlines for entries, which should be referred
to the attention of Ms. Antoinette Thompson, Deputy
Permanent Secretary, Department of Public Service, is

Friday 24th July, 2009.

A Dell Desktop 2400 Computer System will be awarded
to the winner in each category. The first runners-up for
both the Essay and Speech Competition in the Junior &
Senior High School category, will be awarded a $500 gift

certificate.

The winners will be announced during the Tenth Annual
Public Service Week Awards Ceremony scheduled for

Saturday 10th October 2009.

Students interested in the Speech Competition for the
Northern and Southern Bahamas should contact their

Language Arts Teacher.

Agenda

"The prime minister will be going to that
meeting and we'll be bringing up the agen-
da very shortly. .. That meeting is not until
November so we're still discussing the whole

Mr Symonette said it was too early to say

what level of support this country will offer
Trinidad. "We haven't finalised that yet.

‘KEMP'S FUNERAL HOME LIMITED



I'm not sure for instance whether we'll be
sending Defence Force officers. “Those
things haven't been nailed down yet.

“T don't want to say that we're going to be
doing ‘x, y, z' and that’s not the case, but
we'll obviously try and assist as best we
can," said Mr Symonette.

Trinidad will host its second major inter-
national summit in November; the country
recently hosted the Summit of the Americ-
as in April, attended by several world lead-
ers including US President Barack Obama.

The Bahamas hosted the CHOGM in
2006 and should be able to offer Trinidad
advice on preparing for the prestigious
meeting.

2? Palmdale Avenue, Palmdale
Nassau, N.P., The Bahamas

CR ee
Mr. Harry Thomas Lloyd Albury

of Rock Sound,
Eleuthera, The
Bahamas, Who died at
Doctor's Hospital,
Nassau on 10th May,
2009, after a long
ness, will be held at
the Rock Sound
Methodist Church,
Rock Sound, on
Saturday, 16th May,
2009 at 10:30 a.m.

Rev. Kendris Carey will officiate and interment
will follow in the Rock Sound Public Cemetery.

Mr. Albury was pre-deceased by his parents,
John |, Albury and Albertha J. Albury, his
brothers-in-law, Sylvester Cleare and Hanford
W. Darville, C.B.E., J.P., and his nephew, Steve
Darville.

He is survived by his sisters, Ethelyn Darville,
Lauriette Albury and Eleanor Cleare; his
nephews, John and Robert Darville; a great niece,
Caron Watson and a great nephew, Jamie Darville
and many relatives and friends in Eleuthera and
in Nassau,

The family would like to thank Dr. Theodore
Turnquest and Dr. Duvaughn Curling and the
Nurses N.N.O.W. Limited for the care and
kindness shown to Harry Albury during his
illness.

Instead of flowers, donations may be made to
the Cancer Society of The Bahamas, PO.BOX
5.5. 6559, Nassau or The Bahamas Heart
Association, PO.BOX N.8189, Nassau or the
Rock Sound Methodist Church,Rock Sound,
Eleuthera, The Bahamas, in Memory of Mr.
Harry T. L. Albury.

Arrangements by Kemp's Funeral Home
Limited, 22 Palmdale Avenue, Nassau, N.P.,
The Bahamas.

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THe TRIBUNE



City Lumber on Marathon

Road is still in business

CITY Lumber, an 83-year-old
business, founded by the late Sir
George Roberts, is still very
much in business on Marathon
Road.

In Tribune Business on Mon-
day it was reported that “the old
City Lumberyard, which met its
end by fire several years ago,
has recetved more than a $15
million makeover from its new
owners who are developing the
almost 12-acre property into
Builder’s Mall.”

This was incorrect. The ref-
erence was to a fire that
destroyed the old Bahamian
Lumber Company, which was
located on Wulff Road.

This property has since been
purchased by Mr Mark Roberts
for his newly created Builder’s
Mall.

Bahamian Lumber was start-
ed in 1959 by the three sons of
the late Ronald Albury —
David, Jimmy, and Billy.

It was purchased by Messrs
David Thompson and Samuel
Sawyer, directors of Pioneer
Shipping, around 1979 and
operated until the September 7,
1990 fire.

About three years ago the
almost 12-acre property was
purchased by Mr Mark Roberts
and turned into a large Builder’s
Mall.

“The idea behind Builder’s
Mall is that we would like to
create a facility that makes it
easy to come and do a lot of

construction-oriented business,”

said the young businessman.

(See correction on page 1 of i

today’s Business section).

Located at Builder’s Mall will
be four businesses owned by Mr
Roberts, in addition to two inde- }
pendent businesses whose own- }
ers are leasing space from him.

Mr Robert’s Tile King, which
specialises in tile, granite, and i
natural stone, has moved to the }
Mall from its Palmdale location. }
Also located at the Mall is Mr
Robert’s newest business, Fix }
Your Place (FYP), which sells }
lumber, hardware and building }
materials, and the Paint Centre, i
which offers a wide range of i

paints.

Mr Roberts is now working
on plans for manufacturing large ;
slabs of marble and granite for }
counter tops and custom-made :
granite and marble products. It }
will be a separate granite-marble

centre.

Also located at Builder’s Mall i
is the business of M.R. Higgs, }
owned by Mr Andrew Higgs, }
which specialises in awnings, i
shutters and window treatment. }

And Tamboura Coleby’s :
Freedom Appliances and Elec- }
tronics, which carries a wide }
range of appliances and elec- }
tronic equipment, is also to be :

found at the Mall.

In the meantime Mr Roberts’
Tile King premises in Palmdale }
is listed for sale with Bahamas :

Realty.

Stabbing victim is the

nation’s latest homicide |

FROM page one

slim build, five feet nine inches tall, and weighing an estimated 165

pounds.

Described as having “uncombed” hair, the police are uncertain
of the victim’s occupation and are appealing for anyone with ;
information to contact them at 911, 919, or their nearest police sta- ;

tion.

In other police news, a 26-year-old resident of Harbour Island ;
drowned over the weekend after taking a group of 14 persons out }

in his 17-foot Boston Whaler.

According to police press liaison officer Walter Evans, some- i
time around 8 o’clock Sunday night, the 26-year-old man left Har- :

bour Island in the Boston Whaler with 14 passengers onboard.

The vessel experienced some difficulties sometime later and the

14 passengers were able to swim to safety.

However, sometime around 9am yesterday, the body of the
man was discovered floating in waters around Harbour island in :

a “motionless state.”

While the police believe he may have drowned, an autopsy is

being performed to determine the exact cause of death.

Former kindergarten teacher

Freda Russell dies age 97

i
MRS FREDA RUSSELL



MRS FREDA RUSSELL
had been out of education for
many years, but her impact on
Nassau society will be felt for a
long time to come.

Mrs Russell, who was 97, had
a significant impact on the many
children who had her as a
kindergarten teacher at Queen’s
College, including many
Bahamians who over the years
have held leading positions in
government and the communi-
ty.

She was described by many
who knew her as a “remarkable
woman” who worked tirelessly
in her field of education — so
much so that she was honoured
with a British Empire Medal in
2002.

Born in Bangalore, India in
1911 where her father had tak-

en up a post with the Methodist
Church, Mrs Russell returned
to England in 1921 and entered
a local boarding school. She
came to the Bahamas on Octo-
ber 24, 1932 with her parents
when her father was appointed
chairman of the Methodist
church here.

In 1933 Mrs Russell started
her career as Queen’s College’s
kindergarten teacher after
accepting the post which was
offered her by QC headmaster
Rev RP Dyer while she was still
at school in England. Mrs Rus-
sell taught at Queen’s College
until 1964.

Marrying Mr Seighbert Rus-
sell, brother of the founder of
the Stop ’N Shop, a well known
Bay Street store, in the late
1930’s, Mrs Russell never had

any children of her own, but
loved her nieces, nephews and
young students dearly. Her hus-
band died in August 1992.

A great reader, Mrs Russell
had a sharp mind and was able
to recall the names and anec-
dotal stories about her students
whenever she met them around
town.

In her retired years, said a
niece, Mrs Russell enjoyed her
dogs and roses very much and
was a great lover of chocolate in
any form.

Suffering from a stroke in
December of last year, Mrs
Russell has been bedridden
since. She died peacefully on
Sunday at 1.30pm at her Lake-
side Road home.

Funeral arrangements will be
announced at a later date.

Brother of slain banker

FROM page one

will remain in the Bahamas until
justice has been served.

Speaking out yesterday, IIt
Jones said: “I wish to make this
statement on behalf of Hywel’s
family following his tragic death
on Friday, May 8, following his
cowardly shooting on April 22.

“We have been assured by the
Royal Bahamas Police Force that
investigations into the shooting
are ongoing and that all lines of
inquiry will be thoroughly inves-
tigated.

“Although for obvious reasons
the police have not always been
able to share details of the lines of
inquiry they are following, we
have been assured that progress
has been made.

“A reward of $50,000 has been
posted through Crime Stoppers
for information that leads to the
prosecution of those behind the
shooting.

“We urge anyone who knows
anything that may assist the police
in their investigations to call 328-
8477 in Nassau or 242-300-8476
for the Family Islands. The
caller’s identity will remain
anonymous.

“My mother and I would like
to pass on our heartfelt thanks
for all the sympathy and messages
of support and goodwill that we
have received following the
shooting and Hywel’s death.

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“We have been moved by the
affection for Hywel expressed by
people from all levels of Bahami-
an society.

“That Hywel has touched the
lives of so many is reflected by
the incredible response to the
appeal for blood donors at Doc-
tor’s Hospital.

“Through his charitable work
and significant contribution to
banking education in this country
Hywel made a very positive con-
tribution to the Bahamian nation.

“Tt’s hard for our family to look
beyond the pain we are suffering.

“But Hywel’s shooting affects
every Bahamian. That a promi-
nent and respected member of
the Bahamian financial services

FROM page one

sector has been gunned down in
broad daylight outside his office
in a popular tourist area in what
appears to be a ‘hit’ has already
been widely reported around the
world.

“In a country so reliant on
financial services and to which its
image as a safe and friendly
tourist destination is so impor-
tant, it’s vital to the very well
being of the Bahamian economy
that the person or persons behind
the killing are swiftly brought to
justice.”

The $50,000 reward posted by
Crime Stoppers is made up of
donations from friends of Hywel
Jones and well-wishers all over
the world.

Ilt Jones will meet with police
tomorrow to further assist inves-
tigations, and said he will remain
in the Bahamas for as long as nec-
essary.

He said: “I intend to stay as
long as it takes to help the police
bring whoever it is to justice and
provide them with any informa-
tion they may need.”

Hywel Jones’ body will be tak-
en to South Wales for burial, and
a funeral service will be held for
his many friends in Nassau on
Saturday, May 23.

Ilt Jones said: “He was very
fun-loving and well liked so I’m
keen for it to be more of a cele-
bration of his life than a memor-
ial and I’m encouraging people
to submit funny anecdotes and
memories of Hywel to compile in
a booklet for the service.”

“He hit me on the right side of my face, knocked
my glasses off, and the person escorting me through
the building grabbed me and stood between us until
he walked away.”

Mr Smith said he is not bruised but his glasses
have been broken and he will press charges and seek
damages for the $600 spectacles.

The court orders came after union executives split
over which day to hold nominations for the council
elections.

Union general secretary Leo Douglas called a
meeting for nominations on Monday, May 4, but
current first vice-president and presidential hopeful
Kirk Wilson refused to nominate himself last week as
he maintained the legitimate nomination day was
scheduled for May 11.

Mr Smith, who claims to represent six out of the 10
union executives, including Mr Wilson, said May 11
is the correct nomination day, which was decided at
the last meeting of the full executive council on April
22.

He said: “The executive council is the supreme
authority on the union and in the circumstances a
meeting was duly called, duly held today and the
people nominated were duly nominated today.

“The meeting on May 4 was of no significance.”

Mr Smith maintains three parties and one inde-
pendent candidate including Kirk Wilson and Tyrone
‘Rock’ Morris representing the Unity party were

FROM page one

Former MP is punched in face

legitimately nominated yesterday.

However, Mr Douglas insists only the May 4 nom-
inations are valid.

The general secretary said: “Keod Smith cannot
speak on behalf of this union. I’m responsible for the
running of the day-to-day business of the union and
official communication.

“We have already written to the registrar of trade
unions in relation to the Industrial Relations Act to
inform them they are required to conduct a poll on
May 28.

“We haven’t seen any other nominations and if
they bring anything to me I will throw it in the
garbage.”

Mr Douglas maintains another attorney repre-
sents the majority of council members, including
himself, president Roy Colebrook, and four others
who make up six out of 11 on the board.

But it was Mr Smith who found himself at the
centre of the row yesterday.

He said: “T have been an activist for a great part of
my adult life so I have been boxed around and
pushed about before. I am not delicate and I am
one who believes you can’t expect to be in the box-
ing ring saying you are a boxer and not expect to be
hit, literally or figuratively.

“T am not bruised, the biggest difficulty is that my
glasses were destroyed,” he said.

Agreeing with the political

“above” such matters, and a
source close to him said they
“hadn’t heard anything” about
him relinquishing the post, other
political commentators said his
time may soon be up.

“I have heard the Governor
General may be stepping down,”
said one political observer.

However, both this observer and
another political source expressed
surprise at the suggestion made on
a political blog that senate presi-
dent Lynn Holowesko may be
appointed in place of Mr Hanna —
one source even going so far as to
suggest that such a move by the
Prime Minister would “cause a
number of (FNMs) to be unhap-
Peed the same observer
conceded that Mrs Holowesko
shares a “very special relationship”

Governor General

with the Prime Minister.

“Although it comes as a sur-
prise, it may well be something
which the Prime Minister does,”
the commentator added.

The current senate president,
an avid supporter of the FNM, is
said to have made “a lot of sacri-
fices” for the party.

The second political source told
this newspaper that he would be
“surprised if Janet Bostwick was
overlooked” for the post, should
the Prime Minister replace the cur-
rent Governor General and be dis-
posed to appoint a woman to the
top job.

“She has given distinguished ser-
vice to the country that would
make her worthy of consideration
for the post,” said the source,
adding that “everyone knows (she)
has been waiting in the wings.”

observer, who said the names of
Sir Arthur Foulkes and former
minister of finance Sir William
Allen “in particular” had been
mentioned in replacing the Gov-
ernor-General, the Opposition
source noted that Sir Arthur has a
“similar legacy” to the Governor-
General.

Contacted yesterday for com-
ment, former prime minister and
opposition leader Perry Christie
told The Tribune he “has not been
consulted with respect to anything”
in relation to the replacement of
Mr Hanna.

Meanwhile, Mrs Bostwick said
she “definitely has not” been
approached to take up the job
since 2002 when she had agreed
to run for the party in that year’s
elections.

A message left for Mrs
Holowesko was not returned up
to press time.

FROM page one

from hearing all matters before him. The case involv-
ing The Central Bank of Ecuador against Conticorp
SA and Luis and Jaime Ortega was expected to start
this week. Justice Lyons’ resignation is expected to
take effect in August.

Last week lawyer Fred Smith, a partner in the firm
Callenders and Co appealed Justice Lyons’ decision
not to recuse himself from the case. Callenders rep-
resents Conticorp, the defendant in the case.

Mr Smith had contended that Justice Lyons had
demonstrated hostility towards lawyers of the Cal-
lenders’ firm on three separate occasions last month
and that his statements from the bench created a
perceived bias against Callenders. Mr Smith had
made the application for recusal before Justice Lyons
on April 20, however the judge refused to step down
from the case. In his ruling on the issue on April
30, Justice Lyons had admitted that he been angry
over the controversy that had stemmed from anoth-
er civil case but that his anger by then had dissipat-
ed. He said that he did not believe that an objective
observer would conclude that he would be biased
towards Callenders and its clients. Mr Smith sub-
mitted to the appellate court last week, however,
that it was clear to an objective observer that the
judge had directed his anger towards the Callen-
ders’ firm.

The ruling handed down by Court of Appeal
President Dame Joan Sawyer stated, “It is clear from
the notes Mr Smith read into the record of this court
of what transpired on April 20, 2009 that the learned
judge conducted the case management conference

Appeal for recusal

with his usual aplomb and that Mr Smith had no
real apprehension that the learned judge harboured
any animosity towards him as counsel or the law
firm of which he is a partner. However, the objective
observer would not necessarily be fixed with any
knowledge of the learned judge’s character.”

The ruling further stated, “The objective observ-
er would be expected to have no personal knowledge
of any of the parties or of the judge. The court must
therefore ask itself what an objective and fair mind-
ed observer with knowledge of all the circumstances
as shown on the evidence, would have any doubt
that the judge on that day would have been impartial
in his treatment.”

“Applying this test to the circumstances of this
appeal, we consider this case to be a borderline one
because we cannot say that such an observer would
not have had doubt about the emotional state of the
judge on that date. For that reason and that alone, we
allow the appeal.”

Justice Lyons made headlines last month after
Senior Justice Anita Allen questioned his appoint-
ment of Daniel Ferguson, an accountant, to work on
a recent case knowing full well that he shared “more
than a friendship” with Mr Ferguson’s sister. Mr
Ferguson’s sister also assisted her brother with
preparing documents for the case, said Justice Allen
as she decided whether or not to recuse herself from
hearing the matter “on the ground of apparent bias”
because of her knowledge of this matter. This dis-
closure prompted calls for Justice's Lyons resignation.
TRIBUNE SPORTS

TUESDAY, MAY 12, 2009, PAGE 13



SPORTS



Gasquet suspended after testing positive for cocaine

Hm By STUART CONDIE
AP Sports Writer

LONDON (AP) — French
tennis player Richard Gasquet
was suspended Monday follow-
ing a positive cocaine test and
will not play in the French
Open.

The International Tennis
Federation expects to have a
panel in place within 60 days
for a hearing. Gasquet could
face a two-year ban if found
guilty.

The 22-year-old player said
he is gathering evidence to
prove his innocence despite two
samples testing positive. He said
a separate test of his hair sam-
ples May 7 showed no trace of
cocaine. Cocaine traces were
found in Gasquet's urine sam-
ple at the Sony Ericsson Open,
in Key Biscayne, Fla., in March.

The French Open, the year’s
second major, begins May 24
and tournament director
Gilbert Ysern withdrew Gas-
quet's name after the provi-
sional suspension.

"He's suspended until the
end of the hearing," ITF
spokesman Neil Robinson said.
"We're now assembling an anti-
doping tribunal. The ideal time
frame is within 60 days, but peo-



IN THIS Thursday, October 16, 2008 file photo, Richard Gasquet serves the ball to Rafael Nadal during a match

at the Madrid Masters.

ple have to fly in from all over
the world for it.”

Gasquet was ranked No. 7 in
July 2007 but has since slipped
to No. 21. He has played just

five matches since pulling out
of the Key Biscayne event
before his second-round match
against Albert Montanes of
Spain.

(AP Photo: Daniel Ochoa de Olza)

Gasquet cited a right shoul-
der injury for the withdrawal
and has since returned to play in
Barcelona and at the Rome
Masters, where he lost in the

Barcelona favourite to lift Copa

lm By STEPHEN MACKEY
Associated Press Writer

MADRID (AP) —
Barcelona hopes Wednesday's
Copa del Rey final against
underdog Athletic Bilbao at
Mestalla Stadium runs more
smoothly than its recent games
as it bids to win the trophy for a
record 25th time.

The Catalan team, which last
won Spain's knockout competi-
tion 11 years ago at the same
Valencia venue, has endured
some high drama in an attempt
to become the first Spanish
team to win the league, cup and
Champions League in a single
season.

Last Wednesday, Andres Ini-
esta's injury-time goal earned
Barcelona a 1-1 draw at
Chelsea's Stamford Bridge and
passage into the Champions
League final.

Four days later, Barcelona
came within three minutes of
winning the Spanish league title
at its Camp Nou stadium only
for Villarreal to equalize in a 3-
3 draw that keeps coach Pep
Guardiola's team waiting for at
least another week.

Guardiola hopes victory
against Bilbao will help banish
the memory of Sunday's disap-
pointment and act as the pre-
lude to title celebrations next
weekend, setting up the sea-
son's finale when it plays Man-



ANDRES INIESTA (center) falls as he vies for the ball with Gonzalo
Rodriguez (bottom) as Sebastian Eguren (right) and Diego Godin (left) look
on during their Spanish La Liga match at Camp Nou stadium in Barcelona,

Spain, on Sunday...

chester United in Rome on May
21.

"Now, we have to raise our-
selves quickly and put a smile
on our faces. It's been a long
time since Barcelona played in a
Copa del Rey final and we have
to win it," Guardiola said.

Barcelona's situation con-

(AP Photo: Manu Fernandez)

trasts greatly with that of Bil-
bao, which hasn't won any
major silverware since it won
the Copa del Rey by beating
Barcelona 1-0 at Santiago Bern-
abeu Stadium 25 years ago.
However, Bilbao remains his-
torically one of Spain's most
successful teams and will be bid-

Iniesta expects to play in
Champions League final

BARCELONA, Spain (AP) — Barcelona mid-
fielder Andres Iniesta believes he will overcome
his right thigh muscle injury and play in the
Champions League final against Manchester

United.

Iniesta reportedly said after undergoing tests on
Monday — his 25th birthday — that his injury
during Barcelona's 3-3 draw the previous day
with Villarreal was only “a small tear."

Measuring the tear at 2 centimeters (0.8 inches)
in length, Barcelona would only say that "doctors
will be working to get Iniesta fit for the final.”

ic Bilbao.

The club had already said Iniesta will miss
Wednesday's Copa del Rey final against Athlet-

Iniesta scored Barcelona's late equalizer last

Wednesday to earn Barcelona a 1-1 draw at

Chelsea and passage into the Champions League
final in Rome on May 27.

Barcelona is expected to face defending cham-
pion United without suspended defenders Eric
Abidal and Daniel Alves together with injured
Rafael Marquez, while striker Thierry Henry is
doubtful with a right knee injury.

UEFA rejects Manchester



United, Barcelona appeals

NYON, Switzerland (AP) —
UEFA on Monday upheld the
refereeing decisions that rule
out Darren Fletcher of Man-
chester United and Barcelon-
a's Eric Abidal and Dani Alves
from playing in the Champions
League final.

UEFA's disciplinary com-
mittee rejected both clubs’
appeals to let the suspended
players take part in the May 27
final in Rome.

UEFA said in a statement
that both clubs missed their
deadline to appeal within 24
hours of their semifinals match-
es played last week.

However, UEFA said even
prompt appeals "would have
been rejected as unfounded as
there were no grounds for con-
testing the referees’ original
decisions.

"All three players are there-
fore suspended for one UEFA

club competition match and will
serve their suspensions ... in the
UEFA Champions League
final," the statement said.

Neither club expected suc-
cess in their appeals because
UEFA tules allow for field of
play decisions to be overturned
only in cases of mistaken iden-
tity.

Fletcher was sent off after
tackling Arsenal's Cesc Fabre-
gas in last Tuesday's semifinal
second leg. Fletcher connected
with the ball first but his
momentum brought down the
Spaniard.

Abidal was sent off when
Chelsea's Nicolas Anelka went
down after a challenge last
Wednesday, though TV replays
suggested there was no contact.

Alves received a yellow card
that activated a ban because of
his past disciplinary record.

Alex Ferguson, the United

manager, said last Friday that
the club wrote UEFA a "com-
passionate letter” on Fletcher's
behalf.

"We understand the system
and I honestly believe that the
referee made the right decision
at the time. I thought it was a
penalty,” Ferguson said.

Abidal’s red card was one of
several disputed decisions made
by Norwegian referee Tom
Henning Ovrebo, who angered
Chelsea players after he turned
down a series of penalty
appeals.

Didier Drogba and Michael
Ballack were among the
Chelsea players who confronted
the referee, and defender Jose
Boswinga later used the word
"thief" in referring to Ovrebo.

UEFA is currently consider-
ing what disciplinary action to
take against Chelsea players
and the club.

ding to win the Copa del Rey
for the 24th time, which would
lift it level with Barcelona as
record winner.

The Basque team would even
consider a triumph as its 25th
in Spain's knockout competi-
tion as it also claims the very
first Copa del Rey in 1902,
which was won by Vizcaya, a
representative team comprising
some Bilbao players.

Bilbao fans are so excited
about the long-awaited final
that about 20,000 of them
watched the team's final train-
ing session at its San Mames
stadium on Sunday.

Bilbao captain Joseba Etxe-
berria is optimistic, even though
he accepts that Barcelona will
start as favorites to win the
fourth final of six played

third round to Fernando Ver-
dasco on May 1.

Gasquet lost to Roger Fed-
erer in the semifinals at Wim-
bledon in 2007. He was consid-
ered a future star when he first
arrived on tour with a one-
handed backhand widely con-
sidered among the best in the
game.

Martina Hingis was banned
for two years early last year
after testing positive for cocaine
at Wimbledon. The five-time
Grand Slam champion and for-
mer top-ranked player failed a
test after losing to Laura
Granville in 2007.

Hingis, who has since retired,
became the second WTA play-
er suspended for cocaine after
Lourdes Dominguez Lino of
Spain was banned for three
months in 2002.

Former top-ranked men's
player Mats Wilander and Karel
Novacek had positive tests for
cocaine at the 1995 French
Open. That was before the
introduction of rules to auto-
matically suspend players fol-
lowing a positive second test.
Both continued playing before
they were banned for three
months and ordered to return
prize money and forfeit rank-
ings points.

(lel Rey

between the teams.

"A single match at a neutral
ground, and with both teams at
the same strength — anything
can happen. And when it's Ath-
letic, even more so. We cer-
tainly don't rule out a victory
and bringing the Cup to Bil-
bao,” Etxeberria said.

A Bilbao win would repre-
sent a triumph for its policy of
selecting Basque-born players,
the only exceptions being play-
ers from the bordering region
of Navarre or those who have
passed through its junior teams.

Barcelona has been hit by
injuries and will be without Ini-
esta, striker Thierry Henry and
defender Rafael Marquez,
together with center back Gabi
Milito, a long-term casualty.

"Even without Rafa, Titi



Cc
te

SERENA WILLIAMS speaks during

a press conference after retiring

with an injury on her right leg dur-
ing the Madrid Open...

(AP Photo: Daniel

Ochoa de Olza)

Serena
Williams
injured

MADRID (AP) — Serena
Williams is out of the Madrid
Open after aggravating a leg
injury in a first-round match
against Francesca Schiavone.

The second-ranked Williams
retired after losing the first set
6-4 Monday.

She says her movement was
hindered by a a recurring injury
to her right leg.

Williams would not comment
on the extent of the injury or
whether it would keep her out
of the upcoming French Open.

(Henry) or Andres we will lift
ourselves and we'll carry on
with what we have got,"
Guardiola said. "And if we
don't have 11 players, we'll use
the junior team."

Young striker Bojan Krkic,
who has led the Barcelona
attack in this season's Copa del
Rey games, is expected to start
the game.

Bilbao has no injury worries,
with coach Joaquin Caparros
resting more than half his team
in Saturday's league game
against Real Betis. The deplet-
ed team won 1-0 to ensure its
record of never having been rel-
egated will continue for anoth-
er season.

The Burns House Group
presents

16,

Poop Deck, Sandyport
3-7pm

Entertainment by:

The G-Nofte All Stars

Admission: General Public $20

Artists include:

Antonius Roberts

Ale] sam ete) 4
Willicey Tynes
eu Talis lai
Malcolm Rae


PAGE 14, TUESDAY, MAY 12, 2009

TRIBUNE SPORTS



SPORTS



Rockets defeat the Lakers
without Yao, even series

@ By The Associated Press

Denver at Dallas (9:30pm EDT). The
Nuggets can reach the Western Confer-
ence finals by completing a sweep of the
Mavericks. Denver leads the series 3-0 after
winning all four games during the regular
season.

STARS

Sunday

—Aaron Brooks, Rockets, scored a
career-high 34 points as Houston beat the
Los Angeles Lakers 99-87 to even their
Western Conference semifinal at two
games apiece.

—Paul Pierce, Celtics, scored 27 points in
Boston's 95-94 victory over Orlando as the
defending NBA champs tied the series 2-2.

OH, BABY!

Glen Davis made a 21-foot jumper as
time expired to help the Boston Celtics
hold off a furious rally and defeat the
Orlando Magic 95-94 on Sunday night to
even their Eastern Conference semifinal
at two games apiece. Davis’ jumper fol-
lowed a pair of free throws by Rashard
Lewis that put the Magic ahead with 11.3
seconds to play. Davis also hit a 15-foot
jumper in the final minute and finished
with 21 points.

STRONG IN DEFEAT

Dwight Howard had 23 points and 17
rebounds in Orlando's 95-94 loss to Boston
on Sunday. ... Pau Gasol scored 30 points as
the Los Angeles Lakers lost to Houston
99-87.

SHARPSHOOTER

Shane Battier sank five 3-pointers and
finished with 23 points as the Rockets beat
the Lakers 99-87 on Sunday to even their
Western Conference semifinal at two
games apiece. Battier was 5 of 10 from 3-
point range.

BANGED UP

Los Angeles' Lamar Odom drove into
Houston's Shane Battier, hit the floor hard,
limped to the bench and went to the lock-
er room with back spasms in the third quar-
ter of the Lakers’ 99-87 loss Sunday night.
Odom was called for a charge on the play
and didn't return. He'll have tests Mon-
day and will sit out practice.

SPEAKING

"T think everyone but us got the memo
that we weren't supposed to show up today
without Yao."

— Houston's Shane Battier after the
Rockets topped the Los Angeles Lakers 99-
87 on Sunday night to even their Western
Conference semifinal at two games apiece.
The win came without Yao Ming, who
broke his left foot in the Lakers’ victory in
Game 3

@ By CHRIS DUNCAN
AP Sports Writer

HOUSTON (AP) — With Yao
Ming out, the Houston Rockets had
no chance to beat the Los Angeles
Lakers. Right?

Wrong.

Aaron Brooks scored a career-high
34, Shane Battier sank five 3-pointers
and added 23 and the Rockets beat
the Lakers 99-87 on Sunday to even
their Western Conference semifinal
at two games apiece.

"T think everyone but us got the
memo that we weren't supposed to
show up today without Yao,” Battier
said.

Luis Scola had 11 points and 14
rebounds as the Rockets got exactly
the team effort they needed after Yao
broke his left foot in the Lakers’ win
in Game 3.

Game 5 is Tuesday night in Los
Angeles, and anyone who thought the
Rockets were finished without their
best player only needed to watch the
first quarter on Sunday, when Hous-
ton built a 29-16 lead.

The Rockets never trailed and led
by as many as 29 before the Lakers
made the score respectable toward
the end.

"I'm not surprised," said Battier.
"It almost sounds cliche, but we're a
resilent group. We talk about bounc-
ing back. Through adversity, through
lineup changes, through trades,
through injuries, we've never quit and
we've never stopped believing.”

Brooks, in his second NBA season,
became Houston's starting point
guard when the team dealt Rafer
Alston to Orlando at the trade dead-
line.

He faced countless questions about
his inexperience before the postseason
began, but keeps showing skeptics
that he can handle the job. He scored
27 points in Houston's Game 1 win in
Portland and had 14 points in the sec-
ond half of the Rockets’ 100-92 vic-
tory in the opener of this series.

Brooks deflected credit to his team-
mates after this one.

"T'm lucky to have these guys," he
said. "It makes it a lot easier on me."

Pau Gasol scored 30 points and
Kobe Bryant had a quiet 15 for Los
Angeles.



AARON BROOKS drives to the basket during the first quarter of Game 4 of a second-
round Western Conference playoff game against the Lakers in Houston, Sunday.
Brooks scored a career-high 34. Houston won 99-87...

Lakers coach Phil Jackson warned
his team about taking the Rockets
too lightly after hearing about Yao's
injury. But the Lakers looked lethar-
gic from the start, giving away careless
turnovers and playing lax defense.

"They didn't anticipate the energy
that they were going to come with,"
Jackson said. "But you say as much as
you can as a coach and then the play-
ers have to execute and do it on the
floor."

The Rockets opened the game with

(AP Photo: Eric Gay)

a 22-7 run, starting 4-of-5 from 3-point
range. Bryant scored the Lakers’ first
three baskets, but the rest of the team
missed its first seven shots.

Houston led 54-36 at the break. The
Lakers grabbed only two offensive
rebounds and generated only four
fast-break points in their lowest-scor-
ing half of the season. Battier had 15
points at halftime, two more than
Bryant.

"T just don't think we started the
game with the right energy or the

right focus or sense of urgency,"
Bryant said.

Los Angeles didn't start the second
half too well, either.

The Rockets outscored Los Ange-
les 29-18 in the decisive third quar-
ter, led by Brooks’ 17 points. The
speedy, 6-foot guard finished the
quarter by catching a midcourt pass by
Ron Artest and putting in a layup just
before the buzzer.

Yao, dressed in a dark suit, wore a
broad grin and applauded when
Brooks sprinted off the floor after the
improbable basket.

The 7-foot-6 Yao is out for the rest
of the playoffs, but the Rockets never
doubted they could beat the Lakers
without him.

"This was the effort we expected,"
said Battier. "I don't know about the
result, but it was the effort that we
expected. There was a different look
to our team today."

Lamar Odom, who scored 16 points
in Game 3, drove into Battier and was
called for a charge midway through
the quarter. He hit the floor hard,
limped to the bench and went to the
locker room with back spasms. He
did not return.

Odom will have tests on Monday
and said he'll sit out practice.

The Rockets led by 27 when Odom
was hurt, and when Brooks complet-
ed the last-second alley-oop, Artest
smacked his hands on the scorers’
table and smiled to the roaring crowd,
in seeming disbelief about how things
were going.

Artest scored only eight points, but
had 10 rebounds and six assists.

Bryant returned from a long rest
with 5:41 left in the game and the Lak-
ers cut the deficit to 10. But it was
too late by then and Brooks fittingly
scored Houston's last two points on
free throws in the final minute.

Notes:@ Scola recorded his fifth
career postseason double-double.
Bryant was held under 30 points for
the first time in four games at the Toy-
ota Center this season. Artest sported a
new mohawk hairdo, similar to the
one he had before the series began.
This time, 'Houston' was shaved on
one side and a Rockets' logo adorned
the other side. The team winning after
the opening quarter has won all 10 of
the Rockets' playoff games.

‘Big Baby’ shot steals
the Magic for Celtics

@ By ANTONIO GONZALEZ
Associated Press Writer

ORLANDO, Fla. (AP) —
Glen Davis never thought he
could replace the "Big Ticket,"
merely hoping to fill in for
injured All-Star Kevin Garnett.

Known as "Big Baby" since
his college days at LSU, Davis
even teased that he was the
"Ticket Stub" compared to
Garnett.

Now he may have another
nickname.

Davis made a 21-foot jumper
as time expired to help the
Boston Celtics hold off a furious
rally and defeat the Orlando
Magic 95-94 on Sunday night to
even their Eastern Conference
semifinal at two games apiece.

"Big-shot Baby Davis,"
Orlando's Dwight Howard said,
shaking his head in disbelief.

Davis took the pass on the
wing from Paul Pierce, made
the jumper and ran to half-
court. He was mobbed by team-
mates, waving his hands in the
air and leaving the Orlando
home crowd silenced, a play
even he couldn't have imagined
until Garnett went down with
a season-ending knee injury
months ago.

"Every time I shoot, I kind
of feel myself making game-
winning shots all the time,”
Davis said. "You always have
to see it. If you see it, you will
believe it."

Believe this: The Celtics are
back in the series.

Falling behind 3-1 would
have been devastating for the
defending champions. Only
eight NBA teams have ever
come back from that deficit.

Boston far outplayed Orlan-
do for most of Game 4, shoot-
ing 52.8 percent from the floor
compared to just 40 percent for
the Magic. But without the final
shot, an otherwise strong per-
formance would have been a
waste.

Davis’ jumper followed a pair
of free throws by Rashard
Lewis that put the Magic ahead
with 11.3 seconds to play. Davis
also hit a 15-foot jumper in the
final minute and finished with
21 points.

Dwight Howard had 23



GLEN DAVIS (center) is congratulated by teammate Bill Walker (right) as
J R Giddens celebrates after Davis made a game-winning shot with time
running out during the second half of a second-round playoff game in
Orlando, Florida, on Sunday. The Celtics won 95-94.

(AP Photo: Phelan M Ebenhack)

points and 17 rebounds, and
Lewis scored 22 for the Magic.
Game 5 is Tuesday in Boston.

"It's going to be difficult,"
Lewis said. "A lot of guys are
upset in the locker room. But
we can't hang our heads too
long.”

Perhaps the only downside
on a series-changing win for
Boston was that center
Kendrick Perkins said he aggra-
vated a left shoulder injury. He
didn't know when it happened
and said he would have it eval-
uated Monday.

The Celtics went ahead by
nine points with about five min-
utes remaining in the third quar-
ter on a 3-pointer by Pierce.
Boston's All-Star forward had
27 points, but would battle foul
trouble the rest of the way,
helping Orlando trim the lead
slowly.

But it was the final play that
changed the series.

Magic coach Stan Van Gundy
said his players carried out the
last play defensively exactly
how he had designed, taking the
ball out of the hands of Pierce
and Ray Allen, and put the
responsibility for his team's fail-
ures on himself.

"The only guy who made a

mistake on the last play was
me,” Van Gundy said.

He's got bigger concerns
moving forward.

Orlando's starting backcourt
of Rafer Alston and J.J. Redick
were downright dreadful. The
pair combined to make just 2
of 14 shots from the floor, with
the Celtics clogging the middle
and practically daring them to
shoot.

"You never want to turn
down good shots,” Alston said.
"T think if we make some of
them, we can force them not to
double-team Dwight."

Van Gundy had cautioned his
team about feeling satisfied with
its Game 3 blowout victory,
even reminding players with a
message at the team's practice
facility that they were in the
same position Philadelphia was
in their first-round series. The
76ers went up 2-1, then lost in
six games.

Davis' shot now puts the
Magic on the same path.

"It really hurts,” Orlando for-
ward Hedo Turkoglu said.
"Especially this kind of a game.
But no matter what, we still
have to go up to Boston. We're
young. We're hungry. We'll
bounce back strong."

Dawson unanimously
outpoints Tarver

LAS VEGAS (AP) — Chad
Dawson successfully defended
his IBF and IBO light heavy-
weight titles Saturday night,
unanimously outpointing Anto-
nio Tarver in a rematch of their
October fight.

The undefeated Dawson,
who looked lackadaisical at
times in fighting off several
impressive combinations from
the 40-year-old Tarver, had win-
ning scores of 116-112, 117-111
and 117-111 from the three
judges.

Unlike their bout last fall,
when the fast-handed left-han-
der dominated in a 118-109,
117-110 and 117-110 victory,
Saturday's fight at the Hard
Rock Hotel and Casino pro-
duced plenty of back-and-forth
action from start to finish.

"He put up a hell of a fight,"
said Dawson, 28-0 with 17
knockouts. "He definitely took
me off my game. My hats off to
Antonio Tarver."

Dawson landed most of sig-
nificant punches in the final four
rounds, including a flurry of
punches at the end of the ninth
round — arguably his most
impressive round.

Tarver was the clear aggres-
sor, throwing 749 punches to
Dawson's 677. But the 26-year-
old Dawson had a 62-14 advan-
tage in punches that connected
with the body and connected
on 31 percent of his punches.
Tarver only landed 16 percent
of his punches.



DAWSON poses after the fight...





ABOVE AND LEFT — Chad Dawson (right) lands a punch to Antonio
Tarver during the fifth round of their IBF light heavyweight championship
match at the Hard Rock Hotel & Casino, on Saturday in Las Vegas. Tarv-
er won by unanimous decision...

"He pushed the fight and
took my off my game plan,”
Dawson said. "He threw a lot of
punches, but I was catching
most of them."

Gary Shaw, Dawson's pro-
moter, said Tarver gave his
fighter everything he could han-
dle.

"T don't know how everyone
else felt but I was scared in
every round,” Shaw said.

Dawson, who was in the first
fight of a two-fight contract with
HBO, said he doesn't know
who he will fight next. An ideal
possibility is Bernard Hopkins,
but Shaw said there has been
little contact with Hopkins’
camp.

"T will fight whoever they
throw in front of me," Dawson
said. "I'm glad I got this
rematch out of the way so I
could get the fights I deserve."

Regardless of the next oppo-
nent, Dawson knows he needs
to improve. Another perfor-
mance like Saturday could
equal his first loss.

"IT know I didn't have my best
night," Dawson said. "I know
it wasn't it my best perfor-
mance. I don't know how much
of that had to do with Tarver
having a good night."

Despite the lopsided outcome

(AP Photos)

in the first meeting, Tarver was
confident he would win the
rematch. He had also lost to
Roy Jones Jr., Glen Johnson
and Eric Harding during his
career, but avenged all three
loses in rematches.

He was almost right. Tarver,
nicknamed the "Magic Man,"
believes he proved he still has
some magic left in his hands.

Tarver, a significant under-
dog, pieced together successful
combinations especially in the
earlier rounds the showed the
veteran champion wasn't going
to be an easy opponent.

"T don't feel like a loser up
here tonight. I truly don't,”
Tarver said. "I fought 12 hard
rounds and I was in it every
round. Let my hands go, and
when I like my hands go, I can
compete with anyone in the
world. I showed that tonight."

He definitely surprised Daw-
son's camp.

"You showed tonight what a
champions heart is made off,”
Dawson's trainer, Eddie
Muhammad, told Tarver in the
post-fight news conference.

Hopkins said he isn't sure
what the future holds, but could
easily see himself returning.

"T just went 12 rounds and
feel great,” he said.
THE TRIBUNE

Dorsett
elected BSF
president

m@ By RENALDO DORSETT
Sports Reporter
rdorsett@tribunemedia. net

AFTER serv-
ing as softball
administrator for
more than three
decades, Burket
Dorsett will head
the country’s
national govern-
ing body.

Dorsett was |
elected as presi-
dent of the
Bahamas Softball
Federation after serving as the
first vice president for nine years
under Romell Knowles.

Dorsett, who officially began
his three- year term this week-
end by delivering the keynote
address on the New Providence
Softball Association’s opening
night, said he looks to continue
the path set forth by Knowles.

“T have accepted the responsi-
bility with great pride and hon-
our, the confidence the federa-
tion has expressed in me is great-
ly appreciated as I seek to serve
with sincerity, commitment and
dedication,” he said. “His tena-
cious leadership style has elevat-
ed this federation second to none
in this country. His passion for
the sport of softball has brought a
new dimension to the BSF. We
salute you president Knowles and
say thank you very much for the
stellar leadership. As a part of his
team for the last nine years I
know of his passion and legacy. I
share in them and I am willing to
carry on with them.”

One of the most experienced
administrators in the local game,
Dorsett outlined several initia-
tives which he and his new admin-
istration set to put in place.

“T have spent my last 33 years
in the administration of softball,
slow pitch, fast pitch and modified
pitch. Over the last nine years in
our administration we have made
great strides in the improvement
of the game on and off the field.
We can only improve with the
practices this administration put
in place. I have a number of ini-
tiatives I plan to set in place as the
BSF plans to move forward over
the course of the next three years
and beyond,” he said. “Firstly we
look to establish a debt free fed-
eration spearheaded by a dynam-
ic national fundraising commit-
tee. We also look to appoint 10
influential distinguished softball
ambassadors, establish a national
season-ending awards banquet,
create an active junior league in
all associations, further technical
assistance fund to help with
equipment, training of officials,
coaches and players, more lucra-
tive prizes for championships,
profit sharing for the National
Round Robin Tournament, and
remember how heroes of yester-
year through several ventures
including a garden of remem-
brance and a “Recognition Day”
to recognise the stalwarts of the
association.”



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TUESDAY, MAY 12,

PAGE 1



Minus Jr vs Pratt will b

m@ By RENALDO DORSETT
Sports Reporter
rdorsett@tribunemedia.net

erhaps the most storied

boxing rivalry in the

Bahamas will add

another chapter to its
legacy, this time not for a cham-
pionship title or bragging rights,
but to help the development of
the sport in their local communi-
ties.

Ray Minus Jr and Quincy Pratt
will resurrect their memorable
matches with a series of exhibi-
tion bouts to raise funds for both
Pratt’s Eastside Amateur Boxing
Club and Minus Jr’s Champion
Amateur Boxing Club.

The exhibitions will take a best
of seven series format with
venues alternating between both
fighters’ home training grounds.

Minus won the trilogy of fights
early in their careers — by TKO in
the sixth round in 1992, by a split
decision in 1999 and by a seventh
round TKO in 2000.

The series of four-round exhi-
bitions will begin on Saturday,
May 16, at the CABC training
grounds with the following fights
taking place in two week inter-
vals.

Well beyond their fighting days
and into their 40s (Minus-45,
Pratt-40), both fighters indicate
that they are in fighting shape and
are preparing to treat fans and
boxing enthusiasts to a new edi-
tion of the showdown, while

‘ts

2009



Felipé Major/Tribune staff

QUINCY PRATT (left) and RAY MINUS JR face off yesterday...

simultaneously assisting their pro-
grammes.

Pratt, who just recently estab-
lished his club in January, saw the
exhibition as an opportunity to
fund equipment after months of
frustrating organising ventures.

“T have not been able to get
any help from anyone, including
the Ministry of Youth Sports and
Culture so Ray and I decided to
come together to stage this best
out of seven showdown to raise
money to buy equipment for both
our clubs,” he said. “Every two
weeks we will host a four-round
exhibition. Our three historic bat-
tles will not be counted in this,
because I lost all three of them, so
they do not count. We know how
to fight boxers never lose their
fighting ability, we just lose con-
ditioning.”

Pratt says he looks forward to

Golfers are invited.

putting on a show for his home
crowd in the Fox Hill community
and his approximately 140 fight-
ers who have yet to see him apply
his craft.

“When we fight in Fox Hill it is
going to be a blockbuster. They
may cheat on Wulff Road, but in
Fox Hill they will not have a
chance, because for the first time
my people to see their hometown
boy fight, so I intend to show
them my best,” he said. “If I raise
enough money in Fox Hill I might
end the battle there, but if not I
will take him in four. The most
important thing is that these fights
are for a worthy cause and that is
to raise money for the youth of
this nation. Most of the guys I
train are excited because they
have never seen me fight, and
they are extremely geared up for
it.”



.

Pratt, who hosts his fighters at
the Urban Renewal building in
Fox Hill, said his ultimate goal is
to help many of the young men in
his community to find discipline
and purpose.

“It is heartbreaking to see the
disappointment in the guys some-
times. I started the club from
scratch. I have been scrambling
trying to find a place to set my
club up, but I need help. We need
assistance to save these young
men and get these young men in
Fox Hill off the park. On the park
we...cursing and all sorts of nega-
tive things going on and I just
want to do all I can to help these
guys. But I will not be discour-
aged, I'll just take it out on Minus
Saturday night,” he said. “This is
all about raising money for my
club. This is the first fight in the
Bahamas for a worthy cause, it is
for the youth and for their
growth. Every time we have
fought the places have been jam-
packed and if we can get half of
that and some financial support it
would go a long way. I had a hard
upbringing and boxing saved my
life, [just want to pass that along
to these young guys. I tell them
boxing is a way out, sports is a
way out. If you take a bad guy
and give them some discipline
and a vision there is no telling
how far they can go.”

Minus Jr said that the four
round exhibition will not have the
intensity of their previous encoun-
ters and both he and Pratt are

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RYOSUKE IRIE leaves the blocks in the mens
4X100m medley relay during the 2009
Japan/Australia Duel in the Pool, at the Aus-
tralian Institute of Sport in Canberra, Australia
Sunday, May 10, 2009. Irie broke a world record
and set a time of one minute, 52.86 seconds,
beating the previous record, held by American
Ryan Lochte, by 1.08 seconds.

(AP Image: Mark Graham)

ready and in shape and set to put
on a show worthy of their legacy.

“T always stay in shape with the
guys I train so it keeps me in a bit
of shape. Of course I am not as
focused as I am when I was a
champion defending my title or
fighting for a title, but the expe-
rience is there. I believe that I
still can go in there and pull off a
win,” he said. “The three previous
times we fought we were sched-
uled for 12 rounds, now that we
are in a four rounder I have to
try to figure out how do I beat
Quincy down early, so I know it’s
a challenge. Both of us are excit-
ed, we are doing it for a good
cause and we want the public’s
support in coming out and sup-
porting us and the young boxers.”

Minus Jr said that while he
identifies with Pratt’s struggle in
beginning a club with little to no
support, he and the remainder of
the boxing community will do
their part to assist.

“My advice to Quincy was to
let us concentrate on what we can
do to make it better. Then if so
we will knock out doors to take it
further. We feel with the support
of the general public, knowing
the history of what we share, and
to bring that back we feel like it
will bring great funding and great
support with the promotion and
funding,” he said.

“It is a struggle getting a club
off the ground but I wanted the
community and Quincy to know
that they have help.”



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PAGE 16, TUESDAY, MAY 12, 2009





OFFICERS MARCH to pay respect to the four Royal Bahamas Defence Force Marines who died in the incident.

Ceremony held to
remember HMBS
Flamingo marines

IN OBSERVANCE of the 29th
anniversary of the sinking of the HMBS
Flamingo by Cuban fighter jets, family
members of the four Royal Bahamas
Defence Force Marines who died in the
incident gathered yesterday for a brief
commemorative ceremony at the Coral
Harbour base.

Following the service, the families were
taken out by a Defence Force craft for
the laying of a wreath at sea in memory
of the vessel and her fallen crew.

On May 10, 1980, reports came from
Ragged Island that Cuban military jets
had sunk the 103-foot Marlin class
Defence Force vessel.

The four marines killed as a result of
the attack were Fenrick Sturrup, Austin
Smith, David Tucker and Edward
Williams.

The tragic incident unfolded after a
group of Cuban fishermen were stopped
by the crew of the Flamingo on suspi-
cion of illegally fishing in Bahamian
waters.

In the wake of the sinking, the Cuban
government said the pilots mistook the
Flamingo for a pirate ship harassing
Cuban fishermen.

Following the tragic incident, Cuba
offered an apology and agreed to pay
$5.4 million in compensation for the sink-
ing of the vessel and the death of the
four marines.

Speaking at the special ceremony,
Minister of Education Carl Bethel
described the sinking of the Flamingo as
a “momentous event” which left a lasting
mark on the Bahamas’ history.

Minister Bethel said: “No doubt the
greatest tragedy in the sinking of the

for a better life





DEFENCE FORCE COMMODORE Clifford Scavella with Minister of Education Carl Bethel

at the memorial.

HMBS Flamingo was the death of our
four marines. Commodore (Clifford)
Scavella, senior officers and officers and
marines of all ranks of the Defence
Force, we all join you in tribute to the
contribution made by the crew of the
Flamingo, those who survived the attack,
and those that did not.”

“Tt is now for us to etch them in our
recollection, as a family members, as col-
leagues, as friends, in our homes, in our
schools, in our institutions, and particu-
larly in the Royal Bahamas Defence
Force. We remember them as patriotic
Bahamians that gave their lives in service
of their country, and that will remain a
part of our history, both oral and writ-
ten.”

CALENDAR CONTEST

acelebration of nature —
45th anniversary calendar

CONTEST RULES

LOCAL NEWS

While Commodore Scavella said that
the Defence Force has been fortunate
not to have encountered any more direct
confrontations in the years following the
sinking of the Flamingo, Mr Bethel said
that the risk to the force has not dimin-
ished.

“Now, the threat to the Defence Force
and the Bahamas comes from predomi-
nantly trans-national criminal activity,
including illicit drugs and arms traffick-
ing, illegal immigration, and yes, poach-
ing in Bahamian waters, the problem that
gave rise to the Flamingo incident,” the
minister said.

Eight Cuban fishermen involved in the
incident were convicted of poaching in

1980. THE FAMILIES watch from onboard the Defence Force craft for the laying of a wreath at sea.

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DATE

THE TRIBUNE

MINISTER OF EDUCATION Carl ‘Bethel ene at the wall of remembrance at the
Defence Force base.

Wal

aed style

Srey

try i i=l * hem:












































Felipé Major/Tribune staff
ROYAL FIDELITY

Money at Work



THE TRIBUNE

isiness

2009

SECTION B « business@tribunemedia.net

$15m building cost hike if project not approved

m@ By NEIL HARTNELL

NASSAU OFFICE

(242) 356-9801

FREEPORT OFFICE

TUESDAY, (242) 351-3010

MAY 12,





* Agoregate prices for Bahamian construction industry to rise 300% if Bahama Rock’s area 4 Freeport harbour expansion fails to go ahead

Tribune Business Editor

likely 300 per cent increase in
aggregate material prices,
which would raise Bahamian

construction industry costs by $15 mil-
lion per annum, will be experienced if

* Non-approval would accelerate company’s departure from Bahamas, costing economy $64.168m over nine year's

Freeport Harbour’s proposed Area 4
expansion does not proceed, the projec-

t’s Environmental Impact Assessment

(EIA) has warned.

The study, prepared for Bahama Rock
by Freeport-based Envirologic Interna-
tional and a host of foreign consulting
firms, also warned that a failure to
approve the project would remove a “no

cost” harbour construction operation and
also lead to the company’s earlier depar-
ture from the Bahamas - a development
that could cost Freeport’s economy
$64.168 million in the nine years to 2018.

The EIA, a copy of which has been
obtained by Tribune Business, said that if

the Freeport Harbour area 4 expansion
was approved, Bahama Rock was
“expected to extend operations” until at
least 2018, thus maintaining its position as
“the largest supplier of construction
grade aggregate in the Bahamas”.
“Other economic impacts absent

Bahama Rock include a significant cost
escalation in providing construction grade
aggregates throughout the Common-
wealth of the Bahamas for all major
developments,”

“An estimated 300 per cent increase in
local Bahamian aggregate pricing could

the EIA said.

‘Too many’ firms lack $163.4m spending boost for Freeport
financial controls

m@ By NEIL HARTNELL
Tribune Business Editor

“TOO many” |#
Bahamian com-
panies - private as
well as public -
have failed to
provide the
resources and
infrastructure to
enable them to
produce timely
internal financial
reports, a leading
accountant charged yesterday, as
he told Tribune Business that his
company would have “no prob-
lem” meeting the draft Securities
Industry Act’s tighter reporting
deadlines once their clients were
up to speed.

Raymond Winder, Deloitte &
Touche (Bahamas) managing
partner, told Tribune Business:
“For too long, too many organi-
sations have not put in place the
resources and infrastructure that
gives them the ability to produce
quality financial statements. We
have not given it the attention
that we ought to have given it.”



Senior accountant says ‘no
problem’ meeting revised
Securities Act reporting
deadlines once quality, timely
internal systems in place

As a result, there were
Bahamian companies that were
simply unable to produce “quali-
ty financial statements on a time-
ly basis” because the internal sys-
tems - both personnel and infra-
structure - were either inefficient
or not up to par.

This, in turn, impacted the abil-
ity of external auditors to turn
around the audit and sign-off on a
company’s accounts, complete
with audit opinion, in a rapid
fashion.

“For too long, we’ve tolerated
and put up with accountants not
making the effort,” Mr Winder
told Tribune Business. In addi-
tion to putting the necessary
resources in place, he urged
Bahamian companies to replace

SEE page 4B

Bahamian visits to US grow 54%

m@ By CHESTER ROBARDS
Business Reporter
crobards@tribunemedia.net

BAHAMIAN visits to the US
increased by 54 per cent in Feb-
ruary 2009 compared to the same
month last year, and were up 68
per cent for the first two months,
according to statistics from the
US Department of Commerce
released yesterday.

These recent numbers have
some Bahamian travel agents per-
plexed, as they have not seen a
decrease in travel, but also have
not noticed a significant increase.

The data showed that the
Bahamas represented the largest
increase in visitor arrivals to the
US, making it the “top visitation
market from the Caribbean
region”.

According to the Department’s
release, the US saw a 12 per cent
decline in international visitations
in February this year, compared
to 2008 figures for the same peri-
od. They also realized $10.1 bil-
lion in visitor spending in Febru-
ary 2009, down 13 per cent from

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February 2008.

Some Bahamian travel agents
say they are not quite sure of the
accuracy of the numbers, as they
have seen a steady flow of busi-
ness - but not a huge jump in
demand.

General Manager of Premier
Travel, Joy Burrows, said the
answer to the high number of
Bahamian travellers could be that
the economic downturn has not
been as bad as previously pre-
dicted.

She said price competition
between the airlines, especially
those that fly to Florida, were
keeping fares within reach of the
average Bahamian.

“They might not go to New
York or Boston, but they can
afford to go to Florida,” said Ms
Burrows. “Though people are out
of jobs, not the entire Bahamas is
suffering.”

SEE page 3B

craly decorated and re

5.410 aq, &, hoene features apacious verandahs, c-

@ By NEIL HARTNELL
Tribune Business Editor

SOME $163.4 million in total
spending will flow into the Grand
Bahama economy over a nine-
year period until 2018, the Envi-
ronmental Impact Assessment
(EIA) for the Freeport Harbour
area 4 expansion project has
revealed, with Bahama Rock’s
payroll expanding by $22.8 mil-
lion to $58 million if the devel-
opment is approved.

The EIA study said the projec-
t’s go-ahead would extend
Bahama Rock’s stay in Grand
Bahama until 2018, securing its
85 jobs for at least that period.
The company’s current annual
payroll was $5.8 million, while 30
indirect employees whose jobs
relied on the Martin Marietta
subsidiary received a further $1.1
million in combined annual
salaries.

However, the study said that if
the area 4 expansion was not
approved, Bahama Rock would
have to remove its large electrical
dragline from Grand Bahama and
redeploy it within the Martin
Marietta infrastructure within two
years.

This would reduce Bahama
Rock’s aggregate production by
35 per cent immediately, and
result in falling employment, with
all 85 direct jobs eliminated by
2016.

“It is estimated that Bahama
Rock’s annual expenditures rep-
resent almost 1 per cent of total
gross domestic product (GDP)
for the Bahamas as a whole, when
excluding tourism and the finan-
cial services,” the EJA said. For
2007, it reported that the compa-
ny had injected $16.211 million

Make ita

* Pension Plans

* Mutual Funds

Study’s go-ahead to generate $50m for Grand
Bahama Power, $24.6m for FOCOL

into the Freeport economy.

“Bahama Rock is the third
largest consumer of power in
Grand Bahama, and is responsi-
ble for approximately 10 per cent
of Grand Bahama Power Com-
pany’s revenue,” the ETA added.

“Bahama Rock spent $5.131
million in 2006, $4.927 million in
2007 for power consumption and
energy, and is estimated to exceed
$6 million in 2008.”

With the rock plant and large
dragline accounting for 96 per
cent of Bahama Rock’s electrical
consumption, the study said that
if area 4 was approved and exca-
vation continued at the present
pace, its energy needs would
remain constant until at least
2018.

“One of the main recipients of
Bahama Rock spending, Grand
Bahama Power, would continue
to bill approximately $5-$6 mil-
lion per year, totalling in excess of
$50 million in revenue over the
10-year period,” the EIA found.

“The Freeport Oil Company
would likewise receive $24.4 mil-
lion of revenue over the same 10-
year period, based on 2007 pric-
ing.”

"and the study added: “To date,
Bahama Rock has provided
equivalent harbour construction
dredge value of approximately
$750 million.

“The harbour would simply not
exist as a large and modern deep-
water port without the win-win
arrangement currently in place
with Bahama Rock. It is also esti-

reality.

* Stock Brokerage

* Corporate Finance

* Investment Management

* Trusts & Estate Planning

° Personal Pension Plan Accounts

* Education Investment Accounts

mated that area 3, area 4 and the
West Channel development
would contribute an additional
$750 million in conventional
dredge value.

“To the community, area 4 pro-
vides potential increases in real
estate values, reductions in traffic
congestion and direct spending
benefits to Grand Bahama Island
of an additional $64.2 million,
including 334 additional man
years of direct employment, and
an estimated $6.3 million in infra-
structure improvements over the
10-year period ending in 2018.”

Bahama Rock had invested
over $100 million in Freeport
since 2001, and failing to approve
the area 4 expansion would leave
it unable “to sustain minimum
economic production levels for
the advancement and completion
of the Freeport Harbour Master
Plan.

“This expansion and excava-
tion will increase harbour capac-
ity and contribute to increased
business activity. The area 4
basin, with harbour connection,
will transform a terrestrial envi-
ronment into valuable waterfront
property. The potential develop-
ment will enable small business
persons and pleasure craft owners
access for the first time through a
private harbour, while entitled to
all the benefits derived from Port
Authority licensing.”

A $1.428 million highway rate
of way would also be constructed
through Bahama Rock’s proper-

ty.

* Foreign developers would be hit, as firm supplies aggregate for all major projects, including 100% of New Providence’s needs
* ‘The future availability of a domestic supply of aggregate, or conversely, importation, is an issue needing further evaluation
by policymakers and those in the construction industry’

be expected, and would add approxi-
mately $15 million to the annual con-
struction sector costs.

“Finally, the excavation and expan-
sion of the harbour would likely cease.

SEE page 4B

Correction

IN the lead story in Mon-
day’s Business section,
“$15m makeover builds key
business location”, read
that “The Old city lumber
yard, which met its end by
fire several years ago....”
The Lumberyard which
met its end was the old
Bahamian Lumberyard.

In the same story, it was
said that a donation of 14
Dialysis machines was
made to Doctor’s Hospital.

The 14 Dialysis machines
were, in fact, donated to the
Princess Margaret Hospi-



The information contained is from a third
party and The Tribune can not be held
responsible for errors and/or omission
from the daily report.



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PAGE 2B, TUESDAY, MAY 12, 2009

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THE TRIBUNE

Mind the ‘brain drain’
costs for our economy

THE ‘graduation season’ is
upon us once again, with thou-
sands of newly-minted high
school graduates and college
graduates (from both domestic
and foreign institutions) set to
descend upon the fragile job mar-
ket seeking employment oppor-
tunities. Notwithstanding the del-
uge of potential workers from
which to choose, I still hear busi-
ness owners complain that they
cannot find qualified applicants
from among whom they can hire
new employees.

Quantity versus Quality

There is certainly a paradox
existing in our labour markets,
where we seemingly have a
detachment between quantity and
quality. I know for a fact that
there are thousands of young
Bahamians looking for employ-
ment but, sadly, many are not
even qualified for the most basic
entry-level jobs. Many of our
youngsters lack communication
skills (basic reading, writing and
speaking skills), basic mathemat-
ical skills and, finally, social skills.

On the other side of the ledger,
one must ask the logical question:
“What about our college gradu-
ates?” It seems like growing num-
bers of our students studying
abroad are happy to remain
abroad indefinitely. This is the so
called ‘brain drain’ effect, which
in a more precise way is defined
as: “The loss of skilled intellec-
tual and technical labour through
the movement of such labour to
more favourable geographic, eco-
nomic or professional environ-
ments”.

Brain drain, fact or fiction

In January 2006, the IMF pub-
lished a working paper entitled
Emigration and Brain Drain: Evi-
dence from the Caribbean. This
study indicated that between 1965
and 2000, approximately 58 per
cent of Bahamians educated at
college level migrated to the US.
When the list of countries was
expanded to include member
countries of the Organisation for
Economic Cooperation and
Development (OECD), the
Bahamas’ number grew to 61 per
cent.

Is it really as much
as 61 per cent?
I must admit that I found this

Financial
Focus

statistic to be shocking because
my perception (and the percep-
tion of persons with whom I inter-
act regularly) was that while there
is undoubtedly a growing num-
ber of Bahamians remaining
abroad after completing college,
the majority still return home to
build their future.

I graduated from St Anne’s
High School in 1975, and I believe
that I can readily account for
about 95 per cent of my graduat-
ing year (those who came back
home after completing their ter-
tiary education and/or profes-
sional qualifications). A colleague
of mine, who graduated from high
school in 1987, estimated that
some 15 per cent of her graduat-
ing year remained abroad.

Finally, in an attempt to get a
more current feel for the situa-
tion, I talked to several of my
peers who have children in uni-
versities abroad. The consensus
was that in the best case scenario,
they seemed to be very ‘open-
minded’ about the prospects of
settling and working abroad. In
the worst case scenario, many had
no intention of returning home
in the foreseeable future. The lat-
ter view especially applied to
graduates in technical, scientific
and specialised fields, where they
indicate that they have little real
alternative but to consider emi-
gration as there are no job oppor-
tunities available - now or in the
foreseeable future - in the
Bahamas in those fields.

While the above observations
are not scientific but purely anec-
dotal, I began to come to grips
with the possibility that 58 per
cent may indeed be a reasonable
number.

The costs of Emigration

Most of the tertiary-educated
Bahamians are trained abroad,
mainly in the United States and
Canada. The majority of the
direct costs are borne by a com-
bination of family; government
scholarships and loans; and pri-
vate scholarships. If we assume

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that the average cost of a four-
year college/university pro-
gramme is about $80,000 to
$100,000, for an economy like the
Bahamas to lose 58 per cent of
this category of future workers is
most significant indeed. From a
macroeconomic standpoint, this
significant investment in educa-
tion is yielding a less than opti-
mum return for the Bahamas.

Furthermore, if the majority of
our immigrant population is
unskilled it is no wonder that we
seem to be in a perpetual open-
ended training mode.

Clearly, this is not a sustain-
able position for the country, as it
implies that we are paying twice
for the same skilled labour — the
cost of educating our children,
and the relatively higher cost of
expatriate labor (which often
includes housing, transportation
and children’s education costs).

Could this promote

mediocrity?

Another fundamental question
we must ask ourselves is: If we
are losing about 60 per cent of
our most highly-trained citizens,
are we setting ourselves up to
allow mediocrity to rise to the
top, as emigration weakens com-
petition and perhaps robs us of
some of our brighter students? I
do not know the answer to these
questions, but it must be placed
on the table for discussion.

The long-term implications of
the IMF study, as it relates to the
Bahamas, suggest that in addition
to a brain drain we will be in a
constant cycle of importing peo-
ple with technical/specialist skills.
To continuously encourage new
investment and maintain the lev-
el of investment that has already
occurred, it is most important that
we have a well-trained, globally-
competitive, indigenous work-
force — both technical and non-
technical.

The great contradiction

At the bottom end, we have a
secondary school education sys-
tem producing graduates pos-
sessing a D+ average in national
BGCSE examinations and, at the
top end, creditable studies tell us
that roughly 60 per cent of our
top and best-trained students may
not return home. We are being

SEE page 4B

FIRSTCARIBBEAN

INTERNATIONAL BANK

GET THERE. TOGETHER.

FirstCaribbean International Bank is a member of the CIBC Group.


THE TRIBUNE



TUESDAY, MAY 12, 2009, PAGE 3B



Film maker says
four productions
yet to turn profit

lm By CHESTER ROBARDS
Business Reporter
crobards@tribunemedia.net

BAHAMIAN filmmaker Celi
Moss is pushing ahead with two
new productions slated to pre-
mier at this year’s Bahamas Film
Festival, despite four unprofitable
films, including one entitled ‘Balls



Real Estate |}

Alley’, which cost an estimated
$50,000 to make and brought him
local acclaim.

One of the films, which is in its
pre-production stages, called ‘My
MP’, will feature a Member of
Parliament called Mr Brown -
loosely based on Immigration
Minister Branville McCArtney -
“who has sought to represent his

constituents in a proper manner.”.

According to Mr Moss, the
main character in the movie
wants to show the Bahamian peo-
ple and his colleagues what true
representation is.

The production of the film is
being underwritten by Mr Moss’s
production company, Yeah Man
Entertainment, while the script

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TAX & THE CHANGING
GLOBAL LANDSCAPE

The Bahamas Financial Service Board (BFSB) has
undertaken an examination of the impact of tax on
the financial services industry, and to assist in the
formulation of a strategic response to developments in
the marketplace.

BFSB invites financial institutions, professional services firms and
industry associations to a presentation on a no-direct tax model

and a direct tax model and to participate in a discussion on the
benefits that can accrue to the industry from warious tax, trade

A WORKSHOP ON



and investment arrangements.

We encourage all industry stakenolders to attend this important
meeting to make yourself aware of the various options and to
engape in this dialogue on sustainable development of our sector.

Date:
Time:
Location:
Cost:

Please confirm attendance by contacting BFSB at
info@bfsb-bahamas.com, or by calling our office at 326 7001.

Friday, May 15, 2009
12:00 p.m. - 4:00 p.m.

British Colonial Hilton Hotel

$40 (including lunch)



is being written by members of
The Bamboo Town Film Club
(TBTFC).

Mr Moss said he hopes this
movie, the first of its kind in the
Bahamas, will inspire young film-
makers to bring their ideas to
fruition.

“T’m interested in using it as
vehicle to get more drama into
schools,” he said. “If you don’t
have positive programmes you'll
have negative energy. It’s all
about moulding new minds.”

According to him, the film
industry in the Bahamas is con-
tinuing to grow, and he insists
that government should get film-
making into different constituen-
cies and schools.

“T would like to see other con-
stituencies start their own film
clubs,” Mr Moss said.

TBTFC hopes to have their
movie complete by November.
Mr Moss said an open casting call
held last Saturday was not well
attended. However, he said as a
filmmaker he works with the cast
he is given.

According to him, because
there is typically little to no mon-
ey put into his movies, all of the
cast members own the film and
will receive royalties should the
film turn a profit.

“Everybody who is a part of
the movie is part owner,” Mr
Moss said.

He lamented that “none have
paid any bills yet”.

‘My MP’ is to expected to
include cameos by several actual
MPs and an appearance by radio
talk show host Ortland Bodie.

Mr Moss is confident that the
film will be well received by view-
ers, as well as his other film now
in production, ‘Dear Mama’,
which is about a mother advocat-
ing for justice when her son’s
killer gets out on bail.

“T want to deal with the crime
situation,” he said.

Bahamian visits to US grow 54%

FROM page 1B

She said US Commerce
Department figures were col-
lected during a traditionally
slow month for Bahamian trav-
el, but she was eager to see
what the busy summer months
will bring.

Ms Burrows said Bahamians
have recently been purchasing
vacations last minute, a trend
that seems to have been born
out of the financial crisis, and
has made hotel and airline
occupancies virtually unpre-
dictable.

“The Easter run was a lot of

—_
NAD

Nassau Airport
Dovelapmont Company

last minute bookings,” she said.
“We always encourage people
to book early, otherwise you
get stuck with a high air fare.”
Ms Burrows said individuals
still come to travel agencies for
vacation bookings, and con-
tends that 70 per cent of
Bahamian travellers purchase
fights through a travel agent.
She said that although ticket
purchases on the Internet was a
growing trend, especially with
young adults, older persons still
trust the expertise and experi-
ence of a travel agent when
planning a trip. “People can
even call us at home to sort
them out,” said Ms Burrows.

PRICE INQUIRY

P-130 Supply & Delivery of
Chillers and Heat Exchangers

Nassau Arport Development Company (NAD has a
requirement for the Supely and Delivery of four, (Gy. 4), 850
fon chillers and four, (by. 4), heal exchangers in
accordance with the required schedule and specifications

tor complebon of Stage

Vand Stage 2 of the LPIA Expansion

Project. Thes is a Supply and Delivery only contract.

Price Inquiry Packages will be available fer pick up after
1:00 pm, on Wedneeday, May 6th, 2008.

Price Inquiry closing is Thursday, June 11th, 2009 at
3:00 pm Bahamas Time

THE AIRPORT AUTHORITY

(ontact: Tres rea
(Contract & Procurement Manager

LIPLA Exepameaon Prey eact

Ph: (242) TOE-0086 | Fem: (242) S772
PC) Bo AP SS229, Messe, Bahamas
Gena: traci brshyiiires bs



LYNDEN PINDLING INTERNATIONAL ATRPORT

P.O. BOX AP-59222

NASSAU, BAHAMAS

REQUEST FOR PROPOSALS (RFP)

FOR FIRE TRUCK

The Airport Authority invites bids for the acquisition of a modem

fire engine for its Crash

Pindling International Airport.

Fire Rescue operations at the Lynden

Specifications can be collected from the Executive Offices of the
Airport Authority, Lynden Pindling International Airport during
normal working hours at any time after the appearance of this RFP

Bids must meet all specifications.

Bids not in compliance with the specifications will be rejected.
Bids must be signed by an individual duly authorized to bind the
bidder to the terms of a contract. Price must include any and all
shipping charges associated with delivery of the apparatus to

Nassau, The Bahamas.

Bids must be submitted by 30th June, 2009 at 11:00am at the men-
tioned address:

General Manager
Executive Offices
Airport Authority
Lynden Pindling International Airport
Nassau, Bahamas

+ BAHAMAS
SN FINANCIAL
SERVICES BOARD

and must be marked:
BIDS FOR FIRE TRUCK




PAGE 4B, TUESDAY, MAY 12, 2009

THE TRIBUNE



SSS SSS ————— Ee
$15m building cost hike if project not approved

Mind the ‘brain
‘drain’ costs for

our economy
FROM page 1B

greatly disadvantaged at both
ends of the spectrum.

Does this reality require a
national bipartisan approach to
finding a solution? I certainly sub-
mit, along with most ‘right think-
ing’ Bahamians, that it does. We
simply cannot build a new
Bahamas that can compete in
today’s world with a substandard
work force.

Conclusion

We need to move with haste
to establish a National Labour
Needs Assessment Bank
(NLNAB) that will assist us with
future planning. We need to
know how many trained persons
we have by skill category, how
many are in the training pipeline
and, most importantly, how many
are we anticipating that we will
need within the next 10 and 15
years, respectively.

The results from the NLNAB
will allow us to direct future grad-
uates towards areas of need, and
to retain a higher percentage of
our graduates if they can be
assured of job opportunities.
Finally, it should aid in helping
to raise the overall level of pro-
ductivity in the workplace.

Until next week...

NB: Larry R. Gibson, a Char-
tered Financial Analyst, is vice-
president - pensions, Colonial
Pensions Services (Bahamas), a
wholly-owned subsidiary of Colo-
nial Group International, which
owns Atlantic Medical Insurance
and is a major shareholder of
Security & General Insurance
Company in the Bahamas.

The views expressed are those
of the author and do not neces-
sarily represent those of Colonial
Group International or any of its
subsidiary and/or affiliated com-
panies. Please direct any ques-
tions or comments to rlgib-
son@atlantichouse.com.bs

FROM page 1B

Conventional dredging can cost
more than $30 per cubic yard, and
require specialised environmental
containment. Bahama Rock is a
‘no cost’ harbour operation with-
out the added problem of dredge
spoils storage and disposal. The
expectation is that Freeport Har-
bour would not likely be enlarged
beyond the current size due to
these issues.”

And the report added: “An
important long-term government
policy question will be raised
sooner rather than later if
Bahama Rock reduces aggregate
supply.

“Bahama Rock supplies New
Providence, through an agree-
ment with a Nassau-based con-
tractor, with 100 per cent of all
coarse aggregate needs. Taking a
long-term viewpoint, the Bahama
Rock operation is finite, and once
the harbour expansion ceases,
Bahama Rock will depart.

“The future availability of a
domestic supply of aggregate, or

FIRMS, from 1B

internal accountants that were
not doing their job.

“As an audit firm, we do not
have a problem meeting these
[Securities Industry Act] stan-
dards once the quality internal
financial data are up to standard,”
Mr Winder said.

His comments came in
response to Tribune Business
questions over the revised pub-
lic company financial reporting
timeframes unveiled in the draft
Securities Industry Act regula-
tion, which were released to the
sector and general public for con-
sultation on Friday.

The draft regulations require
public companies to file their
audited financial statements with
the Securities Commission some
90 days after the relevant year-
end. That makes for a tighter
deadline than the present 120
days allowed for publication

it

NOTICE is hereby given

that KERLINE SAMA of

NASSAU VILLAGE, P.O. BOX SS-19753, NASSAU, BAHAMAS, is
applying to the Minister responsible for Nationality and Citizenship,
for registration/naturalization as a citizen of The Bahamas, and that
any person who knows any reason why registration/naturalization
should not be granted, should send a written and signed statement
of the facts within twenty-eight days from the 5" day of May, 2009
to the Minister responsible for nationality and Citizenship, P.O. Box

N-7147, Nassau, Bahamas.

MEDICAL SUPPLIES
LIQUIDATION SALE

Combine Pad Abdominal Pad 5*9 inch

400/case

Dental Cotton Rolls Medium
20,000/case

XL Gloves Latex Powered
1000/case

$150.00

$60.00

$40.00

Large Gloves latex (Powder Free)

1000/case

Large Gloves Vinyl (Latex Free)

1000/case

Insulin Syringe 100U/ml
3600/case

$40.00

$35.00

$175.00

Nebulizer Mask Kit Adult 20/ml,

Child 6ml, Chamber
100/case

Needle Holders
1200/case

Nasal Cannula Adult
100/case

Oxygen Mask Adult Large
100/case

1ML Syringe with 25G Needle
2400/case

3ML Syringe with 23G Needle
1500/case

$130.00

$70.00

$60.00

$75.00

$100.00

$100.00

S5ML Syringe with 21G Needle and 23G Needle

1200/case

10ML Syringe with 21G Needle

1200/case

Specimen Cups 40z Sterile
100/case

$100.00

$100.00

$25.00

Sterile Surgical Gloves size 7 1/2, 8, 8 1/2,

600/case

$55.00

conversely, importation, is an
issue needing further evaluation
by policymakers and those in the
construction industry.”

Bahama Rock, which is a
Bahamian subsidiary of US
aggregate/quarrying materials
giant, Martin Marietta, was said
by the EIA to produce five mil-
lion tonnes of aggregate per year
- some 20 times’ the next avail-
able supply.

It supplied the Bahamian con-
struction industry with some
812,364 tonnes of aggregate in
2006, with some 218,983 tonnes
of that used in Grand Bahama.

“Bahama Rock supplies all
construction grade aggregate for
Bahamian anchor projects, and
has supplied 100 per cent of mate-
rials for all three phases of the
Paradise Island Atlantis develop-
ment,” the EJA said.

“As other anchor projects are
scheduled to come online in
Grand Bahama and New Provi-
dence in the future, Bahama
Rock will be the key supplier of
low cost, high quality construc-

under BISX rules.

Furthermore, public companies
will have only 45 days from the
relevant period’s end to file their
unaudited interim financial state-
ments. This will be 50 per cent
less time than the current 90 days
they are allowed. Annual reports,
including management’s discus-
sion and analysis, must also be
filed with the Securities Commis-
sion some 90 days after year-end.

The Bahamas International
Securities Exchange (BISX) had
previously proposed changes to
filing deadlines in its own BISX
Rules, seeking to reduce the time-
lines for full year and interim
financial publication from 120
days and 90 days, to 90 days ands
60 days, respectively.

These BISX Rules changes
have yet to be approved, and it is
likely they will now take a back
seat to the Securities Industries
Act and regulations reforms, fol-
lowing them.



tion aggregate and marine rock
armour. This is particularly rele-
vant if the approved projects are
in construction simultaneously.”

The EIA referred to a Febru-
ary 18, 2008, letter from the
Mosko Group, which detailed
“the importance of having a high
quality supply of domestic aggre-
gates available to meet the con-
struction needs in Nassau and
throughout the Bahamas”.

Therefore, failure to approve
the 192-acre Freeport Harbour
expansion would have an
extremely negative impact for
both the Bahamian construction
industry and this nation’s ability
to attract foreign direct invest-
ment from real estate develop-
ers, given the likely increase in
building costs.

The EIA said: “Area 4 will
allow Bahama Rock to continue
to provide a reliable, convenient
and economic supply of building
materials, which are key to the
Bahamian residential and com-
mercial construction industry.”

It listed the company’s ability

In its explanation of the
reforms, the Securities Commis-
sion said the “continuous disclo-
sure requirements for listed com-
panies” on BISX were being
expanded to “all public compa-
nies”, meaning that firms such as
Bahamas Supermarkets - listed
on the over-the-counter market
- would also be expected to toe
the line.

Franklyn Wilson, chairman of
Arawak Homes and Sunshine
Holdings, and the largest investor
in BISX-listed FOCOL Holdings,
yesterday suggested to Tribune
Business that the proposed Secu-
rities Industry Act amendments
would lay down a “challenge” to
his previous profession - the
accountants.

“Can they deliver the [audit-
ed] accounts in time,” he ques-
tioned. “T think it’s going to put
more pressure on the accounting
profession. All I get is a sense
that they are pressured. I get the

Legal Notice

NOTICE
PINK SHELLS HOLDINGS LTD.

(In Voluntary Liquidation)





Notice is hereby given that the above-named
Company is in dissolution, which commenced
on the 29th day of April 2009. The Liquidator is
Argosa Corp. Inc., P.O. Box N-7757 Nassau,

Bahamas.

ARGOSA CORP. INC.
(Liquidator)

we

Bakers Dan

EMPLOYMENT OPPORTUNITY

You are invited to apply for the following position
currently available.

Assistant Marketing Manager

Key Requirements

* Ademonstrated track record of sales to high net

worth clients

Extensive experience maintaining strong long term

customer relationships with significant add-on/repeat

business

A strong existing network with high net worth clients in
the U.S.A. , Europe and The Bahamas
Ability to develop and implement marketing

campaigns to high net worth clients

Qualifications

Bachelor’s degree in Sales, Marketing or related

subject; professional certifications

Minimum five (5) years experience in high net worth

real estate promotions

Must be proficient in C2C software, ACT, Power

Point, Microsoft Word, Excel and Asset Manager

Must be innovative, demonstrate strong leadership

and customer relations skills

Must have excellent written and verbal

communication skills

The successful candidate will have the opportunity to work
in a growing and dynamic organization and must be a self-

to “provide continuous supply of
high quality and low cost aggre-
gates for nearly 100 per cent of all
new construction requirements
for the Commonwealth of the
Bahamas.

“The existence of Bahama
Rock allows for the preservation
of the natural relief in New Prov-
idence and the Family Islands as
the affordable, convenient, sin-
gle source Bahamian aggregate
supplier.”

The area 4 expansion, already
agreed via a Memorandum of
Understanding (MoU) between
Bahama Rock and the Freeport
Harbour Company, the latter of
which is owned 50/50 by Port
Group Ltd and Hutchison
Whampoa, will create a 135-acre
excavated basin immediately to
the west of the Freeport Con-
tainer Port and Bahama Cement
property.

Land usage, the EIA said,
would be altered through the
area’s transformation into a mari-
na, recreational areas with a boat
launch, bridge view and highway

impression things are not easy for
them. As a client, the problem of
turnover of staff is an issue for
them. I get the impression it’s not
easy.”

The proposed deadlines were
not “unreasonable”, Mr Wilson
added, explaining: “Investors
need the numbers in a timely
manner. The utility of them
decreases with every passing day,
week, month.”

He said, though, that the 90-
day deadline for filing annual
reports, complete with manage-
ment discussion and analysis,
“may not be realistic”, given the
need for external auditors to com-
plete and the two-to-three weeks
to get the document printed.

Mr Winder, though, said: “The
deadline is not an onerous prob-
lem for the profession, once an
organisation has proper internal
controls and its internal accounts
are being prepared on a timely
basis.”

If external auditors had to
make numerous adjustments to
the internal accounts they were
presented with, the audit time and
costs would increase.

overlook.

The Bahama Rock proposal,
the study said, would enable the
Freeport Harbour - and the busi-
nesses it supports, such as the
Container Port and Grand
Bahama Shipyard, to match the
depths currently being dug in the
Panama Canal expansion and its
addition of a third lock system.

“The Bahama Rock operation
presents an advantage to Grand
Bahama over competing ports by
matching these depths at ‘no
cost’,” the EJA said.

“The advantage would be the
ability to receive post-Panamex
vessels by the Container Port
along the west channel, allowing
the next generation of 18-metre
draft vessels to utilise Freeport
Harbour. This has the potential to
position Grand Bahama for fur-
ther economic growth over the
next 50 years, facilitating possi-
ble mega-port status.

“If area 4 expansion is
approved, Bahama Rock is
expected to extend operations
through at least 2018.”

Mr Winder, though, urged
Bahamian accountants and their
firms to “make tremendous
efforts to produce quality finan-
cial statements on a timely basis”
and match - even exceed - global
best practices and standards.

He added that the Organisa-
tion for Economic Co-Operation
and Development (OECD), in its
demands for greater “transparen-
cy’ from international financial
centres, was looking at their abil-
ity to produce quality accounting
information.

“As more and more organisa-
tions look at the Bahamas as a
place to reside, and for them to
have some aspect of their back
office operations here - the
invoicing and accounting - the
accounts have to come up to stan-
dard, or the work will switch to
other jurisdictions,” Mr Winder
said.

As a result, he urged compa-
nies not to hold on to accountants
who did not want to have the job,
as there were “lots of bright
young people in the pipeline;
young Bahamians waiting in the
wings”.

NOTICE

NOTICE is hereby given that BOLIE EDWARD LLOYD of
ST. ANDREW BEACH ESTATES, P.O. BOX EE-17273,
is applying to the Minister responsible for Nationality and
Citizenship, for registration/naturalization as a citizen of The
Bahamas, and that any person who knows any reason why
registration/naturalization should not be granted, should
send a written and signed statement of the facts within
twenty-eight days from the 12° day of May, 2009 to the
Minister responsible for nationality and Citizenship, P.O. Box

N-7147, Nassau, Bahamas.

NOTICE is hereby given that MARCNER IZMA of PINEDALE,
EIGHT MILE ROCK, GRAND BAHAMA, BAHAMAS P.O. BOX
F2197 is applying to the Minister responsible for Nationality and
Citizenship, for registration/naturalization as a citizen of The
Bahamas, and that any person who knows any reason why
registration/ naturalization should not be granted, should send a
written and signed statement of the facts within twenty-eight days
from the 4TH day of MAY, 2009 to the Minister responsible for
Nationality and Citizenship, PO.BoxN-7147, Freeport, Bahamas.

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Deadline for Application/resume is May 18th, 2009

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Call or apply celine today to decower our convensent poymect plans


PAGE 6B, TUESDAY, MAY 12, 2009

THE TRIBUNE







The Tribune

B

O Di

A N D



©

coe! N OD



ith





@ By ALEX MISSICK
Tribune Features Reporter
amissick@tribunemedia.net

BEAUTY and self confidence
are attributes that are
extremely important to a
woman living in the 21st cen-
tury involving everything from
the latest makeup craze, to
the shaping and sculpting of
what they feel is the perfect
body including breast size.

Many women feel that having
smaller breasts limits their sex
appeal and choices in the clothes
they wear.

Bahamian men do not make hav-
ing smaller busts any easier on the
women because most of them gener-
ally prefer a voluptuous, busty
woman. This has led some women
here in the Bahamas, to go under the
knife and have a Breast Augmenta-
tion- surgically getting implants to
increase bust size.

The procedure is used to enlarge a
naturally small breast most common-
ly the result or heredity, to restore
breast volume lost following preg-
nancy as a result of breast feeding or
weight loss or to achieve better sym-
metry when breasts are moderately
disproportionate in size and shape
health officials say.

Board Certified Plastic Surgeon,
Doctor Gregory Neil, said the vast
majority of his patients have already
had children who breastfed, or they
always had very small breasts and

a

want to fill out their breasts.

“They are very well adjusted, suc-
cessful, intelligent ladies who want a
little improvement of how their
clothes fit. The vast majority of these
women take very good care of them-
selves and are fit as a fiddle. They
work out, are not run down, over-
weight and are toned, but they just
need their breasts taken care of,” Dr
Neil said.

Perfect candidates

He said that a candidate for
surgery would be a woman that is
physically in tuned, spiritually, emo-
tionally settled with a good support
system and a certain level of under-
standing about the procedure.

“The Bahamian population at
most is very sophisticated and almost
everything new in plastic surgery
they have done their research. So
when they come in, they know most
of what they need to know and my
job is just to talk to them about the
options, weighing the risks and bene-
fits. If the benefits outweighs the
risks then we go ahead with the
surgery,” Dr Neil said.

Dr Neil said during the procedure,
he tries not to put any scarring on
the breasts to achieve the most nat-
ural effect.

“T put a half an inch incision under
the arm and go underneath the pec-
toral muscle- God put a space there
for plastic surgery and that’s where
we place the implant. I roll the emp-
ty implant into the shape of a ciga-
rette, slip it underneath the muscle
and then inflate it. It is the best tech-
nique because there is no scaring of
the breast. We use the best implants

a

Theep

MK sKelE





SIZC

because I think if you are going to
have the procedure done you should
use the best so that it can last you a
lifetime. A breast implant should
look and feel natural. If you want to
get pregnant, it should not impair
your ability to breast feed,” Dr Neil
said.

Personal account

Twenty one year old Katrina
Scott*, said although it seems to be
‘taboo’ for most women in the
Bahamas to talk about the proce-
dure and why they had it done, she
knew having a breast augmentation
would help with her self esteem and
was a priority at that time in her life.

“T got my implants at the age of 17
because I had asymmetrical breasts.
This means that one of my breasts
developed faster than the other and
it became noticeable. The doctors
had been observing the development
since puberty and realised that the
smaller one would never catch up in
size to the other. I wore artificial
inserts in my bra for years and
changed the size to balance it out.
The doctor said that at age 18 or
when I was mentally ready for the
surgery he would doit. At 17, I was
ready so he made the exception after
much consultation. I then had to
have one breast reduced and
implanted and the small breast just
implanted. The reason for the
reduction was to ensure that later on
that the natural drop of one breast
would not be so noticeable as the
implanted breast would always be
perky,” Ms Scott said.

Ms Scott said after the surgery,
her breasts were painful and limited

her from doing anything with her
arms. Her mother did everything for
her including giving her baths. It
was important that she remained
immobile to ensure proper healing.
Ms Scott wore a special bra for
almost 6 months after so that the
implants would sit in the right place.

“As my implants were considered
medically necessary because it hada
psychological effect on me, there
were few cons. My surgery was
more involved because of the reduc-
tion of one and as a result the nip-
ples had to be repositioned. The
doctor gave comprehensive explana-
tions using charts and drawings to
explain what would happen. He also
demonstrated the strength of the
implant to guarantee no leaking and
the size of the implants are a C cup.
The size of the breasts are fine as it
may fluctuate as I gain or loose
weight. I also now have a lifetime
warranty with serial numbers in the
event that anything goes wrong,” Ms
Scott said.

Ms Scott said her parents support-
ed her 100 per cent as it took two
operations and two summers to com-
plete the procedure.

“They Gmplants) make me feel a
lot better. As I became aware of my
body the problem affected me.
Being self conscious of my breasts
even affected my posture as I tried
to divert the attention from my
imperfect chest. So it was a neces-
sary procedure for my mental well
being,” Ms Scott said.

Dr Neil said the cost of implants
can fluctuate depending on the pro-
cedure.

“Tf you do not fall into the catego-
ry of a certain patient, then your cost



|

The Bahamian
population at most is
very sophisticated

and almost everything
new in plastic surgery
they have done their
research. So when
they come in, they
know most of what they
need to know and my
job is just to talk to
them about the options,
weighing the risks

and benefits.

| DR GREGORY NEIL

can differ. The implants alone can
cost a little more than $1,000. For
persons who only need a breast
implant, they can look to spend less
then $5,000 for everything,” Dr Neil
said.

Ms Scott said she wants young
girls in the Bahamas to embrace
what they have in terms of their bod-
ies.

“T don’t feel that small breasts is a
good reason for such an invasive
procedure. However, if it becomes a
situation that affects how you func-
tion in your day to day life then cor-
rect it. Mental well being is impor-
tant to living the best life you can,”
she said.

* Name has been changed

Your body’s talking... Are you listening?

AN AMERICAN special-
ist in massage therapy will be
visiting the Bahamas to offer
free classes for “non-invasive,
scientifically based energy
healthcare” called the
BodyTalk System.

Licensed massage therapist,
certified neuromuscular ther-
apist and Reiki master Jeanne
Ellis of Palm Beach will be in
the Nassau next month to
teach classes which she says
are designed to improve the
quality of life for participants.

According to practitioners,
the BodyTalk System, devel-
oped by Dr John Veltheim,
follows the body’s guidance
directly to the place that needs

attention. “The body has its
own intelligence which coor-
dinates thousands of simulta-
neously occurring functions,
organising the organs,
endocrines, and other major
systems. You don't run your
body, this intelligence does,” a
recent press release stated.

“A BodyTalk Practitioner
can communicate with this
innate wisdom and ‘remind’
the body what needs to hap-
pen in order to heal. The body
also knows when it is no
longer able to heal on its own,
and can alert a practitioner
when medical attention is
needed.”

Ms Ellis said she learnt

about the BodyTalk System
in 1996 and has since been
dedicated to sharing the pro-
gramme’s methods.

Prior to discovering
BodyTalk, she said she knew
that other healthcare pro-
gramme’s were not address-
ing areas such as digestive
issues, fears and phobias, emo-
tions, endocrine imbalances,
belief systems and many other
possibly sub-conscious issues
that needed attention for the
client to truly heal and most
importantly have a long last-
ing result.

“There are 100,000 chemical
reactions every second, 20 mil-
lion red blood cells alone

replaced every second, 40 bil-
lion bits of information
processed in the brain every
second.”

The BodyTalk System inte-
grates well with all other
modalities including Western

Medicine. Doctors, chiro-
practors, massage therapists,
psychologists, and people who
just want to help their family
and loved ones are becoming
Certified BodyTalk Practi-
tioners. It has grown quickly in
the last twelve years because
of good results, and is now
taught in over 30 countries
around the world. ACCESS
is being taught to school chil-
dren with amazing results on

grades, attention spans and
behaviour, the release also
stated.

Ms Ellis has previously
taught BodyTalk methods in
Nassau, with local students
saying that have seen tremen-
dous health improvements.

Ms Ellis will be back in Nas-
sau on June 4 for a free intro-
duction lecture and demo, and
she will teach modules one
and two of the BodyTalk Sys-
tem on June 5 - 8.

For more information on
the Bodytalk system and
upcoming seminars in Nassau
and other international class-
es, visit www.bodytalkcen-
terofpalmbeach.com.



Jeanne Ellis
THE TRIBUNE

TUESDAY, MAY 12, 2009, PAGE 7B





@x

Dating in the Jungle

DATING in the jungle seems heavy
going at times with hungry predators,
slithering snakes creeping up unex-
pectedly and cute clingy furry animals
with big dewy eyes. Manouvering
through the undergrowth can be
exhausting and discouraging particu-
larly when you feel you are making
slow progress. It takes a lot of energy
just to go out and try and survive. So
if it is that difficult, why do we keep
going back again and again? Is it the
vision of the cool, tranquil watering
spot at the end of the journey? That
place of peace when you find a person
who accepts and loves you for who
you are. To be in the comforting arms
that help heal the pain and make us
feel so secure; the reward.

For those of us who suddenly find
ourselves single again, perhaps due
to divorce, death or the end of a long
relationship it can be overwhelming.
Conversations inevitably return to the
same question, ‘Where can you meet
someone decent?’ 'All the good ones

LOVING RELATIONSHPS



BY MAGGIE
i, AUN

are married', and 'No one is serious
anymore. They only want to have a
good time.’ Yes, re-entering the dating
world will most certainly be different
each time and with each decade in
our lives. We do not remain the same
person as the years pass because we
change and grow with all life's expe-
riences. Our expectations change so it
is important to be open to the con-
cept of change. Take time to really
think about the things you do want
and the things that you could not tol-
erate. Be yourself and do not be dis-
couraged by people telling you what
you should or should not be doing. If



this imposed single hood is due to a
failed romance then look within your-
self honestly and try and see how you
played a part in the demise.

Fear of starting again can immo-
bilise us but it is important to under-
stand that everyone has fears. Some of
the most common fears that we bring
from childhood are fear of being
rejected, abandoned, ignored, embar-
rassed, smothered, and of course con-
trolled. When your particular fear
button has been pushed it is vital to
remember that this is probably not
real but a trigger from an old deep
rooted memory. The urge to protect
ourselves from the imaginary pain can
be very strong and we may run and
not deal with problems, or we may
just go quiet and switch off. Alterna-
tively we may stay and fight and argue
and possibly get more and more
angry. These are all behaviours to pro-
tect ourselves from the ensuing pain.
We imagine this pain both physical
and to our egos. As hard as we try, our



triggers will get pushed and the only
way to deal with them is to talk and
explain our fears and anxieties. Shar-
ing these fears with those closest to us
will allow them to know us better and
appreciate our tender areas. If how-
ever we chose to have secrets and
withhold information then our inten-
tion is to create just the right amount
of distance to keep others from know-
ing the real us and in this way gener-
ate a mask or disguise.

The problem with disguises is that
they can be so easy to put on and all
too often it is even difficult for us to
see our true selves. The only effec-
tive road to true intimacy is to learn
how to be transparent and honest.
Being transparent and honest is a very
attractive quality and for most peo-
ple draws us closer to them. Most peo-
ple think that telling the hard truth
will drive people away but we know
for a fact that this is not true. Remem-
ber that even in healthy relationships
people get their feelings hurt at times.



It is impossible not to get hurt because
we are human and life is coming at
us from all angles.

Knowing all these things and still
wanting to have someone close in our
lives is the driving force that sends us
out in to the jungle. Leave home
armed with knowledge and confidence
that everyone is experiencing the same
difficulties as yourself. Relax, enjoy
yourself and try not to worry about
success on any given day. The expres-
sion 'Like attracts like’ is a truism and
one that epitomises the need to work
on producing a positive aura that will
in turn draw the right person to you.

¢ Margaret Bain is an Individual and
Couples Relationship Therapist. She is a
Registered Nurse and a Certified Clinical
Sex Therapist. For appointments call
535-7456 or e-mail her at relateba-
hamas@yahoo.com or www.relateba-
hamas.blogspot.com. She is also avail-
able for speaking engagements.

GREEN SCENE

@x

ATYPICAL scene in the
Sierra Maestra surrounding
Santiago de Cuba.





The other

side of Cuba

OVER the Easter holidays I took my first
trip to Cuba, one of a party of ten. We stayed
in Havana two nights but our main destina-
tion was Santiago de Cuba, over 500 miles
from Havana in the southeast of the country.

Santiago is a city with character. Yes, it
has its old tumbledown buildings in the his-
toric areas but the city is clean and very proud
of its heritage — which is considerable.

Santiago de Cuba was established in 1515,
the same year as Havana, and for a while
was the capital of the Spanish colony.
Although situated on the Caribbean coast
the city is completely surrounded by moun-
tains. Wherever you look the Sierra Maestra
forms a backdrop.

One cannot write about Cuba without men-
tioning the transportation. There are many
modern European and Asian vehicles, from
private cars to luxury buses, but what catch-
es the eye are the pre-1960 US cars that
anachronistically run their appointed rounds
like dinosaurs among cattle. Detroit must
have made solid cars in those days for the
more recent Lada cars from the Soviet Union
all seem on their last legs (wheels?) Add to
these the three-wheeled rickshaws operated
by motorcycle or pedal power, hundreds of
motorcycles, and the great number of horse-
drawn vehicles and you have all the makings
of an eclectic traffic jam.

Cuba has good, dark volcanic soil and the

trees seem to grow far larger than in The
Bahamas. The broad avenues of Santiago
are lined with flowering Yellow Poinciana
and Woman’s Tongue while bare Royal Poin-
ciana trees await their turn to bloom. There
was Bougainvillea everywhere, almost to the
exclusion of other shrubs. I noticed lots of
hibiscus in Havana but virtually none in San-
tiago.

I found it interesting that all of the Frangi-
pani were mature trees.

Here in The Bahamas our Frangipanis top
out as shrubs at 10 to 12 feet with only a few
becoming trees.

When you move into the foothills of the
mountains, the scenery — and flora changes
drastically. There are still Yellow Poincianas
by the roadside in places but the eye roams to
the 100-feet tall mango trees laden with fruit.

We were in Cuba during the dry season
and saw many stream and riverbeds without
water. When the rains come these will be
added attractions to an already lovely region.

Along the roads, sometimes forming nat-
ural fences, were bromeliads our tour guide
told me were called Maya. There were thou-
sands of them and each one could have sold
for $30 or more in Nassau.

The most striking images I will retain from
the mountain tours are of the stately Cuban
Royal Palms (Roystonea regia) which fea-
ture prominently on the Cuban coat of arms.

Reducing redness





BY GARDENER JACK





BROMELIADS abound by the mountain roadsides near
Santiago de Cuba.

We only see Royal Palms in Nassau as a cen-
terpiece for massive lawns or as avenue sen-
tinels, planted at precise distances from each
other. It was distinctly odd to see two or three
randomly growing in a cow field but beautiful
to see groves of them climbing the steep
mountainsides.

The mangoes we ate were obviously of an
early variety. They were quite compact and
had a lovely apricot hue. We also tasted
cashews and a variety of sapodilla that was
torpedo shaped and had orange flesh.

Thad the privilege of being entertained in
five Cuban homes while on vacation. None of
the dwellings had a traditional yard but every
owner grew ornamentals in pots — philoden-
drons, bromeliads and ferns among them.

Every member of the group agreed that
Santiago de Cuba was a far superior tourism
destination to Havana. There were many
attractions to be enjoyed both within the city
and in the nearby countryside. Perhaps, com-
ing from The Bahamas, it was the magic of
the mountains that made the difference.

e j.hardy@coralwave.com





; Tracheal
Collapse



TRACHEAL Collapse is a syndrome charac-

: terised by dorso ventral flattering of the tracheal
: rings with laxity or the dorsal tracheal membrane.
? The syndrome is associated with clinical signs of
? cough and varying degrees of dyspnea (difficult
? breathing) and is most frequently encountered
? in middle — aged to old toy or miniature dogs.
: Considerable controversy surrounds the precise
: cause of the syndrome; consequently there is still
: little agreement concerning the most effective
? approach to its management. The condition occurs
? more frequently in dogs that are obese and in
? those with heart disease or other lung diseases
i such as chronic bronchitis.

The Yorkshire terrier is the most commonly

affected breed followed by the miniature poo-
: dle, Chihuahua and Pomeranian.

Tracheal Collapse syndrome is characterised

? by a chronic paroxysmal cough that is precipitat-
| } ed by excitement, anxiety or pulling on the leash.
? The cough is typically harsh, dry and non-pro-
: ductive and is easily elicited on tracheal palpation.

Diagnosis is confirmed by a combination of

} ? things - eg a positive cough reflex on palpitation
? of the trachea and preferably a positive endo-
i scopic examination that demonstrates intratra-
? cheal changes. However, because of

exorbitant cost of veterinary endoscopes, few

? vets in the Bahamas are equipped with them.
? Therefore the diagnosis is sometimes missed and
: a dog is treated for a chronic respiratory aliment
i instead of tracheal collapse.

Treatment

The practicing vet must be prepared to pursue

? several therapeutic avenues in the management of
? the individual dog to deal with the complex and
? multifactorial etiologies of this syndrome. Suc-
? cessful long term medical management is possible
? for the majority of patients provided the initiating
? factor or factors can be identified. This route
: should always be investigated before a surgical
? solution is considered. If the dog is seen to be in
? respiratory distress, the dog should be stabilised
: firstly. The dog should be sedated and should not
i be stressed. If possible, some oxygen therapy
? should be administered. Some form of cough sup-
} pressant should be given as well.

Weight reduction should be pursued aggres-

i sively in all overweight animals to

improve respiratory function. The daily caloric

; intake should be reduced

significantly.
Respiratory infections should be treated by

i appropriate antibacterial therapy such as antibi-
? otics. The antibiotics Doxycycline, Amoxicillin
? and Cephalexin are commonly used.

The use of collars should be discouraged

? because repeated external pressure on the tra-
? chea may initiate mucosal irritation and promote
? coughing. Body harnesses are an alternative
? means to securing your dog.

? have been numerous complications resulting from
? surgery.

Surgery is an option that should only be con-
sidered after all medical options have been tried
and failed. However, from my experience there

WHETHER genetic or envi-
ronmental, you may not be able
to completely banish redness,
but you can take steps to help
control it.

Wear a sunscreen daily: look
for one containing calming
ingredients like Green Tea and
Licorice to help soothe and con-
trol flare-ups. Choose mois-
turisers containing green natur-
al mineral tint (not an artificial
colour!) to help cancel out visi-
ble redness.

Be mindful of what goes in
your body. Smoking is some-

BY SARAH
BEEK



what like

suffocating the skin from the
inside: it inhibits the body's
ability to provide oxygen and
nutrients to skin while restrict-
ing blood vessels. Excessive
intake of alcoholic beverages
and certain medications (such
as nasal decongestants) can also

contribute to dry skin, leaving
skin more susceptible to sensi-
tivity.

Don't over shower or over-
scrub: The loss of existing oil is
commonly caused by excessive
bathing or showering, or the use
of harsh soaps that dissolve the
protective layer of oil.

Never ever shave without a
protective medium. Using dull
razors can also weaken the
skin's barrier function, leaving
it exposed to environmental
assaults.

Take note of what triggers

the “red” reaction in your skin:
certain foods such as artificial
sweeteners or spices can bring
on the flush look. Also be
aware of your hormones, stress
levels, physical exertion, and
adrenal shifts.

¢ Sarah Beek is a skin care thera-
pist at the Dermal Clinic. Visit her
and her team of skin and body ther-
apists at One Sandyport Plaza (the
same building as Bally’s Gym). For
more information visit www.dermal-
clinic.com or call 327.6788.

Tracheal
Collapse

is most
frequently
encountered
in middle —
aged to old
toy or minia-
ture dogs.


PAGE 8B, TUESDAY, MAY 12, 2009

BARBERSHOP

THE TRIBUNE



Days gone by

@ By LLOYD ALLEN
Tribune Features Reporter
lallen@tribunemedia.net

FOR many men who would have grown up
and experienced most of their youth during the
1960s through to the 1980, the transition of what
the ‘original’ barbershop was, to what it is today,
has in many ways changed dramatically.

Despite the comforts- air conditioning, five
minute cuts, and a myriad of personalised services
-available in barber shops today, one can only
imagine how the barber shop experience was in
years gone by.

This is where barber 69-year-old Eleazor John-
son, from Johnson and Johnson Barber and Beau-
ty salon Fox Hill comes in as he is considered one
of the last remnants of the traditional barber,
with a career spanning more than 50 years.

Reflecting on his early days as a budding coif-
feur, Mr Johnson said a weekly visit to the barber
was a way of life for many young men, an expe-
rience which not only gave them a clean look for
the new work or school week, but also for their
appearance at one or more of the night clubs fre-
quented during that time.

Mr Johnson explained: “At that time we had
places like the Cat and The Fiddle, ZanZa Bar,
The Bloom Night Club, Lemon Tree, Banana
Boat, and so many others.

“Tn one night you and your girlfriend or whom
ever could visit up to five clubs, so visiting the bar-
ber early Saturday morning around 6am or 7am
was the thing to do.”

He said during the sixties, there were dozens of
barbershops all over the island, “there was
Sawyers on Plantol Street, there was Rodney
Darling, Josey’s, Kings Men, and then Cliffie’s on
Farm Road, it was so many of them.”

He explained, one of the most popular bar-
bershop at that time was the Saxony Hotel bar-
bershop located on East Street.

The Saxony had set the standard for what a
barbershop should be, because on the inside there
were several barbers who were always dressed in
their white coats, their hair always trimmed right,
and the interior always kept in tip top shape.

As men would come there sometimes with
their sons to get their cuts, while waiting they
could opt to get their shoes polished by the shoe
shine boys on the outside, or get their cars
washed.

When it comes to the hair cuts, Mr Johnson said

same.

“Back then we had simpler models, but the
machines haven’t changed much. We use to use
the long metal razors ‘the ones that you sharpen
with leather’ they don’t use them anymore, the
tube liner which just come on stream to do a
shape up, we didn’t have them.”

He said unlike today where barbers cut hair
with a cap on, with loud music, or allowing cus-
tomers to drink in their shops, that was not per-
mitted.

He said the Bahamas Barbers Association
(BBA) formed and overseen by the late Barber
Josey enforced uniformity amongst the barbers of
his day.

The association made Wednesday a day of
rest for barbers, and also helped to make hair
cutting a respectable career.

Today, Mr Johnson said he has lost respect for
many in his profession, who he said are in the
business for a ‘quick buck’ rather than developing
their talent and providing a comfortable envi-
ronment for customers.

“There are so many young men who come into
this industry just because they’ve cut one or two
heads, but barbering is so much more than that, it
involves being a people’s person and knowing
your skill,” he said.

Describing himself as a jack of many trades ,
Mr Johnson attributed his success to being able
to multi-task.

Apart from barbering, one of his passions is
boating, an activity he has enjoyed since child-
hood. Although he is no longer a crew member,
Mr Johnson is the proud owner of well known
regatta icon The Lady Natalie.

Named after his mother, the regatta champion
has taken part in dozens of local regattas since the
late 80s, and has racked-up numerous top awards
including Ist place in the 87’ Montagu regatta, 2nd
place in the Exuma B-class in 87’, and first place
wins in Bimini, Grand Bahama, Andros, Ack-
lins, Eleuthera, Cat Island, and Abaco B-class
events.

Nicknamed “The Sailing Barber,’ Mr Johnson
said he has also helped to promote the sport of
sailing throughout many islands, and looks for-
ward to this year’s events.

Two of his four sons have followed in his foot-
steps and Mr Johnson said although he has
accepted that the barbershop experience has gone
through many irreversible changes, he hopes that
those who are coming into it as a profession will

63-YEAR-OLD Barber Eleazor Johnson still has the right touch, seen cutting the hair of a youngste





although the trends have changed over the years, _ take the time to learn its history, and discover its | SHOWING offa picture taken during the 70s where he shaped-up an afro for Bahamian photographer Bob
the equipment for the most part has remained the true potential. Thompson.





The Emperor's new clothes

IN 1837, Hans Christian Andersen wrote
a fable about an emperor that is very simi-
lar to interpersonal dynamics you can wit-
ness in today's work place. In the story,
the emperor was deceived by two salesmen
who convinced him that they would make
him clothing that only persons of an ele-
vated status will be able to appreciate.
Everyone, including the emperor, saw that
they were being deceived but no one said
anything for fear of being labeled low in
status, incompetent, ignorant or stupid.

Now let's fast forward to the present.
Think about your organisation. Are there
managers around you, or, are you a man-
ager who sets the stage so employees will
say what you want to hear for fear of being
labeled?

This can happen for a number of rea-
sons. For instance, some managers think
like President Bush who once said “You
are either for us or against us”. Managers
who think this way feel that everything that
happens falls within a zone of two possi-
bilities. They fail to recognise that there are
so many other possibilities that they don't
even consider them. Consequently, employ-
ees in this kind of environment are afraid to
say anything that can lead the manager to
think the employee is against them.

Another variation on this theme occurs
when employees are negatively labeled
because they have a different point of view.
In cases like this, when employees have
another point of view, the manager decides
the employee either doesn't understand, is
wrong, is not a team player, is incompetent
or is unsupportive. This way of thinking
tends to short circuit any attempts by
employees to communicate their ideas for
fear of the backlash.

From a performance management per-
spective, managers avoid telling employ-
ees about their true performance because
they want to keep the peace and avoid con-
frontation when appraisals are completed.
Therefore, a company can end up with
increasing staff costs through merit increas-
es and bonuses that are rewarding margin-
al performance. In these cases, the man-
agers see what is really going on but again,
they want to avoid conflict.

Managers aren't the only employees who
demonstrate “emperor” behaviour. There
are some co-workers who appear to be
untouchable because of their connections.
Co-workers refrain from saying anything
that can potentially upset or frustrate them
for fear of the potential ramifications. This
happens in highly political office environ-
ments and whittles away at trust and integri-
ty within the team.

Impact on Your Business

In Hans Christian Andersen's story “The
Emperor's New Clothes”, it was clear that
everyone, including the emperor, knew
what was really going on but because they
would be viewed as incompetent, no-one
said anything except an innocent child.
Interestingly enough, when the child blew
the whistle on the staged effort, everyone



continued to pretend that it was business as
usual.

In your organisation, if everyone turns a
blind eye to executive, manager or employ-
ee dysfunction there can be an impact on
the performance of your company or organ-
isation. One of the negative effects can be
on employee morale and productivity.

Let us take a deeper look at this. Ifa
manager is known to be arrogant and not
open to other opinions he will feel threat-
ened when an idea isn't his and so he will
find ways to discourage input by suggesting
that you don't understand the situation or
process.

What is really happening is that he is
destabilised by your idea because he thinks
the best ideas should come from him.
Therefore, instead of supporting your inge-
nuity, and seeking to integrate your sug-
gestion, he seeks to hold onto his sense of
security by trying to dismiss your idea, use
it as his own or convince you into thinking
you are making a mistake. As a result of
this type of behaviour, employees back off,
entering into an apathetic mode. This can
be costly because when things go wrong
employees will hide bad news, system inef-
ficiencies or recommendations because they
want to avoid the perceived consequences.

Why Does this Happen?

When employees perceive they are
unable to be authentic without suffering
some sort of consequence an elaborate sys-
tem of avoidance will inevitably result. On
one hand, there are managers or employees
in survival mode, trying to maintain the
facade of power and status and they are
willing to do what it takes to keep their
power alive by feeding fear within the work
environment.

On the other hand, employees are in
another type of survival mode. They want
peace and harmony and so they create a
fagade of harmony, productivity and com-
petence which they protect at all costs.
Sometimes this protective mode becomes
evident when newcomers join the team.
Newcomers generally want to impress the
boss because they are on probation so they
inadvertently upstage existing employees.
Team members naturally want to avoid the
implications of disrupting the system of
false harmony so they influence the new-
comer into changing his or her behaviours.
Managers often assume that employees
pressure new employees to reduce their
performance levels because of laziness.

However, as managers we need to ask our-

Earth angels
unmasked

selves if the apparent laziness is a cause or }

effect. Is it an unwanted bye-product of }
an elaborate system of behaviour we helped }

to create?

What You Can Do About It
e In environments where authenticity is

non-existent, so is trust. So rebuilding the }

team becomes a trust building exercise.

This is a difficult process because most }
times, an entire system of behaviours sup- i

ported the “Emperor's” behaviours.

There are a few options you have if you
are a primary decision maker and you want }
to turn this around. You can attempt to }
rehabilitate the “emperor” through training }

FROM page 10

? to environmental preservation.

? With a long list of sponsors including The Broadcasting Corpo-
? ration of the Bahamas, Baha Mar Resorts, Sky Bahamas, and the
i Beauty Shack, and a host of other sponsors, this year’s event is noth-
ing short of a community project and is expected to be one of the
? most spectacular events ever, organisers said.

The beauty who wins the crown, will also receive a Diamond’s
International crown, a chance to compete in the Miss World com-
? petition, Miss Tourism Queen International, and Miss Interconti-
nental pageants. Apart from those initial prizes, the girl who is most
successful in the runway segment of the preliminaries, will be cho-
sen to represent the Bahamas in next year’s Top Model of the
World competition.

and coaching and if they don't respond, a ;

restructuring exercise can be considered.

e Another way to build trust and authen-
ticity is to develop the ability to encourage ;

>> 18-year-old SHAVONNE MCKENZIE
Height: 5’6”
Career goal: Forensic Pathologist

and integrate diverse points of view. Diver- }

sity conscious behaviours can improve team

performance significantly because it cre- }
ates a safe space where different points will ;
be heard and used to create holistic solu- :

tions.

Your ultimate goal is to rebuild the team ;
and trust building can take time, particularly }
if the “emperor” is going to undergo a reha- }

bilitative process.

The other thing to remember is that one
person doesn't create the system of behav- }
iour so the team should be a part of the }

| > 20-year-old SWANIQUE SAWYER
Height: 59”
Career goal: Pediatrician

>> 22-year-old MICHAELA FERGUSON
Height: 5’7”
Career goal: Literary Advocate

>> 17-year-old JOANNA BROWN

Height: 6’0”
Career goal: Entrepreneur/Physiologist

rehabilitative effort to make the changes }

stick.

¢ Yvette Bethel is CEO of Organizational

Soul, a company that offers Business Consult- i

ing and Leadership Development services. If
you are interested in creating authentic
change at your organisation, her contact
details can be found at www.orgsoul.com.

In your
organisation,
if everyone turns
a blind eye to
executive, manager
or employee
dystunction there
can be an impact on
the pertormance otf
your company or
organisation.

>> 23-year-old LLATETRA LAING
Height: 5’7”
Career goal: Nurse/Entrepreneur

: >> 18-year-old GABRIELLE MAJOR
i Height: 56”
Career goal: Tourism Marketing & Development

>> 20-year-old EMILY DARVILLE
i Height: 5’9”
Career goal: Culinary Professional

»> 19-year-old DEVERA PINDER
i Height: 5°10”
Career goal: Prime Minister of The Bahamas

' 9} 20-year-old DASHANIQUE POITIER
: Height: 5’8”
Career goal: Journalist/Entrepreneur

>> 20-year-old DANIELLE MORLEY
i Height: 56”
Career goal: Architect/Evangelist

! >> 23-year-old CHANNA CIUS
; Height: 5’8”
Career goal: Interior Designer/Fashion Icon

: »> 20-year-old KENDRA WILKINSON
i Height: 6’0”
Career goal: Dentist
>> 21-year-old MCCHENIER JOHNSON
Height: 59”
Career goal: Photographer/Educator
THE TRIBUNE

‘man TUESDAY, MAY 12 2009





UNMASKED

@ By LLOYD ALLEN
Tribune Features Reporter
lallen@tribunemedia.net

IN an environment where it seems there are as many
beauty contest as there are islands throughout our country,
many may find it difficult to determine a clear distinction
between each one.



Coy de ee ci

>

However the members of this year’s Miss
Bahamas World (MBW) committee have upped
the ante with their pageant, not only producing
their usual TV series Backstage Pass, but also
inviting the general public to be a part of the judg-
ing process for the event through their website
www.tnissbahamas.net.

Organisers officially launched the pageant with
a Go Green reception held at Bahamas National
Trust’s (BNT) Village Road retreat last Monday.
Attendants were mesmerised with an exciting dis-
play of the lucky thirteen who are scheduled to take
part in a long list of activities leading up to the
competition on May 31, at the Wyndham Rain-
forest Theater.

Adding to the growing list of organisations cen-
tered on green living, MBW has already con-
tributed more than $1,200 to its partner BNT,
and during the competition will have the contes-
tants make several visits to Bahamian national
parks while learning about BNT’s contributions

SEE page eight

rilea

eee ete a

Distributed by: BWA, East West Highway « 394-1759














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