Citation
The Tribune

Material Information

Title:
The Tribune
Uniform Title:
Tribune (Nassau, Bahamas)
Portion of title:
Nassau tribune
Place of Publication:
Nassau, Bahamas
Publisher:
Tribune
Publication Date:
Copyright Date:
2009
Frequency:
Daily, except Sunday
daily
normalized irregular
Language:
English
Physical Description:
v. : ill. ; 58 cm.

Subjects

Genre:
newspaper ( sobekcm )
newspaper ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage:
Bahamas

Notes

General Note:
Description based on: Vol. 79, no. 210 (Aug. 3, 1983); title from caption.

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Holding Location:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
This item was contributed to the Digital Library of the Caribbean (dLOC) by the source institution listed in the metadata. This item may or may not be protected by copyright in the country where it was produced. Users of this work have responsibility for determining copyright status prior to reusing, publishing or reproducing this item for purposes other than what is allowed by applicable law, including any applicable international copyright treaty or fair use or fair dealing statutes, which dLOC partners have explicitly supported and endorsed. Any reuse of this item in excess of applicable copyright exceptions may require permission. dLOC would encourage users to contact the source institution directly or dloc@fiu.edu to request more information about copyright status or to provide additional information about the item.
Resource Identifier:
09994850 ( OCLC )

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This item has the following downloads:


Full Text
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he Tribune
= SA TODAY

BAHAMAS EDITION

www.tribune242.com

SATURDAY, MAY 2, 2009

drive-thru is now open

24 hours

Fridays & Saturdays

HIGH
LOW

BREEZY WITH
SUNSHINE

Pwr ele Lc



(Abaco and Grand Bahama $1.25)





PRICE —75¢_








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READ IT THIS MONDAY








rowers Gila ge
after police raid

FML CEO accused of
promoting a lottery
and allowing web shop
to be used for purpose

@ By NATARIO McKENZIE
Tribune Staff Reporter

FML CEO Craig Flowers
appeared in Magistrate’s Court
yesterday charged with promoting
a lottery and permitting his web
shop to be used for the purpose of
conducting a lottery.

He pleaded not guilty to the
allegations.

Flowers, 67, of Victoria
Avenue, appeared before Mag-
istrate Derrence Rolle in Court 5,
Bank Lane, along with several of
his employees and patrons. The
arraignment comes just three days
after police raided FML’s head
office on Wulff Road.

Court dockets state that Mr
Flowers, along with Kingsley
Munroe, 58, Rhodista Rolle, 27,
Anwar McDonald, 23, Nyokia
Myer, 34, Nikita Patton, 19,
Andrinique Dean, 26, Rolinda
Pierre, 29, Makia Stubbs, 23,

Melissa Clarke, 24 and Andrea
Pratt, 20, on Tuesday April 28,
permitted the premises of the
FML Web Shop, located at Wulff
Road, to promote, organise and
conduct a lottery.

The dockets also state that Mr
Flowers and his co-accused know-
ingly permitted the FML Web
Shop on Wulff Road to be used
for the purpose of a lottery.

Munroe, Rolle, McDonald,
Myer, Patton, Dean, Pierre,
Stubbs, Clarke, and Andrea Pratt,
were arraigned along with Hykey-
to Knowles, 31, Stephen New-
bold, 28, Vernita Mackey, 26, and
Germaine Williams-Rahming, 40,
charged with being found on a
premises where a lottery was tak-
ing place. The accused all pleaded
not guilty to the charges.

The prosecution made no
objection to the accused being

SEE page six

Flowers: I would not
support national lottery

m@ By PAUL G TURNQUEST
Tribune Staff Reporter
pturnquest@tribunemedia.net

FML CEO Craig Flowers said he would not support the
Bahamas establishing a national lottery as the country’s size
would not make such a lottery financially feasible.

With a population of little more than 350,000 Mr Flowers said
the pay out for such a lottery would hover somewhere around
$100,000 per dollar ticket purchased — a drastic decrease com-
pared to other regions especially the United States where an
equal dollar wager could reward a player with the opportunity

to win tens of millions of dollars.

“The fact of the matter is, as a national lottery per se, the gam-
ing industry needs to visit and look at what the locals are doing
here in the Bahamas is not a lottery per se. It is a type of game
that is played by their actual name is numbers, but it is not a lot-
tery. A lottery is where numbers are used from a pool of num-
bers and they are draw out in five or six balls one ball at a

time.

“When you have a series of three balls as we do we do not dif-
ferentiate here between one and the other. But that is not the
case. In the Bahamas the local games that we play are number
games. In the lottery, the chances of winning the lottery are one
in seven point something million. But in the numbers game at
least two thirds of the money will move back to the people
who play the numbers every day,” he said.

Therefore, he said, the government needs to understand that
the practice of persons playing the local number system must be

SEE page six



nal
AND REAL ESTATE

BAHAMAS BIGGEST

cilar'ge

Tim Clarke/Tribune staff



FML CEO Craig Flowers (top of stairs in white shirt) enters court,
followed by others appearing in connection with his case

Police officer dies
after traffic accident

A POLICE officer has died
after his motorcycle collided with
a car in Second Street, The
Grove, on Thursday evening.

PC 3124 Rayshano Smith was
riding a 650 motorbike when he
collided with a Honda Odyssey
at around 6.30pm.

The Nassau officer who was off
duty at the time of the accident
sustained serious injuries and was
taken to hospital where he died at

around 9pm Thursday.

Police Commissioner Reginald
Ferguson extended his condo-
lences to the family of PC Smith.

Police are investigating the
cause of the collision.

Anyone with any information
that could assist the investigation
should call traffic police at 393-
7714 or 911, 919, or Crime Stop-
pers anonymously on 328-TIPS
(8477).

i








|. SEE PAGE NINE



US currency
discovered
on aircraft
‘could run

into millions

oe

Man in custody after
hidden cash found

@ By DENISE
MAYCOCK
Tribune Freeport
Reporter
dmaycock@
tribunemedia.net

FREEPORT —- Law
enforcement officials have
discovered a large amount
of US currency — possibly
millions of dollars — hid-
den on board a private
charter aircraft at Grand
Bahama International Air-
port.

Asst Supt Wellbourne
Bootle said a 24-year-old
Bahamian man is in cus-
tody assisting police with
their investigations.

According to reports,
Bahamas Customs, Drug
Enforcement Unit officers



and Airport Police
searched a private aircraft
which arrived from Fort
Lauderdale around
2.30pm on April 30.

While searching a num-
ber of household appli-
ances and grocery items on
board the aircraft, officers
discovered cash hidden
inside the appliances.

ASP Bootle said a man
was arrested. He could not
say whether the plane was
Bahamian or US regis-
tered.

Police also could not say
how much cash was found
as investigations were still
ongoing, he said.

According to a source,
it is believed more
than $6 million was uncov-
ered.

Isolated students and teachers
cleared of swine flu infection

m@ By MEGAN REYNOLDS
Tribune Staff Reporter
mreynolds @tribunemedia.net

ABACO students
and teachers who were
isolated because of
swine flu fears after a
visit to Mexico have
been cleared of infec-
tion, Health Minister
Hubert Minnis announced.

The ten students and two teachers who
went into voluntary isolation upon their
return to Abaco last Saturday were

SEE page six



JET SKI VICTIM ‘WAS
WORKING AT NYGARD CAY
RESORT PARTY’

80% OF SECOND GRADE
STUDENTS READING AT
LEAST TO GRADE LEVEL

RUNNING WATER IS A
‘LUXURY’ FOR SOME NEW
PROVIDENCE RESIDENTS



NASSAU AND BAHAMEA

ISLANDS’ LEADING NEWSPAPER

PAGE TWO



Hubert Minnis

BUT voices concern
over govt approach
to sex allegations

@ By ALISON LOWE
Tribune Staff Reporter
alowe@tribunemedia.net

THE Bahamas Union of
Teachers is concerned about
recent statements made by
Prime Minister Ingraham out-
lining government’s new
approach in dealing with
teachers against whom sex
allegations have been brought.

Father Sebastian Campbell,
Vice President of the
Bahamas Union of Teachers,
said that while the union’s
“first goal is the welfare of

SEE page six



PAGE 2, SATURDAY, MAY 2, 2009

THE TRIBUNE



LOCAL NEWS

students debate ‘eating §=[nmi

Well on a tight budget

THE Ministry of Education, in
collaboration with the Ministry of
Health and Toastmasters Interna-
tional, held a speech competition
centered around National Nutri-
tion Month.

Armed with their oratorical
skills and ready to do battle were
students from New Providence
and the Family Islands.

Participating schools included
LW Young Junior High School, C
C Sweeting Senior, R M Bailey
Senior High School, St Andrew’s
College, Bahamas Academy, and
Saint Francis De Sales. The topic
of the debate was “Eating Well
On a Tight Budget.”

The students admonished the
audience to limit their intake of
fatty and greasy foods; make phys-
ical activity and exercise a part of
their lifestyles; eat fruit and veg-
etables everyday; drink lots of
water; and choose foods with less
sugar and salt.

Permanent Secretary Camille
Johnson, who spoke on behalf of
the Minister of Health Dr Hubert
Minnis, congratulated all of the
students for their participation in
sending the message of healthy

TROPICAL
EXTERMINATORS

PEST CONTROL
PHONE: 322-2157



AFTER THREE INTENSE HOURS,
THE COMPETITION CAME TO AN
END, AND THE WINNERS WERE
DECLARED AS FOLLOWS:



¢ JUNIOR DIVISION:

1. DEOKIN-NIQUE
(LW YOUNG JUNIOR HIGH SCHOOL)

2. TRYKER SMITH
(ST ANDREW'S COLLEGE)

3. TANISHA ANDERSON
(LW YOUNG JUNIOR SCHOOL)

¢ SENIOR DIVISION:

1. KENDRA STUART
(CC SWEETING SENIOR HIGH SCHOOL}

2. ROBERT FARQUHARSON
(ST ANDREW'S COLLEGE)

3. JOY ARCHER (ST FRANCES DE SALES)

lifestyles and good nutrition
through education.

She said the Ministry of Health
will continue to support the speech
contest because good nutrition is
critical to building economic
growth.

Further, Ms Johnson said that
the winners in the junior and
senior divisions will hold the titles
of, “Junior and Senior Nutrition
Ambassadors”, and will work with
the Ministry of Health to promote
good nutrition and health.

gration Department

donates 37 pints of blood

UBS (Bahamas) Lod. is one of the word's leading financal institutions in the
‘Caribbean. Through aur Boars Aree Wealth Managenernt International wee kok
after wealthy private clemts by providing them with comprehersive, walle
enhancing services. Qur client acwisors comming strong personal relationships weth
the resources that are available from across UBS, helping them prowde 4 full
range of wealth management services.

nonder to strengthen cur team in Nassau, we are |polong to fill the follwing

positon;

Accounting & Reporting Expert

Res porrsii ities

m@ By LINDSAY
THOMPSON

IMMIGRATION Depart-
ment employees donated 37
pints of blood to the Princess
Margaret Hospital’s blood bank
on Thursday as part of its 70th
anniversary celebrations.

Minister of State for Immi-
gration Branville McCartney,
the first to donate, said that it
was a pleasure for him to give
back to the community.

“As we celebrate our 70th
anniversary we are giving blood
and hopefully we would help
Save many, many lives,” Mr
McCartney said.

Dr Hubert Minnis, Minister
of Health, commended the
department for “taking the
lead” in such an initiative.

He said operations are peri-
odically delayed due to the
shortage of blood supply.

“What you are embarking on
cannot be matched by any,
because blood is as essential
component of our survival so
you would be saving many
lives,” Dr Minnis said.

An Act of Parliament formed
the Immigration Department

Endure the quality, accuracy, and completeness of all firancial data according to IFAS standards,
Ensure monthly chasing process and correct allocation of costs and revenues:

Perform high quality reporting to local management and regulator,
Reporting of Management 4ccounting data to head office;
Relatiorahip management 4nd investigations with Bracdian organization;

Qualifications:

CRA certilica tion;

Saund working knowledge of IFAS and Based || banking nequlations;
Extensive knowledge of M5 Office and related “pplication Software products;
Knowledge of S4P based accounting applications is a plus;
Minirnunm of 5 years Experience in Accounting. Previaus work in an iMenmational linarcial inétitu-
Ton of accounting firm is a plus;
‘Working knowledge of Portuquese language is required for communication with Braglian clients;

Mn addition, the ideal candidate must possess strom anahlical and communication skilk, be a highly enci-
wabed tear player and willing to adapt bo a chymanmic work environment 4. shrong budinesecushomer ori-

eration & ettertial.

Pease send your resume on or before hay 8", 2009 to:

Arhaharasaube con

aor

UBS (Bahamas) Lod., Human Resources, Pd. Box Ne? 'S!, Nassau, Bahan

a starts wath you.



























52wk-Low

1.28

11.00
6.95
0.63
3.15
1.95

11.09
2.83
6.39
1.31
1.86

Abaco Markets

Bank of Bahamas
Benchmark
Bahamas Waste
Fidelity Bank
Cable Bahamas
Colina Holdings

Doctor's Hospital
6.02
11.00
10.35
5.00

Famguard
Fince

Focol (S)
1.00
0.30
5.50
8.60
10.00

Freeport Concrete
ICD Utilities
J. S. Johnson

Securit y

Bahamas Property Fund

Commonwealth Bank ($1)

Consolidated Water BDRs

FirstCaribbean Bank

Focol Class B Preference

Premier Real Estate

theca er

ROYAL = FIDELITY

Money ot Work





Kristaan Ingraham/BIS

MINISTER OF STATE for Immigration Branville McCartney, donates blood as part of the Immigration

Department’s 70th anniversary.

in 1939. And to commemorate
this occasion, the department
is hosting a number of activi-
ties culminating with a banquet.

“Today we are giving back
to the community,” said Jack
Thompson, Director of Immi-
gration.

“We pause to make a deposit
into the blood bank as this is a
great investment towards saving
lives.”

WHO not recommending travel

restrictions over swine flu



THE United Nations’ World Health
Organisation said yesterday it is not recom-
mending travel restrictions as a result of the

outbreak of swine flu.

The WHO maintains that limiting travel
and imposing travel restrictions would have
“very little effect” on stopping influenza
A(HIN1) from spreading, but would be
“highly disruptive to the global communi-

ty.

A number of cruise ships originally bound
for Mexico have arranged to divert their trips
to the Bahamas in May and June as a result
of the outbreak, while airlines and travel
companies are offering discounted fares to
alternative sunshine destinations for trav-
ellers who are changing their plans to visit

Mexico.

“Travellers can protect themselves and
others by following simple recommendations
related to travel aimed at preventing the
spread of infection,” said a WHO spokesman.

“Individuals who are ill should delay trav-
el plans and returning travellers who fall ill
should seek appropriate medical care.

a
sy
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=
ws
=
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Lud

Panama.

“These recommendations are prudent mea-

Three megayacht tenders reportedly
stolen in just over a month in Bahamas

AN ONLINE yachting mag-
azine has issued a report about
three megayacht tenders being
stolen in the Bahamas in just
over a month.

According to the Triton
Megayacht News, the most
recent boat thefts both took
place on April 6 at the High-
bourne Cay Marina.

The 32-foot vessel “Freak
Show” was recovered with a
gash in its bow and all the acces-
sories missing. The report said
five men were taken into cus-
tody for questioning in connec-
tion with the theft.

That morning, a 28-foot

EG CAPITAL MARKETS

BISxX LISTED & TRADED SECURITIES AS OF:
FRIDAY, 24 APRIL 2009

BISX ALL SHARE INDEX: CLOSE 1,628.06 | CHG 0.08 | %CHG 0.00 | YTD -84.30 | YTD % -4.92

FINDEX: CLOSE 797.40 | YTD -4.49% | 2008 -12.31%

WWW .BISXBAHAMAS.COM | TELEPHONE: 242-323-2330 | FACSIMILE: 242-323-2320

1.40
11.00
6.95
0.63
3.15
2.37
12.04
2.83
6.39
2.54
1.86
7.76
11.00
10.40
5.14
1.00
0.30
5.59
10.50
10.00

Previous Close Today's Close
1.40
11.00
6.95
0.63
3.15
2.37
12.04
2.83
6.39
2.62
1.86
7.76
11.00
10.40
5.14

1.00
0.30
5.59
10.50
10.00

Change Daily Vol. ERPS
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00 =
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.08
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00

BISX LISTED DEBT SECURITIES - (Bonds trade on a Percentage Pricing bases)
Last Sale

52wk-Low
1000.00
1000.00
1000.00
1000.00

52wk-Low

RND Holdings

ABDAB
RND Holdings

Fund Name

1.3041
2.9230
1.3875
3.1964
12.1564
100.0000
96.4070
1.0000
9.0950
1.0000
1.0000
1.0000

Colina Bond Fund

CFAL Global Bond

BISX ALL SHARE INDEX - 19 Dec 02 = 1,000.00
52wk-Hi - Highest closing price in last 52 weeks
52wk-Low - Lowest closing price in last 52 weeks
Previous Close
Today's Close
Change - Change in closing price from day to day
Daily Vol. - Number of total shares traded today

DIV $ - Dividends per share paid in the last 12 months

P/E - Closing price divided by the last 12 month earnings

(S) - 4-for-1 Stock Split - Effective Date 8/8/2007
(S1) - 3-for-1 Stock Split - Effective Date 7/11/2007

Fidelity Bank Note 17 (Series A) +
Fidelity Bank Note 22 (Series B) +
Fidelity Bank Note 13 (Series C) +
Fidelity Bank Note 15 (Series D) +

Symbol
Bahamas Supermarkets
Caribbean Crossings (Pref)

Colina MSI Preferred Fund
Colina Money Market Fund
Fidelity Bahamas G & I Fund
Fidelity Prime Income Fund

CFAL Global Equity Fund

CFAL High Grade Bond Fund
Fidelity International Investment Fund
FG Financial Preferred Income Fund
FG Financial Growth Fund

FG Financial Diversified Fund

- Previous day's weighted price for daily volume
- Current day's weighted price for daily volume

FBB17
FBB22
FBB13
FBB15

100.00
100.00
100.00
100.00

Daily Vol.
0.00 7%
0.00
0.00
0.00

7%

Fidelity Over-The-Counter Securities

Bid $
7.92
4.00
0.35

Ask $
8.42
6.25
0.40

Last Price Weekly Vol.
14.60 =
6.00
0.35

Colina Over-The-Counter Securities

30.13
0.45

31.59
0.55

29.00
0.55

BISX Listed Mutual Funds

NA Vv
1.3664
2.8962
1.4548
3.1964

12.7397
100.5606
96.4070
1.0000
9.1599
1.0440
1.0364
1.0452

Fund

YTD%

0.95

-1.49
1.48

-5.59
0.96
0.56

-3.59
0.00
0.71
0.80
0.33
0.76

Last 12 Months
4.77
-3.35
4.85

-13.64
5.79
0.56
-3.59
0.00
-12.76
4.40
3.64
4.40

Div $

MARKET TERMS
YIELD - last 12 month dividends divided by closing price
Bid $ - Buying price of Colina and Fidelity
Ask & - Selling price of Colina and fidelity

Last Price
Weekly Vol

- Last traded over-the-counter price
- Trading volume of the prior week

Prime + 1.75%
Prime + 1.75%

EPS $

$s Div $
0.127
0.992
0.244
0.877
0.078
0.055
1.309
0.249
0.441
0.099
0.240
0.420
0.322
0.794
0.337

P/E

0.000
0.035
0.407
0.952
0.180

Interest

19 October 2017

19 October 2022
30 May 2013
29 May 2015

Div $
0.300
0.480
0.000

P/E
0.041
0.000
0.001

4.540
0.002

0.000
0.000

Yield %
28-Feb-09
31-Mar-09
17-Apr-09
31-Mar-09
28-Feb-09
31-Dec-08
31-Dec-08
31-Dec-07
31-Mar-09
9-Feb-09
9-Feb-09
9-Feb-09

EPS $ - A company’s reported earnings per share for the last 12 mths
NAV - Net Asset Value
N/M - Not Meaningful

FINDEX - The Fidelity Bahamas Stock Index. January 1, 1994 = 100

TO TRADE CALL: COLINA 242-502-7010 | ROYALFIDELITY 242-356-7764 | F@ CAPITAL MARKETS 242-396-4000 | COLONIAL 242-502-7525

Intrepid tied to M/Y Relentless
was stolen and later recovered
after having suffering some
damage.

The report said Captain Ess-
er of the Freak Show believes
the men were attempting to
make a drug run to Jamaica.

"Mine was stolen because of
its range,” Captain Esser said.
"They wanted it to make a drug
run.”

Capt Robin Norquoy of M/Y
Relentless appealed to local
radio and televisions stations
for help in getting the word out
about the thefts.

Involved

Capt Esser contacted the US
Coast Guard, but little came of
this, so he spoke with the Roy-
al Bahamas Police Force and
the Royal Bahamas Defence
Force, both of which got
involved along with the Drug
Enforcement Agency, the
report said.

"Without those agencies, our
boat would have never been
recovered,” Capt Esser is quot-
ed as saying.

The report said that after
hearing about the thefts, Capt
Zack Green of M/Y Incentive
spoke about a third incident last
month.

PASSENGERS we



=

aring face masks as a precaution
against the swine flu inside a flight heading to

sures which can limit the spread of many
communicable diseases and not only influen-
za A(HIN1).”

e SEE PAGE ONE

"On the night of March 22
while the Incentive, a 142-foot
Palmer Johnson, was anchored
at the eastern end of Nassau
Harbour, our 32-foot Intrepid
with twin 350HP outboards was
stolen from the swim platform.

"It was 9.30pm and all the
lights were on. Crew were on
deck as we were preparing to
depart for Palm Beach. There
was a 10-minute window that
no one was on the aft deck, and
during this time the line was cut.

"We launched a jet ski and a
tender and contacted the local
marine patrol. After hours of
searching, the crew gave up for
the night. In the morning I had
the engineer go to the airport to
charter an airplane because
there were no helicopters avail-
able.

"After 45 minutes in the air,
they spotted what could be our
tender under some trees in the
Sea Breeze canal on the south
side of Nassau. I then sent our
other tender to investigate and,
sure enough, it was our Intrepid,
fully intact.

"After the police tried to take
fingerprints we used the spare
set of keys to bring the Intrepid
back to Nassau and quickly got
under way for Florida,” the
report quoted Capt Green as
saying.

MAIN/SPORTS SECTION

Local News

Editorial/Letters. ..........

pipe Sonele

Santa ueenan Mec ecteeean saunas: P4

CLASSIFIED SECTION 36 PAGES

USA TODAY WEEKENDER 8 PAGES





THE TRIBUNE

SATURDAY, MAY 2, 2009, PAGE 3



LOCAL NEWS



Exhibition to
highlight need to
preserve coastal
environment

THE National Coastal
Awareness Committee is
hosting an exhibition at the
Mall of Marathon to high-
light the need to preserve
and protect our coastal envi-
ronment.

The exhibition, which
opened on Monday, April 27,
and continues to Saturday,
May 9, features a travelling
exhibit entitled “Our Reefs:
Caribbean Connections.”

The modular display was
created by the Florida State
University and is a revision
of an exhibit originally pro-
duced by the Smithsonian
Tropical Research Institute.
It focuses on the problems
affecting coral reefs through-
out the Caribbean. Examples
of impacts to coral reefs from
around the wider Caribbean
are balanced with case stud-
ies of actions that people are
taking to protect reefs and
coastal environments.

The exhibition includes
several important examples
from the Bahamas. The “Our
Reefs” exhibition is on loan
to BREEF, and it also will be
on public display in
Eleuthera, Abaco and Grand
Bahama in the coming
weeks.

Display

“We are very pleased to
have this extraordinary
exhibit on display in the
Bahamas for the first time,”
said Casuarina McKinney,
director of BREEF, a mem-
ber of the National Coastal
Awareness Committee.

“The large display mod-
ules address topics such as
reefs and related ecosystems,
global warming, pollution,
coastal development, over-
fishing, marine protected
areas and reef rehabilitation.
The exhibit provides a public
focal point for students and
adults to encounter and dis-
cuss complex issues that span
the interfaces of science,
technology, economics and
society.”

“The exhibition has
recently been on display at
the 11th International Coral
Reef Symposium and in the
Florida Keys National
Marine Sanctuary.” said
Dr Judy Lang, exhibition
developer, who is currently
in Nassau to assist with
training about the
exhibition.

The exhibition also fea-
tures displays by the
Bahamas National Trust,
Bahamas Environment Sci-
ence and Technology
(BEST) Commission,
BREEF, Dolphin Encoun-
ters — Project BEACH, the
Department of Marine
Resources, the Nature Con-
servancy and the United
States Embassy.

Jet ski victim ‘was working |
_at Nygard Cay resort party’

m@ By MEGAN REYNOLDS
Tribune Staff Reporter
mreynolds@tribunemedia. net

THE man whose body parts were found
in the waters off western New Providence on
Monday was working at a party at the Nygard
Cay resort when he disappeared, it has been
alleged.

Jerome Huyler, 37, had taken two women
out on a jet ski from the beach bordering
fashion mogul Peter Nygard’s exotic Nygard
Cay resort in Lyford Cay when he disap-
peared — creating panic at the resort, a source
claimed.

The lower part of a man’s body was recov-
ered by Royal Bahamas Defence Force divers
on Monday afternoon and police are awaiting
DNA test results to confirm the remains are
Mr Huyler’s.

A source told The Tribune Mr Huyler was
a jet ski operator contracted by Mr Nygard to
take out guests at his Sunday parties and had
arrived at Nygard Cay with his jet skis on

Sunday morning. Mr Huyler had worked at
the resort for at least eight years and was
also a disc jockey at Mr Nygard’s Sunday
pamper parties, the source claimed.

But a spokeswoman for the Nygard Cay
resort denied Mr Huyler was a jet ski opera-
tor at Nygard Cay and said he did not have
permission to operate the jet ski on Sunday
evening as it had been put away for the day.
She further claimed he was not wearing a life
jacket when he went out in rough conditions.

Party

The spokeswoman did confirm Mr Huyler,
also known as DJ Shorts, was scheduled to DJ
at the party that evening.

Police told The Tribune on Thursday they
were not sure if Mr Huyler had been attend-
ing the party at Nygard Cay, and the Nygard
Cay spokeswoman said the accident, “had
nothing to do with Nygard Cay.”

But The Tribune’s source, who claims to

have been at Nygard Cay on Sunday,
rejected statements published in Friday’s edi-
tion.

The source claimed there was panic at the
resort when the two women returned
to the beach at around 6pm without Mr
Huyler

The police were called and three private
boats were sent out in 15 to 18ft waves to
search for Mr Huyler, while others scoured
the coastline until after midnight, the source
said.

“T was frantic, I was very scared,” the
source said. “Jerome’s aunt and two of his
cousins came to the property, and then more
of his cousins came, but his mother couldn’t
handle it.”

The source claimed two staff members
resigned from Nygard Cay because of the
manner in which the incident was handled,
adding: “It must be a very serious thing for an
employee with three children and a mort-
gage to walk off the job in the middle of a
recession.”

80% of second grade students
reading at least to grade level

THE results of the Rigby Reads
Diagnostic Test show that more
than 80 per cent of grade two pub-
lic school students are reading at
or above their grade level, Minis-
ter of Education Carl Bethel said.

This year, primary students in
grades two, four and five took the
test, which is an internationally
acclaimed diagnostic test that pro-
vides a detailed report of students’
learning strengths and weaknesses.

Mr Bethel said the Rigby Reads
Diagnostic Test allows the Min-
istry of Education to standardise
the assessment of reading levels
throughout the Bahamas, so that
the ministry is able to determine
the uniformity and discrepancies in
the reading levels of students in
public schools throughout the
country.

“By assessing our students’
strengths and weaknesses in the
classroom, we are able to respond
to their needs,” he said. “Teachers
are then able to place students in
appropriate instructional groups
and determine the critical skills
that they need to emphasise in
reading.

“Students’ progress is moni-
tored from year-to-year because
they are tested each year,” he said.

Mr Bethel said that last year,
the Rigby Reads Diagnostic Test
was only administered to students
in grade two. But this year, the
testing population was expanded
to include students in grades four
and five with a total of 11,730 stu-
dents participating in the assess-
ment.

He said the Ministry of Educa-
tion has sought for years to estab-
lish a programme to recognise and
honour students at the primary
level for their achievement in lit-
eracy.

“We believe this literacy pro-
gramme today provides that

Orla ei- 1401s)



opportunity to highlight students
for their outstanding achievement
in literacy,” he said.

Mr Bethel said grade two stu-
dents were assessed in the areas of
visual discrimination, auditory dis-
crimination, letter recognition,
sounds-letters and consonants.

Comprehension was the most
challenging area for students for
both years but the minister said
there was an improvement of
three percentage points. He
explained that students in grades
four and five were assessed in the
areas of sound letter consonants,
sound letter vowels, vocabulary,
comprehension and fluency.

Grade four students performed
best in the area of letter conso-
nants and grade five students per-
formed best in the area of vocab-
ulary.

Mr Bethel said the challenging
area for both of these grade levels
were the sound-letters vowels, and
at all levels, the girls consistently
outperformed the boys. He said
his ministry is looking at more

The American Embassy in Nassau, The Bahamas has a requirement for a
qualified contracting firm to provide labour, equipment, and materials to
demolish and remove approximately 62 feet of existing concrete masonry unit
wall and construct 82 feet of 9 foot high reinforced concrete perimeter wall with

steel picket fence.

The wall should be constructed to American Concrete Institute I reinforced
standards or better with proper drainage and a 5ft depth foundation.

Additional work includes cutting through an existing low masonry wall and
installing two single door entrances into an existing building. This construction
effort is estimated at between $50,000 - $100,000 and should be completed no

than a “band-aid” approach to
the illiteracy problem in the
nation.

“We believe that the results of
the Rigby Roads Diagnostic Test
allow us to take steps to imple-
ment programmes and instructions
that will counteract the challenges
our students encounter in read-
ing,” Mr Bethel said.

“T am proud of the fact that we
have already introduced initiatives
and strategies that will move us
forward in the area of reading and
ultimately the entire spectrum of
learning.”

The students who achieved the
highest test scores were: Christal
Adderley; Daunte Bethel; Saman-
tha Cash; Nnika Corbin; Derricka
Ferguson; Ajah Higgs; Midjina
Jose; Ashlee Major; Treyvine Ney-
mour; Cassidy Rolle; Kamrin
Roker; Khyree Rolle; Shaquel
Seymour; Brenton Taylor; Alia
Wilson; Shannon Albury; Paige
Davis; Micah Kelly; Tinisha Miller;

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: Police discover
_ thousands of
_ marijuana plants

A FIELD of thousands of

eee ae plants growing in
? Red Bay, North Andros was
? discovered by police.

It is estimated there are more

: than 1,600 plants of the illegal
? weed growing between two and
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Police who made the discov-

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Anyone with any informa-

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| Arrest after stolen
_ boat recovered

A 25-YEAR-OLD Grand

? Bahama man has been arrested
? after a boat stolen in New Prov-
? idence was recovered in North
? Andros.

The 35ft vessel was found in

the settlement of Conch Sound
? after police received a tip on
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Police press liaison officer

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Have all licenses and permits required by local law;

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PAGE 4, SATURDAY, MAY 2, 2009

EDITORIAL/LETTERS TO THE EDITOR

THE TRIBUNE





The Tribune Limited

NULLIUS ADDICTUS JURARE IN VERBA MAGISTRI
Being Bound to Swear to The Dogmas of No Master

LEON E. H. DUPUCH, Publisher/Editor 1903-1914

SIR ETIENNE DUPUCH, Kt, O.B.E., K.M., K.CS.G.,

(Hon.) LL.D., D.Litt.

Publisher/Editor 1919-1972
Contributing Editor 1972-199]

EILEEN DUPUCH CARRON, C.M.G., M.S. B.A., LL.B.

Publisher/Editor 1972-

Published Daily Monday to Saturday

Shirley Street, RO. Box N-3207, Nassau, Bahamas
Insurance Management Building., P.O. F-485, Freeport, Grand Bahama

TELEPHONES
Switchboard (News, Circulation and Advertising) 322-1986
Advertising Manager - (242) 502-2352
Circulation Department - (242) 502-2387
Nassau Fax: - (242) 328-2398
Freeport, Grand Bahama: 1-(242)-352-6608
Freeport fax: (242) 352-9348

WEBSITE
www.tribune242.com — updated daily at 2pm

Auto deal extends Obama’s reach, risk

WASHINGTON — In forcing a swift bank-
ruptcy on Chrysler, President Barack Obama
expanded the risk and reach of the presidency in
the hope that the hidebound auto industry will
find a way to remake itself.

The government's intervention with Chrysler
LLC and General Motors Corp. has been far
more intrusive than the way it has confronted
troubled financial companies. The administra-
tion's influence now ranges from guaranteeing
brake pads to pushing for new products on the
assembly line.

As Obama himself put it, "If the Japanese can
design an affordable, well-designed hybrid, then,
doggone it, the American people should be able
to do the same.”

Despite an additional $8 billion taxpayer
infusion into Chrysler, the president and his
advisers say the administration has no desire to
be in the auto business. And they say they don't
intend to micromanage the company.

But as part of Thursday's arrangement, the
government will be an investor in the new
Chrysler company, and the Treasury Depart-
ment will select four of its new directors, all of
them presumably sympathetic with the White
House's vision of what the car of the future
should be.

In cutting the deal, Obama buys himself good
will with an important labour force, especially in
the USS. auto industry's home state of Michigan,
which has been suffering hugely from unem-
ployment. At the same time he gets to push a
key policy goal, fuel-efficiency, not just as pres-
ident but as a powerful company investor.

But he also is putting billions of dollars of tax-
payer money at risk at a time of rising anxiety
about government bailouts and soaring deficits.

Even before he got to this point, Obama had
exerted unprecedented power. He rejected
Chrysler's and General Motors’ restructuring
plans last month and forced GM's CEO, Rick
Wagoner, to resign. At Chrysler, too, chief exec-
utive Robert Nardelli said Thursday he is going
to leave when the bankruptcy is complete.

General Motors still has another 30 days to
restructure itself, and its stakeholders may well
take a lesson from the administration's dealings
with Chrysler.

When Obama was not leveraging industry
behaviour with taxpayers' money, he was using
the pulpit of the presidency to make his wishes
known in no uncertain terms. In announcing
the deal Thursday, he left no doubt about his
anger with some Chrysler creditors who refused
to accept a reduced payout for their investment.

"They were hoping that everybody else would
make sacrifices, and they would have to make
none," he said. "I don't stand with them."

Administration officials said they tried to
sweeten the offer Wednesday night to attract
more creditors, to no avail.

That could be an effort to nudge a bank-
ruptcy judge to be tough with recalcitrant stake-
holders. And by showing a willingness to stand
up to some Chrysler creditors, Obama was also
sending a signal to GM bondholders not to hold
out for too great a return.

His tone also carried the same populist strains
that he used when he railed against Wall Street
bonuses.

"He's invested in terms of the taxpayers’
investment, and he's invested in it politically,”
said Sen. Carl Levin, a Michigan Democrat who
had initially objected to bankruptcy as a way to
restructure the company.

While the political risks are potentially great,
taking Chrysler through bankruptcy buys some
short-term political running room.

For months, Republicans and some Democ-
rats have said bankruptcy restructuring was the
proper fate for the automakers. By Thursday,
some past critics of bankruptcy such as Levin
were hailing the deal as a new birth for Chrysler.

What's more, the public appears to tilt in
favour of government interventions, at least so
far. A FOX News/Opinion Dynamics Poll in
March found 43 per cent of respondents saying
the government under Obama was taking an
appropriate role in running U.S. companies.
Thirteen per cent said the administration was not
taking a big enough role.

Despite the stigma often attached to bank-
ruptcy, Obama took pains to portray it as a pos-
itive development. "This is not a sign of weak-
ness," he insisted, "but rather one more step on
a clearly charted path to Chrysler's revival."

To be sure, the administration's day-and-
night involvement with the auto industry does
not match its attempts to rescue financial insti-
tutions. That's partly because the automakers
have made a desperate pitch for a government
bailout, while some of the biggest financial insti-
tutions have been less enthusiastic in their desire
for help.

Many major banks now say they want to
return their share of a $700 billion financial res-
cue fund, in part to avoid restrictions that the
government has imposed or threatened to
impose.

At the same time, the government has always
been able to influence banking behaviour
through regulation. And that's where Obama
says he intends to address the industry's excess-
es. Still, banks can fight back in ways that
automakers can't. On Thursday the banking
industry succeeded in defeating a Senate pro-
posal that would have let homeowners seek
foreclosure relief through bankruptcy court.

So far, the two Detroit car companies are
only asking how high Obama wants them to
jump.

(This article was written by Jim Khunhenn
of the Associated Press).



When the ‘number’

houses are raided
- NOBODY WINS!

EDITOR, The Tribune.

PLEASE allow me to express
my Opinion on an institution
that has existed from time
immemorial in the many homes
and hearts of the majority of
Bahamians.

As the police begin its offen-
sive frisson of enforcement of
the law on many of the “num-
ber houses” throughout the
Bahamas, our lawmakers con-
tinue their bumptious diatribe,
plagued with pointless political
innuendo whilst providing no
action plan of a corrective
nature for many of the funda-
mental issues and laws that
need urgent attention that will
enable them to render proper
decisions aligned with a mod-
ern society.

It is now imperative that a
member of the so-called hon-
ourable House of Assembly,
move to address this issue that
appears to have left our law-
makers in a serious imbroglio
and a quandary — that of
addressing “numbers” playing.
“Numbers”, whether the “three
(3) ball” or “four (4) ball” like it
or not has become intricately
woven in the fabric of Bahami-
an society. While many
Bahamians have their salient
points for or against daily “num-
ber” gambling operations, we
should take note and face the
reality that a vast majority of
the Bahamas play the “num-
bers” daily in New Providence
and the family of islands. It
appears that our law makers are
afraid to address this issue even
though many participate daily
in what has become the “hope-
ful daily stimulus package” for
many strapped Bahamians and
foreigners alike looking for a
financial breakthrough. One can
only conclude that “numbers”
like politics in our country, is
normally addressed depending
on who it affects, when it
affects, and what impact the
affect will have on who it affects
— to target those who for expe-
diency and public relations’
sake unwittingly end up on the
radar screen of those who need
to appear as if they are doing
something. As the raids contin-
ue in months and years to come,
the Haitian and Chinese broth-
ers who are also in this business
will now have an opportunity
to upgrade and continue build-
ing their daily “number” gam-
bling empires and “30-day” for-
tunes.

The Bahamas needs to face
the fact that as a part of our
social renaissance — the lottery is
a reality. The government needs
to muster up the fortitude and
have a referendum to obtain the
consensus of the Bahamian peo-
ple as to where they stand on
“numbers”. The government
would with the concurrence of
the Bahamian people at least
have legal means to obtain addi-
tional revenues through taxa-
tion on such gambling. These
funds can be used to fix the

LETTERS

letters@tribunemedia net



schools and increase teachers,
nurses, and police salaries,
upgrade the nation’s historical
landmarks and infrastructure,
proper support for our national
sporting and cultural pro-
grammes with timely funding
for national events, develop and
enhance the Defence and Police
Force with new modern crime
fighting supplies and equipment
along with many more nation
building priorities that can be
funded in a timely manner.

I do believe that everybody
has a contribution and a voice in
free democratic country. The
government of the Bahamas
should allow the voices of the
many to be heard on this emo-
tive topic of “numbers.” Fur-
ther, it is my conviction that
there must be a level of com-
mon sense that can, and must
be exercised when introducing
new laws, amending old ones
and enforcing existing ones. The
Bahamas whether we like it or
not has changed in many ways.
This country has progressed for
the better, and in the memories
of many and current contem-
plations of others we have

changed for the worst.

Our government should now
move away from this pusillani-
mous approach and take proac-
tive steps to either legalise dai-
ly “numbers” gambling and stop
playing the hypocritical game
of the self righteous, or address
the issue through the democra-
tic process and listen to the
voice of the majority of the peo-
ple. The politicians who are
afraid of addressing this issue,
should resign immediately
because there will be other
more serious issues of national
importance that will require
hard political decisions.

Some religious leaders in cer-
tain denominations and indi-
viduals alike that strongly
oppose such gambling publicly,
undoubtedly will be angry
through the week, but happy
on Sunday in the tally room
when the counting of collection
and donations from the congre-
gation is complete, but this is a
democracy!

Face reality, Bahamas, its has
been here, it will be here long
after those who oppose it today
are gone, so at least fix it, tax it
and build something construc-
tive from it.

ANTHONY BOSTWICK
Nassau,
April, 2009.

Responding to
letters on turtle
harvesting

EDITOR, The Tribune.

IF YOU take the vitriol and personal attacks out of the letters
against Andrew Allen’s position on turtle harvesting then you

are left with next to nothing.

None of the letters address Mr Allen’s two very sensible

points that:

1) To ban turtle harvesting on the basis that some people kill
them cruelly would be a foolish act, as it would punish everyone
who eats turtles instead of simply punishing the acts of cruelty

done to them by some; and

2) The environmental arguments need to focus on what
impact Bahamian (as opposed to international) consumption of
turtle is actually having, rather than simply jumping on to some

international bandwagon.

None of Mr Allen’s critics (NOT ONE) has answered either
of these points with any amount of clarity. Instead they keep
concentrating on him as an individual and berating, him for dar-
ing to speak up. Some of them even seem to be accusing him
(and anyone else who eats turtle) of supporting animal cruelty.

Some of your letter writers seem to think that screaming and
insulting attacks on their critics cover for their own inability to
follow a simple line of logic without straying. One minute they
are talking about environmentalism, the next minute they are
berating all Bahamians for supposedly being torturers.

Please Minister, ignore these crazy people!

M TAYLOR
Nassau,
April 16, 2009.

PUBLIC NOTICE

INTENT TO CHANGE NAME BY DEED POLL

The Public is hereby advised that |, MERC ALEX
CORNEILLE of the Southern Disctrict in the Island
of New Providence, Bahamas, intends to change
my name to MCALEX CORNEILLE, If there are any
objections to this change of name by Deed Poll, you
may write such objections to the Chief Passport Officer,
P.O.Box N-742, Nassau, Bahamas no later than thirty

(30) days after the date of publication of this notice.

PUBLIC NOTICE

INTENT TO CHANGE NAME BY DEED POLL

The Public is hereby advised that |, TAMIKA MONIQUE

STRACHAN of Star Estates, Prince Charles, Nassau,
Bahamas, intends to change my name to TAMIA MILAN
STRACHAN, If there are any objections to this change
of name by Deed Poll, you may write such objections
to the Chief Passport Officer, P.O.Box N-742, Nassau,
Bahamas no later than thirty (30) days after the date of

publication of this notice.

Qeve

NOTICE

NOTICE is hereby given that ANTOINETTE BOX of MARSH
HARBOUR, ABACO, BAHAMAS, P.O.BOX AB 20554 is applying
to the Minister responsible for Nationality and Citizenship,
for registration/naturalization as a citizen of The Bahamas,
and that any person who knows any reason why registration/
naturalization should not be granted, should send a written
and signed statement of the facts within twenty-eight days
from the 2nd day of MAY 2009 to the Minister responsible for
Nationality and Citizenship, PO.Box N-7147, Nassau, Bahamas.

NOTICE

Pursuant to the provisions of Section 138 (4) of the Inter-
national Business Companies Act, 2000, ue is hereby
given that:-

(a) Griffin KAC Holdings Company Limited is in
dissolution;

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THE TRIBUNE

SATURDAY, MAY 2, 2009, PAGE 5



LOCAL NEWS



0 In brief

Computer
and printer
donation to
Crisis Centre

THE CRISIS Centre has
received the donation of a
computer and printer from
the former Innerwheel
Club of Nassau.

Past Innerwheel Club
president Christa Palmer

spent 15 years volunteering i

at the Bahamas Crisis Cen-
tre in the Princess Mar-
garet Hospital, working as
a counsellor for rape vic-
tims and drug addicts, and
as chairperson for the cen-
tre’s rape advocate pro-
gramme.

She and fellow former
Innerwheel Club president

Joan Pinder chose to invest :

left-over funds from the
club in much needed
equipment for the
Bahamas Crisis Centre to
help the charity continue
its good work.

@ By ALISON LOWE
Tribune Staff Reporter
alowe@tribunemedia.net

SOME residents of eastern New Provi-
dence are starting to feel like they have
travelled back in time — to an era when
indoor plumbing and the readily accessible
running water that goes with it is a luxury
and not an everyday utility.

But having gotten used to the conve-
nience of being able to wash up, shower
and flush a toilet whenever they please,
residents like Sammy Ferguson are finding
life without water difficult to put up with.

Mr Ferguson, who lives in an apartment
building near the Sea Grape Plaza on
Prince Charles Drive, said: “It went off
last Saturday, and almost every night since
then there’s been no water from the time I
get home from work until about 10pm.”

“We’re having to save water from the
morning in five gallon bottles. Otherwise
we can’t flush the toilet, wash the dishes or
anything.

“Tf they are doing repairs, I don’t under-
stand why they wouldn’t turn off the water
during the day rather than in the evening.”

Mr Ferguson said his neighbours and

those in other nearby apartment complex-
es are experiencing the same problem.

To make things more frustrating, the
water supply to the area had only recently
improved after shortages in late March,
which the Water and Sewerage Corpora-
tion blamed on sea swells delaying the
arrival of the MT Titus.

The barge, which brings in 30 per cent of
New Providence’s water supply, did not
dock as scheduled, prompting the corpo-
ration to institute “conservation measures”.

Some parts of the island lost all access to
running water, while other areas experi-
enced a significant loss of water pressure.

Another eastern resident yesterday told
The Tribune her water supply never
improved even after the MT Titus was able
to resume normal service.

Having received “excuse after excuse”
from the WSC, who “admit there is a prob-
lem but won’t say what it is”, the Camper-
down mother said she suspects there is a
“major boo boo” being covered up.

“Tt’s been like this for months now. They
said it was going to be fixed up by Easter
but it’s still the same. Every day, if someone
is washing their hands or brushing their
teeth there’s no water in the rest of the

house,” she said.

“God forbid you flush your toilet —
there’s no water in house for 15 minutes!”
she said.

Yesterday Robert Deal, assistant gen-
eral manager at WSC, admitted the cor-
poration is “having a few challenges right
now” as its water storage levels have “not
fully recovered” since the delay of the MT
Titus barge in March.

“We have an ongoing issue of supply
versus demand,” he said.

However, Mr Deal stated that in the
case of Camperdown, the WSC has “done
quite a bit of work” in the area to alleviate
water supply issues and he found it sur-
prising certain homes are still experiencing
problems.

“We have had some complaints from
our Winton pressure supply zone which
includes Camperdown and we have seen
some improvement in the last one to two
weeks. The improvement is based on
reports from our monitoring systems in
the area and direct contact with customers
in the area including customers in the high-
er elevations off Culberts Hill, Blackbeard's
Terrace and Tower Heights,” he said.

Meanwhile, in the case of Mr Ferguson,

Running water is a ‘luxury’ for
some New Providence residents



ACCORDING to the WSC, the island’s water
barge was delayed prompting the corpora-
tion to institute “conservation measures’.

Mr Deal said there are no water works
going on in the area and he questioned
whether the problem might be “internal” to
his building. However, he said the WSC
will “definitely check into it.”

He encouraged people experiencing
water supply problems to contact WSC’s
call center at 302-5599.

Minister: Sporting complex ‘won't he ready’ for June 2009



Letisha Henderson/BIS Photo

ANDREA Davies presents a plaque to retiring Postmaster
General Godfrey Clarke. He officially retired on Thursday, April
30, after 44 years of service.

Postmaster General retires after...

POSTMASTER General Godfrey Clarke retired on
Thursday after 44 years of service.

During a ceremony on Wednesday, employees of post
offices throughout New Providence and the Family Islands
thanked him for his dedication and presented him with
gifts of appreciation.

Deputy Postmaster General Leslie Cartwright described
Mr Clarke as an individual with an “unassuming” personality
and one who “handles stress pretty well.”

He said Mr Clarke was loyal to the service, committed to
his work and held a “great” love for the department.

Mr Clarke expressed his appreciation for his staff, noting
that he enjoyed his time with them.

m@ By DENISE MAYCOCK
Tribune Freeport
Reporter
dmaycock@tribunemedia.net

FREEPORT - Youth, Sports
and Culture Minister Desmond
Bannister announced that the
Junior Central American and
Caribbean Championships will
no longer be held in Grand
Bahama.

Mr Bannister said the Grand
Bahama Sports complex will
not be ready in time for the
June deadline to host the CAC
Games.

The minister held a press
conference in Freeport to
explain why the Games were
being moved to New Provi-
dence.

He said extensive work is
required to bring the sports
facility up to IAAF certifica-
tion, including the new surfac-
ing of the track and relocation
of the existing long jump pit, as
well as other required works.

Mr Bannister noted that
problems were discovered in
April as government was car-
rying out base work in prepa-
ration for the new surfacing of
the track facility.

Last July, the government
awarded a contract to Mondo
Laval of Quebec, Canada, to
resurface the track, as well as
relocate the existing long jump
pit to the outer perimeter of
the track and to construct a sec-
ond long jump pit, in prepara-
tion for the CAC Champi-

onships this June. Mr Bannister
said Waugh Construction was
contracted in January to carry
out base work to remove the
existing running surface, repair
the drain field and construct the
two new long jump pits and
approaches, to prepare the new
running surface.

“While the base work has
progressed somewhat, the
removal of the rubberized sur-
face has proved to be more dif-
ficult and time consuming than
had been initially envisaged,”
he said.

Minister Bannister noted that
numerous concerns were raised
after an extensive survey and
review of the track facility on
April 21 and 22 by Mondo rep-
resentative Franco Ruata.

They were:

¢ The concrete base must be
milled and repaved to very
stringent specifications so as
to permit the adhesion of the

bonding agent

¢ The existing border along
the straight-aways are not in
proper location according to
2008 IAAF rules and will have
be adjusted

¢ Currently there is only one
javelin runway. A second
javelin runway has to be con-
structed in order to meet
IAAFP’s specification for certi-
fication

¢ The steeple chase water
jump has also to be relocated
in order to accommodate the
second javelin runway.

¢ The long and triple jump
runways that were recently
built were too long and too
high. The height of the run-
way will have to be corrected

e The existing high jump
mat must be reduced in size;
and the surface has to be
milled to permit proper
drainage

¢ The discus cage must be

relocated.

Mr Bannister stressed in
order to address the problems
more synthetic material is
required than Mondo had ini-
tially estimated.

“We have been assured that
the company will absorb this
extra cost of synthetic materi-
al without any additional
charges to the Bahamian peo-
ple,” he said.

Minister Bannister said it is
important all of the above con-
cerns are addressed in order
to achieve IAAF certification
of the track.

“The ministry will be seek-
ing to contract the preparato-
ry work out to companies that
are qualified to perform the
required work in the shortest
possible time so that the
Grand Bahama athletic com-
munity can have the best ath-
letic facilities possible,” he
said.

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PAGE 6, SATURDAY, MAY 2, 2009

THE TRIBUNE



LOCAL NEWS



Jamaican man
charged over

Stantott

KINGSTON, Jamaica

A JAMAICAN man
who allegedly took a flight
crew hostage last week at
Montego Bay’s airport
and demanded to be flown
off the island has been
charged with offences
including robbery and
assault, according to Asso-
ciated Press.

Stephen Fray, a 21-year-
old Jamaican described as
emotionally unstable,
faces a total of six charges,
according to a police
statement issued late
Thursday. If convicted he
faces a maximum prison
sentence of 20 years.

Authorities say that
Fray, armed with a hand-
gun, pushed his way
through airport security
on April 19 and entered a
CanJet Airlines plane with
167 people on board. He
reportedly struck a pilot
with the gun, fired into the
air and took cash from the
passengers before freeing
them.

After an eight-hour
standoff, he was captured
in a military raid that
freed the six remaining
hostages without injury.

The charges include ille-
gal possession of a firearm
and ammunition for use of
a handgun that police say
was licensed to Fray’s
father. He was also
charged with shooting
with intent and breaches
of civil aviation regula-
tions.

Fray is due to appear
before a court next week
in the northwestern resort
city of Montego Bay.

Prime Minister Bruce
Golding has ordered an
investigation into the
security breach at Sang-
ster International Airport,
one of two primary air-
ports in a Caribbean
nation that depends heavi-
ly on tourism.

The private security
guards at checkpoints
were not armed and fol-
lowed procedures by
keeping visual contact
with the intruder until
Jamaican police respond-
ed, according to a prelimi-
nary investigation by
MBJ Airports Ltd., the
airport’s operating compa-
ny.





BUT voices concern over

airport hostage !

govt

approach to sex allegations

mlUyram ne lecUeUin



FROM page one

tested for ACH1IN1) influen-
za in line with Ministry of
Health emergency protocol.

But Dr Minnis confirmed
yesterday all 12 have returned
negative tests results.

The Ministry of Health is
still awaiting test results of a
New Providence resident who
reported flu-like symptoms
after returning from a trip to
Mexico this week. He remains
in voluntary isolation and
under Health Ministry sur-
veillance, Dr Minnis said.

Meanwhile, the football
team of 12 players and their
two coaches who went to
Puerto Valerta, Mexico, last
week remained in Florida
under the surveillance of Unit-
ed States health authorities
yesterday.

Dr Minnis held a press con-
ference at the Ministry of

Be Renewed In. The
“Glory Of God's Presence”
Se




i, 4

FROM page one

children,” it remains wary of the pos-
sibility that teachers’ livelihoods may
be jeopardised by unsubstantiated alle-
gations.

“Ultimately we wouldn’t be defend-
ing wrong, but we also must defend
our teachers until they’re proven guilty
of what they are being accused of,” he
said.

Speaking in parliament on Wednes-
day Prime Minister Hubert Ingraham
called into question the future of any
teacher against whom an allegation of
sexual misconduct is made, when he
told parliament that, while “shifting
and transfers are how we have tradi-
tionally dealt with problem employ-
ees in the public sector,” this practice,
which has made it easier for unscrupu-
lous individuals to exploit children,
will be no more.

“The shifting and/or redeployment
of teachers accused of sexual crimes
against children in our schools is also
going to end,” he said.

Illustrating the extent of the prac-
tice in the past, Mr Ingraham noted
that there are currently 15 teachers
against whom sex investigations or
court action is pending, “virtually all”
of whom are still employed by the gov-
ernment, but in different capacities.

The Prime Minister did not elabo-
rate on what would now be the fate
of such teachers — raising questions of
whether they would be made to resign
from the public sector.

Yesterday Mr Campbell said: “An
allegation is precisely what it says: an
allegation.

“Some time has to be given in order
to make out whether there is any sub-
stance to this or not.”

“We have experience in the past
where allegations have been made but
there is no substance to them.”

Mr Campbell suggested that the
teacher’s union has not been consulted
adequately by government on what it
plans to do with educators in these
instances.

“I think we should’ve been. Then
we could speak more intelligently.”

However, he also admitted that the
union itself may not have devoted suf-
ficient attention to addressing the ques-
tion of what fate should befall teachers
against whom accusations are made.

“That’s something to be decided,
to be addressed.

“And we haven’t sat down as a body
to look at the implications of that,” he
said.

In his speech to parliament Mr
Ingraham lamented that some of the
15 former teachers who have been
moved from their place in the class-
room have had the allegations against
them unresolved since as far back as
2001.

“That’s unfortunate”, said Mr
Campbell. “A lot of cases do just hang
around and definitely if you’re talk-
ing about a case involving children, or
somebody’s future, somebody’s liveli-
hood, I trust that with what the Prime
Minister is saying we'll be able to expe-
dite these matters far, far more than is
being done. It’s only what’s fair for
the children, the system and the indi-
viduals involved.”

Isolated students and teachers
— cleared of swine flu infection

Health in Meeting Street, Nas-
sau, yesterday afternoon to
update the public on the latest
developments of the swine flu
pandemic and to send out a
message of reassurance to the
public.

He said: “We want to reas-
sure people we are still man-
aging the whole situation as
best we can and that the test
results from Abaco have
returned and are all negative,
so there is no evidence of
swine flu.

“We will continue to moni-
tor our borders and immigra-
tion officials have various
warning signs advising people
about swine flu.”

Dr Minnis is travelling to
Freeport today to dispel
rumours of a possible case of
the virus at a major industrial
facility in Grand Bahama after
Rand Memorial Hospital was
inundated with calls on Thurs-
day night. He maintains the
calls were sparked purely by
rumour.

He said: “If you follow the
national media you will know
what is going on.

“T want to thank the Press

for reporting very responsi-
bly, even if they may have
been privy to rumours, they
have allowed the professionals
to determine the facts and
published the facts, so I thank
the Press for their profession-
al ethos and judgment to go
beyond the rumours.”

The United Nation’s World
Health Organisation (WHO)
has set its pandemic alert lev-
el at five.

It means there is human to
human transmission of the
virus in at least two countries,
but says it has no immediate
plans to move to the highest
level of six.

Eleven countries have offi-
cially reported 331 cases of
influenza A(H1N1). The Unit-
ed States Government has
reported 109 laboratory con-
firmed human cases, includ-
ing one death. Mexico has
reported 156 confirmed
human cases of infection,
including nine deaths.

Further information on the
situation will be available on
the WHO website on a regu-
lar basis. Log on _ to
www.who.int.

FROM page one

differentiated from the dis-
cussion of a national lottery
as a national lottery is an
unrealistic option for the
Bahamas.

“No small population in
these Caribbean countries can
sustain a lottery game because
the population is too small.
Lotteries cannot survive in
none of these small countries
and be successful. It cannot!”
he exclaimed.

However, in the local num-
ber games, the system is much
more controllable and sus-
tainable where the vast
amount of money that is
played is actually returned to
the persons who play them.
Legalizing such a system, he
said, would be a great step for-
ward for the Bahamas.

“The second thing about it
is you need large volumes of
people playing to make it
attractive. The Bahamas does
not have that volume. Nor
does any other Caribbean
country have those types of
volume. They will suffer —

Flowers
FROM page one

Howers: | would not support national lottery

especially after you take the
administrative fee out of that.
When you go around the
Caribbean you can hardly see
any that are doing that well,
primarily because the popu-
lation is very small and the
numbers that the lottery
board will offer in terms of
prizes are not attractive.
“Because right in the US
next door you can take a one
American dollar and wage it
and be competing for nothing
less $4 million and going up.
But in any Caribbean coun-
try for the same equivalent
money you are looking at
maybe $100,000, $200,000, or
$300,000 maximum for the
same dollar. The competition
makes no sense for us to think
we can run a lottery game in
the Bahamas and be success-
ful. But there is monies to be
made in managing funds
belonging to the people — the
monies that come in through
these small games that peo-
ple win every day, that you
would manage properly and
pay back out. There is a
reward for good management
of numbers money,” he said.

charged

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COME TO WORSHIP LEAVE TO SERVE



granted bail, noting they were already on police bail. Magistrate
Rolle extended the police bail and set July 27 for the start of the tri-
al. The accused were all represented by attorney Charles McKay
who appeared on behalf of Flowers’ attorney Alfred Sears. Thirteen
witnesses are listed on court dockets.

If convicted, the accused could face a fine of up to $5,000 or up
to two years in prison.

On Tuesday afternoon, police raided two suspected gaming
houses, FML on Village Road, and the Our Place Sporting Lounge
in the Mel-Don Shopping Plaza on Mackey Street.

Along with an amount of cash and equipment, police

allegedly also confiscated computers and other “gambling” para-
phernalia.

Flowers recently told The Tribune police confiscated nearly $1
million in cash from his establishment.

CENTRAL GOSPEL CHAPEL

CHRISTIE & DOWDESWELL STREETS ° Tel: 325-2921

SUNDAY, MAY 3RD, 2009
11:30 a.m. Speaker:

ELDER BRENTFORD ISAACS

continues The Revelation Series

Bible Class: 9:45 a.m. ¢ Breaking of Bread Service: 10:45 a.m.
¢ Community Outreach: 11:30 a.m. ¢ Evening Service: 7:00 p.m.
¢ Midweek Service 7:30 p.m. (Wednesdays)
¢ Sisters’ Prayer Meeting: 10:00 a.m. (2nd Thursday of each month)

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| Pastor: HL Mills * Prone: 293-0563 * Box N-ab22 |

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The Holy Ghost Prayer-Line number is 326-7427
(www.gtwesley.org)

SUNDAY, MAY 3RD, 2009
7:00 a.m. Rev. Carla Culmer/Sis. Rosemary Williams
11:00 a.m. Rev. Carla Culmer/Bro. Ernest Miller (HC)
7:00 a.m. BCMC Festival of Praise/
Pre-Mother’s Day Concert/Trinity -4:30p.m.
Theme: “ But As For Me And My Household, We Will Serve the Lord”





THE TRIBUNE

IR
firm donates to
local charities

FREEPORT - Three local
charities were beneficiaries of a
major donation by a New Jer-
sey catering company.

The Grand Bahama Chil-
dren’s Home, Grand Bahama
Red Cross Society and the
Grand Bahama Home For The
Aged received fresh produce
from Foremost Caterers on
behalf of the Magen David
group.

Among the trailer of food
items donated were romaine
lettuce, carrots, sweet peppers,
beans, berries, mushrooms,
potatoes, papayas, pineapples,
chicken soup and orange and
grapefruit juices.

The more than 1,500 pounds
of produce has an estimated
value of $4,000.

Earnestine Moxeyz said
Magen David is a Hebrew

(L-R) EUGENE GORLEKU, director of banquet at Our Lucaya; Rick Bardari
general manager of Foremost Caterers; Victor McKillop; Ossie Saquicela
Anthony Pascalli; Donald Merrick, Agatha Beckles of the Grand Bahama
Home For The Aged; Karen Dean of the Grand Bahama Red Cross Society
and Adrian Dorsett of the Grand Bahama Home For The Aged.

Parochial School located in
New York. She said each year
the children, parents and fami-
ly members of the school travel
together to celebrate the
Passover holiday.

For the past three years, she

said, the group has stayed at
the Westin and Sheraton Grand
Bahama Our Lucaya Resort.

Ms Moxeyz said this year the
700-member group spent more
than 3,000 room nights at the
resort.

SATURDAY, MAY 2, 2009, PAGE 7

LOCAL NEWS

Patrick Hanna/BIS | TWO OF THE four newly

appointed Family Island admin-
istrators with representatives of
the Ministry of Public Works
and Transport and the Ministry
of the Environment at the start
of a two-day training seminar
coordinated by the Ministry of
Works on Thursday, April 30,
2009. From left are Bradley
King, acting chief engineer;
Caldwell Pratt, deputy director;
Michael Major; Charles Zonicle;

| Craig Delancy and Hermis

| Chisholm. Seated from left are
Donald Cash, under-secretary
and Family Island administra-
tors Maxine Duncombe and

yl Gregory Knowles.

New Family Island administrators fully briefed

NEWLY appointed Family
Island administrators were
briefed on the role of the Min-
istry of Public Works and Trans-
port and the Ministry of the
Environment in the Family
Islands during the first of a two-
day training session.

Donald Cash, under-secretary

; in the Ministry of Public Works,

told the administrators his min-
istry plays an integral part in the
Family Islands.

“Without the Ministry of
Works the Family Islands can-
not develop properly,” he said.
“You are the link between the
district where you will serve and
the Ministry of Works.”

Topics to be covered during

the two-day workshop include
mail boat services and board of
survey procedures; contracts and
relations with Family Island engi-
neers; building control; physical
planning and sub-divisions.

The four participating admin-
istrators are Gregory Knowles,
Wilma Colebrooke, Joshua
Smith and Maxine Duncombe.









MICHAEL GARRAWAY (centre), president and CEO of
Satelitte Bahamas, presents a cheque to BBFF president Dan-
ny Sumner (left) and vice president Chevy Roker for their
sponsorship of 23rd Novice Bodybuilding Championships.

Satelitte Bahamas is
bodybuilding sponsor

m@ By BRENT STUBBS
Senior Sports Reporter
bstubbs@tribunemedia.net

FOR the fourth consecutive year, Satellite Bahamas
Limited has agreed to sponsor the Bahamas Bodybuild-
ing and Powerlifting Novice Championships.

The event is scheduled for May 30 at the National
Performing Arts Theatre and is expected to feature com-
petitors from New Providence, Grand Bahama and Long
Island. There is also the possibility that Inagua may enter
a few athletes.

Since its inception, federation president Danny Sum-
ner said they look forward to the championship each
year because it brings out the talent that is coming up and
what can be expected as the year continues.

“From what I’ve gathered so far, a lot of new people
are training for this event, so I would like to see a show
where we have a lot of people competing on stage,”
Sumner said.

“The novice is a springboard for the federation because
it allows those persons who would normally not want to
go on stage and compete among people who are sea-
soned in the sport.”

While the novice is geared for those competitors who
are competing for the first time, Sumner said it’s also open
to those competitors who competed in past champi-
onships, but were not winners in their categories.

“The whole idea behind that is to keep it flowing,” he
said. “Everybody looks up to it because sometimes we
have more people competing in this event than we do in
the other shows.”

Competitors will have the opportunity to compete in
the men’s lightweight, middleweight, light heavyweight
and heavyweight divisions.

The women will have the lightweight and heavyweight
divisions, while there is an open division for the female fit-
ness competitors.

Competitors have until May 15 to register at a cost of
$15. High School students will be free of charge. “We’re
looking at having about 20 competitors alone from New
Providence,” said Chevy Roker, the federation’s vice
president. “We are also looking at a large contingent
from Long Island.

“T am anticipating a large turnout with a lot of com-
petitors coming from high school. We know that Long
Island, led by Omar Daley, has always been a big sup-
porter of the federation, so it’s going to be a good show.”

In the past, the federation was privileged to have a
number of drinks and water companies sponsor the event.
But Sumner said they are really appreciative of the efforts
of Satellite Bahamas Limited and the contribution they
are making to the event.

Michael Garraway, president and chief executive offi-
cer of Satellite Bahamas Limited, said they were always
encouraged by the participation of the high school stu-
dents and that is one of the reasons why they continue to
support the novice.

“We would like to encourage and have the youths
involved in something positive,” Garraway stressed.
“Bodybuilding is not just a past time. It’s an athletic
event.

“So it’s something that could lead into other sports
because other athletes from other sports also do body-
building. So it provides healthy lifetime choices and in this
age of obesity, this is a way of discouraging that.”

SATURDAY, MAY 2,

2009








Alex Smith traded to Patriots

@ By BRENT STUBBS
Senior Sports Reporter
bstubbs@tribunemedia.net

ith the National Football League’s
Draft fast approaching, the Tampa
Bay Buccaneers dealt tight end Alex
Smith, of Bahamian descent, to the
New England Patriots.

The unspecified deal was completed yesterday as the
Patriots gave up an undisclosed pick in next year’s NFL
draft for the four-year veteran, who is the son of defen-
sive end Ed Smith, the first Bahamian to play in the pros
with the Denver Broncos.

Smith, who was drafted by the Buccaneers in the
third round of the 2005 draft out of Stanford Universi-
ty, had a total of 129 receptions for 1,252 yards and 11
touchdowns in 58 games.

Starting in 12 of the 14 games that the 6-feet, 4-inch-
es, 258-pounder played for Tampa Bay, Smith caught a
total of 21 passes.

Smith, 26, had only one year left on his contract with
the Buccaneers. But there were no further comments
made regarding the trade.

But his job seemed to be in jeopardy when Tampa
Bay traded two draft picks (a second rounder this year
and a fifth-rounder next year) to the Cleveland Browns
for tight end Kellen Winslow Jr in February.

Additionally, the Buccaneers have Jerramy Stevens,
who led all tight ends last year with 36 receptions for 397
yards and two TDs and John Gilmore, who is considered
to be a blocking tight end.

In going to the Patriots, who finished second in the
AFC East at 11-5 behind the pennant-winning Miami
Dolphins and missed the playoffs, Smith could end up
playing with Tom Brady — one of the greatest quarter-
backs in the NFL — who went down last season with an
injury.

Unable to be reached for comments, Smith played his
four seasons so far in the NFL with Tampa Bay. In
total, he appeared in 58 games and caught 129 passes for
1,252 yards and 11 touchdowns.

During his rookie season, Smith topped the statis-
tics for all rookies when he had a career-high 41 recep-



ALEX SMITH has been traded to the New England Patriots...
(AP Photo)

tions for 367 yards and two TDs.

Like most players, Smith was set back by a series of
leg and ankle injuries over the past three seasons, forc-
ing him to miss two games each.

With Denver, Colorado, listed as his birthplace, Smith
has always considered the Bahamas to be his home. In
fact, he has returned over the last two years to host a
summer football camp.

During the camp, which was held around the same
time as a few other NFL camps involving Bahamian or
players of Bahamian descent, Smith brought in a num-
ber of his collegiates.

It’s not certain whether or not Smith will return to
host another camp this summer now that he has been
traded.

St Cecilia’s Strikers are Catholic
Diocesan primary track champs

THE annual Catholic Diocesan Primary Schools
Track and Field Championships was held yesterday
at the Thomas A Robinson Track and Field Stadium.

At the end of the day, the St Cecilia’s Strikers pre-
vailed as they successfully defended their overall title
with a total of 333 points. St Cecilia’s also captured the
primary divisional title with Our Lady’s Blue Flames as
the runners-up. In the junior division, St Thomas Sparks
won the title over St Cecilia’s.

Last year, St Cecilia’s won the overall and the junior

divisional crowns. Xavier’s was the primary champions.

According to Patricia Coakley, the meet director, it
was another competitive event with all of the Catholic
primary schools competing. She noted that they are
already looking forward to next year’s championships.

During the official opening ceremonies where Min-
ister of Youth, Sports and Culture Desmond Bannister
delivered the keynote address, the St Bede’s Crushers
were awarded their championship crown for winning
the basketball title.



Bulls top Celtics

128-127 in 3 OTs

to force Game 7...
See page 10



Knowles,
Bhupathi
ease through
quarter-final

@ By BRENT STUBBS
Senior Sports Reporter
bstubbs@tribunemedia.net

MARK Knowles and Mahesh
Bhupathi are getting closer and
closer to returning to their sec-
ond straight final on the ATP
men’s doubles tour.

The Bahamian-Indian duo,
seeded at No. 4 in the Inter-
nazionali BNL d'Ttalia, easily won
their quarter-final match yester-
day in Rome, Italy.

Their victims were the No.6
seeded Polish team of Mariusz
Frystenberg and Marcin
Matkowski, who fell in scores of
6-3, 6-4. They will now meet the
No. 2 team of Canadian Daniel
Nestor and Serbian Nenad
Zimonjic in the semifinal today
in a rematch from last week’s
final at the Barcelona Open Ban-
co Sabadell 2009.

Nestor, Knowles’ long-time
partner, and Zimonjic won in
identical scores of 6-4, 6-4 over
Jeff Coetzee of the Republic of
South Africa and Jordon Kerr of
Australia.

Last Sunday in Barcelona,
Spain, Knowles and Bhupathi
played Nestor and Zimonjic in
the final, but they lost a heart-
breaking 6-3, 7-6 (9) decision.

Knowles noted that it was a
match that they waited on for a
long time and he was quite dis-
appointed that they lost, despite
the fact that they played a pretty
good match.

En route to making it to the
final, Knowles and Bhupathi
eliminated the world’s top seeded
team of Bob and Mike Bryan, the
identical American twin broth-
ers, 6-2, 6-7 (5), 10-7.

By virtue of their perfor-
mances, Knowles and Bhupathi
regained the number three spot
on the ATP computer ranking.
They trail the Bryans, who are
still No.1 and Nestor and Zimon-
jic, who are No.2.

The Bryans clinched their berth
into the semis as well with a 4-6,
6-4, 11-9 victory over No. 7 seeds
Max Mirnyi and Andy Ram.
They will face the No. 3 seeded
team of Lucas Dlouhy of the
Czech Republic and Leander
Paes of India.

The final of the tournament is
scheduled to be played on Sun-
day.

Following Barcelona, Knowles
and Bhupathi will go on to play in
Madrid, Spain, at the next ATP
World Tour Masters 1000 before
they prepare for the French Open
Grand Slam at Roland Garros.

Knowles and Bhpathi are still
looking for their first tournament
victory of the year. They also got
to the final of the Australian
Open, the first Grand Slam in
January, but lost out to the
Bryans.

More than 35 schools to take part in primary track championships

m@ By BRENT STUBBS
Senior Sports Reporter
bstubbs@tribunemedia.net

MORE than 35 schools have
already signed up to compete in
the 28th Primary Schools Track
and Field Championships.

Without a major sponsor out-
side of the Ministry of Youth,
Sports and Culture, the event is
set for May 20-22 at the Thomas
A Robinson Track and Field Sta-
dium.

It was originally scheduled for
May 13-15, but because of the
scheduling of the GLAT exami-
nation, it was rescheduled. How-
ever, although it conflicts with the
Teachers Appreciation Activities,
the organisers indicated that they
were unable to make any further
changes.

Frank ‘Pancho’ Rahming,
chairman of the organising com-
mittee, said that during the past
two years, Milo, through its dis-
tributors Thompson Trading,
sponsored the meet. But due to
economic reasons, they have opt-
ed not to return this year.

“The ministry expresses grati-
tude to Thompson Trading and
Milo for the years they’ve coop-
erated with us and hope that sim-
ilar cooperation will return in the
future.”

SCHOOLS TAKING PART

While the deadline was set for
April 17, schools still have until
May 8 to submit their rosters.

“To date, we have received

entries for more than 20 schools
from the government schools in
New Providence,” he said. “We
have also received entries from
more than 10 schools from the
Family Islands.”

Entered so far from New Prov-
idence are St Francis/Joseph,
Temple Christian, Carlton E
Francis, Lyford Cay, St Cecilia’s,
Tambearly, Westminster, Mt
Carmel, Queen’s College, St
Anne’s, Charles W Saunders,
Sadie Curtis, Jordan Prince
William, Freedom Baptist, See
Saw Academy, Kingsway Acade-
my, Nassau Christian Academy,
St Bede’s, Christian Heritage, St
John’s, Mable Walker, Thelma
Gibson and Garvin Tynes.

Lisa Mortimer, president of the
New Providence Primary Schools
Association, said right now it
would appear that only three will
not be participating this year, one
of which doesn’t have a physical
education teacher.

“Other than that, we should
have 23 of the 26 government
schools participating,” she said.
“Everybody has indicated that
they are coming.”

Nekeno Demeritte, the physi-
cal education teacher at Temple
Christian, said the private schools
in New Providence, from what he
has seen, are all ready to com-
pete.

“We are expecting to come in
and have a good showing,” he
said. ‘“We’re going to be compet-
itive throughout the meet.”

FAMILY ISLAND

PARTICIPATION

From the Family Islands, the
list includes Long Island All-Age,
South Andros, North/Central
Andros, Central Abaco,
Eleuthera, Martin Town, Discov-
ery Primary, Holmes Rock, Wal-
ter Parker, Inagua All-Age and
Exuma.

Among the new schools are
Exuma, Inagua All-Age and Aba-
co, which will only be represented
by Abaco Central, instead of a
combined team from the island.
Frank Hepburn, representing
Abaco, said this is an important
meet for their island and they
look forward to coming and par-
ticipating every year.

“This is normally the largest
contingent of any athletes leav-
ing the island,” Hepburn said. “So
it’s something that we look for-
ward to because it motivates the
parents and it brings everybody
closer together.

“The meet that we had lead-
ing up to this meet was very well
supported by the parents and I
am sure that when we go back
from this meet, we take our hard-
ware. So everybody looks forward
to before and after.”

And James Ingraham, who rep-
resented Eleuthera, said this year
they are coming down with a 50-
member contingent who are
enthusiastic about competing.

“When we come in, we are
looking forward to doing very
well and to take home our hard-



ORGANISERS of the 28th Primary Schools Track and Field Champi-
onships can be seen above. Seated (I-r) are Lisa Mortimer, of the gov-
ernment schools, Nekeno Demeritte of the private schools and Cedricka
Rolle, who is in charge of the cheerleading committee. Standing (I-r) are
committee chairman Frank Rahming, James Ingraham of Eleuthera, Val
Kemp, who is in charge of the Torch Run and opening ceremonies, Frank
Hepburn of Abaco, Ralf McKinney and secretary Sharon Harris.

ware. We had some outstanding
performances in our meet three
weeks ago and so we are looking
forward to our athletes perform-
ing very well this year.”

TORCH RUN

As an added incentive for the
championships, the committee is
scheduled to once again put on
the Torch Run on Saturday, May
16. Interested persons can con-
tact either Val Kemp at Oakes
Field Primary or Nekeno
Demeritte.

“The torch run is to attract the
public and get people hyped up so

that they can beware of what is
happening,” Kemp said. “Most
of the time we don’t have the
press present because it’s early in
the morning. So we are hoping
that the press will support the
event this year.”

The run will start from four dif-
ferent locations at 7am, inclusive
of RM Bailey (east), SC McPher-
son (south), Goodsman Bay
(west) and Long Wharf (north)
and will end up at the Kendal
Isaacs Gymnasium.

On Eleuthera, Ingraham noted
that they will also hold a torch

run at the same time starting from
the north and south and ending
up in Governor’s Harbour where
a volleyball jamboree will be held
to help raise funds.

CHEERLEADING

On Tuesday, May 19, the com-
mittee is slated to once again put
on the popular and crowd pleas-
ing cheerleading competition at
the Kendal Isaacs Gymnasium.

Interested schools are urged to
contact Cedricka Rolle at 323-
5503 or Albury/Sayles Primary
School. “So far, we have about
10 schools, but last year we had
about 13 schools that participat-
ed,” Rolle said. “We hope to go
out there, have some fun, learn
from each other and then come
back the next day for the start of
the championships.”

Rolle said on the application
forms, the schools will find all of
the information regarding their
participation in the event. They
will be judged by an independent
panel of judges.

Ingraham also stated that Span-
ish Wells recently won a cheer-
leading competition that was held
in Eleuthera and that team is
expected to come to town to par-
ticipate in the contest here.

¢ A scratch meeting is sched-
uled for Monday, May 18. The
Palm Resort and Quality Inn,
both on Nassau Street, will serve
as the official hotels and the Fam-
ily Island teams will be trans-
ported to and from the stadium
and fed lunch daily.



PAGE 10, SATURDAY, MAY 2, 2009

TRIBUNE SPORTS



SPORTS



Bulls top Celtics 128-127
in 4 OTs to force Game 7

B By ANDREW SELIGMAN
AP Sports Writer

CHICAGO (AP) — Lead-
ing by eight after an 18-point
run in the fourth quarter, the
Boston Celtics looked like they
were finally ready to move past
the Chicago Bulls.

Instead, a classic first-round
series took its most dramatic
turn and is headed for a Game
7 that seems so fitting. The way
things have been going, over-
time seems almost a certainty.

Derrick Rose scored 28
points and blocked Rajon Ron-
do's potential game-winner,
John Salmons scored 35, and
the Bulls beat the defending
champions 128-127 in triple
overtime Thursday night to
even the first-round series.

Ray Allen scored a career
playoff-high 51 pomts for the
Celtics, but it's back to Boston
for Game 7 on Saturday night
after another classic in a series
that had already seen its share.

"We're starting to see a pat-
tern with these two clubs and
it's crazy," Boston's Paul Pierce
said. "It's good for the fans. It's
good for the viewers. But we
certainly don't like it.”

A record three of the first
five games went to overtime,
including a Game 4 that went
two extra periods. Another
came down to the wire in regu-
lation, but this easily trumped
them all.

Rondo penetrated and pulled
up on the left block with 8 sec-
onds left and turned, only to be
rejected by Rose. The rookie
of the year then missed two free
throws with 3.2 seconds remain-
ing, before Rondo launched a
harmless heave from beyond
midcourt.

"This series is a lot of fun for
the fans, the people of Chicago,
the people of Boston," said the
Bulls' Joakim Noah, who made
the go-ahead three-point play
after a steal.

"It's a lot of fun for us, too,
playing in environments like
this on the big stage,” he con-
tinued. "It's special to be part of
this, and I know that it's a series
people will be talking about for
a long time.”

Rose added: "It's crazy, but
you got to love it."

Things might be different
with a healthy Kevin Garnett,
but without him, the Celtics are
headed for Game 7.

"It's unbelievable," Boston's
Kendrick Perkins said. "Shot
after shot, tough make after
tough make. It’s a tough series.
They're a young team playing
with a lot of confidence.”

@ Bok

NOTICE

















































Noah's three-point play made
it 126-123 with 35.5 seconds
remaining. Eddie House quick-
ly answered with a corner
jumper to pull the Celtics with-
in one, but Brad Miller, who
had 23 points and 10 rebounds,
hit two free throws to get the
lead back to three with 28 sec-
onds left.

Glen Davis added 23 points
and Pierce had 22, while Rondo

M I

of The Bahamas

had eight points, 19 assists and
nine rebounds.

Allen finished three points
shy of John Havlicek's club
playoff record and tied the
NBA playoff mark with nine 3-
pointers.

"It's very bittersweet,” Allen
said. "There's nothing to really
talk about anymore. We lost
and we had the agony that it
wasn't enough."

D

The public is advised that at the Annual General Meeting of Bank of
The Bahamas Limited (“the Bank’) on January 29, 2009, the shareholders
approved the creation of seven additional classes of preference shares series
“D” to “J’. The Directors were given shareholder approval to issue such
preference shares on such terms and conditions and at such times and to such
persons as the Directors think fit.

The Directors subsequently resolved to offer a private placement of 20,000,000
Class D and E perpetual preferences shares representing $20,000,000 with
a minimum subscription of B$250,000. The issue date is expected to be in
early May 2009 providing a variable dividend rate of Nassau prime plus
2.5%, payable semi-annually and callable at the Company’s option with 90

days notice.

The Bank intends to use the net proceeds of the Offering to fulfil multipurpose
objectives including expansion of its Capital Base thereby providing the
continuing ability to pursue new commercial opportunities, rationalize its
internal direct cost structure and to enhance compliance with Basle Capital
Accord requirements as its asset base expands.

Colina Financial Advisors Limited (CFAL) has been engaged as Financial
Advisor and Escrow Agent.



Magic 114, 76ers 89

At Philadelphia, the Magic
— playing without suspended
star Dwight Howard and
injured guard Courtney Lee —
advanced to the second round
with a win in Game 6.

Howard, who was suspend-
ed one game by the NBA for
his elbow on Sixers center
Samuel Dalembert in Game 5,
will return when the Magic play
the winner of the Boston-Chica-
go series.

Rashard Lewis scored 29
points and Rafer Alston had 21
to help the Magic win on the
road for the second time this
series. The Magic's decisive run
came early when they made 12
of their first 19 shots.

Andre Miller scored 24
points for the Sixers, who were
eliminated in the first round for
the second straight season.

Rockets 92, Trail Blazers 76

At Houston, Ron Artest
scored 27 points, Yao Ming had
17 points and 10 rebounds and
the Rockets reached the sec-
ond round for the first time
since 1997 with a win in Game
6.

The Rockets won for the first
time in their last seven first-
round series. They lost Game
6s the last two seasons, both to
Utah.

Houston plays the top-seeded
Los Angeles Lakers beginning
Monday night at the Staples
Center.

LaMarcus Aldridge scored 26
points and Brandon Roy had
22 for the Blazers, who were
making their first playoff
appearance since 2003.

DERRICK ROSE (left) blocks the last
shot of Celtics’ Rajon Rondo during
the closing seconds of the Bulls’ 128-
127 win in triple overtime against
Boston in Game 6 of a first-round
playoff series in Chicago, Thursday
night...

(AP Photo: Charles Rex Arbogast)



ROGER FEDERER returns a ball to Mischa Zverev during their match at the
Rome Masters tournament in Rome, Friday. Federer won 7-6 (3), 6-2.
(AP Photo: Alessandra Tarantine)

Federer, Djokovic
to meet in semis

m By ANDREW DAMPF
AP Sports Writer

ROME (AP) — Roger Fed-
erer and Novak Djokovic post-
ed straight-set wins Friday to
set up a meeting in the Rome
Masters semifinals.

Federer overcame a first-set
challenge from the net-charg-
ing German qualifier Mischa
Zverev, advancing 7-6 (3), 6-2.
Djokovic stayed on course to
defend his title in this clay-court
warmup for the French Open
with a 6-3, 6-4 victory over fifth-
seeded Juan Martin del Potro.

The fast clay at the Foro Ital-
ico suits both Federer and
Djokovic.

"T think both of us like it, so
it's going to be interesting,”
Djokovic said. "I feel quite con-
fident playing here. Each match
I play, I feel more comfortable
moving on the court and just
playing my style of the game."

Federer has won seven of his
10 previous matches against
Djokovic, but the Serb took the
last meeting at the Masters
Series event last month in Key
Biscayne, Fla.

In the other half of the draw,
three-time Rome champion
Rafael Nadal faced eighth-seed-
ed Fernando Verdasco for the
first time since Nadal's epic five-
set win in a match between the
pair at the Australian Open.
Also, No. 12 Fernando Gonza-
lez was to face Argentine qual-
ifier Juan Monaco.

The 76th-ranked Zverev beat
former French Open champion
Juan Carlos Ferrero in qualify-

ing and upset No. 8 Gilles
Simon in his previous match.
Using an effective serve-and-
volley tactic, he didn't allow
Federer to see a break point
until the 10th game of the first
set, saving two set points to get
to 5-5.

But Federer found his range
in the tiebreaker, passing
Zverev several times, and the
13-time Grand Slam winner ran
away with the match in the sec-
ond set.

A two-time runner-up in
Rome, Federer is still seeking
his first title of the year.

Playing in sunny conditions
with no wind, the third-seeded
Djokovic dictated play with
well-angled winners from the
baseline. Del Potro had trou-
ble with his forehand, hitting
the advertising banners lining
the back of the court in one
instance.

"T tried to change the pace a
lot," Djokovic said. "Because I
know that Del Potro likes more
or less same pace, and he's mov-
ing really well for his height.”

Djokovic had a 20-8 edge in
winners while Del Potro com-
mitted 20 unforced errors with
his forehand.

Djokovic needs to defend his
title to prevent Andy Murray
from taking the No. 3 ranking
from him, even though Murray
was eliminated by Monaco on
Wednesday.

Djokovic is the only player
to take a set from Nadal on clay
this year, losing to the Spaniard
in the Monte Carlo Masters
final two weeks ago.

Liverpool looks
to keep faint
title hopes alive

@ By ROB HARRIS
AP Sports Writer

LONDON (AP) — Middles-
brough dented Liverpool's title
hopes in February with an
improbable victory at the River-
side, but the Premier League
strugglers can now do the Reds
a favor by beating leader Man-
chester United on Saturday.

Rafa Benitez's hopes of deliv-
ering Liverpool's first champi-
onship since 1990 are now rely-
ing on the defending champi-
ons slipping up in their remain-
ing five matches.

By the time Liverpool hosts
Newcastle on Sunday, Benitez's
side could be six points behind
United. The Spaniard, though,
is hopeful United's opponents
can help his cause.

"They are in a better position
than us, but we have to keep
going and keep winning match-
es," Benitez said Friday. "They
have some tough games and
you never know in football, so
we have to make sure we do
our job.

"Hopefully they will make
some mistakes. They have a dif-
ficult game this weekend against
Middlesbrough, a team fighting
to avoid relegation, and they
also have to play Hull away as
well as (Manchester) City and
Arsenal at home."

Man United has 77 points
from 33 games, while Liverpool
has 74 having played an extra
game.

A big boost for Benitez is the
return of inspirational captain
Steven Gerrard in midfield after
almost a month out with a groin
injury.

"Everyone knows we are
stronger with him on the pitch,”
Benitez said. "He is a player
who can change games and is
very important for us."

With Newcastle mired in the
relegation zone and needing
three points to boost its survival
prospects, Benitez doesn't
expect a repeat of its 5-1 rout
produced in December.

"T could see the passion and
the work rate of their team.
They were working really hard
trying to win,” Benitez said.
"We will try to play at the same
level as we did at St. James’
Park, but I think it will be a dif-
ferent match.

"When the other team is
working so hard and it is so
close to the end of the season, it
will make it a tough match."

Newcastle is on 31 points,
along with northeast rival Mid-
dlesbrough.

"We are relying on other
teams now, but what it is safe to
say is the teams around us won't
pick up maximum points
between now and the end of the
season,” Newcastle manager
Alan Shearer said. "If they do
slip up, we have got to make
sure we are in a position to take
advantage of that."

Middlesbrough will be look-
ing to maintain its unbeaten
home record in 2009 against
United on Saturday. Boro have
already beaten Liverpool and
drawn with Arsenal at the
Riverside this season.

United manager Alex Fergu-
son faces a quandary over play-
er selection with the second leg
of the Champions League semi-
finals at Arsenal scheduled for
Tuesday. United hold a slender
1-0 lead in the tie.

Center back Rio Ferdinand
will miss the trip to the north-
east but should be fit for Tues-
day after tests cleared him of a
cracked rib.

Teenage strikers Danny Wel-
beck and Federico Macheda
could play a role at Boro as
United looks to move closer to
a third straight league title.

"Each game, if we get the
right result, we get closer and
closer,” winger Ryan Giggs said.
"The games are running out for
other teams to catch us. We'll
be trying to win. It won't be
easy, but if we do get the right
result it will be a great oppor-
tunity for us."

Also Saturday, third-place
Chelsea hosts Fulham, Arsenal
is at Portsmouth, Blackburn is
at Manchester City, West Ham
is at Stoke, West Bromwich
Albion is at Tottenham and
Bolton is at Wigan.

Sunderland, which is four
points above the relegation
zone, hosts Everton in Sunday's
other game. Just a point behind
Sunderland, Hull is at Aston
Villa on Monday.

For the stories
behind the news,

read Insight
on Mondays





PAGE 12, SATURDAY, MAY 2, 2009 THE TRIBUNE
LOCAL NEWS

thescene

by Franklyn G Ferguson, JP









NASSAU EVENTS CAPTURED ON CAMERA

COOPER §











































FAME

I CHESTER COOPER
was inducted into College of
the Bahamas’ alumni Hall of
Fame during a special cere-
mony this week.

Thanking the Alumni
association for their out-
standing selection, COB
president Janyne Hodder
said the college has pro-
duced persons of outstand-
ing character whose accom-
plishments reflect glowingly
on the institution.

“As one of our chief aims
at the college is to drive
national development
through education, research
and innovation it is appropri-
ate that eminent individuals
who excelled at the college
and are also doing great
things since graduating
should in some way be
recognised and honoured.

“Tam impressed by the cri-
teria which were used to
select the honouree -a
leader whose success bene-
fits co-workers, a contributor
to society who excels in civic
outreach, a person who
exhibits strength of character
that personifies the college’s
motto, ‘knowledge, truth,
integrity’ and the meaning of
the European Cup that sym-
bolises the outpouring of
inspiration that causes others
to thirst for those same char-
acteristics listed in the mot-
to,” she said.



41. JOHN Wilson, a partner at
the McKinney Bankcroft and
Hughes law firm and principal
director of British American
Financial: president of the Col-
lege of the Bahamas, Janyne
Hodder; and | Chester Cooper,
president, director and CEO of
British American Financial.

2. Attorney Howard Thompson
Jr with the chairman of British
American Financial Basil Sands.

3. Attorney Bianca V Beneby;
Director General of Tourism
Vernice Walkine; attorney Kahlil
Parker, and attorney Heather
Walkine-Hunt.

4. Senator Michael Halkitis;
Richard Coulson, managing
director of RC Capital Markets;
and chief executive officer at
Doctors Hospital Charles Sealy
lI

5. Attorney Keith Bell, general
council for Sunshine Finance;
president of the UTEB Associa-
tion Jenny Issacs-Dotson, Mr
Cooper, and attorney Donald
Saunders.

6. Attorney Lourey Smith,
accountant John Bain, and
British American senior manag-
er of business development
Tameka Forbes

7. Robert Deal and his wife
Cleopatra with Dr Richard
Crawford, Michelle Gibson and
her husband Cyprian Gibson.



Full Text
» I -
“0-
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it iteli elise Meerel Gu tena

{T)

im blowin’ it

SOF
73F

he Tribune
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SATURDAY, MAY 2, 2009

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rowers Gila ge
after police raid

FML CEO accused of
promoting a lottery
and allowing web shop
to be used for purpose

@ By NATARIO McKENZIE
Tribune Staff Reporter

FML CEO Craig Flowers
appeared in Magistrate’s Court
yesterday charged with promoting
a lottery and permitting his web
shop to be used for the purpose of
conducting a lottery.

He pleaded not guilty to the
allegations.

Flowers, 67, of Victoria
Avenue, appeared before Mag-
istrate Derrence Rolle in Court 5,
Bank Lane, along with several of
his employees and patrons. The
arraignment comes just three days
after police raided FML’s head
office on Wulff Road.

Court dockets state that Mr
Flowers, along with Kingsley
Munroe, 58, Rhodista Rolle, 27,
Anwar McDonald, 23, Nyokia
Myer, 34, Nikita Patton, 19,
Andrinique Dean, 26, Rolinda
Pierre, 29, Makia Stubbs, 23,

Melissa Clarke, 24 and Andrea
Pratt, 20, on Tuesday April 28,
permitted the premises of the
FML Web Shop, located at Wulff
Road, to promote, organise and
conduct a lottery.

The dockets also state that Mr
Flowers and his co-accused know-
ingly permitted the FML Web
Shop on Wulff Road to be used
for the purpose of a lottery.

Munroe, Rolle, McDonald,
Myer, Patton, Dean, Pierre,
Stubbs, Clarke, and Andrea Pratt,
were arraigned along with Hykey-
to Knowles, 31, Stephen New-
bold, 28, Vernita Mackey, 26, and
Germaine Williams-Rahming, 40,
charged with being found on a
premises where a lottery was tak-
ing place. The accused all pleaded
not guilty to the charges.

The prosecution made no
objection to the accused being

SEE page six

Flowers: I would not
support national lottery

m@ By PAUL G TURNQUEST
Tribune Staff Reporter
pturnquest@tribunemedia.net

FML CEO Craig Flowers said he would not support the
Bahamas establishing a national lottery as the country’s size
would not make such a lottery financially feasible.

With a population of little more than 350,000 Mr Flowers said
the pay out for such a lottery would hover somewhere around
$100,000 per dollar ticket purchased — a drastic decrease com-
pared to other regions especially the United States where an
equal dollar wager could reward a player with the opportunity

to win tens of millions of dollars.

“The fact of the matter is, as a national lottery per se, the gam-
ing industry needs to visit and look at what the locals are doing
here in the Bahamas is not a lottery per se. It is a type of game
that is played by their actual name is numbers, but it is not a lot-
tery. A lottery is where numbers are used from a pool of num-
bers and they are draw out in five or six balls one ball at a

time.

“When you have a series of three balls as we do we do not dif-
ferentiate here between one and the other. But that is not the
case. In the Bahamas the local games that we play are number
games. In the lottery, the chances of winning the lottery are one
in seven point something million. But in the numbers game at
least two thirds of the money will move back to the people
who play the numbers every day,” he said.

Therefore, he said, the government needs to understand that
the practice of persons playing the local number system must be

SEE page six



nal
AND REAL ESTATE

BAHAMAS BIGGEST

cilar'ge

Tim Clarke/Tribune staff



FML CEO Craig Flowers (top of stairs in white shirt) enters court,
followed by others appearing in connection with his case

Police officer dies
after traffic accident

A POLICE officer has died
after his motorcycle collided with
a car in Second Street, The
Grove, on Thursday evening.

PC 3124 Rayshano Smith was
riding a 650 motorbike when he
collided with a Honda Odyssey
at around 6.30pm.

The Nassau officer who was off
duty at the time of the accident
sustained serious injuries and was
taken to hospital where he died at

around 9pm Thursday.

Police Commissioner Reginald
Ferguson extended his condo-
lences to the family of PC Smith.

Police are investigating the
cause of the collision.

Anyone with any information
that could assist the investigation
should call traffic police at 393-
7714 or 911, 919, or Crime Stop-
pers anonymously on 328-TIPS
(8477).

i








|. SEE PAGE NINE



US currency
discovered
on aircraft
‘could run

into millions

oe

Man in custody after
hidden cash found

@ By DENISE
MAYCOCK
Tribune Freeport
Reporter
dmaycock@
tribunemedia.net

FREEPORT —- Law
enforcement officials have
discovered a large amount
of US currency — possibly
millions of dollars — hid-
den on board a private
charter aircraft at Grand
Bahama International Air-
port.

Asst Supt Wellbourne
Bootle said a 24-year-old
Bahamian man is in cus-
tody assisting police with
their investigations.

According to reports,
Bahamas Customs, Drug
Enforcement Unit officers



and Airport Police
searched a private aircraft
which arrived from Fort
Lauderdale around
2.30pm on April 30.

While searching a num-
ber of household appli-
ances and grocery items on
board the aircraft, officers
discovered cash hidden
inside the appliances.

ASP Bootle said a man
was arrested. He could not
say whether the plane was
Bahamian or US regis-
tered.

Police also could not say
how much cash was found
as investigations were still
ongoing, he said.

According to a source,
it is believed more
than $6 million was uncov-
ered.

Isolated students and teachers
cleared of swine flu infection

m@ By MEGAN REYNOLDS
Tribune Staff Reporter
mreynolds @tribunemedia.net

ABACO students
and teachers who were
isolated because of
swine flu fears after a
visit to Mexico have
been cleared of infec-
tion, Health Minister
Hubert Minnis announced.

The ten students and two teachers who
went into voluntary isolation upon their
return to Abaco last Saturday were

SEE page six



JET SKI VICTIM ‘WAS
WORKING AT NYGARD CAY
RESORT PARTY’

80% OF SECOND GRADE
STUDENTS READING AT
LEAST TO GRADE LEVEL

RUNNING WATER IS A
‘LUXURY’ FOR SOME NEW
PROVIDENCE RESIDENTS



NASSAU AND BAHAMEA

ISLANDS’ LEADING NEWSPAPER

PAGE TWO



Hubert Minnis

BUT voices concern
over govt approach
to sex allegations

@ By ALISON LOWE
Tribune Staff Reporter
alowe@tribunemedia.net

THE Bahamas Union of
Teachers is concerned about
recent statements made by
Prime Minister Ingraham out-
lining government’s new
approach in dealing with
teachers against whom sex
allegations have been brought.

Father Sebastian Campbell,
Vice President of the
Bahamas Union of Teachers,
said that while the union’s
“first goal is the welfare of

SEE page six
PAGE 2, SATURDAY, MAY 2, 2009

THE TRIBUNE



LOCAL NEWS

students debate ‘eating §=[nmi

Well on a tight budget

THE Ministry of Education, in
collaboration with the Ministry of
Health and Toastmasters Interna-
tional, held a speech competition
centered around National Nutri-
tion Month.

Armed with their oratorical
skills and ready to do battle were
students from New Providence
and the Family Islands.

Participating schools included
LW Young Junior High School, C
C Sweeting Senior, R M Bailey
Senior High School, St Andrew’s
College, Bahamas Academy, and
Saint Francis De Sales. The topic
of the debate was “Eating Well
On a Tight Budget.”

The students admonished the
audience to limit their intake of
fatty and greasy foods; make phys-
ical activity and exercise a part of
their lifestyles; eat fruit and veg-
etables everyday; drink lots of
water; and choose foods with less
sugar and salt.

Permanent Secretary Camille
Johnson, who spoke on behalf of
the Minister of Health Dr Hubert
Minnis, congratulated all of the
students for their participation in
sending the message of healthy

TROPICAL
EXTERMINATORS

PEST CONTROL
PHONE: 322-2157



AFTER THREE INTENSE HOURS,
THE COMPETITION CAME TO AN
END, AND THE WINNERS WERE
DECLARED AS FOLLOWS:



¢ JUNIOR DIVISION:

1. DEOKIN-NIQUE
(LW YOUNG JUNIOR HIGH SCHOOL)

2. TRYKER SMITH
(ST ANDREW'S COLLEGE)

3. TANISHA ANDERSON
(LW YOUNG JUNIOR SCHOOL)

¢ SENIOR DIVISION:

1. KENDRA STUART
(CC SWEETING SENIOR HIGH SCHOOL}

2. ROBERT FARQUHARSON
(ST ANDREW'S COLLEGE)

3. JOY ARCHER (ST FRANCES DE SALES)

lifestyles and good nutrition
through education.

She said the Ministry of Health
will continue to support the speech
contest because good nutrition is
critical to building economic
growth.

Further, Ms Johnson said that
the winners in the junior and
senior divisions will hold the titles
of, “Junior and Senior Nutrition
Ambassadors”, and will work with
the Ministry of Health to promote
good nutrition and health.

gration Department

donates 37 pints of blood

UBS (Bahamas) Lod. is one of the word's leading financal institutions in the
‘Caribbean. Through aur Boars Aree Wealth Managenernt International wee kok
after wealthy private clemts by providing them with comprehersive, walle
enhancing services. Qur client acwisors comming strong personal relationships weth
the resources that are available from across UBS, helping them prowde 4 full
range of wealth management services.

nonder to strengthen cur team in Nassau, we are |polong to fill the follwing

positon;

Accounting & Reporting Expert

Res porrsii ities

m@ By LINDSAY
THOMPSON

IMMIGRATION Depart-
ment employees donated 37
pints of blood to the Princess
Margaret Hospital’s blood bank
on Thursday as part of its 70th
anniversary celebrations.

Minister of State for Immi-
gration Branville McCartney,
the first to donate, said that it
was a pleasure for him to give
back to the community.

“As we celebrate our 70th
anniversary we are giving blood
and hopefully we would help
Save many, many lives,” Mr
McCartney said.

Dr Hubert Minnis, Minister
of Health, commended the
department for “taking the
lead” in such an initiative.

He said operations are peri-
odically delayed due to the
shortage of blood supply.

“What you are embarking on
cannot be matched by any,
because blood is as essential
component of our survival so
you would be saving many
lives,” Dr Minnis said.

An Act of Parliament formed
the Immigration Department

Endure the quality, accuracy, and completeness of all firancial data according to IFAS standards,
Ensure monthly chasing process and correct allocation of costs and revenues:

Perform high quality reporting to local management and regulator,
Reporting of Management 4ccounting data to head office;
Relatiorahip management 4nd investigations with Bracdian organization;

Qualifications:

CRA certilica tion;

Saund working knowledge of IFAS and Based || banking nequlations;
Extensive knowledge of M5 Office and related “pplication Software products;
Knowledge of S4P based accounting applications is a plus;
Minirnunm of 5 years Experience in Accounting. Previaus work in an iMenmational linarcial inétitu-
Ton of accounting firm is a plus;
‘Working knowledge of Portuquese language is required for communication with Braglian clients;

Mn addition, the ideal candidate must possess strom anahlical and communication skilk, be a highly enci-
wabed tear player and willing to adapt bo a chymanmic work environment 4. shrong budinesecushomer ori-

eration & ettertial.

Pease send your resume on or before hay 8", 2009 to:

Arhaharasaube con

aor

UBS (Bahamas) Lod., Human Resources, Pd. Box Ne? 'S!, Nassau, Bahan

a starts wath you.



























52wk-Low

1.28

11.00
6.95
0.63
3.15
1.95

11.09
2.83
6.39
1.31
1.86

Abaco Markets

Bank of Bahamas
Benchmark
Bahamas Waste
Fidelity Bank
Cable Bahamas
Colina Holdings

Doctor's Hospital
6.02
11.00
10.35
5.00

Famguard
Fince

Focol (S)
1.00
0.30
5.50
8.60
10.00

Freeport Concrete
ICD Utilities
J. S. Johnson

Securit y

Bahamas Property Fund

Commonwealth Bank ($1)

Consolidated Water BDRs

FirstCaribbean Bank

Focol Class B Preference

Premier Real Estate

theca er

ROYAL = FIDELITY

Money ot Work





Kristaan Ingraham/BIS

MINISTER OF STATE for Immigration Branville McCartney, donates blood as part of the Immigration

Department’s 70th anniversary.

in 1939. And to commemorate
this occasion, the department
is hosting a number of activi-
ties culminating with a banquet.

“Today we are giving back
to the community,” said Jack
Thompson, Director of Immi-
gration.

“We pause to make a deposit
into the blood bank as this is a
great investment towards saving
lives.”

WHO not recommending travel

restrictions over swine flu



THE United Nations’ World Health
Organisation said yesterday it is not recom-
mending travel restrictions as a result of the

outbreak of swine flu.

The WHO maintains that limiting travel
and imposing travel restrictions would have
“very little effect” on stopping influenza
A(HIN1) from spreading, but would be
“highly disruptive to the global communi-

ty.

A number of cruise ships originally bound
for Mexico have arranged to divert their trips
to the Bahamas in May and June as a result
of the outbreak, while airlines and travel
companies are offering discounted fares to
alternative sunshine destinations for trav-
ellers who are changing their plans to visit

Mexico.

“Travellers can protect themselves and
others by following simple recommendations
related to travel aimed at preventing the
spread of infection,” said a WHO spokesman.

“Individuals who are ill should delay trav-
el plans and returning travellers who fall ill
should seek appropriate medical care.

a
sy
‘@
LL
=
ws
=
wo
ce
~”
Lud

Panama.

“These recommendations are prudent mea-

Three megayacht tenders reportedly
stolen in just over a month in Bahamas

AN ONLINE yachting mag-
azine has issued a report about
three megayacht tenders being
stolen in the Bahamas in just
over a month.

According to the Triton
Megayacht News, the most
recent boat thefts both took
place on April 6 at the High-
bourne Cay Marina.

The 32-foot vessel “Freak
Show” was recovered with a
gash in its bow and all the acces-
sories missing. The report said
five men were taken into cus-
tody for questioning in connec-
tion with the theft.

That morning, a 28-foot

EG CAPITAL MARKETS

BISxX LISTED & TRADED SECURITIES AS OF:
FRIDAY, 24 APRIL 2009

BISX ALL SHARE INDEX: CLOSE 1,628.06 | CHG 0.08 | %CHG 0.00 | YTD -84.30 | YTD % -4.92

FINDEX: CLOSE 797.40 | YTD -4.49% | 2008 -12.31%

WWW .BISXBAHAMAS.COM | TELEPHONE: 242-323-2330 | FACSIMILE: 242-323-2320

1.40
11.00
6.95
0.63
3.15
2.37
12.04
2.83
6.39
2.54
1.86
7.76
11.00
10.40
5.14
1.00
0.30
5.59
10.50
10.00

Previous Close Today's Close
1.40
11.00
6.95
0.63
3.15
2.37
12.04
2.83
6.39
2.62
1.86
7.76
11.00
10.40
5.14

1.00
0.30
5.59
10.50
10.00

Change Daily Vol. ERPS
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00 =
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.08
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00

BISX LISTED DEBT SECURITIES - (Bonds trade on a Percentage Pricing bases)
Last Sale

52wk-Low
1000.00
1000.00
1000.00
1000.00

52wk-Low

RND Holdings

ABDAB
RND Holdings

Fund Name

1.3041
2.9230
1.3875
3.1964
12.1564
100.0000
96.4070
1.0000
9.0950
1.0000
1.0000
1.0000

Colina Bond Fund

CFAL Global Bond

BISX ALL SHARE INDEX - 19 Dec 02 = 1,000.00
52wk-Hi - Highest closing price in last 52 weeks
52wk-Low - Lowest closing price in last 52 weeks
Previous Close
Today's Close
Change - Change in closing price from day to day
Daily Vol. - Number of total shares traded today

DIV $ - Dividends per share paid in the last 12 months

P/E - Closing price divided by the last 12 month earnings

(S) - 4-for-1 Stock Split - Effective Date 8/8/2007
(S1) - 3-for-1 Stock Split - Effective Date 7/11/2007

Fidelity Bank Note 17 (Series A) +
Fidelity Bank Note 22 (Series B) +
Fidelity Bank Note 13 (Series C) +
Fidelity Bank Note 15 (Series D) +

Symbol
Bahamas Supermarkets
Caribbean Crossings (Pref)

Colina MSI Preferred Fund
Colina Money Market Fund
Fidelity Bahamas G & I Fund
Fidelity Prime Income Fund

CFAL Global Equity Fund

CFAL High Grade Bond Fund
Fidelity International Investment Fund
FG Financial Preferred Income Fund
FG Financial Growth Fund

FG Financial Diversified Fund

- Previous day's weighted price for daily volume
- Current day's weighted price for daily volume

FBB17
FBB22
FBB13
FBB15

100.00
100.00
100.00
100.00

Daily Vol.
0.00 7%
0.00
0.00
0.00

7%

Fidelity Over-The-Counter Securities

Bid $
7.92
4.00
0.35

Ask $
8.42
6.25
0.40

Last Price Weekly Vol.
14.60 =
6.00
0.35

Colina Over-The-Counter Securities

30.13
0.45

31.59
0.55

29.00
0.55

BISX Listed Mutual Funds

NA Vv
1.3664
2.8962
1.4548
3.1964

12.7397
100.5606
96.4070
1.0000
9.1599
1.0440
1.0364
1.0452

Fund

YTD%

0.95

-1.49
1.48

-5.59
0.96
0.56

-3.59
0.00
0.71
0.80
0.33
0.76

Last 12 Months
4.77
-3.35
4.85

-13.64
5.79
0.56
-3.59
0.00
-12.76
4.40
3.64
4.40

Div $

MARKET TERMS
YIELD - last 12 month dividends divided by closing price
Bid $ - Buying price of Colina and Fidelity
Ask & - Selling price of Colina and fidelity

Last Price
Weekly Vol

- Last traded over-the-counter price
- Trading volume of the prior week

Prime + 1.75%
Prime + 1.75%

EPS $

$s Div $
0.127
0.992
0.244
0.877
0.078
0.055
1.309
0.249
0.441
0.099
0.240
0.420
0.322
0.794
0.337

P/E

0.000
0.035
0.407
0.952
0.180

Interest

19 October 2017

19 October 2022
30 May 2013
29 May 2015

Div $
0.300
0.480
0.000

P/E
0.041
0.000
0.001

4.540
0.002

0.000
0.000

Yield %
28-Feb-09
31-Mar-09
17-Apr-09
31-Mar-09
28-Feb-09
31-Dec-08
31-Dec-08
31-Dec-07
31-Mar-09
9-Feb-09
9-Feb-09
9-Feb-09

EPS $ - A company’s reported earnings per share for the last 12 mths
NAV - Net Asset Value
N/M - Not Meaningful

FINDEX - The Fidelity Bahamas Stock Index. January 1, 1994 = 100

TO TRADE CALL: COLINA 242-502-7010 | ROYALFIDELITY 242-356-7764 | F@ CAPITAL MARKETS 242-396-4000 | COLONIAL 242-502-7525

Intrepid tied to M/Y Relentless
was stolen and later recovered
after having suffering some
damage.

The report said Captain Ess-
er of the Freak Show believes
the men were attempting to
make a drug run to Jamaica.

"Mine was stolen because of
its range,” Captain Esser said.
"They wanted it to make a drug
run.”

Capt Robin Norquoy of M/Y
Relentless appealed to local
radio and televisions stations
for help in getting the word out
about the thefts.

Involved

Capt Esser contacted the US
Coast Guard, but little came of
this, so he spoke with the Roy-
al Bahamas Police Force and
the Royal Bahamas Defence
Force, both of which got
involved along with the Drug
Enforcement Agency, the
report said.

"Without those agencies, our
boat would have never been
recovered,” Capt Esser is quot-
ed as saying.

The report said that after
hearing about the thefts, Capt
Zack Green of M/Y Incentive
spoke about a third incident last
month.

PASSENGERS we



=

aring face masks as a precaution
against the swine flu inside a flight heading to

sures which can limit the spread of many
communicable diseases and not only influen-
za A(HIN1).”

e SEE PAGE ONE

"On the night of March 22
while the Incentive, a 142-foot
Palmer Johnson, was anchored
at the eastern end of Nassau
Harbour, our 32-foot Intrepid
with twin 350HP outboards was
stolen from the swim platform.

"It was 9.30pm and all the
lights were on. Crew were on
deck as we were preparing to
depart for Palm Beach. There
was a 10-minute window that
no one was on the aft deck, and
during this time the line was cut.

"We launched a jet ski and a
tender and contacted the local
marine patrol. After hours of
searching, the crew gave up for
the night. In the morning I had
the engineer go to the airport to
charter an airplane because
there were no helicopters avail-
able.

"After 45 minutes in the air,
they spotted what could be our
tender under some trees in the
Sea Breeze canal on the south
side of Nassau. I then sent our
other tender to investigate and,
sure enough, it was our Intrepid,
fully intact.

"After the police tried to take
fingerprints we used the spare
set of keys to bring the Intrepid
back to Nassau and quickly got
under way for Florida,” the
report quoted Capt Green as
saying.

MAIN/SPORTS SECTION

Local News

Editorial/Letters. ..........

pipe Sonele

Santa ueenan Mec ecteeean saunas: P4

CLASSIFIED SECTION 36 PAGES

USA TODAY WEEKENDER 8 PAGES


THE TRIBUNE

SATURDAY, MAY 2, 2009, PAGE 3



LOCAL NEWS



Exhibition to
highlight need to
preserve coastal
environment

THE National Coastal
Awareness Committee is
hosting an exhibition at the
Mall of Marathon to high-
light the need to preserve
and protect our coastal envi-
ronment.

The exhibition, which
opened on Monday, April 27,
and continues to Saturday,
May 9, features a travelling
exhibit entitled “Our Reefs:
Caribbean Connections.”

The modular display was
created by the Florida State
University and is a revision
of an exhibit originally pro-
duced by the Smithsonian
Tropical Research Institute.
It focuses on the problems
affecting coral reefs through-
out the Caribbean. Examples
of impacts to coral reefs from
around the wider Caribbean
are balanced with case stud-
ies of actions that people are
taking to protect reefs and
coastal environments.

The exhibition includes
several important examples
from the Bahamas. The “Our
Reefs” exhibition is on loan
to BREEF, and it also will be
on public display in
Eleuthera, Abaco and Grand
Bahama in the coming
weeks.

Display

“We are very pleased to
have this extraordinary
exhibit on display in the
Bahamas for the first time,”
said Casuarina McKinney,
director of BREEF, a mem-
ber of the National Coastal
Awareness Committee.

“The large display mod-
ules address topics such as
reefs and related ecosystems,
global warming, pollution,
coastal development, over-
fishing, marine protected
areas and reef rehabilitation.
The exhibit provides a public
focal point for students and
adults to encounter and dis-
cuss complex issues that span
the interfaces of science,
technology, economics and
society.”

“The exhibition has
recently been on display at
the 11th International Coral
Reef Symposium and in the
Florida Keys National
Marine Sanctuary.” said
Dr Judy Lang, exhibition
developer, who is currently
in Nassau to assist with
training about the
exhibition.

The exhibition also fea-
tures displays by the
Bahamas National Trust,
Bahamas Environment Sci-
ence and Technology
(BEST) Commission,
BREEF, Dolphin Encoun-
ters — Project BEACH, the
Department of Marine
Resources, the Nature Con-
servancy and the United
States Embassy.

Jet ski victim ‘was working |
_at Nygard Cay resort party’

m@ By MEGAN REYNOLDS
Tribune Staff Reporter
mreynolds@tribunemedia. net

THE man whose body parts were found
in the waters off western New Providence on
Monday was working at a party at the Nygard
Cay resort when he disappeared, it has been
alleged.

Jerome Huyler, 37, had taken two women
out on a jet ski from the beach bordering
fashion mogul Peter Nygard’s exotic Nygard
Cay resort in Lyford Cay when he disap-
peared — creating panic at the resort, a source
claimed.

The lower part of a man’s body was recov-
ered by Royal Bahamas Defence Force divers
on Monday afternoon and police are awaiting
DNA test results to confirm the remains are
Mr Huyler’s.

A source told The Tribune Mr Huyler was
a jet ski operator contracted by Mr Nygard to
take out guests at his Sunday parties and had
arrived at Nygard Cay with his jet skis on

Sunday morning. Mr Huyler had worked at
the resort for at least eight years and was
also a disc jockey at Mr Nygard’s Sunday
pamper parties, the source claimed.

But a spokeswoman for the Nygard Cay
resort denied Mr Huyler was a jet ski opera-
tor at Nygard Cay and said he did not have
permission to operate the jet ski on Sunday
evening as it had been put away for the day.
She further claimed he was not wearing a life
jacket when he went out in rough conditions.

Party

The spokeswoman did confirm Mr Huyler,
also known as DJ Shorts, was scheduled to DJ
at the party that evening.

Police told The Tribune on Thursday they
were not sure if Mr Huyler had been attend-
ing the party at Nygard Cay, and the Nygard
Cay spokeswoman said the accident, “had
nothing to do with Nygard Cay.”

But The Tribune’s source, who claims to

have been at Nygard Cay on Sunday,
rejected statements published in Friday’s edi-
tion.

The source claimed there was panic at the
resort when the two women returned
to the beach at around 6pm without Mr
Huyler

The police were called and three private
boats were sent out in 15 to 18ft waves to
search for Mr Huyler, while others scoured
the coastline until after midnight, the source
said.

“T was frantic, I was very scared,” the
source said. “Jerome’s aunt and two of his
cousins came to the property, and then more
of his cousins came, but his mother couldn’t
handle it.”

The source claimed two staff members
resigned from Nygard Cay because of the
manner in which the incident was handled,
adding: “It must be a very serious thing for an
employee with three children and a mort-
gage to walk off the job in the middle of a
recession.”

80% of second grade students
reading at least to grade level

THE results of the Rigby Reads
Diagnostic Test show that more
than 80 per cent of grade two pub-
lic school students are reading at
or above their grade level, Minis-
ter of Education Carl Bethel said.

This year, primary students in
grades two, four and five took the
test, which is an internationally
acclaimed diagnostic test that pro-
vides a detailed report of students’
learning strengths and weaknesses.

Mr Bethel said the Rigby Reads
Diagnostic Test allows the Min-
istry of Education to standardise
the assessment of reading levels
throughout the Bahamas, so that
the ministry is able to determine
the uniformity and discrepancies in
the reading levels of students in
public schools throughout the
country.

“By assessing our students’
strengths and weaknesses in the
classroom, we are able to respond
to their needs,” he said. “Teachers
are then able to place students in
appropriate instructional groups
and determine the critical skills
that they need to emphasise in
reading.

“Students’ progress is moni-
tored from year-to-year because
they are tested each year,” he said.

Mr Bethel said that last year,
the Rigby Reads Diagnostic Test
was only administered to students
in grade two. But this year, the
testing population was expanded
to include students in grades four
and five with a total of 11,730 stu-
dents participating in the assess-
ment.

He said the Ministry of Educa-
tion has sought for years to estab-
lish a programme to recognise and
honour students at the primary
level for their achievement in lit-
eracy.

“We believe this literacy pro-
gramme today provides that

Orla ei- 1401s)



opportunity to highlight students
for their outstanding achievement
in literacy,” he said.

Mr Bethel said grade two stu-
dents were assessed in the areas of
visual discrimination, auditory dis-
crimination, letter recognition,
sounds-letters and consonants.

Comprehension was the most
challenging area for students for
both years but the minister said
there was an improvement of
three percentage points. He
explained that students in grades
four and five were assessed in the
areas of sound letter consonants,
sound letter vowels, vocabulary,
comprehension and fluency.

Grade four students performed
best in the area of letter conso-
nants and grade five students per-
formed best in the area of vocab-
ulary.

Mr Bethel said the challenging
area for both of these grade levels
were the sound-letters vowels, and
at all levels, the girls consistently
outperformed the boys. He said
his ministry is looking at more

The American Embassy in Nassau, The Bahamas has a requirement for a
qualified contracting firm to provide labour, equipment, and materials to
demolish and remove approximately 62 feet of existing concrete masonry unit
wall and construct 82 feet of 9 foot high reinforced concrete perimeter wall with

steel picket fence.

The wall should be constructed to American Concrete Institute I reinforced
standards or better with proper drainage and a 5ft depth foundation.

Additional work includes cutting through an existing low masonry wall and
installing two single door entrances into an existing building. This construction
effort is estimated at between $50,000 - $100,000 and should be completed no

than a “band-aid” approach to
the illiteracy problem in the
nation.

“We believe that the results of
the Rigby Roads Diagnostic Test
allow us to take steps to imple-
ment programmes and instructions
that will counteract the challenges
our students encounter in read-
ing,” Mr Bethel said.

“T am proud of the fact that we
have already introduced initiatives
and strategies that will move us
forward in the area of reading and
ultimately the entire spectrum of
learning.”

The students who achieved the
highest test scores were: Christal
Adderley; Daunte Bethel; Saman-
tha Cash; Nnika Corbin; Derricka
Ferguson; Ajah Higgs; Midjina
Jose; Ashlee Major; Treyvine Ney-
mour; Cassidy Rolle; Kamrin
Roker; Khyree Rolle; Shaquel
Seymour; Brenton Taylor; Alia
Wilson; Shannon Albury; Paige
Davis; Micah Kelly; Tinisha Miller;

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: Police discover
_ thousands of
_ marijuana plants

A FIELD of thousands of

eee ae plants growing in
? Red Bay, North Andros was
? discovered by police.

It is estimated there are more

: than 1,600 plants of the illegal
? weed growing between two and
? four feet tall in the field.

Police who made the discov-

i ery were acting on a tip
? received at around 5.30pm
? Thursday.

No arrests were made, how-

? ever investigations continue.

Anyone with any informa-

: tion that may assist investiga-
? tions should call police on 911,
? 919 or call Crime Stoppers
? anonymously on 328-TIPS
i (8477).

| Arrest after stolen
_ boat recovered

A 25-YEAR-OLD Grand

? Bahama man has been arrested
? after a boat stolen in New Prov-
? idence was recovered in North
? Andros.

The 35ft vessel was found in

the settlement of Conch Sound
? after police received a tip on
? Tuesday.

Police press liaison officer

i Walter Evans said police expect
? to charge the man arrested in
? connection with the theft.

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All firms who respond to the solicitation must be technically qualified and
financially responsible to perform the work. At a minimum, each Offeror must
meet the following requirements when submitting their proposal:

Be able to understand written and spoken English;

Have an established business with a permanent address and telephone listing;
Have the necessary personnel, equipment and financial resources available to
perform the work;

Have all licenses and permits required by local law;

Meet all local insurance requirements;

Have the ability to obtain a performance and guarantee bond and a payment
bond, or to post adequate performance security, such as irrevocable letters of
credit or guarantees issued by a reputable financial institution;

Have no adverse criminal record;

Have no political or business affiliation which could be considered contrary to
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PO Box N-8197, Nassau, The Bahamas. Telephone (242) 322-1181 ext 4277 or

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Fax (242) 328-7838 or via email at nelsonda@state.gov.


PAGE 4, SATURDAY, MAY 2, 2009

EDITORIAL/LETTERS TO THE EDITOR

THE TRIBUNE





The Tribune Limited

NULLIUS ADDICTUS JURARE IN VERBA MAGISTRI
Being Bound to Swear to The Dogmas of No Master

LEON E. H. DUPUCH, Publisher/Editor 1903-1914

SIR ETIENNE DUPUCH, Kt, O.B.E., K.M., K.CS.G.,

(Hon.) LL.D., D.Litt.

Publisher/Editor 1919-1972
Contributing Editor 1972-199]

EILEEN DUPUCH CARRON, C.M.G., M.S. B.A., LL.B.

Publisher/Editor 1972-

Published Daily Monday to Saturday

Shirley Street, RO. Box N-3207, Nassau, Bahamas
Insurance Management Building., P.O. F-485, Freeport, Grand Bahama

TELEPHONES
Switchboard (News, Circulation and Advertising) 322-1986
Advertising Manager - (242) 502-2352
Circulation Department - (242) 502-2387
Nassau Fax: - (242) 328-2398
Freeport, Grand Bahama: 1-(242)-352-6608
Freeport fax: (242) 352-9348

WEBSITE
www.tribune242.com — updated daily at 2pm

Auto deal extends Obama’s reach, risk

WASHINGTON — In forcing a swift bank-
ruptcy on Chrysler, President Barack Obama
expanded the risk and reach of the presidency in
the hope that the hidebound auto industry will
find a way to remake itself.

The government's intervention with Chrysler
LLC and General Motors Corp. has been far
more intrusive than the way it has confronted
troubled financial companies. The administra-
tion's influence now ranges from guaranteeing
brake pads to pushing for new products on the
assembly line.

As Obama himself put it, "If the Japanese can
design an affordable, well-designed hybrid, then,
doggone it, the American people should be able
to do the same.”

Despite an additional $8 billion taxpayer
infusion into Chrysler, the president and his
advisers say the administration has no desire to
be in the auto business. And they say they don't
intend to micromanage the company.

But as part of Thursday's arrangement, the
government will be an investor in the new
Chrysler company, and the Treasury Depart-
ment will select four of its new directors, all of
them presumably sympathetic with the White
House's vision of what the car of the future
should be.

In cutting the deal, Obama buys himself good
will with an important labour force, especially in
the USS. auto industry's home state of Michigan,
which has been suffering hugely from unem-
ployment. At the same time he gets to push a
key policy goal, fuel-efficiency, not just as pres-
ident but as a powerful company investor.

But he also is putting billions of dollars of tax-
payer money at risk at a time of rising anxiety
about government bailouts and soaring deficits.

Even before he got to this point, Obama had
exerted unprecedented power. He rejected
Chrysler's and General Motors’ restructuring
plans last month and forced GM's CEO, Rick
Wagoner, to resign. At Chrysler, too, chief exec-
utive Robert Nardelli said Thursday he is going
to leave when the bankruptcy is complete.

General Motors still has another 30 days to
restructure itself, and its stakeholders may well
take a lesson from the administration's dealings
with Chrysler.

When Obama was not leveraging industry
behaviour with taxpayers' money, he was using
the pulpit of the presidency to make his wishes
known in no uncertain terms. In announcing
the deal Thursday, he left no doubt about his
anger with some Chrysler creditors who refused
to accept a reduced payout for their investment.

"They were hoping that everybody else would
make sacrifices, and they would have to make
none," he said. "I don't stand with them."

Administration officials said they tried to
sweeten the offer Wednesday night to attract
more creditors, to no avail.

That could be an effort to nudge a bank-
ruptcy judge to be tough with recalcitrant stake-
holders. And by showing a willingness to stand
up to some Chrysler creditors, Obama was also
sending a signal to GM bondholders not to hold
out for too great a return.

His tone also carried the same populist strains
that he used when he railed against Wall Street
bonuses.

"He's invested in terms of the taxpayers’
investment, and he's invested in it politically,”
said Sen. Carl Levin, a Michigan Democrat who
had initially objected to bankruptcy as a way to
restructure the company.

While the political risks are potentially great,
taking Chrysler through bankruptcy buys some
short-term political running room.

For months, Republicans and some Democ-
rats have said bankruptcy restructuring was the
proper fate for the automakers. By Thursday,
some past critics of bankruptcy such as Levin
were hailing the deal as a new birth for Chrysler.

What's more, the public appears to tilt in
favour of government interventions, at least so
far. A FOX News/Opinion Dynamics Poll in
March found 43 per cent of respondents saying
the government under Obama was taking an
appropriate role in running U.S. companies.
Thirteen per cent said the administration was not
taking a big enough role.

Despite the stigma often attached to bank-
ruptcy, Obama took pains to portray it as a pos-
itive development. "This is not a sign of weak-
ness," he insisted, "but rather one more step on
a clearly charted path to Chrysler's revival."

To be sure, the administration's day-and-
night involvement with the auto industry does
not match its attempts to rescue financial insti-
tutions. That's partly because the automakers
have made a desperate pitch for a government
bailout, while some of the biggest financial insti-
tutions have been less enthusiastic in their desire
for help.

Many major banks now say they want to
return their share of a $700 billion financial res-
cue fund, in part to avoid restrictions that the
government has imposed or threatened to
impose.

At the same time, the government has always
been able to influence banking behaviour
through regulation. And that's where Obama
says he intends to address the industry's excess-
es. Still, banks can fight back in ways that
automakers can't. On Thursday the banking
industry succeeded in defeating a Senate pro-
posal that would have let homeowners seek
foreclosure relief through bankruptcy court.

So far, the two Detroit car companies are
only asking how high Obama wants them to
jump.

(This article was written by Jim Khunhenn
of the Associated Press).



When the ‘number’

houses are raided
- NOBODY WINS!

EDITOR, The Tribune.

PLEASE allow me to express
my Opinion on an institution
that has existed from time
immemorial in the many homes
and hearts of the majority of
Bahamians.

As the police begin its offen-
sive frisson of enforcement of
the law on many of the “num-
ber houses” throughout the
Bahamas, our lawmakers con-
tinue their bumptious diatribe,
plagued with pointless political
innuendo whilst providing no
action plan of a corrective
nature for many of the funda-
mental issues and laws that
need urgent attention that will
enable them to render proper
decisions aligned with a mod-
ern society.

It is now imperative that a
member of the so-called hon-
ourable House of Assembly,
move to address this issue that
appears to have left our law-
makers in a serious imbroglio
and a quandary — that of
addressing “numbers” playing.
“Numbers”, whether the “three
(3) ball” or “four (4) ball” like it
or not has become intricately
woven in the fabric of Bahami-
an society. While many
Bahamians have their salient
points for or against daily “num-
ber” gambling operations, we
should take note and face the
reality that a vast majority of
the Bahamas play the “num-
bers” daily in New Providence
and the family of islands. It
appears that our law makers are
afraid to address this issue even
though many participate daily
in what has become the “hope-
ful daily stimulus package” for
many strapped Bahamians and
foreigners alike looking for a
financial breakthrough. One can
only conclude that “numbers”
like politics in our country, is
normally addressed depending
on who it affects, when it
affects, and what impact the
affect will have on who it affects
— to target those who for expe-
diency and public relations’
sake unwittingly end up on the
radar screen of those who need
to appear as if they are doing
something. As the raids contin-
ue in months and years to come,
the Haitian and Chinese broth-
ers who are also in this business
will now have an opportunity
to upgrade and continue build-
ing their daily “number” gam-
bling empires and “30-day” for-
tunes.

The Bahamas needs to face
the fact that as a part of our
social renaissance — the lottery is
a reality. The government needs
to muster up the fortitude and
have a referendum to obtain the
consensus of the Bahamian peo-
ple as to where they stand on
“numbers”. The government
would with the concurrence of
the Bahamian people at least
have legal means to obtain addi-
tional revenues through taxa-
tion on such gambling. These
funds can be used to fix the

LETTERS

letters@tribunemedia net



schools and increase teachers,
nurses, and police salaries,
upgrade the nation’s historical
landmarks and infrastructure,
proper support for our national
sporting and cultural pro-
grammes with timely funding
for national events, develop and
enhance the Defence and Police
Force with new modern crime
fighting supplies and equipment
along with many more nation
building priorities that can be
funded in a timely manner.

I do believe that everybody
has a contribution and a voice in
free democratic country. The
government of the Bahamas
should allow the voices of the
many to be heard on this emo-
tive topic of “numbers.” Fur-
ther, it is my conviction that
there must be a level of com-
mon sense that can, and must
be exercised when introducing
new laws, amending old ones
and enforcing existing ones. The
Bahamas whether we like it or
not has changed in many ways.
This country has progressed for
the better, and in the memories
of many and current contem-
plations of others we have

changed for the worst.

Our government should now
move away from this pusillani-
mous approach and take proac-
tive steps to either legalise dai-
ly “numbers” gambling and stop
playing the hypocritical game
of the self righteous, or address
the issue through the democra-
tic process and listen to the
voice of the majority of the peo-
ple. The politicians who are
afraid of addressing this issue,
should resign immediately
because there will be other
more serious issues of national
importance that will require
hard political decisions.

Some religious leaders in cer-
tain denominations and indi-
viduals alike that strongly
oppose such gambling publicly,
undoubtedly will be angry
through the week, but happy
on Sunday in the tally room
when the counting of collection
and donations from the congre-
gation is complete, but this is a
democracy!

Face reality, Bahamas, its has
been here, it will be here long
after those who oppose it today
are gone, so at least fix it, tax it
and build something construc-
tive from it.

ANTHONY BOSTWICK
Nassau,
April, 2009.

Responding to
letters on turtle
harvesting

EDITOR, The Tribune.

IF YOU take the vitriol and personal attacks out of the letters
against Andrew Allen’s position on turtle harvesting then you

are left with next to nothing.

None of the letters address Mr Allen’s two very sensible

points that:

1) To ban turtle harvesting on the basis that some people kill
them cruelly would be a foolish act, as it would punish everyone
who eats turtles instead of simply punishing the acts of cruelty

done to them by some; and

2) The environmental arguments need to focus on what
impact Bahamian (as opposed to international) consumption of
turtle is actually having, rather than simply jumping on to some

international bandwagon.

None of Mr Allen’s critics (NOT ONE) has answered either
of these points with any amount of clarity. Instead they keep
concentrating on him as an individual and berating, him for dar-
ing to speak up. Some of them even seem to be accusing him
(and anyone else who eats turtle) of supporting animal cruelty.

Some of your letter writers seem to think that screaming and
insulting attacks on their critics cover for their own inability to
follow a simple line of logic without straying. One minute they
are talking about environmentalism, the next minute they are
berating all Bahamians for supposedly being torturers.

Please Minister, ignore these crazy people!

M TAYLOR
Nassau,
April 16, 2009.

PUBLIC NOTICE

INTENT TO CHANGE NAME BY DEED POLL

The Public is hereby advised that |, MERC ALEX
CORNEILLE of the Southern Disctrict in the Island
of New Providence, Bahamas, intends to change
my name to MCALEX CORNEILLE, If there are any
objections to this change of name by Deed Poll, you
may write such objections to the Chief Passport Officer,
P.O.Box N-742, Nassau, Bahamas no later than thirty

(30) days after the date of publication of this notice.

PUBLIC NOTICE

INTENT TO CHANGE NAME BY DEED POLL

The Public is hereby advised that |, TAMIKA MONIQUE

STRACHAN of Star Estates, Prince Charles, Nassau,
Bahamas, intends to change my name to TAMIA MILAN
STRACHAN, If there are any objections to this change
of name by Deed Poll, you may write such objections
to the Chief Passport Officer, P.O.Box N-742, Nassau,
Bahamas no later than thirty (30) days after the date of

publication of this notice.

Qeve

NOTICE

NOTICE is hereby given that ANTOINETTE BOX of MARSH
HARBOUR, ABACO, BAHAMAS, P.O.BOX AB 20554 is applying
to the Minister responsible for Nationality and Citizenship,
for registration/naturalization as a citizen of The Bahamas,
and that any person who knows any reason why registration/
naturalization should not be granted, should send a written
and signed statement of the facts within twenty-eight days
from the 2nd day of MAY 2009 to the Minister responsible for
Nationality and Citizenship, PO.Box N-7147, Nassau, Bahamas.

NOTICE

Pursuant to the provisions of Section 138 (4) of the Inter-
national Business Companies Act, 2000, ue is hereby
given that:-

(a) Griffin KAC Holdings Company Limited is in
dissolution;

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THE TRIBUNE

SATURDAY, MAY 2, 2009, PAGE 5



LOCAL NEWS



0 In brief

Computer
and printer
donation to
Crisis Centre

THE CRISIS Centre has
received the donation of a
computer and printer from
the former Innerwheel
Club of Nassau.

Past Innerwheel Club
president Christa Palmer

spent 15 years volunteering i

at the Bahamas Crisis Cen-
tre in the Princess Mar-
garet Hospital, working as
a counsellor for rape vic-
tims and drug addicts, and
as chairperson for the cen-
tre’s rape advocate pro-
gramme.

She and fellow former
Innerwheel Club president

Joan Pinder chose to invest :

left-over funds from the
club in much needed
equipment for the
Bahamas Crisis Centre to
help the charity continue
its good work.

@ By ALISON LOWE
Tribune Staff Reporter
alowe@tribunemedia.net

SOME residents of eastern New Provi-
dence are starting to feel like they have
travelled back in time — to an era when
indoor plumbing and the readily accessible
running water that goes with it is a luxury
and not an everyday utility.

But having gotten used to the conve-
nience of being able to wash up, shower
and flush a toilet whenever they please,
residents like Sammy Ferguson are finding
life without water difficult to put up with.

Mr Ferguson, who lives in an apartment
building near the Sea Grape Plaza on
Prince Charles Drive, said: “It went off
last Saturday, and almost every night since
then there’s been no water from the time I
get home from work until about 10pm.”

“We’re having to save water from the
morning in five gallon bottles. Otherwise
we can’t flush the toilet, wash the dishes or
anything.

“Tf they are doing repairs, I don’t under-
stand why they wouldn’t turn off the water
during the day rather than in the evening.”

Mr Ferguson said his neighbours and

those in other nearby apartment complex-
es are experiencing the same problem.

To make things more frustrating, the
water supply to the area had only recently
improved after shortages in late March,
which the Water and Sewerage Corpora-
tion blamed on sea swells delaying the
arrival of the MT Titus.

The barge, which brings in 30 per cent of
New Providence’s water supply, did not
dock as scheduled, prompting the corpo-
ration to institute “conservation measures”.

Some parts of the island lost all access to
running water, while other areas experi-
enced a significant loss of water pressure.

Another eastern resident yesterday told
The Tribune her water supply never
improved even after the MT Titus was able
to resume normal service.

Having received “excuse after excuse”
from the WSC, who “admit there is a prob-
lem but won’t say what it is”, the Camper-
down mother said she suspects there is a
“major boo boo” being covered up.

“Tt’s been like this for months now. They
said it was going to be fixed up by Easter
but it’s still the same. Every day, if someone
is washing their hands or brushing their
teeth there’s no water in the rest of the

house,” she said.

“God forbid you flush your toilet —
there’s no water in house for 15 minutes!”
she said.

Yesterday Robert Deal, assistant gen-
eral manager at WSC, admitted the cor-
poration is “having a few challenges right
now” as its water storage levels have “not
fully recovered” since the delay of the MT
Titus barge in March.

“We have an ongoing issue of supply
versus demand,” he said.

However, Mr Deal stated that in the
case of Camperdown, the WSC has “done
quite a bit of work” in the area to alleviate
water supply issues and he found it sur-
prising certain homes are still experiencing
problems.

“We have had some complaints from
our Winton pressure supply zone which
includes Camperdown and we have seen
some improvement in the last one to two
weeks. The improvement is based on
reports from our monitoring systems in
the area and direct contact with customers
in the area including customers in the high-
er elevations off Culberts Hill, Blackbeard's
Terrace and Tower Heights,” he said.

Meanwhile, in the case of Mr Ferguson,

Running water is a ‘luxury’ for
some New Providence residents



ACCORDING to the WSC, the island’s water
barge was delayed prompting the corpora-
tion to institute “conservation measures’.

Mr Deal said there are no water works
going on in the area and he questioned
whether the problem might be “internal” to
his building. However, he said the WSC
will “definitely check into it.”

He encouraged people experiencing
water supply problems to contact WSC’s
call center at 302-5599.

Minister: Sporting complex ‘won't he ready’ for June 2009



Letisha Henderson/BIS Photo

ANDREA Davies presents a plaque to retiring Postmaster
General Godfrey Clarke. He officially retired on Thursday, April
30, after 44 years of service.

Postmaster General retires after...

POSTMASTER General Godfrey Clarke retired on
Thursday after 44 years of service.

During a ceremony on Wednesday, employees of post
offices throughout New Providence and the Family Islands
thanked him for his dedication and presented him with
gifts of appreciation.

Deputy Postmaster General Leslie Cartwright described
Mr Clarke as an individual with an “unassuming” personality
and one who “handles stress pretty well.”

He said Mr Clarke was loyal to the service, committed to
his work and held a “great” love for the department.

Mr Clarke expressed his appreciation for his staff, noting
that he enjoyed his time with them.

m@ By DENISE MAYCOCK
Tribune Freeport
Reporter
dmaycock@tribunemedia.net

FREEPORT - Youth, Sports
and Culture Minister Desmond
Bannister announced that the
Junior Central American and
Caribbean Championships will
no longer be held in Grand
Bahama.

Mr Bannister said the Grand
Bahama Sports complex will
not be ready in time for the
June deadline to host the CAC
Games.

The minister held a press
conference in Freeport to
explain why the Games were
being moved to New Provi-
dence.

He said extensive work is
required to bring the sports
facility up to IAAF certifica-
tion, including the new surfac-
ing of the track and relocation
of the existing long jump pit, as
well as other required works.

Mr Bannister noted that
problems were discovered in
April as government was car-
rying out base work in prepa-
ration for the new surfacing of
the track facility.

Last July, the government
awarded a contract to Mondo
Laval of Quebec, Canada, to
resurface the track, as well as
relocate the existing long jump
pit to the outer perimeter of
the track and to construct a sec-
ond long jump pit, in prepara-
tion for the CAC Champi-

onships this June. Mr Bannister
said Waugh Construction was
contracted in January to carry
out base work to remove the
existing running surface, repair
the drain field and construct the
two new long jump pits and
approaches, to prepare the new
running surface.

“While the base work has
progressed somewhat, the
removal of the rubberized sur-
face has proved to be more dif-
ficult and time consuming than
had been initially envisaged,”
he said.

Minister Bannister noted that
numerous concerns were raised
after an extensive survey and
review of the track facility on
April 21 and 22 by Mondo rep-
resentative Franco Ruata.

They were:

¢ The concrete base must be
milled and repaved to very
stringent specifications so as
to permit the adhesion of the

bonding agent

¢ The existing border along
the straight-aways are not in
proper location according to
2008 IAAF rules and will have
be adjusted

¢ Currently there is only one
javelin runway. A second
javelin runway has to be con-
structed in order to meet
IAAFP’s specification for certi-
fication

¢ The steeple chase water
jump has also to be relocated
in order to accommodate the
second javelin runway.

¢ The long and triple jump
runways that were recently
built were too long and too
high. The height of the run-
way will have to be corrected

e The existing high jump
mat must be reduced in size;
and the surface has to be
milled to permit proper
drainage

¢ The discus cage must be

relocated.

Mr Bannister stressed in
order to address the problems
more synthetic material is
required than Mondo had ini-
tially estimated.

“We have been assured that
the company will absorb this
extra cost of synthetic materi-
al without any additional
charges to the Bahamian peo-
ple,” he said.

Minister Bannister said it is
important all of the above con-
cerns are addressed in order
to achieve IAAF certification
of the track.

“The ministry will be seek-
ing to contract the preparato-
ry work out to companies that
are qualified to perform the
required work in the shortest
possible time so that the
Grand Bahama athletic com-
munity can have the best ath-
letic facilities possible,” he
said.

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PAGE 6, SATURDAY, MAY 2, 2009

THE TRIBUNE



LOCAL NEWS



Jamaican man
charged over

Stantott

KINGSTON, Jamaica

A JAMAICAN man
who allegedly took a flight
crew hostage last week at
Montego Bay’s airport
and demanded to be flown
off the island has been
charged with offences
including robbery and
assault, according to Asso-
ciated Press.

Stephen Fray, a 21-year-
old Jamaican described as
emotionally unstable,
faces a total of six charges,
according to a police
statement issued late
Thursday. If convicted he
faces a maximum prison
sentence of 20 years.

Authorities say that
Fray, armed with a hand-
gun, pushed his way
through airport security
on April 19 and entered a
CanJet Airlines plane with
167 people on board. He
reportedly struck a pilot
with the gun, fired into the
air and took cash from the
passengers before freeing
them.

After an eight-hour
standoff, he was captured
in a military raid that
freed the six remaining
hostages without injury.

The charges include ille-
gal possession of a firearm
and ammunition for use of
a handgun that police say
was licensed to Fray’s
father. He was also
charged with shooting
with intent and breaches
of civil aviation regula-
tions.

Fray is due to appear
before a court next week
in the northwestern resort
city of Montego Bay.

Prime Minister Bruce
Golding has ordered an
investigation into the
security breach at Sang-
ster International Airport,
one of two primary air-
ports in a Caribbean
nation that depends heavi-
ly on tourism.

The private security
guards at checkpoints
were not armed and fol-
lowed procedures by
keeping visual contact
with the intruder until
Jamaican police respond-
ed, according to a prelimi-
nary investigation by
MBJ Airports Ltd., the
airport’s operating compa-
ny.





BUT voices concern over

airport hostage !

govt

approach to sex allegations

mlUyram ne lecUeUin



FROM page one

tested for ACH1IN1) influen-
za in line with Ministry of
Health emergency protocol.

But Dr Minnis confirmed
yesterday all 12 have returned
negative tests results.

The Ministry of Health is
still awaiting test results of a
New Providence resident who
reported flu-like symptoms
after returning from a trip to
Mexico this week. He remains
in voluntary isolation and
under Health Ministry sur-
veillance, Dr Minnis said.

Meanwhile, the football
team of 12 players and their
two coaches who went to
Puerto Valerta, Mexico, last
week remained in Florida
under the surveillance of Unit-
ed States health authorities
yesterday.

Dr Minnis held a press con-
ference at the Ministry of

Be Renewed In. The
“Glory Of God's Presence”
Se




i, 4

FROM page one

children,” it remains wary of the pos-
sibility that teachers’ livelihoods may
be jeopardised by unsubstantiated alle-
gations.

“Ultimately we wouldn’t be defend-
ing wrong, but we also must defend
our teachers until they’re proven guilty
of what they are being accused of,” he
said.

Speaking in parliament on Wednes-
day Prime Minister Hubert Ingraham
called into question the future of any
teacher against whom an allegation of
sexual misconduct is made, when he
told parliament that, while “shifting
and transfers are how we have tradi-
tionally dealt with problem employ-
ees in the public sector,” this practice,
which has made it easier for unscrupu-
lous individuals to exploit children,
will be no more.

“The shifting and/or redeployment
of teachers accused of sexual crimes
against children in our schools is also
going to end,” he said.

Illustrating the extent of the prac-
tice in the past, Mr Ingraham noted
that there are currently 15 teachers
against whom sex investigations or
court action is pending, “virtually all”
of whom are still employed by the gov-
ernment, but in different capacities.

The Prime Minister did not elabo-
rate on what would now be the fate
of such teachers — raising questions of
whether they would be made to resign
from the public sector.

Yesterday Mr Campbell said: “An
allegation is precisely what it says: an
allegation.

“Some time has to be given in order
to make out whether there is any sub-
stance to this or not.”

“We have experience in the past
where allegations have been made but
there is no substance to them.”

Mr Campbell suggested that the
teacher’s union has not been consulted
adequately by government on what it
plans to do with educators in these
instances.

“I think we should’ve been. Then
we could speak more intelligently.”

However, he also admitted that the
union itself may not have devoted suf-
ficient attention to addressing the ques-
tion of what fate should befall teachers
against whom accusations are made.

“That’s something to be decided,
to be addressed.

“And we haven’t sat down as a body
to look at the implications of that,” he
said.

In his speech to parliament Mr
Ingraham lamented that some of the
15 former teachers who have been
moved from their place in the class-
room have had the allegations against
them unresolved since as far back as
2001.

“That’s unfortunate”, said Mr
Campbell. “A lot of cases do just hang
around and definitely if you’re talk-
ing about a case involving children, or
somebody’s future, somebody’s liveli-
hood, I trust that with what the Prime
Minister is saying we'll be able to expe-
dite these matters far, far more than is
being done. It’s only what’s fair for
the children, the system and the indi-
viduals involved.”

Isolated students and teachers
— cleared of swine flu infection

Health in Meeting Street, Nas-
sau, yesterday afternoon to
update the public on the latest
developments of the swine flu
pandemic and to send out a
message of reassurance to the
public.

He said: “We want to reas-
sure people we are still man-
aging the whole situation as
best we can and that the test
results from Abaco have
returned and are all negative,
so there is no evidence of
swine flu.

“We will continue to moni-
tor our borders and immigra-
tion officials have various
warning signs advising people
about swine flu.”

Dr Minnis is travelling to
Freeport today to dispel
rumours of a possible case of
the virus at a major industrial
facility in Grand Bahama after
Rand Memorial Hospital was
inundated with calls on Thurs-
day night. He maintains the
calls were sparked purely by
rumour.

He said: “If you follow the
national media you will know
what is going on.

“T want to thank the Press

for reporting very responsi-
bly, even if they may have
been privy to rumours, they
have allowed the professionals
to determine the facts and
published the facts, so I thank
the Press for their profession-
al ethos and judgment to go
beyond the rumours.”

The United Nation’s World
Health Organisation (WHO)
has set its pandemic alert lev-
el at five.

It means there is human to
human transmission of the
virus in at least two countries,
but says it has no immediate
plans to move to the highest
level of six.

Eleven countries have offi-
cially reported 331 cases of
influenza A(H1N1). The Unit-
ed States Government has
reported 109 laboratory con-
firmed human cases, includ-
ing one death. Mexico has
reported 156 confirmed
human cases of infection,
including nine deaths.

Further information on the
situation will be available on
the WHO website on a regu-
lar basis. Log on _ to
www.who.int.

FROM page one

differentiated from the dis-
cussion of a national lottery
as a national lottery is an
unrealistic option for the
Bahamas.

“No small population in
these Caribbean countries can
sustain a lottery game because
the population is too small.
Lotteries cannot survive in
none of these small countries
and be successful. It cannot!”
he exclaimed.

However, in the local num-
ber games, the system is much
more controllable and sus-
tainable where the vast
amount of money that is
played is actually returned to
the persons who play them.
Legalizing such a system, he
said, would be a great step for-
ward for the Bahamas.

“The second thing about it
is you need large volumes of
people playing to make it
attractive. The Bahamas does
not have that volume. Nor
does any other Caribbean
country have those types of
volume. They will suffer —

Flowers
FROM page one

Howers: | would not support national lottery

especially after you take the
administrative fee out of that.
When you go around the
Caribbean you can hardly see
any that are doing that well,
primarily because the popu-
lation is very small and the
numbers that the lottery
board will offer in terms of
prizes are not attractive.
“Because right in the US
next door you can take a one
American dollar and wage it
and be competing for nothing
less $4 million and going up.
But in any Caribbean coun-
try for the same equivalent
money you are looking at
maybe $100,000, $200,000, or
$300,000 maximum for the
same dollar. The competition
makes no sense for us to think
we can run a lottery game in
the Bahamas and be success-
ful. But there is monies to be
made in managing funds
belonging to the people — the
monies that come in through
these small games that peo-
ple win every day, that you
would manage properly and
pay back out. There is a
reward for good management
of numbers money,” he said.

charged

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granted bail, noting they were already on police bail. Magistrate
Rolle extended the police bail and set July 27 for the start of the tri-
al. The accused were all represented by attorney Charles McKay
who appeared on behalf of Flowers’ attorney Alfred Sears. Thirteen
witnesses are listed on court dockets.

If convicted, the accused could face a fine of up to $5,000 or up
to two years in prison.

On Tuesday afternoon, police raided two suspected gaming
houses, FML on Village Road, and the Our Place Sporting Lounge
in the Mel-Don Shopping Plaza on Mackey Street.

Along with an amount of cash and equipment, police

allegedly also confiscated computers and other “gambling” para-
phernalia.

Flowers recently told The Tribune police confiscated nearly $1
million in cash from his establishment.

CENTRAL GOSPEL CHAPEL

CHRISTIE & DOWDESWELL STREETS ° Tel: 325-2921

SUNDAY, MAY 3RD, 2009
11:30 a.m. Speaker:

ELDER BRENTFORD ISAACS

continues The Revelation Series

Bible Class: 9:45 a.m. ¢ Breaking of Bread Service: 10:45 a.m.
¢ Community Outreach: 11:30 a.m. ¢ Evening Service: 7:00 p.m.
¢ Midweek Service 7:30 p.m. (Wednesdays)
¢ Sisters’ Prayer Meeting: 10:00 a.m. (2nd Thursday of each month)

BAPTIST BIBLE CHURCH
SOLDIER ROAD & OLD TRAIL

‘Sunday School: 10am FUNDAMENTAL |
Preaching iiam& 7:30pm EVANGELISTIC
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Wed, Prayer & Praise 7:20pm

PasiorH. Mills

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| Pastor: HL Mills * Prone: 293-0563 * Box N-ab22 |

Grant’s Town Wesley Methodist

(Baillou Hill Rd & Chapel Street) RO.Box CB-13046

The Holy Ghost Prayer-Line number is 326-7427
(www.gtwesley.org)

SUNDAY, MAY 3RD, 2009
7:00 a.m. Rev. Carla Culmer/Sis. Rosemary Williams
11:00 a.m. Rev. Carla Culmer/Bro. Ernest Miller (HC)
7:00 a.m. BCMC Festival of Praise/
Pre-Mother’s Day Concert/Trinity -4:30p.m.
Theme: “ But As For Me And My Household, We Will Serve the Lord”


THE TRIBUNE

IR
firm donates to
local charities

FREEPORT - Three local
charities were beneficiaries of a
major donation by a New Jer-
sey catering company.

The Grand Bahama Chil-
dren’s Home, Grand Bahama
Red Cross Society and the
Grand Bahama Home For The
Aged received fresh produce
from Foremost Caterers on
behalf of the Magen David
group.

Among the trailer of food
items donated were romaine
lettuce, carrots, sweet peppers,
beans, berries, mushrooms,
potatoes, papayas, pineapples,
chicken soup and orange and
grapefruit juices.

The more than 1,500 pounds
of produce has an estimated
value of $4,000.

Earnestine Moxeyz said
Magen David is a Hebrew

(L-R) EUGENE GORLEKU, director of banquet at Our Lucaya; Rick Bardari
general manager of Foremost Caterers; Victor McKillop; Ossie Saquicela
Anthony Pascalli; Donald Merrick, Agatha Beckles of the Grand Bahama
Home For The Aged; Karen Dean of the Grand Bahama Red Cross Society
and Adrian Dorsett of the Grand Bahama Home For The Aged.

Parochial School located in
New York. She said each year
the children, parents and fami-
ly members of the school travel
together to celebrate the
Passover holiday.

For the past three years, she

said, the group has stayed at
the Westin and Sheraton Grand
Bahama Our Lucaya Resort.

Ms Moxeyz said this year the
700-member group spent more
than 3,000 room nights at the
resort.

SATURDAY, MAY 2, 2009, PAGE 7

LOCAL NEWS

Patrick Hanna/BIS | TWO OF THE four newly

appointed Family Island admin-
istrators with representatives of
the Ministry of Public Works
and Transport and the Ministry
of the Environment at the start
of a two-day training seminar
coordinated by the Ministry of
Works on Thursday, April 30,
2009. From left are Bradley
King, acting chief engineer;
Caldwell Pratt, deputy director;
Michael Major; Charles Zonicle;

| Craig Delancy and Hermis

| Chisholm. Seated from left are
Donald Cash, under-secretary
and Family Island administra-
tors Maxine Duncombe and

yl Gregory Knowles.

New Family Island administrators fully briefed

NEWLY appointed Family
Island administrators were
briefed on the role of the Min-
istry of Public Works and Trans-
port and the Ministry of the
Environment in the Family
Islands during the first of a two-
day training session.

Donald Cash, under-secretary

; in the Ministry of Public Works,

told the administrators his min-
istry plays an integral part in the
Family Islands.

“Without the Ministry of
Works the Family Islands can-
not develop properly,” he said.
“You are the link between the
district where you will serve and
the Ministry of Works.”

Topics to be covered during

the two-day workshop include
mail boat services and board of
survey procedures; contracts and
relations with Family Island engi-
neers; building control; physical
planning and sub-divisions.

The four participating admin-
istrators are Gregory Knowles,
Wilma Colebrooke, Joshua
Smith and Maxine Duncombe.






MICHAEL GARRAWAY (centre), president and CEO of
Satelitte Bahamas, presents a cheque to BBFF president Dan-
ny Sumner (left) and vice president Chevy Roker for their
sponsorship of 23rd Novice Bodybuilding Championships.

Satelitte Bahamas is
bodybuilding sponsor

m@ By BRENT STUBBS
Senior Sports Reporter
bstubbs@tribunemedia.net

FOR the fourth consecutive year, Satellite Bahamas
Limited has agreed to sponsor the Bahamas Bodybuild-
ing and Powerlifting Novice Championships.

The event is scheduled for May 30 at the National
Performing Arts Theatre and is expected to feature com-
petitors from New Providence, Grand Bahama and Long
Island. There is also the possibility that Inagua may enter
a few athletes.

Since its inception, federation president Danny Sum-
ner said they look forward to the championship each
year because it brings out the talent that is coming up and
what can be expected as the year continues.

“From what I’ve gathered so far, a lot of new people
are training for this event, so I would like to see a show
where we have a lot of people competing on stage,”
Sumner said.

“The novice is a springboard for the federation because
it allows those persons who would normally not want to
go on stage and compete among people who are sea-
soned in the sport.”

While the novice is geared for those competitors who
are competing for the first time, Sumner said it’s also open
to those competitors who competed in past champi-
onships, but were not winners in their categories.

“The whole idea behind that is to keep it flowing,” he
said. “Everybody looks up to it because sometimes we
have more people competing in this event than we do in
the other shows.”

Competitors will have the opportunity to compete in
the men’s lightweight, middleweight, light heavyweight
and heavyweight divisions.

The women will have the lightweight and heavyweight
divisions, while there is an open division for the female fit-
ness competitors.

Competitors have until May 15 to register at a cost of
$15. High School students will be free of charge. “We’re
looking at having about 20 competitors alone from New
Providence,” said Chevy Roker, the federation’s vice
president. “We are also looking at a large contingent
from Long Island.

“T am anticipating a large turnout with a lot of com-
petitors coming from high school. We know that Long
Island, led by Omar Daley, has always been a big sup-
porter of the federation, so it’s going to be a good show.”

In the past, the federation was privileged to have a
number of drinks and water companies sponsor the event.
But Sumner said they are really appreciative of the efforts
of Satellite Bahamas Limited and the contribution they
are making to the event.

Michael Garraway, president and chief executive offi-
cer of Satellite Bahamas Limited, said they were always
encouraged by the participation of the high school stu-
dents and that is one of the reasons why they continue to
support the novice.

“We would like to encourage and have the youths
involved in something positive,” Garraway stressed.
“Bodybuilding is not just a past time. It’s an athletic
event.

“So it’s something that could lead into other sports
because other athletes from other sports also do body-
building. So it provides healthy lifetime choices and in this
age of obesity, this is a way of discouraging that.”

SATURDAY, MAY 2,

2009








Alex Smith traded to Patriots

@ By BRENT STUBBS
Senior Sports Reporter
bstubbs@tribunemedia.net

ith the National Football League’s
Draft fast approaching, the Tampa
Bay Buccaneers dealt tight end Alex
Smith, of Bahamian descent, to the
New England Patriots.

The unspecified deal was completed yesterday as the
Patriots gave up an undisclosed pick in next year’s NFL
draft for the four-year veteran, who is the son of defen-
sive end Ed Smith, the first Bahamian to play in the pros
with the Denver Broncos.

Smith, who was drafted by the Buccaneers in the
third round of the 2005 draft out of Stanford Universi-
ty, had a total of 129 receptions for 1,252 yards and 11
touchdowns in 58 games.

Starting in 12 of the 14 games that the 6-feet, 4-inch-
es, 258-pounder played for Tampa Bay, Smith caught a
total of 21 passes.

Smith, 26, had only one year left on his contract with
the Buccaneers. But there were no further comments
made regarding the trade.

But his job seemed to be in jeopardy when Tampa
Bay traded two draft picks (a second rounder this year
and a fifth-rounder next year) to the Cleveland Browns
for tight end Kellen Winslow Jr in February.

Additionally, the Buccaneers have Jerramy Stevens,
who led all tight ends last year with 36 receptions for 397
yards and two TDs and John Gilmore, who is considered
to be a blocking tight end.

In going to the Patriots, who finished second in the
AFC East at 11-5 behind the pennant-winning Miami
Dolphins and missed the playoffs, Smith could end up
playing with Tom Brady — one of the greatest quarter-
backs in the NFL — who went down last season with an
injury.

Unable to be reached for comments, Smith played his
four seasons so far in the NFL with Tampa Bay. In
total, he appeared in 58 games and caught 129 passes for
1,252 yards and 11 touchdowns.

During his rookie season, Smith topped the statis-
tics for all rookies when he had a career-high 41 recep-



ALEX SMITH has been traded to the New England Patriots...
(AP Photo)

tions for 367 yards and two TDs.

Like most players, Smith was set back by a series of
leg and ankle injuries over the past three seasons, forc-
ing him to miss two games each.

With Denver, Colorado, listed as his birthplace, Smith
has always considered the Bahamas to be his home. In
fact, he has returned over the last two years to host a
summer football camp.

During the camp, which was held around the same
time as a few other NFL camps involving Bahamian or
players of Bahamian descent, Smith brought in a num-
ber of his collegiates.

It’s not certain whether or not Smith will return to
host another camp this summer now that he has been
traded.

St Cecilia’s Strikers are Catholic
Diocesan primary track champs

THE annual Catholic Diocesan Primary Schools
Track and Field Championships was held yesterday
at the Thomas A Robinson Track and Field Stadium.

At the end of the day, the St Cecilia’s Strikers pre-
vailed as they successfully defended their overall title
with a total of 333 points. St Cecilia’s also captured the
primary divisional title with Our Lady’s Blue Flames as
the runners-up. In the junior division, St Thomas Sparks
won the title over St Cecilia’s.

Last year, St Cecilia’s won the overall and the junior

divisional crowns. Xavier’s was the primary champions.

According to Patricia Coakley, the meet director, it
was another competitive event with all of the Catholic
primary schools competing. She noted that they are
already looking forward to next year’s championships.

During the official opening ceremonies where Min-
ister of Youth, Sports and Culture Desmond Bannister
delivered the keynote address, the St Bede’s Crushers
were awarded their championship crown for winning
the basketball title.



Bulls top Celtics

128-127 in 3 OTs

to force Game 7...
See page 10



Knowles,
Bhupathi
ease through
quarter-final

@ By BRENT STUBBS
Senior Sports Reporter
bstubbs@tribunemedia.net

MARK Knowles and Mahesh
Bhupathi are getting closer and
closer to returning to their sec-
ond straight final on the ATP
men’s doubles tour.

The Bahamian-Indian duo,
seeded at No. 4 in the Inter-
nazionali BNL d'Ttalia, easily won
their quarter-final match yester-
day in Rome, Italy.

Their victims were the No.6
seeded Polish team of Mariusz
Frystenberg and Marcin
Matkowski, who fell in scores of
6-3, 6-4. They will now meet the
No. 2 team of Canadian Daniel
Nestor and Serbian Nenad
Zimonjic in the semifinal today
in a rematch from last week’s
final at the Barcelona Open Ban-
co Sabadell 2009.

Nestor, Knowles’ long-time
partner, and Zimonjic won in
identical scores of 6-4, 6-4 over
Jeff Coetzee of the Republic of
South Africa and Jordon Kerr of
Australia.

Last Sunday in Barcelona,
Spain, Knowles and Bhupathi
played Nestor and Zimonjic in
the final, but they lost a heart-
breaking 6-3, 7-6 (9) decision.

Knowles noted that it was a
match that they waited on for a
long time and he was quite dis-
appointed that they lost, despite
the fact that they played a pretty
good match.

En route to making it to the
final, Knowles and Bhupathi
eliminated the world’s top seeded
team of Bob and Mike Bryan, the
identical American twin broth-
ers, 6-2, 6-7 (5), 10-7.

By virtue of their perfor-
mances, Knowles and Bhupathi
regained the number three spot
on the ATP computer ranking.
They trail the Bryans, who are
still No.1 and Nestor and Zimon-
jic, who are No.2.

The Bryans clinched their berth
into the semis as well with a 4-6,
6-4, 11-9 victory over No. 7 seeds
Max Mirnyi and Andy Ram.
They will face the No. 3 seeded
team of Lucas Dlouhy of the
Czech Republic and Leander
Paes of India.

The final of the tournament is
scheduled to be played on Sun-
day.

Following Barcelona, Knowles
and Bhupathi will go on to play in
Madrid, Spain, at the next ATP
World Tour Masters 1000 before
they prepare for the French Open
Grand Slam at Roland Garros.

Knowles and Bhpathi are still
looking for their first tournament
victory of the year. They also got
to the final of the Australian
Open, the first Grand Slam in
January, but lost out to the
Bryans.

More than 35 schools to take part in primary track championships

m@ By BRENT STUBBS
Senior Sports Reporter
bstubbs@tribunemedia.net

MORE than 35 schools have
already signed up to compete in
the 28th Primary Schools Track
and Field Championships.

Without a major sponsor out-
side of the Ministry of Youth,
Sports and Culture, the event is
set for May 20-22 at the Thomas
A Robinson Track and Field Sta-
dium.

It was originally scheduled for
May 13-15, but because of the
scheduling of the GLAT exami-
nation, it was rescheduled. How-
ever, although it conflicts with the
Teachers Appreciation Activities,
the organisers indicated that they
were unable to make any further
changes.

Frank ‘Pancho’ Rahming,
chairman of the organising com-
mittee, said that during the past
two years, Milo, through its dis-
tributors Thompson Trading,
sponsored the meet. But due to
economic reasons, they have opt-
ed not to return this year.

“The ministry expresses grati-
tude to Thompson Trading and
Milo for the years they’ve coop-
erated with us and hope that sim-
ilar cooperation will return in the
future.”

SCHOOLS TAKING PART

While the deadline was set for
April 17, schools still have until
May 8 to submit their rosters.

“To date, we have received

entries for more than 20 schools
from the government schools in
New Providence,” he said. “We
have also received entries from
more than 10 schools from the
Family Islands.”

Entered so far from New Prov-
idence are St Francis/Joseph,
Temple Christian, Carlton E
Francis, Lyford Cay, St Cecilia’s,
Tambearly, Westminster, Mt
Carmel, Queen’s College, St
Anne’s, Charles W Saunders,
Sadie Curtis, Jordan Prince
William, Freedom Baptist, See
Saw Academy, Kingsway Acade-
my, Nassau Christian Academy,
St Bede’s, Christian Heritage, St
John’s, Mable Walker, Thelma
Gibson and Garvin Tynes.

Lisa Mortimer, president of the
New Providence Primary Schools
Association, said right now it
would appear that only three will
not be participating this year, one
of which doesn’t have a physical
education teacher.

“Other than that, we should
have 23 of the 26 government
schools participating,” she said.
“Everybody has indicated that
they are coming.”

Nekeno Demeritte, the physi-
cal education teacher at Temple
Christian, said the private schools
in New Providence, from what he
has seen, are all ready to com-
pete.

“We are expecting to come in
and have a good showing,” he
said. ‘“We’re going to be compet-
itive throughout the meet.”

FAMILY ISLAND

PARTICIPATION

From the Family Islands, the
list includes Long Island All-Age,
South Andros, North/Central
Andros, Central Abaco,
Eleuthera, Martin Town, Discov-
ery Primary, Holmes Rock, Wal-
ter Parker, Inagua All-Age and
Exuma.

Among the new schools are
Exuma, Inagua All-Age and Aba-
co, which will only be represented
by Abaco Central, instead of a
combined team from the island.
Frank Hepburn, representing
Abaco, said this is an important
meet for their island and they
look forward to coming and par-
ticipating every year.

“This is normally the largest
contingent of any athletes leav-
ing the island,” Hepburn said. “So
it’s something that we look for-
ward to because it motivates the
parents and it brings everybody
closer together.

“The meet that we had lead-
ing up to this meet was very well
supported by the parents and I
am sure that when we go back
from this meet, we take our hard-
ware. So everybody looks forward
to before and after.”

And James Ingraham, who rep-
resented Eleuthera, said this year
they are coming down with a 50-
member contingent who are
enthusiastic about competing.

“When we come in, we are
looking forward to doing very
well and to take home our hard-



ORGANISERS of the 28th Primary Schools Track and Field Champi-
onships can be seen above. Seated (I-r) are Lisa Mortimer, of the gov-
ernment schools, Nekeno Demeritte of the private schools and Cedricka
Rolle, who is in charge of the cheerleading committee. Standing (I-r) are
committee chairman Frank Rahming, James Ingraham of Eleuthera, Val
Kemp, who is in charge of the Torch Run and opening ceremonies, Frank
Hepburn of Abaco, Ralf McKinney and secretary Sharon Harris.

ware. We had some outstanding
performances in our meet three
weeks ago and so we are looking
forward to our athletes perform-
ing very well this year.”

TORCH RUN

As an added incentive for the
championships, the committee is
scheduled to once again put on
the Torch Run on Saturday, May
16. Interested persons can con-
tact either Val Kemp at Oakes
Field Primary or Nekeno
Demeritte.

“The torch run is to attract the
public and get people hyped up so

that they can beware of what is
happening,” Kemp said. “Most
of the time we don’t have the
press present because it’s early in
the morning. So we are hoping
that the press will support the
event this year.”

The run will start from four dif-
ferent locations at 7am, inclusive
of RM Bailey (east), SC McPher-
son (south), Goodsman Bay
(west) and Long Wharf (north)
and will end up at the Kendal
Isaacs Gymnasium.

On Eleuthera, Ingraham noted
that they will also hold a torch

run at the same time starting from
the north and south and ending
up in Governor’s Harbour where
a volleyball jamboree will be held
to help raise funds.

CHEERLEADING

On Tuesday, May 19, the com-
mittee is slated to once again put
on the popular and crowd pleas-
ing cheerleading competition at
the Kendal Isaacs Gymnasium.

Interested schools are urged to
contact Cedricka Rolle at 323-
5503 or Albury/Sayles Primary
School. “So far, we have about
10 schools, but last year we had
about 13 schools that participat-
ed,” Rolle said. “We hope to go
out there, have some fun, learn
from each other and then come
back the next day for the start of
the championships.”

Rolle said on the application
forms, the schools will find all of
the information regarding their
participation in the event. They
will be judged by an independent
panel of judges.

Ingraham also stated that Span-
ish Wells recently won a cheer-
leading competition that was held
in Eleuthera and that team is
expected to come to town to par-
ticipate in the contest here.

¢ A scratch meeting is sched-
uled for Monday, May 18. The
Palm Resort and Quality Inn,
both on Nassau Street, will serve
as the official hotels and the Fam-
ily Island teams will be trans-
ported to and from the stadium
and fed lunch daily.
PAGE 10, SATURDAY, MAY 2, 2009

TRIBUNE SPORTS



SPORTS



Bulls top Celtics 128-127
in 4 OTs to force Game 7

B By ANDREW SELIGMAN
AP Sports Writer

CHICAGO (AP) — Lead-
ing by eight after an 18-point
run in the fourth quarter, the
Boston Celtics looked like they
were finally ready to move past
the Chicago Bulls.

Instead, a classic first-round
series took its most dramatic
turn and is headed for a Game
7 that seems so fitting. The way
things have been going, over-
time seems almost a certainty.

Derrick Rose scored 28
points and blocked Rajon Ron-
do's potential game-winner,
John Salmons scored 35, and
the Bulls beat the defending
champions 128-127 in triple
overtime Thursday night to
even the first-round series.

Ray Allen scored a career
playoff-high 51 pomts for the
Celtics, but it's back to Boston
for Game 7 on Saturday night
after another classic in a series
that had already seen its share.

"We're starting to see a pat-
tern with these two clubs and
it's crazy," Boston's Paul Pierce
said. "It's good for the fans. It's
good for the viewers. But we
certainly don't like it.”

A record three of the first
five games went to overtime,
including a Game 4 that went
two extra periods. Another
came down to the wire in regu-
lation, but this easily trumped
them all.

Rondo penetrated and pulled
up on the left block with 8 sec-
onds left and turned, only to be
rejected by Rose. The rookie
of the year then missed two free
throws with 3.2 seconds remain-
ing, before Rondo launched a
harmless heave from beyond
midcourt.

"This series is a lot of fun for
the fans, the people of Chicago,
the people of Boston," said the
Bulls' Joakim Noah, who made
the go-ahead three-point play
after a steal.

"It's a lot of fun for us, too,
playing in environments like
this on the big stage,” he con-
tinued. "It's special to be part of
this, and I know that it's a series
people will be talking about for
a long time.”

Rose added: "It's crazy, but
you got to love it."

Things might be different
with a healthy Kevin Garnett,
but without him, the Celtics are
headed for Game 7.

"It's unbelievable," Boston's
Kendrick Perkins said. "Shot
after shot, tough make after
tough make. It’s a tough series.
They're a young team playing
with a lot of confidence.”

@ Bok

NOTICE

















































Noah's three-point play made
it 126-123 with 35.5 seconds
remaining. Eddie House quick-
ly answered with a corner
jumper to pull the Celtics with-
in one, but Brad Miller, who
had 23 points and 10 rebounds,
hit two free throws to get the
lead back to three with 28 sec-
onds left.

Glen Davis added 23 points
and Pierce had 22, while Rondo

M I

of The Bahamas

had eight points, 19 assists and
nine rebounds.

Allen finished three points
shy of John Havlicek's club
playoff record and tied the
NBA playoff mark with nine 3-
pointers.

"It's very bittersweet,” Allen
said. "There's nothing to really
talk about anymore. We lost
and we had the agony that it
wasn't enough."

D

The public is advised that at the Annual General Meeting of Bank of
The Bahamas Limited (“the Bank’) on January 29, 2009, the shareholders
approved the creation of seven additional classes of preference shares series
“D” to “J’. The Directors were given shareholder approval to issue such
preference shares on such terms and conditions and at such times and to such
persons as the Directors think fit.

The Directors subsequently resolved to offer a private placement of 20,000,000
Class D and E perpetual preferences shares representing $20,000,000 with
a minimum subscription of B$250,000. The issue date is expected to be in
early May 2009 providing a variable dividend rate of Nassau prime plus
2.5%, payable semi-annually and callable at the Company’s option with 90

days notice.

The Bank intends to use the net proceeds of the Offering to fulfil multipurpose
objectives including expansion of its Capital Base thereby providing the
continuing ability to pursue new commercial opportunities, rationalize its
internal direct cost structure and to enhance compliance with Basle Capital
Accord requirements as its asset base expands.

Colina Financial Advisors Limited (CFAL) has been engaged as Financial
Advisor and Escrow Agent.



Magic 114, 76ers 89

At Philadelphia, the Magic
— playing without suspended
star Dwight Howard and
injured guard Courtney Lee —
advanced to the second round
with a win in Game 6.

Howard, who was suspend-
ed one game by the NBA for
his elbow on Sixers center
Samuel Dalembert in Game 5,
will return when the Magic play
the winner of the Boston-Chica-
go series.

Rashard Lewis scored 29
points and Rafer Alston had 21
to help the Magic win on the
road for the second time this
series. The Magic's decisive run
came early when they made 12
of their first 19 shots.

Andre Miller scored 24
points for the Sixers, who were
eliminated in the first round for
the second straight season.

Rockets 92, Trail Blazers 76

At Houston, Ron Artest
scored 27 points, Yao Ming had
17 points and 10 rebounds and
the Rockets reached the sec-
ond round for the first time
since 1997 with a win in Game
6.

The Rockets won for the first
time in their last seven first-
round series. They lost Game
6s the last two seasons, both to
Utah.

Houston plays the top-seeded
Los Angeles Lakers beginning
Monday night at the Staples
Center.

LaMarcus Aldridge scored 26
points and Brandon Roy had
22 for the Blazers, who were
making their first playoff
appearance since 2003.

DERRICK ROSE (left) blocks the last
shot of Celtics’ Rajon Rondo during
the closing seconds of the Bulls’ 128-
127 win in triple overtime against
Boston in Game 6 of a first-round
playoff series in Chicago, Thursday
night...

(AP Photo: Charles Rex Arbogast)



ROGER FEDERER returns a ball to Mischa Zverev during their match at the
Rome Masters tournament in Rome, Friday. Federer won 7-6 (3), 6-2.
(AP Photo: Alessandra Tarantine)

Federer, Djokovic
to meet in semis

m By ANDREW DAMPF
AP Sports Writer

ROME (AP) — Roger Fed-
erer and Novak Djokovic post-
ed straight-set wins Friday to
set up a meeting in the Rome
Masters semifinals.

Federer overcame a first-set
challenge from the net-charg-
ing German qualifier Mischa
Zverev, advancing 7-6 (3), 6-2.
Djokovic stayed on course to
defend his title in this clay-court
warmup for the French Open
with a 6-3, 6-4 victory over fifth-
seeded Juan Martin del Potro.

The fast clay at the Foro Ital-
ico suits both Federer and
Djokovic.

"T think both of us like it, so
it's going to be interesting,”
Djokovic said. "I feel quite con-
fident playing here. Each match
I play, I feel more comfortable
moving on the court and just
playing my style of the game."

Federer has won seven of his
10 previous matches against
Djokovic, but the Serb took the
last meeting at the Masters
Series event last month in Key
Biscayne, Fla.

In the other half of the draw,
three-time Rome champion
Rafael Nadal faced eighth-seed-
ed Fernando Verdasco for the
first time since Nadal's epic five-
set win in a match between the
pair at the Australian Open.
Also, No. 12 Fernando Gonza-
lez was to face Argentine qual-
ifier Juan Monaco.

The 76th-ranked Zverev beat
former French Open champion
Juan Carlos Ferrero in qualify-

ing and upset No. 8 Gilles
Simon in his previous match.
Using an effective serve-and-
volley tactic, he didn't allow
Federer to see a break point
until the 10th game of the first
set, saving two set points to get
to 5-5.

But Federer found his range
in the tiebreaker, passing
Zverev several times, and the
13-time Grand Slam winner ran
away with the match in the sec-
ond set.

A two-time runner-up in
Rome, Federer is still seeking
his first title of the year.

Playing in sunny conditions
with no wind, the third-seeded
Djokovic dictated play with
well-angled winners from the
baseline. Del Potro had trou-
ble with his forehand, hitting
the advertising banners lining
the back of the court in one
instance.

"T tried to change the pace a
lot," Djokovic said. "Because I
know that Del Potro likes more
or less same pace, and he's mov-
ing really well for his height.”

Djokovic had a 20-8 edge in
winners while Del Potro com-
mitted 20 unforced errors with
his forehand.

Djokovic needs to defend his
title to prevent Andy Murray
from taking the No. 3 ranking
from him, even though Murray
was eliminated by Monaco on
Wednesday.

Djokovic is the only player
to take a set from Nadal on clay
this year, losing to the Spaniard
in the Monte Carlo Masters
final two weeks ago.

Liverpool looks
to keep faint
title hopes alive

@ By ROB HARRIS
AP Sports Writer

LONDON (AP) — Middles-
brough dented Liverpool's title
hopes in February with an
improbable victory at the River-
side, but the Premier League
strugglers can now do the Reds
a favor by beating leader Man-
chester United on Saturday.

Rafa Benitez's hopes of deliv-
ering Liverpool's first champi-
onship since 1990 are now rely-
ing on the defending champi-
ons slipping up in their remain-
ing five matches.

By the time Liverpool hosts
Newcastle on Sunday, Benitez's
side could be six points behind
United. The Spaniard, though,
is hopeful United's opponents
can help his cause.

"They are in a better position
than us, but we have to keep
going and keep winning match-
es," Benitez said Friday. "They
have some tough games and
you never know in football, so
we have to make sure we do
our job.

"Hopefully they will make
some mistakes. They have a dif-
ficult game this weekend against
Middlesbrough, a team fighting
to avoid relegation, and they
also have to play Hull away as
well as (Manchester) City and
Arsenal at home."

Man United has 77 points
from 33 games, while Liverpool
has 74 having played an extra
game.

A big boost for Benitez is the
return of inspirational captain
Steven Gerrard in midfield after
almost a month out with a groin
injury.

"Everyone knows we are
stronger with him on the pitch,”
Benitez said. "He is a player
who can change games and is
very important for us."

With Newcastle mired in the
relegation zone and needing
three points to boost its survival
prospects, Benitez doesn't
expect a repeat of its 5-1 rout
produced in December.

"T could see the passion and
the work rate of their team.
They were working really hard
trying to win,” Benitez said.
"We will try to play at the same
level as we did at St. James’
Park, but I think it will be a dif-
ferent match.

"When the other team is
working so hard and it is so
close to the end of the season, it
will make it a tough match."

Newcastle is on 31 points,
along with northeast rival Mid-
dlesbrough.

"We are relying on other
teams now, but what it is safe to
say is the teams around us won't
pick up maximum points
between now and the end of the
season,” Newcastle manager
Alan Shearer said. "If they do
slip up, we have got to make
sure we are in a position to take
advantage of that."

Middlesbrough will be look-
ing to maintain its unbeaten
home record in 2009 against
United on Saturday. Boro have
already beaten Liverpool and
drawn with Arsenal at the
Riverside this season.

United manager Alex Fergu-
son faces a quandary over play-
er selection with the second leg
of the Champions League semi-
finals at Arsenal scheduled for
Tuesday. United hold a slender
1-0 lead in the tie.

Center back Rio Ferdinand
will miss the trip to the north-
east but should be fit for Tues-
day after tests cleared him of a
cracked rib.

Teenage strikers Danny Wel-
beck and Federico Macheda
could play a role at Boro as
United looks to move closer to
a third straight league title.

"Each game, if we get the
right result, we get closer and
closer,” winger Ryan Giggs said.
"The games are running out for
other teams to catch us. We'll
be trying to win. It won't be
easy, but if we do get the right
result it will be a great oppor-
tunity for us."

Also Saturday, third-place
Chelsea hosts Fulham, Arsenal
is at Portsmouth, Blackburn is
at Manchester City, West Ham
is at Stoke, West Bromwich
Albion is at Tottenham and
Bolton is at Wigan.

Sunderland, which is four
points above the relegation
zone, hosts Everton in Sunday's
other game. Just a point behind
Sunderland, Hull is at Aston
Villa on Monday.

For the stories
behind the news,

read Insight
on Mondays


PAGE 12, SATURDAY, MAY 2, 2009 THE TRIBUNE
LOCAL NEWS

thescene

by Franklyn G Ferguson, JP









NASSAU EVENTS CAPTURED ON CAMERA

COOPER §











































FAME

I CHESTER COOPER
was inducted into College of
the Bahamas’ alumni Hall of
Fame during a special cere-
mony this week.

Thanking the Alumni
association for their out-
standing selection, COB
president Janyne Hodder
said the college has pro-
duced persons of outstand-
ing character whose accom-
plishments reflect glowingly
on the institution.

“As one of our chief aims
at the college is to drive
national development
through education, research
and innovation it is appropri-
ate that eminent individuals
who excelled at the college
and are also doing great
things since graduating
should in some way be
recognised and honoured.

“Tam impressed by the cri-
teria which were used to
select the honouree -a
leader whose success bene-
fits co-workers, a contributor
to society who excels in civic
outreach, a person who
exhibits strength of character
that personifies the college’s
motto, ‘knowledge, truth,
integrity’ and the meaning of
the European Cup that sym-
bolises the outpouring of
inspiration that causes others
to thirst for those same char-
acteristics listed in the mot-
to,” she said.



41. JOHN Wilson, a partner at
the McKinney Bankcroft and
Hughes law firm and principal
director of British American
Financial: president of the Col-
lege of the Bahamas, Janyne
Hodder; and | Chester Cooper,
president, director and CEO of
British American Financial.

2. Attorney Howard Thompson
Jr with the chairman of British
American Financial Basil Sands.

3. Attorney Bianca V Beneby;
Director General of Tourism
Vernice Walkine; attorney Kahlil
Parker, and attorney Heather
Walkine-Hunt.

4. Senator Michael Halkitis;
Richard Coulson, managing
director of RC Capital Markets;
and chief executive officer at
Doctors Hospital Charles Sealy
lI

5. Attorney Keith Bell, general
council for Sunshine Finance;
president of the UTEB Associa-
tion Jenny Issacs-Dotson, Mr
Cooper, and attorney Donald
Saunders.

6. Attorney Lourey Smith,
accountant John Bain, and
British American senior manag-
er of business development
Tameka Forbes

7. Robert Deal and his wife
Cleopatra with Dr Richard
Crawford, Michelle Gibson and
her husband Cyprian Gibson.




PAGE 1

N N A A S S S S A A U U A A N N D D B B A A H H A A M M A A I I S S L L A A N N D D S S L L E E A A D D I I N N G G N N E E W W S S P P A A P P E E R R C M Y K C M Y K V olume: 105 No.132SATURDAY, MAY 2, 2009 PRICE – 75 (Abaco and Grand Bahama $1.25 WEATHER BREEZYWITH SUNSHINE HIGH 85F LOW 73F I N S I G H T READITTHISMONDAY S P O R T S SEEPAGENINE Smith traded to Patriots n By NATARIO McKENZIE Tribune Staff Reporter FML CEO Craig Flowers appeared in Magistrate’s Court y esterday charged with promoting a lottery and permitting his web shop to be used for the purpose of conducting a lottery. He pleaded not guilty to the allegations. Flowers, 67, of Victoria Avenue, appeared before Magistrate Derrence Rolle in Court 5, Bank Lane, along withseveral of his employees and patrons. The arraignment comes just three days after police raided FML’s head office on Wulff Road. Court dockets state that Mr Flowers, along with Kingsley Munroe, 58, Rhodista Rolle, 27, Anwar McDonald, 23, Nyokia Myer, 34, Nikita Patton, 19, Andrinique Dean, 26, Rolinda Pierre, 29, Makia Stubbs, 23, Melissa Clarke, 24 and Andrea Pratt, 20, on Tuesday April 28, permitted the premises of the FML Web Shop, located at Wulff Road, to promote, organise and conduct a lottery. The dockets also state that Mr Flowers and his co-accused knowingly permitted the FML Web Shop on Wulff Road to be used for the purpose of a lottery. Munroe, Rolle, McDonald, Myer, Patton, Dean, Pierre, Stubbs, Clarke, and Andrea Pratt, were arraigned along with Hykey to Knowles, 31, Stephen Newbold, 28, Vernita Mackey, 26, and Germaine Williams-Rahming, 40, charged with being found on a premises where a lottery was taking place. The accused all pleaded not guilty to the charges. The prosecution made no objection to the accused being FML CEO accused of promoting a lottery and allowing web shop to be used for purpose The Tribune ANYTIME ... ANYPLACE , WE RE #1 BAHAMASEDITION TRY OUR SOUTHERN CHICKEN BISCUIT www.tribune242.com BAHAMASBIGGEST CARSFORSALE, HELPWANTED ANDREALESTATE I N S I D E JOHNMARQUIS’ FINALINSIGHT: ACESANDJOKERS Flowers charged after police raid UScurrency discovered on aircraft ‘could run into millions’ n By DENISE MAYCOCKT ribune Freeport Reporter dmaycock@ t ribunemedia.net FREEPORT – Law enforcement officials haved iscovered a large amount o f US currency – possibly millions of dollars – hidden on board a private c harter aircraft at Grand B ahama International Airport. Asst Supt Wellbourne Bootle said a 24-year-old Bahamian man is in custody assisting police with their investigations. According to reports, Bahamas Customs, Drug Enforcement Unit officers a nd Airport Police searched a private aircraft which arrived from FortL auderdale around 2.30pm on April 30. While searching a number of household appli-a nces and grocery items on board the aircraft, officers discovered cash hidden inside the appliances. A SP Bootle said a man was arrested. He could not say whether the plane was Bahamian or US registered. Police also could not say how much cash was found a s investigations were still o ngoing, he said. According to a source, itisbelievedmore than $6 million was uncovered. FML CEO Craig Flowers (top of stairs in white shirt followed by others appearing in connection with his case T i m C l a r k e / T r i b u n e s t a f f n By PAUL G TURNQUEST Tribune Staff Reporter pturnquest@tribunemedia.net FML CEO Craig Flowers said he would not support the Bahamas establishing a national lottery as the country’s size would not make such a lottery financially feasible. With a population of little more than 350,000 Mr Flowers said the pay out for such a lottery would hover somewhere around $100,000 per dollar ticket purchased a drastic decrease com pared to other regions especially the United States where an equal dollar wager could reward a player with the opportunity to win tens of millions of dollars. “The fact of the matter is, as a national lottery per se, the gaming industry needs to visit and look at what the locals are doing here in the Bahamas is not a lottery per se. It is a type of game that is played by their actual name is numbers, but it is not a lottery. A lottery is where numbers are used from a pool of num bers and they are draw out in five or six balls one ball at a time. “When you have a series of three balls as we do we do not differentiate here between one and the other. But that is not the case. In the Bahamas the local games that we play are number games. In the lottery, the chances of winning the lottery are one in seven point something million. But in the numbers game at least two thirds of the money will move back to the people who play the numbers every day,” he said. Therefore, he said, the government needs to understand that the practice of persons playing the local number system must be SEE page six Flowers: I would not support national lottery SEE page six Man in custod y after hidden cash found A POLICE officer has died after his motorcycle collided with a car in Second Street, The Grove, on Thursday evening. PC 3124 Rayshano Smith was riding a 650 motorbike when he collided with a Honda Odyssey at around 6.30pm. The Nassau officer who was off duty at the time of the accident sustained serious injuries and was taken to hospital where he died at around 9pm Thursday. Police Commissioner Reginald Ferguson extended his condolences to the family of PC Smith. Police are investigating the cause of the collision. Anyone with any information that could assist the investigation should call traffic police at 3937714 or 911, 919, or Crime Stoppers anonymously on 328-TIPS (8477 P olice officer dies after tr affic accident n By MEGAN REYNOLDS Tribune Staff Reporter mreynolds@tribunemedia.net ABACO students and teachers who were isolated because of swine flu fears after a visit to Mexico have been cleared of infec tion, Health Minister Hubert Minnis announced. The ten students and two teachers who went into voluntary isolation upon their return to Abaco last Saturday were Isolated students and teachers cleared of swine flu infection INSIDE JET SKI VICTIM ‘W AS WORKING AT NYGARD CAY RESOR T PARTY PAGETHREE 80% OF SECOND GRADE S TUDENTS READING AT LEAS T T O GRADE LEVEL P AGETHREE R UNNING WATER IS A UXURY’ FOR SOME NEW PROVIDENCE RESIDENTS P AGEFIVE SEE page six Hubert Minnis n By ALISON LOWE Tribune Staff Reporter alowe@tribunemedia.net THE Bahamas Union of Teachers is concerned about recent statements made by Prime Minister Ingraham out lining government’s new approach in dealing with teachers against whom sex allegations have been brought. Father Sebastian Campbell, Vice President of the Bahamas Union of Teachers, said that while the union’s “first goal is the welfare of BUT voices concern over govt approach to sex allegations SEE page six WORLD HEALTH ORGANISATION NOT RECOMMENDING TRAVEL RESTRICTIONS OVER SWINE FLU PAGETWO

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THE Ministry of Education, in collaboration with the Ministry of Health and Toastmasters International, held a speech competition centered around National Nutrition Month. Armed with their oratorical skills and ready to do battle were students from New Providenceand the Family Islands. Participating schools included L W Young Junior High School, C C Sweeting Senior, R M Bailey Senior High School, St Andrew’s College, Bahamas Academy, and Saint Francis De Sales. The topic of the debate was “Eating Well On a Tight Budget.” The students admonished the audience to limit their intake of fatty and greasy foods; make physical activity and exercise a part of their lifestyles; eat fruit and vegetables everyday; drink lots of water; and choose foods with less sugar and salt. Permanent Secretary Camille Johnson, who spoke on behalf of the Minister of Health Dr Hubert Minnis, congratulated all of the students for their participation in sending the message of healthy lifestyles and good nutrition through education. She said the Ministry of Health will continue to support the speech contest because good nutrition is critical to building economic growth. Further, Ms Johnson said that the winners in the junior and senior divisions will hold the titles of, “Junior and Senior Nutrition Ambassadors”, and will work with the Ministry of Health to promote good nutrition and health. A N ONLINEyachting magazine has issued a report about three megayacht tenders beings tolen in the Bahamas in just o ver a month. According to the Triton Megayacht News, the most recent boat thefts both took place on April 6 at the Highbourne Cay Marina. The 32-foot vessel “Freak Show” was recovered with a gash in its bow and all the accessories missing. The report said five men were taken into cus tody for questioning in connec tion with the theft. That morning, a 28-foot I ntrepid tied to M/Y Relentless was stolen and later recovered after having suffering somed amage. T he report said Captain Ess er of the Freak Show believes the men were attempting to make a drug run to Jamaica. "Mine was stolen because of its range," Captain Esser said. "They wanted it to make a drug run." Capt Robin Norquoy of M/Y Relentless appealed to local radio and televisions stations for help in getting the word out about the thefts. Involved Capt Esser contacted the US Coast Guard, but little came of this, so he spoke with the Roy al Bahamas Police Force and the Royal Bahamas Defence Force, both of which got involved along with the Drug Enforcement Agency, the report said. "Without those agencies, our boat would have never been recovered,” Capt Esser is quot ed as saying. The report said that after hearing about the thefts, Capt Zack Green of M/Y Incentive spoke about a third incident last month. " On the night of March 22 while the Incentive, a 142-foot Palmer Johnson, was anchoreda t the eastern end of Nassau H arbour, our 32-foot Intrepid with twin 350HP outboards was stolen from the swim platform. "It was 9.30pm and all the lights were on. Crew were on deck as we were preparing to depart for Palm Beach. There was a 10-minute window that no one was on the aft deck, and during this time the line was cut. "We launched a jet ski and a tender and contacted the local marine patrol. After hours of searching, the crew gave up for the night. In the morning I had the engineer go to the airport to charter an airplane because there were no helicopters available. "After 45 minutes in the air, they spotted what could be our tender under some trees in the Sea Breeze canal on the south side of Nassau. I then sent our other tender to investigate and, sure enough, it was our Intrepid, fully intact. "After the police tried to take fingerprints we used the spare set of keys to bring the Intrepid back to Nassau and quickly got under way for Florida,” the report quoted Capt Green as saying. C M Y K C M Y K LOCAL NEWS PAGE 2, SATURDAY, MAY 2, 2009 THE TRIBUNE INDEX MAIN/SPOR TS SECTION Local News ............................. P1,2,3,5,6,7,12 Editorial/Letters. ......................................... P4 Comics........................................................P8 Sports....................................................P9,10W eather ..................................................... P11 CLASSIFIED SECTION 36 PAGES USA TODAY WEEKENDER 8 PAGES Students debate ‘eating well on a tight budget’ AFTER THREE INTENSE HOURS, THE COMPETITION CAME TO AN END, AND THE WINNERS WERE DECLARED AS FOLLOWS: JUNIOR DIVISION: 1. DEOKIN-NIQUE (L W YOUNG JUNIOR HIGH SCHOOL 2 . TRYKER SMITH (ST ANDREW’S COLLEGE 3 . TANISHA ANDERSON (L W YOUNG JUNIOR SCHOOL SENIOR DIVISION: 1. KENDRA STUART (C C SWEETING SENIOR HIGH SCHOOL 2. ROBERT FARQUHARSON (ST ANDREW’S COLLEGE 3. JOY ARCHER (ST FRANCES DE SALES 5 2wk-Hi52wk-LowSecurit y P revious CloseToday's CloseChangeDaily Vol.EPS $Div $P/EYield 1.951.28Abaco Markets1.401.400.000.1270.00011.00.00% 1 1.8011.00Bahamas Property Fund11.0011.000.000.9920.20011.11.82% 9 .686.95Bank of Bahamas6.956.950.000.2440.26028.53.74% 0.990.63Benchmark0.630.630.00-0.8770.000N/M0.00% 3 .743.15Bahamas Waste3.153.150.000.0780.09040.42.86% 2.601.95Fidelity Bank2.372.370.000.0550.04043.11.69% 14.1511.09Cable Bahamas12.0412.040.001.3090.2509.22.08%3 .142.83Colina Holdings2.832.830.000.2490.04011.41.41% 7.446.39Commonwealth Bank (S16.396.390.000.4410.05014.50.78% 4.861.31Consolidated Water BDRs2.542.620.080.0990.05226.51.98% 3.001.86Doctor's Hospital1.861.860.000.2400.0407.82.15% 8.106.02Famguard7.767.760.000.4200.24018.53.09% 12.5011.00Finco11.0011.000.000.3220.67034.26.09% 14.6610.35FirstCaribbean Bank10.4010.400.000.7940.40013.13.85% 6.045.00Focol (S5.145.140.000.3370.15015.32.92%1 .001.00Focol Class B Preference1.001.000.000.0000.000N/M0.00% 1 .000.30Freeport Concrete0.300.300.000.0350.0008.60.00% 8.205.50ICD Utilities5.595.590.000.4070.50013.78.94% 12.508.60J. S. Johnson10.5010.500.000.9520.64011.06.10% 10.0010.00Premier Real Estate10.0010.000.000.1800.00055.60.00% 52wk-Hi52wk-LowSecuritySymbolLast SaleChangeDaily Vol. 1000.001000.00Fidelity Bank Note 17 (Series AFBB17100.000.00 1000.001000.00Fidelity Bank Note 22 (Series BFBB22100.000.00 1000.001000.00Fidelity Bank Note 13 (Series CFBB13100.000.00 1000.001000.00Fidelity Bank Note 15 (Series DFBB15100.000.00 52wk-Hi52wk-LowSymbolBid $ A sk $Last PriceWeekly Vol.EPS $Div $P/EYield 14.6014.25Bahamas Supermarkets7.928.4214.60-0.0410.300N/M2.05% 8.006.00Caribbean Crossings (Pref4.006.256.000.0000.480N/M7.80% 0.540.20RND Holdings0.350.400.350.0010.000256.60.00% 41.0029.00ABDAB30.1331.5929.004.5400.0009.030.00% 0.550.40RND Holdings0.450.550.550.0020.000261.900.00% 52wk-Hi52wk-LowFund NameNA V YTD%Last 12 MonthsDiv $Yield % 1.36641.3041Colina Bond Fund1.36640.954.77 3.03512.9230Colina MSI Preferred Fund2.8962-1.49-3.35 1.45481.3875Colina Money Market Fund1.45481.484.85 3.69603.1964Fidelity Bahamas G & I Fund3.1964-5.59-13.64 12.739712.1564Fidelity Prime Income Fund12.73970.965.79 100.5606100.0000CFAL Global Bond Fund100.56060.560.56 100.000096.4070CFAL Global Equity Fund96.4070-3.59-3.59 1.00001.0000CFAL High Grade Bond Fund1.00000.000.00 10.50009.0950Fidelity International Investment Fund9.15990.71-12.76 1.04401.0000FG Financial Preferred Income Fund1.04400.804.40 1.03641.0000FG Financial Growth Fund1.03640.333.64 1.04521.0000FG Financial Diversified Fund1.04520.764.40 BISX ALL SHARE INDEX 19 Dec 02 = 1,000.00YIELD last 12 month dividends divided by closing price 52wk-Hi Highest closing price in last 52 weeksBid $ Buying price of Colina and Fidelity 52wk-Low Lowest closing price in last 52 weeksAsk $ Selling price of Colina and fidelity Previous Close Previous day's weighted price for daily volumeLast Price Last traded over-the-counter price Today's Close Current day's weighted price for daily volumeWeekly Vol. Trading volume of the prior week Change Change in closing price from day to dayEPS $ A company's reported earnings per share for the last 12 mths Daily Vol. Number of total shares traded todayNAV Net Asset Value DIV $ Dividends per share paid in the last 12 monthsN/M Not Meaningful P/E Closing price divided by the last 12 month earningsFINDEX The Fidelity Bahamas Stock Index. January 1, 1994 = 100 (S (S1T T O O T T R R A A D D E E C C A A L LL L: : C C O O L LI I N N A A 2 24 42 25 50 0 2 27 70 01 10 0 | | R R O O Y Y A A L LF FI I D D E E L LI I T T Y Y 2 24 42 23 35 56 67 77 7 6 64 4 | | F FG G C C A A P P I I T T A A L L M M A A R R K K E E T T S S 2 24 4 2 23 39 9 6 6-4 40 00 00 0 | | C C O O L LO O N N I I A A L L 2 24 42 2-5 50 02 27 75 52 25 5FINDEX: CLOSE 797.40 | YTD -4.49% | 2008 -12.31%BISX LISTED & TRADED SECURITIES AS OF: Fidelity Over-The-Counter Securities Colina Over-The-Counter Securities BISX Listed Mutual Funds MARKET TERMSF RIDAY, 24 APRIL 2009BISX ALL SHARE INDEX: CLOSE 1,628.06 | CHG 0.08 | %CHG 0.00 | YTD -84.30 | YTD % -4.92BISX LISTED DEBT SECURITIES (Bonds trade on a Percentage Pricing basesPrime + 1.75% Maturity 19 October 2017 19 October 2022 30 May 2013 29 May 2015 Interest 7% Prime + 1.75% 7% 28-Feb-09 31-Dec-08 31-Dec-07 31-Mar-09 9-Feb-09 9-Feb-09 W W W WW W . .B B I I S S X X B B A A H H A A M M A A S S . .C C O O M M | | T T E E L L E E P P H H O O N NE E : :2 2 4 4 2 2 -3 3 2 2 3 3 2 2 3 3 3 3 0 0 | | F F A A C C S S I I M M I I L L E E : : 2 2 4 42 2 3 3 2 23 32 2 3 3 2 20 0NAV Date 31-Mar-09 17-Apr-09 31-Mar-09 28-Feb-09 31-Dec-08 9-Feb-09 Three megayacht tenders reportedly stolen in just over a month in Bahamas n By LINDSAY THOMPSON IMMIGRATIONDepartm ent employees donated 37 p ints of blood to the Princess Margaret Hospital’s blood bank on Thursday as part of its 70th anniversary celebrations. Minister of State for Immigration Branville McCartney, t he first to donate, said that it w as a pleasure for him to give back to the community. As we celebrate our 70th a nniversary we are giving blood a nd hopefully we would help s ave many, many lives,” Mr M cCartney said. Dr Hubert Minnis, Minister of Health, commended the department for “taking the lead” in such an initiative. He said operations are periodically delayed due to the s hortage of blood supply. What you are embarking on cannot be matched by any, b ecause blood is as essential component of our survival so y ou would be saving many lives,” Dr Minnis said. An Act of Parliament formed t he Immigration Department in 1939. And to commemorate this occasion, the department is hosting a number of activities culminating with a banquet. “Today we are giving back to the community,” said Jack Thompson, Director of Immigration. “We pause to make a deposit into the blood bank as this is a great investment towards saving lives.” Immigration Department donates 37 pints of blood MINISTER OF STATE for Immigration Branville McCartney, donates blood as part of the Immigration Department’s 70th anniversary. K r i s t a a n I n g r a h a m / B I S THE United Nations’ World Health Organisation said yesterday it is not recom m ending travel restrictions as a result of the outbreak of swine flu. The WHO maintains that limiting travel and imposing travel restrictions would have “very little effect” on stopping influenza A(H1N1 “highly disruptive to the global communi t y.” A number of cruise ships originally bound for Mexico have arranged to divert their trips to the Bahamas in May and June as a resulto f the outbreak, while airlines and travel companies are offering discounted fares to alternative sunshine destinations for trav ellers who are changing their plans to visitM exico. “Travellers can protect themselves and others by following simple recommendations related to travel aimed at preventing thes pread of infection,” said a WHO spokesman. “Individuals who are ill should delay travel plans and returning travellers who fall ills hould seek appropriate medical care. These recommendations are prudent mea s ures which can limit the spread of many communicable diseases and not only influen za A(H1N1 SEEPAGEONE WHO not recommending travel restrictions over swine flu PASSENGERS wearing face masks as a precaution a gainst the swine flu inside a flight heading to Panama. E s t e b a n F e l i / A P

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THE results of the Rigby Reads D iagnostic Test show that more than 80 per cent of grade two pub-l ic school students are reading at or above their grade level, Minist er of Education Carl Bethel said. This year, primary students in grades two, four and five took the test, which is an internationally acclaimed diagnostic test that pro-v ides a detailed report of students’ learning strengths and weaknesses. M r Bethel said the Rigby Reads Diagnostic Test allows the Mini stry of Education to standardise the assessment of reading levels t hroughout the Bahamas, so that the ministry is able to determine the uniformity and discrepancies in the reading levels of students in public schools throughout the c ountry. “By assessing our students’ s trengths and weaknesses in the classroom, we are able to respond t o their needs,” he said. “Teachers are then able to place students in appropriate instructional groups and determine the critical skills that they need to emphasise in r eading. “Students’ progress is monit ored from year-to-year because they are tested each year,” he said. M r Bethel said that last year, the Rigby Reads Diagnostic Test was only administered to students in grade two. But this year, the testing population was expanded to include students in grades four and five with a total of 11,730 stud ents participating in the assessment. H e said the Ministry of Educa tion has sought for years to estab lish a programme to recognise and honour students at the primary level for their achievement in literacy. “We believe this literacy programme today provides that o pportunity to highlight students for their outstanding achievement in literacy,” he said. Mr Bethel said grade two stu dents were assessed in the areas of v isual discrimination, auditory dis crimination, letter recognition, s ounds-letters and consonants. Comprehension was the most c hallenging area for students for both years but the minister said there was an improvement of three percentage points. He explained that students in grades f our and five were assessed in the areas of sound letter consonants, s ound letter vowels, vocabulary, comprehension and fluency. G rade four students performed best in the area of letter consonants and grade five students per formed best in the area of vocabulary. Mr Bethel said the challenging area for both of these grade levelsw ere the sound-letters vowels, and at all levels, the girls consistently o utperformed the boys. He said his ministry is looking at more than a “band-aid” approach to t he illiteracy problem in the nation. We believe that the results of the Rigby Roads Diagnostic Test a llow us to take steps to implement programmes and instructions that will counteract the challenges our students encounter in reading,” Mr Bethel said. I am proud of the fact that we have already introduced initiativesa nd strategies that will move us forward in the area of reading and u ltimately the entire spectrum of learning.” T he students who achieved the highest test scores were: Christal Adderley; Daunte Bethel; Samantha Cash; Nnika Corbin; Derricka Ferguson; Ajah Higgs; Midjina J ose; Ashlee Major; Treyvine Neymour; Cassidy Rolle; KamrinR oker; Khyree Rolle; Shaquel Seymour; Brenton Taylor; Alia W ilson; Shannon Albury; Paige Davis; Micah Kelly; Tinisha Miller; Asia Rolle; Richea Springer; Denn ison Underwood; Cecelia Cartwright, and David Johnson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xhibition to highlight need to preserve coastal environment T HE National Coastal Awareness Committee is hosting an exhibition at the Mall of Marathon to highl ight the need to preserve and protect our coastal environment. The exhibition, which opened on Monday, April 27, a nd continues to Saturday, May 9, features a travelling exhibit entitled “Our Reefs: Caribbean Connections.” T he modular display was created by the Florida State University and is a revision of an exhibit originally produced by the Smithsonian Tropical Research Institute. It focuses on the problems affecting coral reefs throughout the Caribbean. Examples o f impacts to coral reefs from around the wider Caribbean are balanced with case studies of actions that people are taking to protect reefs and coastal environments. The exhibition includes several important examples f rom the Bahamas. The “Our Reefs” exhibition is on loan to BREEF, and it also will be on public display in Eleuthera, Abaco and GrandB ahama in the coming weeks. Display We are very pleased to have this extraordinarye xhibit on display in the Bahamas for the first time,” s aid Casuarina McKinney, director of BREEF, a mem ber of the National Coastal A wareness Committee. “The large display mod u les address topics such as reefs and related ecosystems, g lobal warming, pollution, coastal development, overfishing, marine protected areas and reef rehabilitation. The exhibit provides a public f ocal point for students and adults to encounter and dis c uss complex issues that span the interfaces of science, t echnology, economics and society.” “The exhibition has recently been on display at the 11th International Coral Reef Symposium and in the Florida Keys National M arine Sanctuary.” said Dr Judy Lang, exhibition d eveloper, who is currently in Nassau to assist with training about the exhibition. The exhibition also features displays by the Bahamas National Trust, B ahamas Environment Sci ence and Technology( BEST) Commission, BREEF, Dolphin Encount ers – Project BEACH, the Department of Marine Resources, the Nature Con s ervancy and the United States Embassy. A FIELD of thousands of marijuana plants growing in Red Bay, North Andros was discovered by police. It is estimated there are more than 1,600 plants of the illegal weed growing between two and four feet tall in the field. P olice who made the discovery were acting on a tip received at around 5.30pm Thursday. N o arrests were made, however investigations continue. Anyone with any information that may assist investigations should call police on 911,9 19 or call Crime Stoppers anonymously on 328-TIPS (8477 A 25-YEAR-OLD Grand Bahama man has been arrested after a boat stolen in New Providence was recovered in North Andros. The 35ft vessel was found in the settlement of Conch Sound after police received a tip onT uesday. Police press liaison officer W alter Evans said police expect to charge the man arrested in c onnection with the theft. n B y MEGAN REYNOLDS Tribune Staff Reporter mreynolds@tribunemedia.net T HE man whose body parts were found in the waters off western New Providence on Monday was working at a party at the Nygard Cay resort when he disappeared, it has been a lleged. J erome Huyler, 37, had taken two women out on a jet ski from the beach bordering fashion mogul Peter Nygard’s exotic Nygard Cay resort in Lyford Cay when he disap-p eared – creating panic at the resort, a source claimed. The lower part of a man’s body was recovered by Royal Bahamas Defence Force divers o n Monday afternoon and police are awaiting D NA test results to confirm the remains are Mr Huyler’s. A source told The Tribune Mr Huyler was a jet ski operator contracted by Mr Nygard to t ake out guests at his Sunday parties and had arrived at Nygard Cay with his jet skis on Sunday morning. Mr Huyler had worked at the resort for at least eight years and was a lso a disc jockey at Mr Nygard’s Sunday pamper parties, the source claimed. But a spokeswoman for the Nygard Cay resort denied Mr Huyler was a jet ski operator at Nygard Cay and said he did not havep ermission to operate the jet ski on Sunday evening as it had been put away for the day. She further claimed he was not wearing a life jacket when he went out in rough conditions. P arty The spokeswoman did confirm Mr Huyler, also known as DJ Shorts, was scheduled to DJ at the party that evening. P olice told T he Tribune o n Thursday they were not sure if Mr Huyler had been attending the party at Nygard Cay, and the Nygard Cay spokeswoman said the accident, “had n othing to do with Nygard Cay.” B ut T he Tribune’s s ource, who claims to have been at Nygard Cay on Sunday, rejected statements published in Friday’s edit ion. The source claimed there was panic at the resort when the two women returned to the beach at around 6pm without Mr Huyler T he police were called and three private boats were sent out in 15 to 18ft waves to search for Mr Huyler, while others scoured the coastline until after midnight, the source s aid. “I was frantic, I was very scared,” the source said. “Jerome’s aunt and two of his cousins came to the property, and then more of his cousins came, but his mother couldn’th andle it.” The source claimed two staff members resigned from Nygard Cay because of the manner in which the incident was handled, a dding: “It must be a very serious thing for an employee with three children and a mortgage to walk off the job in the middle of a recession.” 80% of second grade students reading at least to grade level Jet ski victim ‘was working at Nygard Cay resort party’ Carl Bethel Police discover thousands of marijuana plants Arrest after stolen boat recovered In brief

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EDITOR, The Tribune. PLEASEallow me to express m y opinion on an institution that has existed from time immemorial in the many homes and hearts of the majority of Bahamians. As the police begin its offensive frisson of enforcement oft he law on many of the “numb er houses” throughout the Bahamas, our lawmakers continue their bumptious diatribe, plagued with pointless political innuendo whilst providing no a ction plan of a corrective nature for many of the fundamental issues and laws thatn eed urgent attention that will enable them to render proper decisions aligned with a modern society. It is now imperative that a m ember of the so-called honourable House of Assembly, m ove to address this issue that appears to have left our lawmakers in a serious imbroglioa nd a quandary – that of addressing “numbers” playing. Numbers”, whether the “three ( 3) ball” or “four (4) ball” like it o r not has become intricately woven in the fabric of Bahami an society. While many B ahamians have their salient points for or against daily “number” gambling operations, wes hould take note and face the reality that a vast majority of the Bahamas play the “numbers” daily in New Providence a nd the family of islands. It appears that our law makers are afraid to address this issue event hough many participate daily i n what has become the “hope ful daily stimulus package” for many strapped Bahamians andf oreigners alike looking for a financial breakthrough. One can only conclude that “numbers” l ike politics in our country, is normally addressed depending on who it affects, when it affects, and what impact the a ffect will have on who it affects to target those who for expe diency and public relations’ s ake unwittingly end up on the radar screen of those who need to appear as if they are doing something. As the raids continue in months and years to come, the Haitian and Chinese broth e rs who are also in this business will now have an opportunity t o upgrade and continue build ing their daily “number” gambling empires and -day” fortunes. The Bahamas needs to face the fact that as a part of our social renaissance – the lottery isa reality. The government needs to muster up the fortitude and have a referendum to obtain the consensus of the Bahamian people as to where they stand on “numbers”. The government would with the concurrence of the Bahamian people at least have legal means to obtain addi tional revenues through taxa tion on such gambling. These funds can be used to fix the schools and increase teachers, nurses, and police salaries, upgrade the nation’s historical landmarks and infrastructure, proper support for our nationals porting and cultural programmes with timely funding for national events, develop and enhance the Defence and PoliceF orce with new modern crime fighting supplies and equipmenta long with many more nation b uilding priorities that can be f unded in a timely manner. I do believe that everybody has a contribution and a voice inf ree democratic country. The government of the Bahamass hould allow the voices of the m any to be heard on this emot ive topic of “numbers.” Further, it is my conviction that there must be a level of comm on sense that can, and must be exercised when introducing new laws, amending old onesa nd enforcing existing ones. The Bahamas whether we like it or not has changed in many ways. This country has progressed for the better, and in the memories o f many and current contemplations of others we have changed for the worst. Our government should now move away from this pusillani-m ous approach and take proactive steps to either legalise daily “numbers” gambling and stop playing the hypocritical game of the self righteous, or address the issue through the democratic process and listen to thev oice of the majority of the peop le. The politicians who are afraid of addressing this issue, should resign immediately because there will be other more serious issues of national i mportance that will require hard political decisions. Some religious leaders in cert ain denominations and individuals alike that strongly oppose such gambling publicly, undoubtedly will be angry through the week, but happy o n Sunday in the tally room when the counting of collection a nd donations from the congregation is complete, but this is a democracy! F ace reality, Bahamas, its has been here, it will be here longa fter those who oppose it today a re gone, so at least fix it, tax it a nd build something constructive from it. A NTHONY BOSTWICK Nassau, April, 2009. C M Y K C M Y K EDITORIAL/LETTERS TO THE EDITOR P AGE 4, SATURDAY, MAY 2, 2009 THE TRIBUNE The Tribune Limited NULLIUS ADDICTUS JURARE IN VERBA MAGISTRI Being Bound to Swear to The Dogmas of No Master LEON E. H. DUPUCH, Publisher/Editor 1903-1914 SIR ETIENNE DUPUCH, Kt., O.B.E., K.M., K.C.S.G., ( Hon.) LL.D., D.Litt . P ublisher/Editor 1919-1972 Contributing Editor 1972-1991 EILEEN DUPUCH CARRON, C.M.G., M.S., B.A., LL.B. Publisher/Editor 1972Published Daily Monday to Saturday Shirley Street, P.O. Box N-3207, Nassau, Bahamas Insurance Management Building., P.O. F-485, Freeport, Grand Bahama TELEPHONES Switchboard (News, Circulation and Advertising A dvertising Manager (242 Circulation Department (242 Nassau Fax: (242 Freeport, Grand Bahama: 1-(242 Freeport fax: (242 WEBSITE w ww.tribune242.com – updated daily at 2pm WASHINGTON In forcing a swift bankruptcy on Chrysler, President Barack Obama expanded the risk and reach of the presidency in the hope that the hidebound auto industry will find a way to remake itself. The government's intervention with Chrysler LLC and General Motors Corp. has been far more intrusive than the way it has confronted troubled financial companies. The administration's influence now ranges from guaranteeing brake pads to pushing for new products on the assembly line. As Obama himself put it, "If the Japanese can design an affordable, well-designed hybrid, then, doggone it, the American people should be able to do the same." Despite an additional $8 billion taxpayer infusion into Chrysler, the president and his advisers say the administration has no desire to be in the auto business. And they say they don't intend to micromanage the company. But as part of Thursday's arrangement, the government will be an investor in the new Chrysler company, and the Treasury Depart ment will select four of its new directors, all of them presumably sympathetic with the White House's vision of what the car of the future should be. In cutting the deal, Obama buys himself good will with an important labour force, especially in the U.S. auto industry's home state of Michigan, which has been suffering hugely from unemployment. At the same time he gets to push a key policy goal, fuel-efficiency, not just as president but as a powerful company investor. But he also is putting billions of dollars of tax payer money at risk at a time of rising anxiety about government bailouts and soaring deficits. Even before he got to this point, Obama had exerted unprecedented power. He rejected Chrysler's and General Motors' restructuring plans last month and forced GM's CEO, Rick Wagoner, to resign. At Chrysler, too, chief exec utive Robert Nardelli said Thursday he is going to leave when the bankruptcy is complete. General Motors still has another 30 days to restructure itself, and its stakeholders may well take a lesson from the administration's dealings with Chrysler. When Obama was not leveraging industry behaviour with taxpayers' money, he was using the pulpit of the presidency to make his wishes known in no uncertain terms. In announcing the deal Thursday, he left no doubt about his anger with some Chrysler creditors who refused to accept a reduced payout for their investment. "They were hoping that everybody else would make sacrifices, and they would have to make none," he said. "I don't stand with them." Administration officials said they tried to sweeten the offer Wednesday night to attract more creditors, to no avail. That could be an effort to nudge a bankruptcy judge to be tough with recalcitrant stakeholders. And by showing a willingness to stand up to some Chrysler creditors, Obama was also sending a signal to GM bondholders not to hold out for too great a return. His tone also carried the same populist strains that he used when he railed against Wall Street bonuses. "He's invested in terms of the taxpayers' investment, and he's invested in it politically," said Sen. Carl Levin, a Michigan Democrat who had initially objected to bankruptcy as a way to restructure the company. While the political risks are potentially great, taking Chrysler through bankruptcy buys some short-term political running room. For months, Republicans and some Democrats have said bankruptcy restructuring was the proper fate for the automakers. By Thursday, some past critics of bankruptcy such as Levin were hailing the deal as a new birth for Chrysler. What's more, the public appears to tilt in favour of government interventions, at least so far. A FOX News/Opinion Dynamics Poll in March found 43 per cent of respondents saying the government under Obama was taking an appropriate role in running U.S. companies. Thirteen per cent said the administration was not taking a big enough role. Despite the stigma often attached to bank ruptcy, Obama took pains to portray it as a positive development. "This is not a sign of weak ness," he insisted, "but rather one more step ona clearly charted path to Chrysler's revival." To be sure, the administration's day-andnight involvement with the auto industry does not match its attempts to rescue financial insti tutions. That's partly because the automakers have made a desperate pitch for a government bailout, while some of the biggest financial institutions have been less enthusiastic in their desire for help. Many major banks now say they want to return their share of a $700 billion financial rescue fund, in part to avoid restrictions that the government has imposed or threatened to impose. At the same time, the government has always been able to influence banking behaviour through regulation. And that's where Obama says he intends to address the industry's excesses. Still, banks can fight back in ways that automakers can't. On Thursday the banking industry succeeded in defeating a Senate pro posal that would have let homeowners seek foreclosure relief through bankruptcy court. So far, the two Detroit car companies are only asking how high Obama wants them to jump. (This article was written by Jim Khunhenn of the Associated Press). When the ‘number’ houses are raided NOBODY WINS! LETTERS l etters@tribunemedia.net Auto deal extends Obama’s reach, risk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fGD\VDIWHUWKHGDWHRISXEOLFDWLRQRIWKLVQRWLFH EDITOR, The Tribune. IF YOU t ake the vitriol and personal attacks out of the letters against Andrew Allen’s position on turtle harvesting then you are left with next to nothing. N one of the letters address Mr Allen’s two very sensible points that: 1) To ban turtle harvesting on the basis that some people kill t hem cruelly would be a foolish act, as it would punish everyone w ho eats turtles instead of simply punishing the acts of cruelty done to them by some; and 2) The environmental arguments need to focus on what impact Bahamian (as opposed to international turtle is actually having, rather than simply jumping on to some international bandwagon. None of Mr Allen’s critics (NOT ONE of these points with any amount of clarity. Instead they keep concentrating on him as an individual and berating, him for daring to speak up. Some of them even seem to be accusing him (and anyone else who eats turtle Some of your letter writers seem to think that screaming and insulting attacks on their critics cover for their own inability to follow a simple line of logic without straying. One minute they are talking about environmentalism, the next minute they are berating all Bahamians for supposedly being torturers. Please Minister, ignore these crazy people! M TAYLOR Nassau, April 16, 2009. Responding to letters on turtle harvesting

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n By DENISE MAYCOCK Tribune Freeport R eporter dmaycock@tribunemedia.net FREEPORT – Youth, Sports and Culture Minister Desmond Bannister announced that the Junior Central American and Caribbean Championships willn o longer be held in Grand Bahama. M r Bannister said the Grand B ahama Sports complex will not be ready in time for theJ une deadline to host the CAC G ames. The minister held a press conference in Freeport to e xplain why the Games were being moved to New Providence. H e said extensive work is required to bring the sports facility up to IAAF certifica t ion, including the new surfacing of the track and relocation of the existing long jump pit, as well as other required works. M r Bannister noted that problems were discovered in April as government was car r ying out base work in preparation for the new surfacing of t he track facility. L ast July, the government awarded a contract to Mondo Laval of Quebec, Canada, to resurface the track, as well as relocate the existing long jump pit to the outer perimeter of the track and to construct a second long jump pit, in preparation for the CAC Champi o nships this June. Mr Bannister said Waugh Construction was contracted in January to carryo ut base work to remove the existing running surface, repair the drain field and construct the two new long jump pits and approaches, to prepare the new running surface. “While the base work has progressed somewhat, ther emoval of the rubberized surf ace has proved to be more difficult and time consuming thanh ad been initially envisaged,” h e said. Minister Bannister noted that numerous concerns were raised a fter an extensive survey and review of the track facility on April 21 and 22 by Mondo rep-r esentative Franco Ruata. They were: The concrete base must be m illed and repaved to very stringent specifications so as to permit the adhesion of the b onding agent The existing border along the straight-aways are not inp roper location according to 2008 IAAF rules and will have be adjusted Currently there is only one javelin runway. A second javelin runway has to be con structed in order to meet IAAF’s specification for certi-f ication The steeple chase water jump has also to be relocatedi n order to accommodate the s econd javelin runway. The long and triple jump runways that were recently b uilt were too long and too high. The height of the run way will have to be corrected The existing high jump mat must be reduced in size; and the surface has to bem illed to permit proper drainage The discus cage must be r elocated. Mr Bannister stressed in order to address the problemsm ore synthetic material is required than Mondo had initially estimated. “We have been assured that the company will absorb this extra cost of synthetic materi al without any additional charges to the Bahamian peo-p le,” he said. M inister Bannister said it is important all of the above con-c erns are addressed in order t o achieve IAAF certification of the track. “The ministry will be seek i ng to contract the preparatory work out to companies that are qualified to perform ther equired work in the shortest possible time so that the Grand Bahama athletic com-m unity can have the best athletic facilities possible,” he said. C M Y K C M Y K LOCAL NEWS THE TRIBUNE SATURDAY, MAY 2, 2009, PAGE 5 THE CRISIS Centre has received the donation of a computer and printer from the former Innerwheel Club of Nassau. Past Innerwheel Club president Christa Palmer spent 15 years volunteering at the Bahamas Crisis Centre in the Princess Margaret Hospital, working asa counsellor for rape victims and drug addicts, and as chairperson for the centre’s rape advocate programme. She and fellow former Innerwheel Club president Joan Pinder chose to invest left-over funds from the club in much needed equipment for the Bahamas Crisis Centre to help the charity continue its good work. Computer and printer d onation to Crisis Centre In brief Minister: Sporting complex ‘won’t be ready’ for June 2009 n B y ALISON LOWE Tribune Staff Reporter alowe@tribunemedia.net SOME residents of eastern New Provid ence are starting to feel like they have travelled back in time – to an era when indoor plumbing and the readily accessible running water that goes with it is a luxury and not an everyday utility. But having gotten used to the convenience of being able to wash up, shower and flush a toilet whenever they please, residents like Sammy Ferguson are finding l ife without water difficult to put up with. Mr Ferguson, who lives in an apartment building near the Sea Grape Plaza on Prince Charles Drive, said: “It went off last Saturday, and almost every night since then there’s been no water from the time I get home from work until about 10pm.” “We’re having to save water from the m orning in five gallon bottles. Otherwise we can’t flush the toilet, wash the dishes or anything. “If they are doing repairs, I don’t understand why they wouldn’t turn off the water d uring the day rather than in the evening.” Mr Ferguson said his neighbours and those in other nearby apartment complexe s are experiencing the same problem. To make things more frustrating, the water supply to the area had only recently improved after shortages in late March,w hich the Water and Sewerage Corporation blamed on sea swells delaying the arrival of the MT Titus. The barge, which brings in 30 per cent of New Providence’s water supply, did not dock as scheduled, prompting the corporation to institute “conservation measures”. Some parts of the island lost all access to running water, while other areas experienced a significant loss of water pressure. Another eastern resident yesterday told The Tribune her water supply never improved even after the MT Titus was able to resume normal service. Having received “excuse after excuse” from the WSC, who “admit there is a problem but won’t say what it is”, the Camperdown mother said she suspects there is a “major boo boo” being covered up. “It’s been like this for months now. They s aid it was going to be fixed up by Easter but it’s still the same. Every day, if someone is washing their hands or brushing their teeth there’s no water in the rest of the house,” she said. God forbid you flush your toilet – there’s no water in house for 15 minutes!” she said. Yesterday Robert Deal, assistant gene ral manager at WSC, admitted the corporation is “having a few challenges right now” as its water storage levels have “not fully recovered” since the delay of the MT Titus barge in March. “We have an ongoing issue of supply versus demand,” he said. However, Mr Deal stated that in the case of Camperdown, the WSC has “done quite a bit of work” in the area to alleviate water supply issues and he found it surprising certain homes are still experiencing problems. “We have had some complaints from our Winton pressure supply zone which includes Camperdown and we have seen some improvement in the last one to two weeks. The improvement is based on reports from our monitoring systems in the area and direct contact with customersi n the area including customers in the higher elevations off Culberts Hill, Blackbeard's Terrace and Tower Heights,” he said. Meanwhile, in the case of Mr Ferguson, Mr Deal said there are no water works going on in the area and he questioned w hether the problem might be “internal” to his building. However, he said the WSC will “definitely check into it.” H e encouraged people experiencing water supply problems to contact WSC’s call center at 302-5599. R R u u n n n n i i n n g g w w a a t t e e r r i i s s a a l l u u x x u u r r y y f f o o r r s s o o m m e e N N e e w w P P r r o o v v i i d d e e n n c c e e r r e e s s i i d d e e n n t t s s P OSTMASTER General Godfrey Clarke retired on Thursday after 44 years of service. During a ceremony on Wednesday, employees of post offices throughout New Providence and the Family Islands thanked him for his dedication and presented him withg ifts of appreciation. Deputy Postmaster General Leslie Cartwright described Mr Clarke as an individual with an “unassuming” personality and one who “handles stress pretty well.” He said Mr Clarke was loyal to the service, committed to h is work and held a “great” love for the department. M r Clarke expressed his appreciation for his staff, noting that he enjoyed his time with them. Letisha Henderson /BIS Photo ANDREA Davies presents a plaque to retiring Postmaster General Godfrey Clarke. He officially retired on Thursday, April 30, after 44 years of service. P os tmaster General retires after... 44 YEARS OF SERVICE ACCORDING to the WSC, the island’s water barge was delayed prompting the corporation to institute “conservation measures”.

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t ested for A(H1N1 za in line with Ministry of Health emergency protocol. B ut Dr Minnis confirmed y esterday all 12 have returned negative tests results. The Ministry of Health is s till awaiting test results of a New Providence resident who reported flu-like symptoms after returning from a trip toM exico this week. He remains in voluntary isolation and under Health Ministry sur veillance, Dr Minnis said. M eanwhile, the football team of 12 players and their two coaches who went toP uerto Valerta, Mexico, last w eek remained in Florida under the surveillance of Unit ed States health authorities y esterday. D r Minnis held a press con ference at the Ministry of H ealth in Meeting Street, Nassau, yesterday afternoon to u pdate the public on the latest developments of the swine flu pandemic and to send out a m essage of reassurance to the public. H e said: “We want to reass ure people we are still man aging the whole situation as best we can and that the test results from Abaco haver eturned and are all negative, so there is no evidence of swine flu. We will continue to monitor our borders and immigra tion officials have various warning signs advising peoplea bout swine flu.” D r Minnis is travelling to Freeport today to dispel rumours of a possible case oft he virus at a major industrial facility in Grand Bahama after Rand Memorial Hospital was i nundated with calls on Thursd ay night. He maintains the c alls were sparked purely by rumour. He said: “If you follow the national media you will know what is going on. “I want to thank the Press f or reporting very responsibly, even if they may have b een privy to rumours, they have allowed the professionals to determine the facts and p ublished the facts, so I thank the Press for their profession a l ethos and judgment to go b eyond the rumours.” The United Nation’s World Health Organisation (WHO has set its pandemic alert lev e l at five. It means there is human to human transmission of thev irus in at least two countries, but says it has no immediate plans to move to the highest level of six. E leven countries have offi c ially reported 331 cases of influenza A(H1N1 ed States Government has r eported 109 laboratory confirmed human cases, including one death. Mexico has r eported 156 confirmed h uman cases of infection, i ncluding nine deaths. Further information on the situation will be available on the WHO website on a regular basis. Log on to www.who.int. C M Y K C M Y K LOCAL NEWS PAGE 6, SATURDAY, MAY 2, 2009 THE TRIBUNE granted bail, noting they were already on police bail. Magistrate Rolle extended the police bail and set July 27 for the start of the trial. The accused were all represented by attorney Charles McKay who appeared on behalf of Flowers’ attorney Alfred Sears. Thirteen witnesses are listed on court dockets. If convicted, the accused could face a fine of up to $5,000 or up to two years in prison. On Tuesday afternoon, police raided two suspected gaming houses, FML on Village Road, and the Our Place Sporting Lounge in the Mel-Don Shopping Plaza on Mackey Street. Along with an amount of cash and equipment, police allegedly also confiscated computers and other “gambling” para phernalia. Flowers recently told The Tribune police confiscated nearly $1 million in cash from his establishment. d ifferentiated from the disc ussion of a national lottery as a national lottery is an unrealistic option for the B ahamas. “No small population in these Caribbean countries cans ustain a lottery game because t he population is too small. Lotteries cannot survive in none of these small countriesa nd be successful. It cannot!” he exclaimed. However, in the local num b er games, the system is much more controllable and sus tainable where the vast amount of money that is p layed is actually returned to the persons who play them. Legalizing such a system, he said, would be a great step for ward for the Bahamas. “The second thing about it i s you need large volumes of people playing to make it attractive. The Bahamas does not have that volume. Nor does any other Caribbean country have those types of volume. They will suffer e specially after you take the administrative fee out of that. When you go around the Caribbean you can hardly see any that are doing that well, p rimarily because the population is very small and the n umbers that the lottery b oard will offer in terms of prizes are not attractive. “Because right in the US n ext door you can take a one American dollar and wage it and be competing for nothing less $4 million and going up. B ut in any Caribbean coun try for the same equivalent m oney you are looking at m aybe $100,000, $200,000, or $300,000 maximum for the same dollar. The competitionm akes no sense for us to think w e can run a lottery game in the Bahamas and be successful. But there is monies to bem ade in managing funds belonging to the people the monies that come in through t hese small games that peo ple win every day, that you would manage properly and pay back out. There is a r eward for good management of numbers money,” he said. c hildren,” it remains wary of the possibility that teachers’ livelihoods may be jeopardised by unsubstantiated allegations. “Ultimately we wouldn’t be defending wrong, but we also must defendo ur teachers until they’re proven guilty o f what they are being accused of,” he s aid. S peaking in parliament on Wednesday Prime Minister Hubert Ingrahamc alled into question the future of any t eacher against whom an allegation of sexual misconduct is made, when he told parliament that, while “shifting and transfers are how we have tradit ionally dealt with problem employees in the public sector,” this practice, which has made it easier for unscrupul ous individuals to exploit children, w ill be no more. The shifting and/or redeployment o f teachers accused of sexual crimes a gainst children in our schools is also g oing to end,” he said. I llustrating the extent of the practice in the past, Mr Ingraham noted that there are currently 15 teachers against whom sex investigations or court action is pending, “virtually all” of whom are still employed by the government, but in different capacities. T he Prime Minister did not elaborate on what would now be the fate of such teachers raising questions of whether they would be made to resign from the public sector. Yesterday Mr Campbell said: “An allegation is precisely what it says: an allegation. “Some time has to be given in order t o make out whether there is any subs tance to this or not.” We have experience in the past w here allegations have been made but t here is no substance to them.” M r Campbell suggested that the teacher’s union has not been consulted adequately by government on what it plans to do with educators in these instances. “I think we should’ve been. Then we could speak more intelligently.” H owever, he also admitted that the union itself may not have devoted sufficient attention to addressing the question of what fate should befall teachers against whom accusations are made. “That’s something to be decided, to be addressed. And we haven’t sat down as a body to look at the implications of that,” he said. In his speech to parliament Mr Ingraham lamented that some of the 15 former teachers who have been moved from their place in the classroom have had the allegations against them unresolved since as far back as 2 001. That’s unfortunate”, said Mr C ampbell. “A lot of cases do just hang a round and definitely if you’re talki ng about a case involving children, or s omebody’s future, somebody’s livelihood, I trust that with what the Prime Minister is saying we’ll be able to expedite these matters far, far more than is being done. It’s only what’s fair for the children, the system and the individuals involved.” BUTvoices concern over govt approach to sex allegations FROM page one Hubert Ingraham Isolated students and teachers cleared of swine flu infection F ROM page one Flowers:I would not support national lottery FROM page one Flowers char ged FROM page one n KINGSTON, Jamaica A JAMAICANman who allegedly took a flight crew hostage last week at M ontego Bay’s airport a nd demanded to be flown off the island has been charged with offences including robbery and assault, according to Associated Press. S tephen Fray, a 21-yearo ld Jamaican described as e motionally unstable, faces a total of six charges, according to a police statement issued late Thursday. If convicted hef aces a maximum prison sentence of 20 years. A uthorities say that F ray, armed with a handgun, pushed his way through airport securityo n April 19 and entered a CanJet Airlines plane with 1 67 people on board. He r eportedly struck a pilot w ith the gun, fired into the a ir and took cash from the passengers before freeing them. After an eight-hour standoff, he was capturedi n a military raid that freed the six remaining hostages without injury. The charges include illegal possession of a firearm and ammunition for use of a handgun that police say w as licensed to Fray’s father. He was also charged with shootingw ith intent and breaches of civil aviation regulations. F ray is due to appear b efore a court next week in the northwestern resort city of Montego Bay. P rime Minister Bruce Golding has ordered an investigation into the s ecurity breach at Sang ster International Airport, one of two primary air p orts in a Caribbean nation that depends heavily on tourism. The private security g uards at checkpoints were not armed and followed procedures by k eeping visual contact with the intruder until Jamaican police responded, according to a prelimi n ary investigation by MBJ Airports Ltd., the airport’s operating compa n y. Jamaican man charged over airport hostage standoff

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C M Y K C M Y K LOCAL NEWS T HE TRIBUNE SATURDAY, MAY 2, 2009, PAGE 7 NEWLY appointed Family I sland administrators were briefed on the role of the Ministry of Public Works and Transport and the Ministry of the Environment in the Family Islands during the first of a twoday training session. Donald Cash, under-secretary i n the Ministry of Public Works, told the administrators his mini stry plays an integral part in the Family Islands. “Without the Ministry of Works the Family Islands cannot develop properly,” he said. “You are the link between the district where you will serve and the Ministry of Works.” T opics to be covered during the two-day workshop include m ail boat services and board of survey procedures; contracts and relations with Family Island engineers; building control; physical planning and sub-divisions. The four participating administrators are Gregory Knowles, Wilma Colebrooke, Joshua S mith and Maxine Duncombe. FREEPORT Three local charities were beneficiaries of am ajor donation by a New Jersey catering company. The Grand Bahama Children’s Home, Grand Bahama Red Cross Society and the Grand Bahama Home For The A ged received fresh produce f rom Foremost Caterers on b ehalf of the Magen David group. Among the trailer of food items donated were romaine lettuce, carrots, sweet peppers,b eans, berries, mushrooms, p otatoes, papayas, pineapples, chicken soup and orange and grapefruit juices. The more than 1,500 pounds of produce has an estimated value of $4,000. E arnestine Moxeyz said M agen David is a Hebrew P arochial School located in New York. She said each year the children, parents and family members of the school travel together to celebrate theP assover holiday. For the past three years, she s aid, the group has stayed at the Westin and Sheraton Grand Bahama Our Lucaya Resort. Ms Moxeyz said this year the 700-member group spent moret han 3,000 room nights at the resort. (L-R , director of banquet at Our Lucaya; Rick Bardari, general manager of Foremost Caterers; Victor McKillop; Ossie Saquicela; Anthony Pascalli; Donald Merrick; Agatha Beckles of the Grand Bahama Home For The Aged; Karen Dean of the Grand Bahama Red Cross Society, and Adrian Dorsett of the Grand Bahama Home For The Aged. New Jersey firm donates to local charities TWO OF THE four newly appointed Family Island admini strators with representatives of the Ministry of Public Works and Transport and the Ministry of the Environment at the start of a two-day training seminar coordinated by the Ministry of Works on Thursday, April 30, 2009. From left are Bradley King, acting chief engineer; Caldwell Pratt, deputy director; Michael Major; Charles Zonicle; Craig Delancy and Hermis Chisholm. Seated from left are Donald Cash, under-secretary and Family Island administrators Maxine Duncombe and Gregory Knowles. Patrick Hanna /BIS New Family Island administrators fully briefed

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n By BRENT STUBBS Senior Sports Reporter bstubbs@tribunemedia.net W ith the National Football League’s Draft fast approaching, the Tampa Bay Buccaneers dealt tight end Alex Smith, of Bahamian descent, to the New England Patriots. The unspecified deal was completed yesterday as the Patriots gave up an undisclosed pick in next year’s NFL draft for the four-year veteran, who is the son of defensive end Ed Smith, the first Bahamian to play in the pros with the Denver Broncos. Smith, who was drafted by the Buccaneers in the third round of the 2005 draft out of Stanford University, had a total of 129 receptions for 1,252 yards and 11 touchdowns in 58 games. Starting in 12 of the 14 games that the 6-feet, 4-inch es, 258-pounder played for Tampa Bay, Smith caught a total of 21 passes. Smith, 26, had only one year left on his contract with the Buccaneers. But there were no further comments made regarding the trade. But his job seemed to be in jeopardy when Tampa Bay traded two draft picks (a second rounder this year and a fifth-rounder next year) to the Cleveland Browns for tight end Kellen Winslow Jr in February. Additionally, the Buccaneers have Jerramy Stevens, who led all tight ends last year with 36 receptions for 397 y ards and two TDs and John Gilmore, who is considered t o be a blocking tight end. In going to the Patriots, who finished second in the AFC East at 11-5 behind the pennant-winning Miami Dolphins and missed the playoffs, Smith could end up playing with Tom Brady – one of the greatest quarter backs in the NFL – who went down last season with an i njury. U nable to be reached for comments, Smith played his four seasons so far in the NFL with Tampa Bay. In total, he appeared in 58 games and caught 129 passes for 1,252 yards and 11 touchdowns. During his rookie season, Smith topped the statistics for all rookies when he had a career-high 41 receptions for 367 yards and two TDs. Like most players, Smith was set back by a series of leg and ankle injuries over the past three seasons, forcing him to miss two games each. With Denver, Colorado, listed as his birthplace, Smith has always considered the Bahamas to be his home. Inf act, he has returned over the last two years to host a summer football camp. During the camp, which was held around the same time as a few other NFL camps involving Bahamian or players of Bahamian descent, Smith brought in a number of his collegiates. It’s not certain whether or not Smith will return to host another camp this summer now that he has been traded. n By BRENT STUBBS Senior Sports Reporter b stubbs@tribunemedia.net MARK Knowles and Mahesh Bhupathi are getting closer and c loser to returning to their seco nd straight final on the ATP men’s doubles tour. The Bahamian-Indian duo, seeded at No. 4 in the Internazionali BNL d’Italia, easily won t heir quarter-final match yesterday in Rome, Italy. Their victims were the No.6 seeded Polish team of Mariusz Frystenberg and MarcinM atkowski, who fell in scores of 6-3, 6-4. They will now meet theN o. 2 team of Canadian Daniel Nestor and Serbian Nenad Z imonjic in the semifinal today in a rematch from last week’s final at the Barcelona Open Banco Sabadell 2009. Nestor, Knowles’ long-time p artner, and Zimonjic won in identical scores of 6-4, 6-4 overJ eff Coetzee of the Republic of South Africa and Jordon Kerr of A ustralia. Last Sunday in Barcelona, S pain, Knowles and Bhupathi played Nestor and Zimonjic in the final, but they lost a heartbreaking 6-3, 7-6 (9 Knowles noted that it was a m atch that they waited on for a long time and he was quite dis-a ppointed that they lost, despite the fact that they played a pretty g ood match. En route to making it to the final, Knowles and Bhupathi eliminated the world’s top seeded team of Bob and Mike Bryan, the i dentical American twin brothers, 6-2, 6-7 (5 B y virtue of their perfor mances, Knowles and Bhupathi r egained the number three spot on the ATP computer ranking. They trail the Bryans, who are still No.1 and Nestor and Zimonjic, who are No.2. T he Bryans clinched their berth into the semis as well with a 4-6, 6 -4, 11-9 victory over No. 7 seeds Max Mirnyi and Andy Ram. T hey will face the No. 3 seeded team of Lucas Dlouhy of the Czech Republic and Leander Paes of India. The final of the tournament is s cheduled to be played on Sunday. F ollowing Barcelona, Knowles and Bhupathi will go on to play in M adrid, Spain, at the next ATP World Tour Masters 1000 before t hey prepare for the French Open Grand Slam at Roland Garros. Knowles and Bhpathi are still looking for their first tournament victory of the year. They also got to the final of the Australian Open, the first Grand Slam in January, but lost out to the Bryans. C M Y K C M Y K SATURDAY, MAY 2, 2009 THETRIBUNE PAGE 9 P AGE 10 Federer, Djokovic to meet in Rome Masters semis... Bulls top Celtics 128-127 in 3 OTs t o force Game 7... See page 10 n B y BRENT STUBBS Senior Sports Reporter b stubbs@tribunemedia.net FOR the fourth consecutive year, Satellite Bahamas Limited has agreed to sponsor the Bahamas Bodybuilding and Powerlifting Novice Championships. T he event is scheduled for May 30 at the National Performing Arts Theatre and is expected to feature com-p etitors from New Providence, Grand Bahama and Long Island. There is also the possibility that Inagua may enter a few athletes. Since its inception, federation president Danny Sumner said they look forward to the championship each year because it brings out the talent that is coming up and what can be expected as the year continues. “From what I’ve gathered so far, a lot of new people are training for this event, so I would like to see a show w here we have a lot of people competing on stage,” Sumner said. The novice is a springboard for the federation because it allows those persons who would normally not want to g o on stage and compete among people who are sea soned in the sport.” While the novice is geared for those competitors who are competing for the first time, Sumner said it’s also open to those competitors who competed in past champio nships, but were not winners in their categories. “The whole idea behind that is to keep it flowing,” he s aid. “Everybody looks up to it because sometimes we have more people competing in this event than we do in t he other shows.” Competitors will have the opportunity to compete in the men’s lightweight, middleweight, light heavyweight and heavyweight divisions. The women will have the lightweight and heavyweight d ivisions, while there is an open division for the female fitness competitors. C ompetitors have until May 15 to register at a cost of $15. High School students will be free of charge. “We’re l ooking at having about 20 competitors alone from New Providence,” said Chevy Roker, the federation’s vice president. “We are also looking at a large contingent from Long Island. “I am anticipating a large turnout with a lot of com p etitors coming from high school. We know that Long Island, led by Omar Daley, has always been a big sup p orter of the federation, so it’s going to be a good show.” In the past, the federation was privileged to have a number of drinks and water companies sponsor the event. But Sumner said they are really appreciative of the efforts of Satellite Bahamas Limited and the contribution they are making to the event. Michael Garraway, president and chief executive officer of Satellite Bahamas Limited, said they were always encouraged by the participation of the high school stu-d ents and that is one of the reasons why they continue to support the novice. “We would like to encourage and have the youths involved in something positive,” Garraway stressed. “Bodybuilding is not just a past time. It’s an athletic event. “So it’s something that could lead into other sports because other athletes from other sports also do bodybuilding. So it provides healthy lifetime choices and in this age of obesity, this is a way of discouraging that.” Satelitte Bahamas is bodybuilding sponsor MICHAEL GARRAWAY (centre Satelitte Bahamas, presents a cheque to BBFF president Danny Sumner (left sponsorship of 23rd Novice Bodybuilding Championships. n By BRENT STUBBS Senior Sports Reporter bstubbs@tribunemedia.net MORE than 35 schools have already signed up to compete in the 28th Primary Schools Track and Field Championships. Without a major sponsor outside of the Ministry of Youth, Sports and Culture, the event is set for May 20-22 at the Thomas A Robinson Track and Field Stadium. It was originally scheduled for May 13-15, but because of the scheduling of the GLAT examination, it was rescheduled. However, although it conflicts with the Teachers Appreciation Activities, the organisers indicated that they were unable to make any further changes. Frank ‘Pancho’ Rahming, chairman of the organising committee, said that during the past two years, Milo, through its distributors Thompson Trading, sponsored the meet. But due to economic reasons, they have opted not to return this year. “The ministry expresses gratitude to Thompson Trading and Milo for the years they’ve cooperated with us and hope that similar cooperation will return in the future.” S S C C H H O O O O L L S S T T A A K K I I N N G G P P A A R R T T While the deadline was set for April 17, schools still have until May 8 to submit their rosters. “To date, we have received entries for more than 20 schools from the government schools in New Providence,” he said. “We have also received entries from more than 10 schools from the Family Islands.” Entered so far from New Providence are St Francis/Joseph, Temple Christian, Carlton E Francis, Lyford Cay, St Cecilia’s, Tambearly, Westminster, Mt Carmel, Queen’s College, St Anne’s, Charles W Saunders, Sadie Curtis, Jordan Prince William, Freedom Baptist, See Saw Academy, Kingsway Academy, Nassau Christian Academy, St Bede’s, Christian Heritage, St John’s, Mable Walker, Thelma Gibson and Garvin Tynes. Lisa Mortimer, president of the New Providence Primary Schools Association, said right now it would appear that only three will not be participating this year, one of which doesn’t have a physical education teacher. “Other than that, we should have 23 of the 26 government schools participating,” she said. “Everybody has indicated that they are coming.” Nekeno Demeritte, the physical education teacher at Temple Christian, said the private schools in New Providence, from what he has seen, are all ready to compete. “We are expecting to come in and have a good showing,” he said. “We’re going to be compet itive throughout the meet.” F F A A M M I I L L Y Y I I S S L L A A N N D D P P A A R R T T I I C C I I P P A A T T I I O O N N From the Family Islands, the list includes Long Island All-Age, South Andros, North/Central Andros, Central Abaco, Eleuthera, Martin Town, Discovery Primary, Holmes Rock, Wal ter Parker, Inagua All-Age and Exuma. Among the new schools are Exuma, Inagua All-Age and Abaco, which will only be represented by Abaco Central, instead of a combined team from the island. Frank Hepburn, representing Abaco, said this is an important meet for their island and they look forward to coming and participating every year. “This is normally the largest contingent of any athletes leaving the island,” Hepburn said. “So it’s something that we look forward to because it motivates the parents and it brings everybody closer together. “The meet that we had leading up to this meet was very well supported by the parents and I am sure that when we go back from this meet, we take our hard ware. So everybody looks forward to before and after.” And James Ingraham, who rep resented Eleuthera, said this year they are coming down with a 50member contingent who are enthusiastic about competing. “When we come in, we are looking forward to doing very well and to take home our hardware. We had some outstanding performances in our meet three weeks ago and so we are looking forward to our athletes performing very well this year.” T T O O R R C C H H R R U U N N As an added incentive for the championships, the committee is scheduled to once again put on the Torch Run on Saturday, May 16. Interested persons can contact either Val Kemp at Oakes Field Primary or Nekeno Demeritte. “The torch run is to attract the public and get people hyped up so that they can beware of what is happening,” Kemp said. “Most of the time we don’t have the press present because it’s early in the morning. So we are hoping that the press will support the event this year.” The run will start from four different locations at 7am, inclusive of RM Bailey (east son (south (westnorth and will end up at the Kendal Isaacs Gymnasium. On Eleuthera, Ingraham noted that they will also hold a torch run at the same time starting from the north and south and ending up in Governor’s Harbour where a volleyball jamboree will be held to help raise funds. C C H H E E E E R R L L E E A A D D I I N N G G On Tuesday, May 19, the committee is slated to once again put on the popular and crowd pleas ing cheerleading competition at the Kendal Isaacs Gymnasium. Interested schools are urged to contact Cedricka Rolle at 3235503 or Albury/Sayles Primary School. “So far, we have about 10 schools, but last year we had about 13 schools that participat ed,” Rolle said. “We hope to go out there, have some fun, learn from each other and then come back the next day for the start of the championships.” Rolle said on the application forms, the schools will find all of the information regarding their participation in the event. They will be judged by an independent panel of judges. Ingraham also stated that Spanish Wells recently won a cheer leading competition that was held in Eleuthera and that team is expected to come to town to participate in the contest here. A scratch meeting is sched uled for Monday, May 18. The Palm Resort and Quality Inn, both on Nassau Street, will serve as the official hotels and the Fam ily Island teams will be transported to and from the stadium and fed lunch daily. More than 35 schools to take part in primary track championships Knowles, Bhupathi ease through quarter-final THE annual Catholic Diocesan Primary Schools T rack and Field Championships was held yesterday at the Thomas A Robinson Track and Field Stadium. At the end of the day, the St Cecilia’s Strikers prevailed as they successfully defended their overall title with a total of 333 points. St Cecilia’s also captured the primary divisional title with Our Lady’s Blue Flames as the runners-up. In the junior division, St Thomas Sparks won the title over St Cecilia’s. Last year, St Cecilia’s won the overall and the junior divisional crowns. Xavier’s was the primary champions. A ccording to Patricia Coakley, the meet director, it was another competitive event with all of the Catholic primary schools competing. She noted that they are already looking forward to next year’s championships. During the official opening ceremonies where Minister of Youth, Sports and Culture Desmond Bannister delivered the keynote address, the St Bede’s Crushers were awarded their championship crown for winning the basketball title. S S t t C C e e c c i i l l i i a a s s S S t t r r i i k k e e r r s s a a r r e e C C a a t t h h o o l l i i c c D D i i o o c c e e s s a a n n p p r r i i m m a a r r y y t t r r a a c c k k c c h h a a m m p p s s ORGANISERS of the 28th Primary Schools Track and Field Championships can be seen above. Seated (l-r ernment schools, Nekeno Demeritte of the private schools and Cedricka Rolle, who is in charge of the cheerleading committee. Standing (l-r committee chairman Frank Rahming, James Ingraham of Eleuthera, Val Kemp, who is in charge of the Torch Run and opening ceremonies, Frank Hepburn of Abaco, Ralf McKinney and secretary Sharon Harris. Alex Smith traded to Patriots ALEX SMITH has been traded to the New England Patriots... (AP Photo

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Liverpool looks to keep faint title hopes alive C M Y K C M Y K SPORTS PAGE 10, SATURDAY, MAY 2, 2009 TRIBUNE SPORTS 127,&(7KHSXEOLFLVDGYLVHGWKDWDWWKH$QQXDO*HQHUDO0HHWLQJRI%DQNRI 7KH%DKDPDV/LPLWHG%DQNf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fKDVEHHQHQJDJHGDV)LQDQFLDO $GYLVRUDQG(VFURZ$JHQW n By ANDREW DAMPF AP Sports Writer ROME (AP erer and Novak Djokovic post ed straight-set wins Friday to set up a meeting in the Rome Masters semifinals. Federer overcame a first-set challenge from the net-charging German qualifier Mischa Zverev, advancing 7-6 (3 Djokovic stayed on course to defend his title in this clay-court warmup for the French Open with a 6-3, 6-4 victory over fifthseeded Juan Martin del Potro. The fast clay at the Foro Italico suits both Federer and Djokovic. "I think both of us like it, so it's going to be interesting," Djokovic said. "I feel quite con fident playing here. Each match I play, I feel more comfortable moving on the court and just playing my style of the game." Federer has won seven of his 10 previous matches against Djokovic, but the Serb took the last meeting at the Masters Series event last month in Key Biscayne, Fla. In the other half of the draw, three-time Rome champion Rafael Nadal faced eighth-seed ed Fernando Verdasco for the first time since Nadal's epic fiveset win in a match between the pair at the Australian Open. Also, No. 12 Fernando Gonza lez was to face Argentine qualifier Juan Monaco. The 76th-ranked Zverev beat former French Open champion Juan Carlos Ferrero in qualifying and upset No. 8 Gilles Simon in his previous match. Using an effective serve-andvolley tactic, he didn't allow Federer to see a break point until the 10th game of the first set, saving two set points to get to 5-5. But Federer found his range in the tiebreaker, passing Zverev several times, and the 13-time Grand Slam winner ran away with the match in the second set. A two-time runner-up in Rome, Federer is still seeking his first title of the year. Playing in sunny conditions with no wind, the third-seeded Djokovic dictated play with well-angled winners from the baseline. Del Potro had trouble with his forehand, hitting the advertising banners lining the back of the court in one instance. "I tried to change the pace a lot," Djokovic said. "Because I know that Del Potro likes more or less same pace, and he's moving really well for his height." Djokovic had a 20-8 edge in winners while Del Potro committed 20 unforced errors with his forehand. Djokovic needs to defend his title to prevent Andy Murray from taking the No. 3 ranking from him, even though Murray was eliminated by Monaco on Wednesday. Djokovic is the only player to take a set from Nadal on clay this year, losing to the Spaniard in the Monte Carlo Masters final two weeks ago. F eder er, Djokovic to meet in semis n By ANDREW SELIGMAN AP Sports Writer CHICAGO (AP ing by eight after an 18-point run in the fourth quarter, the Boston Celtics looked like they were finally ready to move past the Chicago Bulls. Instead, a classic first-round s eries took its most dramatic turn and is headed for a Game 7 that seems so fitting. The way things have been going, overtime seems almost a certainty. D errick Rose scored 28 points and blocked Rajon Rondo's potential game-winner,J ohn Salmons scored 35, and the Bulls beat the defending c hampions 128-127 in triple overtime Thursday night to even the first-round series. Ray Allen scored a career p layoff-high 51 points for the Celtics, but it's back to Boston for Game 7 on Saturday night after another classic in a series that had already seen its share. "We're starting to see a patt ern with these two clubs and it's crazy," Boston's Paul Pierce said. "It's good for the fans. It's good for the viewers. But wec ertainly don't like it." A record three of the first five games went to overtime, including a Game 4 that went two extra periods. Another came down to the wire in regu-l ation, but this easily trumped t hem all. Rondo penetrated and pulled up on the left block with 8 seconds left and turned, only to be rejected by Rose. The rookie of the year then missed two free throws with 3.2 seconds remain ing, before Rondo launched a harmless heave from beyond midcourt. "This series is a lot of fun for the fans, the people of Chicago,t he people of Boston," said the Bulls' Joakim Noah, who made the go-ahead three-point play after a steal. " It's a lot of fun for us, too, playing in environments like t his on the big stage," he con tinued. "It's special to be part of this, and I know that it's a series people will be talking about fora long time." Rose added: "It's crazy, but y ou got to love it." Things might be different w ith a healthy Kevin Garnett, but without him, the Celtics areh eaded for Game 7. "It's unbelievable," Boston's Kendrick Perkins said. "Shot after shot, tough make after tough make. It's a tough series. They're a young team playing w ith a lot of confidence." Noah's three-point play made it 126-123 with 35.5 seconds remaining. Eddie House quickly answered with a corner jumper to pull the Celtics within one, but Brad Miller, who had 23 points and 10 rebounds, hit two free throws to get the lead back to three with 28 sec onds left. Glen Davis added 23 points and Pierce had 22, while Rondo had eight points, 19 assists and nine rebounds. Allen finished three points shy of John Havlicek's club playoff record and tied the NBA playoff mark with nine 3pointers. "It's very bittersweet," Allen said. "There's nothing to really talk about anymore. We lost and we had the agony that it wasn't enough." M M a a g g i i c c 1 1 1 1 4 4 , , 7 7 6 6 e e r r s s 8 8 9 9 At Philadelphia, the Magic playing without suspended star Dwight Howard and i njured guard Courtney Lee a dvanced to the second round with a win in Game 6. Howard, who was suspended one game by the NBA forh is elbow on Sixers center Samuel Dalembert in Game 5, will return when the Magic play the winner of the Boston-Chica-g o series. Rashard Lewis scored 29 points and Rafer Alston had 21 to help the Magic win on the r oad for the second time this s eries. The Magic's decisive run came early when they made 12o f their first 19 shots. Andre Miller scored 24 points for the Sixers, who were eliminated in the first round for the second straight season. R R o o c c k k e e t t s s 9 9 2 2 , , T T r r a a i i l l B B l l a a z z e e r r s s 7 7 6 6 At Houston, Ron Artest scored 27 points, Yao Ming had 17 points and 10 rebounds and the Rockets reached the sec-o nd round for the first time s ince 1997 with a win in Game 6. The Rockets won for the first time in their last seven firstround series. They lost Game6 s the last two seasons, both to Utah. Houston plays the top-seeded Los Angeles Lakers beginning Monday night at the Staples Center. LaMarcus Aldridge scored 26 points and Brandon Roy had2 2 for the Blazers, who were making their first playoffa ppearance since 2003. Bulls top Celtics 128-127 in 3 OTs to force Game 7 n By ROB HARRIS AP Sports Writer LONDON (AP brough dented Liverpool's title hopes in February with an improbable victory at the Riverside, but the Premier League strugglers can now do the Reds a favor by beating leader Manchester United on Saturday. Rafa Benitez's hopes of delivering Liverpool's first championship since 1990 are now relying on the defending champions slipping up in their remaining five matches. By the time Liverpool hosts Newcastle on Sunday, Benitez's side could be six points behind United. The Spaniard, though, is hopeful United's opponents can help his cause. "They are in a better position than us, but we have to keep going and keep winning matches," Benitez said Friday. "They have some tough games and you never know in football, so we have to make sure we do our job. "Hopefully they will make some mistakes. They have a difficult game this weekend against Middlesbrough, a team fighting to avoid relegation, and they also have to play Hull away as well as (Manchester Arsenal at home." Man United has 77 points from 33 games, while Liverpool has 74 having played an extra game. A big boost for Benitez is the return of inspirational captain Steven Gerrard in midfield after almost a month out with a groin injury. "Everyone knows we are stronger with him on the pitch," Benitez said. "He is a player who can change games and is very important for us." W ith Newcastle mired in the relegation zone and needing three points to boost its survival prospects, Benitez doesn't expect a repeat of its 5-1 rout produced in December. "I could see the passion and t he work rate of their team. They were working really hard trying to win," Benitez said. "We will try to play at the same level as we did at St. James' Park, but I think it will be a different match. " When the other team is working so hard and it is so close to the end of the season, it will make it a tough match." Newcastle is on 31 points, along with northeast rival Middlesbrough. "We are relying on other teams now, but what it is safe to say is the teams around us won't pick up maximum points between now and the end of the season," Newcastle manager Alan Shearer said. "If they do slip up, we have got to make sure we are in a position to take advantage of that." Middlesbrough will be look ing to maintain its unbeaten home record in 2009 against United on Saturday. Boro have already beaten Liverpool and drawn with Arsenal at the Riverside this season. United manager Alex Ferguson faces a quandary over player selection with the second leg of the Champions League semifinals at Arsenal scheduled for Tuesday. United hold a slender 1-0 lead in the tie. Center back Rio Ferdinand will miss the trip to the northeast but should be fit for Tuesday after tests cleared him of a cracked rib. Teenage strikers Danny Welbeck and Federico Macheda could play a role at Boro as United looks to move closer to a third straight league title. "Each game, if we get the right result, we get closer and closer," winger Ryan Giggs said. "The games are running out for other teams to catch us. We'll be trying to win. It won't be easy, but if we do get the right result it will be a great opportunity for us." Also Saturday, third-place Chelsea hosts Fulham, Arsenal is at Portsmouth, Blackburn is at Manchester City, West Ham is at Stoke, West Bromwich Albion is at Tottenham and Bolton is at Wigan. Sunderland, which is four points above the relegation zone, hosts Everton in Sunday's other game. Just a point behind Sunderland, Hull is at Aston Villa on Monday. F o o r r t t h h e e s s t t o o r r i i e e s s b b e e h h i i n n d d t t h h e e n n e e w w s s , , r r e e a a d d I I n n s s i i g g h h t t o o n n M M o o n n d d a a y y s s ROGER FEDERER returns a ball to Mischa Zverev during their match at the Rome Masters tournament in Rome, Friday. Federer won 7-6 (3 (AP Photo: Alessandra Tarantino DERRICK ROSE (left shot of Celtics’ Rajon Rondo during the closing seconds of the Bulls’ 128127 win in triple overtime against Boston in Game 6 of a first-round playoff series in Chicago, Thursday night... (AP Photo: Charles Rex Arbogast

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I CHESTERCOOPER was inducted into College of the Bahamas’ alumni Hall ofF ame during a special ceremony this week. T hanking the Alumni association for their outstanding selection, COBp resident Janyne Hodder said the college has prod uced persons of outstand ing character whose accom plishments reflect glowingly o n the institution. “As one of our chief aims a t the college is to drive national development through education, researcha nd innovation it is appropriate that eminent individuals who excelled at the college and are also doing great things since graduatings hould in some way be recognised and honoured. am impressed by the cri teria which were used to select the honouree – al eader whose success bene fits co-workers, a contributor to society who excels in civico utreach, a person who exhibits strength of character t hat personifies the college’s motto, ‘knowledge, truth, integrity’ and the meaning oft he European Cup that symbolises the outpouring of inspiration that causes others to thirst for those same characteristics listed in the mot to,” she said. 1. JOHN Wilson, a partner at t he McKinney Bankcroft and Hughes law firm and principal director of British AmericanF inancial; president of the Col lege of the Bahamas, Janyne Hodder; and I Chester Cooper, p resident, director and CEO of British American Financial. 2. Attorney Howard Thompson Jr with the chairman of British American Financial Basil Sands. 3. Attorney Bianca V Beneby; Director General of Tourism Vernice Walkine; attorney Kahlil Parker, and attorney Heather Walkine-Hunt. 4. Senator Michael Halkitis; Richard Coulson, managing director of RC Capital Markets; and chief executive officer at Doctors Hospital Charles Sealy II 5. Attorney Keith Bell, general council for Sunshine Finance; president of the UTEB Association Jenny Issacs-Dotson, Mr Cooper, and attorney Donald Saunders. 6. Attorney Lourey Smith, accountant John Bain, and British American senior manager of business development Tameka Forbes 7. Robert Deal and his wife Cleopatra with Dr Richard Crawford, Michelle Gibson and her husband Cyprian Gibson. COOPER INDUCTED INTO COB C M Y K C M Y K LOCAL NEWS PAGE 12, SATURDAY, MAY 2, 2009 THE TRIBUNE the scene N ASSAU E VENTS C APTURED O N C AMERA by Franklyn G Ferguson, JP HALL OF FAME 1 2 7 4 3 5 6


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