Citation
The Tribune - Page 1

Material Information

Title:
The Tribune
Uniform Title:
Tribune (Nassau, Bahamas)
Portion of title:
Nassau tribune
Place of Publication:
Nassau, Bahamas
Publisher:
Tribune
Publication Date:
Copyright Date:
2009
Frequency:
Daily, except Sunday
daily
normalized irregular
Language:
English
Physical Description:
v. : ill. ; 58 cm.

Subjects

Genre:
newspaper ( sobekcm )
newspaper ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage:
Bahamas

Notes

General Note:
Description based on: Vol. 79, no. 210 (Aug. 3, 1983); title from caption.

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Holding Location:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
This item was contributed to the Digital Library of the Caribbean (dLOC) by the source institution listed in the metadata. This item may or may not be protected by copyright in the country where it was produced. Users of this work have responsibility for determining copyright status prior to reusing, publishing or reproducing this item for purposes other than what is allowed by applicable law, including any applicable international copyright treaty or fair use or fair dealing statutes, which dLOC partners have explicitly supported and endorsed. Any reuse of this item in excess of applicable copyright exceptions may require permission. dLOC would encourage users to contact the source institution directly or dloc@fiu.edu to request more information about copyright status or to provide additional information about the item.
Resource Identifier:
09994850 ( OCLC )

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Full Text
WEATHER

TRY OUR
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TWIX MIX

The Tribune

ANY TIME..-ANY PLACE, WE’RE #1

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BAHAMAS EDITION

www.tribune242.com

FRIDAY, APRIL 24, 2009

=

Manhunt (OF gunman

Wild shot DUSINessiial

Expat financial adviser in critical
condition under police guard

m@ By TANEKA THOMPSON
Tribune Staff Reporter
tthompson@tribunemedia. net

POLICE are still searching for
a brazen gunman who ambushed
expatriate financial adviser Hywel
Jones in a company parking lot
and shot him in the head.

At last reports, Mr Jones
remained in critical condition in
hospital under police guard. He
had not regained consciousness,
according to head of the Central
Detective Unit’s Homicide Divi-
sion, Assistant Superintendent
Leon Bethel.

Mr Bethel could not confirm
reports that Mr Jones was fighting
for his life while on life support,
but said doctors told police the
victim could possibly recover
from his injuries.

Mr Jones was shot multiple
times to the head and the body,
police said. Persons in the area

told police they noticed a suspi-
cious man who fit the description
of the gunman loitering in the
area shortly before the shooting.

Based on the nature of the
shooting, police believe Mr Jones
may have been the target of an
arranged hit.

“He is still alive, he is still ill,
and the doctors are optimistic that
he will recover,” said ASP Bethel.
“They said it is a reasonable
chance now that he will recover.”

Police said Mr Jones was unre-
sponsive at the scene and was tak-
en to hospital by ambulance and
rushed into surgery.

After shooting the Welsh born
banker at least twice in the park-
ing lot outside offshore financial
services company, Britannia Con-
sultancy Group, around 10am
Wednesday the gunman left him

SEE page eight



ON SECOND MURDER CHARGE



“ter th ee >





BAISS girls
soccer



accused of
‘acting in
a wholly
improper
manner’

m@ By ALISON LOWE
Tribune Staff
Reporter
alowe@tribunemedia.net

A SUPREME Court
Judge was yesterday
accused of acting in a
“wholly improper” manner
that represented a
“remarkable departure
from the basic require-
ments of a judge’s role.”

Nicholas Lavender, QC,
told the Court of Appeal
that Justice Anita Allen’s
questionable conduct
appeared to stem from her
“taking as a very personal
matter” a request that she
step down from a case.

The British lawyer, rep-
resenting Rami Weissfisch,
one of two Israeli brothers
in a protracted legal battle
over millions of dollars
earned while they were
business partners, suggest-

SEE page eight



Delays in the
granting of
Crown land

hold up Inagua
development

ABOVE: Tyson Deveaux was escorted by SWAT team members as he arrived.
LEFT: Deveaux leaves court yesterday.

|

| =
Sandals reportedly lets
go a team of managers :§
5



DEVELOPMENT of Matthew
Town, Inagua, is being held up
by long delays in the granting of
Crown land, island sources
claimed yesterday.

According to sources, several
residents have been waiting for
years for Crown grants, even
though some handed over con-
siderable sums of money to gov-
ernment as far back as 2003.

Inagua’s plight surfaced as con-

m@ By MEGAN REYNOLDS
Tribune Staff Reporter
mreynolds@tribunemedia.net

LAY-OFFS continued yesterday in the hotel industry as the
Royal Sandals Bahamian Resort reportedly let go a team of man-
agers.

While the Trade Union Congress (TUC) claimed that 12 man-
agers lost their jobs, Sandals’ public relations department said that
only five were let go as part of a restructuring exercise aimed at
streamlining operations in these challenging economic times.

The Sandals workers are currently not represented by a union,
however the TUC and the Bahamas Hotel Maintenance and Allied

SWAT team officers armed with machine guns guarded the
Nassau Street magistrates courts as Tyson Deveaux was arraigned
on his second murder charge yesterday.

Deveaux, 22, of Saffron Street, New Providence, had been
released on bail charged with the 2008 murder of Corey Whymms
when he was arraigned for the murder of Marlon Smith, the man

Workers Union (BHMAWU) have been agitating to be the right-
ful representatives of the workers.





Would-be PLP deputy candidates
forming alliances ahead of convention

m By PAUL G TURNQUEST
Tribune Staff Reporter
pturnquest@tribunemedia.net Po
WITH little over six months to sn
go before the PLP’s national con- r

vention, would-be candidates for
the party’s deputy leadership have
started to form alliances to secure
survival in what is expected to be a
“no holds barred” fight for power.

With many “parliamentary meetings” already
held with prominent PLPs, schemes are in hand to
facilitate the quick departure of Perry Christie from

SEE page eight

. |

Perry Christie



shot dead outside his Pinewood Gardens home on Sunday.

SEE page eight

More than 350 lots for sale
at new gated community

m By PAUL G TURNQUEST
Tribune Staff Reporter
pturnquest@tribunemedia. net

WITH more than 350 lots for sale in the newly

opened gated community of Lyford Hills, this half
a billion dollar real estate development will boast
lots ranging from 7,000 to 21,000 square feet.
Leading developer Tennyson Wells, informed
The Tribune yesterday that these lots will range in
price from $120,000 to $365,000 dollars per lot.
Situated near the luxury gated community of

SEE page eight





NASSAU AND BAHAMEA

ISLANDS’ LEADING NEWSPAPER

troversy swirled around allega-
tions of nepotism by Lands and
Surveys Director Tex Turnquest.
Mr Turnquest denies the allega-
tions.

But an Inagua resident told
The Tribune: “The people are
furious over this.”

He said several locals — includ-
ing Clyde Cleare, Jennifer
Fawkes, Wilfred Seymour and
Olive Seymour - were still wait-
ing for Crown grants, even
though they had paid up to $2,000
a time to government.

“This is holding up the devel-
opment of Matthew Town,” said
the source. “This place is dor-
mant, yet the settlement is sur-
rounded by Crown land. It isn’t
right.”

Messages left with Mr Turn-
quest’s office seeking comment
on the most recent allegations
were not returned by press time
last night.

ntague

MOTORS LTD.





PAGE 2, FRIDAY, APRIL 24, 2009 THE TRIBUNE

LOCAL NEWS

VAY a ea al en a eC)



The restoration of

CENTREVILLE

THIS PHOTOGRAPH shows the property facing Shirley
Street. The property extended down to Shirley Street
and was protected along this street by an ornate iron
fence, a small portion of which still stands. Again the
white lines are roads running through the Collins estate.

( ENTREVILLE House has been much Doctors Hospital now occupies that part of the property

in the news lately as renovations have shown to the left. The Tribune is opposite the property in
now started to restore the property to its former its present location.

glory under the supervision of the Antiquities, Monu-
ments and Museum Corporation.

Its restoration has also resurrected political racists pro-
paganda that the late Ralph G Collins, former owner of the
property, had encircled his grounds with a high wall to keep
out black Bahamians who lived on the western side of his
estate.

On Monday, The Tribune editor, who lived as a young
child on Shirley Street opposite the Collins property, gave
a brief history of the wall and pointed out that racism was
not in the mix when the wall was built.

The following day Aaron Roberts wrote a letter to The
Tribune strongly disagreeing that Mr Collins had built his
wall to “secure his property from bushes (unless bushes is
a new term for black people).”

We promised Mr Roberts that we would publish pho-
tographs to show that the Collins property was surround-
ed on three sides by bush — not by people or people’s
homes. On this page today some of these photographs,
made available by the Collins family, are published show-
ing the property before the wall was constructed.

THIS PHOTOGRAPH taken from the south
facing north shows the property of the
Hon Ralph G Collins in the early thirties.
The white road running through the prop-
erty suggests a perimeter line. However, it
was a road that ran through the centre of
the property from north to south before
Collins Avenue and Centreville grew up
around it. The home faces Shirley Street
on the north. The estate was surrounded
by bush on the other three sides with Mr
Collin’s orchard at the back. The property
extended as far back as Wulff Road.

PHOTOS: Made available by Collins family



Most of Cuba’s political
inmates ‘oppose swap
with spies jailed in US’








































CUBAN PRESIDENT Raul Castro.
m HAVANA

A leading rights activist says most of Cuba's 200 or more politi-
cal prisoners would rather serve out long terms on the island
than be part of an exchange for five communist agents impris-
oned in the US, as Cuban President Raul Castro has suggested,
according to the Associated Press.

President Barack Obama has said Cuba should make the next
move as both leaders try to thaw relations — and that releasing
political prisoners would be a significant step.

Mr Castro responded in part by suggesting a prisoner swap —
sending all of Cuba's political prisoners, and their families, to the
United States in exchange for the five convicted Cuban spies.

“The prisoners themselves? They want nothing of such a

Healthcare is evolving :: Follow the dots. deal ® Havant) ently dieident ssid. Monday.
‘Espionage’

"It's nearly unanimous among the prisoners that they not be
exchanged for military men arrested red-handed in espionage
activities in the United States," said Elizardo Sanchez of the
Cuban Commission for Human Rights and Reconciliation.
"They would rather stay in prison."

Mr Sanchez, the most veteran of the island's rights activists,
talks to numerous political prisoners and their relatives by phone
each day, and updates detailed lists of inmates that he releases
every six months. His reports are a key source of information for
international groups monitoring Cuba's human rights situation.

Castro's government has unilaterally released "prisoners of
conscience" before without suffering any political consequences
inside Cuba. In February, four political prisoners were set free
and immediately exiled to Spain, following human rights talks in
Madrid. It was at least the fifth known release of a group of
political prisoners by Cuba since the mid-1980s that followed an
international appeal or negotiations.

The US has swapped prisoners before with other countries —
notably in the case of KGB spy Rudolph Ivanovich Abel, traded
to the Soviets in 1962 for imprisoned U-2 pilot Francis Gary
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THE TRIBUNE

FRIDAY, APRIL 24, 2009, PAGE 3



LOCAL NEWS

New Customs rules could force us
out of business — courier companies

Complex process will reportedly delay deliveries and damage operations

Doctors
appeal for
blood as they
treat shooting
victim

DOCTORS have issued an
urgent call for blood as they
continue to treat business-
man Hywel Jones, who is
fighting for his life after
being shot in the head and
back early Wednesday
morning.

Mr Jones is in critical con-
dition at Doctors Hospital,
and persons willing to
donate blood are being
asked to visit the hospital’s

blood bank as soon as possi-
ble.

Project to
produce
export/import
price indexes

THROUGHOUT 2009 the
Department of Statistics is
undertaking a project to pro-
duce export/import price
indexes for the Bahamas.

The primary reason for pro-
ducing these indexes is for use
as a deflator in the production
of Gross Domestic Product
(GDP) figures.

However, export/import
price indexes have a number
of additional uses, including
measuring inflation, studying
long-term price trends and as
inputs into forecasting future
price trends.

In order to produce these
indexes the department will
conduct a pricing survey of a
sample of businesses in New
Providence and Grand
Bahama that are involved in
exporting and importing.

Initiation

The first step in the process
involves an “initiation” exer-
cise, in which staff from the
Department of Statistics will
visit selected businesses dur-
ing the month of May.

During the initiation visits,
the department's staff will
identify various commodities
selected for pricing and devel-
op specific descriptions and
codes for each of them.

Once the commodities are
identified, the officers will
attempt to monitor the prices
of each of the commodities on
a quarterly basis.

Said the Department of Sta-
tistics in a statement: “The
support and co-operation of
the selected exporters and
importers is crucial to the suc-
cess of this exercise. As with
all studies conducted by the
department, all information
obtained will be kept in the
strictest confidence.”

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By KARIN HERIG
Tribune Staff Report
kherig@tribunemedia.net

LOCAL courier companies
were up in arms yesterday,
many fearing for the future of
their business, after being
informed that new Customs
regulations will be enforced
this coming Monday.

According to business own-
ers speaking with The Tri-
bune, the new regulations
require courier companies to
go through a complicated and
lengthy process to clear Cus-
toms — a process which com-
panies say will delay the deliv-
ery of goods by at least a day
and do untold damage to their
operations.

One business owner, who
wished to remain anonymous,
said that he was told that
instead of clearing Customs at
the airport, Odyssey Aviation,
they will now have to visit sev-
eral offices, including the Cus-
toms building on Thompson
Boulevard, to pay their duty
fees and complete the neces-
sary paperwork.

Couriers bringing in perish-
able goods, several of whom



“All I can say
is that a lot of
people will be
out of a job
come Wednes-
day if the new
requirements
go into effect
on Monday.”



Courier business
owner

supply the hotels with food,
are particularly concerned
about this development as
there are no refrigeration
facilities in the warehouse at
Odyssey Aviation.

“The stuff will just sit there
for at least day, going bad,”
one company owner said.

Companies that offer over-
night delivery fear that this

new time-consuming Customs
process will make their ser-
vices redundant.

“How can we promise
(same day, over-night) deliv-
ery? We will have to refund
all of our customers.

“All T can say is that a lot of
people will be out of a job
come Wednesday if the new
requirements go into effect on
Monday,” another courier
business owner said.

It is estimated that more
than 30 courier companies
employing hundreds of peo-
ple will be affected by the new
Customs regulations.

One owner of a courier
company said that he does not
understand the need for the
new regulations, as the ones
currently in place are more
than adequate.

“The procedures are there,
they are perfectly adequate —
they only need to be enforced
properly. A lot of the time
persons, even Customs offi-
cers, do not know the correct
procedure,” the business own-
er said.

The country’s courier com-
panies now hope to come
together to form a Bahamas

MINISTRY OF WORKS ELECTRICAL DEPARTMENT

Workers stage demonstration

over ‘long overdue promotions’

EMPLOYEES of the Min-
istry of Works’ electrical
department staged a demon-
stration outside of the min-
istry’s Thompson Boulevard
building yesterday morning,
demanding that government
give them what they claim are
long overdue promotions.

President of the Bahamas
Public Services Union (BPSU)
John Pinder said that the 20 to
25 workers were protesting
the fact that majority of them
have not been promoted in
many years.

Maintenance

“These workers are a main-
tenance team, they do some
construction work, but gov-
ernment wants them to get a
Stage three (certification) in
electrical work before they get
promoted. And a stage three
qualification is really not nec-
essary to do maintenance
work,” he said.

Mr Pinder said the union is
now hoping to meet with
Works Minister Neko Grant
next week to discuss criteria
for promotions and adjust-
ments to the career paths of
the electrical department
workers.

“Before the Cabinet shuf-
fle, we were working with
Minister Earl Deveaux and

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permanent secretary Anita
Bernard and we were making
some headway. But now nei-
ther of them are there any-
more and the issue was put on
the back-burner.

“All we want now is for the
government to give these peo-
ple their deserved promotions
and have the (upcoming) bud-

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“All we want
now is for the
government to
give these
people their
deserved
promotions
and have the
(upcoming)
budget reflect
the money
allocated for
the
promotions.”



John Pinder

get reflect the money allocat-
ed for the promotions,” Mr
Pinder said.

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ernment.

In the meantime, several
companies said they will sus-
pend importation of goods for

now until the they can be
assured that the new process
will not delay delivery to their
customers.

A message left for the head
of the Customs Department,
Glen Gomez, was not
returned up until press time
yesterday.

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PAGE 4, FRIDAY, APRIL 24, 2009

EDITORIAL/LETTERS TO THE EDITOR

THE TRIBUNE





The Tribune Limited

NULLIUS ADDICTUS JURARE IN VERBA MAGISTRI
Being Bound to Swear to The Dogmas of No Master

LEON E. H. DUPUCH, Publisher/Editor 1903-1914

SIR ETIENNE DUPUCH, Kt, O.B.E., K.M., K.C.S.G.,

(Hon.) LL.D., D.Litt.

Publisher/Editor 1919-1972
Contributing Editor 1972-1991

EILEEN DUPUCH CARRON, C.M.G., M.S. B.A., LL.B.

Publisher/Editor 1972-

Published Daily Monday to Saturday

Shirley Street, RO. Box N-3207, Nassau, Bahamas
Insurance Management Building., P.O. F-485, Freeport, Grand Bahama

TELEPHONES
Switchboard (News, Circulation and Advertising) 322-1986

WEBSITE
www.tribune242.com — updated daily at 2pm

Collins Wall nonsense debunked

AS PROMISED we have published on page
2 of today’s Tribune photographs taken in the
early thirties of the Collins property, which is
now being landscaped and renovated by the
Antiquities, Monuments and Museums Corpo-
ration.

A high wall, later built to enclose the prop-
erty, eventually became controversial after
Collins Avenue, Centreville and Palmdale were
carved out of the bushland that had earlier sur-
rounded it. Because of the development on the
eastern side of the wall, and the fact that the
Collins property had been sold to developers,
most of the enclosures that had secured the
property were taken down — all but a section of
the ornate iron fence that fronted the property
on Shirley Street and the western wall.

As settlements grew up on either side of
that wall, persons on the west had to walk a
considerable distance around the wall to go to
work, to shop and to send their children to
school. The wall, which now divided them,
became an issue. Many persons on the west-
ern side of the wall erected a ladder on both
sides as a short cut, and daily persons scaled
the wall to carry on their business. Naturally
there were accidents. On one occasion a young
boy broke his arm, on another a pregnant
woman lost her child.

The incident of the pregnant woman became
an issue in the 1956 election. Sir Etienne
Dupuch, a representative for the Eastern Dis-
trict, lost his seat in the House because of that
wall.

One day school teacher Donald Davis came
to The Tribune to tell Sir Etienne about the
woman’s accident and the social injustice of
this wall remaining. Those opposing Sir Etien-
ne’s re-election knew that at that time it was an
unpopular social issue, but an issue that, regard-
less of personal loss, he would champion. So it
was important that they made him aware of it.

We remember him coming back to his office
very upset about that wall. He immediately sat
down and “fired off” several articles for it either
to come down or a road to be built through it to
allow free passage to all persons living on either
side. Bahamians — predominantly black — liv-
ing on the western side of the wall were jubilant.
However, those living on the eastern side of
the wall were Sir Etienne’s constituents, and
they were not at all pleased. Although mainly
white Bahamians lived on the eastern side of the
wall, black Bahamians were also residents. The
black Bahamians joined with their white neigh-
bours in sending a petition to the House to
leave the wall intact. Those on the eastern side,
regardless of colour, felt that their property val-
ues would go down if they did not remain seg-
regated from “the rest.”

Sir Etienne knew that the situation was
morally wrong. He also knew that if he went
against the wishes of his constituents in fighting

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for social justice for all Bahamians he would
lose the election. His principles were more
important to him than a House of Assembly
seat. He continued the fight to dismantle the
wall. He lost his election.

However, the 1956 fight over the wall had
nothing to do with Mr Collins who had died in
1946.

Nor had the building of the wall anything to
do with segregating one group of people from
the other. From 1871, what later became the
Brice followed by the Collins property, was an
oasis surrounded by bush as the photos on page
2 and taken many years later will show.

Prohibition — the Volstead Act — was intro-
duced in 1920 when America went dry. Bahami-
ans entered the bootleg era with great gusto
determined to slake the thirst of their liquor
starved northern neighbours. The bootleg era
brought untold wealth to the Treasury, but it
also filled the coffers of mobsters like Chicago’s
Al Capone.

It was during this period of relative wealth
that two of our major hotels were built and a
gambling casino was opened in the Bahamian
Club on West Bay Street. Business was good in
the Bahamas, but speakeasies, mobs and murder
escalated in the United States. Prohibition could
not be enforced and so it was repealed in 1933.
The days of Rum Row were over in the
Bahamas. The severe hurricane of 1926 and
then the Wall Street crash crippled this country.

The Bahamas was back in the boondocks. Its
people needed employment.

Mr Ralph Collins rose to the need. He decid-
ed to create employment by building a wall
around his property for which he paid his
labourers 1/- a day and gave them a hot meal.
Communities being built around his wall came
many years later.

However, a letter writer to this newspaper
who knows nothing about those days, wants to
put another spin on history. He claims that Mr
Collins built his wall to keep black people on
one side of the wall from mingling with white
people on the other side. As the letter writer will
see from the photographs on page 2 there were
only trees — not people — on either side of
that wall. Those communities that created so
much trouble in later years did not yet exist.

His argument sounds like those of the world’s
dimwits — never having had to suffer the hor-
rors of World War II — who claim there was no
Holocaust.

A member of the Collins family, who sent
us these photographs, attached a most apt quote
from the Russian author Fyodor Dostoyevsky
that will cover today’s unbelievers:

“Man,” wrote Dostoyevsky, “has such a
predilection for systems and abstract deduc-
tions that he is ready to distort the truth inten-
tionally, he is ready to deny the evidence of his
senses only to justify his logic.”



Smirks and.
laughter amid
Airport hell

EDITOR, The Tribune.

Tunderstand that Anthony U.
Bostwick has already written to
you with regard to the shockingly
poor treatment that visitors to,
and residents of, the Bahamas
must suffer as they try to "pre-
clear" US Immigration at Sir Lyn-
den Pindling International Air-
port, but I will, if I may, add my
two cents worth.

My family and I have just
enjoyed a splendid holiday at the
Atlantis Resort. The facilities are
first class and the service was
almost universally impeccable
and friendly. We had similar hap-
py experiences elsewhere in Nas-
sau and throughout New Provi-
dence. Sadly, our good feelings
from our holiday did not survive
our departure from the Bahamas
because of the hellish conditions
and antagonistic attitudes of the
US Immigration officers at the
airport.

As a Bermudian, I have passed
through US pre-clearance in
Bermuda dozens, if not hundreds
of times, always with ease. Since
2001, this process has become
more bureaucratic and delays,
although rare, are unsurprising.
But they are never severe.

The same cannot be said of
Nassau. My wife, six-year-old son
and I arrived at the airport some
two hours ahead of the scheduled
departure of our 30- minute flight
to Miami and passed through
check-in and the first security
check without difficulty (like Mr.
Bostwick, I find the need for secu-
rity screenings before and after
US Immigration completely inex-
plicable).

More than an hour before our
flight was due to depart, we were
then confronted with a massive
line, while three Immigration offi-
cials languorously checked pass-
ports. After 20 minutes of glacial
progress, I approached a consta-
ble in the Royal Bahamas Police

LETTERS

letters@tribunemedia net



Force to say that I was concerned
we would miss our flight. I was
told a representative of Ameri-
can Airlines "might" come and
retrieve us from the line. This
proved to be a futile hope and
was clearly disingenuous.

Ten minutes later, I spoke to a
man who seemed to be in charge
of US Immigration who told us
that we should have come three
hours before the departure of our
flight and was otherwise entirely
unsympathetic. At this point, US
passport holders from in front
and behind us were taken from
the line and sent to another, faster
line, regardless of whether they
were due to depart in ten min-
utes or ten hours.

Fifteen minutes later, we told
yet another officer (it was aston-
ishing how many officers were
milling around the area when
they could have been stamping
passports) that we now had 15
minutes to make our 12.30 flight.
She responded with a smirk that it
was not yet 12.30 and we should
not worry. She spent the next 15
minutes smiling and laughing
while glancing back at not only
us, but the other dozen or so peo-
ple in our immediate vicinity who
were also about to miss their
flights. At 12.30, needless to say,
we were still in line. When we
eventually reached one of the two
open passport booths on our side
of the hall (one of the officers
having packed up and left, while
another had strolled off to get a
cup of coffee in the middle of this
maelstrom of frustration) and
expressed our unhappiness at the
fact we had missed our flight and
at the lack of organisation at the
Airport, the officer told us that
he didn’t care. When we pointed

out that many of the non-Ameri-
can tourists flying to the US from
Nassau might actually spend
money in the United States and
save what was left of its economy,
he replied that his job was safe.
He later acknowledged that the
system was poor, but claimed this
was the fault of the Airport.

On our arrival at the depar-
ture lounge, having cleared the
second security check, my wife
and son then witnessed a woman
collapse and an urgent call went
out for a doctor. Why she col-
lapsed is a mystery, but I suspect
her blood pressure was through
the roof if her experience was
anything like ours.

Fortunately, with the help of
the very cooperative and com-
pletely unfazed American Air-
lines staff in the departure lounge,
which suggested this was all too
common, we and the other half
dozen people who had missed the
12.30 flight were able to leave on
the next flight out, even though it
had been fully booked. No doubt
the seats we took belonged to
people still trapped in one of
Dante's nine circles of Inferno,
currently masquerading as US
Immigration.

I write this only to urge the
US Embassy, the Department of
Homeland Security and the Gov-
ernment of the Bahamas to come
together to solve what they must
know is a massive problem which
is damaging both Bahamas’
tourism and the reputation of the
United States. I for one, do not
intend to undergo the experience
again, and lacking a boat, this
means I am unlikely to visit the
Bahamas in the foreseeable
future or recommend it to oth-
ers, despite the fact that it was
otherwise a wonderful holiday.

William J.S. Zuill
Hamilton,
Bermuda,

April 17, 2009.

Do we want turtles to exist as a viahle species or not?

EDITOR, The Tribune.

How long the saga as to
whether Bahamians should be
party to the extinction of turtles is
going on shows that it has at least
raised people from their slumbers
about their individual responsi-
bility to their environment. To
me it all boils down to the fact —
do we want turtles to exist as a
viable species or not? They have
value in their own right, and also
as a tourist attraction, so with one
stroke of his pen the Ministry of
Agriculture could please both the
Ministry of Tourism, and the
Ministry of Finance, a win, win
situation, and put paid to Mr
Allen’s assault.

I find it very difficult to take
people seriously who in one
breath exalt such organisations
as ARK, and in the other con-
done, what else can you call it,
the virtual destruction of a species
to the sacred cow of “heritage.”
















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Mr Allen has not made the first
viable suggestion as to how to
sustain turtle populations — he
says leave it to the government,
the depository of all knowledge
and infinite funds! I am well
aware of the need for fishermen
to make a living, which up to now
has included the harvesting of tur-
tles, but all good things come to
an end. When Canada fished out
the cod in the 80’s thousands of
people were out of work. Canada,
being richer, was able to pay peo-
ple $800 per week to sit at home.
I’m not sure the Bahamas Gov-
ernment could afford that.

Mr Allen is very concerned
about criminalising Bahamians,
if a “stop law” is enacted. Oh my,
my, if only Bahamians were so
concerned. To be quite frank I
have never known any law in The
Bahamas to “stop” Bahamians —
unfortunately. You have only to
drive on our roads, or read about
those who fail to pay NHI contri-
butions, and so it goes on ad
infinitum. I remember back in the
60’s and 70’s, perhaps Mr Allen is
too young, spearing crawfish with
tails up to 6lbs and more, how
many that size do you see today,
they are virtually extinct? Now
people catch them undersize,
cook and mash them to disguise
it. Or perhaps Mr Allen would
condone the practice of some
island fishermen who bleached
the reefs to chase out the crawfish
so they could perpetuate their
heritage. Have you seen the
moonscapes, Mr Allen?

Sir David Attenborough, on
BBC World News, has formed a
society to question the sustain-
ability of an ever exploding
human population; none too soon
in my view. It is funny how just
about every other animal popu-
lation, except those who breed
on man’s detritus and misman-
agement, including rats, is failing

fast. ’m glad I did not live in the
next flat. With logic and the
utmost sincerity I catch as many
rats as I can, to feed my four 6ft -
7ft snakes, which I have rescued
from the chop, by people who
think they are doing God’s work
by killing them.

It is the heritage of the Chi-
nese to imbibe ground tiger bones
to enhance some ridiculous
notion that it increases sexual
prowess. At least we should be
thankful turtles have never been
endowed with that ability — poor
old conchs. Mr Allen strikes me
like the Chinese man on an
undercover documentary, who
dealt in such bones, rubbing his
hands together at the thought of
fewer tigers, as the price for the
bones rose to unconscionable lev-
els. No doubt Mr Allen will have
apoplexy at such a comparison,
but I can’t see much difference.
As one letter writer said, “how
can you be sure the turtles are
only for local consumption?”

Mr Cartwright needs to take
the turtle by the flippers, conform
to international law, and do the
right thing. If you wish to be tak-
en seriously stick to your regular
writing Mr Allen and leave the
poor turtle in peace. If the matter
of the environment was not so
serious your protestations would
be taken as tongue in cheek jokes.
I know you won't be able to resist
answering this letter, go ahead,
while the rest of us pity you in
your lonely battle against, logic,
common sense and basic decency.

WE G GRATTAN
Nassau,
April 16, 2009.

P.S. I may not be Bahamian
born, but we all live in the same
world, and there is nothing God
given about being the citizen of
any particular country.

IEMA (sy
Needed

for Clarks and
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THE TRIBUNE

FRIDAY, APRIL 24, 2009, PAGE 5



LOCAL NEWS

RBC invites

community-based
organisations to
apply for its Blue
Water Project grant

RBC Royal Bank of
Canada is offering grants to
local or community organi-
sations in the Bahamas,
Caribbean countries, Cana-
da and the United States
that “inform, educate and
mobilise people about
watershed protection,
increase watershed aware-
ness in the community, and
encourage community-based
watershed stewardship.”

RBC Blue Water Project
is a 10-year, $50-million phil-
anthropic global commit-
ment by RBC Royal Bank of
Canada to support organisa-
tions that are committed to
watershed protection and
providing access to clean
drinking water.

Applications for the
“Community Action Grant”
component of the project are
now welcome.

Grants range from $1,000
to $5,000.

RBC also offers a leader-
ship grant that is currently
closed for 2009.

Launched in late 2007, the
RBC Blue Water Project
will help foster a culture of
water stewardship world
wide. To date, RBC has
committed more than $13
million in grants to 39 organ-
isations.

THE family of a man
killed when a Defence Force
vessel struck his fishing boat
two years ago say their pleas
for an investigation have
been met with a wall of offi-
cial silence.

The relatives of Gladstone
Ferguson, 78, say that
despite assurances from rep-
resentatives of the Defence
Force that a thorough inves-
tigation would be followed
by a timely report, they are
still in grief and still seeking
proper closure.

A statement issued by the
family said: “On the night of
September 6, 2007, the lov-

Just over 5,000 apply for

unemployment benefit

m@ By TANEKA THOMPSON
Tribune Staff Reporter
tthompson@tribunemedia.net

A LITTLE over five thousand
unemployed Bahamians have regis-
tered for the country’s national Unem-
ployment Benefit Programme since
early registration began on April 11,
Minister of Labour Dion Foulkes said.

This was disclosed during a brief ses-
sion of the Senate yesterday morning
as amendments to the Housing Act
and a new Pharmacy Bill were intro-
duced to members of the upper cham-
ber for first reading.

Five thousand and two persons
applied for the plan as of April 22 -
3,360 of them in Nassau; 1,268 in
Grand Bahama and 374 in the various
Family Islands, Mr Foulkes said.

Job

These applicants have also have reg-
istered with the Department of
Laboutr’s skills bank which notifies per-
sons when a job in their area of exper-
tise becomes available.

More than 4,350 persons registered

for the scheme during the
six days when registration
centres were open
throughout New Provi-
dence and Grand
Bahama. Six hundred and
fifty more persons regis-
tered once registration
moved to branches of the
National Insurance Board
on April 20.

Officials previously said
they expected applicants
to flood the doors of the
registration centres when
they opened on April 11
however the numbers
have been more moderate
than first anticipated.

With 12,000 persons said
to be eligible for the ben-
efit, some observers have
noted that either pride or
confusing application requirements
have kept thousands of unemployed
persons away.

But Senator Foulkes disagrees.

“Our project from the actuarial
study was between 5,000 to 7,000 so
the numbers are fairly on target. I must

Pleas for fisherman's death investigation ‘met with silence’

nen BOLO ets



commend that actuary and
staff at the National Insur-
ance Board and the
Department of Labour for
doing a superb job,” he
told The Tribune in an
interview yesterday.

“T think that the amount
of people who are regis-
tered are the amount that
we predicted so it’s not a
question of why there was-
n't a bigger turnout,” he
said, adding that an aver-
age of 120 persons applied
per day for the benefit.

He said while it is not a
priority at present, the
stipulations for applying
may be adjusted at a later
date.

Eligible persons may
continue to apply for the
benefit at the NIB headquarters on
Baillou Hill Road in Nassau, at the
NIB headquarters in Grand Bahama
and at NIB offices throughout the
Family Islands.

There is a two week waiting period
before cheques will be issued, and Mr

Foulkes urged all eligible persons to
apply early.

Recipients of the benefit will receive
half of their average insurable weekly
wage for 13 weeks; the current ceiling
on insurable wages is $400 meaning
the maximum amount anyone can
receive is $200 per week.

Contributions

The benefits will be paid out from
NIB’s $20 million medical branch fund.
Once this is exhausted, the scheme will
be sustained by contributions from
employed persons and employers.

Applicants qualify for the fund if
they are unemployed, under 65, not
self-employed, able to and willing to
work, were last employed on or after
July 1, 2004, not receiving other NIB
benefits — other than disability or sur-
vivors benefits — and have made a cer-
tain number of contributions to NIB.

When registering, applicants must
present a letter of termination — if
one was issued — and complete a
Department of Labour employment
application along with an NIB claim
form.

CEMA Mad CECE:

ing leader of our family,
Gladstone Ferguson, 78, was
killed at sea as a result of a
collision with a Royal
Bahamas Defence Force ves-
sel, at ‘The Narrows’ in the
Paradise Island area.

Minister

“We have written and
made countless phone calls
to the Honourable Tommy
Turnquest, minister respon-
sible for the Defence Force,
Commodore "Butch" Scav-
ella, the commissioner of
police, the attorney general,

and all relevant government
agencies. Almost two years
later, no official report, no
date set for a coroner's
inquest, no formal reply, and
no update. We are still wait-
ing.”

The family said its attor-
neys continue to struggle to
secure an inquest date, “but
seemingly only the rich and
famous with celebrity influ-
ence can make demands on
our judicial system”.

At a press conference ear-
lier this week, a family
spokesperson said: “We
have come today at the
grave site of our fallen fam-

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PAGE 6, FRIDAY, APRIL 24, 2009 THE TRIBUNE

Single mother says

the Immigration
Dept still have not
repaired raid damage



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m@ By MEGAN REYNOLDS
Tribune Staff Reporter
mreynolds@tribunemedia.net

A SINGLE mother continues
to feel insecure as the Immigra-
tion Department have not yet
repaired the damage caused by
armed officers who raided her
home two months ago.

Violet Hanna, 41, said the
security of her home was com-
promised when six armed offi-
cers used a heavy maul to break
open her garden gate and bash
in her back door to gain access to
her property at around 4am on
February 24.

The gate no longer closes
securely and the chain link fence
remains bent after the officers
jumped over it, Ms Hanna said,
adding that the backdoor was
damaged and has now broken
away from the hinge.

Officers left the maul at the
gate when they left the property
— without checking Ms Hanna
and her 7-year-old daughter
Amber’s Bahamian passports,
she said.

Minister of Immigration
Branville McCartney vowed to
personally oversee an investiga-
tion into Ms Hanna’s allegations
after her story was published in
The Tribune on February 26.

A panel of Immigration offi-
cials established to investigate
the matter visited Ms Hanna’s
home in Price Street, Nassau Vil-
lage, to assess the damage, but
the single mother-of-two said
they have not yet assured her
they will restore the security of
her home.

Safety is the single mother’s
main concern as she said an ex-
convict lives nearby, men loiter at
either end of the street smoking
marijuana, and gunshots were
fired in the area last week.

But Ms Hanna maintains she
cannot afford the estimated
$1,000 to repair the damage.

She said: “If I had the money I

a

TAU anal ect E

THE MAUL that vr ra said immigration officers left behind.

would pay for it myself. This is
not a safe area, there is a lot of
noise from people cussing and
carrying on, and last week there
were guys shooting off guns.

“T keep waking up every so
often to check if my car is okay
and everything around is okay.

“T can’t sleep.

“T go to sleep and then I hear a



noise and I’m up. I guess I am
paranoid but I wasn’t like that
before.

“Now I just want to be safe.
That’s all I want. It is so simple,
this could have been over from
the next day.”

Mr McCartney did not respond
to messages left by The Tribune
before press time last night.

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Brokers & Agents Ltd.

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THE TRIBUNE

LOCAL NEWS

FRIDAY, APRIL 24, 2009, PAGE 7



Grenade

accident kills
Yemen Gitmo
dletainee’s Sons

@ SAN’A, Yemen

THE TWO young sons of a
Yemeni detainee at Guantanamo
died when a grenade they were
playing with accidentally deto-
nated inside their home, a human
rights lawyer and the detainee’s
brother said Thursday, accord-
ing to Associated Press.

The two boys were the sons
of Guantanamo prisoner 1463,
Abdelsalam al-Hilah, a busi-
nessman who was captured in
Cairo in 2002 and sent to Guan-
tanamo on charges of terrorism,
said Ahmed Irman of the Hood
Organization for Defending
Human Rights, an organization
that advocates for Guantanamo
detainees in Yemen.

The children, Youssef, 11, and
Omar, 10, were playing unsuper-
vised with the grenade in a room
in the house when it exploded.
It is unclear why the grenade was
in the house.

The detainee’s brother, Nabil
al-Hilah, confirmed the boys
were killed.

Irman said the boys had just
received a rare phone call from
their father two days before their
death in which they chatted with
their dad about their schoolwork
and classes they were attending.
Irman said their father was
shocked to hear how big the boys
had grown.

During the two-hour phone
call, Irman said al-Hilah spoke
about his frustration with being
detained for such a long period of
time and expressed pessimism at
being released in the near future.

Irman said he also spoke about
what he described as a bad con-
ditions in Guantanamo and a
lack of change since President
Barack Obama took office.

The boys were buried on
Wednesday. It is unclear if their
father has been notified of their
death.

The Obama administration
has said that it will close the
detention facility on Cuba which
became a flashpoint for
controversy ever since it was
opened under the Bush adminis-
tration.

However, questions have been
raised about where to send the
remaining detainees, the largest
group of which is from Yemen.

Man aiming to reclaim land says

counter claimant has no case

A BUSINESSMAN who is
on a mission to reclaim land
he says was stolen from his
family more than a century
ago has hit out at a counter
claimant, saying he has no
case.

Warren Aranha, 50, who is
claiming ownership of prop-
erties in downtown Nassau
and on Cable Beach, dis-
missed overlapping land
claims by historian Anthony
Cunningham, saying: “He is
going nowhere. His claims are
absurd. His case is a non-
Starter.”

Properties

Mr Cunningham is disput-
ing Mr Aranha’s various land
claims on the grounds that the
properties were originally
granted by the Crown to his
alleged forebear, General
Robert Cunningham, who
arrived in the Bahamas soon
after the American Revolu-
tion.

Mr Cunningham said Gen-

“He is going nowhere. His

claims are absurd. His case
is a non-starter.”



eral Cunningham was grant-
ed vast holdings for services
rendered to Britain, including
a 465-acre tract on Cable
Beach.

This area includes the for-
mer home of American mur-
deress Sante Kimes, which Mr
Aranha has now moved into,
claiming it belongs to him.

Mr Aranha says that the
Cunningham land grant was
rescinded in 1847. He has pro-
duced a document, allegedly
from the official commutation
book, saying the land was sub-
sequently conveyed to a Mr
Henry Adderley.

Now Mr Aranha is bracing
himself for a three-way legal
battle with Mr Cunningham

Warren Aranha

and Mr Raymond Wong, who
claims his family has owned
the Kimes site since 1986,
having bought it from a Scot-
tish woman, Marilyn Craw-
ford.

Mr Wong, a Nassau busi-
nessman, has threatened to
issue an injunction against Mr
Aranha, saying he is occupy-
ing the Kimes site illegally.

But Mr Aranha said yester-
day: “Before Mr Wong can
issue an injunction, he first has
to produce documentation to
prove his claim.”

Mr Aranha is also claiming
to own two derelict properties
in Cumberland Street, even
though they were reportedly
bought a year ago by attorney

Two brothers among four persons
charged with second degree murder

@ By DENISE MAYCOCK

According to reports in the Hamilton Spec-

Tribune Freeport Reporter
dmaycock@tribunemedia.net

FREEPORT - Bahamian brothers Reno and
Robert Woods of Grand Bahama were among
four persons charged last month in Canada
with second degree murder.

Reno, 23, and Robert 21, are the sons of Mr
Randy Woods, a contractor in Freeport.

The brothers have been living in Hamilton,
Canada. The family is expected to travel to
Canada on Friday.

“This is a very tragic time for the family right
now and we are just praying for them. This is
very unfortunate, but they are innocent until
proven otherwise,” said a close family friend,
who wished to remain anonymous.

tor, the Woods brothers, along with Jerome
Marshall, 23, of Hamilton, and Lani Valdes
Harris, 21, of Woodbridge, were arrested in
connection with the stabbing death of a 29-
year-old man at Mississauga.

The victim, identified as Jermain Marlon
Scott, was involved in an altercation with a
group of men at a popular pub.

While trying to flee, he was chased down
and fatally wounded with a knife. He man-
aged to get away again and was able to hail a
taxi. The driver contacted 911 after realising
that he was injured.

Scott died of his injuries at the hospital.

Reno Woods, Harris, and Marshall were ini-
tially charged in Brampton on March 15.
Robert was later arrested and charged.

Sante Kimes.

Nigel Bowe for half a million
dollars.

He claims the Cumberland
Street and Cable Beach sites
are linked by documents prov-
ing they were both part of the
old J S Johnson estate, of
which he claims to be the sole
inheritor.

Mr Aranha has alleged that
the J S Johnson estate was sys-
tematically “stolen” over a



WARREN ARANHA at the former home of American murderess

period of 50 years in the late
19th and early 20th centuries
by a group of white families.

He believes much of the
land was then sold on to
unsuspecting buyers.

Mr Aranha has already built
a wall on the Cumberland
Street site.

He said: “I have heard noth-
ing from the other side, but I
am standing firm on this.”

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PAGE 8, FRIDAY, APRIL 24, 2009

THE TRIBUNE



LOCAL NEWS

Would-he PLP deputy
candidates forming =:
alliances ahead

of convention

FROM page one

the party’s top post.

Most party members agree
something must be done about
the party leadership, but it is
how they go about it that has
caused a rift within the organi-
sation.

Now three main groups have
emerged: those who wish to get
rid of Mr Christie at the con-
vention; those who are content
with his leadership and want to
see him lead the party into the
next general election, and those
who want him removed as
leader but in a dignified way
sometime after the convention,
but before the next election.

Having led the party to a
crushing defeat at the polls in
2007, Mr Christie commis-
sioned a leading research and
polling company to ascertain
reasons for the PLP’s loss to
the Free National Movement.

Along with a number of
scandals, including two of his
Cabinet ministers, Mr
Christie’s perceived “weak-
ness” in handling his ministers
was paramount among reasons
for the PLP’s poor showing.

Along with other recom-
mendations, the firm suggested
either a change in leadership or
a re-modelling of the leader’s
image to make the party more
attractive to the coveted youth
vote.

Since the PLP’s loss there
has been little change to the
party’s image, which continues
to suffer the shame of contin-
ued scandals even in opposi-
tion.

However, with the conven-
tion and the prospect that cur-
rent deputy leader Cynthia
Pratt will vacate her seat,
PLPs hope to see their party
reinvent itself — hopefully in
time to provide a substantive
alternative to the current gov-
ernment.

FROM page one

ed she felt this way because lawyers did
not request the same of Justice John Lyons,
who had presided over the same case pre-
viously, despite the fact that his conduct
had also caused some alarm amongst attor-
neys involved.

Meanwhile, attorney Michael Scott, rep-
resenting Rami’s brother, Amir Weisfisch,
defended Justice Allen’s judgment.

He proposed she was merely exercising
her “case management” powers to expe-
dite the matter when she determined she
should continue to preside over it despite
admitting to be “conflicted” about it, and
when she appeared dismissive of the evi-
dence of an expert witness without having
heard most of it.

The two attorneys made their arguments
as Mr Lavender continued his submissions
to the Court of Appeal in an application to
have the court overturn Justice Allen’s deci-
sion to remain on the case.

Mr Lavender said: “She repeatedly
referred to the irrelevant consideration that
Justice Lyons was not asked to recuse him-
self...judging by the tone of the comments,
the judge was aggrieved.”

Nonetheless, as recorded in his notes and
her own written judgment on the recusal
application, Mr Lavender proposed to
Court of Appeal President Dame Joan
Sawyer, Justice Hartman Longley and Jus-

More than 350 lots for sale | FROM page one
at new gated community |

FROM page one

Lyford Cay in the western end of New Providence, the 100 acre site
will be complete with putting greens, a club house, swimming
pools, biking trails, tennis courts, a fitness centre, and a natural park
complete with indigenous plants and trees.

Set to be developed in stages, the gated community is scheduled
to be completed in 18 months and is being developed as a “green
area” with solar panels and other earth friendly amenities through-

out.

Noting that no expense has been spared to provide a complete

Judge is accused

tice Emmanuel Osadebay that Justice
Allen’s comments and conduct would sug-
gest to a “fair-minded observer” a “real
possibility of bias on her part” in relation to
the case.

Justice Allen revealed several weeks ago
that she was aware that Justice Lyons, who
stepped down from the matter on the basis
that he did not have time to hear it, appoint-
ed an accountant to provide a report in the
case who was the brother of a woman with
whom he “shared more than a friendship.”

The integrity of that report and the
accountant’s suitability as an “expert wit-
ness” was later questioned by Justice Allen.

She herself, according to Mr Lavender’s
records, raised the issue of “how she could
determine the issue in her conflicted capac-
ity.”

Mr Lavender claimed yesterday that Jus-
tice Allen’s decision to question Daniel
Ferguson’s evidence before and in her judg-
ment on the recusal application was “pre-
mature” in light of the fact that she had
not “read most or all” of his report.

He said that this was evidence of a
“strong disposition to jump to conclusions”
on her part in relation to Mr Ferguson.

Nonetheless, in giving her reasons for
refusing the application for her to step
down, Mr Lavender said Justice Allen

yesterday.

The suspect, described as a slim dark male,
stripped off his shirt and left it in the area before
escaping, he added.

“A number of officers were dispersed in the area
to pick up the (suspect’s) trail. . . the bike was some
distance away from where the incident actually hap-
pened. We are told that some clothing was shed
and those were retrieved. . .I believe it was just a
shirt,” said ASP Bethel.

He could not confirm reports that police were
able to chase the suspect before losing his trail near

lying in a pool of blood before making off on a
nearby motorcycle, ASP Bethel told The Tribune

appeared in her judgment to be “clutching
at straws.”

She attributed to Mr Ferguson’s damag-
ing comments about his effort to complete
the job he was assigned, which the lawyer
told the court transcripts of his testimony
showed he did not say, while suggesting
that she herself was being unfairly
“accused” of being unable to handle the
matter.

Meanwhile, Mr Lavender suggested it
was of particularly “grave concern” to him
that Justice Anita Allen admitted that in
deciding whether to remain on the case she
had taken into consideration the opinions of
her court clerks, which had not been sub-
mitted as evidence.

“She took into account information
received after the hearing of the applica-
tion...it is fundamental that all evidence
should be produced in court,” said Mr
Lavender.

Justice Allen’s reference to her court
clerks came after a disagreement between
herself and Mr Lavender over whether she
had been the first person to suggest that
she recuse herself from the matter during a
hearing in her chambers.

She and all the lawyers involved, except
for Mr Lavender, came under fire by Dame
Joan Sawyer earlier in the week for failing
to keep notes of the hearing that would
have helped the Court of Appeal deter-
mine the way forward.

After being convinced by several differ-
ent attorneys that at one point during the
hearing she told them that she would be
“happy to recuse” herself in light of her
knowledge of the circumstances of the case
—astatement which Mr Lavender said he
took as an “invitation to apply for her
recusal” — the judge “wrongfully reneged”
on her admission when making her judg-
ment, said the QC.

In it, she said that having “searched the
recesses of (her) mind” and consulted with
her clerks, she determined that she did not
make the comment.

Her judgment went on to state that she
had “absolutely no doubt that (she) could
determine the issue” before her. Supporting
Justice Allen yesterday, Mr Scott said he
“vigorously disputed” the claim that Justice
Allen had been the one to raise the recusal
issue.

But Mr Lavender told the court that “no
weight” should be “attached to the con-
tent of the recesses of (Justice Allen’s)
mind” or to the recollections of her clerks,
as they were part of the evidence in the
matter.

“She may have been clouded by a sense
of grievance that Justice Lyons was not
treated in the same way. But her resistance
confirms the fact that, as she suggested in
her chambers, she was unable to deal with
it objectively,” said the QC.

The appeal continues.

Manhunt for gunman

the area of Love Beach.
Meanwhile, police have no leads in the case and a

motive for the shooting has yet to be established,

said the senior officer.

Mr Jones, a resident of western New Providence
said to be in his late fifties, is ex-business partner of
former MP Lester Turnquest. He was born in North
Wales and has worked in the Bahamas for more
than 10 years.

He is now a permanent resident of the Bahamas
and president of the Britannia Group.

Anyone with information about Wednesday’s
shooting can contact police anonymously at 919,
328-TIPS or the Central Detective Unit at 502-9991.

relaxing and tranquil environment, Mr Wells said that even to the
curvature of the roads, the property has been painstakingly designed
to ensure not only slower vehicular traffic, but also helping the sight
line by enhancing the natural beauty of the land.

With a natural elevation that reaches 40 feet at its highest point,
Mr Wells said that Lyford Hills is a singularly “beautiful” piece of
property.

Obviously with such a capital intensive project, Mr Wells said
there are a number of financial investors in the project, including
Superwash President Dionisio D’Aguilar, JS Johnson Managing
Director Marvin Bethel, Lands and Surveys Director Tex Turn-
quest, radio talkshow host Jeffrey Lloyd, George Moss, Chris
Lightbourne, and Douglas Turnquest.

Join the Leading Environmental Conservation

Organization in The Bahamas

JOB OPPORTUNITY:
PARK ADMINISTRATOR

Primary Responsibilities: Provide day to day and long term
management of Exuma Cays Land and Sea Park and enforce
the rules and regulations within the parks.

Duties:

1. Serve as the Liaison between the Exuma Cays Land and
Sea Park and the BNT headquarters in Nassau. Is
responsible for overall supervision and oversight of all
activities that occur in the Park.

. Assist with the development of policies, procedures,
systems, and proposals to further the goals of the Park and
the Bahamas National Trust.

. Assist with fund raising and public relations activities in
the Park — provide liaison between potential donors in the
park and the Executive Director or Development Office.

. Execute activities in General Management Plans, Strategic
Plans, and operating plans to achieve the goals of the Park
and the Bahamas National Trust. Spearhead periodic
review of such plans

. Supervise park staff and volunteers to ensure protection of
natural resources and maintenance of park assets.

. In conjunction with the BNT staff, plan, develop and
implement community outreach programmes, education
and public relations initiatives to promote the goals of the

BNT.

. Provide support to the Royal Bahamas Police and
Defence Force with enforcement of immigration, illegal
drug interdiction and domestic disturbances in the Park.

Required Skills:
Strong interpersonal and communications skills.
Advanced degree in environmental science, administration,
or management required.
5+ years of progressive experience including extensive
supervision and general management experience.
Law enforcement experience, an advantage.
Ability to troubleshoot problems with boat engines and
generators an advantage
Willingness to live in a remote location for extended
periods of time in sometimes difficult and dangerous
conditions.
Advanced computer skills including all MS Office
applications.
Experience handling boats in a variety of sea conditions.
Advanced scuba diving training and experience a plus.
Dedication to conservation of natural resources within
national parks.

Positions offer vacation time, medical insurance subsidy and

housing.

To apply: provide a cover letter, resume, three references
to Bahamas National Trust, P.O.Box N-4105 Nassau, or
bnt@bnt.bs by May 6, 2009.



FROM page one

The Royal Bahamas Police
Force Special Weapons And Tac-
tics (SWAT) team were strategi-
cally placed outside the court
building with scarves covering their
faces and machine guns poised as
Deveaux was brought before Mag-
istrate Susan Charles-Sylvester by
senior homicide detectives.

Deveaux, wearing jeans and a
faded black sweatshirt with a red
and white skull and crossbones
design, stood quietly before the
bench as his lawyer Ian Cargill told
the court how Deveaux was unfit
for arraignment as he is both bipo-
lar and schizophrenic.

Mr Cargill said his client is tak-
ing several types of medication for
his psychological disorders and
appealed for him to receive a psy-
chological examination.

ky.
NAD

Nassau Airport

Development Company

SWAT team

But Mrs Charles-Sylvester, who
was overseeing the arraignment in
the absence of chief magistrate
Roger Gomez, said she was not in
a position to hear the submissions
and arranged for Deveaux to
appear before Mr Gomez on Mon-
day when Mr Cargill can make his
full submissions.

After reading the charge to
Deveaux, including particulars that
Deveaux, being concerned with
others, did intentionally and by
means of unlawful harm, cause the
death of Marlon Smith on April
19, Mrs Charles-Sylvester asked
the accused if he understood.

When he said he did, Mrs
Charles-Sylvester asked what he
understood, to which Deveaux qui-
etly replied: “Everything.”

And as she pressed him further

he elaborated: “Murder. So they
keep telling me, but I didn’t do it.”

Satisfied he had accepted the
charge, Mrs Charles-Sylvester said:
“Tt seems to me the point is taken
and the defendant understands the
nature of the charge that is before
him.

“He also will understand this is a
matter for which I cannot grant
him bail.”

Deveaux was seated as Mr
Cargill began to argue another
case, but when officers went to
escort the murder suspect from the
courtroom his lawyer rushed to his
client’s side and berated officers
for forcing Deveaux against his will
as he followed them to the car
shouting: “You still have to do it
right!”

Deveaux will appear before Mrs
Charles-Sylvester on May 11 in
connection with the murder of
Corey Whymms.

PUBLIC

NOTICE

Removal of Derelict Aircraft

Effective April 20, 2009. the Nassau Airport Development
Company (NAD) is requesting the owners of the aircraft pictured
below to remove their property within 30 days of this

notice.

Both aircraft are Cessna 402s parked on Apron 5 at the Lynden
Pindling Intemational Airport. Failure to do so will result in the
aircraft being removed and discarded by the airport
management company.

For further information contact:

Public Safety Department

Nassau Ainport Development Co,
Lynden Pindling Intemational Airport
P.O. Box AP 59229, Nassau, Bahamas

Ph: (242) 702-1000





THE TRIBUNE

FRIDAY, APRIL 24, 2009, PAGE 9



LOCAL NEWS





UNITED STATES CHARGE D’AFFAIRES Timothy Zuniga-Brown planting the Brasiletto Tree flanked by repre-
sentatives of local environmental organisations.

US Embassy observes
Earth Day with a tree
planting ceremony

IN celebration of Earth Day, the Ministry of the
Environment organised a “Million Trees Pro-
gramme” and the Bahamas government agreed to
plant a million trees throughout the country by
December 31, 2009.

As part of this effort, the ministry invited US
Chargé d’Affaires Timothy Zuniga-Brown as well
as other members of the diplomatic community,
to plant trees on Wednesday.

To mark the event, Mr Zuniga-Brown planted
a Brasiletto Tree, which is indigenous to the
Bahamas.

On hand for the event were representatives



THE newly-launched philan-
thropical arm of Sandals Resort
International, the Sandals Foun-
dation, held a ceremonial tree
planting to help celebrate Earth
Day on Wednesday.

Staff at Sandals Royal
Bahamian led by general man-
ager Michael James, environ-
mental co-ordinator Keva
Varence as well as visiting
guests were on hand to help
plant indigenous sea grape trees
on the resort’s grounds.

A celebration isn’t a celebra-
tion without a fruity beverage,
and the resort’s expert bar team
was there to refresh attendees
with a cocktail specially-created
to mark the occasion — “the
Royal O-Zone”.

Mr James said: “Someone
once said that “The best time to
plant a tree is 20 years ago. The
next best time is today’, and
that’s exactly what we’ve done.
It feels great to know that our
team members are included
amongst the one billion plus
people participating in Earth
Day activities all joined by one
common goal — saving the plan-

Earth Day was founded on
the premise that all people,
regardless of race, gender,
income or geography, have a
moral right to a healthy, sus-
tainable environment. The
Earth Day Network has a glob-
al reach with a network of more
than 17,000 partners and organ-
isations in 174 countries.



SANDALS FOUNDATION LAYS ITS ROOTS

from the Ministry of the Environment, the
Nature Conservancy, the Bahamas Reef
Environment Educational Foundation (BREEF)
and the National Coastal Awareness Commit-
tee.

The US Embassy selected the site at the inter-
section of Blake Road and West Bay Street for
the tree planting.

It was at that site in 1962 that US President
John F Kennedy and British Prime Minister
Harold Macmillan planted a tree as a goodwill
gesture commemorating a meeting of the two
leaders held in Nassau.



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PAGE 16, FRIDAY, APRIL 24, 2009

THE TRIBUNE



INTERNATIONAL NEWS



Canata’s
GDP falls
7.3 per cent :

m TORONTO

CANADA’S central bank :
said Thursday the country’s }
gross domestic product fell 7.3
percent in the first three months ;
of 2009, dropping at the steepest }
pace in decades, according to }
Associated Press. i

The Bank of Canada said }
that’s the biggest contraction }
since comparable records began
being kept in 1961. ;

Mark Carney, the head of the }
central bank, expects the Cana- }
dian economy will shrink by 3 }
percent this year as opposed to }
the 1.2 percent he predicted in }
January. :

Carney blames inaction in the i
United States and Europe in }
dealing with toxic bank assets }
for a recession that has been }
deeper and longer than expect- }
ed. :

“If we had to boil it down to }
one issue, it’s the slowness with }
which other G7 countries have }
dealt with the problems in their :
banks,” Carney said. “There has }
not been as much progress as }
we had expected in January.”

Canada has avoided govern- }
ment bailouts and has not expe- }
rienced the failure of any major ;
financial institution. There has }
been no crippling mortgage }
meltdown or banking crisis. ;

Canada and the U.S. have the :

largest trading relationship in }
the world, however, so the finan- }
cial crisis and the global sell-off }
of commodities have hit Canada :
hard since last fall. Alberta’s }
once-booming oil sands sector }
has cooled as every major com- }
pany has scrapped or delayed }

some expansion plans.

Canada lost a record 273,300
jobs in the first three months of }

the year.

The Bank of Canada cut its }
trendsetting interest rate by a }
quarter point to a record-low :
0.25 percent on Wednesday and
took the unprecedented step of }
saying it will likely stay there }

through June 2010.

The latest interest rate cut }
means the bank has sliced 4.25 }
percentage points off the }
overnight rate since it began eas- }
ing its policy in December 2007. }

Carney is a former Goldman }
Sachs executive who took over }
the central bank’s top post on }
Feb. 1, 2008 from David Dodge.








Mexico proposes expanding

army’s power in drug fight

@ MEXICO CITY

A BILL that would let Mexico declare
temporary states of emergency and
expand the army’s power in a bloody
fight against powerful drug gangs drew
immediate fire Thursday from human
rights activists who say soldiers should
not be doing the job of police, according
to Associated Press.

President Felipe Calderon’s propos-
al, which centers on the idea of declaring
drug trafficking hotspots “domestic secu-
rity” zones, would give the army access
to civilian court and police files.

The measure was submitted to Con-
gress late Wednesday.

“The expansion of organized crime
poses new challenges for democratic
societies,” it reads. “That requires the
government to bring to bear all the force
of the state to confront it.”

Calderon’s government has already
dispatched 45,000 troops to drug-plagued
areas — mostly along the U.S. border
— where cartel battles have cost more
than 10,700 lives since Calderon took
office in December 2006.

By law, soldiers are limited to play-
ing a support role for police.

Military

The proposal would officially place
army troops at the head of anti-crime
efforts in some areas — formalizing the
reality that in some places the military
has effectively replaced weak or corrupt
local forces.

But soldiers have been implicated in
human rights abuses such as shooting
civilians at checkpoints and conducting
illegal searches. Human rights groups
say the bill may be a sign that Calderon
is reversing a promise to get the army off
the streets as soon as possible.

In a February interview with The
Associated Press, Calderon said he
hoped to beat back the cartels by 2012 to
a point that the army and federal police
can withdraw and leave the problem in
the hands of local law enforcement.

“It is worrisome that they could
declare a state of emergency or give the
army more power, given the experiences
we have already had,” said Consuelo
Morales, director of the Monterrey-
based Citizens in Support of Human
Rights.

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Eduardo Verdugo/AP

POLICE OFFICERS guard alleged drug trafficker Isaac Godoy second right, during his presentation to the media in Mexico City, Thursday,

April 23, 2009. Godoy, who allegedly ran operations for the Arellano Felix drug cartel, was arrested Tuesday in Tijuana, northern Mexico,
along with six other alleged members of his cell, police said.

However, Morales acknowledged that
many Mexicans support army involve-
ment in drug-plagued cities.

“People like the military because
they say the police are corrupt,” she
said.

The idea that the military would have
access to civilian legal files angered
defense lawyers like Raquenel Vil-
lanueva, a Monterrey-based attorney
who has served as defense council in a
number of high-profile drug cases.

“The army doesn’t have the training to
do that,” Villanueva said, citing a histo-
ry of due-process violations and illegal
detentions that could make it risky for
the military to have access to all police
files.

Former federal anti-drug prosecutor

Samuel Gonzalez agreed the proposal
introduced gray areas that could lead to
abuses.

“The fact that the military has access
to civilian legal files isn’t of itself a
violation of human rights,” said Gonza-
lez.

“Now, what the military does with that
information, that is another problem.”

The bill says “public servants should
respect human rights” and pledged to
advise human rights groups when the
emergency decrees are issued.

Rebellion, attacks on law enforcement
agencies, a breakdown in public safety or
the incapacity of local authorities would
be conditions for declaring a state of
emergency.

It would let the country’s national

intelligence agency engage in “counter-
intelligence investigations” in cases of
arms trafficking, terrorism or terrorist
financing, foreign interference, attacks by
organized crime gangs against authorities
and intelligence agents, or attacks on
shipping or aviation.

The measure establishes tougher
penalties for soldiers who desert the
army to work for cartels, illegal weapons
possession and threatening public offi-
cials or their families.

The bill would also allow groups of
suspects to be charged individually for
weapons found in a vehicle or house
they all shared; and lay out special pun-
ishments for possession of more than 50
rounds of ammunition or for using guns
altered to be more deadly.

Suspected Somali pirates
appear in Kenyan court

m@ MOMBASA, Kenya

THE 11 SOMALI MEN,
accused in a pirate attack on a
Liberian freighter, filed slowly
into the wood-paneled court.
The magistrate took one look
at their dingy shirts, jackets and
sarongs — two were barefoot
— and ordered a court official
to make sure they were
“dressed properly” for their
next appearance, according to
Associated Press.

Amid proposals for an inter-
national tribunal to tackle pira-
cy, Kenya is implementing
agreements with the European
Union and the United States by
putting the bandits on trial, even
if they are caught on the high
seas by other nations and have
not attacked Kenyan interests.

Thursday’s hearing was the

first court appearance for the
men who were tracked down
by French commandos and
seized April 15 from their skiffs
in waters off Somalia, the law-
less epicenter of the flourishing
pirate industry off the Horn of
Africa.

Authorities

The pirate suspects had been
marched off a French frigate
Wednesday and handed over to
authorities in this Kenyan port
city.

Magistrate Catherine Mwan-
gi adjourned their case until a
bail hearing May 27. They will
remain in a Mombasa jail until
then. She also demanded that
officials give the men fresh
clothing for their bail hearing.

“Tm giving you an order that

Pd cla pete se
ne ee ose ae Bk

ek Ty te oie,

these people be dressed prop-
erly,” Mwangi told court offi-
cials.

The defendants solemnly lis-
tened to a court-provided
Somali translator. At one point,
one man briefly put an arm
round his neighbor’s shoulder
and gave him a reassuring
squeeze.

Defense lawyer Francis Kadi-
ma insisted his clients were
innocent fishermen detained by
mistake.

They had no fishing lines,
nets or hooks when they were
captured, but the French hand-
ed over evidence they did find:
two skiffs, three grappling
hooks, four rusty assault rifles,
two bags of bullets and a ladder.

In courtroom next door, wit-
nesses testified against seven
other suspected pirates in
matching blue overalls. German
sailors captured the men last
month after they reportedly
attacked a German naval supply
ship.

Kenya is also holding another
trial involving pirate suspects
handed over by Britain.

Prosecuting Somali pirates is
seen by Kenya as a way to bur-
nish its image internationally at
a time when the government is
facing criticism over corruption
and political violence.

Charges

A U.S. court this week
brought its first piracy charges
in more than a century.

Abdiwali Abdiqadir Muse of
Somalia appeared Tuesday in
New York charged with partic-
ipating in an April 8 attack on
the Maersk Alabama.

He was charged with piracy,
discharging a firearm, conspir-
ing to commit hostage-taking
and brandishing a firearm —
charges that could add up to life
in jail for the baby-faced, 5-foot-
2 teenager.

Western nations are often
reluctant to try Somali suspects
who may then try to claim asy-
lum, but Kenya has a successful
track record of pirate prosecu-
tions: 10 pirates handed over by
U.S. forces in 2006 are serving
seven-year terms.



Full Text

PAGE 1

n By PAUL G TURNQUEST Tribune Staff Reporter pturnquest@tribunemedia.net WITH little over six months to go before the PLP’s national convention, would-be candidates for the party’s deputy leadership have started to form alliances to secure survival in what is expected to be a “no holds barred” fight for power. With many “parliamentary meetings” already held with prominent PLPs, schemes are in hand to facilitate the quick departure of Perry Christie from N N A A S S S S A A U U A A N N D D B B A A H H A A M M A A I I S S L L A A N N D D S S L L E E A A D D I I N N G G N N E E W W S S P P A A P P E E R R Manhunt for gunman who shot businessman C M Y K C M Y K Volume: 105 No.125FRIDAY, APRIL 24, 2009 PRICE – 75 (Abaco and Grand Bahama $1.25 WEATHER SUNNY AND WINDY HIGH 83F LOW 72F B U S I N E S S SEEBUSINESSFRONT S P O R T S Cruise lines: We don’t recognise tour body SEEPAGEFIFTEEN BAISS girls soccer n B y TANEKA THOMPSON Tribune Staff Reporter t thompson@tribunemedia.net POLICE are still searching for a brazen gunman who ambushed expatriate financial adviser Hywel J ones in a company parking lot and shot him in the head. A t last reports, Mr Jones remained in critical condition in h ospital under police guard. He had not regained consciousness, according to head of the Central Detective Unit’s Homicide Divi sion, Assistant Superintendent Leon Bethel. Mr Bethel could not confirm reports that Mr Jones was fighting for his life while on life support, but said doctors told police the victim could possibly recover from his injuries. Mr Jones was shot multiple times to the head and the body, police said. Persons in the area t old police they noticed a suspicious man who fit the description o f the gunman loitering in the area shortly before the shooting. Based on the nature of the shooting, police believe Mr Jones may have been the target of an a rranged hit. “He is still alive, he is still ill, a nd the doctors are optimistic that he will recover,” said ASP Bethel. They said it is a reasonable chance now that he will recover.” Police said Mr Jones was unresponsive at the scene and was tak en to hospital by ambulance and rushed into surgery. After shooting the Welsh born banker at least twice in the parking lot outside offshore financial s ervices company, Britannia Consultancy Group, around 10am W ednesday the gunman left him Expat financial adviser in critical condition under police guard The Tribune ANYTIME ... ANYPLACE , WE RE #1 B AHAMASEDITION TRY OUR McFLURRY TWIX MIX www.tribune242.com n B y N E I L H A R T N E L L T r i b u n e B u s i n e s s E d i t o r T H E d e v e l o p e r s b e h i n d t h e $ 1 b i l l i o n R o s e I s l a n d R i t z C a r l t o n r e s o r t p r o j e c t h a v e f i l e d a m o t i o n i n t h e U S c o u r t s t h a t s e e k s t o d i s m i s s a $ 2 0 0 , 0 0 0 l a w s u i t f i l e d a g a i n s t t h e m o n a l e g a l t e c h n i c a l i t y . T h e B a h a m i a n i n c o r p o r a t e d R o s e I s l a n d H o t e l C o m p a n y , i t s p r i n c i p a l d e v e l o p e r , M i a m i b a s e d G e n c o m G r o u p , a n d t h e l a t t e r s p r i n c i p a l , K a r i m A l i b h a i a r e a s k i n g t h e U S d i s t r i c t c o u r t f o r t h e s o u t h e r n d i s t r i c t o f F l o r i d a t o d i s m i s s t h e a c t i o n i n i t i a t e d b y a r c h i t e c t f i r m , G a r c i a S t r o m b e r g , o n t h e g r o u n d s t h a t t h e c o u r t l a c k s j u r i s d i c t i o n t o h e a r t h e c a s e . T h e R i t z C a r l t o n R o s e I s l a n d d e f e n d a n t s a r g u e d t h a t t h e a c t i o n f i l e d a g a i n s t t h e m d o e s n o t p r e s e n t l y a l l e g e f a c t s t h a t w o u l d e s t a b l i s h c o m p l e t e d i v e r s i t y b e c a u s e i t d i d n o t s h o w t h e c i t i z e n s h i p o f G a r c i a S t r o m b e r g s p r i n c i p a l s , b o t h b e l i e v e d t o b e F l o r i d a r e s i d e n t s . A s a r e s u l t , t h e d e v e l o p e r s a l l e g e d t h a t d i v e r s i t y j u r i s d i c t i o n u n d e r w h i c h t h e a c t i o n w a s b r o u g h t d o e s n o t e x i s t . I n t h e i r m o t i o n , t h e R i t z C a r l t o n R o s e I s l a n d d e f e n d a n t s a l l e g e d t h a t t h e a c t i o n d i d n o t s t a t e w h y t h e F l o r i d a c o u r t s s h o u l d h a v e j u r i s d i c t i o n , b u t r e a d i n g t h e c o m p l a i n t s h o w e d t h e a r c h i t e c t f i r m w a s r e l y i n g o n d i v e r s i t y j u r i s d i c t i o n . T h i s , t h e y a l l e g e d , a p p l i e d t o a l l c i v i l a c t i o n s w h e r e t h e d a m a g e s b e i n g s o u g h t e x c e e d e d $ 7 5 , 0 0 0 a n d i n v o l v e d c i t i z e n s f r o m d i f f e r e n t s t a t e s . Y e t , b e c a u s e G a r c i a S t r o m b e r g w a s a F l o r i d a i n c o r p o r a t e d c o m p a n y a n d i t s p r i n c i p a l s F l o r i d a c i t i z e n s , a n d M r A l i b h a i a n d t w o o t h e r d e f e n d a n t s w e r e a l s o c i t i z e n s o f t h e s t a t e , d i v e r s i t y j u r i s d i c t i o n d i d n o t e x i s t . G a r c i a S t r o m b e r g a l l e g e d t h a t t h e R i t z C a r l t o n R o s e I s l a n d d e f e n d a n t s h a d f a i l e d t o m e e t t h e i r c o n t r a c t u a l o b l i g a t i o n s t o p a y i t m o r e t h a n $ 2 0 0 , 0 0 0 f o r w o r k d o n e o n t h e B a h a m i a n p r o j e c t . I t a l l e g e d t h a t i t h a d s i g n e d t h r e e c o n t r a c t s t o p r o v i d e a r c h i t e c t u r e c o n s u l t i n g a n d d e s i g n s e r v i c e s t o t h e R i t z C a r l t o n R o s e I s l a n d p r o j e c t , t h e d a t e s o f s i g n i n g b e i n g S e p t e m b e r 2 8 , 2 0 0 7 , J u n e 2 6 , 2 0 0 8 , a n d J u n e 1 8 , 2 0 0 8 . T h e s e i n v o l v e d t h e p r o v i s i o n n B y N E I L H A R T N E L L T r i b u n e B u s i n e s s E d i t o r T H E G o v e r n m e n t s p r o j e c t e d f i s c a l d e f i c i t i n i t s 2 0 0 9 2 0 1 0 B u d g e t c o u l d a p p r o a c h u n m a n a g e a b l e l e v e l s o f a r o u n d 4 p e r c e n t o f g r o s s d o m e s t i c p r o d u c t ( G D P ) , a f o r m e r f i n a n c e m i n i s t e r w a r n e d y e s t e r d a y , w i t h p r o c e e d s f r o m t h e B a h a m a s T e l e c o m m u n i c a t i o n s C o m p a n y s ( B T C ) s a l e t h e s e c r e t w e a p o n t o k e e p t h e p u b l i c f i n a n c e s i n c h e c k . J a m e s S m i t h , m i n i s t e r o f s t a t e f o r f i n a n c e u n d e r t h e f o r m e r C h r i s t i e g o v e r n m e n t , s a i d t h e u p c o m i n g B u d g e t d u e t o b e p r e s e n t e d i n t h e H o u s e o f A s s e m b l y b y P r i m e M i n i s t e r H u b e r t I n g r a h a m b y M a y s e n d w a s l i k e l y t o c o n v e r g e o n p r e t t y u n f a v o u r a b l e f i s c a l t r e n d s i f t h e c u r r e n t f i s c a l p i c t u r e w a s a l l o w e d t o p e r s i s t i n t o t h e m e d i u m t e r m . H e e x p l a i n e d t h a t t h e G o v e r n m e n t s p o l i c y o p t i o n s , w h e n i t c a m e t o s t i m u l a t i n g a B a h a m i a n e c o n o m y b e i n g b a t t e r e d b y a g l o b a l r e c e s s i o n , w e r e q u i t e l i m i t e d g i v e n t h a t 8 5 p e r c e n t o f t h e a n n u a l B u d g e t w e n t o n c o v e r i n g t h e a d m i n i s t r a t i o n s f i x e d c o s t s . M o n e t a r y p o l i c y w a s a l s o a n e f f e c t i v e n o n s t a r t e r i n t h i s c o u r s e , g i v e n t h a t i t w a s d e d i c a t e d t o c u r r e n t a c c o u n t / b a l a n c e o f p a y m e n t s i s s u e s t o m a i n t a i n t h e o n e : o n e U S d o l l a r p e g . I n m a n y w a y s , t h e G o v e r n m e n t h a s a l r e a d y f r a m e d a g o o d p o r t i o n o f i t s B u d g e t , M r S m i t h t o l d T r i b u n e B u s i n e s s . I f y o u t a k e t h e r e c u r r e n t B u d g e t , i t h a s n o t r e d u c e d i t s s t a f f i n g l e v e l s , u n l i k e t h e p r i v a t e s e c t o r , a n d i s s t i l l c a r r y i n g t h e s a m e s a l a r y a n d w a g e s b i l l , w h i c h i s 5 5 p e r c e n t o f t h e B u d g e t . R e n t s a n d o t h e r f i x e d c o s t s a c c o u n t e d f o r a f u r t h e r 3 0 3 5 p e r c e n t o f t h e G o v e r n m e n t s s p e n d i n g p l a n s , a n d t h e B u d g e t w o u l d a l s o p r o b a b l y s e e a n i n c r e a s e i n d e b t s e r v i c i n g , r e f l e c t i n g t h e n e w l o a n s b e i n g s e r v i c e d n e x t y e a r . n B y N E I L H A R T N E L L T r i b u n e B u s i n e s s E d i t o r T H E B a h a m a s f a i l e d t o r e g i s t e r a m o n g t h e C a r i b b e a n s t o p t h r e e t o u r i s m d e s t i n a t i o n s i n t h e e y e s o f t h e w o r l d s m a j o r f i n a n c i a l i n s t i t u t i o n s , a s u r v e y o n t h e f i n a n c i n g p r o s p e c t s f o r t h e r e g i o n s r e s o r t i n d u s t r y f o u n d . O n e o f i t s a u t h o r s s u g g e s t e d t h i s w a s b e c a u s e t h e B a h a m a s p e r c e n t a g e g r o w t h p r o s p e c t s w e r e l e s s . K P M G s 2 0 0 9 C a r i b b e a n R e g i o n F i n a n c i n g S u r v e y d i s c o v e r e d t h a t b a n k s a n d f i n a n c i a l i n s t i t u t i o n s r a t e d t h e D o m i n i c a n R e p u b l i c , N e t h e r l a n d s A n t i l l e s a n d C u b a a s t h e t o p t h r e e d e s t i n a t i o n s w i t h p o s i t i v e g r o w t h p r o s p e c t s o v e r t h e n e x t t h r e e y e a r s . S i m o n T o w n e n d , a K P M G ( B a h a m a s ) p a r t n e r a n d h e a d o f t h e f i r m s C a r i b b e a n w i d e C o r p o r a t e F i n a n c e a r m , s u g g e s t e d t h e B a h a m a s f a i l u r e t o m a k e t h e t o p t h r e e w a s m o r e a r e f l e c t i o n o f t h e r e l a t i v e m a t u r i t y o f i t s t o u r i s m p r o d u c t , a n d t h e f a c t o t h e r c o u n t r i e s w e r e l i k e l y t o e n j o y h i g h e r g r o w t h r a t e s , a s o p p o s e d t o i t s p r o d u c t q u a l i t y . T h e q u e s t i o n w a s f o r p e o p l e t o l i s t t h e t o p t h r e e , a n d t h e B a h a m a s d i d n t a p p e a r i n t o o m a n y r e s p o n s e s , M r T o w n e n d t o l d T r i b u n e B u s i n e s s . I d o n t k n o w w h y . I t h i n k p e o p l e w e r e l o o k i n g a t t h e o p e n i n g u p o f C u b a a s b e i n g s o m e t h i n g i m m i n e n t . C u r a c a o [ N e t h e r l a n d s A n t i l l e s ] h a s e n j o y e d p r e t t y s t r o n g g r o w t h f r o m a s m a l l b a s e , a n d t h e D o m i n i c a n R e p u b l i c h a s b e e n p r e t t y s t r o n g . I w o u l d n t t a k e f r o m i t t h a t t h e B a h a m a s i s n o t c o n s i d e r e d t o b e a t o p d e s t i n a t i o n . I t s j u s t n o t i n t h e t o p t h r e e f r o m a p e r c e n t a g e g r o w t h p e r s p e c t i v e . W h e n i t c a m e t o t h e h o t e l i n d u s t r y s d e b t f i n a n c i n g p r o s p e c t s , M r T o w n e n d s a i d g r e e n f i e l d p r o j e c t s n e w r e s o r t d e v e l o p m e n t s w o u l d f i n d i t v e r y d i f f i c u l t t o o b t a i n c r e d i t g i v e n t h e c u r r e n t s t a t e o f g l o b a l d e b t m a r k e t s . H o w e v e r , b a n k s a n d o t h e r i n s t i t u t i o n s , e s p e c i a l l y t h o s e t h a t w e r e C a r i b b e a n o w n e d o r h a d d e e p r o o t s i n t h i s r e g i o n , w e r e C M Y K C M Y K S E C T I O N B b u s i n e s s @ t r i b u n e m e d i a . n e t F R I D A Y , A P R I L 2 4 , 2 0 0 9 T H E T R I B U N E $ 3 . 4 8 $ 3 . 5 3 $ 3 . 4 8 f o r a b e t t e r l i f eP E N S I O N g r o u p p e n s i o n s a t t r a c t t h e c r e a m o f t h e c r o p k e e p p r e s e n t e m p l o y e e s h a p p y g u a r a n t e e s t a f f r e t i r e m e n t s a v i n g sa l l o f t h e a b o v eF A M I L Y G U A R D I A N C O R P O R A T E C E N T R E : A T T H E J U N C T I O N O F V I L L A G E R O A D , S H I R L E Y S T R E E T & E A S T B A Y S T R E E T I w w w . f a m g u a r d b a h a m a s . c o mc a l l u s t o d a y a t 3 9 6 4 0 0 0 A S U B S I D I A R Y O F B a h a m a s m i s s e s r e g i o n a l t o p t h r e e t o u r i s t d e s t i n a t i o n sS E E p a g e 4 B S E E p a g e 9 B S E E p a g e 2 B U n m a n a g e a b l e d e f i c i t w a r n i n g * B T C s a l e t h e s e c r e t w e a p o n i n k e e p i n g p u b l i c f i n a n c e s i n c h e c k * E x f i n a n c e m i n i s t e r w a r n s 2 0 0 9 2 0 1 0 B u d g e t d e f i c i t c o u l d a p p r o a c h 4 % o f G D P , a s u n f a v o u r a b l e f i s c a l t r e n d s c o n v e r g e S m i t h n B y N E I L H A R T N E L L T r i b u n e B u s i n e s s E d i t o r B A H A M I A N f i n a n c i a l a n a l y s t s a n d b u s i n e s s m e n y e s t e r d a y s a i d t h e y w e r e a b i t s h o c k e d t h a t t h e I n t e r n a t i o n a l M o n e t a r y F u n d ( I M F ) h a d p r o j e c t e d t h a t t h i s n a t i o n s e c o n o m y w o u l d c o n t r a c t b y 4 . 5 p e r c e n t i n 2 0 0 9 , t h e h i g h e s t r a t e i n t h e e n t i r e 3 4 n a t i o n W e s t e r n H e m i s p h e r e . J a m e s S m i t h , f o r m e r m i n i s t e r o f s t a t e f o r f i n a n c e , d e s c r i b e d t h e I M F p r o j e c t i o n , c o n t a i n e d i n i t s l a t e s t W o r l d E c o n o m i c O u t l o o k r e p o r t , a s a l i t t l e a g g r e s s i v e , i m p l y i n g t h a t w h i l e t h e B a h a m i a n e c o n o m y w a s a l r e a d y i n r e c e s s i o n , t h e s e v e r i t y o f t h e d o w n t u r n w a s n o t l i k e l y t o b e a s b a d c l o s e r , p e r h a p s , t o t h e 2 p e r c e n t c o n t r a c t i o n f o r e c a s t b y S t a n d a r d & P o o r s ( S & P ) . K e n w o o d K e r r , c h i e f e x e c u t i v e o f P r o v i d e n c e A d v i s o r s , s a i d t h e e x t e n t o f t h e B a h a m i a n r e c e s s i o n p r o j e c t e d b y t h e I M F w a s S h o c k a s r e c e s s i o n h i t s B a h a m a s w o r s t i n t h e h e m i s p h e r e S E E p a g e 5 B R i t z C a r l t o n d e v e l o p e r s s e e k l a w s u i t d i s m i s s a l n B y C H E S T E R R O B A R D S B u s i n e s s R e p o r t e r c r o b a r d s @ t r i b u n e m e d i a . n e tTh e F l o r i d a C a r i b b e a n C r u i s e A s s o c i a t i o n s ( F C C A ) p r e s i d e n t y e s t e r d a y d e n i e d t h a t B a h a m i a n t o u r a n d e x c u r s i o n o p e r a t o r s w e r e b e i n g d u m p e d f r o m i t s c r u i s e l i n e m e m b e r s l i s t o f t o u r s w i t h o u t c a u s e o r r e a s o n , a n d s a i d i t d i d n o t r e c o g n i s e t h e B a h a m a s A s s o c i a t i o n o f S h o r e E x c u r s i o n i s t s ( B A S E ) a s a n o r g a n i s a t i o n t h a t r e p r e s e n t e d t h e i n d u s t r y h e r e . M i c h e l e P a i g e t o l d T r i b u n e B u s i n e s s t h a t B A S E s c o n c e r n s w e r e n o t p l a u s i b l e , a s c r u i s e l i n e s c o n s i d e r e d t o u r a n d e x c u r s i o n o p e r a t o r s t h e i r l i f e b l o o d . A n d , t o b o o t , s h e a d d e d t h a t t h e F C C A d i d n o t r e c o g n i s e B A S E a s a b a r g a i n i n g a g e n t f o r a n y B a h a m i a n t o u r a n d e x c u r s i o n o p e r a t o r s . I t s n o t a s h o r e e x c u r s i o n p r o v i d e r , s a i d M s P a i g e . W e h a v e a s t r o n g r e l a t i o n s h i p w i t h t h e t o u r p r o v i d e r s . S o u r c e s c l o s e t o B A S E t o l d t h i s n e w s p a p e r t h a t m a j o r c r u i s e l i n e s h a v e d r o p p e d t o u r s f r o m t h e i r l i s t s w i t h n o e x p l a n a t i o n , a n d h a v e d e m a n d e d t h a t t h e y r e d u c e p r i c e s a n d s t o p o n l i n e a d v e r t i s i n g . O p e r a t o r s s u c h a s D o l p h i n E n c o u n t e r s , w h i c h w a s s a i d t o h a v e b e e n d r o p p e d b y C a r n i v a l , w e r e a f r a i d t h a t b u s i n e s s w a s b e i n g d i r e c t e d t o A t l a n t i s , w h e r e a s i m i l a r p r o d u c t i s o f f e r e d . T h i s h a s p u t t h e s e s m a l l b u s i n e s s e s o n e d g e a s t h e y h a v e g r e a t l y d e p e n d e d o n t h e c r u i s e s h i p s f o r s t e a d y r e v e n u e f l o w s . M s P a i g e , t h o u g h , a r g u e d t h a t c r u i s e l i n e s w o u l d n o t s i m p l y s t r i k e a n o p e r a t o r f r o m t h e i r t o u r p r o v i d e r l i s t w i t h o u t c o n t a c t i n g t h e m p r i o r t o d o i n g s o . Y o u d o n t j u s t w a k e u p o n e m o r n i n g a n d s a y w e r e n o t j u s t g o i n g t o u s e y o u r s e r v i c e s , s h e s a i d . H o w e v e r , o n e B a h a m i a n t o u r o p e r a t o r y e s t e r d a y t o l d T r i b u n e B u s i n e s s t h a t a c r u i s e l i n e t h e y o n c e p r o v i d e d t o u r s t o s w i t c h e d t o t h e i r c o m p e t i t o r w i t h o u t n o t i f y i n g t h e m o f t h e c h a n g e . O n e d a y w e j u s t s t o p p e d g e t t i n g b o o k i n g s , s a i d t h e o p e r a t o r . B A S E h a s b e e n l o b b y i n g f o r t h e F C C A t o r e c o g n i s e i t a s a r e p r e s e n t a t i v e f o r t o u r a n d e x c u r s i o n o p e r a t o r s . H o w e v e r , t h e F C C A s p o s i t i o n i s t h a t i t w a n t s w r i t t e n r e a s s u r a n c e f r o m i n d i v i d u a l m e m b e r s t h a t B A S E c a n r e p r e s e n t t h e m , w h i c h , f r o m M s P a i g e s s t a n c e , h a s n o t h a p p e n e d . B A S E d o e s n o t h a v e a r e l a t i o n s h i p w i t h t h e c r u i s e l i n e s , s h e s a i d . W e w i l l h o n o u r a n y a p p o i n t m e n t m a d e . A c c o r d i n g t o h e r , t h e F C C A h a s a s t r o n g r e l a t i o n s h i p w i t h t h e p r i v a t e s e c t o r i n t h e B a h a m a s . S h e s a i d c r u i s e l i n e s w o u l d c e r t a i n l y t a k e o p e r a t o r s i n t o c o n s i d e r a t i o n s h o u l d t h e y c e a s e t o u s e t h e m a s a t o u r p r o v i d e r , t h o u g h s h e a d m i t t e d : I c a n t s p e a k a b o u t t h i n g s g e n e r i c a l l y b e c a u s e I d o n t k n o w t h e s p e c i f i c s . O p e r a t o r s w e r e a l s o c o n c e r n e d t h a t c r u i s e p a s s e n g e r s w e r e e x h a u s t i n g t h e i r s p e n d i n g o n s o m e o f t h e c r u i s e l i n e s p r i v a t e i s l a n d s , w h e r e s o m e e x c u r s i o n s a n d o f f e r i n g s f o u n d a t m a j o r p o r t s o f c a l l a r e d u p l i c a t e d . C a r n i v a l s H a l f M o o n C a y , R o y a l C a r i b b e a n s C o c o C a y a n d D i s n e y s C a s t a w a y C a y h a v e a l l s e e n i n c r e a s e s i n p a s s e n g e r a r r i v a l s l a s t y e a r , w h i l e N a s s a u a n d F r e e p o r t s a w d e c l i n e s . M s P a i g e a s s e r t s t h a t t h e p r i v a t e i s l a n d s a r e a c o m p l e t e l y d i f f e r e n t p r o d u c t f r o m c i t y C r u i s e l i n e s : W e d o n t r e c o g n i s e t o u r b o d y * F C C A d e n i e s B a h a m i a n t o u r o p e r a t o r s b e i n g d r o p p e d w i t h o u t r e a s o n * P r e s i d e n t t e l l s B a h a m i a n o w n e d f i r m s t o s t o p w h i n i n g a b o u t p r i v a t e i s l a n d s a n d t o p u t o n t h e i r t h i n k i n g c a p s t o d e v e l o p b e t t e r p r o d u c t S E E p a g e 2 B BAHAMASBIGGEST CARSFORSALE, HELPWANTED ANDREALESTATE I N S I D E SEE page eight ABOVE: Tyson Deveaux was escorted by SWAT team members as he arrived. L EFT: D eveaux leaves court yesterday. T i m C l a r k e / T r i b u n e s t a f f SWATTEAMOFFICERSGUARDMANONSECONDMURDERCHARGE n By MEGAN REYNOLDS Tribune Staff Reporter mreynolds@tribunemedia.net SWAT team officers armed with machine guns guarded the Nassau Street magistrates courts as Tyson Deveaux was arraigned on his second murder charge yesterday. Deveaux, 22, of Saffron Street, New Providence, had been released on bail charged with the 2008 murder of Corey Whymms when he was arraigned for the murder of Marlon Smith, the man shot dead outside his Pinewood Gardens home on Sunday. SEE page eight n B y ALISON LOWE Tribune Staff R eporter alowe@tribunemedia.net A SUPREME Court Judge was yesterday a ccused of acting in a “wholly improper” manner t hat represented a “remarkable departure f rom the basic requirements of a judge’s role.” N icholas Lavender, QC, told the Court of Appeal that Justice Anita Allen’s questionable conduct appeared to stem from her taking as a very personal matter” a request that shes tep down from a case. The British lawyer, rep r esenting Rami Weissfisch, one of two Israeli brothers in a protracted legal battle over millions of dollars earned while they were b usiness partners, suggestJudge is accused of ‘acting in a wholly improper manner’ Would-be PLP deputy candidates forming alliances ahead of convention SEE page eight Perry Christie n By PAUL G TURNQUEST Tribune Staff Reporter pturnquest@tribunemedia.net WITH more than 350 lots for sale in the newly opened gated community of Lyford Hills, this half a billion dollar real estate development will boast lots ranging from 7,000 to 21,000 square feet. Leading developer Tennyson Wells, informed The Tribune yesterday that these lots will range in price from $120,000 to $365,000 dollars per lot. Situated near the luxury gated community of More than 350 lots for sale at new gated community SEE page eight DEVELOPMENTof Matthew Town, Inagua, is being held up by long delays in the granting of Crown land, island sources claimed yesterday. According to sources, several residents have been waiting for years for Crown grants, even though some handed over considerable sums of money to government as far back as 2003. Inagua’s plight surfaced as controversy swirled around allegations of nepotism by Lands and Surveys Director Tex Turnquest. Mr Turnquest denies the allegations. But an Inagua resident told The Tribune : “The people are furious over this.” He said several locals – including Clyde Cleare, Jennifer Fawkes, Wilfred Seymour and Olive Seymour – were still waiting for Crown grants, even though they had paid up to $2,000 a time to government. “This is holding up the devel opment of Matthew Town,” said the source. “This place is dormant, yet the settlement is sur rounded by Crown land. It isn’t right.” Messages left with Mr Turnquest’s office seeking comment on the most recent allegations were not returned by press time last night. Delays in the granting of Crown land hold up Inagua development SEE page eight LAY-OFFS continued yesterday in the hotel industry as the Royal Sandals Bahamian Resort reportedly let go a team of man agers. While the Trade Union Congress (TUC agers lost their jobs, Sandals’ public relations department said that only five were let go as part of a restructuring exercise aimed at streamlining operations in these challenging economic times. The Sandals workers are currently not represented by a union, however the TUC and the Bahamas Hotel Maintenance and Allied Workers Union (BHMAWU ful representatives of the workers. Sandals reportedly lets g o a team of mana g er s

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C M Y K C M Y K LOCAL NEWS PAGE 2, FRIDAY, APRIL 24, 2009 THE TRIBUNE n HAVANA A leading rights activist says most of Cuba's 200 or more political prisoners would rather serve out long terms on the island than be part of an exchange for five communist agents imprisoned in the US, as Cuban President Raul Castro has suggested, according to the Associated Press . President Barack Obama has said Cuba should make the next move as both leaders try to thaw relations and that releasing political prisoners would be a significant step. Mr Castro responded in part by suggesting a prisoner swap sending all of Cuba's political prisoners, and their families, to the United States in exchange for the five convicted Cuban spies. “The prisoners themselves? They want nothing of such a deal,” Havana's leading dissident said Monday. ‘Espionag "It's nearly unanimous among the prisoners that they not be exchanged for military men arrested red-handed in espionage activities in the United States," said Elizardo Sanchez of the Cuban Commission for Human Rights and Reconciliation. "They would rather stay in prison." Mr Sanchez, the most veteran of the island's rights activists, talks to numerous political prisoners and their relatives by phone each day, and updates detailed lists of inmates that he releases every six months. His reports are a key source of information for international groups monitoring Cuba's human rights situation. Castro's government has unilaterally released "prisoners of conscience" before without suffering any political consequences inside Cuba. In February, four political prisoners were set free and immediately exiled to Spain, following human rights talks in Madrid. It was at least the fifth known release of a group of political prisoners by Cuba since the mid-1980s that followed an international appeal or negotiations. The US has swapped prisoners before with other countries notably in the case of KGB spy Rudolph Ivanovich Abel, traded to the Soviets in 1962 for imprisoned U-2 pilot Francis Gary Powers. C E NTREVILLE House has been much in the news lately as renovations have now started to restore the property to its former g lory under the supervision of the Antiquities, Monuments and Museum Corporation. Its restoration has also resurrected political racists prop aganda that the late Ralph G Collins, former owner of the property, had encircled his grounds with a high wall to keep o ut black Bahamians who lived on the western side of his estate. On Monday, The Tribune editor, who lived as a young c hild on Shirley Street opposite the Collins property, gave a brief history of the wall and pointed out that racism was not in the mix when the wall was built. T he following day Aaron Roberts wrote a letter to The Tribune strongly disagreeing that Mr Collins had built his wall to “secure his property from bushes (unless bushes is a new term for black people).” W e promised Mr Roberts that we would publish photographs to show that the Collins property was surrounde d on three sides by bush not by people or people’s homes. On this page today some of these photographs, made available by the Collins family, are published show-i ng the property before the wall was constructed. CENTREVILLE HOUSE The restoration of P H O T O S : M a d e a v a i l a b l e b y C o l l i n s f a m i l y AERIALVIEWSOFTHECENTREVILLE PROPERTY(ABOUT 1949) Most of Cuba’s political inmates ‘oppose swap with spies jailed inUS’ CUBAN PRESIDENT Raul Castro. THIS PHOTOGRAPH taken from the south facing north shows the property of the Hon Ralph G Collins in the early thirties. The white road running through the property suggests a perimeter line. However, it was a road that ran through the centre of the property from north to south before Collins Avenue and Centreville grew up around it. The home faces Shirley Street on the north. The estate was surrounded by bush on the other three sides with Mr Collin’s orchard at the back. The property extended as far back as Wulff Road. THIS PHOTOGRAPH shows the property facing Shirley Street. The property extended down to Shirley Street and was protected along this street by an ornate iron fence, a small portion of which still stands. Again the white lines are roads running through the Collins estate. Doctors Hospital now occupies that part of the property shown to the left. The Tribune is opposite the property in its present location. THIS PHOTOGRAPH , taken from the east shows the water tower in the distance. All three photographs show the property surrounded by bush.

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EMPLOYEES of the Min i stry of Works’ electrical department staged a demon stration outside of the min i stry’s Thompson Boulevard building yesterday morning, d emanding that government give them what they claim are long overdue promotions. P resident of the Bahamas Public Services Union (BPSU John Pinder said that the 20 to 25 workers were protesting the fact that majority of themh ave not been promoted in many years. Maintenance These workers are a main tenance team, they do some construction work, but gov ernment wants them to get a stage three (certification electrical work before they get promoted. And a stage three qualification is really not necessary to do maintenance work,” he said. Mr Pinder said the union is now hoping to meet with Works Minister Neko Grant next week to discuss criteria for promotions and adjustments to the career paths of the electrical department workers. “Before the Cabinet shuf fle, we were working with Minister Earl Deveaux and permanent secretary Anita Bernard and we were making some headway. But now neither of them are there anymore and the issue was put on the back-burner. “All we want now is for the government to give these peo ple their deserved promotions and have the (upcoming get reflect the money allocated for the promotions,” Mr Pinder said. By KARIN HERIG T ribune Staff Report kherig@tribunemedia.net LOCAL courier companies were up in arms yesterday,m any fearing for the future of their business, after being informed that new Customs regulations will be enforced this coming Monday. A ccording to business owners speaking with The Tribune , the new regulations r equire courier companies to go through a complicated and l engthy process to clear Customs – a process which companies say will delay the deliv-e ry of goods by at least a day and do untold damage to their o perations. One business owner, who wished to remain anonymous,s aid that he was told that instead of clearing Customs at the airport, Odyssey Aviation,t hey will now have to visit several offices, including the Cust oms building on Thompson Boulevard, to pay their duty fees and complete the neces-s ary paperwork. Couriers bringing in perisha ble goods, several of whom supply the hotels with food, a re particularly concerned about this development as t here are no refrigeration facilities in the warehouse at Odyssey Aviation. The stuff will just sit there for at least day, going bad,” one company owner said. Companies that offer overnight delivery fear that this new time-consuming Customs process will make their services redundant. How can we promise ( same day, over-night) delivery? We will have to refund all of our customers. “All I can say is that a lot of people will be out of a job come Wednesday if the newr equirements go into effect on Monday,” another courier b usiness owner said. I t is estimated that more than 30 courier companies e mploying hundreds of people will be affected by the new Customs regulations. O ne owner of a courier company said that he does not u nderstand the need for the new regulations, as the ones currently in place are moret han adequate. “The procedures are there, t hey are perfectly adequate – they only need to be enforced properly. A lot of the timep ersons, even Customs officers, do not know the correct procedure,” the business owner said. The country’s courier comp anies now hope to come together to form a Bahamas Transshipment and Logistics Association to agitate for their rights and to negotiate thei mplementation of Customs r equirements with the government. In the meantime, several companies said they will suspend importation of goods for now until the they can be assured that the new process will not delay delivery to theirc ustomers. A message left for the head of the Customs Department, Glen Gomez, was not returned up until press time yesterday. C M Y K C M Y K LOCAL NEWS THE TRIBUNE FRIDAY, APRIL 24, 2009, PAGE 3 Doctors appeal for b lood as they treat shooting victim Project to produce export/import price indexes In brief DOCTORS have issued an urgent call for blood as theyc ontinue to treat businessman Hywel Jones, who is fighting for his life after being shot in the head and back early Wednesdaym orning. Mr Jones is in critical condition at Doctors Hospital, and persons willing tod onate blood are being asked to visit the hospital’s b lood bank as soon as possible. THROUGHOUT 2009 the Department of Statistics is undertaking a project to produce export/import price i ndexes for the Bahamas. T he primary reason for prod ucing these indexes is for use as a deflator in the production of Gross Domestic Product (GDP However, export/import price indexes have a number of additional uses, including measuring inflation, studying long-term price trends and as inputs into forecasting future price trends. In order to produce these indexes the department willconduct a pricing survey of a sample of businesses in New Providence and Grand Bahama that are involved in exporting and importing. Initiation The first step in the process involves an "initiation" exer cise, in which staff from the Department of Statistics will visit selected businesses during the month of May. During the initiation visits, the department's staff will identify various commodities selected for pricing and devel op specific descriptions and codes for each of them. Once the commodities are identified, the officers will attempt to monitor the prices of each of the commodities ona quarterly basis. Said the Department of Statistics in a statement: “The support and co-operation of the selected exporters and importers is crucial to the success of this exercise. As with aII studies conducted by the department, all information obtained will be kept in the strictest confidence.” New Customs rules could force us out of business – courier companies Complex process will reportedly delay deliveries and damage operations “All I can say is that a lot of p eople will be out of a job come Wednesday if the new requirements go into effect on Monday.” Courier business owner Workers stage demonstration over ‘long overdue promotions’ MINISTRYOFWORKSELECTRICALDEPARTMENT “All we want now is for the government to give these people their deserved promotions and have the (upcoming budget reflect the money allocated for the pr omotions John Pinder

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EDITOR, The Tribune. How long the saga as to whether Bahamians should be party to the extinction of turtles is going on shows that it has at least r aised people from their slumbers about their individual responsi b ility to their environment. To me it all boils down to the fact d o we want turtles to exist as a viable species or not? They have value in their own right, and also as a tourist attraction, so with one stroke of his pen the Ministry of Agriculture could please both the Ministry of Tourism, and theM inistry of Finance, a win, win situation, and put paid to Mr A llen’s assault. I find it very difficult to take people seriously who in one breath exalt such organisations as ARK, and in the other condone, what else can you call it, the virtual destruction of a species to the sacred cow of “heritage.” Mr Allen has not made the first v iable suggestion as to how to sustain turtle populations he says leave it to the government, the depository of all knowledge and infinite funds! I am well a ware of the need for fishermen to make a living, which up to now h as included the harvesting of tur tles, but all good things come to a n end. When Canada fished out the cod in the 80’s thousands of people were out of work. Canada, being richer, was able to pay people $800 per week to sit at home. I’m not sure the Bahamas Gov ernment could afford that. M r Allen is very concerned about criminalising Bahamians, i f a “stop law” is enacted. Oh my, my, if only Bahamians were so concerned. To be quite frank I have never known any law in The Bahamas to “stop” Bahamians unfortunately. You have only to drive on our roads, or read about those who fail to pay NHI contributions, and so it goes on ad infinitum. I remember back in the 60’s and 70’s, perhaps Mr Allen is too young, spearing crawfish with tails up to 6lbs and more, how many that size do you see today, they are virtually extinct? Now people catch them undersize, cook and mash them to disguise it. Or perhaps Mr Allen would condone the practice of some island fishermen who bleached the reefs to chase out the crawfish so they could perpetuate their heritage. Have you seen the moonscapes, Mr Allen? Sir David Attenborough, on BBC World News, has formed a society to question the sustainability of an ever exploding human population; none too soon in my view. It is funny how just about every other animal population, except those who breed on man’s detritus and mismanagement, including rats, is failing fast. I’m glad I did not live in the n ext flat. With logic and the utmost sincerity I catch as many rats as I can, to feed my four 6ft 7ft snakes, which I have rescued from the chop, by people who t hink they are doing God’s work by killing them. I t is the heritage of the Chi nese to imbibe ground tiger bones t o enhance some ridiculous notion that it increases sexual prowess. At least we should be thankful turtles have never been endowed with that ability poor old conchs. Mr Allen strikes me like the Chinese man on anu ndercover documentary, who dealt in such bones, rubbing his h ands together at the thought of fewer tigers, as the price for the bones rose to unconscionable levels. No doubt Mr Allen will have apoplexy at such a comparison, but I can’t see much difference. As one letter writer said, “how can you be sure the turtles are only for local consumption?” Mr Cartwright needs to take the turtle by the flippers, conform to international law, and do the right thing. If you wish to be tak en seriously stick to your regular writing Mr Allen and leave the poor turtle in peace. If the matter of the environment was not so serious your protestations would be taken as tongue in cheek jokes. I know you won't be able to resist answering this letter, go ahead, while the rest of us pity you in your lonely battle against, logic, common sense and basic decency. W E G GRATTAN Nassau, April 16, 2009. P.S. I may not be Bahamian born, but we all live in the same world, and there is nothing God given about being the citizen of any particular country. EDITOR, The Tribune. I understand that Anthony U. Bostwick has already written to you with regard to the shockingly poor treatment that visitors to, and residents of, the Bahamas must suffer as they try to "preclear" US Immigration at Sir Lynden Pindling International Airport, but I will, if I may, add my two cents worth. My family and I have just enjoyed a splendid holiday at the Atlantis Resort. The facilities are first class and the service was almost universally impeccable and friendly. We had similar happy experiences elsewhere in Nassau and throughout New Providence. Sadly, our good feelings from our holiday did not survive our departure from the Bahamas because of the hellish conditionsa nd antagonistic attitudes of the US Immigration officers at the airport. As a Bermudian, I have passed t hrough US pre-clearance in Bermuda dozens, if not hundreds of times, always with ease. Since 2001, this process has become more bureaucratic and delays, although rare, are unsurprising. But they are never severe. T he same cannot be said of N assau. My wife, six-year-old son a nd I arrived at the airport some t wo hours ahead of the scheduled d eparture of our 30minute flight to Miami and passed through c heck-in and the first security c heck without difficulty (like Mr. B ostwick, I find the need for secur ity screenings before and after U S Immigration completely inexp licable). M ore than an hour before our flight was due to depart, we were t hen confronted with a massive line, while three Immigration officials languorously checked passports. After 20 minutes of glacial progress, I approached a consta ble in the Royal Bahamas Police Force to say that I was concerned w e would miss our flight. I was told a representative of American Airlines "might" come and r etrieve us from the line. This proved to be a futile hope and was clearly disingenuous. Ten minutes later, I spoke to a m an who seemed to be in charge of US Immigration who told us that we should have come three h ours before the departure of our f light and was otherwise entirely unsympathetic. At this point, US passport holders from in front a nd behind us were taken from the line and sent to another, faster line, regardless of whether they were due to depart in ten min utes or ten hours. F ifteen minutes later, we told yet another officer (it was astonishing how many officers werem illing around the area when t hey could have been stamping passports) that we now had 15 m inutes to make our 12.30 flight. She responded with a smirk that it w as not yet 12.30 and we should not worry. She spent the next 15 m inutes smiling and laughing while glancing back at not onlyu s, but the other dozen or so people in our immediate vicinity who were also about to miss their flights. At 12.30, needless to say,w e were still in line. When we eventually reached one of the two open passport booths on our side of the hall (one of the officers having packed up and left, whilea nother had strolled off to get a cup of coffee in the middle of this m aelstrom of frustration) and expressed our unhappiness at the f act we had missed our flight and at the lack of organisation at theA irport, the officer told us that he didn’t care. When we pointed out that many of the non-American tourists flying to the US from Nassau might actually spend money in the United States and save what was left of its economy, he replied that his job was safe. He later acknowledged that the system was poor, but claimed this was the fault of the Airport. On our arrival at the departure lounge, having cleared the second security check, my wife and son then witnessed a woman collapse and an urgent call went out for a doctor. Why she collapsed is a mystery, but I suspect her blood pressure was through the roof if her experience was anything like ours. Fortunately, with the help of the very cooperative and completely unfazed American Airlines staff in the departure lounge, which suggested this was all tooc ommon, we and the other half dozen people who had missed the 12.30 flight were able to leave on the next flight out, even though ith ad been fully booked. No doubt the seats we took belonged to people still trapped in one of Dante's nine circles of Inferno, currently masquerading as US Immigration. I write this only to urge the U S Embassy, the Department of H omeland Security and the Gove rnment of the Bahamas to come t ogether to solve what they must k now is a massive problem which is damaging both Bahamas' t ourism and the reputation of the U nited States. I for one, do not i ntend to undergo the experience a gain, and lacking a boat, this m eans I am unlikely to visit the B ahamas in the foreseeable f uture or recommend it to others, despite the fact that it was o therwise a wonderful holiday. William J.S. Zuill Hamilton, Bermuda, April 17, 2009. C M Y K C M Y K EDITORIAL/LETTERS TO THE EDITOR PAGE 4, FRIDAY, APRIL 24, 2009 THE TRIBUNE The Tribune Limited NULLIUS ADDICTUS JURARE IN VERBA MAGISTRI Being Bound to Swear to The Dogmas of No Master L EON E. H. DUPUCH, Publisher/Editor 1903-1914 S IR ETIENNE DUPUCH, Kt., O.B.E., K.M., K.C.S.G., (Hon. P ublisher/Editor 1919-1972 Contributing Editor 1972-1991 EILEEN DUPUCH CARRON, C.M.G., M.S., B.A., LL.B. P ublisher/Editor 1972Published Daily Monday to Saturday S hirley Street, P.O. Box N-3207, Nassau, Bahamas Insurance Management Building., P.O. F-485, Freeport, Grand Bahama T ELEPHONES Switchboard (News, Circulation and Advertising W EBSITE w ww.tribune242.com – updated daily at 2pm AS PROMISED we have published on page 2 of today’s Tribune photographs taken in the e arly thirties of the Collins property, which is now being landscaped and renovated by theA ntiquities, Monuments and Museums Corpo ration. A high wall, later built to enclose the property, eventually became controversial after Collins Avenue, Centreville and Palmdale were carved out of the bushland that had earlier surrounded it. Because of the development on thee astern side of the wall, and the fact that the Collins property had been sold to developers,m ost of the enclosures that had secured the property were taken down all but a section of t he ornate iron fence that fronted the property on Shirley Street and the western wall. As settlements grew up on either side of t hat wall, persons on the west had to walk a considerable distance around the wall to go to w ork, to shop and to send their children to school. The wall, which now divided them, b ecame an issue. Many persons on the west ern side of the wall erected a ladder on both sides as a short cut, and daily persons scaled the wall to carry on their business. Naturally there were accidents. On one occasion a young b oy broke his arm, on another a pregnant woman lost her child. T he incident of the pregnant woman became an issue in the 1956 election. Sir Etienne D upuch, a representative for the Eastern Dis trict, lost his seat in the House because of that wall. One day school teacher Donald Davis came to The Tribune to tell Sir Etienne about the woman’s accident and the social injustice of this wall remaining. Those opposing Sir Etien-n e’s re-election knew that at that time it was an unpopular social issue, but an issue that, regardl ess of personal loss, he would champion. So it was important that they made him aware of it. We remember him coming back to his office very upset about that wall. He immediately sat down and “fired off” several articles for it either to come down or a road to be built through it to allow free passage to all persons living on either side. Bahamians predominantly black liv ing on the western side of the wall were jubilant. H owever, those living on the eastern side of the wall were Sir Etienne’s constituents, and t hey were not at all pleased. Although mainly white Bahamians lived on the eastern side of the wall, black Bahamians were also residents. The black Bahamians joined with their white neighbours in sending a petition to the House tol eave the wall intact. Those on the eastern side, regardless of colour, felt that their property val u es would go down if they did not remain segregated from “the rest.” S ir Etienne knew that the situation was morally wrong. He also knew that if he went against the wishes of his constituents in fighting for social justice for all Bahamians he would lose the election. His principles were morei mportant to him than a House of Assembly seat. He continued the fight to dismantle thew all. He lost his election. However, the 1956 fight over the wall had n othing to do with Mr Collins who had died in 1946. Nor had the building of the wall anything to do with segregating one group of people from the other. From 1871, what later became theB rice followed by the Collins property, was an oasis surrounded by bush as the photos on page2 and taken many years later will show. Prohibition the Volstead Act was introd uced in 1920 when America went dry. Bahamians entered the bootleg era with great gusto determined to slake the thirst of their liquor s tarved northern neighbours. The bootleg era brought untold wealth to the Treasury, but it a lso filled the coffers of mobsters like Chicago’s Al Capone. I t was during this period of relative wealth that two of our major hotels were built and a gambling casino was opened in the Bahamian Club on West Bay Street. Business was good in the Bahamas, but speakeasies, mobs and murder e scalated in the United States. Prohibition could not be enforced and so it was repealed in 1933. T he days of Rum Row were over in the Bahamas. The severe hurricane of 1926 and t hen the Wall Street crash crippled this country. The Bahamas was back in the boondocks. Its people needed employment. Mr Ralph Collins rose to the need. He decided to create employment by building a wall around his property for which he paid his labourers 1/a day and gave them a hot meal.C ommunities being built around his wall came many years later. H owever, a letter writer to this newspaper who knows nothing about those days, wants to put another spin on history. He claims that Mr Collins built his wall to keep black people on one side of the wall from mingling with white people on the other side. As the letter writer will see from the photographs on page 2 there were only trees not people on either side of that wall. Those communities that created so m uch trouble in later years did not yet exist. His argument sounds like those of the world’s d imwits never having had to suffer the horrors of World War II who claim there was no Holocaust. A member of the Collins family, who sent us these photographs, attached a most apt quotef rom the Russian author Fyodor Dostoyevsky that will cover today’s unbelievers: Man,” wrote Dostoyevsky, “has such a predilection for systems and abstract deduct ions that he is ready to distort the truth intentionally, he is ready to deny the evidence of his senses only to justify his logic.” Smirks and laughter amid Airport hell LETTERS letters@tribunemedia.net Collins Wall nonsense debunked Do we want turtles to exist as a viable species or not?

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THE family of a man killed when a Defence Force vessel struck his fishing boat two years ago say their pleasf or an investigation have been met with a wall of official silence. T he relatives of Gladstone Ferguson, 78, say that d espite assurances from rep resentatives of the Defence Force that a thorough inves t igation would be followed by a timely report, they are still in grief and still seeking proper closure. A statement issued by the f amily said: “On the night of September 6, 2007, the lov ing leader of our family, Gladstone Ferguson, 78, was killed at sea as a result of a collision with a RoyalB ahamas Defence Force vessel, at ‘The Narrows’ in the Paradise Island area. Minister “We have written and m ade countless phone calls to the Honourable Tommy Turnquest, minister responsible for the Defence Force, Commodore "Butch" Scav-e lla, the commissioner of police, the attorney general, and all relevant government agencies. Almost two years later, no official report, no date set for a coroner'si nquest, no formal reply, and no update. We are still waiting.” T he family said its attorneys continue to struggle to s ecure an inquest date, “but seemingly only the rich and famous with celebrity influ e nce can make demands on our judicial system”. At a press conference ear lier this week, a family spokesperson said: “Weh ave come today at the grave site of our fallen fam ily leader to draw the gov ernment and the people of the Bahamas' attention to our pain and grief. We hopei mmediate action will be taken to bring truth, honour, and proper closure to thism atter.” C M Y K C M Y K LOCAL NEWS THE TRIBUNE FRIDAY, APRIL 24, 2009, PAGE 5 RBC Royal Bank of Canada is offering grants tol ocal or community organisations in the Bahamas, Caribbean countries, Canada and the United States t hat “inform, educate and mobilise people about watershed protection, increase watershed awareness in the community, ande ncourage community-based watershed stewardship.” RBC Blue Water Project is a 10-year, $50-million phila nthropic global commitment by RBC Royal Bank of Canada to support organisations that are committed to watershed protection andp roviding access to clean drinking water. Applications for the “Community Action Grant” c omponent of the project are now welcome. Grants range from $1,000 to $5,000. RBC also offers a leadership grant that is currently c losed for 2009. Launched in late 2007, the R BC Blue Water Project will help foster a culture ofw ater stewardship world wide. To date, RBC has c ommitted more than $13 million in grants to 39 organisations. n By TANEKA THOMPSON Tribune Staff Reporter tthompson@tribunemedia.net A LITTLE over five thousand unemployed Bahamians have registered for the country’s national Unemployment Benefit Programme since early registration began on April 11,M inister of Labour Dion Foulkes said. T his was disclosed during a brief session of the Senate yesterday morning as amendments to the Housing Acta nd a new Pharmacy Bill were introduced to members of the upper chamb er for first reading. Five thousand and two persons applied for the plan as of April 22 –3 ,360 of them in Nassau; 1,268 in Grand Bahama and 374 in the various F amily Islands, Mr Foulkes said. Job T hese applicants have also have registered with the Department of Labour’s skills bank which notifies persons when a job in their area of expertise becomes available. M ore than 4,350 persons registered for the scheme during the six days when registrationc entres were open throughout New Providence and Grand Bahama. Six hundred and fifty more persons regis-t ered once registration moved to branches of the National Insurance Board on April 20. O fficials previously said they expected applicants to flood the doors of ther egistration centres when they opened on April 11 h owever the numbers have been more moderate than first anticipated. W ith 12,000 persons said to be eligible for the benefit, some observers haven oted that either pride or confusing application requirements h ave kept thousands of unemployed persons away. But Senator Foulkes disagrees. Our project from the actuarial study was between 5,000 to 7,000 so t he numbers are fairly on target. I must commend that actuary and staff at the National Insur-a nce Board and the Department of Labour for doing a superb job,” he told The Tribune in an interview yesterday. I think that the amount of people who are registered are the amount that we predicted so it’s not aq uestion of why there wasn’t a bigger turnout,” he said, adding that an aver-a ge of 120 persons applied per day for the benefit. H e said while it is not a priority at present, the stipulations for applyingm ay be adjusted at a later date. Eligible persons may c ontinue to apply for the benefit at the NIB headquarters on B aillou Hill Road in Nassau, at the NIB headquarters in Grand Bahama and at NIB offices throughout theF amily Islands. There is a two week waiting period b efore cheques will be issued, and Mr Foulkes urged all eligible persons to apply early. R ecipients of the benefit will receive half of their average insurable weekly wage for 13 weeks; the current ceiling on insurable wages is $400 meaning the maximum amount anyone canr eceive is $200 per week. Contributions T he benefits will be paid out from NIB’s $20 million medical branch fund. Once this is exhausted, the scheme willb e sustained by contributions from employed persons and employers. A pplicants qualify for the fund if they are unemployed, under 65, not self-employed, able to and willing tow ork, were last employed on or after July 1, 2004, not receiving other NIB b enefits – other than disability or survivors benefits – and have made a cer tain number of contributions to NIB. W hen registering, applicants must present a letter of termination – if o ne was issued – and complete a Department of Labour employment application along with an NIB claimf orm. Just over 5,000 apply for unemployment benefit Dion Foulkes Pleas for fisherman’s death investigation ‘met with silence’ RBC invites community-basedo rganisations to apply for its BlueW ater Project grant

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f )DPLOLDULW\ZLWK\DFKWLQJERDWLQJRSHUDWLRQV )DPLOLDULW\ZLWKVFKHGXOLQJDQGPRQLWRULQJYLVLWRUERRNLQJV )DPLOLDULW\ZLWK9+)UDGLRRSHUDWLRQDQGSURWRFROV 'HGLFDWHGWRFRQVHUYDWLRQRIQDWXUDOUHVRXUFHV 7KHDELOLW\WRGHDOHIIHFWLYHO\ZLWKDGLYHUVHJURXSRISHUVRQV 3OHDVDQWSHUVRQDOLW\ $ELOLW\WRSULRULWL]HDQGPXOWLWDVN :LOOLQJWRZRUNXQGHUGHPD QGLQJFRQGLWLRQVDQGLQUHPRWH ORFDWLRQIRUH[WHQGHGSHULRGV 3RVLWLRQRIIHUVYDFDWLRQWLPHPHGLFDOLQVXUDQFHVXEVLG\DQG KRXVLQJ 7RDSSO\ SURYLGHDFRYHUOHWWHUUHVXPHWKUHHUHIHUHQFHV WR%DKDPDVDWLRQDO7UXVW n By MEGAN REYNOLDS Tribune Staff Reporter mreynolds@tribunemedia.net A SINGLE mother continues to feel insecure as the Immigration Department have not yet r epaired the damage caused by a rmed officers who raided her home two months ago. Violet Hanna, 41, said the security of her home was comp romised when six armed officers used a heavy maul to break open her garden gate and bash in her back door to gain access to h er property at around 4am on F ebruary 24. The gate no longer closes s ecurely and the chain link fence r emains bent after the officers jumped over it, Ms Hanna said,a dding that the backdoor was damaged and has now broken a way from the hinge. Officers left the maul at the gate when they left the property without checking Ms Hanna and her 7-year-old daughterA mber’s Bahamian passports, she said. M inister of Immigration Branville McCartney vowed to p ersonally oversee an investigation into Ms Hanna’s allegations after her story was published in The Tribune on February 26. A panel of Immigration offic ials established to investigate the matter visited Ms Hanna’s h ome in Price Street, Nassau Village, to assess the damage, but t he single mother-of-two said they have not yet assured her t hey will restore the security of her home. Safety is the single mother’s main concern as she said an exconvict lives nearby, men loiter at e ither end of the street smoking marijuana, and gunshots were f ired in the area last week. But Ms Hanna maintains she c annot afford the estimated $1,000 to repair the damage. She said: “If I had the money I w ould pay for it myself. This is not a safe area, there is a lot of noise from people cussing and carrying on, and last week there were guys shooting off guns. I keep waking up every so often to check if my car is okay a nd everything around is okay. “I can’t sleep. I go to sleep and then I hear a n oise and I’m up. I guess I am paranoid but I wasn’t like that before. “Now I just want to be safe. That’s all I want. It is so simple, t his could have been over from the next day.” M r McCartney did not respond to messages left by The Tribune b efore press time last night. Single mother says the Immigration Dept still have not repaired raid damage T HE GARDEN GATE n o longer closes securely. THE MAUL that Violet Hanna said immigration officers left behind.

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A BUSINESSMAN who is on a mission to reclaim land he says was stolen from his family more than a centurya go has hit out at a counter c laimant, saying he has no case. Warren Aranha, 50, who is claiming ownership of properties in downtown Nassaua nd on Cable Beach, dismissed overlapping land claims by historian AnthonyC unningham, saying: “He is going nowhere. His claims are absurd. His case is a non-s tarter.” Properties M r Cunningham is disputing Mr Aranha’s various land c laims on the grounds that the properties were originally granted by the Crown to hisa lleged forebear, General Robert Cunningham, who a rrived in the Bahamas soon after the American Revolution. M r Cunningham said General Cunningham was grante d vast holdings for services r endered to Britain, including a 465-acre tract on Cable B each. T his area includes the former home of American murd eress Sante Kimes, which Mr Aranha has now moved into, claiming it belongs to him. M r Aranha says that the Cunningham land grant was r escinded in 1847. He has produced a document, allegedly from the official commutationb ook, saying the land was subsequently conveyed to a Mr H enry Adderley. Now Mr Aranha is bracing himself for a three-way legalb attle with Mr Cunningham and Mr Raymond Wong, who c laims his family has owned t he Kimes site since 1986, having bought it from a Scott ish woman, Marilyn Crawf ord. Mr Wong, a Nassau busin essman, has threatened to issue an injunction against Mr Aranha, saying he is occupy-i ng the Kimes site illegally. But Mr Aranha said yesterd ay: “Before Mr Wong can issue an injunction, he first has to produce documentation top rove his claim.” Mr Aranha is also claiming t o own two derelict properties in Cumberland Street, even though they were reportedlyb ought a year ago by attorney Nigel Bowe for half a million dollars. H e claims the Cumberland Street and Cable Beach sites are linked by documents prov-i ng they were both part of the old J S Johnson estate, of w hich he claims to be the sole inheritor. Mr Aranha has alleged that t he J S Johnson estate was systematically “stolen” over a period of 50 years in the late 19th and early 20th centuriesb y a group of white families. He believes much of the land was then sold on tou nsuspecting buyers. Mr Aranha has already built a wall on the Cumberland Street site. He said: “I have heard nothi ng from the other side, but I am standing firm on this.” C M Y K C M Y K LOCAL NEWS THE TRIBUNE FRIDAY, APRIL 24, 2009, PAGE 7 Togetherness is invited.The Sunday Brunch Buffet at Sheraton gives you time for the people who really matter.OurexecutivechefsrealBahamiancreationsavoryourtablewithaheartysupplyof“Mmmmms.At $28 inclusive for adults, $14 for children 5 and no charge for children 4 and under, you can start a new family tradition. Plus, dont forget about our Bahamian rates starting at $149. You dont just stay here. You belong.Booktodayat sheraton.com/nassau orcall242-327-6000formoreinformation.MentioncodeBAHRES. Ratesstartat$149weekdays(Monday–Wednesday)and$169weekends(Thursday–Sundaystartat$169. StarwoodHotels&ResortsWorldwide,Inc.Allrightsreserved.SheratonistheregisteredtrademarkofStarwoodHotels&ResortsWorldwide,Inc.,oritsaffiliates. Member of n By DENISE MAYCOCK Tribune Freeport Reporter dmaycock@tribunemedia.net FREEPORTBahamian brothers Reno and Robert Woods of Grand Bahama were amongf our persons charged last month in Canada with second degree murder. R eno, 23, and Robert 21, are the sons of Mr Randy Woods, a contractor in Freeport. The brothers have been living in Hamilton, C anada. The family is expected to travel to Canada on Friday. This is a very tragic time for the family right now and we are just praying for them. This is very unfortunate, but they are innocent untilp roven otherwise,” said a close family friend, who wished to remain anonymous. According to reports in the Hamilton Spector, the Woods brothers, along with JeromeM arshall, 23, of Hamilton, and Lani Valdes Harris, 21, of Woodbridge, were arrested in c onnection with the stabbing death of a 29year-old man at Mississauga. The victim, identified as Jermain Marlon S cott, was involved in an altercation with a group of men at a popular pub. While trying to flee, he was chased down a nd fatally wounded with a knife. He managed to get away again and was able to hail a taxi. The driver contacted 911 after realising that he was injured. Scott died of his injuries at the hospital. R eno Woods, Harris, and Marshall were ini tially charged in Brampton on March 15. Robert was later arrested and charged. Man aiming to reclaim land says counter claimant has no case Two brothers among four persons charged with second degree murder H H e e i i s s g g o o i i n n g g n n o o w w h h e e r r e e . . H H i i s s c c l l a a i i m m s s a a r r e e a a b b s s u u r r d d . . H H i i s s c c a a s s e e i i s s a a n n o o n n s s t t a a r r t t e e r r . . W arren Aranha WARRENARANHA at the former home of American murderess S ante Kimes. n SAN’A, Yemen THE TWOyoung sons of a Y emeni detainee at Guantanamo died when a grenade they were playing with accidentally detonated inside their home, a human r ights lawyer and the detainee’s b rother said Thursday, a ccording to Associated Press. The two boys were the sons of Guantanamo prisoner 1463,A bdelsalam al-Hilah, a businessman who was captured in Cairo in 2002 and sent to Guantanamo on charges of terrorism, s aid Ahmed Irman of the Hood O rganization for Defending Human Rights, an organization that advocates for Guantanamo detainees in Yemen. T he children, Youssef, 11, and Omar, 10, were playing unsupervised with the grenade in a room in the house when it exploded. I t is unclear why the grenade was i n the house. The detainee’s brother, Nabil al-Hilah, confirmed the boys w ere killed. Irman said the boys had just r eceived a rare phone call from their father two days before their death in which they chatted with their dad about their schoolwork and classes they were attending.I rman said their father was shocked to hear how big the boysh ad grown. During the two-hour phone c all, Irman said al-Hilah spoke about his frustration with being detained for such a long period of time and expressed pessimism at being released in the near future. I rman said he also spoke about what he described as a bad cond itions in Guantanamo and a lack of change since President B arack Obama took office. The boys were buried on Wednesday. It is unclear if their father has been notified of their death. T he Obama administration has said that it will close the d etention facility on Cuba which became a flashpoint for c ontroversy ever since it was opened under the Bush administ ration. However, questions have been raised about where to send the remaining detainees, the largest group of which is from Yemen. Grenade accident kills Yemen Gitmo detainee’s sons

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lying in a pool of blood before making off on a n earby motorcycle, ASP Bethel told The Tribune yesterday. T he suspect, described as a slim dark male, s tripped off his shirt and left it in the area before e scaping, he added. “A number of officers were dispersed in the area t o pick up the (suspect’s distance away from where the incident actually hap p ened. We are told that some clothing was shed and those were retrieved. . .I believe it was just as hirt,” said ASP Bethel. He could not confirm reports that police were a ble to chase the suspect before losing his trail near the area of Love Beach. Meanwhile, police have no leads in the case and a m otive for the shooting has yet to be established, said the senior officer. Mr Jones, a resident of western New Providence said to be in his late fifties, is ex-business partner off ormer MP Lester Turnquest. He was born in North Wales and has worked in the Bahamas for moret han 10 years. He is now a permanent resident of the Bahamas a nd president of the Britannia Group. Anyone with information about Wednesday’s shooting can contact police anonymously at 919, 328-TIPS or the Central Detective Unit at 502-9991. The Royal Bahamas Police F orce Special Weapons And Tactics (SWAT c ally placed outside the court building with scarves covering their faces and machine guns poised as Deveaux was brought before Mag istrate Susan Charles-Sylvester by s enior homicide detectives. Deveaux, wearing jeans and a f aded black sweatshirt with a red and white skull and crossbones d esign, stood quietly before the bench as his lawyer Ian Cargill told the court how Deveaux was unfit for arraignment as he is both bipolar and schizophrenic. M r Cargill said his client is taking several types of medication for h is psychological disorders and appealed for him to receive a psyc hological examination. But Mrs Charles-Sylvester, who was overseeing the arraignment in t he absence of chief magistrate Roger Gomez, said she was not in a position to hear the submissions and arranged for Deveaux to a ppear before Mr Gomez on Mon day when Mr Cargill can make his full submissions. After reading the charge to Deveaux, including particulars that D eveaux, being concerned with others, did intentionally and by m eans of unlawful harm, cause the death of Marlon Smith on April 1 9, Mrs Charles-Sylvester asked the accused if he understood. When he said he did, Mrs Charles-Sylvester asked what he understood, to which Deveaux qui etly replied: “Everything.” And as she pressed him further he elaborated: “Murder. So they k eep telling me, but I didn’t do it.” Satisfied he had accepted the charge, Mrs Charles-Sylvester said: “It seems to me the point is taken and the defendant understands then ature of the charge that is before him. He also will understand this is a matter for which I cannot grant him bail.” Deveaux was seated as Mr Cargill began to argue another c ase, but when officers went to escort the murder suspect from thec ourtroom his lawyer rushed to his client’s side and berated officers f or forcing Deveaux against his will as he followed them to the car shouting: “You still have to do it right!” Deveaux will appear before Mrs Charles-Sylvester on May 11 in connection with the murder of C orey Whymms. the party’s top post. Most party members agree something must be done about the party leadership, but it is how they go about it that has caused a rift within the organisation. Now three main groups have e merged: those who wish to get rid of Mr Christie at the convention; those who are content with his leadership and want to see him lead the party into the next general election, and those who want him removed as leader but in a dignified way sometime after the convention, b ut before the next election. Having led the party to a crushing defeat at the polls in 2007, Mr Christie commissioned a leading research and polling company to ascertain reasons for the PLP’s loss to the Free National Movement. Along with a number of s candals, including two of his Cabinet ministers, Mr Christie’s perceived “weakn ess” in handling his ministers was paramount among reasons f or the PLP’s poor showing. A long with other recommendations, the firm suggested e ither a change in leadership or a re-modelling of the leader’s i mage to make the party more attractive to the coveted youthv ote. Since the PLP’s loss there h as been little change to the party’s image, which continues to suffer the shame of continued scandals even in opposition. H owever, with the convention and the prospect that cur-r ent deputy leader Cynthia Pratt will vacate her seat, P LPs hope to see their party reinvent itself hopefully in time to provide a substantive alternative to the current gov ernment. ed she felt this way because lawyers did not request the same of Justice John Lyons, w ho had presided over the same case prev iously, despite the fact that his conduct had also caused some alarm amongst attorneys involved. Meanwhile, attorney Michael Scott, repr esenting Rami’s brother, Amir Weisfisch, defended Justice Allen’s judgment. He proposed she was merely exercising her “case management” powers to exped ite the matter when she determined she should continue to preside over it despite admitting to be “conflicted” about it, and when she appeared dismissive of the evid ence of an expert witness without having h eard most of it. The two attorneys made their arguments as Mr Lavender continued his submissions to the Court of Appeal in an application toh ave the court overturn Justice Allen’s decision to remain on the case. Mr Lavender said: “She repeatedly referred to the irrelevant consideration that J ustice Lyons was not asked to recuse hims elf...judging by the tone of the comments, the judge was aggrieved.” Nonetheless, as recorded in his notes and her own written judgment on the recusala pplication, Mr Lavender proposed to Court of Appeal President Dame Joan Sawyer, Justice Hartman Longley and Justice Emmanuel Osadebay that Justice Allen’s comments and conduct would sugg est to a “fair-minded observer” a “real possibility of bias on her part” in relation to the case. Justice Allen revealed several weeks ago that she was aware that Justice Lyons, whos tepped down from the matter on the basis that he did not have time to hear it, appointed an accountant to provide a report in the case who was the brother of a woman with w hom he “shared more than a friendship.” The integrity of that report and the accountant’s suitability as an “expert witness” was later questioned by Justice Allen. She herself, according to Mr Lavender’s r ecords, raised the issue of “how she could determine the issue in her conflicted capacity.” Mr Lavender claimed yesterday that Just ice Allen’s decision to question Daniel Ferguson’s evidence before and in her judgment on the recusal application was “premature” in light of the fact that she had not “read most or all” of his report. H e said that this was evidence of a “strong disposition to jump to conclusions” on her part in relation to Mr Ferguson. Nonetheless, in giving her reasons for r efusing the application for her to step down, Mr Lavender said Justice Allen appeared in her judgment to be “clutching a t straws.” She attributed to Mr Ferguson’s damaging comments about his effort to complete the job he was assigned, which the lawyer told the court transcripts of his testimonys howed he did not say, while suggesting that she herself was being unfairly “accused” of being unable to handle the matter. M eanwhile, Mr Lavender suggested it was of particularly “grave concern” to him that Justice Anita Allen admitted that in deciding whether to remain on the case she had taken into consideration the opinions ofh er court clerks, which had not been submitted as evidence. “She took into account information received after the hearing of the applicat ion...it is fundamental that all evidence should be produced in court,” said Mr Lavender. Justice Allen’s reference to her court clerks came after a disagreement betweenh erself and Mr Lavender over whether she had been the first person to suggest that she recuse herself from the matter during a hearing in her chambers. S he and all the lawyers involved, except for Mr Lavender, came under fire by Dame Joan Sawyer earlier in the week for failing to keep notes of the hearing that would have helped the Court of Appeal deter-m ine the way forward. After being convinced by several differe nt attorneys that at one point during the hearing she told them that she would be “happy to recuse” herself in light of her knowledge of the circumstances of the case a statement which Mr Lavender said he t ook as an “invitation to apply for her recusal” the judge “wrongfully reneged” on her admission when making her judgment, said the QC. I n it, she said that having “searched the recesses of (her her clerks, she determined that she did not make the comment. Her judgment went on to state that she h ad “absolutely no doubt that (she determine the issue” before her. Supporting Justice Allen yesterday, Mr Scott said he “vigorously disputed” the claim that Justice A llen had been the one to raise the recusal issue. But Mr Lavender told the court that “no weight” should be “attached to the content of the recesses of (Justice Allen’sm ind” or to the recollections of her clerks, as they were part of the evidence in the matter. “She may have been clouded by a sense o f grievance that Justice Lyons was not treated in the same way. But her resistance confirms the fact that, as she suggested in her chambers, she was unable to deal with it objectively,” said the QC. T he appeal continues. Lyford Cay in the western end of New Providence, the 100 acre site w ill be complete with putting greens, a club house, swimming pools, biking trails, tennis courts, a fitness centre, and a natural parkc omplete with indigenous plants and trees. Set to be developed in stages, the gated community is scheduled t o be completed in 18 months and is being developed as a “green area” with solar panels and other earth friendly amenities throughout. Noting that no expense has been spared to provide a complete relaxing and tranquil environment, Mr Wells said that even to thec urvature of the roads, the property has been painstakingly designed to ensure not only slower vehicular traffic, but also helping the sightl ine by enhancing the natural beauty of the land. With a natural elevation that reaches 40 feet at its highest point, M r Wells said that Lyford Hills is a singularly “beautiful” piece of property. Obviously with such a capital intensive project, Mr Wells said there are a number of financial investors in the project, including Superwash President Dionisio D’Aguilar, JS Johnson Managing D irector Marvin Bethel, Lands and Surveys Director Tex Turnquest, radio talkshow host Jeffrey Lloyd, George Moss, ChrisL ightbourne, and Douglas Turnquest. W ould-be PLP deputy candidates forming alliances ahead o f convention F ROM page one F ROM page one SWAT team F ROM page one Manhunt for gunman More than 350 lots for sale at new gated community FROM page one F ROM page one Judge is accused

PAGE 9

C M Y K C M Y K LOCAL NEWS THE TRIBUNE FRIDAY, APRIL 24, 2009, PAGE 9 THE newly-launched philanthropical arm of Sandals Resort International, the Sandals Foundation, held a ceremonial tree planting to help celebrate Earth Day on Wednesday. Staff at Sandals Royal Bahamian led by general manager Michael James, environmental co-ordinator Keva Varence as well as visiting guests were on hand to help plant indigenous sea grape trees on the resort’s grounds. A celebration isn’t a celebra tion without a fruity beverage, and the resort’s expert bar team was there to refresh attendees with a cocktail specially-created to mark the occasion – “the Royal O-Zone”. Mr James said: “Someone once said that ‘The best time to plant a tree is 20 years ago. The next best time is today’, and that’s exactly what we’ve done. It feels great to know that our team members are included amongst the one billion plus people participating in Earth Day activities all joined by one common goal – saving the planet.” Earth Day was founded on the premise that all people, regardless of race, gender, income or geography, have a moral right to a healthy, sustainable environment. The Earth Day Network has a glob al reach with a network of more than 17,000 partners and organisations in 174 countries. IN celebration of Earth Day, the Ministry of the Environment organised a “Million Trees Pro-g ramme” and the Bahamas government agreed to plant a million trees throughout the country by December 31, 2009. As part of this effort, the ministry invited US Charg d’Affaires Timothy Zuniga-Brown as well as other members of the diplomatic community, to plant trees on Wednesday. T o mark the event, Mr Zuniga-Brown planted a Brasiletto Tree, which is indigenous to the Bahamas. On hand for the event were representatives from the Ministry of the Environment, the Nature Conservancy, the Bahamas Reef E nvironment Educational Foundation (BREEF and the National Coastal Awareness Committee. The US Embassy selected the site at the intersection of Blake Road and West Bay Street for the tree planting. It was at that site in 1962 that US President J ohn F Kennedy and British Prime Minister Harold Macmillan planted a tree as a goodwill gesture commemorating a meeting of the two leaders held in Nassau. MEMBERS of the Bahamas Mother’s Club paid a courtesy call on the Governor General Arthur Hanna at G overnment House Wednesday, April 15. L e t i s h a H e n d e r s o n / B I S MOTHER’S CLUBPAYS VISIT TO GOVERNOR GENERAL US Embassy observes Earth Day with a tree planting ceremony UNITED STATES CHARGE D’AFFAIRES Timothy Zuniga-Brown planting the Brasiletto Tree flanked by representatives of local environmental organisations. S AND AL S F OUND A TION L A YS ITS ROOTS

PAGE 10

n MOMBASA, Kenya THE 11 SOMALI MEN, accused in a pirate attack on a Liberian freighter, filed slowly i nto the wood-paneled court. The magistrate took one look at their dingy shirts, jackets and sarongs two were barefoot and ordered a court official to make sure they were “dressed properly” for their next appearance, according to Associated Press. Amid proposals for an international tribunal to tackle piracy, Kenya is implementing agreements with the European Union and the United States by putting the bandits on trial, even if they are caught on the high seas by other nations and have not attacked Kenyan interests. Thursday’s hearing was the first court appearance for the men who were tracked down by French commandos and seized April 15 from their skiffs in waters off Somalia, the lawless epicenter of the flourishing pirate industry off the Horn of Africa. Authorities The pirate suspects had been marched off a French frigate Wednesday and handed over to authorities in this Kenyan port city. Magistrate Catherine Mwangi adjourned their case until a bail hearing May 27. They will remain in a Mombasa jail until then. She also demanded that officials give the men fresh clothing for their bail hearing. “I’m giving you an order that these people be dressed properly,” Mwangi told court officials. The defendants solemnly listened to a court-provided Somali translator. At one point, one man briefly put an arm round his neighbor’s shoulder and gave him a reassuring squeeze. Defense lawyer Francis Kadima insisted his clients were innocent fishermen detained by mistake. They had no fishing lines, nets or hooks when they were captured, but the French handed over evidence they did find: two skiffs, three grappling hooks, four rusty assault rifles, two bags of bullets and a ladder. In courtroom next door, wit nesses testified against seven other suspected pirates in matching blue overalls. German sailors captured the men last month after they reportedly attacked a German naval supply ship. Kenya is also holding another trial involving pirate suspects handed over by Britain. Prosecuting Somali pirates is seen by Kenya as a way to burnish its image internationally at a time when the government is facing criticism over corruption and political violence. Charges A U.S. court this week brought its first piracy charges in more than a century. Abdiwali Abdiqadir Muse of Somalia appeared Tuesday in New York charged with partic ipating in an April 8 attack on the Maersk Alabama. He was charged with piracy, discharging a firearm, conspiring to commit hostage-taking and brandishing a firearm charges that could add up to life in jail for the baby-faced, 5-foot2 teenager. Western nations are often reluctant to try Somali suspects who may then try to claim asylum, but Kenya has a successful track record of pirate prosecu tions: 10 pirates handed over by U.S. forces in 2006 are serving seven-year terms. C M Y K C M Y K INTERNATIONAL NEWS PAGE 16, FRIDAY, APRIL 24, 2009 THE TRIBUNE n MEXICO CITY A BILL that would let Mexico declare temporary states of emergency and expand the army’s power in a bloody fight against powerful drug gangs drew immediate fire Thursday from human rights activists who say soldiers should not be doing the job of police, according to Associated Press. President Felipe Calderon’s proposal, which centers on the idea of declaring drug trafficking hotspots “domestic security” zones, would give the army access to civilian court and police files. The measure was submitted to Congress late Wednesday. “The expansion of organized crime poses new challenges for democratic societies,” it reads. “That requires the government to bring to bear all the force of the state to confront it.” Calderon’s government has already dispatched 45,000 troops to drug-plagued areas mostly along the U.S. border where cartel battles have cost more than 10,700 lives since Calderon took office in December 2006. By law, soldiers are limited to playing a support role for police. Military The proposal would officially place army troops at the head of anti-crime efforts in some areas formalizing the reality that in some places the military has effectively replaced weak or corrupt local forces. But soldiers have been implicated in human rights abuses such as shooting civilians at checkpoints and conducting illegal searches. Human rights groups say the bill may be a sign that Calderon is reversing a promise to get the army offt he streets as soon as possible. In a February interview with The Associated Press, Calderon said he hoped to beat back the cartels by 2012 toa point that the army and federal police can withdraw and leave the problem in the hands of local law enforcement. “It is worrisome that they could declare a state of emergency or give the army more power, given the experienceswe have already had,” said Consuelo Morales, director of the Monterreybased Citizens in Support of Human Rights. H owever, Morales acknowledged that m any Mexicans support army involvement in drug-plagued cities. “People like the military because they say the police are corrupt,” she said. The idea that the military would have a ccess to civilian legal files angered d efense lawyers like Raquenel Vil lanueva, a Monterrey-based attorney who has served as defense council in a number of high-profile drug cases. “The army doesn’t have the training to do that,” Villanueva said, citing a history of due-process violations and illegal detentions that could make it risky for the military to have access to all police files. Former federal anti-drug prosecutor S amuel Gonzalez agreed the proposal i ntroduced gray areas that could lead to abuses. “The fact that the military has access to civilian legal files isn’t of itself a violation of human rights,” said Gonza lez. Now, what the military does with that i nformation, that is another problem.” The bill says “public servants should respect human rights” and pledged to advise human rights groups when the emergency decrees are issued. Rebellion, attacks on law enforcement agencies, a breakdown in public safety or the incapacity of local authorities would be conditions for declaring a state of emergency. It would let the country’s national i ntelligence agency engage in “counter i ntelligence investigations” in cases of arms trafficking, terrorism or terrorist financing, foreign interference, attacks by organized crime gangs against authorities and intelligence agents, or attacks on shipping or aviation. T he measure establishes tougher p enalties for soldiers who desert the army to work for cartels, illegal weapons possession and threatening public officials or their families. The bill would also allow groups of suspects to be charged individually for weapons found in a vehicle or house they all shared; and lay out special punishments for possession of more than 50 rounds of ammunition or for using guns altered to be more deadly. n TORONTO CANADA’Scentral bank said Thursday the country’s g ross domestic product fell 7.3 percent in the first three monthsof 2009, dropping at the steepest pace in decades, according to A ssociated Press. The Bank of Canada said that’s the biggest contraction since comparable records began being kept in 1961. M ark Carney, the head of the central bank, expects the Canadian economy will shrink by 3 percent this year as opposed to t he 1.2 percent he predicted in January. Carney blames inaction in the United States and Europe in dealing with toxic bank assetsf or a recession that has been deeper and longer than expected. “If we had to boil it down to o ne issue, it’s the slowness with which other G7 countries have dealt with the problems in their banks,” Carney said. “There has not been as much progress as we had expected in January.” C anada has avoided government bailouts and has not expe r ienced the failure of any major financial institution. There hasb een no crippling mortgage meltdown or banking crisis. C anada and the U.S. have the largest trading relationship in the world, however, so the financ ial crisis and the global sell-off of commodities have hit Canada h ard since last fall. Alberta’s once-booming oil sands sectorh as cooled as every major com pany has scrapped or delayed s ome expansion plans. Canada lost a record 273,300 jobs in the first three months of t he year. The Bank of Canada cut its t rendsetting interest rate by a quarter point to a record-low 0 .25 percent on Wednesday and took the unprecedented step of saying it will likely stay there through June 2010. The latest interest rate cut m eans the bank has sliced 4.25 percentage points off theo vernight rate since it began easing its policy in December 2007. C arney is a former Goldman Sachs executive who took over the central bank’s top post on Feb. 1, 2008 from David Dodge. Canada’s GDP falls 7.3 per cent Mexico proposes expanding army’s power in drug fight POLICE OFFICERS guard alleged drug trafficker Isaac Godoy second right, during his presentation to the media in Mexico City, Thursday, April 23, 2009. Godoy, who allegedly ran operations for the Arellano Felix drug cartel, was arrested Tuesday in Tijuana, northern Mexico, along with six other alleged members of his cell, police said. E d u a r d o V e r d u g o / A P Suspected Somali pirates appear in Kenyan court


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FRIDAY, APRIL 24, 2009

=

Manhunt (OF gunman

Wild shot DUSINessiial

Expat financial adviser in critical
condition under police guard

m@ By TANEKA THOMPSON
Tribune Staff Reporter
tthompson@tribunemedia. net

POLICE are still searching for
a brazen gunman who ambushed
expatriate financial adviser Hywel
Jones in a company parking lot
and shot him in the head.

At last reports, Mr Jones
remained in critical condition in
hospital under police guard. He
had not regained consciousness,
according to head of the Central
Detective Unit’s Homicide Divi-
sion, Assistant Superintendent
Leon Bethel.

Mr Bethel could not confirm
reports that Mr Jones was fighting
for his life while on life support,
but said doctors told police the
victim could possibly recover
from his injuries.

Mr Jones was shot multiple
times to the head and the body,
police said. Persons in the area

told police they noticed a suspi-
cious man who fit the description
of the gunman loitering in the
area shortly before the shooting.

Based on the nature of the
shooting, police believe Mr Jones
may have been the target of an
arranged hit.

“He is still alive, he is still ill,
and the doctors are optimistic that
he will recover,” said ASP Bethel.
“They said it is a reasonable
chance now that he will recover.”

Police said Mr Jones was unre-
sponsive at the scene and was tak-
en to hospital by ambulance and
rushed into surgery.

After shooting the Welsh born
banker at least twice in the park-
ing lot outside offshore financial
services company, Britannia Con-
sultancy Group, around 10am
Wednesday the gunman left him

SEE page eight



ON SECOND MURDER CHARGE



“ter th ee >





BAISS girls
soccer



accused of
‘acting in
a wholly
improper
manner’

m@ By ALISON LOWE
Tribune Staff
Reporter
alowe@tribunemedia.net

A SUPREME Court
Judge was yesterday
accused of acting in a
“wholly improper” manner
that represented a
“remarkable departure
from the basic require-
ments of a judge’s role.”

Nicholas Lavender, QC,
told the Court of Appeal
that Justice Anita Allen’s
questionable conduct
appeared to stem from her
“taking as a very personal
matter” a request that she
step down from a case.

The British lawyer, rep-
resenting Rami Weissfisch,
one of two Israeli brothers
in a protracted legal battle
over millions of dollars
earned while they were
business partners, suggest-

SEE page eight



Delays in the
granting of
Crown land

hold up Inagua
development

ABOVE: Tyson Deveaux was escorted by SWAT team members as he arrived.
LEFT: Deveaux leaves court yesterday.

|

| =
Sandals reportedly lets
go a team of managers :§
5



DEVELOPMENT of Matthew
Town, Inagua, is being held up
by long delays in the granting of
Crown land, island sources
claimed yesterday.

According to sources, several
residents have been waiting for
years for Crown grants, even
though some handed over con-
siderable sums of money to gov-
ernment as far back as 2003.

Inagua’s plight surfaced as con-

m@ By MEGAN REYNOLDS
Tribune Staff Reporter
mreynolds@tribunemedia.net

LAY-OFFS continued yesterday in the hotel industry as the
Royal Sandals Bahamian Resort reportedly let go a team of man-
agers.

While the Trade Union Congress (TUC) claimed that 12 man-
agers lost their jobs, Sandals’ public relations department said that
only five were let go as part of a restructuring exercise aimed at
streamlining operations in these challenging economic times.

The Sandals workers are currently not represented by a union,
however the TUC and the Bahamas Hotel Maintenance and Allied

SWAT team officers armed with machine guns guarded the
Nassau Street magistrates courts as Tyson Deveaux was arraigned
on his second murder charge yesterday.

Deveaux, 22, of Saffron Street, New Providence, had been
released on bail charged with the 2008 murder of Corey Whymms
when he was arraigned for the murder of Marlon Smith, the man

Workers Union (BHMAWU) have been agitating to be the right-
ful representatives of the workers.





Would-be PLP deputy candidates
forming alliances ahead of convention

m By PAUL G TURNQUEST
Tribune Staff Reporter
pturnquest@tribunemedia.net Po
WITH little over six months to sn
go before the PLP’s national con- r

vention, would-be candidates for
the party’s deputy leadership have
started to form alliances to secure
survival in what is expected to be a
“no holds barred” fight for power.

With many “parliamentary meetings” already
held with prominent PLPs, schemes are in hand to
facilitate the quick departure of Perry Christie from

SEE page eight

. |

Perry Christie



shot dead outside his Pinewood Gardens home on Sunday.

SEE page eight

More than 350 lots for sale
at new gated community

m By PAUL G TURNQUEST
Tribune Staff Reporter
pturnquest@tribunemedia. net

WITH more than 350 lots for sale in the newly

opened gated community of Lyford Hills, this half
a billion dollar real estate development will boast
lots ranging from 7,000 to 21,000 square feet.
Leading developer Tennyson Wells, informed
The Tribune yesterday that these lots will range in
price from $120,000 to $365,000 dollars per lot.
Situated near the luxury gated community of

SEE page eight





NASSAU AND BAHAMEA

ISLANDS’ LEADING NEWSPAPER

troversy swirled around allega-
tions of nepotism by Lands and
Surveys Director Tex Turnquest.
Mr Turnquest denies the allega-
tions.

But an Inagua resident told
The Tribune: “The people are
furious over this.”

He said several locals — includ-
ing Clyde Cleare, Jennifer
Fawkes, Wilfred Seymour and
Olive Seymour - were still wait-
ing for Crown grants, even
though they had paid up to $2,000
a time to government.

“This is holding up the devel-
opment of Matthew Town,” said
the source. “This place is dor-
mant, yet the settlement is sur-
rounded by Crown land. It isn’t
right.”

Messages left with Mr Turn-
quest’s office seeking comment
on the most recent allegations
were not returned by press time
last night.

ntague

MOTORS LTD.


PAGE 2, FRIDAY, APRIL 24, 2009 THE TRIBUNE

LOCAL NEWS

VAY a ea al en a eC)



The restoration of

CENTREVILLE

THIS PHOTOGRAPH shows the property facing Shirley
Street. The property extended down to Shirley Street
and was protected along this street by an ornate iron
fence, a small portion of which still stands. Again the
white lines are roads running through the Collins estate.

( ENTREVILLE House has been much Doctors Hospital now occupies that part of the property

in the news lately as renovations have shown to the left. The Tribune is opposite the property in
now started to restore the property to its former its present location.

glory under the supervision of the Antiquities, Monu-
ments and Museum Corporation.

Its restoration has also resurrected political racists pro-
paganda that the late Ralph G Collins, former owner of the
property, had encircled his grounds with a high wall to keep
out black Bahamians who lived on the western side of his
estate.

On Monday, The Tribune editor, who lived as a young
child on Shirley Street opposite the Collins property, gave
a brief history of the wall and pointed out that racism was
not in the mix when the wall was built.

The following day Aaron Roberts wrote a letter to The
Tribune strongly disagreeing that Mr Collins had built his
wall to “secure his property from bushes (unless bushes is
a new term for black people).”

We promised Mr Roberts that we would publish pho-
tographs to show that the Collins property was surround-
ed on three sides by bush — not by people or people’s
homes. On this page today some of these photographs,
made available by the Collins family, are published show-
ing the property before the wall was constructed.

THIS PHOTOGRAPH taken from the south
facing north shows the property of the
Hon Ralph G Collins in the early thirties.
The white road running through the prop-
erty suggests a perimeter line. However, it
was a road that ran through the centre of
the property from north to south before
Collins Avenue and Centreville grew up
around it. The home faces Shirley Street
on the north. The estate was surrounded
by bush on the other three sides with Mr
Collin’s orchard at the back. The property
extended as far back as Wulff Road.

PHOTOS: Made available by Collins family



Most of Cuba’s political
inmates ‘oppose swap
with spies jailed in US’








































CUBAN PRESIDENT Raul Castro.
m HAVANA

A leading rights activist says most of Cuba's 200 or more politi-
cal prisoners would rather serve out long terms on the island
than be part of an exchange for five communist agents impris-
oned in the US, as Cuban President Raul Castro has suggested,
according to the Associated Press.

President Barack Obama has said Cuba should make the next
move as both leaders try to thaw relations — and that releasing
political prisoners would be a significant step.

Mr Castro responded in part by suggesting a prisoner swap —
sending all of Cuba's political prisoners, and their families, to the
United States in exchange for the five convicted Cuban spies.

“The prisoners themselves? They want nothing of such a

Healthcare is evolving :: Follow the dots. deal ® Havant) ently dieident ssid. Monday.
‘Espionage’

"It's nearly unanimous among the prisoners that they not be
exchanged for military men arrested red-handed in espionage
activities in the United States," said Elizardo Sanchez of the
Cuban Commission for Human Rights and Reconciliation.
"They would rather stay in prison."

Mr Sanchez, the most veteran of the island's rights activists,
talks to numerous political prisoners and their relatives by phone
each day, and updates detailed lists of inmates that he releases
every six months. His reports are a key source of information for
international groups monitoring Cuba's human rights situation.

Castro's government has unilaterally released "prisoners of
conscience" before without suffering any political consequences
inside Cuba. In February, four political prisoners were set free
and immediately exiled to Spain, following human rights talks in
Madrid. It was at least the fifth known release of a group of
political prisoners by Cuba since the mid-1980s that followed an
international appeal or negotiations.

The US has swapped prisoners before with other countries —
notably in the case of KGB spy Rudolph Ivanovich Abel, traded
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THE TRIBUNE

FRIDAY, APRIL 24, 2009, PAGE 3



LOCAL NEWS

New Customs rules could force us
out of business — courier companies

Complex process will reportedly delay deliveries and damage operations

Doctors
appeal for
blood as they
treat shooting
victim

DOCTORS have issued an
urgent call for blood as they
continue to treat business-
man Hywel Jones, who is
fighting for his life after
being shot in the head and
back early Wednesday
morning.

Mr Jones is in critical con-
dition at Doctors Hospital,
and persons willing to
donate blood are being
asked to visit the hospital’s

blood bank as soon as possi-
ble.

Project to
produce
export/import
price indexes

THROUGHOUT 2009 the
Department of Statistics is
undertaking a project to pro-
duce export/import price
indexes for the Bahamas.

The primary reason for pro-
ducing these indexes is for use
as a deflator in the production
of Gross Domestic Product
(GDP) figures.

However, export/import
price indexes have a number
of additional uses, including
measuring inflation, studying
long-term price trends and as
inputs into forecasting future
price trends.

In order to produce these
indexes the department will
conduct a pricing survey of a
sample of businesses in New
Providence and Grand
Bahama that are involved in
exporting and importing.

Initiation

The first step in the process
involves an “initiation” exer-
cise, in which staff from the
Department of Statistics will
visit selected businesses dur-
ing the month of May.

During the initiation visits,
the department's staff will
identify various commodities
selected for pricing and devel-
op specific descriptions and
codes for each of them.

Once the commodities are
identified, the officers will
attempt to monitor the prices
of each of the commodities on
a quarterly basis.

Said the Department of Sta-
tistics in a statement: “The
support and co-operation of
the selected exporters and
importers is crucial to the suc-
cess of this exercise. As with
all studies conducted by the
department, all information
obtained will be kept in the
strictest confidence.”

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Tribune Staff Report
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LOCAL courier companies
were up in arms yesterday,
many fearing for the future of
their business, after being
informed that new Customs
regulations will be enforced
this coming Monday.

According to business own-
ers speaking with The Tri-
bune, the new regulations
require courier companies to
go through a complicated and
lengthy process to clear Cus-
toms — a process which com-
panies say will delay the deliv-
ery of goods by at least a day
and do untold damage to their
operations.

One business owner, who
wished to remain anonymous,
said that he was told that
instead of clearing Customs at
the airport, Odyssey Aviation,
they will now have to visit sev-
eral offices, including the Cus-
toms building on Thompson
Boulevard, to pay their duty
fees and complete the neces-
sary paperwork.

Couriers bringing in perish-
able goods, several of whom



“All I can say
is that a lot of
people will be
out of a job
come Wednes-
day if the new
requirements
go into effect
on Monday.”



Courier business
owner

supply the hotels with food,
are particularly concerned
about this development as
there are no refrigeration
facilities in the warehouse at
Odyssey Aviation.

“The stuff will just sit there
for at least day, going bad,”
one company owner said.

Companies that offer over-
night delivery fear that this

new time-consuming Customs
process will make their ser-
vices redundant.

“How can we promise
(same day, over-night) deliv-
ery? We will have to refund
all of our customers.

“All T can say is that a lot of
people will be out of a job
come Wednesday if the new
requirements go into effect on
Monday,” another courier
business owner said.

It is estimated that more
than 30 courier companies
employing hundreds of peo-
ple will be affected by the new
Customs regulations.

One owner of a courier
company said that he does not
understand the need for the
new regulations, as the ones
currently in place are more
than adequate.

“The procedures are there,
they are perfectly adequate —
they only need to be enforced
properly. A lot of the time
persons, even Customs offi-
cers, do not know the correct
procedure,” the business own-
er said.

The country’s courier com-
panies now hope to come
together to form a Bahamas

MINISTRY OF WORKS ELECTRICAL DEPARTMENT

Workers stage demonstration

over ‘long overdue promotions’

EMPLOYEES of the Min-
istry of Works’ electrical
department staged a demon-
stration outside of the min-
istry’s Thompson Boulevard
building yesterday morning,
demanding that government
give them what they claim are
long overdue promotions.

President of the Bahamas
Public Services Union (BPSU)
John Pinder said that the 20 to
25 workers were protesting
the fact that majority of them
have not been promoted in
many years.

Maintenance

“These workers are a main-
tenance team, they do some
construction work, but gov-
ernment wants them to get a
Stage three (certification) in
electrical work before they get
promoted. And a stage three
qualification is really not nec-
essary to do maintenance
work,” he said.

Mr Pinder said the union is
now hoping to meet with
Works Minister Neko Grant
next week to discuss criteria
for promotions and adjust-
ments to the career paths of
the electrical department
workers.

“Before the Cabinet shuf-
fle, we were working with
Minister Earl Deveaux and

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Bernard and we were making
some headway. But now nei-
ther of them are there any-
more and the issue was put on
the back-burner.

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government to give these peo-
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allocated for
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promotions.”



John Pinder

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Transshipment and Logistics
Association to agitate for their
rights and to negotiate the
implementation of Customs
requirements with the gov-
ernment.

In the meantime, several
companies said they will sus-
pend importation of goods for

now until the they can be
assured that the new process
will not delay delivery to their
customers.

A message left for the head
of the Customs Department,
Glen Gomez, was not
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PAGE 4, FRIDAY, APRIL 24, 2009

EDITORIAL/LETTERS TO THE EDITOR

THE TRIBUNE





The Tribune Limited

NULLIUS ADDICTUS JURARE IN VERBA MAGISTRI
Being Bound to Swear to The Dogmas of No Master

LEON E. H. DUPUCH, Publisher/Editor 1903-1914

SIR ETIENNE DUPUCH, Kt, O.B.E., K.M., K.C.S.G.,

(Hon.) LL.D., D.Litt.

Publisher/Editor 1919-1972
Contributing Editor 1972-1991

EILEEN DUPUCH CARRON, C.M.G., M.S. B.A., LL.B.

Publisher/Editor 1972-

Published Daily Monday to Saturday

Shirley Street, RO. Box N-3207, Nassau, Bahamas
Insurance Management Building., P.O. F-485, Freeport, Grand Bahama

TELEPHONES
Switchboard (News, Circulation and Advertising) 322-1986

WEBSITE
www.tribune242.com — updated daily at 2pm

Collins Wall nonsense debunked

AS PROMISED we have published on page
2 of today’s Tribune photographs taken in the
early thirties of the Collins property, which is
now being landscaped and renovated by the
Antiquities, Monuments and Museums Corpo-
ration.

A high wall, later built to enclose the prop-
erty, eventually became controversial after
Collins Avenue, Centreville and Palmdale were
carved out of the bushland that had earlier sur-
rounded it. Because of the development on the
eastern side of the wall, and the fact that the
Collins property had been sold to developers,
most of the enclosures that had secured the
property were taken down — all but a section of
the ornate iron fence that fronted the property
on Shirley Street and the western wall.

As settlements grew up on either side of
that wall, persons on the west had to walk a
considerable distance around the wall to go to
work, to shop and to send their children to
school. The wall, which now divided them,
became an issue. Many persons on the west-
ern side of the wall erected a ladder on both
sides as a short cut, and daily persons scaled
the wall to carry on their business. Naturally
there were accidents. On one occasion a young
boy broke his arm, on another a pregnant
woman lost her child.

The incident of the pregnant woman became
an issue in the 1956 election. Sir Etienne
Dupuch, a representative for the Eastern Dis-
trict, lost his seat in the House because of that
wall.

One day school teacher Donald Davis came
to The Tribune to tell Sir Etienne about the
woman’s accident and the social injustice of
this wall remaining. Those opposing Sir Etien-
ne’s re-election knew that at that time it was an
unpopular social issue, but an issue that, regard-
less of personal loss, he would champion. So it
was important that they made him aware of it.

We remember him coming back to his office
very upset about that wall. He immediately sat
down and “fired off” several articles for it either
to come down or a road to be built through it to
allow free passage to all persons living on either
side. Bahamians — predominantly black — liv-
ing on the western side of the wall were jubilant.
However, those living on the eastern side of
the wall were Sir Etienne’s constituents, and
they were not at all pleased. Although mainly
white Bahamians lived on the eastern side of the
wall, black Bahamians were also residents. The
black Bahamians joined with their white neigh-
bours in sending a petition to the House to
leave the wall intact. Those on the eastern side,
regardless of colour, felt that their property val-
ues would go down if they did not remain seg-
regated from “the rest.”

Sir Etienne knew that the situation was
morally wrong. He also knew that if he went
against the wishes of his constituents in fighting

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for social justice for all Bahamians he would
lose the election. His principles were more
important to him than a House of Assembly
seat. He continued the fight to dismantle the
wall. He lost his election.

However, the 1956 fight over the wall had
nothing to do with Mr Collins who had died in
1946.

Nor had the building of the wall anything to
do with segregating one group of people from
the other. From 1871, what later became the
Brice followed by the Collins property, was an
oasis surrounded by bush as the photos on page
2 and taken many years later will show.

Prohibition — the Volstead Act — was intro-
duced in 1920 when America went dry. Bahami-
ans entered the bootleg era with great gusto
determined to slake the thirst of their liquor
starved northern neighbours. The bootleg era
brought untold wealth to the Treasury, but it
also filled the coffers of mobsters like Chicago’s
Al Capone.

It was during this period of relative wealth
that two of our major hotels were built and a
gambling casino was opened in the Bahamian
Club on West Bay Street. Business was good in
the Bahamas, but speakeasies, mobs and murder
escalated in the United States. Prohibition could
not be enforced and so it was repealed in 1933.
The days of Rum Row were over in the
Bahamas. The severe hurricane of 1926 and
then the Wall Street crash crippled this country.

The Bahamas was back in the boondocks. Its
people needed employment.

Mr Ralph Collins rose to the need. He decid-
ed to create employment by building a wall
around his property for which he paid his
labourers 1/- a day and gave them a hot meal.
Communities being built around his wall came
many years later.

However, a letter writer to this newspaper
who knows nothing about those days, wants to
put another spin on history. He claims that Mr
Collins built his wall to keep black people on
one side of the wall from mingling with white
people on the other side. As the letter writer will
see from the photographs on page 2 there were
only trees — not people — on either side of
that wall. Those communities that created so
much trouble in later years did not yet exist.

His argument sounds like those of the world’s
dimwits — never having had to suffer the hor-
rors of World War II — who claim there was no
Holocaust.

A member of the Collins family, who sent
us these photographs, attached a most apt quote
from the Russian author Fyodor Dostoyevsky
that will cover today’s unbelievers:

“Man,” wrote Dostoyevsky, “has such a
predilection for systems and abstract deduc-
tions that he is ready to distort the truth inten-
tionally, he is ready to deny the evidence of his
senses only to justify his logic.”



Smirks and.
laughter amid
Airport hell

EDITOR, The Tribune.

Tunderstand that Anthony U.
Bostwick has already written to
you with regard to the shockingly
poor treatment that visitors to,
and residents of, the Bahamas
must suffer as they try to "pre-
clear" US Immigration at Sir Lyn-
den Pindling International Air-
port, but I will, if I may, add my
two cents worth.

My family and I have just
enjoyed a splendid holiday at the
Atlantis Resort. The facilities are
first class and the service was
almost universally impeccable
and friendly. We had similar hap-
py experiences elsewhere in Nas-
sau and throughout New Provi-
dence. Sadly, our good feelings
from our holiday did not survive
our departure from the Bahamas
because of the hellish conditions
and antagonistic attitudes of the
US Immigration officers at the
airport.

As a Bermudian, I have passed
through US pre-clearance in
Bermuda dozens, if not hundreds
of times, always with ease. Since
2001, this process has become
more bureaucratic and delays,
although rare, are unsurprising.
But they are never severe.

The same cannot be said of
Nassau. My wife, six-year-old son
and I arrived at the airport some
two hours ahead of the scheduled
departure of our 30- minute flight
to Miami and passed through
check-in and the first security
check without difficulty (like Mr.
Bostwick, I find the need for secu-
rity screenings before and after
US Immigration completely inex-
plicable).

More than an hour before our
flight was due to depart, we were
then confronted with a massive
line, while three Immigration offi-
cials languorously checked pass-
ports. After 20 minutes of glacial
progress, I approached a consta-
ble in the Royal Bahamas Police

LETTERS

letters@tribunemedia net



Force to say that I was concerned
we would miss our flight. I was
told a representative of Ameri-
can Airlines "might" come and
retrieve us from the line. This
proved to be a futile hope and
was clearly disingenuous.

Ten minutes later, I spoke to a
man who seemed to be in charge
of US Immigration who told us
that we should have come three
hours before the departure of our
flight and was otherwise entirely
unsympathetic. At this point, US
passport holders from in front
and behind us were taken from
the line and sent to another, faster
line, regardless of whether they
were due to depart in ten min-
utes or ten hours.

Fifteen minutes later, we told
yet another officer (it was aston-
ishing how many officers were
milling around the area when
they could have been stamping
passports) that we now had 15
minutes to make our 12.30 flight.
She responded with a smirk that it
was not yet 12.30 and we should
not worry. She spent the next 15
minutes smiling and laughing
while glancing back at not only
us, but the other dozen or so peo-
ple in our immediate vicinity who
were also about to miss their
flights. At 12.30, needless to say,
we were still in line. When we
eventually reached one of the two
open passport booths on our side
of the hall (one of the officers
having packed up and left, while
another had strolled off to get a
cup of coffee in the middle of this
maelstrom of frustration) and
expressed our unhappiness at the
fact we had missed our flight and
at the lack of organisation at the
Airport, the officer told us that
he didn’t care. When we pointed

out that many of the non-Ameri-
can tourists flying to the US from
Nassau might actually spend
money in the United States and
save what was left of its economy,
he replied that his job was safe.
He later acknowledged that the
system was poor, but claimed this
was the fault of the Airport.

On our arrival at the depar-
ture lounge, having cleared the
second security check, my wife
and son then witnessed a woman
collapse and an urgent call went
out for a doctor. Why she col-
lapsed is a mystery, but I suspect
her blood pressure was through
the roof if her experience was
anything like ours.

Fortunately, with the help of
the very cooperative and com-
pletely unfazed American Air-
lines staff in the departure lounge,
which suggested this was all too
common, we and the other half
dozen people who had missed the
12.30 flight were able to leave on
the next flight out, even though it
had been fully booked. No doubt
the seats we took belonged to
people still trapped in one of
Dante's nine circles of Inferno,
currently masquerading as US
Immigration.

I write this only to urge the
US Embassy, the Department of
Homeland Security and the Gov-
ernment of the Bahamas to come
together to solve what they must
know is a massive problem which
is damaging both Bahamas’
tourism and the reputation of the
United States. I for one, do not
intend to undergo the experience
again, and lacking a boat, this
means I am unlikely to visit the
Bahamas in the foreseeable
future or recommend it to oth-
ers, despite the fact that it was
otherwise a wonderful holiday.

William J.S. Zuill
Hamilton,
Bermuda,

April 17, 2009.

Do we want turtles to exist as a viahle species or not?

EDITOR, The Tribune.

How long the saga as to
whether Bahamians should be
party to the extinction of turtles is
going on shows that it has at least
raised people from their slumbers
about their individual responsi-
bility to their environment. To
me it all boils down to the fact —
do we want turtles to exist as a
viable species or not? They have
value in their own right, and also
as a tourist attraction, so with one
stroke of his pen the Ministry of
Agriculture could please both the
Ministry of Tourism, and the
Ministry of Finance, a win, win
situation, and put paid to Mr
Allen’s assault.

I find it very difficult to take
people seriously who in one
breath exalt such organisations
as ARK, and in the other con-
done, what else can you call it,
the virtual destruction of a species
to the sacred cow of “heritage.”
















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Mr Allen has not made the first
viable suggestion as to how to
sustain turtle populations — he
says leave it to the government,
the depository of all knowledge
and infinite funds! I am well
aware of the need for fishermen
to make a living, which up to now
has included the harvesting of tur-
tles, but all good things come to
an end. When Canada fished out
the cod in the 80’s thousands of
people were out of work. Canada,
being richer, was able to pay peo-
ple $800 per week to sit at home.
I’m not sure the Bahamas Gov-
ernment could afford that.

Mr Allen is very concerned
about criminalising Bahamians,
if a “stop law” is enacted. Oh my,
my, if only Bahamians were so
concerned. To be quite frank I
have never known any law in The
Bahamas to “stop” Bahamians —
unfortunately. You have only to
drive on our roads, or read about
those who fail to pay NHI contri-
butions, and so it goes on ad
infinitum. I remember back in the
60’s and 70’s, perhaps Mr Allen is
too young, spearing crawfish with
tails up to 6lbs and more, how
many that size do you see today,
they are virtually extinct? Now
people catch them undersize,
cook and mash them to disguise
it. Or perhaps Mr Allen would
condone the practice of some
island fishermen who bleached
the reefs to chase out the crawfish
so they could perpetuate their
heritage. Have you seen the
moonscapes, Mr Allen?

Sir David Attenborough, on
BBC World News, has formed a
society to question the sustain-
ability of an ever exploding
human population; none too soon
in my view. It is funny how just
about every other animal popu-
lation, except those who breed
on man’s detritus and misman-
agement, including rats, is failing

fast. ’m glad I did not live in the
next flat. With logic and the
utmost sincerity I catch as many
rats as I can, to feed my four 6ft -
7ft snakes, which I have rescued
from the chop, by people who
think they are doing God’s work
by killing them.

It is the heritage of the Chi-
nese to imbibe ground tiger bones
to enhance some ridiculous
notion that it increases sexual
prowess. At least we should be
thankful turtles have never been
endowed with that ability — poor
old conchs. Mr Allen strikes me
like the Chinese man on an
undercover documentary, who
dealt in such bones, rubbing his
hands together at the thought of
fewer tigers, as the price for the
bones rose to unconscionable lev-
els. No doubt Mr Allen will have
apoplexy at such a comparison,
but I can’t see much difference.
As one letter writer said, “how
can you be sure the turtles are
only for local consumption?”

Mr Cartwright needs to take
the turtle by the flippers, conform
to international law, and do the
right thing. If you wish to be tak-
en seriously stick to your regular
writing Mr Allen and leave the
poor turtle in peace. If the matter
of the environment was not so
serious your protestations would
be taken as tongue in cheek jokes.
I know you won't be able to resist
answering this letter, go ahead,
while the rest of us pity you in
your lonely battle against, logic,
common sense and basic decency.

WE G GRATTAN
Nassau,
April 16, 2009.

P.S. I may not be Bahamian
born, but we all live in the same
world, and there is nothing God
given about being the citizen of
any particular country.

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THE TRIBUNE

FRIDAY, APRIL 24, 2009, PAGE 5



LOCAL NEWS

RBC invites

community-based
organisations to
apply for its Blue
Water Project grant

RBC Royal Bank of
Canada is offering grants to
local or community organi-
sations in the Bahamas,
Caribbean countries, Cana-
da and the United States
that “inform, educate and
mobilise people about
watershed protection,
increase watershed aware-
ness in the community, and
encourage community-based
watershed stewardship.”

RBC Blue Water Project
is a 10-year, $50-million phil-
anthropic global commit-
ment by RBC Royal Bank of
Canada to support organisa-
tions that are committed to
watershed protection and
providing access to clean
drinking water.

Applications for the
“Community Action Grant”
component of the project are
now welcome.

Grants range from $1,000
to $5,000.

RBC also offers a leader-
ship grant that is currently
closed for 2009.

Launched in late 2007, the
RBC Blue Water Project
will help foster a culture of
water stewardship world
wide. To date, RBC has
committed more than $13
million in grants to 39 organ-
isations.

THE family of a man
killed when a Defence Force
vessel struck his fishing boat
two years ago say their pleas
for an investigation have
been met with a wall of offi-
cial silence.

The relatives of Gladstone
Ferguson, 78, say that
despite assurances from rep-
resentatives of the Defence
Force that a thorough inves-
tigation would be followed
by a timely report, they are
still in grief and still seeking
proper closure.

A statement issued by the
family said: “On the night of
September 6, 2007, the lov-

Just over 5,000 apply for

unemployment benefit

m@ By TANEKA THOMPSON
Tribune Staff Reporter
tthompson@tribunemedia.net

A LITTLE over five thousand
unemployed Bahamians have regis-
tered for the country’s national Unem-
ployment Benefit Programme since
early registration began on April 11,
Minister of Labour Dion Foulkes said.

This was disclosed during a brief ses-
sion of the Senate yesterday morning
as amendments to the Housing Act
and a new Pharmacy Bill were intro-
duced to members of the upper cham-
ber for first reading.

Five thousand and two persons
applied for the plan as of April 22 -
3,360 of them in Nassau; 1,268 in
Grand Bahama and 374 in the various
Family Islands, Mr Foulkes said.

Job

These applicants have also have reg-
istered with the Department of
Laboutr’s skills bank which notifies per-
sons when a job in their area of exper-
tise becomes available.

More than 4,350 persons registered

for the scheme during the
six days when registration
centres were open
throughout New Provi-
dence and Grand
Bahama. Six hundred and
fifty more persons regis-
tered once registration
moved to branches of the
National Insurance Board
on April 20.

Officials previously said
they expected applicants
to flood the doors of the
registration centres when
they opened on April 11
however the numbers
have been more moderate
than first anticipated.

With 12,000 persons said
to be eligible for the ben-
efit, some observers have
noted that either pride or
confusing application requirements
have kept thousands of unemployed
persons away.

But Senator Foulkes disagrees.

“Our project from the actuarial
study was between 5,000 to 7,000 so
the numbers are fairly on target. I must

Pleas for fisherman's death investigation ‘met with silence’

nen BOLO ets



commend that actuary and
staff at the National Insur-
ance Board and the
Department of Labour for
doing a superb job,” he
told The Tribune in an
interview yesterday.

“T think that the amount
of people who are regis-
tered are the amount that
we predicted so it’s not a
question of why there was-
n't a bigger turnout,” he
said, adding that an aver-
age of 120 persons applied
per day for the benefit.

He said while it is not a
priority at present, the
stipulations for applying
may be adjusted at a later
date.

Eligible persons may
continue to apply for the
benefit at the NIB headquarters on
Baillou Hill Road in Nassau, at the
NIB headquarters in Grand Bahama
and at NIB offices throughout the
Family Islands.

There is a two week waiting period
before cheques will be issued, and Mr

Foulkes urged all eligible persons to
apply early.

Recipients of the benefit will receive
half of their average insurable weekly
wage for 13 weeks; the current ceiling
on insurable wages is $400 meaning
the maximum amount anyone can
receive is $200 per week.

Contributions

The benefits will be paid out from
NIB’s $20 million medical branch fund.
Once this is exhausted, the scheme will
be sustained by contributions from
employed persons and employers.

Applicants qualify for the fund if
they are unemployed, under 65, not
self-employed, able to and willing to
work, were last employed on or after
July 1, 2004, not receiving other NIB
benefits — other than disability or sur-
vivors benefits — and have made a cer-
tain number of contributions to NIB.

When registering, applicants must
present a letter of termination — if
one was issued — and complete a
Department of Labour employment
application along with an NIB claim
form.

CEMA Mad CECE:

ing leader of our family,
Gladstone Ferguson, 78, was
killed at sea as a result of a
collision with a Royal
Bahamas Defence Force ves-
sel, at ‘The Narrows’ in the
Paradise Island area.

Minister

“We have written and
made countless phone calls
to the Honourable Tommy
Turnquest, minister respon-
sible for the Defence Force,
Commodore "Butch" Scav-
ella, the commissioner of
police, the attorney general,

and all relevant government
agencies. Almost two years
later, no official report, no
date set for a coroner's
inquest, no formal reply, and
no update. We are still wait-
ing.”

The family said its attor-
neys continue to struggle to
secure an inquest date, “but
seemingly only the rich and
famous with celebrity influ-
ence can make demands on
our judicial system”.

At a press conference ear-
lier this week, a family
spokesperson said: “We
have come today at the
grave site of our fallen fam-

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ily leader to draw the gov-
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the Bahamas’ attention to
our pain and grief. We hope
immediate action will be tak-
en to bring truth, honour,
and proper closure to this
matter.”

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PAGE 6, FRIDAY, APRIL 24, 2009 THE TRIBUNE

Single mother says

the Immigration
Dept still have not
repaired raid damage



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- Managing and administering mooring reservations

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bnt@bnt.bs by May 6, 2009.

m@ By MEGAN REYNOLDS
Tribune Staff Reporter
mreynolds@tribunemedia.net

A SINGLE mother continues
to feel insecure as the Immigra-
tion Department have not yet
repaired the damage caused by
armed officers who raided her
home two months ago.

Violet Hanna, 41, said the
security of her home was com-
promised when six armed offi-
cers used a heavy maul to break
open her garden gate and bash
in her back door to gain access to
her property at around 4am on
February 24.

The gate no longer closes
securely and the chain link fence
remains bent after the officers
jumped over it, Ms Hanna said,
adding that the backdoor was
damaged and has now broken
away from the hinge.

Officers left the maul at the
gate when they left the property
— without checking Ms Hanna
and her 7-year-old daughter
Amber’s Bahamian passports,
she said.

Minister of Immigration
Branville McCartney vowed to
personally oversee an investiga-
tion into Ms Hanna’s allegations
after her story was published in
The Tribune on February 26.

A panel of Immigration offi-
cials established to investigate
the matter visited Ms Hanna’s
home in Price Street, Nassau Vil-
lage, to assess the damage, but
the single mother-of-two said
they have not yet assured her
they will restore the security of
her home.

Safety is the single mother’s
main concern as she said an ex-
convict lives nearby, men loiter at
either end of the street smoking
marijuana, and gunshots were
fired in the area last week.

But Ms Hanna maintains she
cannot afford the estimated
$1,000 to repair the damage.

She said: “If I had the money I

a

TAU anal ect E

THE MAUL that vr ra said immigration officers left behind.

would pay for it myself. This is
not a safe area, there is a lot of
noise from people cussing and
carrying on, and last week there
were guys shooting off guns.

“T keep waking up every so
often to check if my car is okay
and everything around is okay.

“T can’t sleep.

“T go to sleep and then I hear a



noise and I’m up. I guess I am
paranoid but I wasn’t like that
before.

“Now I just want to be safe.
That’s all I want. It is so simple,
this could have been over from
the next day.”

Mr McCartney did not respond
to messages left by The Tribune
before press time last night.

Carib Insurance
Brokers & Agents Ltd.

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THE TRIBUNE

LOCAL NEWS

FRIDAY, APRIL 24, 2009, PAGE 7



Grenade

accident kills
Yemen Gitmo
dletainee’s Sons

@ SAN’A, Yemen

THE TWO young sons of a
Yemeni detainee at Guantanamo
died when a grenade they were
playing with accidentally deto-
nated inside their home, a human
rights lawyer and the detainee’s
brother said Thursday, accord-
ing to Associated Press.

The two boys were the sons
of Guantanamo prisoner 1463,
Abdelsalam al-Hilah, a busi-
nessman who was captured in
Cairo in 2002 and sent to Guan-
tanamo on charges of terrorism,
said Ahmed Irman of the Hood
Organization for Defending
Human Rights, an organization
that advocates for Guantanamo
detainees in Yemen.

The children, Youssef, 11, and
Omar, 10, were playing unsuper-
vised with the grenade in a room
in the house when it exploded.
It is unclear why the grenade was
in the house.

The detainee’s brother, Nabil
al-Hilah, confirmed the boys
were killed.

Irman said the boys had just
received a rare phone call from
their father two days before their
death in which they chatted with
their dad about their schoolwork
and classes they were attending.
Irman said their father was
shocked to hear how big the boys
had grown.

During the two-hour phone
call, Irman said al-Hilah spoke
about his frustration with being
detained for such a long period of
time and expressed pessimism at
being released in the near future.

Irman said he also spoke about
what he described as a bad con-
ditions in Guantanamo and a
lack of change since President
Barack Obama took office.

The boys were buried on
Wednesday. It is unclear if their
father has been notified of their
death.

The Obama administration
has said that it will close the
detention facility on Cuba which
became a flashpoint for
controversy ever since it was
opened under the Bush adminis-
tration.

However, questions have been
raised about where to send the
remaining detainees, the largest
group of which is from Yemen.

Man aiming to reclaim land says

counter claimant has no case

A BUSINESSMAN who is
on a mission to reclaim land
he says was stolen from his
family more than a century
ago has hit out at a counter
claimant, saying he has no
case.

Warren Aranha, 50, who is
claiming ownership of prop-
erties in downtown Nassau
and on Cable Beach, dis-
missed overlapping land
claims by historian Anthony
Cunningham, saying: “He is
going nowhere. His claims are
absurd. His case is a non-
Starter.”

Properties

Mr Cunningham is disput-
ing Mr Aranha’s various land
claims on the grounds that the
properties were originally
granted by the Crown to his
alleged forebear, General
Robert Cunningham, who
arrived in the Bahamas soon
after the American Revolu-
tion.

Mr Cunningham said Gen-

“He is going nowhere. His

claims are absurd. His case
is a non-starter.”



eral Cunningham was grant-
ed vast holdings for services
rendered to Britain, including
a 465-acre tract on Cable
Beach.

This area includes the for-
mer home of American mur-
deress Sante Kimes, which Mr
Aranha has now moved into,
claiming it belongs to him.

Mr Aranha says that the
Cunningham land grant was
rescinded in 1847. He has pro-
duced a document, allegedly
from the official commutation
book, saying the land was sub-
sequently conveyed to a Mr
Henry Adderley.

Now Mr Aranha is bracing
himself for a three-way legal
battle with Mr Cunningham

Warren Aranha

and Mr Raymond Wong, who
claims his family has owned
the Kimes site since 1986,
having bought it from a Scot-
tish woman, Marilyn Craw-
ford.

Mr Wong, a Nassau busi-
nessman, has threatened to
issue an injunction against Mr
Aranha, saying he is occupy-
ing the Kimes site illegally.

But Mr Aranha said yester-
day: “Before Mr Wong can
issue an injunction, he first has
to produce documentation to
prove his claim.”

Mr Aranha is also claiming
to own two derelict properties
in Cumberland Street, even
though they were reportedly
bought a year ago by attorney

Two brothers among four persons
charged with second degree murder

@ By DENISE MAYCOCK

According to reports in the Hamilton Spec-

Tribune Freeport Reporter
dmaycock@tribunemedia.net

FREEPORT - Bahamian brothers Reno and
Robert Woods of Grand Bahama were among
four persons charged last month in Canada
with second degree murder.

Reno, 23, and Robert 21, are the sons of Mr
Randy Woods, a contractor in Freeport.

The brothers have been living in Hamilton,
Canada. The family is expected to travel to
Canada on Friday.

“This is a very tragic time for the family right
now and we are just praying for them. This is
very unfortunate, but they are innocent until
proven otherwise,” said a close family friend,
who wished to remain anonymous.

tor, the Woods brothers, along with Jerome
Marshall, 23, of Hamilton, and Lani Valdes
Harris, 21, of Woodbridge, were arrested in
connection with the stabbing death of a 29-
year-old man at Mississauga.

The victim, identified as Jermain Marlon
Scott, was involved in an altercation with a
group of men at a popular pub.

While trying to flee, he was chased down
and fatally wounded with a knife. He man-
aged to get away again and was able to hail a
taxi. The driver contacted 911 after realising
that he was injured.

Scott died of his injuries at the hospital.

Reno Woods, Harris, and Marshall were ini-
tially charged in Brampton on March 15.
Robert was later arrested and charged.

Sante Kimes.

Nigel Bowe for half a million
dollars.

He claims the Cumberland
Street and Cable Beach sites
are linked by documents prov-
ing they were both part of the
old J S Johnson estate, of
which he claims to be the sole
inheritor.

Mr Aranha has alleged that
the J S Johnson estate was sys-
tematically “stolen” over a



WARREN ARANHA at the former home of American murderess

period of 50 years in the late
19th and early 20th centuries
by a group of white families.

He believes much of the
land was then sold on to
unsuspecting buyers.

Mr Aranha has already built
a wall on the Cumberland
Street site.

He said: “I have heard noth-
ing from the other side, but I
am standing firm on this.”

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PAGE 8, FRIDAY, APRIL 24, 2009

THE TRIBUNE



LOCAL NEWS

Would-he PLP deputy
candidates forming =:
alliances ahead

of convention

FROM page one

the party’s top post.

Most party members agree
something must be done about
the party leadership, but it is
how they go about it that has
caused a rift within the organi-
sation.

Now three main groups have
emerged: those who wish to get
rid of Mr Christie at the con-
vention; those who are content
with his leadership and want to
see him lead the party into the
next general election, and those
who want him removed as
leader but in a dignified way
sometime after the convention,
but before the next election.

Having led the party to a
crushing defeat at the polls in
2007, Mr Christie commis-
sioned a leading research and
polling company to ascertain
reasons for the PLP’s loss to
the Free National Movement.

Along with a number of
scandals, including two of his
Cabinet ministers, Mr
Christie’s perceived “weak-
ness” in handling his ministers
was paramount among reasons
for the PLP’s poor showing.

Along with other recom-
mendations, the firm suggested
either a change in leadership or
a re-modelling of the leader’s
image to make the party more
attractive to the coveted youth
vote.

Since the PLP’s loss there
has been little change to the
party’s image, which continues
to suffer the shame of contin-
ued scandals even in opposi-
tion.

However, with the conven-
tion and the prospect that cur-
rent deputy leader Cynthia
Pratt will vacate her seat,
PLPs hope to see their party
reinvent itself — hopefully in
time to provide a substantive
alternative to the current gov-
ernment.

FROM page one

ed she felt this way because lawyers did
not request the same of Justice John Lyons,
who had presided over the same case pre-
viously, despite the fact that his conduct
had also caused some alarm amongst attor-
neys involved.

Meanwhile, attorney Michael Scott, rep-
resenting Rami’s brother, Amir Weisfisch,
defended Justice Allen’s judgment.

He proposed she was merely exercising
her “case management” powers to expe-
dite the matter when she determined she
should continue to preside over it despite
admitting to be “conflicted” about it, and
when she appeared dismissive of the evi-
dence of an expert witness without having
heard most of it.

The two attorneys made their arguments
as Mr Lavender continued his submissions
to the Court of Appeal in an application to
have the court overturn Justice Allen’s deci-
sion to remain on the case.

Mr Lavender said: “She repeatedly
referred to the irrelevant consideration that
Justice Lyons was not asked to recuse him-
self...judging by the tone of the comments,
the judge was aggrieved.”

Nonetheless, as recorded in his notes and
her own written judgment on the recusal
application, Mr Lavender proposed to
Court of Appeal President Dame Joan
Sawyer, Justice Hartman Longley and Jus-

More than 350 lots for sale | FROM page one
at new gated community |

FROM page one

Lyford Cay in the western end of New Providence, the 100 acre site
will be complete with putting greens, a club house, swimming
pools, biking trails, tennis courts, a fitness centre, and a natural park
complete with indigenous plants and trees.

Set to be developed in stages, the gated community is scheduled
to be completed in 18 months and is being developed as a “green
area” with solar panels and other earth friendly amenities through-

out.

Noting that no expense has been spared to provide a complete

Judge is accused

tice Emmanuel Osadebay that Justice
Allen’s comments and conduct would sug-
gest to a “fair-minded observer” a “real
possibility of bias on her part” in relation to
the case.

Justice Allen revealed several weeks ago
that she was aware that Justice Lyons, who
stepped down from the matter on the basis
that he did not have time to hear it, appoint-
ed an accountant to provide a report in the
case who was the brother of a woman with
whom he “shared more than a friendship.”

The integrity of that report and the
accountant’s suitability as an “expert wit-
ness” was later questioned by Justice Allen.

She herself, according to Mr Lavender’s
records, raised the issue of “how she could
determine the issue in her conflicted capac-
ity.”

Mr Lavender claimed yesterday that Jus-
tice Allen’s decision to question Daniel
Ferguson’s evidence before and in her judg-
ment on the recusal application was “pre-
mature” in light of the fact that she had
not “read most or all” of his report.

He said that this was evidence of a
“strong disposition to jump to conclusions”
on her part in relation to Mr Ferguson.

Nonetheless, in giving her reasons for
refusing the application for her to step
down, Mr Lavender said Justice Allen

yesterday.

The suspect, described as a slim dark male,
stripped off his shirt and left it in the area before
escaping, he added.

“A number of officers were dispersed in the area
to pick up the (suspect’s) trail. . . the bike was some
distance away from where the incident actually hap-
pened. We are told that some clothing was shed
and those were retrieved. . .I believe it was just a
shirt,” said ASP Bethel.

He could not confirm reports that police were
able to chase the suspect before losing his trail near

lying in a pool of blood before making off on a
nearby motorcycle, ASP Bethel told The Tribune

appeared in her judgment to be “clutching
at straws.”

She attributed to Mr Ferguson’s damag-
ing comments about his effort to complete
the job he was assigned, which the lawyer
told the court transcripts of his testimony
showed he did not say, while suggesting
that she herself was being unfairly
“accused” of being unable to handle the
matter.

Meanwhile, Mr Lavender suggested it
was of particularly “grave concern” to him
that Justice Anita Allen admitted that in
deciding whether to remain on the case she
had taken into consideration the opinions of
her court clerks, which had not been sub-
mitted as evidence.

“She took into account information
received after the hearing of the applica-
tion...it is fundamental that all evidence
should be produced in court,” said Mr
Lavender.

Justice Allen’s reference to her court
clerks came after a disagreement between
herself and Mr Lavender over whether she
had been the first person to suggest that
she recuse herself from the matter during a
hearing in her chambers.

She and all the lawyers involved, except
for Mr Lavender, came under fire by Dame
Joan Sawyer earlier in the week for failing
to keep notes of the hearing that would
have helped the Court of Appeal deter-
mine the way forward.

After being convinced by several differ-
ent attorneys that at one point during the
hearing she told them that she would be
“happy to recuse” herself in light of her
knowledge of the circumstances of the case
—astatement which Mr Lavender said he
took as an “invitation to apply for her
recusal” — the judge “wrongfully reneged”
on her admission when making her judg-
ment, said the QC.

In it, she said that having “searched the
recesses of (her) mind” and consulted with
her clerks, she determined that she did not
make the comment.

Her judgment went on to state that she
had “absolutely no doubt that (she) could
determine the issue” before her. Supporting
Justice Allen yesterday, Mr Scott said he
“vigorously disputed” the claim that Justice
Allen had been the one to raise the recusal
issue.

But Mr Lavender told the court that “no
weight” should be “attached to the con-
tent of the recesses of (Justice Allen’s)
mind” or to the recollections of her clerks,
as they were part of the evidence in the
matter.

“She may have been clouded by a sense
of grievance that Justice Lyons was not
treated in the same way. But her resistance
confirms the fact that, as she suggested in
her chambers, she was unable to deal with
it objectively,” said the QC.

The appeal continues.

Manhunt for gunman

the area of Love Beach.
Meanwhile, police have no leads in the case and a

motive for the shooting has yet to be established,

said the senior officer.

Mr Jones, a resident of western New Providence
said to be in his late fifties, is ex-business partner of
former MP Lester Turnquest. He was born in North
Wales and has worked in the Bahamas for more
than 10 years.

He is now a permanent resident of the Bahamas
and president of the Britannia Group.

Anyone with information about Wednesday’s
shooting can contact police anonymously at 919,
328-TIPS or the Central Detective Unit at 502-9991.

relaxing and tranquil environment, Mr Wells said that even to the
curvature of the roads, the property has been painstakingly designed
to ensure not only slower vehicular traffic, but also helping the sight
line by enhancing the natural beauty of the land.

With a natural elevation that reaches 40 feet at its highest point,
Mr Wells said that Lyford Hills is a singularly “beautiful” piece of
property.

Obviously with such a capital intensive project, Mr Wells said
there are a number of financial investors in the project, including
Superwash President Dionisio D’Aguilar, JS Johnson Managing
Director Marvin Bethel, Lands and Surveys Director Tex Turn-
quest, radio talkshow host Jeffrey Lloyd, George Moss, Chris
Lightbourne, and Douglas Turnquest.

Join the Leading Environmental Conservation

Organization in The Bahamas

JOB OPPORTUNITY:
PARK ADMINISTRATOR

Primary Responsibilities: Provide day to day and long term
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the rules and regulations within the parks.

Duties:

1. Serve as the Liaison between the Exuma Cays Land and
Sea Park and the BNT headquarters in Nassau. Is
responsible for overall supervision and oversight of all
activities that occur in the Park.

. Assist with the development of policies, procedures,
systems, and proposals to further the goals of the Park and
the Bahamas National Trust.

. Assist with fund raising and public relations activities in
the Park — provide liaison between potential donors in the
park and the Executive Director or Development Office.

. Execute activities in General Management Plans, Strategic
Plans, and operating plans to achieve the goals of the Park
and the Bahamas National Trust. Spearhead periodic
review of such plans

. Supervise park staff and volunteers to ensure protection of
natural resources and maintenance of park assets.

. In conjunction with the BNT staff, plan, develop and
implement community outreach programmes, education
and public relations initiatives to promote the goals of the

BNT.

. Provide support to the Royal Bahamas Police and
Defence Force with enforcement of immigration, illegal
drug interdiction and domestic disturbances in the Park.

Required Skills:
Strong interpersonal and communications skills.
Advanced degree in environmental science, administration,
or management required.
5+ years of progressive experience including extensive
supervision and general management experience.
Law enforcement experience, an advantage.
Ability to troubleshoot problems with boat engines and
generators an advantage
Willingness to live in a remote location for extended
periods of time in sometimes difficult and dangerous
conditions.
Advanced computer skills including all MS Office
applications.
Experience handling boats in a variety of sea conditions.
Advanced scuba diving training and experience a plus.
Dedication to conservation of natural resources within
national parks.

Positions offer vacation time, medical insurance subsidy and

housing.

To apply: provide a cover letter, resume, three references
to Bahamas National Trust, P.O.Box N-4105 Nassau, or
bnt@bnt.bs by May 6, 2009.



FROM page one

The Royal Bahamas Police
Force Special Weapons And Tac-
tics (SWAT) team were strategi-
cally placed outside the court
building with scarves covering their
faces and machine guns poised as
Deveaux was brought before Mag-
istrate Susan Charles-Sylvester by
senior homicide detectives.

Deveaux, wearing jeans and a
faded black sweatshirt with a red
and white skull and crossbones
design, stood quietly before the
bench as his lawyer Ian Cargill told
the court how Deveaux was unfit
for arraignment as he is both bipo-
lar and schizophrenic.

Mr Cargill said his client is tak-
ing several types of medication for
his psychological disorders and
appealed for him to receive a psy-
chological examination.

ky.
NAD

Nassau Airport

Development Company

SWAT team

But Mrs Charles-Sylvester, who
was overseeing the arraignment in
the absence of chief magistrate
Roger Gomez, said she was not in
a position to hear the submissions
and arranged for Deveaux to
appear before Mr Gomez on Mon-
day when Mr Cargill can make his
full submissions.

After reading the charge to
Deveaux, including particulars that
Deveaux, being concerned with
others, did intentionally and by
means of unlawful harm, cause the
death of Marlon Smith on April
19, Mrs Charles-Sylvester asked
the accused if he understood.

When he said he did, Mrs
Charles-Sylvester asked what he
understood, to which Deveaux qui-
etly replied: “Everything.”

And as she pressed him further

he elaborated: “Murder. So they
keep telling me, but I didn’t do it.”

Satisfied he had accepted the
charge, Mrs Charles-Sylvester said:
“Tt seems to me the point is taken
and the defendant understands the
nature of the charge that is before
him.

“He also will understand this is a
matter for which I cannot grant
him bail.”

Deveaux was seated as Mr
Cargill began to argue another
case, but when officers went to
escort the murder suspect from the
courtroom his lawyer rushed to his
client’s side and berated officers
for forcing Deveaux against his will
as he followed them to the car
shouting: “You still have to do it
right!”

Deveaux will appear before Mrs
Charles-Sylvester on May 11 in
connection with the murder of
Corey Whymms.

PUBLIC

NOTICE

Removal of Derelict Aircraft

Effective April 20, 2009. the Nassau Airport Development
Company (NAD) is requesting the owners of the aircraft pictured
below to remove their property within 30 days of this

notice.

Both aircraft are Cessna 402s parked on Apron 5 at the Lynden
Pindling Intemational Airport. Failure to do so will result in the
aircraft being removed and discarded by the airport
management company.

For further information contact:

Public Safety Department

Nassau Ainport Development Co,
Lynden Pindling Intemational Airport
P.O. Box AP 59229, Nassau, Bahamas

Ph: (242) 702-1000


THE TRIBUNE

FRIDAY, APRIL 24, 2009, PAGE 9



LOCAL NEWS





UNITED STATES CHARGE D’AFFAIRES Timothy Zuniga-Brown planting the Brasiletto Tree flanked by repre-
sentatives of local environmental organisations.

US Embassy observes
Earth Day with a tree
planting ceremony

IN celebration of Earth Day, the Ministry of the
Environment organised a “Million Trees Pro-
gramme” and the Bahamas government agreed to
plant a million trees throughout the country by
December 31, 2009.

As part of this effort, the ministry invited US
Chargé d’Affaires Timothy Zuniga-Brown as well
as other members of the diplomatic community,
to plant trees on Wednesday.

To mark the event, Mr Zuniga-Brown planted
a Brasiletto Tree, which is indigenous to the
Bahamas.

On hand for the event were representatives



THE newly-launched philan-
thropical arm of Sandals Resort
International, the Sandals Foun-
dation, held a ceremonial tree
planting to help celebrate Earth
Day on Wednesday.

Staff at Sandals Royal
Bahamian led by general man-
ager Michael James, environ-
mental co-ordinator Keva
Varence as well as visiting
guests were on hand to help
plant indigenous sea grape trees
on the resort’s grounds.

A celebration isn’t a celebra-
tion without a fruity beverage,
and the resort’s expert bar team
was there to refresh attendees
with a cocktail specially-created
to mark the occasion — “the
Royal O-Zone”.

Mr James said: “Someone
once said that “The best time to
plant a tree is 20 years ago. The
next best time is today’, and
that’s exactly what we’ve done.
It feels great to know that our
team members are included
amongst the one billion plus
people participating in Earth
Day activities all joined by one
common goal — saving the plan-

Earth Day was founded on
the premise that all people,
regardless of race, gender,
income or geography, have a
moral right to a healthy, sus-
tainable environment. The
Earth Day Network has a glob-
al reach with a network of more
than 17,000 partners and organ-
isations in 174 countries.



SANDALS FOUNDATION LAYS ITS ROOTS

from the Ministry of the Environment, the
Nature Conservancy, the Bahamas Reef
Environment Educational Foundation (BREEF)
and the National Coastal Awareness Commit-
tee.

The US Embassy selected the site at the inter-
section of Blake Road and West Bay Street for
the tree planting.

It was at that site in 1962 that US President
John F Kennedy and British Prime Minister
Harold Macmillan planted a tree as a goodwill
gesture commemorating a meeting of the two
leaders held in Nassau.



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PAGE 16, FRIDAY, APRIL 24, 2009

THE TRIBUNE



INTERNATIONAL NEWS



Canata’s
GDP falls
7.3 per cent :

m TORONTO

CANADA’S central bank :
said Thursday the country’s }
gross domestic product fell 7.3
percent in the first three months ;
of 2009, dropping at the steepest }
pace in decades, according to }
Associated Press. i

The Bank of Canada said }
that’s the biggest contraction }
since comparable records began
being kept in 1961. ;

Mark Carney, the head of the }
central bank, expects the Cana- }
dian economy will shrink by 3 }
percent this year as opposed to }
the 1.2 percent he predicted in }
January. :

Carney blames inaction in the i
United States and Europe in }
dealing with toxic bank assets }
for a recession that has been }
deeper and longer than expect- }
ed. :

“If we had to boil it down to }
one issue, it’s the slowness with }
which other G7 countries have }
dealt with the problems in their :
banks,” Carney said. “There has }
not been as much progress as }
we had expected in January.”

Canada has avoided govern- }
ment bailouts and has not expe- }
rienced the failure of any major ;
financial institution. There has }
been no crippling mortgage }
meltdown or banking crisis. ;

Canada and the U.S. have the :

largest trading relationship in }
the world, however, so the finan- }
cial crisis and the global sell-off }
of commodities have hit Canada :
hard since last fall. Alberta’s }
once-booming oil sands sector }
has cooled as every major com- }
pany has scrapped or delayed }

some expansion plans.

Canada lost a record 273,300
jobs in the first three months of }

the year.

The Bank of Canada cut its }
trendsetting interest rate by a }
quarter point to a record-low :
0.25 percent on Wednesday and
took the unprecedented step of }
saying it will likely stay there }

through June 2010.

The latest interest rate cut }
means the bank has sliced 4.25 }
percentage points off the }
overnight rate since it began eas- }
ing its policy in December 2007. }

Carney is a former Goldman }
Sachs executive who took over }
the central bank’s top post on }
Feb. 1, 2008 from David Dodge.








Mexico proposes expanding

army’s power in drug fight

@ MEXICO CITY

A BILL that would let Mexico declare
temporary states of emergency and
expand the army’s power in a bloody
fight against powerful drug gangs drew
immediate fire Thursday from human
rights activists who say soldiers should
not be doing the job of police, according
to Associated Press.

President Felipe Calderon’s propos-
al, which centers on the idea of declaring
drug trafficking hotspots “domestic secu-
rity” zones, would give the army access
to civilian court and police files.

The measure was submitted to Con-
gress late Wednesday.

“The expansion of organized crime
poses new challenges for democratic
societies,” it reads. “That requires the
government to bring to bear all the force
of the state to confront it.”

Calderon’s government has already
dispatched 45,000 troops to drug-plagued
areas — mostly along the U.S. border
— where cartel battles have cost more
than 10,700 lives since Calderon took
office in December 2006.

By law, soldiers are limited to play-
ing a support role for police.

Military

The proposal would officially place
army troops at the head of anti-crime
efforts in some areas — formalizing the
reality that in some places the military
has effectively replaced weak or corrupt
local forces.

But soldiers have been implicated in
human rights abuses such as shooting
civilians at checkpoints and conducting
illegal searches. Human rights groups
say the bill may be a sign that Calderon
is reversing a promise to get the army off
the streets as soon as possible.

In a February interview with The
Associated Press, Calderon said he
hoped to beat back the cartels by 2012 to
a point that the army and federal police
can withdraw and leave the problem in
the hands of local law enforcement.

“It is worrisome that they could
declare a state of emergency or give the
army more power, given the experiences
we have already had,” said Consuelo
Morales, director of the Monterrey-
based Citizens in Support of Human
Rights.

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Eduardo Verdugo/AP

POLICE OFFICERS guard alleged drug trafficker Isaac Godoy second right, during his presentation to the media in Mexico City, Thursday,

April 23, 2009. Godoy, who allegedly ran operations for the Arellano Felix drug cartel, was arrested Tuesday in Tijuana, northern Mexico,
along with six other alleged members of his cell, police said.

However, Morales acknowledged that
many Mexicans support army involve-
ment in drug-plagued cities.

“People like the military because
they say the police are corrupt,” she
said.

The idea that the military would have
access to civilian legal files angered
defense lawyers like Raquenel Vil-
lanueva, a Monterrey-based attorney
who has served as defense council in a
number of high-profile drug cases.

“The army doesn’t have the training to
do that,” Villanueva said, citing a histo-
ry of due-process violations and illegal
detentions that could make it risky for
the military to have access to all police
files.

Former federal anti-drug prosecutor

Samuel Gonzalez agreed the proposal
introduced gray areas that could lead to
abuses.

“The fact that the military has access
to civilian legal files isn’t of itself a
violation of human rights,” said Gonza-
lez.

“Now, what the military does with that
information, that is another problem.”

The bill says “public servants should
respect human rights” and pledged to
advise human rights groups when the
emergency decrees are issued.

Rebellion, attacks on law enforcement
agencies, a breakdown in public safety or
the incapacity of local authorities would
be conditions for declaring a state of
emergency.

It would let the country’s national

intelligence agency engage in “counter-
intelligence investigations” in cases of
arms trafficking, terrorism or terrorist
financing, foreign interference, attacks by
organized crime gangs against authorities
and intelligence agents, or attacks on
shipping or aviation.

The measure establishes tougher
penalties for soldiers who desert the
army to work for cartels, illegal weapons
possession and threatening public offi-
cials or their families.

The bill would also allow groups of
suspects to be charged individually for
weapons found in a vehicle or house
they all shared; and lay out special pun-
ishments for possession of more than 50
rounds of ammunition or for using guns
altered to be more deadly.

Suspected Somali pirates
appear in Kenyan court

m@ MOMBASA, Kenya

THE 11 SOMALI MEN,
accused in a pirate attack on a
Liberian freighter, filed slowly
into the wood-paneled court.
The magistrate took one look
at their dingy shirts, jackets and
sarongs — two were barefoot
— and ordered a court official
to make sure they were
“dressed properly” for their
next appearance, according to
Associated Press.

Amid proposals for an inter-
national tribunal to tackle pira-
cy, Kenya is implementing
agreements with the European
Union and the United States by
putting the bandits on trial, even
if they are caught on the high
seas by other nations and have
not attacked Kenyan interests.

Thursday’s hearing was the

first court appearance for the
men who were tracked down
by French commandos and
seized April 15 from their skiffs
in waters off Somalia, the law-
less epicenter of the flourishing
pirate industry off the Horn of
Africa.

Authorities

The pirate suspects had been
marched off a French frigate
Wednesday and handed over to
authorities in this Kenyan port
city.

Magistrate Catherine Mwan-
gi adjourned their case until a
bail hearing May 27. They will
remain in a Mombasa jail until
then. She also demanded that
officials give the men fresh
clothing for their bail hearing.

“Tm giving you an order that

Pd cla pete se
ne ee ose ae Bk

ek Ty te oie,

these people be dressed prop-
erly,” Mwangi told court offi-
cials.

The defendants solemnly lis-
tened to a court-provided
Somali translator. At one point,
one man briefly put an arm
round his neighbor’s shoulder
and gave him a reassuring
squeeze.

Defense lawyer Francis Kadi-
ma insisted his clients were
innocent fishermen detained by
mistake.

They had no fishing lines,
nets or hooks when they were
captured, but the French hand-
ed over evidence they did find:
two skiffs, three grappling
hooks, four rusty assault rifles,
two bags of bullets and a ladder.

In courtroom next door, wit-
nesses testified against seven
other suspected pirates in
matching blue overalls. German
sailors captured the men last
month after they reportedly
attacked a German naval supply
ship.

Kenya is also holding another
trial involving pirate suspects
handed over by Britain.

Prosecuting Somali pirates is
seen by Kenya as a way to bur-
nish its image internationally at
a time when the government is
facing criticism over corruption
and political violence.

Charges

A U.S. court this week
brought its first piracy charges
in more than a century.

Abdiwali Abdiqadir Muse of
Somalia appeared Tuesday in
New York charged with partic-
ipating in an April 8 attack on
the Maersk Alabama.

He was charged with piracy,
discharging a firearm, conspir-
ing to commit hostage-taking
and brandishing a firearm —
charges that could add up to life
in jail for the baby-faced, 5-foot-
2 teenager.

Western nations are often
reluctant to try Somali suspects
who may then try to claim asy-
lum, but Kenya has a successful
track record of pirate prosecu-
tions: 10 pirates handed over by
U.S. forces in 2006 are serving
seven-year terms.





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