Citation
The Tribune

Material Information

Title:
The Tribune
Uniform Title:
Tribune (Nassau, Bahamas)
Portion of title:
Nassau tribune
Place of Publication:
Nassau, Bahamas
Publisher:
Tribune
Publication Date:
Copyright Date:
2009
Frequency:
Daily, except Sunday
daily
normalized irregular
Language:
English
Physical Description:
v. : ill. ; 58 cm.

Subjects

Genre:
newspaper ( sobekcm )
newspaper ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage:
Bahamas

Notes

General Note:
Description based on: Vol. 79, no. 210 (Aug. 3, 1983); title from caption.

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Holding Location:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
This item was contributed to the Digital Library of the Caribbean (dLOC) by the source institution listed in the metadata. This item may or may not be protected by copyright in the country where it was produced. Users of this work have responsibility for determining copyright status prior to reusing, publishing or reproducing this item for purposes other than what is allowed by applicable law, including any applicable international copyright treaty or fair use or fair dealing statutes, which dLOC partners have explicitly supported and endorsed. Any reuse of this item in excess of applicable copyright exceptions may require permission. dLOC would encourage users to contact the source institution directly or dloc@fiu.edu to request more information about copyright status or to provide additional information about the item.
Resource Identifier:
09994850 ( OCLC )

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Full Text
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Pim blowin’ it

84F
75F

PARTLY SUNNY

HIGH
LOW

AND BREEZY

Volume: 105 No.129






i

SPE

he Iribune |
£=JSA TODAY

BAHAMAS EDITION

www.tribune242.com

WEDNESDAY, APRIL 29, 2009







A

uarantine expanded
anid swine flu fears

Local soccer team
to be confined on
return from Mexico

m@ By TANEKA
THOMPSON
Tribune Staff
Reporter
tthompson@
tribunemedia.net

HEALTH officials
plan to expand the
swine-flu quarantine
to include a local soc-
cer team that trav-
elled to Puerto Val-
larta, Mexico earlier
this week to attend a
match, Health Minister Dr
Hubert Minnis said yesterday.

The team is due to arrive
home sometime today.

While health officials do not
anticipate that they were
infected with the dangerous
flu strain, Dr Minnis said they
will be confined for observa-
tion for at least four days —
the incubation period of the
illness.

"Health personnel will meet
those individuals at the air-
port where they will be placed
in quarantine or containment
for at least four days," he said.

Officials are in the process
of identifying two homes
where the group can be
housed during the quarantine,
Dr Minnis added.

Hubert Minnis



"If by chance they
are infected, the incu-
bation period is
about three to four
days. If they show no
evidence of infection
they will be taken out
of quarantine,” he
said, adding that
health officials were
set to brief the team's
families about the sit-
uation.

The 12 players and
two coaches from the
country's national beach soc-
cer team arrived in Mexico on
Monday to attend a tourna-
ment in Puerto Vallarta and
were scheduled to stay in
Mexico until Sunday.

Executive Director of the
Bahamas Soccer Federation
Lionel Haven told The Tri-
bune that although the feder-
ation was aware of the swine-
flu outbreak in Mexico, they
were informed by the tourna-
ment's organisers that the
virus had not spread from
Mexico City to Puerto Vallar-
ta, about 2,000 miles away.

The team was told yester-
day morning that the match
had been postponed. The

SEE page six

NUON Seen Ge

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Insurance Management.
Smart people you can trust.

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Body parts believed to be remains
of man from jet ski accident

m@ By ALISON LOWE
Tribune Staff Reporter
alowe@tribunemedia.net

BODY parts of a man
believed to have been dismem-
bered by a shark were discov-
ered in the waters off western
New Providence on Monday.

Authorities suspect remains
found by Defence Force divers
are those of a man who disap-
peared near the exotic Nygard
Cay resort on Sunday follow-
ing a jet ski accident.

Neither the man’s identity
nor details of which body parts
were found were released to the
media.

A statement from the Royal
Bahamas Defence Force said
the gruesome find came at
around 1pm Monday as a result
of an intensive search of the
area by the Royal Bahamas
Defence Force.

They were acting in response
to reports issued “late Sunday

SEE page eight

Two are reportedly in
hospital after shooting

TWO persons are reported to be in hospital after a brazen

daylight shooting in the Podoleo Street area yesterday.
The incident took place around 2pm when two men ina
green vehicle approached a house near the corner of Podoleo

Street and Balfour Avenue.

SEE page eight

British
American



A

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PRICE —75¢ (Abaco and Grand Bahama $1.25)




Ns





INSIDE TODAY



Man dies in
fire ‘two days
after moving
to Bahamas’



THE REMAINS of the
two adjoining apartments
after the blaze in the
Minnie Street area.





MAN WAITING 12 YEARS
FOR APPROVAL OF CROWN
LAND PURCHASE

BRIDGEWATER AND
LIGHTBOURNE TRIAL IS
LIKELY 10 START ON
SEPTEMBER 21

SWINE FLU PROMPTS CALL
FOR IMPORT TAX DROP ON
FACE MASKS



NASSAU AND BAHAMA

ISLANDS’ LEADING NEWSPAPER

Blaze destroys two
adjoining apartments
































m@ By TANEKA
THOMPSON
Tribune Staff
Reporter
tthompson@
tribunemedia.net



A FIRE that ripped
through two adjoining
apartments in the Minnie
Street area left one man
dead and two families
struggling to pick up the
charred pieces of their lives.

Police said 40-year-old
Ronnie Louis, who accord-
ing to a neighbour had just
arrived from Haiti on Sun-
day afternoon to start a
new life, died in the fire.
Other occupants escaped
unscathed.

Officials suspect the
blaze was set unintention-
ally by a burning candle.

Residents of the area
said Louis was at home
with a young boy, believed
to be about 10 years old,
when the fire began shortly
before midnight on Mon-
day. The boy's father
apparently was not at home






SEE page six

Crackdown hy the
police on suspected
gambling houses

POLICE launched a crack-
down on suspected gambling
houses yesterday.

According to Assistant
Superintendent Walter Evans,
officers made several arrests
at two locations — the FML
Group on Village Road and
the Our Place Sporting
Lounge in the Mel-Don Plaza
on Mackey Street —and
seized some gambling para-
phernalia.

"In an effort to stem the
flow of crime and activities
that may contribute to crime,
the police has mounted an
operation today in respect to
the reduction of crime in two

SEE page six

Tar Tela
Se abs
Ria Les

ee

ANNUITIES
aa a

TA ee
ee ela i





PAGE 2, WEDNESDAY, APRIL 29, 2009

THE TRIBUNE



LOCAL NEWS



Man waiting 12
years for approval of
Crown land purchase

m By PAULG
TURNQUEST
Tribune Staff Reporter
pturnquest@
tribunemedia.net

HAVING invested more
than $3.5 million in his Foun-
tain Bay Resort and Marina,
Cat Island native Ezra Russell
is demanding answers from the
Department of Lands and Sur-
veys as to why his project is
still having to wait — 12 years
later — for final approval for
the Crown land purchase.

Visiting the island yesterday
to tour his 34-acre project in
the southern settlement of
New Bight, The Tribune was
provided with a record of the
correspondence between Mr
Russell and the department.

Having entered into a lease-
to-own agreement for the 34
acres in 1997, Mr Russell has
invested his own money and
met “every stipulation” out-
lined by the department for
final approval to purchase the
property.

At a value of $2,000 per
acre, Mr Russell has provided
the $68,000 to government on
two occasions, only to have his
cheques returned with no
explanation.

As outlined in documenta-
tion from the department, Mr
Russell was required and has
invested more than the
required $750,000 to qualify
him to purchase the property.

Despite his investment, and
the fact that he is a young
Bahamian seeking to make a
substantial investment in his
hometown, Mr Russell told
The Tribune yesterday that he
has met every road block
imaginable while “others with
position and connections” are
able to bypass these processes
entirely.

“From 1997 until now I’m
still in limbo land. But yet,
they’ll give foreigners or their
family and friends property

they can flip and make all kin-
da money. But here you have a
young, black Bahamian trying
to do something and they
block me.

“So you have to ask, what is
the government doing? All
that they have asked me to do
I have done. You’ve seen the
buildings, the marina, the
roads, the power lines and
phone. Everything is in.

“But everyone in this coun-
try knows what’s going on.
Whether it’s Perry Christie or
Hubert Ingraham, either Prime
Minister would deny it but
they know there are a group
of people in this country,
especially up at Lands and Sur-
veys who have more power
than them,” Mr Russell
claimed.

Over the past week, The Tri-
bune has reported allegations
of nepotism in the Department
of Lands and Surveys where

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the Director, Tex Turnquest
has admitted that his family
members and friends have
been sold five ocean front lots
of Crown land on Exuma.

Pointing out that he did not
have the final say over the
sales as the Prime Minister is
the ultimate signatory on the
approvals, Mr Turnquest said
as a result he did not see any
reason for him to recuse him-
self from the transactions.

Four of these five proper-
ties, which were sold for
between $1,200 and $2,500
have since been resold for as
much as $550,000.

With his 34-acre approval
still hanging in the balance, Mr
Russell said his request for this
amount of property is equiva-
lent to a “drop in the bucket”
by comparison to the 100-plus
acres of Crown land that have
been granted without so much
as a raised eyebrow.



EZRA RUSSELL points to a natural
channel that he plans to widen for it

to be the entrance to his marina.

a al

2/3 C1
~

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ch th

Salvation Army
announces new
emergency plans
for hurricane
prone Grand
Bahama

WITH hurricane season
fast approaching, the Salva-
tion Army is making provi-
sions to support the residents
of Grand Bahama, who have
seen their communities rav-
aged by several storms in
recent years.

In the past, staff and vol-
unteers have prepared emer-
gency meals at the Lynda
Speer Community Centre
and delivered them to neigh-
borhoods in the wake of a
hurricane using a van and a
small bus.

This year will be different
thanks to the Salvation Army
branches in Tampa, Florida



kitchen in Grand Bahama

and Atlanta, Georgia.

“Thanks to these generous
Americans, Freeport and the
whole of Grand Bahama
island will soon benefit from
a completely self contained
mobile kitchen and distribu-
tion vehicle commonly called
by the army people a ‘disaster
canteen’,” announced the
local Salvation Army in a
statement.

Lt Colonel Danny Morrow

just arrived in Bahamas!

Also availble in

Bay Shopping Cer
Marathon)!

CALL now:393-5157
446-0681

‘Creating Healt
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Biotech

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THE SALVATION ARMY’S new, completely self-contained mobile



and his wife Lt Colonel
Esther Morrow have been
serving temporarily in Grand
Bahama since January 6.
They said the new unit should
be arriving on the Island
within the next few weeks.

To ensure that an adequate
supply of food and emer-
gency disaster supplies are on
hand for the start of hurri-
cane season in July, the Sal-
vation Army is planning a
fund raising dinner for May 1
at the Junkanoo Beach Club
at Taino Beach, beginning at
4pm.

The theme for the dinner
is “Eating up a Storm” and
the menu will feature Cajun
grilled chicken. There will be
live entertainment featuring
singer Jay Mitchell.

Lt Colonel Morrow said
tickets are available for $10
at the Salvation Army head-
quarters on West Atlantic
Drive, Dolly Madison, Kel-
ly’s, Italian Specialty Imports,
and the Junkanoo Beach
Club.

All proceeds from the din-
ner will be used for hurricane
and disaster services on
Grand Bahama, he said.

The Morrows, now retired,
are veteran Salvation Army
officers, having served for
more than 40 years in the
United States.

They came out of retire-
ment to serve in Freeport for
six months when the need
arose.

They will be replaced this
summer by Salvation Army
officers whose assignment
here will be for three years.



THE TRIBUNE

WEDNESDAY, APRIL 29, 2009, PAGE 3



LOCAL NEWS



0 In brief |

New Road
Traffic Deputy
Controller for
Grand Bahama
announced

Basil Rahming



FREEPORT - Basil Rah-
ming, a career police officer
who retired from the Royal
Bahamas Police Force earli-
er this year, has been named
the new deputy controller of
the Road Traffic Depart-
ment.

Making the announcement
in Grand Bahama yesterday,
Road Traffic Department
Controller Philip Turner said
that Mr Rahming’s appoint-
ment became effective on
Monday, April 27 and that
he will be responsible for
Grand Bahama island.

Valuable

“Mr Rahming brings many
years of valuable experience
and knowledge to this posi-
tion and he will be a great
asset,” said Mr Turner.

He also thanked former
deputy controller Stephanie
Rahming for her service and
leadership over the past 10
years.

Road Traffic
Department siatf
involved in service
improvement
workshop

Staff at the Road Traffic
Department took part ina
two-day workshop on service
improvement held the
British Colonial Hilton.

The workshop is part of
the government’s customer
service improvement initia-
tive for the Public Service.

Topics included the role of
leaders and the qualities nec-
essary to be an effective
leader; motivating staff to
get higher levels of produc-
tivity; improving perfor-
mance; enhancing the inter-
nal work environment and
delivering superior customer
satisfaction.

Facilitator Michael Pintard
said the purpose of the
workshop is to develop a
cohesive team that will com-
mit itself to embracing ser-
vice excellence.

The workshop ended yes-
terday.

WH Hearing fixed for New Providence

@ By NATARIO McKENZIE
Tribune Staff Reporter

THE trial of former PLP sena-
tor Pleasant Bridgewater and for-
mer paramedic Tarino Light-
bourne is expected to open in
New Providence on September
21, despite attempts by their
lawyers yesterday to have the
case heard in Grand Bahama.

Bridgewater, 49, who is also a
lawyer, is charged with Light-
bourne, 47, in connection with an
alleged plot to extort $25 million
from Hollywood actor John Tra-
volta. The two, who were charged
in Magistrate’s Court in late Jan-
uary, were arraigned again before
Senior Justice Anita Allen yes-
terday. Bridgewater, again
dressed in a white outfit, and her
co-accused Lightbourne were
arraigned together on the charges
of conspiring to commit extortion
and attempting to extort money
from John Travolta between Jan-
uary 2 and 20 of this year. When
asked to enter a plea to the
charges, both Lightbourne and
Bridgewater replied, “Absolutely
not guilty.” Bridgewater also
pleaded not guilty to the charge
of abetment to extort.

Reports of the alleged extor-
tion attempt emerged days after
Jett Travolta, the 16-year-old
son of actors John Travolta, 54,
and Kelly Preston, 46, died of a
seizure at the family’s vacation
home in Freeport, Grand
Bahama, on January 2.

ALLEGED TRAVOLTA EXTORTION PLOT

Bridgewater, Lightbourne trial
likely to start on September 21



FRtn aie eeu SIAOLOMCUler nace MOU A MUcKI LOL NE

Attorney Carlson Shurland of
Freeport, Grand Bahama, who
represents Lightbourne pro bono,
objected to yesterday’s arraign-
ment, submitting that the prose-
cution had not provided him with
all of the relevant documents. Mr
Shurland told the court that he
had been provided several typed
statements, but no original hand-
written ones. Mr Shurland also
requested the statement of
Allyson Maynard-Gibson, who is
a lawyer for the Travoltas, tapes

Tim Clarke/Tribune staff

from which the transcripts were
derived, as well as a copy of the
“refusal to transfer” document.
Director of Public Prosecutions
Bernard Turner told the court,
however, that Lightbourne had
been served with all the neces-
sary documents. Mr Turner told
the court that 11 of the 14 type-
written witness statements had
been signed and that he would
undertake to provide Mr Shur-
land with copies of the originals.
John Travolta, West End and

Additional space to cut
passport office waiting

IN an effort to alleviate exor-
bitant waiting periods at the pass-
port office the Ministry of For-
eign Affairs has acquired addi-
tional office space, Minister of
Foreign Affairs Brent Symonette
announced.

The minister said it is hoped
that this will allow for the Pass-
port Office to better accommo-
date the high volume of applica-
tions for the new ePassport.

The Passport Office, which is
located on the lower floor of the
Basden Building on Thompson
Boulevard, will now occupy the
entire building, as staff from the
Ministry of Housing are being
relocated.

The government has been try-
ing to find alternate accommoda-
tions for the Ministry of Housing
staff since August 2007. They will
now occupy offices on Charlotte
Street.

Expand

“We would move in, expand
the services by getting extra staff
for data entry and production so
we could deal with the backlog
of applications and produce more
ePassports,” Mr Symonette said.

He had previously identified a
lack of office space as the prima-
ry impediment to the Ministry not
hiring more data entry staff and
putting to use additional
machines to speed up the rate at
which ePassports are produced.
At present there are two print-
ing machines to produce the
ePassport but only one printing
station — the Passport Office in
New Providence.

“The Ministry of Foreign



— ——————————— | ©
fae ben ep rT \

MORE ROOM: The Ministry of Foreign Affairs has acquired additional office



space to allow the Passport Office to better deal with applications.

Affairs is
reviewing the
possibility of
establishing
another pro-
duction cen-
tre, possibly
in Grand
Bahama. A
statement

BRENT would be
SYMONETTE __ issued on this
matter later,”
Mr Symon-

ette said.

Meanwhile, he is urging
Bahamians whose passports are
set to expire this year to apply
for the ePassport to avoid the tra-
ditional summer rush at the Pass-
port Office.

Approximately 2,833 ePass-
ports were completed in February
2009. Since the system was imple-

ARUN C=



Tim Clarke/Tribune staff

RBC FINCO partnered with the Princess Margaret Hospital to hold a blood drive yesterday at the compa-
ny’s Palmdale Branch on the corner of Rosetta Street and Patton Street. Pictured are Marcus Hutcheson
(right), mortgage manager at RBC FINCO, and Tennille Colebrooke, customer service and operations man-

ager, donate blood.

mented in December, 2007, an
estimated 17,000 Bahamians have
received the ePassport.

The International Civil Avia-
tion Organisation (ICAO), of
which the Bahamas is a member,
has mandated that by 2010, all
countries must be issuing ePass-
ports or machine readable pass-
ports. The ePassport was official-
ly launched on December 5, 2007,
in a move to increase protection
against identity theft, heighten
aviation security and combat ille-
gal immigration.

ie
Ut
Da ete
PHONE: 322-2157

Drinks Troll
Coffee Tab

Cushions

Bimini MP Obie Wilchcombe,
and PLP Senator Allyson May-
nard-Gibson are among witness-
es the prosecution will call.

Both Bridgewater and Light-
bourne informed the court that
they intend to give notice within
21 days as to whether they will
present their alibis and call wit-
nesses on their behalf.

Attorney Murrio Ducille, who
represents Bridgewater, asked the
court to extend the $50,000 bail
which was granted to her in Mag-
istrate’s Court. Although Mr
Ducille noted that the $50,000
bail was a bit high in view of the
alleged offence, Mr Turner sub-
mitted that it was reasonable giv-
en that Ms Bridgewater had no
reporting conditions attached.

Senior Justice Allen left Ms
Bridgewater’s bail at $50,000 with
two sureties.

Attorney Shurland told the
court that Lightbourne, who is
also on $50,000 bail, has to report
to the Central Police in Freeport,
Grand Bahama, every day. He
asked the court to reduce his
client’s reporting conditions to
three days a week and to reduce
his client’s bail to between
$20,000 and $25,000. Senior Jus-
tice Allen took away Light-
bourne’s reporting conditions, but
left his bail at $50,000.

Attorneys Ducille and Shur-
land also submitted to the court
that the case should be heard in
Freeport. Mr Ducille argued that
because the charges emanate



WB Senior Justice Allen refuses bid to have case heard in Freeport

from Freeport and the two
accused reside in Freeport, they
should stand trial there before a
jury of their peers. Mr Shurland
strongly argued for the case to be
heard in Freeport, stating that it
would be very expensive for his
client, who is unemployed, to
have to travel to New Providence
and pay for his accommodations,
as well of those of the four wit-
nesses he intends to call. Mr
Shurland submitted that his clien-
t’s case would be severely preju-
diced because of this. Mr Shur-
land also argued that the
Supreme Court in Freeport is ide-
ally suited to hear the matter
rather quickly as it does not have
a high volume of cases. Senior
Justice Allen, however, ques-
tioned the probability of empan-
elling an impartial jury in
Freeport.

Mr Turner, while accepting
that both of the accused reside in
Grand Bahama, submitted to the
court that significant activities
took place in New Providence.
He also told the court that only
four of the prosecution’s witness-
es reside in Freeport and that the
probability of empanelling an
impartial jury is greater in New
Providence. Senior Justice Allen
refused the application to have
the case heard in Freeport. She is
expected to give her reasons in a
written ruling by the end of the
week. The trial is expected to
open on September 21 and con-
tinue to October 9.

Beat the Summer heat in a great selection of
Swim trunks, Surfer Shorts, Tees, Polos.





















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or Elegance



PAGE 4, WEDNESDAY, APRIL 29, 2009 THE TRIBUNE



EDITORIAL/LETTERS TO THE EDITOR

Ae Significant
turtle project



Being Bound to Swear to The Dogmas of No Master
LEON E. H. DUPUCH, Publisher/Editor 1903-1914

SIR ETIENNE DUPUCH, Kt, O.B.E., K.M., K.CS.G.,
(Hon.) LL.D., D.Litt.

Publisher/Editor 1919-1972

Contributing Editor 1972-1991

EILEEN DUPUCH CARRON, C.M.G., M.S. B.A., LL.B.

Publisher/Editor 1972-

Published Daily Monday to Saturday

Shirley Street, RO. Box N-3207, Nassau, Bahamas
Insurance Management Building., P.O. F-485, Freeport, Grand Bahama

TELEPHONES
Switchboard (News, Circulation and Advertising) 322-1986
Advertising Manager - (242) 502-2352
Circulation Department - (242) 502-2387
Nassau Fax: - (242) 328-2398
Freeport, Grand Bahama: 1-(242)-352-6608
Freeport fax: (242) 352-9348

WEBSITE
www.tribune242.com — updated daily at 2pm

Obama’s nuclear arms offer not realistic

IT isn’t that President Obama doesn’t
understand the problem. However, his solu-
tion needs a great deal of heft to be plausible.

On his recent European tour, the presi-
dent, speaking in Prague, summed up the
daunting challenge succinctly. “In a strange
turn of history,” he said, “the threat of glob-
al nuclear war has gone down, but the risk of
a nuclear attack has gone up.”

He was speaking just hours after North
Korea launched its second ballistic missile, in
defiance of a U.N. resolution, and noted that
al-Qaida and like-minded terrorists are
“determined to buy, build or steal a bomb.”

His proposal of what to do had an air of
unreality, or non sequitur, about it. He said
the U.S. would seek to cut its dominating
nuclear arsenal to set a good example that
would encourage other nations to follow suit.

This sort of trade-off might work with the
Russians, with whom Washington will nego-
tiate. There is no evidence that it would per-
suade those that constitute today’s nuclear
threat — rogue nations and militant insur-
gencies.

Only last week, the Taliban extended its
reach into the Pakistani heartland, imposing
its harsh religious laws on cowed people as it
continues its march to overthrow the secular
government. They did this unopposed by
Pakistan’s feckless regime and its timid or
demoralized military — which the US. is
preparing to underwrite with billions of aid
dollars on top of huge sums already invested.

Pakistan has up to an estimated 100 nuclear
bombs, which could fall into the hands of the
Taliban, whose support of al-Qaida in
Afghanistan resulted in the 9/11 assault on the
US.

Or take Iran. Despite international tut-tut-
ting through ineffective sanctions, it is pro-
gressing steadily on the path to developing
nuclear weapons capability. In addition, with
the help of North Korea, Tehran is much
further along in developing ballistic missiles.

Tran also has a history of secretly shipping
arms to non-state groups, such as Hezbollah
in Lebanon and Hamas in Gaza.

How could one prudently conclude that in
time it would not arm its proxies with nuclear
weapons, should it serve their purpose?

Or take North Korea. It possesses at least
six nuclear bombs and is gearing up to pro-

duce more. The world wrote off its latest
missile test because it failed to place a satel-
lite into orbit. But typically missile develop-
ment is marked by failures before success is
attained. The recent missile travelled about
twice as far as its predecessor before breaking
up.

For its part, North Korea has been
extremely busy selling its missile and nuclear
skills to others, including a nuclear plant it
was building for Syria — until the Israeli air
force flattened it.

It was the father of Pakistan’s nuclear
bombs, A.Q.Khan, who peddled his knowl-
edge to North Korea, Iran and Libya, and
probably would have found another eager
customer in Saddam Hussein.

It is worth noting that while Khan is the
world’s worst sort of nightmare, he is a hero
to his own people. He is now free, after hav-
ing been placed under house arrest by a pre-
vious Pakistani regime.

And there are former Soviet and other
East European scientists who have been
accused of trying to market their skills and
materiel to bomb-seeking entities.

In such an uncertain world, it would seem
that the United States would retain its strong
nuclear advantage as a warning and a dis-
suader of would-be nuclear adventurers.
America’s ability to massively retaliate is the
iron fist that provides diplomacy’s velvet
glove the credibility it needs to be effective.

For international diplomacy to work, agree-
ment among the existing major nuclear pow-
ers — the U.S., Russia, China, Britain and
France — is indispensable.

So far, such collaboration has been limited
and transitory. There is wide disagreement
about the dangers posed by Iran and North
Korea.

Before the U.S. cashes in its nuclear chips,
President Obama should come up with a plan
to deal with the clear and present dangers
emanating from ambitious nations and deter-
mined terrorists whose religious fervour
inspires them to rule the world, through per-
suasion where possible and through power
where necessary.

(This article was written by Harry Rosen-

feld-
c.2009 Albany Times Union).



in Turks and
Caicos Islands

EDITOR, The Tribune.

Your readers who are gen-
uinely interested in ways of pre-
serving marine turtles and pre-
venting cruelty to them may be
interested in a project currently
underway in the Turks and
Caicos Islands.

Headed by the UK-based
Marine Conservation society,
the project is currently working
together with fishermen and the
government in order to update
the ordinances governing tur-
tle fisheries.

Already, the group (led by
Amdeep Sanghera, a British
conservation expert) is collect-
ing information it will need to
update these ordinances and
laws, which will likely involve
restricted seasons, more strin-
gent weight restrictions and the
like.

As for the issue of humani-
tarianism, Mr Sanghera (put off,
like most of us, by the sight of
cruelty to these animals) has
already indicated that his pro-
ject may be able to help gov-
ernment and fishermen assess
the most humane way of slaugh-

LETTERS

letters@tribunemedia net



tering turtles, which will pre-
sumably require some input
from veterinarian scientists.

Readers may enquire directly
about the project by emailing
amdeep.sanghera@mcsuk.org.

The very existence of this
project, and the aims expressed
to date, would appear to sup-
port my view that there is no
reason to ban the entire turtle
fishery industry in order to
serve the causes of both sustain
ability and humanity.

It also demonstrates how a
genuine and healthy civil society
(as opposed to a hostile and
self-appointed one) operates.

It works with people and
within the context of their cul-
ture and practices, in order to
achieve specific, defined objec-
tives.

It does hide behind vague and
jumbled objectives and simply
keep lobbing out crude, lurid
attacks on the traditional prac-

tices themselves.

On the other hand, those
parading as civil activists in this
country are often simply carry-
ing private resentments and
expressing identity-related trib-
alism (both on vivid display in
some of the letters sparked by
my defence of humane, sus-
tainable turtle consumption).

As for Mr W Grattan’s pre-
diction that I would not be able
to resist answering his angry lit-
tle letter of the April 24th, I will
recount an anecdote about the
late Calvin Coolidge, 30th Pres-
ident of the United States, and a
famously reserved and taciturn
man in his day.

A gossipy woman once found
herself sitting next to Mr
Coolidge at a White House din-
ner and was determined to test
him. “Mr President,” she said
“T bet a fellow that I can get
more than two words out of you
tonight.” The President’s retort
was characteristic: “You lose.”

ANDREW ALLEN
Nassau,
April 24, 2009.

Remove this threat to
jewel of the Bahamas

EDITOR, The Tribune.

Tuesday or Wednesday
White Crown Terminal North
Eleuthera shipped aviation gas
containers to ’Briland for
refill. I wish to draw this to
the Hon Earl Deveaux’s Min-
istry. In my opinion this is not
only dangerous, but it is wrong
and despicable.

Kindly see to it, sir, that this
terrible error is corrected. Fur-
thermore these containers are
highly “combustible”, one
does not need a cigarette or
cigar, the sun is quite hot
enough nowadays to ignite.

In the event they blow up,
Harbour Island sinks. This is
the jewel of the Bahamas —
let’s keep it the jewel.

Far too many billionaires
have homes here to lose: we
were never meant to be a
“container port,” every week
the G&G shipping from the
red river in Miami, Florida

with an agent in Harbour
Island.

Kindly speak to the Minister
for the Environment.

People with money, lots of
money love to throw their
weight around. They must be
checked and checked now.

On the other hand ’Briland
has outgrown its dock; we
need a “passenger dock” or
leave the present one and find
a way to provide a “freight
dock.”

When this problem is solved
there would be no more con-
gestion or traffic problems.

The same has been an issue
for over two decades (20
years). What can we do as a

people to help this seemingly
insurmountable difficulty?

We have a “paradise” let us
keep it so.

The sooner we as citizens
and voters focus on the pas-
senger or freight dock the bet-
ter off we will all be.

The G&G serves a special
purpose as an intermediate
mail boat. Building materi-
als, food, etc, are all shipped
by her. True the island is
small; therefore we have to
utilise the space we have to
the best advantage.

RN MATHER
Harbour Island,
April 3, 2009.

Is The Trust qualified for this
technical planning work?

EDITOR, The Tribune.

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If I understood Minister Earl Deveaux, Minister of the Environ-
ment, in a recent statement he seemed to indicate that Town Plan-
ning-Physical Planning for the islands not developed will be in the
hands of The Bahamas National Trust.

What qualifications does The Trust have to carry out this highly
technical planning work?

Okay BNT should be part of a broad grouping that would advise,
consult and propose policy; God forbid BNT will be the sole agency
doing this as I have to admit when looking at Sandy Port, which was
developed by a past BNT president in my opinion there is hardly any
good judgment shown in that development as virtually all the orig-
inal swamp has been removed for artificial canals and totally the
denuding of all natural overgrowth and original trees.

IT hope Government and the professional Town Planners will see
the importance to set back all coastal development a minimum of say
5-800 ft. from high water mark? Insurance companies will I suggest
fully support this idea and our premiums might go down.

Coastal building also with coastal sea frontage we have to preserve
the natural views and don't do what we now are faced with along
Love Beach a total 100 per cent blocking of the natural views lost for-
ever.

T hope the Minister will see fit to amend his policy position if I got
it right as Bahamas National Trust is qualified in their field of
expertise, but not in Town and Physical Planning as much as Town
Planners and Physical Planners are not qualified to do what BNT has
expertise in.

J MOORE
Nassau,
April 16, 2009.

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THE TRIBUNE

WEDNESDAY, APRIL 29, 2009, PAGE 5



LOCAL NEWS



Regional officials
Call for greater
collaboration in

ight against drugs,

OFFICIALS at CARICOM’s }
Regional Workshop on the }
Development of National Anti- }
Drug Strategies and Plans have :
agreed that it is necessary to tar- }
get both supply and demand in }
the fight against drug traffick- }

ing in the Caribbean.

At the opening ceremony ofa }
three-day workshop in Castries, }
Saint Lucia yesterday, CARI- }
COM assistant secretary-gener- }
al for human and social devel- }
opment, Dr Edward Greene, }
told participants, government }
officials and diplomats that if :
there is to be any meaningful, }
sustained results, “we must }
address this phenomenon as a }
whole and not as two disparate i

issues.”

He pointed to the develop- :
ment of a national anti-drug }
strategy and plan as one way of :
marrying the two issues and }
expressed pleasure that the }
CARICOM Secretariat was col- }
laborating with the Inter-Amer-
ican Drug Abuse Control Com- }
mission of the Organisation of :
American States (CICAD) to }
train officials in drug supply con- :
trol and drug demand reduction. }

“We are expecting that the }
participants will leave this week }
of training, with knowledge, :
skills and tools that will enable }
and guide them in effectively }
implementing and monitoring :
their own national anti-drug :
strategies and plan,” Dr Greene }
said, as he pledged the support }
of the CARICOM Secretariat }
in providing on request from }
member states, follow-up in- }
country technical support for this }

initiative.

The deputy permanent secre- i
tary in Saint Lucia’s Ministry of }
Health, Mrs Chreselda St Juste, :

asked facilitators to sensitise par

ticipants to the need to combine
both supply and demand }
approaches when forming poli- :

cy

said.

ment.

private and public sector.

House to debate investigation

into school sex allegations

@ By ALISON LOWE
Tribune Staff Reporter
alowe@tribunemedia.net

PARLIAMENTARIANS will
today debate whether a select com-
mittee should be formed to investi-
gate the circumstances surrounding
allegations of sexual molestation at
the Eight Mile Rock High School in
Grand Bahama.

This comes after PLP parliamen-
tarians criticised House Speaker
Alvin Smith for blocking a move by
PLP chairwoman Glenys Hanna-Mar-
tin to initiate the parliamentary
process necessary to form such a
committee several weeks ago, citing
House rules.

Mrs Hanna-Martin, the Englerston
MP, has repeatedly expressed con-
cern about the allegations and the
ministry’s handling of them.

Both she and leader of opposition



Alvin Smith CHI CM aU elain

business in the House of Assembly,
MP for Bain and Grants Town
Bernard Nottage, accused the gov-
ernment of seeking to avoid debate
on the issue and criticised the Speak-
er Mr Smith, FNM MP for North
Eleuthera, for siding with the
government.

Yesterday, Minister of Education
Carl Bethel said he anticipates a “big
debate” on the matter.

Police have been investigating alle-
gations made by students against sev-
eral teachers at the Eight Mile Rock
High School since two former stu-
dents, both male, accused a male
teacher of sexually molesting them
several years ago.

These claims were brought to
the attention of the press — and
according to Mr Bethel, the Ministry
of Education - in January of this
year.

After the accusations were levied
against this teacher, who has since
fled the country, similar allegations
surfaced in relation to two other
teachers, one of them female.

Following a debate on the matter
tomorrow, parliamentarians will be
given the opportunity to vote on
whether the matter warrants the

appointment of the investigative com-
mittee.

Ms Hanna Martin has said that in
supporting the appointment of MPs
to a select committee, she wishes to
see the initial response by law
enforcement and education officials
examined to determine “whether
there were any failings”.

The PLP chairwoman accused Mr
Bethel in late March of remaining
“callously and inexcusably silent” in
the face of the scandal at the school.

A day later, Mr Bethel and Min-
istry of Education officials called a
press conference where they outlined
what they said were the “extraordi-
nary measures” taken by the ministry
in response to the allegations — such
as deciding to have all prospective
teachers vetted by police.

He admitted that the controversy
had exposed weaknesses in the sys-
tem.




“For too long we have treated }
these components as parallel, }
distinct and distant, despite the }
fact that they both target a com- }
mon enemy, aimed at achieving }
a common cause. It is time we }
stop working in isolation,” she }

Mrs St Juste noted that }
whether “we are so advised by }
funding agencies or not, we have }
expended more funds and:
resources on supply reduction }
without equating demand reduc- }
tion approaches,” and called for }
the region to refocus its public :
education mechanisms on both }
demand and supply reduction in i
an effort to tackle what has }
come to be regarded as a serious }
threat to sustainable develop- ;

The Organisation of Ameri- i
can States (OAS) representative }
in Saint Lucia, Anne Marie }
Blackman, underscored the need }
for evidence-based policies that }
are underpinned by solid analy- }
sis in the fight against drug traf-
ficking and noted that the devel- }
opment of national anti-drug }
plans, strategies and policies ;
should be done in co-ordination }
with all stakeholders in both the

Weather experts examine forecast
methods at Bahamas conference

WEATHER experts in this
country and around the world
are examining ways to better
predict the development of seri-
ous weather systems.

Improving forecasting meth-
ods for serious storms was top
of the agenda at the World
Meteorological Organisation’s
(WMO) 15th session of the
Regional Association Four at
the Wyndham Crystal Palace
and Casino.

The conference was opened
by Desmond Bannister, Minis-
ter of Youth Sports and Cul-
ture, on behalf of Earl Deveaux,
Minister of the Environment.

Knowledge

“Tam glad to see so many
acclaimed weather experts from
around the region comprising
North and Central America, the
Caribbean and other parts of
the globe gathering here today
to share with us knowledge and
ideas on the co-ordination of
meteorological, hydrological
and related activities,” Mr Ban-
nister said.

The Regional Association
Four session is a quadrennial
meeting of weather experts
from North America, Central
America and the Caribbean,
who discuss ways to co-ordinate
meteorological, hydrological
and related activities in the
region.

Discussions will focus on
activities that will enhance the
capability of states to produce

Desmond Bannister



better weather forecasts and
warnings; enhance their ability
to provide better hydrological
forecasts; and enhance
their ability to provide better
climate predictions and assess-
ments.

It has been 12 years since the
Bahamas hosted the meeting
and according to participants,
many changes have taken place
in that time — 1998 was the
warmest year ever recorded, the
Antarctic Larsen B ice shelf col-
lapsed in 2002, and 2005 saw a
record 15 hurricanes.

“With global warming we can
expect stronger storms, more
coastal erosion and flooding of
low-lying areas and the degra-
dation of ecosystems on which
many Bahamians depend,” Mr
Bannister said. “Worst of all, a
sea level rise of just one foot,

CELEBRATING ANNUAL HONOURS DAY

LEST sabes

(Fy

e

rd



MINISTER OF YOUTH, SPORTS AND CULTURE Desmond Bannister poses with members of the Alpha Kappa
Alpha Sorority and students from across the Bahamas as they celebrate their annual Honours Day on Friday,
April 24, at the Ministry of Education's boardroom.



EDUCATION MINISTER Carl Bethel poses with members of the Alpha Kappa Alpha Sorority and students
from across the Bahamas outside the Ministry of Education.

which is anticipated by the end
of the century, would effective-
ly submerge 80 per cent of our
islands.

“IT am happy to see that the
WMO recognises that adapting
to present climate variability
will go a long way in adapting to
long-term climate change; and
that adaptation and mitigation
together can help achieve sus-
tainable development,” Mr
Bannister said.

The government of the
Bahamas has heeded the call of
the WMO and taken actions on
all fronts, he said.

Through the Plant for the
Planet Programme, Mr Bannis-
ter noted, the Bahamas Envi-
ronment, Science and Technol-
ogy (BEST) Commission, has

launched The Bahamas Million
Tree Campaign (BMTC) — an
effort to plant one million trees
across the country by December
31, 2009.

Trees

“The trees will improve the
air quality, support native ani-
mals, conserve water and pre-
vent beach erosion and reduce
run-off that can adversely affect
our marine environment,” he
said.

Agreeing that adaptation and
mitigation together can help to
achieve sustainable develop-
ment, Mr Bannister said the
Ministry of Environment has
drafted an energy policy to

queue Hoty Tay
od

Aaron t

reduce greenhouse gas
emissions by 15 per cent by
2015.

“Our experience has taught
us that weather and climate
information are critical to pre-
venting disasters and saving
lives.

“Tn light of this we have inte-
grated early warning systems
into emergency prevention
preparedness, management
and response,” Mr Bannister
said.

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PAGE 6, WEDNESDAY, APRIL 29, 2009

THE TRIBUNE





i

BOTH THE FACE MASKS (above) and surgical gloves are subject to

45 per cent import duty after shipping.

CRU TT
suspected gambling houses

FROM page one

facilities.



LOCAL NEWS

Swine flu prompts
call for import tax
drop on face masks

m@ By MEGAN REYNOLDS
Tribune Staff Reporter
mreynolds@tribunemedia.net

PROTECTIVE face masks recom-
mended to prevent the spread of the
swine flu are subject to 45 per cent import
tax and medical suppliers are calling on
government to drop the rate.

Both the face masks and surgical gloves
are subject to 45 per cent import duty
after shipping, and pharmaceutical man-
ager at Nassau Agencies Ltd Barbara
Henderson said it is more important now
than ever to make the medical supplies
more affordable.

Mrs Henderson maintains the highest
cost is to the public purse as around 80
per cent of medical materials are pur-
chased by government for hospitals and
health clinics, and as the threat of swine
flu intensifies she is concerned the high
taxes could leave Bahamians vulnerable.

She said: “They should do it even if
they do it temporarily because people
will want to purchase them in order to
protect themselves, and it would save 10

times more money for the government
if people could protect themselves.”

The high rate of duty normally pre-
vents Nassau Agencies Ltd from import-
ing surgical masks and gloves, Mrs Hen-
derson said.

But as several people have been quar-
antined in Abaco and the World Health
Organisation raised the worldwide pan-
demic alert to level four in relation to
Swine Influenza Virus (SIV) , confirming
person-to-person spread of the virus and
the possibility of community-level out-
breaks, the medical supplier ordered in
cases of the face masks expecting an
increased demand.

“We went ahead and ordered some
masks that are certified to be used to pre-
vent the transmission of the virus, and
the whole time we were ordering them we
were cussing and thinking, ‘why the hell
are we paying 45 per cent duty?’,” Mrs
Henderson said.

“It has always been like that and its
ridiculous, especially when you think we
have 10 per cent duty on jewellery - I
mean who the hell cares about jew-

ellery?”

The masks, which sell for around $10 in
the United States, would cost around $20
in the Bahamas after shipping and tax,
and Mrs Henderson said Nassau Agen-
cies Ltd usually avoids importing med-
ical materials as they are not able to offer
competitive prices.

She said: “People are not going to buy
locally when you can just go to Miami
and put them in your suitcase.

“We have never competed in the mate-
rials section because we have always sus-
pected that there was a lot of funny busi-
ness going on.

“People were underbidding us for
things there is no way they could have
afforded for cheaper unless they were
not paying duty and we have never gone
that route.”

Nassau Agencies Ltd have been lob-
bying the Ministry of Health to drop the
duty for 20 years, Mrs Henderson said,
but now they are appealing to the Minis-
ter of Finance to consider suspending or
removing the duty from all medical sup-
plies used in government institutions.

Quarantine expanded

"As a result of these operations, police have taken sever-
al persons into custody; they have taken in several gam-
bling paraphernalia and investigations continue,” Mr Evans
said.

Senior Assistant Commissioner Marvin Dames, who over-
sees the Grand Bahama division, recently spearheaded sev-
eral sting operations on alleged gaming houses on that island.

Algernon Eric Cartwright
66 Algie”
19th Nov. 1936 to 29th April, 2008

We miss you more than
words can say.

Wife, daughter and the family



amid swine flu fears

FROM page one

swine-flu is reported to have
killed at least 150 persons in
Mexico and infected about 64
persons in the United States.

"We had found out about
the situation (swine-flu) and
had been following it up but
we received confirmation
from the organisers that it was
on schedule. We were con-
cerned for them while they
were there but while they
were there were comfortable
and didn't see any problems
but there is concern because
of the panic right now," said
Mr Haven, who did not
accompany the group to Mex-
ico.

According to international
reports, an American team
that travelled to Mexico for
the tournament was returning
to the US yesterday. The can-
cellation was said to be a
move by Mexican officials to
stem the spread of the poten-
tially deadly virus.

Meanwhile, health officials
are still monitoring the con-
dition of 16 persons from
Marsh Harbour who were
placed under a seven-day
quarantine in Abaco after a
recent cruise to Mexico.

On Monday Dr Minnis said
this move was just a precau-
tion and up to press time there
were no documented cases of
swine-flu in the Bahamas.

According to residents of
Marsh Harbour, the persons

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in quarantine are doing well.

Administrator for Central
Abaco Cephas Cooper said
things remain normal on the
island.

"Everyone is going about
their normal business — there
are no signs of any major con-
cerns as yet but I suppose peo-
ple are being watchful, hope-
ful and optimistic that this
thing will hopefully go away,"
he said.

Health officials are warning

Bahamian travellers to pay
special attention world reports
on affected areas, avoid
crowded environments if they
are in a crowded area, main-
tain proper hygiene and cover
coughs and sneezes.

The illness is treatable with
anti-viral drugs of which the
country has a stockpile,
according to officials.

According to the Centre for
Disease Control and Preven-
tion, symptoms of the swine-

flu are similar to those of the
regular flu, including fever,
lethargy, lack of appetite and
coughing.

Persons with swine flu also
have reported a runny nose,
sore throat, nausea, vomiting
and diarrhoea, the CDC
said.

Persons experiencing symp-
toms are advised to avoid pub-
lic places and call the min-
istry's health hotline at 502-
4790.

Man dies in fire ‘two
days after moving
to the Bahamas’

FROM page one

at the time, according to neighbours.

Lewis’ neighbour, Seoalian Mormilien, said
he was inside with his young son when he start-
ed to smell smoke. He said he quickly grabbed
his child and rushed outside where he was met
with screams of help from next door.

Mr Mormilien said he was able to rescue the
young boy who was trapped in the burning
unit next to his home by using a crowbar to pry
the front door open.

"T heard the lil’ boy crying, he couldn't come
out because it was too much smoke so I just
took (the) crowbar and opened the door. Then
I just ask what happened and he say next man
inside the house,” he said, adding that the
smoke in the apartment was too thick to save
Louis from the flames.

He said he did not know much about the
victim except he had arrived from Haiti less
than 48 hours before his death.

Police said they got a call about a fire, which
started shortly before midnight yesterday in a
home on Minnie Street.

"When officers arrived they met fire coming
from a single-storey building and immediately
extinguished the fire, leaving the building with
extensive damage," Press Liaison Officer Assis-
tant Superintendent Walter Evans told The
Tribune yesterday.

"Inside a bedroom officers found the burnt
remains of a man who is believed to be 40-
year-old Ronnie Lewis,” said ASP Evans,
adding that police believe he is a Haitian citi-
zen.

When The Tribune arrived on scene around
2pm yesterday, friends and neighbours were
helping the residents pick through the ashes to
salvage any remains left undamaged by the
fire, yet only a few pieces of clothing remained.

"Nothing was saved, only a few pieces of
clothing were saved for the little boy," said
another neighbour who did not want to be
identified.

Still, Mr Mormilien remained positive and
said he might find shelter with friends in the
area.





THE REMAINS of one of the apartments
following the blaze.



THE TRIBUNE

WEDNESDAY, APRIL 29, 2009, PAGE 7



Cultural industries are in decline

"Bahamian nationalism is a neb-
ulous thing, difficult to
describe... Trying to get a handle on
what ts Bahamian is like trying to
catch a fish with one's bare hands."

- Nicolette Bethel

AST week's article on
ahamian identity and

cultural activity generated some
comment from the cognoscenti,
both on and off the Bahama Pun-
dit website, where the article is
posted.

Two inter-connected points
emerged from that discussion.
There certainly are institutions,
laws and resources to support and
protect Bahamian heritage, but
our cultural industries are nonethe-
less in a perilous state of decline.

Any attempt to analyse why
this is so must look at where we've
come from.

As College of the Bahamas lec-
turer Ian Strachan put it, slavery
convinced black Bahamians of
their inferiority while colonialism
robbed all Bahamians of their con-
fidence.

The result is rootlessness and
indifference, more pronounced
among blacks than whites. Add to
this the enormous influence of
American culture, the impact of
foreign tourists, and the miniscule
size and capacity of our creative
community, and we can begin to
see why cultural activists are moan-
ing.

Here we are more than 30 years
after independence, they say, still
dreaming and arguing about things
that should have been in place long
ago.

We are still trying to save what
remains of our tattered cultural
heritage, and still hoping for the
economic freedom to practise our
craft.

By most accounts, until the
1960s Bahamians had no national
consciousness. But the massive
expansion of education after the
Progressive Liberal Party's 1967
victory led to a new focus on cul-
ture — favouring activities that
had previously been either dis-
counted or wilfully ignored. It was
all part of the “quiet revolution”
that led inexorably from majority
rule to nationhood.

In 1972, when the nationalist
fires were at their peak, the emi-
nent composer and musician
Clement Bethel (best known for
his dissertation on Junkanoo and
for writing the folk opera Sammy
Swain) was picked to head the gov-

YOUR FUTURE

IS ABOUT TO GET BRIGHTER

ernment's newly created cultural
division.

Bethel's untimely death in 1987
coincided with a UNESCO report
by a Canadian university profes-
sor that urged the government to
set priorities and write legislation
to protect Bahamian heritage, pro-
vide training for artists, and devel-
op a range of cultural facilities.

Calling for more arts funding,
the report said: "The lot of the
average Bahamian artist is not a
happy one. Income from art is
modest or non-existent; employ-
ment is scarce and irregular; sales
are infrequent; and training is
demanding and costly."

Nevertheless, cultural activities
were seen as our most promising
and productive economic
resources, and the report called
for a system of matching public
and private sector grants to sup-
port creative individuals and
groups. These recommendations
were largely ignored, but some
proposals — such as a national art
gallery and heritage legislation —
have been realised over the years.

Clement Bethel's death left a
void that was not filled until
Cleophas Adderley's appointment
as director of culture in 1996.
Bethel's daughter, Nicolette,
became director in 2003 but
resigned last year in the face of
what she regards as congenital dis-
interest in the arts on the part of
politicians.

As an example, she cites the
fact that for years the cultural divi-
sion has been shunted from Edu-
cation to Youth, to the Office of
the Prime Minister, and back to
Education. It is now part of the
Ministry of Youth, Sports and Cul-
ture again, with a small staff of 28.

They look after a number of
activities, including the National
Arts Festival, Junkanoo, the
National Dance School, the
National Poetry Competition, The-
atre in the Park, and a range of
other national and international
events.

But the bulk of the division's
$2 million annual budget goes to
Junkanoo for bleacher rentals,
seed and prize money throughout
the Bahamas, as well as adminis-



trative subsidies for the Junkanoo
Committee, and other parade
expenses.

Sixteen years ago the Senate
held a series of hearings on cultur-
al development led by then Inde-
pendent senator Fred Mitchell.
These sessions resulted in a draft
law that sought to create a nation-
al arts council. But that exercise
went nowhere.

In 2002, the Christie adminis-
tration appointed a National Com-
mission on Cultural Development,
whose 60 members met regularly
for several years under the leader-
ship of Charles Carter and the late
Winston Saunders. This body
revised the earlier Bill and sub-
mitted it to Cabinet in 2004, where
it promptly died.

That version called for a semi-
independent arts council to pro-
mote cultural activities generally. It
would do this through a sweeping
mandate to raise funds, operate
creative facilities and training
schools, give grants, produce shows
and fund research.

Since 2004, this Bill has been
circulating among members of the
cultural community, and may have
informed the contents of the
Entertainment and Culture
Encouragement Bill, which is cur-
rently being lobbied by people like
Fred Munnings.

The Cultural Commission also
came up with a policy document
that was unveiled at a National
Cultural Conclave in 2006 and
posted online for comment. It
builds on a draft written in 1995
by Cleophas Adderley and the late
Kayla Lockhart Edwards, and aims
to give “a coherent strategic
national context for planning and
decision-making about culture."

One of the challenges for any
young nation, this document says,
"is the balance between sover-
eignty and national identity, and
the influence of a pervasive global
culture that is increasingly
homogenous and American in
flavour.”

More significantly, the draft pol-
icy calls for an urgent "redirection
of resources and funds to the
development and promotion of the
Bahamian cultural sector," which it

described as "one of the least
developed" in the hemisphere.

This brings us to the question of
exactly what resources are cur-
rently available for the cultural sec-
tor. Although an overarching
national policy and a national arts
council have never been achieved,
there have been some significant
advances in this sector since the
UNESCO report was written.

The Antiquities, Monuments
and Museums Corporation was
created by Parliament in 1998. It is
responsible for archaeological
research and heritage conserva-
tion, and currently operates five
public facilities on New Providence
— Forts Fincastle, Montagu and
Charlotte, Balcony House and the
Pompey Museum

It also administers the Long
Island Museum at Buckley's and
the South Eleuthera Mission at
Rock Sound, and is developing a
museum in the old jail house on
San Salvador.

The AMMC shares responsibil-
ity for the Clifton Heritage Park
with an independent authority that
was created in 2004.

The government is now in the
process of strengthening the Cor-
poration's enabling act, and a deci-
sion will be made soon on whether
the former Collins mansion will
become a national museum or
library. The National Art Gallery
has been established since 2003 in
a restored 19th century mansion
on West Street.

A national endowment for the
arts was set up by the government
in the 1990s, but seems to have
become dormant, with no line item
in the budget. A private Endow-
ment for the Performing Arts,
organised by Winston Saunders
and Sir Orville Turnquest in 1996,
disburses about $60,000 a year in
grants and tuition subsidies to
Bahamian artists.

An Historic Bahamas Founda-
tion was established last year to
raise funds and accept donations
on behalf of the Antiquties Cor-
poration. And both the Lyford Cay
and Cable Bahamas Cares Foun-
dations provide regular funding
for the arts.

There are other public and pri-
vate subsidies to the creative com-
munity, but activists insist there
should be a single national policy
and overarching legislation that
makes sense out of all of these
overlapping initiatives, as well as a
coordinating authority if the state
is to maintain these investments
and subsidies.

More importantly, there needs



“Studies confirm
that cultural heritage
travellers stay longer
and spend more
money than other
kinds of tourists.

So would we be able
to generate more
revenue by investing
more in cultural
activities and product
development?”



to be an appreciation of the eco-
nomic value of cultural activities. A
few years ago, CARICOM pro-
duced a document on the region's
creative industries. It said activi-
ties like music, performing and
visual arts, broadcasting and pub-
lishing can not only create new
jobs but can provide avenues to
engage young people in produc-
tive pursuits.

Just one example will make the
point. Jose Antonio Abreu, an
economist and musician in
Venezuela, founded a programme
to help impoverished Venezuelan
kids take part in classical music.
After 30 years (and 10 political
administrations), it has evolved
into a network of 102 youth
orchestras, 55 children's orches-
tras, and 270 music centres —
embracing almost 250,000 young
musicians.

Their instruments and training
have been fully funded by a suc-
cession of Venezuelan govern-
ments, and the programme has
become an international model
that is seen as an alternative to
drugs and crime as well as a source
of national pride.

According to the CARICOM
report, "There is an urgent need to
put in place the appropriate regu-
latory and policy measures to
develop the enabling environment
for creative industries in this region
to realize their full growth potential
as viable businesses.”

But since commercial banks do
not value intellectual capital and
are reluctant to finance creative
industries, activists argue that gov-
ernment must provide seed money
or loan guarantees.

According to a draft policy on
grants produced a few years ago,
"Culture, like tourism, requires
investment in order to bring about
financial returns. Part of that
investment must be in the support

of private artistic and cultural pro-
jects through an enlightened grants
policy.”

Of course, the danger is that
we open ourselves up to yet anoth-
er massive public sector gravy
train. So perhaps the real question
is whether we are on the right track
with our existing spending. For
example, to my knowledge, no-
one has offered a detailed cost-
benefit analysis for investing up to
$100 million to dredge the harbour
so that bigger cruise ships can call.

And no-one has justified to the
Bahamian people recently the
expenditure of tens of millions on
overseas advertising and pr to gen-
erate tourists, when we all agree
that the visitor experience on the
ground is generally dreadful and
growing worse.

Studies confirm that cultural
heritage travellers stay longer and
spend more money than other
kinds of tourists. So would we be
able to generate more revenue by
investing more in cultural activi-
ties and product development? We
attempted to raise this point with
Tourism Director-General Ver-
nice Walkine, but she did not
return phone calls.

In the meantime there are gen-
uine fears among the creative com-
munity that without coordinated
protections and incentives, our cul-
tural resources could disappear
almost entirely — a predicament
illustrated by this passage from a
1929 account by Amelia Defries.
She described a magnificently
carved bedstead carved by one
Josiah Anthem of Eight Mile
Rock:

"Not eberybody can paint or
carve same as my fader," the
daughter murmered. Then the old
man brought out the chief labour
of his hands piece by piece. "Tt will
last for 30 years...But how can I
sell it when nobody nebber comes
to see?

"That certainly was a prob-
lem...If he put the carved bedstead
upon a sponging vessel and sent it
to Nassau in the fashionable sea-
son, he might sell it, and even get
an order for another.

"Anthem in his isolation was
like a rent and tattered sail after a
storm—a remnant or survival of a
finer past...yet if there was a revival
of cratsmanship on these islands
much good (moral and commer-
cial) might result."

What do you think?
Send comments to

larry@tribunemedia.net
Or visit wvw.bahamapundit.com

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PAGE 8, WEDNESDAY, APRIL 29, 2009

CREDIT SUISSE, NASSAU BRANCH

The Bahamas Financial Centre Telephone +1 242 356 8100
4th Floor Telefax +1 242 396 6589
Shirley & Charlotte Streets www. credit-suisse.com

P.O. Box N-4928

Nassau, Bahamas

CREDIT Suisse

Consolidated balance sheets







Reference
to notes end of
2008 2007
Assets (CHF million)
Cash and due from banks 90,521 36,304



3,892 4,526



purchased under







Central bank funds sold, secunti
resale agreements and securities borrowing transactions 12 269,013 296,341











of which encumbered 16,966 24,719
Trading assets, at fair value 13 341,381 = 830,125
tan apne ee lea anya pon aaron names sont ae fa
Investment securities ESTA 14,681 14,818









of which reported at fair value 24,820 25,080
Net loans 16 220,392 = 221,570
oe — ca een Far ere areal Nee NOE RO ee ae ae ue
EI Tap pei nee eens om a hi ene eee ete a ake ee
Premises and equipment 17 5,789 5,590
Goodwill - 1B «8,195.8, 746
nee renege ay



oo poe a et
Brokerage receivables 57,499 54,890
Other assets 21 85,208 103,079

34,066 49,298







of which reperted at fair value





of which encumbered 3,329 12,084
Assets of discontinued operations held-for-sale 4 1,023 ~
Total assets 1,151,669 1,333,742



Liabilities and shareholder's equity (CHF million) ;
Due to banks 22 74,948 106,979



aiden een ie ee ee esciain acetates, tenet ea yes ccgn eaten eae ona aa eee
Central bank funds purchased, securities sold under
repurchase agreements and securities lending transactions 12 243,970 300,476

174,975 140,424













¢ received as collateral, at fair value. a eee 29,755 «28,798
Trading liabilities, at fair value — - 188,718 200,575
ee ene ae ee
a octet ge eer ee econ ae
Long-term debt "187,282
ofwhich reported at fairvalue 78,069 107,290
Brokerage payables 55,893
Otherliabiities =” 106,530
“ofwhich reported at fair value 24,975 94,291





Liabilities of discontinued operations held-for-sale oe peters ee ee
BY TO asec cas i eemnementantlenatssecvedoun ieee eee ee es eo ee
1,124,801 1,302,408







Total liabilities

cannes Piece DD iii mee
eae act acct cad ah tipeves esac nts 2A eee ac livndecniea atten tae oe
RE as rater nnninineniininannnaneind oe
FE sagas’ pinning ned lednsheasintem tein ies
Ceo ioe ee 24 741) 4,290)
Total shareholder's equity 28,868 31,834

Total liabilities and shareholder's equity “4,151,669 1,333,742





eats eae ge yee ae et tee eee a ee
Additional share information

Par value (CHF) ce canuneen ae eeeatensnales : eo sd cieibnatuatesentsioe sl tone ee
issued shares (million) since ant Rts tees tedeceaaatesan 7 nse Cage ae

44.0 440

Shares outstanding (million)



Interested parties may obtain a copy of the audited accounts from Credit Suisse Nassau Branch, The Bahamas Financial Centre, 4*
Floor, Shirley and Charlotte Streets, P.O. Box N-4928, which would include disclosure of the material matters in Notes 1 and 2
referred to in the Group Auditors Report.

KPMG Kiynveld Peat Marwick Goerdeter SA
Audit Financial Services
Badenerstrasse 172 P.O. Box

CH-8004 Zurich -CH-8026 Zurich

Telephone +41 44 249 31 31
Fax +41 44 249 23:19
internet www.kpmg.ch

Report of the Independent Registered Public Accounting Firm to the General Meeting of

Credit Suisse, Zurich

We have audited Credit Suisse and subsidiaries’ (the “Bank”) interna! control over financial reporting as of December
31. 2008, based on criteria established in internal Control—Integrated Framework issued by the Committee of
Sponsoring Organizations of the Treadway Commission. The Bank's board of directors and management are
responsible for maintaining effective internal control over financial reporting and the Bank's management is
tesponsible for its assessment of the effectiveness of internal contro! over financial reporting, included in the
accompanying Management Report on Internal Contro} over Financial Reporting. Our responsibility is to express an
opinion on the Bank’s internal contro! over financial reporting based on our audit.

We conducted our audit in accordance with the standards of the Public Company Accounting Oversight Board (United
States). Those standards require that we plan and perform the audit to obtain reasonable assurance about whether
effective internal control over financial reporting was maintained in all material respects. Our audit included obtaining
an understanding of interna! contro! over financial reporting, assessing the risk that a material weakness exists, and
testing and evaluating the design and operating effectiveness of internal control based on the assessed risk. Our audit
also included performing such other procedures as we considered necessary in the circumstances. We believe that our
audit provides a reasonable basis for our opinion.

A company's internal control over financial reporting is a process designed to provide reasonable assurance regarding
the reliability of financial reporting and the preparation of financial statements for external purposes in accordance
with U.S. generally accepted accounting principles. A company's internal control over financial reporting includes
those policies and procedures that (1) pertain to the maintenance of records that, in reasonable detail, accurately and
fairly reflect the transactions and dispositions of the assets of the company; (2) provide reasonable assurance that
transactions are recorded as necessary to permit preparation of financia! statements in accordance with generally
accepted accounting principles, and that receipts and expenditures of the company are being made only in accordance
with authorizations of management and directors of the company; and (3) provide reasonable assurance regarding
prevention or timely detection of unauthorized acquisition, use, or disposition of the company’s assets that could have
a material effect on the financial statements.

Because of its inherent limitations. internal control over financial reporting may not prevent or detect misstatements.
Also, projections of any evaluation of effectiveness to future periods are subject to the risk that controls may become
inadequate because of changes in conditions, or that the degree of compliance with the policies or procedures may
detcrioratc.

In our opinion, the Bank maintained, in all material respects, effective internal control over financial reporting as of
December 31, 2008, based on criteria established in Internal Control—Integrated Framework issued by the
Committee of Sponsoring Organizations of the Treadway Commission.

We also have audited, in accordance with the standards of the Public Company Accounting Oversight Board (United
States) and Swiss Auditing Standards, the consolidated balance sheets of the Bank as of December 31, 2008 and 2007,
and the related consolidated statements of operations, changes in shareholder's equity, comprehensive income, and
cash flows, and notes thereto, for each of the years in the three-year period ended December 31, 2008 and our report
dated March 18, 2009. expressed an unqualified opinion on those consolidated financial statements.

KPMG Klynveld Peat Marwick Goerdeler SA

Rs LaVak de ~*~

David L. Jahnke U- Robert S. Overstreet
Licensed Audit Expert Licensed Audit Expert



Zurich, Switzerland
March 18, 2009

THE TRIBUNE



LOCAL NEWS



MRS. GENEVA RUTHERFORD, Director of Training for the GBPA
Group, conducted the four week ‘Service Excellence Customer’

training workshop.

GBPA training
department
hosts customer
service workshop

GRAND BAHAMA Port
Authority president Ian Rolle
and newly appointed vice
president of the Port Group
Limited Ginger Moxey
attended a customer service
training workshop hosted by
the GBPA training depart-
ment.

This training comes as the
result of the new “Making It
Happen” initiatives launched
by the new President at the
Grand Bahama Business Out-
look in February and was
made mandatory for all
Group employees.

Director of Training for the
GBPA Group, Geneva
Rutherford conducted the
four week “Service Excellence
Customer Training Work-
shop” that began Tuesday,
March 10, and ended on
Thursday, April 9.

Each session was tailored to
address the customer services
needs required by the individ-
ual departments of the
Group.

The “Service Excellence”
training is intended to
improve GBPA’s interaction
with its customer.



FRONT ROW: from left to right: Mrs Ginger Moxey, Vice President
of Port Group Limited, (Second) and Mr lan Rolle, President of The
Grand Bahama Port Authority, Limited, (fourth) attended the ‘Ser-

vice Excellence’ customer service training workshop, implemented
and hosted by the GBPA Training Department.

Two are reportedly in
hospital after shooting

FROM page one

Eyewitnesses said one of the men got out of the car armed
with a handgun and opened fire before jumping back into the

vehicle.

Bullets reportedly struck two occupants of the home, a woman
and a young child, who were said to be asleep at the time.
The gunfire reportedly hit the home's front wall and a vehi-

cle parked in the yard.

The owner of the home, Ezra Flowers, told ZNS news last
night that his son, who lives in the house with his girlfriend
and children, was recently the target of hoodlums.

Mr Flowers said his son was not at home when the shooting

took place.

Police investigations continue.

Body parts believed to be remains
of man from jet ski accident

FROM page one

evening” that a man riding a jet
ski had “fallen overboard” near
the resort owned by fashion
mogul Peter Nygard.

According to a source, who
contacted The Tribune yester-
day, concerned that news of the
missing man did not appear to
have reached the press, the indi-
vidual was one of a group invit-
ed to a Sunday event at the lux-
ury property located at the
western tip of Lyford Cay.

It was not clear under what
circumstances the man fell off
the watercraft, however Mr
Lloyd pointed to the fact that
bad weather on Sunday made
conditions at sea very rough and
such activities inadvisable.

The BASRA director noted
that “dead low tides” and reefs

in the vicinity of Nygard Cay
would have presented addi-
tional dangers.

The Defence Force said
patrol crafts HMBS Inagua and
Enduring Friendship 18 were
dispatched to search for the jet
ski rider on Monday.

Mr Lloyd told The Tribune
that having been “surprised” to
find that BASRA was not alert-
ed to the incident before Sun-
day evening, BASRA did not
join the search that night as
darkness would have made it
ineffectual.

HMBS continues to search
the area for further remains,
according to the RBDF.

A message left for Nygard
Cay representatives for addi-
tional information on the inci-
dent was not returned up to
press time yesterday.



PAGE 12, WEDNESDAY, APRIL 29, 2009

SPORTS

TRIBUNE SPORTS





NBA Today

i By The Associated
Press

New Orleans at Denver
(10:30 p.m. EDT). The
Nuggets, who matched an
NBA playoff record with a
58-point victory in Game 4,
can win a series for the first
time since 1994.

STARS

Monday

—Kobe Bryant, Lakers,
scored 31 points to lead Los
Angeles into the second
round of the playoffs with a
107-96 win over Utah.

—Lamar Odom and Pau
Gasol, Lakers. Odom had 26
points and 15 rebounds,
while Gasol added 17 points
and 11 boards against Utah
in Game 5.

—Carmelo Anthony,
Nuggets, scored all of his 26
points in three quarters as
Denver took a 3-1 series
lead with a 121-63 rout of
New Orleans.

—Zaza Pachulia, Hawks,
had 12 points and 18
rebounds as Atlanta evened
its first-round series with
Miami at two games apiece
with an 81-71 victory.

RECORD ROMP

The Denver Nuggets
matched the biggest victory
in playoff history with their
121-63 rout of New Orleans
in Game 4 of their first-
round series. The Min-
neapolis Lakers had the oth-
er 58-point postseason vic-
tory, beating the St. Louis
Hawks 133-75 in 1956. The
Hornets recorded playoff
lows in points, field goals
made (17), field goals
attempted (54), assists (10)
and second-half points (24).
Denver's 121 points set a
Hornets opponent playoff
high.

WOUNDED WADE

Slowed by back pain,
Dwyane Wade was limited
to 22 points on 9-for-26
shooting in Miami's 81-71
loss to Atlanta in Game 4 of
their series. The All-Star
guard and NBA's scoring
leader was wincing from
back spasms that started at
the morning shootaround,
and flared in the first quar-
ter.

PAIR OF 4s

Miami's James Jones con-
verted two four-point plays
in an 11-second span of the
Heat's 81-71 loss to Atlanta
in Game 4 of their series. He
made a 3-pointer with 2:26
remaining in the second
quarter, got fouled by
Solomon Jones and swished
the free throw. And with
2:15 left, James Jones did it
again, connecting on anoth-
er 3-pointer, getting fouled
by Mike Bibby and making
that free throw as well.

ROD RETIRES

Jazz broadcaster "Hot"
Rod Hundley retired after
his long career following
Utah's 107-96 loss to the
Lakers in Game 5 of their
first-round series. Hundley
has been broadcasting Jazz
games since they were an
expansion team playing in
New Orleans in 1974. He
made the move to Utah with
the rest of the club in 1979.
A former star at West Vir-
ginia, the 74-year-old Hund-
ley played six NBA seasons
for the Lakers before he
retired in 1963. Hundley was
acknowledged by the PA
announcer during a timeout
in the fourth quarter and
received a nice ovation from
the crowd.

SPEAKING

"T wouldn't have thought
that we would win by 58
points. I never thought any-
one could win by 58 points
in the playoffs.”

— Carmelo Anthony after
his Denver Nuggets matched
the most lopsided victory in
NBA playoff history by beat-
ing New Orleans 121-63 in
Game 4

TST

For the stories
WATT RUT CS
WAS
NTE ES



Lakers close out Jazz
with 107-96 victory

@ By BERNIE WILSON
AP Sports Writer

LOS ANGELES (AP) —
The Los Angeles Lakers can
put on quite a show offensively,
with 3-pointers, slam dunks and
even Kobe Bryant sinking a
fadeaway jumper as he fell on
his backside.

Its their defense that's going
to need work if they plan on
going deep in the NBA play-
offs.

Bryant and the Lakers are
moving on — as if that was real-
ly in doubt — but even as they
ran away from the Jazz 107-96
on Monday night, they still left
questions about their overall
play.

With Bryant scoring 31 points
and Lamar Odom adding 26
points and 15 rebounds, the
Lakers finished the opening-
round series in five games to
earn a few days rest.

They move on to play the
winner of the Portland-Hous-
ton series.

The partying fans at Staples
Arena — and the Lakers —
were slapped back to reality as
the Jazz cut a 22-point deficit
at the end of the third quarter to
93-86 with 4:37 left. Bryant hit a
turnaround jumper and Odom
finished a fast break with a slam
dunk to fend off Utah's late run.

"We've got to give a better
effort defensively when our sec-
ond unit comes in there, getting
back on defense, not giving up
easy baskets, stuff like that,”
Bryant said. "We've got a week
here before the next series to
have a spirited conversation
with the group and see if we
can't correct that for the next
series."

Bryant doesn't care who the
Lakers play next.

"I'm just ready for the next
series, whoever it is," he said.
"We have to kind of go over it
and evaluate it and see what
areas we can exploit offensively
and defensively. It's different
than playing in the regular sea-
son."

Bryant had a welt under his
right eye. The Lakers acknowl-
edged that Utah was a tough
opponent despite being the No.
8 seed.

It was a disappointing end for
a Jazz team that had high
expectations.

"Injuries kind of affected us
and we really weren't able to
ever get into a rhythm,” point
guard Deron Williams said.
"We kind of headed downhill
toward the playoffs and we just
really didn't get the type of
effort we needed to win a
series."

If there was any question that
this was going to be the Lak-
ers’ night on their home court,
Bryant answered that in the
closing seconds of the first half.

He drove the lane and passed



LAMAR ODOM, right, grabs a rebound with forward Trevor Ariza around Utah Jazz forward Paul Millsap during the first half of a first-round playoff

game in Los Angeles on Monday...

to Pau Gasol. The ball was bat-
ted loose and Bryant grabbed
it, turned and sank a fadeaway
jumper as he fell on his rear
end, giving the Lakers a 56-43
halftime lead. By late in the
third quarter, the Lakers were
toying with the Jazz. Bryant
made a layup, hit a 3-pointer
and fed Gasol for a slam dunk.
Odom added a bucket and just
like that it was 80-58.

Paul Millsap led Utah with
16 points while Andrei Kir-
ilenko and Williams had 14
apiece.

Gasol had 17 points and 11
rebounds, and Ariza 12 points
for the Lakers.

Nuggets 121, Hornets 63

At New Orleans, Carmelo
Anthony scored all of his 26
points in the first three quar-
ters, and Denver took a com-

manding 3-1 lead in its first-
round series.

Denver led 89-50 after three
quarters on its way to match-
ing the most lopsided victory in
NBA playoff history. The Min-
neapolis Lakers beat the St.
Louis Hawks 133-75 in 1956.

The Nuggets stifled Hornets
All-Star Chris Paul, whose four
points and six assists amount-
ed to one of the worst games of
his career.

The Nuggets can close out the
series at home in Game 5 on
Wednesday night.

Hawks 81, Heat 71

At Miami, Zaza Pachulia had
12 points and 18 rebounds, and
Atlanta raced to a huge first-
half lead in tying the first-round
series at two games apiece.

Mike Bibby scored 15 points,
Joe Johnson added 14 and Josh



KOBE BRYANT greets Sean ‘Diddy’ Combs before Game 5 of a first-round playoff series between the Lakers and
the Utah Jazz in Los Angeles on Monday...

(AP Photo/Chris Carlson)

Smith 13 for the Hawks.
Dwyane Wade scored 22
points on 9-for-26 shooting and
wincing at times from a back
injury. It was Atlanta's first road

(AP Photo: Chris Carlson)

postseason win in nearly 12
years, a stretch spanning 13
games.

The series returns to Atlanta
on Wednesday for Game 5.



IN THIS April 25, 2009 file photo, Miami Heat coach Erik Spoelstra, right,
talks to forward Jamario Moon during the first period of Game 3 of their
first-round Eastern Conference playoff series against the Atlanta Hawks in
Miami.

(AP Photo: Wilfredo Lee)

Miami F Jamario
Moon out for
postseason

MIAMI (AP) — Heat for-
ward Jamario Moon will miss
the remainder of the postsea-
son because of a sports hernia
that will require surgery, mean-
ing he may have played his last
game in a Miami uniform.

Moon suffered what was
diagnosed as a lower abdomi-
nal strain in Game 3 of Miami's
first-round series against the
Atlanta Hawks.

An MRI revealed further

problems, and Moon will have
season-ending surgery Thurs-
day.

The team said he will need
two weeks to rest after the
surgery, and will be re-evaluat-
ed at that time.

Moon is due to become a free
agent this summer. The Heat
acquired him and Jermaine
O'Neal in February, in a deal
that sent Shawn Marion to the
Toronto Raptors.



TRIBUNE SPORTS



WEDNESDAY, APRIL 29, 2009, PAGE 13

Scorpions’ 4-1 victory over Pitbulls

Female golfers
trying to make
LPGA Tour

FROM page 15

for help was kind of scary at the
beginning.

“T didn’t really have a home
like I did in Freeport where I
was able to go out and practice
every day and be comfortable.
I’m finally starting to get com-
fortable here and playing.”

At her last tournament, Riley
finished tied for 21st with two
other players. She shot three
rounds of 78-78-75 for her total
of 231.

“T didn’t do as good as I
wanted to, but it was still sol-
id,” she said. “I didn’t win any
money, but still performed well.
I learnt a lot from my rounds.
So I just have to keep pushing.

“The dream is still alive in
me and I’m still fighting for
every inch that I can get.”

As an alternate on the
Futures Tour, Riley said she is
just waiting for her call to play
in her first tournament on their
circuit. But she said her ulti-
mate goal, like Rolle, is to make
it to the LPGA Tour.

“T believe that I have the tal-
ent to do so,” said Riley, who
was a two-time Bahamas junior
champion (1999 and 2000), a
three-time member of the
Bahamas Amateur team (2001,
2002 and 2004) and the 2001
Bahamas national women’s
amateur champion who went
on to represent the Bahamas at
the 2004 World Cup in Puerto
Rico.

“I don’t just want to be a
member. I want to be a con-
tender. I want to compete to
actually win. So in order to
accomplish that goal, I have to
compete in as many local events
as I can and some open events
in Colorado and the US Open
this year.”

The last two years, Riley
made it past the first stage at
the US Open so she’s hoping
to go even further when this
year’s tournament starts on
May 15 in Florida.

“The US Open women’s
qualifier is definitely my next
event until I can get into the
Futures Tour,” she said. “I just
want to play golf.”

SRAM ell

A SWINGING TIME — T ATHOMPSON Scorpions’ pitcher Velnir Desir (not shown) pitched four shutout innings to lead the Scorpions to a 4-1 win
yesterday over the D W Davis Pitbulls at the Baillou Hills Sporting Complex.

FROM page 15

mound in his first softball appearance, and
allowed just two hits, and struck out three
batters.

The Scorpions left runners in scoring
position in both the first and second innings
but finally capitalized on their efficient hit-
ting in the third.

Mavin Saunders blasted an RBI double
which scored Adrian Ferguson for the
game’s first run.

Saunders scored a few players later on a
wild pitch to give his team a 2-0 advantage.

After Pitbulls pitcher William Ferguson
walked Trevor Knowles, Desir’s double
brought home the runner to close out the
third inning.

The Pitbulls looked to rally in the fourth
and Ferguson led off with a single, but the
Scorpions defense rebounded with a double
play on the next pitch.

Keno Cartwright scored T A. Thomp-
son’s final run of the inning on a wild pitch
to end the fourth.





standings (Week 16)



Junior
haseball
Standings

WITH only two weeks
remaining in the Junior
Baseball League of Nas-
sau’s ‘09 regular season,
teams are still looking to
get into the playoffs. Here
are the current standings
and play-off positions, and
are results of weekend
games:

SENIOR LEAGUE
Phillies def. Tigers 20-6
Rangers def.

Pirates 10-6

JUNIOR LEAGUE
Yankees def.

Cardinals 14-4

Twins def. Dodgers 11-3

MAJOR LEAGUE
Marlins def. Indians 7-3
Reds def. Mariners 4-3
Mariners def.

Marlins 5-1

(Make Up Game)

Photos: Tim Clarke/Tribune staff

MINOR LEAGUE
Rockies def.

Red Sox 13-7

Mets def. Royals 9-3

Shown on this page are some of the players in action...

Desir was just a single out from a shutout
game when Timothy Job laced a single
down the third baseline which went into
foul territory and, after a series of errors,
was able to score the Pitbulls’ lone run of
the game.

Desir also finished 2-2 from the plate.

“T think I played well, I was a little ner-
vous out there pitching on the mound
because it was the first time I played softball
but I think I did well,” he said. “My team’s
defense did well and we got the win.”

He said that although most of his experi-
ence came from watching professional base-
ball, with more game time he should
improve as the season progresses.

“T watched a lot of television, watching
the professionals pitch so I just tried to pick
up a few things from that and I hope I can
get better as the season goes on,” he said.
“For just my first game it was better than I
expected and IJ think this team can go far to
the championship and do well once we play
good defense and I get more into it and
experienced.”

COACH PITCH
Athletics def.

Blue Jays 14-3

Cubs def. Angels 18-4
Diamondbacks

def. Astros 18-5

TEE BALL

Sand Gnats def.
Blue Claws 21-18
Knights def.
Grasshoppers 11-0
Sidewinders def.
Raptors 25-15
Grasshoppers def.
Blue Claws 19-3
(Make-up game)
Knights def.
Raptors 19-18
(Make-up game)



K2700/K3000

11//4TON 21/2 TON

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KIA MOTORS

The Power to Surprise

CONGRATS to all T-ball players, coaches, fans and director Pat Moss who wrapped up their reg-
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13 wins, one loss and two ties. Playoffs begin this weekend for T-ball and the 16-18 division. T-ball play-
off is single elimination format and championship series is best of three games. There will be no time

limit.
Schedule are as follows:
T-Ball Division

Guineps vs Sea Grapes on Saturday May 2nd, 2009 @ 4 pm
Jujus vs Coco Plums on Saturday May 2nd, 2009 @ 6 pm

16-18 Division

Tainos vs Arawaks on Sunday May 3rd, 2009 @ 2:30 pm
Caribs vs Lucayans on Sunday May 3rd, 2009 @ 4:30 pm

FREEDOM FARM CURRENT STANDINGS WEEK 16

T-BALL WINS LOSSES TIES STREAK
1. SEA GRAPES cp/pw 13 1 2 wl
2. COCO PLUMS cp 11 3 W3
3. JUJUS ep 6 5 3 Ll
4. GUINEPS cp 4 9 i sla
5. DILLIES e 0 14 ie
COACH PITCH WINS LOSSES TIES STREAK
1. BOAS cp 17 2 wi2
2. BEES cp 15 3 w4
3. SANDFLIES cp 10 8 Ll
4. MOSQUITOES 5 13 L4
5. GREEN TURTLES 4 15 ess
6. WASPS 4 14 w2
9-10 DIVISION WINS LOSSES TIES STREAK
1. BARRACUDAS ep 14 3 1 w4
2. DOLPHINS cp 13 4 1 w2 K3000
3. TURBOTS cp 11 6 Ws
SC naeeTaee : ie ma 2.7 DIESEL STO 3.0 DIESEL STD
6. EELS e 1 16 ee
AIR CONDITION AIR CONDITION

11-12 DIVISION WINS LOSSES TIES STREAK
A Eonar ca 7 a POWER STEERING POWER STEERING
3. BLUE MARLINS cp 14 9 wl
4. NASSAU GROUPERS cp_ 13 9 w2 FOLO-DOWN SIDES POWER WINDOWS
5. DIVERS e 10 12 L3
S CREE ° : 7 a RADIO/CASSETTE FOLO-DUOWN SIDES
8. IGUANAS e 6 14 1 L2
9. WHITE CROWNS e 1 19 1 L4 RADIO/CASSETTE
13-15 DIVISION WINS LOSSES TIES STREAK
1. OWLZ cp 12 6 i W3
1. SILVER JACKS cp 13 i wl
3. POTCAKES cp 10 A 1 Wl
4. STINGRAYS cp 8 9 2 ess
5. RACCOONS e 6 10 2 Ll
6. SHARKS e 3 13 2 oa

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cp — clinched playoff

e — elimination post-season





PAGE 14, WEDNESDAY, APRIL 29, 2009

TRIBUNE SPORTS



SPORTS



Caledonia FC claim BFA KO
Cup in dramatic fashion

CALEDONIA FC salvaged
some respect for their season
when they claimed the BFA
KO Cup in dramatic fashion on
Sunday.

Having lost the league title
to Bears FC and further seeing
them claim the President’s Cup
on New Years Day, Caledonia
put out their best foot to stop
the Bears from claiming the
triple, and needed all of 90 min-
utes to do the job.

The match started evenly
with both teams creating oppor-
tunities to score.

Bears drew first blood in the
23rd minute when a lunging
tackle in the Caledonia penalty
area conceded a penalty.

The league’s leading goalscor-
er Lesly St Fleur stepped up
and converted, giving his team
the one goal lead, and one hand
on the cup.

The first half ended with the
Bears holding on to this lead.
The second half had barely
started, however, before Cale-
donia equalized.



Wagner Machado hit a loop-
ing shot from distance that flew

into the back of the Bears net
34 seconds into the second half,

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and leveled the score.

The early goal made the
match far more open and saw
both teams create opportuni-
ties to steal the match.

Two late occurrences in the
game made its mark. First, with
eight minutes remaining in the
match, on a Bears attack, the
assistant referee signaled for an
infringement that the referee
awarded as a penalty to Bears
FC.

Having discussed the matter
with the assistant, the referee
then decided that the perceived
incident did not in fact take
place, and instead awarded a
goal kick.

This was then followed by a
Caledonia attack, during which
time Bahamian senior interna-
tional Connor Sheehan took a
shot that deflected off a Bears
defender and wrong-footed
goalkeeper Corie Frazer, giv-



COACH OF THE YEAR Christian Villi of FC Nassau, with his twin daughters,
accepts his award from BFA vice president Sam Haven...



LEADING goalscorer and most valuable player Lesly St Fleur accepts
one of his two awards from BFA vice president Sam Haven...

ing Caledonia a 2-1 lead.

Only two minutes remained
after this, which Caledonia
played out and held on to claim
the cup.

The match was followed by
the presentation of awards, con-
ducted by BFA vice president
Sam Haven.

The following awards for the
year were presented:

BFA Knock Out Cup Cham-
pions — Caledonia FC

BFA Knock-Out Cup Run-
ners-Up — Insurance Manage-
ment Bears FC

League Champions — Insur-
ance Management Bears FC

League Runners-Up -— Cale-
donia FC

Most Valuable Player — Lesly
St. Fleur, IM Bears FC

League Leading Goalscorer
— Lesly St. Fleur, IM Bears FC

Youth Player Award — Alex
Iferenta, IM Bears FC

Coach of the Year — Christian
Villi, FC Nassau



YOUTH player of the Year Alex Iferenta (left) of IM Bears FC accepts his award...

GB cycling tour results

THE Grand Bahama Tank Cleaning Company Cycling Tour/Championships was organised by
the Grand Bahama Cyclist Club, headed by Rowshan Jones.

The event was sanctioned by the Bahamas Amateur Cycling Federation. It was staged last
weekend with a 78 mile road race and a 120 mile individual timed trial.

The road race started from McClean’s Town and ended up at West End. The results are as fol-

lows:

1ST Kim Thompson
2nd
3rd_ Tracey Sweeting

4th Anthony Biggie Colebrook

Sth Keith Major
6th Row Shan Jones

Barron Turbo Musgrove

time
time
time
time
time
time

3 hrs.17mins.43 sec
3 hrs.17mins.47 sec
3hrs.21mins.22sec
3hrs.21mins.28sec
3hrs.21mins.31sec
3hrs.22mins.00

¢ The 12-mile individual timed trials was held on Chickewn Farm Road

Here’s a look at the results:

1ST BARRON TURBO MUSGROVE

2ND KIM THOMPSON

3RD TRACEY SWEETING

4TH ROWSHAN JONES

5TH ANTHONY BIGGIE COLEBROOK

TIME 30 MINS. 08 SECOND

TIME 31 MINS. 05 SECOND
TIME 34 MINS. 12 SECOND
TIME 34MINS. 54 SECOND

TIME 38MINS. 54

¢ There was also a 12-mile sprint race for the juniors on the one-lap Chicken Farm Road

Here’s a look at the results:
1ST PLACE

2ND PLACE
3RD PLACE

ANTHONY “BIGGIE” COLEBROOK = TIME 30MINS.S59SEC
JUSTIN MINNS
KENAN SWAIN

TIME 31MINS.O9SEC
TIME 40MINS.03SEC

¢ In the combined scores or times for each race that was used to declare the overall winners
of the cycling tour are as follows:

OVERALL RESULTS
TOP SIX POSITIONS
1ST PLACE

2ND PLACE
3RD PLACE
4TH PLACE
5TH PLACE
6TH PLACE

BARRON TURBO MUSGROVE
KIM THOMPSON

TRACEY SHOW-TIME SWEETING
ANTHONY BIGGIE COLEBROOK
ROWSHAN JONES

KEITH MAJOR

TIME 3HRS.47MNS. 55 SEC
3HRS .4A8MINS. 48 SEC
3HRS. S55MINS. 34 SEC
3HRS. 59MINS. 53 SEC
4HRS. OOMINS. 00 SEC

Elite junior Anthony ‘Biggie’ Colebrook rode impressively enough to be declared
the most outstanding cyclist in the tour





—



WEDNESDAY, APRIL 29,

2009





Lakers close
out Jazz with
107-96 win...

See page 12

Female golfers trying to make LPGA Tour

@ By BRENT STUBBS
Senior Sports Reporter
bstubbs@tribunemedia.net

hey’re both on the verge of
becoming the first Bahami-
ans to make it to the Ladies
Professional Golf Tour.
But for Georgette Rolle and Raquel
Riley, it has not been an easy road.
Rolle, who is attending graduate
school at Texas Southern University,
and Grand Bahamian native Riley,
who resides in South Florida, are trying
to make their breakthrough in the
Duramed Futures Tour.
While Riley is on the alternate list

SPORTS
Wag

CRICKET
FIRST CENTURY




YOUTH player Ryan
Tappin scored the first
century of the season on
Sunday as he led his team,
the Dynasty Stars, to a 98-
run victory over St Agnes.

Batting first, Dynasty
Stars scored a total of 270
runs for the loss of nine
wickets. Tappin top scored
with 102 runs. Marc Levy
scored 31 runs.

Bowling for St Agnes,
Earl Thomas, Omar James
and skipper Hesketh
Dean took two wickets
each.

St Agnes, in their turn
at bat, scored 172 runs all
out. Their top scorers
were Ray Haniff 50 runs
and the youngster Orlan-
do Stewart 24 runs.

Bowling for Dynasty
Stars, Lee Melville took
three wickets and Antonio
Hernandez and Courtney
Waddell took two wickets
each.

¢ Matches next weekend
are expected to showcase
the rising Stars vs Com-
monwealth at Windsor
Park and the Police vs
Dockendale at Haynes
Oval







T ATHOMPSON Scorpions’ pitcher
Velnir Desir in action yesterday. He
pitched four shutout innings to lead
the Scorpions to a 4-1 win over the
D W Davis Pitbulls at the Baillou
Hills Sporting Complex...

waiting for her call, Rolle will be play-
ing in her first tournament this week-
end at the Texas Hill Country Classic
at the Dominion Country Club in San
Antonio, Texas.

“T’ve been working on some things
to improve my ball striking,” said Rolle
in an interview with Tribune Sports as
she prepared to leave for the tourna-
ment yesterday.

“So I definitely want to try and place
in the top ten or the top 15. If I can just
start to try to accumulate points, I will
be able to get a LPGA Tour card from
the Futures’ Tour itself.”

Having played in a couple of the
SunCoast Ladies Series this year, Riley

J

AK EG YR. Hi.

= ‘

said she’s trying to get more comfort-
able with her performance and min-
imise her mistakes.

“Tf I do make a mistake somewhere,
I want to try and finish the hole with no
more than a bogey at worse,” she said.
“So I definitely need to get better at
minimising my mistakes and I think I
will be well on my way.”

Depending on how she does this
weekend, Rolle is counting on being
invited to play in as many of the tour-
naments in order to maintain her stan-
dard to finish in the top 15 by the end
of the year so that she can be exempt-
ed from playing in the developmental
league and advance to the LPGA

|
cd







il

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prelormed a3 an opening act far Noborious Bul. Ck




school.

If she doesn’t get it through the
Futures Tour, Rolle still has the option
of getting her LPGA card through
their school. But she noted that the
latter is more difficult than the former.

“So if I do plan on signing for the
LGPA Tour school this year, which I
didn’t do last year, it’s going to be very
expensive, so I am hoping that I can
make it through the Futures Tour.”

During the Sun Coast Series, Rolle
and Riley played in at least one tour-
nament this year.

Riley, who has been on the pro cir-
cuit since 2005 compared to last year
when Rolle made her debut, is coming

Sports Reporter

Tim Clarke/Tribune staff

off her last appearance in the Sun
Coast Series last week at the Rock
Springs Ridge Golf Club in Apopka,
Florida.

She noted that her game is coming
along very steady and because of her
sponsor, Velez Capital Management
in New York, whom she was able to
acquire through some friends she met
since she went to South Florida.

“T’ve played a few events and have
gotten steady,” she said. “I started off
kind of shaky because coming here on
a dream and being around people you
don’t know and to trust them to look

SEE page 13

> | Pitcher Desir leats
_ Scorpions to 4-1
= win over Pitbulls

m By RENALDO DORSETT
rdorsett@tribunemedia.net

IF NOT for a series of untimely errors late in the fifth inning, Vel-
nir Desir would have had a perfect storybook ending to his first
appearance on the mound in his young career.

Desir pitched four shutout innings to lead the T A Thompson
Scorpions to a 4-1 win over the D W Davis Pitbulls yesterday at the
Baillou Hills Sporting Complex.

A starter on the Scorpions bas-
ketball team, Desir took the

SEE page 13

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With years of giving hie all to music, tees
volved INC an explosive artist with hoes ht
Prowaking melaghors, catchy hooms, gg.
enough energy to power all 700 Bahanterts-4 am
lands. Hapes, lima Boss, and Shawty areal
three of his singles that have hit number
one oan the 100Jame’s Bahama Hoi Ones 3
counidown. Shawty, his atest singk, 6. 9
Qarnering positive feedback and consist
Jiqplay on Several local radio stations, and
Ihe video is being played ori an inter-regional,
music channal.

Currently attached ta S-Typz production #4
eoeipany and label, AiDees is ready for the =
rs ston of hie carpe.

MIDEEZ WAS BRED OF HUMBLE BEGINNINGS
AND WAS SURROUNDED BY STRUGGLE FROM
EARLY IN LIFE. ‘What he did mot know vans that it
wae a Mel lor a chapter in his tifa thet he had yt io
5Ba — music.

Born if a Jamaican father and a Bahamian
mother, fee? found fiengel intertwined with the
Caribbean love for music. He bagan spinning
MacOrds at an ear’ age and was encouraged by
frends to sing. Lead hy this positive pear presaure
and in an effort nod to disappoint, Meer began
writing songs. His Skill is based on the fusion at
writing hip-hop laced with reggae vocals.

Due to the cut-throat natyre ed the music busl-
ness ff is not easy being an artist, bul AlDeez lives
by [he motto “Seize the Moment” ard he uses
very OPPOrUNity to showocese his gift ta win
crows Ovir In over fourteen years, he has per
Tomed a] numerdue clubs and comeeris, in addi
Ton bo performing at focal shows, he has

ea | eh | a | |
= Se — 2









lm By CHESTER ROBARDS
Business Reporter
crobards@tribunemedia.net

THE TRIBUNE

usiness

WEDNESDAY,

AGP Re 220

2009

Commercial property’s
12-15% value fall boost

ROYAL FIDELITY

Money at Work

NASSAU OFFICE

(242) 356-9801

FREEPORT OFFICE
(242) 351-3010



* Price falls aid buyer interest, as $5m Pepsi property comes down to $4m
* Landlords target programmes to keep business tenants in place

he sale and rental of com-

mercial properties is stay-

ing afloat despite a founder-

ing economy due to a 12-15

per cent decline in property values in

New Providence, commercial real

estate agents said yesterday, as below

market prices for spaces and buildings
peak buyer interest.

Veteran real estate agent with Dami-

anos Sotheby’s International Realty,

Security & General parts

Ridley Carroll, said prices on some of
the Family Islands have even been dri-
ven as low as 30 per cent.

The old Pepsi-Cola manufacturing
property on Prince Charles Drive, part
of Mr Carroll’s current sales portfolio,
has been receiving inquiries despite its
$5 million price tag. This has been fur-
ther reduced by $1 million in an
attempt to make the property more

attractive to buyers.

According to Mr Carroll, the Pepsi
building has the most commercial
space of any presently on the market,
with 44,000 square feet, and is on four
acres of land.

He said real estate buyers, especial-
ly those with “old money”, in this coun-
try, are always interested in commercial

property.

“Things that are more price realistic
will move,” Mr Carroll said. “It’s just
that you have to work a little harder.”

Retail sales have been taking a hit
since the onset of the global financial
crisis, with some retailers having to
forfeit their shops because of late rental
payments or, in the case of a purchased
property, loan defaults.

Mr Carroll said Bay Street retail

Chamber warns on possible legal

spaces have become an unfortunate
example of this phenomena, brought
on by a broken global economy.

According to him, even his own busi-
ness in Marina Village on Paradise
Island has seen a 40 to 50 per cent
shortfall in sales.

He, however, is still making sales in

SEE page 3B

company with senior exec

@ By NEIL HARTNELL

Tribune Business Editor

SECURITY & General and
its senior executive have parted
company, Tribune Business can
reveal, due to differences with
top officials from its Bermuda-
based parent over a rise in the
company’s accounts receivables.

Marc Shirra, who had spent
16 years with the Bahamian
general insurer, most of them
as general manager, left the
company on Thursday follow-
ing meetings with senior execu-
tives from the company’s par-
ent, Colonial Group Interna-

tional.

Insurance industry sources
familiar with the situation told
Tribune Business that Mr Shirra
had been made a “scapegoat”
for the recent increase in Secu-
rity & General’s accounts
receivables, which consist
chiefly of premium income due
to it - and which should have
been passed on - by brokers and
agents selling the company’s
policies.

This newspaper was told that
Mr Shirra was asked by Colo-
nial Group executives to resign,

SEE page 2B

Central Bank moves to
‘drive’ Clearing House

@ By NEIL HARTNELL
Tribune Business Editor

Delays ‘a serious
embarrassment to

action over ‘bonded vehicles’

@ By NEIL HARTNELL
Tribune Business Editor

A SENIOR
government min-
ister is due to
meet the Grand
Bahama Cham-
ber of Commerce
and other
Freeport-based
stakeholders lat-
er this week to
discuss issues
related to the
Customs Department and
‘bonded’ goods, Tribune Busi-
ness can reveal, a development
that comes at a time when the



Minister to meet Freeport stakeholders
on bonded goods, Customs issues

Chamber is threatening to take
legal action over ‘bonded vehi-
cles’.

Zhivargo Laing, minister of
state for finance, declined to
comment when contacted by
this newspaper about his
planned meeting schedule in
Freeport, indicating he did not
want to prejudice the content
and outcome of any talks he
may have.

However, Tribune Business
has learnt that his discussions
with the Chamber, Grand

Make it a reality.

Bahama Port Authority
(GBPA) and the latter’s
licensees will focus on a number
of Customs-related issues
thrown up by the Hawksbill
Creek Agreement, ‘bonded’
goods and various Supreme
Court rulings over the years.
Among the issues likely to be
on the table are the Supreme
Court ruling that allowed the
Home Centre to bring its entire
inventory as ‘bonded’ goods,

SEE page 8B

The information contained is from a third
party and The Tribune can not be held
responsible for errors and/or omission
from the daily report.



THE Central Bank has decided
“to step in and drive forward” the
process of establishing the bank-
ing industry’s Automated Clearing House (ACH), Tribune Business
has been told, with one senior banking executive conceding that the
protracted delays experienced by the project were “a serious
embarrassment”.

Dionisio D’Aguilar, the Bahamas Chamber of Commerce’s pres-
ident, who has been a leading critic of the commercial banks for
their failure to get the ACH operational, told this newspaper yes-
terday that Central Bank governor Wendy Craigg had moved to
take a grip on the process, and was demanding weekly updates from
the banks.

“T was recently informed by a senior executive at one of the
Canadian-owned banks that the Central Bank has finally decided

it’s time to step in and drive this
process forward, because if it’s SEE page 8B

banking sector

Cellular card margins ‘out

ar Prime Income Fund
of line’ with sector norm

@ By NEIL HARTNELL
Tribune Business Editor

* Minister says global ¢ A higher, stable rate of return e Professional fund management
standard 8-10%, compared
to BTC’s current 20-25%

* But stresses no decision
taken on cuts, as matter
internal one for BTC and
Board, not a government
policy decision

* Slams predecessor Roberts
for ‘disingenuous’ comments

THE Bahamas Telecommu- e Long-term capital preservation e Diversified portfolio
nications Company (BTC) has
made no decision on whether
to cut the discount rate offered
to pre-paid cellular phone card
vendors, the minister responsi-
ble has told Tribune Business, as
he slammed “disingenuous”
comments on the issue by his
predecessor.

Zhivargo Laing hit back at
Bradley Roberts, who had min-
isterial responsibility for BTC

e Lower risk investment

We can get you there!

FU PA
Nassau: 242.356.9801

Instead, Mr Laing said any Freeport: 242.351.3010

in the former Christie govern-
ment, by saying it was wrong
for the ex-PLP MP to suggest
that any discount rate cut would
result from a policy decision or
directive given by the Ingraham
administration.

Sale Ends
May 16th

future decision on a rate cut
would be an internal BTC mat-
ter, taken by the Board upon
the advice of management.

He pointed out that the cur-

SEE page 2B

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PAGE 2B, WEDNESDAY, APRIL 29, 2009

THE TRIBUNE





wr"
ro
\

Nassau Airport
Dovelopmont Company

TENDER

C-112 Warehouse

Nassau Arpon Develooment Company (MAD) i pleased to
annaunoe the release of Tender 0-112 Warehouse far Stage
1 of the Lynden Finding intametonal Aiport Expansion.
The Scope of Work includes:
-Detaled desion, supply, and installatian af a pre.
manufactured metal warehouse building with
appromimate dimensian of 70 fx 175
Chal works induding site fil, grading, compactian,
Joundations and slab on grade designed to
suit pre-manufactuned metal warehouse building:
‘Ubliby works induding sanitary, power,
communication and water sarvice;
-Formal submission to fra Minisiny of Works to finalize
building peril and basing with Bahamas Elecinc
Company for power service

The C-112 Warehouse Tender Documents wil be avaiable
for pict up oor electronic distbuton afer 3:00pm,
April 16th, 2009) A bidders meeting wil be held al
10:00am, Tuesday April 23rd, 2009 Pease
contact Traci Brisbyy to register at the NAD Project CHfice.

Contac: TRAM BREE
Contracts and Procurement Manager

Phe (242) PITRE | Pee (2) SPAT
PO. Box AP S220, Messen Besharreas
Emadt traci bnshryiiines bs

Haker’s Hap

F& SGCEAM

EMPLOYMENT
OPPORTUNITY

You are invited to apply for the following
positions currently available.

Nurse
Safety & Security Manager

Key Requirements

* Extensive experience in each industry

¢ Ability to organize, train, and lead company
safety initiatives

¢ Willing to relocate to a Family Island

Qualifications
Professional certifications and training a must
Must have sound working knowledge in
computer skills
Must be innovative, demonstrate strong
leadership and customer relations skills
Must have excellent written and verbal
communication skills

The successful candidate will have the
opportunity to work in a growing and dynamic
organization and must be a self-starter, team
player, work at the highest standards of
performance, and meet deadlines.

If you are progressive and prepared to
advance your career, submit your resume
to the attention of the Director of HR &

Training, hr@bakersbayclub.com or by fax at
242-367-0613.

“Becoming the Employer of Choice in The Bahamas!”



Security & General parts
company with senior exec

FROM page 1B

but it is unclear whether he
actually did so. What is known,
though, is that he is no longer
with Security & General, and
the two sides are thought to be
negotiating the terms and value
of his compensation. He has yet
to be replaced.

Mr Shirra declined to com-
ment yesterday when contact-
ed by Tribune Business. His
departure happened last Thurs-
day, and employees at Security
& General and the Colonial
Group’s other Bahamas-based
general insurance carrier -
Atlantic Medical - were
informed in team briefings on

Friday.

Industry sources familiar with
the situation told Tribune Busi-
ness that Colonial Group had
pre-Christmas given Mr Shirra a
three-month period in which to
crack down on, and reduce,
Security & General’s accounts
receivables.

He is understood to have felt
he had accomplished this goal,
and was preparing to give a pre-
sentation on this to Colonial
Group’s visiting executives. Yet
several sources suggested that
he was never allowed to make
the presentation, the Bermuda-
based team having apparently
arrived with minds already
made up.

Tribune Business was told
that the Bermuda parent had
placed Mr Shirra between “a
rock and a hard place” in
demanding that he increase the
written premium income that
Security & General was writing
at the same time as reducing
accounts receivables.

The latter required Security
& General to clamp down on -
even cut-off - those agents and
brokers who owed substantial
premium income in accounts
receivables, at a time when it
needed those same intermedi-
aries to increase the business
they were writing on the carri-
er’s behalf. Trying to achieve
the same aims at the same time,

‘Tribune Business was told, was
contradictory.

Increasing accounts receiv-
ables are a problem that is
becoming more acute for
Bahamian general insurance
carriers. As the risk underwrit-
ers, they require agents and bro-
kers writing the policies for
them to pass on the premium
income collected, once the
intermediaries have taken their
commission cut - usually 12-15
per cent.

Security & General has in
recent years cut-off a number
of agents, and stopped them
writing business for it, due to
accounts receivables and non-
payment of premium issues.

Cellular card margins ‘out of line’

FROM page 1B

rent discounts offered to pre-

a Public Utilities Commission

NOTICE

The — Public

Utilities

Commission’s

(PUC)officewillbeclosedtothe general public
from 10:00 a.m. until 4:00 p.m on Wednesday,
April 29, 2009. The PUC apologizes
for any inconvenience this may cause.

Bimini Sands Resort & Marina
is seeking
Social Directors and a Sushi Chef.

The best candidates must have high
volume experience, must have training
experience, and the ability to motivate
other associates. Salary will reflect
experience and skill set.

Please contact our office at
(242) 347-3500 or
fax resume to (242) 347-3501.



paid cellular phone card ven-
dors, which are in the range of
20-25 per cent depending on the
card’s retail value, were “out of
line” with global industry
norms. Usually, the retail mar-
gins earned by selling these
phone cards were in the 8-10
per cent range, Mr Laing said.

He added that on Mr Robert-
s’s watch, the cellular phone
card discount rate was cut from
35 per cent to 25 per cent, with
the door left open for BTC to
conduct reviews that might lead
to further cuts in the future.

As a result, Mr Laing said he
found it “odd” that Mr Roberts
would now express alarm about
discount rate cuts eating into
the revenues and profits of pre-
paid cellular phone card ven-
dors, given that the present
course was charted on his
watch.

“What I found curious about
his comments was that the ini-
tial 35 per cent rate that was
established on these cards was
implemented at the time that
he was the minister responsible
for BTC,” Mr Laing said of Mr
Roberts.

“At the time, that was out of
line with industry norms,
because they were 8-10 per cent.
During his [Mr Roberts’s]
tenure, this same rate was cut
from 35 per cent to 25 per cent.

“At the time it was cut, the
idea was to cut it then with a
view to reviewing it in future
for further cuts. The expressed
alarm [by Mr Roberts] today is
curious, given what happened
at the time he was the minister
responsible.”

Mr Laing told Tribune Busi-
ness that any decision by BTC
to further slash the margins
enjoyed by card vendors would
not stem from a policy decision
or initiative taken at Cabi-
net/ministerial level.

“It is disingenuous for Mr
Roberts to suggest this is some
government policy initiative,
especially when there was a cut
in the same rate when he was
there, with the intent to review
it for further cuts in the future,”
Mr Laing added.

BTC had already been
reviewing the issue internally
“for almost nine months”, the
minister added.

When asked whether a cut in
retail vendor margins was like-
ly, he added: “I can’t pre-empt

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~ Email: Ledcor.Bahemasitedcorcom



that. All ’'m advised is that it
was an internal review being
conducted, and nothing has for-
mally been put to the BTC
Board for its consideration. I
wouldn’t know one way or
another whether anything has
been determined.”

Mr Roberts previously said
some vendors had been
informed that the discount rate
would be cut from 25 per cent
to 15 per cent, representing the
largest reduction since the pre-
paid cards were introduced in
2001.

This, he said, was an attempt
by BTC to increase its revenues
and profits at the expense of
the ever-growing army of street
vendors selling the cards to end
users. Many of these vendors
have resorted to selling the
cards after losing their jobs as a
result of the economic down-
turn.

Mr Roberts said that in 2002,
discounts for cellular card ven-
dors amounted to about $3.5
million. In 2008, the discounts
totalled about $33.2 million,
compared to $27.3 million in
2007.

At the same time, Mr Roberts
added, prepaid revenues grew
from $135.8 million in 2007 to
$144.4 million in 2008.

Marlon Johnson, BTC’s vice-
president of sales and market-
ing, had previously told Tribune
Business that BTC was con-
ducting an assessment of its
“entire” cellular phone card dis-
tribution network, examining
whether the market that nets
the company $10-$12 million
per month is operating at “opti-
mal efficiency” and is not over-
saturated with vendors.

“What we are doing is a cur-
rent assessment exercise of our
entire distribution network -
relationships with wholesalers
and how cards are being dis-
tributed,” he explained.

“Tt is an exercise looking at
the entire distribution network.
We want to make sure we’re
operating optimally, and in
accordance with best global
practices.”

BTC sells the pre-paid cellu-
lar phone cards, which come in
denominations of $5, $10, $20,
$50 and $100, to some 34 whole-
salers, who include the likes of
Let’s Talk Wireless and Tri-
point. In turn, those wholesalers
sell the cards on to retailers and
street vendors.

Mr Johnson explained that
the study would also assess the
distribution network’s efficien-
cy, and whether end-user con-
sumers - the BTC pre-paid cel-
lular network has some 300,000
subscribers - had the best pos-
sible access to the cards they
purchased.

Vendors, though, are already
nervous about the impact of any
margin cuts. The $5 cards they
sell are bought from wholesalers
for $4, and the $10 cards for $8.

Tony, a 34-year-old vendor
who sells the cards to support
his young son after losing his
job at a major resort late last
year, said: “It would make
things a whole lot more diffi-
cult, which I don’t think is a
good idea. You’re looking at a
whole lot of people who are
unemployed and this is their
only avenue, like myself. What
are these people going to do
now? Turn to crime?”

INSIGHT

For the stories

behind the news,
read Insight
on Mondays





THE TRIBUNE

WEDNESDAY, APRIL 29, 2009, PAGE 3B



BUSINESS eee
The next generation for your sales leads

ARE you searching for new
and innovative ways of sales
lead generation? Are you lack-
ing in sources of good quality
leads? Are you tired and bored
using the same methods for gen-
erating sales leads?

If you answered “Yes”, then
you're going to be very excited
to read this article. Here are the
some of the most profitable
methods I've found for sales
lead generation. Create a list of
at least 100 people you know.
Send out an introductory letter
telling them about your prod-
uct or service. Talk with each
person at least twice. Send them
information of interest at
planned intervals.

Remember, if each person

you know also knows 100 peo-
ple....... well, you get the idea.

Cold Calling

Using cold calling effective-
ly for sales lead generation
requires five key ingredients.
Target the market you are going
to call. Know your objective
(get an appointment, get a
name). Have a memorised
script. Smile. Be prepared for
rejection. Have fun!

Knocking On Doors

This method is much the
same as cold calling. I used this
very effectively. I used to knock
on doors year-round. Do you
think people would remember
someone who knocked on their
door in the middle of a storm?

Promotional
Marketing



by Scott Farrington

Mass Mailing

Also known as direct mar-
keting. Successful use of this
method requires mailing a well-
written sales letter to a targeted
mailing list.

Newspapers

Pay attention to the local
news, business and announce-
ments sections. Look for the
people who get promoted, have
babies, buy and sell homes and

start up new businesses. There
may be leads here for your
product or service.

E-mail publications

Getting e-mail addresses for
past and current clients, your
sphere of influence and anyone
else you come in contact with is
a great way to keep in touch.

Daily Contacts

Every day when you leave
the house take 20 business cards
with you, and make it a point to
give them away. That's 20 cards
times five workdays. If you're
really ambitious, do it on Sat-
urday and Sunday also.

When you're looking to gen-
erate lots of quality sales leads,
the more lines you have in the

Commercial property’s
12-15% value fall boost

FROM page 1B

his capacity as a real estate

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Tribune Business that most
landlords owning retail spaces
are much more interested in
assisting their tenants rather
than have their spaces empty.

“Its’ better to have good
occupancy in your place with
tenants paying something,” he
said.

Mr Morley said many land-
lords have implemented tenant
retention plans to help business
owners in case they are unable
to pay rent, or to entice them to
remain in the rental space
despite difficulties.

Mr Morley said the Mall at
Marathon has been actively
securing new tenants for some
of its vacant spaces, and has also
implemented a tenant retention
plan of sorts.

“They have a programme
that includes beefing up secu-
rity and increasing marketing,”
he said. “There are a lot of ways
that landlords are trying to help
tenants during these tough eco-
nomic times.”

Mr Morley suggested that
there had been an increase in
demand for some retail spaces,
as Bahamians decide to forgo

The American Embassy is presently considering applications
for the following position:

MAINTENANCE CRAFTSMAN

Performs a wide range of skilled maintenance, minor construction and
repair work on U.S. Government-owned buildings and equipment; and
other work relevant to infrastructural and facility maintenance. Completes
assigned work orders and is directly supervised by the Maintenance

Foreman.

This position 1s open to candidates with the following qualifications:

- Completion of High School 1s required.
- Five years of craft work, including carpentry, mechanical, minor
electrical and yard maintenance. Laborer experience required.

PERSONAL ATTRIBUTES:

- Good working knowledge of painting, masonry, dry-wall, plumbing and

carpentry required.

- Ability to use all equipment and tools related to craft work including
cutting, wood fitting, finishing, plumbing, screw drivers and mechanical

and electrical fitting.

BENEFITS PROVIDED INCLUDE:

The successful candidate will be offered an excellent compensation package
including performance-based incentives, medical and dental insurance, life
insurance, pension and opportunities for training and development.

shopping trips abroad for local
purchases.

“Once retailers don’t price
themselves out of the market
there will always be a demand
for local retail,” said Mr Morley.
“Bahamians don’t necessarily
have the wherewithal to fly to
Florida and shop.”

He added that he remains
optimistic about the immediate
future of the commercial real
estate market.

Mr Morley said of a further
contracting economy: “Let’s
hope we don’t have to go that
way. Let’s hope things rebound
quicker.”

He said the repercussions of
store closings would have a
“scary” impact on the Bahami-
an economy and society-at-
large.

Mr Carroll remains optimistic
also about the future of com-
mercial properties, as he con-
tinues to get listings off the mar-
ket. “There is always a value
for commercial property,” he
said.

water the more fish you're apt
to catch.

These are all effective meth-
ods of sales lead generation and
should be used regularly.

All of these marketing strate-
gies are certain to keep your
business on top during these
challenging economic times.
Have a productive and prof-
itable week! Remember:
“THOSE WHO MARKET
WILL MAKE IT.”

NB: Scott Farrington is pres-
ident of SunTee EmbroidMe, a

=e
NAD

Nassau Airport
Dowolopenamt Company

promotional and marketing
company specialising in pro-
motional products.

Established over 27 years
ago, SunTee EmbroidMe has
assisted Bahamian businesses
from various industries, rang-
ing from tourism and banking to
telecommunications, in mar-
keting themselves.

Readers can contact Mr Far-
rington at SunTee EmbroidMe
on East Shirley Street, by e-
mail at scott@sun-tee.com or
by telephone at 242-393-3104.

TENDER

C-120 Airside Civil and

C-130 Landside Civil, Stage 1

Nassay Arpon Develooment Company (NAD 6 pleased to
anaunoe (he pelea of Tender C-120 Arside Civil and
6-130 Landside Chal for Stage 1 of the Lynden Pindling

infamatonal Airport Expansion. MAD) intends to enter into
ane contract fer the completion of lhese wark packages. The

Scope of Work includes:

-Signficant earthmoving, drainage and wilty works
bath alrsice and landide;

-Rioechway, parking lotand apron construction
exceeding $0,000 tors of asphalt paving

“Signage and bohting for roadways, parking bats
aprons and taxiways; and

-
irrigaar

The 0-120 Airside Civil and C-130 Landside Cid, Stage 7
Terminal Expansion Praject Tender Documents will be

availatie for pick up oor ectomic distribution afer
2:00pm, April 16th, 2009. 4 biddars meeting wil
be held at 1:00am, Tuesday April 26th,
Z008. Please contact Traci Bneby to register at the MAD

Project Office.



Coniact TRAD BRESHY

Contracts and Procurement Wlanagar
Phe (242) TO2-1086 | Fam: (242) P2117
PO Goo. AP S009 Massau, Bahamas

Ennead: traci braless bs

Vacation in Paradise.

Only $69"

— per person double occupancy.

Minimum 2-night stay. Bahamas residents only,

Full use of all Atlantis facilities. Plus:
+ Complimentary continental breakfast datly
» Junior Suites with King-size or two double beds
+ Cable TV, refrigerator, in-room safe,

coffee maker, hatr dryer

- Kids 15 and under, jree
¢ Pool with swim-up bar

Applicants must be Bahamian citizens or U.S. citizens who are eligible for
employment under Bahamian laws and regulations.

Application forms are available online at Nassau.usembassy.gov.

Please e-mail or fax applications to the Human Resources Office no later
than May 4, 2009 to: Adamsrc@state.gov or Fernanderra@state.gov or
fax: 328-8251. Applications will not be accepted at the Security Gate of
the Embassy. Absolutely no telephone calls will not be accepted.

Limited-time offer! Reserve today /
Call 242-363-3680

*$69 per person double occupancy per night Sun. - Wed. Add $20 pp for Thurs. - Sat. Maximum
four persons per room. Rates effective through December 15. Additional fees apply for mandatory
taxes, mandatory housekeeping gratuities and utility service fees. Rates quoted are based on
standard room category and are subject to availability. Cancellations must be received 48 hours
prior to arrival or a one night penalty will apply.





PAGE 8B, WEDNESDAY, APRIL 29, 2009

THE TRIBUNE



ear TIE ery Te
Central Bank moves to ‘drive’ Clearing House

FROM page 1B

left to the clearing banks, it’s
never going to happen,” Mr
D’Aguilar told Tribune Busi-
ness.

“We hope that at last they’re
[the banks] getting the message
that this is critical to every busi-
ness in the Bahamas. Every
business needs a bank, and this
is why it hasn’t deterred the
banks from setting their own
agenda on such an important
and critical part of doing busi-
ness. If left to their own agenda,
they would do nothing.”

The Chamber president
added: “The Government and
Central Bank should have been
applying pressure to them to
make this happen, and they
weren't. They were unable to
do that, and I can’t understand
why.

“It’s good to see some pres-

sure being brought to bear. It’s
now time for results. Let’s get
this thing up and running. This
is what happens when the banks
are left up to their own devices.
The Governor should have
stepped in long ago, but the
process has been allowed to
drag on for years.”

Ms Craigg did not return Tri-
bune Business’s call yesterday
seeking comment on the situa-
tion, but one leading commer-
cial bank executive acknowl-
edged that the protracted ACH
installation and implementation
had become “a serious embar-
rassment” to both the Central
Bank and the industry.

Numerous implementation
deadlines have been missed for
starters. The Clearing Banks
Association (CBA) had been
hoping to implement the first
ACH phase as far back as mid-

2007 - almost two years ago -
but the system and its software
is still in testing among all the
banks.

Tribune Business under-
stands that testing of the ACH
system, which will be owned
and operated by Bahamas
Automated Clearing House
(BACH), has revealed far more
system ‘gremlins’ and kinks
than anticipated, all of which
needed to be ironed out.

Then, the commercial banks
each have their own internal
core banking systems and soft-
ware, which have to be recon-
figured to interface and align
with the ACH.

This, Tribune Business under-
stands, has been extremely
problematic for the Canadian-
owned banks - Royal Bank of
Canada, Scotiabank and First-
Caribbean International Bank

(Bahamas) - because all of them
use a common platform shared
by their head offices and affili-
ates worldwide. Thus their

“Testing was far more prob-
lematic than anticipated,” the
banking source said. “There are
banks with different software,
different levels of commit-
ment.... It’s really a struggle to
get everyone on the same page.
We’re making progress, but it’s
slow progress. It’s a serious
embarrassment, and we need to
get it [the ACH implementa-
tion] out of the way.”

The ACH is intended to
replace the current manual sys-
tem for settling cheque trans-
actions, where cheques drawn
on one bank but due to be
deposited at another have to be
taken by armoured car to a cen-
tral location where they are set-
tled by representatives of the

various institutions.

Apart from allowing inter-
bank cheques to be processed
electronically rather than man-
ually at a cheque clearing facil-
ity, the ACH system will allow
direct debits and credits from
accounts, debit cards and a
shared Automatic Teller
Machine (ATM) network.

The latter would allow
Bahamians to use their cash
cards at any bank branch. It
would also reduce the time per-
sons spent in line waiting to
cash and deposit pay cheques,
as they could be deposited to
their account.

Bahamian consumers would
also be able to use direct debits
from their bank accounts to pay
bills such as cable television and
electricity.

The ACH could ultimately
lead to the creation of just one

back office system for the entire
Bahamas. It may also help
develop SWITCH products,
where Bahamians could use
their cash cards at any bank's
ATM machine.

A further potential bonus
from the ACH will be the open-
ing up a whole range of elec-
tronic banking services in the
Bahamas, including its use in
the online purchase of govern-
ment goods and services.

Ultimately, through mod-
ernising the Bahamian pay-
ments system through electron-
ic means, the ACH will provide
buyers and sellers with more
certainty and confidence, espe-
cially when it comes to settling
their transactions.

It will also enhance econom-
ic and business efficiency by set-
tling transactions quicker,
boosting business cash flows.

Chamber warns on possible legal action over ‘bonded vehicles’

and to display ‘bonded’ goods at
retail’, and the ability of GBPA
licensees to use their bonded
vehicles outside the Port area.
Currently, the Customs

COMMONWEALTH OF THE BAHAMAS

Department has implemented
a policy preventing GBPA
licensees from being able to use
their bonded vehicles outside
the Port area for business pur-

2008/CLE/qui/1616

INTHE SUPREME COURT

IN THE MATTER OF ALL THAT piece parcel or
lot of land being Lot 76 containing Twenty seven
thousand six hundred and ninety one square feet
(27,697.00), Stella Maris Subdivision Section
1, Stella Maris, situate between the settlements
of Burnt Ground and Millerton in the Northern
Portion of Long Island, one of the Islands of the
Commonwealth of The Bahamas, which said
piece parcel or lot of land has such position shape
boundaries marks and dimensions as are shown
on a plan filed herein and thereon coloured yellow

AND IN THE MATTER of the Quieting Titles Act, 1959

AND IN THE MATTER of the Petition of Allan

Spector

NOTICE
The Quieting Titles Act 1959

The Petition of Allan Spector of the city of
Toronto, in the Province of Ontario, one of the
Provinces in Canada in respect of: - ALL THAT
piece parcel or lot of land being Lot 76 containing
Twenty seven thousand six hundred and ninety one
square feet (27,697.00), Stella Maris Subdivision
Section 1, Stella Maris, situate between the
settlements of Burnt Ground and Millerton in the
Northern Portion of Long Island, one of the Islands
of the Commonwealth of The Bahamas, which said
piece parcel or lot of land has such position shape
boundaries marks and dimensions as are shown
on a plan filed herein and thereon coloured yellow

Allan Spector claims to be the owner of the
fee simple estate in possession of the tract of land
hereinbefore described free from encumbrances.

AND the Petitioner has made application
to the Supreme Court of the Commonwealth of
The Bahamas under Section 3 of The Quieting
Titles Act 1959 to have his title to the said
tract of land investigated and the nature and
extent thereof determined and declared in a
Certificate of Title to be granted by the Court in
accordance with the provisions of the said Act.

NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that any
persons having Dower or a Right to Dower or an
Adverse Claim or a claim not recognized in the
petition shall on or before the 19% of June A.D., 2009
file in the Supreme Court and serve on the Petitioner
or the undersigned a statement of his claim in the
prescribed form verified by an Affidavit to be filed
therewith. Failure of any such person to file and
serve a statement of his claim on or before the 19% of
June A.D., 2009 will operate as a bar to such claim.
Copies of the Filed Plan may be inspected at:
The Registry of the Supreme Court;
The Chambers of Graham, Thompson & Co.
attorneys for the Petitioner, Sassoon House, Shirley
Street & Victoria Avenue, Nassau, N.P., Bahamas;
The Notice Board of the Administrator
at Stella Maris, Long Island: and
The Local Constable at Stella Maris, Long Island

Dated the 23rd day of April A.D., 2009

GRAHAM, THOMPSON & CO.,
Chambers,
Sassoon House,
Shirley Street & Victoria Avenue,
Nassau, Bahamas.
Attorneys for the Petitioner



poses, something Chamber
president Gregory Moss has
previously told Tribune Busi-
ness is “ultra vires” and breach-
es the Hawksbill Creek Agree-
ment.

Mr Moss did not return Tri-
bune Business’s calls seeking
comment yesterday. But
sources close to the matter said
he had written to the Attorney
General’s Office as Chamber
president to warn that if the
organisation did not hear from
it this week, it would initiate a
legal action on Monday to seek
a Supreme Court declaration
that GBPA licensees could use
their bonded vehicles outside

the Port area.

Meanwhile, Tribune Business
understands that Mr Laing may
also discuss whether the Cus-
toms Management Guide to the
Hawksbill Creek Agreement -
the document that Customs has
been using to determine duty
rates in Freeport for 30 years -
should be placed in statute to
provide all parties with more
clarity/certainty.

This is likely to be opposed
by the private sector, given that
the Guide is currently only an
interpretation of the law, and
one that has been found wanti-
ng on several occasions by the
Supreme Court.

NOTICE

NOTICE is hereby given that ANTOINETTE BARR OF P.O.
BOX AB-20554, MARSH HARBOUR, ABACO, is applying
to the Minister responsible for Nationality and Citizenship, for
registration/naturalization as a citizen of The Bahamas, and
that any person who knows any reason why registration/
naturalization should not be granted, should send a written
and signed statement of the facts within twenty-eight days
from the 29TH day of APRIL, 2009 to the Minister responsible
for Nationality and Citizenship, PRO.Box N-7147, Nassau,

Bahamas.

Yet the need for an accept-
able solution for all was per-
fectly summarised in a 2007
Chamber paper on the practice
of ‘over-the-counter bonded’
goods sales in Freeport, the doc-
ument having previously been
sent to the Government.

The Chamber paper said: “A
standardised, acceptable, mech-
anism must be established for
the management and reporting
of ‘over the counter sale of
bonded goods; that does not
subrogate the rights of the
licensees of the Grand Bahama
Port Authority, while still pro-
tecting the legitimate revenue
collection of the Government

of the Bahamas. This mecha-
nism must be the same for all
vendors and must be derived
from within the laws of the
Bahamas and the terms of the
Hawksbill Creek Agreement.”














INSIGHT

For the stories
behind the news,
read Insight
on Mondays

Share your news

The Tribune wants to hear

from people who are
making news in their
neighbourhoods. Perhaps

you are raising funds for a

good cause, campaigning
for improvements in the
area or have won an
award.

NOTICE

NOTICE is hereby given that YOUDLYN CALIXTE of SOUTH
BEACH, HOLIDAY DRIVE, NASSAU, BAHAMAS, is applying
to the Minister responsible for Nationality and Citizenship, for
registration/naturalization as a citizen of The Bahamas, and that
any person who knows any reason why registration/naturalization
should not be granted, should send a written and signed statement
ofthe facts within twenty-eight days from the 22"? day of April, 2009
to the Minister responsible for nationality and Citizenship, P.O. Box
N-7147, Nassau, Bahamas.

NOTICE

NOTICE is hereby given that IZMA MARCNER of PINEDALE,
EIGHT MILE ROCK, GRAND BAHAMA, BAHAMAS P.O. BOX
F2197 is applying to the Minister responsible for Nationality and
Citizenship, for registration/naturalization as a citizen of The
Bahamas, and that any person who knows any reason why
registration/ naturalization should not be granted, should send a
written and signed statement of the facts within twenty-eight days
from the 22nd day of APRIL, 2009 to the Minister responsible for
Nationality and Citizenship, PO.BoxN-7147, Freeport, Bahamas.

NOTICE

NOTICE is hereby given that LINDA CHRISTINA
BUCHANAN of BEACHWAY DRIVE NORTH, FREEPORT,
GRAND BAHAMA, BAHAMAS P.O. BOX F42915 is applying
to the Minister responsible for Nationality and Citizenship,
for registration/naturalization as a citizen of The Bahamas,
and that any person who knows any reason why registration/
naturalization should not be granted, should send a written and
signed statement of the facts within twenty-eight days from
the 22nd day of APRIL, 2009 to the Minister responsible for
Nationality and Citizenship, PO.BoxN-7147, Freeport, Bahamas.

NOTICE is hereby given that ELLIOTTE SANDS of BALFOUR
AVE., NASSAU, BAHAMAS, is applying to the Minister
responsible for Nationality and Citizenship, for registration/
naturalization as a citizen of The Bahamas, and that any person
who knows any reason why registration/naturalization should not
be granted, should send a written and signed statement of the
facts within twenty-eight days from the 22° day of April, 2009 to
the Minister responsible for nationality and Citizenship, P.O. Box
N-7147, Nassau, Bahamas.

NOTICE

NOTICE is hereby given that CHRISTOPHER DOUGLAS
MAY of BEACHWAY DRIVE NORTH, FREEPORT, GRAND
BAHAMA, BAHAMAS P.O. BOX F42915 is applying to
the Minister responsible for Nationality and Citizenship, for
registration/naturalization as a citizen of The Bahamas, and
that any person who knows any reason why registration/
naturalization should not be granted, should send a written
and signed statement of the facts within twenty-eight days from
the 22nd day of APRIL, 2009 to the Minister responsible for
Nationality and Citizenship, PO.BoxN-7147, Freeport, Bahamas.



If so, call us on 322-1986
and share your story.

NOTICE

NOTICE is hereby given that IMELDA DORVIL of CORDEAUX
AVE., P.O. BOX N-4394, NASSAU, BAHAMAS, is applying to the
Minister responsible for Nationality and Citizenship, for registration/
naturalization as a citizen of The Bahamas, and that any person
who knows any reason why registration/naturalization should not
be granted, should send a written and signed statement of the
facts within twenty-eight days from the 29" day of April, 2009 to
the Minister responsible for nationality and Citizenship, PRO. Box
N-7147, Nassau, Bahamas.

FULLYSTRASSE LIMITED

(In Voluntary Liquidation)

Notice is hereby given that the above-named
Company is in dissolution, which commenced
on the 4th day of March 2009. The Liquidator
is Argosa Corp. Inc., P. O. Box N-7757 Nassau,
Bahamas.

ARGOSA CORP. INC.
(Liquidator)

LEGAL NOTICE

SEA URCHIN
HOLDINGS LTD.

IN VOLUNTARY LIQUIDATION

Notice is hereby given that in accordance with Section 137 of the
International Business Companies Act SEA URCHIN
HOLDINGS LTD. is in dissolution.

The Date of the Commencement of Dissolution was 27th April
2009. David Thain of Arner Bank & Trust (Bahamas) Ltd.,
Building 2 Caves Village, P.O. Box N-3917 is the Liquidator of
SEA URCHIN HOLDINGS LTD. All persons having claims
against the above-named company are required to send their
address and particulars of their debts to the Liquidator before the
27th May 2009.



Full Text
{T)\

Pim blowin’ it

84F
75F

PARTLY SUNNY

HIGH
LOW

AND BREEZY

Volume: 105 No.129






i

SPE

he Iribune |
£=JSA TODAY

BAHAMAS EDITION

www.tribune242.com

WEDNESDAY, APRIL 29, 2009







A

uarantine expanded
anid swine flu fears

Local soccer team
to be confined on
return from Mexico

m@ By TANEKA
THOMPSON
Tribune Staff
Reporter
tthompson@
tribunemedia.net

HEALTH officials
plan to expand the
swine-flu quarantine
to include a local soc-
cer team that trav-
elled to Puerto Val-
larta, Mexico earlier
this week to attend a
match, Health Minister Dr
Hubert Minnis said yesterday.

The team is due to arrive
home sometime today.

While health officials do not
anticipate that they were
infected with the dangerous
flu strain, Dr Minnis said they
will be confined for observa-
tion for at least four days —
the incubation period of the
illness.

"Health personnel will meet
those individuals at the air-
port where they will be placed
in quarantine or containment
for at least four days," he said.

Officials are in the process
of identifying two homes
where the group can be
housed during the quarantine,
Dr Minnis added.

Hubert Minnis



"If by chance they
are infected, the incu-
bation period is
about three to four
days. If they show no
evidence of infection
they will be taken out
of quarantine,” he
said, adding that
health officials were
set to brief the team's
families about the sit-
uation.

The 12 players and
two coaches from the
country's national beach soc-
cer team arrived in Mexico on
Monday to attend a tourna-
ment in Puerto Vallarta and
were scheduled to stay in
Mexico until Sunday.

Executive Director of the
Bahamas Soccer Federation
Lionel Haven told The Tri-
bune that although the feder-
ation was aware of the swine-
flu outbreak in Mexico, they
were informed by the tourna-
ment's organisers that the
virus had not spread from
Mexico City to Puerto Vallar-
ta, about 2,000 miles away.

The team was told yester-
day morning that the match
had been postponed. The

SEE page six

NUON Seen Ge

Never start your

]

When it comes to
Auto Insurance,
remember the smart choice is
Insurance Management.
Smart people you can trust.

i

le Proving | bron Behera
Be SAD Fe SPST

hin
TEAM) SA74G0 (To 8) SAD |e)

INSURANCE MANAGEMENT

(BAHAMAS) UMTED, INSURANCE RROKERS & AGENTS

» | Gatun | fume



Body parts believed to be remains
of man from jet ski accident

m@ By ALISON LOWE
Tribune Staff Reporter
alowe@tribunemedia.net

BODY parts of a man
believed to have been dismem-
bered by a shark were discov-
ered in the waters off western
New Providence on Monday.

Authorities suspect remains
found by Defence Force divers
are those of a man who disap-
peared near the exotic Nygard
Cay resort on Sunday follow-
ing a jet ski accident.

Neither the man’s identity
nor details of which body parts
were found were released to the
media.

A statement from the Royal
Bahamas Defence Force said
the gruesome find came at
around 1pm Monday as a result
of an intensive search of the
area by the Royal Bahamas
Defence Force.

They were acting in response
to reports issued “late Sunday

SEE page eight

Two are reportedly in
hospital after shooting

TWO persons are reported to be in hospital after a brazen

daylight shooting in the Podoleo Street area yesterday.
The incident took place around 2pm when two men ina
green vehicle approached a house near the corner of Podoleo

Street and Balfour Avenue.

SEE page eight

British
American



A

WAKE UP!

Sausage & Eqg

Burrito



PRICE —75¢ (Abaco and Grand Bahama $1.25)




Ns





INSIDE TODAY



Man dies in
fire ‘two days
after moving
to Bahamas’



THE REMAINS of the
two adjoining apartments
after the blaze in the
Minnie Street area.





MAN WAITING 12 YEARS
FOR APPROVAL OF CROWN
LAND PURCHASE

BRIDGEWATER AND
LIGHTBOURNE TRIAL IS
LIKELY 10 START ON
SEPTEMBER 21

SWINE FLU PROMPTS CALL
FOR IMPORT TAX DROP ON
FACE MASKS



NASSAU AND BAHAMA

ISLANDS’ LEADING NEWSPAPER

Blaze destroys two
adjoining apartments
































m@ By TANEKA
THOMPSON
Tribune Staff
Reporter
tthompson@
tribunemedia.net



A FIRE that ripped
through two adjoining
apartments in the Minnie
Street area left one man
dead and two families
struggling to pick up the
charred pieces of their lives.

Police said 40-year-old
Ronnie Louis, who accord-
ing to a neighbour had just
arrived from Haiti on Sun-
day afternoon to start a
new life, died in the fire.
Other occupants escaped
unscathed.

Officials suspect the
blaze was set unintention-
ally by a burning candle.

Residents of the area
said Louis was at home
with a young boy, believed
to be about 10 years old,
when the fire began shortly
before midnight on Mon-
day. The boy's father
apparently was not at home






SEE page six

Crackdown hy the
police on suspected
gambling houses

POLICE launched a crack-
down on suspected gambling
houses yesterday.

According to Assistant
Superintendent Walter Evans,
officers made several arrests
at two locations — the FML
Group on Village Road and
the Our Place Sporting
Lounge in the Mel-Don Plaza
on Mackey Street —and
seized some gambling para-
phernalia.

"In an effort to stem the
flow of crime and activities
that may contribute to crime,
the police has mounted an
operation today in respect to
the reduction of crime in two

SEE page six

Tar Tela
Se abs
Ria Les

ee

ANNUITIES
aa a

TA ee
ee ela i


PAGE 2, WEDNESDAY, APRIL 29, 2009

THE TRIBUNE



LOCAL NEWS



Man waiting 12
years for approval of
Crown land purchase

m By PAULG
TURNQUEST
Tribune Staff Reporter
pturnquest@
tribunemedia.net

HAVING invested more
than $3.5 million in his Foun-
tain Bay Resort and Marina,
Cat Island native Ezra Russell
is demanding answers from the
Department of Lands and Sur-
veys as to why his project is
still having to wait — 12 years
later — for final approval for
the Crown land purchase.

Visiting the island yesterday
to tour his 34-acre project in
the southern settlement of
New Bight, The Tribune was
provided with a record of the
correspondence between Mr
Russell and the department.

Having entered into a lease-
to-own agreement for the 34
acres in 1997, Mr Russell has
invested his own money and
met “every stipulation” out-
lined by the department for
final approval to purchase the
property.

At a value of $2,000 per
acre, Mr Russell has provided
the $68,000 to government on
two occasions, only to have his
cheques returned with no
explanation.

As outlined in documenta-
tion from the department, Mr
Russell was required and has
invested more than the
required $750,000 to qualify
him to purchase the property.

Despite his investment, and
the fact that he is a young
Bahamian seeking to make a
substantial investment in his
hometown, Mr Russell told
The Tribune yesterday that he
has met every road block
imaginable while “others with
position and connections” are
able to bypass these processes
entirely.

“From 1997 until now I’m
still in limbo land. But yet,
they’ll give foreigners or their
family and friends property

they can flip and make all kin-
da money. But here you have a
young, black Bahamian trying
to do something and they
block me.

“So you have to ask, what is
the government doing? All
that they have asked me to do
I have done. You’ve seen the
buildings, the marina, the
roads, the power lines and
phone. Everything is in.

“But everyone in this coun-
try knows what’s going on.
Whether it’s Perry Christie or
Hubert Ingraham, either Prime
Minister would deny it but
they know there are a group
of people in this country,
especially up at Lands and Sur-
veys who have more power
than them,” Mr Russell
claimed.

Over the past week, The Tri-
bune has reported allegations
of nepotism in the Department
of Lands and Surveys where

The, Alp Fegan
te

College of the Bahamas

C ale

2008-2009
HALL OF FAME INDUCTEE

I. CHESTER COOPER

COCKTAIL RECEPTION ON
THURSDAY, APRIL 30TH

AT

THE BRITISH COLONIAL HILTON,
6:30PM

FOR MORE INFORMATION
CONTACT 302-4356

OR EMAIL
ALUMNI@COB.EDU.BS

TICKETS $50 WITH ALL PROCEEDS TO
COLLEGE OF THE BAHAMAS ALUMNI
ASSOCIATION



the Director, Tex Turnquest
has admitted that his family
members and friends have
been sold five ocean front lots
of Crown land on Exuma.

Pointing out that he did not
have the final say over the
sales as the Prime Minister is
the ultimate signatory on the
approvals, Mr Turnquest said
as a result he did not see any
reason for him to recuse him-
self from the transactions.

Four of these five proper-
ties, which were sold for
between $1,200 and $2,500
have since been resold for as
much as $550,000.

With his 34-acre approval
still hanging in the balance, Mr
Russell said his request for this
amount of property is equiva-
lent to a “drop in the bucket”
by comparison to the 100-plus
acres of Crown land that have
been granted without so much
as a raised eyebrow.



EZRA RUSSELL points to a natural
channel that he plans to widen for it

to be the entrance to his marina.

a al

2/3 C1
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Salvation Army
announces new
emergency plans
for hurricane
prone Grand
Bahama

WITH hurricane season
fast approaching, the Salva-
tion Army is making provi-
sions to support the residents
of Grand Bahama, who have
seen their communities rav-
aged by several storms in
recent years.

In the past, staff and vol-
unteers have prepared emer-
gency meals at the Lynda
Speer Community Centre
and delivered them to neigh-
borhoods in the wake of a
hurricane using a van and a
small bus.

This year will be different
thanks to the Salvation Army
branches in Tampa, Florida



kitchen in Grand Bahama

and Atlanta, Georgia.

“Thanks to these generous
Americans, Freeport and the
whole of Grand Bahama
island will soon benefit from
a completely self contained
mobile kitchen and distribu-
tion vehicle commonly called
by the army people a ‘disaster
canteen’,” announced the
local Salvation Army in a
statement.

Lt Colonel Danny Morrow

just arrived in Bahamas!

Also availble in

Bay Shopping Cer
Marathon)!

CALL now:393-5157
446-0681

‘Creating Healt
Aehiewing :

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Biotech

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THE SALVATION ARMY’S new, completely self-contained mobile



and his wife Lt Colonel
Esther Morrow have been
serving temporarily in Grand
Bahama since January 6.
They said the new unit should
be arriving on the Island
within the next few weeks.

To ensure that an adequate
supply of food and emer-
gency disaster supplies are on
hand for the start of hurri-
cane season in July, the Sal-
vation Army is planning a
fund raising dinner for May 1
at the Junkanoo Beach Club
at Taino Beach, beginning at
4pm.

The theme for the dinner
is “Eating up a Storm” and
the menu will feature Cajun
grilled chicken. There will be
live entertainment featuring
singer Jay Mitchell.

Lt Colonel Morrow said
tickets are available for $10
at the Salvation Army head-
quarters on West Atlantic
Drive, Dolly Madison, Kel-
ly’s, Italian Specialty Imports,
and the Junkanoo Beach
Club.

All proceeds from the din-
ner will be used for hurricane
and disaster services on
Grand Bahama, he said.

The Morrows, now retired,
are veteran Salvation Army
officers, having served for
more than 40 years in the
United States.

They came out of retire-
ment to serve in Freeport for
six months when the need
arose.

They will be replaced this
summer by Salvation Army
officers whose assignment
here will be for three years.
THE TRIBUNE

WEDNESDAY, APRIL 29, 2009, PAGE 3



LOCAL NEWS



0 In brief |

New Road
Traffic Deputy
Controller for
Grand Bahama
announced

Basil Rahming



FREEPORT - Basil Rah-
ming, a career police officer
who retired from the Royal
Bahamas Police Force earli-
er this year, has been named
the new deputy controller of
the Road Traffic Depart-
ment.

Making the announcement
in Grand Bahama yesterday,
Road Traffic Department
Controller Philip Turner said
that Mr Rahming’s appoint-
ment became effective on
Monday, April 27 and that
he will be responsible for
Grand Bahama island.

Valuable

“Mr Rahming brings many
years of valuable experience
and knowledge to this posi-
tion and he will be a great
asset,” said Mr Turner.

He also thanked former
deputy controller Stephanie
Rahming for her service and
leadership over the past 10
years.

Road Traffic
Department siatf
involved in service
improvement
workshop

Staff at the Road Traffic
Department took part ina
two-day workshop on service
improvement held the
British Colonial Hilton.

The workshop is part of
the government’s customer
service improvement initia-
tive for the Public Service.

Topics included the role of
leaders and the qualities nec-
essary to be an effective
leader; motivating staff to
get higher levels of produc-
tivity; improving perfor-
mance; enhancing the inter-
nal work environment and
delivering superior customer
satisfaction.

Facilitator Michael Pintard
said the purpose of the
workshop is to develop a
cohesive team that will com-
mit itself to embracing ser-
vice excellence.

The workshop ended yes-
terday.

WH Hearing fixed for New Providence

@ By NATARIO McKENZIE
Tribune Staff Reporter

THE trial of former PLP sena-
tor Pleasant Bridgewater and for-
mer paramedic Tarino Light-
bourne is expected to open in
New Providence on September
21, despite attempts by their
lawyers yesterday to have the
case heard in Grand Bahama.

Bridgewater, 49, who is also a
lawyer, is charged with Light-
bourne, 47, in connection with an
alleged plot to extort $25 million
from Hollywood actor John Tra-
volta. The two, who were charged
in Magistrate’s Court in late Jan-
uary, were arraigned again before
Senior Justice Anita Allen yes-
terday. Bridgewater, again
dressed in a white outfit, and her
co-accused Lightbourne were
arraigned together on the charges
of conspiring to commit extortion
and attempting to extort money
from John Travolta between Jan-
uary 2 and 20 of this year. When
asked to enter a plea to the
charges, both Lightbourne and
Bridgewater replied, “Absolutely
not guilty.” Bridgewater also
pleaded not guilty to the charge
of abetment to extort.

Reports of the alleged extor-
tion attempt emerged days after
Jett Travolta, the 16-year-old
son of actors John Travolta, 54,
and Kelly Preston, 46, died of a
seizure at the family’s vacation
home in Freeport, Grand
Bahama, on January 2.

ALLEGED TRAVOLTA EXTORTION PLOT

Bridgewater, Lightbourne trial
likely to start on September 21



FRtn aie eeu SIAOLOMCUler nace MOU A MUcKI LOL NE

Attorney Carlson Shurland of
Freeport, Grand Bahama, who
represents Lightbourne pro bono,
objected to yesterday’s arraign-
ment, submitting that the prose-
cution had not provided him with
all of the relevant documents. Mr
Shurland told the court that he
had been provided several typed
statements, but no original hand-
written ones. Mr Shurland also
requested the statement of
Allyson Maynard-Gibson, who is
a lawyer for the Travoltas, tapes

Tim Clarke/Tribune staff

from which the transcripts were
derived, as well as a copy of the
“refusal to transfer” document.
Director of Public Prosecutions
Bernard Turner told the court,
however, that Lightbourne had
been served with all the neces-
sary documents. Mr Turner told
the court that 11 of the 14 type-
written witness statements had
been signed and that he would
undertake to provide Mr Shur-
land with copies of the originals.
John Travolta, West End and

Additional space to cut
passport office waiting

IN an effort to alleviate exor-
bitant waiting periods at the pass-
port office the Ministry of For-
eign Affairs has acquired addi-
tional office space, Minister of
Foreign Affairs Brent Symonette
announced.

The minister said it is hoped
that this will allow for the Pass-
port Office to better accommo-
date the high volume of applica-
tions for the new ePassport.

The Passport Office, which is
located on the lower floor of the
Basden Building on Thompson
Boulevard, will now occupy the
entire building, as staff from the
Ministry of Housing are being
relocated.

The government has been try-
ing to find alternate accommoda-
tions for the Ministry of Housing
staff since August 2007. They will
now occupy offices on Charlotte
Street.

Expand

“We would move in, expand
the services by getting extra staff
for data entry and production so
we could deal with the backlog
of applications and produce more
ePassports,” Mr Symonette said.

He had previously identified a
lack of office space as the prima-
ry impediment to the Ministry not
hiring more data entry staff and
putting to use additional
machines to speed up the rate at
which ePassports are produced.
At present there are two print-
ing machines to produce the
ePassport but only one printing
station — the Passport Office in
New Providence.

“The Ministry of Foreign



— ——————————— | ©
fae ben ep rT \

MORE ROOM: The Ministry of Foreign Affairs has acquired additional office



space to allow the Passport Office to better deal with applications.

Affairs is
reviewing the
possibility of
establishing
another pro-
duction cen-
tre, possibly
in Grand
Bahama. A
statement

BRENT would be
SYMONETTE __ issued on this
matter later,”
Mr Symon-

ette said.

Meanwhile, he is urging
Bahamians whose passports are
set to expire this year to apply
for the ePassport to avoid the tra-
ditional summer rush at the Pass-
port Office.

Approximately 2,833 ePass-
ports were completed in February
2009. Since the system was imple-

ARUN C=



Tim Clarke/Tribune staff

RBC FINCO partnered with the Princess Margaret Hospital to hold a blood drive yesterday at the compa-
ny’s Palmdale Branch on the corner of Rosetta Street and Patton Street. Pictured are Marcus Hutcheson
(right), mortgage manager at RBC FINCO, and Tennille Colebrooke, customer service and operations man-

ager, donate blood.

mented in December, 2007, an
estimated 17,000 Bahamians have
received the ePassport.

The International Civil Avia-
tion Organisation (ICAO), of
which the Bahamas is a member,
has mandated that by 2010, all
countries must be issuing ePass-
ports or machine readable pass-
ports. The ePassport was official-
ly launched on December 5, 2007,
in a move to increase protection
against identity theft, heighten
aviation security and combat ille-
gal immigration.

ie
Ut
Da ete
PHONE: 322-2157

Drinks Troll
Coffee Tab

Cushions

Bimini MP Obie Wilchcombe,
and PLP Senator Allyson May-
nard-Gibson are among witness-
es the prosecution will call.

Both Bridgewater and Light-
bourne informed the court that
they intend to give notice within
21 days as to whether they will
present their alibis and call wit-
nesses on their behalf.

Attorney Murrio Ducille, who
represents Bridgewater, asked the
court to extend the $50,000 bail
which was granted to her in Mag-
istrate’s Court. Although Mr
Ducille noted that the $50,000
bail was a bit high in view of the
alleged offence, Mr Turner sub-
mitted that it was reasonable giv-
en that Ms Bridgewater had no
reporting conditions attached.

Senior Justice Allen left Ms
Bridgewater’s bail at $50,000 with
two sureties.

Attorney Shurland told the
court that Lightbourne, who is
also on $50,000 bail, has to report
to the Central Police in Freeport,
Grand Bahama, every day. He
asked the court to reduce his
client’s reporting conditions to
three days a week and to reduce
his client’s bail to between
$20,000 and $25,000. Senior Jus-
tice Allen took away Light-
bourne’s reporting conditions, but
left his bail at $50,000.

Attorneys Ducille and Shur-
land also submitted to the court
that the case should be heard in
Freeport. Mr Ducille argued that
because the charges emanate



WB Senior Justice Allen refuses bid to have case heard in Freeport

from Freeport and the two
accused reside in Freeport, they
should stand trial there before a
jury of their peers. Mr Shurland
strongly argued for the case to be
heard in Freeport, stating that it
would be very expensive for his
client, who is unemployed, to
have to travel to New Providence
and pay for his accommodations,
as well of those of the four wit-
nesses he intends to call. Mr
Shurland submitted that his clien-
t’s case would be severely preju-
diced because of this. Mr Shur-
land also argued that the
Supreme Court in Freeport is ide-
ally suited to hear the matter
rather quickly as it does not have
a high volume of cases. Senior
Justice Allen, however, ques-
tioned the probability of empan-
elling an impartial jury in
Freeport.

Mr Turner, while accepting
that both of the accused reside in
Grand Bahama, submitted to the
court that significant activities
took place in New Providence.
He also told the court that only
four of the prosecution’s witness-
es reside in Freeport and that the
probability of empanelling an
impartial jury is greater in New
Providence. Senior Justice Allen
refused the application to have
the case heard in Freeport. She is
expected to give her reasons in a
written ruling by the end of the
week. The trial is expected to
open on September 21 and con-
tinue to October 9.

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or Elegance
PAGE 4, WEDNESDAY, APRIL 29, 2009 THE TRIBUNE



EDITORIAL/LETTERS TO THE EDITOR

Ae Significant
turtle project



Being Bound to Swear to The Dogmas of No Master
LEON E. H. DUPUCH, Publisher/Editor 1903-1914

SIR ETIENNE DUPUCH, Kt, O.B.E., K.M., K.CS.G.,
(Hon.) LL.D., D.Litt.

Publisher/Editor 1919-1972

Contributing Editor 1972-1991

EILEEN DUPUCH CARRON, C.M.G., M.S. B.A., LL.B.

Publisher/Editor 1972-

Published Daily Monday to Saturday

Shirley Street, RO. Box N-3207, Nassau, Bahamas
Insurance Management Building., P.O. F-485, Freeport, Grand Bahama

TELEPHONES
Switchboard (News, Circulation and Advertising) 322-1986
Advertising Manager - (242) 502-2352
Circulation Department - (242) 502-2387
Nassau Fax: - (242) 328-2398
Freeport, Grand Bahama: 1-(242)-352-6608
Freeport fax: (242) 352-9348

WEBSITE
www.tribune242.com — updated daily at 2pm

Obama’s nuclear arms offer not realistic

IT isn’t that President Obama doesn’t
understand the problem. However, his solu-
tion needs a great deal of heft to be plausible.

On his recent European tour, the presi-
dent, speaking in Prague, summed up the
daunting challenge succinctly. “In a strange
turn of history,” he said, “the threat of glob-
al nuclear war has gone down, but the risk of
a nuclear attack has gone up.”

He was speaking just hours after North
Korea launched its second ballistic missile, in
defiance of a U.N. resolution, and noted that
al-Qaida and like-minded terrorists are
“determined to buy, build or steal a bomb.”

His proposal of what to do had an air of
unreality, or non sequitur, about it. He said
the U.S. would seek to cut its dominating
nuclear arsenal to set a good example that
would encourage other nations to follow suit.

This sort of trade-off might work with the
Russians, with whom Washington will nego-
tiate. There is no evidence that it would per-
suade those that constitute today’s nuclear
threat — rogue nations and militant insur-
gencies.

Only last week, the Taliban extended its
reach into the Pakistani heartland, imposing
its harsh religious laws on cowed people as it
continues its march to overthrow the secular
government. They did this unopposed by
Pakistan’s feckless regime and its timid or
demoralized military — which the US. is
preparing to underwrite with billions of aid
dollars on top of huge sums already invested.

Pakistan has up to an estimated 100 nuclear
bombs, which could fall into the hands of the
Taliban, whose support of al-Qaida in
Afghanistan resulted in the 9/11 assault on the
US.

Or take Iran. Despite international tut-tut-
ting through ineffective sanctions, it is pro-
gressing steadily on the path to developing
nuclear weapons capability. In addition, with
the help of North Korea, Tehran is much
further along in developing ballistic missiles.

Tran also has a history of secretly shipping
arms to non-state groups, such as Hezbollah
in Lebanon and Hamas in Gaza.

How could one prudently conclude that in
time it would not arm its proxies with nuclear
weapons, should it serve their purpose?

Or take North Korea. It possesses at least
six nuclear bombs and is gearing up to pro-

duce more. The world wrote off its latest
missile test because it failed to place a satel-
lite into orbit. But typically missile develop-
ment is marked by failures before success is
attained. The recent missile travelled about
twice as far as its predecessor before breaking
up.

For its part, North Korea has been
extremely busy selling its missile and nuclear
skills to others, including a nuclear plant it
was building for Syria — until the Israeli air
force flattened it.

It was the father of Pakistan’s nuclear
bombs, A.Q.Khan, who peddled his knowl-
edge to North Korea, Iran and Libya, and
probably would have found another eager
customer in Saddam Hussein.

It is worth noting that while Khan is the
world’s worst sort of nightmare, he is a hero
to his own people. He is now free, after hav-
ing been placed under house arrest by a pre-
vious Pakistani regime.

And there are former Soviet and other
East European scientists who have been
accused of trying to market their skills and
materiel to bomb-seeking entities.

In such an uncertain world, it would seem
that the United States would retain its strong
nuclear advantage as a warning and a dis-
suader of would-be nuclear adventurers.
America’s ability to massively retaliate is the
iron fist that provides diplomacy’s velvet
glove the credibility it needs to be effective.

For international diplomacy to work, agree-
ment among the existing major nuclear pow-
ers — the U.S., Russia, China, Britain and
France — is indispensable.

So far, such collaboration has been limited
and transitory. There is wide disagreement
about the dangers posed by Iran and North
Korea.

Before the U.S. cashes in its nuclear chips,
President Obama should come up with a plan
to deal with the clear and present dangers
emanating from ambitious nations and deter-
mined terrorists whose religious fervour
inspires them to rule the world, through per-
suasion where possible and through power
where necessary.

(This article was written by Harry Rosen-

feld-
c.2009 Albany Times Union).



in Turks and
Caicos Islands

EDITOR, The Tribune.

Your readers who are gen-
uinely interested in ways of pre-
serving marine turtles and pre-
venting cruelty to them may be
interested in a project currently
underway in the Turks and
Caicos Islands.

Headed by the UK-based
Marine Conservation society,
the project is currently working
together with fishermen and the
government in order to update
the ordinances governing tur-
tle fisheries.

Already, the group (led by
Amdeep Sanghera, a British
conservation expert) is collect-
ing information it will need to
update these ordinances and
laws, which will likely involve
restricted seasons, more strin-
gent weight restrictions and the
like.

As for the issue of humani-
tarianism, Mr Sanghera (put off,
like most of us, by the sight of
cruelty to these animals) has
already indicated that his pro-
ject may be able to help gov-
ernment and fishermen assess
the most humane way of slaugh-

LETTERS

letters@tribunemedia net



tering turtles, which will pre-
sumably require some input
from veterinarian scientists.

Readers may enquire directly
about the project by emailing
amdeep.sanghera@mcsuk.org.

The very existence of this
project, and the aims expressed
to date, would appear to sup-
port my view that there is no
reason to ban the entire turtle
fishery industry in order to
serve the causes of both sustain
ability and humanity.

It also demonstrates how a
genuine and healthy civil society
(as opposed to a hostile and
self-appointed one) operates.

It works with people and
within the context of their cul-
ture and practices, in order to
achieve specific, defined objec-
tives.

It does hide behind vague and
jumbled objectives and simply
keep lobbing out crude, lurid
attacks on the traditional prac-

tices themselves.

On the other hand, those
parading as civil activists in this
country are often simply carry-
ing private resentments and
expressing identity-related trib-
alism (both on vivid display in
some of the letters sparked by
my defence of humane, sus-
tainable turtle consumption).

As for Mr W Grattan’s pre-
diction that I would not be able
to resist answering his angry lit-
tle letter of the April 24th, I will
recount an anecdote about the
late Calvin Coolidge, 30th Pres-
ident of the United States, and a
famously reserved and taciturn
man in his day.

A gossipy woman once found
herself sitting next to Mr
Coolidge at a White House din-
ner and was determined to test
him. “Mr President,” she said
“T bet a fellow that I can get
more than two words out of you
tonight.” The President’s retort
was characteristic: “You lose.”

ANDREW ALLEN
Nassau,
April 24, 2009.

Remove this threat to
jewel of the Bahamas

EDITOR, The Tribune.

Tuesday or Wednesday
White Crown Terminal North
Eleuthera shipped aviation gas
containers to ’Briland for
refill. I wish to draw this to
the Hon Earl Deveaux’s Min-
istry. In my opinion this is not
only dangerous, but it is wrong
and despicable.

Kindly see to it, sir, that this
terrible error is corrected. Fur-
thermore these containers are
highly “combustible”, one
does not need a cigarette or
cigar, the sun is quite hot
enough nowadays to ignite.

In the event they blow up,
Harbour Island sinks. This is
the jewel of the Bahamas —
let’s keep it the jewel.

Far too many billionaires
have homes here to lose: we
were never meant to be a
“container port,” every week
the G&G shipping from the
red river in Miami, Florida

with an agent in Harbour
Island.

Kindly speak to the Minister
for the Environment.

People with money, lots of
money love to throw their
weight around. They must be
checked and checked now.

On the other hand ’Briland
has outgrown its dock; we
need a “passenger dock” or
leave the present one and find
a way to provide a “freight
dock.”

When this problem is solved
there would be no more con-
gestion or traffic problems.

The same has been an issue
for over two decades (20
years). What can we do as a

people to help this seemingly
insurmountable difficulty?

We have a “paradise” let us
keep it so.

The sooner we as citizens
and voters focus on the pas-
senger or freight dock the bet-
ter off we will all be.

The G&G serves a special
purpose as an intermediate
mail boat. Building materi-
als, food, etc, are all shipped
by her. True the island is
small; therefore we have to
utilise the space we have to
the best advantage.

RN MATHER
Harbour Island,
April 3, 2009.

Is The Trust qualified for this
technical planning work?

EDITOR, The Tribune.

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If I understood Minister Earl Deveaux, Minister of the Environ-
ment, in a recent statement he seemed to indicate that Town Plan-
ning-Physical Planning for the islands not developed will be in the
hands of The Bahamas National Trust.

What qualifications does The Trust have to carry out this highly
technical planning work?

Okay BNT should be part of a broad grouping that would advise,
consult and propose policy; God forbid BNT will be the sole agency
doing this as I have to admit when looking at Sandy Port, which was
developed by a past BNT president in my opinion there is hardly any
good judgment shown in that development as virtually all the orig-
inal swamp has been removed for artificial canals and totally the
denuding of all natural overgrowth and original trees.

IT hope Government and the professional Town Planners will see
the importance to set back all coastal development a minimum of say
5-800 ft. from high water mark? Insurance companies will I suggest
fully support this idea and our premiums might go down.

Coastal building also with coastal sea frontage we have to preserve
the natural views and don't do what we now are faced with along
Love Beach a total 100 per cent blocking of the natural views lost for-
ever.

T hope the Minister will see fit to amend his policy position if I got
it right as Bahamas National Trust is qualified in their field of
expertise, but not in Town and Physical Planning as much as Town
Planners and Physical Planners are not qualified to do what BNT has
expertise in.

J MOORE
Nassau,
April 16, 2009.

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THE TRIBUNE

WEDNESDAY, APRIL 29, 2009, PAGE 5



LOCAL NEWS



Regional officials
Call for greater
collaboration in

ight against drugs,

OFFICIALS at CARICOM’s }
Regional Workshop on the }
Development of National Anti- }
Drug Strategies and Plans have :
agreed that it is necessary to tar- }
get both supply and demand in }
the fight against drug traffick- }

ing in the Caribbean.

At the opening ceremony ofa }
three-day workshop in Castries, }
Saint Lucia yesterday, CARI- }
COM assistant secretary-gener- }
al for human and social devel- }
opment, Dr Edward Greene, }
told participants, government }
officials and diplomats that if :
there is to be any meaningful, }
sustained results, “we must }
address this phenomenon as a }
whole and not as two disparate i

issues.”

He pointed to the develop- :
ment of a national anti-drug }
strategy and plan as one way of :
marrying the two issues and }
expressed pleasure that the }
CARICOM Secretariat was col- }
laborating with the Inter-Amer-
ican Drug Abuse Control Com- }
mission of the Organisation of :
American States (CICAD) to }
train officials in drug supply con- :
trol and drug demand reduction. }

“We are expecting that the }
participants will leave this week }
of training, with knowledge, :
skills and tools that will enable }
and guide them in effectively }
implementing and monitoring :
their own national anti-drug :
strategies and plan,” Dr Greene }
said, as he pledged the support }
of the CARICOM Secretariat }
in providing on request from }
member states, follow-up in- }
country technical support for this }

initiative.

The deputy permanent secre- i
tary in Saint Lucia’s Ministry of }
Health, Mrs Chreselda St Juste, :

asked facilitators to sensitise par

ticipants to the need to combine
both supply and demand }
approaches when forming poli- :

cy

said.

ment.

private and public sector.

House to debate investigation

into school sex allegations

@ By ALISON LOWE
Tribune Staff Reporter
alowe@tribunemedia.net

PARLIAMENTARIANS will
today debate whether a select com-
mittee should be formed to investi-
gate the circumstances surrounding
allegations of sexual molestation at
the Eight Mile Rock High School in
Grand Bahama.

This comes after PLP parliamen-
tarians criticised House Speaker
Alvin Smith for blocking a move by
PLP chairwoman Glenys Hanna-Mar-
tin to initiate the parliamentary
process necessary to form such a
committee several weeks ago, citing
House rules.

Mrs Hanna-Martin, the Englerston
MP, has repeatedly expressed con-
cern about the allegations and the
ministry’s handling of them.

Both she and leader of opposition



Alvin Smith CHI CM aU elain

business in the House of Assembly,
MP for Bain and Grants Town
Bernard Nottage, accused the gov-
ernment of seeking to avoid debate
on the issue and criticised the Speak-
er Mr Smith, FNM MP for North
Eleuthera, for siding with the
government.

Yesterday, Minister of Education
Carl Bethel said he anticipates a “big
debate” on the matter.

Police have been investigating alle-
gations made by students against sev-
eral teachers at the Eight Mile Rock
High School since two former stu-
dents, both male, accused a male
teacher of sexually molesting them
several years ago.

These claims were brought to
the attention of the press — and
according to Mr Bethel, the Ministry
of Education - in January of this
year.

After the accusations were levied
against this teacher, who has since
fled the country, similar allegations
surfaced in relation to two other
teachers, one of them female.

Following a debate on the matter
tomorrow, parliamentarians will be
given the opportunity to vote on
whether the matter warrants the

appointment of the investigative com-
mittee.

Ms Hanna Martin has said that in
supporting the appointment of MPs
to a select committee, she wishes to
see the initial response by law
enforcement and education officials
examined to determine “whether
there were any failings”.

The PLP chairwoman accused Mr
Bethel in late March of remaining
“callously and inexcusably silent” in
the face of the scandal at the school.

A day later, Mr Bethel and Min-
istry of Education officials called a
press conference where they outlined
what they said were the “extraordi-
nary measures” taken by the ministry
in response to the allegations — such
as deciding to have all prospective
teachers vetted by police.

He admitted that the controversy
had exposed weaknesses in the sys-
tem.




“For too long we have treated }
these components as parallel, }
distinct and distant, despite the }
fact that they both target a com- }
mon enemy, aimed at achieving }
a common cause. It is time we }
stop working in isolation,” she }

Mrs St Juste noted that }
whether “we are so advised by }
funding agencies or not, we have }
expended more funds and:
resources on supply reduction }
without equating demand reduc- }
tion approaches,” and called for }
the region to refocus its public :
education mechanisms on both }
demand and supply reduction in i
an effort to tackle what has }
come to be regarded as a serious }
threat to sustainable develop- ;

The Organisation of Ameri- i
can States (OAS) representative }
in Saint Lucia, Anne Marie }
Blackman, underscored the need }
for evidence-based policies that }
are underpinned by solid analy- }
sis in the fight against drug traf-
ficking and noted that the devel- }
opment of national anti-drug }
plans, strategies and policies ;
should be done in co-ordination }
with all stakeholders in both the

Weather experts examine forecast
methods at Bahamas conference

WEATHER experts in this
country and around the world
are examining ways to better
predict the development of seri-
ous weather systems.

Improving forecasting meth-
ods for serious storms was top
of the agenda at the World
Meteorological Organisation’s
(WMO) 15th session of the
Regional Association Four at
the Wyndham Crystal Palace
and Casino.

The conference was opened
by Desmond Bannister, Minis-
ter of Youth Sports and Cul-
ture, on behalf of Earl Deveaux,
Minister of the Environment.

Knowledge

“Tam glad to see so many
acclaimed weather experts from
around the region comprising
North and Central America, the
Caribbean and other parts of
the globe gathering here today
to share with us knowledge and
ideas on the co-ordination of
meteorological, hydrological
and related activities,” Mr Ban-
nister said.

The Regional Association
Four session is a quadrennial
meeting of weather experts
from North America, Central
America and the Caribbean,
who discuss ways to co-ordinate
meteorological, hydrological
and related activities in the
region.

Discussions will focus on
activities that will enhance the
capability of states to produce

Desmond Bannister



better weather forecasts and
warnings; enhance their ability
to provide better hydrological
forecasts; and enhance
their ability to provide better
climate predictions and assess-
ments.

It has been 12 years since the
Bahamas hosted the meeting
and according to participants,
many changes have taken place
in that time — 1998 was the
warmest year ever recorded, the
Antarctic Larsen B ice shelf col-
lapsed in 2002, and 2005 saw a
record 15 hurricanes.

“With global warming we can
expect stronger storms, more
coastal erosion and flooding of
low-lying areas and the degra-
dation of ecosystems on which
many Bahamians depend,” Mr
Bannister said. “Worst of all, a
sea level rise of just one foot,

CELEBRATING ANNUAL HONOURS DAY

LEST sabes

(Fy

e

rd



MINISTER OF YOUTH, SPORTS AND CULTURE Desmond Bannister poses with members of the Alpha Kappa
Alpha Sorority and students from across the Bahamas as they celebrate their annual Honours Day on Friday,
April 24, at the Ministry of Education's boardroom.



EDUCATION MINISTER Carl Bethel poses with members of the Alpha Kappa Alpha Sorority and students
from across the Bahamas outside the Ministry of Education.

which is anticipated by the end
of the century, would effective-
ly submerge 80 per cent of our
islands.

“IT am happy to see that the
WMO recognises that adapting
to present climate variability
will go a long way in adapting to
long-term climate change; and
that adaptation and mitigation
together can help achieve sus-
tainable development,” Mr
Bannister said.

The government of the
Bahamas has heeded the call of
the WMO and taken actions on
all fronts, he said.

Through the Plant for the
Planet Programme, Mr Bannis-
ter noted, the Bahamas Envi-
ronment, Science and Technol-
ogy (BEST) Commission, has

launched The Bahamas Million
Tree Campaign (BMTC) — an
effort to plant one million trees
across the country by December
31, 2009.

Trees

“The trees will improve the
air quality, support native ani-
mals, conserve water and pre-
vent beach erosion and reduce
run-off that can adversely affect
our marine environment,” he
said.

Agreeing that adaptation and
mitigation together can help to
achieve sustainable develop-
ment, Mr Bannister said the
Ministry of Environment has
drafted an energy policy to

queue Hoty Tay
od

Aaron t

reduce greenhouse gas
emissions by 15 per cent by
2015.

“Our experience has taught
us that weather and climate
information are critical to pre-
venting disasters and saving
lives.

“Tn light of this we have inte-
grated early warning systems
into emergency prevention
preparedness, management
and response,” Mr Bannister
said.

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PAGE 6, WEDNESDAY, APRIL 29, 2009

THE TRIBUNE





i

BOTH THE FACE MASKS (above) and surgical gloves are subject to

45 per cent import duty after shipping.

CRU TT
suspected gambling houses

FROM page one

facilities.



LOCAL NEWS

Swine flu prompts
call for import tax
drop on face masks

m@ By MEGAN REYNOLDS
Tribune Staff Reporter
mreynolds@tribunemedia.net

PROTECTIVE face masks recom-
mended to prevent the spread of the
swine flu are subject to 45 per cent import
tax and medical suppliers are calling on
government to drop the rate.

Both the face masks and surgical gloves
are subject to 45 per cent import duty
after shipping, and pharmaceutical man-
ager at Nassau Agencies Ltd Barbara
Henderson said it is more important now
than ever to make the medical supplies
more affordable.

Mrs Henderson maintains the highest
cost is to the public purse as around 80
per cent of medical materials are pur-
chased by government for hospitals and
health clinics, and as the threat of swine
flu intensifies she is concerned the high
taxes could leave Bahamians vulnerable.

She said: “They should do it even if
they do it temporarily because people
will want to purchase them in order to
protect themselves, and it would save 10

times more money for the government
if people could protect themselves.”

The high rate of duty normally pre-
vents Nassau Agencies Ltd from import-
ing surgical masks and gloves, Mrs Hen-
derson said.

But as several people have been quar-
antined in Abaco and the World Health
Organisation raised the worldwide pan-
demic alert to level four in relation to
Swine Influenza Virus (SIV) , confirming
person-to-person spread of the virus and
the possibility of community-level out-
breaks, the medical supplier ordered in
cases of the face masks expecting an
increased demand.

“We went ahead and ordered some
masks that are certified to be used to pre-
vent the transmission of the virus, and
the whole time we were ordering them we
were cussing and thinking, ‘why the hell
are we paying 45 per cent duty?’,” Mrs
Henderson said.

“It has always been like that and its
ridiculous, especially when you think we
have 10 per cent duty on jewellery - I
mean who the hell cares about jew-

ellery?”

The masks, which sell for around $10 in
the United States, would cost around $20
in the Bahamas after shipping and tax,
and Mrs Henderson said Nassau Agen-
cies Ltd usually avoids importing med-
ical materials as they are not able to offer
competitive prices.

She said: “People are not going to buy
locally when you can just go to Miami
and put them in your suitcase.

“We have never competed in the mate-
rials section because we have always sus-
pected that there was a lot of funny busi-
ness going on.

“People were underbidding us for
things there is no way they could have
afforded for cheaper unless they were
not paying duty and we have never gone
that route.”

Nassau Agencies Ltd have been lob-
bying the Ministry of Health to drop the
duty for 20 years, Mrs Henderson said,
but now they are appealing to the Minis-
ter of Finance to consider suspending or
removing the duty from all medical sup-
plies used in government institutions.

Quarantine expanded

"As a result of these operations, police have taken sever-
al persons into custody; they have taken in several gam-
bling paraphernalia and investigations continue,” Mr Evans
said.

Senior Assistant Commissioner Marvin Dames, who over-
sees the Grand Bahama division, recently spearheaded sev-
eral sting operations on alleged gaming houses on that island.

Algernon Eric Cartwright
66 Algie”
19th Nov. 1936 to 29th April, 2008

We miss you more than
words can say.

Wife, daughter and the family



amid swine flu fears

FROM page one

swine-flu is reported to have
killed at least 150 persons in
Mexico and infected about 64
persons in the United States.

"We had found out about
the situation (swine-flu) and
had been following it up but
we received confirmation
from the organisers that it was
on schedule. We were con-
cerned for them while they
were there but while they
were there were comfortable
and didn't see any problems
but there is concern because
of the panic right now," said
Mr Haven, who did not
accompany the group to Mex-
ico.

According to international
reports, an American team
that travelled to Mexico for
the tournament was returning
to the US yesterday. The can-
cellation was said to be a
move by Mexican officials to
stem the spread of the poten-
tially deadly virus.

Meanwhile, health officials
are still monitoring the con-
dition of 16 persons from
Marsh Harbour who were
placed under a seven-day
quarantine in Abaco after a
recent cruise to Mexico.

On Monday Dr Minnis said
this move was just a precau-
tion and up to press time there
were no documented cases of
swine-flu in the Bahamas.

According to residents of
Marsh Harbour, the persons

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Interested and qualified candidatesshould send their resume to
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in quarantine are doing well.

Administrator for Central
Abaco Cephas Cooper said
things remain normal on the
island.

"Everyone is going about
their normal business — there
are no signs of any major con-
cerns as yet but I suppose peo-
ple are being watchful, hope-
ful and optimistic that this
thing will hopefully go away,"
he said.

Health officials are warning

Bahamian travellers to pay
special attention world reports
on affected areas, avoid
crowded environments if they
are in a crowded area, main-
tain proper hygiene and cover
coughs and sneezes.

The illness is treatable with
anti-viral drugs of which the
country has a stockpile,
according to officials.

According to the Centre for
Disease Control and Preven-
tion, symptoms of the swine-

flu are similar to those of the
regular flu, including fever,
lethargy, lack of appetite and
coughing.

Persons with swine flu also
have reported a runny nose,
sore throat, nausea, vomiting
and diarrhoea, the CDC
said.

Persons experiencing symp-
toms are advised to avoid pub-
lic places and call the min-
istry's health hotline at 502-
4790.

Man dies in fire ‘two
days after moving
to the Bahamas’

FROM page one

at the time, according to neighbours.

Lewis’ neighbour, Seoalian Mormilien, said
he was inside with his young son when he start-
ed to smell smoke. He said he quickly grabbed
his child and rushed outside where he was met
with screams of help from next door.

Mr Mormilien said he was able to rescue the
young boy who was trapped in the burning
unit next to his home by using a crowbar to pry
the front door open.

"T heard the lil’ boy crying, he couldn't come
out because it was too much smoke so I just
took (the) crowbar and opened the door. Then
I just ask what happened and he say next man
inside the house,” he said, adding that the
smoke in the apartment was too thick to save
Louis from the flames.

He said he did not know much about the
victim except he had arrived from Haiti less
than 48 hours before his death.

Police said they got a call about a fire, which
started shortly before midnight yesterday in a
home on Minnie Street.

"When officers arrived they met fire coming
from a single-storey building and immediately
extinguished the fire, leaving the building with
extensive damage," Press Liaison Officer Assis-
tant Superintendent Walter Evans told The
Tribune yesterday.

"Inside a bedroom officers found the burnt
remains of a man who is believed to be 40-
year-old Ronnie Lewis,” said ASP Evans,
adding that police believe he is a Haitian citi-
zen.

When The Tribune arrived on scene around
2pm yesterday, friends and neighbours were
helping the residents pick through the ashes to
salvage any remains left undamaged by the
fire, yet only a few pieces of clothing remained.

"Nothing was saved, only a few pieces of
clothing were saved for the little boy," said
another neighbour who did not want to be
identified.

Still, Mr Mormilien remained positive and
said he might find shelter with friends in the
area.





THE REMAINS of one of the apartments
following the blaze.
THE TRIBUNE

WEDNESDAY, APRIL 29, 2009, PAGE 7



Cultural industries are in decline

"Bahamian nationalism is a neb-
ulous thing, difficult to
describe... Trying to get a handle on
what ts Bahamian is like trying to
catch a fish with one's bare hands."

- Nicolette Bethel

AST week's article on
ahamian identity and

cultural activity generated some
comment from the cognoscenti,
both on and off the Bahama Pun-
dit website, where the article is
posted.

Two inter-connected points
emerged from that discussion.
There certainly are institutions,
laws and resources to support and
protect Bahamian heritage, but
our cultural industries are nonethe-
less in a perilous state of decline.

Any attempt to analyse why
this is so must look at where we've
come from.

As College of the Bahamas lec-
turer Ian Strachan put it, slavery
convinced black Bahamians of
their inferiority while colonialism
robbed all Bahamians of their con-
fidence.

The result is rootlessness and
indifference, more pronounced
among blacks than whites. Add to
this the enormous influence of
American culture, the impact of
foreign tourists, and the miniscule
size and capacity of our creative
community, and we can begin to
see why cultural activists are moan-
ing.

Here we are more than 30 years
after independence, they say, still
dreaming and arguing about things
that should have been in place long
ago.

We are still trying to save what
remains of our tattered cultural
heritage, and still hoping for the
economic freedom to practise our
craft.

By most accounts, until the
1960s Bahamians had no national
consciousness. But the massive
expansion of education after the
Progressive Liberal Party's 1967
victory led to a new focus on cul-
ture — favouring activities that
had previously been either dis-
counted or wilfully ignored. It was
all part of the “quiet revolution”
that led inexorably from majority
rule to nationhood.

In 1972, when the nationalist
fires were at their peak, the emi-
nent composer and musician
Clement Bethel (best known for
his dissertation on Junkanoo and
for writing the folk opera Sammy
Swain) was picked to head the gov-

YOUR FUTURE

IS ABOUT TO GET BRIGHTER

ernment's newly created cultural
division.

Bethel's untimely death in 1987
coincided with a UNESCO report
by a Canadian university profes-
sor that urged the government to
set priorities and write legislation
to protect Bahamian heritage, pro-
vide training for artists, and devel-
op a range of cultural facilities.

Calling for more arts funding,
the report said: "The lot of the
average Bahamian artist is not a
happy one. Income from art is
modest or non-existent; employ-
ment is scarce and irregular; sales
are infrequent; and training is
demanding and costly."

Nevertheless, cultural activities
were seen as our most promising
and productive economic
resources, and the report called
for a system of matching public
and private sector grants to sup-
port creative individuals and
groups. These recommendations
were largely ignored, but some
proposals — such as a national art
gallery and heritage legislation —
have been realised over the years.

Clement Bethel's death left a
void that was not filled until
Cleophas Adderley's appointment
as director of culture in 1996.
Bethel's daughter, Nicolette,
became director in 2003 but
resigned last year in the face of
what she regards as congenital dis-
interest in the arts on the part of
politicians.

As an example, she cites the
fact that for years the cultural divi-
sion has been shunted from Edu-
cation to Youth, to the Office of
the Prime Minister, and back to
Education. It is now part of the
Ministry of Youth, Sports and Cul-
ture again, with a small staff of 28.

They look after a number of
activities, including the National
Arts Festival, Junkanoo, the
National Dance School, the
National Poetry Competition, The-
atre in the Park, and a range of
other national and international
events.

But the bulk of the division's
$2 million annual budget goes to
Junkanoo for bleacher rentals,
seed and prize money throughout
the Bahamas, as well as adminis-



trative subsidies for the Junkanoo
Committee, and other parade
expenses.

Sixteen years ago the Senate
held a series of hearings on cultur-
al development led by then Inde-
pendent senator Fred Mitchell.
These sessions resulted in a draft
law that sought to create a nation-
al arts council. But that exercise
went nowhere.

In 2002, the Christie adminis-
tration appointed a National Com-
mission on Cultural Development,
whose 60 members met regularly
for several years under the leader-
ship of Charles Carter and the late
Winston Saunders. This body
revised the earlier Bill and sub-
mitted it to Cabinet in 2004, where
it promptly died.

That version called for a semi-
independent arts council to pro-
mote cultural activities generally. It
would do this through a sweeping
mandate to raise funds, operate
creative facilities and training
schools, give grants, produce shows
and fund research.

Since 2004, this Bill has been
circulating among members of the
cultural community, and may have
informed the contents of the
Entertainment and Culture
Encouragement Bill, which is cur-
rently being lobbied by people like
Fred Munnings.

The Cultural Commission also
came up with a policy document
that was unveiled at a National
Cultural Conclave in 2006 and
posted online for comment. It
builds on a draft written in 1995
by Cleophas Adderley and the late
Kayla Lockhart Edwards, and aims
to give “a coherent strategic
national context for planning and
decision-making about culture."

One of the challenges for any
young nation, this document says,
"is the balance between sover-
eignty and national identity, and
the influence of a pervasive global
culture that is increasingly
homogenous and American in
flavour.”

More significantly, the draft pol-
icy calls for an urgent "redirection
of resources and funds to the
development and promotion of the
Bahamian cultural sector," which it

described as "one of the least
developed" in the hemisphere.

This brings us to the question of
exactly what resources are cur-
rently available for the cultural sec-
tor. Although an overarching
national policy and a national arts
council have never been achieved,
there have been some significant
advances in this sector since the
UNESCO report was written.

The Antiquities, Monuments
and Museums Corporation was
created by Parliament in 1998. It is
responsible for archaeological
research and heritage conserva-
tion, and currently operates five
public facilities on New Providence
— Forts Fincastle, Montagu and
Charlotte, Balcony House and the
Pompey Museum

It also administers the Long
Island Museum at Buckley's and
the South Eleuthera Mission at
Rock Sound, and is developing a
museum in the old jail house on
San Salvador.

The AMMC shares responsibil-
ity for the Clifton Heritage Park
with an independent authority that
was created in 2004.

The government is now in the
process of strengthening the Cor-
poration's enabling act, and a deci-
sion will be made soon on whether
the former Collins mansion will
become a national museum or
library. The National Art Gallery
has been established since 2003 in
a restored 19th century mansion
on West Street.

A national endowment for the
arts was set up by the government
in the 1990s, but seems to have
become dormant, with no line item
in the budget. A private Endow-
ment for the Performing Arts,
organised by Winston Saunders
and Sir Orville Turnquest in 1996,
disburses about $60,000 a year in
grants and tuition subsidies to
Bahamian artists.

An Historic Bahamas Founda-
tion was established last year to
raise funds and accept donations
on behalf of the Antiquties Cor-
poration. And both the Lyford Cay
and Cable Bahamas Cares Foun-
dations provide regular funding
for the arts.

There are other public and pri-
vate subsidies to the creative com-
munity, but activists insist there
should be a single national policy
and overarching legislation that
makes sense out of all of these
overlapping initiatives, as well as a
coordinating authority if the state
is to maintain these investments
and subsidies.

More importantly, there needs



“Studies confirm
that cultural heritage
travellers stay longer
and spend more
money than other
kinds of tourists.

So would we be able
to generate more
revenue by investing
more in cultural
activities and product
development?”



to be an appreciation of the eco-
nomic value of cultural activities. A
few years ago, CARICOM pro-
duced a document on the region's
creative industries. It said activi-
ties like music, performing and
visual arts, broadcasting and pub-
lishing can not only create new
jobs but can provide avenues to
engage young people in produc-
tive pursuits.

Just one example will make the
point. Jose Antonio Abreu, an
economist and musician in
Venezuela, founded a programme
to help impoverished Venezuelan
kids take part in classical music.
After 30 years (and 10 political
administrations), it has evolved
into a network of 102 youth
orchestras, 55 children's orches-
tras, and 270 music centres —
embracing almost 250,000 young
musicians.

Their instruments and training
have been fully funded by a suc-
cession of Venezuelan govern-
ments, and the programme has
become an international model
that is seen as an alternative to
drugs and crime as well as a source
of national pride.

According to the CARICOM
report, "There is an urgent need to
put in place the appropriate regu-
latory and policy measures to
develop the enabling environment
for creative industries in this region
to realize their full growth potential
as viable businesses.”

But since commercial banks do
not value intellectual capital and
are reluctant to finance creative
industries, activists argue that gov-
ernment must provide seed money
or loan guarantees.

According to a draft policy on
grants produced a few years ago,
"Culture, like tourism, requires
investment in order to bring about
financial returns. Part of that
investment must be in the support

of private artistic and cultural pro-
jects through an enlightened grants
policy.”

Of course, the danger is that
we open ourselves up to yet anoth-
er massive public sector gravy
train. So perhaps the real question
is whether we are on the right track
with our existing spending. For
example, to my knowledge, no-
one has offered a detailed cost-
benefit analysis for investing up to
$100 million to dredge the harbour
so that bigger cruise ships can call.

And no-one has justified to the
Bahamian people recently the
expenditure of tens of millions on
overseas advertising and pr to gen-
erate tourists, when we all agree
that the visitor experience on the
ground is generally dreadful and
growing worse.

Studies confirm that cultural
heritage travellers stay longer and
spend more money than other
kinds of tourists. So would we be
able to generate more revenue by
investing more in cultural activi-
ties and product development? We
attempted to raise this point with
Tourism Director-General Ver-
nice Walkine, but she did not
return phone calls.

In the meantime there are gen-
uine fears among the creative com-
munity that without coordinated
protections and incentives, our cul-
tural resources could disappear
almost entirely — a predicament
illustrated by this passage from a
1929 account by Amelia Defries.
She described a magnificently
carved bedstead carved by one
Josiah Anthem of Eight Mile
Rock:

"Not eberybody can paint or
carve same as my fader," the
daughter murmered. Then the old
man brought out the chief labour
of his hands piece by piece. "Tt will
last for 30 years...But how can I
sell it when nobody nebber comes
to see?

"That certainly was a prob-
lem...If he put the carved bedstead
upon a sponging vessel and sent it
to Nassau in the fashionable sea-
son, he might sell it, and even get
an order for another.

"Anthem in his isolation was
like a rent and tattered sail after a
storm—a remnant or survival of a
finer past...yet if there was a revival
of cratsmanship on these islands
much good (moral and commer-
cial) might result."

What do you think?
Send comments to

larry@tribunemedia.net
Or visit wvw.bahamapundit.com

COME SPEAK TO THE EXPERTS

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PAGE 8, WEDNESDAY, APRIL 29, 2009

CREDIT SUISSE, NASSAU BRANCH

The Bahamas Financial Centre Telephone +1 242 356 8100
4th Floor Telefax +1 242 396 6589
Shirley & Charlotte Streets www. credit-suisse.com

P.O. Box N-4928

Nassau, Bahamas

CREDIT Suisse

Consolidated balance sheets







Reference
to notes end of
2008 2007
Assets (CHF million)
Cash and due from banks 90,521 36,304



3,892 4,526



purchased under







Central bank funds sold, secunti
resale agreements and securities borrowing transactions 12 269,013 296,341











of which encumbered 16,966 24,719
Trading assets, at fair value 13 341,381 = 830,125
tan apne ee lea anya pon aaron names sont ae fa
Investment securities ESTA 14,681 14,818









of which reported at fair value 24,820 25,080
Net loans 16 220,392 = 221,570
oe — ca een Far ere areal Nee NOE RO ee ae ae ue
EI Tap pei nee eens om a hi ene eee ete a ake ee
Premises and equipment 17 5,789 5,590
Goodwill - 1B «8,195.8, 746
nee renege ay



oo poe a et
Brokerage receivables 57,499 54,890
Other assets 21 85,208 103,079

34,066 49,298







of which reperted at fair value





of which encumbered 3,329 12,084
Assets of discontinued operations held-for-sale 4 1,023 ~
Total assets 1,151,669 1,333,742



Liabilities and shareholder's equity (CHF million) ;
Due to banks 22 74,948 106,979



aiden een ie ee ee esciain acetates, tenet ea yes ccgn eaten eae ona aa eee
Central bank funds purchased, securities sold under
repurchase agreements and securities lending transactions 12 243,970 300,476

174,975 140,424













¢ received as collateral, at fair value. a eee 29,755 «28,798
Trading liabilities, at fair value — - 188,718 200,575
ee ene ae ee
a octet ge eer ee econ ae
Long-term debt "187,282
ofwhich reported at fairvalue 78,069 107,290
Brokerage payables 55,893
Otherliabiities =” 106,530
“ofwhich reported at fair value 24,975 94,291





Liabilities of discontinued operations held-for-sale oe peters ee ee
BY TO asec cas i eemnementantlenatssecvedoun ieee eee ee es eo ee
1,124,801 1,302,408







Total liabilities

cannes Piece DD iii mee
eae act acct cad ah tipeves esac nts 2A eee ac livndecniea atten tae oe
RE as rater nnninineniininannnaneind oe
FE sagas’ pinning ned lednsheasintem tein ies
Ceo ioe ee 24 741) 4,290)
Total shareholder's equity 28,868 31,834

Total liabilities and shareholder's equity “4,151,669 1,333,742





eats eae ge yee ae et tee eee a ee
Additional share information

Par value (CHF) ce canuneen ae eeeatensnales : eo sd cieibnatuatesentsioe sl tone ee
issued shares (million) since ant Rts tees tedeceaaatesan 7 nse Cage ae

44.0 440

Shares outstanding (million)



Interested parties may obtain a copy of the audited accounts from Credit Suisse Nassau Branch, The Bahamas Financial Centre, 4*
Floor, Shirley and Charlotte Streets, P.O. Box N-4928, which would include disclosure of the material matters in Notes 1 and 2
referred to in the Group Auditors Report.

KPMG Kiynveld Peat Marwick Goerdeter SA
Audit Financial Services
Badenerstrasse 172 P.O. Box

CH-8004 Zurich -CH-8026 Zurich

Telephone +41 44 249 31 31
Fax +41 44 249 23:19
internet www.kpmg.ch

Report of the Independent Registered Public Accounting Firm to the General Meeting of

Credit Suisse, Zurich

We have audited Credit Suisse and subsidiaries’ (the “Bank”) interna! control over financial reporting as of December
31. 2008, based on criteria established in internal Control—Integrated Framework issued by the Committee of
Sponsoring Organizations of the Treadway Commission. The Bank's board of directors and management are
responsible for maintaining effective internal control over financial reporting and the Bank's management is
tesponsible for its assessment of the effectiveness of internal contro! over financial reporting, included in the
accompanying Management Report on Internal Contro} over Financial Reporting. Our responsibility is to express an
opinion on the Bank’s internal contro! over financial reporting based on our audit.

We conducted our audit in accordance with the standards of the Public Company Accounting Oversight Board (United
States). Those standards require that we plan and perform the audit to obtain reasonable assurance about whether
effective internal control over financial reporting was maintained in all material respects. Our audit included obtaining
an understanding of interna! contro! over financial reporting, assessing the risk that a material weakness exists, and
testing and evaluating the design and operating effectiveness of internal control based on the assessed risk. Our audit
also included performing such other procedures as we considered necessary in the circumstances. We believe that our
audit provides a reasonable basis for our opinion.

A company's internal control over financial reporting is a process designed to provide reasonable assurance regarding
the reliability of financial reporting and the preparation of financial statements for external purposes in accordance
with U.S. generally accepted accounting principles. A company's internal control over financial reporting includes
those policies and procedures that (1) pertain to the maintenance of records that, in reasonable detail, accurately and
fairly reflect the transactions and dispositions of the assets of the company; (2) provide reasonable assurance that
transactions are recorded as necessary to permit preparation of financia! statements in accordance with generally
accepted accounting principles, and that receipts and expenditures of the company are being made only in accordance
with authorizations of management and directors of the company; and (3) provide reasonable assurance regarding
prevention or timely detection of unauthorized acquisition, use, or disposition of the company’s assets that could have
a material effect on the financial statements.

Because of its inherent limitations. internal control over financial reporting may not prevent or detect misstatements.
Also, projections of any evaluation of effectiveness to future periods are subject to the risk that controls may become
inadequate because of changes in conditions, or that the degree of compliance with the policies or procedures may
detcrioratc.

In our opinion, the Bank maintained, in all material respects, effective internal control over financial reporting as of
December 31, 2008, based on criteria established in Internal Control—Integrated Framework issued by the
Committee of Sponsoring Organizations of the Treadway Commission.

We also have audited, in accordance with the standards of the Public Company Accounting Oversight Board (United
States) and Swiss Auditing Standards, the consolidated balance sheets of the Bank as of December 31, 2008 and 2007,
and the related consolidated statements of operations, changes in shareholder's equity, comprehensive income, and
cash flows, and notes thereto, for each of the years in the three-year period ended December 31, 2008 and our report
dated March 18, 2009. expressed an unqualified opinion on those consolidated financial statements.

KPMG Klynveld Peat Marwick Goerdeler SA

Rs LaVak de ~*~

David L. Jahnke U- Robert S. Overstreet
Licensed Audit Expert Licensed Audit Expert



Zurich, Switzerland
March 18, 2009

THE TRIBUNE



LOCAL NEWS



MRS. GENEVA RUTHERFORD, Director of Training for the GBPA
Group, conducted the four week ‘Service Excellence Customer’

training workshop.

GBPA training
department
hosts customer
service workshop

GRAND BAHAMA Port
Authority president Ian Rolle
and newly appointed vice
president of the Port Group
Limited Ginger Moxey
attended a customer service
training workshop hosted by
the GBPA training depart-
ment.

This training comes as the
result of the new “Making It
Happen” initiatives launched
by the new President at the
Grand Bahama Business Out-
look in February and was
made mandatory for all
Group employees.

Director of Training for the
GBPA Group, Geneva
Rutherford conducted the
four week “Service Excellence
Customer Training Work-
shop” that began Tuesday,
March 10, and ended on
Thursday, April 9.

Each session was tailored to
address the customer services
needs required by the individ-
ual departments of the
Group.

The “Service Excellence”
training is intended to
improve GBPA’s interaction
with its customer.



FRONT ROW: from left to right: Mrs Ginger Moxey, Vice President
of Port Group Limited, (Second) and Mr lan Rolle, President of The
Grand Bahama Port Authority, Limited, (fourth) attended the ‘Ser-

vice Excellence’ customer service training workshop, implemented
and hosted by the GBPA Training Department.

Two are reportedly in
hospital after shooting

FROM page one

Eyewitnesses said one of the men got out of the car armed
with a handgun and opened fire before jumping back into the

vehicle.

Bullets reportedly struck two occupants of the home, a woman
and a young child, who were said to be asleep at the time.
The gunfire reportedly hit the home's front wall and a vehi-

cle parked in the yard.

The owner of the home, Ezra Flowers, told ZNS news last
night that his son, who lives in the house with his girlfriend
and children, was recently the target of hoodlums.

Mr Flowers said his son was not at home when the shooting

took place.

Police investigations continue.

Body parts believed to be remains
of man from jet ski accident

FROM page one

evening” that a man riding a jet
ski had “fallen overboard” near
the resort owned by fashion
mogul Peter Nygard.

According to a source, who
contacted The Tribune yester-
day, concerned that news of the
missing man did not appear to
have reached the press, the indi-
vidual was one of a group invit-
ed to a Sunday event at the lux-
ury property located at the
western tip of Lyford Cay.

It was not clear under what
circumstances the man fell off
the watercraft, however Mr
Lloyd pointed to the fact that
bad weather on Sunday made
conditions at sea very rough and
such activities inadvisable.

The BASRA director noted
that “dead low tides” and reefs

in the vicinity of Nygard Cay
would have presented addi-
tional dangers.

The Defence Force said
patrol crafts HMBS Inagua and
Enduring Friendship 18 were
dispatched to search for the jet
ski rider on Monday.

Mr Lloyd told The Tribune
that having been “surprised” to
find that BASRA was not alert-
ed to the incident before Sun-
day evening, BASRA did not
join the search that night as
darkness would have made it
ineffectual.

HMBS continues to search
the area for further remains,
according to the RBDF.

A message left for Nygard
Cay representatives for addi-
tional information on the inci-
dent was not returned up to
press time yesterday.
PAGE 12, WEDNESDAY, APRIL 29, 2009

SPORTS

TRIBUNE SPORTS





NBA Today

i By The Associated
Press

New Orleans at Denver
(10:30 p.m. EDT). The
Nuggets, who matched an
NBA playoff record with a
58-point victory in Game 4,
can win a series for the first
time since 1994.

STARS

Monday

—Kobe Bryant, Lakers,
scored 31 points to lead Los
Angeles into the second
round of the playoffs with a
107-96 win over Utah.

—Lamar Odom and Pau
Gasol, Lakers. Odom had 26
points and 15 rebounds,
while Gasol added 17 points
and 11 boards against Utah
in Game 5.

—Carmelo Anthony,
Nuggets, scored all of his 26
points in three quarters as
Denver took a 3-1 series
lead with a 121-63 rout of
New Orleans.

—Zaza Pachulia, Hawks,
had 12 points and 18
rebounds as Atlanta evened
its first-round series with
Miami at two games apiece
with an 81-71 victory.

RECORD ROMP

The Denver Nuggets
matched the biggest victory
in playoff history with their
121-63 rout of New Orleans
in Game 4 of their first-
round series. The Min-
neapolis Lakers had the oth-
er 58-point postseason vic-
tory, beating the St. Louis
Hawks 133-75 in 1956. The
Hornets recorded playoff
lows in points, field goals
made (17), field goals
attempted (54), assists (10)
and second-half points (24).
Denver's 121 points set a
Hornets opponent playoff
high.

WOUNDED WADE

Slowed by back pain,
Dwyane Wade was limited
to 22 points on 9-for-26
shooting in Miami's 81-71
loss to Atlanta in Game 4 of
their series. The All-Star
guard and NBA's scoring
leader was wincing from
back spasms that started at
the morning shootaround,
and flared in the first quar-
ter.

PAIR OF 4s

Miami's James Jones con-
verted two four-point plays
in an 11-second span of the
Heat's 81-71 loss to Atlanta
in Game 4 of their series. He
made a 3-pointer with 2:26
remaining in the second
quarter, got fouled by
Solomon Jones and swished
the free throw. And with
2:15 left, James Jones did it
again, connecting on anoth-
er 3-pointer, getting fouled
by Mike Bibby and making
that free throw as well.

ROD RETIRES

Jazz broadcaster "Hot"
Rod Hundley retired after
his long career following
Utah's 107-96 loss to the
Lakers in Game 5 of their
first-round series. Hundley
has been broadcasting Jazz
games since they were an
expansion team playing in
New Orleans in 1974. He
made the move to Utah with
the rest of the club in 1979.
A former star at West Vir-
ginia, the 74-year-old Hund-
ley played six NBA seasons
for the Lakers before he
retired in 1963. Hundley was
acknowledged by the PA
announcer during a timeout
in the fourth quarter and
received a nice ovation from
the crowd.

SPEAKING

"T wouldn't have thought
that we would win by 58
points. I never thought any-
one could win by 58 points
in the playoffs.”

— Carmelo Anthony after
his Denver Nuggets matched
the most lopsided victory in
NBA playoff history by beat-
ing New Orleans 121-63 in
Game 4

TST

For the stories
WATT RUT CS
WAS
NTE ES



Lakers close out Jazz
with 107-96 victory

@ By BERNIE WILSON
AP Sports Writer

LOS ANGELES (AP) —
The Los Angeles Lakers can
put on quite a show offensively,
with 3-pointers, slam dunks and
even Kobe Bryant sinking a
fadeaway jumper as he fell on
his backside.

Its their defense that's going
to need work if they plan on
going deep in the NBA play-
offs.

Bryant and the Lakers are
moving on — as if that was real-
ly in doubt — but even as they
ran away from the Jazz 107-96
on Monday night, they still left
questions about their overall
play.

With Bryant scoring 31 points
and Lamar Odom adding 26
points and 15 rebounds, the
Lakers finished the opening-
round series in five games to
earn a few days rest.

They move on to play the
winner of the Portland-Hous-
ton series.

The partying fans at Staples
Arena — and the Lakers —
were slapped back to reality as
the Jazz cut a 22-point deficit
at the end of the third quarter to
93-86 with 4:37 left. Bryant hit a
turnaround jumper and Odom
finished a fast break with a slam
dunk to fend off Utah's late run.

"We've got to give a better
effort defensively when our sec-
ond unit comes in there, getting
back on defense, not giving up
easy baskets, stuff like that,”
Bryant said. "We've got a week
here before the next series to
have a spirited conversation
with the group and see if we
can't correct that for the next
series."

Bryant doesn't care who the
Lakers play next.

"I'm just ready for the next
series, whoever it is," he said.
"We have to kind of go over it
and evaluate it and see what
areas we can exploit offensively
and defensively. It's different
than playing in the regular sea-
son."

Bryant had a welt under his
right eye. The Lakers acknowl-
edged that Utah was a tough
opponent despite being the No.
8 seed.

It was a disappointing end for
a Jazz team that had high
expectations.

"Injuries kind of affected us
and we really weren't able to
ever get into a rhythm,” point
guard Deron Williams said.
"We kind of headed downhill
toward the playoffs and we just
really didn't get the type of
effort we needed to win a
series."

If there was any question that
this was going to be the Lak-
ers’ night on their home court,
Bryant answered that in the
closing seconds of the first half.

He drove the lane and passed



LAMAR ODOM, right, grabs a rebound with forward Trevor Ariza around Utah Jazz forward Paul Millsap during the first half of a first-round playoff

game in Los Angeles on Monday...

to Pau Gasol. The ball was bat-
ted loose and Bryant grabbed
it, turned and sank a fadeaway
jumper as he fell on his rear
end, giving the Lakers a 56-43
halftime lead. By late in the
third quarter, the Lakers were
toying with the Jazz. Bryant
made a layup, hit a 3-pointer
and fed Gasol for a slam dunk.
Odom added a bucket and just
like that it was 80-58.

Paul Millsap led Utah with
16 points while Andrei Kir-
ilenko and Williams had 14
apiece.

Gasol had 17 points and 11
rebounds, and Ariza 12 points
for the Lakers.

Nuggets 121, Hornets 63

At New Orleans, Carmelo
Anthony scored all of his 26
points in the first three quar-
ters, and Denver took a com-

manding 3-1 lead in its first-
round series.

Denver led 89-50 after three
quarters on its way to match-
ing the most lopsided victory in
NBA playoff history. The Min-
neapolis Lakers beat the St.
Louis Hawks 133-75 in 1956.

The Nuggets stifled Hornets
All-Star Chris Paul, whose four
points and six assists amount-
ed to one of the worst games of
his career.

The Nuggets can close out the
series at home in Game 5 on
Wednesday night.

Hawks 81, Heat 71

At Miami, Zaza Pachulia had
12 points and 18 rebounds, and
Atlanta raced to a huge first-
half lead in tying the first-round
series at two games apiece.

Mike Bibby scored 15 points,
Joe Johnson added 14 and Josh



KOBE BRYANT greets Sean ‘Diddy’ Combs before Game 5 of a first-round playoff series between the Lakers and
the Utah Jazz in Los Angeles on Monday...

(AP Photo/Chris Carlson)

Smith 13 for the Hawks.
Dwyane Wade scored 22
points on 9-for-26 shooting and
wincing at times from a back
injury. It was Atlanta's first road

(AP Photo: Chris Carlson)

postseason win in nearly 12
years, a stretch spanning 13
games.

The series returns to Atlanta
on Wednesday for Game 5.



IN THIS April 25, 2009 file photo, Miami Heat coach Erik Spoelstra, right,
talks to forward Jamario Moon during the first period of Game 3 of their
first-round Eastern Conference playoff series against the Atlanta Hawks in
Miami.

(AP Photo: Wilfredo Lee)

Miami F Jamario
Moon out for
postseason

MIAMI (AP) — Heat for-
ward Jamario Moon will miss
the remainder of the postsea-
son because of a sports hernia
that will require surgery, mean-
ing he may have played his last
game in a Miami uniform.

Moon suffered what was
diagnosed as a lower abdomi-
nal strain in Game 3 of Miami's
first-round series against the
Atlanta Hawks.

An MRI revealed further

problems, and Moon will have
season-ending surgery Thurs-
day.

The team said he will need
two weeks to rest after the
surgery, and will be re-evaluat-
ed at that time.

Moon is due to become a free
agent this summer. The Heat
acquired him and Jermaine
O'Neal in February, in a deal
that sent Shawn Marion to the
Toronto Raptors.
TRIBUNE SPORTS



WEDNESDAY, APRIL 29, 2009, PAGE 13

Scorpions’ 4-1 victory over Pitbulls

Female golfers
trying to make
LPGA Tour

FROM page 15

for help was kind of scary at the
beginning.

“T didn’t really have a home
like I did in Freeport where I
was able to go out and practice
every day and be comfortable.
I’m finally starting to get com-
fortable here and playing.”

At her last tournament, Riley
finished tied for 21st with two
other players. She shot three
rounds of 78-78-75 for her total
of 231.

“T didn’t do as good as I
wanted to, but it was still sol-
id,” she said. “I didn’t win any
money, but still performed well.
I learnt a lot from my rounds.
So I just have to keep pushing.

“The dream is still alive in
me and I’m still fighting for
every inch that I can get.”

As an alternate on the
Futures Tour, Riley said she is
just waiting for her call to play
in her first tournament on their
circuit. But she said her ulti-
mate goal, like Rolle, is to make
it to the LPGA Tour.

“T believe that I have the tal-
ent to do so,” said Riley, who
was a two-time Bahamas junior
champion (1999 and 2000), a
three-time member of the
Bahamas Amateur team (2001,
2002 and 2004) and the 2001
Bahamas national women’s
amateur champion who went
on to represent the Bahamas at
the 2004 World Cup in Puerto
Rico.

“I don’t just want to be a
member. I want to be a con-
tender. I want to compete to
actually win. So in order to
accomplish that goal, I have to
compete in as many local events
as I can and some open events
in Colorado and the US Open
this year.”

The last two years, Riley
made it past the first stage at
the US Open so she’s hoping
to go even further when this
year’s tournament starts on
May 15 in Florida.

“The US Open women’s
qualifier is definitely my next
event until I can get into the
Futures Tour,” she said. “I just
want to play golf.”

SRAM ell

A SWINGING TIME — T ATHOMPSON Scorpions’ pitcher Velnir Desir (not shown) pitched four shutout innings to lead the Scorpions to a 4-1 win
yesterday over the D W Davis Pitbulls at the Baillou Hills Sporting Complex.

FROM page 15

mound in his first softball appearance, and
allowed just two hits, and struck out three
batters.

The Scorpions left runners in scoring
position in both the first and second innings
but finally capitalized on their efficient hit-
ting in the third.

Mavin Saunders blasted an RBI double
which scored Adrian Ferguson for the
game’s first run.

Saunders scored a few players later on a
wild pitch to give his team a 2-0 advantage.

After Pitbulls pitcher William Ferguson
walked Trevor Knowles, Desir’s double
brought home the runner to close out the
third inning.

The Pitbulls looked to rally in the fourth
and Ferguson led off with a single, but the
Scorpions defense rebounded with a double
play on the next pitch.

Keno Cartwright scored T A. Thomp-
son’s final run of the inning on a wild pitch
to end the fourth.





standings (Week 16)



Junior
haseball
Standings

WITH only two weeks
remaining in the Junior
Baseball League of Nas-
sau’s ‘09 regular season,
teams are still looking to
get into the playoffs. Here
are the current standings
and play-off positions, and
are results of weekend
games:

SENIOR LEAGUE
Phillies def. Tigers 20-6
Rangers def.

Pirates 10-6

JUNIOR LEAGUE
Yankees def.

Cardinals 14-4

Twins def. Dodgers 11-3

MAJOR LEAGUE
Marlins def. Indians 7-3
Reds def. Mariners 4-3
Mariners def.

Marlins 5-1

(Make Up Game)

Photos: Tim Clarke/Tribune staff

MINOR LEAGUE
Rockies def.

Red Sox 13-7

Mets def. Royals 9-3

Shown on this page are some of the players in action...

Desir was just a single out from a shutout
game when Timothy Job laced a single
down the third baseline which went into
foul territory and, after a series of errors,
was able to score the Pitbulls’ lone run of
the game.

Desir also finished 2-2 from the plate.

“T think I played well, I was a little ner-
vous out there pitching on the mound
because it was the first time I played softball
but I think I did well,” he said. “My team’s
defense did well and we got the win.”

He said that although most of his experi-
ence came from watching professional base-
ball, with more game time he should
improve as the season progresses.

“T watched a lot of television, watching
the professionals pitch so I just tried to pick
up a few things from that and I hope I can
get better as the season goes on,” he said.
“For just my first game it was better than I
expected and IJ think this team can go far to
the championship and do well once we play
good defense and I get more into it and
experienced.”

COACH PITCH
Athletics def.

Blue Jays 14-3

Cubs def. Angels 18-4
Diamondbacks

def. Astros 18-5

TEE BALL

Sand Gnats def.
Blue Claws 21-18
Knights def.
Grasshoppers 11-0
Sidewinders def.
Raptors 25-15
Grasshoppers def.
Blue Claws 19-3
(Make-up game)
Knights def.
Raptors 19-18
(Make-up game)



K2700/K3000

11//4TON 21/2 TON

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KIA MOTORS

The Power to Surprise

CONGRATS to all T-ball players, coaches, fans and director Pat Moss who wrapped up their reg-
ular season over the weekend. Special congrats for the Sea Grapes who won the pennant for T-ball with
13 wins, one loss and two ties. Playoffs begin this weekend for T-ball and the 16-18 division. T-ball play-
off is single elimination format and championship series is best of three games. There will be no time

limit.
Schedule are as follows:
T-Ball Division

Guineps vs Sea Grapes on Saturday May 2nd, 2009 @ 4 pm
Jujus vs Coco Plums on Saturday May 2nd, 2009 @ 6 pm

16-18 Division

Tainos vs Arawaks on Sunday May 3rd, 2009 @ 2:30 pm
Caribs vs Lucayans on Sunday May 3rd, 2009 @ 4:30 pm

FREEDOM FARM CURRENT STANDINGS WEEK 16

T-BALL WINS LOSSES TIES STREAK
1. SEA GRAPES cp/pw 13 1 2 wl
2. COCO PLUMS cp 11 3 W3
3. JUJUS ep 6 5 3 Ll
4. GUINEPS cp 4 9 i sla
5. DILLIES e 0 14 ie
COACH PITCH WINS LOSSES TIES STREAK
1. BOAS cp 17 2 wi2
2. BEES cp 15 3 w4
3. SANDFLIES cp 10 8 Ll
4. MOSQUITOES 5 13 L4
5. GREEN TURTLES 4 15 ess
6. WASPS 4 14 w2
9-10 DIVISION WINS LOSSES TIES STREAK
1. BARRACUDAS ep 14 3 1 w4
2. DOLPHINS cp 13 4 1 w2 K3000
3. TURBOTS cp 11 6 Ws
SC naeeTaee : ie ma 2.7 DIESEL STO 3.0 DIESEL STD
6. EELS e 1 16 ee
AIR CONDITION AIR CONDITION

11-12 DIVISION WINS LOSSES TIES STREAK
A Eonar ca 7 a POWER STEERING POWER STEERING
3. BLUE MARLINS cp 14 9 wl
4. NASSAU GROUPERS cp_ 13 9 w2 FOLO-DOWN SIDES POWER WINDOWS
5. DIVERS e 10 12 L3
S CREE ° : 7 a RADIO/CASSETTE FOLO-DUOWN SIDES
8. IGUANAS e 6 14 1 L2
9. WHITE CROWNS e 1 19 1 L4 RADIO/CASSETTE
13-15 DIVISION WINS LOSSES TIES STREAK
1. OWLZ cp 12 6 i W3
1. SILVER JACKS cp 13 i wl
3. POTCAKES cp 10 A 1 Wl
4. STINGRAYS cp 8 9 2 ess
5. RACCOONS e 6 10 2 Ll
6. SHARKS e 3 13 2 oa

T | ON THE SPOT RISA NC ING WITH
16-18 DIVISION WINS LOSSES TIES STREAK ELITE MOTORS LTD. SANPIN MOTORS LIMITED COMMONWEALTH BANK
1. ARAWAKS cp/pw 8 2 W3 4989 Wil Rood Thompson Blvd. « Oakes Field
2. LUCAYANS cp 4 4 Ll ae Te of 24 1 INSUAAMICE AVAILABLE WiTH
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pw — pennant winner

7
cp — clinched playoff

e — elimination post-season


PAGE 14, WEDNESDAY, APRIL 29, 2009

TRIBUNE SPORTS



SPORTS



Caledonia FC claim BFA KO
Cup in dramatic fashion

CALEDONIA FC salvaged
some respect for their season
when they claimed the BFA
KO Cup in dramatic fashion on
Sunday.

Having lost the league title
to Bears FC and further seeing
them claim the President’s Cup
on New Years Day, Caledonia
put out their best foot to stop
the Bears from claiming the
triple, and needed all of 90 min-
utes to do the job.

The match started evenly
with both teams creating oppor-
tunities to score.

Bears drew first blood in the
23rd minute when a lunging
tackle in the Caledonia penalty
area conceded a penalty.

The league’s leading goalscor-
er Lesly St Fleur stepped up
and converted, giving his team
the one goal lead, and one hand
on the cup.

The first half ended with the
Bears holding on to this lead.
The second half had barely
started, however, before Cale-
donia equalized.



Wagner Machado hit a loop-
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34 seconds into the second half,

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and leveled the score.

The early goal made the
match far more open and saw
both teams create opportuni-
ties to steal the match.

Two late occurrences in the
game made its mark. First, with
eight minutes remaining in the
match, on a Bears attack, the
assistant referee signaled for an
infringement that the referee
awarded as a penalty to Bears
FC.

Having discussed the matter
with the assistant, the referee
then decided that the perceived
incident did not in fact take
place, and instead awarded a
goal kick.

This was then followed by a
Caledonia attack, during which
time Bahamian senior interna-
tional Connor Sheehan took a
shot that deflected off a Bears
defender and wrong-footed
goalkeeper Corie Frazer, giv-



COACH OF THE YEAR Christian Villi of FC Nassau, with his twin daughters,
accepts his award from BFA vice president Sam Haven...



LEADING goalscorer and most valuable player Lesly St Fleur accepts
one of his two awards from BFA vice president Sam Haven...

ing Caledonia a 2-1 lead.

Only two minutes remained
after this, which Caledonia
played out and held on to claim
the cup.

The match was followed by
the presentation of awards, con-
ducted by BFA vice president
Sam Haven.

The following awards for the
year were presented:

BFA Knock Out Cup Cham-
pions — Caledonia FC

BFA Knock-Out Cup Run-
ners-Up — Insurance Manage-
ment Bears FC

League Champions — Insur-
ance Management Bears FC

League Runners-Up -— Cale-
donia FC

Most Valuable Player — Lesly
St. Fleur, IM Bears FC

League Leading Goalscorer
— Lesly St. Fleur, IM Bears FC

Youth Player Award — Alex
Iferenta, IM Bears FC

Coach of the Year — Christian
Villi, FC Nassau



YOUTH player of the Year Alex Iferenta (left) of IM Bears FC accepts his award...

GB cycling tour results

THE Grand Bahama Tank Cleaning Company Cycling Tour/Championships was organised by
the Grand Bahama Cyclist Club, headed by Rowshan Jones.

The event was sanctioned by the Bahamas Amateur Cycling Federation. It was staged last
weekend with a 78 mile road race and a 120 mile individual timed trial.

The road race started from McClean’s Town and ended up at West End. The results are as fol-

lows:

1ST Kim Thompson
2nd
3rd_ Tracey Sweeting

4th Anthony Biggie Colebrook

Sth Keith Major
6th Row Shan Jones

Barron Turbo Musgrove

time
time
time
time
time
time

3 hrs.17mins.43 sec
3 hrs.17mins.47 sec
3hrs.21mins.22sec
3hrs.21mins.28sec
3hrs.21mins.31sec
3hrs.22mins.00

¢ The 12-mile individual timed trials was held on Chickewn Farm Road

Here’s a look at the results:

1ST BARRON TURBO MUSGROVE

2ND KIM THOMPSON

3RD TRACEY SWEETING

4TH ROWSHAN JONES

5TH ANTHONY BIGGIE COLEBROOK

TIME 30 MINS. 08 SECOND

TIME 31 MINS. 05 SECOND
TIME 34 MINS. 12 SECOND
TIME 34MINS. 54 SECOND

TIME 38MINS. 54

¢ There was also a 12-mile sprint race for the juniors on the one-lap Chicken Farm Road

Here’s a look at the results:
1ST PLACE

2ND PLACE
3RD PLACE

ANTHONY “BIGGIE” COLEBROOK = TIME 30MINS.S59SEC
JUSTIN MINNS
KENAN SWAIN

TIME 31MINS.O9SEC
TIME 40MINS.03SEC

¢ In the combined scores or times for each race that was used to declare the overall winners
of the cycling tour are as follows:

OVERALL RESULTS
TOP SIX POSITIONS
1ST PLACE

2ND PLACE
3RD PLACE
4TH PLACE
5TH PLACE
6TH PLACE

BARRON TURBO MUSGROVE
KIM THOMPSON

TRACEY SHOW-TIME SWEETING
ANTHONY BIGGIE COLEBROOK
ROWSHAN JONES

KEITH MAJOR

TIME 3HRS.47MNS. 55 SEC
3HRS .4A8MINS. 48 SEC
3HRS. S55MINS. 34 SEC
3HRS. 59MINS. 53 SEC
4HRS. OOMINS. 00 SEC

Elite junior Anthony ‘Biggie’ Colebrook rode impressively enough to be declared
the most outstanding cyclist in the tour


—



WEDNESDAY, APRIL 29,

2009





Lakers close
out Jazz with
107-96 win...

See page 12

Female golfers trying to make LPGA Tour

@ By BRENT STUBBS
Senior Sports Reporter
bstubbs@tribunemedia.net

hey’re both on the verge of
becoming the first Bahami-
ans to make it to the Ladies
Professional Golf Tour.
But for Georgette Rolle and Raquel
Riley, it has not been an easy road.
Rolle, who is attending graduate
school at Texas Southern University,
and Grand Bahamian native Riley,
who resides in South Florida, are trying
to make their breakthrough in the
Duramed Futures Tour.
While Riley is on the alternate list

SPORTS
Wag

CRICKET
FIRST CENTURY




YOUTH player Ryan
Tappin scored the first
century of the season on
Sunday as he led his team,
the Dynasty Stars, to a 98-
run victory over St Agnes.

Batting first, Dynasty
Stars scored a total of 270
runs for the loss of nine
wickets. Tappin top scored
with 102 runs. Marc Levy
scored 31 runs.

Bowling for St Agnes,
Earl Thomas, Omar James
and skipper Hesketh
Dean took two wickets
each.

St Agnes, in their turn
at bat, scored 172 runs all
out. Their top scorers
were Ray Haniff 50 runs
and the youngster Orlan-
do Stewart 24 runs.

Bowling for Dynasty
Stars, Lee Melville took
three wickets and Antonio
Hernandez and Courtney
Waddell took two wickets
each.

¢ Matches next weekend
are expected to showcase
the rising Stars vs Com-
monwealth at Windsor
Park and the Police vs
Dockendale at Haynes
Oval







T ATHOMPSON Scorpions’ pitcher
Velnir Desir in action yesterday. He
pitched four shutout innings to lead
the Scorpions to a 4-1 win over the
D W Davis Pitbulls at the Baillou
Hills Sporting Complex...

waiting for her call, Rolle will be play-
ing in her first tournament this week-
end at the Texas Hill Country Classic
at the Dominion Country Club in San
Antonio, Texas.

“T’ve been working on some things
to improve my ball striking,” said Rolle
in an interview with Tribune Sports as
she prepared to leave for the tourna-
ment yesterday.

“So I definitely want to try and place
in the top ten or the top 15. If I can just
start to try to accumulate points, I will
be able to get a LPGA Tour card from
the Futures’ Tour itself.”

Having played in a couple of the
SunCoast Ladies Series this year, Riley

J

AK EG YR. Hi.

= ‘

said she’s trying to get more comfort-
able with her performance and min-
imise her mistakes.

“Tf I do make a mistake somewhere,
I want to try and finish the hole with no
more than a bogey at worse,” she said.
“So I definitely need to get better at
minimising my mistakes and I think I
will be well on my way.”

Depending on how she does this
weekend, Rolle is counting on being
invited to play in as many of the tour-
naments in order to maintain her stan-
dard to finish in the top 15 by the end
of the year so that she can be exempt-
ed from playing in the developmental
league and advance to the LPGA

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school.

If she doesn’t get it through the
Futures Tour, Rolle still has the option
of getting her LPGA card through
their school. But she noted that the
latter is more difficult than the former.

“So if I do plan on signing for the
LGPA Tour school this year, which I
didn’t do last year, it’s going to be very
expensive, so I am hoping that I can
make it through the Futures Tour.”

During the Sun Coast Series, Rolle
and Riley played in at least one tour-
nament this year.

Riley, who has been on the pro cir-
cuit since 2005 compared to last year
when Rolle made her debut, is coming

Sports Reporter

Tim Clarke/Tribune staff

off her last appearance in the Sun
Coast Series last week at the Rock
Springs Ridge Golf Club in Apopka,
Florida.

She noted that her game is coming
along very steady and because of her
sponsor, Velez Capital Management
in New York, whom she was able to
acquire through some friends she met
since she went to South Florida.

“T’ve played a few events and have
gotten steady,” she said. “I started off
kind of shaky because coming here on
a dream and being around people you
don’t know and to trust them to look

SEE page 13

> | Pitcher Desir leats
_ Scorpions to 4-1
= win over Pitbulls

m By RENALDO DORSETT
rdorsett@tribunemedia.net

IF NOT for a series of untimely errors late in the fifth inning, Vel-
nir Desir would have had a perfect storybook ending to his first
appearance on the mound in his young career.

Desir pitched four shutout innings to lead the T A Thompson
Scorpions to a 4-1 win over the D W Davis Pitbulls yesterday at the
Baillou Hills Sporting Complex.

A starter on the Scorpions bas-
ketball team, Desir took the

SEE page 13

—
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& é Pere. ie al .

| = iene

rd BET's first Wrag-lt-Up tour !

Deer is impartial te all genres of music and
his. lyrital variety speaks to thal, Fromm the mu-
ital guidances of Stevie Wander, Shateba,
Michael Jackson, Bob Marley andl just anyone
Wilh great musical genius, Mower has
crated & uraque reggae hip-hop mixly re
that infuses his passion for music ared life,
With years of giving hie all to music, tees
volved INC an explosive artist with hoes ht
Prowaking melaghors, catchy hooms, gg.
enough energy to power all 700 Bahanterts-4 am
lands. Hapes, lima Boss, and Shawty areal
three of his singles that have hit number
one oan the 100Jame’s Bahama Hoi Ones 3
counidown. Shawty, his atest singk, 6. 9
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Currently attached ta S-Typz production #4
eoeipany and label, AiDees is ready for the =
rs ston of hie carpe.

MIDEEZ WAS BRED OF HUMBLE BEGINNINGS
AND WAS SURROUNDED BY STRUGGLE FROM
EARLY IN LIFE. ‘What he did mot know vans that it
wae a Mel lor a chapter in his tifa thet he had yt io
5Ba — music.

Born if a Jamaican father and a Bahamian
mother, fee? found fiengel intertwined with the
Caribbean love for music. He bagan spinning
MacOrds at an ear’ age and was encouraged by
frends to sing. Lead hy this positive pear presaure
and in an effort nod to disappoint, Meer began
writing songs. His Skill is based on the fusion at
writing hip-hop laced with reggae vocals.

Due to the cut-throat natyre ed the music busl-
ness ff is not easy being an artist, bul AlDeez lives
by [he motto “Seize the Moment” ard he uses
very OPPOrUNity to showocese his gift ta win
crows Ovir In over fourteen years, he has per
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Ton bo performing at focal shows, he has

ea | eh | a | |
= Se — 2






lm By CHESTER ROBARDS
Business Reporter
crobards@tribunemedia.net

THE TRIBUNE

usiness

WEDNESDAY,

AGP Re 220

2009

Commercial property’s
12-15% value fall boost

ROYAL FIDELITY

Money at Work

NASSAU OFFICE

(242) 356-9801

FREEPORT OFFICE
(242) 351-3010



* Price falls aid buyer interest, as $5m Pepsi property comes down to $4m
* Landlords target programmes to keep business tenants in place

he sale and rental of com-

mercial properties is stay-

ing afloat despite a founder-

ing economy due to a 12-15

per cent decline in property values in

New Providence, commercial real

estate agents said yesterday, as below

market prices for spaces and buildings
peak buyer interest.

Veteran real estate agent with Dami-

anos Sotheby’s International Realty,

Security & General parts

Ridley Carroll, said prices on some of
the Family Islands have even been dri-
ven as low as 30 per cent.

The old Pepsi-Cola manufacturing
property on Prince Charles Drive, part
of Mr Carroll’s current sales portfolio,
has been receiving inquiries despite its
$5 million price tag. This has been fur-
ther reduced by $1 million in an
attempt to make the property more

attractive to buyers.

According to Mr Carroll, the Pepsi
building has the most commercial
space of any presently on the market,
with 44,000 square feet, and is on four
acres of land.

He said real estate buyers, especial-
ly those with “old money”, in this coun-
try, are always interested in commercial

property.

“Things that are more price realistic
will move,” Mr Carroll said. “It’s just
that you have to work a little harder.”

Retail sales have been taking a hit
since the onset of the global financial
crisis, with some retailers having to
forfeit their shops because of late rental
payments or, in the case of a purchased
property, loan defaults.

Mr Carroll said Bay Street retail

Chamber warns on possible legal

spaces have become an unfortunate
example of this phenomena, brought
on by a broken global economy.

According to him, even his own busi-
ness in Marina Village on Paradise
Island has seen a 40 to 50 per cent
shortfall in sales.

He, however, is still making sales in

SEE page 3B

company with senior exec

@ By NEIL HARTNELL

Tribune Business Editor

SECURITY & General and
its senior executive have parted
company, Tribune Business can
reveal, due to differences with
top officials from its Bermuda-
based parent over a rise in the
company’s accounts receivables.

Marc Shirra, who had spent
16 years with the Bahamian
general insurer, most of them
as general manager, left the
company on Thursday follow-
ing meetings with senior execu-
tives from the company’s par-
ent, Colonial Group Interna-

tional.

Insurance industry sources
familiar with the situation told
Tribune Business that Mr Shirra
had been made a “scapegoat”
for the recent increase in Secu-
rity & General’s accounts
receivables, which consist
chiefly of premium income due
to it - and which should have
been passed on - by brokers and
agents selling the company’s
policies.

This newspaper was told that
Mr Shirra was asked by Colo-
nial Group executives to resign,

SEE page 2B

Central Bank moves to
‘drive’ Clearing House

@ By NEIL HARTNELL
Tribune Business Editor

Delays ‘a serious
embarrassment to

action over ‘bonded vehicles’

@ By NEIL HARTNELL
Tribune Business Editor

A SENIOR
government min-
ister is due to
meet the Grand
Bahama Cham-
ber of Commerce
and other
Freeport-based
stakeholders lat-
er this week to
discuss issues
related to the
Customs Department and
‘bonded’ goods, Tribune Busi-
ness can reveal, a development
that comes at a time when the



Minister to meet Freeport stakeholders
on bonded goods, Customs issues

Chamber is threatening to take
legal action over ‘bonded vehi-
cles’.

Zhivargo Laing, minister of
state for finance, declined to
comment when contacted by
this newspaper about his
planned meeting schedule in
Freeport, indicating he did not
want to prejudice the content
and outcome of any talks he
may have.

However, Tribune Business
has learnt that his discussions
with the Chamber, Grand

Make it a reality.

Bahama Port Authority
(GBPA) and the latter’s
licensees will focus on a number
of Customs-related issues
thrown up by the Hawksbill
Creek Agreement, ‘bonded’
goods and various Supreme
Court rulings over the years.
Among the issues likely to be
on the table are the Supreme
Court ruling that allowed the
Home Centre to bring its entire
inventory as ‘bonded’ goods,

SEE page 8B

The information contained is from a third
party and The Tribune can not be held
responsible for errors and/or omission
from the daily report.



THE Central Bank has decided
“to step in and drive forward” the
process of establishing the bank-
ing industry’s Automated Clearing House (ACH), Tribune Business
has been told, with one senior banking executive conceding that the
protracted delays experienced by the project were “a serious
embarrassment”.

Dionisio D’Aguilar, the Bahamas Chamber of Commerce’s pres-
ident, who has been a leading critic of the commercial banks for
their failure to get the ACH operational, told this newspaper yes-
terday that Central Bank governor Wendy Craigg had moved to
take a grip on the process, and was demanding weekly updates from
the banks.

“T was recently informed by a senior executive at one of the
Canadian-owned banks that the Central Bank has finally decided

it’s time to step in and drive this
process forward, because if it’s SEE page 8B

banking sector

Cellular card margins ‘out

ar Prime Income Fund
of line’ with sector norm

@ By NEIL HARTNELL
Tribune Business Editor

* Minister says global ¢ A higher, stable rate of return e Professional fund management
standard 8-10%, compared
to BTC’s current 20-25%

* But stresses no decision
taken on cuts, as matter
internal one for BTC and
Board, not a government
policy decision

* Slams predecessor Roberts
for ‘disingenuous’ comments

THE Bahamas Telecommu- e Long-term capital preservation e Diversified portfolio
nications Company (BTC) has
made no decision on whether
to cut the discount rate offered
to pre-paid cellular phone card
vendors, the minister responsi-
ble has told Tribune Business, as
he slammed “disingenuous”
comments on the issue by his
predecessor.

Zhivargo Laing hit back at
Bradley Roberts, who had min-
isterial responsibility for BTC

e Lower risk investment

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Instead, Mr Laing said any Freeport: 242.351.3010

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that any discount rate cut would
result from a policy decision or
directive given by the Ingraham
administration.

Sale Ends
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future decision on a rate cut
would be an internal BTC mat-
ter, taken by the Board upon
the advice of management.

He pointed out that the cur-

SEE page 2B

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PAGE 2B, WEDNESDAY, APRIL 29, 2009

THE TRIBUNE





wr"
ro
\

Nassau Airport
Dovelopmont Company

TENDER

C-112 Warehouse

Nassau Arpon Develooment Company (MAD) i pleased to
annaunoe the release of Tender 0-112 Warehouse far Stage
1 of the Lynden Finding intametonal Aiport Expansion.
The Scope of Work includes:
-Detaled desion, supply, and installatian af a pre.
manufactured metal warehouse building with
appromimate dimensian of 70 fx 175
Chal works induding site fil, grading, compactian,
Joundations and slab on grade designed to
suit pre-manufactuned metal warehouse building:
‘Ubliby works induding sanitary, power,
communication and water sarvice;
-Formal submission to fra Minisiny of Works to finalize
building peril and basing with Bahamas Elecinc
Company for power service

The C-112 Warehouse Tender Documents wil be avaiable
for pict up oor electronic distbuton afer 3:00pm,
April 16th, 2009) A bidders meeting wil be held al
10:00am, Tuesday April 23rd, 2009 Pease
contact Traci Brisbyy to register at the NAD Project CHfice.

Contac: TRAM BREE
Contracts and Procurement Manager

Phe (242) PITRE | Pee (2) SPAT
PO. Box AP S220, Messen Besharreas
Emadt traci bnshryiiines bs

Haker’s Hap

F& SGCEAM

EMPLOYMENT
OPPORTUNITY

You are invited to apply for the following
positions currently available.

Nurse
Safety & Security Manager

Key Requirements

* Extensive experience in each industry

¢ Ability to organize, train, and lead company
safety initiatives

¢ Willing to relocate to a Family Island

Qualifications
Professional certifications and training a must
Must have sound working knowledge in
computer skills
Must be innovative, demonstrate strong
leadership and customer relations skills
Must have excellent written and verbal
communication skills

The successful candidate will have the
opportunity to work in a growing and dynamic
organization and must be a self-starter, team
player, work at the highest standards of
performance, and meet deadlines.

If you are progressive and prepared to
advance your career, submit your resume
to the attention of the Director of HR &

Training, hr@bakersbayclub.com or by fax at
242-367-0613.

“Becoming the Employer of Choice in The Bahamas!”



Security & General parts
company with senior exec

FROM page 1B

but it is unclear whether he
actually did so. What is known,
though, is that he is no longer
with Security & General, and
the two sides are thought to be
negotiating the terms and value
of his compensation. He has yet
to be replaced.

Mr Shirra declined to com-
ment yesterday when contact-
ed by Tribune Business. His
departure happened last Thurs-
day, and employees at Security
& General and the Colonial
Group’s other Bahamas-based
general insurance carrier -
Atlantic Medical - were
informed in team briefings on

Friday.

Industry sources familiar with
the situation told Tribune Busi-
ness that Colonial Group had
pre-Christmas given Mr Shirra a
three-month period in which to
crack down on, and reduce,
Security & General’s accounts
receivables.

He is understood to have felt
he had accomplished this goal,
and was preparing to give a pre-
sentation on this to Colonial
Group’s visiting executives. Yet
several sources suggested that
he was never allowed to make
the presentation, the Bermuda-
based team having apparently
arrived with minds already
made up.

Tribune Business was told
that the Bermuda parent had
placed Mr Shirra between “a
rock and a hard place” in
demanding that he increase the
written premium income that
Security & General was writing
at the same time as reducing
accounts receivables.

The latter required Security
& General to clamp down on -
even cut-off - those agents and
brokers who owed substantial
premium income in accounts
receivables, at a time when it
needed those same intermedi-
aries to increase the business
they were writing on the carri-
er’s behalf. Trying to achieve
the same aims at the same time,

‘Tribune Business was told, was
contradictory.

Increasing accounts receiv-
ables are a problem that is
becoming more acute for
Bahamian general insurance
carriers. As the risk underwrit-
ers, they require agents and bro-
kers writing the policies for
them to pass on the premium
income collected, once the
intermediaries have taken their
commission cut - usually 12-15
per cent.

Security & General has in
recent years cut-off a number
of agents, and stopped them
writing business for it, due to
accounts receivables and non-
payment of premium issues.

Cellular card margins ‘out of line’

FROM page 1B

rent discounts offered to pre-

a Public Utilities Commission

NOTICE

The — Public

Utilities

Commission’s

(PUC)officewillbeclosedtothe general public
from 10:00 a.m. until 4:00 p.m on Wednesday,
April 29, 2009. The PUC apologizes
for any inconvenience this may cause.

Bimini Sands Resort & Marina
is seeking
Social Directors and a Sushi Chef.

The best candidates must have high
volume experience, must have training
experience, and the ability to motivate
other associates. Salary will reflect
experience and skill set.

Please contact our office at
(242) 347-3500 or
fax resume to (242) 347-3501.



paid cellular phone card ven-
dors, which are in the range of
20-25 per cent depending on the
card’s retail value, were “out of
line” with global industry
norms. Usually, the retail mar-
gins earned by selling these
phone cards were in the 8-10
per cent range, Mr Laing said.

He added that on Mr Robert-
s’s watch, the cellular phone
card discount rate was cut from
35 per cent to 25 per cent, with
the door left open for BTC to
conduct reviews that might lead
to further cuts in the future.

As a result, Mr Laing said he
found it “odd” that Mr Roberts
would now express alarm about
discount rate cuts eating into
the revenues and profits of pre-
paid cellular phone card ven-
dors, given that the present
course was charted on his
watch.

“What I found curious about
his comments was that the ini-
tial 35 per cent rate that was
established on these cards was
implemented at the time that
he was the minister responsible
for BTC,” Mr Laing said of Mr
Roberts.

“At the time, that was out of
line with industry norms,
because they were 8-10 per cent.
During his [Mr Roberts’s]
tenure, this same rate was cut
from 35 per cent to 25 per cent.

“At the time it was cut, the
idea was to cut it then with a
view to reviewing it in future
for further cuts. The expressed
alarm [by Mr Roberts] today is
curious, given what happened
at the time he was the minister
responsible.”

Mr Laing told Tribune Busi-
ness that any decision by BTC
to further slash the margins
enjoyed by card vendors would
not stem from a policy decision
or initiative taken at Cabi-
net/ministerial level.

“It is disingenuous for Mr
Roberts to suggest this is some
government policy initiative,
especially when there was a cut
in the same rate when he was
there, with the intent to review
it for further cuts in the future,”
Mr Laing added.

BTC had already been
reviewing the issue internally
“for almost nine months”, the
minister added.

When asked whether a cut in
retail vendor margins was like-
ly, he added: “I can’t pre-empt

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that. All ’'m advised is that it
was an internal review being
conducted, and nothing has for-
mally been put to the BTC
Board for its consideration. I
wouldn’t know one way or
another whether anything has
been determined.”

Mr Roberts previously said
some vendors had been
informed that the discount rate
would be cut from 25 per cent
to 15 per cent, representing the
largest reduction since the pre-
paid cards were introduced in
2001.

This, he said, was an attempt
by BTC to increase its revenues
and profits at the expense of
the ever-growing army of street
vendors selling the cards to end
users. Many of these vendors
have resorted to selling the
cards after losing their jobs as a
result of the economic down-
turn.

Mr Roberts said that in 2002,
discounts for cellular card ven-
dors amounted to about $3.5
million. In 2008, the discounts
totalled about $33.2 million,
compared to $27.3 million in
2007.

At the same time, Mr Roberts
added, prepaid revenues grew
from $135.8 million in 2007 to
$144.4 million in 2008.

Marlon Johnson, BTC’s vice-
president of sales and market-
ing, had previously told Tribune
Business that BTC was con-
ducting an assessment of its
“entire” cellular phone card dis-
tribution network, examining
whether the market that nets
the company $10-$12 million
per month is operating at “opti-
mal efficiency” and is not over-
saturated with vendors.

“What we are doing is a cur-
rent assessment exercise of our
entire distribution network -
relationships with wholesalers
and how cards are being dis-
tributed,” he explained.

“Tt is an exercise looking at
the entire distribution network.
We want to make sure we’re
operating optimally, and in
accordance with best global
practices.”

BTC sells the pre-paid cellu-
lar phone cards, which come in
denominations of $5, $10, $20,
$50 and $100, to some 34 whole-
salers, who include the likes of
Let’s Talk Wireless and Tri-
point. In turn, those wholesalers
sell the cards on to retailers and
street vendors.

Mr Johnson explained that
the study would also assess the
distribution network’s efficien-
cy, and whether end-user con-
sumers - the BTC pre-paid cel-
lular network has some 300,000
subscribers - had the best pos-
sible access to the cards they
purchased.

Vendors, though, are already
nervous about the impact of any
margin cuts. The $5 cards they
sell are bought from wholesalers
for $4, and the $10 cards for $8.

Tony, a 34-year-old vendor
who sells the cards to support
his young son after losing his
job at a major resort late last
year, said: “It would make
things a whole lot more diffi-
cult, which I don’t think is a
good idea. You’re looking at a
whole lot of people who are
unemployed and this is their
only avenue, like myself. What
are these people going to do
now? Turn to crime?”

INSIGHT

For the stories

behind the news,
read Insight
on Mondays


THE TRIBUNE

WEDNESDAY, APRIL 29, 2009, PAGE 3B



BUSINESS eee
The next generation for your sales leads

ARE you searching for new
and innovative ways of sales
lead generation? Are you lack-
ing in sources of good quality
leads? Are you tired and bored
using the same methods for gen-
erating sales leads?

If you answered “Yes”, then
you're going to be very excited
to read this article. Here are the
some of the most profitable
methods I've found for sales
lead generation. Create a list of
at least 100 people you know.
Send out an introductory letter
telling them about your prod-
uct or service. Talk with each
person at least twice. Send them
information of interest at
planned intervals.

Remember, if each person

you know also knows 100 peo-
ple....... well, you get the idea.

Cold Calling

Using cold calling effective-
ly for sales lead generation
requires five key ingredients.
Target the market you are going
to call. Know your objective
(get an appointment, get a
name). Have a memorised
script. Smile. Be prepared for
rejection. Have fun!

Knocking On Doors

This method is much the
same as cold calling. I used this
very effectively. I used to knock
on doors year-round. Do you
think people would remember
someone who knocked on their
door in the middle of a storm?

Promotional
Marketing



by Scott Farrington

Mass Mailing

Also known as direct mar-
keting. Successful use of this
method requires mailing a well-
written sales letter to a targeted
mailing list.

Newspapers

Pay attention to the local
news, business and announce-
ments sections. Look for the
people who get promoted, have
babies, buy and sell homes and

start up new businesses. There
may be leads here for your
product or service.

E-mail publications

Getting e-mail addresses for
past and current clients, your
sphere of influence and anyone
else you come in contact with is
a great way to keep in touch.

Daily Contacts

Every day when you leave
the house take 20 business cards
with you, and make it a point to
give them away. That's 20 cards
times five workdays. If you're
really ambitious, do it on Sat-
urday and Sunday also.

When you're looking to gen-
erate lots of quality sales leads,
the more lines you have in the

Commercial property’s
12-15% value fall boost

FROM page 1B

his capacity as a real estate

TUNE UP
SPECIAL

agent.
David Morley, managing
director of Morley Realty, told

INGRAHAM’s

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SUPPLIES CO. LTD.

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*Repair & Rebuild Starters

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We also import parts for any
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Tribune Business that most
landlords owning retail spaces
are much more interested in
assisting their tenants rather
than have their spaces empty.

“Its’ better to have good
occupancy in your place with
tenants paying something,” he
said.

Mr Morley said many land-
lords have implemented tenant
retention plans to help business
owners in case they are unable
to pay rent, or to entice them to
remain in the rental space
despite difficulties.

Mr Morley said the Mall at
Marathon has been actively
securing new tenants for some
of its vacant spaces, and has also
implemented a tenant retention
plan of sorts.

“They have a programme
that includes beefing up secu-
rity and increasing marketing,”
he said. “There are a lot of ways
that landlords are trying to help
tenants during these tough eco-
nomic times.”

Mr Morley suggested that
there had been an increase in
demand for some retail spaces,
as Bahamians decide to forgo

The American Embassy is presently considering applications
for the following position:

MAINTENANCE CRAFTSMAN

Performs a wide range of skilled maintenance, minor construction and
repair work on U.S. Government-owned buildings and equipment; and
other work relevant to infrastructural and facility maintenance. Completes
assigned work orders and is directly supervised by the Maintenance

Foreman.

This position 1s open to candidates with the following qualifications:

- Completion of High School 1s required.
- Five years of craft work, including carpentry, mechanical, minor
electrical and yard maintenance. Laborer experience required.

PERSONAL ATTRIBUTES:

- Good working knowledge of painting, masonry, dry-wall, plumbing and

carpentry required.

- Ability to use all equipment and tools related to craft work including
cutting, wood fitting, finishing, plumbing, screw drivers and mechanical

and electrical fitting.

BENEFITS PROVIDED INCLUDE:

The successful candidate will be offered an excellent compensation package
including performance-based incentives, medical and dental insurance, life
insurance, pension and opportunities for training and development.

shopping trips abroad for local
purchases.

“Once retailers don’t price
themselves out of the market
there will always be a demand
for local retail,” said Mr Morley.
“Bahamians don’t necessarily
have the wherewithal to fly to
Florida and shop.”

He added that he remains
optimistic about the immediate
future of the commercial real
estate market.

Mr Morley said of a further
contracting economy: “Let’s
hope we don’t have to go that
way. Let’s hope things rebound
quicker.”

He said the repercussions of
store closings would have a
“scary” impact on the Bahami-
an economy and society-at-
large.

Mr Carroll remains optimistic
also about the future of com-
mercial properties, as he con-
tinues to get listings off the mar-
ket. “There is always a value
for commercial property,” he
said.

water the more fish you're apt
to catch.

These are all effective meth-
ods of sales lead generation and
should be used regularly.

All of these marketing strate-
gies are certain to keep your
business on top during these
challenging economic times.
Have a productive and prof-
itable week! Remember:
“THOSE WHO MARKET
WILL MAKE IT.”

NB: Scott Farrington is pres-
ident of SunTee EmbroidMe, a

=e
NAD

Nassau Airport
Dowolopenamt Company

promotional and marketing
company specialising in pro-
motional products.

Established over 27 years
ago, SunTee EmbroidMe has
assisted Bahamian businesses
from various industries, rang-
ing from tourism and banking to
telecommunications, in mar-
keting themselves.

Readers can contact Mr Far-
rington at SunTee EmbroidMe
on East Shirley Street, by e-
mail at scott@sun-tee.com or
by telephone at 242-393-3104.

TENDER

C-120 Airside Civil and

C-130 Landside Civil, Stage 1

Nassay Arpon Develooment Company (NAD 6 pleased to
anaunoe (he pelea of Tender C-120 Arside Civil and
6-130 Landside Chal for Stage 1 of the Lynden Pindling

infamatonal Airport Expansion. MAD) intends to enter into
ane contract fer the completion of lhese wark packages. The

Scope of Work includes:

-Signficant earthmoving, drainage and wilty works
bath alrsice and landide;

-Rioechway, parking lotand apron construction
exceeding $0,000 tors of asphalt paving

“Signage and bohting for roadways, parking bats
aprons and taxiways; and

-
irrigaar

The 0-120 Airside Civil and C-130 Landside Cid, Stage 7
Terminal Expansion Praject Tender Documents will be

availatie for pick up oor ectomic distribution afer
2:00pm, April 16th, 2009. 4 biddars meeting wil
be held at 1:00am, Tuesday April 26th,
Z008. Please contact Traci Bneby to register at the MAD

Project Office.



Coniact TRAD BRESHY

Contracts and Procurement Wlanagar
Phe (242) TO2-1086 | Fam: (242) P2117
PO Goo. AP S009 Massau, Bahamas

Ennead: traci braless bs

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- Kids 15 and under, jree
¢ Pool with swim-up bar

Applicants must be Bahamian citizens or U.S. citizens who are eligible for
employment under Bahamian laws and regulations.

Application forms are available online at Nassau.usembassy.gov.

Please e-mail or fax applications to the Human Resources Office no later
than May 4, 2009 to: Adamsrc@state.gov or Fernanderra@state.gov or
fax: 328-8251. Applications will not be accepted at the Security Gate of
the Embassy. Absolutely no telephone calls will not be accepted.

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four persons per room. Rates effective through December 15. Additional fees apply for mandatory
taxes, mandatory housekeeping gratuities and utility service fees. Rates quoted are based on
standard room category and are subject to availability. Cancellations must be received 48 hours
prior to arrival or a one night penalty will apply.


PAGE 8B, WEDNESDAY, APRIL 29, 2009

THE TRIBUNE



ear TIE ery Te
Central Bank moves to ‘drive’ Clearing House

FROM page 1B

left to the clearing banks, it’s
never going to happen,” Mr
D’Aguilar told Tribune Busi-
ness.

“We hope that at last they’re
[the banks] getting the message
that this is critical to every busi-
ness in the Bahamas. Every
business needs a bank, and this
is why it hasn’t deterred the
banks from setting their own
agenda on such an important
and critical part of doing busi-
ness. If left to their own agenda,
they would do nothing.”

The Chamber president
added: “The Government and
Central Bank should have been
applying pressure to them to
make this happen, and they
weren't. They were unable to
do that, and I can’t understand
why.

“It’s good to see some pres-

sure being brought to bear. It’s
now time for results. Let’s get
this thing up and running. This
is what happens when the banks
are left up to their own devices.
The Governor should have
stepped in long ago, but the
process has been allowed to
drag on for years.”

Ms Craigg did not return Tri-
bune Business’s call yesterday
seeking comment on the situa-
tion, but one leading commer-
cial bank executive acknowl-
edged that the protracted ACH
installation and implementation
had become “a serious embar-
rassment” to both the Central
Bank and the industry.

Numerous implementation
deadlines have been missed for
starters. The Clearing Banks
Association (CBA) had been
hoping to implement the first
ACH phase as far back as mid-

2007 - almost two years ago -
but the system and its software
is still in testing among all the
banks.

Tribune Business under-
stands that testing of the ACH
system, which will be owned
and operated by Bahamas
Automated Clearing House
(BACH), has revealed far more
system ‘gremlins’ and kinks
than anticipated, all of which
needed to be ironed out.

Then, the commercial banks
each have their own internal
core banking systems and soft-
ware, which have to be recon-
figured to interface and align
with the ACH.

This, Tribune Business under-
stands, has been extremely
problematic for the Canadian-
owned banks - Royal Bank of
Canada, Scotiabank and First-
Caribbean International Bank

(Bahamas) - because all of them
use a common platform shared
by their head offices and affili-
ates worldwide. Thus their

“Testing was far more prob-
lematic than anticipated,” the
banking source said. “There are
banks with different software,
different levels of commit-
ment.... It’s really a struggle to
get everyone on the same page.
We’re making progress, but it’s
slow progress. It’s a serious
embarrassment, and we need to
get it [the ACH implementa-
tion] out of the way.”

The ACH is intended to
replace the current manual sys-
tem for settling cheque trans-
actions, where cheques drawn
on one bank but due to be
deposited at another have to be
taken by armoured car to a cen-
tral location where they are set-
tled by representatives of the

various institutions.

Apart from allowing inter-
bank cheques to be processed
electronically rather than man-
ually at a cheque clearing facil-
ity, the ACH system will allow
direct debits and credits from
accounts, debit cards and a
shared Automatic Teller
Machine (ATM) network.

The latter would allow
Bahamians to use their cash
cards at any bank branch. It
would also reduce the time per-
sons spent in line waiting to
cash and deposit pay cheques,
as they could be deposited to
their account.

Bahamian consumers would
also be able to use direct debits
from their bank accounts to pay
bills such as cable television and
electricity.

The ACH could ultimately
lead to the creation of just one

back office system for the entire
Bahamas. It may also help
develop SWITCH products,
where Bahamians could use
their cash cards at any bank's
ATM machine.

A further potential bonus
from the ACH will be the open-
ing up a whole range of elec-
tronic banking services in the
Bahamas, including its use in
the online purchase of govern-
ment goods and services.

Ultimately, through mod-
ernising the Bahamian pay-
ments system through electron-
ic means, the ACH will provide
buyers and sellers with more
certainty and confidence, espe-
cially when it comes to settling
their transactions.

It will also enhance econom-
ic and business efficiency by set-
tling transactions quicker,
boosting business cash flows.

Chamber warns on possible legal action over ‘bonded vehicles’

and to display ‘bonded’ goods at
retail’, and the ability of GBPA
licensees to use their bonded
vehicles outside the Port area.
Currently, the Customs

COMMONWEALTH OF THE BAHAMAS

Department has implemented
a policy preventing GBPA
licensees from being able to use
their bonded vehicles outside
the Port area for business pur-

2008/CLE/qui/1616

INTHE SUPREME COURT

IN THE MATTER OF ALL THAT piece parcel or
lot of land being Lot 76 containing Twenty seven
thousand six hundred and ninety one square feet
(27,697.00), Stella Maris Subdivision Section
1, Stella Maris, situate between the settlements
of Burnt Ground and Millerton in the Northern
Portion of Long Island, one of the Islands of the
Commonwealth of The Bahamas, which said
piece parcel or lot of land has such position shape
boundaries marks and dimensions as are shown
on a plan filed herein and thereon coloured yellow

AND IN THE MATTER of the Quieting Titles Act, 1959

AND IN THE MATTER of the Petition of Allan

Spector

NOTICE
The Quieting Titles Act 1959

The Petition of Allan Spector of the city of
Toronto, in the Province of Ontario, one of the
Provinces in Canada in respect of: - ALL THAT
piece parcel or lot of land being Lot 76 containing
Twenty seven thousand six hundred and ninety one
square feet (27,697.00), Stella Maris Subdivision
Section 1, Stella Maris, situate between the
settlements of Burnt Ground and Millerton in the
Northern Portion of Long Island, one of the Islands
of the Commonwealth of The Bahamas, which said
piece parcel or lot of land has such position shape
boundaries marks and dimensions as are shown
on a plan filed herein and thereon coloured yellow

Allan Spector claims to be the owner of the
fee simple estate in possession of the tract of land
hereinbefore described free from encumbrances.

AND the Petitioner has made application
to the Supreme Court of the Commonwealth of
The Bahamas under Section 3 of The Quieting
Titles Act 1959 to have his title to the said
tract of land investigated and the nature and
extent thereof determined and declared in a
Certificate of Title to be granted by the Court in
accordance with the provisions of the said Act.

NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that any
persons having Dower or a Right to Dower or an
Adverse Claim or a claim not recognized in the
petition shall on or before the 19% of June A.D., 2009
file in the Supreme Court and serve on the Petitioner
or the undersigned a statement of his claim in the
prescribed form verified by an Affidavit to be filed
therewith. Failure of any such person to file and
serve a statement of his claim on or before the 19% of
June A.D., 2009 will operate as a bar to such claim.
Copies of the Filed Plan may be inspected at:
The Registry of the Supreme Court;
The Chambers of Graham, Thompson & Co.
attorneys for the Petitioner, Sassoon House, Shirley
Street & Victoria Avenue, Nassau, N.P., Bahamas;
The Notice Board of the Administrator
at Stella Maris, Long Island: and
The Local Constable at Stella Maris, Long Island

Dated the 23rd day of April A.D., 2009

GRAHAM, THOMPSON & CO.,
Chambers,
Sassoon House,
Shirley Street & Victoria Avenue,
Nassau, Bahamas.
Attorneys for the Petitioner



poses, something Chamber
president Gregory Moss has
previously told Tribune Busi-
ness is “ultra vires” and breach-
es the Hawksbill Creek Agree-
ment.

Mr Moss did not return Tri-
bune Business’s calls seeking
comment yesterday. But
sources close to the matter said
he had written to the Attorney
General’s Office as Chamber
president to warn that if the
organisation did not hear from
it this week, it would initiate a
legal action on Monday to seek
a Supreme Court declaration
that GBPA licensees could use
their bonded vehicles outside

the Port area.

Meanwhile, Tribune Business
understands that Mr Laing may
also discuss whether the Cus-
toms Management Guide to the
Hawksbill Creek Agreement -
the document that Customs has
been using to determine duty
rates in Freeport for 30 years -
should be placed in statute to
provide all parties with more
clarity/certainty.

This is likely to be opposed
by the private sector, given that
the Guide is currently only an
interpretation of the law, and
one that has been found wanti-
ng on several occasions by the
Supreme Court.

NOTICE

NOTICE is hereby given that ANTOINETTE BARR OF P.O.
BOX AB-20554, MARSH HARBOUR, ABACO, is applying
to the Minister responsible for Nationality and Citizenship, for
registration/naturalization as a citizen of The Bahamas, and
that any person who knows any reason why registration/
naturalization should not be granted, should send a written
and signed statement of the facts within twenty-eight days
from the 29TH day of APRIL, 2009 to the Minister responsible
for Nationality and Citizenship, PRO.Box N-7147, Nassau,

Bahamas.

Yet the need for an accept-
able solution for all was per-
fectly summarised in a 2007
Chamber paper on the practice
of ‘over-the-counter bonded’
goods sales in Freeport, the doc-
ument having previously been
sent to the Government.

The Chamber paper said: “A
standardised, acceptable, mech-
anism must be established for
the management and reporting
of ‘over the counter sale of
bonded goods; that does not
subrogate the rights of the
licensees of the Grand Bahama
Port Authority, while still pro-
tecting the legitimate revenue
collection of the Government

of the Bahamas. This mecha-
nism must be the same for all
vendors and must be derived
from within the laws of the
Bahamas and the terms of the
Hawksbill Creek Agreement.”














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NOTICE

NOTICE is hereby given that YOUDLYN CALIXTE of SOUTH
BEACH, HOLIDAY DRIVE, NASSAU, BAHAMAS, is applying
to the Minister responsible for Nationality and Citizenship, for
registration/naturalization as a citizen of The Bahamas, and that
any person who knows any reason why registration/naturalization
should not be granted, should send a written and signed statement
ofthe facts within twenty-eight days from the 22"? day of April, 2009
to the Minister responsible for nationality and Citizenship, P.O. Box
N-7147, Nassau, Bahamas.

NOTICE

NOTICE is hereby given that IZMA MARCNER of PINEDALE,
EIGHT MILE ROCK, GRAND BAHAMA, BAHAMAS P.O. BOX
F2197 is applying to the Minister responsible for Nationality and
Citizenship, for registration/naturalization as a citizen of The
Bahamas, and that any person who knows any reason why
registration/ naturalization should not be granted, should send a
written and signed statement of the facts within twenty-eight days
from the 22nd day of APRIL, 2009 to the Minister responsible for
Nationality and Citizenship, PO.BoxN-7147, Freeport, Bahamas.

NOTICE

NOTICE is hereby given that LINDA CHRISTINA
BUCHANAN of BEACHWAY DRIVE NORTH, FREEPORT,
GRAND BAHAMA, BAHAMAS P.O. BOX F42915 is applying
to the Minister responsible for Nationality and Citizenship,
for registration/naturalization as a citizen of The Bahamas,
and that any person who knows any reason why registration/
naturalization should not be granted, should send a written and
signed statement of the facts within twenty-eight days from
the 22nd day of APRIL, 2009 to the Minister responsible for
Nationality and Citizenship, PO.BoxN-7147, Freeport, Bahamas.

NOTICE is hereby given that ELLIOTTE SANDS of BALFOUR
AVE., NASSAU, BAHAMAS, is applying to the Minister
responsible for Nationality and Citizenship, for registration/
naturalization as a citizen of The Bahamas, and that any person
who knows any reason why registration/naturalization should not
be granted, should send a written and signed statement of the
facts within twenty-eight days from the 22° day of April, 2009 to
the Minister responsible for nationality and Citizenship, P.O. Box
N-7147, Nassau, Bahamas.

NOTICE

NOTICE is hereby given that CHRISTOPHER DOUGLAS
MAY of BEACHWAY DRIVE NORTH, FREEPORT, GRAND
BAHAMA, BAHAMAS P.O. BOX F42915 is applying to
the Minister responsible for Nationality and Citizenship, for
registration/naturalization as a citizen of The Bahamas, and
that any person who knows any reason why registration/
naturalization should not be granted, should send a written
and signed statement of the facts within twenty-eight days from
the 22nd day of APRIL, 2009 to the Minister responsible for
Nationality and Citizenship, PO.BoxN-7147, Freeport, Bahamas.



If so, call us on 322-1986
and share your story.

NOTICE

NOTICE is hereby given that IMELDA DORVIL of CORDEAUX
AVE., P.O. BOX N-4394, NASSAU, BAHAMAS, is applying to the
Minister responsible for Nationality and Citizenship, for registration/
naturalization as a citizen of The Bahamas, and that any person
who knows any reason why registration/naturalization should not
be granted, should send a written and signed statement of the
facts within twenty-eight days from the 29" day of April, 2009 to
the Minister responsible for nationality and Citizenship, PRO. Box
N-7147, Nassau, Bahamas.

FULLYSTRASSE LIMITED

(In Voluntary Liquidation)

Notice is hereby given that the above-named
Company is in dissolution, which commenced
on the 4th day of March 2009. The Liquidator
is Argosa Corp. Inc., P. O. Box N-7757 Nassau,
Bahamas.

ARGOSA CORP. INC.
(Liquidator)

LEGAL NOTICE

SEA URCHIN
HOLDINGS LTD.

IN VOLUNTARY LIQUIDATION

Notice is hereby given that in accordance with Section 137 of the
International Business Companies Act SEA URCHIN
HOLDINGS LTD. is in dissolution.

The Date of the Commencement of Dissolution was 27th April
2009. David Thain of Arner Bank & Trust (Bahamas) Ltd.,
Building 2 Caves Village, P.O. Box N-3917 is the Liquidator of
SEA URCHIN HOLDINGS LTD. All persons having claims
against the above-named company are required to send their
address and particulars of their debts to the Liquidator before the
27th May 2009.






PAGE 1

N N A A S S S S A A U U A A N N D D B B A A H H A A M M A A I I S S L L A A N N D D S S L L E E A A D D I I N N G G N N E E W W S S P P A A P P E E R R Quarantine expanded amid swine flu fears C M Y K C M Y K V olume: 105 No.129WEDNESDAY, APRIL 29, 2009 PRICE – 75 (Abaco and Grand Bahama $1.25 WEATHER PARTLYSUNNY ANDBREEZY HIGH 84F LOW 75F I N S I D E n B y TANEKA THOMPSON Tribune StaffR eporter tthompson@ tribunemedia.net H EALTH officials plan to expand the swine-flu quarantine to include a local socc er team that travelled to Puerto Vallarta, Mexico earlier t his week to attend a m atch, Health Minister Dr H ubert Minnis said yesterday. The team is due to arrive home sometime today. While health officials do not anticipate that they were infected with the dangerous flu strain, Dr Minnis said they will be confined for observation for at least four days the incubation period of the illness. "Health personnel will meet those individuals at the air port where they will be placed in quarantine or containment for at least four days," he said. Officials are in the process of identifying two homes where the group can be housed during the quarantine, Dr Minnis added. "If by chance they are infected, the incu bation period is about three to four days. If they show noe vidence of infection they will be taken out of quarantine," he said, adding thath ealth officials were set to brief the team's families about the situ ation. T he 12 players and two coaches from the country's national beach soc cer team arrived in Mexico on Monday to attend a tournament in Puerto Vallarta and were scheduled to stay in Mexico until Sunday. Executive Director of the Bahamas Soccer Federation Lionel Haven told The Tribune that although the federation was aware of the swineflu outbreak in Mexico, they were informed by the tournament's organisers that the virus had not spread from Mexico City to Puerto Vallarta, about 2,000 miles away. The team was told yester day morning that the match had been postponed. The Local soccer team to be conf ined on r etur n fr om Me xico The Tribune ANYTIME ... ANYPLACE , WE RE #1 BAHAMASEDITION TRY OUR M cFLURRY TWIX MIX www.tribune242.com INSIDETODAY Man dies in fire ‘two days after moving to Bahamas’ n B y TANEKA THOMPSON Tribune Staff Reporter t thompson@ tribunemedia.net A FIRE that ripped t hrough two adjoining apartments in the Minnie Street area left one mand ead and two families s truggling to pick up the charred pieces of their lives. Police said 40-year-old Ronnie Louis, who accord i ng to a neighbour had just arrived from Haiti on Sun day afternoon to start a new life, died in the fire. Other occupants escaped unscathed. Officials suspect the b laze was set unintention a lly by a burning candle. Residents of the area said Louis was at home with a young boy, believed to be about 10 years old, when the fire began shortly before midnight on Monday. The boy's father apparently was not at home Blaze destroys two adjoining apartments SEE page six THEREMAINS of the two adjoining apartments after the blaze in the Minnie Street area. REMAINSOFBUILDINGAFTERFIRE POLICE launched a crackdown on suspected gambling houses yesterday. According to Assistant Superintendent Walter Evans, officers made several arrests at two locations the FML Group on Village Road and the Our Place Sporting Lounge in the Mel-Don Plaza on Mackey Street and seized some gambling para phernalia. "In an effort to stem the flow of crime and activities that may contribute to crime, the police has mounted an operation today in respect to the reduction of crime in two n By ALISON LOWE Tribune Staff Reporter alowe@tribunemedia.net BODY parts of a man believed to have been dismem bered by a shark were discov ered in the waters off western New Providence on Monday. Authorities suspect remains found by Defence Force divers are those of a man who disappeared near the exotic Nygard Cay resort on Sunday follow ing a jet ski accident. Neither the man’s identity nor details of which body parts were found were released to the media. A statement from the Royal Bahamas Defence Force said the gruesome find came at around 1pm Monday as a result of an intensive search of the area by the Royal Bahamas Defence Force. They were acting in response to reports issued “late Sunday Body parts believed to be remains of man from jet ski accident SEE page eight TWO persons are reported to be in hospital after a brazen daylight shooting in the Podoleo Street area yesterday. The incident took place around 2pm when two men in a green vehicle approached a house near the corner of Podoleo Street and Balfour Avenue. Two are reportedly in hospital after shooting SEE page eight Crackdown by the police on suspected gambling houses SEE page six INSIDE MAN W AITING 1 2 YEARS F OR APPR OV AL OF CROWN L AND PUR CHASE PAGETWO BRIDGEWATER AND LIGHTBOURNE TRIAL IS LIKELY TO START ON SEPTEMBER 2 1 PAGETHREE SWINE FLU PROMPTS CALL FOR IMPORT TAX DROP ON FACE MASKS PAGE SIX H ubert Minnis SEE page six

PAGE 2

WITH hurricane season fast approaching, the Salva tion Army is making provisions to support the residents of Grand Bahama, who have seen their communities ravaged by several storms in recent years. In the past, staff and volunteers have prepared emergency meals at the Lynda Speer Community Centre and delivered them to neigh borhoods in the wake of a hurricane using a van and a small bus. This year will be different thanks to the Salvation Army branches in Tampa, Florida and Atlanta, Georgia. “Thanks to these generous Americans, Freeport and the whole of Grand Bahama island will soon benefit from a completely self contained mobile kitchen and distribu tion vehicle commonly called by the army people a ‘disaster canteen’,” announced the local Salvation Army in a statement. Lt Colonel Danny Morrow and his wife Lt Colonel Esther Morrow have been serving temporarily in Grand Bahama since January 6. They said the new unit should be arriving on the Island within the next few weeks. To ensure that an adequate supply of food and emergency disaster supplies are on hand for the start of hurricane season in July, the Salvation Army is planning a fund raising dinner for May 1 at the Junkanoo Beach Club at Taino Beach, beginning at 4pm. The theme for the dinner is “Eating up a Storm” and the menu will feature Cajun grilled chicken. There will be live entertainment featuring singer Jay Mitchell. Lt Colonel Morrow said tickets are available for $10 at the Salvation Army headquarters on West Atlantic Drive, Dolly Madison, Kel ly’s, Italian Specialty Imports, and the Junkanoo Beach Club. All proceeds from the dinner will be used for hurricane and disaster services on Grand Bahama, he said. The Morrows, now retired, are veteran Salvation Army officers, having served for more than 40 years in the United States. They came out of retire ment to serve in Freeport for six months when the need arose. They will be replaced this summer by Salvation Army officers whose assignment here will be for three years. C M Y K C M Y K LOCAL NEWS PAGE 2, WEDNESDAY, APRIL 29, 2009 THE TRIBUNE TheAlumniAssociation of the CollegeoftheBahamas Congratulates2008-2009 Hall of Fame InducteeI. Chester CooperCocktailReceptionon Thursday, April 30th At TheBritishColonialHilton, 6:30pm Formoreinformation contact 302-4356 Or email alumni@cob.edu.bsTickets $50 with all proceeds to CollegeofTheBahamasAlumni Association n By PAUL G TURNQUESTT ribune Staff Reporter pturnquest@ tribunemedia.net HAVING invested more than $3.5 million in his Fountain Bay Resort and Marina,C at Island native Ezra Russell is demanding answers from the Department of Lands and Surveys as to why his project is still having to wait – 12 years later – for final approval for the Crown land purchase. Visiting the island yesterday to tour his 34-acre project in t he southern settlement of New Bight, The Tribune was p rovided with a record of the correspondence between Mr Russell and the department. Having entered into a leaset o-own agreement for the 34 a cres in 1997, Mr Russell has invested his own money and met “every stipulation” out-l ined by the department for final approval to purchase the property. A t a value of $2,000 per a cre, Mr Russell has provided the $68,000 to government on two occasions, only to have hisc heques returned with no explanation. As outlined in documentat ion from the department, Mr R ussell was required and has invested more than the required $750,000 to qualify h im to purchase the property. Despite his investment, and the fact that he is a youngB ahamian seeking to make a substantial investment in his hometown, Mr Russell told T he Tribune y esterday that he has met every road block imaginable while “others with position and connections” are a ble to bypass these processes entirely. “From 1997 until now I’m still in limbo land. But yet, t hey’ll give foreigners or their family and friends property t hey can flip and make all kind a money. But here you have a y oung, black Bahamian trying to do something and they block me. So you have to ask, what is the government doing? Allt hat they have asked me to do I have done. You’ve seen the b uildings, the marina, the roads, the power lines and phone. Everything is in. But everyone in this coun try knows what’s going on. Whether it’s Perry Christie or Hubert Ingraham, either Prime M inister would deny it but they know there are a group of people in this country, e specially up at Lands and Surveys who have more power than them,” Mr Russellc laimed. Over the past week, The Tri bune has reported allegations of nepotism in the Departmento f Lands and Surveys where t he Director, Tex Turnquest h as admitted that his family m embers and friends have been sold five ocean front lots of Crown land on Exuma. P ointing out that he did not have the final say over thes ales as the Prime Minister is t he ultimate signatory on the a pprovals, Mr Turnquest said as a result he did not see any reason for him to recuse hims elf from the transactions. Four of these five properties, which were sold for between $1,200 and $2,500 h ave since been resold for as much as $550,000. With his 34-acre approval s till hanging in the balance, Mr Russell said his request for this amount of property is equiva l ent to a “drop in the bucket” by comparison to the 100-plus acres of Crown land that have been granted without so mucha s a raised eyebrow. Salvation Ar my announces new emer gency plans for hurricane prone Grand Bahama THE SALVATION ARMY’S new, completely self-contained mobile kitchen in Grand Bahama Man waiting 12 years for approval of Crown land purchase EZRA RUSSELL points to a natural channel that he plans to widen for it to be the entrance to his marina. P LANS FOR t he Fountain Bay Resort and Marina. ONEOF THE BUILDINGS on the land of the 34 acre project. E ZRA RUSSELL s hows the plans for his resort and marina.

PAGE 3

I N an effort to alleviate exorbitant waiting periods at the passp ort office the Ministry of Foreign Affairs has acquired addi tional office space, Minister of Foreign Affairs Brent Symonette announced. T he minister said it is hoped that this will allow for the Passp ort Office to better accommo date the high volume of applicat ions for the new ePassport. The Passport Office, which is located on the lower floor of the Basden Building on Thompson Boulevard, will now occupy the e ntire building, as staff from the Ministry of Housing are being r elocated. The government has been try ing to find alternate accommodations for the Ministry of Housing staff since August 2007. They will now occupy offices on Charlotte Street. Expand “We would move in, expand the services by getting extra staff for data entry and production so we could deal with the backlog of applications and produce more ePassports,” Mr Symonette said. He had previously identified a lack of office space as the primary impediment to the Ministry not hiring more data entry staff and putting to use additional machines to speed up the rate at which ePassports are produced. At present there are two printing machines to produce the ePassport but only one printing station – the Passport Office in New Providence. “The Ministry of Foreign Affairs is reviewing the possibility of establishing another production cen tre, possibly in Grand Bahama. A statement would be issued on this matter later,” Mr Symonette said. Meanwhile, he is urging Bahamians whose passports are set to expire this year to apply for the ePassport to avoid the tra ditional summer rush at the Passport Office. Approximately 2,833 ePassports were completed in February 2009. Since the system was imple mented in December, 2007, an estimated 17,000 Bahamians have received the ePassport. The International Civil Aviation Organisation (ICAO which the Bahamas is a member, has mandated that by 2010, all countries must be issuing ePassports or machine readable passports. The ePassport was official ly launched on December 5, 2007, in a move to increase protection against identity theft, heighten aviation security and combat illegal immigration. C M Y K C M Y K LOCAL NEWS THE TRIBUNE WEDNESDAY, APRIL 29, 2009, PAGE 3 x xChairs Chairsx xTables Tablesx xBenches Benchesx xUmbrellas Umbrellasx xLoungers Loungersx xDrinks Trolleys Drinks Trolleysx xCoffee Tables Coffee Tablesx xEnd Tables End Tablesx xCushions CushionsT T h h e e J J a a v v a a G G a a l l l l e e r r y y T T h he e J Ja a v v a a G G a a l l l l e e r r y yWong’s Plaza • Madeira St. Wong’s Plaza • Madeira St. Tel: (242 Tel: (242)326 2335 2335Outdoor Elegance Outdoor Elegance Beat the Summer heat in a great selection of Swim trunks, Surfer Shorts, Tees, Polos. New Road Traffic Deputy Controller for Grand Bahama announced Road Traffic Department staff involved in service impr ovement workshop Staff at the Road Traffic Department took part in a two-day workshop on service improvement held the British Colonial Hilton. The workshop is part of the government’s customer service improvement initiative for the Public Service. Topics included the role of leaders and the qualities necessary to be an effective leader; motivating staff to get higher levels of productivity; improving performance; enhancing the inter nal work environment and delivering superior customer satisfaction. Facilitator Michael Pintard said the purpose of the workshop is to develop a cohesive team that will com mit itself to embracing service excellence. The workshop ended yesterday. FREEPORT – Basil Rahming, a career police officerw ho retired from the Royal Bahamas Police Force earlie r this year, has been named the new deputy controller of the Road Traffic Depart-m ent. Making the announcement i n Grand Bahama yesterday, Road Traffic Department Controller Philip Turner saidt hat Mr Rahming’s appointment became effective on Monday, April 27 and that he will be responsible for Grand Bahama island. Valuable Mr Rahming brings many years of valuable experience a nd knowledge to this position and he will be a great asset,” said Mr Turner. H e also thanked former deputy controller Stephanie R ahming for her service and leadership over the past 10 years. Basil Rahming n By NATARIO McKENZIE Tribune Staff Reporter THE trial of former PLP senator Pleasant Bridgewater and former paramedic Tarino Lightbourne is expected to open in N ew Providence on September 21, despite attempts by their lawyers yesterday to have the case heard in Grand Bahama. B ridgewater, 49, who is also a lawyer, is charged with Lightbourne, 47, in connection with an alleged plot to extort $25 million f rom Hollywood actor John Travolta. The two, who were charged in Magistrate’s Court in late January, were arraigned again before Senior Justice Anita Allen yes-t erday. Bridgewater, again d ressed in a white outfit, and her co-accused Lightbourne were arraigned together on the charges of conspiring to commit extortion and attempting to extort moneyf rom John Travolta between January 2 and 20 of this year. Whena sked to enter a plea to the charges, both Lightbourne and B ridgewater replied, “Absolutely not guilty.” Bridgewater also pleaded not guilty to the charge of abetment to extort. Reports of the alleged extor t ion attempt emerged days after Jett Travolta, the 16-year-olds on of actors John Travolta, 54, and Kelly Preston, 46, died of a s eizure at the family’s vacation home in Freeport, Grand Bahama, on January 2. Attorney Carlson Shurland of F reeport, Grand Bahama, who represents Lightbourne pro bono,o bjected to yesterday’s arraignment, submitting that the prosec ution had not provided him with all of the relevant documents. Mr Shurland told the court that he had been provided several typed statements, but no original hand-w ritten ones. Mr Shurland also requested the statement of A llyson Maynard-Gibson, who is a lawyer for the Travoltas, tapes from which the transcripts were d erived, as well as a copy of the “refusal to transfer” document. D irector of Public Prosecutions Bernard Turner told the court, h owever, that Lightbourne had been served with all the necessary documents. Mr Turner told the court that 11 of the 14 typewritten witness statements hadb een signed and that he would undertake to provide Mr Shurl and with copies of the originals. John Travolta, West End and Bimini MP Obie Wilchcombe, and PLP Senator Allyson Maynard-Gibson are among witnesses the prosecution will call. Both Bridgewater and Lightb ourne informed the court that they intend to give notice within 21 days as to whether they will present their alibis and call witnesses on their behalf. Attorney Murrio Ducille, who represents Bridgewater, asked the court to extend the $50,000 bail which was granted to her in Mag-i strate’s Court. Although Mr Ducille noted that the $50,000 bail was a bit high in view of the alleged offence, Mr Turner subm itted that it was reasonable given that Ms Bridgewater had no reporting conditions attached. Senior Justice Allen left Ms Bridgewater’s bail at $50,000 with two sureties. A ttorney Shurland told the court that Lightbourne, who isa lso on $50,000 bail, has to report to the Central Police in Freeport, G rand Bahama, every day. He asked the court to reduce his client’s reporting conditions to three days a week and to reduce his client’s bail to between$ 20,000 and $25,000. Senior Justice Allen took away Light-b ourne’s reporting conditions, but left his bail at $50,000. A ttorneys Ducille and Shurland also submitted to the court that the case should be heard in Freeport. Mr Ducille argued that because the charges emanate from Freeport and the two accused reside in Freeport, they should stand trial there before a jury of their peers. Mr Shurland strongly argued for the case to be h eard in Freeport, stating that it would be very expensive for his client, who is unemployed, to have to travel to New Providence and pay for his accommodations, as well of those of the four witnesses he intends to call. Mr Shurland submitted that his client’s case would be severely preju-d iced because of this. Mr Shurland also argued that the Supreme Court in Freeport is ideally suited to hear the matter r ather quickly as it does not have a high volume of cases. Senior Justice Allen, however, questioned the probability of empanelling an impartial jury in Freeport. M r Turner, while accepting that both of the accused reside inG rand Bahama, submitted to the court that significant activities t ook place in New Providence. He also told the court that only four of the prosecution’s witnesses reside in Freeport and that the probability of empanelling ani mpartial jury is greater in New Providence. Senior Justice Allenr efused the application to have the case heard in Freeport. She is e xpected to give her reasons in a written ruling by the end of the week. The trial is expected to open on September 21 and con tinue to October 9. RBC FINCO partnered with the Princess Margaret Hospital to hold a blood drive yesterday at the company’s Palmdale Branch on the corner of Rosetta Street and Patton Street. Pictured are Marcus Hutcheson (right ager, donate blood. In brief Bridgewater, Lightbourne trial likely to start on September 21 ALLEGEDTRAVOLTAEXTORTION PLOT A CCUSED: P leasant Bridgewater arrives at court yesterday. T i m C l a r k e / T r i b u n e s t a f f Additional space to cut passport office waiting MORE ROOM: The Ministry of Foreign Affairs has acquired additional office space to allow the Passport Office to better deal with applications. RBC FINCO partners with PMH for blood drive Tim Clarke /Tribune staff BRENT SYMONETTE Senior Justice Allen refuses bid to have case heard in Freeport Hearing fixed for New Providence

PAGE 4

EDITOR, The Tribune. Tuesday or Wednesday White Crown Terminal North Eleuthera shipped aviation gas containers to ’Briland forr efill. I wish to draw this to the Hon Earl Deveaux’s Min istry. In my opinion this is not only dangerous, but it is wrong and despicable. K indly see to it, sir, that this terrible error is corrected. Furthermore these containers areh ighly “combustible”, one does not need a cigarette or cigar, the sun is quite hot enough nowadays to ignite. In the event they blow up, H arbour Island sinks. This is the jewel of the Bahamas let’s keep it the jewel. Far too many billionaires have homes here to lose: we were never meant to be a “container port,” every week the G&G shipping from the red river in Miami, Florida with an agent in Harbour I sland. Kindly speak to the Minister for the Environment. People with money, lots of money love to throw theirw eight around. They must be checked and checked now. On the other hand ’Briland has outgrown its dock; we need a “passenger dock” orl eave the present one and find a way to provide a “freight dock.” W hen this problem is solved there would be no more con gestion or traffic problems. The same has been an issue for over two decades (20y ears). What can we do as a people to help this seemingly i nsurmountable difficulty? We have a “paradise” let us keep it so. The sooner we as citizens and voters focus on the pas s enger or freight dock the better off we will all be. The G&G serves a special purpose as an intermediate mail boat. Building materi a ls, food, etc, are all shipped by her. True the island is small; therefore we have tou tilise the space we have to the best advantage. R N MATHER Harbour Island, A pril 3, 2009. EDITOR, The Tribune. Your readers who are genuinely interested in ways of preserving marine turtles and preventing cruelty to them may be interested in a project currently underway in the Turks and Caicos Islands. Headed by the UK-based Marine Conservation society, the project is currently working together with fishermen and the government in order to update the ordinances governing turtle fisheries. Already, the group (led by Amdeep Sanghera, a British conservation expert) is collecting information it will need to update these ordinances and laws, which will likely involve restricted seasons, more stringent weight restrictions and the like. As for the issue of humanitarianism, Mr Sanghera (put off, like most of us, by the sight of cruelty to these animals) has already indicated that his project may be able to help gov ernment and fishermen assess the most humane way of slaughtering turtles, which will presumably require some input from veterinarian scientists. Readers may enquire directly about the project by emailing amdeep.sanghera@mcsuk.org. The very existence of this project, and the aims expressed to date, would appear to support my view that there is no reason to ban the entire turtle fishery industry in order to s erve the causes of both sustain a bility and humanity. It also demonstrates how a genuine and healthy civil society (as opposed to a hostile and self-appointed one) operates. It works with people and within the context of their culture and practices, in order to achieve specific, defined objectives. It does hide behind vague and jumbled objectives and simply keep lobbing out crude, lurid attacks on the traditional practices themselves. On the other hand, those parading as civil activists in this country are often simply carrying private resentments and expressing identity-related tribalism (both on vivid display in some of the letters sparked by my defence of humane, sustainable turtle consumption). As for Mr W Grattan’s prediction that I would not be able to resist answering his angry little letter of the April 24th, I will recount an anecdote about the late Calvin Coolidge, 30th President of the United States, and a famously reserved and taciturn man in his day. A gossipy woman once found herself sitting next to Mr Coolidge at a White House dinner and was determined to test him. “Mr President,” she said “I bet a fellow that I can get more than two words out of you tonight.” The President’s retort was characteristic: “You lose.” ANDREW ALLEN Nassau, April 24, 2009. C M Y K C M Y K EDITORIAL/LETTERS TO THE EDITOR PAGE 4, WEDNESDAY, APRIL 29, 2009 THE TRIBUNE The Tribune Limited NULLIUS ADDICTUS JURARE IN VERBA MAGISTRI Being Bound to Swear to The Dogmas of No Master L EON E. H. DUPUCH, Publisher/Editor 1903-1914 S IR ETIENNE DUPUCH, Kt., O.B.E., K.M., K.C.S.G., (Hon. P ublisher/Editor 1919-1972 Contributing Editor 1972-1991 EILEEN DUPUCH CARRON, C.M.G., M.S., B.A., LL.B. P ublisher/Editor 1972Published Daily Monday to Saturday S hirley Street, P.O. Box N-3207, Nassau, Bahamas Insurance Management Building., P.O. F-485, Freeport, Grand Bahama T ELEPHONES Switchboard (News, Circulation and Advertising Advertising Manager (242 C irculation Department (242 N assau Fax: (242 Freeport, Grand Bahama: 1-(242 F reeport fax: (242 W EBSITE www.tribune242.com – updated daily at 2pm IT isn’t that President Obama doesn’t understand the problem. However, his solution needs a great deal of heft to be plausible. On his recent European tour, the president, speaking in Prague, summed up the daunting challenge succinctly. “In a strange turn of history,” he said, “the threat of global nuclear war has gone down, but the risk of a nuclear attack has gone up.” He was speaking just hours after North Korea launched its second ballistic missile, in defiance of a U.N. resolution, and noted that al-Qaida and like-minded terrorists are “determined to buy, build or steal a bomb.” His proposal of what to do had an air of unreality, or non sequitur, about it. He said the U.S. would seek to cut its dominating nuclear arsenal to set a good example that would encourage other nations to follow suit. This sort of trade-off might work with the Russians, with whom Washington will negotiate. There is no evidence that it would per suade those that constitute today’s nuclear threat rogue nations and militant insurgencies. Only last week, the Taliban extended its reach into the Pakistani heartland, imposing its harsh religious laws on cowed people as it continues its march to overthrow the secular government. They did this unopposed by Pakistan’s feckless regime and its timid or demoralized military which the U.S. is preparing to underwrite with billions of aid dollars on top of huge sums already invested. Pakistan has up to an estimated 100 nuclear bombs, which could fall into the hands of the Taliban, whose support of al-Qaida in Afghanistan resulted in the 9/11 assault on the U.S. Or take Iran. Despite international tut-tut ting through ineffective sanctions, it is pro gressing steadily on the path to developing nuclear weapons capability. In addition, with the help of North Korea, Tehran is much further along in developing ballistic missiles. Iran also has a history of secretly shipping a rms to non-state groups, such as Hezbollah in Lebanon and Hamas in Gaza. How could one prudently conclude that in time it would not arm its proxies with nuclear weapons, should it serve their purpose? Or take North Korea. It possesses at least six nuclear bombs and is gearing up to pro duce more. The world wrote off its latest missile test because it failed to place a satellite into orbit. But typically missile development is marked by failures before success is attained. The recent missile travelled about twice as far as its predecessor before breaking up. For its part, North Korea has been extremely busy selling its missile and nuclear skills to others, including a nuclear plant it was building for Syria until the Israeli air force flattened it. It was the father of Pakistan’s nuclear bombs, A.Q.Khan, who peddled his knowl edge to North Korea, Iran and Libya, and probably would have found another eager customer in Saddam Hussein. It is worth noting that while Khan is the world’s worst sort of nightmare, he is a hero to his own people. He is now free, after having been placed under house arrest by a previous Pakistani regime. And there are former Soviet and other East European scientists who have been accused of trying to market their skills and materiel to bomb-seeking entities. In such an uncertain world, it would seem that the United States would retain its strong nuclear advantage as a warning and a dissuader of would-be nuclear adventurers. America’s ability to massively retaliate is the iron fist that provides diplomacy’s velvet glove the credibility it needs to be effective. For international diplomacy to work, agree ment among the existing major nuclear powers the U.S., Russia, China, Britain and France is indispensable. So far, such collaboration has been limited and transitory. There is wide disagreement about the dangers posed by Iran and North Korea. Before the U.S. cashes in its nuclear chips, President Obama should come up with a plan to deal with the clear and present dangers emanating from ambitious nations and determined terrorists whose religious fervouri nspires them to rule the world, through per suasion where possible and through power where necessary. (This article was written by Harry Rosenfeldc.2009 Albany Times Union). Significant turtle project in Turks and Caicos Islands LETTERS letters@tribunemedia.net Obama’s nuclear arms offer not realistic Remove this threat to jewel of the Bahamas EDITOR, The Tribune. If I understood Minister Earl Deveaux, Minister of the Environment, in a recent statement he seemed to indicate that Town Planning-Physical Planning for the islands not developed will be in the hands of The Bahamas National Trust. What qualifications does The Trust have to carry out this highly technical planning work? Okay BNT should be part of a broad grouping that would advise, consult and propose policy; God forbid BNT will be the sole agency doing this as I have to admit when looking at Sandy Port, which was developed by a past BNT president in my opinion there is hardly any good judgment shown in that development as virtually all the original swamp has been removed for artificial canals and totally the denuding of all natural overgrowth and original trees. I hope Government and the professional Town Planners will see the importance to set back all coastal development a minimum of say 5-800 ft. from high water mark? Insurance companies will I suggest fully support this idea and our premiums might go down. Coastal building also with coastal sea frontage we have to preserve the natural views and don't do what we now are faced with along Love Beach a total 100 per cent blocking of the natural views lost for ever. I hope the Minister will see fit to amend his policy position if I got it right as Bahamas National Trust is qualified in their field of expertise, but not in Town and Physical Planning as much as Town Planners and Physical Planners are not qualified to do what BNT has expertise in. J MOORE Nassau, April 16, 2009. Is The T r ust qualif ied for this technical planning work?

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WEATHERexperts in this c ountry and around the world are examining ways to better predict the development of seri-o us weather systems. Improving forecasting methods for serious storms was top o f the agenda at the World M eteorological Organisation’s (WMO Regional Association Four at t he Wyndham Crystal Palace and Casino. The conference was opened b y Desmond Bannister, Minis ter of Youth Sports and Cul ture, on behalf of Earl Deveaux, M inister of the Environment. Kno wledge I am glad to see so many acclaimed weather experts from around the region comprisingN orth and Central America, the C aribbean and other parts of the globe gathering here today to share with us knowledge andi deas on the co-ordination of meteorological, hydrological and related activities,” Mr Ban-n ister said. The Regional Association Four session is a quadrennialm eeting of weather experts from North America, Central America and the Caribbean, who discuss ways to co-ordinate meteorological, hydrological and related activities in the region. Discussions will focus on activities that will enhance the capability of states to produce better weather forecasts and warnings; enhance their abilityt o provide better hydrological forecasts; and enhance their ability to provide better climate predictions and assess m ents. It has been 12 years since the Bahamas hosted the meeting and according to participants, many changes have taken place in that time – 1998 was the warmest year ever recorded, theA ntarctic Larsen B ice shelf col lapsed in 2002, and 2005 saw a record 15 hurricanes. “With global warming we can expect stronger storms, more coastal erosion and flooding of low-lying areas and the degradation of ecosystems on which many Bahamians depend,” Mr Bannister said. “Worst of all, a sea level rise of just one foot, which is anticipated by the end o f the century, would effectively submerge 80 per cent of our islands. I am happy to see that the WMO recognises that adapting to present climate variability w ill go a long way in adapting to l ong-term climate change; and that adaptation and mitigation together can help achieve sus t ainable development,” Mr Bannister said. The government of the B ahamas has heeded the call of the WMO and taken actions on all fronts, he said. T hrough the Plant for the Planet Programme, Mr Bannister noted, the Bahamas Envi ronment, Science and Technolo gy (BEST launched The Bahamas Million T ree Campaign (BMTC effort to plant one million trees across the country by December3 1, 2009. Trees “The trees will improve the air quality, support native animals, conserve water and prev ent beach erosion and reduce run-off that can adversely affect our marine environment,” hes aid. Agreeing that adaptation and mitigation together can help to achieve sustainable develop m ent, Mr Bannister said the Ministry of Environment has drafted an energy policy to reducegreenhousegas e missions by 15 per cent by 2015. “Our experience has taught u s that weather and climate information are critical to preventing disasters and saving l ives. In light of this we have integrated early warning systems into emergency prevention p reparedness, management and response,” Mr Bannister said. C M Y K C M Y K LOCAL NEWS T HE TRIBUNE WEDNESDAY, APRIL 29, 2009, PAGE 5 OFFICIALSat CARICOM’s Regional Workshop on the Development of National AntiDrug Strategies and Plans have agreed that it is necessary to target both supply and demand in the fight against drug trafficking in the Caribbean. At the opening ceremony of a three-day workshop in Castries, Saint Lucia yesterday, CARICOM assistant secretary-general for human and social development, Dr Edward Greene, told participants, government officials and diplomats that if there is to be any meaningful, sustained results, “we must address this phenomenon as a whole and not as two disparate issues.” He pointed to the development of a national anti-drug strategy and plan as one way of marrying the two issues and expressed pleasure that the CARICOM Secretariat was collaborating with the Inter-American Drug Abuse Control Commission of the Organisation of American States (CICAD train officials in drug supply control and drug demand reduction. “We are expecting that the participants will leave this week of training, with knowledge, skills and tools that will enable and guide them in effectively implementing and monitoring their own national anti-drug strategies and plan,” Dr Greene said, as he pledged the supportof the CARICOM Secretariat in providing on request from member states, follow-up incountry technical support for this initiative. The deputy permanent secretary in Saint Lucia’s Ministry of Health, Mrs Chreselda St Juste, asked facilitators to sensitise par-ticipants to the need to combine both supply and demand approaches when forming poli cy. “For too long we have treated these components as parallel, distinct and distant, despite the fact that they both target a common enemy, aimed at achievinga common cause. It is time we stop working in isolation,” she said. Mrs St Juste noted that whether “we are so advised by funding agencies or not, we haveexpended more funds and resources on supply reduction without equating demand reduc tion approaches,” and called for the region to refocus its public education mechanisms on both demand and supply reduction inan effort to tackle what has come to be regarded as a serious threat to sustainable development. The Organisation of Ameri can States (OAS in Saint Lucia, Anne Marie Blackman, underscored the need for evidence-based policies that are underpinned by solid analy sis in the fight against drug trafficking and noted that the development of national anti-drug plans, strategies and policies should be done in co-ordination with all stakeholders in both the private and public sector. Regional officials call for greater collaboration in fight against drugs n By ALISON LOWE Tribune Staff Reporter alowe@tribunemedia.net PARLIAMENTARIANSwill today debate whether a select comm ittee should be formed to investig ate the circumstances surrounding allegations of sexual molestation at the Eight Mile Rock High School in Grand Bahama. This comes after PLP parliamentarians criticised House Speaker Alvin Smith for blocking a move by PLP chairwoman Glenys Hanna-Mart in to initiate the parliamentary p rocess necessary to form such a c ommittee several weeks ago, citing H ouse rules. M rs Hanna-Martin, the Englerston M P, has repeatedly expressed concern about the allegations and the ministry’s handling of them. Both she and leader of opposition business in the House of Assembly, M P for Bain and Grants Town B ernard Nottage, accused the gove rnment of seeking to avoid debate o n the issue and criticised the Speake r Mr Smith, FNM MP for North E leuthera, for siding with the government. Yesterday, Minister of Education C arl Bethel said he anticipates a “big debate” on the matter. Police have been investigating allegations made by students against several teachers at the Eight Mile Rock High School since two former students, both male, accused a male t eacher of sexually molesting them s everal years ago. T hese claims were brought to the attention of the press – and according to Mr Bethel, the Ministry of Education – in January of this y ear. A fter the accusations were levied a gainst this teacher, who has since f led the country, similar allegations s urfaced in relation to two other t eachers, one of them female. Following a debate on the matter tomorrow, parliamentarians will be given the opportunity to vote on w hether the matter warrants the appointment of the investigative comm ittee. Ms Hanna Martin has said that in supporting the appointment of MPs to a select committee, she wishes to see the initial response by law enforcement and education officials examined to determine “whether t here were any failings”. T he PLP chairwoman accused Mr B ethel in late March of remaining “callously and inexcusably silent” in the face of the scandal at the school. A day later, Mr Bethel and Mini stry of Education officials called a p ress conference where they outlined w hat they said were the “extraordin ary measures” taken by the ministry i n response to the allegations – such a s deciding to have all prospective teachers vetted by police. He admitted that the controversy had exposed weaknesses in the syst em. House to debate investigation into school sex allegations Alvin Smith Glenys Hanna-Martin Weather experts examine forecast methods at Bahamas conference Desmond Bannister EDUCATION MINISTER Carl Bethel poses with members of the Alpha Kappa Alpha Sorority and students from across the Bahamas outside the Ministry of Education. MINISTER OF YOUTH, SPORTS AND CULTURE Desmond Bannister poses with members of the Alpha Kappa Alpha Sorority and students from across the Bahamas as they celebrate their annual Honours Day on Friday, April 24, at the Ministry of Education's boardroom. CELEBRATINGANNUALHONOURSDAY D e r e k S m i t h / B I S

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C M Y K C M Y K LOCAL NEWS PAGE 6, WEDNESDAY, APRIL 29, 2009 THE TRIBUNE Job Opportunity Curator Requirements & Responsibilities: xGreat team leader with strong organizational & communication skills & excellent time management xBackground in zoo collection & development xProven rescue & restraint experience with birds, reptiles & mammals xPhysically fit individual with knowledge of animal training & enrichment xStrong computer skills & working knowledge of ARKS xWillingness to work weekends Interested and qualified candidates should send their resume to “Curator Position” at P. O. Box SS 5256, Nassau, Bahamas or e-mail to dpa@dpa-media.com. n B y MEGAN REYNOLDS T ribune Staff Reporter m reynolds@tribunemedia.net PROTECTIVE face masks recommended to prevent the spread of the s wine flu are subject to 45 per cent import t ax and medical suppliers are calling on government to drop the rate. B oth the face masks and surgical gloves a re subject to 45 per cent import duty a fter shipping, and pharmaceutical manager at Nassau Agencies Ltd Barbara Henderson said it is more important nowt han ever to make the medical supplies more affordable. Mrs Henderson maintains the highest cost is to the public purse as around 80 per cent of medical materials are purchased by government for hospitals and health clinics, and as the threat of swine flu intensifies she is concerned the high taxes could leave Bahamians vulnerable. S he said: “They should do it even if they do it temporarily because people will want to purchase them in order to p rotect themselves, and it would save 10 times more money for the government i f people could protect themselves.” T he high rate of duty normally prev ents Nassau Agencies Ltd from importing surgical masks and gloves, Mrs Hen-d erson said. B ut as several people have been quara ntined in Abaco and the World Health O rganisation raised the worldwide pand emic alert to level four in relation to Swine Influenza Virus (SIV person-to-person spread of the virus andt he possibility of community-level outbreaks, the medical supplier ordered in cases of the face masks expecting an increased demand. We went ahead and ordered some masks that are certified to be used to prevent the transmission of the virus, and t he whole time we were ordering them we w ere cussing and thinking, ‘why the hell a re we paying 45 per cent duty?’,” Mrs Henderson said. It has always been like that and its r idiculous, especially when you think we have 10 per cent duty on jewellery – I mean who the hell cares about jew ellery?” T he masks, which sell for around $10 in t he United States, would cost around $20 i n the Bahamas after shipping and tax, and Mrs Henderson said Nassau Agen-c ies Ltd usually avoids importing medi cal materials as they are not able to offer c ompetitive prices. S he said: “People are not going to buy l ocally when you can just go to Miami and put them in your suitcase. “We have never competed in the mater ials section because we have always suspected that there was a lot of funny business going on. “People were underbidding us for t hings there is no way they could have afforded for cheaper unless they were not paying duty and we have never gone t hat route.” N assau Agencies Ltd have been lob b ying the Ministry of Health to drop the duty for 20 years, Mrs Henderson said,b ut now they are appealing to the Minis t er of Finance to consider suspending or removing the duty from all medical supplies used in government institutions. Swine flu prompts call for import tax drop on face masks swine-flu is reported to have k illed at least 150 persons in Mexico and infected about 64 persons in the United States. " We had found out about the situation (swine-flu had been following it up but we received confirmationf rom the organisers that it was o n schedule. We were con cerned for them while they were there but while theyw ere there were comfortable and didn't see any problems but there is concern because o f the panic right now," said M r Haven, who did not a ccompany the group to Mexico. According to international reports, an American team that travelled to Mexico for the tournament was returning to the US yesterday. The cancellation was said to be a move by Mexican officials to stem the spread of the poten tially deadly virus. Meanwhile, health officials are still monitoring the condition of 16 persons from Marsh Harbour who were placed under a seven-day quarantine in Abaco after a recent cruise to Mexico. On Monday Dr Minnis said this move was just a precaution and up to press time there were no documented cases of swine-flu in the Bahamas. According to residents of Marsh Harbour, the persons i n quarantine are doing well. Administrator for Central Abaco Cephas Cooper said things remain normal on thei sland. " Everyone is going about their normal business there are no signs of any major con-c erns as yet but I suppose peo ple are being watchful, hope ful and optimistic that this thing will hopefully go away,"h e said. Health officials are warning B ahamian travellers to pay special attention world reports on affected areas, avoid crowded environments if theya re in a crowded area, maint ain proper hygiene and cover coughs and sneezes. The illness is treatable with a nti-viral drugs of which the country has a stockpile, according to officials. According to the Centre for D isease Control and Prevention, symptoms of the swinef lu are similar to those of the regular flu, including fever, lethargy, lack of appetite and coughing. P ersons with swine flu also h ave reported a runny nose, sore throat, nausea, vomiting and diarrhoea, the CDC s aid. Persons experiencing symp toms are advised to avoid public places and call the min-i stry's health hotline at 5 024790 . f acilities. "As a result of these operations, police have taken sever al persons into custody; they have taken in several gamb ling paraphernalia and investigations continue," Mr Evans s aid. Senior Assistant Commissioner Marvin Dames, who oversees the Grand Bahama division, recently spearheaded sev e ral sting operations on alleged gaming houses on that island. B OTH THE FACE MASKS ( above) and surgical gloves are subject to 45 per cent import duty after shipping. Crackdown by the police on suspected gambling houses FROM page one Quarantine expanded amid swine flu fears FROM page one at the time, according to neighbours. Lewis' neighbour, Seoalian Mormilien, said he was inside with his young son when he started to smell smoke. He said he quickly grabbed his child and rushed outside where he was met with screams of help from next door. Mr Mormilien said he was able to rescue the young boy who was trapped in the burning unit next to his home by using a crowbar to pry the front door open. "I heard the lil' boy crying, he couldn't come out because it was too much smoke so I just took (the I just ask what happened and he say next man inside the house," he said, adding that the smoke in the apartment was too thick to save Louis from the flames. He said he did not know much about the victim except he had arrived from Haiti less than 48 hours before his death. Police said they got a call about a fire, which started shortly before midnight yesterday in a home on Minnie Street. "When officers arrived they met fire coming from a single-storey building and immediately extinguished the fire, leaving the building with extensive damage," Press Liaison Officer Assistant Superintendent Walter Evans told The Tribune yesterday. "Inside a bedroom officers found the burnt remains of a man who is believed to be 40year-old Ronnie Lewis," said ASP Evans, adding that police believe he is a Haitian citizen. When The Tribune arrived on scene around 2pm yesterday, friends and neighbours were helping the residents pick through the ashes to salvage any remains left undamaged by the fire, yet only a few pieces of clothing remained. "Nothing was saved, only a few pieces of clothing were saved for the little boy," said another neighbour who did not want to be identified. Still, Mr Mormilien remained positive and said he might find shelter with friends in the area. Man dies in fire ‘two days after moving to the Bahamas’ FROM page one THEREMAINS of one of the apartments following the blaze.

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Nicolette Bethel L AST week's article on Bahamian identity and cultural activity generated some comment from the cognoscenti,both on and off the Bahama Pundit website, where the article is posted. Two inter-connected points emerged from that discussion. There certainly are institutions, laws and resources to support and protect Bahamian heritage, but our cultural industries are nonetheless in a perilous state of decline. Any attempt to analyse why this is so must look at where we've come from. As College of the Bahamas lecturer Ian Strachan put it, slavery convinced black Bahamians of their inferiority while colonialism robbed all Bahamians of their confidence. The result is rootlessness and indifference, more pronounced among blacks than whites. Add to this the enormous influence of American culture, the impact of foreign tourists, and the miniscule size and capacity of our creative community, and we can begin to see why cultural activists are moaning. Here we are more than 30 years after independence, they say, still dreaming and arguing about things that should have been in place long ago. We are still trying to save what remains of our tattered cultural heritage, and still hoping for the economic freedom to practise our craft. By most accounts, until the 1960s Bahamians had no national consciousness. But the massive expansion of education after the Progressive Liberal Party's 1967 victory led to a new focus on culture favouring activities that had previously been either discounted or wilfully ignored. It was all part of the “quiet revolution” that led inexorably from majority rule to nationhood. In 1972, when the nationalist fires were at their peak, the emi nent composer and musician Clement Bethel (best known forhis dissertation on Junkanoo and for writing the folk opera Sammy Swain) was picked to head the government's newly created cultural d ivision. Bethel's untimely death in 1987 coincided with a UNESCO report by a Canadian university professor that urged the government to set priorities and write legislation to protect Bahamian heritage, provide training for artists, and develop a range of cultural facilities. Calling for more arts funding, the report said: "The lot of the average Bahamian artist is not a happy one. Income from art is modest or non-existent; employment is scarce and irregular; sales are infrequent; and training is demanding and costly." Nevertheless, cultural activities were seen as our most promising and productive economic resources, and the report called for a system of matching public and private sector grants to sup port creative individuals and groups. These recommendations were largely ignored, but some proposals such as a national art gallery and heritage legislation have been realised over the years. Clement Bethel's death left a void that was not filled until Cleophas Adderley's appointment as director of culture in 1996. Bethel's daughter, Nicolette, became director in 2003 but resigned last year in the face of what she regards as congenital dis interest in the arts on the part of politicians. As an example, she cites the fact that for years the cultural division has been shunted from Education to Youth, to the Office of the Prime Minister, and back to Education. It is now part of the Ministry of Youth, Sports and Cul ture again, with a small staff of 28. They look after a number of activities, including the National Arts Festival, Junkanoo, the National Dance School, the National Poetry Competition, Theatre in the Park, and a range of other national and international events. But the bulk of the division's $2 million annual budget goes to Junkanoo for bleacher rentals, seed and prize money throughout the Bahamas, as well as administrative subsidies for the Junkanoo C ommittee, and other parade expenses. Sixteen years ago the Senate held a series of hearings on cultural development led by then Independent senator Fred Mitchell. These sessions resulted in a draft law that sought to create a national arts council. But that exercise went nowhere. In 2002, the Christie administration appointed a National Commission on Cultural Development, whose 60 members met regularly for several years under the leadership of Charles Carter and the late Winston Saunders. This body revised the earlier Bill and submitted it to Cabinet in 2004, where it promptly died. That version called for a semiindependent arts council to promote cultural activities generally. It would do this through a sweeping mandate to raise funds, operate creative facilities and training schools, give grants, produce shows and fund research. Since 2004, this Bill has been circulating among members of the cultural community, and may have informed the contents of the Entertainment and Culture Encouragement Bill, which is currently being lobbied by people like Fred Munnings. The Cultural Commission also came up with a policy document that was unveiled at a National Cultural Conclave in 2006 and posted online for comment. It builds on a draft written in 1995 by Cleophas Adderley and the late Kayla Lockhart Edwards, and aims to give "a coherent strategic national context for planning and decision-making about culture." One of the challenges for any young nation, this document says, "is the balance between sover eignty and national identity, and the influence of a pervasive global culture that is increasingly homogenous and American in flavour." More significantly, the draft pol icy calls for an urgent "redirection of resources and funds to the development and promotion of the Bahamian cultural sector," which it described as "one of the least developed" in the hemisphere. This brings us to the question of exactly what resources are currently available for the cultural sector. Although an overarching national policy and a national arts council have never been achieved, there have been some significant advances in this sector since the UNESCO report was written. The Antiquities, Monuments and Museums Corporation was created by Parliament in 1998. It is responsible for archaeological research and heritage conservation, and currently operates five public facilities on New Providence Forts Fincastle, Montagu and Charlotte, Balcony House and the Pompey Museum It also administers the Long Island Museum at Buckley's and the South Eleuthera Mission at Rock Sound, and is developing a museum in the old jail house on San Salvador. The AMMC shares responsibility for the Clifton Heritage Park with an independent authority that was created in 2004. The government is now in the process of strengthening the Corporation's enabling act, and a decision will be made soon on whether the former Collins mansion will become a national museum or library. The National Art Gallery has been established since 2003 ina restored 19th century mansion on West Street. A national endowment for the arts was set up by the government in the 1990s, but seems to have become dormant, with no line item in the budget. A private Endowment for the Performing Arts, organised by Winston Saunders and Sir Orville Turnquest in 1996, disburses about $60,000 a year in grants and tuition subsidies to Bahamian artists. An Historic Bahamas Foundation was established last year to raise funds and accept donations on behalf of the Antiquties Corporation. And both the Lyford Cay and Cable Bahamas Cares Foundations provide regular funding for the arts. There are other public and private subsidies to the creative community, but activists insist there should be a single national policy and overarching legislation that makes sense out of all of these overlapping initiatives, as well as a coordinating authority if the state is to maintain these investments and subsidies. More importantly, there needs to be an appreciation of the economic value of cultural activities. A few years ago, CARICOM produced a document on the region's creative industries. It said activities like music, performing and visual arts, broadcasting and publishing can not only create new jobs but can provide avenues to engage young people in productive pursuits. Just one example will make the point. Jose Antonio Abreu, an economist and musician in Venezuela, founded a programme to help impoverished Venezuelan kids take part in classical music. A fter 30 years (and 10 political administrations), it has evolved i nto a network of 102 youth orchestras, 55 children's orches tras, and 270 music centres embracing almost 250,000 young musicians. Their instruments and training have been fully funded by a suc c ession of Venezuelan governments, and the programme has b ecome an international model that is seen as an alternative to drugs and crime as well as a source of national pride. According to the CARICOM report, "There is an urgent need to put in place the appropriate regu l atory and policy measures to develop the enabling environment f or creative industries in this region to realize their full growth potential as viable businesses." But since commercial banks do not value intellectual capital and are reluctant to finance creative industries, activists argue that gov ernment must provide seed money or loan guarantees. According to a draft policy on grants produced a few years ago, "Culture, like tourism, requires investment in order to bring about financial returns. Part of that investment must be in the support of private artistic and cultural projects through an enlightened grants policy." Of course, the danger is that we open ourselves up to yet another massive public sector gravy train. So perhaps the real question is whether we are on the right track with our existing spending. For example, to my knowledge, noone has offered a detailed costbenefit analysis for investing up to $100 million to dredge the harbour so that bigger cruise ships can call. And no-one has justified to the Bahamian people recently the expenditure of tens of millions on overseas advertising and pr to generate tourists, when we all agree that the visitor experience on the ground is generally dreadful and growing worse. Studies confirm that cultural heritage travellers stay longer and spend more money than other kinds of tourists. So would we be able to generate more revenue by investing more in cultural activities and product development? We attempted to raise this point with Tourism Director-General Vernice Walkine, but she did not return phone calls. In the meantime there are genuine fears among the creative community that without coordinated protections and incentives, our cultural resources could disappear almost entirely a predicament illustrated by this passage from a 1929 account by Amelia Defries. She described a magnificently carved bedstead carved by one Josiah Anthem of Eight Mile Rock: "Not eberybody can paint or carve same as my fader," the daughter murmered. Then the old man brought out the chief labour of his hands piece by piece. "It will last for 30 years...But how can I sell it when nobody nebber comes to see? "That certainly was a problem...If he put the carved bedstead upon a sponging vessel and sent it to Nassau in the fashionable season, he might sell it, and even get an order for another. "Anthem in his isolation was like a rent and tattered sail after a storma remnant or survival of a finer past...yet if there was a revival of cratsmanship on these islands much good (moral and commer cial) might result." What do you think? Send comments to larry@tribunemedia.net Or visit www.bahamapundit.com Cultural industries are in decline S S t t u u d d i i e e s s c c o o n n f f i i r r m m t t h h a a t t c c u u l l t t u u r r a a l l h h e e r r i i t t a a g g e e t t r r a a v v e e l l l l e e r r s s s s t t a a y y l l o o n n g g e e r r a a n n d d s s p p e e n n d d m m o o r r e e m m o o n n e e y y t t h h a a n n o o t t h h e e r r k k i i n n d d s s o o f f t t o o u u r r i i s s t t s s . . S S o o w w o o u u l l d d w w e e b b e e a a b b l l e e t t o o g g e e n n e e r r a a t t e e m m o o r r e e r r e e v v e e n n u u e e b b y y i i n n v v e e s s t t i i n n g g m m o o r r e e i i n n c c u u l l t t u u r r a a l l a a c c t t i i v v i i t t i i e e s s a a n n d d p p r r o o d d u u c c t t d d e e v v e e l l o o p p m m e e n n t t ? ?

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C M Y K C M Y K LOCAL NEWS PAGE 8, WEDNESDAY, APRIL 29, 2009 THE TRIBUNE GRAND BAHAMA P ort Authority president Ian Rolle and newly appointed vice president of the Port Group Limited Ginger Moxey a ttended a customer service t raining workshop hosted by t he GBPA training departm ent. T his training comes as the r esult of the new “Making It Happen” initiatives launched by the new President at the Grand Bahama Business Outlook in February and was made mandatory for all Group employees. Director of Training for the GBPA Group, Geneva Rutherford conducted the four week “Service Excellence Customer Training Works hop” that began Tuesday, M arch 10, and ended on T hursday, April 9. E ach session was tailored to a ddress the customer services n eeds required by the individual departments of the Group. The “Service Excellence” training is intended to improve GBPA’s interaction with its customer. evening” that a man riding a jet ski had “fallen overboard” near the resort owned by fashion mogul Peter Nygard. According to a source, who contacted The Tribune yesterday, concerned that news of the missing man did not appear to have reached the press, the individual was one of a group invit ed to a Sunday event at the luxury property located at the western tip of Lyford Cay. It was not clear under what circumstances the man fell off the watercraft, however Mr Lloyd pointed to the fact that bad weather on Sunday made conditions at sea very rough and such activities inadvisable. The BASRA director noted that “dead low tides” and reefs in the vicinity of Nygard Cay would have presented addi tional dangers. The Defence Force said patrol crafts HMBS Inagua and Enduring Friendship 18 were dispatched to search for the jet ski rider on Monday. Mr Lloyd told The Tribune that having been “surprised” to find that BASRA was not alert ed to the incident before Sunday evening, BASRA did not join the search that night as darkness would have made it ineffectual. HMBS continues to search the area for further remains, according to the RBDF. A message left for Nygard Cay representatives for addi tional information on the inci dent was not returned up to press time yesterday. Eyewitnesses said one of the men got out of the car armed with a handgun and opened fire before jumping back into the vehicle. Bullets reportedly struck two occupants of the home, a woman and a young child, who were said to be asleep at the time. The gunfire reportedly hit the home's front wall and a vehicle parked in the yard. The owner of the home, Ezra Flowers, told ZNS news last night that his son, who lives in the house with his girlfriend and children, was recently the target of hoodlums. Mr Flowers said his son was not at home when the shooting took place. Police investigations continue. M RS. GENEVA RUTHERFORD , Director of Training for the GBPA G roup, conducted the four week ‘Service Excellence Customer’ t raining workshop. GBPAtraining department hosts customer service workshop FRONT ROW: from left to right: Mrs Ginger Moxey, Vice President of Port Group Limited, (second Grand Bahama Port Authority, Limited, (fourth vice Excellence’ customer service training workshop, implemented and hosted by the GBPA Training Department. Two are reportedly in hospital after shooting FROM page one FROM page one Body parts believed to be remains of man from jet ski accident

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n By BERNIE WILSON AP Sports Writer LOS ANGELES (AP The Los Angeles Lakers can put on quite a show offensively, with 3-pointers, slam dunks and even Kobe Bryant sinking a fadeaway jumper as he fell on his backside. Its their defense that's going to need work if they plan on going deep in the NBA playoffs. Bryant and the Lakers are moving on as if that was really in doubt but even as they ran away from the Jazz 107-96 on Monday night, they still left questions about their overall play. With Bryant scoring 31 points and Lamar Odom adding 26 points and 15 rebounds, the Lakers finished the openinground series in five games to earn a few days rest. They move on to play the winner of the Portland-Houston series. The partying fans at Staples Arena and the Lakers were slapped back to reality as the Jazz cut a 22-point deficit at the end of the third quarter to 93-86 with 4:37 left. Bryant hit a turnaround jumper and Odom finished a fast break with a slamd unk to fend off Utah's late run. "We've got to give a better effort defensively when our sec ond unit comes in there, getting back on defense, not giving up easy baskets, stuff like that,"B ryant said. "We've got a week h ere before the next series to have a spirited conversation with the group and see if we can't correct that for the next series." Bryant doesn't care who the Lakers play next. " I'm just ready for the next series, whoever it is," he said. "We have to kind of go over it and evaluate it and see what areas we can exploit offensively and defensively. It's different than playing in the regular sea son." Bryant had a welt under his right eye. The Lakers acknowl edged that Utah was a tough opponent despite being the No.8 seed. It was a disappointing end for a Jazz team that had high expectations. "Injuries kind of affected us and we really weren't able to ever get into a rhythm," point guard Deron Williams said. "We kind of headed downhill toward the playoffs and we just really didn't get the type of effort we needed to win a series." If there was any question that this was going to be the Lakers' night on their home court, Bryant answered that in the closing seconds of the first half. He drove the lane and passed to Pau Gasol. The ball was batted loose and Bryant grabbed it, turned and sank a fadeaway jumper as he fell on his rear end, giving the Lakers a 56-43 halftime lead. By late in the third quarter, the Lakers were toying with the Jazz. Bryant made a layup, hit a 3-pointer and fed Gasol for a slam dunk. Odom added a bucket and just like that it was 80-58. Paul Millsap led Utah with 16 points while Andrei Kir ilenko and Williams had 14 apiece. Gasol had 17 points and 11 rebounds, and Ariza 12 points for the Lakers. N N u u g g g g e e t t s s 1 1 2 2 1 1 , , H H o o r r n n e e t t s s 6 6 3 3 At New Orleans, Carmelo Anthony scored all of his 26 points in the first three quarters, and Denver took a commanding 3-1 lead in its firstround series. Denver led 89-50 after three quarters on its way to matching the most lopsided victory in NBA playoff history. The Min neapolis Lakers beat the St. Louis Hawks 133-75 in 1956. The Nuggets stifled Hornets All-Star Chris Paul, whose four points and six assists amount ed to one of the worst games of his career. The Nuggets can close out the series at home in Game 5 on Wednesday night. H H a a w w k k s s 8 8 1 1 , , H H e e a a t t 7 7 1 1 At Miami, Zaza Pachulia had 12 points and 18 rebounds, and Atlanta raced to a huge firsthalf lead in tying the first-round series at two games apiece. Mike Bibby scored 15 points, Joe Johnson added 14 and Josh Smith 13 for the Hawks. Dwyane Wade scored 22 points on 9-for-26 shooting and wincing at times from a back injury. It was Atlanta's first road postseason win in nearly 12 years, a stretch spanning 13 games. The series returns to Atlanta on Wednesday for Game 5. C M Y K C M Y K SPORTS PAGE 12, WEDNESDAY, APRIL 29, 2009 TRIBUNE SPORTS Lakers close out Jazz with 107-96 victory MIAMI (AP ward Jamario Moon will miss the remainder of the postseason because of a sports hernia that will require surgery, meaning he may have played his last game in a Miami uniform. Moon suffered what was diagnosed as a lower abdominal strain in Game 3 of Miami's first-round series against the Atlanta Hawks. An MRI revealed further problems, and Moon will have season-ending surgery Thursday. The team said he will need two weeks to rest after the surgery, and will be re-evaluated at that time. Moon is due to become a free agent this summer. The Heat acquired him and Jermaine O'Neal in February, in a deal that sent Shawn Marion to the Toronto Raptors. Miami F J amar io Moon out for postseason n By The Associated Press New Orleans at Denver (10:30 p.m. EDT Nuggets, who matched an NBAplayoff record with a 58-point victory in Game 4, can win a series for the first time since 1994. S S T T A A R R S S Monday Kobe Bryant, Lakers, scored 31 points to lead Los Angeles into the second round of the playoffs with a 107-96 win over Utah. Lamar Odom and Pau Gasol, Lakers. Odom had 26 points and 15 rebounds, while Gasol added 17 points and 11 boards against Utah in Game 5. Carmelo Anthony, Nuggets, scored all of his 26 points in three quarters as Denver took a 3-1 series lead with a 121-63 rout of New Orleans. Zaza Pachulia, Hawks, had 12 points and 18 rebounds as Atlanta evened its first-round series with Miami at two games apiece with an 81-71 victory. R R E E C C O O R R D D R R O O M M P P The Denver Nuggets matched the biggest victory in playoff history with their 121-63 rout of New Orleans in Game 4 of their firstround series. The Minneapolis Lakers had the other 58-point postseason victory, beating the St. Louis Hawks 133-75 in 1956. The Hornets recorded playoff lows in points, field goals made (17 attempted (5410 and second-half points (24 Denver's 121 points set a Hornets opponent playoff high. W W O O U U N N D D E E D D W W A A D D E E Slowed by back pain, Dwyane Wade was limited to 22 points on 9-for-26 shooting in Miami's 81-71 loss to Atlanta in Game 4 of their series. The All-Star guard and NBA's scoring leader was wincing from back spasms that started at the morning shootaround, and flared in the first quar ter. P P A A I I R R O O F F 4 4 s s M iami's James Jones converted two four-point plays in an 11-second span of the Heat's 81-71 loss to Atlanta in Game 4 of their series. He made a 3-pointer with 2:26 remaining in the secondq uarter, got fouled by S olomon Jones and swished the free throw. And with 2:15 left, James Jones did it again, connecting on anoth er 3-pointer, getting fouled by Mike Bibby and making that free throw as well. R R O O D D R R E E T T I I R R E E S S Jazz broadcaster "Hot" Rod Hundley retired after his long career following Utah's 107-96 loss to the Lakers in Game 5 of their first-round series. Hundley has been broadcasting Jazz games since they were an expansion team playing in New Orleans in 1974. He made the move to Utah with the rest of the club in 1979. A former star at West Vir ginia, the 74-year-old Hund ley played six NBA seasons for the Lakers before he retired in 1963. Hundley was acknowledged by the PA announcer during a timeout in the fourth quarter and received a nice ovation from the crowd. S S P P E E A A K K I I N N G G "I wouldn't have thought that we would win by 58 points. I never thought anyone could win by 58 points in the playoffs." Carmelo Anthony after his Denver Nuggets matched the most lopsided victory in NBAplayoff history by beating New Orleans 121-63 in Game 4 NBA Today IN THIS April 25, 2009 file photo, Miami Heat coach Erik Spoelstra, right, talks to forward Jamario Moon during the first period of Game 3 of their first-round Eastern Conference playoff series against the Atlanta Hawks in Miami. (AP Photo: Wilfredo Lee INSIGHT For the stories behind the news, read Insight on Mondays LAMAR ODOM , right, grabs a rebound with forward Trevor Ariza around Utah Jazz forward Paul Millsap during the first half of a first-round playoff game in Los Angeles on Monday... (AP Photo: Chris Carlson KOBE BRYANT greets Sean 'Diddy' Combs before Game 5 of a first-round playoff series between the Lakers and the Utah Jazz in Los Angeles on Monday... (AP Photo/Chris Carlson

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C M Y K C M Y K SPORTS TRIBUNE SPORTS WEDNESDAY, APRIL 29, 2009, PAGE 13 Junior baseball standings WITH only two weeks remaining in the Junior Baseball League of Nassau’s regular season, t eams are still looking to get into the playoffs. Here are the current standings a nd play-off positions, and are results of weekend games: S S E E N N I I O O R R L L E E A A G G U U E E Phillies def. Tigers 20-6 R angers def. P irates 10-6 J J U U N N I I O O R R L L E E A A G G U U E E Y ankees def. Cardinals 14-4 T wins def. Dodgers 11-3 M M A A J J O O R R L L E E A A G G U U E E M arlins def. Indians 7-3 R eds def. Mariners 4-3 Mariners def. M arlins 5-1 ( Make Up Game) M M I I N N O O R R L L E E A A G G U U E E Rockies def. R ed Sox 13-7 M ets def. Royals 9-3 C C O O A A C C H H P P I I T T C C H H A thletics def. Blue Jays 14-3 C ubs def. Angels 18-4 Diamondbacks def. Astros 18-5 T T E E E E B B A A L L L L S and Gnats def. Blue Claws 21-18 K nights def. Grasshoppers 11-0 Sidewinders def. R aptors 25-15 G rasshoppers def. Blue Claws 19-3 (Make-up gameK nights def. Raptors 19-18 (Make-up game CONGRATS to all T-ball players, coaches, fans and director Pat Moss who wrapped up their regular season over the weekend. Special congrats for the Sea Grapes who won the pennant for T-ball with 13 wins, one loss and two ties. Playoffs begin this weekend for T-ball and the 16-18 division. T-ball play off is single elimination format and championship series is best of three games. There will be no time limit. Schedule are as follows: T T B B a a l l l l D D i i v v i i s s i i o o n n Guineps vs Sea Grapes on Saturday May 2nd, 2009 @ 4 pm Jujus vs Coco Plums on Saturday May 2nd, 2009 @ 6 pm 16-18 Division Tainos vs Arawaks on Sunday May 3rd, 2009 @ 2:30 pm Caribs vs Lucayans on Sunday May 3rd, 2009 @ 4:30 pm F F R R E E E E D D O O M M F F A A R R M M C C U U R R R R E E N N T T S S T T A A N N D D I I N N G G S S W W E E E E K K 1 1 6 6 T T B B A A L L L L WINSLOSSESTIESSTREAK 1. SEA GRAPES cp/pw 13 1 2 W1 2. COCO PLUMS cp113W3 3. JUJUS cp 6 53L1 4. GUINEPS cp 491T1 5. DILLIES e014L14 C C O O A A C C H H P P I I T T C C H H WINS LOSSES TIES STREAK 1. BOAS cp172W12 2. BEES cp153W4 3. SANDFLIES cp 10 8 L1 4. MOSQUITOES513L4 5. GREEN TURTLES 4 15L5 6. WASPS414W2 9 9 1 1 0 0 D D I I V V I I S S I I O O N N WINSLOSSESTIESSTREAK 1. BARRACUDAS cp 14 3 1 W4 2. DOLPHINS cp1341W2 3. TURBOTS cp116W8 4. OCTOPUS cp 8 10 L3 5. RED SNAPPERS e513L4 6. EELS e 116L2 1 1 1 1 1 1 2 2 D D I I V V I I S S I I O O N N WINSLOSSESTIESSTREAK 1. WILD DOGS cp/pw210W21 2. CONCHS cp 15 6 W4 3. BLUE MARLINS cp149W1 4. NASSAU GROUPERS cp 13 9 W2 5. DIVERS e 10 12 L3 6. HURRICANES e813L5 7. GREEN PAROTTS e 814W1 8. IGUANAS e6141L2 9. WHITE CROWNSe1191L4 1 1 3 3 1 1 5 5 D D I I V V I I S S I I O O N N WINS LOSSES TIES STREAK 1. OWLZ cp1261W3 1. SILVER JACKS cp 13 7 W1 3. POTCAKES cp 10 7 1W1 4. STINGRAYS cp892L5 5. RACCOONS e6102L1 6. SHARKS e3132L1 1 1 6 6 1 1 8 8 D D I I V V I I S S I I O O N N WINSLOSSESTIESSTREAK 1. ARAWAKS cp/pw 8 2 W3 2. LUCAYANS cp44L1 3. CARIBS cp 4 5 L2 4. TAINOS cp 2 7 W1 pw – pennant winner cp – clinched playoffe – elimination post-season Freedom Farm standings (Week 16) Female golfers trying to make LPGA Tour for help was kind of scary at the beginning. “I didn’t really have a home like I did in Freeport where I was able to go out and practice every day and be comfortable. I’m finally starting to get comfortable here and playing.” At her last tournament, Riley finished tied for 21st with two other players. She shot threer ounds of 78-78-75 for her total of 231. “I didn’t do as good as I wanted to, but it was still solid,” she said. “I didn’t win any money, but still performed well. I learnt a lot from my rounds. So I just have to keep pushing. “The dream is still alive in me and I’m still fighting for every inch that I can get.” As an alternate on the Futures Tour, Riley said she is just waiting for her call to play in her first tournament on their circuit. But she said her ultimate goal, like Rolle, is to make it to the LPGA Tour. “I believe that I have the talent to do so,” said Riley, who was a two-time Bahamas junior champion (1999 and 2000 three-time member of the Bahamas Amateur team (2001, 2002 and 2004) and the 2001 Bahamas national women’s amateur champion who went on to represent the Bahamas at the 2004 World Cup in Puerto Rico. “I don’t just want to be a member. I want to be a contender. I want to compete to actually win. So in order to accomplish that goal, I have to compete in as many local events as I can and some open events in Colorado and the US Open this year.” The last two years, Riley m ade it past the first stage at the US Open so she’s hoping to go even further when this year’s tournament starts on May 15 in Florida. “The US Open women’s qualifier is definitely my nexte vent until I can get into the F utures Tour,” she said. “I just want to play golf.” F F R R O O M M p p a a g g e e 1 1 5 5 Scorpions’ 4-1 victory over Pitbulls mound in his first softball appearance, and allowed just two hits, and struck out three batters. The Scorpions left runners in scoring position in both the first and second innings but finally capitalized on their efficient hitting in the third. Mavin Saunders blasted an RBI double which scored Adrian Ferguson for the game’s first run. Saunders scored a few players later on a wild pitch to give his team a 2-0 advantage. After Pitbulls pitcher William Ferguson walked Trevor Knowles, Desir’s double brought home the runner to close out the third inning. The Pitbulls looked to rally in the fourth and Ferguson led off with a single, but the Scorpions defense rebounded with a double play on the next pitch. Keno Cartwright scored T A. Thompson’s final run of the inning on a wild pitch to end the fourth. Desir was just a single out from a shutout game when Timothy Job laced a single down the third baseline which went into foul territory and, after a series of errors, was able to score the Pitbulls’ lone run of the game. Desir also finished 2-2 from the plate. “I think I played well, I was a little nervous out there pitching on the mound because it was the first time I played softball but I think I did well,” he said. “My team’s defense did well and we got the win.” H e said that although most of his experie nce came from watching professional base ball, with more game time he should improve as the season progresses. “I watched a lot of television, watching the professionals pitch so I just tried to pick up a few things from that and I hope I can get better as the season goes on,” he said. For just my first game it was better than I expected and I think this team can go far to the championship and do well once we play good defense and I get more into it and experienced.” F F R R O O M M p p a a g g e e 1 1 5 5 A SWINGING TIME T A THOMPSON Scorpions’ pitcher Velnir Desir (not shown yesterday over the D W Davis Pitbulls at the Baillou Hills Sporting Complex. Shown on this page are some of the players in action... P h o t o s : T i m C l a r k e / T r i b u n e s t a f f

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CALEDONIA FC salvaged some respect for their season when they claimed the BFA KO Cup in dramatic fashion on Sunday. Having lost the league title to Bears FC and further seeing them claim the President’s Cup on New Years Day, Caledonia put out their best foot to stop the Bears from claiming the triple, and needed all of 90 minutes to do the job. The match started evenly with both teams creating opportunities to score. Bears drew first blood in the 23rd minute when a lunging tackle in the Caledonia penalty area conceded a penalty. The league’s leading goalscorer Lesly St Fleur stepped up and converted, giving his team the one goal lead, and one hand on the cup. The first half ended with the Bears holding on to this lead. The second half had barely started, however, before Caledonia equalized. Wagner Machado hit a looping shot from distance that flew into the back of the Bears net 34 seconds into the second half, and leveled the score. The early goal made the match far more open and saw both teams create opportuni ties to steal the match. Two late occurrences in the game made its mark. First, with eight minutes remaining in the match, on a Bears attack, the assistant referee signaled for an infringement that the referee awarded as a penalty to Bears FC. Having discussed the matter with the assistant, the referee then decided that the perceived incident did not in fact take place, and instead awarded a goal kick. This was then followed by a Caledonia attack, during which time Bahamian senior international Connor Sheehan took a shot that deflected off a Bears defender and wrong-footed goalkeeper Corie Frazer, giv ing Caledonia a 2-1 lead. Only two minutes remained after this, which Caledonia played out and held on to claim the cup. The match was followed by the presentation of awards, conducted by BFA vice president Sam Haven. The following awards for the year were presented: B B F F A A K K n n o o c c k k O O u u t t C C u u p p C C h h a a m m p p i i o o n n s s C C a a l l e e d d o o n n i i a a F F C C B B F F A A K K n n o o c c k k O O u u t t C C u u p p R R u u n n n n e e r r s s U U p p I I n n s s u u r r a a n n c c e e M M a a n n a a g g e e m m e e n n t t B B e e a a r r s s F F C C L L e e a a g g u u e e C C h h a a m m p p i i o o n n s s I I n n s s u u r r a a n n c c e e M M a a n n a a g g e e m m e e n n t t B B e e a a r r s s F F C C L L e e a a g g u u e e R R u u n n n n e e r r s s U U p p C C a a l l e e d d o o n n i i a a F F C C M M o o s s t t V V a a l l u u a a b b l l e e P P l l a a y y e e r r L L e e s s l l y y S S t t . . F F l l e e u u r r , , I I M M B B e e a a r r s s F F C C L L e e a a g g u u e e L L e e a a d d i i n n g g G G o o a a l l s s c c o o r r e e r r L L e e s s l l y y S S t t . . F F l l e e u u r r , , I I M M B B e e a a r r s s F F C C Y Y o o u u t t h h P P l l a a y y e e r r A A w w a a r r d d A A l l e e x x I I f f e e r r e e n n t t a a , , I I M M B B e e a a r r s s F F C C C C o o a a c c h h o o f f t t h h e e Y Y e e a a r r C C h h r r i i s s t t i i a a n n V V i i l l l l i i , , F F C C N N a a s s s s a a u u C M Y K C M Y K SPORTS PAGE 14, WEDNESDAY, APRIL 29, 2009 TRIBUNE SPORTS THE Grand Bahama Tank Cleaning Company Cycling Tour/Championships was organised by the Grand Bahama Cyclist Club, headed by Rowshan Jones. The event was sanctioned by the Bahamas Amateur Cycling Federation. It was staged last weekend with a 78 mile road race and a 120 mile individual timed trial. The road race started from McClean’s Town and ended up at West End. The results are as fol lows: 1ST Kim Thompsontime 3 hrs.17mins.43 sec 2nd Barron Turbo Musgrovetime 3 hrs.17mins.47 sec 3rd Tracey Sweeting time 3hrs.21mins.22sec 4th Anthony Biggie Colebrook time 3hrs.21mins.28sec 5th Keith Major time 3hrs.21mins.31sec 6th Row Shan Jones time 3hrs.22mins.00 The 12-mile individual timed trials was held on Chickewn Farm Road Here’s a look at the results: 1ST BARRON TURBO MUSGROVE TIME 30 MINS. 08 SECOND 2ND KIM THOMPSON TIME 31 MINS. 05 SECOND 3RD TRACEY SWEETING TIME 34 MINS. 12 SECOND 4TH ROWSHAN JONES TIME 34MINS. 54 SECOND 5TH ANTHONY BIGGIE COLEBROOK TIME 38MINS. 54 There was also a 12-mile sprint race for the juniors on the one-lap Chicken Farm Road Here’s a look at the results: 1ST PLACE ANTHONY “BIGGIE” COLEBROOK TIME 30MINS.59SEC 2ND PLACE JUSTIN MINNS TIME 31MINS.09SEC 3RD PLACE KENAN SWAIN TIME 40MINS.03SEC In the combined scores or times for each race that was used to declare the overall winners of the cycling tour are as follows: O O V V E E R R A A L L L L R R E E S S U U L L T T S S TOP SIX POSITIONS 1ST PLACEBARRON TURBO MUSGROVE TIME 3HRS .47MNS. 55 SEC 2ND PLACEKIM THOMPSON3HRS .48MINS. 48 SEC 3RD PLACE TRACEY SHOW-TIME SWEETING 3HRS. 55MINS. 34 SEC 4TH PLACEANTHONY BIGGIE COLEBROOK3HRS. 59MINS. 53 SEC 5TH PLACEROWSHAN JONES4HRS. 00MINS. 00 SEC 6TH PLACE KEITH MAJOR Elite junior Anthony ‘Biggie’ Colebrook rode impressively enough to be declared the most outstanding cyclist in the tour GB cycling tour results Caledonia FC claim BFA KO Cup in dramatic fashion Insurance Management Bears FC 2009 League and Presidents Cup Winners YOUTH player of the Year Alex Iferenta (left C OACH OF THE YEAR C hristian Villi of FC Nassau, with his twin daughters, accepts his award from BFA vice president Sam Haven... CALEDONIA FA with the BFA Knock-Out Cup after winning in dramatic fashion. LEADING goalscorer and most valuable player Lesly St Fleur accepts one of his two awards from BFA vice president Sam Haven...

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n By BRENT STUBBS Senior Sports Reporter bstubbs@tribunemedia.net T hey’re both on the verge of becoming the first Bahamians to make it to the Ladies Professional Golf Tour. But for Georgette Rolle and Raquel Riley, it has not been an easy road. Rolle, who is attending graduate school at Texas Southern University, a nd Grand Bahamian native Riley, w ho resides in South Florida, are trying t o make their breakthrough in the Duramed Futures Tour. While Riley is on the alternate list waiting for her call, Rolle will be playing in her first tournament this weekend at the Texas Hill Country Classic at the Dominion Country Club in San Antonio, Texas. “I’ve been working on some things to improve my ball striking,” said Rolle in an interview with Tribune Sports as she prepared to leave for the tournament yesterday. “So I definitely want to try and place in the top ten or the top 15. If I can just start to try to accumulate points, I will be able to get a LPGA Tour card from the Futures’ Tour itself.” Having played in a couple of the SunCoast Ladies Series this year, Riley said she’s trying to get more comfortable with her performance and minimise her mistakes. “If I do make a mistake somewhere, I want to try and finish the hole with no more than a bogey at worse,” she said. “So I definitely need to get better at minimising my mistakes and I think I will be well on my way.” Depending on how she does this weekend, Rolle is counting on being invited to play in as many of the tournaments in order to maintain her standard to finish in the top 15 by the end of the year so that she can be exempted from playing in the developmental league and advance to the LPGA school. If she doesn’t get it through the Futures Tour, Rolle still has the option of getting her LPGA card through their school. But she noted that the latter is more difficult than the former. “So if I do plan on signing for the LGPA Tour school this year, which I didn’t do last year, it’s going to be very expensive, so I am hoping that I can make it through the Futures Tour.” During the Sun Coast Series, Rolle and Riley played in at least one tournament this year. Riley, who has been on the pro circuit since 2005 compared to last year when Rolle made her debut, is coming off her last appearance in the Sun Coast Series last week at the Rock Springs Ridge Golf Club in Apopka, Florida. She noted that her game is coming along very steady and because of her sponsor, Velez Capital Management in New York, whom she was able to acquire through some friends she met since she went to South Florida. “I’ve played a few events and have gotten steady,” she said. “I started off kind of shaky because coming here on a dream and being around people you don’t know and to trust them to look C M Y K C M Y K WEDNESDAY, APRIL 29, 2009 THETRIBUNE PAGE 15 P AGE 14 Caledonia FC claim BFA KO Cup... C C R R I I C C K K E E T T F F I I R R S S T T C C E E N N T T U U R R Y Y Y OUTH player Ryan Tappin scored the first century of the season onS unday as he led his team, the Dynasty Stars, to a 98run victory over St Agnes. B atting first, Dynasty Stars scored a total of 270 runs for the loss of ninew ickets. Tappin top scored with 102 runs. Marc Levy scored 31 runs. B owling for St Agnes, E arl Thomas, Omar James and skipper HeskethD ean took two wickets each. St Agnes, in their turn at bat, scored 172 runs allo ut. Their top scorers were Ray Haniff 50 runsa nd the youngster Orland o Stewart 24 runs. Bowling for Dynasty Stars, Lee Melville took three wickets and Antonio Hernandez and Courtney Waddell took two wickets each. Matches next weekend a re expected to showcase t he rising Stars vs Com monwealth at Windsor P ark and the Police vs D ockendale at Haynes Oval SPORTS IN BRIEF Lakers close out Jazz with1 07-96 win... See page 12 Female golfers trying to make LPGA Tour S S E E E E p p a a g g e e 1 1 3 3 T A THOMPSON Scorpions’ pitcher Velnir Desir in action yesterday. He pitched four shutout innings to lead the Scorpions to a 4-1 win over the D W Davis Pitbulls at the Baillou Hills Sporting Complex... T i m C l a r k e / T r i b u n e s t a f f n By RENALDO DORSETT Sports Reporter rdorsett@tribunemedia.net IF NOT for a series of untimely errors late in the fifth inning, Vel nir Desir would have had a perfect storybook ending to his first appearance on the mound in his young career. Desir pitched four shutout innings to lead the T A Thompson Scorpions to a 4-1 win over the D W Davis Pitbulls yesterday at the Baillou Hills Sporting Complex. A starter on the Scorpions basketball team, Desir took the Pitcher Desir leads Scorpions to 4-1 win over Pitbulls S S E E E E p p a a g g e e 1 1 3 3

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n B y CHESTER ROBARDS Business Reporter crobards@tribunemedia.net T he sale and rental of commercial properties is staying afloat despite a foundering economy due to a 12-15 per cent decline in property values in New Providence, commercial real estate agents said yesterday, as below m arket prices for spaces and buildings p eak buyer interest. V eteran real estate agent with Damianos Sotheby’s International Realty, Ridley Carroll, said prices on some of the Family Islands have even been driv en as low as 30 per cent. T he old Pepsi-Cola manufacturing p roperty on Prince Charles Drive, part of Mr Carroll’s current sales portfolio, has been receiving inquiries despite its $5 million price tag. This has been further reduced by $1 million in an attempt to make the property more attractive to buyers. According to Mr Carroll, the Pepsi b uilding has the most commercial s pace of any presently on the market, w ith 44,000 square feet, and is on four acres of land. He said real estate buyers, especially those with “old money”, in this country, are always interested in commercial property. “Things that are more price realistic will move,” Mr Carroll said. “It’s just t hat you have to work a little harder.” R etail sales have been taking a hit s ince the onset of the global financial crisis, with some retailers having to forfeit their shops because of late rental payments or, in the case of a purchased property, loan defaults. Mr Carroll said Bay Street retail spaces have become an unfortunate example of this phenomena, brought o n by a broken global economy. A ccording to him, even his own busi n ess in Marina Village on Paradise Island has seen a 40 to 50 per cent shortfall in sales. He, however, is still making sales in n By NEIL HARTNELL Tribune Business Editor THE Central Bank has decided to step in and drive forward” the process of establishing the banking industry’s Automated Clearing House (ACH has been told, with one senior banking executive conceding that the protracted delays experienced by the project were “a serious embarrassment”. Dionisio D’Aguilar, the Bahamas Chamber of Commerce’s president, who has been a leading critic of the commercial banks for their failure to get the ACH operational, told this newspaper yesterday that Central Bank governor Wendy Craigg had moved to take a grip on the process, and was demanding weekly updates from the banks. “I was recently informed by a senior executive at one of the Canadian-owned banks that the Central Bank has finally decided it’s time to step in and drive this process forward, because if it’s Cellular car d mar gins ‘out of line’ with sector norm C M Y K C M Y K SECTIONB business@tribunemedia.net WEDNESDAY, APRIL 29, 2009 THETRIBUNE $4. 68 $4. 51 $4. 69T he information contained is from a third party and The Tribune can not be held responsible for errors and/or omission from the daily report.$4.29 $4.29 $4.29T he information c ontained is from a third party and The Tribune can not be held responsible for errors and/or o mission from the d aily report. $3.53 $3.53 $3.48 n By NEIL HARTNELL Tribune Business Editor THE Bahamas Telecommunications Company (BTC made no decision on whether to cut the discount rate offered to pre-paid cellular phone card vendors, the minister responsible has told Tribune Business , as he slammed “disingenuous” comments on the issue by his predecessor. Zhivargo Laing hit back at Bradley Roberts, who had min isterial responsibility for BTC in the former Christie government, by saying it was wrong for the ex-PLP MP to suggest that any discount rate cut would result from a policy decision or directive given by the Ingraham administration. Instead, Mr Laing said any future decision on a rate cut would be an internal BTC matter, taken by the Board upon the advice of management. He pointed out that the curCentral Bank moves to ‘drive’ Clearing House n By NEIL HARTNELL T ribune Business Editor A SENIOR government minister is due to meet the Grand Bahama Chamber of Commercea nd other Freeport-based stakeholders lat er this week to discuss issues related to the Customs Department and ‘bonded’ goods, Tribune Business can reveal, a development that comes at a time when the Chamber is threatening to take legal action over ‘bonded vehicles’. Zhivargo Laing, minister of state for finance, declined to comment when contacted by this newspaper about his planned meeting schedule in Freeport, indicating he did not want to prejudice the content and outcome of any talks he may have. However, Tribune Business has learnt that his discussions with the Chamber, Grand Bahama Port Authority (GBPA licensees will focus on a number of Customs-related issues thrown up by the Hawksbill Creek Agreement, ‘bonded’ goods and various Supreme Court rulings over the years. Among the issues likely to be on the table are the Supreme Court ruling that allowed the Home Centre to bring its entire inventory as ‘bonded’ goods, Chamber warns on possible legal action over ‘bonded vehicles’ * Minister says global standard 8-10%, compared to BTC’s current 20-25% * But stresses no decision taken on cuts, as matter internal one for BTC and Board, not a government policy decision * Slams predecessor Roberts for ‘disingenuous’ comments Delays ‘a serious embarrassment’ to banking sector S S E E E E p p a a g g e e 2 2 B B S S E E E E p p a a g g e e 8 8 B B S S E E E E p p a a g g e e 8 8 B B S S E E E E p p a a g g e e 3 3 B B Minister to meet Freeport stakeholders on bonded goods, Customs issues Commercial property’s 12-15% value fall boost n B y NEIL HARTNELL T ribune Business Editor SECURITY & General and its senior executive have parted company, Tribune Business can reveal, due to differences with top officials from its Bermuda-b ased parent over a rise in the c ompany’s accounts receivables. Marc Shirra, who had spent 16 years with the Bahamian general insurer, most of them as general manager, left the company on Thursday following meetings with senior execu tives from the company’s par ent, Colonial Group International. Insurance industry sources familiar with the situation told Tribune Business that Mr Shirra had been made a “scapegoat” for the recent increase in Security & General’s accounts receivables, which consist chiefly of premium income due to it and which should have been passed on by brokers and agents selling the company’s policies. This newspaper was told that Mr Shirra was asked by Colonial Group executives to resign, Security & General parts company with senior exec * Price falls aid buyer interest, as $5m Pepsi property comes down to $4m * Landlords target programmes to keep business tenants in place S S E E E E p p a a g g e e 2 2 B B Laing

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rent discounts offered to pre-paid cellular phone card vendors, which are in the range of 20-25 per cent depending on the card’s retail value, were “out of line” with global industry norms. Usually, the retail margins earned by selling these phone cards were in the 8-10 per cent range, Mr Laing said. He added that on Mr Roberts’s watch, the cellular phone card discount rate was cut from 35 per cent to 25 per cent, with the door left open for BTC to conduct reviews that might lead to further cuts in the future. As a result, Mr Laing said he found it “odd” that Mr Roberts would now express alarm about discount rate cuts eating into the revenues and profits of prepaid cellular phone card vendors, given that the present course was charted on his watch. “What I found curious about his comments was that the ini tial 35 per cent rate that was established on these cards was implemented at the time thathe was the minister responsible for BTC,” Mr Laing said of Mr Roberts. “At the time, that was out of line with industry norms, because they were 8-10 per cent. During his [Mr Roberts’s] tenure, this same rate was cut from 35 per cent to 25 per cent. “At the time it was cut, the idea was to cut it then with a view to reviewing it in future for further cuts. The expressed alarm [by Mr Roberts] today is curious, given what happened at the time he was the minister responsible.” Mr Laing told Tribune Business that any decision by BTC to further slash the margins enjoyed by card vendors would not stem from a policy decision or initiative taken at Cabinet/ministerial level. “It is disingenuous for Mr Roberts to suggest this is some government policy initiative, especially when there was a cut in the same rate when he was there, with the intent to review it for further cuts in the future,” Mr Laing added. BTC had already been reviewing the issue internally “for almost nine months”, the minister added. When asked whether a cut in retail vendor margins was like ly, he added: “I can’t pre-empt that. All I’m advised is that it was an internal review being conducted, and nothing has formally been put to the BTC Board for its consideration. I wouldn’t know one way or another whether anything has been determined.” Mr Roberts previously said some vendors had been informed that the discount rate would be cut from 25 per cent to 15 per cent, representing the largest reduction since the prepaid cards were introduced in 2001. This, he said, was an attempt by BTC to increase its revenues and profits at the expense of the ever-growing army of street vendors selling the cards to end users. Many of these vendors have resorted to selling the cards after losing their jobs as a result of the economic downturn. Mr Roberts said that in 2002, discounts for cellular card vendors amounted to about $3.5 million. In 2008, the discounts totalled about $33.2 million, compared to $27.3 million in 2007. At the same time, Mr Roberts added, prepaid revenues grew from $135.8 million in 2007 to $144.4 million in 2008. Marlon Johnson, BTC’s vicepresident of sales and marketing, had previously told Tribune Business that BTC was conducting an assessment of its “entire” cellular phone card distribution network, examining whether the market that nets the company $10-$12 million per month is operating at “optimal efficiency” and is not oversaturated with vendors. “What we are doing is a cur rent assessment exercise of our entire distribution network relationships with wholesalers and how cards are being distributed,” he explained. “It is an exercise looking at the entire distribution network. We want to make sure we’re operating optimally, and in accordance with best global practices.” BTC sells the pre-paid cellular phone cards, which come in denominations of $5, $10, $20, $50 and $100, to some 34 wholesalers, who include the likes of Let’s Talk Wireless and Tripoint. In turn, those wholesalers sell the cards on to retailers and street vendors. Mr Johnson explained that the study would also assess the distribution network’s efficiency, and whether end-user consumers the BTC pre-paid cel lular network has some 300,000 subscribers had the best pos sible access to the cards they purchased. Vendors, though, are already nervous about the impact of any margin cuts. The $5 cards they sell are bought from wholesalers for $4, and the $10 cards for $8. Tony, a 34-year-old vendor who sells the cards to support his young son after losing his job at a major resort late last year, said: “It would make things a whole lot more diffi cult, which I don’t think is a good idea. You’re looking at a whole lot of people who are unemployed and this is their only avenue, like myself. What are these people going to do now? Turn to crime?” C M Y K C M Y K BUSINESS PAGE 2B, WEDNESDAY, APRIL 29, 2009 THE TRIBUNE (03/2<0(17 23325781,7<
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his capacity as a real estate agent. David Morley, managing director of Morley Realty, told Tribune Business that most landlords owning retail spaces are much more interested in assisting their tenants rather than have their spaces empty. “Its’ better to have good o ccupancy in your place with t enants paying something,” he s aid. Mr Morley said many landlords have implemented tenant retention plans to help business owners in case they are unable to pay rent, or to entice them to remain in the rental space despite difficulties. Mr Morley said the Mall at Marathon has been actively securing new tenants for some of its vacant spaces, and has also implemented a tenant retention plan of sorts. “They have a programme that includes beefing up secu rity and increasing marketing,” he said. “There are a lot of ways that landlords are trying to help tenants during these tough eco nomic times.” Mr Morley suggested that there had been an increase in demand for some retail spaces, as Bahamians decide to forgo shopping trips abroad for local purchases. “Once retailers don’t price themselves out of the market there will always be a demand for local retail,” said Mr Morley. Bahamians don’t necessarily h ave the wherewithal to fly to F lorida and shop.” He added that he remains optimistic about the immediate future of the commercial real estate market. Mr Morley said of a further contracting economy: “Let’s hope we don’t have to go that way. Let’s hope things rebound quicker.” He said the repercussions of store closings would have a “scary” impact on the Bahami an economy and society-atlarge. Mr Carroll remains optimistic also about the future of com mercial properties, as he continues to get listings off the market. “There is always a value for commercial property,” he said. ARE you searching for new and innovative ways of sales lead generation? Are you lacking in sources of good quality leads? Are you tired and bored using the same methods for generating sales leads? If you answered “Yes”, then you're going to be very excited to read this article. Here are the some of the most profitable methods I've found for sales lead generation. Create a list ofat least 100 people you know. Send out an introductory letter telling them about your prod-uct or service. Talk with each person at least twice. Send them information of interest at planned intervals. Remember, if each person you know also knows 100 people....... well, you get the idea. C C o o l l d d C C a a l l l l i i n n g g Using cold calling effectively for sales lead generation requires five key ingredients. Target the market you are going to call. Know your objective (get an appointment, get a name). Have a memorised script. Smile. Be prepared for rejection. Have fun! K K n n o o c c k k i i n n g g O O n n D D o o o o r r s s This method is much the same as cold calling. I used this very effectively. I used to knock on doors year-round. Do you think people would remember someone who knocked on their door in the middle of a storm? M M a a s s s s M M a a i i l l i i n n g g Also known as direct marketing. Successful use of this method requires mailing a wellwritten sales letter to a targeted mailing list. N N e e w w s s p p a a p p e e r r s s Pay attention to the local news, business and announcements sections. Look for the people who get promoted, have babies, buy and sell homes and start up new businesses. There may be leads here for your product or service. E E m m a a i i l l p p u u b b l l i i c c a a t t i i o o n n s s Getting e-mail addresses for past and current clients, your sphere of influence and anyone else you come in contact with is a great way to keep in touch. D D a a i i l l y y C C o o n n t t a a c c t t s s Every day when you leave the house take 20 business cards with you, and make it a point to give them away. That's 20 cards times five workdays. If you're really ambitious, do it on Saturday and Sunday also. When you're looking to generate lots of quality sales leads, the more lines you have in the water the more fish you're apt to catch. These are all effective methods of sales lead generation and should be used regularly. All of these marketing strategies are certain to keep your business on top during these challenging economic times. Have a productive and profitable week! Remember: “THOSE WHO MARKET WILL MAKE IT.” N N B B : : S S c c o o t t t t F F a a r r r r i i n n g g t t o o n n i i s s p p r r e e s s i i d d e e n n t t o o f f S S u u n n T T e e e e E E m m b b r r o o i i d d M M e e , , a a p p r r o o m m o o t t i i o o n n a a l l a a n n d d m m a a r r k k e e t t i i n n g g c c o o m m p p a a n n y y s s p p e e c c i i a a l l i i s s i i n n g g i i n n p p r r o o m m o o t t i i o o n n a a l l p p r r o o d d u u c c t t s s . . E E s s t t a a b b l l i i s s h h e e d d o o v v e e r r 2 2 7 7 y y e e a a r r s s a a g g o o , , S S u u n n T T e e e e E E m m b b r r o o i i d d M M e e h h a a s s a a s s s s i i s s t t e e d d B B a a h h a a m m i i a a n n b b u u s s i i n n e e s s s s e e s s f f r r o o m m v v a a r r i i o o u u s s i i n n d d u u s s t t r r i i e e s s , , r r a a n n g g i i n n g g f f r r o o m m t t o o u u r r i i s s m m a a n n d d b b a a n n k k i i n n g g t t o o t t e e l l e e c c o o m m m m u u n n i i c c a a t t i i o o n n s s , , i i n n m m a a r r k k e e t t i i n n g g t t h h e e m m s s e e l l v v e e s s . . R R e e a a d d e e r r s s c c a a n n c c o o n n t t a a c c t t M M r r F F a a r r r r i i n n g g t t o o n n a a t t S S u u n n T T e e e e E E m m b b r r o o i i d d M M e e o o n n E E a a s s t t S S h h i i r r l l e e y y S S t t r r e e e e t t , , b b y y e e m m a a i i l l a a t t s s c c o o t t t t @ @ s s u u n n t t e e e e . . c c o o m m o o r r b b y y t t e e l l e e p p h h o o n n e e a a t t 2 2 4 4 2 2 3 3 9 9 3 3 3 3 1 1 0 0 4 4 . . C M Y K C M Y K BUSINESS THE TRIBUNE WEDNESDAY, APRIL 29, 2009, PAGE 3B Vacation in Paradise.Only $69*per person double occupancy.Minimum 2-night stay. Bahamas residents only. Full use of all Atlantis facilities. Plus: Limited-time offer! 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G u s U g a r t e 2 / 2 5 4 p m CTS-9-N003_NassauGuardian.indd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s AUTO ELECTRICAL SUPPLIES CO. LTD. Other Services Includes: *Auto Body Repairs *Diagnostics Test *Mechanical Repairs * Brakes, C&V Joints Replacement * Head Jobs *Engine Overhaul *Electrical Repairs *Repair & Rebuild Starters * Rebuild & RepairWireHarness * Repair & InstallWindow Motors * Repair Lights & Switches C C o o l l l l e e g g e e A A v v e e n n u u e e , , O O a a k k e e s s F F i i e e l l d d M onday—Friday 8am-5pm S aturday 8a 1pm TUNE UP SPECIAL S S E E R R V V I I C C E E : : O O i i l l O O i i l l F F i i l l t t e e r r A A i i r r F F i i l l t t e e r r F F u u e e l l F F i i l l t t e e r r S S p p a a r r k k P P l l u u g g s s ( ( p p a a r r t t s s n n o o t t i i n n c c l l u u d d e e d d ) ) T T e e l l : : 3 3 2 2 3 3 5 5 8 8 3 3 5 5 / / 3 3 2 2 3 3 5 5 4 4 3 3 6 6 We also import parts for any make and model vehicle with an Impressive turn-around. Come in and see us today! The next generation for your sales leads Promotional Marketing b y Scott Farrington Commercial property’s 12-15% value fall boost F F R R O O M M p p a a g g e e 1 1 B B

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and to display ‘bonded’ goods at retail’, and the ability of GBPA licensees to use their bonded vehicles outside the Port area. C urrently, the Customs Department has implemented a policy preventing GBPA licensees from being able to use their bonded vehicles outsidet he Port area for business purposes, something Chamber president Gregory Moss has previously told Tribune Business is “ultra vires” and breach-e s the Hawksbill Creek Agreement. Mr Moss did not return Tribune Business’s calls seeking comment yesterday. But sources close to the matter said he had written to the Attorney General’s Office as Chamber president to warn that if the organisation did not hear from it this week, it would initiate a legal action on Monday to seeka Supreme Court declaration t hat GBPA licensees could use t heir bonded vehicles outside the Port area. Meanwhile, Tribune Business understands that Mr Laing may also discuss whether the Cus-t oms Management Guide to the Hawksbill Creek Agreement the document that Customs has been using to determine duty rates in Freeport for 30 years should be placed in statute to provide all parties with more clarity/certainty. This is likely to be opposed by the private sector, given that the Guide is currently only an interpretation of the law, and one that has been found wantin g on several occasions by the S upreme Court. Yet the need for an acceptable solution for all was perfectly summarised in a 2007 Chamber paper on the practiceo f ‘over-the-counter bonded’ goods sales in Freeport, the document having previously been sent to the Government. The Chamber paper said: “A standardised, acceptable, mechanism must be established for the management and reporting of ‘over the counter sale of bonded goods; that does not subrogate the rights of the licensees of the Grand Bahama Port Authority, while still prot ecting the legitimate revenue c ollection of the Government of the Bahamas. This mechanism must be the same for all vendors and must be derived from within the laws of theB ahamas and the terms of the Hawksbill Creek Agreement.”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t&2 127,&(LVKHUHE\JLYHQWKDW ,0(/'$'259,/ RI&25'($8; $3%2;1$66$8%$+$0$6 LVDSSO\LQJWRWKH 0LQLVWHUUHVSRQVLEOHIRU1DWLRQDOLW\DQG&LWL]HQVKLSIRUUHJLVWUDWLRQ QDWXUDOL]DWLRQDVFLWL]HQRI7KH%DKDPDVDQGWKDWDQ\SHUVRQ Z KRNQRZVDQ\UHDVRQZK\UHJLVWUDWLRQQDWXUDOL]DWLRQVKRXOGQRW EHJUDQWHGVKRXOGVHQGZULWWHQDQGVLJQHGVWDWHPHQWRIWKH IDFWVZLWKLQWZHQW\HLJKWGD\VIURPWKH 7+ GD\ RI $SULO WR WKH0LQLVWHUUHVSRQVLEOHIRUQDWLRQDOLW\DQG&LWL]HQVKLS3%R[ )8//<675$66(/,0,7('ROXQWDU\/LTXLGDWLRQf1RWLFHLVKHUHE\JLYHQWKDWWKHDERYHQDPHG &RPSDQ\LVLQGLVVROXWLRQZKLFKFRPPHQFHG RQWKHGD\RI0DUFK7KH/LTXLGDWRU $UJRVD&RUS1DVVDX %DKDPDV Central Bank moves to ‘drive’ Clearing House left to the clearing banks, it’s never going to happen,” Mr D’Aguilar told Tribune Business. “We hope that at last they’re [the banks] getting the message that this is critical to every business in the Bahamas. Every business needs a bank, and this is why it hasn’t deterred the banks from setting their own agenda on such an important and critical part of doing business. If left to their own agenda, they would do nothing.” The Chamber president added: “The Government and C entral Bank should have been a pplying pressure to them to m ake this happen, and they weren’t. They were unable to do that, and I can’t understand why. “It’s good to see some pressure being brought to bear. It’s now time for results. Let’s get this thing up and running. This is what happens when the banks are left up to their own devices. The Governor should have stepped in long ago, but the process has been allowed to drag on for years.” Ms Craigg did not return Tribune Business’s call yesterday seeking comment on the situation, but one leading commercial bank executive acknowledged that the protracted ACH installation and implementation had become “a serious embarrassment” to both the CentralB ank and the industry. Numerous implementation deadlines have been missed for starters. The Clearing Banks Association (CBA hoping to implement the first ACH phase as far back as mid2007 almost two years ago but the system and its software is still in testing among all the banks. Tribune Business understands that testing of the ACH system, which will be owned and operated by Bahamas Automated Clearing House (BACH system ‘gremlins’ and kinks than anticipated, all of which needed to be ironed out. Then, the commercial banks each have their own internal core banking systems and software, which have to be reconfigured to interface and alignw ith the ACH. This, Tribune Business understands, has been extremely problematic for the Canadianowned banks Royal Bank of Canada, Scotiabank and FirstCaribbean International Bank (Bahamas use a common platform shared by their head offices and affiliates worldwide. Thus their “Testing was far more problematic than anticipated,” the banking source said. “There are banks with different software, different levels of commitment.... It’s really a struggle to get everyone on the same page. We’re making progress, but it’s slow progress. It’s a serious embarrassment, and we need to get it [the ACH implementation] out of the way.” The ACH is intended to replace the current manual sys-t em for settling cheque transactions, where cheques drawn on one bank but due to be deposited at another have to be taken by armoured car to a central location where they are settled by representatives of the various institutions. Apart from allowing interbank cheques to be processed electronically rather than manually at a cheque clearing facility, the ACH system will allow direct debits and credits from accounts, debit cards and a shared Automatic Teller Machine (ATM The latter would allow Bahamians to use their cash cards at any bank branch. It would also reduce the time persons spent in line waiting to cash and deposit pay cheques, as they could be deposited to their account. B ahamian consumers would also be able to use direct debits from their bank accounts to pay bills such as cable television and electricity. The ACH could ultimately lead to the creation of just one back office system for the entire Bahamas. It may also help develop SWITCH products, where Bahamians could use their cash cards at any bank's ATM machine. A further potential bonus from the ACH will be the opening up a whole range of electronic banking services in the Bahamas, including its use in the online purchase of government goods and services. Ultimately, through modernising the Bahamian payments system through electronic means, the ACH will provide buyers and sellers with morec ertainty and confidence, especially when it comes to settling their transactions. It will also enhance economic and business efficiency by settling transactions quicker, boosting business cash flows. F F R R O O M M p p a a g g e e 1 1 B B Chamber warns on possible legal action over ‘bonded vehicles’ Shar e your news T he Tribune wants to hear from people who arem aking news in their neighbourhoods. Perhaps you ar e raising funds for a good cause, campaigning for improvements in the ar ea or have won an awar d. If so, call us on 322-1986 a nd share your story. I I N N S S I I G G H H T T F o o r r t t h h e e s s t t o o r r i i e e s s b b e e h h i i n n d d t t h h e e n n e e w w s s , , r r e e a a d d I I n n s s i i g g h h t t o o n n M M o o n n d d a a y y s s


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