Citation
The Tribune

Material Information

Title:
The Tribune
Uniform Title:
Tribune (Nassau, Bahamas)
Portion of title:
Nassau tribune
Place of Publication:
Nassau, Bahamas
Publisher:
Tribune
Publication Date:
Copyright Date:
2009
Frequency:
Daily, except Sunday
daily
normalized irregular
Language:
English
Physical Description:
v. : ill. ; 58 cm.

Subjects

Genre:
newspaper ( sobekcm )
newspaper ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage:
Bahamas

Notes

General Note:
Description based on: Vol. 79, no. 210 (Aug. 3, 1983); title from caption.

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Holding Location:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
This item was contributed to the Digital Library of the Caribbean (dLOC) by the source institution listed in the metadata. This item may or may not be protected by copyright in the country where it was produced. Users of this work have responsibility for determining copyright status prior to reusing, publishing or reproducing this item for purposes other than what is allowed by applicable law, including any applicable international copyright treaty or fair use or fair dealing statutes, which dLOC partners have explicitly supported and endorsed. Any reuse of this item in excess of applicable copyright exceptions may require permission. dLOC would encourage users to contact the source institution directly or dloc@fiu.edu to request more information about copyright status or to provide additional information about the item.
Resource Identifier:
09994850 ( OCLC )

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Full Text
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BAHAMAS EDITION

www.tribune242.com

SATURDAY, MAY 9, 2009

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© Andre Birbal wanted in connection with molestation claims

@ Move to extradite fugitive from United States to Bahamas

m@ By DENISE MAYCOCK
Tribune Freeport Reporter
dmaycock@tribunemedia.net

FREEPORT - Fugitive Andre Birbal — the former Eight Mile
Rock High School teacher wanted for questioning in connection
with allegations of sexual molestation — was arrested in the United
States. An effort is now being made for his extradition to the
Bahamas.

Senior Assistant Commissioner Marvin Dames confirmed on
Friday that Birbal, 46, was arrested by US authorities in New
York early this week.

He said that the Police and the Attorney General’s Office are
working with authorities in the United States to have him returned
to the Bahamas as soon as possible.

“We told you over a month ago that we
did in fact have an international APB out on
him and this demonstrates that the system
does in fact work,” said Mr Dames.

Birbal was arrested on Sunday, May 3,
by a New York Transit Police Officer after
he committed a traffic violation. Bahamian
Police were immediately notified of his
arrest.

Mr Dames explained that following his
arrest the authorities took Birbal into cus-
tody and conducted a check and discovered
that there was an APB out on him from
the Bahamas.

The Trinidadian teacher is wanted by
police here for questioning into allegations
of unnatural sexual intercourse with two former students.

Birbal was employed as an art teacher at Eight Mile Rock High.
He was removed from the school after allegations of molestation
surfaced in January.

He fled the country in February after police investigations were
launched into complaints concerning the molestation of two former
male students, who claimed they were abused while in the seventh
grade.

The students, who are now out of school, claim that the abuse
lasted for eight years.

Birbal has denied the accusations. He has been teaching in the

SEE page eight

Andre Birbal



Fears that Justice Lyons’

could hit commercial case hearings

SC TB ge

Felipé Major/Tribune staff

COURT APPEARANCE: Angie Brown, who also goes by the name of Ang-
ie Moss, pleaded guilty to making a false statement.
SEE STORY ON RIGHT

INSIDE

AUDITIONS FOR MOVIE

COM





m@ By TANEKA THOMPSON
Tribune Staff Reporter
tthompson@tribunemedia.net

CONCERNS arose within the legal
fraternity yesterday that the sudden res-
ignation of Supreme Court Senior Jus-
tice John Lyons could possibly cripple
the hearing of commercial cases, an area
in which Justice Lyons is highly spe-
cialised.

According to a high-profile member
of the legal community, who was "surprised"
by the turn of events, his departure could affect
the way the Bahamas’ court system is perceived
by the international public.

"This is a big problem, we don't have sufficient
judges in the Bahamas, we don't have sufficient
judges with experience, and lastly we don't have
sufficient judges with experience in the com-
mercial section.

"So it's a real problem for us trying to promote
ourselves as a first world country, a financial
services centre — it’s going to make matters

worse," said the lawyer, who asked to remain

NASSAU AND BAHAMEA

John Rens

anonymous. According to the Supreme
Court's website there are currently 11
justices — excluding Justice Lyons —
one of whom is listed as an acting justice.
Sources said Chief Justice Sir Burton
| Hall and Justice Jon Isaacs are mem-
bers of the Supreme Court who are well
versed in commercial court matters beg-
ging the need for a replacement to Jus-
tice Lyons with similar qualifications.
"T think that they are certainly going to
have to look inside and outside for
replacements because he was one of the more
senior and he was dealing with quite a few of the
large, commercial, technical cases," said a second
well-placed member of the legal community
who did not want to be identified.

A important case involving the Central Bank
of Ecuador and other parties is one example of
the extensive cases he was scheduled to hear.

"The other senior people have really been
concentrating on criminal matters — but that is

SEE page eight



ON BAHAMIAN POLITICS
PAGE THREE
BAHAMIANS BEING
OVERLOOKED FOR TOP
JOBS, PHARMACEUTICAL

WORKERS CLAIM
PAGE THREE

ASYLUM REQUEST
REJECTION INVESTIGATION

WELCOMED
PAGE SIX

BAHAMAS AND INDONESIA
TO FORMALISE TRADE AND

ECONOMIC TIES
PAGE SEVEN

‘I wanted my
ex-boytriend
locked up’

Mother who made kidnap claim
says she feared for family’s safety

@ By NATARIO McKENZIE
Tribune Staff Reporter

THE woman who alleged that her former boyfriend had
kidnapped her three-year-old son said yesterday that she
had made the false claim because she wanted police to
lock him up.

Angie Brown, 37, told the court yesterday that “as long
as he is locked up, I know I’ll be safe as well as my family.”

“My life is disgusting because of him,” she said.

Brown, who also goes by the name of Angie Moss, told
Chief Magistrate Roger Gomez that she is tired of the
physical abuse and death threats to which he has subject-
ed her.

According to prosecutor Sergeant Sean Thurston, Moss,
a mother of five, told
police on May 1 that
her former boyfriend,
35-year-old Kendrick
Siefort, had removed
her 1996 Bluebird
from outside her
Lewis Street home.

She also told them
that her son, Shannon
Bannister, was asleep |
on the back seat.

On Tuesday police
issued an all points Felipé Major/Tribune staff
bulletin for Siefort, SPEAKING OUT: Tracey, sister of
who turned himself in Kendrick Siefort, talks to the media
on Wednesday. Sgt. yesterday outside court.

Thurston told the
court that investigators later discovered that Brown had
made a false report.

He said that Brown had told police that she just wanted
Siefort off the streets.

Sgt Thurston said Brown had also told police that Siefort
had beat her on several occasions. He told the court that
Brown has no criminal record, but that he has several
matters in court against Siefort.

He recommended that she be sent to Sandilands to be
evaluated.

Brown pleaded guilty to deceiving woman Corporal
2687 Clarke by making a false statement. She claimed,

SEE page eight



Detention Centre conditions
better since Tribune story

m@ By MEGAN REYNOLDS
Tribune Staff Reporter
mreynolds@tribunemedia. net

DETAINEES in the Carmichael Road Detention Centre say liv-
ing conditions have improved greatly since The Tribune reported
allegations about the terrible state of the centre.

However repeated calls for press access to the facility and inde-
pendent investigations into claims of abuse have so far been
ignored.

The detainees who complained of “con- Ueververcesvcsccccuccuscusousousousousous

centration camp” like conditions in February “I wanted
told The Tribune yesterday how dirty old to go see it
sues have ee eae with ne and I was
ones, the grimy walls have been repainted,
the blocked toilets repaired, and washing pecans pee
machines and dryers have been installed for eur PTISe
detainees to wash their clothes. They also with what I
said cable televisions have been set up in Saw.”
the men’s and women’s dorms.

Immigration Minister Branville McCart- Branville
ney said he was “pleasantly surprised” when McCartney

he toured the facility with Immigration boss-
es last week.

He said: “I wanted to go see it and I was pleasantly surprised with
what I saw... I think they are happy. I have some concerns about

SEE page eight



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THE TRIBUNE

LOCAL NEWS



ORIGINAL Bahamian
crafts were on display in
downtown Nassau yester-
day for both tourists and
locals to browse and buy.

Authentic native straw
work, wood work and jew-
ellery made from locally
sourced shells grabbed
the attention of passers-
by in Charlotte Street.

And those who stayed to
appreciate the work
indulged in the sensuous
delights of handmade
soaps, bath gels and
creams, or cracked a smile
over humorous signs
crafted out of driftwood.

The craft show was put
on by the Ministry of
Tourism.



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THE TRIBUNE

SATURDAY, MAY 9, 2009, PAGE 3



LOCAL NEWS



Man arraigned
on accusations
of bribery

A MAN accused of offer-
ing a bribe to the police and
an officer accused of accept-
ing a bribe were arraigned in
the Magistrate’s Court yes-
terday.

Police have charged
Anthony Rolle, 41, of
Leward East, with two counts
of offering a bribe.

It is alleged that on Octo-
ber 20, 2008, Rolle offered
$400 to police Constable
Arnold Cooper and $200 to
Constable 1878 Bryan Dillet
as an inducement to prevent
another public servant from
performing his duty.

Rolle pleaded not guilty to
the charge.

Police have also charged
Constable Dillet, 34, of
Southern Breeze Estates,
with abetment to offer a
bribe and accepting a bribe.

It is alleged that on Mon-
day, October 20, 2008, Offi-
cer Dillet offered a bribe to
Constable 415 Arnold Coop-
er.

It is further alleged that
on the same day, Officer Dil-
let accepted $200 from
Anthony Rolle.

Dillet pleaded not guilty to
the charges.

Rolle and Dillet, who were
arraigned before Chief Mag-
istrate Roger Gomez yester-
day, will remain on police bail
until they appear in Court 10,
Nassau Street on May 11.

THE monthly meeting of
the Commonwealth Writers
of the Bahamas will be held
today at Chapter One Book
Store at the College of the
Bahamas, beginning at 2pm
on the second floor.

CORRECTION

¢ AN article on page five of
yesterday's Tribune under
the headline ‘Shoes destroyed
by store bosses ‘not fit for
charity” inaccurately reported
that hundreds of pairs of
shoes were destroyed by the
president and co-owner of
Shoe Village Egan Kemp.

However, Mr Kemp is in
fact the president and co-
owner of Shoe Depot.

Shoe Village was not
involved in the matter in any
way.

The Tribune apologises for
any inconvenience this error
may have caused.

Filmmaker Celi Moss



m@ By TANEKA THOMPSON
Tribune Staff Reporter
tthompson@tribunemedia.net

DISGRUNTLED pharmaceu-
tical workers claim Bahamians are
being overlooked for top jobs in
the industry to the benefit of for-
eign workers.

They say they are fed up with
the influx of expatriates — usually
from other parts of the Caribbean
— who come to fill management
positions that should be offered
to Bahamians.

They claimed the foreign work-
ers are often paid more than
equally qualified Bahamians.

"Our country's practice is to
bring in foreigners for jobs
Bahamians are qualified to do. In
the pharmaceutical industry it's
common to bring in foreigners to
work the Bahamian territory and
these are not specialised positions,
they will teach you what you need
to learn,” said one pharmaceutical
salesman, who asked to remain
anonymous.

"What qualifications does a
Jamaican bring that a Bahamian
doesn't bring, especially in these
tough economic times? They
come and they work and then
they just bank their money," said

another employee, who ques-
tioned why drug companies would
choose to foot living, work per-
mit and other expenses for a for-
eign worker instead of hiring a
Bahamian.

However local pharmaceutical
distributor Nassau Agencies Ltd
said out of their 30 sales repre-
sentatives who work for about 15
international drug companies,
only one of them is foreign.

And this worker — who holds a
management position — is only
hired on a temporary “training”
basis, and will train a Bahamian to
later assume the post, said phar-
maceuticals manager Barbara
Donathan-Henderson, who said
she could only speak for her
agency.

Ms Henderson argued that the
company's policy is to ensure
vacancies are not filled by for-
eigners if there are qualified
Bahamian applicants.

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WATER CONVERSATION MEASURES

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MANAGEMENT

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Auditions begin for
new Bahamian movie

m@ By MEGAN REYNOLDS
Tribune Staff Reporter
mreynolds@tribunemedia.net

ASPIRING film stars of all
ages are being called up to
audition for a new movie
about Bahamian politics in
Bamboo Town, Nassau, this
afternoon.

The Bamboo Town Film
Club production “My MP’ writ-
ten by Bahamas Film Festival
president Celi Moss, famed for
his independent gangster film
‘Balls Alley’, will feature fic-
tional characters based on real
life politicians.

Parts will be cast for the lead
role of progressive Bamboo
Town MP ‘Mr Brown’, the
prime minister, leader of the
opposition, members of par-
lament, news reporters and
the Bamboo Town con-
stituents.

The film follows Mr Brown
as he tries to move away from
the hand-out culture, where
MPs are expected to lavish
gifts on the community, and

"Very often (the drug compa-
nies) need somebody with expe-
rience depending on the position
they need to fill but we never con-
done any company bringing in a
foreigner if we know there is
someone able to fill the position
here. But Bahamians traditional-
ly have not always been, com-
pared to others in the region; we
tend to be less sales (oriented).”

Ms Henderson added that if a
local company does hire a for-
eigner, all the costs associated
with bringing in the worker are
usually paid for by the interna-
tional drug companies.

acts as a facilitator for people
in his constituency by assisting
them in various ways instead.

Real life Bamboo Town MP
and Minister of Immigration
Branville McCartney said the
likeness is uncanny.

He said: “When I read the
movie I often wondered if Mr
Moss was on the campaign
trail with me during he elec-
tion. Many of the things I said
and did and continue to do are
reflected in that movie.”

Mr McCartney sanctioned
the move and has opened his
constituency office in East
Street South for today’s audi-
tion and subsequent meetings
of the Bamboo Town Film
Club.

He said: “The movie is real-
ly about today’s political envi-
ronment and it has some funny
scenes in it, but also serious
connotations in terms of the
underlying theme.”

Mr McCartney is hoping the

Galleria

premiere of the film at the
sixth annual Bahamas Film
Festival in November will raise
funds for young people in his
constituency to obtain schol-
arships for the College of the
Bahamas.

Filmmaker Mr Moss praised
the educational incentive and
said: “Filmmaking stimulates
the mind and allows young-
sters to explore endless possi-
bilities not only for themselves
but for their community and
also their country.

“T look forward to continu-
ally working with the residents
of Bamboo Town with this and
other projects. I also congrat-
ulate the members of the Bam-
boo Town Film Club for their
dedication and hard work.”

The casting call is for men
and women of all ages, sizes
and ethnicities. Auditions will
be held at the constituency
office in East Street South
from 12 to 3pm today.

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PAGE 4, SATURDAY, MAY 9, 2009

THE TRIBUNE



EDITORIAL/LETTERS TO THE EDITOR

The Tribune Limited

NULLIUS ADDICTUS JURARE IN VERBA MAGISTRI
Being Bound to Swear to The Dogmas of No Master

LEON E. H. DUPUCH, Publisher/Editor 1903-1914

SIR ETIENNE DUPUCH, Kt, O.B.E., K.M., K.C.S.G.,

(Hon.) LL.D., D.Litt.

Publisher/Editor 1919-1972
Contributing Editor 1972-1991

EILEEN DUPUCH CARRON, C.M.G., M.S. B.A., LL.B.

Publisher/Editor 1972-

Published Daily Monday to Saturday

Shirley Street, RO. Box N-3207, Nassau, Bahamas
Insurance Management Building., P.O. F-485, Freeport, Grand Bahama

TELEPHONES
Switchboard (News, Circulation and Advertising) 322-1986
Advertising Manager - (242) 502-2352
Circulation Department - (242) 502-2387
Nassau Fax: - (242) 328-2398
Freeport, Grand Bahama: 1-(242)-352-6608
Freeport fax: (242) 352-9348

WEBSITE
www.tribune242.com — updated daily at 2pm

Palin still an easy target

EVERYONE is piling on Sarah Palin,
even though she will never be president
of the United States.

The Alaska governor is everyone’s
favourite foil, from the left-wing Huffington
Post to the ever-posturing Mitt Romney.
John McCain, the Republican presidential
nominee who cynically chose her as his
running mate, now snubs her with relish.

They all act like she has a real chance to
win the White House, when they all know
the truth.

When it comes to be taken seriously by
the general electorate as a potential presi-
dent, it’s as over for her as it was for Dan
Quayle.

Quayle was doomed even after he served
four years as vice president. He was the
proverbial heartbeat away from the first
President Bush, but could never overcome
the perception that he lacked gravitas.

Palin only ran for vice president; she
never made it from Wasilla to Washing-
ton. And her political problem is bigger
than Quayle’s, because it extends to her
family.

Think about the picture-perfect Obama
family, from adorable First Daughters to
adorable First Puppy.

And speaking of adorable, what is more
adorable than the president and his wife
strolling hand-in-hand around the White
House grounds after a Saturday night date?
Their family image is managed expertly
by the White House with help from the
media.

Palin’s family portrait is much more com-
plicated and gritty.

In some ways, it is more reflective of the
reality of American family life.

But it brings baggage that is especially
difficult for a female candidate to over-
come.

From the moment Palin appeared on the
national scene as a surprise pick for vice
president, her family attracted critical atten-
tion.

Palin had to fight off Internet-spawned
rumours that her youngest child, Trig, who
was born with Down syndrome, was really
her daughter’s.

Then came the real news. Bristol Palin,
her 17-year-old daughter, was unwed and
pregnant, despite her mother’s abstinence-
only platform.

Palin weathered those headlines and oth-
ers about her snowmobiling husband,
Todd.

As the campaign moved forward, she
was undercut more by her own perfor-
mance in a series of nationally televised
interviews.

PUBLIC NOTICE

INTENT TO CHANGE NAME BY DEED POLL

The Public is hereby advised that |, ESTHER VICTORIA
STUART of Rosewood Street, Pinewood Gardens,
P.0.Box SB-52267 intend to my name to ESTHER
VICTORIA WOODSIDE If there are any objections to
this change of name by Deed Poll, you may write such
objections to the Chief Passport Officer, PO.Box N-742,
Nassau, Bahamas no later than thirty (30) days after the

date of publication of this notice.

They revealed an inexperienced candi-
date with a superficial understanding of
economic and foreign policy matters.

Palin managed to survive a debate with
Joe Biden, the Democratic vice presidential
candidate, and remained popular on the
campaign trail with her core conservative
constituency.

But she was a major turnoff to the very
voters she was supposed to attract —
Hillary Clinton’s female supporters.

Palin is still extremely popular with the
hard-core conservative base and was
recently named to the National Council
for a New America, a group aimed at
rebranding the GOP. A recent CNN/Opin-
ion Research poll of 429 Republicans gave
Palin a slight edge over fellow Republi-
cans like Romney and Mike Huckabee.
Palin also made Time magazine’s list of
influential people, causing Romney to
crack: “But was that the issue on the most
beautiful people or the most influential
people?”

Romney is smarter and more accom-
plished than Palin, and just as good-look-
ing. But Palin has something he lacks: a
core set of unwavering conservative prin-
ciples. It gives her an early advantage with
Republican primary voters.

Lucky for rivals like Romney, Palin also
faces an ongoing family soap opera that
continues to undercut her political mes-
sage. Bristol Palin broke up with Levi John-
ston, the father of their child. The two are
not getting married, as announced during
the presidential campaign.

Johnston’s mother faces a drug posses-
sion trial.

His sister accused Bristol Palin of calling
her family “white trash.” After giving one
interview in which she said abstinence is
“not realistic at all,” Bristol Palin is now
speaking out as a teen advocate for absti-
nence.

None of that should matter. But family
issues do matter, especially for female can-
didates.

When it comes to temperament, accom-
plishments, and work/family balance,
women always walk a line.

The line Palin walks as a working moth-
er of five and new grandmother continues
to trip her up as a presidential candidate.

That makes her an easy target for
Democrats and Republicans, who enjoy
running against her.

(This article was written by Joan Ven-
nochi of the Boston Globe -c. 2009).



PUBLIC NOTICE

INTENT TO CHANGE NAME BY DEED POLL

The Public is hereby advised that |, JEAN BAPTISTE
JANVIER of East Street, PO.Box CB-12627 intend to
my name to JEAN BAPTISTE OLIBRICE. If there are
any objections to this change of name by Deed Poll, you
may write such objections to the Chief Passport Officer,
P.O.Box N-742, Nassau, Bahamas no later than thirty
(30) days after the date of publication of this notice.

eee oe ae eee

for

The hypocrisy of
the PLP as it relates
to EMR molestation

EDITOR, The Tribune.

The hollering and scream-
ing from the PLP for a select
committee about the unfortu-
nate allegations of molesta-
tion at the Eight Mile Rock
Senior High School, Eight
Mile Rock Grand Bahama is
nothing more than a political
ploy to gain headlines and to
appear to be serious about the
incident that happened.

The fact of the matter is
that the PLP behaviour and
record does not, in my opin-
ion, bear out their seriousness.

There were many incidences
that have happened that could
be used to prove that there is
simply no sincerity in the PLP.
But the one that stands out
was the sexual molestation
and brutal murder of the six
boys in Freeport.

To my best recollection and
I certainly stand to be cor-
rected, the murders occurred
around the same time the
molestation of the boy(s) in
Bight Mile Rock High School
began.

I intend to shine a floodlight
on the obvious inconsistency
of the PLP and how they play
with people's minds and emo-
tions, strictly for political pur-
poses.

The murders and molesta-
tion started around May 2003.

It was horrible and sent
shock waves not only in the
Grand Bahama area but
throughout the entire
Bahamas.

I know for a fact that the
international press was also
interested in the events.

But what was not only sig-
nificantly interesting but stun-
ning was that the DPM and
Minister of National Security
Cynthia Pratt did not visit or

LETTERS

letters@tribunemedia net



address the Freeport incident
until September, 120 days plus
after the murders were report-
ed.

The visit came after there
was not only a public outcry
but a demonstration.

Mother Pratt visited
Freeport at least two to three
times before finally address-
ing the horrible incidents.

This is what it took for the
PLP to finally say something
to a confused people that in
many cases were frightened
to death and in a state of pan-
ic.

According to my informa-
tion, Mother Pratt did not vis-
it the parents of the missing
boys until the following
month.

During this time there was
no select committee, no call
for a select committee, no one
volunteered for one.

These are the facts, nothing
personal.

The point I am really dri-
ving to is that if the same
enthusiasm that the opposi-
tion is pretending to have now
was used, then maybe these
incidences at Eight Mile Rock
could have been avoided.

Had there been measures
put in place then, maybe the
necessary discipline and
checks and balances would
have been used to not only
detect that kind of behaviour
but after detection the appro-
priate conclusions would have
been made.

Had there been interven-
tion by the PLP government,
rather than sweeping this

under the proverbial carpet,
maybe, just maybe, we could
have saved these boys at Eight
Mile Rock High School and
other boys from experiencing
the horror they have.

The PLP owe the people of
Grand Bahama and the entire
Bahamas an apology for com-
pletely ignoring some things
that could have, and in my
Opinion in this particular case,
made the difference.

So friends and countrymen
listen to this, whenever the
PLP starts hollering, maybe
we should find out if it is
because they are hurting from
seeing the handwriting on the
wall, or if it is because their
collective conscience is both-
ering them from not doing
what was and is necessary to
protect our children.

The PLP did nothing to
address the molestation and
would pretend to be con-
cerned now.

How hypocritical, how
devious.

They did nothing then and,
in my opinion, they could care
less now.

Actually Bahamians are dis-
gusted with the desperate tac-
tics that they are using. It is
counterproductive.

The PLP are bankrupt of
sensible ideas and are appar-
ently hell-bent on destroying
this country, no matter what.
They can't win again, so they
want to take the ball and end
the game.

This is how selfish, “all for
me baby” people behave.
This is pathetic.

IVOINE W INGRAHAM
Nassau,
May 4, 2009.

Who will fill John Marquis’ shoes?

EDITOR, The Tribune.

Your recently retired Managing Editor, John
Marquis, displayed a talent for stirring contro-
versy, intellectual or otherwise.

This, of course, and perhaps unfortunately
for relentless “seekers of truth”, made him
unique among local practitioners of journal-
ism.

This burning, and indubitably, universal
desire “to know,” probably explains the popu-
larity of a certain bi-weekly tabloid, which, in
addition to “news of the screws,” tries to keep
its readers regularly informed of the “stories
behind the stories”.

Photojournalist Philip Jones Griffiths (1936-
2008), is reported to have said that journalists,
by their very nature, must be anarchists.

This “distinction” must have applied to Mr
Marquis, at least according to some, who
described him as “a paid journalistic assassin”
practising his art, according to another, in a
news media engaged in “journalistic terror-
ism.”

But those aspiring to fill Mr Marquis’ shoes,
might take heed to the words of New York
Times Executive Editor Bill Keller, who
observed that quality journalism “involves
experienced reporters going places, bearing
witness, digging into records, developing
sources, checking and double-checking, backed

Tel. 304-5707

Extrema

So off

Privilege «ards
tornte Partners

by editors who try to enforce high standards.

I mean journalism that, however imperfect,
labours hard to be trustworthy, to supply you
with the kind of information you need to be an
engaged citizen.

The supply of this kind of journalism is
declining because it is hard, expensive, some-
times dangerous work.”

My own umbrage with Mr Marquis, if it can
be so described, is his somewhat, although per-
haps unintentional, deprecating reference to
the Bahamas’ former slave status. History has
shown many times over that national origins
cannot be the ultimate determinant of success.

To quote Ralph Emerson, although the
words can perhaps be more accurately attrib-
uted to “Anonymous”: “What lies behind
us/And what lies before us/Are tiny mat-
ters/Compared to what lies within us.”

After all, Mr Marquis’ model country, Great
Britain, was once enslaved by the Romans for
500 years, and look what they have achieved.

Wishing Mr Marquis all the best and much
success in his reportedly in-the-works book on
The Bahamas, I remain,

SIMON ARTZI
Nassau,
May, 2009

The paradox of power and incentives
for future economic growth

EDITOR, The Tribune.

James Madison, one of the so-called Founding Fathers of the
United States, pointed out in 1788 that the authority of government
creates strong incentives for abuse of power.

And in these trying economic times Mr. Hubert Ingraham,
Prime Minister of The Bahamas advised that government revenue
is in extreme decline (my words) and there are only a couple
options for them to consider:

Tax more, borrow more or cut services.

As we know, government is the only organisation among us that
can force its will under the threat of a fine, jail time or both. So this
presents what James Madison and economists refer to as The
Paradox of Power. Does the government control itself or does it
simply use its power to tax Bahamians more?

As pointed out by Peter Leeson in his recent book, The Invisi-
ble Hook; "Ruler's predatory behaviour shapes citizens’ incentive to
cooperate for mutual gain. If leaders are going to take nearly all the
proceeds of production and exchange, why bother producing and
exchanging? The resulting decline in cooperation impoverishes soci-
ety. Thus, solving the paradox of power is crucial to a successful and
flourishing society."

Hopefully Mr. Ingraham and his government will remember this
sage advice from 221 years ago when they are deliberating about
how to provide the right incentives for future economic growth in

s . - The Bahamas.
; Pashion Yours in Liberty,
Finds $10.00 RICK LOWE
â„¢ nn al Nassau,



up

May 6, 2009



THE TRIBUNE

SATURDAY, MAY 9, 2009, PAGE 5



LOCAL NEWS

Samples of fire-hit Workers’ Party HQ sent for analysis

PHOTOS: Rodney Moncur



THIS PHOTO shows fire marks on the wall of the home of Workers’ Party leader Rodney Moncur. An
attempted arson attack was made on the house in April 2008. The blaze also destroyed Mr Moncur’s banana

trees in the yard.

Man shot in back

turing armed robbery

A 56-year-old man was } parked in the disabled spot at

shot in the back during an ; Super Value out west. Is the

armed robbery of an East }
: i they are employing disabled

Police reported that a num-
ber of employees and patrons :
were at the Shipwreck Bar }
around 6pm on Thursday :
when two gunmen entered }
and fired shots from weapons. }
were }
ordered to get to the ground }
as one of the gunmen went }
to the cash register and stole ;
an undetermined amount of :
cash. The gunmen, who were }
; granting the unemployed per-

Bay Street bar.

Those present

both dressed in blue jeans,

one wearing a yellow shirt, :
the other a blue shirt, fled the }
scene on foot and were last :

seen heading towards the i "
i pay the NIB its due so that the

Balls Alley area.

A 56-year-old male patron }
received a gun shot injury
to his back was transported }
to hospital for treatment. He }

is presently in stable condi-

tion. Police investigations }

continue.

! ll By TANEKA THOMPSON

Tribune Staff Reporter
tthompson@tribunemedia.net

"I wex when I see a police car

force so short of recruits that

people? Or is their disability
that they cannot read?"

— IRRITATED, NASSAU

"Tam vex that people in the
business community can find
time to complain that NIB will
be short of funds 50 years in the
future especially at this rough
period when the government is
trying at the very same time to
assist those same businesses by

sons money to spend.

"Those business complainers
should instead be encouraging
their fellow business owners to

funds will be there and also to
stop ripping off the unfortunate
employees by not paying their

2

— CRY BABY SOUR LIME, NASSAU

"I vex because I am tired of

these Bahamians blaming the
government for the situation we
are in with the economy! Wake
up people, we not the only peo-
ple suffering, it's happening all
around the world and nobody
saw it coming.

"Open up your eyes and ears
and listen to the American
news. Don't be listening to those
crazy PLP — if they were in pow-
er we would still be where we
are today. They couldn't have
done no better.”

— WAKE UP PEOPLE,
BAHAMAS.

"IT vex because even though I
live out east in a nice house in a
nice area with all the modern
conveniences I soon ga have to
start toting water from the pump
to bathe with because of the
slackness at Water and Sewage.
With all our advancements we
are still a third world country
masquerading as a first world
nation where people can't even
get a heavy stream of water to
bathe with or wash they clothes.

"What kind of mess is this
when I pay for water every bill
period, but only one lil’ trickle is
come out the tap, and when it
come out it rusty as nail? But

Sannin Motors itd

EVEN IF IT DOESN’T MOVE
WE WILL TRADE IT IN.

BEST PRICES
EVER SALE!

ON THE SPOT FINANCING WITH

SAMPLES of the wall and
ground near the fire-ravaged
Workers’ Party headquarters in
Black Village have been sent to a
laboratory for analysis, the Fire
Department said.

The party’s office was
destroyed by a fire that ripped
through the building at around
4am on Thursday. See photos on
the right.

It is the third time in less than
12 months that the office on
Rupert Dean Lane South has
been damaged by fire.

The previous fire in October
last year damaged three rooms
just six months after the first fire
tore through the building in April
2008.

The blaze this week has now
led to the building being com-
pletely demolished, party leader
Rodney Moncur said.

Mr Moncur said he suspects
the fires are the work of arsonists
and said there was also an

the pow-
ers that
be say
we hav-
in g
barge problems and this and
that, but I bet if the prime min-
ister's water was slow and rusty
that thing would get fix quick.”

— Sick of rusty slow water,
Bahamas.



"I vex at people who is try to
take the bibby out of someone
else eye when theirs so crust
they can't even see straight.
Now I don't like to judge people
or criticise them, but some peo-
ple just is blow me over how
they always in other people
business and is the first one to
point out what they see is
wrong.

"But since they will never see
what they doing wrong I will
take this time to give a shout to
all them people out there who
watching me and everyone else
instead of living their life.”

— HATER BLOCKER, NASSAU.

Are you vex? Send your com-
plaints to whyyouvex@tribuneme-
dia.net?

attempted arson attack on his
house in April last year.

“T have had a number of
attacks involving fire so I went
to see the Commissioner of
Police to be as responsible as pos-
sible and avert something great
from happening,” the Workers’
Party leader said.



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PAGE 6, SATURDAY, MAY 9, 2009

THE TRIBUNE



LOCAL NEWS

Asylum request rejection
investigation welcomed

OTNEKRe ENR caay
for CARICOM conference

Climate change poses one of the most serious challenges to the
sustainable development of small island and low lying coastal
developing states in the Caribbean, according to CARICOM.

Recognising this threat, the Caribbean Community Climate
Change Centre (CCCCC) in tandem with the CARICOM Sec-
retariat has drafted a regional Climate Change Strategic Frame-
work in an effort to point the way to building the region’s
resilience to the effects of climate change, over the next five
years. Described as the premier document for resource mobili-
sation, the primary focus of the strategic framework is developing
programmes to support region-wide mitigation of and adaptation
to climate change.

The framework is predicated on four strategic pillars: reduc-
ing greenhouse gas emissions through energy reduction and
conservation and switching to renewable energy sources; min-
imising the effects of greenhouse gas emissions through disaster
mitigation; developing and implementing public awareness and
education programmes and building national and regional capac-
ities to manage adaptation.

At the second meeting of the CARICOM task force on climate
change and development on Thursday, members agreed that the
strategic framework would be fine-tuned for presentation to
the CARICOM Heads of Government Conference in July.

Leading up to the conference however, the Climate Change
Centre said it will continue region wide consultations particularly
with civil society to solicit feedback on the strategic framework.

In undertaking this, the task force has also recommended
that the document should be placed on both the websites of
CARICOM Secretariat, www.caricom.org, and the CCCCC for
persons who wish to provide feedback on the framework.

Comments should be directed to the Secretariat at piu@cari-
com.org as well as to the Climate Change Centre at
www.caribbeanclimate.bz by May 15.

Oa ETS
















































ROKER’S Point Primary
School in Exuma was
among the winners
during the Ministry of
Education’s Minister’s

5) Literacy Awards

1 Ceremony for the Primary
Division on April 30 held
at the Church of God of
Prophecy Tabernacle,
New Providence. Christal
Monique Adderley of
Roker’s Point Primary is
pictured receiving her
award from Minister of
Education Carl Bethel.

Raymond A Bethel/
BIS Photo

CHRISTIE & DOWDESWELL STREETS ° Tel: 325-2921

SUNDAY, MAY 10TH, 2009

11:30 a.m. Speaker:
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m@ By DENISE MAYCOCK
Tribune Freeport Reporter
dmaycock@tribunemedia.net

FREEPORT - Jetta Baptiste, president of
the Haitian Bahamian Society of the Bahamas,
is pleased that investigations are underway
by immigration officials in the case of Ander-
son Pierre, a 37-year-old Haitian who was
denied asylum in the Bahamas.

“T am happy to learn that an investigation is
currently underway,” said Ms Baptiste, “but I
hope that the final report is not issued ‘until
further notice,’ which can take years to be
produced.”

Amnesty International has called for a “full
and thorough” investigation into the circum-
stances surrounding the Immigration Depart-
ment’s decision to reject Mr Pierre’s request
for political asylum.

Mr Pierre was ordered to leave the country
in September 2008, two years after he and his
wife filed their application for asylum. He left
Freeport in February and went to Cap Hai-
tien, but was killed by unknown gunmen in
Santo Domingo on April 24.

Immigration Director Jack Thompson has
said that a full statement would be released
shortly in relation to Mr Pierre’s asylum case.

Ms Baptiste said it is important that the
report is released in a timely fashion.

“We are still waiting for an investigation
report from the police in the case of the fires
that destroyed almost 100 homes in Marsh
Harbour, Abaco, back in May 2004. This is
five years later and the government has not
given an official response on that issue yet,”
she said.

Ms Baptiste also responded to remarks
made by Bahamian Julian Knowles, who has
called on Ms Baptiste to apologise for refer-

Anderson Pierre

Jetta Baptiste



“Iam happy to learn
that an investigation is
currently underway.”



Jetta Baptiste

ring to Bahamians as “Christ-less and real
children of the devil.”

“It is too bad and too sad that Mr Julian
Knowles has taken grave exception to my
comments concerning how many of my fellow
Bahamians are ‘Christ-less’ these days and
are ‘acting like children of the devil.’

“The real truth hurts. I suggest that we not
focus on the messenger, and take a real hard
look at the message. It is the message that is
important as we speak. I refuse to be chastised
for speaking the truth just to satisfy those
who wish that I would say what is politically
correct.

“Asking me to apologise will not change
the facts that we have too many ‘children of
the devil’ living among us. Getting these evil
persons living among us to change their
wicked ways and repent is and should be our

goal, so that we can live in God’s paradise.”

Ms Baptiste said that the Haitian Bahami-
an Society of the Bahamas is very grateful
for the assistance that was given to Haiti after
the hurricanes.

She noted that in addition to Bahamians,
Jamaicans, Americans, Turks Islanders and
other persons from around the Caribbean
also made contributions to the worthy cause.

“T must say that we are thankful and grate-
ful for all of those kind hearted persons who
donated clothing, food, money, and other
goods for the Haitian hurricane relief efforts,”
she said.

Ms Baptiste stressed that the investigations
into why Mr Pierre’s application for political
asylum was denied is priority.

“Now, please get back to the real issue that
is most important at this time, and that is
investigating why Mr Anderson Pierre’s appli-
cation for political asylum was denied and
what is going to happen to his family and to
others who find themselves in a similar situa-
tion.

“That is the real issue. Please do not try to
detract or distract me or others from dealing
with what is really important at this time.
Thanks for not being anti-Haitian. But we
need answers from those involved with Ander-
son Pierre’s case,” she said.

“Yes, the Bahamas have ‘real’ Christians.
But what percentage of the Bahamian people
are ‘real’ Christians? Would you say 50 per
cent or more or 50 per cent or less? We must
not be in denial about the truth. We have to be
sincere about what is happening in this coun-
try today and let us not live in a fallacy,” she
said.

Mr Pierre’s wife hopes that the Immigration
Department will reconsider her asylum case
and allow her to remain in Grand Bahama
with her infant son.

Tighter inventory controls instituted at public healthcare facilities

m@ BY MATT MAURA

THE Ministry of Health has
tightened inventory controls at
the three state-owned health-
care facilities and at the com-
munity clinic level to ensure
that a readily available supply of
fast-moving drugs “is kept on
hand,” Minister of Health Dr
Hubert Minnis said on Thurs-
day.

Dr Minnis said the tighten-
ing of controls is part of a series
of measures health officials
have implemented to improve
efficiency in operations.





N extans our rela-
tively young capital
market is imperative for the
future well being of our people.
An essential tool for the mobi-
lization and democratization of
investment in economic activity
is a successful and active stock
exchange. Which brings me to
The Bahamas International Secu-
rities Exchange or as it is com-
monly known BISX.

When I titled this column the
“late” BISX I wasn’t referring to
its demise. Although, should we
look at the volume of trading in
recent months, one would have
to check for vital signs. I was
referring to the promptness with

The new measures were
implemented in response to
complaints of long lines at hos-
pital and clinic registration
counters, protests against long
waiting times to see physicians,
and a “clamour for more
drugs,” he said.

“We tightened our invento-
ry controls so that our clinics
are able to keep a supply of fast-
moving drugs readily available,”
Dr Minnis said.

“We have revamped the dis-
tribution of drugs at the
Princess Margaret Hospital,
established a line for senior cit-



J O HN

which the directors of the listed
companies report to their employ-
ers, the shareholders, on the out-
come of their stewardship.

The rules of the exchange are
out of step with modern practice
by giving listed companies 90 days
to publish their interim results.
No director or manager worth
their salt would wait that long to
find out the results of the previous
three months of operation. So the
question arises, that if they know,
why shouldn’t the shareholders
and the investing public to whom
shares are on offer on the
exchange also have this informa-
tion. The maximum allowable
time should be no more than 30
days, but for a start maybe it
should be set at 45 days.

BAPTIST BIBLE CHURCH
SOLDIER ROAD & OLD TRAIL

‘Sunday School: 10am
Preaching
Radio Bible Hour:

Sunday 6pm - 2N5 2

Wed, Prayer & Praise 7:20pm

FUNDAMENTAL |
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ee eM ee ee
Horth &merica

WHERE GODS ADORED AND EFERVONE [8 APFIRWED

Worship Time: [1 a. rt.

Prayer Tome: 10:13a.m.

Church School during Worship Service

Place: Toynam Heights
off Prince Charles Drive

Minister: Rev. Henley Perry

MO). Box 88-5631

Tele

hone number: 324-2545

Telefax number: 324-2587
COME TO WORSHIP LEAVE TOSERVE

VIEW FROM AFAR



izens only and reduced the
number of persons sent to oth-
er clinics to have prescriptions
filled.”

Health officials have also
increased their orders of the
most commonly used drugs,
particularly those used to com-
bat chronic, non-communicable
diseases including diabetes,
hypertension and cancer.

A ‘drop-off’ system has also
been implemented so that pre-
scriptions can be written one
day, dropped off and filled the
next day.

Dr Minnis said his ministry



| &- s F

Additionally, BISX should
publish weekly in the print media
and continuously on their web-
site a list of companies in breach
of this or any other listing regu-
lation.

This 90-day requirement is
only part of the problem. The
equally serious or maybe even
more serious problem is that
many listed companies do not
even meet this much extended
deadline. There are exceptions.
A few very large companies meet
and beat the deadline. In fact
Commonwealth Bank’s results
for the quarter ended March 31st
was published in this newspaper
on April 24th.

If we are to gain the trust of
large and small savers in order to

has heard the complaints “and
we have responded.”

“We have improved efficien-
cies in operations at no addi-
tional cost, while providing
greater satisfaction to the gen-
eral public.”

Officials have also made
adjustments with regards to
staffing, primary among them
being the removal of technical
staff from administrative duties.

“This was done so that they
could assist in providing the ser-
vice for which they have the
training and competence,” Dr
Minnis said.





attract them to invest listed enter-
prises, this unsatisfactory situa-
tion has to change. If BISX is to
be engine for capital formation
and investment that it can and
must be, this unsatisfactory situa-
tion must change. If BISX is to be
the instrument for the democra-
tization of wealth that it can be,
this unsatisfactory situation must
change.

It is easy to do. The board of
BISX just has to change then
enforce the rules.

Grant’s Town Wesley Methodist Church

(Baillou Hill Rd & Chapel Street) RO.Box CB-13046

The Holy Ghost Prayer-Line number is 326-7427
(www.gtwesley.org)

SUNDAY, MAY 3RD, 2009
7:00 a.m. Rev. Carla Culmer/Sis. Katherine Rose
11:00 a.m. Rev. Carla Culmer/Women’s Fellowship
7:00 a.m. Bro. Jamicko Forde/
Board of Lay Ministry, Worship & Training
Theme: “ But As For Me And My Household, We Will Serve the Lord”

LIGHT AND LIFE COMMUNITY CHURCH
Grounded In The Past &

=

Worship time: [lam & 7pm
Sunday School: 9:45am
Prayer time: 6:30pm

Place:
The Madeira

Shopping Center

(Geared To The Future

=

Rev. Dr. Fromklin Kone bes

ALL ARE WELCOME TO ATTEND
Pastor: Rev. Dr Franklin Knowles

P.O.Box EE-16807-
Telephone number 325-5712
EMAIL - vaink@ batelnet.bs



THE TRIBUNE

SATURDAY, MAY 9, 2009, PAGE 7



LOCAL NEWS

LIS seniors return
TROT M LR Lert
adventure

Photo courtesy of
Sydney Watson

FREEPORT — Last month, 11 senior students from the
Lucaya International School (LIS) and their teacher Sydney
Watson made a 10-day pilgrimage through Europe in an effort
to truly experience their international studies.

“This trip afforded 11 students a complete immersion in
European history,” said Nigel Kirkby, acting director of LIS,
“affirming their academic studies and providing them with
culture-rich experiences, making it ‘the educational experi-
ence of a lifetime’.”

International curriculum-linked school trips are one of
many programmes offered at LIS.

“These trips enable young people to broaden their horizons
as they learn new skills, improve their ability to work as part of
a team and conquer their fears, in a fun and safe environ-

ment,” the school said.

“The trip was both an educational and cultural experi-
ence,” said Sydney Watson, senior English teacher at LIS.
“The students learned about ancient history and visited the sites
that brought it to life. Travelling with peers enabled the stu-
dents to learn about independence and responsibility. In fact,
Abilene Jones, a year 11 student, believed that the trip was
much more adventurous with my friends and the freedom we
had made it much more exciting.”

Lucaya International School trips offer young people the
opportunity to experience a wide range of challenges and
activities that go beyond the boundaries of the classroom.

With its focus on the ancient sites of Italy and Greece, the
excursion succeeded in taking the students out of their text-
books and allowing them to touch, feel, and live the passion and
history described in their studies, the school said.

When in Rome, they toured such amazing sites as the Vat-
ican, the Sistene Chapel, St Peter’s Basilica and the Colosseum.

Bahamas and Indonesia seek to
formalise trade and economic ties

m@ BY LINDSAY THOMPSON

THE governments of the
Bahamas and Indonesia are
seeking to formalise relations
with the signing of an econom-
ic and technical cooperation
framework agreement.

The agreement and the fos-
tering of other areas of diplo-
matic relations were addressed
as Governor- General Arthur
Hanna accepted Letters of Cre-
dence from Banua Radja
Manik, Ambassador of the
Republic of Indonesia to the
Bahamas, during a ceremony at
Government House on May 7.

“The Bahamas values the
cordial relations between our
two countries and looks forward
to continuing to strengthen our
relationship,” said Mr Hanna.

The last representative of the
government of Indonesia bade
farewell to Bahamian officials
in April, 2007.

Like the Bahamas, Indone-
sia is an archipelagic country
comprising more than 17,000
islands, 6,000 of which are
inhabited.

It is the fourth most populat-
ed country in the world with
240.3 million people.

Indonesia has a market-based
economy in which the govern-
ment plays a significant role.
There are 139 state-owned
enterprises.

The government administers
prices on several basic goods,
including fuel, rice and electric-
ity.

“The Bahamas and Indonesia
share a wide base of linkages
founded on common interests
and the diplomatic relations
that have indeed consolidated
our continued common under-
standing.

“It is on this premise that the
Bahamas government appreci-
ates the expressed interest of
the government of Indonesia to
further enhance, deepen and



Kristaan Ingraham/BIS photo

DEPUTY Prime Minister and Minister of Foreign Affairs Brent Symonette
(right), accepts credentials from Banua Radja Manik, Ambassador of the
Republic of Indonesia to the Bahamas during a courtesy call at the Min-
istry of Foreign Affairs on Wednesday, May 6, 2009.

diversify the scope of our two
countries’ cooperative endeav-
ours in all sectors, but particu-
larly in the field of trade,
tourism and investment,” said
Governor-General Hanna.

While tourism is the
Bahamas’ main industry, he
said, efforts are being made to
encourage economic diversifi-
cation through the development
of other sectors.

“In this regard,” said Mr
Hanna, “the government of the
Bahamas would equally value
and welcome increased bilater-
al trade and technical coopera-
tion with Indonesia by both
countries committing to
employing their efforts to for-
malise their relations with the
signing of an economic and
technical cooperation frame-
work agreement.

“The many multilateral fora
in which we both participate,
and in which Indonesia has
demonstrated the highest order
of leadership, bring us together
in a joint commitment to ensure
that our goals come to fruition.”

Ambassador Manik, 59,
acknowledged that both coun-
tries share the “highest aspira-
tions” and dedication to the
development and protection of
their respective societies.

He said he was honoured by

COMMONWEALTH OF THE BAHAMAS

the opportunity to represent
Indonesia in a country with “a
great international presence,
rich in the beauty of its nature,
and more importantly with
which Indonesia has had long-
standing bilateral relationship.”

“Tt is heartening to note that
our relations have continued to
develop for the common inter-
est of the two countries,” said
Ambassador Manik, “as we
support one another in interna-
tional fora especially in the
Non-aligned Movement, the
Group of 77, South-south
Cooperation and other interna-
tional organisations of which
the Bahamas and Indonesia are
members.”

Mr Manik is director for
Diplomatic Security Service.

He served as head of Section
for Economics in the Indone-
sian Embassy, in Harare, Zim-
babwe, and as head of Sub-Sec-
tion for Economics II within the
Indonesian Permanent Mission
to the United Nations.

He is married to Monry
Manik and they have three chil-
dren.

2008/CLE/qui/16 16

IN THE SUPREME COURT

Already deeply affected, the group continued to Pompeii.
“The entire city of Pompeii was covered by a volcanic eruption
in 79 AD and has now been unearthed by archeologists,”
explained Ms Watson, “the students were able to walk the
streets of the ancient people and view this historic city, frozen
in time.”

The group was often overwhelmed with the magnitude of
what they were undertaking. “It was a once in a lifetime oppor-
tunity,” said student Jessica Raad, “and a truly worthy expe-
rience.”

Other highlights from the trip include disco dancing at an
authentic Greek disco in the small waterfront town of Tolo and,
of course, sampling delicious native foods from every site.

“These students were able to explore Olympia,” said Ms
Watson, “and stand in the very first Olympic arena, what a
thrill. These are sites some people live to only read about,
what an amazing opportunity to be able to experience this.”

“The overall trip was a great experience, and definitely
one of the most fun times in my life. My classmates and I got
to see the beauty of history, and how people in Europe lived in
the past, and how they live now,” said Ryan Parsons, a year 11
student. “Most of us got to see a new culture and way of life
of how the people of both Italy and Greece lived. It was mind-
blowing to see how these ancient ruins are still perfectly pre-
served over thousands of years, and I truly got to see how
history is not only what we learn from text books.”

C avd ad thanks ce the late



Light a candle for the one we mourn.
Into a new life he will be born.

Do not look for him at the gravesite.
He ts somewsere else radiating hus
beautiful light.

He hws gone toa new world where there ts
ro darkness, mo putitt.

His light and essence will alioays remain.

The family of the late Robert Pox expresses our heartfelt
gratitude to these whe have prayed, called, gave a helping
hand and sent flowers, during bis illness and after his
demise. Special thanks to Bishop ( NM. Williams, Pastor
Julian Johnson, Pastor Rowena Fawkes and members of the
Church of Ged of Prophecy, Seven Hills; Shennan Bethel,
Cammuice Curtis, the lanl working staff of Demeritte’s
Funeral Home, the stall of Woodlawn Gardens and Rent
Fowkes Limousine Services. May the pence of Christ be
with you always and may Cod continne to bless you,





NOTICE

NOTICE is hereby given that ROSELANDE
DUVERSONNE of STEP STREET, FOX HILL, NASSAU,
BAHAMAS is applying to the Minister responsible
for Nationality and Citizenship, for registration/
naturalization as a citizen of The Bahamas, and that
any person who knows any reason why registration/
naturalization should not be granted, should send a

written and signed statement of the facts within twenty-
eight days from the 9** day of May, 2009 to the Minister
responsible for nationality and Citizenship, PO. Box
N-7147, Nassau, Bahamas.

NOTICE

NOTICE is hereby given that ANTOINETTE BOX of MARSH
HARBOUR, ABACO, BAHAMAS, P.O.BOX AB 20554 is applying
to the Minister responsible for Nationality and Citizenship,
for registration/naturalization as a citizen of The Bahamas,
and that any person who knows any reason why registration/
naturalization should not be granted, should send a written
and signed statement of the facts within twenty-eight days
from the 2nd day of MAY 2009 to the Minister responsible for
Nationality and Citizenship, P.O.Box N-7147, Nassau, Bahamas.



NOTICE

IN THE ESTATE OF WILTON

ELIJAH EDGECOMBE late of the

Island of San Salvador one of the Islands
of the Commonwealth of the Bahamas,
deceased.

NOTICE is hereby given that all persons
having any claim or demand against the above
Estate are required to send the same duly
certified in writing to the Undersigned on or
before the 29th May, 2009, after which date
the Administratrix will proceed to distribute

the assets having regard only to the claims of
which she shall then have had notice

AND NOTICE is hereby also given that
all persons indebted to the said Estate are
requested to make full settlement on or before
the date hereinbefore mentioned.

HIGGS & JOHNSON
Attorneys for the Administratrix
Chambers

P. ©. Box N-3247

Ocean Centre

Montagu Foreshore

Fast Bay Street

Nassau, Bahamas



IN THE MATTER OF ALL THAT piece parcel or
lot of land being Lot 76 containing Twenty seven
thousand six hundred and ninety one square feet
(27,697.00), Stella Maris Subdivision Section
1, Stella Maris, situate between the settlements
of Burnt Ground and Millerton in the Northern
Portion of Long Island, one of the Islands of the
Commonwealth of The Bahamas, which said
piece parcel or lot of land has such position shape
boundaries marks and dimensions as are shown
on a plan filed herein and thereon coloured yellow

AND IN THE MATTER of the Quieting Titles Act, 1959

AND IN THE MATTER of the Petition of Allan

Spector

NOTICE
The Quieting Titles Act 1959

The Petition of Allan Spector of the city of
Toronto, in the Province of Ontario, one of the
Provinces in Canada in respect of: - ALL THAT
piece parcel or lot of land being Lot 76 containing
Twenty seven thousand six hundred and ninety one
square feet (27,697.00), Stella Maris Subdivision
Section 1, Stella Maris, situate between the
settlements of Burnt Ground and Millerton in the
Northern Portion of Long Island, one of the Islands
of the Commonwealth of The Bahamas, which said
piece parcel or lot of land has such position shape
boundaries marks and dimensions as are shown
on a plan filed herein and thereon coloured yellow

Allan Spector claims to be the owner of the
fee simple estate in possession of the tract of land
hereinbefore described free from encumbrances.

AND the Petitioner has made application
to the Supreme Court of the Commonwealth of
The Bahamas under Section 3 of The Quieting
Titles Act 1959 to have his title to the said
tract of land investigated and the nature and
extent thereof determined and declared in a
Certificate of Title to be granted by the Court in
accordance with the provisions of the said Act.

NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that any
persons having Dower or a Right to Dower or an
Adverse Claim or a claim not recognized in the
petition shall on or before the 19" of June A.D., 2009
file in the Supreme Court and serve on the Petitioner
or the undersigned a statement of his claim in the
prescribed form verified by an Affidavit to be filed
therewith. Failure of any such person to file and
serve a statement of his claim on or before the 19" of
June A.D., 2009 will operate as a bar to such claim.
Copies of the Filed Plan may be inspected at:
The Registry of the Supreme Court;
The Chambers of Graham, Thompson & Co.
attorneys for the Petitioner, Sassoon House, Shirley
Street & Victoria Avenue, Nassau, N.P., Bahamas;
The Notice Board of the Administrator
at Stella Maris, Long Island: and
The Local Constable at Stella Maris, Long Island

Dated the 23rd day of April A.D., 2009

GRAHAM, THOMPSON & CoO.,
Chambers,
Sassoon House,
Shirley Street & Victoria Avenue,
Nassau, Bahamas.
Attorneys for the Petitioner



PAGE 8, SATURDAY, MAY 9, 2009

THE TRIBUNE



LOCAL NEWS

FROM PAGE |

Fears that Justice Lyons’ resignation
could hit hearing of commercial cases

Alleged sex
scandal teacher
arrested in US

FROM page one

public school system for some 20 years in the Bahamas.

Asst Supt Welbourne Bootle, press liaison officer, said Bahami-
an authorities are going through the necessary procedures for Bir-
bal’s extradition.

ACP Dames could not say exactly when Birbal would be returned
to the Grand Bahama.

“We really can’t put a time frame on this,” he said. “We are deal-
ing with two countries and so we will have to see how the process
works itself out.

“We know where he is at and we are working to have him
returned to the Bahamas as soon as possible.

“We have a provisional warrant out for him and the Office of
Attorney General will be working with their counterparts in the US
to see how quickly that can happen,” said Mr Dames.

Two other teachers at Eight Mile Rock High School — a woman
and another man — have also been removed following complaints
of molestation.

Mr Dames stated that police investigations concerning the woman
teacher are nearing completion.

“We should be making some determination on that within the
next few days,” he said.

As a result of the sex scandals at Eight Mile Rock High, the Edu-
cation Minister has implemented measures that call for all new
teachers to be vetted by police.

Safety committees made up of students, teachers, administrators,
and parents also will be established at schools to oversee com-
plaints.

FROM page one

always been one of the criti-
cisms of our system that you
don't have courts which focus
on the commercial area," the
insider continued.

Prominent attorney Brian
Moree — who has been vocal
for the need of more specialised
divisions in the courts with an
extensive background in com-
mercial cases — might be a suit-
able replacement for Justice
Lyons, sources said.

News broke on Thursday that
Justice Lyons had tendered his

resignation from the Supreme
Court.

A terse statement released by
government yesterday said the
chief justice had advised the
governor general of the deci-
sion, which takes effect on
August 1.

Meantime, Justice Lyons will
take "pre-retirement leave"
effective from May, 11, the
statement said.

Sources said it was too early
to tell who would take over any
of Justice Lyon's pending cases
adding that he would be able
to hand down judgments on





NOTICE




NOTICE is hereby given that FRANCYS PEREZ SMITH



of Pueblo Ariguanabo, La Habana, Bauta, Cuba, P.O. Box



32400 is applying to the Minister responsible for Nationality



and Citizenship, for registration/naturalization as a citizen of



The Bahamas, and that any person who knows any reason




why registration/naturalization should notbe granted, should



send a written and signed statement of the facts within



twenty-eight days from the 9° day of May, 2009 to the



Minister responsible for nationality and Citizenship, P.O. Box





N-7147, Nassau, Bahamas.



“IT think he’s
always been kind
of ill at ease in
the Bahamian
judicial system...”



completed cases during his
leave.

A controversial figure in his
own right, Justice Lyons made
headlines after his fellow jus-
tice, Anita Allen scolded him
for appointing Daniel Fergu-
son, an accountant, to work on
a recent case knowing full well
that he shared “more than a
friendship” with Mr Ferguson’s
sister.

Mr Ferguson’s sister also
assisted her brother with
preparing documents for the
case, said Justice Allen as she
decided whether or not to
recuse herself from hearing the
matter “on the ground of appar-

ent bias” because of her knowl-
edge of this matter.

This disclosure prompted
calls for Justice's Lyons resig-
nation.

Despite the recent furor sur-
rounding the justice's actions in
court, one lawyer commented
that resignations of senior jus-
tices were "pretty rare in the
Bahamas." He speculated that
the mounting public pressure
over recent cases led to Justice
Lyon's decision.

"T think that it was the pres-
sure that developed from the
negative exposure that he got,
he felt as if his career had come
to an end, that the bad publici-
ty could not be remedied and
that can be pretty devastating."

But another source said the
expatriate justice was never ful-
ly happy in the Bahamas. He
said the move was "not totally
unexpected."

"I think he's always been
kind of ill at ease in the Bahami-
an judicial system — he comes
from a very large territory and
sometimes it's very difficult to
adjust to a smaller, closely-knit
society,” he said.

Mother who made kidnap
claim tells court she
feared for family’s safety

FROM page one

hosiery Dy

however, that Seifort had attempted to kidnap her son and had sent
her threatening text messages. She also claimed that Siefort would
kidnap her every time he saw her, beat her up and on one occasion
had even hit her in her head with a hammer.

Brown said she has filed a complaint with police. Chief Magistrate
Gomez ordered that Brown be remanded to Sandilands Rehabil-
itation Centre for 14 days.

Outside of court yesterday, Siefort’s sister Tracy, told reporters
that her brother had been framed.

She claimed that her brother had never stolen the car as it was his
car.

“Tt really bothers me to see how some women can be so sick and
vindictive, she needs help,” she said.

tte ec a
TTR ema [ey
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Detention Centre conditions
have ‘greatly improved’



* Silky * Smooth * Seamless * Sheer

ULTRA SHEER PANTYHOSE

MINISTERIAL VISIT: Minister Branville McCartney and directors eat in the
canteen.

FROM page one

people who have been there, I think, too long because of their cir-
cumstances, but hopefully they will be out by the end of the month.

“Some of them were in there from the end of last year, and one
or two have been there from 2007, so we need to make a determi-
nation and regularise their status so they are able to leave the
detention centre.”

Just over two months ago detainees told The Tribune how offi-
cers beat one detainee so badly he lost his fingernails, while anoth-
er man was allegedly “beaten senseless” on the roof of the facility
before he fell to the ground, and that inadequate meals drove
some detainees to provide sexual favours for food.

Three Cuban detainees then went on a hunger strike to protest
the deplorable conditions they were forced to endure.

Reports sparked response from Amnesty International and
human rights advocates around the world, and letters continue to
flood in to The Tribune and government offices calling for an
independent investigation into abuse and living conditions at the
centre.

The Immigration Department appointed a fact-finding commit-
tee, including psychologist Dr David Allen, Social Services direc-
tor Mellany Zonical, Archdeacon James Palacious, and Immigra-
tion Director Jack Thompson, who toured the facility and talked
with the detainees in March. However, their report has yet to be
released to the press and The Tribune has not yet been given per-
mission to tour the facility as requested.

Mr McCartney told The Tribune: “T have no hesitations about you
coming in and I still want to do a press conference about the inves-
tigation with all of the committee members so they can present their
report.”

But the minister said such a press conference scheduled for last
week was postponed because the report has still not been pre-
sented to the Cabinet.

He maintains that there is no evidence of abuse at the facility that
would require an independent investigation.

Mr McCartney said: “One of the main concerns was the alleged
abuse and alleged hunger strike.

“They found no abuse, no hunger strike, and the detainees said
they really wanted more recreational stuff, washing facilities and a
change of menu.

“Tf there is no evidence of abuse there’s nothing to investigate, but
if we were to find any evidence, you can bet your bottom dollar that
we would.”

FG CAPITAL MARKETS
BROKERAG!

Bk ADVISORY SERVICES

ROYAL = FIDELITY

Money ot Work

BISX LISTED & TRADED SECURITIES AS OF:
THURSDAY, 7 MAY 2009
BISX ALL SHARE INDEX: CLOSE 1,613.79 | CHG -0.13 | %CHG -0.01 | YTD -98.57 | YTD % -5.76
FINDEX: CLOSE 798.52 | YTD -4.35% | 2008 -12.31%

WWW _.BISXBAHAMAS.COM | TELEPHONE: 242-323-2330 | FACSIMILE: 242-323-2320
52wk-Low Securit y Previous Close Today's Close Change Daily Vol. EPS $ Div $ P/E
1.28 Abaco Markets 1.40 1.40 0.127
11.00 Bahamas Property Fund 11.00 11.00 0.992
6.95 Bank of Bahamas 6.95 6.95 0.244
0.63 Benchmark 0.63 0.63 -0.877
3.15 Bahamas Waste 3.15 3.15 0.078
1.95 Fidelity Bank 2.37 2.37 0.055
11.09 Cable Bahamas 11.75 11.75 1.309
2.83 Colina Holdings 2.83 2.83 0.249
6.17 Commonwealth Bank ($1) 6.17 6.17 0.419
1.31 Consolidated Water BDRs 2.60 2.48 0.099
1.86 Doctor's Hospital 1.86 1.86 0.240
0.420
0.322
0.794
0.332
0.000
0.035
0.407
0.952
0.180

6.02
11.00
10.35

5.00

7.76
11.00
10.40

5.14

7.76
11.00
10.40

5.14

Famguard
Finco
FirstCaribbean Bank
Focol (S)
Focol Class B Preference
Freeport Concrete
ICD Utilities
J. S. Johnson 10.50 10.50 0.00
Premier Real Estate 10.00 10.00 0.00
BISX LISTED DEBT SECURITIES - (Bonds trade on a Percentage Pricing bases)
Securit Symbol Last Sale Change Daily Vol.
Fidelity Bank Note 17 (Series A) + FBB17 100.00 0.00 7%
Fidelity Bank Note 22 (Series B) + FBB22 100.00 0.00 Prime + 1.75%
Fidelity Bank Note 13 (Series C) + FBB13 100.00 0.00 T%
Fidelity Bank Note 15 (Series D) + FBB15 100.00 0.00 Prime + 1.75%
Fidelity Over-The-Counter Securities
Bid $ Ask $ Last Price
7.92 8.42 14.60
4.00 6.25 6.00
0.35 0.40 0.35
Colina Over-The-Counter Securities
30.13 31.59 29.00
0.45 0.55 0.55
BISX Listed Mutual Funds
NA Vv YTD% Last 12 Months
1.3664 0.95 4.77
2.8962 -1.49 -3.35
1.4590 1.77 5.09
3.1964 -5.59 -13.64
12.7397 0.96 5.79
100.5606 0.56 0.56
96.4070 -3.59 -3.59
1.0000 0.00 0.00
9.1599 0.71 -12.76
1.0440 0.80 4.40
1.0364 0.33 3.64
1.0452 0.76 4.40
MARKET TERMS
YIELD - last 12 month dividends divided by closing price
Bid $ - Buying price of Colina and Fidelity
Ask $ - Selling price of Colina and fidelity
Last Price - Last traded over-the-counter price
Weekly Vol. - Trading volume of the prior week
EPS $ - A company’s reported earnings per share for the last 12 mths
NAV - Net Asset Value
N/M - Not Meaningful
FINDEX - The Fidelity Bahamas Stock Index. January 1, 1994 = 100

1.00
0.30
5.50
8.60
10.00

0.00
0.00
0.00

1.00
0.30
5.59

1.00
0.30
5.59

52wk-Low
1000.00
1000.00
1000.00
1000.00

Interest
19 October 2017
19 October 2022
30 May 2013
29 May 2015
52wk-Low Symbol
Bahamas Supermarkets
Caribbean Crossings (Pref)
RND Holdings

Weekly Vol. EPS $
-0.041
0.000

0.001

Div $
0.300
0.480
0.000

P/E

ABDAB
RND Holdings

4.540
0.002

0.000
0.000
Fund Name Div $ Yield %
Colina Bond Fund

Colina MSI Preferred Fund
Colina Money Market Fund
Fidelity Bahamas G & I Fund

1.3041
2.9230
1.3883
3.1964
12.1564
100.0000
96.4070
1.0000
9.0950
1.0000
1.0000
1.0000

28-Feb-09
31-Mar-09
11-May-09
31-Mar-09
28-Feb-09
31-Dec-08
31-Dec-08
31-Dec-07
31-Mar-09
9-Feb-09
9-Feb-09
9-Feb-09

Fidelity Prime Income Fund

CFAL Global Bond Fund

CFAL Global Equity Fund

CFAL High Grade Bond Fund
Fidelity International Investment Fund
FG Financial Preferred Income Fund
FG Financial Growth Fund

FG Financial Diversified Fund

BISX ALL SHARE INDEX - 19 Dec 02 = 1,000.00
52Wk-Hi - Highest closing price in last 52 weeks
52wk-Low - Lowest closing price in last 52 weeks
Previous Close - Previous day's weighted price for daily volume
Today's Close - Current day's weighted price for daily volume
Change - Change in closing price from day to day
Daily Vol. - Number of total shares traded today
DIV $ - Dividends per share paid in the last 12 months
P/E - Closing price divided by the last 12 month earnings
(S) - 4-for-1 Stock Split - Effective Date 8/8/2007
(S1) - 3-for-1 Stock Split - Effective Date 7/11/2007
TO TRADE CALL: COLINA 242-502-7010 | ROYALFIDELITY 242-356-7764 | FG CAPITAL MARKETS 242-396-1000 | COLONIAL 242-502-7525





THE TRIBUNE



SATURDAY, MAY 9,

‘Things could
get ugly’ at the
first ever Miss
Bahamas World
Sportswoman
Challenge

BEAUTY queens are
known for being delicate
and pretty, but things
could get ugly during the
first ever Miss Bahamas
World Sportswoman Chal-
lenge, scheduled for 4pm
today at St Paul’s play
field, Lyford Cay.

The 13 earth angels will
shun their high heels for
sneakers and knee pads as
they compete against each
other on a challenging
obstacle course designed
by officers of the Royal
Bahamas Defence Force.

At the end of the chal-
lenge, one young woman
will emerge Miss Bahamas
World Sportswoman and
will be rewarded with an
automatic placement in
the semifinals of the
pageant.

The idea of the Sports-
woman Challenge stems
from the Miss World
pageant, which also has a
similar competition for its
contestants.

Miss Bahamas Organi-
sation® president
Michelle Malcolm
explains that the winner of
the Miss Bahamas World
competition will have to
face this type of challenge
when she goes to South
Africa later this year, and
so she might as well get
used to the idea now.

“We are anticipating the
day to be a lot of fun,” she
says, “and we know that
the girls will give it their
all because they all want
to grab that placement in
the semifinals.”

She is encouraging the
families and friends of the
contestants, as well as
pageant fans, to come out
and support the young
ladies as they try to prove
that they are the fittest of
the bunch.

The contestants will be
split into two teams, and
each team will have to
clear an obstacle course
designed by Lieutenant
Ricardo Barry of the Roy-
al Bahamas Defence
Force.

Once a winning team
has been determined, the
team members will then
compete against each oth-
er in a series of physical
challenges.

The final three women
left standing will then face
the obstacle course once
again - this time as indi-
viduals — to determine the
overall winner.

And there will be an
added bonus to Saturday’s
event.

The women of the Roy-
al Bahamas Police Force
and the Royal Bahamas
Defence Force will have a
friendly competition of
their own.

They too will face an
obstacle — one that is con-
siderably more challeng-
ing than the one designed
for the earth angels — to
determine which of the
armed forces has the
fittest women.

The winners will be
named Sportswomen of
the Year, and will be given
a floating trophy by the
Miss Bahamas Organisa-
tion®.

“We were so excited
when both the Defence
and Police forces agreed
to be a part of this event,”
says Miss Malcolm. “We
can’t wait to see how this
friendly rivalry will pan
out, and we know it will
be very entertaining.”

The Miss Bahamas
World Sportswoman Chal-
lenge is being billed as the
perfect family outing.
Tickets will be available at
the door.

PAGE 12

INSIDE ¢ International sports news

‘ts

2009










LeBron and
Cavs coast past
Hawks for 2-0

series lead...
See page 14



Hepburn to run for top NPAAA post

m@ By BRENT STUBBS
Senior Sports Reporter
bstubbs@tribunemedia.net

ith the forma-

tion of the New

Providence

Amateur Ath-
letic Associations, the
Bahamas Association of Ath-
letic Associations can now con-
centrate on the international
aspects of the sport.

Curt ‘Mr H’ Hollingsworth
said the NPAAA has been
mandated to deal strictly with
organising local sporting
events.

Formed within the first six
months of Hollingsworth’s
presidency of the BAAA, the
NPAAA will go to the polls to
elect its first official body.

And Ray Hepburn, who has
headed the steering commit-
tee since its inception, said he
will definitely be running for
the top post.

“We have been given the
responsibility of starting the
NPAAA,” Hepburn said. “We
will be the governing body for



SHOWN (I-r) are Ray Hepburn, Kermit Taylor and Curt Hollingsworth

track and field in New Provi-
dence.

“The executives are already
in place and the six council
members are also in place and
the constitution has been
drawn up. We have submitted
to the executives of the BAAA
and so we’re just waiting on
our sanctioning letter.”

Hollingsworth said they have
been waiting so long for the
formation of the association

that they have given Hepburn
and his executives the permis-
sion to start operating while
they wait for the letter.

And according to Hepburn,
they are already in operation.

“The wheels are already in
motion, but we are just waiting
for them to give us a plan on
how they want to see track and
field operate in New Provi-
dence,” he said.

“My plan to the executives is

that what we want to do is put
the foundation down so that
no matter who comes behind,
they can build on it.”

Not only is the NPAAA
putting its focus on the opera-
tion of the association, but
Hepburn said they intend to
work closely with the coaches
and athletes to ensure that
there is a smooth transition
from the junior to the senior
level.

“We also want to train our
coaches,” Hepburn stressed.
“We talked extensively about
having a good training pro-
gramme where we can go into
the schools and get the physical
education teachers to be
trained in track and field.

“We know we have a lot of
talent in the schools, but we
haven’t identified them and
help to them develop them.”

Hollingsworth said the only
major difference between the
federation and the association
is that the latter is mandated to
carry out the affairs of the
association.

“We are responsible for

national events. That has been
my cry for years,” he pointed
out. “There is only one associ-
ation outside of New Provi-
dence. That is the GBAAA.

“Now we have the NPAAA,
which is ready to go. The
Andros AAA is getting ready
to come on stream in a couple
of weeks when they have their
elections. We are also in con-
versation with Eleuthera and
Abaco and Bimini is excited.
They simply said we took so
long.”

Under his administration,
Hollingsworth said they are
mandated to ensure that they
include the Family Islands and
the coaches who have not been
a part of the programme.

Hollingsworth said he was
so pleased to have two athletes
outside of New Providence and
Grand Bahama make the
Carifta team that competed in
St Lucia in April.

“That’s something we are
really striving towards,” said
Hollingsworth about including
more of the Family Island ath-
letes on its national teams.

SWIMMERS from various private schools across New Providence compete in the Bahamas Association of Independent Secondary Schools (BAISS) annual swimming champi-
onships at the Betty Kelly Kenning Swimming Complex yesterday. The official results were not available up to press time last night. The championships is one of the last two events

on the 2008-2009 BAISS sporting calendar. The other is volleyball, which is expected to be concluded next week.



(Photos by Felipé Major/Tribune staff)

Legends coming to softball/baseball great’s aid

= By BRENT STUBBS

Legends are slated to put on a series of

business houses in Governor’s Harbour

Billy,”

said Bethel of the local sports

Senior Sports Reporter
bstubbs@tribunemedia.net

DAVID ‘Billy’ McKlewhite was prob-
ably one of the most celebrated natives
out of Governor’s Harbour, Eleuthera.
Now that the former softball/baseball
great is experiencing his difficulties, the
community is coming to his aid.

A steering committee, called the Leg-
ends, has been formed to help raise funds
to assist McKlewhite in getting a replace-
ment for his left leg which was recently
amputated while he was in hospital in
New Providence.

Kingsley Bethel, one of the public rela-
tions officers for the committee, said the

activities from Thursday to Sunday (June
18-21) in Governor’s Harbour.

“It’s a group of us who have formed
the committee,” Bethel said.

Paul Simmons is the chairman of the
committee, assisted by Mark Thompson.
Val Sands is the secretary, Demetrius
Johnson is treasurer and Bethel, assisted
by the Rev Charles Sands, is responsible
for public relations.

The activities are set to kick off on
June 18 with a slide presentation on the
performances recorded of McKlewhite
and the Beck’s Hustlers, whom he played
for, in the Parish Hall.

On June 19, the committee is plan-
ning a T-shirt day and it is hoped that all

will buy the shirts, which will bear McK-
lewhite’s image on the front.

Then on June 20 there will be a full
day of activities in Bay Front Park,
including the Legends in action in soft-
ball. The activities will come to a close
with a church service on Sunday, June
21.

“We are inviting any and everybody
who has any affiliation with Governor’s
Harbour or softball in Eleuthera to come
out and help us,” Bethel said.

McKlewhite, who had to be treated
for diabetics when he had his leg ampu-
tated, is back home in Eleuthera and
according to Bethel, is in high spirits.

“We are very pleased to do this for

hero turned businessman. “This is a big
help for him financially because this is
something that is badly needed.”

During his heydays as one of the most
feared batters, McKlewhite starred for
the Beck’s Hustlers and he also repre-
sented the Bahamas on numerous
national teams.

McKlewhite was also one of the many
Bahamians who excelled to play in minor
league baseball, having suited up briefly
for the New York Mets’ Greenville Mets.

As an outfielder, McKlewhite played
in 1965 in Greenville, South Carolina,
at the age of 18. He played in 11 games
and had 20 at-bats, producing just two
hits, one of which was a triple.



TRIBUNE SPORTS

SATURDAY, MAY 9, 2009, PAGE 13



INTERNATIONAL SPORTS



Safina stops Williams to
reach Italian Open finals

lm By ALESSANDRA RIZZO
Associated Press Writer

ROME (AP) — Top-ranked
Dinara Safina outlasted Venus
Williams 6-7 (3), 6-3, 6-4 Fri-
day to advance to the finals of
the Italian Open, where she will
play Svetlana Kuznetsova in an
all-Russian match.

Kuznetsova beat Belarusian
teenager Victoria Azarenka 6-2,
6-4 in the other semifinal at the
Foro Italico.

Safina and the fifth-ranked
Williams used ferocious hitting
from the baseline, with the
American often rushing the net
to finish points.

In the third set, Safina served
out the 3-hour, 9-minute match
after committing three double-
faults and saving four break



points.

"It was a very long match and
I think I played one of my best
tennis (matches)," Safina said.

Williams closed out the first-
set tiebreaker with a delicate
drop volley, and went on to
break her opponent in the
opening game of the second set.
But the 23-year-old Russian
came back to even the match.

"It was not easy mentally,"
said Safina, who had lost her
two previous matches to
Williams.

Safina had 32 winners, com-
pared to 38 for Williams.

Williams, by reaching the
semifinals in Rome, is still
assured of moving to third in
the rankings — her highest spot
in Six years.

The final on Saturday will be

VENUS WILLIAMS reacts after losing a point to Safina...



DINARA SAFINA strikes a backhand to Venus Williams in a semifinal match at Italian Rome Masters tournament
in Rome on Friday. Safina won 6-7(3), 6-3, 6-4.

a repeat of last week's Porsche
GP final in Germany, where
Kuznetsova defeated Safina in
straight sets to capture her first
title in almost two years. Both
players have been runners-up
in Rome, Kuznetsova in 2007
and Safina in 2006.

"It was good (to win) in two
sets," Kuznetsova said. "But it
was very difficult for me, she
was hitting as hard as she
could."

Kuznetsova struggled with
her serve, but hit 23 winners —
10 more than her opponent.

The eighth-ranked Kuznetso-
va broke Azarenka three times
to capture the first set in 41 min-
utes.

In the second, the ninth-
ranked Azarenka pushed ahead
with a break but appeared to
lose her concentration as she
disputed a call by the umpire in
the third game. She lost the next

Thierry Henry could
Champions League final

BARCELONA, Spain (AP)
— Barcelona striker Thierry
Henry could miss the Champi-
ons League final against Man-
chester United due to a knee
injury.

The France striker will miss
Barcelona's next four games,
including Wednesday's Copa
del Rey final against Athletic
Bilbao, after the club said he
strained a ligament in his right
knee.

Henry injured his knee dur-
ing Barcelona's 6-2 win at Real
Madrid on Saturday and missed
Wednesday's 1-1 draw at
Chelsea which advanced the
Spanish league leader to the
Champions League final at
Rome on May 27.

Henry, who has scored 25
goals in 39 appearances in all
competitions this season, will
miss league matches against Vil-
larreal, Mallorca and Osasuna
also.

THIERRY HENRY is seen
during their training session
at Stamford Bridge, London,
on Tuesday, May 5, 2009.

(AP Photo: Alastair Grant)

Security top priority for IOC in 2016 bids



B By HAROLD HECKLE
Associated Press Writer

MADRID (AP) — Security
against terror threats is a top
priority for the International
Olympic Committee as it
weighs bids for the 2016
Olympics from Madrid and
three other cities, the head of
the evaluation panel said Fri-
day.

Nawal el Moutawakel, chair
of the IOC commission, said the
ability of a city "to organize a
safe and secure games" would
weigh heavily in the commit-
tee's technical assessment.
Chicago, Tokyo and Rio de
Janeiro are also vying to host
the 2016 Olympics.

"We have been most
impressed to find what the city

of Madrid could offer the
Olympics,” El Moutawakel said,
nearly the same words she used
after visiting the other bid cities.

"From what we have seen,
Madrid is ready to present the
games just like the other three
cities," she said at the close of
the five-day visit.

El] Moutawakel and the other
IOC members had lunch with
Spain's Royal family, who will
lead the delegation in Copen-
hagen on Oct. 2 for the final
vote on the host city.

El Moutawakel said the pan-
el had enjoyed meeting tennis
star Rafa Nadal, Real Madrid
captain Raul Gonzalez and for-
mer IOC president Juan Anto-
nio Samaranch.

Earlier, Spanish Interior Min-
ister Alfredo Perez Rubalcaba

said separatist militants would
not pose a threat to the 2016
Olympics if Madrid wins.

Rubalcaba told the 13-mem-
ber IOC evaluation team that
security forces had considerable
experience in protecting inter-
national sporting events in
Spain.

Worry

"We won't need to worry
about (Basque separatist group)
ETA in 2016," Rubalcaba said.

Madrid has already complet-
ed 77 percent of its Olympic
venues, which it believes will
allow it to weather the eco-
nomic crisis. Spain is one of the
worse-hit European countries,
with unemployment figures
expected to hit 20 percent next

year.

The IOC evaluation panel
will compile a report assessing
the four bids by Sept. 2.

Meanwhile, Spanish Sport
Minister Jaime Lissavetzky said
he doesn't believe that a pend-
ing doping law that goes against
World Anti-Doping Agency
rules would hurt Madrid's bid
chances.

The law would prohibit drug-
testing of athletes between 11
p.m. and 8 am. WADA rules
state that athletes must be avail-
able for drug testing 24 hours a
day.

Lissavetzky will attend
WADA meetings in Montreal
this weekend, where he is
expected to discuss the issue
with WADA director general
David Howman.

(AP Photos: Andrew Medichini)

five games and fell on the fourth
match point.

"When I was already playing
much better and everything, this
thing happens and it takes me
right from where I started,” said
the 19-year-old Azarenka.

Kuznetsova said her oppo-
nent should not have been so
worked up.

"To me, she (got) too upset
for no reason," she said. "It was
just one ball in the match."

miss





Nalbandian
to undergo
hip surgery
hext week

BUENOS AIRES, Argenti-
na (AP) — David Nalbandian
of Argentina will have surgery
next week on his right hip and
be sidelined for 3 to 4 months.

He will miss the French
Open, Wimbledon and the
Davis Cup quarterfinal against
the Czech Republic in July.

Nalbandian was a Wimble-
don finalist in 2002, and
reached the French Open
semifinals in 2004 and 2006.

He played in last year's
Davis Cup final loss to Spain
and was expected to team with
Juan Martin del Potro on
Argentina's Davis Cup team.
Nalbandian is ranked No. 19.

Nalbandian's spokesman
Bernardo Ballero told
Argentina's Fox Sports on Fri-
day that the operation would
take place Wednesday in
Barcelona.

Ivanovic out
of Madrid
Open with

knee injury

MADRID (AP) — Ana
Ivanovic has withdrawn from
the Madrid Open because of a
knee injury, yet expects to be
fit in time to defend her French
Open title.

The seventh-ranked Serb is
struggling with an inflammation
in her right knee. Doctors have
ordered her not to play for a
week.

Ivanovic says in a statement
Friday that the knee has both-
ered her since a Fed Cup match
last month. She says “it's
become more painful with each
match, so I decided to go and
see a specialist in Munich.”

Ivanovic says there is "no
danger” of her missing the
French Open, which begins
May 24.

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PAGE 14, SATURDAY, MAY 9, 2009

INTERNATIONAL SPORTS

TRIBUNE SPORTS





LeBRON JAMES dunks over Atlanta
Hawks’ Solomon Jones in the first quarter
VMN ac SIAC eNO cms Me TEUMO EIN
Thursday night in Cleveland...

(AP Photos: Tony Dejak)



LeBron and Cavs coast pas
Hawks for 2-0 series

@ By TOM WITHERS
AP Sports Writer

CLEVELAND (AP) —
Once the lead fattened to 16
points midway through the sec-
ond quarter, Cavaliers coach
Mike Brown turned to his
bench and summoned one of
his rested players to check back
in.

Pulling a towel from his neck
and yanking off his sweats, the
substitute hurried to the scor-
er's table and waited.

LeBron James was ready.

The Atlanta Hawks were
done.

Like a playoff wrecking ball,
the Cleveland Cavaliers rolled
to their sixth straight double-
digit win of the postseason on
Thursday night as James scored
27 points in a 105-85 demoli-
tion of the Hawks, who are
hurting and in an 0-2 hole in
the Eastern Conference semifi-
nal.

James made another of those
you've-got-to-be-kidding
buzzer beaters at the end of the
first half, Mo Williams scored
15 and Wally Szczerbiak added
17 off the bench as the Cavs
tied a league postseason record
by winning their sixth consecu-
tive playoff game by at least 10
points.

"We don't go into a game
and say ‘Let's win by 20,'"
James said. "We say ‘Let's exe-
cute and take one possession
at a time and get better. If it
causes us to win by 20 or by
two, we're ready."

The only other team to win
six straight so easily was the
2004 Indiana Pacers. Cleveland
also matched the 1986 Los
Angeles Lakers by winning
three straight games by at least
20 points in a postseason.

"We're not idiots,” center
Zydrunas Ilgauskas said. "We'll



LeBRON JAMES, Mo Williams (center) and Anderson Varejao laugh on the bench late in a 105-85 win over the
Atlanta Hawks. The Cavaliers lead the series 2-0...

run into some adversity. You
don't win 66 games just by
walking around in the park.
When it happens, we'll handle
it."

James made a step-back, 36-
foot 3-pointer at the halftime
horn to give the Cavaliers a 24-
point lead. The stunning shot
was similar to the one he
banked in at the end of the first
half in Game 1 of Cleveland's
opening-round sweep of the
Detroit Pistons.

The Hawks are the ones reel-
ing now.

Atlanta entered the game
without center Al Horford and
forward Marvin Williams —
two of its best players —
because of injuries. If that was-
n't bad enough, leading scorer
Joe Johnson rolled his right
ankle when he had his shot
blocked by James in the third
quarter and did not return.

X-rays were negative, but
Johnson, who needed a wheel-

chair to get to the locker room,
wore a walking boot as he and
his teammates headed home for
Game 3 on Saturday.

"T can't see me not playing,”
Johnson said. "I don't want to
let this opportunity go by.
We're down 0-2. I want to be
out there for my teammates.
Hopefully in 48 hours I will feel
a lot better."

While the rest of the NBA
exchanges elbows, flagrant
fouls and menacing stares in

lead

the playoffs, the Cavaliers are
looking for a fight — but so far,
James and his gang can't find
one.

Atlanta adjusted its defense
to try and stop the league's
MVP from getting to the bas-
ket, but he got there anyway.
Out of position, all the Hawks
could do was reach in as James
streaked past, and by halftime
he had already attempted 10
free throws.

"Honestly, I don't think that
even if we were 100 percent
that if we gave it the effort we
gave, that it would have made a
difference," said Maurice
Evans, who led the Hawks with
16 points.

"They are playing team bas-
ketball at both ends of the
floor."

The Hawks were in a similar
jam last season in the first
round. They got blown out by
23 and 19 points in the first two
games in Boston, but won two
at home and forced a seven-
game series.

"We're still in it,” said Josh
Smith, who scored just eight
points on 2-of-13 shooting. "We
have to be ready to protect
home court."

On the 20th anniversary of
Michael Jordan's double-
clutching jumper — known
infamously around here as
"The Shot" — over Craig Ehlo
that beat the Cavaliers in the
1989 playoffs, James gave
Cleveland fans a shot to savor.

Taking an inbounds pass with
5.4 seconds left, James quickly
dribbled into the frontcourt,
pulled up on Hawks guard
Mario West, flicked his wrist
and splashed his deep shot to
make it 59-35. As 20,000-plus
fans erupted, James stood and
playfully swung his arms back
and forth.

So easy.

NBA Today

@ By The Associated
Press

Cleveland at Atlanta (8pm
EDT). The Cavaliers, who
had the league's best record,
66-16, are 6-0 in the playoffs
and up 2-0 in the Eastern
Conference semifinal against
the undermanned Hawks.

STARS

Thursday

—LeBron James, Cava-
liers, scored 27 points, end-
ing the first and second quar-
ters with last-second baskets,
as the Cleveland overpow-
ered Atlanta 105-85 to open
a 2-0 lead in their Eastern
Conference semifinal.

—Anderson Verejao,
Cavaliers, added 12 points,
eight rebounds and four
blocked shots for Cleveland.

STATS

Now a perfect 6-0 in the
postseason, the Cavaliers
tied a league record by win-
ning their sixth consecutive
playoff game by double dig-
its, beating Atlanta 105-85.
The only other team to do it
was the 2004 Indiana Pacers
... Cleveland led by as much
as 36 points in its rout of the
Hawks.

JOB SECURITY

The New Orleans Hornets
are sticking with head coach
Byron Scott for at least one
more season. Team presi-
dent Hugh Weber says the
franchise was disappointed
by its first-round exit from
the playoffs, but that the
entire organization shares
responsibility. Weber added
that Scott has not expressed
an interest in leaving and
that any interest other teams
may have in the coach is
"not an issue."

SUSPENDED

The Lakers’ Derek Fisher
and Orlando's Rafer Alston
were both suspended one
game by the NBA for sepa-
rate incidents in playoff

games. Fisher was called for
a flagrant foul when he
struck the Rockets’ Luis
Scola, who was setting a
pick, with his shoulder and
head as the Rockets brought
the ball up the court. Fisher
was ejected from Game 2 on
Wednesday.

In the Magic's 112-94 loss
that same night, Boston's
Eddie House was celebrat-
ing after making a shot when
Alston reached out and
slapped him in the back of
the head. Each received a
technical foul after standing
face-to-face for a few sec-
onds before referees inter-
vened.

Both players will miss
games on Friday. The Magic
are at home, tied 1-1 with
Boston, while the Lakers
will be in Houston in a series
that is also tied 1-1.

SIDELINED

The Hawks were missing
center Al Horford and for-
ward Marvin Williams
because of injuries for Game
2 in Cleveland. Then, lead-
ing scorer Joe Johnson
rolled his right ankle in the
third quarter and did not
return. X-rays were negative
and the Hawks said Johnson
is doubtful for Game 3 on
Saturday in Atlanta.

SPEAKING

"I'm having fun. I'm hav-
ing a ball.”

— LeBron James, the
NBA's most valuable play-
er, after leading Cleveland to
its sixth straight playoff vic-
tory and a 2-0 series lead
over Atlanta

"If that was me throwing
the elbow at Kobe, first of
all, I would've hurt Kobe
way more than he hurt me. I
probably would've knocked
him out with the same force
he used against me. That's
why I'm not going to throw
an elbow at somebody's
head. It’s dangerous."

— Rockets forward Ron
Artest on a confrontation
with Lakers star Kobe
Bryant in Game 2 of their
series



INSIGHT

For the stories

behind the news,
read Insight
on Mondays





PAGE 16, SATURDAY, MAY 9, 2009

THE TRIBUNE



INTERNATIONAL NEWS



Angry protests

killed in Afghan violence

in Haiti over
slaying of
countryman

ANGRY demonstrators }
hurled stones and tore downa }
sign at the Dominican Repub- }
lic’s consulate in Haiti on Fri- }
day to protest the decapita- :
tion slaying of a Haitian in }
Santo Domingo, according to }

the Associated Press.

About 150 protesters }
massed outside the walled }
compound, but Haitian police }
prevented them from enter- }
ing. U.N. peacekeepers with
riot gear waited nearby but }

did not enter the fray.

Some protesters shoved
pictures of the decapitated }
body into the faces of Hait- ;
ian police as they yelled and }
pushed at the human barri-

cade.

At the embassy, demon- i
strators broke a window and }
burned a makeshift Domini-

can flag.

The protesters chanted
“justice for Carlos,” in refer- }
ence to Haitian migrant Car- }
los Nerilus, whose decapitated }
body was found Saturday in }
what Dominican authorities }
described as an “incident

between individuals.”

Police Maj. Jose Lluberes }
said the slaying was meant to }
avenge the death of ai
Dominican businessman who }
was recently killed in the }

same Way.

Prosecutor Miguel Morfe
said a man identified as Con- }
fesor Reyes has been charged }
with involuntary homicide }
and possession of an illegal }
weapon. A judge has ordered }
him to remain in prison for
three months as authorities }

investigate.

Reyes’ attorney, Isaias }
Matos, said his client is inno- }
cent and argued unsuccess- }
fully against his detainment. It }
is unclear what kind of evi- }
dence police have against }

Reyes.

Haitian officials have ques-
tioned whether Dominican }
police could have prevented }

Nerilus’ killing.

The neighboring countries ;
have a bitter history. An esti- }
mated 1 million people of }
Haitian descent live in the }
Dominican Republic, often }
suffering discrimination and }

violence.
British MPs
caught in

EXPense
Claims farce

m@ LONDON

IT HAS all the makings ofa
Monty Python sketch — prim
British lawmakers caught ina
farce over expense claims for }
everything from X-rated }
movies to a bathtub plug, }
according to the Associated }

Press.

But reality has come home
to roost in the often absurd }
world of Her Majesty’s Gov- }

ernment.

Friday’s leaked list of law- }
maker expenses has leveled :
another blow to Prime Minister
Gordon Brown’s beleaguered
government, which has been
blamed for a litany of problems
ranging from the Iraq war to }

the deepening recession.

According to the details pub- }
lished by Britain’s Daily Tele- ;
graph, Brown paid his brother :
Andrew more than 6,500 :
pounds ($9,800) in two years i
for a maid the two shared when }
Brown was Britain’s Treasury :
chief. The newspaper declined
to say how it had obtained }
expense claims from 13 minis- }
ters but promised to roll out }

more in the coming days.

Home Office Secretary }
Jacqui Smith expensed two X- i
rated movies her husband }
watched, which she later }
repaid. Housing minister and }
former Foreign Secretary }
claimed 600 pounds ($900) for
hanging plant baskets. And for-
mer Deputy Prime Minister }
John Prescott claimed 300 :
pounds ($450) over two years }

to fix broken toilet seats.

The list could also prove }
damaging to the opposition }
Conservatives — one Tory }
lawmaker expensed fertilizer }
used on his country house gar- }
den, putting in as well for cans i

of cat food.

Other expenses, categorized :
only by political party, includ- }
ed toilet seats, horse manure, }
wine rack, rat poison, pool }
maintenance, piano tuning, a ;
chocolate Santa and a pizza }

cutter.



US denies 147 civilians

@ KABUL

VIDEO of the aftermath of a disputed
incident involving American forces and
the Taliban shows bloodied bodies of
children laid out with other corpses, con-
firming international Red Cross findings
at the two remote villages in western
Afghanistan, according to the Associated
Press.

The U.S. military does not contest that
civilians died but called “extremely over-
exaggerated” a report by an Afghan offi-
cial that as many as 147 were killed.

Afghans blame aerial bombing Mon-
day and Tuesday for the deaths and
destruction. US. officials have suggested
that Taliban fighters caused at least some
of the deaths, and said investigators on a
joint U.S.-Afghan team were still ana-
lyzing data collected in the villages of
Ganjabad and Gerani in Farah province.

In a video obtained Friday by Associ-
ated Press Television News, villagers are
seen wrapping the mangled bodies of
some of the victims in blankets and
cloths and lining them up on the dusty
ground.

In one shot, two children are lifted
from a blanket with another adult
already in it. The children’s faces are
blackened, and parts of their tunics are
soaked in what appears to be dried
blood.

Their limp bodies are then put on the
ground, wrapped in another cloth and
placed next to the other bodies. It was
not clear how many bodies were in the
room where the video was shot.

The man who shot the video said
many of the bodies he filmed Tuesday in
Gerani were in pieces. He spoke on con-
dition of anonymity out of fear of retri-
bution from security agencies.

It was not possible to verify indepen-
dently the authenticity of the video. The
International Committee of the Red
Cross also has said that women and chil-
dren were among dozens of dead people
its teams saw in the two villages.

On Thursday, a local official said he
collected from residents the names of

» FLOODING IN BRAZIL



David Guttenfelder/AP Photo

SPL. Jordan Custer from the U.S. Army First Battalion, 26th Infantry returns fire on a Taliban position as their base Camp
Restrepo comes under attack in the Korengal Valley of Afghanistan's Kunar Province on Friday May 8, 2009.

147 people killed in the fighting. If true,
it would be the deadliest case of civilian
casualties in Afghanistan since the 2001
U.S.-led invasion that ousted the Tal-
iban regime.

Villagers “were pointing to graves and
saying, "This is my son, this is my daugh-
ter,”’ said Abdul Basir Khan, a mem-
ber of Farah’s provincial council. He said
he gave his tally to the investigators.

The U.S. military described that toll as
over the top.

“The investigators and the folks on
the ground think that those numbers are
extremely over-exaggerated,” U.S. mili-
tary spokeswoman Capt. Elizabeth
Mathias said. “We are definitely
nowhere near those estimates.”

While past reports of civilian deaths at
the hands of international forces drew
immediate outcries from President

—_ oT eee eg ee

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es
= 2

Hamid Karzai’s government, this time
the response has been muted. The most
vehement reaction has come from oppo-
sition lawmakers, who demanded an
agreement regulating the operations of
foreign troops.

After a period of tense relations with
the Washington, Karzai appears to have
toned down his statements about civilian
casualties caused by Western forces even
though the issue resonates with Afghan
public.

One reason could be that Karzai feels
confident he will win re-election in August
without further appealing to nationalist
emotions, as no strong challenger has
emerged and Friday was the deadline for
registering as a candidate.

Also, he may not want to stir up anti-
American sentiment as the Obama admin-
istration rolls out its strategy for the region.

NORTHERN Brazil's worst
floods in decades have dri-
ven tens of thousands from
their homes to seek refuge
wherever they can, packing
onto flatbed trucks and
braving rivers teeming with

deadly reptiles in a scramble

for higher ground. Brazil-
ians huddled in cow pens
converted into emergency
shelters Friday, as swollen
rivers continue to rise and
northern Brazil’s worst
floods in decades boosted
the number of homeless to
nearly 270,000. The death
toll rose to 39.

That strategy involves linking success
in Afghanistan with security in neigh-
boring Pakistan, where Taliban militants
are active along the border. The U.S.
has also pledged long-term nonmilitary
efforts here — for example, civilian
expertise in farming and other specialties
— along with an increase of 21,000 U.S.
troops.

“If there’s one lesson I draw from the
past, it is the importance of our staying
engaged,” Defense Secretary Robert
Gates told reporters Friday at Forward
Operating Base Airborne in northern
Afghanistan, shortly before heading back
to Washington.

“And if there’s a lesson for Ameri-
cans and the international community,
it’s that we don’t dare turn our backs on
Afghanistan. This will work if we stay
engaged.”

2





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BAHAMAS EDITION

www.tribune242.com

SATURDAY, MAY 9, 2009

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SOUS =

Allegetl SBX re
leacher' arrested

© Andre Birbal wanted in connection with molestation claims

@ Move to extradite fugitive from United States to Bahamas

m@ By DENISE MAYCOCK
Tribune Freeport Reporter
dmaycock@tribunemedia.net

FREEPORT - Fugitive Andre Birbal — the former Eight Mile
Rock High School teacher wanted for questioning in connection
with allegations of sexual molestation — was arrested in the United
States. An effort is now being made for his extradition to the
Bahamas.

Senior Assistant Commissioner Marvin Dames confirmed on
Friday that Birbal, 46, was arrested by US authorities in New
York early this week.

He said that the Police and the Attorney General’s Office are
working with authorities in the United States to have him returned
to the Bahamas as soon as possible.

“We told you over a month ago that we
did in fact have an international APB out on
him and this demonstrates that the system
does in fact work,” said Mr Dames.

Birbal was arrested on Sunday, May 3,
by a New York Transit Police Officer after
he committed a traffic violation. Bahamian
Police were immediately notified of his
arrest.

Mr Dames explained that following his
arrest the authorities took Birbal into cus-
tody and conducted a check and discovered
that there was an APB out on him from
the Bahamas.

The Trinidadian teacher is wanted by
police here for questioning into allegations
of unnatural sexual intercourse with two former students.

Birbal was employed as an art teacher at Eight Mile Rock High.
He was removed from the school after allegations of molestation
surfaced in January.

He fled the country in February after police investigations were
launched into complaints concerning the molestation of two former
male students, who claimed they were abused while in the seventh
grade.

The students, who are now out of school, claim that the abuse
lasted for eight years.

Birbal has denied the accusations. He has been teaching in the

SEE page eight

Andre Birbal



Fears that Justice Lyons’

could hit commercial case hearings

SC TB ge

Felipé Major/Tribune staff

COURT APPEARANCE: Angie Brown, who also goes by the name of Ang-
ie Moss, pleaded guilty to making a false statement.
SEE STORY ON RIGHT

INSIDE

AUDITIONS FOR MOVIE

COM





m@ By TANEKA THOMPSON
Tribune Staff Reporter
tthompson@tribunemedia.net

CONCERNS arose within the legal
fraternity yesterday that the sudden res-
ignation of Supreme Court Senior Jus-
tice John Lyons could possibly cripple
the hearing of commercial cases, an area
in which Justice Lyons is highly spe-
cialised.

According to a high-profile member
of the legal community, who was "surprised"
by the turn of events, his departure could affect
the way the Bahamas’ court system is perceived
by the international public.

"This is a big problem, we don't have sufficient
judges in the Bahamas, we don't have sufficient
judges with experience, and lastly we don't have
sufficient judges with experience in the com-
mercial section.

"So it's a real problem for us trying to promote
ourselves as a first world country, a financial
services centre — it’s going to make matters

worse," said the lawyer, who asked to remain

NASSAU AND BAHAMEA

John Rens

anonymous. According to the Supreme
Court's website there are currently 11
justices — excluding Justice Lyons —
one of whom is listed as an acting justice.
Sources said Chief Justice Sir Burton
| Hall and Justice Jon Isaacs are mem-
bers of the Supreme Court who are well
versed in commercial court matters beg-
ging the need for a replacement to Jus-
tice Lyons with similar qualifications.
"T think that they are certainly going to
have to look inside and outside for
replacements because he was one of the more
senior and he was dealing with quite a few of the
large, commercial, technical cases," said a second
well-placed member of the legal community
who did not want to be identified.

A important case involving the Central Bank
of Ecuador and other parties is one example of
the extensive cases he was scheduled to hear.

"The other senior people have really been
concentrating on criminal matters — but that is

SEE page eight



ON BAHAMIAN POLITICS
PAGE THREE
BAHAMIANS BEING
OVERLOOKED FOR TOP
JOBS, PHARMACEUTICAL

WORKERS CLAIM
PAGE THREE

ASYLUM REQUEST
REJECTION INVESTIGATION

WELCOMED
PAGE SIX

BAHAMAS AND INDONESIA
TO FORMALISE TRADE AND

ECONOMIC TIES
PAGE SEVEN

‘I wanted my
ex-boytriend
locked up’

Mother who made kidnap claim
says she feared for family’s safety

@ By NATARIO McKENZIE
Tribune Staff Reporter

THE woman who alleged that her former boyfriend had
kidnapped her three-year-old son said yesterday that she
had made the false claim because she wanted police to
lock him up.

Angie Brown, 37, told the court yesterday that “as long
as he is locked up, I know I’ll be safe as well as my family.”

“My life is disgusting because of him,” she said.

Brown, who also goes by the name of Angie Moss, told
Chief Magistrate Roger Gomez that she is tired of the
physical abuse and death threats to which he has subject-
ed her.

According to prosecutor Sergeant Sean Thurston, Moss,
a mother of five, told
police on May 1 that
her former boyfriend,
35-year-old Kendrick
Siefort, had removed
her 1996 Bluebird
from outside her
Lewis Street home.

She also told them
that her son, Shannon
Bannister, was asleep |
on the back seat.

On Tuesday police
issued an all points Felipé Major/Tribune staff
bulletin for Siefort, SPEAKING OUT: Tracey, sister of
who turned himself in Kendrick Siefort, talks to the media
on Wednesday. Sgt. yesterday outside court.

Thurston told the
court that investigators later discovered that Brown had
made a false report.

He said that Brown had told police that she just wanted
Siefort off the streets.

Sgt Thurston said Brown had also told police that Siefort
had beat her on several occasions. He told the court that
Brown has no criminal record, but that he has several
matters in court against Siefort.

He recommended that she be sent to Sandilands to be
evaluated.

Brown pleaded guilty to deceiving woman Corporal
2687 Clarke by making a false statement. She claimed,

SEE page eight



Detention Centre conditions
better since Tribune story

m@ By MEGAN REYNOLDS
Tribune Staff Reporter
mreynolds@tribunemedia. net

DETAINEES in the Carmichael Road Detention Centre say liv-
ing conditions have improved greatly since The Tribune reported
allegations about the terrible state of the centre.

However repeated calls for press access to the facility and inde-
pendent investigations into claims of abuse have so far been
ignored.

The detainees who complained of “con- Ueververcesvcsccccuccuscusousousousousous

centration camp” like conditions in February “I wanted
told The Tribune yesterday how dirty old to go see it
sues have ee eae with ne and I was
ones, the grimy walls have been repainted,
the blocked toilets repaired, and washing pecans pee
machines and dryers have been installed for eur PTISe
detainees to wash their clothes. They also with what I
said cable televisions have been set up in Saw.”
the men’s and women’s dorms.

Immigration Minister Branville McCart- Branville
ney said he was “pleasantly surprised” when McCartney

he toured the facility with Immigration boss-
es last week.

He said: “I wanted to go see it and I was pleasantly surprised with
what I saw... I think they are happy. I have some concerns about

SEE page eight



ISLANDS’ LEADING NEWSPAPER
PAGE 2, SATURDAY, MAY 9, 2009

























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THE TRIBUNE

LOCAL NEWS



ORIGINAL Bahamian
crafts were on display in
downtown Nassau yester-
day for both tourists and
locals to browse and buy.

Authentic native straw
work, wood work and jew-
ellery made from locally
sourced shells grabbed
the attention of passers-
by in Charlotte Street.

And those who stayed to
appreciate the work
indulged in the sensuous
delights of handmade
soaps, bath gels and
creams, or cracked a smile
over humorous signs
crafted out of driftwood.

The craft show was put
on by the Ministry of
Tourism.



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THE TRIBUNE

SATURDAY, MAY 9, 2009, PAGE 3



LOCAL NEWS



Man arraigned
on accusations
of bribery

A MAN accused of offer-
ing a bribe to the police and
an officer accused of accept-
ing a bribe were arraigned in
the Magistrate’s Court yes-
terday.

Police have charged
Anthony Rolle, 41, of
Leward East, with two counts
of offering a bribe.

It is alleged that on Octo-
ber 20, 2008, Rolle offered
$400 to police Constable
Arnold Cooper and $200 to
Constable 1878 Bryan Dillet
as an inducement to prevent
another public servant from
performing his duty.

Rolle pleaded not guilty to
the charge.

Police have also charged
Constable Dillet, 34, of
Southern Breeze Estates,
with abetment to offer a
bribe and accepting a bribe.

It is alleged that on Mon-
day, October 20, 2008, Offi-
cer Dillet offered a bribe to
Constable 415 Arnold Coop-
er.

It is further alleged that
on the same day, Officer Dil-
let accepted $200 from
Anthony Rolle.

Dillet pleaded not guilty to
the charges.

Rolle and Dillet, who were
arraigned before Chief Mag-
istrate Roger Gomez yester-
day, will remain on police bail
until they appear in Court 10,
Nassau Street on May 11.

THE monthly meeting of
the Commonwealth Writers
of the Bahamas will be held
today at Chapter One Book
Store at the College of the
Bahamas, beginning at 2pm
on the second floor.

CORRECTION

¢ AN article on page five of
yesterday's Tribune under
the headline ‘Shoes destroyed
by store bosses ‘not fit for
charity” inaccurately reported
that hundreds of pairs of
shoes were destroyed by the
president and co-owner of
Shoe Village Egan Kemp.

However, Mr Kemp is in
fact the president and co-
owner of Shoe Depot.

Shoe Village was not
involved in the matter in any
way.

The Tribune apologises for
any inconvenience this error
may have caused.

Filmmaker Celi Moss



m@ By TANEKA THOMPSON
Tribune Staff Reporter
tthompson@tribunemedia.net

DISGRUNTLED pharmaceu-
tical workers claim Bahamians are
being overlooked for top jobs in
the industry to the benefit of for-
eign workers.

They say they are fed up with
the influx of expatriates — usually
from other parts of the Caribbean
— who come to fill management
positions that should be offered
to Bahamians.

They claimed the foreign work-
ers are often paid more than
equally qualified Bahamians.

"Our country's practice is to
bring in foreigners for jobs
Bahamians are qualified to do. In
the pharmaceutical industry it's
common to bring in foreigners to
work the Bahamian territory and
these are not specialised positions,
they will teach you what you need
to learn,” said one pharmaceutical
salesman, who asked to remain
anonymous.

"What qualifications does a
Jamaican bring that a Bahamian
doesn't bring, especially in these
tough economic times? They
come and they work and then
they just bank their money," said

another employee, who ques-
tioned why drug companies would
choose to foot living, work per-
mit and other expenses for a for-
eign worker instead of hiring a
Bahamian.

However local pharmaceutical
distributor Nassau Agencies Ltd
said out of their 30 sales repre-
sentatives who work for about 15
international drug companies,
only one of them is foreign.

And this worker — who holds a
management position — is only
hired on a temporary “training”
basis, and will train a Bahamian to
later assume the post, said phar-
maceuticals manager Barbara
Donathan-Henderson, who said
she could only speak for her
agency.

Ms Henderson argued that the
company's policy is to ensure
vacancies are not filled by for-
eigners if there are qualified
Bahamian applicants.

POR 3 IN 1 LAW SCE
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COMMUNITY ANNOUNCEMENT

WATER CONVERSATION MEASURES

The Water and Sewerage Corporation wishes to advise its customers
in New Providence that the Corporation is presently experiencing
water supply challenges. The Corporation will be implementing
water conservation efforts that may result in periods of reduced
water supply. Customers are asked to conserve their water usage

where possible.

The Corporation sincerely apologizes for any inconvenience caused
and will do its endeavor best to limit the severity and duration of
these conservation measures. Customers with specific complaints
are urged to call the Corporation’s Call Center at 302-5599 or 325-
0505."

MANAGEMENT

WATER AND SEWERAGE COPORATION



Auditions begin for
new Bahamian movie

m@ By MEGAN REYNOLDS
Tribune Staff Reporter
mreynolds@tribunemedia.net

ASPIRING film stars of all
ages are being called up to
audition for a new movie
about Bahamian politics in
Bamboo Town, Nassau, this
afternoon.

The Bamboo Town Film
Club production “My MP’ writ-
ten by Bahamas Film Festival
president Celi Moss, famed for
his independent gangster film
‘Balls Alley’, will feature fic-
tional characters based on real
life politicians.

Parts will be cast for the lead
role of progressive Bamboo
Town MP ‘Mr Brown’, the
prime minister, leader of the
opposition, members of par-
lament, news reporters and
the Bamboo Town con-
stituents.

The film follows Mr Brown
as he tries to move away from
the hand-out culture, where
MPs are expected to lavish
gifts on the community, and

"Very often (the drug compa-
nies) need somebody with expe-
rience depending on the position
they need to fill but we never con-
done any company bringing in a
foreigner if we know there is
someone able to fill the position
here. But Bahamians traditional-
ly have not always been, com-
pared to others in the region; we
tend to be less sales (oriented).”

Ms Henderson added that if a
local company does hire a for-
eigner, all the costs associated
with bringing in the worker are
usually paid for by the interna-
tional drug companies.

acts as a facilitator for people
in his constituency by assisting
them in various ways instead.

Real life Bamboo Town MP
and Minister of Immigration
Branville McCartney said the
likeness is uncanny.

He said: “When I read the
movie I often wondered if Mr
Moss was on the campaign
trail with me during he elec-
tion. Many of the things I said
and did and continue to do are
reflected in that movie.”

Mr McCartney sanctioned
the move and has opened his
constituency office in East
Street South for today’s audi-
tion and subsequent meetings
of the Bamboo Town Film
Club.

He said: “The movie is real-
ly about today’s political envi-
ronment and it has some funny
scenes in it, but also serious
connotations in terms of the
underlying theme.”

Mr McCartney is hoping the

Galleria

premiere of the film at the
sixth annual Bahamas Film
Festival in November will raise
funds for young people in his
constituency to obtain schol-
arships for the College of the
Bahamas.

Filmmaker Mr Moss praised
the educational incentive and
said: “Filmmaking stimulates
the mind and allows young-
sters to explore endless possi-
bilities not only for themselves
but for their community and
also their country.

“T look forward to continu-
ally working with the residents
of Bamboo Town with this and
other projects. I also congrat-
ulate the members of the Bam-
boo Town Film Club for their
dedication and hard work.”

The casting call is for men
and women of all ages, sizes
and ethnicities. Auditions will
be held at the constituency
office in East Street South
from 12 to 3pm today.

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PAGE 4, SATURDAY, MAY 9, 2009

THE TRIBUNE



EDITORIAL/LETTERS TO THE EDITOR

The Tribune Limited

NULLIUS ADDICTUS JURARE IN VERBA MAGISTRI
Being Bound to Swear to The Dogmas of No Master

LEON E. H. DUPUCH, Publisher/Editor 1903-1914

SIR ETIENNE DUPUCH, Kt, O.B.E., K.M., K.C.S.G.,

(Hon.) LL.D., D.Litt.

Publisher/Editor 1919-1972
Contributing Editor 1972-1991

EILEEN DUPUCH CARRON, C.M.G., M.S. B.A., LL.B.

Publisher/Editor 1972-

Published Daily Monday to Saturday

Shirley Street, RO. Box N-3207, Nassau, Bahamas
Insurance Management Building., P.O. F-485, Freeport, Grand Bahama

TELEPHONES
Switchboard (News, Circulation and Advertising) 322-1986
Advertising Manager - (242) 502-2352
Circulation Department - (242) 502-2387
Nassau Fax: - (242) 328-2398
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Freeport fax: (242) 352-9348

WEBSITE
www.tribune242.com — updated daily at 2pm

Palin still an easy target

EVERYONE is piling on Sarah Palin,
even though she will never be president
of the United States.

The Alaska governor is everyone’s
favourite foil, from the left-wing Huffington
Post to the ever-posturing Mitt Romney.
John McCain, the Republican presidential
nominee who cynically chose her as his
running mate, now snubs her with relish.

They all act like she has a real chance to
win the White House, when they all know
the truth.

When it comes to be taken seriously by
the general electorate as a potential presi-
dent, it’s as over for her as it was for Dan
Quayle.

Quayle was doomed even after he served
four years as vice president. He was the
proverbial heartbeat away from the first
President Bush, but could never overcome
the perception that he lacked gravitas.

Palin only ran for vice president; she
never made it from Wasilla to Washing-
ton. And her political problem is bigger
than Quayle’s, because it extends to her
family.

Think about the picture-perfect Obama
family, from adorable First Daughters to
adorable First Puppy.

And speaking of adorable, what is more
adorable than the president and his wife
strolling hand-in-hand around the White
House grounds after a Saturday night date?
Their family image is managed expertly
by the White House with help from the
media.

Palin’s family portrait is much more com-
plicated and gritty.

In some ways, it is more reflective of the
reality of American family life.

But it brings baggage that is especially
difficult for a female candidate to over-
come.

From the moment Palin appeared on the
national scene as a surprise pick for vice
president, her family attracted critical atten-
tion.

Palin had to fight off Internet-spawned
rumours that her youngest child, Trig, who
was born with Down syndrome, was really
her daughter’s.

Then came the real news. Bristol Palin,
her 17-year-old daughter, was unwed and
pregnant, despite her mother’s abstinence-
only platform.

Palin weathered those headlines and oth-
ers about her snowmobiling husband,
Todd.

As the campaign moved forward, she
was undercut more by her own perfor-
mance in a series of nationally televised
interviews.

PUBLIC NOTICE

INTENT TO CHANGE NAME BY DEED POLL

The Public is hereby advised that |, ESTHER VICTORIA
STUART of Rosewood Street, Pinewood Gardens,
P.0.Box SB-52267 intend to my name to ESTHER
VICTORIA WOODSIDE If there are any objections to
this change of name by Deed Poll, you may write such
objections to the Chief Passport Officer, PO.Box N-742,
Nassau, Bahamas no later than thirty (30) days after the

date of publication of this notice.

They revealed an inexperienced candi-
date with a superficial understanding of
economic and foreign policy matters.

Palin managed to survive a debate with
Joe Biden, the Democratic vice presidential
candidate, and remained popular on the
campaign trail with her core conservative
constituency.

But she was a major turnoff to the very
voters she was supposed to attract —
Hillary Clinton’s female supporters.

Palin is still extremely popular with the
hard-core conservative base and was
recently named to the National Council
for a New America, a group aimed at
rebranding the GOP. A recent CNN/Opin-
ion Research poll of 429 Republicans gave
Palin a slight edge over fellow Republi-
cans like Romney and Mike Huckabee.
Palin also made Time magazine’s list of
influential people, causing Romney to
crack: “But was that the issue on the most
beautiful people or the most influential
people?”

Romney is smarter and more accom-
plished than Palin, and just as good-look-
ing. But Palin has something he lacks: a
core set of unwavering conservative prin-
ciples. It gives her an early advantage with
Republican primary voters.

Lucky for rivals like Romney, Palin also
faces an ongoing family soap opera that
continues to undercut her political mes-
sage. Bristol Palin broke up with Levi John-
ston, the father of their child. The two are
not getting married, as announced during
the presidential campaign.

Johnston’s mother faces a drug posses-
sion trial.

His sister accused Bristol Palin of calling
her family “white trash.” After giving one
interview in which she said abstinence is
“not realistic at all,” Bristol Palin is now
speaking out as a teen advocate for absti-
nence.

None of that should matter. But family
issues do matter, especially for female can-
didates.

When it comes to temperament, accom-
plishments, and work/family balance,
women always walk a line.

The line Palin walks as a working moth-
er of five and new grandmother continues
to trip her up as a presidential candidate.

That makes her an easy target for
Democrats and Republicans, who enjoy
running against her.

(This article was written by Joan Ven-
nochi of the Boston Globe -c. 2009).



PUBLIC NOTICE

INTENT TO CHANGE NAME BY DEED POLL

The Public is hereby advised that |, JEAN BAPTISTE
JANVIER of East Street, PO.Box CB-12627 intend to
my name to JEAN BAPTISTE OLIBRICE. If there are
any objections to this change of name by Deed Poll, you
may write such objections to the Chief Passport Officer,
P.O.Box N-742, Nassau, Bahamas no later than thirty
(30) days after the date of publication of this notice.

eee oe ae eee

for

The hypocrisy of
the PLP as it relates
to EMR molestation

EDITOR, The Tribune.

The hollering and scream-
ing from the PLP for a select
committee about the unfortu-
nate allegations of molesta-
tion at the Eight Mile Rock
Senior High School, Eight
Mile Rock Grand Bahama is
nothing more than a political
ploy to gain headlines and to
appear to be serious about the
incident that happened.

The fact of the matter is
that the PLP behaviour and
record does not, in my opin-
ion, bear out their seriousness.

There were many incidences
that have happened that could
be used to prove that there is
simply no sincerity in the PLP.
But the one that stands out
was the sexual molestation
and brutal murder of the six
boys in Freeport.

To my best recollection and
I certainly stand to be cor-
rected, the murders occurred
around the same time the
molestation of the boy(s) in
Bight Mile Rock High School
began.

I intend to shine a floodlight
on the obvious inconsistency
of the PLP and how they play
with people's minds and emo-
tions, strictly for political pur-
poses.

The murders and molesta-
tion started around May 2003.

It was horrible and sent
shock waves not only in the
Grand Bahama area but
throughout the entire
Bahamas.

I know for a fact that the
international press was also
interested in the events.

But what was not only sig-
nificantly interesting but stun-
ning was that the DPM and
Minister of National Security
Cynthia Pratt did not visit or

LETTERS

letters@tribunemedia net



address the Freeport incident
until September, 120 days plus
after the murders were report-
ed.

The visit came after there
was not only a public outcry
but a demonstration.

Mother Pratt visited
Freeport at least two to three
times before finally address-
ing the horrible incidents.

This is what it took for the
PLP to finally say something
to a confused people that in
many cases were frightened
to death and in a state of pan-
ic.

According to my informa-
tion, Mother Pratt did not vis-
it the parents of the missing
boys until the following
month.

During this time there was
no select committee, no call
for a select committee, no one
volunteered for one.

These are the facts, nothing
personal.

The point I am really dri-
ving to is that if the same
enthusiasm that the opposi-
tion is pretending to have now
was used, then maybe these
incidences at Eight Mile Rock
could have been avoided.

Had there been measures
put in place then, maybe the
necessary discipline and
checks and balances would
have been used to not only
detect that kind of behaviour
but after detection the appro-
priate conclusions would have
been made.

Had there been interven-
tion by the PLP government,
rather than sweeping this

under the proverbial carpet,
maybe, just maybe, we could
have saved these boys at Eight
Mile Rock High School and
other boys from experiencing
the horror they have.

The PLP owe the people of
Grand Bahama and the entire
Bahamas an apology for com-
pletely ignoring some things
that could have, and in my
Opinion in this particular case,
made the difference.

So friends and countrymen
listen to this, whenever the
PLP starts hollering, maybe
we should find out if it is
because they are hurting from
seeing the handwriting on the
wall, or if it is because their
collective conscience is both-
ering them from not doing
what was and is necessary to
protect our children.

The PLP did nothing to
address the molestation and
would pretend to be con-
cerned now.

How hypocritical, how
devious.

They did nothing then and,
in my opinion, they could care
less now.

Actually Bahamians are dis-
gusted with the desperate tac-
tics that they are using. It is
counterproductive.

The PLP are bankrupt of
sensible ideas and are appar-
ently hell-bent on destroying
this country, no matter what.
They can't win again, so they
want to take the ball and end
the game.

This is how selfish, “all for
me baby” people behave.
This is pathetic.

IVOINE W INGRAHAM
Nassau,
May 4, 2009.

Who will fill John Marquis’ shoes?

EDITOR, The Tribune.

Your recently retired Managing Editor, John
Marquis, displayed a talent for stirring contro-
versy, intellectual or otherwise.

This, of course, and perhaps unfortunately
for relentless “seekers of truth”, made him
unique among local practitioners of journal-
ism.

This burning, and indubitably, universal
desire “to know,” probably explains the popu-
larity of a certain bi-weekly tabloid, which, in
addition to “news of the screws,” tries to keep
its readers regularly informed of the “stories
behind the stories”.

Photojournalist Philip Jones Griffiths (1936-
2008), is reported to have said that journalists,
by their very nature, must be anarchists.

This “distinction” must have applied to Mr
Marquis, at least according to some, who
described him as “a paid journalistic assassin”
practising his art, according to another, in a
news media engaged in “journalistic terror-
ism.”

But those aspiring to fill Mr Marquis’ shoes,
might take heed to the words of New York
Times Executive Editor Bill Keller, who
observed that quality journalism “involves
experienced reporters going places, bearing
witness, digging into records, developing
sources, checking and double-checking, backed

Tel. 304-5707

Extrema

So off

Privilege «ards
tornte Partners

by editors who try to enforce high standards.

I mean journalism that, however imperfect,
labours hard to be trustworthy, to supply you
with the kind of information you need to be an
engaged citizen.

The supply of this kind of journalism is
declining because it is hard, expensive, some-
times dangerous work.”

My own umbrage with Mr Marquis, if it can
be so described, is his somewhat, although per-
haps unintentional, deprecating reference to
the Bahamas’ former slave status. History has
shown many times over that national origins
cannot be the ultimate determinant of success.

To quote Ralph Emerson, although the
words can perhaps be more accurately attrib-
uted to “Anonymous”: “What lies behind
us/And what lies before us/Are tiny mat-
ters/Compared to what lies within us.”

After all, Mr Marquis’ model country, Great
Britain, was once enslaved by the Romans for
500 years, and look what they have achieved.

Wishing Mr Marquis all the best and much
success in his reportedly in-the-works book on
The Bahamas, I remain,

SIMON ARTZI
Nassau,
May, 2009

The paradox of power and incentives
for future economic growth

EDITOR, The Tribune.

James Madison, one of the so-called Founding Fathers of the
United States, pointed out in 1788 that the authority of government
creates strong incentives for abuse of power.

And in these trying economic times Mr. Hubert Ingraham,
Prime Minister of The Bahamas advised that government revenue
is in extreme decline (my words) and there are only a couple
options for them to consider:

Tax more, borrow more or cut services.

As we know, government is the only organisation among us that
can force its will under the threat of a fine, jail time or both. So this
presents what James Madison and economists refer to as The
Paradox of Power. Does the government control itself or does it
simply use its power to tax Bahamians more?

As pointed out by Peter Leeson in his recent book, The Invisi-
ble Hook; "Ruler's predatory behaviour shapes citizens’ incentive to
cooperate for mutual gain. If leaders are going to take nearly all the
proceeds of production and exchange, why bother producing and
exchanging? The resulting decline in cooperation impoverishes soci-
ety. Thus, solving the paradox of power is crucial to a successful and
flourishing society."

Hopefully Mr. Ingraham and his government will remember this
sage advice from 221 years ago when they are deliberating about
how to provide the right incentives for future economic growth in

s . - The Bahamas.
; Pashion Yours in Liberty,
Finds $10.00 RICK LOWE
â„¢ nn al Nassau,



up

May 6, 2009
THE TRIBUNE

SATURDAY, MAY 9, 2009, PAGE 5



LOCAL NEWS

Samples of fire-hit Workers’ Party HQ sent for analysis

PHOTOS: Rodney Moncur



THIS PHOTO shows fire marks on the wall of the home of Workers’ Party leader Rodney Moncur. An
attempted arson attack was made on the house in April 2008. The blaze also destroyed Mr Moncur’s banana

trees in the yard.

Man shot in back

turing armed robbery

A 56-year-old man was } parked in the disabled spot at

shot in the back during an ; Super Value out west. Is the

armed robbery of an East }
: i they are employing disabled

Police reported that a num-
ber of employees and patrons :
were at the Shipwreck Bar }
around 6pm on Thursday :
when two gunmen entered }
and fired shots from weapons. }
were }
ordered to get to the ground }
as one of the gunmen went }
to the cash register and stole ;
an undetermined amount of :
cash. The gunmen, who were }
; granting the unemployed per-

Bay Street bar.

Those present

both dressed in blue jeans,

one wearing a yellow shirt, :
the other a blue shirt, fled the }
scene on foot and were last :

seen heading towards the i "
i pay the NIB its due so that the

Balls Alley area.

A 56-year-old male patron }
received a gun shot injury
to his back was transported }
to hospital for treatment. He }

is presently in stable condi-

tion. Police investigations }

continue.

! ll By TANEKA THOMPSON

Tribune Staff Reporter
tthompson@tribunemedia.net

"I wex when I see a police car

force so short of recruits that

people? Or is their disability
that they cannot read?"

— IRRITATED, NASSAU

"Tam vex that people in the
business community can find
time to complain that NIB will
be short of funds 50 years in the
future especially at this rough
period when the government is
trying at the very same time to
assist those same businesses by

sons money to spend.

"Those business complainers
should instead be encouraging
their fellow business owners to

funds will be there and also to
stop ripping off the unfortunate
employees by not paying their

2

— CRY BABY SOUR LIME, NASSAU

"I vex because I am tired of

these Bahamians blaming the
government for the situation we
are in with the economy! Wake
up people, we not the only peo-
ple suffering, it's happening all
around the world and nobody
saw it coming.

"Open up your eyes and ears
and listen to the American
news. Don't be listening to those
crazy PLP — if they were in pow-
er we would still be where we
are today. They couldn't have
done no better.”

— WAKE UP PEOPLE,
BAHAMAS.

"IT vex because even though I
live out east in a nice house in a
nice area with all the modern
conveniences I soon ga have to
start toting water from the pump
to bathe with because of the
slackness at Water and Sewage.
With all our advancements we
are still a third world country
masquerading as a first world
nation where people can't even
get a heavy stream of water to
bathe with or wash they clothes.

"What kind of mess is this
when I pay for water every bill
period, but only one lil’ trickle is
come out the tap, and when it
come out it rusty as nail? But

Sannin Motors itd

EVEN IF IT DOESN’T MOVE
WE WILL TRADE IT IN.

BEST PRICES
EVER SALE!

ON THE SPOT FINANCING WITH

SAMPLES of the wall and
ground near the fire-ravaged
Workers’ Party headquarters in
Black Village have been sent to a
laboratory for analysis, the Fire
Department said.

The party’s office was
destroyed by a fire that ripped
through the building at around
4am on Thursday. See photos on
the right.

It is the third time in less than
12 months that the office on
Rupert Dean Lane South has
been damaged by fire.

The previous fire in October
last year damaged three rooms
just six months after the first fire
tore through the building in April
2008.

The blaze this week has now
led to the building being com-
pletely demolished, party leader
Rodney Moncur said.

Mr Moncur said he suspects
the fires are the work of arsonists
and said there was also an

the pow-
ers that
be say
we hav-
in g
barge problems and this and
that, but I bet if the prime min-
ister's water was slow and rusty
that thing would get fix quick.”

— Sick of rusty slow water,
Bahamas.



"I vex at people who is try to
take the bibby out of someone
else eye when theirs so crust
they can't even see straight.
Now I don't like to judge people
or criticise them, but some peo-
ple just is blow me over how
they always in other people
business and is the first one to
point out what they see is
wrong.

"But since they will never see
what they doing wrong I will
take this time to give a shout to
all them people out there who
watching me and everyone else
instead of living their life.”

— HATER BLOCKER, NASSAU.

Are you vex? Send your com-
plaints to whyyouvex@tribuneme-
dia.net?

attempted arson attack on his
house in April last year.

“T have had a number of
attacks involving fire so I went
to see the Commissioner of
Police to be as responsible as pos-
sible and avert something great
from happening,” the Workers’
Party leader said.



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PAGE 6, SATURDAY, MAY 9, 2009

THE TRIBUNE



LOCAL NEWS

Asylum request rejection
investigation welcomed

OTNEKRe ENR caay
for CARICOM conference

Climate change poses one of the most serious challenges to the
sustainable development of small island and low lying coastal
developing states in the Caribbean, according to CARICOM.

Recognising this threat, the Caribbean Community Climate
Change Centre (CCCCC) in tandem with the CARICOM Sec-
retariat has drafted a regional Climate Change Strategic Frame-
work in an effort to point the way to building the region’s
resilience to the effects of climate change, over the next five
years. Described as the premier document for resource mobili-
sation, the primary focus of the strategic framework is developing
programmes to support region-wide mitigation of and adaptation
to climate change.

The framework is predicated on four strategic pillars: reduc-
ing greenhouse gas emissions through energy reduction and
conservation and switching to renewable energy sources; min-
imising the effects of greenhouse gas emissions through disaster
mitigation; developing and implementing public awareness and
education programmes and building national and regional capac-
ities to manage adaptation.

At the second meeting of the CARICOM task force on climate
change and development on Thursday, members agreed that the
strategic framework would be fine-tuned for presentation to
the CARICOM Heads of Government Conference in July.

Leading up to the conference however, the Climate Change
Centre said it will continue region wide consultations particularly
with civil society to solicit feedback on the strategic framework.

In undertaking this, the task force has also recommended
that the document should be placed on both the websites of
CARICOM Secretariat, www.caricom.org, and the CCCCC for
persons who wish to provide feedback on the framework.

Comments should be directed to the Secretariat at piu@cari-
com.org as well as to the Climate Change Centre at
www.caribbeanclimate.bz by May 15.

Oa ETS
















































ROKER’S Point Primary
School in Exuma was
among the winners
during the Ministry of
Education’s Minister’s

5) Literacy Awards

1 Ceremony for the Primary
Division on April 30 held
at the Church of God of
Prophecy Tabernacle,
New Providence. Christal
Monique Adderley of
Roker’s Point Primary is
pictured receiving her
award from Minister of
Education Carl Bethel.

Raymond A Bethel/
BIS Photo

CHRISTIE & DOWDESWELL STREETS ° Tel: 325-2921

SUNDAY, MAY 10TH, 2009

11:30 a.m. Speaker:
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m@ By DENISE MAYCOCK
Tribune Freeport Reporter
dmaycock@tribunemedia.net

FREEPORT - Jetta Baptiste, president of
the Haitian Bahamian Society of the Bahamas,
is pleased that investigations are underway
by immigration officials in the case of Ander-
son Pierre, a 37-year-old Haitian who was
denied asylum in the Bahamas.

“T am happy to learn that an investigation is
currently underway,” said Ms Baptiste, “but I
hope that the final report is not issued ‘until
further notice,’ which can take years to be
produced.”

Amnesty International has called for a “full
and thorough” investigation into the circum-
stances surrounding the Immigration Depart-
ment’s decision to reject Mr Pierre’s request
for political asylum.

Mr Pierre was ordered to leave the country
in September 2008, two years after he and his
wife filed their application for asylum. He left
Freeport in February and went to Cap Hai-
tien, but was killed by unknown gunmen in
Santo Domingo on April 24.

Immigration Director Jack Thompson has
said that a full statement would be released
shortly in relation to Mr Pierre’s asylum case.

Ms Baptiste said it is important that the
report is released in a timely fashion.

“We are still waiting for an investigation
report from the police in the case of the fires
that destroyed almost 100 homes in Marsh
Harbour, Abaco, back in May 2004. This is
five years later and the government has not
given an official response on that issue yet,”
she said.

Ms Baptiste also responded to remarks
made by Bahamian Julian Knowles, who has
called on Ms Baptiste to apologise for refer-

Anderson Pierre

Jetta Baptiste



“Iam happy to learn
that an investigation is
currently underway.”



Jetta Baptiste

ring to Bahamians as “Christ-less and real
children of the devil.”

“It is too bad and too sad that Mr Julian
Knowles has taken grave exception to my
comments concerning how many of my fellow
Bahamians are ‘Christ-less’ these days and
are ‘acting like children of the devil.’

“The real truth hurts. I suggest that we not
focus on the messenger, and take a real hard
look at the message. It is the message that is
important as we speak. I refuse to be chastised
for speaking the truth just to satisfy those
who wish that I would say what is politically
correct.

“Asking me to apologise will not change
the facts that we have too many ‘children of
the devil’ living among us. Getting these evil
persons living among us to change their
wicked ways and repent is and should be our

goal, so that we can live in God’s paradise.”

Ms Baptiste said that the Haitian Bahami-
an Society of the Bahamas is very grateful
for the assistance that was given to Haiti after
the hurricanes.

She noted that in addition to Bahamians,
Jamaicans, Americans, Turks Islanders and
other persons from around the Caribbean
also made contributions to the worthy cause.

“T must say that we are thankful and grate-
ful for all of those kind hearted persons who
donated clothing, food, money, and other
goods for the Haitian hurricane relief efforts,”
she said.

Ms Baptiste stressed that the investigations
into why Mr Pierre’s application for political
asylum was denied is priority.

“Now, please get back to the real issue that
is most important at this time, and that is
investigating why Mr Anderson Pierre’s appli-
cation for political asylum was denied and
what is going to happen to his family and to
others who find themselves in a similar situa-
tion.

“That is the real issue. Please do not try to
detract or distract me or others from dealing
with what is really important at this time.
Thanks for not being anti-Haitian. But we
need answers from those involved with Ander-
son Pierre’s case,” she said.

“Yes, the Bahamas have ‘real’ Christians.
But what percentage of the Bahamian people
are ‘real’ Christians? Would you say 50 per
cent or more or 50 per cent or less? We must
not be in denial about the truth. We have to be
sincere about what is happening in this coun-
try today and let us not live in a fallacy,” she
said.

Mr Pierre’s wife hopes that the Immigration
Department will reconsider her asylum case
and allow her to remain in Grand Bahama
with her infant son.

Tighter inventory controls instituted at public healthcare facilities

m@ BY MATT MAURA

THE Ministry of Health has
tightened inventory controls at
the three state-owned health-
care facilities and at the com-
munity clinic level to ensure
that a readily available supply of
fast-moving drugs “is kept on
hand,” Minister of Health Dr
Hubert Minnis said on Thurs-
day.

Dr Minnis said the tighten-
ing of controls is part of a series
of measures health officials
have implemented to improve
efficiency in operations.





N extans our rela-
tively young capital
market is imperative for the
future well being of our people.
An essential tool for the mobi-
lization and democratization of
investment in economic activity
is a successful and active stock
exchange. Which brings me to
The Bahamas International Secu-
rities Exchange or as it is com-
monly known BISX.

When I titled this column the
“late” BISX I wasn’t referring to
its demise. Although, should we
look at the volume of trading in
recent months, one would have
to check for vital signs. I was
referring to the promptness with

The new measures were
implemented in response to
complaints of long lines at hos-
pital and clinic registration
counters, protests against long
waiting times to see physicians,
and a “clamour for more
drugs,” he said.

“We tightened our invento-
ry controls so that our clinics
are able to keep a supply of fast-
moving drugs readily available,”
Dr Minnis said.

“We have revamped the dis-
tribution of drugs at the
Princess Margaret Hospital,
established a line for senior cit-



J O HN

which the directors of the listed
companies report to their employ-
ers, the shareholders, on the out-
come of their stewardship.

The rules of the exchange are
out of step with modern practice
by giving listed companies 90 days
to publish their interim results.
No director or manager worth
their salt would wait that long to
find out the results of the previous
three months of operation. So the
question arises, that if they know,
why shouldn’t the shareholders
and the investing public to whom
shares are on offer on the
exchange also have this informa-
tion. The maximum allowable
time should be no more than 30
days, but for a start maybe it
should be set at 45 days.

BAPTIST BIBLE CHURCH
SOLDIER ROAD & OLD TRAIL

‘Sunday School: 10am
Preaching
Radio Bible Hour:

Sunday 6pm - 2N5 2

Wed, Prayer & Praise 7:20pm

FUNDAMENTAL |
iam &7-300m EWANGELISTIC

PasiorH. Mills

“Preaching the Bible as is, to men aa they are”
[Pastor A. Mills * Prone: 393-0563 * Box N-SB22 |

Grace and ert Wesleyan Lees
ee eM ee ee
Horth &merica

WHERE GODS ADORED AND EFERVONE [8 APFIRWED

Worship Time: [1 a. rt.

Prayer Tome: 10:13a.m.

Church School during Worship Service

Place: Toynam Heights
off Prince Charles Drive

Minister: Rev. Henley Perry

MO). Box 88-5631

Tele

hone number: 324-2545

Telefax number: 324-2587
COME TO WORSHIP LEAVE TOSERVE

VIEW FROM AFAR



izens only and reduced the
number of persons sent to oth-
er clinics to have prescriptions
filled.”

Health officials have also
increased their orders of the
most commonly used drugs,
particularly those used to com-
bat chronic, non-communicable
diseases including diabetes,
hypertension and cancer.

A ‘drop-off’ system has also
been implemented so that pre-
scriptions can be written one
day, dropped off and filled the
next day.

Dr Minnis said his ministry



| &- s F

Additionally, BISX should
publish weekly in the print media
and continuously on their web-
site a list of companies in breach
of this or any other listing regu-
lation.

This 90-day requirement is
only part of the problem. The
equally serious or maybe even
more serious problem is that
many listed companies do not
even meet this much extended
deadline. There are exceptions.
A few very large companies meet
and beat the deadline. In fact
Commonwealth Bank’s results
for the quarter ended March 31st
was published in this newspaper
on April 24th.

If we are to gain the trust of
large and small savers in order to

has heard the complaints “and
we have responded.”

“We have improved efficien-
cies in operations at no addi-
tional cost, while providing
greater satisfaction to the gen-
eral public.”

Officials have also made
adjustments with regards to
staffing, primary among them
being the removal of technical
staff from administrative duties.

“This was done so that they
could assist in providing the ser-
vice for which they have the
training and competence,” Dr
Minnis said.





attract them to invest listed enter-
prises, this unsatisfactory situa-
tion has to change. If BISX is to
be engine for capital formation
and investment that it can and
must be, this unsatisfactory situa-
tion must change. If BISX is to be
the instrument for the democra-
tization of wealth that it can be,
this unsatisfactory situation must
change.

It is easy to do. The board of
BISX just has to change then
enforce the rules.

Grant’s Town Wesley Methodist Church

(Baillou Hill Rd & Chapel Street) RO.Box CB-13046

The Holy Ghost Prayer-Line number is 326-7427
(www.gtwesley.org)

SUNDAY, MAY 3RD, 2009
7:00 a.m. Rev. Carla Culmer/Sis. Katherine Rose
11:00 a.m. Rev. Carla Culmer/Women’s Fellowship
7:00 a.m. Bro. Jamicko Forde/
Board of Lay Ministry, Worship & Training
Theme: “ But As For Me And My Household, We Will Serve the Lord”

LIGHT AND LIFE COMMUNITY CHURCH
Grounded In The Past &

=

Worship time: [lam & 7pm
Sunday School: 9:45am
Prayer time: 6:30pm

Place:
The Madeira

Shopping Center

(Geared To The Future

=

Rev. Dr. Fromklin Kone bes

ALL ARE WELCOME TO ATTEND
Pastor: Rev. Dr Franklin Knowles

P.O.Box EE-16807-
Telephone number 325-5712
EMAIL - vaink@ batelnet.bs
THE TRIBUNE

SATURDAY, MAY 9, 2009, PAGE 7



LOCAL NEWS

LIS seniors return
TROT M LR Lert
adventure

Photo courtesy of
Sydney Watson

FREEPORT — Last month, 11 senior students from the
Lucaya International School (LIS) and their teacher Sydney
Watson made a 10-day pilgrimage through Europe in an effort
to truly experience their international studies.

“This trip afforded 11 students a complete immersion in
European history,” said Nigel Kirkby, acting director of LIS,
“affirming their academic studies and providing them with
culture-rich experiences, making it ‘the educational experi-
ence of a lifetime’.”

International curriculum-linked school trips are one of
many programmes offered at LIS.

“These trips enable young people to broaden their horizons
as they learn new skills, improve their ability to work as part of
a team and conquer their fears, in a fun and safe environ-

ment,” the school said.

“The trip was both an educational and cultural experi-
ence,” said Sydney Watson, senior English teacher at LIS.
“The students learned about ancient history and visited the sites
that brought it to life. Travelling with peers enabled the stu-
dents to learn about independence and responsibility. In fact,
Abilene Jones, a year 11 student, believed that the trip was
much more adventurous with my friends and the freedom we
had made it much more exciting.”

Lucaya International School trips offer young people the
opportunity to experience a wide range of challenges and
activities that go beyond the boundaries of the classroom.

With its focus on the ancient sites of Italy and Greece, the
excursion succeeded in taking the students out of their text-
books and allowing them to touch, feel, and live the passion and
history described in their studies, the school said.

When in Rome, they toured such amazing sites as the Vat-
ican, the Sistene Chapel, St Peter’s Basilica and the Colosseum.

Bahamas and Indonesia seek to
formalise trade and economic ties

m@ BY LINDSAY THOMPSON

THE governments of the
Bahamas and Indonesia are
seeking to formalise relations
with the signing of an econom-
ic and technical cooperation
framework agreement.

The agreement and the fos-
tering of other areas of diplo-
matic relations were addressed
as Governor- General Arthur
Hanna accepted Letters of Cre-
dence from Banua Radja
Manik, Ambassador of the
Republic of Indonesia to the
Bahamas, during a ceremony at
Government House on May 7.

“The Bahamas values the
cordial relations between our
two countries and looks forward
to continuing to strengthen our
relationship,” said Mr Hanna.

The last representative of the
government of Indonesia bade
farewell to Bahamian officials
in April, 2007.

Like the Bahamas, Indone-
sia is an archipelagic country
comprising more than 17,000
islands, 6,000 of which are
inhabited.

It is the fourth most populat-
ed country in the world with
240.3 million people.

Indonesia has a market-based
economy in which the govern-
ment plays a significant role.
There are 139 state-owned
enterprises.

The government administers
prices on several basic goods,
including fuel, rice and electric-
ity.

“The Bahamas and Indonesia
share a wide base of linkages
founded on common interests
and the diplomatic relations
that have indeed consolidated
our continued common under-
standing.

“It is on this premise that the
Bahamas government appreci-
ates the expressed interest of
the government of Indonesia to
further enhance, deepen and



Kristaan Ingraham/BIS photo

DEPUTY Prime Minister and Minister of Foreign Affairs Brent Symonette
(right), accepts credentials from Banua Radja Manik, Ambassador of the
Republic of Indonesia to the Bahamas during a courtesy call at the Min-
istry of Foreign Affairs on Wednesday, May 6, 2009.

diversify the scope of our two
countries’ cooperative endeav-
ours in all sectors, but particu-
larly in the field of trade,
tourism and investment,” said
Governor-General Hanna.

While tourism is the
Bahamas’ main industry, he
said, efforts are being made to
encourage economic diversifi-
cation through the development
of other sectors.

“In this regard,” said Mr
Hanna, “the government of the
Bahamas would equally value
and welcome increased bilater-
al trade and technical coopera-
tion with Indonesia by both
countries committing to
employing their efforts to for-
malise their relations with the
signing of an economic and
technical cooperation frame-
work agreement.

“The many multilateral fora
in which we both participate,
and in which Indonesia has
demonstrated the highest order
of leadership, bring us together
in a joint commitment to ensure
that our goals come to fruition.”

Ambassador Manik, 59,
acknowledged that both coun-
tries share the “highest aspira-
tions” and dedication to the
development and protection of
their respective societies.

He said he was honoured by

COMMONWEALTH OF THE BAHAMAS

the opportunity to represent
Indonesia in a country with “a
great international presence,
rich in the beauty of its nature,
and more importantly with
which Indonesia has had long-
standing bilateral relationship.”

“Tt is heartening to note that
our relations have continued to
develop for the common inter-
est of the two countries,” said
Ambassador Manik, “as we
support one another in interna-
tional fora especially in the
Non-aligned Movement, the
Group of 77, South-south
Cooperation and other interna-
tional organisations of which
the Bahamas and Indonesia are
members.”

Mr Manik is director for
Diplomatic Security Service.

He served as head of Section
for Economics in the Indone-
sian Embassy, in Harare, Zim-
babwe, and as head of Sub-Sec-
tion for Economics II within the
Indonesian Permanent Mission
to the United Nations.

He is married to Monry
Manik and they have three chil-
dren.

2008/CLE/qui/16 16

IN THE SUPREME COURT

Already deeply affected, the group continued to Pompeii.
“The entire city of Pompeii was covered by a volcanic eruption
in 79 AD and has now been unearthed by archeologists,”
explained Ms Watson, “the students were able to walk the
streets of the ancient people and view this historic city, frozen
in time.”

The group was often overwhelmed with the magnitude of
what they were undertaking. “It was a once in a lifetime oppor-
tunity,” said student Jessica Raad, “and a truly worthy expe-
rience.”

Other highlights from the trip include disco dancing at an
authentic Greek disco in the small waterfront town of Tolo and,
of course, sampling delicious native foods from every site.

“These students were able to explore Olympia,” said Ms
Watson, “and stand in the very first Olympic arena, what a
thrill. These are sites some people live to only read about,
what an amazing opportunity to be able to experience this.”

“The overall trip was a great experience, and definitely
one of the most fun times in my life. My classmates and I got
to see the beauty of history, and how people in Europe lived in
the past, and how they live now,” said Ryan Parsons, a year 11
student. “Most of us got to see a new culture and way of life
of how the people of both Italy and Greece lived. It was mind-
blowing to see how these ancient ruins are still perfectly pre-
served over thousands of years, and I truly got to see how
history is not only what we learn from text books.”

C avd ad thanks ce the late



Light a candle for the one we mourn.
Into a new life he will be born.

Do not look for him at the gravesite.
He ts somewsere else radiating hus
beautiful light.

He hws gone toa new world where there ts
ro darkness, mo putitt.

His light and essence will alioays remain.

The family of the late Robert Pox expresses our heartfelt
gratitude to these whe have prayed, called, gave a helping
hand and sent flowers, during bis illness and after his
demise. Special thanks to Bishop ( NM. Williams, Pastor
Julian Johnson, Pastor Rowena Fawkes and members of the
Church of Ged of Prophecy, Seven Hills; Shennan Bethel,
Cammuice Curtis, the lanl working staff of Demeritte’s
Funeral Home, the stall of Woodlawn Gardens and Rent
Fowkes Limousine Services. May the pence of Christ be
with you always and may Cod continne to bless you,





NOTICE

NOTICE is hereby given that ROSELANDE
DUVERSONNE of STEP STREET, FOX HILL, NASSAU,
BAHAMAS is applying to the Minister responsible
for Nationality and Citizenship, for registration/
naturalization as a citizen of The Bahamas, and that
any person who knows any reason why registration/
naturalization should not be granted, should send a

written and signed statement of the facts within twenty-
eight days from the 9** day of May, 2009 to the Minister
responsible for nationality and Citizenship, PO. Box
N-7147, Nassau, Bahamas.

NOTICE

NOTICE is hereby given that ANTOINETTE BOX of MARSH
HARBOUR, ABACO, BAHAMAS, P.O.BOX AB 20554 is applying
to the Minister responsible for Nationality and Citizenship,
for registration/naturalization as a citizen of The Bahamas,
and that any person who knows any reason why registration/
naturalization should not be granted, should send a written
and signed statement of the facts within twenty-eight days
from the 2nd day of MAY 2009 to the Minister responsible for
Nationality and Citizenship, P.O.Box N-7147, Nassau, Bahamas.



NOTICE

IN THE ESTATE OF WILTON

ELIJAH EDGECOMBE late of the

Island of San Salvador one of the Islands
of the Commonwealth of the Bahamas,
deceased.

NOTICE is hereby given that all persons
having any claim or demand against the above
Estate are required to send the same duly
certified in writing to the Undersigned on or
before the 29th May, 2009, after which date
the Administratrix will proceed to distribute

the assets having regard only to the claims of
which she shall then have had notice

AND NOTICE is hereby also given that
all persons indebted to the said Estate are
requested to make full settlement on or before
the date hereinbefore mentioned.

HIGGS & JOHNSON
Attorneys for the Administratrix
Chambers

P. ©. Box N-3247

Ocean Centre

Montagu Foreshore

Fast Bay Street

Nassau, Bahamas



IN THE MATTER OF ALL THAT piece parcel or
lot of land being Lot 76 containing Twenty seven
thousand six hundred and ninety one square feet
(27,697.00), Stella Maris Subdivision Section
1, Stella Maris, situate between the settlements
of Burnt Ground and Millerton in the Northern
Portion of Long Island, one of the Islands of the
Commonwealth of The Bahamas, which said
piece parcel or lot of land has such position shape
boundaries marks and dimensions as are shown
on a plan filed herein and thereon coloured yellow

AND IN THE MATTER of the Quieting Titles Act, 1959

AND IN THE MATTER of the Petition of Allan

Spector

NOTICE
The Quieting Titles Act 1959

The Petition of Allan Spector of the city of
Toronto, in the Province of Ontario, one of the
Provinces in Canada in respect of: - ALL THAT
piece parcel or lot of land being Lot 76 containing
Twenty seven thousand six hundred and ninety one
square feet (27,697.00), Stella Maris Subdivision
Section 1, Stella Maris, situate between the
settlements of Burnt Ground and Millerton in the
Northern Portion of Long Island, one of the Islands
of the Commonwealth of The Bahamas, which said
piece parcel or lot of land has such position shape
boundaries marks and dimensions as are shown
on a plan filed herein and thereon coloured yellow

Allan Spector claims to be the owner of the
fee simple estate in possession of the tract of land
hereinbefore described free from encumbrances.

AND the Petitioner has made application
to the Supreme Court of the Commonwealth of
The Bahamas under Section 3 of The Quieting
Titles Act 1959 to have his title to the said
tract of land investigated and the nature and
extent thereof determined and declared in a
Certificate of Title to be granted by the Court in
accordance with the provisions of the said Act.

NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that any
persons having Dower or a Right to Dower or an
Adverse Claim or a claim not recognized in the
petition shall on or before the 19" of June A.D., 2009
file in the Supreme Court and serve on the Petitioner
or the undersigned a statement of his claim in the
prescribed form verified by an Affidavit to be filed
therewith. Failure of any such person to file and
serve a statement of his claim on or before the 19" of
June A.D., 2009 will operate as a bar to such claim.
Copies of the Filed Plan may be inspected at:
The Registry of the Supreme Court;
The Chambers of Graham, Thompson & Co.
attorneys for the Petitioner, Sassoon House, Shirley
Street & Victoria Avenue, Nassau, N.P., Bahamas;
The Notice Board of the Administrator
at Stella Maris, Long Island: and
The Local Constable at Stella Maris, Long Island

Dated the 23rd day of April A.D., 2009

GRAHAM, THOMPSON & CoO.,
Chambers,
Sassoon House,
Shirley Street & Victoria Avenue,
Nassau, Bahamas.
Attorneys for the Petitioner
PAGE 8, SATURDAY, MAY 9, 2009

THE TRIBUNE



LOCAL NEWS

FROM PAGE |

Fears that Justice Lyons’ resignation
could hit hearing of commercial cases

Alleged sex
scandal teacher
arrested in US

FROM page one

public school system for some 20 years in the Bahamas.

Asst Supt Welbourne Bootle, press liaison officer, said Bahami-
an authorities are going through the necessary procedures for Bir-
bal’s extradition.

ACP Dames could not say exactly when Birbal would be returned
to the Grand Bahama.

“We really can’t put a time frame on this,” he said. “We are deal-
ing with two countries and so we will have to see how the process
works itself out.

“We know where he is at and we are working to have him
returned to the Bahamas as soon as possible.

“We have a provisional warrant out for him and the Office of
Attorney General will be working with their counterparts in the US
to see how quickly that can happen,” said Mr Dames.

Two other teachers at Eight Mile Rock High School — a woman
and another man — have also been removed following complaints
of molestation.

Mr Dames stated that police investigations concerning the woman
teacher are nearing completion.

“We should be making some determination on that within the
next few days,” he said.

As a result of the sex scandals at Eight Mile Rock High, the Edu-
cation Minister has implemented measures that call for all new
teachers to be vetted by police.

Safety committees made up of students, teachers, administrators,
and parents also will be established at schools to oversee com-
plaints.

FROM page one

always been one of the criti-
cisms of our system that you
don't have courts which focus
on the commercial area," the
insider continued.

Prominent attorney Brian
Moree — who has been vocal
for the need of more specialised
divisions in the courts with an
extensive background in com-
mercial cases — might be a suit-
able replacement for Justice
Lyons, sources said.

News broke on Thursday that
Justice Lyons had tendered his

resignation from the Supreme
Court.

A terse statement released by
government yesterday said the
chief justice had advised the
governor general of the deci-
sion, which takes effect on
August 1.

Meantime, Justice Lyons will
take "pre-retirement leave"
effective from May, 11, the
statement said.

Sources said it was too early
to tell who would take over any
of Justice Lyon's pending cases
adding that he would be able
to hand down judgments on





NOTICE




NOTICE is hereby given that FRANCYS PEREZ SMITH



of Pueblo Ariguanabo, La Habana, Bauta, Cuba, P.O. Box



32400 is applying to the Minister responsible for Nationality



and Citizenship, for registration/naturalization as a citizen of



The Bahamas, and that any person who knows any reason




why registration/naturalization should notbe granted, should



send a written and signed statement of the facts within



twenty-eight days from the 9° day of May, 2009 to the



Minister responsible for nationality and Citizenship, P.O. Box





N-7147, Nassau, Bahamas.



“IT think he’s
always been kind
of ill at ease in
the Bahamian
judicial system...”



completed cases during his
leave.

A controversial figure in his
own right, Justice Lyons made
headlines after his fellow jus-
tice, Anita Allen scolded him
for appointing Daniel Fergu-
son, an accountant, to work on
a recent case knowing full well
that he shared “more than a
friendship” with Mr Ferguson’s
sister.

Mr Ferguson’s sister also
assisted her brother with
preparing documents for the
case, said Justice Allen as she
decided whether or not to
recuse herself from hearing the
matter “on the ground of appar-

ent bias” because of her knowl-
edge of this matter.

This disclosure prompted
calls for Justice's Lyons resig-
nation.

Despite the recent furor sur-
rounding the justice's actions in
court, one lawyer commented
that resignations of senior jus-
tices were "pretty rare in the
Bahamas." He speculated that
the mounting public pressure
over recent cases led to Justice
Lyon's decision.

"T think that it was the pres-
sure that developed from the
negative exposure that he got,
he felt as if his career had come
to an end, that the bad publici-
ty could not be remedied and
that can be pretty devastating."

But another source said the
expatriate justice was never ful-
ly happy in the Bahamas. He
said the move was "not totally
unexpected."

"I think he's always been
kind of ill at ease in the Bahami-
an judicial system — he comes
from a very large territory and
sometimes it's very difficult to
adjust to a smaller, closely-knit
society,” he said.

Mother who made kidnap
claim tells court she
feared for family’s safety

FROM page one

hosiery Dy

however, that Seifort had attempted to kidnap her son and had sent
her threatening text messages. She also claimed that Siefort would
kidnap her every time he saw her, beat her up and on one occasion
had even hit her in her head with a hammer.

Brown said she has filed a complaint with police. Chief Magistrate
Gomez ordered that Brown be remanded to Sandilands Rehabil-
itation Centre for 14 days.

Outside of court yesterday, Siefort’s sister Tracy, told reporters
that her brother had been framed.

She claimed that her brother had never stolen the car as it was his
car.

“Tt really bothers me to see how some women can be so sick and
vindictive, she needs help,” she said.

tte ec a
TTR ema [ey
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Detention Centre conditions
have ‘greatly improved’



* Silky * Smooth * Seamless * Sheer

ULTRA SHEER PANTYHOSE

MINISTERIAL VISIT: Minister Branville McCartney and directors eat in the
canteen.

FROM page one

people who have been there, I think, too long because of their cir-
cumstances, but hopefully they will be out by the end of the month.

“Some of them were in there from the end of last year, and one
or two have been there from 2007, so we need to make a determi-
nation and regularise their status so they are able to leave the
detention centre.”

Just over two months ago detainees told The Tribune how offi-
cers beat one detainee so badly he lost his fingernails, while anoth-
er man was allegedly “beaten senseless” on the roof of the facility
before he fell to the ground, and that inadequate meals drove
some detainees to provide sexual favours for food.

Three Cuban detainees then went on a hunger strike to protest
the deplorable conditions they were forced to endure.

Reports sparked response from Amnesty International and
human rights advocates around the world, and letters continue to
flood in to The Tribune and government offices calling for an
independent investigation into abuse and living conditions at the
centre.

The Immigration Department appointed a fact-finding commit-
tee, including psychologist Dr David Allen, Social Services direc-
tor Mellany Zonical, Archdeacon James Palacious, and Immigra-
tion Director Jack Thompson, who toured the facility and talked
with the detainees in March. However, their report has yet to be
released to the press and The Tribune has not yet been given per-
mission to tour the facility as requested.

Mr McCartney told The Tribune: “T have no hesitations about you
coming in and I still want to do a press conference about the inves-
tigation with all of the committee members so they can present their
report.”

But the minister said such a press conference scheduled for last
week was postponed because the report has still not been pre-
sented to the Cabinet.

He maintains that there is no evidence of abuse at the facility that
would require an independent investigation.

Mr McCartney said: “One of the main concerns was the alleged
abuse and alleged hunger strike.

“They found no abuse, no hunger strike, and the detainees said
they really wanted more recreational stuff, washing facilities and a
change of menu.

“Tf there is no evidence of abuse there’s nothing to investigate, but
if we were to find any evidence, you can bet your bottom dollar that
we would.”

FG CAPITAL MARKETS
BROKERAG!

Bk ADVISORY SERVICES

ROYAL = FIDELITY

Money ot Work

BISX LISTED & TRADED SECURITIES AS OF:
THURSDAY, 7 MAY 2009
BISX ALL SHARE INDEX: CLOSE 1,613.79 | CHG -0.13 | %CHG -0.01 | YTD -98.57 | YTD % -5.76
FINDEX: CLOSE 798.52 | YTD -4.35% | 2008 -12.31%

WWW _.BISXBAHAMAS.COM | TELEPHONE: 242-323-2330 | FACSIMILE: 242-323-2320
52wk-Low Securit y Previous Close Today's Close Change Daily Vol. EPS $ Div $ P/E
1.28 Abaco Markets 1.40 1.40 0.127
11.00 Bahamas Property Fund 11.00 11.00 0.992
6.95 Bank of Bahamas 6.95 6.95 0.244
0.63 Benchmark 0.63 0.63 -0.877
3.15 Bahamas Waste 3.15 3.15 0.078
1.95 Fidelity Bank 2.37 2.37 0.055
11.09 Cable Bahamas 11.75 11.75 1.309
2.83 Colina Holdings 2.83 2.83 0.249
6.17 Commonwealth Bank ($1) 6.17 6.17 0.419
1.31 Consolidated Water BDRs 2.60 2.48 0.099
1.86 Doctor's Hospital 1.86 1.86 0.240
0.420
0.322
0.794
0.332
0.000
0.035
0.407
0.952
0.180

6.02
11.00
10.35

5.00

7.76
11.00
10.40

5.14

7.76
11.00
10.40

5.14

Famguard
Finco
FirstCaribbean Bank
Focol (S)
Focol Class B Preference
Freeport Concrete
ICD Utilities
J. S. Johnson 10.50 10.50 0.00
Premier Real Estate 10.00 10.00 0.00
BISX LISTED DEBT SECURITIES - (Bonds trade on a Percentage Pricing bases)
Securit Symbol Last Sale Change Daily Vol.
Fidelity Bank Note 17 (Series A) + FBB17 100.00 0.00 7%
Fidelity Bank Note 22 (Series B) + FBB22 100.00 0.00 Prime + 1.75%
Fidelity Bank Note 13 (Series C) + FBB13 100.00 0.00 T%
Fidelity Bank Note 15 (Series D) + FBB15 100.00 0.00 Prime + 1.75%
Fidelity Over-The-Counter Securities
Bid $ Ask $ Last Price
7.92 8.42 14.60
4.00 6.25 6.00
0.35 0.40 0.35
Colina Over-The-Counter Securities
30.13 31.59 29.00
0.45 0.55 0.55
BISX Listed Mutual Funds
NA Vv YTD% Last 12 Months
1.3664 0.95 4.77
2.8962 -1.49 -3.35
1.4590 1.77 5.09
3.1964 -5.59 -13.64
12.7397 0.96 5.79
100.5606 0.56 0.56
96.4070 -3.59 -3.59
1.0000 0.00 0.00
9.1599 0.71 -12.76
1.0440 0.80 4.40
1.0364 0.33 3.64
1.0452 0.76 4.40
MARKET TERMS
YIELD - last 12 month dividends divided by closing price
Bid $ - Buying price of Colina and Fidelity
Ask $ - Selling price of Colina and fidelity
Last Price - Last traded over-the-counter price
Weekly Vol. - Trading volume of the prior week
EPS $ - A company’s reported earnings per share for the last 12 mths
NAV - Net Asset Value
N/M - Not Meaningful
FINDEX - The Fidelity Bahamas Stock Index. January 1, 1994 = 100

1.00
0.30
5.50
8.60
10.00

0.00
0.00
0.00

1.00
0.30
5.59

1.00
0.30
5.59

52wk-Low
1000.00
1000.00
1000.00
1000.00

Interest
19 October 2017
19 October 2022
30 May 2013
29 May 2015
52wk-Low Symbol
Bahamas Supermarkets
Caribbean Crossings (Pref)
RND Holdings

Weekly Vol. EPS $
-0.041
0.000

0.001

Div $
0.300
0.480
0.000

P/E

ABDAB
RND Holdings

4.540
0.002

0.000
0.000
Fund Name Div $ Yield %
Colina Bond Fund

Colina MSI Preferred Fund
Colina Money Market Fund
Fidelity Bahamas G & I Fund

1.3041
2.9230
1.3883
3.1964
12.1564
100.0000
96.4070
1.0000
9.0950
1.0000
1.0000
1.0000

28-Feb-09
31-Mar-09
11-May-09
31-Mar-09
28-Feb-09
31-Dec-08
31-Dec-08
31-Dec-07
31-Mar-09
9-Feb-09
9-Feb-09
9-Feb-09

Fidelity Prime Income Fund

CFAL Global Bond Fund

CFAL Global Equity Fund

CFAL High Grade Bond Fund
Fidelity International Investment Fund
FG Financial Preferred Income Fund
FG Financial Growth Fund

FG Financial Diversified Fund

BISX ALL SHARE INDEX - 19 Dec 02 = 1,000.00
52Wk-Hi - Highest closing price in last 52 weeks
52wk-Low - Lowest closing price in last 52 weeks
Previous Close - Previous day's weighted price for daily volume
Today's Close - Current day's weighted price for daily volume
Change - Change in closing price from day to day
Daily Vol. - Number of total shares traded today
DIV $ - Dividends per share paid in the last 12 months
P/E - Closing price divided by the last 12 month earnings
(S) - 4-for-1 Stock Split - Effective Date 8/8/2007
(S1) - 3-for-1 Stock Split - Effective Date 7/11/2007
TO TRADE CALL: COLINA 242-502-7010 | ROYALFIDELITY 242-356-7764 | FG CAPITAL MARKETS 242-396-1000 | COLONIAL 242-502-7525


THE TRIBUNE



SATURDAY, MAY 9,

‘Things could
get ugly’ at the
first ever Miss
Bahamas World
Sportswoman
Challenge

BEAUTY queens are
known for being delicate
and pretty, but things
could get ugly during the
first ever Miss Bahamas
World Sportswoman Chal-
lenge, scheduled for 4pm
today at St Paul’s play
field, Lyford Cay.

The 13 earth angels will
shun their high heels for
sneakers and knee pads as
they compete against each
other on a challenging
obstacle course designed
by officers of the Royal
Bahamas Defence Force.

At the end of the chal-
lenge, one young woman
will emerge Miss Bahamas
World Sportswoman and
will be rewarded with an
automatic placement in
the semifinals of the
pageant.

The idea of the Sports-
woman Challenge stems
from the Miss World
pageant, which also has a
similar competition for its
contestants.

Miss Bahamas Organi-
sation® president
Michelle Malcolm
explains that the winner of
the Miss Bahamas World
competition will have to
face this type of challenge
when she goes to South
Africa later this year, and
so she might as well get
used to the idea now.

“We are anticipating the
day to be a lot of fun,” she
says, “and we know that
the girls will give it their
all because they all want
to grab that placement in
the semifinals.”

She is encouraging the
families and friends of the
contestants, as well as
pageant fans, to come out
and support the young
ladies as they try to prove
that they are the fittest of
the bunch.

The contestants will be
split into two teams, and
each team will have to
clear an obstacle course
designed by Lieutenant
Ricardo Barry of the Roy-
al Bahamas Defence
Force.

Once a winning team
has been determined, the
team members will then
compete against each oth-
er in a series of physical
challenges.

The final three women
left standing will then face
the obstacle course once
again - this time as indi-
viduals — to determine the
overall winner.

And there will be an
added bonus to Saturday’s
event.

The women of the Roy-
al Bahamas Police Force
and the Royal Bahamas
Defence Force will have a
friendly competition of
their own.

They too will face an
obstacle — one that is con-
siderably more challeng-
ing than the one designed
for the earth angels — to
determine which of the
armed forces has the
fittest women.

The winners will be
named Sportswomen of
the Year, and will be given
a floating trophy by the
Miss Bahamas Organisa-
tion®.

“We were so excited
when both the Defence
and Police forces agreed
to be a part of this event,”
says Miss Malcolm. “We
can’t wait to see how this
friendly rivalry will pan
out, and we know it will
be very entertaining.”

The Miss Bahamas
World Sportswoman Chal-
lenge is being billed as the
perfect family outing.
Tickets will be available at
the door.

PAGE 12

INSIDE ¢ International sports news

‘ts

2009










LeBron and
Cavs coast past
Hawks for 2-0

series lead...
See page 14



Hepburn to run for top NPAAA post

m@ By BRENT STUBBS
Senior Sports Reporter
bstubbs@tribunemedia.net

ith the forma-

tion of the New

Providence

Amateur Ath-
letic Associations, the
Bahamas Association of Ath-
letic Associations can now con-
centrate on the international
aspects of the sport.

Curt ‘Mr H’ Hollingsworth
said the NPAAA has been
mandated to deal strictly with
organising local sporting
events.

Formed within the first six
months of Hollingsworth’s
presidency of the BAAA, the
NPAAA will go to the polls to
elect its first official body.

And Ray Hepburn, who has
headed the steering commit-
tee since its inception, said he
will definitely be running for
the top post.

“We have been given the
responsibility of starting the
NPAAA,” Hepburn said. “We
will be the governing body for



SHOWN (I-r) are Ray Hepburn, Kermit Taylor and Curt Hollingsworth

track and field in New Provi-
dence.

“The executives are already
in place and the six council
members are also in place and
the constitution has been
drawn up. We have submitted
to the executives of the BAAA
and so we’re just waiting on
our sanctioning letter.”

Hollingsworth said they have
been waiting so long for the
formation of the association

that they have given Hepburn
and his executives the permis-
sion to start operating while
they wait for the letter.

And according to Hepburn,
they are already in operation.

“The wheels are already in
motion, but we are just waiting
for them to give us a plan on
how they want to see track and
field operate in New Provi-
dence,” he said.

“My plan to the executives is

that what we want to do is put
the foundation down so that
no matter who comes behind,
they can build on it.”

Not only is the NPAAA
putting its focus on the opera-
tion of the association, but
Hepburn said they intend to
work closely with the coaches
and athletes to ensure that
there is a smooth transition
from the junior to the senior
level.

“We also want to train our
coaches,” Hepburn stressed.
“We talked extensively about
having a good training pro-
gramme where we can go into
the schools and get the physical
education teachers to be
trained in track and field.

“We know we have a lot of
talent in the schools, but we
haven’t identified them and
help to them develop them.”

Hollingsworth said the only
major difference between the
federation and the association
is that the latter is mandated to
carry out the affairs of the
association.

“We are responsible for

national events. That has been
my cry for years,” he pointed
out. “There is only one associ-
ation outside of New Provi-
dence. That is the GBAAA.

“Now we have the NPAAA,
which is ready to go. The
Andros AAA is getting ready
to come on stream in a couple
of weeks when they have their
elections. We are also in con-
versation with Eleuthera and
Abaco and Bimini is excited.
They simply said we took so
long.”

Under his administration,
Hollingsworth said they are
mandated to ensure that they
include the Family Islands and
the coaches who have not been
a part of the programme.

Hollingsworth said he was
so pleased to have two athletes
outside of New Providence and
Grand Bahama make the
Carifta team that competed in
St Lucia in April.

“That’s something we are
really striving towards,” said
Hollingsworth about including
more of the Family Island ath-
letes on its national teams.

SWIMMERS from various private schools across New Providence compete in the Bahamas Association of Independent Secondary Schools (BAISS) annual swimming champi-
onships at the Betty Kelly Kenning Swimming Complex yesterday. The official results were not available up to press time last night. The championships is one of the last two events

on the 2008-2009 BAISS sporting calendar. The other is volleyball, which is expected to be concluded next week.



(Photos by Felipé Major/Tribune staff)

Legends coming to softball/baseball great’s aid

= By BRENT STUBBS

Legends are slated to put on a series of

business houses in Governor’s Harbour

Billy,”

said Bethel of the local sports

Senior Sports Reporter
bstubbs@tribunemedia.net

DAVID ‘Billy’ McKlewhite was prob-
ably one of the most celebrated natives
out of Governor’s Harbour, Eleuthera.
Now that the former softball/baseball
great is experiencing his difficulties, the
community is coming to his aid.

A steering committee, called the Leg-
ends, has been formed to help raise funds
to assist McKlewhite in getting a replace-
ment for his left leg which was recently
amputated while he was in hospital in
New Providence.

Kingsley Bethel, one of the public rela-
tions officers for the committee, said the

activities from Thursday to Sunday (June
18-21) in Governor’s Harbour.

“It’s a group of us who have formed
the committee,” Bethel said.

Paul Simmons is the chairman of the
committee, assisted by Mark Thompson.
Val Sands is the secretary, Demetrius
Johnson is treasurer and Bethel, assisted
by the Rev Charles Sands, is responsible
for public relations.

The activities are set to kick off on
June 18 with a slide presentation on the
performances recorded of McKlewhite
and the Beck’s Hustlers, whom he played
for, in the Parish Hall.

On June 19, the committee is plan-
ning a T-shirt day and it is hoped that all

will buy the shirts, which will bear McK-
lewhite’s image on the front.

Then on June 20 there will be a full
day of activities in Bay Front Park,
including the Legends in action in soft-
ball. The activities will come to a close
with a church service on Sunday, June
21.

“We are inviting any and everybody
who has any affiliation with Governor’s
Harbour or softball in Eleuthera to come
out and help us,” Bethel said.

McKlewhite, who had to be treated
for diabetics when he had his leg ampu-
tated, is back home in Eleuthera and
according to Bethel, is in high spirits.

“We are very pleased to do this for

hero turned businessman. “This is a big
help for him financially because this is
something that is badly needed.”

During his heydays as one of the most
feared batters, McKlewhite starred for
the Beck’s Hustlers and he also repre-
sented the Bahamas on numerous
national teams.

McKlewhite was also one of the many
Bahamians who excelled to play in minor
league baseball, having suited up briefly
for the New York Mets’ Greenville Mets.

As an outfielder, McKlewhite played
in 1965 in Greenville, South Carolina,
at the age of 18. He played in 11 games
and had 20 at-bats, producing just two
hits, one of which was a triple.
TRIBUNE SPORTS

SATURDAY, MAY 9, 2009, PAGE 13



INTERNATIONAL SPORTS



Safina stops Williams to
reach Italian Open finals

lm By ALESSANDRA RIZZO
Associated Press Writer

ROME (AP) — Top-ranked
Dinara Safina outlasted Venus
Williams 6-7 (3), 6-3, 6-4 Fri-
day to advance to the finals of
the Italian Open, where she will
play Svetlana Kuznetsova in an
all-Russian match.

Kuznetsova beat Belarusian
teenager Victoria Azarenka 6-2,
6-4 in the other semifinal at the
Foro Italico.

Safina and the fifth-ranked
Williams used ferocious hitting
from the baseline, with the
American often rushing the net
to finish points.

In the third set, Safina served
out the 3-hour, 9-minute match
after committing three double-
faults and saving four break



points.

"It was a very long match and
I think I played one of my best
tennis (matches)," Safina said.

Williams closed out the first-
set tiebreaker with a delicate
drop volley, and went on to
break her opponent in the
opening game of the second set.
But the 23-year-old Russian
came back to even the match.

"It was not easy mentally,"
said Safina, who had lost her
two previous matches to
Williams.

Safina had 32 winners, com-
pared to 38 for Williams.

Williams, by reaching the
semifinals in Rome, is still
assured of moving to third in
the rankings — her highest spot
in Six years.

The final on Saturday will be

VENUS WILLIAMS reacts after losing a point to Safina...



DINARA SAFINA strikes a backhand to Venus Williams in a semifinal match at Italian Rome Masters tournament
in Rome on Friday. Safina won 6-7(3), 6-3, 6-4.

a repeat of last week's Porsche
GP final in Germany, where
Kuznetsova defeated Safina in
straight sets to capture her first
title in almost two years. Both
players have been runners-up
in Rome, Kuznetsova in 2007
and Safina in 2006.

"It was good (to win) in two
sets," Kuznetsova said. "But it
was very difficult for me, she
was hitting as hard as she
could."

Kuznetsova struggled with
her serve, but hit 23 winners —
10 more than her opponent.

The eighth-ranked Kuznetso-
va broke Azarenka three times
to capture the first set in 41 min-
utes.

In the second, the ninth-
ranked Azarenka pushed ahead
with a break but appeared to
lose her concentration as she
disputed a call by the umpire in
the third game. She lost the next

Thierry Henry could
Champions League final

BARCELONA, Spain (AP)
— Barcelona striker Thierry
Henry could miss the Champi-
ons League final against Man-
chester United due to a knee
injury.

The France striker will miss
Barcelona's next four games,
including Wednesday's Copa
del Rey final against Athletic
Bilbao, after the club said he
strained a ligament in his right
knee.

Henry injured his knee dur-
ing Barcelona's 6-2 win at Real
Madrid on Saturday and missed
Wednesday's 1-1 draw at
Chelsea which advanced the
Spanish league leader to the
Champions League final at
Rome on May 27.

Henry, who has scored 25
goals in 39 appearances in all
competitions this season, will
miss league matches against Vil-
larreal, Mallorca and Osasuna
also.

THIERRY HENRY is seen
during their training session
at Stamford Bridge, London,
on Tuesday, May 5, 2009.

(AP Photo: Alastair Grant)

Security top priority for IOC in 2016 bids



B By HAROLD HECKLE
Associated Press Writer

MADRID (AP) — Security
against terror threats is a top
priority for the International
Olympic Committee as it
weighs bids for the 2016
Olympics from Madrid and
three other cities, the head of
the evaluation panel said Fri-
day.

Nawal el Moutawakel, chair
of the IOC commission, said the
ability of a city "to organize a
safe and secure games" would
weigh heavily in the commit-
tee's technical assessment.
Chicago, Tokyo and Rio de
Janeiro are also vying to host
the 2016 Olympics.

"We have been most
impressed to find what the city

of Madrid could offer the
Olympics,” El Moutawakel said,
nearly the same words she used
after visiting the other bid cities.

"From what we have seen,
Madrid is ready to present the
games just like the other three
cities," she said at the close of
the five-day visit.

El] Moutawakel and the other
IOC members had lunch with
Spain's Royal family, who will
lead the delegation in Copen-
hagen on Oct. 2 for the final
vote on the host city.

El Moutawakel said the pan-
el had enjoyed meeting tennis
star Rafa Nadal, Real Madrid
captain Raul Gonzalez and for-
mer IOC president Juan Anto-
nio Samaranch.

Earlier, Spanish Interior Min-
ister Alfredo Perez Rubalcaba

said separatist militants would
not pose a threat to the 2016
Olympics if Madrid wins.

Rubalcaba told the 13-mem-
ber IOC evaluation team that
security forces had considerable
experience in protecting inter-
national sporting events in
Spain.

Worry

"We won't need to worry
about (Basque separatist group)
ETA in 2016," Rubalcaba said.

Madrid has already complet-
ed 77 percent of its Olympic
venues, which it believes will
allow it to weather the eco-
nomic crisis. Spain is one of the
worse-hit European countries,
with unemployment figures
expected to hit 20 percent next

year.

The IOC evaluation panel
will compile a report assessing
the four bids by Sept. 2.

Meanwhile, Spanish Sport
Minister Jaime Lissavetzky said
he doesn't believe that a pend-
ing doping law that goes against
World Anti-Doping Agency
rules would hurt Madrid's bid
chances.

The law would prohibit drug-
testing of athletes between 11
p.m. and 8 am. WADA rules
state that athletes must be avail-
able for drug testing 24 hours a
day.

Lissavetzky will attend
WADA meetings in Montreal
this weekend, where he is
expected to discuss the issue
with WADA director general
David Howman.

(AP Photos: Andrew Medichini)

five games and fell on the fourth
match point.

"When I was already playing
much better and everything, this
thing happens and it takes me
right from where I started,” said
the 19-year-old Azarenka.

Kuznetsova said her oppo-
nent should not have been so
worked up.

"To me, she (got) too upset
for no reason," she said. "It was
just one ball in the match."

miss





Nalbandian
to undergo
hip surgery
hext week

BUENOS AIRES, Argenti-
na (AP) — David Nalbandian
of Argentina will have surgery
next week on his right hip and
be sidelined for 3 to 4 months.

He will miss the French
Open, Wimbledon and the
Davis Cup quarterfinal against
the Czech Republic in July.

Nalbandian was a Wimble-
don finalist in 2002, and
reached the French Open
semifinals in 2004 and 2006.

He played in last year's
Davis Cup final loss to Spain
and was expected to team with
Juan Martin del Potro on
Argentina's Davis Cup team.
Nalbandian is ranked No. 19.

Nalbandian's spokesman
Bernardo Ballero told
Argentina's Fox Sports on Fri-
day that the operation would
take place Wednesday in
Barcelona.

Ivanovic out
of Madrid
Open with

knee injury

MADRID (AP) — Ana
Ivanovic has withdrawn from
the Madrid Open because of a
knee injury, yet expects to be
fit in time to defend her French
Open title.

The seventh-ranked Serb is
struggling with an inflammation
in her right knee. Doctors have
ordered her not to play for a
week.

Ivanovic says in a statement
Friday that the knee has both-
ered her since a Fed Cup match
last month. She says “it's
become more painful with each
match, so I decided to go and
see a specialist in Munich.”

Ivanovic says there is "no
danger” of her missing the
French Open, which begins
May 24.

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PAGE 14, SATURDAY, MAY 9, 2009

INTERNATIONAL SPORTS

TRIBUNE SPORTS





LeBRON JAMES dunks over Atlanta
Hawks’ Solomon Jones in the first quarter
VMN ac SIAC eNO cms Me TEUMO EIN
Thursday night in Cleveland...

(AP Photos: Tony Dejak)



LeBron and Cavs coast pas
Hawks for 2-0 series

@ By TOM WITHERS
AP Sports Writer

CLEVELAND (AP) —
Once the lead fattened to 16
points midway through the sec-
ond quarter, Cavaliers coach
Mike Brown turned to his
bench and summoned one of
his rested players to check back
in.

Pulling a towel from his neck
and yanking off his sweats, the
substitute hurried to the scor-
er's table and waited.

LeBron James was ready.

The Atlanta Hawks were
done.

Like a playoff wrecking ball,
the Cleveland Cavaliers rolled
to their sixth straight double-
digit win of the postseason on
Thursday night as James scored
27 points in a 105-85 demoli-
tion of the Hawks, who are
hurting and in an 0-2 hole in
the Eastern Conference semifi-
nal.

James made another of those
you've-got-to-be-kidding
buzzer beaters at the end of the
first half, Mo Williams scored
15 and Wally Szczerbiak added
17 off the bench as the Cavs
tied a league postseason record
by winning their sixth consecu-
tive playoff game by at least 10
points.

"We don't go into a game
and say ‘Let's win by 20,'"
James said. "We say ‘Let's exe-
cute and take one possession
at a time and get better. If it
causes us to win by 20 or by
two, we're ready."

The only other team to win
six straight so easily was the
2004 Indiana Pacers. Cleveland
also matched the 1986 Los
Angeles Lakers by winning
three straight games by at least
20 points in a postseason.

"We're not idiots,” center
Zydrunas Ilgauskas said. "We'll



LeBRON JAMES, Mo Williams (center) and Anderson Varejao laugh on the bench late in a 105-85 win over the
Atlanta Hawks. The Cavaliers lead the series 2-0...

run into some adversity. You
don't win 66 games just by
walking around in the park.
When it happens, we'll handle
it."

James made a step-back, 36-
foot 3-pointer at the halftime
horn to give the Cavaliers a 24-
point lead. The stunning shot
was similar to the one he
banked in at the end of the first
half in Game 1 of Cleveland's
opening-round sweep of the
Detroit Pistons.

The Hawks are the ones reel-
ing now.

Atlanta entered the game
without center Al Horford and
forward Marvin Williams —
two of its best players —
because of injuries. If that was-
n't bad enough, leading scorer
Joe Johnson rolled his right
ankle when he had his shot
blocked by James in the third
quarter and did not return.

X-rays were negative, but
Johnson, who needed a wheel-

chair to get to the locker room,
wore a walking boot as he and
his teammates headed home for
Game 3 on Saturday.

"T can't see me not playing,”
Johnson said. "I don't want to
let this opportunity go by.
We're down 0-2. I want to be
out there for my teammates.
Hopefully in 48 hours I will feel
a lot better."

While the rest of the NBA
exchanges elbows, flagrant
fouls and menacing stares in

lead

the playoffs, the Cavaliers are
looking for a fight — but so far,
James and his gang can't find
one.

Atlanta adjusted its defense
to try and stop the league's
MVP from getting to the bas-
ket, but he got there anyway.
Out of position, all the Hawks
could do was reach in as James
streaked past, and by halftime
he had already attempted 10
free throws.

"Honestly, I don't think that
even if we were 100 percent
that if we gave it the effort we
gave, that it would have made a
difference," said Maurice
Evans, who led the Hawks with
16 points.

"They are playing team bas-
ketball at both ends of the
floor."

The Hawks were in a similar
jam last season in the first
round. They got blown out by
23 and 19 points in the first two
games in Boston, but won two
at home and forced a seven-
game series.

"We're still in it,” said Josh
Smith, who scored just eight
points on 2-of-13 shooting. "We
have to be ready to protect
home court."

On the 20th anniversary of
Michael Jordan's double-
clutching jumper — known
infamously around here as
"The Shot" — over Craig Ehlo
that beat the Cavaliers in the
1989 playoffs, James gave
Cleveland fans a shot to savor.

Taking an inbounds pass with
5.4 seconds left, James quickly
dribbled into the frontcourt,
pulled up on Hawks guard
Mario West, flicked his wrist
and splashed his deep shot to
make it 59-35. As 20,000-plus
fans erupted, James stood and
playfully swung his arms back
and forth.

So easy.

NBA Today

@ By The Associated
Press

Cleveland at Atlanta (8pm
EDT). The Cavaliers, who
had the league's best record,
66-16, are 6-0 in the playoffs
and up 2-0 in the Eastern
Conference semifinal against
the undermanned Hawks.

STARS

Thursday

—LeBron James, Cava-
liers, scored 27 points, end-
ing the first and second quar-
ters with last-second baskets,
as the Cleveland overpow-
ered Atlanta 105-85 to open
a 2-0 lead in their Eastern
Conference semifinal.

—Anderson Verejao,
Cavaliers, added 12 points,
eight rebounds and four
blocked shots for Cleveland.

STATS

Now a perfect 6-0 in the
postseason, the Cavaliers
tied a league record by win-
ning their sixth consecutive
playoff game by double dig-
its, beating Atlanta 105-85.
The only other team to do it
was the 2004 Indiana Pacers
... Cleveland led by as much
as 36 points in its rout of the
Hawks.

JOB SECURITY

The New Orleans Hornets
are sticking with head coach
Byron Scott for at least one
more season. Team presi-
dent Hugh Weber says the
franchise was disappointed
by its first-round exit from
the playoffs, but that the
entire organization shares
responsibility. Weber added
that Scott has not expressed
an interest in leaving and
that any interest other teams
may have in the coach is
"not an issue."

SUSPENDED

The Lakers’ Derek Fisher
and Orlando's Rafer Alston
were both suspended one
game by the NBA for sepa-
rate incidents in playoff

games. Fisher was called for
a flagrant foul when he
struck the Rockets’ Luis
Scola, who was setting a
pick, with his shoulder and
head as the Rockets brought
the ball up the court. Fisher
was ejected from Game 2 on
Wednesday.

In the Magic's 112-94 loss
that same night, Boston's
Eddie House was celebrat-
ing after making a shot when
Alston reached out and
slapped him in the back of
the head. Each received a
technical foul after standing
face-to-face for a few sec-
onds before referees inter-
vened.

Both players will miss
games on Friday. The Magic
are at home, tied 1-1 with
Boston, while the Lakers
will be in Houston in a series
that is also tied 1-1.

SIDELINED

The Hawks were missing
center Al Horford and for-
ward Marvin Williams
because of injuries for Game
2 in Cleveland. Then, lead-
ing scorer Joe Johnson
rolled his right ankle in the
third quarter and did not
return. X-rays were negative
and the Hawks said Johnson
is doubtful for Game 3 on
Saturday in Atlanta.

SPEAKING

"I'm having fun. I'm hav-
ing a ball.”

— LeBron James, the
NBA's most valuable play-
er, after leading Cleveland to
its sixth straight playoff vic-
tory and a 2-0 series lead
over Atlanta

"If that was me throwing
the elbow at Kobe, first of
all, I would've hurt Kobe
way more than he hurt me. I
probably would've knocked
him out with the same force
he used against me. That's
why I'm not going to throw
an elbow at somebody's
head. It’s dangerous."

— Rockets forward Ron
Artest on a confrontation
with Lakers star Kobe
Bryant in Game 2 of their
series



INSIGHT

For the stories

behind the news,
read Insight
on Mondays


PAGE 16, SATURDAY, MAY 9, 2009

THE TRIBUNE



INTERNATIONAL NEWS



Angry protests

killed in Afghan violence

in Haiti over
slaying of
countryman

ANGRY demonstrators }
hurled stones and tore downa }
sign at the Dominican Repub- }
lic’s consulate in Haiti on Fri- }
day to protest the decapita- :
tion slaying of a Haitian in }
Santo Domingo, according to }

the Associated Press.

About 150 protesters }
massed outside the walled }
compound, but Haitian police }
prevented them from enter- }
ing. U.N. peacekeepers with
riot gear waited nearby but }

did not enter the fray.

Some protesters shoved
pictures of the decapitated }
body into the faces of Hait- ;
ian police as they yelled and }
pushed at the human barri-

cade.

At the embassy, demon- i
strators broke a window and }
burned a makeshift Domini-

can flag.

The protesters chanted
“justice for Carlos,” in refer- }
ence to Haitian migrant Car- }
los Nerilus, whose decapitated }
body was found Saturday in }
what Dominican authorities }
described as an “incident

between individuals.”

Police Maj. Jose Lluberes }
said the slaying was meant to }
avenge the death of ai
Dominican businessman who }
was recently killed in the }

same Way.

Prosecutor Miguel Morfe
said a man identified as Con- }
fesor Reyes has been charged }
with involuntary homicide }
and possession of an illegal }
weapon. A judge has ordered }
him to remain in prison for
three months as authorities }

investigate.

Reyes’ attorney, Isaias }
Matos, said his client is inno- }
cent and argued unsuccess- }
fully against his detainment. It }
is unclear what kind of evi- }
dence police have against }

Reyes.

Haitian officials have ques-
tioned whether Dominican }
police could have prevented }

Nerilus’ killing.

The neighboring countries ;
have a bitter history. An esti- }
mated 1 million people of }
Haitian descent live in the }
Dominican Republic, often }
suffering discrimination and }

violence.
British MPs
caught in

EXPense
Claims farce

m@ LONDON

IT HAS all the makings ofa
Monty Python sketch — prim
British lawmakers caught ina
farce over expense claims for }
everything from X-rated }
movies to a bathtub plug, }
according to the Associated }

Press.

But reality has come home
to roost in the often absurd }
world of Her Majesty’s Gov- }

ernment.

Friday’s leaked list of law- }
maker expenses has leveled :
another blow to Prime Minister
Gordon Brown’s beleaguered
government, which has been
blamed for a litany of problems
ranging from the Iraq war to }

the deepening recession.

According to the details pub- }
lished by Britain’s Daily Tele- ;
graph, Brown paid his brother :
Andrew more than 6,500 :
pounds ($9,800) in two years i
for a maid the two shared when }
Brown was Britain’s Treasury :
chief. The newspaper declined
to say how it had obtained }
expense claims from 13 minis- }
ters but promised to roll out }

more in the coming days.

Home Office Secretary }
Jacqui Smith expensed two X- i
rated movies her husband }
watched, which she later }
repaid. Housing minister and }
former Foreign Secretary }
claimed 600 pounds ($900) for
hanging plant baskets. And for-
mer Deputy Prime Minister }
John Prescott claimed 300 :
pounds ($450) over two years }

to fix broken toilet seats.

The list could also prove }
damaging to the opposition }
Conservatives — one Tory }
lawmaker expensed fertilizer }
used on his country house gar- }
den, putting in as well for cans i

of cat food.

Other expenses, categorized :
only by political party, includ- }
ed toilet seats, horse manure, }
wine rack, rat poison, pool }
maintenance, piano tuning, a ;
chocolate Santa and a pizza }

cutter.



US denies 147 civilians

@ KABUL

VIDEO of the aftermath of a disputed
incident involving American forces and
the Taliban shows bloodied bodies of
children laid out with other corpses, con-
firming international Red Cross findings
at the two remote villages in western
Afghanistan, according to the Associated
Press.

The U.S. military does not contest that
civilians died but called “extremely over-
exaggerated” a report by an Afghan offi-
cial that as many as 147 were killed.

Afghans blame aerial bombing Mon-
day and Tuesday for the deaths and
destruction. US. officials have suggested
that Taliban fighters caused at least some
of the deaths, and said investigators on a
joint U.S.-Afghan team were still ana-
lyzing data collected in the villages of
Ganjabad and Gerani in Farah province.

In a video obtained Friday by Associ-
ated Press Television News, villagers are
seen wrapping the mangled bodies of
some of the victims in blankets and
cloths and lining them up on the dusty
ground.

In one shot, two children are lifted
from a blanket with another adult
already in it. The children’s faces are
blackened, and parts of their tunics are
soaked in what appears to be dried
blood.

Their limp bodies are then put on the
ground, wrapped in another cloth and
placed next to the other bodies. It was
not clear how many bodies were in the
room where the video was shot.

The man who shot the video said
many of the bodies he filmed Tuesday in
Gerani were in pieces. He spoke on con-
dition of anonymity out of fear of retri-
bution from security agencies.

It was not possible to verify indepen-
dently the authenticity of the video. The
International Committee of the Red
Cross also has said that women and chil-
dren were among dozens of dead people
its teams saw in the two villages.

On Thursday, a local official said he
collected from residents the names of

» FLOODING IN BRAZIL



David Guttenfelder/AP Photo

SPL. Jordan Custer from the U.S. Army First Battalion, 26th Infantry returns fire on a Taliban position as their base Camp
Restrepo comes under attack in the Korengal Valley of Afghanistan's Kunar Province on Friday May 8, 2009.

147 people killed in the fighting. If true,
it would be the deadliest case of civilian
casualties in Afghanistan since the 2001
U.S.-led invasion that ousted the Tal-
iban regime.

Villagers “were pointing to graves and
saying, "This is my son, this is my daugh-
ter,”’ said Abdul Basir Khan, a mem-
ber of Farah’s provincial council. He said
he gave his tally to the investigators.

The U.S. military described that toll as
over the top.

“The investigators and the folks on
the ground think that those numbers are
extremely over-exaggerated,” U.S. mili-
tary spokeswoman Capt. Elizabeth
Mathias said. “We are definitely
nowhere near those estimates.”

While past reports of civilian deaths at
the hands of international forces drew
immediate outcries from President

—_ oT eee eg ee

E ae et aol

es
= 2

Hamid Karzai’s government, this time
the response has been muted. The most
vehement reaction has come from oppo-
sition lawmakers, who demanded an
agreement regulating the operations of
foreign troops.

After a period of tense relations with
the Washington, Karzai appears to have
toned down his statements about civilian
casualties caused by Western forces even
though the issue resonates with Afghan
public.

One reason could be that Karzai feels
confident he will win re-election in August
without further appealing to nationalist
emotions, as no strong challenger has
emerged and Friday was the deadline for
registering as a candidate.

Also, he may not want to stir up anti-
American sentiment as the Obama admin-
istration rolls out its strategy for the region.

NORTHERN Brazil's worst
floods in decades have dri-
ven tens of thousands from
their homes to seek refuge
wherever they can, packing
onto flatbed trucks and
braving rivers teeming with

deadly reptiles in a scramble

for higher ground. Brazil-
ians huddled in cow pens
converted into emergency
shelters Friday, as swollen
rivers continue to rise and
northern Brazil’s worst
floods in decades boosted
the number of homeless to
nearly 270,000. The death
toll rose to 39.

That strategy involves linking success
in Afghanistan with security in neigh-
boring Pakistan, where Taliban militants
are active along the border. The U.S.
has also pledged long-term nonmilitary
efforts here — for example, civilian
expertise in farming and other specialties
— along with an increase of 21,000 U.S.
troops.

“If there’s one lesson I draw from the
past, it is the importance of our staying
engaged,” Defense Secretary Robert
Gates told reporters Friday at Forward
Operating Base Airborne in northern
Afghanistan, shortly before heading back
to Washington.

“And if there’s a lesson for Ameri-
cans and the international community,
it’s that we don’t dare turn our backs on
Afghanistan. This will work if we stay
engaged.”

2






PAGE 1

N N A A S S S S A A U U A A N N D D B B A A H H A A M M A A I I S S L L A A N N D D S S L L E E A A D D I I N N G G N N E E W W S S P P A A P P E E R R Alleged sex scandal teacher ar r ested C M Y K C M Y K WEATHER A FULLDAY OF SUNSHINE HIGH 86F LOW 77F I N S I D E SEE PAGE 5 S P O R T S Samples sent for analysis following fire SEEFRONTOFSPORTS H epburn to run for NPAAA post Andre Birbal wanted in connection with molestation claims Move to extradite fugitive from United States to Bahamas The Tribune ANYTIME ... ANYPLACE , WE RE #1 B AHAMASEDITION TRY OUR SOUTHERN CHICKEN BISCUIT www.tribune242.com BAHAMASBIGGEST CARSFORSALE, HELPWANTED ANDREALESTATE I N S I D E INSIDE AUDITIONS FOR MOVIE ON B AHAMIAN POLITICS PAGE THREE B AHAMIANS BEING OVERLOOKED FOR TOP JOBS, PHARMACEUTICAL WORKERS CLAIM PAGE THREE ASYLUM REQUEST REJECTION INVESTIGATION WEL C OMED PAGE SIX B AHAMAS AND INDONESIA T O F ORMALISE TRADE AND EC ONOMIC TIES PAGE SEVEN Volume: 105 No.138SATURDAY, MAY 9, 2009 PRICE – 75 (Abaco and Grand Bahama $1.25 ‘I wanted my ex-boyfriend locked up’ Mother who made kidnap claim says she feared for family’ s safety n By NATARIO McKENZIE Tribune Staff Reporter THE woman who alleged that her former boyfriend had kidnapped her three-year-old son said yesterday that she had made the false claim because she wanted police tol ock him up. Angie Brown, 37, told the court yesterday that “as long as he is locked up, I know I’ll be safe as well as my family.” “My life is disgusting because of him,” she said. Brown, who also goes by the name of Angie Moss, told Chief Magistrate Roger Gomez that she is tired of the physical abuse and death threats to which he has subject-e d her. According to prosecutor Sergeant Sean Thurston, Moss, a mother of five, told police on May 1 that her former boyfriend, 35-year-old Kendrick Siefort, had removedh er 1996 Bluebird from outside her Lewis Street home. She also told them that her son, Shannon Bannister, was asleep on the back seat. On Tuesday police issued an all points bulletin for Siefort, who turned himself in on Wednesday. Sgt. Thurston told the court that investigators later discovered that Brown had made a false report. He said that Brown had told police that she just wanted Siefort off the streets. Sgt Thurston said Brown had also told police that Siefort had beat her on several occasions. He told the court that Brown has no criminal record, but that he has several matters in court against Siefort. He recommended that she be sent to Sandilands to be evaluated. Brown pleaded guilty to deceiving woman Corporal 2687 Clarke by making a false statement. She claimed, n By DENISE MAYCOCK Tribune Freeport Reporter dmaycock@tribunemedia.net FREEPORT – Fugitive Andre Birbal – the former Eight Mile Rock High School teacher wanted for questioning in connection with allegations of sexual molestation – was arrested in the United States. An effort is now being made for his extradition to the Bahamas. Senior Assistant Commissioner Marvin Dames confirmed on Friday that Birbal, 46, was arrested by US authorities in New York early this week. He said that the Police and the Attorney General’s Office are working with authorities in the United States to have him returned to the Bahamas as soon as possible. “We told you over a month ago that we did in fact have an international APB out on him and this demonstrates that the system does in fact work,” said Mr Dames. Birbal was arrested on Sunday, May 3, by a New York Transit Police Officer after he committed a traffic violation. Bahamian Police were immediately notified of his arrest. Mr Dames explained that following his arrest the authorities took Birbal into custody and conducted a check and discovered that there was an APB out on him from the Bahamas. The Trinidadian teacher is wanted by police here for questioning into allegations of unnatural sexual intercourse with two former students. Birbal was employed as an art teacher at Eight Mile Rock High. He was removed from the school after allegations of molestation surfaced in January. He fled the country in February after police investigations were launched into complaints concerning the molestation of two former male students, who claimed they were abused while in the seventh grade. The students, who are now out of school, claim that the abuse lasted for eight years. Birbal has denied the accusations. He has been teaching in the W OMAN IN C OURTOVER FALSECLAIM F e l i p M a j o r / T r i b u n e s t a f f Andre Birbal COURTAPPEARANCE: Angie Brown, who also goes by the name of Angie Moss, pleaded guilty to making a false statement. n SEESTORYONRIGHT SEE page eight Felip Major /Tribune staff SPEAKING OUT: Tracey, sister of Kendrick Siefort, talks to the media yesterday outside court. SEE page eight n By TANEKA THOMPSON Tribune Staff Reporter tthompson@tribunemedia.net CONCERNS arose within the legal fraternity yesterday that the sudden resignation of Supreme Court Senior Justice John Lyons could possibly cripple the hearing of commercial cases, an area in which Justice Lyons is highly specialised. According to a high-profile member of the legal community, who was "surprised" by the turn of events, his departure could affect the way the Bahamas' court system is perceived by the international public. "This is a big problem, we don't have sufficient judges in the Bahamas, we don't have sufficient judges with experience, and lastly we don't have sufficient judges with experience in the com mercial section. "So it's a real problem for us trying to promote ourselves as a first world country, a financial services centre it's going to make matters worse," said the lawyer, who asked to remain anonymous. According to the Supreme Court's website there are currently 11 justices excluding Justice Lyons one of whom is listed as an acting justice. Sources said Chief Justice Sir Burton Hall and Justice Jon Isaacs are members of the Supreme Court who are well versed in commercial court matters beg ging the need for a replacement to Jus tice Lyons with similar qualifications. "I think that they are certainly going to have to look inside and outside for replacements because he was one of the more senior and he was dealing with quite a few of the large, commercial, technical cases," said a second well-placed member of the legal community who did not want to be identified. A important case involving the Central Bank of Ecuador and other parties is one example of the extensive cases he was scheduled to hear. "The other senior people have really been concentrating on criminal matters but that is Fears that Justice Lyons’ resignation could hit commercial case hearings SEE page eight John Lyons Detention Centre conditions better since Tribune story n By MEGAN REYNOLDS Tribune Staff Reporter mreynolds@tribunemedia.net DETAINEES in the Carmichael Road Detention Centre say living conditions have improved greatly since The Tribune reported allegations about the terrible state of the centre. However repeated calls for press access to the facility and independent investigations into claims of abuse have so far been ignored. The detainees who complained of “concentration camp” like conditions in February told The Tribune yesterday how dirty old mattresses have been replaced with new ones, the grimy walls have been repainted, the blocked toilets repaired, and washing machines and dryers have been installed for detainees to wash their clothes. They also said cable televisions have been set up in the men’s and women’s dorms. Immigration Minister Branville McCart ney said he was “pleasantly surprised” when he toured the facility with Immigration boss es last week. He said: “I wanted to go see it and I was pleasantly surprised with what I saw... I think they are happy. I have some concerns about SEE page eight “I wanted to go see it and I was pleasantly surprised with what I saw.” Branville McCartney

PAGE 2

C M Y K C M Y K LOCAL NEWS PAGE 2, SATURDAY, MAY 9, 2009 THE TRIBUNE MOTHER’S DAY CRAFT SHOW ORIGINAL Bahamian crafts were on display ind owntown Nassau yesterday for both tourists and locals to browse and buy. Authentic native straw work, wood work and jewellery made from locally sourced shells grabbedt he attention of passersby in Charlotte Street. And those who stayed to appreciate the work indulged in the sensuous delights of handmade soaps, bath gels and creams, or cracked a smile o ver humorous signs crafted out of driftwood. The craft show was put on by the Ministry of Tourism. Felip Major /Tribune staff

PAGE 3

n By MEGAN REYNOLDS Tribune Staff Reporter mreynolds@tribunemedia.net A SPIRING film stars of all a ges are being called up to audition for a new movie about Bahamian politics in Bamboo Town, Nassau, this afternoon. The Bamboo Town Film C lub production ‘My MP’ writt en by Bahamas Film Festival president Celi Moss, famed for his independent gangster film ‘Balls Alley’, will feature fictional characters based on reall ife politicians. Parts will be cast for the lead r ole of progressive Bamboo T own MP ‘Mr Brown’, the p rime minister, leader of the o pposition, members of parl iament, news reporters and t he Bamboo Town con stituents. T he film follows Mr Brown a s he tries to move away from t he hand-out culture, where M Ps are expected to lavish gifts on the community, and a cts as a facilitator for people in his constituency by assisting them in various ways instead. Real life Bamboo Town MP and Minister of Immigration Branville McCartney said the l ikeness is uncanny. H e said: “When I read the movie I often wondered if Mr Moss was on the campaign trail with me during he election. Many of the things I said and did and continue to do are r eflected in that movie.” M r McCartney sanctioned the move and has opened his constituency office in East Street South for today’s audi-t ion and subsequent meetings of the Bamboo Town Film Club. He said: “The movie is really about today’s political environment and it has some funny scenes in it, but also seriousc onnotations in terms of the underlying theme.” Mr McCartney is hoping the p remiere of the film at the sixth annual Bahamas Film Festival in November will raise funds for young people in his constituency to obtain scholarships for the College of the B ahamas. F ilmmaker Mr Moss praised the educational incentive and said: “Filmmaking stimulates the mind and allows youngsters to explore endless possibilities not only for themselves b ut for their community and a lso their country. “I look forward to continually working with the residents of Bamboo Town with this ando ther projects. I also congratulate the members of the Bamboo Town Film Club for their dedication and hard work.” The casting call is for men and women of all ages, sizes and ethnicities. Auditions willb e held at the constituency office in East Street South from 12 to 3pm today. n B y TANEKA THOMPSON T ribune Staff Reporter tthompson@tribunemedia.net DISGRUNTLED pharmaceu tical workers claim Bahamians are being overlooked for top jobs in the industry to the benefit of for eign workers. They say they are fed up with the influx of expatriates – usually from other parts of the Caribbean who come to fill management positions that should be offered to Bahamians. They claimed the foreign work ers are often paid more than equally qualified Bahamians. "Our country's practice is to bring in foreigners for jobs Bahamians are qualified to do. In the pharmaceutical industry it's common to bring in foreigners to work the Bahamian territory and these are not specialised positions, they will teach you what you need to learn," said one pharmaceutical salesman, who asked to remain anonymous. "What qualifications does a Jamaican bring that a Bahamian doesn't bring, especially in these tough economic times? They come and they work and then they just bank their money," said another employee, who questioned why drug companies would choose to foot living, work permit and other expenses for a foreign worker instead of hiring a Bahamian. However local pharmaceutical distributor Nassau Agencies Ltd said out of their 30 sales representatives who work for about 15 international drug companies, only one of them is foreign. And this worker – who holds a management position – is only hired on a temporary "training" basis, and will train a Bahamian to later assume the post, said pharmaceuticals manager Barbara Donathan-Henderson, who said she could only speak for her agency. Ms Henderson argued that the company's policy is to ensure vacancies are not filled by for eigners if there are qualified Bahamian applicants. "Very often (the drug companies) need somebody with experience depending on the position they need to fill but we never condone any company bringing in a foreigner if we know there is someone able to fill the position here. But Bahamians traditionally have not always been, compared to others in the region; we tend to be less sales (oriented Ms Henderson added that if a local company does hire a for eigner, all the costs associated with bringing in the worker are usually paid for by the interna tional drug companies. C M Y K C M Y K L OCAL NEWS THE TRIBUNE SATURDAY, MAY 9, 2009, PAGE 3 A MAN accused of offering a bribe to the police and an officer accused of accepting a bribe were arraigned in the Magistrate’s Court yesterday. P olice have charged A nthony Rolle, 41, of Leward East, with two counts of offering a bribe. It is alleged that on October 20, 2008, Rolle offered $400 to police Constable A rnold Cooper and $200 to C onstable 1878 Bryan Dillet as an inducement to prevent another public servant from performing his duty. R olle pleaded not guilty to the charge. Police have also charged Constable Dillet, 34, of Southern Breeze Estates, with abetment to offer a bribe and accepting a bribe. I t is alleged that on Monday, October 20, 2008, Offi cer Dillet offered a bribe to C onstable 415 Arnold Cooper. It is further alleged that o n the same day, Officer Dill et accepted $200 from Anthony Rolle. Dillet pleaded not guilty to t he charges. Rolle and Dillet, who were arraigned before Chief Mag-i strate Roger Gomez yesterd ay, will remain on police bail until they appear in Court 10, Nassau Street on May 11. AN article on page five of yesterday’s Tribune under the headline ‘Shoes destroyed by store bosses ‘not fit for charity’’ inaccurately reported t hat hundreds of pairs of s hoes were destroyed by the president and co-owner of S hoe Village Egan Kemp. However, Mr Kemp is in fact the president and co-o wner of Shoe Depot. Shoe Village was not i nvolved in the matter in any way. T he Tribune a pologises for a ny inconvenience this error may have caused. WRITERS MEETING T HE monthly meeting of t he Commonwealth Writers of the Bahamas will be held today at Chapter One BookS tore at the College of the Bahamas, beginning at 2pm on the second floor. Auditions begin for new Bahamian movie Filmmaker Celi Moss Pharmacy workers claim discrimination crime BRIEF Man arraigned on accusations of bribery CORRECTION

PAGE 4

EDITOR, The Tribune. The hollering and screaming from the PLP for a select committee about the unfortunate allegations of molestation at the Eight Mile Rock Senior High School, EightM ile Rock Grand Bahama is nothing more than a political ploy to gain headlines and toa ppear to be serious about the incident that happened. The fact of the matter is t hat the PLP behaviour and record does not, in my opinion, bear out their seriousness. There were many incidences that have happened that could b e used to prove that there is simply no sincerity in the PLP. But the one that stands out was the sexual molestationa nd brutal murder of the six boys in Freeport. T o my best recollection and I certainly stand to be corrected, the murders occurred a round the same time the molestation of the boy(s Eight Mile Rock High School began. I intend to shine a floodlight on the obvious inconsistencyo f the PLP and how they play with people's minds and emo t ions, strictly for political pur p oses. The murders and molesta tion started around May 2003. I t was horrible and sent shock waves not only in the Grand Bahama area but throughout the entire Bahamas. I know for a fact that the international press was also interested in the events. But what was not only sig nificantly interesting but stun ning was that the DPM and Minister of National Security C ynthia Pratt did not visit or address the Freeport incident u ntil September, 120 days plus after the murders were reported. The visit came after there w as not only a public outcry but a demonstration. M other Pratt visited Freeport at least two to three times before finally address-i ng the horrible incidents. This is what it took for the PLP to finally say somethingt o a confused people that in many cases were frightened t o death and in a state of panic. According to my informat ion, Mother Pratt did not visit the parents of the missing b oys until the following month. During this time there was n o select committee, no call for a select committee, no one v olunteered for one. These are the facts, nothing personal. T he point I am really dri ving to is that if the same enthusiasm that the opposition is pretending to have now was used, then maybe thesei ncidences at Eight Mile Rock could have been avoided. Had there been measures p ut in place then, maybe the necessary discipline and c hecks and balances would have been used to not only detect that kind of behaviourb ut after detection the appropriate conclusions would have b een made. Had there been intervention by the PLP government,r ather than sweeping this under the proverbial carpet, maybe, just maybe, we could have saved these boys at Eight Mile Rock High School ando ther boys from experiencing the horror they have. The PLP owe the people of Grand Bahama and the entire Bahamas an apology for completely ignoring some things that could have, and in my opinion in this particular case, made the difference. So friends and countrymen l isten to this, whenever the P LP starts hollering, maybe w e should find out if it is because they are hurting from seeing the handwriting on the wall, or if it is because their c ollective conscience is bothe ring them from not doing w hat was and is necessary to protect our children. T he PLP did nothing to address the molestation and w ould pretend to be concerned now. H ow hypocritical, how d evious. T hey did nothing then and, in my opinion, they could care less now. Actually Bahamians are disgusted with the desperate tactics that they are using. It is counterproductive. The PLP are bankrupt of sensible ideas and are appar-e ntly hell-bent on destroying t his country, no matter what. They can't win again, so they want to take the ball and end the game. This is how selfish, “all for me baby” people behave. This is pathetic. I VOINE W INGRAHAM N assau, May 4, 2009. C M Y K C M Y K EDITORIAL/LETTERS TO THE EDITOR PAGE 4, SATURDAY, MAY 9, 2009 THE TRIBUNE The Tribune Limited NULLIUS ADDICTUS JURARE IN VERBA MAGISTRI Being Bound to Swear to The Dogmas of No Master L EON E. H. DUPUCH, Publisher/Editor 1903-1914 S IR ETIENNE DUPUCH, Kt., O.B.E., K.M., K.C.S.G., (Hon. P ublisher/Editor 1919-1972 Contributing Editor 1972-1991 EILEEN DUPUCH CARRON, C.M.G., M.S., B.A., LL.B. P ublisher/Editor 1972Published Daily Monday to Saturday S hirley Street, P.O. Box N-3207, Nassau, Bahamas Insurance Management Building., P.O. F-485, Freeport, Grand Bahama T ELEPHONES Switchboard (News, Circulation and Advertising Advertising Manager (242 C irculation Department (242 N assau Fax: (242 Freeport, Grand Bahama: 1-(242 F reeport fax: (242 W EBSITE www.tribune242.com – updated daily at 2pm EVERYONE is piling on Sarah Palin, even though she will never be president of the United States. The Alaska governor is everyone’s f avourite foil, from the left-wing Huffington P ost to the ever-posturing Mitt Romney. J ohn McCain, the Republican presidential n ominee who cynically chose her as his r unning mate, now snubs her with relish. They all act like she has a real chance to win the White House, when they all know t he truth. When it comes to be taken seriously by the general electorate as a potential presid ent, it’s as over for her as it was for Dan Q uayle. Quayle was doomed even after he served four years as vice president. He was the proverbial heartbeat away from the firstP resident Bush, but could never overcome the perception that he lacked gravitas. Palin only ran for vice president; she n ever made it from Wasilla to Washington. And her political problem is bigger than Quayle’s, because it extends to her family. T hink about the picture-perfect Obama family, from adorable First Daughters to adorable First Puppy. And speaking of adorable, what is more adorable than the president and his wife s trolling hand-in-hand around the White H ouse grounds after a Saturday night date? Their family image is managed expertly by the White House with help from the m edia. P alin’s family portrait is much more com plicated and gritty. In some ways, it is more reflective of the reality of American family life. But it brings baggage that is especially difficult for a female candidate to overcome. From the moment Palin appeared on the national scene as a surprise pick for vice president, her family attracted critical attention. Palin had to fight off Internet-spawned rumours that her youngest child, Trig, who was born with Down syndrome, was really her daughter’s. Then came the real news. Bristol Palin, her 17-year-old daughter, was unwed and pregnant, despite her mother’s abstinenceonly platform. Palin weathered those headlines and others about her snowmobiling husband, Todd. As the campaign moved forward, she was undercut more by her own performance in a series of nationally televised interviews. They revealed an inexperienced candidate with a superficial understanding of economic and foreign policy matters. P alin managed to survive a debate with Joe Biden, the Democratic vice presidential c andidate, and remained popular on the campaign trail with her core conservative constituency. But she was a major turnoff to the very voters she was supposed to attract Hillary Clinton’s female supporters. Palin is still extremely popular with the hard-core conservative base and wasr ecently named to the National Council for a New America, a group aimed at rebranding the GOP. A recent CNN/Opini on Research poll of 429 Republicans gave Palin a slight edge over fellow Republicans like Romney and Mike Huckabee. Palin also made Time magazine’s list of i nfluential people, causing Romney to crack: “But was that the issue on the most beautiful people or the most influential people?” R omney is smarter and more accomp lished than Palin, and just as good-looking. But Palin has something he lacks: a core set of unwavering conservative prin ciples. It gives her an early advantage with Republican primary voters. Lucky for rivals like Romney, Palin also faces an ongoing family soap opera that continues to undercut her political message. Bristol Palin broke up with Levi Johnston, the father of their child. The two aren ot getting married, as announced during the presidential campaign. J ohnston’s mother faces a drug possession trial. His sister accused Bristol Palin of calling her family “white trash.” After giving one interview in which she said abstinence is “not realistic at all,” Bristol Palin is now speaking out as a teen advocate for absti nence. None of that should matter. But family issues do matter, especially for female candidates. When it comes to temperament, accomplishments, and work/family balance, women always walk a line. The line Palin walks as a working mother of five and new grandmother continues to trip her up as a presidential candidate. That makes her an easy target for Democrats and Republicans, who enjoy running against her. (This article was written by Joan Vennochi of the Boston Globe -c. 2009). The hypocrisy of the PLP as it relates to EMR molestation LETTERS letters@tribunemedia.net Palin still an easy target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fGD\VDIWHUWKHGDWHRISXEOLFDWLRQRIWKLVQRWLFH EDITOR, The Tribune. Y our recently retired Managing Editor, John M arquis, displayed a talent for stirring contro versy, intellectual or otherwise. T his, of course, and perhaps unfortunately for relentless “seekers of truth”, made him u nique among local practitioners of journalism. T his burning, and indubitably, universal d esire “to know,” probably explains the popu larity of a certain bi-weekly tabloid, which, in addition to “news of the screws,” tries to keep its readers regularly informed of the “stories behind the stories”. Photojournalist Philip Jones Griffiths (19362008), is reported to have said that journalists, by their very nature, must be anarchists. This “distinction” must have applied to Mr Marquis, at least according to some, who described him as “a paid journalistic assassin” practising his art, according to another, in a news media engaged in “journalistic terrorism.” But those aspiring to fill Mr Marquis’ shoes, might take heed to the words of New York Times Executive Editor Bill Keller, who observed that quality journalism “involves experienced reporters going places, bearing witness, digging into records, developing sources, checking and double-checking, backed by editors who try to enforce high standards. I mean journalism that, however imperfect, labours hard to be trustworthy, to supply you with the kind of information you need to be an engaged citizen. T he supply of this kind of journalism is declining because it is hard, expensive, some times dangerous work.” M y own umbrage with Mr Marquis, if it can b e so described, is his somewhat, although per haps unintentional, deprecating reference to the Bahamas’ former slave status. History has shown many times over that national origins cannot be the ultimate determinant of success. To quote Ralph Emerson, although the words can perhaps be more accurately attributed to “Anonymous”: “What lies behind us/And what lies before us/Are tiny matters/Compared to what lies within us.” After all, Mr Marquis’ model country, Great Britain, was once enslaved by the Romans for 500 years, and look what they have achieved. Wishing Mr Marquis all the best and much success in his reportedly in-the-works book on The Bahamas, I remain, SIMON ARTZI Nassau, May, 2009 Who will fill John Marquis’ shoes? EDITOR, The Tribune . James Madison, one of the so-called Founding Fathers of the United States, pointed out in 1788 that the authority of government creates strong incentives for abuse of power. And in these trying economic times Mr. Hubert Ingraham, Prime Minister of The Bahamas advised that government revenue is in extreme decline (my words options for them to consider: Tax more, borrow more or cut services. As we know, government is the only organisation among us that can force its will under the threat of a fine, jail time or both. So this presents what James Madison and economists refer to as The Paradox of Power. Does the government control itself or does it simply use its power to tax Bahamians more? As pointed out by Peter Leeson in his recent book, The Invisi ble Hook ; "Ruler's predatory behaviour shapes citizens' incentive to cooperate for mutual gain. If leaders are going to take nearly all the proceeds of production and exchange, why bother producing and exchanging? The resulting decline in cooperation impoverishes society. Thus, solving the paradox of power is crucial to a successful and flourishing society." Hopefully Mr. Ingraham and his government will remember this sage advice from 221 years ago when they are deliberating about how to provide the right incentives for future economic growth in The Bahamas. Yours in Liberty, RICK LOWE Nassau, May 6, 2009 The paradox of power and incentives for futur e economic growth

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SAMPLES of the wall and ground near the fire-ravaged Workers’ Party headquarters in Black Village have been sent to a laboratory for analysis, the Fire D epartment said. The party’s office was destroyed by a fire that ripped through the building at around 4am on Thursday. See photos on the right. It is the third time in less than 12 months that the office on Rupert Dean Lane South has been damaged by fire. The previous fire in October last year damaged three rooms just six months after the first fire tore through the building in April 2008. The blaze this week has now led to the building being completely demolished, party leader Rodney Moncur said. Mr Moncur said he suspects the fires are the work of arsonists and said there was also an attempted arson attack on his house in April last year. “I have had a number of attacks involving fire so I went to see the Commissioner of P olice to be as responsible as possible and avert something great from happening,” the Workers’ Party leader said. C M Y K C M Y K L OCAL NEWS T HE TRIBUNE SATURDAY, MAY 9, 2009, PAGE 5 THIS PHOTO shows fire marks on the wall of the home of Workers’ Party leader Rodney Moncur. An attempted arson attack was made on the house in April 2008. The blaze also destroyed Mr Moncur’s banana trees in the yard. P HOTOS: R odney Moncur n By TANEKA THOMPSON T ribune Staff Reporter t thompson@tribunemedia.net " I wex when I see a police car p arked in the disabled spot at Super Value out west. Is the force so short of recruits that they are employing disabled p eople? Or is their disability t hat they cannot read?" IRRITATED, NASSAU "I am vex that people in the b usiness community can find time to complain that NIB willb e short of funds 50 years in the f uture especially at this rough p eriod when the government is trying at the very same time to assist those same businesses by g ranting the unemployed per sons money to spend. "Those business complainers s hould instead be encouraging t heir fellow business owners to pay the NIB its due so that the funds will be there and also tos top ripping off the unfortunate employees by not paying their NIB.” CRY BABY SOUR LIME, NASSAU "I vex because I am tired of these Bahamians blaming the g overnment for the situation we are in with the economy! Wake up people, we not the only peo-p le suffering, it's happening all around the world and nobody saw it coming. " Open up your eyes and ears a nd listen to the American news. Don't be listening to those crazy PLP – if they were in powe r we would still be where we are today. They couldn't have done no better.” WAKE UP PEOPLE, BAHAMAS. " I vex because even though I live out east in a nice house in an ice area with all the modern c onveniences I soon ga have to start toting water from the pump to bathe with because of the slackness at Water and Sewage. W ith all our advancements we are still a third world country masquerading as a first worldn ation where people can't even g et a heavy stream of water to bathe with or wash they clothes. "What kind of mess is this w hen I pay for water every bill period, but only one lil' trickle is come out the tap, and when it c ome out it rusty as nail? But the powe rs that be say we hav-i ng barge problems and this and that, but I bet if the prime min-i ster's water was slow and rusty t hat thing would get fix quick.” Sick of rusty slow water, Bahamas. "I vex at people who is try to take the bibby out of someonee lse eye when theirs so crust t hey can't even see straight. Now I don't like to judge people or criticise them, but some people just is blow me over how they always in other people business and is the first one top oint out what they see is wrong. "But since they will never see what they doing wrong I will t ake this time to give a shout to all them people out there who watching me and everyone elsei nstead of living their life.” HATER BLOCKER, NASSAU. A re you vex? Send your complaints to whyyouvex@tribunemedia.net? WHY YOU VEX? A 56-year-old man was shot in the back during an armed robbery of an East Bay Street bar. P olice reported that a number of employees and patrons were at the Shipwreck Bar a round 6pm on Thursday when two gunmen entered and fired shots from weapons. T hose present were ordered to get to the ground as one of the gunmen went to the cash register and stole a n undetermined amount of cash. The gunmen, who were both dressed in blue jeans, one wearing a yellow shirt, the other a blue shirt, fled the scene on foot and were last seen heading towards the Balls Alley area. A 56-year-old male patron r eceived a gun shot injury to his back was transported t o hospital for treatment. He is presently in stable condi tion. Police investigations continue. crime BRIEF Man shot in back during armed robbery Samples of fire-hit Workers’ Party HQ sent for analysis

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n By DENISE MAYCOCK Tribune Freeport Reporter dmaycock@tribunemedia.net FREEPORT Jetta Baptiste, president of t he Haitian Bahamian Society of the Bahamas, is pleased that investigations are underway by immigration officials in the case of Anderson Pierre, a 37-year-old Haitian who was d enied asylum in the Bahamas. “I am happy to learn that an investigation is currently underway,” said Ms Baptiste, “but I hope that the final report is not issued ‘until further notice,’ which can take years to bep roduced.” Amnesty International has called for a “full and thorough” investigation into the circumstances surrounding the Immigration Departm ent’s decision to reject Mr Pierre’s request for political asylum. Mr Pierre was ordered to leave the country in September 2008, two years after he and his wife filed their application for asylum. He leftF reeport in February and went to Cap Haitien, but was killed by unknown gunmen in Santo Domingo on April 24. Immigration Director Jack Thompson has s aid that a full statement would be released shortly in relation to Mr Pierre’s asylum case. M s Baptiste said it is important that the report is released in a timely fashion. We are still waiting for an investigation report from the police in the case of the fires t hat destroyed almost 100 homes in Marsh Harbour, Abaco, back in May 2004. This is five years later and the government has not given an official response on that issue yet,” she said. M s Baptiste also responded to remarks made by Bahamian Julian Knowles, who hasc alled on Ms Baptiste to apologise for refer ring to Bahamians as “Christ-less and real children of the devil.” “It is too bad and too sad that Mr Julian K nowles has taken grave exception to my comments concerning how many of my fellow Bahamians are ‘Christ-less’ these days and a re ‘acting like children of the devil.’ “The real truth hurts. I suggest that we not f ocus on the messenger, and take a real hard look at the message. It is the message that is i mportant as we speak. I refuse to be chastised for speaking the truth just to satisfy thosew ho wish that I would say what is politically correct. Asking me to apologise will not change the facts that we have too many ‘children of the devil’ living among us. Getting these evil persons living among us to change their wicked ways and repent is and should be our g oal, so that we can live in God’s paradise.” Ms Baptiste said that the Haitian Bahamian Society of the Bahamas is very grateful for the assistance that was given to Haiti after t he hurricanes. She noted that in addition to Bahamians, Jamaicans, Americans, Turks Islanders and other persons from around the Caribbean also made contributions to the worthy cause. “I must say that we are thankful and grateful for all of those kind hearted persons who donated clothing, food, money, and other goods for the Haitian hurricane relief efforts,” s he said. Ms Baptiste stressed that the investigations into why Mr Pierre’s application for political asylum was denied is priority. “Now, please get back to the real issue that is most important at this time, and that is investigating why Mr Anderson Pierre’s application for political asylum was denied and what is going to happen to his family and to o thers who find themselves in a similar situation. “That is the real issue. Please do not try to detract or distract me or others from dealing with what is really important at this time. Thanks for not being anti-Haitian. But we need answers from those involved with Anderson Pierre’s case,” she said. Yes, the Bahamas have ‘real’ Christians. But what percentage of the Bahamian people a re ‘real’ Christians? Would you say 50 per cent or more or 50 per cent or less? We must not be in denial about the truth. We have to be sincere about what is happening in this country today and let us not live in a fallacy,” shes aid. Mr Pierre’s wife hopes that the Immigration D epartment will reconsider her asylum case and allow her to remain in Grand Bahama w ith her infant son. C M Y K C M Y K LOCAL NEWS PAGE 6, SATURDAY, MAY 9, 2009 THE TRIBUNE Anderson Pierre Jetta Baptiste Climate change poses one of the most serious challenges to the sustainable development of small island and low lying coastal developing states in the Caribbean, according to CARICOM. Recognising this threat, the Caribbean Community Climate Change Centre (CCCCC retariat has drafted a regional Climate Change Strategic Framework in an effort to point the way to building the region’s resilience to the effects of climate change, over the next five years. Described as the premier document for resource mobilisation, the primary focus of the strategic framework is developing programmes to support region-wide mitigation of and adaptation to climate change. The framework is predicated on four strategic pillars: reducing greenhouse gas emissions through energy reduction and conservation and switching to renewable energy sources; minimising the effects of greenhouse gas emissions through disaster mitigation; developing and implementing public awareness and education programmes and building national and regional capacities to manage adaptation. At the second meeting of the CARICOM task force on climate change and development on Thursday, members agreed that the strategic framework would be fine-tuned for presentation to the CARICOM Heads of Government Conference in July. Leading up to the conference however, the Climate Change Centre said it will continue region wide consultations particularly with civil society to solicit feedback on the strategic framework. In undertaking this, the task force has also recommended t hat the document should be placed on both the websites of C ARICOM Secretariat, www.caricom.org, and the CCCCC for persons who wish to provide feedback on the framework. Comments should be directed to the Secretariat at piu@caricom.orgas well as to the Climate Change Centre at www.caribbeanclimate.bz by May 15. N URTURING our rela tively young capital market is imperative for the future well being of our people.A n essential tool for the mobilization and democratization of i nvestment in economic activity is a successful and active stock e xchange. Which brings me to The Bahamas International Securities Exchange or as it is commonly known BISX. When I titled this column the “late” BISX I wasn’t referring to its demise. Although, should we look at the volume of trading in recent months, one would have to check for vital signs. I was referring to the promptness with which the directors of the listed c ompanies report to their employ ers, the shareholders, on the out come of their stewardship. The rules of the exchange are out of step with modern practiceb y giving listed companies 90 days to publish their interim results. N o director or manager worth their salt would wait that long to f ind out the results of the previous three months of operation. So the question arises, that if they know, why shouldn’t the shareholders and the investing public to whom shares are on offer on the exchange also have this information. The maximum allowable time should be no more than 30 days, but for a start maybe it should be set at 45 days. Additionally, BISX should p ublish weekly in the print media and continuously on their web site a list of companies in breach of this or any other listing regulation. T his 90-day requirement is only part of the problem. The e qually serious or maybe even more serious problem is that m any listed companies do not even meet this much extended deadline. There are exceptions. A few very large companies meet and beat the deadline. In fact Commonwealth Bank’s results for the quarter ended March 31st was published in this newspaper on April 24th. If we are to gain the trust of large and small savers in order to attract them to invest listed enterprises, this unsatisfactory situa t ion has to change. If BISX is to be engine for capital formation a nd investment that it can and must be, this unsatisfactory situation must change. If BISX is to be the instrument for the democratization of wealth that it can be, this unsatisfactory situation must change. It is easy to do. The board of BISX just has to change then enforce the rules. Asylum request rejection investigation welcomed THE ‘LATE’ BISX V IEW FROM A F AR J OHN I SSA Climate change strategy for CARICOM conference n BY MATT MAURA T HE Ministry of Health has tightened inventory controls at the three state-owned health care facilities and at the community clinic level to ensure that a readily available supply of fast-moving drugs “is kept onh and,” Minister of Health Dr H ubert Minnis said on Thurs day. Dr Minnis said the tightening of controls is part of a series of measures health officials have implemented to improve efficiency in operations. The new measures were implemented in response to complaints of long lines at hospital and clinic registration counters, protests against long waiting times to see physicians, and a “clamour for more drugs,” he said. “We tightened our invento ry controls so that our clinics are able to keep a supply of fastmoving drugs readily available,” Dr Minnis said. “We have revamped the distribution of drugs at the Princess Margaret Hospital, established a line for senior citizens only and reduced the number of persons sent to other clinics to have prescriptions filled.” Health officials have also increased their orders of the most commonly used drugs, particularly those used to combat chronic, non-communicable diseases including diabetes, hypertension and cancer. A ‘drop-off’ system has also been implemented so that prescriptions can be written one day, dropped off and filled the next day. Dr Minnis said his ministry has heard the complaints “and we have responded.” “We have improved efficiencies in operations at no additional cost, while providing greater satisfaction to the gen eral public.” Officials have also made adjustments with regards to staffing, primary among them being the removal of technical staff from administrative duties. “This was done so that they could assist in providing the service for which they have the training and competence,” Dr Minnis said. Tighter inventory controls instituted at public healthcare facilities “I am happy to learn that an investigation is currently underway.” Jetta Baptiste LITERACYAWARDWINNER ROKER’S Point Primary School in Exuma was among the winners during the Ministry of Education’s Minister’s Literacy Awards Ceremony for the Primary Division on April 30 held at the Church of God of Prophecy Tabernacle, New Providence. Christal Monique Adderley of Roker’s Point Primary is pictured receiving her award from Minister of Education Carl Bethel. Raymond A Bethel / BIS Photo

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LIS seniors return from European adventure n BY LINDSAY THOMPSON THE governments of the Bahamas and Indonesia are seeking to formalise relations with the signing of an economic and technical cooperation framework agreement. The agreement and the fostering of other areas of diplomatic relations were addressed as GovernorGeneral Arthur Hanna accepted Letters of Credence from Banua Radja Manik, Ambassador of the Republic of Indonesia to the Bahamas, during a ceremony at Government House on May 7. “The Bahamas values the cordial relations between our two countries and looks forward to continuing to strengthen our relationship,” said Mr Hanna. The last representative of the government of Indonesia bade farewell to Bahamian officials in April, 2007. Like the Bahamas, Indonesia is an archipelagic country comprising more than 17,000 islands, 6,000 of which are inhabited. It is the fourth most populated country in the world with 240.3 million people. Indonesia has a market-based economy in which the government plays a significant role. There are 139 state-owned enterprises. The government administers prices on several basic goods, including fuel, rice and electricity. “The Bahamas and Indonesia share a wide base of linkages founded on common interests and the diplomatic relations that have indeed consolidated our continued common understanding. “It is on this premise that the Bahamas government appreciates the expressed interest of the government of Indonesia to further enhance, deepen and diversify the scope of our two countries’ cooperative endeavours in all sectors, but particularly in the field of trade, tourism and investment,” said Governor-General Hanna. While tourism is the Bahamas’ main industry, he said, efforts are being made to e ncourage economic diversifi c ation through the development of other sectors. “In this regard,” said Mr Hanna, “the government of the Bahamas would equally value and welcome increased bilateral trade and technical cooperation with Indonesia by both countries committing to employing their efforts to formalise their relations with the signing of an economic and technical cooperation framework agreement. The many multilateral fora in which we both participate, and in which Indonesia has demonstrated the highest order of leadership, bring us together in a joint commitment to ensure that our goals come to fruition.” Ambassador Manik, 59, acknowledged that both countries share the “highest aspirations” and dedication to the development and protection of their respective societies. He said he was honoured by the opportunity to represent Indonesia in a country with “a great international presence, rich in the beauty of its nature, and more importantly with which Indonesia has had longstanding bilateral relationship.” “It is heartening to note that our relations have continued to develop for the common interest of the two countries,” said Ambassador Manik, “as we support one another in international fora especially in the Non-aligned Movement, the Group of 77, South-south Cooperation and other international organisations of which the Bahamas and Indonesia are members.” Mr Manik is director for Diplomatic Security Service. He served as head of Section for Economics in the Indonesian Embassy, in Harare, Zimbabwe, and as head of Sub-Section for Economics II within the Indonesian Permanent Mission to the United Nations. He is married to Monry Manik and they have three children. C M Y K C M Y K LOCAL NEWS THE TRIBUNE SATURDAY, MAY 9, 2009, PAGE 7 &20021:($/7+(%$+$0$6 ,17+(0$77(52)$//7+$7 $ 1',17+($77(5 $ 1',17+($77(5 RIWKHHWLWLRQRI$OODQ 6SHFWRU 127,&( $//7+$7 127,&(,6+(5(%<*,9(1 WK WK 7KH1RWLFH%RDUGRIWKH$GPLQLVWUDWRU DW6WHOOD0DULV/RQJ,VODQGDQG *5$+$07+203621t&2 127,&(LVKHUHE\JLYHQWKDW 526(/$1'( '89(56211(RI67(3675((7)2;+,//1$66$8 %$+$0$6 LVDSSO\LQJWRWKH0LQLVWHUUHVSRQVLEOH IRU1DWLRQDOLW\DQG&LWL]HQVKLSIRUUHJLVWUDWLRQ QDWXUDOL]DWLRQDVFLWL]HQRI7KH%DKDPDVDQGWKDW D SHUVRQZKRNQRZVDQ\UHDVRQZK\UHJLVWUDWLRQ Q DWXUDOL]DWLRQVKRXOGQRWEHJUDQWHGVKRXOGVHQG ZULWWHQDQGVLJQHGVWDWHPHQWRIWKHIDFWVZLWKLQWZHQW\ HLJKWGD\VIURPWKH W K GD\ RI 0D\ WRWKH0LQLVWHU UHVSRQVLEOHIRUQDWLRQDOLW\DQG&LWL]HQVKLS3%R[ FREEPORT – Last month, 11 senior students from the Lucaya International School (LIS W atson made a 10-day pilgrimage through Europe in an effort t o truly experience their international studies. “This trip afforded 11 students a complete immersion in E uropean history,” said Nigel Kirkby, acting director of LIS, affirming their academic studies and providing them with culture-rich experiences, making it ‘the educational experience of a lifetime’.” International curriculum-linked school trips are one of m any programmes offered at LIS. “These trips enable young people to broaden their horizons as they learn new skills, improve their ability to work as part of a team and conquer their fears, in a fun and safe environm ent,” the school said. The trip was both an educational and cultural experience,” said Sydney Watson, senior English teacher at LIS. “The students learned about ancient history and visited the sites that brought it to life. Travelling with peers enabled the stud ents to learn about independence and responsibility.In fact, Abilene Jones, a year 11 student, believed that the trip was much more adventurous with my friends and the freedom we had made it much more exciting.” Lucaya International School trips offer young people the o pportunity to experience a wide range of challenges and activities that go beyond the boundaries of the classroom. W ith its focus on the ancient sites of Italy and Greece, the excursion succeeded in taking the students out of their textb ooks and allowing them to touch, feel, and live the passion and history described in their studies, the school said. When in Rome, they toured such amazing sites as the Vatican, the Sistene Chapel, St Peter’s Basilica and the Colosseum. Already deeply affected, the group continued to Pompeii. The entire city of Pompeii was covered by a volcanic eruption in 79 AD and has now been unearthed by archeologists,” e xplained Ms Watson, “the students were able to walk the streets of the ancient people and view this historic city, frozen i n time.” The group was often overwhelmed with the magnitude of what they were undertaking. “It was a once in a lifetime opportunity,” said student Jessica Raad, “and a truly worthy experience.” Other highlights from the trip include disco dancing at an authentic Greek disco in the small waterfront town of Tolo and, of course, sampling delicious native foods from every site. “These students were able to explore Olympia,” said Ms W atson, “and stand in the very first Olympic arena, what a thrill. These are sites some people live to only read about, what an amazing opportunity to be able to experience this.” “The overall trip was a great experience, and definitely one of the most fun times in my life. My classmates and I got to see the beauty of history, and how people in Europe lived in the past, and how they live now,” said Ryan Parsons, a year 11 student. “Most of us got to see a new culture and way of life of how the people of both Italy and Greece lived. It was mindb lowing to see how these ancient ruins are still perfectly preserved over thousands of years, and I truly got to see how h istory is not only what we learn from text books.” Bahamas and Indonesia seek to formalise trade and economic ties DEPUTY Prime Minister and Minister of Foreign Affairs Brent Symonette (right Republic of Indonesia to the Bahamas during a courtesy call at the Ministry of Foreign Affairs on Wednesday, May 6, 2009. K r i s t a a n I n g r a h a m / B I S p h o t o P h o t o c o u r t e s y o f S y d n e y W a t s o n

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always been one of the criticisms of our system that you don't have courts which focus on the commercial area," the insider continued. Prominent attorney Brian Moree who has been vocal for the need of more specialised divisions in the courts with an extensive background in commercial cases might be a suitable replacement for Justice Lyons, sources said. News broke on Thursday that Justice Lyons had tendered his resignation from the Supreme Court. A terse statement released by government yesterday said the chief justice had advised the governor general of the decision, which takes effect on August 1. Meantime, Justice Lyons will take "pre-retirement leave" effective from May, 11, the statement said. Sources said it was too early to tell who would take over any of Justice Lyon's pending cases adding that he would be able to hand down judgments on completed cases during his leave. A controversial figure in his own right, Justice Lyons made headlines after his fellow justice, Anita Allen scolded him for appointing Daniel Ferguson, an accountant, to work ona recent case knowing full well that he shared “more than a friendship” with Mr Ferguson’s sister. Mr Ferguson’s sister also assisted her brother with preparing documents for the case, said Justice Allen as she decided whether or not to recuse herself from hearing the matter “on the ground of apparent bias” because of her knowledge of this matter. This disclosure prompted calls for Justice's Lyons resignation. Despite the recent furor surrounding the justice's actions in court, one lawyer commented that resignations of senior justices were "pretty rare in the Bahamas." He speculated that the mounting public pressure over recent cases led to Justice Lyon's decision. "I think that it was the pressure that developed from the negative exposure that he got, he felt as if his career had come to an end, that the bad publicity could not be remedied and that can be pretty devastating." But another source said the expatriate justice was never fully happy in the Bahamas. He said the move was "not totally unexpected." "I think he's always been kind of ill at ease in the Bahamian judicial system he comes from a very large territory and sometimes it's very difficult to adjust to a smaller, closely-knit s ociety," he said. C M Y K C M Y K LOCAL NEWS PAGE 8, SATURDAY, MAY 9, 2009 THE TRIBUNE 52wk-Hi52wk-LowSecurit y Previous CloseToday's CloseChangeDaily Vol.EPS $Div $P/EYield 1.951.28Abaco Markets1.401.400.000.1270.00011.00.00% 11.8011.00Bahamas Property Fund11.0011.000.000.9920.20011.11.82% 9.686.95Bank of Bahamas6.956.950.000.2440.26028.53.74%0 .900.63Benchmark0.630.630.00-0.8770.000N/M0.00% 3.743.15Bahamas Waste3.153.150.000.0780.09040.42.86% 2.601.95Fidelity Bank2.372.370.000.0550.04043.11.69% 1 4.1511.09Cable Bahamas11.7511.750.001.3090.2509.02.13% 3.142.83Colina Holdings2.832.830.000.2490.04011.41.41% 7.446.17Commonwealth Bank (S16.176.170.005540.4190.05014.70.81% 4 .661.31Consolidated Water BDRs2.602.48-0.120.0990.05225.12.10% 3.001.86Doctor's Hospital1.861.860.000.2400.0807.84.30% 8.106.02Famguard7.767.760.000.4200.24018.53.09% 12.5011.00Finco11.0011.000.000.3220.67034.26.09% 14.6610.35FirstCaribbean Bank10.4010.400.000.7940.40013.13.85% 5.555.00Focol (S5.145.140.000.3320.15015.52.92%1 .001.00Focol Class B Preference1.001.000.000.0000.000N/M0.00% 0.500.30Freeport Concrete0.300.300.000.0350.0008.60.00% 8.205.50ICD Utilities5.595.590.000.4070.50013.78.94% 12.508.60J. S. Johnson10.5010.500.000.9520.64011.06.10% 10.0010.00Premier Real Estate10.0010.000.000.1800.00055.60.00% 52wk-Hi52wk-LowSecuritySymbolLast SaleChangeDaily Vol. 1000.001000.00Fidelity Bank Note 17 (Series AFBB17100.000.00 1000.001000.00Fidelity Bank Note 22 (Series BFBB22100.000.00 1000.001000.00Fidelity Bank Note 13 (Series CFBB13100.000.00 1000.001000.00Fidelity Bank Note 15 (Series DFBB15100.000.00 52wk-Hi52wk-LowSymbolBid $ A sk $Last PriceWeekly Vol.EPS $Div $P/EYield 14.6014.25Bahamas Supermarkets7.928.4214.60-0.0410.300N/M2.05% 8.006.00Caribbean Crossings (Pref4.006.256.000.0000.480N/M7.80% 0.540.20RND Holdings0.350.400.350.0010.000256.60.00% 41.0029.00ABDAB30.1331.5929.004.5400.0009.030.00% 0.550.40RND Holdings0.450.550.550.0020.000261.900.00% 52wk-Hi52wk-LowFund NameNA V YTD%Last 12 MonthsDiv $Yield % 1.36641.3041Colina Bond Fund1.36640.954.77 3.03512.9230Colina MSI Preferred Fund2.8962-1.49-3.35 1.45901.3883Colina Money Market Fund1.45901.775.09 3.69603.1964Fidelity Bahamas G & I Fund3.1964-5.59-13.64 12.739712.1564Fidelity Prime Income Fund12.73970.965.79 100.5606100.0000CFAL Global Bond Fund100.56060.560.56 100.000096.4070CFAL Global Equity Fund96.4070-3.59-3.59 1.00001.0000CFAL High Grade Bond Fund1.00000.000.00 10.50009.0950Fidelity International Investment Fund9.15990.71-12.76 1.04401.0000FG Financial Preferred Income Fund1.04400.804.40 1.03641.0000FG Financial Growth Fund1.03640.333.64 1.04521.0000FG Financial Diversified Fund1.04520.764.40 BISX ALL SHARE INDEX 19 Dec 02 = 1,000.00YIELD last 12 month dividends divided by closing price 52wk-Hi Highest closing price in last 52 weeksBid $ Buying price of Colina and Fidelity 52wk-Low Lowest closing price in last 52 weeksAsk $ Selling price of Colina and fidelity Previous Close Previous day's weighted price for daily volumeLast Price Last traded over-the-counter price Today's Close Current day's weighted price for daily volumeWeekly Vol. Trading volume of the prior week Change Change in closing price from day to dayEPS $ A company's reported earnings per share for the last 12 mths Daily Vol. Number of total shares traded todayNAV Net Asset Value DIV $ Dividends per share paid in the last 12 monthsN/M Not Meaningful P/E Closing price divided by the last 12 month earningsFINDEX The Fidelity Bahamas Stock Index. January 1, 1994 = 100 (S (S19-Feb-09 9-Feb-09 W W W W W W . .B B I I S S X X B B A A H H A A M M A A S S . .C C O O M M | | T T E E L L E E P P H HO ON NE E : : 2 2 4 4 2 2 -3 3 2 2 3 3 -2 2 3 3 3 3 0 0 | | F FA A C C S S I I M M I I L L E E : : 2 2 4 42 2 -3 3 2 2 3 3 2 2 3 3 2 2 0 0NAV Date 31-Mar-09 1-May-09 31-Mar-09 28-Feb-09 31-Dec-08 9-Feb-09 28-Feb-09 31-Dec-08 31-Dec-07 31-Mar-09 Prime + 1.75% Maturity 19 October 2017 19 October 2022 30 May 2013 29 May 2015 Interest 7% Prime + 1.75% 7%T T O O T T R R A A D D E E C C A A L L L L : : C C O O L LI I N N A A 2 24 4 2 2 5 5 0 0 2 27 70 0 1 10 0 | | R R O O Y Y A A L L F F I I D D E E L L I I T T Y Y 2 2 4 42 2 3 3 5 56 6 7 77 7 6 64 4 | | F F G G C C A A P P I I T T A A L L M M A A R R K K E E T T S S 2 2 4 4 2 23 39 9 6 64 4 0 00 0 0 0 | | C C O O L L O ON N I I A A L L 2 24 4 2 2 5 5 0 02 2-7 75 5 2 2 5 5FINDEX: CLOSE 798.52 | YTD -4.35% | 2008 -12.31%BISX LISTED & TRADED SECURITIES AS OF: Fidelity Over-The-Counter Securities Colina Over-The-Counter Securities BISX Listed Mutual Funds MARKET TERMSTHURSDAY, 7 MAY 2009BISX ALL SHARE INDEX: CLOSE 1,613.79 | CHG -0.13 | %CHG -0.01 | YTD -98.57 | YTD % -5.76BISX LISTED DEBT SECURITIES (Bonds trade on a Percentage Pricing bases 127,&(LVKHUHE\JLYHQWKDW )5$1&<63(5(=60,7+ RI3XHEOR$ULJXDQDER/D+DEDQD%DXWD&XED3%R[ LVDSSO\LQJWRWKH0LQLVWHUUHVSRQVLEOHIRU1DWLRQDOLW\ D QG&LWL]HQVKLSIRUUHJLVWUDWLRQQDWXUDOL]DWLRQDVFLWL]HQRI 7KH%DKDPDVDQGWKDWDQ\SHUVRQZKRNQRZVDQ\UHDVRQZ UHJLVWUDWLRQQDWXUDOL]DWLRQVKRXOGQRWEHJUDQWHGVKRXOG V HQGZULWWHQDQGVLJQHGVWDWHPHQWRIWKHIDFWVZLWKLQ WZHQW\HLJKWGD\VIURPWKH WKGD\ RI 0D\ WR WKH 0 LQLVWHUUHVSRQVLEOHIRUQDWLRQDOLW\DQG&LWL]HQVKLS3%R[ 1 127,&( FROM PAGE 1 however, that Seifort had attempted to kidnap her son and had sent her threatening text messages. She also claimed that Siefort would kidnap her every time he saw her, beat her up and on one occasion had even hit her in her head with a hammer. Brown said she has filed a complaint with police. Chief Magistrate Gomez ordered that Brown be remanded to Sandilands Rehabil itation Centre for 14 days. Outside of court yesterday, Siefort’s sister Tracy, told reporters that her brother had been framed. She claimed that her brother had never stolen the car as it was his car. “It really bothers me to see how some women can be so sick and vindictive, she needs help,” she said. Mother who made kidnap claim tells court she feared for family’s safety FROM page one p ublic school system for some 20 years in the Bahamas. A sst Supt Welbourne Bootle, press liaison officer, said Bahamian authorities are going through the necessary procedures for Birbal’s extradition. ACP Dames could not say exactly when Birbal would be returned to the Grand Bahama. “We really can’t put a time frame on this,” he said. “We are dealing with two countries and so we will have to see how the process works itself out. “We know where he is at and we are working to have him returned to the Bahamas as soon as possible. “We have a provisional warrant out for him and the Office of Attorney General will be working with their counterparts in the US to see how quickly that can happen,” said Mr Dames. Two other teachers at Eight Mile Rock High School – a woman and another man – have also been removed following complaints of molestation. Mr Dames stated that police investigations concerning the woman teacher are nearing completion. “We should be making some determination on that within the n ext few days,” he said. A s a result of the sex scandals at Eight Mile Rock High, the Education Minister has implemented measures that call for all new teachers to be vetted by police. Safety committees made up of students, teachers, administrators, and parents also will be established at schools to oversee complaints. Alleged sex scandal teacher arrested in US F ROM page one Fears that Justice Lyons’ resignation could hit hearing of commercial cases FROM page one “I think he’s always been kind of ill at ease in the Bahamian judicial system...” MINISTERIAL VISIT: Minister Branville McCartney and directors eat in the canteen. people who have been there, I think, too long because of their cir cumstances, but hopefully they will be out by the end of the month. “Some of them were in there from the end of last year, and one or two have been there from 2007, so we need to make a determination and regularise their status so they are able to leave the detention centre.” Just over two months ago detainees told The Tribune how officers beat one detainee so badly he lost his fingernails, while anoth er man was allegedly “beaten senseless” on the roof of the facility before he fell to the ground, and that inadequate meals drove some detainees to provide sexual favours for food. Three Cuban detainees then went on a hunger strike to protest the deplorable conditions they were forced to endure. Reports sparked response from Amnesty International and human rights advocates around the world, and letters continue to flood in to The Tribune and government offices calling for an independent investigation into abuse and living conditions at the centre. The Immigration Department appointed a fact-finding commit tee, including psychologist Dr David Allen, Social Services director Mellany Zonical, Archdeacon James Palacious, and Immigration Director Jack Thompson, who toured the facility and talked with the detainees in March. However, their report has yet to be released to the press and The Tribune has not yet been given permission to tour the facility as requested. Mr McCartney told The Tribune : “I have no hesitations about you coming in and I still want to do a press conference about the investigation with all of the committee members so they can present their report.” But the minister said such a press conference scheduled for last week was postponed because the report has still not been presented to the Cabinet. He maintains that there is no evidence of abuse at the facility that would require an independent investigation. Mr McCartney said: “One of the main concerns was the alleged abuse and alleged hunger strike. “They found no abuse, no hunger strike, and the detainees said they really wanted more recreational stuff, washing facilities and a change of menu. “If there is no evidence of abuse there’s nothing to investigate, but if we were to find any evidence, you can bet your bottom dollar that we would.” Detention Centre conditions have ‘greatly improved’ FROM page one

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n B y BRENT STUBBS Senior Sports Reporter bstubbs@tribunemedia.net W ith the formation of the New P rovidence Amateur Athl etic Associations, the Bahamas Association of Athletic Associations can now con-c entrate on the international a spects of the sport. Curt ‘Mr H’ Hollingsworth s aid the NPAAA has been mandated to deal strictly with organising local sporting events. F ormed within the first six months of Hollingsworth’s presidency of the BAAA, the N PAAA will go to the polls to elect its first official body. A nd Ray Hepburn, who has h eaded the steering committ ee since its inception, said he w ill definitely be running for the top post. We have been given the r esponsibility of starting the NPAAA,” Hepburn said. “We will be the governing body for t rack and field in New Providence. The executives are already i n place and the six council members are also in place andt he constitution has been d rawn up. We have submitted to the executives of the BAAA a nd so we’re just waiting on our sanctioning letter.” Hollingsworth said they have b een waiting so long for the formation of the association t hat they have given Hepburn and his executives the permis-s ion to start operating while t hey wait for the letter. And according to Hepburn, t hey are already in operation. The wheels are already in motion, but we are just waiting f or them to give us a plan on how they want to see track and field operate in New Provid ence,” he said. “My plan to the executives is that what we want to do is put the foundation down so that n o matter who comes behind, they can build on it.” Not only is the NPAAA p utting its focus on the operation of the association, but H epburn said they intend to work closely with the coaches a nd athletes to ensure that there is a smooth transition from the junior to the senior l evel. “We also want to train our coaches,” Hepburn stressed. We talked extensively about h aving a good training programme where we can go into t he schools and get the physical education teachers to be trained in track and field. We know we have a lot of t alent in the schools, but we h aven’t identified them and h elp to them develop them.” Hollingsworth said the only major difference between the f ederation and the association is that the latter is mandated to c arry out the affairs of the a ssociation. We are responsible for national events. That has been my cry for years,” he pointed o ut. “There is only one association outside of New Providence. That is the GBAAA. Now we have the NPAAA, which is ready to go. The A ndros AAA is getting ready to come on stream in a couple o f weeks when they have their elections. We are also in conversation with Eleuthera and A baco and Bimini is excited. They simply said we took so long.” U nder his administration, H ollingsworth said they are mandated to ensure that they i nclude the Family Islands and the coaches who have not been a part of the programme. H ollingsworth said he was s o pleased to have two athletes o utside of New Providence and G rand Bahama make the Carifta team that competed in St Lucia in April. That’s something we are really striving towards,” said H ollingsworth about including m ore of the Family Island athl etes on its national teams. ‘Things could get ugly’ at the first ever Miss Bahamas World Sportswoman Challenge C M Y K C M Y K SATURDAY, MAY 9, 2009 THETRIBUNE PAGE 12 I NSIDE International sports news L L e e B B r r o o n n a a n n d d C C a a v v s s c c o o a a s s t t p p a a s s t t H H a a w w k k s s f f o o r r 2 2 0 0 s s e e r r i i e e s s l l e e a a d d . . . . . . See page 14 B EAUTY queens are k nown for being delicate a nd pretty, but things c ould get ugly during the f irst ever Miss Bahamas World Sportswoman Chal-l enge, scheduled for 4pm t oday at St Paul’s play field, Lyford Cay. T he 13 earth angels will s hun their high heels for sneakers and knee pads as t hey compete against each o ther on a challenging obstacle course designed b y officers of the Royal Bahamas Defence Force. At the end of the chall enge, one young woman will emerge Miss Bahamas World Sportswoman and w ill be rewarded with an automatic placement in t he semifinals of the p ageant. T he idea of the Sports woman Challenge stems from the Miss World pageant, which also has a similar competition for itsc ontestants. M iss Bahamas Organi sation president M ichelle Malcolm explains that the winner of the Miss Bahamas Worldc ompetition will have to f ace this type of challenge when she goes to South Africa later this year, ands o she might as well get used to the idea now. We are anticipating the day to be a lot of fun,” she says, “and we know that t he girls will give it their all because they all want to grab that placement int he semifinals.” She is encouraging the families and friends of thec ontestants, as well as pageant fans, to come out and support the young ladies as they try to prove that they are the fittest of the bunch. T he contestants will be split into two teams, and each team will have to clear an obstacle course designed by Lieutenant Ricardo Barry of the Royal Bahamas Defence Force. Once a winning team has been determined, the team members will then compete against each other in a series of physical challenges. The final three women left standing will then face the obstacle course once again this time as individuals – to determine the overall winner. And there will be an added bonus to Saturday’s event. The women of the Royal Bahamas Police Force and the Royal Bahamas Defence Force will have a friendly competition of their own. They too will face an obstacle – one that is considerably more challeng ing than the one designed for the earth angels – to determine which of the armed forces has the fittest women. The winners will be named Sportswomen of the Year, and will be given a floating trophy by the Miss Bahamas Organisation. “We were so excited when both the Defence and Police forces agreed to be a part of this event,” says Miss Malcolm. “We can’t wait to see how this friendly rivalry will pan out, and we know it will be very entertaining.” The Miss Bahamas World Sportswoman Chal lenge is being billed as the perfect family outing. Tickets will be available at the door. Hepburn to run for top NPAAA post SHOWN (l-r Swimmers make BAISS splash! n By BRENT STUBBS Senior Sports Reporter bstubbs@tribunemedia.net DAVID ‘Billy’ McKlewhite was prob ably one of the most celebrated natives out of Governor’s Harbour, Eleuthera. Now that the former softball/baseball great is experiencing his difficulties, the community is coming to his aid. A steering committee, called the Legends, has been formed to help raise funds to assist McKlewhite in getting a replacement for his left leg which was recently amputated while he was in hospital in New Providence. Kingsley Bethel, one of the public relations officers for the committee, said the Legends are slated to put on a series of activities from Thursday to Sunday (June 18-21) in Governor’s Harbour. “It’s a group of us who have formed the committee,” Bethel said. Paul Simmons is the chairman of the committee, assisted by Mark Thompson. Val Sands is the secretary, Demetrius Johnson is treasurer and Bethel, assisted by the Rev Charles Sands, is responsible for public relations. The activities are set to kick off on June 18 with a slide presentation on the performances recorded of McKlewhite and the Beck’s Hustlers, whom he played for, in the Parish Hall. On June 19, the committee is plan ning a T-shirt day and it is hoped that all business houses in Governor’s Harbour will buy the shirts, which will bear McK lewhite’s image on the front. Then on June 20 there will be a full day of activities in Bay Front Park, including the Legends in action in softball. The activities will come to a close with a church service on Sunday, June 21. “We are inviting any and everybody who has any affiliation with Governor’s Harbour or softball in Eleuthera to come out and help us,” Bethel said. McKlewhite, who had to be treated for diabetics when he had his leg amputated, is back home in Eleuthera and according to Bethel, is in high spirits. “We are very pleased to do this for Billy,” said Bethel of the local sports hero turned businessman. “This is a big help for him financially because this is something that is badly needed.” During his heydays as one of the most feared batters, McKlewhite starred for the Beck’s Hustlers and he also represented the Bahamas on numerous national teams. McKlewhite was also one of the many Bahamians who excelled to play in minor league baseball, having suited up briefly for the New York Mets’ Greenville Mets. As an outfielder, McKlewhite played in 1965 in Greenville, South Carolina, at the age of 18. He played in 11 games and had 20 at-bats, producing just two hits, one of which was a triple. Legends coming to softball/baseball great’s aid SWIMMERS from various private schools across New Providence compete in the Bahamas Association of Independent Secondary Schools (BAISS onships at the Betty Kelly Kenning Swimming Complex yesterday. The official results were not available up to press time last night. The championships is one of the last two events on the 2008-2009 BAISS sporting calendar. The other is volleyball, which is expected to be concluded next week. (Photos by Felip Major/Tribune staff

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n By ALESSANDRA RIZZO Associated Press Writer ROME (AP Dinara Safina outlasted Venus Williams 6-7 (3 d ay to advance to the finals of t he Italian Open, where she will p lay Svetlana Kuznetsova in an all-Russian match. Kuznetsova beat Belarusian teenager Victoria Azarenka 6-2, 6-4 in the other semifinal at the Foro Italico. Safina and the fifth-ranked Williams used ferocious hitting from the baseline, with the American often rushing the net to finish points. In the third set, Safina served out the 3-hour, 9-minute match after committing three doublefaults and saving four break points. "It was a very long match and I think I played one of my best tennis (matches Williams closed out the firstset tiebreaker with a delicate drop volley, and went on to break her opponent in the opening game of the second set. But the 23-year-old Russian came back to even the match. "It was not easy mentally," said Safina, who had lost her two previous matches to Williams. Safina had 32 winners, compared to 38 for Williams. Williams, by reaching the semifinals in Rome, is still assured of moving to third in the rankings her highest spot in six years. The final on Saturday will be a repeat of last week's Porsche GP final in Germany, where Kuznetsova defeated Safina in straight sets to capture her first title in almost two years. Both players have been runners-up in Rome, Kuznetsova in 2007 and Safina in 2006. "It was good (to win sets," Kuznetsova said. "But it was very difficult for me, she was hitting as hard as she could." Kuznetsova struggled with her serve, but hit 23 winners 10 more than her opponent. The eighth-ranked Kuznetsova broke Azarenka three times to capture the first set in 41 minutes. In the second, the ninthranked Azarenka pushed ahead with a break but appeared to lose her concentration as she disputed a call by the umpire in the third game. She lost the next five games and fell on the fourth match point. "When I was already playing much better and everything, this thing happens and it takes me right from where I started," said the 19-year-old Azarenka. Kuznetsova said her oppo nent should not have been so worked up. "To me, she (got for no reason," she said. "It was just one ball in the match." MADRID (AP Ivanovic has withdrawn from the Madrid Open because of a knee injury, yet expects to be fit in time to defend her French Open title. The seventh-ranked Serb is struggling with an inflammation in her right knee. Doctors have ordered her not to play for a week. Ivanovic says in a statement Friday that the knee has bothered her since a Fed Cup match last month. She says "it's become more painful with each match, so I decided to go and see a specialist in Munich." Ivanovic says there is "no danger" of her missing the French Open, which begins May 24. BUENOS AIRES, Argentina (AP of Argentina will have surgery next week on his right hip and be sidelined for 3 to 4 months. He will miss the French Open, Wimbledon and the Davis Cup quarterfinal against the Czech Republic in July. Nalbandian was a Wimbledon finalist in 2002, and reached the French Open semifinals in 2004 and 2006. He played in last year's Davis Cup final loss to Spain and was expected to team with Juan Martin del Potro on Argentina's Davis Cup team. Nalbandian is ranked No. 19. Nalbandian's spokesman Bernardo Ballero told Argentina's Fox Sports on Friday that the operation would take place Wednesday in Barcelona. C M Y K C M Y K INTERNATIONAL SPORTS TRIBUNE SPORTS SATURDAY, MAY 9, 2009, PAGE 13 Ivanovic out of Madrid Open with knee injury Nalbandian to undergo hip surgery next week n By HAROLD HECKLE Associated Press Writer MADRID (AP against terror threats is a top priority for the International Olympic Committee as it weighs bids for the 2016 Olympics from Madrid and three other cities, the head of the evaluation panel said Fri day. Nawal el Moutawakel, chair of the IOC commission, said the ability of a city "to organize a safe and secure games" would weigh heavily in the commit tee's technical assessment. Chicago, Tokyo and Rio de Janeiro are also vying to host the 2016 Olympics. "We have been most impressed to find what the city of Madrid could offer the Olympics," El Moutawakel said, nearly the same words she used after visiting the other bid cities. "From what we have seen, Madrid is ready to present the games just like the other three cities," she said at the close of the five-day visit. El Moutawakel and the other IOC members had lunch with Spain's Royal family, who will lead the delegation in Copenhagen on Oct. 2 for the final vote on the host city. El Moutawakel said the panel had enjoyed meeting tennis star Rafa Nadal, Real Madrid captain Raul Gonzalez and former IOC president Juan Antonio Samaranch. Earlier, Spanish Interior Minister Alfredo Perez Rubalcaba said separatist militants would not pose a threat to the 2016 Olympics if Madrid wins. Rubalcaba told the 13-member IOC evaluation team that security forces had considerable experience in protecting international sporting events in Spain. Worry "We won't need to worry about (Basque separatist group ETA in 2016," Rubalcaba said. Madrid has already completed 77 percent of its Olympic venues, which it believes will allow it to weather the economic crisis. Spain is one of the worse-hit European countries, with unemployment figures expected to hit 20 percent next year. The IOC evaluation panel will compile a report assessing the four bids by Sept. 2. Meanwhile, Spanish Sport Minister Jaime Lissavetzky said he doesn't believe that a pending doping law that goes against World Anti-Doping Agency rules would hurt Madrid's bid chances. The law would prohibit drugtesting of athletes between 11 p.m. and 8 a.m. WADA rules state that athletes must be available for drug testing 24 hours a day. Lissavetzky will attend WADA meetings in Montreal this weekend, where he is expected to discuss the issue with WADA director general David Howman. Security top priority for IOC in 2016 bids Safina stops Williams to reach Italian Open finals DINARA SAFINA strikes a backhand to Venus Williams in a semifinal match at Italian Rome Masters tournament in Rome on Friday. Safina won 6-7(3 (AP Photos: Andrew Medichini VENUS WILLIAMS reacts after losing a point to Safina... BARCELONA, Spain (AP Barcelona striker Thierry Henry could miss the Champi ons League final against Manchester United due to a knee injury. The France striker will miss Barcelona's next four games, including Wednesday's Copa del Rey final against Athletic Bilbao, after the club said he strained a ligament in his right knee. Henry injured his knee during Barcelona's 6-2 win at Real Madrid on Saturday and missed Wednesday's 1-1 draw at Chelsea which advanced the Spanish league leader to the Champions League final at Rome on May 27. Henry, who has scored 25 goals in 39 appearances in all competitions this season, will miss league matches against Vil larreal, Mallorca and Osasuna also. Thierry Henry could miss Champions League final To advertise in The Tribune , just call 502-2371 today! THIERRY HENRY is seen during their training session at Stamford Bridge, London, on Tuesday, May 5, 2009. (AP Photo: Alastair Grant

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C M Y K C M Y K INTERNATIONAL SPORTS PAGE 14, SATURDAY, MAY 9, 2009 TRIBUNE SPORTS n By TOM WITHERS AP Sports Writer CLEVELAND (AP Once the lead fattened to 16 points midway through the second quarter, Cavaliers coach Mike Brown turned to his bench and summoned one of his rested players to check back in. Pulling a towel from his neck and yanking off his sweats, the substitute hurried to the scorer's table and waited. LeBron James was ready. The Atlanta Hawks were done. Like a playoff wrecking ball, the Cleveland Cavaliers rolled to their sixth straight doubledigit win of the postseason on Thursday night as James scored 27 points in a 105-85 demolition of the Hawks, who are hurting and in an 0-2 hole in the Eastern Conference semifinal. James made another of those you've-got-to-be-kidding buzzer beaters at the end of the first half, Mo Williams scored 15 and Wally Szczerbiak added 17 off the bench as the Cavs tied a league postseason record by winning their sixth consecutive playoff game by at least 10 points. "We don't go into a game and say 'Let's win by 20,'" James said. "We say 'Let's execute and take one possession at a time and get better. If it causes us to win by 20 or by two, we're ready." The only other team to win six straight so easily was the 2004 Indiana Pacers. Cleveland also matched the 1986 Los Angeles Lakers by winning three straight games by at least 20 points in a postseason. "We're not idiots," center Zydrunas Ilgauskas said. "We'll run into some adversity. You don't win 66 games just by walking around in the park. When it happens, we'll handle it." James made a step-back, 36foot 3-pointer at the halftime horn to give the Cavaliers a 24point lead. The stunning shot was similar to the one he banked in at the end of the first half in Game 1 of Cleveland's opening-round sweep of the Detroit Pistons. The Hawks are the ones reel ing now. Atlanta entered the game without center Al Horford and forward Marvin Williams two of its best players because of injuries. If that was n't bad enough, leading scorer Joe Johnson rolled his right ankle when he had his shot blocked by James in the third quarter and did not return. X-rays were negative, but Johnson, who needed a wheelchair to get to the locker room, wore a walking boot as he and his teammates headed home for Game 3 on Saturday. "I can't see me not playing," Johnson said. "I don't want to let this opportunity go by. We're down 0-2. I want to be out there for my teammates. Hopefully in 48 hours I will feel a lot better." While the rest of the NBA exchanges elbows, flagrant fouls and menacing stares in the playoffs, the Cavaliers are looking for a fight but so far, James and his gang can't find one. Atlanta adjusted its defense to try and stop the league's MVP from getting to the basket, but he got there anyway. Out of position, all the Hawks could do was reach in as James streaked past, and by halftime he had already attempted 10 free throws. "Honestly, I don't think that even if we were 100 percent that if we gave it the effort we gave, that it would have made a difference," said Maurice Evans, who led the Hawks with 16 points. "They are playing team basketball at both ends of the floor." The Hawks were in a similar jam last season in the first round. They got blown out by 23 and 19 points in the first two games in Boston, but won two at home and forced a sevengame series. "We're still in it," said Josh Smith, who scored just eight points on 2-of-13 shooting. "We have to be ready to protect home court." On the 20th anniversary of Michael Jordan's doubleclutching jumper known infamously around here as "The Shot" over Craig Ehlo that beat the Cavaliers in the 1989 playoffs, James gave Cleveland fans a shot to savor. Taking an inbounds pass with 5.4 seconds left, James quickly dribbled into the frontcourt, pulled up on Hawks guard Mario West, flicked his wrist and splashed his deep shot to make it 59-35. As 20,000-plus fans erupted, James stood and playfully swung his arms back and forth. So easy. LeBron and Cavs coast past Hawks for 2-0 series lead n By The Associated Press Cleveland at Atlanta (8pm EDT). The Cavaliers, who had the league's best record, 66-16, are 6-0 in the playoffs and up 2-0 in the Eastern Conference semifinal against the undermanned Hawks. S S T T A A R R S S Thursday LeBron James, Cavaliers, scored 27 points, ending the first and second quarters with last-second baskets, as the Cleveland overpowered Atlanta 105-85 to open a 2-0 lead in their Eastern Conference semifinal. Anderson Verejao, Cavaliers, added 12 points, eight rebounds and four blocked shots for Cleveland. S S T T A A T T S S Now a perfect 6-0 in the postseason, the Cavaliers tied a league record by winning their sixth consecutive playoff game by double digits, beating Atlanta 105-85. The only other team to do it was the 2004 Indiana Pacers ... Cleveland led by as much as 36 points in its rout of the Hawks. J J O O B B S S E E C C U U R R I I T T Y Y The New Orleans Hornets are sticking with head coach Byron Scott for at least one more season. Team president Hugh Weber says the franchise was disappointed by its first-round exit from the playoffs, but that the entire organization shares responsibility. Weber added that Scott has not expressed an interest in leaving and that any interest other teams may have in the coach is "not an issue." S S U U S S P P E E N N D D E E D D The Lakers' Derek Fisher a nd Orlando's Rafer Alston were both suspended one game by the NBA for separate incidents in playoff games. Fisher was called for a flagrant foul when he struck the Rockets' LuisS cola, who was setting a pick, with his shoulder and head as the Rockets brought the ball up the court. Fisher was ejected from Game 2 on Wednesday. In the Magic's 112-94 loss t hat same night, Boston's Eddie House was celebrat ing after making a shot when Alston reached out and slapped him in the back of the head. Each received a technical foul after standing face-to-face for a few sec onds before referees inter vened. Both players will miss games on Friday. The Magic are at home, tied 1-1 with Boston, while the Lakers will be in Houston in a series that is also tied 1-1. S S I I D D E E L L I I N N E E D D The Hawks were missing center Al Horford and for ward Marvin Williams because of injuries for Game 2 in Cleveland. Then, leading scorer Joe Johnson rolled his right ankle in the third quarter and did not return. X-rays were negative and the Hawks said Johnson is doubtful for Game 3 on Saturday in Atlanta. S S P P E E A A K K I I N N G G "I'm having fun. I'm having a ball." LeBron James, the NBA's most valuable play er, after leading Cleveland to its sixth straight playoff vic tory and a 2-0 series lead over Atlanta "If that was me throwing the elbow at Kobe, first of all, I would've hurt Kobe way more than he hurt me. I probably would've knocked him out with the same force he used against me. That's why I'm not going to throw an elbow at somebody's head. It's dangerous." Rockets forward Ron Artest on a confrontation with Lakers star Kobe Bryant in Game 2 of their series NBA Today I I N N S S I I G G H H T T F o o r r t t h h e e s s t t o o r r i i e e s s b b e e h h i i n n d d t t h h e e n n e e w w s s , , r r e e a a d d I I n n s s i i g g h h t t o o n n M M o o n n d d a a y y s s LeBRON JAMES dunks over Atlanta Hawks’ Solomon Jones in the first quarter of an Eastern Conference semifinal game Thursday night in Cleveland... (AP Photos: Tony Dejak LeBRON JAMES , Mo Williams (center Atlanta Hawks. The Cavaliers lead the series 2-0...

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C M Y K C M Y K INTERNATIONAL NEWS P AGE 16, SATURDAY, MAY 9, 2009 THE TRIBUNE n KABUL VIDEO of the aftermath of a disputed incident involving American forces and the Taliban shows bloodied bodies ofc hildren laid out with other corpses, confirming international Red Cross findingsa t the two remote villages in western Afghanistan, according to the Associated Press . The U.S. military does not contest that civilians died but called “extremely over-e xaggerated” a report by an Afghan official that as many as 147 were killed. Afghans blame aerial bombing Monday and Tuesday for the deaths and destruction. U.S. officials have suggested that Taliban fighters caused at least some of the deaths, and said investigators on a joint U.S.-Afghan team were still ana-l yzing data collected in the villages of G anjabad and Gerani in Farah province. In a video obtained Friday by Associated Press Television News, villagers are s een wrapping the mangled bodies of s ome of the victims in blankets and c loths and lining them up on the dusty ground. I n one shot, two children are lifted from a blanket with another adult already in it. The children’s faces areb lackened, and parts of their tunics are s oaked in what appears to be dried b lood. Their limp bodies are then put on the ground, wrapped in another cloth and placed next to the other bodies. It was not clear how many bodies were in ther oom where the video was shot. The man who shot the video said many of the bodies he filmed Tuesday in Gerani were in pieces. He spoke on condition of anonymity out of fear of retribution from security agencies. I t was not possible to verify independ ently the authenticity of the video. The International Committee of the Red Cross also has said that women and chil-d ren were among dozens of dead people its teams saw in the two villages. On Thursday, a local official said he c ollected from residents the names of 147 people killed in the fighting. If true, it would be the deadliest case of civilian c asualties in Afghanistan since the 2001 U .S.-led invasion that ousted the Taliban regime. V illagers “were pointing to graves and saying, ’This is my son, this is my daughter,”’ said Abdul Basir Khan, a member of Farah’s provincial council. He said he gave his tally to the investigators. T he U.S. military described that toll as over the top. The investigators and the folks on the ground think that those numbers are extremely over-exaggerated,” U.S. military spokeswoman Capt. Elizabeth M athias said. “We are definitely nowhere near those estimates.” While past reports of civilian deaths at t he hands of international forces drew i mmediate outcries from President Hamid Karzai’s government, this time the response has been muted. The most v ehement reaction has come from oppo s ition lawmakers, who demanded an agreement regulating the operations of f oreign troops. After a period of tense relations with the Washington, Karzai appears to have toned down his statements about civilian casualties caused by Western forces even t hough the issue resonates with Afghan public. O ne reason could be that Karzai feels confident he will win re-election in August without further appealing to nationalist emotions, as no strong challenger has e merged and Friday was the deadline for registering as a candidate. Also, he may not want to stir up antiA merican sentiment as the Obama admini stration rolls out its strategy for the region. That strategy involves linking success in Afghanistan with security in neighb oring Pakistan, where Taliban militants a re active along the border. The U.S. has also pledged long-term nonmilitary e fforts here for example, civilian expertise in farming and other specialties along with an increase of 21,000 U.S. troops. “If there’s one lesson I draw from the p ast, it is the importance of our staying engaged,” Defense Secretary Robert G ates told reporters Friday at Forward Operating Base Airborne in northern Afghanistan, shortly before heading back to Washington. And if there’s a lesson for Ameri cans and the international community, it’s that we don’t dare turn our backs onA fghanistan. This will work if we stay e ngaged.” US denies 147 civilians killed in Afghan violence SPL. Jordan Custer from the U.S. Army First Battalion, 26th Infantry returns fire on a Taliban position as their base Camp Restrepo comes under attack in the Korengal Valley of Afghanistan's Kunar Province on Friday May 8, 2009. D a v i d G u t t e n f e l d e r / A P P h o t o n LONDON I T HAS all the makings of a Monty Python sketch prim British lawmakers caught in a farce over expense claims for everything from X-rated movies to a bathtub plug, according to the Associated Press . But reality has come home to roost in the often absurd world of Her Majesty’s Government. Friday’s leaked list of law maker expenses has leveled another blow to Prime Minister Gordon Brown’s beleaguered government, which has been blamed for a litany of problems ranging from the Iraq war to the deepening recession. According to the details pub lished by Britain’s Daily Tele graph, Brown paid his brother Andrew more than 6,500 pounds ($9,800 for a maid the two shared when Brown was Britain’s Treasury chief. The newspaper declined to say how it had obtained expense claims from 13 minis ters but promised to roll out more in the coming days. Home Office Secretary Jacqui Smith expensed two Xrated movies her husband watched, which she later repaid. Housing minister and former Foreign Secretary claimed 600 pounds ($900 hanging plant baskets. And for mer Deputy Prime Minister John Prescott claimed 300 pounds ($450to fix broken toilet seats. The list could also prove damaging to the opposition Conservatives one Tory lawmaker expensed fertilizer used on his country house gar den, putting in as well for cans of cat food. Other expenses, categorized only by political party, includ ed toilet seats, horse manure, wine rack, rat poison, pool maintenance, piano tuning, a chocolate Santa and a pizza cutter. British MPs caught in expense claims farce Angry protests i n Haiti over slaying of countryman In brief FLOODING IN BRAZIL n PETIONVILLE, Haiti ANGRYdemonstrators hurled stones and tore down a sign at the Dominican Repub-l ic’s consulate in Haiti on Friday to protest the decapitat ion slaying of a Haitian in Santo Domingo, according to the Associated Press . About 150 protesters massed outside the walledc ompound, but Haitian police prevented them from entering. U.N. peacekeepers with riot gear waited nearby but did not enter the fray. Some protesters shoved pictures of the decapitated body into the faces of Haiti an police as they yelled and p ushed at the human barricade. At the embassy, demons trators broke a window and b urned a makeshift Dominic an flag. The protesters chanted justice for Carlos,” in reference to Haitian migrant Carlos Nerilus, whose decapitated b ody was found Saturday in w hat Dominican authorities d escribed as an “incident between individuals.” Police Maj. Jose Lluberes said the slaying was meant to avenge the death of aD ominican businessman who was recently killed in the same way. Prosecutor Miguel Morfe said a man identified as Confesor Reyes has been charged w ith involuntary homicide a nd possession of an illegal weapon. A judge has ordered him to remain in prison fort hree months as authorities investigate. Reyes’ attorney, Isaias M atos, said his client is inno cent and argued unsuccessfully against his detainment. It is unclear what kind of evi d ence police have against Reyes. Haitian officials have quest ioned whether Dominican police could have prevented Nerilus’ killing. T he neighboring countries have a bitter history. An esti mated 1 million people of Haitian descent live in theD ominican Republic, often suffering discrimination and violence. NORTHERN Brazil's worst floods in decades have dri ven tens of thousands from their homes to seek refuge wherever they can, packing onto flatbed trucks and braving rivers teeming with deadly reptiles in a scramble for higher ground. Brazilians huddled in cow pens converted into emergency shelters Friday, as swollen rivers continue to rise and northern Brazil’s worst floods in decades boosted the number of homeless to nearly 270,000. The death toll rose to 39. A n d r e P e n n e r / A P P h o t o s