Citation
The Tribune - Page 1

Material Information

Title:
The Tribune
Uniform Title:
Tribune (Nassau, Bahamas)
Portion of title:
Nassau tribune
Place of Publication:
Nassau, Bahamas
Publisher:
Tribune
Publication Date:
Copyright Date:
2009
Frequency:
Daily, except Sunday
daily
normalized irregular
Language:
English
Physical Description:
v. : ill. ; 58 cm.

Subjects

Genre:
newspaper ( sobekcm )
newspaper ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage:
Bahamas

Notes

General Note:
Description based on: Vol. 79, no. 210 (Aug. 3, 1983); title from caption.

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Holding Location:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
This item was contributed to the Digital Library of the Caribbean (dLOC) by the source institution listed in the metadata. This item may or may not be protected by copyright in the country where it was produced. Users of this work have responsibility for determining copyright status prior to reusing, publishing or reproducing this item for purposes other than what is allowed by applicable law, including any applicable international copyright treaty or fair use or fair dealing statutes, which dLOC partners have explicitly supported and endorsed. Any reuse of this item in excess of applicable copyright exceptions may require permission. dLOC would encourage users to contact the source institution directly or dloc@fiu.edu to request more information about copyright status or to provide additional information about the item.
Resource Identifier:
09994850 ( OCLC )

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Full Text
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=USA TODAY.

BAHAMAS EDITION

www.tribune242.com

SATURDAY, APRIL 25, 2009

Old Worl
BUR



WORLD'S MOST POPULAR WINE

Family $ ‘Suspicions
On expats shooting

Voice ideas on
motive and
identity behind
those involved

@ By ALISON LOWE
Tribune Staff Reporter
alowe@tribunemedia.net

THE family of an expatriate
financial adviser gunned-down
execution style have their “sus-
picions” about who may have
targeted him and why, accord-
ing to the head of the police’s
Homicide Unit.

However, as of yesterday
afternoon an island-wide man-
hunt by police had yet to result
in any arrests by police in con-
nection with the shooting of
Hywel Jones, said Assistant
Superintendent Leon Bethel.

Benefit
cheques
to come
on May 4

@ By NATARIO
MCKENZIE
Tribune Staff
Reporter

IT is anticipated that by
May 4, cheques will be made
available to those persons
who have qualified for
national unemployment
benefit, Labour Minister
Dion Foulkes said yester-
day.

“We are very happy and
pleased by the process that
was used by the Department
of Labour and the National
Insurance Board during the
six days of registration at the
four centres here in New
Providence, the two centres
in Grand Bahama and also
at the administrator’s office
, and National Insurance
offices throughout the Fam-
ily Islands,” Mr Foulkes said
during a press conference

SEE page 6





ah A See LOS Tt

Welsh-born Hywel Jones,
whose status is listed as “seri-
ous”, continued to fight for his
life in the Intensive Care Unit at
Doctor’s Hospital yesterday.

A gunman shot him in the
head about 10am Wednesday
in the parking lot of Britannia
Consultancy Group, an offshore
financial services company of
which he is president. The park-
ing lot is located just west of
Gambier Village.

ASP Bethel said: “He has
some family members here and
we have interviewed some of
them. They have suspicions
(about why Mr Jones was shot),
but I cannot repeat them at this
time as it may jeopardise the
success of our investigations.”

The officer emphasised that
police are “looking at all possi-
bilities” in relation to the case.

ASP Bethel said that a few
people have come forward to
offer police assistance in con-
nection with their investigation
into the matter, but they need
more help.

“We have one or two people
who have been giving us some
assistance which we appreciate,
but we are still hoping that oth-
er people will come forward to
talk to us.”

He said police strongly

SEE page 6

1

SETTING THE SCENE: Philip Davis (right), MP for Cat Island, points out the view from the 18th

hole of what will be a PGA golf course in Cat Island

@ By TANEKA THOMPSON
Tribune Staff Reporter
tthompson@tribunemedia.net

IN SPITE of a global recession, government
officials and developers broke ground yesterday
on a multi-million dollar project on Cat Island
that Prime Minister Hubert Ingraham described
as the singular significant development in the
history of the island.

The proposed world-class PGA Village golf
course and beach resort, to be developed by
the Cat Island Partners group is expected to
create over 200 construction jobs and more
than 900 permanent jobs during ongoing oper-
ations — a much welcomed “economic shot in
the arm” for the underdeveloped island.

The resort also will be a springboard for “hun-
dreds and hundreds” of job opportunities in
the area of tours, transport, souvenir and straw
production, local food, fish and marine pro-
duction, Prime Minister Ingraham said.

He urged Cat Islanders to take advantage of
the impending employment chances before they
are filled by workers from New Providence or
Grand Bahama.

“During this time of uncertainty in the
employment market, it is important that resi-

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dents here in Cat Island take up the challenge to
fill as many of these job opportunities as possi-
ble. I assure you that construction workers, idle
in New Providence and Grand Bahama, will
have a keen interest in availing themselves of
these opportunities,” he said.

The development will encompass a hotel,
casino, a golf instruction centre, 223 single fam-
ily residential lots, retail and dining areas, spa
and two 18-hole golf courses atop 1,906 acres of
oceanfront property. Government has also
agreed, subject to the completion of the appro-
priate environmental studies, the addition of a
marina component to this development at a
proposed Port Howe site.

Mr Ingraham said he believed the develop-
ment of the marina would provide for an excel-
lent opportunity to pursue the stabilization and
conservation of the historic Farquharson Plan-
tation Great House and for the safeguarding
of the adjoining historic one-room original
school house in Port Howe.

Mr Ingraham congratulated the Cat Island
Partners for keeping their commitment to the
government and people of Cat Island notwith-
standing the considerable deterioration in the

SEE page 6





NASSAU AND BAHAMEA

ISLANDS’ LEADING NEWSPAPER



Home of: oF]

extrahours

PRICE —75¢ (Abaco and Grand Bahama $1.25)

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THE PATRON

SPIRITS COMFANY



Funeral
of vendor
killed in
hit-and-run

m@ By MEGAN
REYNOLDS
Tribune Staff
Reporter
mreynolds@tribunemedia.net

FRIENDS and relations
of the popular Fox Hill
newspaper vendor, who was
knocked off his bicycle in a
hit-and-run accident last
week, will gather at St
Anselm’s Church for his
funeral this afternoon.

Humphrey “Trod” Ger-
ard Jackman, 47, lived oppo-
site St Anselm’s Roman
Catholic Church in Bernard
Road, Fox Hill, all his life,
and was well-known and
well-liked in the community
for his gentle nature, sense
of humour and abundant
creativity.

The newspaper vendor
started selling The Tribune,
The Guardian and The
Punch outside MP Fred
Mitchell’s constituency office
on the Fox Hill roundabout
when he lost his job as a chef
in the main kitchen at
Atlantis six years ago. He
saved his money to continue
culinary courses after leaving
the Paradise Island hotel.

Mr Jackman was planning
to embark on his first
gourmet cooking course in
August, but his life was cut
short when a silver Chevro-
let Equinox knocked him off
his bicycle near LW Young
Junior High School in
Bernard Road between 4am
and 6am on Thursday, April
16.



PUT

Police have recovered a
bicycle, thought to be the
bike he rode to The
Guardian office off Thomp-
son Boulevard at 4am every
morning to collect around
40 Tribunes, 20 Guardians
and the bi-weekly Punch,
and are still appealing for
witnesses to find the driver
who left him suffering at the

SEE page 6



PAGE 2, SATURDAY, APRIL 25, 2009

THE TRIBUNE



~ — a ee

LOCAL NEWS

First skate
park opens

THE Bahamas’ first skate
park will open at the YWCA
today as the centre celebrates
World YWCA Day with a
cook-out and live reggae music.

Willis Knowles from the up-
and-coming reggae band “Willis
and the Illest” promises a set
of uplifting tunes while skate-
boarding enthusiasts try out
tricks on the new ramps, and
ping pong champs battle it out
on the tables.

YWCA general secretary
Rosalie Fawkes said the demon-
strations will give just a small
taste of the variety of activities
taking place at the Young
Women’s Christian Association
(YWCA) on Dolphin Drive, off
John F Kennedy Drive, and she
hopes to draw fresh interest in
the revitalised community cen-
tre.

“One of the aims of the
World YWCA Day is to
increase the visibility and pres-
ence of the YWCA in the com-
munity, so I am hoping people
will come and learn a bit more
about it,” Ms Fawkes said.



“It’s all about service and giv-
ing back, that is what we have
been doing for 72 years.”

Activities at the “Y” include
an outreach programme for
young people at the Ranfurly
Home for Children, the Smart
Kids Academy pre-school, a
dance school, the Y Kids Club
and askate park with a quarter-
pipe, pyramid and half-pipe
constructed by local skaters
with wood donated by FYP in
Wulff Road.

Skate park manager Alex
Holden said: “We want to
develop skateboarding in the
Bahamas and provide a whole-
some service to the community.
It’s all about good, clean fun.”

The YWCA is also building
14 affordable housing units on
site which are scheduled for
completion in June.

The World YWCA day cele-
bration will be from 12pm to
5pm today and tickets are $10
for the cook-out and entertain-
ment, and will be available at
the door. All proceeds go to the
YWCA.

MAIN/SPORTS SECTION

Local News

Editorial/Letters. ..........

Pipe. 2 ofO alo

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CLASSIFIED SECTION 36 PAGES



USA TODAY WEEKENDER 8 PAGES






















CLUB

SUPERDEATH



« Heineken’

al, Fail
FLYING HIGH: The Bahamas will see the opening of its first skate park at the YWCA today

service training

By Kathryn Campbell

TWENTY-FIVE employ-
ees of the Buildings Control
Division of the Ministry of
Public Works and Transport
participated in a two-day
workshop designed to
enhance customer service
skills.

Organised by the Depart-
ment of Public Service, the
workshop at the British Colo-
nial Hilton is in keeping with
the government’s programme
that aims to formulate strate-
gies for internal and external
service improvement.

The programme was imple-
mented in six key service
delivery agencies within the
public service. The depart-
ments include the Depart-
ment of Public Service, the
Passport Office, the Regis-
trar General’s Department,
the Department of Road
Traffic, the Department of

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Physical Planning and the
Buildings Control Division in
the Ministry of Public Works
and Transport.

Topics to be covered
include leadership, how to
deliver quality customer ser-
vice and how to build a
dream team.

Facilitator Michael Pintard
told participants that the pub-
lic service needs “coura-
geous” individuals “who will
not intellectually surrender,
who will come to work with
their minds and hearts fully
engaged and prepared to
look at the structure of the
organisation, the regulations,
procedures and culture to
make suggestions on how to
change it.

“The public sector needs
creative persons who are will-
ing to engage themselves in
improving the public sector,”
said Mr Pintard.



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Leto Volunteers

receive customer

recognised
by hospital

@ By DENISE MAYCOCK
Tribune Freeport
Reporter
dmaycock@tribunemedia.net

FREEPORT - In observance
of National Volunteer Recog-
nition Day, seven healthcare
volunteers were recognised for
providing unselfish service at
the Rand Memorial Hospital on
Grand Bahama.

Medical Chief of Staff, Dr
Frank Bartlette, believes that
volunteering in the health care
system is important because it
contributes to the overall qual-
ity of patient care at the Rand.

“We have quite a few volun-
teers, and some are involved
with patient care. So in addi-
tion to seeing doctors and nurs-

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Ashley Miller, Kelly’s

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closed
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es, patients also interact with
volunteers and the benefit goes
a long way for the morale of
patients, which helps with the
overall healthcare system,” said
Dr Bartlette.

Hospital retiree Shirley
Weech, who oversees the vol-
unteer programme at the Rand,
said the programme has been
in existence for the past five
years.

Although there are seven
active volunteers, Mrs Weech
said a total of over 40 persons
have served as volunteers at the
hospital.

“Volunteer work is important
at the hospital because volun-
teers provide assistance to nurs-
es so they can focus on treating
their patients. There is always a
need for more volunteers,” she
said.

Mrs Weech, who worked with
the hospital for 40 years, has
been an exemplary community
volunteer on Grand Bahama.

After retiring from hospital
work, Mrs Weech volunteered
at the Red Cross for four years
before returning back to the
hospital as a volunteer. She has
been a hospital volunteer for
five years.

“T get a lot of satisfaction
knowing that I am helping
someone, but today everyone
wants to get paid no matter how
simple the task,” she said.

Pastor Henry Moncur, of the
Shiloh Seventh Day Adventist
Church, commended the hos-
pital volunteers for unselfishly
giving their time to those who
need it most.

He said more persons need
to lend a helping hand without
looking for remuneration.

“Volunteerism is extremely
important because that is one
of God’s purposes for us here.
We must give back to the com-
munity,” Pastor Moncur said.

He said to be a volunteer a
person must be sensitive to the
needs of individuals.

“Sadly, too many individuals
are insensitive to the needs of
others. It is good to know what
people are going through so we
can lend a helping hand and you
must reach out and show com-
passion.

“Compassion is different
from sympathy because it not
only says that you are sorry for
that person’s situation, but that
you willing to share something
tangible with them.”

Pastor Moncur said that
another component of volun-
teering is not looking for recog-
nition. “There are folks who
will not be thankful for what
you do to them, but you must
understand that when God has
touched your heart, irrespective
of whether you’re getting paid
or whether they say thanks, you
will do it simply because of your
heart.”



THE TRIBUNE

SATURDAY, APRIL 25, 2009, PAGE 3



LOCAL NEWS



Minister: | was ‘notified’
of Sandals staff lay-offs

@ By NATARIO McKENZIE
Tribune Staff Reporter

LABOUR Minister Dion Foulkes
said yesterday that he was notified by
executives of the Sandals Royal
Bahamian Resort that several man-
agers would be laid-off on Thursday.

“We were notified by Sandals that
they had intended to lay off some of
their managers and as required by the
Code of Industrial Practice, we
advised Sandals as to what they were
obligated to do under the terms of
the contract with the managers and
also pursuant to the Employment Act.

UNDER the command of }
Chief Superintendent Stephen }
Dean, officers from the Royal }
Bahamas Police and Defence }
Forces conducted raids in the }
western, southern and east- }
ern districts of New Provi-
dence, focusing primarily on }
construction sites. ;

On April 18, a raid in the }
southern part of the island }
netted 32 suspected illegal :
migrants. i

In a second exercise on }
April 21 in the western dis- }
trict, 26 suspected illegal
immigrants were apprehend- }
ed. :

According to a statement }
from the Department of }
Immigration, the officers who }
participated in the “Back to ;
Basics” operation conducted
their raids in Lyford Cay, }
Gamble Heights, Joe Far-

CONTINENTAL Air-

“It is my understanding that they
complied with all of their legal oblig-
ations to those managers who were
terminated,” Mr Foulkes said.

There are reportedly just over 20
managers remaining at the property.

Mr Foulkes said that while he has
had discussions with Sandals execu-
tives he could not disclose the reason
behind the lay-offs.

According to Sandals’ public rela-
tions department, five managers were
let go as part of a restructuring exer-
cise aimed at streamlining operations
in these challenging economic times.

The lay-offs come just four months

ed to travellers as destina-

after 150 employees were made
redundant. At a press conference at
the Clarence A Bain Building yester-
day, Mr Foulkes said that he is not
aware of plans for any further lay-
offs.

“We have no notice of any further
impending lay-offs in the hospitality
sector or any other sector for that
matter,” Mr Foulkes said.

He said that the question of whether
managers will be unionised has not
been discussed with his ministry.

Line staff at Sandals are represent-
ed by the Bahamas Hotel Catering
and Allied Workers Union.



Tourism & Aviation Minister
meets with Continental Airlines

sales based at Continental



DION FOULKES was notified by execu-
tives of the Sandals Royal Bahamian
Resort that several managers would be
laid-off.

PICTURED (I-r) are: Rigoberto
Alverenga, director of sales for
the Caribbean; Minister Van-
derpool-Wallace; Ms Rodgers,
Freddy Rodriquez, sales man-
ager for the Caribbean, and
Tyrone Sawyer, director of air-
lift development with the Min-
istry of Tourism and Aviation.

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2
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nN

HANNAH MONTANA MOVIE

THE FAST AND THE FURIOUS
MONSTERS VS. ALIENS

THE HAUNTING IN CONNECTICUT

rington Road, Yamacraw, and }

Winton Heights.

Of the last 26 persons }
apprehended, 23 were Hait- i
ian men, with one Haitian }
woman and two Jamaican }

men.

The persons who were dis- ;
covered to be without status }
are expected to be repatriated }

sometime next week.

lines executives got a close
look at the Ministry of
Tourism’s vision for pro-
moting individual islands of
the Bahamas on Wednes-
day when they paid a cour-
tesy call on Minister of
Tourism and Aviation Vin-
cent Vanderpool-Wallace.
In a stimulating and cor-

tions in their own right.
He also discussed oppor-
tunities to provide better
airlift access, and updated
the airline’s team on the
government’s unfolding
initiative to make airlift to
the Bahamas much more
attractive for both cus-
tomers and airline part-

Airlines’ headquarters in
Houston, Texas.

FOR 3 IN 1 LAWN SERVICE
Fertilizer, Fungicide,
IA aH
Tropical Exterminators
322-2157

0 In brief

Grenada
plans to ban
smoking in
public areas

m@ ST GEORGE'S, Grenada

THE CARIBBEAN island

? of Grenada has agreed to ban
? smoking from all public places,
? including beaches, parks and
? bus terminals, according to the
? Associated Press.

Authorities expect to place

: signs on government buildings
? by June as a reminder.

Community health director

; Christine La Grenade said
: Wednesday that she hopes the
i private sector will embrace a
: similar policy.

The ban has been approved

? only by Cabinet members so it
? does not yet carry any penal-
? ties. Legislators are expected
: to approve the proposal later
: this year.

No one has publicly opposed

? it. It is unknown how many of
? Grenada's 91,000 people
? smoke. Anti-narcotics director
? James Roderique said smoking
i is most common among
? teenagers, but that they prefer
? marijuana over cigarettes.

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HANNAH MONTANA MOVIE

THE FAST AND THE FURIOUS T

380-FLIX

dial exchange, Minister
Vanderpool-Wallace
explained that the individ-
ual islands will be present-

ners.
The Continental Airlines

team was led by Christy

Rodgers, senior director of

The Immigration Depart- }
ment said it expects to inten- }
sify its efforts in this opera-
tion in the coming weeks.

Mother's Day § Ve
Super
BUY I

5pc place alll eal late!

BAe

SYSTEM ADMINISTRATOR

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To ensure the stable operation of the in house computer software systems
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Duties and Responsibilities

1. Ensure hardware and software are maintained and data is secured through
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. Assist with IT inventory (software and hardware) including procurement of same.

. Proactively ensure all identified applications; hardware and general equipment are
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. Provide ongoing monitoring of server and network based components via related
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. Assist in the installation of network infrastructure equipment and cabling and
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. Assist with assigned business driven technology projects and initiatives, with use of
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. Provide, (or recommend where necessary), end-user training in the use of new
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. Adhere to Management methodologies and procedures inclusive of Problem/
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REQUIRED SKILLS, KNOWLEDGE AND COMPETENCIES

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Recognized IT qualifications such as MCP. CISSP and CCNA would be
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Experience with information systems, computer systems and network
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Able to assist with and maintain a sound information security framework.
business continuity / disaster recovery processes.

Possess excellent organizational , analytical, and interpersonal skills.

Ability to prioritize tasks and multitask effectively.

Able to provide feedback and guidance to senior management with respect
to the performance of computer and network management systems.





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May 9th, 2009
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Interested persons should submit a resume. police certificate, testimonials.
photograph and covering letter outlining background and achievements to:

The closing date for applications May 1, 2009. Apply to:
DA 69713




with every poner: Day na Gales clo The Tribune
purchase in the ot ama et P.0.Box N3207

OF oe he 8 O74

Bridal Department ax: (242) 393-4096

Sresbini-AT ena



Nassau, Bahamas



PAGE 4, SATURDAY, APRIL 25, 2009

EDITORIAL/LETTERS TO THE EDITOR

THE TRIBUNE





The Tribune Limited

NULLIUS ADDICTUS JURARE IN VERBA MAGISTRI
Being Bound to Swear to The Dogmas of No Master

LEON E. H. DUPUCH, Publisher/Editor 1903-1914

SIR ETIENNE DUPUCH, Kt, O.B.E., K.M., K.C.S.G.,

(Hon.) LL.D., D.Litt.

Publisher/Editor 1919-1972
Contributing Editor 1972-199]

EILEEN DUPUCH CARRON, C.M.G., M.S. B.A., LL.B.

Publisher/Editor 1972-

Published Daily Monday to Saturday

Shirley Street, PO. Box N-3207, Nassau, Bahamas
Insurance Management Building., P.O. F-485, Freeport, Grand Bahama

TELEPHONES
Switchboard (News, Circulation and Advertising) 322-1986
Advertising Manager - (242) 502-2352
Circulation Department - (242) 502-2387
Nassau Fax: - (242) 328-2398
Freeport, Grand Bahama: 1-(242)-352-6608
Freeport fax: (242) 352-9348

WEBSITE
www.tribune242.com — updated daily at 2pm

Obama walks thin line on interrogations

WASHINGTON (AP) — Barack Obama,
facing perhaps the trickiest political issue of his
young presidency, is trying to appease his liberal
base without losing control of a potentially
volatile inquiry into the George W. Bush admin-
istration's use of harsh interrogation tactics
against terrorism suspects.

One step to the left or right could land him in
political trouble.

If Obama seems inclined to stifle an investi-
gation and possible prosecution of Bush admin-
istration officials who approved rough interro-
gations by the CIA, he may infuriate liberal
activists who were crucial to his election. But if
Democratic lawmakers appear too zealous in
pursuing departed Republican government offi-
cials, they might be portrayed as vindictive and
backward-looking, undermining Obama's image
as a forward-looking figure of hope and
progress.

While Obama struggles to calibrate the mat-
ter, Republicans sense a possible gap in his
armour and an uncharacteristic shakiness in his
message. In the past few days, the White House
signalled that it would not support the prose-
cution of Bush administration lawyers who had
justified the interrogation tactics, which Obama
has likened to torture. Later, Obama said the
attorney general should make such decisions.

On Tuesday, Obama said he wanted to look
forward, not back, but he would prefer an inde-
pendent commission to a complete congres-
sional investigation if a full-blown inquiry is
pursued. On Thursday, the president told con-
gressional leaders he had no interest in such a
panel, which some call a “truth commission."

The speaker of the House of Representa-
tives, Democrat Nancy Pelosi, continues to push
for such a commission with subpoena powers.
But lawmakers agree that the idea is probably
dead, at least for now.

That leaves hearings in the hands of House
and Senate committees, which Democrats con-
trol. The House Judiciary Committee, chaired
by Democratic Rep. John Conyers, has an espe-
cially large number of sharply partisan Democ-
rats and Republicans, who could produce tele-
vised fireworks and unpredictable results.

Terry Holt is among the Republican strate-
gists who think Obama and his allies will suffer
because the scenario is apt to look more like a
witch hunt than a sober search for justice.

"It would be a total circus and be complete
chaos and expose them to terrible risk," Holt
said. "Obama's political strength is based on
the notion that he is the future, moving for-

Position WANTED:
REGISTERED NURSE

ward. I felt Obama's first instinct was the correct
one: to let this stuff go." Democrat Dianne
Feinstein says the effort will take months, which
might allow the issue to cool down a bit.

It is red hot for now, however. Liberal
groups, blogs and Web sites are demanding full-
bore inquiries and possible prosecutions of the
lawyers and officials who justified the tactics.

Those tactics included 11 days of sleep depri-
vation for some detainees and repeated water-
boarding, an ordeal that simulates drowning.

Recently released memos from the Justice
Department "provide shocking confirmation of
high-level involvement in the sadistic interro-
gation methods the Bush administration autho-
rised the CIA to use on detainees," the Amer-
ican Civil Liberties Union says on its Web site.
"It is indefensible to avoid investigating and
prosecuting those responsible for these heinous
crimes."

Liberal talk show host Ed Schultz said this
week on MSNBC that many liberal Democrats
"want to see prosecution. Does the president
just ignore them?" After 2,000 viewers texted
their opinions, Schultz said, "Ninety-four per
cent want to see Bush officials prosecuted."

The White House is walking a careful line.
On one hand, Obama cannot spurn his liberal
backers too often, and he already has disap-
pointed them on issues such as sending more
troops to Afghanistan.

But the president also cannot afford to let
Republican strategists portray the CIA inter-
rogations matter as a case of Democratic over-
reaching, perhaps comparable to the GOP's
strategic overreach in impeaching then-President
Bill Clinton. Matt Bennett, vice president of
the moderate-Democratic group Third Way,
said the potentially unconstitutional actions of
the Bush administration officials require looking
into. But he is wary of a potentially partisan
food fight if congressional committees alone
conduct the investigations.

"If this were to proceed," Bennett said, "the
best model is the 9/11 Commission, with unques-
tionably responsible leaders, like Lee Hamil-
ton." Hamilton, a former Democratic lawmak-
er from Indiana, co-chaired the highly regarded
commission that investigated the Sept. 11, 2001,
terror attacks.

But Obama threw cold water on the inde-
pendent commission idea Thursday. That leaves
Congress, and the nation, with an unclear path
on how to pursue a combustible question.

(This article was written by Charles Babing-
ton of the Associated Press).





A Major Development in Southwest New Providence is
seeking a full time on-site registered nurse. The nurse
will be responsible for non-critical incidents/accident
to provide the necessary first aid and first responder
treatment.

Duties include but not limited to:-

Stabilization of any injured person/s until
they can be transferred to a clinic or
hospital facilities for complete evaluation
by a doctor.

Administer drug and alcohol testing to
construction and company staff if required.

Complete any reports required by in house
and relevant government agencies
regarding injuries or incidents on site.

Suitable candidates must have full medical liability
insurance coverage, be technically trained and
a Ministry of Health approved/certified medical
professional with at least five (5) years experience in the
medical field. Emergency room experience is a plus.

Salary is commensurate with qualifications and
experience. Interested persons may send resume to
P.O. Box SP-63158





Strengthen
marriage as
social pillar

EDITOR, The Tribune.

There is no doubt that the
basic and fundamental social
fabric of The Bahamas has long
gone to the dogs and is beyond
any norm and probably now the
root cause of the majority of
our social problems.

Month after month we hear
about forums, seminars, etc,
focusing on the social fabric of
our country and from the top
to the bottom we hear com-
ments, so-called ‘learned’ which
are nothing more than the con-
tinued repeat of the cause of
the troubles we are faced with;
it is as if we try desperately to
propagate the cancer killing us.

Any analysis of the so-called
social fabric confirms that we
have a society which is primar-
ily unnatural in composition and
we who comprise this are total-
ly disillusioned but profess first-
ly to be a so-called Christian
nation which requires the
upholding of the primary Faith
and belief in the Ten Com-
mandments and the norm of
social behaviour.

Again last week, so the tele-
vision news reported we saw the
Minister of Social Develop-
ment, Hon Loretta Butler Turn-
er followed quickly by Dr Keva
Bethel commenting on Bahami-
an social behaviour and neither
acknowledged the root cancer
nor the obvious requirement to
start what is a long road back to
normality in our society and
bring social pride in our peo-
ple.

Social analysts even in the US
looking at the social well-being
of Afro-Americans have for a
long time supported and advo-
cated that the norm of parent-
ing solely in a marriage union
not only to abide by basic Chris-
tian belief but for economic rea-
sons gives even the lowest in
the social class a chance to sur-

LETTERS

letters@tribunemedia net



vive — a mother on her own
striving to feed, educate and
bring up two, three or more sin-
gle parented children is grossly
disadvantaged against the con-
trast of the norm of a dual par-
ent home with two incomes.

The facts speak for them-
selves that no one has the guts
to compromise the cancer we
have and how we have today
totally accepted child-bearing
outside of the norm of a mar-
riage union is socially accepted
and socially acceptable period.

If the minister, the church
and civic leaders do not awaken
to the required change then
only they will carry the
inevitable that our Bahamas will
remain a third world nation
embroiled in an abnormal soci-
ety solely interested in the flesh
and no moral and ethical basis
of a normal society.

The total refusal of the
church to teach and chastise the
continual programmed single
parenting is beyond any under-
standing that the church, per se,
actually stands for the moral
authority of the command-
ments. The church leaders seem
to worry more about the col-
lection plate than teaching the
truth and the Christian belief
as they see they will step and
crunch too many exposed toes.

The blood of our failed soci-
ety is on the hands of the past
politicians and church leaders.

One pregnancy outside of
marriage might be acceptable
but when women have three-
four-five children outside of the
marriage union, sorry we have
gone far too far laughing in
God’s face and the proclaimed
commandments and Christian

Saddened
vendor’s

EDITOR, The Tribune.

What a sad day for me today
as I drove by the Fox Hill
Parade and did not see the
familiar face of the shy, smil-
ing, gentleman who sells The
Tribune in front of the Nation-
al Insurance Building.

eV ihe

INDUSTRIES LTD.

WILL BE CLOSED For
ANNUAL STOCKTAKING

THURSDAY, APRIL 23
FRIDAY, APRIL 24
SATURDAY, APRIL 25

We regret any
inconvenience this will
cause to our customers.

I saw a picture and a large
bow on the telephone pole
where he used to sit so I parked
my car to inquire about him
only to be told that he had been
hit and killed by a hit- and-run
driver on his way to "his spot"
to sell his newspapers.

I wonder how the driver that
hit him and left him to die
would feel if that were their
brother, mother, father or child.
Perhaps he could have been

belief.

A recent speech on education
acknowledged that there is a
connection between single par-
enting and the continual nega-
tive examination results and the
unacceptable level of education,
especially if you look at our
national education investment
now of billions of tax dollars
against the return — one can
only describe that as dismal toa
failing grade and an horrific
misuse of tax payers money.

Some contend and there is a
strong argument to this that suc-
cessive governments have inten-
tionally by design allowed for
this social cancer to grow and
grow as with poverty, educa-
tional ignorance political power
remains in the hands of those
who can manipulate to stay in
power. Why has successive
majority governments seeming-
ly had fiscal and financial poli-
cies to control the creation of
wealth? Solely again to control
the people and control where
they will vote.

We have to start now to cause
over the coming 40-60 years to
turn the clock back to the
acceptable Christian and even
Islamic belief in the sole privi-
lege of procreation in and exclu-
sively in marriage — marriage I
must state of man and woman.

Minister Loretta Butler Turn-
er and Dr Keva Bethel are
totally and absolutely wrong in
their approach — their
approach for the continuance
of the mess and cancer we have
is tantamount to endorsing sin-
gle parenting which any truthful
social analyst will confirm is not
normal, immoral and the cancer
that has eaten the total fabric
of the once proud Christian and
moral society of our nation.

J MOORE
Nassau,
April, 2009.

over
eath

saved if someone could have
helped him. What goes around,
comes around.

We will all miss him because
he was a special part of Fox
Hill. My sympathy to his family
and friends. He will be so
missed.

D. KNOWLES
Nassau,
April 23, 2009

Standing by
wall’s impact

EDITOR, The Tribune.

Thank you for publishing my
thoughts. You are right I was
not born when all this occurred
and Iam elated I was not. You
try to portray me as a racist or
as a product of some warped
political landscape. You say
people like me are keeping the
Bahamas from being this utopia
of unity. [say BS.

My grandfather was killed
because of that wall. I have
been reading your tabloid for
sometime now, and I say
‘tabloid’ because anyone with
any sense or the slightest intel-
ligence can see through your

feeble attempts to coerce public
opinion with the type of trash
you guys write.

I thought you knew better
than most that the truth is not in
your files stashed in your
archives, but rather it’s what the
masses believe as truth and right
now the masses believe that the
Collins wall is the symbol of
racial division for the Bahamas
and no matter how ridiculous
you try too make me look, that
is the facts.

AARON ROBERTS
Nassau,
April 23, 2009.

PUBLIC NOTICE

INTENT TO CHANGE NAME BY DEED POLL

The Public is hereby advised that |, KRYSTLE IRENE
JOHNSON of Sandilands Village, P.O. Box N-4447, Nassau,

Bahamas intends to change my name to KRYSTLE IRENE
FINLAYSON. If there are any objections to this change of
name by Deed Poll, you may write such objections to the
Chief Passport Officer, PO.Box N-742, Nassau, Bahamas
no later than thirty (30) days after the date of publication of
this notice.





THE TRIBUNE

SATURDAY, APRIL 25, 2009, PAGE 5



Exuma hosts Miss Bahamas Universe On brief

EXUMAV’S economy received
a welcome boost as the island
hosted the contestants of the
Miss Bahamas Universe compe-
tition last weekend.

It is just under a month to go
before the country crowns the
new Miss Bahamas Universe.

Last weekend all 17 contes-
tants touched down at the Moss
Town International Airport in
Exuma where they received a
warm welcome from the island’s
youth marching band.

They were also the special
guests at a welcome reception
courtesy of the Ministry of
Tourism and February Point
Resorts.

The island of Exuma came
alive as they watched contestants
give it their all in the swimsuit
and spokesmodel competitions
held at the Four Seasons Resort.

One by one the bevy of beau-
ties strutted their stuff on the
runway.

Following the big showdown,
some of the girls spoke with the
press about their performance
on stage.

Miss New Providence Ronnell
Armbrister said, “I've been
working very hard to get in
shape for the swimsuit competi-
tion, but for the spokesmodel
competition I feel I was really
impressive.”

Miss Freeport Sharie Delva
said: “Everyone here is ready
and very excited about the com-

MISS Bahamas Universe contestants take part in photo shoots during the pageant’s preliminary competitions in Exuma.

petition.

Another contestant, Miss
Deadman’s Cay Alyssa Knowles
said she believes her passion for
the country came through
strongly.

The audience showed their
support for each contestant with
loud cheers as they paraded one
by one onto the stage. The high-
light of the night was the
spokesmodel segment — all 17
beauties were given the oppor-
tunity to present a 30 to 60 sec-
ond commercial on why tourists
should come to the Bahamas

and what islands they must see.

The pageant’s director of cor-
porate affairs Robert Pinder said
he is pleased with the success of
the event so far and the over-
whelming support that has come
from various companies on the
island.

Exuma Tours provided the
transportation and Charlie's
Restaurant gave the girls ‘down-
home’ meals as they hosted
them following the competitions.

The Four Seasons and Febru-
ary Point provided accommoda-
tions for the organisation and

Western Air flew in all the par-
ticipants from Nassau.

Acting general manager of the
Exuma tourism office Petheri-
na Hanna said the event gave
Exuma a “great” economic
boost.

“(n) these economic chal-
lenging times, things are a little
abnormal here because we are
used to a really, really, high qual-
ity of life, and in the last few
months in the world we have
been feeling it, so with the music
fest that just ended and now the
Miss Bahamas swimsuit compe-



tition and then the 56th Family
Island Regatta, they're all great
examples of domestic tourism
and the ministry of tourism
encourages that.”

The next competitions, cos-
tume and talent, are scheduled
for May 17. Scores from both
events added to the judge's inter-
view on May 23 will determine
the top 12 contestants.

Winners of each category will
be announced during the finals
of the Miss Bahamas Universe
Pageant on May 24 at the Wyn-
dham Nassau Resort.

2 -New Puerto

Rican port
scheduled

: to open

next year

| MIPONCE, Puerto Rico

LOCAL officials say a

i new port will generate

about 5,000 jobs when it
opens in southern Puerto
Rico next year, according

to the Associated Press.

Ponce mayor Maria

Melendez says that a
? group of U.S. and South
: Korean investors, known

as UCW America, plan to

start hiring port adminis-
? trators in January

They will spend $48 mil-

lion on roads to the har-
: bour.

Melendez on Wednes-

i day said the $600 million
? Port of the Americas will
i be one of the region's

i largest seaports.

Originally due to open

? in 2006, it will compete

i with existing ports in

? Jamaica, the Bahamas and
? the Dominican Republic.

WHY YOU VEX¢



@ By TANEKA THOMPSON
Tribune Staff Reporter
whyyouvex@tribunemedia.net

“T vex at so many buses filled
with passengers who take short-
cuts through the residential
areas off Baillou Hill Road try-
ing to avoid the long lines
before getting to Mall at
Marathon. There seems to be
no law for them, they speed
over speed bumps, overtake
other buses and put children,
elderly persons and others in
serious danger.

“Should they not be on the
main streets only? Nothing will
be done until someone gets
kill.”

-DH

“T vex because for the past
two Tuesdays I've missed my
favourite show on channel 43
because some cable channels
were without sound. The first
week I was on hold for almost
40 minutes, with 22 callers
ahead of me, trying to find out
what was going on.

“This week I had a shorter
wait as there were only three
callers ahead of me, thankfully.
What's really going on Cable
Bahamas? Am I going to miss
my Spm programme this com-
ing Tuesday too? Will I ever
see and hear it again?”

- VEX “REAPER”
WATCHER

“T vex that every time I go
into my favourite lunchtime
restaurant the girls behind the
counter act like I do them
something. Particularly in a
location where there is a popu-
lar shopping centre, I have wit-
nessed other customers get stink
stares, and the girls grumble
when they ask for orders. On
top of this stinkness, half the
time I bite into my food the
bread is so hard and dry I won-
der why I keep going back.

“T even went to another loca-
tion (of this restaurant chain)
and saw that someone had post-
ed an internal memo, begging
employees to smile and be nice,
in plain view of customers. I
wish more of these owners
would send in friends or family

as mystery customers so they
can see how no good and slack
their employees are because I
didn’t ask for a side of attitude
with my food.”

- SICK OF SUB-STAN-
DARD SERVICE.

“T vex because a big hole in
the road burst my tyre last night
right by Caves Village and that
hole been there for a long time.
I mean sometimes driving on
these streets is like ducking and
dodging - when you miss one,
another one right there to get
you.

“Everywhere you go the
roads dig right up, and it seems
like they worse off than before.
The government say they doing

this expansive road improve-
ment project but it seems like
these streets getting worser and
worser - but right now my main
concern is if the government ga’
pay for me to get a new tyre,
man.”

- PEEVED AT
POTHOLES.

e Are you vex? Send your com-
plaints to whyyouvex@tribuneme-
dia.net

TROPICAL
EXTERMINATORS

RR UE
PHONE: 322-2157



ROAD TRAFFIC DEPARTMENT
PUBLIC NOTICE

The American Embassy is presently considering applications
for the following position:

MAINTENANCE CRAFTSMAN

Performs a wide range of skilled maintenance, minor construction and
repair work on U.S. Government-owned buildings and equipment; and
other work relevant to infrastructural and facility maintenance. Completes
assigned work orders and is directly supervised by the Maintenance
Foreman.

This position 1s open to candidates with the following qualifications:

- Completion of High School 1s required.
- Five years of craft work, including carpentry, mechanical, minor
electrical and yard maintenance. Laborer experience required.

PERSONALATTRIBUTES:

- Good working knowledge of painting, masonry, dry-wall, plumbing and
carpentry required.

- Ability to use all equipment and tools related to craft work including
cutting, wood fitting, finishing, plumbing, screw drivers and mechanical
and electrical fitting.

BENEFITS PROVIDED INCLUDE:

The successful candidate will be offered an excellent compensation package
including performance-based incentives, medical and dental insurance, life
insurance, pension and opportunities for training and development.

Applicants must be Bahamian citizens or U.S. citizens who are eligible for
employment under Bahamian laws and regulations.

Application forms are available online at Nassau.usembassy.gov.

Please e-mail or fax applications to the Human Resources Office no later
than May 4, 2009 to: Adamsrc@state.gov or Fernanderra@state.gov or
fax: 328-8251. Applications will not be accepted at the Security Gate of
the Embassy. Absolutely no telephone calls will not be accepted.

ALL FRANCHISE HOLDERS

In accordance with the Road Traffic Act Chapter 220
Statue Laws of the Bahamas, the imspection and
licensing of All Public Service vehicles will be
carried out in New Providence and the Family
Island’s beginning Friday, I*t May thru Friday, 29
May, 2009.

Owners and Operators of these vehicles must ensure
that the total numbers of vehicles covered by their
franchise are presented for Inspection and

Licensing.

Further, all franchise holders must produce the
following documents for Licensing and Inspection:

Valid Insurance
Valid Business License
Grant Letter

Franchise Payment Receipt

Bank Certified Cheque or Major Credit
Card (Only)

CONTROLLER





PAGE 6, SATURDAY, APRIL 25, 2009

THE TRIBUNE



LOCAL NEWS

Cat Islanders QMETERGtitacbnweonnilionss

urged to seek
project jobs

FROM page one

global economic situation and
the less than bright projections
for economic recovery in the
short term.

The prime minister, who says
he does not make a habit of
travelling the country with
prospective investors, said he
made an exception in the case
of David Southward and his
partners because they assured
him that they had the financial
means and will to complete the
development, notwithstanding
the global financial crisis.

“The global economy has
performed even more poorly
than we expected then, with sig-
nificant negative impact on our
economy, particularly since Sep-
tember last year. The result has
been a measurable decrease in
visitor arrivals on our shores
and a sharp increase in unem-
ployment levels,” the prime
minister said.

Principal of Cat Island Part-
ners David Southward antici-
pates the timing of end of phase
one construction will coincide
with the end of the current glob-
al recession.

“We truly believe that in two
to three years from now as
phase one of this great project
starts to come online, we will
no longer be in a world-wide
recession at that point — so we
actually think the timing of
developing this project could-
mt be better.

“We knew that in this day
and age our consumer and cus-
tomers won’t come and buy
property at any resort until the
developers have built the
amenities and the facilities
ahead of time. So we have to
take the lead, we have to get
started,” he said.



The project will feature the
first PGA Village constructed
outside of the United States and
just the third in the world.

Cat Island was the site of a
number of plantation estates
during early colonial times and
just in the near vicinity of this
site can be seen the historic
ruins of the Farquharson, Bour-
bon and Armbrister Great
Houses.

“We meet almost in the shad-
ow of Cumo Hill, made famous
as Mount Alvernia by the
Roman Catholic hermit Father
Jerome Hawes when he built a
small chapel at its peak — the
highest point in the country.

“Cat Island is the home of
rake ’n’ scrape music, quadrille
dancing and flour cakes. It is,
nowadays, the host of two
important annual cultural
events — the Labour Day
Weekend Rake ’n’ Scrape
Music Festival and the Emanci-
pation Day Weekend Regatta,”
said Mr Ingraham.

The island is also the ances-
tral home of the internationally
acclaimed Oscar winning movie
and stage actor, Sir Sidney Poiti-
er.

The prime minister told Mr
Southward and his partners that
he hoped as developers, they
will tap into this rich and varied
cultural and historical back-
ground and that some aspects
of the culture of Cat Island will
be incorporated into the PGA
Village.

Mr Ingraham said that this
development is being held to
the highest ecological standards
to safeguard the environmen-
tal integrity of the landscape
and marine resources and to
ensure the environmental and
economic sustainability of the
development.

Share your news
















The Tribune wants to hear

from people who are
making news in their
neighbourhoods. Perhaps

you are raising funds for a

good cause, campaigning
for improvements in the
area or have won an
award.

If so, call us on 322-1986
and share your story.

HUMPHREY JACKMAN as ‘Michael Jackson’

FROM page one

side of the road after knocking
him off his bicycle.

Mr Jackman is believed to
have been taken to hospital in a
private vehicle, and died at the
Princess Margaret Hospital that
evening.

The following morning
thieves broke into the home he
shared with his 94-year-old
maternal uncle, Lenneth Davis,
stole his safe and rifled through
his clothes and personal belong-
ings, including hundreds of pho-
tographs of himself and his
friends.

Mr Jackman’s brother,
Patrick Jackman, 37, said his
brother was creative in every-

thing he did, as he had excelled
at making and hanging curtains
for Sholan’s Drapery near his
home in Bernard Road for 13
years before he became an
enthusiastic chef, and he always
had a talent for making any-
thing he wished, including real-
istic models using just newspa-
per and glue.

“He could sit down and build
anything,” Patrick said.

“He built a speed boat out of
newspaper. He made model air-
planes out of paper that looked
just like the ones made from
kits. It was something that he
had.”

Another of Mr Jackman’s
talents was impersonations, and
his charismatic likeness to
Michael Jackson earned him the

Shot expat’s family
voices ‘suspicions’

FROM page one

believe there are more people
who would have been in the
area before, during and after
Jones was gunned down who
may be able to provide insight
into the attempted killing of the
businessman.

At present, officers continue
to seek a motive for the appar-
ently arranged daylight attack.

The suspect in the case,
described as a slim built dark
male, stripped off his shirt and
left it in the area before he
made his escape on a motor-
bike, which was later found

was a resident of Western New
Providence. After living in The
Bahamas for over 10 years, he
was a permanent resident.

His former business partner,
ex-MP Lester Turnquest, told
The Tribune on Wednesday
that despite a protracted legal
battle between the pair that
ended in the severance of their
relationship, hearing the news
of the incident was “like getting
hit with a brick.”

He described Mr Jones as
someone who “thrived on
excitement (and) of living close
to the edge.”

Anyone with information
about the shooting can contact



HUMPHREY JACKMAN as ‘Elvis Presley’

nickname “Jackson”.

Patrick said: “From when he
was small he started collecting
Michael Jackson albums, and
everyone called him Jackson.

“He could dance and do any-
thing Michael Jackson could
do.”

As a child Patrick remem-
bers his brother, aged around
17, making Batman and Robin
costumes for himself and his lit-
tle brother exactly as they were
in their favourite television car-
toon.

“Mine was a little tight, but it
was just as I saw it on the TV,
the stitch was the same and
everything.

“We put them on Christmas
morning and we walked out on
the porch and my cape got
snagged, so I ended up busting
my eye and he looked at me
and said, ‘Robin, always
remember to tuck your cape in,
you’re fighting super villains,
not yourself.’”

Patrick added: “Sometimes
in the morning he would call
me for a ride to The Guardian
and not once did I refuse, even



though I live deep in the west,
because that’s the love I had for
my brother.

“He didn’t like crowds, he
didn’t drink, he didn’t smoke,
my mother never had to bail
him out of jail, he was not a
problematic person at all, he
was just in his own world.”

Mr Jackman never married
or had children, and left behind
his mother Marsil Jackman-
Kerr, stepfather George Kerr,
three brothers and six sisters.

His eldest brother, Tony
Brown, 55, who run’s Tony’s
Jerk on Fox Hill Road said his
younger brother loved talking
to people in the community
about the daily news.

“He was a really nice fella,”
Mr Brown said.

Mr Jackman’s funeral will be
held at 3pm today at St
Anselm’s Roman Catholic
Church, where Mr Jackman
never missed a service. View-
ing will be at Clarke’s Funeral
Home, 10 Tonique Williams-
Darling Highway from 10am to
noon and at the church from
2pm until the service.

Over 5,000 registered for
unemployment benefits

FROM page one

yesterday.

He said that a total of 800 persons have registered for the unem-
ployment benefit since Monday of this week, bringing the number

to 5,150 persons.

“We anticipate that the $20 million that was allocated from the
medical branch fund will be sufficient for this year. “That is the pre-




















“Glory Of Gods Presence”

Come, join usjas)we come togetherand)s *
worship the|Uord in Spiritiand int cuth one

ASSEMBLIES OF 600}

OPPORTUNITIES FOR
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Evening Worship Service

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WEDNESDAY at 7:30 p.m.

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FRIDAY at 7:30 p.m.
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Sundays at 8:30 a.m. - ZNS 1 - TEMPLE TIME

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Tel: 322-8304, Fax: 322-4793. P.O. Box: N-1566
Email: evtemple@batelnet.bs Web: www.evangelistictemple.org





abandoned.

MG iones ta tices, PO nasty ates

TIPS or 502-9991.

BAPTIST BIBLE CHURCH
SOLDIER ROAD & OLD TRAIL

Sunday School: 10am FUNDAMENTAL
Preaching ~ 11am & 7:30pm EVANGELISTIC
Radio Bible Hour:

Sunday 6pm - ZNS 2

Wed. Prayer & Praise 7:30pm



Pastor:H. Mills

“Preaching the Bible as is, to men as they are”
Pastor: H. Mills ¢ Phone: 393-0563 ¢ Box N-3622

CENTRAL GOSPEL CHAPEL

CHRISTIE & DOWDESWELL STREETS * Tel: 325-2921

SUNDAY, APRIL 26TH, 2008
11:30 am. Speaker:

Pastor Marcel Lightbourne

Bible Class: 9:45 a.m. * Breaking of Bread Service: 10:45 a.m.
*# Community Outreach: 11:30 a.m. « Evening Service: 7:00 p.m.
* Midweek Service 7:30 p.m. (Wednesdays)
* Sisters’ Prayer Meeting: 10:00 a.m. (2nd Thursday of each month)

=m LIGHT AND LIFE COMMUNITY CHURCH

r =a Grounded In The Past &
ee. Geared To The Future

Worship time: Ilam & 7pm
Sunday School: 9:45am
Prayer time: 6:30pm
Place:

The Madeira
Shopping Center

Rev. Dr. Franklin Knowles

ALL ARE WELCOME TO ATTEND

Pastor: Rev. Dr Franklin Knowles

P.O .Box EE-16807
Telephone number 325-5712
EMAIL - lynnk@ batelnet.bs

sent project of the National Insurance Board. The numbers in
terms of persons who are registering for the benefit are in the
range that we originally predicted,’ Minister Foulkes said.

Recipients of the benefit will receive half of their average insur-
able weekly wage for 13 weeks; the current ceiling on insurable
wages is $400 meaning the maximum amount anyone can receive
is $200 a week. The benefits will be paid out from NIB’s $20 million
medical branch fund. Once this is exhausted, it will be sustained by
contributions from employed persons and employers.

While some see the benefit as minimal, Minister Foulkes said the
benefit is merely intended to be a “helping hand.”

“The benefit is intended to be a help during difficult times for a
lot of unemployed Bahamians. It is intended to be only for 13
weeks to allow persons to seek another job or to find other ways to
gain employment.

“It is not intended to be a permanent form of assistance. It
averages out to almost $900 a month for three months,” Minister
Foulkes said.

Grant’s Town Wesley Methodist Church

(Baillou Hill Rd & Chapel Street) PO.Box CB-13046

The Holy Ghost Prayer-Line number is 326-7427
(www.gtwesley.org)

SUNDAY, APRIL 26TH, 2009

7:00 a.m. Rev. Carla Culmer/Bro. Ernest Miller
11:00 a.m. Sanctuary Choir Anniversary
7:00 a.m. Sanctuary Choir

Theme: “ But As For Me And My Household, We Will Serve the Lord”

Grace and Peace Wesleyan Church
A Society of The Free Methodist Church of
North America

WHERE GOD IS ADORED AND EVERYONE IS AFFIRMED

7; Worship Time: Lla.m.

Prayer Time: 10:15a.m.

Church School during Worship Service

Place: Twynam Heights
off Prince Charles Drive

Minister: Rev. Henley Perry
P.O. Box SS-5631
Telephone number: 324-2538
Telefax number: 324-2587

COME TO WORSHIP, LEAVE TO SERVE





THE TRIBUNE

SATURDAY, APRIL 25, 2009, PAGE 7



LOCAL NEWS



Lauderdale speaks
to GB businessmen

@ BY DENISE MAYCOCK
Tribune Freeport Reporter
dmaycock@tribunemedia.net

FREEPORT - Retired Flori-
da News Anchorman Dwight
Lauderdale addressed business
professionals on the topic of
unemployment at the Grand
Bahama Chamber of Com-
merce’s Administrative Profes-
sionals and Bosses Luncheon in
Grand Bahama.

Mr Lauderdale, former news
anchor of WPLG Channel 10,
was accompanied by his wife.
He spoke about a number of
global issues, including the
worldwide problem of unem-
ployment.

“We are not going to recover
from this economic disaster
until we start putting people
back to work,” he told business
persons attending the luncheon
held at the Sunrise Resort and
Marina.

Unemployment, he said, is
one of the biggest problems in

Alpha Kap
Alpha Sorority
hosts 31st annual
Honours Day

THE Alpha
Kappa Alpha

the United States and the
Bahamas. He noted that the
actual unemployed figures are
probably much higher as statis-
tics are based on rounded fig-
ures.

Mr Lauderdale, who is a fre-
quent visitor to Grand Bahama,
said that being a tourist desti-
nation is no longer enough to
sustain the economy. He said
other industries must be con-
vinced to do business on the
island.

“The unemployment rate
here is 15 per cent and that is up
from nine per cent a year ago,
and that is just the folks they
can count. As you know there is
a lot of rounding in statistics
and I wonder what the real fig-
ures might be,” he said.

The former newsman said he
is aware that every effort is
being made to keep the Isle of
Capri Casino open on Grand
Bahama.

He also said that he believes
that the opening of a new $20

million glass factory will bode
well for the island’s economy.

“T think it is great news
because it shows that someone
on this island understands that it
is no longer enough just to be a
tourist destination, that here on
Grand Bahama you are going
to have to depend on more than
tourism to succeed economical-
ly and to move forward,” he
said.

“Here on Grand Bahama, I
understand that there is a lot of
optimism these days over some
recent changes at the Grand
Bahama Port Authority.”

Mr Lauderdale said that com-
pany owners and operators
must realise that their employ-
ees are vital to their business,
especially during the current
economic climate.

He stressed that employers
should not intimidate or take
advantage of their employees
during times of economic uncer-
tainty.

“Bosses who are silently or

even loudly intimidating
employees and trying to make
them feel lucky they have a job,
you are actually hurting the
business,” he said.

Even though many bosses
may feel they have more job
security, Mr Lauderdale
stressed that nobody is safe in
this uncertain climate.

He said the way bosses treat
their employees will determine
if the business survives or suf-
fers.

“There will be some employ-
ers who try to take advantage of
these dark days, those folks are
going to learn a hard lesson,”
he said.

“Everybody agrees that the
economy will come back at
some point, but please know
that when it does bounce back,
it is not going to be business as
usual. Every business - small or
large - will have to press the
reset button. Every business will
have to figure out how to work
smarter,” he said.

pa Additional performance for
— “Trapped in Marriage’ held
tonight at Regency Theatre

Sorority will be
hosting its 31st
annual Honours
Day on Sunday,
April 26, at 3pm
at Government
House.

High Schools
throughout the
Bahamas have
nominated out-
standing gradu-
ating senior
female students
and the winners
will be



event.

SOME of the nomi-
nees from top left
column: Giselle
Outten, SAC;
Dashinique Moss,
Crooked Island;
Phylicia Bastian,
Queens College;
Alexis McIntosh,
Faith Temple Acad-
emy. Second col-
umn: Rachael M
Albury, St Andrews
Academy.

Bisk

announced at the
: three-dimensional characters of true depth,”

i the producers said.

ROYAL =rinELitTy

“TRAPPED in Marriage”, a new

i Bahamian play by S L Sheppard, premiered
? at the Regency Theatre on Friday. An addi-
? tional performance will be held tonight.

The cast includes veteran actors Brion

: Roxbury, Tawari Rodgers, Denise DeGre-
? gory, Dawn Rolle and Liselle Harris. Rela-
i tive newcomers Caron Smith, Andre
? Cartwright and Luckner Timothee round
? out the cast.

The play tells the story of four couples at

; different stages of their marriages.

“You will laugh and cry and recognise

i yourself and your friends in this produc-
i tion. Every aspect of this play seems true to
i life in the Bahamas. The characters are pre-
? sented with all their faults and weaknesses,
i? with their strengths and virtues. The actors

have worked extremely hard to present

“There are many ways to be trapped.

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Some are even of our own making. The
play explores these themes. How do we
enable others to lie and cheat? How does
self-interest guide our actions? How do we
take charge of our own lives without hurting
others? Though the themes may seem
somber, they are presented with a light
touch that will delight and touch the audi-
ence.”

S L Sheppard is the author of the novel
“The Green Shutters” and five Bahamian
plays including “Staff Room Gossip”, “The
Woman From Nassau”, ‘You Never Go
Back”, and “With a Little of Luck.”
She has also published many short stories in
international magazines, and her poetry can
be found in international anthologies. Her
Christmas plays for children have been per-
formed yearly for many years. She is a past-
president and now board member of the
Freeport Players’ Guild and a veteran actor
and director for the company.

Cast of
‘Trapped in
Marriage’

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VEHICLE AUCTION

U.S. EMBASSY
SATURDAY, MAY 2%?, 2009
SHIPAHOY COMPLEX (Western Gate)
West Bay Street, opposite Well’s Service

Stations

DOORS OPEN FOR INSPECTION 9:00
A.M. — 9:30 A.M.

AUCTION 9:30 A.M. — 11:00 A.M.












Successful bidders must pay a minimum
$300 non-refundable deposit immediately
after each bid closes in order to secure their
purchase of the offered vehicle. Balance
due May 6, 2009.

GENERAL PUBLIC IS INVITED

Bahamas Bus & Truck Co., Ltd,

Montrose Avenue
Phone:322-1722 » Fax: 326-7452

Large Shipment
of
Used Cars

/COME CHECK
US OUT

_New Shipments Arrived

Hurry, Hurry, Hurry and
Get Your First Choice
For Easy Financing

Bank Ando Inéurance

On Premises
Check Our Prices
Before buying



THE TRIBUNE

spor

SATURDAY, APRIL 25,



PAGE 9





ts

2009

PAGE 13 © Legacy baseball/softball heats up...








Jason Terry
wins NBA
sixth man

award...
See page 10



National Family istand regatta
expected to heat up today

hile the first
champion
has been
decided in
the 56th
National Family Island Regatta,
the competition is expected to
heat up today as the final cham-
pions are crowned in Elizabeth
Harbour, Georgetown, Exuma.

So far the regatta has gotten
off to a pretty good start with
more than 50 boats, as antici-
pated by commodore Danny
Strachan, participating.

The largest fleet of boats are
entered in the B Class.

But the first champions were
decided in the Sir Durward
Knowles Junior National
Championship with Leslie Rolle
Jr and the Bulla Reg having
secured the crown.

They won it in a fiercely com-
petitive three-race series that
concluded on Thursday.

Yesterday, the action heated
up as the other major classes
staged their second races.

There was one major incident
yesterday as the Cobra and the
Six Sisters collided as they head-
ed for the starting line-up in the
B Class.

While the Cobra, skippered
by Dwayne Higgins, managed
to make the starting canyon, Six
Sisters, skippered by the Rev
Elkin Symonette, was ground-
ed.

When the race was complet-
ed, the Terri Ann, skippered by
Davis Mitchell out of Staniel
Cay, emerged as the champi-
ons. They were followed by
Miss Susan Chase from Man-
grove Bush, Long Island, and
skippered by Stefan Knowles.

Lundy Robinson and the
Eudeva, the winner of the first
B Class race, had to settle for



CLASS C BOAT FUGITIVE crew members celebrate...

SWiR Gems bl



INBRIEF

FLAG FOOTBALL
SCHEDULE

THE newly formed Flag
Football League in the
Bahamas is currently under-
way with games being
played every weekend at the
Winton rugby pitch.

The initial season com-

menced on Saturday, March
28 and is expected to run
through to mid-June.

¢ Here’s a look at the
schedule of games on tap for
this weekend:

Today’s schedule
Spm — War vs Sna
4pm — Spa vs War

Sunday’s schedule
2:30pm — BR vs Sna
4:30pm — RBC vs Pros

third place, while the John B
from Abaco got fourth. Queen
Drucuilla was fifth, followed by
the Cobra, Lady Sonia and the
Barbarian.

With the first two races com-
bined, the Eudeva is in a two-
way tie with the Susan Chase
in first place with 24 points
apiece. The Eudeva is the
defending champions.

The Terri Ann is close behind
in third with 22. Captain Ray is
fourth with 16. The Healthcliff
and the Cobra are tied for fifth
place with 10 points each.

The third and final race in the
series will be contested today.

In the first race in the C Class,
the defending champion Bulla
Reg, skippered by Leslie
‘Buzzy’ Rolle, has taken the
early lead with a one point lead
over Lady Diane.

And in the A Class, the Tida
Wave is the defending champi-
on. She has taken the initial lead
after the first race. The Run-
ning Tide is in second and the
Red Stripe is third.

In the Sir Durward Knowles
Junior Nationals, Leslie Rolle
Jr and the Bulla Reg made sure
that at least one of the champi-
onship trophies will remain in
Exuma.

They have collected a total
of 43 points. In second place
was Marcus Thomas and the
Winnie K with 34 points and
Revardo McKenzie and the
Fugitive from Exuma also had
34 points for third place.

Thomas Treco and the Sweet
Island Gal had to settle for
fourth with 33 points.

In the first race, Marcus
Knowles and his Winnie K from
Long Island, was the winner
with Thomas Treco on the
Sweet Island Gal from Long

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——
a

CLASS A BOAT RED STRIPE...

Island second and Leslie Rolle
and the Bull Reg third.
In the second race, Leslie

WHEN the race was completed,
Class B boat Terri Ann (shown),
skippered by Davis Mitchell out
of Staniel Cay, emerged as the
champions...

Rolle and the Bulla Reg took
the victory, followed by Mar-
cus Knowles and the Winnie K
in second and Thomas Treco
and the Sweet Island Gal.
And in the third and final
race, Leslie Rolle and the Bulla
Reg once again came out on top
to cement their title. Marcus
Thomas and the Winnie K end-

m@ By RENALDO DORSETT
Sports Reporter
rdorsett@tribunemedia.net

PORGY BAY, BIMINI — After a
series of delayed stats, the Bahamas Bas-
ketball Federation’s Round Robin tour-
nament kicked off in Bimini yesterday,
featuring a showdown between two of
the top teams from the capital and the
nation’s second city.

Match Point Investment Gems — 80
Electro Telecom Cybot Queens — 51

The Gems took advantage of a short-
handed Cybots squad and with a stifling
defense that gave up just six points in
the second quarter pulled away to take
the tournament’s opening game in con-
vincing fashion.

A closely contested game early in the
first quarter featured four ties and five
lead changes before the Gems pulled
away with a 15-4 run to end the period
and grab a 25-14 lead.

A constantly attacking Gems squad
took advantage of a foul prone Cybots
defense and built on the late first quarter

ed up in second.



CLASS C BOATS can be seen during the regatta...

“We were just focused the whole way
and we did not want to let up once we
had a lead because we know how important
it is to get that first win under your belt in the
tournament. Our defense was good, especially
in the second half we just wanted to pressure
their ball handlers and create as much turnovers
as possible and we were able to do that.”

momentum in the second.

The Gems lead reached 20 for the first
time on a pair of free throws by Analicia
Ferguson and capitalized on a stagnant
Electro Telecom offense.

They took a 47-20 lead into the half.

With one player sidelined by injury
and another pair fouled out early in the
third quarter, the Cybots were able to

— Gems’ Analicia Ferguson

field just four players for much of the
second half.

The Gems took their largest lead of
the game on a runner by Royel Brown
late in the third to take a 62-32 advan-
tage.

Electro managed to shave just two
points from the substantial margin and
trailed 65-40 heading into the final peri-



ow out Cybots, 80-51

od.

The fourth quarter featured much of
the same as the Gems’ reserves contin-
ued to compound the advantage over a
listless and depleted Cybots lineup.

Sharpshooting guard Jesheena Pinder
led the Gems with 18 points, Latonya
Hamilton added 13 while Ferguson and
Ariel Brown finished with 10 points
apiece.

Tracey Lewis led the Cybots with 17
points.

Ferguson said her team’s goal was to
jump out early and make a statement in
the first game of the tournament.

“We were just focused the whole way
and we did not want to let up once we
had a lead because we know how impor-
tant it is to get that first win under your
belt in the tournament,” she said. “Our
defense was good, especially in the sec-
ond half we just wanted to pressure their
ball handlers and create as much
turnovers as possible and we were able
to do that.”

The men’s division of the BBF Round
Robin also began play yesterday, how-
ever the results were unavailable up to
press time last night.



PAGE 10, SATURDAY, APRIL 25, 2009

TRIBUNE SPORTS



SPORTS



' 5 5
it
LL it Ss

NIKOLAY DAVYDENKO, of Russia, returns the ball to Czech Republic's Radek Stepanek during their Barcelona Open Tennis tournament match
in Barcelona, Spain, on Friday. Davydenko won 6-7, 6-2, 6-2.

(AP Photos: Manu Fernandez)

Davydenko to face Nadal
in Barcelona Open semis

BARCELONA, Spain (AP) — Third-
seeded Nikolay Davydenko rallied for a
6-7 (4), 6-2, 6-2 victory over Radek
Stepanek on Friday to reach a Barcelona
Open semifinal against Rafael Nadal.

Fourth-seeded David Ferrer and Fer-
nando Gonzalez of Chile will meet in the

other semifinal.

Davydenko recovered from mistakes
early in the first set, but wasted three set
points as Stepanek used crafty net play to
frustrate to force the tiebreaker. Stepanek
then hit one of his seven aces to secure

the first set.

But the Czech player then crumbled
behind a slew of unforced errors, and
Davydenko broke to take a 3-2 lead and
then used another break to clinch the

second set.

Davydenko used strong returns to
break twice more in the third to set up a
meeting with the top-ranked Nadal.

Nadal, who has a 3-2 record against
Davydenko and 2-0 on clay, reached the
semifinals without having to play Friday,
after quarterfinal opponent David Nal-
bandian withdrew on Thursday with a

right hip injury.

The Spaniard is vying to follow up his
fifth straight Monte Carlo Masters trophy
with a fifth straight title at Barcelona.

The fifth-seeded Gonzalez defeated
No. 2 Fernando Verdasco 6-3, 4-6, 6-4,
and Ferrer beat Tommy Robredo 6-3, 6-

4in an all-Spanish match.

Ferrer, who reached last year's final,
won 43 of 61 service points and broke

his Davis Cup teammate once in each

set.

in Barcelona, Spain, on Friday...

RAFAEL NADAL, of Spain, during a training session during a Barcelona Open tournament match



McDaniels: Broncos likely
to stand pat in Round 1

m@ By ARNIE STAPLETON
AP Sports Writer



ENGLEWOOD), Colo. (AP)
— The private workout that
general manager Brian Xanders
and offensive coordinator Mike
McCoy had with USC quarter-
back Mark Sanchez in Los
Angeles will likely be the last
time the strong-armed passer
practices for the Denver Bron-
cos.

Coach Josh McDaniels sug-
gested as much Friday when he
said he doubts the Broncos
would move into the top 10 in
the NFL draft and he unequiv-
ocally dismissed the notion of
trading both of his first-round
picks to make a move for any
top-tier player.

The Broncos own the 12th
and 18th selections Saturday
and they might have to move
ahead of Seattle at No. 4 to
have a shot at Sanchez.

"I think we're in a great
spot,” McDaniels said. "I think
we have an opportunity to get
two players right away that can
impact our team.”

But the Broncos would cer-
tainly be tempted to move up if
Sanchez starts to slip down the
board — so long as it doesn't

involve both of their first-round
picks. "We won't do that,”
McDaniels said. "We won't
trade 12 and 18 to move up."

After trading Pro Bowl quar-
terback Jay Cutler to Chicago
earlier this month, the Broncos
were intrigued enough by
Sanchez to fly out for a private
workout and interview with him
in Los Angeles on Tuesday.

McDaniels had to skip the
meeting because of a migraine
headache, his second since tak-
ing over as Broncos coach three
months ago.

"I think it's more about
hydration and the altitude,”
McDaniels said. "I had them
when I was younger, but noth-
ing wrong neurological, they
checked me out and I'm fine."

Although the Broncos liked
what they saw in Sanchez, "I
don't think we would do a lot of
moving up from where we're at
at 12," McDaniels said. "Maybe.
There's a possibility. But I think
we feel pretty comfortable with
where we're at."

The Broncos have 10 picks
this weekend, and McDaniels
wouldn't mind trading down in
any round to stockpile more
selections as he retools a team
that hasn't reached the playoffs

since 2005. And, as Cutler
learned this spring, McDaniels
will pick up the phone and listen
to any trade proposal.

"We're not going to turn our
head from any opportunity to
go back, go up," McDaniels
said.

The beginning of the end of
Cutler's time in Denver came
Feb. 28, when McDaniels talked
about trading Cutler for Matt
Cassel. Although the deal nev-
er materialized, it led to a six-
week feud that ended with Cut-
ler going to Chicago for Kyle
Orton and a bevy of draft picks.

McDaniels said that while the
Broncos really like Sanchez,
they also feel good about Orton
and free agent Chris Simms.

"He's a good quarterback.
We have two good quarter-
backs," McDaniels said. "And I
think that's ultimately what
we're going to finalize today,
before tomorrow morning, and
we'll make sure that we feel one
way or the other about it.

"But I Know this: we feel
comfortable with the guys we
have. They performed well at
the minicamp. Nobody in this
building is afraid to move for-
ward and play the season with
them."

Xanders and McDaniels, who
signed an NFL-high 16 unre-
stricted free agents, have the
ammo to move up if they want
to: they own five picks in the
first 84 selections.

Of course, the Broncos, like
many teams, are leery of the
multimillion-dollar guarantees
for top-10 picks, and this is a
franchise that began laying off
front-office staff long before the
economic downturn picked up
steam.

Whether or not it’s a premier
passer, the Broncos want to
come out of the weekend with a
third quarterback to compete
with Orton and Simms.

They also need plenty of help
on defense, where they're
switching to a 3-4 scheme
instead of the four-man front
favored by former coach Mike
Shanahan.

The Broncos aren't antici-
pating having to draft a wide
receiver. They haven't heard
from the commissioner's office
regarding possible punishment
for Pro Bowler Brandon Mar-
shall over his latest run-in with
the law, an arrest for fighting
with his fiance in March, leading
them to believe he won't be fac-
ing a lengthy suspension.

Man U looking
to avoid slip-up
against Spurs

m@ By STUART CONDIE
AP Sports Writer

LONDON (AP) — Man-
chester United's players saw
Liverpool and Chelsea slip up
in their pursuit of the Premier
League title this week and
now must avoid a stumble of
their own against Tottenham
on Saturday.

United beat Portsmouth on
Wednesday to go three points
clear at the top of the stand-
ings after Liverpool and
Chelsea both drew their mid-
week games.

But the Red Devils are
only just emerging from their
own period of shaky form,
which included back-to-back
Premier League losses and
elimination from the FA Cup
semifinals, and could be vul-
nerable at Old Trafford
against a Tottenham side
unbeaten in six Premier
League games against the top
four this season.

Spurs, who beat both Liver-
pool and Chelsea this season,
have won six of their past
eight matches to move from
the verge of the relegation
zone and into contention for
European qualification.

The north London side will
hope to have captain Ledley
King back in central defense
alongside Jonathan
Woodgate after his chronic
knee complaint kept him out
of last weekend's 1-0 win
over Newcastle.

"Our record against the top
four is impeccable but United
will put out a strong side and
it will be very tough,"
Woodgate said.

Players

One of those players could
be Ryan Giggs, who would
make his 800th appearance
for the club. Giggs set up the
opening goal in Wednesday's
2-0 win, while fellow veteran
Paul Scholes may also play
again after making the second
goal for Michael Carrick in
his 600th club match.

The pair's guile could be
crucial against a team increas-
ingly hard to break down.

After five consecutive
home games without conced-
ing, Tottenham is trying hard
to replicate its form at White
Hart Lane in away matches.

Spurs have conceded just
five goals in their last 15
home games — and nine all
season — suggesting they
could beat the club record of
11 in a season set back in
1919-20.

"We've done well in the
games that we've won 1-0,"
Woodgate said. "It's impor-

tant to keep clean sheets
because our strikers are
always going to score goals."

Liverpool is at Hull know-
ing it has to win if it is to
avoid compounding the dam-
age done to its challenge by
Tuesday's 4-4 draw with
Arsenal.

The Reds have scored 27
goals in their past eight
games to shake off their repu-
tation as one of the league's
less attractive big sides, but
have to tighten up a defense
that has been breached eight
times in two matches.

Goals

"Scoring goals is the most
difficult thing in football but
now we must sort some of the
problems we're having in
defense," Liverpool goal-
keeper Pepe Reina said.
"We've always had the bal-
ance between attack and
defense. That's why we're
always there in the Champi-
ons League and cup competi-
tions, because we are a team
with balance.

"We have to get back to
this way."

But Liverpool captain
Steven Gerrard will again be
absent because of the adduc-
tor injury he sustained against
Chelsea on April 8.

"T think he will be available
next week because he's
improving, but this game is
too soon," manager Rafa
Benitez said.

Chelsea's challenge is fad-
ing after the Blues slipped six
points off the lead with
Wednesday's 0-0 draw
against Everton, leaving the
side similarly hungry for a
win at West Ham — a side
that is also desperate for
points to keep seventh place
and likely European qualifi-
cation ahead of resurgent
Tottenham.

The Blues have a fully fit
squad other than the absent
Deco and Ricardo Carvalho.
Hiddink said he may rest
players ahead of next week's
Champions League meeting
with Barcelona.

Also Saturday, Aston Villa
is at Bolton, Manchester City
is at Everton, Stoke is at Ful-
ham and Sunderland is at
last-place West Bromwich
Albion.

If the Baggies lose, Black-
burn could end up effectively
relegating them with victory
over Wigan on Sunday, when
Arsenal hosts Middles-
brough.

Newcastle hosts
Portsmouth on Monday still
looking for a first victory
under manager Alan Shearer.

JASON TERRY celebrates at the end of a game against the Houston
Rockets in Dallas on April 15. The Mavericks won 95-84.

(AP Photo: Donna McWilliam)

Jason Terry wins NBA
sixth man award

DALLAS (AP) — Mavericks guard Jason Terry is the best

off the bench.

Terry, who took on a different role for Dallas the past two
seasons, was presented Friday with the NBA sixth man award
that goes to the league's top reserve.

While starting only 11 of his 74 games in the regular season,
Terry averaged 19.6 points and 3.4 assists while playing about

34 minutes a game.

The only time Terry had a higher scoring average was 2000-
01, his second NBA season, when he averaged 19.7 points for

Atlanta.

After starting only 27 games as a rookie, Terry started 531
of his 563 games for the Hawks and Mavericks from 2000-07.
Terry averaged 15.5 points for Dallas last season, when he start-
ed 34 times but was the only Mavericks player to get into

every game.





Categories of financial instruments

The following table analyses the carrying amounts of financial assets and financial liabilities
as defined by LAS 39 Financial Instruments: Recognition and Measurement:

2008 2007
Financial Assets

Available-for-sale financial assets $ 4,850,736 $ 6,053,546
Held-for-trading securities at FVTPL $ 5,170 $ -
Foreign currency forward contracts $91,903,468: $ 65,672,686

Loans and receivables (including cash and

due from banks) $ 8,040,294,293 §$ 7,254,484,914

Accrued interest receivable $85,239,829 $ 99,614,242
Financial Liabilities
Foreign currency forward contracts $38,439,876 $ 50,077,026

Other financial liabilities $4,979,973,713 $ 3,702,088,870

Accrued interest payable $ 12,645,685 $ 19,309,423

The following table is an analysis of financial instruments by credit quality:

2008 2007
Cash and due from banks

Neither past duc or impaired $7,023,405,792 $6,307,659,119

Available-for-sale financial assets
Neither past due or impaired $4,850,736 6,053,546

Loans and receivables

Neither past due or impaired $ 1,016,810,846 $ 946,599,101

Past due not impaired $ _77,655 $ 226,694

Financial Assets are past due when a counterparty has failed to make a payment, when the
amount is contractually due or when an overdrawn account exceeds its credit line for more
than 90 days.

Derivative Instruments

2007

Foreign currency forward contracts

Notional Amount $3,694,913,181 $2,541,477,778

Fair Value
Assets $ 91,903,468 $ 65,672,686
Liabilities 38,439,876 50,077,026

$_ 53,463,592 $ 15,595,660

CAPITAL REQUIREMENTS

The Bank is subject to the regulations of the Central Bank of The Bahamas (“Central Bank”),
These regulations, which are subject to interpretation by the Central Bank, establish guidelines
to evaluate the capital adequacy of institutions incorporated in The Bahamas. The Central
Bank has established minimum risk-based capital ratios. At December 31, 2008, the Bank’s
management is of the opinion that the Bank meets the established minimum ratios established
by the Central Bank.

ACCUMULATED OTHER PROVISIONS
Accumulated other provisions at December 31, 2008, consist of the following:

2008 2007

Guarantees issued by the Bank to related parties $1,267,075,000 $1,334,799,000
Others 6,219,234 7,379,277

$1,273,294,234 $1,342,178,277

SUBSEQUENT EVENT

As at December 31, 2008, the Bank had in custody from customers shares in the Optimal
Strategic US Equity Series of Optimal Multiadvisors Ltd and the Optimal Strategic US Equity
Ireland US Dollar Fund and the Optimal Strategic US Equity Ireland Euro Fund of Optimal
Multiadvisors Ireland ple (the “Strategic US Equity Shares”) whose value as per the November
30, 2008 NAV was 422,956,240 US Dollars and 1,704,350 Euros for the Strategic US Equity
Shares denominated in, respectively, US Dollars and Euros. The Optimal Strategic US Equity
Ireland US Dollar Fund and the Optimal Strategic US Equity Ireland Euro Fund invested all of
their assets in shares in the Optimal Strategic US Equity Series of Optimal Multiadvisors Ltd.
Optimal Multiadvisors Lid. is a Bahamian Fund whose assets corresponding to its Optimal
Strategic US Equity Series are held by and through its Bahamian trading subsidiary, Optimal
Strategic US Equity Ltd.

Optimal Strategie US Equity Ltd., in turn, had engaged Bernard L. Madoff Investment
Securities LLC (“Madoff Securities”), an entity registered as broker-dealer and investment
advisor with the Securities and Exchange Commission of the United States of America
(“SEC”) and regulated and supervised by the SEC and the Financial Industry Regulatory
Authority of the United States of America (“FINRA”), to execute its investment strategy and
had all or a substantial part of its assets deposited with and traded through Madoff Securities.

On December 15, 2008, the U.S. Federal Court for the Southern District of New York ordered
that Madoff Securities be placed into bankruptcy and simultaneously appointed a trustee to
oversee the liquidation of Madoff Securities as well as the issuance of claims against the
Securities Investor Protection Corporation (“SIPC”).

As a consequence of the foregoing events, all redemptions and the calculation of the net asset
value (the “NAV”) for the shares in the Optimal Strategic US Equity Series and the Optimal
Strategic US Equity Ireland Funds were suspended with immediate effect on, respectively,
December 15, 2008 and December 16, 2008,

In January 2009 the Bank, in view of the exceptional circumstances in the case and on the
basis of exclusively business considerations, has decided to offer a solution to its private
banking clients who have invested in the Strategic US Equity Shares. The solution consists in
an exchange in which the private banking clients of the bank are offered the possibility of
exchanging their Strategic US Equity Shares for long term subordinated securities to be issued
by Santander Group (the “Group”). The securities will have an annual remuneration of 2%
and a call by the Group from year 10. The cost to the Bank will not exceed 208,000,000 US
Dollars and 1,624,000 Euros for the exchange of Strategic US Equity Shares denominated in,
respectively, US Dollars and Euros.

The Bank has acted at all times with the due diligence in the management of its clients’
investments in the Optimal Strategic US Equity Shares and in accordance with all applicable
laws and sound banking practices and procedures with respect to those investments. The sale
of these products has always been transparent and in compliance with all applicable
regulations and established procedures.

As of March 12, 2009 the Bank is not aware of any lawsuit filed against it and connected with
the Strategic US Equity Shares. The Group is considering the initiation of the appropriate
legal actions.

Deloitte.

Deloitte & Touche

Chartered Accountants

and Management Consultants
2nd Terrace, Centreville

P.O. Box N-7120

Nassau, Bahamas

Tel: + 1 (242) 302-4800
Fax: +1 (242) 322-3101
http: //www.deloitte.com.bs

INDEPENDENT AUDITORS’ REPORT

To the Board of Directors of
Santander Bank & Trust Ltd.:

We have audited the accompanying balance sheet of Santander Bank & Trust Ltd. (the “Bank”) as at
December 31, 2008. This balance sheet is the responsibility of the Bank’s management. Our
responsibility is to express an opinion on this balance sheet.

We conducted our audit in accordance with International Standards on Auditing. Those Standards
require that we plan and perform the audit to obtain reasonable assurance about whether the balance
sheet is free from material misstatement. An audit includes examining, on a test basis, evidence
supporting the amounts and disclosures in the balance sheet. An audit also includes assessing the
accounting principles used and significant estimates made by management, as well as evaluating the
overall presentation of the balance sheet. We believe that the audit provide a reasonable basis for
our opinion.

In our opinion, the balances sheet presents fairly, in all material respects, the financial position of the
Bank as at December 31, 2008, in accordance with International Financial Reporting Standards.

Without qualifying our opinion, we emphasize that the balance sheet does not comprise a complete
sct of financial statements in accordance with International Financial Reporting Standards.
Information on results of operations, cash flows and changes in equity is necessary to obtain a
complete understanding of the financial position, performance and changes in financial position of
the Bank.

Aiclgtt. € fpucke-

March 12, 2009

A member firm of
Deloitte Touche Tohmatsu



TRIBUNE SPORTS

SATURDAY, APRIL 25, 2009, PAGE 13



SPORTS



LEGACY NATIONAL TEAM REPS — Six members of the Legacy Baseball/Softball Association were named to
National Teams to travel this summer. Shown above are Patrick Knowles, Sr, Manager of the BBF 15-16 play-
ing in the PONY Zone Championships in Puerto Rico; Aneko Knowles and Desmond Russell, both named to the
16-18 team for the Little League team going to Venezuela. Russell has also been named to the Men’s National
Team to compete in Seattle, Washington July 14th to July 27th; and right, Legacy President Stephen Burrows.

Legacy baseball/
softball heats up

NOW that the Easter holiday
is over, things are heating up in
the Legacy Baseball/Softball
Association as teams in the
baseball division jockey for wins
and position and players gear
up for this weekend’s upcom-
ing All-Star Challenges at the
YMCA beginning at 9am.

The highlight of these games
to date has been the competi-
tion between mothers and
female coaches and the Tee-
Ballers.

This year fathers, together
with male coaches, have been
added to the mix. Fathers and
coaches will take on the Coach
Pitch All Stars with the handi-
cap of having to bat from the
opposite side during the game.

Eugene Thompson, Legacy
player agent, said that the fol-
lowing considerations are in
place for the games, and coach-
es have been advised to:

a) Pay special attention to the
start and completion time for
each all star game as Legacy
wishes to showcase each divi-
sion, hence all games will be
played individually. Punctuality
is a must to enable us to com-
plete the schedule. Everyone
will be encouraged to sit and
watch the all-stars in action.

b) Contact your players
whom you recommended and
inform them of their placement
(president/ vice president) and
start time for their game.

c) All players and coaches are
to wear this year's complete uni-
form.

d) All are reminded that hats
are a required part of uniforms
and players are expected to
wear them at all games.

e) Coaches and spectators are
reminded to be on your best



PLAYERS are shown during a practice session...

behaviour, cheering on and
encouraging the players as this
is also a fundraising event and
we expect the general public to
attend these events.

f) Coaches, please allow
every all-star to play. Try to get
non-starters in as soon as possi-
ble, even if you have to use re-
entry to get the starters back in.

Thompson noted that this
event is also being used as an
evaluation for players and
coaches in terms of participa-
tion in the upcoming nationals.

Legacy president Stephen
Burrows also expressed delight
that six members of the Legacy
family have been selected to
national teams scheduled to
travel this summer.

Named to the BBF national
teams from Legacy for the 15-16
team to the Pony Caribbean
Zone Championships in San
Juan, Puerto Rico are:

¢ ANDRE TURNQUEST
and JERVIS (Champ) STU-
ART Jr. This team is scheduled
to depart July 6 and returns July
12

Named to the 16-18 Team for
the Little League Baseball Latin
American Regional Tourna-
ment in Maracaibo, Venezuela
are:
¢ DESMOND RUSSELL,
PATRICK ‘Ali? KNOWLES Jr,
ANEKO KNOWLES, and
LEON COOPER JR. This
team departs June 19 and
returns June 28.

The men’s national team to
compete in Seattle, Washing-
ton, July 14-27 includes
DESMOND RUSSELL, and
PATRICK ’Al’? KNOWLES Jr.

Selected to head teams are: -
15 -16 Team: Manager, Patrick
Knowles Sr. - GB, and Coach:
Clarence McKenzie - NP.

Heading the 16-18 Team are:
Manager: Terran Rodgers - NP;
Coach: Feleipe Sweeting - NP,
and Coach: Opie Cooper - GB.

Family and fans are asked to
support the Associations Fund
Raising Day, also on Saturday,
as funds are being sought to
assist in getting teams to the
BBF National Championships
in June.

ALL STAR TEAM MEMBERS

(1) TEEBALL ALL STAR TEAM

TEAM
BTC RED SOX

Russell, Daniel Blake, Andre Gardiner

PLAYERS Connelly
Tionate

Port Authority Dodgers Avery Basden, Jor-

Manager, Wory Gilbert, and Coach: Harry

(3) MUSTANG DIVISION ALL STARS

dan Robertson, Jayvyn Clarke
Bellevue Blue Jays
Parker, Adrian Neely, Kevin Collie
Corp. Law Marlins Morgan
Hanna, Gabriel Laing, Lashawn Grant
Rodney

Kyron

Smith, Jaylon Lord
COACHES:

Mark Gardiner, Buster Laing,
K. Brian Hanna, Ural Forbes, and Kirt Neely.

Jason Lord,

TEE BALL MOTHERS/FEMALE

COACHES TEAM

Laverne Gardiner, Leteasha Lord, Rochelle
Godet, Shurmon Clarke,

Adrienne Fawkes, Charisse Brown, Stacey
Knowles, Ricarla Neely,

Shakeva Davis, Wende Hanna, Rickelle Sey-
mour, Allison Meadows,

Suezette Basden, Antonia Johnson.

COACHES: Lavette Saint and Jackie A.
Thompson

(2) COACH PITCH ALL STAR TEAM
Legacy Marlins Camrone Meadows,
Tasimo Bullard, Ke’Adre Thompson
Alexander
Sweeting, Nathaniel Bain, D’ondre Harvey
Jahsiah
Gilbert
Legacy Blue Jays Or Xavier
Yechiel Saint, Cassidy McBride, Charles Thomp-
son,
Kyrio Con-
nolly, Robert Swain, Jr., Brent Burrows
Sherman
Hendfield
COACHES:
Eugene Thompson

Orville Saint and

COACHES/FATHERS

Wory Gilbert, Trevor Edgecombe, Steve
Meadows, Morris Bain

Brian Hanna, Buster Laing, Jason Lord, Mark
Gardiner

Ural Forbes, Sr., Kurt Neely, Wayne Basden,
Kevin McLaughlin

Harry Connelly, Charles Thompson, Chovez
McBride, Francois Burrows

PRESIDENT’S TEAM

Burger King Rockies: Orveo Saint, Bailey
McBride, Devonte Dean, Lames Pierson

Hong Kong Cuisine White Sox: Abdul Gor-
don, Leonardo Danaj Bain, Alonzo Williams,
and Courtney Moore

Jus Cool Tigers; Voshawn
Russell, Justin Beckford, Thomas Blake, Cas-
tromer Griffin, Jr.

MANAGER: Sean Russell
ES: Orville Saint/James Pierson

COACH-

VICE PRESIDENT’S TEAM

Burger King Rockies O. Yeshua Saint,
Kevion Knowles, Michael Wilson, Drenard
Delancy

Hong Kong Cuisine White Sox Trent
Rolle, Janeil Cash, Christian Bowe, Matthew
Bowe

Jus Cool Tigers Myles Green,
Chavier Grant, Floyd Giddings, Jr., Levar
Morris

MANAGER: Eugene Thompson
COACHES: Freddie Cash & Ryan Lowe

(4) BRONCO DIVISION ALL STARS

PRESIDENT’S TEAM - 12:30 PM TO 2:00
PM

Vopak Met Khalil Knowles,
Kent Parker, Dominique Kemp, Tafari Rolle

GB Shipyard Cardinals Ural Forbes, Jr.,
Maleek Perpall, D’Angelo Hopkins, Kevon Rus-
sell

Kitty’s Boutique Yankees Donovan
Cox, Quincy Grant, Jason Wood, Chris Sawyer

MANAGER: Elkino Bain.
COACHES: Roscoe Kemp/Ural Forbes, Sr.

VICE PRESIDENT’S TEAM

Vopak Mets Jonathon Johnson,
Malik Green, Marvin Roberts, John Burrows

GB Shipyard Cardinals Malik Dames,
Spencer Hepburn, Rondre Hall, Shane Booth

Kitty’s Boutique Yankees Joshua
Campbell, Liam Brown, Hilary Huyler, Joseph
Downing

MANAGER:

David Downing
COACHES: Ron Bonaventura Tony Dames





THE TRIBUNE

THE WEATHER REPORTE

5-Day FORECAST

ax

iF



Hi

ORLANDO |
High: 84° F/29°C
Low:63°F/17°C

TAMPA —

High:88°F/31°C

Low: 65° F/18°C
@

KEY WEST
High: 82° F/28° C
Low: 74° F/23°C

@

1

Shown is today's weather. Temperatures are today's
highs and tonights's lows.

Albuquerque
Anchorage
Atlanta
Atlantic City
Baltimore
Boston
Buffalo
Charleston, SC
Chicago
Cleveland
Dallas
Denver
Detroit
Honolulu
Houston

Sunny and windy. Partly cloudy and Brilliant sunshine and Mostly sunny and Mostly sunny and Clouds and sun, The higher the AccuWeather UV Indexâ„¢ number, the
windy. windy. windy. breezy. breezy and pleasant. greater the need for eye and skin protection.
. High: 82° High: 84° High: 83° High: 84°
High: 83° Low: 72° Low: 72° Low: 71° Low: 74° Low: 73° see EOE
PEE aa Eee
82°-13° F 86°-71° F High _Ht.(ft.)_ Low Ht. (ft.
. The exclusive AccuWeather RealFeel Ho an index that combines the effects of temperature, wind, humidity, sunshine intensity, cloudiness, precipitation, pressure, and Today 8:38 a.m. 2.6 2:36am. -0.1
elevation on the human body—everything that effects how warm or cold a person feels. Temperatures reflect the high and the low for the day. 856p.m. 3.3 2:31pm. -0.1
9:24am. 26 3:23am. -0.1
Statistics are for Nassau through 2 p.m. yesterday Monday To12am. 26 41i2am. 04
Temperature 10:35pm. 3.2 4:06p.m. -0.1
ABACO
4 + ahs O40 ° High SinanGbdech heen (adalah ehRee ddeednenereeaibech dees 79° F/26° C 11:03 96 5-03 0.0
e en High: 81° F/27” C LOW oe 72° F/22° C Tuesday 41-29 oa 34 4:59 oth 04
a Low: 66° F/19°C Normal high... go-FeeG
Normal low 70° F/21°C
@ WEST PALM BEACH Last year's High ....ccccsscssssseuesiene src | ONT UCI
High: 82° F/28° C ; Last year's lOW oe eeeeeeeeeeeeeeees 71° F/22° C
Low: 70° F/21°C as Precipitation _ ee ae a.m. Ly nies nal a.m.
As of 2 p.m. yesterday ....ccccccssssessscsseeeeseseeeee 0.00" unset....... 37 p.m. Moonset..... :32 p.m.
FT. LAUDERDALE FREEPORT Year to date : First Full Last New
High: 83° F/28° C @ High: 81° F/27°C Normal year to date .o...cccccccscccccccsecseesceseenees 7.05" ‘ a -
Low: 73° F/23°C Low: 64° F/18° C me
~ AccuWeather.com 2
@ i Forecasts and graphics provided by a %
MIAMI AccuWeather, Inc. ©2009 May 1 May 9 May 17. =‘ May 24
High: 84° F/29° C EL ELT HERA
Low: 70°F/21°C NASSAU SSE rene
High: 83° F/28° C oa:
‘ Low: 72° F/22°C
is 7s @
_— CATISLAND
High: 80° F/27° C
Low: 65° F/18°C
GREAT EXUMA ee
a. SAN SALVADOR
High: 81° F/27°C 5 ah. 04° EQ°
Low:72°F/22°C High: 84° F/29° C
ANDROS ; ow: 72°F / Low: 68° F/20° C
High: 86° F/30° C ‘
Low: 70° F/21°C {. a in
a
LONGISLAND
Low: 69° F/21°C
Today Sunday Today Sunday =_ MAYAGUANA
High Low W High Low W High Low W High Low W % High: 84° F/29° C
FC FIC FC FIC FC FIC FC FIC we \N Low: 70° F/21°C
Indianapolis 81/27 59/15 s 79/26 60/15 pc Philadelphia 85/29 60/15 s 89/31 62/16 s
Jacksonville 84/28 59/15 s 82/27 58/14 s Phoenix 89/31 61/16 pc 385/29 61/16 s CRO eo
Kansas City 72/22 60/15 t 74/23 5713 t Pittsburgh 84/28 58/14 s 84/28 56/13 s RAGGED ISLAND igh: . ,
Las Vegas 74/23 53/11 po 81/27 60/15 s Portland, OR 55/12 41/5 po 58/14 42/5 cee Low:72°F/22°C
Little Rock 83/28 61/16 pc 83/28 64/17 pc Raleigh-Durham 389/31 63/17 s 89/31 58/14 s Low:69°F/21°C AG
Los Angeles 70/21 5442 pe 70/21 54/12 pc St. Louis 83/28 64/17 pc 82/27 65/18 pc . .
Louisville 84/28 66/18 s 84/28 63/17 s Salt Lake City 57/13 38/3 c 56/13 41/5 c GREATINAGUA AY
Memphis 84/28 65/18 s 83/28 65/18 pc San Antonio 87/30 70/21 t 81/27 70/21 pc High:87°F/31°C
Miami 84/28 70/21 s 82/27 72/22 s San Diego 66/18 56/13 pce 65/18 56/13 pc Low 71°F22°C
Minneapolis 56/12 43/6 1 57/13 43/6 1 San Francisco 56/13 48/8 s 58/14 49/9 pc i
Nashville 84/28 64/17 $s 83/28 60/15 s Seattle 5412 42/5 pe 5915 41 pc
New Orleans 84/28 67/19 s 83/28 67/19 s Tallahassee 85/29 62/16 s 85/29 61/16 s a
New York 83/28 65/18 §s 85/29 61/16 s Tampa 88/31 65/18 s 88/31 66/18 s —
Oklahoma City 79/26 65/18 pce 77/25 62/16 t Tucson 86/30 59/15 s 82/27 52/11 s ae
Orlando 84/28 63/17 $s 84/28 63/17 s Washington, DC 86/30 64/17 s 88/31 62/16 s

High
F/C
76/24
46/7
86/30
78/25
85/29
80/26
78/25
86/30
74/23
82/27
80/26
56/13
80/26
80/26
82/27

Today

Low

F/C
48/8
37/2
60/15
61/16
56/13
61/16
52/11
60/15
49/9
56/13
70/21
41/5
53/11
66/18
70/21

WwW

—=— 1) ho eo mew eo hee me

oO

High

F/C
73/22
50/10
81/27
89/31
87/30
80/26
68/20
83/28
72/22
79/26
80/26
62/16
71/21
83/28
84/28

Sunday

Low

F/C
44/6
39/3
57/13
60/15
58/14
53/11
51/10
59/15
57/13
60/15
68/20
37/2
55/12
66/18
68/20

Ww

~ Ee Ese ben Ee coe ce Oe

bes

oO

3







i





iV INDEX TODAY

3|4|5

MODERATE

6|7

HIGH

o|1|2

LOW

4
8 | alo
V. HIGH EXT.









Acapulco
Amsterdam
Ankara, Turkey
Athens
Auckland
Bangkok
Barbados
Barcelona
Beijing
Beirut
Belgrade
Berlin
Bermuda
Bogota
Brussels
Budapest
Buenos Aires
Cairo
Calcutta
Calgary
Cancun
Caracas
Casablanca
Copenhagen
Dublin
Frankfurt
Geneva
Halifax
Havana
Helsinki
Hong Kong
Islamabad
Istanbul
Jerusalem
Johannesburg
Kingston
Lima
London
Madrid
Manila
Mexico City
Monterrey
Montreal
Moscow
Munich
Nairobi
New Delhi
Oslo

Paris
Prague

Rio de Janeiro
Riyadh
Rome

St. Thomas
San Juan
San Salvador
Santiago
Santo Domingo
Sao Paulo
Seoul
Stockholm
Sydney
Taipei

Tokyo
Toronto
Trinidad
Vancouver
Vienna
Warsaw
Winnipeg

High
F/C
90/32
59/15
64/17
67/19
69/20
94/34
85/29
64/17
70/21
67/19
68/20
70/21
70/21
66/18
63/17
72/22
77/25
85/29
106/41
43/6
86/30
81/27
66/18
60/15
50/10
68/20
68/20
60/15
85/29
60/15
81/27
101/38
61/16
67/19
66/18
88/31
82/27
57/13
66/18
86/30
82/27
95/35
79/26
54/12
72/22
84/28
102/38
59/15
59/15
70/21
79/26
100/37
69/20
84/28
82/27
91/32
81/27
86/30
73/22
55/12
64/17
73/22
73/22
61/16
78/25
86/30
55/12
68/20
62/16
46/7

ealil

Today

Low
F/C
73/22
50/10
39/3
57/13
57/13
79/26
75/23
54/12
49/9
62/16
44/6
51/10
66/18
49/9
46/7
41/5
59/15
61/16
81/27
25/-3
73/22
70/21
43/8
54/12
41/5
46/7
43/8
48/8
67/19
44/6
70/21
64/17
43/8
49/9
49/9
77/25
62/16
46/7
45/7
78/25
52/11
70/21
54/12
36/2
33/0
61/16
72/22
41/5
51/10
41/5
68/20
75/23
52/11
75/23
51/10
70/21
52/11
70/21
55/12
42/5
45/7
57/13
62/16
57/13
52/11
70/21
42/5
47/8
39/3
30/-1

PAGE 15

INSURANCE MANAGEMENT

(BAHAMAS) LIMITED. INSURANCE BROKERS & AGENTS

Worvo Gines Marine Forecast

WwW

$
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$
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pc
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$
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High
F/C
90/32
66/18
65/18
58/14
69/20
91/32
85/29
66/18
75/23
67/19
68/20
73/22
72/22
67/19
64/17
70/21
68/20
84/28
107/41
34/1
86/30
81/27
64/17
68/20
54/12
70/21
58/14
59/15
86/30
61/16
77/25
102/38
59/15
69/20
63/17
86/30
82/27
55/12
63/17
86/30
81/27
98/36
66/18
63/17
72/22
83/28
102/38
61/16
57/13
70/21
78/25
101/38
63/17
85/29
17/25
89/31
84/28
82/27
72/22
58/14
64/17
66/18
72/22
67/19
56/13
84/28
58/14
68/20
68/20
50/10

Sunday

Low
F/C
74/23
50/10
37/2
49/9
ile
78/25
76/24
52/11
52/11
63/17
44/6
52/11
69/20
48/8
46/7
37/2
55/12
58/14
80/26
19/-7
71/21
71/21
47/8
57/13
43/6
50/10
50/10
41/5
67/19
43/6
69/20
67/19
52/11
47/8
47/8
77/25
63/17
41/5
37/2
77/25
51/10
71/21
54/12
41/5
42/5
62/16
73/22
44/6
50/10
42/5
68/20
69/20
ails
76/24
51/10
73/22
52/11
69/20
56/13
43/6
46/7
48/8
61/16
52/11
49/9
67/19
42/5
47/8
41/5
32/0

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pe

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Weather (W): s-sunny, pe-partly cloudy, c-cloudy, sh-showers, t-thunder-
storms, r-rain, sf-snow flurries, sn-snow, i-ice, Prcp- precipitation, Tr-trace



WINDS WAVES VISIBILITY WATER TEMPS.
NASSAU Today: NE at 12-22 Knots 3-5 Feet 10-20 Miles 77°F
Sunday: NE at 15-30 Knots 4-6 Feet 10-20 Miles 77°F
FREEPORT Today: NE at 10-20 Knots 2-4 Feet 10-20 Miles 77°F
Sunday: NE at 12-22 Knots 3-5 Feet 10-20 Miles 77°F
ABACO Today: NE at 10-20 Knots 2-4 Feet 10-20 Miles 77°F
Sunday: NE at 12-22 Knots 3-5 Feet 10-20 Miles 77°F

Topay's U.S. FORECAST

Billings
oe
55/43)
| ed Chicago
74/49

Showers
T-storms
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Flurries
Snow
[y_Â¥] Ice

Shown are noon positions of weather systems and
precipitation. Temperature bands are highs for the day.
Forecast high/low temperatures are for selected cities.







-10s





Miami
84/70

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Warm fianfienfis

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(BAHAMAS) LIMITED. INSURANCE BROKERS & AGENTS

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PAGE 16, SATURDAY, APRIL 25, 2009 THE TRIBUNE
LOCAL NEWS

_thescene

by Franklyn G Ferguson, JP









NASSAU EVENTS CAPTURED ON CAMERA

fyceee =” CONFERMENT OF BAHAMAS ASSOCIATION OF

tion of member of the Caribbean
College of Family Physicians

esc PRIMARY CARE PHYSICIANS DESIGNATION (MCCFP)

ceremony held at the Paul Far-
quharson Convention Centre.

Among those attending was
Health Minister Dr Hubert Minnis,
a specialist in obstetrics and
gynaecology, who commended
the organisation on its endeavour
to recognise and advance the
cause of family medicine locally
and throughout the region.

He said the role of family medi-
cine is to reduce the rate of
chronic non-communicable dis-
eases in the Bahamas.

Also attending was Dr Pauline
Williams-Green, president of the
Caribbean College of Family
Physicians, who gave the princi-
pal address.

The BAPCP was formed in
October 2006 as the local chapter
of the Caribbean College of Fami-
ly Physicians (CCFP).


























































































1. (I-r) DR Pauline Williams-
Green, president of Caribbean
College of Family Physicians; for-
mer Governor General Dame Dr
lvy Dumont, patron of BAPCP;
Minister of Health Dr Hubert Min-
nis; Dr Carnille Farquharson,
president of BAPCP.

2. PHYSICIANS who received
the designation MCCFP certificate
are pictured from left to right —
Dr Mortimer Moxey (GP); Dr
Mystee Spencer-Prince (FM); Dr
Gertrude Holder (FM); Dr
Chineyere Carey-Bullard (FM); Dr
Sharmaine Butler (FM); Dr C Gra-
ham Cates (FM): Dr Carnille Far-
quharson (FM): Dr Carla Bethel
(FM); Dr Alexya Dorsette-
Williams (FM); Dr Cherilyn Han-
na-Mahase, immediate past pres-
ident of the BAPCP, and Dr Fran-
cis Williams (FM). Missing is Dr
Myles Poitier (FM).

3. SHELDON Prince, a physio-
therapist at Doctors Hospital, is
shown with his wife Dr Mystee
Spencer-Prince, family physician
at Princess Margaret Hospital.

4. DR Francis Williams, family
physician at Princess Margaret
Hospital; Marcian Bethell, a mas-
sage therapist at SuperClubs
Breezes, and vice-president of
finance at Cable Bahamas Barry
Williams.



5. DR C Graham Cates, first
vice-president of BAPCP and
principal of the Family Medicine
Centre; Marva Moxey-Sawyer
interior designer; Dr Mortimer
Moxey, general practitioner and
councillor with BAPCP.

6. DR Lisa Rolle-Smith, fami-
ly medicine resident and public
relations officer of the BAPCP; Dr
Tiadra Dorsette-Williams, family
medicine resident and secretary
with the BAPCP: Dr Alexya
Williams-Dorsette, designee and
assistant public relations officer
with the BAPCP.

7. DR Carnille Farquharson,
designee and president of the
BAPCP; Dr Glen Beneby, an
anaesthesiologist and medical
adviser with the Public Hospitals
Authority.



8. DR Horizal Simmons, gen-
eral practitioner, councillor with
the BAPCP and chairman of the
Health Professionals Council; Dr
Carnille Farquharson of the Holis-
tic Family Medicine Centre locat-
ed on Tonique Williams-Darling
Highway; Health Minister Dr
Hubert Minnis, and Frances Sim-
mons.



Full Text
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=USA TODAY.

BAHAMAS EDITION

www.tribune242.com

SATURDAY, APRIL 25, 2009

Old Worl
BUR



WORLD'S MOST POPULAR WINE

Family $ ‘Suspicions
On expats shooting

Voice ideas on
motive and
identity behind
those involved

@ By ALISON LOWE
Tribune Staff Reporter
alowe@tribunemedia.net

THE family of an expatriate
financial adviser gunned-down
execution style have their “sus-
picions” about who may have
targeted him and why, accord-
ing to the head of the police’s
Homicide Unit.

However, as of yesterday
afternoon an island-wide man-
hunt by police had yet to result
in any arrests by police in con-
nection with the shooting of
Hywel Jones, said Assistant
Superintendent Leon Bethel.

Benefit
cheques
to come
on May 4

@ By NATARIO
MCKENZIE
Tribune Staff
Reporter

IT is anticipated that by
May 4, cheques will be made
available to those persons
who have qualified for
national unemployment
benefit, Labour Minister
Dion Foulkes said yester-
day.

“We are very happy and
pleased by the process that
was used by the Department
of Labour and the National
Insurance Board during the
six days of registration at the
four centres here in New
Providence, the two centres
in Grand Bahama and also
at the administrator’s office
, and National Insurance
offices throughout the Fam-
ily Islands,” Mr Foulkes said
during a press conference

SEE page 6





ah A See LOS Tt

Welsh-born Hywel Jones,
whose status is listed as “seri-
ous”, continued to fight for his
life in the Intensive Care Unit at
Doctor’s Hospital yesterday.

A gunman shot him in the
head about 10am Wednesday
in the parking lot of Britannia
Consultancy Group, an offshore
financial services company of
which he is president. The park-
ing lot is located just west of
Gambier Village.

ASP Bethel said: “He has
some family members here and
we have interviewed some of
them. They have suspicions
(about why Mr Jones was shot),
but I cannot repeat them at this
time as it may jeopardise the
success of our investigations.”

The officer emphasised that
police are “looking at all possi-
bilities” in relation to the case.

ASP Bethel said that a few
people have come forward to
offer police assistance in con-
nection with their investigation
into the matter, but they need
more help.

“We have one or two people
who have been giving us some
assistance which we appreciate,
but we are still hoping that oth-
er people will come forward to
talk to us.”

He said police strongly

SEE page 6

1

SETTING THE SCENE: Philip Davis (right), MP for Cat Island, points out the view from the 18th

hole of what will be a PGA golf course in Cat Island

@ By TANEKA THOMPSON
Tribune Staff Reporter
tthompson@tribunemedia.net

IN SPITE of a global recession, government
officials and developers broke ground yesterday
on a multi-million dollar project on Cat Island
that Prime Minister Hubert Ingraham described
as the singular significant development in the
history of the island.

The proposed world-class PGA Village golf
course and beach resort, to be developed by
the Cat Island Partners group is expected to
create over 200 construction jobs and more
than 900 permanent jobs during ongoing oper-
ations — a much welcomed “economic shot in
the arm” for the underdeveloped island.

The resort also will be a springboard for “hun-
dreds and hundreds” of job opportunities in
the area of tours, transport, souvenir and straw
production, local food, fish and marine pro-
duction, Prime Minister Ingraham said.

He urged Cat Islanders to take advantage of
the impending employment chances before they
are filled by workers from New Providence or
Grand Bahama.

“During this time of uncertainty in the
employment market, it is important that resi-

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dents here in Cat Island take up the challenge to
fill as many of these job opportunities as possi-
ble. I assure you that construction workers, idle
in New Providence and Grand Bahama, will
have a keen interest in availing themselves of
these opportunities,” he said.

The development will encompass a hotel,
casino, a golf instruction centre, 223 single fam-
ily residential lots, retail and dining areas, spa
and two 18-hole golf courses atop 1,906 acres of
oceanfront property. Government has also
agreed, subject to the completion of the appro-
priate environmental studies, the addition of a
marina component to this development at a
proposed Port Howe site.

Mr Ingraham said he believed the develop-
ment of the marina would provide for an excel-
lent opportunity to pursue the stabilization and
conservation of the historic Farquharson Plan-
tation Great House and for the safeguarding
of the adjoining historic one-room original
school house in Port Howe.

Mr Ingraham congratulated the Cat Island
Partners for keeping their commitment to the
government and people of Cat Island notwith-
standing the considerable deterioration in the

SEE page 6





NASSAU AND BAHAMEA

ISLANDS’ LEADING NEWSPAPER



Home of: oF]

extrahours

PRICE —75¢ (Abaco and Grand Bahama $1.25)

65
“BS

Distributed by: B R I S T O L

WINES & SPIRITS

© GREY GOOSE

BACARDI. | theworids ost tasting Vodka

THE PATRON

SPIRITS COMFANY



Funeral
of vendor
killed in
hit-and-run

m@ By MEGAN
REYNOLDS
Tribune Staff
Reporter
mreynolds@tribunemedia.net

FRIENDS and relations
of the popular Fox Hill
newspaper vendor, who was
knocked off his bicycle in a
hit-and-run accident last
week, will gather at St
Anselm’s Church for his
funeral this afternoon.

Humphrey “Trod” Ger-
ard Jackman, 47, lived oppo-
site St Anselm’s Roman
Catholic Church in Bernard
Road, Fox Hill, all his life,
and was well-known and
well-liked in the community
for his gentle nature, sense
of humour and abundant
creativity.

The newspaper vendor
started selling The Tribune,
The Guardian and The
Punch outside MP Fred
Mitchell’s constituency office
on the Fox Hill roundabout
when he lost his job as a chef
in the main kitchen at
Atlantis six years ago. He
saved his money to continue
culinary courses after leaving
the Paradise Island hotel.

Mr Jackman was planning
to embark on his first
gourmet cooking course in
August, but his life was cut
short when a silver Chevro-
let Equinox knocked him off
his bicycle near LW Young
Junior High School in
Bernard Road between 4am
and 6am on Thursday, April
16.



PUT

Police have recovered a
bicycle, thought to be the
bike he rode to The
Guardian office off Thomp-
son Boulevard at 4am every
morning to collect around
40 Tribunes, 20 Guardians
and the bi-weekly Punch,
and are still appealing for
witnesses to find the driver
who left him suffering at the

SEE page 6
PAGE 2, SATURDAY, APRIL 25, 2009

THE TRIBUNE



~ — a ee

LOCAL NEWS

First skate
park opens

THE Bahamas’ first skate
park will open at the YWCA
today as the centre celebrates
World YWCA Day with a
cook-out and live reggae music.

Willis Knowles from the up-
and-coming reggae band “Willis
and the Illest” promises a set
of uplifting tunes while skate-
boarding enthusiasts try out
tricks on the new ramps, and
ping pong champs battle it out
on the tables.

YWCA general secretary
Rosalie Fawkes said the demon-
strations will give just a small
taste of the variety of activities
taking place at the Young
Women’s Christian Association
(YWCA) on Dolphin Drive, off
John F Kennedy Drive, and she
hopes to draw fresh interest in
the revitalised community cen-
tre.

“One of the aims of the
World YWCA Day is to
increase the visibility and pres-
ence of the YWCA in the com-
munity, so I am hoping people
will come and learn a bit more
about it,” Ms Fawkes said.



“It’s all about service and giv-
ing back, that is what we have
been doing for 72 years.”

Activities at the “Y” include
an outreach programme for
young people at the Ranfurly
Home for Children, the Smart
Kids Academy pre-school, a
dance school, the Y Kids Club
and askate park with a quarter-
pipe, pyramid and half-pipe
constructed by local skaters
with wood donated by FYP in
Wulff Road.

Skate park manager Alex
Holden said: “We want to
develop skateboarding in the
Bahamas and provide a whole-
some service to the community.
It’s all about good, clean fun.”

The YWCA is also building
14 affordable housing units on
site which are scheduled for
completion in June.

The World YWCA day cele-
bration will be from 12pm to
5pm today and tickets are $10
for the cook-out and entertain-
ment, and will be available at
the door. All proceeds go to the
YWCA.

MAIN/SPORTS SECTION

Local News

Editorial/Letters. ..........

Pipe. 2 ofO alo

Ap ee hee ce ce reeeee teats P4



CLASSIFIED SECTION 36 PAGES



USA TODAY WEEKENDER 8 PAGES






















CLUB

SUPERDEATH



« Heineken’

al, Fail
FLYING HIGH: The Bahamas will see the opening of its first skate park at the YWCA today

service training

By Kathryn Campbell

TWENTY-FIVE employ-
ees of the Buildings Control
Division of the Ministry of
Public Works and Transport
participated in a two-day
workshop designed to
enhance customer service
skills.

Organised by the Depart-
ment of Public Service, the
workshop at the British Colo-
nial Hilton is in keeping with
the government’s programme
that aims to formulate strate-
gies for internal and external
service improvement.

The programme was imple-
mented in six key service
delivery agencies within the
public service. The depart-
ments include the Depart-
ment of Public Service, the
Passport Office, the Regis-
trar General’s Department,
the Department of Road
Traffic, the Department of

«(
3S

Physical Planning and the
Buildings Control Division in
the Ministry of Public Works
and Transport.

Topics to be covered
include leadership, how to
deliver quality customer ser-
vice and how to build a
dream team.

Facilitator Michael Pintard
told participants that the pub-
lic service needs “coura-
geous” individuals “who will
not intellectually surrender,
who will come to work with
their minds and hearts fully
engaged and prepared to
look at the structure of the
organisation, the regulations,
procedures and culture to
make suggestions on how to
change it.

“The public sector needs
creative persons who are will-
ing to engage themselves in
improving the public sector,”
said Mr Pintard.



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Leto Volunteers

receive customer

recognised
by hospital

@ By DENISE MAYCOCK
Tribune Freeport
Reporter
dmaycock@tribunemedia.net

FREEPORT - In observance
of National Volunteer Recog-
nition Day, seven healthcare
volunteers were recognised for
providing unselfish service at
the Rand Memorial Hospital on
Grand Bahama.

Medical Chief of Staff, Dr
Frank Bartlette, believes that
volunteering in the health care
system is important because it
contributes to the overall qual-
ity of patient care at the Rand.

“We have quite a few volun-
teers, and some are involved
with patient care. So in addi-
tion to seeing doctors and nurs-

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es, patients also interact with
volunteers and the benefit goes
a long way for the morale of
patients, which helps with the
overall healthcare system,” said
Dr Bartlette.

Hospital retiree Shirley
Weech, who oversees the vol-
unteer programme at the Rand,
said the programme has been
in existence for the past five
years.

Although there are seven
active volunteers, Mrs Weech
said a total of over 40 persons
have served as volunteers at the
hospital.

“Volunteer work is important
at the hospital because volun-
teers provide assistance to nurs-
es so they can focus on treating
their patients. There is always a
need for more volunteers,” she
said.

Mrs Weech, who worked with
the hospital for 40 years, has
been an exemplary community
volunteer on Grand Bahama.

After retiring from hospital
work, Mrs Weech volunteered
at the Red Cross for four years
before returning back to the
hospital as a volunteer. She has
been a hospital volunteer for
five years.

“T get a lot of satisfaction
knowing that I am helping
someone, but today everyone
wants to get paid no matter how
simple the task,” she said.

Pastor Henry Moncur, of the
Shiloh Seventh Day Adventist
Church, commended the hos-
pital volunteers for unselfishly
giving their time to those who
need it most.

He said more persons need
to lend a helping hand without
looking for remuneration.

“Volunteerism is extremely
important because that is one
of God’s purposes for us here.
We must give back to the com-
munity,” Pastor Moncur said.

He said to be a volunteer a
person must be sensitive to the
needs of individuals.

“Sadly, too many individuals
are insensitive to the needs of
others. It is good to know what
people are going through so we
can lend a helping hand and you
must reach out and show com-
passion.

“Compassion is different
from sympathy because it not
only says that you are sorry for
that person’s situation, but that
you willing to share something
tangible with them.”

Pastor Moncur said that
another component of volun-
teering is not looking for recog-
nition. “There are folks who
will not be thankful for what
you do to them, but you must
understand that when God has
touched your heart, irrespective
of whether you’re getting paid
or whether they say thanks, you
will do it simply because of your
heart.”
THE TRIBUNE

SATURDAY, APRIL 25, 2009, PAGE 3



LOCAL NEWS



Minister: | was ‘notified’
of Sandals staff lay-offs

@ By NATARIO McKENZIE
Tribune Staff Reporter

LABOUR Minister Dion Foulkes
said yesterday that he was notified by
executives of the Sandals Royal
Bahamian Resort that several man-
agers would be laid-off on Thursday.

“We were notified by Sandals that
they had intended to lay off some of
their managers and as required by the
Code of Industrial Practice, we
advised Sandals as to what they were
obligated to do under the terms of
the contract with the managers and
also pursuant to the Employment Act.

UNDER the command of }
Chief Superintendent Stephen }
Dean, officers from the Royal }
Bahamas Police and Defence }
Forces conducted raids in the }
western, southern and east- }
ern districts of New Provi-
dence, focusing primarily on }
construction sites. ;

On April 18, a raid in the }
southern part of the island }
netted 32 suspected illegal :
migrants. i

In a second exercise on }
April 21 in the western dis- }
trict, 26 suspected illegal
immigrants were apprehend- }
ed. :

According to a statement }
from the Department of }
Immigration, the officers who }
participated in the “Back to ;
Basics” operation conducted
their raids in Lyford Cay, }
Gamble Heights, Joe Far-

CONTINENTAL Air-

“It is my understanding that they
complied with all of their legal oblig-
ations to those managers who were
terminated,” Mr Foulkes said.

There are reportedly just over 20
managers remaining at the property.

Mr Foulkes said that while he has
had discussions with Sandals execu-
tives he could not disclose the reason
behind the lay-offs.

According to Sandals’ public rela-
tions department, five managers were
let go as part of a restructuring exer-
cise aimed at streamlining operations
in these challenging economic times.

The lay-offs come just four months

ed to travellers as destina-

after 150 employees were made
redundant. At a press conference at
the Clarence A Bain Building yester-
day, Mr Foulkes said that he is not
aware of plans for any further lay-
offs.

“We have no notice of any further
impending lay-offs in the hospitality
sector or any other sector for that
matter,” Mr Foulkes said.

He said that the question of whether
managers will be unionised has not
been discussed with his ministry.

Line staff at Sandals are represent-
ed by the Bahamas Hotel Catering
and Allied Workers Union.



Tourism & Aviation Minister
meets with Continental Airlines

sales based at Continental



DION FOULKES was notified by execu-
tives of the Sandals Royal Bahamian
Resort that several managers would be
laid-off.

PICTURED (I-r) are: Rigoberto
Alverenga, director of sales for
the Caribbean; Minister Van-
derpool-Wallace; Ms Rodgers,
Freddy Rodriquez, sales man-
ager for the Caribbean, and
Tyrone Sawyer, director of air-
lift development with the Min-
istry of Tourism and Aviation.

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a
2
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HANNAH MONTANA MOVIE

THE FAST AND THE FURIOUS
MONSTERS VS. ALIENS

THE HAUNTING IN CONNECTICUT

rington Road, Yamacraw, and }

Winton Heights.

Of the last 26 persons }
apprehended, 23 were Hait- i
ian men, with one Haitian }
woman and two Jamaican }

men.

The persons who were dis- ;
covered to be without status }
are expected to be repatriated }

sometime next week.

lines executives got a close
look at the Ministry of
Tourism’s vision for pro-
moting individual islands of
the Bahamas on Wednes-
day when they paid a cour-
tesy call on Minister of
Tourism and Aviation Vin-
cent Vanderpool-Wallace.
In a stimulating and cor-

tions in their own right.
He also discussed oppor-
tunities to provide better
airlift access, and updated
the airline’s team on the
government’s unfolding
initiative to make airlift to
the Bahamas much more
attractive for both cus-
tomers and airline part-

Airlines’ headquarters in
Houston, Texas.

FOR 3 IN 1 LAWN SERVICE
Fertilizer, Fungicide,
IA aH
Tropical Exterminators
322-2157

0 In brief

Grenada
plans to ban
smoking in
public areas

m@ ST GEORGE'S, Grenada

THE CARIBBEAN island

? of Grenada has agreed to ban
? smoking from all public places,
? including beaches, parks and
? bus terminals, according to the
? Associated Press.

Authorities expect to place

: signs on government buildings
? by June as a reminder.

Community health director

; Christine La Grenade said
: Wednesday that she hopes the
i private sector will embrace a
: similar policy.

The ban has been approved

? only by Cabinet members so it
? does not yet carry any penal-
? ties. Legislators are expected
: to approve the proposal later
: this year.

No one has publicly opposed

? it. It is unknown how many of
? Grenada's 91,000 people
? smoke. Anti-narcotics director
? James Roderique said smoking
i is most common among
? teenagers, but that they prefer
? marijuana over cigarettes.

ea LS

eu an oe ROSETTA



MA
eels a:a5_| NA | 60s | e:30 | 10:40

FIGHTING




new) 110 | s40 | WA | 600 | 828 | 1018

vaca» [a0 [ao [ wa | e20 | eas | 1020]
wna vo [as [wn | os [2 | re
2s |

HANNAH MONTANA MOVIE

THE FAST AND THE FURIOUS T

380-FLIX

dial exchange, Minister
Vanderpool-Wallace
explained that the individ-
ual islands will be present-

ners.
The Continental Airlines

team was led by Christy

Rodgers, senior director of

The Immigration Depart- }
ment said it expects to inten- }
sify its efforts in this opera-
tion in the coming weeks.

Mother's Day § Ve
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Experience with information systems, computer systems and network
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Nassau, Bahamas
PAGE 4, SATURDAY, APRIL 25, 2009

EDITORIAL/LETTERS TO THE EDITOR

THE TRIBUNE





The Tribune Limited

NULLIUS ADDICTUS JURARE IN VERBA MAGISTRI
Being Bound to Swear to The Dogmas of No Master

LEON E. H. DUPUCH, Publisher/Editor 1903-1914

SIR ETIENNE DUPUCH, Kt, O.B.E., K.M., K.C.S.G.,

(Hon.) LL.D., D.Litt.

Publisher/Editor 1919-1972
Contributing Editor 1972-199]

EILEEN DUPUCH CARRON, C.M.G., M.S. B.A., LL.B.

Publisher/Editor 1972-

Published Daily Monday to Saturday

Shirley Street, PO. Box N-3207, Nassau, Bahamas
Insurance Management Building., P.O. F-485, Freeport, Grand Bahama

TELEPHONES
Switchboard (News, Circulation and Advertising) 322-1986
Advertising Manager - (242) 502-2352
Circulation Department - (242) 502-2387
Nassau Fax: - (242) 328-2398
Freeport, Grand Bahama: 1-(242)-352-6608
Freeport fax: (242) 352-9348

WEBSITE
www.tribune242.com — updated daily at 2pm

Obama walks thin line on interrogations

WASHINGTON (AP) — Barack Obama,
facing perhaps the trickiest political issue of his
young presidency, is trying to appease his liberal
base without losing control of a potentially
volatile inquiry into the George W. Bush admin-
istration's use of harsh interrogation tactics
against terrorism suspects.

One step to the left or right could land him in
political trouble.

If Obama seems inclined to stifle an investi-
gation and possible prosecution of Bush admin-
istration officials who approved rough interro-
gations by the CIA, he may infuriate liberal
activists who were crucial to his election. But if
Democratic lawmakers appear too zealous in
pursuing departed Republican government offi-
cials, they might be portrayed as vindictive and
backward-looking, undermining Obama's image
as a forward-looking figure of hope and
progress.

While Obama struggles to calibrate the mat-
ter, Republicans sense a possible gap in his
armour and an uncharacteristic shakiness in his
message. In the past few days, the White House
signalled that it would not support the prose-
cution of Bush administration lawyers who had
justified the interrogation tactics, which Obama
has likened to torture. Later, Obama said the
attorney general should make such decisions.

On Tuesday, Obama said he wanted to look
forward, not back, but he would prefer an inde-
pendent commission to a complete congres-
sional investigation if a full-blown inquiry is
pursued. On Thursday, the president told con-
gressional leaders he had no interest in such a
panel, which some call a “truth commission."

The speaker of the House of Representa-
tives, Democrat Nancy Pelosi, continues to push
for such a commission with subpoena powers.
But lawmakers agree that the idea is probably
dead, at least for now.

That leaves hearings in the hands of House
and Senate committees, which Democrats con-
trol. The House Judiciary Committee, chaired
by Democratic Rep. John Conyers, has an espe-
cially large number of sharply partisan Democ-
rats and Republicans, who could produce tele-
vised fireworks and unpredictable results.

Terry Holt is among the Republican strate-
gists who think Obama and his allies will suffer
because the scenario is apt to look more like a
witch hunt than a sober search for justice.

"It would be a total circus and be complete
chaos and expose them to terrible risk," Holt
said. "Obama's political strength is based on
the notion that he is the future, moving for-

Position WANTED:
REGISTERED NURSE

ward. I felt Obama's first instinct was the correct
one: to let this stuff go." Democrat Dianne
Feinstein says the effort will take months, which
might allow the issue to cool down a bit.

It is red hot for now, however. Liberal
groups, blogs and Web sites are demanding full-
bore inquiries and possible prosecutions of the
lawyers and officials who justified the tactics.

Those tactics included 11 days of sleep depri-
vation for some detainees and repeated water-
boarding, an ordeal that simulates drowning.

Recently released memos from the Justice
Department "provide shocking confirmation of
high-level involvement in the sadistic interro-
gation methods the Bush administration autho-
rised the CIA to use on detainees," the Amer-
ican Civil Liberties Union says on its Web site.
"It is indefensible to avoid investigating and
prosecuting those responsible for these heinous
crimes."

Liberal talk show host Ed Schultz said this
week on MSNBC that many liberal Democrats
"want to see prosecution. Does the president
just ignore them?" After 2,000 viewers texted
their opinions, Schultz said, "Ninety-four per
cent want to see Bush officials prosecuted."

The White House is walking a careful line.
On one hand, Obama cannot spurn his liberal
backers too often, and he already has disap-
pointed them on issues such as sending more
troops to Afghanistan.

But the president also cannot afford to let
Republican strategists portray the CIA inter-
rogations matter as a case of Democratic over-
reaching, perhaps comparable to the GOP's
strategic overreach in impeaching then-President
Bill Clinton. Matt Bennett, vice president of
the moderate-Democratic group Third Way,
said the potentially unconstitutional actions of
the Bush administration officials require looking
into. But he is wary of a potentially partisan
food fight if congressional committees alone
conduct the investigations.

"If this were to proceed," Bennett said, "the
best model is the 9/11 Commission, with unques-
tionably responsible leaders, like Lee Hamil-
ton." Hamilton, a former Democratic lawmak-
er from Indiana, co-chaired the highly regarded
commission that investigated the Sept. 11, 2001,
terror attacks.

But Obama threw cold water on the inde-
pendent commission idea Thursday. That leaves
Congress, and the nation, with an unclear path
on how to pursue a combustible question.

(This article was written by Charles Babing-
ton of the Associated Press).





A Major Development in Southwest New Providence is
seeking a full time on-site registered nurse. The nurse
will be responsible for non-critical incidents/accident
to provide the necessary first aid and first responder
treatment.

Duties include but not limited to:-

Stabilization of any injured person/s until
they can be transferred to a clinic or
hospital facilities for complete evaluation
by a doctor.

Administer drug and alcohol testing to
construction and company staff if required.

Complete any reports required by in house
and relevant government agencies
regarding injuries or incidents on site.

Suitable candidates must have full medical liability
insurance coverage, be technically trained and
a Ministry of Health approved/certified medical
professional with at least five (5) years experience in the
medical field. Emergency room experience is a plus.

Salary is commensurate with qualifications and
experience. Interested persons may send resume to
P.O. Box SP-63158





Strengthen
marriage as
social pillar

EDITOR, The Tribune.

There is no doubt that the
basic and fundamental social
fabric of The Bahamas has long
gone to the dogs and is beyond
any norm and probably now the
root cause of the majority of
our social problems.

Month after month we hear
about forums, seminars, etc,
focusing on the social fabric of
our country and from the top
to the bottom we hear com-
ments, so-called ‘learned’ which
are nothing more than the con-
tinued repeat of the cause of
the troubles we are faced with;
it is as if we try desperately to
propagate the cancer killing us.

Any analysis of the so-called
social fabric confirms that we
have a society which is primar-
ily unnatural in composition and
we who comprise this are total-
ly disillusioned but profess first-
ly to be a so-called Christian
nation which requires the
upholding of the primary Faith
and belief in the Ten Com-
mandments and the norm of
social behaviour.

Again last week, so the tele-
vision news reported we saw the
Minister of Social Develop-
ment, Hon Loretta Butler Turn-
er followed quickly by Dr Keva
Bethel commenting on Bahami-
an social behaviour and neither
acknowledged the root cancer
nor the obvious requirement to
start what is a long road back to
normality in our society and
bring social pride in our peo-
ple.

Social analysts even in the US
looking at the social well-being
of Afro-Americans have for a
long time supported and advo-
cated that the norm of parent-
ing solely in a marriage union
not only to abide by basic Chris-
tian belief but for economic rea-
sons gives even the lowest in
the social class a chance to sur-

LETTERS

letters@tribunemedia net



vive — a mother on her own
striving to feed, educate and
bring up two, three or more sin-
gle parented children is grossly
disadvantaged against the con-
trast of the norm of a dual par-
ent home with two incomes.

The facts speak for them-
selves that no one has the guts
to compromise the cancer we
have and how we have today
totally accepted child-bearing
outside of the norm of a mar-
riage union is socially accepted
and socially acceptable period.

If the minister, the church
and civic leaders do not awaken
to the required change then
only they will carry the
inevitable that our Bahamas will
remain a third world nation
embroiled in an abnormal soci-
ety solely interested in the flesh
and no moral and ethical basis
of a normal society.

The total refusal of the
church to teach and chastise the
continual programmed single
parenting is beyond any under-
standing that the church, per se,
actually stands for the moral
authority of the command-
ments. The church leaders seem
to worry more about the col-
lection plate than teaching the
truth and the Christian belief
as they see they will step and
crunch too many exposed toes.

The blood of our failed soci-
ety is on the hands of the past
politicians and church leaders.

One pregnancy outside of
marriage might be acceptable
but when women have three-
four-five children outside of the
marriage union, sorry we have
gone far too far laughing in
God’s face and the proclaimed
commandments and Christian

Saddened
vendor’s

EDITOR, The Tribune.

What a sad day for me today
as I drove by the Fox Hill
Parade and did not see the
familiar face of the shy, smil-
ing, gentleman who sells The
Tribune in front of the Nation-
al Insurance Building.

eV ihe

INDUSTRIES LTD.

WILL BE CLOSED For
ANNUAL STOCKTAKING

THURSDAY, APRIL 23
FRIDAY, APRIL 24
SATURDAY, APRIL 25

We regret any
inconvenience this will
cause to our customers.

I saw a picture and a large
bow on the telephone pole
where he used to sit so I parked
my car to inquire about him
only to be told that he had been
hit and killed by a hit- and-run
driver on his way to "his spot"
to sell his newspapers.

I wonder how the driver that
hit him and left him to die
would feel if that were their
brother, mother, father or child.
Perhaps he could have been

belief.

A recent speech on education
acknowledged that there is a
connection between single par-
enting and the continual nega-
tive examination results and the
unacceptable level of education,
especially if you look at our
national education investment
now of billions of tax dollars
against the return — one can
only describe that as dismal toa
failing grade and an horrific
misuse of tax payers money.

Some contend and there is a
strong argument to this that suc-
cessive governments have inten-
tionally by design allowed for
this social cancer to grow and
grow as with poverty, educa-
tional ignorance political power
remains in the hands of those
who can manipulate to stay in
power. Why has successive
majority governments seeming-
ly had fiscal and financial poli-
cies to control the creation of
wealth? Solely again to control
the people and control where
they will vote.

We have to start now to cause
over the coming 40-60 years to
turn the clock back to the
acceptable Christian and even
Islamic belief in the sole privi-
lege of procreation in and exclu-
sively in marriage — marriage I
must state of man and woman.

Minister Loretta Butler Turn-
er and Dr Keva Bethel are
totally and absolutely wrong in
their approach — their
approach for the continuance
of the mess and cancer we have
is tantamount to endorsing sin-
gle parenting which any truthful
social analyst will confirm is not
normal, immoral and the cancer
that has eaten the total fabric
of the once proud Christian and
moral society of our nation.

J MOORE
Nassau,
April, 2009.

over
eath

saved if someone could have
helped him. What goes around,
comes around.

We will all miss him because
he was a special part of Fox
Hill. My sympathy to his family
and friends. He will be so
missed.

D. KNOWLES
Nassau,
April 23, 2009

Standing by
wall’s impact

EDITOR, The Tribune.

Thank you for publishing my
thoughts. You are right I was
not born when all this occurred
and Iam elated I was not. You
try to portray me as a racist or
as a product of some warped
political landscape. You say
people like me are keeping the
Bahamas from being this utopia
of unity. [say BS.

My grandfather was killed
because of that wall. I have
been reading your tabloid for
sometime now, and I say
‘tabloid’ because anyone with
any sense or the slightest intel-
ligence can see through your

feeble attempts to coerce public
opinion with the type of trash
you guys write.

I thought you knew better
than most that the truth is not in
your files stashed in your
archives, but rather it’s what the
masses believe as truth and right
now the masses believe that the
Collins wall is the symbol of
racial division for the Bahamas
and no matter how ridiculous
you try too make me look, that
is the facts.

AARON ROBERTS
Nassau,
April 23, 2009.

PUBLIC NOTICE

INTENT TO CHANGE NAME BY DEED POLL

The Public is hereby advised that |, KRYSTLE IRENE
JOHNSON of Sandilands Village, P.O. Box N-4447, Nassau,

Bahamas intends to change my name to KRYSTLE IRENE
FINLAYSON. If there are any objections to this change of
name by Deed Poll, you may write such objections to the
Chief Passport Officer, PO.Box N-742, Nassau, Bahamas
no later than thirty (30) days after the date of publication of
this notice.


THE TRIBUNE

SATURDAY, APRIL 25, 2009, PAGE 5



Exuma hosts Miss Bahamas Universe On brief

EXUMAV’S economy received
a welcome boost as the island
hosted the contestants of the
Miss Bahamas Universe compe-
tition last weekend.

It is just under a month to go
before the country crowns the
new Miss Bahamas Universe.

Last weekend all 17 contes-
tants touched down at the Moss
Town International Airport in
Exuma where they received a
warm welcome from the island’s
youth marching band.

They were also the special
guests at a welcome reception
courtesy of the Ministry of
Tourism and February Point
Resorts.

The island of Exuma came
alive as they watched contestants
give it their all in the swimsuit
and spokesmodel competitions
held at the Four Seasons Resort.

One by one the bevy of beau-
ties strutted their stuff on the
runway.

Following the big showdown,
some of the girls spoke with the
press about their performance
on stage.

Miss New Providence Ronnell
Armbrister said, “I've been
working very hard to get in
shape for the swimsuit competi-
tion, but for the spokesmodel
competition I feel I was really
impressive.”

Miss Freeport Sharie Delva
said: “Everyone here is ready
and very excited about the com-

MISS Bahamas Universe contestants take part in photo shoots during the pageant’s preliminary competitions in Exuma.

petition.

Another contestant, Miss
Deadman’s Cay Alyssa Knowles
said she believes her passion for
the country came through
strongly.

The audience showed their
support for each contestant with
loud cheers as they paraded one
by one onto the stage. The high-
light of the night was the
spokesmodel segment — all 17
beauties were given the oppor-
tunity to present a 30 to 60 sec-
ond commercial on why tourists
should come to the Bahamas

and what islands they must see.

The pageant’s director of cor-
porate affairs Robert Pinder said
he is pleased with the success of
the event so far and the over-
whelming support that has come
from various companies on the
island.

Exuma Tours provided the
transportation and Charlie's
Restaurant gave the girls ‘down-
home’ meals as they hosted
them following the competitions.

The Four Seasons and Febru-
ary Point provided accommoda-
tions for the organisation and

Western Air flew in all the par-
ticipants from Nassau.

Acting general manager of the
Exuma tourism office Petheri-
na Hanna said the event gave
Exuma a “great” economic
boost.

“(n) these economic chal-
lenging times, things are a little
abnormal here because we are
used to a really, really, high qual-
ity of life, and in the last few
months in the world we have
been feeling it, so with the music
fest that just ended and now the
Miss Bahamas swimsuit compe-



tition and then the 56th Family
Island Regatta, they're all great
examples of domestic tourism
and the ministry of tourism
encourages that.”

The next competitions, cos-
tume and talent, are scheduled
for May 17. Scores from both
events added to the judge's inter-
view on May 23 will determine
the top 12 contestants.

Winners of each category will
be announced during the finals
of the Miss Bahamas Universe
Pageant on May 24 at the Wyn-
dham Nassau Resort.

2 -New Puerto

Rican port
scheduled

: to open

next year

| MIPONCE, Puerto Rico

LOCAL officials say a

i new port will generate

about 5,000 jobs when it
opens in southern Puerto
Rico next year, according

to the Associated Press.

Ponce mayor Maria

Melendez says that a
? group of U.S. and South
: Korean investors, known

as UCW America, plan to

start hiring port adminis-
? trators in January

They will spend $48 mil-

lion on roads to the har-
: bour.

Melendez on Wednes-

i day said the $600 million
? Port of the Americas will
i be one of the region's

i largest seaports.

Originally due to open

? in 2006, it will compete

i with existing ports in

? Jamaica, the Bahamas and
? the Dominican Republic.

WHY YOU VEX¢



@ By TANEKA THOMPSON
Tribune Staff Reporter
whyyouvex@tribunemedia.net

“T vex at so many buses filled
with passengers who take short-
cuts through the residential
areas off Baillou Hill Road try-
ing to avoid the long lines
before getting to Mall at
Marathon. There seems to be
no law for them, they speed
over speed bumps, overtake
other buses and put children,
elderly persons and others in
serious danger.

“Should they not be on the
main streets only? Nothing will
be done until someone gets
kill.”

-DH

“T vex because for the past
two Tuesdays I've missed my
favourite show on channel 43
because some cable channels
were without sound. The first
week I was on hold for almost
40 minutes, with 22 callers
ahead of me, trying to find out
what was going on.

“This week I had a shorter
wait as there were only three
callers ahead of me, thankfully.
What's really going on Cable
Bahamas? Am I going to miss
my Spm programme this com-
ing Tuesday too? Will I ever
see and hear it again?”

- VEX “REAPER”
WATCHER

“T vex that every time I go
into my favourite lunchtime
restaurant the girls behind the
counter act like I do them
something. Particularly in a
location where there is a popu-
lar shopping centre, I have wit-
nessed other customers get stink
stares, and the girls grumble
when they ask for orders. On
top of this stinkness, half the
time I bite into my food the
bread is so hard and dry I won-
der why I keep going back.

“T even went to another loca-
tion (of this restaurant chain)
and saw that someone had post-
ed an internal memo, begging
employees to smile and be nice,
in plain view of customers. I
wish more of these owners
would send in friends or family

as mystery customers so they
can see how no good and slack
their employees are because I
didn’t ask for a side of attitude
with my food.”

- SICK OF SUB-STAN-
DARD SERVICE.

“T vex because a big hole in
the road burst my tyre last night
right by Caves Village and that
hole been there for a long time.
I mean sometimes driving on
these streets is like ducking and
dodging - when you miss one,
another one right there to get
you.

“Everywhere you go the
roads dig right up, and it seems
like they worse off than before.
The government say they doing

this expansive road improve-
ment project but it seems like
these streets getting worser and
worser - but right now my main
concern is if the government ga’
pay for me to get a new tyre,
man.”

- PEEVED AT
POTHOLES.

e Are you vex? Send your com-
plaints to whyyouvex@tribuneme-
dia.net

TROPICAL
EXTERMINATORS

RR UE
PHONE: 322-2157



ROAD TRAFFIC DEPARTMENT
PUBLIC NOTICE

The American Embassy is presently considering applications
for the following position:

MAINTENANCE CRAFTSMAN

Performs a wide range of skilled maintenance, minor construction and
repair work on U.S. Government-owned buildings and equipment; and
other work relevant to infrastructural and facility maintenance. Completes
assigned work orders and is directly supervised by the Maintenance
Foreman.

This position 1s open to candidates with the following qualifications:

- Completion of High School 1s required.
- Five years of craft work, including carpentry, mechanical, minor
electrical and yard maintenance. Laborer experience required.

PERSONALATTRIBUTES:

- Good working knowledge of painting, masonry, dry-wall, plumbing and
carpentry required.

- Ability to use all equipment and tools related to craft work including
cutting, wood fitting, finishing, plumbing, screw drivers and mechanical
and electrical fitting.

BENEFITS PROVIDED INCLUDE:

The successful candidate will be offered an excellent compensation package
including performance-based incentives, medical and dental insurance, life
insurance, pension and opportunities for training and development.

Applicants must be Bahamian citizens or U.S. citizens who are eligible for
employment under Bahamian laws and regulations.

Application forms are available online at Nassau.usembassy.gov.

Please e-mail or fax applications to the Human Resources Office no later
than May 4, 2009 to: Adamsrc@state.gov or Fernanderra@state.gov or
fax: 328-8251. Applications will not be accepted at the Security Gate of
the Embassy. Absolutely no telephone calls will not be accepted.

ALL FRANCHISE HOLDERS

In accordance with the Road Traffic Act Chapter 220
Statue Laws of the Bahamas, the imspection and
licensing of All Public Service vehicles will be
carried out in New Providence and the Family
Island’s beginning Friday, I*t May thru Friday, 29
May, 2009.

Owners and Operators of these vehicles must ensure
that the total numbers of vehicles covered by their
franchise are presented for Inspection and

Licensing.

Further, all franchise holders must produce the
following documents for Licensing and Inspection:

Valid Insurance
Valid Business License
Grant Letter

Franchise Payment Receipt

Bank Certified Cheque or Major Credit
Card (Only)

CONTROLLER


PAGE 6, SATURDAY, APRIL 25, 2009

THE TRIBUNE



LOCAL NEWS

Cat Islanders QMETERGtitacbnweonnilionss

urged to seek
project jobs

FROM page one

global economic situation and
the less than bright projections
for economic recovery in the
short term.

The prime minister, who says
he does not make a habit of
travelling the country with
prospective investors, said he
made an exception in the case
of David Southward and his
partners because they assured
him that they had the financial
means and will to complete the
development, notwithstanding
the global financial crisis.

“The global economy has
performed even more poorly
than we expected then, with sig-
nificant negative impact on our
economy, particularly since Sep-
tember last year. The result has
been a measurable decrease in
visitor arrivals on our shores
and a sharp increase in unem-
ployment levels,” the prime
minister said.

Principal of Cat Island Part-
ners David Southward antici-
pates the timing of end of phase
one construction will coincide
with the end of the current glob-
al recession.

“We truly believe that in two
to three years from now as
phase one of this great project
starts to come online, we will
no longer be in a world-wide
recession at that point — so we
actually think the timing of
developing this project could-
mt be better.

“We knew that in this day
and age our consumer and cus-
tomers won’t come and buy
property at any resort until the
developers have built the
amenities and the facilities
ahead of time. So we have to
take the lead, we have to get
started,” he said.



The project will feature the
first PGA Village constructed
outside of the United States and
just the third in the world.

Cat Island was the site of a
number of plantation estates
during early colonial times and
just in the near vicinity of this
site can be seen the historic
ruins of the Farquharson, Bour-
bon and Armbrister Great
Houses.

“We meet almost in the shad-
ow of Cumo Hill, made famous
as Mount Alvernia by the
Roman Catholic hermit Father
Jerome Hawes when he built a
small chapel at its peak — the
highest point in the country.

“Cat Island is the home of
rake ’n’ scrape music, quadrille
dancing and flour cakes. It is,
nowadays, the host of two
important annual cultural
events — the Labour Day
Weekend Rake ’n’ Scrape
Music Festival and the Emanci-
pation Day Weekend Regatta,”
said Mr Ingraham.

The island is also the ances-
tral home of the internationally
acclaimed Oscar winning movie
and stage actor, Sir Sidney Poiti-
er.

The prime minister told Mr
Southward and his partners that
he hoped as developers, they
will tap into this rich and varied
cultural and historical back-
ground and that some aspects
of the culture of Cat Island will
be incorporated into the PGA
Village.

Mr Ingraham said that this
development is being held to
the highest ecological standards
to safeguard the environmen-
tal integrity of the landscape
and marine resources and to
ensure the environmental and
economic sustainability of the
development.

Share your news
















The Tribune wants to hear

from people who are
making news in their
neighbourhoods. Perhaps

you are raising funds for a

good cause, campaigning
for improvements in the
area or have won an
award.

If so, call us on 322-1986
and share your story.

HUMPHREY JACKMAN as ‘Michael Jackson’

FROM page one

side of the road after knocking
him off his bicycle.

Mr Jackman is believed to
have been taken to hospital in a
private vehicle, and died at the
Princess Margaret Hospital that
evening.

The following morning
thieves broke into the home he
shared with his 94-year-old
maternal uncle, Lenneth Davis,
stole his safe and rifled through
his clothes and personal belong-
ings, including hundreds of pho-
tographs of himself and his
friends.

Mr Jackman’s brother,
Patrick Jackman, 37, said his
brother was creative in every-

thing he did, as he had excelled
at making and hanging curtains
for Sholan’s Drapery near his
home in Bernard Road for 13
years before he became an
enthusiastic chef, and he always
had a talent for making any-
thing he wished, including real-
istic models using just newspa-
per and glue.

“He could sit down and build
anything,” Patrick said.

“He built a speed boat out of
newspaper. He made model air-
planes out of paper that looked
just like the ones made from
kits. It was something that he
had.”

Another of Mr Jackman’s
talents was impersonations, and
his charismatic likeness to
Michael Jackson earned him the

Shot expat’s family
voices ‘suspicions’

FROM page one

believe there are more people
who would have been in the
area before, during and after
Jones was gunned down who
may be able to provide insight
into the attempted killing of the
businessman.

At present, officers continue
to seek a motive for the appar-
ently arranged daylight attack.

The suspect in the case,
described as a slim built dark
male, stripped off his shirt and
left it in the area before he
made his escape on a motor-
bike, which was later found

was a resident of Western New
Providence. After living in The
Bahamas for over 10 years, he
was a permanent resident.

His former business partner,
ex-MP Lester Turnquest, told
The Tribune on Wednesday
that despite a protracted legal
battle between the pair that
ended in the severance of their
relationship, hearing the news
of the incident was “like getting
hit with a brick.”

He described Mr Jones as
someone who “thrived on
excitement (and) of living close
to the edge.”

Anyone with information
about the shooting can contact



HUMPHREY JACKMAN as ‘Elvis Presley’

nickname “Jackson”.

Patrick said: “From when he
was small he started collecting
Michael Jackson albums, and
everyone called him Jackson.

“He could dance and do any-
thing Michael Jackson could
do.”

As a child Patrick remem-
bers his brother, aged around
17, making Batman and Robin
costumes for himself and his lit-
tle brother exactly as they were
in their favourite television car-
toon.

“Mine was a little tight, but it
was just as I saw it on the TV,
the stitch was the same and
everything.

“We put them on Christmas
morning and we walked out on
the porch and my cape got
snagged, so I ended up busting
my eye and he looked at me
and said, ‘Robin, always
remember to tuck your cape in,
you’re fighting super villains,
not yourself.’”

Patrick added: “Sometimes
in the morning he would call
me for a ride to The Guardian
and not once did I refuse, even



though I live deep in the west,
because that’s the love I had for
my brother.

“He didn’t like crowds, he
didn’t drink, he didn’t smoke,
my mother never had to bail
him out of jail, he was not a
problematic person at all, he
was just in his own world.”

Mr Jackman never married
or had children, and left behind
his mother Marsil Jackman-
Kerr, stepfather George Kerr,
three brothers and six sisters.

His eldest brother, Tony
Brown, 55, who run’s Tony’s
Jerk on Fox Hill Road said his
younger brother loved talking
to people in the community
about the daily news.

“He was a really nice fella,”
Mr Brown said.

Mr Jackman’s funeral will be
held at 3pm today at St
Anselm’s Roman Catholic
Church, where Mr Jackman
never missed a service. View-
ing will be at Clarke’s Funeral
Home, 10 Tonique Williams-
Darling Highway from 10am to
noon and at the church from
2pm until the service.

Over 5,000 registered for
unemployment benefits

FROM page one

yesterday.

He said that a total of 800 persons have registered for the unem-
ployment benefit since Monday of this week, bringing the number

to 5,150 persons.

“We anticipate that the $20 million that was allocated from the
medical branch fund will be sufficient for this year. “That is the pre-




















“Glory Of Gods Presence”

Come, join usjas)we come togetherand)s *
worship the|Uord in Spiritiand int cuth one

ASSEMBLIES OF 600}

OPPORTUNITIES FOR
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SUNDAY SERVICES

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Evening Worship Service

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WEDNESDAY at 7:30 p.m.

Selective Bible Teaching
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FRIDAY at 7:30 p.m.
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RADIO MINISTRY
Sundays at 8:30 a.m. - ZNS 1 - TEMPLE TIME

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EVANGELISTIC TEMPLE

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Tel: 322-8304, Fax: 322-4793. P.O. Box: N-1566
Email: evtemple@batelnet.bs Web: www.evangelistictemple.org





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TIPS or 502-9991.

BAPTIST BIBLE CHURCH
SOLDIER ROAD & OLD TRAIL

Sunday School: 10am FUNDAMENTAL
Preaching ~ 11am & 7:30pm EVANGELISTIC
Radio Bible Hour:

Sunday 6pm - ZNS 2

Wed. Prayer & Praise 7:30pm



Pastor:H. Mills

“Preaching the Bible as is, to men as they are”
Pastor: H. Mills ¢ Phone: 393-0563 ¢ Box N-3622

CENTRAL GOSPEL CHAPEL

CHRISTIE & DOWDESWELL STREETS * Tel: 325-2921

SUNDAY, APRIL 26TH, 2008
11:30 am. Speaker:

Pastor Marcel Lightbourne

Bible Class: 9:45 a.m. * Breaking of Bread Service: 10:45 a.m.
*# Community Outreach: 11:30 a.m. « Evening Service: 7:00 p.m.
* Midweek Service 7:30 p.m. (Wednesdays)
* Sisters’ Prayer Meeting: 10:00 a.m. (2nd Thursday of each month)

=m LIGHT AND LIFE COMMUNITY CHURCH

r =a Grounded In The Past &
ee. Geared To The Future

Worship time: Ilam & 7pm
Sunday School: 9:45am
Prayer time: 6:30pm
Place:

The Madeira
Shopping Center

Rev. Dr. Franklin Knowles

ALL ARE WELCOME TO ATTEND

Pastor: Rev. Dr Franklin Knowles

P.O .Box EE-16807
Telephone number 325-5712
EMAIL - lynnk@ batelnet.bs

sent project of the National Insurance Board. The numbers in
terms of persons who are registering for the benefit are in the
range that we originally predicted,’ Minister Foulkes said.

Recipients of the benefit will receive half of their average insur-
able weekly wage for 13 weeks; the current ceiling on insurable
wages is $400 meaning the maximum amount anyone can receive
is $200 a week. The benefits will be paid out from NIB’s $20 million
medical branch fund. Once this is exhausted, it will be sustained by
contributions from employed persons and employers.

While some see the benefit as minimal, Minister Foulkes said the
benefit is merely intended to be a “helping hand.”

“The benefit is intended to be a help during difficult times for a
lot of unemployed Bahamians. It is intended to be only for 13
weeks to allow persons to seek another job or to find other ways to
gain employment.

“It is not intended to be a permanent form of assistance. It
averages out to almost $900 a month for three months,” Minister
Foulkes said.

Grant’s Town Wesley Methodist Church

(Baillou Hill Rd & Chapel Street) PO.Box CB-13046

The Holy Ghost Prayer-Line number is 326-7427
(www.gtwesley.org)

SUNDAY, APRIL 26TH, 2009

7:00 a.m. Rev. Carla Culmer/Bro. Ernest Miller
11:00 a.m. Sanctuary Choir Anniversary
7:00 a.m. Sanctuary Choir

Theme: “ But As For Me And My Household, We Will Serve the Lord”

Grace and Peace Wesleyan Church
A Society of The Free Methodist Church of
North America

WHERE GOD IS ADORED AND EVERYONE IS AFFIRMED

7; Worship Time: Lla.m.

Prayer Time: 10:15a.m.

Church School during Worship Service

Place: Twynam Heights
off Prince Charles Drive

Minister: Rev. Henley Perry
P.O. Box SS-5631
Telephone number: 324-2538
Telefax number: 324-2587

COME TO WORSHIP, LEAVE TO SERVE


THE TRIBUNE

SATURDAY, APRIL 25, 2009, PAGE 7



LOCAL NEWS



Lauderdale speaks
to GB businessmen

@ BY DENISE MAYCOCK
Tribune Freeport Reporter
dmaycock@tribunemedia.net

FREEPORT - Retired Flori-
da News Anchorman Dwight
Lauderdale addressed business
professionals on the topic of
unemployment at the Grand
Bahama Chamber of Com-
merce’s Administrative Profes-
sionals and Bosses Luncheon in
Grand Bahama.

Mr Lauderdale, former news
anchor of WPLG Channel 10,
was accompanied by his wife.
He spoke about a number of
global issues, including the
worldwide problem of unem-
ployment.

“We are not going to recover
from this economic disaster
until we start putting people
back to work,” he told business
persons attending the luncheon
held at the Sunrise Resort and
Marina.

Unemployment, he said, is
one of the biggest problems in

Alpha Kap
Alpha Sorority
hosts 31st annual
Honours Day

THE Alpha
Kappa Alpha

the United States and the
Bahamas. He noted that the
actual unemployed figures are
probably much higher as statis-
tics are based on rounded fig-
ures.

Mr Lauderdale, who is a fre-
quent visitor to Grand Bahama,
said that being a tourist desti-
nation is no longer enough to
sustain the economy. He said
other industries must be con-
vinced to do business on the
island.

“The unemployment rate
here is 15 per cent and that is up
from nine per cent a year ago,
and that is just the folks they
can count. As you know there is
a lot of rounding in statistics
and I wonder what the real fig-
ures might be,” he said.

The former newsman said he
is aware that every effort is
being made to keep the Isle of
Capri Casino open on Grand
Bahama.

He also said that he believes
that the opening of a new $20

million glass factory will bode
well for the island’s economy.

“T think it is great news
because it shows that someone
on this island understands that it
is no longer enough just to be a
tourist destination, that here on
Grand Bahama you are going
to have to depend on more than
tourism to succeed economical-
ly and to move forward,” he
said.

“Here on Grand Bahama, I
understand that there is a lot of
optimism these days over some
recent changes at the Grand
Bahama Port Authority.”

Mr Lauderdale said that com-
pany owners and operators
must realise that their employ-
ees are vital to their business,
especially during the current
economic climate.

He stressed that employers
should not intimidate or take
advantage of their employees
during times of economic uncer-
tainty.

“Bosses who are silently or

even loudly intimidating
employees and trying to make
them feel lucky they have a job,
you are actually hurting the
business,” he said.

Even though many bosses
may feel they have more job
security, Mr Lauderdale
stressed that nobody is safe in
this uncertain climate.

He said the way bosses treat
their employees will determine
if the business survives or suf-
fers.

“There will be some employ-
ers who try to take advantage of
these dark days, those folks are
going to learn a hard lesson,”
he said.

“Everybody agrees that the
economy will come back at
some point, but please know
that when it does bounce back,
it is not going to be business as
usual. Every business - small or
large - will have to press the
reset button. Every business will
have to figure out how to work
smarter,” he said.

pa Additional performance for
— “Trapped in Marriage’ held
tonight at Regency Theatre

Sorority will be
hosting its 31st
annual Honours
Day on Sunday,
April 26, at 3pm
at Government
House.

High Schools
throughout the
Bahamas have
nominated out-
standing gradu-
ating senior
female students
and the winners
will be



event.

SOME of the nomi-
nees from top left
column: Giselle
Outten, SAC;
Dashinique Moss,
Crooked Island;
Phylicia Bastian,
Queens College;
Alexis McIntosh,
Faith Temple Acad-
emy. Second col-
umn: Rachael M
Albury, St Andrews
Academy.

Bisk

announced at the
: three-dimensional characters of true depth,”

i the producers said.

ROYAL =rinELitTy

“TRAPPED in Marriage”, a new

i Bahamian play by S L Sheppard, premiered
? at the Regency Theatre on Friday. An addi-
? tional performance will be held tonight.

The cast includes veteran actors Brion

: Roxbury, Tawari Rodgers, Denise DeGre-
? gory, Dawn Rolle and Liselle Harris. Rela-
i tive newcomers Caron Smith, Andre
? Cartwright and Luckner Timothee round
? out the cast.

The play tells the story of four couples at

; different stages of their marriages.

“You will laugh and cry and recognise

i yourself and your friends in this produc-
i tion. Every aspect of this play seems true to
i life in the Bahamas. The characters are pre-
? sented with all their faults and weaknesses,
i? with their strengths and virtues. The actors

have worked extremely hard to present

“There are many ways to be trapped.

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Some are even of our own making. The
play explores these themes. How do we
enable others to lie and cheat? How does
self-interest guide our actions? How do we
take charge of our own lives without hurting
others? Though the themes may seem
somber, they are presented with a light
touch that will delight and touch the audi-
ence.”

S L Sheppard is the author of the novel
“The Green Shutters” and five Bahamian
plays including “Staff Room Gossip”, “The
Woman From Nassau”, ‘You Never Go
Back”, and “With a Little of Luck.”
She has also published many short stories in
international magazines, and her poetry can
be found in international anthologies. Her
Christmas plays for children have been per-
formed yearly for many years. She is a past-
president and now board member of the
Freeport Players’ Guild and a veteran actor
and director for the company.

Cast of
‘Trapped in
Marriage’

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VEHICLE AUCTION

U.S. EMBASSY
SATURDAY, MAY 2%?, 2009
SHIPAHOY COMPLEX (Western Gate)
West Bay Street, opposite Well’s Service

Stations

DOORS OPEN FOR INSPECTION 9:00
A.M. — 9:30 A.M.

AUCTION 9:30 A.M. — 11:00 A.M.












Successful bidders must pay a minimum
$300 non-refundable deposit immediately
after each bid closes in order to secure their
purchase of the offered vehicle. Balance
due May 6, 2009.

GENERAL PUBLIC IS INVITED

Bahamas Bus & Truck Co., Ltd,

Montrose Avenue
Phone:322-1722 » Fax: 326-7452

Large Shipment
of
Used Cars

/COME CHECK
US OUT

_New Shipments Arrived

Hurry, Hurry, Hurry and
Get Your First Choice
For Easy Financing

Bank Ando Inéurance

On Premises
Check Our Prices
Before buying
THE TRIBUNE

spor

SATURDAY, APRIL 25,



PAGE 9





ts

2009

PAGE 13 © Legacy baseball/softball heats up...








Jason Terry
wins NBA
sixth man

award...
See page 10



National Family istand regatta
expected to heat up today

hile the first
champion
has been
decided in
the 56th
National Family Island Regatta,
the competition is expected to
heat up today as the final cham-
pions are crowned in Elizabeth
Harbour, Georgetown, Exuma.

So far the regatta has gotten
off to a pretty good start with
more than 50 boats, as antici-
pated by commodore Danny
Strachan, participating.

The largest fleet of boats are
entered in the B Class.

But the first champions were
decided in the Sir Durward
Knowles Junior National
Championship with Leslie Rolle
Jr and the Bulla Reg having
secured the crown.

They won it in a fiercely com-
petitive three-race series that
concluded on Thursday.

Yesterday, the action heated
up as the other major classes
staged their second races.

There was one major incident
yesterday as the Cobra and the
Six Sisters collided as they head-
ed for the starting line-up in the
B Class.

While the Cobra, skippered
by Dwayne Higgins, managed
to make the starting canyon, Six
Sisters, skippered by the Rev
Elkin Symonette, was ground-
ed.

When the race was complet-
ed, the Terri Ann, skippered by
Davis Mitchell out of Staniel
Cay, emerged as the champi-
ons. They were followed by
Miss Susan Chase from Man-
grove Bush, Long Island, and
skippered by Stefan Knowles.

Lundy Robinson and the
Eudeva, the winner of the first
B Class race, had to settle for



CLASS C BOAT FUGITIVE crew members celebrate...

SWiR Gems bl



INBRIEF

FLAG FOOTBALL
SCHEDULE

THE newly formed Flag
Football League in the
Bahamas is currently under-
way with games being
played every weekend at the
Winton rugby pitch.

The initial season com-

menced on Saturday, March
28 and is expected to run
through to mid-June.

¢ Here’s a look at the
schedule of games on tap for
this weekend:

Today’s schedule
Spm — War vs Sna
4pm — Spa vs War

Sunday’s schedule
2:30pm — BR vs Sna
4:30pm — RBC vs Pros

third place, while the John B
from Abaco got fourth. Queen
Drucuilla was fifth, followed by
the Cobra, Lady Sonia and the
Barbarian.

With the first two races com-
bined, the Eudeva is in a two-
way tie with the Susan Chase
in first place with 24 points
apiece. The Eudeva is the
defending champions.

The Terri Ann is close behind
in third with 22. Captain Ray is
fourth with 16. The Healthcliff
and the Cobra are tied for fifth
place with 10 points each.

The third and final race in the
series will be contested today.

In the first race in the C Class,
the defending champion Bulla
Reg, skippered by Leslie
‘Buzzy’ Rolle, has taken the
early lead with a one point lead
over Lady Diane.

And in the A Class, the Tida
Wave is the defending champi-
on. She has taken the initial lead
after the first race. The Run-
ning Tide is in second and the
Red Stripe is third.

In the Sir Durward Knowles
Junior Nationals, Leslie Rolle
Jr and the Bulla Reg made sure
that at least one of the champi-
onship trophies will remain in
Exuma.

They have collected a total
of 43 points. In second place
was Marcus Thomas and the
Winnie K with 34 points and
Revardo McKenzie and the
Fugitive from Exuma also had
34 points for third place.

Thomas Treco and the Sweet
Island Gal had to settle for
fourth with 33 points.

In the first race, Marcus
Knowles and his Winnie K from
Long Island, was the winner
with Thomas Treco on the
Sweet Island Gal from Long

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——
a

CLASS A BOAT RED STRIPE...

Island second and Leslie Rolle
and the Bull Reg third.
In the second race, Leslie

WHEN the race was completed,
Class B boat Terri Ann (shown),
skippered by Davis Mitchell out
of Staniel Cay, emerged as the
champions...

Rolle and the Bulla Reg took
the victory, followed by Mar-
cus Knowles and the Winnie K
in second and Thomas Treco
and the Sweet Island Gal.
And in the third and final
race, Leslie Rolle and the Bulla
Reg once again came out on top
to cement their title. Marcus
Thomas and the Winnie K end-

m@ By RENALDO DORSETT
Sports Reporter
rdorsett@tribunemedia.net

PORGY BAY, BIMINI — After a
series of delayed stats, the Bahamas Bas-
ketball Federation’s Round Robin tour-
nament kicked off in Bimini yesterday,
featuring a showdown between two of
the top teams from the capital and the
nation’s second city.

Match Point Investment Gems — 80
Electro Telecom Cybot Queens — 51

The Gems took advantage of a short-
handed Cybots squad and with a stifling
defense that gave up just six points in
the second quarter pulled away to take
the tournament’s opening game in con-
vincing fashion.

A closely contested game early in the
first quarter featured four ties and five
lead changes before the Gems pulled
away with a 15-4 run to end the period
and grab a 25-14 lead.

A constantly attacking Gems squad
took advantage of a foul prone Cybots
defense and built on the late first quarter

ed up in second.



CLASS C BOATS can be seen during the regatta...

“We were just focused the whole way
and we did not want to let up once we
had a lead because we know how important
it is to get that first win under your belt in the
tournament. Our defense was good, especially
in the second half we just wanted to pressure
their ball handlers and create as much turnovers
as possible and we were able to do that.”

momentum in the second.

The Gems lead reached 20 for the first
time on a pair of free throws by Analicia
Ferguson and capitalized on a stagnant
Electro Telecom offense.

They took a 47-20 lead into the half.

With one player sidelined by injury
and another pair fouled out early in the
third quarter, the Cybots were able to

— Gems’ Analicia Ferguson

field just four players for much of the
second half.

The Gems took their largest lead of
the game on a runner by Royel Brown
late in the third to take a 62-32 advan-
tage.

Electro managed to shave just two
points from the substantial margin and
trailed 65-40 heading into the final peri-



ow out Cybots, 80-51

od.

The fourth quarter featured much of
the same as the Gems’ reserves contin-
ued to compound the advantage over a
listless and depleted Cybots lineup.

Sharpshooting guard Jesheena Pinder
led the Gems with 18 points, Latonya
Hamilton added 13 while Ferguson and
Ariel Brown finished with 10 points
apiece.

Tracey Lewis led the Cybots with 17
points.

Ferguson said her team’s goal was to
jump out early and make a statement in
the first game of the tournament.

“We were just focused the whole way
and we did not want to let up once we
had a lead because we know how impor-
tant it is to get that first win under your
belt in the tournament,” she said. “Our
defense was good, especially in the sec-
ond half we just wanted to pressure their
ball handlers and create as much
turnovers as possible and we were able
to do that.”

The men’s division of the BBF Round
Robin also began play yesterday, how-
ever the results were unavailable up to
press time last night.
PAGE 10, SATURDAY, APRIL 25, 2009

TRIBUNE SPORTS



SPORTS



' 5 5
it
LL it Ss

NIKOLAY DAVYDENKO, of Russia, returns the ball to Czech Republic's Radek Stepanek during their Barcelona Open Tennis tournament match
in Barcelona, Spain, on Friday. Davydenko won 6-7, 6-2, 6-2.

(AP Photos: Manu Fernandez)

Davydenko to face Nadal
in Barcelona Open semis

BARCELONA, Spain (AP) — Third-
seeded Nikolay Davydenko rallied for a
6-7 (4), 6-2, 6-2 victory over Radek
Stepanek on Friday to reach a Barcelona
Open semifinal against Rafael Nadal.

Fourth-seeded David Ferrer and Fer-
nando Gonzalez of Chile will meet in the

other semifinal.

Davydenko recovered from mistakes
early in the first set, but wasted three set
points as Stepanek used crafty net play to
frustrate to force the tiebreaker. Stepanek
then hit one of his seven aces to secure

the first set.

But the Czech player then crumbled
behind a slew of unforced errors, and
Davydenko broke to take a 3-2 lead and
then used another break to clinch the

second set.

Davydenko used strong returns to
break twice more in the third to set up a
meeting with the top-ranked Nadal.

Nadal, who has a 3-2 record against
Davydenko and 2-0 on clay, reached the
semifinals without having to play Friday,
after quarterfinal opponent David Nal-
bandian withdrew on Thursday with a

right hip injury.

The Spaniard is vying to follow up his
fifth straight Monte Carlo Masters trophy
with a fifth straight title at Barcelona.

The fifth-seeded Gonzalez defeated
No. 2 Fernando Verdasco 6-3, 4-6, 6-4,
and Ferrer beat Tommy Robredo 6-3, 6-

4in an all-Spanish match.

Ferrer, who reached last year's final,
won 43 of 61 service points and broke

his Davis Cup teammate once in each

set.

in Barcelona, Spain, on Friday...

RAFAEL NADAL, of Spain, during a training session during a Barcelona Open tournament match



McDaniels: Broncos likely
to stand pat in Round 1

m@ By ARNIE STAPLETON
AP Sports Writer



ENGLEWOOD), Colo. (AP)
— The private workout that
general manager Brian Xanders
and offensive coordinator Mike
McCoy had with USC quarter-
back Mark Sanchez in Los
Angeles will likely be the last
time the strong-armed passer
practices for the Denver Bron-
cos.

Coach Josh McDaniels sug-
gested as much Friday when he
said he doubts the Broncos
would move into the top 10 in
the NFL draft and he unequiv-
ocally dismissed the notion of
trading both of his first-round
picks to make a move for any
top-tier player.

The Broncos own the 12th
and 18th selections Saturday
and they might have to move
ahead of Seattle at No. 4 to
have a shot at Sanchez.

"I think we're in a great
spot,” McDaniels said. "I think
we have an opportunity to get
two players right away that can
impact our team.”

But the Broncos would cer-
tainly be tempted to move up if
Sanchez starts to slip down the
board — so long as it doesn't

involve both of their first-round
picks. "We won't do that,”
McDaniels said. "We won't
trade 12 and 18 to move up."

After trading Pro Bowl quar-
terback Jay Cutler to Chicago
earlier this month, the Broncos
were intrigued enough by
Sanchez to fly out for a private
workout and interview with him
in Los Angeles on Tuesday.

McDaniels had to skip the
meeting because of a migraine
headache, his second since tak-
ing over as Broncos coach three
months ago.

"I think it's more about
hydration and the altitude,”
McDaniels said. "I had them
when I was younger, but noth-
ing wrong neurological, they
checked me out and I'm fine."

Although the Broncos liked
what they saw in Sanchez, "I
don't think we would do a lot of
moving up from where we're at
at 12," McDaniels said. "Maybe.
There's a possibility. But I think
we feel pretty comfortable with
where we're at."

The Broncos have 10 picks
this weekend, and McDaniels
wouldn't mind trading down in
any round to stockpile more
selections as he retools a team
that hasn't reached the playoffs

since 2005. And, as Cutler
learned this spring, McDaniels
will pick up the phone and listen
to any trade proposal.

"We're not going to turn our
head from any opportunity to
go back, go up," McDaniels
said.

The beginning of the end of
Cutler's time in Denver came
Feb. 28, when McDaniels talked
about trading Cutler for Matt
Cassel. Although the deal nev-
er materialized, it led to a six-
week feud that ended with Cut-
ler going to Chicago for Kyle
Orton and a bevy of draft picks.

McDaniels said that while the
Broncos really like Sanchez,
they also feel good about Orton
and free agent Chris Simms.

"He's a good quarterback.
We have two good quarter-
backs," McDaniels said. "And I
think that's ultimately what
we're going to finalize today,
before tomorrow morning, and
we'll make sure that we feel one
way or the other about it.

"But I Know this: we feel
comfortable with the guys we
have. They performed well at
the minicamp. Nobody in this
building is afraid to move for-
ward and play the season with
them."

Xanders and McDaniels, who
signed an NFL-high 16 unre-
stricted free agents, have the
ammo to move up if they want
to: they own five picks in the
first 84 selections.

Of course, the Broncos, like
many teams, are leery of the
multimillion-dollar guarantees
for top-10 picks, and this is a
franchise that began laying off
front-office staff long before the
economic downturn picked up
steam.

Whether or not it’s a premier
passer, the Broncos want to
come out of the weekend with a
third quarterback to compete
with Orton and Simms.

They also need plenty of help
on defense, where they're
switching to a 3-4 scheme
instead of the four-man front
favored by former coach Mike
Shanahan.

The Broncos aren't antici-
pating having to draft a wide
receiver. They haven't heard
from the commissioner's office
regarding possible punishment
for Pro Bowler Brandon Mar-
shall over his latest run-in with
the law, an arrest for fighting
with his fiance in March, leading
them to believe he won't be fac-
ing a lengthy suspension.

Man U looking
to avoid slip-up
against Spurs

m@ By STUART CONDIE
AP Sports Writer

LONDON (AP) — Man-
chester United's players saw
Liverpool and Chelsea slip up
in their pursuit of the Premier
League title this week and
now must avoid a stumble of
their own against Tottenham
on Saturday.

United beat Portsmouth on
Wednesday to go three points
clear at the top of the stand-
ings after Liverpool and
Chelsea both drew their mid-
week games.

But the Red Devils are
only just emerging from their
own period of shaky form,
which included back-to-back
Premier League losses and
elimination from the FA Cup
semifinals, and could be vul-
nerable at Old Trafford
against a Tottenham side
unbeaten in six Premier
League games against the top
four this season.

Spurs, who beat both Liver-
pool and Chelsea this season,
have won six of their past
eight matches to move from
the verge of the relegation
zone and into contention for
European qualification.

The north London side will
hope to have captain Ledley
King back in central defense
alongside Jonathan
Woodgate after his chronic
knee complaint kept him out
of last weekend's 1-0 win
over Newcastle.

"Our record against the top
four is impeccable but United
will put out a strong side and
it will be very tough,"
Woodgate said.

Players

One of those players could
be Ryan Giggs, who would
make his 800th appearance
for the club. Giggs set up the
opening goal in Wednesday's
2-0 win, while fellow veteran
Paul Scholes may also play
again after making the second
goal for Michael Carrick in
his 600th club match.

The pair's guile could be
crucial against a team increas-
ingly hard to break down.

After five consecutive
home games without conced-
ing, Tottenham is trying hard
to replicate its form at White
Hart Lane in away matches.

Spurs have conceded just
five goals in their last 15
home games — and nine all
season — suggesting they
could beat the club record of
11 in a season set back in
1919-20.

"We've done well in the
games that we've won 1-0,"
Woodgate said. "It's impor-

tant to keep clean sheets
because our strikers are
always going to score goals."

Liverpool is at Hull know-
ing it has to win if it is to
avoid compounding the dam-
age done to its challenge by
Tuesday's 4-4 draw with
Arsenal.

The Reds have scored 27
goals in their past eight
games to shake off their repu-
tation as one of the league's
less attractive big sides, but
have to tighten up a defense
that has been breached eight
times in two matches.

Goals

"Scoring goals is the most
difficult thing in football but
now we must sort some of the
problems we're having in
defense," Liverpool goal-
keeper Pepe Reina said.
"We've always had the bal-
ance between attack and
defense. That's why we're
always there in the Champi-
ons League and cup competi-
tions, because we are a team
with balance.

"We have to get back to
this way."

But Liverpool captain
Steven Gerrard will again be
absent because of the adduc-
tor injury he sustained against
Chelsea on April 8.

"T think he will be available
next week because he's
improving, but this game is
too soon," manager Rafa
Benitez said.

Chelsea's challenge is fad-
ing after the Blues slipped six
points off the lead with
Wednesday's 0-0 draw
against Everton, leaving the
side similarly hungry for a
win at West Ham — a side
that is also desperate for
points to keep seventh place
and likely European qualifi-
cation ahead of resurgent
Tottenham.

The Blues have a fully fit
squad other than the absent
Deco and Ricardo Carvalho.
Hiddink said he may rest
players ahead of next week's
Champions League meeting
with Barcelona.

Also Saturday, Aston Villa
is at Bolton, Manchester City
is at Everton, Stoke is at Ful-
ham and Sunderland is at
last-place West Bromwich
Albion.

If the Baggies lose, Black-
burn could end up effectively
relegating them with victory
over Wigan on Sunday, when
Arsenal hosts Middles-
brough.

Newcastle hosts
Portsmouth on Monday still
looking for a first victory
under manager Alan Shearer.

JASON TERRY celebrates at the end of a game against the Houston
Rockets in Dallas on April 15. The Mavericks won 95-84.

(AP Photo: Donna McWilliam)

Jason Terry wins NBA
sixth man award

DALLAS (AP) — Mavericks guard Jason Terry is the best

off the bench.

Terry, who took on a different role for Dallas the past two
seasons, was presented Friday with the NBA sixth man award
that goes to the league's top reserve.

While starting only 11 of his 74 games in the regular season,
Terry averaged 19.6 points and 3.4 assists while playing about

34 minutes a game.

The only time Terry had a higher scoring average was 2000-
01, his second NBA season, when he averaged 19.7 points for

Atlanta.

After starting only 27 games as a rookie, Terry started 531
of his 563 games for the Hawks and Mavericks from 2000-07.
Terry averaged 15.5 points for Dallas last season, when he start-
ed 34 times but was the only Mavericks player to get into

every game.


Categories of financial instruments

The following table analyses the carrying amounts of financial assets and financial liabilities
as defined by LAS 39 Financial Instruments: Recognition and Measurement:

2008 2007
Financial Assets

Available-for-sale financial assets $ 4,850,736 $ 6,053,546
Held-for-trading securities at FVTPL $ 5,170 $ -
Foreign currency forward contracts $91,903,468: $ 65,672,686

Loans and receivables (including cash and

due from banks) $ 8,040,294,293 §$ 7,254,484,914

Accrued interest receivable $85,239,829 $ 99,614,242
Financial Liabilities
Foreign currency forward contracts $38,439,876 $ 50,077,026

Other financial liabilities $4,979,973,713 $ 3,702,088,870

Accrued interest payable $ 12,645,685 $ 19,309,423

The following table is an analysis of financial instruments by credit quality:

2008 2007
Cash and due from banks

Neither past duc or impaired $7,023,405,792 $6,307,659,119

Available-for-sale financial assets
Neither past due or impaired $4,850,736 6,053,546

Loans and receivables

Neither past due or impaired $ 1,016,810,846 $ 946,599,101

Past due not impaired $ _77,655 $ 226,694

Financial Assets are past due when a counterparty has failed to make a payment, when the
amount is contractually due or when an overdrawn account exceeds its credit line for more
than 90 days.

Derivative Instruments

2007

Foreign currency forward contracts

Notional Amount $3,694,913,181 $2,541,477,778

Fair Value
Assets $ 91,903,468 $ 65,672,686
Liabilities 38,439,876 50,077,026

$_ 53,463,592 $ 15,595,660

CAPITAL REQUIREMENTS

The Bank is subject to the regulations of the Central Bank of The Bahamas (“Central Bank”),
These regulations, which are subject to interpretation by the Central Bank, establish guidelines
to evaluate the capital adequacy of institutions incorporated in The Bahamas. The Central
Bank has established minimum risk-based capital ratios. At December 31, 2008, the Bank’s
management is of the opinion that the Bank meets the established minimum ratios established
by the Central Bank.

ACCUMULATED OTHER PROVISIONS
Accumulated other provisions at December 31, 2008, consist of the following:

2008 2007

Guarantees issued by the Bank to related parties $1,267,075,000 $1,334,799,000
Others 6,219,234 7,379,277

$1,273,294,234 $1,342,178,277

SUBSEQUENT EVENT

As at December 31, 2008, the Bank had in custody from customers shares in the Optimal
Strategic US Equity Series of Optimal Multiadvisors Ltd and the Optimal Strategic US Equity
Ireland US Dollar Fund and the Optimal Strategic US Equity Ireland Euro Fund of Optimal
Multiadvisors Ireland ple (the “Strategic US Equity Shares”) whose value as per the November
30, 2008 NAV was 422,956,240 US Dollars and 1,704,350 Euros for the Strategic US Equity
Shares denominated in, respectively, US Dollars and Euros. The Optimal Strategic US Equity
Ireland US Dollar Fund and the Optimal Strategic US Equity Ireland Euro Fund invested all of
their assets in shares in the Optimal Strategic US Equity Series of Optimal Multiadvisors Ltd.
Optimal Multiadvisors Lid. is a Bahamian Fund whose assets corresponding to its Optimal
Strategic US Equity Series are held by and through its Bahamian trading subsidiary, Optimal
Strategic US Equity Ltd.

Optimal Strategie US Equity Ltd., in turn, had engaged Bernard L. Madoff Investment
Securities LLC (“Madoff Securities”), an entity registered as broker-dealer and investment
advisor with the Securities and Exchange Commission of the United States of America
(“SEC”) and regulated and supervised by the SEC and the Financial Industry Regulatory
Authority of the United States of America (“FINRA”), to execute its investment strategy and
had all or a substantial part of its assets deposited with and traded through Madoff Securities.

On December 15, 2008, the U.S. Federal Court for the Southern District of New York ordered
that Madoff Securities be placed into bankruptcy and simultaneously appointed a trustee to
oversee the liquidation of Madoff Securities as well as the issuance of claims against the
Securities Investor Protection Corporation (“SIPC”).

As a consequence of the foregoing events, all redemptions and the calculation of the net asset
value (the “NAV”) for the shares in the Optimal Strategic US Equity Series and the Optimal
Strategic US Equity Ireland Funds were suspended with immediate effect on, respectively,
December 15, 2008 and December 16, 2008,

In January 2009 the Bank, in view of the exceptional circumstances in the case and on the
basis of exclusively business considerations, has decided to offer a solution to its private
banking clients who have invested in the Strategic US Equity Shares. The solution consists in
an exchange in which the private banking clients of the bank are offered the possibility of
exchanging their Strategic US Equity Shares for long term subordinated securities to be issued
by Santander Group (the “Group”). The securities will have an annual remuneration of 2%
and a call by the Group from year 10. The cost to the Bank will not exceed 208,000,000 US
Dollars and 1,624,000 Euros for the exchange of Strategic US Equity Shares denominated in,
respectively, US Dollars and Euros.

The Bank has acted at all times with the due diligence in the management of its clients’
investments in the Optimal Strategic US Equity Shares and in accordance with all applicable
laws and sound banking practices and procedures with respect to those investments. The sale
of these products has always been transparent and in compliance with all applicable
regulations and established procedures.

As of March 12, 2009 the Bank is not aware of any lawsuit filed against it and connected with
the Strategic US Equity Shares. The Group is considering the initiation of the appropriate
legal actions.

Deloitte.

Deloitte & Touche

Chartered Accountants

and Management Consultants
2nd Terrace, Centreville

P.O. Box N-7120

Nassau, Bahamas

Tel: + 1 (242) 302-4800
Fax: +1 (242) 322-3101
http: //www.deloitte.com.bs

INDEPENDENT AUDITORS’ REPORT

To the Board of Directors of
Santander Bank & Trust Ltd.:

We have audited the accompanying balance sheet of Santander Bank & Trust Ltd. (the “Bank”) as at
December 31, 2008. This balance sheet is the responsibility of the Bank’s management. Our
responsibility is to express an opinion on this balance sheet.

We conducted our audit in accordance with International Standards on Auditing. Those Standards
require that we plan and perform the audit to obtain reasonable assurance about whether the balance
sheet is free from material misstatement. An audit includes examining, on a test basis, evidence
supporting the amounts and disclosures in the balance sheet. An audit also includes assessing the
accounting principles used and significant estimates made by management, as well as evaluating the
overall presentation of the balance sheet. We believe that the audit provide a reasonable basis for
our opinion.

In our opinion, the balances sheet presents fairly, in all material respects, the financial position of the
Bank as at December 31, 2008, in accordance with International Financial Reporting Standards.

Without qualifying our opinion, we emphasize that the balance sheet does not comprise a complete
sct of financial statements in accordance with International Financial Reporting Standards.
Information on results of operations, cash flows and changes in equity is necessary to obtain a
complete understanding of the financial position, performance and changes in financial position of
the Bank.

Aiclgtt. € fpucke-

March 12, 2009

A member firm of
Deloitte Touche Tohmatsu



TRIBUNE SPORTS

SATURDAY, APRIL 25, 2009, PAGE 13



SPORTS



LEGACY NATIONAL TEAM REPS — Six members of the Legacy Baseball/Softball Association were named to
National Teams to travel this summer. Shown above are Patrick Knowles, Sr, Manager of the BBF 15-16 play-
ing in the PONY Zone Championships in Puerto Rico; Aneko Knowles and Desmond Russell, both named to the
16-18 team for the Little League team going to Venezuela. Russell has also been named to the Men’s National
Team to compete in Seattle, Washington July 14th to July 27th; and right, Legacy President Stephen Burrows.

Legacy baseball/
softball heats up

NOW that the Easter holiday
is over, things are heating up in
the Legacy Baseball/Softball
Association as teams in the
baseball division jockey for wins
and position and players gear
up for this weekend’s upcom-
ing All-Star Challenges at the
YMCA beginning at 9am.

The highlight of these games
to date has been the competi-
tion between mothers and
female coaches and the Tee-
Ballers.

This year fathers, together
with male coaches, have been
added to the mix. Fathers and
coaches will take on the Coach
Pitch All Stars with the handi-
cap of having to bat from the
opposite side during the game.

Eugene Thompson, Legacy
player agent, said that the fol-
lowing considerations are in
place for the games, and coach-
es have been advised to:

a) Pay special attention to the
start and completion time for
each all star game as Legacy
wishes to showcase each divi-
sion, hence all games will be
played individually. Punctuality
is a must to enable us to com-
plete the schedule. Everyone
will be encouraged to sit and
watch the all-stars in action.

b) Contact your players
whom you recommended and
inform them of their placement
(president/ vice president) and
start time for their game.

c) All players and coaches are
to wear this year's complete uni-
form.

d) All are reminded that hats
are a required part of uniforms
and players are expected to
wear them at all games.

e) Coaches and spectators are
reminded to be on your best



PLAYERS are shown during a practice session...

behaviour, cheering on and
encouraging the players as this
is also a fundraising event and
we expect the general public to
attend these events.

f) Coaches, please allow
every all-star to play. Try to get
non-starters in as soon as possi-
ble, even if you have to use re-
entry to get the starters back in.

Thompson noted that this
event is also being used as an
evaluation for players and
coaches in terms of participa-
tion in the upcoming nationals.

Legacy president Stephen
Burrows also expressed delight
that six members of the Legacy
family have been selected to
national teams scheduled to
travel this summer.

Named to the BBF national
teams from Legacy for the 15-16
team to the Pony Caribbean
Zone Championships in San
Juan, Puerto Rico are:

¢ ANDRE TURNQUEST
and JERVIS (Champ) STU-
ART Jr. This team is scheduled
to depart July 6 and returns July
12

Named to the 16-18 Team for
the Little League Baseball Latin
American Regional Tourna-
ment in Maracaibo, Venezuela
are:
¢ DESMOND RUSSELL,
PATRICK ‘Ali? KNOWLES Jr,
ANEKO KNOWLES, and
LEON COOPER JR. This
team departs June 19 and
returns June 28.

The men’s national team to
compete in Seattle, Washing-
ton, July 14-27 includes
DESMOND RUSSELL, and
PATRICK ’Al’? KNOWLES Jr.

Selected to head teams are: -
15 -16 Team: Manager, Patrick
Knowles Sr. - GB, and Coach:
Clarence McKenzie - NP.

Heading the 16-18 Team are:
Manager: Terran Rodgers - NP;
Coach: Feleipe Sweeting - NP,
and Coach: Opie Cooper - GB.

Family and fans are asked to
support the Associations Fund
Raising Day, also on Saturday,
as funds are being sought to
assist in getting teams to the
BBF National Championships
in June.

ALL STAR TEAM MEMBERS

(1) TEEBALL ALL STAR TEAM

TEAM
BTC RED SOX

Russell, Daniel Blake, Andre Gardiner

PLAYERS Connelly
Tionate

Port Authority Dodgers Avery Basden, Jor-

Manager, Wory Gilbert, and Coach: Harry

(3) MUSTANG DIVISION ALL STARS

dan Robertson, Jayvyn Clarke
Bellevue Blue Jays
Parker, Adrian Neely, Kevin Collie
Corp. Law Marlins Morgan
Hanna, Gabriel Laing, Lashawn Grant
Rodney

Kyron

Smith, Jaylon Lord
COACHES:

Mark Gardiner, Buster Laing,
K. Brian Hanna, Ural Forbes, and Kirt Neely.

Jason Lord,

TEE BALL MOTHERS/FEMALE

COACHES TEAM

Laverne Gardiner, Leteasha Lord, Rochelle
Godet, Shurmon Clarke,

Adrienne Fawkes, Charisse Brown, Stacey
Knowles, Ricarla Neely,

Shakeva Davis, Wende Hanna, Rickelle Sey-
mour, Allison Meadows,

Suezette Basden, Antonia Johnson.

COACHES: Lavette Saint and Jackie A.
Thompson

(2) COACH PITCH ALL STAR TEAM
Legacy Marlins Camrone Meadows,
Tasimo Bullard, Ke’Adre Thompson
Alexander
Sweeting, Nathaniel Bain, D’ondre Harvey
Jahsiah
Gilbert
Legacy Blue Jays Or Xavier
Yechiel Saint, Cassidy McBride, Charles Thomp-
son,
Kyrio Con-
nolly, Robert Swain, Jr., Brent Burrows
Sherman
Hendfield
COACHES:
Eugene Thompson

Orville Saint and

COACHES/FATHERS

Wory Gilbert, Trevor Edgecombe, Steve
Meadows, Morris Bain

Brian Hanna, Buster Laing, Jason Lord, Mark
Gardiner

Ural Forbes, Sr., Kurt Neely, Wayne Basden,
Kevin McLaughlin

Harry Connelly, Charles Thompson, Chovez
McBride, Francois Burrows

PRESIDENT’S TEAM

Burger King Rockies: Orveo Saint, Bailey
McBride, Devonte Dean, Lames Pierson

Hong Kong Cuisine White Sox: Abdul Gor-
don, Leonardo Danaj Bain, Alonzo Williams,
and Courtney Moore

Jus Cool Tigers; Voshawn
Russell, Justin Beckford, Thomas Blake, Cas-
tromer Griffin, Jr.

MANAGER: Sean Russell
ES: Orville Saint/James Pierson

COACH-

VICE PRESIDENT’S TEAM

Burger King Rockies O. Yeshua Saint,
Kevion Knowles, Michael Wilson, Drenard
Delancy

Hong Kong Cuisine White Sox Trent
Rolle, Janeil Cash, Christian Bowe, Matthew
Bowe

Jus Cool Tigers Myles Green,
Chavier Grant, Floyd Giddings, Jr., Levar
Morris

MANAGER: Eugene Thompson
COACHES: Freddie Cash & Ryan Lowe

(4) BRONCO DIVISION ALL STARS

PRESIDENT’S TEAM - 12:30 PM TO 2:00
PM

Vopak Met Khalil Knowles,
Kent Parker, Dominique Kemp, Tafari Rolle

GB Shipyard Cardinals Ural Forbes, Jr.,
Maleek Perpall, D’Angelo Hopkins, Kevon Rus-
sell

Kitty’s Boutique Yankees Donovan
Cox, Quincy Grant, Jason Wood, Chris Sawyer

MANAGER: Elkino Bain.
COACHES: Roscoe Kemp/Ural Forbes, Sr.

VICE PRESIDENT’S TEAM

Vopak Mets Jonathon Johnson,
Malik Green, Marvin Roberts, John Burrows

GB Shipyard Cardinals Malik Dames,
Spencer Hepburn, Rondre Hall, Shane Booth

Kitty’s Boutique Yankees Joshua
Campbell, Liam Brown, Hilary Huyler, Joseph
Downing

MANAGER:

David Downing
COACHES: Ron Bonaventura Tony Dames


THE TRIBUNE

THE WEATHER REPORTE

5-Day FORECAST

ax

iF



Hi

ORLANDO |
High: 84° F/29°C
Low:63°F/17°C

TAMPA —

High:88°F/31°C

Low: 65° F/18°C
@

KEY WEST
High: 82° F/28° C
Low: 74° F/23°C

@

1

Shown is today's weather. Temperatures are today's
highs and tonights's lows.

Albuquerque
Anchorage
Atlanta
Atlantic City
Baltimore
Boston
Buffalo
Charleston, SC
Chicago
Cleveland
Dallas
Denver
Detroit
Honolulu
Houston

Sunny and windy. Partly cloudy and Brilliant sunshine and Mostly sunny and Mostly sunny and Clouds and sun, The higher the AccuWeather UV Indexâ„¢ number, the
windy. windy. windy. breezy. breezy and pleasant. greater the need for eye and skin protection.
. High: 82° High: 84° High: 83° High: 84°
High: 83° Low: 72° Low: 72° Low: 71° Low: 74° Low: 73° see EOE
PEE aa Eee
82°-13° F 86°-71° F High _Ht.(ft.)_ Low Ht. (ft.
. The exclusive AccuWeather RealFeel Ho an index that combines the effects of temperature, wind, humidity, sunshine intensity, cloudiness, precipitation, pressure, and Today 8:38 a.m. 2.6 2:36am. -0.1
elevation on the human body—everything that effects how warm or cold a person feels. Temperatures reflect the high and the low for the day. 856p.m. 3.3 2:31pm. -0.1
9:24am. 26 3:23am. -0.1
Statistics are for Nassau through 2 p.m. yesterday Monday To12am. 26 41i2am. 04
Temperature 10:35pm. 3.2 4:06p.m. -0.1
ABACO
4 + ahs O40 ° High SinanGbdech heen (adalah ehRee ddeednenereeaibech dees 79° F/26° C 11:03 96 5-03 0.0
e en High: 81° F/27” C LOW oe 72° F/22° C Tuesday 41-29 oa 34 4:59 oth 04
a Low: 66° F/19°C Normal high... go-FeeG
Normal low 70° F/21°C
@ WEST PALM BEACH Last year's High ....ccccsscssssseuesiene src | ONT UCI
High: 82° F/28° C ; Last year's lOW oe eeeeeeeeeeeeeeees 71° F/22° C
Low: 70° F/21°C as Precipitation _ ee ae a.m. Ly nies nal a.m.
As of 2 p.m. yesterday ....ccccccssssessscsseeeeseseeeee 0.00" unset....... 37 p.m. Moonset..... :32 p.m.
FT. LAUDERDALE FREEPORT Year to date : First Full Last New
High: 83° F/28° C @ High: 81° F/27°C Normal year to date .o...cccccccscccccccsecseesceseenees 7.05" ‘ a -
Low: 73° F/23°C Low: 64° F/18° C me
~ AccuWeather.com 2
@ i Forecasts and graphics provided by a %
MIAMI AccuWeather, Inc. ©2009 May 1 May 9 May 17. =‘ May 24
High: 84° F/29° C EL ELT HERA
Low: 70°F/21°C NASSAU SSE rene
High: 83° F/28° C oa:
‘ Low: 72° F/22°C
is 7s @
_— CATISLAND
High: 80° F/27° C
Low: 65° F/18°C
GREAT EXUMA ee
a. SAN SALVADOR
High: 81° F/27°C 5 ah. 04° EQ°
Low:72°F/22°C High: 84° F/29° C
ANDROS ; ow: 72°F / Low: 68° F/20° C
High: 86° F/30° C ‘
Low: 70° F/21°C {. a in
a
LONGISLAND
Low: 69° F/21°C
Today Sunday Today Sunday =_ MAYAGUANA
High Low W High Low W High Low W High Low W % High: 84° F/29° C
FC FIC FC FIC FC FIC FC FIC we \N Low: 70° F/21°C
Indianapolis 81/27 59/15 s 79/26 60/15 pc Philadelphia 85/29 60/15 s 89/31 62/16 s
Jacksonville 84/28 59/15 s 82/27 58/14 s Phoenix 89/31 61/16 pc 385/29 61/16 s CRO eo
Kansas City 72/22 60/15 t 74/23 5713 t Pittsburgh 84/28 58/14 s 84/28 56/13 s RAGGED ISLAND igh: . ,
Las Vegas 74/23 53/11 po 81/27 60/15 s Portland, OR 55/12 41/5 po 58/14 42/5 cee Low:72°F/22°C
Little Rock 83/28 61/16 pc 83/28 64/17 pc Raleigh-Durham 389/31 63/17 s 89/31 58/14 s Low:69°F/21°C AG
Los Angeles 70/21 5442 pe 70/21 54/12 pc St. Louis 83/28 64/17 pc 82/27 65/18 pc . .
Louisville 84/28 66/18 s 84/28 63/17 s Salt Lake City 57/13 38/3 c 56/13 41/5 c GREATINAGUA AY
Memphis 84/28 65/18 s 83/28 65/18 pc San Antonio 87/30 70/21 t 81/27 70/21 pc High:87°F/31°C
Miami 84/28 70/21 s 82/27 72/22 s San Diego 66/18 56/13 pce 65/18 56/13 pc Low 71°F22°C
Minneapolis 56/12 43/6 1 57/13 43/6 1 San Francisco 56/13 48/8 s 58/14 49/9 pc i
Nashville 84/28 64/17 $s 83/28 60/15 s Seattle 5412 42/5 pe 5915 41 pc
New Orleans 84/28 67/19 s 83/28 67/19 s Tallahassee 85/29 62/16 s 85/29 61/16 s a
New York 83/28 65/18 §s 85/29 61/16 s Tampa 88/31 65/18 s 88/31 66/18 s —
Oklahoma City 79/26 65/18 pce 77/25 62/16 t Tucson 86/30 59/15 s 82/27 52/11 s ae
Orlando 84/28 63/17 $s 84/28 63/17 s Washington, DC 86/30 64/17 s 88/31 62/16 s

High
F/C
76/24
46/7
86/30
78/25
85/29
80/26
78/25
86/30
74/23
82/27
80/26
56/13
80/26
80/26
82/27

Today

Low

F/C
48/8
37/2
60/15
61/16
56/13
61/16
52/11
60/15
49/9
56/13
70/21
41/5
53/11
66/18
70/21

WwW

—=— 1) ho eo mew eo hee me

oO

High

F/C
73/22
50/10
81/27
89/31
87/30
80/26
68/20
83/28
72/22
79/26
80/26
62/16
71/21
83/28
84/28

Sunday

Low

F/C
44/6
39/3
57/13
60/15
58/14
53/11
51/10
59/15
57/13
60/15
68/20
37/2
55/12
66/18
68/20

Ww

~ Ee Ese ben Ee coe ce Oe

bes

oO

3







i





iV INDEX TODAY

3|4|5

MODERATE

6|7

HIGH

o|1|2

LOW

4
8 | alo
V. HIGH EXT.









Acapulco
Amsterdam
Ankara, Turkey
Athens
Auckland
Bangkok
Barbados
Barcelona
Beijing
Beirut
Belgrade
Berlin
Bermuda
Bogota
Brussels
Budapest
Buenos Aires
Cairo
Calcutta
Calgary
Cancun
Caracas
Casablanca
Copenhagen
Dublin
Frankfurt
Geneva
Halifax
Havana
Helsinki
Hong Kong
Islamabad
Istanbul
Jerusalem
Johannesburg
Kingston
Lima
London
Madrid
Manila
Mexico City
Monterrey
Montreal
Moscow
Munich
Nairobi
New Delhi
Oslo

Paris
Prague

Rio de Janeiro
Riyadh
Rome

St. Thomas
San Juan
San Salvador
Santiago
Santo Domingo
Sao Paulo
Seoul
Stockholm
Sydney
Taipei

Tokyo
Toronto
Trinidad
Vancouver
Vienna
Warsaw
Winnipeg

High
F/C
90/32
59/15
64/17
67/19
69/20
94/34
85/29
64/17
70/21
67/19
68/20
70/21
70/21
66/18
63/17
72/22
77/25
85/29
106/41
43/6
86/30
81/27
66/18
60/15
50/10
68/20
68/20
60/15
85/29
60/15
81/27
101/38
61/16
67/19
66/18
88/31
82/27
57/13
66/18
86/30
82/27
95/35
79/26
54/12
72/22
84/28
102/38
59/15
59/15
70/21
79/26
100/37
69/20
84/28
82/27
91/32
81/27
86/30
73/22
55/12
64/17
73/22
73/22
61/16
78/25
86/30
55/12
68/20
62/16
46/7

ealil

Today

Low
F/C
73/22
50/10
39/3
57/13
57/13
79/26
75/23
54/12
49/9
62/16
44/6
51/10
66/18
49/9
46/7
41/5
59/15
61/16
81/27
25/-3
73/22
70/21
43/8
54/12
41/5
46/7
43/8
48/8
67/19
44/6
70/21
64/17
43/8
49/9
49/9
77/25
62/16
46/7
45/7
78/25
52/11
70/21
54/12
36/2
33/0
61/16
72/22
41/5
51/10
41/5
68/20
75/23
52/11
75/23
51/10
70/21
52/11
70/21
55/12
42/5
45/7
57/13
62/16
57/13
52/11
70/21
42/5
47/8
39/3
30/-1

PAGE 15

INSURANCE MANAGEMENT

(BAHAMAS) LIMITED. INSURANCE BROKERS & AGENTS

Worvo Gines Marine Forecast

WwW

$
pc
$
r
r
pc
sh

nnn
—— oF

+m Bean oo a
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pc
Ss
$
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High
F/C
90/32
66/18
65/18
58/14
69/20
91/32
85/29
66/18
75/23
67/19
68/20
73/22
72/22
67/19
64/17
70/21
68/20
84/28
107/41
34/1
86/30
81/27
64/17
68/20
54/12
70/21
58/14
59/15
86/30
61/16
77/25
102/38
59/15
69/20
63/17
86/30
82/27
55/12
63/17
86/30
81/27
98/36
66/18
63/17
72/22
83/28
102/38
61/16
57/13
70/21
78/25
101/38
63/17
85/29
17/25
89/31
84/28
82/27
72/22
58/14
64/17
66/18
72/22
67/19
56/13
84/28
58/14
68/20
68/20
50/10

Sunday

Low
F/C
74/23
50/10
37/2
49/9
ile
78/25
76/24
52/11
52/11
63/17
44/6
52/11
69/20
48/8
46/7
37/2
55/12
58/14
80/26
19/-7
71/21
71/21
47/8
57/13
43/6
50/10
50/10
41/5
67/19
43/6
69/20
67/19
52/11
47/8
47/8
77/25
63/17
41/5
37/2
77/25
51/10
71/21
54/12
41/5
42/5
62/16
73/22
44/6
50/10
42/5
68/20
69/20
ails
76/24
51/10
73/22
52/11
69/20
56/13
43/6
46/7
48/8
61/16
52/11
49/9
67/19
42/5
47/8
41/5
32/0

Ww

s
pe
pe

YO BO mo Bet meee Bee Bee ee co
ce

——— ee
Oo ee

nw
— —

Weather (W): s-sunny, pe-partly cloudy, c-cloudy, sh-showers, t-thunder-
storms, r-rain, sf-snow flurries, sn-snow, i-ice, Prcp- precipitation, Tr-trace



WINDS WAVES VISIBILITY WATER TEMPS.
NASSAU Today: NE at 12-22 Knots 3-5 Feet 10-20 Miles 77°F
Sunday: NE at 15-30 Knots 4-6 Feet 10-20 Miles 77°F
FREEPORT Today: NE at 10-20 Knots 2-4 Feet 10-20 Miles 77°F
Sunday: NE at 12-22 Knots 3-5 Feet 10-20 Miles 77°F
ABACO Today: NE at 10-20 Knots 2-4 Feet 10-20 Miles 77°F
Sunday: NE at 12-22 Knots 3-5 Feet 10-20 Miles 77°F

Topay's U.S. FORECAST

Billings
oe
55/43)
| ed Chicago
74/49

Showers
T-storms
ee
Flurries
Snow
[y_Â¥] Ice

Shown are noon positions of weather systems and
precipitation. Temperature bands are highs for the day.
Forecast high/low temperatures are for selected cities.







-10s





Miami
84/70

Fronts

Cold =="
Warm fianfienfis

Stationary Mangunllite

-Os (0s) 10s 20s [B0Sl] 40s (50s 60s 70s 80s [SOsiiNGUSIATIS]

AUTO INSURANCE

Never st

OUI |

EN Sinle without us!

co MES, to Auto Insurance,
jer the smart choice is

“Management.

ople you can trust.

INSURANCE MANAGEMENT

(BAHAMAS) LIMITED. INSURANCE BROKERS & AGENTS

“Hew Proidewe {GondBoboma | Aco | eutea

Exum

METER) SO AOD | TE 087) SU SSO0 (Te PAD) SOD |e (42) $32-2800 | (42) 200

a =


PAGE 16, SATURDAY, APRIL 25, 2009 THE TRIBUNE
LOCAL NEWS

_thescene

by Franklyn G Ferguson, JP









NASSAU EVENTS CAPTURED ON CAMERA

fyceee =” CONFERMENT OF BAHAMAS ASSOCIATION OF

tion of member of the Caribbean
College of Family Physicians

esc PRIMARY CARE PHYSICIANS DESIGNATION (MCCFP)

ceremony held at the Paul Far-
quharson Convention Centre.

Among those attending was
Health Minister Dr Hubert Minnis,
a specialist in obstetrics and
gynaecology, who commended
the organisation on its endeavour
to recognise and advance the
cause of family medicine locally
and throughout the region.

He said the role of family medi-
cine is to reduce the rate of
chronic non-communicable dis-
eases in the Bahamas.

Also attending was Dr Pauline
Williams-Green, president of the
Caribbean College of Family
Physicians, who gave the princi-
pal address.

The BAPCP was formed in
October 2006 as the local chapter
of the Caribbean College of Fami-
ly Physicians (CCFP).


























































































1. (I-r) DR Pauline Williams-
Green, president of Caribbean
College of Family Physicians; for-
mer Governor General Dame Dr
lvy Dumont, patron of BAPCP;
Minister of Health Dr Hubert Min-
nis; Dr Carnille Farquharson,
president of BAPCP.

2. PHYSICIANS who received
the designation MCCFP certificate
are pictured from left to right —
Dr Mortimer Moxey (GP); Dr
Mystee Spencer-Prince (FM); Dr
Gertrude Holder (FM); Dr
Chineyere Carey-Bullard (FM); Dr
Sharmaine Butler (FM); Dr C Gra-
ham Cates (FM): Dr Carnille Far-
quharson (FM): Dr Carla Bethel
(FM); Dr Alexya Dorsette-
Williams (FM); Dr Cherilyn Han-
na-Mahase, immediate past pres-
ident of the BAPCP, and Dr Fran-
cis Williams (FM). Missing is Dr
Myles Poitier (FM).

3. SHELDON Prince, a physio-
therapist at Doctors Hospital, is
shown with his wife Dr Mystee
Spencer-Prince, family physician
at Princess Margaret Hospital.

4. DR Francis Williams, family
physician at Princess Margaret
Hospital; Marcian Bethell, a mas-
sage therapist at SuperClubs
Breezes, and vice-president of
finance at Cable Bahamas Barry
Williams.



5. DR C Graham Cates, first
vice-president of BAPCP and
principal of the Family Medicine
Centre; Marva Moxey-Sawyer
interior designer; Dr Mortimer
Moxey, general practitioner and
councillor with BAPCP.

6. DR Lisa Rolle-Smith, fami-
ly medicine resident and public
relations officer of the BAPCP; Dr
Tiadra Dorsette-Williams, family
medicine resident and secretary
with the BAPCP: Dr Alexya
Williams-Dorsette, designee and
assistant public relations officer
with the BAPCP.

7. DR Carnille Farquharson,
designee and president of the
BAPCP; Dr Glen Beneby, an
anaesthesiologist and medical
adviser with the Public Hospitals
Authority.



8. DR Horizal Simmons, gen-
eral practitioner, councillor with
the BAPCP and chairman of the
Health Professionals Council; Dr
Carnille Farquharson of the Holis-
tic Family Medicine Centre locat-
ed on Tonique Williams-Darling
Highway; Health Minister Dr
Hubert Minnis, and Frances Sim-
mons.




PAGE 1

N N A A S S S S A A U U A A N N D D B B A A H H A A M M A A I I S S L L A A N N D D S S L L E E A A D D I I N N G G N N E E W W S S P P A A P P E E R R C M Y K C M Y K Volume: 105 No.126SATURDAY, APRIL 25, 2009 PRICE – 75 (Abaco and Grand Bahama $1.25 WEATHER SUNNY AND WARM HIGH 83F LOW 72F THE family of an expatriate financial adviser gunned-down execution style have their “suspicions” about who may have targeted him and why, according to the head of the police’s Homicide Unit. However, as of yesterday afternoon an island-wide man hunt by police had yet to result in any arrests by police in connection with the shooting of Hywel Jones, said Assistant Superintendent Leon Bethel. Welsh-born Hywel Jones, whose status is listed as “serious”, continued to fight for his life in the Intensive Care Unit at Doctor’s Hospital yesterday. A gunman shot him in the head about 10am Wednesday in the parking lot of Britannia Consultancy Group, an offshore financial services company of which he is president. The parking lot is located just west of Gambier Village. ASP Bethel said: “He has some family members here and we have interviewed some of them. They have suspicions (about why Mr Jones was shot but I cannot repeat them at this time as it may jeopardise the success of our investigations.” The officer emphasised that police are “looking at all possi bilities” in relation to the case. ASP Bethel said that a few people have come forward to offer police assistance in connection with their investigation into the matter, but they need more help. “We have one or two people who have been giving us some assistance which we appreciate, but we are still hoping that other people will come forward to talk to us.” He said police strongly Voice ideas on motive and identity behind those in v olv ed The Tribune ANYTIME ... ANYPLACE , WE RE #1 B AHAMASEDITION TRY OUR McFLURRY TWIX MIX www.tribune242.com $19.25Each.Distributed by: INTRODUCING Home of: Family’s ‘suspicions’ on expat’s shooting Funeral of vendor killed in hit-and-run FRIENDS and relations of the popular Fox Hill newspaper vendor, who was knocked off his bicycle in a hit-and-run accident last week, will gather at St Anselm’s Church for his funeral this afternoon. Humphrey “Trod” Gerard Jackman, 47, lived oppo site St Anselm’s Roman Catholic Church in Bernard Road, Fox Hill, all his life, and was well-known and well-liked in the community for his gentle nature, sense of humour and abundant creativity. The newspaper vendor started selling The Tribune, The Guardian and TheP unch outside MP Fred Mitchell’s constituency office on the Fox Hill roundabout when he lost his job as a chef in the main kitchen at Atlantis six years ago. He saved his money to continuec ulinary courses after leaving the Paradise Island hotel. Mr Jackman was planning to embark on his first gourmet cooking course in August, but his life was cut short when a silver Chevro l et Equinox knocked him off his bicycle near LW Young Junior High School in Bernard Road between 4am and 6am on Thursday, April16. Police have recovered a bicycle, thought to be the bike he rode to The Guardian office off Thomp son Boulevard at 4am every morning to collect around 40 Tribunes, 20 Guardians and the bi-weekly Punch, and are still appealing for witnesses to find the driver who left him suffering at the HYWELJONES n By ALISON LOWE Tribune Staff Reporter alowe@tribunemedia.net n By MEGAN REYNOLDST ribune Staff Reporter mreynolds@tribunemedia.net MUL TI-MILLION DOLLAR RESORT PROJECT BREAKS GROUND IN SPITE of a global recession, government officials and developers broke ground yesterday on a multi-million dollar project on Cat Island that Prime Minister Hubert Ingraham described as the singular significant development in the history of the island. The proposed world-class PGA Village golf course and beach resort, to be developed by the Cat Island Partners group is expected to create over 200 construction jobs and more than 900 permanent jobs during ongoing operations a much welcomed “economic shot in the arm” for the underdeveloped island. The resort also will be a springboard for “hundreds and hundreds” of job opportunities in the area of tours, transport, souvenir and straw production, local food, fish and marine production, Prime Minister Ingraham said. He urged Cat Islanders to take advantage of the impending employment chances before they are filled by workers from New Providence or Grand Bahama. “During this time of uncertainty in the employment market, it is important that residents here in Cat Island take up the challenge to fill as many of these job opportunities as possible. I assure you that construction workers, idle in New Providence and Grand Bahama, will have a keen interest in availing themselves of these opportunities,” he said. The development will encompass a hotel, casino, a golf instruction centre, 223 single family residential lots, retail and dining areas, spa and two 18-hole golf courses atop 1,906 acres of oceanfront property. Government has also agreed, subject to the completion of the appro priate environmental studies, the addition of a marina component to this development at a proposed Port Howe site. Mr Ingraham said he believed the development of the marina would provide for an excellent opportunity to pursue the stabilization and conservation of the historic Farquharson Plantation Great House and for the safeguarding of the adjoining historic one-room original school house in Port Howe. Mr Ingraham congratulated the Cat Island Partners for keeping their commitment to the government and people of Cat Island notwithstanding the considerable deterioration in the T i m C l a r k e / T r i b u n e s t a f f SETTINGTHESCENE: Philip Davis (right hole of what will be a PGA golf course in Cat Island n By TANEKA THOMPSON Tribune Staff Reporter tthompson@tribunemedia.net SEE page 6 SEE page 6 SEE page 6 IT is anticipated that by May 4, cheques will be made available to those persons who have qualified for national unemployment benefit, Labour Minister Dion Foulkes said yesterday. “We are very happy and pleased by the process that was used by the Department of Labour and the National Insurance Board during the six days of registration at the four centres here in New Providence, the two centres in Grand Bahama and also at the administrator’s office , and National Insurance offices throughout the Family Islands,” Mr Foulkes said during a press conference Benefit cheques to come on May 4 n By NATARIO MCKENZIE Tribune Staff Reporter SEE page 6 Humphrey Jackman

PAGE 2

FREEPORT – In observance of National Volunteer Recognition Day, seven healthcare volunteers were recognised for providing unselfish service at the Rand Memorial Hospital on Grand Bahama. Medical Chief of Staff, Dr Frank Bartlette, believes that volunteering in the health care system is important because it contributes to the overall qual ity of patient care at the Rand. “We have quite a few volunteers, and some are involved with patient care. So in addition to seeing doctors and nurs e s, patients also interact with volunteers and the benefit goesa long way for the morale of patients, which helps with the overall healthcare system,” said Dr Bartlette. Hospital retiree Shirley Weech, who oversees the volunteer programme at the Rand, said the programme has been in existence for the past five years. Although there are seven active volunteers, Mrs Weech said a total of over 40 persons have served as volunteers at the hospital. “Volunteer work is important at the hospital because volunteers provide assistance to nurses so they can focus on treating their patients. There is always a need for more volunteers,” she said. Mrs Weech, who worked with the hospital for 40 years, has been an exemplary community volunteer on Grand Bahama. After retiring from hospital work, Mrs Weech volunteered at the Red Cross for four years before returning back to the hospital as a volunteer. She has been a hospital volunteer for five years. “I get a lot of satisfaction knowing that I am helping someone, but today everyone wants to get paid no matter how simple the task,” she said. Pastor Henry Moncur, of the Shiloh Seventh Day Adventist Church, commended the hospital volunteers for unselfishly giving their time to those who need it most. He said more persons need to lend a helping hand without looking for remuneration. “Volunteerism is extremely important because that is one of God’s purposes for us here. We must give back to the community,” Pastor Moncur said. He said to be a volunteer a person must be sensitive to the needs of individuals. “Sadly, too many individuals are insensitive to the needs of others. It is good to know what people are going through so we can lend a helping hand and you must reach out and show compassion. “Compassion is different from sympathy because it not only says that you are sorry for that person’s situation, but that you willing to share something tangible with them.” Pastor Moncur said that another component of volunteering is not looking for recog nition. “There are folks who will not be thankful for what you do to them, but you must understand that when God has touched your heart, irrespective of whether you’re getting paid or whether they say thanks, you will do it simply because of your heart.” C M Y K C M Y K LOCAL NEWS PAGE 2, SATURDAY, APRIL 25, 2009 THE TRIBUNE INDEX MAIN/SPORTS SECTION Local News.............................P1,2,3,5,6,7,16 Editorial/Letters..........................................P4 Comics........................................................P8 Sports...............................................P9,10,13 Advts ..............................................P11,12,14W eather ..................................................... P15 CLASSIFIED SECTION 36 PAGES USA TODAY WEEKENDER 8 PAGES THE Bahamas’ first skate park will open at the YWCA today as the centre celebrates World YWCA Day with a cook-out and live reggae music. Willis Knowles from the upa nd-coming reggae band “Willis a nd the Illest” promises a set of uplifting tunes while skateboarding enthusiasts try out tricks on the new ramps, and ping pong champs battle it out on the tables. YWCA general secretary Rosalie Fawkes said the demonstrations will give just a small taste of the variety of activities taking place at the Young Women’s Christian Association(YWCA on Dolphin Drive, off John F Kennedy Drive, and she hopes to draw fresh interest in the revitalised community centre. “One of the aims of the World YWCA Day is to increase the visibility and presence of the YWCA in the community, so I am hoping people will come and learn a bit more about it,” Ms Fawkes said. “It’s all about service and giving back, that is what we have been doing for 72 years.” Activities at the “Y” include an outreach programme for young people at the Ranfurly H ome for Children, the Smart K ids Academy pre-school, a dance school, the Y Kids Club and a skate park with a quarterpipe, pyramid and half-pipe constructed by local skaters with wood donated by FYP in Wulff Road. Skate park manager Alex Holden said: “We want to develop skateboarding in the Bahamas and provide a wholesome service to the community. It’s all about good, clean fun.” The YWCA is also building 14 affordable housing units on site which are scheduled for completion in June. The World YWCA day celebration will be from 12pm to 5pm today and tickets are $10 for the cook-out and entertainment, and will be available at the door. All proceeds go to the YWCA. First skate park opens FLYING HIGH:The Bahamas will see the opening of its first skate park at the YWCA today B B y y K K a a t t h h r r y y n n C C a a m m p p b b e e l l l l TWENTY-FIVE employ ees of the Buildings Control Division of the Ministry of Public Works and Transport participated in a two-day workshop designed to enhance customer service skills. Organised by the Depart ment of Public Service, the w orkshop at the British Colon ial Hilton is in keeping with the government’s programme that aims to formulate strategies for internal and external service improvement. The programme was implemented in six key serviced elivery agencies within the public service. The departments include the Department of Public Service, the Passport Office, the Registrar General’s Department, the Department of Road Traffic, the Department of Physical Planning and the Buildings Control Division in the Ministry of Public Works and Transport. Topics to be covered include leadership, how to deliver quality customer service and how to build a dream team. Facilitator Michael Pintard told participants that the public service needs “courageous” individuals “who will not intellectually surrender, who will come to work with their minds and hearts fullye ngaged and prepared to look at the structure of the organisation, the regulations, procedures and culture to make suggestions on how to change it. “The public sector needs creative persons who are willing to engage themselves in improving the public sector,” said Mr Pintard. Works employees receive customer service training Volunteers recognised by hospital n By DENISE MAYCOCK T ribune Freeport Reporter dmaycock@tribunemedia.net

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CONTINENTAL Air l ines executives got a close look at the Ministry of Tourism’s vision for pro m oting individual islands of the Bahamas on Wednes d ay when they paid a courtesy call on Minister of Tourism and Aviation Vin c ent Vanderpool-Wallace. In a stimulating and cordial exchange, Minister Vanderpool-Wallace explained that the individ-u al islands will be present ed to travellers as destina t ions in their own right. He also discussed oppor tunities to provide better a irlift access, and updated the airline’s team on the g overnment’s unfolding initiative to make airlift to the Bahamas much morea ttractive for both customers and airline partners. The Continental Airlines team was led by ChristyR odgers, senior director of sales based at Continental A irlines’ headquarters in Houston, Texas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f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f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n By NATARIO McKENZIE Tribune Staff Reporter L ABOUR Minister Dion Foulkes said yesterday that he was notified by executives of the Sandals Royal B ahamian Resort that several managers would be laid-off on Thursday. “We were notified by Sandals that t hey had intended to lay off some of their managers and as required by the Code of Industrial Practice, we a dvised Sandals as to what they were obligated to do under the terms of t he contract with the managers and a lso pursuant to the Employment Act. “It is my understanding that they complied with all of their legal obliga tions to those managers who were terminated,” Mr Foulkes said. There are reportedly just over 20 managers remaining at the property. Mr Foulkes said that while he has had discussions with Sandals executives he could not disclose the reason behind the lay-offs. According to Sandals’ public relat ions department, five managers were let go as part of a restructuring exerc ise aimed at streamlining operations in these challenging economic times. The lay-offs come just four months after 150 employees were made redundant. At a press conference at t he Clarence A Bain Building yesterday, Mr Foulkes said that he is not aware of plans for any further layoffs. “We have no notice of any further impending lay-offs in the hospitality sector or any other sector for that matter,” Mr Foulkes said. He said that the question of whether m anagers will be unionised has not been discussed with his ministry. L ine staff at Sandals are represented by the Bahamas Hotel Catering and Allied Workers Union. Minister: I was ‘notified’ of Sandals staff lay-offs n ST GEORGE'S, Grenada THE CARIBBEANisland o f Grenada has agreed to ban smoking from all public places,i ncluding beaches, parks and bus terminals, according to the Associated Press . A uthorities expect to place signs on government buildings b y June as a reminder. Community health director Christine La Grenade said Wednesday that she hopes the private sector will embrace a s imilar policy. The ban has been approved o nly by Cabinet members so it does not yet carry any penalties. Legislators are expected to approve the proposal later this year. N o one has publicly opposed i t. It is unknown how many of Grenada's 91,000 people s moke. Anti-narcotics director James Roderique said smoking is most common among teenagers, but that they prefer marijuana over cigarettes. Grenada plans to bans moking in public areas In brief D ION FOULKES w as notified by executives of the Sandals Royal Bahamian R esort that several managers would be laid-off. UNDER the command of Chief Superintendent Stephen Dean, officers from the Royal Bahamas Police and Defence Forces conducted raids in the western, southern and eastern districts of New Providence, focusing primarily on construction sites. On April 18, a raid in the s outhern part of the island netted 32 suspected illegal migrants. In a second exercise on April 21 in the western district, 26 suspected illegal immigrants were apprehended. According to a statement from the Department of Immigration, the officers who participated in the “Back to Basics” operation conducted their raids in Lyford Cay, Gamble Heights, Joe Farrington Road, Yamacraw, and Winton Heights. Of the last 26 persons apprehended, 23 were Haitian men, with one Haitian woman and two Jamaican men. The persons who were discovered to be without status are expected to be repatriated sometime next week. The Immigration Depart ment said it expects to intensify its efforts in this operation in the coming weeks. news BRIEF Tourism & Aviation Minister meets with Continental Airlines PICTURED (l-r Alverenga, director of sales for the Caribbean; Minister Vanderpool-Wallace; Ms Rodgers, Freddy Rodriquez, sales manager for the Caribbean, and Tyrone Sawyer, director of airlift development with the Ministry of Tourism and Aviation.

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EDITOR, The Tribune. What a sad day for me today as I drove by the Fox Hill Parade and did not see the familiar face of the shy, smil ing, gentleman who sells The Tribune in front of the Nation al Insurance Building. I saw a picture and a large bow on the telephone pole where he used to sit so I parked my car to inquire about him only to be told that he had been hit and killed by a hitand-run driver on his way to "his spot" to sell his newspapers. I wonder how the driver that hit him and left him to die would feel if that were their brother, mother, father or child. Perhaps he could have been saved if someone could have helped him.What goes around, comes around. We will all miss him because he was a special part of Fox Hill. My sympathy to his family and friends. He will be so missed. D. KNOWLES Nassau, April 23, 2009 EDITOR, The Tribune. There is no doubt that the basic and fundamental social fabric of The Bahamas has long gone to the dogs and is beyond any norm and probably now the root cause of the majority of our social problems. Month after month we hear about forums, seminars, etc, focusing on the social fabric of our country and from the top to the bottom we hear comments, so-called ‘learned’ which are nothing more than the continued repeat of the cause of the troubles we are faced with; it is as if we try desperately to propagate the cancer killing us. Any analysis of the so-called social fabric confirms that we have a society which is primarily unnatural in composition and we who comprise this are totally disillusioned but profess firstly to be a so-called Christian nation which requires the upholding of the primary Faith and belief in the Ten Commandments and the norm of social behaviour. Again last week, so the television news reported we saw the Minister of Social Development, Hon Loretta Butler Turner followed quickly by Dr Keva Bethel commenting on Bahamian social behaviour and neither acknowledged the root cancer nor the obvious requirement to start what is a long road back to normality in our society and bring social pride in our people. Social analysts even in the US looking at the social well-being of Afro-Americans have for a long time supported and advo cated that the norm of parenting solely in a marriage union not only to abide by basic Christian belief but for economic rea-s ons gives even the lowest in the social class a chance to survive a mother on her own striving to feed, educate and bring up two, three or more single parented children is grossly disadvantaged against the contrast of the norm of a dual parent home with two incomes. The facts speak for themselves that no one has the guts to compromise the cancer we h ave and how we have today t otally accepted child-bearing outside of the norm of a marriage union is socially accepted and socially acceptable period. If the minister, the church and civic leaders do not awaken to the required change then only they will carry the inevitable that our Bahamas will remain a third world nation embroiled in an abnormal society solely interested in the flesh and no moral and ethical basis o f a normal society. T he total refusal of the c hurch to teach and chastise the continual programmed single parenting is beyond any understanding that the church, per se, actually stands for the moral authority of the command ments. The church leaders seem to worry more about the col lection plate than teaching the truth and the Christian belief as they see they will step and crunch too many exposed toes. The blood of our failed society is on the hands of the past politicians and church leaders. One pregnancy outside of marriage might be acceptable but when women have threefour-five children outside of the marriage union, sorry we have gone far too far laughing in God’s face and the proclaimed commandments and Christian belief. A recent speech on education acknowledged that there is a connection between single parenting and the continual negative examination results and the unacceptable level of education, especially if you look at our national education investment now of billions of tax dollars against the return one can only describe that as dismal to a failing grade and an horrific misuse of tax payers money. Some contend and there is a strong argument to this that successive governments have intentionally by design allowed for this social cancer to grow and grow as with poverty, educational ignorance political power remains in the hands of those who can manipulate to stay in power. Why has successive majority governments seemingly had fiscal and financial policies to control the creation of wealth? Solely again to control the people and control where they will vote. We have to start now to cause over the coming 40-60 years to turn the clock back to the acceptable Christian and even Islamic belief in the sole privilege of procreation in and exclusively in marriage marriage I must state of man and woman. Minister Loretta Butler Turn er and Dr Keva Bethel are totally and absolutely wrong in their approach their approach for the continuance of the mess and cancer we have is tantamount to endorsing sin gle parenting which any truthful social analyst will confirm is not normal, immoral and the cancer that has eaten the total fabric of the once proud Christian and moral society of our nation. J MOORE N assau, April, 2009. C M Y K C M Y K EDITORIAL/LETTERS TO THE EDITOR PAGE 4, SATURDAY, APRIL 25, 2009 THE TRIBUNE The Tribune Limited NULLIUS ADDICTUS JURARE IN VERBA MAGISTRI Being Bound to Swear to The Dogmas of No Master L EON E. H. DUPUCH, Publisher/Editor 1903-1914 S IR ETIENNE DUPUCH, Kt., O.B.E., K.M., K.C.S.G., (Hon. P ublisher/Editor 1919-1972 Contributing Editor 1972-1991 EILEEN DUPUCH CARRON, C.M.G., M.S., B.A., LL.B. P ublisher/Editor 1972Published Daily Monday to Saturday S hirley Street, P.O. Box N-3207, Nassau, Bahamas Insurance Management Building., P.O. F-485, Freeport, Grand Bahama T ELEPHONES Switchboard (News, Circulation and Advertising Advertising Manager (242 C irculation Department (242 N assau Fax: (242 Freeport, Grand Bahama: 1-(242 F reeport fax: (242 W EBSITE www.tribune242.com – updated daily at 2pm WASHINGTON (AP f acing perhaps the trickiest political issue of his young presidency, is trying to appease his liberalb ase without losing control of a potentially volatile inquiry into the George W. Bush admini stration's use of harsh interrogation tactics against terrorism suspects. One step to the left or right could land him in political trouble. If Obama seems inclined to stifle an investi g ation and possible prosecution of Bush administration officials who approved rough interro g ations by the CIA, he may infuriate liberal activists who were crucial to his election. But if Democratic lawmakers appear too zealous in pursuing departed Republican government officials, they might be portrayed as vindictive and b ackward-looking, undermining Obama's image as a forward-looking figure of hope andp rogress. While Obama struggles to calibrate the mat t er, Republicans sense a possible gap in his armour and an uncharacteristic shakiness in his message. In the past few days, the White House signalled that it would not support the prosecution of Bush administration lawyers who had j ustified the interrogation tactics, which Obama has likened to torture. Later, Obama said the a ttorney general should make such decisions. On Tuesday, Obama said he wanted to look f orward, not back, but he would prefer an independent commission to a complete congres sional investigation if a full-blown inquiry is pursued. On Thursday, the president told congressional leaders he had no interest in such a p anel, which some call a "truth commission." The speaker of the House of Representa t ives, Democrat Nancy Pelosi, continues to push for such a commission with subpoena powers. B ut lawmakers agree that the idea is probably dead, at least for now. That leaves hearings in the hands of House and Senate committees, which Democrats con trol. The House Judiciary Committee, chaired by Democratic Rep. John Conyers, has an especially large number of sharply partisan Democ-r ats and Republicans, who could produce tele vised fireworks and unpredictable results. Terry Holt is among the Republican strate gists who think Obama and his allies will suffer b ecause the scenario is apt to look more like a witch hunt than a sober search for justice. " It would be a total circus and be complete chaos and expose them to terrible risk," Holt said. "Obama's political strength is based on the notion that he is the future, moving for ward. I felt Obama's first instinct was the correct o ne: to let this stuff go." Democrat Dianne Feinstein says the effort will take months, whichm ight allow the issue to cool down a bit. It is red hot for now, however. Liberal g roups, blogs and Web sites are demanding fullbore inquiries and possible prosecutions of the lawyers and officials who justified the tactics. Those tactics included 11 days of sleep deprivation for some detainees and repeated water b oarding, an ordeal that simulates drowning. Recently released memos from the Justice D epartment "provide shocking confirmation of high-level involvement in the sadistic interrogation methods the Bush administration authorised the CIA to use on detainees," the American Civil Liberties Union says on its Web site. " It is indefensible to avoid investigating and prosecuting those responsible for these heinousc rimes." Liberal talk show host Ed Schultz said this w eek on MSNBC that many liberal Democrats "want to see prosecution. Does the president just ignore them?" After 2,000 viewers texted their opinions, Schultz said, "Ninety-four per cent want to see Bush officials prosecuted." T he White House is walking a careful line. On one hand, Obama cannot spurn his liberal b ackers too often, and he already has disap pointed them on issues such as sending more t roops to Afghanistan. But the president also cannot afford to let Republican strategists portray the CIA interrogations matter as a case of Democratic overreaching, perhaps comparable to the GOP's s trategic overreach in impeaching then-President Bill Clinton. Matt Bennett, vice president of t he moderate-Democratic group Third Way, said the potentially unconstitutional actions of t he Bush administration officials require looking into. But he is wary of a potentially partisan food fight if congressional committees alone conduct the investigations. "If this were to proceed," Bennett said, "the best model is the 9/11 Commission, with unquestionably responsible leaders, like Lee Hamil-t on." Hamilton, a former Democratic lawmak er from Indiana, co-chaired the highly regarded commission that investigated the Sept. 11, 2001, terror attacks. B ut Obama threw cold water on the independent commission idea Thursday. That leaves C ongress, and the nation, with an unclear path on how to pursue a combustible question. (This article was written by Charles Babington of the Associated Press). Strengthen marriage as social pillar LETTERS letters@tribunemedia.net Obama walks thin line on interrogations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EXUMA’S economy received a welcome boost as the island hosted the contestants of the Miss Bahamas Universe competition last weekend. It is just under a month to go before the country crowns the new Miss Bahamas Universe. Last weekend all 17 contestants touched down at the Moss Town International Airport in Exuma where they received a warm welcome from the island’s youth marching band. They were also the special guests at a welcome reception courtesy of the Ministry of Tourism and February Point Resorts. The island of Exuma came alive as they watched contestants give it their all in the swimsuit and spokesmodel competitions held at the Four Seasons Resort. One by one the bevy of beauties strutted their stuff on the runway. Following the big showdown, some of the girls spoke with the press about their performance on stage. Miss New Providence Ronnell Armbrister said, “I've been working very hard to get in shape for the swimsuit competition, but for the spokesmodel competition I feel I was really impressive.” Miss Freeport Sharie Delva said: “Everyone here is ready and very excited about the competition. Another contestant, Miss Deadman’s Cay Alyssa Knowles said she believes her passion for the country came through strongly. The audience showed their support for each contestant with loud cheers as they paraded one by one onto the stage. The highlight of the night was the spokesmodel segment – all 17 beauties were given the opportunity to present a 30 to 60 second commercial on why tourists should come to the Bahamas and what islands they must see. The pageant’s director of corporate affairs Robert Pinder said he is pleased with the success of the event so far and the overwhelming support that has come from various companies on the island. Exuma Tours provided the transportation and Charlie's Restaurant gave the girls ‘downhome’ meals as they hosted them following the competitions. The Four Seasons and February Point provided accommodations for the organisation and Western Air flew in all the participants from Nassau. Acting general manager of the Exuma tourism office Petherina Hanna said the event gave Exuma a “great” economic boost. “(In lenging times, things are a little abnormal here because we are used to a really, really, high quality of life, and in the last few months in the world we have been feeling it, so with the music fest that just ended and now the Miss Bahamas swimsuit competition and then the 56th Family Island Regatta, they're all great examples of domestic tourism and the ministry of tourism encourages that.” The next competitions, costume and talent, are scheduled for May 17. Scores from both events added to the judge's interview on May 23 will determine the top 12 contestants. Winners of each category will be announced during the finals of the Miss Bahamas Universe Pageant on May 24 at the Wyndham Nassau Resort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n PONCE, Puerto Rico LOCAL officials say a new port will generatea bout 5,000 jobs when it o pens in southern Puerto Rico next year, according to the Associated Press . P once mayor Maria Melendez says that a group of U.S. and SouthK orean investors, known as UCW America, plan to s tart hiring port administrators in January. They will spend $48 mill ion on roads to the harbour. Melendez on Wednesd ay said the $600 million Port of the Americas will b e one of the region's largest seaports. Originally due to open i n 2006, it will compete with existing ports in J amaica, the Bahamas and the Dominican Republic. n By TANEKA THOMPSON Tribune Staff Reporter w hyyouvex@tribunemedia.net “I vex at so many buses filled with passengers who take short cuts through the residential a reas off Baillou Hill Road tryi ng to avoid the long lines before getting to Mall at Marathon. There seems to be no law for them, they speed over speed bumps, overtake other buses and put children, elderly persons and others in serious danger. “Should they not be on the main streets only? Nothing will be done until someone gets kill.” D H “I vex because for the past two Tuesdays I've missed my favourite show on channel 43 because some cable channels were without sound. The first week I was on hold for almost 40 minutes, with 22 callers ahead of me, trying to find out what was going on. “This week I had a shorter wait as there were only three callers ahead of me, thankfully. What's really going on Cable Bahamas? Am I going to miss my 8pm programme this coming Tuesday too? Will I ever see and hear it again?” VEX “REAPER” WATCHER “I vex that every time I go into my favourite lunchtime restaurant the girls behind the counter act like I do them something. Particularly in a location where there is a popular shopping centre, I have witnessed other customers get stink stares, and the girls grumble when they ask for orders. On top of this stinkness, half the time I bite into my food the bread is so hard and dry I wonder why I keep going back. “I even went to another location (of this restaurant chain and saw that someone had post ed an internal memo, begging employees to smile and be nice, in plain view of customers. I wish more of these owners would send in friends or family as mystery customers so they can see how no good and slack their employees are because I didn’t ask for a side of attitude with my food.” SICK OF SUB-STANDARD SERVICE. “I vex because a big hole in the road burst my tyre last night right by Caves Village and that hole been there for a long time.I mean sometimes driving on these streets is like ducking and dodging when you miss one, another one right there to get you. “Everywhere you go the roads dig right up, and it seems like they worse off than before. The government say they doing this expansive road improvement project but it seems like these streets getting worser and worser but right now my main concern is if the government ga’ pay for me to get a new tyre, man.” PEEVED AT POTHOLES. Are you vex? Send your complaints to whyyouvex@tribunemedia.net WHY YOU VEX? MISS Bahamas Universe contestants take part in photo shoots during the pageant’s preliminary competitions in Exuma. In brief Exuma hosts Miss Bahamas Universe New Puerto Rican port scheduled to open next year

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side of the road after knocking him off his bicycle. Mr Jackman is believed to have been taken to hospital in a private vehicle, and died at the Princess Margaret Hospital that evening. The following morning thieves broke into the home he shared with his 94-year-old maternal uncle, Lenneth Davis, stole his safe and rifled through his clothes and personal belongings, including hundreds of photographs of himself and his friends. Mr Jackman’s brother, Patrick Jackman, 37, said his brother was creative in everyt hing he did, as he had excelled a t making and hanging curtains f or Sholan’s Drapery near his home in Bernard Road for 13 years before he became an enthusiastic chef, and he always had a talent for making anything he wished, including realistic models using just newspaper and glue. “He could sit down and build anything,” Patrick said. “He built a speed boat out of newspaper. He made model airplanes out of paper that lookedj ust like the ones made from kits. It was something that he had.” Another of Mr Jackman’s talents was impersonations, and his charismatic likeness to Michael Jackson earned him the n ickname “Jackson”. P atrick said: “From when he w as small he started collecting Michael Jackson albums, and everyone called him Jackson. “He could dance and do anything Michael Jackson could do.” As a child Patrick remembers his brother, aged around 17, making Batman and Robin costumes for himself and his little brother exactly as they were in their favourite television cartoon. Mine was a little tight, but it was just as I saw it on the TV, the stitch was the same and everything. “We put them on Christmas morning and we walked out on the porch and my cape got snagged, so I ended up busting my eye and he looked at me and said, ‘Robin, always remember to tuck your cape in, you’re fighting super villains, not yourself.’” Patrick added: “Sometimes in the morning he would call me for a ride to The Guardian and not once did I refuse, even t hough I live deep in the west, b ecause that’s the love I had for m y brother. “He didn’t like crowds, he didn’t drink, he didn’t smoke, my mother never had to bail him out of jail, he was not a problematic person at all, he was just in his own world.” Mr Jackman never married or had children, and left behind his mother Marsil JackmanKerr, stepfather George Kerr, three brothers and six sisters. His eldest brother, Tony B rown, 55, who run’s Tony’s Jerk on Fox Hill Road said his younger brother loved talking to people in the community about the daily news. “He was a really nice fella,” Mr Brown said. Mr Jackman’s funeral will be held at 3pm today at St Anselm’s Roman Catholic Church, where Mr Jackman never missed a service. View ing will be at Clarke’s Funeral Home, 10 Tonique WilliamsDarling Highway from 10am to noon and at the church from 2pm until the service. C M Y K C M Y K LOCAL NEWS PAGE 6, SATURDAY, APRIL 25, 2009 THE TRIBUNE believe there are more people who would have been in the area before, during and after Jones was gunned down who may be able to provide insight into the attempted killing of the businessman. At present, officers continue to seek a motive for the apparently arranged daylight attack. The suspect in the case, described as a slim built dark male, stripped off his shirt and left it in the area before he made his escape on a motor bike, which was later found abandoned. Mr Jones, in his mid-fifties, was a resident of Western New Providence. After living in The Bahamas for over 10 years, hew as a permanent resident. H is former business partner, ex-MP Lester Turnquest, told The Tribune on Wednesday that despite a protracted legal battle between the pair that ended in the severance of their relationship, hearing the news of the incident was “like getting hit with a brick.” He described Mr Jones as someone who “thrived on excitement (and to the edge.” Anyone with information about the shooting can contact police anonymously at 919, 328TIPS or 502-9991. y esterday. He said that a total of 800 persons have registered for the unemployment benefit since Monday of this week, bringing the number to 5,150 persons. “We anticipate that the $20 million that was allocated from the medical branch fund will be sufficient for this year. “That is the pre sent project of the National Insurance Board. The numbers in terms of persons who are registering for the benefit are in the range that we originally predicted,” Minister Foulkes said. Recipients of the benefit will receive half of their average insurable weekly wage for 13 weeks; the current ceiling on insurable wages is $400 meaning the maximum amount anyone can receive is $200 a week. The benefits will be paid out from NIB’s $20 million medical branch fund. Once this is exhausted, it will be sustained by contributions from employed persons and employers. While some see the benefit as minimal, Minister Foulkes said the benefit is merely intended to be a “helping hand.” “The benefit is intended to be a help during difficult times for a lot of unemployed Bahamians. It is intended to be only for 13 weeks to allow persons to seek another job or to find other ways to gain employment. “It is not intended to be a permanent form of assistance. It averages out to almost $900 a month for three months,” Minister Foulkes said. global economic situation and the less than bright projections for economic recovery in the short term. The prime minister, who says he does not make a habit of travelling the country with prospective investors, said he made an exception in the case of David Southward and his partners because they assured him that they had the financial means and will to complete the development, notwithstanding the global financial crisis. “The global economy has performed even more poorly than we expected then, with significant negative impact on our economy, particularly since September last year. The result has been a measurable decrease in visitor arrivals on our shores and a sharp increase in unemployment levels,” the prime minister said. Principal of Cat Island Partners David Southward anticipates the timing of end of phaseone construction will coincide with the end of the current global recession. “We truly believe that in two to three years from now as phase one of this great project starts to come online, we will no longer be in a world-wide recession at that point so we actually think the timing of developing this project could n ’t be better. “We knew that in this day and age our consumer and customers won’t come and buy property at any resort until the developers have built the amenities and the facilitiesa head of time. So we have to t ake the lead, we have to get started,” he said. The project will feature the first PGA Village constructed outside of the United States and just the third in the world. Cat Island was the site of a number of plantation estates during early colonial times and just in the near vicinity of this site can be seen the historic ruins of the Farquharson, Bourbon and Armbrister Great Houses. “We meet almost in the shadow of Cumo Hill, made famous as Mount Alvernia by the Roman Catholic hermit Father Jerome Hawes when he built a small chapel at its peak the highest point in the country. “Cat Island is the home of r ake ’n’ scrape music, quadrille dancing and flour cakes. It is, nowadays, the host of two important annual culturale vents the Labour Day Weekend Rake ’n’ Scrape Music Festival and the Emancipation Day Weekend Regatta,” said Mr Ingraham. The island is also the ancestral home of the internationally acclaimed Oscar winning movie and stage actor, Sir Sidney Poitier. The prime minister told Mr Southward and his partners that he hoped as developers, they will tap into this rich and varied cultural and historical background and that some aspects of the culture of Cat Island will be incorporated into the PGA Village. Mr Ingraham said that this development is being held to the highest ecological standards to safeguard the environmental integrity of the landscape and marine resources and to ensure the environmental and economic sustainability of the development. Cat Islanders urged to seek project jobs F ROM page one Share your news T he Tribune wants to hear from people who are making news in their neighbourhoods. Perhaps you are raising funds for a good cause, campaigning for impr ovements in the ar ea or have won an awar d. If so, call us on 322-1986 and share your story. FROM page one Shot expat’s family voices ‘suspicions’ FROM page one Over 5,000 registered for unemployment benefits FROM page one Popular vendor to be remembered H UMPHREYJACKMANas ‘Michael Jackson’ H UMPHREYJACKMANas ‘Elvis Presley’

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TRAPPED in Marriage”, a new Bahamian play by S L Sheppard, premiered at the Regency Theatre on Friday. An additional performance will be held tonight. The cast includes veteran actors Brion Roxbury, Tawari Rodgers, Denise DeGre gory, Dawn Rolle and Liselle Harris. Rela-t ive newcomers Caron Smith, Andre Cartwright and Luckner Timothee round out the cast. The play tells the story of four couples at different stages of their marriages. “You will laugh and cry and recognise yourself and your friends in this produc tion. Every aspect of this play seems true to life in the Bahamas. The characters are pre sented with all their faults and weaknesses, with their strengths and virtues. The actors have worked extremely hard to present three-dimensional characters of true depth,” the producers said. “There are many ways to be trapped. S ome are even of our own making. The play explores these themes. How do we enable others to lie and cheat? How does self-interest guide our actions? How do we take charge of our own lives without hurting others? Though the themes may seem somber, they are presented with a lightt ouch that will delight and touch the audience.” S L Sheppard is the author of the novel “The Green Shutters” and five Bahamian plays including “Staff Room Gossip”, “The Woman From Nassau”, ‘You Never Go Back”, and “With a Little of Luck.” She has also published many short stories in international magazines, and her poetry can be found in international anthologies. Her Christmas plays for children have been performed yearly for many years. She is a pastpresident and now board member of the Freeport Players’ Guild and a veteran actor and director for the company. C M Y K C M Y K LOCAL NEWS THE TRIBUNE SATURDAY, APRIL 25, 2009, PAGE 7 9(+,&/($8&7,218 (0%$66<6$785'$<<1' 6 +,3$+2<&203/(;:HVWHUQ*DWHf :HVW%D\WUHHWRSSRVLWH:HOOVHUYLFH 6WDWLRQV '2256”(1)25,163(&7,21 6XFFHVVIXOELGGHUVPXVWSD\PLQLPXP QRQUHIXQGDEOHGHSRVLWLPPHGLDWHO\ DIWHUHDFKELGFORVHVLQRUGHUWRVHFXUHWKHLU SXUFKDVHRIWKHRIIHUHGYHKLFOH%DODQFH *(1(5$/%/,&,6,19,7(' n BY DENISE MAYCOCK T ribune Freeport Reporter dmaycock@tribunemedia.net FREEPORT Retired Florida News Anchorman Dwight Lauderdale addressed business professionals on the topic of unemployment at the Grand Bahama Chamber of Commerce’s Administrative Professionals and Bosses Luncheon in Grand Bahama. Mr Lauderdale, former news anchor of WPLG Channel 10, was accompanied by his wife. He spoke about a number of global issues, including the worldwide problem of unemployment. “We are not going to recover from this economic disaster until we start putting people back to work,” he told business persons attending the luncheon held at the Sunrise Resort and Marina. Unemployment, he said, is one of the biggest problems in the United States and the Bahamas. He noted that the actual unemployed figures are probably much higher as statistics are based on rounded figures. Mr Lauderdale, who is a frequent visitor to Grand Bahama, said that being a tourist destination is no longer enough to sustain the economy. He said other industries must be convinced to do business on the island. “The unemployment rate here is 15 per cent and that is up from nine per cent a year ago, and that is just the folks they can count. As you know there is a lot of rounding in statistics and I wonder what the real figures might be,” he said. The former newsman said he is aware that every effort is being made to keep the Isle of Capri Casino open on Grand Bahama. He also said that he believes that the opening of a new $20 million glass factory will bode well for the island’s economy. “I think it is great news because it shows that someone on this island understands that it is no longer enough just to be a tourist destination, that here on Grand Bahama you are going to have to depend on more than tourism to succeed economically and to move forward,” he said. “Here on Grand Bahama, I understand that there is a lot of optimism these days over some recent changes at the Grand Bahama Port Authority.” Mr Lauderdale said that company owners and operators must realise that their employees are vital to their business, especially during the current economic climate. He stressed that employers should not intimidate or take advantage of their employees during times of economic uncertainty. “Bosses who are silently or even loudly intimidating employees and trying to make them feel lucky they have a job, you are actually hurting the business,” he said. Even though many bosses may feel they have more job security, Mr Lauderdale stressed that nobody is safe in this uncertain climate. He said the way bosses treat their employees will determine if the business survives or suffers. “There will be some employers who try to take advantage of these dark days, those folks are going to learn a hard lesson,” he said. “Everybody agrees that the economy will come back at some point, but please know that when it does bounce back, it is not going to be business as usual. Every business small or large will have to press the reset button. Every business will have to figure out how to work smarter,” he said. T HE Alpha Kappa Alpha Sorority will be h osting its 31st a nnual Honours D ay on Sunday, A pril 26, at 3pm at Government House. High Schools throughout the Bahamas have nominated outstanding gradu ating senior female students and the winners will be announced at the event. Additional performance for rapped in Marriage’ held tonight at Regency Theatre Alpha Kappa Alpha Sorority hosts 31st annual Honours Day L L a a u u d d e e r r d d a a l l e e s s p p e e a a k k s s t t o o G G B B b b u u s s i i n n e e s s s s m m e e n n Retired Florida News Anchorman Dwight Lauderdale Cast of ‘Trapped inM arriage’ SOME of the nominees from top left column: Giselle Outten, SAC; Dashinique Moss, Crooked Island; Phylicia Bastian, Queens College; Alexis McIntosh, Faith Temple Acad emy. Second col umn: Rachael M Albury, St Andrews Academy.

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W hile the first champion has been decided in the 56th National Family Island Regatta, the competition is expected to heat up today as the final champions are crowned in Elizabeth Harbour, Georgetown, Exuma. So far the regatta has gotten off to a pretty good start with more than 50 boats, as anticipated by commodore Danny Strachan, participating. The largest fleet of boats are entered in the B Class. But the first champions were decided in the Sir Durward Knowles Junior National Championship with Leslie Rolle Jr and the Bulla Reg having secured the crown. They won it in a fiercely competitive three-race series that concluded on Thursday. Yesterday, the action heated up as the other major classes staged their second races. There was one major incident yesterday as the Cobra and the Six Sisters collided as they head ed for the starting line-up in the B Class. While the Cobra, skippered by Dwayne Higgins, managed to make the starting canyon, Six Sisters, skippered by the Rev Elkin Symonette, was grounded. When the race was complet ed, the Terri Ann, skippered by Davis Mitchell out of Staniel Cay, emerged as the champi o ns. They were followed by Miss Susan Chase from Mangrove Bush, Long Island, and skippered by Stefan Knowles. Lundy Robinson and the Eudeva, the winner of the first B Class race, had to settle for third place, while the John B from Abaco got fourth. Queen Drucuilla was fifth, followed by the Cobra, Lady Sonia and the Barbarian. With the first two races combined, the Eudeva is in a twoway tie with the Susan Chase in first place with 24 points apiece. The Eudeva is the defending champions. The Terri Ann is close behind in third with 22. Captain Ray is fourth with 16. The Healthcliff and the Cobra are tied for fifth place with 10 points each. The third and final race in the series will be contested today. In the first race in the C Class, the defending champion BullaR eg, skippered by Leslie Buzzy’ Rolle, has taken the early lead with a one point lead over Lady Diane. And in the A Class, the Tida Wave is the defending champion. She has taken the initial lead after the first race. The Run n ing Tide is in second and the Red Stripe is third. In the Sir Durward Knowles Junior Nationals, Leslie Rolle Jr and the Bulla Reg made sure that at least one of the championship trophies will remain in Exuma. They have collected a total of 43 points. In second place was Marcus Thomas and the Winnie K with 34 points and Revardo McKenzie and the Fugitive from Exuma also had 34 points for third place. Thomas Treco and the Sweet Island Gal had to settle for fourth with 33 points. In the first race, Marcus Knowles and his Winnie K from Long Island, was the winner with Thomas Treco on the Sweet Island Gal from Long Island second and Leslie Rolle and the Bull Reg third. In the second race, Leslie Rolle and the Bulla Reg took the victory, followed by Mar cus Knowles and the Winnie K in second and Thomas Treco and the Sweet Island Gal. And in the third and final race, Leslie Rolle and the Bulla Reg once again came out on top to cement their title. Marcus Thomas and the Winnie K ended up in second. C M Y K C M Y K SATURDAY, APRIL 25, 2009 THETRIBUNE PAGE 9 P AGE 13 Legacy baseball/softball heats up... FLAG FOOTBALL SCHEDULE THE newly formed Flag Football League in the Bahamas is currently underway with games being played every weekend at the Winton rugby pitch. The initial season commenced on Saturday, March 28 and is expected to run through to mid-June. Here’s a look at the schedule of games on tap for this weekend: Today’s schedule 5pm –War vs Sna 4pm – Spa vs War Sunday’s schedule 2:30pm – BR vs Sna 4:30pm – RBC vs Pros SPORTS IN BRIEF Jason Terry wins NBA sixth man award... See page 10 National Family Island regatta expected to heat up today WHEN the race was completed, Class B boat Terri Ann (shown skippered by Davis Mitchell out of Staniel Cay, emerged as the champions... CLASS A BOAT RED STRIPE... CLASS C BOAT FUGITIVE crew members celebrate... CLASS B BOAT QUEEN DRUCILLA... CLASS C BOATS can be seen during the regatta... n By RENALDO DORSETT Sports Reporter rdorsett@tribunemedia.net PORGY BAY, BIMINI After a series of delayed stats, the Bahamas Basketball Federation’s Round Robin tour nament kicked off in Bimini yesterday, featuring a showdown between two of the top teams from the capital and the nation’s second city. Match Point Investment Gems – 80 Electro Telecom Cybot Queens – 51 The Gems took advantage of a short handed Cybots squad and with a stifling defense that gave up just six points in the second quarter pulled away to take the tournament’s opening game in convincing fashion. A closely contested game early in the first quarter featured four ties and five lead changes before the Gems pulled away with a 15-4 run to end the period and grab a 25-14 lead. A constantly attacking Gems squad took advantage of a foul prone Cybots defense and built on the late first quarter momentum in the second. The Gems lead reached 20 for the first time on a pair of free throws by Analicia Ferguson and capitalized on a stagnant Electro Telecom offense. They took a 47-20 lead into the half. With one player sidelined by injury and another pair fouled out early in the third quarter, the Cybots were able to field just four players for much of the second half. The Gems took their largest lead of the game on a runner by Royel Brown late in the third to take a 62-32 advantage. Electro managed to shave just two points from the substantial margin and trailed 65-40 heading into the final peri od. The fourth quarter featured much of the same as the Gems’ reserves contin ued to compound the advantage over a listless and depleted Cybots lineup. Sharpshooting guard Jesheena Pinder led the Gems with 18 points, Latonya Hamilton added 13 while Ferguson and Ariel Brown finished with 10 points apiece. Tracey Lewis led the Cybots with 17 points. Ferguson said her team’s goal was to jump out early and make a statement in the first game of the tournament. “We were just focused the whole way and we did not want to let up once we had a lead because we know how important it is to get that first win under your belt in the tournament,” she said. “Our defense was good, especially in the sec ond half we just wanted to pressure their ball handlers and create as much turnovers as possible and we were able to do that.” The men’s division of the BBF Round Robin also began play yesterday, however the results were unavailable up to press time last night. Gems blow out Cybots, 80-51 e were just focused the whole way and we did not want to let up once we had a lead because we know how important it is to get that first win under your belt in the tournament. Our defense was good, especially in the second half we just wanted to pressure their ball handlers and create as much turnovers as possib le and w e w er e a ble to do that. Gems’ Analicia Fer guson P h o t o s : P a t r i c k H a n n a / B I S

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Davydenko to face Nadal in Barcelona Open semis n By STUART CONDIE AP Sports Writer L ONDON (AP chester United's players saw Liverpool and Chelsea slip up in their pursuit of the Premier League title this week and now must avoid a stumble of their own against Tottenham o n Saturday. United beat Portsmouth on W ednesday to go three points clear at the top of the standings after Liverpool andC helsea both drew their midweek games. But the Red Devils are only just emerging from their own period of shaky form, which included back-to-back P remier League losses and elimination from the FA Cup semifinals, and could be vulnerable at Old Trafford against a Tottenham side unbeaten in six Premier League games against the top four this season. Spurs, who beat both Liverpool and Chelsea this season, have won six of their past eight matches to move from the verge of the relegation zone and into contention for European qualification. The north London side will h ope to have captain Ledley King back in central defense alongside JonathanW oodgate after his chronic knee complaint kept him outo f last weekend's 1-0 win over Newcastle. "Our record against the top four is impeccable but United will put out a strong side and it will be very tough," Woodgate said. Players One of those players could be Ryan Giggs, who would make his 800th appearance for the club. Giggs set up the opening goal in Wednesday's 2-0 win, while fellow veteran P aul Scholes may also play again after making the second goal for Michael Carrick in his 600th club match. T he pair's guile could be crucial against a team increasingly hard to break down. After five consecutive home games without conced ing, Tottenham is trying hard to replicate its form at White Hart Lane in away matches. S purs have conceded just five goals in their last 15 home games and nine all season suggesting they could beat the club record of 11 in a season set back in 1919-20. "We've done well in the games that we've won 1-0," Woodgate said. "It's import ant to keep clean sheets because our strikers are always going to score goals." Liverpool is at Hull knowing it has to win if it is to avoid compounding the damage done to its challenge by Tuesday's 4-4 draw with Arsenal. The Reds have scored 27 goals in their past eight games to shake off their reput ation as one of the league's less attractive big sides, but h ave to tighten up a defense that has been breached eight times in two matches. G oals " Scoring goals is the most difficult thing in football but now we must sort some of the problems we're having in defense," Liverpool goalk eeper Pepe Reina said. " We've always had the balance between attack and defense. That's why we're always there in the Champions League and cup competi t ions, because we are a team with balance. "We have to get back to this way." But Liverpool captain Steven Gerrard will again be absent because of the adductor injury he sustained against Chelsea on April 8. "I think he will be available next week because he'si mproving, but this game is too soon," manager Rafa Benitez said. Chelsea's challenge is fading after the Blues slipped six points off the lead withW ednesday's 0-0 draw against Everton, leaving the side similarly hungry for a win at West Ham a side that is also desperate for points to keep seventh placea nd likely European qualifi c ation ahead of resurgent Tottenham. The Blues have a fully fit squad other than the absent Deco and Ricardo Carvalho. Hiddink said he may rest players ahead of next week's Champions League meeting with Barcelona. Also Saturday, Aston Villa is at Bolton, Manchester City is at Everton, Stoke is at Ful-h am and Sunderland is at last-place West Bromwich Albion. If the Baggies lose, Blackburn could end up effectively relegating them with victory over Wigan on Sunday, when Arsenal hosts Middlesbrough. Newcastle hosts Portsmouth on Monday still looking for a first victory under manager Alan Shearer. Jason Terry wins NBA sixth man award C M Y K C M Y K SPORTS PAGE 10, SATURDAY, APRIL 25, 2009 TRIBUNE SPORTS DALLAS (AP off the bench. Terry, who took on a different role for Dallas the past two seasons, was presented Friday with the NBA sixth man award that goes to the league's top reserve. While starting only 11 of his 74 games in the regular season, Terry averaged 19.6 points and 3.4 assists while playing about 34 minutes a game. The only time Terry had a higher scoring average was 200001, his second NBA season, when he averaged 19.7 points for Atlanta. After starting only 27 games as a rookie, Terry started 531 of his 563 games for the Hawks and Mavericks from 2000-07. Terry averaged 15.5 points for Dallas last season, when he started 34 times but was the only Mavericks player to get into every game. JASON TERRY celebrates at the end of a game against the Houston Rockets in Dallas on April 15. The Mavericks won 95-84. (AP Photo: Donna McWilliam n By ARNIE STAPLETON AP Sports Writer ENGLEWOOD, Colo. (AP The private workout that general manager Brian Xanders and offensive coordinator Mike McCoy had with USC quarterback Mark Sanchez in Los Angeles will likely be the last time the strong-armed passer practices for the Denver Bron cos. Coach Josh McDaniels sug gested as much Friday when he said he doubts the Broncos would move into the top 10 in the NFL draft and he unequivocally dismissed the notion of trading both of his first-round picks to make a move for any top-tier player. The Broncos own the 12th and 18th selections Saturday and they might have to move ahead of Seattle at No. 4 to have a shot at Sanchez. "I think we're in a great spot," McDaniels said. "I think we have an opportunity to get two players right away that can impact our team." But the Broncos would certainly be tempted to move up if Sanchez starts to slip down the board so long as it doesn't involve both of their first-round picks. "We won't do that," McDaniels said. "We won't trade 12 and 18 to move up." After trading Pro Bowl quarterback Jay Cutler to Chicago earlier this month, the Broncos were intrigued enough by Sanchez to fly out for a private workout and interview with him in Los Angeles on Tuesday. McDaniels had to skip the meeting because of a migraine headache, his second since taking over as Broncos coach three months ago. "I think it's more about hydration and the altitude," McDaniels said. "I had them when I was younger, but noth ing wrong neurological, they checked me out and I'm fine." Although the Broncos liked what they saw in Sanchez, "I don't think we would do a lot of moving up from where we're at at 12," McDaniels said. "Maybe. There's a possibility. But I think we feel pretty comfortable with where we're at." The Broncos have 10 picks this weekend, and McDaniels wouldn't mind trading down in any round to stockpile more selections as he retools a team that hasn't reached the playoffs since 2005. And, as Cutler learned this spring, McDaniels will pick up the phone and listen to any trade proposal. "We're not going to turn our head from any opportunity to go back, go up," McDaniels said. The beginning of the end of Cutler's time in Denver came Feb. 28, when McDaniels talked about trading Cutler for Matt Cassel. Although the deal never materialized, it led to a sixweek feud that ended with Cutler going to Chicago for Kyle Orton and a bevy of draft picks. McDaniels said that while the Broncos really like Sanchez, they also feel good about Orton and free agent Chris Simms. "He's a good quarterback. We have two good quarterbacks," McDaniels said. "And I think that's ultimately what we're going to finalize today, before tomorrow morning, and we'll make sure that we feel one way or the other about it. "But I know this: we feel comfortable with the guys we have. They performed well at the minicamp. Nobody in this building is afraid to move forward and play the season with them." Xanders and McDaniels, who signed an NFL-high 16 unre stricted free agents, have the ammo to move up if they want to: they own five picks in the first 84 selections. Of course, the Broncos, like many teams, are leery of the multimillion-dollar guarantees for top-10 picks, and this is a franchise that began laying off front-office staff long before the economic downturn picked up steam. Whether or not it's a premier passer, the Broncos want to come out of the weekend with a third quarterback to compete with Orton and Simms. They also need plenty of help on defense, where they're switching to a 3-4 scheme instead of the four-man front favored by former coach Mike Shanahan. The Broncos aren't antici pating having to draft a wide receiver. They haven't heard from the commissioner's office regarding possible punishment for Pro Bowler Brandon Marshall over his latest run-in with the law, an arrest for fighting with his fiance in March, leading them to believe he won't be fac ing a lengthy suspension. McDaniels: Broncos likely to stand pat in Round 1 BARCELONA, Spain (AP seeded Nikolay Davydenko rallied for a6 -7 (4 Stepanek on Friday to reach a Barcelona Open semifinal against Rafael Nadal. Fourth-seeded David Ferrer and Fer nando Gonzalez of Chile will meet in the other semifinal. Davydenko recovered from mistakes e arly in the first set, but wasted three set points as Stepanek used crafty net play to frustrate to force the tiebreaker. Stepanek then hit one of his seven aces to secure the first set. But the Czech player then crumbled behind a slew of unforced errors, andD avydenko broke to take a 3-2 lead and then used another break to clinch the second set. Davydenko used strong returns to break twice more in the third to set up a meeting with the top-ranked Nadal. Nadal, who has a 3-2 record against Davydenko and 2-0 on clay, reached the semifinals without having to play Friday, after quarterfinal opponent David Nal bandian withdrew on Thursday with a right hip injury. The Spaniard is vying to follow up his fifth straight Monte Carlo Masters trophy with a fifth straight title at Barcelona. The fifth-seeded Gonzalez defeated No. 2 Fernando Verdasco 6-3, 4-6, 6-4, and Ferrer beat Tommy Robredo 6-3, 64 in an all-Spanish match. Ferrer, who reached last year's final, won 43 of 61 service points and broke his Davis Cup teammate once in each set. Man U looking to avoid slip-up against Spurs RAFAEL NADAL , of Spain, during a training session during a Barcelona Open tournament match in Barcelona, Spain, on Friday... NIKOLAY DAVYDENKO , of Russia, returns the ball to Czech Republic's Radek Stepanek during their Barcelona Open Tennis tournament match in Barcelona, Spain, on Friday. Davydenko won 6-7, 6-2, 6-2. (AP Photos: Manu Fernandez

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C M Y K C M Y K SPORTS TRIBUNE SPORTS SATURDAY, APRIL 25, 2009, PAGE 13 NOW that the Easter holiday is over, things are heating up in the Legacy Baseball/Softball Association as teams in the baseball division jockey for wins and position and players gear u p for this weekend’s upcomi ng All-Star Challenges at the Y MCA beginning at 9am. The highlight of these games to date has been the competition between mothers and female coaches and the TeeBallers. This year fathers, together with male coaches, have been added to the mix. Fathers and coaches will take on the Coach Pitch All Stars with the handi cap of having to bat from the opposite side during the game. Eugene Thompson, Legacy player agent, said that the following considerations are in place for the games, and coaches have been advised to: a) Pay special attention to the start and completion time for each all star game as Legacy wishes to showcase each division, hence all games will be played individually. Punctuality is a must to enable us to com plete the schedule. Everyone will be encouraged to sit and watch the all-stars in action. b) Contact your players whom you recommended and inform them of their placement (president/ vice president start time for their game. c) All players and coaches are to wear this year's complete uniform. d) All are reminded that hats are a required part of uniforms and players are expected to wear them at all games. e) Coaches and spectators are reminded to be on your best behaviour, cheering on and encouraging the players as this is also a fundraising event and we expect the general public to attend these events. f) Coaches, please allow every all-star to play. Try to get non-starters in as soon as possi b le, even if you have to use reentry to get the starters back in. Thompson noted that this event is also being used as an evaluation for players and coaches in terms of participa tion in the upcoming nationals. L egacy president Stephen B urrows also expressed delight that six members of the Legacy family have been selected to national teams scheduled to travel this summer. Named to the BBF national teams from Legacy for the 15-16 team to the Pony Caribbean Zone Championships in San Juan, Puerto Rico are: ANDRE TURNQUEST and JERVIS (Champ ART Jr. This team is scheduled to depart July 6 and returns July 12. Named to the 16-18 Team for the Little League Baseball Latin American Regional Tourna ment in Maracaibo, Venezuela are: DESMOND RUSSELL, PATRICK ‘Ali’ KNOWLES Jr, ANEKO KNOWLES, andL EON COOPER JR. This team departs June 19 and returns June 28. The men’s national team to compete in Seattle, Washington, July 14-27 includes DESMOND RUSSELL, andP ATRICK ’Ali’ KNOWLES Jr. S elected to head teams are: 15 -16 Team: Manager, Patrick Knowles Sr. GB, and Coach: Clarence McKenzie NP. Heading the 16-18 Team are: Manager: Terran Rodgers NP; Coach: Feleipe Sweeting NP, and Coach: Opie Cooper GB. Family and fans are asked to support the Associations Fund Raising Day, also on Saturday, as funds are being sought to assist in getting teams to the BBF National Championships in June. Legacy baseball/ softball heats up (1 TEAM PLAYERS BTC RED SOX Tionate Russell, Daniel Blake, Andre Gardiner Port Authority Dodgers Avery Basden, Jordan Robertson, Jayvyn Clarke Bellevue Blue Jays Kyron Parker, Adrian Neely, Kevin Collie Corp. Law Marlins Morgan Hanna, Gabriel Laing, Lashawn Grant Rodney Smith, Jaylon Lord COACHES:Jason Lord, Mark Gardiner, Buster Laing, K. Brian Hanna, Ural Forbes, and Kirt Neely. TEE BALL MOTHERS/FEMALE COACHES TEAM Laverne Gardiner, Leteasha Lord, Rochelle Godet, Shurmon Clarke, Adrienne Fawkes, Charisse Brown, Stacey Knowles, Ricarla Neely, Shakeva Davis, Wende Hanna, Rickelle Sey mour, Allison Meadows, Suezette Basden, Antonia Johnson. COACHES: Lavette Saint and Jackie A. Thompson (2 Legacy MarlinsCamrone Meadows, Tasimo Bullard, Ke’Adre Thompson Alexander Sweeting, Nathaniel Bain, D’ondre Harvey Jahsiah Gilbert Legacy Blue JaysOrXavier Yechiel Saint, Cassidy McBride, Charles Thomp son, Kyrio Con nolly, Robert Swain, Jr., Brent Burrows Sherman Hendfield COACHES:Orville Saint and Eugene Thompson COACHES/FATHERS Wory Gilbert, Trevor Edgecombe, Steve Meadows, Morris Bain Brian Hanna, Buster Laing, Jason Lord, Mark Gardiner Ural Forbes, Sr., Kurt Neely, Wayne Basden, Kevin McLaughlin Harry Connelly, Charles Thompson, Chovez McBride, Francois Burrows Manager, Wory Gilbert, and Coach: Harry Connelly (3 PRESIDENT’S TEAM Burger King Rockies: Orveo Saint, Bailey McBride, Devonte Dean, Lames Pierson Hong Kong Cuisine White Sox: Abdul Gor don, Leonardo Danaj Bain, Alonzo Williams, and Courtney Moore Jus Cool Tigers; Voshawn Russell, Justin Beckford, Thomas Blake, Castromer Griffin, Jr. MANAGER: Sean RussellCOACHES: Orville Saint/James Pierson VICE PRESIDENT’S TEAM Burger King Rockies O. Yeshua Saint, Kevion Knowles, Michael Wilson, Drenard Delancy Hong Kong Cuisine White Sox Trent Rolle, Janeil Cash, Christian Bowe, Matthew Bowe Jus Cool Tigers Myles Green, Chavier Grant, Floyd Giddings, Jr., Levar Morris MANAGER:Eugene Thompson COACHES:Freddie Cash & Ryan Lowe (4 PRESIDENT’S TEAM 12:30 PM TO 2:00 PM Vopak Met Khalil Knowles, Kent Parker, Dominique Kemp, Tafari Rolle GB Shipyard Cardinals Ural Forbes, Jr., Maleek Perpall, D’Angelo Hopkins, Kevon Russell Kitty’s Boutique YankeesDonovan Cox, Quincy Grant, Jason Wood, Chris Sawyer MANAGER: Elkino Bain. COACHES: Roscoe Kemp/Ural Forbes, Sr. VICE PRESIDENT’S TEAM Vopak MetsJonathon Johnson, Malik Green, Marvin Roberts, John Burrows GB Shipyard CardinalsMalik Dames, Spencer Hepburn, Rondre Hall, Shane Booth Kitty’s Boutique YankeesJoshua Campbell, Liam Brown, Hilary Huyler, Joseph Downing MANAGER: David Downing COACHES: Ron Bonaventura Tony Dames LEGACY NATIONAL TEAM REPS Six members of the Legacy Baseball/Softball Association were named to National Teams to travel this summer. Shown above are Patrick Knowles, Sr, Manager of the BBF 15-16 playing in the PONY Zone Championships in Puerto Rico; Aneko Knowles and Desmond Russell, both named to the 16-18 team for the Little League team going to Venezuela. Russell has also been named to the Men’s National Team to compete in Seattle, Washington July 14th to July 27th; and right, Legacy President Stephen Burrows. ALL STAR TEAM MEMBERS PLAYERS are shown during a practice session...

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ANDROS CAT ISLAND ELEUTHERA MAYAGUANA SAN SALVADOR GREAT INAGUA GREAT EXUMA CROOKED ISLAND / ACKLINS LONG ISLAND ABACO Shown is today's weather. Temperatures are today's highs and tonights's lows. KEY WEST WEST PALM BEACH FT. LAUDERDALE TAMPA ORLANDOLow: 63F/17C Low: 65F/18C Low: 70 F/21C Low: 73 F/23 Low: 70 F/21C Low: 74 F/23C Low: 72F/22C Low: 64 F/18 High: 84F/29C High: 88F/31C High: 82F/28C High: 83F/28C High: 84F/29C High: 82F/28C High: 83F/28C Low: 66F/19C High: 81F/27C Low: 68 F/20C High: 84F/29CRAGGED ISLANDLow: 69 F/21C High: 85F/29C Low: 72F/22C High: 81 F/27C Low: 65F/18C High: 80F/27C Low: 68 F/20 High: 84F/29C Low: 72 F/22C High: 87F/31C Low: 69 F/21C High: 83 F/28C Low: 70F/21C High: 84F/29C Low: 71 F/22 High: 87F/31C Low: 70F/21C High: 86 F/30C High: 81 F/27 CFREEPORT NASSAU MIAMI THE TRIBUNE PAGE 15 THE WEATHER REPORT 5-DAYFORECAST Sunny and windy. Partly cloudy and windy . Brilliant sunshine and windy . Mostly sunny and windy . Mostly sunny and breezy. High: 83 Low: 72 High: 82 High: 84 High: 83 AccuW eather RealFeel AccuW eather RealFeel AccuW eather RealFeel AccuW eather RealFeel AccuW eather RealFeel Clouds and sun, breezy and pleasant. High: 84 Low: 72 Low: 71 Low: 74 AccuWeather RealFeel 82 The exclusive AccuWeather RealFeel Temperatureis an index that combines the effects of temperature, wind, humidity, sunshine intensity, cloudiness, precipitation, pressure, and elevation on the human bodyeverything that effects how warm or cold a person feels. Temperatures reflect the high and the low for the day. 73F 87-71F 82-73F 86-71F 84 F Low: 73 TODAYTONIGHTSUNDAYMONDAYTUESDAYWEDNESDAY ALMANAC High ..................................................79F/26C Low ....................................................72F/22C Normal high ......................................82F/28C Normal low ........................................70F/21C Last year's high ..................................83F/29C Last year's low ..................................71F/22C As of 2 p.m. yesterday ..................................0.00" Year to date ..................................................2.19" Normal year to date ......................................7.05" Statistics are for Nassau through 2 p.m. yesterday Temperature Precipitation SUNANDMOON TIDESFORNASSAU First Full Last New May 1 May 9May 17May 24 Sunrise . . . . . . 6:39 a.m. Sunset . . . . . . . 7:37 p.m. Moonrise . . . . . 6:41 a.m. Moonset . . . . . 8:32 p.m. Today Sunday Monday T uesday HighHt.(ft.LowHt.(ft. 8:38 a.m.2.62:36 a.m.-0.1 8:56 p.m.3.32:31 p.m.-0.1 9:24 a.m. 2.63:23 a.m.-0.1 9:44 p.m. 3.33:18 p.m.-0.1 10:12 a.m.2.64:12 a.m.-0.1 10:35 p.m.3.24:06 p.m.-0.1 11:03 a.m.2.65:03 a.m.0.0 11:29 p.m.3.14:59 p.m.-0.1 WORLDCITIES Acapulco90/3273/22s90/3274/23s Amsterdam59/1550/10pc66/1850/10pcAnkara, T urkey64/1739/3s65/1837/2pc Athens67/1957/13r58/1449/9s Auckland69/2057/13r69/2057/13sh Bangkok94/3479/26pc91/3278/25cBarbados 85/2975/23sh85/2976/24pc Barcelona64/1754/12pc66/1852/11sh Beijing70/2149/9s75/2352/11s Beirut67/1962/16s67/1963/17sBelgrade 68/20 44/6s68/2044/6s Berlin 70/21 51/10s73/2252/11s Bermuda70/2166/18s72/2269/20s Bogota66/1849/9r67/1948/8r Brussels63/1746/7pc64/1746/7cBudapest 72/2241/5s70/2137/2s Buenos Aires77/2559/15pc68/2055/12pc Cairo85/2961/16pc84/2858/14s Calcutta106/4181/27s107/4180/26s Calgary43/625/-3r34/119/-7c Cancun86/3073/22pc86/3071/21t Caracas81/2770/21pc81/2771/21pc Casablanca66/1848/8pc64/1747/8r Copenhagen 60/1554/12s68/2057/13s Dublin50/1041/5r54/1243/6pc Frankfurt 68/20 46/7 s70/2150/10pc Geneva 68/20 48/8 pc58/1450/10r Halifax60/1548/8s59/1541/5sh Havana85/2967/19pc86/3067/19sh Helsinki60/1544/6s61/1643/6sHong Kong 81/2770/21r77/2569/20c Islamabad101/3864/17s102/3867/19pc Istanbul61/1648/8s59/1552/11sJerusalem 67/19 49/9pc69/2047/8s Johannesburg66/1849/9s63/1747/8r Kingston88/3177/25sh86/3077/25sh Lima82/2762/16pc82/2763/17pc London57/1346/7c55/1241/5c Madrid66/1845/7pc63/1737/2c Manila 86/30 78/25 r86/3077/25r Mexico City 82/27 52/11s81/2751/10t Monterrey 95/3570/21s98/3671/21pc Montreal79/2654/12s66/1854/12sh Moscow54/1236/2c63/1741/5pc Munich 72/22 33/0 s72/2242/5pc Nairobi 84/28 61/16t83/2862/16t New Delhi102/3872/22pc102/3873/22pc Oslo59/1541/5s61/1644/6pc Paris 59/1551/10r57/1350/10t Prague70/2141/5s70/2142/5s Rio de Janeiro 79/2668/20pc78/2568/20r Riyadh100/3775/23s101/3869/20pc Rome 69/20 52/11 s63/1757/13c St. Thomas84/2875/23sh85/2976/24s San Juan82/2751/10s77/2551/10pc San Salvador91/3270/21pc89/3173/22c Santiago81/2752/11s84/2852/11s Santo Domingo 86/30 70/21 sh82/2769/20sh Sao Paulo 73/2255/12pc72/2256/13sh Seoul55/1242/5c58/1443/6c Stockholm64/1745/7s64/1746/7pc Sydney73/2257/13s66/1848/8pcT aipei 73/22 62/16r72/2261/16pc T okyo61/1657/13r67/1952/11pc Toronto78/2552/11pc56/1349/9t T rinidad 86/3070/21t84/2867/19sh Vancouver55/1242/5pc58/1442/5pc Vienna68/2047/8s68/2047/8s Warsaw62/1639/3s68/2041/5sWinnipeg 46/7 30/-1 c50/1032/0c HighLowWHighLowW F/C F/CF/CF/C T odaySundayW eather (W s -sunny , pc -partly cloudy , c -cloudy , sh -showers, t -thunder storms, r -rain, sf -snow flurries, sn -snow , i -ice, Pr cp-precipitation, T r -trace TODAY'SU.S. FORECAST MARINEFORECAST WINDSWAVESVISIBILITYWATER TEMPS. NASSAU FREEPORT ABACO T oday:NE at 12-22 Knots3-5 Feet10-20 Miles77F Sunday: NE at 15-30 Knots4-6 Feet10-20 Miles77F Today:NE at 10-20 Knots2-4 Feet10-20 Miles77F Sunday:NE at 12-22 Knots3-5 Feet10-20 Miles77F Today:NE at 10-20 Knots2-4 Feet10-20 Miles77F Sunday:NE at 12-22 Knots3-5 Feet10-20 Miles77F U.S. CITIES Albuquerque 76/24 48/8pc73/2244/6pc Anchorage46/737/2r50/1039/3r Atlanta 86/3060/15s81/2757/13s Atlantic City78/2561/16s89/3160/15s Baltimore 85/29 56/13 s 87/3058/14s Boston 80/2661/16s80/2653/11s Buffalo78/2552/11s68/2051/10pc Charleston, SC86/3060/15s83/2859/15s Chicago74/2349/9t72/2257/13t Cleveland82/2756/13s79/2660/15pcDallas 80/26 70/21 t80/2668/20c Denver56/1341/5r62/1637/2cDetroit 80/2653/11s71/2155/12t Honolulu80/2666/18s83/2866/18s Houston82/2770/21t84/2868/20c HighLowWHighLowW F/C F/C F/CF/C High LowWHighLowW F/CF/CF/CF/C High LowWHighLowW F/CF/CF/CF/C TodaySunday T odaySunday T odaySunday Indianapolis 81/27 59/15s79/2660/15pc Jacksonville84/2859/15s82/2758/14s Kansas City 72/2260/15t74/2357/13t Las Vegas74/2353/11pc81/2760/15s Little Rock 83/28 61/16 pc 83/2864/17pc Los Angeles 70/2154/12pc70/2154/12pc Louisville84/2866/18s84/2863/17s Memphis84/2865/18s83/2865/18pc Miami84/2870/21s82/2772/22s Minneapolis55/1243/6r57/1343/6rNashville 84/28 64/17 s83/2860/15s New Orleans84/2867/19s83/2867/19s New Y ork83/2865/18s85/2961/16s Oklahoma City79/2665/18pc77/2562/16t Orlando84/2863/17s84/2863/17s Philadelphia85/2960/15s89/3162/16s Phoenix89/3161/16pc85/2961/16s Pittsburgh84/2858/14s84/2856/13s Portland, OR 55/1241/5pc58/1442/5pc Raleigh-Durham 89/31 63/17s89/3158/14s St. Louis83/2864/17pc82/2765/18pc Salt Lake City 57/13 38/3 c 56/13 41/5 c San Antonio87/3070/21t81/2770/21pc San Diego 66/18 56/13pc65/1856/13pc San Francisco 56/13 48/8 s 58/1449/9pc Seattle 54/1242/5pc59/1541/5pc Tallahassee85/2962/16s85/2961/16s Tampa88/3165/18s88/3166/18sT ucson86/3059/15s82/2752/11s W ashington, DC 86/30 64/17s88/3162/16s UV INDEXTODAY The higher the AccuWeather UV IndexTM number, the greater the need for eye and skin protection.Forecasts and graphics provided by AccuW eather , Inc. Cold W arm Stationary FrontsShown are noon positions of weather systems and precipitation. T emperature bands are highs for the day. Forecast high/low temperatures are for selected cities. -10s-0s0s10s20s30s40s50s60s70s80s90s100s110s Showers T -storms Rain FlurriesSnowIce AccuW eather.com

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C M Y K C M Y K LOCAL NEWS PAGE 16, SATURDAY, APRIL 25, 2009 THE TRIBUNE the scene N ASSAU E VENTS C APTURED O N C AMERA by Franklyn G Ferguson, JP THE Bahamas Association of Primary Care Physicians (BAPCP recently conferred the designation of member of the Caribbean College of Family Physicians (MCCFP family medicine specialists and general practitioners during a ceremony held at the Paul Farquharson Convention Centre. Among those attending was Health Minister Dr Hubert Minnis, a specialist in obstetrics and gynaecology, who commended the organisation on its endeavour to recognise and advance the cause of family medicine locally and throughout the region. He said the role of family medicine is to reduce the rate of chronic non-communicable diseases in the Bahamas. Also attending was Dr Pauline Williams-Green, president of the Caribbean College of Family Physicians, who gave the principal address. The BAPCP was formed in October 2006 as the local chapter of the Caribbean College of Family Physicians (CCFP 1 . ( l-r) DR Pauline WilliamsGreen, president of Caribbean College of Family Physicians; former Governor General Dame Dr Ivy Dumont, patron of BAPCP; Minister of Health Dr Hubert Minnis; Dr Carnille Farquharson, president of BAPCP. 2. PHYSICIANS who received the designation MCCFP certificate are pictured from left to right – Dr Mortimer Moxey (GP Mystee Spencer-Prince (FM Gertrude Holder (FM Chineyere Carey-Bullard (FM Sharmaine Butler (FM ham Cates (FM quharson (FM (FM Williams (FM na-Mahase, immediate past president of the BAPCP, and Dr Francis Williams (FM Myles Poitier (FM 3. SHELDON Prince, a physio therapist at Doctors Hospital, is shown with his wife Dr Mystee Spencer-Prince, family physician at Princess Margaret Hospital. 4. DR Francis Williams, family physician at Princess Margaret Hospital; Marcian Bethell, a mas sage therapist at SuperClubs Breezes, and vice-president of finance at Cable Bahamas Barry Williams. 5. DR C Graham Cates, first vice-president of BAPCP and principal of the Family Medicine Centre; Marva Moxey-Sawyer interior designer; Dr Mortimer Moxey, general practitioner and councillor with BAPCP. 6. DR Lisa Rolle-Smith, family medicine resident and public relations officer of the BAPCP; Dr Tiadra Dorsette-Williams, family medicine resident and secretary with the BAPCP; Dr Alexya Williams-Dorsette, designee and assistant public relations officer with the BAPCP. 7. DR Carnille Farquharson, designee and president of the BAPCP; Dr Glen Beneby, an anaesthesiologist and medical adviser with the Public Hospitals Authority. 8. DR Horizal Simmons, general practitioner, councillor with the BAPCP and chairman of the Health Professionals Council; Dr Carnille Farquharson of the Holistic Family Medicine Centre locat ed on Tonique Williams-Darling Highway; Health Minister Dr Hubert Minnis, and Frances Simmons. CONFERMENT OF BAHAMAS ASSOCIATION OF PRIMARY CARE PHYSICIANS DESIGNATION (MCCFP 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8


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