Citation
The Tribune

Material Information

Title:
The Tribune
Uniform Title:
Tribune (Nassau, Bahamas)
Portion of title:
Nassau tribune
Place of Publication:
Nassau, Bahamas
Publisher:
Tribune
Publication Date:
Copyright Date:
2009
Frequency:
Daily, except Sunday
daily
normalized irregular
Language:
English
Physical Description:
v. : ill. ; 58 cm.

Subjects

Genre:
newspaper ( sobekcm )
newspaper ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage:
Bahamas

Notes

General Note:
Description based on: Vol. 79, no. 210 (Aug. 3, 1983); title from caption.

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Holding Location:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
This item was contributed to the Digital Library of the Caribbean (dLOC) by the source institution listed in the metadata. This item may or may not be protected by copyright in the country where it was produced. Users of this work have responsibility for determining copyright status prior to reusing, publishing or reproducing this item for purposes other than what is allowed by applicable law, including any applicable international copyright treaty or fair use or fair dealing statutes, which dLOC partners have explicitly supported and endorsed. Any reuse of this item in excess of applicable copyright exceptions may require permission. dLOC would encourage users to contact the source institution directly or dloc@fiu.edu to request more information about copyright status or to provide additional information about the item.
Resource Identifier:
09994850 ( OCLC )

Downloads

This item has the following downloads:


Full Text
{T)\

Mim blowin’ it

87F
76F

PLENTY
OF SUN

The Tribune

=USA TODAY.

BAHAMAS EDITION

www.tribune242.com

LOW Get Your or re) d

Coffee Fix



Volume: 105 No.139

aoa =1Gi
The stories behind the news

URCA an The Milk of Hatehet Bay











TT
ee ety




MONDAY, MAY 11, 2009

1 OTOL

Expat Danker' les

Hywel Jones had
been in coma
for three weeks

THE murder count rose
to 26 over the weekend
when Welsh banker Hywel
Jones, 55, a permanent res-
ident of the Bahamas, died
from injuries he received
when shot execution style
three weeks ago.

Jones, 55, died in hos-
pital at 11.45 pm Friday
with his brother, It, a Cal-
ifornian film producer, at
his side.

Mr Jones was shot in broad daylight outside
his offshore financial services company near
Compass Point, West Bay Street, around 10am
on April 22. He had been left in a coma to die.

Police suspected that Mr Jones, president of

SEE page eight



Hywel Jones

Dominicans arrested
over suspected human
smuggling operation

uries










SEE PAGE FIFTEEN










Claim that govt
‘neglecting duty’
to deal with the
high crime level

Rev CB Moss commends
police efforts but warns of
damage to Bahamian society

mâ„¢ By PAULG
TURNQUEST

Tribune Staff Reporter

pturnquest@tribunemedia.net

THE Bahamas Government is
endangering the lives of its citizens
if it continues on its present course
of neglecting its duty to deal with
the unacceptably high levels of
crime and criminality, Rev CB

Moss said yesterday.

As an executive director of the
Bahamas Against Crime commit-
tee, Mr Moss said government

must not be “narrow-minded or

RCO em (Ost

fearful” in dealing with this scourge
that is currently plaguing the nation.

While commending the Royal Bahamas Police Force
for its valiant efforts, Mr Moss said that crime and vio-
lence is becoming entrenched in the Bahamian soci-

SEE page eight






Felipé Major/Tribune staff



=
EIGHT Dominicans were arrested and hand- es | z 7 ,
oe FORMER MANAGING EDITOR of The Tribune John Marquis (left) with
believed was a human smuggling operation. = Tribune Chief Reporter Rupert Missick Jr.
Two Bahamian men suspected of being a B= 4 4
part of the illegal operation were taken into PS Tribune bids farewell to former
olice custody. According to reports, police on S- e e e
“SEE page eight d Managing Editor John Marquis
a
: 7 m@ By PAULG
j GWENDOLYN CLARKE, a 95-year-old native of Green Turtle Cay, TURNQUEST
















i ig Ghee Say yS

Ue rela ee mete
www.bossbahamas.com

Abaco, enjoys Mother’s Day with her one-year-old great granddaughter
K’leigh Davies yesterday at her home in Fox Hill.

Tribune Staff Reporter
pturnquest@tribunemedia.net

FRIENDS, family and col-



Defence Force member _ kazues sathered to big ZBTH ANNIVERDARY OF
farewell to The Tribune’s for- THE HMBS FLAMINGO
di . ffi lli : mer Managing Editor John SINKING
1¢e S in tr a 1C CO 1810n Marquis as he transitions from
re cant abeuemoliided wtih ie his time behind the desk to a
- - member of about collided with a white 4; :
ie Roylechac Wee Good Milas) ence, arte relaxation and book [Riu uyuseess=s sss
Force died early Saturday morn- The driver of the Lancer, who : :
Sale Ends ing following a collision on was a member of the Royal _ Holding Eig ee eS clly COMMONWEALTH LOCAL
May 16th Carmichael Road. Bahamas Defence Force, died at tion his honour at the GOVT CONFERENCE HELD
According to reports, around the scene. The Lancer’s two back = Breeze’s Bahamas Resort on IN THE BAHAMAS FOR THE
1.30 am Saturday, a green seat passengers were taken to Saturday night, an admirer
coloured Ford Explorer heading —_ hospital for injuries after the offi- travelled from as far away as FIRST TIME






ee CTC Mere le)
Canon pi7ddh Sharp elz630 Casio per 275

$9900

$4500

east on Carmichael Road and
east of the Coral Harbour round-

SEE page eight

e *

At

esp

SEE page two

= = ‘ae.

A

Fr r |

="!
— |

eer

ae eS, PERE ee Ee

>*

a a Jay

Quiznos

ITALIAN CLUB
TURKEY & SWISS
HAM & CHEDDAR

$ 00
eee aoe
(Except on
Ce ae eee me CHICKEN & CHEDDAR
BOSS Target for MORE great DEALS!





NASSAU AND BAHAMA ISLANDS” LEADING NEWSPAPER



PAGE 2, MONDAY, MAY 11, 2009

LOCAL NEWS

Tribune bids farewell
to former Managing
Editor John Marquis

SEE

Whopper Jr.

Double
Cheeseburger

BLT & Cheese Includes Fries &

160z Soft Drink

Adda
l20z Milkshake

Ss
2 Cookies for .99¢

Village Ad. Roundabout + Harold Rd. + Prince Charles + Frederick Street North * Cable Beach

Ham & Cheese

5pec Tenders

hd dda.

CARIB INSURANCE MOSELEY + BURNSIDE

BROKERS & AGENTS 0.

€e> N-U-A
NOW WE ARE ONE.

A message to our Valued Customers:

We are pleased to announce that Carib insurance Brokers & Agents Lid. and Moseley
Burnside Insurance Agency Lid. are now part of NUA Insurance Agents & Brokers
Lid. For our customers, this means:

LOCATIONS

* The Moseley Burnside location at the Harbour Bay Shopping Centre becomes
NUA's second Service Centre in New Providence, complementing its existing
Service Centre and Head Office on Collins Avenue

* The Carb office on Charlotte Street in downtown Nassau will close effective
April 24, 2009, Customers will have the convenience of being served at either the
Collins Avenue or Harbour Bay Shopping Canirea locations.

CUSTOMER BENEFITS

+ Greater convenience for all of your general insurance needs, including policy
renewals

* The benefit of our combined experience, expertise and areas of specialization.

* Your insurance coverage remains unchanged. Nothing changes with your
current policies.

* Gontinued excellant service that you have come to expect.

As part of tha Bahamas First Group of Companies, we have the security of the
largest and most trusted general insurer in The Bahamas. Bahamas First General
Insurance Gompany Lid. has anA.M. Best Rating of A- (Excellent) which reflects the
company's excellent capital and liquidity position as well as its superior operational
resuilts.

Now we area ona, committed to helping individuals and businesses with all of their
general insurance needs. If you have any questions please call or walt us al one of
our Service Genires.

The F.H. Bobby Symonette Building
ard Terrace & Collings Avenue

P.O. Box N-dB70, Nassau

The Bahamas

Harbour Bay Shopping Centre
P.O.Box N-4870, Nassau
The Bahamas

Tel: 202-9100, 328 SOG49 Tel:
or 356-7800
Fax: 328 5974 of 326-3701 Fax

in
at
nr
a
er

302-9700), 354-8905
or 322-8210
a2e-5277 of 34-8909

the Hands On

Insurance

N-U-A

A a 74
ALENC }
Piste ad ° .



GTR |
EVERY DAY

VALUE |

el”
ALL DAY. EWERN DAY.

SPO /TMLLAM - TUNA
FERGIE RELITE are
TURKEY BREAST & BLACK FOREST HAM
BLT - COLO COT COMaO
WEATRILL WAAIMARA
OVEN ROASTED CHICKEN BREAST

REGULAR

FROM page one

London to attend, returning
the next day to prepare for
law exams. Mr Marquis was
praised and presented with
gifts for his outstanding jour-
nalistic career that has
spanned almost 50 years —
11 of them with The Tribune.

Having worked as a
reporter in the Bahamas in
the mid-sixties, first at The
Nassau Guardian, then at
The Tribune, Mr Marquis
held a number of top posts at
various newspapers in Eng-
land before returning to the
Bahamas in 1999 to take up
the position of Tribune Man-
aging Editor.

After working on the
Reuters news agency’s world
desk, he joined the Thomson
group of newspapers and
became their Sports Editor
and chief boxing correspon-
dent, covering most of the
great fights of the legendary
Mohammed Ali, including
his last fight in the Bahamas.
In the seventies Mr Marquis
was named Provincial Jour-
nalist of the Year after
exposing two doctors
involved in the deaths of two
child patients.

Thanking the newspaper’s
publisher Eileen Carron, for-
mer Managing Editor Roger
Carron, and current Presi-
dent Robert Carron for this
opportunity, Mr Marquis
said he wanted to end his
journalistic career at The Tri-
bune, the newspaper that had
remained true to its mission.

“T wanted to rejoin The
Tribune because I believed
in its mission. It is the one
voice everyone can trust, a
vital part of the democratic
process. Newspapers are
going through very tough
times and soon many of the
great titles will no longer
exist in print form.

“Unfortunately, many cor-
porate newspaper organisa-
tions have downgraded jour-
nalism to a secondary role,
but The Tribune has always
been an editorially-led news-
paper and that makes all the
difference. It remains what
newspapers are supposed to

TROPICAL
EXTERMINATORS

a ee a)
PHONE: 322-2157



THE TRIBUNE







FORMER TRIBUNE MANAGING EDITOR John Marquis chats with
Tribune graphic designer Dale Dean (left) and Tribune news editor Paco

Nunez at Saturday night’s function.



FORMER TRIBUNE MANAGING EDITOR John Marquis receives a
keepsake from Tribune president Robert Carron.

be all about,” he said.

Mr Marquis said he counts
himself fortunate to be one
of the few editors in the busi-
ness today who can retire
from a newspaper secure in
the knowledge that its circu-
lation continues to rise.

“Over the last few years
we have changed the nation-
al mindset towards those in
authority who were previ-
ously considered untouch-
able. But Bahamians still
need to know that when
good people stay silent, bad
people prevail. You need to
build free speech into your
culture so that it can never
again be challenged by those
in power,” he reminded his
young news staff — those he
has spent long hours in

MAIN/SPORTS SECTION

Local News

Editorial/Letters. ..........

BUSINESS SECTION
Business
INSIGHT SECTION
Insight

Palecr oe oposite. nO lmlee
epee eee eee P4

P12,13,14,15

pero eae One. Onl ani

CLASSIFIED SECTION 40 PAGES

REAL ESTATE GUIDE 28 PAGES

USA TODAY MAIN SECTION 12 PAGES

FOOTLONGS ”



preparing to carry the torch.

Flying in Saturday morn-
ing from Buckingham Uni-
versity in England, especial-
ly for the evening event,
Controversy TV co-host Lin-
coln Bain described Mr Mar-
quis as one of his role-mod-
els who had shown him the
benefit of being fearless in
the pursuit of Truth.

“Mr Marquis is one of
those people who supported
me and encouraged me and
kept me going even though I
was getting death threats
right along with him. But I
want to thank you, Mr Mar-
quis, for being what you
were to the Bahamas, and
being a role model to a lot
of other young persons who
are going into journalism;
and for leading the country
in the direction you have led
it in the past few years,” he
said.

Mr Bain then entertained
guests with a live perfor-
mance of his freestyle out-
line of one of Mr Marquis’
most controversial Insight
pieces on the disappearance
of pilot Chauncey Tynes Jr
and the suggestion by
Chauncey’s father that the
young man might have
known too much about the
friendship of the late prime
minister, Sir Lynden Pin-
dling, and drug cartel head,
Joe Carlos Lehder, who
operated from Norman’s Cay
in the Bahamas.

Succeeding Mr Marquis in
the post of Managing Editor
is Mr John Fleet, an editor
from newspapers in North-
ern England and Scotland,
and winner of two North
East Press Awards for Best
Front Page and Best Inside
Page design. He joined The
Tribune on March 30.

FOR A LIMITED TIME ONLY!
AT PARTICIPATING STORES

ITALIAN BML - TORKER BREAST =
HLACK FOREST HAM

DAI 2000

cai ¥ J





THE TRIBUNE

LOCAL NEWS

MONDAY, MAY 11, 2009, PAGE 3



0 In brief

Police find
handgun,
ammunition
and marijuana

POLICE on Saturday
seized a .380 handgun,
seven live rounds of
ammunition and a small
quantity of marijuana
after responding toa

complaint from the Laird

Street area.

According to reports,
while responding toa
complaint made by a 21-
year-old woman about a

male companion, officers }

from the Central Detec-

tive Unit went to a home }

in Laird Street around 5

am Saturday. While exe- }

cuting a search warrant,
officers found a .380
handgun with seven live

rounds of ammunition in :
a toilet bowl in the bath- }

room with a small
amount of marijuana. A
26-year-old man was
arrested and is in police
custody.

¢ TWO men were
arrested early Saturday
morning after police

seized a .40 handgun and }

seven live rounds of
ammunition.
According to reports,

officers from the Central }

Police Station were on
patrol in the area of
Comfort Street around

3am Saturday when they

observed and searched
the occupants of a gold

coloured Honda Accord. :

Inside the car, officers

found a .40 handgun with }

seven live rounds of
ammunition. The occu-
pants of the vehicle, a
28-year-old man of Ross

Corner and a 22-year-old
man from Williams Lane ;

were arrested.

¢ A 23-year-old man of

Fritz Lane is in police
custody after being

found in possession of an }

imitation firearm.
Around 5pm Friday,
officers of the Mobile

Division were in the area }

of Fritz Lane when they
observed a 23-year-old

man who was wanted for }

questioning by the
police. The officers

stopped and searched the
man and discovered that :

he had in his possession
a replica handgun.

¢ A local company was

robbed of an undeter-
mined amount of cash
last Friday.

According to reports,
around 4 pm Friday,
police received a report

of an armed robbery tak- }

ing place at S&P Shea
Limited on Carib Road.
The company was
robbed of an undeter-
mined amount of cash.
When officers from the
Wulff Road Police Sta-
tion arrived at the scene,
they saw a man leaving
the area dressed ina
white T-shirt and blue
jeans and carrying a
shotgun.

Police pursued the man
who dropped the weapon }

and fled the scene.

Police retrieved the
shotgun along with two
shotgun shells.

eR ee Bsa
Fertilizer, Fungicide,
SAO TiaH)|
ee Pcie
322-2157

EN

25. a

28th anniversary of the
HMBS Flamingo sinking

Attack came

just six weeks
alter RBDE
established

SUNDAY marked the
28th anniversary of sinking
of HMBS Flamingo and the
deaths of four Royal
Bahamas Defence Force
Marines in an attack by
Cuban fighter jets.

The attack on HMBS
Flamingo, and its crew came
just six weeks after the estab-
lishment of the Royal
Bahamas Defence Force.

On Saturday, May 10, 1980
the Flamingo, which was on
routine patrol in the Ragged

Financing Available Through
Commonwealth Bank

Solid Wood






Island chain, apprehended a
pair of Cuban fishing boats
off Cay Santo Domingo, in
the Bahamas, just 35 miles
from the Cuban coast.

Each vessel had four crew
members who were arrested.

While in the process of
towing the vessels towards



Cay Santo Domingo, howev-
er, two Cuban MiG jet fight-
ers appeared overhead and
opened machine gunfire.

Nearly an hour later the
Cuban fighter jets returned
and attacked HMBS Flamin-
go with rocket and machine
gunfire.

1 pe 5 Drawer Chest

pes sere

[ ‘OM? O O yf
) 0 OFF ALL
| a | 0 Mo FABRICS

One of a kind Special Occasion Fabric

— —_ an aL Pre Ye

ee

Madeira St. [242] 325-8233 * Robinson Rd.[242] 322-3080

Beaded & Sequin Fabric

WA ea

pn purchased same dayas fabric

Queen 8 Pc Set
King 8 Pe Set ..






lridescent Taffeta
Two Tone Shantung






Lamour, Chiffon





ACCESSORIES










- Evening Bogs
“Gloves




prone iahnology that works.

â„¢ Micronet

BUSINESS TECHNOLOGY

56 MADEIRA STREET, PALMDALE
242.928.3040 « WWW.MICRONET.BS

TOSHIBA
Leading Innowathon >>>
Multifunction Coplers

MONDAY JUNE 2 1980 — The
parents of the four dead
marines are shown seated front
row under the Clifford Park
pavilion with the 15 survivors of
the ill-fated HMBS Flamingo.

Despite a search by
Bahamian and American res-
cue teams, the four marines,
Able Seaman Fenrick Stur-
rup and Marine Seamen
David Tucker, Edward
Williams and Austin Smith
were never found.

A special ceremony com-
memorating the death of the
four marines is scheduled for

All, except four of the 19
crewmen, made it to one of
the fishing boats.

8.30 am at the Defence
Forces' Coral Harbour base

today.

“~ “Where Our Quality & Experience Shine!”
Specializing in:
Roofing, Home Maintenance, Painting & Varnishing,

Pressure & Mildew Cleaning, Roof Painting, Water
Proofing, Plumbing, Window Cleaning, Drywall
Installation, Replace Rotten Woodwork,

Laminate Floor, Tiling, Repair

i Cracks to Concrete Walls

LEROY TUCKER - Proprietor

Tel: 242-324-2153 ¢ Cell 432-3561 ¢ P.O. Box SP -60315

CARPET, FURNITURE, MARBLE & TILE CARE

Tue Most Tromooad Rretoaanoy & Cuan Ever, on Tun Jon & Far!
Massau”s Oey Phos aL, Comm Soosn Cans & Unley Caen Ses.

* Carpet, Upholstery, Stone and Martie Cleaning d

Restoraion Speciale.

* Prochen Cleaning Sysnome nomeved. Damp a Hearey

Soil, Hactera, Cf Teas, Weterarice and Staines ie
Cupetg & Fermitire, restoring thom to like acw
afb Trectios of replacemenn 2661.

+ Carpet, Sofa's, Loweasns. Chairs. Caning Chairs, Cars,
Boe, Growt, Tiles, Marte & ‘Some

* Pendan, Wool & Silk Carpet Cleaning Specialist

* AMahle Polishing. Reworation & Cane
+ Woed Floor Resteralion

Suited Stent Tech Profesional Costracior

CALL PROCHEM BAHAMAS
PHONE: 323-8083 or 323-1594

A LA, Ae Oo

PROCH F M SYSTEM (om)

COVEY WE LAN CTT Bie
er PAs Tat ° RIT ee are ST ® WELT, Oe
+ paper ic

mis 4 SOLOS oSiaead

A

CoPNItsrEN Cincinna

Che Mall-at-*Larathon
ROX OFFICE OPENS AT i0-00 4M DADLY

Aaa aE
SMRTREKH new | 1200 | 90 | WIA | Geno | 20 [sO |

TDA I COC
TEUENCRGEWOUERINE new | 00 [RE [WA | ea0_[ae |W

wen macs wowenine | 200 | 40 | €90 | 720 [Mit [10:40 |
THE GHOST OF GIRLFRIEND'S Past r_| 4:40 [Wid] NA | eto [230 [10050 |

se ee ele

cas [rss |
iomoeuee ——< Ten [et [er [eclos bas
rT TtTttt—

TERS gee aS

RECARO TO AESERWE TIGRETS AT S369 OF WE GALLERIA NEMAS

anand iow foes [00 [oe [a
Ah oes WUE We] (28 [39H [ WA | 40 | 02

i oss oF araeno T [90 [45 [MA | 600 070 | 10
loesesseo | st | 965_| WA | G05 | 30) tieaa

oime __Â¥ [| aan [na | e10 [096] 10
rn 0 | 0 [at [wa | @20 | 095 ve
es

380-FLIX





PAGE 4, MONDAY, MAY 11, 2009

EDITORIAL/LETTERS TO THE EDITOR

THE TRIBUNE





The Tribune Limited

NULLIUS ADDICTUS JURARE IN VERBA MAGISTRI
Being Bound to Swear to The Dogmas of No Master

LEON E. H. DUPUCH, Publisher/Editor 1903-1914

SIR ETIENNE DUPUCH, Kt, O.B.E., K.M., K.C.S.G.,

(Hon.) LL.D., D.Litt.

Publisher/Editor 1919-1972
Contributing Editor 1972-1991

EILEEN DUPUCH CARRON, C.M.G., M.S. B.A., LL.B.

Publisher/Editor 1972-

Published Daily Monday to Saturday

Shirley Street, RO. Box N-3207, Nassau, Bahamas
Insurance Management Building., P.O. F-485, Freeport, Grand Bahama

TELEPHONES
Switchboard (News, Circulation and Advertising) 322-1986
Advertising Manager - (242) 502-2352
Circulation Department - (242) 502-2387
Nassau Fax: - (242) 328-2398
Freeport, Grand Bahama: 1-(242)-352-6608
Freeport fax: (242) 352-9348

WEBSITE
www.tribune242.com — updated daily at 2pm

Taliban defeats require boots on ground

NEW YORK — Last week brought
good news and bad news for President
Obama’s strategic focus on Afghanistan
and Pakistan — but mostly bad news.

First, though, the good. The president
and his foreign-policy team have shown
they understand the gravity of the situation
in western Pakistan, where Taliban insur-
gents recently took control of an area just
60 miles from the capital of Islamabad.
More importantly, Pakistan’s President
Asif Ali Zardari seems to have heeded
Washington’s calls for forceful action, as
Pakistan’s military last week pounded Tal-
iban positions in and around the contested
Swat Valley.

That’s the good news. The bad news
relates mostly to the inherent difficulties of
fighting a war of insurgency in a distant
part of the world, where the United States
is viewed with suspicion at best.

At the same time that President Zardari
and President Hamid Karzai of
Afghanistan were meeting with Secretary
of State Hillary Clinton and Obama in
Washington, a USS. air raid that had inflict-
ed heavy civilian casualties in Afghanistan
was making headlines around the world.

Put yourself, for the moment, in the
shoes of a Pakistani or Afghan civilian,
wondering with whom to side.

You hear about the dead civilians in
Afghanistan, you see news of the Pakistani
government’s counteroffensive in Swat and
the tens of thousands of innocent refugees
now fleeing that region — and then you see
the pictures of your president, be it Karzai
or Zardari, sitting at a table in Washington
with the U.S. president.

If this were you, you might be forgiven
for thinking that your leaders were doing
the bidding of a foreign power, with death
and misery as the results.

This is what the US. is up against: Islam-
ic insurgents who vow our destruction, who
strike and then hide among civilians.
Because the U.S. does not — not yet, any-
way — have the ground forces to meet
Taliban attacks, our military has had to
rely on airstrikes, which lead to civilian

casualties. Which lead, in turn, to greater
sympathy for the Taliban.

Meanwhile, there is the irony that Karzai
and Zardari, who run the risk at home of
being seen as U.S. puppets, are not leaders
whom those in Washington consider reli-
able or capable guardians of U.S. inter-
ests.

But these are the allies we’ve got, in the
fight that Obama has deemed central to
defeating Islamic terrorism.

The stakes of that fight are driven high-
er by the fact that Pakistan, where the US.
has little to no direct influence on the
ground, possesses nuclear weapons.

The war against the Taliban will not be
won, however victory is defined, by military
means alone.

Obama, if he realizes this — and he
seems to — will need to convince Con-
gress and the American people of this, too.
You need civilian support to defeat an
insurgency, and to gain civilian support
you need a government that can deliver
basic services without shaking down the
populace for constant bribes.

Doing this takes money and time, and
the US. will need to spend both if the Tal-
iban are to be defeated.

You also need to assure the safety of
civilians who may want to help you, and
you need to avoid killing them in battles
against the insurgents.

These two objectives take boots on the
ground, and the U.S. will need a lot of
them, too, to defeat the Taliban.

This is not the time when Americans
want to hear about the need for another
major Overseas commitment in treasure
and treasured servicemen and women.

But absent such a commitment, and a
commitment for the long haul, the
prospects grow for more weeks where the
bad news in South Asia surpasses the good.

(This article was written by Dan Rather —
c.2009 Hearst Newspapers).



My CARICOM
vision: one
country, one
Prime Minister

EDITOR, The Tribune.

I have read some interesting
information regarding the CARI-
COM Single Market and Econo-
my (CSME). I am still waiting to
receive a comprehensive, coher-
ent, and contemporary single doc-
ument outlining The Bahamas’
position on including ourselves
or excluding ourselves from this
single market and economy and
the reasons why (either way).
Most of what I have gathered to
date is courtesy of the newspa-
pers, the radio, the television and
a few pamphlets. It will not suf-
fice.

Nevertheless, the refrain of this
and previous governments is that
The Bahamas will never accede to
the CSME’s provisions as long as
the free movement of labour and
a single market currency are part
and parcel of the agreement.

Praise the Lord.

However, that does not mean
that I would be altogether averse
to entertaining the idea of a single
market and economy sometime
in the future.

Since (I believe) the govern-
ment’s fear is that The Bahamas
would be flooded with immi-
grants from sister CARICOM
states, the dollar would be deval-
ued, and subsequently the stan-
dard of living would coinciden-
tally plummet if we join, it is my
humble opinion that it is incum-
bent upon the government to do
all within its power to ensure the
upliftment of less prosperous

LETTERS

letters@tribunemedia net



CARICOM states to prevent this
inevitable migration from the
south to our shores. Passage of
legislation, policy formulation,
exerting world influence, bud-
getary allocations and provision
of incentives are some of the tools
of the government which may be
used over the ensuing years to
seek to cause virtual parity of eco-
nomic prosperity between CARI-
COM states.

I am not so naive as to think
that this objective will come to
fruition in a short period of time.
My guess is that the process will
necessarily outlive all who are
alive today (May 3, 2009) and is
able to competently read and
comprehend this presentation.
And so, this initiative will require
the commitment of visionary
Bahamians who are prepared to
(almost) sacrifice immediate grat-
ification for the good of the
(future) Bahamas. Are you one of
those Bahamians? Are you a
visionary?

In my humble opinion, it is
extremely important that the
CSME becomes structured in
such a way so as to pave the way
for The Bahamas’ inevitable
ascension. The Bahamas can
boast of a population of only
320,000 people. If we were to join

CARICOM today, we would be a
part of an organisation of over 14
million people. And if you don’t
know by now, let me inform you
that there is definitely strength in
numbers, Just ask the Chinese!

Earlier, I was purposefully
vague in proposing the options
available to the government of
The Bahamas in causing all this to
be manifested (one day). It is
because I am only one person.
My creativity has its limitations.
However, there are (320,000
minus 1) more minds that the
government can tap to help
achieve this objective. All of our
ideas could be then collated by
the governmental technocrats so
that, in the end, a coherent plan
for the way forward could be for-
mulated.

Included in my vision for The
Bahamas as far as the CSME is
concerned is total integration —
politics and all. I would like to
know that sometime in the future
history of humankind that CARI-
COM would be one country with
one Prime Minister.

Again, you would have to be
a visionary to see that. Again, you
would have to be committed to
that. Again, your creativity will
be stretched to its limits. And,
again, immediate gratification
would have to be sacrificed.

MARVIN G
LIGHTBOURN
Nassau,

May 3, 2009.

Our leaders should learn from Obama
be heard on TV interviewed by press

EDITOR, The Tribune.

I have today written the same letter to The Tri-
bune, The Nassau Guardian and The Bahama Jour-
nal, because I would like to make the following sug-
gestion to the three, which I thought they might
agree. I have listened to President Obama on many
occasions when he has made himself available to
be questioned by the press and television of the

United States.

Others have done the same before, but none has
been better examples of democracy at work.
The Bahamas too is a democracy, and there is

no better example of the availability of the political
leadership of the constitutionally provided Prime

Nassau,

April 30, 2009.

Minister (Article 73) and the leadership of the oppo-
sition (Article 82).

The Prime Minister and leader of the opposition
should be heard on television to be interviewed by
the press for the benefit of the Bahamian people, like
President Obama is heard by millions of the people
of the United States.

HON PAUL L ADDERLEY

Review needed for $11 procedure — it could save lives

EDITOR, The Tribune.

Last night at 2249 hours I got a
call from a friend who said that a
person in dark clothes was behind
her apartment looking in the win-
dow. I asked her if she had called
the police, she said yes at 2230
hours.

I arrived at her apartment at
2300 hours and asked if the police
had been there. The answer was

no as when she dialed 911, she
was put to the Lucaya Police Sta-
tion. She lives in Bahamia.
Bahamia may be for the Policitial
Area - Lucaya, but it would have
made more sense for Mobile Unit
or Freeport Unit to respond as
they would be closer.

The police arrived at 2225
hours, fifty five minutes after the
call. Had the person looking in
the window got into the apart-

ment, we could have three injured
or dead persons this morning. A
mother and two small children.

Please review the procedure
that is used to respond to 911 or
emergency calls. This could save
time in the response and maybe
the lives of the callers.

SIGMUND WILLIS
Freeport,
April 25, 2009.

Quality Auto Sales
PRE-OWNED CARS & TRUCKS
For the best deal in town on

pre-owned cars, with ~
de-ins on new car sales

Must be able to work flexible hours, weekends ir STOCK!
and holidays.

Must possess good leadership and ‘01 TOYOTA CAMRY an
interpersonal Kills, ‘05 TOYOTA CAMRY oy:
‘07 TOYOTA YARIS *
‘06 HYUNDAI TERRACAN
‘01 HYUNDAI COUPE
‘04 HYUNDAI SANTA FE
‘06 HYUNDAI ELANTRA
‘06 HYUNDAI SONATA
‘01 HYUNDAI HD-65 TRUCK

‘94 MITSUBISHI DIAMANTE
‘94 TOYOTA CAMRY

Bahamas QSR Limited Oe Serer oS

Deliever to KFC om Sos Center
#1 AUTO GEALER IM THE BaHamad

Horseshoe Drive EAST SHIRLEY STREET « 322- 3775 . 325-3079
Nassau, Bahamas . an Hie. a eect itd ie eerie

oe bas Marka T AACE Mp Bed, es

Senda. “© Royal Bahamian Resort @ Offshore Island.

BAHAMAS QSR LIMITED

NOW HIRING
STORE AND ASST. MANAGERS

Invites applications for the positions of:

Accountants
Cost Controller
General Cashier
Receiving Clerk

Executive Chauffeurs
Director of Sales
Security Manager

Exec. Housekeeper
Resort Shop Manager
Photo Shop Manager
Assistant Training Manager

The successful applicant must have at least
three (3) years experience in full service / fast
food operations.

Must have good written and oral

Applicant must have at _ least five
communication skills,

years experience in the Hospitality
Industry in the above mentioned positions,
excellent communication, organizational and
interpersonal skills, must be able to train and
motivate team members. Formal qualifications
and computer skills desirable must be able to work
flexible and long hours.

Must be able to implement and maintain
company standards and procedures.

Must be self motivated.

Benefit package includes medical, pension
and bonus.

EXPERIENCED PERSONS ONLY SHOULD
SEND RESUME WITH
A LETTER OF REFERENCE TO:

Fax or email résumé’s with proof of qualifications
and experience to:

cmajor@grp.sandals.com
Fax 677-6828.

Attention Director of Operations,

Closing date May 9th. 2009.





THE TRIBUNE

MONDAY, MAY 11, 2009, PAGE 5



LOCAL NEWS



Commonwealth Local
Govt Conference held in the
Bahamas for the first time

m@ By DENISE MAYCOCK
Tribune Freeport Reporter
dmaycock@tribunemedia.net

FREEPORT - After two years
of planning, the Commonwealth
Local Government Conference
will open on Grand Bahama on
Monday for some 600 delegates
from 46 Commonwealth nations.

Byran Woodside, Minister of
State for Lands and Local Gov-
ernment, announced on Sunday
that the conference will take place
from May 11 -14 at the Westin at
Our Lucaya Resort.

He said it is the first time that
the event is being held in the
Bahamas.

“We are most excited by the fact
that this is the first time that the
CLGC will be held in the Americ-
as, and certainly we feel it is in
recognition of the role the
Bahamas holds within the region.

“It is only fitting that the first
time the CLGC has been held in
the Americas, it is being held in
the Bahamas,” said Minister
Woodside.

Prime Minister Hubert Ingra-
ham will officially open the fifth
CLGC at 5pm on Monday in the
Conference Centre. The theme for
this year’s conference is “Improv-
ing Local Government: The Com-
monwealth vision.”

Mr Woodside said that govern-
ment is fully supportive of the con-
ference being held in Grand
Bahama.

“The government is cognizant
of the economic challenges that
Grand Bahama has faced over the
years. We are pleased that
Freeport was chosen for the con-
ference venue,” he said.

He stated that the conference
will bring politicians, policy mak-
ers, local government practition-
ers, and persons of civil society in
the private sector from 46 of the 53
Commonwealth nations.

Mr Woodside said delegates
from the Caribbean, Africa, the
Americas, Europe, Asia, and the
Pacific Basin will attend the con-
ference.

He noted that international and
regional leaders are also expected
to speak at the conference, includ-
ing Bruce Golding, Prime Minister



MINISTER OF STATE for Local
Government Byran Woodside
addresses reporters at a press
conference ahead of the start
of the Commonwealth Local
Government Conference.

of Jamaica, Commonwealth Sec-
retary-General Kamalesh Sharma,
and CARICOM Secretary-Gen-
eral of CARICOM Edwin Car-
rington, .

Minister Woodside said confer-
ence delegates will be hosted to
various cultural events on Grand
Bahama, including a cultural
extravaganza, a Fish Fry on Taino
Beach, and a Junkanoo perfor-
mance.

“They will have a unique oppor-
tunity to meet with their peers and
hear about best practices from
across the Commonwealth, and
see case studies of successful local
government projects in the three
local government districts in Grand
Bahama,” he said.

“T want to say that the Bahamas
government fully supports this con-
ference and we are really happy
to be the host of this event,” he
said.

Basil Morrison, chairperson of
the CLGF, said the current eco-
nomic climate and issues facing
local government in the Com-
monwealth will be discussed.

“Tt is more important now than
ever in view of the issue facing us
in the Commonwealth and by invi-
tation the world, for local govern-
ment to find ways and means of

talking to colleagues of how to
deliver services more efficiently,
cost effectively while trying to meet
the expectations of citizens,” he
said.

“Now is the time we have to put
the effort into building confidence
back in the communities that are
facing unemployment and
strengthen economic ties in regards
to civic society making contribu-
tions to the community.”

Carlton Wright, Secretary Gen-
eral of CLGC, said the conference
will bring all core stakeholders
together to share common experi-
ences.

He noted that 20 national min-
isters are among the 600 delegates
that will be in Freeport.

“This is a high level policy forum
and the conference outcomes will
be transmitted to the Common-
wealth Heads of Government who
are also meeting later this year in
Trinidad.

“We will have the opportunity
of taking what will become the
Freeport declaration or Section to
heads of government for policy
endorsements, ongoing policy
making, and political processes at
the highest level,” he said.

In addition to improving the
quality of core services, Mr Wright
stated that local government offi-
cials will also discuss ways of
improving local democracy and
accountability.

He said that finance is another
important area. “Local govern-
ment needs money and we will dis-
cuss ways to improve financial via-
bility of local authorities,” he said.

The conference will close on
Thursday, May 14.

PRR Ra Satta os
FLIES, MOSQUITOES, TICKS & FLEAS
PHONE: 327-6464
ee








Nill Mi

OFFICIALS ARE pictured on Sun-
day, May 10, 2009 at a press con-
ference ahead of the start of the
Commonwealth Local Government
Conference to be held May 11-14 at
the Westin at Our Lucaya Resort,
Freeport, Grand Bahama. Pictured

i) from left are Deon Sweeting, Presi-
-) dent of the Bahamas Association of
Local Government Authorities;
Basil Morrison, Chairperson, Com-
monwealth Local Government
Forum (CLGF), Minister of State for
Local Government the Hon. Byran
Woodside and Carl Wright, Secre-
tary General, CLGF.

INERNMEN COKE



9 Seater Vans
Starting at $9,900

iy,

| cer i i
| = yi
j
t oe

st =

many to choose from...

Government
Workers

Aceéial $19,900.00: 2005/06 30 SEATER

" ae FOR SHORT TERW \SE
: eee
FETE err

FAX: (242) 361-1136

eee

UA a
Was iT
Who Market

Use promeotionel
eens Ren

SunTee Embroidme,
the country’s leading promotional & marketing experts
a=] oe O Ce tnt RT|
AHEAD OF YOUR COMPETITORS.
Mae ees |) ee) ee (8) gn ste gr] 88 (ee 8 [eR er a -Bee- gee le

your company’s logo on. Ifyou think it...Ve will ink it

i [oe=| sete oes] en Re oe

moa O BOR R08 Cen ete grade oie

Sun Tee EmbroidMe Today!

fn

Uniforms * Embroidery « Screen Printing « Promotional Products

rte meee Cee
East Shirley Street + Ph: 393-1004 + 393-3104 + www.sun-tee.com





PAGE 6, MONDAY, MAY 11, 2009

THE TRIBUNE



LOCAL NEWS



Three arrested in human :

trafficking operation

m CLEARWATER, Fla.

AUTHORITIES say they’ve }
arrested three people who were }
running a human trafficking oper- }
ation in Pinellas County, accord- }

ing to Associated Press.

The sheriff’s office reports that }
38-year-old Kenyatta Cornelous, :
47-year-old Edward Jones and }
24-year-old Corinna Shaffer were }
arrested on multiple charges Sat- }
urday after a two-month investi- :
gation. Authorities believe it’s }
the first case of domestic human }
trafficking in the Tampa Bay- }

area, possibly in the state.

The sheriff’s office reports that }
the suspects physically and men- }
tally abused the victims and took }
their identification cards and:
money. Investigators believe the
victims were forced to work as }
prostitutes and dancers at Tampa }
Bay-area clubs. Authorities aren’t
saying how many victims there }

were.



Bahamas

Defence Force seeks
bids for 11 new vessels

Craft will be acquired
over next six years

THE Royal Defence Force
is currently seeking bids for 11
new mid to long range vessels
as part of a continuing phased
acquisition of craft for the
Defence Force, Minister of
National Security Tommy
Turnquest said on Friday.

Speaking at the passing out
parade of 48 new marines,
Minister Turnquest said that
the craft will be acquired over
the next six years.

The Defence Force is seek-

Gispets) Training Pants

and Wipesitar
_ Jour baby!

Oe Teal Or,

Agencies

séaning Gehannians with the best Grands for 60 yaars

404 So i | way, bahamas SATE ke CIT

Monday through Saturday for lunch
Wednesday through

ing to acquire two 140-foot
vessels, four 100-foot vessels,
four 60-foot vessels and an
auxiliary vessel between 60
and 180 feet.

"The Defence Force has
now taken possession of its

two newly acquired aircraft, a
Cessna Grand Caravan and
a Vulcan Surveillance Air-
craft, and these planes will
be formally commissioned
shortly," he said.

"Initiatives are ongoing to

keep our craft sea worthy,
our officers and marines
trained and competent and
new cutting edge technolo-
gies readily available," Min-
ister Turnquest said.
Minister Turnquest chal-
lenged the Marines made up
of New Entry 46 and Woman
Entry 16, to quickly find their
places on the force, deter-
mine their career path in the
organisation and work con-
structively to merit advance-

"You should choose your
career path within the
Defence Force with the clear
understanding that it is essen-
tially a seagoing organisation
and that it serves the entire
Bahamas," he said.

"IT want you to be held up
as examples of integrity, hon-
our, respectability and cour-
tesy," Minister Turnquest
said.

Since May 2007, 178
persons have joined the Roy-
al Bahamas Defence Force.

Grade ‘A

PRIMARY and secondary school students
throughout the Bahamas with at least one “A”
grade on their final report card for 2009 have the
chance to win a state-of-the-art, 24-inch iMac
computer system or a HP Compaq Presario
desktop system.

The prize give-away is part of Custom Com-
puters’ second annual ‘As’ For Excellence Pro-
gramme.

A special prize also will be given to the stu-
dent whom Custom Computers considers had
the most impressive report card.

The programme, which was launched last
year, is designed to reward students for their
hard work and academic achievements, while
also encouraging them to strive for excellence in
everything they do.

Last year’s programme was enthusiastically
received by officials at the Ministry of Educa-
tion, with Patricia Collins, director of Education,
describing the programme “as most welcomed
and timely as it recognised deserving students in
government and independent schools in New
Providence and the Family Islands.”

Pia Farmer, co-owner and marketing director
of Customs Computers, said that last year her
team saw an overwhelming response with more
than 400 primary and high school students
entering the competition. This year, Ms Farmer
is expecting a larger number of applicants.

“We were so impressed by the number of
students who entered last year, a large per-
centage of whom had multiple As. We were
also impressed with the parents because every
child’s success is directly tied to the involve-
ment of his and her parents. And today’s edu-
cational system and competitive environment

Saturday for dinner

NE Lib

Sandwiches
EEE aa

ment through the ranks.

’ students have the
chance to win computer prizes

makes it imperative for each child to have access
to a computer.”

“At Custom Computers we are committed to
the continuing education and training of our
team in order to deliver the highest standards of
service in our industry. We believe that the ‘As
for Excellence’ campaign reflects these impor-
tant values and we are very happy to provide
our students throughout the Bahamas with the
tools which they need to succeed, as well as
supporting the Ministry of Education and our
teachers in their continuing efforts to provide
our children with a sound and quality educa-
tion,” she said.

Last year’s winners in the primary and sec-
ondary school categories, respectively, were
second grader Jodie Dodge of St Thomas More
who won a HP Laptop, and eighth grader Brit-
tany John of St Augustine’s College who won
the iMac Computer System.

Chauncy Bethel, a sixth grade student at
Faith Temple, was presented with an i-Pod
Touch.

To enter the competition, all students have to
do is visit any one of Custom Computers store
locations on Cable Beach or East Bay Street, fill
in an entry form and present a copy of their
report card while accompanied by a par-
ent or guardian. Students may com-
plete one entry form for every “A”
grade they received. Students in
the Family Islands may down-
load the entry form from the
Customs Computers website.

The deadline for entry is 12
noon on Saturday, August
15, 2009. The drawing will

take place the same day at 2pm during a special
reception at Custom Computers “Know How
Store” on Cable Beach.

To further assist families in gaining access
to computers, Custom Computers will also
launch its lay-away campaign i June in which
customers can purchase a computer with three
payments, without any added interest rates or
finance charges.

Also next month, the company will launch
the first monthly ‘zero down financing fair’
geared towards assisting qualified government
and public service employees
in purchasing computers
on the spot.

Ms Farmer said she
hopes the easy financ-
ing campaigns will
assist persons who
may be experiencing
challenges during the
economic downturn,
while at the same time
empowering and giving
families the tools

they need to suc-

ceed.















& LIGHTING

Tel (242) 341-4000
Fax (242) 341-5080
Email: eaglebahamas@gmail.com

ENJOY EAGLE’S SUPER SPECIALS!

TELEPHONE WIRE
wo =~: 1000' ROLL*

r
=

Our stock of air conditioning units are now in!
12000 BTU @ $449.00

CAVES VILLAGE, Sn Fol ee

CALE a2fa22 | a
EMAIL MANGOSCAFE@CORALWAVE.COM

_TV CABLE

1000' ROLL*

= - 1Ton

—uuW~“X~x“ —-

Don’t miss this limited time offer for super savings.

CAT 5 WIRE
1000° ROLL*

14-2 ROMEX WIRE
ROLL*

EAGLESIR

- 1.5 Ton 18000 BTU @ $675.00
-2Ton 24000 BTU @ $869.00



We ship to the ,
Family Islands!

Eagle Electrical Supplies & Lighting Center
Tonique Williams Darling Highway (formerly Harold Road)

P.O. Box CR-55440 Nassau, Bahamas
BEST QUALITY, BEST PRICE, GUARANTEED !!!





THE TRIBUNE

MONDAY, MAY 11, 2009, PAGE 7



Caribbean crisis:
no time to spare

@ By SIR RONALD
SANDERS

(The writer is a
consultant and former
Caribbean Diplomat)

HE economic crisis in

the Caribbean is set
to get worse rather than bet-
ter.

Four years ago in a book
entitled, “Crumbled Small”, I
wrote: “Small states of the
Commonwealth Caribbean
are in crisis. There is need for
urgent action at the domestic,
regional and international lev-
els to spare them from sinking
into widespread poverty and
becoming client-states of larg-
er nations upon whom they
could become economically
reliant.”

Little action was taken to
tackle the difficulties that
faced Caribbean countries
which, even then, were highly-
indebted, plagued by the
effects of drug trafficking, sub-
ject to devastation by increas-
ing and stronger hurricanes,
losing their preferential mar-
kets for key commodities, and,
for the most part, graduated
from concessionary financing
from international financial
institutions. Then, as now,
they were also extremely vul-
nerable to the fortunes of their
main trading partners in North
America and Europe espe-
cially in tourism.

Since 2005, the situation has
worsened. The national debt
of each country has increased,
except in Guyana which
enjoyed large write-offs of
debt when it was classified as a
Highly Indebted Poor Coun-
try. In almost all others, except
Trinidad and Tobago and Bar-
bados, debt has increased to a
point where servicing it has
become difficult. Worryingly,
a significant portion of gov-
ernments’ debt is to financial
institutions in their own coun-
tries. This pattern of borrow-
ing could also now threaten
the banking system if govern-
ments find it difficult to ser-
vice the debt on schedule.

The problems surrounding
CLICO and British American
Insurance, which caused finan-
cial interventions by both the
governments of Trinidad and
Tobago and Barbados, may
not yet be over. Almost every
country in the Caribbean
Community and Common
Market (CARICOM) has
been affected by what appears
to be a substantial shortfall
between the assets and liabil-
ities of these two companies.
CLICO’s regulators say that
the Trinidad government will
have to spend about US$1 bil-
lion over the next two years
to protect policyholders. Even
greater fragilities may yet
appear with far-reaching con-
sequences for the smaller
countries of the region.

The events surrounding
CLICO and British American
clearly occurred because of
either poor regulation and
supervision or inadequate
machinery for implementing
corrective measures. While it
may be closing the stable door
after the horse has bolted,
CARICOM countries should
now strengthen regulation of
all financial institutions at both
national and pan-CARICOM
levels to guard against repe-
titions.

There is no reason why
CARICOM countries should
not establish a pan-CARI-
COM regulator for cross-bor-
der transactions. After all, in
the wake of a G20 Summit in
London in April and after the
Organisation for Economic
Cooperation and Develop-
ment (OECD) published a
new list of co-operative and
non-cooperative jurisdictions
for providing tax information
on request, every Caribbean
country that was on the so-
called “grey list” (that is coun-
tries that have to do more to
be regarded as fully co-opera-
tive with the OECD), pledged
that they will comply.

Compliance requires them
to sign Tax Information
Exchange Agreements
(TIEA’s) with at least 12
OECD countries, show a
readiness to sign more of
them, and passing OECD cri-

insight |

WORLD VIEW



“The problems
surrounding
CLICO and
British
American have
exacerbated the
effects of the
current global
financial crisis
which also had
its origin in
poor regulation
in the United
States and
Europe.”



teria for effectiveness in
implementation. Of necessity,
this compliance requires heavy
expenditure in either negoti-
ating at least 12 agreements
or merely signing the OECD
model blindly.

In any event, new legisla-
tion will have to be enacted
in each jurisdiction.

And since they chose not to
resist the OECD in any way
but to comply fully with its
requirements, they will have
to do so or suffer the conse-
quences. OECD Secretary-
General, Angel Gurria, has
already said, “The OECD,
tasked with a mandate to
monitor their performance,
will be watching like a hawk.”

So if CARICOM govern-
ments are willing to be
watched “like a hawk” by the
OECD, they should be able
to hawkishly watch the cross-
border transactions within
their own economic space in a
collective way.

The problems surrounding
CLICO and British American
have exacerbated the effects
of the current global financial
crisis which also had its origin
in poor regulation in the Unit-
ed States and Europe. Those
effects include a huge down-
turn in tourist spending in the
Caribbean, a major reduction
in remittances from the
Caribbean Diaspora, a
diminution in investment in
Caribbean economies and a
drying-up of credit from the
international commercial mar-
ket.

This situation is unlikely to
change in a hurry. As the
Prime Minister of Jamaica,
Bruce Golding, pointed out in
a parliamentary debate on the
Jamaica Budget on May 5th,
“We delude ourselves if we
think that after the recession
has ended the world will
return to what it was before.
Banks are going to be more

3

S

cautious in their lending,
demanding more collateral
and greater ability to repay,
investors more contemplative
in their investments. It is not
going to be business as usu-
al.”

Against this background,
CARICOM governments
could do well to bolster their
economies and their capacity
for dealing with the interna-
tional community by com-
pleting the arrangements for
implementing the Caribbean
Single Market and for bar-
gaining collectively with inter-
national financial institutions,
countries and regions.

For instance, two of the
International and Multilateral
financial institutions claim to
have funds that could be made
available to the private sector
in the region for development
projects that are also com-
mercially viable.

It would be helpful if
CARICOM governments
could provide a team of
experts with the specific task
of assisting the private sector
to devise viable projects and
present them to the financial
institutions for funding.

It would be of added benefit
if some of these projects could
integrate production in more
than one CARICOM country
to spread the benefits of
employment and revenues
throughout the region.

At the G20 Summit, it was
announced that $1.1 trillion
will be provided to the Inter-
national Monetary Fund
(IMF) to help ease the cur-
rent dire economic circum-
stances that grip most coun-
tries around the world.

It is doubtful that half of
that sum will actually be deliv-
ered. But, even if only half is
delivered, CARICOM coun-
tries ought to be exploring col-
lectively with the IMF how
they might access some of that
money for projects that could
be distributed throughout its
member states without the
usual onerous and harsh IMF
conditions.

Also, even though the lan-
guage of the G20 Commu-
niqué was hazy, it did under-
take to boost the resources of
the Inter-American Develop-
ment Bank.

CARICOM governments
should also be investigating
collectively how they could
secure funds to build sustain-
able infrastructure and open
new areas of production in the
context of the Caribbean Sin-
gle Market.

The crisis that CARICOM
countries face requires nation-
al action, but it also demands
regional cohesion. There is no
time to spare.

Responses to:
ronaldsanders29@hotmail.com

for
excellence!

COMPUTERS LIMITED

/")
SIR RONALD SANDERS



} M KINGSTON, Ontario

i President Ricardo Alar-
? con dismissed President
? Barack Obama’s recent
? overtures to Cuba and
? said Saturday for the first
? time that the new U.S.
? administration’s stance
? is “the continuation of |
? an illegal, unjustifiable [Ree weeerlne io human rights, free
: and failed policy”,
? according to Associated Press.

Cuban parliament president
dismisses Barack Obama

CUBAN Parliament

Obama has suggested it may

: be time for a new beginning with
? Cuba, and the White House
? authorized unlimited travel and
? money transfers for Americans
: with relatives in Cuba. But his
? administration has said it would
? like Cuba to respond by making
? small political and social changes
? to its single-party communist sys-
? tem.

“In other words Cuba must

: change and behave in accor-
? dance with Washington’s wish-

es,” Alarcon said at the close of

? a Cuban academic conference in
: Canada.

“That attitude is not only the

i continuation of an illegal, unjus-



tifiable and failed poli-
cy, it is also the conse-
quence of a profound
misconception, a false
perception of itself that
lies as the foundation of
the U.S. role in the
world.”

The U.S. has long
sought what it considers
real change from Cuba

speech, free markets and
democratic government.

Last month, President Raul
Castro said Cuba was willing to
discuss “everything” with the

S., leading to hopes that a
door was opening to a new rela-
tionship.

But former President Fidel
Castro insists that Cuba should
make no concessions in return
for better US. ties.

The Obama administration
has said it has no plans to lift the
embargo which bans nearly all
trade with Cuba. The island’s
government blames those sanc-
tions for frequent shortages of
food, medicine, farming and
transportation machinery and
other basics.










ATTENTION

ALL CIVIL SERVANTS!!!

(Not presently members of Public Worké¢

Cooperative

money,

$100.00































operative Credit Union LimiJusi) walk
into the offices of the Public Workers’
Credit Union Limited in
Nassau or Freeport, with any amount of
between
$5,000.00, and leave with DOUBLE that
amount, pending receipt of an approved
salary deduction form.

and

DOUBLE YOUR FUNDS.00

That’s right, a Loan approved in












less than 24 hours!!

Come, and take advantage of this offer,
which begins Monday, May 4th, 2009
for a limited time only.

Public Workers’











Co-opera

Credit Union. lamiced

Nassau
Freeport













(32370594)
(ool 727)

“THE: SAMILLY. CREDIT UNION”

ENTER TO WIN!

HOW TO ENTER

HP Desktop
& 17” monitor

Bring in your report card, with a



F Cf parent or guardian to one of our two
locations, For mwery 'A' on your
report card you can enter to WIN,
Orawing to be held Saturday, August
15th at 2PM al our Cable Beach
lacatlion.

’wwreLcCLEtomcomputers.bs solutionsiicustomcampaters.bs





PAGE 8, MONDAY, MAY 11, 2009

LOCAL NEWS

THE TRIBUNE





YOUR BABY CAN READ!

An early literacy system for babies,
toddlers and preschoolers

Authorized Distributor
Sherle Knowles
Phone: 393-8478 or 380-8023
babiescanread (hotmail.com

EM TM ic feet ri

CUS CE CT

“The premier choice for serious business”

1,661 sq. ft. $5,813.50 p. month incl. CAM Fees
1,083 sq. ft. $3,790.00 p. month incl. CAM Fees
839 sq. ft. $2,936.50 p. month incl. CAM Fees
850 sq. ft. $2,975.00 p. month incl. CAM Fees

Contact Mr. Simon Chappell on
327-1575 or 477-7610
Email: simon @cavesheights.com



Expat banker dies
of shooting injuries

FROM page one

Britannia Consultancy Group,
had been targeted.

Mr Jones, in the Bahamas
for more than 20 years,

had been an adviser to gov-

ernment on banking legisla-
tion on several occasions.
Police said that a brazen,
unmasked gunman, on foot,
approached Mr Jones around
10 am, as he got out of his
vehicle in the company’s park-
ing lot near Compass Point
Studios. Police said that the
gunman then shot Mr Jones
at least twice — once in the
head and then in the body —
before heading south towards
nearby Gambier Village.

Following Mr Jones’ shoot-

THE COLLEGE OF THE BAHAMAS

Visit our website at www.cob.edu.bs

CENTRE FOR CONTINUING EDUCATION

& EXTENSION SERVICES

©

COMPUTER COURSES SUMMER 022009

50+ and/or RETIREES

COURSE
wD

COMRSE DESCRIPTIONS TIME

COP Pah REY HOARD NA» D1 AHAB HIP M1

COM PAks INTRODUCTHON TO

MICKOSOFT WORD

D1 AKDAM-24HIPM

[INTRODUCTION Tc THE | Soa A M-40P Mi

INTERNET

COMPOS |

DAY

Mel lI

WED

START | DUR

-May | Sake

[3-May | Sake

PTHUVERI | 1415

MeLay

ENQUIRIES: Gantact the Go-cedinator al Teh (242) J25-57 14 f (24e) JAB-0083 | 8-196 0-00 eet, SZ or

email acunryigcob |edu.bs

“ Tioses akare ee with the exception of the eee foe of S400) (oe ——

and Ceres Materiale

‘RES neverves fight to chen Tuo, Fevev, 6 e Cede, Circe Sac bay



DOES YOUR STORAGE LOOK ae THIS?



CALL US TODAY TO HELP WITH YOUR

ARCHIVAL CLEANOUT!



SUNRYSE SHREDDING SERVICES

We provide security, shredding is only the vehicle we use to deliver it.

T: 242-322-6448 | www.sunryseshred.com

Email: info@sunryseshred.com



URES
Md

ing, police mounted an island-
wide search for the gunman
who was described as a slim,
dark-complexioned male,
wearing dark clothing.

"We are still following sev-
eral leads but there have been
no arrests as yet," Superin-
tendent Ellsworth Moss, head
of the Central Detective Unit,
told The Tribune yesterday.
"We are still appealing to the
public for information,” he
said.

Mr Jones had earlier been
attacked on two occasions.

On one occasion his home
was broken into and he

was beaten.

He was taken to hospital
where his injuries were
stitched. On another occasion,
his car was bumped.

When he got out to see the
damage, he was attacked.

The $50,000 reward, posted
in the local press last week for
information that might lead
to the arrest or conviction of
those responsible for his mur-
der still stands.

Mr Jones was born in
North Wales and worked in
the financial services sector in
the U.K., Jamaica and the
Bahamas.

He was the former director
of the Bankers’ Association
of the Bahamas and the
Bahamas Institute of Bankers.
Last year, Mr Jones was
embroiled in a legal dispute
with former FNM MP Lester
Turnquest who was once an
associate with him in Britan-
nia Consultancy.

Last year, Canadian officials
were also investigating allega-
tions of a fraudulent tax
scheme having been commit-
ted on the investment compa-
ny.

Mr Jones’ mother was liv-
ing with him in Nassau.

Claim that government ‘neglecting duty’

FROM page one

ety and must be rooted out
“before a great deal more
damage is done.”

“Bahamas Against Crime is
calling upon the government
to carry out its responsibility
and lead the way in preparing
an integrated strategy to inflict
a serious blow to crime and
criminality in the country.
Don’t be narrow-minded or
fearful the government is
warned, because to continue
the present course will demand
a defence from the govern-
ment of a charge of negligence,
neglect of duty, and endan-
gering the people of the
Bahamas — a very serious
charge,” he said.

Noting that its current
approach has failed to reduce
the levels of crime and vio-
lence on the streets, Mr Moss
said that government must
rethink its approach before it
is too late.

Therefore, he urged the
church, the business sector,
civil society, and the media to
reject the status quo and mobi-
lize for an intense and sus-

tained action until the
“scourge of crime” is signifi-
cantly reduced.

“Religious leaders are called
upon to lift their sights beyond
the walls of the church and
work toward improved secu-
rity of people. The corporate
community is challenged to
seek the public good, not just
private gain in their economic
lives.

“Civil society is called upon
to agitate and lobby the gov-
ernment to get up and provide
the leadership that is so criti-
cally necessary at this very vul-
nerable time in our society.

“The media is urged to
demand more accountability,
especially from all public insti-
tutions and officials in order
to create more transparency.
This will greatly reduce cor-
ruption, and injustice which
fuels crimes and violence,” he
said.

However, the longer the cur-
rent levels of crime and crimi-
nality continue, Rev Moss said,
the more difficult it will be to
correct.

Therefore, he said, the time
to act is now.

‘Defence Force

FROM page one

? cers of the Fire Services freed
? them using the Jaws of Life.
? They are listed in serious con-
? dition. The driver of the Ford
: received minor injuries. Traf-
i fic police are investigating the
? accident.

Dominicans arrested
| FROM page one

? Andros while in the settlement
? of Stafford Creek around 1 pm
i? Saturday, stopped and
? searched the occupants of a
? maroon coloured 1995 Ford
? Aero star Van.

i Officers found eight
? Dominican men inside the
? vehicle.

i The 29-year-old male driver
? was from Andros and a 28-
? year-old Eleuthera man was
? also in the vehicle.

? The Dominicans were hand-
? ed over to immigration offi-
i cers.

? The two Bahamian men
? were also arrested and are in
? police custody.

THE CANCER CENTRE

announces
The Specialists’ Cancer Clinics

Prof. of Oncology
The Hon. Prof.

Arthur Porter

PC, MD, MBA, FACR,
FACRO, FRCPC
Director General & CEO
McGill University
Health Centre

Managing Director &

Director of Radiation

Oncology
The Cancer Centre

Saturday, May 16,

2009

Starting at 10am

Prof. of Medical Oncology

Prof. Karol

Sikora
MA, MB BChir, PhD,
FRCR, FRCP, FFPM
Dean of the University
of Buckingham
School of Medicine

Director of

Medical

Oncology
The Cancer Centre

Friday, May 29,

2009

Starting at 10am

At The Centreville Medical Pavilion

72 Collins Ave

Telephone: 502-9610
Open to The Public





THE TRIBUNE

MONDAY, MAY 11, 2009, PAGE 9



LOCAL NEWS

New entrepreneurs
take their places



(BIS Photo/Derek Smith)

THE GRADUATING CLASS is pictured above with College of the Bahamas vice president Dr Rhonda Chipman-
Johnson, BAIC executive chairman Edison Key and BAIC officials.

NASSAU, Bahamas - Seventy
new entrepreneurs took their
places on the Bahamian business
scene following a graduation cer-
emony at the College of The
Bahamas last weekend.

They were participants in the
Bahamas Agricultural and Indus-
trial Corporation's (BAIC)
twelve-week Business Empower-
ment Lecture Series, held in con-
junction with the College's School
of Business headed by Mrs
Remilda Moxey.

BAIC's deputy general man-
ager Don Major said: "An army
of entrepreneurs who will trans-
form the economic landscape by
establishing sustainable business
enterprises throughout our coun-
try has been launched."

Hosted by BAIC's Business
Services Department, the semi-
nar featured successful busi-
nesspersons who shared with par-
ticipants proven business tech-
niques.

"It allowed participants to
avoid the pitfalls of those who
failed," said Mr Major, "and
acquire the knowledge and exper-
tise that successful business per-
sons have discovered.

"BAIC exists in order to pro-
vide entrepreneurs the option of

avoiding traveling by the seats of
their pants - the pain and terror of
learning by trial and error.

"We provide training opportu-
nities and a myriad of other ser-
vices that are geared to provide
you with all that you need to start
and run a business successfully.”

BAIC's executive chairman
Edison Key encouraged gradu-
ates to take advantage of multi-
million-dollar opportunities in
agriculture and souvenir produc-
tion.

He said BAIC can facilitate
that by allowing them to use of
tens of thousands of acres of land

BAIC owns and controls in North
Andros, Abaco and Eleuthera.

College vice president Dr
Rhonda Chipman-Johnson
underscored the importance of
being creative and versatile in the
approach to employment.

"Your presence at this semi-
nar is evidence that you are pre-
pared to meet the challenge of
helping to stimulate our econo-
my by engaging in some kind of
business activity,” said Dr Chip-
man-Johnson.

"We need to increase the num-
ber of citizens who are willing to
create employment."

Share your news

The Tribune wants to hear
from people who are
making news in their
neighbourhoods. Perhaps

you are raising funds for a
good cause, campaigning
for improvements in the
area or have won an
award.

If so, call us on 322-1986
and share your story.



The effects of HPV could put your daughter's

future at risk—you can help protect her.

Cervical cancer—it's not too carly to think about it.

YOUN women in their teas and 20s ara more vulnerable to APY, the virus that
Causes Garvical cancer, beacause their bodies ara still developing. If a girl or young
woman has HPV, and her body dacsnt olear the virus, cervical cancer can devclap
ater in life. So while most women diagnosed with cervical cancer are betesen the
afee of 35 and 55 years old. meeny of them were profebly eepoeed to a “high-risk”
tye of HY i their pouth

Having Pap bests regularly can help protect wu fram increase” risk of cervical cancer
So can winning the facts abut wh and how different types of cancers form

Taginal camcor—hard to detect.
BGS ho GO ot canine ere
sharin the lining cf the wegiinm

eno Gn freee fen aie no es

Comical camner—ae reaalt of APY,
Canical cancer is cancer of

Tet Oevin tne hee eT of Tie
Utne that conpecie the womb

I
Hitec The wi

Vilar onmoer—look for arty sigma
Burning, teh’ng. painful werination,
Of Fy Gul’ G0und digo! visa
camicer which aMacts the inner
SIS OF es Yagi Gueler hehe.

Prowancers— whert canoer begins.
Higih-risk Gye of HY con couge efronnal
celia to forn im the cervin, vagina, and vulvs.
ff meat Gatiected aurty. thames calls can tum

“yet
into precencern, ore ten cornoor. e

bee diiflicasdt tte think of your daughters cutfaring fram any of theese Iinaceenn
and ruining? her dreams of «a healthy future. fou can do semathing te help
Protect her And teow Ttiane mow,

Talk to a doctor about the only vaccine that can
help protect your daughter from cervical cancer
and other HPV diseases.

FREE ANNUAL CERVICAL/BREAST SCREENING
May 9- Flamingo Gardens Clinic May 23 - South Beach Clinic
May 16 - Elizabeth Esiales Clinic May 30 - Annual Cancer Sociely Ball
Fleming M4. Clinic

THE COLLEGE OF THE BAHAMAS

Visit our website at www.cob.edu.bs








































CENTRE FOR CONTINUING EDUCATION AND EXTENSION SERVICES

PERSONAL DEVELOPMENT - SUMMER SEMESTER 022009

fous _] SECT _ Che
-A___{._-nesieigg tt DESCAITION ony

‘acca im _| ACCOUNTING FOR BEGINNERS |
ee ee ACCOUNTING FOR BEGINNERS Il

ACCAgoT
ACCOUNTING FOR BEGINKERS Ill

STAAT | OUR

MoniWed
eee

8:00pm MoniWed

Tues Thurs

ee
Ta
Taam
‘custo [ot __|surenorcustowenser ws | 4s
A tpn
ALE 00 CREDIT AWD COLLECTIONS |

Spr
jwuseor | oy | oreo ano couerrons

BLE

COMPUTERS —

Cofd Fadi

Thue.
Thiitg.
12 -e,

o ms

COMPUTER APPLICATIONS I Viton | as

COMP9O1 COMPUTER APPLICATIONS I Geb | 0 minx

Cota Pate COMPUTER APPLICATIONS: I V4 =tiiea) | 8 ice

COM FOS0 WEE PAGE DESIGH W'S |

-oowrass | or | we act os wi

COSMETOLOGY
COGMBO WAKE UP APPLICATIORS

PT
peconaTnc =|

‘romano [ot | oma esi

FLOREDO
ee EFFECTIVE WRITING SKILLS
= MASSAGE THERAPY ESSENTIALS |

us

H1sJun |) 2 cove

tB-Juil | Bdays

xs THERAPY ESSENTIALS Il

f.d0pm-
BALLADUM DANCING Ba0pm 2l- May S278

aaa

aos en [oe fe
itty | one | sn
ET

tiOpm-
/waraon | ov | Hunan RESOUBCE mga
po

40pm
ENQUIRIES: Contact the Co-ordinator at Tel: (242) 325-6714 (242) 328-000 / 328-1936! 30043900 ext. S202 or
bina prevsdevdhcob.edu.bs

Thurs

Mon

All fees are included with the exception of the application fee of $40.00 (ome time).
CEES reserves the right to change Tuition. Fees. Course Content, Course Schedule and Course Materials.

Top of the Line
Performance Vehicles.

1 Tae

outa hota tee en
et ert 2

Tyreflex Star Motors is the Exclusive
Authorized Dealer for Mercedes-Benz,
Subaru and lsuzu vehicles.
> New & Used Cars & Trucks
> Sales, Parts & Service

Call us today at 325.4961

Visit our showroom on Wulff Rd!

Fax: 323.4667 / Open Mon-Fri, §am-Spm
Wultt Road, P. 0. Box M9123, Massau

TYREFLEX STAR MOTORS



PAGE 10, MONDAY, MAY 11, 2009

THE TRIBUNE





Evaluating performances
YOUNG MAn’s VIEW

@ By ADRIAN GIBSON
ajbahama@hotmail.com

THIS column, my first after
being injured in a car accident
and having to have urgent eye
surgery in the US as a result, is
dedicated to one of my literary
mentors— the fearless, now
retired Tribune Managing Edi-
tor John Marquis. Over the
last few years, [ have been able
to understudy Mr Marquis and
will miss our weekly chats
about a variety of personal and
social/political issues. Howev-
er, we will keep in touch.

7K Ok Ok ok

In its second year since
being elected to the govern-
ment of the Bahamas, the
FNM finds itself governing ina

ADRIAN

recessionary period, with a
contracting global economy,
foreign credit markets, unem-
ployment inching upwards and
the unlikelihood of any possi-
ble decoupling of the Bahamas
and US economies in the near
future, as was once noted by
the Prime Minister.
However, while consider-
ing these factors, I will assess
the FNM’s governance thus
far and evaluate the perfor-
mances—or lack thereof—of

The Bahamas Electricity Corporation

Tender

Fuel Oil Tank Erection &
Associated Works
Bailey Town, Bimini

The Bahamas Electricity Corporation
invites Tenders for the abowe named services

Bidders are required ta collect packages from the
Corporation's Administration Office, Blue Hill & Tucker Roads

Contact: Mrs. Delmeta Seymour at telephone 302-1158

Tenders are to be addressed ta:
Mr. Kevin Basden, General Manager
Bahamas Electricity Corporation
Executive Offices = Blue Hill & Tacker Roads
Nassau, Bahamas

Deadline for delivery to BEC: on of before
15th May, 2009
no later than 4:00 p.m,

Submissions should be marked as follows:
Tender No, 689/09
FUEL O)L TANK ERECTION & ASSOCIATED WORKS
BAILEY TOWM, BIMIMI

The Corporation reserves the right
to accept of reject any or all proposals.
For all enquiries regarding the tenders and site visits, contact

Mr. Kermit McCartney at telephone 302-1247

G IBS ON



individual ministers.

To the government's credit,
they have seemingly taken a
pragmatic approach to the
unemployment/economic cri-
sis, instituted social assistance
programmes in a timely man-
ner, pressed for the budgetary
rationalization of tariffs, initi-
ated short-term stimulus
spending on infrastructural
development (harbour dredg-
ing, road works), started clean-
up campaigns and passed leg-

islation to empower the air-
port redevelopment company
in its thrust to improve the
major gateway of our tourism
dependent country.
However, the FNM has
seemingly done little to
empower Bahamians by ensur-
ing greater involvement in
major projects. Frankly, there
is aneed to ensure the involve-
ment of more small-time, local
contractors—not just the usu-
al suspects—in infrastructural
upgrades, a need of greater
transparency and accountabil-
ity, the development of a clear-
ly articulated trade policy and
the diversification of the econ-
omy so that the country would
be better able to sustain itself
during this gloomy global
economy. The government

Bahamas Bus & Truck Co., Ltd,

Montrose Avenue
Phone:322-1722 * Fax: 326-7452

=
i
iy
j

i ae

te
Ps

te.

S— EXT

=

#/ COME CHECK

RA, EXTRA,
EXTRA,

Large Shipment

of

New Shipments Arrived

Hurry, Hurry, Hurry and
Get Your First Choice
For Easy Financing

Bank And Inaurance

On Premises
Check Our Prices
Before buying

CALL 322-1722



You can TRUST a health plan that delivers
on its promise.

yA COLONIAL GROUP

ma INTERNATIONAL

MEDICAL

was sectarian and exhibited lit-
tle foresight when petty poli-
tics may have possibly led it
to scrap a few of the worth-
while initiatives of the former
administration, only to rein-
state those that worked. On
the other hand, the PLP is
hardly better as an Opposition
than they were when in gov-
ernment, appearing to be
bankrupt of ideas and reck-
lessly obstructing almost all
proposals of government while
themselves proposing nothing.

Thus far, the FNM Cabinet
has steered clear of major
scandals.

However, there are certain
members of Cabinet who are
not the ideal choice and who
appear to be mere space
cadets whose brain power
seems to be of the lowest pos-
sible wattage. In his third term,
it appears that Prime Minister
Hubert Ingraham is a bit
shorthanded, particularly since
he must contend with a few
hopeless jokers in his board-
room, who seem out of touch
with public sentiment and
merely concerned with the
pomp and trappings of high
office, living in their world of
fantas

Although I will not apply a
grade to the government until
the end of this column, the
FNM must respond to the
crescendo of voices lobbying
for anew economic approach
and the empowerment of
young Bahamians. Under Mr
Ingraham, much of the scan-
dals and alleged corruption
seemingly ingrained in local
politics—which has at times
internationally gained the
Bahamas a reputation as a
soprano state—hardly occurs,
since he is known for his
integrity and no-nonsense
approach.

When evaluating the per-
formance of individual minis-
ters, Dr Earl Deveaux—Min-
ister for the Environment—
earns a B-plus. Dr Deveaux
has initiated the process of
tidying up the city/islands,
pledged to safeguard the coun-
try’s natural resources and has
pushed for a concerted drive
toward environmental restora-
tion; however, he cannot do it
alone. In his capacity, Dr
Deveaux has pledged to initi-
ate projects to plant sea oats
and other indigenous plants to
protect sand dunes/coastal
zones and he must vigorously
seck to have the marine envi-
ronment zoned. I am curious
as to whether his ministry has
beyond to fulfil his stated goal
of zoning 20 per cent of the
marine environment.

Dr Deveaux, who I under-

stand is a superb MP, set out
to put a spanking on potential
challenger Jerome Fitzgerald
during the next general elec-
tion cycle—appears to be sin-
cerely confronting any set-
backs/problems in his minis-
terial portfolio. In his attempt
to confront the Bahamas’ envi-
ronmental woes, he must also
seek the passage and enforce-
ment of legislation mandating
the recycling and separation
of garbage, a new landfill facil-
ity, the implementation of a
garbage tax, launch a compre-
hensive educational campaign
about the importance of wet-
lands and also encourage
green building standards. I
would also recommend that
he deploy environmental offi-
cers to Cowpen Road West—
where a property has been cal-
lously cut below the level of
the road almost into the water
table, in the ruthless pursuit
of quarry/cracker dust—and
also to Bacardi Road where,
like Sandyport, the wetlands
are rapidly being filled-in and
destroyed. This service-ori-
ented statesman has had suc-
cesses and unlike many of his
Cabinet colleagues, he has
demonstrated an understand-
ing of the issues.



Brent Symonette, the For-
eign Affairs Minister, has
become known as the foreign-
affairs-minister-from-Nassau
who rarely travels, seldom con-
tributes in the House of
Assembly and appears to be
merely playing second fiddle.
Mr Symonette appears to be a
stealth-like minister who is
hardly seen and who seems to
be on cruise control. Accord-
ing to the Oxford dictionary,
foreign mean “dealing with
other countries such as foreign
policy” or “having to do witha

SEE page 11

Atlantic Medical

Atlantic Medical is the market leading health insurance



provider because it offers the best care at the best

possible price.

Your health care is a very important part of your life, so

it Is reassuring If you know your plan and your insurance

provider will deliver on care, benefits and service when

you need it.

You can enjoy that reassurance with Atlantic Medical. Just

ask any one of 50,000 health plan members who trust

Colonial Group International to work for them day-in,

day-out, at home or overseas.

People trust Atlantic Medical for care, service and value

that really makes a difference and makes sure you will

ae

ATLANTIC MEDICAL INSURANCE CO. LTD.
Atlantic House, 2nd Terrace & Collins Avenue, PO. Box SS-5915, Nassau Tel. 326-8191
Suite 5, Jasmine Corporate Center, East Sunrise Highway, RO. Box F-42655, Freeport Tel. 351-3960

A member of Colonial Group International: Insurance, Health, Pensions, Life

receive the best health cover money can buy,

Colonial Group International is
rated A-(Excellent) by AM Best.





THE TRIBUNE

MONDAY, MAY 11, 2009, PAGE 11



of government ministers

FROM page 10

country or language other than
one’s own”, however Mr
Symonette hardly travels. How
is it that our country’s foreign
affairs minister was absent
from the biggest government
meeting the hemisphere over
the last two years—the Sum-
mit of the Americas?

The chaos at the passport
office has poorly reflected on
the minister, whose ministry
has had little to no policy
changes. While the complete
implementation of e-passport
and the movement to secure
accomplishments, both were
initiated by the former admin-
istration and are presently
being poorly executed, so-
much-so that I believe the
country could possibly miss the
2010 e-passport deadline. Mr
Symonette should secure the
temporary secondment of pub-
lic servants to ensure that the
e-passport deadline is met or
outsource the appointments
and scheduling of passport
drop-offs and pickups in the
same format as the US
embassy has done for Bahami-
ans seeking visas.

The Foreign Affairs min-
istry is a conduit for the provi-
sion of technical assistance
offered by major international
organizations to Bahamians,
however that ministry has
seemingly not sought out or
taken advantage of such
opportunities. Furthermore,
there are no new ideas or rare
policy statements with refer-
ence to the Bahamas’ relations
with the ACP group, the Com-
monwealth, the OAS and
Haiti. If Mr Symonette is craft-
ing new foreign affairs strate-
gies, the public relations arm
of his ministry is not informa-
tive, only showing him in a cer-
emonial role making photo
albums with visiting or newly
assigned diplomats.

I do credit Mr Symonette
for maintaining our embassies
and having the foresight to
grant, what I’m told, will be
temporary visa waivers for

British Colonial Hilton
Friday, May 15, 2009
Cocktails at 6:30 pm,

Auction of 5-7 collectibles

Sale of over 100 pieces

of decorative art
(all under $100 each)

Proceeds to benefit
the UHAB Community
Emergency Fund (CEF)

Donation $20

sm includes valet parking & 2 drinks

persons affiliated with the
upcoming Miss Universe
pageant. He earns a miserable
C-minus.



Branville McCartney, the
Minister State for Immigration
and another outstanding MP,
appears to have taken a cue
from former MP Ron Pinder
and has become the number
one public relations man in
Cabinet. Mr McCartney is a
first-class politician who has
actively sought to rid the immi-
gration department of slack-
ness and corruption and has
vigorously confronted the ille-
gal immigration problem.
However, MP McCartney
must seck to consistently
expand the security infra-
structure at his ministry, rid
the department of its time-con-
suming and antiquated meth-
ods while moving to online
applications and reducing the
lengthy waits for persons
applying for status, requesting
documents or having already
met the stated criteria. Per-
haps the restructuring of the
Immigration Department, by
order of the PM, will promote
improved modes of operation,
however the Immigration
Board must become more
transparent, being more
broad-based in composition,

Auction

a Sale

of Decorative

Haitian Art

at 7:00 pm sharp

explaining to applicants why
they may have been denied
status or making notes from a
meeting about an applicant
available for his/her perusal.
The minister must remain vig-
ilant, and be careful and wary
of appearing to be inhumane
in his pursuits. Mr McCartney
does appear to be acutely
addressing immigration mat-
ters and earns B-plus.

Tommy Turnquest, the
hapless Minister of National
Security, reminds me of a dead
spark plug and appears to be
bereft of ideas in the fight
against crime. I have two
words for Mr Turnquest—
“wrong ministry.” Under Mr
Turnquest, there is a deepen-
ing climate of fear, heightened
by his embarrassing, yet fre-
quent recounting of the statis-
tics of crime.

In the fight against crime, it
appears that he can hardly see
the forest for the trees, setting
up meaningless committees to
tell Bahamians what they
already know and compiling
volumes of reports that, like
many others, probably end up
gathering dust in some bureau-
cratic backroom.

Can Mr Turnquest inspire
those officers who, when
called, are known to tell some
distressed complainants that
no car is available or that they
are calling the wrong station,
while a unit is brazenly parked
at Bamboo Shack or a sweet-
heart’s house?

Mr Turnquest should
expand the training of police
officers to one year, aggres-
sively address police brutality
and offer rewards to anyone
with proof of police officers
paying social visits to bars
while on duty or being caught
in compromising positions
while working. The buck stops
with you sir!

It appears that we have
moved from five years of inef-
fectiveness under Cynthia
“Mother” Pratt to another
term of hopelessness—from
one minister who preaches to
another who merely recites
statistics.

ae

TITTT rrr

ee LOR ELELL LLL) Lo

eo Ted

1s

~ For ticket Information

ph: 433-8487 or 323-5300 |

(GSs

(0)

ity ft.

Mr Turnquest has no law
enforcement experience or
related qualifications and has a
standoffish demeanour that is
almost comparable to a rusting
lamp pole. I do credit the min-
ister with acquiring new
resources to outfit the police
and defence force, however he
should also seek to reorganize
and bring greater transparency
to the Police and Judicial
Commission, which handles
promotions, and to whom
political appointments are
made without effective vetting
as to a person’s qualifications
for such an appointment. I
have yet to forget how Mr
Turnquest was muscled about
by BTC union president
Robert Farquharson and how,
after being affronted, he sim-
ply turned around and
stomped off while BTC work-
ers brought Bay Street to a
halt.

Mr Turnquest is better suit-
ed for a ministry such as Social
Services or Housing. He earns
an F-plus, since he has yet to
deploy a more proactive, mul-
ti-disciplinary approach to
aggressively fighting the spike
in violent crime and the appre-
hension of citizens.

NEW CONDOS

Resario West
St. Albans Dr. New 3 Bedroom, 2 1/2 Bath,
3 Storey Townhouses. Gated Property.
Modern Kitchens & Well Appointed Interiors
$239,000) with only 5% deposit required.
Bank Financing Available
325-1325 454-2098 or 422-4489



Phase IT commences July 2009

Share your news

The Tribune wants to hear
from people who are
making news in their
neighbourhoods. Perhaps
you are raising funds for a
good cause, campaigning
for improvements in the
area or have won an
award.

If so, call us on 322-1986

¢TO BECONTINUED | | and share your story.








































FURNI
Celebrating

Z 0 years

Nassau * Grand Bahama * World Wide Web

tn 40
7 PIECE ACCENT COLEGIO ee Weer,

Add an accent
collection to your

room purchase
for as low as

per
5 week*

Here's how to enter:
Spend §500° or more

Fill out your entry forms
(1 per every $500 spent)

Your entries rallover every month
until September.

Shop early for MORE CHANCES to WIN,

Win one of 16 wanderful Island
Getaway trips for to
(Hotel & Flights included).

Grand Bahama and Nassau
Showrooms will draw Winners
at the end of every month

Show your Bahamian spirit and
“Shop 2 Hop” here at home... today!

C [el hey Ladin Caste

Wie dor just fy heen ‘ve: ieee har
VW
a

"WESTERN Air

* While Supplies Last
* With Approved Credit
* Some Stipulations May Apply

pitty. FORBES
SP HARTER

| Apply for IN-HOUSE FINANCING online today!

a
SS) NASSAU * Town Centre Mall

me Tel: (242) 397-PLUS 7s87
Mon-Fri Sam-6pm © Sat Jam-4pm Fos Mon-Sat 9am-9pm
Fax: (242) 352-9823 ~O- Fax: (242) 325-6368

www.fu rnitureplus.com

GRAND BAHAMA * Madeira Craft
Tel: (242) 352-PLUS san)



PAGE 12, MONDAY, MAY 11, 2009

TRIBUNE SPORTS



SPORTS

Henrik
Stenson wins
sVit EN on
Championship

HENRIK STENSON,

of Sweden, kisses the
winner's trophy after his
four shot victory at The
Players Championship
golf tournament at TPC
Sawgrass in Ponte Vedra
Beach, Fla., Sunday, May
10, 2009.

(AP Photo/Wilfredo Lee)



IN BRIEF

Gasquet: test
came hack
positive for coke

m@ PARIS

French tennis player Richard
Gasquet has acknowledged he’s
been told he tested positive for
cocaine but says he’s innocent,
according to Associated Press.

“T am gathering together proof
of my innocence and I will choose
an appropriate moment to
express myself,” Gasquet said in a
statement Sunday.

Gasquet said the “B” sample
from the tournament in Key Bis-
cayne, Fla., confirmed the result
of the “A” sample taken the same

2 0 Oo9 Spectra5/CERATO day. The Web site of sports daily
L’Equipe reported Saturday that

KIA MOTORS

The Power to Surprise”

The Spectras CERATO haa a sporty attitude with ita sport- ) :
fully independent ond Test against West Indies.

tuned suspension,

Buapension. It can seat up to five occupants. It is powered by a
1.6-liter four-cylinder that ia mated to a standard four-speed
automatic transmission.
Door Lacks, CD Radio, Two 4-Door Sedan Models including the

5-Boor Modal

ELITE MOTORS LTD. SANPIN MOTORS LIMITED

Thompéon Bhd. « Oakes Field
t, 242.326.6377" f. 242.326.6315
®. sanping@coralwave.com

#259 Vill Rood
PS. Be Matus
ba?) aD} | PPS





Alp Gondition, PWR Windows, FPWR

traces of the banned drug were
found in the 22-year-old Gas-
quet’s urine sample at the Sony
Ericsson Open.

UK's Button wins
Spanish Grand Prix
ASE Fat ee






BRAWN GP Jenson Button of
Britain celebrates after winning the
Spanish Formula One Grand Prix in
front of thrid placed Red Bull Mark
Webber, foreground, at the
Catalunya racetrack in Montmelo,
near Barcelona, Spain, on Sunday,
May 10, 2009.

Bell, Sidebottom
recalled for Test

England have recalled War-
wickshire batsman Jan Bell and
Nottinghamshire left-armer
Ryan Sidebottom for the sec-

Andrew Strauss’ team head
to the Riverside this week hav-
ing gone 1-0 up in the npower
series, bolstered by the addition
of an extra option in both bat-
ting and bowling departments.

; Bell was axed after the Test
ON THE SPOT FISLAN CIRE: WITH

COMMONaAEALTH BANK defeat in Jamaica three months

onemermasoamers ago but will offer the alterna-
u : ante .

chee hia ca ae tive of fielding six frontline bats-

BACKERS & AGENTS LTD men if the Chester-le-Street sur-

face looks seamer-friendly.



OLuropean soccer

Martin Rickett/AP Photo/PA

et s u
MANCHESTER UNITED'S Ryan Giggs, left, and Manchester City's
Nigel De Jong battle for the ball during their English Premier League
soccer match against Manchester City at Old Trafford Stadium,
Manchester, England, Sunday, May 10, 2009.

Man United move closer to title

mm LONDON — Manchester United held its three-point margin atop the
Premier League by beating neighbor Manchester City 2-0 on Sunday
while Chelsea romped to a 4-1 victory at Arsenal, according to the Asso-
ciated Press.

Cristiano Ronaldo scored his 18th league goal of the season with a
free kick at Old Trafford and Carlos Tevez added the second with a
shot from the edge of the area in the 45th to put United within four
points of a third Premier League title in a row and 11th in 17 seasons
under manager Alex Ferguson.

The victory maintained Man United’s lead with a game in hand
despite Liverpool’s 3-0 win at West Ham on Saturday, and Fergu-
son’s stars can move closer to the title by winning at Wigan on Wednes-
day. The two blemishes on United’s performance, however, were the
behavior of the two scorers.

While Man United moved closer to the title, Chelsea underlined why
it will challenge next season with a 4-1 victory at Arsenal.

After Alex and Nicolas Anelka gave Chelsea a 2-0 halftime lead, an
own goal by Kolo Tour in the 49th virtually put the game out of reach.
Although Arsenal’s Nicklas Bendtner scored, Florent Malouda added
a fourth in the 86th minute. Chelsea is three points behind Liverpool
as it tries to maintain its record of finishing in the top two in five sea-
sons. In contrast, Arsenal is guaranteed to finish fourth for the third sea-
son in four with no top-two finish during that time. That followed an
eight-season spell when the Gunners were never out of the top two,
winning three titles.



@ MADRID — Barcelona was denied the Spanish League title when
Joseba Llorente scored an injury-time goal to give Villarreal a 3-3 tie
at Barcelona. Barcelona was leading 3-1 after first-half goals by Seydou
Keita, Samuel Eto’o and Daniel Alves, leading to premature chants of
“champions” from Barcelona supporters at Camp Nou stadium. How-
ever, Villarreal scored a second goal with 13 minutes remaining — a
penalty by Mati Fernandez, which led to the dismissal of Barcelona
defender Eric Abidal. Llorente, who had also scored Villareal’s open-
ing goal, silenced the crowd with the late equalizer. Eight points clear
of Real Madrid with three rounds remaining, Barcelona hopes to
clinch the title next Sunday when it visits Mallorca.



B GLASGOW, Scotland — Rangers went to top of the Scottish Pre-
mier League standings with three games remaining after a 1-0 win over
defending champion and city rival Celtic.

Midfielder Steve Davis scored in the 37th minute at Ibrox to move
Rangers to 79 points, two more than Celtic, which is aiming for a
fourth straight title. Rangers is at Hibernian on Wednesday before host-
ing Aberdeen next weekend and finishing the league season at Dundee
United on May 24. It also plays Falkirk in the Scottish Cup final the fol-
lowing weekend.

THE THEFT OF ELEGTRIGHTY
IS A CRIMINAL OFFENCE

PUNISHABLE BY
TWO YEARS IN JAIL AND/OR
A $2000 FINE.

‘The PUwens to
report and
eratlicate this
crime runs

through YOU"

Please report all suspected cases of meter tampering and
electricity theft to the Bahamas Electricity Corporation.
Anonymous calls are welcomed. Confidentiality is guaranteed.
Please contact us at 323-4130.





TRIBUNE SPORTS

MONDAY, MAY 11, 2009, PAGE 13



SPORTS



BAPTIST SPORTS COUNCIL'S 2009 JOYCE MINUS BASKETBALL CLASSIC



Three new ch

IN an historic final day of com-
petition, three new champions
were crowned in the Baptist
Sports Council’ 2009 Joyce Minus
Basketball Classic on Saturday a
the Baillou Hills Sporting Com-
plex.

It was the first time that any
one Church contested for all of
the titles at the same time.

But Macedonia Baptist,
coached by Dayton Turnquest
and Brent Stubbs, denied Tem-
ple Fellowship the opportunity to
add another piece of history by
winning all three crowns.

In a clean sweep of their best-
of-three series, Macedonia clob-
bered Temple Fellowship 35-20
and 27-20 to secure the 15-and-
under title.

Coach Geno Campbell and
Temple Fellowship, however,
made sure that the other two
crowns didn't slip out of their
hands.

Their 19-and-under team also
pulled off a two-game sweep over
Golden Gates, coached by
league's honoree Joyce Minus, as
they pulled off the 33-31 and 42-
36 victories.

And in the men's series, it went
right down to the wire as Tem-
ple Fellowship dethroned Evan-
gelistic Center, coached by Alvin
Sands, with their 36-30, 19-33 and
46-26 decisions.

For his efforts, Campbell made
history as he was named the
Coach of the Year in both the 15-
and-under and men's division.

The other Coach of the Year
went to Norleen Henfield, who
won the title in the 19-and-under
division.

First Baptist was the first
Church to win two titles in two
divisions in the 15-and-under and
19-and-under for the past two
years. They were eliminated from
the playoffs by Temple Fellow-
ship in all three divisions.

Winning the Most Valuable
Player awards were James Rolle
from Macedonia in the 15-and-
under, Gabbie Laurent from
Temple Fellowship in the 19-and-
under and Jason Cooper from
Temple Fellowship in the men.

¢ Here's a summary o the
games played:

Macedonia 35, Temple Fel-
lowship 20 (15-and-under):
Stephen Miller led Macedonia in
the opener with 10 and James
Rolle and Adolpheus Leadon
both had eight. DeShawn White
had a game high 13 in the loss.

Macedonia 27, Temple Fel-
lowship 20 (15-and-under): James
Rolle scored nine points, Stephen
Miller had five and Geno Bullard
and Devin Carey both helped out
with four in the clincher for
Macedonia. DeShawn White had
a game high 12 ad Randy Miller
add five in the loss.

Temple Fellowship 33, Gold-
en Gates 31 (19-and-under):
Kevin Burrows had a game high
15, Marvin Albury and Gabbie
Laurent both had eight and Najee
Bethel and Leron Albury both
contributed three in the opener
for Temple Fellowship. Mel John-
son had 10, Samuel Johnson
added seven and Jonathan Davis
chipped in with five in the loss.

Temple Fellowship 42, Gold-
en Gates 36 (19-and-under):
Najee Bethel scored eight, Mar-
vin Albury had five and Gabbie
Laurent four as Temple Fellow-
ship wrapped up the sweep. Mel
Johnson had a game high 19,
Jonathan Davis added five and
Dominique Beadle chipped in
with four in the loss.

Temple Fellowship 36, Evan-
gelistic Center 30 (Men): Gabbie
Laurent had eight, Najee Bethel
six, Ilan Pinder five and Jason
Cooper four in the opener for
Temple Fellowship. Randy Fer-
guson had seven, Tyrone Sands
five and Kathon Hanna four in
the loss.

Evangelistic Center 33, Tem-








COACH Dayton Turnquest (kneeling) pose with members of Macedonia, who
captured the 15-and-under title in the Baptist Sports Council’s 2009 Joyce Minus
Basketball Classic on Saturday. At right is Minus, who made the presentation of
awards.



MEMBERS of Temple Fellowship celebrate above with their trophies for winning
the men’s championship and the president’s pennant in the Baptist Sports Coun-
cil’s 2009 Joyce Minus Basketball Classic on Saturday.

COACH Geno Bullard (center) poses with members of his Temple Fellowship 15-

and-under team that finished as runners-up. At left of Campbell is Joyce Minus, the
patron for this year’s tournament.

Jan Pinder added four in the loss.

Temple Fellowship 46, Evan-
gelistic Center 26 (Men): Ian Pin-
der scored a game high 10, Jason
Cooper had eight, Ishban Lynes
added six and Kevin Burrows

ple Fellowship 19 (Men): Tyrone
Sands had a game high eight
points and Randy Ferguson
added four as Evangelistic Center
starved off elimination in game
two. Jason Cooper scored six and

eee a ae eee ee ee a ae eee ee |

RM FRAME

WINDOWS

Nassau's Leading Manufacturer of Vinyl Windows and Vinyl Doors

APRIL SHOWERS

IN MAY 7?

Call for your FREE quote or

Come visit our factory located on 74 Mount Royal Avenue, Nassau,

TEL: 1-242-325-6633

: 1-242-325-6638



ampions crowned

JOYCE MINUS (second left) is honored by the Baptist Sports Council for her
administrative role she played over the years as the vice chairman. At left is
Renea Brice and at right is Norleen Henfield, who both made presentations to Minus
on behalf of the BSC. Behind are two players who played for Minus’ Golden
Gates team.








































































































The Bahamas Electricity Corporation

Tender

DAY TANK INSTALLATION
BAILEY TOWN, BIMINI

The Bahamas Electricity Corporation invites Tenders
from eligible bidders for the provision of
DAY TANK INSTALLATION AT BIMINI POWER STATION.

Sports

Bidders are required to collect packages from
the Corporation's Administration Office,
Blue Hill & Tucker Roads,
Contact Mrs. Delmeta Seymour at telephone 302-1158.

Volleyball Baptist
Sports Council meeting

WITH the basketball season
now completed, the Baptist
Sports Council will begin
preparation for the hosting of
the 2009 Nicola Major Vol-
leyball Classic. A meeting is
scheduled for Saturday at 10
am at the Bahamas Baptist
College, Jean Street for all
Churches interested

in participating. The league is
expected to get started on
Saturday, May 30 at the Tom
‘the Bird’ Grant Park in Yel-
low Elder. There is a regis-
tration fee of $100.00 per
team in each division. All
Churches, no matter what
denomination, are invited to
participate.

Tenders are to be addressed ta:
Mr. Kevin Basden, General Manager
Bahamas Electricity Corporation
Executive Offices
Blue Hill & Tucker Roads
Nassau, Bahamas

Deadline for delivery to BEC;

on or before May 15, 2009
no later than 4:00 p.m.

Submissions should be marked as follows:
Tender No. 703/09
DAY TAME IMSTALLATION
BAILEY TOWM, BIMINI

The Corporation reserves the right to accept
or reject the whole or such part of any Tender
chipped in with four in the closer
for Temple Fellowship. Tyrone
Sands scored nine, Randy Fergu-
son had six and Sherman Bowe
four in the loss.

For all enquiries regarding the Tenders, contact
Miss Simone Sawyer at telephone 302-1236

ft] CMT
70 kW/3,400 rpm

240 N-m/2,000 rpm 4

(SAE Net) .

-
q

By

y=) 3

Features Include:

* Extra power and fuel economy with the 14B direct injection
system diesel engine

* Air conditioning

* Rope hooks & footsteps for easy loading

* Automatically-adjusting clutch for easy maintenance

* Exhaust brake system for stopping power ach ary cent

/30,000-mile factory warranty, full parts

EM oy ARMA RULES

Price includes licensing and inspection to

birthday, floor mats and full tank of fuel.

* Heavy-duty front & rear suspension systems protect cargo
* Tilt/power steering & superb visibility in a comfortable cabin
* Wide, extra-long cargo bed with reinforced frame

EXECUTIVE
MOTORS LTD

AUTHORISED DAIHATSU DEALER
Available in Grand Bahama at Quality Auto Sales (Freeport) e Queens Hwy, 352-6122 * Abaco Motor Mall, Don MacKay Blvd, 367-2916

Auto Mall, Shirley Street (opp. St. Matthew’s Church)
Open Mon to Fri 8am - 5:30pm
Sat 8am - 12noon

Tel: 397-1700

E-mail: execmotor@batelnet.bs
Parts and service guaranteed



PAGE 14, MONDAY, MAY 11, 2009

TRIBUNE SPORTS



SPORTS



Truckers and Brackettes continue winning trends

m@ By RENALDO DORSETT
Sports Reporter
rdorsett@tribunemedia.net

Defending champions in both men’s
and women’s divisions continued the
winning trends from 2008 with a pair of
opening day wins to begin the 2009
New Providence Softball Association
season.

In the men’s feature, the Commando
Security Truckers held of a late game
charge to outlast the Robin Hood Hit-
men 8-7, while in the women’s match
up the Sigma Brackettes won 10-5 over
the Proper Care Pool Sharks.

In aclosely contested game through-

TRACK AND FIELD

Mathieu dominates
200 and 400 metres

out, the Truckers and Hitmen played
to an even 6-6 tie through three
innings.

After both teams went scoreless over
the course of the next two innings, the
Truckers took a decisive advantage
with two runs in the bottom half of the
sixth inning to take an 8-6 advantage.

The Hitmen managed one run in the
bottom half of the seventh but failed to
score an equalizer to force extra
innings.

Freddie Cornish led the defending
NPSA pennant winners, league cham-
pions and national champions, Truck-
ers to the win while Cardinal Gilbert
was tagged with the loss.

Steven Brown highlighted the Truck-
ers’ evening at the plate with a three
run home run in the first inning, his
lone hit of the game.

Marvin Wood finished 2-4, includ-
ing one double, with two runs and one
RBI.

Darron Stevens led the Hitmen
offensively as he went 2-4 with one
triple and one run scored while
Garfield Bethel went 2-5 with one run
and one RBI.

In the women’s feature the Brack-
ettes took charge from the game’s out-
set with an early 2-0 lead after the first
inning and never relinquished the
advantage.

The Brackettes piled on at least a
single run over the next three innings
and took a 6-3 lead heading into the
fifth.

The defending champions added
their run total with their most efficient
scoring inning of the game with four
runs.

Garnette Curry led the Brackettes
offensively as she went 2-3 with four
RBI and Shevette Taylor was 2-4, a
pair of doubles, with two runs and one
RBI.

Kelly Smith led the Sharks going 2-4
with one run scored.

Burket Dorsett, Bahamas Softball
Federation President said the federa-

tion was pleased with the level of play
on day one and looks forward to a sea-
son of similar play over the year.
“Competition was keen from the
very first night as we expected, these
players worked hard in the off-season
and it showed tonight on the field set-
ting the pace for what is expected to be
a great season” he said, “The BSF
wishes the NPSA, its players, execu-
tives and administrators a successful
season, we will facilitate their growth
and development particularly with the
youth initiatives as we concentrate on
the training of a younger generation
of softball players to continue the rich
heritage of the sport in the country.”

FROM page 15

Bahamas Speed Dynamics’
Shautae Miller in 26.55. Club
Monica’s Kellie Rolle was third
in 26.70.

And in the 400, Bahamas
Speed Dynamics’ Pedrya Sey-
mour won in 1:00.83.

College of the Bahamas’ Itsa
Smith was second in 1:03.12 and
Striders Athletics’ Shatyna Stu-
art got third in 1:03.19.

Robinson also doubled up in
the girls under-18 100 hurdles
in 14.15.

Star Trackers’ Devinn
Cartwright (14.58) and Lauren
Charlton (16.04) were second
and third respectively.

And she made it a triple treat
with her victory in the women’s
long jump with a leap of 5.52
metres.

Deandra Deveaux of
Jumpers Inc was second with
5.16 and Striders Athletics’
Shatyna Stuart was third with
4.89. Kemp pulled off a victory
in the women’s 100 hurdles in
14.87. CI Gibson’s Vanessa
Brown was second in 19.61.

@ FRITZ GRANT TRACK

AND FIELD INVITATIONAL



Among the other winners
were Marissa Capron in the
girls under-7 80 (14.53); Joshua
Ferguson in the boys under-7
80 (14.38); Gem Wilson in the
under-9 girls 80 (12.41); Blaize
Darling in the boys under-8 80
(12.35).

Blayre Catalyn in the girls
under-11 100 (14.14); Sanchez
Thompson in the boys under-
11 100 (14.28); Shaunae Miller
in the girls under-17 100 (12.35)
and Harold Carter in the boys
under-17 100 (10.86).

There was also two races for
the Special Olympics.

In the girls 100, Racquel
Moxey won in 14.94, followed
by Trenice Bell in 15.17 with
Ruth Hepburn third in 15.44.

The boys’ straight away race
was won by D’Edwin Major in
12.55, followed by Brent Coop-
er in 12.61.

Christopher Rolle was third
in 12.65.

PHOTOS: Felipé Major/Tribune staff






























2008 FORD EXPLORER XLT

7 Passanger XLT, Leather Interior

~~’

was $42,073.00 |
NOW $33,800.00

DEAL

2008 FORD SPORT TRAC

















LIMITED - Leather Interior

was $46,186.00
NOW $37,300.00 f

i __ --

, |= =//

ee

2008 FORD EDGE SEL

=

= i
——— |

a

i
_ ae

Save BIG Right Now!

was $41 670.00
NOW $35,400.00

3 years or 36,000 miles warranty, 3 years roadside
= | assistant, 3 years rust protections warranty and
~ licensed and inspected up to birthday.

Now THAT S REALLY A

| 53| |((}\Deal
FRIENDLY MOTORS CO, LTD

THOMPSON BOULEVARD ° TEL.: 356-7100 * FAX: 328-6094

EMAIL: friendlymotors@hotmail.com * WEBSITE: friendlymotorsbahamas.com

NOW $35,800.00

QJAY FERGUSON in the 400 metres.

RYAN INGRAHAM is airborne during the high jump.

FROM page 15

Olympic champion LaShawn
Merritt (44.50) and runner-up
Jeremy Wariner (44.69). Latroy
Williams, another Bahamian, who
had originally led the list with
45.01, has dropped to fourth, but
he's also qualified for Berlin.

American Darold Williamson
was second in Friday's race in
45.68 and Sanjay Ayre got third in
45.98. Over at the Osaka Grand
Prix in his return to Japan where
he made a sensational break-
through at the World Champi-
onships last year, Shamar Sands
posted a winning time of 13.40 in
the men's 110 hurdles.

Not only was it below the qual-
ifying standard of 13.55 for Berlin,
but it also reduced Sands’ nation-
al record of 13.40. Sands now has
the ninth fastest time in the world.
Leading the way is American
David Oliver in 13.09.

China's Shi Dongpeng was sec-
ond in 13.48 and Ji Wei got third
in 13.51. “IT am satisfied with my
(national) record, although I hit
the sixth and seventh hurdles,"
Sands was quoted as saying in an
interview on the meet's website.
"My start was especially good.”

Also at the meet, Donald
Thomas had another victorious
performance in the men's high
jump, although he only cleared
2.28 metres. Thomas still has the
third best leap of the season with
2.30. Andre Manson is out front

VALONEE ROBINSON wins the long jump.



Athletes shine

with 2.35. Thomas, another
Grand Bahamian native who
three years ago switched from
playing basketball to clearing the
high bar, won the world champi-
onship title in Japan in his debut
there two years ago.

"Nagai stadium is good to me,"
said Thomas about his back-to-
back winning feat in as many
appearances.

American Tora Harris was sec-
ond in 2.25 and Poland's Grze-
gorz Sposob got third in 2.25.

Sprinter Derrick Atkins, the
World Championships’ 100 silver
medalist from Osaka, is slowly
working back to his old form after
he was hampered with a slight
injury going into the Olympics
where he failed to make the final.

Stepping up to the half-lapper
as he looks ahead to a possible
100-200 combo in Berlin, Atkins
won the race in 20.35 over quar-
ter-miler Nathaniel McKinney,
who did 20.67 for second. Amer-
ican David Dickens was third in
20.70.

They were a part of a Bahami-
an contingent that competed at
the Georgia Invitational at the
University of Georgia's Specs
Town Track in Athens, Georgia.

McKinney, working his way
back for a spot on the men's 4 x

ee
ease uleoreh
In Just One Day!

Our DuraBath SSP Bathtubs & Wall Systems
are custom made to cover worn-out bathtubs
and out-of-date wall tiles...

No Mess. No Stress.
No Inconvenience.

tr .rebath.com

RE*BATH BAHAMAS

(Manufacturer's Lifetime Warranty).

Telephone:
(oa 93-8501
242) 394-6969

“Agthorzed Oealer

Sm ire eee Mere oR en Maeda ise
Open Monday - Friday - 9:00 am. - 5:00 p.m.



400 team again after he was left
off the Olympic team, also com-
peted in the 400 where he won
the one-lapper in 47.34.

Another Bahamian and fellow
Olympic team-mate Aaron
Cleare was second in 47.54.
American Montez Valentine,
competing for Shorter, was third
in 48.67. Also at the meet, Bene-
dict College's Petra McDonald
took the women's 100 hurdles in
14.17 in a photo finish with Jas-
mine Johnson of Georgia State.

McDonald also contested the
long jump, but she failed to
record a leap, having fouled her
first five attempts and passed on
the sixth and final one.
Antionette Oglesby of Fort Val-
ley State won with a leap of 19-5
1/2. And her Benedict State team-
mate Melinda Bastian picked up
a third place finish in the women's
javelin with a heave of 146-feet,
11-inches (44.79 metres) on her
second attempt. Winning the
event was Michelle Thompson of
Georgia with 165-8 (50.50) on her
first attempt, followed by Kristy
Woodward with 156-5 (47.68
metres) on her first attempt as
well.

At the 2009 Chick-fil-A UNC
Elite Meet in Chapel Hill, North
Carolina, veteran sprinter Chan-
dra Sturrup came close to pulling
off a double dose of victory as
she continue her quest to another
appearance at the World Cham-
pionships. Sturrup easily ran away
with the field in the women's 100,
shooting through the straightaway
in 11.28 to go under the A quali-
fying mark of 11.30 for Berlin.
Two South Carolina athletes, Kya
Brookins and Gabby Glenn were
second and third respectively in
11.47 and 11.81.

However, Sturrup had to settle
for second when she moved up
to the half-lapper, clocking 23.72
for second place in the women's
200, which was shy of the B qual-
ifying time of 23.30.

Cynetheia Rooks of Shekinah
Track Club stopped the clock in
23.42 for the win. Shayla Mahan
of South Carolina was third in
23.86. At the Ward Haylett Invi-
tational at the R V Christian
Track in Manhattan, Kansas, Tia
Rolle produced the same finishers
as Sturrup, only in reverse order.

Representing Lincoln Univer-
sity, Rolle ran 12.07 for second
in the century. Her team-mate
Nandelle Cameron won in 11.79
and Maja Mihalinec of Nebras-
ka-Omaha was third in 12.12.

In the 200, Rolle pulled off the
victory in 24.62. Kim Haberman
of Kansas-State was second in
24.94 and Sudian Davis of Lin-



THE TRIBUNE





















FROSTY-Cino

Coffee Shake

PAGE 15
-
|

MONDAY, MAY 11,







TRACK AND FIELD





Baliamian athletes
shine around word

Andrae Williams records one of fastest times in men’s 400
Shamar Sands posts national record in 110 hurdles

——

MICHAEL MATHIEU wins
the men’s invitational

400 metres.

Twisted Frosty

mg By BRENT STUBBS
Tribune Sports Reporter
bstubbs@tribunemdia. net

IT was another sizzling week-
end — posting one of the fastest
time in the men's 400 and anoth-
er 110 hurdles national record —
for Bahamian athletes around the
world.

It started on Friday at the
Texas Tech Open at the Terry
and Linda Fuller Track & Field
Complex where Andrae Wiliams
continued to keep his name in
the forefront in the men's 400.

The Grand Bahamian native,

who ran on the Bahamas’ 4 x 400
relay team that secured the sil-
ver at the Olympic Games in Bei-
jing, China, is aiming for a spot in
the 400 at the IAAF World
Championships in Berlin, Ger-
many in August.

Williams qualified for the event
by clocking a season's best of
44.98 seconds to win the one-lap-
per at the . The A qualifying
mark for Berlin is 45.55.

He now moves into third place
in the IAAF world list behind

SEE page 14

Felipé Major/Tribune staff

Mathieu dominates

200 and 400 metres

m@ By BRENT STUBBS
Senior Sports Reporter
bstubbs@tribunemedia.com

MICHAEL Mathieu took advantage of the visiting athletes that
came to town for the Fritz Grant Track and Field Invitational by
dominating the men’s invitational 200 and 400 metres.

The Grand Bahamian native easily took the half-lapper in 20.80
seconds, well ahead of his Bahamian rival Adrian Griffith, who got

second in 21.25.

Jamaican DeWayne Barrett was third in

21.59.

“The elite

Mathieu, a member of the Bahamas’ 4x athletes who
400 relay team that clinched the silver at Were In town
the Olympic Games in Beijing, China last said they will
year, doubled up in the one-lapper with his definitely come

victory in 46.26.

back next year

In the process, he held off a pair of if they aa
Jamaicans who challenged him. Barrett had invited.
to once again settle for second in 46.69 and
Sekou Clarke ended up third in 46.80.
In another race featuring the interna-
tional flavour, Jamaican Lerone Clarke sped
to a winning time of 10.36 ahead of two Bahamians.
Griffith got second in 10.44 and his training partner Rodney

Green was third in 10.55.

Meet director Bernard Newbold said the visiting athletes certainly
brought a new dimension to the meet.

But he said there were sufficient local athletes participating that
enabled the meet to live up to its advanced billing.

“The meet was very successful,” said Newbold, who noted that
they had more than 600 athletes registered.

“The elite athletes who were in town said they will definitely
come back next year if they are invited.”

The 4x 100 metre shuttle relay, which was introduced for the first
time at a local meet, was just as exciting for the fans who showed up
on Saturday’s final day of competition.

The relays, which allowed the athletes to run in a format back and
forth from the starting line to the finish, were contested for the
under-7, under-9 and under-11 divisions.

There was one invitational race for women with Ambassadors
Athletics’ Katrina Seymour winning the 400 in 55.88. Deshana
Burnside of Bahamas Speed Dynamics in 56.79, followed by her
team-mate Shauntae Miller in 59.60.

V’Alonee Robinson, competing for Club Monica, took the 100 in
11.85 over her team-mate Ivanique Kemp (12.19) and Bahamas
Speed Dynamics’ Dominique Morley (12.59).

In the 200, Kemp stopped the clock in 25.37, followed by

SEE page 14



THE TRIBUNE
D yu

lm By CHESTER ROBARDS
Business Reporter
crobards@tribunemedia.net

THE OLD City Lumberyard,
which met its end by fire sever-
al years ago, has received a
more than $15 million
makeover from its new owners,
who are developing the almost-
12 acre property into Builder’s
Mall.

Owner Mark Roberts said
FYP (Fix Your Place) will
become a veritable builder’s
mecca once the proposed gran-
ite fabrication factory is con-
structed, Tile King is moved
from its existing Palmdale
premises to the new Wulff
Road location, and several oth-
er construction-oriented busi-
nesses lease FYP’s available
office space.

“The idea behind Builder’s
Mall is that we would like to
create a facility that makes it
easy to come and do a lot of
construction-oriented business,”
said Mr Roberts.

The property’s enormous red
hardware store is hard to miss,
but the 65 foot tower crane



ine

MONDAY,



MAY 11,

SECTION B « business@tribunemedia.net

$15m makeover builds
key business location

Granite fabrication facility, kitchen manufacturing
and possible concrete block plant all possible
future additions to FYP’s Wulff Road complex

looming in the rear of the build-
ings, which is part of a fleet of
rental equipment, including a
Skytrak, and other forklifts, is
difficult to overlook.

Mr Roberts said the company
was toying with the idea of also
constructing a concrete block
plant, but that could be three
to four years into the future.

For the moment, the Paint
Centre, the hardware store, the
future site of the Tile King and
the lumberyard occupy only
four of the property’s 12 acres.

They hope to also open a
kitchen manufacturing facility
on property. “We’ll be doing
custom kitchens,” said Mr
Roberts.

Despite the large number of
outlets concentrated on FYP’s
lot, he argues that he can never

BISX-listed entity eyes
real estate deal overseas

@ By NEIL HARTNELL
Tribune Business Editor

THE BISX-listed Bahamas
Property Fund is exploring the
potential acquisition of foreign
properties, its administrator has
told Tribune Business, in addi-
tion to diversifying its real estate
holdings into ventures such as
shopping centres, having end-
ed fiscal 2008 with a 1.45 per
cent net income increase to
$2.654 million.

Michael Anderson, who is
also president of RoyalFidelity
Merchant Bank & Trust, said
the Property Fund’s balance
sheet strength had left it well-
positioned to acquire further
select commercial properties,
with the economic downturn
likely to place some owners
under pressure to sell.

He told Tribune Business
that the Property Fund was
“potentially looking at acquiring
a property in the Cayman
Islands”, where RoyalFidelity
and one of the latter’s 50 per
cent shareholders had an exten-
sive commercial presence.

While the Property Fund was
not currently in negotiations for
any specific property, Mr
Anderson added: “If we can
find something that makes
sense for us, and can get Central
Bank approval to buy the prop-
erty, it will help us diversify out-
side the Bahamas, and give us

* Still waiting for
Investments Board
approvals to close $3.5m
Pwe building deal

* Property Fund looking
for further diversification
through likes of
shopping centres

* Looking to end for
approvals ‘anomaly’

investment opportunities out-
side the Bahamas.

“If there are opportunities
here or somewhere else, we
have to be in a position to take
advantage of them.”

When it came to ammunition
for acquisition financing, Mr
Anderson said the Property
Fund had plenty. He pointed to
its year-end 2008 balance sheet,
which showed it had some
$33.573 million in net equity,
and debt amounting to just over
$15.5 million collectively.

This was almost a complete
reversal of the Property Fund’s
financial position when it was
formed, as then it had two-
thirds of its financing in debt
and one-third in equity. The
2008 year-end balance sheet

SEE page 7B

Harbour Breeze

Offered for sale and available for immediate occupancy, this 3 bedroom,
3 bath ground floor condo offers the best value on Paradise Island. Special
features include French doors and casement windows, dual zone air con-
ditioning system, tray ceilings and porcelain floor tiles. The superior qual-
ity of construction 1s visible throughout the 2800 SF of living
space/patios. Community amenities include a fitness center, spectacular
zero entry pool, underground parking, gated entrances and panoramic
harbour views. Offered by Mario Carey Realty for sale at $1,160,000 and
for rent at $7,000 per month. Web Listing #8325.

NA

MARIO CAREY REALTY

Dts about you... Let's talk.

Tel: 242-677-TALK (8255) | Fax: 242-677-8256 | Cell: 242-357-7013
info@mariocareyrealty.com | www.mariocareyrealty.com



claim the place to be a one-stop
shop.

“You go to Home Depot and
sometimes you can’t find what
you need,” he said.

The store is comfortably rem-
iniscent of the US hardware
giant popular with Bahamians,
as steel shelves that are a famil-
iar sight in all Home

Depot stores rise from the
concrete flooring. In fact, FYP’s
shelving was once part of a
Home Depot store.

The showroom for the hard-
ware section features tools man-
ufactured worldwide, with
sundry brands lining the wall
adjacent to what is the nut, bolt
and screw distribution counter.

The hardware section of FYP
opened its doors only last week,
three years after Mr Roberts

acquired the property, while the
Tile King is scheduled to open
in July. The Paint Centre has
been operating for one year.

A known philanthropist Mr
Roberts hopes to take his suc-
cess outside of the boundaries
of FYP’s gates to the surround-
ing community. His company is
well-known for its charity work,
having made building supply
donations to the people of
Inagua in the wake of last year’s
hurricane Ike and donating 14
new dialysis machines to Doc-
tor’s Hospital.

“We want to do more com-
munity service in the area,” said
Mr Roberts.

Now more expansions are on
the drawing table, and July’s
Grand Opening just around the
corner.

we

ColinaImperial.

Confidence For Life





Bank’s $20m offering
‘20% oversubscribed’

B By NEIL HARTNELL
Tribune Business Editor

BANK of the
Bahamas Inter- |
national’s $20 ee
million private
preference share |-
issue was “over-
subscribed by
about 20 per
cent”, the com-
pany’s place-
ment agent told
Tribune Busi-
ness, with the institution itself
saying the response represented
“a vote of confidence” in the
bank and its strategy.

Anthony Ferguson, CFAL’s
president, said: “It was $20 mil-
lion raised, and it was oversub-
scribed by about 20 per cent, I
believe.” That would imply that
subscriptions were received for
a total of around $24 million.

Mr Ferguson said all investors
who subscribed to the private
placement offering would be
accommodated, with CFAL and
Bank of the Bahamas Interna-
tional adopting a “bottom up”
approach. This means that all
investors would receive their
first tranche of $250,000 worth
of preference shares, the mini-
mum subscription requirement.
They would then work their

>
” Coe
=
ber
i

Ferguson

Kitchen company fits Bahamas first

m By CHESTER ROBARDS
Business Reporter
crobards@tribunemedia.net

CANADA-based
Downsview Kitchens has
launched its first showroom and
distribution centre outside of
North America at the Airport
Industrial Park in Western New
Providence, having picked up
an exclusive contract to do cus-
tom installations for the $1.4
billion Albany project just the
day before.

Gary Stannis,the company’s
design consultant, told Tribune
Business during the showroom
launch that the Albany devel-
Opers were impressed by the
model of their conservative-tyle
kitchen.

* Unveils first distribution centre outside
North America at Airport Industrial Park
* Lands contract with $1.4bn Albany project

“We’re excited about the
opportunity to work on the
[Albany] cottages,” he said. “It
should hopefully lead to more
and more.”

Mr Stannis said Downsview
was a high-end custom kitchen
cabinetry maker that has fur-
nished multi-million dolar
properties from Canada to
South America.

In the Bahamas, Downsview
had done jobs on properties in
Lyfrod Cay, the Ocean Club
Estates, Old Fort Bay and in
the Goodman’s Bay area.

Mr Stannis said some of those
jobs ranged in price from
$300,000 to $400,000, with the
most expensive installation on
the island costing around
$650,000.

Despite the name,
Downsview Kitchen also spe-
cializes in custom bathrooms
and entertainment centres.

Downsview is represented in
the Bahamas by Caribbean
Construction and Management
Service (CCMS), and has show-

SEE page 4B

medical emergencies

don't study economics

... they don't know the word “recession” either. That's why you
need to maintain your insurance coverage with Colinalmperial
even when the economy is weak — to make sure hard times don't
get harder just because you fall ill or fall down on your luck.

Stay confident. Stay connected,

confidence for life

i
,

FIRST AID

Tee ec ae



* Managing director says
placement’s success a ‘vote
of confidence’ in bank

way up via tranches of $250,000,
with those investors who sub-
scribed for the most receiving
the least in relation to the size of
their application.

Paul McWeeney, Bank of the
Bahamas International’s man-
aging director, told Tribune
Business that the $20 million
share offering closed “on
Wednesday or Thursday” last
week after it was oversub-
scribed.

“They’re working through the
allotments,” he added, of how
CFAL were allocating the
shares. “It’s a vote of confidence
in the bank, and it reflects the
fact that investors are looking
for attractive, safer types of
investment.

“We’re doing the closing and
issuing share certificates now.
The settlement account is with
the bank, and the funds are sub-
stantially in place.”

Mr McWeeney said Bahami-
an investors were currently
looking for safety, soundness

SEE page 8B



party and The Tr a e
responsible for errors and/or “omissi
from the daily report. stall

ColinaImperial.





THE TRIBUNE

MONDAY, MAY 11, 2009, PAGE 3B





Nassau/PI stopovers fall 15.9% in January

@ By NEIL HARTNELL
Tribune Business Editor

AJR stopover visitors to Nas-
sau/Paradise Island declined by
15.9 per cent during January
2009 year-over-year, highlight-
ing the full extent of the impact
that the global economic down-
turn has had on the highest
spending tourist category.

The Ministry of Tourism’s
Market Update for January this
year, which was obtained by
Tribune Business after being
released to the private sector
on Friday, revealed that Cat
Cay (a private island) and Bimi-
ni were the only two destina-
tions in the Bahamas to experi-
ence an increase in air arrivals
during January 2009.

The report confirmed earlier
revelations by Vincent Vander-
pool-Wallace, the minister of
tourism, in stating that air
arrivals for the Bahamas as a
whole for January 2009 declined
by 18.7 per cent to 89,999, com-
pared to 110,759 in 2008,. Nas-
sau/Paradise Island, which
attracts the lion’s share, saw vis-
itor numbers fall from 81,923 in
2008 to 68,880 this time around.

Faring worst were the Berry
Islands and Cat Island, which
saw year-over-year stopover
tourist declines of 56.2 per cent
and 53 per cent respectively.
Also faring worse than Nas-
sau/Paradise Island were Grand
Bahama, with a 25.8 per cent
drop; Abaco, with a 24.2 per
cent decline; Exuma, with a 37
per cent fall, and Eleuthera with
a 29.8 per cent drop-off.

While the Ministry of
Tourism made much of the fact
that the Bahamas enjoyed a
22.5 per cent increase in cruise
arrivals during January 2009,
raising total tourist arrivals by
10.2 per cent year-over-year,
this did little to compensate for
the drastic fall-off in revenues
experienced by hotels and all
land-based companies depen-
dent on the tourism industry.

For starters, when it comes
to per head spending, there is
no comparison. Stopover visi-
tors spend in the region of
$1100 per visit, cruise passen-
gers somewhere between $50-
$60 per head.

Pontificating on some of
these questions itself, the Min-
istry of Tourism said in its Mar-
ket Update: “The year 2009
gave birth to a brighter new day
with January. Visitor arrivals to
the Bahamas took a turn for the
better and were up by 10.2 per
cent.

“Air arrivals, which had been
strong in January 2008, were

weak in January 2009 (down
18.7 per cent) but cruise arrivals
to the Bahamas were very
strong (up 22.5 per cent) despite
the challenges now facing the
cruise industry.

“Cruise arrivals, which had
been weak in the early part of
2008, would now in 2009 be the
driving force behind the
increase in visitor arrivals. The
questions that would now be on
the minds of many people
would be: ‘How well would the
cruise arrivals to the destina-
tion be able to sustain and pre-
vent the falloff in total visitor
arrivals? And would the
Bahamas be able to sustain the
growth in cruise arrivals for any
length of time?’”

Elsewhere, anticipating a few
negative answers, the Ministry
of Tourism pointed out that



































eh Tee

boi Sherl

De Deo a Rei Td

France, Germany and the UK,
which respectively contributed 1
per cent, 1 per cent and 3 per
cent of the Bahamas’ total
stopover visitor business were
all now in economic recession.

And Canada, which was the
second largest supplier of
stopover visitors with an 8 per
cent market share, was also in
trouble. “Arrivals to the
Bahamas from Canada have
fallen off since the financial
meltdown in September 2008,
and by January 2009 they had
not yet recovered,” the Ministry
of Tourism warned.

Not surprisingly, this trans-
lated into a reduction in
stopover visitors from all major
markets during 2009, with the
exception of Europe, Latin
America and the Middle East.

On the cruise front, while

A

STERLING

«PERSUASIVE
* PERSISTENT
* PROFESSIONAL

ieee eee mei

CPA/ CERTIFIED PUBLIC ACCOUNTANT

eh Description:

Apoly princicdes of accounting to analyze financial information and prepare financial reports by

compiling infirmalion, preparing prolit and kes statements, and utilizing appropriate accounting,
control procedures.

Primary Hesponsibiliises
|, Prepare pent and loss strtements and monthly chosing and cost acoounting reports.

2. Compile and analyze financial information to prepare emines io accounts, such a8 general ledger
ACCOUNT, and docanecnt business transactions.
3, Establish, maintain, ond coordinate the implementation of acoqanting and accounting coetrol

procedures.

4. Analyze and review budgets and expenditures for contracts

5. Manitor and riwiew accounting and related system reports lor accuracy and completeness.
6. Prepare and review budget, revenue, expense, payroll entries, invoices, and other accounting

documents,

J. Analyae revenue and expendibere trends and recommend appropriate budget levels, and ensure
expenditure contral,
K. Explain hilling invoices and accounting policies in stalf, vendors and clients.
4, Resolve accounting discrepancies,
10. Recommend, develop and mamtain financial data bases, computer software systems and manual

filing aysbertes.

11. Supervise the input and handling of financial data and reports for the company’s automated

firancaal systems.

12. Interact with aadivors im completing audits if mecessary.
13. Other duties as assigned.

Additional Responsibilitics
|. Develop the annual operating budget and coma: with departmental managementon the fiscal
xepects of program planning, salary recommendations, and other administrative actions,

2. Prowide accounting policy orientation for new stalf,

Skills Required::

Keowlodec of finance, accounting, budgeting, and cost control principles inchading Generally Accepted

Accounting Principles. Knowledge of financial and acocunting software applications,
Cenckbouks and Mirces solkware brcwledge a plus.

Employment Type: Full Time

Yearly Salary: Unegecified

Level of Education; College
Vears of Work 3405 Years
Experience:

Edwcution & Experience

Contect Infermadion

Nassau/Paradise Island did see a
22.2 per cent increase in these
visitors from 130,312 to 159,197
during January 2009, the scale
of that increase was matched —
or even dwarfed — by cruise line
use of their private islands.
The Berry Islands, where
Coco Cay is situated, experi-
enced a 54 per cent increase in
cruise arrivals during January
2009, with Half Moon Cay
enjoying a 22.8 per cent growth.
While all cruise lines

“brought in significantly more
passengers in January 2009
compared to January 2008”, the


























Market Update added: “The
Out Islands were up 29 per cent
(first port of entry) in January
2009 because many of the major
cruise lines brought in more
passengers than during the
same period of 2008.

“Disney Cruise’s Disney
Wonder brought in more pas-
sengers to Castaway Cay, Aba-
co, in January 2009 than in the
same period of 2008. In Janu-
ary 2009, Royal Caribbean
International’s Mariner of the
Seas, Monarch of the Seas, and
Navigator of the Seas all
brought in more passengers to

Coco Cay (Berry Islands,
Bahamas) as a first port of call
than in the same period of
2008.

“In addition, Norwegian
Cruise line’s Norwegian Dawn,
Norwegian Majesty, and Nor-
wegian Pearl all brought in
more passengers as a first port
of call into Great Stirrup Cay
(Berry Islands, Bahamas) than
in the same period of 2008.
Holland American Cruises
brought in more passengers to
Half Moon Cay as a first port of
call in January 2009 than in the
same period of 2008.”

Are youa

mature learner
who wants an

upgrade?

Are you seeking

personal

development?

The College of The Bahamas
Centre for Continuing Education and
Extension Services (CEES)
is offering these Summer 2009 Computer Courses

for 50+ learners and retirees:-

Keyboarding - 5 weeks ($200)

Introduction to Microsoft Word - 4 weeks ($200)
Introduction to the Internet - 2 days ($155)

CLASSES BEGIN May 4th, 6th and 7th

All fees are included with the exception of a one time application fee of $40. CEES reserves the right

to change tuition, fees, content, course schedule and course materials.

Phone: 325-5714; 328-0093; 328-1936;
302-4300 ext. 5202 or email: acurry@cob.edu.bs





Only $69"



Vacation in Paradise.

per person double occupancy.

Minimum 2-night stay. Bahamas residents only.

J A a)

ab

Bo _—" 4) ue

Le we tea |

ae a
ee ~
i J

opt
? —
. Sid ja

Full use of all Atlantis facilities. Plus:
+ Complimentary continental breakfast datly
¢ Junwor Suites with King-size or two double beds
+ Cable TV, refrigerator, in-room safe,
coffee maker, hair dryer

«Kids 15 and under, jree

Company: King’s Ricalty ° Pool with swim-up har

Coatact Mame: Lillith Bostwick

Coatact Phone: 242-99444997

Limited-time offer! Reserve today /
Call 242-363-3680

*$69 per person double occupancy per night Sun. - Wed. Add $20 pp for Thurs. - Sat. Maximum
four persons per room. Rates effective through December 15. Additional fees apply for mandatory
taxes, mandatory housekeeping gratuities and utility service fees. Rates quoted are based on
standard room category and are subject to availability. Cancellations must be received 48 hours
prior to arrival or a one night penalty will apply.

Coatact Fax: 243-304-4492

Coatact E-mail:

linthkingsrealty com ! bakamssiikingsrcalty. com



Preferred Method
af Contact:

E-mail









PAGE 4B, MONDAY, MAY 11, 2009

THE TRIBUNE



>) =<;\;
GM bankruptcy almost inevitable, experts say

mg By TOM KRISHER
AP Auto Writer

DETROIT (AP) — For Gen-
eral Motors Corp., the task at
hand is so difficult that experts
say a Chapter 11 bankruptcy fil-
ing is all but inevitable.

To remake itself outside of
court, GM must persuade bond-
holders to swap $27 billion in
debt for 10 percent of its risky
stock. On top of that, the
automaker must work out deals
with its union, announce factory
closures, cut or sell brands and
force hundreds of dealers out of
business — all in three weeks.

"T just don't see how it's pos-
sible, given all of the pieces,”

said Stephen J. Lubben, a pro-
fessor at Seton Hall University
School of Law who specializes in
bankruptcy.

In Ohio, the automaker
employs thousands at a number
of plants, including a major
assembly complex in Lordstown,
near Youngstown.

GM, which has received $15.4
billion in federal aid, faces a
June 1 government deadline to
complete its restructuring plan.
If it can't finish in time, the com-
pany will follow Detroit com-
petitor Chrysler LLC into bank-
ruptcy protection.

Although company executives
said last week they would still
prefer to restructure out of

WHY PAY MORE?

Round Trip Airfare

$79.99

Nassau — Mangrove Cay
Nassau — Congo Town
Nassau — Fresh Creek

Roeewicthore, Apipdp

For ticket sales and travel information contac!
Performance Air at 262-1008 / 362. 2202.

or
WW, POTTOrmaAnce-alrcom



License # AGG PRLA-TaH

court, experts say all GM is
doing now is lining up majori-
ties of stakeholders to make its
court-supervised reorganization
move more quickly.

"If we need to pursue bank-
ruptcy, we will make sure that
we do it in an expeditious fash-
ion. The exact strategies I'm not
getting into today, but we'll be
ready to go if that's required,”
Chief Executive Fritz Hender-
son said last week.

The threat of bankruptcy,
however, may be just a negoti-
ating ploy to pull reluctant bond-
holders into the equity swap
deal. In Chrysler's case, some
secured debtholders resisted tak-
ing roughly 30 cents on the dol-
lar for what they were owed, but
most gave in after they were
identified in court documents.

Henderson, who took over in
March when the government
ousted Rick Wagoner, said last
week there's still time to get
everything done by the dead-
line, although he conceded it will
be difficult to meet a govern-
ment requirement that 90 per-
cent of its thousands of bond-
holders agree to the stock swap.

The biggest obstacle to GM
restructuring out of court
appears to be its bondholders,
who have been reluctant to sign
on to the stock swap when the

government and United Auto
Workers union would get far
more stock in exchange for debts
owed by GM.

GM has proposed issuing 62
billion new shares, 100 times
more than the 611 million now
offered publicly.

Even though the U.S. govern-
ment has agreed to back up GM
and Chrysler new-car warranties,
potential car buyers already view
GM as if it's in bankruptcy,
reflected by the company’s steep
revenue drop in the latest quar-
ter, Lubben said. On Thursday,
GM posted a $6 billion first-
quarter loss and said its revenue
dropped plunged by nearly half,
largely because bankruptcy fears
scared customers away from
showrooms.

"T don't think anyone is buy-
ing cars from a company who is
wringing their hands about a
potential bankruptcy for the past
year or so," he said.

Under Chapter 11, a company
can stay in operation under
court protection while sheds
debts and unprofitable assets to
emerge in a stronger financial
position.

At this point, GM needs to
resolve the uncertainty and get
in and out of bankruptcy as
quickly as possible, Lubben said.

The company is talking with

Kitchen company
fits Bahamas first

FROM page 1B

rooms in Dania Beach, Florida,
at the exclusive Design Centre
of the Americas, and in Juno
Beach, Florida.

“The local showroom has

Bahamas Red Cross Society

Job Openings

The Bahamas Red Cross Society has immediate openings for the

position of:
Welfare Officer
Cook

Duties:

Welfare Officer:

1. Coordination of the Welfare Department to include the supervision of
staff and monitoring of donations of a non-financial nature.

Overall responsibility for the management of the Meals-on-Wheels

Programme.

3. Act as a liaison officer with the Family Island Centers and group

leaders.

Competencies:

The successful candidate should possess a high degree of competence

in teamwork.

Commitment to the Fundamental Principles of the International
Federation of the International Red Cross and Red Crescent Societies

required.

Integrity and aaert ss conduct; sensitivity to diversity, flexibility

and adaptabill

ty; should also have a high degree of competence in

Management of strategy, change, leadership, planning, budgets,

resources.

Able to monitor and supervise team with regards to reporting;
communication; networking. Skills in management of self and others a

must.

oo

. Preparation of nutritionally balanced meals daily for approximately

one hundred

ersons.

Ensuring working inventory is always at an acceptable level.

ae kitchen is sanitary and surroundin
lance with Ministry of Health’s standards by overseeing the

in comp

areas are clean and

operation, cleaning and maintenance of food services equipment and
facilities, managing food safety, and practicing workplace health and

safety procedures.

Competencies:

Minimum of two — three years experience in the preparation of large

been getting a good response,”
said Mr Stannis.

Downsview has several other
showrooms throughout North,
South and Central America, but
all of its manufacturing is done
at its 600,000 square foot facili-
ty in Toronto, Canada.

Manager

Alexander Reed, CCMS’
executive manager,said the
partnership with Downsview
Kitchens had brought “one of
the most successful high end
production companies to the
Bahamas”.

l=) mal =

a wal

the UAW and Canadian auto
workers unions about conces-
sions, including getting the
UAW to take roughly 39 per-
cent of its stock in exchange for
half of the $20 billion GM must
pay into a union-run trust that
will take over retiree health care
payments next year.

About 50 percent of the stock
would go to the government for
its loans. GM said last week it
would need another $2.6 billion
in May and $9 billion more for
the rest of the year, bringing the
total to $27 billion.

One percent would go to cur-
rent shareholders, with bond-
holders getting the other 10 per-
cent.

Bondholders are reluctant to
take the deal because the gov-
ernment and UAW are getting
far bigger stakes in the company,
said Kevin Tynan, an industry
analyst for Argus Research in
New York.

"When you look across at
what the union is getting and
what the government is getting,
to expect them to take 10 per-
cent is just unrealistic,” he said.

Cutting dealers also remains a
huge hurdle, with GM hoping
to shed 2,600 of its 6,246 dealer-
ships by 2010.

But dealers are protected by
state franchise laws, and trying

to shed them outside of bank-
ruptcy would result in either mil-
lions of dollars in payments or
multiple lengthy lawsuits,
Lubben said.

"That means you've got to
negotiate with each one of those
dealers individually."

Also, GM on Friday told its
major parts suppliers that it
would move up payments due
on June 2 to May 28.

Company spokesman Dan
Flores said it was being done to
help the suppliers at a critical
time, but he denied that the pay-
ments were pulled ahead of a
potential June 1 bankruptcy fil-
ing.

GM has begun to temporarily
close 13 assembly plants for up
to 11 weeks through mid-July in
an effort to control inventory.
With Chrysler plants also shut
down during its bankruptcy pro-
ceedings, parts suppliers will
soon have no income and could
go under.

It would help speed up GM's
stay in bankruptcy court if it
could pull together big blocks
of stakeholders to agree on
reducing debt or changing other
stakes, said Robert Gordon,
head of the corporate restruc-
turing and bankruptcy group at
the Clark Hill PLC law firm in
Detroit.

ENERGY SAVING

en aaiiinene
Cut Your Electic

c Bild

Up To 40%

* Tankless Water co
* Compact Fluorescent Bulbs
* Energy Saving Capacitors for
Motors, A/C, Pumps etc.
® Fridgi-tech oil additive to increase A/C

efficiency

For more information or survey

Email: energysavingsconsultants @hotmail.com

Contact 326-6121

1 aT@ stich 4

CeCe

Montrose Avenue



all summer!

selected Innovair Ductless
Air Conditioners!

quantities of food an asset.

High degree of personal hygiene a must. Applicants must be dedicated
and committed to providing tasty, nutritious meals. Must be reliable,
adaptable to fast-paced activities, able to plan and organize their tasks
and those of their support staff, and be strong team players.

Remuneration:
Salary commensurate with qualification and experience

Interested persons should forward their resumé with cover letter to:

The Director General
Bahamas Red Cross
P.O. Box N-8331
Nassau, Bahamas
Or
redcross@bahamas.net.bs

All applications should be submitted by May 15, 2009



—

Offer only good while supplies last!

Master Cra itd

od ee ee ee

Village Rd., Open Mon. thru Sat. 8:30am 'til 5:30pm
eee R EO eee a dy mit hi tec ae sles leh aelis





THE TRIBUNE

MONDAY, MAY 11, 2009, PAGE 5B





Cable reveals its
34.5% profit rise

@ By NEIL HARTNELL
Tribune Business Editor

CABLE Bahamas has given
further encouragement to
potential investors in its $40 mil-
lion preference share issue by
unveiling a 34.5 per net income
increase to $7.452 million for
the 2009 first quarter, although
the share issue was still awaiting
Central Bank of the Bahamas
approval as of Friday’s press
deadline.

For the three months to
March 31, 2009, the BISX-listed
company said top line revenues
increased by 5.2 per cent year-
over-year to $21.087 million,
compared to $20.042 million
year-over-year.

It added that cable TV rev-
enues realized $11.2 million in
revenues, the Coralwave Inter-
net business $6.5 million, and
its data and web hosting busi-
ness, another $3.3 million. As a

nications in the $80 million buy-
out. However, a lot can happen
to share prices over two years,
and it is only when the conver-
sion day arrives that preference
share investors wishing to con-
vert will be able to tell whether
they have a good conversion
price or not.

If they choose not to convert,
investors will regain all their
principal by the time the pref-
erence share issue matures 10
years from its closing date.
Those who stick with this invest-
ment tool will start receiving
their principal back on the sixth
anniversary of closing, with the
full sum paid back in five equal
annual instalments.

According to the offering
term sheet, preference share
investors will have an 8 per cent

interest rate of return on their
investment. Dividends, it added,
are due to be paid semi-annu-
ally on June 30 and December
31 of each year, with the first
payment coming on the latter
date in 2009.

Cable Bahamas is also unable
to redeem the preference shares
until after the second date of
the issue’s closing. The $13.43
per share price that Columbus
Communications, an entity
owned by Barbados-based
Columbus Communications Inc,
will receive represents an 11.5
per cent premium to the $12.04
that Cable Bahamas’ stock
closed at on BISX last night.

The purchase price for
Columbus Communications’
5,954,600 shares has decreased
by 6 per cent compared to the

$14.28 per share initially con-
templated by the parties pre-
Christmas, after Tribune Busi-
ness had exclusively revealed
details of the proposed buyout.

Back then, the purchase price
represented just a 1 per cent
premium to the then-prevailing
market price, as opposed to the
11.5 per cent now. Still, back
then Columbus Communica-
tions’ stake was valued at
$85.174 million, and now it is
some $5 million less at $80 mil-
lion. The company then was val-
ued in total at $282.035 million,
and now that figure is $264.9
million.

Visit our website at www.cob.edu.bs

Job vacancies:

CAMPUS NURSE COUNSELLOR
FINANCIAL CONTROLLER
FINANCIAL ANALYST

Further details can be found at the College of The
Bahamas website, www.cob.edu.bs

Interested applicants should submit:

Completed Application with supplemental documentation
requested attached

(inclusive of passport photo)

Cover letter of interest

Current Resume’

This package should be forwarded to the following address
by Monday, April 20, 2009:

The Director

Human Resources Department
The College of The Bahamas
Oakes Field Campus

P.O. Box N-4912

Nassau, Bahamas OR hrapply@cob.edu.bs



THE COLLEGE OF THE BAHAMAS

Visit our website af wew.cob.edu.bs

PlusGroup

of Companies

3 Prime Locations

ACU Teee VTE sem ol (eels

INTERNATION Al
LAN GUAGES
aes ates

INS T

COURSE OFFERING: Be

result, the company’s revenue
mix, while still dominated by
cable TV at 53.3 per cent, now
includes a 31 per cent contribu-
tion from broadband Internet
and 15.7 from the data business.

Operating expenses remained
almost flat at $9.863 million,
compared to $9.759 million for
they year before period, while
operating income reached
$11.224 million — an increase of
almost $1 million or 9.2 per cent
year-over-year.

Earnings per share grew by
34.9 per cent to $0.38 per share,
as opposed to $0.28 per share
the year before. Cable
Bahamas’ Board of Directors
also approved an increase in
ordinary share dividends from
an annualised rate of $0.24 per
share to $0.28 per share, a 16.7
per cent increase.

Meanwhile, Tribune Business
understands that the major
approval Cable Bahamas and
its advisers, RoyalFidelity Cap-
ital Markets, were waiting on
for the $40 million preference
share offering late Friday after-
noon was exchange control per-
mission from the Central Bank.

It is unclear whether it was
received, but is required
because it is proposed that $20
million, or 50 per cent of the
issue, be financed in US dollars.
If approvals was received before
end of business on Friday, the
preference share issue will be
launched today.

The preference share issue,
which is being targeted at select
institutional and high net worth
individuals, meaning members
of the public should not apply to
become involved, is priced at
$10 per share.

The minimum subscription,
according to the term sheet, is
5,000 shares or $50,000, with the
proceeds set to join some $90
million in bank financing to help
fund the buyout of the 30.2 per
cent stake held by controlling
shareholder, Columbus Com-
munications.

The proceeds from the $40
million issue, and the $90 mil-
lion syndicated credit facility
from Royal Bank of Canada,
FirstCaribbean International
Bank (Bahamas) and Scotia-
bank, will also be used to refi-
nance Cable Bahamas’ existing
debt and credit facilities, plus
pay transaction costs and fund
working capital.

As previously revealed by
Tribune Business, preference
share investors will have the
option to convert their invest-
ment into Cable Bahamas ordi-
nary shares (equity) some two
years after the $40 million issue
closes.

The conversion price will be
the $13.43 per share transaction
price that Columbus Commu-
nications is receiving from the
company in return for selling
its stake. Effectively, one pref-
erence share - priced at $10 -
would be equivalent to 0.7433
ordinary shares, based on those
prices.

This means that, at current
market prices, investors in
Cable Bahamas’ preference
share issue will effectively be
paying the same 11.5 per cent
premium that the company is
paying to Columbus Commu-

INSIGHT

For the stories

Heal Estate Division

See) eal ad

Mackey Street
12,300 sq. ft.

‘18th, 2009

CONVERSATIONAL HAITIAN CREOLE I & Il
CONVERSATIONAL FRENCH I
CONVERSATIONAL SPANISH I & II
ENGLISH AS A SECOND LANGUAGE I
CONVERSATIONAL MANDARIN [& UH
SURVIVAL MANDARIN FOR BUSINESS -

PRICE: § 230.00 per course

Retail ce 2 4,050 sq, ft
1x 4,200 sq. it.

2x 6,000 sq. ft. LOCATION: Munnings Blig

ext to KPC across from main
CHT PMNS
2-week intensive; $500 per student

12,000 sq. ft. Warehouse ......

« Town Centre Mall

East West Highway a Blue Hill Road

3,718 59. ft 1x 1,1185q, ft.
1x 1,200 sq. it.
1x 1,400 sq. ft.

PLEASE CALL US TO CONFIRM DAYS AND TIMES FOR THE COURSES

J PHONE: 302-4584 or 302-4587 E-MAIL: ileif@)eob.ecu. bs

REQUEST FOR PROPOSAL

1x 10,000 59, ft

« Seagrapes Shopping Centre

Prince Charles Drive
9.563 99. ft

STUDENT-ATHLETE INSURANCE
COVERAGE

The College of The Bahamas is seeking competitive proposals from suitably qualified health and
medical insirance companies to create a package that 1s tailored to the needs of student-athketes
who are engaged in games, practices, or designated athletic team activities locally ane
inbermaticwnal by

2x 1,061 sq. ft
1x 1,591 sq. ft
1x 1,750 50, #t
1x 1,790 sq. it.
1x 2310sq. ft

eye lesm Ml Oe em ECL
Tel: (242) 427 0106
PW EMG nie aa Ste eee

Companies with specific experience in dealing with tertiary level educational Ietitutians are
especially welcome

Proposal should inclide, rate and coversge quotalions: sample pics; company protile; company
philosophy and how it approaches health care for students ancl most recent financial statements.

Proposals must be submitted ne later than Friday, May 15°" at Sp...

For more information, log onto www.cob.edulbs or contact:

Ms. Cheryl Sims OR
WP, Firamce
csinmaacrh cau bs

Mrs Kimberley Rolle
Director, Athbeties

Tal _ krollefaioob edu. hs
Rakers Miap

EMPLOYMENT OPPORTUNITY

You are invited to apply for the following position
currently available.

The Callege mf The Baharcas
SORTS & WELLNESS INSTITUTE

WELLNESS APPLICATION FORM

PUN RUB WALK - Sunurday May 24rd, 2009

Assistant Marketing Manager

Fimet Samer

Key Requirements

* A demonstrated track record of sales to high net Age MALE| | FEMALE| |

worth clients

Emergeacy Contact “ane Telepiome

* Extensive experience maintaining strong long term

customer relationships with significant add-on/repeat Category:

business (A) RUNNER
* Astrong existing network with high net worth clients in
the U.S.A. , Europe and The Bahamas

* Ability to develop and implement marketing

Jamdunmier| | Sn-50[ | Sl |

(Bj) WALKER

5S metal under 36-50. |] 51m [ |

campaigns to high net worth clients
T-Shirt Sive: Chikd) fa [IL ’ Mi |x | [XX | | XXXL
Qualifications

* Bachelor’s degree in Sales, Marketing or related Entire Fee: SUDO (%: XL | SLZAM (XXL or larper)
3 7 ag A helrver te: A'ellness Canine, Onkes Field Cz ee

subject; professional certifications ' ra “<1 °° seal A
* Minimum five (5) years experience in high net worth

. PUN RUN WALK START TIME: fof0uoum.
real estate promotions
* Must be proficient in C2C software, ACT, Power

Point, Microsoft Word, Excel and Asset Manager

ROUTES S:an atthe Portia Smith Building on Poinciana Drive: revel cast onto Wolff Road; nonh ono Collins Avenue:
meet onto Shirley Steet; nerih onin Cemberiind Sineet: weet onto West Tey Street; south onion Niece Street; eet oni
tia Smith Building.

Poiteioaa Drive aid hack oo the Pa
* Must be innovative, demonstrate strong leadership

DISCLAMIPER: 0 dectere ond affirms ches | am phavcizalis dt to pardsipat in The Cefiege of The Ushamas Sporn & Welles Incl itune’s Fan
Ben Via aed have Gon bree ody eel there be od medical pretiteer. The anderegeed accep aed eecdireteech that seaher The C elege ef The Marna
wr aes enbds ef The 0 efirge of Phe Bafsorna eaeerds, The byperis & Veils berideie, arenes recymmed bility or any injaries raseerd ierieali eg deal thal ey

and customer relations skills
* Must have excellent written and verbal

arte vhiky pertiripaiieg im thy Foe Moe The periirqeei.on bebe ef the peréripasi’s brit peal oeewier, waives ibe righi ie sey eee) rebewer wll kevers
ore dame ges thei mee erie oe che perc ipa et. |, te pecticipens oeeae one acrepd aes ree thal mee be ie eed ie the Poo Hee alk

communication skills

The successful candidate will have the opportunity to work
in a growing and dynamic organization and must be a self-
starter, team player, work at the highest standards of
performance, and meet deadlines. If you are progressive
and prepared to advance your career, submit your resume
to the attention of:The Director of HR & Training, hr@
bakersbayclub.com or by fax at 242-367-0613

Deadline for Application/resume is May 18th, 2009

Sepratir Parc (1 ender the age of 1X years old)

Spomsnredl hy: a The dAlbenas Agency Ltd. ;

MINISTRY OF HEALTH

behind the news,
read Insight
on Mondays

LREAT PRIZES!





PAGE 6B, MONDAY, MAY 11, 2009

BEAUMONT HOUSE

NASSAU, BAHAMAS

LEASING
OPPORTUNITY

For Infannation, contact

W. Lory Roberts
T: 242.396.0026
roberts] bahomasealfy.bs

Donald Marinborough
1; 242,.376,0028
drartinborough bahar tyes

RENTABLE AREA: 14.710 - 16,287 SF (Divisible)

PREMISES: First, Second & Third Floors
Bohoarmoas Realty Undted
PO). Box Ne] 132
Massou, Bohomas

AVAILABILITY: 90 Days
TERM: 3- 5 Years
we bohomascommercia.com RENT: $18 per SF per annum

a CAM: $11.11 per SF oer annum

* Locoted on Boy Street

* Stote-of-the-ort Telecommunications System

« Full service standby generator

« Two Elevators

® Central Air-conditioning

® [impact resistant windows & doors
* Underground Parking

REALTY um

SECURITIES COMMISSION OF THE BAHAMAS
PUBLIC NOTICE

No. 3 of 2009 11" May 2009

Re: Gulf International Investment Group

This NOTICE is issued by the Securities Commission of The
Bahamas (“the Commission”) pursuant to Section 4(2) of the
Securities Industry Act, 1999 (“the Act’).

It has been brought to the attention of the Commission that the
above named company may be carrying out activities that are
registrable under the Acct.

The general public is HEREBY ADVISED that neither Gulf
International Investment Group, its agents nor its consultants
are registrants of the Securities Commission nor have they
made application for registration with the Commission.
Therefore, any activity by this company, its agents or consultants
in conducting registrable activity in or from this jurisdiction is a
violation of the Act. Further, if this company in any way holds
itself out as fully compliant and bona fide persons operating in
the securities industry from this jurisdiction, ithas committed an
offence and is liable for criminal prosecution and/or regulatory
sanctions under the relevant laws of The Bahamas.

Background

Gulf International Investment Group appears to be a
company engaged in providing investment advice and
services to the public. The company is holding itself out as
being located at Charlotte House, Shirley & Charlotte Streets,
Nassau, Bahamas. The Commission has not been able to
locate a company at Charlotte House by that name. However,
the Commission has received information that in November of
2007, the company was holding itself out as duly registered in
this jurisdiction.

Persons desirous of conducting business with Gulf
International Investment Group, its agents, or its
consultants, should be cognizant that they are doing
so with an unregulated entity and individuals. You are
therefore strongly urged to conduct full and proper
due diligence and exercise the utmost caution before
engaging in transactions with the above named company,
its agents or its consultants.

Any persons who are already involved in transactions with
the above named company, its agents or its consultants and
are concerned about these transactions should contact Ms.
Mechelle Martinborough, Secretary & Legal Counsel at the
Securities Commission of The Bahamas at telephone number
356-6291/2 or in writing to P.O. Box N-8347, Nassau, The
Bahamas or via e-mail: info@scb.gov.bs



THE TRIBUNE



as ae
Reborn Fiat shakes up Italian stereotype

m By COLLEEN BARRY
AP Business Writer

MILAN (AP) — Ina perfect
world, so the joke goes, the
Germans are the mechanics, the
Swiss are the timekeepers and
the Italians are the lovers.

With Fiat snapping up a 20
percent stake in Chrysler LLC
and bidding for General Motor
Corp.'s European car-making
business, it seems the Italian
will now be the guy who makes
the cars.

Italian Premier Silvio Berlus-
coni says Fiat's dealmaking is
"a dream ... for all Italians.” But
few Americans have given Fiat
much thought since at least the
1980s, when the Italian
automaker last did business in
North America before pulling
up stakes and returning to Italy,
reputation for quality in tatters,
the brunt of another old joke
that Fiat stood for Fix It Again,
Tony.

In his past five years as CEO,
56-year-old Sergio Marchionne
has engineered a stunning
comeback for Fiat. The year
after taking over, he posted
Fiat's first net profit in five
years, streamlined manage-
ment, burnished the Fiat brand
with the award-winning update
of the much-loved Fiat 500 and
entered a series of strategic
alliances to share costs and
enter new markets. He will also
head Chrysler when it emerges
from bankruptcy.

Analysts warn, however, that
the sexy, appealing 500 —
Cinquecento in Italian and
"Luigi" in the cartoon movie
"Cars" — won't be enough to
get Chrysler back on its feet
even if it captures the hearts of
America’s city drivers. And
more than one international
hookup has gone sour on cul-

tural differences, as the failed
marriage of Germany's Daimler
and Chrysler testifies.

"T think the proof is in the
pudding,” said Howard Wheel-
don, a senior strategist at BGC
Partners. "Americans have no
idea who Marchionne is. .. The
first thing Marchionne and his
team need to do is to command
respect that is going to be diffi-
cult. It has been doing a lot bet-
ter in recent times, but Fiat's
history is awful."

Look no further than Fiat's
20-year presence in the U.S.
The costs of handling warranty
repairs to Fiat's Strada, a mid-
size four-door sedan launched
in 1974, wiped out any profits
on its sale, a Fiat executive con-
fided to Giuseppe Volpato, who
has written three books on Fiat.

There were successes, like the
Fiat 124 Spider, a convertible
two-seater that sold well for
over a decade but remained a
niche product.

Inauspiciously, Fiat stopped
exporting even profitable cars
to the U.S. in the early 1980s.
The reasons: It lacked the deal-
er network to properly service
its cars, it was having trouble
meeting environmental stan-
dards and sales were slipping
under pressure to Japanese
competition, said Volpato, a
professor at the Ca’ Foscari
University of Venice.

Returning to America con-
fronts Marchionne with one of
the world’s toughest and most
varied markets.

A citizen of Italy and Cana-
da, Marchionne has focused on
bringing out the best of Fiat's
Italian DNA, that sense of style
that made the original Cinque-
cento a raging success.

But even in Marchionne's
world, the Germans are still the
mechanics. His chief technology

OFFICE SPACE AVAILABLE
FOR RENT

3 Medical or dental office spaces in the

Cable Beach Area from July 2009

For further details please contact 376-7777
Xi AW (c1c) am NaTe Male UL eme) |
10a.m. - 5p.m. Monday to Friday



Colina Imperial

officer is Harald Wester, who
came from Volkswagen.

"Everything behind the prod-
uct — engineering, manufac-
turing and quality — is man-
aged by leaders who have been
trained for the most part by our
German competitors. They
have the right level of discipline
and rigor to properly run the
hard factors in this industry,”
Marchionne told Automotive
News Europe in a 2005 inter-
view.

Marchionne also has made
Fiat one of the most environ-
mentally fit automakers — one
of the qualities that won the
attention of U.S. President
Barack Obama, whose auto
task force underlined the
importance of Fiat's clean
small-car technology to
Chrysler's SUV- and minivan-
heavy lineup.

But transnational alliances
have often failed. "Cultural dif-
ferences can never be underes-
timated," Wheeldon said, men-
tioning such unhappy partner-
ships as Daimler-Chrysler and
BMW with Britain's Rover.

Marchionne was born in cen-
tral Italy, raised in Canada from
age 14 and educated there,
returning in his early 40s to
Europe where he secured his
reputation as a turnaround
expert in Switzerland. Many
hope that this intercontinental
background can help bridge the
differences.

"Marchionne has virtues of
being Italian in his head but
reared in the world, and the
challenge is for Fiat to repeat
this model,” Giacomo Vaciago,
a political economist at Milan's
Catholic University, said recent-
ly on il Sole 24 Ore radio.

Fiat's well-remembered fail-
ures aside, Italy boasts high-
quality engineering in autos,
including Ferrari and Maserati,
both owned by Fiat, and Lam-
borghini, owned by Volkswa-
gen, as well as such design firms
as Pininfarina, known primarily
for its Ferrari and Alfa Romeo
designs.

As Italy's biggest industrial
concern, Fiat's ambitions to
spread into the Americas and
redraw the global auto map is a
source of great national pride.
Italians have a hard time seeing
themselves — and certainly
their Fiat 500 — as anyone's
saviour.

The following individuals are asked to contact Mrs. Kimley Saunders

(396-2047) or Ms. Kayshonta Smith

Insurance Ltd:

Princess Butler
P.O. Box ES-6069
Nassau, Bahamas

Brendilee Rolle
P.O. Box 7290
Pine Barron Road
Nassau, Bahamas

Tamika Williams
P.O. Box F 42299

Freeport, Bahamas

Tiffany Rolle
P.O. Box GT 2395
Nassau, Bahamas

Tanya Rolle
P.O. Box GT 2395
Nassau, Bahamas

Bridgette Hog
P.O. Box GT 2395
Nassau, Bahamas

(396-2031) at Colinalmperial

Eddison Paul Sweeting Jr.
Nassau Bahamas

Michelle Sweeting
Nassau Bahamas

Christon Mackey
Nassau, Bahamas

Terasean Sweeting
P.O. Box CR 56708

Sunset Park

Nassau, Bahamas

Kemuel Delancey
P.O. Box CR 56708

Sunset Park

Nassau, Bahamas

Terry Sweeting

P.O. Box CR 56708

Sunset Park

Nassau, Bahamas

Theresa Deleveaux
P.O. Box N 732
Nassau, Bahamas

Albert Smith
P.O. Box SS-6104
Nassau, Bahamas

Granville Neville Williams
485 Inagua Avenue,
Freeport, Grand Bahama

Ms. Alquennia Rolle-Cunningham
General Delivery
Moore's Island, Abaco

Charlissa C.D. Poitier
P.O. Box N-978
Nassau Bahamas

James Wallace
Nassau, Bahamas

Stafford Bullard
P.O. Box N 3730
Nassau, Bahamas

Larado D. Evans
P.O. Box N 3730
Nassau, Bahamas

Francis Roberts
P.O. Box $$5175
Nassau, Bahamas

Mr. Godfrey Roberts
Freeport, Grand Bahama





THE TRIBUNE

MONDAY, MAY 11, 2009, PAGE 7B



BFSB announces

Freeport hotel

FOOM Fevenues

(lecline eleven
per cent

@ By NEIL HARTNELL
Tribune Business Editor

FREEPORT hotels saw their
room revenues decline by 11
per cent year-over-year for
2008, a Ministry of Tourism
report has revealed, as
increased average daily room
rates (ADRs) were unable to
compensate for hotel occupan-
cy declines.

The Ministry’s Hotel Occu-
pancy 2008 report found that
resorts in Freeport’s Lucaya
area (chiefly the Our Lucaya)
were unable to charge higher
ADRs than in 2007, resulting
in a 20.2 per cent hotel room
revenue reduction.

In a summary of the report’s
main findings, the Ministry of
Tourism said: “In 2008, the
hotels in West End, Grand
Bahama, had lower occupancy
levels, lower ADRs and hence
lower hotel room revenues than
in 2007.

“Tn 2008, the combined hotel
properties in the Out Islands
had lower hotel occupancy lev-
els than in 2007. They did
charge higher ADRs but were
still unable to generate more
hotel room revenue than in
2007.”

As for other findings, the
Ministry of Tourism report
found that the all-inclusive
resorts on Cable Beach in New
Providence, namely Sandals
Royal Bahamian and Super-
Clubs Breezes, fared better than
their Paradise Island-based
counterparts when it came to
hotel occupancy and room rate
levels in 2008.

Tax Review

THE Bahamas Financial Ser-
vices Board (BFSB) will hold
its “Tax Review: Part IT forum
on Friday, May 15, at the British
Colonial Hilton Hotel. Chair-
man Craig Tony Gomez says
the BFSB will roll out this next
step to progress industry dia-
logue on the role information
and tax plays in the financial
services industry.

Structured as a workshop, the
May 15 event will allow partic-
ipants to engage in a dialogue
about the evolving landscape
for financial services. Workshop
session topics will include The
Fiscal Environment and Its
Impact on Conducting Business
as well as a Review of Suitable
Arrangements to meet the
OECD Tax Standard.

Presenters Andy Todd, lead
tax partner of Deloitte London;

Sara Lee: Fiscal
Q3 profit falls
22 per cent

SARA LEE poultry products rest
on the counter of a butcher shop
Monday, May 4, 2009, in Chicago
Ridge, Ill. Food maker Sara Lee
Corp. said Thursday (May 7) that
its fiscal third-quarter profit fell 22
per cent as softness in its North
American foodservice division and
the stronger dollar pushed sales
lower. Still, adjusted results were
much better than Wall Street
expected.

(AP Photo: M Spencer Green)

Tony Gomez

ety
ve ee

LS pick-ups S500
2 Hligthes clair



forum

Richard Hay, international tax
principal of international law
firm Stikeman Ellliott; and
Steven Cantor, managing part-
ner of international law firm
Cantor & Webb, will facilitate
the brainstorming sessions and
dialogue with industry stake-
holders.

BFSB has been engaged in
various discussions on the tax
model of the Bahamas and that
of its competitors over the past
six years. Specifically leading
from the 2009 Bahamas Finan-
cial Services Retreat and a fol-
low-up Information and Tax
Forum, Mr Gomez says: “We
now propose to secure the
industry’s considered views on
the approach to implementing
the OECD standard and
encourage the active participa-
tion by industry stakeholders.”

A
&

Sane ahay chelivery,
for congo mecewedd by 123060 mea
Custos lbookacmage: available
Pooe Mass chclivsry for saad) peeckagecs

Cargo

Caustoms Air Freight Building, “45





















































a
~r
NAD
Nassau Airport
Dovelapmont Company

TENDER

Nassau Arpor Develooment Company (NAD is pleased to
annaunoe the release of Tender 0-112 Warehouse tor Stage
1 of the Lynden Pinding Intemational Aiport Expansion.
The Scope of Wark indudes:
‘Detailed desion, supply, and installatian af a pre
manufactured metal warehouse building with
approcimate dimension of 70 ft x 176 ft
Chal works induding gle fil, grading, compactian,
foundations and slab on grade designed to suit
pre-manufachired metal warehouse buicing:
Ubliy works induding sanitary, power
communication and water service;
-Formal submission to fhe Ministry of Works §o finaline
Suilding perl and lasing wilh Bahamas Blectric
Company for power service

The C-112 Warehouse Tender Documents wil be avaiable
for pick up or electronic distibution after 3:00pm, April
16th, 2009

Contach TRAM BREET
Contracts and Procurement Manager

Phe (242) PG-106 | Fine: S| PAA?
PO. Bow AP 59220, Meeeray, Behar:
Email traci brshryjiines bs

rborne Freight
Services

Massau, Ralhamas
Phone: 242.377. 0450/2

Fax: 242.377.0451
470-3043 8/24 2.455 .0092

hood preeoerics? Woot us slop Bor ou .
fi
954.240.3805 (Vibe)

Cleli: =
BPeecheyesss 1 ter DO Ths Airoomm: 3 OOK
Pachapes 1Obo 20 Tas Airbeoooe S15 20K
Paces 20bo SO Ibs JAirbomme 5 45.000
Packages Sto DOO Bs Adrbomme 3 OOOO

Adtbone's Rate peri S An

1295 2-053 NW 22nd Avenue (C(Lejume Rel.»
lisa, FL 4401454
Phone 4005 8S BSS
B77 68S 4544
Fax: FOS O85 85-44
Cell: 954.394. 223043

NOTICE

The Department of Statistics will carry out its
Annual Household survey during the period of Kev wn, President « Kevin
May. Enumerators with offical identification cards
from the Department of Statistics will visit selected
household in New Providence, Grand Bahama,
Exuma and Long Island and will be calling upon
residents to complete the questionnaires honestly
and accurately. The information obtained will be
handled in the strictest confidence and will be used
to maintain essential statical data on our country.”

Visit our website at www.cob.edu.bs

CENTRE FOR CONTINUING EDUCATION & EXTENSION SERVICES
PROFESSIONAL DEVELOPMENT DEPARTMENT

CERTIFICATION & CERTIFICATE PROGRAMMES
Bahamas Law Enforcement

Co-operative Credit Union Ltd

We can helpyou achieve your career posal! A wide array of courses
md PU em bes leading lo ceniificale, cenification and leensure are
altered

Choose the courses or programme to help you
accomplish your career goals...

NOTICE OF :
ANNUAL GENERAL MEETING

Certified Professional Manager, Institute ol Centifed

Professional Managers (IGPM), James Madigan Lintversty

(JMU, Harrsonburg, VAs

Certified Associate Manager, bCPM, James Madison

University, Harrisonburg, vA

Ag ministrative SHS, (CPM, James Madson Unaversily, Harrisonburg, Wa
Certified Comauter Operatar |Microsot Office Specialist- MOUS)

Certified Human Ressurce Manager (Gert KRM) National Management Sececalian of America,
Dayton Baach, Ohio

Gene! Legal Principles, The institute of Legal Executives, Bedford, Eiglane
Business Communication, The institute of Legal Executives, Bedtard, England
Reconds Management, [he Institute of Legal Executives, Becton, England
Certified Public Accountant (CPA), Becker Review Oakbrook Tarace Chicago, Il
Accounting Fer Mon-Financial Managere

Company Law, The Inatitute of Legal Execulives, Bedford England

Employ ment Law, Te instiuie af Legal Executives, Bedtord, England

Ethics and Professional Responsibility

Journeyman Plumbing Linanse IPL)

Legal Writing & Research

Real Estate Sales Certfication

Singk Phase Elecrical icense (SPELL)

IntroSucian to tie Intemet & E-mailing

Writing & Research Skills

THERE WILL NOT BE A SECOND
Oe ee eee a who
ACT 2005 SECTION 22

The 24" Annual General Meeting of the Bahamas
Law Enforcement Co-operative Credit Union Ltd will
be held on

Saturday, May 16'", 2009
at
9:00 am
at
Paul H. Farquharson
Conference Centre
Police Headquarters
East Street

er |

REGISTRATION & ADVISEMENT DATES: 12” - 13" May 2009

No entrance exams required Tuition payment is die per term.
For additional information, telephone us at (242) 325-5714 or (242) 328-0003
bees May be Paid Hy Cash, Crecht Card, or Hank Ceritied Cheque lo: bieCollege of Lhe Bahawas, Hesiness Othice
CEES Reserves The Right Ta Change Tuition, Fees, Course Content, Comme Schedole and Course Materials



Refreshments will be provided



OFFICIAL GAZETTE

SELES ae RTA

The following list of Dentists obtained Licenses under
Section 10 of the Dental Act, 1989, as at 31st March, 2009.

ADDERLEY, Catherine
ALLEYNE, Kenneth
ALMIRA, Dindo
ALMIRA, Maria
ARANHA, Artherine
ARCHER, Jacqulin

BACCHUS, Olga
BAIN, Kay

BAIN, Larry
BASTIAN, Karen
BASTIAN, Wesley
BAZARD, Dante
BENNETT, Erica
BONAMY, Therese

CAMBRIDGE, Sythela
CLARKE, Andre
CLARKE, Antoine
CONLIFFE, Vaughan
COVE, Sandra

COVE, Norman
CRAWFORD, Ricardo
CUMBERBATCH, Brasil

DAVIES, Mark
DAVIS, Anthony

ECCLES-MAJOR, Michelle
ENEAS Jr, Cleveland
Erskine, Rosamund

FERGUSON, Sparkman
FORBES, Charles
FRANCIS, Emmanuel
FRANCIS, Welmilya
FRANKS, Russanne

GIBSON, Gill

HALKITIS, Melanie
HOLFORD, Richard

JOFFRE, Elexis
KNOWLES, Hadassah

LEE, William
LEWIS, Nigel
LEWIS, Kirk
LOCKHART, Hiram
LOUIS, John

LOUIS, John
LUNDY III, Leo

MACKEY-POPLE, Michelle
MAJOR, Kendal
McCARTNEY, Cyd
McIVER, Veronica
McWEENEY, Vincent
MORTEMORE, Tanya
MUNROE, Derwin

NEWBOLD, Kenworth

PEARCE, Shequel
PEET-IFERENTA, Renee
PERCENTIE, Leatendore
PICKSTOCK, Joyous

RASHAD, Munir

REID, Charlene
RICHARDSON, Kimberley
RICHARDSON, Osmond
ROLLINS, Sylvester
ROMER, Hayward
ROUSSOS, Desiree
RUSSELL, Lofton

RYAN, Michael

SAWYER, Marlene
SCAVELLA-TAYLOR, Tavette
SEYMOUR, Copelin
STRACHAN, Ellen

STUART, Wendy
SWEETING, Sidney

THEOPHILUS, Julius
THOMPSON, Woodley
TILBERG, Todd

VANDERPOOL, Cyril
VARGA, Christopher
VASSELL, Danette

WARREN, Annette
WILLIAMS-BETHEL, Marsha
WOOD, Cynthia

Abe i ceed

te



Dr. Anthony Davis
Registrar
Bahamas Dental Council

OFFICIAL GAZETTE

Bahamas Dental Council

The following list of Dental Hygienists obtained Licenses under
Section 14 of the Dental Act, 1989, as at 31st March, 2009.

BAIN, Raynell
BARRY, Deborah
BETHELL, Gia
BLOOMFIELD, Cheryl
BOWE, Carol

DORSETT, Amy
DUNCOMBE, June

FORBES, Sonia
FORBES, Samantha

GIBSON, Jacqueline
GREEN, Jeanette

HIGGS, Lauren
HUYLER-BEAL, Claudette

INGRAHAM, Margot

JOHNSON, Denise
JONES, Gurceille
JONES, Samantha

KING, Valencia

OFFICIAL GAZETTE

Bahamas Dental Council

The following list of Dental Technologists
obtained Licenses under Section 14 of the
Dental Act, 1989, as at 31st March, 2009.

HIGGS, Danny
PARDO, Sarahy

TAYLOR, Leonard
THEOPHILUS SR., Eneas

WEECH, Irwin

Abe? i ow

oe



Dr. Anthony Davis
Registrar
Bahamas Dental Council

KNOWLES, Giselle

LIGHTBOURN, Indirah
LOCKHART, Mika

MOXEY, Austia

RICHARDS, Michaelle
ROBARDS, Leah
ROLLE, Sanna
RUTHERFORD, Jerice

SANDS, Lesia

SINCLAIR, Barrington
SMITH, Giavanna
SUTHERLAND, Shannon
SYMMONETT, Della-Reese

WARD, Jill

Abe? i ~~ ee

tee”



Dr. Anthony Davis
Registrar
Bahamas Dental Council

OFFICIAL GAZETTE

Bahamas Dental Council

The following list of Dental Nurse
obtained Licenses under Section 14 of the
Dental Act, 1989, as at 31st March, 2009.

FERGUSON, Lagloria

Abbe i—~$~—- aes

tee"



Dr. Anthony Davis
Registrar
Bahamas Dental Council



PAGE 8B, MONDAY, MAY 11, 2009

THE TRIBUNE



Bank’s $20m
offering “20%
oversubscribed’

FROM page 1B

and a competitive return with
regard to their investments, all
of which the bank was in a posi-
tion to provide.

The Bank of the Bahamas
International managing direc-
tor told Tribune Business last
week that it was issuing the
shares as part of a strategy tar-
geting a 20 per cent Tier I capi-
tal ratio by the end of its 2010
financial year.

The $20 million offering rep-
resents the first tranche of the

$100 million in preference
shares - divided into seven class-
es - that were approved by the
bank’s annual general meeting
(AGM).

Strategy

“This is the start of the strat-
egy to raise new capital through
preference shares. We don’t
think the current market con-
ditions are supportive of a com-
mon share issue at this point in
time. It’s [preference shares]
not the ideal route, but it’s suit-
able for the current environ-
ment,” Mr McWeeney added.

He said that when completed

NOTICE

Notice is given that the roadways at Steven’s North
Side, Long Island including the Bay Road from D12
to Steven’s Rock will be closed for 24hrs commenc-
ing midnight 11th May, 2009 in order to preserve

right of ownership.

Signed
Patrick M. Turnquest
Kevin R.A. Turnquest
Est. of Harcourt A. Turnquest
Riturn Investments Limited

Dated 7th May, 2009



and fully subscribed, the $20
million preference share issue
would increase Bank of the
Bahamas International’s Tier I
capital ratio from 12 per cent
to 15 per cent, well in excess of
the minimum 8 per cent ratio.
Preference shares are eligible
to be included in Tier I share
capital calculations.

Explaining that the main
strategy behind the share issue
was capital, rather than liquidi-
ty or funds for lending, Mr
McWeeney told Tribune Busi-
ness: “Our capital ratio objec-
tive is 20 per cent, so we still
want to grow our capital base.

“We are looking at other
measures [other than prefer-
ence shares] to achieve that.
We’re looking at some internal
issues. It’s safe to say the bank is
looking at all ways to expand
its capital base, not liquidity,
but capital.

“The objective is a capital
ratio of 20 per cent. That has
been the objective set for the
five-year plan we’re on. We’re
in the last year of that plan, and
hope to ensure that ratio is close
to 20 per cent. We don’t see that
we will not be able to achieve
that by the end of the fiscal peri-
od 2010.”

Achieving that goal, Mr
McWeeney said, would position
the bank perfectly for the “start
of a new five-year plan”, which
would kick-in from the start of
fiscal 2010 on July 1 of that year.

MNISTRY OF HOUSING
ENGINEERING SERVICES FOR THE DESIGN OF ROADS
AND DRAINAGE SYSTEMS, ELECTRICAL
DISTRIBUTION SYSTEM AND POTABLE WATER AND
SEWERAGE DISTRIBUTION SYSTEMS IN SPRING CITY,

ABACO

REQUEST FOR PROPOSALS (RFP)

The Government of the Commonwealth of the Bahamas through the
Ministry of Housing is requesting proposals from qualified Consulting
Engineering firms to provide Engineering Design, Supervision of the
Construction Tender Process, and Contract Administration Services for
the development of the following housing subdivision:

(i) Spring City, Abaco - Roads and drainage system design, electrical
distribution system design and potable water & sewerage distribution

design.

Interested parties may obtain further information and purchase a copy
of the Request for Proposal from:

The Office of the Permanent Secretary

Ministry of Housing
Claughton House

Shirley and Charlotte Sts.

Nassau, Bahamas

Tel: 242-322-6005/6006

For a non-refundable fee $100. The method of payment may be cash

or a certified cheque made payable to the “Ministry of Housing”. The
documents will be ready for collection beginning Thursday 7th May,
2009 and ending Friday 15th May, 2009 between the hours of 9:30am
to 4:30pm. An information meeting will be held on Tuesday 19th May
at 10am in the conference room at the Ministry of Housing, Claughton

House.

Tenders are to be submitted in a sealed envelope marked as indicated
in the RFP document to:

The Office of the Permanent Secretary

Ministry of Housing
Claughton House

Shirley and Charlotte Sts.

Nassau, Bahamas

No later than 12 noon on Tuesday 26th May, 2009. Tenders will be
opened at 12:01 pm on Tuesday 26th May, 2009 in the conference

room at the Ministry of Housing, Claughton House. The Government
reserves the right to reject any or all Tenders.





THE TRIBUNE

MONDAY, MAY 11, 2009, PAGE 9B



I =.) | =1<~
Nassau resort holds weather conference

NASSAU, BAHAMAS
(May 6, 2009) — The Shera-
ton Nassau Beach Resort, host-
ed the 13th Annual Bahamas
Weather Conference from
April 15-19, 2009.

Attended by officials from
the National Oceanic and
Atmospheric Association
(NOAA), the National Hurri-
cane Center (NHC), members
of emergency management
organizations, academia and
television news weathermen
and women from all over the
world, this signature annual
event is considered one of the
most important forums for
Bahamian, U.S. and interna-
tional meteorologists to discuss
new and emerging topics in the
field of meteorology.

This year's conference was
attended by world-renowned
experts in meteorology, includ-
ing Max Mayfield, former
director of the National Hurri-
cane Center, who moderated
and planned the conference
agenda.

Bill Read, current director
of the National Hurricane Cen-
ter, also presented a review of
the 2008 Atlantic hurricane
season, while Dr Phillip
Klotzbach from Colorado State
University presented the fore-
cast for the 2009 Atlantic sea-
son.

Other topics discussed
included tropical climatology,
global warming, storm surges,
home safety and property
insurance matters.

PUBLIC NOTICE

INTENT TO CHANGE NAME BY DEED POLL

The Public is hereby advised that |, MALIK SOROHANO
RAHDIGAN RAHMING of Golden Gates #1 intend to my









SHOWN (lI-r) are Vernice Walkine, director general, Ministry of
Tourism, Max Mayfield, former director of National Hurricane Cen-
ter, Vincent Vanderpool-Wallace, Minister of Tourism and Hyacinth
Pratt, permanent secretary, Ministry of Tourism, at the opening
ceremonies of the 13th Annual Bahamas Weather Conference at Sher-
aton Nassau Beach Resort...

name to HENRY STEPHEN MILES. If there are any
objections to this change of name by Deed Poll, you
may write such objections to the Chief Passport Officer,
P.O.Box N-742, Nassau, Bahamas no later than thirty
(30) days after the date of publication of this notice.



Fully furnished town house in private area on

Legal Notice Legal Notice

eastern road, one minute from beach, 2 bed-

rooms, 1 1/2 baths, washroom, large kitchen,
burglar bars, A/C & C/A asking $1,050 per month,
$50 discount per month towards utilities, serious

enquires only please, 323-4326

NOTICE

NOTICE is hereby given that JYOTI P. CHOUDHURY of #5 HUDSON
STREET, P.O. BOX AP-§9217, SLOT 2106, NASSAU, BAHAMAS,

NOTICE
BEGONIA FLOWERS INC.

(In Voluntary Liquidation)

Notice is hereby given that the above-named
Company is in dissolution, which commenced
on the 7th day of May 2009. The Liquidator is
Argosa Corp. Inc., P.O. Box N-7757 Nassau,

Bahamas.

NOTICE
PATHOS SHORES INC.

(In Voluntary Liquidation)

Notice is hereby given that the above-named
Company is in dissolution, which commenced
on the 9th day of April 2009. The Liquidator is
Argosa Corp. Inc., P.O. Box N-7757 Nassau,

Bahamas.

is applying to the Minister responsible for Nationality and Citizenship,
for registration/naturalization as a citizen of The Bahamas, and that
any person who knows any reason why registration/naturalization
should not be granted, should send a written and signed statement
of the facts within twenty-eight days from the 4â„¢ day of May, 2009
to the Minister responsible for nationality and Citizenship, P.O. Box

N-7147, Nassau, Bahamas. ARGOSA CORP. INC.

(Liquidator)

ARGOSA CORP. INC.
(Liquidator)

Legal Notice

NOTICE
HERBLIGEN LTD.

NOTICE is hereby given that SWAT] CHOUDHURY of #5 HUDSON
STREET, P.O. BOX AP-59217, SLOT 2106, NASSAU, BAHAMAS,
is applying to the Minister responsible for Nationality and Citizenship,
for registration/naturalization as a citizen of The Bahamas, and that
any person who knows any reason why registration/naturalization
should not be granted, should send a written and signed statement
of the facts within twenty-eight days from the 4â„¢ day of May, 2009
to the Minister responsible for nationality and Citizenship, P.O. Box
N-7147, Nassau, Bahamas.

Legal Notice

NOTICE
BROOKBUSH LIMITED

(In Voluntary Liquidation)
a “,—
Notice is hereby given that the above-named
Company is in dissolution, which commenced

on the 7th day of May 2009. The Liquidator is
Argosa Corp. Inc., P.O. Box N-7757 Nassau,

Notice is hereby given that in accordance with Section 138
(8) of the International Business Companies Act 2000, the
dissolution of HERBLIGEN LTD. has been completed;

a Certificate of Dissolution has been issued and the Com-

NOTICE is hereby given that DWAIPAYAN CHOUDHURY of #5 Bahamas.

HUDSON STREET, P.O. BOX AP-59217, SLOT 2106, NASSAU,
BAHAMAS, is applying to the Minister responsible for Nationality
and Citizenship, for registration/naturalization as a citizen of The
Bahamas, and that any person who knows any reason why registration/
naturalization should not be granted, should send a written and signed
statement of the facts within twenty-eight days from the 4â„¢ day of May,
2009 to the Minister responsible for nationality and Citizenship, P.O. Box
N-7147, Nassau, Bahamas.

NOTICE

NOTICE is hereby given that BLONEVA ETOY GREENE of
LEEWARD PALMS, PROVIDENCIALES, P.O. BOX F-41123, TURKS
AND CAICOS, is applying to the Minister responsible for Nationality
and Citizenship, for registration/naturalization as a citizen of The
Bahamas, and that any person who knows any reason why registration/
naturalization should not be granted, should send a written and signed
statement of the facts within twenty-eight days from the 4â„¢ day of May,
2009 to the Minister responsible for nationality and Citizenship, P.O. Box
N-7147, Nassau, Bahamas.

pany has therefore been struck off the Register.

ARGOSA CORP. INC.

Cagudion ARGOSA CORP. INC.

(Liquidator)

GY

BISX LISTED & TRADED SECURITIES AS OF:
THURSDAY, 7 MAY 2009
BISX ALL SHARE INDEX: CLOSE 1,613.79 | CHG -0.13 | %CHG -0.01 | YTD -98.57 | YTD % -5.76
FINDEX: CLOSE 798.52 | YTD -4.35% | 2008 -12.31%
WWW .BISXBAHAMAS.COM | TELEPHONE: 242-323-2330 | FACSIMILE: 242-323-2320
Securit y Previous Close Today's Close Change Daily Vol. EPS $ Div $ P/E
Abaco Markets
Bahamas Property Fund
Bank of Bahamas
Benchmark
Bahamas Waste
Fidelity Bank
Cable Bahamas
Colina Holdings
Commonwealth Bank ($1)
Consolidated Water BDRs
Doctor's Hospital
Famguard
Fince
FirstCaribbean Bank
Focol (S)
Focol Class B Preference
Freeport Concrete
ICD Utilities
J. S. Johnson 10.50 10.50
Premier Real Estate 10.00 10.00 is
BISX LISTED DEBT SECURITIES - (Bonds trade on a Percentage Pricing bases)
Securi Symbol Last Sale g il
Fidelity Bank Note 17 (Series A) + FBB17 100.00
Fidelity Bank Note 22 (Series B) + FBB22 100.00 Prime + 1.75%
Fidelity Bank Note 13 (Series C) + FBB13 100.00 = T%
Fidelity Bank Note 15 (Series D) + FBB15 100.00 Prime + 1.75%
Fidelity Over-The-Counter Securities
Last Price

FG CAPITAL MARKETS
BROKERAGE & ADVISORY SERVICES

ROYAL = FIDELITY

Money at Work

Legal Notice

NOTICE
RHUBARBE LTD.

19 October 2017
19 October 2022
30 May 2013
29 May 2015

— f—

Symbol
Bahamas Supermarkets
Caribbean Crossings (Pref)
RND Holdings

(8) of the International Business Companies Act 2000, the ; 00 ABDAB i 3 31.59 a
dissolution of RHUBARBE LTD. has been completed; a

5:
BISX Listed Mutual Funds
Certificate of Dissolution has been issued and the Com-

Notice is hereby given that in accordance with Section 138

0.000

0.000
0.55 - 0.000

Fund Name
Colina Bond Fund
Colina MSI Preferred Fund
Colina Money Market Fund
Fidelity Bahamas G & | Fund
Fidelity Prime Income Fund
CFAL Global Bond Fund
CFAL Global Equity Fund
CFAL High Grade Bond Fund

YTD% Last 12 Months Yield %

pany has therefore been struck off the Register.

Fidelity International Investment Fund
FG Financial Preferred Income Fund
FG Financial Growth Fund
FG Financial Diversified Fund 1.0452 =
MARKET TERMS
YIELD - last 12 month dividends divided by closing price
Bid $ - Buying price of Colina and Fidelity

ARGOSA CORP. INC.
(Liquidator)

EPS $ - A company’s reported earnings per share for the last 12 mths
NAV - Net Asset Value

N/M - Not Meaningful

FINDEX - The Fidelity Bahamas Stock Index. January 1, 1994 = 100

- Number of total shares traded today
DIV $ - Dividends per share paid in the last 12 months
P/E - Closing price divided by the last 12 month earnings
(S) - 4-for-1 Stock Split - Effective Date 8/8/2007
(S1) - 3-for-1 Stock Split - Effective Date 7/11/2007
TO TRADE CALL: COLINA 242-502-7010 | ROYALFIDELITY 242-356-7764 | FG CAPITAL MARKETS 242-396-1000 | COLONIAL 242-502-7525





PAGE 10B, MONDAY, MAY 11, 2009

THE TRIBUNE





—_
NAD

Nassau Airport
Dowelopmomt Company

TENDER

C-120 Airside Civil and
C-130 Landside Civil, Stage 1

Nassau Arpor Deyvelooment Company (NAD) is pleased to
annaunoe fhe release of Tender C-120 Airside Civil and
(6-130 Landside Col for Stage 1 of the Lynden Pineling
inematonal Airport Expansion. MAD intends to enter into
oné conrad fer ihe completion of lhese wark packages, The
Scope of Work includes:

-Signaicant sarthmening, drainage and utility works

bath airside and landside;

-Rioadway, parking lotand apron conatruction
auceeding 60,000 tons of asphalt paving:

‘Signage and lighting fer readways, parking hats
aprons and taxiways; and

-Instalation of hard and sof landside landscaping and
imagatar

The -120 Airside Civil and C-130 Landside Cl, Stage 1
Terminal Expansion Project Tender Documents will be
available for pick up of electronic distribution after
3:00pm, April 16th, 2009. 4 biddars meeting wil
be held at 1:00am, Tuesday April 28th,
2008. Please contact Traci Ansty to register at the MAD
Project Office.

Contact TRAD BREE

Gontracks and Procurement Wanager

Phe (242) POR 086 | Fam: AZ) TAT
PO Goo AP 55009 Massau, Bahames
Emel. traci babyiines bs





BISX-listed entity eyes
real estate deal overseas

FROM page 1B

gave the BISX-listed entity
“good debt carrying capacity”
to enable it to fund a major
acquisition.

“We’re looking to diversify
into shopping centres,” Mr
Anderson added, “something
like Harbour Bay Shopping
Centre, or somewhere where
it’s not all office space that is
being rented.

“There may well be opportu-
nities as we move through this
down cycle, as people exit real
estate investments, that allow
us to buy it at the right price.
We’re the only corporate pur-
chaser of real estate, and if peo-
ple are looking to sell, we’re
there.”

Meanwhile, Mr Anderson
told Tribune Business that the
Property Fund had yet to close
the $3.5 million purchase of
Providence House, the Price-
waterhouseCoopers (PwC)
Bahamas headquarters on East
Hill Street, which was
announced around the turn of
the year. The deal has yet to
receive approval from the Gov-
ernment’s Investments Board.

“We’re waiting for govern-
ment approval. We haven’t
completed that transaction yet,”
he said. “That will come on
stream hopefully in the next
month or so. It’s all signed,
done and dusted except for the
Foreign Investments Board.”

Ministry of Youth, Sports and Culture



e Are you articulate and passionate about representing your country
¢ Do you enjoy traveling and meeting young people both nationally and inter

nationally

¢ Do you enjoy discussing issues relevant to young people?

Then you are a potential candidate for the position of

*”’ Youth Ambassador’”’

Interested persons must be:
Between the ages of 18 - 25 years
Bahamian
Must reside in the Bahamas
Experienced in Youth Work
Available for travel outside the Bahamas



These persons may contact the Youth Division of the Ministry of Youth,
Sports and Culture at telephone# 502-0601 for application forms. All



forms must be complete on or before May 31, 2009.

COMMUNITY ANNOUNCEMENT

WATER CONVERSATION MEASURES

The Water and Sewerage Corporation wishes to advise its customers
in New Providence that the Corporation is presently experiencing

water supply challenges. The Corporation will be implementing
water conservation efforts that may result in periods of reduced
water supply. Customers are asked to conserve their water usage
where possible,

The Corporation sincerely apologizes for any inconvenience caused
and will do its endeavor best to limit the severity and duration of
these conservation measures. Customers with specific complaints
are urged to call the Corporation's Call Center at 302-5599 or 325-

0505,"

MANAGEMENT

WATER AND SEWERAGE COPORATION

The need for Investments
Board approval has resulted
from the fact that there is a
minor element of non-Bahami-
an ownership in the deal. Mr
Anderson described this as an
“anomaly” that needed to be
corrected, as it effectively
placed the Property Fund at a
disadvantage against the com-
mercial banks, some of which
have much greater foreign own-
ership components, when it
came to closing real estate
transactions.

Mr Anderson said publicly-
listed companies regulated by
the Securities Commission of
the Bahamas were permitted to
have resident, non-Bahamian
ownership of their shares, while
those listed on the Bahamas
International Securities
Exchange (BISX) were also
exempt from the payment of
Stamp and transfer taxes when-
ever those shares were traded.

As a result, Mr Anderson
said the Property Fund held
several compelling advantages
when it came to investing in real
estate purchases. However, he
explained that this was being
negated because banks were
allowed to purchase property
without having to get Invest-
ments Board approval.

“Tt’s an anomaly,” Mr Ander-
son said. “Where banks should
have to go through the same
process as us, in practice it does
not work that way. We need to
have that resolved, to allow the



he if Tie

‘The Tribune

Real Estate |

Property Fund to make acqui-
sitions without having to go
through this onerous process.”

He added: “Our key market
is the Bahamas. We don’t have
any further specific property
acquisitions in mind at the
moment, and are not in negoti-
ations with anyone to buy prop-
erty.

Debtors

“In times like this, debtors
can’t afford to pay. We have a
much stronger capital position
than most people holding real
estate in this market, so it’s a
good time for us to be able to
take advantage of opportuni-
ties.”

The Property Fund’s two
existing properties, the
Bahamas Financial Centre in
downtown Nassau and One
Marina Drive on Paradise
Island, continue to provide it
with a solid earnings platform.
For the year to December 31,
2008, the Property Fund
enjoyed a 2.67 per cent increase
in rental and parking revenue
to $4.307 million, compared to
$4.195 million the year before.

Mr Anderson explained that
the Property Fund had built-in
2-3 per cent annual rental
increases in most tenant con-
tracts, depending on the dura-
tion of the lease. This generated
increasing revenue streams as
the company’s cost base
decreased, due to the fact that

PCC Cem EU cme LIS MUON UT Tot Tt cae

financing (interest rate) costs
were reducing as its debt fell.
Total expenses, meanwhile,
rose to $1.443 million compared
to $960,025 in 2007, due largely
to a more than doubling of com-
mon area maintenance (CAM)
expenses that the Property
Fund was forced to pick up at
the Bahamas Financial Centre.;
Mr Anderson said some
13,000 square feet at the
Bahamas Financial Centre, out
of a total 100,000 square feet,
remained vacant and had been
that way sine mid-2007. The

Property Fund, as
landlord/owner, picked up the
CAM tab for that space.

However, the CAM expenses
were offset by the net gain on
the valuation of the Property
Fund’s real estate investments,
which rose from $446,814 in
2007 to $807,000 in 2008. The
increase, Mr Anderson
explained, resulted from not
incurring the capital improve-
ments that the Property Fund
made, particularly on the Finan-
cial Centre, in 2007.

“The biggest change for us
last year was the higher CAM
rate at the Financial Centre,
which quite substantially
increased landlord costs at the
premises, because we carry at
the CAM on the vacant space,
which impacted all our profits,”
Mr Anderson said. “But we
were able to benefit from hav-
ing a much higher kicker on the
valuation.”

i Remtals

s+ 4 eg Buyers |

Tel: Mea 2 :

for ad rates



The College of The Bahamas
Centre for Continuing Education
and Extension Services (CEES)

SUMMER SCHEDULE

PPA Ue)

BUSINESS COURSES

* Accounting for Beginners I, II, II] (4th & 5th May)

¢ Credit & Collections Procedures I & I (12th & 14th May)
* Superior Customer Service Workshop (12th June)

* Human Resource Management I & I] (4th & 7th May)

* Effective Writing Skills (12th May)

HEALTH, FITNESS & COSMETOLOGY COURSES
* Massage Therapy Essentials I & II (11th & 14th May)
¢ Make-up Applications (11th May)



SEWING AND DECORATING COURSES
* Basic of Freehand Cutting I (11th May)
¢ Drapery Making I (12th May)

* Jewelry Making (14th May)
* Floral Design I (11th May)

* Floral Design IT (20th April)

COMPUTER COURSES

* Computer Applications I & I (4th & 7th May)
* Web Page Design I W/S (11th June)
* Web Page Design II W/S (16th July)

Phone: 325-5714; 328-0093; 328-1936;
302-4300 ext. 5202 or email: acurry@cob.edu.bs





THE TRIBUNE

MONDAY, MAY 11, 2009, PAGE 11B



Retail earnings,
consumer spending
come into focus

m@ By STEPHEN BERNARD
AP Business Writer

NEW YORK (AP) — After
a week when investors were
reassured by the government's
assessment of the banking
industry and its latest reading
on the job market, Wall
Street's focus turns to the con-
sumer.

The coming week features
first-quarter earnings figures
from Wal-Mart Stores Inc.,
Macy's Inc. and other retailers
and the Commerce Depart-
ment's retail sales report for
April. So far, the expectations
are that the readings will help
the stock market extend a two-
month-old rally.

The government's retail
sales tally follows April sales
figures issued by the retailers
on Thursday. Those reports
showed spending generally fell,
but by a smaller amount than
in the previous months. Still,
the recession weighed on con-
sumers, who concentrated their
spending on necessities such
as groceries and health care
products.

Economists polled by Thom-
son Reuters, on average, pre-
dict the government will report
a 0.1 percent dip in retail sales
from March's level.

"IT would be surprised if
retail sales come in anything
other than expected," said Jeff
Ivory, a partner at Stonebridge
Financial Partners LLC in
Bingham Farms, Mich. Meet-
ing or even exceeding forecasts
would provide additional
strength to the market, he said.

Ivory said investors still have
the mind-set that started the
stock rally in early March.
They're focused on whether
economic data and corporate
reports are showing incremen-

tal improvement, even if there
are still signs of weakness.

"What we're seeing in aggere-
gate is that bad news isn't nec-
essarily bad news anymore,"
Ivory said. “It's all relative."

Consumer spending
accounts for more than two-
third of economic activity. So
signs of stronger spending or
upbeat outlooks from retailers
would give investors incentive
to keep buying.

Brett D'Arcy, Chief Invest-
ment Officer of CBIZ Wealth
Management in San Diego,
said a worse-than-expected
reading on retail sales or dis-
appointing results from a
major retailer might lead to a
short-term drop in the market,
but only a series of bad reports
over a couple of weeks would
be likely to derail the rally.

Cincinnati-based Macy's
first-quarter results are sched-
uled to be released Wednes-
day, while investors hear from
Bentonville, Ark.-based Wal-
Mart on Thursday. Analysts
expect Macy's to post a quar-
terly loss of 23 cents per share,
while Wal-Mart is expected to
earn 77 cents per share.

Very little has been able to
slow down the market in
recent weeks — not even the
government saying some of the
nation's largest banks are still
facing capital shortfalls. The
government's stress-test results
did just the opposite.

For the week, the Dow
Jones industrials average
gained 2 percent. The broader
Standard & Poor's 500 index
rose 2.4 percent, while the Nas-
daq composite index gained
1.3 percent.

Investors believe the stress
tests gave them more clarity
about where the nation's 19
largest banks stand and how

much money they will need to
protect against further losses.

The benchmark KBW Bank
Index, which tracks 24 of the
nation's largest banks, jumped
12.1 percent Friday, The test
results were released late
Thursday.

The government's findings
"lessened the worst fears
investors had," said Nicholas
Sargen, chief investment offi-
cer at Fort Washington Invest-
ment Advisors in Columbus,
Ohio. Just a few months ago,
investors were worried about
potential government
takeovers of the largest banks
or their collapse, he said.

CBIZ's D'Arcy said infor-
mation leaking out about the
results in the days before the
official release also helped the
market. That included word
that Bank of America Corp.
would have to make up a near-
ly $34 billion shortfall.

"The way they put it out to
the public, it was highly
telegraphed so when the actu-
al results came, it wasn't a big
shock," D'Arcy said.

And in a sign that the reces-
sion is moderating, the Labor
Department said layoffs
totaled 539,000 in April. Econ-
omists expected employers to
cut 620,000 jobs during the
month.

The unemployment rate
climbed to 8.9 percent, meeting
expectations.

The improvement in the jobs
loss figure was helped along
by a burst of hiring by the fed-
eral government to prepare for
the 2010 Census. But there
were also smaller payrolls cuts
at construction companies, fac-
tories, retailers and financial
services, and that is the kind
of incremental improvement
Wall Street is looking for.



Approx. 6 acres of Waterfront property with a 152 feet wide canal.
Property comprises three buildings:

Building A: Seafood Processing Plant include a reception area, an
office, three bathrooms, a receiving room, a dressing room,
a packing room, a storage room, a laboratory and a
processing room, (3) 10 ft x 30 ft blast freezers, and (1)
15ft x 15 ft and (1) 10 ft x15 ft holding freezers.

Building B: Generator House

Building C: The Water Plant consists of a reverse osmosis water
system that converts salt water into drinking water with
a 10,000 storage capacity.

Interested persons should submit offers to:
The Manager, Credit Risk Management, P. O. Box N-7518,
Nassau, Bahamas
To reach us on or before June 12, 2009

For further information, please contact us at
502-0929, 356-1685 or 356-1608







PAGE 12B, MONDAY, MAY 11, 2009

THE TRIBUNE





Gym shrinks
for survival

m By CHESTER ROBARDS
Business Reporter
crobards@tribunemedia.net

THE ECONOMIC down-
turn has forced the popular
Palmdale gym, Mystical, to give
up 4000 square feet of space,
according to its general manag-
er.
Derrick Bullard said increas-
ing rental payments and a
declining economy, which had
reduced both gym user num-
bers and the frequency of their
visits, had forced him to return
to the landlord space he had
allocated for his health and
wellness store.

With this yield of space, Mr
Bullard said the gym would
have to construct a new
entrance that could cost him a
substantial sum.

Mr Bullard said he had been
trying to keep gym membership
fees down in order to attract
patrons, but the landlord had
continually increased their rent.

“We have been advertising
and piggybacking on certain
events,” said Mr Bullard. “And
we have added more classes to
keep people coming in.”

He said he has been in talks
with the Miss Bahamas Uni-
verse organizers, lobbying for

“We have been
advertising and
piggybacking on certain
events. And we have
added more classes to
keep people coming in.”

— Derrick Bullard



them to use his gym, which
could give the establishment
some much-needed publicity.

Also, he has tweaked the
gym’s hours to try to accom-
modate individual work habits
and lifestyles.

According to Mr Bullard,
personal trainers have taken a
greater hit than the gym itself.

“People are cutting back on
personal trainers,” he said. “At
the end of the day they say they
can’t afford it.”

He said that when the Rus-

sell’s retail outlet closed down
next to him in the Palmdale
Shopping Plaza, it was a clear
indication that change might
come to Mystical and it has.

On the western side of New
Providence Bally’s Gym is is
doing fine, though usage is
down, according to its general
manager.

Naomi Rickets said the gym
had seen a bit of a decline with
the onset of the economic crisis,
but now things were back to
normal for them.

——="

bahamasc

Jiami Int. Airport

+tax x room per room to be paid at hotel

Airfare

OT = Daws Interm. (Car
. PER PERSOM

Airfare
» 2 Days Minivan
PER PERSOM

Airfare
2 Days Compact Car
PER PERS@t?ry]

‘Some resincions may apply

Re ear Easy
YOU NEED A CERTAIN BANK.

=| THE BEST ASSET IS
PEACE OF MIND.

You couldn't be in better hands.

~ FIRSTCARIBBEAN

NWlrERNATIONAL BANK

GET THERE. TOGETHER.

www. firstcaribbeanbank.com FirstCaribbean International Bank is a member of the CIBC Group.





MONDAY, MAY 11, 2009

bE







IG jr 1

The stories behind the news



URCA and The Milk of Hatchet Bay

A brief insight into the SUS s more than 40 year attempt to ‘Bahamianise’..



@ By RUPERT MISSICK Jr
Chief Reporter
rmissick@tribunemedia.net

6 Bahamianisation” is a falla-

cy, a half-hearted attempt

to bring about a level play-

ing field, political propa-

ganda, idealistic, incomplete,

and an ideal that has never been forti-

fied with the tools it needed to be
realised.

These were all words used to
described the philosophy of Bahami-
anisation to Insight this past week.

Certainly “Bahamianisation” means
“Bahamians first” or as one senior
statesman said, Bahamian “owner-
ship”, but a fact that may be hard to
swallow for many is that realistically
Bahamianisation truly means “Bahami-
ans eventually.”

The reason is because it was intro-
duced by a government that did not
fully understand what was required to
produce the results the philosophy pro-
fessed to bring about.

If one chose to be cynical it could
be said that government has believed
only in Bahamianisation’s ability to
bring in votes.

A woman who describes herself as
“one of the beneficiaries of Bahami-
anisation” explained it to Insight this
way.

“They did not “‘Bahamianise’ us cul-
turally or on a deep educational level
like (other governments) did in the
other Caribbean nations. I guess we
still had it too good, too close to the
US. It was like we were kids let loose in
a candy store. But now the store was
ours we were not educated on how to
take care of it on our own or how to
use sugar to make things other than
candy.

“The government was eager and
tried to educate us, but we lost some-
thing in the process: Morality, work
ethics. Everything came too easily. I
was 16 during independence. The gov-
ernment paid for my education, for
high school and up to my first degree in
college. I was a beneficiary. I was one
of those who received government
scholarships that were given out freely
after Majority Rule to ensure that we
had Bahamian professionals, especial-
ly in the education field, but not every-
one benefited.”

The PLP’s successors in office (which
includes not only the FNM but the
“new” PLP) has had to temper an all-
or-nothing expectation that has accom-
panied “Bahamianisation” with matu-
rity, a new found, although not wide-
spread, collective security and, as one
senior politician noted last week, a
healthy dose of reality.

This past Wednesday, during his con-
tribution to the debate on the Bill that
would establish the Utilities Regula-
tion and Competition Authority
(URCA) that is expected to regulate
electronic communications in the
Bahamas, Prime Minister Hubert
Ingraham said that it is his govern-
ment’s hope that it will be able to pop-
ulate this regulatory authority with
Bahamians.

“But we are realists and we also
recognise that in this early phase we
will be required to access talent that
may not be available in the Bahamas,”
he said.

Government has already identified
this talent in someone outside the
Bahamas who will be the Policy Direc-
tor of URCA.

Mr Ingraham acknowledged that the
salaries payable for jobs in this sector
are far in excess of anything known by
public sector enterprises.

“T would expect that some of the
salaries paid to some of the profes-
sionals will be higher than what is nor-
mally paid in other areas in the
Bahamas,” the prime minister said.

The creation of URCA, and the new
Communications Bill in general, sig-
nals, according to the prime minister, a
new phase in the Bahamas’ develop-
ment. URCA was not something that
the country actually needed before
now. In a developing nation with a
population of 300,000 people and a
growing need for doctors, teachers,
nurses, contractors, engineers, and the
like, it is hard to imagine that a
Bahamian would have anticipated this
obscure and future need and had the
foresight to prepare himself to fill the
position of URCA’s Policy Director.

When Insight discussed this point of
view with a young Bahamian, he con-
ceded everything to a certain extent.
He asserted that while it may be new to
the general public, URCA’s establish-
ment is no surprise to the current gov-
ernment. “They’re in power two years
now and had to prepare the legislation
for it. Why didn’t they send a Bahami-
an abroad for those two years and have
them come back now ready to lead this
thing?”

The answer could be based on the
assumption — albeit an embarrassing-
ly apparent one — that in a small coun-
try with limited resources there is a lot
of pressure and in fact a desperate need
to get things right the first time around.

The demand then for a person who
knows what he is doing the first day on
the job as opposed to a person who
may be ineptly groping with theoretical
rather than practical experience is not
only risky, but costly.

Does this mean that URCA is not

—
= 3

JANUARY 1979 BDP Leader J Henry
Bostwick during his one day fact fining
tour of the Hatchet Bay Farms at Alice
Town Eleuthera. Mr Bostwick is shown
in one of the coops filled with hundreds

a — ——_ of layer chickens...



THE ROOM in which thousands of chickens were killed packaged and sent to Nassau,

clean closed and deserted...



“Bahamianised”? It may not be imme-
diately, but it could be eventually.

Now that the public is aware that
the job exists and that the salary is “in
excess of anything known by public
sector enterprises,” a Bahamian, who is
so inclined, should do some research,
educate himself and work his way up
the ranks of URCA to be eventually
equipped to fully merit the position.

In a world populated by the Internet,
microwaves, instant messenger and e-
mail it may be too much to ask the
modern Bahamian to accept this grad-
ualism. We do have, however, an his-
torical example where a rush to
“Bahamianise,” supported by govern-
ment’s failure to truly prepare Bahami-
ans for ownership, caused the failure of
a once vibrant institution.

In 1975, the government bought a
successful dairy and chicken farm from
the Harrisville Company — it was
known as the “Hatchet Bay Farm.”
The farm, which was developed by the
late American millionaire Austin T
Levy, provided jobs for 300 people in
the settlement of Alice Town.

The 2,500-acre farm was bought by
government for $3 million. On the far-
m’s take-over, the late Prime Minister
Sir Lynden Pindling declared that
Bahamians were witnessing a “triumph
of the human sprit.”

He said the Hatchet Bay take-over
was the “greatest success story in the
country’s history of agriculture.”

But the dream quickly went sour.

Shortly after the take-over there
were reports that large numbers of
chickens had died. There were allega-
tions that the farm’s seed boat was
being used to bring in cars and appli-

SEE page 2C

FX — — ly The most fuel-efficient passenger bus around!

The Suzuki APY is perfect for the
family and also for the business.
7-sealer passenger-car comfort,
better performance, incredible

fuel-efficiency & all-round utiltityl

* 1600 cc engine
* Automatic Transmission
(GLS only)
* Alloy Wheels
* Keyless Entry (GLS only)
* CD Player
* Dual Air Conditioning
* Power Steering
* Power Windows & Door Locks

& QUALITY 2%:

os
$a es is =
—

#1 AUTO DEALER IM THE BAHAMAS
EAST SHIRLEY STREET + 322-3775 * 325-3079

Wiel our chesercars af Quality Auto alec [PF respacri] Lid Forcier deals, Quewes Rey, 057-4192
of Mboto Beto: Mal, Den be Kee Bhd, BoP





PAGE 76

THE WEATHER REPORT

5-Day FORECAST



THE TRIBUNE ~ 5/11/09

INSURANCE MANAGEMENT

FL (BAHAMAS) LIMITED. INSURANCE BROKERS & AGENTS

Woo Gines Marine Forecast



a “

m1 ae Ui Vg































x Today Tuesday WINDS WAVES VISIBILITY WATER TEMPS.
f | a we High = Low W High Low W NASSAU Today: SE at 5-10 Knots 0-2 Feet 10-20 Miles 77°F
’ = y, Ol f 9/10 F/C F/C F/C F/C Tuesday: E at 5-10 Knots 0-2 Feet 10-20 Miles 77°F
a é or o| : |2 3|4|5 6|7 8|olio Acapulco 88/31 75/23 pc 88/31 76/24 pc FREEPORT te SE at 5-10 Knots 0-2 Feet 10-20 Miles 76° F
i-_, rr LOW | MODERATE J HIGH | V.HIGH J EXT. = Amsterdam 58/14 47/8 c 58/14 54/12 pe Tuesday: _E at 5-10 Knots 0-2 Feet 10-20 Miles 77°F
k am ORLANDO Ankara, Turkey 68/20 414 t 71/21 43/6 pe = ABACO Today: SE at 5-10 Knots 0-2 Feet 10-20 Miles 76° F
High:93°F34°C Plenty of sun. Mainly clear. Sunny. Breezy with plenty of Windy with plenty of | Windy with a full day The higher the AccuWeather UV Index™ number, the Athens 76/24 64/17 s 81/27 66/18 s Tuesday: _E at 5-10 Knots 0-2 Feet 10-20 Miles TE
Low69°F/21°C - sunshine. sunshine. of sunshine. greater the need for eye and skin protection. Auckland 56/12 48/8 sh 57/13 46/7 sh
769° ae cies (ais «alk BES re Bangkok 95/35 81/27 t 93/33 81/27 t
} @ sit aia a High: 85° High: 86° High: 85° High: 86° Barbados 85/29 76/24 pc 85/29 76/24 pc MMR Ve TAH |
TAMPA a | High: 87 Low: 76 Low: 76 Low: 77 Low: 75 Low: 76 yas Posy UL Barcelona 72/22 58/14 pc 71/21 58/14 pc Daa
ot Le ; PETE ai ee ETC Beijin 79/96 64/17 pe 84/98 BOB
High: 89° F/32°C ey 102° F 92°-83° F 92°-81° F 91°-78° F High _Ht.(ft.) Low _Ht.(ft. ar caer ear = one teed
Low: 72° F/22°C e] r The exclusive AccuWeather RealFeel Temperature® is an index that combines the effects of temperature, wind, humidity, sunshine intensity, cloudiness, precipitation, pressure, and Today 9:57am. 24 4:00am. 02 Belarade 84/28 60/15 pc 93/98 GI/16 s
ay @ ad 2 elevation on the human body—everything that effects how warm or cold a person feels. Temperatures reflect the high and the low for the day. 10:20pm. 29 3:52pm. 0.2 ean 66/18 42/5 - 65/18 45/7 § (56/44
ie Tuesday !0:36am. 23 4:40am. 0.2 Bermuda 76/24 68/20 sh 75/23 65/18 pc Billings
a «5 | CO 11:00pm. 27 4:33pm. 03 Bogota 66/18 48/8 sh 65/18 48/8 t “Tuaey
J ee ae Statistics are for Nassau through 2 p.m. yesterday Wednesday! 1:16 am. 03 520am. 03 Brussels 58/14 52/11 sh 64/17 60/15 sh
| r ABACO Temperature 1:41pm. 26 5:15pm. 04 Budapest 84/28 60/15 pc 79/26 54/12 pe (H)
rr - 5 = ¥ High: 86° F/30°C 7 Hanugigaaibaen UbdedaReeuaddaechaneiananiemene cae : Thursday 11:59 am. 99 602am. 04 — Aires ri — ” a ae '
cy ll ee Low: 73° F/23°C Normal high... Yt 106/41 82/27 s 100/37 79/26 s “ast
F Normal low 71° F/21° C Calgary 62/16 39/3 sh 44/6 29/-1 sh
2 @ WEST PALM BEACH iy Last year's High ...csssssesesseserssne 91° F/33° C SuN Vn Cancun 90/32 69/20 s 92/33 69/20 s Los Angee
—— High: 86° F/30° C » Last year's low Gieaeauleaeateeetiss 78° F/25° C " Caracas 81/27 72/22 5 81/27 71/21 pc ,
Low: 72° F/22°C Precipitation = CséSrisle 6:28am. Moonrise ...10:20p.m. — Casablanca 74/23 57/13 s 73/22 57/13 s Aan: :
As of 2 terd 0.00" Sunset 7-45 p.m. Moonset 8:02am. Copenh 54/12 48/8 63/17 47/8 i
$0 AM. YOSTOMCAY .... ce cceceee eee ee eee eee UE UN eee sees aera ee : Ea ta Ba opennagen s S
FT. LAUDERDALE FREEPORT oe asi New Dublin 55/12 43/6 pc 55/12 45/7 po
— High: 86° F/30° C @ High: 85° F/29° C Normal year to date oo... 8.90" a Frankfurt 63/17 56/13 sh 71/21 58/14 ¢
Low: 74° F/23°C Low: 71° F/22° C fe Geneva 74/23 56/13 t 74/23 54/12 c
AccuWeather.com = Halifax 50/10 33/0 c 51/10 34/1 c ee nisi
= @ Forecasts and graphics provided by ay Havana 88/31 67/19 s 89/31 66/18 s Tetorme 89/75
\ MIAMI AccuWeather, Inc. ©2009 May 17 May 24 Helsinki 55/12 37/2 t 54/12 36/2 pe [aad Rain E
~ High: 89° F/32°C ELEUTHERA Hong Kong 86/30 75/23 t 88/31 75/23 pe Mea Furies au
Low: 75° F/24°C NASSAU High: 86° F/30° C Islamabad 95/35 66/18 s 108/42 71/21 s BK Snow Shown are noon positions of weather systems and Oar ata
= seals — F High: 87° F/31°C Low: 72° F/22°C Istanbul 76/24 60/15 s 75/23 63/17 s [=] ice ea
Low: 76° F/24°C Jerusalem 69/20 48/3 s 70/21 49/9 s orecasi nign/iow temperatures are tor selected citles. tationary Meugumiit-
a : Johannesburg 61/16 44/6 sh 65/18 47/8 s -10s | Os ts 10s 20s /30s") 40s
KEY WEST eX @ CATISLAND Kingston 87/30 78/25 + 86/30 78/25 sh
High: 86° F/30°C Hi h:84°F/29°C Lima 78/25 60/15 pc 77/25 61/16 pc
Low: 77° F/25°C Ng Es rone London 63/17 50/10 pc 6116 56/13 +
; ow: 68° F/20° Madrid 75/23 48/8 pe 73/22 48/8 pc
@ =F Manila 93/33 77/25 t 90/32 79/26 t AUTO IN 16. R yay NJ Cc FE
in © Mexico City 80/26 52/11 pc 79/26 51/10 pc
Monterrey 104/40 72/22 pc 102/38 72/22 s
GREAT EXUMA SAN SALVADOR Montreal 5713 39/3 pc 6417 43/6 pc
7 Low:74°F/23°C Lew 72°F" Munich 74/23 52/11 t 71/21 50/10 c
Shown is today's weather. Temperatures are today's _ANDROS . Nairobi 81/27 63/17 t 77le5 BA/I7 +
ights' High: 88° F/31°C New Delhi 100/37 79/26 s 102/38 77/25 s
meee Mew — Low: 73° F/23°C Osl 54/12 42/5 57/13 43/6
: P ow: 73° S slo pe pe !
<< © Paris 74/23 61/16 sh 71/21 58/14 pc el Mc Wit QO [ us
Prague 63/17 46/7 sh 65/18 43/6 s = ; °
LONGISLAND Rio de Janeiro 81/27 70/21 s 83/28 71/21 s eee i
Ce rec om ‘ro28 SYit ©7428. SD § When it to Auto I :
Low: 72° F/22°C Rome 75/23 53/11 s 74/23 55/12 s to uto Insurance,
Today Tuesday Today Tuesday Today Tuesday MAYAGUANA St. Thomas 85/29 76/24 sh 84/28 75/23 sh “the Smart choice 18
High Low W High Low W High Low W High Low W High Low W High Low W High: 87° F/31°C San Juan 77/125 48/8 pe 78/25 45/7 ¢ et Ley
FC FIC FC FIC FC FIC FC FIC Fic FIC FC FIC et Low: 72° F/22°C gee ae vane t ee vos a rance Management.
Albuquerque 86/30 58/14 s 88/31 57/13 s Indianapolis 67/49 44/6 pe 71/21 56/12 s Philadelphia 69/20 48/8 s 69/20 50/10 pe anag ome pe a oe *
Anchorage 62/16 43/6 s GAIT 41/5 s —_— Jacksonville. ~—«92/33- 65/18 t 80/26 64/17 t Phoenix 102/38 75/23 s 102/38 74/23 s CROOKED ISLAND / ACKLINS Santo Domingo oe let 83/28 71/21 sh i cae - -ople you can trust.
Atlanta 70/21 55412 t 76/24 5915 s Kansas City 71/21 58/1 s 72/22 647 + Pittsburgh 62416 38/3 po 64/17 393 s RAGGEDISLAND — High:s0°F/s2°c - — ae Tn t ee — s D>
Atlantic City 64/17 42/5 s 68/20 43/6 po Las Vegas «99/87 60/20 s 96/85 73/22 s Portland, OR + G1/16 46/7 c 5713. 42/5 sh Highteee rice = LOW 74°F/28°C eBekht ore eee Te —
Baltimore 66/18 43/6 pc 68/20 45/7 s Little Rock 67/19 57/13 t 75/23 67/19 t Raleigh-Durham 64/17 46/7 + 74/23 50/10 s Low: 70° F/21°C ae Bee EO sais soit. aD
Boston 63/17 45/7 pe 50/15 47/8 ¢t Los Angeles 78/25 60/15 pc 78/25 58/14 pc St. Louis 71/21 53/11 pe 75/23 62/16 pe . a ae ae : Rae : ; RANCE MAN AGEMENT
Buffalo 5814 36/2 po 59/15 37/2 s Louisville 72/22 50/10 po 75/23 5814 s SaltLakeCity 79/26 5241 s 75/23 47/8 pc GREATINAGUA Tava eae Ane ae ee
Charleston, SC 80/26 54/12 t 76/24 59/15 pe Memphis 71/21 57/13 t 73/22 65/18 pc San Antonio 90/32 71/21 pce 89/31 72/22 pc nimabpene panier: y P P al (BAHAMAS) LIMITED. INSURANCE BROKERS & AGENTS
: ied : High: 89° F/32° C Toronto 57/13 37/2 pc 5713 416 s
Chicago 6216 41/5 pe 67/19 50/10 s Miami 89/31 75/23 pe 87/80 74/23 s San Diego 69/20 61/16 pc 70/21 59/15 pc Low: 74° F/23°C Trinidad 99/27 70/21 t 81/27 69/20 t ; Vee.
Cleveland 57/13 38/3 pc 66/18 44/6 s Minneapolis 68/20 50/10 pc 66/18 55/12 t Sanfrancisco 62/16 499 s 66/18 51/40 pc : vee ca SEE : New Providence Grond Rehome Ahaco Fleutherg Eyam
Dallas 75/23 64/17 c 87/30 72/22 pc Nashville 72/22 50/10 t 77/25 6015 s Seattle 5613 44/6 sh 54/12 42/5 sh Viana 79/22 50/10 t 69/20 49/9 c BCE HEAT E50 4D) agen (D4) Ete (DEN tbr
Denver 74/23 51/10 pc 83/28 46/7 pc NewOrleans 88/31 71/21 t 88/31 71/21 t Tallahassee © 90/32 68/20 t 82/27 65/18 t WaT 63/17 46/7 pc 6216 36/2 s BRD A (BAT) S50-S50) | Te: (242) (142) $3): (it})
Honolulu «8520 7121 ¢ 8599 722 s OdatomaGly 6217 S73 1 7026 6820 t Twos 1007 GOS 6 10188 Gola © ~~ aimee ee ———_—_———
onolulu s s ahoma Ci ucson s s — 7 7 | :
Houston 91/32 72/22 pc 88/31 73/22 po Orlando 93/33 69/20 pc 89/31 68/20 pc Washington, DC 65/18 48/8 pc 70/21 50/10 s Th ee





PAGE 2C, MONDAY, MAY 11, 2009

THE TRIBUNE



INSIGHT



URCA and The Milk of Hatchet Bay

FROM page 1B

ances like air conditioners and
fridges duty free.

The farm ran into problems
with its creditors.

Employees were laid off and
the farm that once supplied 60
per cent of the domestic market
with eggs as well as providing
poultry, milk and ice-cream, col-
lapsed.

Insight spoke with an
Eleutheran who remembered
the excitement some felt over
the PLP’s move to “Bahami-
anise” the Hatchet Bay Farm,
but said in the end governmen-
t’s intention was less than sin-
cere.

“All of the foreign scientists
and veterinarians, etceteras,


























































went home, but that wasn’t it.
All of the white Bahamians
were fired and then all of the
black Bahamians who didn’t
support the PLP were sent
home,” he said.

Before the take-over, many, if
not a disproportionate majority
of Bahamians on the farm were
labourers and factory workers
and did not have or were not
given the opportunity to have
the skills to administer the far-
m’s operations.

Insight suggested to the
Eleutheran, now well into his
50s, that surely, it was the gov-
ernment’s intention, in its move
to “Bahamianise” Hatchet Bay,
to educate and train Bahami-
ans to effectively run the plan-
tation.

He snarled and coldly
remarked that only “a handful
of people at the top who would
have given their first born child
to the PLP were given a chance
to do anything that would have
made any difference.”

He admitted that he had been
embittered by this period in
Eleuthera’s history and said he
was unapologetic in his asser-
tion that the PLP had
“destroyed Hatchet Bay and
left Eleuthera to rot in the sun
like the thousands of chickens
they let die in those boxes at
the airport.”

In January 1978, then leader
of the Bahamian Democratic
Party and the official opposi-
tion leader J. Henry Bostwick
led a group, which included

NEW STRONGER FORMULA
















WITH BETTER SMELL.
Show insects no mercy.

Distributed in the Bahamas
by The d’Albenas Agency e 322 1441








G@Johnson

re ae



WHERE there were once neat buildings and immaculate lawns today
there are only abandoned structures junk and weeds...

Clarence Town MP, the late
James (Jimmy) Knowles, and
Senator Edmund Moxey, to
Hatchet Bay on an extensive
“fact finding” tour of the 2,500-
acre plantation .

The BDP parliamentarians
made the trip as a result of
numerous reports in the press
concerning the state of affairs
at the farm. The politicians
found it nearly in ruins.

Speaking to Insight last week
it became apparent that Mr
Bostwick’s crusade more than
30 years ago was a bit of a pil-
grimage as well. He said that
remembering the decline of the
once vibrant farm was sad for
him.

“IT was raised on the milk of
Hatchet Bay,” he said.

Many of his generation were.
No doubt, like others from the
same era, Mr Bostwick saw no
need for Hatchet Bay not to
continue just as it was at the
time. “Let it continue to live its
own life,” he said.

“The government of the day
was socialising everything, caus-
ing the demise of (all enterpris-
es) that were independent,
especially if they were operating
successfully,” he said.

The former statesman said
that in its raw form “Bahami-
anisation” meant “ownership,”
but at the time it was far from
being a national ideal.

“Bahamianisation was a PLP
government concept. It was a
political ideal, rather than some-
thing (driven by the people),”
Mr Bostwick said.

However, Mr Bostwick said
that some good did come out
of this “political ideal.”

“Was Bahamianisation suc-
cessful? Yes in that quite a
number of black millionaires
came into being. It opened a
door that had been hitherto
closed and it changed the face
of the country’s economy. Peo-
ple like me were able to suc-
ceed and advance because we
took the legitimate opportuni-

TST

For the stories

WATT TS
Wr ES
on Mondays



ties that were available,” he
said.

Still, he acknowledged that
today’s generation has awak-
ened to the fact that the country
has changed and their parents’
“misplaced” sense of entitle-
ment will not provide them with
the things they want from life.

“All the choice properties on
New Providence are gone.
(Young people) have a real
thirst for land, but it has come at
a time when it is too late to do
anything about it.”

These days, said Mr Bost-
wick, the idea that one should
“possess or own land and every-
thing on it due to nationality or
colour, because it’s their God-
given right, is total nonsense.”

Mr Bostwick expects govern-
ment to announce very soon
that it is developing Andros,
Inagua or Crooked Island so
that Bahamians can get land.

It is not hard to imagine that
the former opposition leader’s
words may prove one day to be
prophetic, but his insight on the
here and now as it relates to the
new generation of Bahamians
is spot on.

Younger Bahamians want to
own, but they are not weight-
ed down by the paternalism of
their parents. They expect gov-
ernment to be facilitators, not
providers.

Insight exchanged e-mails
with a professional lady in her
early 30s about this topic of
Bahamianisation and thought
that her response was so telling
on a number of levels that it
should be printed in its entirety.

“Rupert to tell you the truth,
I have no clue what that con-
cept even means so, I did some
research. This is what I found —
‘At its most basic level, Bahami-
anisation is widely accepted to
mean that as the owners of
these islands, we have first call
on all the best in resources and
rewards available herein.’
(Source: The Bahama Journal.
Article by Theresa Moxey-
Ingraham)

“Tf this is the definition, ALL
successive governments have
failed miserably. If governments
were/are serious about this
Bahamianisation policy it could
happen within a blink of an eye.
Through free job training pro-
grammes, free continuing edu-
cation programmes, community
centres in EVERY neighbour-
hood, free quality health care,
free quality education (inclu-
sive of tertiary education), land
grants, clean streets, parks for
recreation, beach access and
grants for small businesses for
example. For EVERY person
born here NO MATTER where
their parents are from.

“The solution is that we will
not wait for our governments
to give us anything. We will now
take what is ours by building
our own institutions, schools,
media institutions, community
centres, health care institutions
and the list goes on.

“Many people are already
taking this approach and in the
next 10-20 years I think that this
country will begin to reap the
benefits of a bottom up
Bahamianisation policy because
of African warrior scholars who
are working for the empower-
ment and liberation of our com-
munities,” she said.

Modern Bahamian govern-
ments are now (we hope) more
mature, or perhaps less inse-
cure. Government may also, as
the prime minister said, be pop-
ulated by more “realists.”

This would explain his admin-
istration’s decision to bring in
a person with the skills needed
to operate URCA, facing the
reality that no such Bahamian is
currently available in our labour
pool.

The reasonable conclusion
should be that “Bahamianisa-
tion” isn’t an event or period in
our history, but a continuing
process. Perhaps it is occurring
more gradually than people
hoped or expected, but we’re
getting there.

Today, Bahamians don’t own
or control everything, but since
July 10, 1973, we have become
executives and managers in
major companies, both locally
and internationally, opened and
operated hospitals and clinics,
law firms and supermarkets,
insurance and real estate com-
panies, major liquor companies,
breweries, radio and television
stations, newspapers, schools
and independently administered
one of the most stable govern-
ments in one of the most pros-
perous countries in the region
for nearly 40 years.

Even so, it will be up to indi-
viduals to determine whether
this progress has been enough.

It should be painfully obvi-
ous that there isn’t anything
wrong with the idea of
“Bahamianisation,” but it
requires the participation and
inclusion of all Bahamians, both
white and black. It is also an
ideal that has no teeth if it is
not supported by an adequate
education system that is sup-
ported by government, corpo-
rate and civil society.

Finally, and more important-
ly, it requires actual work and a
drive on the part of individual
Bahamians who would see sec-
tors where Bahamians are not
present or under-represented
to equip themselves to climb to
the top of these industries.

“By the sweat of your brow
you shall eat.”

There is no shame in that, is
there?

Many things could have been
done and there is no telling
what eventually suffered
because of the break-neck
speed with which “Bahamiani-
sation” was attempted to be
implemented.

It was introduced by a young
government desperate to prove
itself and embraced by a newly
independent dispossessed peo-
ple eager to possess. Perhaps
both groups were expecting
instantaneous fruits from a tree
that in reality takes decades
upon decades to reach maturity.

rocts reality. Jah Nyne has peroemed in numercas
shows with other Cariobean artists such as Capleton
and is looking inte colaborating with the best artists
in the Caribbean as well as. abroad.

Jan Nyne says his greatest inspiration camesinaih
“His Imperial Majesty Haile Selassie | who inSeinge me
to sing music of redemption for the human race Siig ip
ad an exemplary life of faith, integrity and courage"
His lyrics. are inspired by world events, everyday

vity a5 well a5 peTsoaal experiences.

AS an inspiring culture artist Jah Myris on
a mission to take his music and message to
tne world to share nis Message of po sthive
living with an intematinal audience. For
now his focus is on networking with thetin=
dustry, make his mark in the international
music business and ar alGurnm is in &1e
pipeline for later this year. His goal of Be
coming a great inbemetipnal artist, bringing
Bahamian reggae to the forefront and spredtile
ing his massage of positivity Jah Myne is
working towards iuming his goal into reality

ae

Ww) We

BORN SEAN ROLLE ON THE ISLAND OF GRAND
BAHAMA JAH AYHE GREW UP IM THE COMMU-
NITY OF HAWKSBILL. Jah Myne grew up around
music being first influenced by his father, who was a
lead guitarist and vocalist of a band called the in
truders. As 4 teenager at that time Jah Nyne and his
friends would string up a dj set.and one by ome they
would take tims singing and djing on weekends. At
times they would also record their sessions. with a
camcorder a5 they performed.

In 1998 Jah Nyne performed before an audience
for the first time when he opened a show for Exter-
minator with recording artists Luciana, Sizzla and
Milcey General Al that time ne reaiged fat he
wanted 10 Make a career in music and he has been
warking hard since. With a strong and positive mes-
Sage, Mis Music is spiritually cultivated and sure to
draw the attention of listeners with a vibration of

MAY 16, O09
BUTLER & SANOS
GROUNDS, JFK





THE TRIBUNE MONDAY, MAY 11, 2009, PAGE 3C



IN THIS September 26, 2007
courtroom sketch, Kirby Logan
Archer, 35, of Strawberry, Ark.,
left, and Guillermo Zarabozo, 19,
of Hialeah, Fla., right, appear in
federal court in Miami. A judge
sentenced Zarabozo Wednesday,
May 6, 2009 to five consecutive
life prison sentences plus 85 years
for taking part in the 2007 hijack-
ing of the “Joe Cool” charter boat
and killings at sea of its captain,
his wife and two crew members.

(AP Photo: Shirley Henderson)



Life plus

85 years for

Joe Cool’ boat killings

m@ By CURT ANDERSON
AP Legal Affairs Writer

MIAMI (AP) — A judge
sentenced a former security
guard Wednesday to five con-
secutive life prison sentences
plus 85 years for taking part in
the 2007 hijacking of the "Joe
Cool" charter boat and killings
at sea of its captain, his wife
and two crew members.

A life sentence was manda-
tory following the conviction
of Guillermo Zarabozo, 21, on
16 charges in February. But
US. District Judge Paul Huck
sided with prosecutors who
wanted a more severe sen-
tence, even if stringing togeth-
er multiple life terms was
essentially symbolic.

Zarabozo testified at his tri-
al that he did not kill anyone,
instead blaming the hijacking
and murders on his confeder-
ate Kirby Archer. Archer, 37,
pleaded guilty and is also serv-
ing five life terms. Zarabozo
repeated his claims in court
Wednesday.

"When I got onto that boat,
I didn't know what Archer was
going to do," Zarabozo told
the judge. "I had no intention
of hurting anybody."

Huck, however, called
Zarabozo's statements and tes-
timony "largely a fabrication"
clearly contradicted by the evi-
dence and Zarabozo's decision
to bring a gun and other
weapons on board.

"It was so obviously not
true," Huck said.

Prosecutors said Zarabozo

wished for a life of adventure
and got involved because
Archer claimed connections
with the CIA and made
promises of a lucrative career
filled with undercover excite-
ment.

Security

Zarabozo, a security guard
who once aspired to a police
career, was convicted in Feb-
ruary of kidnapping, murder
and other charges. Trial testi-
mony showed that he and
Archer paid $4,000 cash to hire
the "Joe Cool" in September
2007 for a purported trip to
Bimini, Bahamas, then fatally
shot all four people and tried
to make it to Cuba. The plot
failed when the boat ran out
of gas a few miles from Cuban
waters.

Killed were boat captain
Jake Branam, 27; his wife, Kel-
ley Branam, 30; crew members
Scott Gamble, 35, and Samuel
Kairy, 27. The Branams left
two small children now being
cared for by relatives.

Friends and family members

of the victims and Zarabozo
packed the courtroom. Maria
Gagliardo, partner of Jake
Branam's grandfather Joe Har-
ry Branam Sr., read two
lengthy statements that repeat-
edly called Zarabozo a "mon-
ster" who had wrecked the
families.

"Life for you will be long
and unpleasant and you will
die a convicted murderer," she
said. "You are a coward. You
chose to take innocent lives."

Zarabozo's mother, Francis-
ca Alfonso, repeated her son's
claims of innocence but also
expressed sympathy for the
victim's families.

"There have been two fami-
lies that have been destroyed. I
feel their pain,” she said.

When Zarabozo and Archer
were first rescued floating in
the "Joe Cool" life raft, they
claimed the boat had been set
upon by Cuban pirates who
had committed the slayings.
But investigators believed oth-
erwise, and pieced together a
case based on circumstantial
evidence such as the discovery
of shell casings that matched

To advertise in The Tritune -

the #1 newspaper in circulation,
just call 502-2371 today!



IH ALIBORANGE|

The Omega-3 fish
Oy MAR es ie of fruit.

FISH OIL
SCE ee Ey

FRUIT BURST

‘abl te

pe eh

oe ee ee

ee ee

iy ilatd |

FRUIT BURST
CAPSULES

PUTA IP URC AeAC AAS
xl ET eA An) ca

Distributed by Nassau Agencies Ltd. - 393-4854



a 9mm handgun owned by
Zarabozo.

Archer, a former military
policeman who had been sta-
tioned at Guantanamo Bay,
Cuba, was a fugitive from
Arkansas when he hired the
boat. He was under investiga-
tion for child molestation and
was wanted for stealing $92,000
from a Wal-Mart where he had
been a manager.

Zarabozo's first trial ended
in a mistrial when jurors failed
to agree on verdicts on the
Most serious counts but con-
victed him on underlying
weapons charges. Huck threw
out the weapons verdicts and
ordered a second trial, finding
the jury was confused by faulty
instructions on the law.




wait

Peper

pein
Pye) Lalu A



err = Kath Kem “s

Butter).

It's Electric!

Geoffrey Jones has you covered when it comes to
electrical supplies & accessories. Great service
at competitive prices. Come in today!

#14 single wire (500’ roll)...

N142 NM Cable (250’ roll)
4” Square box (50)

4” Single Gang Ring (50)
F40D/CW 4’ Bulb (30)

1/2” PVC Pipe (100Lts)
1/2” PVC Adapters (100)
1/2” Locknuts (100)

* CASH ONLY

net

©2009 CreativeRelations.

Sales & Full Service Department
Rosetta & Montgomery Streets
Tel: 322-2188/9

veseeeeee 40,50 NET

$58.50 NET
$55.80 NET
$39.60 NET
$53.10 NET
$64.95 NET





Email: GeofflJones@comcast.net



accel

Geta free Orville Redenbacher popianm bowl when you bring your entry

to The d'Albenas Agency Lic.

Master Techalel

ilage Mew . i!

Qik Deter backe mcSard pope Bk lege ed wrk ol

Cat pt Cia, lentil

Copies oF Tied Alben. doer oy, Moria Coops

AE dhe 4 The ae Agency Ltd.



BIG TV, BIG POP
‘GIVEAWAY

Enter to Win 1 of 2
Panasonic 42"
Flat Panel HDTV's



To play, attach 3 boxes of
any Orville Redenbacher
Microwave Poncom to an
entry form, complete the
skill question and drop inte
boxes at participating
stores or The d Albenas
Agengy Ltd. in-Palmecale.



ant Miwuer Techobcuon). cir agenm arc broeedlue Gordie ace oot elle. Phoec (I regained to collect pric.

PET EPP PC eeeee Teer Teer rrr reer rrr!

BIG TV, BIG POP GIVEAWAY

NAME:
ADDRESS:

Have a healthier snack with Orville Redenbacher's 5 M

TELEPHONE:

R_ POP!



PAGE 4C, MONDAY, MAY 11, 2009

THE TRIBUNE



INSIGHT



TS

For the stories

TAT RUT Ca
WAS
on Mondays

lm By TRAVIS REED
Associated Press Writer

THE cruise Zenaiva Cer-
vantes booked was to stop in



sun-drenched beach cities on
the Mexican Riviera. The cruise
she took? That landed her in
Seattle, where she pulled her
arms tightly to her chest as she

MINISTRY OF PUBLIC WORKS AND TRANSPORT
EXPRESSION OF INTEREST

Project: NEW PROVIDENCE TRANSPORT PROGRAM

Financing: Inter-American Development Bank

Abstract: Road Maintenance Management System (RMMS)
For the Island of New Providence

Sector: Transport

Loan/Credit Number: Loan No. 1320/OC-BH & 1988/OC-BH

Contract/Bid Number: Invitation for Expression of Interest

Deadline: 5th June 2009

The Government of the Commonwealth of The Bahamas has received a loan
from the Inter-American Development Bank (IDB) to finance the cost of Road
Improvement on the island of New Providence. It is intended that part of the loan
proceeds be applied to eligible payments under the technical consultancy on
establishment and implementation of Road Maintenance Management System
(RMMS) for the Island of New Providence.

The Government of The Commonwealth of The Bahamas though the Ministry of
Works and Transport (MoWT) now invites interested parties from any member
country of the IDB to present their expression of interest in sealed envelopes for
the design and implementation of a simple and practical computerized RMMS
program to develop annual plans and periodic programs of routine and periodic
maintenance activities to be executed by contract or by force account.

Consultancy Firms should demonstrate that they have extensive experience
in road maintenance programs, planning and management for urban road
networks. In addition consultants must show evidence that they have experience
of successfully implementing similar systems in the government organization
responsible for road network maintenance.

The total duration of the implementation period of the consultancy should not
exceed six months.

The Consultant will be based in Nassau, The Bahamas and throughout the
undertaking of the assignment the consulting team will be holding consultations
with relevant stakeholders.

The selection of the shortlist will be based on qualifications and relevant
experience of the Consultancy Firm and therefore the submitted Expression of
Interest should include the following information:

* General background of the Company

* Experience in establishing and implementation of RMMS for urban
road network in the region

* Experience in the organization and facilitation of seminars/workshops
for training in use of the RMMS system developed

* Curriculum Vitae of Principals and key professional staff who may be
available to work on the project

* Experience in the Bahamas and Caribbean region.

The results of the evaluation of the expressions of interest will be used to prepare
a shortlist of no more than six consulting firms. The firms included in the shortlist
will subsequently be invited to present technical and economical proposals on
the basis of a request for proposals (RFP) mailed to them which would include
the detailed terms of reference.

Interested firm s are requested to submit their Expression of Interest by 5th June,
2009.

Applications must be placed in a sealed envelope and addressed and forwarded
to the address below. Interested consultant may obtain further information at the
said address.

Contacts:

Project Coordinator

Project Execution Unit

Ministry of Works and Transport,

JFK Drive, 2nd Floor North Wing

P.O. Box N-8156, Nassau, Bahamas

Tel: (+1 242) 302-9538, Fax: (+ 1 242) 326-0470
Email: GEORGEHUTCHINSON@BAHAMAS.GOV.BS



debarked on a damp, 50-degree
morning.

"We wanted to relax in the
warmth,” the 61-year-old Tijua-
na, Mexico, resident said in
Spanish Thursday. "If someone
had told me I'd be in Seattle
eight days ago, I wouldn't have
believed them."

At the peak of the swine flu
outbreak, major cruise opera-
tors Carnival Corp. and Royal
Caribbean Cruises Ltd. — des-
perate to avoid passenger ill-
ness and lost revenue — decid-
ed to reroute Mexico voyages
until mid-June.

So even though fear has
receded, once-sun-seeking pas-
sengers like Cervantes are find-
ing themselves in San Francisco,
Seattle and Victoria, B.C., in
Canada. Cruise companies are
compensating passengers for
the switch with onboard credit
plus vouchers for a future
cruise. Passengers also had the
choice to stay home and get a
full refund, but most passengers
are choosing to travel when
they planned, the cruise lines
said.

What they're losing in sun-
shine and tan lines, their new
destinations are gaining in mil-
lions of dollars of business. In
San Francisco, the 16 addition-
al swine flu-related landings will
boost the year's port traffic 31
percent and bring 49,000 new
visitors, said Michael Nerney,
San Francisco's maritime mar-
keting manager. Each call could
mean $1 million in sales for city
businesses and together they'll
produce $500,000 in revenue for
the port.

"This is highly unusual —
shocking, really — as the cruise
lines set their sailing schedules
12 to 18 months in advance, and
even minor changes are rare,”
Nerney said.

The great number of alterna-
tive ports in the Caribbean
makes it far easier to swap stops
there. Instead of Cozumel in
Mexico, companies are opting
for Ocho Rios or Montego Bay
in Jamaica, Nassau or Freeport
in the Bahamas, the Virgin
Islands' St. Thomas, St.

Maarten or Key West, Fla., or
points across the Caymans and
Turks and Caicos.

The Bahamas is happily
awaiting diverted ships. Cus-
toms receives $15 for each pas-
senger, and island clothing and
jewelry shops, bars and cafes
depend on tourist dollars, said
tourism minister Vincent Van-
derpool-Wallace said.

Analysts think the benefits
may be fleeting for these ports
because the outbreak hasn't
been severe.

"I think it's a short-term
bump that may already be dis-
sipating,” said Michael McCall,
a hospitality research fellow and
lecturer at Cornell University.

Jan Freitag, vice president of
global development at Smith
Travel Research, noted that, in
addition to swine flu, Mexico
travel has been affected by fear
of heightened drug violence in
border states. He sees business
travel to Mexico remaining
steady and swine flu having
minimal impact on leisure traf-
fic unless the virus worsens.

Hotel operators are seeing
travelers postpone plans. The
Ritz-Carlton Hotel Company
and Four Seasons Hotel and
Resorts said virtually all guests
booked at two of their Mexico
resorts in late April and early
May will come a few months
later instead. Starwood Hotels
& Resorts Inc. expected the flu
to cost it $4 million to $5 million
in revenue but said it could
recover much of it from guests
rebooked at its U.S. or
Caribbean resorts.

The federal Centers for Dis-
ease Control and Prevention
now says only 10 percent of
infected Americans picked up
the virus in Mexico, not one-
third as previously estimated.
But it maintains its warning
against nonessential travel to
Mexico.

Michael Crye, vice president
of technology and regulatory
affairs for the Cruise Lines
International Association,
called that restriction damaging
and unnecessary, because areas
hit hardest by the flu's spread

“Pelecting the needs of advertisers

and readers motivates me to do

a good job. The Tribune is

my newspaper.”

ESTHER BARRY
PRODUCTION MAINA GER

THE TRIBUNE

The Tribune

fly Lice. Ply Hewzoaper!

Swine flu is windfall for
some top tourism spots

are inland and the flu season is
almost over.

Crye pointed to lessons
learned from several rounds of
bad publicity after gastroin-
testinal illnesses like the "Nor-
walk" virus broke out and said
new passenger screenings
ensure ships don't help spread
the H1N1 virus, which causes
swine flu.

"We believe ... we've got a
good story to tell, and that
you're probably at less risk
going ahead with your destina-
tion than you would be in vir-
tually any other public place,”
Crye said.

Eric Brey, head of the Center
for Resort and Hospitality Busi-
ness at the University of Mem-
phis, predicted tourists would
have no problem returning
quickly to Mexico.

"Outside of this summer, I
don't see it being that big a
deal,” Brey said.

In Charlotte Amalie on St.
Thomas, a place hit hard as
tourism has fallen amid the
recession, it is usually quiet this
time of year. But taxies zipped
abundantly by the docks last
week.

"(The swine flu) is a good
problem for us," said Edward
Thomas, CEO of the West Indi-
an Company Dock.

Despite the lack of sunshine,
Cervantes, her husband and the
thousands of other passengers
who ended up in the Pacific
Northwest with them enjoyed
Seattle's blocks of boutiques
and Pike Place Market, where
vendors famously sling fish.

"We thought we'd be in our
bikinis and bathing suits,” said
Philipe Tabet, a 53-year-old
restaurateur from Albuquerque,
N.M., traveling with his wife.
"We just had to pack a little bit
different, that's all. Unpack, and
pack again."

¢ Associated Press Writer
Manuel Valdes contributed to
this report from Seattle; Judi
Shimel contributed from St.
Thomas, US Virgin Islands; and
Juan McCartney contributed
from the Bahamas





Full Text


{T)\

Mim blowin’ it

87F
76F

PLENTY
OF SUN

The Tribune

=USA TODAY.

BAHAMAS EDITION

www.tribune242.com

LOW Get Your or re) d

Coffee Fix



Volume: 105 No.139

aoa =1Gi
The stories behind the news

URCA an The Milk of Hatehet Bay











TT
ee ety




MONDAY, MAY 11, 2009

1 OTOL

Expat Danker' les

Hywel Jones had
been in coma
for three weeks

THE murder count rose
to 26 over the weekend
when Welsh banker Hywel
Jones, 55, a permanent res-
ident of the Bahamas, died
from injuries he received
when shot execution style
three weeks ago.

Jones, 55, died in hos-
pital at 11.45 pm Friday
with his brother, It, a Cal-
ifornian film producer, at
his side.

Mr Jones was shot in broad daylight outside
his offshore financial services company near
Compass Point, West Bay Street, around 10am
on April 22. He had been left in a coma to die.

Police suspected that Mr Jones, president of

SEE page eight



Hywel Jones

Dominicans arrested
over suspected human
smuggling operation

uries










SEE PAGE FIFTEEN










Claim that govt
‘neglecting duty’
to deal with the
high crime level

Rev CB Moss commends
police efforts but warns of
damage to Bahamian society

mâ„¢ By PAULG
TURNQUEST

Tribune Staff Reporter

pturnquest@tribunemedia.net

THE Bahamas Government is
endangering the lives of its citizens
if it continues on its present course
of neglecting its duty to deal with
the unacceptably high levels of
crime and criminality, Rev CB

Moss said yesterday.

As an executive director of the
Bahamas Against Crime commit-
tee, Mr Moss said government

must not be “narrow-minded or

RCO em (Ost

fearful” in dealing with this scourge
that is currently plaguing the nation.

While commending the Royal Bahamas Police Force
for its valiant efforts, Mr Moss said that crime and vio-
lence is becoming entrenched in the Bahamian soci-

SEE page eight






Felipé Major/Tribune staff



=
EIGHT Dominicans were arrested and hand- es | z 7 ,
oe FORMER MANAGING EDITOR of The Tribune John Marquis (left) with
believed was a human smuggling operation. = Tribune Chief Reporter Rupert Missick Jr.
Two Bahamian men suspected of being a B= 4 4
part of the illegal operation were taken into PS Tribune bids farewell to former
olice custody. According to reports, police on S- e e e
“SEE page eight d Managing Editor John Marquis
a
: 7 m@ By PAULG
j GWENDOLYN CLARKE, a 95-year-old native of Green Turtle Cay, TURNQUEST
















i ig Ghee Say yS

Ue rela ee mete
www.bossbahamas.com

Abaco, enjoys Mother’s Day with her one-year-old great granddaughter
K’leigh Davies yesterday at her home in Fox Hill.

Tribune Staff Reporter
pturnquest@tribunemedia.net

FRIENDS, family and col-



Defence Force member _ kazues sathered to big ZBTH ANNIVERDARY OF
farewell to The Tribune’s for- THE HMBS FLAMINGO
di . ffi lli : mer Managing Editor John SINKING
1¢e S in tr a 1C CO 1810n Marquis as he transitions from
re cant abeuemoliided wtih ie his time behind the desk to a
- - member of about collided with a white 4; :
ie Roylechac Wee Good Milas) ence, arte relaxation and book [Riu uyuseess=s sss
Force died early Saturday morn- The driver of the Lancer, who : :
Sale Ends ing following a collision on was a member of the Royal _ Holding Eig ee eS clly COMMONWEALTH LOCAL
May 16th Carmichael Road. Bahamas Defence Force, died at tion his honour at the GOVT CONFERENCE HELD
According to reports, around the scene. The Lancer’s two back = Breeze’s Bahamas Resort on IN THE BAHAMAS FOR THE
1.30 am Saturday, a green seat passengers were taken to Saturday night, an admirer
coloured Ford Explorer heading —_ hospital for injuries after the offi- travelled from as far away as FIRST TIME






ee CTC Mere le)
Canon pi7ddh Sharp elz630 Casio per 275

$9900

$4500

east on Carmichael Road and
east of the Coral Harbour round-

SEE page eight

e *

At

esp

SEE page two

= = ‘ae.

A

Fr r |

="!
— |

eer

ae eS, PERE ee Ee

>*

a a Jay

Quiznos

ITALIAN CLUB
TURKEY & SWISS
HAM & CHEDDAR

$ 00
eee aoe
(Except on
Ce ae eee me CHICKEN & CHEDDAR
BOSS Target for MORE great DEALS!





NASSAU AND BAHAMA ISLANDS” LEADING NEWSPAPER
PAGE 2, MONDAY, MAY 11, 2009

LOCAL NEWS

Tribune bids farewell
to former Managing
Editor John Marquis

SEE

Whopper Jr.

Double
Cheeseburger

BLT & Cheese Includes Fries &

160z Soft Drink

Adda
l20z Milkshake

Ss
2 Cookies for .99¢

Village Ad. Roundabout + Harold Rd. + Prince Charles + Frederick Street North * Cable Beach

Ham & Cheese

5pec Tenders

hd dda.

CARIB INSURANCE MOSELEY + BURNSIDE

BROKERS & AGENTS 0.

€e> N-U-A
NOW WE ARE ONE.

A message to our Valued Customers:

We are pleased to announce that Carib insurance Brokers & Agents Lid. and Moseley
Burnside Insurance Agency Lid. are now part of NUA Insurance Agents & Brokers
Lid. For our customers, this means:

LOCATIONS

* The Moseley Burnside location at the Harbour Bay Shopping Centre becomes
NUA's second Service Centre in New Providence, complementing its existing
Service Centre and Head Office on Collins Avenue

* The Carb office on Charlotte Street in downtown Nassau will close effective
April 24, 2009, Customers will have the convenience of being served at either the
Collins Avenue or Harbour Bay Shopping Canirea locations.

CUSTOMER BENEFITS

+ Greater convenience for all of your general insurance needs, including policy
renewals

* The benefit of our combined experience, expertise and areas of specialization.

* Your insurance coverage remains unchanged. Nothing changes with your
current policies.

* Gontinued excellant service that you have come to expect.

As part of tha Bahamas First Group of Companies, we have the security of the
largest and most trusted general insurer in The Bahamas. Bahamas First General
Insurance Gompany Lid. has anA.M. Best Rating of A- (Excellent) which reflects the
company's excellent capital and liquidity position as well as its superior operational
resuilts.

Now we area ona, committed to helping individuals and businesses with all of their
general insurance needs. If you have any questions please call or walt us al one of
our Service Genires.

The F.H. Bobby Symonette Building
ard Terrace & Collings Avenue

P.O. Box N-dB70, Nassau

The Bahamas

Harbour Bay Shopping Centre
P.O.Box N-4870, Nassau
The Bahamas

Tel: 202-9100, 328 SOG49 Tel:
or 356-7800
Fax: 328 5974 of 326-3701 Fax

in
at
nr
a
er

302-9700), 354-8905
or 322-8210
a2e-5277 of 34-8909

the Hands On

Insurance

N-U-A

A a 74
ALENC }
Piste ad ° .



GTR |
EVERY DAY

VALUE |

el”
ALL DAY. EWERN DAY.

SPO /TMLLAM - TUNA
FERGIE RELITE are
TURKEY BREAST & BLACK FOREST HAM
BLT - COLO COT COMaO
WEATRILL WAAIMARA
OVEN ROASTED CHICKEN BREAST

REGULAR

FROM page one

London to attend, returning
the next day to prepare for
law exams. Mr Marquis was
praised and presented with
gifts for his outstanding jour-
nalistic career that has
spanned almost 50 years —
11 of them with The Tribune.

Having worked as a
reporter in the Bahamas in
the mid-sixties, first at The
Nassau Guardian, then at
The Tribune, Mr Marquis
held a number of top posts at
various newspapers in Eng-
land before returning to the
Bahamas in 1999 to take up
the position of Tribune Man-
aging Editor.

After working on the
Reuters news agency’s world
desk, he joined the Thomson
group of newspapers and
became their Sports Editor
and chief boxing correspon-
dent, covering most of the
great fights of the legendary
Mohammed Ali, including
his last fight in the Bahamas.
In the seventies Mr Marquis
was named Provincial Jour-
nalist of the Year after
exposing two doctors
involved in the deaths of two
child patients.

Thanking the newspaper’s
publisher Eileen Carron, for-
mer Managing Editor Roger
Carron, and current Presi-
dent Robert Carron for this
opportunity, Mr Marquis
said he wanted to end his
journalistic career at The Tri-
bune, the newspaper that had
remained true to its mission.

“T wanted to rejoin The
Tribune because I believed
in its mission. It is the one
voice everyone can trust, a
vital part of the democratic
process. Newspapers are
going through very tough
times and soon many of the
great titles will no longer
exist in print form.

“Unfortunately, many cor-
porate newspaper organisa-
tions have downgraded jour-
nalism to a secondary role,
but The Tribune has always
been an editorially-led news-
paper and that makes all the
difference. It remains what
newspapers are supposed to

TROPICAL
EXTERMINATORS

a ee a)
PHONE: 322-2157



THE TRIBUNE







FORMER TRIBUNE MANAGING EDITOR John Marquis chats with
Tribune graphic designer Dale Dean (left) and Tribune news editor Paco

Nunez at Saturday night’s function.



FORMER TRIBUNE MANAGING EDITOR John Marquis receives a
keepsake from Tribune president Robert Carron.

be all about,” he said.

Mr Marquis said he counts
himself fortunate to be one
of the few editors in the busi-
ness today who can retire
from a newspaper secure in
the knowledge that its circu-
lation continues to rise.

“Over the last few years
we have changed the nation-
al mindset towards those in
authority who were previ-
ously considered untouch-
able. But Bahamians still
need to know that when
good people stay silent, bad
people prevail. You need to
build free speech into your
culture so that it can never
again be challenged by those
in power,” he reminded his
young news staff — those he
has spent long hours in

MAIN/SPORTS SECTION

Local News

Editorial/Letters. ..........

BUSINESS SECTION
Business
INSIGHT SECTION
Insight

Palecr oe oposite. nO lmlee
epee eee eee P4

P12,13,14,15

pero eae One. Onl ani

CLASSIFIED SECTION 40 PAGES

REAL ESTATE GUIDE 28 PAGES

USA TODAY MAIN SECTION 12 PAGES

FOOTLONGS ”



preparing to carry the torch.

Flying in Saturday morn-
ing from Buckingham Uni-
versity in England, especial-
ly for the evening event,
Controversy TV co-host Lin-
coln Bain described Mr Mar-
quis as one of his role-mod-
els who had shown him the
benefit of being fearless in
the pursuit of Truth.

“Mr Marquis is one of
those people who supported
me and encouraged me and
kept me going even though I
was getting death threats
right along with him. But I
want to thank you, Mr Mar-
quis, for being what you
were to the Bahamas, and
being a role model to a lot
of other young persons who
are going into journalism;
and for leading the country
in the direction you have led
it in the past few years,” he
said.

Mr Bain then entertained
guests with a live perfor-
mance of his freestyle out-
line of one of Mr Marquis’
most controversial Insight
pieces on the disappearance
of pilot Chauncey Tynes Jr
and the suggestion by
Chauncey’s father that the
young man might have
known too much about the
friendship of the late prime
minister, Sir Lynden Pin-
dling, and drug cartel head,
Joe Carlos Lehder, who
operated from Norman’s Cay
in the Bahamas.

Succeeding Mr Marquis in
the post of Managing Editor
is Mr John Fleet, an editor
from newspapers in North-
ern England and Scotland,
and winner of two North
East Press Awards for Best
Front Page and Best Inside
Page design. He joined The
Tribune on March 30.

FOR A LIMITED TIME ONLY!
AT PARTICIPATING STORES

ITALIAN BML - TORKER BREAST =
HLACK FOREST HAM

DAI 2000

cai ¥ J


THE TRIBUNE

LOCAL NEWS

MONDAY, MAY 11, 2009, PAGE 3



0 In brief

Police find
handgun,
ammunition
and marijuana

POLICE on Saturday
seized a .380 handgun,
seven live rounds of
ammunition and a small
quantity of marijuana
after responding toa

complaint from the Laird

Street area.

According to reports,
while responding toa
complaint made by a 21-
year-old woman about a

male companion, officers }

from the Central Detec-

tive Unit went to a home }

in Laird Street around 5

am Saturday. While exe- }

cuting a search warrant,
officers found a .380
handgun with seven live

rounds of ammunition in :
a toilet bowl in the bath- }

room with a small
amount of marijuana. A
26-year-old man was
arrested and is in police
custody.

¢ TWO men were
arrested early Saturday
morning after police

seized a .40 handgun and }

seven live rounds of
ammunition.
According to reports,

officers from the Central }

Police Station were on
patrol in the area of
Comfort Street around

3am Saturday when they

observed and searched
the occupants of a gold

coloured Honda Accord. :

Inside the car, officers

found a .40 handgun with }

seven live rounds of
ammunition. The occu-
pants of the vehicle, a
28-year-old man of Ross

Corner and a 22-year-old
man from Williams Lane ;

were arrested.

¢ A 23-year-old man of

Fritz Lane is in police
custody after being

found in possession of an }

imitation firearm.
Around 5pm Friday,
officers of the Mobile

Division were in the area }

of Fritz Lane when they
observed a 23-year-old

man who was wanted for }

questioning by the
police. The officers

stopped and searched the
man and discovered that :

he had in his possession
a replica handgun.

¢ A local company was

robbed of an undeter-
mined amount of cash
last Friday.

According to reports,
around 4 pm Friday,
police received a report

of an armed robbery tak- }

ing place at S&P Shea
Limited on Carib Road.
The company was
robbed of an undeter-
mined amount of cash.
When officers from the
Wulff Road Police Sta-
tion arrived at the scene,
they saw a man leaving
the area dressed ina
white T-shirt and blue
jeans and carrying a
shotgun.

Police pursued the man
who dropped the weapon }

and fled the scene.

Police retrieved the
shotgun along with two
shotgun shells.

eR ee Bsa
Fertilizer, Fungicide,
SAO TiaH)|
ee Pcie
322-2157

EN

25. a

28th anniversary of the
HMBS Flamingo sinking

Attack came

just six weeks
alter RBDE
established

SUNDAY marked the
28th anniversary of sinking
of HMBS Flamingo and the
deaths of four Royal
Bahamas Defence Force
Marines in an attack by
Cuban fighter jets.

The attack on HMBS
Flamingo, and its crew came
just six weeks after the estab-
lishment of the Royal
Bahamas Defence Force.

On Saturday, May 10, 1980
the Flamingo, which was on
routine patrol in the Ragged

Financing Available Through
Commonwealth Bank

Solid Wood






Island chain, apprehended a
pair of Cuban fishing boats
off Cay Santo Domingo, in
the Bahamas, just 35 miles
from the Cuban coast.

Each vessel had four crew
members who were arrested.

While in the process of
towing the vessels towards



Cay Santo Domingo, howev-
er, two Cuban MiG jet fight-
ers appeared overhead and
opened machine gunfire.

Nearly an hour later the
Cuban fighter jets returned
and attacked HMBS Flamin-
go with rocket and machine
gunfire.

1 pe 5 Drawer Chest

pes sere

[ ‘OM? O O yf
) 0 OFF ALL
| a | 0 Mo FABRICS

One of a kind Special Occasion Fabric

— —_ an aL Pre Ye

ee

Madeira St. [242] 325-8233 * Robinson Rd.[242] 322-3080

Beaded & Sequin Fabric

WA ea

pn purchased same dayas fabric

Queen 8 Pc Set
King 8 Pe Set ..






lridescent Taffeta
Two Tone Shantung






Lamour, Chiffon





ACCESSORIES










- Evening Bogs
“Gloves




prone iahnology that works.

â„¢ Micronet

BUSINESS TECHNOLOGY

56 MADEIRA STREET, PALMDALE
242.928.3040 « WWW.MICRONET.BS

TOSHIBA
Leading Innowathon >>>
Multifunction Coplers

MONDAY JUNE 2 1980 — The
parents of the four dead
marines are shown seated front
row under the Clifford Park
pavilion with the 15 survivors of
the ill-fated HMBS Flamingo.

Despite a search by
Bahamian and American res-
cue teams, the four marines,
Able Seaman Fenrick Stur-
rup and Marine Seamen
David Tucker, Edward
Williams and Austin Smith
were never found.

A special ceremony com-
memorating the death of the
four marines is scheduled for

All, except four of the 19
crewmen, made it to one of
the fishing boats.

8.30 am at the Defence
Forces' Coral Harbour base

today.

“~ “Where Our Quality & Experience Shine!”
Specializing in:
Roofing, Home Maintenance, Painting & Varnishing,

Pressure & Mildew Cleaning, Roof Painting, Water
Proofing, Plumbing, Window Cleaning, Drywall
Installation, Replace Rotten Woodwork,

Laminate Floor, Tiling, Repair

i Cracks to Concrete Walls

LEROY TUCKER - Proprietor

Tel: 242-324-2153 ¢ Cell 432-3561 ¢ P.O. Box SP -60315

CARPET, FURNITURE, MARBLE & TILE CARE

Tue Most Tromooad Rretoaanoy & Cuan Ever, on Tun Jon & Far!
Massau”s Oey Phos aL, Comm Soosn Cans & Unley Caen Ses.

* Carpet, Upholstery, Stone and Martie Cleaning d

Restoraion Speciale.

* Prochen Cleaning Sysnome nomeved. Damp a Hearey

Soil, Hactera, Cf Teas, Weterarice and Staines ie
Cupetg & Fermitire, restoring thom to like acw
afb Trectios of replacemenn 2661.

+ Carpet, Sofa's, Loweasns. Chairs. Caning Chairs, Cars,
Boe, Growt, Tiles, Marte & ‘Some

* Pendan, Wool & Silk Carpet Cleaning Specialist

* AMahle Polishing. Reworation & Cane
+ Woed Floor Resteralion

Suited Stent Tech Profesional Costracior

CALL PROCHEM BAHAMAS
PHONE: 323-8083 or 323-1594

A LA, Ae Oo

PROCH F M SYSTEM (om)

COVEY WE LAN CTT Bie
er PAs Tat ° RIT ee are ST ® WELT, Oe
+ paper ic

mis 4 SOLOS oSiaead

A

CoPNItsrEN Cincinna

Che Mall-at-*Larathon
ROX OFFICE OPENS AT i0-00 4M DADLY

Aaa aE
SMRTREKH new | 1200 | 90 | WIA | Geno | 20 [sO |

TDA I COC
TEUENCRGEWOUERINE new | 00 [RE [WA | ea0_[ae |W

wen macs wowenine | 200 | 40 | €90 | 720 [Mit [10:40 |
THE GHOST OF GIRLFRIEND'S Past r_| 4:40 [Wid] NA | eto [230 [10050 |

se ee ele

cas [rss |
iomoeuee ——< Ten [et [er [eclos bas
rT TtTttt—

TERS gee aS

RECARO TO AESERWE TIGRETS AT S369 OF WE GALLERIA NEMAS

anand iow foes [00 [oe [a
Ah oes WUE We] (28 [39H [ WA | 40 | 02

i oss oF araeno T [90 [45 [MA | 600 070 | 10
loesesseo | st | 965_| WA | G05 | 30) tieaa

oime __Â¥ [| aan [na | e10 [096] 10
rn 0 | 0 [at [wa | @20 | 095 ve
es

380-FLIX


PAGE 4, MONDAY, MAY 11, 2009

EDITORIAL/LETTERS TO THE EDITOR

THE TRIBUNE





The Tribune Limited

NULLIUS ADDICTUS JURARE IN VERBA MAGISTRI
Being Bound to Swear to The Dogmas of No Master

LEON E. H. DUPUCH, Publisher/Editor 1903-1914

SIR ETIENNE DUPUCH, Kt, O.B.E., K.M., K.C.S.G.,

(Hon.) LL.D., D.Litt.

Publisher/Editor 1919-1972
Contributing Editor 1972-1991

EILEEN DUPUCH CARRON, C.M.G., M.S. B.A., LL.B.

Publisher/Editor 1972-

Published Daily Monday to Saturday

Shirley Street, RO. Box N-3207, Nassau, Bahamas
Insurance Management Building., P.O. F-485, Freeport, Grand Bahama

TELEPHONES
Switchboard (News, Circulation and Advertising) 322-1986
Advertising Manager - (242) 502-2352
Circulation Department - (242) 502-2387
Nassau Fax: - (242) 328-2398
Freeport, Grand Bahama: 1-(242)-352-6608
Freeport fax: (242) 352-9348

WEBSITE
www.tribune242.com — updated daily at 2pm

Taliban defeats require boots on ground

NEW YORK — Last week brought
good news and bad news for President
Obama’s strategic focus on Afghanistan
and Pakistan — but mostly bad news.

First, though, the good. The president
and his foreign-policy team have shown
they understand the gravity of the situation
in western Pakistan, where Taliban insur-
gents recently took control of an area just
60 miles from the capital of Islamabad.
More importantly, Pakistan’s President
Asif Ali Zardari seems to have heeded
Washington’s calls for forceful action, as
Pakistan’s military last week pounded Tal-
iban positions in and around the contested
Swat Valley.

That’s the good news. The bad news
relates mostly to the inherent difficulties of
fighting a war of insurgency in a distant
part of the world, where the United States
is viewed with suspicion at best.

At the same time that President Zardari
and President Hamid Karzai of
Afghanistan were meeting with Secretary
of State Hillary Clinton and Obama in
Washington, a USS. air raid that had inflict-
ed heavy civilian casualties in Afghanistan
was making headlines around the world.

Put yourself, for the moment, in the
shoes of a Pakistani or Afghan civilian,
wondering with whom to side.

You hear about the dead civilians in
Afghanistan, you see news of the Pakistani
government’s counteroffensive in Swat and
the tens of thousands of innocent refugees
now fleeing that region — and then you see
the pictures of your president, be it Karzai
or Zardari, sitting at a table in Washington
with the U.S. president.

If this were you, you might be forgiven
for thinking that your leaders were doing
the bidding of a foreign power, with death
and misery as the results.

This is what the US. is up against: Islam-
ic insurgents who vow our destruction, who
strike and then hide among civilians.
Because the U.S. does not — not yet, any-
way — have the ground forces to meet
Taliban attacks, our military has had to
rely on airstrikes, which lead to civilian

casualties. Which lead, in turn, to greater
sympathy for the Taliban.

Meanwhile, there is the irony that Karzai
and Zardari, who run the risk at home of
being seen as U.S. puppets, are not leaders
whom those in Washington consider reli-
able or capable guardians of U.S. inter-
ests.

But these are the allies we’ve got, in the
fight that Obama has deemed central to
defeating Islamic terrorism.

The stakes of that fight are driven high-
er by the fact that Pakistan, where the US.
has little to no direct influence on the
ground, possesses nuclear weapons.

The war against the Taliban will not be
won, however victory is defined, by military
means alone.

Obama, if he realizes this — and he
seems to — will need to convince Con-
gress and the American people of this, too.
You need civilian support to defeat an
insurgency, and to gain civilian support
you need a government that can deliver
basic services without shaking down the
populace for constant bribes.

Doing this takes money and time, and
the US. will need to spend both if the Tal-
iban are to be defeated.

You also need to assure the safety of
civilians who may want to help you, and
you need to avoid killing them in battles
against the insurgents.

These two objectives take boots on the
ground, and the U.S. will need a lot of
them, too, to defeat the Taliban.

This is not the time when Americans
want to hear about the need for another
major Overseas commitment in treasure
and treasured servicemen and women.

But absent such a commitment, and a
commitment for the long haul, the
prospects grow for more weeks where the
bad news in South Asia surpasses the good.

(This article was written by Dan Rather —
c.2009 Hearst Newspapers).



My CARICOM
vision: one
country, one
Prime Minister

EDITOR, The Tribune.

I have read some interesting
information regarding the CARI-
COM Single Market and Econo-
my (CSME). I am still waiting to
receive a comprehensive, coher-
ent, and contemporary single doc-
ument outlining The Bahamas’
position on including ourselves
or excluding ourselves from this
single market and economy and
the reasons why (either way).
Most of what I have gathered to
date is courtesy of the newspa-
pers, the radio, the television and
a few pamphlets. It will not suf-
fice.

Nevertheless, the refrain of this
and previous governments is that
The Bahamas will never accede to
the CSME’s provisions as long as
the free movement of labour and
a single market currency are part
and parcel of the agreement.

Praise the Lord.

However, that does not mean
that I would be altogether averse
to entertaining the idea of a single
market and economy sometime
in the future.

Since (I believe) the govern-
ment’s fear is that The Bahamas
would be flooded with immi-
grants from sister CARICOM
states, the dollar would be deval-
ued, and subsequently the stan-
dard of living would coinciden-
tally plummet if we join, it is my
humble opinion that it is incum-
bent upon the government to do
all within its power to ensure the
upliftment of less prosperous

LETTERS

letters@tribunemedia net



CARICOM states to prevent this
inevitable migration from the
south to our shores. Passage of
legislation, policy formulation,
exerting world influence, bud-
getary allocations and provision
of incentives are some of the tools
of the government which may be
used over the ensuing years to
seek to cause virtual parity of eco-
nomic prosperity between CARI-
COM states.

I am not so naive as to think
that this objective will come to
fruition in a short period of time.
My guess is that the process will
necessarily outlive all who are
alive today (May 3, 2009) and is
able to competently read and
comprehend this presentation.
And so, this initiative will require
the commitment of visionary
Bahamians who are prepared to
(almost) sacrifice immediate grat-
ification for the good of the
(future) Bahamas. Are you one of
those Bahamians? Are you a
visionary?

In my humble opinion, it is
extremely important that the
CSME becomes structured in
such a way so as to pave the way
for The Bahamas’ inevitable
ascension. The Bahamas can
boast of a population of only
320,000 people. If we were to join

CARICOM today, we would be a
part of an organisation of over 14
million people. And if you don’t
know by now, let me inform you
that there is definitely strength in
numbers, Just ask the Chinese!

Earlier, I was purposefully
vague in proposing the options
available to the government of
The Bahamas in causing all this to
be manifested (one day). It is
because I am only one person.
My creativity has its limitations.
However, there are (320,000
minus 1) more minds that the
government can tap to help
achieve this objective. All of our
ideas could be then collated by
the governmental technocrats so
that, in the end, a coherent plan
for the way forward could be for-
mulated.

Included in my vision for The
Bahamas as far as the CSME is
concerned is total integration —
politics and all. I would like to
know that sometime in the future
history of humankind that CARI-
COM would be one country with
one Prime Minister.

Again, you would have to be
a visionary to see that. Again, you
would have to be committed to
that. Again, your creativity will
be stretched to its limits. And,
again, immediate gratification
would have to be sacrificed.

MARVIN G
LIGHTBOURN
Nassau,

May 3, 2009.

Our leaders should learn from Obama
be heard on TV interviewed by press

EDITOR, The Tribune.

I have today written the same letter to The Tri-
bune, The Nassau Guardian and The Bahama Jour-
nal, because I would like to make the following sug-
gestion to the three, which I thought they might
agree. I have listened to President Obama on many
occasions when he has made himself available to
be questioned by the press and television of the

United States.

Others have done the same before, but none has
been better examples of democracy at work.
The Bahamas too is a democracy, and there is

no better example of the availability of the political
leadership of the constitutionally provided Prime

Nassau,

April 30, 2009.

Minister (Article 73) and the leadership of the oppo-
sition (Article 82).

The Prime Minister and leader of the opposition
should be heard on television to be interviewed by
the press for the benefit of the Bahamian people, like
President Obama is heard by millions of the people
of the United States.

HON PAUL L ADDERLEY

Review needed for $11 procedure — it could save lives

EDITOR, The Tribune.

Last night at 2249 hours I got a
call from a friend who said that a
person in dark clothes was behind
her apartment looking in the win-
dow. I asked her if she had called
the police, she said yes at 2230
hours.

I arrived at her apartment at
2300 hours and asked if the police
had been there. The answer was

no as when she dialed 911, she
was put to the Lucaya Police Sta-
tion. She lives in Bahamia.
Bahamia may be for the Policitial
Area - Lucaya, but it would have
made more sense for Mobile Unit
or Freeport Unit to respond as
they would be closer.

The police arrived at 2225
hours, fifty five minutes after the
call. Had the person looking in
the window got into the apart-

ment, we could have three injured
or dead persons this morning. A
mother and two small children.

Please review the procedure
that is used to respond to 911 or
emergency calls. This could save
time in the response and maybe
the lives of the callers.

SIGMUND WILLIS
Freeport,
April 25, 2009.

Quality Auto Sales
PRE-OWNED CARS & TRUCKS
For the best deal in town on

pre-owned cars, with ~
de-ins on new car sales

Must be able to work flexible hours, weekends ir STOCK!
and holidays.

Must possess good leadership and ‘01 TOYOTA CAMRY an
interpersonal Kills, ‘05 TOYOTA CAMRY oy:
‘07 TOYOTA YARIS *
‘06 HYUNDAI TERRACAN
‘01 HYUNDAI COUPE
‘04 HYUNDAI SANTA FE
‘06 HYUNDAI ELANTRA
‘06 HYUNDAI SONATA
‘01 HYUNDAI HD-65 TRUCK

‘94 MITSUBISHI DIAMANTE
‘94 TOYOTA CAMRY

Bahamas QSR Limited Oe Serer oS

Deliever to KFC om Sos Center
#1 AUTO GEALER IM THE BaHamad

Horseshoe Drive EAST SHIRLEY STREET « 322- 3775 . 325-3079
Nassau, Bahamas . an Hie. a eect itd ie eerie

oe bas Marka T AACE Mp Bed, es

Senda. “© Royal Bahamian Resort @ Offshore Island.

BAHAMAS QSR LIMITED

NOW HIRING
STORE AND ASST. MANAGERS

Invites applications for the positions of:

Accountants
Cost Controller
General Cashier
Receiving Clerk

Executive Chauffeurs
Director of Sales
Security Manager

Exec. Housekeeper
Resort Shop Manager
Photo Shop Manager
Assistant Training Manager

The successful applicant must have at least
three (3) years experience in full service / fast
food operations.

Must have good written and oral

Applicant must have at _ least five
communication skills,

years experience in the Hospitality
Industry in the above mentioned positions,
excellent communication, organizational and
interpersonal skills, must be able to train and
motivate team members. Formal qualifications
and computer skills desirable must be able to work
flexible and long hours.

Must be able to implement and maintain
company standards and procedures.

Must be self motivated.

Benefit package includes medical, pension
and bonus.

EXPERIENCED PERSONS ONLY SHOULD
SEND RESUME WITH
A LETTER OF REFERENCE TO:

Fax or email résumé’s with proof of qualifications
and experience to:

cmajor@grp.sandals.com
Fax 677-6828.

Attention Director of Operations,

Closing date May 9th. 2009.


THE TRIBUNE

MONDAY, MAY 11, 2009, PAGE 5



LOCAL NEWS



Commonwealth Local
Govt Conference held in the
Bahamas for the first time

m@ By DENISE MAYCOCK
Tribune Freeport Reporter
dmaycock@tribunemedia.net

FREEPORT - After two years
of planning, the Commonwealth
Local Government Conference
will open on Grand Bahama on
Monday for some 600 delegates
from 46 Commonwealth nations.

Byran Woodside, Minister of
State for Lands and Local Gov-
ernment, announced on Sunday
that the conference will take place
from May 11 -14 at the Westin at
Our Lucaya Resort.

He said it is the first time that
the event is being held in the
Bahamas.

“We are most excited by the fact
that this is the first time that the
CLGC will be held in the Americ-
as, and certainly we feel it is in
recognition of the role the
Bahamas holds within the region.

“It is only fitting that the first
time the CLGC has been held in
the Americas, it is being held in
the Bahamas,” said Minister
Woodside.

Prime Minister Hubert Ingra-
ham will officially open the fifth
CLGC at 5pm on Monday in the
Conference Centre. The theme for
this year’s conference is “Improv-
ing Local Government: The Com-
monwealth vision.”

Mr Woodside said that govern-
ment is fully supportive of the con-
ference being held in Grand
Bahama.

“The government is cognizant
of the economic challenges that
Grand Bahama has faced over the
years. We are pleased that
Freeport was chosen for the con-
ference venue,” he said.

He stated that the conference
will bring politicians, policy mak-
ers, local government practition-
ers, and persons of civil society in
the private sector from 46 of the 53
Commonwealth nations.

Mr Woodside said delegates
from the Caribbean, Africa, the
Americas, Europe, Asia, and the
Pacific Basin will attend the con-
ference.

He noted that international and
regional leaders are also expected
to speak at the conference, includ-
ing Bruce Golding, Prime Minister



MINISTER OF STATE for Local
Government Byran Woodside
addresses reporters at a press
conference ahead of the start
of the Commonwealth Local
Government Conference.

of Jamaica, Commonwealth Sec-
retary-General Kamalesh Sharma,
and CARICOM Secretary-Gen-
eral of CARICOM Edwin Car-
rington, .

Minister Woodside said confer-
ence delegates will be hosted to
various cultural events on Grand
Bahama, including a cultural
extravaganza, a Fish Fry on Taino
Beach, and a Junkanoo perfor-
mance.

“They will have a unique oppor-
tunity to meet with their peers and
hear about best practices from
across the Commonwealth, and
see case studies of successful local
government projects in the three
local government districts in Grand
Bahama,” he said.

“T want to say that the Bahamas
government fully supports this con-
ference and we are really happy
to be the host of this event,” he
said.

Basil Morrison, chairperson of
the CLGF, said the current eco-
nomic climate and issues facing
local government in the Com-
monwealth will be discussed.

“Tt is more important now than
ever in view of the issue facing us
in the Commonwealth and by invi-
tation the world, for local govern-
ment to find ways and means of

talking to colleagues of how to
deliver services more efficiently,
cost effectively while trying to meet
the expectations of citizens,” he
said.

“Now is the time we have to put
the effort into building confidence
back in the communities that are
facing unemployment and
strengthen economic ties in regards
to civic society making contribu-
tions to the community.”

Carlton Wright, Secretary Gen-
eral of CLGC, said the conference
will bring all core stakeholders
together to share common experi-
ences.

He noted that 20 national min-
isters are among the 600 delegates
that will be in Freeport.

“This is a high level policy forum
and the conference outcomes will
be transmitted to the Common-
wealth Heads of Government who
are also meeting later this year in
Trinidad.

“We will have the opportunity
of taking what will become the
Freeport declaration or Section to
heads of government for policy
endorsements, ongoing policy
making, and political processes at
the highest level,” he said.

In addition to improving the
quality of core services, Mr Wright
stated that local government offi-
cials will also discuss ways of
improving local democracy and
accountability.

He said that finance is another
important area. “Local govern-
ment needs money and we will dis-
cuss ways to improve financial via-
bility of local authorities,” he said.

The conference will close on
Thursday, May 14.

PRR Ra Satta os
FLIES, MOSQUITOES, TICKS & FLEAS
PHONE: 327-6464
ee








Nill Mi

OFFICIALS ARE pictured on Sun-
day, May 10, 2009 at a press con-
ference ahead of the start of the
Commonwealth Local Government
Conference to be held May 11-14 at
the Westin at Our Lucaya Resort,
Freeport, Grand Bahama. Pictured

i) from left are Deon Sweeting, Presi-
-) dent of the Bahamas Association of
Local Government Authorities;
Basil Morrison, Chairperson, Com-
monwealth Local Government
Forum (CLGF), Minister of State for
Local Government the Hon. Byran
Woodside and Carl Wright, Secre-
tary General, CLGF.

INERNMEN COKE



9 Seater Vans
Starting at $9,900

iy,

| cer i i
| = yi
j
t oe

st =

many to choose from...

Government
Workers

Aceéial $19,900.00: 2005/06 30 SEATER

" ae FOR SHORT TERW \SE
: eee
FETE err

FAX: (242) 361-1136

eee

UA a
Was iT
Who Market

Use promeotionel
eens Ren

SunTee Embroidme,
the country’s leading promotional & marketing experts
a=] oe O Ce tnt RT|
AHEAD OF YOUR COMPETITORS.
Mae ees |) ee) ee (8) gn ste gr] 88 (ee 8 [eR er a -Bee- gee le

your company’s logo on. Ifyou think it...Ve will ink it

i [oe=| sete oes] en Re oe

moa O BOR R08 Cen ete grade oie

Sun Tee EmbroidMe Today!

fn

Uniforms * Embroidery « Screen Printing « Promotional Products

rte meee Cee
East Shirley Street + Ph: 393-1004 + 393-3104 + www.sun-tee.com


PAGE 6, MONDAY, MAY 11, 2009

THE TRIBUNE



LOCAL NEWS



Three arrested in human :

trafficking operation

m CLEARWATER, Fla.

AUTHORITIES say they’ve }
arrested three people who were }
running a human trafficking oper- }
ation in Pinellas County, accord- }

ing to Associated Press.

The sheriff’s office reports that }
38-year-old Kenyatta Cornelous, :
47-year-old Edward Jones and }
24-year-old Corinna Shaffer were }
arrested on multiple charges Sat- }
urday after a two-month investi- :
gation. Authorities believe it’s }
the first case of domestic human }
trafficking in the Tampa Bay- }

area, possibly in the state.

The sheriff’s office reports that }
the suspects physically and men- }
tally abused the victims and took }
their identification cards and:
money. Investigators believe the
victims were forced to work as }
prostitutes and dancers at Tampa }
Bay-area clubs. Authorities aren’t
saying how many victims there }

were.



Bahamas

Defence Force seeks
bids for 11 new vessels

Craft will be acquired
over next six years

THE Royal Defence Force
is currently seeking bids for 11
new mid to long range vessels
as part of a continuing phased
acquisition of craft for the
Defence Force, Minister of
National Security Tommy
Turnquest said on Friday.

Speaking at the passing out
parade of 48 new marines,
Minister Turnquest said that
the craft will be acquired over
the next six years.

The Defence Force is seek-

Gispets) Training Pants

and Wipesitar
_ Jour baby!

Oe Teal Or,

Agencies

séaning Gehannians with the best Grands for 60 yaars

404 So i | way, bahamas SATE ke CIT

Monday through Saturday for lunch
Wednesday through

ing to acquire two 140-foot
vessels, four 100-foot vessels,
four 60-foot vessels and an
auxiliary vessel between 60
and 180 feet.

"The Defence Force has
now taken possession of its

two newly acquired aircraft, a
Cessna Grand Caravan and
a Vulcan Surveillance Air-
craft, and these planes will
be formally commissioned
shortly," he said.

"Initiatives are ongoing to

keep our craft sea worthy,
our officers and marines
trained and competent and
new cutting edge technolo-
gies readily available," Min-
ister Turnquest said.
Minister Turnquest chal-
lenged the Marines made up
of New Entry 46 and Woman
Entry 16, to quickly find their
places on the force, deter-
mine their career path in the
organisation and work con-
structively to merit advance-

"You should choose your
career path within the
Defence Force with the clear
understanding that it is essen-
tially a seagoing organisation
and that it serves the entire
Bahamas," he said.

"IT want you to be held up
as examples of integrity, hon-
our, respectability and cour-
tesy," Minister Turnquest
said.

Since May 2007, 178
persons have joined the Roy-
al Bahamas Defence Force.

Grade ‘A

PRIMARY and secondary school students
throughout the Bahamas with at least one “A”
grade on their final report card for 2009 have the
chance to win a state-of-the-art, 24-inch iMac
computer system or a HP Compaq Presario
desktop system.

The prize give-away is part of Custom Com-
puters’ second annual ‘As’ For Excellence Pro-
gramme.

A special prize also will be given to the stu-
dent whom Custom Computers considers had
the most impressive report card.

The programme, which was launched last
year, is designed to reward students for their
hard work and academic achievements, while
also encouraging them to strive for excellence in
everything they do.

Last year’s programme was enthusiastically
received by officials at the Ministry of Educa-
tion, with Patricia Collins, director of Education,
describing the programme “as most welcomed
and timely as it recognised deserving students in
government and independent schools in New
Providence and the Family Islands.”

Pia Farmer, co-owner and marketing director
of Customs Computers, said that last year her
team saw an overwhelming response with more
than 400 primary and high school students
entering the competition. This year, Ms Farmer
is expecting a larger number of applicants.

“We were so impressed by the number of
students who entered last year, a large per-
centage of whom had multiple As. We were
also impressed with the parents because every
child’s success is directly tied to the involve-
ment of his and her parents. And today’s edu-
cational system and competitive environment

Saturday for dinner

NE Lib

Sandwiches
EEE aa

ment through the ranks.

’ students have the
chance to win computer prizes

makes it imperative for each child to have access
to a computer.”

“At Custom Computers we are committed to
the continuing education and training of our
team in order to deliver the highest standards of
service in our industry. We believe that the ‘As
for Excellence’ campaign reflects these impor-
tant values and we are very happy to provide
our students throughout the Bahamas with the
tools which they need to succeed, as well as
supporting the Ministry of Education and our
teachers in their continuing efforts to provide
our children with a sound and quality educa-
tion,” she said.

Last year’s winners in the primary and sec-
ondary school categories, respectively, were
second grader Jodie Dodge of St Thomas More
who won a HP Laptop, and eighth grader Brit-
tany John of St Augustine’s College who won
the iMac Computer System.

Chauncy Bethel, a sixth grade student at
Faith Temple, was presented with an i-Pod
Touch.

To enter the competition, all students have to
do is visit any one of Custom Computers store
locations on Cable Beach or East Bay Street, fill
in an entry form and present a copy of their
report card while accompanied by a par-
ent or guardian. Students may com-
plete one entry form for every “A”
grade they received. Students in
the Family Islands may down-
load the entry form from the
Customs Computers website.

The deadline for entry is 12
noon on Saturday, August
15, 2009. The drawing will

take place the same day at 2pm during a special
reception at Custom Computers “Know How
Store” on Cable Beach.

To further assist families in gaining access
to computers, Custom Computers will also
launch its lay-away campaign i June in which
customers can purchase a computer with three
payments, without any added interest rates or
finance charges.

Also next month, the company will launch
the first monthly ‘zero down financing fair’
geared towards assisting qualified government
and public service employees
in purchasing computers
on the spot.

Ms Farmer said she
hopes the easy financ-
ing campaigns will
assist persons who
may be experiencing
challenges during the
economic downturn,
while at the same time
empowering and giving
families the tools

they need to suc-

ceed.















& LIGHTING

Tel (242) 341-4000
Fax (242) 341-5080
Email: eaglebahamas@gmail.com

ENJOY EAGLE’S SUPER SPECIALS!

TELEPHONE WIRE
wo =~: 1000' ROLL*

r
=

Our stock of air conditioning units are now in!
12000 BTU @ $449.00

CAVES VILLAGE, Sn Fol ee

CALE a2fa22 | a
EMAIL MANGOSCAFE@CORALWAVE.COM

_TV CABLE

1000' ROLL*

= - 1Ton

—uuW~“X~x“ —-

Don’t miss this limited time offer for super savings.

CAT 5 WIRE
1000° ROLL*

14-2 ROMEX WIRE
ROLL*

EAGLESIR

- 1.5 Ton 18000 BTU @ $675.00
-2Ton 24000 BTU @ $869.00



We ship to the ,
Family Islands!

Eagle Electrical Supplies & Lighting Center
Tonique Williams Darling Highway (formerly Harold Road)

P.O. Box CR-55440 Nassau, Bahamas
BEST QUALITY, BEST PRICE, GUARANTEED !!!


THE TRIBUNE

MONDAY, MAY 11, 2009, PAGE 7



Caribbean crisis:
no time to spare

@ By SIR RONALD
SANDERS

(The writer is a
consultant and former
Caribbean Diplomat)

HE economic crisis in

the Caribbean is set
to get worse rather than bet-
ter.

Four years ago in a book
entitled, “Crumbled Small”, I
wrote: “Small states of the
Commonwealth Caribbean
are in crisis. There is need for
urgent action at the domestic,
regional and international lev-
els to spare them from sinking
into widespread poverty and
becoming client-states of larg-
er nations upon whom they
could become economically
reliant.”

Little action was taken to
tackle the difficulties that
faced Caribbean countries
which, even then, were highly-
indebted, plagued by the
effects of drug trafficking, sub-
ject to devastation by increas-
ing and stronger hurricanes,
losing their preferential mar-
kets for key commodities, and,
for the most part, graduated
from concessionary financing
from international financial
institutions. Then, as now,
they were also extremely vul-
nerable to the fortunes of their
main trading partners in North
America and Europe espe-
cially in tourism.

Since 2005, the situation has
worsened. The national debt
of each country has increased,
except in Guyana which
enjoyed large write-offs of
debt when it was classified as a
Highly Indebted Poor Coun-
try. In almost all others, except
Trinidad and Tobago and Bar-
bados, debt has increased to a
point where servicing it has
become difficult. Worryingly,
a significant portion of gov-
ernments’ debt is to financial
institutions in their own coun-
tries. This pattern of borrow-
ing could also now threaten
the banking system if govern-
ments find it difficult to ser-
vice the debt on schedule.

The problems surrounding
CLICO and British American
Insurance, which caused finan-
cial interventions by both the
governments of Trinidad and
Tobago and Barbados, may
not yet be over. Almost every
country in the Caribbean
Community and Common
Market (CARICOM) has
been affected by what appears
to be a substantial shortfall
between the assets and liabil-
ities of these two companies.
CLICO’s regulators say that
the Trinidad government will
have to spend about US$1 bil-
lion over the next two years
to protect policyholders. Even
greater fragilities may yet
appear with far-reaching con-
sequences for the smaller
countries of the region.

The events surrounding
CLICO and British American
clearly occurred because of
either poor regulation and
supervision or inadequate
machinery for implementing
corrective measures. While it
may be closing the stable door
after the horse has bolted,
CARICOM countries should
now strengthen regulation of
all financial institutions at both
national and pan-CARICOM
levels to guard against repe-
titions.

There is no reason why
CARICOM countries should
not establish a pan-CARI-
COM regulator for cross-bor-
der transactions. After all, in
the wake of a G20 Summit in
London in April and after the
Organisation for Economic
Cooperation and Develop-
ment (OECD) published a
new list of co-operative and
non-cooperative jurisdictions
for providing tax information
on request, every Caribbean
country that was on the so-
called “grey list” (that is coun-
tries that have to do more to
be regarded as fully co-opera-
tive with the OECD), pledged
that they will comply.

Compliance requires them
to sign Tax Information
Exchange Agreements
(TIEA’s) with at least 12
OECD countries, show a
readiness to sign more of
them, and passing OECD cri-

insight |

WORLD VIEW



“The problems
surrounding
CLICO and
British
American have
exacerbated the
effects of the
current global
financial crisis
which also had
its origin in
poor regulation
in the United
States and
Europe.”



teria for effectiveness in
implementation. Of necessity,
this compliance requires heavy
expenditure in either negoti-
ating at least 12 agreements
or merely signing the OECD
model blindly.

In any event, new legisla-
tion will have to be enacted
in each jurisdiction.

And since they chose not to
resist the OECD in any way
but to comply fully with its
requirements, they will have
to do so or suffer the conse-
quences. OECD Secretary-
General, Angel Gurria, has
already said, “The OECD,
tasked with a mandate to
monitor their performance,
will be watching like a hawk.”

So if CARICOM govern-
ments are willing to be
watched “like a hawk” by the
OECD, they should be able
to hawkishly watch the cross-
border transactions within
their own economic space in a
collective way.

The problems surrounding
CLICO and British American
have exacerbated the effects
of the current global financial
crisis which also had its origin
in poor regulation in the Unit-
ed States and Europe. Those
effects include a huge down-
turn in tourist spending in the
Caribbean, a major reduction
in remittances from the
Caribbean Diaspora, a
diminution in investment in
Caribbean economies and a
drying-up of credit from the
international commercial mar-
ket.

This situation is unlikely to
change in a hurry. As the
Prime Minister of Jamaica,
Bruce Golding, pointed out in
a parliamentary debate on the
Jamaica Budget on May 5th,
“We delude ourselves if we
think that after the recession
has ended the world will
return to what it was before.
Banks are going to be more

3

S

cautious in their lending,
demanding more collateral
and greater ability to repay,
investors more contemplative
in their investments. It is not
going to be business as usu-
al.”

Against this background,
CARICOM governments
could do well to bolster their
economies and their capacity
for dealing with the interna-
tional community by com-
pleting the arrangements for
implementing the Caribbean
Single Market and for bar-
gaining collectively with inter-
national financial institutions,
countries and regions.

For instance, two of the
International and Multilateral
financial institutions claim to
have funds that could be made
available to the private sector
in the region for development
projects that are also com-
mercially viable.

It would be helpful if
CARICOM governments
could provide a team of
experts with the specific task
of assisting the private sector
to devise viable projects and
present them to the financial
institutions for funding.

It would be of added benefit
if some of these projects could
integrate production in more
than one CARICOM country
to spread the benefits of
employment and revenues
throughout the region.

At the G20 Summit, it was
announced that $1.1 trillion
will be provided to the Inter-
national Monetary Fund
(IMF) to help ease the cur-
rent dire economic circum-
stances that grip most coun-
tries around the world.

It is doubtful that half of
that sum will actually be deliv-
ered. But, even if only half is
delivered, CARICOM coun-
tries ought to be exploring col-
lectively with the IMF how
they might access some of that
money for projects that could
be distributed throughout its
member states without the
usual onerous and harsh IMF
conditions.

Also, even though the lan-
guage of the G20 Commu-
niqué was hazy, it did under-
take to boost the resources of
the Inter-American Develop-
ment Bank.

CARICOM governments
should also be investigating
collectively how they could
secure funds to build sustain-
able infrastructure and open
new areas of production in the
context of the Caribbean Sin-
gle Market.

The crisis that CARICOM
countries face requires nation-
al action, but it also demands
regional cohesion. There is no
time to spare.

Responses to:
ronaldsanders29@hotmail.com

for
excellence!

COMPUTERS LIMITED

/")
SIR RONALD SANDERS



} M KINGSTON, Ontario

i President Ricardo Alar-
? con dismissed President
? Barack Obama’s recent
? overtures to Cuba and
? said Saturday for the first
? time that the new U.S.
? administration’s stance
? is “the continuation of |
? an illegal, unjustifiable [Ree weeerlne io human rights, free
: and failed policy”,
? according to Associated Press.

Cuban parliament president
dismisses Barack Obama

CUBAN Parliament

Obama has suggested it may

: be time for a new beginning with
? Cuba, and the White House
? authorized unlimited travel and
? money transfers for Americans
: with relatives in Cuba. But his
? administration has said it would
? like Cuba to respond by making
? small political and social changes
? to its single-party communist sys-
? tem.

“In other words Cuba must

: change and behave in accor-
? dance with Washington’s wish-

es,” Alarcon said at the close of

? a Cuban academic conference in
: Canada.

“That attitude is not only the

i continuation of an illegal, unjus-



tifiable and failed poli-
cy, it is also the conse-
quence of a profound
misconception, a false
perception of itself that
lies as the foundation of
the U.S. role in the
world.”

The U.S. has long
sought what it considers
real change from Cuba

speech, free markets and
democratic government.

Last month, President Raul
Castro said Cuba was willing to
discuss “everything” with the

S., leading to hopes that a
door was opening to a new rela-
tionship.

But former President Fidel
Castro insists that Cuba should
make no concessions in return
for better US. ties.

The Obama administration
has said it has no plans to lift the
embargo which bans nearly all
trade with Cuba. The island’s
government blames those sanc-
tions for frequent shortages of
food, medicine, farming and
transportation machinery and
other basics.










ATTENTION

ALL CIVIL SERVANTS!!!

(Not presently members of Public Worké¢

Cooperative

money,

$100.00































operative Credit Union LimiJusi) walk
into the offices of the Public Workers’
Credit Union Limited in
Nassau or Freeport, with any amount of
between
$5,000.00, and leave with DOUBLE that
amount, pending receipt of an approved
salary deduction form.

and

DOUBLE YOUR FUNDS.00

That’s right, a Loan approved in












less than 24 hours!!

Come, and take advantage of this offer,
which begins Monday, May 4th, 2009
for a limited time only.

Public Workers’











Co-opera

Credit Union. lamiced

Nassau
Freeport













(32370594)
(ool 727)

“THE: SAMILLY. CREDIT UNION”

ENTER TO WIN!

HOW TO ENTER

HP Desktop
& 17” monitor

Bring in your report card, with a



F Cf parent or guardian to one of our two
locations, For mwery 'A' on your
report card you can enter to WIN,
Orawing to be held Saturday, August
15th at 2PM al our Cable Beach
lacatlion.

’wwreLcCLEtomcomputers.bs solutionsiicustomcampaters.bs


PAGE 8, MONDAY, MAY 11, 2009

LOCAL NEWS

THE TRIBUNE





YOUR BABY CAN READ!

An early literacy system for babies,
toddlers and preschoolers

Authorized Distributor
Sherle Knowles
Phone: 393-8478 or 380-8023
babiescanread (hotmail.com

EM TM ic feet ri

CUS CE CT

“The premier choice for serious business”

1,661 sq. ft. $5,813.50 p. month incl. CAM Fees
1,083 sq. ft. $3,790.00 p. month incl. CAM Fees
839 sq. ft. $2,936.50 p. month incl. CAM Fees
850 sq. ft. $2,975.00 p. month incl. CAM Fees

Contact Mr. Simon Chappell on
327-1575 or 477-7610
Email: simon @cavesheights.com



Expat banker dies
of shooting injuries

FROM page one

Britannia Consultancy Group,
had been targeted.

Mr Jones, in the Bahamas
for more than 20 years,

had been an adviser to gov-

ernment on banking legisla-
tion on several occasions.
Police said that a brazen,
unmasked gunman, on foot,
approached Mr Jones around
10 am, as he got out of his
vehicle in the company’s park-
ing lot near Compass Point
Studios. Police said that the
gunman then shot Mr Jones
at least twice — once in the
head and then in the body —
before heading south towards
nearby Gambier Village.

Following Mr Jones’ shoot-

THE COLLEGE OF THE BAHAMAS

Visit our website at www.cob.edu.bs

CENTRE FOR CONTINUING EDUCATION

& EXTENSION SERVICES

©

COMPUTER COURSES SUMMER 022009

50+ and/or RETIREES

COURSE
wD

COMRSE DESCRIPTIONS TIME

COP Pah REY HOARD NA» D1 AHAB HIP M1

COM PAks INTRODUCTHON TO

MICKOSOFT WORD

D1 AKDAM-24HIPM

[INTRODUCTION Tc THE | Soa A M-40P Mi

INTERNET

COMPOS |

DAY

Mel lI

WED

START | DUR

-May | Sake

[3-May | Sake

PTHUVERI | 1415

MeLay

ENQUIRIES: Gantact the Go-cedinator al Teh (242) J25-57 14 f (24e) JAB-0083 | 8-196 0-00 eet, SZ or

email acunryigcob |edu.bs

“ Tioses akare ee with the exception of the eee foe of S400) (oe ——

and Ceres Materiale

‘RES neverves fight to chen Tuo, Fevev, 6 e Cede, Circe Sac bay



DOES YOUR STORAGE LOOK ae THIS?



CALL US TODAY TO HELP WITH YOUR

ARCHIVAL CLEANOUT!



SUNRYSE SHREDDING SERVICES

We provide security, shredding is only the vehicle we use to deliver it.

T: 242-322-6448 | www.sunryseshred.com

Email: info@sunryseshred.com



URES
Md

ing, police mounted an island-
wide search for the gunman
who was described as a slim,
dark-complexioned male,
wearing dark clothing.

"We are still following sev-
eral leads but there have been
no arrests as yet," Superin-
tendent Ellsworth Moss, head
of the Central Detective Unit,
told The Tribune yesterday.
"We are still appealing to the
public for information,” he
said.

Mr Jones had earlier been
attacked on two occasions.

On one occasion his home
was broken into and he

was beaten.

He was taken to hospital
where his injuries were
stitched. On another occasion,
his car was bumped.

When he got out to see the
damage, he was attacked.

The $50,000 reward, posted
in the local press last week for
information that might lead
to the arrest or conviction of
those responsible for his mur-
der still stands.

Mr Jones was born in
North Wales and worked in
the financial services sector in
the U.K., Jamaica and the
Bahamas.

He was the former director
of the Bankers’ Association
of the Bahamas and the
Bahamas Institute of Bankers.
Last year, Mr Jones was
embroiled in a legal dispute
with former FNM MP Lester
Turnquest who was once an
associate with him in Britan-
nia Consultancy.

Last year, Canadian officials
were also investigating allega-
tions of a fraudulent tax
scheme having been commit-
ted on the investment compa-
ny.

Mr Jones’ mother was liv-
ing with him in Nassau.

Claim that government ‘neglecting duty’

FROM page one

ety and must be rooted out
“before a great deal more
damage is done.”

“Bahamas Against Crime is
calling upon the government
to carry out its responsibility
and lead the way in preparing
an integrated strategy to inflict
a serious blow to crime and
criminality in the country.
Don’t be narrow-minded or
fearful the government is
warned, because to continue
the present course will demand
a defence from the govern-
ment of a charge of negligence,
neglect of duty, and endan-
gering the people of the
Bahamas — a very serious
charge,” he said.

Noting that its current
approach has failed to reduce
the levels of crime and vio-
lence on the streets, Mr Moss
said that government must
rethink its approach before it
is too late.

Therefore, he urged the
church, the business sector,
civil society, and the media to
reject the status quo and mobi-
lize for an intense and sus-

tained action until the
“scourge of crime” is signifi-
cantly reduced.

“Religious leaders are called
upon to lift their sights beyond
the walls of the church and
work toward improved secu-
rity of people. The corporate
community is challenged to
seek the public good, not just
private gain in their economic
lives.

“Civil society is called upon
to agitate and lobby the gov-
ernment to get up and provide
the leadership that is so criti-
cally necessary at this very vul-
nerable time in our society.

“The media is urged to
demand more accountability,
especially from all public insti-
tutions and officials in order
to create more transparency.
This will greatly reduce cor-
ruption, and injustice which
fuels crimes and violence,” he
said.

However, the longer the cur-
rent levels of crime and crimi-
nality continue, Rev Moss said,
the more difficult it will be to
correct.

Therefore, he said, the time
to act is now.

‘Defence Force

FROM page one

? cers of the Fire Services freed
? them using the Jaws of Life.
? They are listed in serious con-
? dition. The driver of the Ford
: received minor injuries. Traf-
i fic police are investigating the
? accident.

Dominicans arrested
| FROM page one

? Andros while in the settlement
? of Stafford Creek around 1 pm
i? Saturday, stopped and
? searched the occupants of a
? maroon coloured 1995 Ford
? Aero star Van.

i Officers found eight
? Dominican men inside the
? vehicle.

i The 29-year-old male driver
? was from Andros and a 28-
? year-old Eleuthera man was
? also in the vehicle.

? The Dominicans were hand-
? ed over to immigration offi-
i cers.

? The two Bahamian men
? were also arrested and are in
? police custody.

THE CANCER CENTRE

announces
The Specialists’ Cancer Clinics

Prof. of Oncology
The Hon. Prof.

Arthur Porter

PC, MD, MBA, FACR,
FACRO, FRCPC
Director General & CEO
McGill University
Health Centre

Managing Director &

Director of Radiation

Oncology
The Cancer Centre

Saturday, May 16,

2009

Starting at 10am

Prof. of Medical Oncology

Prof. Karol

Sikora
MA, MB BChir, PhD,
FRCR, FRCP, FFPM
Dean of the University
of Buckingham
School of Medicine

Director of

Medical

Oncology
The Cancer Centre

Friday, May 29,

2009

Starting at 10am

At The Centreville Medical Pavilion

72 Collins Ave

Telephone: 502-9610
Open to The Public


THE TRIBUNE

MONDAY, MAY 11, 2009, PAGE 9



LOCAL NEWS

New entrepreneurs
take their places



(BIS Photo/Derek Smith)

THE GRADUATING CLASS is pictured above with College of the Bahamas vice president Dr Rhonda Chipman-
Johnson, BAIC executive chairman Edison Key and BAIC officials.

NASSAU, Bahamas - Seventy
new entrepreneurs took their
places on the Bahamian business
scene following a graduation cer-
emony at the College of The
Bahamas last weekend.

They were participants in the
Bahamas Agricultural and Indus-
trial Corporation's (BAIC)
twelve-week Business Empower-
ment Lecture Series, held in con-
junction with the College's School
of Business headed by Mrs
Remilda Moxey.

BAIC's deputy general man-
ager Don Major said: "An army
of entrepreneurs who will trans-
form the economic landscape by
establishing sustainable business
enterprises throughout our coun-
try has been launched."

Hosted by BAIC's Business
Services Department, the semi-
nar featured successful busi-
nesspersons who shared with par-
ticipants proven business tech-
niques.

"It allowed participants to
avoid the pitfalls of those who
failed," said Mr Major, "and
acquire the knowledge and exper-
tise that successful business per-
sons have discovered.

"BAIC exists in order to pro-
vide entrepreneurs the option of

avoiding traveling by the seats of
their pants - the pain and terror of
learning by trial and error.

"We provide training opportu-
nities and a myriad of other ser-
vices that are geared to provide
you with all that you need to start
and run a business successfully.”

BAIC's executive chairman
Edison Key encouraged gradu-
ates to take advantage of multi-
million-dollar opportunities in
agriculture and souvenir produc-
tion.

He said BAIC can facilitate
that by allowing them to use of
tens of thousands of acres of land

BAIC owns and controls in North
Andros, Abaco and Eleuthera.

College vice president Dr
Rhonda Chipman-Johnson
underscored the importance of
being creative and versatile in the
approach to employment.

"Your presence at this semi-
nar is evidence that you are pre-
pared to meet the challenge of
helping to stimulate our econo-
my by engaging in some kind of
business activity,” said Dr Chip-
man-Johnson.

"We need to increase the num-
ber of citizens who are willing to
create employment."

Share your news

The Tribune wants to hear
from people who are
making news in their
neighbourhoods. Perhaps

you are raising funds for a
good cause, campaigning
for improvements in the
area or have won an
award.

If so, call us on 322-1986
and share your story.



The effects of HPV could put your daughter's

future at risk—you can help protect her.

Cervical cancer—it's not too carly to think about it.

YOUN women in their teas and 20s ara more vulnerable to APY, the virus that
Causes Garvical cancer, beacause their bodies ara still developing. If a girl or young
woman has HPV, and her body dacsnt olear the virus, cervical cancer can devclap
ater in life. So while most women diagnosed with cervical cancer are betesen the
afee of 35 and 55 years old. meeny of them were profebly eepoeed to a “high-risk”
tye of HY i their pouth

Having Pap bests regularly can help protect wu fram increase” risk of cervical cancer
So can winning the facts abut wh and how different types of cancers form

Taginal camcor—hard to detect.
BGS ho GO ot canine ere
sharin the lining cf the wegiinm

eno Gn freee fen aie no es

Comical camner—ae reaalt of APY,
Canical cancer is cancer of

Tet Oevin tne hee eT of Tie
Utne that conpecie the womb

I
Hitec The wi

Vilar onmoer—look for arty sigma
Burning, teh’ng. painful werination,
Of Fy Gul’ G0und digo! visa
camicer which aMacts the inner
SIS OF es Yagi Gueler hehe.

Prowancers— whert canoer begins.
Higih-risk Gye of HY con couge efronnal
celia to forn im the cervin, vagina, and vulvs.
ff meat Gatiected aurty. thames calls can tum

“yet
into precencern, ore ten cornoor. e

bee diiflicasdt tte think of your daughters cutfaring fram any of theese Iinaceenn
and ruining? her dreams of «a healthy future. fou can do semathing te help
Protect her And teow Ttiane mow,

Talk to a doctor about the only vaccine that can
help protect your daughter from cervical cancer
and other HPV diseases.

FREE ANNUAL CERVICAL/BREAST SCREENING
May 9- Flamingo Gardens Clinic May 23 - South Beach Clinic
May 16 - Elizabeth Esiales Clinic May 30 - Annual Cancer Sociely Ball
Fleming M4. Clinic

THE COLLEGE OF THE BAHAMAS

Visit our website at www.cob.edu.bs








































CENTRE FOR CONTINUING EDUCATION AND EXTENSION SERVICES

PERSONAL DEVELOPMENT - SUMMER SEMESTER 022009

fous _] SECT _ Che
-A___{._-nesieigg tt DESCAITION ony

‘acca im _| ACCOUNTING FOR BEGINNERS |
ee ee ACCOUNTING FOR BEGINNERS Il

ACCAgoT
ACCOUNTING FOR BEGINKERS Ill

STAAT | OUR

MoniWed
eee

8:00pm MoniWed

Tues Thurs

ee
Ta
Taam
‘custo [ot __|surenorcustowenser ws | 4s
A tpn
ALE 00 CREDIT AWD COLLECTIONS |

Spr
jwuseor | oy | oreo ano couerrons

BLE

COMPUTERS —

Cofd Fadi

Thue.
Thiitg.
12 -e,

o ms

COMPUTER APPLICATIONS I Viton | as

COMP9O1 COMPUTER APPLICATIONS I Geb | 0 minx

Cota Pate COMPUTER APPLICATIONS: I V4 =tiiea) | 8 ice

COM FOS0 WEE PAGE DESIGH W'S |

-oowrass | or | we act os wi

COSMETOLOGY
COGMBO WAKE UP APPLICATIORS

PT
peconaTnc =|

‘romano [ot | oma esi

FLOREDO
ee EFFECTIVE WRITING SKILLS
= MASSAGE THERAPY ESSENTIALS |

us

H1sJun |) 2 cove

tB-Juil | Bdays

xs THERAPY ESSENTIALS Il

f.d0pm-
BALLADUM DANCING Ba0pm 2l- May S278

aaa

aos en [oe fe
itty | one | sn
ET

tiOpm-
/waraon | ov | Hunan RESOUBCE mga
po

40pm
ENQUIRIES: Contact the Co-ordinator at Tel: (242) 325-6714 (242) 328-000 / 328-1936! 30043900 ext. S202 or
bina prevsdevdhcob.edu.bs

Thurs

Mon

All fees are included with the exception of the application fee of $40.00 (ome time).
CEES reserves the right to change Tuition. Fees. Course Content, Course Schedule and Course Materials.

Top of the Line
Performance Vehicles.

1 Tae

outa hota tee en
et ert 2

Tyreflex Star Motors is the Exclusive
Authorized Dealer for Mercedes-Benz,
Subaru and lsuzu vehicles.
> New & Used Cars & Trucks
> Sales, Parts & Service

Call us today at 325.4961

Visit our showroom on Wulff Rd!

Fax: 323.4667 / Open Mon-Fri, §am-Spm
Wultt Road, P. 0. Box M9123, Massau

TYREFLEX STAR MOTORS
PAGE 10, MONDAY, MAY 11, 2009

THE TRIBUNE





Evaluating performances
YOUNG MAn’s VIEW

@ By ADRIAN GIBSON
ajbahama@hotmail.com

THIS column, my first after
being injured in a car accident
and having to have urgent eye
surgery in the US as a result, is
dedicated to one of my literary
mentors— the fearless, now
retired Tribune Managing Edi-
tor John Marquis. Over the
last few years, [ have been able
to understudy Mr Marquis and
will miss our weekly chats
about a variety of personal and
social/political issues. Howev-
er, we will keep in touch.

7K Ok Ok ok

In its second year since
being elected to the govern-
ment of the Bahamas, the
FNM finds itself governing ina

ADRIAN

recessionary period, with a
contracting global economy,
foreign credit markets, unem-
ployment inching upwards and
the unlikelihood of any possi-
ble decoupling of the Bahamas
and US economies in the near
future, as was once noted by
the Prime Minister.
However, while consider-
ing these factors, I will assess
the FNM’s governance thus
far and evaluate the perfor-
mances—or lack thereof—of

The Bahamas Electricity Corporation

Tender

Fuel Oil Tank Erection &
Associated Works
Bailey Town, Bimini

The Bahamas Electricity Corporation
invites Tenders for the abowe named services

Bidders are required ta collect packages from the
Corporation's Administration Office, Blue Hill & Tucker Roads

Contact: Mrs. Delmeta Seymour at telephone 302-1158

Tenders are to be addressed ta:
Mr. Kevin Basden, General Manager
Bahamas Electricity Corporation
Executive Offices = Blue Hill & Tacker Roads
Nassau, Bahamas

Deadline for delivery to BEC: on of before
15th May, 2009
no later than 4:00 p.m,

Submissions should be marked as follows:
Tender No, 689/09
FUEL O)L TANK ERECTION & ASSOCIATED WORKS
BAILEY TOWM, BIMIMI

The Corporation reserves the right
to accept of reject any or all proposals.
For all enquiries regarding the tenders and site visits, contact

Mr. Kermit McCartney at telephone 302-1247

G IBS ON



individual ministers.

To the government's credit,
they have seemingly taken a
pragmatic approach to the
unemployment/economic cri-
sis, instituted social assistance
programmes in a timely man-
ner, pressed for the budgetary
rationalization of tariffs, initi-
ated short-term stimulus
spending on infrastructural
development (harbour dredg-
ing, road works), started clean-
up campaigns and passed leg-

islation to empower the air-
port redevelopment company
in its thrust to improve the
major gateway of our tourism
dependent country.
However, the FNM has
seemingly done little to
empower Bahamians by ensur-
ing greater involvement in
major projects. Frankly, there
is aneed to ensure the involve-
ment of more small-time, local
contractors—not just the usu-
al suspects—in infrastructural
upgrades, a need of greater
transparency and accountabil-
ity, the development of a clear-
ly articulated trade policy and
the diversification of the econ-
omy so that the country would
be better able to sustain itself
during this gloomy global
economy. The government

Bahamas Bus & Truck Co., Ltd,

Montrose Avenue
Phone:322-1722 * Fax: 326-7452

=
i
iy
j

i ae

te
Ps

te.

S— EXT

=

#/ COME CHECK

RA, EXTRA,
EXTRA,

Large Shipment

of

New Shipments Arrived

Hurry, Hurry, Hurry and
Get Your First Choice
For Easy Financing

Bank And Inaurance

On Premises
Check Our Prices
Before buying

CALL 322-1722



You can TRUST a health plan that delivers
on its promise.

yA COLONIAL GROUP

ma INTERNATIONAL

MEDICAL

was sectarian and exhibited lit-
tle foresight when petty poli-
tics may have possibly led it
to scrap a few of the worth-
while initiatives of the former
administration, only to rein-
state those that worked. On
the other hand, the PLP is
hardly better as an Opposition
than they were when in gov-
ernment, appearing to be
bankrupt of ideas and reck-
lessly obstructing almost all
proposals of government while
themselves proposing nothing.

Thus far, the FNM Cabinet
has steered clear of major
scandals.

However, there are certain
members of Cabinet who are
not the ideal choice and who
appear to be mere space
cadets whose brain power
seems to be of the lowest pos-
sible wattage. In his third term,
it appears that Prime Minister
Hubert Ingraham is a bit
shorthanded, particularly since
he must contend with a few
hopeless jokers in his board-
room, who seem out of touch
with public sentiment and
merely concerned with the
pomp and trappings of high
office, living in their world of
fantas

Although I will not apply a
grade to the government until
the end of this column, the
FNM must respond to the
crescendo of voices lobbying
for anew economic approach
and the empowerment of
young Bahamians. Under Mr
Ingraham, much of the scan-
dals and alleged corruption
seemingly ingrained in local
politics—which has at times
internationally gained the
Bahamas a reputation as a
soprano state—hardly occurs,
since he is known for his
integrity and no-nonsense
approach.

When evaluating the per-
formance of individual minis-
ters, Dr Earl Deveaux—Min-
ister for the Environment—
earns a B-plus. Dr Deveaux
has initiated the process of
tidying up the city/islands,
pledged to safeguard the coun-
try’s natural resources and has
pushed for a concerted drive
toward environmental restora-
tion; however, he cannot do it
alone. In his capacity, Dr
Deveaux has pledged to initi-
ate projects to plant sea oats
and other indigenous plants to
protect sand dunes/coastal
zones and he must vigorously
seck to have the marine envi-
ronment zoned. I am curious
as to whether his ministry has
beyond to fulfil his stated goal
of zoning 20 per cent of the
marine environment.

Dr Deveaux, who I under-

stand is a superb MP, set out
to put a spanking on potential
challenger Jerome Fitzgerald
during the next general elec-
tion cycle—appears to be sin-
cerely confronting any set-
backs/problems in his minis-
terial portfolio. In his attempt
to confront the Bahamas’ envi-
ronmental woes, he must also
seek the passage and enforce-
ment of legislation mandating
the recycling and separation
of garbage, a new landfill facil-
ity, the implementation of a
garbage tax, launch a compre-
hensive educational campaign
about the importance of wet-
lands and also encourage
green building standards. I
would also recommend that
he deploy environmental offi-
cers to Cowpen Road West—
where a property has been cal-
lously cut below the level of
the road almost into the water
table, in the ruthless pursuit
of quarry/cracker dust—and
also to Bacardi Road where,
like Sandyport, the wetlands
are rapidly being filled-in and
destroyed. This service-ori-
ented statesman has had suc-
cesses and unlike many of his
Cabinet colleagues, he has
demonstrated an understand-
ing of the issues.



Brent Symonette, the For-
eign Affairs Minister, has
become known as the foreign-
affairs-minister-from-Nassau
who rarely travels, seldom con-
tributes in the House of
Assembly and appears to be
merely playing second fiddle.
Mr Symonette appears to be a
stealth-like minister who is
hardly seen and who seems to
be on cruise control. Accord-
ing to the Oxford dictionary,
foreign mean “dealing with
other countries such as foreign
policy” or “having to do witha

SEE page 11

Atlantic Medical

Atlantic Medical is the market leading health insurance



provider because it offers the best care at the best

possible price.

Your health care is a very important part of your life, so

it Is reassuring If you know your plan and your insurance

provider will deliver on care, benefits and service when

you need it.

You can enjoy that reassurance with Atlantic Medical. Just

ask any one of 50,000 health plan members who trust

Colonial Group International to work for them day-in,

day-out, at home or overseas.

People trust Atlantic Medical for care, service and value

that really makes a difference and makes sure you will

ae

ATLANTIC MEDICAL INSURANCE CO. LTD.
Atlantic House, 2nd Terrace & Collins Avenue, PO. Box SS-5915, Nassau Tel. 326-8191
Suite 5, Jasmine Corporate Center, East Sunrise Highway, RO. Box F-42655, Freeport Tel. 351-3960

A member of Colonial Group International: Insurance, Health, Pensions, Life

receive the best health cover money can buy,

Colonial Group International is
rated A-(Excellent) by AM Best.


THE TRIBUNE

MONDAY, MAY 11, 2009, PAGE 11



of government ministers

FROM page 10

country or language other than
one’s own”, however Mr
Symonette hardly travels. How
is it that our country’s foreign
affairs minister was absent
from the biggest government
meeting the hemisphere over
the last two years—the Sum-
mit of the Americas?

The chaos at the passport
office has poorly reflected on
the minister, whose ministry
has had little to no policy
changes. While the complete
implementation of e-passport
and the movement to secure
accomplishments, both were
initiated by the former admin-
istration and are presently
being poorly executed, so-
much-so that I believe the
country could possibly miss the
2010 e-passport deadline. Mr
Symonette should secure the
temporary secondment of pub-
lic servants to ensure that the
e-passport deadline is met or
outsource the appointments
and scheduling of passport
drop-offs and pickups in the
same format as the US
embassy has done for Bahami-
ans seeking visas.

The Foreign Affairs min-
istry is a conduit for the provi-
sion of technical assistance
offered by major international
organizations to Bahamians,
however that ministry has
seemingly not sought out or
taken advantage of such
opportunities. Furthermore,
there are no new ideas or rare
policy statements with refer-
ence to the Bahamas’ relations
with the ACP group, the Com-
monwealth, the OAS and
Haiti. If Mr Symonette is craft-
ing new foreign affairs strate-
gies, the public relations arm
of his ministry is not informa-
tive, only showing him in a cer-
emonial role making photo
albums with visiting or newly
assigned diplomats.

I do credit Mr Symonette
for maintaining our embassies
and having the foresight to
grant, what I’m told, will be
temporary visa waivers for

British Colonial Hilton
Friday, May 15, 2009
Cocktails at 6:30 pm,

Auction of 5-7 collectibles

Sale of over 100 pieces

of decorative art
(all under $100 each)

Proceeds to benefit
the UHAB Community
Emergency Fund (CEF)

Donation $20

sm includes valet parking & 2 drinks

persons affiliated with the
upcoming Miss Universe
pageant. He earns a miserable
C-minus.



Branville McCartney, the
Minister State for Immigration
and another outstanding MP,
appears to have taken a cue
from former MP Ron Pinder
and has become the number
one public relations man in
Cabinet. Mr McCartney is a
first-class politician who has
actively sought to rid the immi-
gration department of slack-
ness and corruption and has
vigorously confronted the ille-
gal immigration problem.
However, MP McCartney
must seck to consistently
expand the security infra-
structure at his ministry, rid
the department of its time-con-
suming and antiquated meth-
ods while moving to online
applications and reducing the
lengthy waits for persons
applying for status, requesting
documents or having already
met the stated criteria. Per-
haps the restructuring of the
Immigration Department, by
order of the PM, will promote
improved modes of operation,
however the Immigration
Board must become more
transparent, being more
broad-based in composition,

Auction

a Sale

of Decorative

Haitian Art

at 7:00 pm sharp

explaining to applicants why
they may have been denied
status or making notes from a
meeting about an applicant
available for his/her perusal.
The minister must remain vig-
ilant, and be careful and wary
of appearing to be inhumane
in his pursuits. Mr McCartney
does appear to be acutely
addressing immigration mat-
ters and earns B-plus.

Tommy Turnquest, the
hapless Minister of National
Security, reminds me of a dead
spark plug and appears to be
bereft of ideas in the fight
against crime. I have two
words for Mr Turnquest—
“wrong ministry.” Under Mr
Turnquest, there is a deepen-
ing climate of fear, heightened
by his embarrassing, yet fre-
quent recounting of the statis-
tics of crime.

In the fight against crime, it
appears that he can hardly see
the forest for the trees, setting
up meaningless committees to
tell Bahamians what they
already know and compiling
volumes of reports that, like
many others, probably end up
gathering dust in some bureau-
cratic backroom.

Can Mr Turnquest inspire
those officers who, when
called, are known to tell some
distressed complainants that
no car is available or that they
are calling the wrong station,
while a unit is brazenly parked
at Bamboo Shack or a sweet-
heart’s house?

Mr Turnquest should
expand the training of police
officers to one year, aggres-
sively address police brutality
and offer rewards to anyone
with proof of police officers
paying social visits to bars
while on duty or being caught
in compromising positions
while working. The buck stops
with you sir!

It appears that we have
moved from five years of inef-
fectiveness under Cynthia
“Mother” Pratt to another
term of hopelessness—from
one minister who preaches to
another who merely recites
statistics.

ae

TITTT rrr

ee LOR ELELL LLL) Lo

eo Ted

1s

~ For ticket Information

ph: 433-8487 or 323-5300 |

(GSs

(0)

ity ft.

Mr Turnquest has no law
enforcement experience or
related qualifications and has a
standoffish demeanour that is
almost comparable to a rusting
lamp pole. I do credit the min-
ister with acquiring new
resources to outfit the police
and defence force, however he
should also seek to reorganize
and bring greater transparency
to the Police and Judicial
Commission, which handles
promotions, and to whom
political appointments are
made without effective vetting
as to a person’s qualifications
for such an appointment. I
have yet to forget how Mr
Turnquest was muscled about
by BTC union president
Robert Farquharson and how,
after being affronted, he sim-
ply turned around and
stomped off while BTC work-
ers brought Bay Street to a
halt.

Mr Turnquest is better suit-
ed for a ministry such as Social
Services or Housing. He earns
an F-plus, since he has yet to
deploy a more proactive, mul-
ti-disciplinary approach to
aggressively fighting the spike
in violent crime and the appre-
hension of citizens.

NEW CONDOS

Resario West
St. Albans Dr. New 3 Bedroom, 2 1/2 Bath,
3 Storey Townhouses. Gated Property.
Modern Kitchens & Well Appointed Interiors
$239,000) with only 5% deposit required.
Bank Financing Available
325-1325 454-2098 or 422-4489



Phase IT commences July 2009

Share your news

The Tribune wants to hear
from people who are
making news in their
neighbourhoods. Perhaps
you are raising funds for a
good cause, campaigning
for improvements in the
area or have won an
award.

If so, call us on 322-1986

¢TO BECONTINUED | | and share your story.








































FURNI
Celebrating

Z 0 years

Nassau * Grand Bahama * World Wide Web

tn 40
7 PIECE ACCENT COLEGIO ee Weer,

Add an accent
collection to your

room purchase
for as low as

per
5 week*

Here's how to enter:
Spend §500° or more

Fill out your entry forms
(1 per every $500 spent)

Your entries rallover every month
until September.

Shop early for MORE CHANCES to WIN,

Win one of 16 wanderful Island
Getaway trips for to
(Hotel & Flights included).

Grand Bahama and Nassau
Showrooms will draw Winners
at the end of every month

Show your Bahamian spirit and
“Shop 2 Hop” here at home... today!

C [el hey Ladin Caste

Wie dor just fy heen ‘ve: ieee har
VW
a

"WESTERN Air

* While Supplies Last
* With Approved Credit
* Some Stipulations May Apply

pitty. FORBES
SP HARTER

| Apply for IN-HOUSE FINANCING online today!

a
SS) NASSAU * Town Centre Mall

me Tel: (242) 397-PLUS 7s87
Mon-Fri Sam-6pm © Sat Jam-4pm Fos Mon-Sat 9am-9pm
Fax: (242) 352-9823 ~O- Fax: (242) 325-6368

www.fu rnitureplus.com

GRAND BAHAMA * Madeira Craft
Tel: (242) 352-PLUS san)
PAGE 12, MONDAY, MAY 11, 2009

TRIBUNE SPORTS



SPORTS

Henrik
Stenson wins
sVit EN on
Championship

HENRIK STENSON,

of Sweden, kisses the
winner's trophy after his
four shot victory at The
Players Championship
golf tournament at TPC
Sawgrass in Ponte Vedra
Beach, Fla., Sunday, May
10, 2009.

(AP Photo/Wilfredo Lee)



IN BRIEF

Gasquet: test
came hack
positive for coke

m@ PARIS

French tennis player Richard
Gasquet has acknowledged he’s
been told he tested positive for
cocaine but says he’s innocent,
according to Associated Press.

“T am gathering together proof
of my innocence and I will choose
an appropriate moment to
express myself,” Gasquet said in a
statement Sunday.

Gasquet said the “B” sample
from the tournament in Key Bis-
cayne, Fla., confirmed the result
of the “A” sample taken the same

2 0 Oo9 Spectra5/CERATO day. The Web site of sports daily
L’Equipe reported Saturday that

KIA MOTORS

The Power to Surprise”

The Spectras CERATO haa a sporty attitude with ita sport- ) :
fully independent ond Test against West Indies.

tuned suspension,

Buapension. It can seat up to five occupants. It is powered by a
1.6-liter four-cylinder that ia mated to a standard four-speed
automatic transmission.
Door Lacks, CD Radio, Two 4-Door Sedan Models including the

5-Boor Modal

ELITE MOTORS LTD. SANPIN MOTORS LIMITED

Thompéon Bhd. « Oakes Field
t, 242.326.6377" f. 242.326.6315
®. sanping@coralwave.com

#259 Vill Rood
PS. Be Matus
ba?) aD} | PPS





Alp Gondition, PWR Windows, FPWR

traces of the banned drug were
found in the 22-year-old Gas-
quet’s urine sample at the Sony
Ericsson Open.

UK's Button wins
Spanish Grand Prix
ASE Fat ee






BRAWN GP Jenson Button of
Britain celebrates after winning the
Spanish Formula One Grand Prix in
front of thrid placed Red Bull Mark
Webber, foreground, at the
Catalunya racetrack in Montmelo,
near Barcelona, Spain, on Sunday,
May 10, 2009.

Bell, Sidebottom
recalled for Test

England have recalled War-
wickshire batsman Jan Bell and
Nottinghamshire left-armer
Ryan Sidebottom for the sec-

Andrew Strauss’ team head
to the Riverside this week hav-
ing gone 1-0 up in the npower
series, bolstered by the addition
of an extra option in both bat-
ting and bowling departments.

; Bell was axed after the Test
ON THE SPOT FISLAN CIRE: WITH

COMMONaAEALTH BANK defeat in Jamaica three months

onemermasoamers ago but will offer the alterna-
u : ante .

chee hia ca ae tive of fielding six frontline bats-

BACKERS & AGENTS LTD men if the Chester-le-Street sur-

face looks seamer-friendly.



OLuropean soccer

Martin Rickett/AP Photo/PA

et s u
MANCHESTER UNITED'S Ryan Giggs, left, and Manchester City's
Nigel De Jong battle for the ball during their English Premier League
soccer match against Manchester City at Old Trafford Stadium,
Manchester, England, Sunday, May 10, 2009.

Man United move closer to title

mm LONDON — Manchester United held its three-point margin atop the
Premier League by beating neighbor Manchester City 2-0 on Sunday
while Chelsea romped to a 4-1 victory at Arsenal, according to the Asso-
ciated Press.

Cristiano Ronaldo scored his 18th league goal of the season with a
free kick at Old Trafford and Carlos Tevez added the second with a
shot from the edge of the area in the 45th to put United within four
points of a third Premier League title in a row and 11th in 17 seasons
under manager Alex Ferguson.

The victory maintained Man United’s lead with a game in hand
despite Liverpool’s 3-0 win at West Ham on Saturday, and Fergu-
son’s stars can move closer to the title by winning at Wigan on Wednes-
day. The two blemishes on United’s performance, however, were the
behavior of the two scorers.

While Man United moved closer to the title, Chelsea underlined why
it will challenge next season with a 4-1 victory at Arsenal.

After Alex and Nicolas Anelka gave Chelsea a 2-0 halftime lead, an
own goal by Kolo Tour in the 49th virtually put the game out of reach.
Although Arsenal’s Nicklas Bendtner scored, Florent Malouda added
a fourth in the 86th minute. Chelsea is three points behind Liverpool
as it tries to maintain its record of finishing in the top two in five sea-
sons. In contrast, Arsenal is guaranteed to finish fourth for the third sea-
son in four with no top-two finish during that time. That followed an
eight-season spell when the Gunners were never out of the top two,
winning three titles.



@ MADRID — Barcelona was denied the Spanish League title when
Joseba Llorente scored an injury-time goal to give Villarreal a 3-3 tie
at Barcelona. Barcelona was leading 3-1 after first-half goals by Seydou
Keita, Samuel Eto’o and Daniel Alves, leading to premature chants of
“champions” from Barcelona supporters at Camp Nou stadium. How-
ever, Villarreal scored a second goal with 13 minutes remaining — a
penalty by Mati Fernandez, which led to the dismissal of Barcelona
defender Eric Abidal. Llorente, who had also scored Villareal’s open-
ing goal, silenced the crowd with the late equalizer. Eight points clear
of Real Madrid with three rounds remaining, Barcelona hopes to
clinch the title next Sunday when it visits Mallorca.



B GLASGOW, Scotland — Rangers went to top of the Scottish Pre-
mier League standings with three games remaining after a 1-0 win over
defending champion and city rival Celtic.

Midfielder Steve Davis scored in the 37th minute at Ibrox to move
Rangers to 79 points, two more than Celtic, which is aiming for a
fourth straight title. Rangers is at Hibernian on Wednesday before host-
ing Aberdeen next weekend and finishing the league season at Dundee
United on May 24. It also plays Falkirk in the Scottish Cup final the fol-
lowing weekend.

THE THEFT OF ELEGTRIGHTY
IS A CRIMINAL OFFENCE

PUNISHABLE BY
TWO YEARS IN JAIL AND/OR
A $2000 FINE.

‘The PUwens to
report and
eratlicate this
crime runs

through YOU"

Please report all suspected cases of meter tampering and
electricity theft to the Bahamas Electricity Corporation.
Anonymous calls are welcomed. Confidentiality is guaranteed.
Please contact us at 323-4130.


TRIBUNE SPORTS

MONDAY, MAY 11, 2009, PAGE 13



SPORTS



BAPTIST SPORTS COUNCIL'S 2009 JOYCE MINUS BASKETBALL CLASSIC



Three new ch

IN an historic final day of com-
petition, three new champions
were crowned in the Baptist
Sports Council’ 2009 Joyce Minus
Basketball Classic on Saturday a
the Baillou Hills Sporting Com-
plex.

It was the first time that any
one Church contested for all of
the titles at the same time.

But Macedonia Baptist,
coached by Dayton Turnquest
and Brent Stubbs, denied Tem-
ple Fellowship the opportunity to
add another piece of history by
winning all three crowns.

In a clean sweep of their best-
of-three series, Macedonia clob-
bered Temple Fellowship 35-20
and 27-20 to secure the 15-and-
under title.

Coach Geno Campbell and
Temple Fellowship, however,
made sure that the other two
crowns didn't slip out of their
hands.

Their 19-and-under team also
pulled off a two-game sweep over
Golden Gates, coached by
league's honoree Joyce Minus, as
they pulled off the 33-31 and 42-
36 victories.

And in the men's series, it went
right down to the wire as Tem-
ple Fellowship dethroned Evan-
gelistic Center, coached by Alvin
Sands, with their 36-30, 19-33 and
46-26 decisions.

For his efforts, Campbell made
history as he was named the
Coach of the Year in both the 15-
and-under and men's division.

The other Coach of the Year
went to Norleen Henfield, who
won the title in the 19-and-under
division.

First Baptist was the first
Church to win two titles in two
divisions in the 15-and-under and
19-and-under for the past two
years. They were eliminated from
the playoffs by Temple Fellow-
ship in all three divisions.

Winning the Most Valuable
Player awards were James Rolle
from Macedonia in the 15-and-
under, Gabbie Laurent from
Temple Fellowship in the 19-and-
under and Jason Cooper from
Temple Fellowship in the men.

¢ Here's a summary o the
games played:

Macedonia 35, Temple Fel-
lowship 20 (15-and-under):
Stephen Miller led Macedonia in
the opener with 10 and James
Rolle and Adolpheus Leadon
both had eight. DeShawn White
had a game high 13 in the loss.

Macedonia 27, Temple Fel-
lowship 20 (15-and-under): James
Rolle scored nine points, Stephen
Miller had five and Geno Bullard
and Devin Carey both helped out
with four in the clincher for
Macedonia. DeShawn White had
a game high 12 ad Randy Miller
add five in the loss.

Temple Fellowship 33, Gold-
en Gates 31 (19-and-under):
Kevin Burrows had a game high
15, Marvin Albury and Gabbie
Laurent both had eight and Najee
Bethel and Leron Albury both
contributed three in the opener
for Temple Fellowship. Mel John-
son had 10, Samuel Johnson
added seven and Jonathan Davis
chipped in with five in the loss.

Temple Fellowship 42, Gold-
en Gates 36 (19-and-under):
Najee Bethel scored eight, Mar-
vin Albury had five and Gabbie
Laurent four as Temple Fellow-
ship wrapped up the sweep. Mel
Johnson had a game high 19,
Jonathan Davis added five and
Dominique Beadle chipped in
with four in the loss.

Temple Fellowship 36, Evan-
gelistic Center 30 (Men): Gabbie
Laurent had eight, Najee Bethel
six, Ilan Pinder five and Jason
Cooper four in the opener for
Temple Fellowship. Randy Fer-
guson had seven, Tyrone Sands
five and Kathon Hanna four in
the loss.

Evangelistic Center 33, Tem-








COACH Dayton Turnquest (kneeling) pose with members of Macedonia, who
captured the 15-and-under title in the Baptist Sports Council’s 2009 Joyce Minus
Basketball Classic on Saturday. At right is Minus, who made the presentation of
awards.



MEMBERS of Temple Fellowship celebrate above with their trophies for winning
the men’s championship and the president’s pennant in the Baptist Sports Coun-
cil’s 2009 Joyce Minus Basketball Classic on Saturday.

COACH Geno Bullard (center) poses with members of his Temple Fellowship 15-

and-under team that finished as runners-up. At left of Campbell is Joyce Minus, the
patron for this year’s tournament.

Jan Pinder added four in the loss.

Temple Fellowship 46, Evan-
gelistic Center 26 (Men): Ian Pin-
der scored a game high 10, Jason
Cooper had eight, Ishban Lynes
added six and Kevin Burrows

ple Fellowship 19 (Men): Tyrone
Sands had a game high eight
points and Randy Ferguson
added four as Evangelistic Center
starved off elimination in game
two. Jason Cooper scored six and

eee a ae eee ee ee a ae eee ee |

RM FRAME

WINDOWS

Nassau's Leading Manufacturer of Vinyl Windows and Vinyl Doors

APRIL SHOWERS

IN MAY 7?

Call for your FREE quote or

Come visit our factory located on 74 Mount Royal Avenue, Nassau,

TEL: 1-242-325-6633

: 1-242-325-6638



ampions crowned

JOYCE MINUS (second left) is honored by the Baptist Sports Council for her
administrative role she played over the years as the vice chairman. At left is
Renea Brice and at right is Norleen Henfield, who both made presentations to Minus
on behalf of the BSC. Behind are two players who played for Minus’ Golden
Gates team.








































































































The Bahamas Electricity Corporation

Tender

DAY TANK INSTALLATION
BAILEY TOWN, BIMINI

The Bahamas Electricity Corporation invites Tenders
from eligible bidders for the provision of
DAY TANK INSTALLATION AT BIMINI POWER STATION.

Sports

Bidders are required to collect packages from
the Corporation's Administration Office,
Blue Hill & Tucker Roads,
Contact Mrs. Delmeta Seymour at telephone 302-1158.

Volleyball Baptist
Sports Council meeting

WITH the basketball season
now completed, the Baptist
Sports Council will begin
preparation for the hosting of
the 2009 Nicola Major Vol-
leyball Classic. A meeting is
scheduled for Saturday at 10
am at the Bahamas Baptist
College, Jean Street for all
Churches interested

in participating. The league is
expected to get started on
Saturday, May 30 at the Tom
‘the Bird’ Grant Park in Yel-
low Elder. There is a regis-
tration fee of $100.00 per
team in each division. All
Churches, no matter what
denomination, are invited to
participate.

Tenders are to be addressed ta:
Mr. Kevin Basden, General Manager
Bahamas Electricity Corporation
Executive Offices
Blue Hill & Tucker Roads
Nassau, Bahamas

Deadline for delivery to BEC;

on or before May 15, 2009
no later than 4:00 p.m.

Submissions should be marked as follows:
Tender No. 703/09
DAY TAME IMSTALLATION
BAILEY TOWM, BIMINI

The Corporation reserves the right to accept
or reject the whole or such part of any Tender
chipped in with four in the closer
for Temple Fellowship. Tyrone
Sands scored nine, Randy Fergu-
son had six and Sherman Bowe
four in the loss.

For all enquiries regarding the Tenders, contact
Miss Simone Sawyer at telephone 302-1236

ft] CMT
70 kW/3,400 rpm

240 N-m/2,000 rpm 4

(SAE Net) .

-
q

By

y=) 3

Features Include:

* Extra power and fuel economy with the 14B direct injection
system diesel engine

* Air conditioning

* Rope hooks & footsteps for easy loading

* Automatically-adjusting clutch for easy maintenance

* Exhaust brake system for stopping power ach ary cent

/30,000-mile factory warranty, full parts

EM oy ARMA RULES

Price includes licensing and inspection to

birthday, floor mats and full tank of fuel.

* Heavy-duty front & rear suspension systems protect cargo
* Tilt/power steering & superb visibility in a comfortable cabin
* Wide, extra-long cargo bed with reinforced frame

EXECUTIVE
MOTORS LTD

AUTHORISED DAIHATSU DEALER
Available in Grand Bahama at Quality Auto Sales (Freeport) e Queens Hwy, 352-6122 * Abaco Motor Mall, Don MacKay Blvd, 367-2916

Auto Mall, Shirley Street (opp. St. Matthew’s Church)
Open Mon to Fri 8am - 5:30pm
Sat 8am - 12noon

Tel: 397-1700

E-mail: execmotor@batelnet.bs
Parts and service guaranteed
PAGE 14, MONDAY, MAY 11, 2009

TRIBUNE SPORTS



SPORTS



Truckers and Brackettes continue winning trends

m@ By RENALDO DORSETT
Sports Reporter
rdorsett@tribunemedia.net

Defending champions in both men’s
and women’s divisions continued the
winning trends from 2008 with a pair of
opening day wins to begin the 2009
New Providence Softball Association
season.

In the men’s feature, the Commando
Security Truckers held of a late game
charge to outlast the Robin Hood Hit-
men 8-7, while in the women’s match
up the Sigma Brackettes won 10-5 over
the Proper Care Pool Sharks.

In aclosely contested game through-

TRACK AND FIELD

Mathieu dominates
200 and 400 metres

out, the Truckers and Hitmen played
to an even 6-6 tie through three
innings.

After both teams went scoreless over
the course of the next two innings, the
Truckers took a decisive advantage
with two runs in the bottom half of the
sixth inning to take an 8-6 advantage.

The Hitmen managed one run in the
bottom half of the seventh but failed to
score an equalizer to force extra
innings.

Freddie Cornish led the defending
NPSA pennant winners, league cham-
pions and national champions, Truck-
ers to the win while Cardinal Gilbert
was tagged with the loss.

Steven Brown highlighted the Truck-
ers’ evening at the plate with a three
run home run in the first inning, his
lone hit of the game.

Marvin Wood finished 2-4, includ-
ing one double, with two runs and one
RBI.

Darron Stevens led the Hitmen
offensively as he went 2-4 with one
triple and one run scored while
Garfield Bethel went 2-5 with one run
and one RBI.

In the women’s feature the Brack-
ettes took charge from the game’s out-
set with an early 2-0 lead after the first
inning and never relinquished the
advantage.

The Brackettes piled on at least a
single run over the next three innings
and took a 6-3 lead heading into the
fifth.

The defending champions added
their run total with their most efficient
scoring inning of the game with four
runs.

Garnette Curry led the Brackettes
offensively as she went 2-3 with four
RBI and Shevette Taylor was 2-4, a
pair of doubles, with two runs and one
RBI.

Kelly Smith led the Sharks going 2-4
with one run scored.

Burket Dorsett, Bahamas Softball
Federation President said the federa-

tion was pleased with the level of play
on day one and looks forward to a sea-
son of similar play over the year.
“Competition was keen from the
very first night as we expected, these
players worked hard in the off-season
and it showed tonight on the field set-
ting the pace for what is expected to be
a great season” he said, “The BSF
wishes the NPSA, its players, execu-
tives and administrators a successful
season, we will facilitate their growth
and development particularly with the
youth initiatives as we concentrate on
the training of a younger generation
of softball players to continue the rich
heritage of the sport in the country.”

FROM page 15

Bahamas Speed Dynamics’
Shautae Miller in 26.55. Club
Monica’s Kellie Rolle was third
in 26.70.

And in the 400, Bahamas
Speed Dynamics’ Pedrya Sey-
mour won in 1:00.83.

College of the Bahamas’ Itsa
Smith was second in 1:03.12 and
Striders Athletics’ Shatyna Stu-
art got third in 1:03.19.

Robinson also doubled up in
the girls under-18 100 hurdles
in 14.15.

Star Trackers’ Devinn
Cartwright (14.58) and Lauren
Charlton (16.04) were second
and third respectively.

And she made it a triple treat
with her victory in the women’s
long jump with a leap of 5.52
metres.

Deandra Deveaux of
Jumpers Inc was second with
5.16 and Striders Athletics’
Shatyna Stuart was third with
4.89. Kemp pulled off a victory
in the women’s 100 hurdles in
14.87. CI Gibson’s Vanessa
Brown was second in 19.61.

@ FRITZ GRANT TRACK

AND FIELD INVITATIONAL



Among the other winners
were Marissa Capron in the
girls under-7 80 (14.53); Joshua
Ferguson in the boys under-7
80 (14.38); Gem Wilson in the
under-9 girls 80 (12.41); Blaize
Darling in the boys under-8 80
(12.35).

Blayre Catalyn in the girls
under-11 100 (14.14); Sanchez
Thompson in the boys under-
11 100 (14.28); Shaunae Miller
in the girls under-17 100 (12.35)
and Harold Carter in the boys
under-17 100 (10.86).

There was also two races for
the Special Olympics.

In the girls 100, Racquel
Moxey won in 14.94, followed
by Trenice Bell in 15.17 with
Ruth Hepburn third in 15.44.

The boys’ straight away race
was won by D’Edwin Major in
12.55, followed by Brent Coop-
er in 12.61.

Christopher Rolle was third
in 12.65.

PHOTOS: Felipé Major/Tribune staff






























2008 FORD EXPLORER XLT

7 Passanger XLT, Leather Interior

~~’

was $42,073.00 |
NOW $33,800.00

DEAL

2008 FORD SPORT TRAC

















LIMITED - Leather Interior

was $46,186.00
NOW $37,300.00 f

i __ --

, |= =//

ee

2008 FORD EDGE SEL

=

= i
——— |

a

i
_ ae

Save BIG Right Now!

was $41 670.00
NOW $35,400.00

3 years or 36,000 miles warranty, 3 years roadside
= | assistant, 3 years rust protections warranty and
~ licensed and inspected up to birthday.

Now THAT S REALLY A

| 53| |((}\Deal
FRIENDLY MOTORS CO, LTD

THOMPSON BOULEVARD ° TEL.: 356-7100 * FAX: 328-6094

EMAIL: friendlymotors@hotmail.com * WEBSITE: friendlymotorsbahamas.com

NOW $35,800.00

QJAY FERGUSON in the 400 metres.

RYAN INGRAHAM is airborne during the high jump.

FROM page 15

Olympic champion LaShawn
Merritt (44.50) and runner-up
Jeremy Wariner (44.69). Latroy
Williams, another Bahamian, who
had originally led the list with
45.01, has dropped to fourth, but
he's also qualified for Berlin.

American Darold Williamson
was second in Friday's race in
45.68 and Sanjay Ayre got third in
45.98. Over at the Osaka Grand
Prix in his return to Japan where
he made a sensational break-
through at the World Champi-
onships last year, Shamar Sands
posted a winning time of 13.40 in
the men's 110 hurdles.

Not only was it below the qual-
ifying standard of 13.55 for Berlin,
but it also reduced Sands’ nation-
al record of 13.40. Sands now has
the ninth fastest time in the world.
Leading the way is American
David Oliver in 13.09.

China's Shi Dongpeng was sec-
ond in 13.48 and Ji Wei got third
in 13.51. “IT am satisfied with my
(national) record, although I hit
the sixth and seventh hurdles,"
Sands was quoted as saying in an
interview on the meet's website.
"My start was especially good.”

Also at the meet, Donald
Thomas had another victorious
performance in the men's high
jump, although he only cleared
2.28 metres. Thomas still has the
third best leap of the season with
2.30. Andre Manson is out front

VALONEE ROBINSON wins the long jump.



Athletes shine

with 2.35. Thomas, another
Grand Bahamian native who
three years ago switched from
playing basketball to clearing the
high bar, won the world champi-
onship title in Japan in his debut
there two years ago.

"Nagai stadium is good to me,"
said Thomas about his back-to-
back winning feat in as many
appearances.

American Tora Harris was sec-
ond in 2.25 and Poland's Grze-
gorz Sposob got third in 2.25.

Sprinter Derrick Atkins, the
World Championships’ 100 silver
medalist from Osaka, is slowly
working back to his old form after
he was hampered with a slight
injury going into the Olympics
where he failed to make the final.

Stepping up to the half-lapper
as he looks ahead to a possible
100-200 combo in Berlin, Atkins
won the race in 20.35 over quar-
ter-miler Nathaniel McKinney,
who did 20.67 for second. Amer-
ican David Dickens was third in
20.70.

They were a part of a Bahami-
an contingent that competed at
the Georgia Invitational at the
University of Georgia's Specs
Town Track in Athens, Georgia.

McKinney, working his way
back for a spot on the men's 4 x

ee
ease uleoreh
In Just One Day!

Our DuraBath SSP Bathtubs & Wall Systems
are custom made to cover worn-out bathtubs
and out-of-date wall tiles...

No Mess. No Stress.
No Inconvenience.

tr .rebath.com

RE*BATH BAHAMAS

(Manufacturer's Lifetime Warranty).

Telephone:
(oa 93-8501
242) 394-6969

“Agthorzed Oealer

Sm ire eee Mere oR en Maeda ise
Open Monday - Friday - 9:00 am. - 5:00 p.m.



400 team again after he was left
off the Olympic team, also com-
peted in the 400 where he won
the one-lapper in 47.34.

Another Bahamian and fellow
Olympic team-mate Aaron
Cleare was second in 47.54.
American Montez Valentine,
competing for Shorter, was third
in 48.67. Also at the meet, Bene-
dict College's Petra McDonald
took the women's 100 hurdles in
14.17 in a photo finish with Jas-
mine Johnson of Georgia State.

McDonald also contested the
long jump, but she failed to
record a leap, having fouled her
first five attempts and passed on
the sixth and final one.
Antionette Oglesby of Fort Val-
ley State won with a leap of 19-5
1/2. And her Benedict State team-
mate Melinda Bastian picked up
a third place finish in the women's
javelin with a heave of 146-feet,
11-inches (44.79 metres) on her
second attempt. Winning the
event was Michelle Thompson of
Georgia with 165-8 (50.50) on her
first attempt, followed by Kristy
Woodward with 156-5 (47.68
metres) on her first attempt as
well.

At the 2009 Chick-fil-A UNC
Elite Meet in Chapel Hill, North
Carolina, veteran sprinter Chan-
dra Sturrup came close to pulling
off a double dose of victory as
she continue her quest to another
appearance at the World Cham-
pionships. Sturrup easily ran away
with the field in the women's 100,
shooting through the straightaway
in 11.28 to go under the A quali-
fying mark of 11.30 for Berlin.
Two South Carolina athletes, Kya
Brookins and Gabby Glenn were
second and third respectively in
11.47 and 11.81.

However, Sturrup had to settle
for second when she moved up
to the half-lapper, clocking 23.72
for second place in the women's
200, which was shy of the B qual-
ifying time of 23.30.

Cynetheia Rooks of Shekinah
Track Club stopped the clock in
23.42 for the win. Shayla Mahan
of South Carolina was third in
23.86. At the Ward Haylett Invi-
tational at the R V Christian
Track in Manhattan, Kansas, Tia
Rolle produced the same finishers
as Sturrup, only in reverse order.

Representing Lincoln Univer-
sity, Rolle ran 12.07 for second
in the century. Her team-mate
Nandelle Cameron won in 11.79
and Maja Mihalinec of Nebras-
ka-Omaha was third in 12.12.

In the 200, Rolle pulled off the
victory in 24.62. Kim Haberman
of Kansas-State was second in
24.94 and Sudian Davis of Lin-
THE TRIBUNE





















FROSTY-Cino

Coffee Shake

PAGE 15
-
|

MONDAY, MAY 11,







TRACK AND FIELD





Baliamian athletes
shine around word

Andrae Williams records one of fastest times in men’s 400
Shamar Sands posts national record in 110 hurdles

——

MICHAEL MATHIEU wins
the men’s invitational

400 metres.

Twisted Frosty

mg By BRENT STUBBS
Tribune Sports Reporter
bstubbs@tribunemdia. net

IT was another sizzling week-
end — posting one of the fastest
time in the men's 400 and anoth-
er 110 hurdles national record —
for Bahamian athletes around the
world.

It started on Friday at the
Texas Tech Open at the Terry
and Linda Fuller Track & Field
Complex where Andrae Wiliams
continued to keep his name in
the forefront in the men's 400.

The Grand Bahamian native,

who ran on the Bahamas’ 4 x 400
relay team that secured the sil-
ver at the Olympic Games in Bei-
jing, China, is aiming for a spot in
the 400 at the IAAF World
Championships in Berlin, Ger-
many in August.

Williams qualified for the event
by clocking a season's best of
44.98 seconds to win the one-lap-
per at the . The A qualifying
mark for Berlin is 45.55.

He now moves into third place
in the IAAF world list behind

SEE page 14

Felipé Major/Tribune staff

Mathieu dominates

200 and 400 metres

m@ By BRENT STUBBS
Senior Sports Reporter
bstubbs@tribunemedia.com

MICHAEL Mathieu took advantage of the visiting athletes that
came to town for the Fritz Grant Track and Field Invitational by
dominating the men’s invitational 200 and 400 metres.

The Grand Bahamian native easily took the half-lapper in 20.80
seconds, well ahead of his Bahamian rival Adrian Griffith, who got

second in 21.25.

Jamaican DeWayne Barrett was third in

21.59.

“The elite

Mathieu, a member of the Bahamas’ 4x athletes who
400 relay team that clinched the silver at Were In town
the Olympic Games in Beijing, China last said they will
year, doubled up in the one-lapper with his definitely come

victory in 46.26.

back next year

In the process, he held off a pair of if they aa
Jamaicans who challenged him. Barrett had invited.
to once again settle for second in 46.69 and
Sekou Clarke ended up third in 46.80.
In another race featuring the interna-
tional flavour, Jamaican Lerone Clarke sped
to a winning time of 10.36 ahead of two Bahamians.
Griffith got second in 10.44 and his training partner Rodney

Green was third in 10.55.

Meet director Bernard Newbold said the visiting athletes certainly
brought a new dimension to the meet.

But he said there were sufficient local athletes participating that
enabled the meet to live up to its advanced billing.

“The meet was very successful,” said Newbold, who noted that
they had more than 600 athletes registered.

“The elite athletes who were in town said they will definitely
come back next year if they are invited.”

The 4x 100 metre shuttle relay, which was introduced for the first
time at a local meet, was just as exciting for the fans who showed up
on Saturday’s final day of competition.

The relays, which allowed the athletes to run in a format back and
forth from the starting line to the finish, were contested for the
under-7, under-9 and under-11 divisions.

There was one invitational race for women with Ambassadors
Athletics’ Katrina Seymour winning the 400 in 55.88. Deshana
Burnside of Bahamas Speed Dynamics in 56.79, followed by her
team-mate Shauntae Miller in 59.60.

V’Alonee Robinson, competing for Club Monica, took the 100 in
11.85 over her team-mate Ivanique Kemp (12.19) and Bahamas
Speed Dynamics’ Dominique Morley (12.59).

In the 200, Kemp stopped the clock in 25.37, followed by

SEE page 14
THE TRIBUNE
D yu

lm By CHESTER ROBARDS
Business Reporter
crobards@tribunemedia.net

THE OLD City Lumberyard,
which met its end by fire sever-
al years ago, has received a
more than $15 million
makeover from its new owners,
who are developing the almost-
12 acre property into Builder’s
Mall.

Owner Mark Roberts said
FYP (Fix Your Place) will
become a veritable builder’s
mecca once the proposed gran-
ite fabrication factory is con-
structed, Tile King is moved
from its existing Palmdale
premises to the new Wulff
Road location, and several oth-
er construction-oriented busi-
nesses lease FYP’s available
office space.

“The idea behind Builder’s
Mall is that we would like to
create a facility that makes it
easy to come and do a lot of
construction-oriented business,”
said Mr Roberts.

The property’s enormous red
hardware store is hard to miss,
but the 65 foot tower crane



ine

MONDAY,



MAY 11,

SECTION B « business@tribunemedia.net

$15m makeover builds
key business location

Granite fabrication facility, kitchen manufacturing
and possible concrete block plant all possible
future additions to FYP’s Wulff Road complex

looming in the rear of the build-
ings, which is part of a fleet of
rental equipment, including a
Skytrak, and other forklifts, is
difficult to overlook.

Mr Roberts said the company
was toying with the idea of also
constructing a concrete block
plant, but that could be three
to four years into the future.

For the moment, the Paint
Centre, the hardware store, the
future site of the Tile King and
the lumberyard occupy only
four of the property’s 12 acres.

They hope to also open a
kitchen manufacturing facility
on property. “We’ll be doing
custom kitchens,” said Mr
Roberts.

Despite the large number of
outlets concentrated on FYP’s
lot, he argues that he can never

BISX-listed entity eyes
real estate deal overseas

@ By NEIL HARTNELL
Tribune Business Editor

THE BISX-listed Bahamas
Property Fund is exploring the
potential acquisition of foreign
properties, its administrator has
told Tribune Business, in addi-
tion to diversifying its real estate
holdings into ventures such as
shopping centres, having end-
ed fiscal 2008 with a 1.45 per
cent net income increase to
$2.654 million.

Michael Anderson, who is
also president of RoyalFidelity
Merchant Bank & Trust, said
the Property Fund’s balance
sheet strength had left it well-
positioned to acquire further
select commercial properties,
with the economic downturn
likely to place some owners
under pressure to sell.

He told Tribune Business
that the Property Fund was
“potentially looking at acquiring
a property in the Cayman
Islands”, where RoyalFidelity
and one of the latter’s 50 per
cent shareholders had an exten-
sive commercial presence.

While the Property Fund was
not currently in negotiations for
any specific property, Mr
Anderson added: “If we can
find something that makes
sense for us, and can get Central
Bank approval to buy the prop-
erty, it will help us diversify out-
side the Bahamas, and give us

* Still waiting for
Investments Board
approvals to close $3.5m
Pwe building deal

* Property Fund looking
for further diversification
through likes of
shopping centres

* Looking to end for
approvals ‘anomaly’

investment opportunities out-
side the Bahamas.

“If there are opportunities
here or somewhere else, we
have to be in a position to take
advantage of them.”

When it came to ammunition
for acquisition financing, Mr
Anderson said the Property
Fund had plenty. He pointed to
its year-end 2008 balance sheet,
which showed it had some
$33.573 million in net equity,
and debt amounting to just over
$15.5 million collectively.

This was almost a complete
reversal of the Property Fund’s
financial position when it was
formed, as then it had two-
thirds of its financing in debt
and one-third in equity. The
2008 year-end balance sheet

SEE page 7B

Harbour Breeze

Offered for sale and available for immediate occupancy, this 3 bedroom,
3 bath ground floor condo offers the best value on Paradise Island. Special
features include French doors and casement windows, dual zone air con-
ditioning system, tray ceilings and porcelain floor tiles. The superior qual-
ity of construction 1s visible throughout the 2800 SF of living
space/patios. Community amenities include a fitness center, spectacular
zero entry pool, underground parking, gated entrances and panoramic
harbour views. Offered by Mario Carey Realty for sale at $1,160,000 and
for rent at $7,000 per month. Web Listing #8325.

NA

MARIO CAREY REALTY

Dts about you... Let's talk.

Tel: 242-677-TALK (8255) | Fax: 242-677-8256 | Cell: 242-357-7013
info@mariocareyrealty.com | www.mariocareyrealty.com



claim the place to be a one-stop
shop.

“You go to Home Depot and
sometimes you can’t find what
you need,” he said.

The store is comfortably rem-
iniscent of the US hardware
giant popular with Bahamians,
as steel shelves that are a famil-
iar sight in all Home

Depot stores rise from the
concrete flooring. In fact, FYP’s
shelving was once part of a
Home Depot store.

The showroom for the hard-
ware section features tools man-
ufactured worldwide, with
sundry brands lining the wall
adjacent to what is the nut, bolt
and screw distribution counter.

The hardware section of FYP
opened its doors only last week,
three years after Mr Roberts

acquired the property, while the
Tile King is scheduled to open
in July. The Paint Centre has
been operating for one year.

A known philanthropist Mr
Roberts hopes to take his suc-
cess outside of the boundaries
of FYP’s gates to the surround-
ing community. His company is
well-known for its charity work,
having made building supply
donations to the people of
Inagua in the wake of last year’s
hurricane Ike and donating 14
new dialysis machines to Doc-
tor’s Hospital.

“We want to do more com-
munity service in the area,” said
Mr Roberts.

Now more expansions are on
the drawing table, and July’s
Grand Opening just around the
corner.

we

ColinaImperial.

Confidence For Life





Bank’s $20m offering
‘20% oversubscribed’

B By NEIL HARTNELL
Tribune Business Editor

BANK of the
Bahamas Inter- |
national’s $20 ee
million private
preference share |-
issue was “over-
subscribed by
about 20 per
cent”, the com-
pany’s place-
ment agent told
Tribune Busi-
ness, with the institution itself
saying the response represented
“a vote of confidence” in the
bank and its strategy.

Anthony Ferguson, CFAL’s
president, said: “It was $20 mil-
lion raised, and it was oversub-
scribed by about 20 per cent, I
believe.” That would imply that
subscriptions were received for
a total of around $24 million.

Mr Ferguson said all investors
who subscribed to the private
placement offering would be
accommodated, with CFAL and
Bank of the Bahamas Interna-
tional adopting a “bottom up”
approach. This means that all
investors would receive their
first tranche of $250,000 worth
of preference shares, the mini-
mum subscription requirement.
They would then work their

>
” Coe
=
ber
i

Ferguson

Kitchen company fits Bahamas first

m By CHESTER ROBARDS
Business Reporter
crobards@tribunemedia.net

CANADA-based
Downsview Kitchens has
launched its first showroom and
distribution centre outside of
North America at the Airport
Industrial Park in Western New
Providence, having picked up
an exclusive contract to do cus-
tom installations for the $1.4
billion Albany project just the
day before.

Gary Stannis,the company’s
design consultant, told Tribune
Business during the showroom
launch that the Albany devel-
Opers were impressed by the
model of their conservative-tyle
kitchen.

* Unveils first distribution centre outside
North America at Airport Industrial Park
* Lands contract with $1.4bn Albany project

“We’re excited about the
opportunity to work on the
[Albany] cottages,” he said. “It
should hopefully lead to more
and more.”

Mr Stannis said Downsview
was a high-end custom kitchen
cabinetry maker that has fur-
nished multi-million dolar
properties from Canada to
South America.

In the Bahamas, Downsview
had done jobs on properties in
Lyfrod Cay, the Ocean Club
Estates, Old Fort Bay and in
the Goodman’s Bay area.

Mr Stannis said some of those
jobs ranged in price from
$300,000 to $400,000, with the
most expensive installation on
the island costing around
$650,000.

Despite the name,
Downsview Kitchen also spe-
cializes in custom bathrooms
and entertainment centres.

Downsview is represented in
the Bahamas by Caribbean
Construction and Management
Service (CCMS), and has show-

SEE page 4B

medical emergencies

don't study economics

... they don't know the word “recession” either. That's why you
need to maintain your insurance coverage with Colinalmperial
even when the economy is weak — to make sure hard times don't
get harder just because you fall ill or fall down on your luck.

Stay confident. Stay connected,

confidence for life

i
,

FIRST AID

Tee ec ae



* Managing director says
placement’s success a ‘vote
of confidence’ in bank

way up via tranches of $250,000,
with those investors who sub-
scribed for the most receiving
the least in relation to the size of
their application.

Paul McWeeney, Bank of the
Bahamas International’s man-
aging director, told Tribune
Business that the $20 million
share offering closed “on
Wednesday or Thursday” last
week after it was oversub-
scribed.

“They’re working through the
allotments,” he added, of how
CFAL were allocating the
shares. “It’s a vote of confidence
in the bank, and it reflects the
fact that investors are looking
for attractive, safer types of
investment.

“We’re doing the closing and
issuing share certificates now.
The settlement account is with
the bank, and the funds are sub-
stantially in place.”

Mr McWeeney said Bahami-
an investors were currently
looking for safety, soundness

SEE page 8B



party and The Tr a e
responsible for errors and/or “omissi
from the daily report. stall

ColinaImperial.


THE TRIBUNE

MONDAY, MAY 11, 2009, PAGE 3B





Nassau/PI stopovers fall 15.9% in January

@ By NEIL HARTNELL
Tribune Business Editor

AJR stopover visitors to Nas-
sau/Paradise Island declined by
15.9 per cent during January
2009 year-over-year, highlight-
ing the full extent of the impact
that the global economic down-
turn has had on the highest
spending tourist category.

The Ministry of Tourism’s
Market Update for January this
year, which was obtained by
Tribune Business after being
released to the private sector
on Friday, revealed that Cat
Cay (a private island) and Bimi-
ni were the only two destina-
tions in the Bahamas to experi-
ence an increase in air arrivals
during January 2009.

The report confirmed earlier
revelations by Vincent Vander-
pool-Wallace, the minister of
tourism, in stating that air
arrivals for the Bahamas as a
whole for January 2009 declined
by 18.7 per cent to 89,999, com-
pared to 110,759 in 2008,. Nas-
sau/Paradise Island, which
attracts the lion’s share, saw vis-
itor numbers fall from 81,923 in
2008 to 68,880 this time around.

Faring worst were the Berry
Islands and Cat Island, which
saw year-over-year stopover
tourist declines of 56.2 per cent
and 53 per cent respectively.
Also faring worse than Nas-
sau/Paradise Island were Grand
Bahama, with a 25.8 per cent
drop; Abaco, with a 24.2 per
cent decline; Exuma, with a 37
per cent fall, and Eleuthera with
a 29.8 per cent drop-off.

While the Ministry of
Tourism made much of the fact
that the Bahamas enjoyed a
22.5 per cent increase in cruise
arrivals during January 2009,
raising total tourist arrivals by
10.2 per cent year-over-year,
this did little to compensate for
the drastic fall-off in revenues
experienced by hotels and all
land-based companies depen-
dent on the tourism industry.

For starters, when it comes
to per head spending, there is
no comparison. Stopover visi-
tors spend in the region of
$1100 per visit, cruise passen-
gers somewhere between $50-
$60 per head.

Pontificating on some of
these questions itself, the Min-
istry of Tourism said in its Mar-
ket Update: “The year 2009
gave birth to a brighter new day
with January. Visitor arrivals to
the Bahamas took a turn for the
better and were up by 10.2 per
cent.

“Air arrivals, which had been
strong in January 2008, were

weak in January 2009 (down
18.7 per cent) but cruise arrivals
to the Bahamas were very
strong (up 22.5 per cent) despite
the challenges now facing the
cruise industry.

“Cruise arrivals, which had
been weak in the early part of
2008, would now in 2009 be the
driving force behind the
increase in visitor arrivals. The
questions that would now be on
the minds of many people
would be: ‘How well would the
cruise arrivals to the destina-
tion be able to sustain and pre-
vent the falloff in total visitor
arrivals? And would the
Bahamas be able to sustain the
growth in cruise arrivals for any
length of time?’”

Elsewhere, anticipating a few
negative answers, the Ministry
of Tourism pointed out that



































eh Tee

boi Sherl

De Deo a Rei Td

France, Germany and the UK,
which respectively contributed 1
per cent, 1 per cent and 3 per
cent of the Bahamas’ total
stopover visitor business were
all now in economic recession.

And Canada, which was the
second largest supplier of
stopover visitors with an 8 per
cent market share, was also in
trouble. “Arrivals to the
Bahamas from Canada have
fallen off since the financial
meltdown in September 2008,
and by January 2009 they had
not yet recovered,” the Ministry
of Tourism warned.

Not surprisingly, this trans-
lated into a reduction in
stopover visitors from all major
markets during 2009, with the
exception of Europe, Latin
America and the Middle East.

On the cruise front, while

A

STERLING

«PERSUASIVE
* PERSISTENT
* PROFESSIONAL

ieee eee mei

CPA/ CERTIFIED PUBLIC ACCOUNTANT

eh Description:

Apoly princicdes of accounting to analyze financial information and prepare financial reports by

compiling infirmalion, preparing prolit and kes statements, and utilizing appropriate accounting,
control procedures.

Primary Hesponsibiliises
|, Prepare pent and loss strtements and monthly chosing and cost acoounting reports.

2. Compile and analyze financial information to prepare emines io accounts, such a8 general ledger
ACCOUNT, and docanecnt business transactions.
3, Establish, maintain, ond coordinate the implementation of acoqanting and accounting coetrol

procedures.

4. Analyze and review budgets and expenditures for contracts

5. Manitor and riwiew accounting and related system reports lor accuracy and completeness.
6. Prepare and review budget, revenue, expense, payroll entries, invoices, and other accounting

documents,

J. Analyae revenue and expendibere trends and recommend appropriate budget levels, and ensure
expenditure contral,
K. Explain hilling invoices and accounting policies in stalf, vendors and clients.
4, Resolve accounting discrepancies,
10. Recommend, develop and mamtain financial data bases, computer software systems and manual

filing aysbertes.

11. Supervise the input and handling of financial data and reports for the company’s automated

firancaal systems.

12. Interact with aadivors im completing audits if mecessary.
13. Other duties as assigned.

Additional Responsibilitics
|. Develop the annual operating budget and coma: with departmental managementon the fiscal
xepects of program planning, salary recommendations, and other administrative actions,

2. Prowide accounting policy orientation for new stalf,

Skills Required::

Keowlodec of finance, accounting, budgeting, and cost control principles inchading Generally Accepted

Accounting Principles. Knowledge of financial and acocunting software applications,
Cenckbouks and Mirces solkware brcwledge a plus.

Employment Type: Full Time

Yearly Salary: Unegecified

Level of Education; College
Vears of Work 3405 Years
Experience:

Edwcution & Experience

Contect Infermadion

Nassau/Paradise Island did see a
22.2 per cent increase in these
visitors from 130,312 to 159,197
during January 2009, the scale
of that increase was matched —
or even dwarfed — by cruise line
use of their private islands.
The Berry Islands, where
Coco Cay is situated, experi-
enced a 54 per cent increase in
cruise arrivals during January
2009, with Half Moon Cay
enjoying a 22.8 per cent growth.
While all cruise lines

“brought in significantly more
passengers in January 2009
compared to January 2008”, the


























Market Update added: “The
Out Islands were up 29 per cent
(first port of entry) in January
2009 because many of the major
cruise lines brought in more
passengers than during the
same period of 2008.

“Disney Cruise’s Disney
Wonder brought in more pas-
sengers to Castaway Cay, Aba-
co, in January 2009 than in the
same period of 2008. In Janu-
ary 2009, Royal Caribbean
International’s Mariner of the
Seas, Monarch of the Seas, and
Navigator of the Seas all
brought in more passengers to

Coco Cay (Berry Islands,
Bahamas) as a first port of call
than in the same period of
2008.

“In addition, Norwegian
Cruise line’s Norwegian Dawn,
Norwegian Majesty, and Nor-
wegian Pearl all brought in
more passengers as a first port
of call into Great Stirrup Cay
(Berry Islands, Bahamas) than
in the same period of 2008.
Holland American Cruises
brought in more passengers to
Half Moon Cay as a first port of
call in January 2009 than in the
same period of 2008.”

Are youa

mature learner
who wants an

upgrade?

Are you seeking

personal

development?

The College of The Bahamas
Centre for Continuing Education and
Extension Services (CEES)
is offering these Summer 2009 Computer Courses

for 50+ learners and retirees:-

Keyboarding - 5 weeks ($200)

Introduction to Microsoft Word - 4 weeks ($200)
Introduction to the Internet - 2 days ($155)

CLASSES BEGIN May 4th, 6th and 7th

All fees are included with the exception of a one time application fee of $40. CEES reserves the right

to change tuition, fees, content, course schedule and course materials.

Phone: 325-5714; 328-0093; 328-1936;
302-4300 ext. 5202 or email: acurry@cob.edu.bs





Only $69"



Vacation in Paradise.

per person double occupancy.

Minimum 2-night stay. Bahamas residents only.

J A a)

ab

Bo _—" 4) ue

Le we tea |

ae a
ee ~
i J

opt
? —
. Sid ja

Full use of all Atlantis facilities. Plus:
+ Complimentary continental breakfast datly
¢ Junwor Suites with King-size or two double beds
+ Cable TV, refrigerator, in-room safe,
coffee maker, hair dryer

«Kids 15 and under, jree

Company: King’s Ricalty ° Pool with swim-up har

Coatact Mame: Lillith Bostwick

Coatact Phone: 242-99444997

Limited-time offer! Reserve today /
Call 242-363-3680

*$69 per person double occupancy per night Sun. - Wed. Add $20 pp for Thurs. - Sat. Maximum
four persons per room. Rates effective through December 15. Additional fees apply for mandatory
taxes, mandatory housekeeping gratuities and utility service fees. Rates quoted are based on
standard room category and are subject to availability. Cancellations must be received 48 hours
prior to arrival or a one night penalty will apply.

Coatact Fax: 243-304-4492

Coatact E-mail:

linthkingsrealty com ! bakamssiikingsrcalty. com



Preferred Method
af Contact:

E-mail






PAGE 4B, MONDAY, MAY 11, 2009

THE TRIBUNE



>) =<;\;
GM bankruptcy almost inevitable, experts say

mg By TOM KRISHER
AP Auto Writer

DETROIT (AP) — For Gen-
eral Motors Corp., the task at
hand is so difficult that experts
say a Chapter 11 bankruptcy fil-
ing is all but inevitable.

To remake itself outside of
court, GM must persuade bond-
holders to swap $27 billion in
debt for 10 percent of its risky
stock. On top of that, the
automaker must work out deals
with its union, announce factory
closures, cut or sell brands and
force hundreds of dealers out of
business — all in three weeks.

"T just don't see how it's pos-
sible, given all of the pieces,”

said Stephen J. Lubben, a pro-
fessor at Seton Hall University
School of Law who specializes in
bankruptcy.

In Ohio, the automaker
employs thousands at a number
of plants, including a major
assembly complex in Lordstown,
near Youngstown.

GM, which has received $15.4
billion in federal aid, faces a
June 1 government deadline to
complete its restructuring plan.
If it can't finish in time, the com-
pany will follow Detroit com-
petitor Chrysler LLC into bank-
ruptcy protection.

Although company executives
said last week they would still
prefer to restructure out of

WHY PAY MORE?

Round Trip Airfare

$79.99

Nassau — Mangrove Cay
Nassau — Congo Town
Nassau — Fresh Creek

Roeewicthore, Apipdp

For ticket sales and travel information contac!
Performance Air at 262-1008 / 362. 2202.

or
WW, POTTOrmaAnce-alrcom



License # AGG PRLA-TaH

court, experts say all GM is
doing now is lining up majori-
ties of stakeholders to make its
court-supervised reorganization
move more quickly.

"If we need to pursue bank-
ruptcy, we will make sure that
we do it in an expeditious fash-
ion. The exact strategies I'm not
getting into today, but we'll be
ready to go if that's required,”
Chief Executive Fritz Hender-
son said last week.

The threat of bankruptcy,
however, may be just a negoti-
ating ploy to pull reluctant bond-
holders into the equity swap
deal. In Chrysler's case, some
secured debtholders resisted tak-
ing roughly 30 cents on the dol-
lar for what they were owed, but
most gave in after they were
identified in court documents.

Henderson, who took over in
March when the government
ousted Rick Wagoner, said last
week there's still time to get
everything done by the dead-
line, although he conceded it will
be difficult to meet a govern-
ment requirement that 90 per-
cent of its thousands of bond-
holders agree to the stock swap.

The biggest obstacle to GM
restructuring out of court
appears to be its bondholders,
who have been reluctant to sign
on to the stock swap when the

government and United Auto
Workers union would get far
more stock in exchange for debts
owed by GM.

GM has proposed issuing 62
billion new shares, 100 times
more than the 611 million now
offered publicly.

Even though the U.S. govern-
ment has agreed to back up GM
and Chrysler new-car warranties,
potential car buyers already view
GM as if it's in bankruptcy,
reflected by the company’s steep
revenue drop in the latest quar-
ter, Lubben said. On Thursday,
GM posted a $6 billion first-
quarter loss and said its revenue
dropped plunged by nearly half,
largely because bankruptcy fears
scared customers away from
showrooms.

"T don't think anyone is buy-
ing cars from a company who is
wringing their hands about a
potential bankruptcy for the past
year or so," he said.

Under Chapter 11, a company
can stay in operation under
court protection while sheds
debts and unprofitable assets to
emerge in a stronger financial
position.

At this point, GM needs to
resolve the uncertainty and get
in and out of bankruptcy as
quickly as possible, Lubben said.

The company is talking with

Kitchen company
fits Bahamas first

FROM page 1B

rooms in Dania Beach, Florida,
at the exclusive Design Centre
of the Americas, and in Juno
Beach, Florida.

“The local showroom has

Bahamas Red Cross Society

Job Openings

The Bahamas Red Cross Society has immediate openings for the

position of:
Welfare Officer
Cook

Duties:

Welfare Officer:

1. Coordination of the Welfare Department to include the supervision of
staff and monitoring of donations of a non-financial nature.

Overall responsibility for the management of the Meals-on-Wheels

Programme.

3. Act as a liaison officer with the Family Island Centers and group

leaders.

Competencies:

The successful candidate should possess a high degree of competence

in teamwork.

Commitment to the Fundamental Principles of the International
Federation of the International Red Cross and Red Crescent Societies

required.

Integrity and aaert ss conduct; sensitivity to diversity, flexibility

and adaptabill

ty; should also have a high degree of competence in

Management of strategy, change, leadership, planning, budgets,

resources.

Able to monitor and supervise team with regards to reporting;
communication; networking. Skills in management of self and others a

must.

oo

. Preparation of nutritionally balanced meals daily for approximately

one hundred

ersons.

Ensuring working inventory is always at an acceptable level.

ae kitchen is sanitary and surroundin
lance with Ministry of Health’s standards by overseeing the

in comp

areas are clean and

operation, cleaning and maintenance of food services equipment and
facilities, managing food safety, and practicing workplace health and

safety procedures.

Competencies:

Minimum of two — three years experience in the preparation of large

been getting a good response,”
said Mr Stannis.

Downsview has several other
showrooms throughout North,
South and Central America, but
all of its manufacturing is done
at its 600,000 square foot facili-
ty in Toronto, Canada.

Manager

Alexander Reed, CCMS’
executive manager,said the
partnership with Downsview
Kitchens had brought “one of
the most successful high end
production companies to the
Bahamas”.

l=) mal =

a wal

the UAW and Canadian auto
workers unions about conces-
sions, including getting the
UAW to take roughly 39 per-
cent of its stock in exchange for
half of the $20 billion GM must
pay into a union-run trust that
will take over retiree health care
payments next year.

About 50 percent of the stock
would go to the government for
its loans. GM said last week it
would need another $2.6 billion
in May and $9 billion more for
the rest of the year, bringing the
total to $27 billion.

One percent would go to cur-
rent shareholders, with bond-
holders getting the other 10 per-
cent.

Bondholders are reluctant to
take the deal because the gov-
ernment and UAW are getting
far bigger stakes in the company,
said Kevin Tynan, an industry
analyst for Argus Research in
New York.

"When you look across at
what the union is getting and
what the government is getting,
to expect them to take 10 per-
cent is just unrealistic,” he said.

Cutting dealers also remains a
huge hurdle, with GM hoping
to shed 2,600 of its 6,246 dealer-
ships by 2010.

But dealers are protected by
state franchise laws, and trying

to shed them outside of bank-
ruptcy would result in either mil-
lions of dollars in payments or
multiple lengthy lawsuits,
Lubben said.

"That means you've got to
negotiate with each one of those
dealers individually."

Also, GM on Friday told its
major parts suppliers that it
would move up payments due
on June 2 to May 28.

Company spokesman Dan
Flores said it was being done to
help the suppliers at a critical
time, but he denied that the pay-
ments were pulled ahead of a
potential June 1 bankruptcy fil-
ing.

GM has begun to temporarily
close 13 assembly plants for up
to 11 weeks through mid-July in
an effort to control inventory.
With Chrysler plants also shut
down during its bankruptcy pro-
ceedings, parts suppliers will
soon have no income and could
go under.

It would help speed up GM's
stay in bankruptcy court if it
could pull together big blocks
of stakeholders to agree on
reducing debt or changing other
stakes, said Robert Gordon,
head of the corporate restruc-
turing and bankruptcy group at
the Clark Hill PLC law firm in
Detroit.

ENERGY SAVING

en aaiiinene
Cut Your Electic

c Bild

Up To 40%

* Tankless Water co
* Compact Fluorescent Bulbs
* Energy Saving Capacitors for
Motors, A/C, Pumps etc.
® Fridgi-tech oil additive to increase A/C

efficiency

For more information or survey

Email: energysavingsconsultants @hotmail.com

Contact 326-6121

1 aT@ stich 4

CeCe

Montrose Avenue



all summer!

selected Innovair Ductless
Air Conditioners!

quantities of food an asset.

High degree of personal hygiene a must. Applicants must be dedicated
and committed to providing tasty, nutritious meals. Must be reliable,
adaptable to fast-paced activities, able to plan and organize their tasks
and those of their support staff, and be strong team players.

Remuneration:
Salary commensurate with qualification and experience

Interested persons should forward their resumé with cover letter to:

The Director General
Bahamas Red Cross
P.O. Box N-8331
Nassau, Bahamas
Or
redcross@bahamas.net.bs

All applications should be submitted by May 15, 2009



—

Offer only good while supplies last!

Master Cra itd

od ee ee ee

Village Rd., Open Mon. thru Sat. 8:30am 'til 5:30pm
eee R EO eee a dy mit hi tec ae sles leh aelis


THE TRIBUNE

MONDAY, MAY 11, 2009, PAGE 5B





Cable reveals its
34.5% profit rise

@ By NEIL HARTNELL
Tribune Business Editor

CABLE Bahamas has given
further encouragement to
potential investors in its $40 mil-
lion preference share issue by
unveiling a 34.5 per net income
increase to $7.452 million for
the 2009 first quarter, although
the share issue was still awaiting
Central Bank of the Bahamas
approval as of Friday’s press
deadline.

For the three months to
March 31, 2009, the BISX-listed
company said top line revenues
increased by 5.2 per cent year-
over-year to $21.087 million,
compared to $20.042 million
year-over-year.

It added that cable TV rev-
enues realized $11.2 million in
revenues, the Coralwave Inter-
net business $6.5 million, and
its data and web hosting busi-
ness, another $3.3 million. As a

nications in the $80 million buy-
out. However, a lot can happen
to share prices over two years,
and it is only when the conver-
sion day arrives that preference
share investors wishing to con-
vert will be able to tell whether
they have a good conversion
price or not.

If they choose not to convert,
investors will regain all their
principal by the time the pref-
erence share issue matures 10
years from its closing date.
Those who stick with this invest-
ment tool will start receiving
their principal back on the sixth
anniversary of closing, with the
full sum paid back in five equal
annual instalments.

According to the offering
term sheet, preference share
investors will have an 8 per cent

interest rate of return on their
investment. Dividends, it added,
are due to be paid semi-annu-
ally on June 30 and December
31 of each year, with the first
payment coming on the latter
date in 2009.

Cable Bahamas is also unable
to redeem the preference shares
until after the second date of
the issue’s closing. The $13.43
per share price that Columbus
Communications, an entity
owned by Barbados-based
Columbus Communications Inc,
will receive represents an 11.5
per cent premium to the $12.04
that Cable Bahamas’ stock
closed at on BISX last night.

The purchase price for
Columbus Communications’
5,954,600 shares has decreased
by 6 per cent compared to the

$14.28 per share initially con-
templated by the parties pre-
Christmas, after Tribune Busi-
ness had exclusively revealed
details of the proposed buyout.

Back then, the purchase price
represented just a 1 per cent
premium to the then-prevailing
market price, as opposed to the
11.5 per cent now. Still, back
then Columbus Communica-
tions’ stake was valued at
$85.174 million, and now it is
some $5 million less at $80 mil-
lion. The company then was val-
ued in total at $282.035 million,
and now that figure is $264.9
million.

Visit our website at www.cob.edu.bs

Job vacancies:

CAMPUS NURSE COUNSELLOR
FINANCIAL CONTROLLER
FINANCIAL ANALYST

Further details can be found at the College of The
Bahamas website, www.cob.edu.bs

Interested applicants should submit:

Completed Application with supplemental documentation
requested attached

(inclusive of passport photo)

Cover letter of interest

Current Resume’

This package should be forwarded to the following address
by Monday, April 20, 2009:

The Director

Human Resources Department
The College of The Bahamas
Oakes Field Campus

P.O. Box N-4912

Nassau, Bahamas OR hrapply@cob.edu.bs



THE COLLEGE OF THE BAHAMAS

Visit our website af wew.cob.edu.bs

PlusGroup

of Companies

3 Prime Locations

ACU Teee VTE sem ol (eels

INTERNATION Al
LAN GUAGES
aes ates

INS T

COURSE OFFERING: Be

result, the company’s revenue
mix, while still dominated by
cable TV at 53.3 per cent, now
includes a 31 per cent contribu-
tion from broadband Internet
and 15.7 from the data business.

Operating expenses remained
almost flat at $9.863 million,
compared to $9.759 million for
they year before period, while
operating income reached
$11.224 million — an increase of
almost $1 million or 9.2 per cent
year-over-year.

Earnings per share grew by
34.9 per cent to $0.38 per share,
as opposed to $0.28 per share
the year before. Cable
Bahamas’ Board of Directors
also approved an increase in
ordinary share dividends from
an annualised rate of $0.24 per
share to $0.28 per share, a 16.7
per cent increase.

Meanwhile, Tribune Business
understands that the major
approval Cable Bahamas and
its advisers, RoyalFidelity Cap-
ital Markets, were waiting on
for the $40 million preference
share offering late Friday after-
noon was exchange control per-
mission from the Central Bank.

It is unclear whether it was
received, but is required
because it is proposed that $20
million, or 50 per cent of the
issue, be financed in US dollars.
If approvals was received before
end of business on Friday, the
preference share issue will be
launched today.

The preference share issue,
which is being targeted at select
institutional and high net worth
individuals, meaning members
of the public should not apply to
become involved, is priced at
$10 per share.

The minimum subscription,
according to the term sheet, is
5,000 shares or $50,000, with the
proceeds set to join some $90
million in bank financing to help
fund the buyout of the 30.2 per
cent stake held by controlling
shareholder, Columbus Com-
munications.

The proceeds from the $40
million issue, and the $90 mil-
lion syndicated credit facility
from Royal Bank of Canada,
FirstCaribbean International
Bank (Bahamas) and Scotia-
bank, will also be used to refi-
nance Cable Bahamas’ existing
debt and credit facilities, plus
pay transaction costs and fund
working capital.

As previously revealed by
Tribune Business, preference
share investors will have the
option to convert their invest-
ment into Cable Bahamas ordi-
nary shares (equity) some two
years after the $40 million issue
closes.

The conversion price will be
the $13.43 per share transaction
price that Columbus Commu-
nications is receiving from the
company in return for selling
its stake. Effectively, one pref-
erence share - priced at $10 -
would be equivalent to 0.7433
ordinary shares, based on those
prices.

This means that, at current
market prices, investors in
Cable Bahamas’ preference
share issue will effectively be
paying the same 11.5 per cent
premium that the company is
paying to Columbus Commu-

INSIGHT

For the stories

Heal Estate Division

See) eal ad

Mackey Street
12,300 sq. ft.

‘18th, 2009

CONVERSATIONAL HAITIAN CREOLE I & Il
CONVERSATIONAL FRENCH I
CONVERSATIONAL SPANISH I & II
ENGLISH AS A SECOND LANGUAGE I
CONVERSATIONAL MANDARIN [& UH
SURVIVAL MANDARIN FOR BUSINESS -

PRICE: § 230.00 per course

Retail ce 2 4,050 sq, ft
1x 4,200 sq. it.

2x 6,000 sq. ft. LOCATION: Munnings Blig

ext to KPC across from main
CHT PMNS
2-week intensive; $500 per student

12,000 sq. ft. Warehouse ......

« Town Centre Mall

East West Highway a Blue Hill Road

3,718 59. ft 1x 1,1185q, ft.
1x 1,200 sq. it.
1x 1,400 sq. ft.

PLEASE CALL US TO CONFIRM DAYS AND TIMES FOR THE COURSES

J PHONE: 302-4584 or 302-4587 E-MAIL: ileif@)eob.ecu. bs

REQUEST FOR PROPOSAL

1x 10,000 59, ft

« Seagrapes Shopping Centre

Prince Charles Drive
9.563 99. ft

STUDENT-ATHLETE INSURANCE
COVERAGE

The College of The Bahamas is seeking competitive proposals from suitably qualified health and
medical insirance companies to create a package that 1s tailored to the needs of student-athketes
who are engaged in games, practices, or designated athletic team activities locally ane
inbermaticwnal by

2x 1,061 sq. ft
1x 1,591 sq. ft
1x 1,750 50, #t
1x 1,790 sq. it.
1x 2310sq. ft

eye lesm Ml Oe em ECL
Tel: (242) 427 0106
PW EMG nie aa Ste eee

Companies with specific experience in dealing with tertiary level educational Ietitutians are
especially welcome

Proposal should inclide, rate and coversge quotalions: sample pics; company protile; company
philosophy and how it approaches health care for students ancl most recent financial statements.

Proposals must be submitted ne later than Friday, May 15°" at Sp...

For more information, log onto www.cob.edulbs or contact:

Ms. Cheryl Sims OR
WP, Firamce
csinmaacrh cau bs

Mrs Kimberley Rolle
Director, Athbeties

Tal _ krollefaioob edu. hs
Rakers Miap

EMPLOYMENT OPPORTUNITY

You are invited to apply for the following position
currently available.

The Callege mf The Baharcas
SORTS & WELLNESS INSTITUTE

WELLNESS APPLICATION FORM

PUN RUB WALK - Sunurday May 24rd, 2009

Assistant Marketing Manager

Fimet Samer

Key Requirements

* A demonstrated track record of sales to high net Age MALE| | FEMALE| |

worth clients

Emergeacy Contact “ane Telepiome

* Extensive experience maintaining strong long term

customer relationships with significant add-on/repeat Category:

business (A) RUNNER
* Astrong existing network with high net worth clients in
the U.S.A. , Europe and The Bahamas

* Ability to develop and implement marketing

Jamdunmier| | Sn-50[ | Sl |

(Bj) WALKER

5S metal under 36-50. |] 51m [ |

campaigns to high net worth clients
T-Shirt Sive: Chikd) fa [IL ’ Mi |x | [XX | | XXXL
Qualifications

* Bachelor’s degree in Sales, Marketing or related Entire Fee: SUDO (%: XL | SLZAM (XXL or larper)
3 7 ag A helrver te: A'ellness Canine, Onkes Field Cz ee

subject; professional certifications ' ra “<1 °° seal A
* Minimum five (5) years experience in high net worth

. PUN RUN WALK START TIME: fof0uoum.
real estate promotions
* Must be proficient in C2C software, ACT, Power

Point, Microsoft Word, Excel and Asset Manager

ROUTES S:an atthe Portia Smith Building on Poinciana Drive: revel cast onto Wolff Road; nonh ono Collins Avenue:
meet onto Shirley Steet; nerih onin Cemberiind Sineet: weet onto West Tey Street; south onion Niece Street; eet oni
tia Smith Building.

Poiteioaa Drive aid hack oo the Pa
* Must be innovative, demonstrate strong leadership

DISCLAMIPER: 0 dectere ond affirms ches | am phavcizalis dt to pardsipat in The Cefiege of The Ushamas Sporn & Welles Incl itune’s Fan
Ben Via aed have Gon bree ody eel there be od medical pretiteer. The anderegeed accep aed eecdireteech that seaher The C elege ef The Marna
wr aes enbds ef The 0 efirge of Phe Bafsorna eaeerds, The byperis & Veils berideie, arenes recymmed bility or any injaries raseerd ierieali eg deal thal ey

and customer relations skills
* Must have excellent written and verbal

arte vhiky pertiripaiieg im thy Foe Moe The periirqeei.on bebe ef the peréripasi’s brit peal oeewier, waives ibe righi ie sey eee) rebewer wll kevers
ore dame ges thei mee erie oe che perc ipa et. |, te pecticipens oeeae one acrepd aes ree thal mee be ie eed ie the Poo Hee alk

communication skills

The successful candidate will have the opportunity to work
in a growing and dynamic organization and must be a self-
starter, team player, work at the highest standards of
performance, and meet deadlines. If you are progressive
and prepared to advance your career, submit your resume
to the attention of:The Director of HR & Training, hr@
bakersbayclub.com or by fax at 242-367-0613

Deadline for Application/resume is May 18th, 2009

Sepratir Parc (1 ender the age of 1X years old)

Spomsnredl hy: a The dAlbenas Agency Ltd. ;

MINISTRY OF HEALTH

behind the news,
read Insight
on Mondays

LREAT PRIZES!


PAGE 6B, MONDAY, MAY 11, 2009

BEAUMONT HOUSE

NASSAU, BAHAMAS

LEASING
OPPORTUNITY

For Infannation, contact

W. Lory Roberts
T: 242.396.0026
roberts] bahomasealfy.bs

Donald Marinborough
1; 242,.376,0028
drartinborough bahar tyes

RENTABLE AREA: 14.710 - 16,287 SF (Divisible)

PREMISES: First, Second & Third Floors
Bohoarmoas Realty Undted
PO). Box Ne] 132
Massou, Bohomas

AVAILABILITY: 90 Days
TERM: 3- 5 Years
we bohomascommercia.com RENT: $18 per SF per annum

a CAM: $11.11 per SF oer annum

* Locoted on Boy Street

* Stote-of-the-ort Telecommunications System

« Full service standby generator

« Two Elevators

® Central Air-conditioning

® [impact resistant windows & doors
* Underground Parking

REALTY um

SECURITIES COMMISSION OF THE BAHAMAS
PUBLIC NOTICE

No. 3 of 2009 11" May 2009

Re: Gulf International Investment Group

This NOTICE is issued by the Securities Commission of The
Bahamas (“the Commission”) pursuant to Section 4(2) of the
Securities Industry Act, 1999 (“the Act’).

It has been brought to the attention of the Commission that the
above named company may be carrying out activities that are
registrable under the Acct.

The general public is HEREBY ADVISED that neither Gulf
International Investment Group, its agents nor its consultants
are registrants of the Securities Commission nor have they
made application for registration with the Commission.
Therefore, any activity by this company, its agents or consultants
in conducting registrable activity in or from this jurisdiction is a
violation of the Act. Further, if this company in any way holds
itself out as fully compliant and bona fide persons operating in
the securities industry from this jurisdiction, ithas committed an
offence and is liable for criminal prosecution and/or regulatory
sanctions under the relevant laws of The Bahamas.

Background

Gulf International Investment Group appears to be a
company engaged in providing investment advice and
services to the public. The company is holding itself out as
being located at Charlotte House, Shirley & Charlotte Streets,
Nassau, Bahamas. The Commission has not been able to
locate a company at Charlotte House by that name. However,
the Commission has received information that in November of
2007, the company was holding itself out as duly registered in
this jurisdiction.

Persons desirous of conducting business with Gulf
International Investment Group, its agents, or its
consultants, should be cognizant that they are doing
so with an unregulated entity and individuals. You are
therefore strongly urged to conduct full and proper
due diligence and exercise the utmost caution before
engaging in transactions with the above named company,
its agents or its consultants.

Any persons who are already involved in transactions with
the above named company, its agents or its consultants and
are concerned about these transactions should contact Ms.
Mechelle Martinborough, Secretary & Legal Counsel at the
Securities Commission of The Bahamas at telephone number
356-6291/2 or in writing to P.O. Box N-8347, Nassau, The
Bahamas or via e-mail: info@scb.gov.bs



THE TRIBUNE



as ae
Reborn Fiat shakes up Italian stereotype

m By COLLEEN BARRY
AP Business Writer

MILAN (AP) — Ina perfect
world, so the joke goes, the
Germans are the mechanics, the
Swiss are the timekeepers and
the Italians are the lovers.

With Fiat snapping up a 20
percent stake in Chrysler LLC
and bidding for General Motor
Corp.'s European car-making
business, it seems the Italian
will now be the guy who makes
the cars.

Italian Premier Silvio Berlus-
coni says Fiat's dealmaking is
"a dream ... for all Italians.” But
few Americans have given Fiat
much thought since at least the
1980s, when the Italian
automaker last did business in
North America before pulling
up stakes and returning to Italy,
reputation for quality in tatters,
the brunt of another old joke
that Fiat stood for Fix It Again,
Tony.

In his past five years as CEO,
56-year-old Sergio Marchionne
has engineered a stunning
comeback for Fiat. The year
after taking over, he posted
Fiat's first net profit in five
years, streamlined manage-
ment, burnished the Fiat brand
with the award-winning update
of the much-loved Fiat 500 and
entered a series of strategic
alliances to share costs and
enter new markets. He will also
head Chrysler when it emerges
from bankruptcy.

Analysts warn, however, that
the sexy, appealing 500 —
Cinquecento in Italian and
"Luigi" in the cartoon movie
"Cars" — won't be enough to
get Chrysler back on its feet
even if it captures the hearts of
America’s city drivers. And
more than one international
hookup has gone sour on cul-

tural differences, as the failed
marriage of Germany's Daimler
and Chrysler testifies.

"T think the proof is in the
pudding,” said Howard Wheel-
don, a senior strategist at BGC
Partners. "Americans have no
idea who Marchionne is. .. The
first thing Marchionne and his
team need to do is to command
respect that is going to be diffi-
cult. It has been doing a lot bet-
ter in recent times, but Fiat's
history is awful."

Look no further than Fiat's
20-year presence in the U.S.
The costs of handling warranty
repairs to Fiat's Strada, a mid-
size four-door sedan launched
in 1974, wiped out any profits
on its sale, a Fiat executive con-
fided to Giuseppe Volpato, who
has written three books on Fiat.

There were successes, like the
Fiat 124 Spider, a convertible
two-seater that sold well for
over a decade but remained a
niche product.

Inauspiciously, Fiat stopped
exporting even profitable cars
to the U.S. in the early 1980s.
The reasons: It lacked the deal-
er network to properly service
its cars, it was having trouble
meeting environmental stan-
dards and sales were slipping
under pressure to Japanese
competition, said Volpato, a
professor at the Ca’ Foscari
University of Venice.

Returning to America con-
fronts Marchionne with one of
the world’s toughest and most
varied markets.

A citizen of Italy and Cana-
da, Marchionne has focused on
bringing out the best of Fiat's
Italian DNA, that sense of style
that made the original Cinque-
cento a raging success.

But even in Marchionne's
world, the Germans are still the
mechanics. His chief technology

OFFICE SPACE AVAILABLE
FOR RENT

3 Medical or dental office spaces in the

Cable Beach Area from July 2009

For further details please contact 376-7777
Xi AW (c1c) am NaTe Male UL eme) |
10a.m. - 5p.m. Monday to Friday



Colina Imperial

officer is Harald Wester, who
came from Volkswagen.

"Everything behind the prod-
uct — engineering, manufac-
turing and quality — is man-
aged by leaders who have been
trained for the most part by our
German competitors. They
have the right level of discipline
and rigor to properly run the
hard factors in this industry,”
Marchionne told Automotive
News Europe in a 2005 inter-
view.

Marchionne also has made
Fiat one of the most environ-
mentally fit automakers — one
of the qualities that won the
attention of U.S. President
Barack Obama, whose auto
task force underlined the
importance of Fiat's clean
small-car technology to
Chrysler's SUV- and minivan-
heavy lineup.

But transnational alliances
have often failed. "Cultural dif-
ferences can never be underes-
timated," Wheeldon said, men-
tioning such unhappy partner-
ships as Daimler-Chrysler and
BMW with Britain's Rover.

Marchionne was born in cen-
tral Italy, raised in Canada from
age 14 and educated there,
returning in his early 40s to
Europe where he secured his
reputation as a turnaround
expert in Switzerland. Many
hope that this intercontinental
background can help bridge the
differences.

"Marchionne has virtues of
being Italian in his head but
reared in the world, and the
challenge is for Fiat to repeat
this model,” Giacomo Vaciago,
a political economist at Milan's
Catholic University, said recent-
ly on il Sole 24 Ore radio.

Fiat's well-remembered fail-
ures aside, Italy boasts high-
quality engineering in autos,
including Ferrari and Maserati,
both owned by Fiat, and Lam-
borghini, owned by Volkswa-
gen, as well as such design firms
as Pininfarina, known primarily
for its Ferrari and Alfa Romeo
designs.

As Italy's biggest industrial
concern, Fiat's ambitions to
spread into the Americas and
redraw the global auto map is a
source of great national pride.
Italians have a hard time seeing
themselves — and certainly
their Fiat 500 — as anyone's
saviour.

The following individuals are asked to contact Mrs. Kimley Saunders

(396-2047) or Ms. Kayshonta Smith

Insurance Ltd:

Princess Butler
P.O. Box ES-6069
Nassau, Bahamas

Brendilee Rolle
P.O. Box 7290
Pine Barron Road
Nassau, Bahamas

Tamika Williams
P.O. Box F 42299

Freeport, Bahamas

Tiffany Rolle
P.O. Box GT 2395
Nassau, Bahamas

Tanya Rolle
P.O. Box GT 2395
Nassau, Bahamas

Bridgette Hog
P.O. Box GT 2395
Nassau, Bahamas

(396-2031) at Colinalmperial

Eddison Paul Sweeting Jr.
Nassau Bahamas

Michelle Sweeting
Nassau Bahamas

Christon Mackey
Nassau, Bahamas

Terasean Sweeting
P.O. Box CR 56708

Sunset Park

Nassau, Bahamas

Kemuel Delancey
P.O. Box CR 56708

Sunset Park

Nassau, Bahamas

Terry Sweeting

P.O. Box CR 56708

Sunset Park

Nassau, Bahamas

Theresa Deleveaux
P.O. Box N 732
Nassau, Bahamas

Albert Smith
P.O. Box SS-6104
Nassau, Bahamas

Granville Neville Williams
485 Inagua Avenue,
Freeport, Grand Bahama

Ms. Alquennia Rolle-Cunningham
General Delivery
Moore's Island, Abaco

Charlissa C.D. Poitier
P.O. Box N-978
Nassau Bahamas

James Wallace
Nassau, Bahamas

Stafford Bullard
P.O. Box N 3730
Nassau, Bahamas

Larado D. Evans
P.O. Box N 3730
Nassau, Bahamas

Francis Roberts
P.O. Box $$5175
Nassau, Bahamas

Mr. Godfrey Roberts
Freeport, Grand Bahama


THE TRIBUNE

MONDAY, MAY 11, 2009, PAGE 7B



BFSB announces

Freeport hotel

FOOM Fevenues

(lecline eleven
per cent

@ By NEIL HARTNELL
Tribune Business Editor

FREEPORT hotels saw their
room revenues decline by 11
per cent year-over-year for
2008, a Ministry of Tourism
report has revealed, as
increased average daily room
rates (ADRs) were unable to
compensate for hotel occupan-
cy declines.

The Ministry’s Hotel Occu-
pancy 2008 report found that
resorts in Freeport’s Lucaya
area (chiefly the Our Lucaya)
were unable to charge higher
ADRs than in 2007, resulting
in a 20.2 per cent hotel room
revenue reduction.

In a summary of the report’s
main findings, the Ministry of
Tourism said: “In 2008, the
hotels in West End, Grand
Bahama, had lower occupancy
levels, lower ADRs and hence
lower hotel room revenues than
in 2007.

“Tn 2008, the combined hotel
properties in the Out Islands
had lower hotel occupancy lev-
els than in 2007. They did
charge higher ADRs but were
still unable to generate more
hotel room revenue than in
2007.”

As for other findings, the
Ministry of Tourism report
found that the all-inclusive
resorts on Cable Beach in New
Providence, namely Sandals
Royal Bahamian and Super-
Clubs Breezes, fared better than
their Paradise Island-based
counterparts when it came to
hotel occupancy and room rate
levels in 2008.

Tax Review

THE Bahamas Financial Ser-
vices Board (BFSB) will hold
its “Tax Review: Part IT forum
on Friday, May 15, at the British
Colonial Hilton Hotel. Chair-
man Craig Tony Gomez says
the BFSB will roll out this next
step to progress industry dia-
logue on the role information
and tax plays in the financial
services industry.

Structured as a workshop, the
May 15 event will allow partic-
ipants to engage in a dialogue
about the evolving landscape
for financial services. Workshop
session topics will include The
Fiscal Environment and Its
Impact on Conducting Business
as well as a Review of Suitable
Arrangements to meet the
OECD Tax Standard.

Presenters Andy Todd, lead
tax partner of Deloitte London;

Sara Lee: Fiscal
Q3 profit falls
22 per cent

SARA LEE poultry products rest
on the counter of a butcher shop
Monday, May 4, 2009, in Chicago
Ridge, Ill. Food maker Sara Lee
Corp. said Thursday (May 7) that
its fiscal third-quarter profit fell 22
per cent as softness in its North
American foodservice division and
the stronger dollar pushed sales
lower. Still, adjusted results were
much better than Wall Street
expected.

(AP Photo: M Spencer Green)

Tony Gomez

ety
ve ee

LS pick-ups S500
2 Hligthes clair



forum

Richard Hay, international tax
principal of international law
firm Stikeman Ellliott; and
Steven Cantor, managing part-
ner of international law firm
Cantor & Webb, will facilitate
the brainstorming sessions and
dialogue with industry stake-
holders.

BFSB has been engaged in
various discussions on the tax
model of the Bahamas and that
of its competitors over the past
six years. Specifically leading
from the 2009 Bahamas Finan-
cial Services Retreat and a fol-
low-up Information and Tax
Forum, Mr Gomez says: “We
now propose to secure the
industry’s considered views on
the approach to implementing
the OECD standard and
encourage the active participa-
tion by industry stakeholders.”

A
&

Sane ahay chelivery,
for congo mecewedd by 123060 mea
Custos lbookacmage: available
Pooe Mass chclivsry for saad) peeckagecs

Cargo

Caustoms Air Freight Building, “45





















































a
~r
NAD
Nassau Airport
Dovelapmont Company

TENDER

Nassau Arpor Develooment Company (NAD is pleased to
annaunoe the release of Tender 0-112 Warehouse tor Stage
1 of the Lynden Pinding Intemational Aiport Expansion.
The Scope of Wark indudes:
‘Detailed desion, supply, and installatian af a pre
manufactured metal warehouse building with
approcimate dimension of 70 ft x 176 ft
Chal works induding gle fil, grading, compactian,
foundations and slab on grade designed to suit
pre-manufachired metal warehouse buicing:
Ubliy works induding sanitary, power
communication and water service;
-Formal submission to fhe Ministry of Works §o finaline
Suilding perl and lasing wilh Bahamas Blectric
Company for power service

The C-112 Warehouse Tender Documents wil be avaiable
for pick up or electronic distibution after 3:00pm, April
16th, 2009

Contach TRAM BREET
Contracts and Procurement Manager

Phe (242) PG-106 | Fine: S| PAA?
PO. Bow AP 59220, Meeeray, Behar:
Email traci brshryjiines bs

rborne Freight
Services

Massau, Ralhamas
Phone: 242.377. 0450/2

Fax: 242.377.0451
470-3043 8/24 2.455 .0092

hood preeoerics? Woot us slop Bor ou .
fi
954.240.3805 (Vibe)

Cleli: =
BPeecheyesss 1 ter DO Ths Airoomm: 3 OOK
Pachapes 1Obo 20 Tas Airbeoooe S15 20K
Paces 20bo SO Ibs JAirbomme 5 45.000
Packages Sto DOO Bs Adrbomme 3 OOOO

Adtbone's Rate peri S An

1295 2-053 NW 22nd Avenue (C(Lejume Rel.»
lisa, FL 4401454
Phone 4005 8S BSS
B77 68S 4544
Fax: FOS O85 85-44
Cell: 954.394. 223043

NOTICE

The Department of Statistics will carry out its
Annual Household survey during the period of Kev wn, President « Kevin
May. Enumerators with offical identification cards
from the Department of Statistics will visit selected
household in New Providence, Grand Bahama,
Exuma and Long Island and will be calling upon
residents to complete the questionnaires honestly
and accurately. The information obtained will be
handled in the strictest confidence and will be used
to maintain essential statical data on our country.”

Visit our website at www.cob.edu.bs

CENTRE FOR CONTINUING EDUCATION & EXTENSION SERVICES
PROFESSIONAL DEVELOPMENT DEPARTMENT

CERTIFICATION & CERTIFICATE PROGRAMMES
Bahamas Law Enforcement

Co-operative Credit Union Ltd

We can helpyou achieve your career posal! A wide array of courses
md PU em bes leading lo ceniificale, cenification and leensure are
altered

Choose the courses or programme to help you
accomplish your career goals...

NOTICE OF :
ANNUAL GENERAL MEETING

Certified Professional Manager, Institute ol Centifed

Professional Managers (IGPM), James Madigan Lintversty

(JMU, Harrsonburg, VAs

Certified Associate Manager, bCPM, James Madison

University, Harrisonburg, vA

Ag ministrative SHS, (CPM, James Madson Unaversily, Harrisonburg, Wa
Certified Comauter Operatar |Microsot Office Specialist- MOUS)

Certified Human Ressurce Manager (Gert KRM) National Management Sececalian of America,
Dayton Baach, Ohio

Gene! Legal Principles, The institute of Legal Executives, Bedford, Eiglane
Business Communication, The institute of Legal Executives, Bedtard, England
Reconds Management, [he Institute of Legal Executives, Becton, England
Certified Public Accountant (CPA), Becker Review Oakbrook Tarace Chicago, Il
Accounting Fer Mon-Financial Managere

Company Law, The Inatitute of Legal Execulives, Bedford England

Employ ment Law, Te instiuie af Legal Executives, Bedtord, England

Ethics and Professional Responsibility

Journeyman Plumbing Linanse IPL)

Legal Writing & Research

Real Estate Sales Certfication

Singk Phase Elecrical icense (SPELL)

IntroSucian to tie Intemet & E-mailing

Writing & Research Skills

THERE WILL NOT BE A SECOND
Oe ee eee a who
ACT 2005 SECTION 22

The 24" Annual General Meeting of the Bahamas
Law Enforcement Co-operative Credit Union Ltd will
be held on

Saturday, May 16'", 2009
at
9:00 am
at
Paul H. Farquharson
Conference Centre
Police Headquarters
East Street

er |

REGISTRATION & ADVISEMENT DATES: 12” - 13" May 2009

No entrance exams required Tuition payment is die per term.
For additional information, telephone us at (242) 325-5714 or (242) 328-0003
bees May be Paid Hy Cash, Crecht Card, or Hank Ceritied Cheque lo: bieCollege of Lhe Bahawas, Hesiness Othice
CEES Reserves The Right Ta Change Tuition, Fees, Course Content, Comme Schedole and Course Materials



Refreshments will be provided
OFFICIAL GAZETTE

SELES ae RTA

The following list of Dentists obtained Licenses under
Section 10 of the Dental Act, 1989, as at 31st March, 2009.

ADDERLEY, Catherine
ALLEYNE, Kenneth
ALMIRA, Dindo
ALMIRA, Maria
ARANHA, Artherine
ARCHER, Jacqulin

BACCHUS, Olga
BAIN, Kay

BAIN, Larry
BASTIAN, Karen
BASTIAN, Wesley
BAZARD, Dante
BENNETT, Erica
BONAMY, Therese

CAMBRIDGE, Sythela
CLARKE, Andre
CLARKE, Antoine
CONLIFFE, Vaughan
COVE, Sandra

COVE, Norman
CRAWFORD, Ricardo
CUMBERBATCH, Brasil

DAVIES, Mark
DAVIS, Anthony

ECCLES-MAJOR, Michelle
ENEAS Jr, Cleveland
Erskine, Rosamund

FERGUSON, Sparkman
FORBES, Charles
FRANCIS, Emmanuel
FRANCIS, Welmilya
FRANKS, Russanne

GIBSON, Gill

HALKITIS, Melanie
HOLFORD, Richard

JOFFRE, Elexis
KNOWLES, Hadassah

LEE, William
LEWIS, Nigel
LEWIS, Kirk
LOCKHART, Hiram
LOUIS, John

LOUIS, John
LUNDY III, Leo

MACKEY-POPLE, Michelle
MAJOR, Kendal
McCARTNEY, Cyd
McIVER, Veronica
McWEENEY, Vincent
MORTEMORE, Tanya
MUNROE, Derwin

NEWBOLD, Kenworth

PEARCE, Shequel
PEET-IFERENTA, Renee
PERCENTIE, Leatendore
PICKSTOCK, Joyous

RASHAD, Munir

REID, Charlene
RICHARDSON, Kimberley
RICHARDSON, Osmond
ROLLINS, Sylvester
ROMER, Hayward
ROUSSOS, Desiree
RUSSELL, Lofton

RYAN, Michael

SAWYER, Marlene
SCAVELLA-TAYLOR, Tavette
SEYMOUR, Copelin
STRACHAN, Ellen

STUART, Wendy
SWEETING, Sidney

THEOPHILUS, Julius
THOMPSON, Woodley
TILBERG, Todd

VANDERPOOL, Cyril
VARGA, Christopher
VASSELL, Danette

WARREN, Annette
WILLIAMS-BETHEL, Marsha
WOOD, Cynthia

Abe i ceed

te



Dr. Anthony Davis
Registrar
Bahamas Dental Council

OFFICIAL GAZETTE

Bahamas Dental Council

The following list of Dental Hygienists obtained Licenses under
Section 14 of the Dental Act, 1989, as at 31st March, 2009.

BAIN, Raynell
BARRY, Deborah
BETHELL, Gia
BLOOMFIELD, Cheryl
BOWE, Carol

DORSETT, Amy
DUNCOMBE, June

FORBES, Sonia
FORBES, Samantha

GIBSON, Jacqueline
GREEN, Jeanette

HIGGS, Lauren
HUYLER-BEAL, Claudette

INGRAHAM, Margot

JOHNSON, Denise
JONES, Gurceille
JONES, Samantha

KING, Valencia

OFFICIAL GAZETTE

Bahamas Dental Council

The following list of Dental Technologists
obtained Licenses under Section 14 of the
Dental Act, 1989, as at 31st March, 2009.

HIGGS, Danny
PARDO, Sarahy

TAYLOR, Leonard
THEOPHILUS SR., Eneas

WEECH, Irwin

Abe? i ow

oe



Dr. Anthony Davis
Registrar
Bahamas Dental Council

KNOWLES, Giselle

LIGHTBOURN, Indirah
LOCKHART, Mika

MOXEY, Austia

RICHARDS, Michaelle
ROBARDS, Leah
ROLLE, Sanna
RUTHERFORD, Jerice

SANDS, Lesia

SINCLAIR, Barrington
SMITH, Giavanna
SUTHERLAND, Shannon
SYMMONETT, Della-Reese

WARD, Jill

Abe? i ~~ ee

tee”



Dr. Anthony Davis
Registrar
Bahamas Dental Council

OFFICIAL GAZETTE

Bahamas Dental Council

The following list of Dental Nurse
obtained Licenses under Section 14 of the
Dental Act, 1989, as at 31st March, 2009.

FERGUSON, Lagloria

Abbe i—~$~—- aes

tee"



Dr. Anthony Davis
Registrar
Bahamas Dental Council



PAGE 8B, MONDAY, MAY 11, 2009

THE TRIBUNE



Bank’s $20m
offering “20%
oversubscribed’

FROM page 1B

and a competitive return with
regard to their investments, all
of which the bank was in a posi-
tion to provide.

The Bank of the Bahamas
International managing direc-
tor told Tribune Business last
week that it was issuing the
shares as part of a strategy tar-
geting a 20 per cent Tier I capi-
tal ratio by the end of its 2010
financial year.

The $20 million offering rep-
resents the first tranche of the

$100 million in preference
shares - divided into seven class-
es - that were approved by the
bank’s annual general meeting
(AGM).

Strategy

“This is the start of the strat-
egy to raise new capital through
preference shares. We don’t
think the current market con-
ditions are supportive of a com-
mon share issue at this point in
time. It’s [preference shares]
not the ideal route, but it’s suit-
able for the current environ-
ment,” Mr McWeeney added.

He said that when completed

NOTICE

Notice is given that the roadways at Steven’s North
Side, Long Island including the Bay Road from D12
to Steven’s Rock will be closed for 24hrs commenc-
ing midnight 11th May, 2009 in order to preserve

right of ownership.

Signed
Patrick M. Turnquest
Kevin R.A. Turnquest
Est. of Harcourt A. Turnquest
Riturn Investments Limited

Dated 7th May, 2009



and fully subscribed, the $20
million preference share issue
would increase Bank of the
Bahamas International’s Tier I
capital ratio from 12 per cent
to 15 per cent, well in excess of
the minimum 8 per cent ratio.
Preference shares are eligible
to be included in Tier I share
capital calculations.

Explaining that the main
strategy behind the share issue
was capital, rather than liquidi-
ty or funds for lending, Mr
McWeeney told Tribune Busi-
ness: “Our capital ratio objec-
tive is 20 per cent, so we still
want to grow our capital base.

“We are looking at other
measures [other than prefer-
ence shares] to achieve that.
We’re looking at some internal
issues. It’s safe to say the bank is
looking at all ways to expand
its capital base, not liquidity,
but capital.

“The objective is a capital
ratio of 20 per cent. That has
been the objective set for the
five-year plan we’re on. We’re
in the last year of that plan, and
hope to ensure that ratio is close
to 20 per cent. We don’t see that
we will not be able to achieve
that by the end of the fiscal peri-
od 2010.”

Achieving that goal, Mr
McWeeney said, would position
the bank perfectly for the “start
of a new five-year plan”, which
would kick-in from the start of
fiscal 2010 on July 1 of that year.

MNISTRY OF HOUSING
ENGINEERING SERVICES FOR THE DESIGN OF ROADS
AND DRAINAGE SYSTEMS, ELECTRICAL
DISTRIBUTION SYSTEM AND POTABLE WATER AND
SEWERAGE DISTRIBUTION SYSTEMS IN SPRING CITY,

ABACO

REQUEST FOR PROPOSALS (RFP)

The Government of the Commonwealth of the Bahamas through the
Ministry of Housing is requesting proposals from qualified Consulting
Engineering firms to provide Engineering Design, Supervision of the
Construction Tender Process, and Contract Administration Services for
the development of the following housing subdivision:

(i) Spring City, Abaco - Roads and drainage system design, electrical
distribution system design and potable water & sewerage distribution

design.

Interested parties may obtain further information and purchase a copy
of the Request for Proposal from:

The Office of the Permanent Secretary

Ministry of Housing
Claughton House

Shirley and Charlotte Sts.

Nassau, Bahamas

Tel: 242-322-6005/6006

For a non-refundable fee $100. The method of payment may be cash

or a certified cheque made payable to the “Ministry of Housing”. The
documents will be ready for collection beginning Thursday 7th May,
2009 and ending Friday 15th May, 2009 between the hours of 9:30am
to 4:30pm. An information meeting will be held on Tuesday 19th May
at 10am in the conference room at the Ministry of Housing, Claughton

House.

Tenders are to be submitted in a sealed envelope marked as indicated
in the RFP document to:

The Office of the Permanent Secretary

Ministry of Housing
Claughton House

Shirley and Charlotte Sts.

Nassau, Bahamas

No later than 12 noon on Tuesday 26th May, 2009. Tenders will be
opened at 12:01 pm on Tuesday 26th May, 2009 in the conference

room at the Ministry of Housing, Claughton House. The Government
reserves the right to reject any or all Tenders.


THE TRIBUNE

MONDAY, MAY 11, 2009, PAGE 9B



I =.) | =1<~
Nassau resort holds weather conference

NASSAU, BAHAMAS
(May 6, 2009) — The Shera-
ton Nassau Beach Resort, host-
ed the 13th Annual Bahamas
Weather Conference from
April 15-19, 2009.

Attended by officials from
the National Oceanic and
Atmospheric Association
(NOAA), the National Hurri-
cane Center (NHC), members
of emergency management
organizations, academia and
television news weathermen
and women from all over the
world, this signature annual
event is considered one of the
most important forums for
Bahamian, U.S. and interna-
tional meteorologists to discuss
new and emerging topics in the
field of meteorology.

This year's conference was
attended by world-renowned
experts in meteorology, includ-
ing Max Mayfield, former
director of the National Hurri-
cane Center, who moderated
and planned the conference
agenda.

Bill Read, current director
of the National Hurricane Cen-
ter, also presented a review of
the 2008 Atlantic hurricane
season, while Dr Phillip
Klotzbach from Colorado State
University presented the fore-
cast for the 2009 Atlantic sea-
son.

Other topics discussed
included tropical climatology,
global warming, storm surges,
home safety and property
insurance matters.

PUBLIC NOTICE

INTENT TO CHANGE NAME BY DEED POLL

The Public is hereby advised that |, MALIK SOROHANO
RAHDIGAN RAHMING of Golden Gates #1 intend to my









SHOWN (lI-r) are Vernice Walkine, director general, Ministry of
Tourism, Max Mayfield, former director of National Hurricane Cen-
ter, Vincent Vanderpool-Wallace, Minister of Tourism and Hyacinth
Pratt, permanent secretary, Ministry of Tourism, at the opening
ceremonies of the 13th Annual Bahamas Weather Conference at Sher-
aton Nassau Beach Resort...

name to HENRY STEPHEN MILES. If there are any
objections to this change of name by Deed Poll, you
may write such objections to the Chief Passport Officer,
P.O.Box N-742, Nassau, Bahamas no later than thirty
(30) days after the date of publication of this notice.



Fully furnished town house in private area on

Legal Notice Legal Notice

eastern road, one minute from beach, 2 bed-

rooms, 1 1/2 baths, washroom, large kitchen,
burglar bars, A/C & C/A asking $1,050 per month,
$50 discount per month towards utilities, serious

enquires only please, 323-4326

NOTICE

NOTICE is hereby given that JYOTI P. CHOUDHURY of #5 HUDSON
STREET, P.O. BOX AP-§9217, SLOT 2106, NASSAU, BAHAMAS,

NOTICE
BEGONIA FLOWERS INC.

(In Voluntary Liquidation)

Notice is hereby given that the above-named
Company is in dissolution, which commenced
on the 7th day of May 2009. The Liquidator is
Argosa Corp. Inc., P.O. Box N-7757 Nassau,

Bahamas.

NOTICE
PATHOS SHORES INC.

(In Voluntary Liquidation)

Notice is hereby given that the above-named
Company is in dissolution, which commenced
on the 9th day of April 2009. The Liquidator is
Argosa Corp. Inc., P.O. Box N-7757 Nassau,

Bahamas.

is applying to the Minister responsible for Nationality and Citizenship,
for registration/naturalization as a citizen of The Bahamas, and that
any person who knows any reason why registration/naturalization
should not be granted, should send a written and signed statement
of the facts within twenty-eight days from the 4â„¢ day of May, 2009
to the Minister responsible for nationality and Citizenship, P.O. Box

N-7147, Nassau, Bahamas. ARGOSA CORP. INC.

(Liquidator)

ARGOSA CORP. INC.
(Liquidator)

Legal Notice

NOTICE
HERBLIGEN LTD.

NOTICE is hereby given that SWAT] CHOUDHURY of #5 HUDSON
STREET, P.O. BOX AP-59217, SLOT 2106, NASSAU, BAHAMAS,
is applying to the Minister responsible for Nationality and Citizenship,
for registration/naturalization as a citizen of The Bahamas, and that
any person who knows any reason why registration/naturalization
should not be granted, should send a written and signed statement
of the facts within twenty-eight days from the 4â„¢ day of May, 2009
to the Minister responsible for nationality and Citizenship, P.O. Box
N-7147, Nassau, Bahamas.

Legal Notice

NOTICE
BROOKBUSH LIMITED

(In Voluntary Liquidation)
a “,—
Notice is hereby given that the above-named
Company is in dissolution, which commenced

on the 7th day of May 2009. The Liquidator is
Argosa Corp. Inc., P.O. Box N-7757 Nassau,

Notice is hereby given that in accordance with Section 138
(8) of the International Business Companies Act 2000, the
dissolution of HERBLIGEN LTD. has been completed;

a Certificate of Dissolution has been issued and the Com-

NOTICE is hereby given that DWAIPAYAN CHOUDHURY of #5 Bahamas.

HUDSON STREET, P.O. BOX AP-59217, SLOT 2106, NASSAU,
BAHAMAS, is applying to the Minister responsible for Nationality
and Citizenship, for registration/naturalization as a citizen of The
Bahamas, and that any person who knows any reason why registration/
naturalization should not be granted, should send a written and signed
statement of the facts within twenty-eight days from the 4â„¢ day of May,
2009 to the Minister responsible for nationality and Citizenship, P.O. Box
N-7147, Nassau, Bahamas.

NOTICE

NOTICE is hereby given that BLONEVA ETOY GREENE of
LEEWARD PALMS, PROVIDENCIALES, P.O. BOX F-41123, TURKS
AND CAICOS, is applying to the Minister responsible for Nationality
and Citizenship, for registration/naturalization as a citizen of The
Bahamas, and that any person who knows any reason why registration/
naturalization should not be granted, should send a written and signed
statement of the facts within twenty-eight days from the 4â„¢ day of May,
2009 to the Minister responsible for nationality and Citizenship, P.O. Box
N-7147, Nassau, Bahamas.

pany has therefore been struck off the Register.

ARGOSA CORP. INC.

Cagudion ARGOSA CORP. INC.

(Liquidator)

GY

BISX LISTED & TRADED SECURITIES AS OF:
THURSDAY, 7 MAY 2009
BISX ALL SHARE INDEX: CLOSE 1,613.79 | CHG -0.13 | %CHG -0.01 | YTD -98.57 | YTD % -5.76
FINDEX: CLOSE 798.52 | YTD -4.35% | 2008 -12.31%
WWW .BISXBAHAMAS.COM | TELEPHONE: 242-323-2330 | FACSIMILE: 242-323-2320
Securit y Previous Close Today's Close Change Daily Vol. EPS $ Div $ P/E
Abaco Markets
Bahamas Property Fund
Bank of Bahamas
Benchmark
Bahamas Waste
Fidelity Bank
Cable Bahamas
Colina Holdings
Commonwealth Bank ($1)
Consolidated Water BDRs
Doctor's Hospital
Famguard
Fince
FirstCaribbean Bank
Focol (S)
Focol Class B Preference
Freeport Concrete
ICD Utilities
J. S. Johnson 10.50 10.50
Premier Real Estate 10.00 10.00 is
BISX LISTED DEBT SECURITIES - (Bonds trade on a Percentage Pricing bases)
Securi Symbol Last Sale g il
Fidelity Bank Note 17 (Series A) + FBB17 100.00
Fidelity Bank Note 22 (Series B) + FBB22 100.00 Prime + 1.75%
Fidelity Bank Note 13 (Series C) + FBB13 100.00 = T%
Fidelity Bank Note 15 (Series D) + FBB15 100.00 Prime + 1.75%
Fidelity Over-The-Counter Securities
Last Price

FG CAPITAL MARKETS
BROKERAGE & ADVISORY SERVICES

ROYAL = FIDELITY

Money at Work

Legal Notice

NOTICE
RHUBARBE LTD.

19 October 2017
19 October 2022
30 May 2013
29 May 2015

— f—

Symbol
Bahamas Supermarkets
Caribbean Crossings (Pref)
RND Holdings

(8) of the International Business Companies Act 2000, the ; 00 ABDAB i 3 31.59 a
dissolution of RHUBARBE LTD. has been completed; a

5:
BISX Listed Mutual Funds
Certificate of Dissolution has been issued and the Com-

Notice is hereby given that in accordance with Section 138

0.000

0.000
0.55 - 0.000

Fund Name
Colina Bond Fund
Colina MSI Preferred Fund
Colina Money Market Fund
Fidelity Bahamas G & | Fund
Fidelity Prime Income Fund
CFAL Global Bond Fund
CFAL Global Equity Fund
CFAL High Grade Bond Fund

YTD% Last 12 Months Yield %

pany has therefore been struck off the Register.

Fidelity International Investment Fund
FG Financial Preferred Income Fund
FG Financial Growth Fund
FG Financial Diversified Fund 1.0452 =
MARKET TERMS
YIELD - last 12 month dividends divided by closing price
Bid $ - Buying price of Colina and Fidelity

ARGOSA CORP. INC.
(Liquidator)

EPS $ - A company’s reported earnings per share for the last 12 mths
NAV - Net Asset Value

N/M - Not Meaningful

FINDEX - The Fidelity Bahamas Stock Index. January 1, 1994 = 100

- Number of total shares traded today
DIV $ - Dividends per share paid in the last 12 months
P/E - Closing price divided by the last 12 month earnings
(S) - 4-for-1 Stock Split - Effective Date 8/8/2007
(S1) - 3-for-1 Stock Split - Effective Date 7/11/2007
TO TRADE CALL: COLINA 242-502-7010 | ROYALFIDELITY 242-356-7764 | FG CAPITAL MARKETS 242-396-1000 | COLONIAL 242-502-7525


PAGE 10B, MONDAY, MAY 11, 2009

THE TRIBUNE





—_
NAD

Nassau Airport
Dowelopmomt Company

TENDER

C-120 Airside Civil and
C-130 Landside Civil, Stage 1

Nassau Arpor Deyvelooment Company (NAD) is pleased to
annaunoe fhe release of Tender C-120 Airside Civil and
(6-130 Landside Col for Stage 1 of the Lynden Pineling
inematonal Airport Expansion. MAD intends to enter into
oné conrad fer ihe completion of lhese wark packages, The
Scope of Work includes:

-Signaicant sarthmening, drainage and utility works

bath airside and landside;

-Rioadway, parking lotand apron conatruction
auceeding 60,000 tons of asphalt paving:

‘Signage and lighting fer readways, parking hats
aprons and taxiways; and

-Instalation of hard and sof landside landscaping and
imagatar

The -120 Airside Civil and C-130 Landside Cl, Stage 1
Terminal Expansion Project Tender Documents will be
available for pick up of electronic distribution after
3:00pm, April 16th, 2009. 4 biddars meeting wil
be held at 1:00am, Tuesday April 28th,
2008. Please contact Traci Ansty to register at the MAD
Project Office.

Contact TRAD BREE

Gontracks and Procurement Wanager

Phe (242) POR 086 | Fam: AZ) TAT
PO Goo AP 55009 Massau, Bahames
Emel. traci babyiines bs





BISX-listed entity eyes
real estate deal overseas

FROM page 1B

gave the BISX-listed entity
“good debt carrying capacity”
to enable it to fund a major
acquisition.

“We’re looking to diversify
into shopping centres,” Mr
Anderson added, “something
like Harbour Bay Shopping
Centre, or somewhere where
it’s not all office space that is
being rented.

“There may well be opportu-
nities as we move through this
down cycle, as people exit real
estate investments, that allow
us to buy it at the right price.
We’re the only corporate pur-
chaser of real estate, and if peo-
ple are looking to sell, we’re
there.”

Meanwhile, Mr Anderson
told Tribune Business that the
Property Fund had yet to close
the $3.5 million purchase of
Providence House, the Price-
waterhouseCoopers (PwC)
Bahamas headquarters on East
Hill Street, which was
announced around the turn of
the year. The deal has yet to
receive approval from the Gov-
ernment’s Investments Board.

“We’re waiting for govern-
ment approval. We haven’t
completed that transaction yet,”
he said. “That will come on
stream hopefully in the next
month or so. It’s all signed,
done and dusted except for the
Foreign Investments Board.”

Ministry of Youth, Sports and Culture



e Are you articulate and passionate about representing your country
¢ Do you enjoy traveling and meeting young people both nationally and inter

nationally

¢ Do you enjoy discussing issues relevant to young people?

Then you are a potential candidate for the position of

*”’ Youth Ambassador’”’

Interested persons must be:
Between the ages of 18 - 25 years
Bahamian
Must reside in the Bahamas
Experienced in Youth Work
Available for travel outside the Bahamas



These persons may contact the Youth Division of the Ministry of Youth,
Sports and Culture at telephone# 502-0601 for application forms. All



forms must be complete on or before May 31, 2009.

COMMUNITY ANNOUNCEMENT

WATER CONVERSATION MEASURES

The Water and Sewerage Corporation wishes to advise its customers
in New Providence that the Corporation is presently experiencing

water supply challenges. The Corporation will be implementing
water conservation efforts that may result in periods of reduced
water supply. Customers are asked to conserve their water usage
where possible,

The Corporation sincerely apologizes for any inconvenience caused
and will do its endeavor best to limit the severity and duration of
these conservation measures. Customers with specific complaints
are urged to call the Corporation's Call Center at 302-5599 or 325-

0505,"

MANAGEMENT

WATER AND SEWERAGE COPORATION

The need for Investments
Board approval has resulted
from the fact that there is a
minor element of non-Bahami-
an ownership in the deal. Mr
Anderson described this as an
“anomaly” that needed to be
corrected, as it effectively
placed the Property Fund at a
disadvantage against the com-
mercial banks, some of which
have much greater foreign own-
ership components, when it
came to closing real estate
transactions.

Mr Anderson said publicly-
listed companies regulated by
the Securities Commission of
the Bahamas were permitted to
have resident, non-Bahamian
ownership of their shares, while
those listed on the Bahamas
International Securities
Exchange (BISX) were also
exempt from the payment of
Stamp and transfer taxes when-
ever those shares were traded.

As a result, Mr Anderson
said the Property Fund held
several compelling advantages
when it came to investing in real
estate purchases. However, he
explained that this was being
negated because banks were
allowed to purchase property
without having to get Invest-
ments Board approval.

“Tt’s an anomaly,” Mr Ander-
son said. “Where banks should
have to go through the same
process as us, in practice it does
not work that way. We need to
have that resolved, to allow the



he if Tie

‘The Tribune

Real Estate |

Property Fund to make acqui-
sitions without having to go
through this onerous process.”

He added: “Our key market
is the Bahamas. We don’t have
any further specific property
acquisitions in mind at the
moment, and are not in negoti-
ations with anyone to buy prop-
erty.

Debtors

“In times like this, debtors
can’t afford to pay. We have a
much stronger capital position
than most people holding real
estate in this market, so it’s a
good time for us to be able to
take advantage of opportuni-
ties.”

The Property Fund’s two
existing properties, the
Bahamas Financial Centre in
downtown Nassau and One
Marina Drive on Paradise
Island, continue to provide it
with a solid earnings platform.
For the year to December 31,
2008, the Property Fund
enjoyed a 2.67 per cent increase
in rental and parking revenue
to $4.307 million, compared to
$4.195 million the year before.

Mr Anderson explained that
the Property Fund had built-in
2-3 per cent annual rental
increases in most tenant con-
tracts, depending on the dura-
tion of the lease. This generated
increasing revenue streams as
the company’s cost base
decreased, due to the fact that

PCC Cem EU cme LIS MUON UT Tot Tt cae

financing (interest rate) costs
were reducing as its debt fell.
Total expenses, meanwhile,
rose to $1.443 million compared
to $960,025 in 2007, due largely
to a more than doubling of com-
mon area maintenance (CAM)
expenses that the Property
Fund was forced to pick up at
the Bahamas Financial Centre.;
Mr Anderson said some
13,000 square feet at the
Bahamas Financial Centre, out
of a total 100,000 square feet,
remained vacant and had been
that way sine mid-2007. The

Property Fund, as
landlord/owner, picked up the
CAM tab for that space.

However, the CAM expenses
were offset by the net gain on
the valuation of the Property
Fund’s real estate investments,
which rose from $446,814 in
2007 to $807,000 in 2008. The
increase, Mr Anderson
explained, resulted from not
incurring the capital improve-
ments that the Property Fund
made, particularly on the Finan-
cial Centre, in 2007.

“The biggest change for us
last year was the higher CAM
rate at the Financial Centre,
which quite substantially
increased landlord costs at the
premises, because we carry at
the CAM on the vacant space,
which impacted all our profits,”
Mr Anderson said. “But we
were able to benefit from hav-
ing a much higher kicker on the
valuation.”

i Remtals

s+ 4 eg Buyers |

Tel: Mea 2 :

for ad rates



The College of The Bahamas
Centre for Continuing Education
and Extension Services (CEES)

SUMMER SCHEDULE

PPA Ue)

BUSINESS COURSES

* Accounting for Beginners I, II, II] (4th & 5th May)

¢ Credit & Collections Procedures I & I (12th & 14th May)
* Superior Customer Service Workshop (12th June)

* Human Resource Management I & I] (4th & 7th May)

* Effective Writing Skills (12th May)

HEALTH, FITNESS & COSMETOLOGY COURSES
* Massage Therapy Essentials I & II (11th & 14th May)
¢ Make-up Applications (11th May)



SEWING AND DECORATING COURSES
* Basic of Freehand Cutting I (11th May)
¢ Drapery Making I (12th May)

* Jewelry Making (14th May)
* Floral Design I (11th May)

* Floral Design IT (20th April)

COMPUTER COURSES

* Computer Applications I & I (4th & 7th May)
* Web Page Design I W/S (11th June)
* Web Page Design II W/S (16th July)

Phone: 325-5714; 328-0093; 328-1936;
302-4300 ext. 5202 or email: acurry@cob.edu.bs


THE TRIBUNE

MONDAY, MAY 11, 2009, PAGE 11B



Retail earnings,
consumer spending
come into focus

m@ By STEPHEN BERNARD
AP Business Writer

NEW YORK (AP) — After
a week when investors were
reassured by the government's
assessment of the banking
industry and its latest reading
on the job market, Wall
Street's focus turns to the con-
sumer.

The coming week features
first-quarter earnings figures
from Wal-Mart Stores Inc.,
Macy's Inc. and other retailers
and the Commerce Depart-
ment's retail sales report for
April. So far, the expectations
are that the readings will help
the stock market extend a two-
month-old rally.

The government's retail
sales tally follows April sales
figures issued by the retailers
on Thursday. Those reports
showed spending generally fell,
but by a smaller amount than
in the previous months. Still,
the recession weighed on con-
sumers, who concentrated their
spending on necessities such
as groceries and health care
products.

Economists polled by Thom-
son Reuters, on average, pre-
dict the government will report
a 0.1 percent dip in retail sales
from March's level.

"IT would be surprised if
retail sales come in anything
other than expected," said Jeff
Ivory, a partner at Stonebridge
Financial Partners LLC in
Bingham Farms, Mich. Meet-
ing or even exceeding forecasts
would provide additional
strength to the market, he said.

Ivory said investors still have
the mind-set that started the
stock rally in early March.
They're focused on whether
economic data and corporate
reports are showing incremen-

tal improvement, even if there
are still signs of weakness.

"What we're seeing in aggere-
gate is that bad news isn't nec-
essarily bad news anymore,"
Ivory said. “It's all relative."

Consumer spending
accounts for more than two-
third of economic activity. So
signs of stronger spending or
upbeat outlooks from retailers
would give investors incentive
to keep buying.

Brett D'Arcy, Chief Invest-
ment Officer of CBIZ Wealth
Management in San Diego,
said a worse-than-expected
reading on retail sales or dis-
appointing results from a
major retailer might lead to a
short-term drop in the market,
but only a series of bad reports
over a couple of weeks would
be likely to derail the rally.

Cincinnati-based Macy's
first-quarter results are sched-
uled to be released Wednes-
day, while investors hear from
Bentonville, Ark.-based Wal-
Mart on Thursday. Analysts
expect Macy's to post a quar-
terly loss of 23 cents per share,
while Wal-Mart is expected to
earn 77 cents per share.

Very little has been able to
slow down the market in
recent weeks — not even the
government saying some of the
nation's largest banks are still
facing capital shortfalls. The
government's stress-test results
did just the opposite.

For the week, the Dow
Jones industrials average
gained 2 percent. The broader
Standard & Poor's 500 index
rose 2.4 percent, while the Nas-
daq composite index gained
1.3 percent.

Investors believe the stress
tests gave them more clarity
about where the nation's 19
largest banks stand and how

much money they will need to
protect against further losses.

The benchmark KBW Bank
Index, which tracks 24 of the
nation's largest banks, jumped
12.1 percent Friday, The test
results were released late
Thursday.

The government's findings
"lessened the worst fears
investors had," said Nicholas
Sargen, chief investment offi-
cer at Fort Washington Invest-
ment Advisors in Columbus,
Ohio. Just a few months ago,
investors were worried about
potential government
takeovers of the largest banks
or their collapse, he said.

CBIZ's D'Arcy said infor-
mation leaking out about the
results in the days before the
official release also helped the
market. That included word
that Bank of America Corp.
would have to make up a near-
ly $34 billion shortfall.

"The way they put it out to
the public, it was highly
telegraphed so when the actu-
al results came, it wasn't a big
shock," D'Arcy said.

And in a sign that the reces-
sion is moderating, the Labor
Department said layoffs
totaled 539,000 in April. Econ-
omists expected employers to
cut 620,000 jobs during the
month.

The unemployment rate
climbed to 8.9 percent, meeting
expectations.

The improvement in the jobs
loss figure was helped along
by a burst of hiring by the fed-
eral government to prepare for
the 2010 Census. But there
were also smaller payrolls cuts
at construction companies, fac-
tories, retailers and financial
services, and that is the kind
of incremental improvement
Wall Street is looking for.



Approx. 6 acres of Waterfront property with a 152 feet wide canal.
Property comprises three buildings:

Building A: Seafood Processing Plant include a reception area, an
office, three bathrooms, a receiving room, a dressing room,
a packing room, a storage room, a laboratory and a
processing room, (3) 10 ft x 30 ft blast freezers, and (1)
15ft x 15 ft and (1) 10 ft x15 ft holding freezers.

Building B: Generator House

Building C: The Water Plant consists of a reverse osmosis water
system that converts salt water into drinking water with
a 10,000 storage capacity.

Interested persons should submit offers to:
The Manager, Credit Risk Management, P. O. Box N-7518,
Nassau, Bahamas
To reach us on or before June 12, 2009

For further information, please contact us at
502-0929, 356-1685 or 356-1608




PAGE 12B, MONDAY, MAY 11, 2009

THE TRIBUNE





Gym shrinks
for survival

m By CHESTER ROBARDS
Business Reporter
crobards@tribunemedia.net

THE ECONOMIC down-
turn has forced the popular
Palmdale gym, Mystical, to give
up 4000 square feet of space,
according to its general manag-
er.
Derrick Bullard said increas-
ing rental payments and a
declining economy, which had
reduced both gym user num-
bers and the frequency of their
visits, had forced him to return
to the landlord space he had
allocated for his health and
wellness store.

With this yield of space, Mr
Bullard said the gym would
have to construct a new
entrance that could cost him a
substantial sum.

Mr Bullard said he had been
trying to keep gym membership
fees down in order to attract
patrons, but the landlord had
continually increased their rent.

“We have been advertising
and piggybacking on certain
events,” said Mr Bullard. “And
we have added more classes to
keep people coming in.”

He said he has been in talks
with the Miss Bahamas Uni-
verse organizers, lobbying for

“We have been
advertising and
piggybacking on certain
events. And we have
added more classes to
keep people coming in.”

— Derrick Bullard



them to use his gym, which
could give the establishment
some much-needed publicity.

Also, he has tweaked the
gym’s hours to try to accom-
modate individual work habits
and lifestyles.

According to Mr Bullard,
personal trainers have taken a
greater hit than the gym itself.

“People are cutting back on
personal trainers,” he said. “At
the end of the day they say they
can’t afford it.”

He said that when the Rus-

sell’s retail outlet closed down
next to him in the Palmdale
Shopping Plaza, it was a clear
indication that change might
come to Mystical and it has.

On the western side of New
Providence Bally’s Gym is is
doing fine, though usage is
down, according to its general
manager.

Naomi Rickets said the gym
had seen a bit of a decline with
the onset of the economic crisis,
but now things were back to
normal for them.

——="

bahamasc

Jiami Int. Airport

+tax x room per room to be paid at hotel

Airfare

OT = Daws Interm. (Car
. PER PERSOM

Airfare
» 2 Days Minivan
PER PERSOM

Airfare
2 Days Compact Car
PER PERS@t?ry]

‘Some resincions may apply

Re ear Easy
YOU NEED A CERTAIN BANK.

=| THE BEST ASSET IS
PEACE OF MIND.

You couldn't be in better hands.

~ FIRSTCARIBBEAN

NWlrERNATIONAL BANK

GET THERE. TOGETHER.

www. firstcaribbeanbank.com FirstCaribbean International Bank is a member of the CIBC Group.


MONDAY, MAY 11, 2009

bE







IG jr 1

The stories behind the news



URCA and The Milk of Hatchet Bay

A brief insight into the SUS s more than 40 year attempt to ‘Bahamianise’..



@ By RUPERT MISSICK Jr
Chief Reporter
rmissick@tribunemedia.net

6 Bahamianisation” is a falla-

cy, a half-hearted attempt

to bring about a level play-

ing field, political propa-

ganda, idealistic, incomplete,

and an ideal that has never been forti-

fied with the tools it needed to be
realised.

These were all words used to
described the philosophy of Bahami-
anisation to Insight this past week.

Certainly “Bahamianisation” means
“Bahamians first” or as one senior
statesman said, Bahamian “owner-
ship”, but a fact that may be hard to
swallow for many is that realistically
Bahamianisation truly means “Bahami-
ans eventually.”

The reason is because it was intro-
duced by a government that did not
fully understand what was required to
produce the results the philosophy pro-
fessed to bring about.

If one chose to be cynical it could
be said that government has believed
only in Bahamianisation’s ability to
bring in votes.

A woman who describes herself as
“one of the beneficiaries of Bahami-
anisation” explained it to Insight this
way.

“They did not “‘Bahamianise’ us cul-
turally or on a deep educational level
like (other governments) did in the
other Caribbean nations. I guess we
still had it too good, too close to the
US. It was like we were kids let loose in
a candy store. But now the store was
ours we were not educated on how to
take care of it on our own or how to
use sugar to make things other than
candy.

“The government was eager and
tried to educate us, but we lost some-
thing in the process: Morality, work
ethics. Everything came too easily. I
was 16 during independence. The gov-
ernment paid for my education, for
high school and up to my first degree in
college. I was a beneficiary. I was one
of those who received government
scholarships that were given out freely
after Majority Rule to ensure that we
had Bahamian professionals, especial-
ly in the education field, but not every-
one benefited.”

The PLP’s successors in office (which
includes not only the FNM but the
“new” PLP) has had to temper an all-
or-nothing expectation that has accom-
panied “Bahamianisation” with matu-
rity, a new found, although not wide-
spread, collective security and, as one
senior politician noted last week, a
healthy dose of reality.

This past Wednesday, during his con-
tribution to the debate on the Bill that
would establish the Utilities Regula-
tion and Competition Authority
(URCA) that is expected to regulate
electronic communications in the
Bahamas, Prime Minister Hubert
Ingraham said that it is his govern-
ment’s hope that it will be able to pop-
ulate this regulatory authority with
Bahamians.

“But we are realists and we also
recognise that in this early phase we
will be required to access talent that
may not be available in the Bahamas,”
he said.

Government has already identified
this talent in someone outside the
Bahamas who will be the Policy Direc-
tor of URCA.

Mr Ingraham acknowledged that the
salaries payable for jobs in this sector
are far in excess of anything known by
public sector enterprises.

“T would expect that some of the
salaries paid to some of the profes-
sionals will be higher than what is nor-
mally paid in other areas in the
Bahamas,” the prime minister said.

The creation of URCA, and the new
Communications Bill in general, sig-
nals, according to the prime minister, a
new phase in the Bahamas’ develop-
ment. URCA was not something that
the country actually needed before
now. In a developing nation with a
population of 300,000 people and a
growing need for doctors, teachers,
nurses, contractors, engineers, and the
like, it is hard to imagine that a
Bahamian would have anticipated this
obscure and future need and had the
foresight to prepare himself to fill the
position of URCA’s Policy Director.

When Insight discussed this point of
view with a young Bahamian, he con-
ceded everything to a certain extent.
He asserted that while it may be new to
the general public, URCA’s establish-
ment is no surprise to the current gov-
ernment. “They’re in power two years
now and had to prepare the legislation
for it. Why didn’t they send a Bahami-
an abroad for those two years and have
them come back now ready to lead this
thing?”

The answer could be based on the
assumption — albeit an embarrassing-
ly apparent one — that in a small coun-
try with limited resources there is a lot
of pressure and in fact a desperate need
to get things right the first time around.

The demand then for a person who
knows what he is doing the first day on
the job as opposed to a person who
may be ineptly groping with theoretical
rather than practical experience is not
only risky, but costly.

Does this mean that URCA is not

—
= 3

JANUARY 1979 BDP Leader J Henry
Bostwick during his one day fact fining
tour of the Hatchet Bay Farms at Alice
Town Eleuthera. Mr Bostwick is shown
in one of the coops filled with hundreds

a — ——_ of layer chickens...



THE ROOM in which thousands of chickens were killed packaged and sent to Nassau,

clean closed and deserted...



“Bahamianised”? It may not be imme-
diately, but it could be eventually.

Now that the public is aware that
the job exists and that the salary is “in
excess of anything known by public
sector enterprises,” a Bahamian, who is
so inclined, should do some research,
educate himself and work his way up
the ranks of URCA to be eventually
equipped to fully merit the position.

In a world populated by the Internet,
microwaves, instant messenger and e-
mail it may be too much to ask the
modern Bahamian to accept this grad-
ualism. We do have, however, an his-
torical example where a rush to
“Bahamianise,” supported by govern-
ment’s failure to truly prepare Bahami-
ans for ownership, caused the failure of
a once vibrant institution.

In 1975, the government bought a
successful dairy and chicken farm from
the Harrisville Company — it was
known as the “Hatchet Bay Farm.”
The farm, which was developed by the
late American millionaire Austin T
Levy, provided jobs for 300 people in
the settlement of Alice Town.

The 2,500-acre farm was bought by
government for $3 million. On the far-
m’s take-over, the late Prime Minister
Sir Lynden Pindling declared that
Bahamians were witnessing a “triumph
of the human sprit.”

He said the Hatchet Bay take-over
was the “greatest success story in the
country’s history of agriculture.”

But the dream quickly went sour.

Shortly after the take-over there
were reports that large numbers of
chickens had died. There were allega-
tions that the farm’s seed boat was
being used to bring in cars and appli-

SEE page 2C

FX — — ly The most fuel-efficient passenger bus around!

The Suzuki APY is perfect for the
family and also for the business.
7-sealer passenger-car comfort,
better performance, incredible

fuel-efficiency & all-round utiltityl

* 1600 cc engine
* Automatic Transmission
(GLS only)
* Alloy Wheels
* Keyless Entry (GLS only)
* CD Player
* Dual Air Conditioning
* Power Steering
* Power Windows & Door Locks

& QUALITY 2%:

os
$a es is =
—

#1 AUTO DEALER IM THE BAHAMAS
EAST SHIRLEY STREET + 322-3775 * 325-3079

Wiel our chesercars af Quality Auto alec [PF respacri] Lid Forcier deals, Quewes Rey, 057-4192
of Mboto Beto: Mal, Den be Kee Bhd, BoP


PAGE 76

THE WEATHER REPORT

5-Day FORECAST



THE TRIBUNE ~ 5/11/09

INSURANCE MANAGEMENT

FL (BAHAMAS) LIMITED. INSURANCE BROKERS & AGENTS

Woo Gines Marine Forecast



a “

m1 ae Ui Vg































x Today Tuesday WINDS WAVES VISIBILITY WATER TEMPS.
f | a we High = Low W High Low W NASSAU Today: SE at 5-10 Knots 0-2 Feet 10-20 Miles 77°F
’ = y, Ol f 9/10 F/C F/C F/C F/C Tuesday: E at 5-10 Knots 0-2 Feet 10-20 Miles 77°F
a é or o| : |2 3|4|5 6|7 8|olio Acapulco 88/31 75/23 pc 88/31 76/24 pc FREEPORT te SE at 5-10 Knots 0-2 Feet 10-20 Miles 76° F
i-_, rr LOW | MODERATE J HIGH | V.HIGH J EXT. = Amsterdam 58/14 47/8 c 58/14 54/12 pe Tuesday: _E at 5-10 Knots 0-2 Feet 10-20 Miles 77°F
k am ORLANDO Ankara, Turkey 68/20 414 t 71/21 43/6 pe = ABACO Today: SE at 5-10 Knots 0-2 Feet 10-20 Miles 76° F
High:93°F34°C Plenty of sun. Mainly clear. Sunny. Breezy with plenty of Windy with plenty of | Windy with a full day The higher the AccuWeather UV Index™ number, the Athens 76/24 64/17 s 81/27 66/18 s Tuesday: _E at 5-10 Knots 0-2 Feet 10-20 Miles TE
Low69°F/21°C - sunshine. sunshine. of sunshine. greater the need for eye and skin protection. Auckland 56/12 48/8 sh 57/13 46/7 sh
769° ae cies (ais «alk BES re Bangkok 95/35 81/27 t 93/33 81/27 t
} @ sit aia a High: 85° High: 86° High: 85° High: 86° Barbados 85/29 76/24 pc 85/29 76/24 pc MMR Ve TAH |
TAMPA a | High: 87 Low: 76 Low: 76 Low: 77 Low: 75 Low: 76 yas Posy UL Barcelona 72/22 58/14 pc 71/21 58/14 pc Daa
ot Le ; PETE ai ee ETC Beijin 79/96 64/17 pe 84/98 BOB
High: 89° F/32°C ey 102° F 92°-83° F 92°-81° F 91°-78° F High _Ht.(ft.) Low _Ht.(ft. ar caer ear = one teed
Low: 72° F/22°C e] r The exclusive AccuWeather RealFeel Temperature® is an index that combines the effects of temperature, wind, humidity, sunshine intensity, cloudiness, precipitation, pressure, and Today 9:57am. 24 4:00am. 02 Belarade 84/28 60/15 pc 93/98 GI/16 s
ay @ ad 2 elevation on the human body—everything that effects how warm or cold a person feels. Temperatures reflect the high and the low for the day. 10:20pm. 29 3:52pm. 0.2 ean 66/18 42/5 - 65/18 45/7 § (56/44
ie Tuesday !0:36am. 23 4:40am. 0.2 Bermuda 76/24 68/20 sh 75/23 65/18 pc Billings
a «5 | CO 11:00pm. 27 4:33pm. 03 Bogota 66/18 48/8 sh 65/18 48/8 t “Tuaey
J ee ae Statistics are for Nassau through 2 p.m. yesterday Wednesday! 1:16 am. 03 520am. 03 Brussels 58/14 52/11 sh 64/17 60/15 sh
| r ABACO Temperature 1:41pm. 26 5:15pm. 04 Budapest 84/28 60/15 pc 79/26 54/12 pe (H)
rr - 5 = ¥ High: 86° F/30°C 7 Hanugigaaibaen UbdedaReeuaddaechaneiananiemene cae : Thursday 11:59 am. 99 602am. 04 — Aires ri — ” a ae '
cy ll ee Low: 73° F/23°C Normal high... Yt 106/41 82/27 s 100/37 79/26 s “ast
F Normal low 71° F/21° C Calgary 62/16 39/3 sh 44/6 29/-1 sh
2 @ WEST PALM BEACH iy Last year's High ...csssssesesseserssne 91° F/33° C SuN Vn Cancun 90/32 69/20 s 92/33 69/20 s Los Angee
—— High: 86° F/30° C » Last year's low Gieaeauleaeateeetiss 78° F/25° C " Caracas 81/27 72/22 5 81/27 71/21 pc ,
Low: 72° F/22°C Precipitation = CséSrisle 6:28am. Moonrise ...10:20p.m. — Casablanca 74/23 57/13 s 73/22 57/13 s Aan: :
As of 2 terd 0.00" Sunset 7-45 p.m. Moonset 8:02am. Copenh 54/12 48/8 63/17 47/8 i
$0 AM. YOSTOMCAY .... ce cceceee eee ee eee eee UE UN eee sees aera ee : Ea ta Ba opennagen s S
FT. LAUDERDALE FREEPORT oe asi New Dublin 55/12 43/6 pc 55/12 45/7 po
— High: 86° F/30° C @ High: 85° F/29° C Normal year to date oo... 8.90" a Frankfurt 63/17 56/13 sh 71/21 58/14 ¢
Low: 74° F/23°C Low: 71° F/22° C fe Geneva 74/23 56/13 t 74/23 54/12 c
AccuWeather.com = Halifax 50/10 33/0 c 51/10 34/1 c ee nisi
= @ Forecasts and graphics provided by ay Havana 88/31 67/19 s 89/31 66/18 s Tetorme 89/75
\ MIAMI AccuWeather, Inc. ©2009 May 17 May 24 Helsinki 55/12 37/2 t 54/12 36/2 pe [aad Rain E
~ High: 89° F/32°C ELEUTHERA Hong Kong 86/30 75/23 t 88/31 75/23 pe Mea Furies au
Low: 75° F/24°C NASSAU High: 86° F/30° C Islamabad 95/35 66/18 s 108/42 71/21 s BK Snow Shown are noon positions of weather systems and Oar ata
= seals — F High: 87° F/31°C Low: 72° F/22°C Istanbul 76/24 60/15 s 75/23 63/17 s [=] ice ea
Low: 76° F/24°C Jerusalem 69/20 48/3 s 70/21 49/9 s orecasi nign/iow temperatures are tor selected citles. tationary Meugumiit-
a : Johannesburg 61/16 44/6 sh 65/18 47/8 s -10s | Os ts 10s 20s /30s") 40s
KEY WEST eX @ CATISLAND Kingston 87/30 78/25 + 86/30 78/25 sh
High: 86° F/30°C Hi h:84°F/29°C Lima 78/25 60/15 pc 77/25 61/16 pc
Low: 77° F/25°C Ng Es rone London 63/17 50/10 pc 6116 56/13 +
; ow: 68° F/20° Madrid 75/23 48/8 pe 73/22 48/8 pc
@ =F Manila 93/33 77/25 t 90/32 79/26 t AUTO IN 16. R yay NJ Cc FE
in © Mexico City 80/26 52/11 pc 79/26 51/10 pc
Monterrey 104/40 72/22 pc 102/38 72/22 s
GREAT EXUMA SAN SALVADOR Montreal 5713 39/3 pc 6417 43/6 pc
7 Low:74°F/23°C Lew 72°F" Munich 74/23 52/11 t 71/21 50/10 c
Shown is today's weather. Temperatures are today's _ANDROS . Nairobi 81/27 63/17 t 77le5 BA/I7 +
ights' High: 88° F/31°C New Delhi 100/37 79/26 s 102/38 77/25 s
meee Mew — Low: 73° F/23°C Osl 54/12 42/5 57/13 43/6
: P ow: 73° S slo pe pe !
<< © Paris 74/23 61/16 sh 71/21 58/14 pc el Mc Wit QO [ us
Prague 63/17 46/7 sh 65/18 43/6 s = ; °
LONGISLAND Rio de Janeiro 81/27 70/21 s 83/28 71/21 s eee i
Ce rec om ‘ro28 SYit ©7428. SD § When it to Auto I :
Low: 72° F/22°C Rome 75/23 53/11 s 74/23 55/12 s to uto Insurance,
Today Tuesday Today Tuesday Today Tuesday MAYAGUANA St. Thomas 85/29 76/24 sh 84/28 75/23 sh “the Smart choice 18
High Low W High Low W High Low W High Low W High Low W High Low W High: 87° F/31°C San Juan 77/125 48/8 pe 78/25 45/7 ¢ et Ley
FC FIC FC FIC FC FIC FC FIC Fic FIC FC FIC et Low: 72° F/22°C gee ae vane t ee vos a rance Management.
Albuquerque 86/30 58/14 s 88/31 57/13 s Indianapolis 67/49 44/6 pe 71/21 56/12 s Philadelphia 69/20 48/8 s 69/20 50/10 pe anag ome pe a oe *
Anchorage 62/16 43/6 s GAIT 41/5 s —_— Jacksonville. ~—«92/33- 65/18 t 80/26 64/17 t Phoenix 102/38 75/23 s 102/38 74/23 s CROOKED ISLAND / ACKLINS Santo Domingo oe let 83/28 71/21 sh i cae - -ople you can trust.
Atlanta 70/21 55412 t 76/24 5915 s Kansas City 71/21 58/1 s 72/22 647 + Pittsburgh 62416 38/3 po 64/17 393 s RAGGEDISLAND — High:s0°F/s2°c - — ae Tn t ee — s D>
Atlantic City 64/17 42/5 s 68/20 43/6 po Las Vegas «99/87 60/20 s 96/85 73/22 s Portland, OR + G1/16 46/7 c 5713. 42/5 sh Highteee rice = LOW 74°F/28°C eBekht ore eee Te —
Baltimore 66/18 43/6 pc 68/20 45/7 s Little Rock 67/19 57/13 t 75/23 67/19 t Raleigh-Durham 64/17 46/7 + 74/23 50/10 s Low: 70° F/21°C ae Bee EO sais soit. aD
Boston 63/17 45/7 pe 50/15 47/8 ¢t Los Angeles 78/25 60/15 pc 78/25 58/14 pc St. Louis 71/21 53/11 pe 75/23 62/16 pe . a ae ae : Rae : ; RANCE MAN AGEMENT
Buffalo 5814 36/2 po 59/15 37/2 s Louisville 72/22 50/10 po 75/23 5814 s SaltLakeCity 79/26 5241 s 75/23 47/8 pc GREATINAGUA Tava eae Ane ae ee
Charleston, SC 80/26 54/12 t 76/24 59/15 pe Memphis 71/21 57/13 t 73/22 65/18 pc San Antonio 90/32 71/21 pce 89/31 72/22 pc nimabpene panier: y P P al (BAHAMAS) LIMITED. INSURANCE BROKERS & AGENTS
: ied : High: 89° F/32° C Toronto 57/13 37/2 pc 5713 416 s
Chicago 6216 41/5 pe 67/19 50/10 s Miami 89/31 75/23 pe 87/80 74/23 s San Diego 69/20 61/16 pc 70/21 59/15 pc Low: 74° F/23°C Trinidad 99/27 70/21 t 81/27 69/20 t ; Vee.
Cleveland 57/13 38/3 pc 66/18 44/6 s Minneapolis 68/20 50/10 pc 66/18 55/12 t Sanfrancisco 62/16 499 s 66/18 51/40 pc : vee ca SEE : New Providence Grond Rehome Ahaco Fleutherg Eyam
Dallas 75/23 64/17 c 87/30 72/22 pc Nashville 72/22 50/10 t 77/25 6015 s Seattle 5613 44/6 sh 54/12 42/5 sh Viana 79/22 50/10 t 69/20 49/9 c BCE HEAT E50 4D) agen (D4) Ete (DEN tbr
Denver 74/23 51/10 pc 83/28 46/7 pc NewOrleans 88/31 71/21 t 88/31 71/21 t Tallahassee © 90/32 68/20 t 82/27 65/18 t WaT 63/17 46/7 pc 6216 36/2 s BRD A (BAT) S50-S50) | Te: (242) (142) $3): (it})
Honolulu «8520 7121 ¢ 8599 722 s OdatomaGly 6217 S73 1 7026 6820 t Twos 1007 GOS 6 10188 Gola © ~~ aimee ee ———_—_———
onolulu s s ahoma Ci ucson s s — 7 7 | :
Houston 91/32 72/22 pc 88/31 73/22 po Orlando 93/33 69/20 pc 89/31 68/20 pc Washington, DC 65/18 48/8 pc 70/21 50/10 s Th ee


PAGE 2C, MONDAY, MAY 11, 2009

THE TRIBUNE



INSIGHT



URCA and The Milk of Hatchet Bay

FROM page 1B

ances like air conditioners and
fridges duty free.

The farm ran into problems
with its creditors.

Employees were laid off and
the farm that once supplied 60
per cent of the domestic market
with eggs as well as providing
poultry, milk and ice-cream, col-
lapsed.

Insight spoke with an
Eleutheran who remembered
the excitement some felt over
the PLP’s move to “Bahami-
anise” the Hatchet Bay Farm,
but said in the end governmen-
t’s intention was less than sin-
cere.

“All of the foreign scientists
and veterinarians, etceteras,


























































went home, but that wasn’t it.
All of the white Bahamians
were fired and then all of the
black Bahamians who didn’t
support the PLP were sent
home,” he said.

Before the take-over, many, if
not a disproportionate majority
of Bahamians on the farm were
labourers and factory workers
and did not have or were not
given the opportunity to have
the skills to administer the far-
m’s operations.

Insight suggested to the
Eleutheran, now well into his
50s, that surely, it was the gov-
ernment’s intention, in its move
to “Bahamianise” Hatchet Bay,
to educate and train Bahami-
ans to effectively run the plan-
tation.

He snarled and coldly
remarked that only “a handful
of people at the top who would
have given their first born child
to the PLP were given a chance
to do anything that would have
made any difference.”

He admitted that he had been
embittered by this period in
Eleuthera’s history and said he
was unapologetic in his asser-
tion that the PLP had
“destroyed Hatchet Bay and
left Eleuthera to rot in the sun
like the thousands of chickens
they let die in those boxes at
the airport.”

In January 1978, then leader
of the Bahamian Democratic
Party and the official opposi-
tion leader J. Henry Bostwick
led a group, which included

NEW STRONGER FORMULA
















WITH BETTER SMELL.
Show insects no mercy.

Distributed in the Bahamas
by The d’Albenas Agency e 322 1441








G@Johnson

re ae



WHERE there were once neat buildings and immaculate lawns today
there are only abandoned structures junk and weeds...

Clarence Town MP, the late
James (Jimmy) Knowles, and
Senator Edmund Moxey, to
Hatchet Bay on an extensive
“fact finding” tour of the 2,500-
acre plantation .

The BDP parliamentarians
made the trip as a result of
numerous reports in the press
concerning the state of affairs
at the farm. The politicians
found it nearly in ruins.

Speaking to Insight last week
it became apparent that Mr
Bostwick’s crusade more than
30 years ago was a bit of a pil-
grimage as well. He said that
remembering the decline of the
once vibrant farm was sad for
him.

“IT was raised on the milk of
Hatchet Bay,” he said.

Many of his generation were.
No doubt, like others from the
same era, Mr Bostwick saw no
need for Hatchet Bay not to
continue just as it was at the
time. “Let it continue to live its
own life,” he said.

“The government of the day
was socialising everything, caus-
ing the demise of (all enterpris-
es) that were independent,
especially if they were operating
successfully,” he said.

The former statesman said
that in its raw form “Bahami-
anisation” meant “ownership,”
but at the time it was far from
being a national ideal.

“Bahamianisation was a PLP
government concept. It was a
political ideal, rather than some-
thing (driven by the people),”
Mr Bostwick said.

However, Mr Bostwick said
that some good did come out
of this “political ideal.”

“Was Bahamianisation suc-
cessful? Yes in that quite a
number of black millionaires
came into being. It opened a
door that had been hitherto
closed and it changed the face
of the country’s economy. Peo-
ple like me were able to suc-
ceed and advance because we
took the legitimate opportuni-

TST

For the stories

WATT TS
Wr ES
on Mondays



ties that were available,” he
said.

Still, he acknowledged that
today’s generation has awak-
ened to the fact that the country
has changed and their parents’
“misplaced” sense of entitle-
ment will not provide them with
the things they want from life.

“All the choice properties on
New Providence are gone.
(Young people) have a real
thirst for land, but it has come at
a time when it is too late to do
anything about it.”

These days, said Mr Bost-
wick, the idea that one should
“possess or own land and every-
thing on it due to nationality or
colour, because it’s their God-
given right, is total nonsense.”

Mr Bostwick expects govern-
ment to announce very soon
that it is developing Andros,
Inagua or Crooked Island so
that Bahamians can get land.

It is not hard to imagine that
the former opposition leader’s
words may prove one day to be
prophetic, but his insight on the
here and now as it relates to the
new generation of Bahamians
is spot on.

Younger Bahamians want to
own, but they are not weight-
ed down by the paternalism of
their parents. They expect gov-
ernment to be facilitators, not
providers.

Insight exchanged e-mails
with a professional lady in her
early 30s about this topic of
Bahamianisation and thought
that her response was so telling
on a number of levels that it
should be printed in its entirety.

“Rupert to tell you the truth,
I have no clue what that con-
cept even means so, I did some
research. This is what I found —
‘At its most basic level, Bahami-
anisation is widely accepted to
mean that as the owners of
these islands, we have first call
on all the best in resources and
rewards available herein.’
(Source: The Bahama Journal.
Article by Theresa Moxey-
Ingraham)

“Tf this is the definition, ALL
successive governments have
failed miserably. If governments
were/are serious about this
Bahamianisation policy it could
happen within a blink of an eye.
Through free job training pro-
grammes, free continuing edu-
cation programmes, community
centres in EVERY neighbour-
hood, free quality health care,
free quality education (inclu-
sive of tertiary education), land
grants, clean streets, parks for
recreation, beach access and
grants for small businesses for
example. For EVERY person
born here NO MATTER where
their parents are from.

“The solution is that we will
not wait for our governments
to give us anything. We will now
take what is ours by building
our own institutions, schools,
media institutions, community
centres, health care institutions
and the list goes on.

“Many people are already
taking this approach and in the
next 10-20 years I think that this
country will begin to reap the
benefits of a bottom up
Bahamianisation policy because
of African warrior scholars who
are working for the empower-
ment and liberation of our com-
munities,” she said.

Modern Bahamian govern-
ments are now (we hope) more
mature, or perhaps less inse-
cure. Government may also, as
the prime minister said, be pop-
ulated by more “realists.”

This would explain his admin-
istration’s decision to bring in
a person with the skills needed
to operate URCA, facing the
reality that no such Bahamian is
currently available in our labour
pool.

The reasonable conclusion
should be that “Bahamianisa-
tion” isn’t an event or period in
our history, but a continuing
process. Perhaps it is occurring
more gradually than people
hoped or expected, but we’re
getting there.

Today, Bahamians don’t own
or control everything, but since
July 10, 1973, we have become
executives and managers in
major companies, both locally
and internationally, opened and
operated hospitals and clinics,
law firms and supermarkets,
insurance and real estate com-
panies, major liquor companies,
breweries, radio and television
stations, newspapers, schools
and independently administered
one of the most stable govern-
ments in one of the most pros-
perous countries in the region
for nearly 40 years.

Even so, it will be up to indi-
viduals to determine whether
this progress has been enough.

It should be painfully obvi-
ous that there isn’t anything
wrong with the idea of
“Bahamianisation,” but it
requires the participation and
inclusion of all Bahamians, both
white and black. It is also an
ideal that has no teeth if it is
not supported by an adequate
education system that is sup-
ported by government, corpo-
rate and civil society.

Finally, and more important-
ly, it requires actual work and a
drive on the part of individual
Bahamians who would see sec-
tors where Bahamians are not
present or under-represented
to equip themselves to climb to
the top of these industries.

“By the sweat of your brow
you shall eat.”

There is no shame in that, is
there?

Many things could have been
done and there is no telling
what eventually suffered
because of the break-neck
speed with which “Bahamiani-
sation” was attempted to be
implemented.

It was introduced by a young
government desperate to prove
itself and embraced by a newly
independent dispossessed peo-
ple eager to possess. Perhaps
both groups were expecting
instantaneous fruits from a tree
that in reality takes decades
upon decades to reach maturity.

rocts reality. Jah Nyne has peroemed in numercas
shows with other Cariobean artists such as Capleton
and is looking inte colaborating with the best artists
in the Caribbean as well as. abroad.

Jan Nyne says his greatest inspiration camesinaih
“His Imperial Majesty Haile Selassie | who inSeinge me
to sing music of redemption for the human race Siig ip
ad an exemplary life of faith, integrity and courage"
His lyrics. are inspired by world events, everyday

vity a5 well a5 peTsoaal experiences.

AS an inspiring culture artist Jah Myris on
a mission to take his music and message to
tne world to share nis Message of po sthive
living with an intematinal audience. For
now his focus is on networking with thetin=
dustry, make his mark in the international
music business and ar alGurnm is in &1e
pipeline for later this year. His goal of Be
coming a great inbemetipnal artist, bringing
Bahamian reggae to the forefront and spredtile
ing his massage of positivity Jah Myne is
working towards iuming his goal into reality

ae

Ww) We

BORN SEAN ROLLE ON THE ISLAND OF GRAND
BAHAMA JAH AYHE GREW UP IM THE COMMU-
NITY OF HAWKSBILL. Jah Myne grew up around
music being first influenced by his father, who was a
lead guitarist and vocalist of a band called the in
truders. As 4 teenager at that time Jah Nyne and his
friends would string up a dj set.and one by ome they
would take tims singing and djing on weekends. At
times they would also record their sessions. with a
camcorder a5 they performed.

In 1998 Jah Nyne performed before an audience
for the first time when he opened a show for Exter-
minator with recording artists Luciana, Sizzla and
Milcey General Al that time ne reaiged fat he
wanted 10 Make a career in music and he has been
warking hard since. With a strong and positive mes-
Sage, Mis Music is spiritually cultivated and sure to
draw the attention of listeners with a vibration of

MAY 16, O09
BUTLER & SANOS
GROUNDS, JFK


THE TRIBUNE MONDAY, MAY 11, 2009, PAGE 3C



IN THIS September 26, 2007
courtroom sketch, Kirby Logan
Archer, 35, of Strawberry, Ark.,
left, and Guillermo Zarabozo, 19,
of Hialeah, Fla., right, appear in
federal court in Miami. A judge
sentenced Zarabozo Wednesday,
May 6, 2009 to five consecutive
life prison sentences plus 85 years
for taking part in the 2007 hijack-
ing of the “Joe Cool” charter boat
and killings at sea of its captain,
his wife and two crew members.

(AP Photo: Shirley Henderson)



Life plus

85 years for

Joe Cool’ boat killings

m@ By CURT ANDERSON
AP Legal Affairs Writer

MIAMI (AP) — A judge
sentenced a former security
guard Wednesday to five con-
secutive life prison sentences
plus 85 years for taking part in
the 2007 hijacking of the "Joe
Cool" charter boat and killings
at sea of its captain, his wife
and two crew members.

A life sentence was manda-
tory following the conviction
of Guillermo Zarabozo, 21, on
16 charges in February. But
US. District Judge Paul Huck
sided with prosecutors who
wanted a more severe sen-
tence, even if stringing togeth-
er multiple life terms was
essentially symbolic.

Zarabozo testified at his tri-
al that he did not kill anyone,
instead blaming the hijacking
and murders on his confeder-
ate Kirby Archer. Archer, 37,
pleaded guilty and is also serv-
ing five life terms. Zarabozo
repeated his claims in court
Wednesday.

"When I got onto that boat,
I didn't know what Archer was
going to do," Zarabozo told
the judge. "I had no intention
of hurting anybody."

Huck, however, called
Zarabozo's statements and tes-
timony "largely a fabrication"
clearly contradicted by the evi-
dence and Zarabozo's decision
to bring a gun and other
weapons on board.

"It was so obviously not
true," Huck said.

Prosecutors said Zarabozo

wished for a life of adventure
and got involved because
Archer claimed connections
with the CIA and made
promises of a lucrative career
filled with undercover excite-
ment.

Security

Zarabozo, a security guard
who once aspired to a police
career, was convicted in Feb-
ruary of kidnapping, murder
and other charges. Trial testi-
mony showed that he and
Archer paid $4,000 cash to hire
the "Joe Cool" in September
2007 for a purported trip to
Bimini, Bahamas, then fatally
shot all four people and tried
to make it to Cuba. The plot
failed when the boat ran out
of gas a few miles from Cuban
waters.

Killed were boat captain
Jake Branam, 27; his wife, Kel-
ley Branam, 30; crew members
Scott Gamble, 35, and Samuel
Kairy, 27. The Branams left
two small children now being
cared for by relatives.

Friends and family members

of the victims and Zarabozo
packed the courtroom. Maria
Gagliardo, partner of Jake
Branam's grandfather Joe Har-
ry Branam Sr., read two
lengthy statements that repeat-
edly called Zarabozo a "mon-
ster" who had wrecked the
families.

"Life for you will be long
and unpleasant and you will
die a convicted murderer," she
said. "You are a coward. You
chose to take innocent lives."

Zarabozo's mother, Francis-
ca Alfonso, repeated her son's
claims of innocence but also
expressed sympathy for the
victim's families.

"There have been two fami-
lies that have been destroyed. I
feel their pain,” she said.

When Zarabozo and Archer
were first rescued floating in
the "Joe Cool" life raft, they
claimed the boat had been set
upon by Cuban pirates who
had committed the slayings.
But investigators believed oth-
erwise, and pieced together a
case based on circumstantial
evidence such as the discovery
of shell casings that matched

To advertise in The Tritune -

the #1 newspaper in circulation,
just call 502-2371 today!



IH ALIBORANGE|

The Omega-3 fish
Oy MAR es ie of fruit.

FISH OIL
SCE ee Ey

FRUIT BURST

‘abl te

pe eh

oe ee ee

ee ee

iy ilatd |

FRUIT BURST
CAPSULES

PUTA IP URC AeAC AAS
xl ET eA An) ca

Distributed by Nassau Agencies Ltd. - 393-4854



a 9mm handgun owned by
Zarabozo.

Archer, a former military
policeman who had been sta-
tioned at Guantanamo Bay,
Cuba, was a fugitive from
Arkansas when he hired the
boat. He was under investiga-
tion for child molestation and
was wanted for stealing $92,000
from a Wal-Mart where he had
been a manager.

Zarabozo's first trial ended
in a mistrial when jurors failed
to agree on verdicts on the
Most serious counts but con-
victed him on underlying
weapons charges. Huck threw
out the weapons verdicts and
ordered a second trial, finding
the jury was confused by faulty
instructions on the law.




wait

Peper

pein
Pye) Lalu A



err = Kath Kem “s

Butter).

It's Electric!

Geoffrey Jones has you covered when it comes to
electrical supplies & accessories. Great service
at competitive prices. Come in today!

#14 single wire (500’ roll)...

N142 NM Cable (250’ roll)
4” Square box (50)

4” Single Gang Ring (50)
F40D/CW 4’ Bulb (30)

1/2” PVC Pipe (100Lts)
1/2” PVC Adapters (100)
1/2” Locknuts (100)

* CASH ONLY

net

©2009 CreativeRelations.

Sales & Full Service Department
Rosetta & Montgomery Streets
Tel: 322-2188/9

veseeeeee 40,50 NET

$58.50 NET
$55.80 NET
$39.60 NET
$53.10 NET
$64.95 NET





Email: GeofflJones@comcast.net



accel

Geta free Orville Redenbacher popianm bowl when you bring your entry

to The d'Albenas Agency Lic.

Master Techalel

ilage Mew . i!

Qik Deter backe mcSard pope Bk lege ed wrk ol

Cat pt Cia, lentil

Copies oF Tied Alben. doer oy, Moria Coops

AE dhe 4 The ae Agency Ltd.



BIG TV, BIG POP
‘GIVEAWAY

Enter to Win 1 of 2
Panasonic 42"
Flat Panel HDTV's



To play, attach 3 boxes of
any Orville Redenbacher
Microwave Poncom to an
entry form, complete the
skill question and drop inte
boxes at participating
stores or The d Albenas
Agengy Ltd. in-Palmecale.



ant Miwuer Techobcuon). cir agenm arc broeedlue Gordie ace oot elle. Phoec (I regained to collect pric.

PET EPP PC eeeee Teer Teer rrr reer rrr!

BIG TV, BIG POP GIVEAWAY

NAME:
ADDRESS:

Have a healthier snack with Orville Redenbacher's 5 M

TELEPHONE:

R_ POP!
PAGE 4C, MONDAY, MAY 11, 2009

THE TRIBUNE



INSIGHT



TS

For the stories

TAT RUT Ca
WAS
on Mondays

lm By TRAVIS REED
Associated Press Writer

THE cruise Zenaiva Cer-
vantes booked was to stop in



sun-drenched beach cities on
the Mexican Riviera. The cruise
she took? That landed her in
Seattle, where she pulled her
arms tightly to her chest as she

MINISTRY OF PUBLIC WORKS AND TRANSPORT
EXPRESSION OF INTEREST

Project: NEW PROVIDENCE TRANSPORT PROGRAM

Financing: Inter-American Development Bank

Abstract: Road Maintenance Management System (RMMS)
For the Island of New Providence

Sector: Transport

Loan/Credit Number: Loan No. 1320/OC-BH & 1988/OC-BH

Contract/Bid Number: Invitation for Expression of Interest

Deadline: 5th June 2009

The Government of the Commonwealth of The Bahamas has received a loan
from the Inter-American Development Bank (IDB) to finance the cost of Road
Improvement on the island of New Providence. It is intended that part of the loan
proceeds be applied to eligible payments under the technical consultancy on
establishment and implementation of Road Maintenance Management System
(RMMS) for the Island of New Providence.

The Government of The Commonwealth of The Bahamas though the Ministry of
Works and Transport (MoWT) now invites interested parties from any member
country of the IDB to present their expression of interest in sealed envelopes for
the design and implementation of a simple and practical computerized RMMS
program to develop annual plans and periodic programs of routine and periodic
maintenance activities to be executed by contract or by force account.

Consultancy Firms should demonstrate that they have extensive experience
in road maintenance programs, planning and management for urban road
networks. In addition consultants must show evidence that they have experience
of successfully implementing similar systems in the government organization
responsible for road network maintenance.

The total duration of the implementation period of the consultancy should not
exceed six months.

The Consultant will be based in Nassau, The Bahamas and throughout the
undertaking of the assignment the consulting team will be holding consultations
with relevant stakeholders.

The selection of the shortlist will be based on qualifications and relevant
experience of the Consultancy Firm and therefore the submitted Expression of
Interest should include the following information:

* General background of the Company

* Experience in establishing and implementation of RMMS for urban
road network in the region

* Experience in the organization and facilitation of seminars/workshops
for training in use of the RMMS system developed

* Curriculum Vitae of Principals and key professional staff who may be
available to work on the project

* Experience in the Bahamas and Caribbean region.

The results of the evaluation of the expressions of interest will be used to prepare
a shortlist of no more than six consulting firms. The firms included in the shortlist
will subsequently be invited to present technical and economical proposals on
the basis of a request for proposals (RFP) mailed to them which would include
the detailed terms of reference.

Interested firm s are requested to submit their Expression of Interest by 5th June,
2009.

Applications must be placed in a sealed envelope and addressed and forwarded
to the address below. Interested consultant may obtain further information at the
said address.

Contacts:

Project Coordinator

Project Execution Unit

Ministry of Works and Transport,

JFK Drive, 2nd Floor North Wing

P.O. Box N-8156, Nassau, Bahamas

Tel: (+1 242) 302-9538, Fax: (+ 1 242) 326-0470
Email: GEORGEHUTCHINSON@BAHAMAS.GOV.BS



debarked on a damp, 50-degree
morning.

"We wanted to relax in the
warmth,” the 61-year-old Tijua-
na, Mexico, resident said in
Spanish Thursday. "If someone
had told me I'd be in Seattle
eight days ago, I wouldn't have
believed them."

At the peak of the swine flu
outbreak, major cruise opera-
tors Carnival Corp. and Royal
Caribbean Cruises Ltd. — des-
perate to avoid passenger ill-
ness and lost revenue — decid-
ed to reroute Mexico voyages
until mid-June.

So even though fear has
receded, once-sun-seeking pas-
sengers like Cervantes are find-
ing themselves in San Francisco,
Seattle and Victoria, B.C., in
Canada. Cruise companies are
compensating passengers for
the switch with onboard credit
plus vouchers for a future
cruise. Passengers also had the
choice to stay home and get a
full refund, but most passengers
are choosing to travel when
they planned, the cruise lines
said.

What they're losing in sun-
shine and tan lines, their new
destinations are gaining in mil-
lions of dollars of business. In
San Francisco, the 16 addition-
al swine flu-related landings will
boost the year's port traffic 31
percent and bring 49,000 new
visitors, said Michael Nerney,
San Francisco's maritime mar-
keting manager. Each call could
mean $1 million in sales for city
businesses and together they'll
produce $500,000 in revenue for
the port.

"This is highly unusual —
shocking, really — as the cruise
lines set their sailing schedules
12 to 18 months in advance, and
even minor changes are rare,”
Nerney said.

The great number of alterna-
tive ports in the Caribbean
makes it far easier to swap stops
there. Instead of Cozumel in
Mexico, companies are opting
for Ocho Rios or Montego Bay
in Jamaica, Nassau or Freeport
in the Bahamas, the Virgin
Islands' St. Thomas, St.

Maarten or Key West, Fla., or
points across the Caymans and
Turks and Caicos.

The Bahamas is happily
awaiting diverted ships. Cus-
toms receives $15 for each pas-
senger, and island clothing and
jewelry shops, bars and cafes
depend on tourist dollars, said
tourism minister Vincent Van-
derpool-Wallace said.

Analysts think the benefits
may be fleeting for these ports
because the outbreak hasn't
been severe.

"I think it's a short-term
bump that may already be dis-
sipating,” said Michael McCall,
a hospitality research fellow and
lecturer at Cornell University.

Jan Freitag, vice president of
global development at Smith
Travel Research, noted that, in
addition to swine flu, Mexico
travel has been affected by fear
of heightened drug violence in
border states. He sees business
travel to Mexico remaining
steady and swine flu having
minimal impact on leisure traf-
fic unless the virus worsens.

Hotel operators are seeing
travelers postpone plans. The
Ritz-Carlton Hotel Company
and Four Seasons Hotel and
Resorts said virtually all guests
booked at two of their Mexico
resorts in late April and early
May will come a few months
later instead. Starwood Hotels
& Resorts Inc. expected the flu
to cost it $4 million to $5 million
in revenue but said it could
recover much of it from guests
rebooked at its U.S. or
Caribbean resorts.

The federal Centers for Dis-
ease Control and Prevention
now says only 10 percent of
infected Americans picked up
the virus in Mexico, not one-
third as previously estimated.
But it maintains its warning
against nonessential travel to
Mexico.

Michael Crye, vice president
of technology and regulatory
affairs for the Cruise Lines
International Association,
called that restriction damaging
and unnecessary, because areas
hit hardest by the flu's spread

“Pelecting the needs of advertisers

and readers motivates me to do

a good job. The Tribune is

my newspaper.”

ESTHER BARRY
PRODUCTION MAINA GER

THE TRIBUNE

The Tribune

fly Lice. Ply Hewzoaper!

Swine flu is windfall for
some top tourism spots

are inland and the flu season is
almost over.

Crye pointed to lessons
learned from several rounds of
bad publicity after gastroin-
testinal illnesses like the "Nor-
walk" virus broke out and said
new passenger screenings
ensure ships don't help spread
the H1N1 virus, which causes
swine flu.

"We believe ... we've got a
good story to tell, and that
you're probably at less risk
going ahead with your destina-
tion than you would be in vir-
tually any other public place,”
Crye said.

Eric Brey, head of the Center
for Resort and Hospitality Busi-
ness at the University of Mem-
phis, predicted tourists would
have no problem returning
quickly to Mexico.

"Outside of this summer, I
don't see it being that big a
deal,” Brey said.

In Charlotte Amalie on St.
Thomas, a place hit hard as
tourism has fallen amid the
recession, it is usually quiet this
time of year. But taxies zipped
abundantly by the docks last
week.

"(The swine flu) is a good
problem for us," said Edward
Thomas, CEO of the West Indi-
an Company Dock.

Despite the lack of sunshine,
Cervantes, her husband and the
thousands of other passengers
who ended up in the Pacific
Northwest with them enjoyed
Seattle's blocks of boutiques
and Pike Place Market, where
vendors famously sling fish.

"We thought we'd be in our
bikinis and bathing suits,” said
Philipe Tabet, a 53-year-old
restaurateur from Albuquerque,
N.M., traveling with his wife.
"We just had to pack a little bit
different, that's all. Unpack, and
pack again."

¢ Associated Press Writer
Manuel Valdes contributed to
this report from Seattle; Judi
Shimel contributed from St.
Thomas, US Virgin Islands; and
Juan McCartney contributed
from the Bahamas






PAGE 1

N N A A S S S S A A U U A A N N D D B B A A H H A A M M A A I I S S L L A A N N D D S S L L E E A A D D I I N N G G N N E E W W S S P P A A P P E E R R Expat banker dies of shooting injuries C M Y K C M Y K Volume: 105 No.139MONDAY, MAY 11, 2009 PRICE – 75 (Abaco and Grand Bahama $1.25 WEATHER PLENTY OFSUN HIGH 87F LOW 76F SEEINSIGHTFRONT S P O R T S URCA and The Milk of Hatchet Bay SEEPAGEFIFTEEN Bahamian athletes shine around the world THE murder count rose to 26 over the weekend when Welsh banker Hywel Jones, 55, a permanent res ident of the Bahamas, died from injuries he received when shot execution style three weeks ago. Jones, 55, died in hospital at 11.45 pm Friday with his brother, Ilt, a Californian film producer, at his side. Mr Jones was shot in broad daylight outside his offshore financial services company near Compass Point, West Bay Street, around 10am on April 22. He had been left in a coma to die. Police suspected that Mr Jones, president of Hywel Jones had been in coma for three weeks The Tribune ANYTIME ... ANYPLACE , WE RE #1 B AHAMASEDITION TRY OUR SOUTHERN CHICKEN BISCUIT www.tribune242.com I N S I D E SECTIONINSIDE Real Estate I N S I G H T C M Y K C M Y K T h e T r i b u n e I N S I G H T M O N D A Y , M A Y 1 1 , 2 0 0 9T h e s t o r i e s b e h i n d t h e n e w s n B y R U P E R T M I S S I C K J r C h i e f R e p o r t e r r m i s s i c k @ t r i b u n e m e d i a . n e tB a h a m i a n i s a t i o n i s a f a l l a c y , a h a l f h e a r t e d a t t e m p t t o b r i n g a b o u t a l e v e l p l a y i n g f i e l d , p o l i t i c a l p r o p a g a n d a , i d e a l i s t i c , i n c o m p l e t e , a n d a n i d e a l t h a t h a s n e v e r b e e n f o r t i f i e d w i t h t h e t o o l s i t n e e d e d t o b e r e a l i s e d . T h e s e w e r e a l l w o r d s u s e d t o d e s c r i b e d t h e p h i l o s o p h y o f B a h a m i a n i s a t i o n t o I n s i g h t t h i s p a s t w e e k . C e r t a i n l y B a h a m i a n i s a t i o n m e a n s B a h a m i a n s f i r s t o r a s o n e s e n i o r s t a t e s m a n s a i d , B a h a m i a n o w n e r s h i p , b u t a f a c t t h a t m a y b e h a r d t o s w a l l o w f o r m a n y i s t h a t r e a l i s t i c a l l y B a h a m i a n i s a t i o n t r u l y m e a n s B a h a m i a n s e v e n t u a l l y . T h e r e a s o n i s b e c a u s e i t w a s i n t r o d u c e d b y a g o v e r n m e n t t h a t d i d n o t f u l l y u n d e r s t a n d w h a t w a s r e q u i r e d t o p r o d u c e t h e r e s u l t s t h e p h i l o s o p h y p r o f e s s e d t o b r i n g a b o u t . I f o n e c h o s e t o b e c y n i c a l i t c o u l d b e s a i d t h a t g o v e r n m e n t h a s b e l i e v e d o n l y i n B a h a m i a n i s a t i o n s a b i l i t y t o b r i n g i n v o t e s . A w o m a n w h o d e s c r i b e s h e r s e l f a s o n e o f t h e b e n e f i c i a r i e s o f B a h a m i a n i s a t i o n e x p l a i n e d i t t o I n s i g h t t h i s w a y . T h e y d i d n o t B a h a m i a n i s e u s c u l t u r a l l y o r o n a d e e p e d u c a t i o n a l l e v e l l i k e ( o t h e r g o v e r n m e n t s ) d i d i n t h e o t h e r C a r i b b e a n n a t i o n s . I g u e s s w e s t i l l h a d i t t o o g o o d , t o o c l o s e t o t h e U S . I t w a s l i k e w e w e r e k i d s l e t l o o s e i n a c a n d y s t o r e . B u t n o w t h e s t o r e w a s o u r s w e w e r e n o t e d u c a t e d o n h o w t o t a k e c a r e o f i t o n o u r o w n o r h o w t o u s e s u g a r t o m a k e t h i n g s o t h e r t h a n c a n d y . T h e g o v e r n m e n t w a s e a g e r a n d t r i e d t o e d u c a t e u s , b u t w e l o s t s o m e t h i n g i n t h e p r o c e s s : M o r a l i t y , w o r k e t h i c s . E v e r y t h i n g c a m e t o o e a s i l y . I w a s 1 6 d u r i n g i n d e p e n d e n c e . T h e g o v e r n m e n t p a i d f o r m y e d u c a t i o n , f o r h i g h s c h o o l a n d u p t o m y f i r s t d e g r e e i n c o l l e g e . I w a s a b e n e f i c i a r y . I w a s o n e o f t h o s e w h o r e c e i v e d g o v e r n m e n t s c h o l a r s h i p s t h a t w e r e g i v e n o u t f r e e l y a f t e r M a j o r i t y R u l e t o e n s u r e t h a t w e h a d B a h a m i a n p r o f e s s i o n a l s , e s p e c i a l l y i n t h e e d u c a t i o n f i e l d , b u t n o t e v e r y o n e b e n e f i t e d . T h e P L P s s u c c e s s o r s i n o f f i c e ( w h i c h i n c l u d e s n o t o n l y t h e F N M b u t t h e n e w P L P ) h a s h a d t o t e m p e r a n a l l o r n o t h i n g e x p e c t a t i o n t h a t h a s a c c o m p a n i e d B a h a m i a n i s a t i o n w i t h m a t u r i t y , a n e w f o u n d , a l t h o u g h n o t w i d e s p r e a d , c o l l e c t i v e s e c u r i t y a n d , a s o n e s e n i o r p o l i t i c i a n n o t e d l a s t w e e k , a h e a l t h y d o s e o f r e a l i t y . T h i s p a s t W e d n e s d a y , d u r i n g h i s c o n t r i b u t i o n t o t h e d e b a t e o n t h e B i l l t h a t w o u l d e s t a b l i s h t h e U t i l i t i e s R e g u l a t i o n a n d C o m p e t i t i o n A u t h o r i t y ( U R C A ) t h a t i s e x p e c t e d t o r e g u l a t e e l e c t r o n i c c o m m u n i c a t i o n s i n t h e B a h a m a s , P r i m e M i n i s t e r H u b e r t I n g r a h a m s a i d t h a t i t i s h i s g o v e r n m e n t s h o p e t h a t i t w i l l b e a b l e t o p o p u l a t e t h i s r e g u l a t o r y a u t h o r i t y w i t h B a h a m i a n s . B u t w e a r e r e a l i s t s a n d w e a l s o r e c o g n i s e t h a t i n t h i s e a r l y p h a s e w e w i l l b e r e q u i r e d t o a c c e s s t a l e n t t h a t m a y n o t b e a v a i l a b l e i n t h e B a h a m a s , h e s a i d . G o v e r n m e n t h a s a l r e a d y i d e n t i f i e d t h i s t a l e n t i n s o m e o n e o u t s i d e t h e B a h a m a s w h o w i l l b e t h e P o l i c y D i r e c t o r o f U R C A . M r I n g r a h a m a c k n o w l e d g e d t h a t t h e s a l a r i e s p a y a b l e f o r j o b s i n t h i s s e c t o r a r e f a r i n e x c e s s o f a n y t h i n g k n o w n b y p u b l i c s e c t o r e n t e r p r i s e s . I w o u l d e x p e c t t h a t s o m e o f t h e s a l a r i e s p a i d t o s o m e o f t h e p r o f e s s i o n a l s w i l l b e h i g h e r t h a n w h a t i s n o r m a l l y p a i d i n o t h e r a r e a s i n t h e B a h a m a s , t h e p r i m e m i n i s t e r s a i d . T h e c r e a t i o n o f U R C A , a n d t h e n e w C o m m u n i c a t i o n s B i l l i n g e n e r a l , s i g n a l s , a c c o r d i n g t o t h e p r i m e m i n i s t e r , a n e w p h a s e i n t h e B a h a m a s d e v e l o p m e n t . U R C A w a s n o t s o m e t h i n g t h a t t h e c o u n t r y a c t u a l l y n e e d e d b e f o r e n o w . I n a d e v e l o p i n g n a t i o n w i t h a p o p u l a t i o n o f 3 0 0 , 0 0 0 p e o p l e a n d a g r o w i n g n e e d f o r d o c t o r s , t e a c h e r s , n u r s e s , c o n t r a c t o r s , e n g i n e e r s , a n d t h e l i k e , i t i s h a r d t o i m a g i n e t h a t a B a h a m i a n w o u l d h a v e a n t i c i p a t e d t h i s o b s c u r e a n d f u t u r e n e e d a n d h a d t h e f o r e s i g h t t o p r e p a r e h i m s e l f t o f i l l t h e p o s i t i o n o f U R C A s P o l i c y D i r e c t o r . W h e n I n s i g h t d i s c u s s e d t h i s p o i n t o f v i e w w i t h a y o u n g B a h a m i a n , h e c o n c e d e d e v e r y t h i n g t o a c e r t a i n e x t e n t . H e a s s e r t e d t h a t w h i l e i t m a y b e n e w t o t h e g e n e r a l p u b l i c , U R C A s e s t a b l i s h m e n t i s n o s u r p r i s e t o t h e c u r r e n t g o v e r n m e n t . T h e y r e i n p o w e r t w o y e a r s n o w a n d h a d t o p r e p a r e t h e l e g i s l a t i o n f o r i t . W h y d i d n t t h e y s e n d a B a h a m i a n a b r o a d f o r t h o s e t w o y e a r s a n d h a v e t h e m c o m e b a c k n o w r e a d y t o l e a d t h i s t h i n g ? T h e a n s w e r c o u l d b e b a s e d o n t h e a s s u m p t i o n a l b e i t a n e m b a r r a s s i n g l y a p p a r e n t o n e t h a t i n a s m a l l c o u n t r y w i t h l i m i t e d r e s o u r c e s t h e r e i s a l o t o f p r e s s u r e a n d i n f a c t a d e s p e r a t e n e e d t o g e t t h i n g s r i g h t t h e f i r s t t i m e a r o u n d . T h e d e m a n d t h e n f o r a p e r s o n w h o k n o w s w h a t h e i s d o i n g t h e f i r s t d a y o n t h e j o b a s o p p o s e d t o a p e r s o n w h o m a y b e i n e p t l y g r o p i n g w i t h t h e o r e t i c a l r a t h e r t h a n p r a c t i c a l e x p e r i e n c e i s n o t o n l y r i s k y , b u t c o s t l y . D o e s t h i s m e a n t h a t U R C A i s n o t B a h a m i a n i s e d ? I t m a y n o t b e i m m e d i a t e l y , b u t i t c o u l d b e e v e n t u a l l y . N o w t h a t t h e p u b l i c i s a w a r e t h a t t h e j o b e x i s t s a n d t h a t t h e s a l a r y i s i n e x c e s s o f a n y t h i n g k n o w n b y p u b l i c s e c t o r e n t e r p r i s e s , a B a h a m i a n , w h o i s s o i n c l i n e d , s h o u l d d o s o m e r e s e a r c h , e d u c a t e h i m s e l f a n d w o r k h i s w a y u p t h e r a n k s o f U R C A t o b e e v e n t u a l l y e q u i p p e d t o f u l l y m e r i t t h e p o s i t i o n . I n a w o r l d p o p u l a t e d b y t h e I n t e r n e t , m i c r o w a v e s , i n s t a n t m e s s e n g e r a n d e m a i l i t m a y b e t o o m u c h t o a s k t h e m o d e r n B a h a m i a n t o a c c e p t t h i s g r a d u a l i s m . W e d o h a v e , h o w e v e r , a n h i s t o r i c a l e x a m p l e w h e r e a r u s h t o B a h a m i a n i s e , s u p p o r t e d b y g o v e r n m e n t s f a i l u r e t o t r u l y p r e p a r e B a h a m i a n s f o r o w n e r s h i p , c a u s e d t h e f a i l u r e o f a o n c e v i b r a n t i n s t i t u t i o n . I n 1 9 7 5 , t h e g o v e r n m e n t b o u g h t a s u c c e s s f u l d a i r y a n d c h i c k e n f a r m f r o m t h e H a r r i s v i l l e C o m p a n y i t w a s k n o w n a s t h e H a t c h e t B a y F a r m . T h e f a r m , w h i c h w a s d e v e l o p e d b y t h e l a t e A m e r i c a n m i l l i o n a i r e A u s t i n T L e v y , p r o v i d e d j o b s f o r 3 0 0 p e o p l e i n t h e s e t t l e m e n t o f A l i c e T o w n . T h e 2 , 5 0 0 a c r e f a r m w a s b o u g h t b y g o v e r n m e n t f o r $ 3 m i l l i o n . O n t h e f a r m s t a k e o v e r , t h e l a t e P r i m e M i n i s t e r S i r L y n d e n P i n d l i n g d e c l a r e d t h a t B a h a m i a n s w e r e w i t n e s s i n g a t r i u m p h o f t h e h u m a n s p r i t . H e s a i d t h e H a t c h e t B a y t a k e o v e r w a s t h e g r e a t e s t s u c c e s s s t o r y i n t h e c o u n t r y s h i s t o r y o f a g r i c u l t u r e . B u t t h e d r e a m q u i c k l y w e n t s o u r . S h o r t l y a f t e r t h e t a k e o v e r t h e r e w e r e r e p o r t s t h a t l a r g e n u m b e r s o f c h i c k e n s h a d d i e d . T h e r e w e r e a l l e g a t i o n s t h a t t h e f a r m s s e e d b o a t w a s U R C A a n d T h e M i l k o f H a t c h e t B a y A b r i e f i n s i g h t i n t o t h e c o u n t r y s m o r e t h a n 4 0 y e a r a t t e m p t t o B a h a m i a n i s e . . . T H E R O O M i n w h i c h t h o u s a n d s o f c h i c k e n s w e r e k i l l e d p a c k a g e d a n d s e n t t o N a s s a u , c l e a n c l o s e d a n d d e s e r t e d . . .S E E p a g e 2 C J A N U A R Y 1 9 7 9 B D P L e a d e r J H e n r y B o s t w i c k d u r i n g h i s o n e d a y f a c t f i n i n g t o u r o f t h e H a t c h e t B a y F a r m s a t A l i c e T o w n E l e u t h e r a . M r B o s t w i c k i s s h o w n i n o n e o f t h e c o o p s f i l l e d w i t h h u n d r e d s o f l a y e r c h i c k e n s . . . I N S I G H T GWENDOLYN CLARKE , a 95-year-old native of Green Turtle Cay, Abaco, enjoys Mother’s Day with her one-year-old great granddaughter K’leigh Davies yesterday at her home in Fox Hill. CELEBRA TING MO THER’S DAY F e l i p M a j o r / T r i b u n e s t a f f F e l i p M a j o r / T r i b u n e s t a f f n By PAUL G TURNQUESTT ribune Staff Reporter pturnquest@tribunemedia.net THE Bahamas Government is endangering the lives of its citizensi f it continues on its present course of neglecting its duty to deal with the unacceptably high levels ofc rime and criminality, Rev CB Moss said yesterday. A s an executive director of the Bahamas Against Crime committee, Mr Moss said governmentm ust not be “narrow-minded or fearful” in dealing with this scourge that is currently plaguing the nation. While commending the Royal Bahamas Police Force for its valiant efforts, Mr Moss said that crime and vio-l ence is becoming entrenched in the Bahamian sociClaim that govt ‘neglecting duty’ to deal with the high crime level Rev CB Moss commends police efforts but warns of dama g e to Bahamian society SEE page eight Rev CBMoss n By PAUL G TURNQUEST Tribune Staff Reporter pturnquest@tribunemedia.net FRIENDS, family and colleagues gathered to bid farewell to The Tribune ’s former Managing Editor John Marquis as he transitions from his time behind the desk to a life of relaxation and book writing. Holding a retirement reception in his honour at the Breeze’s Bahamas Resort on Saturday night, an admirer travelled from as far away as T ribune bids farewell to former Managing Editor John Marquis SEE page two FORMERMANAGINGEDITOR of The Tribune John Marquis (leftwith Tribune Chief Reporter Rupert Missick Jr. A 20-YEAR-OLDmember of the Royal Bahamas Defence Force died early Saturday morning following a collision on Carmichael Road. According to reports, around 1.30 am Saturday, a green coloured Ford Explorer heading east on Carmichael Road and east of the Coral Harbour roundabout collided with a white coloured Mitsubishi Lancer. The driver of the Lancer, who was a member of the Royal Bahamas Defence Force, died at the scene. The Lancer’s two back seat passengers were taken to hospital for injuries after the offiDef ence F or ce member dies in traffic collision SEE page eight INSIDE 28TH ANNIVERS AR Y OF THE HMBS FL AMINGO SINKING PAGETHREE C OMMONWEAL TH LOC AL GOV T C ONFEREN CE HELD IN THE B AHAMAS FOR THE FIRS T TIME P A GE FIVE Hywel Jones EIGHT Dominicans were arrested and hand ed over to immigration officials over the week end after police on Andros broke up what they believed was a human smuggling operation. Two Bahamian men suspected of being a part of the illegal operation were taken into police custody. According to reports, police on Dominicans arrested over suspected human smuggling operation SEE page eight SEE page eight

PAGE 2

London to attend, returning the next day to prepare for law exams. Mr Marquis wasp raised and presented with gifts for his outstanding journalistic career that has spanned almost 50 years 1 1 of them with T he Tribune . Having worked as a r eporter in the Bahamas in the mid-sixties, first at The Nassau Guardian , then at T he Tribune , Mr Marquis held a number of top posts at v arious newspapers in England before returning to the Bahamas in 1999 to take upt he position of Tribune Managing Editor. A fter working on the Reuters news agency’s world desk, he joined the Thomsong roup of newspapers and became their Sports Editor and chief boxing correspon-d ent, covering most of the great fights of the legendary M ohammed Ali, including his last fight in the Bahamas. In the seventies Mr Marquisw as named Provincial Journalist of the Year after e xposing two doctors involved in the deaths of two child patients. T hanking the newspaper’s publisher Eileen Carron, former Managing Editor RogerC arron, and current President Robert Carron for this opportunity, Mr Marquis said he wanted to end his journalistic career at The Trib une, t he newspaper that had remained true to its mission. “I wanted to rejoin The T ribune b ecause I believed in its mission. It is the one v oice everyone can trust, a vital part of the democratic process. Newspapers areg oing through very tough times and soon many of the great titles will no longer exist in print form. “Unfortunately, many corp orate newspaper organisations have downgraded journalism to a secondary role, but The Tribune has always been an editorially-led news-p aper and that makes all the difference. It remains what newspapers are supposed to be all about,” he said. Mr Marquis said he counts h imself fortunate to be one of the few editors in the busi ness today who can retire from a newspaper secure in the knowledge that its circu l ation continues to rise. “Over the last few years we have changed the nation al mindset towards those in authority who were previ o usly considered untouch able. But Bahamians still need to know that when good people stay silent, bad people prevail. You need tob uild free speech into your culture so that it can never again be challenged by those in power,” he reminded his young news staff those he has spent long hours in preparing to carry the torch. Flying in Saturday morn i ng from Buckingham Uni versity in England, especial ly for the evening event, Controversy TV co-host Lin coln Bain described Mr Mar q uis as one of his role-mod els who had shown him the benefit of being fearless in the pursuit of Truth. “Mr Marquis is one of t hose people who supported me and encouraged me and kept me going even though I was getting death threats right along with him. But Iw ant to thank you, Mr Marquis, for being what you were to the Bahamas, and being a role model to a lot of other young persons who are going into journalism; and for leading the country in the direction you have led it in the past few years,” he said. Mr Bain then entertained guests with a live performance of his freestyle outline of one of Mr Marquis’ most controversial Insight pieces on the disappearance of pilot Chauncey Tynes Jr and the suggestion by Chauncey’s father that the young man might have known too much about the friendship of the late prime minister, Sir Lynden Pindling, and drug cartel head, Joe Carlos Lehder, who operated from Norman’s Cay in the Bahamas. Succeeding Mr Marquis in the post of Managing Editor is Mr John Fleet, an editor from newspapers in Northern England and Scotland, and winner of two North East Press Awards for Best Front Page and Best Inside Page design. He joined The Tribune on March 30. C M Y K C M Y K LOCAL NEWS PAGE 2, MONDAY, MAY 11, 2009 THE TRIBUNE INDEX MAIN/SPOR TS SECTION Local News.............P1,2,3,5,6,7,8,9,10,11,16 Editorial/Letters..........................................P4 Sports ........................................P12,13,14,15 BUSINESS SECTION Business..............P1,2,3,4,5,6,7,8,9,10,11,12 INSIGHT SECTION Insight................................................P1,2,3,4 Advt.........................................................P5,8 Comics........................................................P6 Weather.......................................................P7 CLASSIFIED SECTION 40 PAGES REAL ESTATE GUIDE 28 PAGES USA TODAY MAIN SECTION 12 PAGES Tribune bids farewell to former Managing Editor John Marquis FORMERTRIBUNE MANAGING EDITOR John Marquis chats with Tribune graphic designer Dale Dean (left Nunez at Saturday night’s function. FROM page one FORMERTRIBUNE MANAGING EDITOR John Marquis receives a keepsake from Tribune president Robert Carron.

PAGE 3

S UNDAY marked the 28th anniversary of sinking of HMBS Flamingo and the d eaths of four Royal B ahamas Defence Force M arines in an attack by Cuban fighter jets. The attack on HMBS F lamingo, and its crew came just six weeks after the establ ishment of the Royal Bahamas Defence Force. On Saturday, May 10, 1980 t he Flamingo, which was on routine patrol in the Ragged I sland chain, apprehended a pair of Cuban fishing boats off Cay Santo Domingo, in the Bahamas, just 35 miles f rom the Cuban coast. Each vessel had four crew members who were arrested. W hile in the process of t owing the vessels towards C ay Santo Domingo, however, two Cuban MiG jet fighters appeared overhead and opened machine gunfire. N early an hour later the Cuban fighter jets returned and attacked HMBS Flaming o with rocket and machine g unfire. A ll, except four of the 19 crewmen, made it to one of the fishing boats. Despite a search by Bahamian and American resc ue teams, the four marines, A ble Seaman Fenrick Sturrup and Marine Seamen D avid Tucker, Edward W illiams and Austin Smith w ere never found. A special ceremony comm emorating the death of the f our marines is scheduled for 8.30 am at the Defence Forces' Coral Harbour base today. C M Y K C M Y K LOCAL NEWS T HE TRIBUNE MONDAY, MAY 11, 2009, PAGE 3 3 pc Queen Sleigh Bed 3 pc Queen Sleigh Bed 1 pc Dresser 1 pc Dresser 1 pc Mirror 1 pc Mirror 2 pc Nightstands 2 pc Nightstands 1 pc 5 Drawer Chest 1 pc 5 Drawer Chest Queen 8 Pc Queen 8 Pc $3,440 $3,440 King 8 Pc Set King 8 Pc Set $3,600 $3,600Solid Wood Solid WoodT T h h e e T T h h e e J J a a v v a a G G a a l l l l e e r r y y J J a a v v a a G G a a l l l l e e r r y yW ong’s Plaza Wong’s Plaza M adeira Street Madeira Street (242 (242 2335 2335Financing Available Through Commonwealth Bank P P i i n n e e C C o o t t t t a a g g e e P P i i n n e e C C o o t t t t a a g g e e POLICE on Saturday seized a .380 handgun, seven live rounds of a mmunition and a small q uantity of marijuana after responding to a complaint from the Laird Street area. According to reports, while responding to a complaint made by a 21year-old woman about a male companion, officers from the Central Detective Unit went to a home in Laird Street around 5 am Saturday. While exec uting a search warrant, o fficers found a .380 handgun with seven live r ounds of ammunition in a toilet bowl in the bathr oom with a small amount of marijuana. A 26-year-old man wasa rrested and is in police custody. TWO men were a rrested early Saturday morning after police seized a .40 handgun and s even live rounds of a mmunition. A ccording to reports, officers from the CentralP olice Station were on p atrol in the area of Comfort Street around 3am Saturday when they observed and searched the occupants of a gold coloured Honda Accord. Inside the car, officersf ound a .40 handgun with s even live rounds of ammunition. The occupants of the vehicle, a2 8-year-old man of Ross Corner and a 22-year-old man from Williams Lanewere arrested. A 23-year-old man of Fritz Lane is in policec ustody after being f ound in possession of an imitation firearm. Around 5pm Friday, officers of the MobileD ivision were in the area of Fritz Lane when they observed a 23-year-old man who was wanted forq uestioning by the police. The officers stopped and searched the man and discovered that he had in his possession a replica handgun. A local company was robbed of an undeter mined amount of cash last Friday. According to reports, around 4 pm Friday, police received a report of an armed robbery tak ing place at S&P Shea Limited on Carib Road. The company was robbed of an undetermined amount of cash. When officers from the Wulff Road Police Station arrived at the scene, they saw a man leaving the area dressed in a white T-shirt and blue jeans and carrying a shotgun. Police pursued the man who dropped the weapon and fled the scene. Police retrieved the shotgun along with two shotgun shells. Police find handgun, ammunition and marijuana In brief 28th anniversary of the HMBS Flamingo sinking M ONDAY JUNE 2 1980 The parents of the four dead marines are shown seated front row under the Clifford Park pavilion with the 15 survivors of the ill-fated HMBS Flamingo. Attack came just six weeks after RBDF established

PAGE 4

EDITOR, The Tribune. I have read some interesting information regarding the CARICOM Single Market and Economy (CSME receive a comprehensive, cohere nt, and contemporary single document outlining The Bahamas’ position on including ourselves or excluding ourselves from thiss ingle market and economy and the reasons why (either way Most of what I have gathered to date is courtesy of the newspapers, the radio, the television and a few pamphlets. It will not suf f ice. Nevertheless, the refrain of this a nd previous governments is that The Bahamas will never accede to t he CSME’s provisions as long as the free movement of labour and a single market currency are part and parcel of the agreement. Praise the Lord.H owever, that does not mean that I would be altogether averset o entertaining the idea of a single market and economy sometime i n the future. Since (I believe ment’s fear is that The Bahamas would be flooded with immigrants from sister CARICOM s tates, the dollar would be devalued, and subsequently the stan d ard of living would coinciden tally plummet if we join, it is my h umble opinion that it is incum bent upon the government to do all within its power to ensure the upliftment of less prosperous CARICOM states to prevent this i nevitable migration from the south to our shores. Passage of legislation, policy formulation, exerting world influence, budg etary allocations and provision of incentives are some of the tools of the government which may be used over the ensuing years to seek to cause virtual parity of economic prosperity between CARIC OM states. I am not so na•ve as to think t hat this objective will come to fruition in a short period of time. M y guess is that the process will necessarily outlive all who are a live today (May 3, 2009 able to competently read andc omprehend this presentation. And so, this initiative will require t he commitment of visionary Bahamians who are prepared to (almost ification for the good of the (futuret hose Bahamians? Are you a visionary? I n my humble opinion, it is extremely important that the CSME becomes structured in such a way so as to pave the way for The Bahamas’ inevitable a scension. The Bahamas can boast of a population of only3 20,000 people. If we were to join CARICOM today, we would be a part of an organisation of over 14m illion people. And if you don’t know by now, let me inform you that there is definitely strength in numbers, Just ask the Chinese! Earlier, I was purposefully v ague in proposing the options available to the government of The Bahamas in causing all this to be manifested (one dayb ecause I am only one person. My creativity has its limitations. However, there are (320,000 minus 1) more minds that the government can tap to help achieve this objective. All of ouri deas could be then collated by the governmental technocrats sot hat, in the end, a coherent plan for the way forward could be form ulated. Included in my vision for The Bahamas as far as the CSME is concerned is total integration – politics and all. I would like tok now that sometime in the future history of humankind that CARI-C OM would be one country with one Prime Minister. A gain, you would have to be a visionary to see that. Again, you would have to be committed to that. Again, your creativity will be stretched to its limits. And, a gain, immediate gratification would have to be sacrificed. MARVIN G L IGHTBOURN Nassau, May 3, 2009. C M Y K C M Y K EDITORIAL/LETTERS TO THE EDITOR PAGE 4, MONDAY, MAY 11, 2009 THE TRIBUNE The Tribune Limited NULLIUS ADDICTUS JURARE IN VERBA MAGISTRI Being Bound to Swear to The Dogmas of No Master L EON E. H. DUPUCH, Publisher/Editor 1903-1914 S IR ETIENNE DUPUCH, Kt., O.B.E., K.M., K.C.S.G., (Hon. P ublisher/Editor 1919-1972 Contributing Editor 1972-1991 EILEEN DUPUCH CARRON, C.M.G., M.S., B.A., LL.B. P ublisher/Editor 1972Published Daily Monday to Saturday S hirley Street, P.O. Box N-3207, Nassau, Bahamas Insurance Management Building., P.O. F-485, Freeport, Grand Bahama T ELEPHONES Switchboard (News, Circulation and Advertising Advertising Manager (242 C irculation Department (242 N assau Fax: (242 Freeport, Grand Bahama: 1-(242 F reeport fax: (242 W EBSITE www.tribune242.com – updated daily at 2pm NEW YORK Last week brought good news and bad news for PresidentO bama’s strategic focus on Afghanistan and Pakistan but mostly bad news. First, though, the good. The president and his foreign-policy team have shown they understand the gravity of the situation in western Pakistan, where Taliban insurgents recently took control of an area just 6 0 miles from the capital of Islamabad. More importantly, Pakistan’s President Asif Ali Zardari seems to have heeded Washington’s calls for forceful action, as Pakistan’s military last week pounded Taliban positions in and around the contested Swat Valley. That’s the good news. The bad news relates mostly to the inherent difficulties of fighting a war of insurgency in a distant part of the world, where the United States is viewed with suspicion at best. At the same time that President Zardari and President Hamid Karzai of Afghanistan were meeting with Secretaryo f State Hillary Clinton and Obama in Washington, a U.S. air raid that had inflicted heavy civilian casualties in Afghanistanw as making headlines around the world. Put yourself, for the moment, in the shoes of a Pakistani or Afghan civilian, wondering with whom to side. Y ou hear about the dead civilians in Afghanistan, you see news of the Pakistani government’s counteroffensive in Swat andt he tens of thousands of innocent refugees now fleeing that region and then you see the pictures of your president, be it Karzai or Zardari, sitting at a table in Washington with the U.S. president. If this were you, you might be forgiven f or thinking that your leaders were doing the bidding of a foreign power, with death and misery as the results. This is what the U.S. is up against: Islamic insurgents who vow our destruction, who strike and then hide among civilians. Because the U.S. does not not yet, any way have the ground forces to meet Taliban attacks, our military has had to rely on airstrikes, which lead to civilian casualties. Which lead, in turn, to greater s ympathy for the Taliban. Meanwhile, there is the irony that Karzai a nd Zardari, who run the risk at home of being seen as U.S. puppets, are not leaders whom those in Washington consider relia ble or capable guardians of U.S. interests. B ut these are the allies we’ve got, in the fight that Obama has deemed central to defeating Islamic terrorism. The stakes of that fight are driven higher by the fact that Pakistan, where the U.S. has little to no direct influence on the g round, possesses nuclear weapons. The war against the Taliban will not be w on, however victory is defined, by military m eans alone. Obama, if he realizes this and he s eems to will need to convince Congress and the American people of this, too. You need civilian support to defeat an insurgency, and to gain civilian support you need a government that can deliver basic services without shaking down the populace for constant bribes. Doing this takes money and time, and t he U.S. will need to spend both if the Taliban are to be defeated. Y ou also need to assure the safety of civilians who may want to help you, and you need to avoid killing them in battles against the insurgents. These two objectives take boots on the g round, and the U.S. will need a lot of them, too, to defeat the Taliban. This is not the time when Americans want to hear about the need for another major overseas commitment in treasure and treasured servicemen and women. But absent such a commitment, and a commitment for the long haul, the prospects grow for more weeks where the bad news in South Asia surpasses the good. (This article was written by Dan Rather c.2009 Hearst Newspapers). My CARICOM vision: one country, one Prime Minister LETTERS letters@tribunemedia.net Taliban defeats require boots on ground Royal Bahamian Resort @ Offshore Island.Invites applications for the positions of: Accountants Cost Controller General Cashier Receiving Clerk Executive Chauffeurs Director of Sales Security Manager Exec. Housekeeper Resort Shop Manager Photo Shop Manager Assistant Training Manager years experience in the Hospitality Industry in the above mentioned positions, excellent communication, organizational and interpersonal skills, must be able to train and and computer skills desirable must be able to work and experience to: cmajor@grp.sandals.com Fax 677-6828. Closing date May 9th. 2009. EDITOR, The Tribune. I have today written the same letter to The Tribune, The Nassau Guardian and The Bahama Journal, because I would like to make the following suggestion to the three, which I thought they might a gree. I have listened to President Obama on many occasions when he has made himself available to b e questioned by the press and television of the United States. Others have done the same before, but none has been better examples of democracy at work. The Bahamas too is a democracy, and there is no better example of the availability of the political leadership of the constitutionally provided Prime Minister (Article 73 sition (Article 82 The Prime Minister and leader of the opposition should be heard on television to be interviewed by t he press for the benefit of the Bahamian people, like President Obama is heard by millions of the people o f the United States. HON PAUL L ADDERLEY Nassau, April 30, 2009. Our leaders should learn from Obama be heard on TV interviewed by press EDITOR, The Tribune. Last night at 2249 hours I got a call from a friend who said that a person in dark clothes was behind her apartment looking in the win-d ow. I asked her if she had called the police, she said yes at 2230 h ours. I arrived at her apartment at 2300 hours and asked if the police had been there. The answer was no as when she dialed 911, she w as put to the Lucaya Police Station. She lives in Bahamia. Bahamia may be for the Policitial Area Lucaya, but it would have made more sense for Mobile Unit o r Freeport Unit to respond as they would be closer. T he police arrived at 2225 hours, fifty five minutes after the call. Had the person looking in the window got into the apartment, we could have three injured o r dead persons this morning. A mother and two small children. Please review the procedure that is used to respond to 911 or emergency calls. This could savet ime in the response and maybe the lives of the callers. SIGMUND WILLIS Freeport, April 25, 2009. Review needed for 911 procedure – it could save lives

PAGE 5

n By DENISE MAYCOCK Tribune Freeport Reporter d maycock@tribunemedia.net FREEPORT – After two years of planning, the Commonwealth L ocal Government Conference will open on Grand Bahama on Monday for some 600 delegates from 46 Commonwealth nations. Byran Woodside, Minister of State for Lands and Local Government, announced on Sunday that the conference will take place from May 11 -14 at the Westin at O ur Lucaya Resort. He said it is the first time that the event is being held in the Bahamas. “We are most excited by the fact that this is the first time that the CLGC will be held in the Americas, and certainly we feel it is in recognition of the role the B ahamas holds within the region. “It is only fitting that the first time the CLGC has been held in the Americas, it is being held int he Bahamas,” said Minister Woodside. P rime Minister Hubert Ingraham will officially open the fifth C LGC at 5pm on Monday in the Conference Centre. The theme for this year’s conference is “Improving Local Government: The Com-m onwealth vision.” M r Woodside said that government is fully supportive of the conference being held in Grand Bahama. The government is cognizant of the economic challenges that G rand Bahama has faced over the years. We are pleased that F reeport was chosen for the con ference venue,” he said. He stated that the conference will bring politicians, policy mak ers, local government practitione rs, and persons of civil society in the private sector from 46 of the 53C ommonwealth nations. Mr Woodside said delegates f rom the Caribbean, Africa, the Americas, Europe, Asia, and the Pacific Basin will attend the con ference. He noted that international and regional leaders are also expected to speak at the conference, includ i ng Bruce Golding, Prime Minister of Jamaica, Commonwealth Secr etary-General Kamalesh Sharma, and CARICOM Secretary-Gen-e ral of CARICOM Edwin Carrington, . M inister Woodside said conference delegates will be hosted to various cultural events on Grand Bahama, including a cultural extravaganza, a Fish Fry on TainoB each, and a Junkanoo performance. They will have a unique opportunity to meet with their peers and h ear about best practices from across the Commonwealth, and see case studies of successful local government projects in the three local government districts in Grand B ahama,” he said. want to say that the Bahamas g overnment fully supports this conference and we are really happy t o be the host of this event,” he said. Basil Morrison, chairperson of the CLGF, said the current eco nomic climate and issues facing l ocal government in the Commonwealth will be discussed. It is more important now than ever in view of the issue facing us i n the Commonwealth and by invitation the world, for local government to find ways and means of talking to colleagues of how to deliver services more efficiently, cost effectively while trying to meet the expectations of citizens,” hes aid. “Now is the time we have to put the effort into building confidence back in the communities that are f acing unemployment and strengthen economic ties in regards to civic society making contributions to the community.” Carlton Wright, Secretary Gene ral of CLGC, said the conference will bring all core stakeholders together to share common experiences. H e noted that 20 national ministers are among the 600 delegates that will be in Freeport. “This is a high level policy forum and the conference outcomes willb e transmitted to the Commonwealth Heads of Government who are also meeting later this year inT rinidad. “We will have the opportunity of taking what will become the Freeport declaration or Section to h eads of government for policy endorsements, ongoing policy making, and political processes at the highest level,” he said. I n addition to improving the q uality of core services, Mr Wright stated that local government officials will also discuss ways of improving local democracy and a ccountability. He said that finance is another important area. “Local government needs money and we will dis-c uss ways to improve financial viab ility of local authorities,” he said. The conference will close on T hursday, May 14. C M Y K C M Y K LOCAL NEWS THE TRIBUNE MONDAY, MAY 11, 2009, PAGE 5 RATS, ANTS, TERMITES, ROACHES, FLIES, MOSQUITOES, TICKS & FLEAS PHONE: 327-6464WE SEND ‘EM PACKIN’!STRUCKUM(DF55 OFFICIALS ARE pictured on Sunday, May 10, 2009 at a press conference ahead of the start of the C ommonwealth Local Government C onference to be held May 11-14 at the Westin at Our Lucaya Resort, Freeport, Grand Bahama. Pictured from left are Deon Sweeting, Presid ent of the Bahamas Association of Local Government Authorities; Basil Morrison, Chairperson, Commonwealth Local Government F orum (CLGF L ocal Government the Hon. Byran Woodside and Carl Wright, Secretary General, CLGF. Sharon Turner /BIS Commonwealth Local Govt Conference held in the Bahamas for the first time MINISTER OF STATE for Local Government Byran Woodside addresses reporters at a press conference ahead of the start of the Commonwealth Local Government Conference.

PAGE 6

THE Royal Defence Force is currently seeking bids for 11 new mid to long range vesselsa s part of a continuing phased acquisition of craft for the Defence Force, Minister of NationalSecurity Tommy Turnquestsaidon Friday. S peaking at the passing out parade of 48 new marines, Minister Turnquest said that the craft will be acquired overt he next six years. The Defence Force is seeki ng to acquire two 140-foot vessels, four 100-foot vessels, four 60-foot vessels and ana uxiliary vessel between 60 and 180 feet. "The Defence Force has n ow taken possession of its t wo newly acquired aircraft, a Cessna Grand Caravan and a Vulcan Surveillance Airc raft, and these planes will be formally commissioned shortly," he said. " Initiatives are ongoing to keep our craft sea worthy, our officers and marines trained and competent andn ew cutting edge technologies readily available," Minister Turnquest said. Minister Turnquest challenged the Marines made upo f New Entry 46 and Woman Entry 16, to quickly find their places on the force, determine their career path in theo rganisation and work constructively to merit advancem ent through the ranks. "You should choose your career path within the Defence Force with the clearu nderstanding that it is essentially a seagoing organisation and that it serves the entire Bahamas," he said. "I want you to be held up a s examples of integrity, honour, respectability and courtesy," Minister Turnquest said. S ince May 2007, 178 persons have joined the Roya l Bahamas Defence Force. C M Y K C M Y K LOCAL NEWS PAGE 6, MONDAY, MAY 11, 2009 THE TRIBUNE * All prices are net. EAGLE ELECTRICAL &LIGHTING2" GALVANIZED PIPE* 4X4 BOXES ENJOYEAGLE’S SUPER SPECIALS! E A G L E S P E C I A L S ! Tel (242 Fax (242 Email: eaglebahamas@gmail.com4" RECESSED CANS* #14 THHN WIRE500' ROLL* 14-2 ROMEX WIRE ROLL* Don’t miss this limited time offer for super savings.CAT 5 WIRE 1000' ROLL* 1/2" PVC PIPE 1000' ROLL* TV CABLE1000' ROLL*TELEPHONE WIRE $ 1 . 0 0 $ 7 5 . 0 0 $ 3 4 . 0 0 $ 8 1 . 0 0 $ 9 9 . 0 0 $ 2 . 2 5 $ 1 3 0 . 5 0 $ 5 4 . 0 0 $ 1 2 . 8 0 Our stock of air conditioning units are now in!1Ton12000BTU@$449.00 1.5Ton18000BTU@$675.00 2Ton24000BTU@$869.00 We ship to the Family Islands! * ALL PRICES ARE NET. PRIMARY and secondary school students t hroughout the Bahamas with at least one “A” grade on their final report card for 2009 have the chance to win a state-of-the-art, 24-inch iMac computer system or a HP Compaq Presario desktop system. T he prize give-away is part of Custom Computers’ second annual ‘As’ For Excellence Pro-g ramme. A special prize also will be given to the stud ent whom Custom Computers considers had the most impressive report card. The programme, which was launched last year, is designed to reward students for their hard work and academic achievements, whilea lso encouraging them to strive for excellence in everything they do. L ast year’s programme was enthusiastically received by officials at the Ministry of Educa t ion, with Patricia Collins, director of Education, describing the programme “as most welcomed a nd timely as it recognised deserving students in government and independent schools in New Providence and the Family Islands.” Pia Farmer, co-owner and marketing director of Customs Computers, said that last year her t eam saw an overwhelming response with more than 400 primary and high school studentse ntering the competition. This year, Ms Farmer is expecting a larger number of applicants. We were so impressed by the number of students who entered last year, a large percentage of whom had multiple As. We were also impressed with the parents because every child’s success is directly tied to the involvem ent of his and her parents. And today’s educational system and competitive environment makes it imperative for each child to have access t o a computer.” “At Custom Computers we are committed to the continuing education and training of our team in order to deliver the highest standards of service in our industry. We believe that the ‘Asf or Excellence’ campaign reflects these important values and we are very happy to provideo ur students throughout the Bahamas with the tools which they need to succeed, as well as s upporting the Ministry of Education and our teachers in their continuing efforts to provide our children with a sound and quality education,” she said. Last year’s winners in the primary and seco ndary school categories, respectively, were second grader Jodie Dodge of St Thomas Morew ho won a HP Laptop, and eighth grader Brittany John of St Augustine’s College who won t he iMac Computer System. Chauncy Bethel, a sixth grade student at F aith Temple, was presented with an i-Pod Touch. To enter the competition, all students have to do is visit any one of Custom Computers store locations on Cable Beach or East Bay Street, fill i n an entry form and present a copy of their report card while accompanied by a par e nt or guardian. Students may complete one entry form for every “A” g rade they received. Students in the Family Islands may download the entry form from the Customs Computers website. The deadline for entry is 12 n oon on Saturday, August 15, 2009. The drawing will take place the same day at 2pm during a special r eception at Custom Computers “Know How Store” on Cable Beach. To further assist families in gaining access to computers, Custom Computers will also launch its lay-away campaign in June in whichc ustomers can purchase a computer with three payments, without any added interest rates orf inance charges. Also next month, the company will launch t he first monthly ‘zero down financing fair’ geared towards assisting qualified government and public service employees in purchasing computers on the spot. M s Farmer said she hopes the easy financi ng campaigns will assist persons who m ay be experiencing challenges during the e conomic downturn, while at the same time empowering and giving families the tools they need to succ eed. Defence Force seeks bids for 11 new vessels Craft will be acquired over next six years Grade ‘A’ students have the chance to win computer prizes n CLEARWATER, Fla. A UTHORITIESsay they’ve arrested three people who were running a human trafficking operation in Pinellas County, accordi ng to Associated Press. The sheriff’s office reports that 38-year-old Kenyatta Cornelous, 47-year-old Edward Jones and 2 4-year-old Corinna Shaffer were a rrested on multiple charges Saturday after a two-month investigation. Authorities believe it’s the first case of domestic human t rafficking in the Tampa Bayarea, possibly in the state. The sheriff’s office reports that the suspects physically and ment ally abused the victims and took t heir identification cards and money. Investigators believe the victims were forced to work as prostitutes and dancers at Tampa B ay-area clubs. Authorities aren’t saying how many victims there were. Three arrested in human trafficking operation

PAGE 7

n B y SIR RONALD S ANDERS (The writer is a consultant and former Caribbean Diplomat) T H E economic crisis in the Caribbean is set t o get worse rather than better. Four years ago in a book entitled, “Crumbled Small”, I wrote: “Small states of the Commonwealth Caribbean are in crisis. There is need for u rgent action at the domestic, r egional and international leve ls to spare them from sinking i nto widespread poverty and b ecoming client-states of larg e r nations upon whom they could become economically reliant.” Little action was taken to tackle the difficulties that faced Caribbean countries which, even then, were highlyi ndebted, plagued by the effects of drug trafficking, subject to devastation by increasi ng and stronger hurricanes, l osing their preferential mark ets for key commodities, and, for the most part, graduated from concessionary financingf rom international financial institutions. Then, as now, they were also extremely vul nerable to the fortunes of their main trading partners in North America and Europe espe cially in tourism. S ince 2005, the situation has w orsened. The national debt of each country has increased, except in Guyana whiche njoyed large write-offs of debt when it was classified as a Highly Indebted Poor Country. In almost all others, exceptT rinidad and Tobago and Barbados, debt has increased to a point where servicing it has become difficult. Worryingly,a significant portion of gov ernments’ debt is to financial institutions in their own countries. This pattern of borrow i ng could also now threaten the banking system if govern ments find it difficult to ser vice the debt on schedule. T he problems surrounding CLICO and British American Insurance, which caused financial interventions by both the governments of Trinidad and Tobago and Barbados, may not yet be over. Almost every country in the Caribbean Community and Common Market (CARICOM been affected by what appears to be a substantial shortfall between the assets and liabilities of these two companies. CLICO’s regulators say that the Trinidad government will have to spend about US$1 billion over the next two years to protect policyholders. Even greater fragilities may yet appear with far-reaching con sequences for the smaller countries of the region. The events surrounding CLICO and British American clearly occurred because of either poor regulation and supervision or inadequate machinery for implementing corrective measures. While it may be closing the stable door after the horse has bolted, CARICOM countries should now strengthen regulation of all financial institutions at both national and pan-CARICOM levels to guard against repetitions. There is no reason why CARICOM countries should not establish a pan-CARI COM regulator for cross-bor der transactions. After all, in the wake of a G20 Summit in London in April and after the Organisation for Economic Cooperation and Develop ment (OECD new list of co-operative and non-cooperative jurisdictions for providing tax information on request, every Caribbean country that was on the socalled “grey list” (that is coun tries that have to do more to be regarded as fully co-operative with the OECD), pledged that they will comply. Compliance requires them to sign Tax Information Exchange Agreements (TIEA’s OECD countries, show a readiness to sign more of them, and passing OECD cri t eria for effectiveness in i mplementation. Of necessity, this compliance requires heavy e xpenditure in either negotia ting at least 12 agreements o r merely signing the OECD model blindly. In any event, new legislation will have to be enactedi n each jurisdiction. And since they chose not to resist the OECD in any wayb ut to comply fully with its requirements, they will have to do so or suffer the consequences. OECD Secretary-G eneral, Angel Gurr’a, has a lready said, “The OECD, tasked with a mandate tom onitor their performance, w ill be watching like a hawk.” So if CARICOM govern ments are willing to be watched “like a hawk” by theO ECD, they should be able to hawkishly watch the crossborder transactions within their own economic space in a collective way. The problems surrounding CLICO and British American h ave exacerbated the effects o f the current global financial c risis which also had its origin in poor regulation in the United States and Europe. Those effects include a huge down turn in tourist spending in the Caribbean, a major reduction in remittances from the Caribbean Diaspora, a diminution in investment in Caribbean economies and a drying-up of credit from the international commercial market. This situation is unlikely to change in a hurry. As the Prime Minister of Jamaica, Bruce Golding, pointed out in a parliamentary debate on the Jamaica Budget on May 5th, “We delude ourselves if we think that after the recession has ended the world will return to what it was before. Banks are going to be more cautious in their lending, d emanding more collateral a nd greater ability to repay, i nvestors more contemplative i n their investments. It is not g oing to be business as usual.” Against this background, CARICOM governments could do well to bolster their economies and their capacity for dealing with the internat ional community by comp leting the arrangements for implementing the Caribbean S ingle Market and for barg aining collectively with intern ational financial institutions, countries and regions. For instance, two of the I nternational and Multilateral financial institutions claim to have funds that could be made available to the private sector in the region for development projects that are also com mercially viable. I t would be helpful if C ARICOM governments c ould provide a team of experts with the specific tasko f assisting the private sector t o devise viable projects and present them to the financial institutions for funding. It would be of added benefit i f some of these projects could integrate production in more than one CARICOM countryt o spread the benefits of employment and revenues throughout the region. At the G20 Summit, it was a nnounced that $1.1 trillion w ill be provided to the Inter national Monetary Fund (IMF rent dire economic circum stances that grip most countries around the world. It is doubtful that half of t hat sum will actually be deliv ered. But, even if only half is delivered, CARICOM coun t ries ought to be exploring coll ectively with the IMF how they might access some of that money for projects that could b e distributed throughout its m ember states without the usual onerous and harsh IMF conditions. Also, even though the language of the G20 Communiqu was hazy, it did undertake to boost the resources of the Inter-American Develop ment Bank. CARICOM governments should also be investigating collectively how they could secure funds to build sustainable infrastructure and open new areas of production in the context of the Caribbean Single Market. The crisis that CARICOM countries face requires national action, but it also demands regional cohesion. There is no time to spare. Responses to: ronaldsanders29@hotmail.com C M Y K C M Y K T HE TRIBUNE MONDAY, MAY 11, 2009, PAGE 7 ALLCIVILSERVANTS!!!(Notpresentlymembers of Public Workers’ C operativeCreditUnionLimited) J ustwalk intotheofficesofthePublicWorkers’ CooperativeCreditUnionLimitedin Nassau or Freeport, with any amount of money,between$100.00and $5,000.00, and leave with DOUBLE that amount, pending receipt of an approved salary deduction form. “THE FAMILY CREDIT UNION”N R36ATTENTION...Public Workers’ Co-operative Credit Union LimitedNassau (323-6594 Freeport (351-7129) That’s right, a Loan approved in less than 24 hours!! Come, and take advantage of this offer, which begins Monday, May 4th, 2009 for a limited time only. Caribbean crisis: no time to spare WORLDVIEW SIRRONALD SANDERS T T h h e e p p r r o o b b l l e e m m s s s s u u r r r r o o u u n n d d i i n n g g C C L L I I C C O O a a n n d d B B r r i i t t i i s s h h A A m m e e r r i i c c a a n n h h a a v v e e e e x x a a c c e e r r b b a a t t e e d d t t h h e e e e f f f f e e c c t t s s o o f f t t h h e e c c u u r r r r e e n n t t g g l l o o b b a a l l f f i i n n a a n n c c i i a a l l c c r r i i s s i i s s w w h h i i c c h h a a l l s s o o h h a a d d i i t t s s o o r r i i g g i i n n i i n n p p o o o o r r r r e e g g u u l l a a t t i i o o n n i i n n t t h h e e U U n n i i t t e e d d S S t t a a t t e e s s a a n n d d E E u u r r o o p p e e . . n KINGSTON, Ontario CUBANParliament President Ricardo Alarcon dismissed President Barack Obama’s recent overtures to Cuba and said Saturday for the first time that the new U.S. administration’s stance is “the continuation of an illegal, unjustifiable and failed policy”, according to Associated Press. Obama has suggested it may be time for a new beginning with Cuba, and the White House authorized unlimited travel and money transfers for Americans with relatives in Cuba. But his administration has said it would like Cuba to respond by making small political and social changes to its single-party communist system. “In other words Cuba must change and behave in accordance with Washington’s wishes,” Alarcon said at the close of a Cuban academic conference in Canada. “That attitude is not only the continuation of an illegal, unjus tifiable and failed policy, it is also the consequence of a profound misconception, a false perception of itself that lies as the foundation of the U.S. role in the world.” The U.S. has long sought what it considers real change from Cuba in human rights, free speech, free markets and democratic government. Last month, President Raul Castro said Cuba was willing to discuss “everything” with the U.S., leading to hopes that a door was opening to a new relationship. But former President Fidel Castro insists that Cuba should make no concessions in return for better U.S. ties. The Obama administration has said it has no plans to lift the embargo which bans nearly all trade with Cuba. The island’s government blames those sanctions for frequent shortages of food, medicine, farming and transportation machinery and other basics. Cuban parliament president dismisses Barack Obama Barack Obama

PAGE 8

C M Y K C M Y K LOCAL NEWS PAGE 8, MONDAY, MAY 11, 2009 THE TRIBUNE SUNRYSE DOES YOUR STORAGE LOOK LIKE THIS?MOBILE DOCUMENT DESTRUCTIONCALL US TODAY TO HELP WITH YOUR ARCHIVAL CLEANOUT!We provide security, shredding is only the vehicle we use to deliver it. SUNRYSE SHREDDING SERVICEST: 242-322-6448 www.sunryseshred.com Email: info@sunryseshred.com 1 0 % O F FO F F Y O U R N E X T S E R V I C EE X P I R E S M AY 3 0 2 0 0 9 Prof. of Medical OncologyProf. Karol Sikora MA, MB BChir, PhD, FRCR, FRCP, FFPM Dean of the University of Buckingham School of Medicine Director of Medical Oncology The Cancer CentreFriday, May 29, 2009Starting at 10amAt The Centreville Medical Pavilion 72 Collins AveTelephone: 502-9610Open to The PublicProf. of Oncology The Hon. Prof. Arthur Porter PC, MD, MBA, FACR, FACRO, FRCPC Director General & CEO McGill University Health Centre Managing Director & Director of Radiation Oncology The Cancer CentreSaturday, May 16, 2009Starting at 10amTHE CANCER CENTREannouncesThe Specialists Cancer Clinics THE COLLEGE OFTHE BAHAMASVisit our website at www.cob.edu.bs Britannia Consultancy Group, had been targeted. Mr Jones, in the Bahamas for more than 20 years, had been an adviser to government on banking legisla-t ion on several occasions. Police said that a brazen, unmasked gunman, on foot,a pproached Mr Jones around 10 am, as he got out of his vehicle in the company’s park-i ng lot near Compass Point Studios. Police said that the gunman then shot Mr Jonesa t least twice once in the head and then in the body b efore heading south towards nearby Gambier Village. Following Mr Jones' shooting, police mounted an islandw ide search for the gunman who was described as a slim, dark-complexioned male, wearing dark clothing. "We are still following seve ral leads but there have been no arrests as yet," Superintendent Ellsworth Moss, head of the Central Detective Unit, told The Tribune yesterday. "We are still appealing to the public for information," hes aid. Mr Jones had earlier been a ttacked on two occasions. On one occasion his home was broken into and he was beaten. H e was taken to hospital where his injuries were stitched. On another occasion, his car was bumped. When he got out to see the d amage, he was attacked. The $50,000 reward, posted in the local press last week for information that might lead to the arrest or conviction of those responsible for his murder still stands. M r Jones was born in North Wales and worked in t he financial services sector in the U.K., Jamaica and the Bahamas. He was the former director o f the Bankers’ Association of the Bahamas and the Bahamas Institute of Bankers. Last year, Mr Jones was embroiled in a legal disputew ith former FNM MP Lester Turnquest who was once an associate with him in Britannia Consultancy. Last year, Canadian officials were also investigating allegations of a fraudulent taxs cheme having been committed on the investment compan y. Mr Jones’ mother was living with him in Nassau. ety and must be rooted out “before a great deal mored amage is done.” “Bahamas Against Crime is c alling upon the government to carry out its responsibility and lead the way in preparinga n integrated strategy to inflict a serious blow to crime and c riminality in the country. Don’t be narrow-minded or fearful the government isw arned, because to continue the present course will demand a defence from the government of a charge of negligence, neglect of duty, and endan-g ering the people of the Bahamas a very serious charge,” he said. N oting that its current approach has failed to reduce t he levels of crime and violence on the streets, Mr Moss said that government mustr ethink its approach before it is too late. T herefore, he urged the church, the business sector, civil society, and the media tor eject the status quo and mobilize for an intense and sust ained action until the “scourge of crime” is significantly reduced. Religious leaders are called upon to lift their sights beyond t he walls of the church and work toward improved security of people. The corporatec ommunity is challenged to seek the public good, not just private gain in their economic lives. “Civil society is called upon t o agitate and lobby the government to get up and provide the leadership that is so critic ally necessary at this very vulnerable time in our society. “The media is urged to d emand more accountability, especially from all public insti tutions and officials in order to create more transparency. This will greatly reduce cor-r uption, and injustice which fuels crimes and violence,” he said. However, the longer the current levels of crime and crimi n ality continue, Rev Moss said, the more difficult it will be to correct. T herefore, he said, the time to act is now. Expat banker dies of shooting injuries Claim that government ‘neglecting duty’ c ers of the Fire Services freed t hem using the Jaws of Life. T hey are listed in serious condition. The driver of the Ford r eceived minor injuries. Traffic police are investigating the a ccident. F ROM page one FROM page one Andros while in the settlement of Stafford Creek around 1 pmS aturday, stopped and searched the occupants of a maroon coloured 1995 Ford Aero star Van. Officers found eight Dominican men inside the vehicle. T he 29-year-old male driver w as from Andros and a 28year-old Eleuthera man was also in the vehicle. The Dominicans were hand ed over to immigration offi cers. The two Bahamian men were also arrested and are in police custody. F ROM page one Dominicans ar rested F ROM page one Defence Force

PAGE 9

C M Y K C M Y K LOCAL NEWS THE TRIBUNE MONDAY, MAY 11, 2009, PAGE 9 THE COLLEGE OFTHE BAHAMASVisit our website at www.cob.edu.bs NASSAU, Bahamas – Seventy new entrepreneurs took theirp laces on the Bahamian business scene following a graduation cer-e mony at the College of The Bahamas last weekend. T hey were participants in the Bahamas Agricultural and Industrial Corporation's (BAIC twelve-week Business Empowerment Lecture Series, held in con-j unction with the College's School of Business headed by MrsR emilda Moxey. BAIC's deputy general mana ger Don Major said: "An army of entrepreneurs who will transf orm the economic landscape by establishing sustainable business enterprises throughout our country has been launched." Hosted by BAIC's Business S ervices Department, the seminar featured successful busin esspersons who shared with par ticipants proven business techn iques. "It allowed participants to avoid the pitfalls of those who failed," said Mr Major, "and acquire the knowledge and exper t ise that successful business persons have discovered. " BAIC exists in order to pro vide entrepreneurs the option of avoiding traveling by the seats of their pants the pain and terror ofl earning by trial and error. "We provide training opportun ities and a myriad of other services that are geared to provide y ou with all that you need to start and run a business successfully." BAIC's executive chairman Edison Key encouraged graduates to take advantage of multi-m illion-dollar opportunities in agriculture and souvenir produc-t ion. He said BAIC can facilitate t hat by allowing them to use of tens of thousands of acres of land BAIC owns and controls in North Andros, Abaco and Eleuthera. C ollege vice president Dr Rhonda Chipman-Johnsonu nderscored the importance of being creative and versatile in the a pproach to employment. "Your presence at this seminar is evidence that you are prepared to meet the challenge of helping to stimulate our econo-m y by engaging in some kind of business activity," said Dr Chip-m an-Johnson. "We need to increase the numb er of citizens who are willing to create employment." New entrepreneurs take their places (BIS Photo/Derek Smith THE GRADUATING CLASS is pictured above with College of the Bahamas vice president Dr Rhonda ChipmanJohnson, BAIC executive chairman Edison Key and BAIC officials. Shar e your news The Tribune wants to hear from people who are making news in their neighbourhoods. Perhaps you ar e raising funds for a good cause, campaigningf or improvements in the area or have won an awar d . If so, call us on 322-1986 and shar e your stor y .

PAGE 10

n By ADRIAN GIBSON ajbahama@hotmail.com THIS column, my first after being injured in a car accident and having to have urgent eye surgery in the US as a result, is dedicated to one of my literary mentors the fearless, now retired Tribune Managing Edit or John Marquis. Over the l ast few years, I have been able t o understudy Mr Marquis and will miss our weekly chats about a variety of personal and social/political issues. However, we will keep in touch. * * * * I n its second year since b eing elected to the governm ent of the Bahamas, the F NM finds itself governing in a recessionary period, with a contracting global economy, f oreign credit markets, unemp loyment inching upwards and t he unlikelihood of any possible decoupling of the Bahamas and US economies in the near future, as was once noted by the Prime Minister. H owever, while consideri ng these factors, I will assess the FNM’s governance thusf ar and evaluate the perform ancesor lack thereofof individual ministers. To the government’s credit, t hey have seemingly taken a p ragmatic approach to the u nemployment/economic crisis, instituted social assistance programmes in a timely manner, pressed for the budgetary rationalization of tariffs, initia ted short-term stimulus s pending on infrastructural development (harbour dredg-i ng, road works), started cleanu p campaigns and passed legislation to empower the airport redevelopment company in its thrust to improve the major gateway of our tourism dependent country. However, the FNM has s eemingly done little to e mpower Bahamians by ensuring greater involvement in major projects. Frankly, there is a need to ensure the involvement of more small-time, local contractorsnot just the usua l suspectsin infrastructural u pgrades, a need of greater transparency and accountability, the development of a clear-l y articulated trade policy and t he diversification of the econo my so that the country would b e better able to sustain itself during this gloomy global economy. The government was sectarian and exhibited little foresight when petty politics may have possibly led it to scrap a few of the worthwhile initiatives of the former administration, only to reins tate those that worked. On t he other hand, the PLP is hardly better as an Opposition than they were when in government, appearing to be bankrupt of ideas and recklessly obstructing almost all p roposals of government while t hemselves proposing nothing. Thus far, the FNM Cabinet has steered clear of majors candals. H owever, there are certain m embers of Cabinet who are n ot the ideal choice and who appear to be mere space cadets whose brain power seems to be of the lowest possible wattage. In his third term, it appears that Prime Minister Hubert Ingraham is a bit s horthanded, particularly since h e must contend with a few hopeless jokers in his boardr oom, who seem out of touch w ith public sentiment and m erely concerned with the pomp and trappings of high office, living in their world off antasy Although I will not apply a grade to the government until the end of this column, the F NM must respond to the crescendo of voices lobbying for a new economic approach a nd the empowerment of y oung Bahamians. Under Mr I ngraham, much of the scandals and alleged corruptions eemingly ingrained in local p oliticswhich has at times internationally gained the Bahamas a reputation as a soprano statehardly occurs,s ince he is known for his integrity and no-nonsense approach. W hen evaluating the per formance of individual minis ters, Dr Earl Deveaux Minister for the Environmente arns a B-plus. Dr Deveaux has initiated the process of tidying up the city/islands, pledged to safeguard the coun t ry’s natural resources and has pushed for a concerted drive toward environmental restora t ion; however, he cannot do it a lone. In his capacity, Dr Deveaux has pledged to initiate projects to plant sea oats and other indigenous plants top rotect sand dunes/coastal zones and he must vigorously seek to have the marine environment zoned. I am curiousa s to whether his ministry has beyond to fulfil his stated goal of zoning 20 per cent of the marine environment. Dr Deveaux, who I understand is a superb MP, set out to put a spanking on potential challenger Jerome Fitzgerald during the next general election cycleappears to be sincerely confronting any setb acks/problems in his minist erial portfolio. In his attempt to confront the Bahamas’ environmental woes, he must also seek the passage and enforcement of legislation mandating the recycling and separation o f garbage, a new landfill facili ty, the implementation of a garbage tax, launch a comprehensive educational campaigna bout the importance of wetl ands and also encourage g reen building standards. I w ould also recommend that he deploy environmental officers to Cowpen Road West where a property has been callously cut below the level of the road almost into the water table, in the ruthless pursuit o f quarry/cracker dustand a lso to Bacardi Road where, like Sandyport, the wetlands a re rapidly being filled-in and d estroyed. This service-ori e nted statesman has had successes and unlike many of his Cabinet colleagues, he hasd emonstrated an understanding of the issues. Brent Symonette , the For e ign Affairs Minister, has become known as the foreignaffairs-minister-from-Nassauw ho rarely travels, seldom cont ributes in the House of Assembly and appears to be merely playing second fiddle. Mr Symonette appears to be as tealth-like minister who is hardly seen and who seems to be on cruise control. According to the Oxford dictionary,f oreign mean “dealing with other countries such as foreign policy” or “having to do with a C M Y K C M Y K PAGE 10, MONDAY, MAY 11, 2009 THE TRIBUNE ATLANTIC MEDICAL INSURANCE CO.LTD. Atlantic House,2nd Terrace & Collins Avenue,P.O.Box SS-5915,Nassau Tel.326-8191 Suite 5,Jasmine Corporate Center,East Sunrise Highway,P.O.Box F-42655,Freeport Tel.351-3960A member of Colonial Group International:Insurance,Health,Pensions,LifeAtlantic Medical is the market leading health insurance provider because it offers the best care at the best possible price. Your health care is a very important part of your life,so it is reassuring if you know your plan and your insurance provider will deliver on care,benefits and service when you need it. You can enjoy that reassurance with Atlantic Medical.Just ask any one of 50,000 health plan members who trust Colonial Group International to work for them day-in, day-out,at home or overseas. People trust Atlantic Medical for care,service and value that really makes a difference and makes sure you will receive the best health cover money can buy.You can TRUST a health plan that delivers on its promise. Colonial Group International is rated A-(Excellentby AM Best. Atlantic Medical Evaluating performances of government ministers Y OUNG M AN S V IEW ADRIANGIBSON SEE page 11

PAGE 11

c ountry or language other than one’s own”, however Mr Symonette hardly travels. How is it that our country’s foreign affairs minister was absent from the biggest government meeting the hemisphere over the last two yearsthe Summit of the Americas? The chaos at the passport office has poorly reflected on the minister, whose ministry has had little to no policy c hanges. While the complete i mplementation of e-passport and the movement to secure a ccomplishments, both were initiated by the former administration and are presently b eing poorly executed, som uch-so that I believe the c ountry could possibly miss the 2 010 e-passport deadline. Mr Symonette should secure the t emporary secondment of public servants to ensure that the e -passport deadline is met or outsource the appointments and scheduling of passport drop-offs and pickups in the same format as the US e mbassy has done for Bahamia ns seeking visas. The Foreign Affairs mini stry is a conduit for the provis ion of technical assistance o ffered by major international organizations to Bahamians, however that ministry hass eemingly not sought out or taken advantage of such opportunities. Furthermore, there are no new ideas or rare policy statements with reference to the Bahamas’ relations with the ACP group, the Comm onwealth, the OAS and H aiti. If Mr Symonette is craft ing new foreign affairs strate gies, the public relations arm o f his ministry is not informa tive, only showing him in a cer emonial role making photo albums with visiting or newlya ssigned diplomats. I do credit Mr Symonette for maintaining our embassies and having the foresight tog rant, what I’m told, will be temporary visa waivers for persons affiliated with the upcoming Miss Universe pageant. He earns a miserable C-minus. B ranville McCartney , the Minister State for Immigration a nd another outstanding MP, a ppears to have taken a cue f rom former MP Ron Pinder and has become the number one public relations man inC abinet. Mr McCartney is a first-class politician who has actively sought to rid the immigration department of slackn ess and corruption and has vigorously confronted the illegal immigration problem. H owever, MP McCartney m ust seek to consistently e xpand the security infrastructure at his ministry, ridt he department of its time-cons uming and antiquated methods while moving to online applications and reducing the lengthy waits for personsa pplying for status, requesting documents or having already met the stated criteria. Per-h aps the restructuring of the Immigration Department, by order of the PM, will promote improved modes of operation,h owever the Immigration Board must become more transparent, being more broad-based in composition, explaining to applicants why they may have been denied status or making notes from a meeting about an applicant available for his/her perusal. The minister must remain vigi lant, and be careful and wary o f appearing to be inhumane in his pursuits. Mr McCartney does appear to be acutely addressing immigration matters and earns B-plus. Tommy Turnquest, the h apless Minister of National S ecurity, reminds me of a dead spark plug and appears to be bereft of ideas in the fighta gainst crime. I have two w ords for Mr Turnquest wrong ministry.” Under Mr T urnquest, there is a deepening climate of fear, heightened by his embarrassing, yet frequent recounting of the statistics of crime. In the fight against crime, it appears that he can hardly see t he forest for the trees, setting u p meaningless committees to tell Bahamians what they a lready know and compiling v olumes of reports that, like m any others, probably end up gathering dust in some bureaucratic backroom. C an Mr Turnquest inspire those officers who, when called, are known to tell some distressed complainants that n o car is available or that they are calling the wrong station, while a unit is brazenly parked a t Bamboo Shack or a sweeth eart’s house? M r Turnquest should expand the training of policeo fficers to one year, aggress ively address police brutality and offer rewards to anyone with proof of police officers paying social visits to barsw hile on duty or being caught in compromising positions while working. The buck stopsw ith you sir! It appears that we have moved from five years of ineffectiveness under Cynthia Mother” Pratt to another term of hopelessnessfrom one minister who preaches to another who merely recitess tatistics. Mr Turnquest has no law enforcement experience or related qualifications and has a standoffish demeanour that is almost comparable to a rusting lamp pole. I do credit the mini ster with acquiring new r esources to outfit the police and defence force, however he should also seek to reorganize and bring greater transparency to the Police and Judicial Commission, which handles p romotions, and to whom p olitical appointments are made without effective vetting as to a person’s qualificationsf or such an appointment. I h ave yet to forget how Mr T urnquest was muscled about b y BTC union president Robert Farquharson and how, after being affronted, he simply turned around and stomped off while BTC workers brought Bay Street to a halt. M r Turnquest is better suite d for a ministry such as Social Services or Housing. He earns a n F-plus, since he has yet to d eploy a more proactive, mul t i-disciplinary approach to aggressively fighting the spike in violent crime and the appre-h ension of citizens. TO BE CONTINUED C M Y K C M Y K T HE TRIBUNE MONDAY, MAY 11, 2009, PAGE 11 of government ministers FROM page 10 Share your news The Tribune wants to hear from people who are making news in their neighbourhoods. Perhaps you ar e raising funds for a good cause, campaigning for improvements in the area or have won an award. If so, call us on 322-1986 and share your story.

PAGE 12

C M Y K C M Y K SPORTS PAGE 12, MONDAY, MAY 11, 2009 TRIBUNE SPORTS MANCHESTER UNITED'S Ryan Giggs, left, and Manchester City's Nigel De Jong battle for the ball during their English Premier League soccer match against Manchester City at Old Trafford Stadium, Manchester, England, Sunday, May 10, 2009. Man United move closer to title European soccer M a r t i n R i c k e t t / A P P h o t o / P A n LONDON Manchester United held its three-point margin atop the Premier League by beating neighbor Manchester City 2-0 on Sunday w hile Chelsea romped to a 4-1 victory at Arsenal, a ccording to the Assoc iated Press . Cristiano Ronaldo scored his 18th league goal of the season with a free kick at Old Trafford and Carlos Tevez added the second with a shot from the edge of the area in the 45th to put United within four p oints of a third Premier League title in a row and 11th in 17 seasons under manager Alex Ferguson. The victory maintained Man United’s lead with a game in hand d espite Liverpool’s 3-0 win at West Ham on Saturday, and Ferguson’s stars can move closer to the title by winning at Wigan on Wednesday. The two blemishes on United’s performance, however, were the behavior of the two scorers. While Man United moved closer to the title, Chelsea underlined why i t will challenge next season with a 4-1 victory at Arsenal. After Alex and Nicolas Anelka gave Chelsea a 2-0 halftime lead, an o wn goal by Kolo Tour in the 49th virtually put the game out of reach. Although Arsenal’s Nicklas Bendtner scored, Florent Malouda added a fourth in the 86th minute. Chelsea is three points behind Liverpool as it tries to maintain its record of finishing in the top two in five seasons. In contrast, Arsenal is guaranteed to finish fourth for the third season in four with no top-two finish during that time. That followed an eight-season spell when the Gunners were never out of the top two,w inning three titles. n M ADRID Barcelona was denied the Spanish League title when Joseba Llorente scored an injury-time goal to give Villarreal a 3-3 tie a t Barcelona. Barcelona was leading 3-1 after first-half goals by Seydou Keita, Samuel Eto’o and Daniel Alves, leading to premature chants of champions” from Barcelona supporters at Camp Nou stadium. How ever, Villarreal scored a second goal with 13 minutes remaining a penalty by Mati Fernandez, which led to the dismissal of Barcelona defender Eric Abidal. Llorente, who had also scored Villareal’s open ing goal, silenced the crowd with the late equalizer. Eight points clearo f Real Madrid with three rounds remaining, Barcelona hopes to clinch the title next Sunday when it visits Mallorca. n GLASGOW, Scotland Rangers went to top of the Scottish Prem ier League standings with three games remaining after a 1-0 win over defending champion and city rival Celtic. Midfielder Steve Davis scored in the 37th minute at Ibrox to move Rangers to 79 points, two more than Celtic, which is aiming for a fourth straight title. Rangers is at Hibernian on Wednesday before hosti ng Aberdeen next weekend and finishing the league season at Dundee United on May 24. It also plays Falkirk in the Scottish Cup final the foll owing weekend. Henrik S tenson wins T he Players Championship HENRIK STENSON , of Sweden, kisses the winner's trophy after his four shot victory at The Players Championship golf tournament at TPC Sawgrass in Ponte Vedra Beach, Fla., Sunday, May 10, 2009. (AP Photo/Wilfredo Lee n PARIS French tennis player Richard G asquet has acknowledged he’s been told he tested positive for cocaine but says he’s innocent, according to Associated Press . I am gathering together proof of my innocence and I will choose an appropriate moment to express myself,” Gasquet said in a statement Sunday. G asquet said the “B” sample from the tournament in Key Biscayne, Fla., confirmed the result of the “A” sample taken the same d ay. The Web site of sports daily L’Equipe reported Saturday that traces of the banned drug were found in the 22-year-old Gasquet’s urine sample at the SonyE ricsson Open. Gasquet: test came back positive for coke UK’s Button wins Spanish Grand Prix Bell, Sidebottom recalled for Test INBRIEF B RAWN GP J enson Button of Britain celebrates after winning the Spanish Formula One Grand Prix in front of thrid placed Red Bull Mark Webber, foreground, at the Catalunya racetrack in Montmelo, near Barcelona, Spain, on Sunday, May 10, 2009. England have recalled War wickshire batsman Ian Bell and Nottinghamshire left-armer Ryan Sidebottom for the second Test against West Indies. Andrew Strauss' team head to the Riverside this week hav ing gone 1-0 up in the npower series, bolstered by the addition of an extra option in both bat ting and bowling departments. Bell was axed after the Test defeat in Jamaica three months ago but will offer the alternative of fielding six frontline batsmen if the Chester-le-Street surface looks seamer-friendly.

PAGE 13

IN an historic final day of competition, three new champions w ere crowned in the Baptist Sports Council' 2009 Joyce Minus Basketball Classic on Saturday a the Baillou Hills Sporting Comp lex. It was the first time that any one Church contested for all of the titles at the same time. B ut Macedonia Baptist, c oached by Dayton Turnquest and Brent Stubbs, denied Temple Fellowship the opportunity to add another piece of history by w inning all three crowns. In a clean sweep of their bestof-three series, Macedonia clobbered Temple Fellowship 35-20 a nd 27-20 to secure the 15-andu nder title. Coach Geno Campbell and Temple Fellowship, however, made sure that the other twoc rowns didn't slip out of their hands. Their 19-and-under team also pulled off a two-game sweep over G olden Gates, coached by l eague's honoree Joyce Minus, as they pulled off the 33-31 and 4236 victories. A nd in the men's series, it went right down to the wire as Temp le Fellowship dethroned Evangelistic Center, coached by Alvin Sands, with their 36-30, 19-33 and 46-26 decisions. For his efforts, Campbell made h istory as he was named the Coach of the Year in both the 15-a nd-under and men's division. The other Coach of the Year w ent to Norleen Henfield, who won the title in the 19-and-under division. First Baptist was the first Church to win two titles in twod ivisions in the 15-and-under and 19-and-under for the past two y ears. They were eliminated from the playoffs by Temple Fellows hip in all three divisions. Winning the Most Valuable Player awards were James Rolle from Macedonia in the 15-andunder, Gabbie Laurent from T emple Fellowship in the 19-andunder and Jason Cooper from T emple Fellowship in the men. Here's a summary o the g ames played: Macedonia 35, Temple Fell owship 20 (15-and-under Stephen Miller led Macedonia in the opener with 10 and James Rolle and Adolpheus Leadon both had eight. DeShawn White h ad a game high 13 in the loss. Macedonia 27, Temple Fel l owship 20 (15-and-under J ames Rolle scored nine points, Stephen M iller had five and Geno Bullard and Devin Carey both helped out with four in the clincher for Macedonia. DeShawn White had a game high 12 ad Randy Miller a dd five in the loss. Temple Fellowship 33, Gold e n Gates 31 (19-and-under Kevin Burrows had a game high 15, Marvin Albury and Gabbie Laurent both had eight and Najee Bethel and Leron Albury bothc ontributed three in the opener for Temple Fellowship. Mel Johns on had 10, Samuel Johnson added seven and Jonathan Davis c hipped in with five in the loss. Temple Fellowship 42, Golden Gates 36 (19-and-under Najee Bethel scored eight, Mar vin Albury had five and Gabbie Laurent four as Temple Fellowship wrapped up the sweep. Mel Johnson had a game high 19, Jonathan Davis added five and Dominique Beadle chipped in with four in the loss. Temple Fellowship 36, Evangelistic Center 30 (Men Gabbie Laurent had eight, Najee Bethel six, Ian Pinder five and Jason Cooper four in the opener for Temple Fellowship. Randy Ferguson had seven, Tyrone Sands five and Kathon Hanna four in the loss. Evangelistic Center 33, Temple Fellowship 19 (Men Tyrone Sands had a game high eight points and Randy Ferguson added four as Evangelistic Center starved off elimination in game two. Jason Cooper scored six and Ian Pinder added four in the loss. Temple Fellowship 46, Evangelistic Center 26 (Men Ian Pinder scored a game high 10, Jason Cooper had eight, Ishban Lynes added six and Kevin Burrows chipped in with four in the closer for Temple Fellowship. Tyrone Sands scored nine, Randy Ferguson had six and Sherman Bowe f our in the loss. C M Y K C M Y K SPORTS TRIBUNE SPORTS MONDAY, MAY 11, 2009, PAGE 13 JOYCE MINUS (second left administrative role she played over the years as the vice chairman. At left is Renea Brice and at right is Norleen Henfield, who both made presentations to Minus on behalf of the BSC. Behind are two players who played for Minus’ Golden Gates team. Three new champions crowned BAPTIST SPORTS COUNCIL’S 2009 JOYCE MINUS BASKETBALL CLASSIC COACH Dayton Turnquest (kneeling captured the 15-and-under title in the Baptist Sports Council’s 2009 Joyce Minus Basketball Classic on Saturday. At right is Minus, who made the presentation ofa wards. MEMBERS of Temple Fellowship celebrate above with their trophies for winning t he men’s championship and the president’s pennant in the Baptist Sports Coun cil’s 2009 Joyce Minus Basketball Classic on Saturday. COACH Geno Bullard (center and-under team that finished as runners-up. At left of Campbell is Joyce Minus, the patron for this year’s tournament. W ITH the basketball season now completed, the BaptistS ports Council will begin preparation for the hosting of t he 2009 Nicola Major Volleyball Classic. A meeting is scheduled for Saturday at 10 am at the Bahamas Baptist College, Jean Street for allC hurches interested in participating. The league is e xpected to get started on Saturday, May 30 at the Tom 'the Bird' Grant Park in Yel low Elder. There is a registration fee of $100.00 per t eam in each division. All Churches, no matter whatd enomination, are invited to participate. sports NOTES Volleyball Baptist Sports Council meeting

PAGE 14

Bahamas Speed Dynamics’ Shautae Miller in 26.55. Club Monica’s Kellie Rolle was third in 26.70. And in the 400, Bahamas Speed Dynamics’ Pedrya Seymour won in 1:00.83. College of the Bahamas’ Itsa Smith was second in 1:03.12 and Striders Athletics’ Shatyna Stu-a rt got third in 1:03.19. Robinson also doubled up in the girls under-18 100 hurdles in 14.15. Star Trackers’ Devinn Cartwright (14.58 Charlton (16.04 and third respectively. And she made it a triple treat with her victory in the women’s long jump with a leap of 5.52 metres. Deandra Deveaux of Jumpers Inc was second with 5.16 and Striders Athletics’ Shatyna Stuart was third with 4.89. Kemp pulled off a victory in the women’s 100 hurdles in 14.87. CI Gibson’s Vanessa Brown was second in 19.61. Among the other winners were Marissa Capron in the girls under-7 80 (14.53 Ferguson in the boys under-7 80 (14.38 under-9 girls 80 (12.41 Darling in the boys under-8 80 (12.35 Blayre Catalyn in the girls under-11 100 (14.14 Thompson in the boys under11 100 (14.28 in the girls under-17 100 (12.35 and Harold Carter in the boys under-17 100 (10.86 There was also two races for the Special Olympics. In the girls 100, Racquel Moxey won in 14.94, followed by Trenice Bell in 15.17 with Ruth Hepburn third in 15.44. The boys’ straight away race was won by D’Edwin Major in 12.55, followed by Brent Cooper in 12.61. Christopher Rolle was third in 12.65. Olympic champion LaShawn M erritt (44.50 Jeremy Wariner (44.69 W illiams, another Bahamian, who had originally led the list with 45.01, has dropped to fourth, but he's also qualified for Berlin. American Darold Williamson was second in Friday's race in 45.68 and Sanjay Ayre got third in 45.98. Over at the Osaka Grand Prix in his return to Japan where he made a sensational breakthrough at the World Championships last year, Shamar Sands posted a winning time of 13.40 in the men's 110 hurdles. Not only was it below the qual ifying standard of 13.55 for Berlin, but it also reduced Sands' national record of 13.40. Sands now has the ninth fastest time in the world. Leading the way is American David Oliver in 13.09. China's Shi Dongpeng was second in 13.48 and Ji Wei got third in 13.51. “I am satisfied with my (national the sixth and seventh hurdles," Sands was quoted as saying in an interview on the meet's website. "My start was especially good.” Also at the meet, Donald Thomas had another victorious performance in the men's high jump, although he only cleared 2.28 metres. Thomas still has the third best leap of the season with 2.30. Andre Manson is out front w ith 2.35. Thomas, another Grand Bahamian native who t hree years ago switched from playing basketball to clearing the high bar, won the world champi onship title in Japan in his debut there two years ago. " Nagai stadium is good to me," said Thomas about his back-tob ack winning feat in as many appearances. American Tora Harris was second in 2.25 and Poland's Grze gorz Spos—b got third in 2.25. S printer Derrick Atkins, the World Championships' 100 silver m edalist from Osaka, is slowly working back to his old form after he was hampered with a slight injury going into the Olympics where he failed to make the final. Stepping up to the half-lapper as he looks ahead to a possible 100-200 combo in Berlin, Atkins won the race in 20.35 over quarter-miler Nathaniel McKinney, who did 20.67 for second. American David Dickens was third in 20.70. They were a part of a Bahami an contingent that competed at the Georgia Invitational at the University of Georgia's Specs Town Track in Athens, Georgia. McKinney, working his way back for a spot on the men's 4 x 4 00 team again after he was left off the Olympic team, also comp eted in the 400 where he won the one-lapper in 47.34. Another Bahamian and fellow Olympic team-mate Aaron Cleare was second in 47.54. A merican Montez Valentine, competing for Shorter, was third i n 48.67. Also at the meet, Benedict College's Petra McDonald took the women's 100 hurdles in 14.17 in a photo finish with Jas mine Johnson of Georgia State. M cDonald also contested the long jump, but she failed to r ecord a leap, having fouled her first five attempts and passed on the sixth and final one. Antionette Oglesby of Fort Valley State won with a leap of 19-5 1/2. And her Benedict State teammate Melinda Bastian picked up a third place finish in the women's javelin with a heave of 146-feet, 11-inches (44.79 metres second attempt. Winning the event was Michelle Thompson of Georgia with 165-8 (50.50 first attempt, followed by Kristy Woodward with 156-5 (47.68 metres) on her first attempt as well. At the 2009 Chick-fil-A UNC Elite Meet in Chapel Hill, North Carolina, veteran sprinter Chandra Sturrup came close to pulling off a double dose of victory as she continue her quest to another appearance at the World Cham pionships. Sturrup easily ran away with the field in the women's 100, shooting through the straightaway in 11.28 to go under the A quali fying mark of 11.30 for Berlin. Two South Carolina athletes, Kya Brookins and Gabby Glenn were second and third respectively in 11.47 and 11.81. However, Sturrup had to settle for second when she moved up to the half-lapper, clocking 23.72 for second place in the women's 200, which was shy of the B qualifying time of 23.30. Cynetheia Rooks of Shekinah Track Club stopped the clock in 23.42 for the win. Shayla Mahan of South Carolina was third in 23.86. At the Ward Haylett Invitational at the R V Christian Track in Manhattan, Kansas, Tia Rolle produced the same finishers as Sturrup, only in reverse order. Representing Lincoln University, Rolle ran 12.07 for second in the century. Her team-mate Nandelle Cameron won in 11.79 and Maja Mihalinec of Nebras ka-Omaha was third in 12.12. In the 200, Rolle pulled off the victory in 24.62. Kim Haberman of Kansas-State was second in 24.94 and Sudian Davis of LinC M Y K C M Y K SPORTS PAGE 14, MONDAY, MAY 11, 2009 TRIBUNE SPORTS n By RENALDO DORSETT Sports Reporter rdorsett@tribunemedia.net Defending champions in both men’s and women’s divisions continued the w inning trends from 2008 with a pair of o pening day wins to begin the 2009 N ew Providence Softball Association season. In the men’s feature, the Commando Security Truckers held of a late game charge to outlast the Robin Hood Hitmen 8-7, while in the women’s match up the Sigma Brackettes won 10-5 over the Proper Care Pool Sharks. In a closely contested game throughout, the Truckers and Hitmen played to an even 6-6 tie through three innings. After both teams went scoreless over the course of the next two innings, the Truckers took a decisive advantage with two runs in the bottom half of the sixth inning to take an 8-6 advantage. The Hitmen managed one run in the bottom half of the seventh but failed to score an equalizer to force extra innings. Freddie Cornish led the defending NPSA pennant winners, league champions and national champions, Truckers to the win while Cardinal Gilbert was tagged with the loss. Steven Brown highlighted the Truckers’ evening at the plate with a three run home run in the first inning, his lone hit of the game. Marvin Wood finished 2-4, including one double, with two runs and one RBI. Darron Stevens led the Hitmen offensively as he went 2-4 with one triple and one run scored while Garfield Bethel went 2-5 with one run and one RBI. In the women’s feature the Brackettes took charge from the game’s outset with an early 2-0 lead after the first inning and never relinquished the advantage. The Brackettes piled on at least a single run over the next three innings and took a 6-3 lead heading into the fifth. The defending champions added their run total with their most efficient scoring inning of the game with four runs. Garnette Curry led the Brackettes offensively as she went 2-3 with four RBI and Shevette Taylor was 2-4, a pair of doubles, with two runs and one RBI. Kelly Smith led the Sharks going 2-4 with one run scored. Burket Dorsett, Bahamas Softball Federation President said the federation was pleased with the level of play on day one and looks forward to a season of similar play over the year. “Competition was keen from the very first night as we expected, these players worked hard in the off-season and it showed tonight on the field setting the pace for what is expected to be a great season” he said, “The BSF wishes the NPSA, its players, executives and administrators a successful season, we will facilitate their growth and development particularly with the youth initiatives as we concentrate on the training of a younger generation of softball players to continue the rich heritage of the sport in the country.” NEW PROVIDENCE SOFTBALL ASSOCIATION Truckers and Brackettes continue winning trends TRACK AND FIELD FROM page 15 Athletes shine Mathieu dominates 200 and 400 metres F ROM page 15 FRITZGRANTTRACK A NDFIELD INVITATIONAL OJAY FERGUSON in the 400 metres. V’ALONEE ROBINSON wins the long jump. RYAN INGRAHAM is airborne during the high jump. PHOTOS: Felip Major /T ribune staff

PAGE 15

C M Y K C M Y K MONDAY, MAY 11, 2009 THETRIBUNE PAGE 15 I NSIDE Premiership roundup n By BRENT STUBBS Tribune Sports Reporter b stubbs@tribunemdia.net IT was another sizzling weekend – posting one of the fastestt ime in the men's 400 and anothe r 110 hurdles national record – for Bahamian athletes around the world. It started on Friday at the T exas Tech Open at the Terry and Linda Fuller Track & Field Complex where Andrae Wiliams continued to keep his name int he forefront in the men's 400. T he Grand Bahamian native, who ran on the Bahamas' 4 x 400 relay team that secured the silv er at the Olympic Games in Beijing, China, is aiming for a spot in the 400 at the IAAF World Championships in Berlin, Ger-m any in August. W illiams qualified for the event by clocking a season's best of 44.98 seconds to win the one-lapper at the . The A qualifying m ark for Berlin is 45.55. He now moves into third place in the IAAF world list behind Bahamian athletes shine around world n By BRENT STUBBS Senior Sports Reporter bstubbs@tribunemedia.com MICHAEL Mathieu took advantage of the visiting athletes that came to town for the Fritz Grant Track and Field Invitational by dominating the men’s invitational 200 and 400 metres. The Grand Bahamian native easily took the half-lapper in 20.80 seconds, well ahead of his Bahamian rival Adrian Griffith, who got second in 21.25. Jamaican DeWayne Barrett was third in 21.59. Mathieu, a member of the Bahamas’ 4 x 400 relay team that clinched the silver at the Olympic Games in Beijing, China last year, doubled up in the one-lapper with his victory in 46.26. In the process, he held off a pair of Jamaicans who challenged him. Barrett had to once again settle for second in 46.69 and Sekou Clarke ended up third in 46.80. In another race featuring the interna tional flavour, Jamaican Lerone Clarke sped to a winning time of 10.36 ahead of two Bahamians. Griffith got second in 10.44 and his training partner Rodney Green was third in 10.55. Meet director Bernard Newbold said the visiting athletes certainly brought a new dimension to the meet. But he said there were sufficient local athletes participating that enabled the meet to live up to its advanced billing. “The meet was very successful,” said Newbold, who noted that they had more than 600 athletes registered. “The elite athletes who were in town said they will definitely come back next year if they are invited.” The 4 x 100 metre shuttle relay, which was introduced for the first time at a local meet, was just as exciting for the fans who showed up on Saturday’s final day of competition. The relays, which allowed the athletes to run in a format back and forth from the starting line to the finish, were contested for the under-7, under-9 and under-11 divisions. There was one invitational race for women with Ambassadors Athletics’ Katrina Seymour winning the 400 in 55.88. Deshana Burnside of Bahamas Speed Dynamics in 56.79, followed by her team-mate Shauntae Miller in 59.60. V’Alonee Robinson, competing for Club Monica, took the 100 in 11.85 over her team-mate Ivanique Kemp (12.19 Speed Dynamics’ Dominique Morley (12.59 In the 200, Kemp stopped the clock in 25.37, followed by Andrae Williams records one of fastest times in men’s 400 Shamar Sands posts national record in 110 hurdles TRACKANDFIELD Andrae Williams SEE page 14 POWERINGTOVICTORY Mathieu dominates 200 and 400 metres MICHAEL MATHIEU wins the men’s invitational 400 metres. F e l i p M a j o r / T r i b u n e s t a f f “The elite athletes who were in town said they will definitely come back next year if they are invited.” Bernard Newbold SEE page 14

PAGE 16

Bank’s $20m offering % oversubscribed’ n By NEIL HARTNELL Tribune Business Editor BANK of the Bahamas International’s $20 million private preference share issue was “oversubscribed by about 20 per cent”, the company’s placement agent told Tribune Business, with the institution itself saying the response represented “a vote of confidence” in the bank and its strategy. Anthony Ferguson, CFAL’s president, said: “It was $20 mil lion raised, and it was oversubscribed by about 20 per cent, I believe.” That would imply that subscriptions were received for a total of around $24 million. Mr Ferguson said all investors who subscribed to the private placement offering would be accommodated, with CFAL and Bank of the Bahamas International adopting a “bottom up” approach. This means that all investors would receive their first tranche of $250,000 worth of preference shares, the minimum subscription requirement. They would then work their way up via tranches of $250,000, with those investors who subscribed for the most receiving the least in relation to the size of their application. Paul McWeeney, Bank of the Bahamas International’s managing director, told Tribune Business that the $20 million share offering closed “on Wednesday or Thursday” last week after it was oversubscribed. “They’re working through the allotments,” he added, of how CFAL were allocating the shares. “It’s a vote of confidence in the bank, and it reflects the fact that investors are looking for attractive, safer types of investment. “We’re doing the closing and issuing share certificates now. The settlement account is with the bank, and the funds are substantially in place.” Mr McWeeney said Bahami an investors were currently looking for safety, soundness * Managing director says placement’s success a ‘vote o f confidence’ in bank S S E E E E p p a a g g e e 8 8 B B Ferguson n By NEIL HARTNELL Tribune Business Editor THE BISX-listed Bahamas Property Fund is exploring the potential acquisition of foreign properties, its administrator has told Tribune Business, in addition to diversifying its real estate holdings into ventures such as shopping centres, having end ed fiscal 2008 with a 1.45 perc ent net income increase to $2.654 million. Michael Anderson, who is also president of RoyalFidelity Merchant Bank & Trust, said the Property Fund’s balance sheet strength had left it wellpositioned to acquire further select commercial properties, with the economic downturn likely to place some owners under pressure to sell. He told Tribune Business that the Property Fund was “potentially looking at acquiring a property in the Cayman Islands”, where RoyalFidelity and one of the latter’s 50 per cent shareholders had an exten sive commercial presence. While the Property Fund was not currently in negotiations for any specific property, Mr Anderson added: “If we can find something that makes sense for us, and can get Central Bank approval to buy the property, it will help us diversify out side the Bahamas, and give us investment opportunities outside the Bahamas. “If there are opportunities here or somewhere else, we have to be in a position to take advantage of them.” When it came to ammunition for acquisition financing, Mr Anderson said the Property Fund had plenty. He pointed to its year-end 2008 balance sheet, which showed it had some $33.573 million in net equity, and debt amounting to just over $15.5 million collectively. This was almost a complete reversal of the Property Fund’s financial position when it was formed, as then it had twothirds of its financing in debt and one-third in equity. The 2008 year-end balance sheet C M Y K C M Y K SECTIONB business@tribunemedia.net MONDAY, MAY 11, 2009 THETRIBUNE $4. 68 $4. 51 $4. 69The information contained is from a third party and The Tribune can not be held r esponsible for errors and/or omission f rom the daily report.$4.29 $4.29 $4.29T he information c ontained is from a t hird party and The T ribune can not be h eld responsible for errors and/or omission from the daily report. $3.53 $3.62 $3.48 n n t t f f r r t t f f n n b b !!! b nff '*'*,!"+n n! *'-$''*'&*+,!+,$-'&+$ ''*+/"&'/+1'&"* ,"'&"& +0+,,*–"$"& +('*"&$''*,"$++*"'*)",0'&+,*-,"'&"+."+"$,!*'!'-,,!$"."& '%%-&",0%&","+",&++ 1*'&,*0(''$-* *'-&(*#"& &,&'* *'-*."/+*"'0,0'*+ '**&,%'&,! n By CHESTER ROBARDS Business Reporter crobards@tribunemedia.net THE OLD City Lumberyard, which met its end by fire several years ago, has received a more than $15 million makeover from its new owners, who are developing the almost12 acre property into Builder’s Mall. Owner Mark Roberts said FYP (Fix Your Place become a veritable builder’s mecca once the proposed gran ite fabrication factory is constructed, Tile King is moved from its existing Palmdale premises to the new Wulff Road location, and several other construction-oriented businesses lease FYP’s available office space. “The idea behind Builder’s Mall is that we would like to create a facility that makes it easy to come and do a lot of construction-oriented business,” said Mr Roberts. The property’s enormous red hardware store is hard to miss, but the 65 foot tower crane looming in the rear of the buildings, which is part of a fleet of rental equipment, including a Skytrak, and other forklifts, is difficult to overlook. Mr Roberts said the company was toying with the idea of also constructing a concrete block plant, but that could be three to four years into the future. For the moment, the Paint Centre, the hardware store, the future site of the Tile King and the lumberyard occupy only four of the property’s 12 acres. They hope to also open a kitchen manufacturing facility on property. “We’ll be doing custom kitchens,” said Mr Roberts. Despite the large number of outlets concentrated on FYP’s lot, he argues that he can never claim the place to be a one-stop shop. “You go to Home Depot and sometimes you can’t find what you need,” he said. The store is comfortably rem iniscent of the US hardware giant popular with Bahamians, as steel shelves that are a famil iar sight in all Home Depot stores rise from the concrete flooring. In fact, FYP’s shelving was once part of a Home Depot store. The showroom for the hard ware section features tools manufactured worldwide, with sundry brands lining the wall adjacent to what is the nut, bolt and screw distribution counter. The hardware section of FYP opened its doors only last week, three years after Mr Roberts acquired the property, while the Tile King is scheduled to open in July. The Paint Centre has been operating for one year. A known philanthropist Mr Roberts hopes to take his suc cess outside of the boundaries of FYP’s gates to the surrounding community. His company is well-known for its charity work, having made building supply donations to the people of Inagua in the wake of last year’s hurricane Ike and donating 14 new dialysis machines to Doc tor’s Hospital. “We want to do more com munity service in the area,” said Mr Roberts. Now more expansions are on the drawing table, and July’s Grand Opening just around the corner. $15m makeover builds key business location BISX-listed entity eyes real estate deal overseas n By CHESTER ROBARDS Business Reporter crobards@tribunemedia.net CANADA-based Downsview Kitchens has launched its first showroom and distribution centre outside of North America at the Airport Industrial Park in Western New Providence, having picked up an exclusive contract to do cus tom installations for the $1.4 billion Albany project just the day before. Gary Stannis,the company’s design consultant, told Tribune Business during the showroom launch that the Albany developers were impressed by the model of their conservative-tyle kitchen. “We’re excited about the opportunity to work on the [Albany] cottages,” he said. “It should hopefully lead to more and more.” Mr Stannis said Downsview was a high-end custom kitchen cabinetry maker that has fur nished multi-million dollar properties from Canada to South America. In the Bahamas, Downsview had done jobs on properties in Lyfrod Cay, the Ocean Club Estates, Old Fort Bay and in the Goodman’s Bay area. Mr Stannis said some of those jobs ranged in price from $300,000 to $400,000, with the most expensive installation on the island costing around $650,000. Despite the name, Downsview Kitchen also spe cializes in custom bathrooms and entertainment centres. Downsview is represented in the Bahamas by Caribbean Construction and Management Service (CCMS Kitchen company fits Bahamas first S S E E E E p p a a g g e e 4 4 B B S S E E E E p p a a g g e e ? ? B B * Un v eils f ir st distr ibution centr e outside Nor th Amer ica at Airpor t Industr ial P ar k * Lands contract with $1.4bn Albany project * Still waiting for Investments Board approvals to close $3.5m Pwc building deal * Property Fund looking for further diversification through likes of shopping centres * Looking to end for approvals ‘anomaly’ Granite fabrication facility, kitchen manufacturing and possible concrete block plant all possible future additions to FYP’s Wulff Road complex

PAGE 17

Bank’s $20m offering % oversubscribed’ n By NEIL HARTNELL Tribune Business Editor BANK of the Bahamas International’s $20 million private preference share issue was “oversubscribed by about 20 per cent”, the company’s placement agent told Tribune Business, with the institution itself saying the response represented “a vote of confidence” in the bank and its strategy. Anthony Ferguson, CFAL’s president, said: “It was $20 mil lion raised, and it was oversubscribed by about 20 per cent, I believe.” That would imply that subscriptions were received for a total of around $24 million. Mr Ferguson said all investors who subscribed to the private placement offering would be accommodated, with CFAL and Bank of the Bahamas International adopting a “bottom up” approach. This means that all investors would receive their first tranche of $250,000 worth of preference shares, the minimum subscription requirement. They would then work their way up via tranches of $250,000, with those investors who subscribed for the most receiving the least in relation to the size of their application. Paul McWeeney, Bank of the Bahamas International’s managing director, told Tribune Business that the $20 million share offering closed “on Wednesday or Thursday” last week after it was oversubscribed. “They’re working through the allotments,” he added, of how CFAL were allocating the shares. “It’s a vote of confidence in the bank, and it reflects the fact that investors are looking for attractive, safer types of investment. “We’re doing the closing and issuing share certificates now. The settlement account is with the bank, and the funds are substantially in place.” Mr McWeeney said Bahami an investors were currently looking for safety, soundness * Managing director says placement’s success a ‘vote o f confidence’ in bank S S E E E E p p a a g g e e 8 8 B B Ferguson n By NEIL HARTNELL Tribune Business Editor THE BISX-listed Bahamas Property Fund is exploring the potential acquisition of foreign properties, its administrator has told Tribune Business, in addition to diversifying its real estate holdings into ventures such as shopping centres, having end ed fiscal 2008 with a 1.45 perc ent net income increase to $2.654 million. Michael Anderson, who is also president of RoyalFidelity Merchant Bank & Trust, said the Property Fund’s balance sheet strength had left it wellpositioned to acquire further select commercial properties, with the economic downturn likely to place some owners under pressure to sell. He told Tribune Business that the Property Fund was “potentially looking at acquiring a property in the Cayman Islands”, where RoyalFidelity and one of the latter’s 50 per cent shareholders had an exten sive commercial presence. While the Property Fund was not currently in negotiations for any specific property, Mr Anderson added: “If we can find something that makes sense for us, and can get Central Bank approval to buy the property, it will help us diversify out side the Bahamas, and give us investment opportunities outside the Bahamas. “If there are opportunities here or somewhere else, we have to be in a position to take advantage of them.” When it came to ammunition for acquisition financing, Mr Anderson said the Property Fund had plenty. He pointed to its year-end 2008 balance sheet, which showed it had some $33.573 million in net equity, and debt amounting to just over $15.5 million collectively. This was almost a complete reversal of the Property Fund’s financial position when it was formed, as then it had twothirds of its financing in debt and one-third in equity. The 2008 year-end balance sheet C M Y K C M Y K SECTIONB business@tribunemedia.net MONDAY, MAY 11, 2009 THETRIBUNE $4. 68 $4. 51 $4. 69The information contained is from a third party and The Tribune can not be held r esponsible for errors and/or omission f rom the daily report.$4.29 $4.29 $4.29T he information c ontained is from a t hird party and The T ribune can not be h eld responsible for errors and/or omission from the daily report. $3.53 $3.62 $3.48 n n t t f f r r t t f f n n b b !!! b nff '*'*,!"+n n! *'-$''*'&*+,!+,$-'&+$ ''*+/"&'/+1'&"* ,"'&"& +0+,,*–"$"& +('*"&$''*,"$++*"'*)",0'&+,*-,"'&"+."+"$,!*'!'-,,!$"."& '%%-&",0%&","+",&++ 1*'&,*0(''$-* *'-&(*#"& &,&'* *'-*."/+*"'0,0'*+ '**&,%'&,! n By CHESTER ROBARDS Business Reporter crobards@tribunemedia.net THE OLD City Lumberyard, which met its end by fire several years ago, has received a more than $15 million makeover from its new owners, who are developing the almost12 acre property into Builder’s Mall. Owner Mark Roberts said FYP (Fix Your Place become a veritable builder’s mecca once the proposed gran ite fabrication factory is constructed, Tile King is moved from its existing Palmdale premises to the new Wulff Road location, and several other construction-oriented businesses lease FYP’s available office space. “The idea behind Builder’s Mall is that we would like to create a facility that makes it easy to come and do a lot of construction-oriented business,” said Mr Roberts. The property’s enormous red hardware store is hard to miss, but the 65 foot tower crane looming in the rear of the buildings, which is part of a fleet of rental equipment, including a Skytrak, and other forklifts, is difficult to overlook. Mr Roberts said the company was toying with the idea of also constructing a concrete block plant, but that could be three to four years into the future. For the moment, the Paint Centre, the hardware store, the future site of the Tile King and the lumberyard occupy only four of the property’s 12 acres. They hope to also open a kitchen manufacturing facility on property. “We’ll be doing custom kitchens,” said Mr Roberts. Despite the large number of outlets concentrated on FYP’s lot, he argues that he can never claim the place to be a one-stop shop. “You go to Home Depot and sometimes you can’t find what you need,” he said. The store is comfortably rem iniscent of the US hardware giant popular with Bahamians, as steel shelves that are a famil iar sight in all Home Depot stores rise from the concrete flooring. In fact, FYP’s shelving was once part of a Home Depot store. The showroom for the hard ware section features tools manufactured worldwide, with sundry brands lining the wall adjacent to what is the nut, bolt and screw distribution counter. The hardware section of FYP opened its doors only last week, three years after Mr Roberts acquired the property, while the Tile King is scheduled to open in July. The Paint Centre has been operating for one year. A known philanthropist Mr Roberts hopes to take his suc cess outside of the boundaries of FYP’s gates to the surrounding community. His company is well-known for its charity work, having made building supply donations to the people of Inagua in the wake of last year’s hurricane Ike and donating 14 new dialysis machines to Doc tor’s Hospital. “We want to do more com munity service in the area,” said Mr Roberts. Now more expansions are on the drawing table, and July’s Grand Opening just around the corner. $15m makeover builds key business location BISX-listed entity eyes real estate deal overseas n By CHESTER ROBARDS Business Reporter crobards@tribunemedia.net CANADA-based Downsview Kitchens has launched its first showroom and distribution centre outside of North America at the Airport Industrial Park in Western New Providence, having picked up an exclusive contract to do cus tom installations for the $1.4 billion Albany project just the day before. Gary Stannis,the company’s design consultant, told Tribune Business during the showroom launch that the Albany developers were impressed by the model of their conservative-tyle kitchen. “We’re excited about the opportunity to work on the [Albany] cottages,” he said. “It should hopefully lead to more and more.” Mr Stannis said Downsview was a high-end custom kitchen cabinetry maker that has fur nished multi-million dollar properties from Canada to South America. In the Bahamas, Downsview had done jobs on properties in Lyfrod Cay, the Ocean Club Estates, Old Fort Bay and in the Goodman’s Bay area. Mr Stannis said some of those jobs ranged in price from $300,000 to $400,000, with the most expensive installation on the island costing around $650,000. Despite the name, Downsview Kitchen also spe cializes in custom bathrooms and entertainment centres. Downsview is represented in the Bahamas by Caribbean Construction and Management Service (CCMS Kitchen company fits Bahamas first S S E E E E p p a a g g e e 4 4 B B S S E E E E p p a a g g e e ? ? B B * Un v eils f ir st distr ibution centr e outside Nor th Amer ica at Airpor t Industr ial P ar k * Lands contract with $1.4bn Albany project * Still waiting for Investments Board approvals to close $3.5m Pwc building deal * Property Fund looking for further diversification through likes of shopping centres * Looking to end for approvals ‘anomaly’ Granite fabrication facility, kitchen manufacturing and possible concrete block plant all possible future additions to FYP’s Wulff Road complex

PAGE 18

n By NEIL HARTNELL Tribune Business Editor AIR stopover visitors to Nassau/Paradise Island declined by 15.9 per cent during January 2009 year-over-year, highlighting the full extent of the impact that the global economic downturn has had on the highest spending tourist category. The Ministry of Tourism’s Market Update for January this year, which was obtained by Tribune Business after being released to the private sector on Friday, revealed that CatCay (a private island ni were the only two destinations in the Bahamas to experience an increase in air arrivals during January 2009. The report confirmed earlier revelations by Vincent Vanderpool-Wallace, the minister of tourism, in stating that air arrivals for the Bahamas as a whole for January 2009 declined by 18.7 per cent to 89,999, compared to 110,759 in 2008,. Nass au/Paradise Island, which a ttracts the lion’s share, saw visitor numbers fall from 81,923 in 2008 to 68,880 this time around. Faring worst were the Berry Islands and Cat Island, which saw year-over-year stopover tourist declines of 56.2 per centand 53 per cent respectively. Also faring worse than Nassau/Paradise Island were Grand Bahama, with a 25.8 per cent drop; Abaco, with a 24.2 per cent decline; Exuma, with a 37 per cent fall, and Eleuthera with a 29.8 per cent drop-off. While the Ministry of Tourism made much of the fact that the Bahamas enjoyed a 22.5 per cent increase in cruise arrivals during January 2009, raising total tourist arrivals by 10.2 per cent year-over-year, this did little to compensate for the drastic fall-off in revenues experienced by hotels and all land-based companies dependent on the tourism industry. For starters, when it comes to per head spending, there is no comparison. Stopover visitors spend in the region of $1100 per visit, cruise passengers somewhere between $50$60 per head. Pontificating on some of these questions itself, the Min istry of Tourism said in its Mar ket Update: “The year 2009 gave birth to a brighter new day with January. Visitor arrivals to the Bahamas took a turn for the better and were up by 10.2 per cent. “Air arrivals, which had been strong in January 2008, were weak in January 2009 (down 18.7 per cent) but cruise arrivals to the Bahamas were very strong (up 22.5 per cent the challenges now facing the cruise industry. “Cruise arrivals, which had been weak in the early part of 2 008, would now in 2009 be the d riving force behind the i ncrease in visitor arrivals.The questions that would now be on the minds of many people would be: ‘How well would the cruise arrivals to the destination be able to sustain and prevent the falloff in total visitor arrivals? And would the Bahamas be able to sustain the growth in cruise arrivals for any length of time?’” Elsewhere, anticipating a few negative answers, the Ministry o f Tourism pointed out that France, Germany and the UK, which respectively contributed 1 per cent, 1 per cent and 3 per cent of the Bahamas’ total stopover visitor business were all now in economic recession. And Canada, which was the second largest supplier of s topover visitors with an 8 per c ent market share, was also in t rouble. “Arrivals to the Bahamas from Canada have fallen off since the financial meltdown in September 2008, and by January 2009 they had not yet recovered,” the Ministry of Tourism warned. Not surprisingly, this translated into a reduction in stopover visitors from all major markets during 2009, with the exception of Europe, Latin America and the Middle East. O n the cruise front, while Nassau/Paradise Island did see a 22.2 per cent increase in these visitors from 130,312 to 159,197 during January 2009, the scaleof that increase was matched – or even dwarfed – by cruise line use of their private islands. The Berry Islands, where C oco Cay is situated, experie nced a 54 per cent increase in c ruise arrivals during January 2009, with Half Moon Cay enjoying a 22.8 per cent growth. While all cruise lines “brought in significantly more passengers in January 2009 compared to January 2008”, the Market Update added: “The Out Islands were up 29 per cent (first port of entry 2009 because many of the major cruise lines brought in more passengers than during the same period of 2008. “Disney Cruise’s Disney W onder brought in more pass engers to Castaway Cay, Abac o, in January 2009 than in the same period of 2008.In January 2009, Royal Caribbean International’s Mariner of the Seas, Monarch of the Seas, and Navigator of the Seas all brought in more passengers to Coco Cay (Berry Islands, Bahamas) as a first port of call than in the same period of 2008. “In addition, Norwegian Cruise line’s Norwegian Dawn, Norwegian Majesty, and Norwegian Pearl all brought in m ore passengers as a first port o f call into Great Stirrup Cay ( Berry Islands, Bahamas) than in the same period of 2008. Holland American Cruises brought in more passengers to Half Moon Cay as a first port of call in January 2009 than in the same period of 2008.” C M Y K C M Y K BUSINESS THE TRIBUNE MONDAY, MAY 11, 2009, PAGE 3B Vacation in Paradise.Only $69*per person double occupancy.Minimum 2-night stay. Bahamas residents only. Full use of all Atlantis facilities. Plus: Limited-time offer! Reserve today !BSP Job #: CTS-9-N003 JM# 8634 Client: Comfort Suites Description: Stay In Paradise 1/4 pg Bleed: non Color: 1C Black Specs: PDFX1A Mech #3 Date: 2/25/2009 Time: 1:30 Mech Person: GUDimensions: 5.75in x 10.5 in Issue: Nassau Tribune 3/2/2009 Closing: 2/26/09 *$69 per person double occupancy per night Sun. – Wed. Add $20 pp for Thurs. – Sat. Maximum four persons per room. Rates effective through December 15. Additional fees apply for mandatory taxes, mandatory housekeeping gratuities and utility service fees. Rates quoted are based on standard room category and are subject to availability. Cancellations must be received 48 hours prior to arrival or a one night penalty will apply. G u s U g a r t e 2 / 2 5 4 p m CTS-9-N003_NassauGuardian.indd 2 2/25/09 4:14:07 PM Nassau/PI stopovers fall 15.9% in January

PAGE 19

n B y TOM KRISHER AP Auto Writer DETROIT (AP eral Motors Corp., the task at hand is so difficult that experts say a Chapter 11 bankruptcy filing is all but inevitable. To remake itself outside of court, GM must persuade bondholders to swap $27 billion in debt for 10 percent of its risky stock. On top of that, the automaker must work out deals with its union, announce factory closures, cut or sell brands and force hundreds of dealers out of business all in three weeks. "I just don't see how it's possible, given all of the pieces," said Stephen J. Lubben, a professor at Seton Hall University School of Law who specializes in bankruptcy. In Ohio, the automaker employs thousands at a number of plants, including a major assembly complex in Lordstown, near Youngstown. GM, which has received $15.4 b illion in federal aid, faces a June 1 government deadline to c omplete its restructuring plan. If it can't finish in time, the company will follow Detroit comp etitor Chrysler LLC into bankruptcy protection. A lthough company executives said last week they would still prefer to restructure out of court, experts say all GM is doing now is lining up majorities of stakeholders to make its court-supervised reorganization move more quickly. "If we need to pursue bankruptcy, we will make sure that we do it in an expeditious fashion. The exact strategies I'm not getting into today, but we'll be r eady to go if that's required," Chief Executive Fritz Henders on said last week. The threat of bankruptcy, however, may be just a negotia ting ploy to pull reluctant bondholders into the equity swap d eal. In Chrysler's case, some secured debtholders resisted taking roughly 30 cents on the dollar for what they were owed, but most gave in after they were i dentified in court documents. Henderson, who took over in March when the government ousted Rick Wagoner, said last week there's still time to get everything done by the deadline, although he conceded it will be difficult to meet a governm ent requirement that 90 percent of its thousands of bondholders agree to the stock swap. The biggest obstacle to GM restructuring out of court appears to be its bondholders, who have been reluctant to sign on to the stock swap when the government and United Auto Workers union would get far more stock in exchange for debts owed by GM. GM has proposed issuing 62 billion new shares, 100 times more than the 611 million now offered publicly. Even though the U.S. government has agreed to back up GM a nd Chrysler new-car warranties, potential car buyers already view G M as if it's in bankruptcy, reflected by the company's steep revenue drop in the latest quart er, Lubben said. On Thursday, GM posted a $6 billion firstq uarter loss and said its revenue dropped plunged by nearly half, largely because bankruptcy fears scared customers away from showrooms. " I don't think anyone is buying cars from a company who is wringing their hands about a potential bankruptcy for the past year or so," he said. Under Chapter 11, a company can stay in operation under court protection while sheds d ebts and unprofitable assets to emerge in a stronger financial position. At this point, GM needs to resolve the uncertainty and get in and out of bankruptcy as quickly as possible, Lubben said. The company is talking with the UAW and Canadian auto workers unions about concessions, including getting the UAW to take roughly 39 percent of its stock in exchange for half of the $20 billion GM must pay into a union-run trust that will take over retiree health care payments next year. About 50 percent of the stock w ould go to the government for its loans. GM said last week it w ould need another $2.6 billion in May and $9 billion more for the rest of the year, bringing the t otal to $27 billion. One percent would go to curr ent shareholders, with bondholders getting the other 10 percent. Bondholders are reluctant to take the deal because the gove rnment and UAW are getting far bigger stakes in the company, said Kevin Tynan, an industry analyst for Argus Research in New York. "When you look across at what the union is getting and what the government is getting, t o expect them to take 10 percent is just unrealistic," he said. Cutting dealers also remains a huge hurdle, with GM hoping to shed 2,600 of its 6,246 dealerships by 2010. But dealers are protected by state franchise laws, and trying to shed them outside of bankruptcy would result in either millions of dollars in payments or multiple lengthy lawsuits, Lubben said. "That means you've got to negotiate with each one of those dealers individually." Also, GM on Friday told its major parts suppliers that it w ould move up payments due on June 2 to May 28. C ompany spokesman Dan Flores said it was being done to help the suppliers at a critical t ime, but he denied that the payments were pulled ahead of a p otential June 1 bankruptcy filing. GM has begun to temporarily close 13 assembly plants for up to 11 weeks through mid-July in a n effort to control inventory. With Chrysler plants also shut down during its bankruptcy proceedings, parts suppliers will soon have no income and could go under. It would help speed up GM's stay in bankruptcy court if it c ould pull together big blocks of stakeholders to agree on reducing debt or changing other stakes, said Robert Gordon, head of the corporate restructuring and bankruptcy group at the Clark Hill PLC law firm in Detroit. rooms in Dania Beach, Florida, at the exclusive Design Centreo f the Americas, and in Juno B each, Florida. “The local showroom has been getting a good response,” said Mr Stannis. Downsview has several other showrooms throughout North, South and Central America, buta ll of its manufacturing is done a t its 600,000 square foot facili ty in Toronto, Canada. Manager Alexander Reed, CCMS’ executive manager,said thep artnership with Downsview Kitchens had brought “one of the most successful high end production companies to the Bahamas”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pVXPpZLWKFRYHUOHWWHUWR 7KH'LUHFWRU*HQHUDO %DKDPDVHG&URVV 3 1DVVDX%DKDPDV 2U UHGFURVV#EDKDPDVQHWEV $OODSSOLFDWLRQVVKRXOGEHVXEPLWWHGE\D\ Kitchen company fits Bahamas first F F R R O O M M p p a a g g e e 1 1 B B GM bankruptcy almost inevitable, experts say

PAGE 20

n By NEIL HARTNELL Tribune Business Editor CABLE Bahamas has given further encouragement to p otential investors in its $40 mill ion preference share issue by u nveiling a 34.5 per net income increase to $7.452 million for the 2009 first quarter, although the share issue was still awaiting Central Bank of the Bahamas approval as of Friday’s press deadline. For the three months to March 31, 2009, the BISX-listed company said top line revenues increased by 5.2 per cent yearover-year to $21.087 million, compared to $20.042 million year-over-year. It added that cable TV revenues realized $11.2 million in revenues, the Coralwave Internet business $6.5 million, andi ts data and web hosting business, another $3.3 million. As a result, the company’s revenuemix, while still dominated by cable TV at 53.3 per cent, now includes a 31 per cent contribution from broadband Internet and 15.7 from the data business. Operating expenses remained almost flat at $9.863 million, compared to $9.759 million for they year before period, while operating income reached $ 11.224 million – an increase of a lmost $1 million or 9.2 per cent year-over-year. Earnings per share grew by 34.9 per cent to $0.38 per share,as opposed to $0.28 per share the year before. Cable Bahamas’ Board of Directors also approved an increase in ordinary share dividends from an annualised rate of $0.24 per share to $0.28 per share, a 16.7per cent increase. Meanwhile, Tribune Business understands that the major approval Cable Bahamas andits advisers, RoyalFidelity Cap ital Markets, were waiting on for the $40 million preference share offering late Friday afternoon was exchange control permission from the Central Bank. It is unclear whether it was received, but is required because it is proposed that $20 million, or 50 per cent of the issue, be financed in US dollars. If approvals was received before end of business on Friday, the preference share issue will be launched today. The preference share issue, which is being targeted at select institutional and high net worth individuals, meaning members of the public should not apply to become involved, is priced at $10 per share. The minimum subscription, according to the term sheet, is 5,000 shares or $50,000, with the proceeds set to join some $90 million in bank financing to help fund the buyout of the 30.2 per cent stake held by controlling shareholder, Columbus Communications. The proceeds from the $40 million issue, and the $90 mil lion syndicated credit facility from Royal Bank of Canada, FirstCaribbean International Bank (Bahamas bank, will also be used to refinance Cable Bahamas’ existing debt and credit facilities, plus pay transaction costs and fund working capital. As previously revealed by Tribune Business, preference share investors will have the option to convert their investment into Cable Bahamas ordinary shares (equity years after the $40 million issue closes. The conversion price will be the $13.43 per share transaction price that Columbus Communications is receiving from the company in return for selling its stake. Effectively, one preference share priced at $10 would be equivalent to 0.7433 ordinary shares, based on those prices. This means that, at current market prices, investors in Cable Bahamas’ preference share issue will effectively be paying the same 11.5 per cent premium that the company is paying to Columbus Commu nications in the $80 million buyout. However, a lot can happen to share prices over two years, and it is only when the conversion day arrives that preference share investors wishing to convert will be able to tell whether they have a good conversion price or not. If they choose not to convert, investors will regain all their principal by the time the preference share issue matures 10 years from its closing date. Those who stick with this investment tool will start receiving their principal back on the sixth anniversary of closing, with the full sum paid back in five equal annual instalments. According to the offering term sheet, preference share investors will have an 8 per cent interest rate of return on their investment. Dividends, it added, are due to be paid semi-annually on June 30 and December 31 of each year, with the first payment coming on the latter date in 2009. Cable Bahamas is also unable to redeem the preference shares until after the second date of the issue’s closing. The $13.43 per share price that Columbus Communications, an entity owned by Barbados-based Columbus Communications Inc, will receive represents an 11.5 per cent premium to the $12.04 that Cable Bahamas’ stock closed at on BISX last night. The purchase price for Columbus Communications’ 5,954,600 shares has decreased by 6 per cent compared to the $14.28 per share initially contemplated by the parties preChristmas, after Tribune Business had exclusively revealed details of the proposed buyout. Back then, the purchase price represented just a 1 per cent premium to the then-prevailing market price, as opposed to the 11.5 per cent now. Still, back then Columbus Communications’ stake was valued at $85.174 million, and now it is some $5 million less at $80 million. The company then was valued in total at $282.035 million, and now that figure is $264.9 million. C M Y K C M Y K BUSINESS THE TRIBUNE MONDAY, MAY 11, 2009, PAGE 5B EMPLOYMENT OPPORTUNITYYou are invited to apply for the following position currently available.Assistant Marketing ManagerKey Requirements worth clients business to the attention of: hr@ Cable reveals its 34.5% profit rise I I N N S S I I G G H H T T F o o r r t t h h e e s s t t o o r r i i e e s s b b e e h h i i n n d d t t h h e e n n e e w w s s , , r r e e a a d d I I n n s s i i g g h h t t o o n n M M o o n n d d a a y y s s

PAGE 21

n By COLLEEN BARRY AP Business Writer MILAN (AP world, so the joke goes, the Germans are the mechanics, the Swiss are the timekeepers and the Italians are the lovers. With Fiat snapping up a 20 percent stake in Chrysler LLC a nd bidding for General Motor Corp.'s European car-making business, it seems the Italian will now be the guy who makes the cars. I talian Premier Silvio Berlusconi says Fiat's dealmaking is "a dream ... for all Italians." But few Americans have given Fiat much thought since at least the 1980s, when the Italian automaker last did business in North America before pulling u p stakes and returning to Italy, reputation for quality in tatters, the brunt of another old joke that Fiat stood for Fix It Again, Tony. In his past five years as CEO, 56-year-old Sergio Marchionneh as engineered a stunning comeback for Fiat. The year a fter taking over, he posted Fiat's first net profit in five years, streamlined managem ent, burnished the Fiat brand w ith the award-winning update of the much-loved Fiat 500 and entered a series of strategic alliances to share costs ande nter new markets. He will also h ead Chrysler when it emerges from bankruptcy. Analysts warn, however, that the sexy, appealing 500 Cinquecento in Italian and" Luigi" in the cartoon movie " Cars" won't be enough to get Chrysler back on its feet even if it captures the hearts of America's city drivers. And more than one international hookup has gone sour on cultural differences, as the failed m arriage of Germany's Daimler and Chrysler testifies. "I think the proof is in the pudding," said Howard Wheeldon, a senior strategist at BGC Partners. "Americans have no idea who Marchionne is. .. The first thing Marchionne and his t eam need to do is to command respect that is going to be difficult. It has been doing a lot better in recent times, but Fiat's history is awful." Look no further than Fiat's 20-year presence in the U.S. The costs of handling warranty r epairs to Fiat's Strada, a midsize four-door sedan launched in 1974, wiped out any profits on its sale, a Fiat executive conf ided to Giuseppe Volpato, who has written three books on Fiat. There were successes, like the Fiat 124 Spider, a convertible two-seater that sold well for over a decade but remained a niche product. Inauspiciously, Fiat stopped exporting even profitable cars to the U.S. in the early 1980s. The reasons: It lacked the deale r network to properly service its cars, it was having trouble meeting environmental standards and sales were slipping under pressure to Japanesec ompetition, said Volpato, a p rofessor at the Ca' Foscari University of Venice. Returning to America confronts Marchionne with one of the world's toughest and mostv aried markets. A citizen of Italy and Canada, Marchionne has focused on bringing out the best of Fiat's Italian DNA, that sense of style that made the original Cinque-c ento a raging success. But even in Marchionne's w orld, the Germans are still the mechanics. His chief technology officer is Harald Wester, who c ame from Volkswagen. "Everything behind the product engineering, manufacturing and quality is managed by leaders who have been trained for the most part by our German competitors. They have the right level of discipline a nd rigor to properly run the hard factors in this industry," Marchionne told Automotive News Europe in a 2005 interview. Marchionne also has made Fiat one of the most environmentally fit automakers one o f the qualities that won the attention of U.S. President Barack Obama, whose auto task force underlined the i mportance of Fiat's clean small-car technology to Chrysler's SUVand minivanheavy lineup. But transnational alliances have often failed. "Cultural differences can never be underestimated," Wheeldon said, mentioning such unhappy partnerships as Daimler-Chrysler and BMW with Britain's Rover. M archionne was born in central Italy, raised in Canada from age 14 and educated there, returning in his early 40s to Europe where he secured hisr eputation as a turnaround e xpert in Switzerland. Many hope that this intercontinental background can help bridge the differences. "Marchionne has virtues of b eing Italian in his head but reared in the world, and the challenge is for Fiat to repeat this model," Giacomo Vaciago, a political economist at Milan's Catholic University, said recent-l y on il Sole 24 Ore radio. Fiat's well-remembered failu res aside, Italy boasts highquality engineering in autos, i ncluding Ferrari and Maserati, both owned by Fiat, and Lamb orghini, owned by Volkswa gen, as well as such design firms a s Pininfarina, known primarily for its Ferrari and Alfa Romeod esigns. As Italy's biggest industrial concern, Fiat's ambitions to spread into the Americas andr edraw the global auto map is a source of great national pride. Italians have a hard time seeing themselves and certainly their Fiat 500 as anyone's saviour. C M Y K C M Y K BUSINESS PAGE 6B, MONDAY, MAY 11, 2009 THE TRIBUNE 6(&85,7,(6&200,66,21)7+(%$+$0$638%/,&,&( WK 5H*XOI,QWHUQDWLRQDO,QYHVWPHQW*URXS 7KLV 127,&( LVLVVXHGWKH6HFXULWLHV&RPPLVVLRQRI7KH %DKDPDV&RPPLVVLRQf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
PAGE 22

T HE Bahamas Financial Serv ices Board (BFSB i ts ‘Tax Review: Part II’ forum on Friday, May 15, at the British Colonial Hilton Hotel.Chairman Craig Tony Gomez says the BFSB will roll out this next step to progress industry dialogue on the role information and tax plays in the financial services industry. Structured as a workshop, the May 15 event will allow participantsto engage in a dialogue about the evolving landscape f or financial services. Workshop session topics will include The Fiscal Environment and Its Impact on Conducting Business as well asa Review of Suitable Arrangements to meet the OECD Tax Standard. Presenters Andy Todd, lead tax partner of Deloitte London; R ichardHay, international tax p rincipal ofinternational law f irmStikeman Ellliott; and Steven Cantor, managing partner of international law firm Cantor & Webb,will facilitate the brainstorming sessions and dialogue with industry stakeholders. BFSB has been engaged in various discussions on the tax model of the Bahamas and that of its competitors over the past six years. Specifically leading from the 2009 Bahamas Financ ial Services Retreat and a follow-up Information and Tax Forum, Mr Gomez says: “We now propose to secure the industry’s considered views on the approach to implementing the OECD standard and encourage the active participation by industry stakeholders.” Freeport hotel room revenues decline eleven per cent C M Y K C M Y K BUSINESS THE TRIBUNE MONDAY, MAY 11, 2009, PAGE 7B n By NEIL HARTNELL Tribune Business Editor FREEPORT hotels saw their room revenues decline by 11 per cent year-over-year for 2008, a Ministry of Tourism report has revealed, as increased average daily room rates (ADRs compensate for hotel occupancy declines. The Ministry’s Hotel Occupancy 2008 report found that resorts in Freeport’s Lucaya area (chiefly the Our Lucayawere unable to charge higher ADRs than in 2007, resulting in a 20.2 per cent hotel room revenue reduction. In a summary of the report’s main findings, the Ministry of Tourism said: “In 2008, the hotels in West End, Grand Bahama, had lower occupancy levels, lower ADRs and hence lower hotel room revenues than in 2007. “In 2008, the combined hotel properties in the Out Islands had lower hotel occupancy lev-els than in 2007. They did charge higher ADRs but were still unable to generate more hotel room revenue than in 2007.” As for other findings, the Ministry of Tourism report found that the all-inclusive resorts on Cable Beach in New Providence, namely Sandals Royal Bahamian and SuperClubs Breezes, fared better than their Paradise Island-based counterparts when it came to hotel occupancy and room rate levels in 2008. BFSB announces Tax Review forum Tony Gomez SARA LEE poultry products rest on the counter of a butcher shop Monday, May 4, 2009, in Chicago Ridge, Ill. Food maker Sara Lee Corp. said Thursday (May 7 its fiscal third-quarter profit fell 22 per cent as softness in its North American foodservice division and the stronger dollar pushed sales lower. Still, adjusted results were much better than Wall Street expected. (AP Photo: M Spencer Green Sara Lee: Fiscal Q3 profit falls 22 per cent

PAGE 23

and a competitive return with regard to their investments, all of which the bank was in a position to provide. The Bank of the Bahamas International managing director told Tribune Business last week that it was issuing the shares as part of a strategy targeting a 20 per cent Tier I capit al ratio by the end of its 2010 f inancial year. The $20 million offering represents the first tranche of the $100 million in preference shares divided into seven classes that were approved by the bank’s annual general meeting (AGM Strategy “This is the start of the strategy to raise new capital through preference shares. We don’t think the current market conditions are supportive of a common share issue at this point in t ime. It’s [preference shares] not the ideal route, but it’s suitable for the current environment,” Mr McWeeney added. He said that when completed and fully subscribed, the $20 million preference share issue would increase Bank of the Bahamas International’s Tier I capital ratio from 12 per cent to 15 per cent, well in excess of the minimum 8 per cent ratio. Preference shares are eligible to be included in Tier I share capital calculations. Explaining that the main strategy behind the share issue was capital, rather than liquidity or funds for lending, Mr M cWeeney told Tribune Business: “Our capital ratio objective is 20 per cent, so we still want to grow our capital base. “We are looking at other measures [other than preference shares] to achieve that. We’re looking at some internal issues. It’s safe to say the bank is looking at all ways to expand its capital base, not liquidity, but capital. “The objective is a capital ratio of 20 per cent. That has been the objective set for the five-year plan we’re on. We’re in the last year of that plan, and hope to ensure that ratio is close to 20 per cent. We don’t see that we will not be able to achieve that by the end of the fiscal period 2010.” Achieving that goal, Mr McWeeney said, would position the bank perfectly for the “start of a new five-year plan”, which would kick-in from the start of fiscal 2010 on July 1 of that year. C M Y K C M Y K BUSINESS PAGE 8B, MONDAY, MAY 11, 2009 THE TRIBUNE MNISTRY OF HOUSINGENGINEERING SERVICES FOR THE DESIGN OF ROADS AND DRAINAGE SYSTEMS, ELECTRICAL DISTRIBUTION SYSTEM AND POTABLE WATER AND SEWERAGE DISTRIBUTION SYSTEMS IN SPRING CITY, ABACOThe Government of the Commonwealth of the Bahamas through the Ministry of Housing is requesting proposals from qualified Consulting Engineering firms to provide Engineering Design, Supervision of the Construction Tender Process, and Contract Administration Services for the development of the following housing subdivision: (i, Abaco Roads and drainage system design, electrical distribution system design and potable water & sewerage distribution design. Interested parties mayobtain further information and purchase a copy ofthe Request for Proposal from: The Office of the Permanent Secretary Ministry of Housing Claughton House Shirley and Charlotte Sts. Nassau, Bahamas Tel: 242-322-6005/6006 F or a non-r efundable fee $100 .The method of payment may be cash or a certified cheque made payable to the “Ministry of Housing”. The documents will be readyfor collection beginning Thursday 7th May, 2009 and ending Friday 15th May, 2009 between the hours of 9:30am to 4:30pm. An information meeting will be held on Tuesday 19th May at 10am in the conference room at the Ministry of Housing, Claughton House. Tenders are to be submitted in a sealed envelope marked as indicated inthe RFP document to: The Office of the Permanent Secretary Ministry of Housing Claughton House Shirley and Charlotte Sts. Nassau, Bahamas Nolater than 12 noon on T uesda y26th Ma y ,2009 .Tenders will be opened at 12:01 pm on Tuesday 26th May, 2009 in the conference room at the Ministry of Housing, Claughton House. The Government reserves the right to reject any or all Tenders.REQ UEST FOR PROPOSALS (RFP ADDERLEY, Catherine ALLEYNE, Kenneth A LMIRA, Dindo ALMIRA, Maria ARANHA, Artherine ARCHER, Jacqulin BACCHUS, Olga BAIN, Kay BAIN, Larry BASTIAN, Karen BASTIAN, Wesley BAZARD, Dante BENNETT, Erica B ONAMY, Therese CAMBRIDGE, Sythela CLARKE, Andre CLARKE, Antoine CONLIFFE, Vaughan COVE, Sandra COVE, Norman CRAWFORD, Ricardo C UMBERBATCH, Brasil DAVIES, Mark D AVIS, Anthony ECCLES-MAJOR, Michelle ENEAS Jr, Cleveland Erskine, Rosamund F ERGUSON, Sparkman FORBES, Charles F RANCIS, Emmanuel FRANCIS, Welmilya FRANKS, Russanne G IBSON, Gill H ALKITIS, Melanie HOLFORD, Richard JOFFRE, Elexis KNOWLES, Hadassah LEE, William L EWIS, Nigel LEWIS, Kirk LOCKHART, Hiram LOUIS, John LOUIS, John LUNDY III, Leo MACKEY-POPLE, Michelle MAJOR, Kendal McCARTNEY, Cyd M cIVER, Veronica McWEENEY, Vincent MORTEMORE, Tanya MUNROE, Derwin NEWBOLD, Kenworth PEARCE, Shequel P EET-IFERENTA, Renee PERCENTIE, Leatendore PICKSTOCK, Joyous RASHAD, Munir REID, Charlene RICHARDSON, Kimberley RICHARDSON, Osmond ROLLINS, Sylvester R OMER, Hayward R OUSSOS, Desir ee RUSSELL, Lofton R YAN, Michael SAWYER, Marlene SCAVELLA-TAYLOR, Tavette SEYMOUR, CopelinS TRACHAN, Ellen STUART, Wendy SWEETING, Sidney THEOPHILUS, Julius THOMPSON, Woodley T ILBERG, Todd VANDERPOOL, Cyril V ARGA, Christopher VASSELL, Danette WARREN, Annette WILLIAMS-BETHEL, Marsha WOOD, Cynthia _ __________________________________ D r. Anthony Davis Registrar Bahamas Dental Council FERGUSON, Lagloria ______________________________ Dr. Anthony Davis Registrar Bahamas Dental Council OFFICIAL GAZETTEBahamas Dental Council T he following list of Dentists obtained Licenses under S ection 10 of the Dental Act, 1989, as at 31st March, 2009. OFFICIAL GAZETTEBahamas Dental Council OFFICIAL GAZETTEBahamas Dental Council OFFICIAL GAZETTEBahamas Dental Council The following list of Dental Hygienists obtained Licenses under Section 14 of the Dental Act, 1989, as at 31st March, 2009. BAIN, Raynell B ARRY, Deborah BETHELL, Gia BLOOMFIELD, Cheryl BOWE, Carol DORSETT, Amy DUNCOMBE, June FORBES, Sonia FORBES, Samantha GIBSON, Jacqueline GREEN, Jeanette HIGGS, Lauren HUYLER-BEAL, Claudette INGRAHAM, Margot JOHNSON, Denise JONES, Gurceille JONES, Samantha KING, Valencia KNOWLES, Giselle LIGHTBOURN, Indirah LOCKHART, Mika MOXEY, Austia RICHARDS, Michaelle ROBARDS, Leah ROLLE, Sanna RUTHERFORD, Jerice SANDS, Lesia SINCLAIR, Barrington SMITH, Giavanna SUTHERLAND, Shannon SYMMONETT, Della-Reese WARD, Jill ______________________________ Dr. Anthony Davis Registrar Bahamas Dental Council The following list of Dental Technologists obtained Licenses under Section 14 of the Dental Act, 1989, as at 31st March, 2009. HIGGS, Danny PARDO, Sarahy TAYLOR, Leonard THEOPHILUS SR., Eneas WEECH, Irwin ______________________________ Dr. Anthony Davis Registrar Bahamas Dental Council The following list of Dental Nurse obtained Licenses under Section 14 of the Dental Act, 1989, as at 31st March, 2009. Bank’s $20m offering % oversubscribed’ F F R R O O M M p p a a g g e e 1 1 B B

PAGE 24

C M Y K C M Y K BUSINESS THE TRIBUNE MONDAY, MAY 11, 2009, PAGE 9B 52wk-Hi52wk-LowSecurit y Previous CloseToday's CloseChangeDaily Vol.EPS $Div $P/EYield 1.951.28Abaco Markets1.401.400.000.1270.00011.00.00% 11.8011.00Bahamas Property Fund11.0011.000.000.9920.20011.11.82% 9.686.95Bank of Bahamas6.956.950.000.2440.26028.53.74%0 .900.63Benchmark0.630.630.00-0.8770.000N/M0.00% 3.743.15Bahamas Waste3.153.150.000.0780.09040.42.86% 2.601.95Fidelity Bank2.372.370.000.0550.04043.11.69% 1 4.1511.09Cable Bahamas11.7511.750.001.3090.2509.02.13% 3.142.83Colina Holdings2.832.830.000.2490.04011.41.41% 7.446.17Commonwealth Bank (S16.176.170.005540.4190.05014.70.81% 4 .661.31Consolidated Water BDRs2.602.48-0.120.0990.05225.12.10% 3.001.86Doctor's Hospital1.861.860.000.2400.0807.84.30% 8.106.02Famguard7.767.760.000.4200.24018.53.09% 12.5011.00Finco11.0011.000.000.3220.67034.26.09% 14.6610.35FirstCaribbean Bank10.4010.400.000.7940.40013.13.85% 5.555.00Focol (S5.145.140.000.3320.15015.52.92%1 .001.00Focol Class B Preference1.001.000.000.0000.000N/M0.00% 0.500.30Freeport Concrete0.300.300.000.0350.0008.60.00% 8.205.50ICD Utilities5.595.590.000.4070.50013.78.94% 12.508.60J. S. Johnson10.5010.500.000.9520.64011.06.10% 10.0010.00Premier Real Estate10.0010.000.000.1800.00055.60.00% 52wk-Hi52wk-LowSecuritySymbolLast SaleChangeDaily Vol. 1000.001000.00Fidelity Bank Note 17 (Series AFBB17100.000.00 1000.001000.00Fidelity Bank Note 22 (Series BFBB22100.000.00 1000.001000.00Fidelity Bank Note 13 (Series CFBB13100.000.00 1000.001000.00Fidelity Bank Note 15 (Series DFBB15100.000.00 52wk-Hi52wk-LowSymbolBid $ A sk $Last PriceWeekly Vol.EPS $Div $P/EYield 14.6014.25Bahamas Supermarkets7.928.4214.60-0.0410.300N/M2.05% 8.006.00Caribbean Crossings (Pref4.006.256.000.0000.480N/M7.80% 0.540.20RND Holdings0.350.400.350.0010.000256.60.00% 41.0029.00ABDAB30.1331.5929.004.5400.0009.030.00% 0.550.40RND Holdings0.450.550.550.0020.000261.900.00% 52wk-Hi52wk-LowFund NameNA V YTD%Last 12 MonthsDiv $Yield % 1.36641.3041Colina Bond Fund1.36640.954.77 3.03512.9230Colina MSI Preferred Fund2.8962-1.49-3.35 1.45901.3883Colina Money Market Fund1.45901.775.09 3.69603.1964Fidelity Bahamas G & I Fund3.1964-5.59-13.64 12.739712.1564Fidelity Prime Income Fund12.73970.965.79 100.5606100.0000CFAL Global Bond Fund100.56060.560.56 100.000096.4070CFAL Global Equity Fund96.4070-3.59-3.59 1.00001.0000CFAL High Grade Bond Fund1.00000.000.00 10.50009.0950Fidelity International Investment Fund9.15990.71-12.76 1.04401.0000FG Financial Preferred Income Fund1.04400.804.40 1.03641.0000FG Financial Growth Fund1.03640.333.64 1.04521.0000FG Financial Diversified Fund1.04520.764.40 BISX ALL SHARE INDEX 19 Dec 02 = 1,000.00YIELD last 12 month dividends divided by closing price 52wk-Hi Highest closing price in last 52 weeksBid $ Buying price of Colina and Fidelity 52wk-Low Lowest closing price in last 52 weeksAsk $ Selling price of Colina and fidelity Previous Close Previous day's weighted price for daily volumeLast Price Last traded over-the-counter price Today's Close Current day's weighted price for daily volumeWeekly Vol. Trading volume of the prior week Change Change in closing price from day to dayEPS $ A company's reported earnings per share for the last 12 mths Daily Vol. Number of total shares traded todayNAV Net Asset Value DIV $ Dividends per share paid in the last 12 monthsN/M Not Meaningful P/E Closing price divided by the last 12 month earningsFINDEX The Fidelity Bahamas Stock Index. January 1, 1994 = 100 (S (S19-Feb-09 9-Feb-09 W W W WW W . .B B I I S S X X B B A A H H A A M M A A S S . .C C O O M M | | T T E E L L E E P P H HO O N NE E : :2 2 4 4 2 2 3 3 2 2 3 3 -2 2 3 3 3 3 0 0 | | F FA A C C S S I I M M I I L L E E : : 2 2 4 4 2 23 3 2 2 3 3-2 23 3 2 20 0NAV Date 31-Mar-09 1-May-09 31-Mar-09 28-Feb-09 31-Dec-08 9-Feb-09 28-Feb-09 31-Dec-08 31-Dec-07 31-Mar-09 Prime + 1.75% Maturity 19 October 2017 19 October 2022 30 May 2013 29 May 2015 Interest 7% Prime + 1.75% 7%T T O O T T R R A A D D E E C C A A L LL L : : C C O O L L I I N N A A 2 2 4 4 2 25 50 0 2 27 7 0 01 1 0 0 | | R R O O Y Y A A L L F FI I D D E E L L I I T T Y Y 2 2 4 4 2 2 3 3 5 56 6 7 7 7 7 6 64 4 | | F F G G C C A A P P I I T T A A L L M M A A R R K K E E T T S S 2 24 42 2 3 3 9 9 6 6-4 40 0 0 0 0 0 | | C C O O L L O O N NI I A A L L 2 24 4 2 2 5 5 0 02 27 75 5 2 25 5FINDEX: CLOSE 798.52 | YTD -4.35% | 2008 -12.31%BISX LISTED & TRADED SECURITIES AS OF: Fidelity Over-The-Counter Securities Colina Over-The-Counter Securities BISX Listed Mutual Funds MARKET TERMSTHURSDAY, 7 MAY 2009BISX ALL SHARE INDEX: CLOSE 1,613.79 | CHG -0.13 | %CHG -0.01 | YTD -98.57 | YTD % -5.76BISX LISTED DEBT SECURITIES (Bonds trade on a Percentage Pricing bases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f 1RWLFHLVKHUHE\JLYHQWKDWWKHDERYHQDPHG &RPSDQ\LVLQGLVVROXWLRQZKLFKFRPPHQFHG RQWKHGD\RI0D\ 7KH/LTXLGDWRULV $UJRVD&RUS1DVVDX %DKDPDV /HJDORWLFH 127,&( ROXQWDU\/LTXLGDWLRQf 1RWLFHLVKHUHE\JLYHQWKDWWKHDERYHQDPHG &RPSDQ\LVLQGLVVROXWLRQZKLFKFRPPHQFHG RQWKHGD\RI0D\ 7KH/LTXLGDWRULV $UJRVD&RUS1DVVDX %DKDPDV / HJDORWLFH 1 27,&( ROXQWDU\/LTXLGDWLRQf 1RWLFHLVKHUHE\JLYHQWKDWWKHDERYHQDPHG &RPSDQ\LVLQGLVVROXWLRQZKLFKFRPPHQFHG RQWKHGD\RI$SULO 7KH/LTXLGDWRULV $UJRVD&RUS1DVVDX %DKDPDV 7KH3XEOLFLVKHUHE\DGYLVHGWKDW 0$/,.6252+$12 5$+',*$15$+0,1* RI*ROGHQ*DWHVLQWHQGWR QDPHWR +(15<67(3+(10,/(6 ,IWKHUHDUHDQ\ REMHFWLRQVWRWKLVFKDQJHRIQDPH'HHG3ROO\RX PD\ZULWHVXFKREMHFWLRQVWRWKH &KLHI3DVVSRUW2IFHU 31DVVDX%DKDPDVQRODWHUWKDQWKLUW\ fGD\VDIWHUWKHGDWHRISXEOLFDWLRQRIWKLVQRWLFH NASSAU, BAHAMAS (May 6, 2009t on Nassau Beach Resort, hosted the 13th Annual Bahamas Weather Conference from April 15-19, 2009. Attended by officials from the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Association( NOAA), the National Hurricane Center (NHC of emergency management organizations, academia and television news weathermen and women from all over the world, this signature annuale vent is considered one of the most important forums for Bahamian, U.S. and international meteorologists to discuss new and emerging topics in the field of meteorology. This year's conference was attended by world-renownede xperts in meteorology, including Max Mayfield, former director of the National Hurricane Center, who moderated and planned the conference agenda. Bill Read, current director o f the National Hurricane Center, also presented a review of the 2008 Atlantic hurricane season, while Dr Phillip Klotzbach from Colorado State University presented the forecast for the 2009 Atlantic sea-s on. Other topics discussed included tropical climatology, global warming, storm surges, home safety and property insurance matters. Nassau resort holds weather conference SHOWN (l-r Tourism, Max Mayfield, former director of National Hurricane Center, Vincent Vanderpool-Wallace, Minister of Tourism and Hyacinth P ratt, permanent secretary, Ministry of Tourism, at the opening ceremonies of the 13th Annual Bahamas Weather Conference at Sheraton Nassau Beach Resort...

PAGE 25

gave the BISX-listed entity “good debt carrying capacity” to enable it to fund a major acquisition. “We’re looking to diversify into shopping centres,” Mr Anderson added, “something like Harbour Bay Shopping Centre, or somewhere where it’s not all office space that is being rented. There may well be opportunities as we move through this down cycle, as people exit real estate investments, that allow us to buy it at the right price. We’re the only corporate purchaser of real estate, and if people are looking to sell, we’re there.” Meanwhile, Mr Anderson told Tribune Business that the Property Fund had yet to close the $3.5 million purchase of Providence House, the PricewaterhouseCoopers (PwC Bahamas headquarters on East Hill Street, which was announced around the turn of the year. The deal has yet to receive approval from the Government’s Investments Board. “We’re waiting for government approval. We haven’t completed that transaction yet,” he said. “That will come on stream hopefully in the next month or so. It’s all signed, done and dusted except for the Foreign Investments Board.” The need for Investments Board approval has resulted from the fact that there is a minor element of non-Bahamian ownership in the deal. Mr Anderson described this as an “anomaly” that needed to be corrected, as it effectively placed the Property Fund at a disadvantage against the commercial banks, some of which have much greater foreign ownership components, when it came to closing real estate transactions. Mr Anderson said publiclylisted companies regulated by the Securities Commission of the Bahamas were permitted to have resident, non-Bahamian ownership of their shares, while those listed on the Bahamas International Securities Exchange (BISX exempt from the payment of Stamp and transfer taxes whenever those shares were traded. As a result, Mr Anderson said the Property Fund held several compelling advantages when it came to investing in real estate purchases. However, he explained that this was being negated because banks were allowed to purchase property without having to get Investments Board approval. “It’s an anomaly,” Mr Anderson said. “Where banks should have to go through the same process as us, in practice it does not work that way. We need to have that resolved, to allow the Property Fund to make acquisitions without having to go through this onerous process.” He added: “Our key market is the Bahamas. We don’t have any further specific property acquisitions in mind at the moment, and are not in negotiations with anyone to buy property. Debtors “In times like this, debtors can’t afford to pay. We have a much stronger capital position than most people holding real estate in this market, so it’s a good time for us to be able to take advantage of opportunities.” The Property Fund’s two existing properties, the Bahamas Financial Centre in downtown Nassau and One Marina Drive on Paradise Island, continue to provide it with a solid earnings platform. For the year to December 31, 2008, the Property Fund enjoyed a 2.67 per cent increase in rental and parking revenue to $4.307 million, compared to $4.195 million the year before. Mr Anderson explained that the Property Fund had built-in 2-3 per cent annual rental increases in most tenant contracts, depending on the duration of the lease. This generated increasing revenue streams as the company’s cost base decreased, due to the fact that financing (interest rate were reducing as its debt fell. Total expenses, meanwhile, rose to $1.443 million compared to $960,025 in 2007, due largely to a more than doubling of common area maintenance (CAM expenses that the Property Fund was forced to pick up at the Bahamas Financial Centre.; Mr Anderson said some 13,000 square feet at the Bahamas Financial Centre, out of a total 100,000 square feet, remained vacant and had been that way sine mid-2007. The Property Fund, as landlord/owner, picked up the CAM tab for that space. However, the CAM expenses were offset by the net gain on the valuation of the Property Fund’s real estate investments, which rose from $446,814 in 2007 to $807,000 in 2008. The increase, Mr Anderson explained, resulted from not incurring the capital improvements that the Property Fund made, particularly on the Financial Centre, in 2007. “The biggest change for us last year was the higher CAM rate at the Financial Centre, which quite substantially increased landlord costs at the premises, because we carry at the CAM on the vacant space, which impacted all our profits,” Mr Anderson said. “But we were able to benefit from having a much higher kicker on the valuation.” C M Y K C M Y K BUSINESS PAGE 10B, MONDAY, MAY 11, 2009 THE TRIBUNE BISX-listed entity eyes real estate deal overseas F F R R O O M M p p a a g g e e 1 1 B B

PAGE 26

C M Y K C M Y K BUSINESS THE TRIBUNE MONDAY, MAY 11, 2009, PAGE 11B n By STEPHEN BERNARD AP Business Writer NEW YORK (AP a week when investors were reassured by the government's assessment of the banking industry and its latest reading on the job market, Wall S treet's focus turns to the cons umer. T he coming week features first-quarter earnings figures f rom Wal-Mart Stores Inc., M acy's Inc. and other retailers a nd the Commerce Departm ent's retail sales report for A pril. So far, the expectations a re that the readings will help t he stock market extend a twom onth-old rally. The government's retail s ales tally follows April sales figures issued by the retailers o n Thursday. Those reports s howed spending generally fell, but by a smaller amount than i n the previous months. Still, t he recession weighed on consumers, who concentrated their s pending on necessities such as groceries and health care products. E conomists polled by Thoms on Reuters, on average, pred ict the government will report a 0.1 percent dip in retail sales f rom March's level. "I would be surprised if retail sales come in anythingo ther than expected," said Jeff I vory, a partner at Stonebridge Financial Partners LLC inB ingham Farms, Mich. Meeti ng or even exceeding forecasts would provide additional strength to the market, he said. I vory said investors still have the mind-set that started thes tock rally in early March. T hey're focused on whether economic data and corporate reports are showing increment al improvement, even if there are still signs of weakness. "What we're seeing in aggreg ate is that bad news isn't necessarily bad news anymore," Ivory said. "It's all relative." Consumer spending accounts for more than twothird of economic activity. So signs of stronger spending or u pbeat outlooks from retailers w ould give investors incentive to keep buying. Brett D'Arcy, Chief Investm ent Officer of CBIZ Wealth Management in San Diego, said a worse-than-expectedr eading on retail sales or disappointing results from a m ajor retailer might lead to a s hort-term drop in the market, but only a series of bad reports over a couple of weeks would b e likely to derail the rally. Cincinnati-based Macy's f irst-quarter results are scheduled to be released Wednesday, while investors hear fromB entonville, Ark.-based WalMart on Thursday. Analysts e xpect Macy's to post a quarterly loss of 23 cents per share, while Wal-Mart is expected to e arn 77 cents per share. V ery little has been able to slow down the market in r ecent weeks not even the government saying some of the n ation's largest banks are still f acing capital shortfalls. The government's stress-test results did just the opposite. For the week, the Dow Jones industrials averageg ained 2 percent. The broader Standard & Poor's 500 index rose 2.4 percent, while the Nas d aq composite index gained 1 .3 percent. Investors believe the stress t ests gave them more clarity about where the nation's 19 largest banks stand and how m uch money they will need to protect against further losses. The benchmark KBW Bank I ndex, which tracks 24 of the nation's largest banks, jumped 12.1 percent Friday, The test results were released late Thursday. The government's findings "lessened the worst fears i nvestors had," said Nicholas S argen, chief investment officer at Fort Washington Investment Advisors in Columbus,O hio. Just a few months ago, investors were worried about potential governmentt akeovers of the largest banks or their collapse, he said. C BIZ's D'Arcy said inform ation leaking out about the results in the days before the official release also helped the m arket. That included word that Bank of America Corp. w ould have to make up a nearly $34 billion shortfall. "The way they put it out to t he public, it was highly telegraphed so when the actua l results came, it wasn't a big shock," D'Arcy said. And in a sign that the recess ion is moderating, the Labor D epartment said layoffs totaled 539,000 in April. Econo mists expected employers to cut 620,000 jobs during the m onth. T he unemployment rate climbed to 8.9 percent, meeting expectations. The improvement in the jobs loss figure was helped alongb y a burst of hiring by the fed eral government to prepare for the 2010 Census. But therew ere also smaller payrolls cuts a t construction companies, factories, retailers and financials ervices, and that is the kind of incremental improvement Wall Street is looking for. Retail earnings, consumer spending come into focus

PAGE 27

C M Y K C M Y K BUSINESS PAGE 12B, MONDAY, MAY 11, 2009 THE TRIBUNE n By CHESTER ROBARDS Business Reporter crobards@tribunemedia.net THE ECONOMIC downturn has forced the popular Palmdale gym, Mystical, to give up 4000 square feet of space, according to its general manager. Derrick Bullard said increasing rental payments and a declining economy, which had reduced both gym user numbers and the frequency of their visits, had forced him to return to the landlord space he had allocated for his health and wellness store. With this yield of space, Mr Bullard said the gym would have to construct a new entrance that could cost him a substantial sum. Mr Bullard said he had been trying to keep gym membership fees down in order to attract patrons, but the landlord had continually increased their rent. “We have been advertising and piggybacking on certain events,” said Mr Bullard. “And we have added more classes to keep people coming in.” He said he has been in talks with the Miss Bahamas Universe organizers, lobbying for them to use his gym, which could give the establishment some much-needed publicity. A lso, he has tweaked the gym’s hours to try to accommodate individual work habits and lifestyles. According to Mr Bullard, personal trainers have taken a greater hit than the gym itself. “People are cutting back on personal trainers,” he said. “At the end of the day they say they can’t afford it.” He said that when the Russell’s retail outlet closed down next to him in the Palmdale Shopping Plaza, it was a clear i ndication that change might come to Mystical and it has. On the western side of New Providence Bally’s Gym is is doing fine, though usage is down, according to its general manager. Naomi Rickets said the gym had seen a bit of a decline with the onset of the economic crisis, but now things were back to normal for them. Gym shrinks for survival e have been advertising and piggybacking on certain events. And we have added more classes to keep people coming in. Derrick Bullard

PAGE 28

INSIGHT C M Y K C M Y K The Tribune INSIGHT M ONDAY, MAY 11, 2009 The stories behind the news n By RUPERT MISSICK Jr Chief Reporter rmissick@tribunemedia.net Bahamianisation” is a fallacy, a half-hearted attempt to bring about a level playing field, political propaganda, idealistic, incomplete, and an ideal that has never been forti fied with the tools it needed to be realised. These were all words used to described the philosophy of Bahamianisation to Insight this past week. Certainly “Bahamianisation” means “Bahamians first” or as one senior statesman said, Bahamian “ownership”, but a fact that may be hard to swallow for many is that realistically Bahamianisation truly means “Bahamians eventually.” The reason is because it was introduced by a government that did not fully understand what was required to produce the results the philosophy professed to bring about. If one chose to be cynical it could be said that government has believed only in Bahamianisation’s ability to bring in votes. A woman who describes herself as “one of the beneficiaries of Bahami anisation” explained it to Insight this way. “They did not ‘Bahamianise’ us cul turally or on a deep educational level like (other governments other Caribbean nations. I guess we still had it too good, too close to the US. It was like we were kids let loose in a candy store. But now the store was ours we were not educated on how to take care of it on our own or how to use sugar to make things other than candy. “The government was eager and tried to educate us, but we lost some thing in the process: Morality, work ethics. Everything came too easily. I was 16 during independence. The gov ernment paid for my education, for high school and up to my first degree in college. I was a beneficiary. I was one of those who received government scholarships that were given out freely after Majority Rule to ensure that we had Bahamian professionals, especiall y in the education field, but not everyone benefited.” The PLP’s successors in office (which includes not only the FNM but the “new” PLP) has had to temper an allor-nothing expectation that has accom panied “Bahamianisation” with maturity, a new found, although not widespread, collective security and, as one senior politician noted last week, a healthy dose of reality. This past Wednesday, during his con tribution to the debate on the Bill that would establish the Utilities Regula tion and Competition Authority (URCA electronic communications in the Bahamas, Prime Minister Hubert Ingraham said that it is his government’s hope that it will be able to populate this regulatory authority with Bahamians. “But we are realists and we also recognise that in this early phase we will be required to access talent that may not be available in the Bahamas,” he said. Government has already identified this talent in someone outside the Bahamas who will be the Policy Direc tor of URCA. Mr Ingraham acknowledged that the salaries payable for jobs in this sector are far in excess of anything known by public sector enterprises. “I would expect that some of the salaries paid to some of the profes sionals will be higher than what is nor mally paid in other areas in the Bahamas,” the prime minister said. T he creation of URCA, and the new C ommunications Bill in general, sig nals, according to the prime minister, a new phase in the Bahamas’ development. URCA was not something that the country actually needed before now. In a developing nation with a population of 300,000 people and a growing need for doctors, teachers, nurses, contractors, engineers, and the like, it is hard to imagine that a Bahamian would have anticipated this obscure and future need and had the foresight to prepare himself to fill the position of URCA’s Policy Director. When Insight discussed this point of view with a young Bahamian, he conceded everything to a certain extent. He asserted that while it may be new to the general public, URCA’s establish ment is no surprise to the current government. “They’re in power two years now and had to prepare the legislation for it. Why didn’t they send a Bahamian abroad for those two years and have them come back now ready to lead this thing?” The answer could be based on the assumption albeit an embarrassing ly apparent one that in a small country with limited resources there is a lot of pressure and in fact a desperate need to get things right the first time around. The demand then for a person who knows what he is doing the first day on the job as opposed to a person who may be ineptly groping with theoretical rather than practical experience is not only risky, but costly. Does this mean that URCA is not “Bahamianised”? It may not be imme diately, but it could be eventually. Now that the public is aware that the job exists and that the salary is “in excess of anything known by publics ector enterprises,” a Bahamian, who is s o inclined, should do some research, educate himself and work his way up the ranks of URCA to be eventually equipped to fully merit the position. In a world populated by the Internet, microwaves, instant messenger and email it may be too much to ask the modern Bahamian to accept this gradualism. We do have, however, an historical example where a rush to “Bahamianise,” supported by government’s failure to truly prepare Bahami ans for ownership, caused the failure of a once vibrant institution. In 1975, the government bought a successful dairy and chicken farm from the Harrisville Company it was known as the “Hatchet Bay Farm.” The farm, which was developed by the late American millionaire Austin T Levy, provided jobs for 300 people in the settlement of Alice Town. The 2,500-acre farm was bought by government for $3 million. On the farm’s take-over, the late Prime Minister Sir Lynden Pindling declared that Bahamians were witnessing a “triumph of the human sprit.” He said the Hatchet Bay take-over was the “greatest success story in the country’s history of agriculture.” But the dream quickly went sour. Shortly after the take-over there were reports that large numbers of chickens had died. There were allegations that the farm’s seed boat was being used to bring in cars and appli URCA and The Milk of Hatchet Bay A brief insight into the country’s more than 40 year attempt to ‘Bahamianise’... THE ROOM in which thousands of chickens were killed packaged and sent to Nassau, clean closed and deserted... S S E E E E p p a a g g e e 2 2 C C JANUARY 1979 BDP Leader J Henry B ostwick during his one day fact fining t our of the Hatchet Bay Farms at Alice Town Eleuthera. Mr Bostwick is shown i n one of the coops filled with hundreds o f layer chickens...

PAGE 29

ANDROS CAT ISLAND ELEUTHERA MAYAGUANA SAN SAL V ADOR GREAT INAGUA GREAT EXUMA CROOKED ISLAND / ACKLINS LONG ISLAND ABACO Shown is today's weather . T emperatures are today's highs and tonights's lows. KEY WEST WEST PALM BEACH FT. LAUDERDALE TAMPA ORLANDO Low: 69F/21C Low: 72F/22C Low: 72F/22C Low: 74F/23C Low: 75 F/24 C Low: 77F/25C Low: 76 F/24 C Low: 71 F/22 C High: 93F/34C High: 89F/32C High: 86 F/30 C High: 86 F/30 C High: 89F/32C High: 86 F/30C High: 87F/31C Low: 73F/23C High: 86F/30C Low: 72 F/22 C High: 86F/30C RAGGED ISLAND Low: 70F/21C High: 88 F/31 C Low: 74F/23C High: 84 F/29 Low: 68F/20C High: 84F/29C Low: 72 F/22C High: 87F/31C Low: 74 F/23 C High: 90F/32C Low: 72 F/22 C High: 87F/31C Low: 72 F/22 C High: 87F/31C Low: 74F/23C High: 89 F/32 C Low: 73F/23C High: 88F/31C High: 85 F/29 C FREEPORT NASSAU MIAMI PAGE 7C THE TRIBUNE ~ 5/11/09 THE WEATHER REPORT 5-D AY F ORECAST Plenty of sun. Mainly clear.Sunny.Breezy with plenty of sunshine. Windy with plenty of sunshine. High: 87 Low: 76 High: 85 High: 86 High: 85 A ccuWeather RealFeel A ccuWeather RealFeel A ccuWeather RealFeel A ccuWeather RealFeel A ccuWeather RealFeel Windy with a full day of sunshine. High: 86 Low: 76 Low: 77 Low: 75 AccuWeather RealFeel 102F T he exclusive AccuWeather RealFeel Temperature i s an index that combines the effects of temperature, wind, humidity, sunshine intensity, cloudiness, precipitation, pressure, and e levation on the human bodyeverything that effects how warm or cold a person feels. Temperatures reflect the high and the low for the day. 79F 92-83F 92-81F 91-77F 91-78F Low: 76 TODAYTONIGHTTUESDAYWEDNESDAYTHURSDAYFRIDAY A LMANAC High ..................................................88F/31C Low ....................................................77F/25C Normal high ......................................84F/29C Normal low ........................................71F/21C Last year's high .................................. 91 F/33C Last year's low .................................. 78 F/25C As of 2 p.m. yesterday ..................................0.00" Year to date ..................................................2.21" Normal year to date ......................................8.90" Statistics are for Nassau through 2 p.m. yesterday Temperature Precipitation S UN AND M OON T IDESFOR N ASSAU Last New First Full May 17 May 24May 30Jun. 7 Sunrise . . . . . . 6:28 a.m. Sunset . . . . . . . 7:45 p.m. Moonrise . . . 10:20 p.m. Moonset . . . . . 8:02 a.m. Today Tuesday Wednesday Thursday HighHt.(ft.LowHt.(ft. 9:57 a.m.2.44:00 a.m.0.2 10:20 p.m.2.93:52 p.m.0.2 10:36 a.m.2.34:40 a.m.0.2 11:00 p.m.2.74:33 p.m.0.3 11:16 a.m.2.35:20 a.m.0.3 11:41 p.m.2.65:15 p.m.0.4 11:59 a.m.2.26:02 a.m.0.4 -----6:00 p.m.0.5 W ORLD C ITIES Acapulco88/3175/23pc88/3176/24pc Amsterdam58/1447/8c58/1454/12pc Ankara, Turkey68/2041/5t71/2143/6pc Athens76/2464/17s81/2766/18s Auckland55/1248/8sh57/1346/7sh Bangkok95/3581/27t93/3381/27t Barbados85/2976/24pc85/2976/24pc Barcelona72/2258/14pc71/2158/14pc Beijing79/2664/17pc84/2859/15s Beirut72/2259/15s70/2165/18s Belgrade84/2860/15pc83/2861/16s Berlin66/1842/5c65/1845/7s Bermuda76/2468/20sh75/2365/18pc Bogota66/1848/8sh65/1848/8t Brussels58/1452/11sh64/1760/15sh Budapest84/2860/15pc79/2654/12pc Buenos Aires72/2254/12sh62/1649/9sh Cairo82/2763/17s86/3060/15s Calcutta106/4182/27s100/3779/26s Calgary62/1639/3sh44/629/-1sh Cancun90/3269/20s92/3369/20s Caracas81/2772/22s81/2771/21pc Casablanca74/2357/13s73/2257/13s Copenhagen54/1248/8s63/1747/8s Dublin55/1243/6pc55/1245/7pc Frankfurt63/1756/13sh71/2158/14c Geneva 74/23 56/13 t 74/2354/12c Halifax 50/10 33/0 c 51/10 34/1 c Havana 88/31 67/19 s 89/31 66/18 s Helsinki 55/12 37/2t54/1236/2pc Hong Kong 86/30 75/23 t 88/31 75/23pc Islamabad 95/35 66/18 s 108/42 71/21 s Istanbul76/2460/15s75/2363/17s Jerusalem 69/20 48/8s70/2149/9s Johannesburg 61/1644/6sh65/1847/8s Kingston 87/3078/25r86/3078/25sh Lima78/2560/15pc77/2561/16pc London63/1750/10pc61/1656/13r Madrid75/2348/8pc73/2248/8pc Manila93/3377/25t90/3279/26t Mexico City80/2652/11pc79/2651/10pc Monterrey104/4072/22pc102/3872/22s Montreal57/1339/3pc64/1743/6pc Moscow68/2049/9pc61/1644/6r Munich74/2352/11t71/2150/10c Nairobi81/2763/17t77/2564/17r New Delhi 100/3779/26s102/3877/25s Oslo54/1242/5pc57/1343/6pc Paris74/2361/16sh71/2158/14pc Prague 63/17 46/7 sh 65/18 43/6 s Rio de Janeiro81/2770/21s83/2871/21s Riyadh100/3779/26s99/3781/27s Rome 75/23 53/11 s 74/23 55/12 s St. Thomas85/2976/24sh84/2875/23sh San Juan77/2548/8pc78/2545/7c San Salvador 86/30 73/22 t 86/30 74/23 t Santiago 59/1550/10pc61/1650/10sh Santo Domingo84/2871/21r83/2871/21sh Sao Paulo 77/25 59/15 t 80/26 62/16s Seoul66/1855/12r75/2352/11r Stockholm 55/12 37/2 pc 54/12 36/2 pc Sydney 66/18 52/11 s66/1852/11s Taipei89/3173/22s90/3273/22s T okyo 75/23 64/17 pc 77/25 64/17 pc T oronto 57/1337/2pc57/1341/5s Trinidad82/2770/21t81/2769/20t V ancouver 59/15 46/7 sh 56/1344/6c Vienna 72/2250/10t69/2049/9c W arsaw 63/17 46/7 pc 62/16 36/2 s Winnipeg 64/17 46/7 pc 66/1843/6t H ighLowWHighLowW F/CF/CF/CF/C T odayTuesday Weather (Ws -sunny, pc -partly cloudy, c -cloudy, sh -showers, t -thunderstorms, r -rain, sf -snow flurries, sn -snow, i -ice, Prcp-precipitation, Tr -trace T ODAY ' S U.S. F ORECAST M ARINE F ORECAST WINDSWAVESVISIBILITYWATER TEMPS. NASSAU FREEPORT ABACO Today:SE at 5-10 Knots0-2 Feet10-20 Miles77F Tuesday:E at 5-10 Knots0-2 Feet10-20 Miles77F Today:SE at 5-10 Knots0-2 Feet10-20 Miles76F Tuesday:E at 5-10 Knots0-2 Feet10-20 Miles77F Today:SE at 5-10 Knots0-2 Feet10-20 Miles76F Tuesday:E at 5-10 Knots0-2 Feet10-20 Miles77F U.S. C ITIES Albuquerque86/3058/14s88/3157/13s Anchorage62/1643/6s64/1741/5s Atlanta70/2155/12t76/2459/15s Atlantic City64/1742/5s68/2043/6pc Baltimore66/1843/6pc68/2045/7s Boston63/1745/7pc59/1547/8t Buffalo58/1436/2pc59/1537/2s Charleston, SC80/2654/12t76/2459/15pc Chicago62/1641/5pc67/1950/10s Cleveland57/1338/3pc66/1844/6s Dallas75/2364/17c87/3072/22pc Denver74/2351/10pc83/2846/7pc Detroit61/1643/6pc64/1745/7s Honolulu85/2971/21s85/2972/22s Houston91/3272/22pc88/3173/22pc HighLowWHighLowW F/CF/CF/CF/C HighLowWHighLowW F/CF/CF/CF/C HighLowWHighLowW F/CF/CF/CF/C T odayTuesday TodayTuesdayTodayTuesday Indianapolis67/1944/6pc71/2155/12s Jacksonville92/3365/18t80/2664/17t Kansas City71/2153/11s72/2264/17r Las Vegas99/3769/20s96/3573/22s Little Rock67/1957/13t75/2367/19t Los Angeles78/2560/15pc78/2558/14pc Louisville72/2250/10pc75/2358/14s Memphis71/2157/13t73/2265/18pc Miami89/3175/23pc87/3074/23s Minneapolis68/2050/10pc66/1855/12t Nashville72/2250/10t77/2560/15s New Orleans88/3171/21t88/3171/21t New York68/2050/10s66/1852/11pc Oklahoma City63/1757/13t79/2668/20t Orlando93/3369/20pc89/3168/20pc Philadelphia69/2048/8s69/2050/10pc Phoenix 102/38 75/23 s 102/3874/23s Pittsburgh62/1638/3pc64/1739/3s Portland, OR 61/1646/7c57/1342/5sh Raleigh-Durham 64/17 46/7 r 74/23 50/10 s St. Louis71/2153/11pc75/2362/16pc Salt Lake City 79/26 52/11 s 75/2347/8pc San Antonio 90/32 71/21 pc 89/31 72/22 pc San Diego69/2061/16pc70/2159/15pc San Francisco 62/16 49/9 s 66/1851/10pc Seattle56/1344/6sh54/1242/5sh T allahassee 90/3268/20t82/2765/18t T ampa 89/31 72/22 pc 88/31 70/21pc Tucson100/3766/18s101/3866/18s W ashington, DC 65/18 48/8pc70/2150/10s UV I NDEX T ODAY T he higher the A ccuWeather UV Index T M n umber, the greater the need for eye and skin protection. Forecasts and graphics provided by AccuWeather, Inc. Cold W arm Stationary Fronts Shown are noon positions of weather systems and precipitation. Temperature bands are highs for the day. Forecast high/low temperatures are for selected cities. 1 1 0 0 s s 0 0 s s 0 0 s s 1 1 0 0 s s 2 2 0 0 s s 3 3 0 0 s s 4 4 0 0 s s 5 5 0 0 s s 6 6 0 0 s s 7 7 0 0 s s 8 8 0 0 s s 9 9 0 0 s s 1 1 0 0 0 0 s s 1 1 1 1 0 0 s s Showers T-storms Rain Flurries Snow Ice AccuW eather .com

PAGE 30

ances like air conditioners and fridges duty free. The farm ran into problems with its creditors. Employees were laid off and the farm that once supplied 60 per cent of the domestic market with eggs as well as providing poultry, milk and ice-cream, collapsed. Insight spoke with an Eleutheran who remembered the excitement some felt over the PLP’s move to “Bahamianise” the Hatchet Bay Farm, but said in the end government’s intention was less than sincere. “All of the foreign scientists and veterinarians, etceteras, went home, but that wasn’t it. All of the white Bahamians were fired and then all of the black Bahamians who didn’t support the PLP were sent home,” he said. Before the take-over, many, if not a disproportionate majority of Bahamians on the farm were labourers and factory workers and did not have or were not given the opportunity to have the skills to administer the farm’s operations. Insight suggested to the Eleutheran, now well into his 50s, that surely, it was the government’s intention, in its move to “Bahamianise” Hatchet Bay, to educate and train Bahamians to effectively run the plantation. He snarled and coldly remarked that only “a handful of people at the top who would have given their first born child to the PLP were given a chance to do anything that would have made any difference.” He admitted that he had been embittered by this period in Eleuthera’s history and said he was unapologetic in his assertion that the PLP had “destroyed Hatchet Bay and left Eleuthera to rot in the sun like the thousands of chickens they let die in those boxes at the airport.” In January 1978, then leader of the Bahamian Democratic Party and the official opposition leader J Henry Bostwick led a group, which included C larence Town MP, the late J ames (Jimmy Senator Edmund Moxey, to Hatchet Bay on an extensive “fact finding” tour of the 2,500acre plantation . The BDP parliamentarians made the trip as a result of numerous reports in the press concerning the state of affairs at the farm. The politicians found it nearly in ruins. Speaking to Insight last week it became apparent that Mr Bostwick’s crusade more than 30 years ago was a bit of a pilgrimage as well. He said that remembering the decline of the once vibrant farm was sad for him. “I was raised on the milk of Hatchet Bay,” he said. Many of his generation were. No doubt, like others from the same era, Mr Bostwick saw no need for Hatchet Bay not to continue just as it was at the time. “Let it continue to live its own life,” he said. “The government of the day was socialising everything, causing the demise of (all enterpris-e s) that were independent, e specially if they were operating successfully,” he said. The former statesman said that in its raw form “Bahami anisation” meant “ownership,” but at the time it was far from being a national ideal. “Bahamianisation was a PLP government concept. It was a political ideal, rather than some thing (driven by the people Mr Bostwick said. However, Mr Bostwick said that some good did come out of this “political ideal.” “Was Bahamianisation successful? Yes in that quite a number of black millionaires came into being. It opened a door that had been hitherto closed and it changed the face of the country’s economy. Peo ple like me were able to succeed and advance because we took the legitimate opportuni t ies that were available,” he s aid. Still, he acknowledged that today’s generation has awakened to the fact that the country has changed and their parents’ “misplaced” sense of entitlement will not provide them with the things they want from life. “All the choice properties on New Providence are gone. (Young people thirst for land, but it has come ata time when it is too late to do anything about it.” These days, said Mr Bostwick, the idea that one should “possess or own land and everything on it due to nationality or colour, because it’s their Godgiven right, is total nonsense.” Mr Bostwick expects government to announce very soon that it is developing Andros, Inagua or Crooked Island so that Bahamians can get land. It is not hard to imagine that the former opposition leader’s words may prove one day to be prophetic, but his insight on the here and now as it relates to the new generation of Bahamiansi s spot on. Y ounger Bahamians want to own, but they are not weight ed down by the paternalism of their parents. They expect gov ernment to be facilitators, not providers. Insight exchanged e-mails with a professional lady in her early 30s about this topic of Bahamianisation and thought that her response was so telling on a number of levels that it should be printed in its entirety. “Rupert to tell you the truth, I have no clue what that concept even means so, I did some research. This is what I found ‘At its most basic level, Bahamianisation is widely accepted to mean that as the owners of these islands, we have first call on all the best in resources and rewards available herein.’ (Source: The Bahama Journal. Article by Theresa MoxeyIngraham) “If this is the definition, ALL successive governments have failed miserably. If governments were/are serious about this Bahamianisation policy it could happen within a blink of an eye. Through free job training programmes, free continuing education programmes, community centres in EVERY neighbour hood, free quality health care, free quality education (inclu sive of tertiary education), land grants, clean streets, parks for recreation, beach access and grants for small businesses for example. For EVERY person born here NO MATTER where their parents are from. “The solution is that we will not wait for our governments to give us anything. We will now take what is ours by building our own institutions, schools, media institutions, community centres, health care institutions and the list goes on. “Many people are already taking this approach and in the next 10-20 years I think that this country will begin to reap the benefits of a bottom up Bahamianisation policy because of African warrior scholars who are working for the empowerment and liberation of our communities,” she said. Modern Bahamian governments are now (we hope mature, or perhaps less insecure. Government may also, as the prime minister said, be populated by more “realists.” This would explain his administration’s decision to bring in a person with the skills needed to operate URCA, facing the reality that no such Bahamian is currently available in our labour pool. The reasonable conclusion should be that “Bahamianisation” isn’t an event or period in our history, but a continuing process. Perhaps it is occurring more gradually than people hoped or expected, but we’re getting there. Today, Bahamians don’t own or control everything, but since July 10, 1973, we have become executives and managers in major companies, both locally and internationally, opened and operated hospitals and clinics, law firms and supermarkets, insurance and real estate companies, major liquor companies, breweries, radio and television stations, newspapers, schools and independently administered one of the most stable governments in one of the most prosperous countries in the region for nearly 40 years. Even so, it will be up to individuals to determine whether this progress has been enough. It should be painfully obvi ous that there isn’t anything wrong with the idea of “Bahamianisation,” but it requires the participation and inclusion of all Bahamians, both white and black. It is also an ideal that has no teeth if it is not supported by an adequate education system that is sup ported by government, corporate and civil society. Finally, and more importantly, it requires actual work and a drive on the part of individual Bahamians who would see sectors where Bahamians are not present or under-represented to equip themselves to climb to the top of these industries. “By the sweat of your brow you shall eat.” There is no shame in that, is there? Many things could have been done and there is no telling what eventually suffered because of the break-neck speed with which “Bahamianisation” was attempted to be implemented. It was introduced by a young government desperate to prove itself and embraced by a newly independent dispossessed people eager to possess. Perhaps both groups were expecting instantaneous fruits from a tree that in reality takes decades upon decades to reach maturity. C M Y K C M Y K INSIGHT PAGE 2C, MONDAY, MAY 11, 2009 THE TRIBUNE URCA and The Milk of Hatchet Bay F F R R O O M M p p a a g g e e 1 1 B B INSIGHT For the stories behind the news, r ead Insight on Mondays WHERE there were once neat buildings and immaculate lawns today there are only abandoned structures junk and weeds...

PAGE 31

n B y CURT ANDERSON A P Legal Affairs Writer MIAMI (AP sentenced a former security g uard Wednesday to five consecutive life prison sentences plus 85 years for taking part int he 2007 hijacking of the "Joe C ool" charter boat and killings at sea of its captain, his wifea nd two crew members. A life sentence was mandatory following the conviction of Guillermo Zarabozo, 21, on 1 6 charges in February. But U.S. District Judge Paul Huck sided with prosecutors whow anted a more severe sentence, even if stringing together multiple life terms was e ssentially symbolic. Zarabozo testified at his tri al that he did not kill anyone, i nstead blaming the hijacking and murders on his confeder ate Kirby Archer. Archer, 37, pleaded guilty and is also serving five life terms. Zarabozor epeated his claims in court W ednesday. "When I got onto that boat, I didn't know what Archer was going to do," Zarabozo told the judge. "I had no intentiono f hurting anybody." H uck, however, called Zarabozo's statements and testimony "largely a fabrication" c learly contradicted by the evidence and Zarabozo's decision to bring a gun and other weapons on board. "It was so obviously not true," Huck said. Prosecutors said Zarabozo w ished for a life of adventure and got involved because Archer claimed connections w ith the CIA and made p romises of a lucrative career f illed with undercover excite m ent. Security Zarabozo, a security guard who once aspired to a policec areer, was convicted in February of kidnapping, murder and other charges. Trial testi-m ony showed that he and Archer paid $4,000 cash to hire the "Joe Cool" in September2 007 for a purported trip to Bimini, Bahamas, then fatally shot all four people and triedt o make it to Cuba. The plot f ailed when the boat ran out of gas a few miles from Cuban waters. K illed were boat captain Jake Branam, 27; his wife, Kelley Branam, 30; crew membersS cott Gamble, 35, and Samuel Kairy, 27. The Branams left two small children now beingc ared for by relatives. Friends and family members o f the victims and Zarabozo packed the courtroom. Maria Gagliardo, partner of Jake B ranam's grandfather Joe Harr y Branam Sr., read two l engthy statements that repeat e dly called Zarabozo a "mons ter" who had wrecked the families. " Life for you will be long and unpleasant and you will die a convicted murderer," shes aid. "You are a coward. You chose to take innocent lives." Zarabozo's mother, Francisc a Alfonso, repeated her son's claims of innocence but also expressed sympathy for thev ictim's families. "There have been two families that have been destroyed. If eel their pain," she said. W hen Zarabozo and Archer were first rescued floating in the "Joe Cool" life raft, theyc laimed the boat had been set upon by Cuban pirates who had committed the slayings.B ut investigators believed otherwise, and pieced together a case based on circumstantiale vidence such as the discovery of shell casings that matched a 9mm handgun owned by Zarabozo. Archer, a former military p oliceman who had been stat ioned at Guantanamo Bay, C uba, was a fugitive from A rkansas when he hired the b oat. He was under investiga tion for child molestation andw as wanted for stealing $92,000 from a Wal-Mart where he had been a manager. Z arabozo's first trial ended in a mistrial when jurors failed to agree on verdicts on them ost serious counts but convicted him on underlying weapons charges. Huck threwo ut the weapons verdicts and ordered a second trial, finding the jury was confused by faultyi nstructions on the law. C M Y K C M Y K INSIGHT THE TRIBUNE MONDAY, MAY 11, 2009, PAGE 3C Distributed by Nas sau Ag enc ies Lt d. 393-4854 Email: 2 0 0 9 C r e a t i v e R e l a t i o n s . n e t It’sElectric! Life plus 85 years for ‘Joe Cool’ boat killings I N THIS September 26, 2007 courtroom sketch, Kirby Logan A rcher, 35, of Strawberry, Ark., left, and Guillermo Zarabozo, 19, of Hialeah, Fla., right, appear inf ederal court in Miami. A judge sentenced Zarabozo Wednesday, May 6, 2009 to five consecutivel ife prison sentences plus 85 years for taking part in the 2007 hijacking of the “JoeCool” charter boat and killings at sea of its captain, his wife and two crew members. (AP Photo: Shirley Henderson To advertise in The Tribune the #1 newspaper in cir culation, just call 502-2371 today!

PAGE 32

n By TRAVIS REED Associated Press Writer THE cruise Zenaiva Cervantes booked was to stop in sun-drenched beach cities on the Mexican Riviera. The cruise she took? That landed her in Seattle, where she pulled her arms tightly to her chest as she debarked on a damp, 50-degree morning. "We wanted to relax in the warmth," the 61-year-old Tijuana, Mexico, resident said in Spanish Thursday. "If someone had told me I'd be in Seattle eight days ago, I wouldn't have believed them." At the peak of the swine flu outbreak, major cruise operators Carnival Corp. and Royal Caribbean Cruises Ltd. desperate to avoid passenger illness and lost revenue decided to reroute Mexico voyages until mid-June. So even though fear has receded, once-sun-seeking passengers like Cervantes are finding themselves in San Francisco, Seattle and Victoria, B.C., in Canada. Cruise companies are compensating passengers for the switch with onboard credit plus vouchers for a future cruise. Passengers also had the choice to stay home and get a full refund, but most passengers are choosing to travel when they planned, the cruise lines said. What they're losing in sunshine and tan lines, their new destinations are gaining in millions of dollars of business. In San Francisco, the 16 additional swine flu-related landings will boost the year's port traffic 31 percent and bring 49,000 new visitors, said Michael Nerney, San Francisco's maritime marketing manager. Each call could mean $1 million in sales for city businesses and together they'll produce $500,000 in revenue for the port. "This is highly unusual shocking, really as the cruise lines set their sailing schedules 12 to 18 months in advance, and even minor changes are rare," Nerney said. The great number of alterna tive ports in the Caribbean makes it far easier to swap stops there. Instead of Cozumel in Mexico, companies are opting for Ocho Rios or Montego Bay in Jamaica, Nassau or Freeporti n the Bahamas, the Virgin Islands' St. Thomas, St. Maarten or Key West, Fla., or points across the Caymans and Turks and Caicos. The Bahamas is happily awaiting diverted ships. Customs receives $15 for each passenger, and island clothing and jewelry shops, bars and cafes depend on tourist dollars, said tourism minister Vincent Vanderpool-Wallace said. Analysts think the benefits may be fleeting for these ports because the outbreak hasn't been severe. "I think it's a short-term bump that may already be dissipating," said Michael McCall, a hospitality research fellow and lecturer at Cornell University. Jan Freitag, vice president of global development at Smith Travel Research, noted that, in addition to swine flu, Mexico travel has been affected by fear of heightened drug violence in border states. He sees business travel to Mexico remaining steady and swine flu having minimal impact on leisure traffic unless the virus worsens. Hotel operators are seeing travelers postpone plans. The Ritz-Carlton Hotel Company and Four Seasons Hotel and Resorts said virtually all guests booked at two of their Mexico resorts in late April and early May will come a few months later instead. Starwood Hotels & Resorts Inc. expected the flu to cost it $4 million to $5 million in revenue but said it could recover much of it from guests rebooked at its U.S. or Caribbean resorts. The federal Centers for Disease Control and Prevention now says only 10 percent of infected Americans picked up the virus in Mexico, not onethird as previously estimated. But it maintains its warning against nonessential travel to Mexico. Michael Crye, vice president of technology and regulatory affairs for the Cruise Lines International Association, called that restriction damaginga nd unnecessary, because areas hit hardest by the flu's spread are inland and the flu season is almost over. Crye pointed to lessons learned from several rounds of bad publicity after gastrointestinal illnesses like the "Norwalk" virus broke out and said new passenger screenings ensure ships don't help spread the H1N1 virus, which causes swine flu. "We believe ... we've got a good story to tell, and that you're probably at less risk going ahead with your destination than you would be in virtually any other public place," Crye said. Eric Brey, head of the Center for Resort and Hospitality Business at the University of Memphis, predicted tourists would have no problem returning quickly to Mexico. "Outside of this summer, I don't see it being that big a deal," Brey said. In Charlotte Amalie on St. Thomas, a place hit hard as tourism has fallen amid the recession, it is usually quiet this time of year. But taxies zipped abundantly by the docks last week. "(The swine flu problem for us," said Edward Thomas, CEO of the West Indian Company Dock. Despite the lack of sunshine, Cervantes, her husband and the thousands of other passengers who ended up in the Pacific Northwest with them enjoyed Seattle's blocks of boutiques and Pike Place Market, where vendors famously sling fish. "We thought we'd be in our bikinis and bathing suits," said Philipe Tabet, a 53-year-old restaurateur from Albuquerque, N.M., traveling with his wife. "We just had to pack a little bit different, that's all. Unpack, and pack again." Associated Press Writer Manuel Valdes contributed to this report from Seattle; Judi Shimel contributed from St. Thomas, US Virgin Islands; and J uan McCartney contributed from the Bahamas C M Y K C M Y K INSIGHT PAGE 4C, MONDAY, MAY 11, 2009 THE TRIBUNE Swine flu is windfall for some top tourism spots INSIGHT For the stories behind the news, read Insight on Mondays


xml version 1.0 encoding UTF-8
REPORT xmlns http:www.fcla.edudlsmddaitss xmlns:xsi http:www.w3.org2001XMLSchema-instance xsi:schemaLocation http:www.fcla.edudlsmddaitssdaitssReport.xsd
INGEST IEID EBAN0EOYW_M4TIFW INGEST_TIME 2011-08-03T01:46:38Z PACKAGE UF00084249_01309
AGREEMENT_INFO ACCOUNT UF PROJECT UFDC
FILES