Citation
The Tribune

Material Information

Title:
The Tribune
Uniform Title:
Tribune (Nassau, Bahamas)
Portion of title:
Nassau tribune
Place of Publication:
Nassau, Bahamas
Publisher:
Tribune
Publication Date:
Copyright Date:
2009
Frequency:
Daily, except Sunday
daily
normalized irregular
Language:
English
Physical Description:
v. : ill. ; 58 cm.

Subjects

Genre:
newspaper ( sobekcm )
newspaper ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage:
Bahamas

Notes

General Note:
Description based on: Vol. 79, no. 210 (Aug. 3, 1983); title from caption.

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Holding Location:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
This item was contributed to the Digital Library of the Caribbean (dLOC) by the source institution listed in the metadata. This item may or may not be protected by copyright in the country where it was produced. Users of this work have responsibility for determining copyright status prior to reusing, publishing or reproducing this item for purposes other than what is allowed by applicable law, including any applicable international copyright treaty or fair use or fair dealing statutes, which dLOC partners have explicitly supported and endorsed. Any reuse of this item in excess of applicable copyright exceptions may require permission. dLOC would encourage users to contact the source institution directly or dloc@fiu.edu to request more information about copyright status or to provide additional information about the item.
Resource Identifier:
09994850 ( OCLC )

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Full Text
Get Your Cold
Coffee aha

HIGH 87F
SUNSHINE BAHAMAS EDITION

m Lhe Tribune
a a USA TODAY.
Katz
acrylics



Volume: 105 No.135

WEDNESDAY, MAY 6, 2009



eS
al
AND REAL a

PUES Te







aU a







m@ By ALISON LOWE
Tribune Staff Reporter
alowe@tribunemedia.net

POLICE are hunting a man
who has kidnapped and threat-
ened to kill a three-year-old
toddler.

Shannon Bannister was
asleep in the back of his moth-
er’s grey Nissan Bluebird when
a man known to police — 35-
year-old Kendrick Sifford, alias
Dog — allegedly stole the car
from outside her Lewis Street
home on Friday.

A former boyfriend of Shan-
non’s mother, Angie Moss, the
Nassau Village resident has
since evaded officers while
sending horrific text messages
to his distraught ex-girlfriend.

“Yeah bitch, I know you was
working for the po po (police).
Look harder, you will feel the
pain. His time running out. See
ya at the funeral,” said one mes-
sage, seen by The Tribune.

Yesterday, Ms Moss pleaded
with anyone who thinks they
might have seen Sifford or her
son to contact police.

“All I want is my little boy
back, that’s all I want. Nothing
else matters to me, just my

ABOVE: Police are hunting for
35-year-old Kendrick Sifford.

RIGHT: A tearful Angie Moss,
mother of Shannon Bannister,
speaks to The Tribune yesterday.

Ms Moss suggested her ex-
boyfriend may be trying to scare
her into dropping assault
charges she pursued against
him.

“The last time he beat me he
hit me in the head with a ham-
mer and tried to strangle me. I
have multiple charges against
him,” the mother said.

Meanwhile, describing the



/ SEE PAGE SEVEN

Kidnapper: re
Kill your baby

Text threats to mum



Tim Clarke/Tribune staff



Young woman
testifies she
had sex with
Bishop Fraser
12 times a month

@ By NATARIO
McKENZIE
Tribune Staff
Reporter

THE young woman,
who alleged she and
Bishop Earl “Randy”
Fraser had a sexual rela-
tionship four years ago,
testified yesterday that
she and the accused had
sex on an average of 12
times a month.

Prosecutors allege that
Fraser engaged in a sex-
ual relationship with a
dependent between July
2005 and February 20006.
During cross-examina-
tion by Fraser’s attorney
Wayne Munroe yester-
day, the virtual com-
plainant who was 16
years old at the time the
offences were allegedly
committed, said that she
and Fraser would have
sex three or four times a

SEE page six

Motorists detained
on outdated arrest
warrants call
for urgent action

m@ By ALISON LOWE

Tribune Staff Reporter
alowe@tribunemedia.net



FED-UP MOTORISTS
detained by police on outdated
arrest warrants are calling for
government to take urgent
action to fix an apparently dys-
functional warrant system.

Two New Providence resi-
dents who contacted The Tri-
bune separately in the last
month claim they were picked
up by officers on warrants
issued for traffic violations for

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NASSAU AND BAHAMA ISLANDS” LEADING NEWSPAPER



THE TRIBUNE



WEDNESDAY, MAY 6, 2009, PAGE 3

RIVER eR Cte

© In brief | Wheelchair-bound amputee
dies after being hit by car

M@ Victim, 42, waiting on side of Long Island road

DEU officers
arrest 17
over seizures
of firearms
and cocaine

DRUG Enforcement Unit
officers arrested 17 persons
in connection with separate
seizures of illegal firearms,
marijuana and cocaine
throughout the capital.

Asst Supt Walter Evans
reported that over the past
three days, DEU officers
conducted operation “Snatch
and Grab” throughout New
Providence.

During the special opera-
tion, officers seized one AK-
47 rifle; a .14 rifle; 20 live
rounds of .223 ammunition
and 15 live rounds of 7.62
ammunition; 10 ounces of
marijuana, and two grammes
of cocaine.

Police also seized more
than $2,400 in cash during
the search, Mr Evans said.

m@ By TANEKA THOMPSON
Tribune Staff Reporter
tthompson@tribunemedia. net

A wheelchair-bound amputee
died after he was struck by a car
while waiting on the side of the
road in Long Island on Mon-
day.

The 42-year-old victim, iden-
tified by family members as
Cabbage Point resident Lester
Pratt, was apparently waiting
for a friend to pick him up when
the incident occurred about half
a mile from where he lived, the
victim’s father, Rudolph Pratt,
said.

Police reported that the driver
of a Chevrolet Corsica was trav-
elling on Queens Highway in
the Berries — an area in south
Long Island — around 9pm on
Monday when a 42-year-old
man from Cabbage Point was
hit while sitting in a chair near
the road.

Mr Pratt was taken to the



“It’s too early
to say if it was
the result of
negligent
driving ...”



Stephen Adderley

local clinic where he died of his
injuries, Assistant Superinten-
dent Walter Evans said.
Speaking with The Tribune
from Long Island yesterday, the
victim’s father said: "(My son)
was probably down there visit-
ing people nearby, it's a bar
nearby, and a friend was sup-
posed to pick him up and he
heard a vehicle coming, but it
must have been the wrong car
and the car didn’t see him and

struck him.” Mr Pratt, who was
married with children and a cab-
inet maker by trade, had his
right arm amputated several
years ago, his father said.

Officer-in-charge of the Long
Island police station Assistant
Superintendent Stephen Adder-
ley said it is too early to tell if
speed, driver negligence or alco-
hol played a part in the acci-
dent.

"It's too early to say if it was
the result of negligent driving
— there are so many variables
to consider, like road lighting
and actions of the driver and the
victim,” said Mr Adderley.

Officers are canvassing the
area and are still interviewing
the driver to determine the
cause of the accident.

Police investigations contin-
ue.

Mr Pratt's death is the third
traffic fatality in Long Island for
the year.

Rethink plan to move container port, says PLP activist

m@ By PAUL G TURNQUEST
Tribune Staff Reporter

pturnquest@tribunemedia.net

DEMANDING that govern-
ment rethink its efforts to relo-
cate the container port to a pro-
posed man-made island off Saun-
ders Beach, PLP activist Paul
Moss called on all Bahamians to
make their voices heard and
protest the plan at all costs.

Holding a press conference at
Saunders Beach yesterday morn-
ing, Mr Moss, with attorney
Fayne Thompson, produced
copies of the report by the archi-
tectural and environment con-
sulting company EDAW.

EDAW was commissioned by
the previous government for half
a million dollars and, in its report,
suggested the
relocation of
the port to an
alternate site in
the southeast-
ern part of the
island.

Mr Moss
said the report
shows that the
development
of a man-made

island was the sixth best option,
coming in after the suggestion
that the port remain at its cur-
rent location.





“This is
Senos eee bate)
we will not
stand for it.”

The proposed
man-made island,
which is projected
to encompass some
72 acres, would be
connected to New Providence by
a bridge and would be located
directly across from Saunders
Beach, in between New Provi-

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dence and Shipwreck Island
(Long Cay).

Causeway

“They intend to build a cause-
way from the man-made exten-
sion over Saunders Beach to
West Bay Street,” Mr Moss said.

“This is wrong and we will not
stand for it. All over this country
beach access is being denied to
Bahamians. In fact, the proposed
site at Arawak Cay is the absolute
wrong site for the port. We have
a report done by EDAW which
states that Arawak Cay is the
sixth worst site out of seven pos-
sible sites for the container port.

“In fact, the present port is a
better location. The question then
is why are they (the government)
seeking to do something so illog-
ical? Well the answer maybe in
the minutes of a meeting held in
2007 and hosted by the (Deputy
Prime Minister) Brent Symon-
ette. It is of interest to note that
this beach was sold to the gov-
ernment by Mr Symonette in the
1990s for $1. Could it be that he
thinks he owns it?” Mr Moss
asked.

Providing copies of the min-
utes from this meeting along with
other documentation, Mr Moss
said it was obvious that the gov-
ernment was trying to “swing”
the Bahamian people “big time”
by suggesting that the relocation
of the port to the southwest was

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PLP ACTIVIST Paul Moss
pointing towards the
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man-made island which
could be the new site for
the container port.




too costly an idea. Claiming that
certain individuals are now “lick-
ing their lips” in anticipation of
their windfall profits from this
proposal, Mr Moss said that he
and his supporters will block
Saunders Beach and Arawak Cay
if they have to.

“No more can we allow our-
selves to get swing again. Enough
is enough and we put the govern-
ment on notice that they should
not seek to put this port at
Arawak Cay. We call on (envi-
ronmentalist) Sam Duncombe to
check this out and the Bahamas
National Trust to intervene. We
also call on the Bahamian peo-
ple to stand up and not allow this
to happen,” he said.

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implement tax treaties

THE Bahamas must quickly implement
tax treaties with the United States and the
European Union if it wants to avoid being
labelled a tax haven by the Obama adminis-
tration, political activist Paul Moss said yes-
terday.

During a brief press conference at Saun-
ders Beach, Mr Moss and attorney Fayne
Thompson pointed out that the Bahamas is
now a very transparent country.

“Gone are the days when the Bahamas
can make a living relying on persons who
would either have avoided taxes, evaded tax-
es, or simply come to the Bahamas because they do not want the
scrutiny,” Mr Moss said. He noted that the Bahamas is hoping to join
the World Trade Organisation and complete an Economic Part-
nership Agreement (EPA) with the European Union, and that
both these entities want the country to eliminate or substantially
reduce Customs duties — the government’s main source of revenue.

Services

“Well, if you are going to get rid of Custom duties, how then are
you going to feed the children, educate the children, and look after
the essential services that this country requires?” Mr Moss asked. He
said the only solution is for the Bahamas to implement an income tax
to replace Customs duties as the main source of revenue.

“Only when we do so will we see the Bahamas removed from this
gray list put forward by President Obama,” Mr Moss said.

On Monday, US President Barak Obama announced his admin-
istration’s plan to reform that nation’s tax policy and crackdown on
overseas “tax havens.”

Jurisdictions such as Bermuda and the Cayman Islands are home
to many large American companies and are projected to be the
countries most effected by this move by the United States.

However, local financial insiders fear that this policy could prove
a direct threat to the country’s second economic pillar — the finan-
cial services industry. According to the Associated Press, the pres-
ident’s plan would stop US companies from delaying tax payments
by keeping profits in foreign countries instead of declaring them at
home along with calling for increased transparency in American
bank accounts held in off-shore jurisdictions.

This reform would also prevent US companies from getting tax
deductions on profits earned overseas and essentially decrease
their desire to be established in these countries.

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PAGE 4, WEDNESDAY, MAY 6, 2009

EDITORIAL/LETTERS TO THE EDITOR

THE TRIBUNE





The Tribune Limited

NULLIUS ADDICTUS JURARE IN VERBA MAGISTRI
Being Bound to Swear to The Dogmas of No Master

LEON E. H. DUPUCH, Publisher/Editor 1903-1914

SIR ETIENNE DUPUCH, Kt, O.B.E., K.M., K.C.S.G.,

(Hon.) LL.D., D.Litt.

Publisher/Editor 1919-1972
Contributing Editor 1972-1991

EILEEN DUPUCH CARRON, C.M.G., M.S., B.A., LL.B.

Publisher/Editor 1972-

Published Daily Monday to Saturday

Shirley Street, RO. Box N-3207, Nassau, Bahamas
Insurance Management Building., P.O. F-485, Freeport, Grand Bahama

TELEPHONES
Switchboard (News, Circulation and Advertising) 322-1986
Advertising Manager - (242) 502-2352
Circulation Department - (242) 502-2387
Nassau Fax: - (242) 328-2398
Freeport, Grand Bahama: 1-(242)-352-6608
Freeport fax: (242) 352-9348

WEBSITE
www.tribune242.com — updated daily at 2pm

Crises that know no borders

A SHIVER went down the spine of the
world when it was discovered that an entire-
ly new breed of influenza, known neither to
man nor beast, was rampaging through Mex-
ico. In the time it takes a jet to propel pas-
sengers over vast oceans, the strain had
showed up in Canada, Spain, Israel, Hong
Kong, and a dozen other countries includ-
ing pristine and isolated New Zealand, where
indigenous Maoris have been advised to stop
rubbing noses as a traditional greeting. Epi-
demic was edging up to pandemic, warned the
World Health Organisation.

No one knows how species-jumping germs
will develop. As dry leaves quickly succumb
to fire, so do terrifying strains of Ebola tear
through a population, burning themselves
out. Other ills, such as AIDS, have been com-
pared to a fire in a coal mine, smouldering
slowly but steadily through the population,
perhaps for hundreds of years.

Influenza viruses sometimes become less
virulent in time. Others will become more
dangerous as they change and adjust to their
hosts. Respiratory illnesses can come from
wild ducks, tame chickens, and pigs, espe-
cially in populations where people live close
to their animals, infecting each other in end-
less cycles of mutation.

Epidemiologists, like Californians living
on the earthquake-prone St Andreas Fault,
are always worrying about “the big one,” a
repeat of the great pandemic of 1918, which
came in a shuddering first wave, only to sub-
side and come back with a tsunami of death in
its second wave.

Yet none want to over react, as they did in
1976 when a wave of immunization in the
United States proved far more deadly than
the flu it was intended to prevent.

Countries behave differently when con-
fronted with the shadow of a deadly disease.
Mexico, it would appear, has behaved well,
getting the word out quickly, virtually closing
down one of the world’s biggest cities for
five days to prevent the spread. China, when
faced with SARS a few years ago, first tried to
cover it up.

The Obama administration reacted with
caution. The president, who is emerging as
the great calm father-figure of the republic,
told us not to panic and to wash our hands.
Vice President Joe Biden, as is his wont,

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spoke out bluntly and said he would not want
to be in a crowded airplane, generating the
usual what-he-meant-to-say-was...

If there was a common consensus it was
that it’s too late to contain this new strain,
which seems able to jump from person to
person, to continent to continent, with ease.
Modern communications has put paid to any
hope of isolating it. What is needed now is to
mitigate the consequences and prepare to
handle the worst if the virus becomes more
dangerous while we seek a vaccine.

When you think about it, the same could be
said for all the major national-security dan-
gers we face today.

I heard a panel of distinguished national-
security elders at that temple of American sci-
ence, the Massachusetts Institute of Tech-
nology, that included former secretary of
defence Harold Brown and former national
security adviser Brent Scowcroft, among oth-
ers. They identified weapons of mass destruc-
tion and climate change as, perhaps, the two
most formidable challenges we face.

Yet the doings of Pakistan’s A.Q.Khan
have shown that nuclear weapon technology
can slip across national borders to pop up in
Pyonyang, Teheran, and Tripoli before the
world is aware. And the MIT panel ended
with the gloomy thought that the ultimate
problem that knows no frontiers, climate
change, cannot be reversed, and that the
world must now come to terms with adjusting
to it.

Terror, too, knows no borders. The dis-
content of Muslims, for example, cannot be
contained in the mountains of Afghanistan
and Pakistan. It spreads, with the help of
modern communications, into the farthest
reaches of the Indonesian Archipelago, to
the worn industrial towns of England, to
youths in America who sign up to fight in
far-away failed states.

Even the failed economy, which could not
be contained in the hot zones of Manhattan
and London, has mutated across the globe. In
today’s world, our greatest problems, and,
by necessity solutions, have become transna-
tional.

(This article was written by H.D.S. Green-
way of the Boston Globe- c. 2009 The Boston
Globe).



How can our
family survive on
$169 per week?

EDITOR, The Tribune.

I am writing to express my
disgust and discomfort with the
Government. I am a 40-year-
old woman who has been work-
ing for the Department of Envi-
ronmental health for the past
nine years and during this time
I have struggled and struggled
to survive for me and my chil-
dren, with my salary being that
of $169 per week.

For the past nine years I have
stood around without sound
hoping that the good Lord
would continue to give me
strength in this time of need and
without question I endeavour
to make ends meet, however,
I’m finding it more and more
difficult to do, with my two kids
to feed among other bills I am
not even being considered by
social services which I have
already tried...please tell me
how me and my children are to
continue in these hard times to
survive with $169 and if that’s
not bad enough after nine years
Tam still a weekly paid worker
who should have been a month-
ly paid worker and it’s really
hurtful to know that there are
many who have been here for
shorter periods of time and
have already gone monthly, it’s
just not fair. Something is terri-
bly wrong with this picture.

There are many of us who are
in this situation and who feel
the same way, what’s happening
with the government, is any-
body paying attention to us in

LETTERS

letters@tribunemedia net



the Environmental Health
Department, is anybody looking
out for us, we are considered
the lowest paid lowly looked at
workers though we work hard
on the roadsides every morn-
ing and through the day, where
is the minister, does he know
what’s going on?

As we, the workers intend to
do what we must to take care of
our families, we the workers are
yet stung with another blow, we
realise the government is try-
ing to assist with the clean up
effort by hiring more persons,
but yet we have come to realise
that those new persons that was
just recently hired is at this very
time being paid $210 per week.
This is ridiculous and unfair,
this is wrong to the hundreds
of others like myself who have
been there for so many years
and being paid $169 per week,
who do we need to talk to, this
is absolutely wrong and we the
workers are not happy, the gov-
ernment is slapping us in the
face, on top of this there were
some weekly persons who
recently as last week making
$169 just got an increase to
$210, but the sad thing about it
is that those who got the
increase spent far less years on
the job than others.

We, the workers, especially

myself, who have two kids and
can’t even obtain a decent bank
loan because my salary is too
small, have had enough, we
have been treated unfairly for
too too long, we can’t even get
the back pay that is due to us,
what are we suppose to do, how
are we suppose to live, we
would like to speak out, but we
don’t for fear of being fired and
so we are held hostage by are
own fears, we want to make a
stand and we will...we want fair
treatment and the money that’s
owed to us, the increase of
salary and or the back pay the
government is holding on, how
can newly hired persons that
have been on the job one week
make $210 when I have been
on the job nine years and make
$169, workers one week old get
paid more than a nine-year-old
worker when we are both doing
the same thing, it’s just not fair,
we want the government to act
in this matter immediately,
immediately so we can have this
issue resolved.

We have kids, and light bill
and water bill, some of our
homes don’t even have elec-
tricity, we can’t even afford to
maintain our children in school,
please tell me, sir, what must
we do, we only want to be treat-
ed fairly, somebody must want
to hear our cry and ease our
burden. Upsettingly.

DISGRUNTLE WORKERS
Nassau,
March 18, 2009.

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EDITOR, The Tribune.

Brewing scandal(s). Unconscionable delays at
the Passport Office and health clinics. The bot-
toming out of the economy. An escalating misery
index. Water shortages. Perpetually blinking traf-
fic lights that constitute more of a hazard than an
aid to motorists.

At this rate, by or before the 2012 general elec-
tion, the current administration may well have
topped the “wutlessness” of the previous, much-
maligned Perry Christie administration.

It’s nice that roughly $6 million is being spent
on milling, asphalting and paving West Bay Street
and a few other roads in New Providence by
Lamour Mechanical Trucking and Paving and
Bahamix, but in the “inner city” where the roads
are used by a far greater percentage of the tax-
paying population, couldn’t “a few dollars more”
be found to get the traffic lights working?

Being, however, an “eternal optimist” who
prefers to “eliminate the negative and latch on to
the affirmative,” while I have ‘pen in hand’ (actu-
ally it’s a computer mouse), I must commend the
Bahamas National Symphony Orchestra for pro-
viding an enchanting night of classical and more
contemporary music at the Kirk Hall on Saturday
last.

They certainly “spread joy up to the maxi-
mum” and brought “gloom down to the mini-

mum” with a number of classical pieces, in addi-
tion to a tribute to Louis “Satchmo” Armstrong
and excerpts from the Wizard of Oz and much,
much more.

Perhaps for those, myself included, who can’t
listen to the William Tell overture without think-
ing about the Lone Ranger, ‘instant culture’ and
enjoyment was the order of the day at this ancient
church building founded by fifty-five Scottish
Settlers in 1798.

With the entire highly accomplished ensemble
flawlessly conducted by and under the command
of Douglas Turnquest and Jennifer Hudson (No,
not that Jennifer Hudson), the young female
flutist and special guest on the Stradvarius violin
earned special applause. Hopefully without
sounding like a BNSO — sorry, make that SNOB
(a flash of dyslexia caused me to walk into a bra
the other day) — and unable to resist my inner
Simon Cowell, I must add that, although pre-
sented in a very pleasant voice and personable
manner — the intermittent commentary could, in
order to have better suited the occasion, reflect-
ed a ‘wee bit’ higher level of sophistication.

That said, kudos to all involved for an enjoy-
able, well-spent evening.

ARTHUR LEE
Nassau,
April, 2009.

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THE TRIBUNE

WEDNESDAY, MAY 6, 2009, PAGE 5



LOCAL NEWS

Downtown Nassau
Partnership to host
town hall meeting on
Pevitalisation tonight

THE DOWNTOWN
NASSAU PARTNER-
SHIP, the public-private
sector organisation
charged with steering the
revitalisation of historic
Nassau, will host its first
town meeting tonight at
the British Colonial
Hilton.

“We hope that every
stakeholder with an inter-
est in the transformation
of downtown Nassau will
become part of this move-
ment, asking questions,
sharing ideas and being
involved beginning with
this town meeting on
Wednesday,” said Vaughn
Roberts, DNP managing
director. “The meeting is
open to the public and we

plan to discuss the revitali-

sation efforts to date and
the plans to improve
downtown Nassau for the
benefit of residents and
visitors. We are also hon-
oured to have at the meet-
ing two very important

persons in the internation- ;

al downtown management

arena — Dave Feehan, past }

president of the Interna-

tional Downtown Associa-
tion, and Brad Segal, pres- :
ident of Progressive Urban :

Management Associates,
who will serve as consul-
tants in forming the Busi-

ness Improvement District

for the city.”

The town meeting is
scheduled for 6 — 7.30pm
in Governors C Ballroom
of the Hilton. There is no
charge.

m By DENISE MAYCOCK
Tribune Freeport Reporter
dmaycock@tribunemedia.net

FREEPORT - The families of the two
male students who were allegedly molested
by a male teacher at Eight Mile Rock High
School intend to take legal action against
the Ministry of Education.

Rev Glenroy Bethel, founder of Families
for Justice (FFJ), said the families are under
“ereat stress.” He has asked his organisa-
tion to represent them.

“We believe the Ministry of Education
must be held accountable,” he said. “We
believe they are getting off too lightly ...
and there is some liability for the incidents
that have happened on the school property,”
he said.

A former teacher at Eight Mile Rock

when they were in the seventh grade. It is
alleged that the abuse continued for eight
years.

The suspected teacher has fled the coun-
try and is now being sought by the police.

Rev Bethel said FFJ is very concerned
that the abuse allegedly happened while the
victims were under the ministry’s care.

Concern

Also expressing concern for the victims
and their families were PTA president Troy
Garvey, Rastas Jah Shiloh and Dadda Rag-
ga of the Unity Is Strength Movement, and
Dudley Seide of Outreach Ministry.

“We have come together to stand for jus-
tice. We also see a great need to protect our
children not just at Eight Mile Rock High
School, but the entire Bahamas because we

in the system at other schools,” said Rev
Bethel.

Troy Garvey said the PTA is also con-
cerned about the status of investigations
involving two other teachers at Eight Mile
Rock High.

A female teacher and another male
teacher have been removed from the school
over alleged complaints of sexual misconduct
involving students.

Education Minister Carl Bethel was crit-
icised for his silence concerning the initial
allegations, which surfaced in January.

Mr Garvey believes the appointment of a
select committee to investigate complaints of
sexual molestation would bring better results.

He said the victims went to the police,
the Ministry of Education, and Social Ser-
vices but got no help.

“When you look at how the system dealt
with the matter someone has to be held

allegedly molested plan legal action

tened from the beginning we would not have
a teacher (out there) on the run from the sys-
tem,” he said.

Dudley Seide stressed that there are a lot
of good teachers in the education system.
“We must weed out those teachers who
decide to betray our kids and come to school
to molest,” he said.

Rasta Jah Shiloh is pleased the matter
has finally got the attention of national lead-
ers.

“Tt is quite pleasing to see both the oppo-
sition and the governing party on one accord
and recognising the need to address this sit-
uation. We as a people must remember that
together we stand. Let’s stand together in the
protection of the future of our country,” he
said.

Rev Bethel is calling on the prime minis-
ter and the minister of national security to

High School is accused of molesting the two
students — who have both now left school —

TIMELINE...











¢ October 2002 — Angry work-
ers of Gladstone Farms went on
strike over fears they would not
be paid severance pay following
the closure of the company.

e¢ Then Minister of Agricul-
ture V Alfred Gray said he
expected the severance packages
to be paid before the farm shut
its doors.

¢ That same month, president
of the Bahamas Commercial
Stores, Warehouse and Allied
Workers Union Elgin Douglas
announced that severance pack-
ages had been negotiated and
that all employees would be paid
following the farm's closure.

¢ November 2002 — Gladstone
Farms closes leaving more than
200 workers jobless. The com-
pany was later placed into liqui-
dation.

¢ In late 2002, Trade Union
Congress president Obie Fergu-
son weighed in and said he wrote
numerous letters to government







officials on behalf of the former
employees. He said he was
informed that the employees’
payment would be discussed as
soon as the company's assets
were realised.

e August, 2004 — A group of
former employees appeals in
writing to then prime minister
Perry Christie for assistance in
receiving their severance pay.

e April, 2007 — Former Glad-
stone Farms owner Canadian
Tim Wien tells The Tribune he
was unaware of any agreement
with the former workers.

¢ February 2008 — The group
writes to Prime Minister Hubert
Ingraham to intervene in the
matter.

e April 2009 - Some of the
former workers meet with per-
manent secretary at the Ministry
of Agriculture Creswell Sturrup
and outline their situation. They
are told they will be contacted in
a few weeks for an update.

Minister: election uproar
is embarrassment for union

m@ By MEGAN REYNOLDS
Tribune Staff Reporter
mreynolds@tribunemedia.net

THE UPROAR over election
nominations for the Bahamas Hotel
Catering and Allied Worker’s Union
is an embarrassment for the union,
maintains Labour Minister Dion

Foulkes.

Police were called to control the
chaos as hundreds of BHCAWU
members went to Worker’s House on |
Harrold Road on Monday to regis-
ter their nominations for the union’s

May 28 elections.

But two of the 60-plus candidates
rallying for the union’s 12 executive
positions lost out on nominations.

BHCAWU secretary general Leo Douglas said
the disruption was sparked when presidential
hopeful Kirk Wilson, currently first vice-presi-
dent under Roy Colebrook’s leadership and
leader of the Deliverance party, argued the nom-
inations should be held on May 11, and subse-

quently was not nominated.

His actions led to two Deliverance party can-
didates nominating themselves independently,

Mr Douglas said.

And further confusion was caused when union
officials had to turn down Tyrone ‘Rock’ Morris’s
bid for the presidency as head of the Unity party
because he is not entitled to BHCAWU mem-
bership as an Atlantis casino croupier.

Dion ence



Mr Douglas said: “The only thing
they are trying to do is hijack an
organisation that’s been in existence
for the past 50 years plus.

“T didn’t expect that, I thought they
would have behaved in a better way,
there shouldn’t have been any dis-
ruption.”

When news of the disorderly nom-
ination process travelled to Labour
Minister Dion Foulkes, it was met
with disappointment.

Mr Foulkes said: “It’s very unfor-
tunate that the nomination process
has deteriorated. I would wish to
appeal to all of the candidates to exer-
cise a strong degree of maturity and
always consider the interests of their
members.

“As Minister of Labour my main concern is
to ensure the members’ rights and interests are
always represented, and what happened yesterday
takes away from the union’s ability to represent
the interests of their membership.

“Tt’s really an embarrassment to the union so I

would appeal to all of the candidates to respect

the process and respect the procedure.”
The Ministry of Labour is not involved in the

nomination process but will supervise the election

on May 28.

BHCAWU.

Union President Roy Colebrook, Nicole Mar-
tin, Tyrone Butler and Abraham Smith have all
been nominated for the top post of the

Business focuses on training in response to recession

A BAHAMIAN business is
responding to the recession by
providing training and profes-
sional development for its staff
during these challenging eco-
nomic times.

JMEL Enterprises, parent
company of Texaco Faith Avenue
and Fire Trail Road, East Street
and Soldier, Wulff and Kemp
Roads, said it believes that train-
ing is essential to the success of
their company.

It is a trend they hope other
businesses throughout the coun-
try will emulate.

The company recently held a
recognition luncheon at the
British Colonial Hilton for nine
senior supervisors and supervi-
sors who completed a leadership
training programme conducted
by human resources consultant
Dr Richard Pinder.

The 12-month programme con-
sisted of a number of seminars
which focused on identifying
strengths and weaknesses; devel-
oping leadership skills, enhanc-
ing people skills, setting goals
and executing leadership.

Several of the nine employees
were once gas pump attendants,
or as JMEL calls them, customer
service representatives, who
worked their way up in the com-
pany through hard work and
determination.

President of JMEL Enterprises
Merritt Storr expressed his grati-
tude to the nine team members
for providing outstanding service
to the company.

Managing director of JMEL
Enterprises Ethan Moss applaud-
ed the service of the supervisors
and thanked them for their dedi-
cation to the company. He said
that their standards for customer
service can be applied to any
industry and work.

“Service is based on how peo-

ple feel and how people feel will
be based on the knowledge of
their thoughts. It doesn’t take
earth shattering innovation or
changes to have a significant
impact on employees.

“Employers throughout the
country need to know that if
employees are not treated well
by management and companies
do not invest in them, why are
they, then in turn going to exude
good customer service,” said Mr
Moss.

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believe that there are (dangerous teachers)



















accountable for it. If the authorities had lis-

ensure the safety of children at all public
and private schools.

Former workers of Gladstone Farms
RONAN A HIKB ENA To PIICem DLO ete es

m@ By TANEKA THOMPSON
Tribune Staff Reporter
tthompson@tribunemedia. net

MORE than six years after they
lost their jobs, former workers of
Gladstone Farms have renewed
their call for government to fulfil
promises made by the former
Christie administration regarding
their unpaid severance packages.

Although the workers "have
never seen a dime” of the
promised money, they are still
hopeful the funds will be distrib-
uted some day.

Hartley Strachan, a mainte-
nance supervisor for the company
for about 33 years, said the situa-
tion feels like a slap in the face,
especially after the former gov-
ernment made provisions to pay
former workers of the now closed
Royal Oasis hotel in Grand
Bahama.

"It's been years and not only
myself but all of the former
employees have been waiting.

“It's ridiculous in these hard
times that the former administra-
tion could pay one set of work-
ers and no one, not even the
Christian community, saw fit to
say: “We sympathise with the for-

mall @ marathon

mer employees of Gladstone
Farms.”

"So anytime they say they care
about the workers of this coun-
try — the black-belt and grassroots
people — we are wondering who
are they talking about. Because
here it is, almost six years down
the road we're still not paid,” he
said.

He estimates he is owed around
$30,000 in severance pay but said
if only a portion of that were paid
"it would be welcomed."

Although Mr Strachan was able
to find employment after the com-
pany closed, many of his co-work-
ers who did not posses marketable
skills are still struggling to make
ends meet.

Fred Stubbs, a former purchas-
ing manager who worked with the
company for about 38 years, is
one of those workers. He was 60-
years-old when the farm closed
in 2002, and because of his age, it
was hard to find a new job.

He is now relying on his small
pension to pay the bills.

"You just barely get by. You
have to make due with what you
have," he said.

But the group is still holding
out hope after a recent meeting





with Department of Agriculture
officials, who Mr Strachan said
promised to "look into" the situ-
ation, but made no assurances
about the former workers receiv-
ing any money.

The company — which was the
country's largest chicken produc-
ing business — was sold in 2002
after the company failed to recov-
er from setbacks due to damage
from Hurricane Floyd in 1999 and
Hurricane Michelle in 2001, and
from the 1998 reduction in Cus-
toms duties which gave an advan-
tage to foreign imports. The clo-
sure left about 200 workers out
of work.

Attempts to reach Minister of
Labour Dion Foulkes and Minis-
ter of Agriculture Larry
Cartwright were unsuccessful yes-
terday, as both men were in Cab-
inet.

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PAGE 6, WEDNESDAY, MAY 6, 2009

THE TRIBUNE



LOCAL NEWS

FROM page one

non disappeared from her
sight, Ms Moss said: “I left
him in the back seat and I'd
just gone inside for a minute.
Then my sister came running
in and said ‘Hey! (Sifford’s)
gone with the baby!’

“T came outside and tried
to stop him and said ‘Please,
just let my baby out the car!’
— he tried to run me over and
that was it.”

Shannon’s mother did not
see her baby again until yes-
terday when she spotted her
car with the child and Sifford
inside near the National Insur-
ance Board headquarters on
Wulff Road.

“Before I could get to him,
he sped off. I was in a pan-
icked state...I called 911 but I
was so (hysterical) they prob-
ably couldn’t understand what
I was saying,” she said.

Meanwhile, it appeared that
her car, license plate number
183906, had been sanded
down in preparation for being
repainted in an apparent
attempt to disguise it, said the
mother.

Officer in Charge of the
Central Detective Unit, Chief
Superintendent Elsworth
Moss, told The Tribune that
having kept the matter quiet
in an attempt to capture Sif-

Kidnapper: Ill
kill your baby

ford the police are now chang-
ing tack.

this child is. We staked out
the house and did all the nec-
essary things, put everything
in place, but he’s not surfaced

through the media,” he said.

In an All Points Bulletin
issued by police, the accused i
kidnapper was described as }
slim with a “medium com- }
plexion”, 5 foot 7 inches tall
and weighing around 160 :

pounds.

Ms Moss added that Sifford
often speaks with an Ameri- }
can accent, interchanged with :
Bahamian }
accents. He also alternates the
spelling of his surname, some-

Jamaican or

times using “Siefort.”

Anyone with information ;

on the whereabouts of Sifford

or Shannon are asked to con- i
tact their nearest police sta-
tion or call 919, 911 (police
502-
9930/9991 (C.D.U), 322 3333 i
(police control room) or 328- }

emergency room),

8477 (Crime Stoppers).

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@ By DENISE MAYCOCK
Tribune Freeport Reporter
dmaycock@tribunemedia.net

BAHAMIAN Julian Knowles says he
takes grave exception to comments by
Jetta Baptiste printed in a Tribune article
in which she referred to Bahamians as
“Christ-less” and “real children of the
devil.”

Mr Knowles thinks that Ms Baptiste,
president of the Haitian Bahamian Soci-
ety of the Bahamas, owes the Bahamian
people and the nation an apology for her
“offensive” comments.

“I was very disturbed about what she
said and I took grave offence to it and felt
greatly insulted, and I think she was out
of place,” he said yesterday at The Tri-
bune’s Freeport Office.

Mr Knowles said he is not anti-Haitian,
but felt compelled to express his con-
cerns after reading the article in The Tri-
bune.

In a story that appeared on May 1
under the heading, “Haitian man denied
Bahamas asylum executed on homeland
return,” Ms Baptiste expressed deep con-
cern and sadness over the death of Hait-
ian Anderson Pierre, 37, who was killed
on his return to Haiti after being denied
asylum in the Bahamas. He was ordered
to leave the country by immigration offi-
cials in Freeport.

Yesterday, Amnesty International
called for a “full and thorough” investi-
gation into the Immigration Departmen-
t’s decision to reject Mr Pierre’s asylum
application.

Ms Baptiste said: “God is not pleased
with a country which touts itself as a
Christian nation, and yet their actions

FROM page one

week. She told the court that
she and Fraser had sex on an
average of 12 times a month,

Anderson Pierre

Jetta Baptiste

show that they are really Christ-less and
act like real children of the devil.”

Mr Pierre, and his wife, Paulette, had
applied for political asylum two years ago
on the grounds that they feared their lives
would be in danger if they returned to
Haiti.

Mr Knowles stated that while the death
of Mr Pierre was unfortunate, he does
not believe that the Bahamas should be
blamed for what happened in Santo
Domingo.

“The decision for asylum I feel should
be left to the proper authorities, but I
call upon the Ministry of National Secu-
rity and Immigration, and the Ministry
of Foreign Affairs to investigate this mat-
ter and to provide necessary protection
for Mrs Pierre,” he said.

“We are a God-fearing country and I
think we owe her that much, to protect
her while she is here or however long she
is going be here, or for as long as she
wants to be here and that the matter
could be resolved in a decent, respectable
way.”

Mr Knowles said the Bahamas has nev-
er been known as a country of “devil
worshippers.”

Young woman testifies she had sex
with Bishop Fraser 12 times a month



Bahamian hits back over

“We’re seeking to find out }
where this guy is and where }

- ‘Christ-less’ comments

and the car has not been }
located on the streets, sonow }
we’re going to flush him out }

He noted that the Bahamas govern-
ment and ordinary Bahamians sent aid
to Haiti when hurricanes devastated the
island last year.

“It was this Christ-less and devil wor-
shiping country that sent trailers there,
and there is no other country in the world
other than America that Haitians have
benefitted from more than the Bahamas,
whether they came here legally or ille-
gally. The Bahamas has been good to
them,” said Mr Knowles.

“We could have sent stuff to Inagua
and Turks Island but we sent trailer loads
of items donated not only from Haitians
here, but from Bahamians too — only
Christ-like people do those things.

“Tam therefore, demanding that Ms
Baptiste offer an apology to this nation. I
have no gripes against Haitians, my issue
is with Ms Baptiste and the language she
used.

“She made her comments in a leading
newspaper that is read all over the world
and on the internet, and now Amnesty
International is involved. I call on her to
retract her comments and apologise,”
said Mr Knowles.

Ms Baptiste has called on government
to review and revise its immigration poli-
cies concerning political asylum appli-
cants.

She has also appealed to government
and members of the United Nations High
Commission for Refugees to conduct an
investigation into the death of Anderson
Pierre.

Mr Pierre’s widow is calling on Immi-
gration officials to reconsider her asylum
case and allow her to remain in Grand
Bahama with her three-week-old son,
who was born in the Bahamas.

presence of his wife and sever-
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then six to eight times a month
from October 2005 when she
developed a vaginal infection.
Mr Munroe, however, point-
ed out that the virtual com-
plainant had stated at the first
trial that she and Fraser had
sex a total of 15 times in 2005.
The witness did not recall mak-
ing that statement, but remem-
bered stating that they had sex
15 or more times at his church
office and five times at his
home. The young woman told
the court that she sometimes
spoke to Fraser over the tele-
phone for three to four hours at
a time, but usually a total of
five or six hours every day. She
told the court that Fraser had
instructed her to call him every
day and on occasions when she
didn’t, he would make a fuss.
The young woman told the
court that the first counselling
session with Fraser took place
on the evening of June 13, 2005.
She denied Mr Munroe’s sug-
gestion that at that time Fraser
took six pages of notes. She

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admitted that she had told Fras-
er that she had a terrible child-
hood, a bad relationship with
her mother and that she had
felt suicidal. She said that dur-
ing a second meeting, Fraser
did not take any notes and that
all of their discussions about
her childhood and her rela-
tionship with her mother had
occurred during their first
meeting.

The young woman told the

court that the sexual relation-
ship between her and Bishop
Fraser ended in February 2006.
She also told the court that in
April 2005, members of her
family confronted Fraser at his
church office. At that time, she
said that Fraser let them listen
to a voice mail that one of her
aunts had sent him. She told
the court that on another occa-
sion, the police were called to
the church and Fraser in the

yesterday was the Seiko watch
the young woman claimed
Fraser had bought for her, the
packet that had contained the
earrings she claimed he had
bought and a box of Monistat
cream. Prosecuting the case are
Franklyn Williams, Assistant
director of Legal Affairs in the
Attorney General’s Office, and
attorney Darnelle Dorsette.
The case continues before
Magistrate Carolita Bethel
today.

Man’s body found floating in water
behind the Harbour Moon Hotel

FROM page one

hauled the body out of the water, as dozens of

bystanders looked on.

His body was taken by police boat to the

RBPF's Harbour Patrol unit.

While initial evidence does not suggest the
man died as a result of foul play, an autopsy will
be commissioned to determine the official cause

of death, police said.

"Just after 8(am) we received a report of a
body of a man found in the water (near) the Har-
bour Moon Hotel, in the water at the rear of that
hotel. As a result of that, officers from the Royal
Bahamas Police Force and members from the
Defence Force retrieved the body and upon
examination of the body we have discovered
there are no signs of trauma to the body.

"We do not suspect foul play at this stage — an
autopsy will be performed to confirm the cause of
death," Assistant Superintendent Walter Evans
told reporters at a briefing at the nearby Har-
bour Patrol Unit base on Bay Street.” He may
have been one of those individuals who frequent

FROM page one

which they paid the required
fines over a year ago.

Galmando Gibson and Ter-
rance Gilbert say government
must urgently address the prob-
lem — whether through com-
puterisation or simply greater
diligence by police or court staff
— which appears to allow for
warrants to remain active in the
police’s records despite having
been disposed of in the courts.

In Mr Gibson’s case, he was
forced to find time to go before
a magistrate twice on two dif-
ferent days before finally being
directed to a nearby court log-
book where proof that he had
paid a $250 fine a year prior was
recorded, rendering the entire
ordeal an unnecessary inconve-
nience.

“Tt almost cost me my job,”
said Gibson, who was detained
for several hours in Central
Police station one morning
when he should have been at
work.

“As a tax paying citizen I
should be able to go about my

that area but we are investigating and will do
some (more) inquiries, but again we do not sus-

this stage.

pect foul play at this stage.

"There are no signs of trauma, no signs of
injuries, anything that causes us to feel that we
need to look at this from a criminal matter at

He speculated that the man may have somehow
fallen into the water at least 12 hours before he
was discovered.

"He may have fallen accidentally into the water
— we're not sure.”

Mr Evans also dispelled rumours that the man
was handcuffed.

The man, believed to be in his late 20s to early
30s, was dressed in a white T-shirt and blue shorts
when his body was found.

Police yesterday appealed for public assistance
to discover the man's identity.

"At this stage we are investigating and we are
asking anyone with information who might have
had any relative gone missing, perhaps within
the last 12 to 24 hours, to contact the police so we
can verify and get information in regard to the
identity of this individual," said Mr Evans.

Motorists detained on
outdated arrest warrants
call for urgent action

business freely if I have done
everything that is required of
me,” he said.

Meanwhile, Terrance Gilbert,
40, was also held for over five
hours at the police Warrant
Office last Friday before he was
able to convince an employee
that he had paid the fine for his
previous traffic violation and
should be permitted to go and
search for his receipt.

Having not been able to find
the document, a perusal of the
same court logbook as Mr Gib-
son enabled him also to quickly
find evidence of the payment.

Now he has been warned by
police that in order to avoid get-
ting into the same situation
again, he should keep his pay-
ment reference number on his
person at all times.

“Tt’s ridiculous. Why should I

have to suffer because of their
system?” asked Mr Gilbert.
“Unless someone says some-
thing about the situation things
will just get slacker and slack-
er.”

In Mr Gibson’s case, his
detention was all the more frus-
trating as he had followed this
advice and kept his receipt for
almost a year after he had paid
the fine, only to find that he was
picked up on the warrant short-
ly after he disposed of it.

“Something needs to be
done,” he told The Tribune.

Calls to the Traffic Court and
Police Warrants Office yester-
day both resulted in The Tri-
bune being directed to contact
Assistant Commissioner of
Police, Hulan Hanna. A mes-
sage left for ACP Hanna was
not returned up to press time.



THE TRIBUNE

WEDNESDAY, MAY 6, 2009, PAGE 7





A hurricane across the green fields of life:
How the 1918 flu affected the Caribbean

“So vast was the catastrophe...that
our minds, surfeited with the horrors
of war, refused to realise it. It came
and went, a hurricane across the
green fields of life, sweeping away
our youth in the hundreds of thou-
sands and leaving a toll of sickness
and infirmity which will not be reck-
oned in this generation.” -- article in
The Times of London on the 1918
influenza pandemic.

QO: of the most devastat-
ing fires in human history
began smouldering in March 1918
in the American midwest and
exploded that August to affect more
than a third of the world's popula-
tion.

New research confirms that the
virus which caused the 1918 influen-
za pandemic is directly linked to the
current swine flu virus, which has
the potential to cause a new pan-
demic. Scientists say the 1918 virus
spread in pigs and eventually pro-
duced the current HIN1 swine flu
virus, which has led health authori-
ties to declare an international emer-
gency.

The 1918 flu killed more than 50
million people around the world in
just a few months — many more
than the 16 million military and civil-
ian deaths of the First World War,
which was one of history's bloodi-
est. In fact, it killed more people
than all the wars of the 20th century
combined. More even than medieval
Europe's horrifying Black Death.

A pandemic is a worldwide epi-
demic caused by a new virus to
which people have no immunity.
One of the big reasons for the
“mother of pandemics” in 1918 was
that the virus had mutated so it could
pass easily among people. And that
is a feature of the current virus,
which has infected over a thousand
people in 21 countries since it was
first reported on April 12.

There is another similarity too. A
century ago, it was the young and
fit who were most at risk from the flu
— those in the prime of their lives.
And that seems to be the case with
the current outbreak. Dr Alan Hay,
director of the World Influenza Cen-
tre says the most worrying aspect to
this new virus is that it affects young,
healthy adults.

The death rate from the current

flu outbreak is low, but health
experts fear a second wave of infec-
tion this winter could be more lethal.
That is also what happened in 1918.
The first outbreak in Kansas was rel-
atively mild, but a second outbreak
in Europe later the same year pro-
duced alarmingly high death rates.
People would go to work in the
morning and be dead by evening.

Strangely, this terrible event in
the world’s recent past kept a very
low profile until recently. Parents
and grandparents never mentioned
it. University of London history pro-
fessor, Dr David Killingray, noted
that: “Despite the fearsome impact,
there seems to have been a collective
amnesia...the full impact of the epi-
demic appears to have been cloaked
by the pre-occupations of a horren-
dous war.”

At first, no-one knew what
caused the epidemic, but rumours
abounded. Many believed it was a
bio-war unleashed by the Germans.
Evangelist Billy Sunday — the Billy
Graham of his day — thought it was
a punishment for sin. "We can meet
here tonight and pray down the epi-
demic," Sunday said. But even as he
spoke people in the audience col-
lapsed with the flu.

Tt was difficult to avoid. Everyone
has to breathe and every sneeze
spreads millions of infected droplets
into the air. As a children's nursery
rhyme of the day put it: "I opened
the window and in-flu-enza." The
1918 virus had a mortality rate of
2.5 per cent compared to less than
0.1 per cent in previous flu epi-
demics. Doctors reported that
patients "died struggling to clear
their airways of a blood-tinged froth
that gushed from their nose and
mouth."

The 1918 pandemic circled the
globe in a few months, following
trade routes and shipping lanes. In
the early years of the 20th century
public health systems were limited,
and contemporary observers were
often vague in recording causes of



death, particularly in outlying
colonies. But Killingray estimates
about 100,000 flu deaths in the
Caribbean, with nearly 30,000 in
British territories including the
Bahamas:

“Tts spread and effects on certain
islands and areas seemed to be arbi-
trarily selective, and there are no
clear answers why one place suffered
high morbidity and mortality rates,
another widespread infection but
low mortality, while other places
remained virtually untouched by the
disease. Such variations may have
been due to prompt quarantine by
the authorities, for example, in the
Bahamas, which although in close
proximity to the United States, must
have been helped by a dearth of
wartime shipping.”

We were luckier than most. The
devastating effects of earlier cholera
epidemics led to the Quarantine Act
of 1905 and construction of an isola-
tion station on Athol Island, which
operated until the 1920s. This effi-
cient quarantine system seems to
have preserved the Bahamas from
infection during the 1918 pandemic.
Barbados was similarly fortunate.

However, a 1919 Colonial Office
report did note that “many” of the
2,500-plus Bahamian migrant work-
ers in the US became infected and
died during the pandemic. Bahami-
an migration to America peaked
during this period, and the popula-
tion of the islands actually fell for
the first time. The total recorded in
1921 was marginally lower than that
in 1901 — about 53,000.

A: a non-notifiable disease,
influenza was not covered

by international quarantine regula-
tions in 1918. And when the virus
mutated in August of that year it
spread rapidly and with unprece-
dented virulence, helped by wartime
disruption and troop movements.
Among British territories, Jamaica,
Guyana and Belize were the most

The first 100 days: new American
engagement for the 21st Century

m JAMES L JONES
United States National
Security Advisor

Or hundred days ago, the
United States celebrated the
inauguration of our 44th President. Many
around the world joined us in celebrating
what was an historic occasion for the
American people, and for all who believe
in the possibility of hope for a better
future for themselves and their children.

The excitement and optimism we as
Americans felt on January 20 has only
grown since then, even in the face of a
sobering global economic crisis, news of a
flu virus, and daunting 21st century challenges like ter-
rorism and nuclear proliferation; climate change and
poverty; enduring conflicts and dangerous disease.

These challenges were not caused by any one
nation, nor can they be solved by any one nation.
As President Obama said on just his second day in
office, “For the sake of our national security and the
common aspirations of people around the globe, an
era of new American leadership in the world has to
begin now.”

During the first 100 days of his administration,
President Obama has already demonstrated to the
world what a new American engagement will look
like.

First, he has committed himself and his adminis-
tration to a foreign policy that ensures the safety of the
American people and that of our friends and allies.
Global engagement on the basis of mutual interests
and mutual respect is the starting point of our foreign
policy. And while there will be circumstances where
such an approach might not be successful, the United
States will first be prepared to listen to and talk with
potential adversaries to advance our national interests
and those of the global community that depend on the
United States for leadership on security issues. In
those instances where a more demonstrable use of
power is inevitable, no adversary should be under
any illusion as to the outcome. This is why we will con-
tinue to maintain our Armed Forces as the best in the
world as well as the most admired and respected.

To carry out our engagement strategies, and almost
immediately upon taking office the President appoint-
ed some of America’s most talented diplomats to
serve as special envoys and representatives — for Mid-
dle East peace, for South West Asia, for Sudan, for
Afghanistan and Pakistan, and for climate change.
This fact alone illustrates that the 21st century is one
in which regional strategies will be at the forefront of
our energy and focus on issues pertaining to nation-
al and international security. This represents a clear
recognition that we must deal with the world as it is
today and not as it was in the 20th century. Over the
past three months, the national security community,
to include our serving diplomats abroad, has engaged
in active and effective diplomacy to confront the
many challenges we face. To date the results have
been encouraging, but much remains to be done.

President Obama has also made clear his commit-
ment to pursue a deep and positive dialogue with
Muslim communities around the world. That is the
reason he gave his first televised interview as Presi-
dent to al-Arabiya. It is also why he told Iran’s peo-
ple and leaders that he seeks a new dialogue on the
full range of issues that we face, and it is also why he
spoke of new partnerships on behalf of education,
health care, and opportunity in his speech before the
Turkish Parliament. And finally, it is why he has
made it clear that the United States is not now, and
will never be, at war with Islam.

Second, we’ve made it clear that it is our intent to
disrupt, dismantle, and defeat al Qaeda.



President Barack Obama

YOUR SAY



In March, the President announced the
results of a comprehensive strategy review
for Pakistan and Afghanistan that will
finally provide the resources we need to
achieve our goals, while helping the peo-
ple of Afghanistan and Pakistan pursue
security and greater opportunity.

In Strasbourg, at the 60th anniversary
of the founding of the North Atlantic
Treaty Organisation (NATO), the Presi-
dent received broad international sup-
port for his strategy and a commitment from our
NATO allies to create a new strategic concept so
that the Alliance can become more relevant in meet-
ing the challenges of the 21st century.

And in Baghdad, the President reiterated his com-
mitment to responsibly reduce our forces in keeping
with the Status of Forces Agreement negotiated with
the government of Iraq, all the while helping Iraqis
take responsibility for their sovereign future.

Third, President Obama has worked to forge com-
mon approaches to a wide range of global challenges.
In London, he helped build an important consensus
on concrete steps to deal with the global financial
crisis, including a new global regulatory framework,
increased assistance for developing nations, and a
renewed commitment to free and fair trade. In
Prague, he launched an ambitious agenda to secure all
“loose” nuclear materials around the world in four
years, to reverse the tide of nuclear proliferation,
and to strive for a world free of nuclear weapons.

Closer to home, President Obama has recognised
our shared responsibility to effectively address drug
demand and illicit arms trafficking and he has
launched a new plan to combat drug-related violence
along the US-Mexico border. The President also
announced the lifting of restrictions on remittances
and travel to Cuba for Cuban-Americans, and marked
a new beginning with our neighbours in the hemi-
sphere, offering cooperation on a wide range of issues
at the Summit of the Americas.

The President has also worked effectively with
multilateral organisations. In past weeks the United
States rallied our allies and the world community in
response to the launching of the North Korean mis-
sile launch, and is augmenting the international effort
to combat piracy off the coast of Somalia. Finally, the
United States has signaled its intent to lead on still
other important initiatives of great importance to
our planet in advancing partnerships on clean energy
and climate change, starting with the first preparato-
ry session of the Major Economies Forum on Energy
and Climate.

And finally, President Obama has rejected as false
any choice between America’s security and its ideals.
On his first day in office, he ordered the closure of the
Guantanamo Bay Detention Centre within one year,
banned enhanced detention techniques, and made
clear without exception or equivocation that the Unit-
ed States fully supports the Geneva Convention and
does not practice nor condone torture.

Here too, we will be expected to lead by the pow-
er of our example.

While much has been said and done in the first 100
days, those of us who are privileged to serve our
nation in this remarkably complex and challenging
period fully realise that we are only at the beginning
of the journey. We believe that we are making
progress in meeting some of the great challenges we
face in first restoring America’s standing as a friend
and partner to all who seek a future of peace, pros-
perity and dignity for their citizens.



National Museum of Health and Medicine, Armed Forces

Institute of Pathology/AP

IN THIS 1918 PHOTOGRAPH, influenza victims crowd into an emergency hospital at Camp Funston, a
subdivision of Fort Riley in Kansas. The flu, which is believed to have originated in Kansas, killed at least

20 million people worldwide.

severely affected in the region.

“The virus raged through the
plantations and slum housing of the
low-lying coastal towns.” Killingray
wrote in the 2003 edition of the
Caribbean Quarterly. “East Indian
labour was hard hit, but not as
severely as Native Americans. By
early October the influenza pan-
demic was well-established in Cen-
tral America and from there it
reached Belize on the eleventh of
the month....and a little later that
month it appeared in the Bahamas.”

In Jamaica the authorities restrict-
ed rail travel, fumigated money and
suspended postal service. Schools
and shops closed and social events
were suspended, but by early
November the disease had affected
the entire island, with the Gleaner
reporting that “coolie labour on the
estates has been reduced almost to
vanishing point.”

Medical facilities were over-
whelmed across the region. In Belize
infection rates were as high as 80
per cent and crops went unharvested.
In Guyana there were serious strains
on burial society funds as plantation
labourers were decimated. And
some Amerindian tribes were said to
have been wiped out.

“This epidemic has been the most
severe visitation of disease within
the memory of any colonist,”
Guyana’s acting surgeon-general
concluded at the time. “The almost
universal prevalence and high mot-

tality rate have caused untold suf-
fering.”

As you might expect, rum was
considered one of the most potent
treatments for the flu at the time.
Other popular remedies included
Horlicks, insecticide, Palmolive soap
and tobacco.

In the Bahamas there were no
official reports of deaths from the
flu, but recent estimates say as many
as 60 may have died during the epi-
demic. In Guyana, with a popula-
tion of 310,000, there were some
12,000 deaths. And perhaps 10,000 in
Jamaica, out of a population of
850,000.

“These figures take account of
unrecorded deaths, those reported as
dying of other causes such as fevers
and pneumonia — often complica-
tions of influenza — (and) long-term
influenza infections such as
encephalitis lethargica,” Killingray
explained. “The pandemic of 1918-19
came suddenly and moved with
deadly speed. The largely laissez-
faire systems of government were
caught ill-prepared, while the med-
ical and scientific professions were
unable to provide effective treat-
ment or cure."

Today, the fear is that a flu pan-
demic will stall the global economy,
overwhelm hospitals, and produce
chaos in local communities.
Bahamuans rely on cross-border trav-
el to make a living, for example, and
it was only five years ago that Toron-

to’s tourist business collapsed
overnight during the SARS out-
break. The strain of a collapse in
travel added to the current econom-
ic meltdown could threaten our very
social fabric.

But the 2003 SARS outbreak and
a small but rising number of deaths
from bird flu since 2005 has spurred
world health authorities to make bet-
ter preparations. Bird flu has claimed
257 lives and infected over 400 peo-
ple around the world, but it is still
considered "inefficient" in its trans-
mission among humans. The good
news, experts say, is that although
the current swine flu virus is highly
transmissible, it appears far less
lethal than bird flu at this point.

Also, since 2007 the World
Health Organisation's hand has been
strengthened by a global agreement
on surveillance and response mea-
sures to acute public health risks that
have the potential to threaten people
worldwide. These International
Health Regulations aim to limit
interference with travel and trade
while ensuring public health through
the prevention of disease spread.

That is good news, because
experts say it can’t be ruled out that
we could be facing the first flu pan-
demic in over 40 years.

What do you think?
Send comments to

larry@tribunemedia net
Or visit www.bahamapundit.com

SHOE
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PAGE 12, WEDNESDAY, MAY 6, 2009



SPORTS

SPORT eee
Coach impressed with ‘Bahamian connection’

FROM page 14

ours this year,” Hylan projected. “She’s just a
junior, having transferred in, so we are looking
for some big things from her in her senior year
when she returns next year.”

As for Nixon, Hyland said she had a very
good season.

“She won the Conference Championship
title in the shot and she was second in the dis-
cus and the hammer,” Hyland said. “But this
was only her second year throwing the hammer.

“She did very well this year. She didn’t qual-
ify for nationals, but she did very well. She still
has two more years, so she should do very well
next year.”

Last week, Nixon completed her sophomore
year by winning all three throws.

Nixon, who is preparing to return home on
Sunday, said she got off to a really slow start,
but as she started to compete in their confer-
ence meets, things started to improve.

“At Conference, I wanted to do better than
I did, but at the last meet over the weekend, I
did a lot better in the discus,” she said. “Hope-
fully I can have a better season next year.”

The hammer was a new event for Nixon,
who noted that she still has some more fine
tuning to do. “I have to master the spin,” she
insisted. “But it was fun doing it last year and
this year.”

Nixon, who intends to compete in the
BAAA Nationals, said it would be good if they
can do the event at home because it will make
it much easier for the athletes when they have
to make the necessary adjustments to add it to
their repertoire at college. “I would like to do
it at home so people can really see how it’s
done,” she stated. fthe Bahamian connection,
Nixon said she felt right at home because every-
body cheered each other on and encouraged
them to do their best. “We are like a little fam-
ily within a family,” she said.

PETRA McDONALD in action...

Wright first Bahamian
to qualify for Olympics

FROM page 14 in the hot scorching sun before
he gets back on the road to face
the cold weather.

mode.” In 2006 in Whistler where he

Wright, who started competing
in snowboard competitively at
the age of 14, will be entered in
the halfpipe, which will comprise
of two qualifying rounds during
the Olympics.

Based on their difficulties of
the moves and variations, the
competitors will make the cut for
the final where they will have
another two rounds to determine
the medal winners.

While back at home, Wright
said he intends to get a good tan

resides, Wright was approached
by Bahamas High Commission
after he got a third place in his
first-ever World Cup to compete
for the Bahamas.

The rest was history.

Wright, 22, started the
2006/2007 year ranked 13th in
the world. He contested the 2009
Olympic trials that was held in
New Zealand, but he didn’t
make the cut. Wright is the son
of Bahamian businessman Ethric
Bowe.

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KORATH WRIGHT (shown) is the first Bahamian to qualify to compete in the Winter Olympics...

ae E THe Ed Ce
Williams comes
back, O’Neal out

Bm By TIM REYNOLDS
AP Sports Writer

MIAMI (AP) — Marvin
Williams is feeling better. Jer-
maine O'Neal, not so much.

An hour before Game 6 of the
Atlanta-Miami first-round East-
ern Conference series, the
Hawks got a boost and the Heat
took a hit.

Williams returned for the
Hawks on Friday night, even
though Atlanta coach Mike
Woodson declared him out just
hours earlier citing continued
issues with Williams’ sprained
right wrist.

"He started to shoot this
morning,” Woodson said Friday
night. "I wasn't expecting him
back at all.”

O'Neal, meanwhile, missed
the game because of a slight con-
cussion sustained when the
Hawks' Zaza Pachulia struck
him in the face during Game 5,
with little-used Joel Anthony
opening the game in his place.

O'Neal did not practice Thurs-
day or Friday morning, but the
Heat believed he would play.
Doctors, though, conferred with
O'Neal shortly before tip-off and
made the decision that he
shouldn't go, not wanting to risk
other potential problems with
the concussion.

"He's still a little bit groggy,
still a little bit of a headache
today," Heat coach Erik Spoel-
stra said. "He wants to go."

Williams sprained his right
wrist in Game 2, missed the next
three games, and the Hawks
were bracing to be without their





JOSH SMITH goes up over Heat
defender Jermaine O'Neal...
(AP Photo: John Bazemore)

small forward for the remainder
of the series.

Williams did some more
shooting about 90 minutes before
tip-off of Game 6, and was
included on the roster Atlanta
submitted shortly thereafter.

He checked in with 3:51
remaining in the opening quar-
ter, wearing a wrap on his wrist.

Forward Al Horford was also
on Atlanta's active roster and
took part in the team's warm-
ups, although he, too, was
declared out in the morning by
Woodson because of a sprained
right ankle suffered in Game 5.
Solomon Jones started in Hor-
ford's place, and Mo Evans start-
ed again at small forward.

Powe surgery successful

BOSTON (AP) — Boston Celtics forward Leon Powe has under-
gone successful surgery for a microfracture and torn ligaments in his

left knee.

The team announced that team physician Dr Brian McKeon per-
formed the surgery Tuesday morning at New England Baptist Hos-
pital. No timetable has been set for Powe's return.

The forward tore his anterior cruciate ligament and meniscus in the
first quarter of the Celtics 118-115 win in Game 2 of their first-round
playoff series against the Chicago Bulls on April 20. The defending
NBA champions won the series in seven games.

Coach Doc Rivers said Powe hurt himself on a spin move but
continued playing for three more minutes.

Powe averaged 7.7 points and 4.9 rebounds per game this season.

TRIBUNE SPORTS

@ By The Associated
Press

Orlando at Boston (8pm
EDT). The Magic won the
opener at Boston 95-90 to get
a jump on the defending
champions in the Eastern
Conference semifinal series.

STARS

Monday

—Dwight Howard, Magic,
returned from a one-game
suspension with 16 points and
22 rebounds and Orlando
held off late-charging Boston
95-90 in Game 1 of the East-
ern Conference semifinals.

—Rashard Lewis, Magic,
had 18 points, seven
rebounds and three steals for
the Magic.

—Yao Ming, Rockets, who
briefly left with a knee injury
in the closing minutes, had 28
points and 10 rebounds to
lead Houston to a physical
100-92 victory over the Los
Angeles Lakers in Game 1 of
the Western Conference
semifinals.

—Ron Artest and Aaron
Brooks, Rockets. Artest
added 21 points and Brooks
had 19 for the Rockets, who
are in the second round for
the first time since 1997.

LEBRON THE MVP

An MVP vote some
expected to be close was
another slam dunk by Cava-
liers star LeBron James. He
received 109 of a possible 121
first-place votes to easily out-
distance Kobe Bryant. James
totaled 1,172 points in ballot-
ing by media members in the
US and Canada. It's his first
MVP.

STRONG IN DEFEAT

Kobe Bryant scored 32
points against Houston, doing
his best to keep the Lakers
in the game despite missing
practice on Sunday with a
sore throat. He scored 22 of
the Lakers’ final 42 points ...
Paul Pierce scored 16 of his
23 points in the second half
and Rajon Rondo had 14
points, 10 rebounds and eight
assists for Boston in its 95-90
loss to Orlando in Game 1.

SWING

Both NBA finalists from
2008 lost their second-round
openers at home, Boston to
Orlando and Los Angeles to
Houston.

Orlando grabbed a 28-
point lead, 65-37, in the third
quarter, then saw it dwindle
to three before holding on to
beat the Celtics 95-90.

The Celtics did not go to
the free throw line in the first
half, but Rajon Rondo shot
12 free throws in the third
quarter.

FINED

Nuggets forward Kenyon
Martin was fined $25,000 by
the NBA for knocking Mav-
ericks forward Dirk Nowitzki
to the court in the opener of
their second-round playoff
series.

Martin was also assessed a
flagrant foul 1 for the contact
in the first quarter of Sun-
day's game, after Nowitzki
had scored Dallas’ first 10
points on 5-for-5 shooting.

BLOODIED

Houston forward Shane
Battier needed four stitches
to close a gash over his left
eye late in the first quarter of
a 100-92 win at Los Angeles.
He returned and finished
with six points. He was hit
when Los Angeles’ Sasha
Vujacic swatted a loose ball
out to Kobe Bryant. The
force of the impact knocked
Battier to the ground. Work-
ers spent a few minutes wip-
ing blood off the court.

SPEAKING

"I'm 24 years old and I'm
receiving this award, I never
thought it would happen this
fast. I never dreamed about
being MVP, but if I said I did-
n't enjoy this award I'd be
lying. Hard work pays off and
dreams do come true."

— Cavaliers star LeBron
James after being voted the
NBA's most valuable player

"The last 16 minutes was a
debacle. We were sort of try-
ing to run out the clock, and
you can't do that in games
like this. Especially in the
playoffs, teams are going to
keep fighting and keep com-
ing back. (But) how about the
fact that we were up 28? You
play these games to win, and
that's it. We won. Right now,
the series is 1-0."

— Magic coach Stan Van
Gundy after a 95-90 victory
at Boston



TRIBUNE SPORTS



WEDNESDAY, MAY 6, 2009, PAGE 13

SPORTS



Phelps’ three-month
suspension is over

m By PAUL NEWBERRY
AP Sports Writer

BALTIMORE (AP) —
Michael Phelps’ three-month
suspension from competition is
now over and he marked the
occasion like any other day: He
woke up late and headed to the
pool.

Speaking exclusively with The
Associated Press, Phelps said he
didn't even realize his suspen-
sion ended Tuesday. Coach Bob
Bowman couldn't resist making a
joke, saying he planned to enter
his star swimmer in a meet later
that night.

"I had no idea," Phelps said
of his ban, which was doled out
by USA Swimming after a pic-
ture surfaced in a London
tabloid showing him inhaling
from a marijuana pipe.

Actually, he'll return to com-
petition next week at a meet in
Charlotte, N.C. It will be his first
time swimming competitively
since winning eight gold medals
at the Beijing Olympics.

"I'm happy to be back in the
water and be back in semi-
shape," said Phelps, who's lost
almost 20 pounds in last two
months. "I'm sort of getting back
into racing shape and getting
ready to race my first race since
Beijing. We'll see how it's goes.

"I'm happy to have some
structure back in my life,” he
added.

Phelps said he considered
retiring from the sport after the
picture surfaced. After all, he
already broke Mark Spitz's 36-
year-old record of seven gold
medals and became the win-
ningest Olympian ever with 14
golds.

But after writing down the
pros and cons of resuming his
career, Phelps decided to get
back in the water. He's not con-
cerned what the photo did to his
image.

"It was a stupid mistake that I
made," he said during an inter-
view on the deck of the pool at
Loyola University in his native
Baltimore. "But I'll have what
I've accomplished in and out of
the pool for the rest of my life.
I'm satisfied with what I've done
and happy with what I've done.”



OLYMPIC swimming gold medallist Michael Phelps works out Tuesday,
May 5, 2009 in Baltimore...
(AP Photo: Gail Burton)

Special Olympics sponsors course

IN its ongoing training programme for its ath-
letes, coaches, volunteers and board members, the
board of directors of Special Olympics Bahamas
sponsored a two-day intensive course in event man-
agement and programme management for selected
organisers.

The Games Management System (GMS) is one
of the most comprehensive sports systems in the
world, and is used by all Special Olympics regions
around the world.

It not only efficiently computerizes all aspects of
games competitions in all Olympic sports, but cre-
ates a database for all aspects of training, athletes,
coaches, registration, results, reports and history of
performances.

The course was conducted by Reuben Silva of
Special Olympics Inc., the prime developer of this
sophisticated programme. The participants includ-
ed board members, technical directors and meet
directors.

Silva travels the world to educate Special
Olympics national programmes in this new sys-
tem, and national chairman, Basil Christie,
expressed his pride in the initiative taken by his
board to be one of the forerunners in the region
taking advantage of this useful tool.

With the implementation of this system, Spe-
cial Olympics Bahamas will be able to log all activ-
ities of our national programme, create profiles of
all of its athletes, coaches, board members and
volunteers.

REUBEN SILVA (sitting) can be seen showing board
director Nello Lambert and national director Amanda
Moncur the new programme management system...

Probably the most valuable aspect of the sys-
tem is the potential to more successfully plan and
organise its games. “On May 29-30, the Special
Olympics National Games will be celebrated here
in Nassau, and everything will be run on our com-
puters,” said a release.

Last month, Special Olympics offered a certifi-
cation course for 42 new coaches for coaches and
physical education teachers from within the public
school system and Sandilands Rehabilitation Cen-
ter.

Later on this month, a similar course will he
offered to teachers in Grand Bahama. The Board
is committed to training and qualifying all persons
working with persons with intellectual disabilities
registered in our national programme.

Phelps said the whole experi-
ence has "shown me who my real
friends are. It's also given me a
lot of time to think. Pretty much
since Beijing ended, I didn't real-
ly know what I wanted to do."

After going into virtual seclu-
sion for nearly a month after the
photo surfaced, Phelps called
Bowman on March 1 — the
coach remembers the day vivid-
ly — and said simply, "I'm doing
it."

"T was not really concerned
whether he would quit or not,”
Bowman said. "I was concerned
that if he did quit, that he did it
for the right reasons. Otherwise,
it would just be a joke. I have
told him, 'You've done all there
is to do. If you quit today, you're
the greatest of all time. You can
walk away.’ But I did think it
would be bad if he walked away
because of this thing. He should
go on his own terms.”

His motivation restored,
Phelps plans to keep swimming
through the 2012 London
Olympics. While he's not going
to attempt eight gold medals
again, he will continue to do a
program that would be exhaust-
ing to most swimmers.

In Charlotte, he'll swim five
events: the 50-meter freestyle,
100 free, 200 free, 100 backstroke
and 200 butterfly. Only two were

on his record-breaking program
in Beijing, the 200 free and 200
fly.

"I'm feeling good in the water
and swimming some decent
times in practice," Phelps said.
"But I have no idea what to
expect in the meet. I'm going in
open minded.”

As for his life away from the
pool, Phelps wouldn't discuss
tabloid reports that he's dating
Miss California, Carrie Prejean,
who made headlines of her own
last month when she finished
runner-up in the Miss USA
pageant. Some thought her
response to a question about
legalizing same-sex marriage
may have cost her the title.

Phelps would only say the two
"are good friends,” but added
that he can sympathize with what
she's gone through since express-
ing her opposition to gay mar-
riage.

As for tabloid reports of his
heavy partying, Phelps rolled his
eyes and said nearly everything
written about him was false.
Specifically, he denied a report
detailing a wild night in New
York City.

"I know I have not been per-
fect by any means,” he said. "But
I have learned from all of my
mistakes. That's all you can ask
for."

-MONTAGU GARDENS
PHONE: 394-6347 }
East of Club Waterloo

May 10, 2009

Special One

ossed Salad

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Vegetable Rice

Mashed Sweet Potatoes

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ossed Salad
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Vegetable Kice
Mashed Sweet Potatoes

Fresh Vegetables

Tossed Salad

Special Three

Roast Prime Rib of Beef

Grouper Fingers
ice

Vegetables

Mashed Sweet Potatoes

Steam Vegetables

Dessert with abovemenus,
Guava Cheese Cake, Carrot Cake or Key Lime Pie
Price 22.00 per person plus 19% gratuity
per person plus 19% gratuity

Children #1 2.0



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THE TRIBUNE

Spo

14

PAGE



WEDNESDAY, MAY 6,



2009






Wright first Bahamian to qualify for Winter Olympics

m By BRENT STUBBS
Senior Sports Reporter
bstubbs@tribunemedia.net

THE Bahamas has achieved
another historic feat. This time,
it’s Korath Wright, who has
become the first Bahamian to
qualify to compete in the Win-
ter Olympics.

Earlier this year, Wright
booked his ticket to WVancou-
ver, Canada, for the 2010
Games slated for February 12-
28.

Wright, who was born in the
Bahamas on August 26, 1985,
but moved to Canada to attend
school at the age of 10 where he
started snowboarding, said he’s
really excited to be making his-
tory as the first Bahamian to
































































compete in the Winter
Olympics.

“Pm ready to go,” said
Wright, who is back home try-
ing to generate the funding to
help his further preparation for
the trip. “The whole thing is
just overwhelming.

“This is something that ['m
very proud to be able to do.
Representing the Bahamas at
the Olympics is right at the top
of my list of things to do. ’m
just happy yo be competing for
my nation.”

Now that he has qualified,
Wright said he is eager to get
back on the ice and start train-
ing again because he knows it
won't be an easy task compet-
ing in Canada next year.

“T just need to raise the mon-

>



KORATH WRIGHT (shown) is the first Bahamian to qualify to compete in
the Winter Olympics...

mee Coach impress
1 : : i
Bahamian connection

GABRIELLE NIXON in action...




mg By BRENT STUBBS
Senior Sports Reporter
bstubbs@tribunemedia.net

n injury has

hampered

Oneil

Williams’ }

final season
at Benedict College, cutting
it short. But coach Frank
Hyland said he was really
impressed with the Bahami-
an connection of Williams,
Gabrielle Nixon, Petra
McDonald and Melinda
Bastian.

While Williams went down with a stress
fracture after getting his senior year off to a
fantastic start, Hyland said Nixon had a solid
season, but just fell short of joining both Bas-
tian and McDonald in qualifying for the
NCAA Division II National Championships
slated to be held at the end of the month in
Angelo State University in Angelo, Texas.

“They were all outstanding this year,” said
Hyland of the Bahamian connection, which
is close to the 4-5 from Kenya and well ahead
of the one from Hyland’s homeland of
Trinidad & Tobago.

“Our main goal is to get the athletes who are
academically sound and athletically. So if I
can get anymore Bahamians, I will continue to
recruit them. The programme in the Bahamas
is so much better than ours in Trinidad.”

Putting their individual seasons in prospec-
tive, Hyland said it was disappointing when
Williams went down with the injury near the
end of the season.

“He’s back on track for training and hope-
fully he will get to qualify for the national
team,” said Hyland of Williams, who gradu-
ates.

Before he went out with the injury, Williams
clocked one minute and 51 seconds in the 800
metres. He leaves Benedict College as the
record holder in the 800, 1,500, 5,000 and
10,000, making him what Hyland calls “the
greatest distance runner to come out of our

Frank Hyland

programme.”

This Paper), ish Collie, D Angel,

ey so that I can get back on the
ice and start training,” he said.
“T’m talking to some sponsors
so I can raise the money before
I leave so that I can perform at
my maximum.”

When he leaves here, Wright
intends to travel to Oregon
where he will spend a month in
training, followed by a month in
New Zealand leading into first
competition in September.

“My focus right now is to
start my training,” he said. “As
the Olympics comes closer, I
will be switching to training to
compete. So initially I will start
with basic training, then when it
get closer, I will concentrate
more on the competition

SEE page 12

ed with

MELINDA BASTIAN in action...

Although she will also graduate this year,
McDonald, according to Hyland, ran a colle-
giate best of 14.04 in the 100 hurdles and is
ranked at number nine in the nation.

That time has qualified her for the nationals
and is on the provisional list for the hep-
tathalon. McDonald also competes in the high
jump, but she didn’t qualify for the nationals.

Bastian, who last year competed in volley-
ball and softball, had a full season in track
and field where she had a season’s best of
49.97 metres in the javelin that has her ranked
at No.3 in the nation and is ranked at No.14 in
the heptathalon.

At present, Bastian holds both Benedict
College and the regional records in both the
javelin and heptathalon.

“She is probably the most promising one
of all of our athletes to get All-American hon-

SEE page 12

ee

~ Phelps’

bs three-month

\ suspension
dl .
| is Over...
See page 15

fe
il

Miami Gardens
Express will not
take part in
track meet

mg By BRENT STUBBS
Senior Sports Reporter
bstubbs@tribunemedia. net

ONE day after
announcing the partic-
ipation of the Miami
Gardens Express team
at the second annual
Coach Fritz Grant
Invitational Track
Classic, patron/sponsor
Harrison Petty
revealed that they
won't be coming any-
more.

Petty said when he
contacted the coach of
the team, which had athletes compete
in the Junior Olympics, he discovered
that they didn’t have any passports
and hence would not be able to travel
on Thursday as planned to compete
this weekend at the Thomas A Robin-
son Track and Field Stadium.

“When I contacted the coach to con-
firm their participation, he said ‘oh,
we're ready, we’re coming on Thurs-
day,” Petty said. “I asked him if every-
body had passports and he said ‘pass-
ports? Do we need passports to come
to the Bahamas?”

The coach had informed Petty that
five years ago when he and his wife
visited the Bahamas, they didn’t need
a passport.

“T told him that the law has changed,
so they can’t leave without the pass-
ports,” Petty said. “So we have to
scrape that group from the meet.”

Petty, whose Petty Group of Com-
panies are the major sponsors for the
meet, said it’s quite disappointing that
the young athletes won’t be able to
compete.

“They were all hyped up to come.
The parents were coming too,” he said.
“But there’s nothing we can do.”

While the juniors have been elimi-
nated, Petty said the senior segment
now has about four Jamaicans and a
Haitian competitor coming in.

“One of the Jamaicans has already
ran 10.19 in the 100 and there’s a quar-
ter-miler who has ran 45.20, so the
senior competition is going to be
extremely exciting,” Petty said.

And even though the Miami Gar-
dens Express are not coming to town,
Petty said the juniors should still have
some excitement with the introduc-
tion of the Shuttle Hurdle Relay.

“These kids would have certainly
added favour to it as our athletes mix
and match to compete with them,”
Petty said. “But they are not coming,
but we will still have a very good
meet.”

Just yesterday, Petty said coach
Dwayne Jennings decided to bring a
team in from Grand Bahama to com-
pete. “We didn’t have any entrants
from Grand Bahama,” Petty said. “But
he said he will e-mail his entries to
meet director Bernard (Newbold)
today. So the excitement is building
for a very good meet.”

The meet is scheduled to kick off
5:30pm Friday and wrap up Saturday,
starting at noon.



WHEN TOU THINK EXPLOSIVE TRACKS AMD GAPTI-
VATING HOOKS; you think Padnino! Mo stranger bo fhe
Mus ingusiry A Padnino’s birth name Rony Beye he
aver 10 years of experience in the game. Born a
In the Bahamas, he soent mest of his POUNger years an
the Gland and ihe vert on fo five in fhe USA tor about 7
YES TO PUPS Misa

Making his mark in 2003, fer co-produced tor fark
Middlenton fomnerk: orihe GRAMATY AVAL Wenning
R&B group Black Street He op wrote and produced
Mark's first single “Constant and co produced and ap
‘TOE Several SONGS On the album leading Mark to (Sony
Records). Pacino went on to produee for Young & Qub
(Del JanvASMG along with Pastor Trey (Linivercal
Records}

In ale A008 Padrino returned ta the Bahamas to find a
Slarvingy music industry ready for change and growth
He Quackly became one of the met influential producers.
Bred writers. imi fhe indusbry and began producing many
radio hits. Me his helped develop artists le Daddi
Whites (242, Change The Word), Shuce (it ls What i bs),
NCity (Calling You Out, Locked Up), Porter The Poel (Gat

Tala Sofa Mdees, and many more. All
whch Mave been in fener radio rotation
both in the Carihean and Intemational
Markets.

He then teamed we with Fey ‘Milions® fdlinnus
1) become Co Cwners in what & ane of the most re-
Spected Tecording shuckos in the Bahamas, “The White
House

Padning took 2 2 monih bresk ie lite PO0E bo work on hie
Solo project which is mow one od the mcest articinated al-
burs to drag “inauguraion Day", Thes record promises to
be asacthy what the industry has been misting, Swagga,
Originality and of course someshing for the ladies. The first
20 from tha album Worries ii the Dance*

5 fo their teat

2 ELON DO Mey SUT ieees ered

what's happening now inthe work. | iry bo lel it by a
reelection of me My personality, ow alr OOae and my
Creaiveness. | make i ‘ourimusic’, music fer the people
(try #0 Oring change tan uncertain world of musi: ane
make f accessible 10 al who desins a chance. Someone
had fo ge me 8 chance, mder its my tum.”

onngs listen

eT rerer yy



MAY 16, -O09

BUTLER & SANDS
GROUNDS, JFK

- =



PAGE 16, WEDNESDAY, MAY 6, 2009 THE TRIBUNE
LOCAL NEWS











































For the Love Of...

eee eLCu eam tial ee AMI Fun Walk.

This gift is for the love I 2 000 take to streets



have for you.

for annual fun walk

Receive 10 - 60% off select merchandise Atlantic Medical Insurance Company holds event

THERE was camaraderie,enthu- one at the event. Drew said he is he has participated in five AMI
May At = 10€ siasm and lots of sweat as the looking forward to walking next —_ walks so far.

Atlantic Medical Insurance Compa- year. He said what he enjoys most
7 1 ny (AMI) hosted its 11th Annual Peter Rutherford, another partic- | about the annual walk is the cama-
Free Gift with every Purc hase aA wae from Montagu Beach to ipant in the event, said: “Doing raderie.
Paradise Island and back recently. something is better than doing “Atlantic Medical has done a
! a The event, which is geared toward —_ nothing in order to stay healthy and ~—s great job of promoting healthy
promoting healthy lifestyles, attract- _ fit.” lifestyles among our people,” he said.
ed over 2,000 participants including Mr Rutherford, assistant general Former Minister of Trade and

adults and children who came out manager of customer service at Industry Leslie Miller is also a regu-
as early as 6.30am to begin their trek. BEC, joined the group for his morn- __ lar participant in the event. He said

While the underlying theme has ing walk. AMI has been doing a wonderful
always been healthy living and He said he was particularly job at keeping Bahamians fit for
healthy lifestyles, this year Atlantic pleased to see the children partici- many years and it has always been a
Medical chose to focus on children —_ pating in the fun walk, as children __ privilege for him to walk with his
by encouraging them to lead healthy — should also strive to lead healthy —_ fellow Bahamians.

lifestyles from a young age on. lifestyles. Being an ardent jogger himself,

Among the walkers and runners Minister of Health Dr Hubert Mr Miller said “it has been proven
was general manager and executive Minnis also joined AMI for his _ that exercising and staying fit will
vice-president of Atlantic Medical morning walk. help persons to live longer, it makes
Lynda Gibson. Speaking to one of the country’s you feel good and it helps one’s brain

“We are very happy that the peo- — major health challenges, obesity - function better when the body is fit
ple of the Bahamas continue to sup- | Dr Minnis said medical statistics and healthy.”
port us,” she said. “Our 11th yearis show that some 65 per cent of the Jillian Bartlett, a representative
asignificant one because we arenow Bahamian population is considered _ of Bally’s Total Fitness, said the fun
instituting our ‘Healthy Kids are —_ obese or overweight, a fact that has — walk is a great way to get both adults
Happy Kids’ programme. We _ had a great impact upon chronic —_ and children excited about the idea
believe it is best to teach them to —_ non-communicable diseases affecting _—_ of being fit.

live healthy lives while they are the country. She, too, encouraged Bahamians
young.” The fun walk, he said,isastepin to get serious about their health.
Eleven-year-old Drew Bastian, the right direction in a bid to combat As in previous years, proceeds
who participated in the AMI fun __ this challenge. from the fun walk will be donated to
walk with his parents, has been He said he is pleased that Atlantic — the Cancer Society of the Bahamas

attending the event for most of his | Medical has been such anexemplary and the Bahamas Diabetic Associa-
life. He said his favourite part is | corporate citizen by encouraging __ tion in aid of research and commu-
meeting new people, seeing new Bahamian adults and children to nity programmes being carried out
faces and the enthusiasm of every- _ lead healthy lifestyles and noted that — by both organisations.

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(Nail Tenia Hermane Thompson (Hair Stylist). Missing from the photo: JeRome
Miller (Master Hairstylist), Sharon Thompson (Nail Technician) and Yolanda Contreras (Hair Stylist).

) OPehk Wlondky JOann>4pra ° Wuestlay » Sarurcay Sana - Spina







@ By NEIL HARTNELL
Tribune Business Editor

idelity Bank
(Bahamas) yesterday
blamed the global
economic downturn
for delaying its high-
er net income objectives by “12 to
18 months”, with its chief execu-
tive attributing a 10.5 per cent
decline in its fiscal 2008 profits to
investment for future gain and
increased deposit costs.

Anwer Sunderji, who is also
chairman and chief executive of
its 75 per cent majority share-
holder and parent company,
Fidelity Bank & Trust Interna-
tional, said the commercial bank
was “where we want to be”, hav-
ing used the 12 months to Decem-
ber 31, 2008, to position itself for
future earnings growth.

Fidelity Bank (Bahamas) had
projected that net income growth
would occur in 2009 and 2010, as
a result of the investments made
and expanded balance sheet, but
Mr Sunderji acknowledged that

THE TRIBUNE

usine

WEDNESDAY,



MAY 6,



2009

SECTION B ¢ business@tribunemedia.net

Fidelity eyes 12-18 month profit delay

achieving these
objectives was
likely to be
impacted - and
delayed - by the
global economic
downturn.

For instance,
while the BISX-
listed bank had
grown its loan
portfolio by 30.2
per cent year-
over-year, from
$152.716 million
tO $198.862 million as at Decem-
ber 31, 2008, Mr Sunderji pro-
jected more modest growth of 10
per cent for fiscal 2009.

He added that Fidelity Bank
(Bahamas) capital ratios were
“extremely strong”, with its Tier I
capital under the Basle accord
“exceeding 20 per cent”.

And Mr Sunderji said Fidelity
Bank (Bahamas) ranked second
behind Finance Corporation of
the Bahamas (FINCO) in terms
of the share of mortgage market
growth it took in 2008. The bank

A Sunderji

Government coy on Arawak port

m@ By CHESTER ROBARDS
Business Reporter
crobards@tribunemedia.net

THE RELOCATION of downtown Nassau’s container shipping
facilities to Arawak Cay seems to be going ahead as planned, accord-
ing to sources close to the developmen, despite the Government’s
reluctance to discuss the project and the Deputy Prime Minister’s
seeming lack of knowledge regarding the project.

When asked whether the container shipping relocation project was
going ahead, Brent Symonette simply told Tribune Business: “No

Idea!”

However, a thoroughfare being constructed from John F Kennedy
Drive to Saunders Beach is suspected to be a part of the new Arawak
Cay container port’s proposed road infrastructure, which will link to a
causeway connecting with a proposed 75-acre man made island off

Saunders Beach.

However, Mr Symonette said this new road was simply another

corridor planned as part of the $120
million New Providence Road

SEE PORT, page 5B

‘Substantial crisis’ for debt
burdened Bahamian firms

@ By NEIL HARTNELL
Tribune Business Editor

BAHAMIAN businesses car-
rying debt loads on their balance
sheets are facing “a substantial
crisis” with almost one in five
commercial loans in arrears, the
Bahamas Chamber of Com-
merce’s president said yesterday,
as he urged the Government not
to impose new or increased taxes
on the private sector in the
upcoming Budget.

Dionisio D’ Aguilar, who is also
Superwash’s president, said the
fact that 18.9 per cent of com-
mercial loans were in arrears at
end-March 2009 showed Bahami-
an businesses were “hurting”,
with almost none have foreseen
or prepared themselves for the
severity of the current economic
downturn.

“My gut reaction is that, as pro-
jected, things are bad and things








The information contained is from a third
party and The Tribune can not be held
tesponsible for errors and/or omission
from the daily report.

Sale Ends
May 16th

* Chamber chief says one in
five commercial loan defaults
shows need for government to
impose no new or increased
taxes in Budget

* Superwash sales down 10%
every month for year-to-date

are going to probably get worse
before they get better,” Mr
D’ Aguilar told Tribune Business
of the 3.37 per cent increase in
commercial loan arrears in
March.

“When one in five loans are in
arrears, it sends a clear message
that things are not good. I guess
no one knew how bad it was
going to get, but when you get
one in five commercial loans in
arrears, it demonstrates the busi-
ness community is hurting. That is
backed up by the fact local import
duties are down so substantially
because there is less economic
activity.

“Clearly, most businesses were
not prepared or braced for a
recession as long and hard and
deep as this one. One in five busi-
nesses with loans are catching
hell.”

In many cases, Mr D’ Aguilar
said Bahamian businesses - small,
medium and large - had seen their
top-line revenues decline year-
over-year by anywhere between
10-50 per cent, putting them in
immediate difficulties when it
came to covering overheads and
meeting debt repayments.

Although not in trouble, the
Chamber president said his own
Superwash laundromat chain had
experienced these trends.

“January to August was flat in
2008, and then October, Novem-
ber, December saw a precipitous
decline - a 10, 11, 12 per cent rev-

SEE page 5B



ROYAL SFIDELITY

* BISX-listed bank says downturn may hinder increased
net income target, after 10.5% decline in 2008 profit
* Projects 10% loan growth for 2009, compared
to 30 per cent in 2008, due to economy
* Capital ratios ‘extremely strong’ at over 20%, with bank taking
second largest share or mortgage market growth in 2008 at 15%
* Defaulted loans 50% of banking sector average

had a 15 per cent share of the
growth, something Mr Sunderji
described as “a significant num-
ber”, and second only to FINCO
which had a 40 per cent share.
“We had set out to grow our
balance sheet, which we did sub-
stantially. That was our plan,” Mr
Sunderji said. “Our loan book
grew, and positioned us for high-
er net income going forward.
“By and large, we’re where we
expected to be, and 2009 and 2010
is where the bottom line recovery
is expected. Quite frankly, this
global financial crisis has delayed
some of our objectives that we’re

trying to reach, so we might be
off 12-18 months.”

For fiscal 2008, Fidelity Bank
(Bahamas) saw its net income
drop from $1.467 million in 2007
to $1.313 million. The bank saw
good top line growth, with inter-
est income up 53.3 per cent to
$17.312 million.

Yet this did not filter through
completely to net income, due to
a 92.5 per cent rise in net interest
expense to $9.812 million, com-
pared to $5.097 million the year
before.

“Our margins were compressed
because the cost of money went

up,” Mr Sunderji said. “We suf-
fered some margin deterioration,
which kept net income about
flat.”

Net interest income was still
up by 19.3 per cent at $8.783 mil-
lion, and total income almost $2
million ahead of 2007. However,
this was more than cancelled out
by a more than $2 million
increase in expenses, with both
salaries and benefits and general
and administrative expenses rising
by around $1 million compared
to 2007 figures.

SEE page 3B

Tribunal moves over royalties rate creation

@ By NEIL HARTNELL
Tribune Business Editor

THE Copyright Royalties Tribunal has “started
research” on the creation of compensation rates to
remunerate Bahamian artists for use of their copy-
righted works, its chairman telling Tribune Busi-
ness yesterday that the body wanted to raise this
nation’s intellectual property rights regime to “inter-
national best practice” standards.

Attorney Kirkwood Seymour said that despite
the Tribunal’s somewhat “limited mandate”
focused on ensuring that Bahamian artists and enter-
tainers in all fields received the appropriate royalties
compensation for the use of their works.

Acknowledging that there was much to do in
enhancing the Bahamas intellectual property rights
regime, especially its coverage and enforcement,

* Body wants to establish collection/claims
process for Bahamian artists and rights holders

, it was

Mr Seymour said the Tribunal was working to estab-

lish royalty/compensation rates and a process for




Make it a reality.






























* Concern on cable TV compulsory licence
* Aiming to take Bahamas in line with
‘international best practices’ on
intellectual property rights

how these could be paid and collected.

The Tribunal was hoping to complete this work
within the next few weeks, Mr Seymour said, and
two months at latest, although the final decision
would rest with the minister responsible, attorney-
general Michael Barnett.

He added that “progress” had been made, with
the Tribunal having been given a site in the Royal

SEE page 3B

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‘A little
troubled’ by
stagflation
risk

@ By NEIL HARTNELL
Tribune Business Editor

A FORMER Ga
finance minister
said yesterday he
was “a little bit
troubled” by the
fact the
Bahamas may be
facing the spec-
tre of stagflation
- an economy in
recession with
increasing unem-
ployment, and
rising prices at
the same time.

James Smith, CFAL’s chair-
man, who was minister of state
for finance in the former Christie
administration from 2002-2007,
told Tribune Business that the
Central Bank of the Bahamas’
report on monthly economic
developments for March 2009
showed evidence of rising infla-
tion occurring simultaneously
with mounting unemployment.

“What I found a little bit trou-
bling in the report was that infla-
tion almost doubled,” Mr Smith
explained. “That harks back to
the 1970s when you had stagfla-
tion - you had the stagnant
economies, but prices were going
up, impacting households.”

Inflation for the 12-months to
March 2009 stood at 4.9 per cent,
unchanged from February but up
from the 2.4 per cent comparison a
year earlier.

SEE page 5B



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PAGE 2B, WEDNESDAY, MAY 6, 2009

THE TRIBUNE















































MOET NECTAR ROSE
WAS $96.00

GRAHAM BECK ROSE

KORBEL BRUT ROSE
WAS $21.55

BERINGER
WHITE ZINFANDEL
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DEPARTMENT OF STATISTICS
EXPORT/IMPORT PRICE SURVEY

During the month of May, 2009
The Department of Statistics will
conduct a _ pricing survey. The
staff of The Department will visit
selected businesses throughout
New Providence & Grand Bahama
to collect prices of various
commodities. The Department will
therefore be seeking the co-operation
of businesses involved in exporting
and importing as we embark upon this

most important exercise.

THE DEPARTMENT OF STATISTICS
APPRECIATES YOUR SUPPORT &
CO-OPERATION

as ae
It’s not all about you

LISTED here are the top 10
issues that stop you and your
sales staff from winning busi-
ness. They were created by
Drew J. Stevens, PhD.

1. Stop talking about you.
Yes, that’s right. Stop talking
about you. No one cares.
Kennedy stated: “Ask what you
can do for your country.” That
said, ask what you can do for
your client.

2. Stop talking, period. Your
creator gave you one mouth
and two ears. For some of us,
our one mouth is wider than the
space allotted for both of our
ears combined. Take the cot-
ton out of your ears and put it in
your mouth. Stop talking and
listen to the client needs.

3. Provide value. Too often,
selling professionals continual-
ly mention features.

Customers purchase based on
the value they gain from your
service. Turn features into ben-
efits.

Promotional
Marketing

Lacon erm MTICeCOyTT



4. Stop Closing. Yes, I said:
“Stop closing.” The notion of
closing based on ridiculous
questioning techniques and sta-
tistics is false. You gain busi-
ness when you engage in par-
ticipative conversation. Rela-
tionship controls the business.

5. Procrastination. Too many
selling professionals are not
organised, and spend much time
shying away from undesired
calls and paperwork. Wasted
time is what builds. Do the
things you hate to do first, and
end your day on a crescendo.

6. Asking inane questions.
Customers cringe when selling
representatives call and state:
“How are you doing today?”

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Unless you are a relative, stop
repeating clichéd lines. The
sweetest sound people hear is
their name. Repeat it, and the
purpose for your call.

7. Reach decision makers. Be
creative, and use different meth-
ods to reach the unreachables. I
once read of someone who
bought a coconut and wrote the
words: “You’re a tuff nut to
crack”, boxed it and sent it to an
unreachable. It worked!

8. Selling is a profession, sim-
ilar to that of a doctor, lawyer
and architect. Selling profes-
sionals must conduct themselves
similarly. Discover information
on the company and develop
three reasons for connecting
with them.

9. Database. Keep your own
records of clients and potential
clients. Write notes of when and
who you called. If you get the
person on the line, write notes.
If you promise to do something
in a specified time, write notes
and do it.

10. Did I mention stop talking
about you? Stop selling your-
self. You’re here for one rea-
son and that is to provide a ben-
efit for that client. If you can’t
provide benefit, you are wasting
everybody’s time. Simple, yet
profound

All of these marketing strate-
gies are certain to keep your
business on top during these
challenging economic times.
Have a productive and prof-
itable week! Remember:
“THOSE WHO MARKET
WILL MAKE IT.”

NB: Scott Farrington is pres-
ident of SunTee EmbroidMe, a
promotional and marketing
company specialising in pro-
motional products.

Established over 27 years
ago, SunTee EmbroidMe has
assisted Bahamian businesses
in various industries - from
tourism and banking - and
telecommunications in market-
ing themselves. Readers can
contact Mr Farrington at Sun-
Tee EmbroidMe on East
Shirley Street, by e-mail at
scott@sun-tee.com or by tele-
phone at 242-393-3104.

PUBLIC NOTICE

Mass Disconnection of All
Post-paid Cellular Accounts

BIC will conduct mass
disconnection on all post-paid
cellular accounts that have exceeded

their Credit Limit

on

Thursday May 7th

Customers are asked to ensure
that their accounts are current to
avoid disconnection.

For more information

CALL BIC (225-5282) or www.bicbahamas.com



THE TRIBUNE



WEDNESDAY, MAY 6, 2009, PAGE 3B

rr "> -<>~ ee
GB Power investor earns $1.1m

A 25 per cent shareholder in
Grand Bahama Power Company
yesterday revealed that its invest-
ment had generated earnings of
$1.1 million for it in the 2009 first
quarter, implying that the utility
made a $4.4 million profit.

Emera, the Canadian power
giant that holds a 50 per cent
stake in BISX-listed ICD Utili-
ties, purchased its stake for $42.3
million from Lady Henrietta St
George in September 2008.

Grand Bahama Power Com-
pany has 137 megawatts of gen-
eration capacity, and some 19,000

FIDELITY, from 1B

customers on the island.

The company is currently doing
a $250,000 wind power study on
Grand Bahama in conjunction
with Emera.

E O Ferrell, Grand Bahama
Power’s chief executive, said it
was a possible first step towards
the use of renewable energy on
Grand Bahama. “This is an excit-
ing new chapter in energy gener-
ation on Grand Bahama island,”
he said. “The use of the wind has
the advantage of lessening our
dependence on expensive import-
ed oil, and producing energy with-

out emissions.”

Mr Ferrell noted that wind gen-
eration technology has been
proven across Europe and is
widely used in the US. He said
the objective of the study was to
determine if there was sufficient
wind quantity and duration on
Grand Bahama to make the
investment in wind turbines a
viable alternative for Grand
Bahama Power customers.

Carlton Bosfield, the project
manager, said the study will be
conducted in three phases. He
said the first phase involves tow-

er erection in various parts of
Grand Bahama. In addition to
the Dover Sound site, other sites
have been identified — two in East
Grand Bahama, one Holmes
Rock in West Grand Bahama,
and at the Container Port Navi-
gation Tower at the Garnet
Levarity Highway.

Mr Bosfield said the second
phase will involve the collecting
of wind data. He said if it was
determined that wind power is an
acceptable alternative, then they
will move to the third phase,
which is the development phase.

However, Mr Sunderji said Fidelity Bank
(Bahamas) said it had not expected bottom
line growth in 2008, because it was investing in
new products and an expanded branch net-
work that would bear fruit in the future.

“It’s because we opened a new branch at
Robin Hood and introduced Visa credit
cards,” Mr Sunderji said of the expense
increases. “This required us to gear up for
the launch of the cards, getting a full comple-
ment of staff and marketing.

“Both those initiatives were quite costly
and did not contribute revenue until the last
quarter. It’s this year that we expect to bene-
fit from these initiatives.” Some 17 new staff

Tribunal moves over royalties rate creation

were added to the bank for these programmes.

Still, some analysts have been left unim-
pressed, telling Tribune Business that the
increased expenses and flat top-line showed
there were inefficiencies in Fidelity Bank
(Bahamas) operations and that it was strug-
gling to achieve the scale necessary for it to be
competitive.

Yet Mr Sunderji said Fidelity Bank
(Bahamas) had achieved its scale, balance
sheet and loan objectives for 2008, adding
that it had attracted new customers by wrap-
ping loan products with savings features, such
as its Moneyback Mortgage.

However, with the deterioration in credit
quality as a result of the recession, Mr Sunderji

said 2009 would see a renewed focus on cred-
it quality and cost containment. Resources
had been redeployed to concentrate on
restructuring and rewriting loans owed by
clients having difficulties meeting their oblig-
ations.

However, Mr Sunderji said Fidelity Bank
(Bahamas) non-performing loans were “50
per cent of the banking sector average”, stand-
ing at $6.734 million or 3.34 per cent of the
total portfolio, compared to 2.53 per cent or
$3.916 million the year before.

Some 80 per cent of the bank’s loans, he
added, were secured by a first mortgage on the
borrower’s primary residence, helping to mit-
igate the risk.



FROM page 1B

Victoria Gardens, where it was
in the process of establishing a
physical office. Permission had
also been given within the last
month for the Tribunal to hire a
part-time secretary, who was now
employed and getting its website,
telephones, e-mail and office up
and running.

“We've started research and
embarked on inquires in other
countries to see how they use
their expertise to establish [roy-
alty] rates,” Mr Seymour told Tri-
bune Business. “There are no
rates at this time. We’ve
embarked on that process.”

The Copyright Royalties Tri-
bunal has oversight over a fund,
into which compensation for
copyrighted works is paid in antic-
ipation that the owners will make
a claim for remuneration.

The fund currently holds
around $3 million, Mr Seymour
said yesterday, but currently its
only contributor is Cable
Bahamas. The BISX-listed entity
makes payments into the fund as
compensation to the program-
mers and rights holders for some
of the content it transmits in the
Bahamas.

However, none of those pro-
grammers to date have made a
claim on the fund, largely due, it
is believed, because in their eyes
they do not want to ‘legitimise’
Cable Bahamas’ use of their sig-
nals and content due to the ongo-
ing dispute they have with the
company.

Mr Seymour told Tribune Busi-
ness that Cable Bahamas was
“almost up to date” with its pay-
ments to the Fund, adding: “They
were just about one year behind.
We got another payment from
them last week.

“They’re aware they have some
things to do, especially with the
compulsory licence about to
expire. We have discussed this at
the Tribunal level, and are going
to communicate our concerns
about its renewal without the

a
NAD

Nassau Airport
Dovelopmont Campany

means to control the payment or
collection of contributions to the
Fund.”

The Bahamas’ compulsory
licensing regime for Cable
Bahamas is considered by the US
programming industry and copy-
right holders as too broad and
not providing compensation for
their works at ‘fair market rates’.

Mr Seymour described the
licence as a “sticking point” in
discussions with the US Trade
Representative’s Office over the
Bahamas’ intellectual property
rights protection and enforcement
regime, adding: “We’re going to
have to, at some point, review all
of that and see if there is a way to
offer the service and have intel-
lectual property rights protection
at the same time.”

“What we’re hoping to do is
bring this regime up to interna-
tional best practices for the
Bahamas,” Mr Seymour said.
“It’s the enforcement thing that’s
really created a bit of a problem.

“My concern is especially that
artists get rewarded for their
works, or otherwise they will have
no incentive to create. We have
all that in front of us as a mandate
for what we want to achieve.
We’re moving in the right direc-
tion.

“We see our work cut out for
us, but are encouraged because
we’ve been able to make some
progress and aim to take it to the
next level. It’s taken too long.”

Mr Seymour said the Tribunal
had held preliminary discussions
with the Performing Rights Soci-
ety of the UK, including talks on
how to claim from its Fund as no
claims had yet been submitted.

“There are some Bahamians
that are part of the Performing
Rights Society of the UK, mem-
bers there, and we want to make
sure artists in the Bahamas and
elsewhere are compensated for
their works.”

The Tribunal’s other members
are accountant James Gomez and
artist Stan Burnside.

TENDER

C-112 Warehouse

Nassau Arpor Development Company (HAD) i ploased 10
annaunoe the release of Tender 0-112 Vierehouse far Stage
1 of the Lynden Finding Intemational Ainport Expansion.
The Scope of Wark includes:
Detailed design, supply, and installalian af a pre-
manufactured meta warehouse building with
appronimale dimension of 70 fx 175 ft
Civ works induding site fil, grading, compaction,
foundations and slab on grade designed to suit
pre-manufachired metal warehouse building,
“Ublity works induding sanitary, power,
communication and water service;
-Formal submission to tha Minisiry of Works to finalize
Sulding pemal and laaang wilh Bahamas Bleectic
Company for power service

The ©-112 Warehouse Tender Documents wil be avaiable
for pick up or electronic distnbution after 3:00pm, April

16th, 2009

Contach TRAM BREET

Contracts and Procurement Manager

Phe 24) 1086 | Fane: (a) SPAT
PO. Goo AP SS320, Meeereu, Gebers:

Emad traci brishyfines bs



coer accra i ic. ATT

Chega: H rd

tr pong THN Your pemaens

NOTICE

NOTICE is hereby given that IMELDA DORVIL of CORDEAUX
AVE., P.O. BOX N-4394, NASSAU, BAHAMAS, is applying to the
Minister responsible for Nationality and Citizenship, for registration/

naturalization as a citizen of The Bahamas, and that any person
who knows any reason why registration/naturalization should not
be granted, should send a written and signed statement of the
facts within twenty-eight days from the 297 day of April, 2009 to
the Minister responsible for nationality and Citizenship, PRO. Box
N-7147, Nassau, Bahamas.

NOTICE

NOTICE is hereby given that JOY CYNTHIA TILBAYNE of
WOOD BURN ESTATE, P.O, BOX N-4303, NASSAU, BAHAMAS,
is applying to the Minister responsible for Nationality and Citizenship,
for registration/naturalization as a citizen of The Bahamas, and that
any person who knows any reason why registration/naturalization
should not be granted, should send a written and signed statement
of the facts within twenty-eight days from the 6â„¢ day of May, 2009
to the Minister responsible for nationality and Citizenship, PO. Box
N-7147, Nassau, Bahamas.



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What is a Credit Limit?

Credit limits are assigned amounts that you cannot exceed on
a monthly basis. Once you exceed your credit limit your
account is suspended until payment. For more information
please call our Credit & Collections Department at 225-5282.

YOUR CONWECTIO

O THE WORLD

For more information
CALL BIC (225-5282) ow www.btcbahamas.com





PAGE 4B, WEDNESDAY, MAY 6, 2009

Legal Notice

NOTICE
MANSUETUS CORP.

(In Voluntary Liquidation)

Notice is hereby given that the above-named
Company is in dissolution, which commenced

on the 29th day of April 2009. The Liquidator is
Argosa Corp. Inc., P.O. Box N-7757 Nassau,

Bahamas.

ARGOSA CORP. INC.
(Liquidator)

LEGAL NOTICE
Clico (Bahamas) Limited

(In Liquidation)

Nie: @ hereby given that the above-named Compmy is in
liquidation, commencing the 7" day of April, 2009. Creditors having
debts or claims against the Company are required to send particulars
to Craig A. (Tony) Gomez, Official Liquidator of the said Company at
the offices of Baker Tilly Gomez, The Deanery, No. 28 Cumberland
Street, P.O. Box N-1991, Nassau, Bahamas and if so required by
notice in writing from the said Liquidator, to come in and prove the
faad debts or claims at such time and place a3 ahall be specified in
such noe, or in default thereof, they will be excluded from any
distribution made before such debts are proved or precloded fom
objecting to any such distribution

Dated this 22â„¢ day of April, 2008

CRAIG A. (TONY) GOMEZ
Official Liquidator

Legal Notice

NOTICE

Pursuant to the provisions of Section 137 of the
International Business Companies Act, (No. 45 of
2000), NOTICE is hereby given that Jumani Corp. is
in dissolution and the date of commencement of the
dissolution is 1 May 2009.

Margaret Tatem-Gilbert and Lorna Kemp
LIQUIDATORS
c/o EFG Bank & Trust (Bahamas) Ltd
1 Bay Street
2â„¢ Floor, Centre of Commerce
P.O. Box SS-6289
Nassau, Bahamas

NOTICE

EXXONMOBIL EXPLORATI
LIMITED

N MOROCC

Pursuant to the provisions of Section 137 (8) of the
International Business Companies Act 2000, notice
is hereby given that the above-named Company has
been dissolved and struck off the Register pursuant
to a Certificate of Dissolution issued by The
Registrar General on the 1st day of May, A.D., 2009.

Dated the 5th day of May, A.D., 2009.

Gary Johnsen

Liquidator of

EXXONMOBIL EXPLORATION
MOROCCO LIMITED

NOTICE

ESSO ANGOLA GAS COMPANY LIMITED

Pursuant to the provisions of Section 137 (8) of the
International Business Companies Act 2000, notice
is hereby given that the above-named Company has
been dissolved and struck off the Register pursuant
to a Certificate of Dissolution issued by The Registrar
General on the 1st day of May, A.D., 2009.

Dated the 5th day of May, A.D., 2009.

Gary Johnsen
Liquidator of
ESSO ANGOLA GAS COMPANY LIMITED

Td

Legal Notice

NOTICE
WHITE STALLION

INDUSTRIAL LTD.

(In Voluntary Liquidation)

Notice is hereby given that the above-named
Company is in dissolution, which commenced
on the 26th day of January 2009. The Liquidator
is Argosa Corp. Inc., P.O. Box N-7757 Nassau,

Bahamas.

ARGOSA CORP. INC.
(Liquidator)

Legal Notice

NOTICE
KEYCOVE MANAGEMENT LTD.

(In Voluntary Liquidation)





















Notice is hereby given that the above-named
Company is in dissolution, which commenced
on the 29th day of April 2009. The Liquidator is
Argosa Corp. Inc., P.O. Box N-7757 Nassau,

Bahamas.

ARGOSA CORP. INC.
(Liquidator)

NOTICE

INTERNATIONAL BUSINESS COMPANIES ACT. 2000
No. 45 of 2000

HILBERRY INTERNATIONAL LIMITED

Notice is hereby given that in accordance with Section
138 (8) of the International Business Companies Act, (No.
45 of 2000), the Dissolution of HILBERRY INTERNA-
TIONAL LIMITED has been completed, a Certificate of
Dissolution has been issued and the Company has there-
fore been struck off the Registrar. The date of completion
of the dissolution was the 30th day of April, 2009.

Totalserve Management Limited
TOTALSERVE MANAGEMENT LIMITED

NOTICE

EXXONMOBIL EXPLORATION AND
PRODUCTION (KENYA) LIMITED

Pursuant to the provisions of Section 137 (8) of the
International Business Companies Act 2000, notice
is hereby given that the above-named Company has
been dissolved and struck off the Register pursuant
to a Certificate of Dissolution issued by The
Registrar General on the 1st day of May, A.D., 2009.

Dated the 5th day of May, A.D., 2009.

Gary Johnsen

Liquidator of

EXXONMOBIL EXPLORATION AND
PRODUCTION

(KENYA) LIMITED

NOTICE
INTERNATIONAL BUSINESS COMPANIES ACT

No. 45 of 2000

VICENNE INVEST SA

Notice is hereby given that in accordance with Section
137 of The International Business Companies Act No.
45 of 2000, VICENNE INVEST SA is in dissolution.
The date of commencement of dissolution was the 4th
day of May, 2009. Dillon Dean of Nassau, Bahamas
is the Liquidator of VICENNE INVEST SA

Dillon Dean
LIQUIDATOR

THE TRIBUNE

$1000 CASH
ail aiD,

for return of missing
17” Apple MAC laptop computer
and blue USB Hard Drive

stolen from green jeep
parked at Parliment and Bay Street

NO QUESTIONS ASKED

CALL 468-9789



LEGAL NOTICE

CLICO (Bahamas) Limited
(In Liquidation)

Notice is hereby given that the above-named Company is in|
Liquidation, commencing the T day of April, 2009 and that Craig A. |

(Tony) Gomez, of Baker Tilly Gomez, The Deanery, No. 28

Cumberland Street, P.O. Box N-1991, Nassau, Bahamas is appointed |

the Official Liquidator of the saad Company.
Dated this 22â„¢ day of April, 20X19

CRAIG A. (TONY) GOMEZ
Official Liguadator

NOTICE
ECUALACT CORP.

In Voluntary Liquidation

Notice is hereby given that in accordance with Section
138(4) of the International Business Companies Act.
2000, ECUALACT CORP. is in dissolution as of
April 27, 2009. International Liquidator Services
Inc. situated at 35A Regent Street, P. O. Box 1777,
Belize City, Belize is the Liquidator.

LIQUIDATOR

NOTICE

EXXONMOBIL EXPLORATION AND
PRODUCTION (MOZAMBIQUE) LIMITED

Pursuant to the provisions of Section 137 (8) of the
International Business Companies Act 2000, notice
is hereby given that the above-named Company has
been dissolved and struck off the Register pursuant
to a Certificate of Dissolution issued by The Registrar
General on the 1st day of May, A.D., 2009.

Dated the 5th day of May, A.D., 2009.

Gary Johnsen

Liquidator of EXXONMOBIL
EXPLORATION AND PRODUCTION
(MOZAMBIQUE) LIMITED

NOTICE

INTERNATIONAL BUSINESS COMPANIES ACT. 2000
No. 45 of 2000

CALDTON INVESTMENTS LIMITED

Notice is hereby given that in accordance with Section
138 (8) of the International Business Companies Act, (No.
45 of 2000), the Dissolution of CALDTON INVEST-
MENTS LIMITED has been completed, a Certificate of
Dissolution has been issued and the Company has there-
fore been struck off the Registrar. The date of completion
of the dissolution was the 30th day of April, 2009.

Totalserve Management Limited
TOTALSERVE MANAGEMENT LIMITED



THE TRIBUNE

WEDNESDAY, MAY 6, 2009, PAGE 5B





PORT, from 1B

Improvement Project, being con-
structed by the Argentine firm,
Jose Cartellone Construction
Company (JCCC).

Mr Symonette began to say
that if the proposed Arawak Cay
development, which calls for such
a road, goes through it may be
incorporated into the design.
However, he wrapped-up his
statement by saying there is no
connection between the land
clearance presently ongoing for
the new road and the Arawak
Cay container port development.

Plans for the new container
port development, labelled ‘Draft
— For discussion purposes only’,
shows this new road connecting to
a causeway that spans the dis-
tance between Saunders Beach
and the proposed man-made con-
tainer port. A second causeway
then connects the container port
with Arawak Cay.

The Government appears to
be engaged in semantics, with the
Arawak Cay port project shroud-
ed in great secrecy and a seeming
lack of transparency. Those close
to the downtown revitalisation
project give credence to the idea
of the Arawak Cay container port

development and the Govern-
ment continuing projects relative
to “tentative” port development
plans, but keeping tight lipped on
its status as public scrutiny height-
ens,

Tribune Business understands
that details on the project are
being treated as a closely-guarded
secret by the Prime Minister’s
Office and a small, close-knit
group from the shipping industry
fraternity. Some have suggested
this is a deliberate tactic by the
Government to muzzle public dis-
cussion and dissent, given that
the Opposition PLP are under-
stood to be focusing on the issue
as one that could give them an
electoral boost similar to what
the Clifton Cay project did in
2002.

Tribune Business understands
that the Government also warned
the shipping industry, following
this newspaper’s revelations that
the Prime Minister had “changed
the rules of the game” regading
the Arawak Cay port’s financing,
that it might withdraw its support
for the project if further details
appeared in the press.

As a result, negotiations with
the Government are being han-
dled by Arawak Cay Port Devel-

opment Company chairman Jim-
my Mosko and a small group
close to him. Tribune Business
has been told that not all the pro-
posed 19-20 shareholders in the
company are fully in the loop as
to what is going on.

Sources close to the discussions
told Tribune Business that diffi-
culties had arisen because the
Prime Minister did not want any
debt financing, which would fund
the Arawak Cay port’s construc-
tion, to be secured by a first
charge mortgage/lien/debenture
over the land.

From the Government’s view-
point, this is undrstandable as the
Arawak Cay port land would be
leased to the private sector and
still owned by it. The Govern-
ment would not want its land to
be encumbered by a mortgage
placing the property under the
potential control of a financial
institution.

But other sources, while admit-
ting the financing for the Arawak
Cay port was in a “state of flux”,
said there was no plan for debt
financing to be secured by a mort-
gage.

PLP activist Paul Moss said
yesterday that he has also learned
of the Government’s intention to

go full steam ahead with the
Arawak Cay container port
development.

He argued that the develop-
ment will “have the effect of elim-
inating the beach (Saunders
Beach) through erosion and
access because of the bridge
(aforementioned causeway)”.

“This is wrong and we will not
stand for it,” he said. “All over
this country, beach access is being
denied to Bahamians. In fact the
proposed site at Arawak Cay is
the absolute wrong site for the
port.”

The Arawak Cay container
port was deemed in a study of
optional sites to be the sixth best
location for the Container Port,
with the fifth best option being
its present location downtown.

However, it has been widely
said that the revitalisation of
downtown Nassau can only begin
in earnest when the present con-
tainer facilities have been
removed.

When the former government
commissioned the study on the
container port relocation, they
decided that the Clifton area of
southwest Nassau would be the
best location for a deep-water
port. Yet the present government

‘A little troubled’ by stagflation risk

FROM page 1B

“Except for the slightly moderat-
ed rise in average transportation
costs (3 per cent) and a steadied
increase for furniture and household
operations (6.6 per cent), other com-
ponents of the Retail Price Index
rose at an accelerated pace,” the
Central Bank said.

“Of particular note were the aver-
age cost run-ups for food and bev-
erages (7.8 per cent), housing (3.6
per cent), recreation and entertain-
ment services (4.3 per cent) and
medical and healthcare (4.1 per
cent).

Meanwhile, the Department of
Statistics’ interim Labour Force
Survey showed that unemploy-
ment rates had increased to 12.1
per cent in New Providence and
14.1 per cent in Grand Bahama.
This raises the spectre that the
Bahamas is having to confront
both rising unemployment and
inflation.

Inflation, defined as a sustained
rise in the weighted average of
prices over a specific period, is
undesirable because it devalues
savings and erodes the living stan-
dards of persons on fixed
incomes, such as pensioners.

‘Substantial crisis’

FROM page 1B

enue decrease,” he added. “That
decrease has continued into 2009,
where every single month rev-
enues are down by at least 10 per
cent. Coin sales are down even
more, probably 15 per cent.”

Mr D’ Aguilar said the one sav-
ing grace for himself and other
businesses was the dramatic
decline in electricity and gasoline
costs as a result of the fall in oil
prices from their $147 per barrel
peak in July, but they were still
left to generate enough revenues
to cover fixed costs and over-
heads.

“T don’t think the private sector
was prepared for this,” Mr
D’ Aguilar said. “We had so many
years of feast that we got fat and
lazy, not lean and mean. Maybe
we over-extended ourselves. No
one could have projected rev-
enues would decrease by 25-35
per cent, double digits, in such a
short period of time.

“No one was prepared for that,
and as a result they could not
adjust cost structures fast enough
for such a precipitous decline rev-
enues. Some companies have had
10-40 per cent declines in rev-
enue; the car companies
decreased by 50 per cent.

“How could you have prepared
for such a scenario? We were all
piggybacking off out-of-control
spending and consumption. I did-
n’t think 18-20 per cent of com-
mercial loans would be in arrears.
I thought it would be 12-13 per
cent, and not as high as that.”

Referring to the data contained
in the Central Bank report, Mr
D’ Aguilar said: “This is clear
message to the Minister of
Finance, as he ponders his Budget
and sharpens his pencil, that
imposing additional taxes on busi-
ness does not bode well for that
sector of the economy.

“He should use this as an indi-
cation that companies are hurt-
ing, and this is not the time to
impose those additional taxes on
the business community. They
should look at things not being
taxed.”

Prime Minister Hubert Ingra-
ham, who holds the Minister of
Finance position, is due to pre-
sent the 2009-2010 Budget to the
House of Assembly in three
weeks’ time - by end of May. It is
likely to contain more deficit
spending and national debt
increases, as the Government
seeks to mitigate the impact from
the economic downturn.

If the Government was look-
ing for new and easy revenue
sources, the Chamber president
urged them to target gaming and
the burgeoning ‘numbers’ busi-

Explaining the stagflation issue,
Mr Smith told Tribune Business:
“It’s troublesome from the house-
hold point of view, because ris-
ing unemployment means there
is less income coming into the
household, and the income com-
ing in is being eaten up by rising
prices.

“So it’s having a very detri-
mental effect on low income
households. It’s one thing to have
less income, working two to three
days a week, but then to also have
that income eaten up by the food
store. It points to how open the
economy is, and being hit by the
increased price of imports.”

Mr Smith said the “almost dou-
bling” of the Government’s fis-
cal deficit to $173.4 million for
the first eight months of the 2008-
2009 Budget year was not unex-
pected, the expectation having
been for a “sizeable increase” due
to the fall-off in tourist arrivals
and economic activity, the latter
of which had reduced imports and
their related duties.

The 12.1 per cent drop in
departure taxes, Mr Smith told
Tribune Business, gave a good
indication of the pressure the
Bahamian tourism industry was
under. And the Government’s
planned social programmes and

borrowing to finance capital
works projects “point to a widen-
ing of the gap” for the remain-
der of this Budget year and 2009-
2010.

“You're probably going to see
it fall-off a little more in the
remaining four months,” Mr
Smith said of the fiscal deficit.
However, he added that the
deficit was not as wide as it could
have been, although with rev-
enues off by 4 per cent it was like-
ly to be equivalent to that
amount.

“The revenue performance,
though down, is doing better than
expected, because it appears that
the fall-off in air travel has been
compensated by other factors,”
the former minister said. “The
feeling is that there are some
compensating factors at work,
and it’s not as deep as expected.”

Mr Smith said the Central
Bank reported indicated that
hotel occupancy rates had exceed-
ed expectations, showing that the
Bahamas was perhaps benefiting
from its proximity to the US.

The Central Bank, in its report
on monthly economic developments
for March 2009, reported that year-
over year, the fiscal deficit for the
eight months to February 2009 had
increased by 86.9 per cent to $173.5

for debt burdened Bahamian firms

ness. “Government should seri-
ously look at that,” he said.

“Tf they’re looking for easy rev-
enue, gaming and the numbers
business is it. Everyone is expect-
ing them to do something about
it. Take the religious twist out of
it, and it’s a nice little revenue
earner.”

Mr D’ Aguilar also suggested
that, apart from attempting to
maximise the Bahamas Telecom-
munications Company’s (BTC)
purchase price, the Government
also tax the payment of dividends
by Bahamian subsidiaries to their
foreign parents. He did not iden-
tify which subsidiaries and com-
panies he was referring to, but is
likely to mean the foreign-owned
commercial banks.

The Chamber president sug-
gested that the banks would have
little choice but to rewrite or
restructure many commercial
loans on their books, for other-
wise they might be unable to
reclaim what was due to them.

Mr D’ Aguilar suggested that

they let troubled businesses make
interest-only repayments, and sus-
pend the repayment of principal.
He expressed concern that the
high level of commercial loan
arrears could encourage the
banks to switch lending away
from this sector to consumer
advances and mortgages, rather
than the productive areas of the
Bahamian economy.

Import duties, in particular, have
been heavily impacted by the down-
turn in economic activity that has
led to less demand for imported
goods. These duties, for the first
eight months of the 2008-2009 Bud-
get year, were down 26.91 per cent at
$251.5 million, compared to $344.1
million the year before.

Mr D’ Aguilar said this again
showed the need for the Govern-
ment to broaden its tax base beyond
the heavy reliance on international
trade and physical goods, which
accounted for 60 per cent of its rev-
enue base. He suggested that the tax
base could be broadened to encom-
pass services.

million, compared to $92.8 million
the year before.

The Central Bank said that for
the first eight months of the 2008-
2009 Budget year, total government
revenues fell by 4.2 per cent from
$873.4 million to $837.1 million,
while total recurrent spending rose
6.95 per cent from $836.7 million to
$894.8 million.

“Tn particular, tax receipts fell by
5.5 per cent to $758.7 million, owing
primarily to a 10 per cent reduction
in international trade taxes,” the
Central Bank said.

“Declines were also noted in
stamp taxes on financial and other
transactions (18.7 per cent) and in
departure taxes (12.1 per cent).
These outweighed the improvements
for business and professional taxes
(15.9 per cent), property taxes (5.2
per cent) and increased yields under
“other” unclassified revenue sources.
A 10.8 per cent gain was also record-
ed under non-tax revenues, at $78.4
million, reflecting a timing—related
increase in income receipts.

“On the expenditure side, current
spending firmed by 5.4 per cent to
$894.8 million, led by higher pay-
ments for wages and salaries (5 per
cent), contractual services (17.4 per
cent), interest costs on debt (6.9 per
cent) and subsidies (7.4 per cent),
mainly to quasi-public entities.”

asserts that Clifton would be too
expensive a development and
opted for Arawak Cay.

No environmental impact study
concerning the proposed man-
made island has surfaced of late,
and the Government has not vol-
unteered any information on
what the repercussions of building
an island and causeways for large
diesel trucks would be on the
public beach that would exist
alongside.

However, the downtown revi-
talisation project, which hinges
on the port’s removal, seems to




be picking up momentum, with
the announcement of the pub-
lic/private partnership body that
will oversee the development.
Mr Moss said he will continue
to call for the Arawak Cay con-
tainer port location to be recon-
sidered by the Government, and
called for intervention by envi-
ronmentalists and all Bahamians.
“We call on Sam Duncombe
to check this out and the
Bahamas National Trust to inter-
vene. We also call on the Bahami-
an people to stand up for once,”
he said. “Don’t let this happen!”

Bahamas Law Enforcement
Co-operative Credit Union Ltd


















NOTICE OF
ANNUAL GENERAL MEETING






THERE WILL NOT BE A SECOND
OF ee Oo ek DO
ACT 2005 SECTION 22









The 24" Annual General Meeting of the Bahamas
Law Enforcement Co-operative Credit Union Ltd will
be held on








Saturday, May 16", 2009






9:00 am






Paul H. Farquharson
Conference Centre
Police Headquarters
East Street












Refreshments will be provided





EAGLE ELECTRICAL






























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Tel (242) 341-4000 Fax (242) 341-5080
paglebahamas@gmail.com

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PAGE 6B, WEDNESDAY, MAY 6, 2009

Legal Notice

NOTICE
PINK SHELLS HOLDINGS LTD.

(In Voluntary Liquidation)

Notice is hereby given that the above-named
Company is in dissolution, which commenced
on the 29th day of April 2009. The Liquidator is
Argosa Corp. Inc., P.O. Box N-7757 Nassau,

Bahamas.

ARGOSA CORP. INC.
(Liquidator)

NOTICE
LAIR SECURITIES LIMITED

NOTIC EIS HEREBY GIVEN as follows:

(a) LAIR SECURITIES LIMITED is in voluntary
dissolution under the provisions of Section 137 (4) of
the International Business Companies Act 2000.

(b) The dissolution of the said company commenced
on the 4th April, 2009 when the Articles of Dissolution
were submitted to and registered by the Registrar
General.

(c) The Liquidator of the said company is Credit Suisse
Trust Limited, Rue de Lausanne 17 bis, Geneva.

Dated this 6th day of April, A. D. 2009

Credit Suisse Trust Limited
Liquidator

THE TRIBUNE

NOTICE
TANAKA LIMITED

NOTICEIS HEREBY GIVEN as follows:

(a) TANAKA LIMITED is in voluntary dissolution under
the provisions of Section 137 (4) of the International
Business Companies Act 2000.

(b) The dissolution of the said company commenced
on the 5th April, 2009 when the Articles of Dissolution
were submitted to and registered by the Registrar
General.

(c) The Liquidator of the said company is Credit Suisse
Trust Limited, Rue de Lausanne 17 bis, Geneva.

Dated this 6th day of April, A. D. 2009

Credit Suisse Trust Limited
Liquidator





ils



THE WEATHER REPORT

iP | |

Brilliant sunshine.

5-Day FORECAST

—

ORLANDO —
High: 90° F/32° C

~ Low:67°FAS°C ee

(F @
TAMPA iy

High: 88° F/31°C

Low: 72° F/22°C i

@ ts

e oO

KEY WEST
High: 84° F/29° C
Low: 75° F/24° C

@

Humid with plenty of
sunshine.

ale h: 87°
ICE UC ac ec

102° F



A moonlit sky. Plenty of sunshine.
High: 85°
Low: 74° Low: 76°

97°-88° F

High:

86°

Low: 77°





ae

e~



Mostly sunny and Mostly sunny.
humid.
High: 86° High: 86°
Low: 76° Low: 75°
ETCH
100°-86° F 102°-82° F

The exclusive AccuWeather RealFeel Temperature® is an index that combines o effects of temperature, wind, humidity, sunshine intensity, cloudiness, precipitation, pressure, and
elevation on the human body—everything that effects how warm or cold a person feels. Temperatures reflect the high and the low for the day.

Fo

@ WEST PALM BEACH iy

High: 87° F/31°C
Low: 71° F/22°C

FT. LAUDERDALE

High:85°F/29°C

Low: 73° F/23°C

en

Shown is today's weather. Temperatures are today's
highs and tonights's lows.

Albuquerque
Anchorage
Atlanta
Atlantic City
Baltimore
Boston
Buffalo
Charleston, SC
Chicago
Cleveland
Dallas
Denver
Detroit
Honolulu
Houston

High
F/C
838/31
54/12
78/25
66/18
70/21
64/17
68/20
85/29
70/21
70/21
86/30
76/24
72/22
85/29
88/31

Today

Low

F/C
58/14
39/3
61/16
62/16
60/15
53/11
51/10
65/18
53/11
50/10
71/21
46/7
54/12
72/22
74/23

Ww

High
F/C
90/32
56/13
17/25
74/23
76/24
60/15
68/20
83/28
73/22
70/21
89/31
75/23
72/22
87/30
90/32

Thursday

Low

F/C
58/14
41/5
64/17
60/15
56/13
51/10
50/10
66/18
50/10
51/10
73/22
43/6
50/10
72/22
74/23

Ww

oO

NoVgnrrrongrerann
oO

=
CED

Indianapolis
Jacksonville
Kansas City
Las Vegas
Little Rock
Los Angeles
Louisville
Memphis
Miami
Minneapolis
Nashville
New Orleans
New York
Oklahoma City
Orlando

@

MIAMI

High: 86° F/30° C

Low: 74° F/23°C



High
F/C
74/23
87/30
17/25
97/36
78/25
80/26
74/23
78/25
86/30
74/23
74/23
87/30
66/18
82/27
90/32

Today

Low

F/C
57/13
63/17
58/14
69/20
67/19
60/15
58/14
68/20
74/23
52/11
58/14
71/21
57/13
67/19
67/19

Ww

le gon — ea © bee Eee Eee bee
ee oO oOo Oo

nesTD
oO

High
F/C
73/22
89/31
72/22
97/36
82/27
86/30
77/25
84/28
86/30
67/19
80/26
88/31
71/21
88/31
90/32

FREEPORT
High: 82° F/28° C
Low: 70° F/21°C



ABACO

High: 84° F/29° C

Low: 72° F/22°C

0

Statistics are for Nassau through 2 p.m. yesterday
Temperature



IGN sesssasedvsseesslacetsonaetecsieianed saeco 82° F/28° C
LOW Normal high .... 83° F/28° C
Normal low 70° F/21°C
Last year's Nigh oo... ceeteteteeeeteees 86° F/30° C

Last year's OW o..cccceeseseteeseeeeeees 70° F/21°C
Precipitation



As of 2 p.m. yesterday .......ccccccccccnseeceneee 0.00"

Year to date :

Normal year to date oo... ccc eeeeeeee 8.21"
AccuWeather.com

Forecasts and graphics provided by
AccuWeather, Inc. ©2009



=
mn INDEX TODAY



o|1|2

LOW

3|4|5

MODERATE

el?

HIGH

8|9|1oji1
\. HIGH

The higher the AccuWeather UV Indexâ„¢ number, the
greater the need for eye and skin protection.

Se Posy

High Ht.(ft.) — Low
Tod 6:29am. 26 12:20am. 0.0
ev 652pm. 31 12:23pm. 00
Thursd 716am. 25 1:10am. 0.0
mse 7:37pm. 31 1:08pm. 0.0
Frid 79am. 2.5 1:55am. 0.0
mV 39pm. 31 15ipm. 00
Saturd 8:40am. 25 2:38am. 0.0
aeey 900pm. 31 232pm. 04
ST MLCT
Sunrise...... 6:31am. Moonrise .... 5:39 p.m.
Sunset....... 7:43 p.m. Moonset..... 4:33 a.m.
Full pa New First



May 9 May 30

a 17 May 24

ELEUTHERA
NASSAU High: 87° F/31°C
High: 87° F/31°C Low: 71 F/22 C
Low: 74° F/23°C
Ce -
CATISLAND
High: 83° F/28° C
Low: 67° F/19°C
GREAT EXUMA O SAN SALVADOR
ia High: 83" F/28° C High: 86° F/30° c
ANDROS md Low: 71 F/22 C Low: 70° F/21°C
High: 88° F/31°C
Low: 72° F/22° C ©
LONG ISLAND
High: 86° F/30° C
Low: 72° F/22°C
Thursday Today Thursday MAYAGUANA
low W High Low W High Low W High: 87° F/31°C
F/C FC F/C Fie F/C me Low: 71°F/22°C
52/1 it Philadelphia 69/20 56/13 c 73/22 58/14 +
66/18 pc Phoenix 102/38 75/23 $s 105/40 75/23 s CRO eo
55/12 t Pittsburgh «70/21 54/12 t 68/20 52/11 t RAGGEDISLAND — Uiigh:89°F/s2"
72/22 § Portland, OR 58/14 47/8 + 6015 43/6 c Eee Low: 74° F/23°C
66/18 t Raleigh-Durham 78/25 60/15 t 80/26 62/16 t Low: 70°F/21°C
60/15 s$ St. Louis 78/25 61/16 t 74/23 5613 t .
AAS) iL Salt Lake City 72/22 51/110 pce 71/21 45/7 pc
66/18 t San Antonio 96/35 74/23 pce 93/83 75/23 pc Ae
73/22 s San Diego 70/21 62/16 pc 76/24 60/15 s Low. 73°F/23°C
45/7 t San Francisco 66/18 51/10 pce 70/21 49/9 s i
61/16 t Seattle 58/14 45/7 + 56/13 44/6 c
70/21 pe Tallahassee 89/31 63/17 pce 89/381 62/16 pc
58/14 1 Tampa 88/31 72/22 s 88/31 71/21 $s
67/19 pc Tucson 100/87 67/19 s 103/89 67/19 5s
68/20 s$ Washington, DC 74/23 60/15 t 80/26 61/16 pc

rears LT

Acapulco
Amsterdam
Ankara, Turkey
Athens
Auckland
Bangkok
Barbados
Barcelona
Beijing
Beirut
Belgrade
Berlin
Bermuda
Bogota
Brussels
Budapest
Buenos Aires
Cairo
Calcutta
Calgary
Cancun
Caracas
Casablanca
Copenhagen
Dublin
Frankfurt
Geneva
Halifax
Havana
Helsinki
Hong Kong
Islamabad
Istanbul
Jerusalem
Johannesburg
Kingston
Lima
London
Madrid
Manila
Mexico City
Monterrey
Montreal
Moscow
Munich
Nairobi
New Delhi
Oslo

Paris
Prague

Rio de Janeiro
Riyadh
Rome

St. Thomas
San Juan
San Salvador
Santiago
Santo Domingo
Sao Paulo
Seoul
Stockholm
Sydney
Taipei

Tokyo
Toronto
Trinidad
Vancouver
Vienna
Warsaw
Winnipeg

High
F/C
90/32
57/13
61/16
68/20
59/15
94/34
85/29
72/22
90/32
68/20
65/18
59/15
75/23
64/17
61/16
61/16
68/20
82/27
104/40
55/12
88/31
79/26
84/28
53/11
57/13
61/16
68/20
54/12
90/32
55/12
80/26
98/36
72/22
65/18
69/20
86/30
76/24
68/20
82/27
81/27
86/30
102/38
61/16
68/20
53/11
82/27
107/41
54/12
64/17
58/14
84/28
104/40
70/21
84/28
17/25
84/28
66/18
84/28
79/26
84/28
55/12
68/20
78/25
68/20
68/20
86/30
55/12
58/14
57/13
64/17

= (hil

Today

Low
F/C
70/21
46/7
46/7
59/15
52/11
81/27
76/24
59/15
64/17
63/17
51/10
46/7
68/20
43/8
46/7
45/7
50/10
64/17
81/27
39/3
73/22
67/19
60/15
44/6
46/7
48/8
47/8
44/6
70/21
36/2
72/22
67/19
57/13
47/8
50/10
77/25
59/15
46/7
55/12
76/24
54/12
75/23
46/7
46/7
43/6
59/15
76/24
36/2
41/5
49/9
71/21
79/26
54/12
75/23
43/8
70/21
43/6
70/21
60/15
55/12
39/3
54/12
66/18
62/16
49/9
70/21




pc

raoaoonten

47/8

50/10
40/4
47/8

sh
sh
Cc

High
F/C
90/32
65/18
63/17
72/22
61/16
92/33
85/29
71/21
93/33
68/20
68/20
64/17
75/23
66/18
68/20
68/20
72/22
83/28
108/42
48/8
89/31
81/27
86/30
64/17
54/12
72/22
76/24
55/12
89/31
59/15
80/26
104/40
67/19
66/18
67/19
86/30
77/25
63/17
84/28
86/30
87/30
106/41
57/13
70/21
73/22
81/27
108/42
55/12
72/22
70/21
81/27
101/38
73/22
83/28
80/26
86/30
66/18
84/28
76/24
82/27
57/13
67/19
82/27
63/17
64/17
82/27
58/14
72/22
62/16
51/10

INSURANCE MANAGEMENT

(BAHAMAS) LIMITED. INSURANCE BROKERS & AGENTS
Marine FORECAST

Thursday
Low W
F/C

72/22 s
45/7 pc
43/6 pc
61/16 pc
55/12 s
80/26 pc
76/24 sh
57/13 s
62/16 pc
63/17 s
54/12 pc
50/10 pc
68/20 s
49/9 +
50/10 pc
50/10 pc
57/13 pc
61/16 s
82/27 s
36/2 ¢
73/22 s
71/21 t
62/16 s

48/8 sh

43/6 pc

46/7 pc

55/12 s

45/7 +

68/20 pc

37/2 pc

72/22 s

70/21 s

56/13 ¢

47/8 s

47/8 sh

77/25 +

60/15 pc

46/7 pc

54/12 pc

76/24 +

54/12 s

75/23 pc

48/8 5

48/8 sh

49/9 s

59/15 r

US/ZOMS

39/3 +

48/8 pc

48/8 pc

71/21 s

76/24 s

51/10 s

75/23

46/7 s

73/22 t

43/6 p

72/22 +

60/15 t

58/14 s

41/5 sh

51/10 s

67/19 s

60/15 c

48/8 c

70/21 t

45/7 s

57/13 s

46/7 pc

Weather (W): s-sunny, pe-partly cloudy, c-cloudy, sh-showers, t-thunder-
storms, r-rain, sf-snow flurries, sn-snow, i-ice, Prcp- precipitation, Tr-trace



WEDNESDAY, MAY 6Tn, 2009, PAGE 11B

WINDS WAVES VISIBILITY WATER TEMPS.
NASSAU Today: ENE at 6-12 Knots 0-2 Feet 10-20 Miles 77°F
Thursday: — ENE at 10-20 Knots 0-2 Feet 10-20 Miles 77°F
FREEPORT Today: E at 6-12 Knots 0-2 Feet 10-20 Miles 76° F
Thursday: — ENE at 10-20 Knots 0-2 Feet 10-20 Miles 77°F
ABACO Today: E at 7-14 Knots 0-2 Feet 10-20 Miles 76° F
Thursday: _E at 10-20 Knots 0-2 Feet 10-20 Miles 77°F



Topay's U.S. FORECAST

* Billings
67/44

LosAngeles,

80/60.

Showers
T-storms
[gad Rain

Miami
86/74

Fronts

Flurries

Cold

Shown are noon positions of weather systems and
precipitation. Temperature bands are highs for the day.
Forecast high/low temperatures are for selected cities.

War fliemiliielile

Stationary eagemii-

Snow
Ice





“10s



Os [05 10s 20s [303] 40s



TR EME) SUSAN Te (0) 350-3500

AUTO INSURANCE

Never st:
Engine wit

-to Auto Insurance,
he Smart choice is

© Management.
Me you can trust.

OUT

out us!

7 INSURANCE MANAGEMENT

(BAHAMAS) LIMITED. INSURANCE BROKERS & AGENTS

“Hew Proidene fliaen | Abaco {onto Fyn
PEMA (3-620





PAGE 8B, WEDNESDAY, MAY 6, 2009

THE TRIBUNE



eS



The Tribune

‘Taste



TAKE MOM 10 BRUNCH

@ By ALEX MISSICK
Tribune Features Reporter
amissick@tribunemedia.net

ALL your life your mother
has cared for you, nursed your
bruises and fed you daily to
make sure you had the
required nutrients you needed
to be healthy. She even snuck
in a few snacks every now and
then just for a treat. This Moth-
er’s Day you can return the
favor by treating your mom to
a Mother’s Day Brunch at
many of the popular eateries
around town.

Sue Lawrence, Sales Director for
Ristrorante Luciano’s of Chicago,
located on East Bay Street, said they
decided to have Mother’s Day
Brunch featuring some of the things
they thought mothers and the local
Bahamian population would love.

“Our Mother’s Day brunch starts
at 11:30 am through 3:30 pm. All of
the appetizers and desserts are
served on a buffet and then the
entrée’s are a la Carte, so you order
your entrée course and the price of
the entrée course, which is $30 cov-
ers the appetizer and dessert buf-
fet,” Ms Sue Lawrence said.

Ms Lawrence said most of the
seating is set on the outside deck
overlooking the beautiful Nassau
harbor and in terms of the entrée’s,

the Fruitti di Mare is their most pop-
ular dish.

“The Chicken Parmigiana is some-
thing the kids always like. With lamb
being a spring time thing, we have a
boneless stuffed leg of lamb with
pine nuts, sun dried tomatoes and
herbed breadcrumbs so it is very
often on the Mother’s Day menu.
For the gentlemen that are coming
along with their mothers we offered
them something a little bit heavier
with a roasted loin of pork with
sautéed apples and oranges, the filet
mignon with a Chianti reduction.
We also have the oven roasted
grouper and a little minced lobster
arrabiatta for Bahamians,” Ms
Lawrence said

For those mothers who would pre-

fer amore indoor feel, the Sea Side
buffet at the Wyndham Nassau
Resort, Cable Beach, will feature a
wide spread of succulent Bahamian
dishes to treat your mom this Moth-
ers day.

The cost of brunch is $28 plus a 15
per cent gratuity and includes dish-
es such as a grandma’s peas soup
and dough, a crispy lemon and pep-
per grouper with Creole sauce,
baked Andros crab, and coconut rice
with spicy lobster just to name a few.

The dessert table will include
mouth watering desserts such as hot
pudding and a variety of cakes, tarts
and mousses.

For a more secluded and earthy
location, why not take mom further
out west to the Marley Resort and

Spa for a tasty Mother’s Day treat
and maybe a few extra surprises.

Daniel Zonicle, assistant restau-
rant manager at the Marley resort,
said they are anticipating a nice turn
out this mother’s day.

“Brunch starts at 12 pm and the
menu is really buffet style featuring
a variety of Bahamian foods at $30
per person. We have seating at the
sea front, and two other really nice
spaces so the guests can have a
choice as to where they want to
enjoy their meals,” Mr Zonicle said.

With all these different places to
choose from serving all these very
different dishes, they all have one
thing in mind- to please the ever
changing palette of your loving
mother.

Unique fundraiser to help
fight hunger in the Bahamas

LOCAL Chefs from thirteen different
restaurants will showcase exciting new cre-
ations or their well-loved signature fare to
guests of Paradise Plates, Hands For
Hunger's first annual fundraiser event
being held on Saturday, May 23 from 7 - 11
pm at the Atlantis Crown Ballroom.

Sponsored by The New Providence
Development Company Limited and Old
Fort Bay, the unique event will feature a
sampling of gourmet food, fine wine and
live entertainment with all proceeds bene-
fiting Hands For Hunger the non-profit,
humanitarian organisation committed to
the elimination of hunger and the reduc-
tion of food waste in The Bahamas.

To date, Chefs from a wide array of
restaurants including: Mesa Grill; Nobu;
Dune; British Colonial Hilton; Old Fort
Bay Club; Lucianos; The Patisserie; Van

“Mother's Day

Salefi

*






Badash Crystal
Jewelry Boxes
Godinger Silver
Picture Frames
Artificial Flowers

Gibson Dinnerware
Arc Glass & Crystal

Gift Baskets

Breugels; Balduccinos; Compass Point;
Goodfellow Farms; Food Art by Cacique;
and Le Petit Gourmet have agreed to par-

ticipate and showcase their extraordinary

food.

Fine wine will also be showcased at Par-

adise Plates. Pia Farmer, owner of Men-

Beer at the event.

tions.



doza Wine Imports will be offering sam-
ples of some of her wines from Argentina
and the Sands Brewery will offer Sands

Other sponsors include: Atlantis, Pearle
Vision, Prime Advisory Group, The d'Al-
benas Agency Ltd., Royal Star Assurance,
Sun Tee Embroid Me and Creative Rela-

Tickets for Paradise Plates are $125 per
person and can be purchased or reserved
by calling or emailing at 327-
or info@handsforhunger.org.

1660 ext. 241




TL

Aree
- THC oe Ts
AL ae
aie pila
ere he

from Max’s '

Sale dates:
May 1st - 9th, 2009

*Except on red tagged
and net items

Kelly's

Fax:



os iy peer

io Ceramics

prt
PN ha
< © Picure ria
Puke

Hoyses,

Home

Mall at Marathon

242) 393-4096

www.kellysbahamas.com






GOAT cheese and balsamic vinegar (top), a Porcini with smoked gouda (middle left) and blue-cheese cov-

ered with spiced walnuts (bottom).

Meet two of the Chefs for Hands for
Hunger and Paradise Plates 2009

@ By CARA BRENNEN-
BETHEL
Tribune Features Editor

NOBU Chef Ricky Sauri has
a history of using his culinary
skills to give back, so its no won-
der he jumped at the chance to
participate in this month’s Hands
For Hunger’s fund raiser Par-
adise Plates 2009.

Recently, the native Puerto
Rican invited Tribune Taste to
sample the restaurant’s signa-
ture black cod dish which he and
a sous chef will be preparing for
the 400 persons who will attend
the gala event on May 23.

“We will be making black cod
marinated for three days and
cooked with miso on butter let-
tuce with ginger, and garlic chips.
This is really a signature Nobu
dish which Nobu Matsuttisa cre-
ated for his restaurants 12 years
ago, This dish he made famous.”

Mr Sauri has been a part of
the Nobu family since 2002 and
has been a chef since 1990.

He said that while at the Nobu
in Miami, Florida, he and the
other chefs were always doing
charity events such as fundraisers
for breast cancer awareness and
so volunteering for this event
came naturally.

Mr Sauri describes himself as
a self taught chef. Originally, he
spent five years in college obtain-
ing a degree in Business in Puer-
to Rico- although he said he was
always cooking for family and

@ By Lloyd Allan
Tribune Features Reporter

OWNER and operator of Le
Petit Gourmet - a newly opened
French Canadian restaurant - in
the Shirley Street Plaza-Julie
Andree-Knowles is slated to
have treats from her restaurant
featured at both the VIP pre-
party and general fundraiser of
the upcoming Hands for Hun-
gry dinner set to take place later
this month.

The chef is best know for her
mouth watering dishes, and
home style lunch presentations,
which have been known to draw
in scores of clients from all

ee Friday 9: pane mre en
Tel: (242 -4002 2a pm
o t } ree Sunday dosed around the island.

Chef Knowles who’s original-
ly from Quebec, Canada, said

Chefs Julie Andree-Knowles (left) and Ricky Sauri (right).

friends.

“I don’t have classical train-
ing. When I was finished school,
I asked myself if I really wanted
to spend the rest of my life in
accounting and realised no. So I
moved to New York and got a
job at restaurant and then even-
tually ended up at the Nobu in
Miami and then here.”

The chef has prepared food
from many different countries
and said that cooking is a sure
way to learn more about peo-
ple.

“Tt lets you know how people
eat in different places and you
learn different techniques. Since
I started with Japanese foods,
my diet has changed, I don’t eat
so much fatty foods. It is also

although she is self taught, her
unique approach to involving her
clients to help in creating her
menu has proven to be key in
enticing and maintaining them.

Speaking of her involvement
in the Hands for Hunger project,
Mrs Knowles explained: “I think
that people forget to be grateful
for what they have, we live in a
world of abundance and people
forget to be thankful for every
single little thing, one of which is
food.

“T think hands for hunger
makes people realise that a lot of
people out there do not have that
chance, and that for everything
they do get they are very grate-
ful.”

During the main event, Mrs
Knowles said she will be pre-



interesting how people are
inspired by other countries,
because Nobu visited Peru and
his cooking is very much inspired
by a Latin influence- the use of
cilantro, avocado for instance.”

Mr Sauri said he himself has
blended everything he has
learned with his own Puerto
Rican background.

And he encourages even the
novice chef to try their hand at
Japanese cooking.

“ Tt is not only sushi. There
are many types of Japanese
cooking. It is all about keeping
food simple. People don’t have
to be afraid, you don’t want to
overwhelm the food, its all
about making good food fresh
and simple.”

senting about 20 of her unique
spreads, many of which have a
cream cheese base, and are a
complete success among her fol-
lowers.

During a recent sampling, Mrs
Knowles showcased one of her
spreads, which she said is nor-
mally served with Crustinis - a
chip like bread prepared with
olive oil.

Included were three unique
spreads, the first was made with
goat cheese and balsamic vine-
gar.

Second was a blue-cheese cov-
ered with spiced walnuts, and the
third was a Porcini with smoked
gouda. Even if you're not a
cheese lover, these treats are sure
to add an interesting flavor to
any white or red wine.



THE TRIBUNE

WEDNESDAY, MAY 6, 2009, PAGE 9B



ENTERTAINMENT



The Tribune












-

@ By LLOYD ALLEN
Tribune Features
Reporter

lallen@tribunemedia.net :
READY, set, and go! enter- m By TOYO AELEN
tainment this week is all about :
cars, culture, and gorgeous ;
women. Decorated with concerts, ;
speed racing, a one love extrava- :

: icon PitBull blazed the stage
women, this weekend’s lineup of :

i at the Wyndham Resort's

events offers a collection of good :
times, complete wonder, and :
: for a screaming crowd of
| Spring breakers this past
/ month.

ganza, and did | say gorgeous

most important, something new.

1.The Crisis Centre of the
Bahamas is hosting a cultural
fair and entertainment extrava-
ganza at the grounds of the
National Centre for Performing
Arts on Shirley Street this com-
ing Saturday. The event which
begins at noon, includes a
range of activities for both
adults and children including
fun games, an appearance by
Dora and Diego, and loads of
fun foods, treats, and much
more. Then around 7pm, local
entertainers including Sammi
Starr, Bodine a.k.a ‘B’, and the
National Dance School, are
expected to set a mood of full-
circle entertainment. Tickets for
the event are $10, and can be
purchased at Airbrush Junkies
in the Marathon Mall, and from
the Crisis Centre on Collins
Avenue.

2. Continuing with its 50th
anniversary celebrations, the

ing “Music In The Garden,” an
exhibition of an eclectic musical
ensemble. With Christine Gan-
gelhoff on the flute, Chris
Justillien on the saxophone,
and Christy Lee on the piano,
this colorful event is set to take

on Village Road this Friday at
7pm, with tickets priced at $20
for members, $25, for non-
members, and just $10 for stu-
dents. All music lovers,
Bahamians, and others are
invited to attend and show sup-
port for this cultural event.

3. Bay Area Entertainment
along with Tycon Entertainment
is once again presenting the
One Love Festival, a musical
melting pot of some of the
most popular conscious music
icons from throughout the
region. This three day fest has
everything from beach parties,
dance-offs, and pre-concert, to
a heavy hitting reggae splash.
For the concert on Saturday
which is being hosted by Jah
Cure, scheduled performances
are expected from | Wayne,
Fantan Mojah, B, Sammie Starr,
|-Rate, Jah Doctrine, Mr Cure
himself, and many others.
Concert tickets are priced at
$40 general admission, $70

pre-concert on Friday at the
Fluid Lounge, tickets are $10
for ladies, and $15 for guys.
Then for the beach party on
Sunday on Long Wharf beach,
tickets are available at $5, all of
which can be purchased at the
Juke Box at the Marathon Mall,
or at Gizmos and Gadgets.

4.The organisers of the Miss
Bahamas Universe beauty
pageant have planned an all
white boat cruise for this Satur-
day, where the 13 contestant of
this year’s pageant will be out
and dressed to impress on
board the Bahamas Fast Fer-
ries. Continuing with its theme
of Earth Angels, the girls will
exhibit the full embodiment of
nature as they continue with
their list of pre-pageant public
engagements. Set to board at
7.30pm from the Potter Cay
dock, this aquatic event is
priced at $10 and is said to bea
sure night of glamour, top
notch entertainment, and indul-
gence.

5.The Bahamas Hot Rod
Association (BHRA) is revving
up this Friday for its regular
Street Legal Racing show-
down. The event which is
being held at the BHRA
motorsports park at the Queen
Elizabeth sporting complex,
Oakes Field, cost just $5 per
person, Starting at 7pm, the
event is expected to draw an
eager mix of motor-sport
enthusiasts and high powered
vehicles.

PITBULL:

UNC

Tribune Features Reporter
lallen@tribunemedia.net

CUBAN-American musical

Rainforest theater performing

Commonly considered strictly a Reg-

: gaeton artist, PitBull’s recent perfor-
: mance showcased a myriad of songs
: from his past albums and upcoming CD
: ranging from rap, reggaeton, and even
! crunk.

Linked to some of the most popular

: artists from the East Coast including Lil
: Jon, the Ying Yang twins, Rick Ross,
: Fuego, Omega, and Trina, PitBull
: proved that contrary to common opin-
: ion, he is a jack of many trades. He has
: fused numerous genres into his musical
repertoire.

In an exclusive interview with “Mr

: 305” himself after the mini-concert, Pit-
: Bull said 2009 will be one of his biggest
: years yet, bringing a fresh sound, anew
: image, and a new label.

He explained: “The whole PitBull

: movement has to do with a lot of move-
: ments, people always try to label me in
i a particular box, whether it be Crunk,
i? Down South, Reggaeton, or this, that,
i and the third.

Bahamas National Trust is host- :

“T just happen to be involved with a

i lot of musical sounds because I’m a
i chameleon at the end of the day. I adapt
i to any environment, and coming from
i Miami which is a melting pot of music,
i whether it be music from the Caribbean,
i Dance Hall, Soca, Meringue, Salsa, or
i Cha-Cha, whether it be freestyle music,
place at the BNT Retreat Garden :







IN THIS film publicity image released by 20th Century Fox, Hugh Jack-
man unleashes his adamantium claws in a scene from "Wolverine."

Men Origins: VVolverine

VIP, and $120 platinum. For the |

booty shaking music, or Hip hop, you
put all that together and that’s the true
definition of PitBull.”

PitBull said like many Cuban-Ameri-
can artists before him, music been a part
of his life for a long time mainly because
of his culture, However it officially
developed into a career after he was
first invited by his high school drama
teacher - Hope Martinez - to watch a
DMX live video shot in 1998.

He said: “There I met Swizz Beats, I
met Irv Gotti, where he had asked me if
I wrote music, and I said no, I just
freestyled. He said freestyling is great
but it don’t make no money, and that’s
what turned me on to music right there.”

From that moment on, PitBull said
his career grew like “a chicken on
steroids.” He was soon signed to Luke
Records, but moved around through
several labels, and has now settled with
305 Inc/Polo Grounds Music and RCA
Music Group for both an English and
Spanish deal.

With his music immersed in markets
across the globe, PitBull said there
remains an attraction to the Caribbean
which goes far deeper than just his roots.

“The energy in the Caribbean is some-
thing that can’t be described, our blood
is hot, what we do is hot, we’re passion-
ate about everything that we do,
whether it’s in the bedroom, whether
it’s moving on the dance floor, or mak-
ing music, we’re very passionate about it,
and I think that’s what the Caribbean
brings,” he said.

Switching gears to what’s to come this
year in his professional life, PitBull said
this is a new chapter for him filled with
limitless possibilities, because for the
first time he considers himself free.

“This year has been very special to
me, because I’ve fought my way and
won my freedom as far as the music
game is concerned...so now that we’re



Michael Muller/AP Photo

cutting these new deals, and the music is
growing, and the whole movement is
growing, I think what it’s all about from
this point on is making sure that five
years from now, the decisions that I
make this year make all the sense in the
world in the future,” he said.

THE INTERNET

PitBull said he recognises the impor-
tance of the Internet and the way it is
used to bring hype to any artist. He con-
siders himself computer illiterate, but
explained that despite knowing how to
use the computer, the habit of continu-
ously using it to get information and
learn more is both a blessing and a curse.

PitBull said: “Someone once said that
the more you know, the more things will
bother you, so the less you know the
more you’re able to live life a little sweet-
er and stress free.

“But I definitely take advantage of
global communication on sites like
Myspace, Youtube, and Facebook, but
[I’m not on that Twitter thing, cause I
can’t let people know everywhere that
Tm at.”

He said another beautiful thing
about the Internet is the fans that real-
ly support him follow him online.

REBELUTION

With his fifth album “Rebelution”
set to be released in September, Pitb-
Bull said fans will definitely be
pleased with his new mater-
ial, including the release
of Blanco, I Know






You Want Me, Calle Ocho, and Krazy.

“The decision to name my album Rebe-
lution came first from me being a rebel in
my own right, I fought my way through
the game, and I figured out how to make
my own money.

“The ‘lution’ end of it comes from me
doing things a new way, where four to
five years from now my music will make
all the sense in the world, where compa-
nies who want to cater to Latins are going
to have to come to me to stamp their
products.”

With high hopes for his future as a lead-
ing Latin artist, PitBull is certain that the
only thing between him and his future
success is time.



res /

BIG TV, BIG POP
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_ M_By JASON DONALD

THE first X-Men movie,

: released in 2000, was a slight
i but watchable effort and invit-
i ed a sequel. However, the sec-
i ond film in the series, X-Men
i United, seemed to feature end-
i less scenes of men pointing
i guns at steel doors. Then the
i third, The Last Stand, had a cli-
i mactic battle that would have
i looked cheap on the Sci-Fi
i Channel.

But, incredibly, the franchise

: has reached a new low with this
i latest, needless episode, X-Men
i Origins: Wolverine.

As the title suggests, this is

: the origin story of the X-Man
i with the muscular sideburns,
i and it all gets underway in 1845.
i ‘Little’ Wolverine, or Logan to
i his friends, kills his abusive
i father with his freaky hands
: and then goes on the run with
: his brother, Victor, who has
: some genetic hand issues of his
: own.

The pair battle their way,

i side-by-side, through the 20th
: Century’s global conflicts
| before joining an elite fighting
: team of super humans, led by
: the mysterious Stryker.

But when Logan becomes

i disturbed by the ruthless streak
: that runs through his colleagues
: and goes into hiding, he soon
: realises they aren’t quite ready

to let him go.

Perhaps the main problem
with Wolverine is that every-
thing the film has to offer has
been done better elsewhere.

The title sequence is suspi-
ciously reminiscent of the
recent stunning Watchmen
opening, the chase scenes are
lifeless, and the multiple face-
offs between Logan and Victor
become increasingly anti-cli-
mactic.

The one inspired moment -
a fight on some sort of giant
chimney thing- comes so late, it
feels like a set piece that’s wan-
dered in from another film.
And a better one at that.

To add to these issues, the
script is truly atrocious, with
characters trading flat, macho
dialogue that would have Vin
Diesel shaking his head.

In the last couple of years,
films like The Dark Knight and
the aforementioned Watchmen
have shown how super hero
movies can have depth and
intelligence to match the special
effects. Even Iron Man, which
was lighter than those two, had
well rounded characters and a
tight narrative.

In comparison, Wolverine
seems dated, flabby and, unfor-
givably for this type of picture,
dull.

As fans of the series all know,
when Logan eventually
becomes a member of the X-
Men, he no longer has any
memory of this story. I wish I
could say the same for myself.



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any Orville Redenbacher
Microwave Popcorn to an
entry form, complete the
skill question and drop into
boxes at participating
stores or The d’Albenas
Agengy Ltd. in Palmdale.





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PAGE 10B, WEDNESDAY, MAY 6, 2009

THE TRIBUNE



Pretty flowers for a special lady

@ By ALEX MISSICK
Tribune Features Reporter
amissick@tribunemedia.net

TO celebrate mothers and
the contributions they make
in the lives of their children
and those around them,
many persons go all out
with elaborate jewelry and
fine china. However, why
not give the most common
gift of natural beauty- the
gift of flowers for that all

around beauty in your life-.

Just as flowers bloom with every
sunrise, moms are up at the crack of
dawn preparing for the best day she
can give her family. Omar Williams
of Wild Seed designs knows all too
well about those fresh, gorgeous
flowers that make every morning
special.

“We have been around for ten
years. We do everyday flower
arrangements from parties to wed-
dings, offices, and we do a lot of
native foliage as well such as sea
grapes and so forth,” Mr Williams
said.

Mr Williams said although he loves





PPT ete

what he does with flowers, he studied
to be an artist.

“T went to school to study art. It’s a
kind of departure from what I
thought I would be doing but its still
an art form- just another medium. It
does involve a lot of business and a
little less art than I would like,” Mr
Williams said.

The typical flowers Mr Williams
uses for Mother’s Day include Ger-
bera daisies, which are related to sun-
flowers and have a variety of colors
to choose from; lilies, roses, chrysan-
themums and to add special elements
to soften the arrangement, tulips are
used.

To create gorgeous floral arrange-
ments, especially for Mother’s Day,
Mr Williams said there are many fac-
tors that comes to mind.

“We are a small flower store and
we do a lot of different things. The
inspiration to create these pieces is
somewhat personal because I don’t
dictate every arrangement because it
is up to the individual person who is
making the arrangement to decide
what it is going to be. When you are
retailing flowers of course profitabili-
ty and money is something that defi-
nitely comes into play. It puts bound-
aries into what you can do, but we
take a lot of inspiration from nature
because we use a lot of native stuff so
they would kind of determine how

arrangements would look. We also
take into consideration the size, kind
of flower, shape and how many flow-
ers used in the piece. So those play a
major role in how much of something
you have but then you go and use
your artistic ability to put it togeth-
er,” Mr Williams said.

The usual floral arrangements
from Wild Seeds Designs begin at
$30 and for Mother’s Day they start
from $50 and up.

“Each arrangement is different. A
normal arrangement is usual ten to
fifteen minutes to make. The $50
arrangements will probably be the
more basic arrangements but we do
have fruit and flower baskets
along with gourmet baskets he.
filled with things like cheese,
crackers etc. Last year we had
plants and flowers because
most women like to garden so
we included things they could plant
in their home gardens in the arrange-



ail
BAHAMAS NATIONAL

ORCHESTRA

Scenes from the
orchestra’s gala con-
cert which was held on
April 25 at the St
Andrew’s Kirk. The
conductor was Dou-
glas Turnquest and the
concert master was
Jennifer Hudson.

ments as well,” Mr Williams said.

Mr Williams said as an artist, he
has to listen to the client even if they
do not say it with words.

“We use both fresh flowers and
silk flowers. As an artist you have to
interpret what it is and try to push it
out as an arrangement. I don’t just
see them as flowers. We have
arrangements
that we made

i



Felipé Major/Tribune staff





Katz acrylics

FROM page 12

Although Ms Katz has not had a show
in about a year and a half, she decided to
showcase her work in an open house May
9 at Post House studio and Gallery, locat-
ed on Sanford Drive from 11-4pm. The
show will run for two weeks.

“Most people know me for my collage
work which is what I still do, but I want-
ed to do something different this time.
So I did all still life acrylic paintings this
time,” Ms Katz said.

Ms Katz said she used acrylics a long
time ago and got interested in collage and
mixed media.

“T focused on those two for a long time.
I always liked doing still life just because
I like setting up little environments. I find
it fascinating so I decided to do an entire
show using still life and acrylic,” Ms Katz
said.

She said in these new paintings, she
decided to put together different elements
that she felt were interesting.

“T tried to use some sort of constant
elements in a lot of my pieces like certain

vases, and maybe like patterns that go
together. I used my cat a lot in my pieces
because she is a good prop,” Ms Katz.

In her creative way, Ms Katz pieces are
not your typical still life pieces. They are
vibrant and fun pieces filled with life and
humor. Ms Katz will have 22 pieces dis-
played at her art show using all acrylic
medium.

“The colors are very bright, sort of
funky colors-just very different. I think
what people see the show they will be
surprised at the pieces,” Ms Katz said.

As with all things artistic, it is not
always easy and Ms Katz said to pull off
this show was a lot of hard work.

“Every artist has different ways that
they work. I am better when I work at
the last minute. I work better under pres-
sure but it is a lot to that goes into an art
show. You got to put together all your
work, do all the framing which is expen-
sive, the invitations and so forth. It can
also be stressful because as an artist your
work is up there and you feel very vul-
nerable because your work is personal,”
Ms Katz said.

six years ago and they are still talking
about the arrangement. We know
how important these are to people. I
have a mom and other people have
moms so I know how special the
occasion is,” Mr Williams said.

FLOWERS are the most com-
mon gift of natural beauty.

q yw ¥





GG
Most people
know me tor my
collage work
which is what |
still do, but |
wanted to do
something ditferent
this time. So | did
all still lite acrylic
paintings this time.










Pitbull lights up the
Rainforest theatre .
4

See page nine



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Full Text


Get Your Cold
Coffee aha

HIGH 87F
SUNSHINE BAHAMAS EDITION

m Lhe Tribune
a a USA TODAY.
Katz
acrylics



Volume: 105 No.135

WEDNESDAY, MAY 6, 2009



eS
al
AND REAL a

PUES Te







aU a







m@ By ALISON LOWE
Tribune Staff Reporter
alowe@tribunemedia.net

POLICE are hunting a man
who has kidnapped and threat-
ened to kill a three-year-old
toddler.

Shannon Bannister was
asleep in the back of his moth-
er’s grey Nissan Bluebird when
a man known to police — 35-
year-old Kendrick Sifford, alias
Dog — allegedly stole the car
from outside her Lewis Street
home on Friday.

A former boyfriend of Shan-
non’s mother, Angie Moss, the
Nassau Village resident has
since evaded officers while
sending horrific text messages
to his distraught ex-girlfriend.

“Yeah bitch, I know you was
working for the po po (police).
Look harder, you will feel the
pain. His time running out. See
ya at the funeral,” said one mes-
sage, seen by The Tribune.

Yesterday, Ms Moss pleaded
with anyone who thinks they
might have seen Sifford or her
son to contact police.

“All I want is my little boy
back, that’s all I want. Nothing
else matters to me, just my

ABOVE: Police are hunting for
35-year-old Kendrick Sifford.

RIGHT: A tearful Angie Moss,
mother of Shannon Bannister,
speaks to The Tribune yesterday.

Ms Moss suggested her ex-
boyfriend may be trying to scare
her into dropping assault
charges she pursued against
him.

“The last time he beat me he
hit me in the head with a ham-
mer and tried to strangle me. I
have multiple charges against
him,” the mother said.

Meanwhile, describing the



/ SEE PAGE SEVEN

Kidnapper: re
Kill your baby

Text threats to mum



Tim Clarke/Tribune staff



Young woman
testifies she
had sex with
Bishop Fraser
12 times a month

@ By NATARIO
McKENZIE
Tribune Staff
Reporter

THE young woman,
who alleged she and
Bishop Earl “Randy”
Fraser had a sexual rela-
tionship four years ago,
testified yesterday that
she and the accused had
sex on an average of 12
times a month.

Prosecutors allege that
Fraser engaged in a sex-
ual relationship with a
dependent between July
2005 and February 20006.
During cross-examina-
tion by Fraser’s attorney
Wayne Munroe yester-
day, the virtual com-
plainant who was 16
years old at the time the
offences were allegedly
committed, said that she
and Fraser would have
sex three or four times a

SEE page six

Motorists detained
on outdated arrest
warrants call
for urgent action

m@ By ALISON LOWE

Tribune Staff Reporter
alowe@tribunemedia.net



FED-UP MOTORISTS
detained by police on outdated
arrest warrants are calling for
government to take urgent
action to fix an apparently dys-
functional warrant system.

Two New Providence resi-
dents who contacted The Tri-
bune separately in the last
month claim they were picked
up by officers on warrants
issued for traffic violations for

ey a “Stn sone eee eee PiJ= SEE page six
home, off East Street. age SIX - =

iia AJ ETIMMXOC hm COLIC nF

floating in water | =
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Moon Hotel WHEELCHAIR-BOUND
eee a AMPUTEE DIES AFTER
de body Of a man was Tour BEING HIT BY CAR
floating in waters behind the Har-
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y Oe ees 3 Si ee tact ale
eee ae bo ra aa 2 FAMILIES OF TWO
near & barge shortly hee 8 ae a 5 STUDENTS WHO WERE

When it comes to : Police aad defence force officers S ALLEGEDLY MOLESTED
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SEE page six







NASSAU AND BAHAMA ISLANDS” LEADING NEWSPAPER
THE TRIBUNE



WEDNESDAY, MAY 6, 2009, PAGE 3

RIVER eR Cte

© In brief | Wheelchair-bound amputee
dies after being hit by car

M@ Victim, 42, waiting on side of Long Island road

DEU officers
arrest 17
over seizures
of firearms
and cocaine

DRUG Enforcement Unit
officers arrested 17 persons
in connection with separate
seizures of illegal firearms,
marijuana and cocaine
throughout the capital.

Asst Supt Walter Evans
reported that over the past
three days, DEU officers
conducted operation “Snatch
and Grab” throughout New
Providence.

During the special opera-
tion, officers seized one AK-
47 rifle; a .14 rifle; 20 live
rounds of .223 ammunition
and 15 live rounds of 7.62
ammunition; 10 ounces of
marijuana, and two grammes
of cocaine.

Police also seized more
than $2,400 in cash during
the search, Mr Evans said.

m@ By TANEKA THOMPSON
Tribune Staff Reporter
tthompson@tribunemedia. net

A wheelchair-bound amputee
died after he was struck by a car
while waiting on the side of the
road in Long Island on Mon-
day.

The 42-year-old victim, iden-
tified by family members as
Cabbage Point resident Lester
Pratt, was apparently waiting
for a friend to pick him up when
the incident occurred about half
a mile from where he lived, the
victim’s father, Rudolph Pratt,
said.

Police reported that the driver
of a Chevrolet Corsica was trav-
elling on Queens Highway in
the Berries — an area in south
Long Island — around 9pm on
Monday when a 42-year-old
man from Cabbage Point was
hit while sitting in a chair near
the road.

Mr Pratt was taken to the



“It’s too early
to say if it was
the result of
negligent
driving ...”



Stephen Adderley

local clinic where he died of his
injuries, Assistant Superinten-
dent Walter Evans said.
Speaking with The Tribune
from Long Island yesterday, the
victim’s father said: "(My son)
was probably down there visit-
ing people nearby, it's a bar
nearby, and a friend was sup-
posed to pick him up and he
heard a vehicle coming, but it
must have been the wrong car
and the car didn’t see him and

struck him.” Mr Pratt, who was
married with children and a cab-
inet maker by trade, had his
right arm amputated several
years ago, his father said.

Officer-in-charge of the Long
Island police station Assistant
Superintendent Stephen Adder-
ley said it is too early to tell if
speed, driver negligence or alco-
hol played a part in the acci-
dent.

"It's too early to say if it was
the result of negligent driving
— there are so many variables
to consider, like road lighting
and actions of the driver and the
victim,” said Mr Adderley.

Officers are canvassing the
area and are still interviewing
the driver to determine the
cause of the accident.

Police investigations contin-
ue.

Mr Pratt's death is the third
traffic fatality in Long Island for
the year.

Rethink plan to move container port, says PLP activist

m@ By PAUL G TURNQUEST
Tribune Staff Reporter

pturnquest@tribunemedia.net

DEMANDING that govern-
ment rethink its efforts to relo-
cate the container port to a pro-
posed man-made island off Saun-
ders Beach, PLP activist Paul
Moss called on all Bahamians to
make their voices heard and
protest the plan at all costs.

Holding a press conference at
Saunders Beach yesterday morn-
ing, Mr Moss, with attorney
Fayne Thompson, produced
copies of the report by the archi-
tectural and environment con-
sulting company EDAW.

EDAW was commissioned by
the previous government for half
a million dollars and, in its report,
suggested the
relocation of
the port to an
alternate site in
the southeast-
ern part of the
island.

Mr Moss
said the report
shows that the
development
of a man-made

island was the sixth best option,
coming in after the suggestion
that the port remain at its cur-
rent location.





“This is
Senos eee bate)
we will not
stand for it.”

The proposed
man-made island,
which is projected
to encompass some
72 acres, would be
connected to New Providence by
a bridge and would be located
directly across from Saunders
Beach, in between New Provi-

Ode NA C Ga Kden

where life is still simple and people still care
Murphyville, 2nd House left from Sears Road.
Telephone 322-8493









At Odessa Garden we have a variety of items to
give her a memorable Mothers Day





~The Best Loved Poems of Jacqueline Kennedy Onassis.
~Beautiful, long lasting silk flower summer arrangements
~Early Vintage (Old) Limoges Tea Service
~Hats (for weddings, evenings and church)
~Limoges Display Plates
~Vintage Linen Tablecloths
~Crochet Evening Tops
~The Complete Motown Anthology (10 CD's)

Etta James, Her Best, Ella Fitzgerald At her Very Best.
Ella Fitzgerald Sings Irving Berlin and Duke Ellington.
Aretha Franklin, Queen of Soul
Picture Frames



















Solid Wo

mm WViaclsire



dence and Shipwreck Island
(Long Cay).

Causeway

“They intend to build a cause-
way from the man-made exten-
sion over Saunders Beach to
West Bay Street,” Mr Moss said.

“This is wrong and we will not
stand for it. All over this country
beach access is being denied to
Bahamians. In fact, the proposed
site at Arawak Cay is the absolute
wrong site for the port. We have
a report done by EDAW which
states that Arawak Cay is the
sixth worst site out of seven pos-
sible sites for the container port.

“In fact, the present port is a
better location. The question then
is why are they (the government)
seeking to do something so illog-
ical? Well the answer maybe in
the minutes of a meeting held in
2007 and hosted by the (Deputy
Prime Minister) Brent Symon-
ette. It is of interest to note that
this beach was sold to the gov-
ernment by Mr Symonette in the
1990s for $1. Could it be that he
thinks he owns it?” Mr Moss
asked.

Providing copies of the min-
utes from this meeting along with
other documentation, Mr Moss
said it was obvious that the gov-
ernment was trying to “swing”
the Bahamian people “big time”
by suggesting that the relocation
of the port to the southwest was

Wong's Plaza
Street
(242) oe Dick 5 |

ie

30 Yo ueen Sleigh Bed

| oc SFeseeTs
a Aa
- ee


























PLP ACTIVIST Paul Moss
pointing towards the
proposed location for a
man-made island which
could be the new site for
the container port.




too costly an idea. Claiming that
certain individuals are now “lick-
ing their lips” in anticipation of
their windfall profits from this
proposal, Mr Moss said that he
and his supporters will block
Saunders Beach and Arawak Cay
if they have to.

“No more can we allow our-
selves to get swing again. Enough
is enough and we put the govern-
ment on notice that they should
not seek to put this port at
Arawak Cay. We call on (envi-
ronmentalist) Sam Duncombe to
check this out and the Bahamas
National Trust to intervene. We
also call on the Bahamian peo-
ple to stand up and not allow this
to happen,” he said.

ee Bie
Fertilizer, Fungicide,
Pest Control

Tropical Exterminators
322-2157






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e Red and White Carnations for Corsages —..2/$ ]

* White Gloves starting at
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* New Candle nt Mugs, Mother’s Day bears

implement tax treaties

THE Bahamas must quickly implement
tax treaties with the United States and the
European Union if it wants to avoid being
labelled a tax haven by the Obama adminis-
tration, political activist Paul Moss said yes-
terday.

During a brief press conference at Saun-
ders Beach, Mr Moss and attorney Fayne
Thompson pointed out that the Bahamas is
now a very transparent country.

“Gone are the days when the Bahamas
can make a living relying on persons who
would either have avoided taxes, evaded tax-
es, or simply come to the Bahamas because they do not want the
scrutiny,” Mr Moss said. He noted that the Bahamas is hoping to join
the World Trade Organisation and complete an Economic Part-
nership Agreement (EPA) with the European Union, and that
both these entities want the country to eliminate or substantially
reduce Customs duties — the government’s main source of revenue.

Services

“Well, if you are going to get rid of Custom duties, how then are
you going to feed the children, educate the children, and look after
the essential services that this country requires?” Mr Moss asked. He
said the only solution is for the Bahamas to implement an income tax
to replace Customs duties as the main source of revenue.

“Only when we do so will we see the Bahamas removed from this
gray list put forward by President Obama,” Mr Moss said.

On Monday, US President Barak Obama announced his admin-
istration’s plan to reform that nation’s tax policy and crackdown on
overseas “tax havens.”

Jurisdictions such as Bermuda and the Cayman Islands are home
to many large American companies and are projected to be the
countries most effected by this move by the United States.

However, local financial insiders fear that this policy could prove
a direct threat to the country’s second economic pillar — the finan-
cial services industry. According to the Associated Press, the pres-
ident’s plan would stop US companies from delaying tax payments
by keeping profits in foreign countries instead of declaring them at
home along with calling for increased transparency in American
bank accounts held in off-shore jurisdictions.

This reform would also prevent US companies from getting tax
deductions on profits earned overseas and essentially decrease
their desire to be established in these countries.

Set fl Derfect
Mother § Day “ble

Barack Obama



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Bayparl Building on Parliament Street
Telephone: (242) 323-6145
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Madeira St. [242] 325-8233 » Robinson Rd.[242] 322-3080 » Fax:[242] rr
PAGE 4, WEDNESDAY, MAY 6, 2009

EDITORIAL/LETTERS TO THE EDITOR

THE TRIBUNE





The Tribune Limited

NULLIUS ADDICTUS JURARE IN VERBA MAGISTRI
Being Bound to Swear to The Dogmas of No Master

LEON E. H. DUPUCH, Publisher/Editor 1903-1914

SIR ETIENNE DUPUCH, Kt, O.B.E., K.M., K.C.S.G.,

(Hon.) LL.D., D.Litt.

Publisher/Editor 1919-1972
Contributing Editor 1972-1991

EILEEN DUPUCH CARRON, C.M.G., M.S., B.A., LL.B.

Publisher/Editor 1972-

Published Daily Monday to Saturday

Shirley Street, RO. Box N-3207, Nassau, Bahamas
Insurance Management Building., P.O. F-485, Freeport, Grand Bahama

TELEPHONES
Switchboard (News, Circulation and Advertising) 322-1986
Advertising Manager - (242) 502-2352
Circulation Department - (242) 502-2387
Nassau Fax: - (242) 328-2398
Freeport, Grand Bahama: 1-(242)-352-6608
Freeport fax: (242) 352-9348

WEBSITE
www.tribune242.com — updated daily at 2pm

Crises that know no borders

A SHIVER went down the spine of the
world when it was discovered that an entire-
ly new breed of influenza, known neither to
man nor beast, was rampaging through Mex-
ico. In the time it takes a jet to propel pas-
sengers over vast oceans, the strain had
showed up in Canada, Spain, Israel, Hong
Kong, and a dozen other countries includ-
ing pristine and isolated New Zealand, where
indigenous Maoris have been advised to stop
rubbing noses as a traditional greeting. Epi-
demic was edging up to pandemic, warned the
World Health Organisation.

No one knows how species-jumping germs
will develop. As dry leaves quickly succumb
to fire, so do terrifying strains of Ebola tear
through a population, burning themselves
out. Other ills, such as AIDS, have been com-
pared to a fire in a coal mine, smouldering
slowly but steadily through the population,
perhaps for hundreds of years.

Influenza viruses sometimes become less
virulent in time. Others will become more
dangerous as they change and adjust to their
hosts. Respiratory illnesses can come from
wild ducks, tame chickens, and pigs, espe-
cially in populations where people live close
to their animals, infecting each other in end-
less cycles of mutation.

Epidemiologists, like Californians living
on the earthquake-prone St Andreas Fault,
are always worrying about “the big one,” a
repeat of the great pandemic of 1918, which
came in a shuddering first wave, only to sub-
side and come back with a tsunami of death in
its second wave.

Yet none want to over react, as they did in
1976 when a wave of immunization in the
United States proved far more deadly than
the flu it was intended to prevent.

Countries behave differently when con-
fronted with the shadow of a deadly disease.
Mexico, it would appear, has behaved well,
getting the word out quickly, virtually closing
down one of the world’s biggest cities for
five days to prevent the spread. China, when
faced with SARS a few years ago, first tried to
cover it up.

The Obama administration reacted with
caution. The president, who is emerging as
the great calm father-figure of the republic,
told us not to panic and to wash our hands.
Vice President Joe Biden, as is his wont,

Sandal

Invites applications for the positions of:

Accountants

Royal Bahamian Resort @ Offshore Island.

spoke out bluntly and said he would not want
to be in a crowded airplane, generating the
usual what-he-meant-to-say-was...

If there was a common consensus it was
that it’s too late to contain this new strain,
which seems able to jump from person to
person, to continent to continent, with ease.
Modern communications has put paid to any
hope of isolating it. What is needed now is to
mitigate the consequences and prepare to
handle the worst if the virus becomes more
dangerous while we seek a vaccine.

When you think about it, the same could be
said for all the major national-security dan-
gers we face today.

I heard a panel of distinguished national-
security elders at that temple of American sci-
ence, the Massachusetts Institute of Tech-
nology, that included former secretary of
defence Harold Brown and former national
security adviser Brent Scowcroft, among oth-
ers. They identified weapons of mass destruc-
tion and climate change as, perhaps, the two
most formidable challenges we face.

Yet the doings of Pakistan’s A.Q.Khan
have shown that nuclear weapon technology
can slip across national borders to pop up in
Pyonyang, Teheran, and Tripoli before the
world is aware. And the MIT panel ended
with the gloomy thought that the ultimate
problem that knows no frontiers, climate
change, cannot be reversed, and that the
world must now come to terms with adjusting
to it.

Terror, too, knows no borders. The dis-
content of Muslims, for example, cannot be
contained in the mountains of Afghanistan
and Pakistan. It spreads, with the help of
modern communications, into the farthest
reaches of the Indonesian Archipelago, to
the worn industrial towns of England, to
youths in America who sign up to fight in
far-away failed states.

Even the failed economy, which could not
be contained in the hot zones of Manhattan
and London, has mutated across the globe. In
today’s world, our greatest problems, and,
by necessity solutions, have become transna-
tional.

(This article was written by H.D.S. Green-
way of the Boston Globe- c. 2009 The Boston
Globe).



How can our
family survive on
$169 per week?

EDITOR, The Tribune.

I am writing to express my
disgust and discomfort with the
Government. I am a 40-year-
old woman who has been work-
ing for the Department of Envi-
ronmental health for the past
nine years and during this time
I have struggled and struggled
to survive for me and my chil-
dren, with my salary being that
of $169 per week.

For the past nine years I have
stood around without sound
hoping that the good Lord
would continue to give me
strength in this time of need and
without question I endeavour
to make ends meet, however,
I’m finding it more and more
difficult to do, with my two kids
to feed among other bills I am
not even being considered by
social services which I have
already tried...please tell me
how me and my children are to
continue in these hard times to
survive with $169 and if that’s
not bad enough after nine years
Tam still a weekly paid worker
who should have been a month-
ly paid worker and it’s really
hurtful to know that there are
many who have been here for
shorter periods of time and
have already gone monthly, it’s
just not fair. Something is terri-
bly wrong with this picture.

There are many of us who are
in this situation and who feel
the same way, what’s happening
with the government, is any-
body paying attention to us in

LETTERS

letters@tribunemedia net



the Environmental Health
Department, is anybody looking
out for us, we are considered
the lowest paid lowly looked at
workers though we work hard
on the roadsides every morn-
ing and through the day, where
is the minister, does he know
what’s going on?

As we, the workers intend to
do what we must to take care of
our families, we the workers are
yet stung with another blow, we
realise the government is try-
ing to assist with the clean up
effort by hiring more persons,
but yet we have come to realise
that those new persons that was
just recently hired is at this very
time being paid $210 per week.
This is ridiculous and unfair,
this is wrong to the hundreds
of others like myself who have
been there for so many years
and being paid $169 per week,
who do we need to talk to, this
is absolutely wrong and we the
workers are not happy, the gov-
ernment is slapping us in the
face, on top of this there were
some weekly persons who
recently as last week making
$169 just got an increase to
$210, but the sad thing about it
is that those who got the
increase spent far less years on
the job than others.

We, the workers, especially

myself, who have two kids and
can’t even obtain a decent bank
loan because my salary is too
small, have had enough, we
have been treated unfairly for
too too long, we can’t even get
the back pay that is due to us,
what are we suppose to do, how
are we suppose to live, we
would like to speak out, but we
don’t for fear of being fired and
so we are held hostage by are
own fears, we want to make a
stand and we will...we want fair
treatment and the money that’s
owed to us, the increase of
salary and or the back pay the
government is holding on, how
can newly hired persons that
have been on the job one week
make $210 when I have been
on the job nine years and make
$169, workers one week old get
paid more than a nine-year-old
worker when we are both doing
the same thing, it’s just not fair,
we want the government to act
in this matter immediately,
immediately so we can have this
issue resolved.

We have kids, and light bill
and water bill, some of our
homes don’t even have elec-
tricity, we can’t even afford to
maintain our children in school,
please tell me, sir, what must
we do, we only want to be treat-
ed fairly, somebody must want
to hear our cry and ease our
burden. Upsettingly.

DISGRUNTLE WORKERS
Nassau,
March 18, 2009.

An enchanting night of music

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EDITOR, The Tribune.

Brewing scandal(s). Unconscionable delays at
the Passport Office and health clinics. The bot-
toming out of the economy. An escalating misery
index. Water shortages. Perpetually blinking traf-
fic lights that constitute more of a hazard than an
aid to motorists.

At this rate, by or before the 2012 general elec-
tion, the current administration may well have
topped the “wutlessness” of the previous, much-
maligned Perry Christie administration.

It’s nice that roughly $6 million is being spent
on milling, asphalting and paving West Bay Street
and a few other roads in New Providence by
Lamour Mechanical Trucking and Paving and
Bahamix, but in the “inner city” where the roads
are used by a far greater percentage of the tax-
paying population, couldn’t “a few dollars more”
be found to get the traffic lights working?

Being, however, an “eternal optimist” who
prefers to “eliminate the negative and latch on to
the affirmative,” while I have ‘pen in hand’ (actu-
ally it’s a computer mouse), I must commend the
Bahamas National Symphony Orchestra for pro-
viding an enchanting night of classical and more
contemporary music at the Kirk Hall on Saturday
last.

They certainly “spread joy up to the maxi-
mum” and brought “gloom down to the mini-

mum” with a number of classical pieces, in addi-
tion to a tribute to Louis “Satchmo” Armstrong
and excerpts from the Wizard of Oz and much,
much more.

Perhaps for those, myself included, who can’t
listen to the William Tell overture without think-
ing about the Lone Ranger, ‘instant culture’ and
enjoyment was the order of the day at this ancient
church building founded by fifty-five Scottish
Settlers in 1798.

With the entire highly accomplished ensemble
flawlessly conducted by and under the command
of Douglas Turnquest and Jennifer Hudson (No,
not that Jennifer Hudson), the young female
flutist and special guest on the Stradvarius violin
earned special applause. Hopefully without
sounding like a BNSO — sorry, make that SNOB
(a flash of dyslexia caused me to walk into a bra
the other day) — and unable to resist my inner
Simon Cowell, I must add that, although pre-
sented in a very pleasant voice and personable
manner — the intermittent commentary could, in
order to have better suited the occasion, reflect-
ed a ‘wee bit’ higher level of sophistication.

That said, kudos to all involved for an enjoy-
able, well-spent evening.

ARTHUR LEE
Nassau,
April, 2009.

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THE TRIBUNE

WEDNESDAY, MAY 6, 2009, PAGE 5



LOCAL NEWS

Downtown Nassau
Partnership to host
town hall meeting on
Pevitalisation tonight

THE DOWNTOWN
NASSAU PARTNER-
SHIP, the public-private
sector organisation
charged with steering the
revitalisation of historic
Nassau, will host its first
town meeting tonight at
the British Colonial
Hilton.

“We hope that every
stakeholder with an inter-
est in the transformation
of downtown Nassau will
become part of this move-
ment, asking questions,
sharing ideas and being
involved beginning with
this town meeting on
Wednesday,” said Vaughn
Roberts, DNP managing
director. “The meeting is
open to the public and we

plan to discuss the revitali-

sation efforts to date and
the plans to improve
downtown Nassau for the
benefit of residents and
visitors. We are also hon-
oured to have at the meet-
ing two very important

persons in the internation- ;

al downtown management

arena — Dave Feehan, past }

president of the Interna-

tional Downtown Associa-
tion, and Brad Segal, pres- :
ident of Progressive Urban :

Management Associates,
who will serve as consul-
tants in forming the Busi-

ness Improvement District

for the city.”

The town meeting is
scheduled for 6 — 7.30pm
in Governors C Ballroom
of the Hilton. There is no
charge.

m By DENISE MAYCOCK
Tribune Freeport Reporter
dmaycock@tribunemedia.net

FREEPORT - The families of the two
male students who were allegedly molested
by a male teacher at Eight Mile Rock High
School intend to take legal action against
the Ministry of Education.

Rev Glenroy Bethel, founder of Families
for Justice (FFJ), said the families are under
“ereat stress.” He has asked his organisa-
tion to represent them.

“We believe the Ministry of Education
must be held accountable,” he said. “We
believe they are getting off too lightly ...
and there is some liability for the incidents
that have happened on the school property,”
he said.

A former teacher at Eight Mile Rock

when they were in the seventh grade. It is
alleged that the abuse continued for eight
years.

The suspected teacher has fled the coun-
try and is now being sought by the police.

Rev Bethel said FFJ is very concerned
that the abuse allegedly happened while the
victims were under the ministry’s care.

Concern

Also expressing concern for the victims
and their families were PTA president Troy
Garvey, Rastas Jah Shiloh and Dadda Rag-
ga of the Unity Is Strength Movement, and
Dudley Seide of Outreach Ministry.

“We have come together to stand for jus-
tice. We also see a great need to protect our
children not just at Eight Mile Rock High
School, but the entire Bahamas because we

in the system at other schools,” said Rev
Bethel.

Troy Garvey said the PTA is also con-
cerned about the status of investigations
involving two other teachers at Eight Mile
Rock High.

A female teacher and another male
teacher have been removed from the school
over alleged complaints of sexual misconduct
involving students.

Education Minister Carl Bethel was crit-
icised for his silence concerning the initial
allegations, which surfaced in January.

Mr Garvey believes the appointment of a
select committee to investigate complaints of
sexual molestation would bring better results.

He said the victims went to the police,
the Ministry of Education, and Social Ser-
vices but got no help.

“When you look at how the system dealt
with the matter someone has to be held

allegedly molested plan legal action

tened from the beginning we would not have
a teacher (out there) on the run from the sys-
tem,” he said.

Dudley Seide stressed that there are a lot
of good teachers in the education system.
“We must weed out those teachers who
decide to betray our kids and come to school
to molest,” he said.

Rasta Jah Shiloh is pleased the matter
has finally got the attention of national lead-
ers.

“Tt is quite pleasing to see both the oppo-
sition and the governing party on one accord
and recognising the need to address this sit-
uation. We as a people must remember that
together we stand. Let’s stand together in the
protection of the future of our country,” he
said.

Rev Bethel is calling on the prime minis-
ter and the minister of national security to

High School is accused of molesting the two
students — who have both now left school —

TIMELINE...











¢ October 2002 — Angry work-
ers of Gladstone Farms went on
strike over fears they would not
be paid severance pay following
the closure of the company.

e¢ Then Minister of Agricul-
ture V Alfred Gray said he
expected the severance packages
to be paid before the farm shut
its doors.

¢ That same month, president
of the Bahamas Commercial
Stores, Warehouse and Allied
Workers Union Elgin Douglas
announced that severance pack-
ages had been negotiated and
that all employees would be paid
following the farm's closure.

¢ November 2002 — Gladstone
Farms closes leaving more than
200 workers jobless. The com-
pany was later placed into liqui-
dation.

¢ In late 2002, Trade Union
Congress president Obie Fergu-
son weighed in and said he wrote
numerous letters to government







officials on behalf of the former
employees. He said he was
informed that the employees’
payment would be discussed as
soon as the company's assets
were realised.

e August, 2004 — A group of
former employees appeals in
writing to then prime minister
Perry Christie for assistance in
receiving their severance pay.

e April, 2007 — Former Glad-
stone Farms owner Canadian
Tim Wien tells The Tribune he
was unaware of any agreement
with the former workers.

¢ February 2008 — The group
writes to Prime Minister Hubert
Ingraham to intervene in the
matter.

e April 2009 - Some of the
former workers meet with per-
manent secretary at the Ministry
of Agriculture Creswell Sturrup
and outline their situation. They
are told they will be contacted in
a few weeks for an update.

Minister: election uproar
is embarrassment for union

m@ By MEGAN REYNOLDS
Tribune Staff Reporter
mreynolds@tribunemedia.net

THE UPROAR over election
nominations for the Bahamas Hotel
Catering and Allied Worker’s Union
is an embarrassment for the union,
maintains Labour Minister Dion

Foulkes.

Police were called to control the
chaos as hundreds of BHCAWU
members went to Worker’s House on |
Harrold Road on Monday to regis-
ter their nominations for the union’s

May 28 elections.

But two of the 60-plus candidates
rallying for the union’s 12 executive
positions lost out on nominations.

BHCAWU secretary general Leo Douglas said
the disruption was sparked when presidential
hopeful Kirk Wilson, currently first vice-presi-
dent under Roy Colebrook’s leadership and
leader of the Deliverance party, argued the nom-
inations should be held on May 11, and subse-

quently was not nominated.

His actions led to two Deliverance party can-
didates nominating themselves independently,

Mr Douglas said.

And further confusion was caused when union
officials had to turn down Tyrone ‘Rock’ Morris’s
bid for the presidency as head of the Unity party
because he is not entitled to BHCAWU mem-
bership as an Atlantis casino croupier.

Dion ence



Mr Douglas said: “The only thing
they are trying to do is hijack an
organisation that’s been in existence
for the past 50 years plus.

“T didn’t expect that, I thought they
would have behaved in a better way,
there shouldn’t have been any dis-
ruption.”

When news of the disorderly nom-
ination process travelled to Labour
Minister Dion Foulkes, it was met
with disappointment.

Mr Foulkes said: “It’s very unfor-
tunate that the nomination process
has deteriorated. I would wish to
appeal to all of the candidates to exer-
cise a strong degree of maturity and
always consider the interests of their
members.

“As Minister of Labour my main concern is
to ensure the members’ rights and interests are
always represented, and what happened yesterday
takes away from the union’s ability to represent
the interests of their membership.

“Tt’s really an embarrassment to the union so I

would appeal to all of the candidates to respect

the process and respect the procedure.”
The Ministry of Labour is not involved in the

nomination process but will supervise the election

on May 28.

BHCAWU.

Union President Roy Colebrook, Nicole Mar-
tin, Tyrone Butler and Abraham Smith have all
been nominated for the top post of the

Business focuses on training in response to recession

A BAHAMIAN business is
responding to the recession by
providing training and profes-
sional development for its staff
during these challenging eco-
nomic times.

JMEL Enterprises, parent
company of Texaco Faith Avenue
and Fire Trail Road, East Street
and Soldier, Wulff and Kemp
Roads, said it believes that train-
ing is essential to the success of
their company.

It is a trend they hope other
businesses throughout the coun-
try will emulate.

The company recently held a
recognition luncheon at the
British Colonial Hilton for nine
senior supervisors and supervi-
sors who completed a leadership
training programme conducted
by human resources consultant
Dr Richard Pinder.

The 12-month programme con-
sisted of a number of seminars
which focused on identifying
strengths and weaknesses; devel-
oping leadership skills, enhanc-
ing people skills, setting goals
and executing leadership.

Several of the nine employees
were once gas pump attendants,
or as JMEL calls them, customer
service representatives, who
worked their way up in the com-
pany through hard work and
determination.

President of JMEL Enterprises
Merritt Storr expressed his grati-
tude to the nine team members
for providing outstanding service
to the company.

Managing director of JMEL
Enterprises Ethan Moss applaud-
ed the service of the supervisors
and thanked them for their dedi-
cation to the company. He said
that their standards for customer
service can be applied to any
industry and work.

“Service is based on how peo-

ple feel and how people feel will
be based on the knowledge of
their thoughts. It doesn’t take
earth shattering innovation or
changes to have a significant
impact on employees.

“Employers throughout the
country need to know that if
employees are not treated well
by management and companies
do not invest in them, why are
they, then in turn going to exude
good customer service,” said Mr
Moss.

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believe that there are (dangerous teachers)



















accountable for it. If the authorities had lis-

ensure the safety of children at all public
and private schools.

Former workers of Gladstone Farms
RONAN A HIKB ENA To PIICem DLO ete es

m@ By TANEKA THOMPSON
Tribune Staff Reporter
tthompson@tribunemedia. net

MORE than six years after they
lost their jobs, former workers of
Gladstone Farms have renewed
their call for government to fulfil
promises made by the former
Christie administration regarding
their unpaid severance packages.

Although the workers "have
never seen a dime” of the
promised money, they are still
hopeful the funds will be distrib-
uted some day.

Hartley Strachan, a mainte-
nance supervisor for the company
for about 33 years, said the situa-
tion feels like a slap in the face,
especially after the former gov-
ernment made provisions to pay
former workers of the now closed
Royal Oasis hotel in Grand
Bahama.

"It's been years and not only
myself but all of the former
employees have been waiting.

“It's ridiculous in these hard
times that the former administra-
tion could pay one set of work-
ers and no one, not even the
Christian community, saw fit to
say: “We sympathise with the for-

mall @ marathon

mer employees of Gladstone
Farms.”

"So anytime they say they care
about the workers of this coun-
try — the black-belt and grassroots
people — we are wondering who
are they talking about. Because
here it is, almost six years down
the road we're still not paid,” he
said.

He estimates he is owed around
$30,000 in severance pay but said
if only a portion of that were paid
"it would be welcomed."

Although Mr Strachan was able
to find employment after the com-
pany closed, many of his co-work-
ers who did not posses marketable
skills are still struggling to make
ends meet.

Fred Stubbs, a former purchas-
ing manager who worked with the
company for about 38 years, is
one of those workers. He was 60-
years-old when the farm closed
in 2002, and because of his age, it
was hard to find a new job.

He is now relying on his small
pension to pay the bills.

"You just barely get by. You
have to make due with what you
have," he said.

But the group is still holding
out hope after a recent meeting





with Department of Agriculture
officials, who Mr Strachan said
promised to "look into" the situ-
ation, but made no assurances
about the former workers receiv-
ing any money.

The company — which was the
country's largest chicken produc-
ing business — was sold in 2002
after the company failed to recov-
er from setbacks due to damage
from Hurricane Floyd in 1999 and
Hurricane Michelle in 2001, and
from the 1998 reduction in Cus-
toms duties which gave an advan-
tage to foreign imports. The clo-
sure left about 200 workers out
of work.

Attempts to reach Minister of
Labour Dion Foulkes and Minis-
ter of Agriculture Larry
Cartwright were unsuccessful yes-
terday, as both men were in Cab-
inet.

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PAGE 6, WEDNESDAY, MAY 6, 2009

THE TRIBUNE



LOCAL NEWS

FROM page one

non disappeared from her
sight, Ms Moss said: “I left
him in the back seat and I'd
just gone inside for a minute.
Then my sister came running
in and said ‘Hey! (Sifford’s)
gone with the baby!’

“T came outside and tried
to stop him and said ‘Please,
just let my baby out the car!’
— he tried to run me over and
that was it.”

Shannon’s mother did not
see her baby again until yes-
terday when she spotted her
car with the child and Sifford
inside near the National Insur-
ance Board headquarters on
Wulff Road.

“Before I could get to him,
he sped off. I was in a pan-
icked state...I called 911 but I
was so (hysterical) they prob-
ably couldn’t understand what
I was saying,” she said.

Meanwhile, it appeared that
her car, license plate number
183906, had been sanded
down in preparation for being
repainted in an apparent
attempt to disguise it, said the
mother.

Officer in Charge of the
Central Detective Unit, Chief
Superintendent Elsworth
Moss, told The Tribune that
having kept the matter quiet
in an attempt to capture Sif-

Kidnapper: Ill
kill your baby

ford the police are now chang-
ing tack.

this child is. We staked out
the house and did all the nec-
essary things, put everything
in place, but he’s not surfaced

through the media,” he said.

In an All Points Bulletin
issued by police, the accused i
kidnapper was described as }
slim with a “medium com- }
plexion”, 5 foot 7 inches tall
and weighing around 160 :

pounds.

Ms Moss added that Sifford
often speaks with an Ameri- }
can accent, interchanged with :
Bahamian }
accents. He also alternates the
spelling of his surname, some-

Jamaican or

times using “Siefort.”

Anyone with information ;

on the whereabouts of Sifford

or Shannon are asked to con- i
tact their nearest police sta-
tion or call 919, 911 (police
502-
9930/9991 (C.D.U), 322 3333 i
(police control room) or 328- }

emergency room),

8477 (Crime Stoppers).

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@ By DENISE MAYCOCK
Tribune Freeport Reporter
dmaycock@tribunemedia.net

BAHAMIAN Julian Knowles says he
takes grave exception to comments by
Jetta Baptiste printed in a Tribune article
in which she referred to Bahamians as
“Christ-less” and “real children of the
devil.”

Mr Knowles thinks that Ms Baptiste,
president of the Haitian Bahamian Soci-
ety of the Bahamas, owes the Bahamian
people and the nation an apology for her
“offensive” comments.

“I was very disturbed about what she
said and I took grave offence to it and felt
greatly insulted, and I think she was out
of place,” he said yesterday at The Tri-
bune’s Freeport Office.

Mr Knowles said he is not anti-Haitian,
but felt compelled to express his con-
cerns after reading the article in The Tri-
bune.

In a story that appeared on May 1
under the heading, “Haitian man denied
Bahamas asylum executed on homeland
return,” Ms Baptiste expressed deep con-
cern and sadness over the death of Hait-
ian Anderson Pierre, 37, who was killed
on his return to Haiti after being denied
asylum in the Bahamas. He was ordered
to leave the country by immigration offi-
cials in Freeport.

Yesterday, Amnesty International
called for a “full and thorough” investi-
gation into the Immigration Departmen-
t’s decision to reject Mr Pierre’s asylum
application.

Ms Baptiste said: “God is not pleased
with a country which touts itself as a
Christian nation, and yet their actions

FROM page one

week. She told the court that
she and Fraser had sex on an
average of 12 times a month,

Anderson Pierre

Jetta Baptiste

show that they are really Christ-less and
act like real children of the devil.”

Mr Pierre, and his wife, Paulette, had
applied for political asylum two years ago
on the grounds that they feared their lives
would be in danger if they returned to
Haiti.

Mr Knowles stated that while the death
of Mr Pierre was unfortunate, he does
not believe that the Bahamas should be
blamed for what happened in Santo
Domingo.

“The decision for asylum I feel should
be left to the proper authorities, but I
call upon the Ministry of National Secu-
rity and Immigration, and the Ministry
of Foreign Affairs to investigate this mat-
ter and to provide necessary protection
for Mrs Pierre,” he said.

“We are a God-fearing country and I
think we owe her that much, to protect
her while she is here or however long she
is going be here, or for as long as she
wants to be here and that the matter
could be resolved in a decent, respectable
way.”

Mr Knowles said the Bahamas has nev-
er been known as a country of “devil
worshippers.”

Young woman testifies she had sex
with Bishop Fraser 12 times a month



Bahamian hits back over

“We’re seeking to find out }
where this guy is and where }

- ‘Christ-less’ comments

and the car has not been }
located on the streets, sonow }
we’re going to flush him out }

He noted that the Bahamas govern-
ment and ordinary Bahamians sent aid
to Haiti when hurricanes devastated the
island last year.

“It was this Christ-less and devil wor-
shiping country that sent trailers there,
and there is no other country in the world
other than America that Haitians have
benefitted from more than the Bahamas,
whether they came here legally or ille-
gally. The Bahamas has been good to
them,” said Mr Knowles.

“We could have sent stuff to Inagua
and Turks Island but we sent trailer loads
of items donated not only from Haitians
here, but from Bahamians too — only
Christ-like people do those things.

“Tam therefore, demanding that Ms
Baptiste offer an apology to this nation. I
have no gripes against Haitians, my issue
is with Ms Baptiste and the language she
used.

“She made her comments in a leading
newspaper that is read all over the world
and on the internet, and now Amnesty
International is involved. I call on her to
retract her comments and apologise,”
said Mr Knowles.

Ms Baptiste has called on government
to review and revise its immigration poli-
cies concerning political asylum appli-
cants.

She has also appealed to government
and members of the United Nations High
Commission for Refugees to conduct an
investigation into the death of Anderson
Pierre.

Mr Pierre’s widow is calling on Immi-
gration officials to reconsider her asylum
case and allow her to remain in Grand
Bahama with her three-week-old son,
who was born in the Bahamas.

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then six to eight times a month
from October 2005 when she
developed a vaginal infection.
Mr Munroe, however, point-
ed out that the virtual com-
plainant had stated at the first
trial that she and Fraser had
sex a total of 15 times in 2005.
The witness did not recall mak-
ing that statement, but remem-
bered stating that they had sex
15 or more times at his church
office and five times at his
home. The young woman told
the court that she sometimes
spoke to Fraser over the tele-
phone for three to four hours at
a time, but usually a total of
five or six hours every day. She
told the court that Fraser had
instructed her to call him every
day and on occasions when she
didn’t, he would make a fuss.
The young woman told the
court that the first counselling
session with Fraser took place
on the evening of June 13, 2005.
She denied Mr Munroe’s sug-
gestion that at that time Fraser
took six pages of notes. She

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admitted that she had told Fras-
er that she had a terrible child-
hood, a bad relationship with
her mother and that she had
felt suicidal. She said that dur-
ing a second meeting, Fraser
did not take any notes and that
all of their discussions about
her childhood and her rela-
tionship with her mother had
occurred during their first
meeting.

The young woman told the

court that the sexual relation-
ship between her and Bishop
Fraser ended in February 2006.
She also told the court that in
April 2005, members of her
family confronted Fraser at his
church office. At that time, she
said that Fraser let them listen
to a voice mail that one of her
aunts had sent him. She told
the court that on another occa-
sion, the police were called to
the church and Fraser in the

yesterday was the Seiko watch
the young woman claimed
Fraser had bought for her, the
packet that had contained the
earrings she claimed he had
bought and a box of Monistat
cream. Prosecuting the case are
Franklyn Williams, Assistant
director of Legal Affairs in the
Attorney General’s Office, and
attorney Darnelle Dorsette.
The case continues before
Magistrate Carolita Bethel
today.

Man’s body found floating in water
behind the Harbour Moon Hotel

FROM page one

hauled the body out of the water, as dozens of

bystanders looked on.

His body was taken by police boat to the

RBPF's Harbour Patrol unit.

While initial evidence does not suggest the
man died as a result of foul play, an autopsy will
be commissioned to determine the official cause

of death, police said.

"Just after 8(am) we received a report of a
body of a man found in the water (near) the Har-
bour Moon Hotel, in the water at the rear of that
hotel. As a result of that, officers from the Royal
Bahamas Police Force and members from the
Defence Force retrieved the body and upon
examination of the body we have discovered
there are no signs of trauma to the body.

"We do not suspect foul play at this stage — an
autopsy will be performed to confirm the cause of
death," Assistant Superintendent Walter Evans
told reporters at a briefing at the nearby Har-
bour Patrol Unit base on Bay Street.” He may
have been one of those individuals who frequent

FROM page one

which they paid the required
fines over a year ago.

Galmando Gibson and Ter-
rance Gilbert say government
must urgently address the prob-
lem — whether through com-
puterisation or simply greater
diligence by police or court staff
— which appears to allow for
warrants to remain active in the
police’s records despite having
been disposed of in the courts.

In Mr Gibson’s case, he was
forced to find time to go before
a magistrate twice on two dif-
ferent days before finally being
directed to a nearby court log-
book where proof that he had
paid a $250 fine a year prior was
recorded, rendering the entire
ordeal an unnecessary inconve-
nience.

“Tt almost cost me my job,”
said Gibson, who was detained
for several hours in Central
Police station one morning
when he should have been at
work.

“As a tax paying citizen I
should be able to go about my

that area but we are investigating and will do
some (more) inquiries, but again we do not sus-

this stage.

pect foul play at this stage.

"There are no signs of trauma, no signs of
injuries, anything that causes us to feel that we
need to look at this from a criminal matter at

He speculated that the man may have somehow
fallen into the water at least 12 hours before he
was discovered.

"He may have fallen accidentally into the water
— we're not sure.”

Mr Evans also dispelled rumours that the man
was handcuffed.

The man, believed to be in his late 20s to early
30s, was dressed in a white T-shirt and blue shorts
when his body was found.

Police yesterday appealed for public assistance
to discover the man's identity.

"At this stage we are investigating and we are
asking anyone with information who might have
had any relative gone missing, perhaps within
the last 12 to 24 hours, to contact the police so we
can verify and get information in regard to the
identity of this individual," said Mr Evans.

Motorists detained on
outdated arrest warrants
call for urgent action

business freely if I have done
everything that is required of
me,” he said.

Meanwhile, Terrance Gilbert,
40, was also held for over five
hours at the police Warrant
Office last Friday before he was
able to convince an employee
that he had paid the fine for his
previous traffic violation and
should be permitted to go and
search for his receipt.

Having not been able to find
the document, a perusal of the
same court logbook as Mr Gib-
son enabled him also to quickly
find evidence of the payment.

Now he has been warned by
police that in order to avoid get-
ting into the same situation
again, he should keep his pay-
ment reference number on his
person at all times.

“Tt’s ridiculous. Why should I

have to suffer because of their
system?” asked Mr Gilbert.
“Unless someone says some-
thing about the situation things
will just get slacker and slack-
er.”

In Mr Gibson’s case, his
detention was all the more frus-
trating as he had followed this
advice and kept his receipt for
almost a year after he had paid
the fine, only to find that he was
picked up on the warrant short-
ly after he disposed of it.

“Something needs to be
done,” he told The Tribune.

Calls to the Traffic Court and
Police Warrants Office yester-
day both resulted in The Tri-
bune being directed to contact
Assistant Commissioner of
Police, Hulan Hanna. A mes-
sage left for ACP Hanna was
not returned up to press time.
THE TRIBUNE

WEDNESDAY, MAY 6, 2009, PAGE 7





A hurricane across the green fields of life:
How the 1918 flu affected the Caribbean

“So vast was the catastrophe...that
our minds, surfeited with the horrors
of war, refused to realise it. It came
and went, a hurricane across the
green fields of life, sweeping away
our youth in the hundreds of thou-
sands and leaving a toll of sickness
and infirmity which will not be reck-
oned in this generation.” -- article in
The Times of London on the 1918
influenza pandemic.

QO: of the most devastat-
ing fires in human history
began smouldering in March 1918
in the American midwest and
exploded that August to affect more
than a third of the world's popula-
tion.

New research confirms that the
virus which caused the 1918 influen-
za pandemic is directly linked to the
current swine flu virus, which has
the potential to cause a new pan-
demic. Scientists say the 1918 virus
spread in pigs and eventually pro-
duced the current HIN1 swine flu
virus, which has led health authori-
ties to declare an international emer-
gency.

The 1918 flu killed more than 50
million people around the world in
just a few months — many more
than the 16 million military and civil-
ian deaths of the First World War,
which was one of history's bloodi-
est. In fact, it killed more people
than all the wars of the 20th century
combined. More even than medieval
Europe's horrifying Black Death.

A pandemic is a worldwide epi-
demic caused by a new virus to
which people have no immunity.
One of the big reasons for the
“mother of pandemics” in 1918 was
that the virus had mutated so it could
pass easily among people. And that
is a feature of the current virus,
which has infected over a thousand
people in 21 countries since it was
first reported on April 12.

There is another similarity too. A
century ago, it was the young and
fit who were most at risk from the flu
— those in the prime of their lives.
And that seems to be the case with
the current outbreak. Dr Alan Hay,
director of the World Influenza Cen-
tre says the most worrying aspect to
this new virus is that it affects young,
healthy adults.

The death rate from the current

flu outbreak is low, but health
experts fear a second wave of infec-
tion this winter could be more lethal.
That is also what happened in 1918.
The first outbreak in Kansas was rel-
atively mild, but a second outbreak
in Europe later the same year pro-
duced alarmingly high death rates.
People would go to work in the
morning and be dead by evening.

Strangely, this terrible event in
the world’s recent past kept a very
low profile until recently. Parents
and grandparents never mentioned
it. University of London history pro-
fessor, Dr David Killingray, noted
that: “Despite the fearsome impact,
there seems to have been a collective
amnesia...the full impact of the epi-
demic appears to have been cloaked
by the pre-occupations of a horren-
dous war.”

At first, no-one knew what
caused the epidemic, but rumours
abounded. Many believed it was a
bio-war unleashed by the Germans.
Evangelist Billy Sunday — the Billy
Graham of his day — thought it was
a punishment for sin. "We can meet
here tonight and pray down the epi-
demic," Sunday said. But even as he
spoke people in the audience col-
lapsed with the flu.

Tt was difficult to avoid. Everyone
has to breathe and every sneeze
spreads millions of infected droplets
into the air. As a children's nursery
rhyme of the day put it: "I opened
the window and in-flu-enza." The
1918 virus had a mortality rate of
2.5 per cent compared to less than
0.1 per cent in previous flu epi-
demics. Doctors reported that
patients "died struggling to clear
their airways of a blood-tinged froth
that gushed from their nose and
mouth."

The 1918 pandemic circled the
globe in a few months, following
trade routes and shipping lanes. In
the early years of the 20th century
public health systems were limited,
and contemporary observers were
often vague in recording causes of



death, particularly in outlying
colonies. But Killingray estimates
about 100,000 flu deaths in the
Caribbean, with nearly 30,000 in
British territories including the
Bahamas:

“Tts spread and effects on certain
islands and areas seemed to be arbi-
trarily selective, and there are no
clear answers why one place suffered
high morbidity and mortality rates,
another widespread infection but
low mortality, while other places
remained virtually untouched by the
disease. Such variations may have
been due to prompt quarantine by
the authorities, for example, in the
Bahamas, which although in close
proximity to the United States, must
have been helped by a dearth of
wartime shipping.”

We were luckier than most. The
devastating effects of earlier cholera
epidemics led to the Quarantine Act
of 1905 and construction of an isola-
tion station on Athol Island, which
operated until the 1920s. This effi-
cient quarantine system seems to
have preserved the Bahamas from
infection during the 1918 pandemic.
Barbados was similarly fortunate.

However, a 1919 Colonial Office
report did note that “many” of the
2,500-plus Bahamian migrant work-
ers in the US became infected and
died during the pandemic. Bahami-
an migration to America peaked
during this period, and the popula-
tion of the islands actually fell for
the first time. The total recorded in
1921 was marginally lower than that
in 1901 — about 53,000.

A: a non-notifiable disease,
influenza was not covered

by international quarantine regula-
tions in 1918. And when the virus
mutated in August of that year it
spread rapidly and with unprece-
dented virulence, helped by wartime
disruption and troop movements.
Among British territories, Jamaica,
Guyana and Belize were the most

The first 100 days: new American
engagement for the 21st Century

m JAMES L JONES
United States National
Security Advisor

Or hundred days ago, the
United States celebrated the
inauguration of our 44th President. Many
around the world joined us in celebrating
what was an historic occasion for the
American people, and for all who believe
in the possibility of hope for a better
future for themselves and their children.

The excitement and optimism we as
Americans felt on January 20 has only
grown since then, even in the face of a
sobering global economic crisis, news of a
flu virus, and daunting 21st century challenges like ter-
rorism and nuclear proliferation; climate change and
poverty; enduring conflicts and dangerous disease.

These challenges were not caused by any one
nation, nor can they be solved by any one nation.
As President Obama said on just his second day in
office, “For the sake of our national security and the
common aspirations of people around the globe, an
era of new American leadership in the world has to
begin now.”

During the first 100 days of his administration,
President Obama has already demonstrated to the
world what a new American engagement will look
like.

First, he has committed himself and his adminis-
tration to a foreign policy that ensures the safety of the
American people and that of our friends and allies.
Global engagement on the basis of mutual interests
and mutual respect is the starting point of our foreign
policy. And while there will be circumstances where
such an approach might not be successful, the United
States will first be prepared to listen to and talk with
potential adversaries to advance our national interests
and those of the global community that depend on the
United States for leadership on security issues. In
those instances where a more demonstrable use of
power is inevitable, no adversary should be under
any illusion as to the outcome. This is why we will con-
tinue to maintain our Armed Forces as the best in the
world as well as the most admired and respected.

To carry out our engagement strategies, and almost
immediately upon taking office the President appoint-
ed some of America’s most talented diplomats to
serve as special envoys and representatives — for Mid-
dle East peace, for South West Asia, for Sudan, for
Afghanistan and Pakistan, and for climate change.
This fact alone illustrates that the 21st century is one
in which regional strategies will be at the forefront of
our energy and focus on issues pertaining to nation-
al and international security. This represents a clear
recognition that we must deal with the world as it is
today and not as it was in the 20th century. Over the
past three months, the national security community,
to include our serving diplomats abroad, has engaged
in active and effective diplomacy to confront the
many challenges we face. To date the results have
been encouraging, but much remains to be done.

President Obama has also made clear his commit-
ment to pursue a deep and positive dialogue with
Muslim communities around the world. That is the
reason he gave his first televised interview as Presi-
dent to al-Arabiya. It is also why he told Iran’s peo-
ple and leaders that he seeks a new dialogue on the
full range of issues that we face, and it is also why he
spoke of new partnerships on behalf of education,
health care, and opportunity in his speech before the
Turkish Parliament. And finally, it is why he has
made it clear that the United States is not now, and
will never be, at war with Islam.

Second, we’ve made it clear that it is our intent to
disrupt, dismantle, and defeat al Qaeda.



President Barack Obama

YOUR SAY



In March, the President announced the
results of a comprehensive strategy review
for Pakistan and Afghanistan that will
finally provide the resources we need to
achieve our goals, while helping the peo-
ple of Afghanistan and Pakistan pursue
security and greater opportunity.

In Strasbourg, at the 60th anniversary
of the founding of the North Atlantic
Treaty Organisation (NATO), the Presi-
dent received broad international sup-
port for his strategy and a commitment from our
NATO allies to create a new strategic concept so
that the Alliance can become more relevant in meet-
ing the challenges of the 21st century.

And in Baghdad, the President reiterated his com-
mitment to responsibly reduce our forces in keeping
with the Status of Forces Agreement negotiated with
the government of Iraq, all the while helping Iraqis
take responsibility for their sovereign future.

Third, President Obama has worked to forge com-
mon approaches to a wide range of global challenges.
In London, he helped build an important consensus
on concrete steps to deal with the global financial
crisis, including a new global regulatory framework,
increased assistance for developing nations, and a
renewed commitment to free and fair trade. In
Prague, he launched an ambitious agenda to secure all
“loose” nuclear materials around the world in four
years, to reverse the tide of nuclear proliferation,
and to strive for a world free of nuclear weapons.

Closer to home, President Obama has recognised
our shared responsibility to effectively address drug
demand and illicit arms trafficking and he has
launched a new plan to combat drug-related violence
along the US-Mexico border. The President also
announced the lifting of restrictions on remittances
and travel to Cuba for Cuban-Americans, and marked
a new beginning with our neighbours in the hemi-
sphere, offering cooperation on a wide range of issues
at the Summit of the Americas.

The President has also worked effectively with
multilateral organisations. In past weeks the United
States rallied our allies and the world community in
response to the launching of the North Korean mis-
sile launch, and is augmenting the international effort
to combat piracy off the coast of Somalia. Finally, the
United States has signaled its intent to lead on still
other important initiatives of great importance to
our planet in advancing partnerships on clean energy
and climate change, starting with the first preparato-
ry session of the Major Economies Forum on Energy
and Climate.

And finally, President Obama has rejected as false
any choice between America’s security and its ideals.
On his first day in office, he ordered the closure of the
Guantanamo Bay Detention Centre within one year,
banned enhanced detention techniques, and made
clear without exception or equivocation that the Unit-
ed States fully supports the Geneva Convention and
does not practice nor condone torture.

Here too, we will be expected to lead by the pow-
er of our example.

While much has been said and done in the first 100
days, those of us who are privileged to serve our
nation in this remarkably complex and challenging
period fully realise that we are only at the beginning
of the journey. We believe that we are making
progress in meeting some of the great challenges we
face in first restoring America’s standing as a friend
and partner to all who seek a future of peace, pros-
perity and dignity for their citizens.



National Museum of Health and Medicine, Armed Forces

Institute of Pathology/AP

IN THIS 1918 PHOTOGRAPH, influenza victims crowd into an emergency hospital at Camp Funston, a
subdivision of Fort Riley in Kansas. The flu, which is believed to have originated in Kansas, killed at least

20 million people worldwide.

severely affected in the region.

“The virus raged through the
plantations and slum housing of the
low-lying coastal towns.” Killingray
wrote in the 2003 edition of the
Caribbean Quarterly. “East Indian
labour was hard hit, but not as
severely as Native Americans. By
early October the influenza pan-
demic was well-established in Cen-
tral America and from there it
reached Belize on the eleventh of
the month....and a little later that
month it appeared in the Bahamas.”

In Jamaica the authorities restrict-
ed rail travel, fumigated money and
suspended postal service. Schools
and shops closed and social events
were suspended, but by early
November the disease had affected
the entire island, with the Gleaner
reporting that “coolie labour on the
estates has been reduced almost to
vanishing point.”

Medical facilities were over-
whelmed across the region. In Belize
infection rates were as high as 80
per cent and crops went unharvested.
In Guyana there were serious strains
on burial society funds as plantation
labourers were decimated. And
some Amerindian tribes were said to
have been wiped out.

“This epidemic has been the most
severe visitation of disease within
the memory of any colonist,”
Guyana’s acting surgeon-general
concluded at the time. “The almost
universal prevalence and high mot-

tality rate have caused untold suf-
fering.”

As you might expect, rum was
considered one of the most potent
treatments for the flu at the time.
Other popular remedies included
Horlicks, insecticide, Palmolive soap
and tobacco.

In the Bahamas there were no
official reports of deaths from the
flu, but recent estimates say as many
as 60 may have died during the epi-
demic. In Guyana, with a popula-
tion of 310,000, there were some
12,000 deaths. And perhaps 10,000 in
Jamaica, out of a population of
850,000.

“These figures take account of
unrecorded deaths, those reported as
dying of other causes such as fevers
and pneumonia — often complica-
tions of influenza — (and) long-term
influenza infections such as
encephalitis lethargica,” Killingray
explained. “The pandemic of 1918-19
came suddenly and moved with
deadly speed. The largely laissez-
faire systems of government were
caught ill-prepared, while the med-
ical and scientific professions were
unable to provide effective treat-
ment or cure."

Today, the fear is that a flu pan-
demic will stall the global economy,
overwhelm hospitals, and produce
chaos in local communities.
Bahamuans rely on cross-border trav-
el to make a living, for example, and
it was only five years ago that Toron-

to’s tourist business collapsed
overnight during the SARS out-
break. The strain of a collapse in
travel added to the current econom-
ic meltdown could threaten our very
social fabric.

But the 2003 SARS outbreak and
a small but rising number of deaths
from bird flu since 2005 has spurred
world health authorities to make bet-
ter preparations. Bird flu has claimed
257 lives and infected over 400 peo-
ple around the world, but it is still
considered "inefficient" in its trans-
mission among humans. The good
news, experts say, is that although
the current swine flu virus is highly
transmissible, it appears far less
lethal than bird flu at this point.

Also, since 2007 the World
Health Organisation's hand has been
strengthened by a global agreement
on surveillance and response mea-
sures to acute public health risks that
have the potential to threaten people
worldwide. These International
Health Regulations aim to limit
interference with travel and trade
while ensuring public health through
the prevention of disease spread.

That is good news, because
experts say it can’t be ruled out that
we could be facing the first flu pan-
demic in over 40 years.

What do you think?
Send comments to

larry@tribunemedia net
Or visit www.bahamapundit.com

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PAGE 12, WEDNESDAY, MAY 6, 2009



SPORTS

SPORT eee
Coach impressed with ‘Bahamian connection’

FROM page 14

ours this year,” Hylan projected. “She’s just a
junior, having transferred in, so we are looking
for some big things from her in her senior year
when she returns next year.”

As for Nixon, Hyland said she had a very
good season.

“She won the Conference Championship
title in the shot and she was second in the dis-
cus and the hammer,” Hyland said. “But this
was only her second year throwing the hammer.

“She did very well this year. She didn’t qual-
ify for nationals, but she did very well. She still
has two more years, so she should do very well
next year.”

Last week, Nixon completed her sophomore
year by winning all three throws.

Nixon, who is preparing to return home on
Sunday, said she got off to a really slow start,
but as she started to compete in their confer-
ence meets, things started to improve.

“At Conference, I wanted to do better than
I did, but at the last meet over the weekend, I
did a lot better in the discus,” she said. “Hope-
fully I can have a better season next year.”

The hammer was a new event for Nixon,
who noted that she still has some more fine
tuning to do. “I have to master the spin,” she
insisted. “But it was fun doing it last year and
this year.”

Nixon, who intends to compete in the
BAAA Nationals, said it would be good if they
can do the event at home because it will make
it much easier for the athletes when they have
to make the necessary adjustments to add it to
their repertoire at college. “I would like to do
it at home so people can really see how it’s
done,” she stated. fthe Bahamian connection,
Nixon said she felt right at home because every-
body cheered each other on and encouraged
them to do their best. “We are like a little fam-
ily within a family,” she said.

PETRA McDONALD in action...

Wright first Bahamian
to qualify for Olympics

FROM page 14 in the hot scorching sun before
he gets back on the road to face
the cold weather.

mode.” In 2006 in Whistler where he

Wright, who started competing
in snowboard competitively at
the age of 14, will be entered in
the halfpipe, which will comprise
of two qualifying rounds during
the Olympics.

Based on their difficulties of
the moves and variations, the
competitors will make the cut for
the final where they will have
another two rounds to determine
the medal winners.

While back at home, Wright
said he intends to get a good tan

resides, Wright was approached
by Bahamas High Commission
after he got a third place in his
first-ever World Cup to compete
for the Bahamas.

The rest was history.

Wright, 22, started the
2006/2007 year ranked 13th in
the world. He contested the 2009
Olympic trials that was held in
New Zealand, but he didn’t
make the cut. Wright is the son
of Bahamian businessman Ethric
Bowe.

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KORATH WRIGHT (shown) is the first Bahamian to qualify to compete in the Winter Olympics...

ae E THe Ed Ce
Williams comes
back, O’Neal out

Bm By TIM REYNOLDS
AP Sports Writer

MIAMI (AP) — Marvin
Williams is feeling better. Jer-
maine O'Neal, not so much.

An hour before Game 6 of the
Atlanta-Miami first-round East-
ern Conference series, the
Hawks got a boost and the Heat
took a hit.

Williams returned for the
Hawks on Friday night, even
though Atlanta coach Mike
Woodson declared him out just
hours earlier citing continued
issues with Williams’ sprained
right wrist.

"He started to shoot this
morning,” Woodson said Friday
night. "I wasn't expecting him
back at all.”

O'Neal, meanwhile, missed
the game because of a slight con-
cussion sustained when the
Hawks' Zaza Pachulia struck
him in the face during Game 5,
with little-used Joel Anthony
opening the game in his place.

O'Neal did not practice Thurs-
day or Friday morning, but the
Heat believed he would play.
Doctors, though, conferred with
O'Neal shortly before tip-off and
made the decision that he
shouldn't go, not wanting to risk
other potential problems with
the concussion.

"He's still a little bit groggy,
still a little bit of a headache
today," Heat coach Erik Spoel-
stra said. "He wants to go."

Williams sprained his right
wrist in Game 2, missed the next
three games, and the Hawks
were bracing to be without their





JOSH SMITH goes up over Heat
defender Jermaine O'Neal...
(AP Photo: John Bazemore)

small forward for the remainder
of the series.

Williams did some more
shooting about 90 minutes before
tip-off of Game 6, and was
included on the roster Atlanta
submitted shortly thereafter.

He checked in with 3:51
remaining in the opening quar-
ter, wearing a wrap on his wrist.

Forward Al Horford was also
on Atlanta's active roster and
took part in the team's warm-
ups, although he, too, was
declared out in the morning by
Woodson because of a sprained
right ankle suffered in Game 5.
Solomon Jones started in Hor-
ford's place, and Mo Evans start-
ed again at small forward.

Powe surgery successful

BOSTON (AP) — Boston Celtics forward Leon Powe has under-
gone successful surgery for a microfracture and torn ligaments in his

left knee.

The team announced that team physician Dr Brian McKeon per-
formed the surgery Tuesday morning at New England Baptist Hos-
pital. No timetable has been set for Powe's return.

The forward tore his anterior cruciate ligament and meniscus in the
first quarter of the Celtics 118-115 win in Game 2 of their first-round
playoff series against the Chicago Bulls on April 20. The defending
NBA champions won the series in seven games.

Coach Doc Rivers said Powe hurt himself on a spin move but
continued playing for three more minutes.

Powe averaged 7.7 points and 4.9 rebounds per game this season.

TRIBUNE SPORTS

@ By The Associated
Press

Orlando at Boston (8pm
EDT). The Magic won the
opener at Boston 95-90 to get
a jump on the defending
champions in the Eastern
Conference semifinal series.

STARS

Monday

—Dwight Howard, Magic,
returned from a one-game
suspension with 16 points and
22 rebounds and Orlando
held off late-charging Boston
95-90 in Game 1 of the East-
ern Conference semifinals.

—Rashard Lewis, Magic,
had 18 points, seven
rebounds and three steals for
the Magic.

—Yao Ming, Rockets, who
briefly left with a knee injury
in the closing minutes, had 28
points and 10 rebounds to
lead Houston to a physical
100-92 victory over the Los
Angeles Lakers in Game 1 of
the Western Conference
semifinals.

—Ron Artest and Aaron
Brooks, Rockets. Artest
added 21 points and Brooks
had 19 for the Rockets, who
are in the second round for
the first time since 1997.

LEBRON THE MVP

An MVP vote some
expected to be close was
another slam dunk by Cava-
liers star LeBron James. He
received 109 of a possible 121
first-place votes to easily out-
distance Kobe Bryant. James
totaled 1,172 points in ballot-
ing by media members in the
US and Canada. It's his first
MVP.

STRONG IN DEFEAT

Kobe Bryant scored 32
points against Houston, doing
his best to keep the Lakers
in the game despite missing
practice on Sunday with a
sore throat. He scored 22 of
the Lakers’ final 42 points ...
Paul Pierce scored 16 of his
23 points in the second half
and Rajon Rondo had 14
points, 10 rebounds and eight
assists for Boston in its 95-90
loss to Orlando in Game 1.

SWING

Both NBA finalists from
2008 lost their second-round
openers at home, Boston to
Orlando and Los Angeles to
Houston.

Orlando grabbed a 28-
point lead, 65-37, in the third
quarter, then saw it dwindle
to three before holding on to
beat the Celtics 95-90.

The Celtics did not go to
the free throw line in the first
half, but Rajon Rondo shot
12 free throws in the third
quarter.

FINED

Nuggets forward Kenyon
Martin was fined $25,000 by
the NBA for knocking Mav-
ericks forward Dirk Nowitzki
to the court in the opener of
their second-round playoff
series.

Martin was also assessed a
flagrant foul 1 for the contact
in the first quarter of Sun-
day's game, after Nowitzki
had scored Dallas’ first 10
points on 5-for-5 shooting.

BLOODIED

Houston forward Shane
Battier needed four stitches
to close a gash over his left
eye late in the first quarter of
a 100-92 win at Los Angeles.
He returned and finished
with six points. He was hit
when Los Angeles’ Sasha
Vujacic swatted a loose ball
out to Kobe Bryant. The
force of the impact knocked
Battier to the ground. Work-
ers spent a few minutes wip-
ing blood off the court.

SPEAKING

"I'm 24 years old and I'm
receiving this award, I never
thought it would happen this
fast. I never dreamed about
being MVP, but if I said I did-
n't enjoy this award I'd be
lying. Hard work pays off and
dreams do come true."

— Cavaliers star LeBron
James after being voted the
NBA's most valuable player

"The last 16 minutes was a
debacle. We were sort of try-
ing to run out the clock, and
you can't do that in games
like this. Especially in the
playoffs, teams are going to
keep fighting and keep com-
ing back. (But) how about the
fact that we were up 28? You
play these games to win, and
that's it. We won. Right now,
the series is 1-0."

— Magic coach Stan Van
Gundy after a 95-90 victory
at Boston
TRIBUNE SPORTS



WEDNESDAY, MAY 6, 2009, PAGE 13

SPORTS



Phelps’ three-month
suspension is over

m By PAUL NEWBERRY
AP Sports Writer

BALTIMORE (AP) —
Michael Phelps’ three-month
suspension from competition is
now over and he marked the
occasion like any other day: He
woke up late and headed to the
pool.

Speaking exclusively with The
Associated Press, Phelps said he
didn't even realize his suspen-
sion ended Tuesday. Coach Bob
Bowman couldn't resist making a
joke, saying he planned to enter
his star swimmer in a meet later
that night.

"I had no idea," Phelps said
of his ban, which was doled out
by USA Swimming after a pic-
ture surfaced in a London
tabloid showing him inhaling
from a marijuana pipe.

Actually, he'll return to com-
petition next week at a meet in
Charlotte, N.C. It will be his first
time swimming competitively
since winning eight gold medals
at the Beijing Olympics.

"I'm happy to be back in the
water and be back in semi-
shape," said Phelps, who's lost
almost 20 pounds in last two
months. "I'm sort of getting back
into racing shape and getting
ready to race my first race since
Beijing. We'll see how it's goes.

"I'm happy to have some
structure back in my life,” he
added.

Phelps said he considered
retiring from the sport after the
picture surfaced. After all, he
already broke Mark Spitz's 36-
year-old record of seven gold
medals and became the win-
ningest Olympian ever with 14
golds.

But after writing down the
pros and cons of resuming his
career, Phelps decided to get
back in the water. He's not con-
cerned what the photo did to his
image.

"It was a stupid mistake that I
made," he said during an inter-
view on the deck of the pool at
Loyola University in his native
Baltimore. "But I'll have what
I've accomplished in and out of
the pool for the rest of my life.
I'm satisfied with what I've done
and happy with what I've done.”



OLYMPIC swimming gold medallist Michael Phelps works out Tuesday,
May 5, 2009 in Baltimore...
(AP Photo: Gail Burton)

Special Olympics sponsors course

IN its ongoing training programme for its ath-
letes, coaches, volunteers and board members, the
board of directors of Special Olympics Bahamas
sponsored a two-day intensive course in event man-
agement and programme management for selected
organisers.

The Games Management System (GMS) is one
of the most comprehensive sports systems in the
world, and is used by all Special Olympics regions
around the world.

It not only efficiently computerizes all aspects of
games competitions in all Olympic sports, but cre-
ates a database for all aspects of training, athletes,
coaches, registration, results, reports and history of
performances.

The course was conducted by Reuben Silva of
Special Olympics Inc., the prime developer of this
sophisticated programme. The participants includ-
ed board members, technical directors and meet
directors.

Silva travels the world to educate Special
Olympics national programmes in this new sys-
tem, and national chairman, Basil Christie,
expressed his pride in the initiative taken by his
board to be one of the forerunners in the region
taking advantage of this useful tool.

With the implementation of this system, Spe-
cial Olympics Bahamas will be able to log all activ-
ities of our national programme, create profiles of
all of its athletes, coaches, board members and
volunteers.

REUBEN SILVA (sitting) can be seen showing board
director Nello Lambert and national director Amanda
Moncur the new programme management system...

Probably the most valuable aspect of the sys-
tem is the potential to more successfully plan and
organise its games. “On May 29-30, the Special
Olympics National Games will be celebrated here
in Nassau, and everything will be run on our com-
puters,” said a release.

Last month, Special Olympics offered a certifi-
cation course for 42 new coaches for coaches and
physical education teachers from within the public
school system and Sandilands Rehabilitation Cen-
ter.

Later on this month, a similar course will he
offered to teachers in Grand Bahama. The Board
is committed to training and qualifying all persons
working with persons with intellectual disabilities
registered in our national programme.

Phelps said the whole experi-
ence has "shown me who my real
friends are. It's also given me a
lot of time to think. Pretty much
since Beijing ended, I didn't real-
ly know what I wanted to do."

After going into virtual seclu-
sion for nearly a month after the
photo surfaced, Phelps called
Bowman on March 1 — the
coach remembers the day vivid-
ly — and said simply, "I'm doing
it."

"T was not really concerned
whether he would quit or not,”
Bowman said. "I was concerned
that if he did quit, that he did it
for the right reasons. Otherwise,
it would just be a joke. I have
told him, 'You've done all there
is to do. If you quit today, you're
the greatest of all time. You can
walk away.’ But I did think it
would be bad if he walked away
because of this thing. He should
go on his own terms.”

His motivation restored,
Phelps plans to keep swimming
through the 2012 London
Olympics. While he's not going
to attempt eight gold medals
again, he will continue to do a
program that would be exhaust-
ing to most swimmers.

In Charlotte, he'll swim five
events: the 50-meter freestyle,
100 free, 200 free, 100 backstroke
and 200 butterfly. Only two were

on his record-breaking program
in Beijing, the 200 free and 200
fly.

"I'm feeling good in the water
and swimming some decent
times in practice," Phelps said.
"But I have no idea what to
expect in the meet. I'm going in
open minded.”

As for his life away from the
pool, Phelps wouldn't discuss
tabloid reports that he's dating
Miss California, Carrie Prejean,
who made headlines of her own
last month when she finished
runner-up in the Miss USA
pageant. Some thought her
response to a question about
legalizing same-sex marriage
may have cost her the title.

Phelps would only say the two
"are good friends,” but added
that he can sympathize with what
she's gone through since express-
ing her opposition to gay mar-
riage.

As for tabloid reports of his
heavy partying, Phelps rolled his
eyes and said nearly everything
written about him was false.
Specifically, he denied a report
detailing a wild night in New
York City.

"I know I have not been per-
fect by any means,” he said. "But
I have learned from all of my
mistakes. That's all you can ask
for."

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THE TRIBUNE

Spo

14

PAGE



WEDNESDAY, MAY 6,



2009






Wright first Bahamian to qualify for Winter Olympics

m By BRENT STUBBS
Senior Sports Reporter
bstubbs@tribunemedia.net

THE Bahamas has achieved
another historic feat. This time,
it’s Korath Wright, who has
become the first Bahamian to
qualify to compete in the Win-
ter Olympics.

Earlier this year, Wright
booked his ticket to WVancou-
ver, Canada, for the 2010
Games slated for February 12-
28.

Wright, who was born in the
Bahamas on August 26, 1985,
but moved to Canada to attend
school at the age of 10 where he
started snowboarding, said he’s
really excited to be making his-
tory as the first Bahamian to
































































compete in the Winter
Olympics.

“Pm ready to go,” said
Wright, who is back home try-
ing to generate the funding to
help his further preparation for
the trip. “The whole thing is
just overwhelming.

“This is something that ['m
very proud to be able to do.
Representing the Bahamas at
the Olympics is right at the top
of my list of things to do. ’m
just happy yo be competing for
my nation.”

Now that he has qualified,
Wright said he is eager to get
back on the ice and start train-
ing again because he knows it
won't be an easy task compet-
ing in Canada next year.

“T just need to raise the mon-

>



KORATH WRIGHT (shown) is the first Bahamian to qualify to compete in
the Winter Olympics...

mee Coach impress
1 : : i
Bahamian connection

GABRIELLE NIXON in action...




mg By BRENT STUBBS
Senior Sports Reporter
bstubbs@tribunemedia.net

n injury has

hampered

Oneil

Williams’ }

final season
at Benedict College, cutting
it short. But coach Frank
Hyland said he was really
impressed with the Bahami-
an connection of Williams,
Gabrielle Nixon, Petra
McDonald and Melinda
Bastian.

While Williams went down with a stress
fracture after getting his senior year off to a
fantastic start, Hyland said Nixon had a solid
season, but just fell short of joining both Bas-
tian and McDonald in qualifying for the
NCAA Division II National Championships
slated to be held at the end of the month in
Angelo State University in Angelo, Texas.

“They were all outstanding this year,” said
Hyland of the Bahamian connection, which
is close to the 4-5 from Kenya and well ahead
of the one from Hyland’s homeland of
Trinidad & Tobago.

“Our main goal is to get the athletes who are
academically sound and athletically. So if I
can get anymore Bahamians, I will continue to
recruit them. The programme in the Bahamas
is so much better than ours in Trinidad.”

Putting their individual seasons in prospec-
tive, Hyland said it was disappointing when
Williams went down with the injury near the
end of the season.

“He’s back on track for training and hope-
fully he will get to qualify for the national
team,” said Hyland of Williams, who gradu-
ates.

Before he went out with the injury, Williams
clocked one minute and 51 seconds in the 800
metres. He leaves Benedict College as the
record holder in the 800, 1,500, 5,000 and
10,000, making him what Hyland calls “the
greatest distance runner to come out of our

Frank Hyland

programme.”

This Paper), ish Collie, D Angel,

ey so that I can get back on the
ice and start training,” he said.
“T’m talking to some sponsors
so I can raise the money before
I leave so that I can perform at
my maximum.”

When he leaves here, Wright
intends to travel to Oregon
where he will spend a month in
training, followed by a month in
New Zealand leading into first
competition in September.

“My focus right now is to
start my training,” he said. “As
the Olympics comes closer, I
will be switching to training to
compete. So initially I will start
with basic training, then when it
get closer, I will concentrate
more on the competition

SEE page 12

ed with

MELINDA BASTIAN in action...

Although she will also graduate this year,
McDonald, according to Hyland, ran a colle-
giate best of 14.04 in the 100 hurdles and is
ranked at number nine in the nation.

That time has qualified her for the nationals
and is on the provisional list for the hep-
tathalon. McDonald also competes in the high
jump, but she didn’t qualify for the nationals.

Bastian, who last year competed in volley-
ball and softball, had a full season in track
and field where she had a season’s best of
49.97 metres in the javelin that has her ranked
at No.3 in the nation and is ranked at No.14 in
the heptathalon.

At present, Bastian holds both Benedict
College and the regional records in both the
javelin and heptathalon.

“She is probably the most promising one
of all of our athletes to get All-American hon-

SEE page 12

ee

~ Phelps’

bs three-month

\ suspension
dl .
| is Over...
See page 15

fe
il

Miami Gardens
Express will not
take part in
track meet

mg By BRENT STUBBS
Senior Sports Reporter
bstubbs@tribunemedia. net

ONE day after
announcing the partic-
ipation of the Miami
Gardens Express team
at the second annual
Coach Fritz Grant
Invitational Track
Classic, patron/sponsor
Harrison Petty
revealed that they
won't be coming any-
more.

Petty said when he
contacted the coach of
the team, which had athletes compete
in the Junior Olympics, he discovered
that they didn’t have any passports
and hence would not be able to travel
on Thursday as planned to compete
this weekend at the Thomas A Robin-
son Track and Field Stadium.

“When I contacted the coach to con-
firm their participation, he said ‘oh,
we're ready, we’re coming on Thurs-
day,” Petty said. “I asked him if every-
body had passports and he said ‘pass-
ports? Do we need passports to come
to the Bahamas?”

The coach had informed Petty that
five years ago when he and his wife
visited the Bahamas, they didn’t need
a passport.

“T told him that the law has changed,
so they can’t leave without the pass-
ports,” Petty said. “So we have to
scrape that group from the meet.”

Petty, whose Petty Group of Com-
panies are the major sponsors for the
meet, said it’s quite disappointing that
the young athletes won’t be able to
compete.

“They were all hyped up to come.
The parents were coming too,” he said.
“But there’s nothing we can do.”

While the juniors have been elimi-
nated, Petty said the senior segment
now has about four Jamaicans and a
Haitian competitor coming in.

“One of the Jamaicans has already
ran 10.19 in the 100 and there’s a quar-
ter-miler who has ran 45.20, so the
senior competition is going to be
extremely exciting,” Petty said.

And even though the Miami Gar-
dens Express are not coming to town,
Petty said the juniors should still have
some excitement with the introduc-
tion of the Shuttle Hurdle Relay.

“These kids would have certainly
added favour to it as our athletes mix
and match to compete with them,”
Petty said. “But they are not coming,
but we will still have a very good
meet.”

Just yesterday, Petty said coach
Dwayne Jennings decided to bring a
team in from Grand Bahama to com-
pete. “We didn’t have any entrants
from Grand Bahama,” Petty said. “But
he said he will e-mail his entries to
meet director Bernard (Newbold)
today. So the excitement is building
for a very good meet.”

The meet is scheduled to kick off
5:30pm Friday and wrap up Saturday,
starting at noon.



WHEN TOU THINK EXPLOSIVE TRACKS AMD GAPTI-
VATING HOOKS; you think Padnino! Mo stranger bo fhe
Mus ingusiry A Padnino’s birth name Rony Beye he
aver 10 years of experience in the game. Born a
In the Bahamas, he soent mest of his POUNger years an
the Gland and ihe vert on fo five in fhe USA tor about 7
YES TO PUPS Misa

Making his mark in 2003, fer co-produced tor fark
Middlenton fomnerk: orihe GRAMATY AVAL Wenning
R&B group Black Street He op wrote and produced
Mark's first single “Constant and co produced and ap
‘TOE Several SONGS On the album leading Mark to (Sony
Records). Pacino went on to produee for Young & Qub
(Del JanvASMG along with Pastor Trey (Linivercal
Records}

In ale A008 Padrino returned ta the Bahamas to find a
Slarvingy music industry ready for change and growth
He Quackly became one of the met influential producers.
Bred writers. imi fhe indusbry and began producing many
radio hits. Me his helped develop artists le Daddi
Whites (242, Change The Word), Shuce (it ls What i bs),
NCity (Calling You Out, Locked Up), Porter The Poel (Gat

Tala Sofa Mdees, and many more. All
whch Mave been in fener radio rotation
both in the Carihean and Intemational
Markets.

He then teamed we with Fey ‘Milions® fdlinnus
1) become Co Cwners in what & ane of the most re-
Spected Tecording shuckos in the Bahamas, “The White
House

Padning took 2 2 monih bresk ie lite PO0E bo work on hie
Solo project which is mow one od the mcest articinated al-
burs to drag “inauguraion Day", Thes record promises to
be asacthy what the industry has been misting, Swagga,
Originality and of course someshing for the ladies. The first
20 from tha album Worries ii the Dance*

5 fo their teat

2 ELON DO Mey SUT ieees ered

what's happening now inthe work. | iry bo lel it by a
reelection of me My personality, ow alr OOae and my
Creaiveness. | make i ‘ourimusic’, music fer the people
(try #0 Oring change tan uncertain world of musi: ane
make f accessible 10 al who desins a chance. Someone
had fo ge me 8 chance, mder its my tum.”

onngs listen

eT rerer yy



MAY 16, -O09

BUTLER & SANDS
GROUNDS, JFK

- =
PAGE 16, WEDNESDAY, MAY 6, 2009 THE TRIBUNE
LOCAL NEWS











































For the Love Of...

eee eLCu eam tial ee AMI Fun Walk.

This gift is for the love I 2 000 take to streets



have for you.

for annual fun walk

Receive 10 - 60% off select merchandise Atlantic Medical Insurance Company holds event

THERE was camaraderie,enthu- one at the event. Drew said he is he has participated in five AMI
May At = 10€ siasm and lots of sweat as the looking forward to walking next —_ walks so far.

Atlantic Medical Insurance Compa- year. He said what he enjoys most
7 1 ny (AMI) hosted its 11th Annual Peter Rutherford, another partic- | about the annual walk is the cama-
Free Gift with every Purc hase aA wae from Montagu Beach to ipant in the event, said: “Doing raderie.
Paradise Island and back recently. something is better than doing “Atlantic Medical has done a
! a The event, which is geared toward —_ nothing in order to stay healthy and ~—s great job of promoting healthy
promoting healthy lifestyles, attract- _ fit.” lifestyles among our people,” he said.
ed over 2,000 participants including Mr Rutherford, assistant general Former Minister of Trade and

adults and children who came out manager of customer service at Industry Leslie Miller is also a regu-
as early as 6.30am to begin their trek. BEC, joined the group for his morn- __ lar participant in the event. He said

While the underlying theme has ing walk. AMI has been doing a wonderful
always been healthy living and He said he was particularly job at keeping Bahamians fit for
healthy lifestyles, this year Atlantic pleased to see the children partici- many years and it has always been a
Medical chose to focus on children —_ pating in the fun walk, as children __ privilege for him to walk with his
by encouraging them to lead healthy — should also strive to lead healthy —_ fellow Bahamians.

lifestyles from a young age on. lifestyles. Being an ardent jogger himself,

Among the walkers and runners Minister of Health Dr Hubert Mr Miller said “it has been proven
was general manager and executive Minnis also joined AMI for his _ that exercising and staying fit will
vice-president of Atlantic Medical morning walk. help persons to live longer, it makes
Lynda Gibson. Speaking to one of the country’s you feel good and it helps one’s brain

“We are very happy that the peo- — major health challenges, obesity - function better when the body is fit
ple of the Bahamas continue to sup- | Dr Minnis said medical statistics and healthy.”
port us,” she said. “Our 11th yearis show that some 65 per cent of the Jillian Bartlett, a representative
asignificant one because we arenow Bahamian population is considered _ of Bally’s Total Fitness, said the fun
instituting our ‘Healthy Kids are —_ obese or overweight, a fact that has — walk is a great way to get both adults
Happy Kids’ programme. We _ had a great impact upon chronic —_ and children excited about the idea
believe it is best to teach them to —_ non-communicable diseases affecting _—_ of being fit.

live healthy lives while they are the country. She, too, encouraged Bahamians
young.” The fun walk, he said,isastepin to get serious about their health.
Eleven-year-old Drew Bastian, the right direction in a bid to combat As in previous years, proceeds
who participated in the AMI fun __ this challenge. from the fun walk will be donated to
walk with his parents, has been He said he is pleased that Atlantic — the Cancer Society of the Bahamas

attending the event for most of his | Medical has been such anexemplary and the Bahamas Diabetic Associa-
life. He said his favourite part is | corporate citizen by encouraging __ tion in aid of research and commu-
meeting new people, seeing new Bahamian adults and children to nity programmes being carried out
faces and the enthusiasm of every- _ lead healthy lifestyles and noted that — by both organisations.

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@ By NEIL HARTNELL
Tribune Business Editor

idelity Bank
(Bahamas) yesterday
blamed the global
economic downturn
for delaying its high-
er net income objectives by “12 to
18 months”, with its chief execu-
tive attributing a 10.5 per cent
decline in its fiscal 2008 profits to
investment for future gain and
increased deposit costs.

Anwer Sunderji, who is also
chairman and chief executive of
its 75 per cent majority share-
holder and parent company,
Fidelity Bank & Trust Interna-
tional, said the commercial bank
was “where we want to be”, hav-
ing used the 12 months to Decem-
ber 31, 2008, to position itself for
future earnings growth.

Fidelity Bank (Bahamas) had
projected that net income growth
would occur in 2009 and 2010, as
a result of the investments made
and expanded balance sheet, but
Mr Sunderji acknowledged that

THE TRIBUNE

usine

WEDNESDAY,



MAY 6,



2009

SECTION B ¢ business@tribunemedia.net

Fidelity eyes 12-18 month profit delay

achieving these
objectives was
likely to be
impacted - and
delayed - by the
global economic
downturn.

For instance,
while the BISX-
listed bank had
grown its loan
portfolio by 30.2
per cent year-
over-year, from
$152.716 million
tO $198.862 million as at Decem-
ber 31, 2008, Mr Sunderji pro-
jected more modest growth of 10
per cent for fiscal 2009.

He added that Fidelity Bank
(Bahamas) capital ratios were
“extremely strong”, with its Tier I
capital under the Basle accord
“exceeding 20 per cent”.

And Mr Sunderji said Fidelity
Bank (Bahamas) ranked second
behind Finance Corporation of
the Bahamas (FINCO) in terms
of the share of mortgage market
growth it took in 2008. The bank

A Sunderji

Government coy on Arawak port

m@ By CHESTER ROBARDS
Business Reporter
crobards@tribunemedia.net

THE RELOCATION of downtown Nassau’s container shipping
facilities to Arawak Cay seems to be going ahead as planned, accord-
ing to sources close to the developmen, despite the Government’s
reluctance to discuss the project and the Deputy Prime Minister’s
seeming lack of knowledge regarding the project.

When asked whether the container shipping relocation project was
going ahead, Brent Symonette simply told Tribune Business: “No

Idea!”

However, a thoroughfare being constructed from John F Kennedy
Drive to Saunders Beach is suspected to be a part of the new Arawak
Cay container port’s proposed road infrastructure, which will link to a
causeway connecting with a proposed 75-acre man made island off

Saunders Beach.

However, Mr Symonette said this new road was simply another

corridor planned as part of the $120
million New Providence Road

SEE PORT, page 5B

‘Substantial crisis’ for debt
burdened Bahamian firms

@ By NEIL HARTNELL
Tribune Business Editor

BAHAMIAN businesses car-
rying debt loads on their balance
sheets are facing “a substantial
crisis” with almost one in five
commercial loans in arrears, the
Bahamas Chamber of Com-
merce’s president said yesterday,
as he urged the Government not
to impose new or increased taxes
on the private sector in the
upcoming Budget.

Dionisio D’ Aguilar, who is also
Superwash’s president, said the
fact that 18.9 per cent of com-
mercial loans were in arrears at
end-March 2009 showed Bahami-
an businesses were “hurting”,
with almost none have foreseen
or prepared themselves for the
severity of the current economic
downturn.

“My gut reaction is that, as pro-
jected, things are bad and things








The information contained is from a third
party and The Tribune can not be held
tesponsible for errors and/or omission
from the daily report.

Sale Ends
May 16th

* Chamber chief says one in
five commercial loan defaults
shows need for government to
impose no new or increased
taxes in Budget

* Superwash sales down 10%
every month for year-to-date

are going to probably get worse
before they get better,” Mr
D’ Aguilar told Tribune Business
of the 3.37 per cent increase in
commercial loan arrears in
March.

“When one in five loans are in
arrears, it sends a clear message
that things are not good. I guess
no one knew how bad it was
going to get, but when you get
one in five commercial loans in
arrears, it demonstrates the busi-
ness community is hurting. That is
backed up by the fact local import
duties are down so substantially
because there is less economic
activity.

“Clearly, most businesses were
not prepared or braced for a
recession as long and hard and
deep as this one. One in five busi-
nesses with loans are catching
hell.”

In many cases, Mr D’ Aguilar
said Bahamian businesses - small,
medium and large - had seen their
top-line revenues decline year-
over-year by anywhere between
10-50 per cent, putting them in
immediate difficulties when it
came to covering overheads and
meeting debt repayments.

Although not in trouble, the
Chamber president said his own
Superwash laundromat chain had
experienced these trends.

“January to August was flat in
2008, and then October, Novem-
ber, December saw a precipitous
decline - a 10, 11, 12 per cent rev-

SEE page 5B



ROYAL SFIDELITY

* BISX-listed bank says downturn may hinder increased
net income target, after 10.5% decline in 2008 profit
* Projects 10% loan growth for 2009, compared
to 30 per cent in 2008, due to economy
* Capital ratios ‘extremely strong’ at over 20%, with bank taking
second largest share or mortgage market growth in 2008 at 15%
* Defaulted loans 50% of banking sector average

had a 15 per cent share of the
growth, something Mr Sunderji
described as “a significant num-
ber”, and second only to FINCO
which had a 40 per cent share.
“We had set out to grow our
balance sheet, which we did sub-
stantially. That was our plan,” Mr
Sunderji said. “Our loan book
grew, and positioned us for high-
er net income going forward.
“By and large, we’re where we
expected to be, and 2009 and 2010
is where the bottom line recovery
is expected. Quite frankly, this
global financial crisis has delayed
some of our objectives that we’re

trying to reach, so we might be
off 12-18 months.”

For fiscal 2008, Fidelity Bank
(Bahamas) saw its net income
drop from $1.467 million in 2007
to $1.313 million. The bank saw
good top line growth, with inter-
est income up 53.3 per cent to
$17.312 million.

Yet this did not filter through
completely to net income, due to
a 92.5 per cent rise in net interest
expense to $9.812 million, com-
pared to $5.097 million the year
before.

“Our margins were compressed
because the cost of money went

up,” Mr Sunderji said. “We suf-
fered some margin deterioration,
which kept net income about
flat.”

Net interest income was still
up by 19.3 per cent at $8.783 mil-
lion, and total income almost $2
million ahead of 2007. However,
this was more than cancelled out
by a more than $2 million
increase in expenses, with both
salaries and benefits and general
and administrative expenses rising
by around $1 million compared
to 2007 figures.

SEE page 3B

Tribunal moves over royalties rate creation

@ By NEIL HARTNELL
Tribune Business Editor

THE Copyright Royalties Tribunal has “started
research” on the creation of compensation rates to
remunerate Bahamian artists for use of their copy-
righted works, its chairman telling Tribune Busi-
ness yesterday that the body wanted to raise this
nation’s intellectual property rights regime to “inter-
national best practice” standards.

Attorney Kirkwood Seymour said that despite
the Tribunal’s somewhat “limited mandate”
focused on ensuring that Bahamian artists and enter-
tainers in all fields received the appropriate royalties
compensation for the use of their works.

Acknowledging that there was much to do in
enhancing the Bahamas intellectual property rights
regime, especially its coverage and enforcement,

* Body wants to establish collection/claims
process for Bahamian artists and rights holders

, it was

Mr Seymour said the Tribunal was working to estab-

lish royalty/compensation rates and a process for




Make it a reality.






























* Concern on cable TV compulsory licence
* Aiming to take Bahamas in line with
‘international best practices’ on
intellectual property rights

how these could be paid and collected.

The Tribunal was hoping to complete this work
within the next few weeks, Mr Seymour said, and
two months at latest, although the final decision
would rest with the minister responsible, attorney-
general Michael Barnett.

He added that “progress” had been made, with
the Tribunal having been given a site in the Royal

SEE page 3B

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‘A little
troubled’ by
stagflation
risk

@ By NEIL HARTNELL
Tribune Business Editor

A FORMER Ga
finance minister
said yesterday he
was “a little bit
troubled” by the
fact the
Bahamas may be
facing the spec-
tre of stagflation
- an economy in
recession with
increasing unem-
ployment, and
rising prices at
the same time.

James Smith, CFAL’s chair-
man, who was minister of state
for finance in the former Christie
administration from 2002-2007,
told Tribune Business that the
Central Bank of the Bahamas’
report on monthly economic
developments for March 2009
showed evidence of rising infla-
tion occurring simultaneously
with mounting unemployment.

“What I found a little bit trou-
bling in the report was that infla-
tion almost doubled,” Mr Smith
explained. “That harks back to
the 1970s when you had stagfla-
tion - you had the stagnant
economies, but prices were going
up, impacting households.”

Inflation for the 12-months to
March 2009 stood at 4.9 per cent,
unchanged from February but up
from the 2.4 per cent comparison a
year earlier.

SEE page 5B



James Smith

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PAGE 2B, WEDNESDAY, MAY 6, 2009

THE TRIBUNE















































MOET NECTAR ROSE
WAS $96.00

GRAHAM BECK ROSE

KORBEL BRUT ROSE
WAS $21.55

BERINGER
WHITE ZINFANDEL
PIM |

KORBEL

Bu

AOET es GHAND!

kh Sere

DEPARTMENT OF STATISTICS
EXPORT/IMPORT PRICE SURVEY

During the month of May, 2009
The Department of Statistics will
conduct a _ pricing survey. The
staff of The Department will visit
selected businesses throughout
New Providence & Grand Bahama
to collect prices of various
commodities. The Department will
therefore be seeking the co-operation
of businesses involved in exporting
and importing as we embark upon this

most important exercise.

THE DEPARTMENT OF STATISTICS
APPRECIATES YOUR SUPPORT &
CO-OPERATION

as ae
It’s not all about you

LISTED here are the top 10
issues that stop you and your
sales staff from winning busi-
ness. They were created by
Drew J. Stevens, PhD.

1. Stop talking about you.
Yes, that’s right. Stop talking
about you. No one cares.
Kennedy stated: “Ask what you
can do for your country.” That
said, ask what you can do for
your client.

2. Stop talking, period. Your
creator gave you one mouth
and two ears. For some of us,
our one mouth is wider than the
space allotted for both of our
ears combined. Take the cot-
ton out of your ears and put it in
your mouth. Stop talking and
listen to the client needs.

3. Provide value. Too often,
selling professionals continual-
ly mention features.

Customers purchase based on
the value they gain from your
service. Turn features into ben-
efits.

Promotional
Marketing

Lacon erm MTICeCOyTT



4. Stop Closing. Yes, I said:
“Stop closing.” The notion of
closing based on ridiculous
questioning techniques and sta-
tistics is false. You gain busi-
ness when you engage in par-
ticipative conversation. Rela-
tionship controls the business.

5. Procrastination. Too many
selling professionals are not
organised, and spend much time
shying away from undesired
calls and paperwork. Wasted
time is what builds. Do the
things you hate to do first, and
end your day on a crescendo.

6. Asking inane questions.
Customers cringe when selling
representatives call and state:
“How are you doing today?”

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Unless you are a relative, stop
repeating clichéd lines. The
sweetest sound people hear is
their name. Repeat it, and the
purpose for your call.

7. Reach decision makers. Be
creative, and use different meth-
ods to reach the unreachables. I
once read of someone who
bought a coconut and wrote the
words: “You’re a tuff nut to
crack”, boxed it and sent it to an
unreachable. It worked!

8. Selling is a profession, sim-
ilar to that of a doctor, lawyer
and architect. Selling profes-
sionals must conduct themselves
similarly. Discover information
on the company and develop
three reasons for connecting
with them.

9. Database. Keep your own
records of clients and potential
clients. Write notes of when and
who you called. If you get the
person on the line, write notes.
If you promise to do something
in a specified time, write notes
and do it.

10. Did I mention stop talking
about you? Stop selling your-
self. You’re here for one rea-
son and that is to provide a ben-
efit for that client. If you can’t
provide benefit, you are wasting
everybody’s time. Simple, yet
profound

All of these marketing strate-
gies are certain to keep your
business on top during these
challenging economic times.
Have a productive and prof-
itable week! Remember:
“THOSE WHO MARKET
WILL MAKE IT.”

NB: Scott Farrington is pres-
ident of SunTee EmbroidMe, a
promotional and marketing
company specialising in pro-
motional products.

Established over 27 years
ago, SunTee EmbroidMe has
assisted Bahamian businesses
in various industries - from
tourism and banking - and
telecommunications in market-
ing themselves. Readers can
contact Mr Farrington at Sun-
Tee EmbroidMe on East
Shirley Street, by e-mail at
scott@sun-tee.com or by tele-
phone at 242-393-3104.

PUBLIC NOTICE

Mass Disconnection of All
Post-paid Cellular Accounts

BIC will conduct mass
disconnection on all post-paid
cellular accounts that have exceeded

their Credit Limit

on

Thursday May 7th

Customers are asked to ensure
that their accounts are current to
avoid disconnection.

For more information

CALL BIC (225-5282) or www.bicbahamas.com
THE TRIBUNE



WEDNESDAY, MAY 6, 2009, PAGE 3B

rr "> -<>~ ee
GB Power investor earns $1.1m

A 25 per cent shareholder in
Grand Bahama Power Company
yesterday revealed that its invest-
ment had generated earnings of
$1.1 million for it in the 2009 first
quarter, implying that the utility
made a $4.4 million profit.

Emera, the Canadian power
giant that holds a 50 per cent
stake in BISX-listed ICD Utili-
ties, purchased its stake for $42.3
million from Lady Henrietta St
George in September 2008.

Grand Bahama Power Com-
pany has 137 megawatts of gen-
eration capacity, and some 19,000

FIDELITY, from 1B

customers on the island.

The company is currently doing
a $250,000 wind power study on
Grand Bahama in conjunction
with Emera.

E O Ferrell, Grand Bahama
Power’s chief executive, said it
was a possible first step towards
the use of renewable energy on
Grand Bahama. “This is an excit-
ing new chapter in energy gener-
ation on Grand Bahama island,”
he said. “The use of the wind has
the advantage of lessening our
dependence on expensive import-
ed oil, and producing energy with-

out emissions.”

Mr Ferrell noted that wind gen-
eration technology has been
proven across Europe and is
widely used in the US. He said
the objective of the study was to
determine if there was sufficient
wind quantity and duration on
Grand Bahama to make the
investment in wind turbines a
viable alternative for Grand
Bahama Power customers.

Carlton Bosfield, the project
manager, said the study will be
conducted in three phases. He
said the first phase involves tow-

er erection in various parts of
Grand Bahama. In addition to
the Dover Sound site, other sites
have been identified — two in East
Grand Bahama, one Holmes
Rock in West Grand Bahama,
and at the Container Port Navi-
gation Tower at the Garnet
Levarity Highway.

Mr Bosfield said the second
phase will involve the collecting
of wind data. He said if it was
determined that wind power is an
acceptable alternative, then they
will move to the third phase,
which is the development phase.

However, Mr Sunderji said Fidelity Bank
(Bahamas) said it had not expected bottom
line growth in 2008, because it was investing in
new products and an expanded branch net-
work that would bear fruit in the future.

“It’s because we opened a new branch at
Robin Hood and introduced Visa credit
cards,” Mr Sunderji said of the expense
increases. “This required us to gear up for
the launch of the cards, getting a full comple-
ment of staff and marketing.

“Both those initiatives were quite costly
and did not contribute revenue until the last
quarter. It’s this year that we expect to bene-
fit from these initiatives.” Some 17 new staff

Tribunal moves over royalties rate creation

were added to the bank for these programmes.

Still, some analysts have been left unim-
pressed, telling Tribune Business that the
increased expenses and flat top-line showed
there were inefficiencies in Fidelity Bank
(Bahamas) operations and that it was strug-
gling to achieve the scale necessary for it to be
competitive.

Yet Mr Sunderji said Fidelity Bank
(Bahamas) had achieved its scale, balance
sheet and loan objectives for 2008, adding
that it had attracted new customers by wrap-
ping loan products with savings features, such
as its Moneyback Mortgage.

However, with the deterioration in credit
quality as a result of the recession, Mr Sunderji

said 2009 would see a renewed focus on cred-
it quality and cost containment. Resources
had been redeployed to concentrate on
restructuring and rewriting loans owed by
clients having difficulties meeting their oblig-
ations.

However, Mr Sunderji said Fidelity Bank
(Bahamas) non-performing loans were “50
per cent of the banking sector average”, stand-
ing at $6.734 million or 3.34 per cent of the
total portfolio, compared to 2.53 per cent or
$3.916 million the year before.

Some 80 per cent of the bank’s loans, he
added, were secured by a first mortgage on the
borrower’s primary residence, helping to mit-
igate the risk.



FROM page 1B

Victoria Gardens, where it was
in the process of establishing a
physical office. Permission had
also been given within the last
month for the Tribunal to hire a
part-time secretary, who was now
employed and getting its website,
telephones, e-mail and office up
and running.

“We've started research and
embarked on inquires in other
countries to see how they use
their expertise to establish [roy-
alty] rates,” Mr Seymour told Tri-
bune Business. “There are no
rates at this time. We’ve
embarked on that process.”

The Copyright Royalties Tri-
bunal has oversight over a fund,
into which compensation for
copyrighted works is paid in antic-
ipation that the owners will make
a claim for remuneration.

The fund currently holds
around $3 million, Mr Seymour
said yesterday, but currently its
only contributor is Cable
Bahamas. The BISX-listed entity
makes payments into the fund as
compensation to the program-
mers and rights holders for some
of the content it transmits in the
Bahamas.

However, none of those pro-
grammers to date have made a
claim on the fund, largely due, it
is believed, because in their eyes
they do not want to ‘legitimise’
Cable Bahamas’ use of their sig-
nals and content due to the ongo-
ing dispute they have with the
company.

Mr Seymour told Tribune Busi-
ness that Cable Bahamas was
“almost up to date” with its pay-
ments to the Fund, adding: “They
were just about one year behind.
We got another payment from
them last week.

“They’re aware they have some
things to do, especially with the
compulsory licence about to
expire. We have discussed this at
the Tribunal level, and are going
to communicate our concerns
about its renewal without the

a
NAD

Nassau Airport
Dovelopmont Campany

means to control the payment or
collection of contributions to the
Fund.”

The Bahamas’ compulsory
licensing regime for Cable
Bahamas is considered by the US
programming industry and copy-
right holders as too broad and
not providing compensation for
their works at ‘fair market rates’.

Mr Seymour described the
licence as a “sticking point” in
discussions with the US Trade
Representative’s Office over the
Bahamas’ intellectual property
rights protection and enforcement
regime, adding: “We’re going to
have to, at some point, review all
of that and see if there is a way to
offer the service and have intel-
lectual property rights protection
at the same time.”

“What we’re hoping to do is
bring this regime up to interna-
tional best practices for the
Bahamas,” Mr Seymour said.
“It’s the enforcement thing that’s
really created a bit of a problem.

“My concern is especially that
artists get rewarded for their
works, or otherwise they will have
no incentive to create. We have
all that in front of us as a mandate
for what we want to achieve.
We’re moving in the right direc-
tion.

“We see our work cut out for
us, but are encouraged because
we’ve been able to make some
progress and aim to take it to the
next level. It’s taken too long.”

Mr Seymour said the Tribunal
had held preliminary discussions
with the Performing Rights Soci-
ety of the UK, including talks on
how to claim from its Fund as no
claims had yet been submitted.

“There are some Bahamians
that are part of the Performing
Rights Society of the UK, mem-
bers there, and we want to make
sure artists in the Bahamas and
elsewhere are compensated for
their works.”

The Tribunal’s other members
are accountant James Gomez and
artist Stan Burnside.

TENDER

C-112 Warehouse

Nassau Arpor Development Company (HAD) i ploased 10
annaunoe the release of Tender 0-112 Vierehouse far Stage
1 of the Lynden Finding Intemational Ainport Expansion.
The Scope of Wark includes:
Detailed design, supply, and installalian af a pre-
manufactured meta warehouse building with
appronimale dimension of 70 fx 175 ft
Civ works induding site fil, grading, compaction,
foundations and slab on grade designed to suit
pre-manufachired metal warehouse building,
“Ublity works induding sanitary, power,
communication and water service;
-Formal submission to tha Minisiry of Works to finalize
Sulding pemal and laaang wilh Bahamas Bleectic
Company for power service

The ©-112 Warehouse Tender Documents wil be avaiable
for pick up or electronic distnbution after 3:00pm, April

16th, 2009

Contach TRAM BREET

Contracts and Procurement Manager

Phe 24) 1086 | Fane: (a) SPAT
PO. Goo AP SS320, Meeereu, Gebers:

Emad traci brishyfines bs



coer accra i ic. ATT

Chega: H rd

tr pong THN Your pemaens

NOTICE

NOTICE is hereby given that IMELDA DORVIL of CORDEAUX
AVE., P.O. BOX N-4394, NASSAU, BAHAMAS, is applying to the
Minister responsible for Nationality and Citizenship, for registration/

naturalization as a citizen of The Bahamas, and that any person
who knows any reason why registration/naturalization should not
be granted, should send a written and signed statement of the
facts within twenty-eight days from the 297 day of April, 2009 to
the Minister responsible for nationality and Citizenship, PRO. Box
N-7147, Nassau, Bahamas.

NOTICE

NOTICE is hereby given that JOY CYNTHIA TILBAYNE of
WOOD BURN ESTATE, P.O, BOX N-4303, NASSAU, BAHAMAS,
is applying to the Minister responsible for Nationality and Citizenship,
for registration/naturalization as a citizen of The Bahamas, and that
any person who knows any reason why registration/naturalization
should not be granted, should send a written and signed statement
of the facts within twenty-eight days from the 6â„¢ day of May, 2009
to the Minister responsible for nationality and Citizenship, PO. Box
N-7147, Nassau, Bahamas.



To advertise in Zhe Tribune -
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Caren Cairge

50.00)

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What is a Credit Limit?

Credit limits are assigned amounts that you cannot exceed on
a monthly basis. Once you exceed your credit limit your
account is suspended until payment. For more information
please call our Credit & Collections Department at 225-5282.

YOUR CONWECTIO

O THE WORLD

For more information
CALL BIC (225-5282) ow www.btcbahamas.com


PAGE 4B, WEDNESDAY, MAY 6, 2009

Legal Notice

NOTICE
MANSUETUS CORP.

(In Voluntary Liquidation)

Notice is hereby given that the above-named
Company is in dissolution, which commenced

on the 29th day of April 2009. The Liquidator is
Argosa Corp. Inc., P.O. Box N-7757 Nassau,

Bahamas.

ARGOSA CORP. INC.
(Liquidator)

LEGAL NOTICE
Clico (Bahamas) Limited

(In Liquidation)

Nie: @ hereby given that the above-named Compmy is in
liquidation, commencing the 7" day of April, 2009. Creditors having
debts or claims against the Company are required to send particulars
to Craig A. (Tony) Gomez, Official Liquidator of the said Company at
the offices of Baker Tilly Gomez, The Deanery, No. 28 Cumberland
Street, P.O. Box N-1991, Nassau, Bahamas and if so required by
notice in writing from the said Liquidator, to come in and prove the
faad debts or claims at such time and place a3 ahall be specified in
such noe, or in default thereof, they will be excluded from any
distribution made before such debts are proved or precloded fom
objecting to any such distribution

Dated this 22â„¢ day of April, 2008

CRAIG A. (TONY) GOMEZ
Official Liquidator

Legal Notice

NOTICE

Pursuant to the provisions of Section 137 of the
International Business Companies Act, (No. 45 of
2000), NOTICE is hereby given that Jumani Corp. is
in dissolution and the date of commencement of the
dissolution is 1 May 2009.

Margaret Tatem-Gilbert and Lorna Kemp
LIQUIDATORS
c/o EFG Bank & Trust (Bahamas) Ltd
1 Bay Street
2â„¢ Floor, Centre of Commerce
P.O. Box SS-6289
Nassau, Bahamas

NOTICE

EXXONMOBIL EXPLORATI
LIMITED

N MOROCC

Pursuant to the provisions of Section 137 (8) of the
International Business Companies Act 2000, notice
is hereby given that the above-named Company has
been dissolved and struck off the Register pursuant
to a Certificate of Dissolution issued by The
Registrar General on the 1st day of May, A.D., 2009.

Dated the 5th day of May, A.D., 2009.

Gary Johnsen

Liquidator of

EXXONMOBIL EXPLORATION
MOROCCO LIMITED

NOTICE

ESSO ANGOLA GAS COMPANY LIMITED

Pursuant to the provisions of Section 137 (8) of the
International Business Companies Act 2000, notice
is hereby given that the above-named Company has
been dissolved and struck off the Register pursuant
to a Certificate of Dissolution issued by The Registrar
General on the 1st day of May, A.D., 2009.

Dated the 5th day of May, A.D., 2009.

Gary Johnsen
Liquidator of
ESSO ANGOLA GAS COMPANY LIMITED

Td

Legal Notice

NOTICE
WHITE STALLION

INDUSTRIAL LTD.

(In Voluntary Liquidation)

Notice is hereby given that the above-named
Company is in dissolution, which commenced
on the 26th day of January 2009. The Liquidator
is Argosa Corp. Inc., P.O. Box N-7757 Nassau,

Bahamas.

ARGOSA CORP. INC.
(Liquidator)

Legal Notice

NOTICE
KEYCOVE MANAGEMENT LTD.

(In Voluntary Liquidation)





















Notice is hereby given that the above-named
Company is in dissolution, which commenced
on the 29th day of April 2009. The Liquidator is
Argosa Corp. Inc., P.O. Box N-7757 Nassau,

Bahamas.

ARGOSA CORP. INC.
(Liquidator)

NOTICE

INTERNATIONAL BUSINESS COMPANIES ACT. 2000
No. 45 of 2000

HILBERRY INTERNATIONAL LIMITED

Notice is hereby given that in accordance with Section
138 (8) of the International Business Companies Act, (No.
45 of 2000), the Dissolution of HILBERRY INTERNA-
TIONAL LIMITED has been completed, a Certificate of
Dissolution has been issued and the Company has there-
fore been struck off the Registrar. The date of completion
of the dissolution was the 30th day of April, 2009.

Totalserve Management Limited
TOTALSERVE MANAGEMENT LIMITED

NOTICE

EXXONMOBIL EXPLORATION AND
PRODUCTION (KENYA) LIMITED

Pursuant to the provisions of Section 137 (8) of the
International Business Companies Act 2000, notice
is hereby given that the above-named Company has
been dissolved and struck off the Register pursuant
to a Certificate of Dissolution issued by The
Registrar General on the 1st day of May, A.D., 2009.

Dated the 5th day of May, A.D., 2009.

Gary Johnsen

Liquidator of

EXXONMOBIL EXPLORATION AND
PRODUCTION

(KENYA) LIMITED

NOTICE
INTERNATIONAL BUSINESS COMPANIES ACT

No. 45 of 2000

VICENNE INVEST SA

Notice is hereby given that in accordance with Section
137 of The International Business Companies Act No.
45 of 2000, VICENNE INVEST SA is in dissolution.
The date of commencement of dissolution was the 4th
day of May, 2009. Dillon Dean of Nassau, Bahamas
is the Liquidator of VICENNE INVEST SA

Dillon Dean
LIQUIDATOR

THE TRIBUNE

$1000 CASH
ail aiD,

for return of missing
17” Apple MAC laptop computer
and blue USB Hard Drive

stolen from green jeep
parked at Parliment and Bay Street

NO QUESTIONS ASKED

CALL 468-9789



LEGAL NOTICE

CLICO (Bahamas) Limited
(In Liquidation)

Notice is hereby given that the above-named Company is in|
Liquidation, commencing the T day of April, 2009 and that Craig A. |

(Tony) Gomez, of Baker Tilly Gomez, The Deanery, No. 28

Cumberland Street, P.O. Box N-1991, Nassau, Bahamas is appointed |

the Official Liquidator of the saad Company.
Dated this 22â„¢ day of April, 20X19

CRAIG A. (TONY) GOMEZ
Official Liguadator

NOTICE
ECUALACT CORP.

In Voluntary Liquidation

Notice is hereby given that in accordance with Section
138(4) of the International Business Companies Act.
2000, ECUALACT CORP. is in dissolution as of
April 27, 2009. International Liquidator Services
Inc. situated at 35A Regent Street, P. O. Box 1777,
Belize City, Belize is the Liquidator.

LIQUIDATOR

NOTICE

EXXONMOBIL EXPLORATION AND
PRODUCTION (MOZAMBIQUE) LIMITED

Pursuant to the provisions of Section 137 (8) of the
International Business Companies Act 2000, notice
is hereby given that the above-named Company has
been dissolved and struck off the Register pursuant
to a Certificate of Dissolution issued by The Registrar
General on the 1st day of May, A.D., 2009.

Dated the 5th day of May, A.D., 2009.

Gary Johnsen

Liquidator of EXXONMOBIL
EXPLORATION AND PRODUCTION
(MOZAMBIQUE) LIMITED

NOTICE

INTERNATIONAL BUSINESS COMPANIES ACT. 2000
No. 45 of 2000

CALDTON INVESTMENTS LIMITED

Notice is hereby given that in accordance with Section
138 (8) of the International Business Companies Act, (No.
45 of 2000), the Dissolution of CALDTON INVEST-
MENTS LIMITED has been completed, a Certificate of
Dissolution has been issued and the Company has there-
fore been struck off the Registrar. The date of completion
of the dissolution was the 30th day of April, 2009.

Totalserve Management Limited
TOTALSERVE MANAGEMENT LIMITED
THE TRIBUNE

WEDNESDAY, MAY 6, 2009, PAGE 5B





PORT, from 1B

Improvement Project, being con-
structed by the Argentine firm,
Jose Cartellone Construction
Company (JCCC).

Mr Symonette began to say
that if the proposed Arawak Cay
development, which calls for such
a road, goes through it may be
incorporated into the design.
However, he wrapped-up his
statement by saying there is no
connection between the land
clearance presently ongoing for
the new road and the Arawak
Cay container port development.

Plans for the new container
port development, labelled ‘Draft
— For discussion purposes only’,
shows this new road connecting to
a causeway that spans the dis-
tance between Saunders Beach
and the proposed man-made con-
tainer port. A second causeway
then connects the container port
with Arawak Cay.

The Government appears to
be engaged in semantics, with the
Arawak Cay port project shroud-
ed in great secrecy and a seeming
lack of transparency. Those close
to the downtown revitalisation
project give credence to the idea
of the Arawak Cay container port

development and the Govern-
ment continuing projects relative
to “tentative” port development
plans, but keeping tight lipped on
its status as public scrutiny height-
ens,

Tribune Business understands
that details on the project are
being treated as a closely-guarded
secret by the Prime Minister’s
Office and a small, close-knit
group from the shipping industry
fraternity. Some have suggested
this is a deliberate tactic by the
Government to muzzle public dis-
cussion and dissent, given that
the Opposition PLP are under-
stood to be focusing on the issue
as one that could give them an
electoral boost similar to what
the Clifton Cay project did in
2002.

Tribune Business understands
that the Government also warned
the shipping industry, following
this newspaper’s revelations that
the Prime Minister had “changed
the rules of the game” regading
the Arawak Cay port’s financing,
that it might withdraw its support
for the project if further details
appeared in the press.

As a result, negotiations with
the Government are being han-
dled by Arawak Cay Port Devel-

opment Company chairman Jim-
my Mosko and a small group
close to him. Tribune Business
has been told that not all the pro-
posed 19-20 shareholders in the
company are fully in the loop as
to what is going on.

Sources close to the discussions
told Tribune Business that diffi-
culties had arisen because the
Prime Minister did not want any
debt financing, which would fund
the Arawak Cay port’s construc-
tion, to be secured by a first
charge mortgage/lien/debenture
over the land.

From the Government’s view-
point, this is undrstandable as the
Arawak Cay port land would be
leased to the private sector and
still owned by it. The Govern-
ment would not want its land to
be encumbered by a mortgage
placing the property under the
potential control of a financial
institution.

But other sources, while admit-
ting the financing for the Arawak
Cay port was in a “state of flux”,
said there was no plan for debt
financing to be secured by a mort-
gage.

PLP activist Paul Moss said
yesterday that he has also learned
of the Government’s intention to

go full steam ahead with the
Arawak Cay container port
development.

He argued that the develop-
ment will “have the effect of elim-
inating the beach (Saunders
Beach) through erosion and
access because of the bridge
(aforementioned causeway)”.

“This is wrong and we will not
stand for it,” he said. “All over
this country, beach access is being
denied to Bahamians. In fact the
proposed site at Arawak Cay is
the absolute wrong site for the
port.”

The Arawak Cay container
port was deemed in a study of
optional sites to be the sixth best
location for the Container Port,
with the fifth best option being
its present location downtown.

However, it has been widely
said that the revitalisation of
downtown Nassau can only begin
in earnest when the present con-
tainer facilities have been
removed.

When the former government
commissioned the study on the
container port relocation, they
decided that the Clifton area of
southwest Nassau would be the
best location for a deep-water
port. Yet the present government

‘A little troubled’ by stagflation risk

FROM page 1B

“Except for the slightly moderat-
ed rise in average transportation
costs (3 per cent) and a steadied
increase for furniture and household
operations (6.6 per cent), other com-
ponents of the Retail Price Index
rose at an accelerated pace,” the
Central Bank said.

“Of particular note were the aver-
age cost run-ups for food and bev-
erages (7.8 per cent), housing (3.6
per cent), recreation and entertain-
ment services (4.3 per cent) and
medical and healthcare (4.1 per
cent).

Meanwhile, the Department of
Statistics’ interim Labour Force
Survey showed that unemploy-
ment rates had increased to 12.1
per cent in New Providence and
14.1 per cent in Grand Bahama.
This raises the spectre that the
Bahamas is having to confront
both rising unemployment and
inflation.

Inflation, defined as a sustained
rise in the weighted average of
prices over a specific period, is
undesirable because it devalues
savings and erodes the living stan-
dards of persons on fixed
incomes, such as pensioners.

‘Substantial crisis’

FROM page 1B

enue decrease,” he added. “That
decrease has continued into 2009,
where every single month rev-
enues are down by at least 10 per
cent. Coin sales are down even
more, probably 15 per cent.”

Mr D’ Aguilar said the one sav-
ing grace for himself and other
businesses was the dramatic
decline in electricity and gasoline
costs as a result of the fall in oil
prices from their $147 per barrel
peak in July, but they were still
left to generate enough revenues
to cover fixed costs and over-
heads.

“T don’t think the private sector
was prepared for this,” Mr
D’ Aguilar said. “We had so many
years of feast that we got fat and
lazy, not lean and mean. Maybe
we over-extended ourselves. No
one could have projected rev-
enues would decrease by 25-35
per cent, double digits, in such a
short period of time.

“No one was prepared for that,
and as a result they could not
adjust cost structures fast enough
for such a precipitous decline rev-
enues. Some companies have had
10-40 per cent declines in rev-
enue; the car companies
decreased by 50 per cent.

“How could you have prepared
for such a scenario? We were all
piggybacking off out-of-control
spending and consumption. I did-
n’t think 18-20 per cent of com-
mercial loans would be in arrears.
I thought it would be 12-13 per
cent, and not as high as that.”

Referring to the data contained
in the Central Bank report, Mr
D’ Aguilar said: “This is clear
message to the Minister of
Finance, as he ponders his Budget
and sharpens his pencil, that
imposing additional taxes on busi-
ness does not bode well for that
sector of the economy.

“He should use this as an indi-
cation that companies are hurt-
ing, and this is not the time to
impose those additional taxes on
the business community. They
should look at things not being
taxed.”

Prime Minister Hubert Ingra-
ham, who holds the Minister of
Finance position, is due to pre-
sent the 2009-2010 Budget to the
House of Assembly in three
weeks’ time - by end of May. It is
likely to contain more deficit
spending and national debt
increases, as the Government
seeks to mitigate the impact from
the economic downturn.

If the Government was look-
ing for new and easy revenue
sources, the Chamber president
urged them to target gaming and
the burgeoning ‘numbers’ busi-

Explaining the stagflation issue,
Mr Smith told Tribune Business:
“It’s troublesome from the house-
hold point of view, because ris-
ing unemployment means there
is less income coming into the
household, and the income com-
ing in is being eaten up by rising
prices.

“So it’s having a very detri-
mental effect on low income
households. It’s one thing to have
less income, working two to three
days a week, but then to also have
that income eaten up by the food
store. It points to how open the
economy is, and being hit by the
increased price of imports.”

Mr Smith said the “almost dou-
bling” of the Government’s fis-
cal deficit to $173.4 million for
the first eight months of the 2008-
2009 Budget year was not unex-
pected, the expectation having
been for a “sizeable increase” due
to the fall-off in tourist arrivals
and economic activity, the latter
of which had reduced imports and
their related duties.

The 12.1 per cent drop in
departure taxes, Mr Smith told
Tribune Business, gave a good
indication of the pressure the
Bahamian tourism industry was
under. And the Government’s
planned social programmes and

borrowing to finance capital
works projects “point to a widen-
ing of the gap” for the remain-
der of this Budget year and 2009-
2010.

“You're probably going to see
it fall-off a little more in the
remaining four months,” Mr
Smith said of the fiscal deficit.
However, he added that the
deficit was not as wide as it could
have been, although with rev-
enues off by 4 per cent it was like-
ly to be equivalent to that
amount.

“The revenue performance,
though down, is doing better than
expected, because it appears that
the fall-off in air travel has been
compensated by other factors,”
the former minister said. “The
feeling is that there are some
compensating factors at work,
and it’s not as deep as expected.”

Mr Smith said the Central
Bank reported indicated that
hotel occupancy rates had exceed-
ed expectations, showing that the
Bahamas was perhaps benefiting
from its proximity to the US.

The Central Bank, in its report
on monthly economic developments
for March 2009, reported that year-
over year, the fiscal deficit for the
eight months to February 2009 had
increased by 86.9 per cent to $173.5

for debt burdened Bahamian firms

ness. “Government should seri-
ously look at that,” he said.

“Tf they’re looking for easy rev-
enue, gaming and the numbers
business is it. Everyone is expect-
ing them to do something about
it. Take the religious twist out of
it, and it’s a nice little revenue
earner.”

Mr D’ Aguilar also suggested
that, apart from attempting to
maximise the Bahamas Telecom-
munications Company’s (BTC)
purchase price, the Government
also tax the payment of dividends
by Bahamian subsidiaries to their
foreign parents. He did not iden-
tify which subsidiaries and com-
panies he was referring to, but is
likely to mean the foreign-owned
commercial banks.

The Chamber president sug-
gested that the banks would have
little choice but to rewrite or
restructure many commercial
loans on their books, for other-
wise they might be unable to
reclaim what was due to them.

Mr D’ Aguilar suggested that

they let troubled businesses make
interest-only repayments, and sus-
pend the repayment of principal.
He expressed concern that the
high level of commercial loan
arrears could encourage the
banks to switch lending away
from this sector to consumer
advances and mortgages, rather
than the productive areas of the
Bahamian economy.

Import duties, in particular, have
been heavily impacted by the down-
turn in economic activity that has
led to less demand for imported
goods. These duties, for the first
eight months of the 2008-2009 Bud-
get year, were down 26.91 per cent at
$251.5 million, compared to $344.1
million the year before.

Mr D’ Aguilar said this again
showed the need for the Govern-
ment to broaden its tax base beyond
the heavy reliance on international
trade and physical goods, which
accounted for 60 per cent of its rev-
enue base. He suggested that the tax
base could be broadened to encom-
pass services.

million, compared to $92.8 million
the year before.

The Central Bank said that for
the first eight months of the 2008-
2009 Budget year, total government
revenues fell by 4.2 per cent from
$873.4 million to $837.1 million,
while total recurrent spending rose
6.95 per cent from $836.7 million to
$894.8 million.

“Tn particular, tax receipts fell by
5.5 per cent to $758.7 million, owing
primarily to a 10 per cent reduction
in international trade taxes,” the
Central Bank said.

“Declines were also noted in
stamp taxes on financial and other
transactions (18.7 per cent) and in
departure taxes (12.1 per cent).
These outweighed the improvements
for business and professional taxes
(15.9 per cent), property taxes (5.2
per cent) and increased yields under
“other” unclassified revenue sources.
A 10.8 per cent gain was also record-
ed under non-tax revenues, at $78.4
million, reflecting a timing—related
increase in income receipts.

“On the expenditure side, current
spending firmed by 5.4 per cent to
$894.8 million, led by higher pay-
ments for wages and salaries (5 per
cent), contractual services (17.4 per
cent), interest costs on debt (6.9 per
cent) and subsidies (7.4 per cent),
mainly to quasi-public entities.”

asserts that Clifton would be too
expensive a development and
opted for Arawak Cay.

No environmental impact study
concerning the proposed man-
made island has surfaced of late,
and the Government has not vol-
unteered any information on
what the repercussions of building
an island and causeways for large
diesel trucks would be on the
public beach that would exist
alongside.

However, the downtown revi-
talisation project, which hinges
on the port’s removal, seems to




be picking up momentum, with
the announcement of the pub-
lic/private partnership body that
will oversee the development.
Mr Moss said he will continue
to call for the Arawak Cay con-
tainer port location to be recon-
sidered by the Government, and
called for intervention by envi-
ronmentalists and all Bahamians.
“We call on Sam Duncombe
to check this out and the
Bahamas National Trust to inter-
vene. We also call on the Bahami-
an people to stand up for once,”
he said. “Don’t let this happen!”

Bahamas Law Enforcement
Co-operative Credit Union Ltd


















NOTICE OF
ANNUAL GENERAL MEETING






THERE WILL NOT BE A SECOND
OF ee Oo ek DO
ACT 2005 SECTION 22









The 24" Annual General Meeting of the Bahamas
Law Enforcement Co-operative Credit Union Ltd will
be held on








Saturday, May 16", 2009






9:00 am






Paul H. Farquharson
Conference Centre
Police Headquarters
East Street












Refreshments will be provided





EAGLE ELECTRICAL






























& LIGHTING

Tel (242) 341-4000 Fax (242) 341-5080
paglebahamas@gmail.com

ry
tC

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gift from your heart to her home. Check
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Tonique Williams Darling Highway (formerly Harold Road)
P.O. Box CR-55440 Nassau, Bahamas

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Family Islands!
PAGE 6B, WEDNESDAY, MAY 6, 2009

Legal Notice

NOTICE
PINK SHELLS HOLDINGS LTD.

(In Voluntary Liquidation)

Notice is hereby given that the above-named
Company is in dissolution, which commenced
on the 29th day of April 2009. The Liquidator is
Argosa Corp. Inc., P.O. Box N-7757 Nassau,

Bahamas.

ARGOSA CORP. INC.
(Liquidator)

NOTICE
LAIR SECURITIES LIMITED

NOTIC EIS HEREBY GIVEN as follows:

(a) LAIR SECURITIES LIMITED is in voluntary
dissolution under the provisions of Section 137 (4) of
the International Business Companies Act 2000.

(b) The dissolution of the said company commenced
on the 4th April, 2009 when the Articles of Dissolution
were submitted to and registered by the Registrar
General.

(c) The Liquidator of the said company is Credit Suisse
Trust Limited, Rue de Lausanne 17 bis, Geneva.

Dated this 6th day of April, A. D. 2009

Credit Suisse Trust Limited
Liquidator

THE TRIBUNE

NOTICE
TANAKA LIMITED

NOTICEIS HEREBY GIVEN as follows:

(a) TANAKA LIMITED is in voluntary dissolution under
the provisions of Section 137 (4) of the International
Business Companies Act 2000.

(b) The dissolution of the said company commenced
on the 5th April, 2009 when the Articles of Dissolution
were submitted to and registered by the Registrar
General.

(c) The Liquidator of the said company is Credit Suisse
Trust Limited, Rue de Lausanne 17 bis, Geneva.

Dated this 6th day of April, A. D. 2009

Credit Suisse Trust Limited
Liquidator


ils



THE WEATHER REPORT

iP | |

Brilliant sunshine.

5-Day FORECAST

—

ORLANDO —
High: 90° F/32° C

~ Low:67°FAS°C ee

(F @
TAMPA iy

High: 88° F/31°C

Low: 72° F/22°C i

@ ts

e oO

KEY WEST
High: 84° F/29° C
Low: 75° F/24° C

@

Humid with plenty of
sunshine.

ale h: 87°
ICE UC ac ec

102° F



A moonlit sky. Plenty of sunshine.
High: 85°
Low: 74° Low: 76°

97°-88° F

High:

86°

Low: 77°





ae

e~



Mostly sunny and Mostly sunny.
humid.
High: 86° High: 86°
Low: 76° Low: 75°
ETCH
100°-86° F 102°-82° F

The exclusive AccuWeather RealFeel Temperature® is an index that combines o effects of temperature, wind, humidity, sunshine intensity, cloudiness, precipitation, pressure, and
elevation on the human body—everything that effects how warm or cold a person feels. Temperatures reflect the high and the low for the day.

Fo

@ WEST PALM BEACH iy

High: 87° F/31°C
Low: 71° F/22°C

FT. LAUDERDALE

High:85°F/29°C

Low: 73° F/23°C

en

Shown is today's weather. Temperatures are today's
highs and tonights's lows.

Albuquerque
Anchorage
Atlanta
Atlantic City
Baltimore
Boston
Buffalo
Charleston, SC
Chicago
Cleveland
Dallas
Denver
Detroit
Honolulu
Houston

High
F/C
838/31
54/12
78/25
66/18
70/21
64/17
68/20
85/29
70/21
70/21
86/30
76/24
72/22
85/29
88/31

Today

Low

F/C
58/14
39/3
61/16
62/16
60/15
53/11
51/10
65/18
53/11
50/10
71/21
46/7
54/12
72/22
74/23

Ww

High
F/C
90/32
56/13
17/25
74/23
76/24
60/15
68/20
83/28
73/22
70/21
89/31
75/23
72/22
87/30
90/32

Thursday

Low

F/C
58/14
41/5
64/17
60/15
56/13
51/10
50/10
66/18
50/10
51/10
73/22
43/6
50/10
72/22
74/23

Ww

oO

NoVgnrrrongrerann
oO

=
CED

Indianapolis
Jacksonville
Kansas City
Las Vegas
Little Rock
Los Angeles
Louisville
Memphis
Miami
Minneapolis
Nashville
New Orleans
New York
Oklahoma City
Orlando

@

MIAMI

High: 86° F/30° C

Low: 74° F/23°C



High
F/C
74/23
87/30
17/25
97/36
78/25
80/26
74/23
78/25
86/30
74/23
74/23
87/30
66/18
82/27
90/32

Today

Low

F/C
57/13
63/17
58/14
69/20
67/19
60/15
58/14
68/20
74/23
52/11
58/14
71/21
57/13
67/19
67/19

Ww

le gon — ea © bee Eee Eee bee
ee oO oOo Oo

nesTD
oO

High
F/C
73/22
89/31
72/22
97/36
82/27
86/30
77/25
84/28
86/30
67/19
80/26
88/31
71/21
88/31
90/32

FREEPORT
High: 82° F/28° C
Low: 70° F/21°C



ABACO

High: 84° F/29° C

Low: 72° F/22°C

0

Statistics are for Nassau through 2 p.m. yesterday
Temperature



IGN sesssasedvsseesslacetsonaetecsieianed saeco 82° F/28° C
LOW Normal high .... 83° F/28° C
Normal low 70° F/21°C
Last year's Nigh oo... ceeteteteeeeteees 86° F/30° C

Last year's OW o..cccceeseseteeseeeeeees 70° F/21°C
Precipitation



As of 2 p.m. yesterday .......ccccccccccnseeceneee 0.00"

Year to date :

Normal year to date oo... ccc eeeeeeee 8.21"
AccuWeather.com

Forecasts and graphics provided by
AccuWeather, Inc. ©2009



=
mn INDEX TODAY



o|1|2

LOW

3|4|5

MODERATE

el?

HIGH

8|9|1oji1
\. HIGH

The higher the AccuWeather UV Indexâ„¢ number, the
greater the need for eye and skin protection.

Se Posy

High Ht.(ft.) — Low
Tod 6:29am. 26 12:20am. 0.0
ev 652pm. 31 12:23pm. 00
Thursd 716am. 25 1:10am. 0.0
mse 7:37pm. 31 1:08pm. 0.0
Frid 79am. 2.5 1:55am. 0.0
mV 39pm. 31 15ipm. 00
Saturd 8:40am. 25 2:38am. 0.0
aeey 900pm. 31 232pm. 04
ST MLCT
Sunrise...... 6:31am. Moonrise .... 5:39 p.m.
Sunset....... 7:43 p.m. Moonset..... 4:33 a.m.
Full pa New First



May 9 May 30

a 17 May 24

ELEUTHERA
NASSAU High: 87° F/31°C
High: 87° F/31°C Low: 71 F/22 C
Low: 74° F/23°C
Ce -
CATISLAND
High: 83° F/28° C
Low: 67° F/19°C
GREAT EXUMA O SAN SALVADOR
ia High: 83" F/28° C High: 86° F/30° c
ANDROS md Low: 71 F/22 C Low: 70° F/21°C
High: 88° F/31°C
Low: 72° F/22° C ©
LONG ISLAND
High: 86° F/30° C
Low: 72° F/22°C
Thursday Today Thursday MAYAGUANA
low W High Low W High Low W High: 87° F/31°C
F/C FC F/C Fie F/C me Low: 71°F/22°C
52/1 it Philadelphia 69/20 56/13 c 73/22 58/14 +
66/18 pc Phoenix 102/38 75/23 $s 105/40 75/23 s CRO eo
55/12 t Pittsburgh «70/21 54/12 t 68/20 52/11 t RAGGEDISLAND — Uiigh:89°F/s2"
72/22 § Portland, OR 58/14 47/8 + 6015 43/6 c Eee Low: 74° F/23°C
66/18 t Raleigh-Durham 78/25 60/15 t 80/26 62/16 t Low: 70°F/21°C
60/15 s$ St. Louis 78/25 61/16 t 74/23 5613 t .
AAS) iL Salt Lake City 72/22 51/110 pce 71/21 45/7 pc
66/18 t San Antonio 96/35 74/23 pce 93/83 75/23 pc Ae
73/22 s San Diego 70/21 62/16 pc 76/24 60/15 s Low. 73°F/23°C
45/7 t San Francisco 66/18 51/10 pce 70/21 49/9 s i
61/16 t Seattle 58/14 45/7 + 56/13 44/6 c
70/21 pe Tallahassee 89/31 63/17 pce 89/381 62/16 pc
58/14 1 Tampa 88/31 72/22 s 88/31 71/21 $s
67/19 pc Tucson 100/87 67/19 s 103/89 67/19 5s
68/20 s$ Washington, DC 74/23 60/15 t 80/26 61/16 pc

rears LT

Acapulco
Amsterdam
Ankara, Turkey
Athens
Auckland
Bangkok
Barbados
Barcelona
Beijing
Beirut
Belgrade
Berlin
Bermuda
Bogota
Brussels
Budapest
Buenos Aires
Cairo
Calcutta
Calgary
Cancun
Caracas
Casablanca
Copenhagen
Dublin
Frankfurt
Geneva
Halifax
Havana
Helsinki
Hong Kong
Islamabad
Istanbul
Jerusalem
Johannesburg
Kingston
Lima
London
Madrid
Manila
Mexico City
Monterrey
Montreal
Moscow
Munich
Nairobi
New Delhi
Oslo

Paris
Prague

Rio de Janeiro
Riyadh
Rome

St. Thomas
San Juan
San Salvador
Santiago
Santo Domingo
Sao Paulo
Seoul
Stockholm
Sydney
Taipei

Tokyo
Toronto
Trinidad
Vancouver
Vienna
Warsaw
Winnipeg

High
F/C
90/32
57/13
61/16
68/20
59/15
94/34
85/29
72/22
90/32
68/20
65/18
59/15
75/23
64/17
61/16
61/16
68/20
82/27
104/40
55/12
88/31
79/26
84/28
53/11
57/13
61/16
68/20
54/12
90/32
55/12
80/26
98/36
72/22
65/18
69/20
86/30
76/24
68/20
82/27
81/27
86/30
102/38
61/16
68/20
53/11
82/27
107/41
54/12
64/17
58/14
84/28
104/40
70/21
84/28
17/25
84/28
66/18
84/28
79/26
84/28
55/12
68/20
78/25
68/20
68/20
86/30
55/12
58/14
57/13
64/17

= (hil

Today

Low
F/C
70/21
46/7
46/7
59/15
52/11
81/27
76/24
59/15
64/17
63/17
51/10
46/7
68/20
43/8
46/7
45/7
50/10
64/17
81/27
39/3
73/22
67/19
60/15
44/6
46/7
48/8
47/8
44/6
70/21
36/2
72/22
67/19
57/13
47/8
50/10
77/25
59/15
46/7
55/12
76/24
54/12
75/23
46/7
46/7
43/6
59/15
76/24
36/2
41/5
49/9
71/21
79/26
54/12
75/23
43/8
70/21
43/6
70/21
60/15
55/12
39/3
54/12
66/18
62/16
49/9
70/21




pc

raoaoonten

47/8

50/10
40/4
47/8

sh
sh
Cc

High
F/C
90/32
65/18
63/17
72/22
61/16
92/33
85/29
71/21
93/33
68/20
68/20
64/17
75/23
66/18
68/20
68/20
72/22
83/28
108/42
48/8
89/31
81/27
86/30
64/17
54/12
72/22
76/24
55/12
89/31
59/15
80/26
104/40
67/19
66/18
67/19
86/30
77/25
63/17
84/28
86/30
87/30
106/41
57/13
70/21
73/22
81/27
108/42
55/12
72/22
70/21
81/27
101/38
73/22
83/28
80/26
86/30
66/18
84/28
76/24
82/27
57/13
67/19
82/27
63/17
64/17
82/27
58/14
72/22
62/16
51/10

INSURANCE MANAGEMENT

(BAHAMAS) LIMITED. INSURANCE BROKERS & AGENTS
Marine FORECAST

Thursday
Low W
F/C

72/22 s
45/7 pc
43/6 pc
61/16 pc
55/12 s
80/26 pc
76/24 sh
57/13 s
62/16 pc
63/17 s
54/12 pc
50/10 pc
68/20 s
49/9 +
50/10 pc
50/10 pc
57/13 pc
61/16 s
82/27 s
36/2 ¢
73/22 s
71/21 t
62/16 s

48/8 sh

43/6 pc

46/7 pc

55/12 s

45/7 +

68/20 pc

37/2 pc

72/22 s

70/21 s

56/13 ¢

47/8 s

47/8 sh

77/25 +

60/15 pc

46/7 pc

54/12 pc

76/24 +

54/12 s

75/23 pc

48/8 5

48/8 sh

49/9 s

59/15 r

US/ZOMS

39/3 +

48/8 pc

48/8 pc

71/21 s

76/24 s

51/10 s

75/23

46/7 s

73/22 t

43/6 p

72/22 +

60/15 t

58/14 s

41/5 sh

51/10 s

67/19 s

60/15 c

48/8 c

70/21 t

45/7 s

57/13 s

46/7 pc

Weather (W): s-sunny, pe-partly cloudy, c-cloudy, sh-showers, t-thunder-
storms, r-rain, sf-snow flurries, sn-snow, i-ice, Prcp- precipitation, Tr-trace



WEDNESDAY, MAY 6Tn, 2009, PAGE 11B

WINDS WAVES VISIBILITY WATER TEMPS.
NASSAU Today: ENE at 6-12 Knots 0-2 Feet 10-20 Miles 77°F
Thursday: — ENE at 10-20 Knots 0-2 Feet 10-20 Miles 77°F
FREEPORT Today: E at 6-12 Knots 0-2 Feet 10-20 Miles 76° F
Thursday: — ENE at 10-20 Knots 0-2 Feet 10-20 Miles 77°F
ABACO Today: E at 7-14 Knots 0-2 Feet 10-20 Miles 76° F
Thursday: _E at 10-20 Knots 0-2 Feet 10-20 Miles 77°F



Topay's U.S. FORECAST

* Billings
67/44

LosAngeles,

80/60.

Showers
T-storms
[gad Rain

Miami
86/74

Fronts

Flurries

Cold

Shown are noon positions of weather systems and
precipitation. Temperature bands are highs for the day.
Forecast high/low temperatures are for selected cities.

War fliemiliielile

Stationary eagemii-

Snow
Ice





“10s



Os [05 10s 20s [303] 40s



TR EME) SUSAN Te (0) 350-3500

AUTO INSURANCE

Never st:
Engine wit

-to Auto Insurance,
he Smart choice is

© Management.
Me you can trust.

OUT

out us!

7 INSURANCE MANAGEMENT

(BAHAMAS) LIMITED. INSURANCE BROKERS & AGENTS

“Hew Proidene fliaen | Abaco {onto Fyn
PEMA (3-620


PAGE 8B, WEDNESDAY, MAY 6, 2009

THE TRIBUNE



eS



The Tribune

‘Taste



TAKE MOM 10 BRUNCH

@ By ALEX MISSICK
Tribune Features Reporter
amissick@tribunemedia.net

ALL your life your mother
has cared for you, nursed your
bruises and fed you daily to
make sure you had the
required nutrients you needed
to be healthy. She even snuck
in a few snacks every now and
then just for a treat. This Moth-
er’s Day you can return the
favor by treating your mom to
a Mother’s Day Brunch at
many of the popular eateries
around town.

Sue Lawrence, Sales Director for
Ristrorante Luciano’s of Chicago,
located on East Bay Street, said they
decided to have Mother’s Day
Brunch featuring some of the things
they thought mothers and the local
Bahamian population would love.

“Our Mother’s Day brunch starts
at 11:30 am through 3:30 pm. All of
the appetizers and desserts are
served on a buffet and then the
entrée’s are a la Carte, so you order
your entrée course and the price of
the entrée course, which is $30 cov-
ers the appetizer and dessert buf-
fet,” Ms Sue Lawrence said.

Ms Lawrence said most of the
seating is set on the outside deck
overlooking the beautiful Nassau
harbor and in terms of the entrée’s,

the Fruitti di Mare is their most pop-
ular dish.

“The Chicken Parmigiana is some-
thing the kids always like. With lamb
being a spring time thing, we have a
boneless stuffed leg of lamb with
pine nuts, sun dried tomatoes and
herbed breadcrumbs so it is very
often on the Mother’s Day menu.
For the gentlemen that are coming
along with their mothers we offered
them something a little bit heavier
with a roasted loin of pork with
sautéed apples and oranges, the filet
mignon with a Chianti reduction.
We also have the oven roasted
grouper and a little minced lobster
arrabiatta for Bahamians,” Ms
Lawrence said

For those mothers who would pre-

fer amore indoor feel, the Sea Side
buffet at the Wyndham Nassau
Resort, Cable Beach, will feature a
wide spread of succulent Bahamian
dishes to treat your mom this Moth-
ers day.

The cost of brunch is $28 plus a 15
per cent gratuity and includes dish-
es such as a grandma’s peas soup
and dough, a crispy lemon and pep-
per grouper with Creole sauce,
baked Andros crab, and coconut rice
with spicy lobster just to name a few.

The dessert table will include
mouth watering desserts such as hot
pudding and a variety of cakes, tarts
and mousses.

For a more secluded and earthy
location, why not take mom further
out west to the Marley Resort and

Spa for a tasty Mother’s Day treat
and maybe a few extra surprises.

Daniel Zonicle, assistant restau-
rant manager at the Marley resort,
said they are anticipating a nice turn
out this mother’s day.

“Brunch starts at 12 pm and the
menu is really buffet style featuring
a variety of Bahamian foods at $30
per person. We have seating at the
sea front, and two other really nice
spaces so the guests can have a
choice as to where they want to
enjoy their meals,” Mr Zonicle said.

With all these different places to
choose from serving all these very
different dishes, they all have one
thing in mind- to please the ever
changing palette of your loving
mother.

Unique fundraiser to help
fight hunger in the Bahamas

LOCAL Chefs from thirteen different
restaurants will showcase exciting new cre-
ations or their well-loved signature fare to
guests of Paradise Plates, Hands For
Hunger's first annual fundraiser event
being held on Saturday, May 23 from 7 - 11
pm at the Atlantis Crown Ballroom.

Sponsored by The New Providence
Development Company Limited and Old
Fort Bay, the unique event will feature a
sampling of gourmet food, fine wine and
live entertainment with all proceeds bene-
fiting Hands For Hunger the non-profit,
humanitarian organisation committed to
the elimination of hunger and the reduc-
tion of food waste in The Bahamas.

To date, Chefs from a wide array of
restaurants including: Mesa Grill; Nobu;
Dune; British Colonial Hilton; Old Fort
Bay Club; Lucianos; The Patisserie; Van

“Mother's Day

Salefi

*






Badash Crystal
Jewelry Boxes
Godinger Silver
Picture Frames
Artificial Flowers

Gibson Dinnerware
Arc Glass & Crystal

Gift Baskets

Breugels; Balduccinos; Compass Point;
Goodfellow Farms; Food Art by Cacique;
and Le Petit Gourmet have agreed to par-

ticipate and showcase their extraordinary

food.

Fine wine will also be showcased at Par-

adise Plates. Pia Farmer, owner of Men-

Beer at the event.

tions.



doza Wine Imports will be offering sam-
ples of some of her wines from Argentina
and the Sands Brewery will offer Sands

Other sponsors include: Atlantis, Pearle
Vision, Prime Advisory Group, The d'Al-
benas Agency Ltd., Royal Star Assurance,
Sun Tee Embroid Me and Creative Rela-

Tickets for Paradise Plates are $125 per
person and can be purchased or reserved
by calling or emailing at 327-
or info@handsforhunger.org.

1660 ext. 241




TL

Aree
- THC oe Ts
AL ae
aie pila
ere he

from Max’s '

Sale dates:
May 1st - 9th, 2009

*Except on red tagged
and net items

Kelly's

Fax:



os iy peer

io Ceramics

prt
PN ha
< © Picure ria
Puke

Hoyses,

Home

Mall at Marathon

242) 393-4096

www.kellysbahamas.com






GOAT cheese and balsamic vinegar (top), a Porcini with smoked gouda (middle left) and blue-cheese cov-

ered with spiced walnuts (bottom).

Meet two of the Chefs for Hands for
Hunger and Paradise Plates 2009

@ By CARA BRENNEN-
BETHEL
Tribune Features Editor

NOBU Chef Ricky Sauri has
a history of using his culinary
skills to give back, so its no won-
der he jumped at the chance to
participate in this month’s Hands
For Hunger’s fund raiser Par-
adise Plates 2009.

Recently, the native Puerto
Rican invited Tribune Taste to
sample the restaurant’s signa-
ture black cod dish which he and
a sous chef will be preparing for
the 400 persons who will attend
the gala event on May 23.

“We will be making black cod
marinated for three days and
cooked with miso on butter let-
tuce with ginger, and garlic chips.
This is really a signature Nobu
dish which Nobu Matsuttisa cre-
ated for his restaurants 12 years
ago, This dish he made famous.”

Mr Sauri has been a part of
the Nobu family since 2002 and
has been a chef since 1990.

He said that while at the Nobu
in Miami, Florida, he and the
other chefs were always doing
charity events such as fundraisers
for breast cancer awareness and
so volunteering for this event
came naturally.

Mr Sauri describes himself as
a self taught chef. Originally, he
spent five years in college obtain-
ing a degree in Business in Puer-
to Rico- although he said he was
always cooking for family and

@ By Lloyd Allan
Tribune Features Reporter

OWNER and operator of Le
Petit Gourmet - a newly opened
French Canadian restaurant - in
the Shirley Street Plaza-Julie
Andree-Knowles is slated to
have treats from her restaurant
featured at both the VIP pre-
party and general fundraiser of
the upcoming Hands for Hun-
gry dinner set to take place later
this month.

The chef is best know for her
mouth watering dishes, and
home style lunch presentations,
which have been known to draw
in scores of clients from all

ee Friday 9: pane mre en
Tel: (242 -4002 2a pm
o t } ree Sunday dosed around the island.

Chef Knowles who’s original-
ly from Quebec, Canada, said

Chefs Julie Andree-Knowles (left) and Ricky Sauri (right).

friends.

“I don’t have classical train-
ing. When I was finished school,
I asked myself if I really wanted
to spend the rest of my life in
accounting and realised no. So I
moved to New York and got a
job at restaurant and then even-
tually ended up at the Nobu in
Miami and then here.”

The chef has prepared food
from many different countries
and said that cooking is a sure
way to learn more about peo-
ple.

“Tt lets you know how people
eat in different places and you
learn different techniques. Since
I started with Japanese foods,
my diet has changed, I don’t eat
so much fatty foods. It is also

although she is self taught, her
unique approach to involving her
clients to help in creating her
menu has proven to be key in
enticing and maintaining them.

Speaking of her involvement
in the Hands for Hunger project,
Mrs Knowles explained: “I think
that people forget to be grateful
for what they have, we live in a
world of abundance and people
forget to be thankful for every
single little thing, one of which is
food.

“T think hands for hunger
makes people realise that a lot of
people out there do not have that
chance, and that for everything
they do get they are very grate-
ful.”

During the main event, Mrs
Knowles said she will be pre-



interesting how people are
inspired by other countries,
because Nobu visited Peru and
his cooking is very much inspired
by a Latin influence- the use of
cilantro, avocado for instance.”

Mr Sauri said he himself has
blended everything he has
learned with his own Puerto
Rican background.

And he encourages even the
novice chef to try their hand at
Japanese cooking.

“ Tt is not only sushi. There
are many types of Japanese
cooking. It is all about keeping
food simple. People don’t have
to be afraid, you don’t want to
overwhelm the food, its all
about making good food fresh
and simple.”

senting about 20 of her unique
spreads, many of which have a
cream cheese base, and are a
complete success among her fol-
lowers.

During a recent sampling, Mrs
Knowles showcased one of her
spreads, which she said is nor-
mally served with Crustinis - a
chip like bread prepared with
olive oil.

Included were three unique
spreads, the first was made with
goat cheese and balsamic vine-
gar.

Second was a blue-cheese cov-
ered with spiced walnuts, and the
third was a Porcini with smoked
gouda. Even if you're not a
cheese lover, these treats are sure
to add an interesting flavor to
any white or red wine.
THE TRIBUNE

WEDNESDAY, MAY 6, 2009, PAGE 9B



ENTERTAINMENT



The Tribune












-

@ By LLOYD ALLEN
Tribune Features
Reporter

lallen@tribunemedia.net :
READY, set, and go! enter- m By TOYO AELEN
tainment this week is all about :
cars, culture, and gorgeous ;
women. Decorated with concerts, ;
speed racing, a one love extrava- :

: icon PitBull blazed the stage
women, this weekend’s lineup of :

i at the Wyndham Resort's

events offers a collection of good :
times, complete wonder, and :
: for a screaming crowd of
| Spring breakers this past
/ month.

ganza, and did | say gorgeous

most important, something new.

1.The Crisis Centre of the
Bahamas is hosting a cultural
fair and entertainment extrava-
ganza at the grounds of the
National Centre for Performing
Arts on Shirley Street this com-
ing Saturday. The event which
begins at noon, includes a
range of activities for both
adults and children including
fun games, an appearance by
Dora and Diego, and loads of
fun foods, treats, and much
more. Then around 7pm, local
entertainers including Sammi
Starr, Bodine a.k.a ‘B’, and the
National Dance School, are
expected to set a mood of full-
circle entertainment. Tickets for
the event are $10, and can be
purchased at Airbrush Junkies
in the Marathon Mall, and from
the Crisis Centre on Collins
Avenue.

2. Continuing with its 50th
anniversary celebrations, the

ing “Music In The Garden,” an
exhibition of an eclectic musical
ensemble. With Christine Gan-
gelhoff on the flute, Chris
Justillien on the saxophone,
and Christy Lee on the piano,
this colorful event is set to take

on Village Road this Friday at
7pm, with tickets priced at $20
for members, $25, for non-
members, and just $10 for stu-
dents. All music lovers,
Bahamians, and others are
invited to attend and show sup-
port for this cultural event.

3. Bay Area Entertainment
along with Tycon Entertainment
is once again presenting the
One Love Festival, a musical
melting pot of some of the
most popular conscious music
icons from throughout the
region. This three day fest has
everything from beach parties,
dance-offs, and pre-concert, to
a heavy hitting reggae splash.
For the concert on Saturday
which is being hosted by Jah
Cure, scheduled performances
are expected from | Wayne,
Fantan Mojah, B, Sammie Starr,
|-Rate, Jah Doctrine, Mr Cure
himself, and many others.
Concert tickets are priced at
$40 general admission, $70

pre-concert on Friday at the
Fluid Lounge, tickets are $10
for ladies, and $15 for guys.
Then for the beach party on
Sunday on Long Wharf beach,
tickets are available at $5, all of
which can be purchased at the
Juke Box at the Marathon Mall,
or at Gizmos and Gadgets.

4.The organisers of the Miss
Bahamas Universe beauty
pageant have planned an all
white boat cruise for this Satur-
day, where the 13 contestant of
this year’s pageant will be out
and dressed to impress on
board the Bahamas Fast Fer-
ries. Continuing with its theme
of Earth Angels, the girls will
exhibit the full embodiment of
nature as they continue with
their list of pre-pageant public
engagements. Set to board at
7.30pm from the Potter Cay
dock, this aquatic event is
priced at $10 and is said to bea
sure night of glamour, top
notch entertainment, and indul-
gence.

5.The Bahamas Hot Rod
Association (BHRA) is revving
up this Friday for its regular
Street Legal Racing show-
down. The event which is
being held at the BHRA
motorsports park at the Queen
Elizabeth sporting complex,
Oakes Field, cost just $5 per
person, Starting at 7pm, the
event is expected to draw an
eager mix of motor-sport
enthusiasts and high powered
vehicles.

PITBULL:

UNC

Tribune Features Reporter
lallen@tribunemedia.net

CUBAN-American musical

Rainforest theater performing

Commonly considered strictly a Reg-

: gaeton artist, PitBull’s recent perfor-
: mance showcased a myriad of songs
: from his past albums and upcoming CD
: ranging from rap, reggaeton, and even
! crunk.

Linked to some of the most popular

: artists from the East Coast including Lil
: Jon, the Ying Yang twins, Rick Ross,
: Fuego, Omega, and Trina, PitBull
: proved that contrary to common opin-
: ion, he is a jack of many trades. He has
: fused numerous genres into his musical
repertoire.

In an exclusive interview with “Mr

: 305” himself after the mini-concert, Pit-
: Bull said 2009 will be one of his biggest
: years yet, bringing a fresh sound, anew
: image, and a new label.

He explained: “The whole PitBull

: movement has to do with a lot of move-
: ments, people always try to label me in
i a particular box, whether it be Crunk,
i? Down South, Reggaeton, or this, that,
i and the third.

Bahamas National Trust is host- :

“T just happen to be involved with a

i lot of musical sounds because I’m a
i chameleon at the end of the day. I adapt
i to any environment, and coming from
i Miami which is a melting pot of music,
i whether it be music from the Caribbean,
i Dance Hall, Soca, Meringue, Salsa, or
i Cha-Cha, whether it be freestyle music,
place at the BNT Retreat Garden :







IN THIS film publicity image released by 20th Century Fox, Hugh Jack-
man unleashes his adamantium claws in a scene from "Wolverine."

Men Origins: VVolverine

VIP, and $120 platinum. For the |

booty shaking music, or Hip hop, you
put all that together and that’s the true
definition of PitBull.”

PitBull said like many Cuban-Ameri-
can artists before him, music been a part
of his life for a long time mainly because
of his culture, However it officially
developed into a career after he was
first invited by his high school drama
teacher - Hope Martinez - to watch a
DMX live video shot in 1998.

He said: “There I met Swizz Beats, I
met Irv Gotti, where he had asked me if
I wrote music, and I said no, I just
freestyled. He said freestyling is great
but it don’t make no money, and that’s
what turned me on to music right there.”

From that moment on, PitBull said
his career grew like “a chicken on
steroids.” He was soon signed to Luke
Records, but moved around through
several labels, and has now settled with
305 Inc/Polo Grounds Music and RCA
Music Group for both an English and
Spanish deal.

With his music immersed in markets
across the globe, PitBull said there
remains an attraction to the Caribbean
which goes far deeper than just his roots.

“The energy in the Caribbean is some-
thing that can’t be described, our blood
is hot, what we do is hot, we’re passion-
ate about everything that we do,
whether it’s in the bedroom, whether
it’s moving on the dance floor, or mak-
ing music, we’re very passionate about it,
and I think that’s what the Caribbean
brings,” he said.

Switching gears to what’s to come this
year in his professional life, PitBull said
this is a new chapter for him filled with
limitless possibilities, because for the
first time he considers himself free.

“This year has been very special to
me, because I’ve fought my way and
won my freedom as far as the music
game is concerned...so now that we’re



Michael Muller/AP Photo

cutting these new deals, and the music is
growing, and the whole movement is
growing, I think what it’s all about from
this point on is making sure that five
years from now, the decisions that I
make this year make all the sense in the
world in the future,” he said.

THE INTERNET

PitBull said he recognises the impor-
tance of the Internet and the way it is
used to bring hype to any artist. He con-
siders himself computer illiterate, but
explained that despite knowing how to
use the computer, the habit of continu-
ously using it to get information and
learn more is both a blessing and a curse.

PitBull said: “Someone once said that
the more you know, the more things will
bother you, so the less you know the
more you’re able to live life a little sweet-
er and stress free.

“But I definitely take advantage of
global communication on sites like
Myspace, Youtube, and Facebook, but
[I’m not on that Twitter thing, cause I
can’t let people know everywhere that
Tm at.”

He said another beautiful thing
about the Internet is the fans that real-
ly support him follow him online.

REBELUTION

With his fifth album “Rebelution”
set to be released in September, Pitb-
Bull said fans will definitely be
pleased with his new mater-
ial, including the release
of Blanco, I Know






You Want Me, Calle Ocho, and Krazy.

“The decision to name my album Rebe-
lution came first from me being a rebel in
my own right, I fought my way through
the game, and I figured out how to make
my own money.

“The ‘lution’ end of it comes from me
doing things a new way, where four to
five years from now my music will make
all the sense in the world, where compa-
nies who want to cater to Latins are going
to have to come to me to stamp their
products.”

With high hopes for his future as a lead-
ing Latin artist, PitBull is certain that the
only thing between him and his future
success is time.



res /

BIG TV, BIG POP
GIVEAWAY

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_ M_By JASON DONALD

THE first X-Men movie,

: released in 2000, was a slight
i but watchable effort and invit-
i ed a sequel. However, the sec-
i ond film in the series, X-Men
i United, seemed to feature end-
i less scenes of men pointing
i guns at steel doors. Then the
i third, The Last Stand, had a cli-
i mactic battle that would have
i looked cheap on the Sci-Fi
i Channel.

But, incredibly, the franchise

: has reached a new low with this
i latest, needless episode, X-Men
i Origins: Wolverine.

As the title suggests, this is

: the origin story of the X-Man
i with the muscular sideburns,
i and it all gets underway in 1845.
i ‘Little’ Wolverine, or Logan to
i his friends, kills his abusive
i father with his freaky hands
: and then goes on the run with
: his brother, Victor, who has
: some genetic hand issues of his
: own.

The pair battle their way,

i side-by-side, through the 20th
: Century’s global conflicts
| before joining an elite fighting
: team of super humans, led by
: the mysterious Stryker.

But when Logan becomes

i disturbed by the ruthless streak
: that runs through his colleagues
: and goes into hiding, he soon
: realises they aren’t quite ready

to let him go.

Perhaps the main problem
with Wolverine is that every-
thing the film has to offer has
been done better elsewhere.

The title sequence is suspi-
ciously reminiscent of the
recent stunning Watchmen
opening, the chase scenes are
lifeless, and the multiple face-
offs between Logan and Victor
become increasingly anti-cli-
mactic.

The one inspired moment -
a fight on some sort of giant
chimney thing- comes so late, it
feels like a set piece that’s wan-
dered in from another film.
And a better one at that.

To add to these issues, the
script is truly atrocious, with
characters trading flat, macho
dialogue that would have Vin
Diesel shaking his head.

In the last couple of years,
films like The Dark Knight and
the aforementioned Watchmen
have shown how super hero
movies can have depth and
intelligence to match the special
effects. Even Iron Man, which
was lighter than those two, had
well rounded characters and a
tight narrative.

In comparison, Wolverine
seems dated, flabby and, unfor-
givably for this type of picture,
dull.

As fans of the series all know,
when Logan eventually
becomes a member of the X-
Men, he no longer has any
memory of this story. I wish I
could say the same for myself.



To play, attach 3 boxes of
any Orville Redenbacher
Microwave Popcorn to an
entry form, complete the
skill question and drop into
boxes at participating
stores or The d’Albenas
Agengy Ltd. in Palmdale.





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Have a healthier snack with Orville RedenbachersSM __R__ POP!
PAGE 10B, WEDNESDAY, MAY 6, 2009

THE TRIBUNE



Pretty flowers for a special lady

@ By ALEX MISSICK
Tribune Features Reporter
amissick@tribunemedia.net

TO celebrate mothers and
the contributions they make
in the lives of their children
and those around them,
many persons go all out
with elaborate jewelry and
fine china. However, why
not give the most common
gift of natural beauty- the
gift of flowers for that all

around beauty in your life-.

Just as flowers bloom with every
sunrise, moms are up at the crack of
dawn preparing for the best day she
can give her family. Omar Williams
of Wild Seed designs knows all too
well about those fresh, gorgeous
flowers that make every morning
special.

“We have been around for ten
years. We do everyday flower
arrangements from parties to wed-
dings, offices, and we do a lot of
native foliage as well such as sea
grapes and so forth,” Mr Williams
said.

Mr Williams said although he loves





PPT ete

what he does with flowers, he studied
to be an artist.

“T went to school to study art. It’s a
kind of departure from what I
thought I would be doing but its still
an art form- just another medium. It
does involve a lot of business and a
little less art than I would like,” Mr
Williams said.

The typical flowers Mr Williams
uses for Mother’s Day include Ger-
bera daisies, which are related to sun-
flowers and have a variety of colors
to choose from; lilies, roses, chrysan-
themums and to add special elements
to soften the arrangement, tulips are
used.

To create gorgeous floral arrange-
ments, especially for Mother’s Day,
Mr Williams said there are many fac-
tors that comes to mind.

“We are a small flower store and
we do a lot of different things. The
inspiration to create these pieces is
somewhat personal because I don’t
dictate every arrangement because it
is up to the individual person who is
making the arrangement to decide
what it is going to be. When you are
retailing flowers of course profitabili-
ty and money is something that defi-
nitely comes into play. It puts bound-
aries into what you can do, but we
take a lot of inspiration from nature
because we use a lot of native stuff so
they would kind of determine how

arrangements would look. We also
take into consideration the size, kind
of flower, shape and how many flow-
ers used in the piece. So those play a
major role in how much of something
you have but then you go and use
your artistic ability to put it togeth-
er,” Mr Williams said.

The usual floral arrangements
from Wild Seeds Designs begin at
$30 and for Mother’s Day they start
from $50 and up.

“Each arrangement is different. A
normal arrangement is usual ten to
fifteen minutes to make. The $50
arrangements will probably be the
more basic arrangements but we do
have fruit and flower baskets
along with gourmet baskets he.
filled with things like cheese,
crackers etc. Last year we had
plants and flowers because
most women like to garden so
we included things they could plant
in their home gardens in the arrange-



ail
BAHAMAS NATIONAL

ORCHESTRA

Scenes from the
orchestra’s gala con-
cert which was held on
April 25 at the St
Andrew’s Kirk. The
conductor was Dou-
glas Turnquest and the
concert master was
Jennifer Hudson.

ments as well,” Mr Williams said.

Mr Williams said as an artist, he
has to listen to the client even if they
do not say it with words.

“We use both fresh flowers and
silk flowers. As an artist you have to
interpret what it is and try to push it
out as an arrangement. I don’t just
see them as flowers. We have
arrangements
that we made

i



Felipé Major/Tribune staff





Katz acrylics

FROM page 12

Although Ms Katz has not had a show
in about a year and a half, she decided to
showcase her work in an open house May
9 at Post House studio and Gallery, locat-
ed on Sanford Drive from 11-4pm. The
show will run for two weeks.

“Most people know me for my collage
work which is what I still do, but I want-
ed to do something different this time.
So I did all still life acrylic paintings this
time,” Ms Katz said.

Ms Katz said she used acrylics a long
time ago and got interested in collage and
mixed media.

“T focused on those two for a long time.
I always liked doing still life just because
I like setting up little environments. I find
it fascinating so I decided to do an entire
show using still life and acrylic,” Ms Katz
said.

She said in these new paintings, she
decided to put together different elements
that she felt were interesting.

“T tried to use some sort of constant
elements in a lot of my pieces like certain

vases, and maybe like patterns that go
together. I used my cat a lot in my pieces
because she is a good prop,” Ms Katz.

In her creative way, Ms Katz pieces are
not your typical still life pieces. They are
vibrant and fun pieces filled with life and
humor. Ms Katz will have 22 pieces dis-
played at her art show using all acrylic
medium.

“The colors are very bright, sort of
funky colors-just very different. I think
what people see the show they will be
surprised at the pieces,” Ms Katz said.

As with all things artistic, it is not
always easy and Ms Katz said to pull off
this show was a lot of hard work.

“Every artist has different ways that
they work. I am better when I work at
the last minute. I work better under pres-
sure but it is a lot to that goes into an art
show. You got to put together all your
work, do all the framing which is expen-
sive, the invitations and so forth. It can
also be stressful because as an artist your
work is up there and you feel very vul-
nerable because your work is personal,”
Ms Katz said.

six years ago and they are still talking
about the arrangement. We know
how important these are to people. I
have a mom and other people have
moms so I know how special the
occasion is,” Mr Williams said.

FLOWERS are the most com-
mon gift of natural beauty.

q yw ¥





GG
Most people
know me tor my
collage work
which is what |
still do, but |
wanted to do
something ditferent
this time. So | did
all still lite acrylic
paintings this time.







Pitbull lights up the
Rainforest theatre .
4

See page nine



p

ee
——— —

-_



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STILL Ts UU i
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i" Po a! ss

—_

eC ae EN ae VASES AND FRUIT.






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n By ALISON LOWE Tribune Staff Reporter alowe@tribunemedia.net P OLICE are hunting a man w ho has kidnapped and threat ened to kill a three-year-old toddler. Shannon Bannister was asleep in the back of his mother’s grey Nissan Bluebird whena man known to police – 35y ear-old Kendrick Sifford, alias Dog – allegedly stole the car from outside her Lewis Street home on Friday. A former boyfriend of Shan non’s mother, Angie Moss, the Nassau Village resident has since evaded officers while sending horrific text messages to his distraught ex-girlfriend. “Yeah bitch, I know you was working for the po po (police Look harder, you will feel the pain. His time running out. See ya at the funeral,” said one message, seen by The Tribune. Yesterday, Ms Moss pleaded with anyone who thinks they might have seen Sifford or her son to contact police. “All I want is my little boy back, that’s all I want. Nothing else matters to me, just my baby,” she cried, in an emotional interview outside her home, off East Street. Ms Moss suggested her exboyfriend may be trying to scare her into dropping assault charges she pursued against him. “The last time he beat me he hit me in the head with a hammer and tried to strangle me. I have multiple charges against him,” the mother said. Meanwhile, describing the terrifying moment that Shan N N A A S S S S A A U U A A N N D D B B A A H H A A M M A A I I S S L L A A N N D D S S L L E E A A D D I I N N G G N N E E W W S S P P A A P P E E R R C M Y K C M Y K Volume: 105 No.135WEDNESDAY, MAY 6, 2009 PRICE – 75 (Abaco and Grand Bahama $1.25 WEATHER HUMIDWITH SUNSHINE HIGH 87F LOW 74F F E A T U R E S SEETHEARTS SEEPAGESEVEN Larry Smith’s Tough Call T ext threats to mum of three-year-old boy The Tribune ANYTIME ... ANYPLACE , WE RE #1 B AHAMASEDITION TRY OUR SOUTHERN CHICKEN BISCUIT www.tribune242.com Kidnapper: I’ll kill your baby I N S I D E BAHAMASBIGGEST CARSFORSALE, HELPWANTED ANDREALESTATE I N S I D E ABOVE: Police are hunting for 35-year-old Kendrick Sifford. RIGHT: A tearful Angie Moss, mother of Shannon Bannister, speaks to The Tribune yesterday. SEE page six T i m C l a r k e / T r i b u n e s t a f f n B y NATARIO McKENZIE T ribune Staff Reporter T HE young woman, who alleged she and Bishop Earl “Randy” F raser had a sexual relationship four years ago, testified yesterday that she and the accused had sex on an average of 12t imes a month. Prosecutors allege that Fraser engaged in a sex-u al relationship with a dependent between July 2 005 and February 2006. During cross-examination by Fraser’s attorneyW ayne Munroe yesterday, the virtual complainant who was 16 years old at the time the offences were allegedlyc ommitted, said that she and Fraser would have sex three or four times a Young woman testifies she had sex with Bishop Fraser 12 times a month SEE page six n By ALISON LOWE Tribune Staff Reporter alowe@tribunemedia.net FED-UPMOTORISTS detained by police on outdated arrest warrants are calling for government to take urgent action to fix an apparently dys functional warrant system. Two New Providence residents who contacted The Tribune separately in the last month claim they were picked up by officers on warrants issued for traffic violations for Motorists detained on outdated arrest warrants call for urgent action SEE page six THE body of a man was found floating in waters behind the Harbour Moon Hotel in the East Bay Street area yesterday. A man who worked in the area stumbled upon the gruesome discovery of a lifeless body bobbing near a barge shortly before 8 am yesterday. Police and defence force officers were called to the scene and about two hours later RBDF divers Man’ s body found floating in water behind Harbour Moon Hotel SEE page six POLICE and Defence Force officers pull the body of a man from the water. INSIDE WHEELCHAIR-BOUND AMPUTEEDIESAFTER BEING HIT B Y CAR PAGETHREE FAMILIES OF TWO S TUDENTS WHO WERE ALLEGEDLY MOLESTED PL AN LEGAL A CTION PAGEFIVE T i m C l a r k e / T r i b u n e s t a f f Katz acrylics

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n By MEGAN REYNOLDS Tribune Staff Reporter mreynolds@tribunemedia.net THE UPROAR over election nominations for the Bahamas Hotel Catering and Allied Worker’s Union is an embarrassment for the union, maintains Labour Minister Dion Foulkes. Police were called to control the chaos as hundreds of BHCAWU members went to Worker’s House on Harrold Road on Monday to register their nominations for the union’s May 28 elections. But two of the 60-plus candidates rallying for the union’s 12 executive positions lost out on nominations. BHCAWU secretary general Leo Douglas said the disruption was sparked when presidential hopeful Kirk Wilson, currently first vice-president under Roy Colebrook’s leadership and leader of the Deliverance party, argued the nominations should be held on May 11, and subsequently was not nominated. His actions led to two Deliverance party candidates nominating themselves independently,Mr Douglas said. And further confusion was caused when union officials had to turn down Tyrone ‘Rock’ Morris’s bid for the presidency as head of the Unity party because he is not entitled to BHCAWU membership as an Atlantis casino croupier. Mr Douglas said: “The only thing t hey are trying to do is hijack an o rganisation that’s been in existence for the past 50 years plus. “I didn’t expect that, I thought they would have behaved in a better way, there shouldn’t have been any disruption.” When news of the disorderly nomi nation process travelled to Labour Minister Dion Foulkes, it was met with disappointment. Mr Foulkes said: “It’s very unfortunate that the nomination process has deteriorated. I would wish to appeal to all of the candidates to exercise a strong degree of maturity and always consider the interests of their members. “As Minister of Labour my main concern is to ensure the members’ rights and interests are always represented, and what happened yesterday takes away from the union’s ability to represent the interests of their membership. “It’s really an embarrassment to the union so I would appeal to all of the candidates to respect the process and respect the procedure.” The Ministry of Labour is not involved in the nomination process but will supervise the election on May 28. Union President Roy Colebrook, Nicole Mar tin, Tyrone Butler and Abraham Smith have all been nominated for the top post of the BHCAWU. n By DENISE MAYCOCK Tribune Freeport Reporter d maycock@tribunemedia.net FREEPORT – The families of the two male students who were allegedly molested by a male teacher at Eight Mile Rock HighS chool intend to take legal action against the Ministry of Education. Rev Glenroy Bethel, founder of Families for Justice (FFJ great stress.” He has asked his organisation to represent them. “We believe the Ministry of Education must be held accountable,” he said. “We believe they are getting off too lightly a nd there is some liability for the incidents that have happened on the school property,” he said. A former teacher at Eight Mile Rock H igh School is accused of molesting the two students – who have both now left school – when they were in the seventh grade. It is alleged that the abuse continued for eight years. The suspected teacher has fled the country and is now being sought by the police. R ev Bethel said FFJ is very concerned that the abuse allegedly happened while the victims were under the ministry’s care. Concern Also expressing concern for the victims and their families were PTA president Troy Garvey, Rastas Jah Shiloh and Dadda Ragga of the Unity Is Strength Movement, and Dudley Seide of Outreach Ministry. “We have come together to stand for justice. We also see a great need to protect our c hildren not just at Eight Mile Rock High School, but the entire Bahamas because we believe that there are (dangerous teachers in the system at other schools,” said Rev Bethel. Troy Garvey said the PTA is also concerned about the status of investigations involving two other teachers at Eight Mile R ock High. A female teacher and another male teacher have been removed from the school over alleged complaints of sexual misconduct involving students. Education Minister Carl Bethel was criticised for his silence concerning the initial allegations, which surfaced in January. Mr Garvey believes the appointment of a s elect committee to investigate complaints of sexual molestation would bring better results. He said the victims went to the police, the Ministry of Education, and Social Services but got no help. “When you look at how the system dealt with the matter someone has to be held accountable for it. If the authorities had listened from the beginning we would not have a teacher (out there tem,” he said. Dudley Seide stressed that there are a lot of good teachers in the education system. We must weed out those teachers who decide to betray our kids and come to school to molest,” he said. Rasta Jah Shiloh is pleased the matter has finally got the attention of national leaders. “It is quite pleasing to see both the opposition and the governing party on one accord and recognising the need to address this situ ation. We as a people must remember that together we stand. Let’s stand together in the protection of the future of our country,” he said. Rev Bethel is calling on the prime minister and the minister of national security to ensure the safety of children at all public and private schools. A BAHAMIANbusiness is responding to the recession by providing training and profes sional development for its staff during these challenging eco nomic times. JMEL Enterprises, parent company of Texaco Faith Avenue and Fire Trail Road, East Street and Soldier, Wulff and Kemp Roads, said it believes that train ing is essential to the success of their company. It is a trend they hope other businesses throughout the country will emulate. The company recently held a recognition luncheon at the British Colonial Hilton for nine senior supervisors and supervi sors who completed a leadership training programme conducted by human resources consultant Dr Richard Pinder. The 12-month programme consisted of a number of seminars which focused on identifying strengths and weaknesses; developing leadership skills, enhanc ing people skills, setting goals and executing leadership. Several of the nine employees were once gas pump attendants, or as JMEL calls them, customer service representatives, who worked their way up in the company through hard work and determination. President of JMEL Enterprises Merritt Storr expressed his grati tude to the nine team members for providing outstanding service to the company. Managing director of JMEL Enterprises Ethan Moss applaud ed the service of the supervisors and thanked them for their dedication to the company. He said that their standards for customer service can be applied to any industry and work. “Service is based on how peo ple feel and how people feel will be based on the knowledge of their thoughts. It doesn’t take earth shattering innovation or changes to have a significant impact on employees. “Employers throughout the country need to know that if employees are not treated well by management and companies do not invest in them, why are they, then in turn going to exude good customer service,” said Mr Moss. C M Y K C M Y K LOCAL NEWS THE TRIBUNE WEDNESDAY, MAY 6, 2009, PAGE 5 THE DOWNTOWN NASSAU PARTNERSHIP, the public-privates ector organisation c harged with steering the revitalisation of historic Nassau, will host its first town meeting tonight at the British ColonialH ilton. “We hope that every stakeholder with an inter-e st in the transformation o f downtown Nassau will become part of this movem ent, asking questions, sharing ideas and being involved beginning witht his town meeting on Wednesday,” said Vaughn R oberts, DNP managing director. “The meeting is open to the public and we plan to discuss the revitalis ation efforts to date and the plans to improve downtown Nassau for theb enefit of residents and visitors. We are also hono ured to have at the meeting two very important persons in the internation-a l downtown management arena – Dave Feehan, past p resident of the International Downtown Association, and Brad Segal, pres-i dent of Progressive Urban Management Associates, w ho will serve as consultants in forming the Busin ess Improvement District for the city.” The town meeting is s cheduled for 6 – 7.30pm in Governors C Ballroom of the Hilton. There is no charge. D owntown Nassau Partnership to host town hall meeting on revitalisation tonight In brief Families of two students who were allegedly molested plan legal action n B y TANEKA THOMPSON Tribune Staff Reporter t thompson@tribunemedia.net M ORE than six years after they lost their jobs, former workers of Gladstone Farms have renewed their call for government to fulfil promises made by the formerC hristie administration regarding their unpaid severance packages. A lthough the workers "have never seen a dime" of the p romised money, they are still hopeful the funds will be distributed some day. H artley Strachan, a maintenance supervisor for the company f or about 33 years, said the situa tion feels like a slap in the face, e specially after the former gov ernment made provisions to pay former workers of the now closed Royal Oasis hotel in Grand Bahama. " It's been years and not only myself but all of the former e mployees have been waiting. “It's ridiculous in these hard t imes that the former administra tion could pay one set of work ers and no one, not even the Christian community, saw fit to say: “We sympathise with the for m er employees of Gladstone Farms.” " So anytime they say they care about the workers of this count ry – the black-belt and grassroots people – we are wondering who are they talking about. Because here it is, almost six years down the road we're still not paid," hes aid. He estimates he is owed around $ 30,000 in severance pay but said if only a portion of that were paid " it would be welcomed." Although Mr Strachan was able t o find employment after the com pany closed, many of his co-workers who did not posses marketable skills are still struggling to make ends meet. F red Stubbs, a former purchasing manager who worked with thec ompany for about 38 years, is one of those workers. He was 60y ears-old when the farm closed in 2002, and because of his age, it was hard to find a new job. He is now relying on his small pension to pay the bills. " You just barely get by. You have to make due with what youh ave," he said. But the group is still holding o ut hope after a recent meeting w ith Department of Agriculture officials, who Mr Strachan saidp romised to "look into" the situ ation, but made no assurances a bout the former workers receiving any money. The company – which was the country's largest chicken producing business – was sold in 2002a fter the company failed to recover from setbacks due to damagef rom Hurricane Floyd in 1999 and Hurricane Michelle in 2001, and f rom the 1998 reduction in Customs duties which gave an advant age to foreign imports. The clo sure left about 200 workers out of work. Attempts to reach Minister of Labour Dion Foulkes and Minist er of Agriculture Larry Cartwright were unsuccessful yes-t erday, as both men were in Cabinet. October 2002 – Angry workers of Gladstone Farms went ons trike over fears they would not be paid severance pay followingt he closure of the company. Then Minister of Agricult ure V Alfred Gray said he expected the severance packages to be paid before the farm shut its doors. That same month, president o f the Bahamas Commercial Stores, Warehouse and AlliedW orkers Union Elgin Douglas announced that severance packa ges had been negotiated and that all employees would be paid following the farm's closure. November 2002 – Gladstone Farms closes leaving more than 200 workers jobless. The company was later placed into liqui d ation. In late 2002, Trade Union C ongress president Obie Fergu son weighed in and said he wrote n umerous letters to government officials on behalf of the former employees. He said he wasi nformed that the employees' payment would be discussed ass oon as the company's assets were realised. August, 2004 – A group of former employees appeals in writing to then prime minister Perry Christie for assistance in receiving their severance pay. April, 2007 – Former Gladstone Farms owner CanadianT im Wien tells T he Tribune h e was unaware of any agreement w ith the former workers. February 2008 – The group writes to Prime Minister Hubert Ingraham to intervene in the matter. April 2009 – Some of the former workers meet with per m anent secretary at the Ministry of Agriculture Creswell Sturrup a nd outline their situation. They are told they will be contacted in a few weeks for an update. Former workers of Gladstone Farms renew calls for severance packages TIMELINE Minister: election uproar is embarrassment for union Business focuses on training in response to recession Dion Foulkes

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n By PAUL G TURNQUEST T ribune Staff Reporter pturnquest@tribunemedia.net D EMANDING that government rethink its efforts to reloc ate the container port to a proposed man-made island off Saunders Beach, PLP activist Paul Moss called on all Bahamians to make their voices heard and protest the plan at all costs. Holding a press conference at S aunders Beach yesterday morning, Mr Moss, with attorney F ayne Thompson, produced copies of the report by the archit ectural and environment con sulting company EDAW. EDAW was commissioned by the previous government for halfa million dollars and, in its report, s uggested the relocation of t he port to an alternate site in t he southeastern part of the island. Mr Moss said the report shows that the development of a man-made island was the sixth best option, c oming in after the suggestion that the port remain at its current location. The proposed man-made island, which is projected to encompass some 72 acres, would be c onnected to New Providence by a bridge and would be located d irectly across from Saunders Beach, in between New Providence and Shipwreck Island (Long Cay Causeway They intend to build a causeway from the man-made extens ion over Saunders Beach to West Bay Street,” Mr Moss said. “This is wrong and we will not stand for it. All over this country beach access is being denied to Bahamians. In fact, the proposed site at Arawak Cay is the absolute wrong site for the port. We have a report done by EDAW which states that Arawak Cay is the sixth worst site out of seven possible sites for the container port. “In fact, the present port is a better location. The question then is why are they (the government seeking to do something so illog ical? Well the answer maybe in the minutes of a meeting held in 2007 and hosted by the (Deputy Prime Minister) Brent Symonette. It is of interest to note that this beach was sold to the government by Mr Symonette in the 1990s for $1. Could it be that he thinks he owns it?” Mr Moss asked. Providing copies of the minutes from this meeting along with other documentation, Mr Moss said it was obvious that the gov ernment was trying to “swing” the Bahamian people “big time” by suggesting that the relocation of the port to the southwest was t oo costly an idea. Claiming that certain individuals are now “lick i ng their lips” in anticipation of their windfall profits from this p roposal, Mr Moss said that he and his supporters will block Saunders Beach and Arawak Cay if they have to. “No more can we allow ourselves to get swing again. Enough is enough and we put the governm ent on notice that they should not seek to put this port at A rawak Cay. We call on (environmentalist) Sam Duncombe to check this out and the BahamasN ational Trust to intervene. We also call on the Bahamian peop le to stand up and not allow this to happen,” he said. C M Y K C M Y K LOCAL NEWS THE TRIBUNE WEDNESDAY, MAY 6, 2009, PAGE 3 3 pc Queen Sleigh Bed 3 pc Queen Sleigh Bed 1 pc Dresser 1 pc Dresser 1 pc Mirror 1 pc Mirror 2 pc Nightstands 2 pc Nightstands 1 pc 5 Drawer Chest 1 pc 5 Drawer Chest Queen 8 Pc Queen 8 Pc $4,210 $4,210 King 8 Pc Set King 8 Pc Set $4,410 $4,410Solid Wood Solid WoodT T h h e e T T h h e e J J a a v v a a G G a a l l l l e e r r y y J J a a v v a a G G a a l l l l e e r r y yWong’s Plaza Wong’s Plaza Madeira Street Madeira Street (242 (242 2335 2335Financing Available Through Commonwealth Bank M M e e d d i i t t e e r r r r a a n n e e a a n n M M e e d d i i t t e e r r r r a a n n e e a a n n b2))(17,5(672&.):+,7()$%5,&&UHSH%DFNHGDWLQ/DPRXU +HDYLO\(PEURLGHUHG(\HOHW/DFH 5DPLH/LQHQRSOLQ%URFDGHtLON 5HGDQG:KLWH&DUQDWLRQVIRU&RUVDJHV :KLWH*ORYHVVWDUWLQJDW 1HZHDUOHFNODFHHWV *LDQWRWKHUV'D\&DUGVIURP 3RWWHGUFKLGVDQGRVHV 1HZ&DQGOHVHWVXJVRWKHUV'D\EHDUV DEU officers arrest 17 over seizures of firearms and cocaine In brief n By TANEKA THOMPSON Tribune Staff Reporter tthompson@tribunemedia.net A wheelchair-bound amputee died after he was struck by a car while waiting on the side of the road in Long Island on Monday. The 42-year-old victim, identified by family members as Cabbage Point resident LesterP ratt, was apparently waiting for a friend to pick him up when the incident occurred about half a mile from where he lived, the victim’s father, Rudolph Pratt, said. Police reported that the driver of a Chevrolet Corsica was travelling on Queens Highway in the Berries an area in south Long Island around 9pm on Monday when a 42-year-old man from Cabbage Point was hit while sitting in a chair near the road. Mr Pratt was taken to the l ocal clinic where he died of his i njuries, Assistant Superintendent Walter Evans said. Speaking with The Tribune from Long Island yesterday, the victim’s father said: "(My son was probably down there visiting people nearby, it's a bar nearby, and a friend was supposed to pick him up and he heard a vehicle coming, but it must have been the wrong car and the car didn’t see him and struck him.” Mr Pratt, who was married with children and a cabinet maker by trade, had his right arm amputated several years ago, his father said. Officer-in-charge of the Long Island police station Assistant Superintendent Stephen Adderley said it is too early to tell if speed, driver negligence or alcohol played a part in the accid ent. "It's too early to say if it was the result of negligent driving there are so many variables to consider, like road lighting and actions of the driver and the victim," said Mr Adderley. O fficers are canvassing the area and are still interviewing the driver to determine the cause of the accident. Police investigations continue. Mr Pratt's death is the third traffic fatality in Long Island for the year. D RUG Enforcement Unit officers arrested 17 persons in connection with separate seizures of illegal firearms, marijuana and cocainet hroughout the capital. Asst Supt Walter Evans reported that over the past three days, DEU officersc onducted operation “Snatch and Grab” throughout New P rovidence. During the special operation, officers seized one AK-4 7 rifle; a .14 rifle; 20 live rounds of .223 ammunition a nd 15 live rounds of 7.62 ammunition; 10 ounces of marijuana, and two grammeso f cocaine. Police also seized more t han $2,400 in cash during the search, Mr Evans said. THE Bahamas must quickly implement tax treaties with the United States and the E uropean Union if it wants to avoid being labelled a tax haven by the Obama administration, political activist Paul Moss said yesterday. During a brief press conference at Saund ers Beach, Mr Moss and attorney Fayne Thompson pointed out that the Bahamas is now a very transparent country. “Gone are the days when the Bahamas c an make a living relying on persons who would either have avoided taxes, evaded taxes, or simply come to the Bahamas because they do not want the scrutiny,” Mr Moss said. He noted that the Bahamas is hoping to join the World Trade Organisation and complete an Economic Part-n ership Agreement (EPA both these entities want the country to eliminate or substantially reduce Customs duties – the government’s main source of revenue. S ervices “Well, if you are going to get rid of Custom duties, how then are you going to feed the children, educate the children, and look after the essential services that this country requires?” Mr Moss asked. Hes aid the only solution is for the Bahamas to implement an income tax to replace Customs duties as the main source of revenue. “Only when we do so will we see the Bahamas removed from this gray list put forward by President Obama,” Mr Moss said. O n Monday, US President Barak Obama announced his administration’s plan to reform that nation’s tax policy and crackdown on overseas “tax havens.” Jurisdictions such as Bermuda and the Cayman Islands are home t o many large American companies and are projected to be the countries most effected by this move by the United States. H owever, local financial insiders fear that this policy could prove a direct threat to the country’s second economic pillar – t he financ ial services industry. According to the Associated Press, the president’s plan would stop US companies from delaying tax paymentsb y keeping profits in foreign countries instead of declaring them at home along with calling for increased transparency in American b ank accounts held in off-shore jurisdictions. This reform would also prevent US companies from getting tax deductions on profits earned overseas and essentially decrease t heir desire to be established in these countries. Wheelchair-bound amputee dies after being hit by car Bahamas urged to implement tax treaties Barack Obama Rethink plan to move container port, says PLP activist PLP ACTIVIST Paul Moss pointing towards the proposed location for a man-made island which could be the new site for the container port. Victim, 42, waiting on side of Long Island road It’s too early to say if it was the result of negligent driving ...” S tephen Adderley “This is wrong and we will not stand for it.”

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EDITOR, The Tribune. I am writing to express my disgust and discomfort with the Government. I am a 40-yearold woman who has been working for the Department of Environmental health for the past nine years and during this time I have struggled and struggled to survive for me and my children, with my salary being that o f $169 per week. For the past nine years I have stood around without sound hoping that the good Lord would continue to give me strength in this time of need and without question I endeavour to make ends meet, however, I’m finding it more and more difficult to do, with my two kids to feed among other bills I am not even being considered by social services which I have already tried...please tell me how me and my children are to continue in these hard times to survive with $169 and if that’s not bad enough after nine years I am still a weekly paid worker who should have been a monthly paid worker and it’s really hurtful to know that there are many who have been here for shorter periods of time and have already gone monthly, it’s just not fair. Something is terri bly wrong with this picture. There are many of us who are in this situation and who feel the same way, what’s happening with the government, is any body paying attention to us in the Environmental Health Department, is anybody looking o ut for us, we are considered t he lowest paid lowly looked at workers though we work hard on the roadsides every morning and through the day, where is the minister, does he know what’s going on? As we, the workers intend to do what we must to take care of our families, we the workers are yet stung with another blow, we realise the government is trying to assist with the clean up effort by hiring more persons, but yet we have come to realise that those new persons that was just recently hired is at this very time being paid $210 per week. T his is ridiculous and unfair, t his is wrong to the hundreds o f others like myself who have been there for so many years and being paid $169 per week, who do we need to talk to, this is absolutely wrong and we the workers are not happy, the government is slapping us in thef ace, on top of this there were some weekly persons who recently as last week making $169 just got an increase to $210, but the sad thing about it is that those who got the increase spent far less years ont he job than others. We, the workers, especially myself, who have two kids and can’t even obtain a decent bank loan because my salary is too small, have had enough, we have been treated unfairly for too too long, we can’t even get the back pay that is due to us, what are we suppose to do, how are we suppose to live, we would like to speak out, but we don’t for fear of being fired and so we are held hostage by are o wn fears, we want to make a stand and we will...we want fair treatment and the money that’s owed to us, the increase of salary and or the back pay the government is holding on, how can newly hired persons that have been on the job one week make $210 when I have been on the job nine years and make $169, workers one week old get paid more than a nine-year-old worker when we are both doing the same thing, it’s just not fair, we want the government to act in this matter immediately, immediately so we can have this issue resolved. We have kids, and light bill and water bill, some of our homes don’t even have electricity, we can’t even afford to maintain our children in school, please tell me, sir, what must we do, we only want to be treat ed fairly, somebody must want to hear our cry and ease our burden. Upsettingly. DISGRUNTLE WORKERS Nassau, March 18, 2009. C M Y K C M Y K EDITORIAL/LETTERS TO THE EDITOR PAGE 4, WEDNESDAY, MAY 6, 2009 THE TRIBUNE The Tribune Limited NULLIUS ADDICTUS JURARE IN VERBA MAGISTRI Being Bound to Swear to The Dogmas of No Master L EON E. H. DUPUCH, Publisher/Editor 1903-1914 S IR ETIENNE DUPUCH, Kt., O.B.E., K.M., K.C.S.G., (Hon. P ublisher/Editor 1919-1972 Contributing Editor 1972-1991 EILEEN DUPUCH CARRON, C.M.G., M.S., B.A., LL.B. P ublisher/Editor 1972Published Daily Monday to Saturday S hirley Street, P.O. Box N-3207, Nassau, Bahamas Insurance Management Building., P.O. F-485, Freeport, Grand Bahama T ELEPHONES Switchboard (News, Circulation and Advertising Advertising Manager (242 C irculation Department (242 N assau Fax: (242 Freeport, Grand Bahama: 1-(242 F reeport fax: (242 W EBSITE www.tribune242.com – updated daily at 2pm A SHIVER went down the spine of the world when it was discovered that an entirely new breed of influenza, known neither to man nor beast, was rampaging through Mexico. In the time it takes a jet to propel passengers over vast oceans, the strain had showed up in Canada, Spain, Israel, Hong Kong, and a dozen other countries including pristine and isolated New Zealand, where indigenous Maoris have been advised to stop rubbing noses as a traditional greeting. Epidemic was edging up to pandemic, warned the World Health Organisation. No one knows how species-jumping germs will develop. As dry leaves quickly succumbto fire, so do terrifying strains of Ebola tear through a population, burning themselves out. Other ills, such as AIDS, have been compared to a fire in a coal mine, smouldering slowly but steadily through the population, perhaps for hundreds of years. Influenza viruses sometimes become less virulent in time. Others will become more dangerous as they change and adjust to their hosts. Respiratory illnesses can come from wild ducks, tame chickens, and pigs, especially in populations where people live close to their animals, infecting each other in end less cycles of mutation. Epidemiologists, like Californians living on the earthquake-prone St Andreas Fault, are always worrying about “the big one,” a repeat of the great pandemic of 1918, which came in a shuddering first wave, only to sub side and come back with a tsunami of death in its second wave. Yet none want to over react, as they did in 1976 when a wave of immunization in the United States proved far more deadly than the flu it was intended to prevent. Countries behave differently when con fronted with the shadow of a deadly disease. Mexico, it would appear, has behaved well, getting the word out quickly, virtually closing down one of the world’s biggest cities for five days to prevent the spread. China, whenf aced with SARS a few years ago, first tried to cover it up. The Obama administration reacted with caution. The president, who is emerging as the great calm father-figure of the republic, told us not to panic and to wash our hands. Vice President Joe Biden, as is his wont, spoke out bluntly and said he would not want to be in a crowded airplane, generating the usual what-he-meant-to-say-was... If there was a common consensus it was that it’s too late to contain this new strain, which seems able to jump from person to person, to continent to continent, with ease. Modern communications has put paid to any hope of isolating it. What is needed now is to mitigate the consequences and prepare to handle the worst if the virus becomes more dangerous while we seek a vaccine. When you think about it, the same could be said for all the major national-security dan gers we face today. I heard a panel of distinguished nationalsecurity elders at that temple of American science, the Massachusetts Institute of Technology, that included former secretary of defence Harold Brown and former national security adviser Brent Scowcroft, among others. They identified weapons of mass destruc tion and climate change as, perhaps, the two most formidable challenges we face. Yet the doings of Pakistan’s A.Q.Khan have shown that nuclear weapon technology can slip across national borders to pop up in Pyonyang, Teheran, and Tripoli before the world is aware. And the MIT panel ended with the gloomy thought that the ultimate problem that knows no frontiers, climate change, cannot be reversed, and that the world must now come to terms with adjusting to it. Terror, too, knows no borders. The discontent of Muslims, for example, cannot be contained in the mountains of Afghanistan and Pakistan. It spreads, with the help of modern communications, into the farthest reaches of the Indonesian Archipelago, to the worn industrial towns of England, to youths in America who sign up to fight in far-away failed states. Even the failed economy, which could not be contained in the hot zones of Manhattan and London, has mutated across the globe. Int oday’s world, our greatest problems, and, by necessity solutions, have become transnational. (This article was written by H.D.S. Greenway of the Boston Globec. 2009 The Boston Globe). How can our family survive on $169 per week? LETTERS letters@tribunemedia.net Crises that know no borders Royal Bahamian Resort @ Offshore Island.Invites applications for the positions of: Accountants Cost Controller General Cashier Receiving Clerk Executive Chauffeurs Director of Sales Security Manager Exec. Housekeeper Resort Shop Manager Photo Shop Manager Assistant Training Manager years experience in the Hospitality Industry in the above mentioned positions, excellent communication, organizational and interpersonal skills, must be able to train and and computer skills desirable must be able to work and experience to: cmajor@grp.sandals.com Fax 677-6828. Closing date May 9th. 2009. EDITOR, The Tribune. Brewing scandal(s the Passport Office and health clinics. The bot toming out of the economy. An escalating misery index. Water shortages. Perpetually blinking traf-f ic lights that constitute more of a hazard than an a id to motorists. At this rate, by or before the 2012 general election, the current administration may well have topped the “wutlessness” of the previous, muchmaligned Perry Christie administration. It’s nice that roughly $6 million is being spent on milling, asphalting and paving West Bay Street and a few other roads in New Providence by Lamour Mechanical Trucking and Paving and Bahamix, but in the “inner city” where the roads are used by a far greater percentage of the taxpaying population, couldn’t “a few dollars more” be found to get the traffic lights working? Being, however, an “eternal optimist” who prefers to “eliminate the negative and latch on to the affirmative,” while I have ‘pen in hand’ (actually it’s a computer mouse), I must commend the Bahamas National Symphony Orchestra for providing an enchanting night of classical and more contemporary music at the Kirk Hall on Saturday last. They certainly “spread joy up to the maximum” and brought “gloom down to the minimum” with a number of classical pieces, in addition to a tribute to Louis “Satchmo” Armstrong and excerpts from the Wizard of Oz and much, much more. Perhaps for those, myself included, who can’t listen to the William Tell overture without think-i ng about the Lone Ranger, ‘instant culture’ and e njoyment was the order of the day at this ancient church building founded by fifty-five Scottish Settlers in 1798. With the entire highly accomplished ensemble flawlessly conducted by and under the command of Douglas Turnquest and Jennifer Hudson (No, not that Jennifer Hudson), the young female flutist and special guest on the Stradvarius violin earned special applause. Hopefully without sounding like a BNSO sorry, make that SNOB (a flash of dyslexia caused me to walk into a bra the other day) and unable to resist my inner Simon Cowell, I must add that, although presented in a very pleasant voice and personable manner the intermittent commentary could, in order to have better suited the occasion, reflected a ‘wee bit’ higher level of sophistication. That said, kudos to all involved for an enjoyable, well-spent evening. ARTHUR LEE Nassau, April, 2009. An enchanting night of music

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n By MEGAN REYNOLDS Tribune Staff Reporter mreynolds@tribunemedia.net THE UPROAR over election nominations for the Bahamas Hotel Catering and Allied Worker’s Union is an embarrassment for the union, maintains Labour Minister Dion Foulkes. Police were called to control the chaos as hundreds of BHCAWU members went to Worker’s House on Harrold Road on Monday to register their nominations for the union’s May 28 elections. But two of the 60-plus candidates rallying for the union’s 12 executive positions lost out on nominations. BHCAWU secretary general Leo Douglas said the disruption was sparked when presidential hopeful Kirk Wilson, currently first vice-president under Roy Colebrook’s leadership and leader of the Deliverance party, argued the nominations should be held on May 11, and subsequently was not nominated. His actions led to two Deliverance party candidates nominating themselves independently,Mr Douglas said. And further confusion was caused when union officials had to turn down Tyrone ‘Rock’ Morris’s bid for the presidency as head of the Unity party because he is not entitled to BHCAWU membership as an Atlantis casino croupier. Mr Douglas said: “The only thing t hey are trying to do is hijack an o rganisation that’s been in existence for the past 50 years plus. “I didn’t expect that, I thought they would have behaved in a better way, there shouldn’t have been any disruption.” When news of the disorderly nomi nation process travelled to Labour Minister Dion Foulkes, it was met with disappointment. Mr Foulkes said: “It’s very unfortunate that the nomination process has deteriorated. I would wish to appeal to all of the candidates to exercise a strong degree of maturity and always consider the interests of their members. “As Minister of Labour my main concern is to ensure the members’ rights and interests are always represented, and what happened yesterday takes away from the union’s ability to represent the interests of their membership. “It’s really an embarrassment to the union so I would appeal to all of the candidates to respect the process and respect the procedure.” The Ministry of Labour is not involved in the nomination process but will supervise the election on May 28. Union President Roy Colebrook, Nicole Mar tin, Tyrone Butler and Abraham Smith have all been nominated for the top post of the BHCAWU. n By DENISE MAYCOCK Tribune Freeport Reporter d maycock@tribunemedia.net FREEPORT – The families of the two male students who were allegedly molested by a male teacher at Eight Mile Rock HighS chool intend to take legal action against the Ministry of Education. Rev Glenroy Bethel, founder of Families for Justice (FFJ great stress.” He has asked his organisation to represent them. “We believe the Ministry of Education must be held accountable,” he said. “We believe they are getting off too lightly a nd there is some liability for the incidents that have happened on the school property,” he said. A former teacher at Eight Mile Rock H igh School is accused of molesting the two students – who have both now left school – when they were in the seventh grade. It is alleged that the abuse continued for eight years. The suspected teacher has fled the country and is now being sought by the police. R ev Bethel said FFJ is very concerned that the abuse allegedly happened while the victims were under the ministry’s care. Concern Also expressing concern for the victims and their families were PTA president Troy Garvey, Rastas Jah Shiloh and Dadda Ragga of the Unity Is Strength Movement, and Dudley Seide of Outreach Ministry. “We have come together to stand for justice. We also see a great need to protect our c hildren not just at Eight Mile Rock High School, but the entire Bahamas because we believe that there are (dangerous teachers in the system at other schools,” said Rev Bethel. Troy Garvey said the PTA is also concerned about the status of investigations involving two other teachers at Eight Mile R ock High. A female teacher and another male teacher have been removed from the school over alleged complaints of sexual misconduct involving students. Education Minister Carl Bethel was criticised for his silence concerning the initial allegations, which surfaced in January. Mr Garvey believes the appointment of a s elect committee to investigate complaints of sexual molestation would bring better results. He said the victims went to the police, the Ministry of Education, and Social Services but got no help. “When you look at how the system dealt with the matter someone has to be held accountable for it. If the authorities had listened from the beginning we would not have a teacher (out there tem,” he said. Dudley Seide stressed that there are a lot of good teachers in the education system. We must weed out those teachers who decide to betray our kids and come to school to molest,” he said. Rasta Jah Shiloh is pleased the matter has finally got the attention of national leaders. “It is quite pleasing to see both the opposition and the governing party on one accord and recognising the need to address this situ ation. We as a people must remember that together we stand. Let’s stand together in the protection of the future of our country,” he said. Rev Bethel is calling on the prime minister and the minister of national security to ensure the safety of children at all public and private schools. A BAHAMIANbusiness is responding to the recession by providing training and profes sional development for its staff during these challenging eco nomic times. JMEL Enterprises, parent company of Texaco Faith Avenue and Fire Trail Road, East Street and Soldier, Wulff and Kemp Roads, said it believes that train ing is essential to the success of their company. It is a trend they hope other businesses throughout the country will emulate. The company recently held a recognition luncheon at the British Colonial Hilton for nine senior supervisors and supervi sors who completed a leadership training programme conducted by human resources consultant Dr Richard Pinder. The 12-month programme consisted of a number of seminars which focused on identifying strengths and weaknesses; developing leadership skills, enhanc ing people skills, setting goals and executing leadership. Several of the nine employees were once gas pump attendants, or as JMEL calls them, customer service representatives, who worked their way up in the company through hard work and determination. President of JMEL Enterprises Merritt Storr expressed his grati tude to the nine team members for providing outstanding service to the company. Managing director of JMEL Enterprises Ethan Moss applaud ed the service of the supervisors and thanked them for their dedication to the company. He said that their standards for customer service can be applied to any industry and work. “Service is based on how peo ple feel and how people feel will be based on the knowledge of their thoughts. It doesn’t take earth shattering innovation or changes to have a significant impact on employees. “Employers throughout the country need to know that if employees are not treated well by management and companies do not invest in them, why are they, then in turn going to exude good customer service,” said Mr Moss. C M Y K C M Y K LOCAL NEWS THE TRIBUNE WEDNESDAY, MAY 6, 2009, PAGE 5 THE DOWNTOWN NASSAU PARTNERSHIP, the public-privates ector organisation c harged with steering the revitalisation of historic Nassau, will host its first town meeting tonight at the British ColonialH ilton. “We hope that every stakeholder with an inter-e st in the transformation o f downtown Nassau will become part of this movem ent, asking questions, sharing ideas and being involved beginning witht his town meeting on Wednesday,” said Vaughn R oberts, DNP managing director. “The meeting is open to the public and we plan to discuss the revitalis ation efforts to date and the plans to improve downtown Nassau for theb enefit of residents and visitors. We are also hono ured to have at the meeting two very important persons in the internation-a l downtown management arena – Dave Feehan, past p resident of the International Downtown Association, and Brad Segal, pres-i dent of Progressive Urban Management Associates, w ho will serve as consultants in forming the Busin ess Improvement District for the city.” The town meeting is s cheduled for 6 – 7.30pm in Governors C Ballroom of the Hilton. There is no charge. D owntown Nassau Partnership to host town hall meeting on revitalisation tonight In brief Families of two students who were allegedly molested plan legal action n B y TANEKA THOMPSON Tribune Staff Reporter t thompson@tribunemedia.net M ORE than six years after they lost their jobs, former workers of Gladstone Farms have renewed their call for government to fulfil promises made by the formerC hristie administration regarding their unpaid severance packages. A lthough the workers "have never seen a dime" of the p romised money, they are still hopeful the funds will be distributed some day. H artley Strachan, a maintenance supervisor for the company f or about 33 years, said the situa tion feels like a slap in the face, e specially after the former gov ernment made provisions to pay former workers of the now closed Royal Oasis hotel in Grand Bahama. " It's been years and not only myself but all of the former e mployees have been waiting. “It's ridiculous in these hard t imes that the former administra tion could pay one set of work ers and no one, not even the Christian community, saw fit to say: “We sympathise with the for m er employees of Gladstone Farms.” " So anytime they say they care about the workers of this count ry – the black-belt and grassroots people – we are wondering who are they talking about. Because here it is, almost six years down the road we're still not paid," hes aid. He estimates he is owed around $ 30,000 in severance pay but said if only a portion of that were paid " it would be welcomed." Although Mr Strachan was able t o find employment after the com pany closed, many of his co-workers who did not posses marketable skills are still struggling to make ends meet. F red Stubbs, a former purchasing manager who worked with thec ompany for about 38 years, is one of those workers. He was 60y ears-old when the farm closed in 2002, and because of his age, it was hard to find a new job. He is now relying on his small pension to pay the bills. " You just barely get by. You have to make due with what youh ave," he said. But the group is still holding o ut hope after a recent meeting w ith Department of Agriculture officials, who Mr Strachan saidp romised to "look into" the situ ation, but made no assurances a bout the former workers receiving any money. The company – which was the country's largest chicken producing business – was sold in 2002a fter the company failed to recover from setbacks due to damagef rom Hurricane Floyd in 1999 and Hurricane Michelle in 2001, and f rom the 1998 reduction in Customs duties which gave an advant age to foreign imports. The clo sure left about 200 workers out of work. Attempts to reach Minister of Labour Dion Foulkes and Minist er of Agriculture Larry Cartwright were unsuccessful yes-t erday, as both men were in Cabinet. October 2002 – Angry workers of Gladstone Farms went ons trike over fears they would not be paid severance pay followingt he closure of the company. Then Minister of Agricult ure V Alfred Gray said he expected the severance packages to be paid before the farm shut its doors. That same month, president o f the Bahamas Commercial Stores, Warehouse and AlliedW orkers Union Elgin Douglas announced that severance packa ges had been negotiated and that all employees would be paid following the farm's closure. November 2002 – Gladstone Farms closes leaving more than 200 workers jobless. The company was later placed into liqui d ation. In late 2002, Trade Union C ongress president Obie Fergu son weighed in and said he wrote n umerous letters to government officials on behalf of the former employees. He said he wasi nformed that the employees' payment would be discussed ass oon as the company's assets were realised. August, 2004 – A group of former employees appeals in writing to then prime minister Perry Christie for assistance in receiving their severance pay. April, 2007 – Former Gladstone Farms owner CanadianT im Wien tells T he Tribune h e was unaware of any agreement w ith the former workers. February 2008 – The group writes to Prime Minister Hubert Ingraham to intervene in the matter. April 2009 – Some of the former workers meet with per m anent secretary at the Ministry of Agriculture Creswell Sturrup a nd outline their situation. They are told they will be contacted in a few weeks for an update. Former workers of Gladstone Farms renew calls for severance packages TIMELINE Minister: election uproar is embarrassment for union Business focuses on training in response to recession Dion Foulkes

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n By DENISE MAYCOCK Tribune Freeport Reporter d maycock@tribunemedia.net BAHAMIAN Julian Knowles says he takes grave exception to comments by Jetta Baptiste printed in a Tribune article i n which she referred to Bahamians as “Christ-less” and “real children of the devil.” Mr Knowles thinks that Ms Baptiste, p resident of the Haitian Bahamian Society of the Bahamas, owes the Bahamian p eople and the nation an apology for her offensive” comments. “I was very disturbed about what she s aid and I took grave offence to it and felt greatly insulted, and I think she was out of place,” he said yesterday at The Trib une’s F reeport Office. Mr Knowles said he is not anti-Haitian, b ut felt compelled to express his concerns after reading the article in The Tribune. I n a story that appeared on May 1 under the heading, “Haitian man denied B ahamas asylum executed on homeland return,” Ms Baptiste expressed deep concern and sadness over the death of Hait-i an Anderson Pierre, 37, who was killed on his return to Haiti after being denied a sylum in the Bahamas. He was ordered to leave the country by immigration officials in Freeport. Y esterday, Amnesty International called for a “full and thorough” investigation into the Immigration Department’s decision to reject Mr Pierre’s asylum application. Ms Baptiste said: “God is not pleased w ith a country which touts itself as a Christian nation, and yet their actions show that they are really Christ-less and act like real children of the devil.” M r Pierre, and his wife, Paulette, had applied for political asylum two years ago o n the grounds that they feared their lives would be in danger if they returned to Haiti. M r Knowles stated that while the death of Mr Pierre was unfortunate, he does not believe that the Bahamas should be blamed for what happened in Santo Domingo. The decision for asylum I feel should be left to the proper authorities, but I call upon the Ministry of National Secu r ity and Immigration, and the Ministry of Foreign Affairs to investigate this mat t er and to provide necessary protection for Mrs Pierre,” he said. “We are a God-fearing country and I t hink we owe her that much, to protect her while she is here or however long she i s going be here, or for as long as she wants to be here and that the matter could be resolved in a decent, respectablew ay.” Mr Knowles said the Bahamas has nev er been known as a country of “devil worshippers.” He noted that the Bahamas governm ent and ordinary Bahamians sent aid to Haiti when hurricanes devastated the island last year. “It was this Christ-less and devil worshiping country that sent trailers there,a nd there is no other country in the world other than America that Haitians have benefitted from more than the Bahamas, whether they came here legally or ille-g ally. The Bahamas has been good to them,” said Mr Knowles. We could have sent stuff to Inagua and Turks Island but we sent trailer loads of items donated not only from Haitiansh ere, but from Bahamians too – only Christ-like people do those things. I am therefore, demanding that Ms Baptiste offer an apology to this nation. I have no gripes against Haitians, my issuei s with Ms Baptiste and the language she used. She made her comments in a leading newspaper that is read all over the world and on the internet, and now AmnestyI nternational is involved. I call on her to retract her comments and apologise,” said Mr Knowles. M s Baptiste has called on government to review and revise its immigration polic ies concerning political asylum applicants. She has also appealed to government a nd members of the United Nations High Commission for Refugees to conduct an i nvestigation into the death of Anderson Pierre. Mr Pierre’s widow is calling on Immigration officials to reconsider her asylum case and allow her to remain in GrandB ahama with her three-week-old son, who was born in the Bahamas. Bahamian hits back over ‘Christ-less’ comments C M Y K C M Y K LOCAL NEWS PAGE 6, WEDNESDAY, MAY 6, 2009 THE TRIBUNE non disappeared from her sight, Ms Moss said: “I left him in the back seat and I’d just gone inside for a minute. Then my sister came running in and said ‘Hey! (Sifford’s gone with the baby!’ “I came outside and tried to stop him and said ‘Please, just let my baby out the car!’ he tried to run me over and that was it.” Shannon’s mother did not see her baby again until yesterday when she spotted her car with the child and Sifford inside near the National Insurance Board headquarters on Wulff Road. “Before I could get to him, he sped off. I was in a panicked state...I called 911 but I was so (hysterical ably couldn’t understand what I was saying,” she said. Meanwhile, it appeared that her car, license plate number 183906, had been sanded down in preparation for being repainted in an apparent attempt to disguise it, said the mother. Officer in Charge of the Central Detective Unit, Chief Superintendent Elsworth Moss, told The Tribune that having kept the matter quiet in an attempt to capture Sifford the police are now changing tack. “We’re seeking to find out where this guy is and where this child is. We staked out the house and did all the necessary things, put everything in place, but he’s not surfaced and the car has not been located on the streets, so now we’re going to flush him out through the media,” he said. In an All Points Bulletin issued by police, the accused kidnapper was described as slim with a “medium complexion”, 5 foot 7 inches tall and weighing around 160 pounds. Ms Moss added that Sifford often speaks with an American accent, interchanged with Jamaican or Bahamian accents. He also alternates the spelling of his surname, sometimes using “Siefort.” Anyone with information on the whereabouts of Sifford or Shannon are asked to contact their nearest police station or call 919, 911 (police emergency room), 5029930/9991 (C.D.U (police control room 8477 (Crime Stoppers week. She told the court that she and Fraser had sex on an average of 12 times a month,t hen six to eight times a month from October 2005 when she developed a vaginal infection. Mr Munroe, however, pointed out that the virtual com-p lainant had stated at the first trial that she and Fraser had sex a total of 15 times in 2005.T he witness did not recall making that statement, but rememb ered stating that they had sex 15 or more times at his church office and five times at hish ome. The young woman told the court that she sometimes spoke to Fraser over the tele phone for three to four hours at a time, but usually a total off ive or six hours every day. She told the court that Fraser had instructed her to call him every day and on occasions when she didn’t, he would make a fuss. The young woman told the court that the first counselling session with Fraser took place on the evening of June 13, 2005. She denied Mr Munroe’s suggestion that at that time Fraser took six pages of notes. She admitted that she had told Fras e r that she had a terrible childhood, a bad relationship with her mother and that she hadf elt suicidal. She said that during a second meeting, Fraser d id not take any notes and that all of their discussions about her childhood and her rela-t ionship with her mother had occurred during their first meeting. The young woman told the court that the sexual relation s hip between her and Bishop Fraser ended in February 2006. She also told the court that inA pril 2005, members of her family confronted Fraser at his c hurch office. At that time, she said that Fraser let them listen to a voice mail that one of hera unts had sent him. She told the court that on another occasion, the police were called to the church and Fraser in the presence of his wife and several church members, denied thath e had been having a sexual relationship with her. Submitted into evidence yesterday was the Seiko watch the young woman claimedF raser had bought for her, the packet that had contained the earrings she claimed he had bought and a box of Monistat cream. Prosecuting the case areF ranklyn Williams, Assistant director of Legal Affairs in the Attorney General’s Office, anda ttorney Darnelle Dorsette. The case continues before M agistrate Carolita Bethel today. which they paid the required fines over a year ago. Galmando Gibson and Terrance Gilbert say government must urgently address the problem whether through computerisation or simply greater diligence by police or court staff – which appears to allow for warrants to remain active in the police’s records despite having been disposed of in the courts. In Mr Gibson’s case, he was forced to find time to go before a magistrate twice on two different days before finally being directed to a nearby court log book where proof that he had paid a $250 fine a year prior was recorded, rendering the entire ordeal an unnecessary inconvenience. “It almost cost me my job,” said Gibson, who was detained for several hours in Central Police station one morning when he should have been at work. “As a tax paying citizen I should be able to go about my business freely if I have done everything that is required of me,” he said. Meanwhile, Terrance Gilbert, 40, was also held for over five hours at the police Warrant Office last Friday before he was able to convince an employee that he had paid the fine for his previous traffic violation and should be permitted to go and search for his receipt. Having not been able to find the document, a perusal of the same court logbook as Mr Gibson enabled him also to quickly find evidence of the payment. Now he has been warned by police that in order to avoid get ting into the same situation again, he should keep his pay ment reference number on his person at all times. “It’s ridiculous. Why should I have to suffer because of their system?” asked Mr Gilbert. “Unless someone says some thing about the situation things will just get slacker and slacker.” In Mr Gibson’s case, his detention was all the more frustrating as he had followed this advice and kept his receipt for almost a year after he had paid the fine, only to find that he was picked up on the warrant short ly after he disposed of it. “Something needs to be done,” he told The Tribune. Calls to the Traffic Court and Police Warrants Office yesterday both resulted in The Tri bune being directed to contact Assistant Commissioner of Police, Hulan Hanna. A message left for ACP Hanna was not returned up to press time. Kidnapper: I’ll k ill your baby F ROM page one hauled the body out of the water, as dozens of bystanders looked on. His body was taken by police boat to the RBPF's Harbour Patrol unit. While initial evidence does not suggest the man died as a result of foul play, an autopsy will be commissioned to determine the official cause of death, police said. "Just after 8(am body of a man found in the water (near bour Moon Hotel, in the water at the rear of that hotel. As a result of that, officers from the Royal Bahamas Police Force and members from the Defence Force retrieved the body and upon examination of the body we have discovered there are no signs of trauma to the body. "We do not suspect foul play at this stage an autopsy will be performed to confirm the cause of death," Assistant Superintendent Walter Evans told reporters at a briefing at the nearby Harbour Patrol Unit base on Bay Street.” He may have been one of those individuals who frequent that area but we are investigating and will do some (more pect foul play at this stage. "There are no signs of trauma, no signs of injuries, anything that causes us to feel that we need to look at this from a criminal matter at this stage. He speculated that the man may have somehow fallen into the water at least 12 hours before he was discovered. "He may have fallen accidentally into the water we're not sure.” Mr Evans also dispelled rumours that the man was handcuffed. The man, believed to be in his late 20s to early 30s, was dressed in a white T-shirt and blue shorts when his body was found. Police yesterday appealed for public assistance to discover the man's identity. "At this stage we are investigating and we are asking anyone with information who might have had any relative gone missing, perhaps within the last 12 to 24 hours, to contact the police so we can verify and get information in regard to the identity of this individual," said Mr Evans. F ROM page one Y oung woman testifies she had sex with Bishop Fraser 12 times a month Man’ s body found floating in water behind the Harbour Moon Hotel FROM page one FROM page one Motor ists detained on outdated arrest warrants call for urgent action Anderson Pierre Jetta Baptiste

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C M Y K C M Y K THE TRIBUNE WEDNESDAY, MAY 6, 2009, PAGE 7 “So vast was the catastrophe...that our minds, surfeited with the horrorsof war, refused to realise it. It came a nd went, a hurricane across the green fields of life, sweeping away our youth in the hundreds of thousands and leaving a toll of sickness a nd infirmity which will not be recko ned in this generation.” -article in The Times of London on the 1918 influenza pandemic. O ne of the most devastating fires in human history began smouldering in March 1918 i n the American midwest and e xploded that August to affect more than a third of the world's population. New research confirms that the v irus which caused the 1918 influenza pandemic is directly linked to the current swine flu virus, which has the potential to cause a new pand emic. Scientists say the 1918 virus s pread in pigs and eventually produced the current H1N1 swine flu virus, which has led health authorities to declare an international emer-g ency. T he 1918 flu killed more than 50 million people around the world in just a few months many more than the 16 million military and civil-i an deaths of the First World War, w hich was one of history's bloodiest. In fact, it killed more people than all the wars of the 20th century combined. More even than medieval E urope's horrifying Black Death. A pandemic is a worldwide epidemic caused by a new virus to which people have no immunity.O ne of the big reasons for the mother of pandemics” in 1918 was that the virus had mutated so it could pass easily among people. And that is a feature of the current virus, w hich has infected over a thousand people in 21 countries since it wasf irst reported on April 12. There is another similarity too. A c entury ago, it was the young and fit who were most at risk from the flu – those in the prime of their lives. And that seems to be the case with the current outbreak. Dr Alan Hay, d irector of the World Influenza Centre says the most worrying aspect to t his new virus is that it affects young, healthy adults. T he death rate from the current flu outbreak is low, but health experts fear a second wave of infection this winter could be more lethal. T hat is also what happened in 1918. T he first outbreak in Kansas was relatively mild, but a second outbreak in Europe later the same year produced alarmingly high death rates.P eople would go to work in the morning and be dead by evening. Strangely, this terrible event in the world’s recent past kept a very l ow profile until recently. Parents a nd grandparents never mentioned it. University of London history professor, Dr David Killingray, noted that: “Despite the fearsome impact,t here seems to have been a collective amnesia...the full impact of the epidemic appears to have been cloaked by the pre-occupations of a horrend ous war.” At first, no-one knew what c aused the epidemic, but rumours abounded. Many believed it was ab io-war unleashed by the Germans. Evangelist Billy Sunday the Billy G raham of his day thought it was a punishment for sin. "We can meet here tonight and pray down the epidemic," Sunday said. But even as he spoke people in the audience col-l apsed with the flu. It was difficult to avoid. Everyone h as to breathe and every sneeze spreads millions of infected droplets i nto the air. As a children's nursery rhyme of the day put it: "I opened the window and in-flu-enza." The 1918 virus had a mortality rate of 2.5 per cent compared to less than 0.1 per cent in previous flu epidemics. Doctors reported that p atients "died struggling to clear their airways of a blood-tinged frotht hat gushed from their nose and mouth." T he 1918 pandemic circled the globe in a few months, following trade routes and shipping lanes. In the early years of the 20th century public health systems were limited, a nd contemporary observers were often vague in recording causes of death, particularly in outlying colonies. But Killingray estimates about 100,000 flu deaths in the C aribbean, with nearly 30,000 in B ritish territories including the Bahamas: “Its spread and effects on certain islands and areas seemed to be arbi-t rarily selective, and there are no clear answers why one place suffered high morbidity and mortality rates, another widespread infection but l ow mortality, while other places r emained virtually untouched by the disease. Such variations may have been due to prompt quarantine by the authorities, for example, in theB ahamas, which although in close proximity to the United States, must have been helped by a dearth of wartime shipping.” W e were luckier than most. The devastating effects of earlier cholera e pidemics led to the Quarantine Act of 1905 and construction of an isola-t ion station on Athol Island, which operated until the 1920s. This effic ient quarantine system seems to have preserved the Bahamas from infection during the 1918 pandemic. Barbados was similarly fortunate. However, a 1919 Colonial Office r eport did note that “many” of the 2,500-plus Bahamian migrant work-e rs in the US became infected and died during the pandemic. Bahamia n migration to America peaked during this period, and the popula tion of the islands actually fell for the first time. The total recorded in 1921 was marginally lower than that in 1901 – about 53,000. A s a non-notifiable disease, i nfluenza was not covered by international quarantine regula t ions in 1918. And when the virus mutated in August of that year it spread rapidly and with unprecedented virulence, helped by wartime disruption and troop movements. A mong British territories, Jamaica, Guyana and Belize were the most s everely affected in the region. “The virus raged through the plantations and slum housing of thel ow-lying coastal towns.” Killingray w rote in the 2003 edition of the Caribbean Quarterly. “East Indian labour was hard hit, but not as severely as Native Americans. By e arly October the influenza pandemic was well-established in Central America and from there it reached Belize on the eleventh oft he month....and a little later that m onth it appeared in the Bahamas.” In Jamaica the authorities restricted rail travel, fumigated money and suspended postal service. Schools a nd shops closed and social events were suspended, but by early N ovember the disease had affected the entire island, with the Gleaner r eporting that “coolie labour on the estates has been reduced almost to vanishing point.” Medical facilities were overwhelmed across the region. In Belize i nfection rates were as high as 80 per cent and crops went unharvested.I n Guyana there were serious strains on burial society funds as plantation l abourers were decimated. And some Amerindian tribes were said to have been wiped out. “This epidemic has been the most severe visitation of disease within t he memory of any colonist,” Guyana’s acting surgeon-general c oncluded at the time. “The almost universal prevalence and high mort ality rate have caused untold suffering.” As you might expect, rum was c onsidered one of the most potent t reatments for the flu at the time. Other popular remedies included Horlicks, insecticide, Palmolive soap and tobacco. I n the Bahamas there were no official reports of deaths from the flu, but recent estimates say as many as 60 may have died during the epi-d emic. In Guyana, with a populat ion of 310,000, there were some 12,000 deaths. And perhaps 10,000 in Jamaica, out of a population of 850,000. These figures take account of unrecorded deaths, those reported as d ying of other causes such as fevers and pneumonia – often complicat ions of influenza (and influenza infections such as encephalitis lethargica,” Killingray explained. “The pandemic of 1918-19 came suddenly and moved with d eadly speed. The largely laissezfaire systems of government werec aught ill-prepared, while the medical and scientific professions were u nable to provide effective treat ment or cure." Today, the fear is that a flu pandemic will stall the global economy, overwhelm hospitals, and produce c haos in local communities. Bahamians rely on cross-border trav e l to make a living, for example, and it was only five years ago that Toront o’s tourist business collapsed overnight during the SARS outbreak. The strain of a collapse int ravel added to the current economi c meltdown could threaten our very social fabric. But the 2003 SARS outbreak and a small but rising number of deaths f rom bird flu since 2005 has spurred world health authorities to make better preparations. Bird flu has claimed 257 lives and infected over 400 peo-p le around the world, but it is still c onsidered "inefficient" in its transmission among humans. The good news, experts say, is that although the current swine flu virus is highly t ransmissible, it appears far less lethal than bird flu at this point. A lso, since 2007 the World Health Organisation's hand has been s trengthened by a global agreement on surveillance and response measures to acute public health risks that have the potential to threaten people worldwide. These International H ealth Regulations aim to limit interference with travel and tradew hile ensuring public health through the prevention of disease spread. T hat is good news, because experts say it can’t be ruled out that we could be facing the first flu pandemic in over 40 years. W hat do you think? Send comments to l arry@tribunemedia.net Or visit www.bahamapundit.com A hurricane across the green fields of life: How the 1918 flu affected the Caribbean n JAMES L JONES United States National Security Advisor O NE hundred days ago, the U nited States celebrated the inauguration of our 44th President. Many a round the world joined us in celebrating what was an historic occasion for the American people, and for all who believe in the possibility of hope for a better future for themselves and their children. T he excitement and optimism we as Americans felt on January 20 has only g rown since then, even in the face of a sobering global economic crisis, news of a f lu virus, and daunting 21st century challenges like terrorism and nuclear proliferation; climate change and p overty; enduring conflicts and dangerous disease. These challenges were not caused by any one nation, nor can they be solved by any one nation. As President Obama said on just his second day in office, “For the sake of our national security and the common aspirations of people around the globe, an era of new American leadership in the world has to begin now.” During the first 100 days of his administration, President Obama has already demonstrated to the world what a new American engagement will look like. First, he has committed himself and his administration to a foreign policy that ensures the safety of the American people and that of our friends and allies. Global engagement on the basis of mutual interests and mutual respect is the starting point of our foreign policy. And while there will be circumstances where such an approach might not be successful, the United States will first be prepared to listen to and talk with potential adversaries to advance our national interests and those of the global community that depend on the United States for leadership on security issues. In those instances where a more demonstrable use of power is inevitable, no adversary should be under any illusion as to the outcome. This is why we will continue to maintain our Armed Forces as the best in the world as well as the most admired and respected. To carry out our engagement strategies, and almost immediately upon taking office the President appointed some of America’s most talented diplomats to serve as special envoys and representatives – for Middle East peace, for South West Asia, for Sudan, for Afghanistan and Pakistan, and for climate change. This fact alone illustrates that the 21st century is one in which regional strategies will be at the forefront of our energy and focus on issues pertaining to nation al and international security. This represents a clear recognition that we must deal with the world as it is today and not as it was in the 20th century. Over the past three months, the national security community, to include our serving diplomats abroad, has engaged in active and effective diplomacy to confront the many challenges we face. To date the results have been encouraging, but much remains to be done. President Obama has also made clear his commit ment to pursue a deep and positive dialogue with Muslim communities around the world. That is the reason he gave his first televised interview as President to al-Arabiya. It is also why he told Iran’s people and leaders that he seeks a new dialogue on the full range of issues that we face, and it is also why he spoke of new partnerships on behalf of education, health care, and opportunity in his speech before the Turkish Parliament. And finally, it is why he has made it clear that the United States is not now, and will never be, at war with Islam. Second, we’ve made it clear that it is our intent to disrupt, dismantle, and defeat al Qaeda. In March, the President announced the r esults of a comprehensive strategy review for Pakistan and Afghanistan that will finally provide the resources we need to achieve our goals, while helping the people of Afghanistan and Pakistan pursue security and greater opportunity. In Strasbourg, at the 60th anniversary o f the founding of the North Atlantic Treaty Organisation (NATO d ent received broad international support for his strategy and a commitment from our N ATO allies to create a new strategic concept so that the Alliance can become more relevant in meeting the challenges of the 21st century. And in Baghdad, the President reiterated his com mitment to responsibly reduce our forces in keeping with the Status of Forces Agreement negotiated with the government of Iraq, all the while helping Iraqis take responsibility for their sovereign future. Third, President Obama has worked to forge common approaches to a wide range of global challenges. In London, he helped build an important consensus on concrete steps to deal with the global financial crisis, including a new global regulatory framework, increased assistance for developing nations, and a renewed commitment to free and fair trade. In Prague, he launched an ambitious agenda to secure all “loose” nuclear materials around the world in four years, to reverse the tide of nuclear proliferation, and to strive for a world free of nuclear weapons. Closer to home, President Obama has recognised our shared responsibility to effectively address drug demand and illicit arms trafficking and he has launched a new plan to combat drug-related violence along the US-Mexico border. The President also announced the lifting of restrictions on remittances and travel to Cuba for Cuban-Americans, and marked a new beginning with our neighbours in the hemi sphere, offering cooperation on a wide range of issues at the Summit of the Americas. The President has also worked effectively with multilateral organisations. In past weeks the United States rallied our allies and the world community in response to the launching of the North Korean mis sile launch, and is augmenting the international effort to combat piracy off the coast of Somalia. Finally, the United States has signaled its intent to lead on still other important initiatives of great importance to our planet in advancing partnerships on clean energy and climate change, starting with the first preparatory session of the Major Economies Forum on Energy and Climate. And finally, President Obama has rejected as false any choice between America’s security and its ideals. On his first day in office, he ordered the closure of the Guantanamo Bay Detention Centre within one year, banned enhanced detention techniques, and made clear without exception or equivocation that the United States fully supports the Geneva Convention and does not practice nor condone torture. Here too, we will be expected to lead by the power of our example. While much has been said and done in the first 100 days, those of us who are privileged to serve our nation in this remarkably complex and challenging period fully realise that we are only at the beginning of the journey. We believe that we are making progress in meeting some of the great challenges we face in first restoring America’s standing as a friend and partner to all who seek a future of peace, prosperity and dignity for their citizens. IN THIS 1918 PHOTOGRAPH , influenza victims crowd into an emergency hospital at Camp Funston, a subdivision of Fort Riley in Kansas. The flu, which is believed to have originated in Kansas, killed at least 20 million people worldwide. N a t i o n a l M u s e u m o f H e a l t h a n d M e d i c i n e , A r m e d F o r c e s I n s t i t u t e o f P a t h o l o g y / A P The first 100 days: new American enga gement for the 21st Century Y OUR S A Y President Barack Obama

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ours this year,” Hylan projected. “She’s just a junior, having transferred in, so we are looking for some big things from her in her senior year when she returns next year.” A s for Nixon, Hyland said she had a very good season. “She won the Conference Championship title in the shot and she was second in the discus and the hammer,” Hyland said. “But this w as only her second year throwing the hammer. “She did very well this year. She didn’t qualify for nationals, but she did very well. She still has two more years, so she should do very well next year.” L ast week, Nixon completed her sophomore year by winning all three throws. Nixon, who is preparing to return home on Sunday, said she got off to a really slow start, but as she started to compete in their confere nce meets, things started to improve. “At Conference, I wanted to do better than I did, but at the last meet over the weekend, I did a lot better in the discus,” she said. “Hopefully I can have a better season next year.” T he hammer was a new event for Nixon, who noted that she still has some more fine t uning to do. “I have to master the spin,” she insisted. “But it was fun doing it last year and this year.” Nixon, who intends to compete in the BAAA Nationals, said it would be good if they can do the event at home because it will make it much easier for the athletes when they have to make the necessary adjustments to add it to their repertoire at college. “I would like to doi t at home so people can really see how it’s d one,” she stated. fthe Bahamian connection, Nixon said she felt right at home because everybody cheered each other on and encouraged them to do their best. “We are like a little fami ly within a family,” she said. n By TIM REYNOLDS AP Sports Writer MIAMI (AP Williams is feeling better. Jermaine O'Neal, not so much. An hour before Game 6 of the Atlanta-Miami first-round Eastern Conference series, the Hawks got a boost and the Heat took a hit. Williams returned for the Hawks on Friday night, even though Atlanta coach Mike Woodson declared him out just hours earlier citing continued issues with Williams' sprained right wrist. "He started to shoot this morning," Woodson said Friday night. "I wasn't expecting him back at all." O'Neal, meanwhile, missed the game because of a slight con cussion sustained when the Hawks' Zaza Pachulia struck him in the face during Game 5, with little-used Joel Anthony opening the game in his place. O'Neal did not practice Thursday or Friday morning, but the Heat believed he would play. Doctors, though, conferred with O'Neal shortly before tip-off and made the decision that he shouldn't go, not wanting to risk other potential problems with the concussion. "He's still a little bit groggy, still a little bit of a headache today," Heat coach Erik Spoel stra said. "He wants to go." Williams sprained his right wrist in Game 2, missed the next three games, and the Hawks were bracing to be without their small forward for the remainder of the series. Williams did some more shooting about 90 minutes before tip-off of Game 6, and was included on the roster Atlanta submitted shortly thereafter. He checked in with 3:51 remaining in the opening quarter, wearing a wrap on his wrist. Forward Al Horford was also on Atlanta's active roster and took part in the team's warmups, although he, too, was declared out in the morning by Woodson because of a sprained right ankle suffered in Game 5. Solomon Jones started in Hor ford's place, and Mo Evans started again at small forward. C M Y K C M Y K SPORTS PAGE 12, WEDNESDAY, MAY 6, 2009 TRIBUNE SPORTS n By The Associated P ress Orlando at Boston (8pm E DT). The Magic won the opener at Boston 95-90 to get a jump on the defending champions in the Eastern C onference semifinal series. S S T T A A R R S S M onday Dwight Howard, Magic, r eturned from a one-game suspension with 16 points and 22 rebounds and Orlando held off late-charging Boston 95-90 in Game 1 of the Easte rn Conference semifinals. Rashard Lewis, Magic, had 18 points, seven rebounds and three steals for the Magic. Yao Ming, Rockets, who briefly left with a knee injury i n the closing minutes, had 28 p oints and 10 rebounds to l ead Houston to a physical 1 00-92 victory over the Los Angeles Lakers in Game 1 of the Western Conference semifinals. Ron Artest and Aaron B rooks, Rockets. Artest added 21 points and Brooks had 19 for the Rockets, who are in the second round fort he first time since 1997. L L E E B B R R O O N N T T H H E E M M V V P P An MVP vote some expected to be close was another slam dunk by Caval iers star LeBron James. He r eceived 109 of a possible 121 f irst-place votes to easily outdistance Kobe Bryant. James totaled 1,172 points in balloting by media members in the U S and Canada. It's his first M VP. S S T T R R O O N N G G I I N N D D E E F F E E A A T T Kobe Bryant scored 32 p oints against Houston, doing h is best to keep the Lakers i n the game despite missing practice on Sunday with a sore throat. He scored 22 of the Lakers' final 42 points ... Paul Pierce scored 16 of his 2 3 points in the second half and Rajon Rondo had 14 points, 10 rebounds and eight assists for Boston in its 95-90 loss to Orlando in Game 1. S S W W I I N N G G Both NBA finalists from 2008 lost their second-round openers at home, Boston to Orlando and Los Angeles toH ouston. Orlando grabbed a 28p oint lead, 65-37, in the third quarter, then saw it dwindle to three before holding on to beat the Celtics 95-90. The Celtics did not go to t he free throw line in the first half, but Rajon Rondo shot 12 free throws in the third quarter. F F I I N N E E D D Nuggets forward Kenyon Martin was fined $25,000 by the NBA for knocking Mavericks forward Dirk Nowitzki to the court in the opener of their second-round playoff series. Martin was also assessed a flagrant foul 1 for the contact in the first quarter of Sunday's game, after Nowitzki had scored Dallas' first 10 points on 5-for-5 shooting. B B L L O O O O D D I I E E D D Houston forward Shane Battier needed four stitches to close a gash over his left eye late in the first quarter of a 100-92 win at Los Angeles. He returned and finished with six points. He was hit when Los Angeles' Sasha Vujacic swatted a loose ball out to Kobe Bryant. The force of the impact knocked Battier to the ground. Workers spent a few minutes wiping blood off the court. S S P P E E A A K K I I N N G G "I'm 24 years old and I'm receiving this award, I never thought it would happen this fast. I never dreamed about being MVP, but if I said I didn't enjoy this award I'd be lying. Hard work pays off and dreams do come true." Cavaliers star LeBron James after being voted the NBA's most valuable player "The last 16 minutes was a debacle. We were sort of trying to run out the clock, and you can't do that in games like this. Especially in the playoffs, teams are going to keep fighting and keep com ing back. (But fact that we were up 28? You play these games to win, and that's it. We won. Right now, the series is 1-0." Magic coach Stan Van Gundy after a 95-90 victory at Boston NBA Today BOSTON (AP gone successful surgery for a microfracture and torn ligaments in his left knee. The team announced that team physician Dr Brian McKeon per formed the surgery Tuesday morning at New England Baptist Hospital. No timetable has been set for Powe's return. The forward tore his anterior cruciate ligament and meniscus in the first quarter of the Celtics 118-115 win in Game 2 of their first-round playoff series against the Chicago Bulls on April 20. The defending NBA champions won the series in seven games. Coach Doc Rivers said Powe hurt himself on a spin move but continued playing for three more minutes. Powe averaged 7.7 points and 4.9 rebounds per game this season. Powe surgery successful New plans: Hawks’ Williams comes back, O’Neal out JOSH SMITH goes up over Heat defender Jermaine O'Neal... (AP Photo: John Bazemore mode.” W right, who started competing i n snowboard competitively at the age of 14, will be entered in the halfpipe, which will comprise of two qualifying rounds during the Olympics. B ased on their difficulties of the moves and variations, the competitors will make the cut for the final where they will have another two rounds to determine t he medal winners. W hile back at home, Wright said he intends to get a good tan i n the hot scorching sun before he gets back on the road to face t he cold weather. In 2006 in Whistler where he resides, Wright was approachedb y Bahamas High Commission a fter he got a third place in his first-ever World Cup to compete for the Bahamas. The rest was history. Wright, 22, started the 2 006/2007 year ranked 13th in t he world. He contested the 2009 Olympic trials that was held in New Zealand, but he didn’t make the cut. Wright is the son of Bahamian businessman EthricB owe. Wright first Bahamian to qualify for Olympics Coach impressed with ‘Bahamian connection’ F F R R O O M M p p a a g g e e 1 1 4 4 F F R R O O M M p p a a g g e e 1 1 4 4 KORATH WRIGHT (shown PETRA McDONALD in action... O NEIL WILLIAMS i n action...

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C M Y K C M Y K SPORTS TRIBUNE SPORTS WEDNESDAY, MAY 6, 2009, PAGE 13 n B y PAUL NEWBERRY AP Sports Writer BALTIMORE (AP Michael Phelps' three-month s uspension from competition is now over and he marked the occasion like any other day: He woke up late and headed to the pool. S peaking exclusively with The Associated Press, Phelps said he d idn't even realize his suspension ended Tuesday. Coach Bob Bowman couldn't resist making aj oke, saying he planned to enter his star swimmer in a meet later t hat night. "I had no idea," Phelps said of his ban, which was doled out b y USA Swimming after a picture surfaced in a London tabloid showing him inhaling from a marijuana pipe. Actually, he'll return to comp etition next week at a meet in C harlotte, N.C. It will be his first time swimming competitively since winning eight gold medals at the Beijing Olympics. " I'm happy to be back in the water and be back in semis hape," said Phelps, who's lost almost 20 pounds in last two months. "I'm sort of getting back into racing shape and getting ready to race my first race sinceB eijing. We'll see how it's goes. "I'm happy to have some structure back in my life," he added. Phelps said he considered r etiring from the sport after the picture surfaced. After all, he already broke Mark Spitz's 36year-old record of seven gold medals and became the win n ingest Olympian ever with 14 g olds. But after writing down the pros and cons of resuming his career, Phelps decided to get back in the water. He's not con c erned what the photo did to his image. "It was a stupid mistake that I made," he said during an interview on the deck of the pool at Loyola University in his native Baltimore. "But I'll have what I 've accomplished in and out of the pool for the rest of my life. I'm satisfied with what I've done and happy with what I've done." P helps said the whole experie nce has "shown me who my real f riends are. It's also given me a lot of time to think. Pretty much s ince Beijing ended, I didn't really know what I wanted to do." A fter going into virtual seclus ion for nearly a month after the p hoto surfaced, Phelps called Bowman on March 1 the coach remembers the day vividly and said simply, "I'm doing i t." "I was not really concerned whether he would quit or not," Bowman said. "I was concerned that if he did quit, that he did itf or the right reasons. Otherwise, it would just be a joke. I have t old him, 'You've done all there is to do. If you quit today, you're the greatest of all time. You can walk away.' But I did think it would be bad if he walked awayb ecause of this thing. He should go on his own terms." H is motivation restored, Phelps plans to keep swimming through the 2012 LondonO lympics. While he's not going t o attempt eight gold medals a gain, he will continue to do a program that would be exhausting to most swimmers. In Charlotte, he'll swim five e vents: the 50-meter freestyle, 1 00 free, 200 free, 100 backstroke and 200 butterfly. Only two were o n his record-breaking program i n Beijing, the 200 free and 200 f ly. "I'm feeling good in the water a nd swimming some decent times in practice," Phelps said. " But I have no idea what to e xpect in the meet. I'm going in o pen minded." As for his life away from the pool, Phelps wouldn't discuss tabloid reports that he's dating M iss California, Carrie Prejean, who made headlines of her own last month when she finished runner-up in the Miss USA pageant. Some thought herr esponse to a question about legalizing same-sex marriage m ay have cost her the title. Phelps would only say the two "are good friends," but added that he can sympathize with what she's gone through since express-i ng her opposition to gay marriage. A s for tabloid reports of his heavy partying, Phelps rolled his eyes and said nearly everythingw ritten about him was false. S pecifically, he denied a report d etailing a wild night in New York City. "I know I have not been per fect by any means," he said. "But I have learned from all of my m istakes. That's all you can ask for." Phelps’ three-month suspension is over OLYMPIC swimming gold medallist Michael Phelps works out Tuesday, May 5, 2009 in Baltimore... (AP Photo: Gail Burton IN its ongoing training programme for its athl etes, coaches, volunteers and board members, the b oard of directors of Special Olympics Bahamas sponsored a two-day intensive course in event management and programme management for selected organisers. T he Games Management System (GMS of the most comprehensive sports systems in the world, and is used by all Special Olympics regions around the world. I t not only efficiently computerizes all aspects of g ames competitions in all Olympic sports, but creates a database for all aspects of training, athletes, coaches, registration, results, reports and history of performances. T he course was conducted by Reuben Silva of Special Olympics Inc., the prime developer of this sophisticated programme. The participants included board members, technical directors and meet d irectors. S ilva travels the world to educate Special Olympics national programmes in this new system, and national chairman, Basil Christie, expressed his pride in the initiative taken by hisb oard to be one of the forerunners in the region taking advantage of this useful tool. With the implementation of this system, Special Olympics Bahamas will be able to log all activi ties of our national programme, create profiles of a ll of its athletes, coaches, board members and volunteers. Probably the most valuable aspect of the syst em is the potential to more successfully plan and o rganise its games. “On May 29, the Special Olympics National Games will be celebrated here in Nassau, and everything will be run on our computers,” said a release. L ast month, Special Olympics offered a certification course for 42 new coaches for coaches and physical education teachers from within the public school system and Sandilands Rehabilitation Cent er. L ater on this month, a similar course will he offered to teachers in Grand Bahama. The Board is committed to training and qualifying all persons working with persons with intellectual disabilitiesr egistered in our national programme. Special Olympics sponsors course REUBEN SILVA (sitting director Nello Lambert and national director AmandaM oncur the new programme management system...

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Coach impr essed with ‘Bahamian connection’ WEDNESDAY, MAY 6, 2009 THETRIBUNE PAGE 14 P AGE 13 Special Olympics Bahamas sponsors course... C M Y K C M Y K n By BRENT STUBBS S enior Sports Reporter bstubbs@tribunemedia.net ONE day after announcing the partici pation of the Miami Gardens Express team at the second annual Coach Fritz Grant Invitational Track Classic, patron/sponsor Harrison Petty r evealed that they won’t be coming anymore. Petty said when he contacted the coach of the team, which had athletes compete i n the Junior Olympics, he discovered that they didn’t have any passports a nd hence would not be able to travel on Thursday as planned to compete this weekend at the Thomas A Robinson Track and Field Stadium. “When I contacted the coach to con f irm their participation, he said ‘oh, we’re ready, we’re coming on Thursday,’” Petty said. “I asked him if everybody had passports and he said ‘passports? Do we need passports to come t o the Bahamas?” T he coach had informed Petty that five years ago when he and his wife visited the Bahamas, they didn’t need a passport. I told him that the law has changed, s o they can’t leave without the passp orts,” Petty said. “So we have to scrape that group from the meet.” Petty, whose Petty Group of Companies are the major sponsors for them eet, said it’s quite disappointing that the young athletes won’t be able to compete. “They were all hyped up to come. The parents were coming too,” he said. “But there’s nothing we can do.” W hile the juniors have been elimin ated, Petty said the senior segment now has about four Jamaicans and a Haitian competitor coming in. “One of the Jamaicans has already ran 10.19 in the 100 and there’s a quarter-miler who has ran 45.20, so the s enior competition is going to be e xtremely exciting,” Petty said. And even though the Miami Gardens Express are not coming to town, Petty said the juniors should still have some excitement with the introduc t ion of the Shuttle Hurdle Relay. These kids would have certainly added favour to it as our athletes mix and match to compete with them,” Petty said. “But they are not coming, b ut we will still have a very good m eet.” Just yesterday, Petty said coach Dwayne Jennings decided to bring a team in from Grand Bahama to compete. “We didn’t have any entrants from Grand Bahama,” Petty said. “But he said he will e-mail his entries to meet director Bernard (Newbold today. So the excitement is building for a very good meet.” The meet is scheduled to kick off 5:30pm Friday and wrap up Saturday, starting at noon. Miami Gardens Express will not take part in track meet Petty n By BRENT STUBBS S enior Sports Reporter bstubbs@tribunemedia.net THE Bahamas has achieved another historic feat. This time, i t’s Korath Wright, who has become the first Bahamian to q ualify to compete in the Winter Olympics. Earlier this year, Wright booked his ticket to Vancouver, Canada, for the 2010 G ames slated for February 1228. W right, who was born in the Bahamas on August 26, 1985, but moved to Canada to attend school at the age of 10 where he started snowboarding, said he’s really excited to be making his t ory as the first Bahamian to compete in the Winter Olympics. “I’m ready to go,” said Wright, who is back home try-i ng to generate the funding to help his further preparation for the trip. “The whole thing is just overwhelming. “This is something that I’m v ery proud to be able to do. Representing the Bahamas at the Olympics is right at the top of my list of things to do. I’m just happy yo be competing for m y nation.” Now that he has qualified, W right said he is eager to get b ack on the ice and start traini ng again because he knows it w on’t be an easy task competing in Canada next year. “I just need to raise the mon ey so that I can get back on the ice and start training,” he said. “I’m talking to some sponsors so I can raise the money beforeI leave so that I can perform at my maximum.” When he leaves here, Wright intends to travel to Oregon where he will spend a month in t raining, followed by a month in New Zealand leading into first competition in September. “My focus right now is to start my training,” he said. “As t he Olympics comes closer, I will be switching to training to c ompete. So initially I will start w ith basic training, then when it g et closer, I will concentrate m ore on the competition Wright first Bahamian to qualify for Winter Olympics n B y BRENT STUBBS Senior Sports Reporter bstubbs@tribunemedia.net A n injury has h ampered Oneil Williams’ final season at Benedict College, cuttingi t short. But coach Frank Hyland said he was really impressed with the Bahamian connection of Williams, Gabrielle Nixon, PetraM cDonald and Melinda B astian. While Williams went down with a stress fracture after getting his senior year off to a fantastic start, Hyland said Nixon had a solid season, but just fell short of joining both Bas tian and McDonald in qualifying for the N CAA Division II National Championships s lated to be held at the end of the month in Angelo State University in Angelo, Texas. “They were all outstanding this year,” said Hyland of the Bahamian connection, which is close to the 4-5 from Kenya and well ahead o f the one from Hyland’s homeland of T rinidad & Tobago. “Our main goal is to get the athletes who are academically sound and athletically. So if I can get anymore Bahamians, I will continue to recruit them. The programme in the Bahamas is so much better than ours in Trinidad.” Putting their individual seasons in prospective, Hyland said it was disappointing when Williams went down with the injury near the end of the season. He’s back on track for training and hopefully he will get to qualify for the national team,” said Hyland of Williams, who gradu ates. Before he went out with the injury, Williams clocked one minute and 51 seconds in the 800 metres. He leaves Benedict College as the record holder in the 800, 1,500, 5,000 and 10,000, making him what Hyland calls “the greatest distance runner to come out of our programme.” Although she will also graduate this year, M cDonald, according to Hyland, ran a colleg iate best of 14.04 in the 100 hurdles and is ranked at number nine in the nation. That time has qualified her for the nationals and is on the provisional list for the heptathalon. McDonald also competes in the high jump, but she didn’t qualify for the nationals. Bastian, who last year competed in volleyball and softball, had a full season in track and field where she had a season’s best of 49.97 metres in the javelin that has her ranked at No.3 in the nation and is ranked at No.14 in the heptathalon. At present, Bastian holds both Benedict College and the regional records in both the javelin and heptathalon. “She is probably the most promising one of all of our athletes to get All-American honKORATH WRIGHT (shown the Winter Olympics... S S E E E E p p a a g g e e 1 1 2 2 S S E E E E p p a a g g e e 1 1 2 2 Phelps’ t hree-month suspension is over... See page 13 Frank Hyland MELINDA BASTIAN in action... GABRIELLE NIXON in action...

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C M Y K C M Y K LOCAL NEWS PAGE 16, WEDNESDAY, MAY 6, 2009 THE TRIBUNE THERE was camaraderie, enthus iasm and lots of sweat as the Atlantic Medical Insurance Company (AMI Fun Walk from Montagu Beach toP aradise Island and back recently. T he event, which is geared toward promoting healthy lifestyles, attracted over 2,000 participants including adults and children who came out a s early as 6.30am to begin their trek. While the underlying theme has always been healthy living and healthy lifestyles, this year AtlanticM edical chose to focus on children b y encouraging them to lead healthy lifestyles from a young age on. Among the walkers and runners was general manager and executive v ice-president of Atlantic Medical Lynda Gibson. We are very happy that the people of the Bahamas continue to supp ort us,” she said. “Our 11th year is a significant one because we are now instituting our ‘Healthy Kids are Happy Kids’ programme. We believe it is best to teach them to l ive healthy lives while they are young.” E leven-year-old Drew Bastian, who participated in the AMI fun w alk with his parents, has been attending the event for most of his life. He said his favourite part is meeting new people, seeing new faces and the enthusiasm of everyone at the event. Drew said he is l ooking forward to walking next year. Peter Rutherford, another participant in the event, said: “Doings omething is better than doing n othing in order to stay healthy and fit.” Mr Rutherford, assistant general manager of customer service at B EC, joined the group for his morning walk. He said he was particularly pleased to see the children partici-p ating in the fun walk, as children s hould also strive to lead healthy lifestyles. Minister of Health Dr Hubert Minnis also joined AMI for his m orning walk. Speaking to one of the country’s m ajor health challenges, obesity Dr Minnis said medical statistics s how that some 65 per cent of the Bahamian population is considered obese or overweight, a fact that has had a great impact upon chronic non-communicable diseases affecting t he country. The fun walk, he said, is a step in t he right direction in a bid to combat this challenge. H e said he is pleased that Atlantic Medical has been such an exemplary corporate citizen by encouraging Bahamian adults and children to lead healthy lifestyles and noted that he has participated in five AMI w alks so far. He said what he enjoys most about the annual walk is the camaraderie. Atlantic Medical has done a g reat job of promoting healthy lifestyles among our people,” he said. Former Minister of Trade and Industry Leslie Miller is also a regul ar participant in the event. He said AMI has been doing a wonderful job at keeping Bahamians fit for many years and it has always been ap rivilege for him to walk with his f ellow Bahamians. Being an ardent jogger himself, Mr Miller said “it has been proven that exercising and staying fit will h elp persons to live longer, it makes you feel good and it helps one’s brainf unction better when the body is fit and healthy.” J illian Bartlett, a representative of Bally’s Total Fitness, said the fun walk is a great way to get both adults and children excited about the idea of being fit. S he, too, encouraged Bahamians to get serious about their health. A s in previous years, proceeds from the fun walk will be donated to t he Cancer Society of the Bahamas and the Bahamas Diabetic Association in aid of research and community programmes being carried out by both organisations. 2,000 take to streets for annual fun walk Atlantic Medical Insurance Company holds event PARTICIPANTS take part in the recent AMIFun Walk.

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n By NEIL HARTNELL Tribune Business Editor F idelity Bank (Bahamas blamed the global economic downturn for delaying its higher net income objectives by to 18 months”, with its chief executive attributing a 10.5 per cent decline in its fiscal 2008 profits to investment for future gain and increased deposit costs. Anwer Sunderji, who is also chairman and chief executive of its 75 per cent majority shareholder and parent company, Fidelity Bank & Trust International, said the commercial bank was “where we want to be”, having used the 12 months to December 31, 2008, to position itself for future earnings growth. Fidelity Bank (Bahamas p rojected that net income growth would occur in 2009 and 2010, asa result of the investments made and expanded balance sheet, but Mr Sunderji acknowledged that achieving these objectives was likely to be impacted and delayed by the global economic downturn. For instance, while the BISXlisted bank had grown its loan portfolio by 30.2 per cent yearover-year, from $152.716 million t0 $198.862 million as at December 31, 2008, Mr Sunderji projected more modest growth of 10 per cent for fiscal 2009. He added that Fidelity Bank (Bahamas “extremely strong”, with its Tier I capital under the Basle accord “exceeding 20 per cent”. And Mr Sunderji said Fidelity Bank (Bahamas behind Finance Corporation of the Bahamas (FINCO of the share of mortgage market growth it took in 2008. The bank had a 15 per cent share of the growth, something Mr Sunderji described as “a significant number”, and second only to FINCO which had a 40 per cent share. “We had set out to grow our balance sheet, which we did substantially. That was our plan,” Mr Sunderji said. “Our loan book grew, and positioned us for higher net income going forward. “By and large, we’re where we expected to be, and 2009 and 2010 is where the bottom line recovery is expected. Quite frankly, this global financial crisis has delayed some of our objectives that we’re trying to reach, so we might be off 12-18 months.” For fiscal 2008, Fidelity Bank (Bahamas drop from $1.467 million in 2007 to $1.313 million. The bank saw good top line growth, with interest income up 53.3 per cent to $17.312 million. Yet this did not filter through completely to net income, due to a 92.5 per cent rise in net interest expense to $9.812 million, compared to $5.097 million the year before. “Our margins were compressed because the cost of money went up,” Mr Sunderji said. “We suffered some margin deterioration, which kept net income about flat.” Net interest income was still up by 19.3 per cent at $8.783 million, and total income almost $2 million ahead of 2007. However, this was more than cancelled out by a more than $2 million increase in expenses, with both salaries and benefits and general and administrative expenses rising by around $1 million compared to 2007 figures. n By NEIL HARTNELL Tribune Business Editor BAHAMIAN businesses carrying debt loads on their balance sheets are facing “a substantial crisis” with almost one in five commercial loans in arrears, the B ahamas Chamber of Com merce’s president said yesterday, as he urged the Government not to impose new or increased taxes on the private sector in the upcoming Budget. Dionisio D’Aguilar, who is also Superwash’s president, said the fact that 18.9 per cent of commercial loans were in arrears at end-March 2009 showed Bahamian businesses were “hurting”, with almost none have foreseenor prepared themselves for the severity of the current economic downturn. “My gut reaction is that, as projected, things are bad and things are going to probably get worse before they get better,” Mr D’Aguilar told Tribune Business of the 3.37 per cent increase in commercial loan arrears in March. “When one in five loans are in arrears, it sends a clear message that things are not good. I guess no one knew how bad it was going to get, but when you get one in five commercial loans in arrears, it demonstrates the business community is hurting. That is backed up by the fact local import duties are down so substantially because there is less economic activity. “Clearly, most businesses were not prepared or braced for a recession as long and hard and deep as this one. One in five businesses with loans are catching hell.” In many cases, Mr D’Aguilar said Bahamian businesses small, medium and large had seen their top-line revenues decline yearover-year by anywhere between 10-50 per cent, putting them in immediate difficulties when it came to covering overheads and meeting debt repayments. Although not in trouble, the Chamber president said his own Superwash laundromat chain had experienced these trends. “January to August was flat in 2008, and then October, Novem ber, December saw a precipitous decline a 10, 11, 12 per cent rev C M Y K C M Y K SECTIONB business@tribunemedia.net WEDNESDAY, MAY 6, 2009 THETRIBUNE $4.68$4.51$4.69The information contained is from a third party and The Tribune can not be held responsible for errors and/or omission from the daily report.$ $3.53 $3.62 $3.48 ‘Substantial cr isis’ for debt burdened Bahamian firms * Chamber chief says one in five commercial loan defaults shows need for government to impose no new or increased taxes in Budget * Superwash sales down 10% every month for year-to-date S S E E E E p p a a g g e e 5 5 B B n By NEIL HARTNELL Tribune Business Editor A FORMER finance minister said yesterday he was “a little bit troubled” by the fact the Bahamas may be facing the spec tre of stagflation an economy in recession with increasing unem ployment, and rising prices at the same time. James Smith, CFAL’s chairman, who was minister of state for finance in the former Christie a dministration from 2002-2007, told Tribune Business that the Central Bank of the Bahamas’ report on monthly economic developments for March 2009 showed evidence of rising inflation occurring simultaneously with mounting unemployment. “What I found a little bit troub ling in the report was that inflation almost doubled,” Mr Smith explained. “That harks back to the 1970s when you had stagflation you had the stagnant economies, but prices were going up, impacting households.” Inflation for the 12-months to March 2009 stood at 4.9 per cent,u nchanged from February but up from the 2.4 per cent comparison a year earlier. ‘A little troubled’ by stagflation risk S S E E E E p p a a g g e e 5 5 B B James Smith A Sunderji n B y NEIL HARTNELL Tribune Business Editor THE Copyright Royalties Tribunal has “started research” on the creation of compensation rates to remunerate Bahamian artists for use of their copy righted works, its chairman telling Tribune Busi ness yesterday that the body wanted to raise this nation’s intellectual property rights regime to “inter-n ational best practice” standards. Attorney Kirkwood Seymour said that despite the Tribunal’s somewhat “limited mandate”, it was focused on ensuring that Bahamian artists and entertainers in all fields received the appropriate royalties compensation for the use of their works. Acknowledging that there was much to do in enhancing the Bahamas intellectual property rights regime, especially its coverage and enforcement,M r Seymour said the Tribunal was working to estab lish royalty/compensation rates and a process for how these could be paid and collected. The Tribunal was hoping to complete this work within the next few weeks, Mr Seymour said, and two months at latest, although the final decision would rest with the minister responsible, attorneygeneral Michael Barnett. H e added that “progress” had been made, with the Tribunal having been given a site in the Royal Tribunal moves over royalties rate creation * Body wants to establish collection/claims process for Bahamian artists and rights holders * Concern on cable TV compulsory licence * Aiming to take Bahamas in line with international best practices’ on intellectual property rights S S E E E E p p a a g g e e 3 3 B B S S E E E E p p a a g g e e 3 3 B B n By CHESTER ROBARDS B usiness Reporter crobards@tribunemedia.net THE RELOCATION of downtown Nassau’s container shipping facilities to Arawak Cay seems to be going ahead as planned, according to sources close to the developmen, despite the Government’s reluctance to discuss the project and the Deputy Prime Minister’s seeming lack of knowledge regarding the project. When asked whether the container shipping relocation project was g oing ahead, Brent Symonette simply told Tribune Business: “No Idea!” However, a thoroughfare being constructed from John F Kennedy Drive to Saunders Beach is suspected to be a part of the new Arawak Cay container port’s proposed road infrastructure, which will link to a causeway connecting with a proposed 75-acre man made island off Saunders Beach. However, Mr Symonette said this new road was simply another corridor planned as part of the $120m illion New Providence Road Government coy on Arawak port S S E E E E P P O O R R T T , , p p a a g g e e 5 5 B B Fidelity eyes 12-18 month profit delay * BISX-listed bank says downturn may hinder increased n et income target, after 10.5% decline in 2008 profit * Projects 10% loan growth for 2009, compared t o 30 per cent in 2008, due to economy * Capital ratios ‘extremely strong’ at over 20%, with bank taking second largest share or mortgage market growth in 2008 at 15% * Defaulted loans 50% of banking sector average

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LISTED here are the top 10 issues that stop you and your sales staff from winning business. They were created by Drew J. Stevens, PhD. 1. Stop talking about you. Yes, that’s right. Stop talking about you. No one cares. Kennedy stated: “Ask what you can do for your country.” That said, ask what you can do for your client. 2. Stop talking, period. Your creator gave you one mouth and two ears. For some of us, our one mouth is wider than the space allotted for both of our ears combined. Take the cotton out of your ears and put it in your mouth. Stop talking and listen to the client needs. 3. Provide value. Too often, selling professionals continually mention features. Customers purchase based on the value they gain from your service. Turn features into bene fits. 4. Stop Closing. Yes, I said: “Stop closing.” The notion of closing based on ridiculous questioning techniques and statistics is false. You gain business when you engage in participative conversation. Relationship controls the business. 5. Procrastination. Too many selling professionals are not organised, and spend much time shying away from undesired calls and paperwork. Wasted time is what builds. Do the things you hate to do first, and end your day on a crescendo. 6. Asking inane questions. Customers cringe when selling representatives call and state: “How are you doing today?” Unless you are a relative, stop repeating clichd lines. The sweetest sound people hear is their name. Repeat it, and the purpose for your call. 7. Reach decision makers. Be creative, and use different methods to reach the unreachables. I once read of someone who bought a coconut and wrote the words: “You’re a tuff nut to crack”, boxed it and sent it to an unreachable. It worked! 8. Selling is a profession, similar to that of a doctor, lawyer and architect. Selling professionals must conduct themselves similarly. Discover information on the company and develop three reasons for connecting with them. 9. Database. Keep your own records of clients and potential clients. Write notes of when and who you called. If you get the person on the line, write notes. If you promise to do something i n a specified time, write notes a nd do it. 10. Did I mention stop talking about you? Stop selling yourself. You’re here for one reason and that is to provide a benefit for that client. If you can’t provide benefit, you are wasting everybody’s time. Simple, yet profound All of these marketing strategies are certain to keep your business on top during these c hallenging economic times. H ave a productive and profitable week! Remember: “THOSE WHO MARKET WILL MAKE IT.” N N B B : : S S c c o o t t t t F F a a r r r r i i n n g g t t o o n n i i s s p p r r e e s s i i d d e e n n t t o o f f S S u u n n T T e e e e E E m m b b r r o o i i d d M M e e , , a a p p r r o o m m o o t t i i o o n n a a l l a a n n d d m m a a r r k k e e t t i i n n g g c c o o m m p p a a n n y y s s p p e e c c i i a a l l i i s s i i n n g g i i n n p p r r o o m m o o t t i i o o n n a a l l p p r r o o d d u u c c t t s s . . E E s s t t a a b b l l i i s s h h e e d d o o v v e e r r 2 2 7 7 y y e e a a r r s s a a g g o o , , S S u u n n T T e e e e E E m m b b r r o o i i d d M M e e h h a a s s a a s s s s i i s s t t e e d d B B a a h h a a m m i i a a n n b b u u s s i i n n e e s s s s e e s s i i n n v v a a r r i i o o u u s s i i n n d d u u s s t t r r i i e e s s f f r r o o m m t t o o u u r r i i s s m m a a n n d d b b a a n n k k i i n n g g a a n n d d t t e e l l e e c c o o m m m m u u n n i i c c a a t t i i o o n n s s i i n n m m a a r r k k e e t t i i n n g g t t h h e e m m s s e e l l v v e e s s . . R R e e a a d d e e r r s s c c a a n n c c o o n n t t a a c c t t M M r r F F a a r r r r i i n n g g t t o o n n a a t t S S u u n n T T e e e e E E m m b b r r o o i i d d M M e e o o n n E E a a s s t t S S h h i i r r l l e e y y S S t t r r e e e e t t , , b b y y e e m m a a i i l l a a t t s s c c o o t t t t @ @ s s u u n n t t e e e e . . c c o o m m o o r r b b y y t t e e l l e e p p h h o o n n e e a a t t 2 2 4 4 2 2 3 3 9 9 3 3 3 3 1 1 0 0 4 4 . . C M Y K C M Y K BUSINESS PAGE 2B, WEDNESDAY, MAY 6, 2009 THE TRIBUNE Promotional Marketing by Scott Farrington It’s not all about you

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A 25 per cent shareholder in Grand Bahama Power Companyy esterday revealed that its investment had generated earnings of $1.1 million for it in the 2009 first quarter, implying that the utility m ade a $4.4 million profit. Emera, the Canadian power giant that holds a 50 per cent stake in BISX-listed ICD Utilities, purchased its stake for $42.3m illion from Lady Henrietta St George in September 2008. Grand Bahama Power Company has 137 megawatts of gene ration capacity, and some 19,000 customers on the island. The company is currently doing a $250,000 wind power study on Grand Bahama in conjunction with Emera. E O Ferrell, Grand Bahama P ower’s chief executive, said it was a possible first step towards the use of renewable energy on Grand Bahama. “This is an exciting new chapter in energy gener-a tion on Grand Bahama island,” he said. “The use of the wind has the advantage of lessening our dependence on expensive importe d oil, and producing energy without emissions.” Mr Ferrell noted that wind gene ration technology has been proven across Europe and is widely used in the US. He said the objective of the study was to d etermine if there was sufficient wind quantity and duration on Grand Bahama to make the investment in wind turbines a viable alternative for GrandB ahama Power customers. Carlton Bosfield, the project manager, said the study will be conducted in three phases. He s aid the first phase involves tower erection in various parts of Grand Bahama. In addition tot he Dover Sound site, other sites have been identified – two in East Grand Bahama, one Holmes Rock in West Grand Bahama, a nd at the Container Port Navigation Tower at the Garnet Levarity Highway. Mr Bosfield said the second phase will involve the collectingo f wind data. He said if it was determined that wind power is an acceptable alternative, then they will move to the third phase, w hich is the development phase. However, Mr Sunderji said Fidelity Bank (Bahamas l ine growth in 2008, because it was investing in new products and an expanded branch network that would bear fruit in the future. “It’s because we opened a new branch at Robin Hood and introduced Visa credit cards,” Mr Sunderji said of the expense increases. “This required us to gear up for the launch of the cards, getting a full complement of staff and marketing. Both those initiatives were quite costly and did not contribute revenue until the last quarter. It’s this year that we expect to benef it from these initiatives.” Some 17 new staff were added to the bank for these programmes. S till, some analysts have been left unimpressed, telling Tribune Business that the increased expenses and flat top-line showed there were inefficiencies in Fidelity Bank ( Bahamas) operations and that it was struggling to achieve the scale necessary for it to be competitive. Yet Mr Sunderji said Fidelity Bank (Bahamass heet and loan objectives for 2008, adding that it had attracted new customers by wrapping loan products with savings features, such as its Moneyback Mortgage. However, with the deterioration in credit q uality as a result of the recession, Mr Sunderji said 2009 would see a renewed focus on credi t quality and cost containment. Resources had been redeployed to concentrate on restructuring and rewriting loans owed by clients having difficulties meeting their obliga tions. However, Mr Sunderji said Fidelity Bank (Bahamas per cent of the banking sector average”, standing at $6.734 million or 3.34 per cent of thet otal portfolio, compared to 2.53 per cent or $3.916 million the year before. Some 80 per cent of the bank’s loans, he added, were secured by a first mortgage on the borrower’s primary residence, helping to miti gate the risk. C M Y K C M Y K BUSINESS THE TRIBUNE WEDNESDAY, MAY 6, 2009, PAGE 3B NOTICE is hereby given that JOYCYNTHIATILBAYNE of W OOD BURN ESTATE, P.O. BOX N-4303, NASSAU, BAHAMAS , is applying to the Minister responsible for Nationality and Citizenship, f or registration/naturalization as a citizen of The Bahamas, and that a ny person who knows any reason why registration/naturalization should not be granted, should send a written and signed statement o f the facts within twenty-eight days from the 6TH d ay of May, 2009 t o the Minister responsible for nationality and Citizenship, P.O. Box N-7147, Nassau, Bahamas.NOTICE 127,&(LVKHUHE\JLYHQWKDW ,0(/'$'259,/ RI&25'($8; $3%2;1$66$8%$+$0$6 LVDSSO\LQJWRWKH 0LQLVWHUUHVSRQVLEOHIRU1DWLRQDOLW\DQG&LWL]HQVKLSIRUUHJLVWUDWLRQ Q DWXUDOL]DWLRQDVFLWL]HQRI7KH%DKDPDVDQGWKDWDQ\SHUVRQ Z KRNQRZVDQ\UHDVRQZK\UHJLVWUDWLRQQDWXUDOL]DWLRQVKRXOGQRW EHJUDQWHGVKRXOGVHQGZULWWHQDQGVLJQHGVWDWHPHQWRIWKH IDFWVZLWKLQWZHQW\HLJKWGD\VIURPWKH 7 + GD\ RI $SULO WR WKH0LQLVWHUUHVSRQVLEOHIRUQDWLRQDOLW\DQG&LWL]HQVKLS3%R[ 1 T ribunal moves over royalties rate creation Victoria Gardens, where it was in the process of establishing a physical office. Permission hada lso been given within the last month for the Tribunal to hire ap art-time secretary, who was now employed and getting its website, t elephones, e-mail and office up and running. “We’ve started research and embarked on inquires in other countries to see how they uset heir expertise to establish [royalty] rates,” Mr Seymour told Tri b une Business. “There are no rates at this time. We’ve embarked on that process.” The Copyright Royalties Tribunal has oversight over a fund, i nto which compensation for copyrighted works is paid in antic i pation that the owners will make a claim for remuneration. T he fund currently holds around $3 million, Mr Seymour said yesterday, but currently its only contributor is Cable Bahamas. The BISX-listed entity m akes payments into the fund as compensation to the program m ers and rights holders for some of the content it transmits in the B ahamas. However, none of those programmers to date have made a claim on the fund, largely due, it is believed, because in their eyes they do not want to ‘legitimise’ Cable Bahamas’ use of their sig n als and content due to the ongoing dispute they have with the c ompany. Mr Seymour told Tribune Busin ess that Cable Bahamas was “almost up to date” with its payments to the Fund, adding: “They were just about one year behind. We got another payment from them last week. “They’re aware they have some t hings to do, especially with the compulsory licence about to e xpire. We have discussed this at the Tribunal level, and are going to communicate our concerns about its renewal without the means to control the payment or c ollection of contributions to the Fund.” T he Bahamas’ compulsory licensing regime for Cable Bahamas is considered by the US programming industry and copyright holders as too broad andn ot providing compensation for their works at ‘fair market rates’. M r Seymour described the licence as a “sticking point” in discussions with the US Trade Representative’s Office over the Bahamas’ intellectual property r ights protection and enforcement regime, adding: “We’re going toh ave to, at some point, review all of that and see if there is a way to o ffer the service and have intel lectual property rights protection at the same time.” “What we’re hoping to do is bring this regime up to internat ional best practices for the Bahamas,” Mr Seymour said. It’s the enforcement thing that’s really created a bit of a problem. My concern is especially that artists get rewarded for their works, or otherwise they will have no incentive to create. We have all that in front of us as a mandate f or what we want to achieve. We’re moving in the right direc t ion. “We see our work cut out for u s, but are encouraged because we’ve been able to make some progress and aim to take it to the next level. It’s taken too long.” Mr Seymour said the Tribunal h ad held preliminary discussions with the Performing Rights Soci-e ty of the UK, including talks on how to claim from its Fund as no c laims had yet been submitted. “There are some Bahamians t hat are part of the Performing Rights Society of the UK, mem b ers there, and we want to make sure artists in the Bahamas and e lsewhere are compensated for their works.” The Tribunal’s other members are accountant James Gomez and artist Stan Burnside. F F R R O O M M p p a a g g e e 1 1 B B GB Power investor earns $1.1m F F I I D D E E L L I I T T Y Y , , f f r r o o m m 1 1 B B To advertise in The Tribune just call 502-2371 today!

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Legal NoticeNOTICEKEYCOVE MANAGEMENT LTD.(In Voluntary Liquidation)Notice is hereby given that the above-named Company is in dissolution, which commenced on the 29th day of April2009.TheLiquidator is Argosa Corp. Inc.,P.O.Box N-7757 Nassau, B ahamas.ARGOSA CORP. INC.(Liquidator L egal NoticeN OTICEMANSUETUS CORP.(In Voluntary Liquidation)Notice is hereby given that the above-named Company is in dissolution, which commenced on the 29th day of April2009.TheLiquidator is Argosa Corp. Inc.,P.O.Box N-7757 Nassau, Bahamas.ARGOSA CORP. INC.( Liquidator) L egal NoticeN OTICEWHITE STALLION INDUSTRIAL LTD.( In Voluntary Liquidation)Notice is hereby given that the above-named Company is in dissolution, which commenced on the 26th day of January 2009.TheLiquidator isArgosa Corp. Inc.,P.O.Box N-7757 Nassau, Bahamas. ARGOSA CORP. INC.( Liquidator) C M Y K C M Y K BUSINESS PAGE 4B, WEDNESDAY, MAY 6, 2009 THE TRIBUNE INTERNATIONAL BUSINESS COMPANIES ACT. 2000No. 45 of 2000Notice is hereby given that in accordance with Section 1 38 (8Business Companies Act, (No. 45 of 2000), the Dissolution of HILBERRYINTERNAT IONALLIMITED Dissolution has been issued and the Company has therefore been struck off the Registrar. The date of completion o f the dissolution was the 30th day of April, 2009. NOTICEHILBERRY INTERNATIONAL LIMITED INTERNATIONAL BUSINESS COMPANIES ACT. 2000No. 45 of 2000Notice is hereby given that in accordance with Section 138 (8Business Companies Act, (No. 45 of 2000), the Dissolution of CALDTON INVESTMENTS LIMITED Dissolution has been issued and the Company has therefore been struck off the Registrar. The date of completion of the dissolution was the 30th day of April, 2009. NOTICECALDTON INVESTMENTS LIMITED 127,&( (;;2102%,/(;3/25$7,21$1' 352'8&7,21=$0%,48(f/,0,7(' 3XUVXDQWWRWKHSURYLVLRQVRI6HFWLRQRIWKH ,QWHUQDWLRQDO%XVLQHVV&RPSDQLHV$FWQRWLFH LVKHUHE\JLYHQWKDWWKHDERYHQDPHG&RPSDQ\KDV EHHQGLVVROYHGDQGVWUXFNRIWKH5HJLVWHUSXUVXDQW WR&HUWLFDWHRI'LVVROXWLRQLVVXHG7KH5HJLVWUDU *HQHUDORQWKHVWGD\RID\ 'DWHGWKHWKGD\RID\*DU\-RKQVHQ /LTXLGDWRURI(;;2102%,/ (;3/25$7,21$1''8&7,21 =$0%,48(f/,0,7(' 127,&( (;;2102%,/(;3/25$7,21&&2 /,0,7(' 3XUVXDQWWRWKHSURYLVLRQVRI6HFWLRQRIWKH ,QWHUQDWLRQDO%XVLQHVV&RPSDQLHV$FWQRWLFH LVKHUHE\JLYHQWKDWWKHDERYHQDPHG&RPSDQ\KDV EHHQGLVVROYHGDQGVWUXFNRIWKH5HJLVWHUSXUVXDQW WR&HUWLFDWHRI'LVVROXWLRQLVVXHG7KH 5HJLVWUDU*HQHUDORQWKHGD\RI0D\ 'DWHGWKHWKGD\RID\*DU\-RKQVHQ /LTXLGDWRURI (;;2102%,/(;3/25$7,21 0252&&2/,0,7(' 127,&( (662$1*2/$*$6&203$1
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I mprovement Project, being cons tructed by the Argentine firm, Jose Cartellone Construction Company (JCCC Mr Symonette began to say t hat if the proposed Arawak Cay development, which calls for sucha road, goes through it may be incorporated into the design. H owever, he wrapped-up his s tatement by saying there is no connection between the land clearance presently ongoing for the new road and the ArawakC ay container port development. Plans for the new container port development, labelled ‘Draft For discussion purposes only’, s hows this new road connecting to a causeway that spans the distance between Saunders Beach and the proposed man-made container port. A second causewayt hen connects the container port with Arawak Cay. The Government appears to be engaged in semantics, with the A rawak Cay port project shrouded in great secrecy and a seeming lack of transparency. Those close to the downtown revitalisation project give credence to the ideao f the Arawak Cay container port development and the Governm ent continuing projects relative to “tentative” port development plans, but keeping tight lipped on its status as public scrutiny heightens. T ribune Business understands that details on the project are being treated as a closely-guarded secret by the Prime Minister’s O ffice and a small, close-knit group from the shipping industry fraternity. Some have suggested this is a deliberate tactic by the Government to muzzle public dis-c ussion and dissent, given that the Opposition PLP are understood to be focusing on the issue as one that could give them an e lectoral boost similar to what the Clifton Cay project did in 2002. Tribune Business understands that the Government also warnedt he shipping industry, following this newspaper’s revelations that the Prime Minister had “changed the rules of the game” regading t he Arawak Cay port’s financing, that it might withdraw its support for the project if further details appeared in the press. As a result, negotiations with t he Government are being handled by Arawak Cay Port Development Company chairman Jimm y Mosko and a small group close to him. Tribune Business has been told that not all the proposed 19-20 shareholders in the company are fully in the loop ast o what is going on. Sources close to the discussions told Tribune Business that difficulties had arisen because the P rime Minister did not want any debt financing, which would fund the Arawak Cay port’s construction, to be secured by a first charge mortgage/lien/debentureo ver the land. From the Government’s viewpoint, this is undrstandable as the Arawak Cay port land would be l eased to the private sector and still owned by it. The Government would not want its land to be encumbered by a mortgage placing the property under thep otential control of a financial institution. But other sources, while admitting the financing for the Arawak C ay port was in a “state of flux”, said there was no plan for debt financing to be secured by a mortgage. PLP activist Paul Moss said y esterday that he has also learned of the Government’s intention to go full steam ahead with the A rawak Cay container port development. He argued that the development will “have the effect of eliminating the beach (SaundersB each) through erosion and access because of the bridge (aforementioned causeway “This is wrong and we will not s tand for it,” he said. “All over this country, beach access is being denied to Bahamians. In fact the proposed site at Arawak Cay is the absolute wrong site for thep ort.” The Arawak Cay container port was deemed in a study of optional sites to be the sixth best l ocation for the Container Port, with the fifth best option being its present location downtown. However, it has been widely said that the revitalisation ofd owntown Nassau can only begin in earnest when the present container facilities have been removed. W hen the former government commissioned the study on the container port relocation, they decided that the Clifton area of southwest Nassau would be theb est location for a deep-water port. Yet the present government asserts that Clifton would be too e xpensive a development and opted for Arawak Cay. No environmental impact study concerning the proposed manmade island has surfaced of late,a nd the Government has not volunteered any information on what the repercussions of building an island and causeways for large d iesel trucks would be on the public beach that would exist alongside. However, the downtown revitalisation project, which hingeso n the port’s removal, seems to be picking up momentum, with t he announcement of the public/private partnership body that will oversee the development. Mr Moss said he will continue to call for the Arawak Cay con-t ainer port location to be reconsidered by the Government, and called for intervention by environmentalists and all Bahamians. We call on Sam Duncombe to check this out and the Bahamas National Trust to intervene. We also call on the Bahamian people to stand up for once,”h e said. “Don’t let this happen!” Except for the slightly moderated rise in average transportation costs (3 per cent increase for furniture and household o perations (6.6 per cent ponents of the Retail Price Index rose at an accelerated pace,” the Central Bank said. Of particular note were the avera ge cost run-ups for food and beverages (7.8 per cent), housing (3.6 per cent), recreation and entertainment services (4.3 per cent m edical and healthcare (4.1 per cent). Meanwhile, the Department of Statistics’ interim Labour Force Survey showed that unemploy m ent rates had increased to 12.1 per cent in New Providence and 1 4.1 per cent in Grand Bahama. This raises the spectre that the B ahamas is having to confront both rising unemployment and inflation. Inflation, defined as a sustained rise in the weighted average of p rices over a specific period, is undesirable because it devalues s avings and erodes the living stan dards of persons on fixed i ncomes, such as pensioners. E xplaining the stagflation issue, M r Smith told Tribune Business: It’s troublesome from the househ old point of view, because rising unemployment means there i s less income coming into the household, and the income com i ng in is being eaten up by rising prices. So it’s having a very detri mental effect on low income h ouseholds. It’s one thing to have less income, working two to three days a week, but then to also have that income eaten up by the food store. It points to how open thee conomy is, and being hit by the increased price of imports.” M r Smith said the “almost dou bling” of the Government’s fiscal deficit to $173.4 million for the first eight months of the 20082009 Budget year was not unexp ected, the expectation having been for a “sizeable increase” duet o the fall-off in tourist arrivals and economic activity, the latter o f which had reduced imports and their related duties. The 12.1 per cent drop in departure taxes, Mr Smith told Tribune Business, gave a good i ndication of the pressure the Bahamian tourism industry was u nder. And the Government’s planned social programmes and b orrowing to finance capital w orks projects “point to a wideni ng of the gap” for the remaind er of this Budget year and 20092010. You’re probably going to see it fall-off a little more in the r emaining four months,” Mr Smith said of the fiscal deficit.H owever, he added that the deficit was not as wide as it could h ave been, although with revenues off by 4 per cent it was likely to be equivalent to that amount. “The revenue performance, t hough down, is doing better than expected, because it appears that t he fall-off in air travel has been compensated by other factors,” the former minister said. “The feeling is that there are some compensating factors at work, a nd it’s not as deep as expected.” Mr Smith said the Central B ank reported indicated that hotel occupancy rates had exceed e d expectations, showing that the Bahamas was perhaps benefiting from its proximity to the US. The Central Bank, in its report on monthly economic developments f or March 2009, reported that yearover year, the fiscal deficit for the e ight months to February 2009 had increased by 86.9 per cent to $173.5 m illion, compared to $92.8 million t he year before. T he Central Bank said that for t he first eight months of the 20082009 Budget year, total government r evenues fell by 4.2 per cent from $873.4 million to $837.1 million, w hile total recurrent spending rose 6.95 per cent from $836.7 million to$ 894.8 million. “In particular, tax receipts fell by 5 .5 per cent to $758.7 million, owing primarily to a 10 per cent reduction in international trade taxes,” the Central Bank said. “Declines were also noted in s tamp taxes on financial and other transactions (18.7 per cent d eparture taxes (12.1 per cent These outweighed the improvements for business and professional taxes (15.9 per cent), property taxes (5.2 per cent) and increased yields under other” unclassified revenue sources. A 10.8 per cent gain was also record e d under non-tax revenues, at $78.4 million, reflecting a timing–related i ncrease in income receipts. “On the expenditure side, current spending firmed by 5.4 per cent to $894.8 million, led by higher payments for wages and salaries (5 per c ent), contractual services (17.4 per cent), interest costs on debt (6.9 per c ent) and subsidies (7.4 per cent), mainly to quasi-public entities.” enue decrease,” he added. “That d ecrease has continued into 2009, where every single month rev e nues are down by at least 10 per cent. Coin sales are down even m ore, probably 15 per cent.” Mr D’Aguilar said the one sav i ng grace for himself and other businesses was the dramatic decline in electricity and gasoline costs as a result of the fall in oil prices from their $147 per barrel p eak in July, but they were still left to generate enough revenues to cover fixed costs and overheads. “I don’t think the private sector was prepared for this,” Mr D’Aguilar said. “We had so many years of feast that we got fat and lazy, not lean and mean. Maybe we over-extended ourselves. No one could have projected revenues would decrease by 25-35 per cent, double digits, in such a short period of time. “No one was prepared for that, and as a result they could not adjust cost structures fast enough for such a precipitous decline revenues. Some companies have had 10-40 per cent declines in revenue; the car companies decreased by 50 per cent. “How could you have prepared for such a scenario? We were all piggybacking off out-of-control spending and consumption. I didn’t think 18-20 per cent of commercial loans would be in arrears.I thought it would be 12-13 per cent, and not as high as that.” Referring to the data contained in the Central Bank report, Mr D’Aguilar said: “This is clear message to the Minister of Finance, as he ponders his Budget and sharpens his pencil, that imposing additional taxes on busi ness does not bode well for that sector of the economy. “He should use this as an indication that companies are hurt ing, and this is not the time to impose those additional taxes on the business community. They should look at things not being taxed.” Prime Minister Hubert Ingraham, who holds the Minister of Finance position, is due to present the 2009-2010 Budget to the House of Assembly in three weeks’ time by end of May. It is likely to contain more deficit spending and national debt increases, as the Government seeks to mitigate the impact from the economic downturn. If the Government was looking for new and easy revenue sources, the Chamber president urged them to target gaming and the burgeoning ‘numbers’ business. “Government should seriously look at that,” he said. If they’re looking for easy revenue, gaming and the numbers b usiness is it. Everyone is expect ing them to do something about i t. Take the religious twist out of it, and it’s a nice little revenue earner.” Mr D’Aguilar also suggested that, apart from attempting to maximise the Bahamas Telecommunications Company’s (BTCp urchase price, the Government also tax the payment of dividends by Bahamian subsidiaries to their foreign parents. He did not iden-t ify which subsidiaries and companies he was referring to, but is l ikely to mean the foreign-owned commercial banks. The Chamber president suggested that the banks would have little choice but to rewrite or restructure many commercial loans on their books, for otherwise they might be unable to reclaim what was due to them. Mr D’Aguilar suggested that they let troubled businesses make interest-only repayments, and sus p end the repayment of principal. He expressed concern that the h igh level of commercial loan arrears could encourage the b anks to switch lending away from this sector to consumer advances and mortgages, rather than the productive areas of the Bahamian economy. Import duties, in particular, have been heavily impacted by the down-t urn in economic activity that has led to less demand for imported goods. These duties, for the first eight months of the 2008-2009 Bud-g et year, were down 26.91 per cent at $251.5 million, compared to $344.1 m illion the year before. Mr D’Aguilar said this again showed the need for the Government to broaden its tax base beyond the heavy reliance on international trade and physical goods, which accounted for 60 per cent of its revenue base. He suggested that the tax base could be broadened to encom pass services. C M Y K C M Y K BUSINESS THE TRIBUNE WEDNESDAY, MAY 6, 2009, PAGE 5B 393 2966 | www.bahamasagencies.comdistributed by ‘Substantial crisis’ for debt bur dened Bahamian fir ms F F R R O O M M p p a a g g e e 1 1 B B F F R R O O M M p p a a g g e e 1 1 B B EAGLE ELECTRICAL &LIGHTING Tel (242Fax (242 Email: eaglebahamas@gmail.com ARTIFICIAL PLANTS TABLETOP & LARGE FOUNTAINS LAMPS DECORATIVE FANS SHOPFOR MOM ATEAGLE! Wantagiftformomthatwilllast?Geta giftfromyourhearttoherhome.Check outthevarietyofproductsfromour HomeCollection. CHANDELIERS We ship to the Family Islands! Not sure what to buy? Wrap up a Gift Certicate from Eagle! 20%offlisted items ‘A little troubled’ by stagflation risk P P O O R R T T , , f f r r o o m m 1 1 B B

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C M Y K C M Y K PAGE 6B, WEDNESDAY, MAY 6, 2009 THE TRIBUNE Legal NoticeN OTICEPINK SHELLS HOLDINGS LTD.(In Voluntary Liquidation)Notice is hereby given that the above-named Company is in dissolution, which commenced on the 29th day of April2009.TheLiquidator is Argosa Corp. Inc.,P.O.Box N-7757 Nassau, Bahamas.ARGOSA CORP. INC.(Liquidator

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ANDROS CAT ISLAND ELEUTHERA MAYAGUANA SAN SAL V ADOR GREAT INAGUA GREAT EXUMA CROOKED ISLAND / ACKLINS LONG ISLAND ABACO Shown is today's weather . T emperatures are today's highs and tonights's lows. KEY WEST WEST PALM BEACH FT. LAUDERDALE TAMPA ORLANDO Low: 67F/19C Low: 72F/22C Low: 71F/22C Low: 73F/23C Low: 74 F/23 C Low: 75F/24C Low: 74 F/23 C Low: 70 F/21 C High: 90F/32C High: 88F/31C High: 87 F/31 C High: 85 F/29 C High: 86F/30C High: 84 F/29C High: 87F/31C Low: 72F/22C High: 84F/29C Low: 71 F/22 C High: 87F/31C RAGGED ISLAND Low: 70F/21C High: 87 F/31 C Low: 71F/22C High: 83 F/28 Low: 67F/19C High: 83F/28C Low: 70 F/21C High: 86F/30C Low: 74 F/23 C High: 89F/32C Low: 72 F/22 C High: 86F/30C Low: 71 F/22 C High: 87F/31C Low: 73F/23C High: 89 F/32 C Low: 72F/22C High: 88F/31C High: 82 F/28 C FREEPORT NASSAU MIAMI THE TRIBUNE WEDNESDAY, MAY 6 TH , 2009, PAGE 11B THE WEATHER REPORT 5-D AY F ORECAST Humid with plenty of sunshine. A moonlit sky.Plenty of sunshine.Brilliant sunshine. Mostly sunny and humid. High: 87 Low: 74 High: 85 High: 86 High: 86 A ccuWeather RealFeel A ccuWeather RealFeel A ccuWeather RealFeel A ccuWeather RealFeel A ccuWeather RealFeel Mostly sunny. High: 86 Low: 76 Low: 77 Low: 76 AccuWeather RealFeel 102F T he exclusive AccuWeather RealFeel Temperature i s an index that combines the effects of temperature, wind, humidity, sunshine intensity, cloudiness, precipitation, pressure, and e levation on the human bodyeverything that effects how warm or cold a person feels. Temperatures reflect the high and the low for the day. 78F 95-83F 97-88F 100-86F 102-82F Low: 75 TODAYTONIGHTTHURSDAYFRIDAYSATURDAYSUNDAY A LMANAC High ..................................................82F/28C Low ....................................................70F/21C Normal high ......................................83F/28C Normal low ........................................70F/21C Last year's high .................................. 86 F/30C Last year's low .................................. 70 F/21C As of 2 p.m. yesterday ..................................0.00" Year to date ..................................................2.21" Normal year to date ......................................8.21" Statistics are for Nassau through 2 p.m. yesterday Temperature Precipitation S UN AND M OON T IDESFOR N ASSAU Full Last New First May 9 May 17May 24May 30 Sunrise . . . . . . 6:31 a.m. Sunset . . . . . . . 7:43 p.m. Moonrise . . . . 5:39 p.m. Moonset . . . . . 4:33 a.m. Today Thursday Friday Saturday HighHt.(ft.LowHt.(ft. 6:29 a.m.2.612:20 a.m.0.0 6:52 p.m.3.112:23 p.m.0.0 7:16 a.m.2.51:10 a.m.0.0 7:37 p.m.3.11:08 p.m.0.0 7:59 a.m.2.51:55 a.m.0.0 8:19 p.m.3.11:51 p.m.0.0 8:40 a.m.2.52:38 a.m.0.0 9:00 p.m.3.12:32 p.m.0.1 W ORLD C ITIES Acapulco90/3270/21s90/3272/22s Amsterdam57/1346/7c65/1845/7pc Ankara, Turkey61/1646/7r63/1743/6pc Athens68/2059/15t72/2261/16pc Auckland59/1552/11sh61/1655/12s Bangkok94/3481/27pc92/3380/26pc Barbados85/2976/24t85/2976/24sh Barcelona72/2259/15s71/2157/13s Beijing90/3264/17s93/3362/16pc Beirut68/2063/17c68/2063/17s Belgrade65/1851/10c68/2054/12pc Berlin59/1546/7sh64/1750/10pc Bermuda75/2368/20pc75/2368/20s Bogota64/1748/8r66/1849/9r Brussels61/1646/7pc68/2050/10pc Budapest61/1645/7sh68/2050/10pc Buenos Aires68/2050/10s72/2257/13pc Cairo82/2764/17s83/2861/16s Calcutta104/4081/27s108/4282/27s Calgary55/1239/3pc48/836/2c Cancun88/3173/22s89/3173/22s Caracas79/2667/19pc81/2771/21t Casablanca84/2860/15s86/3062/16s Copenhagen53/1144/6sh64/1748/8sh Dublin57/1346/7sh54/1243/6pc Frankfurt61/1648/8sh72/2246/7pc Geneva 68/20 47/8 pc 76/2455/12s Halifax 54/12 44/6 r 55/12 45/7 r Havana 90/32 70/21 s 89/31 68/20 pc Helsinki 55/12 36/2sh59/1537/2pc Hong Kong 80/26 72/22 s 80/26 72/22s Islamabad 98/36 67/19 s 104/40 70/21 s Istanbul72/2257/13pc67/1956/13c Jerusalem 65/18 47/8pc66/1847/8s Johannesburg 69/2050/10c67/1947/8sh Kingston 86/3077/25sh86/3077/25r Lima76/2459/15c77/2560/15pc London68/2046/7pc63/1746/7pc Madrid82/2755/12pc84/2854/12pc Manila81/2776/24r86/3076/24r Mexico City86/3054/12s87/3054/12s Monterrey102/3875/23pc106/4175/23pc Montreal61/1646/7pc57/1348/8r Moscow68/2046/7c70/2148/8sh Munich53/1143/6sh73/2249/9s Nairobi82/2759/15sh81/2759/15r New Delhi 107/4176/24s108/4275/23s Oslo54/1236/2sh55/1239/3r Paris64/1741/5pc72/2248/8pc Prague 58/14 49/9 sh 70/21 48/8 pc Rio de Janeiro84/2871/21s81/2771/21s Riyadh104/4079/26s101/3876/24s Rome 70/21 54/12 pc 73/22 51/10 s St. Thomas84/2875/23r83/2875/23r San Juan77/2548/8pc80/2646/7s San Salvador 84/28 70/21 t 86/30 73/22 t Santiago 66/1843/6pc66/1843/6pc Santo Domingo84/2870/21t84/2872/22r Sao Paulo 79/26 60/15 s 76/24 60/15t Seoul84/2855/12s82/2758/14s Stockholm 55/12 39/3 pc 57/13 41/5 sh Sydney 68/20 54/12 s67/1951/10s Taipei78/2566/18c82/2767/19s T okyo 68/20 62/16 c 63/17 60/15 c T oronto 68/2049/9c64/1748/8c Trinidad86/3070/21t82/2770/21t V ancouver 55/12 47/8 r 58/1445/7sh Vienna 58/1450/10sh72/2257/13s W arsaw 57/13 40/4 sh 62/16 46/7 pc Winnipeg 64/17 47/8 c 51/1035/1r H ighLowWHighLowW F/CF/CF/CF/C T odayThursday Weather (Ws -sunny, pc -partly cloudy, c -cloudy, sh -showers, t -thunderstorms, r -rain, sf -snow flurries, sn -snow, i -ice, Prcp-precipitation, Tr -trace T ODAY ' S U.S. F ORECAST M ARINE F ORECAST WINDSWAVESVISIBILITYWATER TEMPS. NASSAU FREEPORT ABACO Today:ENE at 6-12 Knots0-2 Feet10-20 Miles77F Thursday:ENE at 10-20 Knots0-2 Feet10-20 Miles77F Today:E at 6-12 Knots0-2 Feet10-20 Miles76F Thursday:ENE at 10-20 Knots0-2 Feet10-20 Miles77F Today:E at 7-14 Knots0-2 Feet10-20 Miles76F Thursday:E at 10-20 Knots0-2 Feet10-20 Miles77F U.S. C ITIES Albuquerque88/3158/14s90/3258/14s Anchorage54/1239/3sh56/1341/5s Atlanta78/2561/16t77/2564/17t Atlantic City66/1862/16c74/2360/15t Baltimore70/2160/15t76/2456/13pc Boston64/1753/11r60/1551/10r Buffalo68/2051/10pc68/2050/10c Charleston, SC85/2965/18pc83/2866/18t Chicago70/2153/11t73/2250/10t Cleveland70/2150/10t70/2151/10t Dallas86/3071/21t89/3173/22s Denver76/2446/7pc75/2343/6pc Detroit72/2254/12c72/2250/10c Honolulu85/2972/22s87/3072/22s Houston88/3174/23pc90/3274/23pc HighLowWHighLowW F/CF/CF/CF/C HighLowWHighLowW F/CF/CF/CF/C HighLowWHighLowW F/CF/CF/CF/C T odayThursday TodayThursdayTodayThursday Indianapolis74/2357/13t73/2252/11t Jacksonville87/3063/17pc89/3166/18pc Kansas City77/2558/14pc72/2255/12t Las Vegas97/3669/20s97/3672/22s Little Rock78/2567/19t82/2766/18t Los Angeles80/2660/15s86/3060/15s Louisville74/2358/14t77/2557/13t Memphis78/2568/20t84/2866/18t Miami86/3074/23pc86/3073/22s Minneapolis74/2352/11t67/1945/7t Nashville74/2358/14t80/2661/16t New Orleans87/3071/21pc88/3170/21pc New York66/1857/13pc71/2158/14r Oklahoma City82/2767/19pc88/3167/19pc Orlando90/3267/19s90/3268/20s Philadelphia69/2056/13c73/2258/14r Phoenix 102/38 75/23 s 105/4075/23s Pittsburgh70/2154/12t68/2052/11t Portland, OR 58/1447/8r60/1543/6c Raleigh-Durham 78/25 60/15 t 80/26 62/16 t St. Louis78/2561/16t74/2356/13t Salt Lake City 72/22 51/10 pc 71/2145/7pc San Antonio 96/35 74/23 pc 93/33 75/23 pc San Diego70/2162/16pc76/2460/15s San Francisco 66/18 51/10 pc 70/2149/9s Seattle58/1445/7r56/1344/6c T allahassee 89/3163/17pc89/3162/16pc T ampa 88/31 72/22 s 88/31 71/21s Tucson100/3767/19s103/3967/19s W ashington, DC 74/23 60/15t80/2661/16pc UV I NDEX T ODAY T he higher the A ccuWeather UV Index T M n umber, the greater the need for eye and skin protection. Forecasts and graphics provided by AccuWeather, Inc. Cold Warm Stationary Fronts Shown are noon positions of weather systems and precipitation. Temperature bands are highs for the day. Forecast high/low temperatures are for selected cities. 1 1 0 0 s s 0 0 s s 0 0 s s 1 1 0 0 s s 2 2 0 0 s s 3 3 0 0 s s 4 4 0 0 s s 5 5 0 0 s s 6 6 0 0 s s 7 7 0 0 s s 8 8 0 0 s s 9 9 0 0 s s 1 1 0 0 0 0 s s 1 1 1 1 0 0 s s Showers T-storms Rain Flurries Snow Ice AccuW eather .com

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C M Y K C M Y K TASTE PAGE 8B, WEDNESDAY, MAY 6, 2009 THE TRIBUNE T h e T r i b u n e n By ALEX MISSICK Tribune Features Reporter amissick@tribunemedia.net A LL your life your mother h as cared for you, nursed your b ruises and fed you daily to make sure you had the required nutrients you needed t o be healthy. She even snuck i n a few snacks every now and t hen just for a treat. This Mothe r’s Day you can return the f avor by treating your mom to a Mother’s Day Brunch at many of the popular eateries around town. Sue Lawrence, Sales Director for Ristrorante Luciano’s of Chicago, located on East Bay Street, said they decided to have Mother’s Day Brunch featuring some of the things they thought mothers and the local B ahamian population would love. “Our Mother’s Day brunch starts a t 11:30 am through 3:30 pm. All of the appetizers and desserts are served on a buffet and then the e ntre’s are a la Carte, so you order y our entre course and the price of t he entre course, which is $30 cove rs the appetizer and dessert buffet,” Ms Sue Lawrence said. Ms Lawrence said most of the seating is set on the outside decko verlooking the beautiful Nassau harbor and in terms of the entre’s, the Fruitti di Mare is their most popular dish. “The Chicken Parmigiana is something the kids always like. With lamb being a spring time thing, we have a boneless stuffed leg of lamb with p ine nuts, sun dried tomatoes and herbed breadcrumbs so it is very o ften on the Mother’s Day menu. For the gentlemen that are coming along with their mothers we offered t hem something a little bit heavier w ith a roasted loin of pork with s auted apples and oranges, the filet m ignon with a Chianti reduction. We also have the oven roasted grouper and a little minced lobster arrabiatta for Bahamians,” MsL awrence said For those mothers who would prefer a more indoor feel, the Sea Side buffet at the Wyndham Nassau Resort, Cable Beach, will feature a wide spread of succulent Bahamian dishes to treat your mom this Mothers day. T he cost of brunch is $28 plus a 15 per cent gratuity and includes dishe s such as a grandma’s peas soup and dough, a crispy lemon and pepper grouper with Creole sauce, b aked Andros crab, and coconut rice w ith spicy lobster just to name a few. T he dessert table will include m outh watering desserts such as hot pudding and a variety of cakes, tarts and mousses. For a more secluded and earthy l ocation, why not take mom further out west to the Marley Resort and Spa for a tasty Mother’s Day treat and maybe a few extra surprises. Daniel Zonicle, assistant restaurant manager at the Marley resort, said they are anticipating a nice turn out this mother’s day. Brunch starts at 12 pm and the menu is really buffet style featuring a variety of Bahamian foods at $30 per person. We have seating at the sea front, and two other really nice s paces so the guests can have a c hoice as to where they want to e njoy their meals,” Mr Zonicle said. W ith all these different places to choose from serving all these very different dishes, they all have one thing in mindto please the everc hanging palette of your loving mother. TAKE MOM TO BRUNCH LOCAL Chefs from thirteen different r estaurants will showcase exciting new creations or their well-loved signature fare to guests of Paradise Plates, Hands For Hunger's first annual fundraiser event being held on Saturday, May 23 from 7 11 pm at the Atlantis Crown Ballroom. Sponsored by The New Providence Development Company Limited and Old Fort Bay, the unique event will feature a sampling of gourmet food, fine wine and live entertainment with all proceeds bene f iting Hands For Hunger the non-profit, humanitarian organisation committed to the elimination of hunger and the reduction of food waste in The Bahamas. T o date, Chefs from a wide array of restaurants including: Mesa Grill; Nobu; Dune; British Colonial Hilton; Old Fort Bay Club; Lucianos; The Patisserie; Van Breugels; Balduccinos; Compass Point; G oodfellow Farms; Food Art by Cacique; and Le Petit Gourmet have agreed to participate and showcase their extraordinary food. Fine wine will also be showcased at Paradise Plates. Pia Farmer, owner of Mendoza Wine Imports will be offering sam ples of some of her wines from Argentina and the Sands Brewery will offer Sands Beer at the event. Other sponsors include: Atlantis, Pearle V ision, Prime Advisory Group, The d'Al benas Agency Ltd., Royal Star Assurance, Sun Tee Embroid Me and Creative Relations. T ickets for Paradise Plates are $125 per person and can be purchased or reserved by calling or emailing at 327-1660 ext. 241 or info@handsforhunger.org. n By CARA BRENNENBETHEL T ribune Features Editor NOBUChef Ricky Sauri has a history of using his culinary skills to give back, so its no wonder he jumped at the chance to participate in this month’s Hands For Hunger’s fund raiser Paradise Plates 2009. Recently, the native Puerto Rican invited Tribune Taste to sample the restaurant’s signa ture black cod dish which he and a sous chef will be preparing for the 400 persons who will attend the gala event on May 23. “ We will be making black cod marinated for three days and cooked with miso on butter lettuce with ginger, and garlic chips. This is really a signature Nobu dish which Nobu Matsuttisa created for his restaurants 12 years ago, This dish he made famous.” Mr Sauri has been a part of the Nobu family since 2002 and has been a chef since 1990. He said that while at the Nobu in Miami, Florida, he and the other chefs were always doing charity events such as fundraisers for breast cancer awareness and so volunteering for this event came naturally. Mr Sauri describes himself as a self taught chef. Originally, he spent five years in college obtaining a degree in Business in Puerto Ricoalthough he said he was always cooking for family and friends. “I don’t have classical training. When I was finished school, I asked myself if I really wanted to spend the rest of my life in accounting and realised no. So I moved to New York and got a job at restaurant and then even tually ended up at the Nobu in Miami and then here.” The chef has prepared food from many different countries and said that cooking is a sure way to learn more about peo ple. “ It lets you know how people eat in different places and you learn different techniques. Since I started with Japanese foods, my diet has changed, I don’t eat so much fatty foods. It is also interesting how people are inspired by other countries, because Nobu visited Peru and his cooking is very much inspired by a Latin influencethe use of cilantro, avocado for instance.” Mr Sauri said he himself has blended everything he has learned with his own Puerto Rican background. And he encourages even the novice chef to try their hand at Japanese cooking. “ It is not only sushi. There are many types of Japanese cooking. It is all about keeping food simple. People don’t have to be afraid, you don’t want to overwhelm the food, its all about making good food fresh and simple.” Unique fundraiser to help fight hunger in the Bahamas n By Lloyd Allan Tribune Features Reporter OWNERand operator of Le Petit Gourmet a newly opened French Canadian restaurant in the Shirley Street Plaza-Julie Andree-Knowles is slated to have treats from her restaurant featured at both the VIP preparty and general fundraiser of the upcoming Hands for Hun gry dinner set to take place later this month. The chef is best know for her mouth watering dishes, and home style lunch presentations, which have been known to draw in scores of clients from all around the island. Chef Knowles who’s original ly from Quebec, Canada, said although she is self taught, her unique approach to involving her clients to help in creating her menu has proven to be key in enticing and maintaining them. Speaking of her involvement in the Hands for Hunger project, Mrs Knowles explained: “I think that people forget to be grateful for what they have, we live in a world of abundance and people forget to be thankful for every single little thing, one of which is food. “I think hands for hunger makes people realise that a lot of people out there do not have that chance, and that for everything they do get they are very grateful.” During the main event, Mrs Knowles said she will be pre senting about 20 of her unique spreads, many of which have a cream cheese base, and are a complete success among her fol lowers. During a recent sampling, Mrs Knowles showcased one of her spreads, which she said is normally served with Crustinis a chip like bread prepared with olive oil. Included were three unique spreads, the first was made with goat cheese and balsamic vine gar. Second was a blue-cheese covered with spiced walnuts, and the third was a Porcini with smoked gouda. Even if you're not a cheese lover, these treats are sure to add an interesting flavor to any white or red wine. Meet two of the Chefs for Hands for Hunger and Paradise Plates 2009 Chefs Julie Andree-Knowles (leftright GOAT cheese and balsamic vinegar (topmiddle left ered with spiced walnuts (bottom

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n By LLOYD ALLEN Tribune Features Reporter l allen@tribunemedia.net CUBAN-American musical icon PitBull blazed the stage at the Wyndham Resort’s R ainforest theater performing for a screaming crowd of Spring breakers this past month. Commonly considered strictly a Reggaeton artist, PitBull’s recent perfor mance showcased a myriad of songs from his past albums and upcoming CD ranging from rap, reggaeton, and even crunk. Linked to some of the most popular artists from the East Coast including Lil Jon, the Ying Yang twins, Rick Ross, Fuego, Omega, and Trina, PitBull proved that contrary to common opin ion, he is a jack of many trades. He has fused numerous genres into his musical repertoire. In an exclusive interview with “Mr 305” himself after the mini-concert, PitBull said 2009 will be one of his biggest years yet, bringing a fresh sound, a new image, and a new label. H e explained: “The whole PitBull movement has to do with a lot of move ments, people always try to label me ina particular box, whether it be Crunk, Down South, Reggaeton, or this, that, and the third. just happen to be involved with a l ot of musical sounds because I’m a c hameleon at the end of the day. I adapt to any environment, and coming from Miami which is a melting pot of music, whether it be music from the Caribbean, Dance Hall, Soca, Meringue, Salsa, or Cha-Cha, whether it be freestyle music, booty shaking music, or Hip hop, you p ut all that together and that’s the true definition of PitBull.” PitBull said like many Cuban-American artists before him, music been a part of his life for a long time mainly because of his culture, However it officially developed into a career after he was first invited by his high school drama teacher Hope Martinez to watch a DMX live video shot in 1998. He said: “There I met Swizz Beats, I met Irv Gotti, where he had asked me if I wrote music, and I said no, I just freestyled. He said freestyling is great but it don’t make no money, and that’s what turned me on to music right there.” From that moment on, PitBull said his career grew like “a chicken on s teroids.” He was soon signed to Luke R ecords, but moved around through s everal labels, and has now settled with 305 Inc/Polo Grounds Music and RCA Music Group for both an English and Spanish deal. With his music immersed in markets across the globe, PitBull said there remains an attraction to the Caribbean which goes far deeper than just his roots. “The energy in the Caribbean is something that can’t be described, our blood is hot, what we do is hot, we’re passion ate about everything that we do, whether it’s in the bedroom, whether it’s moving on the dance floor, or making music, we’re very passionate about it, and I think that’s what the Caribbean brings,” he said. Switching gears to what’s to come this year in his professional life, PitBull said this is a new chapter for him filled with limitless possibilities, because for the first time he considers himself free. “This year has been very special to me, because I’ve fought my way and won my freedom as far as the music game is concernedso now that we’re cutting these new deals, and the music is growing, and the whole movement is growing, I think what it’s all about from this point on is making sure that five years from now, the decisions that I make this year make all the sense in the world in the future,” he said. T HE INTERNET PitBull said he recognises the importance of the Internet and the way it is used to bring hype to any artist. He considers himself computer illiterate, but explained that despite knowing how to use the computer, the habit of continuously using it to get information and learn more is both a blessing and a curse. PitBull said: “Someone once said that the more you know, the more things will bother you, so the less you know the more you’re able to live life a little sweet er and stress free. “But I definitely take advantage of global communication on sites like Myspace, Youtube, and Facebook, but I’m not on that Twitter thing, cause I can’t let people know everywhere that I’m at.” He said another beautiful thing about the Internet is the fans that really support him follow him online. R EBELUTION With his fifth album “ Rebelution set to be released in September, Pitb-B ull said fans will definitely be pleased with his new material, including the release of Blanco, I Know You Want Me, Calle Ocho , and Krazy . “The decision to name my album Rebelution came first from me being a rebel in my own right, I fought my way through the game, and I figured out how to make my own money. “The ‘lution’ end of it comes from me doing things a new way, where four to five years from now my music will make all the sense in the world, where companies who want to cater to Latins are going to have to come to me to stamp their products.” With high hopes for his future as a leading Latin artist, PitBull is certain that the only thing between him and his future success is time. C M Y K C M Y K ENTERTAINMENT THE TRIBUNE WEDNESDAY, MAY 6, 2009, PAGE 9B T h e T r i b u n e n By JASON DONALD STARRING: Hugh Jackman, Live Schreiber, Danny Huston, Will I Am, Lynn Collins THE first X-Men movie, released in 2000, was a slight but watchable effort and invited a sequel. However, the second film in the series, X-Men United , seemed to feature end less scenes of men pointing guns at steel doors. Then the third, The Last Stand , had a cli mactic battle that would have looked cheap on the Sci-Fi Channel. But, incredibly, the franchise has reached a new low with this latest, needless episode, X-Men Origins: Wolverine. As the title suggests, this is the origin story of the X-Man with the muscular sideburns, and it all gets underway in 1845. ‘Little’ Wolverine, or Logan to his friends, kills his abusive father with his freaky hands and then goes on the run with his brother, Victor, who has some genetic hand issues of his own. The pair battle their way, side-by-side, through the 20th Century’s global conflicts before joining an elite fighting team of super humans, led by the mysterious Stryker. But when Logan becomes disturbed by the ruthless streak that runs through his colleagues and goes into hiding, he soon realises they aren’t quite ready to let him go. Perhaps the main problem with Wolverine is that everything the film has to offer has been done better elsewhere. The title sequence is suspiciously reminiscent of the recent stunning Watchmen opening, the chase scenes are lifeless, and the multiple faceoffs between Logan and Victor become increasingly anti-climactic. The one inspired moment a fight on some sort of giant chimney thingcomes so late, it feels like a set piece that’s wandered in from another film. And a better one at that. To add to these issues, the script is truly atrocious, with characters trading flat, macho dialogue that would have Vin Diesel shaking his head. In the last couple of years, films like The Dark Knight and the aforementioned Watchmen have shown how super hero movies can have depth and intelligence to match the special effects. Even Iron Man , which was lighter than those two, had well rounded characters and a tight narrative. In comparison, Wolverine seems dated, flabby and, unforgivably for this type of picture, dull. As fans of the series all know, when Logan eventually becomes a member of the XMen, he no longer has any memory of this story. I wish I could say the same for myself. X-Men Origins: Wolverine movie REVIEW IN THIS film publicity image released by 20th Century Fox, Hugh Jackman unleashes his adamantium claws in a scene from "Wolverine." M i c h a e l M u l l e r / A P P h o t o n By LLOYD ALLEN Tribune Features Reporter lallen@tribunemedia.net READY, set, and go! entertainment this week is all about cars, culture, and gorgeous women. Decorated with concerts, speed racing, a one love extravaganza, and did I say gorgeous women, this weekend’s lineup of events offers a collection of good times, complete wonder, and most important, something new. 1. The Crisis Centre of the Bahamas is hosting a cultural fair and entertainment extravaganza at the grounds of the National Centre for Performing Arts on Shirley Street this coming Saturday. The event which begins at noon, includes a range of activities for both adults and children including fun games, an appearance by Dora and Diego, and loads of fun foods, treats, and much more. Then around 7pm, local entertainers including Sammi Starr, Bodine a.k.a ‘B’, and the National Dance School, are expected to set a mood of full-c ircle entertainment. Tickets for the event are $10, and can be purchased at Airbrush Junkies in the Marathon Mall, and from the Crisis Centre on Collins Avenue. 2 . C ontinuing with its 50th anniversary celebrations, the Bahamas National Trust is host ing “Music In The Garden,” an exhibition of an eclectic musical ensemble. With Christine Gangelhoff on the flute, Chris Justillien on the saxophone, and Christy Lee on the piano, this colorful event is set to take place at the BNT Retreat Garden on Village Road this Friday at 7pm, with tickets priced at $20 for members, $25, for nonmembers, and just $10 for stu dents. All music lovers, Bahamians, and others are invited to attend and show sup p ort for this cultural event. 3. Bay Area Entertainment along with Tycon Entertainment is once again presenting the One Love Festival, a musical melting pot of some of the most popular conscious music icons from throughout the region. This three day fest has everything from beach parties, dance-offs, and pre-concert, to a heavy hitting reggae splash. For the concert on Saturday which is being hosted by Jah Cure, scheduled performances are expected from I Wayne, Fantan Mojah, B, Sammie Starr, I-Rate, Jah Doctrine, Mr Cure himself, and many others. Concert tickets are priced at $40 general admission, $70 VIP, and $120 platinum. For the pre-concert on Friday at the Fluid Lounge, tickets are $10 for ladies, and $15 for guys. Then for the beach party on Sunday on Long Wharf beach, tickets are available at $5, all of which can be purchased at the Juke Box at the Marathon Mall, or at Gizmos and Gadgets. 4. The organisers of the Miss Bahamas Universe beauty pageant have planned an all white boat cruise for this Saturday, where the 13 contestant of this year’s pageant will be out and dressed to impress on board the Bahamas Fast Fer ries. Continuing with its theme of Earth Angels, the girls will exhibit the full embodiment of nature as they continue with their list of pre-pageant public engagements. Set to board at 7.30pm from the Potter Cay dock, this aquatic event is priced at $10 and is said to be a sure night of glamour, top notch entertainment, and indulgence. 5. The Bahamas Hot Rod Association (BHRA up this Friday for its regular Street Legal Racing showdown. The event which is being held at the BHRA motorsports park at the Queen Elizabeth sporting complex, Oakes Field, cost just $5 per person. Starting at 7pm, the event is expected to draw an eager mix of motor-sport enthusiasts and high powered vehicles. things 2 DO PITBULL: U NCAGE D PITBULL

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C M Y K C M Y K ARTS PAGE 10B, WEDNESDAY, MAY 6, 2009 THE TRIBUNE Although Ms Katz has not had a show in about a year and a half, she decided to showcase her work in an open house May9 at Post House studio and Gallery, located on Sanford Drive from 11-4pm. The show will run for two weeks. “Most people know me for my collage work which is what I still do, but I wanted to do something different this time. So I did all still life acrylic paintings this time,” Ms Katz said. Ms Katz said she used acrylics a long time ago and got interested in collage and mixed media. “I focused on those two for a long time. I always liked doing still life just because I like setting up little environments. I find it fascinating so I decided to do an entire show using still life and acrylic,” Ms Katz said. She said in these new paintings, she decided to put together different elements that she felt were interesting. “I tried to use some sort of constant elements in a lot of my pieces like certain vases, and maybe like patterns that go together. I used my cat a lot in my pieces because she is a good prop,” Ms Katz. In her creative way, Ms Katz pieces are not your typical still life pieces. They are vibrant and fun pieces filled with life and humor. Ms Katz will have 22 pieces displayed at her art show using all acrylic medium. “The colors are very bright, sort of funky colors-just very different. I think what people see the show they will be surprised at the pieces,” Ms Katz said. As with all things artistic, it is not always easy and Ms Katz said to pull off this show was a lot of hard work. “Every artist has different ways that they work. I am better when I work at the last minute. I work better under pressure but it is a lot to that goes into an art show. You got to put together all your work, do all the framing which is expensive, the invitations and so forth. It can also be stressful because as an artist your work is up there and you feel very vulnerable because your work is personal,” Ms Katz said. n B y ALEX MISSICK Tribune Features Reporter amissick@tribunemedia.net TO celebrate mothers and the contributions they makein the lives of their children and those around them, many persons go all out with elaborate jewelry and fine china. However, why not give the most common gift of natural beautythe gift of flowers for that all around beauty in your life-. Just as flowers bloom with every sunrise, moms are up at the crack of dawn preparing for the best day she can give her family. Omar Williams of Wild Seed designs knows all too well about those fresh, gorgeous flowers that make every morning special. “We have been around for ten years. We do everyday flower arrangements from parties to weddings, offices, and we do a lot of native foliage as well such as sea grapes and so forth,” Mr Williams said. Mr Williams said although he loves what he does with flowers, he studied to be an artist. “I went to school to study art. It’s a kind of departure from what I thought I would be doing but its still an art formjust another medium. It does involve a lot of business and a little less art than I would like,” Mr Williams said. The typical flowers Mr Williams uses for Mother’s Day include Gerbera daisies, which are related to sunflowers and have a variety of colors to choose from; lilies, roses, chrysanthemums and to add special elements to soften the arrangement, tulips are used. To create gorgeous floral arrangements, especially for Mother’s Day, Mr Williams said there are many factors that comes to mind. “We are a small flower store and we do a lot of different things. The inspiration to create these pieces is somewhat personal because I don’t dictate every arrangement because it is up to the individual person who is making the arrangement to decide what it is going to be. When you are retailing flowers of course profitability and money is something that definitely comes into play. It puts boundaries into what you can do, but we take a lot of inspiration from nature because we use a lot of native stuff so they would kind of determine how arrangements would look. We also take into consideration the size, kind of flower, shape and how many flowers used in the piece. So those play a major role in how much of something you have but then you go and use your artistic ability to put it together,” Mr Williams said. The usual floral arrangements from Wild Seeds Designs begin at $30 and for Mother’s Day they start from $50 and up. “Each arrangement is different. A normal arrangement is usual ten to fifteen minutes to make. The $50 arrangements will probably be the more basic arrangements but we do have fruit and flower baskets along with gourmet baskets filled with things like cheese, crackers etc. Last year we had plants and flowers because most women like to garden so we included things they could plant in their home gardens in the arrangements as well,” Mr Williams said. Mr Williams said as an artist, he has to listen to the client even if they do not say it with words. “We use both fresh flowers and silk flowers. As an artist you have to interpret what it is and try to push it out as an arrangement. I don’t just see them as flowers. We have arrangements that we made six years ago and they are still talking about the arrangement. We know how important these are to people. I have a mom and other people have moms so I know how special the occasion is,” Mr Williams said. Pretty flowers for a special lady Katz acrylics FROM page 12 BAGEL WITH JUICE. Most people know me for my collage work which is what I still do, but I wanted to do something different this time. So I did all still life acr ylic paintings this time. SUE KATZ FLOWERS are the most common gift of natural beauty. BAHAMAS NATIONAL SYMPHONY ORCHESTRA Scenes from the orchestra’s gala concert which was held on April 25 at the St Andrew’s Kirk. The conductor was Douglas Turnquest and the concert master was Jennifer Hudson. F e l i p M a j o r / T r i b u n e s t a f f

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C M Y K C M Y K I N S I D E Paradise plates See page eight WEDNESDAY, MAY 6, 2009 n By ALEX MISSICK Tribune Features Reporter amissick@tribunemedia.net W ITH an ever changing environment, people have to adjust to differentt hings, e ven if it means switching up the things you enjoy doing from time to time. Artist, Sue Katz, has no problem using her creative flair to offer some t hing dif ferent to her ar tistic lif estyle. katz ACRYLICS Just in time for spring Sue Katz’s vibrant, fun, coloured paintings are sure to spruce up any room The Tribune SECTIONB Pitbull lights up the Rainforest theatre S ee page nine SEE page 10 FRUITS AND VASES. ITAMIN C PACKED BREAKFAST WITH A CUP OF COFFEE. KATZ’S CAT ENJOYING HER SPACE. FRUITS, WINE AND ART. MUFFIN WITH JAM. VASES AND FRUIT. STILL LIFE PAINTING OF TARTS AND FRUITS. COLOURFUL STILL LIFE PIECE OF A HEARTY BREAKFAST.


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