Citation
The Tribune

Material Information

Title:
The Tribune
Uniform Title:
Tribune (Nassau, Bahamas)
Portion of title:
Nassau tribune
Place of Publication:
Nassau, Bahamas
Publisher:
Tribune
Publication Date:
Copyright Date:
2009
Frequency:
Daily, except Sunday
daily
normalized irregular
Language:
English
Physical Description:
v. : ill. ; 58 cm.

Subjects

Genre:
newspaper ( sobekcm )
newspaper ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage:
Bahamas

Notes

General Note:
Description based on: Vol. 79, no. 210 (Aug. 3, 1983); title from caption.

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Holding Location:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
This item was contributed to the Digital Library of the Caribbean (dLOC) by the source institution listed in the metadata. This item may or may not be protected by copyright in the country where it was produced. Users of this work have responsibility for determining copyright status prior to reusing, publishing or reproducing this item for purposes other than what is allowed by applicable law, including any applicable international copyright treaty or fair use or fair dealing statutes, which dLOC partners have explicitly supported and endorsed. Any reuse of this item in excess of applicable copyright exceptions may require permission. dLOC would encourage users to contact the source institution directly or dloc@fiu.edu to request more information about copyright status or to provide additional information about the item.
Resource Identifier:
09994850 ( OCLC )

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PAL SSS

Justice JON
resigns {rom

Unexpected
move from
controversial
figure

m@ By PAUL G TURNQUEST
Tribune Staff Reporter
pturnquest@tribunemedia.net

THE legal
profession was
taken by sur-
prise yesterday,
when Senior
Justice John
Lyons unex-
pectedly ten-
dered his resig-
nation from the
Supreme Court.

Taking effect
in August, Jus-
tice Lyons is
expected to take
a vacation in the meantime hav-
ing recused himself from all
matters that were before his
court.

With it being no secret that
Justice Lyons had been quite
“unhappy” for sometime with
the state of the Judiciary,
sources within this fraternity
confirmed that over the past
few weeks he had been making
provisions to secure his gratuity
before handing in his resigna-
tion.

John Lyons

SEE page nine

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m@ COURT OF APPEAL
RESERVES DECISION

THE Court of Appeal has
reserved its decision on a
recent application to have
Justice John Lyons recuse
himself from a case.

Last month, Justice Lyons
delivered a ruling refusing
an application by attorney
Fred Smith, a partner at Cal-
lenders and Co, seeking to

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PM denies claims
FNM ‘wasted’ $138m
preparing BTC for
privatisation in 90s

@ By ALISON LOWE
Tribune Staff Reporter
alowe@tribunemedia.net

STEPPING into the politi-
cal tit-for-tat over the privati-
sation of BTC, Prime Minister
Hubert Ingraham denied
accusations by PLP leader
Perry Christie that the former
FNM administration had
“wasted” $138 million as it
sought to prepare the corpo-
ration for privatisation in the
1990s.

Itemising the expenditure
of funds which totalled $139.5
million at that time, including
$94 million spent on severance
packages for staff — Mr
Ingraham told parliament that
BTC’s profits in the years sub-
sequent to the “right sizing”
of the company in preparation
for its privatisation “explod-
ed.”

SEE page nine



WI SKomrl
make CLICO

announcement

m By ALISON LOWE
Tribune Staff Reporter
alowe@tribunemedia.net

A PLP senator yesterday
commended Prime Minister
Hubert Ingraham on his state-
ment that he will shortly make
a new “announcement with
regard to CLICO and its pol-
icyholders in the Bahamas.”

Jerome Fitzgerald said he
hopes whatever is said will
“make policyholders feel
more comfortable that
their concerns are being
addressed.”

“It’s going to be interesting
to see what they’re going to
announce,” said Senator
Fitzgerald, adding that it is
“not too late” for the govern-
ment to say it will guarantee
the investments of Bahamian
policy holders in CLICO as
the Trinidadian and Guyanese
governments have done.

Yesterday in the House of

SEE page 16



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ack and Field
TEL Ee)



Mother who
made kidnap
claim expected
to be charged

Woman under arrest in
connection with ‘false
information’ given to police

m@ By TANEKA THOMPSON

Tribune Staff Reporter

tthompson@tribunemedia.net

A MOTHER, who claimed her three-
year-old son was recently kidnapped out-
side her home, is expected to be formally
charged sometime today with deceiving }

police.

As first reported by The Tribune, police
said Wednesday night that they were ques-
tioning 37-year-old Angie Moss to vali-
date the allegations surrounding the |}

alleged kidnapping.

"Police discovered that the child was

Angie Moss

not kidnapped and was in the care of a
relative. After being questioned, it was revealed that Ms
Moss had other motives and was placed under arrest last
night for false information provided to the police.

"She is in custody and is expected to be charged with
deceit of a Public Officer in court sometime (today)," Press
Liaison Officer Assistant Superintendent Walter Evans said

yesterday.

SEE page 10



Students ordered not to return to
school until they’ve had drugs test

m@ By MEGAN REYNOLDS
Tribune Staff Reporter
mreynolds@tribunemedia.net

A GROUP of students at
RM Bailey Senior High School
were sent home from school on
Monday and ordered not to
return until they have been test-
ed for drugs.

And Shantel Smith, the
mother of a grade 10 student at
the school in Marathon Road,

INSIDE

A NASSAU TO BE PROUD OF
“JUST AROUND THE CORNER’
PAGE TWO
INGRAHAM AND PLP IN
CONFLICT OF INTEREST ROW
PAGE THREE
SHOES DESTROYED BY
STORE BOSSES ‘NOT FIT
FOR CHARITY’
PAGE FIVE



i
Pee

| leet id



NASSAU AND BAHAMA

ISLANDS’ LEADING NEWSPAPER

Nassau, is angry her son has
been barred from school since
Monday because as an unem-
ployed single mother of three
she is unable to pay for the $20
drug test.

When The Tribune alerted
Education Minister Carl Bethel

SEE page 10

Bishop Fraser
retrial is stayed

@ By NATARIO McKENZIE
Tribune Staff Reporter

IN A startling turn of events
yesterday, the retrial of Bish-
op Earl Randy Fraser was
stayed pending a decision ona
constitutional application by
his defence attorneys.

Fraser, who is on $10,000
bail, is accused of having a
sexual relationship with a 16-
year-old girl between July
2005 and February 2006. The
retrial began before Magis-
trate Carolita Bethel on Mon-
day and so far five witnesses,

SEE page 10



PAGE 2, FRIDAY, MAY 8, 2009

THE TRIBUNE



LOCAL NEWS



A Nassau to be proud of
‘Just around the corner’

m By ALISON LOWE
Tribune Staff Reporter
alowe@tribunemedia. net

DOWNTOWN stakeholders
enthusiastically relayed impres-
sive short and long term plans for
the revitalisation of the city of
Nassau at a town meeting on
Wednesday night — assuring more
than 130 audience members that a
Nassau they can be proud of is

just around the corner.

After decades of discussion,
Charles Klonaris, co-chair of the
newly-formed public-private
downtown management commit-
tee — the Downtown Nassau Part-
nership — said people will soon
“see many visible improvements
to the city.”

With a full time management
team in place, a secure stream of
revenue and drafting of legisla-

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tion under way to “give teeth” to
the DNP’s authority to maintain,
develop and promote the city of
Nassau, the revitalisation effort
has taken a leap forward with
respect to putting in place the
components that authorities on
downtown enhancement say are
needed to create a much more
attractive, welcoming and enter-
taining destination for Bahamians
and tourists alike, speakers told
those attending.

“The process takes time but
we're not 20 years away, we’re
right on the other side of it right
now,” said Mr Klonaris, address-
ing the gathering, which took place
at the British Colonial Hilton.

Improvements

DNP managing director
Vaughn Roberts identified some
of the various improvements to
be pushed by the DNP over the
next few months as: cleaning and
sanitation, beautification, reduc-
ing congestion, increasing the
availability of parking options,
undertaking streetscaping, main-
taining buildings and sidewalks
and creating new entertainment
possibilities.

“These are visible quick wins,”
said Mr Roberts, who said the
DNP currently has access to
$650,000 in joint public-private
funds to reach its intermediate
goals.

Meanwhile, once government
passes legislation to enact a Busi-
ness Improvement District for the
city of Nassau, the DNP will have
greater authority and funds to

plan, promote and push the revi-
talisation effort at a level beyond
superficial improvements.
Architect Jackson Burnside
spoke passionately about the huge
potential dowtown Nassau has to
become the “leading visitor attrac-
tion in any small island state” in
the world thanks to its inherent
assets as a waterfront port and the
commitment of the DNP.

Designs

To illustrate his vision, Mr
Burnside, who has been contract-
ed to produce designs for the revi-
talised downtown area, exhibited
some of his renderings of a vibrant
and expanded and transformed
waterfront on Nassau Harbour
and beautified sidestreets, lead-
ing down from Bay Street to the
water, closed to traffic.

Along these newly explorable
routes, such as Charlotte and
Frederick Streets, the idea is to
have more restaurants, greenery,
artistic attractions and perfor-
mances “spilling out” into an open
air environment.

Other possibilities to enhance
the experience of those stepping
off cruise ships into Nassau
include opening up the north side
of Rawson Square which faces the
waterfront to allow visitors to walk
straight into the plaza from the
wharf.

The square is intended become
an easily-accessible staging ground
for a heightened number of activ-
ities and performances designed
to capture the imagination of vis-
itors.

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THE WORKERS PARTY building is engulfed by flames.

Workers Party olfice
is destroyed by fire

m@ By MEGAN REYNOLDS
Tribune Staff Reporter
mreynolds@tribunemedia.net



FIRE ripped through the Workers Party office in Black Village
yesterday morning destroying the building which has been ravaged by
fire three times in a year.

Workers Party leader Rodney Moncur was alerted to the fire in
Rupert Dean Lane South at around 4am, and said he found “a huge
fire, an inferno.”

The previous fire in October last year damaged three rooms just six
months after the first fire tore through the building in April 2008.

Yesterday’s blaze has now led to the building being completely
demolished, Mr Moncur said.

He suspects the fires have been the work of arsonists and said there
was also an attempted arson attack on his house in April last year.

Mr Moncur added: “I have had a number of attacks involving fire so
I went to see the commissioner of police to be as responsible as possible
and avert something great from happening.

“T think the police need to be more visible in my community. They
are not as visible as I think they ought to be and I have been saying that
to them for quite a long time, so after the meeting I hope to see some
positive action. It’s serious when arson attacks take place.”

Mr Moncur intends to clear the site and rebuild the Workers Party
office.

Deputy Prime Minister to attend COFCOR, Kingston, Jamaica

m By LINDSAY THOMPSON

DEPUTY Prime Minister and Min-
ister of Foreign Affairs Brent Symon-
ette is representing the Bahamas at
the two-day twelfth meeting of the
Council for Foreign and Community
Relations in Kingston, Jamaica, which
opened yesterday.

Accompanied by first assistant sec-
retary Brian Serville, Mr Symonette
will lead the agenda on finances in
view of the global economic crises.

A special part of the meeting is a
retreat, at which foreign ministers will
discuss aspects of CARICOM inte-
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concerns.

They will also discuss developments
within the Organisation for Econom-
ic Cooperation and Development
(OECD) and the G-20 countries.

“These items were requested to be
put on the agenda by the Bahamas
because of our particular interest in
financial issues,” said Joshua Sears,
director general in the Ministry of
Foreign Affairs.

The Bahamas also requested that
the issue of piracy in the Gulf of Aden
be placed on the agenda of COF-
COR, he said. The Bahamas present-
ed a paper on the impact of piracy

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With more than 1,700 vessels reg-
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largest ship registry in the world
behind Panama and Liberia.

The foreign ministers are also
expected to discuss reforming the
Association of Caribbean States
(ACS), an organisation established
to deepen integration in the wider
Caribbean region.

“The Caribbean Community
(CARICOM) feels that this organi-
sation needs to be reformed with
respect to its leadership, trade and
tourism,” Mr Sears said.

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THE TRIBUNE

FRIDAY, MAY 8, 2009, PAGE 3



0 In brief _

Ingraham and PLP in
conflict of interest clash

Mi Nottage questions appointment of Butler-Turner
to committee probing teacher-student sex claims

Five men in
court after raid
on suspected
numbers house

FIVE men charged in connec-
tion with last week’s raid on a
suspected numbers house
appeared in a Magistrate’s
Court yesterday.

Ernest Scavella, 70, of Bel
Air Estates; Lawson Gray, 49,
of Colony Village; Kelvin
Clarke, 37, of Yellow Elder
Gardens; Michael Davis, 49, of
Lake Cunningham, and Martin
Albury, 50, of Yamacraw Beach
Estates — a former employee at
ZNS — appeared before Chief
Magistrate Roger Gomez in
Court 1, Bank Lane.

Their arraignment comes a
week after FML CEO Craig
Flowers and 15 others were
arraigned on charges stemming
from a raid on FML’s head
office on Wulff Road.

It is alleged that the five men,
on April 28, were found on a
premises where a lottery was
taking place. Court dockets
state that the men were found at
Our Place, The Man Gone
Crazy on Mackey Street.

The accused pleaded not
guilty to the charge. The men
are on $3,000 bail and the case
has been adjourned to Septem-
ber 14. Five other persons also
have been charged in connec-
tion with the alleged offence.

Man, 21,
arraigned on
arson charge

A 21-year-old man charged
with arson was arraigned in
Magistrate’s Court yesterday.

It is alleged that on Monday,
April 20, Keith Mason III of
Lake View Road set fire to the
home of Trahisson Baptiste at
Bellot Road. The accused, who
appeared before Magistrate
Carolita Bethel in Court 8,
Bank Lane, was not required to
enter a plea to the charge.

He was granted bail in the
sum of $7,500. The case was
adjourned to May 11 and trans-
ferred to Court 10.

Mason was represented by
attorney Krysta Smith.

PM makes
hasic cable
service pletige

EVERY community in the
Bahamas with 10 or more
homes will have access to basic
cable service under the new
communications legislation,
Prime Minister Hubert Ingra-
ham told parliament yesterday.

While contributing to the
debate on a Bill for an Act to
Provide Communications Ser-
vices, Mr Ingraham explained
that successive governments
have tried to extend cable ser-
vices to several sparsely popu-
lated Family Islands, sometimes
unsuccessfully. Mr Ingraham
said Cable Bahamas - the coun-
try's only cable service provider
- had "no legal obligation" to fill
these requests and refuted
assertions from PLP MP for Cat
Island, Rum Cay and San Sal-
vador Philip Davis that the deci-
sion not to provide cable to
some homes was politically
motivated.

"We were early in the cable
business. The FNM did that
within a year of coming to
office. All those years before
our time there was no cable for
the Bahamas. Now the FNM
brought cable to the Bahamas
and I hear, ‘I haven’t gotten
mine yet, the FNM did not give
it to me.’ Well, what happened
before we came in?

"The member for Cat Island
said this morning - and you
know, it is unbelievable what
some members say, they obvi-
ously do not care about their
credibility — the member said
the only reason United Estates
in San Salvador did not get
cable was they were PLP. "Well
I wonder why Long Island, Salt
Pond which always votes FNM,
did not get cable. I wonder why
Guana Cay in Abaco which
always voted 100 per cent FNM
didn’t get cable — because they
are FNMs? That is a silly thing
to say. There are many commu-
nities in the Bahamas that do
not have cable yet and we
would like to have every single
community in the Bahamas
have cable.

"And so, in this Bill, we are
going to require as a condition,
that every community in the
Bahamas that has 10 or more
residences will have basic cable
service," he said.

Yesterday, the Bill for an Act
to Provide Communications
Services was passed in the
House of Assembly. The Bill
now moves to the Senate for
debate before it passes into law.



mw By ALISON LOWE
Tribune Staff Reporter
alowe@tribunemedia.net

The prime minister and the
PLP clashed in parliament yes-
terday over opposition MP
Bernard Nottage’s suggestion that
Minister of State for Social Ser-
vices Loretta Butler-Turner
would be in a conflicted position
were she to remain on a commit-
tee appointed to investigate the
circumstances surrounding
teacher-student sex claims in
Grand Bahama.

MP for Bain and Grants Town
and leader of opposition business
in the House of Assembly, Dr
Nottage proposed that parliament
“may have erred” when it
appointed Mrs Butler-Turner as
one among a group of MPs cho-
sen to sit on a Select Committee
to probe the Eight Mile Rock
High School child molestation
scandal as the investigation would
involve individuals in her own
ministry.

However, Prime Minister
Hubert Ingraham shot down Dr
Nottage’s claim, stating that he
can see “no good justifiable rea-
son” for the minister of state’s
removal from the committee.

“Tt is not a personal thing,” said
Dr Nottage, “The point is not that
there was an allegation against
the minister or ministry but the
point is that there were, stem-
ming from the debate, allegations
made against certain agencies of
the government, amongst them
agencies associated with (Mrs
Butler Turner).

“Since that would appear to be
an investigation which would
include looking into the conduct
of officers who work under her

REPORTS FROM PARLIAMENT



BL TPAEUROM (Oneal e fe

ministerial responsibility (there
are questions raised as to)
whether this would be an appro-
priate person to be on the com-
mittee,” said the MP.

However, Mr Ingraham said he
felt Mrs Butler Turner is “as com-
petent as anyone else to perform
the duty”.

Allegations

“The allegations (made by PLP
chairman Glenys Hanna Martin
when she moved a motion for the
appointment of the committee)
were against the ministry of edu-
cation,” claimed Mr Ingraham,
who added that if the party was
concerned it could have raised
the issue at an earlier, more con-
venient point.

To this, Dr Nottage respond-
ed: “Obviously if the government
doesn’t see the potential conflict
in this matter... I just thought it
proper for me to bring it to the
attention of the House and I
thought that having regard to the
nature of this matter that the gov-
ernment might see the wisdom to



MolgsvicssiOUi cl emMOlantsde

bring in a different appointment.
If the government insists then we
leave it there,” he said.

Mr Ingraham retorted that it
was not he but the Speaker of the
House, Alvin Smith, who made
the appointments, which the gov-
ernment supports.

“T then appeal to the Speak-
er’s objectivity and sense of fair-
ness,” said Dr Nottage.

Mr Smith told the MP that he
“would consider” the suggestion
to remove Mrs Butler-Turner.

The committee was appointed
on April 28 after Mrs Hanna
Martin described the Eight Mile
Rock scandal as a matter of the
“utmost public importance.”

She claimed various agencies
including the Ministry of Educa-
tion, the Department of Social
Services and the police may not
have “responded adequately or
at all to complaints that children
had been sexually exploited” by a
teacher at the school, allowing
the alleged molester to remain in
a position where he would have
been able to continue to perpe-
trate crimes against children.

PM takes Wilchcombe to task over
support for ‘outdated’ legislation

m@ By TANEKA THOMPSON
Tribune Staff Reporter
tthompson@tribunemedia. net

PRIME Minister Hubert Ingra-
ham took former Tourism Min-
ister Obie Wilchcombe to task for
supporting legislation in parlia-
ment that moments before, he
had criticised as “outdated” and
“rushed.”

"The Bill is not rushed as I
heard the member for West End
and Bimini say, not rushed at all.
In fact, his statement was incon-
sistent because he said it was
rushed, being done to facilitate a
fireside sale, and then he said 'T
am going to vote for it.’

"Well
_| why would

you do
| that? He
says it is
going to be
outdated,
but yes he
is going to
vote for it.
He imme-
diately
brought his
credibility into play as to why a
distinguished member (of parlia-
ment) would vote for such a Bill
that is ‘outdated, rushed, that has-
n’t been consulted on',” Mr Ingra-
ham said. The nation's chief also
dispelled concerns that the new
laws would lead to broadcasting
censorship. He explained that the
legislation would regulate broad-
cast content and allow for penal-
ties or fines to be imposed on
those found guilty of transmitting
"offensive" material.

Rules

"Everyone in here would like
to have, I believe, some rules in
place that if someone who is a
licensee broadcasts something
that is against public policy of the
Bahamas — that is offensive — con-
sistent with what is in the Broad-
casting Act now, that somebody
should be able to report them to
some authority for having done
so, so that an investigation can
take place as to what was broad-
cast and that some penalty could
be imposed if found to have done
so.

"The point is to have an author-
ity that can deal with such a thing
and that is all that was meant by
“content regulation” — no more
than that... You are free to
broadcast. If you offend the rules,
someone can cause you to be
brought up on a charge of having
offended the rules," he said.

Mr Ingraham’s comments came
on Wednesday afternoon as mem-
bers of the lower chamber debat-
ed new communications legisla-
tion, which he previously said is
needed to provide a regulatory
framework for the proposed pri-

MIU TaM OTe UN



“He says it is going
to be outdated, but
yes he is going to vote
for it. He immediately
brought his credibili-
ty into play as to why
a distinguished mem-
ber (of parliament)
would vote for such a
Bill that is 'outdated,
rushed, that hasn’t
been consulted on’...”
—————————S SSS

Hubert Ingraham

vatisation of BTC. While speaking
on the issue of censorship, Mr
Ingraham recalled instances while
he was a member of the opposi-
tion under the Pindling adminis-
tration when the content of his
speeches was thoroughly combed
over.

"(Speeches) used to be asked
for when I was in opposition.
They had to be sent down to Mr
Pindling firstly. Secondly, the gen-
eral manager of ZNS would sit
down in a chair next to me with a
copy of my speech in his hand
going down the list to make sure
that I say every word that is on
there. So I have been there, I
know about that."

Under the proposed legislation,
a new regulatory authority — the
Utilities Regulation and Comple-
tion Authority (URCA) — will
be established with more exten-
sive powers and duties than those
of the soon to be defunct Public
Utilities Commission.

Once the Bill comes into force,
the PUC and the Television Reg-
ulatory Authority, which comes
under the Television Regulator
Authority Act, will cease to exist.

Broadcasting, cable, telephone
and Internet services will come
under the jurisdiction of a single
entity called URCA, said Mr
Ingraham. He added that "one
day" the Bahamas Electricity Cor-
poration and the Water and
Sewage Corporation would fall
under the URCA's umbrella.

This "new phase of develop-
ment" will hopefully allow the
country’s communications sector
to operate under internationally
accepted standards, with trans-
parent guidelines, said Mr Ingra-
ham. A Bill for an Act to Provide
Communications Services, or the
Communications Act 2009 was
passed in House of Assembly yes-
terday.

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PAGE 4, FRIDAY, MAY 8, 2009

THE TRIBUNE



EDITORIAL/LETTERS TO THE EDITOR

Extreme moral
makeover needed
to address nation’s
deep wounds

LETTERS

The Tribune Limited

NULLIUS ADDICTUS JURARE IN VERBA MAGISTRI
Being Bound to Swear to The Dogmas of No Master














































































LEON E. H. DUPUCH, Publisher/Editor 1903-1914

SIR ETIENNE DUPUCH, Kt, O.B.E., K.M., K.CS.G.,
(Hon.) LL.D., D.Litt.

Publisher/Editor 1919-1972
Contributing Editor 1972-1991

EILEEN DUPUCH CARRON, C.M.G., M.S., B.A. LL.B.
Publisher/Editor 1972-

Published Daily Monday to Saturday

Shirley Street, RO. Box N-3207, Nassau, Bahamas
Insurance Management Building., P.O. F-485, Freeport, Grand Bahama

TELEPHONES
Switchboard (News, Circulation and Advertising) 322-1986
Advertising Manager - (242) 502-2352

WEBSITE
www.tribune242.com — updated daily at 2pm

This nonsense has to stop

A TAXI driver was almost “locked up”, two
men were picked up for traffic violations, one
almost losing his job as a result, and a honey-
moon almost postponed because of confusion in
the warrants department of the Prosecutor’s
office.

To avoid wasting the time of police officers,
who often present warrants that have already
been dealt with, we suggested that the depart-
ment would be more efficient if it were com-
puterised. We were surprised to learn that it is
already computerised. Therefore, there can be
only one conclusion — some of the staff are
not on top of the job. From lack of communi-
cation between the courts and the Prosecutor’s
Office and staff in the department not daily
updating the warrants as they come in, to man-
agers not properly supervising the departmen-
t’s backsliders, the public is being harassed and
inconvenienced.

Last year a young man, about to be mar-
ried, went to the department for his police
record to get a US visa to go away on his hon-
eymoon. He was fingerprinted. When the
records were scanned he was horrified that two
outstanding warrants appeared against him —
one going back to 1995 and the other to 2001—
both traffic offences.

In 1995 he was home with school friends,
had just got his driving licence and was going for
a drive, when he turned into a street that he did-
n’t realise was one-way. He thought everything
was all right because the police officer on point
duty gave him no indication that he should not
turn. But no sooner had he made the turn than
the policeman walked over and booked him.
The young man said his mother paid his fine.

On the second occasion a car, which was to
be sold, was sitting unlicensed in the family’s
backyard. One day he had to go to a nearby
store and saw no harm in quickly nipping out in
the unlicensed car and nipping back in. But it
didn’t quite work that way. He was caught by a
police officer and this time ticketed for driving
an unlicensed car. Again mother came to the
rescue and paid the fine.

Only incorrigible hoarders would keep traf-
fic receipts for 14 or even eight years. Natural-
ly he could not produce the two receipts the
police officer demanded before he could give
him a clean police record for his visa.

The police went through their files but could
find no paper work for the first offence. That
one, therefore, had to be written off. As for
the eight-year-old warrant, although there was
a record, nothing showed that it had been paid,
and so he paid the fine, which he maintains was
a second payment. Today, his wife has those
precious receipts under lock and key in case
they again turn up as “unpaid” in the computer.

Obviously members of the public trust the
authorities to have up-to-date files. They don’t

expect to have to keep these little chits of paper
forever. And so after a reasonable time they
are discarded.

This week a taxi driver told of how he was
almost “locked up” on a warrant for his arrest
dating back to 2004 — again for a minor traffic
violation. He knew he had paid the fine the
same year.

“The only thing that saved me,” he said,
“was that some kind person did put in the sys-
tem that I had paid the $250 fine. But the prob-
lem was that they didn’t cancel the warrant — I
could have been locked up!”

“The attitude in the warrant office is very,
very complacent. The pile-up, the backlog—
that’s normal for them. When they did find out
Td paid it, they were just like, ‘Okay, you can go
on our way,” he said. Apparently, there wasn’t
even an apology for the time-wasting mistake.

And then there were the two men, who were
picked up separately by officers, who served
them with warrants issued for traffic violations.
They had both paid their fines.

One gentleman said he almost lost his job
when he had to take time off to go before a
magistrate twice on two different days before
being directed to a nearby court logbook where
proof was found that he had paid the $250 fine
the year before.

But just consider the number of persons
inconvenienced by a staff member in the war-
rants department who failed to record that this
fine had been paid. First the magistrate, who
always has a heavy case load, wasting time on
two occasions on a citizen who should not even
have been in her court. And then there was the
policeman— many of them have complained
that there are not enough hours in the day to
deliver all the warrants given them. And also, of
course, there is the victim, who almost lost his
job, and the employer who lost two days of his
employee’s labour — and all for the want of
posting the payment of a fine.

The second man was held for five hours last
Friday before he was allowed to go home to
search for the receipt of a fine he had also paid.
Failing to find it, he was allowed to look in the
same court logbook, where the other man had
found his payment. His was also there.

As he left the policeman advised him that to
avoid the same situation again he should keep
his payment reference number on him at all
times.

This is not the answer. Someone has to quick-
ly reorganise the warrant office, introduce an
efficient system between it and the courts, and
make certain that a staff member goes through
a daily routine of posting warrants as they have
been completed.

The present system is wasting time and mon-
ey, not only for government, but for the police
force and the public.

Sender Royal Bahamian Resort @ Offshore Island.

Invites applications for the positions of:

Accountants
Cost Controller
General Cashier
Receiving Clerk

Executive Chauffeurs
Director of Sales
Security Manager

Exec. Housekeeper
Resort Shop Manager
Photo Shop Manager
Assistant Training Manager

Applicant must have at _ least five
years experience in the — Hospitality
Industry in the above mentioned positions,
excellent communication, organizational and
interpersonal skills, must be able to train and
motivate team members. Formal qualifications
and computer skills desirable must be able to work
flexible and long hours.

Fax or email résumé’s with proof of qualifications
and experience to:

cmajor@grp.sandals.com
Fax 677-6828.

EDITOR, The Tribune.

As the Government grapples
with putting together a credi-
ble Budget, all the armchair
economists and their cousins
have been offering different
solutions to solve the nation’s
ills. I wish to argue that no eco-
nomic strategy will effectively
address the deep wounds of this
nation without an extreme
moral makeover.

Our moral foundations are
fundamentally compromised.
The Bahamas has grown
wealthier during the last 20
years but not through increased
production and export earnings.
Rather, the wealth has been
achieved at the awesome price
of becoming debt-driven,
addicted to avarice, crime-
infested, violence-sapped,
widening the gap between the
rich and poor, importing more
and exporting less, investing lit-
tle in growing or consuming
locally grown foods, and becom-
ing over dependent on a fragile
service industry. The end result
is that we have become a soci-
ety spiritually bereft because
our moral foundations are fun-
damentally compromised.

As the Government prepares
the next budget, the critical sub-
ject of taxation will become
paramount. We have produced
a taxation culture that rewards
the very wealthy and punishes
the rest by making enterprise a
painful business. Since the
1970’s, the sad state of our par-
asitic political parties has
ensured the absence of politi-
cal, economic and social con-
sensus that facilitates good gov-
ernance. Instead, successive
governments uncritically
embrace the dominant global
neo-liberal economics model of

letters@tribunemedia net



development that made the
market into an uncontrollable
god or goddess.

In the unrestrained race and
insatiable appetite to acquire
wealth quickly, anyhow, and at
any price, the values of the old
Bahamas that called for saving
some of what you earn for a
rainy day and not building your
family’s future on debts that
cannot be serviced, were thrown
overboard as archaic philoso-
phy. In the new Bahamas that
has emerged, the soul of the
nation has been fundamentally
altered. A deadly virus that
thrives on rampant individual-
ism and a corrosive and selfish
value system has infected the
core of the nation.

Everyone wants to live life in
the fast lane! Our insatiable
appetite for quick wealth is will-
ing to accommodate the collat-
eral damage of loss of lives, if
that is what it takes to achieve
our financial goals.

Long before the global finan-
cial crisis hit the nation, we had
already compromised the eco-
nomic foundations through our
consumerism supported by debt
rather than savings. It was
bereft of probity, thrift, person-
al responsibility and good stew-
ardship of family life.

The moral makeover that is
needed must be driven by
courageous and resolute lead-
ership at all levels. The renewal
and transformation of the
nation necessitates a new defi-
nition of what constitutes the
common good for this nation.
Everyone seems to be doing

what is right in his or her own
eyes because we have not cor-
porately signed off on what are
our consensus values. The
moral assumptions and behav-
ioural codes that informed how
our people behaved in a neo-
liberal economic environment
have disappeared and have
been replaced by an “anything
goes” culture.

Our current crop of political
and business leaders, for the
most part, behave like the blind
leading the blind in these dan-
gerous and uncharted waters.
They are fast losing their legiti-
macy because they have funda-
mentally breached the exercise
of authority and discipline in
the nation. They have sown the
wind and are reaping the whirl-
wind! They always do well in
our kleptocratic financial cul-
ture where there are no rules
for people with money. They
will buy or pay their way
through any entrenched bureau-
cracy to make more money.
However, for the ordinary per-
son who obeys the rules of this
nation, their progress will
always be blocked.

Our nation must change
course if it is to survive in these
dangerous times. It cannot be
business as usual! This eco-
nomic tsunami requires the full
mobilisation of the nation to
overcome the threat to our
national well-being. No one par-
ty can deliver this nation out of
this entrenched crisis. Now,
more than ever, the leadership
of our political parties, the pri-
vate sector and civil society
must develop a united front to
address this economic crisis.

JERRY ROKER
Nassau,
April 27, 2009.

How much longer must we endure the red tide?

EDITOR, The Tribune.

At the risk of offending my friend and broth-
er, Robert Deal, I must ask the Water and Sew-
erage Corporation how much longer must we

endure the RED TIDE.

Week in and week out we persevere, without
recourse or compensation, through ruined laun-
dry, stained tubs and toilets and pressure so low
one can pee with more force than the faucet.

It is a national disgrace particularly in light of
the government's latest bailout of WSC's fiscal
fiasco and their union's recent demands for more
money despite their abominable performance.

result of the inconsistent supply. In my business
shoddy products or services are made good at

the company's expense on pain of losing cus-
tomers, not so with the government corporations
that seemingly cannot be held accountable for

the replacement of ruined clothes, plumbing fix-

Notwithstanding modern RO technology and a

wealth of salt water we are still reduced to drink-

ing, cooking and bathing with rusty water in spite

of many of us having invested in, at considerable
expense, holding, pressure tanks and pumps as a

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In my view it is past high time that the monop-
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THE TRIBUNE

FRIDAY, MAY 8, 2009, PAGE 5



LOCAL NEWS



Grand Bahama Power Company

apologises for service interruptions:

THE Grand Bahama Pow-
er Company yesterday apolo-
gised for the prolonged inter-
ruptions of service over the
past two days.

On Tuesday, May 5, while
the largest generator, Unit 13,
was undergoing planned rou-
tine maintenance, two other
generators experienced fail-
ures resulting in interruption
of service to approximately
4,000 customers. These fail-
ures required the company to
implement their feeder rota-
tion programme between 5pm
and 11pm.

At 6.30pm on May 6, a
third generator went off line
due to a mechanical failure.
The loss of this generator
forced the company to length-

en and broaden the scope of
its planned feeder rotation :

programme.

Currently, the feeder rota-
tion programme is still in }
progress, impacting approxi- j i

mately 5,000 customers.
Grand Bahama Power Com: |
pany said it continues to work }
diligently to return the gen- }
erators to service and ensure

that power is restored to all }
customers aS Soon as possi- }

ble.

and/or air-conditioning units.”



KEVIN KEMP is pictured with camera operator and high definition :
consultant Jeff Cree (Titanic, Avalon: Beyond the Abyss) at NAB 2009. :

Film Commission executive
learns latest technology

LAS VEGAS, Nevada — The
Bahamas Film Commission, a unit
of the Ministry of Tourism and
Aviation, was represented last
month at the world’s largest elec-
tronic media show. Kevin Kemp,
executive in the Film Commis-
sion, attended the 2009 National
Association of Broadcasters
Show, otherwise known as NAB
2009. The event updated him on
the latest developments in film
entertainment, management,
internet use and audio technology.

NAB 2009 was attended by
over 83,842 registered delegates,
including 23,232 international and
1,246 news media participants.
The show took place from April
18-23 at the Las Vegas Conven-
tion Centre and other locations
throughout the city.

In addition to meeting with rep- 3
resentatives from companies such }
as Sony, Panasonic, Band Pro }
Film and Digital Inc, B & H Pho- }
to, Tiffen, Euphonix, and Promax, :
Mr Kemp was invited to a special }
behind-the-scenes event for the i
RED USER '09 digital camera at }

the RIO hotel.

He pointed out that RED is :
becoming a popular format for }
Bahamian filmmakers looking to }
make their mark in the industry. :

“IT want to make certain that }
we have the knowledge and infor- }
mation we need for digital cinema }
in the Bahamas and that Bahami- }
ans are prepared to take advan- i
tage of the technology, not just :
for our filmmakers but for our }
broadcasters, radio and internet }
providers as well,” Mr Kemp said. }

The Grand Bahama Power }
Company is asking all cus- :
tomers to conserve energy by :
“only using necessary lights; }
restricting use of dryers, wash- }
ing machines and irons, and :
turning off water heaters }

Shoes destroyed.
by store bosses
‘not fit for charity’

m@ By MEGAN REYNOLDS
Tribune Staff Reporter
mreynolds@tribunemedia.net

OVER a thousand shoes
destroyed by bosses at Shoe Vil-
lage were not fit to be donated
to charity, company president
and co-owner Egan Kemp said.

Lester Ferguson from the Sal-
vation Army told ZNS News
that there are many people in
need of shoes as Mr Kemp was
interviewed about a dumpster
filled with unworn shoes at the
Shoe Depot warehouse in Palm-
dale.

He explained that the hun-
dreds of shoes he had destroyed
on Wednesday were of such
poor quality they could not be
donated.

Mr Kemp said the glue hold-
ing the soles to the upper parts
of the shoes was so substandard
the footwear would have fallen
apart within a matter of days.
He blamed the factory from
which he ordered the shoes.

He added: “It was a major

Hundreds of pairs of footwear
‘could not be donated’

issue, so for me to pass them
on, even if it was to an organi-
sation to ship to Haiti, it would
have wasted them a lot of time
and money because within three
weeks they would be destroyed.

“This is not an issue that I
take lightly and I did what I did
because I had to, not because I
wanted to.

“Tf there was any way I could
have donated over 1,000 pairs of
shoes to anyone it would have
been a great PR operation, but
I would have looked like a fool
because they would have fall-
en apart weeks later so it would-
n’t have helped anybody.”

Mr Kemp further said that he
is wary of making such dona-
tions to individuals or charitable
organisations because all too

often the beneficiaries will try to
return the shoes in exchange for
credit.

And the ruckus caused by
these recipients in Shoe Village
stores throughout Nassau is so
damaging to business, it is not
worth his while, Mr Kemp said.

“Unfortunately the many dis-
honest people that try to exploit
the situation have caused us to
destroy the shoes,” he said.

Madeline Froning, communi-
ty relations associate for the Sal-
vation Army, said Shoe Depot
has made donations to the char-
ity in the past.

She added: “There is a big
need and we can always use
stuff like that but sometimes
there is a reason for things we
don’t initially understand.”

Cultural show at
_ the Crisis Centre

SOME OF the country’s biggest

? music and dance acts are set to
? take the stage at the Crisis Cen-
? tre’s first annual cultural show to be
? held tomorrow under the patron-
; ; age of the Delores Ingraham.

Organisers of the event put
fc nee a star-studded list of
? Bahamian singers and dancers who
? volunteers say are sure to “wow”
? the crowd —all for a nominal fee of
$10.

Artists will include some of the

; © Balanites’ biggest up and coming
? rap artists such as Sosaman, Mr
? Deeds and Sammi Star. The event
? will also feature the music of the
? Royal Bahamas Defence Force
: Band, Extra Band and the finalist
? of the hit television show ‘Bahami-
? an Idol’.

The Crisis Centre has long been

? a local refuge for women, men and
? children who have been affected
? by domestic problems and are in
? need of social assistance.

“We are raising awareness about

? domestic violence and family issues
? across the country and raising
? funds for families who could not
: ordinarily afford certain services,”
? one volunteer said.

There will be a free family fair at

i the National Centre for the Per-
: forming Arts from 12no0on to 6pm
? and the cultural show will com-
? mence immediately after.

Ua Be
EXTERMINATORS

FOR PEST PROBLEMS
PHONE: 322-2157



A Special Tribute

WE REMEMBER

December 16th, 1919- May 8th 2008

to

Mothers

OLS SPONSORS: nA eeu Ge ita)



TEAM SCOTIA menbers alone with coaches and members of the
Silver Lightning Track Club.

SCOTIABANK (Bahamas), as the title sponsor of the Silver
Lightning Track Meet that was held at the Thomas A Robinson
Stadium, made a donation to the club and presented the 75 ath-
letes with T-shirts, sports bags, sports bottles and caps.

Members of “Team Scotia” also attended the track meet in
full force and assisted in all areas needed. Team Scotia is a
group of Scotiabank employees who volunteer their time to give
back to the community.

Rupert Gardiner, president of the Silver Lightning Track
Club, thanked Scotiabank for its assistance in making the event
a success.

“On behalf of the coaches, parents and athletes of the Silver
Lightning, I would like to say that we are pleased to have the
support of Scotiabank as we host our third annual track meet,”
said Mr Gardiner.

As we honour our
matriarch this Mother’s Day, we
invite you to nominate your mom to
be honoured in conjunction with John Bull’s

80th anniversary celebrations.

GREEN PARROT
BAR. + GRILL

Mother's Day Speci al Visit any John Bull owned store
between April 30th and May 9th,
complete an entry form and enter to win

one of g Gift Cards, valued at $800 each.

No purchase necessary.

§SOu

1929102009

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PAGE 6, FRIDAY, MAY 8, 2009



THE TRIBUNE



Ode eh G G a rden

where (ife is still simple and people stil care
Murphyville, 2nd House left from Sears Road.
Telephone 322-8493

At Odessa Garden we have a variety of items to
give her a memorable Mothers Day

~The Best Loved Poems of Jacqueline Kennedy Onassis,
~Beautiful, long lasting silk flower summer arrangements
~Early Vintage (Old) Limoges Tea Service
Hats (for weddings, evenings and church]
-Limoges Display Plates
-Vintage Linen Tablechoths
-Crochet Evening Tops
~The Complete Motown Anthology (10 CD's)

Etta James, Her Best, Ella Fitzgerald At her Very Best.
Ella Fitzgerald Sings Irving Berlin and Duke Ellington.
Aretha Franklin, Queen of Soul
~Picture Frames

Agencies

saning Behanians with the best brands for GO yaars

Bahamas

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DiapEnsy ‘Wea ing) Pants



LOCAL NEWS

Minister in tour of
Cat Island schools

EDUCATION Minister
Carl Bethel took a one day
whirlwind tour of schools on
Cat Island to hear concerns
and to encourage the students
to study hard.

He was accompanied by act-
ing permanent secretary
Sherylee Smith and acting
director of education Lionel
Sands.

Mr Bethel visited New Bight
Primary School, where he
assured the administrators,
teachers and students that Cat
Island would get the same lev-
el and quality of education that
exists in New Providence and
Grand Bahama.

After encouraging the stu-
dents to obey their parents and
to study hard, the team was
off to the Old Bight Primary
and Pre-School, Old Bight
High School, Bennett’s Har-
bour Primary School, Dum-
fries Primary School, and final-
ly Arthur’s Town High School.

The minister entertained
questions from students,
whose concerns ranged from
text book shortages to the lack
of an auditorium on the island.

He congratulated the
schools for putting together
the winning national debate
team for two years in a row,
and noted that the remote
island has a great history of
producing prominent intellec-
tuals.

ABOVE: Minister of Education
Carl Bethel at Old Bight Primary
School.

RIGHT: The Minister talks to
students at Dumfries Primary.

Mr Bethel encouraged the
students to carry on this tra-
dition, and said if they worked
diligently to maintain good
grades, the government would
do its best to support them
through scholarships, grants,
loans and special awards.

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THE TRIBUNE

FRIDAY, MAY 8, 2009, PAGE 7



LOCAL NEWS

Bahamas visits to get
easier for travellers

@
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=
=
=
=
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a
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a

MINISTER VANDERPOOL-WALLACE presents Dr Frank Wright, presi-
dent and CEO of National Religious Broadcasters (NRB), with a Bahami-
an coin set gift. In the exchange, Mr Vanderpool-Wallace received an

English Standard Version bible.

MINISTER of Tourism and
Aviation Vincent Vanderpool-
Wallace recently guaranteed reli-
gious broadcasters that govern-
ment will make it increasingly
easier to travel to all the islands of
the Bahamas from outside the
country.

Mr Vanderpool-Wallace was
welcoming the board of directors
of National Religious Broadcast-
ers (NRB) to the Bahamas. The
group, led by Dr Frank Wright,
held its annual board meeting in
the Bahamas at the Sheraton
Nassau Beach Resort with a spe-
cial welcome reception hosted at
Wyndham Nassau Resort.

Board directors travelled to
Nassau from as far away as Cali-
fornia. Some of them endured
inconvenient air connections and
several hours of travelling.

“Tt is one of the things that we
are going to fix, to make it so
much easier and inexpensive for
people to get to and throughout
the islands of the Bahamas,” Min-
ister Vanderpool-Wallace said.

He said the Bahamas will soon
develop projects that will cause
the country to be described as
“the Greek islands of the
Caribbean.”

The projects will allow an
increased number of efficient and
enjoyable ferry services between
several islands.

“We are making certain dur-
ing these times that we are doing
everything we can to make cer-



tain that when this is over, we }
know we are going to see an
explosion of traffic coming here }
because we are going to make it }
so much easier for people to }

come here.”

Mark Hawken, assistant gen- :
eral manager of Wyndham Nas- }
sau Resort, said his resort is pre- }
pared to accommodate NRB and }
any other organisation affiliated }
with them. He said the facility i
extensive ;
upgrades, and the well-trained }
team is prepared to assist reli- }

has undergone

gious groups and others.

Dr Frank Wright, president }
and CEO of the NRB, said the }
Bahamas was the perfect place }
for his group to enjoy leisure time }
and to hold productive meetings }

at the same time.

“And I think that many of our }
members who may want to come }
and follow in our steps and have :
meetings in the Bahamas would
also want to accomplish impor- }
tant purposes for the goals of }
their organisations as well as hav-
ing a time of rest and refresh- }
ment, and what better place than }

this,” he said.

Dr Wright pointed out that }
Bahamians and Americans have }
a lot in common. He said Amer-
icans view the Bahamas as a
“friendly and peaceable” neigh- :

bour.

“We are grateful for your hos-
pitality and it is indeed better in }

the Bahamas,” he said.

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Call for a special court to
focus on child sex abuse

COMMENDING Prime Min-
ister Hubert Ingraham on his con-
demnation of sexual violence, the
Crisis Centre yesterday called for
the establishment of a special
court to focus on child sexual
abuse matters.

This comes after last week’s
appointment of a Select Com-
mittee of the House of Assembly
to examine allegations of sexual
abuse at Eight Mile Rock High
School in Grand Bahama, and
procedures of the Ministry of
Education in general.

Director of the Crisis Centre
Dr Sandra Dean-Patterson said
that to hear that 15 teachers are
currently being investigated for
sexual impropriety with students
they are supposed to be protect-
ing is of great concern to all citi-
zens.

“The prime minister is very
right when he says that many peo-
ple in our nation have been clos-
ing their eyes, refusing to accept
that this can happen in their
homes, in schools, in the commu-
nity, to their children. Our prime
minister is very right when he
speaks of the impact (of) the hor-
rendous delay that victims have to
endure in order to get justice,”
she said.

On an average, Dr Dean-Pat-
terson said, victims have to wait
four, five, even six years before
their case reaches the Supreme
Court.



“The prime minister
is very right when he
says that many
people in our nation
have been closing
their eyes, refusing to
accept that this can
happen in their
homes, in schools, in
the community, to
their children.”



Director of the Crisis
Centre Dr Sandra
Dean-Patterson

“(There was a) recent incident
where a 10-year-old had to wait
for her case to reach court until
she was 16 years old and then the
perpetrator walked. We can all
imagine what she feels about a
system that allows this. It is unac-
ceptable that children and victims
of sexual assault have to continue
to undergo this long drawn-out
re-victimisation by a system that
appears not to care about their
violation.”

Dr Dean-Patterson said that
while there is legislation in place,
the Bahamas has a very broad
definition of sexual assault.

“We have increased the penal-
ties to the ultimate and we com-

mend this government for doing
this in December 2008. But legis-
lation alone is not enough and is
only one component in the
process of achieving justice.

“There must be consequences
as a result of the reports that are
made, these reports must be thor-
oughly investigated, the Volun-
tary Bill of Indictment must be
utilised to avoid victims having
to experience two trials, and the
process a speedy one. Serious
consideration must be given to
the establishment of a special
court to fast track child sexual
abuse matters,” she said.

A key component in the man-
agement of child sexual abuse,
she explained, is the way in which
the child’s disclosure is handled
both on an individual basis by the
family and support system of that
child, but also on a community

and national level.

“We must not re-victimise the
victim. We must not facilitate a
process that frightens or deters
other children from telling or
coming forward. That is why the
members of the Select Committee
in the House must be careful in
their handling of the recent dis-
closures so as not to prevent oth-
er children who may want to
come forward from doing so,” she
said.

“Our country must be one
where our children and citizens
can be and feel safe. We com-
mend you, prime minister. You
make us even prouder to be
Bahamian. We look forward to
the work of the Select Committee
and their recommendations for
action.

“The Crisis Centre stands
ready to help.”

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PAGE 8, FRIDAY, MAY 8, 2009

THE TRIBUNE





LOCAL NEWS

Thousands get a
taste of the Bahamas

m@ By K QUINCY PARKER
Press/Cultural Attaché
Embassy of
the Bahamas

MORE than 3,000 people
got a taste of the Bahamas this
past weekend when the
Embassy of the Bahamas to the
United States participated in
two events that raised the
Embassy’s profile in Washing-
ton, DC, exposing the metro-
politan community to Bahami-
an culture and furthering cul-
tural relations between the two
countries.

On May 2, the Bahamas
Embassy hosted a special
breakfast for two groups of
tour operators as part of Cul-
tural Tourism DC’s second
annual “Passport DC.” At the
breakfast, Bahamas Ambas-
sador to the US C A Smith

touted the Bahamas as a “glit-
tering jewel in the Atlantic
ocean”, and an ideal climate
for investment in both tourism
and financial services.

The guests at the breakfast,
affiliated with Mid-Atlantic
Tour Receptors, questioned
the Ambassador on many
points.

Experience

After the breakfast, the
Bahamas Embassy threw open
its doors and thousands of peo-
ple poured in, seeking a little of
“the Bahamian experience” in
Washington, DC.

Before too long, the line to
get into the Embassy stretched
down Massachusetts Avenue —
in the section known as
Embassy Row — and around

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the corner onto 22nd Street.

As the guests entered, they
sampled conch fritters and — to
the great delight of the adults —
‘Sky Juice,’ the colloquial nom-
de-guerre for gin, sweetened
condensed milk, and coconut
water.

In addition to the popularity
of the fritters and the drinks,
DC residents and visitors also
got to participate in a small but
enthusiastic junkanoo rush-out
and hear the calypso crooning
of Ray Smith. They learned to
‘play’ the saw, beat the
goatskin drum and ‘knock the
conch style.’

At the end of the day, just
under 3,000 people had
crammed themselves into the
Bahamas Embassy, where they
mingled with the embassy per-
sonnel and other Bahamians
who had come to represent
their country.

In the aftermath, Ambas-
sador Smith — who was present
and glad-handing the line of
waiting participants for much
of the day — said, “this was a
most successful day, a chance
for us to let the Bahamas
shine.”

The following day, on May
3, the Bahamas had a booth at
the Organisation of Women of
the Americas (OWA) annual
Food Festival of the Americ-
as. The Bahamas booth offered
hundreds who braved the
steady rain that soaked the
grounds of the Organisation of
American States (OAS) the
chance to sample the peas and
rice, macaroni, chicken, fish,
conch fritters, rum punch and,
of course, the ubiquitous ‘Sky
Juice.’

A smiling Ambassador
Smith, who was present in a
straw hat and bright yellow rain
slicker, said, “This is wonder-
ful.”

Toward the end of the day,
the event’s deejay was handed
a recording of junkanoo music,
and once the sounds of the
drums, bells and horns lit up
the square, it was as if the Box-
ing Day or New Years Day
parades had overtaken that lit-
tle patch of Washington, DC.

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who swarmed
the Bahamas

Washington,





BAHAMAS AMBASSADOR TO THE US CA Smith engages tour company owners on the various attractions
available in the Bahamas and answers their questions about things like destination weddings.

THIS YOUNG
woman was
one of thou-
sands who
stood in the
lengthy line to
get into the
Bahamas
Embassy in
Washington,
DC, in order
to get a taste
of Bahamian
culture during
Passport DC.

BAHAMIAN
WANDA |
MCPHEE |
answers. |
questions |
about the
Bahamas

from guests

Embassy in

DC, over the
weekend. It
was part of

an event
called Pass-
port DC.



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THE TRIBUNE FRIDAY, MAY 8, 2009, PAGE 9

LOCAL NEWS

Justice John Lyons PM denies claims FNM ‘wasted’ $138m

preparing BTC for privatisation in 90s





resigns from court

FROM page one

A controversial figure in his
own right, Justice Lyons has
been the brunt of recent reports
in the media after his fellow
justice, Anita Allen scolded
him for appointing Daniel Fer-
guson, an accountant, to work
on a case knowing that he
shared “more than a friend-
ship” with Mr Ferguson’s sis-
ter.

Mr Ferguson’s sister also
assisted her brother with

COURT OF
APPEAL

RESERVES
DECISION

FROM page one

have him recuse himself
from an upcoming case
involving the Central Bank
of Ecuador. During an
appeal hearing against that
ruling on Wednesday, Mr
Smith submitted to the court
that while on the bench, Jus-
tice Lyons had shown hos-
tility towards the law firm,
Callenders and Co, and its
attorneys on several occa-
sions.

Justice Lyons’ conduct
was called into question fol-
lowing a ruling in March by
Senior Justice Anita who
criticised his appointment of
an accountant who he
ordered to prepare a finan-
cial report in a civil case.
That case is presently at the
centre of an application for
Justice Allen’s recusal. In
her ruling it was also
revealed that Justice Lyons
and the sister of the accoun-
tant shared more than a
friendship.



preparing documents for the
case, said Justice Allen as she
decided whether or not to
recuse herself from hearing the
matter “on the ground of
apparent bias” because of her
knowledge of this matter.

Following this revelation, the
National Jubilee Coalition
called for an investigation into
the conduct of Senior Justice
Lyons stating that anyone asso-
ciated with the judicial system
should be “beyond the slightest
reproach.”

“Any hint that a sitting judge
might be compromised in any
way warrants the appropriate
attention and investigation.

“The pervasive crime prob-
lem in our Bahamas is exacer-
bated by an ever revolving jus-
tice system that seems unable
to deliver swift justice,” the
statement read.

Justice Lyons had earlier
recused himself from the case,
which involved the distribution
of funds between business part-
ners, on the grounds that he did
not have time to hear the mat-
ter.

However, attorneys involved
in the case told Justice Allen
that Justice Lyons had “literal-
ly forced” the appointment of
the accountant on their clients.
They said that Justice Lyons
“threatened” to walk out of
court if they did not agree to
the appointment.

According to the judgment,
on the first day of the hearing,
the accountant was asked and
denied that he had a social rela-
tionship with Senior Justice
Lyons.

Then, on the second day of
cross-examination, he was
asked whether a relative of his
had any relationship with
Senior Justice Lyons to which
he responded that “he didn’t
get into his sister’s business but
he knew that she and the judge
were friends.”

“Tt was only then that I made
the connection between the
accountant and information
which was in the public domain
for some time, that the judge

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had more than a friendship with
a woman who up to that point I
did not know was the accoun-
tant’s sister,” Justice Allen stat-
ed in the ruling, which was
handed down on March 24.

In an attempt to ensure trans-
parency in her conduct as a
judicial officer and as the judge
who was to determine whether
the accountant’s report should
be approved, Justice Allen said
she informed counsel that she
was aware of this information.

The ruling was in relation to
a request by lawyers for one of
the litigants that Justice Allen
recuse herself from the case
because of her knowledge of
Justice Lyon’s relationship with
the accountant’s sister, which
might have prejudiced her judg-
ment as to whether the accoun-
tant’s report would have been
valid.

The National Jubilee Coali-
tion consists of Bishop Simeon
Hall, president, Dr Philip
McPhee, vice-president and Dr
Keith Russell, Grand Bahama
regional director.

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“Between 1988 and 1998, with BATELCO
having a staff of 2,359 during that period,
with revenue of $120 million, BATELCO’s
total profit for (those) 10 years was
$62,327,000.”

“In the three years following privatization,
BATELCO’s total profits were $161 million
as compared to $62 million in a 10-year peri-
od,” said Mr Ingraham.

Speaking in the House of Assembly, the
Prime Minister said he was responding to
this “demonstrably false” claim and others
made by the PLP relating to the FNM’s han-
dling of BTC in light of the fact the Opposi-
tion continues to make the charges despite
previous rebuttals.

Mr Ingraham went on to take a swipe of
his own at the PLP’s handling of the priviti-
sation process, stating that “$130 million in
the bank” at BTC, the agreement which the
former PLP government was seeking to con-
clude in the run up to the May 2007 election
for the sale of 49 per cent of the corporation
for $260 million was not to be boasted about.

“The Leader of the Opposition said yes-
terday...that someone offered (the FNM gov-
ernment) $130 million to buy 49 per cent of
BTC, and he clearly was of the view that that
was a ridiculous offer that certainly was

unworthy of being entertained.”

“I just want to say to the Leader of the
Opposition, that perhaps he ought to reflect
on what he was contemplating agreeing to
do when he was seeking to sell for $260 mil-
lion,” said the Prime Minister.

Mr Ingraham also refuted Mr Christie’s
suggestion that it was left up to the PLP gov-
ernment to produce a vesting order for BTC
which protected various properties owned
by the company from being sold with it when
it would be privatised.

“The Government that I led (prior to 2002)
determined that there were certain properties
owned by BATELCO that were not avail-
able for sale to a strategic partner and it came
to Parliament and produced a Vesting Order
to that effect.

“T understand that subsequent to 2002,
there needed to be an amendment to that
Order and that that amendment was done
by the Leader of the Opposition’s Govern-
ment.

“But the Order listing the properties we
determined, was tabled in the House and
comprised the following properties that were
taken out and returned to the Govern-
ment/public ownership,” he said.

Those properties stretched throughout the
Bahamas, from New Providence, to Andros
and Inagua.



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PAGE 10, FRIDAY, MAY 8, 2009

THE TRIBUNE



Students ordered not to return to

school until they’ve had drugs test

FROM page one

of the matter he promised to
invoke his powers under the
Education Act to require med-
ical examination of the children
involved and provide the ser-
vice free of charge.

The Ministry of Education
confirmed the parents of three
RM Bailey students have
sought help from the Ministry
as the required drug test is pre-
venting their children from
going to school.

Ms Smith believes around 75
students in grade 10 and 11
have been sent home from RM
Bailey for drug testing.

School principal Julian



Anderson was unavailable for
comment yesterday, and a vice
principal said he was unable to
speak on behalf of the school
in Mr Anderson’s absence.

Ms Smith said that as she is in
regular communication with the
school, she was surprised to
receive a letter from the princi-
pal and school counsellor on
Monday stating they had rea-
son to believe her son had been
smoking an illegal substance
and was required to be tested
for substance abuse.

Should his results return pos-
itive, her son will be referred to
the Community Counselling
Centre for substance abuse
counselling, Ms Smith was told.

Legal Notice

NOTICE

AVIOR LTD.










But when Ms Smith, of East
Street South, took her son to
the Community Counselling
Centre in Market Street to be
tested under the school’s direc-
tion, she was told the test had to
be done at Chela-Tech Medical
and Analytical Laboratory in
Fourth Terrace for $20.

She appealed to the Ministry
of Education and the South
East school district superinten-
dent for help, but as she still
cannot pay for the test, her son
remained at home yesterday.

Ms Smith said: “All this time
is being wasted, and all this time
he’s out of school until he gets
this test done.

“How could you send this let-
ter home to parents when you
can’t tell me you caught my
child in the act?

“He’s got exams coming up
in June, and he’s in grade 10 so
he’s got practical classes for
tourism, cooking and every-
thing, and he’s missing all that.

“They should have had these

Orla st- 140s)



children tested and then if it
was negative or positive contact
the parents and say they need
help.”

The grade 10 boy has already
missed school this term because
of an outbreak of chicken pox
over the Easter holidays, and
although his mother thinks he
could do better than his current
2.30 Grade Point Average, she

said missing school will not help.

She said: “I spoke to the
school counsellor after Easter
and he never told me of any sit-
uation or anything like that, and
that was a week before the let-
ter came so this was like a slap
in the face.”

Education Minister Carl
Bethel said if the school wanted
to test scores of students for
substance abuse the principal
could have made a special rec-
ommendation for the Ministry
to arrange the students’ drug
tests.

He said: “If the principal has
any reason to suspect that sig-
nificant numbers of their chil-
dren are that way we will take
steps to deal with it at Ministry
level.

“All of these things can only
be done if there is reasonable
cause to suspect.”

After learning of Ms Smith’s
predicament Mr Bethel said he
would arrange for the students
to be tested free of charge.

_ Bishop Fraser

retrial stayed
FROM page one

including the virtual com-

: plainant, have testified.

The young woman, who

i is now 20-years-old testi-
? fied that she and Fraser

: had sex on an average of
i 12 times a month at his

? home and office at Pil-

? grim Baptist Temple.

i Fraser’s attorney Wayne
? Munroe made an applica-
? tion yesterday to have the
i case referred to the

} Supreme Court.

The issue, Mr Munroe

i said yesterday, arose dur-
i ing the testimony ofa

? forensic scientist on Tues-
i} day. According to Mr

? Munroe, the witness had

i presented new evidence

i? that had not been

: adduced at the initial trial
? and adversely affected his
; defence strategy.

Prosecutors contend-

ed, however, that the
? application was miscon-
: ceived. The application
















— 4 —
Notice is hereby given that in accordance with Section 138
(8) of the International Business Companies Act 2000, the
dissolution of AVIOR LTD. has been completed; a Certifi-
cate of Dissolution has been issued and the Company has

therefore been struck off the Register.

ARGOSA CORP. INC.
(Liquidator)

Legal Notice

NOTICE
PATRAVI CLOSE LIMITED

(In Voluntary Liquidation)

Notice is hereby given that the above-named
Company is in dissolution, which commenced
on the 9th day of April 2009. The Liquidator is
Argosa Corp. Inc., P.O. Box N-7757 Nassau,

Bahamas.

ARGOSA CORP. INC.
(Liquidator)

Legal Notice
NOTICE
GOLDEN MARCHE

RESOURCES LTD.
a ¢, a
Notice is hereby given that in accordance with Section
138 (8) of the International Business Companies Act 2000,
the dissolution of GOLDEN MARCHE RESOURCES
LTD. has been completed; a Certificate of Dissolution has
been issued and the Company has therefore been struck off

the Register.

ARGOSA CORP. INC.
(Liquidator)

Legal Notice

NOTICE
EL’ VIRA MANOR INC.

(In Voluntary Liquidation)

Notice is hereby given that the above-named
Company is in dissolution, which commenced
on the 6th day of May 2009. The Liquidator is
Argosa Corp. Inc., P.O. Box N-7757 Nassau,

Bahamas.

ARGOSA CORP. INC.
(Liquidator)

Mother who made kidnap
claim expected to be charged

FROM page one ae

The woman reported that the companion
took her vehicle from her home. She told police
that her 3-year-old son was asleep on the car’s

He added that the man sought by police for
questioning in connection with the alleged kid-
napping — who turned himself into police
Wednesday morning — has since been released
from custody.

Earlier this week police said they received a
report shortly after 7am last Friday from a 37-
year-old Lewis Street woman, who claimed

back seat.

Legal Notice

NOTICE
BALEEN ARCH HOLDINGS INC.

(In Voluntary Liquidation)

Notice is hereby given that the above-named
Company is in dissolution, which commenced
on the 6th day of May 2009. The Liquidator is
Argosa Corp. Inc., P.O. Box N-7757 Nassau,

Bahamas.

ARGOSA CORP. INC.
(Liquidator)

Legal Notice

NOTICE
MIRLOUETTE INC.

(In Voluntary Liquidation)

Notice is hereby given that the above-named
Company is in dissolution, which commenced
on the 20th day of April 2009. The Liquidator is
Argosa Corp. Inc., P.O. Box N-7757 Nassau,

Bahamas.

ARGOSA CORP. INC.
(Liquidator)

Legal Notice

NOTICE
MATRIX ADVANCE INC.

— f}—

Notice is hereby given that in accordance with Section 138
(8) of the International Business Companies Act 2000, the
dissolution of MATRIX ADVANCE INC. has been com-
pleted; a Certificate of Dissolution has been issued and the

Company has therefore been struck off the Register.

ARGOSA CORP. INC.
(Liquidator)

that a male companion visited her residence to

On Tuesday police released the all-points-
bulletin, saying they were actively seeking the
whereabouts of a man by the name of Siefort,
the child, and asked for the media’s “urgent
assistance” in getting the word out.

? has been directed to the

: Supreme Court where a

? judge could decide to

? allow the trial to continue
? or quash the complaint.

i The case was adjourned

? to May 21 when counsel

? will notify Magistrate

: Bethel on the status of the
: application.

i Fraser was initially

? charged in 2006, but dis-

? charged in 2007 after then
: Magistrate Marilyn

i Meeres ruled that there

? was no physical evidence
? to link him to the alleged
: offence. The Court of

i Appeal, however, over-

? turned that decision and

} ordered a retrial.

Legal Notice

NOTICE
EBONIQUE MOUNTAIN CORP.

—_ ¢, —
Notice is hereby given that in accordance with Section
138 (8) of the International Business Companies Act 2000,
the dissolution of EBONIQUE MOUNTAIN CORP. has
been completed; a Certificate of Dissolution has been is-
sued and the Company has therefore been struck off the

Register.

ARGOSA CORP. INC.
(Liquidator)

Legal Notice

NOTICE
ORLANDI VALUTA INC.

(In Voluntary Liquidation)

Notice is hereby given that the above-named
Company is in dissolution, which commenced
on the 8th day of April 2009. The Liquidator is
Argosa Corp. Inc., P.O. Box N-7757 Nassau,

Bahamas.

ARGOSA CORP. INC.
(Liquidator)

Legal Notice

NOTICE
ORANGE VALLEY INC.

(In Voluntary Liquidation)

Notice is hereby given that the above-named
Company is in dissolution, which commenced
on the 15th day of April 2009. The Liquidator is
Argosa Corp. Inc., P.O. Box N-7757 Nassau,

Bahamas.

ARGOSA CORP. INC.
(Liquidator)



THE TRIBUNE



—_
FRIDAY, MAY 8,

ATHLETES IN TOWN FOR

ey

2009



Hollingsworth pleased.
with BAAA’s progress



@ By BRENT STUBBS
Senior Sports Reporter
bstubbs@tribunemedia.net

SINCE stepping up to take
over the presidency of the
Bahamas Association of Ath-
letic Associations, Curt
Hollingsworth said he’s been
pleased with the progress they
have made.

The association, according to
Hollingsworth, has come off a
successful showing at the Carif-
ta Games. And they have final-
ly been able to establish the
New Providence Amateur Ath-
letic Association.

Now Mr. H, as he is affec-
tionately called, announced the
plans at a press conference at
the Ministry of Youth, Sports
and Culture yesterday.

Attending along with public

relations officers Kermit Tay-
lor and Troy McIntosh,
NPAAA’s chairman Ray Hep-
burn and director Ralph McK-
inney, Hollingsworth said they
are gearing up with a very busy
six months, starting with the
hosting of the Central Ameri-
can and Caribbean Age Group
Championships.

He said they have been com-
mitted to getting four teams
qualified for the IAAF World
Championships in Berlin, Ger-
many and so far only the men’s
4x 100 metre has not achieved
that goal.

“We are elated that we have
been able to put ourselves in a
position so that these teams
would have been given an
opportunity to qualify,”
Hollingsworth said.

“Currently we have three

teams that will be heading to
Berlin to compete in the World
Championships. For us, that is a
major accomplishment.”

Praising the work ethic of the
coaches and the support of the
parents, Hollingsworth said the
Bahamas has been able to finish
third at the Carifta Games in
St. Lucia.

“We see the rebirth of this
programme and we feel that we
are on the right track,” he said.
“We will continue with our
effort as we prepare for the
upcoming games, which is the
CAC Age Group Champi-
onships.”

Originally scheduled for the
Grand Bahama Sports Com-
plex, Hollingsworth said they
have been forced to bring it to
the Thomas A. Robinson Track
and Field Stadium for June 18-

SEATED from
left are Ray
Hepburn,
NPAAA interum
president; Ker-
mit Taylor,
public relations
officer; Curt
Hollingsworth,
president; Troy
McIntosh, pub-
lic relations and
Ralph Mckin-
ney, director.

19 because of the extensive
work that needs to be done to
the track facility in Grand
Bahama.

“To the disappointment of
many in Grand Bahama and the
Family Islanders and the Nas-
sau based athletes, the champi-
onships, as announced by the
Minister (of Youth, Sports and
Culture, Desmond Bannister),
has to be moved to New Provi-
dence,” he said.

That same weekend, the
BAAA will also host the Junior
Nationals at the Thomas A.
Robinson Stadium, but it will
follow the completion of the
CAC Age Group on June 19-
20.

The following weekend, the
BAAA will host the Open

SEE page 14

SPORTSNOTES

e THE Junior Baseball League of Nas-
sau will complete another successful year
as Regular Season games come to an end
this weekend.

Regular season final games will feature
three divisions in which the pennant win-
ner has yet to be decided.

In the Tee Ball, the Knights and the
Sidewinders are in a tie for the pennant
and the final games on Saturday may or
may not decide the winner.

Should both teams win, a one game
play-off will be necessary on Sunday at 2
pm.

In the Coach Pitch, the Athletics hold a
1/2 game lead on the Diamondbacks and
fate would have it that they play each oth-

er at 10 AM on Saturday.

The winner of this game will win the
pennant.

In the Junior League, the Dodgers hold
a one game lead over the Yankees and
they will also meet on Saturday at 12:30
pm. The winner of this game will also win
the pennant.

GAMES SCHEDULED:

TEE BALL

11 am Blue Claws vs Knights

lpm Sidewinders vs Grasshoppers
3 pm Sand Gnats vs Raptors
COACH PITCH

10 am Diamondbacks vs Athletics
12:30 pm Cubs vs Blue Jays

3 pm Astros vs Angels
MINOR LEAGUE

10 am Rays vs Mets

12:30 pm Royals vs Red Sox
MAJOR LEAGUE

12:30 pm Marlins vs Mariners
3 pm Indians vs Reds
JUNIOR LEAGUE

10 am Cardinals vs Twins
12:30 pm Yankees vs Dodgers
SENIOR LEAGUE
Saturday

3 pm Phillies vs Rangers
Sunday

3 pm Tigers vs Pirates

SEE page 12



HAITIAN sprinter
Roudy Munrose goes
through his starter’s
workout in the blocks.



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PAGE 12, FRIDAY, MAY 8, 2009

TRIBUNE SPORTS



SPORTS



Sports notes cont'd
FROM page 11

INTERNATIONAL
TOURNEY

¢ The Bahamas Karate
Academy will host its 21st
Invitational Karate Tourna-
ment on Saturday at 4 pm at
the Kendall G.L. Isaacs
Gym. Karate Schools from
Abaco, Bimini, Freeport
and Nassau will be partici-
pating. Tournament events
include: Individual Kata,
Individual Kumite, Tag
Kumite and Team Kata,
Male, Female or Mixed)
and Grand Champion Kata.

Doors Open at 3 pm and
competition will begin
promptly at 4 pm.

The public is invited.

SNAPPER TOURNEY

e Red Bays, North
Andros will be ground zero
from May 14-16 as the Sixth
Annual Cultural Festival
Homecoming and Snapper
Tournament will take place.

Alphonso Smith, tourna-
ment coordinator, say this
year’s event is

in honour of Frank Han-
na, who has been a partici-
pant and sponsor of the
tournament from the begin-
ning. Up to 15 boats, each
with four fishermen, are
expected to participate in
the tournament, which
starts at 8am and ends at 4
pm on Saturday, May 16.

Smith say fishing enthusi-
asts are coming from New
Providence, Abaco,

Exuma and Grand
Bahama. Snappers only will
be counted and the winners
will be the boat with the
largest catch.

The prizes are: $1,500 for
first place, $1,000 for sec-
ond, $750 for third and $300
for fourth.

WRIGHT CORRECTION

e IT was incorrectly stat-
ed in Wednesday’s Tribune
that Winter Olympic bound
Korath Wright moved to
Canada when he was ten.
Actually he moved there
with his mother when he
was one year old.

And it was further stated
that Wright contested the
2009 Olympic

Trials in New Zealand
but didn’t make the cut.
Actually, he competed in a

World Cup event in New
Zealand in September, and
finished 24th. He did not
make it to the finals of this
contest, but in fact, the
points he received in that
contest helped his overall
standing for the year, and
led to his Olympic Qualifi-
cation.

Michael Steele/Getty Images

Aris: Competitive

DONALD Quarrie (I) of Jamaica the
1976 200m Olympic champion poses
alongside Howard Oris (r) President
of Jamaica Athletics Association dur-
ing the ‘IAAF Day in the Life’ on May
2, 2009 in Kingston, Jamaica.



school system to

credit for JA track and field success

m@ By RENALDO DORSETT
Sports Reporter
rdorsett@tribunemedia.net

FOR YEARS the region and
indeed the remainder of the
world have marvelled the secret
to a seemingly endless stream
of successful Jamaican sprint-
ers on the International stage.
Now top executives of the
Jamaican Amateur Athletic
Association have offered some
insight into the phenomenon.

President of the JAAA
Howard Aris credited an uber-
competitive school system for
identifying talent as early as
possible, which the federation
uses as the initial stepping stone
in the development of its pro-
gramme.

School system

“We have a very competitive
school system in the primary
school, secondary, and tertiary
school. The federation’s role is
to cultivate the growth of the
sport and create an environ-
ment that is conducive to the
development of talent, which is
why we sanction, organise and
officiate every meet in the coun-
try,” he said. “ With the IAAF
coaching certification pro-
gramme we have been able to
consistently produce qualified
coaches and we do this because
we recognise that the technical
applications of track and field
vary and change and improve
and the best way for us to keep

pace with techniques is to com-
plete the programme of training
and certifying our coaches. The
coaches that we qualify usually
end up coaching in the schools
system which we think gives us
the most organized and com-
petitive school programme in
the world. This is of the utmost
importance to us because out
of the high school programme
all of our international talent is
first recognised.”

Sports lottery

Aris said the country’s
National Sports Lottery is the
catalyst for many of the initia-
tives the JAAAs and other
sporting bodies ability to
improve their coaching, infra-
structure and general funding
which creates a system of sup-
port for the athletes at an early
stage.

“Once special elite level tal-
ents are recognised, the schools
they attend pay special atten-
tion to them through the alum-
ni and mentors. All of our high
schools have special past stu-
dents that come back and offer
help to prospective athletes in
terms of management or financ-
ing of their careers,” he said.
“They have a benefit of a sup-
port structure outside of the
state and outside of the schools.
From the point they are junior
athletes we recognise from the
Carifta Games which is the first
level of international competi-
tions for much of our athletes

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and they get that first taste of
competition outside of
Jamaica.”

Aris, who has served for 33
years at the forefront of Sports
Administration, Sports Devel-
opment and Planning, Manage-
ment and Physical Therapy and
was recognised by the Govern-
ment of Jamaica in 1998 when
he was awarded the Order of
Distinction For Contribution to
Sports, said the infusion of a
local training programme at the
tertiary level has given many
senior athletes an option to
remain locally based through-
out their careers.

“We have a very strong pro-
gramme locally where the auto-
matic transfer of our elite level
athletes to the use for tertiary
education and training is no
longer necessary. We have
more than competent coaches
therefore if they choose an ath-
lete can remain here receive the
best coaching and select the
meets and events in which they
compete. I am not trying to be
disparaging of the NCAAs pro-
gramme, but when you have a
track scholarship your obliga-
tions are clear because you have
to compete whereas Asafa,
Usain and Shelly-Ann who
have remained here they can
create their own schedules and
they events in which they com-
pete, so we see that as an advan-
tage,” he said, “Additionally,
their tertiary education is also
addressed, the difference is, it is

not as rigid. There is nothing
wrong with the older way of
doing things, what we have is
an option, those who want to
go there can go there, but those
who wish to stay and select
events and competitions they
want have that option. At Bei-
jing we had medal winners from
both sides, athletes that live and
train in the US and athletes
train here. We are not yet clear
how you access the value of
either programme.”

Relationship

Donald Quarrie, federation
executive and former Olympic
medallist in the 100m, 400m
relay, and champion in the 200m
said the relationship between
the federation and the athletes is
one of the integral factors
Jamaica’s success in the sport.

“What we have is the ex-ath-
letes, the remainder of the exec-
utive board are a lot more objec-
tive and we get as close as we
can to the athletes to find out
what is it they want for us to do
instead of us insisting on what
should be done, so the feedback
and communication between us
is fantastic. And with the ex-ath-
letes involved we are able to
share information and experi-
ences with the executives and
this combination gives the best
experience for the athletes.”

Quarrie said the success of
the Beijing Olympics gives
Jamaica a strong foothold as the
leaders in track and field sprint-

ing but the federation and its
athletes remained inspired to
retain that position.

“The fact that we are at the
top, the entire world will be
chasing us looking to claim the
crown, and this is god for ath-
letics. The fact that we are at
the top means our athletes and
executives will train and work
harder to retain this status. We
saw the success at Beijing com-
ing, it just happened to come at
the right time. In other coun-
tries when an athlete gets to the
top or just near the top they are
hidden and they do not chal-
lenge each other, here they have
to compete constantly against
each other so the competitive
nature is important for them in
gaining status and keeping them
sharp.”

Consistency

With a legacy of medal win-
ning performances that began
with Herb McKenley in 1948
and continued with Usain Bolt’s
trio of record breaking perfor-
mances in 2008, Aris said
Jamaica’s most important fac-
tor in its model of consistency
has been its ability to adapt.

“Nothing stands still in track
and field there are always new
coaching techniques new meth-
ods, new talent, different appli-
cations,” he said, “It is an evo-
lutionary process and we are
not afraid to change at the risk
becoming overshadowed by
anyone else.”

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TRIBUNE SPORTS FRIDAY, MAY 8, 2009, PAGE 13
SPORTS



Bahamian soccer player Kilroy ‘Killer’ Farrington, spent much of his life
involved in football, as a player, referee, coach and administrator.
Here he is pictured with two of the soccer teams he coached.

Kilroy in action

Well-known Bahamian soccer player “y

Kilroy ‘Killer’ Farrington dies

THE Bahamas Football Association mourns Kilroy hi ,«
“Killer” Farrington who passed away on Sunday, May | 3, 2009 after a brief stay in the hospital. A

“Killer”, as he was affection- ;

ately Known in the football cir- a” as
cle, spent much of his life 7 a
involved in football, as a play- | Rg

er, referee, coach and adminis-
trator.

Virtually his entire career
was with one club, Dynamos
Football Club, where Farring-
ton played in central defence
for the team for many years,
retiring only a few years ago
from active play, but maintain-
ing his involvement with the
club as a coach with the club’s
youth programme.

Farrington’s passion for the
game led him to also serve as a
referee for many years in the
senior league, commencing in
this arena in the early 1990s
and continuing to assist refer-












eeing in the Bahamas until his e Ba d ash Crysta |
oF cena din th or
arrington also served in the H
national programme, serving as © J ewe | ry Boxes . china SL ae Mt
an Administrator and Equip- r TiC mi vy tae
ment Manager for many e A Ld ‘
national teams. He was a con- - O I Nn g e r I ve r
stant presence with the U-15 : . 7
and U-17 Boys National Team, | =i D Al
but also served with the U-20 . f eacon na e | ure ral ) es
Boys National Team that com- J h «its «
se etereeiree Onnson ¢ Artificial Flowers
a tear ee omens oe ii May 26th, 1930 - May 9th, 2008
A fun-loving person, and v , , . e
one always known to have a : : D
smile on his face, Farrington It has been a year Since our sister, e Gi bson / Nn n er an e
enjoyed the game he loved aunt, adopted mother, niece, cousin, =
right to the end, spending his ‘ church leader and friend soul took ~ e Ar G | & C ST |
final days outside the hospital fit and winged its way to the limitless Cc ass ry. ad
at the soccer field, on Satur- Eternity in th N t
days with the Dynamos FC U- ¢ Sxpallce OF ery oe oO G ift B ad skets
16 Boys team and on Sundays ; Dresence of God. As Y, WE pals
assisting Dynamos senior team , ~, h to thank God for her sterling qualities f fro m M ax 's
coach Dion Peterson with a ‘1 A and labour of love. For these and == “ >
bm —) the treasured memories we hold dear, | > 7

Farrington will be sorely




missed and the football frater- 1 We say to God be the glory. '

ity in the Bah has lost ‘ "ot em | °
ee EE see tantitYsvcilbiue © Sale dates: Kell 's Houses
ee oe ~~ of our tabernacle be dissolved we May 1st - 9th, 2009 Ho me

and the entire football family A

in the Bahamas wish to extend r have another building a house not Mall at Marathon

sincere condolences 10 thé oe have another building a house not — Friday 9:00am8:00pm
family on their loss, and will made by hands eternal in the heavens", *Except on red tagged Tel: (pat 393-4002 sag aa pm
continue to keep them in our i and net items Fax: (242) 393-4096 = wwwkellysbahamas.com



prayers.
May his soul rest in peace.



WN;



PAGE 14, FRIDAY, MAY 8, 2009

TRIBUNE SPORTS



SPORTS

Ramirez suspended 50
games for drug violation

Athletes in town for Fritz Grant
Track and Field Invitational

FROM page 11

felt. “I’m looking forward to see where I’m really at,”

said Clarke, who opened the season with a 10.19.
“Once the wind is legal, I know I should be able to run }

fast with the competition here.”

Sekou Clarke, a Jamaican 200/400 specialist, is also
coming back after competing in the CAC Champi- }
onships in 2005. Having some competition here, he said }

he just want to go out and run a season’s best.

“The competition is supposed to be very good, so
I’m just looking for the best,” he said. “My season’s }
best is 46.3, so anything faster than that, I will be hap- }

py.”

onships’ A qualifying time of 20.59 in the 200.

“With a lot more competition and in better shape
than last year, I hope to do very well,” he said. “Pm
familiar with a lot of the guys, but I’m not going to put ;

any pressure on myself.

“T’ve been training, so I know what my capabilities
are. So I just want to represent the Haitian federation ;
and the Haitian people in this country and try to ;

improve as much as I can.”
Most of the visiting athletes are based in Orlando,
Florida.

Hollingsworth pleased
With BAAA'’s progress

FROM page 11

Nationals, which will serve as the final trials for

the World Championships in August.

“We have some young quarter-milers who are
doing very well and we have some young sprinters }
who are also running very well,” Hollingsworth :

said.
“So we just want to say thanks to our sponsors,

the corporate citizens who have stepped up and }
helped us to realise our goals. We are looking for- ;

ward to a very busy second half of the season.”

Additionally, the BAAA will also be sending }
teams off to compete in the Junior Pan Am in }
Trinidad & Tobago, the Senior CAC Champi- }
onships in Cuba, the first Caribbean Games also in }
Trinidad & Tobago and the World Youth Champi- }

onships in Bressanone, Italy, all in July.

“You could imagine that the financial challenges
are going to be awesome and so I would like to }
appeal to those corporate citizens who have not }
had an opportunity and would like to be a part of i
this venture, to just make themselves available for :

us,” he said.

Hollingsworth said they have been pleased to
note that over the past six months, they have been }
able to put in a place a steering committee to deal }
with the formation of the NPAAA, headed by Ray }

Hepburn and the Masters Track and Field Pro- : batting practice before playing against the San Francisco Giants in a baseball

game in San Francisco. Ramirez has been suspended for 50 games by Major

gramme, headed by Foster Dorsett.

More details of the newly formed NPAAA anda

Back his second appearance in the meet, Munrose
said his aim is to delight the Haitian following in the }
Bahamas and eventually surpass the World Champi- }





m@ BASEBALL
LOS ANGELES
Associated Press

MANNY Ramirez joined a
growing lineup of All-Stars
linked to drugs Thursday, with
the dreadlocked slugger ban-
ished for 50 games by a sport
that cannot shake free from
scandal.

The Los Angeles Dodgers
outfielder was suspended by
Major League Baseball for a
drug violation, adding a further
stamp to what will forever be
known as the Steroids Era.

“It’s a dark day for baseball
and certainly for this organiza-
tion,” Dodgers general manager
Ned Colletti told reporters on
the field at Dodger Stadium.
“This organization will never
condone anything that isn’t
clean.”

Ramirez said he did not take
steroids and was given medica-
tion by a doctor that contained a
banned substance. A person
familiar with the details of the
suspension said Ramirez used
the female fertility drug HCG,
or human chorionic
gonadotropin. The person spoke
to The Associated Press on con-
dition of anonymity because the
banned substance wasn’t
announced.

“As tough as it is for us, it’s
pretty tough for Manny, too,”
Dodgers manager Joe Torre
said. “I know he’s the one that
did the wrong thing and nobody
is trying to cover that up, but
it’s still something that I know
he’s sorry about.”

HCG is popular among
steroid users because it can mit-
igate the side effects of ending a
cycle of the drugs. The body
may stop producing testosterone
when users go off steroids,
which can cause sperm counts
to decrease and testicles to

Jeff Chiu/AP Photo shrink.

Ramirez’s suspension was

IN THIS April 17, 2009 file photo, Los Angeles Dodgers’ Manny Ramirez during —- based not on a spring training

urine test result but rather evi-
dence obtained afterward, a sec-
ond person familiar with the sus-

dition of anonymity because
those details were not released.
MLB had concluded the spring
test was positive, but the per-
son said the players’ association
would have challenged the result
because of “testing issues.”

Ranked 17th on the career
home run list with 533, Ramirez
became the most prominent
baseball player to be penalized
for drugs. His ban came three
months after Alex Rodriguez
admitted using steroids, and at a
time when Barry Bonds is under
federal indictment and Roger
Clemens is being investigated
by a federal grand jury to deter-
mine whether he lied when he
told Congress he never used
steroids or human growth hor-
mone. And Miguel Tejada was
sentenced in March to one year
of probation after pleading
guilty in federal court to mis-
leading Congress about the use
of performance-enhancing
drugs.

No matter which way base-
ball turns, the legitimacy of
many of its recent home run and
pitching records is being ques-
tioned. Sluggers Mark McGwire
and Sammy Sosa have been
tainted by steroid allegations,
Rafael Palmeiro tested positive
for a banned drug and Jose
Canseco said he used them.

In every case, players once
believed to be locks for the Hall
of Fame may now be locked out.

“You can’t have arguably the
greatest pitcher of our era,
arguably the two greatest play-
ers of our era and now another
very, very good player be under
this cloud of suspicion and not
feel like it has ruined it for
everybody,” Atlanta star Chip-
per Jones said.

“But what are you going to
do? You can’t be born in a dif-
ferent era. It is the Steroid Era,”
he said.

Colletti and Torre said they
found out about Ramirez’s sus-
pension during an early morning
phone call from team owner
Frank McCourt. Both said they
were surprised and saddened at

projection on the BAAA’s National Open Cham- : League Baseball, becoming by far the highest-profile player ensnared in the
pionships will be published in Saturday’s edition. : Sport's drug scandals.

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THE TRIBUNE FRIDAY, MAY 8, 2009, PAGE 15
LOCAL NEWS

MINISTRY NAMES EMPLOYEE OF THE YEAR



LOUISE SIMMONS,
senior youth officer
in the Department
of Youth, was
named the Ministry
of Youth, Sports
and Culture’s
Employee of

the Year. Mrs Sim-
mons is pictured
with Minister of
Youth, Sports and
Culture Desmond
Bannister (left)

and Permanent
Secretary Archie
Nairn during a
ceremony last
weekend. Mrs
Simmons joined
the public service
in 1968.

Derek Smith/BIS







PAGE 16, FRIDAY, MAY 8, 2009

THE TRIBUNE







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these amendments are driven by
(the circumstances surrounding

the failure of) a company called
CLICO, and by the time we come
back to the House to debate these
bills we will have an announce-
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ment’s position with respect to
CLICO and its policyholders in
The Bahamas.”

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Earlier this week Mr Fitzgerald
accused government of “washing
its hands” of any responsibility
for the CLICO debacle, which
left 23,000 Bahamian policyhold-
ers uncertain of their investments.

“At a minimum the govern-
ment owes the policyholders and
Bahamian people an explanation
of how this happened and the
assurance that they have taken
steps to ensure this will not hap-
pen again,” said the senator, who
has given notice of his intention to
call for the appointment of a sen-
ate select committee to further
probe the issue.

Mr Fitzgerald suggested that
Mr Ingraham’s brief statement of
his intention to speak further on
the issue seems to indicate “that
(the government has) come to the
realisation that the Bahamian
public expects them be more
forthright and transparent.”

“Tt is imperative and incum-
bent upon government to make
an announcement...to make peo-
ple feel more comfortable that
their concerns are being
addressed, and secondly that gov-
ernment will tighten up regula-
tions in law to make sure this
doesn’t happen again,” he said.

Men wanted for
questioning now
in police custody

FREEPORT - Three men
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police official said Thursday.

Supt Emrick Seymour
reported that police have
arrested Renaldo Kemp who
was wanted for questioning
in connection with a rape.

He said that Emealio Rus-
sell, who was wanted for
questioning over a fraud
matter, turned himself into
the police following the
release of an all points bul-
letin for his arrest on
Wednesday.

Also taken into custody
was Jamal Roberts, who was
wanted for questioning in
connection with an armed
robbery.

Supt Seymour thanked
members of the public for
their assistance. “We want to
thank the public for their
assistance and ask for their
continue cooperation in the
fight against crime.

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Central Bank:
MAleeyiel meCools

43.4% of GDP
at 08 year-end

Already past 40%
danger threshold,
with further increases
to follow from Budget
deficit, revenue
fall-off and 2009

GDP decline

m@ By NEIL HARTNELL

Tribune Business Editor

The Bahamas’ national debt
stood at 43.4 per cent of gross
domestic product at year-end
2008, the Central Bank of the
Bahamas has revealed, a
threshold well above the ‘dan-
ger’ 40 per cent level, with the
possibility existing that this
ratio could soon reach
between 45-50 per cent.

The Central Bank, in its
2008 annual report, said the
national debt increased by
$130 million or 4.1 per cent to
$3.2 billion at December 31,
2008, the latter figure equiva-
lent to 43.4 per cent of
Bahamian per annum gross
domestic product (GDP).

This compared to the year-
before ratio of 42.4 per cent,
which was already well above
the 40 per cent debt to GDP
ratio that is regarded as a
‘danger’ threshold by the likes
of the International Monetary
Fund (IMF), and credit rating
agencies such as Moody’s and
Standard & Poor’s (S&P).

Once this threshold is
breached, these agencies
become concerned about a
country’s ability to service its
debt, with the latter two possi-
bly contemplating a sovereign
credit rating downgrade.

This is something the
Bahamas would want to avoid
at all costs, as a downgrade
would leave it having to pay
more for any government bor-
rowing on the capital markets,
given that investors would
want higher interest rates to
compensate for the perceived
increased risk.

Unlikely

A credit rating downgrade is
unlikely to happen to the
Bahamas in the short-term,
and the 2008 increase in the
national debt was less than the
$182.8 million or 6.3 per cent
growth experienced in 2007.

“For calendar year 2008, the
direct charge on government
increased by $128.3 million or
4.9 per cent to $2.673 billion.
Bahamian dollar claims
accounted for 86.1 per cent of
the total, gaining $39.5 million
or 1.7 per cent to $2.379 bil-
lion,” the Central Bank said.

“By creditor composition,
the majority of Bahamian dol-
lar debt was held by private
and institutional investors (32
per cent); followed by public
corporations (30.3 per cent);
domestic banks (29.2 per
cent); and the Central Bank
(8.5 per cent).

Some $835.9 million of the
Bahamas’ national debt is
denominated in foreign cur-
rency, but here again, $405.3
million or 48.5 per cent of this
amount is held within this
nation by Bahamian investors.
This helps to reduce the lever-
age international financial
institutions could bring to bear
on the Bahamas, should it run
into difficulty repaying its
debts.

However, with the Govern-
ment’s 2008-2009 fiscal deficit
likely to come in close to 4 per
cent of GDP, and various bor-
rowings being undertaken to
finance infrastructure and cap-
ital works programmes, the
conditions are in place for a
further national debt increase
this year.

At the same time, Bahamian
GDP will fall due to the reces-
sion - the IMF predicting by as

SEE page 4B



THE TRIBUNE

usine

FRIDAY,

MAY 8,



2009

SECTION B « business@tribunemedia.net

‘Devastating’ power
fears among insurers

MH Insurance industry so concerned about administrator/appointment
powers that Supreme Court challenge likely if Bills not changed

I Government: some changes made
MW But Bill to introduce 3% annuities tax not tabled in House yesterday

@ By NEIL HARTNELL
Tribune Business Editor

The Government yesterday
told Tribune Business that
amendments had been made to
the initial Domestic Insurance
Act draft reforms, after the indus-
try warned that the proposals for
appointing an administrator - and
his powers - would have “a sti-
fling and devastating impact” on
affected firms and possibly
prompt them to appeal the issue
to the Supreme Court.

An April 27, 2009, letter sent to
Lennox McCartney, the Regis-
trar of Insurance, by the Bahamas
General Insurance Association
(BGIA), which was obtained by
this newspaper yesterday,
expressed the sector’s concerns
about the regulator’s ability to
appoint an administrator for a
troubled insurance carrier, and
the powers such a person would
have.

The BGIA letter said: “The
reasons for an appointment of an
administrator by the [Insurance]
Commission are extremely vague
and subjective.

“This provision as presently
drafted is too imprecise - it does-
n't provide insurance companies
with a definitive benchmark or
parameter for the appointment
of an administrator. The
approach should be a streamlined
objective, one whereby insurance
companies know for certain when
they have fallen afoul of govern-
ment regulations.”

The draft Domestic Insurance
Act reforms, a copy of which has
also been obtained by Tribune
Business, empowers the Insur-
ance Commission (the successor
to the Registrar of Insurance) to
appoint an administrator in cases
where insurers have failed or are
unlikely to meet their liabilities;
assets do not give sufficient pro-
tection to policyholders or are

Ex-minister disputes PM's
$130m BIC sale assertion

@ By NEIL HARTNELL
Tribune Business Editor

A former finance minister
yesterday disputed Prime Min-
ister Hubert Ingraham’s asser-
tion that the former Christie
administration had effectively
attempted to sell the Bahamas
Telecommunications Company
(BTC) for $130 million, telling
Tribune Business that in valuing
the firm for privatisation the
parties had to assess more than
just one balance sheet item.

Mr Ingraham, during the
debate on the raft of legislation
intended to revamp the
Bahamas’ communications reg-
ulatory regime, implied in the
House of Assembly that the net
worth of the agreement in prin-
ciple struck between the former
PLP government and Bluewater
Communications Holdings for
the sale of a 49 per cent BTC
stake was $130 million, rather
than $260 million.

The Prime Minister said this
was because at that date, BTC
held on its balance sheet some
$130 million in cash on hand at
the bank - an asset that would
have been transferred to Blue-
water upon the privatisation’s
completion.

This, he implied, could have
been used by the telecoms buy-
out group to effectively repay
50 per cent of the headline $260
million purchase price it had
paid the Government. This, Mr
Ingraham said, meant Bluewa-
ter would in reality have paid
$130 million for a 49 per cent
BTC stake - the same sum that
the Christie administration had
received four years earlier, and
rejected, from the Tom Bain-
led BahamaTel consortium.

This, though, was rejected by
James Smith, the minister of
state for finance who had
responsibility for BTC’s pri-
vatisation under the Christie
government.

Now CFAL chairman, Mr
Smith told Tribune Business
yesterday that any business -
not just BTC - could not be val-
ued on the basis of just one
asset, such as cash in hand or
at the bank.

Mr Smith pointed out that
apart from assets, both current
and non-current, whenever a
company was sold the buyer
also acquired all its liabilities as
per the acquisition date. This
meant that apart from its
accounts receivables, invento-
ries, investments, and property
and infrastructure, Bluewater
would also have acquired BTC’s

SEE page 5B

APTA Smith



FAMGUARD

less than liabilities; the compa-
ny’s assets and capital are eroding
drastically; and its business is
being conducted in a manner
detrimental to policyholders.

The BGIA’s concerns, as
expressed in its letter, also related
to the powers the administrator
would have.

The letter said: “The wide and
extensive powers granted to the
administrator will undoubtedly
have a stifling and devastating
impact on an insurance compa-
ny’s business reputation, and way
of doing business.

“Generally speaking, we find
this proposal intrusive and oner-
ous, and we therefore vehement-
ly oppose the inclusion of the
same in the manner herewith sug-
gested.

“Even more alarming is the
absence of the criteria for choos-

SEE page 2B

The information contained is from a third
party and The Tribune can not be held
responsible for errors and/or omission
from the daily report.



FAMILY GUARDIAN

INSURANCE COMPANY LIMITED



Real estate
ownership
‘integrity’

undermined

m@ By NEIL HARTNELL
Tribune Business Editor

A resort/real estate developer yesterday said the “integri-
ty” and security of private real estate ownership in the
Bahamas was being undermined by abuse of legislation
such as the Quieting Titles Act, with his project embroiled
in three alleged “land grab” cases.

Joerg Friese, director/partner of Long Island’s Stella
Maris Resort development, told Tribune Business that the
development was already involved in three potential land
battles, one of which had gone to court, that had been
invoked under the Quieting Titles Act and Squatters Rights
Act.

“We consider it absolutely unethical that anyone, except
perhaps generation land-owning Bahamian families, would
attempt to obtain real estate without applying proper meth-
ods, such as per purchase, lease, rent,” Mr Friese said.

“We are of the opinion that both the Quieting Titles and
the Squatters Rights Acts were intended to clarify/develop
certain ownership situations, being connected with genera-
tion land and such.

“Tt is a fact in the Bahamas that, in particular, the Quiet-
ing Titles Act is archaic and — today and for non-Bahami-
ans — unfair, inviting actions which were never intended by

SEE page 2B



Inner-city revival seeks
downtown project spin-offs

m@ By CHESTER ROBARDS
Business Reporter
crobards@tribunemedia.net

Will ‘insist’
downtown
efforts move ‘a
few feet beyond
Bay Street’ to
turn Bain and
Grants Town into

THE BAIN and Grants Town
revitalisation project will be solely
private sector driven, a senior coor-
dinator said yesterday, as it “insists”
that financing poured into down-
town Nassau’s redevelopment
move “a few feet beyond Bay
Street” to establish the inner-city as
another entertainment destination.

Rev CB Moss, speaking at the

Rotary Club of West Nassau’s
monthly meeting, gave assurances entertainment
that the project will move forward de stination

SEE page 5B

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PAGE 2B, FRIDAY, MAY 8, 2009

THE TRIBUNE



‘Devastating’ power fears among insurers

FROM page 1B

ing an administrator, in addition
to the clear absence of a concilia-
tory approach/procedure between
the Commission and the insur-
ance company in the first









































instance.

“We see no reason why you
should want to by-pass the court-
appointed Judicial Manager, and
if this proposed amendment
remains in the Bill, this Associa-
tion will be forced to appeal the
matter to the Supreme Court.”

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Timothy Ingraham, the
BGIA’s chairman, was out of
office when Tribune Business
called seeking comment. Howev-
er, Patrick Ward, Bahamas First’s
president and chief executive,
confirmed that the general insur-
ance industry’s prime concerns
over the amendments related to
the appointment of an adminis-
trator and his/her powers.

“There was no question that
the Association objected in fairly
strong terms to some of the pro-
visions, because we felt it went
too far in giving unfettered pow-
ers to the regulator and adminis-
trator,” Mr Ward told Tribune
Business.

Zhivargo Laing, minister of
state for finance, told this news-
paper that some of the Bahamian
insurance industry’s concerns had
been taken into account in rela-
tion to the Domestic Insurance
Act amendments, and changes
made. He did not specify, though,
what had been changed.

“The industry had no objec-
tions to most of the amendments
being proposed to the Domestic
Insurance Act,” Mr Laing said.
“They had a few things they
raised questions about, and we
considered them.

“The Bills are going to be
debated, fully debated [in Parlia-
ment]. Everything the industry
has pointed out and raised with
us, we considered. Some were
accepted, others were not accept-
ed.”

Concerns

Similarly, Lennox McCartney,
the Registrar of Insurance, told
Tribune Business: “We met with
the industry, and were able to lis-
ten to their concerns.

“They provided us with a writ-
ten response in the first instance,
and we were able to meet with
them to get some clarity as to
what their concerns were, and
explain ourselves to them face-
to-face, instead of written com-
munications.”

Apart from the Domestic
Insurance Act amendments,
changes to the Companies Act
and a new External Insurance
Act were also tabled in the House
of Assembly yesterday for a first
reading.

Many of the amendments to
the first two Acts have been
prompted by the CLICO
(Bahamas) collapse into liquida-
tion, Prime Minister Hubert

Ingraham acknowledging as much
yesterday, and hinting that the
Government may soon announce
plans to compensate policyhold-
ers/annuity depositors for their
investments.

Mr McCartney added: “Some
of it has to do with CLICO, and
to provide additional mechanisms
to deal with a situation like that.
That’s why some of those amend-
ments were proposed.”

Yet the Business Licence Act
amendments, which would have
seen the 3 per cent premium tax
on insurance policies extended to
annuities, was not tabled in the
House of Assembly yesterday.

“It wasn’t tabled. That’s all I
can say right now,” said Mr
McCartney, when asked if this
meant the annuity tax position
had been reversed.

Tribune Business revealed on
Monday that the Bahamian insur-
ance industry was opposing pro-
posed amendments to the Busi-
ness Licence Act that would
extend the three per cent premi-
um tax levied on all insurance
policies to annuities, on the
grounds that it would create a
“disincentive” to save and give
the banking industry an unfair
competitive advantage.

One source said at the time:
“Annuities are a very small frac-
tion of the overall financial indus-
try. The tax would act as a disin-
centive to save in an environment
where savings are most needed —
where 75 per cent of companies
don’t have an employee pension
plan, and personal savings habits
are so bad.

“Other countries offer incen-
tives to save. I don’t see why we
would want to go the other way.”

Tribune Business understands
that it is estimated that total
annuity deposits in the Bahamian
market are worth collectively
$150 million, a sum that is equiv-
alent to 3 per cent of the total
$5.6 billion deposits in the
nation’s commercial banking sys-
tem — highlighting their relative
insignificance, and the fact that
the Government would only gain
an extra $4.5 million in tax rev-
enues should the tax be imposed.

Several insurance industry
sources said it was unclear where
the idea to extend the 3 per cent
premium tax to annuities had
come from, but questioned why it
was being imposed on Bahami-
an-owned companies and not
banking deposits controlled,
largely, by foreign-owned banks.

OPEN iloncay Iam -4pinn °

Real estate ownership ‘integrity’ undermined

FROM page 1B

the definition of such law. It needs to be
changed.

“The results of such activities, especially
when undertaken by non-Bahamians, if suc-
cessful, will not only be in contrast to what
is considered fair and proper business, but
will greatly undermine the integrity of the
status of Bahamian real estate ownership,
be it Bahamian or foreign.”

Mr Friese explained that in one case, a
real estate owner at Stella Maris had told
the developers they wanted to acquire own-
ership of an adjacent lot under the Squatters
Rights Act, something they protested.

A title search revealed that the Stella
Maris developers still owned the lot in ques-
tion, and Mr Friese said the real estate buy-
er joined forces with another neighbour at
the development to negotiate its purchase.

The second neighbour took a first option
on the lot, meaning he would buy it if the
deal fell through.

Yet the original buyer “quietly”
embarked on a legal action to obtain the lot,

Sa

Re.

without any of the other parties knowing.

The Supreme Court threw out the action
on a technicality, but not before the Stella
Maris developers had incurred $70,000 in
legal costs. So far, the second neighbour
has been unable to complete a $95,000 pur-
chase of the lot despite paying a deposit, Mr
Friese estimating that its current value was
now $150,000.

“Either way, combined legal and con-
nected expenses came to or by far super-
seded the value of the property,” he added.

In a second episode, Mr Friese said
another property owner at Stella Maris had
attempted to acquire an adjoining lot via the
Quieting Titles Act.

“T, as a director of the Stella Maris Prop-
erty Owners Association, together with its
President, went to see them, very, very nice
people, with whom we had a very warm
and long-term relationship, in order to
make them aware of what they were about
to do, and what implications their actions
may result in, socially and otherwise,” Mr
Friese said.

“A very calm and neutrally-kept conver-

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sation ended with pleasant goodbye’s being
extended. This was followed, however, with
a police warning, directed to both the pres-
ident and to myself, advising us that we
were no longer accepted on their property.”

The developers’ attempts to locate the
$20,000 lot’s owners have so far proved
fruitless, and Mr Friese said no one else
could act on their behalf without authority.

Another Quieting Titles Act action, Mr
Friese said, had also been initiated by
another property owner - except this time
they were likely to be embroiled in a court
battle, as the lot in question was owned by
a prominent Nassau business family, one
of whose members was a Bahamian attor-
ney.

These episodes again suggest the need
for a major overhaul of the legal and regu-
latory framework governing Bahamian real
estate and property ownership, and the way
in which conveyancing deeds and land own-
ership are registered.

From an economic perspective, given the
relative scarcity of land in the Bahamas,
ownership is critical.

In the Photo starting from the front Row left with lady in the cream: Ebony Dorsett (Massage
and Skin Care Specialist), Shekera Forbes (Shampoo Assistant), Mekeisha Fernander (Massage
Therapist), Janet Joseph (Hair Stylist), Kenya Mortimer-McKenzie (Spa Director, Massage Therapist,

Skin Gare Specialist).

The Row in the back starting from left with lady in black and gold: Stacy Thompson-Demeritte

(Hair Stylist), Gertrude Roberts (Nail Technician), Kedra Bell (Front Desk Manager), Tara Chipman

(Nail Technician), Harmane Thompson (Hair Stylist), Missing from the photo: JeRome
Miller (Master Hairstylist), Sharon Thompson (Nail Technician) and Yolanda Contreras (Hair Stylist).

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Tuesday - Saturday Sam » Spm

a





THE TRIBUNE

FRIDAY, MAY 8, 2009, PAGE 3B





Work permit
application fall

m By CHESTER ROBARDS
Business Reporter

crobards@tribunemedia.net

THE BAHAMAS Immigra-
tion Department has seen a
decrease in work permit applica-
tions, its minister said yesterday,
although submissions for live-in
maids and handymen continue to
proliferate.

Branville McCartney told Tri-
bune Business that the Immigra-
tion Board, which processes per-
mit applications, attempts to meet
every Monday in order to deter-
mine how many would be given
to expatriate workers and how
many Bahamians are called to

fulfill requested positions.

However, he admitted that
some permit applications do “slip
through the cracks” when
Bahamian workers may be avail-
able. Mr McCartney lamented
that Bahamians are still shying
away from positions they consid-
er menial and degrading, which
have to be granted to foreigners
because of their disinterest.

“We still have some people
applying for live-in maids and
handymen, and many times
Bahamians who take those jobs
don’t work professionally on
those job,” he said.

“We have to look at the eco-
nomic times and do what is nec-

$1000 CASH
asl

for return of missing
17” Apple MAC laptop computer
and blue USB Hard Drive

stolen from green jeep
parked at Parliment and Bay Street

NO QUESTIONS ASKED

CALL 468-9789

essary to make ends meet. Cer-
tainly, if I have to be a house-
keeper or a handyman or sweep
the street, I'd be the best street
sweeper in the Bahamas.”

Minister of Labour Dion
Foulkes touted the recently-
implemented unemployment
assistance program for its ability
of modernize the Labour Depart-
ment’s database of unemployed
persons, and monitor areas where
labour is needed. The database
will also allow the ministry to
track, in tandem with its Skills
Bank, unemployed persons’ qual-
ifications and fields of expertise in
order to place them when
employment options become
available.

According to Mr McCartney,
the Department of Labour is
always present during Immigra-
tion Board meetings to assist with
the placement of expatriate work-
ers, and also examining what jobs
can be offered to Bahamian
labourers. “We don’t approve
anything unless we have a labour
certificate, so they go through the
process of determining whether
there is a Bahamian qualified and
suited for this job,” he said.

“Where they don’t have
Bahamians we grant the permit, if
everything else is in order.”

Mr McCartney also touted the
unemployment scheme, saying:
“It’s going to give us a better idea
of those persons who are out
there, their qualifications and who
is looking for work.”

Sharing sentiments with Mr
Foulkes, Mr McCartney said that
if the Labour Department is to
really be effective in helping the
Immigration Board, persons must
be actively pursuing a job and use
the resources provided by each
department.

BID for downtown Nassau continuity

m@ By CHESTER ROBARDS
Business Reporter
crobards@tirbunemedia.net

THE DOWNTOWN Nassau
Partnership (DNP) is seeking to
create draft legislation and a busi-
ness plan that will give way to the
development of a Business
Improvement District (BID) in
the capital, ensuring the project’s
continuity should there be a
change of government, the direc-
tor-general of tourism has said.

Speaking at the DNP’s first
town meeting, Vernice Walkine
said the legislation will legally
empower the BID - when created
- to seamlessly carry on the
improvements and maintenance
to downtown Nassau and Bay
Street, even in the event of a
change in government.

“Part of what will eliminate
that particular problem or con-
cern would be the legislation we
are talking about,” she said.

“This [revitalisation project] is
intended to be enshrined in legis-
lation so that we have the legal
authority to create the city that
we are talking about. We have
the mechanism legally to do those
things that will give us the out-
come that we’re seeking.”

According to the DNP’s man-
aging director, Vaughn Roberts,
the draft legislation and business
plan for the BID will be created
simultaneously, with a tentative
end-of-summer deadline for the
business plan. The draft legisla-
tion could take a bit longer and
would then have to go to Cabinet
for approval.

BID consultant Dave Feehan
said this kind of organisational
authority is crucial to the success
of a city, and makes downtown
districts more competitive in their
region.

According to him, there are
over 1,000 BIDs in the US alone
and hundreds others throughout
the world.

Mr Feehan and a colleague are
assisting the DNP in creating
draft legislation that will allow

the city of Nassau to create an
autonomous entity charged with
managing its affairs.

Meanwhile, the interim DNP
will submit proposals to cCabi-
net and create short-term pro-
jects that will show visible
improvements to the city until the
BID, a single management mech-
anism, comes to fruition.

The DNP will also have to pre-
sent detailed master plans to Cab-
inet for the Bay Street Improve-
ments and its Phase 1 pedestri-
anisation of Woodes Rodgers
Wharf, which will be included in
the draft legislation and initial
business plan.

Some improvements have
already begun to the city, includ-
ing the $13 million renovation of
the Moses Plaza, according to Mr
Roberts. The extensive clean-up
and superficial renovations of
many downtown areas will begin
to take place almost immediately.

It has been suggested that the

removal of the shipping facilities
from downtown area will enable
the revitalisation to begin in
earnest. All plans call for the con-
tainer port to be moved to the
area west of Arawak Cay, where
a man-made island has been pro-
posed to accommodate it.

However, the Government has
been quiet about the deal and is
said to have placed a virtual gag
order on all investors related to
the relocation of the port.

Some suggest that it is because
the port will be going back into
the hands of those that once oper-
ated there when it was known as
Kelly Island. And there are some
who see that return as a regres-
sion in this country’s economic
expansion and dispersion of prop-
erty and wealth.

The town meeting revealed
that the container port will in be
moved to Arawak cay as an inte-
gral part of the Downtown revi-
talization.

FOR RENT

Fully furnished town house in private area on
eastern road, one minute from beach, 2 bed-

rooms, 1 1/2 baths, washroom, large kitchen,
burglar bars, A/C & C/A asking $1,050 per month,
$50 discount per month towards utilities, serious

enquires only please, 323-4396



SN
vo
NAD

Nassau Airport
Development Company

C-112 Warehouse

NOTICE

The Department of Statistics will carry out its
Annual Household survey during the period of
May. Enumerators with offical identification cards
from the Department of Statistics will visit selected
household in New Providence, Grand Bahama,
Exuma and Long Island and will be calling upon
residents to complete the questionnaires honestly
and accurately. The information obtained will be
handled in the strictest confidence and will be used
to maintain essential statical data on our country.”

NOTICE

RIME PORTFOLIO INC.

Notice is hereby given that in accordance with Section
137 (8) of the International Business Companies Act,
2000, RIME PORTFOLIO INC.,, has been dissolved
and struck off the Register according to the Certificate
of Dissolution issued by the Registrar General on the
24" of April, A.D., 2008.

Dated the 7" day of May A.D., 2009

A.J.K. Corporate Services (Bahamas) Limited
Liquidator

NOTICE

MAERSK BAHAMAS LTD.



Great Investment Opportunity

An Entrepreneur/Operations Specialist is in search
of Venture Capital to invest in a new but promising
business. Partnership opportunity is available. The
business requires a sizable sum of money for startup;
however the projected profits are reasonable and can
only get better despite the economy.

For more information forward a profile of yourself along
with contact information to businessopportunity@liv
e.com only trustworthy and proficient persons need
Te ee

NOTICE
ECUALACT CORP.

Tn Voluntary Liquidation

Notice is hereby given that in accordance
with Section 138(4) of the International Business Companies
Act. 2000, ECUALACT CORP. is in dissolution as of April
27, 2009.

Diego Fernando Coellar Neira situated at
Fray Reinaldo Arizaga 2-73, Cuenca, Ecuador is the
Liquidator.

LIQUIDATOR

An established bakery is looking for:

Cashier

Qualities

You must be young and energetic with an exciting and vivid
personality. You should be an ordered and disciplined person
accustomed to following a routine. You should appreciate
clean and neat surroundings. Excellence, not average, should
be your measure. Your enthusiasm should be contagious.

Neasau Ainpon Development Campany (NAD) 8 pleased to
announce the release of Tender C-112 Warehouge for Stage
tof tha Lynden Finding International Aiport Expansion
Tha Scape of Work inchuches:
‘Detailed design, supply, and installation of a pre-
manutaciured metal warehouse Guiding with
aporcximate dimension of FO tts 175 ft
-Crvil works inducing sft fil, grading, compaction
foundations and slab on grade designed to sul
prerrarulachured medal warehouse building
“Ubihy works inducing sanitary, power
communication and water service:
-Formal suimission to the Ministry of Works to finalize
building peamnit and liasing with Bahamas Blactnic
Campany lor (AMT St Vie

The C-112 Warehouse Tender Documents wil be available
for pick up or electronic distnbution ater 3:00pm, Aypril
16th, 2009

Contact: TRAD BRISBY

Contracts and Procurement Manager

Phe: (a2 PO DBS | Freee: (2p STFS
P.O Box AP 59770 Nassau, Bahamas
Exrreail: breve borvesh piftiras Joes



STERLING

* PERSUASIVE
* PERSISTENT
* PROFESSIONAL





NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that at an Extraordinary
General Meeting of the Shareholder of the above-named
Company duly convened and held on the 26" day of
February 2009 the following resolutions were passed:

Your ethics should be impeccable, and you should possess an
obsession for doing what is right. You must be responsible. You
must be self-assured. Your attitude should not be malodorous.
Above all you must be able to resist the urge to steal.

RESOLVED that MAERSK BAHAMAS LTD.

be wound up voluntarily. Qualifications

¢ Must be familiar with Quickbooks Point of Sales System
« EXPERIENCED
¢ Proven selling skills

RESOLVED that INTERNATIONAL
LIQUIDATOR SERVICES INC. be appointed the
Liquidator for the purpose of winding up.

nology

HS ta

Dated the 12% day of March 2009. A doctorate degree while not mandatory would be a plus!!
Only person fitting these descriptions need apply. Persons
pretending to fit these qualities only to get the job will be
promptly fired upon the exposure of their true colors. Please
call 4369203

MMG BAHAMAS LTD.
Registered Office

For the above-named Company ——

Decthionsltd.com

ieee Ba LCT
Webiwww, sterling




































Legal Notice

NOTICE
TAMARIND VALLEY INC.

— 4 —
Notice is hereby given that in accordance with Section 138
(8) of the International Business Companies Act 2000, the
dissolution of TAMARIND VALLEY INC. has been com-
pleted; a Certificate of Dissolution has been issued and the

Company has therefore been struck off the Register.

ARGOSA CORP. INC.
(Liquidator)

ee Ra
ane
NAD

Nassau Airport
Developmont Company

C-120 Airside Civil and
C-130 Landside Civil, Stage 1

Nassay Arpon Develooment Company (MAD) 6 pleased io
announce fhe peleaee of Tender C2120 Airside Civil and
(-130 Lamdside Cal for Stage 1 of the Lynden Pindling
infemational Airport Expansion. WALD) intends to enter inio
one contract for the cam pletion of hese wark packages, The
Scone of Work includes

-Signiicant sarthmoving, drainage and utility works

bolh arse ard landside'

“Roadway, parking lotand apron conatructon

aceeding $0, 000 tons. of asphalt paving

Signage and lohting for roadways, parking lals

apron and taxiways; and

-Instalation of hard and sof lancsida landscaping and

Imiganan
The 0-120 Airside Civil and -130 Landside Civ, Stage 7
Terminal Expansion Project Tender Documents will be
availshle for pick up of electronic disinbutien afer
2:00pm, April 16th, 2009. 4 bidders mesting wil
be hed at 1:00am, Tuesday April 26th,
2008. Please contact Traci Bneby to register at the MAD
Project Office

Contact TRAD BREE

Gontracts and Procurement anager

Phe (242) P0206 | Fam: (242) 77-2117
PO Goo AP G9 Massa, Bahamas
Enrad: traci brebyiiines b=

Ministry of Public Works
and Transport

PUBLIC NOTICE

TENDER FOR FENCING AT THE MINISTRY OF WORKS
AND TRANSPORT COMPOUND NASSAU, BAHAMAS

The Government of the Bahamas, through
the Ministry of Works and Transport is inviting
Tenders from fencing contractors to carry out
repairs and installation of chain link fencing.

Schedule for Tender Opening
Companies interested in tendering may attend
a Pre-Tender meeting at the Ministry of Works
Conference Room at 10:00 am, May 8, 2009
and followed by a site visit.

All tender bids should include the following:
¢« Complete Tender Document .
* Copy of current Business License .
¢ National Insurance board letter of good

standing
Tenders must be submitted
envelopes marked:

“Tender for Fencing at the Ministry of

Public Works and Transport”
and delivered to:

in sealed

Chairman Tenders Board
Ministry of Finance
3rd Floor Reception Desk
Cecil Wallace-Whitfield Centre
P.O. Box N-3017,
Cable Beach, West Bay Street
Nassau, Bahamas

All Tenders must be received at the above
address on or before 10:00 am Tuesday,
19th May 2009. All persons who submit bids
are invited to attend the opening of Tenders
at the Ministry of Finance, 3rd Floor, Cecil
Wallace-Whitfield Centre, Cable Beach, West
Bay Street, Nassau, Bahamas at 10:00 am,
on Tuesday, 19th May, 2009 The Ministry of
Public Works and Transport reserves the right
to reject any or all Tenders.

PAGE 4B, FRIDAY, MAY 8, 2009

THE TRIBUNE



Central Bank: National debt
43.4% of GDP at ’08 year-end

FROM page 1B

much as 4.5 per cent, S&P 2 per
cent - meaning that the debt-
to-GDP ratio will further
increase due to the latter fig-
ure’s contraction.

The Government is borrow-
ing $200 million to help finance
projects such as the Nassau har-
bour dredging and downtown
improvement; a further $100
million is coming for the New
Providence Road Improvement
Project; and $140 million is
being advanced by the People’s
Republic of China.

All this will add further to the
national debt, possibly taking it
- by Tribune Business calcula-
tions - to around 48 per cent of
GDP by year-end.

The Government will point
out that the Bahamas’ debt-to-
GDP ratio is far better than
most of its Caribbean and cred-
it rating peers, and that it has no
problem servicing its debt - the

key measurement. Yet, if the
credit rating agencies do not see
an improvement in the
Bahamas’ fiscal position once
it comes out of recession, they
may dictate policy changes to
the Government in return for
avoiding a credit rating down-
grade.

That, of course, could prompt
cuts in the Government’s social
programmes and spending.

Weakness

The weakness of the Gov-
ernment’s fiscal position is clear,
given that its Budget deficit
“almost doubled” to $173.4 mil-
lion for the first eight months
of 2008-2009, largely due to a
10 per cent drop in import-relat-
ed tax revenues.

Elsewhere, the Central Bank
projected that the Bahamian
economy had suffered a “mod-
erate contraction” in 20089
GDP, meaning that the econo-
my did indeed slip into reces-

sion. This was most evident in
commercial bank credit quali-
ty.
The Central Bank’s annual
report said the “most significant
deterioration” in bank credit
quality was seen in the mort-
gage market, where total loans
in arrears “rose by more than a
third” to $364 million.

This meant that mortgage
loans in arrears accounted for
13.2 per cent of such loans, a
2.8 per cent increase upon the
previous year.



The value of
commercial/business loans in
arrears rose from $94 million at
year-end 2007 to $161 million
as at end-December 2008, cre-
ating an arrears rate of 15.5 per
cent, as opposed to 9.3 per cent.

Consumer loan arrears,
meanwhile, increased by 39.6
per cent to $240 million.

The latter figure represented
10.8 per cent of this portfolio
as at end-December 2008, com-
pared to the previous year.

Legal Notice

NOTICE
ADDED WEALTH INC.

(In Voluntary Liquidation)

NOTICE

NOTICE is hereby given that YYVENA JOSEPH of FAITH AVE.,
NASSAU, BAHAMAS, is applying to the Minister responsible
for Nationality and Citizenship, for registration/naturalization
as a citizen of The Bahamas, and that any person who knows
any reason why registration/naturalization should not be
granted, should send a written and signed statement of the facts
within twenty-eight days from the 18’ day of May, 2009 to the
Minister responsible for nationality and Citizenship, P.O. Box
N-7147, Nassau, Bahamas.

NOTICE

NOTICE is hereby given that KERLINE ESTIME of
BAHAMA AVE., BLUE HILL ROAD, PO. BOX N-
4922, NASSAU, BAHAMAS is applying to the Minister
responsible for Nationality and Citizenship, for registration/
naturalization as a citizen of The Bahamas, and that
any person who knows any reason why registration/
naturalization should not be granted, should send a
written and signed statement of the facts within twenty-
eight days from the 8 day of May, 2009 to the Minister
responsible for nationality and Citizenship, P.O. Box
N-7147, Nassau, Bahamas.

NOTICE

NOTICE is hereby given that FREDLEANE DELVA of
GOVERNOR’S HARBOUR, ELEUTHERA, BAHAMAS is applying
to the Minister responsible for Nationality and Citizenship, for
registration/naturalization as a citizen of The Bahamas, and that
any person who knows any reason why registration/naturalization
should not be granted, should send a written and signed statement
of the facts within twenty-eight days from the 8â„¢ day of May, 2009
to the Minister responsible for nationality and Citizenship, PO. Box
N-7147, Nassau, Bahamas.

Legal Notice

NOTICE
TUZ GRANGES INC.

(In Voluntary Liquidation)

Notice is hereby given that the above-named
Company is in dissolution, which commenced
on the 6th day of May 2009. The Liquidator is
Argosa Corp. Inc., P.O. Box N-7757 Nassau,

Bahamas.

ARGOSA CORP. INC.
(Liquidator)

Legal Notice

NOTICE
LOILOIL CO. LTD.

—_— f}—

Notice is hereby given that in accordance with Section 138
(8) of the International Business Companies Act 2000, the
dissolution of LOILOIL CO. LTD. has been completed;
a Certificate of Dissolution has been issued and the Com-

pany has therefore been struck off the Register.

ARGOSA CORP. INC.
(Liquidator)

Notice is hereby given that the above-named
Company is in dissolution, which commenced
on the 6th day of May 2009. The Liquidator is
Argosa Corp. Inc., P.O. Box N-7757 Nassau,

Bahamas.

ARGOSA CORP. INC.
(Liquidator)

Legal Notice

NOTICE
SULMONA LASCO LIMITED

a ‘, oe
Notice is hereby given that in accordance with Section 138
(8) of the International Business Companies Act 2000, the
dissolution of SULMONA LASCO LIMITED has been
completed; a Certificate of Dissolution has been issued and

the Company has therefore been struck off the Register.

ARGOSA CORP. INC.
(Liquidator)

Legal Notice

NOTICE
SOLAR GALAXIES INC.

(In Voluntary Liquidation)

Notice is hereby given that the above-named
Company is in dissolution, which commenced
on the 6th day of May 2009. The Liquidator is
Argosa Corp. Inc., P.O. Box N-7757 Nassau,

Bahamas.

ARGOSA CORP. INC.
(Liquidator)

Legal Notice

NOTICE
BORISON INC.

(In Voluntary Liquidation)

Notice is hereby given that the above-named
Company is in dissolution, which commenced
on the 6th day of May 2009. The Liquidator is
Argosa Corp. Inc., P.O. Box N-7757 Nassau,

Bahamas.

ARGOSA CORP. INC.
(Liquidator)



THE TRIBUNE

FRIDAY, MAY 8, 2009, PAGE 5B



EX-minister disputes PM's $130m BIC sale assertion



FROM page 1B

“You can’t look
at one item on
the balance
sheet, like cash,

liabilities - its accounts payables,
security deposits, loans owed
and deferred incomes.

BTC’s 2006 annual report,
the last one available, shows
that while the 100 per cent

state-owned telecoms operator without looking
had $213.849 million in current

assets, including $128.501 mil. at the other

lion in cash on hand and at the liabilities.”

bank, it also had $139.105 mil-
lion in current liabilities.

As a result, Mr Smith said it
was impossible to determine the
true value, or net worth, of BTC
by looking at just one balance
sheet item as Mr Ingraham had
implied. The normal valuation
methods used were to look at

Inner-city revival seeks downtown project spin-offs

FROM page 1B

without the Government’s
intervention, even though it was
hoped it could give as much
support as necessary.

Rev Moss said a Bain and
Grants Town Association had
been established to drive the
project forward alongside pri-
vate investors to ensure its suc-
cess.

He added that most revitali-
sation projects started in those
inner-city areas had failed. The
Government’s past efforts,
which included the removal of
derelict vehicles and imple-
mentation of less-than-ambi-
tious social and community pro-
grammes, had been wholly
unsuccessful.

However, as the Downtown
Nassau revitalisation project
finds its legs, Rev Moss said
Bain and Grants Town will take
advantage of that momentum.





James Smith

cash flow, book value, or cash
flow discounted for present val-
ue and multiplied by future
earnings.

“This downtown redevelop-
ment project; we (Bain and
Grants Town) will be a part of
that. We’re tired of the Gov-
ernment, through the Ministry
of Tourism every few years,
pouring tons and tons of money
into the refurbishment of Bay
Street, but nothing a few feet
beyond, and we insist that that
will change,” Rev Moss said.

The termed ‘Over the Hill’
revitalisation project will have
the Ministry of Tourism on
board to assist the area in
becoming a tourist attraction
through arranged tours, said
Rev Moss. “The ministry has
agreed to train tour guides,” he
said.

The project hopes to make
Bain and Grants Town another
entertainment district, with
hotels and restaurants incorpo-
rated into the revitalisation
scheme.

Advocating the ‘Over the
Hill’ project, Freddie Munnings

Legal Notice

NOTICE
NORTHCOASTAL SHORES LTD.

(In Voluntary Liquidation)












Notice is hereby given that the above-named
Company is in dissolution, which commenced
on the 16th day of April 2009. The Liquidator is
Argosa Corp. Inc., P.O. Box N-7757 Nassau,











Bahamas.

ARGOSA CORP. INC.
(Liquidator)

Legal Notice

NOTICE
EOLO GROUP LTD.

— #,—

Notice is hereby given that in accordance with Section 138

(8) of the International Business Companies Act 2000, the
dissolution of EOLO GROUP LTD. has been completed;

a Certificate of Dissolution has been issued and the Com-

pany has therefore been struck off the Register.

ARGOSA CORP. INC.
(Liquidator)

Legal Notice

NOTICE
OESTORPHIO INC.

— f}—

Notice is hereby given that in accordance with Section 138

(8) of the International Business Companies Act 2000, the
dissolution of OESTORPHIO INC. has been completed;

a Certificate of Dissolution has been issued and the Com-

pany has therefore been struck off the Register.

ARGOSA CORP. INC.
(Liquidator)

“You can’t look at one item
on the balance sheet, like cash,
without looking at the other lia-
bilities,” Mr Smith told Tribune
Business. “The book value, the
net worth, is the difference
between the two and that,
together with the other method-
ologies, is the most appropriate
mechanism for valuing BTC.”

In response to Mr Ingraham
yesterday, former prime minis-
ter Perry Christie said that the
deal his administration had
secured with Bluewater includ-
ed a “provision” to deal with
the substantial cash build-up on
BTC’s balance sheet.

However, the Prime Minister
attacked the Bluewater deal’s
terms, accusing the former

Jr. said entertainment must be
an integral part of the revital-
ization of any area. He added
that entertainment drives
tourism, and was the allure to
attract visitors.

Mr Munnings suggested that
the Government should give
every Bahamian working
towards the revitalization of
their area the same investment
incentives that downtown mer-
chants and foreign investors are
receiving.

He said it was the unique
Bahamian experience that will
keep visitors coming back to an
area.

And that is precisely what
Rev Moss said Bain and Grants
Town would mean to the
tourism product after the revi-
talization is complete.

“Hotels and restaurants will
be popping up all over Bain and
Grants town,” he said. “Enter-
tainment will be the order of
the day.”

Paramount to the changes in
infrastructure and aesthetics in
those areas will be a change in
the attitudes and culture of the
people who reside there.

“There has to be, first of all,
that psychological change in the
residents. They will do the rest.
They will take care of the phys-
ical and infrastructural changes
that are necessary, but they
must have that mindset change,
and that’s what we’re working
on,” said Rev Moss

He added that they have
already begun to attract resi-
dents into social development
programmes, such as free Span-
ish classes, and are beginning
to implement a project called
Y13 (2013), which will teach

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administration of seeking to pri-
vatise BTC “on credit”, with
the then-government “trusting
the balance” to Bluewater.

He accused the former gov-
ernment of “seeking to con-
clude frantically, three days
before the election, on the 27th
or 28th of April, 2007, behind

ed after the Ingraham adminis-
tration took office. Bluewater
has now invoked arbitration
proceedings in the UK against
the Government.

Mr Christie, though, defend-
ed his government by saying
that the Bluewater transaction
was “a good deal for BTC at

the time... When we looked at
the offer we had, we thought
that the offer we had last, from
Bluewater, was a significant
improvement over the offer we
had the first time, and we
thought we acted prudently in
the circumstances”.

Air hooe
Adchorne

closed doors and without any
public announcement”, the pri-
vatisation with Bluewater.

The deal struck then involved
Bluewater paying $225 million
for its 49 per cent stake up-
front, with a further $30 million
payable five years after the pri-
vatisation completion, and $5
million in year six.

The agreement in principle,
though, was never consummat-

NOTICE

International Business Companies Act
(No. 46 of 2000)

NESLIN LTD

Registration Number 147357B

Pursuant to the provision of Section 138 (8) of the
International Business Companies Act, 2000 notice
is hereby given that NESLIN LTD. has been dis-
solved and has been struck off the Register of Com-
panies with effect from the 20th day of April, 2009.

adults rudimentary computer
skills.

These projects, said Rev
Moss, will help the community
to understand the revitalisation
effort and allow them to feel a
part of its existence.

“We will use that new-found [
sense of pride and dignity to ee al se
motivate them, to fuel them for- rf
ward into what we are planning
to do,” he said.

G50 Corporate Services Ltd, ~
Liquidator



THE COLLEGE OF THE BAHAMAS

Visit our website at www.cob.edu.bs

CENTRE FOR CONTINUING EDUCATION &
EXTENSION SERVICES

COMPUTER COURSES SUMMER 022009
50+ and/or RETIREES

pC | COURSE DESCRIPTORS
NOD.

[COUR | TIME [DAY START

UNO
COMPOn | a KEY ROAR DING mM

1 0-CHLA SAWN

COMPLE § | Ol IN TROD Td) CRS T
| WORD
INTRODUCTION To THE

INTERNET

1 HLA MLD

S21HI

| S70, Med UPA | £3iMi

COMPO | Gy

ENQUIRIES: Contact tha Co-ordinator ai Tal (242) J25-57
or email amuryitooh edu, ba

14) (242) RABAD0SS f 28-1096 | 0F-4SO0 ext, S22

All fees are included with the excepdion of the application fee of 240,00 fone tiene |

CEES reer fer nfl in chaege Tuto, Fees, Cowes Content, Course Sched ard! Couree Worterxals



Airborne Freight
& Cargo Services

Claustoms Air Freight Building, “458
Massau, Rahamas
Phone: 242.37 7.04502
Pax: 242.43 7 7.0451
47643048; 242

9454.24 S804 (Vibe)

Clell: 242 135.0092
3 LO.o00
3 15.6)

$ 45.00

123295 2-04 SWS og 2nd Awenwe (Lejume Ecil.>
Nlisami, FL 4230044

Phone 40S GAS BSS

Pachagss SObo DOO Es Adrbome: 3 OOK) RIT ORS 48S44

Airtonne's Rabe perib S&S SH)

Fax: 205. 085 55-4

Cell: 954.394.2204

FG CAPITAL MARKETS
BROKERAGE & ADVISORY SERVICES

Cah 1

ROYAL = FIDELITY

Money at Work
Lr a “a Ts
BISxX LISTED & TRADED SECURITIES AS OF:
THURSDAY, 7 MAY 2009

BISX ALL SHARE INDEX: CLOSE 1,613.79 | CHG -0.13 | %CHG -0.01 | YTD -98.57 | YTD % -5.76

FINDEX: CLOSE 798.52 | YTD -4.35% | 2008 -12.31%

WWW .BISXBAHAMAS.COM | TELEPHONE:242-323-2330 | FACSIMILE: 242-323-2320

52wk-Low
Abaco Markets

Bahamas Property Fund
Bank of Bahamas

Benchmark
Bahamas Waste
Fidelity Bank
Cable Bahamas
Colina Holdings

Commonwealth Bank (S1)
Consolidated Water BDRs

Doctor's Hospital
Famguard
Fince

FirstCaribbean Bank

Focol (S)

Focol Class B Preference
Freeport Concrete

ICD Utilities
J. S. Johnson

Premier Real Estate

Securit y

EPS $ Div $ P/E
0.127
0.992
0.244

-0.877
0.078
0.055
1.309
0.249
0.419
0.099
0.240
0.420
0.322
0.794
0.332

Previous Close Today's Close
1.40 1.40
11.00 11.00
6.95 6.95
0.63 0.63
3.15 3.15
2.37 2.37
11.75
2.83
6.17
2.48
1.86

Change Daily Vol.
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00

-0.12
0.00

11.75
2.83
6.17
2.60
1.86
7.76

11.00

10.40
5.14

7.76
11.00
10.40

5.14

0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
1.00
0.30
5.59
10.50
10.00

1.00
0.30
5.59
10.50
10.00

0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00

0.000
0.035
0.407
0.952
0.180

BISX LISTED DEBT SECURITIES - (Bonds trade on a Percentage Pricing bases)

1000.00
1000.00
1000.00
1000.00

52wk-Low

RND Holdings

ABDAB
RND Holdings

Fund Name
Colina Bond Fund
Colina MSI Preferred Fund
Colina Money Market Fund
Fidelity Bahamas G & I Fund

1.3041
2.9230
1.3883
3.1964
12.1564
100.0000
96.4070
1.0000
9.0950
1.0000
1.0000
1.0000

BISX ALL SHARE INDEX - 19 Dec 02 = 1,000.00
52Wk-Hi - Highest closing price in last 52 weeks
52wk-Low - Lowest closing price in last 52 weeks

Previous Close - Previous day's weighted price for daily volume
Today's Close - Current day's weighted price for daily volume

Change - Change in closing price from day to day
Daily Vol. - Number of total shares traded today

DIV $ - Dividends per share paid in the last 12 months
P/E - Closing price divided by the last 12 month earnings

(S) - 4-for-1 Stook Split - Effective Date 8/8/2007
(S1) - 3-for-1 Stock Split - Effective Date 7/11/2007

Fidelity Bank Note 17 (Series A) +
Fidelity Bank Note 22 (Series B) +
Fidelity Bank Note 13 (Series C) +
Fidelity Bank Note 15 (Series D) +

Symbol
Bahamas Supermarkets
Caribbean Crossings (Pref)

Fidelity Prime Income Fund

CFAL Global Bend Fund

CFAL Global Equity Fund

CFAL High Grade Bond Fund
Fidelity International Investment Fund
FG Financial Preferred Income Fund
FG Financial Growth Fund

FG Financial Diversified Fund

Symbol Last Sale Interest
FBB17 . . 7%
FBB22 0.00 Prime + 1.75%
FBB13 100.00 0.00 T%
FBB15 100.00 0.00 Prime + 1.75%
Fidelity Over-The-Counter Securities
Bid $ Ask $ Last Price
£.92 8.42 14.60
4.00 6.25 6.00
0.35 0.40 0.35
Colina Over-The-Counter Securities
30.13 31.59 29.00
0.45 0.55 0.55
BISX Listed Mutual Funds
NA Vv YTD% Last 12 Months
1.3664 0.95 4.77
2.8962 -1.49 3.35
1.4590 1.77 5.09
-5.59 -13.64
0.96 5.79
0.56 0.56
-3.59 -3.59
0.00 0.00
0.71 -12.76
1.0440 0.80 4.40
1.0364 0.33 3.64
1.0452 0.76 4.40
MARKET TERMS
YIELD - last 12 month dividends divided by closing price
Bid $ - Buying price of Colina and Fidelity
Ask $ - Selling price of Colina and fidelity
Last Price - Last traded over-the-counter price
Weekly Vol. - Trading volume of the prior week
EPS $ - Acompany’s reported earnings per share for the last 12 mths
NAY - Net Asset Value
N/M - Not Meaningful
FINDEX - The Fidelity Bahamas Stock Index. January 1, 1994 = 100

19 October 2017
19 October 2022
30 May 2013
29 May 2015

EPS $
-0.041
0.000
0.001

Div $
0.300
0.480
0.000

Weekly Vol. P/E

4.540
0.002

0.000
0.000
Div $ Yield %
28-Feb-09
31-Mar-09
11-May-09
31-Mar-09
28-Feb-09
31-Dec-08
31-Dec-08
31-Dec-O7
31-Mar-09
9-Feb-09
9-Feb-09
9-Feb-09

3.1964
12.7397
100.5606
96.4070
1.0000
9.1599

TO TRADE CALL: COLINA 242-502-7010 | ROYALFIDELITY 242-356-7764 | FG CAPITAL MARKETS 242-396-1000 | COLONIAL 242-502-7525





PAGE 8B, FRIDAY, MAY 8, 2009

DEVELOPMENT FOR SALE
MARINA & SEAFOOD PROCESSING PLANT
ALLIGATOR BAY, NORTH LONG ISLAND

Approx. 6 acres of Waterfront property with a 152 feet wide canal.
Property comprises three buildings:

Building A: Seafood Processing Plant include a reception area, an
office, three bathrooms, a receiving room, a dressing room,
a packing room, a storage room, a laboratory and a
processing room, (3) 10 ft x 30 ft blast freezers, and (1)
15ft x 15 ft and (1) 10 ft x15 ft holding freezers.

Building B: Generator House

Building C: The Water Plant consists of a reverse osmosis water
system that converts salt water into drinking water with

j

a 10,000 storage capacity.

Interested persons should submit offers to:

The Manager, Credit Risk Management, P. O. Box N-7518,
Nassau, Bahamas

To reach us on or before June 12, 2009

For further information, please contact us at
502-0929, 356-1685 or 356-1608

THE TRIBUNE

Treat yourself to lunch at Domi

Oweatlable Idanm—dperm Baily. Carry Out & Oelivery (rmmimmirourmn purchase for delivery $12.00}

CHECK OUT

|

STARTING

oa

$499

Get the Door. It’s Domino’s

9 Convenient Locations to Serve You

BODINE ‘BE JOHNSON HAS BEEW AN ENTER-
TAINER FOR AS LONG AS SHE CAN REMEMBER
having evolved from being a poet into a writer, tel
BWSION and radia producer and host, model, ac-
TESS, Casigner, Sookesecenan and
businesswoman.

The Bahamian bombshell 6 now one of The Ba-
Hamas Premiere recanding artists and parlormers
whose Stage mame, ‘Be' encompasses all aspects
of this multiialanted woman In 2007, she was
aligned te Fronfine Productions and BullBoo
Records and began work on her first tull ength
album

She has released Reggee songs, ‘Gotta Move
On’, ‘One’, ‘Good Lovin’ and ‘| Gon Ward you’
wrech have all been popular on local and interna-
liognal radio stations. and ‘iloxicated' a Soca re-
leasé ot British Virgin land's superstar Lincoln
Ward's One Might Riddim.

She has done school tows with Tamoo Televi-
sion and BTC as part of the Badness Outta Style
school Tour and Tampo Turns 3 celebrations

Since relassing her debut single ‘One’. on the
CopyGat Riddim Compikitien Album in 2007, Be
fas rebranded herself as a tamale music power.
nouse whose populanty condinues bo soread na-
thonmwide. Her each does end thar however
with har music being played in the Caribbean,
Florida, Mew ork and many other countries
veo richie

Her refesse ‘| Dor Wand You’ on ButiBeo
Recond’s Promise Riddim has been ranked
among the Top 40 by Captain Kirk of the
stutfieet Music Pool, listed among the Tap 50 cen
nats of the Masseoal DW Association, and has bees
dtenicadad a5 far as France, Germany, tha Nether-
ands, Canada, and South America while simultane-
ously hittieg the Top of the Bahamian Music Charts

An avid waiter, Bodine Victoria Johnson eeolved
from writing poems into a perlormance postand
Script writer dor formal and informal television =
shows.

She has co-produced and oo-directed tveo
Stage shows “Sirena’ and ‘“Adro-DZ-A0" which in-
duded acting, singing and dancing a& part al
Panache Productions



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Full Text

PAGE 1

n By ALISON LOWE Tribune Staff Reporter alowe@tribunemedia.net STEPPING into the politi cal tit-for-tat over the privatisation of BTC, Prime Minister Hubert Ingraham denied accusations by PLP leader Perry Christie that the former FNM administration had “wasted” $138 million as it sought to prepare the corpo ration for privatisation in the 1990s. Itemising the expenditure of funds which totalled $139.5 million at that time, including $94 million spent on severance packages for staff Mr Ingraham told parliament that BTC’s profits in the years sub sequent to the “right sizing” of the company in preparation for its privatisation “explod ed.” N N A A S S S S A A U U A A N N D D B B A A H H A A M M A A I I S S L L A A N N D D S S L L E E A A D D I I N N G G N N E E W W S S P P A A P P E E R R Justice John Lyons resigns from court C M Y K C M Y K WEATHER BRILLIANT SUNSHINE HIGH 88F LOW 76F SEEBUSINESSFRONT S P O R T S SEEPAGE14 Fritz Grant Track and Field Invitational n By PAUL G TURNQUEST Tribune Staff Reporter pturnquest@tribunemedia.net THElegal profession was taken by surprise yesterday, when Senior Justice John Lyons unex pectedly tendered his resignation from the Supreme Court. Taking effect in August, Justice Lyons is expected to take a vacation in the meantime hav ing recused himself from all matters that were before hiscourt. With it being no secret that Justice Lyons had been quite “unhappy” for sometime with the state of the Judiciary, sources within this fraternity confirmed that over the past few weeks he had been making provisions to secure his gratuity before handing in his resignation. Unexpected move from controversial figure The Tribune ANYTIME ... ANYPLACE , WE RE #1 B AHAMASEDITION TRY OUR SOUTHERN CHICKEN BISCUIT www.tribune242.com BAHAMASBIGGEST CARSFORSALE, HELPWANTED ANDREALESTATE I N S I D E C M Y K C M Y K S E C T I O N B b u s i n e s s @ t r i b u n e m e d i a . n e t F R I D A Y , M A Y 8 , 2 0 0 9 T H E T R I B U N E $ 4 .6 8$ 4 .5 1$ 4 .6 9T h e i n f o r m a t i o n c o n t a i n e d i s f r o m a t h i r d p a r t y a n d T h e T r i b u n e c a n n o t b e h e l d r e s p o n s i b l e f o r e r r o r s a n d / o r o m i s s i o n f r o m t h e d a i l y r e p o r t . $ 3 . 5 3 $ 3 . 6 2 $ 3 . 4 8 R e a l e s t a t e o w n e r s h i p i n t e g r i t y u n d e r m i n e d C e n t r a l B a n k : N a t i o n a l d e b t 4 3 . 4 % o f G D P a t 0 8 y e a r e n d nB y N E I L H A R T N E L L T r i b u n e B u s i n e s s E d i t o r T h e B a h a m a s n a t i o n a l d e b t s t o o d a t 4 3 . 4 p e r c e n t o f g r o s s d o m e s t i c p r o d u c t a t y e a r e n d 2 0 0 8 , t h e C e n t r a l B a n k o f t h e B a h a m a s h a s r e v e a l e d , a t h r e s h o l d w e l l a b o v e t h e d a n g e r 4 0 p e r c e n t l e v e l , w i t h t h e p o s s i b i l i t y e x i s t i n g t h a t t h i s r a t i o c o u l d s o o n r e a c h b e t w e e n 4 5 5 0 p e r c e n t . T h e C e n t r a l B a n k , i n i t s 2 0 0 8 a n n u a l r e p o r t , s a i d t h e n a t i o n a l d e b t i n c r e a s e d b y $ 1 3 0 m i l l i o n o r 4 . 1 p e r c e n t t o $ 3 . 2 b i l l i o n a t D e c e m b e r 3 1 , 2 0 0 8 , t h e l a t t e r f i g u r e e q u i v a l e n t t o 4 3 . 4 p e r c e n t o f B a h a m i a n p e r a n n u m g r o s s d o m e s t i c p r o d u c t ( G D P ) . T h i s c o m p a r e d t o t h e y e a r b e f o r e r a t i o o f 4 2 . 4 p e r c e n t , w h i c h w a s a l r e a d y w e l l a b o v e t h e 4 0 p e r c e n t d e b t t o G D P r a t i o t h a t i s r e g a r d e d a s a d a n g e r t h r e s h o l d b y t h e l i k e s o f t h e I n t e r n a t i o n a l M o n e t a r y F u n d ( I M F ) , a n d c r e d i t r a t i n g a g e n c i e s s u c h a s M o o d y s a n d S t a n d a r d & P o o r s ( S & P ) . O n c e t h i s t h r e s h o l d i s b r e a c h e d , t h e s e a g e n c i e s b e c o m e c o n c e r n e d a b o u t a c o u n t r y s a b i l i t y t o s e r v i c e i t s d e b t , w i t h t h e l a t t e r t w o p o s s i b l y c o n t e m p l a t i n g a s o v e r e i g n c r e d i t r a t i n g d o w n g r a d e . T h i s i s s o m e t h i n g t h e B a h a m a s w o u l d w a n t t o a v o i d a t a l l c o s t s , a s a d o w n g r a d e w o u l d l e a v e i t h a v i n g t o p a y m o r e f o r a n y g o v e r n m e n t b o r r o w i n g o n t h e c a p i t a l m a r k e t s , g i v e n t h a t i n v e s t o r s w o u l d w a n t h i g h e r i n t e r e s t r a t e s t o c o m p e n s a t e f o r t h e p e r c e i v e d i n c r e a s e d r i s k .U n l i k e l yA c r e d i t r a t i n g d o w n g r a d e i s u n l i k e l y t o h a p p e n t o t h e B a h a m a s i n t h e s h o r t t e r m , a n d t h e 2 0 0 8 i n c r e a s e i n t h e n a t i o n a l d e b t w a s l e s s t h a n t h e $ 1 8 2 . 8 m i l l i o n o r 6 . 3 p e r c e n t g r o w t h e x p e r i e n c e d i n 2 0 0 7 . F o r c a l e n d a r y e a r 2 0 0 8 , t h e d i r e c t c h a r g e o n g o v e r n m e n t i n c r e a s e d b y $ 1 2 8 . 3 m i l l i o n o r 4 . 9 p e r c e n t t o $ 2 . 6 7 3 b i l l i o n . B a h a m i a n d o l l a r c l a i m s a c c o u n t e d f o r 8 6 . 1 p e r c e n t o f t h e t o t a l , g a i n i n g $ 3 9 . 5 m i l l i o n o r 1 . 7 p e r c e n t t o $ 2 . 3 7 9 b i l l i o n , t h e C e n t r a l B a n k s a i d . B y c r e d i t o r c o m p o s i t i o n , t h e m a j o r i t y o f B a h a m i a n d o l l a r d e b t w a s h e l d b y p r i v a t e a n d i n s t i t u t i o n a l i n v e s t o r s ( 3 2 p e r c e n t ) ; f o l l o w e d b y p u b l i c c o r p o r a t i o n s ( 3 0 . 3 p e r c e n t ) ; d o m e s t i c b a n k s ( 2 9 . 2 p e r c e n t ) ; a n d t h e C e n t r a l B a n k ( 8 . 5 p e r c e n t ) . S o m e $ 8 3 5 . 9 m i l l i o n o f t h e B a h a m a s n a t i o n a l d e b t i s d e n o m i n a t e d i n f o r e i g n c u r r e n c y , b u t h e r e a g a i n , $ 4 0 5 . 3 m i l l i o n o r 4 8 . 5 p e r c e n t o f t h i s a m o u n t i s h e l d w i t h i n t h i s n a t i o n b y B a h a m i a n i n v e s t o r s . T h i s h e l p s t o r e d u c e t h e l e v e r a g e i n t e r n a t i o n a l f i n a n c i a l i n s t i t u t i o n s c o u l d b r i n g t o b e a r o n t h e B a h a m a s , s h o u l d i t r u n i n t o d i f f i c u l t y r e p a y i n g i t s d e b t s . H o w e v e r , w i t h t h e G o v e r n m e n t s 2 0 0 8 2 0 0 9 f i s c a l d e f i c i t l i k e l y t o c o m e i n c l o s e t o 4 p e r c e n t o f G D P , a n d v a r i o u s b o r r o w i n g s b e i n g u n d e r t a k e n t o f i n a n c e i n f r a s t r u c t u r e a n d c a p i t a l w o r k s p r o g r a m m e s , t h e c o n d i t i o n s a r e i n p l a c e f o r a f u r t h e r n a t i o n a l d e b t i n c r e a s e t h i s y e a r . A t t h e s a m e t i m e , B a h a m i a n G D P w i l l f a l l d u e t o t h e r e c e s s i o n t h e I M F p r e d i c t i n g b y a s A l r e a d y p a s t 4 0 % d a n g e r t h r e s h o l d , w i t h f u r t h e r i n c r e a s e s t o f o l l o w f r o m B u d g e t d e f i c i t , r e v e n u e f a l l o f f a n d 2 0 0 9 G D P d e c l i n eS E E p a g e 4 B nB y C H E S T E R R O B A R D S B u s i n e s s R e p o r t e r c r o b a r d s @ t r i b u n e m e d i a . n e t T H E B A I N a n d G r a n t s T o w n r e v i t a l i s a t i o n p r o j e c t w i l l b e s o l e l y p r i v a t e s e c t o r d r i v e n , a s e n i o r c o o r d i n a t o r s a i d y e s t e r d a y , a s i t i n s i s t s t h a t f i n a n c i n g p o u r e d i n t o d o w n t o w n N a s s a u s r e d e v e l o p m e n t m o v e a f e w f e e t b e y o n d B a y S t r e e t t o e s t a b l i s h t h e i n n e r c i t y a s a n o t h e r e n t e r t a i n m e n t d e s t i n a t i o n . R e v C B M o s s , s p e a k i n g a t t h e R o t a r y C l u b o f W e s t N a s s a u s m o n t h l y m e e t i n g , g a v e a s s u r a n c e s t h a t t h e p r o j e c t w i l l m o v e f o r w a r d I n n e r c i t y r e v i v a l s e e k s d o w n t o w n p r o j e c t s p i n o f f s W i l l i n s i s t d o w n t o w n e f f o r t s m o v e a f e w f e e t b e y o n d B a y S t r e e t t o t u r n B a i n a n d G r a n t s T o w n i n t o e n t e r t a i n m e n t d e s t i n a t i o n S E E p a g e 5 B nB y N E I L H A R T N E L L T r i b u n e B u s i n e s s E d i t o r A f o r m e r f i n a n c e m i n i s t e r y e s t e r d a y d i s p u t e d P r i m e M i n i s t e r H u b e r t I n g r a h a m s a s s e r t i o n t h a t t h e f o r m e r C h r i s t i e a d m i n i s t r a t i o n h a d e f f e c t i v e l y a t t e m p t e d t o s e l l t h e B a h a m a s T e l e c o m m u n i c a t i o n s C o m p a n y ( B T C ) f o r $ 1 3 0 m i l l i o n , t e l l i n g T r i b u n e B u s i n e s s t h a t i n v a l u i n g t h e f i r m f o r p r i v a t i s a t i o n t h e p a r t i e s h a d t o a s s e s s m o r e t h a n j u s t o n e b a l a n c e s h e e t i t e m . M r I n g r a h a m , d u r i n g t h e d e b a t e o n t h e r a f t o f l e g i s l a t i o n i n t e n d e d t o r e v a m p t h e B a h a m a s c o m m u n i c a t i o n s r e g u l a t o r y r e g i m e , i m p l i e d i n t h e H o u s e o f A s s e m b l y t h a t t h e n e t w o r t h o f t h e a g r e e m e n t i n p r i n c i p l e s t r u c k b e t w e e n t h e f o r m e r P L P g o v e r n m e n t a n d B l u e w a t e r C o m m u n i c a t i o n s H o l d i n g s f o r t h e s a l e o f a 4 9 p e r c e n t B T C s t a k e w a s $ 1 3 0 m i l l i o n , r a t h e r t h a n $ 2 6 0 m i l l i o n . T h e P r i m e M i n i s t e r s a i d t h i s w a s b e c a u s e a t t h a t d a t e , B T C h e l d o n i t s b a l a n c e s h e e t s o m e $ 1 3 0 m i l l i o n i n c a s h o n h a n d a t t h e b a n k a n a s s e t t h a t w o u l d h a v e b e e n t r a n s f e r r e d t o B l u e w a t e r u p o n t h e p r i v a t i s a t i o n s c o m p l e t i o n . T h i s , h e i m p l i e d , c o u l d h a v e b e e n u s e d b y t h e t e l e c o m s b u y o u t g r o u p t o e f f e c t i v e l y r e p a y 5 0 p e r c e n t o f t h e h e a d l i n e $ 2 6 0 m i l l i o n p u r c h a s e p r i c e i t h a d p a i d t h e G o v e r n m e n t . T h i s , M r I n g r a h a m s a i d , m e a n t B l u e w a t e r w o u l d i n r e a l i t y h a v e p a i d $ 1 3 0 m i l l i o n f o r a 4 9 p e r c e n t B T C s t a k e t h e s a m e s u m t h a t t h e C h r i s t i e a d m i n i s t r a t i o n h a d r e c e i v e d f o u r y e a r s e a r l i e r , a n d r e j e c t e d , f r o m t h e T o m B a i n l e d B a h a m a T e l c o n s o r t i u m . T h i s , t h o u g h , w a s r e j e c t e d b y J a m e s S m i t h , t h e m i n i s t e r o f s t a t e f o r f i n a n c e w h o h a d r e s p o n s i b i l i t y f o r B T C s p r i v a t i s a t i o n u n d e r t h e C h r i s t i e g o v e r n m e n t . N o w C F A L c h a i r m a n , M r S m i t h t o l d T r i b u n e B u s i n e s s y e s t e r d a y t h a t a n y b u s i n e s s n o t j u s t B T C c o u l d n o t b e v a l u e d o n t h e b a s i s o f j u s t o n e a s s e t , s u c h a s c a s h i n h a n d o r a t t h e b a n k . M r S m i t h p o i n t e d o u t t h a t a p a r t f r o m a s s e t s , b o t h c u r r e n t a n d n o n c u r r e n t , w h e n e v e r a c o m p a n y w a s s o l d t h e b u y e r a l s o a c q u i r e d a l l i t s l i a b i l i t i e s a s p e r t h e a c q u i s i t i o n d a t e . T h i s m e a n t t h a t a p a r t f r o m i t s a c c o u n t s r e c e i v a b l e s , i n v e n t o r i e s , i n v e s t m e n t s , a n d p r o p e r t y a n d i n f r a s t r u c t u r e , B l u e w a t e r w o u l d a l s o h a v e a c q u i r e d B T C s E x m i n i s t e r d i s p u t e s P M s $ 1 3 0 m B T C s a l e a s s e r t i o nS E E p a g e 5 B J a m e s S m i t h nB y N E I L H A R T N E L L T r i b u n e B u s i n e s s E d i t o r A r e s o r t / r e a l e s t a t e d e v e l o p e r y e s t e r d a y s a i d t h e i n t e g r i t y a n d s e c u r i t y o f p r i v a t e r e a l e s t a t e o w n e r s h i p i n t h e B a h a m a s w a s b e i n g u n d e r m i n e d b y a b u s e o f l e g i s l a t i o n s u c h a s t h e Q u i e t i n g T i t l e s A c t , w i t h h i s p r o j e c t e m b r o i l e d i n t h r e e a l l e g e d l a n d g r a b c a s e s . J o e r g F r i e s e , d i r e c t o r / p a r t n e r o f L o n g I s l a n d s S t e l l a M a r i s R e s o r t d e v e l o p m e n t , t o l d T r i b u n e B u s i n e s s t h a t t h e d e v e l o p m e n t w a s a l r e a d y i n v o l v e d i n t h r e e p o t e n t i a l l a n d b a t t l e s , o n e o f w h i c h h a d g o n e t o c o u r t , t h a t h a d b e e n i n v o k e d u n d e r t h e Q u i e t i n g T i t l e s A c t a n d S q u a t t e r s R i g h t s A c t . W e c o n s i d e r i t a b s o l u t e l y u n e t h i c a l t h a t a n y o n e , e x c e p t p e r h a p s g e n e r a t i o n l a n d o w n i n g B a h a m i a n f a m i l i e s , w o u l d a t t e m p t t o o b t a i n r e a l e s t a t e w i t h o u t a p p l y i n g p r o p e r m e t h o d s , s u c h a s p e r p u r c h a s e , l e a s e , r e n t , M r F r i e s e s a i d . W e a r e o f t h e o p i n i o n t h a t b o t h t h e Q u i e t i n g T i t l e s a n d t h e S q u a t t e r s R i g h t s A c t s w e r e i n t e n d e d t o c l a r i f y / d e v e l o p c e r t a i n o w n e r s h i p s i t u a t i o n s , b e i n g c o n n e c t e d w i t h g e n e r a t i o n l a n d a n d s u c h . I t i s a f a c t i n t h e B a h a m a s t h a t , i n p a r t i c u l a r , t h e Q u i e t i n g T i t l e s A c t i s a r c h a i c a n d t o d a y a n d f o r n o n B a h a m i a n s u n f a i r , i n v i t i n g a c t i o n s w h i c h w e r e n e v e r i n t e n d e d b y S E E p a g e 2 B nB y N E I L H A R T N E L L T r i b u n e B u s i n e s s E d i t o r T h e G o v e r n m e n t y e s t e r d a y t o l d T r i b u n e B u s i n e s s t h a t a m e n d m e n t s h a d b e e n m a d e t o t h e i n i t i a l D o m e s t i c I n s u r a n c e A c t d r a f t r e f o r m s , a f t e r t h e i n d u s t r y w a r n e d t h a t t h e p r o p o s a l s f o r a p p o i n t i n g a n a d m i n i s t r a t o r a n d h i s p o w e r s w o u l d h a v e a s t i f l i n g a n d d e v a s t a t i n g i m p a c t o n a f f e c t e d f i r m s a n d p o s s i b l y p r o m p t t h e m t o a p p e a l t h e i s s u e t o t h e S u p r e m e C o u r t . A n A p r i l 2 7 , 2 0 0 9 , l e t t e r s e n t t o L e n n o x M c C a r t n e y , t h e R e g i s t r a r o f I n s u r a n c e , b y t h e B a h a m a s G e n e r a l I n s u r a n c e A s s o c i a t i o n ( B G I A ) , w h i c h w a s o b t a i n e d b y t h i s n e w s p a p e r y e s t e r d a y , e x p r e s s e d t h e s e c t o r s c o n c e r n s a b o u t t h e r e g u l a t o r s a b i l i t y t o a p p o i n t a n a d m i n i s t r a t o r f o r a t r o u b l e d i n s u r a n c e c a r r i e r , a n d t h e p o w e r s s u c h a p e r s o n w o u l d h a v e . T h e B G I A l e t t e r s a i d : T h e r e a s o n s f o r a n a p p o i n t m e n t o f a n a d m i n i s t r a t o r b y t h e [ I n s u r a n c e ] C o m m i s s i o n a r e e x t r e m e l y v a g u e a n d s u b j e c t i v e . T h i s p r o v i s i o n a s p r e s e n t l y d r a f t e d i s t o o i m p r e c i s e i t d o e s n ' t p r o v i d e i n s u r a n c e c o m p a n i e s w i t h a d e f i n i t i v e b e n c h m a r k o r p a r a m e t e r f o r t h e a p p o i n t m e n t o f a n a d m i n i s t r a t o r . T h e a p p r o a c h s h o u l d b e a s t r e a m l i n e d o b j e c t i v e , o n e w h e r e b y i n s u r a n c e c o m p a n i e s k n o w f o r c e r t a i n w h e n t h e y h a v e f a l l e n a f o u l o f g o v e r n m e n t r e g u l a t i o n s . T h e d r a f t D o m e s t i c I n s u r a n c e A c t r e f o r m s , a c o p y o f w h i c h h a s a l s o b e e n o b t a i n e d b y T r i b u n e B u s i n e s s , e m p o w e r s t h e I n s u r a n c e C o m m i s s i o n ( t h e s u c c e s s o r t o t h e R e g i s t r a r o f I n s u r a n c e ) t o a p p o i n t a n a d m i n i s t r a t o r i n c a s e s w h e r e i n s u r e r s h a v e f a i l e d o r a r e u n l i k e l y t o m e e t t h e i r l i a b i l i t i e s ; a s s e t s d o n o t g i v e s u f f i c i e n t p r o t e c t i o n t o p o l i c y h o l d e r s o r a r e l e s s t h a n l i a b i l i t i e s ; t h e c o m p a n y s a s s e t s a n d c a p i t a l a r e e r o d i n g d r a s t i c a l l y ; a n d i t s b u s i n e s s i s b e i n g c o n d u c t e d i n a m a n n e r d e t r i m e n t a l t o p o l i c y h o l d e r s . T h e B G I A s c o n c e r n s , a s e x p r e s s e d i n i t s l e t t e r , a l s o r e l a t e d t o t h e p o w e r s t h e a d m i n i s t r a t o r w o u l d h a v e . T h e l e t t e r s a i d : T h e w i d e a n d e x t e n s i v e p o w e r s g r a n t e d t o t h e a d m i n i s t r a t o r w i l l u n d o u b t e d l y h a v e a s t i f l i n g a n d d e v a s t a t i n g i m p a c t o n a n i n s u r a n c e c o m p a n y s b u s i n e s s r e p u t a t i o n , a n d w a y o f d o i n g b u s i n e s s . G e n e r a l l y s p e a k i n g , w e f i n d t h i s p r o p o s a l i n t r u s i v e a n d o n e r o u s , a n d w e t h e r e f o r e v e h e m e n t l y o p p o s e t h e i n c l u s i o n o f t h e s a m e i n t h e m a n n e r h e r e w i t h s u g g e s t e d . E v e n m o r e a l a r m i n g i s t h e a b s e n c e o f t h e c r i t e r i a f o r c h o o s D e v a s t a t i n g p o w e r f e a r s a m o n g i n s u r e r s I n s u r a n c e i n d u s t r y s o c o n c e r n e d a b o u t a d m i n i s t r a t o r / a p p o i n t m e n t p o w e r s t h a t S u p r e m e C o u r t c h a l l e n g e l i k e l y i f B i l l s n o t c h a n g e d G o v e r n m e n t : s o m e c h a n g e s m a d e B u t B i l l t o i n t r o d u c e 3 % a n n u i t i e s t a x n o t t a b l e d i n H o u s e y e s t e r d a y S E E p a g e 2 B B U S I N E S S ‘Devastating’ power fears among insurers Volume: 105 No.137FRIDAY, MAY 8, 2009 PRICE – 75 (Abaco and Grand Bahama $1.25 SEE page nine WHAT started as a small crack on the sea wall at Long Wharf a year ago, has now spread causing the road to crumble. The area has been blocked off to pedestrians by protective barriers. John Lyons F e l i p M a j o r / T r i b u n e s t a f f D AMAGE TAKES ITS TOLL ON SEA WALL n By TANEKA THOMPSON Tribune Staff Reporter tthompson@tribunemedia.net A MOTHER, who claimed her threey ear-old son was recently kidnapped outs ide her home, is expected to be formally charged sometime today with deceiving police. As first reported by The Tribune, police said Wednesday night that they were questioning 37-year-old Angie Moss to validate the allegations surrounding the alleged kidnapping. "Police discovered that the child was not kidnapped and was in the care of a relative. After being questioned, it was revealed that Ms Moss had other motives and was placed under arrest last night for false information provided to the police. "She is in custody and is expected to be charged with deceit of a Public Officer in court sometime (today Liaison Officer Assistant Superintendent Walter Evans said yesterday. Mother who made kidnap claim expected to be charged Woman under arrest in connection with ‘false information’ given to police SEE page 10 n By ALISON LOWE Tribune Staff Reporter alowe@tribunemedia.net A PLP senator yesterday commended Prime Minister Hubert Ingraham on his statement that he will shortly make a new “announcement with regard to CLICO and its policyholders in the Bahamas.” Jerome Fitzgerald said he hopes whatever is said will “make policyholders feel more comfortable that their concernsarebeing addressed.” “It’s going to be interesting to see what they’re going to announce,” said Senator Fitzgerald, adding that it is “not too late” for the government to say it will guarantee the investments of Bahamian policy holders in CLICO as the Trinidadian and Guyanese governments have done. Yesterday in the House of PM denies claims FNM ‘wasted’ $138m preparing BTC for privatisation in 90s SEE page nine PM is set to make CLICO announcement SEE page 16 n By MEGAN REYNOLDS Tribune Staff Reporter mreynolds@tribunemedia.net A GROUP of students at RM Bailey Senior High School were sent home from school on Monday and ordered not to return until they have been tested for drugs. And Shantel Smith, the mother of a grade 10 student at the school in Marathon Road, Nassau, is angry her son has been barred from school since Monday because as an unem ployed single mother of three she is unable to pay for the $20 drug test. When The Tribune alerted Education Minister Carl Bethel Students ordered not to return to school until they’ve had drugs test SEE page 10 INSIDE A NASSAU TO BE PROUD OF ‘JUST AROUND THE CORNER’ P A GE T W O INGRAHAM AND PLP IN CONFLICT OF INTEREST ROW P A GE THREE SHOES DESTROYED BY STORE BOSSES ‘NOT FIT F OR CHARIT Y P AGEFIVE n By NATARIO McKENZIE Tribune Staff Reporter IN Astartling turn of events yesterday, the retrial of Bishop Earl Randy Fraser was stayed pending a decision on a constitutional application by his defence attorneys. Fraser, who is on $10,000 bail, is accused of having a sexual relationship with a 16year-old girl between July 2005 and February 2006. The retrial began before Magistrate Carolita Bethel on Mon day and so far five witnesses, Bishop Fraser retrial is stayed SEE page 10 n COURTOFAPPEAL RESERVES DECISION THE Court of Appeal has reserved its decision on a recent application to have Justice John Lyons recuse himself from a case. Last month, Justice Lyons delivered a ruling refusing an application by attorney Fred Smith, a partner at Callenders and Co, seeking to SEE page nine Angie Moss

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n B y ALISON LOWE Tribune Staff Reporter alowe@tribunemedia.net D OWNTOWN stakeholders e nthusiastically relayed impressive short and long term plans for the revitalisation of the city of Nassau at a town meeting on W ednesday night – assuring more than 130 audience members that a Nassau they can be proud of is just around the corner. After decades of discussion, Charles Klonaris, co-chair of the newly-formed public-private downtown management committee – the Downtown Nassau Partnership – said people will soon see many visible improvements to the city.” With a full time management team in place, a secure stream of revenue and drafting of legislation under way to “give teeth” to the DNP’s authority to maintain, develop and promote the city of Nassau, the revitalisation effort has taken a leap forward with respect to putting in place the components that authorities on d owntown enhancement say are needed to create a much more attractive, welcoming and entertaining destination for Bahamians and tourists alike, speakers told those attending. “The process takes time but we’re not 20 years away, we’re right on the other side of it right n ow,” said Mr Klonaris, addressing the gathering, which took place at the British Colonial Hilton. Improvements D NP managing director Vaughn Roberts identified some of the various improvements to be pushed by the DNP over the n ext few months as: cleaning and s anitation, beautification, reducing congestion, increasing the availability of parking options,u ndertaking streetscaping, maintaining buildings and sidewalks and creating new entertainment possibilities. These are visible quick wins,” said Mr Roberts, who said the DNP currently has access to $650,000 in joint public-privatef unds to reach its intermediate g oals. Meanwhile, once government passes legislation to enact a Business Improvement District for the c ity of Nassau, the DNP will have greater authority and funds to plan, promote and push the revitalisation effort at a level beyond superficial improvements. Architect Jackson Burnside spoke passionately about the huge potential dowtown Nassau has to become the “leading visitor attract ion in any small island state” in the world thanks to its inherent assets as a waterfront port and the commitment of the DNP. Designs To illustrate his vision, Mr Burnside, who has been contracted to produce designs for the revit alised downtown area, exhibited s ome of his renderings of a vibrant and expanded and transformed waterfront on Nassau Harbour and beautified sidestreets, leadi ng down from Bay Street to the water, closed to traffic. Along these newly explorable routes, such as Charlotte and F rederick Streets, the idea is to h ave more restaurants, greenery, artistic attractions and performances “spilling out” into an opena ir environment. Other possibilities to enhance the experience of those stepping off cruise ships into Nassau i nclude opening up the north side of Rawson Square which faces the waterfront to allow visitors to walk straight into the plaza from thew harf. T he square is intended become an easily-accessible staging ground for a heightened number of activities and performances designed t o capture the imagination of visitors. C M Y K C M Y K LOCAL NEWS PAGE 2, FRIDAY, MAY 8, 2009 THE TRIBUNE n B y LINDSAY THOMPSON D EPUTY Prime Minister and Minister of Foreign Affairs Brent Symon ette is representing the Bahamas at the two-day twelfth meeting of the Council for Foreign and Community R elations in Kingston, Jamaica, which opened yesterday. A ccompanied by first assistant sec retary Brian Serville, Mr Symonette w ill lead the agenda on finances in view of the global economic crises. A special part of the meeting is a retreat, at which foreign ministers will discuss aspects of CARICOM integ ration, global issues, and the econ omic crisis, among other concerns. T hey will also discuss developments within the Organisation for Econom ic Cooperation and Development (OECD “These items were requested to be p ut on the agenda by the Bahamas because of our particular interest in f inancial issues,” said Joshua Sears, director general in the Ministry of F oreign Affairs. The Bahamas also requested that the issue of piracy in the Gulf of Aden be placed on the agenda of COFCOR, he said. The Bahamas presente d a paper on the impact of piracy w ith respect to maritime transporta tion. W ith more than 1,700 vessels reg istered, the Bahamas has the third largest ship registry in the world behind Panama and Liberia. The foreign ministers are also e xpected to discuss reforming the Association of Caribbean States ( ACS), an organisation established to deepen integration in the wider C aribbean region. “The Caribbean Community (CARICOM sation needs to be reformed with respect to its leadership, trade and t ourism,” Mr Sears said. n By MEGAN REYNOLDS Tribune Staff Reporter mreynolds@tribunemedia.net FIRE ripped through the Workers Party office in Black Village yesterday morning destroying the building which has been ravaged by fire three times in a year. W orkers Party leader Rodney Moncur was alerted to the fire in Rupert Dean Lane South at around 4am, and said he found “a huge f ire, an inferno.” The previous fire in October last year damaged three rooms just six m onths after the first fire tore through the building in April 2008. Yesterday’s blaze has now led to the building being completely d emolished, Mr Moncur said. He suspects the fires have been the work of arsonists and said there was also an attempted arson attack on his house in April last year. Mr Moncur added: “I have had a number of attacks involving fire so I went to see the commissioner of police to be as responsible as possible a nd avert something great from happening. “I think the police need to be more visible in my community. They a re not as visible as I think they ought to be and I have been saying that to them for quite a long time, so after the meeting I hope to see some p ositive action. It’s serious when arson attacks take place.” Mr Moncur intends to clear the site and rebuild the Workers Party office. Deputy Prime Minister to attend COFCOR, Kingston, Jamaica Brent Symonette Workers Party office is destroyed by fire THEWORKERS PARTY building is engulfed by flames.R O D N E Y M O N C U R A Nassau to be proud of ‘just around the corner’

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n By TANEKA THOMPSON T ribune Staff Reporter tthompson@tribunemedia.net PRIME Minister Hubert Ingraham took former Tourism Min i ster Obie Wilchcombe to task for supporting legislation in parliam ent that moments before, he had criticised as “outdated” and rushed.” "The Bill is not rushed as I heard the member for West End and Bimini say, not rushed at all. In fact, his statement was incon-s istent because he said it was rushed, being done to facilitate a f ireside sale, and then he said 'I am going to vote for it.' " Well why would y ou do that? He says it is going to be outdated, but yes he is going to vote for it. He immediately brought his credibility into play as to why a distinguished member (of parliament) would vote for such a Bill that is 'outdated, rushed, that hasn’t been consulted on'," Mr Ingra ham said. The nation's chief also dispelled concerns that the new laws would lead to broadcasting censorship. He explained that the legislation would regulate broadcast content and allow for penalties or fines to be imposed on those found guilty of transmitting "offensive" material. Rules "Everyone in here would like to have, I believe, some rules in place that if someone who is a licensee broadcasts something that is against public policy of the Bahamas – that is offensive – con sistent with what is in the Broadcasting Act now, that somebody should be able to report them to some authority for having done so, so that an investigation can take place as to what was broadcast and that some penalty could be imposed if found to have done so. "The point is to have an authority that can deal with such a thing and that is all that was meant by “content regulation” – no more than that . . . You are free to broadcast. If you offend the rules, someone can cause you to be brought up on a charge of having offended the rules," he said. Mr Ingraham’s comments came on Wednesday afternoon as members of the lower chamber debat ed new communications legislation, which he previously said is needed to provide a regulatory framework for the proposed privatisation of BTC. While speaking on the issue of censorship, Mr Ingraham recalled instances while he was a member of the opposition under the Pindling adminis tration when the content of his speeches was thoroughly combed over. "(Speeches for when I was in opposition. They had to be sent down to Mr Pindling firstly. Secondly, the general manager of ZNS would sit down in a chair next to me with a copy of my speech in his hand going down the list to make sure that I say every word that is on there. So I have been there, I know about that." Under the proposed legislation, a new regulatory authority – the Utilities Regulation and Completion Authority (URCA be established with more extensive powers and duties than those of the soon to be defunct Public Utilities Commission. Once the Bill comes into force, the PUC and the Television Regulatory Authority, which comes under the Television Regulator Authority Act, will cease to exist. Broadcasting, cable, telephone and Internet services will come under the jurisdiction of a single entity called URCA, said Mr Ingraham. He added that "one day" the Bahamas Electricity Corporation and the Water and Sewage Corporation would fall under the URCA's umbrella. This "new phase of development" will hopefully allow the country's communications sector to operate under internationally accepted standards, with transparent guidelines, said Mr Ingraham. A Bill for an Act to Provide Communications Services, or the Communications Act 2009 was passed in House of Assembly yesterday. C M Y K C M Y K LOCAL NEWS THE TRIBUNE FRIDAY, MAY 8, 2009, PAGE 3 Five men in court after raido n suspected numbers house Man, 21, arraigned on arson charge PM makes basic cable service pledge In brief n By ALISON LOWE Tribune Staff Reporter a lowe@tribunemedia.net The prime minister and the P LP clashed in parliament yesterday over opposition MP Bernard Nottage’s suggestion that Minister of State for Social Services Loretta Butler-Turner would be in a conflicted position were she to remain on a committee appointed to investigate the c ircumstances surrounding teacher-student sex claims in Grand Bahama. MP for Bain and Grants Town and leader of opposition business in the House of Assembly, Dr Nottage proposed that parliament “may have erred” when it appointed Mrs Butler-Turner as one among a group of MPs chos en to sit on a Select Committee to probe the Eight Mile Rock High School child molestation scandal as the investigation would involve individuals in her own ministry. However, Prime Minister H ubert Ingraham shot down Dr Nottage’s claim, stating that hec an see “no good justifiable reason” for the minister of state’s removal from the committee. “It is not a personal thing,” said D r Nottage, “The point is not that there was an allegation against the minister or ministry but thep oint is that there were, stemming from the debate, allegations m ade against certain agencies of the government, amongst them a gencies associated with (Mrs Butler Turner). Since that would appear to be an investigation which would include looking into the conduct o f officers who work under her ministerial responsibility (there are questions raised as to) w hether this would be an appropriate person to be on the comm ittee,” said the MP. However, Mr Ingraham said he f elt Mrs Butler Turner is “as competent as anyone else to perform the duty”. Allegations The allegations (made by PLP chairman Glenys Hanna Martin when she moved a motion for the appointment of the committee)w ere against the ministry of education,” claimed Mr Ingraham, w ho added that if the party was concerned it could have raisedt he issue at an earlier, more con venient point. T o this, Dr Nottage responded: “Obviously if the government doesn’t see the potential conflict in this matter . . . I just thought it proper for me to bring it to the attention of the House and It hought that having regard to the nature of this matter that the gove rnment might see the wisdom to bring in a different appointment. If the government insists then we leave it there,” he said. Mr Ingraham retorted that it w as not he but the Speaker of the House, Alvin Smith, who made t he appointments, which the government supports. “I then appeal to the Speaker’s objectivity and sense of fair-n ess,” said Dr Nottage. M r Smith told the MP that he “would consider” the suggestion to remove Mrs Butler-Turner. The committee was appointed on April 28 after Mrs HannaM artin described the Eight Mile R ock scandal as a matter of the “utmost public importance.” She claimed various agencies including the Ministry of Educa tion, the Department of Social S ervices and the police may not h ave “responded adequately or a t all to complaints that children had been sexually exploited” by a teacher at the school, allowing the alleged molester to remain ina position where he would have b een able to continue to perpet rate crimes against children. A 21-year-old man charged with arson was arraigned in Magistrate’s Court yesterday. It is alleged that on Monday, A pril 20, Keith Mason III of Lake View Road set fire to the h ome of Trahisson Baptiste at Bellot Road. The accused, who a ppeared before Magistrate Carolita Bethel in Court 8, Bank Lane, was not required to enter a plea to the charge. He was granted bail in the s um of $7,500. The case was adjourned to May 11 and transf erred to Court 10. Mason was represented by a ttorney Krysta Smith. FIVE men charged in connection with last week’s raid on as uspected numbers house appeared in a Magistrate’s Court yesterday. Ernest Scavella, 70, of Bel A ir Estates; Lawson Gray, 49, o f Colony Village; Kelvin Clarke, 37, of Yellow Elder Gardens; Michael Davis, 49, of Lake Cunningham, and MartinA lbury, 50, of Yamacraw Beach Estates a former employee at ZNS appeared before Chief Magistrate Roger Gomez in C ourt 1, Bank Lane. T heir arraignment comes a week after FML CEO Craig Flowers and 15 others were arraigned on charges stemmingf rom a raid on FML’s head office on Wulff Road. It is alleged that the five men, on April 28, were found on a p remises where a lottery was t aking place. Court dockets s tate that the men were found at Our Place, The Man GoneC razy on Mackey Street. The accused pleaded not g uilty to the charge. The men are on $3,000 bail and the case has been adjourned to September 14. Five other persons also have been charged in connec-t ion with the alleged offence. E VERY community in the Bahamas with 10 or more homes will have access to basic cable service under the new communications legislation, Prime Minister Hubert Ingraham told parliament yesterday. W hile contributing to the debate on a Bill for an Act to Provide Communications Ser vices, Mr Ingraham explained that successive governments have tried to extend cable ser vices to several sparsely populated Family Islands, sometimes unsuccessfully. Mr Ingraham said Cable Bahamas the coun try's only cable service provider had "no legal obligation" to fill these requests and refuted assertions from PLP MP for Cat Island, Rum Cay and San Sal vador Philip Davis that the decision not to provide cable to some homes was politically motivated. "We were early in the cable business. The FNM did that within a year of coming to office. All those years before our time there was no cable for the Bahamas. Now the FNM brought cable to the Bahamas and I hear, ‘I haven’t gotten mine yet, the FNM did not giveit to me.’ Well, what happened before we came in? "The member for Cat Island said this morning and you know, it is unbelievable what some members say, they obviously do not care about their credibility – the member said the only reason United Estatesin San Salvador did not get cable was they were PLP. "Well I wonder why Long Island, Salt Pond which always votes FNM, did not get cable. I wonder why Guana Cay in Abaco which always voted 100 per cent FNM didn’t get cable – because they are FNMs? That is a silly thing to say. There are many communities in the Bahamas that do not have cable yet and we would like to have every single community in the Bahamas have cable. "And so, in this Bill, we are going to require as a condition, that every community in the Bahamas that has 10 or more residences will have basic cable service," he said. Yesterday, the Bill for an Act to Provide Communications Services was passed in the House of Assembly. The Bill now moves to the Senate for debate before it passes into law. Ingraham and PLP in conflict of interest clash Nottage questions appointment of Butler-Turner to committee probing teacher-student sex claims PM takes Wilchcombe to task over support for ‘outdated’ legislation B ernard Nottage Hubert Ingraham L oretta Butler-Turner “He says it is going to be outdated, but yes he is going to vote for it. He immediately brought his credibility into play as to why a distinguished mem ber (of parliament would vote for such a Bill that is 'outdated, rushed, that hasn’t been consulted on'...” Hubert Ingraham REPORTSFROM PARLIAMENT

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EDITOR, The Tribune. As the Government grapples with putting together a credible Budget, all the armchair economists and their cousins have been offering different solutions to solve the nation’s ills. I wish to argue that no economic strategy will effectively address the deep wounds of this nation without an extreme moral makeover. Our moral foundations are fundamentally compromised. The Bahamas has grown wealthier during the last 20 years but not through increased production and export earnings. Rather, the wealth has been achieved at the awesome price of becoming debt-driven, addicted to avarice, crimeinfested, violence-sapped, widening the gap between the rich and poor, importing more and exporting less, investing little in growing or consuming locally grown foods, and becoming over dependent on a fragile service industry. The end result is that we have become a society spiritually bereft because our moral foundations are fundamentally compromised. As the Government prepares the next budget, the critical sub ject of taxation will become paramount. We have produceda taxation culture that rewards the very wealthy and punishes the rest by making enterprise a painful business. Since the 1970’s, the sad state of our parasitic political parties has ensured the absence of politi cal, economic and social consensus that facilitates good gov ernance. Instead, successive governments uncritically embrace the dominant global neo-liberal economics model of development that made the market into an uncontrollable god or goddess. In the unrestrained race and insatiable appetite to acquire wealth quickly, anyhow, and at any price, the values of the old Bahamas that called for saving some of what you earn for a rainy day and not building your family’s future on debts that cannot be serviced, were thrown overboard as archaic philosophy. In the new Bahamas that has emerged, the soul of the nation has been fundamentally altered. A deadly virus that thrives on rampant individualism and a corrosive and selfish value system has infected the core of the nation. Everyone wants to live life in the fast lane! Our insatiable appetite for quick wealth is willing to accommodate the collat eral damage of loss of lives, if that is what it takes to achieve our financial goals. Long before the global finan cial crisis hit the nation, we had already compromised the economic foundations through our consumerism supported by debt rather than savings. It was bereft of probity, thrift, personal responsibility and good stewardship of family life. T he moral makeover that is needed must be driven by courageous and resolute lead ership at all levels. The renewal and transformation of the nation necessitates a new definition of what constitutes thec ommon good for this nation. E veryone seems to be doing what is right in his or her own eyes because we have not corporately signed off on what are our consensus values. The moral assumptions and behavioural codes that informed how our people behaved in a neoliberal economic environment have disappeared and have been replaced by an “anything goes” culture. Our current crop of political and business leaders, for the most part, behave like the blind leading the blind in these dangerous and uncharted waters. They are fast losing their legitimacy because they have fundamentally breached the exercise of authority and discipline in the nation. They have sown the wind and are reaping the whirlwind! They always do well in our kleptocratic financial culture where there are no rules for people with money. They will buy or pay their way through any entrenched bureau cracy to make more money. However, for the ordinary person who obeys the rules of this nation, their progress will always be blocked. Our nation must change course if it is to survive in these dangerous times. It cannot be business as usual! This eco nomic tsunami requires the full mobilisation of the nation to overcome the threat to our national well-being. No one party can deliver this nation out of this entrenched crisis. Now, more than ever, the leadership of our political parties, the pri vate sector and civil society must develop a united front to address this economic crisis. JERRY ROKER Nassau, April 27, 2009. C M Y K C M Y K EDITORIAL/LETTERS TO THE EDITOR PAGE 4, FRIDAY, MAY 8, 2009 THE TRIBUNE The Tribune Limited NULLIUS ADDICTUS JURARE IN VERBA MAGISTRI Being Bound to Swear to The Dogmas of No Master L EON E. H. DUPUCH, Publisher/Editor 1903-1914 S IR ETIENNE DUPUCH, Kt., O.B.E., K.M., K.C.S.G., (Hon. P ublisher/Editor 1919-1972 Contributing Editor 1972-1991 EILEEN DUPUCH CARRON, C.M.G., M.S., B.A., LL.B. P ublisher/Editor 1972Published Daily Monday to Saturday S hirley Street, P.O. Box N-3207, Nassau, Bahamas Insurance Management Building., P.O. F-485, Freeport, Grand Bahama T ELEPHONES Switchboard (News, Circulation and Advertising Advertising Manager (242 W EBSITE www.tribune242.com – updated daily at 2pm A TAXI driver was almost “locked up”, two men were picked up for traffic violations, one almost losing his job as a result, and a honeymoon almost postponed because of confusion in the warrants department of the Prosecutor’so ffice. To avoid wasting the time of police officers, w ho often present warrants that have already been dealt with, we suggested that the departm ent would be more efficient if it were computerised. We were surprised to learn that it is already computerised. Therefore, there can be only one conclusion some of the staff are not on top of the job. From lack of communi c ation between the courts and the Prosecutor’s Office and staff in the department not dailyu pdating the warrants as they come in, to managers not properly supervising the departmen t’s backsliders, the public is being harassed and inconvenienced. Last year a young man, about to be mar r ied, went to the department for his police record to get a US visa to go away on his hon e ymoon. He was fingerprinted. When the records were scanned he was horrified that two o utstanding warrants appeared against him one going back to 1995 and the other to 2001 both traffic offences. In 1995 he was home with school friends, had just got his driving licence and was going for a drive, when he turned into a street that he didn’t realise was one-way. He thought everything w as all right because the police officer on point duty gave him no indication that he should not t urn. But no sooner had he made the turn than the policeman walked over and booked him. The young man said his mother paid his fine. On the second occasion a car, which was to be sold, was sitting unlicensed in the family’s backyard. One day he had to go to a nearby store and saw no harm in quickly nipping out in the unlicensed car and nipping back in. But it didn’t quite work that way. He was caught by a p olice officer and this time ticketed for driving an unlicensed car. Again mother came to the rescue and paid the fine. Only incorrigible hoarders would keep traffic receipts for 14 or even eight years. Natural ly he could not produce the two receipts the police officer demanded before he could give h im a clean police record for his visa. The police went through their files but could f ind no paper work for the first offence. That one, therefore, had to be written off. As for t he eight-year-old warrant, although there was a record, nothing showed that it had been paid, and so he paid the fine, which he maintains was a second payment. Today, his wife has those precious receipts under lock and key in caset hey again turn up as “unpaid” in the computer. Obviously members of the public trust the authorities to have up-to-date files. They don’t e xpect to have to keep these little chits of paper forever. And so after a reasonable time they are discarded. This week a taxi driver told of how he was almost “locked up” on a warrant for his arrestd ating back to 2004 again for a minor traffic violation. He knew he had paid the fine thes ame year. “The only thing that saved me,” he said, was that some kind person did put in the system that I had paid the $250 fine. But the problem was that they didn’t cancel the warrant I could have been locked up!” “The attitude in the warrant office is very, v ery complacent. The pile-up, the backlog that’s normal for them. When they did find outI ’d paid it, they were just like, ‘Okay, you can go on our way,’” he said. Apparently, there wasn’t even an apology for the time-wasting mistake. And then there were the two men, who were picked up separately by officers, who served t hem with warrants issued for traffic violations. They had both paid their fines. O ne gentleman said he almost lost his job when he had to take time off to go before a m agistrate twice on two different days before being directed to a nearby court logbook where proof was found that he had paid the $250 fine the year before. But just consider the number of persons i nconvenienced by a staff member in the warrants department who failed to record that this f ine had been paid. First the magistrate, who always has a heavy case load, wasting time on t wo occasions on a citizen who should not even have been in her court. And then there was the policeman many of them have complained that there are not enough hours in the day to deliver all the warrants given them. And also, of course, there is the victim, who almost lost his job, and the employer who lost two days of his employee’s labour and all for the want of posting the payment of a fine. T he second man was held for five hours last Friday before he was allowed to go home to search for the receipt of a fine he had also paid. Failing to find it, he was allowed to look in the same court logbook, where the other man had found his payment. His was also there. As he left the policeman advised him that to a void the same situation again he should keep his payment reference number on him at all t imes. This is not the answer. Someone has to quickl y reorganise the warrant office, introduce an efficient system between it and the courts, and make certain that a staff member goes through a daily routine of posting warrants as they have been completed. T he present system is wasting time and money, not only for government, but for the police force and the public. Extreme moral makeover needed to address nation’s deep wounds LETTERS letters@tribunemedia.net This nonsense has to stop Royal Bahamian Resort @ Offshore Island.Invites applications for the positions of: Accountants Cost Controller General Cashier Receiving Clerk Executive Chauffeurs Director of Sales Security Manager Exec. Housekeeper Resort Shop Manager Photo Shop Manager Assistant Training Manager years experience in the Hospitality Industry in the above mentioned positions, excellent communication, organizational and interpersonal skills, must be able to train and and computer skills desirable must be able to work and experience to: cmajor@grp.sandals.com Fax 677-6828. Closing date May 9th. 2009. EDITOR, The Tribune. At the risk of offending my friend and brother, Robert Deal, I must ask the Water and Sewerage Corporation how much longer must we endure the RED TIDE. Week in and week out we persevere, without recourse or compensation, through ruined laundry, stained tubs and toilets and pressure so low one can pee with more force than the faucet. It is a national disgrace particularly in light of the government's latest bailout of WSC's fiscal fiasco and their union's recent demands for more money despite their abominable performance. Notwithstanding modern RO technology and a wealth of salt water we are still reduced to drinking, cooking and bathing with rusty water in spite of many of us having invested in, at considerable expense, holding, pressure tanks and pumps as a result of the inconsistent supply. In my business shoddy products or services are made good at the company's expense on pain of losing customers, not so with the government corporations that seemingly cannot be held accountable for the replacement of ruined clothes, plumbing fix tures or burnt out electrical appliances. In my view it is past high time that the monopoly on essential services held by government run corporations is broken, paving the way for efficient and accountable private entities to provide the necessary services, water, electricity and communications, required and deserved by a 21st century Bahamas. IAN MABON Nassau, April 30, 2009 How much longer must we endure the red tide?

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n By MEGAN REYNOLDS Tribune Staff Reporter mreynolds@tribunemedia.net OVER a thousand shoes destroyed by bosses at Shoe Village were not fit to be donated to charity, company president and co-owner Egan Kemp said. Lester Ferguson from the Salvation Army told ZNS News that there are many people in need of shoes as Mr Kemp was interviewed about a dumpster filled with unworn shoes at the Shoe Depot warehouse in Palmdale. He explained that the hundreds of shoes he had destroyed on Wednesday were of such poor quality they could not be donated. Mr Kemp said the glue holding the soles to the upper parts of the shoes was so substandard the footwear would have fallen apart within a matter of days. He blamed the factory from which he ordered the shoes. He added: “It was a major issue, so for me to pass them on, even if it was to an organisation to ship to Haiti, it would have wasted them a lot of time and money because within three weeks they would be destroyed. “This is not an issue that I take lightly and I did what I did because I had to, not because I wanted to. “If there was any way I could have donated over 1,000 pairs of shoes to anyone it would have been a great PR operation, butI would have looked like a fool because they would have fallen apart weeks later so it wouldn’t have helped anybody.” Mr Kemp further said that he is wary of making such donations to individuals or charitable organisations because all too often the beneficiaries will try to return the shoes in exchange for credit. And the ruckus caused by these recipients in Shoe Village stores throughout Nassau is so damaging to business, it is not worth his while, Mr Kemp said. “Unfortunately the many dishonest people that try to exploit the situation have caused us to destroy the shoes,” he said. Madeline Froning, community relations associate for the Sal vation Army, said Shoe Depot has made donations to the charity in the past. She added: “There is a big need and we can always use stuff like that but sometimes there is a reason for things we don’t initially understand.” C M Y K C M Y K LOCAL NEWS THE TRIBUNE FRIDAY, MAY 8, 2009, PAGE 5 LAS VEGAS, Nevada – The B ahamas Film Commission, a unit of the Ministry of Tourism and A viation, was represented last month at the world’s largest elec tronic media show. Kevin Kemp, executive in the Film Commission, attended the 2009 National A ssociation of Broadcasters Show, otherwise known as NAB 2 009. The event updated him on the latest developments in film e ntertainment, management, internet use and audio technology. NAB 2009 was attended by over 83,842 registered delegates, including 23,232 international and 1,246 news media participants. The show took place from April 18-23 at the Las Vegas Conven tion Centre and other locations t hroughout the city. In addition to meeting with repr esentatives from companies such as Sony, Panasonic, Band Pro F ilm and Digital Inc, B & H Pho to, Tiffen, Euphonix, and Promax, Mr Kemp was invited to a special behind-the-scenes event for the RED USER '09 digital camera at t he RIO hotel. He pointed out that RED is b ecoming a popular format for Bahamian filmmakers looking to m ake their mark in the industry. “I want to make certain that we have the knowledge and information we need for digital cinema in the Bahamas and that Bahami ans are prepared to take advantage of the technology, not just for our filmmakers but for our broadcasters, radio and internet p roviders as well,” Mr Kemp said. THE Grand Bahama Power Company yesterday apologised for the prolonged inter-r uptions of service over the past two days. On Tuesday, May 5, while the largest generator, Unit 13, was undergoing planned rou-t ine maintenance, two other generators experienced failures resulting in interruptionof service to approximately 4,000 customers. These fail-u res required the company to implement their feeder rotation programme between 5pm and 11pm. At 6.30pm on May 6, a third generator went off lined ue to a mechanical failure. T he loss of this generator forced the company to lengthen and broaden the scope of its planned feeder rotation programme. C urrently, the feeder rotation programme is still in progress, impacting approximately 5,000 customers. Grand Bahama Power Com-p any said it continues to work diligently to return the generators to service and ensure that power is restored to all customers as soon as possi-b le. The Grand Bahama Power Company is asking all customers to conserve energy by “only using necessary lights; restricting use of dryers, wash-i ng machines and irons, and t urning off water heaters and/orair-conditioning units.” SOME OF the country’s biggest m usic and dance acts are set to take the stage at the Crisis Centre’s first annual cultural show to be held tomorrow under the patrona ge of the Delores Ingraham. Organisers of the event put together a star-studded list of Bahamian singers and dancers who volunteers say are sure to “wow”t he crowd – all for a nominal fee of $10. Artists will include some of the Bahamas’ biggest up and coming r ap artists such as Sosaman, Mr Deeds and Sammi Star. The event will also feature the music of the Royal Bahamas Defence Force Band, Extra Band and the finalisto f the hit television show ‘Bahamian Idol’. The Crisis Centre has long been a local refuge for women, men and c hildren who have been affected by domestic problems and are in need of social assistance. “We are raising awareness about domestic violence and family issuesa cross the country and raising funds for families who could not ordinarily afford certain services,” one volunteer said. T here will be a free family fair at the National Centre for the Performing Arts from 12noon to 6pm a nd the cultural show will comm ence immediately after. SCOTIABANK (Bahamas Lightning Track Meet that was held at the Thomas A Robinson Stadium, made a donation to the club and presented the 75 athletes with T-shirts, sports bags, sports bottles and caps. Members of “Team Scotia” also attended the track meet in full force and assisted in all areas needed. Team Scotia is a group of Scotiabank employees who volunteer their time to give back to the community. Rupert Gardiner, president of the Silver Lightning Track Club, thanked Scotiabank for its assistance in making the eventa success. “On behalf of the coaches, parents and athletes of the Silver Lightning, I would like to say that we are pleased to have the support of Scotiabank as we host our third annual track meet,”said Mr Gardiner. SCOTIABANK SPONSORS SILVER LIGHTNING TRACK MEET TEAM SCOTIA members along with coaches and members of the Silver Lightning Track Club. Shoes destroyed by store bosses ‘not fit for charity’ Cultural show at the Crisis Centre G rand BahamaPower Company apologises for service interruptions KEVIN KEMP is pictured with camera operator and high definition c onsultant Jeff Cree (Titanic, Avalon: Beyond the Abyss Hundreds of pairs of footwear ‘could not be donated’ Film commission executive learns latest technology

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C M Y K C M Y K LOCAL NEWS PAGE 6, FRIDAY, MAY 8, 2009 THE TRIBUNE THECOLLEGE OFTHE BAHAMASVisit our website at www.cob.edu.bs EDUCATION Minister C arl Bethel took a one day whirlwind tour of schools on Cat Island to hear concerns and to encourage the students to study hard. H e was accompanied by acting permanent secretary Sherylee Smith and acting director of education Lionel Sands. Mr Bethel visited New Bight Primary School, where hea ssured the administrators, teachers and students that Cat I sland would get the same level and quality of education that exists in New Providence andG rand Bahama. After encouraging the students to obey their parents andt o study hard, the team was off to the Old Bight Primary a nd Pre-School, Old Bight High School, Bennett’s Harbour Primary School, Dum-f ries Primary School, and finally Arthur’s Town High School. T he minister entertained questions from students, whose concerns ranged fromt ext book shortages to the lack of an auditorium on the island. H e congratulated the schools for putting together the winning national debatet eam for two years in a row, and noted that the remote island has a great history of p roducing prominent intellec tuals. Mr Bethel encouraged the students to carry on this tradition, and said if they workedd iligently to maintain good grades, the government would do its best to support them t hrough scholarships, grants, loans and special awards. Minister in tour of Cat Island schools A BOVE: M inister of Education Carl Bethel at Old Bight Primary S chool. RIGHT: The Minister talks to s tudents at Dumfries Primary.

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MINISTER of Tourism and Aviation Vincent VanderpoolWallace recently guaranteed reli-g ious broadcasters that government will make it increasingly easier to travel to all the islands of the Bahamas from outside the c ountry. Mr Vanderpool-Wallace was w elcoming the board of directors of National Religious Broadcasters (NRB group, led by Dr Frank Wright, h eld its annual board meeting in the Bahamas at the Sheraton Nassau Beach Resort with a special welcome reception hosted atW yndham Nassau Resort. B oard directors travelled to Nassau from as far away as California. Some of them endured inconvenient air connections and s everal hours of travelling. “It is one of the things that we are going to fix, to make it so much easier and inexpensive forp eople to get to and throughout the islands of the Bahamas,” Minister Vanderpool-Wallace said. He said the Bahamas will soon develop projects that will cause t he country to be described as “the Greek islands of theC aribbean.” The projects will allow an i ncreased number of efficient and enjoyable ferry services between several islands. “We are making certain during these times that we are doing e verything we can to make certain that when this is over, we know we are going to see an explosion of traffic coming hereb ecause we are going to make it so much easier for people to come here.” Mark Hawken, assistant gene ral manager of Wyndham Nassau Resort, said his resort is pre p ared to accommodate NRB and any other organisation affiliated with them. He said the facility has undergone extensive u pgrades, and the well-trained team is prepared to assist religious groups and others. Dr Frank Wright, president a nd CEO of the NRB, said the B ahamas was the perfect place for his group to enjoy leisure time and to hold productive meetings at the same time. And I think that many of our members who may want to come and follow in our steps and have meetings in the Bahamas woulda lso want to accomplish impor tant purposes for the goals of their organisations as well as hav ing a time of rest and refreshment, and what better place than t his,” he said. Dr Wright pointed out that B ahamians and Americans have a lot in common. He said Ameri cans view the Bahamas as a “friendly and peaceable” neighbour. “We are grateful for your hospitality and it is indeed better in t he Bahamas,” he said. COMMENDING Prime Mini ster Hubert Ingraham on his condemnation of sexual violence, the Crisis Centre yesterday called for the establishment of a special court to focus on child sexuala buse matters. This comes after last week’s appointment of a Select Committee of the House of Assembly t o examine allegations of sexual abuse at Eight Mile Rock High School in Grand Bahama, and procedures of the Ministry of Education in general. D irector of the Crisis Centre Dr Sandra Dean-Patterson said that to hear that 15 teachers are currently being investigated for s exual impropriety with students they are supposed to be protecting is of great concern to all citizens. “The prime minister is very r ight when he says that many people in our nation have been closing their eyes, refusing to accept that this can happen in their h omes, in schools, in the community, to their children. Our prime m inister is very right when he s peaks of the impact (of r endous delay that victims have to endure in order to get justice,” s he said. On an average, Dr Dean-Pat t erson said, victims have to wait four, five, even six years beforet heir case reaches the Supreme Court. “(There was a w here a 10-year-old had to wait for her case to reach court until she was 16 years old and then the perpetrator walked. We can all imagine what she feels about as ystem that allows this. It is unacceptable that children and victims of sexual assault have to continuet o undergo this long drawn-out re-victimisation by a system thata ppears not to care about their v iolation.” D r Dean-Patterson said that w hile there is legislation in place, the Bahamas has a very broad d efinition of sexual assault. “We have increased the penal t ies to the ultimate and we commend this government for doing t his in December 2008. But legislation alone is not enough and is only one component in the process of achieving justice. “There must be consequences a s a result of the reports that are made, these reports must be thoroughly investigated, the Voluntary Bill of Indictment must be u tilised to avoid victims having to experience two trials, and the process a speedy one. Serious consideration must be given to the establishment of a specialc ourt to fast track child sexual abuse matters,” she said. A key component in the management of child sexual abuse, s he explained, is the way in which the child’s disclosure is handled both on an individual basis by the family and support system of that child, but also on a community and national level. We must not re-victimise the victim. We must not facilitate a process that frightens or deters other children from telling or coming forward. That is why them embers of the Select Committee in the House must be careful in their handling of the recent disclosures so as not to prevent othe r children who may want to come forward from doing so,” she said. “Our country must be one where our children and citizensc an be and feel safe. We commend you, prime minister. You make us even prouder to be Bahamian. We look forward to t he work of the Select Committee and their recommendations for action. “The Crisis Centre stands ready to help.” C M Y K C M Y K LOCAL NEWS THE TRIBUNE FRIDAY, MAY 8, 2009, PAGE 7 Call for a special court to focus on child sex abuse M INISTER VANDERPOOL-WALLACE p resents Dr Frank Wright, president and CEO of National Religious Broadcasters (NRB an coin set gift. In the exchange, Mr Vanderpool-Wallace received an English Standard Version bible. D e r e k S m i t h / B I S Bahamas visits to get easier for travellers T T h h e e p p r r i i m m e e m m i i n n i i s s t t e e r r i i s s v v e e r r y y r r i i g g h h t t w w h h e e n n h h e e s s a a y y s s t t h h a a t t m m a a n n y y p p e e o o p p l l e e i i n n o o u u r r n n a a t t i i o o n n h h a a v v e e b b e e e e n n c c l l o o s s i i n n g g t t h h e e i i r r e e y y e e s s , , r r e e f f u u s s i i n n g g t t o o a a c c c c e e p p t t t t h h a a t t t t h h i i s s c c a a n n h h a a p p p p e e n n i i n n t t h h e e i i r r h h o o m m e e s s , , i i n n s s c c h h o o o o l l s s , , i i n n t t h h e e c c o o m m m m u u n n i i t t y y , , t t o o t t h h e e i i r r c c h h i i l l d d r r e e n n . . Director of the Crisis Centre Dr Sandra Dean-Patterson

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n By K QUINCY PARKER Press/Cultural Attach Embassy of the Bahamas MORE than 3,000 people got a taste of the Bahamas this past weekend when theEmbassy of the Bahamas to the United States participated in two events that raised the Embassy’s profile in Washington, DC, exposing the metropolitan community to Bahami-an culture and furthering cultural relations between the two countries. On May 2, the Bahamas Embassy hosted a special breakfast for two groups of tour operators as part of Cultural Tourism DC’s second annual “Passport DC.” At the breakfast, Bahamas Ambassador to the US C A Smith touted the Bahamas as a “glittering jewel in the Atlantic ocean”, and an ideal climate for investment in both tourism and financial services. The guests at the breakfast, affiliated with Mid-Atlantic Tour Receptors, questioned the Ambassador on many points. Experience After the breakfast, the Bahamas Embassy threw open its doors and thousands of people poured in, seeking a little of “the Bahamian experience” in Washington, DC. Before too long, the line to get into the Embassy stretched down Massachusetts Avenue – in the section known as Embassy Row – and around the corner onto 22nd Street. As the guests entered, they sampled conch fritters and – to the great delight of the adults – ‘Sky Juice,’ the colloquial nomde-guerre for gin, sweetened condensed milk, and coconut water. In addition to the popularity of the fritters and the drinks, DC residents and visitors also got to participate in a small but enthusiastic junkanoo rush-out and hear the calypso crooning of Ray Smith. They learned to ‘play’ the saw, beat the goatskin drum and ‘knock the conch style.’ At the end of the day, just under 3,000 people had crammed themselves into the Bahamas Embassy, where they mingled with the embassy personnel and other Bahamians who had come to represent their country. In the aftermath, Ambassador Smith – who was present and glad-handing the line of waiting participants for much of the day – said, “this was a most successful day, a chance for us to let the Bahamas shine.” The following day, on May 3, the Bahamas had a booth at the Organisation of Women of the Americas (OWA Food Festival of the Americ as. The Bahamas booth offered hundreds who braved the steady rain that soaked the grounds of the Organisation of American States (OAS chance to sample the peas and rice, macaroni, chicken, fish, conch fritters, rum punch and, of course, the ubiquitous ‘Sky Juice.’ A smiling Ambassador Smith, who was present in as traw hat and bright yellow rain slicker, said, “This is wonderful.” Toward the end of the day, the event’s deejay was handeda recording of junkanoo music, and once the sounds of thed rums, bells and horns lit up the square, it was as if the Box ing Day or New Years Day parades had overtaken that little patch of Washington, DC. C M Y K C M Y K LOCAL NEWS PAGE 8, FRIDAY, MAY 8, 2009 THE TRIBUNE Thousands get a taste of the Bahamas BAHAMAS AMBASSADOR TO THE US CA Smith engages tour company owners on the various attractions available in the Bahamas and answers their questions about things like destination weddings. THIS YOUNG woman was one of thousands who stood in the lengthy line to get into the Bahamas Embassy in Washington, DC, in order to get a taste of Bahamian culture during Passport DC. BAHAMIAN WANDA MCPHEE answers questions about the Bahamas from guests who swarmed the Bahamas Embassy in Washington, DC, over the weekend. It was part of an event called Passport DC.

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A controversial figure in his own right, Justice Lyons has been the brunt of recent reports in the media after his fellow justice, Anita Allen scolded him for appointing Daniel Ferguson, an accountant, to work on a case knowing that he shared “more than a friendship” with Mr Ferguson’s sister. Mr Ferguson’s sister also assisted her brother with preparing documents for the case, said Justice Allen as she decided whether or not to recuse herself from hearing the matter “on the ground of apparent bias” because of her knowledge of this matter. Following this revelation, the National Jubilee Coalition called for an investigation into the conduct of Senior Justice Lyons stating that anyone associated with the judicial system should be “beyond the slightest reproach.” “Any hint that a sitting judge might be compromised in any way warrants the appropriate attention and investigation. “The pervasive crime problem in our Bahamas is exacerbated by an ever revolving justice system that seems unable to deliver swift justice,” the statement read. Justice Lyons had earlier recused himself from the case, which involved the distribution of funds between business partners, on the grounds that he did not have time to hear the matter. However, attorneys involved in the case told Justice Allen that Justice Lyons had “literally forced” the appointment of the accountant on their clients. They said that Justice Lyons “threatened” to walk out of court if they did not agree to the appointment. According to the judgment, on the first day of the hearing, the accountant was asked and denied that he had a social relationship with Senior Justice Lyons. Then, on the second day of cross-examination, he was asked whether a relative of his had any relationship with Senior Justice Lyons to which he responded that “he didn’t get into his sister’s business but he knew that she and the judge were friends.” “It was only then that I made the connection between the accountant and information which was in the public domain for some time, that the judge had more than a friendship with a woman who up to that point I did not know was the accountant’s sister,” Justice Allen stated in the ruling, which was handed down on March 24. In an attempt to ensure transparency in her conduct as a judicial officer and as the judge who was to determine whether the accountant’s report should be approved, Justice Allen said she informed counsel that she was aware of this information. The ruling was in relation to a request by lawyers for one of the litigants that Justice Allen recuse herself from the case because of her knowledge of Justice Lyon’s relationship with the accountant’s sister, which might have prejudiced her judgment as to whether the accountant’s report would have been valid. The National Jubilee Coalition consists of Bishop Simeon Hall, president, Dr Philip McPhee, vice-president and Dr Keith Russell, Grand Bahama regional director. C M Y K C M Y K LOCAL NEWS THE TRIBUNE FRIDAY, MAY 8, 2009, PAGE 9 “Between 1988 and 1998, with BATELCO having a staff of 2,359 during that period, with revenue of $120 million, BATELCO’st otal profit for (those $62,327,000.” “In the three years following privatization, BATELCO’s total profits were $161 million as compared to $62 million in a 10-year peri-o d,” said Mr Ingraham. Speaking in the House of Assembly, the Prime Minister said he was responding to this “demonstrably false” claim and others made by the PLP relating to the FNM’s hand ling of BTC in light of the fact the Opposition continues to make the charges despite previous rebuttals. M r Ingraham went on to take a swipe of his own at the PLP’s handling of the privitis ation process, stating that “$130 million in the bank” at BTC, the agreement which the former PLP government was seeking to con-c lude in the run up to the May 2007 election for the sale of 49 per cent of the corporation f or $260 million was not to be boasted about. “The Leader of the Opposition said yesterday...that someone offered (the FNM gov-e rnment) $130 million to buy 49 per cent of BTC, and he clearly was of the view that that was a ridiculous offer that certainly was unworthy of being entertained.” “I just want to say to the Leader of the O pposition, that perhaps he ought to reflect on what he was contemplating agreeing to do when he was seeking to sell for $260 million,” said the Prime Minister. Mr Ingraham also refuted Mr Christie’s s uggestion that it was left up to the PLP government to produce a vesting order for BTC which protected various properties owned by the company from being sold with it when it would be privatised. The Government that I led (prior to 2002 d etermined that there were certain properties owned by BATELCO that were not available for sale to a strategic partner and it camet o Parliament and produced a Vesting Order to that effect. “I understand that subsequent to 2002, t here needed to be an amendment to that Order and that that amendment was done b y the Leader of the Opposition’s Governm ent. “But the Order listing the properties we d etermined, was tabled in the House and comprised the following properties that were taken out and returned to the Govern-m ent/public ownership,” he said. Those properties stretched throughout the B ahamas, from New Providence, to Andros and Inagua. have him recuse himself from an upcoming case involving the Central Bank of Ecuador. During an appeal hearing against that ruling on Wednesday, Mr Smith submitted to the court that while on the bench, Justice Lyons had shown hostility towards the law firm, Callenders and Co, and its attorneys on several occasions. Justice Lyons’ conduct was called into question fol lowing a ruling in March by Senior Justice Anita who criticised his appointment ofa n accountant who he o rdered to prepare a finan cial report in a civil case. That case is presently at the centre of an application for Justice Allen’s recusal. In her ruling it was also revealed that Justice Lyonsa nd the sister of the accountant shared more than a friendship. Justice John Lyons resigns from court F ROM page one COURTOF APPEAL RESERVES DECISION F ROM page one PM denies claims FNM ‘wasted’ $138m preparing BTC for privatisation in 90s FROM page one

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of the matter he promised to i nvoke his powers under the E ducation Act to require medi cal examination of the children involved and provide the service free of charge. The Ministry of Education confirmed the parents of threeR M Bailey students have s ought help from the Ministry as the required drug test is preventing their children from going to school. Ms Smith believes around 75 students in grade 10 and 11h ave been sent home from RM B ailey for drug testing. School principal Julian Anderson was unavailable for c omment yesterday, and a vice principal said he was unable to speak on behalf of the school in Mr Anderson’s absence. Ms Smith said that as she is in r egular communication with the s chool, she was surprised to r eceive a letter from the principal and school counsellor on Monday stating they had reason to believe her son had been smoking an illegal substancea nd was required to be tested f or substance abuse. Should his results return positive, her son will be referred to the Community Counselling Centre for substance abuse counselling, Ms Smith was told. But when Ms Smith, of East S treet South, took her son to the Community Counselling Centre in Market Street to be tested under the school’s direction, she was told the test had tob e done at Chela-Tech Medical a nd Analytical Laboratory in F ourth Terrace for $20. She appealed to the Ministry of Education and the South East school district superintendent for help, but as she stillc annot pay for the test, her son r emained at home yesterday. Ms Smith said: “All this time is being wasted, and all this time he’s out of school until he gets this test done. “How could you send this lett er home to parents when you c an’t tell me you caught my c hild in the act? “He’s got exams coming up in June, and he’s in grade 10 soh e’s got practical classes for t ourism, cooking and everything, and he’s missing all that. “They should have had these children tested and then if it was negative or positive contact the parents and say they need help.” The grade 10 boy has already missed school this term becauseo f an outbreak of chicken pox over the Easter holidays, and although his mother thinks he c ould do better than his current 2 .30 Grade Point Average, she said missing school will not help. S he said: “I spoke to the school counsellor after Easter and he never told me of any situation or anything like that, and that was a week before the let-t er came so this was like a slap i n the face.” E ducation Minister Carl Bethel said if the school wanted to test scores of students for substance abuse the principal could have made a special rec-o mmendation for the Ministry t o arrange the students’ drug tests. He said: “If the principal has any reason to suspect that significant numbers of their children are that way we will takes teps to deal with it at Ministry l evel. All of these things can only be done if there is reasonable cause to suspect.” A fter learning of Ms Smith’s p redicament Mr Bethel said he would arrange for the students to be tested free of charge. C M Y K C M Y K LOCAL NEWS PAGE 10, FRIDAY, MAY 8, 2009 THE TRIBUNE /HJDORWLFH 127,&( ROXQWDU\/LTXLGDWLRQf 1RWLFHLVKHUHE\JLYHQWKDWWKHDERYHQDPHG &RPSDQ\LVLQGLVVROXWLRQZKLFKFRPPHQFHG RQWKHGD\RI$SULO 7KH/LTXLGDWRULV $UJRVD&RUS1DVVDX %DKDPDV /HJDORWLFH 127,&( ,QROXQWDU\/LTXLGDWLRQf 1RWLFHLVKHUHE\JLYHQWKDWWKHDERYHQDPHG & RPSDQ\LVLQGLVVROXWLRQZKLFKFRPPHQFHG RQWKHGD\RI$SULO 7KH/LTXLGDWRULV $UJRVD&RUS1DVVDX %DKDPDV /HJDORWLFH 127,&( ROXQWDU\/LTXLGDWLRQf 1RWLFHLVKHUHE\JLYHQWKDWWKHDERYHQDPHG &RPSDQ\LVLQGLVVROXWLRQZKLFKFRPPHQFHG RQWKHGD\RI$SULO 7KH/LTXLGDWRULV $UJRVD&RUS1DVVDX %DKDPDV /HJDORWLFH 127,&( ROXQWDU\/LTXLGDWLRQf 1RWLFHLVKHUHE\JLYHQWKDWWKHDERYHQDPHG &RPSDQ\LVLQGLVVROXWLRQZKLFKFRPPHQFHG RQWKHGD\RI$SULO 7KH/LTXLGDWRULV $UJRVD&RUS1DVVDX %DKDPDV /HJDORWLFH 127,&( ,QROXQWDU\/LTXLGDWLRQf 1RWLFHLVKHUHE\JLYHQWKDWWKHDERYHQDPHG & RPSDQ\LVLQGLVVROXWLRQZKLFKFRPPHQFHG RQWKHGD\RI0D\ 7KH/LTXLGDWRULV $UJRVD&RUS1DVVDX %DKDPDV /HJDORWLFH 127,&( ROXQWDU\/LTXLGDWLRQf 1RWLFHLVKHUHE\JLYHQWKDWWKHDERYHQDPHG &RPSDQ\LVLQGLVVROXWLRQZKLFKFRPPHQFHG RQWKHGD\RI0D\ 7KH/LTXLGDWRULV $UJRVD&RUS1DVVDX %DKDPDV He added that the man sought by police for q uestioning in connection with the alleged kidnapping who turned himself into police W ednesday morning has since been released from custody. Earlier this week police said they received a r eport shortly after 7am last Friday from a 37year-old Lewis Street woman, who claimed that a male companion visited her residence to t alk. T he woman reported that the companion took her vehicle from her home. She told police that her 3-year-old son was asleep on the car’s back seat. On Tuesday police released the all-pointsbulletin, saying they were actively seeking the whereabouts of a man by the name of Siefort, t he child, and asked for the media’s “urgent a ssistance” in getting the word out. including the virtual complainant, have testified. The young woman, who is now 20-years-old testif ied that she and Fraser h ad sex on an average of 1 2 times a month at his home and office at Pilgrim Baptist Temple. Fraser’s attorney Wayne Munroe made an application yesterday to have the case referred to the S upreme Court. The issue, Mr Munroe said yesterday, arose during the testimony of a forensic scientist on Tuesday. According to Mr Munroe, the witness had presented new evidence that had not been a dduced at the initial trial a nd adversely affected his defence strategy. P rosecutors contende d, however, that the a pplication was misconceived. The application has been directed to theS upreme Court where a judge could decide to allow the trial to continue or quash the complaint. T he case was adjourned to May 21 when counsel will notify Magistrate B ethel on the status of the a pplication. F raser was initially charged in 2006, but dis-c harged in 2007 after then M agistrate Marilyn Meeres ruled that there was no physical evidence to link him to the alleged offence. The Court of Appeal, however, overturned that decision and o rdered a retrial. Bishop Fraser retrial stayed FROM page one F ROM page one Mother who made kidnap claim expected to be charged Students ordered not to return to school until they’ve had drugs test FROM page one Carl Bethel

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HAITIAN sprinter Roudy Munrose goes through his starter’s workout in the blocks. C M Y K C M Y K FRIDAY, MAY 8, 2009 THETRIBUNE PAGE 11 THE Junior Baseball League of Nassau will complete another successful year as Regular Season games come to an end this weekend. Regular season final games will feature three divisions in which the pennant winner has yet to be decided. In the Tee Ball, the Knights and the Sidewinders are in a tie for the pennant and the final games on Saturday may or may not decide the winner. Should both teams win, a one game play-off will be necessary on Sunday at 2 pm. In the Coach Pitch, the Athletics hold a 1 game lead on the Diamondbacks and fate would have it that they play each other at 10 AM on Saturday. The winner of this game will win the pennant. In the Junior League, the Dodgers hold a one game lead over the Yankees and they will also meet on Saturday at 12:30 pm. The winner of this game will also win the pennant. GAMES SCHEDULED: T T E E E E B B A A L L L L 11 am Blue Claws vs Knights 1pm Sidewinders vs Grasshoppers 3 pm Sand Gnats vs Raptors C C O O A A C C H H P P I I T T C C H H 10 am Diamondbacks vs Athletics 12:30 pm Cubs vs Blue Jays 3 pm Astros vs Angels M M I I N N O O R R L L E E A A G G U U E E 10 am Rays vs Mets 12:30 pm Royals vs Red Sox M M A A J J O O R R L L E E A A G G U U E E 12:30 pm Marlins vs Mariners 3 pm Indians vs Reds J J U U N N I I O O R R L L E E A A G G U U E E 10 am Cardinals vs Twins 12:30 pm Yankees vs Dodgers S S E E N N I I O O R R L L E E A A G G U U E E S S a a t t u u r r d d a a y y 3 pm Phillies vs Rangers S S u u n n d d a a y y 3 pm Tigers vs Pirates SPORTS NOTES n By BRENT STUBBS Senior Sports Reporter bstubbs@tribunemedia.net SINCE stepping up to take over the presidency of the Bahamas Association of Athletic Associations, Curt Hollingsworth said he’s been pleased with the progress they have made. The association, according to Hollingsworth, has come off a successful showing at the Carifta Games. And they have final ly been able to establish the New Providence Amateur Athletic Association. Now Mr. H, as he is affectionately called, announced the plans at a press conference at the Ministry of Youth, Sports and Culture yesterday. Attending along with public relations officers Kermit Taylor and Troy McIntosh, NPAAA’s chairman Ray Hepburn and director Ralph McK inney, Hollingsworth said they are gearing up with a very busy six months, starting with the hosting of the Central American and Caribbean Age Group Championships. He said they have been committed to getting four teams qualified for the IAAF World Championships in Berlin, Germany and so far only the men’s 4 x 100 metre has not achieved that goal. “We are elated that we have been able to put ourselves in a position so that these teams would have been given an opportunity to qualify,” Hollingsworth said. “Currently we have three teams that will be heading to Berlin to compete in the World Championships. For us, that is a major accomplishment.” Praising the work ethic of the coaches and the support of the parents, Hollingsworth said the Bahamas has been able to finish third at the Carifta Games in St. Lucia. “We see the rebirth of this programme and we feel that we are on the right track,” he said. “We will continue with our effort as we prepare for the upcoming games, which is the CAC Age Group Championships.” Originally scheduled for the Grand Bahama Sports Complex, Hollingsworth said they have been forced to bring it to the Thomas A. Robinson Track and Field Stadium for June 1819 because of the extensive work that needs to be done to the track facility in Grand Bahama. “To the disappointment of many in Grand Bahama and the Family Islanders and the Nassau based athletes, the championships, as announced by the Minister (of Youth, Sports and Culture, Desmond Bannister), has to be moved to New Providence,” he said. That same weekend, the BAAA will also host the Junior Nationals at the Thomas A. Robinson Stadium, but it will follow the completion of the CAC Age Group on June 1920. The following weekend, the BAAA will host the Open SEATED from left are Ray Hepburn, NPAAA interum president; Ker mit Taylor, public relations officer; Curt Hollingsworth, president; Troy McIntosh, public relations and Ralph McKin ney, director. SEE page 14 Hollingsworth pleased with BAAA’s progress n By BRENT STUBBS S enior Sports Reporter bstubbs@tribunemedia.net A COMBINATION of international athletes from the Bahamas, Jamaica, Haiti and the United States are in town to compete in the second annual Fritz Grant Track and Field Invitational. The athletes are all here to compete in t he marquee events in the men’s 100, 200 a nd 400 metres this weekend at the Thomas A. Robinson Track and Field Stadium. Businessman Harrison Petty, who also serves as the patron for the two-day meet, said they are pleased to have the international athletes in town. Heading the list of Bahamian athletes are sprinters Adrian Griffith and Rodney Greene, quarter-miler Michael Mathieu and long jumper Osbourne Moxey. From Jamaica are sprinter Lerone Clarke and quarter-miler Sekou Clarke and from Haiti, sprinter Roudy Munrose. P etty noted that they are still waiting on t he arrival of Trevor Barry, who will compete i n the men’s high jump and two more quarter-milers Dwayne Barrette from Jamaica and Tavares Roberts from the United States were scheduled to arrive in town last night. “We have a lot of our own senior athletes who will be competing,” Petty said. “And so we’re ready to go. The 100 and 400 will be a serious match-up. I’m looking for very low times in both events.” Greene, who is not only aiming to make the men’s 4 x 100 relay team for the World Championships in Berlin, Germany but the 100 as well, said he’s looking forward to putting on a show for the fans. “I really want to do the A qualifying time of 10.21 in the 100,” said Greene, who ran a season’s best of 10.41 coming off a threeweek injury. “I’m at 100 percent right now, so I shouldn’t have any excuse for this meet.” With the international athletes in town, Greene said he anticipates that the “good competition will pull me through. I’m really excited that we have different athletes from different countries competing. I think it will be a good experience for the home crowd.” Lerone Clarke, who trains in Missouri, is back for the second time around after competing in the CAC Championships in 2005. This time, he intend to make his presence Competitors from the Bahamas, Jamaica, Haiti and the United States here for the two-day meet FRITZ GRANT TRACK AND FIELD INVITATIONAL ATHLETES IN TOWN FOR SEE page 12 I NSIDE Local sports news S EE page 14

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C M Y K C M Y K SPORTS PAGE 12, FRIDAY, MAY 8, 2009 TRIBUNE SPORTS WCVH6800 DCVH680E * DayEasy 322-2188/9You’ll wonder how you ever got along without it. $2575.00 KARATE I I N N T T E E R R N N A A T T I I O O N N A A L L T T O O U U R R N N E E Y Y The Bahamas Karate Academy will host its 21st Invitational Karate Tournament on Saturday at 4 pm at the Kendall G.L. Isaacs G ym. Karate Schools from Abaco, Bimini, Freeport and Nassau will be participating. Tournament events include: Individual Kata, Individual Kumite, Tag Kumite and Team Kata, Male, Female or Mixed) and Grand Champion Kata. Doors Open at 3 pm and competition will begin promptly at 4 pm. The public is invited. FISHING S S N N A A P P P P E E R R T T O O U U R R N N E E Y Y Red Bays, North A ndros will be ground zero from May 14-16 as the Sixth Annual Cultural Festival Homecoming and Snapper Tournament will take place. A lphonso Smith, tournament coordinator, say this year’s event is in honour of Frank Hanna, who has been a participant and sponsor of the tournament from the beginn ing. Up to 15 boats, each with four fishermen, are expected to participate in the tournament, which starts at 8am and ends at 4p m on Saturday, May 16. Smith say fishing enthusiasts are coming from New Providence, Abaco, Exuma and Grand Bahama. Snappers only will be counted and the winnersw ill be the boat with the largest catch. The prizes are: $1,500 for first place, $1,000 for sec ond, $750 for third and $300 for fourth. SNOWBOARD W W R R I I G G H H T T C C O O R R R R E E C C T T I I O O N N IT was incorrectly stated in Wednesday’s Tribunet hat Winter Olympic bound Korath Wright moved to Canada when he was ten. Actually he moved there with his mother when he was one year old. And it was further stated that Wright contested the 2009 Olympic Trials in New Zealand but didn’t make the cut. Actually, he competed in a W orld Cup event in New Zealand in September, and finished 24th. He did not make it to the finals of this contest, but in fact, the points he received in that contest helped his overall standing for the year, and led to his Olympic Qualification. Sports notes cont’d FROM page 11 n By RENALDO DORSETT Sports Reporter rdorsett@tribunemedia.net FOR YEARSthe region and indeed the remainder of the world have marvelled the secret to a seemingly endless stream of successful Jamaican sprinters on the International stage. Now top executives of the Jamaican Amateur Athletic Association have offered some insight into the phenomenon. President of the JAAA Howard Aris credited an ubercompetitive school system for identifying talent as early as possible, which the federation uses as the initial stepping stone in the development of its programme. School system “We have a very competitive school system in the primary school, secondary, and tertiary school. The federation’s role is to cultivate the growth of the sport and create an environ ment that is conducive to the development of talent, which is why we sanction, organise and officiate every meet in the country,” he said. “ With the IAAF coaching certification programme we have been able to consistently produce qualified coaches and we do this because we recognise that the technical applications of track and field vary and change and improve and the best way for us to keep pace with techniques is to com plete the programme of training and certifying our coaches. The coaches that we qualify usuallye nd up coaching in the schools system which we think gives us the most organized and com petitive school programme in the world. This is of the utmost importance to us because out of the high school programmea ll of our international talent is f irst recognised.” Sports lottery Aris said the country’s National Sports Lottery is the catalyst for many of the initiatives the JAAAs and other sporting bodies ability to improve their coaching, infrastructure and general funding which creates a system of sup port for the athletes at an early stage. “Once special elite level talents are recognised, the schools they attend pay special attention to them through the alumni and mentors. All of our high schools have special past students that come back and offer help to prospective athletes in terms of management or financing of their careers,” he said. “They have a benefit of a support structure outside of the state and outside of the schools. From the point they are junior athletes we recognise from the Carifta Games which is the first level of international competi tions for much of our athletes and they get that first taste of competition outside of Jamaica.” Aris, who has served for 33 y ears at the forefront of Sports Administration, Sports Development and Planning, Manage ment and Physical Therapy and was recognised by the Government of Jamaica in 1998 when he was awarded the Order ofD istinction For Contribution to S ports, said the infusion of a local training programme at the tertiary level has given many senior athletes an option to remain locally based throughout their careers. “We have a very strong pro gramme locally where the auto matic transfer of our elite level athletes to the use for tertiary education and training is no longer necessary. We have more than competent coaches therefore if they choose an athlete can remain here receive the best coaching and select the meets and events in which they compete. I am not trying to be disparaging of the NCAAs pro gramme, but when you have a track scholarship your obligations are clear because you have to compete whereas Asafa, Usain and Shelly-Ann who have remained here they can create their own schedules and they events in which they com pete, so we see that as an advantage,” he said, “Additionally, their tertiary education is also addressed, the difference is, it is not as rigid. There is nothing wrong with the older way of doing things, what we have is an option, those who want tog o there can go there, but those who wish to stay and select events and competitions they want have that option. At Beijing we had medal winners from both sides, athletes that live and train in the US and athletest rain here. We are not yet clear h ow you access the value of either programme.” Relationship Donald Quarrie, federation executive and former Olympic medallist in the 100m, 400m relay, and champion in the 200m said the relationship between the federation and the athletes is one of the integral factors Jamaica’s success in the sport. “What we have is the ex-ath letes, the remainder of the executive board are a lot more objective and we get as close as we can to the athletes to find out what is it they want for us to do instead of us insisting on what should be done, so the feedback and communication between us is fantastic. And with the ex-athletes involved we are able to share information and experiences with the executives and this combination gives the best experience for the athletes.” Quarrie said the success of the Beijing Olympics gives Jamaica a strong foothold as the leaders in track and field sprinting but the federation and its athletes remained inspired to retain that position. “The fact that we are at the t op, the entire world will be chasing us looking to claim the crown, and this is god for ath letics. The fact that we are at the top means our athletes and executives will train and work harder to retain this status. Wes aw the success at Beijing comi ng, it just happened to come at the right time. In other countries when an athlete gets to the top or just near the top they are hidden and they do not challenge each other, here they have to compete constantly against each other so the competitive nature is important for them in gaining status and keeping them sharp.” Consistency With a legacy of medal winning performances that began with Herb McKenley in 1948 and continued with Usain Bolt’s trio of record breaking performances in 2008, Aris said Jamaica’s most important factor in its model of consistency has been its ability to adapt. “Nothing stands still in track and field there are always new coaching techniques new methods, new talent, different applications,” he said, “It is an evo lutionary process and we are not afraid to change at the risk becoming overshadowed by anyone else.” Aris: Competitive school system to credit for JA track and field success DONALD Quarrie (l 1976 200m Olympic champion poses alongside Howard Oris (r of Jamaica Athletics Association during the 'IAAF Day in the Life' on May 2, 2009 in Kingston, Jamaica. M i c h a e l S t e e l e / G e t t y I m a g e s

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C M Y K C M Y K SPORTS TRIBUNE SPORTS FRIDAY, MAY 8, 2009, PAGE 13 THEBahamas Football Association mourns Kilroy “Killer” Farrington who passed away on Sunday, May 3, 2009 after a brief stay in the hospital. “Killer”, as he was affection ately known in the football cir cle, spent much of his life involved in football, as a player, referee, coach and administrator. Virtually his entire career was with one club, Dynamos Football Club, where Farrington played in central defence for the team for many years, retiring only a few years ago from active play, but maintain ing his involvement with the club as a coach with the club’s youth programme. Farrington’s passion for the game led him to also serve as a referee for many years in the senior league, commencing in this arena in the early 1990s and continuing to assist refer eeing in the Bahamas until his passing. Farrington also served in the national programme, serving as an Administrator and Equipment Manager for many national teams. He was a constant presence with the U-15 and U-17 Boys National Team, but also served with the U-20 Boys National Team that competed in regional qualifying competition in Cuba last year. A fun-loving person, and one always known to have a smile on his face, Farrington enjoyed the game he loved right to the end, spending his final days outside the hospital at the soccer field, on Satur days with the Dynamos FC U-16 Boys team and on Sundays assisting Dynamos senior team coach Dion Peterson with a club match. Farrington will be sorely missed and the football fraternity in the Bahamas has lostone of its loyal warriors. The Executive Committee and the entire football family in the Bahamas wish to extend sincere condolences to the family on their loss, and will continue to keep them in our prayers. M M a a y y h h i i s s s s o o u u l l r r e e s s t t i i n n p p e e a a c c e e . . ‘Killer’ passes away Well-known Bahamian soccer player Kilroy ‘Killer’ Farrington dies Kilroy in action Bahamian soccer player Kilroy ‘Killer’ Farrington, spent much of his life involved in football, as a player, referee, coach and administrator. Here he is pictured with two of the soccer teams he coached.

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C M Y K C M Y K SPORTS PAGE 14, FRIDAY, MAY 8, 2009 TRIBUNE SPORTS EAGLE ELECTRICAL &LIGHTING Tel (242Fax (242 Email: eaglebahamas@gmail.com ARTIFICIAL PLANTS TABLETOP & LARGE FOUNTAINS LAMPS DECORATIVE FANS SHOPFOR MOM ATEAGLE! Wantagiftformomthatwilllast?Geta giftfromyourhearttoherhome.Check outthevarietyofproductsfromour HomeCollection. CHANDELIERS We ship to the Family Islands! Not sure what to buy? Wrap up a Gift Certicate from Eagle! 20%offlisted items Nationals, which will serve as the final trials for the World Championships in August. “We have some young quarter-milers who are doing very well and we have some young sprinters who are also running very well,” Hollingsworth s aid. “So we just want to say thanks to our sponsors, the corporate citizens who have stepped up and helped us to realise our goals. We are looking forward to a very busy second half of the season.” Additionally, the BAAA will also be sending teams off to compete in the Junior Pan Am in Trinidad & Tobago, the Senior CAC Championships in Cuba, the first Caribbean Games also in Trinidad & Tobago and the World Youth Championships in Bressanone, Italy, all in July. “You could imagine that the financial challenges are going to be awesome and so I would like toappeal to those corporate citizens who have not had an opportunity and would like to be a part of this venture, to just make themselves available for us,” he said. Hollingsworth said they have been pleased to note that over the past six months, they have been able to put in a place a steering committee to deal with the formation of the NPAAA, headed by Ray Hepburn and the Masters Track and Field Pro gramme, headed by Foster Dorsett. More details of the newly formed NPAAA and a projection on the BAAA’s National Open Championships will be published in Saturday’s edition. felt. “I’m looking forward to see where I’m really at,” said Clarke, who opened the season with a 10.19. “Once the wind is legal, I know I should be able to run fast with the competition here.” Sekou Clarke, a Jamaican 200/400 specialist, is also coming back after competing in the CAC Championships in 2005. Having some competition here, he saidhe just want to go out and run a season’s best. “The competition is supposed to be very good, so I’m just looking for the best,” he said. “My season’s best is 46.3, so anything faster than that, I will be happy.” Back his second appearance in the meet, Munrose said his aim is to delight the Haitian following in the Bahamas and eventually surpass the World Championships’ A qualifying time of 20.59 in the 200. “With a lot more competition and in better shape than last year, I hope to do very well,” he said. “I’m familiar with a lot of the guys, but I’m not going to put any pressure on myself. “I’ve been training, so I know what my capabilities are. So I just want to represent the Haitian federation and the Haitian people in this country and try to improve as much as I can.” Most of the visiting athletes are based in Orlando, Florida. Athletes in town for Fritz Grant Track and Field Invitational F ROM page 11 Hollingsworth pleased with BAAAs progress F ROM page 11 n B ASEBALL LOS ANGELES Associated Press MANNYRamirez joined a growing lineup of All-Stars linked to drugs Thursday, with the dreadlocked slugger banished for 50 games by a sport that cannot shake free from s candal. T he Los Angeles Dodgers outfielder was suspended by Major League Baseball for a drug violation, adding a further stamp to what will forever be known as the Steroids Era. “It’s a dark day for baseball and certainly for this organization,” Dodgers general manager Ned Colletti told reporters on the field at Dodger Stadium. “This organization will never condone anything that isn’t clean.” Ramirez said he did not take steroids and was given medication by a doctor that contained a b anned substance. A person familiar with the details of the s uspension said Ramirez used the female fertility drug HCG, or human chorionic gonadotropin. The person spoke to The Associated Press on condition of anonymity because the banned substance wasn’t announced. “As tough as it is for us, it’s pretty tough for Manny, too,” Dodgers manager Joe Torres aid. “I know he’s the one that did the wrong thing and nobody i s trying to cover that up, but it’s still something that I know he’s sorry about.” HCG is popular among steroid users because it can mitigate the side effects of ending a cycle of the drugs. The body may stop producing testosterone when users go off steroids, which can cause sperm counts to decrease and testicles to shrink. Ramirez’s suspension was based not on a spring training urine test result but rather evi dence obtained afterward, a second person familiar with the suspension said, speaking on con dition of anonymity because those details were not released. MLB had concluded the spring test was positive, but the person said the players’ association would have challenged the result because of “testing issues.” Ranked 17th on the career home run list with 533, Ramirez became the most prominent baseball player to be penalized for drugs. His ban came three months after Alex Rodriguez admitted using steroids, and at a time when Barry Bonds is under federal indictment and Roger Clemens is being investigated by a federal grand jury to determine whether he lied when he told Congress he never used steroids or human growth hormone. And Miguel Tejada was sentenced in March to one year of probation after pleading guilty in federal court to misleading Congress about the use of performance-enhancing drugs. No matter which way baseball turns, the legitimacy of many of its recent home run and pitching records is being questioned. Sluggers Mark McGwire and Sammy Sosa have been tainted by steroid allegations, Rafael Palmeiro tested positive for a banned drug and Jose Canseco said he used them. In every case, players once believed to be locks for the Hall of Fame may now be locked out. “You can’t have arguably the greatest pitcher of our era, arguably the two greatest players of our era and now another very, very good player be under this cloud of suspicion and not feel like it has ruined it for everybody,” Atlanta star Chipper Jones said. “But what are you going to do? You can’t be born in a different era. It is the Steroid Era,” he said. Colletti and Torre said they found out about Ramirez’s sus pension during an early morning phone call from team owner Frank McCourt. Both said they were surprised and saddened at the news. Ramirez suspended 50 games for drug violation IN THIS April 17, 2009 file photo, Los Angeles Dodgers' Manny Ramirez during batting practice before playing against the San Francisco Giants in a baseball game in San Francisco. Ramirez has been suspended for 50 games by MajorL eague Baseball, becoming by far the highest-profile player ensnared in the sport's drug scandals. Jeff Chiu/ AP Photo

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C M Y K C M Y K LOCAL NEWS T HE TRIBUNE FRIDAY, MAY 8, 2009, PAGE 15 D e r e k S m i t h / B I S MINISTRY NAMES EMPLOYEE OF THE YEAR LOUISE SIMMONS , senior youth officer in the Department o f Youth, was n amed the Ministry o f Youth, Sports and Culture’s Employee of the Year. Mrs Simmons is pictured with Minister ofY outh, Sports and Culture Desmond Bannister (lefta nd Permanent Secretary Archie Nairn during a ceremony last w eekend. Mrs Simmons joined the public service i n 1968.

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Assembly Prime Minister Ingraham initiated the legislative process for a Bill to Amend the Insurance Act. That Act, which was first passed in 2005, never came into force. He said: “I might say some of these amendments are driven by (the circumstances surrounding the failure of) a company called CLICO, and by the time we come back to the House to debate these bills we will have an announcement to make about the government’s position with respect to CLICO and its policyholders in The Bahamas.” T he Prime Minister did not hint at what the content of government’s statement on the matter might be. Earlier this week Mr Fitzgerald accused government of “washing its hands” of any responsibility for the CLICO debacle, which left 23,000 Bahamian policyholders uncertain of their investments. “At a minimum the government owes the policyholders and B ahamian people an explanation of how this happened and the assurance that they have taken steps to ensure this will not happen again,” said the senator, who has given notice of his intention to call for the appointment of a senate select committee to further probe the issue. M r Fitzgerald suggested that Mr Ingraham’s brief statement of his intention to speak further on the issue seems to indicate “that (the government has realisation that the Bahamian public expects them be more forthright and transparent.” “It is imperative and incumb ent upon government to make an announcement...to make people feel more comfortable that their concerns are being addressed, and secondly that government will tighten up regulations in law to make sure this doesn’t happen again,” he said. C M Y K C M Y K LOCAL NEWS PAGE 16, FRIDAY, MAY 8, 2009 THE TRIBUNE PM set to make CLICOannouncement FROM page one F REEPORT – Three men wanted for questioning are now in police custody onG rand Bahama, a senior p olice official said Thursday. Supt Emrick Seymour reported that police have arrested Renaldo Kemp who was wanted for questioning in connection with a rape. H e said that Emealio Russell, who was wanted for questioning over a fraud matter, turned himself into the police following the release of an all points bull etin for his arrest on W ednesday. Also taken into custody was Jamal Roberts, who wasw anted for questioning in connection with an armed robbery. S upt Seymour thanked members of the public for their assistance. “We want tot hank the public for their a ssistance and ask for their continue cooperation in the fight against crime. Men wanted for questioning now in police custody

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C M Y K C M Y K SECTIONB business@tribunemedia.net FRIDAY, MAY 8, 2009 THETRIBUNE $4. 68 $4. 51 $4. 69The information contained is from a third p arty and The Tribune can not be held r esponsible for errors and/or omission from the daily report.$ $3.53 $3.62 $3.48 FAMILY GUARDIAN 396-1355 I BAHAMAHEALTH 396-1300 I FG CAPITAL MARKETS 396-4076 I FG FINANCIAL 396-4080SALES OFFICES: NASSAU I FREEPORT I ABACO I ELEUTHERA I EXUMA I CORPORATE CENTRE: EAST BAY STREET I www.famguardbahamas.com the important link in your financial planning Real estate ownership ‘integrity’ undermined Central Bank: National debt 43.4% of GDP at year-end n By NEIL HARTNELL Tribune Business Editor The Bahamas’ national debt stood at 43.4 per cent of gross domestic product at year-end 2008, the Central Bank of the Bahamas has revealed, a threshold well above the ‘dan ger’ 40 per cent level, with the possibility existing that this ratio could soon reach between 45-50 per cent. The Central Bank, in its 2008 annual report, said the national debt increased by $130 million or 4.1 per cent to $3.2 billion at December 31, 2008, the latter figure equivalent to 43.4 per cent of Bahamian per annum gross domestic product (GDP This compared to the yearbefore ratio of 42.4 per cent, which was already well above the 40 per cent debt to GDP ratio that is regarded as a ‘danger’ threshold by the likes of the International Monetary Fund (IMF agencies such as Moody’s and Standard & Poor’s (S&P Once this threshold is breached, these agencies become concerned about a country’s ability to service its debt, with the latter two possibly contemplating a sovereign credit rating downgrade. This is something the Bahamas would want to avoid at all costs, as a downgrade would leave it having to pay more for any government borrowing on the capital markets, given that investors would want higher interest rates to compensate for the perceived increased risk. Unlikely A credit rating downgrade is unlikely to happen to the Bahamas in the short-term, and the 2008 increase in the national debt was less than the $182.8 million or 6.3 per cent growth experienced in 2007. “For calendar year 2008, the direct charge on government increased by $128.3 million or 4.9 per cent to $2.673 billion. Bahamian dollar claims accounted for 86.1 per cent of the total, gaining $39.5 million or 1.7 per cent to $2.379 billion,” the Central Bank said. “By creditor composition, the majority of Bahamian dollar debt was held by private and institutional investors (32 per cent); followed by public corporations (30.3 per cent domestic banks (29.2 per cent); and the Central Bank (8.5 per cent Some $835.9 million of the Bahamas’ national debt is denominated in foreign currency, but here again, $405.3 million or 48.5 per cent of this amount is held within this nation by Bahamian investors. This helps to reduce the leverage international financial institutions could bring to bear on the Bahamas, should it run into difficulty repaying its debts. However, with the Government’s 2008-2009 fiscal deficit likely to come in close to 4 per cent of GDP, and various borrowings being undertaken to finance infrastructure and capital works programmes, the conditions are in place for a further national debt increase this year. At the same time, Bahamian GDP will fall due to the reces sion the IMF predicting by as Already past 40% danger threshold, with further increases to follow from Budget deficit, revenue fall-off and 2009 GDP decline SEE page 4B n By CHESTER ROBARDS Business Reporter crobards@tribunemedia.net THE BAIN and Grants Town revitalisation project will be solely private sector driven, a senior coor dinator said yesterday, as it “insists” that financing poured into downtown Nassau’s redevelopment move “a few feet beyond Bay Street” to establish the inner-city as another entertainment destination. R ev CB Moss, speaking at the Rotary Club of West Nassau’s monthly meeting, gave assurances that the project will move forward Inner-city revival seeks downtown project spin-offs Will ‘insist’ downtown efforts move ‘a few feet beyond Bay Street’ to turn Bain and Grants T own into entertainment destination SEE page 5B n By NEIL HARTNELL Tribune Business Editor A former finance minister yesterday disputed Prime Minister Hubert Ingraham’s asser tion that the former Christie administration had effectively attempted to sell the BahamasT elecommunications Company (BTC Tribune Business that in valuing the firm for privatisation the parties had to assess more than just one balance sheet item. Mr Ingraham, during the d ebate on the raft of legislation intended to revamp the Bahamas’ communications reg ulatory regime, implied in the House of Assembly that the net worth of the agreement in principle struck between the former PLP government and Bluewater Communications Holdings for the sale of a 49 per cent BTC stake was $130 million, rather than $260 million. The Prime Minister said this was because at that date, BTC held on its balance sheet some $130 million in cash on hand at the bank an asset that would have been transferred to Bluewater upon the privatisation’s completion. This, he implied, could have been used by the telecoms buyout group to effectively repay 50 per cent of the headline $260 million purchase price it had paid the Government. This, Mr Ingraham said, meant Bluewater would in reality have paid $130 million for a 49 per cent BTC stake the same sum that the Christie administration had received four years earlier, and rejected, from the Tom Bainled BahamaTel consortium. This, though, was rejected by James Smith, the minister of state for finance who had responsibility for BTC’s privatisation under the Christie government. Now CFAL chairman, Mr Smith told Tribune Business yesterday that any business not just BTC could not be val ued on the basis of just one asset, such as cash in hand or at the bank. Mr Smith pointed out that apart from assets, both current and non-current, whenever a company was sold the buyer also acquired all its liabilities as per the acquisition date. This meant that apart from its accounts receivables, invento ries, investments, and property and infrastructure, Bluewater would also have acquired BTC’s Ex-minister disputes PM’s $130m BTC sale asser tion SEE page 5B James Smith n By NEIL HARTNELL Tribune Business Editor A resort/real estate developer yesterday said the “integrity” and security of private real estate ownership in the Bahamas was being undermined by abuse of legislation s uch as the Quieting Titles Act, with his project embroiled in three alleged “land grab” cases. Joerg Friese, director/partner of Long Island’s Stella Maris Resort development, told Tribune Business that the development was already involved in three potential land battles, one of which had gone to court, that had been invoked under the Quieting Titles Act and Squatters Rights Act. “We consider it absolutely unethical that anyone, except perhaps generation land-owning Bahamian families, would attempt to obtain real estate without applying proper methods, such as per purchase, lease, rent,” Mr Friese said. “We are of the opinion that both the Quieting Titles and the Squatters Rights Acts were intended to clarify/develop certain ownership situations, being connected with genera tion land and such. “It is a fact in the Bahamas that, in particular, the Quieting Titles Act is archaic and today and for non-Bahami ans unfair, inviting actions which were never intended by SEE page 2B n B y NEIL HARTNELL Tribune Business Editor The Government yesterday t old T ribune Business t hat amendments had been made to the initial Domestic Insurance Act draft reforms, after the industry warned that the proposals fora ppointing an administrator and his powers would have “a sti-f ling and devastating impact” on affected firms and possibly p rompt them to appeal the issue to the Supreme Court. An April 27, 2009, letter sent to Lennox McCartney, the Registrar of Insurance, by the Bahamas General Insurance Association (BGIA t his newspaper yesterday, expressed the sector’s concerns a bout the regulator’s ability to appoint an administrator for a t roubled insurance carrier, and the powers such a person would have. T he BGIA letter said: “The r easons for an appointment of an a dministrator by the [Insurance] Commission are extremely vague a nd subjective. “This provision as presently d rafted is too imprecise it doesn't provide insurance companiesw ith a definitive benchmark or p arameter for the appointment o f an administrator. The a pproach should be a streamlined objective, one whereby insurance c ompanies know for certain when they have fallen afoul of govern m ent regulations.” The draft Domestic Insurance A ct reforms, a copy of which has also been obtained by Tribune B usiness, empowers the Insur ance Commission (the successor to the Registrar of Insurance) to appoint an administrator in cases where insurers have failed or are u nlikely to meet their liabilities; assets do not give sufficient prot ection to policyholders or are l ess than liabilities; the compan y’s assets and capital are eroding d rastically; and its business is being conducted in a manner d etrimental to policyholders. The BGIA’s concerns, as e xpressed in its letter, also related to the powers the administratorw ould have. T he letter said: “The wide and e xtensive powers granted to the a dministrator will undoubtedly have a stifling and devastating i mpact on an insurance company’s business reputation, and way o f doing business. “Generally speaking, we find t his proposal intrusive and onerous, and we therefore vehementl y oppose the inclusion of the same in the manner herewith suggested. “Even more alarming is the absence of the criteria for choos ‘Devastating’ power fears among insurers Insurance industry so concerned about administrator/appointment powers that Supreme Court challenge likely if Bills not changed Government: some changes made But Bill to introduce 3% annuities tax not tabled in House yesterday S EE page 2B

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ing an administrator, in addition t o the clear absence of a conciliatory approach/procedure between the Commission and the insurance company in the first i nstance. We see no reason why you should want to by-pass the courtappointed Judicial Manager, and if this proposed amendmentr emains in the Bill, this Association will be forced to appeal the matter to the Supreme Court.” T imothy Ingraham, the B GIA’s chairman, was out of office when Tribune Business called seeking comment. However, Patrick Ward, Bahamas First’sp resident and chief executive, confirmed that the general insurance industry’s prime concerns over the amendments related to t he appointment of an administ rator and his/her powers. “There was no question that the Association objected in fairly strong terms to some of the pro-v isions, because we felt it went too far in giving unfettered powers to the regulator and administrator,” Mr Ward told Tribune B usiness. Z hivargo Laing, minister of state for finance, told this newspaper that some of the Bahamian insurance industry’s concerns hadb een taken into account in relation to the Domestic Insurance Act amendments, and changes made. He did not specify, though, w hat had been changed. “The industry had no objections to most of the amendments being proposed to the Domestic Insurance Act,” Mr Laing said. They had a few things they r aised questions about, and we considered them. The Bills are going to be d ebated, fully debated [in Parliament]. Everything the industry has pointed out and raised with us, we considered. Some werea ccepted, others were not accepted.” Concerns S imilarly, Lennox McCartney, the Registrar of Insurance, told Tribune Business : “We met with the industry, and were able to lis-t en to their concerns. “They provided us with a written response in the first instance, and we were able to meet with t hem to get some clarity as to w hat their concerns were, and explain ourselves to them faceto-face, instead of written communications.” A part from the Domestic Insurance Act amendments, changes to the Companies Act and a new External Insurance A ct were also tabled in the House of Assembly yesterday for a first reading. Many of the amendments to the first two Acts have beenp rompted by the CLICO ( Bahamas) collapse into liquidation, Prime Minister Hubert I ngraham acknowledging as much y esterday, and hinting that the Government may soon announce plans to compensate policyholders/annuity depositors for theiri nvestments. Mr McCartney added: “Some of it has to do with CLICO, and to provide additional mechanisms t o deal with a situation like that. T hat’s why some of those amendments were proposed.” Yet the Business Licence Act amendments, which would haves een the 3 per cent premium tax on insurance policies extended to annuities, was not tabled in the House of Assembly yesterday. It wasn’t tabled. That’s all I c an say right now,” said Mr McCartney, when asked if this meant the annuity tax position had been reversed. T ribune Business r evealed on Monday that the Bahamian insurance industry was opposing proposed amendments to the Busin ess Licence Act that would extend the three per cent premium tax levied on all insurance policies to annuities, on the grounds that it would create a disincentive” to save and give t he banking industry an unfair competitive advantage. O ne source said at the time: Annuities are a very small fraction of the overall financial industry. The tax would act as a disincentive to save in an environmentw here savings are most needed – where 75 per cent of companies don’t have an employee pension plan, and personal savings habits a re so bad. Other countries offer incentives to save. I don’t see why we would want to go the other way.” Tribune Business understands t hat it is estimated that total annuity deposits in the Bahamian market are worth collectively $150 million, a sum that is equiva lent to 3 per cent of the total $ 5.6 billion deposits in the nation’s commercial banking system – highlighting their relative insignificance, and the fact thatt he Government would only gain an extra $4.5 million in tax revenues should the tax be imposed. Several insurance industry s ources said it was unclear where the idea to extend the 3 per cent premium tax to annuities had come from, but questioned why it was being imposed on Bahami-a n-owned companies and not b anking deposits controlled, largely, by foreign-owned banks. C M Y K C M Y K BUSINESS PAGE 2B, FRIDAY, MAY 8, 2009 THE TRIBUNE Real estate ownership ‘integrity’ undermined the definition of such law. It needs to be changed. The results of such activities, especially w hen undertaken by non-Bahamians, if succ essful, will not only be in contrast to what is considered fair and proper business, but will greatly undermine the integrity of the status of Bahamian real estate ownership, be it Bahamian or foreign.” Mr Friese explained that in one case, a r eal estate owner at Stella Maris had told t he developers they wanted to acquire ownership of an adjacent lot under the Squatters Rights Act, something they protested. A title search revealed that the Stella Maris developers still owned the lot in question, and Mr Friese said the real estate buyer joined forces with another neighbour at the development to negotiate its purchase. The second neighbour took a first option on the lot, meaning he would buy it if the deal fell through. Yet the original buyer “quietly” embarked on a legal action to obtain the lot, without any of the other parties knowing. The Supreme Court threw out the action on a technicality, but not before the Stella Maris developers had incurred $70,000 in legal costs. So far, the second neighbour has been unable to complete a $95,000 purchase of the lot despite paying a deposit, Mr Friese estimating that its current value was now $150,000. “Either way, combined legal and connected expenses came to or by far superseded the value of the property,” he added. In a second episode, Mr Friese said another property owner at Stella Maris had attempted to acquire an adjoining lot via the Quieting Titles Act. “I, as a director of the Stella Maris Property Owners Association, together with its President, went to see them, very, very nice people, with whom we had a very warm and long-term relationship, in order to make them aware of what they were about to do, and what implications their actions may result in, socially and otherwise,” MrF riese said. “A very calm and neutrally-kept conversation ended with pleasant goodbye's being extended. This was followed, however, witha police warning, directed to both the president and to myself, advising us that we were no longer accepted on their property.” The developers’ attempts to locate the $20,000 lot’s owners have so far proved fruitless, and Mr Friese said no one else could act on their behalf without authority. Another Quieting Titles Act action, Mr Friese said, had also been initiated by another property owner except this time they were likely to be embroiled in a court battle, as the lot in question was owned bya prominent Nassau business family, one of whose members was a Bahamian attor ney. These episodes again suggest the need for a major overhaul of the legal and regulatory framework governing Bahamian real estate and property ownership, and the way in which conveyancing deeds and land ownership are registered. From an economic perspective, given the r elative scarcity of land in the Bahamas, ownership is critical. FROM page 1B ‘Devastating’ power fears among insurers FROM page 1B

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n B y CHESTER ROBARDS B usiness Reporter crobards@tirbunemedia.net THE DOWNTOWN Nassau P artnership (DNP create draft legislation and a business plan that will give way to the development of a Business I mprovement District (BID t he capital, ensuring the project’s continuity should there be a change of government, the director-general of tourism has said. S peaking at the DNP’s first town meeting, Vernice Walkine said the legislation will legally empower the BID when created to seamlessly carry on the i mprovements and maintenance to downtown Nassau and Bay Street, even in the event of a change in government. Part of what will eliminate that particular problem or concern would be the legislation we are talking about,” she said. This [revitalisation project] is intended to be enshrined in legislation so that we have the legal authority to create the city that we are talking about. We havet he mechanism legally to do those things that will give us the outcome that we’re seeking.” According to the DNP’s managing director, Vaughn Roberts,t he draft legislation and business p lan for the BID will be created simultaneously, with a tentative end-of-summer deadline for the business plan. The draft legislat ion could take a bit longer and would then have to go to Cabinet for approval. BID consultant Dave Feehan s aid this kind of organisational a uthority is crucial to the success of a city, and makes downtown districts more competitive in their region. A ccording to him, there are over 1,000 BIDs in the US alone a nd hundreds others throughout the world. M r Feehan and a colleague are assisting the DNP in creating draft legislation that will allow the city of Nassau to create an autonomous entity charged with managing its affairs. Meanwhile, the interim DNP will submit proposals to cCabinet and create short-term projects that will show visible i mprovements to the city until the BID, a single management mechanism, comes to fruition. The DNP will also have to present detailed master plans to Cabinet for the Bay Street Improvements and its Phase 1 pedestrianisation of Woodes Rodgers Wharf, which will be included in t he draft legislation and initial business plan. Some improvements have already begun to the city, including the $13 million renovation of the Moses Plaza, according to Mr Roberts. The extensive clean-up and superficial renovations of many downtown areas will begin t o take place almost immediately. It has been suggested that the removal of the shipping facilities from downtown area will enable the revitalisation to begin in earnest. All plans call for the container port to be moved to the area west of Arawak Cay, where a man-made island has been prop osed to accommodate it. However, the Government has been quiet about the deal and is said to have placed a virtual gag order on all investors related to the relocation of the port. Some suggest that it is because the port will be going back into the hands of those that once opera ted there when it was known as Kelly Island. And there are some who see that return as a regression in this country’s economic expansion and dispersion of property and wealth. The town meeting revealed that the container port will in be moved to Arawak cay as an integ ral part of the Downtown revitalization. n B y CHESTER ROBARDS B usiness Reporter crobards@tribunemedia.net THE BAHAMAS Immigrat ion Department has seen a decrease in work permit applications, its minister said yesterday, although submissions for live-in m aids and handymen continue to p roliferate. Branville McCartney told Tribune Business that the Immigration Board, which processes perm it applications, attempts to meet every Monday in order to determine how many would be given to expatriate workers and how m any Bahamians are called to fulfill requested positions. However, he admitted that some permit applications do “slipt hrough the cracks” when Bahamian workers may be available. Mr McCartney lamented that Bahamians are still shying a way from positions they consider menial and degrading, which have to be granted to foreigners because of their disinterest. “We still have some people a pplying for live-in maids and handymen, and many times Bahamians who take those jobs don’t work professionally on t hose job,” he said. “We have to look at the economic times and do what is necessary to make ends meet. Certainly, if I have to be a housekeeper or a handyman or sweept he street, I’d be the best street sweeper in the Bahamas.” Minister of Labour Dion Foulkes touted the recentlyi mplemented unemployment assistance program for its ability of modernize the Labour Department’s database of unemployed persons, and monitor areas wherel abour is needed. The database will also allow the ministry to track, in tandem with its Skills Bank, unemployed persons’ quali fications and fields of expertise in order to place them when employment options become available. According to Mr McCartney, t he Department of Labour is always present during Immigration Board meetings to assist with the placement of expatriate worke rs, and also examining what jobs can be offered to Bahamian labourers. “We don’t approve a nything unless we have a labour c ertificate, so they go through the process of determining whether t here is a Bahamian qualified and suited for this job,” he said. Where they don’t have Bahamians we grant the permit, ife verything else is in order.” M r McCartney also touted the u nemployment scheme, saying: It’s going to give us a better idea of those persons who are out t here, their qualifications and who is looking for work.” S haring sentiments with Mr Foulkes, Mr McCartney said thati f the Labour Department is to really be effective in helping the I mmigration Board, persons must be actively pursuing a job and use the resources provided by each department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much as 4.5 per cent, S&P 2 per cent meaning that the debtto-GDP ratio will further increase due to the latter figure’s contraction. The Government is borrowing $200 million to help finance projects such as the Nassau harbour dredging and downtown improvement; a further $100 million is coming for the New Providence Road Improvement Project; and $140 million is being advanced by the People’s Republic of China. All this will add further to the national debt, possibly taking it by Tribune Business calculations to around 48 per cent of GDP by year-end. The Government will point out that the Bahamas’ debt-toGDP ratio is far better than most of its Caribbean and credit rating peers, and that it has no problem servicing its debt the key measurement. Yet, if the credit rating agencies do not see an improvement in the Bahamas’ fiscal position once it comes out of recession, they may dictate policy changes to the Government in return for avoiding a credit rating downgrade. That, of course, could prompt cuts in the Government’s social programmes and spending. Weakness The weakness of the Government’s fiscal position is clear, given that its Budget deficit “almost doubled” to $173.4 million for the first eight months of 2008-2009, largely due to a 10 per cent drop in import-related tax revenues. Elsewhere, the Central Bank projected that the Bahamian economy had suffered a “moderate contraction” in 20089 GDP, meaning that the economy did indeed slip into recession. This was most evident in commercial bank credit quality. The Central Bank’s annual report said the “most significant deterioration” in bank credit quality was seen in the mortgage market, where total loans in arrears “rose by more than a third” to $364 million. This meant that mortgage loans in arrears accounted for 13.2 per cent of such loans, a 2.8 per cent increase upon the previous year. The value of commercial/business loans in arrears rose from $94 million at year-end 2007 to $161 million as at end-December 2008, creating an arrears rate of 15.5 per cent, as opposed to 9.3 per cent. Consumer loan arrears, meanwhile, increased by 39.6 per cent to $240 million. The latter figure represented 10.8 per cent of this portfolio as at end-December 2008, compared to the previous year. C M Y K C M Y K BUSINESS PAGE 4B, FRIDAY, MAY 8, 2009 THE TRIBUNE 127,&(LVKHUHE\JLYHQWKDW <9(1$-26(3+ RI)$,7+$ 1$66$8%$+$0$6 LVDSSO\LQJWRWKH0LQLVWHUUHVSRQVLEOH I RU1DWLRQDOLW\DQG&LWL]HQVKLSIRUUHJLVWUDWLRQQDWXUDOL]DWLRQ DVFLWL]HQRI7KH%DKDPDVDQGWKDWDQ\SHUVRQZKRNQRZV D UHDVRQZK\UHJLVWUDWLRQQDWXUDOL]DWLRQVKRXOGQRWEH JUDQWHGVKRXOGVHQGZULWWHQDQGVLJQHGVWDWHPHQWRIWKHIDFWV ZLWKLQWZHQW\HLJKWGD\VIURPWKH 67 GD\ RI 0D\ WRWKH 0 LQLVWHUUHVSRQVLEOHIRUQDWLRQDOLW\DQG&LWL]HQVKLS3%R[ 1 27,&(LVKHUHE\JLYHQWKDW . (5/,1((67,0(RI %$+$0$$%/8(+,//52$'3%2; 1$66$8%$+$0$6 LVDSSO\LQJWRWKH0LQLVWHU U HVSRQVLEOHIRU1DWLRQDOLW\DQG&LWL]HQVKLSIRUUHJLVWUDWLRQ QDWXUDOL]DWLRQDVFLWL]HQRI7KH%DKDPDVDQGWKDW DQ\SHUVRQZKRNQRZVDQ\UHDVRQZK\UHJLVWUDWLRQ Q DWXUDOL]DWLRQVKRXOGQRWEHJUDQWHGVKRXOGVHQG ZULWWHQDQGVLJQHGVWDWHPHQWRIWKHIDFWVZLWKLQWZHQW\ HLJKWGD\VIURPWKH WK GD\ RI 0D\ WRWKH0LQLVWHU U HVSRQVLEOHIRUQDWLRQDOLW\DQG&LWL]HQVKLS3%R[ 0LQLVWU\RIXEOLF:RUNV DQGUDQVSRUW38%/,&,&(7(1'(5)25)(1&,1*$7+(,1,675<):25.6 $1'$163257&203281'$66$8%$+$0$67KH*RYHUQPHQWRIWKH%DKDPDVWKURXJK WKH0LQLVWU\RI:RUNVDQG7UDQVSRUWLVLQYLWLQJ 7HQGHUVIURPIHQFLQJFRQWUDFWRUVWRFDUU\RXW UHSDLUVDQGLQVWDOODWLRQRIFKDLQOLQNIHQFLQJ 6FKHGXOHIRUHQGHUSHQLQJ &RPSDQLHVLQWHUHVWHGLQWHQGHULQJPD\DWWHQG D 3UHHQGHUPHHWLQJDWWKH0LQLVWU\RI:RUNV &RQIHUHQFH5RRPDW0D\ DQGIROORZHGE\DVLWHYLVLW $OOWHQGHUELGVVKRXOGLQFOXGHWKHIROORZLQJ &RPSOHWH7HQGHU'RFXPHQW &RS\RIFXUUHQW%XVLQHVV/LFHQVH 1DWLRQDO,QVXUDQFHERDUGOHWWHURIJRRG VWDQGLQJ 7HQGHUVPXVWEHVXEPLWWHGLQVHDOHG HQYHORSHVPDUNHG HQGHUIRU)HQFLQJDWWKHLQLVWU\RI 3XEOLF:RUNVDQGUDQVSRUW DQGGHOLYHUHGWR&KDLUPDQHQGHUV%RDUG 0LQLVWU\RI)LQDQFH UG)ORRUHFHSWLRQ'HVN &HFLO:DOODFH:KLWHOG&HQWUH 3 &DEOH%HDFK:HVW%D\WUHHW 1DVVDX%DKDPDV$OO7HQGHUVPXVWEHUHFHLYHGDWWKHDERYH DGGUHVVRQRUEHIRUHDP7XHVGD\ 0D\$OOSHUVRQVZKRVXEPLWELGV DUHLQYLWHGWRDWWHQGWKHRSHQLQJRI7HQGHUV DWWKH0LQLVWU\RI)LQDQFH)ORRU&HFLO :DOODFH:KLWHOG&HQWUH&DEOH%HDFK:HVW%D\ 6WUHHW1DVVDX%DKDPDVDW RQ7XHVGD\0D\7KH0LQLVWU\RI 3XEOLF:RUNVDQG7UDQVSRUWUHVHUYHVWKHULJKW WRUHMHFWDQ\RUDOO7HQGHUV /HJDORWLFH 127,&( ROXQWDU\/LTXLGDWLRQf 1RWLFHLVKHUHE\JLYHQWKDWWKHDERYHQDPHG &RPSDQ\LVLQGLVVROXWLRQZKLFKFRPPHQFHG RQWKHGD\RI0D\ 7KH/LTXLGDWRULV $UJRVD&RUS1DVVDX %DKDPDV /HJDORWLFH 127,&( ROXQWDU\/LTXLGDWLRQf 1RWLFHLVKHUHE\JLYHQWKDWWKHDERYHQDPHG & RPSDQ\LVLQGLVVROXWLRQZKLFKFRPPHQFHG RQWKHGD\RI0D\ 7KH/LTXLGDWRULV $ UJRVD&RUS1DVVDX %DKDPDV /HJDORWLFH 127,&( ROXQWDU\/LTXLGDWLRQf 1RWLFHLVKHUHE\JLYHQWKDWWKHDERYHQDPHG &RPSDQ\LVLQGLVVROXWLRQZKLFKFRPPHQFHG RQWKHGD\RI0D\ 7KH/LTXLGDWRULV $UJRVD&RUS1DVVDX %DKDPDV /HJDORWLFH 127,&( ROXQWDU\/LTXLGDWLRQf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entral Bank: National debt 43.4% of GDP at year-end F ROM page 1B

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liabilities its accounts payables, security deposits, loans owed and deferred incomes. BTC’s 2006 annual report, the last one available, shows that while the 100 per cent state-owned telecoms operator had $213.849 million in current assets, including $128.501 million in cash on hand and at the bank, it also had $139.105 million in current liabilities. As a result, Mr Smith said it was impossible to determine the true value, or net worth, of BTC by looking at just one balance sheet item as Mr Ingraham had implied. The normal valuation methods used were to look at cash flow, book value, or cash flow discounted for present value and multiplied by future earnings. “You can’t look at one item on the balance sheet, like cash, without looking at the other liabilities,” Mr Smith told Tribune Business . “The book value, the net worth, is the difference between the two and that, together with the other methodologies, is the most appropriate mechanism for valuing BTC.” In response to Mr Ingraham yesterday, former prime minister Perry Christie said that the deal his administration had secured with Bluewater included a “provision” to deal with the substantial cash build-up on BTC’s balance sheet. However, the Prime Minister attacked the Bluewater deal’s terms, accusing the former administration of seeking to privatise BTC “on credit”, with the then-government “trusting the balance” to Bluewater. He accused the former government of “seeking to conclude frantically, three days before the election, on the 27th or 28th of April, 2007, behind closed doors and without any public announcement”, the privatisation with Bluewater. The deal struck then involved Bluewater paying $225 million for its 49 per cent stake upfront, with a further $30 million payable five years after the privatisation completion, and $5 million in year six. The agreement in principle, though, was never consummated after the Ingraham administration took office. Bluewater has now invoked arbitration proceedings in the UK against the Government. Mr Christie, though, defended his government by saying that the Bluewater transaction was “a good deal for BTC at the time... When we looked at the offer we had, we thought that the offer we had last, from Bluewater, was a significant improvement over the offer we had the first time, and we thought we acted prudently in the circumstances”. without the Government’s intervention, even though it was hoped it could give as much support as necessary. Rev Moss said a Bain and Grants Town Association had been established to drive the project forward alongside private investors to ensure its success. He added that most revitalisation projects started in those i nner-city areas had failed. The G overnment’s past efforts, w hich included the removal of derelict vehicles and implementation of less-than-ambitious social and community programmes, had been wholly unsuccessful. However, as the Downtown N assau revitalisation project finds its legs, Rev Moss said Bain and Grants Town will take advantage of that momentum. “This downtown redevelopment project; we (Bain and G rants Town) will be a part of t hat. We’re tired of the Gove rnment, through the Ministry of Tourism every few years, pouring tons and tons of money into the refurbishment of Bay Street, but nothing a few feet beyond, and we insist that that will change,” Rev Moss said. The termed ‘Over the Hill’ revitalisation project will have the Ministry of Tourism on board to assist the area in becoming a tourist attraction through arranged tours, said Rev Moss. “The ministry has agreed to train tour guides,” he said. The project hopes to make Bain and Grants Town another entertainment district, with hotels and restaurants incorpo rated into the revitalisation scheme. Advocating the ‘Over the Hill’ project, Freddie Munnings Jr. said entertainment must be an integral part of the revitali zation of any area. He added t hat entertainment drives t ourism, and was the allure to attract visitors. Mr Munnings suggested that the Government should give every Bahamian working towards the revitalization of their area the same investment incentives that downtown merchants and foreign investors are receiving. He said it was the unique Bahamian experience that will keep visitors coming back to an area. And that is precisely what Rev Moss said Bain and Grants Town would mean to the tourism product after the revitalization is complete. “Hotels and restaurants will be popping up all over Bain and Grants town,” he said. “Entertainment will be the order of the day.” Paramount to the changes in infrastructure and aesthetics in those areas will be a change in the attitudes and culture of the people who reside there. “There has to be, first of all, that psychological change in the residents. They will do the rest. They will take care of the phys ical and infrastructural changes that are necessary, but they must have that mindset change, and that’s what we’re working on,” said Rev Moss He added that they have already begun to attract residents into social development programmes, such as free Span ish classes, and are beginning to implement a project called Y13 (2013 adults rudimentary computer skills. T hese projects, said Rev M oss, will help the community t o understand the revitalisation effort and allow them to feel a part of its existence. “We will use that new-found sense of pride and dignity to motivate them, to fuel them for ward into what we are planning to do,” he said. C M Y K C M Y K BUSINESS THE TRIBUNE FRIDAY, MAY 8, 2009, PAGE 5B 52wk-Hi52wk-LowSecurit y Previous CloseToday's CloseChangeDaily Vol.EPS $Div $P/EYield 1.951.28Abaco Markets1.401.400.000.1270.00011.00.00% 11.8011.00Bahamas Property Fund11.0011.000.000.9920.20011.11.82% 9 .686.95Bank of Bahamas6.956.950.000.2440.26028.53.74% 0.900.63Benchmark0.630.630.00-0.8770.000N/M0.00%3 .743.15Bahamas Waste3.153.150.000.0780.09040.42.86% 2 .601.95Fidelity Bank2.372.370.000.0550.04043.11.69% 14.1511.09Cable Bahamas11.7511.750.001.3090.2509.02.13% 3.142.83Colina Holdings2.832.830.000.2490.04011.41.41% 7 .446.17Commonwealth Bank (S16.176.170.005540.4190.05014.70.81% 4.661.31Consolidated Water BDRs2.602.48-0.120.0990.05225.12.10% 3.001.86Doctor's Hospital1.861.860.000.2400.0807.84.30% 8.106.02Famguard7.767.760.000.4200.24018.53.09% 12.5011.00Finco11.0011.000.000.3220.67034.26.09% 14.6610.35FirstCaribbean Bank10.4010.400.000.7940.40013.13.85% 5.555.00Focol (S5.145.140.000.3320.15015.52.92% 1.001.00Focol Class B Preference1.001.000.000.0000.000N/M0.00% 0.500.30Freeport Concrete0.300.300.000.0350.0008.60.00% 8.205.50ICD Utilities5.595.590.000.4070.50013.78.94% 12.508.60J. S. Johnson10.5010.500.000.9520.64011.06.10% 10.0010.00Premier Real Estate10.0010.000.000.1800.00055.60.00% 52wk-Hi52wk-LowSecuritySymbolLast SaleChangeDaily Vol. 1000.001000.00Fidelity Bank Note 17 (Series AFBB17100.000.00 1000.001000.00Fidelity Bank Note 22 (Series BFBB22100.000.00 1000.001000.00Fidelity Bank Note 13 (Series CFBB13100.000.00 1000.001000.00Fidelity Bank Note 15 (Series DFBB15100.000.00 52wk-Hi52wk-LowSymbolBid $ A sk $Last PriceWeekly Vol.EPS $Div $P/EYield 14.6014.25Bahamas Supermarkets7.928.4214.60-0.0410.300N/M2.05% 8.006.00Caribbean Crossings (Pref4.006.256.000.0000.480N/M7.80% 0.540.20RND Holdings0.350.400.350.0010.000256.60.00% 41.0029.00ABDAB30.1331.5929.004.5400.0009.030.00% 0.550.40RND Holdings0.450.550.550.0020.000261.900.00% 52wk-Hi52wk-LowFund NameNA V YTD%Last 12 MonthsDiv $Yield % 1.36641.3041Colina Bond Fund1.36640.954.77 3.03512.9230Colina MSI Preferred Fund2.8962-1.49-3.35 1.45901.3883Colina Money Market Fund1.45901.775.09 3.69603.1964Fidelity Bahamas G & I Fund3.1964-5.59-13.64 12.739712.1564Fidelity Prime Income Fund12.73970.965.79 100.5606100.0000CFAL Global Bond Fund100.56060.560.56 100.000096.4070CFAL Global Equity Fund96.4070-3.59-3.59 1.00001.0000CFAL High Grade Bond Fund1.00000.000.00 10.50009.0950Fidelity International Investment Fund9.15990.71-12.76 1.04401.0000FG Financial Preferred Income Fund1.04400.804.40 1.03641.0000FG Financial Growth Fund1.03640.333.64 1.04521.0000FG Financial Diversified Fund1.04520.764.40 BISX ALL SHARE INDEX 19 Dec 02 = 1,000.00YIELD last 12 month dividends divided by closing price 52wk-Hi Highest closing price in last 52 weeksBid $ Buying price of Colina and Fidelity 52wk-Low Lowest closing price in last 52 weeksAsk $ Selling price of Colina and fidelity Previous Close Previous day's weighted price for daily volumeLast Price Last traded over-the-counter price Today's Close Current day's weighted price for daily volumeWeekly Vol. Trading volume of the prior week Change Change in closing price from day to dayEPS $ A company's reported earnings per share for the last 12 mths Daily Vol. Number of total shares traded todayNAV Net Asset Value DIV $ Dividends per share paid in the last 12 monthsN/M Not Meaningful P/E Closing price divided by the last 12 month earningsFINDEX The Fidelity Bahamas Stock Index. January 1, 1994 = 100 (S (S19-Feb-09 9-Feb-09 W W W WW W . . B B I I S S X X B B A A H H A A M M A A S S . .C C O OM M | | T T E E L L E E P P H H O O N NE E : : 2 2 4 4 2 2-3 32 23 3 -2 2 3 3 3 30 0 | | F FA A C C S S I I M M I I L L E E : : 2 2 4 42 2 3 32 2 3 3-2 23 32 20 0NAV Date 31-Mar-09 1-May-09 31-Mar-09 28-Feb-09 31-Dec-08 9-Feb-09 28-Feb-09 31-Dec-08 31-Dec-07 31-Mar-09 Prime + 1.75% Maturity 19 October 2017 19 October 2022 30 May 2013 29 May 2015 Interest 7% Prime + 1.75% 7%T T O O T T R R A A D D E E C C A A L L L L : : C C O O L L I I N N A A 2 24 4 2 2 5 5 0 0 2 2 7 7 0 0 1 1 0 0 | | R R O O Y Y A A L LF F I I D D E E L L I I T T Y Y 2 2 4 42 2 -3 3 5 56 6 7 7 7 7 6 64 4 | | F F G G C C A A P P I I T T A A L L M M A A R R K K E E T T S S 2 2 4 42 2 -3 3 9 9 6 6 -4 4 0 00 00 0 | | C C O O L LO O N N I I A A L L 2 2 4 4 2 2 -5 5 0 0 2 2-7 7 5 5 2 2 5 5FINDEX: CLOSE 798.52 | YTD -4.35% | 2008 -12.31%BISX LISTED & TRADED SECURITIES AS OF: Fidelity Over-The-Counter Securities Colina Over-The-Counter Securities BISX Listed Mutual Funds MARKET TERMSTHURSDAY, 7 MAY 2009BISX ALL SHARE INDEX: CLOSE 1,613.79 | CHG -0.13 | %CHG -0.01 | YTD -98.57 | YTD % -5.76BISX LISTED DEBT SECURITIES (Bonds trade on a Percentage Pricing bases /HJDORWLFH 127,&( ,QROXQWDU\/LTXLGDWLRQf 1 RWLFHLVKHUHE\JLYHQWKDWWKHDERYHQDPHG &RPSDQ\LVLQGLVVROXWLRQZKLFKFRPPHQFHG RQWKHGD\RI$SULO 7KH/LTXLGDWRULV $UJRVD&RUS1DVVDX %DKDPDV THECOLLEGE OFTHE BAHAMASVisit our website at www.cob.edu.bs Inner-city revival seeks downtown project spin-offs F ROM page 1B Ex-minister disputes PM’s $130m BTC sale assertion F ROM page 1B ou can’t look at one item on the balance sheet, like cash, w ithout looking at the other liabilities.” J ames Smith

PAGE 22

C M Y K C M Y K PAGE 8B, FRIDAY, MAY 8, 2009 THE TRIBUNE




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PAL SSS

Justice JON
resigns {rom

Unexpected
move from
controversial
figure

m@ By PAUL G TURNQUEST
Tribune Staff Reporter
pturnquest@tribunemedia.net

THE legal
profession was
taken by sur-
prise yesterday,
when Senior
Justice John
Lyons unex-
pectedly ten-
dered his resig-
nation from the
Supreme Court.

Taking effect
in August, Jus-
tice Lyons is
expected to take
a vacation in the meantime hav-
ing recused himself from all
matters that were before his
court.

With it being no secret that
Justice Lyons had been quite
“unhappy” for sometime with
the state of the Judiciary,
sources within this fraternity
confirmed that over the past
few weeks he had been making
provisions to secure his gratuity
before handing in his resigna-
tion.

John Lyons

SEE page nine

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to crumble. The area has been blocked off to pedestrians by protective barriers.

m@ COURT OF APPEAL
RESERVES DECISION

THE Court of Appeal has
reserved its decision on a
recent application to have
Justice John Lyons recuse
himself from a case.

Last month, Justice Lyons
delivered a ruling refusing
an application by attorney
Fred Smith, a partner at Cal-
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PM denies claims
FNM ‘wasted’ $138m
preparing BTC for
privatisation in 90s

@ By ALISON LOWE
Tribune Staff Reporter
alowe@tribunemedia.net

STEPPING into the politi-
cal tit-for-tat over the privati-
sation of BTC, Prime Minister
Hubert Ingraham denied
accusations by PLP leader
Perry Christie that the former
FNM administration had
“wasted” $138 million as it
sought to prepare the corpo-
ration for privatisation in the
1990s.

Itemising the expenditure
of funds which totalled $139.5
million at that time, including
$94 million spent on severance
packages for staff — Mr
Ingraham told parliament that
BTC’s profits in the years sub-
sequent to the “right sizing”
of the company in preparation
for its privatisation “explod-
ed.”

SEE page nine



WI SKomrl
make CLICO

announcement

m By ALISON LOWE
Tribune Staff Reporter
alowe@tribunemedia.net

A PLP senator yesterday
commended Prime Minister
Hubert Ingraham on his state-
ment that he will shortly make
a new “announcement with
regard to CLICO and its pol-
icyholders in the Bahamas.”

Jerome Fitzgerald said he
hopes whatever is said will
“make policyholders feel
more comfortable that
their concerns are being
addressed.”

“It’s going to be interesting
to see what they’re going to
announce,” said Senator
Fitzgerald, adding that it is
“not too late” for the govern-
ment to say it will guarantee
the investments of Bahamian
policy holders in CLICO as
the Trinidadian and Guyanese
governments have done.

Yesterday in the House of

SEE page 16



aw A

ack and Field
TEL Ee)



Mother who
made kidnap
claim expected
to be charged

Woman under arrest in
connection with ‘false
information’ given to police

m@ By TANEKA THOMPSON

Tribune Staff Reporter

tthompson@tribunemedia.net

A MOTHER, who claimed her three-
year-old son was recently kidnapped out-
side her home, is expected to be formally
charged sometime today with deceiving }

police.

As first reported by The Tribune, police
said Wednesday night that they were ques-
tioning 37-year-old Angie Moss to vali-
date the allegations surrounding the |}

alleged kidnapping.

"Police discovered that the child was

Angie Moss

not kidnapped and was in the care of a
relative. After being questioned, it was revealed that Ms
Moss had other motives and was placed under arrest last
night for false information provided to the police.

"She is in custody and is expected to be charged with
deceit of a Public Officer in court sometime (today)," Press
Liaison Officer Assistant Superintendent Walter Evans said

yesterday.

SEE page 10



Students ordered not to return to
school until they’ve had drugs test

m@ By MEGAN REYNOLDS
Tribune Staff Reporter
mreynolds@tribunemedia.net

A GROUP of students at
RM Bailey Senior High School
were sent home from school on
Monday and ordered not to
return until they have been test-
ed for drugs.

And Shantel Smith, the
mother of a grade 10 student at
the school in Marathon Road,

INSIDE

A NASSAU TO BE PROUD OF
“JUST AROUND THE CORNER’
PAGE TWO
INGRAHAM AND PLP IN
CONFLICT OF INTEREST ROW
PAGE THREE
SHOES DESTROYED BY
STORE BOSSES ‘NOT FIT
FOR CHARITY’
PAGE FIVE



i
Pee

| leet id



NASSAU AND BAHAMA

ISLANDS’ LEADING NEWSPAPER

Nassau, is angry her son has
been barred from school since
Monday because as an unem-
ployed single mother of three
she is unable to pay for the $20
drug test.

When The Tribune alerted
Education Minister Carl Bethel

SEE page 10

Bishop Fraser
retrial is stayed

@ By NATARIO McKENZIE
Tribune Staff Reporter

IN A startling turn of events
yesterday, the retrial of Bish-
op Earl Randy Fraser was
stayed pending a decision ona
constitutional application by
his defence attorneys.

Fraser, who is on $10,000
bail, is accused of having a
sexual relationship with a 16-
year-old girl between July
2005 and February 2006. The
retrial began before Magis-
trate Carolita Bethel on Mon-
day and so far five witnesses,

SEE page 10
PAGE 2, FRIDAY, MAY 8, 2009

THE TRIBUNE



LOCAL NEWS



A Nassau to be proud of
‘Just around the corner’

m By ALISON LOWE
Tribune Staff Reporter
alowe@tribunemedia. net

DOWNTOWN stakeholders
enthusiastically relayed impres-
sive short and long term plans for
the revitalisation of the city of
Nassau at a town meeting on
Wednesday night — assuring more
than 130 audience members that a
Nassau they can be proud of is

just around the corner.

After decades of discussion,
Charles Klonaris, co-chair of the
newly-formed public-private
downtown management commit-
tee — the Downtown Nassau Part-
nership — said people will soon
“see many visible improvements
to the city.”

With a full time management
team in place, a secure stream of
revenue and drafting of legisla-

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tion under way to “give teeth” to
the DNP’s authority to maintain,
develop and promote the city of
Nassau, the revitalisation effort
has taken a leap forward with
respect to putting in place the
components that authorities on
downtown enhancement say are
needed to create a much more
attractive, welcoming and enter-
taining destination for Bahamians
and tourists alike, speakers told
those attending.

“The process takes time but
we're not 20 years away, we’re
right on the other side of it right
now,” said Mr Klonaris, address-
ing the gathering, which took place
at the British Colonial Hilton.

Improvements

DNP managing director
Vaughn Roberts identified some
of the various improvements to
be pushed by the DNP over the
next few months as: cleaning and
sanitation, beautification, reduc-
ing congestion, increasing the
availability of parking options,
undertaking streetscaping, main-
taining buildings and sidewalks
and creating new entertainment
possibilities.

“These are visible quick wins,”
said Mr Roberts, who said the
DNP currently has access to
$650,000 in joint public-private
funds to reach its intermediate
goals.

Meanwhile, once government
passes legislation to enact a Busi-
ness Improvement District for the
city of Nassau, the DNP will have
greater authority and funds to

plan, promote and push the revi-
talisation effort at a level beyond
superficial improvements.
Architect Jackson Burnside
spoke passionately about the huge
potential dowtown Nassau has to
become the “leading visitor attrac-
tion in any small island state” in
the world thanks to its inherent
assets as a waterfront port and the
commitment of the DNP.

Designs

To illustrate his vision, Mr
Burnside, who has been contract-
ed to produce designs for the revi-
talised downtown area, exhibited
some of his renderings of a vibrant
and expanded and transformed
waterfront on Nassau Harbour
and beautified sidestreets, lead-
ing down from Bay Street to the
water, closed to traffic.

Along these newly explorable
routes, such as Charlotte and
Frederick Streets, the idea is to
have more restaurants, greenery,
artistic attractions and perfor-
mances “spilling out” into an open
air environment.

Other possibilities to enhance
the experience of those stepping
off cruise ships into Nassau
include opening up the north side
of Rawson Square which faces the
waterfront to allow visitors to walk
straight into the plaza from the
wharf.

The square is intended become
an easily-accessible staging ground
for a heightened number of activ-
ities and performances designed
to capture the imagination of vis-
itors.

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THE WORKERS PARTY building is engulfed by flames.

Workers Party olfice
is destroyed by fire

m@ By MEGAN REYNOLDS
Tribune Staff Reporter
mreynolds@tribunemedia.net



FIRE ripped through the Workers Party office in Black Village
yesterday morning destroying the building which has been ravaged by
fire three times in a year.

Workers Party leader Rodney Moncur was alerted to the fire in
Rupert Dean Lane South at around 4am, and said he found “a huge
fire, an inferno.”

The previous fire in October last year damaged three rooms just six
months after the first fire tore through the building in April 2008.

Yesterday’s blaze has now led to the building being completely
demolished, Mr Moncur said.

He suspects the fires have been the work of arsonists and said there
was also an attempted arson attack on his house in April last year.

Mr Moncur added: “I have had a number of attacks involving fire so
I went to see the commissioner of police to be as responsible as possible
and avert something great from happening.

“T think the police need to be more visible in my community. They
are not as visible as I think they ought to be and I have been saying that
to them for quite a long time, so after the meeting I hope to see some
positive action. It’s serious when arson attacks take place.”

Mr Moncur intends to clear the site and rebuild the Workers Party
office.

Deputy Prime Minister to attend COFCOR, Kingston, Jamaica

m By LINDSAY THOMPSON

DEPUTY Prime Minister and Min-
ister of Foreign Affairs Brent Symon-
ette is representing the Bahamas at
the two-day twelfth meeting of the
Council for Foreign and Community
Relations in Kingston, Jamaica, which
opened yesterday.

Accompanied by first assistant sec-
retary Brian Serville, Mr Symonette
will lead the agenda on finances in
view of the global economic crises.

A special part of the meeting is a
retreat, at which foreign ministers will
discuss aspects of CARICOM inte-
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concerns.

They will also discuss developments
within the Organisation for Econom-
ic Cooperation and Development
(OECD) and the G-20 countries.

“These items were requested to be
put on the agenda by the Bahamas
because of our particular interest in
financial issues,” said Joshua Sears,
director general in the Ministry of
Foreign Affairs.

The Bahamas also requested that
the issue of piracy in the Gulf of Aden
be placed on the agenda of COF-
COR, he said. The Bahamas present-
ed a paper on the impact of piracy

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with respect to maritime transporta-
tion.

With more than 1,700 vessels reg-
istered, the Bahamas has the third
largest ship registry in the world
behind Panama and Liberia.

The foreign ministers are also
expected to discuss reforming the
Association of Caribbean States
(ACS), an organisation established
to deepen integration in the wider
Caribbean region.

“The Caribbean Community
(CARICOM) feels that this organi-
sation needs to be reformed with
respect to its leadership, trade and
tourism,” Mr Sears said.

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THE TRIBUNE

FRIDAY, MAY 8, 2009, PAGE 3



0 In brief _

Ingraham and PLP in
conflict of interest clash

Mi Nottage questions appointment of Butler-Turner
to committee probing teacher-student sex claims

Five men in
court after raid
on suspected
numbers house

FIVE men charged in connec-
tion with last week’s raid on a
suspected numbers house
appeared in a Magistrate’s
Court yesterday.

Ernest Scavella, 70, of Bel
Air Estates; Lawson Gray, 49,
of Colony Village; Kelvin
Clarke, 37, of Yellow Elder
Gardens; Michael Davis, 49, of
Lake Cunningham, and Martin
Albury, 50, of Yamacraw Beach
Estates — a former employee at
ZNS — appeared before Chief
Magistrate Roger Gomez in
Court 1, Bank Lane.

Their arraignment comes a
week after FML CEO Craig
Flowers and 15 others were
arraigned on charges stemming
from a raid on FML’s head
office on Wulff Road.

It is alleged that the five men,
on April 28, were found on a
premises where a lottery was
taking place. Court dockets
state that the men were found at
Our Place, The Man Gone
Crazy on Mackey Street.

The accused pleaded not
guilty to the charge. The men
are on $3,000 bail and the case
has been adjourned to Septem-
ber 14. Five other persons also
have been charged in connec-
tion with the alleged offence.

Man, 21,
arraigned on
arson charge

A 21-year-old man charged
with arson was arraigned in
Magistrate’s Court yesterday.

It is alleged that on Monday,
April 20, Keith Mason III of
Lake View Road set fire to the
home of Trahisson Baptiste at
Bellot Road. The accused, who
appeared before Magistrate
Carolita Bethel in Court 8,
Bank Lane, was not required to
enter a plea to the charge.

He was granted bail in the
sum of $7,500. The case was
adjourned to May 11 and trans-
ferred to Court 10.

Mason was represented by
attorney Krysta Smith.

PM makes
hasic cable
service pletige

EVERY community in the
Bahamas with 10 or more
homes will have access to basic
cable service under the new
communications legislation,
Prime Minister Hubert Ingra-
ham told parliament yesterday.

While contributing to the
debate on a Bill for an Act to
Provide Communications Ser-
vices, Mr Ingraham explained
that successive governments
have tried to extend cable ser-
vices to several sparsely popu-
lated Family Islands, sometimes
unsuccessfully. Mr Ingraham
said Cable Bahamas - the coun-
try's only cable service provider
- had "no legal obligation" to fill
these requests and refuted
assertions from PLP MP for Cat
Island, Rum Cay and San Sal-
vador Philip Davis that the deci-
sion not to provide cable to
some homes was politically
motivated.

"We were early in the cable
business. The FNM did that
within a year of coming to
office. All those years before
our time there was no cable for
the Bahamas. Now the FNM
brought cable to the Bahamas
and I hear, ‘I haven’t gotten
mine yet, the FNM did not give
it to me.’ Well, what happened
before we came in?

"The member for Cat Island
said this morning - and you
know, it is unbelievable what
some members say, they obvi-
ously do not care about their
credibility — the member said
the only reason United Estates
in San Salvador did not get
cable was they were PLP. "Well
I wonder why Long Island, Salt
Pond which always votes FNM,
did not get cable. I wonder why
Guana Cay in Abaco which
always voted 100 per cent FNM
didn’t get cable — because they
are FNMs? That is a silly thing
to say. There are many commu-
nities in the Bahamas that do
not have cable yet and we
would like to have every single
community in the Bahamas
have cable.

"And so, in this Bill, we are
going to require as a condition,
that every community in the
Bahamas that has 10 or more
residences will have basic cable
service," he said.

Yesterday, the Bill for an Act
to Provide Communications
Services was passed in the
House of Assembly. The Bill
now moves to the Senate for
debate before it passes into law.



mw By ALISON LOWE
Tribune Staff Reporter
alowe@tribunemedia.net

The prime minister and the
PLP clashed in parliament yes-
terday over opposition MP
Bernard Nottage’s suggestion that
Minister of State for Social Ser-
vices Loretta Butler-Turner
would be in a conflicted position
were she to remain on a commit-
tee appointed to investigate the
circumstances surrounding
teacher-student sex claims in
Grand Bahama.

MP for Bain and Grants Town
and leader of opposition business
in the House of Assembly, Dr
Nottage proposed that parliament
“may have erred” when it
appointed Mrs Butler-Turner as
one among a group of MPs cho-
sen to sit on a Select Committee
to probe the Eight Mile Rock
High School child molestation
scandal as the investigation would
involve individuals in her own
ministry.

However, Prime Minister
Hubert Ingraham shot down Dr
Nottage’s claim, stating that he
can see “no good justifiable rea-
son” for the minister of state’s
removal from the committee.

“Tt is not a personal thing,” said
Dr Nottage, “The point is not that
there was an allegation against
the minister or ministry but the
point is that there were, stem-
ming from the debate, allegations
made against certain agencies of
the government, amongst them
agencies associated with (Mrs
Butler Turner).

“Since that would appear to be
an investigation which would
include looking into the conduct
of officers who work under her

REPORTS FROM PARLIAMENT



BL TPAEUROM (Oneal e fe

ministerial responsibility (there
are questions raised as to)
whether this would be an appro-
priate person to be on the com-
mittee,” said the MP.

However, Mr Ingraham said he
felt Mrs Butler Turner is “as com-
petent as anyone else to perform
the duty”.

Allegations

“The allegations (made by PLP
chairman Glenys Hanna Martin
when she moved a motion for the
appointment of the committee)
were against the ministry of edu-
cation,” claimed Mr Ingraham,
who added that if the party was
concerned it could have raised
the issue at an earlier, more con-
venient point.

To this, Dr Nottage respond-
ed: “Obviously if the government
doesn’t see the potential conflict
in this matter... I just thought it
proper for me to bring it to the
attention of the House and I
thought that having regard to the
nature of this matter that the gov-
ernment might see the wisdom to



MolgsvicssiOUi cl emMOlantsde

bring in a different appointment.
If the government insists then we
leave it there,” he said.

Mr Ingraham retorted that it
was not he but the Speaker of the
House, Alvin Smith, who made
the appointments, which the gov-
ernment supports.

“T then appeal to the Speak-
er’s objectivity and sense of fair-
ness,” said Dr Nottage.

Mr Smith told the MP that he
“would consider” the suggestion
to remove Mrs Butler-Turner.

The committee was appointed
on April 28 after Mrs Hanna
Martin described the Eight Mile
Rock scandal as a matter of the
“utmost public importance.”

She claimed various agencies
including the Ministry of Educa-
tion, the Department of Social
Services and the police may not
have “responded adequately or
at all to complaints that children
had been sexually exploited” by a
teacher at the school, allowing
the alleged molester to remain in
a position where he would have
been able to continue to perpe-
trate crimes against children.

PM takes Wilchcombe to task over
support for ‘outdated’ legislation

m@ By TANEKA THOMPSON
Tribune Staff Reporter
tthompson@tribunemedia. net

PRIME Minister Hubert Ingra-
ham took former Tourism Min-
ister Obie Wilchcombe to task for
supporting legislation in parlia-
ment that moments before, he
had criticised as “outdated” and
“rushed.”

"The Bill is not rushed as I
heard the member for West End
and Bimini say, not rushed at all.
In fact, his statement was incon-
sistent because he said it was
rushed, being done to facilitate a
fireside sale, and then he said 'T
am going to vote for it.’

"Well
_| why would

you do
| that? He
says it is
going to be
outdated,
but yes he
is going to
vote for it.
He imme-
diately
brought his
credibility into play as to why a
distinguished member (of parlia-
ment) would vote for such a Bill
that is ‘outdated, rushed, that has-
n’t been consulted on',” Mr Ingra-
ham said. The nation's chief also
dispelled concerns that the new
laws would lead to broadcasting
censorship. He explained that the
legislation would regulate broad-
cast content and allow for penal-
ties or fines to be imposed on
those found guilty of transmitting
"offensive" material.

Rules

"Everyone in here would like
to have, I believe, some rules in
place that if someone who is a
licensee broadcasts something
that is against public policy of the
Bahamas — that is offensive — con-
sistent with what is in the Broad-
casting Act now, that somebody
should be able to report them to
some authority for having done
so, so that an investigation can
take place as to what was broad-
cast and that some penalty could
be imposed if found to have done
so.

"The point is to have an author-
ity that can deal with such a thing
and that is all that was meant by
“content regulation” — no more
than that... You are free to
broadcast. If you offend the rules,
someone can cause you to be
brought up on a charge of having
offended the rules," he said.

Mr Ingraham’s comments came
on Wednesday afternoon as mem-
bers of the lower chamber debat-
ed new communications legisla-
tion, which he previously said is
needed to provide a regulatory
framework for the proposed pri-

MIU TaM OTe UN



“He says it is going
to be outdated, but
yes he is going to vote
for it. He immediately
brought his credibili-
ty into play as to why
a distinguished mem-
ber (of parliament)
would vote for such a
Bill that is 'outdated,
rushed, that hasn’t
been consulted on’...”
—————————S SSS

Hubert Ingraham

vatisation of BTC. While speaking
on the issue of censorship, Mr
Ingraham recalled instances while
he was a member of the opposi-
tion under the Pindling adminis-
tration when the content of his
speeches was thoroughly combed
over.

"(Speeches) used to be asked
for when I was in opposition.
They had to be sent down to Mr
Pindling firstly. Secondly, the gen-
eral manager of ZNS would sit
down in a chair next to me with a
copy of my speech in his hand
going down the list to make sure
that I say every word that is on
there. So I have been there, I
know about that."

Under the proposed legislation,
a new regulatory authority — the
Utilities Regulation and Comple-
tion Authority (URCA) — will
be established with more exten-
sive powers and duties than those
of the soon to be defunct Public
Utilities Commission.

Once the Bill comes into force,
the PUC and the Television Reg-
ulatory Authority, which comes
under the Television Regulator
Authority Act, will cease to exist.

Broadcasting, cable, telephone
and Internet services will come
under the jurisdiction of a single
entity called URCA, said Mr
Ingraham. He added that "one
day" the Bahamas Electricity Cor-
poration and the Water and
Sewage Corporation would fall
under the URCA's umbrella.

This "new phase of develop-
ment" will hopefully allow the
country’s communications sector
to operate under internationally
accepted standards, with trans-
parent guidelines, said Mr Ingra-
ham. A Bill for an Act to Provide
Communications Services, or the
Communications Act 2009 was
passed in House of Assembly yes-
terday.

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PAGE 4, FRIDAY, MAY 8, 2009

THE TRIBUNE



EDITORIAL/LETTERS TO THE EDITOR

Extreme moral
makeover needed
to address nation’s
deep wounds

LETTERS

The Tribune Limited

NULLIUS ADDICTUS JURARE IN VERBA MAGISTRI
Being Bound to Swear to The Dogmas of No Master














































































LEON E. H. DUPUCH, Publisher/Editor 1903-1914

SIR ETIENNE DUPUCH, Kt, O.B.E., K.M., K.CS.G.,
(Hon.) LL.D., D.Litt.

Publisher/Editor 1919-1972
Contributing Editor 1972-1991

EILEEN DUPUCH CARRON, C.M.G., M.S., B.A. LL.B.
Publisher/Editor 1972-

Published Daily Monday to Saturday

Shirley Street, RO. Box N-3207, Nassau, Bahamas
Insurance Management Building., P.O. F-485, Freeport, Grand Bahama

TELEPHONES
Switchboard (News, Circulation and Advertising) 322-1986
Advertising Manager - (242) 502-2352

WEBSITE
www.tribune242.com — updated daily at 2pm

This nonsense has to stop

A TAXI driver was almost “locked up”, two
men were picked up for traffic violations, one
almost losing his job as a result, and a honey-
moon almost postponed because of confusion in
the warrants department of the Prosecutor’s
office.

To avoid wasting the time of police officers,
who often present warrants that have already
been dealt with, we suggested that the depart-
ment would be more efficient if it were com-
puterised. We were surprised to learn that it is
already computerised. Therefore, there can be
only one conclusion — some of the staff are
not on top of the job. From lack of communi-
cation between the courts and the Prosecutor’s
Office and staff in the department not daily
updating the warrants as they come in, to man-
agers not properly supervising the departmen-
t’s backsliders, the public is being harassed and
inconvenienced.

Last year a young man, about to be mar-
ried, went to the department for his police
record to get a US visa to go away on his hon-
eymoon. He was fingerprinted. When the
records were scanned he was horrified that two
outstanding warrants appeared against him —
one going back to 1995 and the other to 2001—
both traffic offences.

In 1995 he was home with school friends,
had just got his driving licence and was going for
a drive, when he turned into a street that he did-
n’t realise was one-way. He thought everything
was all right because the police officer on point
duty gave him no indication that he should not
turn. But no sooner had he made the turn than
the policeman walked over and booked him.
The young man said his mother paid his fine.

On the second occasion a car, which was to
be sold, was sitting unlicensed in the family’s
backyard. One day he had to go to a nearby
store and saw no harm in quickly nipping out in
the unlicensed car and nipping back in. But it
didn’t quite work that way. He was caught by a
police officer and this time ticketed for driving
an unlicensed car. Again mother came to the
rescue and paid the fine.

Only incorrigible hoarders would keep traf-
fic receipts for 14 or even eight years. Natural-
ly he could not produce the two receipts the
police officer demanded before he could give
him a clean police record for his visa.

The police went through their files but could
find no paper work for the first offence. That
one, therefore, had to be written off. As for
the eight-year-old warrant, although there was
a record, nothing showed that it had been paid,
and so he paid the fine, which he maintains was
a second payment. Today, his wife has those
precious receipts under lock and key in case
they again turn up as “unpaid” in the computer.

Obviously members of the public trust the
authorities to have up-to-date files. They don’t

expect to have to keep these little chits of paper
forever. And so after a reasonable time they
are discarded.

This week a taxi driver told of how he was
almost “locked up” on a warrant for his arrest
dating back to 2004 — again for a minor traffic
violation. He knew he had paid the fine the
same year.

“The only thing that saved me,” he said,
“was that some kind person did put in the sys-
tem that I had paid the $250 fine. But the prob-
lem was that they didn’t cancel the warrant — I
could have been locked up!”

“The attitude in the warrant office is very,
very complacent. The pile-up, the backlog—
that’s normal for them. When they did find out
Td paid it, they were just like, ‘Okay, you can go
on our way,” he said. Apparently, there wasn’t
even an apology for the time-wasting mistake.

And then there were the two men, who were
picked up separately by officers, who served
them with warrants issued for traffic violations.
They had both paid their fines.

One gentleman said he almost lost his job
when he had to take time off to go before a
magistrate twice on two different days before
being directed to a nearby court logbook where
proof was found that he had paid the $250 fine
the year before.

But just consider the number of persons
inconvenienced by a staff member in the war-
rants department who failed to record that this
fine had been paid. First the magistrate, who
always has a heavy case load, wasting time on
two occasions on a citizen who should not even
have been in her court. And then there was the
policeman— many of them have complained
that there are not enough hours in the day to
deliver all the warrants given them. And also, of
course, there is the victim, who almost lost his
job, and the employer who lost two days of his
employee’s labour — and all for the want of
posting the payment of a fine.

The second man was held for five hours last
Friday before he was allowed to go home to
search for the receipt of a fine he had also paid.
Failing to find it, he was allowed to look in the
same court logbook, where the other man had
found his payment. His was also there.

As he left the policeman advised him that to
avoid the same situation again he should keep
his payment reference number on him at all
times.

This is not the answer. Someone has to quick-
ly reorganise the warrant office, introduce an
efficient system between it and the courts, and
make certain that a staff member goes through
a daily routine of posting warrants as they have
been completed.

The present system is wasting time and mon-
ey, not only for government, but for the police
force and the public.

Sender Royal Bahamian Resort @ Offshore Island.

Invites applications for the positions of:

Accountants
Cost Controller
General Cashier
Receiving Clerk

Executive Chauffeurs
Director of Sales
Security Manager

Exec. Housekeeper
Resort Shop Manager
Photo Shop Manager
Assistant Training Manager

Applicant must have at _ least five
years experience in the — Hospitality
Industry in the above mentioned positions,
excellent communication, organizational and
interpersonal skills, must be able to train and
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flexible and long hours.

Fax or email résumé’s with proof of qualifications
and experience to:

cmajor@grp.sandals.com
Fax 677-6828.

EDITOR, The Tribune.

As the Government grapples
with putting together a credi-
ble Budget, all the armchair
economists and their cousins
have been offering different
solutions to solve the nation’s
ills. I wish to argue that no eco-
nomic strategy will effectively
address the deep wounds of this
nation without an extreme
moral makeover.

Our moral foundations are
fundamentally compromised.
The Bahamas has grown
wealthier during the last 20
years but not through increased
production and export earnings.
Rather, the wealth has been
achieved at the awesome price
of becoming debt-driven,
addicted to avarice, crime-
infested, violence-sapped,
widening the gap between the
rich and poor, importing more
and exporting less, investing lit-
tle in growing or consuming
locally grown foods, and becom-
ing over dependent on a fragile
service industry. The end result
is that we have become a soci-
ety spiritually bereft because
our moral foundations are fun-
damentally compromised.

As the Government prepares
the next budget, the critical sub-
ject of taxation will become
paramount. We have produced
a taxation culture that rewards
the very wealthy and punishes
the rest by making enterprise a
painful business. Since the
1970’s, the sad state of our par-
asitic political parties has
ensured the absence of politi-
cal, economic and social con-
sensus that facilitates good gov-
ernance. Instead, successive
governments uncritically
embrace the dominant global
neo-liberal economics model of

letters@tribunemedia net



development that made the
market into an uncontrollable
god or goddess.

In the unrestrained race and
insatiable appetite to acquire
wealth quickly, anyhow, and at
any price, the values of the old
Bahamas that called for saving
some of what you earn for a
rainy day and not building your
family’s future on debts that
cannot be serviced, were thrown
overboard as archaic philoso-
phy. In the new Bahamas that
has emerged, the soul of the
nation has been fundamentally
altered. A deadly virus that
thrives on rampant individual-
ism and a corrosive and selfish
value system has infected the
core of the nation.

Everyone wants to live life in
the fast lane! Our insatiable
appetite for quick wealth is will-
ing to accommodate the collat-
eral damage of loss of lives, if
that is what it takes to achieve
our financial goals.

Long before the global finan-
cial crisis hit the nation, we had
already compromised the eco-
nomic foundations through our
consumerism supported by debt
rather than savings. It was
bereft of probity, thrift, person-
al responsibility and good stew-
ardship of family life.

The moral makeover that is
needed must be driven by
courageous and resolute lead-
ership at all levels. The renewal
and transformation of the
nation necessitates a new defi-
nition of what constitutes the
common good for this nation.
Everyone seems to be doing

what is right in his or her own
eyes because we have not cor-
porately signed off on what are
our consensus values. The
moral assumptions and behav-
ioural codes that informed how
our people behaved in a neo-
liberal economic environment
have disappeared and have
been replaced by an “anything
goes” culture.

Our current crop of political
and business leaders, for the
most part, behave like the blind
leading the blind in these dan-
gerous and uncharted waters.
They are fast losing their legiti-
macy because they have funda-
mentally breached the exercise
of authority and discipline in
the nation. They have sown the
wind and are reaping the whirl-
wind! They always do well in
our kleptocratic financial cul-
ture where there are no rules
for people with money. They
will buy or pay their way
through any entrenched bureau-
cracy to make more money.
However, for the ordinary per-
son who obeys the rules of this
nation, their progress will
always be blocked.

Our nation must change
course if it is to survive in these
dangerous times. It cannot be
business as usual! This eco-
nomic tsunami requires the full
mobilisation of the nation to
overcome the threat to our
national well-being. No one par-
ty can deliver this nation out of
this entrenched crisis. Now,
more than ever, the leadership
of our political parties, the pri-
vate sector and civil society
must develop a united front to
address this economic crisis.

JERRY ROKER
Nassau,
April 27, 2009.

How much longer must we endure the red tide?

EDITOR, The Tribune.

At the risk of offending my friend and broth-
er, Robert Deal, I must ask the Water and Sew-
erage Corporation how much longer must we

endure the RED TIDE.

Week in and week out we persevere, without
recourse or compensation, through ruined laun-
dry, stained tubs and toilets and pressure so low
one can pee with more force than the faucet.

It is a national disgrace particularly in light of
the government's latest bailout of WSC's fiscal
fiasco and their union's recent demands for more
money despite their abominable performance.

result of the inconsistent supply. In my business
shoddy products or services are made good at

the company's expense on pain of losing cus-
tomers, not so with the government corporations
that seemingly cannot be held accountable for

the replacement of ruined clothes, plumbing fix-

Notwithstanding modern RO technology and a

wealth of salt water we are still reduced to drink-

ing, cooking and bathing with rusty water in spite

of many of us having invested in, at considerable
expense, holding, pressure tanks and pumps as a

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THE TRIBUNE

FRIDAY, MAY 8, 2009, PAGE 5



LOCAL NEWS



Grand Bahama Power Company

apologises for service interruptions:

THE Grand Bahama Pow-
er Company yesterday apolo-
gised for the prolonged inter-
ruptions of service over the
past two days.

On Tuesday, May 5, while
the largest generator, Unit 13,
was undergoing planned rou-
tine maintenance, two other
generators experienced fail-
ures resulting in interruption
of service to approximately
4,000 customers. These fail-
ures required the company to
implement their feeder rota-
tion programme between 5pm
and 11pm.

At 6.30pm on May 6, a
third generator went off line
due to a mechanical failure.
The loss of this generator
forced the company to length-

en and broaden the scope of
its planned feeder rotation :

programme.

Currently, the feeder rota-
tion programme is still in }
progress, impacting approxi- j i

mately 5,000 customers.
Grand Bahama Power Com: |
pany said it continues to work }
diligently to return the gen- }
erators to service and ensure

that power is restored to all }
customers aS Soon as possi- }

ble.

and/or air-conditioning units.”



KEVIN KEMP is pictured with camera operator and high definition :
consultant Jeff Cree (Titanic, Avalon: Beyond the Abyss) at NAB 2009. :

Film Commission executive
learns latest technology

LAS VEGAS, Nevada — The
Bahamas Film Commission, a unit
of the Ministry of Tourism and
Aviation, was represented last
month at the world’s largest elec-
tronic media show. Kevin Kemp,
executive in the Film Commis-
sion, attended the 2009 National
Association of Broadcasters
Show, otherwise known as NAB
2009. The event updated him on
the latest developments in film
entertainment, management,
internet use and audio technology.

NAB 2009 was attended by
over 83,842 registered delegates,
including 23,232 international and
1,246 news media participants.
The show took place from April
18-23 at the Las Vegas Conven-
tion Centre and other locations
throughout the city.

In addition to meeting with rep- 3
resentatives from companies such }
as Sony, Panasonic, Band Pro }
Film and Digital Inc, B & H Pho- }
to, Tiffen, Euphonix, and Promax, :
Mr Kemp was invited to a special }
behind-the-scenes event for the i
RED USER '09 digital camera at }

the RIO hotel.

He pointed out that RED is :
becoming a popular format for }
Bahamian filmmakers looking to }
make their mark in the industry. :

“IT want to make certain that }
we have the knowledge and infor- }
mation we need for digital cinema }
in the Bahamas and that Bahami- }
ans are prepared to take advan- i
tage of the technology, not just :
for our filmmakers but for our }
broadcasters, radio and internet }
providers as well,” Mr Kemp said. }

The Grand Bahama Power }
Company is asking all cus- :
tomers to conserve energy by :
“only using necessary lights; }
restricting use of dryers, wash- }
ing machines and irons, and :
turning off water heaters }

Shoes destroyed.
by store bosses
‘not fit for charity’

m@ By MEGAN REYNOLDS
Tribune Staff Reporter
mreynolds@tribunemedia.net

OVER a thousand shoes
destroyed by bosses at Shoe Vil-
lage were not fit to be donated
to charity, company president
and co-owner Egan Kemp said.

Lester Ferguson from the Sal-
vation Army told ZNS News
that there are many people in
need of shoes as Mr Kemp was
interviewed about a dumpster
filled with unworn shoes at the
Shoe Depot warehouse in Palm-
dale.

He explained that the hun-
dreds of shoes he had destroyed
on Wednesday were of such
poor quality they could not be
donated.

Mr Kemp said the glue hold-
ing the soles to the upper parts
of the shoes was so substandard
the footwear would have fallen
apart within a matter of days.
He blamed the factory from
which he ordered the shoes.

He added: “It was a major

Hundreds of pairs of footwear
‘could not be donated’

issue, so for me to pass them
on, even if it was to an organi-
sation to ship to Haiti, it would
have wasted them a lot of time
and money because within three
weeks they would be destroyed.

“This is not an issue that I
take lightly and I did what I did
because I had to, not because I
wanted to.

“Tf there was any way I could
have donated over 1,000 pairs of
shoes to anyone it would have
been a great PR operation, but
I would have looked like a fool
because they would have fall-
en apart weeks later so it would-
n’t have helped anybody.”

Mr Kemp further said that he
is wary of making such dona-
tions to individuals or charitable
organisations because all too

often the beneficiaries will try to
return the shoes in exchange for
credit.

And the ruckus caused by
these recipients in Shoe Village
stores throughout Nassau is so
damaging to business, it is not
worth his while, Mr Kemp said.

“Unfortunately the many dis-
honest people that try to exploit
the situation have caused us to
destroy the shoes,” he said.

Madeline Froning, communi-
ty relations associate for the Sal-
vation Army, said Shoe Depot
has made donations to the char-
ity in the past.

She added: “There is a big
need and we can always use
stuff like that but sometimes
there is a reason for things we
don’t initially understand.”

Cultural show at
_ the Crisis Centre

SOME OF the country’s biggest

? music and dance acts are set to
? take the stage at the Crisis Cen-
? tre’s first annual cultural show to be
? held tomorrow under the patron-
; ; age of the Delores Ingraham.

Organisers of the event put
fc nee a star-studded list of
? Bahamian singers and dancers who
? volunteers say are sure to “wow”
? the crowd —all for a nominal fee of
$10.

Artists will include some of the

; © Balanites’ biggest up and coming
? rap artists such as Sosaman, Mr
? Deeds and Sammi Star. The event
? will also feature the music of the
? Royal Bahamas Defence Force
: Band, Extra Band and the finalist
? of the hit television show ‘Bahami-
? an Idol’.

The Crisis Centre has long been

? a local refuge for women, men and
? children who have been affected
? by domestic problems and are in
? need of social assistance.

“We are raising awareness about

? domestic violence and family issues
? across the country and raising
? funds for families who could not
: ordinarily afford certain services,”
? one volunteer said.

There will be a free family fair at

i the National Centre for the Per-
: forming Arts from 12no0on to 6pm
? and the cultural show will com-
? mence immediately after.

Ua Be
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A Special Tribute

WE REMEMBER

December 16th, 1919- May 8th 2008

to

Mothers

OLS SPONSORS: nA eeu Ge ita)



TEAM SCOTIA menbers alone with coaches and members of the
Silver Lightning Track Club.

SCOTIABANK (Bahamas), as the title sponsor of the Silver
Lightning Track Meet that was held at the Thomas A Robinson
Stadium, made a donation to the club and presented the 75 ath-
letes with T-shirts, sports bags, sports bottles and caps.

Members of “Team Scotia” also attended the track meet in
full force and assisted in all areas needed. Team Scotia is a
group of Scotiabank employees who volunteer their time to give
back to the community.

Rupert Gardiner, president of the Silver Lightning Track
Club, thanked Scotiabank for its assistance in making the event
a success.

“On behalf of the coaches, parents and athletes of the Silver
Lightning, I would like to say that we are pleased to have the
support of Scotiabank as we host our third annual track meet,”
said Mr Gardiner.

As we honour our
matriarch this Mother’s Day, we
invite you to nominate your mom to
be honoured in conjunction with John Bull’s

80th anniversary celebrations.

GREEN PARROT
BAR. + GRILL

Mother's Day Speci al Visit any John Bull owned store
between April 30th and May 9th,
complete an entry form and enter to win

one of g Gift Cards, valued at $800 each.

No purchase necessary.

§SOu

1929102009

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PAGE 6, FRIDAY, MAY 8, 2009



THE TRIBUNE



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At Odessa Garden we have a variety of items to
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LOCAL NEWS

Minister in tour of
Cat Island schools

EDUCATION Minister
Carl Bethel took a one day
whirlwind tour of schools on
Cat Island to hear concerns
and to encourage the students
to study hard.

He was accompanied by act-
ing permanent secretary
Sherylee Smith and acting
director of education Lionel
Sands.

Mr Bethel visited New Bight
Primary School, where he
assured the administrators,
teachers and students that Cat
Island would get the same lev-
el and quality of education that
exists in New Providence and
Grand Bahama.

After encouraging the stu-
dents to obey their parents and
to study hard, the team was
off to the Old Bight Primary
and Pre-School, Old Bight
High School, Bennett’s Har-
bour Primary School, Dum-
fries Primary School, and final-
ly Arthur’s Town High School.

The minister entertained
questions from students,
whose concerns ranged from
text book shortages to the lack
of an auditorium on the island.

He congratulated the
schools for putting together
the winning national debate
team for two years in a row,
and noted that the remote
island has a great history of
producing prominent intellec-
tuals.

ABOVE: Minister of Education
Carl Bethel at Old Bight Primary
School.

RIGHT: The Minister talks to
students at Dumfries Primary.

Mr Bethel encouraged the
students to carry on this tra-
dition, and said if they worked
diligently to maintain good
grades, the government would
do its best to support them
through scholarships, grants,
loans and special awards.

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THE TRIBUNE

FRIDAY, MAY 8, 2009, PAGE 7



LOCAL NEWS

Bahamas visits to get
easier for travellers

@
re]
=
=
=
=
7)
a
[+b]
—
ao
a

MINISTER VANDERPOOL-WALLACE presents Dr Frank Wright, presi-
dent and CEO of National Religious Broadcasters (NRB), with a Bahami-
an coin set gift. In the exchange, Mr Vanderpool-Wallace received an

English Standard Version bible.

MINISTER of Tourism and
Aviation Vincent Vanderpool-
Wallace recently guaranteed reli-
gious broadcasters that govern-
ment will make it increasingly
easier to travel to all the islands of
the Bahamas from outside the
country.

Mr Vanderpool-Wallace was
welcoming the board of directors
of National Religious Broadcast-
ers (NRB) to the Bahamas. The
group, led by Dr Frank Wright,
held its annual board meeting in
the Bahamas at the Sheraton
Nassau Beach Resort with a spe-
cial welcome reception hosted at
Wyndham Nassau Resort.

Board directors travelled to
Nassau from as far away as Cali-
fornia. Some of them endured
inconvenient air connections and
several hours of travelling.

“Tt is one of the things that we
are going to fix, to make it so
much easier and inexpensive for
people to get to and throughout
the islands of the Bahamas,” Min-
ister Vanderpool-Wallace said.

He said the Bahamas will soon
develop projects that will cause
the country to be described as
“the Greek islands of the
Caribbean.”

The projects will allow an
increased number of efficient and
enjoyable ferry services between
several islands.

“We are making certain dur-
ing these times that we are doing
everything we can to make cer-



tain that when this is over, we }
know we are going to see an
explosion of traffic coming here }
because we are going to make it }
so much easier for people to }

come here.”

Mark Hawken, assistant gen- :
eral manager of Wyndham Nas- }
sau Resort, said his resort is pre- }
pared to accommodate NRB and }
any other organisation affiliated }
with them. He said the facility i
extensive ;
upgrades, and the well-trained }
team is prepared to assist reli- }

has undergone

gious groups and others.

Dr Frank Wright, president }
and CEO of the NRB, said the }
Bahamas was the perfect place }
for his group to enjoy leisure time }
and to hold productive meetings }

at the same time.

“And I think that many of our }
members who may want to come }
and follow in our steps and have :
meetings in the Bahamas would
also want to accomplish impor- }
tant purposes for the goals of }
their organisations as well as hav-
ing a time of rest and refresh- }
ment, and what better place than }

this,” he said.

Dr Wright pointed out that }
Bahamians and Americans have }
a lot in common. He said Amer-
icans view the Bahamas as a
“friendly and peaceable” neigh- :

bour.

“We are grateful for your hos-
pitality and it is indeed better in }

the Bahamas,” he said.

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Call for a special court to
focus on child sex abuse

COMMENDING Prime Min-
ister Hubert Ingraham on his con-
demnation of sexual violence, the
Crisis Centre yesterday called for
the establishment of a special
court to focus on child sexual
abuse matters.

This comes after last week’s
appointment of a Select Com-
mittee of the House of Assembly
to examine allegations of sexual
abuse at Eight Mile Rock High
School in Grand Bahama, and
procedures of the Ministry of
Education in general.

Director of the Crisis Centre
Dr Sandra Dean-Patterson said
that to hear that 15 teachers are
currently being investigated for
sexual impropriety with students
they are supposed to be protect-
ing is of great concern to all citi-
zens.

“The prime minister is very
right when he says that many peo-
ple in our nation have been clos-
ing their eyes, refusing to accept
that this can happen in their
homes, in schools, in the commu-
nity, to their children. Our prime
minister is very right when he
speaks of the impact (of) the hor-
rendous delay that victims have to
endure in order to get justice,”
she said.

On an average, Dr Dean-Pat-
terson said, victims have to wait
four, five, even six years before
their case reaches the Supreme
Court.



“The prime minister
is very right when he
says that many
people in our nation
have been closing
their eyes, refusing to
accept that this can
happen in their
homes, in schools, in
the community, to
their children.”



Director of the Crisis
Centre Dr Sandra
Dean-Patterson

“(There was a) recent incident
where a 10-year-old had to wait
for her case to reach court until
she was 16 years old and then the
perpetrator walked. We can all
imagine what she feels about a
system that allows this. It is unac-
ceptable that children and victims
of sexual assault have to continue
to undergo this long drawn-out
re-victimisation by a system that
appears not to care about their
violation.”

Dr Dean-Patterson said that
while there is legislation in place,
the Bahamas has a very broad
definition of sexual assault.

“We have increased the penal-
ties to the ultimate and we com-

mend this government for doing
this in December 2008. But legis-
lation alone is not enough and is
only one component in the
process of achieving justice.

“There must be consequences
as a result of the reports that are
made, these reports must be thor-
oughly investigated, the Volun-
tary Bill of Indictment must be
utilised to avoid victims having
to experience two trials, and the
process a speedy one. Serious
consideration must be given to
the establishment of a special
court to fast track child sexual
abuse matters,” she said.

A key component in the man-
agement of child sexual abuse,
she explained, is the way in which
the child’s disclosure is handled
both on an individual basis by the
family and support system of that
child, but also on a community

and national level.

“We must not re-victimise the
victim. We must not facilitate a
process that frightens or deters
other children from telling or
coming forward. That is why the
members of the Select Committee
in the House must be careful in
their handling of the recent dis-
closures so as not to prevent oth-
er children who may want to
come forward from doing so,” she
said.

“Our country must be one
where our children and citizens
can be and feel safe. We com-
mend you, prime minister. You
make us even prouder to be
Bahamian. We look forward to
the work of the Select Committee
and their recommendations for
action.

“The Crisis Centre stands
ready to help.”

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PAGE 8, FRIDAY, MAY 8, 2009

THE TRIBUNE





LOCAL NEWS

Thousands get a
taste of the Bahamas

m@ By K QUINCY PARKER
Press/Cultural Attaché
Embassy of
the Bahamas

MORE than 3,000 people
got a taste of the Bahamas this
past weekend when the
Embassy of the Bahamas to the
United States participated in
two events that raised the
Embassy’s profile in Washing-
ton, DC, exposing the metro-
politan community to Bahami-
an culture and furthering cul-
tural relations between the two
countries.

On May 2, the Bahamas
Embassy hosted a special
breakfast for two groups of
tour operators as part of Cul-
tural Tourism DC’s second
annual “Passport DC.” At the
breakfast, Bahamas Ambas-
sador to the US C A Smith

touted the Bahamas as a “glit-
tering jewel in the Atlantic
ocean”, and an ideal climate
for investment in both tourism
and financial services.

The guests at the breakfast,
affiliated with Mid-Atlantic
Tour Receptors, questioned
the Ambassador on many
points.

Experience

After the breakfast, the
Bahamas Embassy threw open
its doors and thousands of peo-
ple poured in, seeking a little of
“the Bahamian experience” in
Washington, DC.

Before too long, the line to
get into the Embassy stretched
down Massachusetts Avenue —
in the section known as
Embassy Row — and around

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the corner onto 22nd Street.

As the guests entered, they
sampled conch fritters and — to
the great delight of the adults —
‘Sky Juice,’ the colloquial nom-
de-guerre for gin, sweetened
condensed milk, and coconut
water.

In addition to the popularity
of the fritters and the drinks,
DC residents and visitors also
got to participate in a small but
enthusiastic junkanoo rush-out
and hear the calypso crooning
of Ray Smith. They learned to
‘play’ the saw, beat the
goatskin drum and ‘knock the
conch style.’

At the end of the day, just
under 3,000 people had
crammed themselves into the
Bahamas Embassy, where they
mingled with the embassy per-
sonnel and other Bahamians
who had come to represent
their country.

In the aftermath, Ambas-
sador Smith — who was present
and glad-handing the line of
waiting participants for much
of the day — said, “this was a
most successful day, a chance
for us to let the Bahamas
shine.”

The following day, on May
3, the Bahamas had a booth at
the Organisation of Women of
the Americas (OWA) annual
Food Festival of the Americ-
as. The Bahamas booth offered
hundreds who braved the
steady rain that soaked the
grounds of the Organisation of
American States (OAS) the
chance to sample the peas and
rice, macaroni, chicken, fish,
conch fritters, rum punch and,
of course, the ubiquitous ‘Sky
Juice.’

A smiling Ambassador
Smith, who was present in a
straw hat and bright yellow rain
slicker, said, “This is wonder-
ful.”

Toward the end of the day,
the event’s deejay was handed
a recording of junkanoo music,
and once the sounds of the
drums, bells and horns lit up
the square, it was as if the Box-
ing Day or New Years Day
parades had overtaken that lit-
tle patch of Washington, DC.

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who swarmed
the Bahamas

Washington,





BAHAMAS AMBASSADOR TO THE US CA Smith engages tour company owners on the various attractions
available in the Bahamas and answers their questions about things like destination weddings.

THIS YOUNG
woman was
one of thou-
sands who
stood in the
lengthy line to
get into the
Bahamas
Embassy in
Washington,
DC, in order
to get a taste
of Bahamian
culture during
Passport DC.

BAHAMIAN
WANDA |
MCPHEE |
answers. |
questions |
about the
Bahamas

from guests

Embassy in

DC, over the
weekend. It
was part of

an event
called Pass-
port DC.



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THE TRIBUNE FRIDAY, MAY 8, 2009, PAGE 9

LOCAL NEWS

Justice John Lyons PM denies claims FNM ‘wasted’ $138m

preparing BTC for privatisation in 90s





resigns from court

FROM page one

A controversial figure in his
own right, Justice Lyons has
been the brunt of recent reports
in the media after his fellow
justice, Anita Allen scolded
him for appointing Daniel Fer-
guson, an accountant, to work
on a case knowing that he
shared “more than a friend-
ship” with Mr Ferguson’s sis-
ter.

Mr Ferguson’s sister also
assisted her brother with

COURT OF
APPEAL

RESERVES
DECISION

FROM page one

have him recuse himself
from an upcoming case
involving the Central Bank
of Ecuador. During an
appeal hearing against that
ruling on Wednesday, Mr
Smith submitted to the court
that while on the bench, Jus-
tice Lyons had shown hos-
tility towards the law firm,
Callenders and Co, and its
attorneys on several occa-
sions.

Justice Lyons’ conduct
was called into question fol-
lowing a ruling in March by
Senior Justice Anita who
criticised his appointment of
an accountant who he
ordered to prepare a finan-
cial report in a civil case.
That case is presently at the
centre of an application for
Justice Allen’s recusal. In
her ruling it was also
revealed that Justice Lyons
and the sister of the accoun-
tant shared more than a
friendship.



preparing documents for the
case, said Justice Allen as she
decided whether or not to
recuse herself from hearing the
matter “on the ground of
apparent bias” because of her
knowledge of this matter.

Following this revelation, the
National Jubilee Coalition
called for an investigation into
the conduct of Senior Justice
Lyons stating that anyone asso-
ciated with the judicial system
should be “beyond the slightest
reproach.”

“Any hint that a sitting judge
might be compromised in any
way warrants the appropriate
attention and investigation.

“The pervasive crime prob-
lem in our Bahamas is exacer-
bated by an ever revolving jus-
tice system that seems unable
to deliver swift justice,” the
statement read.

Justice Lyons had earlier
recused himself from the case,
which involved the distribution
of funds between business part-
ners, on the grounds that he did
not have time to hear the mat-
ter.

However, attorneys involved
in the case told Justice Allen
that Justice Lyons had “literal-
ly forced” the appointment of
the accountant on their clients.
They said that Justice Lyons
“threatened” to walk out of
court if they did not agree to
the appointment.

According to the judgment,
on the first day of the hearing,
the accountant was asked and
denied that he had a social rela-
tionship with Senior Justice
Lyons.

Then, on the second day of
cross-examination, he was
asked whether a relative of his
had any relationship with
Senior Justice Lyons to which
he responded that “he didn’t
get into his sister’s business but
he knew that she and the judge
were friends.”

“Tt was only then that I made
the connection between the
accountant and information
which was in the public domain
for some time, that the judge

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had more than a friendship with
a woman who up to that point I
did not know was the accoun-
tant’s sister,” Justice Allen stat-
ed in the ruling, which was
handed down on March 24.

In an attempt to ensure trans-
parency in her conduct as a
judicial officer and as the judge
who was to determine whether
the accountant’s report should
be approved, Justice Allen said
she informed counsel that she
was aware of this information.

The ruling was in relation to
a request by lawyers for one of
the litigants that Justice Allen
recuse herself from the case
because of her knowledge of
Justice Lyon’s relationship with
the accountant’s sister, which
might have prejudiced her judg-
ment as to whether the accoun-
tant’s report would have been
valid.

The National Jubilee Coali-
tion consists of Bishop Simeon
Hall, president, Dr Philip
McPhee, vice-president and Dr
Keith Russell, Grand Bahama
regional director.

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FROM page one

“Between 1988 and 1998, with BATELCO
having a staff of 2,359 during that period,
with revenue of $120 million, BATELCO’s
total profit for (those) 10 years was
$62,327,000.”

“In the three years following privatization,
BATELCO’s total profits were $161 million
as compared to $62 million in a 10-year peri-
od,” said Mr Ingraham.

Speaking in the House of Assembly, the
Prime Minister said he was responding to
this “demonstrably false” claim and others
made by the PLP relating to the FNM’s han-
dling of BTC in light of the fact the Opposi-
tion continues to make the charges despite
previous rebuttals.

Mr Ingraham went on to take a swipe of
his own at the PLP’s handling of the priviti-
sation process, stating that “$130 million in
the bank” at BTC, the agreement which the
former PLP government was seeking to con-
clude in the run up to the May 2007 election
for the sale of 49 per cent of the corporation
for $260 million was not to be boasted about.

“The Leader of the Opposition said yes-
terday...that someone offered (the FNM gov-
ernment) $130 million to buy 49 per cent of
BTC, and he clearly was of the view that that
was a ridiculous offer that certainly was

unworthy of being entertained.”

“I just want to say to the Leader of the
Opposition, that perhaps he ought to reflect
on what he was contemplating agreeing to
do when he was seeking to sell for $260 mil-
lion,” said the Prime Minister.

Mr Ingraham also refuted Mr Christie’s
suggestion that it was left up to the PLP gov-
ernment to produce a vesting order for BTC
which protected various properties owned
by the company from being sold with it when
it would be privatised.

“The Government that I led (prior to 2002)
determined that there were certain properties
owned by BATELCO that were not avail-
able for sale to a strategic partner and it came
to Parliament and produced a Vesting Order
to that effect.

“T understand that subsequent to 2002,
there needed to be an amendment to that
Order and that that amendment was done
by the Leader of the Opposition’s Govern-
ment.

“But the Order listing the properties we
determined, was tabled in the House and
comprised the following properties that were
taken out and returned to the Govern-
ment/public ownership,” he said.

Those properties stretched throughout the
Bahamas, from New Providence, to Andros
and Inagua.



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PAGE 10, FRIDAY, MAY 8, 2009

THE TRIBUNE



Students ordered not to return to

school until they’ve had drugs test

FROM page one

of the matter he promised to
invoke his powers under the
Education Act to require med-
ical examination of the children
involved and provide the ser-
vice free of charge.

The Ministry of Education
confirmed the parents of three
RM Bailey students have
sought help from the Ministry
as the required drug test is pre-
venting their children from
going to school.

Ms Smith believes around 75
students in grade 10 and 11
have been sent home from RM
Bailey for drug testing.

School principal Julian



Anderson was unavailable for
comment yesterday, and a vice
principal said he was unable to
speak on behalf of the school
in Mr Anderson’s absence.

Ms Smith said that as she is in
regular communication with the
school, she was surprised to
receive a letter from the princi-
pal and school counsellor on
Monday stating they had rea-
son to believe her son had been
smoking an illegal substance
and was required to be tested
for substance abuse.

Should his results return pos-
itive, her son will be referred to
the Community Counselling
Centre for substance abuse
counselling, Ms Smith was told.

Legal Notice

NOTICE

AVIOR LTD.










But when Ms Smith, of East
Street South, took her son to
the Community Counselling
Centre in Market Street to be
tested under the school’s direc-
tion, she was told the test had to
be done at Chela-Tech Medical
and Analytical Laboratory in
Fourth Terrace for $20.

She appealed to the Ministry
of Education and the South
East school district superinten-
dent for help, but as she still
cannot pay for the test, her son
remained at home yesterday.

Ms Smith said: “All this time
is being wasted, and all this time
he’s out of school until he gets
this test done.

“How could you send this let-
ter home to parents when you
can’t tell me you caught my
child in the act?

“He’s got exams coming up
in June, and he’s in grade 10 so
he’s got practical classes for
tourism, cooking and every-
thing, and he’s missing all that.

“They should have had these

Orla st- 140s)



children tested and then if it
was negative or positive contact
the parents and say they need
help.”

The grade 10 boy has already
missed school this term because
of an outbreak of chicken pox
over the Easter holidays, and
although his mother thinks he
could do better than his current
2.30 Grade Point Average, she

said missing school will not help.

She said: “I spoke to the
school counsellor after Easter
and he never told me of any sit-
uation or anything like that, and
that was a week before the let-
ter came so this was like a slap
in the face.”

Education Minister Carl
Bethel said if the school wanted
to test scores of students for
substance abuse the principal
could have made a special rec-
ommendation for the Ministry
to arrange the students’ drug
tests.

He said: “If the principal has
any reason to suspect that sig-
nificant numbers of their chil-
dren are that way we will take
steps to deal with it at Ministry
level.

“All of these things can only
be done if there is reasonable
cause to suspect.”

After learning of Ms Smith’s
predicament Mr Bethel said he
would arrange for the students
to be tested free of charge.

_ Bishop Fraser

retrial stayed
FROM page one

including the virtual com-

: plainant, have testified.

The young woman, who

i is now 20-years-old testi-
? fied that she and Fraser

: had sex on an average of
i 12 times a month at his

? home and office at Pil-

? grim Baptist Temple.

i Fraser’s attorney Wayne
? Munroe made an applica-
? tion yesterday to have the
i case referred to the

} Supreme Court.

The issue, Mr Munroe

i said yesterday, arose dur-
i ing the testimony ofa

? forensic scientist on Tues-
i} day. According to Mr

? Munroe, the witness had

i presented new evidence

i? that had not been

: adduced at the initial trial
? and adversely affected his
; defence strategy.

Prosecutors contend-

ed, however, that the
? application was miscon-
: ceived. The application
















— 4 —
Notice is hereby given that in accordance with Section 138
(8) of the International Business Companies Act 2000, the
dissolution of AVIOR LTD. has been completed; a Certifi-
cate of Dissolution has been issued and the Company has

therefore been struck off the Register.

ARGOSA CORP. INC.
(Liquidator)

Legal Notice

NOTICE
PATRAVI CLOSE LIMITED

(In Voluntary Liquidation)

Notice is hereby given that the above-named
Company is in dissolution, which commenced
on the 9th day of April 2009. The Liquidator is
Argosa Corp. Inc., P.O. Box N-7757 Nassau,

Bahamas.

ARGOSA CORP. INC.
(Liquidator)

Legal Notice
NOTICE
GOLDEN MARCHE

RESOURCES LTD.
a ¢, a
Notice is hereby given that in accordance with Section
138 (8) of the International Business Companies Act 2000,
the dissolution of GOLDEN MARCHE RESOURCES
LTD. has been completed; a Certificate of Dissolution has
been issued and the Company has therefore been struck off

the Register.

ARGOSA CORP. INC.
(Liquidator)

Legal Notice

NOTICE
EL’ VIRA MANOR INC.

(In Voluntary Liquidation)

Notice is hereby given that the above-named
Company is in dissolution, which commenced
on the 6th day of May 2009. The Liquidator is
Argosa Corp. Inc., P.O. Box N-7757 Nassau,

Bahamas.

ARGOSA CORP. INC.
(Liquidator)

Mother who made kidnap
claim expected to be charged

FROM page one ae

The woman reported that the companion
took her vehicle from her home. She told police
that her 3-year-old son was asleep on the car’s

He added that the man sought by police for
questioning in connection with the alleged kid-
napping — who turned himself into police
Wednesday morning — has since been released
from custody.

Earlier this week police said they received a
report shortly after 7am last Friday from a 37-
year-old Lewis Street woman, who claimed

back seat.

Legal Notice

NOTICE
BALEEN ARCH HOLDINGS INC.

(In Voluntary Liquidation)

Notice is hereby given that the above-named
Company is in dissolution, which commenced
on the 6th day of May 2009. The Liquidator is
Argosa Corp. Inc., P.O. Box N-7757 Nassau,

Bahamas.

ARGOSA CORP. INC.
(Liquidator)

Legal Notice

NOTICE
MIRLOUETTE INC.

(In Voluntary Liquidation)

Notice is hereby given that the above-named
Company is in dissolution, which commenced
on the 20th day of April 2009. The Liquidator is
Argosa Corp. Inc., P.O. Box N-7757 Nassau,

Bahamas.

ARGOSA CORP. INC.
(Liquidator)

Legal Notice

NOTICE
MATRIX ADVANCE INC.

— f}—

Notice is hereby given that in accordance with Section 138
(8) of the International Business Companies Act 2000, the
dissolution of MATRIX ADVANCE INC. has been com-
pleted; a Certificate of Dissolution has been issued and the

Company has therefore been struck off the Register.

ARGOSA CORP. INC.
(Liquidator)

that a male companion visited her residence to

On Tuesday police released the all-points-
bulletin, saying they were actively seeking the
whereabouts of a man by the name of Siefort,
the child, and asked for the media’s “urgent
assistance” in getting the word out.

? has been directed to the

: Supreme Court where a

? judge could decide to

? allow the trial to continue
? or quash the complaint.

i The case was adjourned

? to May 21 when counsel

? will notify Magistrate

: Bethel on the status of the
: application.

i Fraser was initially

? charged in 2006, but dis-

? charged in 2007 after then
: Magistrate Marilyn

i Meeres ruled that there

? was no physical evidence
? to link him to the alleged
: offence. The Court of

i Appeal, however, over-

? turned that decision and

} ordered a retrial.

Legal Notice

NOTICE
EBONIQUE MOUNTAIN CORP.

—_ ¢, —
Notice is hereby given that in accordance with Section
138 (8) of the International Business Companies Act 2000,
the dissolution of EBONIQUE MOUNTAIN CORP. has
been completed; a Certificate of Dissolution has been is-
sued and the Company has therefore been struck off the

Register.

ARGOSA CORP. INC.
(Liquidator)

Legal Notice

NOTICE
ORLANDI VALUTA INC.

(In Voluntary Liquidation)

Notice is hereby given that the above-named
Company is in dissolution, which commenced
on the 8th day of April 2009. The Liquidator is
Argosa Corp. Inc., P.O. Box N-7757 Nassau,

Bahamas.

ARGOSA CORP. INC.
(Liquidator)

Legal Notice

NOTICE
ORANGE VALLEY INC.

(In Voluntary Liquidation)

Notice is hereby given that the above-named
Company is in dissolution, which commenced
on the 15th day of April 2009. The Liquidator is
Argosa Corp. Inc., P.O. Box N-7757 Nassau,

Bahamas.

ARGOSA CORP. INC.
(Liquidator)
THE TRIBUNE



—_
FRIDAY, MAY 8,

ATHLETES IN TOWN FOR

ey

2009



Hollingsworth pleased.
with BAAA’s progress



@ By BRENT STUBBS
Senior Sports Reporter
bstubbs@tribunemedia.net

SINCE stepping up to take
over the presidency of the
Bahamas Association of Ath-
letic Associations, Curt
Hollingsworth said he’s been
pleased with the progress they
have made.

The association, according to
Hollingsworth, has come off a
successful showing at the Carif-
ta Games. And they have final-
ly been able to establish the
New Providence Amateur Ath-
letic Association.

Now Mr. H, as he is affec-
tionately called, announced the
plans at a press conference at
the Ministry of Youth, Sports
and Culture yesterday.

Attending along with public

relations officers Kermit Tay-
lor and Troy McIntosh,
NPAAA’s chairman Ray Hep-
burn and director Ralph McK-
inney, Hollingsworth said they
are gearing up with a very busy
six months, starting with the
hosting of the Central Ameri-
can and Caribbean Age Group
Championships.

He said they have been com-
mitted to getting four teams
qualified for the IAAF World
Championships in Berlin, Ger-
many and so far only the men’s
4x 100 metre has not achieved
that goal.

“We are elated that we have
been able to put ourselves in a
position so that these teams
would have been given an
opportunity to qualify,”
Hollingsworth said.

“Currently we have three

teams that will be heading to
Berlin to compete in the World
Championships. For us, that is a
major accomplishment.”

Praising the work ethic of the
coaches and the support of the
parents, Hollingsworth said the
Bahamas has been able to finish
third at the Carifta Games in
St. Lucia.

“We see the rebirth of this
programme and we feel that we
are on the right track,” he said.
“We will continue with our
effort as we prepare for the
upcoming games, which is the
CAC Age Group Champi-
onships.”

Originally scheduled for the
Grand Bahama Sports Com-
plex, Hollingsworth said they
have been forced to bring it to
the Thomas A. Robinson Track
and Field Stadium for June 18-

SEATED from
left are Ray
Hepburn,
NPAAA interum
president; Ker-
mit Taylor,
public relations
officer; Curt
Hollingsworth,
president; Troy
McIntosh, pub-
lic relations and
Ralph Mckin-
ney, director.

19 because of the extensive
work that needs to be done to
the track facility in Grand
Bahama.

“To the disappointment of
many in Grand Bahama and the
Family Islanders and the Nas-
sau based athletes, the champi-
onships, as announced by the
Minister (of Youth, Sports and
Culture, Desmond Bannister),
has to be moved to New Provi-
dence,” he said.

That same weekend, the
BAAA will also host the Junior
Nationals at the Thomas A.
Robinson Stadium, but it will
follow the completion of the
CAC Age Group on June 19-
20.

The following weekend, the
BAAA will host the Open

SEE page 14

SPORTSNOTES

e THE Junior Baseball League of Nas-
sau will complete another successful year
as Regular Season games come to an end
this weekend.

Regular season final games will feature
three divisions in which the pennant win-
ner has yet to be decided.

In the Tee Ball, the Knights and the
Sidewinders are in a tie for the pennant
and the final games on Saturday may or
may not decide the winner.

Should both teams win, a one game
play-off will be necessary on Sunday at 2
pm.

In the Coach Pitch, the Athletics hold a
1/2 game lead on the Diamondbacks and
fate would have it that they play each oth-

er at 10 AM on Saturday.

The winner of this game will win the
pennant.

In the Junior League, the Dodgers hold
a one game lead over the Yankees and
they will also meet on Saturday at 12:30
pm. The winner of this game will also win
the pennant.

GAMES SCHEDULED:

TEE BALL

11 am Blue Claws vs Knights

lpm Sidewinders vs Grasshoppers
3 pm Sand Gnats vs Raptors
COACH PITCH

10 am Diamondbacks vs Athletics
12:30 pm Cubs vs Blue Jays

3 pm Astros vs Angels
MINOR LEAGUE

10 am Rays vs Mets

12:30 pm Royals vs Red Sox
MAJOR LEAGUE

12:30 pm Marlins vs Mariners
3 pm Indians vs Reds
JUNIOR LEAGUE

10 am Cardinals vs Twins
12:30 pm Yankees vs Dodgers
SENIOR LEAGUE
Saturday

3 pm Phillies vs Rangers
Sunday

3 pm Tigers vs Pirates

SEE page 12



HAITIAN sprinter
Roudy Munrose goes
through his starter’s
workout in the blocks.



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PAGE 12, FRIDAY, MAY 8, 2009

TRIBUNE SPORTS



SPORTS



Sports notes cont'd
FROM page 11

INTERNATIONAL
TOURNEY

¢ The Bahamas Karate
Academy will host its 21st
Invitational Karate Tourna-
ment on Saturday at 4 pm at
the Kendall G.L. Isaacs
Gym. Karate Schools from
Abaco, Bimini, Freeport
and Nassau will be partici-
pating. Tournament events
include: Individual Kata,
Individual Kumite, Tag
Kumite and Team Kata,
Male, Female or Mixed)
and Grand Champion Kata.

Doors Open at 3 pm and
competition will begin
promptly at 4 pm.

The public is invited.

SNAPPER TOURNEY

e Red Bays, North
Andros will be ground zero
from May 14-16 as the Sixth
Annual Cultural Festival
Homecoming and Snapper
Tournament will take place.

Alphonso Smith, tourna-
ment coordinator, say this
year’s event is

in honour of Frank Han-
na, who has been a partici-
pant and sponsor of the
tournament from the begin-
ning. Up to 15 boats, each
with four fishermen, are
expected to participate in
the tournament, which
starts at 8am and ends at 4
pm on Saturday, May 16.

Smith say fishing enthusi-
asts are coming from New
Providence, Abaco,

Exuma and Grand
Bahama. Snappers only will
be counted and the winners
will be the boat with the
largest catch.

The prizes are: $1,500 for
first place, $1,000 for sec-
ond, $750 for third and $300
for fourth.

WRIGHT CORRECTION

e IT was incorrectly stat-
ed in Wednesday’s Tribune
that Winter Olympic bound
Korath Wright moved to
Canada when he was ten.
Actually he moved there
with his mother when he
was one year old.

And it was further stated
that Wright contested the
2009 Olympic

Trials in New Zealand
but didn’t make the cut.
Actually, he competed in a

World Cup event in New
Zealand in September, and
finished 24th. He did not
make it to the finals of this
contest, but in fact, the
points he received in that
contest helped his overall
standing for the year, and
led to his Olympic Qualifi-
cation.

Michael Steele/Getty Images

Aris: Competitive

DONALD Quarrie (I) of Jamaica the
1976 200m Olympic champion poses
alongside Howard Oris (r) President
of Jamaica Athletics Association dur-
ing the ‘IAAF Day in the Life’ on May
2, 2009 in Kingston, Jamaica.



school system to

credit for JA track and field success

m@ By RENALDO DORSETT
Sports Reporter
rdorsett@tribunemedia.net

FOR YEARS the region and
indeed the remainder of the
world have marvelled the secret
to a seemingly endless stream
of successful Jamaican sprint-
ers on the International stage.
Now top executives of the
Jamaican Amateur Athletic
Association have offered some
insight into the phenomenon.

President of the JAAA
Howard Aris credited an uber-
competitive school system for
identifying talent as early as
possible, which the federation
uses as the initial stepping stone
in the development of its pro-
gramme.

School system

“We have a very competitive
school system in the primary
school, secondary, and tertiary
school. The federation’s role is
to cultivate the growth of the
sport and create an environ-
ment that is conducive to the
development of talent, which is
why we sanction, organise and
officiate every meet in the coun-
try,” he said. “ With the IAAF
coaching certification pro-
gramme we have been able to
consistently produce qualified
coaches and we do this because
we recognise that the technical
applications of track and field
vary and change and improve
and the best way for us to keep

pace with techniques is to com-
plete the programme of training
and certifying our coaches. The
coaches that we qualify usually
end up coaching in the schools
system which we think gives us
the most organized and com-
petitive school programme in
the world. This is of the utmost
importance to us because out
of the high school programme
all of our international talent is
first recognised.”

Sports lottery

Aris said the country’s
National Sports Lottery is the
catalyst for many of the initia-
tives the JAAAs and other
sporting bodies ability to
improve their coaching, infra-
structure and general funding
which creates a system of sup-
port for the athletes at an early
stage.

“Once special elite level tal-
ents are recognised, the schools
they attend pay special atten-
tion to them through the alum-
ni and mentors. All of our high
schools have special past stu-
dents that come back and offer
help to prospective athletes in
terms of management or financ-
ing of their careers,” he said.
“They have a benefit of a sup-
port structure outside of the
state and outside of the schools.
From the point they are junior
athletes we recognise from the
Carifta Games which is the first
level of international competi-
tions for much of our athletes

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and they get that first taste of
competition outside of
Jamaica.”

Aris, who has served for 33
years at the forefront of Sports
Administration, Sports Devel-
opment and Planning, Manage-
ment and Physical Therapy and
was recognised by the Govern-
ment of Jamaica in 1998 when
he was awarded the Order of
Distinction For Contribution to
Sports, said the infusion of a
local training programme at the
tertiary level has given many
senior athletes an option to
remain locally based through-
out their careers.

“We have a very strong pro-
gramme locally where the auto-
matic transfer of our elite level
athletes to the use for tertiary
education and training is no
longer necessary. We have
more than competent coaches
therefore if they choose an ath-
lete can remain here receive the
best coaching and select the
meets and events in which they
compete. I am not trying to be
disparaging of the NCAAs pro-
gramme, but when you have a
track scholarship your obliga-
tions are clear because you have
to compete whereas Asafa,
Usain and Shelly-Ann who
have remained here they can
create their own schedules and
they events in which they com-
pete, so we see that as an advan-
tage,” he said, “Additionally,
their tertiary education is also
addressed, the difference is, it is

not as rigid. There is nothing
wrong with the older way of
doing things, what we have is
an option, those who want to
go there can go there, but those
who wish to stay and select
events and competitions they
want have that option. At Bei-
jing we had medal winners from
both sides, athletes that live and
train in the US and athletes
train here. We are not yet clear
how you access the value of
either programme.”

Relationship

Donald Quarrie, federation
executive and former Olympic
medallist in the 100m, 400m
relay, and champion in the 200m
said the relationship between
the federation and the athletes is
one of the integral factors
Jamaica’s success in the sport.

“What we have is the ex-ath-
letes, the remainder of the exec-
utive board are a lot more objec-
tive and we get as close as we
can to the athletes to find out
what is it they want for us to do
instead of us insisting on what
should be done, so the feedback
and communication between us
is fantastic. And with the ex-ath-
letes involved we are able to
share information and experi-
ences with the executives and
this combination gives the best
experience for the athletes.”

Quarrie said the success of
the Beijing Olympics gives
Jamaica a strong foothold as the
leaders in track and field sprint-

ing but the federation and its
athletes remained inspired to
retain that position.

“The fact that we are at the
top, the entire world will be
chasing us looking to claim the
crown, and this is god for ath-
letics. The fact that we are at
the top means our athletes and
executives will train and work
harder to retain this status. We
saw the success at Beijing com-
ing, it just happened to come at
the right time. In other coun-
tries when an athlete gets to the
top or just near the top they are
hidden and they do not chal-
lenge each other, here they have
to compete constantly against
each other so the competitive
nature is important for them in
gaining status and keeping them
sharp.”

Consistency

With a legacy of medal win-
ning performances that began
with Herb McKenley in 1948
and continued with Usain Bolt’s
trio of record breaking perfor-
mances in 2008, Aris said
Jamaica’s most important fac-
tor in its model of consistency
has been its ability to adapt.

“Nothing stands still in track
and field there are always new
coaching techniques new meth-
ods, new talent, different appli-
cations,” he said, “It is an evo-
lutionary process and we are
not afraid to change at the risk
becoming overshadowed by
anyone else.”

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TRIBUNE SPORTS FRIDAY, MAY 8, 2009, PAGE 13
SPORTS



Bahamian soccer player Kilroy ‘Killer’ Farrington, spent much of his life
involved in football, as a player, referee, coach and administrator.
Here he is pictured with two of the soccer teams he coached.

Kilroy in action

Well-known Bahamian soccer player “y

Kilroy ‘Killer’ Farrington dies

THE Bahamas Football Association mourns Kilroy hi ,«
“Killer” Farrington who passed away on Sunday, May | 3, 2009 after a brief stay in the hospital. A

“Killer”, as he was affection- ;

ately Known in the football cir- a” as
cle, spent much of his life 7 a
involved in football, as a play- | Rg

er, referee, coach and adminis-
trator.

Virtually his entire career
was with one club, Dynamos
Football Club, where Farring-
ton played in central defence
for the team for many years,
retiring only a few years ago
from active play, but maintain-
ing his involvement with the
club as a coach with the club’s
youth programme.

Farrington’s passion for the
game led him to also serve as a
referee for many years in the
senior league, commencing in
this arena in the early 1990s
and continuing to assist refer-












eeing in the Bahamas until his e Ba d ash Crysta |
oF cena din th or
arrington also served in the H
national programme, serving as © J ewe | ry Boxes . china SL ae Mt
an Administrator and Equip- r TiC mi vy tae
ment Manager for many e A Ld ‘
national teams. He was a con- - O I Nn g e r I ve r
stant presence with the U-15 : . 7
and U-17 Boys National Team, | =i D Al
but also served with the U-20 . f eacon na e | ure ral ) es
Boys National Team that com- J h «its «
se etereeiree Onnson ¢ Artificial Flowers
a tear ee omens oe ii May 26th, 1930 - May 9th, 2008
A fun-loving person, and v , , . e
one always known to have a : : D
smile on his face, Farrington It has been a year Since our sister, e Gi bson / Nn n er an e
enjoyed the game he loved aunt, adopted mother, niece, cousin, =
right to the end, spending his ‘ church leader and friend soul took ~ e Ar G | & C ST |
final days outside the hospital fit and winged its way to the limitless Cc ass ry. ad
at the soccer field, on Satur- Eternity in th N t
days with the Dynamos FC U- ¢ Sxpallce OF ery oe oO G ift B ad skets
16 Boys team and on Sundays ; Dresence of God. As Y, WE pals
assisting Dynamos senior team , ~, h to thank God for her sterling qualities f fro m M ax 's
coach Dion Peterson with a ‘1 A and labour of love. For these and == “ >
bm —) the treasured memories we hold dear, | > 7

Farrington will be sorely




missed and the football frater- 1 We say to God be the glory. '

ity in the Bah has lost ‘ "ot em | °
ee EE see tantitYsvcilbiue © Sale dates: Kell 's Houses
ee oe ~~ of our tabernacle be dissolved we May 1st - 9th, 2009 Ho me

and the entire football family A

in the Bahamas wish to extend r have another building a house not Mall at Marathon

sincere condolences 10 thé oe have another building a house not — Friday 9:00am8:00pm
family on their loss, and will made by hands eternal in the heavens", *Except on red tagged Tel: (pat 393-4002 sag aa pm
continue to keep them in our i and net items Fax: (242) 393-4096 = wwwkellysbahamas.com



prayers.
May his soul rest in peace.



WN;
PAGE 14, FRIDAY, MAY 8, 2009

TRIBUNE SPORTS



SPORTS

Ramirez suspended 50
games for drug violation

Athletes in town for Fritz Grant
Track and Field Invitational

FROM page 11

felt. “I’m looking forward to see where I’m really at,”

said Clarke, who opened the season with a 10.19.
“Once the wind is legal, I know I should be able to run }

fast with the competition here.”

Sekou Clarke, a Jamaican 200/400 specialist, is also
coming back after competing in the CAC Champi- }
onships in 2005. Having some competition here, he said }

he just want to go out and run a season’s best.

“The competition is supposed to be very good, so
I’m just looking for the best,” he said. “My season’s }
best is 46.3, so anything faster than that, I will be hap- }

py.”

onships’ A qualifying time of 20.59 in the 200.

“With a lot more competition and in better shape
than last year, I hope to do very well,” he said. “Pm
familiar with a lot of the guys, but I’m not going to put ;

any pressure on myself.

“T’ve been training, so I know what my capabilities
are. So I just want to represent the Haitian federation ;
and the Haitian people in this country and try to ;

improve as much as I can.”
Most of the visiting athletes are based in Orlando,
Florida.

Hollingsworth pleased
With BAAA'’s progress

FROM page 11

Nationals, which will serve as the final trials for

the World Championships in August.

“We have some young quarter-milers who are
doing very well and we have some young sprinters }
who are also running very well,” Hollingsworth :

said.
“So we just want to say thanks to our sponsors,

the corporate citizens who have stepped up and }
helped us to realise our goals. We are looking for- ;

ward to a very busy second half of the season.”

Additionally, the BAAA will also be sending }
teams off to compete in the Junior Pan Am in }
Trinidad & Tobago, the Senior CAC Champi- }
onships in Cuba, the first Caribbean Games also in }
Trinidad & Tobago and the World Youth Champi- }

onships in Bressanone, Italy, all in July.

“You could imagine that the financial challenges
are going to be awesome and so I would like to }
appeal to those corporate citizens who have not }
had an opportunity and would like to be a part of i
this venture, to just make themselves available for :

us,” he said.

Hollingsworth said they have been pleased to
note that over the past six months, they have been }
able to put in a place a steering committee to deal }
with the formation of the NPAAA, headed by Ray }

Hepburn and the Masters Track and Field Pro- : batting practice before playing against the San Francisco Giants in a baseball

game in San Francisco. Ramirez has been suspended for 50 games by Major

gramme, headed by Foster Dorsett.

More details of the newly formed NPAAA anda

Back his second appearance in the meet, Munrose
said his aim is to delight the Haitian following in the }
Bahamas and eventually surpass the World Champi- }





m@ BASEBALL
LOS ANGELES
Associated Press

MANNY Ramirez joined a
growing lineup of All-Stars
linked to drugs Thursday, with
the dreadlocked slugger ban-
ished for 50 games by a sport
that cannot shake free from
scandal.

The Los Angeles Dodgers
outfielder was suspended by
Major League Baseball for a
drug violation, adding a further
stamp to what will forever be
known as the Steroids Era.

“It’s a dark day for baseball
and certainly for this organiza-
tion,” Dodgers general manager
Ned Colletti told reporters on
the field at Dodger Stadium.
“This organization will never
condone anything that isn’t
clean.”

Ramirez said he did not take
steroids and was given medica-
tion by a doctor that contained a
banned substance. A person
familiar with the details of the
suspension said Ramirez used
the female fertility drug HCG,
or human chorionic
gonadotropin. The person spoke
to The Associated Press on con-
dition of anonymity because the
banned substance wasn’t
announced.

“As tough as it is for us, it’s
pretty tough for Manny, too,”
Dodgers manager Joe Torre
said. “I know he’s the one that
did the wrong thing and nobody
is trying to cover that up, but
it’s still something that I know
he’s sorry about.”

HCG is popular among
steroid users because it can mit-
igate the side effects of ending a
cycle of the drugs. The body
may stop producing testosterone
when users go off steroids,
which can cause sperm counts
to decrease and testicles to

Jeff Chiu/AP Photo shrink.

Ramirez’s suspension was

IN THIS April 17, 2009 file photo, Los Angeles Dodgers’ Manny Ramirez during —- based not on a spring training

urine test result but rather evi-
dence obtained afterward, a sec-
ond person familiar with the sus-

dition of anonymity because
those details were not released.
MLB had concluded the spring
test was positive, but the per-
son said the players’ association
would have challenged the result
because of “testing issues.”

Ranked 17th on the career
home run list with 533, Ramirez
became the most prominent
baseball player to be penalized
for drugs. His ban came three
months after Alex Rodriguez
admitted using steroids, and at a
time when Barry Bonds is under
federal indictment and Roger
Clemens is being investigated
by a federal grand jury to deter-
mine whether he lied when he
told Congress he never used
steroids or human growth hor-
mone. And Miguel Tejada was
sentenced in March to one year
of probation after pleading
guilty in federal court to mis-
leading Congress about the use
of performance-enhancing
drugs.

No matter which way base-
ball turns, the legitimacy of
many of its recent home run and
pitching records is being ques-
tioned. Sluggers Mark McGwire
and Sammy Sosa have been
tainted by steroid allegations,
Rafael Palmeiro tested positive
for a banned drug and Jose
Canseco said he used them.

In every case, players once
believed to be locks for the Hall
of Fame may now be locked out.

“You can’t have arguably the
greatest pitcher of our era,
arguably the two greatest play-
ers of our era and now another
very, very good player be under
this cloud of suspicion and not
feel like it has ruined it for
everybody,” Atlanta star Chip-
per Jones said.

“But what are you going to
do? You can’t be born in a dif-
ferent era. It is the Steroid Era,”
he said.

Colletti and Torre said they
found out about Ramirez’s sus-
pension during an early morning
phone call from team owner
Frank McCourt. Both said they
were surprised and saddened at

projection on the BAAA’s National Open Cham- : League Baseball, becoming by far the highest-profile player ensnared in the
pionships will be published in Saturday’s edition. : Sport's drug scandals.

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THE TRIBUNE FRIDAY, MAY 8, 2009, PAGE 15
LOCAL NEWS

MINISTRY NAMES EMPLOYEE OF THE YEAR



LOUISE SIMMONS,
senior youth officer
in the Department
of Youth, was
named the Ministry
of Youth, Sports
and Culture’s
Employee of

the Year. Mrs Sim-
mons is pictured
with Minister of
Youth, Sports and
Culture Desmond
Bannister (left)

and Permanent
Secretary Archie
Nairn during a
ceremony last
weekend. Mrs
Simmons joined
the public service
in 1968.

Derek Smith/BIS




PAGE 16, FRIDAY, MAY 8, 2009

THE TRIBUNE







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He said: “I might say some of
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CLICO, and by the time we come
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Earlier this week Mr Fitzgerald
accused government of “washing
its hands” of any responsibility
for the CLICO debacle, which
left 23,000 Bahamian policyhold-
ers uncertain of their investments.

“At a minimum the govern-
ment owes the policyholders and
Bahamian people an explanation
of how this happened and the
assurance that they have taken
steps to ensure this will not hap-
pen again,” said the senator, who
has given notice of his intention to
call for the appointment of a sen-
ate select committee to further
probe the issue.

Mr Fitzgerald suggested that
Mr Ingraham’s brief statement of
his intention to speak further on
the issue seems to indicate “that
(the government has) come to the
realisation that the Bahamian
public expects them be more
forthright and transparent.”

“Tt is imperative and incum-
bent upon government to make
an announcement...to make peo-
ple feel more comfortable that
their concerns are being
addressed, and secondly that gov-
ernment will tighten up regula-
tions in law to make sure this
doesn’t happen again,” he said.

Men wanted for
questioning now
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Supt Emrick Seymour
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was wanted for questioning
in connection with a rape.

He said that Emealio Rus-
sell, who was wanted for
questioning over a fraud
matter, turned himself into
the police following the
release of an all points bul-
letin for his arrest on
Wednesday.

Also taken into custody
was Jamal Roberts, who was
wanted for questioning in
connection with an armed
robbery.

Supt Seymour thanked
members of the public for
their assistance. “We want to
thank the public for their
assistance and ask for their
continue cooperation in the
fight against crime.

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Central Bank:
MAleeyiel meCools

43.4% of GDP
at 08 year-end

Already past 40%
danger threshold,
with further increases
to follow from Budget
deficit, revenue
fall-off and 2009

GDP decline

m@ By NEIL HARTNELL

Tribune Business Editor

The Bahamas’ national debt
stood at 43.4 per cent of gross
domestic product at year-end
2008, the Central Bank of the
Bahamas has revealed, a
threshold well above the ‘dan-
ger’ 40 per cent level, with the
possibility existing that this
ratio could soon reach
between 45-50 per cent.

The Central Bank, in its
2008 annual report, said the
national debt increased by
$130 million or 4.1 per cent to
$3.2 billion at December 31,
2008, the latter figure equiva-
lent to 43.4 per cent of
Bahamian per annum gross
domestic product (GDP).

This compared to the year-
before ratio of 42.4 per cent,
which was already well above
the 40 per cent debt to GDP
ratio that is regarded as a
‘danger’ threshold by the likes
of the International Monetary
Fund (IMF), and credit rating
agencies such as Moody’s and
Standard & Poor’s (S&P).

Once this threshold is
breached, these agencies
become concerned about a
country’s ability to service its
debt, with the latter two possi-
bly contemplating a sovereign
credit rating downgrade.

This is something the
Bahamas would want to avoid
at all costs, as a downgrade
would leave it having to pay
more for any government bor-
rowing on the capital markets,
given that investors would
want higher interest rates to
compensate for the perceived
increased risk.

Unlikely

A credit rating downgrade is
unlikely to happen to the
Bahamas in the short-term,
and the 2008 increase in the
national debt was less than the
$182.8 million or 6.3 per cent
growth experienced in 2007.

“For calendar year 2008, the
direct charge on government
increased by $128.3 million or
4.9 per cent to $2.673 billion.
Bahamian dollar claims
accounted for 86.1 per cent of
the total, gaining $39.5 million
or 1.7 per cent to $2.379 bil-
lion,” the Central Bank said.

“By creditor composition,
the majority of Bahamian dol-
lar debt was held by private
and institutional investors (32
per cent); followed by public
corporations (30.3 per cent);
domestic banks (29.2 per
cent); and the Central Bank
(8.5 per cent).

Some $835.9 million of the
Bahamas’ national debt is
denominated in foreign cur-
rency, but here again, $405.3
million or 48.5 per cent of this
amount is held within this
nation by Bahamian investors.
This helps to reduce the lever-
age international financial
institutions could bring to bear
on the Bahamas, should it run
into difficulty repaying its
debts.

However, with the Govern-
ment’s 2008-2009 fiscal deficit
likely to come in close to 4 per
cent of GDP, and various bor-
rowings being undertaken to
finance infrastructure and cap-
ital works programmes, the
conditions are in place for a
further national debt increase
this year.

At the same time, Bahamian
GDP will fall due to the reces-
sion - the IMF predicting by as

SEE page 4B



THE TRIBUNE

usine

FRIDAY,

MAY 8,



2009

SECTION B « business@tribunemedia.net

‘Devastating’ power
fears among insurers

MH Insurance industry so concerned about administrator/appointment
powers that Supreme Court challenge likely if Bills not changed

I Government: some changes made
MW But Bill to introduce 3% annuities tax not tabled in House yesterday

@ By NEIL HARTNELL
Tribune Business Editor

The Government yesterday
told Tribune Business that
amendments had been made to
the initial Domestic Insurance
Act draft reforms, after the indus-
try warned that the proposals for
appointing an administrator - and
his powers - would have “a sti-
fling and devastating impact” on
affected firms and possibly
prompt them to appeal the issue
to the Supreme Court.

An April 27, 2009, letter sent to
Lennox McCartney, the Regis-
trar of Insurance, by the Bahamas
General Insurance Association
(BGIA), which was obtained by
this newspaper yesterday,
expressed the sector’s concerns
about the regulator’s ability to
appoint an administrator for a
troubled insurance carrier, and
the powers such a person would
have.

The BGIA letter said: “The
reasons for an appointment of an
administrator by the [Insurance]
Commission are extremely vague
and subjective.

“This provision as presently
drafted is too imprecise - it does-
n't provide insurance companies
with a definitive benchmark or
parameter for the appointment
of an administrator. The
approach should be a streamlined
objective, one whereby insurance
companies know for certain when
they have fallen afoul of govern-
ment regulations.”

The draft Domestic Insurance
Act reforms, a copy of which has
also been obtained by Tribune
Business, empowers the Insur-
ance Commission (the successor
to the Registrar of Insurance) to
appoint an administrator in cases
where insurers have failed or are
unlikely to meet their liabilities;
assets do not give sufficient pro-
tection to policyholders or are

Ex-minister disputes PM's
$130m BIC sale assertion

@ By NEIL HARTNELL
Tribune Business Editor

A former finance minister
yesterday disputed Prime Min-
ister Hubert Ingraham’s asser-
tion that the former Christie
administration had effectively
attempted to sell the Bahamas
Telecommunications Company
(BTC) for $130 million, telling
Tribune Business that in valuing
the firm for privatisation the
parties had to assess more than
just one balance sheet item.

Mr Ingraham, during the
debate on the raft of legislation
intended to revamp the
Bahamas’ communications reg-
ulatory regime, implied in the
House of Assembly that the net
worth of the agreement in prin-
ciple struck between the former
PLP government and Bluewater
Communications Holdings for
the sale of a 49 per cent BTC
stake was $130 million, rather
than $260 million.

The Prime Minister said this
was because at that date, BTC
held on its balance sheet some
$130 million in cash on hand at
the bank - an asset that would
have been transferred to Blue-
water upon the privatisation’s
completion.

This, he implied, could have
been used by the telecoms buy-
out group to effectively repay
50 per cent of the headline $260
million purchase price it had
paid the Government. This, Mr
Ingraham said, meant Bluewa-
ter would in reality have paid
$130 million for a 49 per cent
BTC stake - the same sum that
the Christie administration had
received four years earlier, and
rejected, from the Tom Bain-
led BahamaTel consortium.

This, though, was rejected by
James Smith, the minister of
state for finance who had
responsibility for BTC’s pri-
vatisation under the Christie
government.

Now CFAL chairman, Mr
Smith told Tribune Business
yesterday that any business -
not just BTC - could not be val-
ued on the basis of just one
asset, such as cash in hand or
at the bank.

Mr Smith pointed out that
apart from assets, both current
and non-current, whenever a
company was sold the buyer
also acquired all its liabilities as
per the acquisition date. This
meant that apart from its
accounts receivables, invento-
ries, investments, and property
and infrastructure, Bluewater
would also have acquired BTC’s

SEE page 5B

APTA Smith



FAMGUARD

less than liabilities; the compa-
ny’s assets and capital are eroding
drastically; and its business is
being conducted in a manner
detrimental to policyholders.

The BGIA’s concerns, as
expressed in its letter, also related
to the powers the administrator
would have.

The letter said: “The wide and
extensive powers granted to the
administrator will undoubtedly
have a stifling and devastating
impact on an insurance compa-
ny’s business reputation, and way
of doing business.

“Generally speaking, we find
this proposal intrusive and oner-
ous, and we therefore vehement-
ly oppose the inclusion of the
same in the manner herewith sug-
gested.

“Even more alarming is the
absence of the criteria for choos-

SEE page 2B

The information contained is from a third
party and The Tribune can not be held
responsible for errors and/or omission
from the daily report.



FAMILY GUARDIAN

INSURANCE COMPANY LIMITED



Real estate
ownership
‘integrity’

undermined

m@ By NEIL HARTNELL
Tribune Business Editor

A resort/real estate developer yesterday said the “integri-
ty” and security of private real estate ownership in the
Bahamas was being undermined by abuse of legislation
such as the Quieting Titles Act, with his project embroiled
in three alleged “land grab” cases.

Joerg Friese, director/partner of Long Island’s Stella
Maris Resort development, told Tribune Business that the
development was already involved in three potential land
battles, one of which had gone to court, that had been
invoked under the Quieting Titles Act and Squatters Rights
Act.

“We consider it absolutely unethical that anyone, except
perhaps generation land-owning Bahamian families, would
attempt to obtain real estate without applying proper meth-
ods, such as per purchase, lease, rent,” Mr Friese said.

“We are of the opinion that both the Quieting Titles and
the Squatters Rights Acts were intended to clarify/develop
certain ownership situations, being connected with genera-
tion land and such.

“Tt is a fact in the Bahamas that, in particular, the Quiet-
ing Titles Act is archaic and — today and for non-Bahami-
ans — unfair, inviting actions which were never intended by

SEE page 2B



Inner-city revival seeks
downtown project spin-offs

m@ By CHESTER ROBARDS
Business Reporter
crobards@tribunemedia.net

Will ‘insist’
downtown
efforts move ‘a
few feet beyond
Bay Street’ to
turn Bain and
Grants Town into

THE BAIN and Grants Town
revitalisation project will be solely
private sector driven, a senior coor-
dinator said yesterday, as it “insists”
that financing poured into down-
town Nassau’s redevelopment
move “a few feet beyond Bay
Street” to establish the inner-city as
another entertainment destination.

Rev CB Moss, speaking at the

Rotary Club of West Nassau’s
monthly meeting, gave assurances entertainment
that the project will move forward de stination

SEE page 5B

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PAGE 2B, FRIDAY, MAY 8, 2009

THE TRIBUNE



‘Devastating’ power fears among insurers

FROM page 1B

ing an administrator, in addition
to the clear absence of a concilia-
tory approach/procedure between
the Commission and the insur-
ance company in the first









































instance.

“We see no reason why you
should want to by-pass the court-
appointed Judicial Manager, and
if this proposed amendment
remains in the Bill, this Associa-
tion will be forced to appeal the
matter to the Supreme Court.”

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Timothy Ingraham, the
BGIA’s chairman, was out of
office when Tribune Business
called seeking comment. Howev-
er, Patrick Ward, Bahamas First’s
president and chief executive,
confirmed that the general insur-
ance industry’s prime concerns
over the amendments related to
the appointment of an adminis-
trator and his/her powers.

“There was no question that
the Association objected in fairly
strong terms to some of the pro-
visions, because we felt it went
too far in giving unfettered pow-
ers to the regulator and adminis-
trator,” Mr Ward told Tribune
Business.

Zhivargo Laing, minister of
state for finance, told this news-
paper that some of the Bahamian
insurance industry’s concerns had
been taken into account in rela-
tion to the Domestic Insurance
Act amendments, and changes
made. He did not specify, though,
what had been changed.

“The industry had no objec-
tions to most of the amendments
being proposed to the Domestic
Insurance Act,” Mr Laing said.
“They had a few things they
raised questions about, and we
considered them.

“The Bills are going to be
debated, fully debated [in Parlia-
ment]. Everything the industry
has pointed out and raised with
us, we considered. Some were
accepted, others were not accept-
ed.”

Concerns

Similarly, Lennox McCartney,
the Registrar of Insurance, told
Tribune Business: “We met with
the industry, and were able to lis-
ten to their concerns.

“They provided us with a writ-
ten response in the first instance,
and we were able to meet with
them to get some clarity as to
what their concerns were, and
explain ourselves to them face-
to-face, instead of written com-
munications.”

Apart from the Domestic
Insurance Act amendments,
changes to the Companies Act
and a new External Insurance
Act were also tabled in the House
of Assembly yesterday for a first
reading.

Many of the amendments to
the first two Acts have been
prompted by the CLICO
(Bahamas) collapse into liquida-
tion, Prime Minister Hubert

Ingraham acknowledging as much
yesterday, and hinting that the
Government may soon announce
plans to compensate policyhold-
ers/annuity depositors for their
investments.

Mr McCartney added: “Some
of it has to do with CLICO, and
to provide additional mechanisms
to deal with a situation like that.
That’s why some of those amend-
ments were proposed.”

Yet the Business Licence Act
amendments, which would have
seen the 3 per cent premium tax
on insurance policies extended to
annuities, was not tabled in the
House of Assembly yesterday.

“It wasn’t tabled. That’s all I
can say right now,” said Mr
McCartney, when asked if this
meant the annuity tax position
had been reversed.

Tribune Business revealed on
Monday that the Bahamian insur-
ance industry was opposing pro-
posed amendments to the Busi-
ness Licence Act that would
extend the three per cent premi-
um tax levied on all insurance
policies to annuities, on the
grounds that it would create a
“disincentive” to save and give
the banking industry an unfair
competitive advantage.

One source said at the time:
“Annuities are a very small frac-
tion of the overall financial indus-
try. The tax would act as a disin-
centive to save in an environment
where savings are most needed —
where 75 per cent of companies
don’t have an employee pension
plan, and personal savings habits
are so bad.

“Other countries offer incen-
tives to save. I don’t see why we
would want to go the other way.”

Tribune Business understands
that it is estimated that total
annuity deposits in the Bahamian
market are worth collectively
$150 million, a sum that is equiv-
alent to 3 per cent of the total
$5.6 billion deposits in the
nation’s commercial banking sys-
tem — highlighting their relative
insignificance, and the fact that
the Government would only gain
an extra $4.5 million in tax rev-
enues should the tax be imposed.

Several insurance industry
sources said it was unclear where
the idea to extend the 3 per cent
premium tax to annuities had
come from, but questioned why it
was being imposed on Bahami-
an-owned companies and not
banking deposits controlled,
largely, by foreign-owned banks.

OPEN iloncay Iam -4pinn °

Real estate ownership ‘integrity’ undermined

FROM page 1B

the definition of such law. It needs to be
changed.

“The results of such activities, especially
when undertaken by non-Bahamians, if suc-
cessful, will not only be in contrast to what
is considered fair and proper business, but
will greatly undermine the integrity of the
status of Bahamian real estate ownership,
be it Bahamian or foreign.”

Mr Friese explained that in one case, a
real estate owner at Stella Maris had told
the developers they wanted to acquire own-
ership of an adjacent lot under the Squatters
Rights Act, something they protested.

A title search revealed that the Stella
Maris developers still owned the lot in ques-
tion, and Mr Friese said the real estate buy-
er joined forces with another neighbour at
the development to negotiate its purchase.

The second neighbour took a first option
on the lot, meaning he would buy it if the
deal fell through.

Yet the original buyer “quietly”
embarked on a legal action to obtain the lot,

Sa

Re.

without any of the other parties knowing.

The Supreme Court threw out the action
on a technicality, but not before the Stella
Maris developers had incurred $70,000 in
legal costs. So far, the second neighbour
has been unable to complete a $95,000 pur-
chase of the lot despite paying a deposit, Mr
Friese estimating that its current value was
now $150,000.

“Either way, combined legal and con-
nected expenses came to or by far super-
seded the value of the property,” he added.

In a second episode, Mr Friese said
another property owner at Stella Maris had
attempted to acquire an adjoining lot via the
Quieting Titles Act.

“T, as a director of the Stella Maris Prop-
erty Owners Association, together with its
President, went to see them, very, very nice
people, with whom we had a very warm
and long-term relationship, in order to
make them aware of what they were about
to do, and what implications their actions
may result in, socially and otherwise,” Mr
Friese said.

“A very calm and neutrally-kept conver-

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sation ended with pleasant goodbye’s being
extended. This was followed, however, with
a police warning, directed to both the pres-
ident and to myself, advising us that we
were no longer accepted on their property.”

The developers’ attempts to locate the
$20,000 lot’s owners have so far proved
fruitless, and Mr Friese said no one else
could act on their behalf without authority.

Another Quieting Titles Act action, Mr
Friese said, had also been initiated by
another property owner - except this time
they were likely to be embroiled in a court
battle, as the lot in question was owned by
a prominent Nassau business family, one
of whose members was a Bahamian attor-
ney.

These episodes again suggest the need
for a major overhaul of the legal and regu-
latory framework governing Bahamian real
estate and property ownership, and the way
in which conveyancing deeds and land own-
ership are registered.

From an economic perspective, given the
relative scarcity of land in the Bahamas,
ownership is critical.

In the Photo starting from the front Row left with lady in the cream: Ebony Dorsett (Massage
and Skin Care Specialist), Shekera Forbes (Shampoo Assistant), Mekeisha Fernander (Massage
Therapist), Janet Joseph (Hair Stylist), Kenya Mortimer-McKenzie (Spa Director, Massage Therapist,

Skin Gare Specialist).

The Row in the back starting from left with lady in black and gold: Stacy Thompson-Demeritte

(Hair Stylist), Gertrude Roberts (Nail Technician), Kedra Bell (Front Desk Manager), Tara Chipman

(Nail Technician), Harmane Thompson (Hair Stylist), Missing from the photo: JeRome
Miller (Master Hairstylist), Sharon Thompson (Nail Technician) and Yolanda Contreras (Hair Stylist).

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Tuesday - Saturday Sam » Spm

a


THE TRIBUNE

FRIDAY, MAY 8, 2009, PAGE 3B





Work permit
application fall

m By CHESTER ROBARDS
Business Reporter

crobards@tribunemedia.net

THE BAHAMAS Immigra-
tion Department has seen a
decrease in work permit applica-
tions, its minister said yesterday,
although submissions for live-in
maids and handymen continue to
proliferate.

Branville McCartney told Tri-
bune Business that the Immigra-
tion Board, which processes per-
mit applications, attempts to meet
every Monday in order to deter-
mine how many would be given
to expatriate workers and how
many Bahamians are called to

fulfill requested positions.

However, he admitted that
some permit applications do “slip
through the cracks” when
Bahamian workers may be avail-
able. Mr McCartney lamented
that Bahamians are still shying
away from positions they consid-
er menial and degrading, which
have to be granted to foreigners
because of their disinterest.

“We still have some people
applying for live-in maids and
handymen, and many times
Bahamians who take those jobs
don’t work professionally on
those job,” he said.

“We have to look at the eco-
nomic times and do what is nec-

$1000 CASH
asl

for return of missing
17” Apple MAC laptop computer
and blue USB Hard Drive

stolen from green jeep
parked at Parliment and Bay Street

NO QUESTIONS ASKED

CALL 468-9789

essary to make ends meet. Cer-
tainly, if I have to be a house-
keeper or a handyman or sweep
the street, I'd be the best street
sweeper in the Bahamas.”

Minister of Labour Dion
Foulkes touted the recently-
implemented unemployment
assistance program for its ability
of modernize the Labour Depart-
ment’s database of unemployed
persons, and monitor areas where
labour is needed. The database
will also allow the ministry to
track, in tandem with its Skills
Bank, unemployed persons’ qual-
ifications and fields of expertise in
order to place them when
employment options become
available.

According to Mr McCartney,
the Department of Labour is
always present during Immigra-
tion Board meetings to assist with
the placement of expatriate work-
ers, and also examining what jobs
can be offered to Bahamian
labourers. “We don’t approve
anything unless we have a labour
certificate, so they go through the
process of determining whether
there is a Bahamian qualified and
suited for this job,” he said.

“Where they don’t have
Bahamians we grant the permit, if
everything else is in order.”

Mr McCartney also touted the
unemployment scheme, saying:
“It’s going to give us a better idea
of those persons who are out
there, their qualifications and who
is looking for work.”

Sharing sentiments with Mr
Foulkes, Mr McCartney said that
if the Labour Department is to
really be effective in helping the
Immigration Board, persons must
be actively pursuing a job and use
the resources provided by each
department.

BID for downtown Nassau continuity

m@ By CHESTER ROBARDS
Business Reporter
crobards@tirbunemedia.net

THE DOWNTOWN Nassau
Partnership (DNP) is seeking to
create draft legislation and a busi-
ness plan that will give way to the
development of a Business
Improvement District (BID) in
the capital, ensuring the project’s
continuity should there be a
change of government, the direc-
tor-general of tourism has said.

Speaking at the DNP’s first
town meeting, Vernice Walkine
said the legislation will legally
empower the BID - when created
- to seamlessly carry on the
improvements and maintenance
to downtown Nassau and Bay
Street, even in the event of a
change in government.

“Part of what will eliminate
that particular problem or con-
cern would be the legislation we
are talking about,” she said.

“This [revitalisation project] is
intended to be enshrined in legis-
lation so that we have the legal
authority to create the city that
we are talking about. We have
the mechanism legally to do those
things that will give us the out-
come that we’re seeking.”

According to the DNP’s man-
aging director, Vaughn Roberts,
the draft legislation and business
plan for the BID will be created
simultaneously, with a tentative
end-of-summer deadline for the
business plan. The draft legisla-
tion could take a bit longer and
would then have to go to Cabinet
for approval.

BID consultant Dave Feehan
said this kind of organisational
authority is crucial to the success
of a city, and makes downtown
districts more competitive in their
region.

According to him, there are
over 1,000 BIDs in the US alone
and hundreds others throughout
the world.

Mr Feehan and a colleague are
assisting the DNP in creating
draft legislation that will allow

the city of Nassau to create an
autonomous entity charged with
managing its affairs.

Meanwhile, the interim DNP
will submit proposals to cCabi-
net and create short-term pro-
jects that will show visible
improvements to the city until the
BID, a single management mech-
anism, comes to fruition.

The DNP will also have to pre-
sent detailed master plans to Cab-
inet for the Bay Street Improve-
ments and its Phase 1 pedestri-
anisation of Woodes Rodgers
Wharf, which will be included in
the draft legislation and initial
business plan.

Some improvements have
already begun to the city, includ-
ing the $13 million renovation of
the Moses Plaza, according to Mr
Roberts. The extensive clean-up
and superficial renovations of
many downtown areas will begin
to take place almost immediately.

It has been suggested that the

removal of the shipping facilities
from downtown area will enable
the revitalisation to begin in
earnest. All plans call for the con-
tainer port to be moved to the
area west of Arawak Cay, where
a man-made island has been pro-
posed to accommodate it.

However, the Government has
been quiet about the deal and is
said to have placed a virtual gag
order on all investors related to
the relocation of the port.

Some suggest that it is because
the port will be going back into
the hands of those that once oper-
ated there when it was known as
Kelly Island. And there are some
who see that return as a regres-
sion in this country’s economic
expansion and dispersion of prop-
erty and wealth.

The town meeting revealed
that the container port will in be
moved to Arawak cay as an inte-
gral part of the Downtown revi-
talization.

FOR RENT

Fully furnished town house in private area on
eastern road, one minute from beach, 2 bed-

rooms, 1 1/2 baths, washroom, large kitchen,
burglar bars, A/C & C/A asking $1,050 per month,
$50 discount per month towards utilities, serious

enquires only please, 323-4396



SN
vo
NAD

Nassau Airport
Development Company

C-112 Warehouse

NOTICE

The Department of Statistics will carry out its
Annual Household survey during the period of
May. Enumerators with offical identification cards
from the Department of Statistics will visit selected
household in New Providence, Grand Bahama,
Exuma and Long Island and will be calling upon
residents to complete the questionnaires honestly
and accurately. The information obtained will be
handled in the strictest confidence and will be used
to maintain essential statical data on our country.”

NOTICE

RIME PORTFOLIO INC.

Notice is hereby given that in accordance with Section
137 (8) of the International Business Companies Act,
2000, RIME PORTFOLIO INC.,, has been dissolved
and struck off the Register according to the Certificate
of Dissolution issued by the Registrar General on the
24" of April, A.D., 2008.

Dated the 7" day of May A.D., 2009

A.J.K. Corporate Services (Bahamas) Limited
Liquidator

NOTICE

MAERSK BAHAMAS LTD.



Great Investment Opportunity

An Entrepreneur/Operations Specialist is in search
of Venture Capital to invest in a new but promising
business. Partnership opportunity is available. The
business requires a sizable sum of money for startup;
however the projected profits are reasonable and can
only get better despite the economy.

For more information forward a profile of yourself along
with contact information to businessopportunity@liv
e.com only trustworthy and proficient persons need
Te ee

NOTICE
ECUALACT CORP.

Tn Voluntary Liquidation

Notice is hereby given that in accordance
with Section 138(4) of the International Business Companies
Act. 2000, ECUALACT CORP. is in dissolution as of April
27, 2009.

Diego Fernando Coellar Neira situated at
Fray Reinaldo Arizaga 2-73, Cuenca, Ecuador is the
Liquidator.

LIQUIDATOR

An established bakery is looking for:

Cashier

Qualities

You must be young and energetic with an exciting and vivid
personality. You should be an ordered and disciplined person
accustomed to following a routine. You should appreciate
clean and neat surroundings. Excellence, not average, should
be your measure. Your enthusiasm should be contagious.

Neasau Ainpon Development Campany (NAD) 8 pleased to
announce the release of Tender C-112 Warehouge for Stage
tof tha Lynden Finding International Aiport Expansion
Tha Scape of Work inchuches:
‘Detailed design, supply, and installation of a pre-
manutaciured metal warehouse Guiding with
aporcximate dimension of FO tts 175 ft
-Crvil works inducing sft fil, grading, compaction
foundations and slab on grade designed to sul
prerrarulachured medal warehouse building
“Ubihy works inducing sanitary, power
communication and water service:
-Formal suimission to the Ministry of Works to finalize
building peamnit and liasing with Bahamas Blactnic
Campany lor (AMT St Vie

The C-112 Warehouse Tender Documents wil be available
for pick up or electronic distnbution ater 3:00pm, Aypril
16th, 2009

Contact: TRAD BRISBY

Contracts and Procurement Manager

Phe: (a2 PO DBS | Freee: (2p STFS
P.O Box AP 59770 Nassau, Bahamas
Exrreail: breve borvesh piftiras Joes



STERLING

* PERSUASIVE
* PERSISTENT
* PROFESSIONAL





NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that at an Extraordinary
General Meeting of the Shareholder of the above-named
Company duly convened and held on the 26" day of
February 2009 the following resolutions were passed:

Your ethics should be impeccable, and you should possess an
obsession for doing what is right. You must be responsible. You
must be self-assured. Your attitude should not be malodorous.
Above all you must be able to resist the urge to steal.

RESOLVED that MAERSK BAHAMAS LTD.

be wound up voluntarily. Qualifications

¢ Must be familiar with Quickbooks Point of Sales System
« EXPERIENCED
¢ Proven selling skills

RESOLVED that INTERNATIONAL
LIQUIDATOR SERVICES INC. be appointed the
Liquidator for the purpose of winding up.

nology

HS ta

Dated the 12% day of March 2009. A doctorate degree while not mandatory would be a plus!!
Only person fitting these descriptions need apply. Persons
pretending to fit these qualities only to get the job will be
promptly fired upon the exposure of their true colors. Please
call 4369203

MMG BAHAMAS LTD.
Registered Office

For the above-named Company ——

Decthionsltd.com

ieee Ba LCT
Webiwww, sterling

































Legal Notice

NOTICE
TAMARIND VALLEY INC.

— 4 —
Notice is hereby given that in accordance with Section 138
(8) of the International Business Companies Act 2000, the
dissolution of TAMARIND VALLEY INC. has been com-
pleted; a Certificate of Dissolution has been issued and the

Company has therefore been struck off the Register.

ARGOSA CORP. INC.
(Liquidator)

ee Ra
ane
NAD

Nassau Airport
Developmont Company

C-120 Airside Civil and
C-130 Landside Civil, Stage 1

Nassay Arpon Develooment Company (MAD) 6 pleased io
announce fhe peleaee of Tender C2120 Airside Civil and
(-130 Lamdside Cal for Stage 1 of the Lynden Pindling
infemational Airport Expansion. WALD) intends to enter inio
one contract for the cam pletion of hese wark packages, The
Scone of Work includes

-Signiicant sarthmoving, drainage and utility works

bolh arse ard landside'

“Roadway, parking lotand apron conatructon

aceeding $0, 000 tons. of asphalt paving

Signage and lohting for roadways, parking lals

apron and taxiways; and

-Instalation of hard and sof lancsida landscaping and

Imiganan
The 0-120 Airside Civil and -130 Landside Civ, Stage 7
Terminal Expansion Project Tender Documents will be
availshle for pick up of electronic disinbutien afer
2:00pm, April 16th, 2009. 4 bidders mesting wil
be hed at 1:00am, Tuesday April 26th,
2008. Please contact Traci Bneby to register at the MAD
Project Office

Contact TRAD BREE

Gontracts and Procurement anager

Phe (242) P0206 | Fam: (242) 77-2117
PO Goo AP G9 Massa, Bahamas
Enrad: traci brebyiiines b=

Ministry of Public Works
and Transport

PUBLIC NOTICE

TENDER FOR FENCING AT THE MINISTRY OF WORKS
AND TRANSPORT COMPOUND NASSAU, BAHAMAS

The Government of the Bahamas, through
the Ministry of Works and Transport is inviting
Tenders from fencing contractors to carry out
repairs and installation of chain link fencing.

Schedule for Tender Opening
Companies interested in tendering may attend
a Pre-Tender meeting at the Ministry of Works
Conference Room at 10:00 am, May 8, 2009
and followed by a site visit.

All tender bids should include the following:
¢« Complete Tender Document .
* Copy of current Business License .
¢ National Insurance board letter of good

standing
Tenders must be submitted
envelopes marked:

“Tender for Fencing at the Ministry of

Public Works and Transport”
and delivered to:

in sealed

Chairman Tenders Board
Ministry of Finance
3rd Floor Reception Desk
Cecil Wallace-Whitfield Centre
P.O. Box N-3017,
Cable Beach, West Bay Street
Nassau, Bahamas

All Tenders must be received at the above
address on or before 10:00 am Tuesday,
19th May 2009. All persons who submit bids
are invited to attend the opening of Tenders
at the Ministry of Finance, 3rd Floor, Cecil
Wallace-Whitfield Centre, Cable Beach, West
Bay Street, Nassau, Bahamas at 10:00 am,
on Tuesday, 19th May, 2009 The Ministry of
Public Works and Transport reserves the right
to reject any or all Tenders.

PAGE 4B, FRIDAY, MAY 8, 2009

THE TRIBUNE



Central Bank: National debt
43.4% of GDP at ’08 year-end

FROM page 1B

much as 4.5 per cent, S&P 2 per
cent - meaning that the debt-
to-GDP ratio will further
increase due to the latter fig-
ure’s contraction.

The Government is borrow-
ing $200 million to help finance
projects such as the Nassau har-
bour dredging and downtown
improvement; a further $100
million is coming for the New
Providence Road Improvement
Project; and $140 million is
being advanced by the People’s
Republic of China.

All this will add further to the
national debt, possibly taking it
- by Tribune Business calcula-
tions - to around 48 per cent of
GDP by year-end.

The Government will point
out that the Bahamas’ debt-to-
GDP ratio is far better than
most of its Caribbean and cred-
it rating peers, and that it has no
problem servicing its debt - the

key measurement. Yet, if the
credit rating agencies do not see
an improvement in the
Bahamas’ fiscal position once
it comes out of recession, they
may dictate policy changes to
the Government in return for
avoiding a credit rating down-
grade.

That, of course, could prompt
cuts in the Government’s social
programmes and spending.

Weakness

The weakness of the Gov-
ernment’s fiscal position is clear,
given that its Budget deficit
“almost doubled” to $173.4 mil-
lion for the first eight months
of 2008-2009, largely due to a
10 per cent drop in import-relat-
ed tax revenues.

Elsewhere, the Central Bank
projected that the Bahamian
economy had suffered a “mod-
erate contraction” in 20089
GDP, meaning that the econo-
my did indeed slip into reces-

sion. This was most evident in
commercial bank credit quali-
ty.
The Central Bank’s annual
report said the “most significant
deterioration” in bank credit
quality was seen in the mort-
gage market, where total loans
in arrears “rose by more than a
third” to $364 million.

This meant that mortgage
loans in arrears accounted for
13.2 per cent of such loans, a
2.8 per cent increase upon the
previous year.



The value of
commercial/business loans in
arrears rose from $94 million at
year-end 2007 to $161 million
as at end-December 2008, cre-
ating an arrears rate of 15.5 per
cent, as opposed to 9.3 per cent.

Consumer loan arrears,
meanwhile, increased by 39.6
per cent to $240 million.

The latter figure represented
10.8 per cent of this portfolio
as at end-December 2008, com-
pared to the previous year.

Legal Notice

NOTICE
ADDED WEALTH INC.

(In Voluntary Liquidation)

NOTICE

NOTICE is hereby given that YYVENA JOSEPH of FAITH AVE.,
NASSAU, BAHAMAS, is applying to the Minister responsible
for Nationality and Citizenship, for registration/naturalization
as a citizen of The Bahamas, and that any person who knows
any reason why registration/naturalization should not be
granted, should send a written and signed statement of the facts
within twenty-eight days from the 18’ day of May, 2009 to the
Minister responsible for nationality and Citizenship, P.O. Box
N-7147, Nassau, Bahamas.

NOTICE

NOTICE is hereby given that KERLINE ESTIME of
BAHAMA AVE., BLUE HILL ROAD, PO. BOX N-
4922, NASSAU, BAHAMAS is applying to the Minister
responsible for Nationality and Citizenship, for registration/
naturalization as a citizen of The Bahamas, and that
any person who knows any reason why registration/
naturalization should not be granted, should send a
written and signed statement of the facts within twenty-
eight days from the 8 day of May, 2009 to the Minister
responsible for nationality and Citizenship, P.O. Box
N-7147, Nassau, Bahamas.

NOTICE

NOTICE is hereby given that FREDLEANE DELVA of
GOVERNOR’S HARBOUR, ELEUTHERA, BAHAMAS is applying
to the Minister responsible for Nationality and Citizenship, for
registration/naturalization as a citizen of The Bahamas, and that
any person who knows any reason why registration/naturalization
should not be granted, should send a written and signed statement
of the facts within twenty-eight days from the 8â„¢ day of May, 2009
to the Minister responsible for nationality and Citizenship, PO. Box
N-7147, Nassau, Bahamas.

Legal Notice

NOTICE
TUZ GRANGES INC.

(In Voluntary Liquidation)

Notice is hereby given that the above-named
Company is in dissolution, which commenced
on the 6th day of May 2009. The Liquidator is
Argosa Corp. Inc., P.O. Box N-7757 Nassau,

Bahamas.

ARGOSA CORP. INC.
(Liquidator)

Legal Notice

NOTICE
LOILOIL CO. LTD.

—_— f}—

Notice is hereby given that in accordance with Section 138
(8) of the International Business Companies Act 2000, the
dissolution of LOILOIL CO. LTD. has been completed;
a Certificate of Dissolution has been issued and the Com-

pany has therefore been struck off the Register.

ARGOSA CORP. INC.
(Liquidator)

Notice is hereby given that the above-named
Company is in dissolution, which commenced
on the 6th day of May 2009. The Liquidator is
Argosa Corp. Inc., P.O. Box N-7757 Nassau,

Bahamas.

ARGOSA CORP. INC.
(Liquidator)

Legal Notice

NOTICE
SULMONA LASCO LIMITED

a ‘, oe
Notice is hereby given that in accordance with Section 138
(8) of the International Business Companies Act 2000, the
dissolution of SULMONA LASCO LIMITED has been
completed; a Certificate of Dissolution has been issued and

the Company has therefore been struck off the Register.

ARGOSA CORP. INC.
(Liquidator)

Legal Notice

NOTICE
SOLAR GALAXIES INC.

(In Voluntary Liquidation)

Notice is hereby given that the above-named
Company is in dissolution, which commenced
on the 6th day of May 2009. The Liquidator is
Argosa Corp. Inc., P.O. Box N-7757 Nassau,

Bahamas.

ARGOSA CORP. INC.
(Liquidator)

Legal Notice

NOTICE
BORISON INC.

(In Voluntary Liquidation)

Notice is hereby given that the above-named
Company is in dissolution, which commenced
on the 6th day of May 2009. The Liquidator is
Argosa Corp. Inc., P.O. Box N-7757 Nassau,

Bahamas.

ARGOSA CORP. INC.
(Liquidator)
THE TRIBUNE

FRIDAY, MAY 8, 2009, PAGE 5B



EX-minister disputes PM's $130m BIC sale assertion



FROM page 1B

“You can’t look
at one item on
the balance
sheet, like cash,

liabilities - its accounts payables,
security deposits, loans owed
and deferred incomes.

BTC’s 2006 annual report,
the last one available, shows
that while the 100 per cent

state-owned telecoms operator without looking
had $213.849 million in current

assets, including $128.501 mil. at the other

lion in cash on hand and at the liabilities.”

bank, it also had $139.105 mil-
lion in current liabilities.

As a result, Mr Smith said it
was impossible to determine the
true value, or net worth, of BTC
by looking at just one balance
sheet item as Mr Ingraham had
implied. The normal valuation
methods used were to look at

Inner-city revival seeks downtown project spin-offs

FROM page 1B

without the Government’s
intervention, even though it was
hoped it could give as much
support as necessary.

Rev Moss said a Bain and
Grants Town Association had
been established to drive the
project forward alongside pri-
vate investors to ensure its suc-
cess.

He added that most revitali-
sation projects started in those
inner-city areas had failed. The
Government’s past efforts,
which included the removal of
derelict vehicles and imple-
mentation of less-than-ambi-
tious social and community pro-
grammes, had been wholly
unsuccessful.

However, as the Downtown
Nassau revitalisation project
finds its legs, Rev Moss said
Bain and Grants Town will take
advantage of that momentum.





James Smith

cash flow, book value, or cash
flow discounted for present val-
ue and multiplied by future
earnings.

“This downtown redevelop-
ment project; we (Bain and
Grants Town) will be a part of
that. We’re tired of the Gov-
ernment, through the Ministry
of Tourism every few years,
pouring tons and tons of money
into the refurbishment of Bay
Street, but nothing a few feet
beyond, and we insist that that
will change,” Rev Moss said.

The termed ‘Over the Hill’
revitalisation project will have
the Ministry of Tourism on
board to assist the area in
becoming a tourist attraction
through arranged tours, said
Rev Moss. “The ministry has
agreed to train tour guides,” he
said.

The project hopes to make
Bain and Grants Town another
entertainment district, with
hotels and restaurants incorpo-
rated into the revitalisation
scheme.

Advocating the ‘Over the
Hill’ project, Freddie Munnings

Legal Notice

NOTICE
NORTHCOASTAL SHORES LTD.

(In Voluntary Liquidation)












Notice is hereby given that the above-named
Company is in dissolution, which commenced
on the 16th day of April 2009. The Liquidator is
Argosa Corp. Inc., P.O. Box N-7757 Nassau,











Bahamas.

ARGOSA CORP. INC.
(Liquidator)

Legal Notice

NOTICE
EOLO GROUP LTD.

— #,—

Notice is hereby given that in accordance with Section 138

(8) of the International Business Companies Act 2000, the
dissolution of EOLO GROUP LTD. has been completed;

a Certificate of Dissolution has been issued and the Com-

pany has therefore been struck off the Register.

ARGOSA CORP. INC.
(Liquidator)

Legal Notice

NOTICE
OESTORPHIO INC.

— f}—

Notice is hereby given that in accordance with Section 138

(8) of the International Business Companies Act 2000, the
dissolution of OESTORPHIO INC. has been completed;

a Certificate of Dissolution has been issued and the Com-

pany has therefore been struck off the Register.

ARGOSA CORP. INC.
(Liquidator)

“You can’t look at one item
on the balance sheet, like cash,
without looking at the other lia-
bilities,” Mr Smith told Tribune
Business. “The book value, the
net worth, is the difference
between the two and that,
together with the other method-
ologies, is the most appropriate
mechanism for valuing BTC.”

In response to Mr Ingraham
yesterday, former prime minis-
ter Perry Christie said that the
deal his administration had
secured with Bluewater includ-
ed a “provision” to deal with
the substantial cash build-up on
BTC’s balance sheet.

However, the Prime Minister
attacked the Bluewater deal’s
terms, accusing the former

Jr. said entertainment must be
an integral part of the revital-
ization of any area. He added
that entertainment drives
tourism, and was the allure to
attract visitors.

Mr Munnings suggested that
the Government should give
every Bahamian working
towards the revitalization of
their area the same investment
incentives that downtown mer-
chants and foreign investors are
receiving.

He said it was the unique
Bahamian experience that will
keep visitors coming back to an
area.

And that is precisely what
Rev Moss said Bain and Grants
Town would mean to the
tourism product after the revi-
talization is complete.

“Hotels and restaurants will
be popping up all over Bain and
Grants town,” he said. “Enter-
tainment will be the order of
the day.”

Paramount to the changes in
infrastructure and aesthetics in
those areas will be a change in
the attitudes and culture of the
people who reside there.

“There has to be, first of all,
that psychological change in the
residents. They will do the rest.
They will take care of the phys-
ical and infrastructural changes
that are necessary, but they
must have that mindset change,
and that’s what we’re working
on,” said Rev Moss

He added that they have
already begun to attract resi-
dents into social development
programmes, such as free Span-
ish classes, and are beginning
to implement a project called
Y13 (2013), which will teach

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administration of seeking to pri-
vatise BTC “on credit”, with
the then-government “trusting
the balance” to Bluewater.

He accused the former gov-
ernment of “seeking to con-
clude frantically, three days
before the election, on the 27th
or 28th of April, 2007, behind

ed after the Ingraham adminis-
tration took office. Bluewater
has now invoked arbitration
proceedings in the UK against
the Government.

Mr Christie, though, defend-
ed his government by saying
that the Bluewater transaction
was “a good deal for BTC at

the time... When we looked at
the offer we had, we thought
that the offer we had last, from
Bluewater, was a significant
improvement over the offer we
had the first time, and we
thought we acted prudently in
the circumstances”.

Air hooe
Adchorne

closed doors and without any
public announcement”, the pri-
vatisation with Bluewater.

The deal struck then involved
Bluewater paying $225 million
for its 49 per cent stake up-
front, with a further $30 million
payable five years after the pri-
vatisation completion, and $5
million in year six.

The agreement in principle,
though, was never consummat-

NOTICE

International Business Companies Act
(No. 46 of 2000)

NESLIN LTD

Registration Number 147357B

Pursuant to the provision of Section 138 (8) of the
International Business Companies Act, 2000 notice
is hereby given that NESLIN LTD. has been dis-
solved and has been struck off the Register of Com-
panies with effect from the 20th day of April, 2009.

adults rudimentary computer
skills.

These projects, said Rev
Moss, will help the community
to understand the revitalisation
effort and allow them to feel a
part of its existence.

“We will use that new-found [
sense of pride and dignity to ee al se
motivate them, to fuel them for- rf
ward into what we are planning
to do,” he said.

G50 Corporate Services Ltd, ~
Liquidator



THE COLLEGE OF THE BAHAMAS

Visit our website at www.cob.edu.bs

CENTRE FOR CONTINUING EDUCATION &
EXTENSION SERVICES

COMPUTER COURSES SUMMER 022009
50+ and/or RETIREES

pC | COURSE DESCRIPTORS
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COMPLE § | Ol IN TROD Td) CRS T
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INTRODUCTION To THE

INTERNET

1 HLA MLD

S21HI

| S70, Med UPA | £3iMi

COMPO | Gy

ENQUIRIES: Contact tha Co-ordinator ai Tal (242) J25-57
or email amuryitooh edu, ba

14) (242) RABAD0SS f 28-1096 | 0F-4SO0 ext, S22

All fees are included with the excepdion of the application fee of 240,00 fone tiene |

CEES reer fer nfl in chaege Tuto, Fees, Cowes Content, Course Sched ard! Couree Worterxals



Airborne Freight
& Cargo Services

Claustoms Air Freight Building, “458
Massau, Rahamas
Phone: 242.37 7.04502
Pax: 242.43 7 7.0451
47643048; 242

9454.24 S804 (Vibe)

Clell: 242 135.0092
3 LO.o00
3 15.6)

$ 45.00

123295 2-04 SWS og 2nd Awenwe (Lejume Ecil.>
Nlisami, FL 4230044

Phone 40S GAS BSS

Pachagss SObo DOO Es Adrbome: 3 OOK) RIT ORS 48S44

Airtonne's Rabe perib S&S SH)

Fax: 205. 085 55-4

Cell: 954.394.2204

FG CAPITAL MARKETS
BROKERAGE & ADVISORY SERVICES

Cah 1

ROYAL = FIDELITY

Money at Work
Lr a “a Ts
BISxX LISTED & TRADED SECURITIES AS OF:
THURSDAY, 7 MAY 2009

BISX ALL SHARE INDEX: CLOSE 1,613.79 | CHG -0.13 | %CHG -0.01 | YTD -98.57 | YTD % -5.76

FINDEX: CLOSE 798.52 | YTD -4.35% | 2008 -12.31%

WWW .BISXBAHAMAS.COM | TELEPHONE:242-323-2330 | FACSIMILE: 242-323-2320

52wk-Low
Abaco Markets

Bahamas Property Fund
Bank of Bahamas

Benchmark
Bahamas Waste
Fidelity Bank
Cable Bahamas
Colina Holdings

Commonwealth Bank (S1)
Consolidated Water BDRs

Doctor's Hospital
Famguard
Fince

FirstCaribbean Bank

Focol (S)

Focol Class B Preference
Freeport Concrete

ICD Utilities
J. S. Johnson

Premier Real Estate

Securit y

EPS $ Div $ P/E
0.127
0.992
0.244

-0.877
0.078
0.055
1.309
0.249
0.419
0.099
0.240
0.420
0.322
0.794
0.332

Previous Close Today's Close
1.40 1.40
11.00 11.00
6.95 6.95
0.63 0.63
3.15 3.15
2.37 2.37
11.75
2.83
6.17
2.48
1.86

Change Daily Vol.
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00

-0.12
0.00

11.75
2.83
6.17
2.60
1.86
7.76

11.00

10.40
5.14

7.76
11.00
10.40

5.14

0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
1.00
0.30
5.59
10.50
10.00

1.00
0.30
5.59
10.50
10.00

0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00

0.000
0.035
0.407
0.952
0.180

BISX LISTED DEBT SECURITIES - (Bonds trade on a Percentage Pricing bases)

1000.00
1000.00
1000.00
1000.00

52wk-Low

RND Holdings

ABDAB
RND Holdings

Fund Name
Colina Bond Fund
Colina MSI Preferred Fund
Colina Money Market Fund
Fidelity Bahamas G & I Fund

1.3041
2.9230
1.3883
3.1964
12.1564
100.0000
96.4070
1.0000
9.0950
1.0000
1.0000
1.0000

BISX ALL SHARE INDEX - 19 Dec 02 = 1,000.00
52Wk-Hi - Highest closing price in last 52 weeks
52wk-Low - Lowest closing price in last 52 weeks

Previous Close - Previous day's weighted price for daily volume
Today's Close - Current day's weighted price for daily volume

Change - Change in closing price from day to day
Daily Vol. - Number of total shares traded today

DIV $ - Dividends per share paid in the last 12 months
P/E - Closing price divided by the last 12 month earnings

(S) - 4-for-1 Stook Split - Effective Date 8/8/2007
(S1) - 3-for-1 Stock Split - Effective Date 7/11/2007

Fidelity Bank Note 17 (Series A) +
Fidelity Bank Note 22 (Series B) +
Fidelity Bank Note 13 (Series C) +
Fidelity Bank Note 15 (Series D) +

Symbol
Bahamas Supermarkets
Caribbean Crossings (Pref)

Fidelity Prime Income Fund

CFAL Global Bend Fund

CFAL Global Equity Fund

CFAL High Grade Bond Fund
Fidelity International Investment Fund
FG Financial Preferred Income Fund
FG Financial Growth Fund

FG Financial Diversified Fund

Symbol Last Sale Interest
FBB17 . . 7%
FBB22 0.00 Prime + 1.75%
FBB13 100.00 0.00 T%
FBB15 100.00 0.00 Prime + 1.75%
Fidelity Over-The-Counter Securities
Bid $ Ask $ Last Price
£.92 8.42 14.60
4.00 6.25 6.00
0.35 0.40 0.35
Colina Over-The-Counter Securities
30.13 31.59 29.00
0.45 0.55 0.55
BISX Listed Mutual Funds
NA Vv YTD% Last 12 Months
1.3664 0.95 4.77
2.8962 -1.49 3.35
1.4590 1.77 5.09
-5.59 -13.64
0.96 5.79
0.56 0.56
-3.59 -3.59
0.00 0.00
0.71 -12.76
1.0440 0.80 4.40
1.0364 0.33 3.64
1.0452 0.76 4.40
MARKET TERMS
YIELD - last 12 month dividends divided by closing price
Bid $ - Buying price of Colina and Fidelity
Ask $ - Selling price of Colina and fidelity
Last Price - Last traded over-the-counter price
Weekly Vol. - Trading volume of the prior week
EPS $ - Acompany’s reported earnings per share for the last 12 mths
NAY - Net Asset Value
N/M - Not Meaningful
FINDEX - The Fidelity Bahamas Stock Index. January 1, 1994 = 100

19 October 2017
19 October 2022
30 May 2013
29 May 2015

EPS $
-0.041
0.000
0.001

Div $
0.300
0.480
0.000

Weekly Vol. P/E

4.540
0.002

0.000
0.000
Div $ Yield %
28-Feb-09
31-Mar-09
11-May-09
31-Mar-09
28-Feb-09
31-Dec-08
31-Dec-08
31-Dec-O7
31-Mar-09
9-Feb-09
9-Feb-09
9-Feb-09

3.1964
12.7397
100.5606
96.4070
1.0000
9.1599

TO TRADE CALL: COLINA 242-502-7010 | ROYALFIDELITY 242-356-7764 | FG CAPITAL MARKETS 242-396-1000 | COLONIAL 242-502-7525


PAGE 8B, FRIDAY, MAY 8, 2009

DEVELOPMENT FOR SALE
MARINA & SEAFOOD PROCESSING PLANT
ALLIGATOR BAY, NORTH LONG ISLAND

Approx. 6 acres of Waterfront property with a 152 feet wide canal.
Property comprises three buildings:

Building A: Seafood Processing Plant include a reception area, an
office, three bathrooms, a receiving room, a dressing room,
a packing room, a storage room, a laboratory and a
processing room, (3) 10 ft x 30 ft blast freezers, and (1)
15ft x 15 ft and (1) 10 ft x15 ft holding freezers.

Building B: Generator House

Building C: The Water Plant consists of a reverse osmosis water
system that converts salt water into drinking water with

j

a 10,000 storage capacity.

Interested persons should submit offers to:

The Manager, Credit Risk Management, P. O. Box N-7518,
Nassau, Bahamas

To reach us on or before June 12, 2009

For further information, please contact us at
502-0929, 356-1685 or 356-1608

THE TRIBUNE

Treat yourself to lunch at Domi

Oweatlable Idanm—dperm Baily. Carry Out & Oelivery (rmmimmirourmn purchase for delivery $12.00}

CHECK OUT

|

STARTING

oa

$499

Get the Door. It’s Domino’s

9 Convenient Locations to Serve You

BODINE ‘BE JOHNSON HAS BEEW AN ENTER-
TAINER FOR AS LONG AS SHE CAN REMEMBER
having evolved from being a poet into a writer, tel
BWSION and radia producer and host, model, ac-
TESS, Casigner, Sookesecenan and
businesswoman.

The Bahamian bombshell 6 now one of The Ba-
Hamas Premiere recanding artists and parlormers
whose Stage mame, ‘Be' encompasses all aspects
of this multiialanted woman In 2007, she was
aligned te Fronfine Productions and BullBoo
Records and began work on her first tull ength
album

She has released Reggee songs, ‘Gotta Move
On’, ‘One’, ‘Good Lovin’ and ‘| Gon Ward you’
wrech have all been popular on local and interna-
liognal radio stations. and ‘iloxicated' a Soca re-
leasé ot British Virgin land's superstar Lincoln
Ward's One Might Riddim.

She has done school tows with Tamoo Televi-
sion and BTC as part of the Badness Outta Style
school Tour and Tampo Turns 3 celebrations

Since relassing her debut single ‘One’. on the
CopyGat Riddim Compikitien Album in 2007, Be
fas rebranded herself as a tamale music power.
nouse whose populanty condinues bo soread na-
thonmwide. Her each does end thar however
with har music being played in the Caribbean,
Florida, Mew ork and many other countries
veo richie

Her refesse ‘| Dor Wand You’ on ButiBeo
Recond’s Promise Riddim has been ranked
among the Top 40 by Captain Kirk of the
stutfieet Music Pool, listed among the Tap 50 cen
nats of the Masseoal DW Association, and has bees
dtenicadad a5 far as France, Germany, tha Nether-
ands, Canada, and South America while simultane-
ously hittieg the Top of the Bahamian Music Charts

An avid waiter, Bodine Victoria Johnson eeolved
from writing poems into a perlormance postand
Script writer dor formal and informal television =
shows.

She has co-produced and oo-directed tveo
Stage shows “Sirena’ and ‘“Adro-DZ-A0" which in-
duded acting, singing and dancing a& part al
Panache Productions



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