Citation
The Tribune - Page 1

Material Information

Title:
The Tribune
Uniform Title:
Tribune (Nassau, Bahamas)
Portion of title:
Nassau tribune
Place of Publication:
Nassau, Bahamas
Publisher:
Tribune
Publication Date:
Copyright Date:
2009
Frequency:
Daily, except Sunday
daily
normalized irregular
Language:
English
Physical Description:
v. : ill. ; 58 cm.

Subjects

Genre:
newspaper ( sobekcm )
newspaper ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage:
Bahamas

Notes

General Note:
Description based on: Vol. 79, no. 210 (Aug. 3, 1983); title from caption.

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Holding Location:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
This item was contributed to the Digital Library of the Caribbean (dLOC) by the source institution listed in the metadata. This item may or may not be protected by copyright in the country where it was produced. Users of this work have responsibility for determining copyright status prior to reusing, publishing or reproducing this item for purposes other than what is allowed by applicable law, including any applicable international copyright treaty or fair use or fair dealing statutes, which dLOC partners have explicitly supported and endorsed. Any reuse of this item in excess of applicable copyright exceptions may require permission. dLOC would encourage users to contact the source institution directly or dloc@fiu.edu to request more information about copyright status or to provide additional information about the item.
Resource Identifier:
09994850 ( OCLC )

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Full Text
WEATHER

TRY OUR
McFLURRY
TWIX MIX

The Tribune

ANY TIME..-ANY PLACE, WE’RE #1

=USA TODAY.

BAHAMAS EDITION

www.tribune242.com

WEDNESDAY, APRIL 22, 2009

Pim blowin’ it

SOF
72F

LOW
PARTLY

C SUNNY

Volume: 105 No.123





SUPPLEMENT INSIDE TODAY

Local criminal
In aris Face

Pmanerommm BURNING OF DEAD DOG SPARKS BLAZE
. — _ : ;



Claims of nepotism
in the granting of
Crown Land denied

Lands and Surveys cm
Director speaks out 4% oi

m@ By PAUL G TURNQUEST
Tribune Staff Reporter
pturnquest@tribunemedia.net

LANDS and Surveys Direc-
tor Tex Turnquest yesterday
denied claims of nepotism in
the granting of Crown land in
Exuma.

Speaking with The Tribune
yesterday, Mr Turnquest
denied his involvement in the
selection and sale of five
beachfront lots on the island i Timatet placed ie

: ponsibility at the feet of
of Exuma, which were sold by prime Minister Hubert Ingraham
government to members of his (left) and former Prime Minister
own family who in turn Perry Christie (right).
“flipped” the properties, net-
ting profits in the hundreds of thousands of dollars.

Placing the responsibility squarely at the feet of Prime
Minister Hubert Ingraham and former Prime Minister Per-
ry Christie, Mr Turnquest said that the minister with respon-
sibility for lands (ie the Prime Minister) is the person who
ultimately signs off on Crown land grants.

Located just outside the settlement of Forbes Hill, Exuma
these Crown land lots border each other and range in size
from over 34,000 square feet to just over 17,750 square feet.

These lots were purchased at $1,550 on January 27, 2003,
$2,340 on August 1, 2001, $1,270 on June 6, 2001, $1,370 on



alter reports that
high-powered rifle
used in murder

m@ By TANEKA THOMPSON
Tribune Staff Reporter

tthompson@tribunemedia.net

LOCAL thugs
may be engaging
in an arms race
to outmatch
rival criminals, it
was suggested
yesterday.

This suggestion

LANDS AND SURVEYS Director

came on the heels of reports
that high-powered machine
guns were used in the murder
of Marlon Javon Smith, a 29-
year-old man who was chased
and killed in the backyard of
his Pinewood Gardens home
Sunday morning. His death
was the twenty-second mur-
der this year. The majority of
these killings involved illegal
firearms.

Yesterday Commissioner of
Police Reginald Ferguson told
The Tribune that police have
ruled out the possibility that
an AK-47 assault rifle was
used in Smith's killing, but
added that it appears likely
that another high-powered
rifle was used to perpetrate

SEE page eight









THE Court of Appeal chal-
lenge over Senior Justice Ani-
ta Allen’s refusal to recuse
herself from a civil case that
involves another judge com-

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Challenge over judge’s refusal to
recuse from civil case continues

ing under fire, continued yes-
terday.

Justice Allen refused to
step down from a case involv-
ing Isracli brothers Rami and
Amir Weissfisch last month
after she expressed concerns
about the integrity of a foren-
sic accounting report prepared
by Daniel Ferguson, the
brother of a close female
friend of Justice John Lyons.
Justice Lyons had appointed
Ferguson to prepare the
report.

Nicholas Lavender, QC,
who represents Rami Weiss-
fisch, continued his submis-
sions yesterday on the grounds
of appeal.

Mr Lavender told the court
that he would need a half day
to complete his submissions.
The appeal hearing has now

SEE page eight

The?” Sa

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FIREFIGHTERS put out a
blaze burning on a property
on Carmichael Road

near the Coral Harbour
roundabout. The fire
reportedly started when a
homeowner burned his
dead dog in his backyard
and the flames spread to a
large area of bush.




m@ By KARIN HERIG
Tribune Staff

Reporter

kherig@tribunemedia.net








A MAN burning a dead
dog in his backyard yes-
terday morning sparked a
fire that destroyed most of
his property, threatened
nearby homes and spread
through a large area of
bush on the southern side
of Carmichael Road near
the Coral Harbour round-
about.

Neighbours told The
Tribune that the home-
owner, who was living in
an unfinished building
with his daughter, started
the fire in his backyard in
very windy conditions and


















SEE page two









March 18, 2002 and $2,105 on June 6, 2001.

The first four of these lots have since been sold. Their
resale was recorded at $550,000 on June 8, 2006; $500,000 on
July 5, 2005; $550,000 on June 8, 2006 and $425,000 on Feb-

ruary 26, 2007.

Sources close to the transactions suggested that the deci-
sion to space out the sale of these properties was to ensure
that Prime Minister Ingraham, who signed the first four
transactions, did not become aware of the family link
between the vendors and the Director of Lands. This tactic,
sources allege, was the main reason for the delay in the final
sale in 2003 after government had changed so that former

SEE page eight



Tribune sales defy global
trends with 7.7 per cent rise

THE TRIBUNE has boost-
ed its lead as the Bahamas’
top daily with street sales up
7.7 per cent over last year in
defiance of all global trends.

Overall, circulation was up
more than five per cent in
March over the same period
last year in spite of the reces-
sion.

Tribune president Robert
Carron said: “Our newspaper
covers the right stories in the
right way and appeals to
Bahamians across the board.
This is a remarkable perfor-
mance.”

Metropolitan dailies in oth-
er parts of the world, and
especially in North America
and Europe, are suffering
unprecedented drops in circu-
lation.



NASSAU AND BAHAMEA

ISLANDS’ LEADING NEWSPAPER

In fact, many once great
titles are now facing bank-
ruptcy and extinction as the
Internet, television and falling
advertising revenues take their
toll.

But The Tribune continues
to rocket skywards, with Mon-
day and Thursday sales par-
ticularly strong. “On Thurs-
days, our print run frequently
hits 23,000 or more,” said Mr
Carron.

The Tribune has shown
steady gains since it turned
from evening to morning pub-
lication in the summer of 1998.

However, the trend has
accelerated since 2001-2002,
making it the undisputed mar-
ket leader.

SEE page eight





PAGE 2, WEDNESDAY, APRIL 22, 2009

THE TRIBUNE



LOCAL NEWS



Mother accused of causing baby’s
death to remain in Sandilands

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@ By NATARIO McKENZIE
Tribune Staff Reporter

A MOTHER accused of
causing the death of her new-
born baby boy, whose body
was discovered in a field near a
church on Soldier Road last
December, will remain at the
Sandilands Rehabilitation Cen-
tre for two more weeks for fur-
ther evaluation, a Magistrates
Court was told yesterday.

Stacia Rolle, 19, of Windsor
Place Road, alias Stacia
Adderley, was arraigned
before Chief Magistrate Roger
Gomez in Court One, Bank
Lane last month, charged with
concealing of the body of a
child.

According to court dockets,
it is alleged that on Wednes-
day, December 10, 2008, Rolle
caused the death of a child with
the intent of concealing its
birth.

The infant’s body was
reportedly discovered by a res-
ident of the neighborhood near
the Church of God on Soldier
Road.

It was suggested that the
baby may have been born only
about an hour before his body

Healthcare is evolving :: Follow the dots.

was discovered.

When police arrived at the
scene they found the body
mutilated; only one finger
remained on one of the baby’s
hands and the feet had been
extensively damaged.

Police also discovered what
appeared to be fresh blood on
pieces of clothing.

Rolle pleaded guilty during
her arraignment and was
remanded to the Sandilands
Rehabilitation Centre for a
psychological evaluation.

She did not appear in court
yesterday as expected.

Police prosecutor Sergeant
Sean Thurston told the court
that officials at Sandilands had
informed him that the psycho-
logical report was still not
ready and that they needed
more time to monitor the
accused.

Rolle’s attorney Ian Cargill
reminded the court that Chief
Magistrate Gomez had
ordered that Rolle be sent to
Sandilands for a period of two
weeks, and said she should
have been brought to court
yesterday.

The matter has now been
adjourned to May 13.

e
—_h



*

moe Naot ,
AIM MCOMIS HI SRROM NIL ICG

POTCAKE ‘Ginger’ went missing from her home in the
Village Road area on Monday, April 20, between 7.30pm and
10.30pm.

The owners say Ginger is a very sweet and friendly dog.

She weighs around 50 to 5Slbs and has long legs.
She was wearing a multi-colour striped collar at the time

she disappeared.

The owners are appealing to members of the public to
take a good look at Ginger’s photo and to keep their eyes

peeled when driving around.



Burning of dead
dog sparks blaze

FROM page one

the flames got out of control.
He reportedly asked his neigh-
bours to borrow a water hose
when he realised that the flames
were rapidly spreading across
his property, which contained
many derelict cars and boats.

The situation was exacerbat-
ed when the gas tanks of the
cars and boats in the yard
exploded, neighbours said.

The fire reportedly also
burned more intensely due to
the fibre glass contained in the
boats’ hulls, which made the
firefighters’ job more difficult.

Director of Fire Services Supt
Jeffrey Deleveaux confirmed to
The Tribune that the fire that
is now burning through several
acres of bush started from a
man burning a dog in his yard.

By yesterday afternoon, Mr
Deleveaux said, firefighters had
extinguished the fire on the
man’s property and had the
bush fire under control.

No further homes or proper-
ties are under threat from the
fire, he said.

However, the inside of the
man’s unfinished house was
completely gutted by the fire
and his possessions, which he
had stored in his backyard, were
reduced to ashes. Other dogs
and a raccoon that he kept on
his property were burned to
death.

The roof of a neighbour’s
two-storey building was also
damaged.

Fire Chief Deleveaux said
there is a possibility that the
homeowner could face charges
for starting a fire in a residential
area and/or negligence.

Yesterday morning’s blaze



DERELICT CARS and garbage
burning yesterday on the property
on Carmichael Road.

was just the latest in a series of
bush fires that have been burn-
ing in the Carmichael Road
area in the past two weeks.

Police believe that a massive
fire that spread across several
acres of forest in the Carmichael
Road area last week was started
by an arsonist near the area's
well-fields.

No one has so far been arrest-
ed in connection with that mat-
ter and investigations continue.

Last week’s fires have for the
most part been completely
extinguished. However, some
smaller areas of bush that are
still burning, are inaccessible
to the firefighters.

MAIN/SPORTS SECTION

Local News

Editorial/Letters. ..........

Pipes Oro oulc

Serrated eee a see eeececeeerstens P4

P9,10,11

BUSINESS/ARTS SECTION

CLASSIFIED SECTION 36 PAGES

USA TODAY MAIN SECTION 12 PAGES





THE TRIBUNE

WEDNESDAY, APRIL 22, 2009, PAGE 3



LOCAL NEWS





Police identify
victim of Queen's
Staircase tragedy




aa oN ba sk,
Tim Clarke/Tribune staff
SCENE OF TRAGEDY: The
Queen’s Staircase.

m By MEGAN REYNOLDS
Tribune Staff Reporter

mreynolds@tribunemedia.net

POLICE have identified the
man who died after falling on
the Queen’s Staircase last
month amid allegations that his
death was caused by the slow
response of medical workers.

Leslie Sands, 50, of Pinewood
Gardens, fell while walking up
the historic stone staircase next
to the Princess Margaret Hospi-
tal (PMH) and lost blood from a
head wound for 45 minutes
before paramedics stationed
only metres away went to his
aid, witness Rev Kevin Cooper
claims. Rev Cooper said he saw
Mr Sands, wearing a yellow
shirt and khaki trousers, in the
PMH pharmacy moments
before he saw him lying on the
central platform of the 65th step
stone staircase with blood pour-
ing from a head wound, the
bones of his nose broken and
his forehead split open.

When emergency services
were slow to respond to calls,
the pastor said, he ran to PMH
— less than 100ft away — to
report the accident but hospital
staff were slow to respond.

Blood

A doctor who walked up the
stairs to take Mr Sands’ pulse
confirmed he was living around
30 minutes after he fell at
around 3pm on Tuesday, March
17, but the injured man contin-
ued to lose blood for another 15
minutes before paramedics
arrived with a stretcher, Rev
Cooper claims. Mr Sands was
finally taken to hospital around
45 minutes after he fell, the wit-
ness said. “He would have been
messed up because of the fall,
but he died because he lost so
much blood and because they
didn’t react fast enough.

“It’s not like they did every-
thing they could, they didn’t do
anything,” he alleged.

Police investigating the death
have not confirmed whether or
not they are investigating Rev
Cooper’s claim. Assistant
Superintendent Walter Evans
said foul play is not suspected
and the cause of death, “could
have been a myriad of issues.”

Princess Margaret Hospital
would not release details of the
incident to the press.

Anyone with any information
which may assist the police
investigation can call the Cen-
tral Detective Unit on 322-2561
or log on to www.rbpf.org to file
an anonymous report online.

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THE BIG CASINO DEBATE

Game for a review
of gambling rules



Top Kerzner executive backs calls to let more people play in casinos

m@ By ALISON LOWE
Tribune Staff Reporter
alowe@tribunemedia.net

KERZNER’S top executive said the
resort stands behind calls for govern-
ment to allow a wider range of people in
the Bahamas to gamble.

George Markantonis, president and
managing director of Kerzner Interna-
tional (Bahamas), told The Tribune the
company “thinks some of the rules
regarding who should be allowed to gam-
ble should be reviewed.”

He said Kerzner International was
“very happy” to play a part in crafting a
recent presentation made by the
Bahamas Hotel Association to the gov-
ernment which addressed the need per-
ceived by the casino industry for a
swathe of changes in the regulatory
framework governing its operations as a
whole if it is to remain competitive.

The Tribune understands that amongst
the recommendations proposed was that,
contrary to current restrictions, residents
of the Bahamas who are not Bahamian

citizens should be allowed to gamble in
casinos.

The presentation was made shortly
after it became clear that Florida’s law-
makers were advancing proposals from
within its casino industry for an all-out
expansion of gambling opportunities in
the state — including permitting popular
table games such as those offered in
Bahamian casinos and lowering the legal
gambling age to 18.

Threat

The move is viewed as a further threat
to the Bahamas’ attractiveness as a des-
tination for US gamblers in particular,
following a decision last year by Florida
to allow Blackjack and Baccarat — games
which would have previously been found
only offshore and in Las Vegas — and
has prompted renewed concern from
stakeholders in the Bahamas that steps
must be taken to shore up the industry’s
position here.

Mr Markantonis said: “There’s no
doubt that Florida has hurt us. Even

though we haven’t seen a huge decline
(in gamblers) that’s just because we are
great marketers and attracting new play-
ers. We’d have been doing way better
(had things remained the same),” he
said. On a recent trip to Florida he was
disheartened to recognise some of
Atlantis’ big players enjoying betting
sessions at the Hard Rock Cafe —a mere
“five minutes from the airport.”

“Tf you go in there now it’s like you
could be in Las Vegas: They have huge
spectacular machines, they have huge
spectacular beautiful casino tables, and
this is what is sad — it was packed.

“We'd see people who were our cus-
tomers and we’d say ‘Jack, why aren’t
you (at Atlantis)?’ He’s like: ‘Well yeah,
instead of flying ... et cetera, et cetera.’
So instead of coming maybe 12 times a
year, once a month, now they’re coming
four, and I can see their point,” he said.

While the property is trying hard to
boost casino revenue in the face of the
Florida threats and an economic down-
turn, the executive noted that the indus-
try remains restricted by longstanding

controls. “I wouldn’t go so far as to say
we are way behind the rest of the world
— we are not — but we do have some
bureaucratic rules and regulations that
make it difficult for us sometimes to do
business in an expeditious way,” he said.

Giving the example of how quickly it is
possible for a player to redeem credit in
Las Vegas, Mr Markantonis claimed they
go through a “ten second process” while
those in the Bahamas are subject to a
more time-consuming process required
by the Gaming Board.

The regulation requiring staff working
in the vicinity of the casino to get a
licence from the Gaming Board also hin-
ders business, he suggested, with one
restaurant located near the casino recent-
ly having to shut down for several days
while the company awaited licenses for
replacement staff to take over from oth-
ers who had quit.

Nonetheless, Mr Markantonis said he
recognises that the hotel industry is just
“one constituency among many” whose
interests the government must weigh
when it determines policy.

‘No more job cuts — if Atlantis

occupancy levels hold up’

mw By ALISON LOWE
Tribune Staff Reporter
alowe@tribunemedia.net

As long as the occupancy levels
seen in the first three months of
2009 continue to hold up, there
will be no need for further job
cuts at Atlantis, Kerzner’s presi-
dent and managing director told
The Tribune.

George Markantonis said he
sees “the glass as half full, not
half empty”, with visitor arrivals
two percentage points higher in
January, February and March
than expected, while bookings for
June and July also look “encour-
aging.”

However, he said that the com-
pany “can’t see beyond” July
right now, and if occupancy levels
“suddenly go off the cliff versus
our projections for another rea-
son, then that may be a different
case.”

Atlantis let go 800 workers in
last year November, citing poor
arrivals and occupancy projec-
tions. At that time, Mr Markan-
tonis indicated that the company
would be in a better position to
undertake a review of employ-
ment levels again around Easter
2009. In the meantime, the com-
pany recently asked 2,500 staff to
take unpaid vacation as part of a
“cost cutting strategy”, indicat-
ing that the move was part of a
plan to ensure the company
meets its “bank covenants and
financial obligations.”

Queried about this statement,
Mr Markantonis defended the
company’s stance, saying it is tak-
ing proactive steps to “stay ahead
of the eightball” financially.

“We are not a knee jerk com-
pany, we are not a reactive com-
pany. This is a highly profession-
al institution. We are not going
to wait until we hit the bank
covenant because of some hurri-
cane coming and whapping us the
month of September, wiping out
business and putting covenants
in trouble and then try to fix it,”

——

. Ve ris|*

G

LANDMARK: The Atlantis re

he said. Bank covenants refer to
certain conditions placed on a
loan by a lender, requiring for
example that the recipient — in
this case Atlantis — meet specific
financial targets or else repay the
loan immediately.

Stating that the company went
“heavily into debt” to build phase
three of the resort and has put
“$3 billion into the Bahamas” to
date, Mr Markantonis said:
“When everything crashes and
particularly when your lenders
have been hurt by their own prac-
tices, they get very jumpy and
they are looking at everybody.

“But when we talk about
whether we are going to make
covenants — we are not going to
go bankrupt. We are making
money. If we weren’t, why the
hell are we here? We’re not run-
ning a charity.”

He noted that asking staff to
take unpaid holiday was just one
aspect of a broad-ranging plan to
reduce the company’s costs and
ensure it remains in a sound
financial position.

Another component, an energy
conservation programme imple-
mented last September, saw staff

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help reduce the resort’s electrici-
ty usage in February 2009 by a
million kilowatt hours versus the
same month in 2008.

Mr Markantonis said the resort
was delighted to see the number
of nights rooms were occupied
this February compared with Feb-
ruary 2008 grow by 4,000 — but
even happier to discover that
rewarding staff for finding ways to
keep the resort’s electricity bill
down led to massive reductions
in energy usage despite the needs
of a greater number of visitors.

Overall, the frugal practices of
the resort’s thousands of employ-
ees saved the company around
$250,000 in February, said Mr
Markantonis. Meanwhile,
although the final numbers are
not yet in, March looks set to
have been an energy saving suc-
cess too. “It was a great month,
kilowatt hours hugely down
again, rooms solid,” he said.



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PAGE 4, WEDNESDAY, APRIL 22, 2009 THE TRIBUNE



Our politicians
fiddle while the
country burns



The Tribune Limited

NULLIUS ADDICTUS JURARE IN VERBA MAGISTRI
Being Bound to Swear to The Dogmas of No Master



LEON E. H. DUPUCH, Publisher/Editor 1903-1914

SIR ETIENNE DUPUCH, Kt, O.B.E., K.M., K.CS.G.,
(Hon.) LL.D., D.Litt.

Publisher/Editor 1919-1972
Contributing Editor 1972-199]

EILEEN DUPUCH CARRON, C.M.G., M.S. B.A., LL.B.



Published Daily Monday to Saturday











Shirley Street, PO. Box N-3207, Nassau, Bahamas
Insurance Management Building., P.O. F-485, Freeport, Grand Bahama

TELEPHONES

Switchboard (News, Circulation and Advertising) 322-1986

Advertising Manager - (242) 502-2352














WEBSITE

www.tribune242.com — updated daily at 2pm

Obama gores foreign policy ox

WASHINGTON — President Barack Oba-
ma has gone abroad and gored an ox — the
deeply held belief that the United States does

Publisher/Editor 1972-

and wealthy nation that realizes it is just one
country among many. Obama said he believes
that other countries have "good ideas" and

EDITOR, The Tribune.

For at least the last three gov-
ernments we seem to have been
on a downward spiral in this
country and the various gov-
ernments and opposition par-
ties seem to be moving on a
stage “directionless”, all fiddling
while the country burns.

All around we see evidence
of chaos and reactions to events
instead of actions from formu-
lated national development
plans. Neither political party in
which we have entrusted the
future of ourselves and our
country seems to have a nation-
al plan for the forward move-
ment of this country, and no
amount of complaining about
what the other boys did or did
not do is easing our almost per-

ilous situation.

LETTERS

letters@tribunemedia net



employment of foreigners with-
out a proper registry of what
skilled and unskilled labour is
needed to promote the well
being of the country and its cit-
izens, criminals have taken over
the streets and the police and
the courts seem powerless to
stop the surge in crime, and we
do not seem able to properly
run a passport office. The edu-
cational outlook is dismal and
we wonder where the person-
nel will come from to man any
industries we may wish to pur-
sue. Instead of our movement
to the First World which was

the country so that a determi-
nation can be made as to how
the plan can be implemented,
and also voters can make edu-
cated decisions based on
responses from persons wish-
ing to engage in public service?

For instance, how do we see
the future of tourism, do we
continue to build mega hotels
like Atlantis when the Ameri-
can tourists who like this kind of
resort may not have the funds
to populate them, or do we
move to the modest hotels
which are preferred by Euro-
peans? Do we confine Family
Island tourism to the models of
Abaco and Harbour Island
which have worked over the
years or do we move the failed
Exuma experiment? Let the
people know you have a plan
and give us the elements of that




not make mistakes in dealings with either
friends or foes.
And in the process, he's taking a huge gam-

interests that cannot be ignored.
Second, while the United States best repre-
sents itself by living up to its universal values

Driving around our capital Promised some decades ago, we pan,
we see strong evidence of Seem to have moved to the sta-









































ble both at home and abroad, for a payoff that
could be a long time coming, if ever.

By way of explanation, senior adviser David
Axelrod describes the president's tactics this
way: “You plant, you cultivate, you harvest.
Over time, the seeds that were planted here
are going to be very, very valuable."

While historic analogies are never perfect,
Obama's stark efforts to change the U.S. image
abroad are reminiscent of the stunning realign-
ments sought by former Soviet leader Michael
Gorbachev. During his short — by Soviet stan-
dards — tenure, he scrambled incessantly to
shed the ideological entanglements that were
leading the communist empire toward ruin.

But Obama is outpacing even Gorbachev.
After just three months in power, the new
American leader has, among many other things:

¢ Admitted to Europeans that America
deserves at least part of the blame for the
world's financial crisis because it did not regu-
late high-flying and greedy Wall Street gam-

¢ Told the Russians he wants to reset rela-
tions that fell to Cold War-style levels under his
predecessor, George W. Bush.

¢ Asked NATO for more help in the fight in
Afghanistan, and, not getting much, did not
castigate alliance partners.

¢ Lifted some restrictions on Cuban Ameri- with."
cans' travel to their communist homeland and
eased rules on sending wages back to families

¢ Shook hands with, more than once, and
accepted a book from Hugo Chavez, the viru-
lently anti-American leader of oil-rich
Venezuela.

¢ Said America's appetite for illegal drugs
and its lax control of the flow of guns and cash
to Mexico were partly to blame for the drug-
lord-inspired violence that is rattling the south-
ern U.S. neighbour.

¢ Said that "if our only interaction with many
of these countries is drug interdiction, if our
only interaction is military, then we may not
be developing the connections that can, over
time, increase our influence" — neglecting to

and ideas, Obama said it must also respect the
variety of cultures and perspectives that guide
both American foes and friends.

"I firmly believe that if we're willing to break
free from the arguments and ideologies of an
earlier era and continue to act, as we have at this
summit, with a sense of mutual responsibility
and mutual respect and mutual interest, then
each of our nations can come out of this chal-
lenging period stronger and more prosperous,
and we can advance opportunity, equality, and
security across the Americas," the president
said. Critics, especially those deeply attached to
the foreign policy course of the past 50-plus
years, see a president whose lofty ideals expose
the country to a dangerous probing of USS.
weakness, of an unseemly readiness to admit
past mistakes, of a willingness to talk with
unpleasant opponents.

"T think it was irresponsible for the president
to be seen kind of laughing and joking with
Hugo Chavez,” said Sen. John Ensign, a Neva-
blers. da Republican. "This is a person along the lines
with Fidel Castro and the types of dictatorship
that he has down there in Venezuela and the
anti-Americanism that he has been spreading
around the world is not somebody the presi-
dent of the United States should be seen as
having, you know, kind of friendly relations

At his news conference Obama said he did-
n't think he did much damage to U.S. security or
there. interests by shaking the hand of Chavez, whose
country has a defence budget about one-six
hundredth the size of the United States, and
depends upon it's oil reserves for solvency.

But beyond specific attacks on his new for-
eign policy are the deeper philosophical chal-
lenges emerging from the still powerful, if dimin-
ished, conservative political structure in the
United States. Such opponents can play havoc
with Obama's attempts to change domestic pol-
icy and will work to weaken his 60-plus per
cent approval among Americans.

Obama brushes that aside:

"One of the benefits of my campaign and
how I've been trying to operate as president is

neglect and lack of mainte-

EDITOR, The Tribune.

something else.

nance. There are more traffic
lights out of order than working,
there are massive pot holes in so
many roads, the public build-
ings are national disgraces, deci-
sions are being made about the

Stop trying to

Did you know Mr Collins
personally? Then how is it that
you know what his intentions
were when he built his infamous
wall? I strongly disagree with
you when you say that he built
the wall to secure his property
from bushes (unless bushes is a
new term for black people).

It amazes me how you white
people are constantly trying to
defend your blatant racism as

Whatever his intentions, the

fact is a white man put up a wall
which was viewed by black peo-
ple as a means of segregation.
Who cares if he handed out a
few jobs to a few select coloured
people who had an obligation
to feel privilege because they
were employed in his fields?
Find something of interest to
write about please and stop try-
ing to make heroes out of

published or not.

AARON ROBERTS
Nassau,
April, 2009.

racists. Thank you, whether

(For years our family lived

tus of banana republic which so
many of our critics have accused
us of being.

Is it too much to ask of our
politicians that they enlighten
us as to what national plan they
have for the advancement of

JEANNE I

THOMPSON

(Tired of banana republic
government under the pretext
of first world status)

Nassau,

April 21, 2009.

make heroes out of racists

to get Bahamians employed. As
a matter of fact, this was very
much the main effort of lead-
ers of this country at that time,
and this happened to be Mr
Collins’ contribution — whether
this letter writer wishes to
accept it or not.

(Somewhere in our numer-
ous files we have an aerial pho-
to of the Collins homestead
with its surrounding environs,
which shows no residential
areas around it. The wall was
not built to segregate one resi-
dential area from another,
because at that time there were
no built up areas to segregate.

(We also remember — after
Mr Collins’ death, and Mrs
Collins’ eventual move to a
smaller residence on East Bay
Street — that the property was
broken up into lots and sold.
Part of the property became
Collins Avenue, and Palmdale
and Centreville grew up around
it. The land on which Doctor’s
Hospital now stands was a part
of the Collins gardens, and
Collins Avenue was all a part
of the estate. What remains of
the present property was
bought by the St Andrew’s

western side were climbing a
ladder as a short cut to get from
one side to the other. There
were several accidents, but the
one that brought the infamy of
the wall to a head was when a
pregnant woman lost her baby
trying to scale it.

(It is true that persons living
on the western side of the wall
were predominantly poor and
black. Those on the eastern side
were middle class Bahamians,
predominantly white, but black
families also had their homes
there. Those against Sir Etien-
ne’s drive to open the wall, pre-
sented a petition to the House
to keep the wall intact. It was
signed by both white and black
residents on the eastern side of
the wall. Black residents were
convinced that if their poor
black brothers to the west were
allowed in, it would reduce the
value of their property.

(The opening of the Collins
Wall became the main issue in
Sir Etienne’s election campaign.
It was because Sir Etienne
wanted the wall down, but his
constituents, both black and
white on the eastern side of the
wall, wanted it to remain up as a
barrier to the residents on the

on Shirley Street immediately Association for St Andrew’s

mention USS. health care, education and human- I don't worry about the politics — I try to figure



itarian relief efforts in Latin America.

At a news conference ending the three-day
Summit of the Americas on Sunday, Obama
was asked to explain what a reporter called this
emerging “Obama Doctrine."

He said that first, he remains intent on telling
the world that the United States is a powerful











Constant Working
Pressure Hoses

out what's right in terms of American inter-
ests, and on this one I think I'm right."

So thought Gorbachev. But being right is
not always politically healthy.

(This article was written by Steven R Hurst of
the Associated Press).

opposite the Collins’ home-
stead, where The Tribune now
stands. Yes, as a child we knew
Mr Collins. However, Sir Eti-
enne Dupuch was his parlia-
mentary colleague and served
on many committees with him.
Sir Etienne had intimate knowl-
edge of Mr Collins’ programme

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School. The property extended
almost to Wulff Road on the
south. It was opened on the
east, and south for development
and even a part of the ornate
black iron railings came down
on the Shirley Street side to
make way for Collins Avenue.
However, the new developers
did not demolish the wall on
the western side, which even-
tually created racial tensions —
long after Mr Collins’ death and
the bush was transformed into
the residential and business
community that we know today.

(The western wall became
an issue in the election of 1956
when Sir Etienne Dupuch cam-
paigned to have it opened so
that there could be a free flow
of people from both sides. Up
until that time, people on the

western side, that he lost his
House of Assembly seat as the
MP for the Eastern district.

(Much of this probably took
place before Mr Aaron Roberts
was even born. We were not
only born during those years,
but as a reporter we recorded
much of this history. We are not
here to convince people like Mr
Roberts who is probably more
comfortable with the political,
racist propaganda on which he
was raised. It is immaterial to
us what he believes. This coun-
try will move ahead with or
without people like him. When-
ever we locate the aerial pho-
tograph of the Collins property,
which over the years has prob-
ably been incorrectly filed, we
shall publish it if only to enlight-
en Aaron Roberts. — Ed).

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THE TRIBUNE

WEDNESDAY, APRIL 22, 2009, PAGE 5



LOCAL NEWS

Local
computer
company
goes green

CUSTOM Computers has
decided to help save planet
Earth — one ink cartridge at a
time.

The company has
announced that it is participat-
ing in the Planet Partners
Return and Recycling Pro-
gramme run by Hewlett-
Packard (HP), the world’s
leading supplier of computer
and software products.

The innovative programme
enables simple, convenient
recycling of original HP inkjet
cartridges, toners and other
products.

Custom Computers is
encouraging its customers to
support the effort, in order to
help rid the planet of the
harmful substances found in
cartridges and toners.

Custom Computers and
Hewlett-Packard will ensure
that the used products are
recycled properly and
processed to recover valuable
plastics and metals for new
products, which will help to
divert millions of tons of waste
from landfills around the
world.

Recyclable

According to the company,
98 per cent of the materials in
ink cartridges are recyclable.

Customers can visit any of
the company’s locations — in
the Island Traders Building on
East Bay Street near the foot
of the old Paradise Island
Bridge, the new location on
Cable Beach, or the Service
Centre on Okra Hill — to turn
in used ink cartridges.

In return, customers will
receive a specially designed
eco-friendly Custom Comput-
ers tote bag with the purchase
of a new ink cartridge or toner
throughout the month of
April.

The tote bags can be used as
areplacement for plastic bags,
which are harmful to the envi-
ronment and take hundreds of
years to decompose.

“Our goal was to make it
easy and convenient for peo-
ple to recycle their ink car-
tridges and toners in a safe
and responsible manner,” said
Pia Farmer, co-owner and
director of Custom Comput-
ers.

“Our customers can rest
assured that none of the ink
cartridges and toners, which
they turn in will be disposed of
at the city’s land fill site on
Harrold Road.

“We are firmly committed
to returning these items to
Hewlett-Packard, which has
an extensive recycling pro-
gramme, and is a proven envi-
ronmentally conscious global
business leader.”

Custom Computers hopes
to extend the recycling pro-
gramme to include other local
partners, and Mrs Farmer
hopes to some day be able to
transport shiploads of boxes
filled with used toners and
cartridges to Hewlett-Packard.

She also hopes that one day,
recycling boxes will be placed
in public places, making it sim-
pler and more convenient for
consumers to recycle.

The Tribune wants to hear
from people who are
making news in their
neighbourhoods. Perhaps
you are raising funds for a
good cause, campaigning
for improvements in the
area or have won an
award.

If so, call us on 322-1986
and share your story.

UB
US)
FOR PEST PROBLEMS
PHONE: 322-2157





A BUSINESSMAN on a mission to
reclaim properties allegedly “stolen” from
his family a century ago is now targeting
two derelict homes in downtown Nassau.

Warren Aranha, 50, says both of the
houses, on Cumberland Street, are part of
the old J S Johnson estate, of which he
claims to be the sole inheritor.

Yesterday, business sources dismissed
Mr Aranha’s claim as “idiotic” and said
the properties changed hands a year ago,
with attorney Nigel Bowe buying them for
around half a million dollars.

But Mr Aranha, president of White
Rose Estates Ltd, a property firm, insists
the houses are his and says he is prepared
to go to court to prove it.

The move is the latest in Mr Aranha’s
campaign to reclaim properties he alleges
were stolen from the J S Johnson family in
the late 19th and early 20th centuries.

He believes a conspiracy involving sev-
eral leading white Bahamian families led to
a massive land grab which dispossessed
descendants of Joseph Samuel Johnson, a
leading 19th century businessman who also
served in the House of Assembly.

Last week, Mr Aranha moved into the
derelict former home of American mur-
deress Sante Kimes on Cable Beach, claim-
ing the two-acre site is part of a 465-acre
parcel filched from the Johnsons in the
early years of the 20th century.

And he is preparing to confront devel-
opment firm Bahamar by leasing an adjoin-
ing three-acre site to a company of archi-
tects and developers, claiming it is also
part of the Johnson property.

Now he is alleging that the Cable Beach
site has a direct documentary link with the
houses in Cumberland Street, and that he
is the true owner of all three properties.

“T am sure my argument will stand up in
court because I have all the papers,” Mr
Aranha told The Tribune.

“All of my research work, all of my

=

DERELICT: Properties in Cumberland Street.

claims, are backed up with solid docu-
mentation.”

He said members of the Johnson family
had been making claims on their estate for
many years now.

But some had allowed themselves to be
intimidated and lost interest.

“People have called them crazy in the
past because of the claims they were mak-
ing. But that is just a tactic to influence
the public,” he said.

He maintained that lots 78 and 79 in
downtown Nassau — supposedly the sites
of the two Cumberland Street houses —
were, in fact, in George Street on the orig-
inal town map.

“Somewhere along the line one map has
been superimposed on another,” he said.
“Mr Bowe thinks he has bought lots 78
and 79, but they’re somewhere else.”



A source close to recent transactions
involving the Cumberland Street properties
has dismissed Mr Aranha’s claims out of
hand, saying solid title can be traced back
into the mid-19th century, with deeds to
support it.

Wrangle

Both homes have fallen into a ruined
state because they were subject to a
Supreme Court wrangle lasting more than
ten years, he added.

The late Mrs Kathleen Cartwright pro-
bated the will after the death of Ms
Clementina Anderson, who had a life ten-
ancy of the property and lived there for
more than 60 years, he said.

However, heirs emerged to question the
validity of the will and won in court. A

subsequent appeal against the judgment
failed.

Hence, said the source, Mr Bowe bought
the houses with secure title in 2007 from
beneficiaries of the estate for half a million
dollars. “Mr Aranha’s claim has no sub-
stance whatsoever,” he added. “He showed
up one day and built a wall on this property
and he was told to clear off.

“However, for anyone not Bahamian
this is a really bad reflection on the legal
system here.”

Yesterday, Mr Aranha’s title battle was
further complicated by the emergence of
historian and businessman Anthony Cun-
ningham, who is also laying claim to some
of the land said to have belonged to the JS
Johnson estate.

Mr Cunningham said Johnson property
was an off-shoot of the Cunningham estate,
which he said dated back to 1783 when a
British general, Robert Cunningham,
arrived in the Bahamas after the American
revolutionary war.

General Cunningham, he said, was
granted the land for services rendered dur-
ing the conflict.

“T am going to enter this fight,” said Mr
Cunningham, “I have engaged a lawyer
and we are looking into the boundaries. I
am prepared to go to court and fight this.

“Lake Cunningham is named after my
family and we are salvaging what we can of
our estate within the constraints of modern
law. There are laws you have to under-
stand, but Mr Aranha doesn’t appear to
understand the law. We have documenta-
tion from crown grants right up from this
date. But we are doing things the legal
way.”

Mr Aranha said his claim dates back to
a mortgage granted to Joseph Samuel
Johnson by Queen Victoria in the late 19th
century. His own link to the estate was
through his grandmother, Sarah Johnson,
he said.

Master plan to be completed for redevelopment of Queen Elizabeth Sports Centre

THE contract for the produc-
tion of a “master plan” and
Environmental Impact Assess-
ment study for the redevelop-
ment of the Queen Elizabeth
Sports Centre has been award-
ed to the Integrated Building
Services Group.

Minister of Public Works and
Transport Neko Grant said it
will take three years to fulfil the
$2,993,857 contract.

Mr Grant said IBS, which is a

to use land in a way that allows
for the future expansion of each
sporting facility, as well as the
construction of new sporting
facilities in years to come.

A second objective, he said, is
to make the most of potential
non-sporting revenue sources,
for example through the con-
struction of concession facili-
ties.

Mr Grant said the govern-
ment also plans to explore

options for further sporting
development.

“These objectives,” said Mr
Grant, “are expected to guide
the work of the consultants in
the completion of an EIA,
which will be completed in the
first instance followed by the
development of the master
plan.”

Desmond Bannister, Minis-
ter for Youth, Sports and Cul-
ture, said: “We look forward to

the development of the Sports
Centre, to the completion of the
master plan for the utilisation
in particular of the Bahamian
sporting public.

“The new stadium and the
related structures which are
planned for the Sports Centre
will ensure that we have the
best possible use of the land in
that area and that we will enjoy
the best sporting facilities in our
region of the world.”

Bahamian company, joined
forces with IBI, an American
company, to present an accept-
able proposal and succeeded in
their bid to execute the project.

“Bearing in mind the pro-
posed relocation of baseball and
softball facilities as a result of
the construction of the new
national stadium, it is the gov-
ernment’s intention to have an
EIA and master plan expedited
to assist in the determination of
a permanent location for these
sporting facilities,” he said.

He explained that the new
national stadium, the funding
for which is being donated by
the Chinese government, will
be the principal facility in the
Queen Elizabeth Sports Cen-
tre, but that other sporting facil-
ities need to be developed in
accordance with the design
brief.

Neko Grant



dium, softball stadium, basket-
ball arena, drag racing strip, rac-
quetball and squash complex,
lawn tennis training complex,
throwers’ practice field annex,
national cross country running
and walking trail, gymnastics
training hall and complex, vol-
leyball training hall and com-
plex, beach volleyball and beach
soccer complex, Bahamas Golf
Federation training facility,
Commonwealth American
Football League training facili-
ty, and a national driving centre.

Mr Grant said one of the
objectives of this master plan is

These include a baseball sta-

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oley aoe

Or, Theodore Runyon, PhD,

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In addmicn fo numerous artkle: and
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This free event is sponsored by



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PAGE 6, WEDNESDAY, APRIL 22, 2009

THE TRIBUNE





Investing in Bahamian culture

You MIGHT not know
it, but there is a fire
burning among artists and intel-
lectuals who believe we are in
grave danger of losing our cultural
heritage — all the things that make
us Bahamian.

They say that the products of
Bahamian culture — our music,
theatre, literature, art, buildings
and folkways — are under-rated,
under-supported and under threat.

More to the point, they argue
that the disintegration of our cul-
tural attractions over the years has
led to a tourism product so barren
and boring that one trip up a dete-
riorating Bay Street completes a
visit.

According to architect Pat Rah-
ming, the services that deliver a
unique experience are what makes
a destination successful. And in
our case, those services — defined
as tours, attractions and entertain-
ment — have been allowed "to
crumble, rot, or go out of busi-
ness."

In other words, there is no
Bahamian brand, a term which
refers to how we package and mar-
ket the Bahamian way of life —
the things that distinguish us from
other countries, and that are
expressed through the cultural
products mentioned above.

Sun, sand and sea do not distin-
guish the Bahamas from similar
destinations, the argument goes.
So rather than spending millions
every year on foreign advertising,
we should be investing more in
business and brand development
locally.

"We must commit resources to
create an environment rich with

opportunities to share the unique-
ness of the Bahamas through the
development of attractions," Rah-
ming says. "Cultural activity must
be acknowledged as the primary
product in the business that drives
(or should drive) our economy."

Or, to put it in the appropriate
intellectual context, as stated by
the African writer Léopold Sédar
Senghor, "culture is at the begin-
ning and the end of development."

This context can be monetarized
too. In most developed economies
cultural industries account for 2-5
per cent of GDP and have gener-
ated consistent and stable growth.
In some major destinations, cul-
tural tourism is estimated to be as
high as 40 per cent of annual visitor
arrivals.

A recent study commissioned
by Canada's Heritage Department,
for example, reckoned that arts
and culture contributed $46 billion
directly to the Canadian economy
in 2007, but the overall impact of
the sector was a much broader
$84.6 billion. That study attributed
more than a million jobs to arts
and culture or to spinoff industries,
such as tourism.

Currently, our Ministry of
Tourism spends most of its $91
million budget overseas. The Min-
istry of Culture has a $2 million
allocation — less than Bahamas
Information Services — and most

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of that goes to fund the annual
Junkanoo parades. The remainder
is used to finance festivals through-
out The Bahamas, maintain a
“national theatre”, and run the
National Arts Festival.

To demonstrate their anger over
this state of affairs, cultural activists
staged a 'Day of Absence’ this past
February. It was based on a play by
Douglas Turner Ward, which told
the story of a small town in the
American South in which the
white inhabitants discover on a
particular day that all the black
people have disappeared.

What would happen, our
activists asked, if Bahamians woke
up one day and found that all the
artists and cultural workers had
suddenly vanished? Wouldn't our
world be a poorer and sadder
place?

According to former cultural
affairs director Nicolette Bethel
(now a lecturer at the College of
The Bahamas), the Day of
Absence attempted to make the
point that Bahamian artists, musi-
cians, writers, actors, directors,
dancers, designers, craftworkers,
you name it — are marginalized,
disrespected, and taken for grant-
ed.

"They are unable to find work in
the areas in which God has gifted
them. There are virtually no
avenues in The Bahamas to enable
creative people to develop and
hone their talents, or to enable
them to make use of them when
they are developed. Our greatest
brain drain is arguably in the area
of the arts, and culture has
absolutely no respect in the nation-
al discourse."

Fred Ferguson is a legendary
musician and producer, who was
for years a member of BahaMen
— the iconic Bahamian band that
made a big splash with their hit
"Who Let the Dogs Out". In 2003
Ferguson started his own band —
Tingum Dem — and plays weekly
at the Tamarind Club on Harrold
Road, a venue that he opened with
partner Ronald Simms.

"The Bahamas is a tough mar-
ket for all entertainers," Ferguson
told me.

"Bahamians have very short
memories and there is a deep-root-

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ed lack of national pride, which
our leaders are not making any
effort to correct. They are only
interested in Bahamian music at
election time."

According to Ferguson, "there's
no programme to develop music
in the Bahamas. Teachers train
kids in the schools and they come
back to be music teachers who
train more kids to be music teach-
ers. There's no way for musicians
to practice their craft."

By most accounts, this is a com-
plex and multi-dimensional issue.
Even Ferguson admits that enter-
tainers often price themselves out
of work and are notoriously tem-
peramental from a business stand-
point.

Others say the problems faced
by cultural workers stem from feel-
ings of entitlement. Some veter-
ans have not produced creatively
for years, critics argue, yet they
expect to receive public support
as a matter of right.

"Government can create a sup-
portive environment but should
not be financing private ventures,"
one tourism executive told me.
"And what are the musicians doing
to promote themselves? Are they
willing to share the economic
risk?" Why don't the musicians
provide some leadership and vision
of their own? Visual artists have
done well over the years and are
well supported by Bahamians, why
not musicians? What are they
doing collectively to come up with
a plan or strategy to help them-
selves?"

W ell, Ferguson's
Tamarind Club was

set up to do just that, playing
Bahamian and old school music in
a comfortable and controlled envi-
ronment, but although he has been
able to build something of an audi-
ence, money is a constant
headache.

"The truth is, I'm struggling to
keep my entertainment business
afloat. I'm facing some of the same
challenges that Freddie Munnings
Sr. faced at the old Cat & Fiddle.
My partner and I have been trying
desperately to acquire financing
to improve our business and to just
basically stay in operation, but
finance institutions have basically
closed the door in offering any
form of assistance."

That's true, according to one
banker we surveyed: "The enter-
tainment industry is financed large-
ly by equity capital, venture capital,
personal resources or love money



“What would
happen, our
activists asked,
if Bahamians
woke up one day
and found that
all the artists and
cultural workers
had suddenly
vanished?”

(friends and family). The risks
associated with this industry cannot
be priced in the traditional prime
plus markets serviced by commer-
cial banks."

For another perspective on this
issue we spoke to Devlynn Stubbs
(who goes by the name of Jah
Doctrine).

He is a young Bahamian song-
writer with a degree in philosophy
who is tackling the industry from a
different angle. He's been produc-
ing music professionally for the
past five years, focusing on reggae,
hip hop and dance hall (see
myspace.com/jahdoctrine).

"T grew up in the church, which
stimulated my interest in music,
and I found I had an ability to
write. But it takes years of planning
and training to make a living off
this so you really gotta do it for
the love. Music is my career but I
need to get a job to live. You got-
ta get up and get humping.”

Stubbs says the local band cir-
cuit is very limited and even form-
ing a band is a challenge, since
musicians want to be paid for prac-
tice time.

"But these days you have to go
at things differently,” he told me.
"You don't form a band, get a
venue, build an audience and then
cut acd. You can cut a cd yourself
with a computer and create a mar-
keting buzz on your own. But you
still need to do shows and per-
form."

Aside from the economics, the
larger issue is the loss of Bahamian
culture: "We do little or nothing
to maintain the things that make us
culturally different," Ferguson says.

"There is an underlying sense
of embarrassment at being
Bahamian. We have to take a
stand. We need leadership and
focus and a determination that our
entertainment is important to us.
We need to put some energy and
funding into these matters and do



things properly.”

As former culture director Nico
Bethel put it: "For a generation
and a half — the entire time since
Independence — our national poli-
cies have been shaped by a group
of men and a handful of women
whose actions and behaviour
cumulatively suggest that they
would rather erase Bahamian cul-
ture than invest in it. Our cultural
industries are in effective decline."

Bethel (a sociologist whose late
father, Clement Bethel, was the
country's first and most eminent
director of culture) argues that the
government provides sporting
facilities throughout the country,
has legislation to promote hotels
and govern education and health,
but nothing — either in law or on
the ground — to support, encour-
age or develop artistic activity.

"We can read the reports for
ourselves, and accept the idea that
culture is the economic sector in
which to invest for nations that are
still developing; or we can share
the delusions of our politicians,
which confuse the grandeur of the
monstrosities that foreign investors
build (and usually protect behind
gates and bridges and visitor pass-
es) with development of a nation
and of a people."

Bethel says she quit as director
because decision-makers won't
take culture seriously: "My father
died at 49 and I have no intention
of wasting what could be the last
years of my life trying to get results
out of a non-responsive, uncaring,
and uninterested public service, or
waiting for the latest bright politi-
cal spark to make good on promis-
es they never intended to honour
in the first place."

Others may point out that it is
not the responsibility of govern-
ment to make it easier for artists to
make a living, or to take care of
musicians, or subsidise straw ven-
dors. In the final analysis we all
have to be responsible for our own
livelihoods.

But the real issue here is one of
judgment. We already spend huge
amounts of taxpayer dollars on
packaging the Bahamas overseas,
while very little thought or money
is invested in the product we are
selling. And it is an undeniable fact
that the average Bahamian vaca-
tion is hollow, superficial, and not
worth the money that tourists pay
for it.

What do you think?

Send comments to
larry@tribunemedia.net

Or visit www.bahamapundit.com

BAHAMAS ELECTRICITY CORPORATION

VACANCY NOTICE

MANAGER, REVENUE ACCOUNTING
CUSTOMER SERVICES DIVISION

A vacancy exists in the Corporation for the position of Manager, Revenue Accounting.

The job manages the billing of all customer accounts in New Providence and the Family Islands and the

reconciliation of all revenue accounts other than miscellaneous receivables.

Responsibilities of the position include, but are not limited to, the following:

Manages the meter reading and billing processes both in New Providence and the Family Islands.

Assists with the disconnection process through the use of meter readers.

Prepares the sales budget.

Prepares the Revenue Accounting Department Budget.

Oversees the preparation of the Accounts Receivable Reconciliation.
Oversees the training of all Customer Services staff in the new billing software.
Prepares monthly Board reports.

Prepares monthly sales analysis and unbilled revenue reports.
Prepares quarterly reports for the Central Bank & Department of Statistics.
Provides statistical billing information for Family Island managers.
Oversees the disconnection of services for non-payment of electricity in the Family Islands.
Attends yearly community meetings as well as ad hoc meetings required during acquisition of new

locations.

Develops and implements rules, guidelines and procedures for the efficient operation of the department.

Job requirements include:

A minimum of a Bachelors degree in Accounts or equivalent

A minimum of 8+ years of experience in accounting practice and theory.

Certified Accountant (CPA) or equivalent qualifications
Knowledge of the Electricity Act of the Bahamas.

Ability to communicate effectively both orally and in writing.
Sound reasoning and good judgment skills.

Ability to interpret financial reports.

Good time management skills.

Project management skills.

Interested persons should apply by completing and returning an Application Form to: The Manager-
Human Resources & Training Department, Bahamas Electricity Corporation, Blue Hill &
Tucker, P. O. Box N-7509 Nassau Bahamas on or before: May 4, 2009.





THE TRIBUNE



LOCAL NEWS

WEDNESDAY, APRIL 22, 2009, PAGE 7



WMO hurricane
session underway

THE 31st session of the
World Meteorological Organ-
isation’s hurricane committee
opened on Monday with a
reminder of the impact global
warming can have on island
nations like the Bahamas.

The melting of the polar ice
caps resulting in a steady rise
in sea levels “should be of
major concern” to Bahamians,
said Arthur Rolle, director of
the Department of Meteorol-
ogy.

He noted that about 80 per
cent of the Bahamas is only
“slightly” above sea level.

“Climate warming and the
melting of polar ice means sea
levels will rise and once that
happens our islands will expe-
rience a lot of inundation,”
said Mr Rolle, also the per-
manent representative of the
Bahamas with the WMO.
“And over time some of our
islands will disappear.

“We have to adapt through
public awareness. For exam-
ple, as the sea level rises, there
will be a need to have homes
built away from the coastline.”




























| in

ROYAL BAHAMAS DEFENCE
Oe am UE litemstr ICUs t ln
is all smiles as he talks with
Prime Minister Hubert Ingra-
ham and National Security
Minister Tommy Turnquest.

Sy
WT
seaman who was
FTAA TEC

m By SHARON TURNER

PORT OF SPAIN, Trinidad —
Prime Minister Hubert Ingraham
and National Security Minister
Tommy Turnquest met with Roy-
al Bahamas Defence Force Sea-
man Bernard Barr, who was acci-
dentally shot during a training
exercise in Trinidad.

The shooting, according to a
Trinidad and Tobago government
release, occurred during a training
exercise on the Tucker Valley
Shooting Range on the morning
of April 4.

Seaman Barr is one of 32
marines deployed to serve on the
5th Summit of the Americas’ mil-
itary team, Mr Turnquest
explained.

“We felt it was important being
here at this Summit to meet Sea-
man Barr and make sure he is
well,” he said. “He seemed to be
in excellent spirits. He indicated
that he felt well and he was well
taken care of as the Ministry of
National Security in Trinidad had
indicated to me personally.

“We have been able to see that,
We met with Lt Commander
Clarence Dean who was a part of
the Advanced Team and also Lt
Ferguson who was a part of the
Special Operations leading the 32
member marine team that is
here.”

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If so, call us on 322-1986
and share your story.





THE MINISTER OF STATE for the Environment addresses delegates at the 31st

pe ie!

session of the World Meteorological Organisation’s Hurricane Committee. Pic-
tured at right are Bill Read, chairman of the R A IV Hurricane Committee; and
Miguel Angel Rabiolo, regional director for the WMO for the Americas.

The opening session at
Wyndham Nassau Resort also
heard from Bill Read, chair-
man of the R A IV Hurricane
Committee; Miguel Angel
Rabiolo, WMO regional direc-
tor for the Americas; and
Phenton Neymour, MP and
Minister of State in the Min-

istry of the Environment.

This meeting follows the
successful Bahamas Weather
Conference, World Meteoro-
logical Day and World Water
Day.

These occasions provided
“great opportunities” for the
Department of Meteorology

La

ay
a

RAIV Hurricane Committee

3st Session

PUCK Toth A |



PICTURED, FROM LEFT, ARE: Koji Kuroiwa, WMO chief of the Tropical Cyclone Programme Division; Miguel

Angel Rabioli, WMO regional director for the Americas; Arthur Rolle, director of the Department of Meteorology
and permanent representative of the Bahamas with the WMO; Phenton Neymour, Minister of State for the Environ-
ment; Bill Read, chairman of the R A IV Hurricane Committee; Dr Jose Rubiera, hurricane committee vice chairman
for Spanish speaking countries and director of the National Forecast Centre in Cuba.

to further impress upon the
nation the gravity of tropical
cyclones, said Mr Neymour.
The hurricane season begins
June 1.

“The Bahamas has learned
its lessons well in that the risks
associated with tropical
cyclones and other related
hazards along coastal areas
could be greatly reduced
through early warning systems
and emergency preparedness,”
said Mr Neymour.

The national meteorologi-
cal service is fulfilling its role
by using a sound network of
meteorological surveillance
tools which provides automat-
ic weather observation on 14
major islands, and includes an
upper air station, lightening
data networks, a wave data
buoy, a Doppler weather
radar, and_ strategically
placed sea-level monitoring
stations.

“The government has pro-
vided the Department of
Meteorology with resources
enabling it to realise its
full potential to provide ser-
vices in real time on issues
relating to the safety and secu-
rity of society, economic wel-
fare, and the protection of the
environment,” said Mr Ney-
mour.



A.G. Electric Co. Ltd.

WE'RE SERIOUS ABOUT LIGHTING.

a

l

32 JEROME AVENUE
MON -FRI 7:00AM - 4:30PM, SAT 7:30AM - 3:00 PM

KY

PHONE: 393.8192

COMMONWEALTH OF THE BAHAMAS 2009

IN THE SUPREME COURT COM/com/00019

COMMERCIAL DIVISION

IN THE MATTER OF CLICO (BAHAMAS) LIMITED
Cn Liquidation)

AND

IN THE MATTER OF THE COMPANIES ACT, 1992
ORDER

Before Her Ladyship The Honourable Mrs. Justice Cheryl
Albury

Dated the 7th day of April, A. D., 2009

UPON THE PETITION of the Registrar appointed
pursuant to section 4 of the Insurance Act, Chapter 347 Revised
Statute Laws of The Bahamas 2000 filed herein on the 24" day
of February, A. D., 2009.

AND UPON READING the Affidavit of Lennox
McCartney filed herein on the 27" day of February, A.D., 2009
on behalf of the Petitioner.

AND UPON HEARING Mr. David Higgins and
Mts. Jacqueline Forbes-Foster of Counsel for the Petitioner.
AND UPON HEARING Mr. Sidney Cambridge, Mr.
Michael J. Saunders and Mr. Darron Pickstock of Counsel for
the Provisional Liquidator.

AND UPON HEARING Mr. Sidney Collie of
Counsel for Bahamasair Employees Provident Fund, David
Charlton, Laura Pratt-Charlton, Cheryl Sands, Sophia Lockhart,
Charine Major, De’andera Hanna, Leonie Minnis-Beneby,
Delora Forbes, Natasha Smith, Juleann Kemp, Charles Hunt,
Keith Beneby, Thomas Randall Hall, Ardis Seymour, Ardis
Evannette Forde, Lawrence (aka) Lawry P. Greene, Phillip
Johnson, and Deborah Palmer in support of the Petition.

AND UPON HEARING Mrs. G. Diane Stewart of
Counsel for First Caribbean International Bank (Bahamas)
Limited and Sheila Carey in support of the Petition.

AND UPON HEARING Mr. Godfrey Pinder and Mr.
Sidney Collie of Counsel (Mr. Collie holding brief for Mr.

Alfred Sears) for a group of ninety seven (97) Creditors in
support of the Petition.

AND UPON HEARING Mrs. Glenys Hanna-Martin
of Counsel for Bahama Islands Resorts & Casinos Cooperative
Credit Union (BIRCCCU) Limited, Oliver Hutchinson, Debra
Moss, Debra Gardiner, Chandalear Forbes, Marvin Smith,
Loletha Knowles, Catherine Knowles, Patrice Colebrooke,
Mavalo Duncanson and all other employees of Bahamas Island
Resort & Casino Cooperative Credit Union Limited in support
of the Petition.

AND UPON HEARING Mrs. Jennifer Mangra
of Counsel for Maurice Alexander Brooks in support of the
Petition.

AND UPON HEARING Mr. Luther McDonald
of Counsel along with Mr. Richard J.W. Horton for CLICO
(Bahamas) Limited.

AND UPON HEARING Mr. Damian Gomez of Counsel
along with Mr. Michael Hamilton for Frederick Emerson
Arnett, Terri Anita Bellot, Stephen Andrew Bellot, Bridgette
Nicolette Butler, John Wellington Dorsett, Marcheta Eneas,
Judson Frasier Eneas, Adrian Jerome Fox, Billy’s Furniture
and Appliance Trading as Donald’s Furniture Company, Zoe
Camille Allyson Gibson, Robert Leon Gibson, James Ikem
Iferenta, Andrea Johnson, Keshlia Shavonne Lockhart, Clement
Travelyan Maynard IIT, Heather Ann Maynard, David Michael
Maynard, Tonia Maynard, Pauline Agnes Outten, Aretha
Amanda Paul, Pratap Kumar Rout, Lofton Barry Russell,
Michael Carrington Symonette, Hilda Louise Symonette and
Shelley Yvette Woodside in opposition to the Petition.

IT IS HEREBY ORDERED:
That CLICO (Bahamas) Limited “the Company” be wound
up by this Honourable Court under the provisions of the
Companies Act, 1992;
Mr. Craig A. (Tony) Gomez be appointed Official Liquidator
of the Company;
Callenders & Co. be appointed Attorneys to the Liquidators;
Mr. David John Thurlow, specialist insurance manager, be
appointed to assist the Liquidator.

BY ORDER OF THE COURT
REGISTRAR





PAGE 8, WEDNESDAY, APRIL 22, 2009

THE TRIBUNE



KEMP'S FUNERAL HOME LIMITED

22 Palmdale Avenue, Palmdale
Nassau, N.P., The Bahamas

Funeral Service for

Violet “Pooey” G. Johnson, 77

of Highland Park, Nas-
sau, The Bahamas and
formerly of Harbour
Island, The Bahamas,
who died at Doctor’s
Hospital on Friday,
17th ~— April, 2009,
after a long Illness, will
be held at Ebenezer

Methodist Church will
be held at Ebenezer
Methodist Church,

East Shirley Street, Nassau on Friday, 24th
April, 2009 at 3:30p.m.Reverend Bill Higgs, Presi-
dent of the Bahamas Conference of The Methodist
Church will officiate. Interment will be in St. Cathe-
rine’s Cemetery, Harbour Island on Saturday morn-
ing, 25th April, 2009.Violet Johnson is survived by
her daughter, Carla Sweeting; her granddaughter,
Christie Sweeting; son-in-law, Andrew Sweeting;
sister, Patricia Aloury; brother, Derrick Johnson of
Harbour Island; brother-in-law, Lester Albury; sister-
in-law, Jo Johnson; nieces, Pamela Russell and her
husband Billy, Patrice Lleida and her husband Ste-
phen, Amanda Albury; nephews, Joseph “Buddy”
Bethell and Lenny Albury; great-nephew, William
Russell Jr.; great nieces, Ashlyn and Amber Llieda;
godson, Steve Taylor Jr.; special family and friends,
Robin Orrell and family of Florida, Diane Greene,
Samatha and Brian Carey and family, Millie and Joe
Lleida, Morette Ellis her caretaker and her friend,
Doreen Albury of Harbour Island, and other fam-
ily and friends in Harbour Island, Florence Carey,
Tootsie Thompson, Paulina Bowe, Suzanne Albury,
Grace Pinder, Dianne Dunn and all of the Friday
morning ladies, Jessie Sweeting and Daphne Un-
derwood and all her friends in Spanish Wells, Doro-
thea Brown, Ray, Richard and Leona Pyfrom and
families, Ebenezer Methodist Church Focus Group
and so many more, too many to name, all of whom
she loved.|Instead of flowers the family request that
donations be made to the Cancer Society of The
Bahmas, P.O. Box S.S. 6539, Nassau or the Ebene-
zer Methodist Church Focus Group, P. O. Box S.S.
6145, Nassau in memory of Violet G. Johnson.

Friends may pay their respects at Kemp’s Funeral
Home Limited, 22 Palmdale Avenue, Palmdale,

on Thursday, 23rd April, 2009 from 4:00p.m. to 6:
00p.m.Arrangements by Kemp’s Funeral Home

Limited.



2.0L Automatic - LOADED ..

was $26,866.00 4
NOW $22,800.00 f

LOCAL NEWS



Claims of nepotism
in the granting of
Crown Land denied

FROM page one

Prime Minister Christie would
not be suspicious of this latest
sale.

“Tam a Bahamian. I have
relatives. I have friends,” Mr
Turnquest said in answer to the
speculation.

“Are you suggesting that as
long as Lam Director of Lands
and Surveys my friends and my
relatives are unable to get
Crown land like any other
Bahamian? I travel from
Inagua to Grand Bahama. I
covered the whole spectrum,
and I have family throughout
and I have friends throughout.

“If [was making the ultimate
decision I can see where I
would have to recuse myself.
But the decision is not made
by me ultimately. It rests with
someone else. So why then
should my friends and family
be prevented from being con-
sidered by somebody else for
Crown land?

“But I certainly know not of
any scheme that this office was
engaged in at any time by
myself or anybody that was
intentionally trying to influence
the decision makers in a way
that would cause them embar-
rassment or the office embar-
rassment or a problem for any
of them,” he said.

When asked if he felt it was
merely a “coincidence” that the
properties near Forbes Hill
were all sold to members of his
family, Mr Turnquest hesitated
before suggesting that he could
have been stationed at the
Prime Minister’s office from
2005 and therefore these trans-
actions could have occurred
after that date when he was not

in the Lands and Surveys
department.

However, the latest govern-
ment grant was signed by for-
mer Prime Minister Christie on
January 27, 2003.

Pointing out this discrepancy
and many others, the former
Agriculture and Lands Minis-
ter George Smith said it was
“inconceivable” for the Direc-
tor of Lands to suggest that he
was not involved in the sale of
these properties.

During Prime Minister
Ingraham’s first administration
in 1992, Mr Turnquest was
appointed Director of Lands
and Surveys. When former
Prime Minister Christie took
over the govenment in 2005,
Mr Turnquest was transferred
to the Prime Minister’s Office.
However, on Mr Ingraham’s
return to government, Mr
Turnquest was returned to
head Lands and Surveys.

Mr Smith, who had respon-
sibility for this ministry from
1977 to 1984, said that Mr
Turnquest, as head of the
department, receives the appli-
cations, processes them, attach-
es a fee to the property, and
ultimately advises the Prime
Minister as to whether or not
to agree to the sale of the
land.

With an intimate knowledge
of Exuma as its former Mem-
ber of Parliament, Mr Smith
said he has first hand knowl-
edge of the value of lands in
Exuma.

He noted that inland prop-
erties were valued far higher
than the price set for the sale
by government of these partic-
ular beachfront lots. This was
contrary to normal practice
where prime beachfront prop-
erty is always more expensive
than inland property.

“In these particular cases the

director has the obligation to
point out to the Minister his
relation to the applicants. He
has an obligation to point that
out and caution the Prime Min-
ister as to the potential reper-
cussions for conflict of inter-
est,” Mr Smith said, alleging
that in his opinion it was “a
bold case” of the Prime Minis-
ter being misled into making a
decision without having been
warned of the possible impli-
cations and “the recommenda-
tion for such a low price” when
a “much higher fee” could have
been recommended.

Mr Smith added that while
the Prime Minister does hold
ultimate responsibility over the
decision to sell these proper-
ties, in the discharge of his
duties, the PM must rely on
proper advice from his officials.
In this case, it was Mr Smith’s
opinion that this did not hap-
pen.

Local criminals
in arms race’

He estimates 15,000 persons in the country
are affiliated with gangs, most of whom may
have easy access to firearms.

FROM page one

the murder.

Head of the Central Detective Unit's homi-
cide squad Assistant Superintendent Leon

RBPF.

Mr Reid sees this as a threat against the

"Our police force boasts at having 3,000

Bethel dispelled concerns that local gangsters
were trading in illegal handguns in favour of
assault rifles and machine guns in an effort to
compile a superior arsenal than police.

"Criminals have to contend with other crim-
inals — I don't think criminals arm them-
selves to be able to outmatch police — they
want to outmatch other criminals in terms of
weapons,” Mr Bethel said.

He contended that local crooks sought
weapons that are more accessible and easily
concealed — like handguns — to secure their
illegal activities from rival threats.

"A pistol is more easily concealed and trans-
ported than an AK-47 or another high pow-
ered rifle, you see. So when these persons are
in a criminal enterprise, they know that they
may be subject to poaching by other criminals
who — especially if they are involved in drugs
— may be arming themselves properly against
other criminals," Mr Bethel said.

"What is being imported is what is accessi-
ble to criminals right now — what they can get
their hands on, and can be transported to the
Bahamas. Definitely they would want some
up-to-date weapons for their criminal enter-
prise, but I do not think there is an arms race
with police. It is only because of these certain
weapons whether they are the normal
revolvers or pistols, or rifles, it's just what is
available to the criminals and they seize what-
ever opportunities they can get their hands
on," he added.

But youth activist and reformed gang mem-
ber Carlos Reid said local thugs are bragging
about possessing assault rifles, bullet proof
vests, and hand grenades.

members but gangs are boasting of having
15,000 members — on a combined effort.
Imagine if just 30 per cent of that owns a
weapon and I'm sure that's higher.

“We're seeing now the emergence of AK-
47s, bullet proof vests, hand grenades, so we
can't say police have more sophisticated
weapons,” he said, claiming a criminal had
boasted to him of owning a pair of matching
Uzi guns.

However, Commissioner Ferguson said
while the RBPF has "always been vulnera-
ble" to heavy imports of illegal firearms, police
intelligence does not reflect an upswing in
more sophisticated weaponry in the country.

"What we see mostly in the Bahamas is a 9
millimeter, and .38 or the .40 Glock, those
type of weapons have been most commonly
confronting the police and we've been making
arrests along those lines," Mr Ferguson said.

He added that the RBPF had ongoing
efforts with international law enforcement
agencies to share intelligence while organising
efforts to seize illegal weaponry.

According to Mr Reid — founder of Youth
Against Violence — for as little as $150, a
crook can buy a gun and parlay that into thou-
sands of dollars from criminal proceeds.

"A lot of young men will tell you straight
up they only working for a couple dollars to
get a gun to make a living stealing, robbing
whatever you call it. You can even put a hit
on somebody for less than $5000," Mr Reid
said.

To counter violent crime, he suggested that
leaders of the country have to invest in com-
munity outreach and judicial reform.

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from people who are
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area or have won an
award.

If so, call us on 322-1986
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FROM page one

Managing editor John Mar-
quis said: “People like The
Tribune because it is fearless
and tells the truth. It is a
‘must’ read for everyone who

really wants to know what’s
going on in the Bahamas.

“Not everybody likes us —
but even those who don’t like
us can’t stop talking about us.
That’s the mark of a really
fine newspaper.”

Challenge over judge’s
refusal to recuse from
civil case continues

FROM page one

been adjourned to Thursday and is expected to continue next

Monday.

It emerged on Monday that Justice Allen had not made notes
of crucial discussions within chambers that were relevant to

the application for her recusal.

Alan Steinfeld, QC, and attorney Michael Scott represent
Amir Weissfisch. Attorney Brian Moree represents the Weiss-

fisch children.



TRIBUNE SPORTS

WEDNESDAY, APRIL 22, 2009, PAGE 9



SPORTS



Medal-winning swimmers shine

HERE’S a look at our
medal-winning swimmers and
the performances the 36-mem-
ber team turned in during the
XXIV Carifta Swimming
Championships that conclud-
ed in Aruba on Sunday.

Gold medallists

¢ McKayla Lightbourn, girls
15-17 800 freestyle, 9:14.88.

¢ Dustin Tynes, boys 11-12
200 breaststroke, 2:41.82.

¢ Evante Gibson, boys 100
butterfly, 1:00.81.

¢ McKayla Lightbourn, girls
15-17 100 butterfly, 1:05.89.

¢ Ashley Butler, McKayla
Lightbourn, Amber Weech,
Ariel Weech, girls 15-17 400
freestyle relay, 4:02.52.

¢ Evante Gibson, boys 13-
14 50 butterfly, 26.97.

¢ Ashley Butler, girls 15-17
50 butterfly, 28.72.

¢ McKayla Lightbourn, girls
15-17 400 IM, 5:08.27.

¢ McKayla Lightbourn, girls
15-17 200 IM, 2:25.44.

¢ Dustin Tynes, boys 11-12
50 breaststroke, 34.20.

¢ Bria Deveaux, girls 13-14
200 butterfly, 2:30.28.

¢ Matthew Lowe, girls 13-14
200 butterfly, 2:18.13.

¢ McKayla Lightbourn, girls
15-17 200 butterfly, 2:24.93.

¢ Amber Weech, Ariel
Weech, Ashley Butler, McK-
ayla Lightbourn, girls 15-17
800 freestyle relay, 9:03.01.

¢ McKayla Lightbourn, girls
15-17 400 freestyle, 4:27.38.

¢ McKayla Lightbourn, girls
15-17 400 freestyle, 4:27.38.

¢ Dustin Tynes, boys 11-12



Maya Albury

NSM slelicle

Zach Moses

JeNae Saunders

Amber Weech

Riquel Rolle



Matthew Lowe

Jacinda Williams

Taryn Smith

¢ Dionisio
Carey, boys 11-
12 50 back-
stroke, 31.42.

° Ariel
Weech, girls
15-17 50 back-
stroke, 31.82.

° Bria
Deveaux, girls
13-14 100 but-
ae 1:09.31.

Tamberly
Meridian

St. Bedes

Hill Cross
Westminster
Bishop Eldon
Blairwood
Faith Temple
Garvin Tynes
Spanish Wells
CC Sweeting
Catholic High
St. Andrews
Heritage

MINI DIVISION

1 St. Francis

2 Meridian

3 Lyford Cay

4 Sandlinds Primary

DIVISIONAL WINNERS
Primary Girls

Home School

Garvin Tynes

Temple Christian

Primary Boys
St. Johns
Queens College

Junior Girls
St. Augustines
Home School
St. Annes

Junior Boys
NCA
Lyford Cay
Kingsway

Senior Girls
SAC

St. Annes
Home School

Senior Boys
Pace
Lyford Cay
NCA



every surface, no? No one is
perfect. Sure, I can improve,"
Nadal said. "I always work to
improve because when you
feel you can't improve, is dif-
ficult to wake up and go on
court and practice."

Nadal is favored to also col-
lect a fifth straight French
Open title, but the way
Djokovic swept Nadal aside in
the second set, and the way
No. 4 Andy Murray rallied
back from 5-2 down to force a
tie break in Saturday's semi-
final offers his rivals a glim-
mer of hope.

Nadal was unhappy with
how he served, and plans to
improve on it before heading
to Roland Garros next month.

“This tournament I didn't
serve very well. Especially the
second serve was sometimes
120 kph (74 mph). So that's
(a) disaster," Nadal said.
"Yeah, I have to play more.
Have to serve better."

Even so, he was delighted
with his win.

"Always really important
for me (to) start the clay sea-
son like this," said Nadal, who
won his third title this season
after hard-court victories at
the Australian Open and Indi-
an Wells, Calif.

He trailed 3-1 in the first set
before reeling off five straight
games. Struggling on serve in
the third, he saved three break
points and needed 14 minutes
to hold his opening service
game.

After a long rally at 30-40,
Djokovic seemed certain to
break Nadal with a drop shot,
but Nadal somehow got it back
for a winner and Djokovic
sank to his knees.

"A little bit lucky because
he has two break points and
important drop shot. I came
back. That point was really
important,” Nadal said. "After
that I think I played really



RAFAEL NADAL reacts after
defeating Serbia's Novak Djokovic
in their final match of the Monte
Carlo Masters tournament, in
Monaco, Sunday...

(AP Photo: Claude Paris)

well. In the important
moments, I was focused all the
time."

It was the third-seeded
Djokovic who crumbled as
Nadal clinched victory on his
first match point when the Ser-
bian sent a backhand into the
net.

"IT played a very good
match, actually one of the best
I have played against him on
this surface," Djokovic said.
"It's really unfortunate that in
certain moments I didn't play
the way I was supposed to
play, with a little bit more
patience.”

Nadal extended his winning
streak at Monte Carlo to 27
matches and won his 21st
straight victory on clay since
losing to Juan Carlos Ferrero
of Spain in the second round

his other title in 1908.

Keith Lloyd Tew lelaleay



Laron Morley

RIM eC liTIAle)

The medal count...

XXIV CARIFTA SWIMMING
CHAMPIONSHIPS,
Aruba, April 16-19, ‘09

Medal Count
Combined: Men + Women

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urprie

100 breaststroke, 1:14.04. a ae
¢ McKayla Lightbourn, girls eveaux, girls .
15-17 100 seen es ¢ Taryn Smith, girls 11-12 ¢Bria Deveauv, girls 13-14 13-14 200 Team Bronze Silver Gold Total
1:17.87. 100 butterfly, 1:09.09. 200 IM, 2:31.72. freestyle, 2:14.49.
¢ Bria Deveaux, Maya ¢ McKayla Lightbourn, girls eEvante Gibson, boys 13- * Jacinda Williams, Laura T&T 31 14 22 67
Albury, Berchadette Moss 15-17 200 freestyle, 2:08.08. 14 50 breaststroke, 31.89. Morley, Taryn Smith, Crystal Bah 18 17 14 49
and Gabrielle Greene, girls ¢ Ariel Weech, girls 15-17 ¢ McKayla Lightbourn, girls Rahming, girls 11-12 400 Guadeloupe 18 17 12 47
13-14 200 freestyle relay, 50 butterfly, 29.30. 15-17 50 breaststroke, 35.41. medley relay, 5:02.48. Barbados Amateur Swimming 12 9 8 29
1:54.58. ¢ Bria Deveaux, girls 13-14 ¢ Amber Weech, girls 15- ¢ Laron Morley, Toby Martinique Natation 8 16 10 34
¢ Ashley Butler, McKayla 400 IM, 5:26.48. 17 50 freestyle, 27.02. McCarroll, Evante Gibson, | 7 aica 8 12 12 32
Lightbourn, Amber Weech ¢ Dionisio Carey, Dustin ¢ Evante Gibson, boys 13- Matthew Lowe, boys 13-14 B A 8 1 3 D
and Ariel Weech, girls 15-17 Tynes, Keith Lloyd, Zach 14 100 backstroke, 1:12.34. 400 medley relay, 4:19.90. ee
200 freestyle relay, 1:49.75. Moses, boys 11-12 400 med- ¢ McKayla Lightbourn, girls ¢ Evante Gibson, boys 13- Suriname 6 6 12 24
ley relay, 4:46.17. 15-17 200 backstroke, 2:28.64. 14 200 IM, 2:18.57. Aruba 5 18 15 38
Silver medallists ¢ Je’Nae Saunders, Riquel ¢ Ashley Butler, girls 15-17 Cayman Islands Junior 3 0 2 5
¢ Laura Lowe (no photo), Rolle, Maya Albury, Bria Bronze medallists 100 freestyle, 59.98. Bermuda Swim Team 1 0 1 2
girls 11-12 200 breaststroke, Deveaux, girls 13-14 400 med- ¢ Matthew Lowe, boys 13- ¢ Laura Morley, girls 11-12 Suriname Swim Club 0 2 2 4
2:51.04. ley relay, 4:48.55. 14 1500, 17:10.57. 100 breaststroke, 1:23.40. Netherlands Antilles 0 1 2 3
¢ Dustin Tynes, boys 11-12 ¢ Ariel Weech, McKayla ¢ Dionisio Carey, boys 11- * Dionisio Carey, boys 11- United States Virgin Islands 0 1 1 2
200 breaststroke, 2:38.79. Lightbourn, Ashley Butler, 12 200 breastroke, 2:50.36. 12 100 breaststroke, 1:18.64. Grenada 0 1 1 2
¢ Toby McCarroll, boys 13- Amber Weech, girls 15-17400 _* McKayla Lightbourn, girls * Toby McCarroll, boys 13- gt neia National Team 0 1 0 1
14 200 breastroke, 2:38.05. medley relay, 4:40.05. 15-17 200 breastroke, 2:44.39. 14 100 backstroke, 1:12.52. ,
Team Rankings - Through Event 114
. : Combined Team Scores
°
MARC REHA Nadal wins 5th straight |
J Place Team Points
e
enti Monte Carlo Masters title | tisisstanstova —rersisso
S an SPURL 2 Bahamas BAH 691.50
3 Guadeloupe GUAD 603
mg JEROME PUGMIRE of the Rome Masters | 4 Martinique Natation 578.50
HERE’S a look at the final AP Sports Writer in May 2008. 5 Jamaica JAM 571.50
standings of the Bahamas Nobody has | 6 Aruba ARU 482
Lawn Tennis Association’s MONACO (AP) — Rafael matched Nadal’s per-_ 7 Suriname SUR 469
first High School Invitational Nadal knows he won't stay on formance at the g Barbados Amateur 312
Tournament held last week at an he oo. cate get — aes — 9 Bermuda BERM 163
: : : etter, even when playing on :
the National Tennis Center: Giay, his favorite durtace furned proie.sionalin - eae re ae : ae
The top-ranked Spaniard 1968. 12 G a a 43
I NCA 84 overcame an upset bid by Reggie Doherty oo .
2 Queens College 61 Novak Djokovic on Sunday, won the event six 13 Netherlands Antilles = 37
3 St. Johns 60 beating the third-ranked Ser- times overall between 14 Suriname Swim Club 31
4 St. Augustine 50 bian 6-3, 2-6, 6-1 for his fifth 1897-99 and 1902-04, | 15 Bermuda Swim Team = 30
5 Home School 48 straight Monte Carlo Masters while five-time win- 16 St. Lucia National Team 17
6 Lyford Cay 45 title after losing a set here for ner Anthony Wilding | 17 Cayman IslandsSwim = 12
7 Kingsway 39 the first time since the 2006 of New Zealand won | 1g Guyana GUY 9
8 Pace 3 final against Roger Federer. four times in a row | 19 Barbados Swim Club 1
9 St. Annes 34 "Everyone can improve in from 1911-14 and got 5,018.00 Total

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PAGE 10, WEDNESDAY, APRIL 22, 2009



SPORTS

TRIBUNE SPORTS



Junior baseball
action resumes
this weekend

THE Junior Baseball League
of Nassau (JBLN) is scheduled
to resume play this weekend
after a two-week break for the
Easter holidays.

With three weeks left in the
regular season, playoff positions
and the pennant winners are
still to be determined in all six
divisions as the league contin-
ued its regular season on Sat-
urday and Sunday at the St
Andrew’s Field of Dreams.

Listed below is a full schedule
of games on tap:

TEE BALL
SATURDAY

liam — Sand Gnats

vs Blue Claws

lpm — Grasshoppers

vs Knights

3pm — Sidewinders

vs Raptors

SUNDAY

2pm — Grasshoppers

vs Blue Claws

3:30pm — Knights Raptors

COACH PITCH
SATURDAY

10am — Blue Jays vs Athletics
12:30pm — Cubs vs Angels
3pm — Astros vs
Diamondbacks

MINOR LEAGUE
SATURDAY

10am — Rockies vs Red Sox
12:30pm — Mets vs Royals
MAJOR LEAGUE
SATURDAY

12:30pm — Marlins vs Indians
3pm — Mariners vs Reds
SUNDAY

2pm — Marlins vs Mariners

JUNIOR LEAGUE
SATURDAY

10am — Cardinals vs Yankees
12:30pm — Twins vs Dodgers

SENIOR LEAGUE
SATURDAY

3pm — Phillies vs Tigers
SUNDAY

3pm — Rangers vs Pirates




Celtics ‘buck’
even with Bulls

m@ HOWARD ULMAN

AP Sports Writer

BOSTON (AP) — Ray
Allen and Ben Gordon can
reminisce this offseason
about their playoff shootout.

For one of the former
UConn guards, his team's
offseason will last longer
than he'd like.

Allen kept the Boston
Celtics from coming dan-
gerously close to being that
team when he broke out of a
slump to score 30 points,
including the decisive 3-
pointer with 2 seconds left.
That gave the defending
NBA champions a 118-115
win over the Bulls on Mon-
day night and a split of the
first two games of the best-
of-seven series. Game 3 is
in Chicago on Thursday
night.

"T'll talk about it over the
summertime and I'll laugh
with him about it," Allen
said. "We were exchanging
jabs there, and I don't mean
shots. I mean he caught me
with an elbow, I got him
right back with an elbow."

Gordon is in his fifth
NBA season, eight fewer
than Allen, but they've
faced each other in summer
pickup games at their old
school.

"UConn has a lot of great
professionals,” Gordon said,
"so anytime you play against
someone from UConn you
just want to go out there and
outdo them. It’s like a game
within the game.”

Gordon outscored Allen
with 42 points exactly 23
years after Michael Jordan
set an NBA playoff record
with 63. But the Celtics beat
the Bulls then, too, 135-131
in double overtime.

Gordon's last basket came
with 12.3 seconds left, tying
the score at 115. Then the



RAY ALLEN is fouled by Bulls forward Tyrus Thomas (left in the
third quarter of a first-round playoff game in Boston Monday...

Celtics set up a play for
Allen, who took a pass from
Rajon Rondo and connected
from the right side.

Allen scored 28 of his 30
points after getting some
advice from coach Doc
Rivers at halftime.

"Doc said going into the
half, ‘Be aggressive, but let it
come to you,’" Allen said.
"T never think I'm not in my
rhythm. It can be a grind as
a shooter. As a scorer you're
always trying to find some-
thing.”

After Tyrus Thomas
missed a shot from midcourt
as time expired, Allen head-
ed for the bench where
injured Kevin Garnett deliv-
ered a couple of congratu-
latory slaps — to his head
and chest.

Allen said he doesn't like
"being made a fuss over.”
But that was unavoidable
after he broke out of his
shooting slump. He scored
just four points on 1-for-12
shooting and missed the
final shot in Chicago's 105-
103 overtime win Saturday.
"We feel very confident

because we feel like we
haven't even played
good basketball yet,”

NOTICE

NOTICE is hereby given that CHRISTOPHER DOUGLAS
MAY of BEACHWAY DRIVE NORTH, FREEPORT, GRAND
BAHAMA, BAHAMAS P.O. BOX F42915 is applying to
the Minister responsible for Nationality and Citizenship, for
registration/naturalization as a citizen of The Bahamas, and
that any person who knows any reason why registration/
naturalization should not be granted, should send a written
and signed statement of the facts within twenty-eight days from
the 22nd day of APRIL, 2009 to the Minister responsible for
Nationality and Citizenship, PO.BoxN-7147, Freeport, Bahamas.

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Boston's Paul Pierce
said. "Our best is yet to
come."

But that will have to
come in Chicago.

"We got a split and
that's tough to do against
the defending champs,”
Gordon said.

Consecutive 3-point-
ers by Gordon gave the
Bulls a 109-104 lead
before the Celtics rallied.
Glen Davis made two
free throws and Rondo
connected on a long
jumper to give Boston a
112-111 lead with 1:01 to




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play.
Gordon followed with
a 16-foot jumper and

(AP Photo: Elise Amendola)

Allen countered with a 3-
pointer that put Boston
ahead 115-113 with 25.3 sec-
onds remaining.

Then it was Gordon's
turn. He connected from
near the foul line before the
Celtics called a timeout to
set up their final play.

Rondo dribbled on the
left side and Allen worked
himself free, caught the pass
in rhythm and converted as
the crowd went wild.

Davis had 26 points for
second-seeded Boston and
Rondo had a triple-dou-
ble — 19 points, 16
assists and 12 rebounds.
Pierce added 18 points
and Kendrick Perkins
contributed 16 points
and 12 rebounds.

John Salmons had 17
points and Brad Miller
scored 16 for Chicago.

The Allen-Gordon
shootout "almost
looked like they turned
it into a personal bat-
tle," Rivers said. "You
know, who's the best
UConn player to ever
play. And it was amaz-
ing."

Chicago coach Vinny
Del Negro cited the
Celtics' rebounding as a
Key to their win.

"They had 21 offen-
sive rebounds," he said,
“and it's going to be
hard to win any game,
not even a playoff
game, if you give up
that many offensive
rebounds.”

The Celtics nearly
lost despite controlling
rookie point guard Der-
rick Rose, who sat out
most of the first quar-
ter with two fouls. He
finished with 10 points,
seven assists and six
rebounds after leading the
Bulls with 36 points and 11
assists on Saturday.

Track & Field
Officials Training

FREEDOM FARM CURRENT
STANDINGS (WEEK 15)

T-BALL

1. SEA GRAPES cp/pw
2. COCO PLUMS cp

3. JUJUS ep

4. GUINEPS cp

5. DILLIES e

COACH PITCH

. BOAS ep

. BEES cp

. SANDFLIES cp

. MOSQUITOES

. GREEN TURTLES
. WASPS

9-10 DIVISION
1. BARRACUDAS cp
2. DOLPHINS cp
3. TURBOTS cp
4. OCTOPUS

5. RED SNAPPERS
6. EELS

11-12 DIVISION WINS
WILD DOGS cp 19

. CONCHS 14
BLUE MARLINS 13
NASSAU GROUPERS 11
DIVERS 10

. HURRICANES 8

. GREEN PAROTTS — 8

. IGUANAS 6

. WHITE CROWNS 1

CKAAMABRYNE

13. 15 DIVISION WINS
. OWLZ cp u

. SILVER JACKS ul

. POTCAKES

. STINGRAYS

. RACCOONS

LOSSES
1

3
4
9
1

2
L
2
3
7
12

12
14

OSSES

LOSSES

3
4
6
8
12
15

LOSSES



Pea Brier CM er Re Col Tey bg

T-Ball Division
Friday Apr. 17th
Saturday Apr. 18th
Saturday Apr. 18th
Coach Pitch
Friday Apr. 17th
Saturday Apr. 18th
Saturday Apr. 18th
Saturday Apr. 18th
Sunday Apr. 19th
9-10 Division
Friday Apr. 17th
Saturday Apr. 18th
Saturday Apr. 18th
Sunday Apr. 19th
11-12 Division

Won

Sea Grapes
Coco Plums
Jujus

Won

Sand Flies
Boas

Bees

Sand Flies
Wasps
Won

Eels
Turbots
Barracudas
Dolphins
Won

Loss

Jujus

Guineps
Dillies

Loss

Green Turtles
Mosquitoes
Green Turtles
Wasps
Mosquitoes

Loss

Octopus

Red Snappers
Eels

Red Snappers
Loss

Friday Apr. 17th
Saturday Apr. 18th
Saturday Apr. 18th
Saturday Apr. 18th
Saturday Apr. 18th
Saturday Apr. 18th
Sunday Apr. 19th
Sunday Apr. 19th
13-15 Division
Saturday Apr. 18th
Saturday Apr. 18th
Saturday Apr. 18th
Saturday Apr. 18th
16-18 Division
Sunday Apr. 19th
Sunday Apr. 19th

Conchs
Divers

Blue Marlins
Divers

Wild Dogs
Iguanas
Conchs
Green Parrots
Won
Potcakes
Owlz
Potcakes
Sharks

Won
Arawaks
Tainos

Iguanas
Hurricanes
Groupers
Hurricanes
White Crowns
Green Parrots
Blue Marlins
White Crowns
Loss

Stingrays
Sharks
Stingrays
Silver Jacks
Loss
Lucayans
Caribs

Score
10-10 Tied Score
16-14
15-3
Score
22-10
21-11
15-5
15-6
10-9
Score
7-0
9-6
19-6
12-8
Score
6-0
14-4
6-3
16-8
7-0
9-5
24-7
9-0
Score
5-2
4-3
11-10
4-3
Score
9-7
7-0



Are you interested in becoming an Official
for Track & Field?

The Bahamas Association of Certified
Officials (BACQ) is extending an invitation

to al! present officials and all interested
persons to participate in a training
session for track & field.

Date: Saturday, April 25, 2009

Venue: Thomas A. Robinson frack & Field

Stadium

Time; 12:00 p.m. - 4:00 p.m.

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Men Pants and Shirts

NOTICE

NOTICE is hereby given that LINDA = CHRISTINA
BUCHANAN of BEACHWAY DRIVE NORTH, FREEPORT,
GRAND BAHAMA, BAHAMAS P.O. BOX F42915 is applying
to the Minister responsible for Nationality and Citizenship,
for registration/naturalization as a citizen of The Bahamas,
and that any person who knows any reason why registration/
naturalization should not be granted, should send a written and
signed statement of the facts within twenty-eight days from
the 22nd day of APRIL, 2009 to the Minister responsible for
Nationality and Citizenship, PO.BoxN-7147, Freeport, Bahamas.

NOTICE

NOTICE is hereby given that YOUDLYN CALIXTE of SOUTH
BEACH, HOLIDAY DRIVE, NASSAU, BAHAMAS, is applying
to the Minister responsible for Nationality and Citizenship, for
registration/naturalization as a citizen of The Bahamas, and that
any person who knows any reason why registration/naturalization
should not be granted, should send a written and signed statement
ofthe facts within twenty-eight days fromthe 22" day of April, 2009
to the Minister responsible for nationality and Citizenship, P.O. Box
N-7147, Nassau, Bahamas.

NOTICE is hereby given that RODLIN FLORESTAL of
EAST ST., NASSAU, BAHAMAS, is applying to the Minister
responsible for Nationality and Citizenship, for registration/
naturalization as a citizen of The Bahamas, and that any person
who knows any reason why registration/naturalization should not
be granted, should send a written and signed statement of the
facts within twenty-eight days from the 15" day of April, 2009 to
the Minister responsible for nationality and Citizenship, PRO. Box
N-7147, Nassau, Bahamas.







THE TRIBUNE

Sp

F

PAGE 1



WEDNESDAY, APRIL 22,

Algernon Cargill



m@ By RENALDO DORSETT
Sports Reporter
rdorsett@tribunemedia.net

ith a third place

finish in 2008 and

a second place

finish at this
year’s Carifta Swimming and Syn-
chronized Swimming Champi-
onships, the Bahamas continues
to bridge the gap between itself
and some of the perennial pow-
erhouses in the Caribbean,
reclaiming a spot atop the Carifta
leaderboard.

The Bahamas finished second
in both the medal count (49) and
points standings (691.50) at the
24th edition of the meet last week
in Savaneta, Aruba.

Trinidad and Tobago captured
the overall title with 67 medals



and 815.50 points.

Bahamas Swimming Federa-
tion president Algernon Cargill
said for the Bahamas to again
capture another Carifta champi-
onship, the teams must meet the
challenge set forth in the distance
races.

“What still separates us some-
what from the countries that fin-
ish ahead of us is their proficien-
cy in the distance events,” he said.
“Our athletes love to sprint, they
do exceptionally well at it at this
level, at the collegiate level, when
they continue on as seniors, and it
is definitely the stronghold in
most our development and train-
ing programmes.”

Cargill said while the Bahamas
continues to enter each Carifta
Games with lofty expectations,
the federation continues to pro-

ARCHIE NAIRN, the
permanent secretary
in the Ministry of
Sports, greets a swim
team member on his
arrival from Carifta
Games in St Lucia on
Monday...

Bimini to host men and
women national round
robin b-ball tourney

@ By BRENT STUBBS
Senior Sports Reporter
bstubbs@tribunemedia.net

FOR the first time, the island
of Bimini will play host to the
Bahamas Basketball Federation
men’s and women’s national
round robin tournament.

Originally, the federation had
intended to host only the men’s
series in Bimini this weekend,
while the women were going to
Grand Bahama next weekend.

But the federation decided that
it would be best if they combine
the two tournaments, thus utiliz-
ing all of their manpower in the
same setting at the same time.

“It’s good for the basketball
family,” said federation president
Lawrence Hepburn. “We get to
see all of the local talent that we
have here.

“In that way, we get a chance
to get a good eye of what we are
looking at in terms of the local
selection for the national team
trials. But it’s good for the bas-
ketball family to get them all
together collectively for the first
time in a long time.”

Hepburn said they are encour-
aging all of the association presi-
dents to accompany their teams
so that the federation can discuss
and plan their future.

“This is a seed which we are
trying to germinate to get the
basketball all together and shar-
ing in the same vision,” Hepburn
said. “So I envision a festive occa-
sion.”

By having the two tourna-
ments going on at the same time,
Hepburn said the women from
their respective islands can watch
and cheer for their male coun-
terparts and vise versa.

Tournament director Sean
‘Bass’ Bastian said everything is
set to go with at least five teams
confirmed to compete in the
women’s division.

“We have the Johnson’s Lady
Truckers, Bommer G Angels, the
Junior All-Stars, the Electro

Telecom Cybots and the Grand
Bahama’s Investment Gems,”
Bastian revealed. “So that’s good
for the female side.”

On the men’s side, Bastian said
they have at least nine teams
already confirmed to compete.
The list is expected to be headed
by the Electro Telecom Cybots,
the champions of the New Prov-
idence Basketball Association.

“This weekend is going to be
power-packed with basketball,”
he pointed out. “We are looking
at least between 25-30 games to
be played over the weekend.”

The teams will be play in a
double elimination format.

“From what we’ve seen, the
Grand Bahama, Eleuthera and
Cybots are expected to be the
top teams in the men’s division,”
Bastian sad. “But it could be a
Truckers and Angels rematch in
the women. But I don’t know
what the Gems look like.”

Hepburn said Bimini is more
than ready to host the spectacu-
lar.

“The housing is ready, the
restaurants are ready and the
venue is ready,” he said. “I think
all who play in the Gateway Min-
istries Gymnasium will be thor-
oughly pleased with the facili-
ties.”

As a result of hosting the two
tournaments at the same time,
Bastian said they are hoping to
generate a lot more support for
the federation’s Independence
Tournament from July 9-12 at
the Kendal Isaacs Gymnasium.

“So this is an opportunity for
us to meet with the presidents of
the associations to plan for that,”
Bastian stated.

Next year’s nationals is tipped
to be staged in Abaco, if their
new gymnasium is completed. If
it’s not, Bastian said they intend
to take the tournament to North
Andros.

“This weekend will be a good
weekend for basketball heads to
come together to plan for the
future,” he summed up.

THE 56th National Family Island Regatta in Georgetown, Exuma,
didn’t get off the ground as planned yesterday in Elizabeth Harbour as
the Sir Durward Knowles Junior Regatta was called off and will get

started today.

Organisers were forced to delay the start until today because all of
the competitors from Long Island had not arrived in sufficient time for
the start of the series of races. So organisers are hoping to stage them

at the start of each daily session.

In addition to the start of the junior regatta, the Ocean Races for the
A Class Prime Minister Cup, the B Class Governor’s General Cup and
the C Class Commodore Emeritus Cup are also scheduled to take
place. Then on Thursday, the first series races for the A, B, C, D and
E Classes will take place. The regatta is expected to continue through

Saturday.

‘ts

2009

Memorial



Our

duce teams which routinely
record top three finishes.

The Bahamas finished third in
the points standings and second in
the medal count in 2004, tied for
the lead in the medal count and
third in the points standings in
2005, and in 2006 finished second
in the medal count and third in
the points standings. “We have
to make further initiatives to
solidify our training programmes
to become more well rounded
and include more distance events
for us to continue to perform at a
high level on this stage,” he said.

The Bahamas took first place
at the 2007 Championships with
an incredible 79 medals, one

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More distance training needed for
Carifta swimmers, says BSF boss

ahead of second place French
Guyana (78) and third place
Trinidad and Tobago (74).

Cargill said the team’s overall
effort was a complete effort by
athletes, administrators and gov-
ernment. “We just about equal
our performance from last year
in terms of the final medal count
and overall placing,” he said.
“The entire team performed
exceptionally well, they were a
number of outstanding perfor-
mances in the pool and from an
executive standpoint. The min-
istry stepped up, provided a char-
ter and cash support to help the
team. This contributed greatly to
the success of the team.”

A
Rotary Club
of Nassau
Event

SELiTe ECORI
The Bahamas Golf Federation

ULATIONS TO OUR WINNERS:

3RD NET - Anthony Hinsey &
Pete Drake with Jean Bethel





PAGE 12, WEDNESDAY, APRIL 22, 2009 THE TRIBUNE



Address to Rotary Club

Ry |
‘ wn |

THE HUB, a downtown art gallery, cele-
brates Earth Day with the completion of

DR. JUDSON ENEAS addressed the Rotary Club of West Nassau at the Soa thetye the Hat's foeves on Baa



club’s meeting on April 2 at Graycliff Restaurant. Dr. Eneas’s topic was Street was transformed from peeling
Men’s Health when he talked about prostate cancer, heart disease and dia- paint to vibrant and colourful imagery
betes. Pictured from left to right: President Michael Hepburn and Dr a I reflecting some of the Bahamas’ most

Judson Eneas. : precious and endangered species. Pine
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THE TRIBUNE



WEDNESDAY.

ine

APR 20.



2009

SECTION B ¢ business@tribunemedia.net

Communications
reform legislation
tabling ‘imminent’

B By NEIL HARTNELL
Tribune Business Editor

THE legislation to usher in a
new regulatory regime for the
Bahamian communications
industry is set to be tabled in
the House of Assembly within
the next week, and possibly as
early as today, Tribune Busi-
ness has been told, as the Gov-
ernment seeks to create the cer-
tainty that will enable it to “pull
the trigger” for the Bahamas
Telecommunications Compa-
ny’s (BTC) privatisation.

The three Bills - the Com-
munications Bill, the Utilities
Regulation and Competition
Authority Bill, and the Utilities
Appeal Tribunal Bill - will cov-
er all communications sectors,
including Internet, radio and
telecoms, creating a new regu-
latory framework and regula-
tor to oversee the sector.

Prime Minister Hubert Ingra-
ham and his government are
understood to be especially
keen to push the Bills through
Parliament because the estab-
lishment of the new regulatory

regime is the
critical pre-
cursor to
starting
BTC’s privati-
sation in
earnest..

Potential
suitors inter-
ested in
acquiring a 51
per cent stake
in BTC will
want to have
certainty and
clarity regarding the regulato-
ry regime they will face, as it
sets the ‘playing field’ and ‘rules
of the game’ that they must
abide by.

Sources suggested that the
Government would look to
table the Bills in the House of
Assembly either this week or, at
latest, by next Wednesday in
order to kick-start debate dur-
ing the second reading. With
the upcoming 2009-2010 Bud-
get presentation set for late May
- some four to five weeks away

SEE page 6B



Chamber chief ‘incredulous’
over Bahamas Waste permits

@ By NEIL HARTNELL
Tribune Business Editor

Warns three-year wait
‘off-putting’ for other

THE Bahamas Chamber of investors and Bahamians
Commerce’s president yesterday with innovative ideas

hit out at the Government for to-
date failing to approve Bahamas

Waste’s $750,000 biodiesel production facility, saying he “found it
incredulous” that the company had endured a three-year wait,
with the situation likely to discourage others from seeking gov-
ernment permits for new ventures.

“T find it incredulous that the minister of state for the environ-
ment [Phenton Neymour] would find it normal to wait for three
years for the Government to make up their minds about a pro-
posal,” Dionisio D’Aguilar, who is also Superwash’s president,

told Tribune Business.

“Tt’s taken three years to make a decision on how to price fuels
produced domestically. This is the problem with government -
they simply take far too long to make a decision.

“Here a company is anxious to
start an initiative in a new field,

SEE page 6B

Ministry targets reduced
airlift cost for pageant

m By CHESTER ROBARDS
Business Reporter
crobards@tribunemedia.net

THE MINISTRY of Tourism
and Aviation is working with
major airlines to find ways to
slash airlift costs to the
Bahamas as the Miss Universe
Pageant nears, as high access
costs threaten to stunt tourism
growth in the Bahamas and the
wider Caribbean.

According to Vincent Van-
derpool-Wallace, minister of
tourism and aviation, his min-
istry is engaged in private dis-
cussions with carriers who could
bring thousands of pageant fol-
lowers to this country in August
2009.

The Ministry of Tourism has
been working since the begin-

The information contained is from a third
party and The Tribune can not be held
responsible for errors and/or omission |
from the daily report.



ning of this year — months
before it was announced that
the Bahamas would host the
Pageant — to have carriers agree
to make some changes that
would result in lower airfares
for flying to the Bahamas.

However, Mr Vanderpool-
Wallace told Tribune Business
that there are still some “struc-
tural issues that have to be
resolved”, along with “other
factors that come into play.”

“A specific programme
requires significant changes on
our part and their part,” he said.
“We need to make sure we get
them aligned.”

As the Ministry exerts every
effort to increase airlift to the
Bahamas by lobbying for com-
petitive pricing, the UK is con-
sidering the implementation of
a higher air passenger duty that
could make air travel to this
region extremely unattractive.

The Caribbean Hotel and
Tourism Association (CHTA)
has appeal to the UK to rescind
the tax they call discriminato-
ry, because it imposes a higher
rate on the Caribbean than
major competing destinations.

“Pending changes to the UK
Air Passenger Duty are expect-
ed to result in increased levels
of duties applied to air tickets
from the UK to all destina-
tions. Of particular concern to
us in the Caribbean are the high
levels of duty to be applied to
tickets to the Caribbean, as well
as the discrimination against the
Caribbean region by illogically
allocating to it a higher tax band
than major competing destina-
tions,” said CHTA president
Enrique De Marchena Kaluche.

Mr Vanderpool-Wallace said

SEE page 6B

ROYAL FIDELITY



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$35m air taxi proposal
‘offers new experience’

@ By NEIL HARTNELL
Tribune Business Editor

Canada-based

entrepreneur yes-

terday said he was

proposing a $35
million project to create a fleet
of amphibious aircraft, or air
taxis, to provide a “new experi-
ence” for Bahamians and
tourists in transporting them
around this nation.

Captain Petr Khomoutovski,
managing director of Lomanti
Transport & Trading, told Tri-
bune Business that he was set to
submit a formal project pro-
posal to the Ministry of Tourism
& Aviation, with construction
of the first five Amphibian Air-
craft Dingo set to cost between
$30-$35 million.

Arguing that his project could
help differentiate the Bahamian
tourism product from its rivals,
as it was not replicated any-
where else in the world, Cap-
tain Khomoutovski said his
amphibious air taxis would not
need to use land-based airports,
instead being able to embark

* Canadian entrepreneur says project part of wider $100m
cruise ships/submarine initiative designed to revolutionise
tourist transport and experience, and create 200-400 jobs

* But financing dependent on government support,
with proposal yet to formally go to the Government

and pick up tourists and
Bahamians from virtually any
coastal locations in this nation.

He suggested that the
amphibious air taxi project
could create between 200 to 400
jobs in the Bahamas if the Gov-
ernment approved it. This ini-
tiative, Captain Khomoutovski
added, was the first pillar in a
much wider strategy that
involved constructing a mini-
cruise passenger ship which
could carry an excursion sub-
marine, giving tourists a whole
new view of the Bahamas - from
underwater.

Describing his project pro-
posal as the Bahamas Cruise
Sub-Air Project, Captain Kho-
moutovski said: “The estimated
pricing of design and construc-

tion of a cruise vessel with 400
passengers, excursion subma-
rine and amphibious aircraft
with air-cushion landing gear is
about $100 million.”

The cruise ship would cost
$60-$65 million, he added, with
the amphibious air taxis adding
the remaining $35 million.
Despite the steep price, he
argued that investors/financiers
would receive their funds back
within five years, with estimated
net income on the cruise ship
side totalling $899,200 in the
first year.

This was based on $9.072 mil-
lion in passenger revenues, off-
set by $2.722 million in expens-
es, $5.351 million in debt ser-
vicing costs, and $100,000 in
insurance costs.

As for the amphibious air
taxis, Captain Khomoutovski
suggested that they would be
relatively cheaply priced, with
service between Nassau-Abaco
costing $30-$40 on a plane that
would seat between 10-20 pas-
sengers.

It is unclear whether the Min-
istry of Tourism and Aviation,
and indeed the Government,
will go for such a project, as it
may be too exotic for its tastes.

When asked by Tribune Busi-
ness whether he had financing
in place for the project, Cap-
tain Khomoutovski indicated
that while he had several part-
ners behind him, prior govern-
ment approval was necessary to

SEE page 3B

Workforce failings ‘smother’ expansion

B By NEIL HARTNELL
Tribune Business Editor

BAHAMIAN-OWNED
businesses are seeing their
growth and expansion “smoth-
ered” because they cannot find
adequately-skilled workers in
sufficient numbers, the
Bahamas Chamber of Com-
merce’s president said yester-
day, with the education system’s
failings “contradicting” the
Government’s pro-foreign
direct investment policies.

Dionisio D’ Aguilar said find-
ing a qualified, productive
workforce was the “most trou-
bling facet of running a busi-
ness” for 99 per cent of Bahami-
an businessmen he had spoken
to, while foreign investors were
complaining about being
“ripped off” by a combination

* Chamber chief: Investors feeling ‘ripped off by high prices and low quality labour force
* Worker woes main concern for ‘99 per cent of Bahamian businessmen’
* ‘Businesses that get high school graduates from Bahamas government

schools have an enormous difficulty in getting people with basic literacy skills’

of high prices
and poor
workmanship.

“The prob-
lem is that the
Government
of the
Bahamas is
producing
schoolchild-
ren who sim-
ply cannot
work, and are
not equipped
to work,” the
Chamber president told Tri-
bune Business. “That appears

D’ Aguilar



to be in contradiction to their
policy of going out and attract-
ing foreign direct investment.

“What is happening is that
we are attracting these foreign-
ers here, and what they’re find-
ing is that there’s insufficient
labour here to fulfil their needs.
They then get frustrated.”

Mr D’Aguilar recalled a
recent conversation he had with
an American investor in the
Bahamas on a flight from Exu-
ma. He said the American had
asked him to detail the advan-
tages of investing in this nation,
to which Mr D’Aguilar cited the

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Yet the American reminded
him that he was still subject to
US taxes because of Washing-
ton’s insistence on levying taxes
on its citizens’ worldwide
income.

The investor then cited as
major concerns “the cost of
labour, the productivity of
labour and the quality of
labour” in the Bahamas, saying
property construction was cost-
ing him $350-$400 per square
foot when it was much cheaper

SEE page 5B

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PAGE 2B, WEDNESDAY, APRIL 22, 2009

THE TRIBUNE



a > =~
‘Trust’ in launch of marketing offensive

JUST as very few persons
would have predicted that the
price of gas would drop signifi-
cantly, months after being at
record-high levels, the future
has a tendency to be full of sur-
prises. That’s why it is impor-
tant to take a smart, offensive
posture to mitigate risk so that
you’re positioned to take on
new challenges, especially when
the economy recovers. And it
will, rather quickly and effec-
tively.

Individuals and companies
alike need to position them-
selves now. When your poten-
tial customers and clients are
ready to make a decision, make
a purchase or use a product,
who are they going to think of?
Who have they been thinking
about? Hopefully, it’s you or
your company. If you start posi-
tioning yourself and your com-
pany now, you increase that

probability exponentially.

History has proven that dur-
ing economic downturns
THOSE WHO MARKET
WILL MAKE IT, and when
things do turn around you and
your company will be miles
ahead of your competition.

Look at the auto industry.
It’s probably in the worst con-
dition ever. However, auto
companies are marketing more
than ever. Why? Because they
know from past experience that
when things do turn around
they far outsell their competi-
tion.

This brings me to the second
question we all need to ask our-
selves. What has changed in this
marketplace? There are really
important, dramatic shifts tak-
ing place in buyer behaviour
that may well reshape the way
you do your work. In the past, it
was the economic decision

Promotional

Marketing

a yaNoim icine rynen



maker who was sought out in
an organisationm - that key
executive who made the deci-
sion to buy.

In many businesses, that
authority is being replaced by a
committee. Officials now have
to obtain sign-offs from several
people to close a deal. For indi-
viduals and companies, this pre-
sents a new challenge. You
need to broaden your market-
ing to ensure you're selling in
broadcast rather than narrow-
cast mode, extending your
reach as widely as possible
across each potential customer.

Another mportant change -

one that clients are confirming
in their own experiences - is
that buyers are taking a longer
time to make decisions. Some
clients are seeing sales cycles
increase from an average of 30
days to 90 days. Some are see-
ing delays of up to 20 per cent.
The reason this is happening is
that customers want to make
sure that they’re making the
right decisions.

And in challenging times,
who can blame them? They
want proof to back the claims
you’re making about your
product or service. They want
someone to demonstrate how
good the return on investment
will be, so that they choose
what you're selling versus that
of a competitor. This means
your marketing message has to
be adjusted.

Bottom line, clients want
comfort, assurance and trust.

Companies are entrenching
their existing business relation-
ships. It’s becoming increasing-
ly difficult to find new cus-
tomers, but existing relation-
ships have become invaluable.
Buyers want to stick with peo-
ple and companies they trust.
As I mentioned earlier, it
comes down to a matter of risk
and trust. Just as you need to
position yourself correctly in
this new economy, buyers are
also doing this. Recognising this
fact, your task is to demonstrate
to your customers that buying
from you or using your service
or product is a good choice -
one that reduces or even elimi-
nates risk.

By branding and marketing
now, you will be sure to deliver
this message. When your poten-
tial customer is ready to make a
decision, who will they think
of?

All these marketing strate-
gies are certain to keep your
business on top during these
challenging economic times.

Have a productive and prof-
itable week! Remember,
“THOSE WHO MARKET
WILL MAKE IT!”

NB: Scott Farrington is pres-
ident of SunTee EmbroidMe,
a promotional and marketing
company specialising in pro-
motional products. Established
over 27 years ago, SunTee
EmbroidMe has assisted local
businesses in various industries
- ranging from tourism and
banking to telecommunications
- in marketing themselves.

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on East Shirley Street, by e-
mail at scott@sun-tee.com or
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DHL JOB DESCRIPTION

POSITION:
REPORTS TO:
LOCATION:

British Caribbean Finance Manager
Bahamas

OVERALL PURPOSE:

China’s $90bn tourism market remains target for Bahamas

m@ By CHESTER ROBARDS
Business Reporter
crobards@tribunemedia.net

CHINA is poised to become an almost
$90 billion leader in outbound tourist flows
within the next 10 years, still one place
below the US, according to the president
and chief executive of the World Travel
and Tourism Council (WTTC). The sta-
tistics show just why the Bahamas has been
attempting to make inroads into the Chi-
nese tourism market.

Jean-Claude Baumgarten, during his
address at the 13th annual Caribbean
Hotel Tourism Investment Conference
(CHTIC), revealed statistics showing Chi-
na’s rise to power in leisure and business
travel in the immediate future.

According to projections, the number
of Chinese visiting countries outside of
their homeland could reach 100 billion by
2020.

Critics have quickly dismissed the rele-
vance of certain monies invested by China
in the Bahamas, including a $150 million
loan by the Asian superpower, some of
which is earmarked for road improvement.

However, most of those critics are more
interested in the terms of the loan signed
on behalf of the Bahamian people by the
Government and not the monetary injec-
tion itself, which by all accounts is regard-
ed as much needed funding for capital
works projects.

my
= 72 EEE
EAP REEF

Commercial Accounting Supervisor- British Caribbean

This position is responsible for managing the Commercial Finance activities for four
countries within the British Caribbean: Bermuda, Bahamas, Cayman and Tortola.
Manages Revenue leakage, establishes credit limits and reviews shipments to profile.
Supervises the following staff; Billing Analyst, Duties and Vendor Analyst, Accounts

Receivable Analyst.

DUTIES AND RESPONSIBILITIES:

* Manage the Commercial activities for a country or group of countries

within the Cluster.

* Supervise Billing, Duties, Accounts Receivable and Vendor Analysts.
* Prepare and analyze statistics and KPls for the country/cluster.
* Responsible for weekly revenue forecasting to Finance Manager and SMT

* Manage customer profiles.

* Establish AR Credit limits.

* Principal contact for Commercial Controller.

* Assist with preparation of Customer profitability analysis.
* Handle Billing queries from Billing Center.

* 1% level of approval for Credit notes.

* Special projects and ad hoc reports as required.

* Performs other assignments as required.

* Analyse daily transport collect and cash on delivery shipments

* Ensure accurate billing of inbound shipments

* Coordinate all Freight and Logistics billing with Caribbean designated

representative

MINIMUM QUALIFICATIONS:

* High school diploma and/or minimal of 5 years applicable experience
* Minimum of 2 years supervisory or management experience leading

a department.
* A background in commercial credit required.

* Experience with a major Enterprise Reporting Package (ERP)

* Excellent analytical and interpersonal skills.

* Ability to read and interpret data reports. Ability to understand and perform data

analysis.

* PC skills should include the basic suite of MS products, Excel, Access, Word,

Office

* Excellent communication skills both written and verbal, this function does a
lot of interfacing with internal and external customers and the Shared Service

Center

PREFERRED QUALIFICATIONS:

* Bachelor’s degree in Accounting/Finance, a related field or equivalent

education

E-mail Romell.knowles @DHL.com

or mail to
C/O Romell Knowles,
P.O. Box N3735,
Nassau, Bahamas

Chinese investors have also signed a let-
ter of intent with the developers of the
$2.6 billion Baha Mar project, and China is
financing the building of the Bahamas’ $30
million National Stadium. The Govern-
ment, as well as the private sector, thus
appear to be positioning themselves to
take full advantage of China’s ever -xpand-
ing economy.

Direct investment in the Bahamas by
the Chinese could mean direct interest in
the Bahamas as a leisure travel destina-
tion.

The Ministry of Tourism and Aviation
has invested a sizeable portion of its bud-
get in creating ads for distribution in Asia,
underscoring the importance of that mar-
ket for these islands.

“Tt’s amazing how this country [China],
when you open it up, how people are going
to go overseas, here on the chart we said
that in 2020 there will be 100 million Chi-
nese going overseas — maybe more,” said
Mr Baumgarten.

China saw 1.6 billion domestic travellers
recently — 300 million more than the coun-
try’s population, he added, underlining
that population’s interest in leisure travel.

According to WTTC statistics, China
will become the second largest Travel and
Tourism economy in the world by 2019,
just below the US.

The other eight biggest Travel and
Tourism economies are projected to be
Japan, Great Britian, France, Spain, Ger-

many, Russia, Italy and Mexico.

With regard to those statistics, the Min-
istry of Tourism has targeted at least three
of the top five emerging Travel and
Tourism Economies, with increased airlift
to Great Britain, direct flights into France
and its proximity to the US.

This country’s direct interest in China
and other Asian markets highlights its
commitment to tapping emerging markets.
And its choice of Vincent Vanderpool-
Wallace for Tourism Minister, several lead-
ers in the industry told this paper at the
CHTIC conference in Bermuda, can only
serve to make the Bahamas’ tourism prod-
uct more progressive than ever.

With the uncertainty of the economic
downturn this year, and the recent worry
over the US relaxing its once-resolute
stance on travel to Cuba, the Bahamas has
been more forward thinking than ever in
terms of its tourism product.

These islands are set to take centre stage,
along with some of the world’s most beau-
tiful woman, as the Miss Universe pageant
airs live from Atlantis, Paradise Island, in
August, and the world’s most popular
sport, soccer, holds its Congress at the
resort in June.

“Long-term prospects in the Travel &
Tourism industry are supported thanks to
the continued rapid expansion of emerging
destinations, along with the global increase
in per capita income,” said Mr Baum-
garten.

Carib Insurance
Brokers & Agents Ltd.

Will Be CLOSED on
Friday 24 April 2009
at 1:00p.m.

We apologize for any



inconvenience caused

signed,

Management



THE TRIBUNE

m@ By CHESTER ROBARDS
Business Reporter
crobards@tribunemedia.net

THOUGH official statistics
are not available, feedback on
the Bahamas cruise product has
been favourable this year, Min-
istry of Tourism officials said yes-
terday. However, visitor spend-
ing is comparatively less than
previous years due to the impact
of the global financial crisis.

According to Minister of
Tourism Vincent Vanderpool-
Wallace, the Bahamas has a
proximity advantage to the US
that has allowed it to retain its
arrivals numbers in the begin-
ning of what could be a deep
recession. Cruise lines have also
cushioned the impact with
aggressive marketing to fill their
staterooms.

One cruise line official told
Tribune Business that ships try
not to cruise with empty beds.
But into year-end 2008, the
cruise industry was slashing its
prices to entice cruise travellers.
Now, price points are so low the
industry may have difficulty dri-

AIR TAXI, from 1B

encourage financial institutions
such as banks, private equity
funds and venture capitalists to
invest in his venture.

Given the Government’s
track record, it is likely to be -
and quite rightly - concerned
about approving projects that
do not have financing arrange-
ments nailed down. Captain
Khomoutovski may also have
to overcome the fact that the
National Investment Policy
adhered to by the Government,
at least in theory, reserves
domestic transportation busi-
nesses for Bahamians only.

Yet Captain Khomoutovski
said yesterday: “The market for
this project is very big. Every
year the Bahamas gets five mil-
lion tourists. It’s a new experi-
ence for the Bahamas, and will
create new jobs. The Bahamas
has real prospects for this.”

WEDNESDAY, APRIL 22, 2009, PAGE 3B

Cruise passenger
spending declines

ving them
back up, but
officials say
the sector is
evening out of
late.

It was
hoped that
cruise passen-
ger spending "
might help to
float the
Bahamas
economy, as
stopover Visi-
tor numbers
diminished because of the global
recession. But all indications
show that cruise passenger
spending has taken a hit on
board the ships and at ports of
call.

“Whereas we do not have the
statistics to support at present,
the general indications are that
the spending has lessened. This is
not unique to the Bahamas, but
globally,” said director of cruise
development Carla Stuart. “Dur-
ing recessionary periods, spend-
ing is generally less, and it is
anticipated that as consumer

*

e.

V-Wallace

confidence heightens, spending
will also improve.”

According to Ms Stuart, the
Department of Statistics has not
yet released the first quarter
report on the Bahamas cruise
industry.

“Thus far, the feedback
appears to be entirely
favourable,” she said.

The largest cruise vessel in the
world, the Oasis of the Seas,
capable of bringing over 5,000
passengers at one time, is expect-
ed to call on the Bahamas later
this year.

And the former Imperial
Majesty/Regal Empress, now the
Bahamas Celebration, is making
regular affordable trips to the
Bahamas.

“The demand for the Bahamas
cruise product is still very high,
and the Celebration offers pas-
sengers the ability to escape for
one day,” said Ms Stuart.

It was announced yesterday
that the Bahamas will possibly
lose its spot as the world’s third
largest ship registry to the Mar-
shall Islands in the Pacific,
according to lloyd’slist.com.

NOTICE

PEAR

IMIT

NOTIC EIS HEREBY GIVEN as follows:

(a) PEARL LEE LIMITED is in voluntary dissolution under
the provisions of Section 137 (4) of the International Business

Companies Act 2000.

(b) The dissolution of the said company commenced on the
20th April, 2009 when the Articles of Dissolution were submitted
to and registered by the Registrar General.

(c) The Liquidator of the said company is Mr. Michael Low of 1
Raffles Link #05-02 Singapore 039393

Dated this 22nd day of April, A. D. 2009

Credit Suisse Trust Limited
Liquidator

Vacation in Paradise.
On ly $69"

— per person double occupancy.

Minimum 2-night stay. Bahamas residents only,

a

Full use of all Atlantis facilities. Plus:
. Complimentary continental breakfast datly

+ Junior Suites with King-size or two double beds
* Cable TV, refrigerator, in-room safe,

coffee maker, haty dryer

* Kids 15 and under, free

¢ Pool with swim-up bar

Limited-time offer! Reserve today /

Call 242-363-3680

*$69 per person double occupancy per night Sun. - Wed. Add $20 pp for Thurs. - Sat. Maximum
four persons per room. Rates effective through December 15. Additional fees apply for mandatory
taxes, mandatory housekeeping gratuities and utility service fees. Rates quoted are based on



standard room category and are subject to availability. Cancellations must be received 48 hours
prior to arrival or a one night penalty will apply.





THE TRIBUNE

FROM page 1B

- “with better quality work at a
much better price” - in coun-
tries such as the Dominican
Republic and Panama.

Mr D’Aguilar said the
investor told him he did not
mind paying $150-$200 in con-
struction costs. Yet he then
informed the Chamber presi-
dent: “I don’t see what advan-
tage there is to investing in the
Bahamas. I’m not prepared to
be ripped-off by paying $400-
$500 per square foot for poor
quality work.”

Education/learning deficien-
cies, which result in an unpro-
ductive, poorly-qualified work-
force, will hinder the Bahamas’
room to manoevere at a time
when external forces are likely
to force its economy to undergo
some profound changes.

The structure and model the
Bahamian economy has been
based upon, and the rules gov-
erning how its firms conduct
business, are under pressure
from the rules-based trading
regimes this country is being
required to join - the Economic
Partnership Agreement (EPA)
with the European Union, the
World Trade Organisation
(WTO) and future trade deals
with the US and Canada.

Then there is the OECD/G-
20 assault on the Bahamian
financial services industry, at a
time when the Bahamian work-
force is not well-equipped to
handle and manage all these

WEDNESDAY, APRIL 22, 2009, PAGE 5B

a
Workforce failings

‘smother’ expansion

enforced changes.

Expanding on this theme, Mr
D’ Aguilar added: “I was speak-
ing to someone in the private
sector, and they said quite right-
ly that in this adjustment, our
labour force just doesn’t cut it.
Then you’ve got an Immigra-
tion Department that appears
to be under pressure to revoke
most permits.”

Referring to businesses such
as landscaping and his own
Superwash laundromat chain,
Mr D’Aguilar said: “At the end
of the day, businesses such as
mine that get high school grad-
uates from Bahamas govern-
ment schools have an enormous
difficulty in getting people with
basic literacy skills, and we’re
banging our heads against the
wall because it’s so frustrating.
We don’t want to expand our
businesses.”

Without reform of the edu-
cation system, the Chamber
president warned: “You’re
going to smother the growth of
businesses. Bahamian business-
men, if you ask them what the
most troubling facet of running
a business is, 99 per cent of
them will say it’s the difficulty in
finding decent, qualified labour.

“This is such a pressing issue
for the country. You just smoth-
er your private sector. The pri-
vate sector lacks a key ingredi-
ent to grow. From every busi-
nessman I’ve spoken to, the
most pressing issue is the qual-
ity of our labour. How do you
get a productive, honest, quali-

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fied labour force?”

Using his business as an
example, Mr D’Aguilar said
Superwash was in desperate
need of hiring male cleaners in
their 30s, due to the need to
lift/move machinery, garbage
bins and heavy boxes.

Employing men aged in their
20s was not the answer, the
Chamber president explained,
because “they’re not settled” to
a working environment.
“They’re impossible, and a
cleaning job is not what they
envisioned they’d be doing,
even though that’s what they’re
qualified for,” he added.

“And finding male cleaners
in their 30s is impossible. They
don’t want to do it. It’s difficult
to get work permits; it’s the has-
sle every year. You’ve got to go
through the agony.”

To help solve the problem,
Mr D’Aguilar said the private
sector needed to establish a
partnership with the Bahamas
Technical and Vocational Insti-
tute (BTVI) and the Depart-
ment of Labour, in a bid to
address industry’s basic skills
needs.

He suggested that other sec-
tors follow landscaping’s lead.
That industry had assessed what
was done in Florida, come back
and set up its own certification
course to provide workers with
the required skills and stan-
dards, thus providing a career
path.

“These are the sort of things
we need to be focusing on,
rather than getting money from
the IDB. Something concrete.
Let’s get things done,” Mr
D’ Aguilar said.

“All we need ask of the Gov-
ernment, and starting today, is
to give us people who can read,
write and add-up 1+ 1.”

Ralph Massey, a founding
member of the Nassau Institute
economic think-tank, in a pre-
sentation last week drew on the
research finding from his The
Learning Crisis essay to show
that, based on the 2006 BGCSE
results, 39 per cent of New
Providence high school students
who sat the English exam failed,
while another 17 per cent were
“language illiterate”.

As for mathematics, the find-
ings were even more shocking -
36 per cent of all New Provi-
dence high school leavers failed
BGCSE maths in 2006, and
another 46 per cent were
deemed numerically illiterate -
they did not know the differ-
ence between addition and sub-
traction.

el a

For the stories
behind the news,
ecto Maro [e lad
on Mondays

A leading retailer is seeking applications for the position of

BOOKKEEPER/ASSISTANT ACCOUNTANT

Requirements

Applicants should possess the following:

¢ Experience in the field of Accounting or Bookkeeping
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Interested persons please forward your resume to:
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Fax: (242) 322-6607

Email: hr@luxuryretaillimited.com





PAGE 6B, WEDNESDAY, APRIL 22, 2009

THE TRIBUNE



ee ee
Chamber chief ‘incredulous’ over Bahamas Waste permits

FROM page 1B

and create employment, but they are
being thwarted by the Government.
The Government needs to make these
decisions more quickly. My God; three
years and counting, and then they’ve
got to hire the Inter-American Devel-
opment Bank (IDB) to assess the pro-
posal. That'll take another six months
to a year.”

Mr D’Aguilar was responding after
Mr Neymour told Tribune Business
on Tuesday that the Government had
yet to approve Bahamas Waste’s
biodiesel initiative due to concerns
about the pricing structure for the pro-
ject, and the environmental impact of
production by-products such as glyc-
erin.

The Chamber president, though, said
that with foreign fuel imports drain-
ing the Bahamas of close to $1 billion
in foreign currency reserves per
annum, it seemed a “no brainer” that
the Government would want to

encourage the production of domesti-
cally produced alternatives.

With the IDB’s new involvement in
the process, Mr D’Aguilar said it was
possible that Bahamas Waste’s three-
year wait could turn into four years.

“Where is the ability of the Govern-
ment to move expeditiously on some-
thing like this?” Mr D’Aguilar asked.
“Tf it takes three years on everything,
people wanting to get into new, innov-
ative ventures, are going to be so dis-
couraged that they don’t bother.

“It’s very off-putting. Every time you
go to the Bahamas government to get
something approved, it takes for ever.
They need to change their business
model. They need to make their deci-
sions expeditiously.

“What is disheartening in the
Bahamas Waste application is that I
don’t think Bahamas Waste even
knows the reason why the Govern-
ment is not getting back to them.
They’re banging their heads against
the wall. If biodiesel is not a good idea,

I don’t know what is.”

The Chamber president added: “If I
was the Government, I would whole-
heartedly encourage the production of
domestic fuels. It’s good for the envi-
ronment, and takes all this oil and fuel
that’s being dumped in the ground and
recycles it.

“You have this glycerin by-product,
but go down to the Cape Eleuthera
Institute and they’re actually looking at
what you can do with it. Glycerin is a
major component of soap.

“Yes, the glycerin run-off is a con-
cern, but look at what it could save in
terms of the drain on foreign reserves.
It could also assist in a small way, but
assists nonetheless, in the removal of
price volatility.

“Here you have a Bahamian com-
pany, owned by Bahamians, and look-
ing to get into a field replicated around
the world already. Both governments
have seen fit to hold it up for three
years. I just don’t get it. I hope this
does not drag on and on. It’s so off-

putting if every time you go to the
Bahamas government it takes one year,
three years.”

Prime Minister Hubert Ingraham
acknowledged earlier this year that the
Bahamas was still, in many ways, too
inflexible and bureaucratic a country
when it came to the investments
approvals process, implying that there
was a need for change.

He has also in the past suggested
that the civil services needs to become
more proactive and responsive.

Mr D’Aguilar yesterday said he
hoped that the Government and BEC
search for renewable, sustainable ener-
gy suppliers would not become bogged
down in the same bureaucratic maze
that had seemingly impacted Bahamas
Waste’s proposal.

“Drag on for too long, and people
lose interest; the dynamics change,”
the Chamber president said. “We’ve
seen this over and over again.

“T would think this would be a major
priority. The economy is hurting. Let’s

NOTICE

INTERNATIONAL BUSINESS COMPANIES ACT





























































No. 45 of 2000

FOREXMA ONE S.A.

Notice is hereby given that in accordance with
Section 137 of The
Companies Act No. 45 of 2000, FOREXMA ONE
5.4. is in dissolution. The date of commencement
of dissolution was the 16th day of April, 2009, Dillon
Dean of Nassau, Bahamas is the Liquidator of
FOREXMA ONE S.A

Intemational Business

Dillon Dean
LIQUIDATOR

NOTICE
PANTALLNA INCORPORATION LTD.

NOTIC £ IS HEREBY GIVEN as follows







(ai) PANTALLNA INCORPORATION LTD. is in voluntary
dissolutom under the provisions of Section 197 (4) of the
Infarnatonal Business Companies Act 2000.

(b) The dissolution of the said oxenpany commenced on ihe 21h
April, 2009 when the Anicles of Dissolution were submited to
and reqestered by the Registrar General.

fc) The Liquidator of ihe said company & Credit Suisse Trust
Limited, Fue de Lausanne 17 bis, Gereva

Dated this 22nd day of April, A.D. 2009

Credit Suisse Trust Limited
Liquidator

orks

Paul Miecheall Salar
fos Woes & Mas

Hair

326-1696
Fax: 326-1698

$6 Madeira Street, Pulmoduwe

Professional Hair Stylist Wanted

Looking for energetic, professionally trained Hair
Stylist for a full time position.

Must have at least three years experience in hair
coloring and styling.

Experience with Paul Mitchell colors and products
would be benefical.

Please email resume to
hairworks 2 coralwave.com or fax to 326-1698,

Clico (Bahamas) Limited
(In Liquidation)

LIQUIDATOR’S NOTICE

Policyholders of Clico (Bahamas) Limited {In
Liquidation) are advised that premium payments and
other policy transactions can be made at the Company’s
}inain otfice, located on Mt. Royal Avenue and Carew
| Strect, Nassau, Bahamas.

Policyholders and the public are further advised that |

office hours are from 9:00 am to 4:30 pm daily.

Craig 4. (Tony) Gomer
Official Liquidator

Communications
reform legislation
tabling ‘imminent’

FROM page 1B

- and subsequent debate like-
ly to clog up parliamentary
time afterwards, now repre-
sents the best time for the
Government to move the
three Bills.

Tribune Business was told
by one source close to the sit-
uation that the proposed new
legislation should set the tele-
coms and communications
regulatory regime in stone
“for some time to come”,
removing the uncertainty and
inadequacies in the existing
legislation.

Yet the source added that
the Bills were also flexible
enough to provide for any
future privatisations that the
Government may contem-
plate, such as selling-off the
Bahamas Electricity Corpo-
ration (BEC) and/or the
Water & Sewerage Corpora-
tion.

Hence the Utilities Regu-
lation and Competition
Authority name given to the
new regulator by the Bill of
the same title, implying that
this body - once created -
would regulate BEC and the
Water & Sewerage Corpora-
tion in the event of both
being privatised.

Industry and public consul-
tation on the three Bills end-
ed on Monday, and the BTC
Privatisation Committee -
aided by attorneys Charles
Russell and its corporate
advisors, KPMG - is now
rapidly assessing the feedback
gleaned.

The Government’s decision
to move rapidly on the legis-
lation may not go down too
well with Systems Resource
Group (SRG) and Cable
Bahamas, both of whom have
asked for more time to sub-
mit responses.

However, sources suggest-
ed that the administration

wanted to move rapidly, and
any amendments required as
a result of the feedback will
be incorporated during the
parliamentary process.

When it comes to BTC’s
actual privatisation, Tribune
Business understands that
Citibank has been testing the
market waters since earlier
this year to determine the lev-
el of interest in acquiring the
state-owned telecoms
provider.

The privatisation aspect of
the Government’s telecoms
sector policy is likely to gain
momentum once the legisla-
tion is passed, with the Pri-
vatisation Committee and its
advisors then likely to engage
in the active solicitation and
assessment of bids for the
company.

The global economic down-
turn and tight credit markets
are a far from ideal backdrop
against which to attempt the
privatisation, but the more
than 10-year process needs to
be brought to an end as
quickly as possible, something
Mr Ingraham seems to have
decided, too.

His plans to liberalise cel-
lular after two years, while
likely to depress BTC’s value
and the price any bidder will
pay further, will benefit the
overall telecoms market and
the Bahamian consumer, who
will enjoy better prices, more
efficient service and multiple
provider options.

Tribune Business under-
stands that one provider still
in the game is Bluewater
Communications Holdings,
the bidder that reached an
agreement in principle with
the former Christie adminis-
tration to acquire a 49 per
cent BTC stake for $260 mil-
lion, only to be turned down
flat by the Ingraham admin-
istration.

Bluewater is since under-

TAYLOR

INDUSTRIES LTD.

WILL BE CLOSED FoR
ANNUAL STOCKTAKING

THURSDAY, APRIL 23
FRIDAY, APRIL 24
SATURDAY, APRIL 25

We regret any
inconvenience this will
cause to our customers.

stood to have adopted a twin-
track process, making initial
moves to start UK-based
arbitration proceedings as per
the terms of its initial con-
tract with the Government,
but also remaining in the
game in the hope that no suit-
able buyer will emerge and
the administration will be
forced to return to the nego-
tiating table with it.

focus on what can make a difference.
Alternative energy is one area. It
would reduce imports, and reduce
emissions from burning fuel. But you
never get the feeling the Government
of the Bahamas is urgent; it only reacts
to events.”

WT a]
Ce A TL
TMT
HUT

FROM page 1B

the Bahamas has also appealed to
the UK to consider what affect the
tax hike will have on the region.

The tax was originally intro-
duced as a “green tax”, imposed
to give the aviation industry
accountability for its impact on the
environment, but according to the
CHTA, “none of the £2 billion-
plus currently collected is specifi-
cally devoted to environmental
projects”.

The International Air Transport
Association asserts that govern-
ments should refrain from “over-
dosing” the tourism industry with
taxation in order to save the prod-
uct — especially in the Bahamas
and the Caribbean, which is
increasingly expanding its market
share outside of the US to Europe
and Asia.

Despite trials with airlift, Mr
Vanderpool-Wallace said prepa-
rations for the Miss Universe
Pageant are going well.

“There is a formula they [the
organisers] find to be successful,”
he said.



ae eer a ear ae

FINANCIAL CONTROLLER

An established Bahantian Company is seeking a

Financial Controller

Qualifications for a position are:

* Bachelor's Degree or equivalent in Accounting
or applied finance from an accredited and
reputable university.

Certified Public Account

3-5 years Audit experience

Proficiency in Accounting Software such as
QuickBooks or Peachtree

Expericnce in preparing IFRS compliant

financial statements

The individual will be responsible for directing
the overall financial plans and accounting
practices of the organization

Interested persons should send resumes to:
PA).Box CB 13526
Nassau, Bahamas

Position WANTED:

treatment,

by a doctor,

Insurance
a Ministry

Salary is

Fa. Box SP-p3 158

REGISTERED NURSE

A Major Development in Southwest New Providence is
seeking @ full time on-site registered nurse. The nurse
will be responsible for non-critical incidents/accident
to provide the necessary first aid and first responder

Duties Include but not limited to:-

Stabilization of any injured person/s until
they can be transferred to a clinic or
hospital facilities for complete evaluation

Administer drug and alcohol testing to
construction and company staff if required.

Complete any reports required by in house
and relevant government agencies
regarding injuries or incidents on site.

Suitable candidates must have foll medical lability
coverare,
of Health approved/certitied
professional with at least five (3) years experience in the
medical field, Emergency room experience is a plus,

trained and

be technically
medical

commensurate with qualifications and
expericnce. Interested persons may send resume tu





PAGE 8B, WEDNESDAY, APRIL 22, 2009

THE TRIBUNE



eS



The Tribune

Kenric Rolle



Kristen Taylor

savoury taste of victory

yo
Nassau Alrport
Development Company

Removal of Derelict Aircraft

Effectve April 20, 2009, the Nassau Arport Deve opment
Campany (NAD is requesting the ewners of the aircraft pictured
ae ow to renove her prooerly within 30 days of this
notice,

Beth aircraft are Cessna 423 parted on Apron 5 et the Lynden
Pindling Intéemabanal Airoert. Fa luré to de sow | result in he
aircratt oeing remeved and discarded oy the a port
manacement comparry,

For further information contact:
Paice Salely esceriment

Nassau Airpon Development Co,

Lynear Pinang Inemeatiang! Airport

PO, Gox AP Sa225, heseau, Gahenge

Bae MP PP Od



m@ By LLOYD ALLEN

Tribune Features Reporter

lallen@tribunemedia.net

YOUNG chefs Kristen Taylor and Kenric Rolle,
made history last month claiming top prizes in
the recent Keizer University cooking competition.

Both in their senior year of
high school, the teens say since
winning scholarships to the
prestigious cooking institute,
their future plans of becoming
professional chefs now seem
more tangible.

Kristen who is currently
enrolled at North Andros High,
said her interest in cooking first
started around age of 12, which
was when she first started high
school.

“T’ve always loved the chal-
lenge of creating new food, and
my grandmother was the first
person who worked with me in
developing that talent.”

Kristen said the first food she
remembers creating was a
home-made coconut bread.
After watching her grandmoth-
er create the heavenly delight
dozens of times before, Kristen
said it was only natural for her
to try it, with her first attempt
just as good as her grandmoth-
er’s.

From there, she said she con-
tinued fostering her talent,
enrolling in cooking classes at
school, and cooking for her fam-
ily occasionally.

Kristen first entered the
Young Chefs Competition in

2007, where she prepared a rice
pudding with pumpkin, potato
pancakes with strawberry sauce,
and a chicken bread served with
yogurt and mango chutney.

Although she did not win,
Kristen said she remained
focused on her dream of one
day attending an international
culinary school.

Practise makes perfect

“T spent more time practis-
ing my knife skills, I practised
different methods of cooking
so that I could become more
familiar with the kitchen, and
continued to keep my eyes
open for cooking opportuni-
ties.”

Kristen also put her all into
her bread recipe for the Agri-
expo bread making she entered
earlier this year.

She said she was extremely
disappointed when she discov-
ered that once again not only
did she not win, but she did not
even place in the competition.

She said at that point she was
almost ready to throw in the
towel, but after speaking with
her cooking coach, realised that
everything that had happened

NOTICE

NOTICE is hereby given that ELLIOTTE SANDS of BALFOUR

AVE., NASSAU,

BAHAMAS, is applying to the Minister

responsible for Nationality and Citizenship, for registration/
naturalization as a citizen of The Bahamas, and that any person
who knows any reason why registration/naturalization should not
be granted, should send a written and signed statement of the
facts within twenty-eight days from the 22° day of April, 2009 to
the Minister responsible for nationality and Citizenship, P.O. Box

N-7147, Nassau, Bahamas.

NOTICE

NOTICE is hereby given that KADIAN BECKFORD of
#23 SAN SOUCI DRIVE, P.O. BOX EE-15368, NASSAU,
BAHAMAS, is applying to the Minister responsible for
Nationality and Citizenship, for registration/naturalization
as a citizen of The Bahamas, and that any person
who knows any reason why registration/naturalization
should not be granted, should send a written and
signed statement of the facts within twenty-eight
days from the 15 day of April, 2009 to the Minister
responsible for nationality and Citizenship, P.O. Box

N-7147, Nassau, Bahamas.



up to that point was a test, only
to prove just how committed she
was to accomplishing her dream.

She said her third and final
opportunity came when she had
found out about the Keizer
competition. This time, Kristen
said she submitted a complete-
ly unique dish which she was
certain would be good enough
to take her to victory.

“It was a plantain conch
wrap, with pickled vegetables,
glazed beets, and sauce,” she
said.

By the end of the competi-
tion, Kristen walked away with
a $5,000 scholarship, which for
her finally proved that she was
good enough to become a pro-
fessional chef, and that her
determination and commit-
ment over the past six years
was not in vain.

Kristen said she hoped her
experience of staying true to
what she loves, will also be a
testament to other young peo-
ple to remain focused and
believe in oneself regardless
of how difficult something may
seem, as you can end up with a
worthwhile reward.

Like Kristen, CC Sweeting
Senior High twelfth grade stu-
dent Kendric Rolle was also
glad when he discovered that
he had won a scholarship to
Keizer University.

Preparing a ground chicken
and plantain burger with
home-made bread, with a side
of green beans, Kendric placed
second place overall, beating
out more than a dozen of oth-
er young chefs.

Kendric who is also a musi-
cian, youth leader, and Christ-
ian, said that apart from cook-
ing being one of the most
important things in his life,
being able to inspire others
through all that he does is what
make his life worth living.

With the intention of attend-
ing Keizer’s Miami campus in
the fall, Kendric said within
the next three years he hopes
to become a certified culinari-
an, return home from his train-
ing, and begin his career as a
professional chef.

He said with this recent
scholarship from Keizer being
an amazing achievement, he is
confident that God has much
more in store for him, and he is
happy to have family and
friend that support him in that
endeavor.

Walking away with the top
prize was Aquinas College
twelfth grader Deandra Rolle
who was featured in Tribune
Taste last week.



THE TRIBUNE

WEDNESDAY, APRIL 22, 2009, PAGE 9B



See



The Tribune



@ By LLOYD ALLEN
Tribune Features
Reporter
lallen@tribunemedia.net

THIS week in The Tri-
bune’s Things 2 Do run-
down, we’ve searched high
and low to bring you the
best events. And as always,
there’s a wide variety of
concerts, parties, art
exhibits, and cultural events
for your complete indul-
gence.

1. Popular RnB recording
artist Bobby Valentino is
scheduled to perform live
from the Fort Charlotte
grounds this Saturday,
along with some of the
biggest names in Bahamian
entertainment including
SO$A Man, Jah Hem,
MDEEZ, Lady Millz, Rapp
Quelle, and others. The
event which is being spon-
sored by Kemis Digital,
Cyclone Entertainment, Fix
Ya Face Entertainment, Fluid

Lounge, and others, is set to |

begin around 9.30pm. Tick-
ats are priced at $25 general
admission, and $40 VIP in
advance, and can be pur-
chased at Airbrush Junkies

and the Juke Box both in the /

Marathon Mall. A pre-party
is also scheduled for Fluid
Lounge on Friday, where the
2009 Trump Model compe-
tition will take place, with
former America’s next top
model contestant Tiffany
Richardson as a judge.
Ladies are free until mid-
night, and men are admitted
for $15 until midnight.

2. As part of its 50th
anniversary celebrations,
the Bahamas National Trust
is hosting a Robin-Hood
inspired feast and extrava-
ganza at its Retreat Garden
on Village Road this Friday

from 6 -10pm. Featuring the

fine cuisine of a few local
chefs, the event will also
host various musicians,
magicians, and other enter-
tainment. Tickets for the
avent are $75, and can be

purchased at BNT headquar-

ters. For more information,
contact 393.1317.

3. Once again the
Express Yourself movement
is scheduled to present its
open mic session at the Hub
art centre on Bay Street
tonight, artists of all forms
and genres will have the
freedom to share their talent
with the Bahamas. This
event which runs from
8.30pm to midnight, has no
cover charge, however
donations for the centre and
event are welcomed.

4, This Friday, art work
by local artist Jane Water-
ous is being featured at the
Doongalik Studio gallery
Marina Village from 6pm to
9. The event which is

themed ‘Peace, Love, Happi-

ness,’ consist of a 17 plus
piece collection. Using resin
and acrylic with some air-
brush to create the pieces,
this exhibit is said to illus-
trate an abstract approach
and view of Mrs Waterous’
life. Admission is free, and
will continue until May 1,
2009.

5. On Saturday, the
Bahamas National Sympho-
ny Orchestra will have it

annual gala concert at the St

Andrews Presbyterian Kirk
Starting at 7.30pm. Featur-
ing a diverse mix of sym-
phonies from the baroque
period up to the contempo-
rary period, the BNSO is
also expected to add a twist
of jazz pieces. Tickets for
the event are $25 in
advance, and $30 at the
door. Ticket venues include
Logos Book Store,
Maranatha Music Centre,
and the Linen Shop on Bay
St. Hors d'oeuvres and
drinks will be also be
served.



Sammi Starr goes to prom

@ By ALEX MISSICK
Tribune Feature Reporter
amissick@tribunemedia.net

PROM season 2009 is almost
here and many young ladies from
across the country are already
shopping around for the perfect
prom dress and scouting potential
date prospects. However, as a
result of the hard economic times
that have fallen on some fami-
lies, many young girls may not
be able to afford the prom of
their dreams.

With this fact in mind, Bahami-
an recording artist Sammi Starr
has decided to give one special
young lady a chance to have her
prom fantasies and dreams come
true by holding a nation wide
competition to win an all expense
paid prom date with him.

To be eligible to win this
celebrity prom date, young ladies
must be high school seniors with
a GPA of at least 2.8, must be

active in their community -sports,
school clubs, etc, have a good
rapport with the student body,
write a short essay as to why they
should win the date, be a fan of
Sammi Starr and be able to name
at least four of his songs. The
entire event will also be aired on
JCN, making this special young
lady a reality star for the night.
“T noticed that the majority of
my fans are between 14 and 23,
which puts most of them in high
school. I know that 65 per cent of
them are females. I wanted to
give back to my fans and show
the Bahamian public, especially
these young people that I am a
strong advocate for education. I
wanted to applaud the efforts of
young female seniors who want
to go away and study hard
because we have a lot of teenage
pregnancy, fighting and those that
do not want to do anything seri-
ous with their lives in this coun-
try. So I wanted to reward one

TRY
2,320 sq. feet located on

Mt. Pleasant Avenue off Carib Road

Available for immediate occupancy
Call 393-7020 for further details

NOTICE is hereby given that



MYRIAME BELLUNE

of COLONY VILLAGE, P.O. BOX N-4218, NASSAU,
BAHAMAS, is applying to the Minister responsible for
Nationality and Citizenship, for registration/naturalization
as a citizen of The Bahamas, and that any person
who knows any reason why registration/naturalization
should not be granted, should send a written and
signed statement of the facts within twenty-eight
days from the 15 day of April, 2009 to the Minister
responsible for nationality and Citizenship, P.O. Box

N-7147, Nassau, Bahamas.



NOTICE

NOTICE is hereby given that IZMA MARCNER of PINEDALE,
EIGHT MILE ROCK, GRAND BAHAMA, BAHAMAS P.O. BOX
F2197 is applying to the Minister responsible for Nationality and
Citizenship, for registration/naturalization as a citizen of The

Bahamas, and that any person who knows any reason why
registration/ naturalization should not be granted, should send a
written and signed statement of the facts within twenty-eight days
from the 22nd day of APRIL, 2009 to the Minister responsible for
Nationality and Citizenship, P.O.Box N-7147, Freeport, Bahamas.



‘

@ By LLOYD ALLEN
Tribune Features Reporter
lallen@tribunemedia.net

MANY in the local entertainment arena and
others were shocked to learn of the recent
death of one of the Bahamas’ most energetic
musicians Cyril “Dry Bread” Ferguson.

Viewed as one of the last in a dying breed of tra-
ditional Bahamian musicians, Mr Ferguson’s life-
time career of producing indigenous Bahamian
melodies in many ways has influenced other local

artists like KB, Geno D, Avvy and Visage.
Longtime friend and colleague Dave Mackey
said that when he last interviewed Dry Bread in
\ 2006, he did not dream that it would be the
| last time the two would work together.
; He explained that over the many years
he has worked as Dry Bread’s engineer,
\, co-producer, and graphic designer, they
\ were able to produce dozens of hits
\ songs, all helping to cement Dry Bread
as a note worthy musician who has tru-
ly made his mark in Bahamian history.
Mr Mackey stated: “From the days
of Cay Gotlieb’s Cicada Sounds Stu-
dio (now COOL96 studios), to my
Mackeymedia multimedia produc-
tion studio, we produced tracks and
albums like Sunshine On My Body,
Bahamian Music, Sweet Ting In Da
Can, She Jump, A Good Woman,
Mr Jitney Man, Lover And A
Friend, Get in the Groove, Shake
Up Your Body Line, Do the
Junkanoo, and lots more.”

Mr Mackey went on to say that
one of the most chilling things
about that interview back in 2006,
was where Dry Bread spoke of hav-
ing to perform at funerals for
























deceased musicians using his music as a healing
tool for their families. Now five years later, Dry
Bread himself has become one of those musi-
cians.

Reflecting on Dry Bread’s passion for music
and ambition as an entertainer, Mr Mackey said:
“ Perhaps Dry Bread’s greatest career wish was in
becoming a senior representative as head of The
Musician’s and Entertainer’s Union, a dream that
never came to fruition during this life.”

Fellow entertainer Ronnie Butler, said although
death is a natural part of human life, he was
extremely sad to learn of the passing of Mr Fer-
guson.

“It’s always sad to hear of any one of our fellow
entertainers passing on, especially one with as
much impact as Mr Ferguson,” he said.

Mr Butler who has worked with Dry Bread on
occasions, said that it is unfortunate that the hard
work that goes in producing and promoting
Bahamian music, is often overlooked for other
artists outside of the country.

Mr Butler said the passing of Dry Bread is
another example of how artists are remembered
after they are “dead and gone,” a reality that he
said does not have to continue.

A longtime activists for increased airplay of
Bahamian music, Mr Butler said he hope that
one day Bahamian music will rule the airways,
giving youngsters a more tangible display of local
culture, music, and Bahamian specific experi-
ences.

West End and Bimini MP Obie Wilchombe
stated: “Dry Bread was a special person who
touched lives and gave of the gift that was
bequeathed to him by his God. He taught chil-
dren music and encouraged each to embrace their
gift and follow their dreams. Dry Bread’s depar-
ture saddens us all particularly the people of
Grand Bahama where he spent the majority of his
life, but his music remains with us and the mem-
ories that will last forever.”

young lady for working hard in
school, being a good role model
and for being just a good all
around person,” Mr Starr said.
Mr Starr said he will pay for
the young lady’s dress (designer
of choice), limo ride to and from
the venue, prom pictures with
family, friends and himself, and
provide a laptop, a cell phone
and even cash to pursue her
dreams of going abroad to the
college/university of her choice.
“T haven’t been to prom in
about six years. It is not about

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winner is gets her mind blown.
It’s going to be a night she will
never forget. We have been get-
ting countless applications so far.
I think this will give young ladies
for next year’s prom season more
incentive to work harder and get
good grades. I want the young
lady who wins to feel that she
was made to feel special for her
accomplishments in high school,”
Mr Starr said.



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PAGE 10B, WEDNESDAY, APRIL 22, 2009

THE TRIBUNE



ARTS



Putting the past in gear

@ By LLOYD ALLEN
Tribune Features Reporter
lallen@tribunemedia.net

THE Bahamas Antique
Auto Club (BAAC) over the
past 22 years has built a
reputation for having some
of the best kept vintage
vehicles available in the
country, and this year the
group celebrates its anniver-
sary with a look into its

past.

Founding President Don Aranha
along with other executives of the
organisation recently spoke with Tri-
bune Entertainment.

Mr Aranha explained that back in
the late 70s, he spent a great deal of
time visiting car shows and auto exhi-
bitions in the United States and Cana-
da. After he submitted his own vehicle
in an antique and specialty car show in
1987 he decided to create the BAAC
with a major focus on fund raising and
charity.

Mr Aranha, said his passion for
antique vehicles began with the pur-
chase of his first vintage vehicle, a 1961
Corvette purchased in 1979.

Club secretary Murray Forde
explained that over the years, apart
from traditional antique vehicles, the
organisation has grown and they are
also featuring more modern vehicles
like the 1991 Eclipse entered in this
year’s show held at Arawak Cay.

Leslie Rahming who owns the 91’
Eclipse explained that the 1.8 turbo
charged vehicle went through several
alterations and updates since he bought
it some years ago.

According to Mr Rahming: “It has
two motorised TVs, a yellow hand held
play station, it has crocodile skin seats,
with the exterior color changed to fuch-
sia pearl and blue pearl.”

With around 20,000 watts needed for
the sound system, there is a 350 ampli-
fied external alternator connecting four
batteries to this seriously “whipped”
ride. He added that in addition to the
chrome detailing throughout the vehi-
cle, there is an additional motorised
screen in the car’s rear trunk, with fiber-
glass molding throughout its flooring.
He said that the vehicle is valued at
well over $100,000, an amount sure to
increase with future modifications.

Mr Forde said: “We have always had
a special-interest class which is really
generally a low production car, a kit
car, a repli-car, but we don’t have a lot
of those.”

Referring to the Eclipse as “a rolling
stereo,” Mr Forde said the vehicle was
popular in this year’s competition and
said that similar cars have helped in
the overall appeal of the annual event.

Overall the group registers more than
100 antique and special interest vehicles
which one member explained, takes a
whole lot of time to maintain and

SENIOR Administrators at the Nazareth Centre accepting proceeds from the Auto Clubs

2009 car show, being given by Richard Blake, President, Peter Armstrong, and Secre-

tary Murray Forde.

upkeep.

BAAC member Richard Blake said,
apart from members having adequate
funds to purchase replacement parts,
they themselves need to be handy or
have a good mechanic to properly com-
plete repair jobs.

“T have particular difficulty with the
1969 AMX, which is a car produced by
American Motors which is now out of
business. The problem was in getting
parts, so it was one or two specialty
stores apart from Ford or GM that I
used,” he said.

Mr Blake said the introduction of
the Internet has helped a lot in locating
hard to find parts, but added that there
are still some major external challenges
to owning a special interest vehicle.

BAAC president Peter Armstrong
detailed one of those challenges as dri-
vers who have no regard for the group’s
regular island long ride.

“We go out on a fun ride every three
months with the last bringing together
around 19 cars,...you can guarantee that
somewhere during that drive, some oth-
er road user will attempt to get past us
and attempt to cut into our ride,” an act
he said is both dangerous and stupid.

Noting that their “train of vehicles”
may be somewhat annoying to others
driving behind them, he said their pace
is usually within speeding limits, thus
not imposing transport delays to others.

The group also identified licensing
as another major hurdle to BAAC
members and others who own vintage
cars.

Mr Armstrong said in two separate
incidents he was pulled over for not
having the appropriate license for his
vehicle, but said he along with the
members of BAAC ride their vehicles
only a few times a years, and feel some-
thing similar to a bond license (O/T
plates) should be created for such vehi-
cles.

Another challenge for many of the
BAAC members is the high duty on
the vehicles.







The art of
conservation

FROM page 12

Franz’s mother, Rose Tay-

Overall the group has generated and
maintained relationships with other
groups such as the Florida Auto Asso-
ciation and the Jamaican Classic Car
Club, as well as contributed to local
charities and children’s homes. Apart
from donating fund raising proceeds
to children’s homes, the group also rais-
es funds and donates groceries to about
80 unfortunate children during the
Christmas holiday.

Mr Forde said: “Generally we pick a
different one each year, and last year
we did the Bilney Lane Children’s
Home, and what we realised was what
we did was a good start with the things
they needed but they need more.”

With this type of commitment, he
explained that although anyone is wel-
comed to apply for membership, the
group prides itself on attracting family
oriented individuals as well as those
who have a serious interest in the
antique auto world.

“We go through a process with the
application forms where the board of
directors would meet to discuss it,
because obviously there are certain
people that we would not want to be
members, but we hardly ever turn
anyone down.”

He explained that there is
no age limit, but expressed
that it was essential to target
younger members to help in
the future growth of the organ-
isation.

Many of the members noted
that apart from the Toyota’s,
Mercedes, and other tradi-
tional vintage cars that have
become synonymous with
the group, bringing in a
younger crop of members
would probably bring cars like
Subaru’s, Skylines, and other modern
day muscle rides. With the club’s defi-
nition of vintage vehicles being cars 20
years and older, members say now is
the time to draw new life to the club
which would reflect the change in time.



babies in the mangroves and if
they don’t have anywhere to
go then we would loose that
part of our economy. I also
incorporated some of the
things I enjoy such as soccer,
my laptop and music,” Mr Tay-
lor said.

Mr Taylor said although he
was never really confident with
his painting skills, after exper-
imenting with a few of his
pieces he has gained a greater
sense of confidence in using
that medium. Most of his art
pieces are abstract using mate-
rials such as coloring pencils
and water colour pencils.

Due to his love for conser-
vation and a healthy planet, Mr
Taylor decided to also make a
3D art piece using some of the
garbage items he collected dur-
ing a beach cleanup that he
participated in.

“T used old roof shingles,
coke bottles, and broken bot-
tles among other things. I
painted it black to show the
impact we are having on the
environment. I also found an
old shoe bottom which I used
to depict our human/carbon
footprint on the environment.
There are also brightly colored
fish jumping away from the
garbage to show that they can’t
live like that,” Mr Taylor said.

He added that he would like
his peers to become educated
about what is going on around
them.

“The destruction of the man-
groves is going on all the time
and people just don’t pay atten-
tion to it, they just focus on
their life. People normally only
focus on temporary things and
are not looking at the long
terms effects of it,” Mr Taylor
said.

lor, said her home country,
Costa Rica, has a long history
of conservation of the environ-
ment and she is very proud that
her son holds a special inter-
est in it.

“He has grown understand-
ing the value of nature. To me
it is very rewarding to see that
he is not just interested in look-
ing after the environment and
keeping it but trying to share
that with other people so that
more citizens of both countries
can eventually learn that we
have to recycle, reuse and
make a better effort to keep
the beauty of the environ-
ment,” Mrs Taylor said.

Mr Taylor said the environ-
ment has had the most signifi-
cant impact on his art pieces
and research.

“The environment brought
up important topics such as
deforestation, pollution and
human destruction of the nat-
ural world that surround us.
When creating these pieces my
intent is to appreciate the nat-
ural beauty of our environment
and encourage others to enjoy
it and make sure that they are
doing all they can to preserve it
for future generations.”

Mr Taylor has been a mem-
ber of The Bahamas National
U15 Soccer team, the Bahamas
National U17 Soccer team, a
member of the Bahamas
National U19 Cricket team and
a 2008 Ministry of Tourism
Foreign Language Cadet. He
won First place on the Dolphin
Encounters Poster Competi-
tion 2008, and second place in
2007. Franz is currently a class
representative in the Student
Council and a member of the
LCIS Senior Band and Steel
Drum Band.

AON Ols
FRANZ’S ART



THE ORIGINAL six members of the club when first formed in 1987. (L to R) Richard
Chestnut, Lenny Brozozog, Don Aranha, Alonzo, Rolle, Murray Forde, and Charles
Johnson. Phot By Elaine Forde.

FOUNDING
members
(from left to
right) Don
Aranha, Mur-
ray Forde,



















































Hardy plan-
ning the
club’s first car
show in 1988,
| which was

| held at Tyer-

| flex, on Wulff
Road.

























ae



THE WEATHER REPORT,



















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ORLANDO . .
FL.ONOF QDI \ Partly sunny. A starry night. Breezy with bright Bright sunshine. Partly sunny and Mostly sunny, a The higher the AccuWeather UV Indexâ„¢ number, the
_ High:83°F/28°C ; ; 5 i reater the need for eye and skin protection.
’ ¢ ot sunshine. windy. t-storm possible. g y p
Low: 58°F/14°C . 5 ; 5 ; 5 ; .
. @ a High: 84 High: 83 High: 83 High: 82
TAMPA c 2) f High: 85° Low: 72° Low: 75° Low: 74° Low: 75° Low: 75° see ET
{ mu i , PETE eae AccuWeather RealFeel
High: 81° F/27°C a * B6°-74° F B6°-72° F High _Ht.(ft.)_ Low _Ht(ft
Low: 62° F/A17°C as r The exclusive AccuWeather RealFeel Temperature® is an index that combines the effects of temperature, wind, humidity, sunshine intensity, cloudiness, precipitation, pressure, and Today 6:25am. 25 12:15am. 0.2
aa @ r - elevation on the human body—everything that effects how warm or cold a person feels. Temperatures reflect the high and the low for the day. 6:41pm. 29 12:21pm. 0.2
: ; , Thursd 10am. 26 1:03am. 0.1
| CO te re tae. o
5 ae Statistics are for Nassau through 2 p.m. yesterday Friday 75dam. 06 149am. 00
; a ABACO Temperature 8:10pm. 3.2 1:47pm. 0.0
? : = ano ° PUG MN, eescceatstes Qaceeuetaceraaect eee 82° F/28° C 3:38 76 7-36 04
= F 1 High: 83° F/28" c LOW cesssiassccsgetes 73° F/23° C Saturday 3:56 a 33 9-34 oa 04
f A Low: 67° F/19°C Normal high... ge a a I
” . Normal low 69° F/21° C
a _ eS @ WEST PALM BEACH Last year's High .....sseccsssscssssesssseeee serrzo°c | NYT TIM UCI
' ll High: 82° F/28° C Last year's lOW oeeceeeseesceeseeeeteeeeeees 64° F/18° C oa ae te os
“os Low: 67°FA9°C 5 Precipitation = ==———————i—SC—S—C——sSSnrise...... ‘41 a.m. Moonrise. .... ‘47 a.m.
i As of 2 p.m. yesterday ..ccccccccccccsssssseeeeeeeeen trace Sumset....... 7:36 p.m. Moonset... .. 5:24 p.m.
; FT. LAUDERDALE FREEPORT Year to date New First Full Last
High: 81° F/27° C @ High: 81° F/27°C Normal year to date... cececsesceeseeseenees 6.82" - na
Low: 67° F/19°C Low: 65° F/18°C a eo
AccuWeather.com al 5
me @ Forecasts and graphics provided by : ae —-l
‘. MIAMI AccuWeather, Inc. ©2009 Apr. 24 May 1 May 9 May 17
High: 82° F/28° C EL ELT HERA
ee — Low:71°F/22°¢ NASSAU Low:70°F/21°C
High: 85° F/29° C ow:
Low: 72° F/22°C
a _,
KEY WEST o~ - 2 CATISLAND
High: 80° F/27°C i High: 80° F/27° C
Low: 71° F/22°C Low:69°F/21°C
e le
——.
GREAT EXUMA — SAN SALVADOR
— eee High: 85° F/29° C
ow:71° . Low: 74° °
ow: 74° F/23° C
Shown is today's weather. Temperatures are today's . ANDROS | , f
highs and tonights's lows. High: 86° F/30° C Pe, ~—
Low: 72° F/22°C —— li
i ——
i
LONG ISLAND
isto
Low: 75° F/24°C
Today Thursday Today Thursday Today Thursday —< MAYAGUANA
High Low W High Low W High Low W High Low W High Low W High Low W K High: 88° F/31° C
Fic FIC Fic FC Fic FIC Fic FC FC FIC FIC FIC KW@® Low: 74° F/23°C
Albuquerque 80/26 51/10 pe 78/25 49/9 pc Indianapolis 60/15 38/8 pe 69/20 55/12 s Philadelphia 60/115 44/6 sh 63/17 44/6 pc
Anchorage 5110 34/1 s 51/10 36/2 s Jacksonville 80/26 55/12 s 85/29 60/15 s Phoenix 97/36 67/19 pc 93/83 67/19 s CROOKED ISLAND / ACKLINS
Atlanta 70/21 52/11 s 76/24 59/15 po Kansas City 77/25 53/11 s 76/24 6216 s Pittsburgh 48/8 35/1 sh 62/16 36/2 pe RAGGEDISLAND — Migh:89°F/s2°c
Atlantic City 58/14 39/3 sh 63/17 38/3 pc Las Vegas 95/35 65/18 pc 90/32 66/418 s Portland,OR 60/15 41/5 pe 56/13 415 pc High: 86° F/30° C Low: 78° F/26°C
Baltimore 60/15 40/4 sh 62/16 38/3 ¢ Little Rock 81/27 56/13 s 83/28 60/15 $s Raleigh-Durham 66/18 40/4 pc 72/22 45/7 s Low: 73°F/23°C
Boston 60/15 42/5 sh 6347 45/7 pec Los Angeles 78/25 58/14 po 72/22 56/13 pc St. Louis 68/20 50/10 s 76/24 62/16 s . a.
Buffalo 48/8 36/2 sh 51/0 38/3 pc Louisville 6417 45/7 pe 74/23 57/13 s Salt Lake City 77/25 55/12 s 78/25 49/9 c GREAT INAGUA
Charleston, SC 76/24 53/11 s 78/25 56/13 $s Memphis 75/23 58/14 s 82/27 63/17 pc San Antonio 89/31 63/17 §s 84/28 66/18 s High: 91° F/33°C
Chicago 52/11 35/1 pe 68/20 53/11 pc Miami 82/27 71/21 $s 84/28 71/21 s San Diego 68/20 58/14 pce 66/18 57/13 pc Low. 76°F/24°C
Cleveland 48/8 35/1 c 56/13 44/6 pc Minneapolis 60/15 46/7 §s 78/25 54/12 pe San Francisco 65/18 51/10 pce 57/13 48/8 pc .
Dallas 86/30 64/17 s 84/28 65/18 $s Nashville 69/20 47/8 pe 77/25 56/13 pc Seattle 5412 40/4 c 55/12 38/3 pe
Denver 75/23, 44/6 pe 80/26 45/7 s New Orleans 83/28 63/17 $s 83/28 62/16 s Tallahassee 80/26 57/13 s 87/30 57/13 s
Detroit 5010 344 c 61/16 44/6 pc New York 62/16 46/7 sh 62/16 50/10 pc Tampa 81/27 62/16 s 84/28 63/17 $s
Honolulu 81/27 68/20 pce 81/27 68/20 pc Oklahoma City 88/31 60/15 s 84/28 60/15 s Tucson 93/33 60/15 pce 90/82 60/15 s
Houston 84/28 62/16 s 82/27 64/17 $s Orlando 83/28 58/14 $s 86/30 62/16 s Washington,DC 62/16 41/5 sh 63/17 44/6 5s








a





Acapulco
Amsterdam
Ankara, Turkey
Athens
Auckland
Bangkok
Barbados
Barcelona
Beijing
Beirut
Belgrade
Berlin
Bermuda
Bogota
Brussels
Budapest
Buenos Aires
Cairo
Calcutta
Calgary
Cancun
Caracas
Casablanca
Copenhagen
Dublin
Frankfurt
Geneva
Halifax
Havana
Helsinki
Hong Kong
Islamabad
Istanbul
Jerusalem
Johannesburg
Kingston
Lima
London
Madrid
Manila
Mexico City
Monterrey
Montreal
Moscow
Munich
Nairobi
New Delhi
Oslo

Paris
Prague

Rio de Janeiro
Riyadh
Rome

St. Thomas
San Juan
San Salvador
Santiago
Santo Domingo
Sao Paulo
Seoul
Stockholm
Sydney
Taipei

Tokyo
Toronto
Trinidad
Vancouver
Vienna
Warsaw
Winnipeg

High
F/C
90/32
63/17
65/18
65/18
64/17
91/32
85/29
70/21
72/22
78/25
61/16
66/18
74/23
66/18
66/18
72/22
75/23
100/37
107/41
51/10
86/30
80/26
74/23
57/13
59/15
70/21
68/20
50/10
82/27
48/8
81/27
97/36
58/14
87/30
61/16
86/30
82/27
68/20
72/22
85/29
77/25
93/33
54/12
41/5
68/20
80/26
107/41
50/10
70/21
65/18
76/24
93/33
70/21
86/30
88/31
91/32
81/27
88/31
74/23
54/12
52/11
70/21
79/26
70/21
48/8
88/31
56/13
68/20
58/14
50/10

Til

Today

Low
F/C
73/22
43/6
44/6
54/12
49/9
78/25
75/23
56/13
46/7
67/19
46/7
44/6
66/18
47/8
43/6
49/9
59/15
63/17
82/27
25/-3
68/20
70/21
56/13
45/7
45/7
41/5
43/6
43/8
66/18
34/1
75/23
60/15
43/8
58/14
45/7
75/23
65/18
43/6
39/3
77/25
50/10
66/18
41/5
27/-2

INSURANCE MANAGEMENT

(BAHAMAS) LIMITED. INSURANCE BROKERS & AGENTS

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64/17

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66/18 s

37/2
46/7
43/6
68/20
69/20
49/9
75/23
54/12
70/21
48/8
70/21
59/15
35/1
36/2
59/15
72/22
57/13
34/1
72/22
38/3
52/11
38/3
43/6

pc

High
F/C
90/32
59/15
58/14
63/17
63/17
94/34
85/29
69/20
59/15
68/20
66/18
63/17
70/21
65/18
63/17
63/17
77/25
80/26
107/41
30/-1
838/31
82/27
80/26
59/15
55/12
64/17
68/20
52/11
82/27
52/11
82/27
97/36
57/13
66/18
63/17
86/30
81/27
66/18
79/26
86/30
79/26
95/35
54/12
46/7
55/12
83/28
105/40
54/12
72/22
50/10
82/27
96/35
70/21
85/29
86/30
91/32
17/25
85/29
76/24
66/18
54/12
72/22
86/30
63/17
53/11
85/29
54/12
55/12
59/15
62/16

Thursday

Low
F/C
73/22
45/7
35/1
52/11
50/10
78/25
75/23
57/13
45/7
63/17
47/8
43/6
62/16
47/8
41/5
48/8
59/15
67/19
81/27
20/-6
69/20
70/21
58/14
46/7
43/6
39/3
37/2
40/4
66/18
36/2
77/25
61/16
44/6
53/11
45/7
75/23
63/17
45/7
43/6
77/25
49/9





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Weather (W): s-sunny, pe-partly cloudy, e-cloudy, sh-showers, t-thunder-
storms, r-rain, sf-snow flurries, sn-snow, i-ice, Prcp-precipitation, Tr-trace

WEDNESDAY, APRIL 22np, 2009, PAGE 11B




MARINE FORECAST



WINDS WAVES VISIBILITY WATER TEMPS.
NASSAU Today: NW at 10-20 Knots 2-4 Feet 10-20 Miles 77°F
Thursday: — NE at 10-20 Knots 1-3 Feet 10-20 Miles 77°F
FREEPORT Today: NW at 10-20 Knots 2-4 Feet 10-20 Miles 77°F
Thursday: — NE at 10-20 Knots 1-3 Feet 10-20 Miles 77°F
ABACO Today: NW at 10-20 Knots 2-4 Feet 10-20 Miles 77°F
Thursday: NE at 10-20 Knots 1-3 Feet 10-20 Miles 77°F



-

On

Showers
EX XJ T-storms
Rain

Miami
82/71



eure Cold Fronts
mules Shown are noon positions of weather systems and ee
Snow precipitation. Temperature bands are highs for the day. Warm Mienflinfilie
Ice Forecast high/low temperatures are for selected cities. Stationary a
-10s| -0s [081] 10s 20s [308%] 40s









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Tet (AD) SOHO BD) SSG PETA) SoPHATO | Tek (TNT) SE0-D8K2 Tek (240) 134-2504














Dry Brea: BAAG celebrates _ ms
A hahamian 22 years \ ee
legend see page 10 \ air

see page nine

WEDNESDAY, APRIL 22, 2009

fp THE ENVIRONMENT

ad has had the most
~ _ significant impact

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Full Text

PAGE 1

THE Court of Appeal chal lenge over Senior Justice Anita Allen’s refusal to recuse herself from a civil case that involves another judge coming under fire, continued yes terday. Justice Allen refused to step down from a case involv ing Israeli brothers Rami and Amir Weissfisch last month after she expressed concerns about the integrity of a forensic accounting report prepared by Daniel Ferguson, the brother of a close female friend of Justice John Lyons. Justice Lyons had appointed Ferguson to prepare the report. Nicholas Lavender, QC, who represents Rami Weissfisch, continued his submissions yesterday on the grounds of appeal. Mr Lavender told the court that he would need a half day to complete his submissions. The appeal hearing has now N N A A S S S S A A U U A A N N D D B B A A H H A A M M A A I I S S L L A A N N D D S S L L E E A A D D I I N N G G N N E E W W S S P P A A P P E E R R Local criminals ‘in arms race’ C M Y K C M Y K Volume: 105 No.123WEDNESDAY, APRIL 22, 2009 PRICE – 75 (Abaco and Grand Bahama $1.25 WEATHER PARTLY SUNNY HIGH 85F LOW 72F n By TANEKA THOMPSON T ribune Staff Reporter tthompson@tribunemedia.net LOCAL thugs may be engagingi n an arms race to outmatch rival criminals, it was suggested yesterday. T his suggestion came on the heels of reports that high-powered machine guns were used in the murder of Marlon Javon Smith, a 29year-old man who was chased and killed in the backyard of his Pinewood Gardens home Sunday morning. His death was the twenty-second murder this year. The majority of these killings involved illegal firearms. Yesterday Commissioner of Police Reginald Ferguson told The Tribune that police have ruled out the possibility that an AK-47 assault rifle was used in Smith's killing, but added that it appears likely that another high-powered rifle was used to perpetrate Suggestion comes after reports that high-powered rifle used in murder The Tribune ANYTIME ... ANYPLACE , WE RE #1 B AHAMASEDITION TRY OUR McFLURRY TWIX MIX www.tribune242.com Claims of nepotism in the granting of Crown Land denied n By PAUL G TURNQUEST Tribune Staff Reporter pturnquest@tribunemedia.net LANDS and Surveys Direc tor Tex Turnquest yesterday denied claims of nepotism in the granting of Crown land in Exuma. Speaking with The Tribune yesterday, Mr Turnquest denied his involvement in the selection and sale of five beachfront lots on the island of Exuma, which were sold by government to members of his own family who in turn “flipped” the properties, netting profits in the hundreds of thousands of dollars. Placing the responsibility squarely at the feet of Prime Minister Hubert Ingraham and former Prime Minister Perry Christie, Mr Turnquest said that the minister with respon sibility for lands (ie the Prime Minister ultimately signs off on Crown land grants. Located just outside the settlement of Forbes Hill, Exuma these Crown land lots border each other and range in size from over 34,000 square feet to just over 17,750 square feet. These lots were purchased at $1,550 on January 27, 2003, $2,340 on August 1, 2001, $1,270 on June 6, 2001, $1,370 on March 18, 2002 and $2,105 on June 6, 2001. The first four of these lots have since been sold. Their resale was recorded at $550,000 on June 8, 2006; $500,000 on July 5, 2005; $550,000 on June 8, 2006 and $425,000 on February 26, 2007. Sources close to the transactions suggested that the deci sion to space out the sale of these properties was to ensure that Prime Minister Ingraham, who signed the first four transactions, did not become aware of the family link between the vendors and the Director of Lands. This tactic, sources allege, was the main reason for the delay in the final sale in 2003 after government had changed so that former SEE page eight n By KARIN HERIG Tribune Staff Reporter kherig@tribunemedia.net A MAN burning a dead dog in his backyard yesterday morning sparked a fire that destroyed most of his property, threatened nearby homes and spread through a large area of bush on the southern side of Carmichael Road near the Coral Harbour round about. Neighbours told The Tribune that the homeowner, who was living in an unfinished building with his daughter, started the fire in his backyard in very windy conditions and FIREFIGHTERS put out a blaze burning on a property on Carmichael Road near the Coral Harbour roundabout. The fire reportedly started when a homeowner burned his dead dog in his backyard and the flames spread to a large area of bush. F e l i p M a j o r / T r i b u n e s t a f f BURNINGOFDEADDOGSPARKSBLAZE SEE page two Challenge over judge’ s refusal to recuse from civil case continues SEE page eight Lands and Surveys Director speaks out SEE page eight THE TRIBUNE has boost ed its lead as the Bahamas’ top daily with street sales up 7.7 per cent over last year in defiance of all global trends. Overall, circulation was up more than five per cent in March over the same period last year in spite of the reces sion. Tribune president Robert Carron said: “Our newspaper covers the right stories in the right way and appeals to Bahamians across the board. This is a remarkable perfor mance.” Metropolitan dailies in oth er parts of the world, and especially in North America and Europe, are suffering unprecedented drops in circu lation. In fact, many once great titles are now facing bankruptcy and extinction as the Internet, television and falling advertising revenues take their toll. But The Tribune continues to rocket skywards, with Monday and Thursday sales par ticularly strong. “On Thurs days, our print run frequently hits 23,000 or more,” said Mr Carron. The Tribune has shown steady gains since it turned from evening to morning pub lication in the summer of 1998. However, the trend has accelerated since 2001-2002, making it the undisputed market leader. LANDS AND SURVEYS Director Tex Turnquest placed the responsibility at the feet of Prime Minister Hubert Ingraham ( left) and former Prime Minister Perry Christie (right Tribune sales defy global trends with 7.7 per cent rise SEE page eight SUPPLEMENT INSIDE TODAY

PAGE 2

n B y NATARIO McKENZIE Tribune Staff Reporter A MOTHER accused of causing the death of her new-b orn baby boy, whose body w as discovered in a field near a church on Soldier Road last December, will remain at the Sandilands Rehabilitation Centre for two more weeks for fur-t her evaluation, a Magistrates Court was told yesterday. Stacia Rolle, 19, of Windsor Place Road, alias StaciaA dderley, was arraigned before Chief Magistrate Roger Gomez in Court One, BankL ane last month, charged with concealing of the body of a c hild. According to court dockets, it is alleged that on Wednes-d ay, December 10, 2008, Rolle caused the death of a child with the intent of concealing its birth. T he infant’s body was reportedly discovered by a resi dent of the neighborhood near the Church of God on Soldier Road. I t was suggested that the baby may have been born only about an hour before his body was discovered. When police arrived at the scene they found the body mutilated; only one fingerr emained on one of the baby’s hands and the feet had been extensively damaged. Police also discovered what appeared to be fresh blood onp ieces of clothing. Rolle pleaded guilty during her arraignment and was remanded to the Sandilands Rehabilitation Centre for a psychological evaluation. S he did not appear in court yesterday as expected. Police prosecutor Sergeant S ean Thurston told the court that officials at Sandilands had i nformed him that the psychological report was still not ready and that they neededm ore time to monitor the accused. Rolle’s attorney Ian Cargill r eminded the court that Chief Magistrate Gomez had o rdered that Rolle be sent to Sandilands for a period of two weeks, and said she shouldh ave been brought to court yesterday. T he matter has now been adjourned to May 13. C M Y K C M Y K LOCAL NEWS PAGE 2, WEDNESDAY, APRIL 22, 2009 THE TRIBUNE INDEX MAIN/SPOR TS SECTION Local News..........................P1,2,3,5,6,7,8,12 Editorial/Letters..........................................P4 Sports...............................................P9,10,11 BUSINESS/ARTS SECTION Business.........................................P1,2,3,5,6 Advt............................................................P4 Comics........................................................P7 Taste........................................................P8,9 Arts......................................................P10,12 Weather.....................................................P11 CLASSIFIED SECTION 36 PAGES USA TODAY MAIN SECTION 12 PAGES Mother accused of causing baby’s death to remain in Sandilands P OTCAKE ‘Ginger’ went missing from her home in the Village Road area on Monday, April 20, between 7.30pm and 1 0.30pm. The owners say Ginger is a very sweet and friendly dog. She weighs around 50 to 55lbs and has long legs. S he was wearing a multi-colour striped collar at the time she disappeared. The owners are appealing to members of the public to t ake a good look at Ginger’s photo and to keep their eyes peeled when driving around. Owners of missing potcake appeal to members of public the flames got out of control. He reportedly asked his neighbours to borrow a water hose when he realised that the flames were rapidly spreading across his property, which contained many derelict cars and boats. The situation was exacerbated when the gas tanks of the cars and boats in the yard exploded, neighbours said. The fire reportedly also burned more intensely due to the fibre glass contained in the boats’ hulls, which made the firefighters’ job more difficult. Director of Fire Services Supt Jeffrey Deleveaux confirmed to The Tribune that the fire that is now burning through several acres of bush started from a man burning a dog in his yard. By yesterday afternoon, Mr Deleveaux said, firefighters had extinguished the fire on the man’s property and had the bush fire under control. No further homes or proper ties are under threat from the fire, he said. However, the inside of the man’s unfinished house was completely gutted by the fire and his possessions, which he had stored in his backyard, were reduced to ashes. Other dogs and a raccoon that he kept on his property were burned to death. The roof of a neighbour’s two-storey building was also damaged. Fire Chief Deleveaux said there is a possibility that the homeowner could face charges for starting a fire in a residential area and/or negligence. Yesterday morning’s blaze was just the latest in a series of bush fires that have been burning in the Carmichael Road area in the past two weeks. Police believe that a massive fire that spread across several acres of forest in the Carmichael Road area last week was started by an arsonist near the area's well-fields. No one has so far been arrested in connection with that mat ter and investigations continue. Last week’s fires have for the most part been completely extinguished. However, some smaller areas of bush that are still burning, are inaccessible to the firefighters. FROM page one THEFIRE threatened the homes of the man’s neighbours. Burning of dead dog spar ks b laze DERELICT CARS and garbage burning yesterday on the property on Carmichael Road. Felip Major /Tribune staff

PAGE 3

n By ALISON LOWE T ribune Staff Reporter alowe@tribunemedia.net As long as the occupancy levels s een in the first three months of 2009 continue to hold up, there w ill be no need for further job cuts at Atlantis, Kerzner’s president and managing director told The Tribune. George Markantonis said he s ees “the glass as half full, not half empty”, with visitor arrivalst wo percentage points higher in January, February and March t han expected, while bookings for June and July also look “encouraging.” However, he said that the com pany “can’t see beyond” July r ight now, and if occupancy levels “suddenly go off the cliff versuso ur projections for another reason, then that may be a different c ase.” Atlantis let go 800 workers in last year November, citing poor arrivals and occupancy projec tions. At that time, Mr Markant onis indicated that the company would be in a better position to u ndertake a review of employment levels again around Easter 2009. In the meantime, the company recently asked 2,500 staff to take unpaid vacation as part of a cost cutting strategy”, indicating that the move was part of a plan to ensure the company meets its “bank covenants and financial obligations.” Queried about this statement, Mr Markantonis defended the company’s stance, saying it is tak ing proactive steps to “stay ahead of the eightball” financially. “We are not a knee jerk company, we are not a reactive com pany. This is a highly professional institution. We are not going to wait until we hit the bank covenant because of some hurri cane coming and whapping us the month of September, wiping out business and putting covenants in trouble and then try to fix it,” he said. Bank covenants refer to certain conditions placed on a loan by a lender, requiring for example that the recipient – in t his case Atlantis – meet specific financial targets or else repay the loan immediately. Stating that the company went “heavily into debt” to build phase three of the resort and has put “$3 billion into the Bahamas” to date, Mr Markantonis said: “When everything crashes and particularly when your lenders have been hurt by their own practices, they get very jumpy and they are looking at everybody. “But when we talk about whether we are going to make covenants – we are not going to go bankrupt. We are making money. If we weren’t, why the hell are we here? We’re not run ning a charity.” He noted that asking staff to take unpaid holiday was just one aspect of a broad-ranging plan to reduce the company’s costs and ensure it remains in a sound financial position. Another component, an energy conservation programme imple mented last September, saw staff help reduce the resort’s electricity usage in February 2009 by a million kilowatt hours versus the same month in 2008. M r Markantonis said the resort was delighted to see the number of nights rooms were occupied this February compared with February 2008 grow by 4,000 – but even happier to discover that rewarding staff for finding ways to keep the resort’s electricity bill down led to massive reductions in energy usage despite the needs of a greater number of visitors. Overall, the frugal practices of the resort’s thousands of employees saved the company around $250,000 in February, said Mr Markantonis. Meanwhile, although the final numbers are not yet in, March looks set to have been an energy saving suc cess too. “It was a great month, kilowatt hours hugely down again, rooms solid,” he said. C M Y K C M Y K LOCAL NEWS THE TRIBUNE WEDNESDAY, APRIL 22, 2009, PAGE 3 T T h h e e J J a a v v a a G G a a l l l l e e r r y y T T h h e e J J a a v v a a G G a a l l l l e e r r y yWong’s Plaza Madeira St. Wong’s Plaza • Madeira St. Tel: (242 Tel: (242 2335 2335 Soft and durable Diversatex Soft and durable DiversatexTM TMcushion is fade and mildew cushion is fade and mildew resistant and is available in resistant and is available in blue, green or terracotta blue, green or terracotta x xChairs Chairsx xTables Tablesx xBenches Benchesx xUmbrellas Umbrellasx xLoungers Loungersx xDrinks Trolleys Drinks Trolleysx xCoffee Tables Coffee Tablesx xEnd Tables End Tablesx xCushions CushionsOutdoor Elegance Outdoor Elegance Police identify victim of Queen’s Staircase tragedy In brief n By ALISON LOWE Tribune Staff Reporter alowe@tribunemedia.net KERZNER’S top executive said the resort stands behind calls for government to allow a wider range of people in the Bahamas to gamble. George Markantonis, president and managing director of Kerzner International (Bahamas The Tribune the company “thinks some of the rules regarding who should be allowed to gamble should be reviewed.” He said Kerzner International was “very happy” to play a part in crafting a recent presentation made by the Bahamas Hotel Association to the government which addressed the need perceived by the casino industry for a swathe of changes in the regulatory framework governing its operations as a whole if it is to remain competitive. The Tribune understands that amongst the recommendations proposed was that, contrary to current restrictions, residents of the Bahamas who are not Bahamian citizens should be allowed to gamble in casinos. The presentation was made shortly after it became clear that Florida’s lawmakers were advancing proposals from within its casino industry for an all-out expansion of gambling opportunities in the state – including permitting popular table games such as those offered in Bahamian casinos and lowering the legal gambling age to 18. Threat The move is viewed as a further threat to the Bahamas’ attractiveness as a destination for US gamblers in particular, following a decision last year by Florida to allow Blackjack and Baccarat – games which would have previously been found only offshore and in Las Vegas – and has prompted renewed concern from stakeholders in the Bahamas that steps must be taken to shore up the industry’s position here. Mr Markantonis said: “There’s no doubt that Florida has hurt us. Even though we haven’t seen a huge decline (in gamblers great marketers and attracting new players. We’d have been doing way better (had things remained the same said. On a recent trip to Florida he was disheartened to recognise some of Atlantis’ big players enjoying betting sessions at the Hard Rock Cafe – a mere “five minutes from the airport.” “If you go in there now it’s like you could be in Las Vegas: They have huge spectacular machines, they have huge spectacular beautiful casino tables, and this is what is sad – it was packed. “We’d see people who were our customers and we’d say ‘Jack, why aren’t you (at Atlantis instead of flying . . . et cetera, et cetera.’ So instead of coming maybe 12 times a year, once a month, now they’re coming four, and I can see their point,” he said. While the property is trying hard to boost casino revenue in the face of the Florida threats and an economic downturn, the executive noted that the indus try remains restricted by longstanding controls. “I wouldn’t go so far as to say we are way behind the rest of the world we are not – but we do have some bureaucratic rules and regulations that make it difficult for us sometimes to do business in an expeditious way,” he said. Giving the example of how quickly it is possible for a player to redeem credit in Las Vegas, Mr Markantonis claimed they go through a “ten second process” while those in the Bahamas are subject to a more time-consuming process required by the Gaming Board. The regulation requiring staff working in the vicinity of the casino to get a licence from the Gaming Board also hinders business, he suggested, with one restaurant located near the casino recently having to shut down for several days while the company awaited licenses for replacement staff to take over from others who had quit. Nonetheless, Mr Markantonis said he recognises that the hotel industry is just “one constituency among many” whose interests the government must weigh when it determines policy. n By MEGAN REYNOLDS Tribune Staff Reporter m reynolds@tribunemedia.net POLICE have identified the man who died after falling on the Queen’s Staircase last month amid allegations that his death was caused by the slow response of medical workers. Leslie Sands, 50, of Pinewood Gardens, fell while walking up the historic stone staircase next t o the Princess Margaret Hospit al (PMH head wound for 45 minutesbefore paramedics stationed o nly metres away went to his aid, witness Rev Kevin Cooper claims. Rev Cooper said he saw Mr Sands, wearing a yellow s hirt and khaki trousers, in the PMH pharmacy moments before he saw him lying on the c entral platform of the 65th step s tone staircase with blood pour ing from a head wound, the bones of his nose broken and h is forehead split open. When emergency services were slow to respond to calls, the pastor said, he ran to PMH less than 100ft away – to report the accident but hospital staff were slow to respond. Blood A doctor who walked up the stairs to take Mr Sands’ pulse confirmed he was living around 30 minutes after he fell at around 3pm on Tuesday, March 17, but the injured man continued to lose blood for another 15 m inutes before paramedics a rrived with a stretcher, Rev Cooper claims. Mr Sands was finally taken to hospital around 4 5 minutes after he fell, the witn ess said. “He would have been messed up because of the fall, but he died because he lost som uch blood and because they didn’t react fast enough. “It’s not like they did every thing they could, they didn’t doa nything,” he alleged. Police investigating the death have not confirmed whether or not they are investigating Rev Cooper’s claim. Assistant Superintendent Walter Evans said foul play is not suspected and the cause of death, “could have been a myriad of issues.” Princess Margaret Hospital would not release details of the incident to the press. Anyone with any information which may assist the police investigation can call the Central Detective Unit on 322-2561 or log on to www.rbpf.org to file an anonymous report online. S CENEOFTRAGEDY: T he Q ueen’s Staircase. Tim Clarke /Tribune staff Game for a review of gambling rules THEBIGCASINODEBATE Top Kerzner executive backs calls to let more people play in casinos ‘No more job cuts – if Atlantis occupancy levels hold up’ LANDMARK: The Atlantis resort on Paradise Island.

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EDITOR, The Tribune. Did you know Mr Collins personally? Then how is it that you know what his intentions were when he built his infamousw all? I strongly disagree with you when you say that he built the wall to secure his property from bushes (unless bushes is a new term for black people). It amazes me how you white people are constantly trying tod efend your blatant racism as something else. Whatever his intentions, the fact is a white man put up a wall which was viewed by black peo ple as a means of segregation. Who cares if he handed out a few jobs to a few select coloured people who had an obligation to feel privilege because they were employed in his fields? Find something of interest to write about please and stop trying to make heroes out of racists. Thank you, whether published or not. AARON ROBERTS Nassau, April, 2009. (For years our family lived on Shirley Street immediately opposite the Collins’ homestead, where The Tribune now stands. Yes, as a child we knew Mr Collins. However, Sir Etienne Dupuch was his parlia mentary colleague and served on many committees with him. Sir Etienne had intimate knowledge of Mr Collins’ programme to get Bahamians employed. As a matter of fact, this was very much the main effort of leaders of this country at that time, and this happened to be Mr Collins’ contribution whethert his letter writer wishes to accept it or not. (Somewhere in our numer ous files we have an aerial pho to of the Collins homestead with its surrounding environs, which shows no residentiala reas around it. The wall was not built to segregate one residential area from another, because at that time there were no built up areas to segregate. (We also remember after Mr Collins’ death, and Mrs Collins’ eventual move to a smaller residence on East Bay Street that the property was broken up into lots and sold. Part of the property became Collins Avenue, and Palmdale and Centreville grew up around it. The land on which Doctor’s Hospital now stands was a part of the Collins gardens, and Collins Avenue was all a part of the estate. What remains of the present property was bought by the St Andrew’s Association for St Andrew’s School. The property extended almost to Wulff Road on the south. It was opened on the east, and south for development and even a part of the ornate black iron railings came down on the Shirley Street side to make way for Collins Avenue. However, the new developers did not demolish the wall on the western side, which even tually created racial tensions long after Mr Collins’ death and the bush was transformed into the residential and business community that we know today. (The western wall became an issue in the election of 1956 when Sir Etienne Dupuch campaigned to have it opened so that there could be a free flow of people from both sides. Up until that time, people on the western side were climbing a ladder as a short cut to get from one side to the other. There were several accidents, but the one that brought the infamy of the wall to a head was when ap regnant woman lost her baby trying to scale it. (It is true that persons living on the western side of the wall were predominantly poor and black. Those on the eastern side were middle class Bahamians,p redominantly white, but black families also had their homes there. Those against Sir Etienne’s drive to open the wall, presented a petition to the House to keep the wall intact. It was signed by both white and black residents on the eastern side of the wall. Black residents were convinced that if their poor black brothers to the west were allowed in, it would reduce the value of their property. (The opening of the Collins Wall became the main issue in Sir Etienne’s election campaign. It was because Sir Etienne wanted the wall down, but his constituents, both black and white on the eastern side of the wall, wanted it to remain up as a barrier to the residents on the western side, that he lost his House of Assembly seat as the MP for the Eastern district. (Much of this probably took place before Mr Aaron Roberts was even born. We were not only born during those years, but as a reporter we recorded much of this history. We are not here to convince people like Mr Roberts who is probably more comfortable with the political, racist propaganda on which he was raised. It is immaterial to us what he believes. This country will move ahead with or without people like him. Whenever we locate the aerial photograph of the Collins property, which over the years has prob ably been incorrectly filed, we shall publish it if only to enlighten Aaron Roberts. Ed). EDITOR, The Tribune. For at least the last three governments we seem to have been on a downward spiral in this country and the various governments and opposition parties seem to be moving on a stage “directionless”, all fiddling while the country burns. All around we see evidence of chaos and reactions to events instead of actions from formulated national development plans. Neither political party in which we have entrusted the future of ourselves and our country seems to have a national plan for the forward movement of this country, and no amount of complaining about what the other boys did or did not do is easing our almost perilous situation. Driving around our capital we see strong evidence of neglect and lack of maintenance. There are more traffic lights out of order than working, there are massive pot holes in so many roads, the public buildings are national disgraces, decisions are being made about the employment of foreigners without a proper registry of what skilled and unskilled labour is needed to promote the well b eing of the country and its citizens, criminals have taken over the streets and the police and the courts seem powerless to stop the surge in crime, and we do not seem able to properly run a passport office. The educational outlook is dismal and we wonder where the person nel will come from to man any industries we may wish to pursue. Instead of our movement to the First World which was promised some decades ago, we seem to have moved to the status of banana republic which so many of our critics have accused us of being. Is it too much to ask of our politicians that they enlighten us as to what national plan they have for the advancement of the country so that a determination can be made as to how the plan can be implemented, and also voters can make educated decisions based on responses from persons wishing to engage in public service? For instance, how do we see the future of tourism, do we continue to build mega hotels like Atlantis when the American tourists who like this kind of resort may not have the funds to populate them, or do we move to the modest hotels which are preferred by Europeans? Do we confine Family Island tourism to the models of Abaco and Harbour Island which have worked over the years or do we move the failed Exuma experiment? Let the people know you have a plan and give us the elements of that plan. JEANNE I THOMPSON (Tired of banana republic government under the pretext of first world status) Nassau, April 21, 2009. C M Y K C M Y K EDITORIAL/LETTERS TO THE EDITOR PAGE 4, WEDNESDAY, APRIL 22, 2009 THE TRIBUNE The Tribune Limited NULLIUS ADDICTUS JURARE IN VERBA MAGISTRI Being Bound to Swear to The Dogmas of No Master L EON E. H. DUPUCH, Publisher/Editor 1903-1914 S IR ETIENNE DUPUCH, Kt., O.B.E., K.M., K.C.S.G., (Hon. P ublisher/Editor 1919-1972 Contributing Editor 1972-1991 EILEEN DUPUCH CARRON, C.M.G., M.S., B.A., LL.B. P ublisher/Editor 1972Published Daily Monday to Saturday S hirley Street, P.O. Box N-3207, Nassau, Bahamas Insurance Management Building., P.O. F-485, Freeport, Grand Bahama T ELEPHONES Switchboard (News, Circulation and Advertising Advertising Manager (242 W EBSITE www.tribune242.com – updated daily at 2pm W ASHINGTON President Barack Obama has gone abroad and gored an ox the d eeply held belief that the United States does not make mistakes in dealings with either friends or foes. And in the process, he's taking a huge gamble both at home and abroad, for a payoff thatc ould be a long time coming, if ever. By way of explanation, senior adviser David A xelrod describes the president's tactics this way: "You plant, you cultivate, you harvest. O ver time, the seeds that were planted here are going to be very, very valuable." While historic analogies are never perfect, Obama's stark efforts to change the U.S. image abroad are reminiscent of the stunning realign m ents sought by former Soviet leader Michael Gorbachev. During his short by Soviet stand ards tenure, he scrambled incessantly to shed the ideological entanglements that were leading the communist empire toward ruin. But Obama is outpacing even Gorbachev. After just three months in power, the new A merican leader has, among many other things: Admitted to Europeans that America d eserves at least part of the blame for the world's financial crisis because it did not regul ate high-flying and greedy Wall Street gam blers. Told the Russians he wants to reset relations that fell to Cold War-style levels under his predecessor, George W. Bush. Asked NATO for more help in the fight in Afghanistan, and, not getting much, did notc astigate alliance partners. Lifted some restrictions on Cuban Americ ans' travel to their communist homeland and eased rules on sending wages back to families there. Shook hands with, more than once, and accepted a book from Hugo Chavez, the virul ently anti-American leader of oil-rich Venezuela. Said America's appetite for illegal drugs and its lax control of the flow of guns and cash t o Mexico were partly to blame for the druglord-inspired violence that is rattling the southern U.S. neighbour. Said that "if our only interaction with many of these countries is drug interdiction, if our only interaction is military, then we may not be developing the connections that can, overt ime, increase our influence" neglecting to mention U.S. health care, education and human i tarian relief efforts in Latin America. At a news conference ending the three-day S ummit of the Americas on Sunday, Obama was asked to explain what a reporter called this e merging "Obama Doctrine." He said that first, he remains intent on telling the world that the United States is a powerful a nd wealthy nation that realizes it is just one country among many. Obama said he believes t hat other countries have "good ideas" and interests that cannot be ignored. Second, while the United States best represents itself by living up to its universal values and ideas, Obama said it must also respect thev ariety of cultures and perspectives that guide both American foes and friends. " I firmly believe that if we're willing to break free from the arguments and ideologies of an e arlier era and continue to act, as we have at this summit, with a sense of mutual responsibility and mutual respect and mutual interest, then each of our nations can come out of this challenging period stronger and more prosperous,a nd we can advance opportunity, equality, and security across the Americas," the president s aid. Critics, especially those deeply attached to the foreign policy course of the past 50-plus years, see a president whose lofty ideals expose the country to a dangerous probing of U.S. weakness, of an unseemly readiness to admit p ast mistakes, of a willingness to talk with unpleasant opponents. " I think it was irresponsible for the president to be seen kind of laughing and joking with H ugo Chavez," said Sen. John Ensign, a Neva da Republican. "This is a person along the lines with Fidel Castro and the types of dictatorship that he has down there in Venezuela and the anti-Americanism that he has been spreading a round the world is not somebody the presi dent of the United States should be seen ash aving, you know, kind of friendly relations with." A t his news conference Obama said he did n't think he did much damage to U.S. security or interests by shaking the hand of Chavez, whose country has a defence budget about one-six hundredth the size of the United States, and d epends upon it's oil reserves for solvency. But beyond specific attacks on his new fore ign policy are the deeper philosophical challenges emerging from the still powerful, if dimini shed, conservative political structure in the United States. Such opponents can play havoc with Obama's attempts to change domestic pol icy and will work to weaken his 60-plus per cent approval among Americans. Obama brushes that aside: "One of the benefits of my campaign and h ow I've been trying to operate as president is I don't worry about the politics I try to figure o ut what's right in terms of American interests, and on this one I think I'm right." S o thought Gorbachev. But being right is not always politically healthy. (This article was written by Steven R Hurst of the Associated Press). Our politicians fiddle while the country burns LETTERS letters@tribunemedia.net Obama gores foreign policy ox HATTERAS SPORTSFISHERBOATDESCRIPTION: 197842’SIZE:Beam-15’/Depth11”GROSS TON:22,800lbs LOCATION: TexacoEastBayDock APPRAISED VALUE: $198,800 F O R S A L E INTERESTED PARTIESSHOULD SUBMITOFFERSINCLUSIVE OF TELEPHONECONTACTAND POSTAL ADDRESS TO: CBDISTRESSED PROPERTIES, CREDIT RISK MANAGEMENT DEPARTMENT, P.O BOXSS-6263 NASSAU,BAHAMAS OR EMAIL US AT:DISTRESSED.PROPERTIES@COMBANKLTD.COM *WERESERVETHERIGHTTOREJECTANYORALL OFFERS. Stop trying to make heroes out of racists

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THE contract for the production of a “master plan” and Environmental Impact Assessment study for the redevelopment of the Queen Elizabeth Sports Centre has been award ed to the Integrated Building Services Group. Minister of Public Works and Transport Neko Grant said it will take three years to fulfil the $2,993,857 contract. Mr Grant said IBS, which is a Bahamian company, joined forces with IBI, an American company, to present an acceptable proposal and succeeded in their bid to execute the project. “Bearing in mind the proposed relocation of baseball and softball facilities as a result of the construction of the new national stadium, it is the gov ernment’s intention to have an EIA and master plan expedited to assist in the determination ofa permanent location for these sporting facilities,” he said. He explained that the new national stadium, the funding for which is being donated by the Chinese government, will be the principal facility in the Queen Elizabeth Sports Centre, but that other sporting facilities need to be developed in accordance with the design brief. These include a baseball stadium, softball stadium, basketball arena, drag racing strip, racquetball and squash complex, lawn tennis training complex, throwers’ practice field annex, national cross country running and walking trail, gymnastics training hall and complex, vol leyball training hall and complex, beach volleyball and beach soccer complex, Bahamas Golf Federation training facility, Commonwealth American Football League training facility, and a national driving centre. Mr Grant said one of the objectives of this master plan is to use land in a way that allows for the future expansion of each sporting facility, as well as the construction of new sporting facilities in years to come. A second objective, he said, is to make the most of potential non-sporting revenue sources, for example through the construction of concession facilities. Mr Grant said the government also plans to explore options for further sporting development. “These objectives,” said Mr Grant, “are expected to guide the work of the consultants in the completion of an EIA, which will be completed in the first instance followed by the development of the master plan.” Desmond Bannister, Minis ter for Youth, Sports and Culture, said: “We look forward to the development of the Sports Centre, to the completion of the master plan for the utilisation in particular of the Bahamian sporting public. “The new stadium and the related structures which are planned for the Sports Centre will ensure that we have the best possible use of the land in that area and that we will enjoy the best sporting facilities in our region of the world.” C M Y K C M Y K LOCAL NEWS THE TRIBUNE WEDNESDAY, APRIL 22, 2009, PAGE 5 Bring your unwanted or used clothing to our Mackey Street or Carmichael Road Thrift Stores. Thank you! Local computer companygoes green In brief CUSTOM Computers has decided to help save planet Earth – one ink cartridge at a time. The company has announced that it is participating in the Planet Partners Return and Recycling Programme run by HewlettPackard (HP leading supplier of computer and software products. The innovative programme enables simple, convenient recycling of original HP inkjet cartridges, toners and other products. Custom Computers is encouraging its customers to s upport the effort, in order to help rid the planet of the h armful substances found in c artridges and toners. C ustom Computers and Hewlett-Packard will ensure that the used products are recycled properly and processed to recover valuable plastics and metals for new products, which will help to divert millions of tons of waste from landfills around the world. Recyc lable According to the company, 98 per cent of the materials in ink cartridges are recyclable. Customers can visit any of the company’s locations – in the Island Traders Building on East Bay Street near the footof the old Paradise Island Bridge, the new location on Cable Beach, or the Service Centre on Okra Hill – to turn in used ink cartridges. In return, customers will receive a specially designed eco-friendly Custom Comput-ers tote bag with the purchase of a new ink cartridge or toner throughout the month ofApril. The tote bags can be used as a replacement for plastic bags, which are harmful to the envi ronment and take hundreds of years to decompose. “Our goal was to make it easy and convenient for peo ple to recycle their ink cartridges and toners in a safe and responsible manner,” said Pia Farmer, co-owner and director of Custom Comput ers. “Our customers can rest assured that none of the ink cartridges and toners, which they turn in will be disposed of at the city’s land fill site on Harrold Road. “We are firmly committed to returning these items to Hewlett-Packard, which has an extensive recycling pro gramme, and is a proven environmentally conscious global business leader.” Custom Computers hopes to extend the recycling pro gramme to include other local partners, and Mrs Farmer hopes to some day be able to transport shiploads of boxes filled with used toners and cartridges to Hewlett-Packard. She also hopes that one day, recycling boxes will be placedin public places, making it sim pler and more convenient for consumers to recycle. A BUSINESSMAN on a mission to r eclaim properties allegedly “stolen” from his family a century ago is now targeting two derelict homes in downtown Nassau. Warren Aranha, 50, says both of the houses, on Cumberland Street, are part of the old J S Johnson estate, of which he claims to be the sole inheritor. Y esterday, business sources dismissed Mr Aranha’s claim as “idiotic” and said t he properties changed hands a year ago, with attorney Nigel Bowe buying them for around half a million dollars. But Mr Aranha, president of White Rose Estates Ltd, a property firm, insists t he houses are his and says he is prepared to go to court to prove it. The move is the latest in Mr Aranha’s campaign to reclaim properties he alleges were stolen from the J S Johnson family in t he late 19th and early 20th centuries. He believes a conspiracy involving seve ral leading white Bahamian families led to a massive land grab which dispossessed descendants of Joseph Samuel Johnson, a leading 19th century businessman who also served in the House of Assembly. Last week, Mr Aranha moved into the derelict former home of American murderess Sante Kimes on Cable Beach, claim-i ng the two-acre site is part of a 465-acre parcel filched from the Johnsons in the e arly years of the 20th century. And he is preparing to confront develo pment firm Bahamar by leasing an adjoining three-acre site to a company of architects and developers, claiming it is also part of the Johnson property. Now he is alleging that the Cable Beach s ite has a direct documentary link with the houses in Cumberland Street, and that he is the true owner of all three properties. “I am sure my argument will stand up in court because I have all the papers,” Mr Aranha told The Tribune . All of my research work, all of my claims, are backed up with solid documentation.” He said members of the Johnson family h ad been making claims on their estate for many years now. But some had allowed themselves to be i ntimidated and lost interest. “People have called them crazy in the past because of the claims they were mak-i ng. But that is just a tactic to influence the public,” he said. He maintained that lots 78 and 79 in d owntown Nassau supposedly the sites of the two Cumberland Street houses were, in fact, in George Street on the orig-i nal town map. “Somewhere along the line one map has been superimposed on another,” he said. Mr Bowe thinks he has bought lots 78 and 79, but they’re somewhere else.” A source close to recent transactions involving the Cumberland Street properties has dismissed Mr Aranha’s claims out of h and, saying solid title can be traced back into the mid-19th century, with deeds to support it. Wrangle B oth homes have fallen into a ruined state because they were subject to a Supreme Court wrangle lasting more thant en years, he added. The late Mrs Kathleen Cartwright probated the will after the death of MsC lementina Anderson, who had a life tenancy of the property and lived there for more than 60 years, he said. H owever, heirs emerged to question the validity of the will and won in court. A subsequent appeal against the judgment f ailed. Hence, said the source, Mr Bowe bought the houses with secure title in 2007 from beneficiaries of the estate for half a million dollars. “Mr Aranha’s claim has no substance whatsoever,” he added. “He showed up one day and built a wall on this property a nd he was told to clear off. “However, for anyone not Bahamian t his is a really bad reflection on the legal system here.” Yesterday, Mr Aranha’s title battle was further complicated by the emergence of historian and businessman Anthony Cunn ingham, who is also laying claim to some of the land said to have belonged to the J S Johnson estate. Mr Cunningham said Johnson property was an off-shoot of the Cunningham estate, w hich he said dated back to 1783 when a British general, Robert Cunningham, a rrived in the Bahamas after the American revolutionary war. General Cunningham, he said, was granted the land for services rendered during the conflict. “I am going to enter this fight,” said Mr Cunningham, “I have engaged a lawyer and we are looking into the boundaries. Ia m prepared to go to court and fight this. “Lake Cunningham is named after my f amily and we are salvaging what we can of our estate within the constraints of modern l aw. There are laws you have to understand, but Mr Aranha doesn’t appear to understand the law. We have documentation from crown grants right up from this date. But we are doing things the legalw ay.” Mr Aranha said his claim dates back to a mortgage granted to Joseph Samuel Johnson by Queen Victoria in the late 19th century. His own link to the estate was through his grandmother, Sarah Johnson, h e said. Share your news The Tribune wants to hear from people who are making news in their neighbourhoods. Perhaps you are raising funds for a good cause, campaigning for improvements in the ar ea or have won an award. If so, call us on 322-1986 and shar e your stor y. ‘Derelict homes are mine – and I can prove it in court’ Master plan to be completed for redevelopment of Queen Elizabeth Sports Centre Neko Grant D ERELICT: P roperties in Cumberland Street. Warren Aranha

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Y OU MIGHT not know it, but there is a fire burning among artists and intellectuals who believe we are in grave danger of losing our cultural heritage all the things that make us Bahamian. They say that the products of Bahamian culture our music, theatre, literature, art, buildings and folkways are under-rated, under-supported and under threat. More to the point, they argue that the disintegration of our cultural attractions over the years has led to a tourism product so barren and boring that one trip up a deteriorating Bay Street completes a visit. According to architect Pat Rahming, the services that deliver a unique experience are what makes a destination successful. And in our case, those services defined as tours, attractions and entertainment have been allowed "to crumble, rot, or go out of business." In other words, there is no Bahamian brand, a term which refers to how we package and market the Bahamian way of life the things that distinguish us from other countries, and that are expressed through the cultural products mentioned above. Sun, sand and sea do not distinguish the Bahamas from similar destinations, the argument goes. So rather than spending millions every year on foreign advertising, we should be investing more in b usiness and brand development locally. "We must commit resources to create an environment rich with opportunities to share the uniqueness of the Bahamas through the development of attractions," Rahm ing says. "Cultural activity must be acknowledged as the primary product in the business that drives (or should drive Or, to put it in the appropriate intellectual context, as stated by the African writer Lopold Sdar Senghor, "culture is at the beginning and the end of development." T his context can be monetarized too. In most developed economies cultural industries account for 2-5 per cent of GDP and have generated consistent and stable growth. In some major destinations, cul tural tourism is estimated to be as high as 40 per cent of annual visitor arrivals. A recent study commissioned by Canada's Heritage Department, for example, reckoned that arts and culture contributed $46 billion directly to the Canadian economy in 2007, but the overall impact of the sector was a much broader $84.6 billion. That study attributed more than a million jobs to arts and culture or to spinoff industries, such as tourism. Currently, our Ministry of Tourism spends most of its $91 million budget overseas. The Ministry of Culture has a $2 million allocation less than Bahamas Information Services and most of that goes to fund the annual Junkanoo parades. The remainder is used to finance festivals througho ut The Bahamas, maintain a “national theatre”, and run the National Arts Festival. To demonstrate their anger over this state of affairs, cultural activists staged a 'Day of Absence' this past February. It was based on a play by Douglas Turner Ward, which told the story of a small town in the A merican South in which the white inhabitants discover on a particular day that all the black people have disappeared. What would happen, our activists asked, if Bahamians woke up one day and found that all the artists and cultural workers had suddenly vanished? Wouldn't our w orld be a poorer and sadder place? According to former cultural affairs director Nicolette Bethel (now a lecturer at the College of The Bahamas), the Day of Absence attempted to make the point that Bahamian artists, musicians, writers, actors, directors, dancers, designers, craftworkers, you name it are marginalized, disrespected, and taken for granted. "They are unable to find work in the areas in which God has gifted them. There are virtually no avenues in The Bahamas to enable creative people to develop and hone their talents, or to enable them to make use of them when they are developed. Our greatest brain drain is arguably in the area of the arts, and culture has absolutely no respect in the national discourse." Fred Ferguson is a legendary musician and producer, who was for years a member of BahaMen the iconic Bahamian band that made a big splash with their hit "Who Let the Dogs Out". In 2003 Ferguson started his own band Tingum Dem and plays weekly at the Tamarind Club on Harrold Road, a venue that he opened with partner Ronald Simms. "The Bahamas is a tough mar ket for all entertainers," Ferguson told me. "Bahamians have very short memories and there is a deep-root ed lack of national pride, which our leaders are not making any effort to correct. They are only interested in Bahamian music at election time." According to Ferguson, "there's n o programme to develop music in the Bahamas. Teachers train kids in the schools and they come back to be music teachers who train more kids to be music teachers. There's no way for musicians to practice their craft." By most accounts, this is a complex and multi-dimensional issue. E ven Ferguson admits that entertainers often price themselves out of work and are notoriously temperamental from a business standpoint. Others say the problems faced by cultural workers stem from feelings of entitlement. Some veterans have not produced creatively f or years, critics argue, yet they expect to receive public support as a matter of right. "Government can create a supportive environment but should not be financing private ventures," one tourism executive told me. "And what are the musicians doing to promote themselves? Are they w illing to share the economic risk?" Why don't the musicians provide some leadership and vision of their own? Visual artists have done well over the years and are well supported by Bahamians, why not musicians? What are they doing collectively to come up witha plan or strategy to help themselves?" W ell, Ferguson's Tamarind Club was set up to do just that, playing Bahamian and old school music in a comfortable and controlled environment, but although he has been able to build something of an audience, money is a constant headache. "The truth is, I'm struggling to keep my entertainment business afloat. I'm facing some of the same challenges that Freddie Munnings Sr. faced at the old Cat & Fiddle. My partner and I have been trying desperately to acquire financing to improve our business and to just basically stay in operation, but finance institutions have basically closed the door in offering any form of assistance." That's true, according to one banker we surveyed: "The entertainment industry is financed largely by equity capital, venture capital, personal resources or love money ( friends and family). The risks associated with this industry cannot be priced in the traditional prime plus markets serviced by commercial banks." For another perspective on this issue we spoke to Devlynn Stubbs (who goes by the name of Jah Doctrine). H e is a young Bahamian songwriter with a degree in philosophy who is tackling the industry from a different angle. He's been producing music professionally for the past five years, focusing on reggae, hip hop and dance hall (see myspace.com/jahdoctrine). " I grew up in the church, which stimulated my interest in music, and I found I had an ability to write. But it takes years of planning and training to make a living off this so you really gotta do it for the love. Music is my career but I need to get a job to live. You gotta get up and get humping." S tubbs says the local band circuit is very limited and even forming a band is a challenge, since musicians want to be paid for prac tice time. "But these days you have to go at things differently," he told me. "You don't form a band, get a venue, build an audience and then c ut a cd. You can cut a cd yourself with a computer and create a marketing buzz on your own. But you still need to do shows and per form." Aside from the economics, the larger issue is the loss of Bahamian culture: "We do little or nothing to maintain the things that make usc ulturally different," Ferguson says. "There is an underlying sense of embarrassment at being Bahamian. We have to take a stand. We need leadership and focus and a determination that our entertainment is important to us. We need to put some energy and funding into these matters and do things properly." As former culture director Nico Bethel put it: "For a generation and a half the entire time since Independence our national policies have been shaped by a group o f men and a handful of women whose actions and behaviour cumulatively suggest that they would rather erase Bahamian culture than invest in it. Our cultural industries are in effective decline." Bethel (a sociologist whose late father, Clement Bethel, was the country's first and most eminent d irector of culture) argues that the government provides sporting facilities throughout the country, has legislation to promote hotels and govern education and health, but nothing either in law or on the ground to support, encourage or develop artistic activity. "We can read the reports for o urselves, and accept the idea that culture is the economic sector in which to invest for nations that are still developing; or we can share the delusions of our politicians, which confuse the grandeur of the monstrosities that foreign investors build (and usually protect behind gates and bridges and visitor passe s) with development of a nation and of a people." Bethel says she quit as director because decision-makers won't take culture seriously: "My father died at 49 and I have no intention of wasting what could be the last years of my life trying to get results out of a non-responsive, uncaring, and uninterested public service, or waiting for the latest bright political spark to make good on promises they never intended to honour in the first place." Others may point out that it is not the responsibility of government to make it easier for artists to make a living, or to take care of musicians, or subsidise straw vendors. In the final analysis we all have to be responsible for our own livelihoods. But the real issue here is one of judgment. We already spend huge amounts of taxpayer dollars on packaging the Bahamas overseas, while very little thought or money is invested in the product we are selling. And it is an undeniable fact that the average Bahamian vacation is hollow, superficial, and not worth the money that tourists pay for it. What do you think? Send comments to larry@tribunemedia.net Or visit www.bahamapundit.com C M Y K C M Y K PAGE 6, WEDNESDAY, APRIL 22, 2009 THE TRIBUNE BAHAMASELECTRICITYCORPORATION VACANCYNOTICE MANAGER,REVENUEACCOUNTING CUSTOMERSERVICESDIVISION Av acancyexistsinthe Corporation for thepositionof Manager,RevenueAccounting . The jobmanagesthe billingof allcustomer accountsinNewProv idence andthe FamilyIslandsandthe reconciliationof allrevenueaccountsother thanmiscellaneousreceivables. Responsibilitiesofthe position include,but are not limited to,thefollowing: Managesthe meter readingandbillingprocess es bothinN ewProvidence andthe FamilyIslands. Assistswiththedisconnectionprocessthroughthe useof meter readers. Preparesthesalesbudget. PreparestheRevenue AccountingDepartmentBudget. Overseesthepreparationofthe Acc ountsReceivableReconciliation. Overseesthetrainingof allCustomer Servicesstaff inthe newbillingsoftware. PreparesmonthlyBoardreports. Preparesmonthlysalesanalysisandunbilledrevenuereports. Preparesquarterlyreportsforthe CentralBank&DepartmentofStatistics. Pro videsstatisticalbillinginformationfor FamilyIslandmanagers. Overseesthedisconnectionof servicesfor non payment of electricity inthe FamilyIslands. Attendsyearlycommunitymeetingsaswellasadhoc meetingsrequiredduringacquisitionof new l ocations. Developsandimplementsrules,guidelinesandproceduresforthe efficientoperationof thedepartment. Jobrequirementsinclude: Aminimum ofaBachelorsdegreeinAccountsor equivalent Aminimum of8+yearsofexperienceinaccountingprac tice andtheory. CertifiedAccountant(CPA) orequivalentqualifications Knowledgeof theElectricityActof theBahamas. Abilitytocommunicateeffectivelybothorallyandinwriting. Soundreasoningandgoodjudgmentskills. Abilitytointerpretfinancia lreports. Goodtime managementskills. Projectmanagementskills. Interested personsshould apply by completing and returning an Application Form to: The Manager HumanResources&Training Department,BahamasElectricity Corporation, BlueHill& Tuc ker,P.O.Box N 7509 Nassau Bahamas onorbefore: May 4,2009. Investing in Bahamian culture W W h h a a t t w w o o u u l l d d h h a a p p p p e e n n , , o o u u r r a a c c t t i i v v i i s s t t s s a a s s k k e e d d , , i i f f B B a a h h a a m m i i a a n n s s w w o o k k e e u u p p o o n n e e d d a a y y a a n n d d f f o o u u n n d d t t h h a a t t a a l l l l t t h h e e a a r r t t i i s s t t s s a a n n d d c c u u l l t t u u r r a a l l w w o o r r k k e e r r s s h h a a d d s s u u d d d d e e n n l l y y v v a a n n i i s s h h e e d d ? ?

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THE 31st session of the World Meteorological Organisation’s hurricane committee opened on Monday with a reminder of the impact global warming can have on island nations like the Bahamas. The melting of the polar ice caps resulting in a steady rise in sea levels “should be of major concern” to Bahamians, said Arthur Rolle, director oft he Department of Meteorology. H e noted that about 80 per cent of the Bahamas is only “slightly” above sea level. “Climate warming and the melting of polar ice means sea levels will rise and once thath appens our islands will exper ience a lot of inundation,” said Mr Rolle, also the permanent representative of the B ahamas with the WMO. And over time some of our i slands will disappear. “We have to adapt through public awareness. For example, as the sea level rises, there w ill be a need to have homes b uilt away from the coastline.” The opening session at W yndham Nassau Resort also h eard from Bill Read, chairman of the R A IV Hurricane Committee; Miguel Angel Rabiolo, WMO regional director for the Americas; and Phenton Neymour, MP and Minister of State in the Ministry of the Environment. T his meeting follows the s uccessful Bahamas Weather Conference, World Meteorological Day and World Water Day. These occasions provided “great opportunities” for the Department of Meteorology C M Y K C M Y K LOCAL NEWS T HE TRIBUNE WEDNESDAY, APRIL 22, 2009, PAGE 7 &20021:($/7+2)7+(,17+((0(&2857&200(5&,$/',9,6,21,17+($77(5&/,&2%$+$0$6f/,0,7(',Q/LTXLGDWLRQf $1' ,17+($77(57+(&203$1,(6$&7 2 5 ' ( 5 %HIRU+HU/DG\VKLS7KH+RQRXUDEOH-XVWLFH&KHU\O $OEXU\ 'DWHGWKHWKGD\RI$SULO 83217+(3(7,7,21 RI WKH 5HJLVWUDU DSSRLQWHG SXUVXDQWWRVHFWLRQRIWKH,QVXUDQFH&KDSWHU5HYLVHG 6WDWXWH/DZVRI7KH%DKDPDVKHUHLQRQWKHWKGD\ RI)HEUXDU\ $1'83215($',1* WKH $IGDYLWRI/HQQR[ 0F&DUWQH\KHUHLQRQWKHWKGD\RI)HEUXDU\ R Q EHKDOIRIWKHHWLWLRQHU $1'8321+($5,1* 0U'DYLG+LJJLQVDQG 0 UV-DFTXHOLQH)RUEHV)RVWHURI&RXQVHOIRUWKHHWLWLRQHU $1'8321+($5,1* 0U6LGQH\&DPEULGJH0U 0 LFKDHO6DXQGHUVDQG0U'DUURQ3LFNVWRFNRI&RXQVHOIRU WKHURYLVLRQDO/LTXLGDWRU $ 1'8321+($5,1* 0U6LGQH\&ROOLHRI &RXQVHOIRU%DKDPDVDLU(PSOR\HHV3URYLGHQW'DYLG &KDUOWRQ/DXUD3UDWW&KDUOWRQ&KHU\O6DQGV6RSKLD/RFNKDUW& KDULQH0DMRU'HDQGHUD+DQQD/HRQLH0LQQLV%HQHE\ 'HORUD)RUEHV1DWDVKD6PLWK-XOHDQQ.HPS&KDUOHV+XQW .HLWK%HQHE\7KRPDV5DQGDOO+DOO$UGLV6H\PRXU$UGLV( YDQQHWWH)RUGH/DZUHQFH/DZU\3*UHHQH3KLOOLS -RKQVRQDQG'HERUDKDOPHULQVXSSRUWRIWKHHWLWLRQ $ 1'8321+($5,1* 'LDQH6WHZDUWRI &RXQVHOIRU)LUVW&DULEEHDQ,QWHUQDWLRQDO%DQN%DKDPDVf /LPLWHGDQGKHLOD&DUH\LQVXSSRUWRIWKHHWLWLRQ $1'8321+($5,1* 0U*RGIUH\3LQGHUDQG0U 6LGQH\&ROOLHRI&RXQVHOU&ROOLHKROGLQJEULHIIRU0U $OIUHG6HDUVfIRUJURXSRIQLQHW\VHYHQ&UHGLWRUVLQ VXSSRUWRIWKHHWLWLRQ $1'8321+($5,1* *OHQ\V+DQQDDUWLQ RI&RXQVHOIRU%DKDPD,VODQGV5HVRUWV&DVLQRV&RRSHUDWLYH &UHGLW8QLRQ%,5&&&8f/LPLWHG2OLYHU+XWFKLQVRQ'HEUD 0RVV'HEUD*DUGLQHU&KDQGDOHDU)RUEHV0DUYLQ6PLWK /ROHWKD.QRZOHV&DWKHULQH.QRZOHV3DWULFH&ROHEURRNH 0DYDOR'XQFDQVRQDQGDOORWKHUHPSOR\HHVRI%DKDPDV,VODQG 5HVRUW&DVLQR&RRSHUDWLYH&UHGLW8QLRQ/LPLWHGLQVXSSRUW RIWKHHWLWLRQ $1'8321+($5,1* 0UV -HQQLIHU0DQJUD RI&RXQVHOIRU0DXULFH$OH[DQGHU%URRNVLQVXSSRUWRIWKH 3HWLWLRQ $1'8321+($5,1* 0U/XWKHU0F'RQDOG RI&RXQVHODORQJZLWK0U5LFKDUG-:+RUWRQIRU&/,&2 %DKDPDVf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been adjourned to Thursday and is expected to continue next Monday. It emerged on Monday that Justice Allen had not made notes of crucial discussions within chambers that were relevant to the application for her recusal. Alan Steinfeld, QC, and attorney Michael Scott represent Amir Weissfisch. Attorney Brian Moree represents the Weissfisch children. Prime Minister Christie would not be suspicious of this latest sale. “I am a Bahamian. I have relatives. I have friends,” Mr Turnquest said in answer to the speculation. “Are you suggesting that as long as I am Director of Lands and Surveys my friends and my relatives are unable to get Crown land like any other Bahamian? I travel from Inagua to Grand Bahama. I covered the whole spectrum, and I have family throughout and I have friends throughout. “If I was making the ultimate decision I can see where I would have to recuse myself. But the decision is not made by me ultimately. It rests with someone else. So why then should my friends and family be prevented from being considered by somebody else for Crown land? “But I certainly know not of a ny scheme that this office was e ngaged in at any time by m yself or anybody that was intentionally trying to influence the decision makers in a way that would cause them embar rassment or the office embar rassment or a problem for any of them,” he said. W hen asked if he felt it was merely a “coincidence” that the properties near Forbes Hill were all sold to members of his family, Mr Turnquest hesitated before suggesting that he could have been stationed at the Prime Minister’s office from 2005 and therefore these transactions could have occurred after that date when he was not in the Lands and Surveys department. However, the latest government grant was signed by former Prime Minister Christie on January 27, 2003. Pointing out this discrepancy and many others, the former Agriculture and Lands Minister George Smith said it was “inconceivable” for the Director of Lands to suggest that he was not involved in the sale of these properties. During Prime Minister Ingraham’s first administration in 1992, Mr Turnquest was appointed Director of Lands and Surveys. When former Prime Minister Christie took over the govenment in 2005, Mr Turnquest was transferred to the Prime Minister’s Office. However, on Mr Ingraham’s return to government, Mr Turnquest was returned to head Lands and Surveys. Mr Smith, who had responsibility for this ministry from 1977 to 1984, said that Mr Turnquest, as head of the department, receives the applications, processes them, attaches a fee to the property, and ultimately advises the Prime Minister as to whether or not to agree to the sale of the land. With an intimate knowledge of Exuma as its former Member of Parliament, Mr Smith said he has first hand knowledge of the value of lands in Exuma. He noted that inland properties were valued far higher than the price set for the sale by government of these particular beachfront lots. This was contrary to normal practice where prime beachfront property is always more expensive than inland property. “In these particular cases the director has the obligation to point out to the Minister his relation to the applicants. He has an obligation to point that out and caution the Prime Minister as to the potential repercussions for conflict of interest,” Mr Smith said, alleging that in his opinion it was “a bold case” of the Prime Minister being misled into making a decision without having been warned of the possible implications and “the recommendation for such a low price” when a “much higher fee” could have been recommended. Mr Smith added that while the Prime Minister does hold ultimate responsibility over the decision to sell these properties, in the discharge of his duties, the PM must rely on proper advice from his officials. In this case, it was Mr Smith’s opinion that this did not happen. Managing editor John Mar quis said: “People like The Tribune because it is fearless and tells the truth. It is a ‘must’ read for everyone who really wants to know what’s going on in the Bahamas. “Not everybody likes us but even those who don’t like us can’t stop talking about us. That’s the mark of a really fine newspaper.” the murder. H ead of the Central Detective Unit's homi cide squad Assistant Superintendent Leon Bethel dispelled concerns that local gangstersw ere trading in illegal handguns in favour of assault rifles and machine guns in an effort to c ompile a superior arsenal than police. "Criminals have to contend with other crim inals I don't think criminals arm thems elves to be able to outmatch police they want to outmatch other criminals in terms of weapons," Mr Bethel said. He contended that local crooks sought weapons that are more accessible and easilyc oncealed like handguns to secure their illegal activities from rival threats. "A pistol is more easily concealed and trans ported than an AK-47 or another high powered rifle, you see. So when these persons arei n a criminal enterprise, they know that they may be subject to poaching by other criminals who especially if they are involved in drugs may be arming themselves properly against other criminals," Mr Bethel said. "What is being imported is what is accessible to criminals right now what they can get their hands on, and can be transported to the Bahamas. Definitely they would want some up-to-date weapons for their criminal enterprise, but I do not think there is an arms race with police. It is only because of these certain weapons whether they are the normal revolvers or pistols, or rifles, it's just what is available to the criminals and they seize whatever opportunities they can get their hands on," he added. But youth activist and reformed gang member Carlos Reid said local thugs are bragging about possessing assault rifles, bullet proof vests, and hand grenades. He estimates 15,000 persons in the country are affiliated with gangs, most of whom mayh ave easy access to firearms. Mr Reid sees this as a threat against the RBPF. "Our police force boasts at having 3,000 members but gangs are boasting of having1 5,000 members on a combined effort. Imagine if just 30 per cent of that owns a weapon and I'm sure that's higher. “We're seeing now the emergence of AK47s, bullet proof vests, hand grenades, so wec an't say police have more sophisticated weapons," he said, claiming a criminal had boasted to him of owning a pair of matchingU zi guns. However, Commissioner Ferguson said w hile the RBPF has "always been vulnera ble" to heavy imports of illegal firearms, police intelligence does not reflect an upswing inm ore sophisticated weaponry in the country. "What we see mostly in the Bahamas is a 9 millimeter, and .38 or the .40 Glock, those type of weapons have been most commonly confronting the police and we've been makinga rrests along those lines," Mr Ferguson said. He added that the RBPF had ongoing efforts with international law enforcement agencies to share intelligence while organising efforts to seize illegal weaponry. According to Mr Reid founder of Youth Against Violence for as little as $150, a crook can buy a gun and parlay that into thousands of dollars from criminal proceeds. "A lot of young men will tell you straight up they only working for a couple dollars to get a gun to make a living stealing, robbing whatever you call it. You can even put a hit on somebody for less than $5000," Mr Reid said. To counter violent crime, he suggested that leaders of the country have to invest in com munity outreach and judicial reform. Claims of nepotism in the granting of Crown Land denied F ROM page one Local criminals ‘in ar ms r ace’ FROM page one Shar e your news The Tribune wants to hear from people who are making news in their neighbour hoods. Perhaps you are raising funds for a good cause, campaigning for impr ovements in the area or have won an awar d. If so, call us on 322-1986 and share your story. Tribune sales defy global trends with 7.7 per cent rise FROM page one Challenge over judge’ s refusal to recuse from civil case continues FROM page one

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HERE’S a look at our medal-winning swimmers and the performances the 36-member team turned in during the XXIV Carifta Swimming Championships that concluded in Aruba on Sunday. G G o o l l d d m m e e d d a a l l l l i i s s t t s s McKayla Lightbourn, girls 1 5-17 800 freestyle, 9:14.88. Dustin Tynes, boys 11-12 200 breaststroke, 2:41.82. Evante Gibson, boys 100 butterfly, 1:00.81. McKayla Lightbourn, girls 15-17 100 butterfly, 1:05.89. Ashley Butler, McKayla Lightbourn, Amber Weech, Ariel Weech, girls 15-17 400 freestyle relay, 4:02.52. Evante Gibson, boys 1314 50 butterfly, 26.97. Ashley Butler, girls 15-17 50 butterfly, 28.72. McKayla Lightbourn, girls 15-17 400 IM, 5:08.27. McKayla Lightbourn, girls 15-17 200 IM, 2:25.44. Dustin Tynes, boys 11-12 50 breaststroke, 34.20. Bria Deveaux, girls 13-14 2 00 butterfly, 2:30.28. Matthew Lowe, girls 13-14 200 butterfly, 2:18.13. McKayla Lightbourn, girls 15-17 200 butterfly, 2:24.93. Amber Weech, Ariel W eech, Ashley Butler, McKa yla Lightbourn, girls 15-17 800 freestyle relay, 9:03.01. McKayla Lightbourn, girls 15-17 400 freestyle, 4:27.38. McKayla Lightbourn, girls 15-17 400 freestyle, 4:27.38. Dustin Tynes, boys 11-12 100 breaststroke, 1:14.04. McKayla Lightbourn, girls 15-17 100 breaststroke, 1:17.87. Bria Deveaux, Maya A lbury, Berchadette Moss and Gabrielle Greene, girls 13-14 200 freestyle relay, 1:54.58. Ashley Butler, McKayla Lightbourn, Amber Weech and Ariel Weech, girls 15-17 200 freestyle relay, 1:49.75. S S i i l l v v e e r r m m e e d d a a l l l l i i s s t t s s Laura Lowe (no photo g irls 11-12 200 breaststroke, 2:51.04. Dustin Tynes, boys 11-12 200 breaststroke, 2:38.79. Toby McCarroll, boys 1314 200 breastroke, 2:38.05. Taryn Smith, girls 11-12 100 butterfly, 1:09.09. McKayla Lightbourn, girls 15-17 200 freestyle, 2:08.08. Ariel Weech, girls 15-17 50 butterfly, 29.36. Bria Deveaux, girls 13-14 400 IM, 5:26.48. Dionisio Carey, Dustin T ynes, Keith Lloyd, Zach M oses, boys 11-12 400 medley relay, 4:46.17. Je’Nae Saunders, Riquel Rolle, Maya Albury, Bria Deveaux, girls 13-14 400 med ley relay, 4:48.55. Ariel Weech, McKayla Lightbourn, Ashley Butler, Amber Weech, girls 15-17 400 medley relay, 4:40.05. Bria Deveauv, girls 13-14 200 IM, 2:31.72. Evante Gibson, boys 131 4 50 breaststroke, 31.89. McKayla Lightbourn, girls 15-17 50 breaststroke, 35.41. Amber Weech, girls 1517 50 freestyle, 27.02. Evante Gibson, boys 1314 100 backstroke, 1:12.34. McKayla Lightbourn, girls 15-17 200 backstroke, 2:28.64. B B r r o o n n z z e e m m e e d d a a l l l l i i s s t t s s Matthew Lowe, boys 1314 1500, 17:10.57. Dionisio Carey, boys 1112 200 breastroke, 2:50.36. McKayla Lightbourn, girls 15-17 200 breastroke, 2:44.39. Dionisio Carey, boys 1112 50 backstroke, 31.42. Ariel Weech, girls 15-17 50 backs troke, 31.82. Bria Deveaux, girls 13-14 100 butterfly, 1:09.31. Bria Deveaux, girls 13-14 200 freestyle, 2:14.49. Jacinda Williams, Laura Morley, Taryn Smith, Crystal Rahming, girls 11-12 400 medley relay, 5:02.48. Laron Morley, Toby M cCarroll, Evante Gibson, Matthew Lowe, boys 13-14 400 medley relay, 4:19.90. Evante Gibson, boys 1314 200 IM, 2:18.57. Ashley Butler, girls 15-17 100 freestyle, 59.98. Laura Morley, girls 11-12 100 breaststroke, 1:23.40. Dionisio Carey, boys 1112 100 breaststroke, 1:18.64. Toby McCarroll, boys 131 4 100 backstroke, 1:12.52. n J EROME PUGMIRE AP Sports Writer MONACO (AP N adal knows he won't stay on top if he doesn't strive to get better, even when playing onc lay, his favorite surface. The top-ranked Spaniard o vercame an upset bid by Novak Djokovic on Sunday, b eating the third-ranked Ser bian 6-3, 2-6, 6-1 for his fifth s traight Monte Carlo Masters title after losing a set here for t he first time since the 2006 final against Roger Federer. "Everyone can improve in every surface, no? No one is perfect. Sure, I can improve," Nadal said. "I always work to improve because when you feel you can't improve, is difficult to wake up and go on court and practice." Nadal is favored to also col lect a fifth straight French Open title, but the way Djokovic swept Nadal aside in the second set, and the way No. 4 Andy Murray rallied back from 5-2 down to force a tie break in Saturday's semifinal offers his rivals a glimmer of hope. Nadal was unhappy with how he served, and plans to improve on it before heading to Roland Garros next month. "This tournament I didn't serve very well. Especially the second serve was sometimes 120 kph (74 mph (a "Yeah, I have to play more. Have to serve better." Even so, he was delighted with his win. "Always really important for me (to son like this," said Nadal, who won his third title this season after hard-court victories at the Australian Open and Indian Wells, Calif. He trailed 3-1 in the first set before reeling off five straight games. Struggling on serve in the third, he saved three break points and needed 14 minutes to hold his opening service game. After a long rally at 30-40, Djokovic seemed certain to break Nadal with a drop shot, but Nadal somehow got it back for a winner and Djokovic sank to his knees. "A little bit lucky because he has two break points and important drop shot. I came back. That point was really important," Nadal said. "After that I think I played really well. In the important moments, I was focused all the time." It was the third-seeded Djokovic who crumbled as Nadal clinched victory on his first match point when the Serbian sent a backhand into the net. "I played a very good match, actually one of the best I have played against him on this surface," Djokovic said. "It's really unfortunate that in certain moments I didn't play the way I was supposed to play, with a little bit more patience." Nadal extended his winning streak at Monte Carlo to 27 matches and won his 21st straight victory on clay since losing to Juan Carlos Ferrero of Spain in the second round C M Y K C M Y K SPORTS TRIBUNE SPORTS WEDNESDAY, APRIL 22, 2009, PAGE 9 X X X X I I V V C C A A R R I I F F T T A A S S W W I I M M M M I I N N G G C C H H A A M M P P I I O O N N S S H H I I P P S S , , A A r r u u b b a a , , A A p p r r i i l l 1 1 6 6 1 1 9 9 , , 0 0 9 9 M M e e d d a a l l C C o o u u n n t t C C o o m m b b i i n n e e d d : : M M e e n n + + W W o o m m e e n n T T e e a a m m B B r r o o n n z z e e S S i i l l v v e e r r G G o o l l d d T T o o t t a a l l T&T31 14 22 67 Bah18 17 14 49 G uadeloupe 18 17 12 47 Barbados Amateur Swimming 12 9 8 29 M artinique Natation 8 16 10 34 Jamaica 8 1 2 12 32 B ermuda 8 1 3 12 Suriname 6 6 12 24 A ruba 5 18 15 38 Cayman Islands Junior 3 0 2 5 Bermuda Swim Team 1 0 1 2 Suriname Swim Club 0 2 2 4 Netherlands Antilles 0 1 2 3 United States Virgin Islands 0 1 1 2 Grenada 0 1 1 2 St. Lucia National Team 0 1 0 1 T T e e a a m m R R a a n n k k i i n n g g s s T T h h r r o o u u g g h h E E v v e e n n t t 1 1 1 1 4 4 C C o o m m b b i i n n e e d d T T e e a a m m S S c c o o r r e e s s P P l l a a c c e e T T e e a a m m P P o o i i n n t t s s 1 Trinidad and Tobago TRI 815.50 2 Bahamas BAH 691.50 3 Guadeloupe GUAD 603 4 Martinique Natation 578.50 5 J amaica JAM 571.50 6 Aruba ARU 482 7 S uriname SUR 469 8 Barbados Amateur312 9 Bermuda BERM 163 10 C ayman Islands Junior 108 1 1 US Virgin Islands USVI 44 12 Grenada GREN 43 13 Netherlands Antilles 37 14 Suriname Swim Club31 15 Bermuda Swim Team 30 16 St. Lucia National Team17 17 Cayman Islands Swim12 18 Guyana GUY 9 19 Barbados Swim Club 1 5 5 , , 0 0 1 1 8 8 . . 0 0 0 0 T T o o t t a a l l The medal count... Medal-winning swimmers shine Dustin Tynes Evante Gibson Ariel Weech Dionisio Carey Bria Deveaux M Lightbourn Maya Albury Toby McCarroll Laura Morley Ashley Butler Amber Weech Matthew Lowe Taryn Smith Keith Lloyd Zach Moses Gabrielle Greene JeNae Saunders Riquel Rolle Jacinda Williams Crystal Rahming L aron Morley B Moss HERE’S a look at the final standings of the Bahamas Lawn Tennis Association’s first High School Invitational Tournament held last week at the National Tennis Center: 1NCA84 2Queens College613 St. Johns60 4St. Augustine50 5 Home School48 6Lyford Cay45 7Kingsway39 8Pace36 9 St. Annes 34 10Tamberly24 11Meridian18 12St. Bedes17 13 Hill Cross 13 14Westminster 12 15Bishop Eldon 10 16Blairwood10 17 Faith Temple 6 18 Garvin Tynes 6 19Spanish Wells 6 20C C Sweeting 5 21 Catholic High 5 22 St. Andrews 5 23Heritage3 M M I I N N I I D D I I V V I I S S I I O O N N 1 St. Francis 176 2 Meridian167 3 Lyford Cay155 4 Sandlinds Primary2 D D I I V V I I S S I I O O N N A A L L W W I I N N N N E E R R S S Primary Girls Home School24 Garvin Tynes 6 Temple Christian6 Primary Boys St. Johns27 Queens College 15 Junior Girls St. Augustines18 Home School 14 St. Annes 10 Junior Boys NCA46 Lyford Cay20 Kingsway16 Senior Girls SAC36 St. Annes26 Home School 18 Senior Boys Pace34 Lyford Cay 30 NCA 22 BL T A: Final standings Nadal wins 5th straight Monte Carlo Masters title of the Rome Masters in May 2008. N obody has matched Nadal's perf ormance at the Monte Carlo tournam ent since tennis turned professional in 1 968. Reggie Doherty won the event six times overall between1 897-99 and 1902-04, while five-time win ner Anthony Wilding of New Zealand won four times in a row from 1911-14 and got his other title in 1908. RAFAEL NADAL reacts after defeating Serbia's Novak Djokovic in their final match of the Monte Carlo Masters tournament, in Monaco, Sunday... (AP Photo: Claude Paris

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n HOWARD ULMAN AP Sports Writer BOSTON (AP Allen and Ben Gordon can reminisce this offseason about their playoff shootout. For one of the former UConn guards, his team's offseason will last longer than he'd like. Allen kept the Boston Celtics from coming dangerously close to being that team when he broke out of a slump to score 30 points, including the decisive 3pointer with 2 seconds left. T hat gave the defending NBA champions a 118-115 win over the Bulls on Monday night and a split of the first two games of the bestof-seven series. Game 3 is in Chicago on Thursday night. "I'll talk about it over the s ummertime and I'll laugh with him about it," Allen said. "We were exchanging jabs there, and I don't means hots. I mean he caught me with an elbow, I got him right back with an elbow." Gordon is in his fifth NBA season, eight fewer than Allen, but they've faced each other in summer p ickup games at their old school. "UConn has a lot of great professionals," Gordon said, " so anytime you play against someone from UConn you just want to go out there and outdo them. It's like a game within the game." Gordon outscored Allen with 42 points exactly 23 years after Michael Jordan set an NBA playoff record with 63. But the Celtics beat the Bulls then, too, 135-131 in double overtime. Gordon's last basket came with 12.3 seconds left, tying the score at 115. Then the Celtics set up a play for A llen, who took a pass from R ajon Rondo and connected from the right side. Allen scored 28 of his 30 points after getting somea dvice from coach Doc Rivers at halftime. "Doc said going into the half, 'Be aggressive, but let it c ome to you,'" Allen said. "I never think I'm not in my rhythm. It can be a grind asa shooter. As a scorer you're always trying to find something." After Tyrus Thomas m issed a shot from midcourt as time expired, Allen headed for the bench where injured Kevin Garnett delive red a couple of congratulatory slaps to his head and chest. Allen said he doesn't like " being made a fuss over." But that was unavoidable after he broke out of his shooting slump. He scored just four points on 1-for-12 shooting and missed the final shot in Chicago's 105103 overtime win Saturday. "We feel very confident because we feel like we haven't even played good basketball yet," Boston's Paul Pierce said. "Our best is yet to come." But that will have to come in Chicago. "We got a split and that's tough to do against the defending champs," Gordon said. Consecutive 3-point ers by Gordon gave the Bulls a 109-104 lead before the Celtics rallied. Glen Davis made two free throws and Rondo connected on a long jumper to give Boston a 112-111 lead with 1:01 to play. Gordon followed with a 16-foot jumper and Allen countered with a 3p ointer that put Boston a head 115-113 with 25.3 seconds remaining. Then it was Gordon's turn. He connected fromn ear the foul line before the Celtics called a timeout to set up their final play. Rondo dribbled on the l eft side and Allen worked himself free, caught the pass in rhythm and converted as the crowd went wild. Davis had 26 points for second-seeded Boston and Rondo had a triple-doub le 19 points, 16 assists and 12 rebounds. Pierce added 18 points and Kendrick Perkins c ontributed 16 points and 12 rebounds. John Salmons had 17 points and Brad Miller s cored 16 for Chicago. The Allen-Gordon shootout "almost looked like they turned it into a personal battle," Rivers said. "You know, who's the best UConn player to ever play. And it was amazing." Chicago coach Vinny Del Negro cited the Celtics' rebounding as a key to their win. "They had 21 offensive rebounds," he said, "and it's going to be hard to win any game, not even a playoff game, if you give up that many offensive rebounds." The Celtics nearly lost despite controlling rookie point guard Der rick Rose, who sat out most of the first quarter with two fouls. He finished with 10 points, seven assists and six rebounds after leading the Bulls with 36 points and 11a ssists on Saturday. Junior baseball a ction resumes this weekend C M Y K C M Y K SPORTS PAGE 10, WEDNESDAY, APRIL 22, 2009 TRIBUNE SPORTS T T B B A A L L L L W W I I N N S S L L O O S S S S E E S S T T I I E E S S S S T T R R E E A A K K 1. SEA GRAPES cp/pw 1212T1 2 . COCO PLUMS c p 1 03W2 3 . JUJUS c p 6 42W1 4. GUINEPS cp 49L2 5. DILLIES e 013L13 C C O O A A C C H H P P I I T T C C H H W W I I N N S S L L O O S S S S E E S S T T I I E E S S S S T T R R E E A A K K 1. BOAS cp 152W10 2. BEES cp 133W2 3. SANDFLIES cp 107W2 4 . MOSQUITOES512L3 5 . GREEN TURTLES412L2 6. WASPS314W1 9 9 1 1 0 0 D D I I V V I I S S I I O O N N W W I I N N S S L L O O S S S S E E S S T T I I E E S S S S T T R R E E A A K K 1 . BARRACUDAS c p 1 3 31W3 2. DOLPHINS cp 1241W1 3. TURBOTS cp 96W6 4. OCTOPUS88L1 5 . RED SNAPPERS512L3 6 . EELS115L1 1 1 1 1 1 1 2 2 D D I I V V I I S S I I O O N N W W I I N N S S L L O O S S S S E E S S T T I I E E S S S S T T R R E E A A K K 1. WILD DOGS cp 190W19 2 . CONCHS 146W3 3. BLUE MARLINS139L1 4. NASSAU GROUPERS119L1 5. DIVERS109W2 6 . HURRICANES812L4 7 . GREEN PAROTTS814W1 8. IGUANAS6121W1 9. WHITE CROWNS1191L4 1 1 3 3 1 1 5 5 D D I I V V I I S S I I O O N N W W I I N N S S L L O O S S S S E E S S T T I I E E S S S S T T R R E E A A K K 1 . OWLZ c p 1 161W2 1. SILVER JACKS116L1 3 . POTCAKES961W6 4. STINGRAYS882L4 5. RACCOONS582L1 T-Ball Division Won Loss Score F riday Apr. 17thSea GrapesJujus10-10 Tied Score Saturday Apr. 18thCoco PlumsGuineps16-14 S aturday Apr. 18th Jujus Dillies 15-3 Coach Pitch Won Loss Score F riday Apr. 17th S and Flies Green Turtles22-10 Saturday Apr. 18th BoasMosquitoes21-11 Saturday Apr. 18thBeesGreen Turtles15-5 Saturday Apr. 18thSand FliesWasps15-6 Sunday Apr. 19thWaspsMosquitoes10-9 9 -10 Division W on L oss S core Friday Apr. 17thEelsOctopus7-0 S aturday Apr. 18th Turbots Red Snappers 9-6 Saturday Apr. 18thBarracudasEels19-6 S unday Apr. 19th D olphins Red Snappers12-8 11-12 Division Won Loss Score Friday Apr. 17thConchsIguanas6-0 Saturday Apr. 18thDiversHurricanes14-4 Saturday Apr. 18th B lue Marlins G roupers 6-3 S aturday Apr. 18thDiversHurricanes16-8 Saturday Apr. 18thWild DogsWhite Crowns7-0 S aturday Apr. 18th Iguanas Green Parrots 9-5 Sunday Apr. 19thConchsBlue Marlins24-7 S unday Apr. 19thGreen ParrotsWhite Crowns9-0 13-15 Division Won Loss Score S aturday Apr. 18th P otcakes Stingrays 5-2 Saturday Apr. 18thOwlzSharks4-3 Saturday Apr. 18th P otcakes S tingrays 11-10 Saturday Apr. 18th Sharks Silver Jacks 4-3 16-18 Division Won Loss Score S unday Apr. 19thArawaksLucayans9-7 Sunday Apr. 19th Tainos C aribs7-0 Freedom Farm Baseball League Week 15 Results FREEDOM FARM CURRENT STANDINGS (WEEK 15 Celtics ‘buck’ even with Bulls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unior Baseball League of Nassau (JBLN to resume play this weekend after a two-week break for the Easter holidays. With three weeks left in the regular season, playoff positions and the pennant winners are still to be determined in all six divisions as the league continued its regular season on Saturday and Sunday at the St Andrew’s Field of Dreams. L L i i s s t t e e d d b b e e l l o o w w i i s s a a f f u u l l l l s s c c h h e e d d u u l l e e o o f f g g a a m m e e s s o o n n t t a a p p : : T T E E E E B B A A L L L L SATURDAY 11am – Sand Gnats vs Blue Claws 1pm – Grasshoppers vs Knights 3pm – Sidewinders vs Raptors SUNDAY 2pm – Grasshoppers vs Blue Claws 3:30pm – Knights Raptors C C O O A A C C H H P P I I T T C C H H SATURDAY 10am – Blue Jays vs Athletics 12:30pm – Cubs vs Angels 3pm – Astros vs Diamondbacks M M I I N N O O R R L L E E A A G G U U E E SATURDAY 10am – Rockies vs Red Sox 12:30pm – Mets vs Royals M M A A J J O O R R L L E E A A G G U U E E SATURDAY 12:30pm – Marlins vs Indians 3pm –Mariners vs Reds SUNDAY 2pm – Marlins vs Mariners J J U U N N I I O O R R L L E E A A G G U U E E SATURDAY 10am – Cardinals vs Yankees 12:30pm – Twins vs Dodgers S S E E N N I I O O R R L L E E A A G G U U E E SATURDAY 3pm – Phillies vs Tigers SUNDAY 3pm – Rangers vs Pirates RAY ALLEN is fouled by Bulls forward Tyrus Thomas (left third quarter of a first-round playoff game in Boston Monday... (AP Photo: Elise Amendola

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n By RENALDO DORSETT Sports Reporter rdorsett@tribunemedia.net W i th a third place finish in 2008 and a second place finish at this y ear’s Carifta Swimming and Sync hronized Swimming Championships, the Bahamas continues to bridge the gap between itself and some of the perennial powerhouses in the Caribbean,r eclaiming a spot atop the Carifta leaderboard. T he Bahamas finished second in both the medal count (49 p oints standings (691.50 24th edition of the meet last week in Savaneta, Aruba. Trinidad and Tobago captured the overall title with 67 medals and 815.50 points. B ahamas Swimming Federation president Algernon Cargill said for the Bahamas to again capture another Carifta championship, the teams must meet thec hallenge set forth in the distance races. “What still separates us some w hat from the countries that finish ahead of us is their proficien-c y in the distance events,” he said. Our athletes love to sprint, they d o exceptionally well at it at this l evel, at the collegiate level, when they continue on as seniors, and it i s definitely the stronghold in most our development and train i ng programmes.” Cargill said while the Bahamas c ontinues to enter each Carifta Games with lofty expectations, t he federation continues to produce teams which routinely r ecord top three finishes. The Bahamas finished third in the points standings and second in the medal count in 2004, tied for the lead in the medal count andt hird in the points standings in 2005, and in 2006 finished second in the medal count and third int he points standings. “We have to make further initiatives tos olidify our training programmes t o become more well rounded a nd include more distance events f or us to continue to perform at a high level on this stage,” he said. T he Bahamas took first place at the 2007 Championships with a n incredible 79 medals, one ahead of second place French G uyana (78 Trinidad and Tobago (74 Cargill said the team’s overall effort was a complete effort by athletes, administrators and gov-e rnment. “We just about equal our performance from last year in terms of the final medal counta nd overall placing,” he said. “The entire team performede xceptionally well, they were a n umber of outstanding perform ances in the pool and from an e xecutive standpoint. The ministry stepped up, provided a chart er and cash support to help the team. This contributed greatly to t he success of the team.” n By BRENT STUBBS Senior Sports Reporter bstubbs@tribunemedia.net FOR the first time, the island o f Bimini will play host to the B ahamas Basketball Federation m en’s and women’s national round robin tournament. Originally, the federation had intended to host only the men’s series in Bimini this weekend, while the women were going to Grand Bahama next weekend. But the federation decided that it would be best if they combine t he two tournaments, thus utiliz ing all of their manpower in the same setting at the same time. “It’s good for the basketball family,” said federation president Lawrence Hepburn. “We get to see all of the local talent that we have here. “In that way, we get a chance to get a good eye of what we are looking at in terms of the local selection for the national team trials. But it’s good for the basketball family to get them all together collectively for the first time in a long time.” Hepburn said they are encouraging all of the association presi dents to accompany their teams so that the federation can discuss and plan their future. “This is a seed which we are trying to germinate to get the basketball all together and sharing in the same vision,” Hepburn said. “So I envision a festive occasion.” By having the two tourna ments going on at the same time, Hepburn said the women from their respective islands can watch and cheer for their male coun terparts and vise versa. Tournament director Sean ‘Bass’ Bastian said everything is set to go with at least five teams confirmed to compete in the women’s division. “We have the Johnson’s Lady Truckers, Bommer G Angels, the Junior All-Stars, the Electro Telecom Cybots and the Grand Bahama’s Investment Gems,”B astian revealed. “So that’s good f or the female side.” On the men’s side, Bastian said they have at least nine teams already confirmed to compete. The list is expected to be headed by the Electro Telecom Cybots, the champions of the New Prov idence Basketball Association. “This weekend is going to be power-packed with basketball,” he pointed out. “We are looking at least between 25-30 games to be played over the weekend.” The teams will be play in a double elimination format. “From what we’ve seen, the Grand Bahama, Eleuthera and Cybots are expected to be the top teams in the men’s division,” Bastian sad. “But it could be a Truckers and Angels rematch in the women. But I don’t know what the Gems look like.” Hepburn said Bimini is more than ready to host the spectacular. “The housing is ready, the restaurants are ready and the venue is ready,” he said. “I think all who play in the Gateway Min istries Gymnasium will be thoroughly pleased with the facilities.” As a result of hosting the two tournaments at the same time, Bastian said they are hoping to generate a lot more support for the federation’s Independence Tournament from July 9-12 at the Kendal Isaacs Gymnasium. “So this is an opportunity for us to meet with the presidents of the associations to plan for that,” Bastian stated. Next year’s nationals is tipped to be staged in Abaco, if their new gymnasium is completed. If it’s not, Bastian said they intend to take the tournament to North Andros. “This weekend will be a good weekend for basketball heads to come together to plan for the future,” he summed up. C M Y K C M Y K WEDNESDAY, APRIL 22, 2009 THETRIBUNE PAGE 11 P AGE 9 Carifta: Medal-winning swimmers in the spotlight... Celtics ‘buck’ even with the Bulls... See page 10 More distance training needed for Carifta swimmers, says BSF boss Bimini to host men and women national round robin b-ball tourney THE 56th National Family Island Regatta in Georgetown, Exuma, didn’t get off the ground as planned yesterday in Elizabeth Harbour as the Sir Durward Knowles Junior Regatta was called off and will get started today. Organisers were forced to delay the start until today because all of the competitors from Long Island had not arrived in sufficient time for the start of the series of races. So organisers are hoping to stage them at the start of each daily session. In addition to the start of the junior regatta, the Ocean Races for the A Class Prime Minister Cup, the B Class Governor’s General Cup and the C Class Commodore Emeritus Cup are also scheduled to take place. Then on Thursday, the first series races for the A, B, C, D and E Classes will take place. The regatta is expected to continue through Saturday. Regatta to set sail today Algernon Cargill S OME m embers of the Bahamas’ Carifta swim team... ARCHIE NAIRN, the permanent secretary in the Ministry ofS ports, greets a swim team member on his arrival from Carifta Games in St Lucia on M onday...

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C M Y K C M Y K LOCAL NEWS PAGE 12, WEDNESDAY, APRIL 22, 2009 THE TRIBUNE DR. JUDSON ENEAS addressed the Rotary Club of West Nassau at the club’s meeting on April 2 at Graycliff Restaurant. Dr. Eneas’s topic was Men’s Health when he talked about prostate cancer, heart disease and diabetes. Pictured from left to right: President Michael Hepburn and Dr Judson Eneas. Address to Rotary Club HUB MARKS EARTH DAY THE HUB, a downtown art gallery, celeb rates Earth Day with the completion of “Facelift: The Hub Mural Project.” Using a “green” theme, the Hub's facade on Bay Street was transformed from peeling p aint to vibrant and colourful imagery r eflecting some of the Bahamas' most precious and endangered species. Pine forest, grouper, mangroves, conch, flamingo and more adorn the building in a t ribute to the significance and magnificence of the Bahamas’ natural environment. AFTER BEFORE T HE C rooked Island Youth Band paid a visit to Prime Minister Hubert Ingraham at the Office of the Prime Minister on Cable Beach, Wednesday, April 15. (BIS Photo/Peter Ramsay) CROOKEDISLANDYOUTH BANDVISITSPM n LIMA, Peru A Venezuelan opposition leader who says he is a victim of political persecution by President Hugo Chavez's government requested political asylum in Peru on Tuesday, one of his lawyers said. Manuel Rosales, a leading Chavez opponent, has been charged with corruption in Venezuela but says his trial would not be fair. Lawyer Javier Valle-Riestra said there is "convincing evidence" supporting his case for asylum and that Peru's foreign ministry should summon Ros ales to explain his request within a week. Peruvian Foreign Minister Jose Antonio Garcia Belaunde said earlier Tuesday that Rosales entered Peru as a tourist on April 4. Venezuelan officials say the charges against Rosales are corruption-related and not political in nature. Rosales, who lost a presidential race to Chavez in 2006, stepped down as mayor of Maracaibo, Venezuela's secondlargest city, three weeks ago and went into hiding in response to harassment and fears he could be in danger, his party said. Prosecutors accuse Rosales of illegal enrichment between 2000 and 2004 while he was gov ernor of Venezuela's western Zulia state. They are seeking his arrest, but a court has yet to approve the charge against him or decide if he should be detained while awaiting trial. Rosales denies the accusa tion, calling it a "political lynching" ordered by Chavez. Chavez opponent seeks asylum in Peru Overseas News

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n By NEIL HARTNELL T ribune Business Editor A C anada-based entrepreneur yesterday said he was proposing a $35 million project to create a fleet of amphibious aircraft, or air taxis, to provide a “new experience” for Bahamians and tourists in transporting them around this nation. Captain Petr Khomoutovski, managing director of Lomanti Transport & Trading, told Tribune Business that he was set to submit a formal project proposal to the Ministry of Tourism & Aviation, with construction of the first five Amphibian Air craft Dingo set to cost between $30-$35 million. Arguing that his project could help differentiate the Bahamian tourism product from its rivals, as it was not replicated anywhere else in the world, Captain Khomoutovski said his amphibious air taxis would not need to use land-based airports, instead being able to embark and pick up tourists and Bahamians from virtually any coastal locations in this nation. He suggested that the amphibious air taxi project could create between 200 to 400 jobs in the Bahamas if the Government approved it. This initiative, Captain Khomoutovski added, was the first pillar in a much wider strategy that involved constructing a minic ruise passenger ship which could carry an excursion sub marine, giving tourists a whole new view of the Bahamas from underwater. Describing his project proposal as the Bahamas Cruise Sub-Air Project, Captain Kho moutovski said: “The estimated pricing of design and construction of a cruise vessel with 400 passengers, excursion submarine and amphibious aircraft with air-cushion landing gear is about $100 million.” The cruise ship would cost $60-$65 million, he added, with the amphibious air taxis adding the remaining $35 million. Despite the steep price, he argued that investors/financiers would receive their funds back w ithin five years, with estimated net income on the cruise ship side totalling $899,200 in the first year. This was based on $9.072 million in passenger revenues, offset by $2.722 million in expenses, $5.351 million in debt ser vicing costs, and $100,000 in insurance costs. As for the amphibious air taxis, Captain Khomoutovski suggested that they would be relatively cheaply priced, with service between Nassau-Abaco costing $30-$40 on a plane that would seat between 10-20 passengers. It is unclear whether the Ministry of Tourism and Aviation, and indeed the Government, will go for such a project, as it m ay be too exotic for its tastes. When asked by Tribune Busi ness whether he had financing in place for the project, Captain Khomoutovski indicated that while he had several partners behind him, prior government approval was necessary to $35m air taxi proposal ‘offers new experience’ * Canadian entrepreneur says project part of wider $100m cruise ships/submarine initiative designed to revolutionise tourist transport and experience, and create 200-400 jobs * But financing dependent on government support, with proposal yet to formally go to the Government S S E E E E p p a a g g e e 3 3 B B n By NEIL HARTNELL Tribune Business Editor THE legislation to usher in a new regulatory regime for the Bahamian communications industry is set to be tabled in the House of Assembly within the next week, and possibly as early as today, Tribune Business has been told, as the Government seeks to create the certainty that will enable it to “pull the trigger” for the Bahamas Telecommunications Company’s (BTC The three Bills the Communications Bill, the Utilities Regulation and Competition Authority Bill, and the Utilities Appeal Tribunal Bill will cover all communications sectors, including Internet, radio and telecoms, creating a new regulatory framework and regula tor to oversee the sector. Prime Minister Hubert Ingraham and his government are understood to be especially keen to push the Bills through Parliament because the establishment of the new regulatory regime is the critical precursor to starting BTC’s privatisation in earnest.. Potential suitors interested in acquiring a 51 per cent stakei n BTC will want to have certainty and clarity regarding the regulatory regime they will face, as it sets the ‘playing field’ and ‘rules of the game’ that they must abide by. Sources suggested that the Government would look to table the Bills in the House of Assembly either this week or, at latest, by next Wednesday in o rder to kick-start debate duri ng the second reading. With t he upcoming 2009-2010 Budget presentation set for late May some four to five weeks away Chamber chief ‘incredulous’ over Bahamas Waste permits n By NEIL HARTNELL Tribune Business Editor BAHAMIAN-OWNED businesses are seeing their growth and expansion “smothered” because they cannot finda dequately-skilled workers in sufficient numbers, the Bahamas Chamber of Com merce’s president said yester day, with the education system’s failings “contradicting” the Government’s pro-foreignd irect investment policies. D ionisio D’Aguilar said finding a qualified, productive workforce was the “most trou bling facet of running a busi ness” for 99 per cent of Bahamian businessmen he had spoken t o, while foreign investors were complaining about being “ripped off” by a combination of high prices and poor workmanship. “The problem is that the Government of the Bahamas is producing schoolchild ren who simply cannot work, and are not equipped to work,” the Chamber president told Tribune Business. “That appears to be in contradiction to their policy of going out and attracting foreign direct investment. “What is happening is that we are attracting these foreign ers here, and what they’re finding is that there’s insufficient labour here to fulfil their needs. They then get frustrated.” Mr D’Aguilar recalled a recent conversation he had with an American investor in the Bahamas on a flight from Exuma. He said the American had asked him to detail the advantages of investing in this nation, to which Mr D’Aguilar cited the Bahamas’ tax neutral platform. Yet the American reminded him that he was still subject to US taxes because of Washington’s insistence on levying taxes on its citizens’ worldwide income. The investor then cited as major concerns “the cost of labour, the productivity of labour and the quality of labour” in the Bahamas, saying property construction was costing him $350-$400 per square foot when it was much cheaper n By CHESTER ROBARDS Business Reporter crobards@tribunemedia.net THE MINISTRY of Tourism and Aviation is working with major airlines to find ways to slash airlift costs to the Bahamas as the Miss Universe Pageant nears, as high access costs threaten to stunt tourism growth in the Bahamas and the wider Caribbean. According to Vincent Vanderpool-Wallace, minister of tourism and aviation, his min istry is engaged in private dis cussions with carriers who could bring thousands of pageant followers to this country in August 2009. The Ministry of Tourism has been working since the begin ning of this year – months before it was announced that the Bahamas would host the Pageant – to have carriers agree to make some changes that would result in lower airfares for flying to the Bahamas. However, Mr VanderpoolWallace told Tribune Business that there are still some “structural issues that have to be resolved”, along with “other factors that come into play.” “A specific programme requires significant changes on our part and their part,” he said. “We need to make sure we get them aligned.” As the Ministry exerts every effort to increase airlift to the Bahamas by lobbying for competitive pricing, the UK is con sidering the implementation of a higher air passenger duty that could make air travel to this region extremely unattractive. The Caribbean Hotel and Tourism Association (CHTA has appeal to the UK to rescind the tax they call discriminatory, because it imposes a higher rate on the Caribbean than major competing destinations. “Pending changes to the UK Air Passenger Duty are expected to result in increased levels of duties applied to air tickets from the UK to all destinations.Of particular concern to us in the Caribbean are the high levels of duty to be applied to tickets to the Caribbean, as well as the discrimination against the Caribbean region by illogically allocating to it a higher tax band than major competing destina tions,” said CHTA president Enrique De Marchena Kaluche. Mr Vanderpool-Wallace said C M Y K C M Y K SECTIONB business@tribunemedia.net WEDNESDAY, APRIL 22, 2009 THETRIBUNE $4. 68 $4. 51 $4. 69The information contained is from a third party and The Tribune can not be held responsible for errors and/or omission from the daily report.$4.29 $4.29 $4.29The information contained is from a third party and The Tribune can not be held responsible for errors and/or omission from the daily report. $3.48 $3.53 $3.48 Workforce failings ‘smother’ expansion Ministr y tar g ets r educed airlift cost f or pa g eant S S E E E E p p a a g g e e 6 6 B B S S E E E E p p a a g g e e 5 5 B B S S E E E E p p a a g g e e 6 6 B B * Chamber chief: Investors feeling ‘ripped off’ by high prices and low quality labour force * W orker woes main concern for per cent of Bahamian businessmen’ * ‘Businesses that get high school graduates from Bahamas government schools have an enormous difficulty in getting people with basic literacy skills’ D’Aguilar PM Ingraham n By NEIL HARTNELL Tribune Business Editor THE Bahamas Chamber of Commerce’s president yesterday hit out at the Government for todate failing to approve Bahamas Waste’s $750,000 biodiesel production facility, saying he “found it incredulous” that the company had endured a three-year wait, with the situation likely to discourage others from seeking government permits for new ventures. “I find it incredulous that the minister of state for the environ ment [Phenton Neymour] would find it normal to wait for three years for the Government to make up their minds about a pro posal,” Dionisio D’Aguilar, who is also Superwash’s president, told Tribune Business. “It’s taken three years to make a decision on how to price fuels produced domestically. This is the problem with government they simply take far too long to make a decision. “Here a company is anxious to start an initiative in a new field, Warns three-year wait ‘off-putting’ for other in v estor s and Bahamians with innovative ideas S S E E E E p p a a g g e e 6 6 B B Communications reform legislation tabling ‘imminent’

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JUST as very few persons would have predicted that the p rice of gas would drop significantly, months after being at record-high levels, the future h as a tendency to be full of surprises. That’s why it is important to take a smart, offensive p osture to mitigate risk so that you’re positioned to take on new challenges, especially when the economy recovers. And it will, rather quickly and effectively. Individuals and companies alike need to position themselves now. When your potential customers and clients are ready to make a decision, makea purchase or use a product, who are they going to think of? Who have they been thinking about? Hopefully, it’s you or your company. If you start positioning yourself and your company now, you increase that probability exponentially. History has proven that duri ng economic downturns THOSE WHO MARKET WILL MAKE IT, and when t hings do turn around you and your company will be miles ahead of your competition. L ook at the auto industry. It’s probably in the worst condition ever. However, auto companies are marketing more than ever. Why? Because they know from past experience that when things do turn around they far outsell their competition. This brings me to the second question we all need to ask ourselves. What has changed in this marketplace? There are really important, dramatic shifts taking place in buyer behaviour that may well reshape the way you do your work. In the past, it was the economic decision maker who was sought out in a n organisationm that key executive who made the decision to buy. In many businesses, that authority is being replaced by a committee. Officials now have to obtain sign-offs from several people to close a deal. For individuals and companies, this presents a new challenge. You need to broaden your marketing to ensure you’re selling in broadcast rather than narrowcast mode, extending your reach as widely as possible across each potential customer. Another important change one that clients are confirming in their own experiences is t hat buyers are taking a longer time to make decisions. Some clients are seeing sales cycles i ncrease from an average of 30 days to 90 days. Some are seeing delays of up to 20 per cent. T he reason this is happening is that customers want to make sure that they’re making the right decisions. And in challenging times, who can blame them? They want proof to back the claims you’re making about your product or service. They want someone to demonstrate how good the return on investment will be, so that they choose what you’re selling versus that of a competitor. This means your marketing message has to be adjusted. Bottom line, clients want comfort, assurance and trust. Companies are entrenching their existing business relations hips. It’s becoming increasingly difficult to find new customers, but existing relations hips have become invaluable. Buyers want to stick with people and companies they trust. A s I mentioned earlier, it comes down to a matter of risk and trust. Just as you need to position yourself correctly in this new economy, buyers are also doing this. Recognising this fact, your taskis to demonstrate to your customers that buying from you or using your service or productis a good choice one that reduces or even eliminates risk. By branding and marketing now, you will be sure to deliver this message. When your potential customer is ready to make a decision, who will they think of? All these marketing strategies are certain to keep your b usiness on top during these challenging economic times. Have a productive and profi table week! Remember, “THOSE WHO MARKET WILL MAKE IT!” N N B B : : S S c c o o t t t t F F a a r r r r i i n n g g t t o o n n i i s s p p r r e e s s i i d d e e n n t t o o f f S S u u n n T T e e e e E E m m b b r r o o i i d d M M e e , , a a p p r r o o m m o o t t i i o o n n a a l l a a n n d d m m a a r r k k e e t t i i n n g g c c o o m m p p a a n n y y s s p p e e c c i i a a l l i i s s i i n n g g i i n n p p r r o o m m o o t t i i o o n n a a l l p p r r o o d d u u c c t t s s . . E E s s t t a a b b l l i i s s h h e e d d o o v v e e r r 2 2 7 7 y y e e a a r r s s a a g g o o , , S S u u n n T T e e e e E E m m b b r r o o i i d d M M e e h h a a s s a a s s s s i i s s t t e e d d l l o o c c a a l l b b u u s s i i n n e e s s s s e e s s i i n n v v a a r r i i o o u u s s i i n n d d u u s s t t r r i i e e s s r r a a n n g g i i n n g g f f r r o o m m t t o o u u r r i i s s m m a a n n d d b b a a n n k k i i n n g g t t o o t t e e l l e e c c o o m m m m u u n n i i c c a a t t i i o o n n s s i i n n m m a a r r k k e e t t i i n n g g t t h h e e m m s s e e l l v v e e s s . . R R e e a a d d e e r r s s c c a a n n c c o o n n t t a a c c t t M M r r F F a a r r r r i i n n g g t t o o n n a a t t S S u u n n T T e e e e E E m m b b r r o o i i d d M M e e o o n n E E a a s s t t S S h h i i r r l l e e y y S S t t r r e e e e t t , , b b y y e e m m a a i i l l a a t t s s c c o o t t t t @ @ s s u u n n t t e e e e . . c c o o m m o o r r b b y y t t e e l l e e p p h h o o n n e e a a t t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f ([FHOOHQWDQDO\WLFDODQGLQWHUSHUVRQDOVNLOOV $ELOLW\WRUHDGDQGLQWHUSUHWGDWDUHSRUWV$ELOLW\WRXQGHUVWDQGDQGSHUIRUPGDWD DQDO\VLV &VNLOOVVKRXOGLQFOXGHWKHEDVLFVXLWHRISURGXFWV([FHO$FFHVV:RUG FH ([FHOOHQWFRPPXQLFDWLRQVNLOOVERWKZULWWHQDQGYHUEDOWKLVIXQFWLRQGRHVD ORWRILQWHUIDFLQJZLWKLQWHUQDODQGH[WHUQDOFXVWRPHUVDQGWKHKDUHGHUYLFH &HQWHU 35()(55('$/,),&$7,216 %DFKHORUVGHJUHHLQ$FFRXQWLQJ)LQDQFHDUHODWHGHOGRUHTXLYDOHQW HGXFDWLRQ rust’ in launch of marketing offensive n B y CHESTER ROBARDS Business Reporter crobards@tribunemedia.net CHINA is poised to become an almost $ 90 billion leader in outbound tourist flows within the next 10 years, still one place below the US, according to the president and chief executive of the World Travel a nd Tourism Council (WTTC tistics show just why the Bahamas has been attempting to make inroads into the Chinese tourism market. Jean-Claude Baumgarten, during his a ddress at the 13th annual Caribbean Hotel Tourism Investment Conference (CHTIC na’s rise to power in leisure and business travel in the immediate future. A ccording to projections, the number o f Chinese visiting countries outside of their homeland could reach 100 billion by 2020. Critics have quickly dismissed the relevance of certain monies invested by China in the Bahamas, including a $150 million loan by the Asian superpower, some of which is earmarked for road improvement. H owever, most of those critics are more interested in the terms of the loan signed on behalf of the Bahamian people by the Government and not the monetary injection itself, which by all accounts is regard ed as much needed funding for capital works projects. C hinese investors have also signed a letter of intent with the developers of the $2.6 billion Baha Mar project, and China is financing the building of the Bahamas’ $30 million National Stadium. The Government, as well as the private sector, thus appear to be positioning themselves to take full advantage of China’s ever -xpanding economy. D irect investment in the Bahamas by the Chinese could mean direct interest in the Bahamas as a leisure travel destination. The Ministry of Tourism and Aviation has invested a sizeable portion of its budget in creating ads for distribution in Asia, underscoring the importance of that market for these islands. “It’s amazing how this country [China], when you open it up, how people are going to go overseas, here on the chart we said that in 2020 there will be 100 million Chinese going overseas – maybe more,” said Mr Baumgarten. China saw 1.6 billion domestic travellers recently – 300 million more than the coun try’s population, he added, underlining that population’s interest in leisure travel. According to WTTC statistics, China will become the second largest Travel and Tourism economy in the world by 2019, just below the US. The other eight biggest Travel and T ourism economies are projected to be Japan, Great Britian, France, Spain, Ger m any, Russia, Italy and Mexico. With regard to those statistics, the Ministry of Tourism has targeted at least three of the top five emerging Travel and Tourism Economies, with increased airlift to Great Britain, direct flights into France and its proximity to the US. This country’s direct interest in China and other Asian markets highlights its c ommitment to tapping emerging markets. And its choice of Vincent VanderpoolWallace for Tourism Minister, several leaders in the industry told this paper at the CHTIC conference in Bermuda, can only serve to make the Bahamas’ tourism product more progressive than ever. With the uncertainty of the economic downturn this year, and the recent worry over the US relaxing its once-resolute stance on travel to Cuba, the Bahamas has been more forward thinking than ever in terms of its tourism product. These islands are set to take centre stage, along with some of the world’s most beautiful woman, as the Miss Universe pageant airs live from Atlantis, Paradise Island, in August, and the world’s most popular sport, soccer, holds its Congress at the resort in June. “Long-term prospects in the Travel & Tourism industry are supported thanks to the continued rapid expansion of emerging destinations, along with the global increasei n per capita income,” said Mr Baumgarten. Promotional M arketing by Scott Farrington China’s $90bn tourism market remains target for Bahamas

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C M Y K C M Y K BUSINESS Vacation in Paradise.Only $69*per person double occupancy.Minimum 2-night stay. Bahamas residents only. Full use of all Atlantis facilities. Plus: Limited-time offer! Reserve today !BSP Job #: CTS-9-N003 JM# 8634 Client: Comfort Suites Description: Stay In Paradise 1/4 pg Bleed: non Color: 1C Black Specs: PDFX1A Mech #3 Date: 2/25/2009 Time: 1:30 Mech Person: GUDimensions: 5.75in x 10.5 in Issue: Nassau Tribune 3/2/2009 Closing: 2/26/09 *$69 per person double occupancy per night Sun. – Wed. Add $20 pp for Thurs. – Sat. Maximum four persons per room. Rates effective through December 15. Additional fees apply for mandatory taxes, mandatory housekeeping gratuities and utility service fees. Rates quoted are based on standard room category and are subject to availability. Cancellations must be received 48 hours prior to arrival or a one night penalty will apply. G u s U g a r t e 2 / 2 5 4 p m CTS-9-N003_NassauGuardian.indd 2 2/25/09 4:14:07 PM THE TRIBUNE WEDNESDAY, APRIL 22, 2009, PAGE 3B encourage financial institutions such as banks, private equity funds and venture capitalists to invest in his venture. Given the Government’s track record, it is likely to be and quite rightly concerned about approving projects that do not have financing arrangements nailed down. Captain Khomoutovski may also have to overcome the fact that the National Investment Policy adhered to by the Government, at least in theory, reserves domestic transportation busi nesses for Bahamians only. Yet Captain Khomoutovski said yesterday: “The market for this project is very big. Every year the Bahamas gets five million tourists. It’s a new experi ence for the Bahamas, and will create new jobs. The Bahamas has real prospects for this.” n By CHESTER ROBARDS B usiness Reporter crobards@tribunemedia.net THOUGH official statistics are not available, feedback on t he Bahamas cruise product has been favourable this year, Ministry of Tourism officials said yest erday. However, visitor spending is comparatively less than p revious years due to the impact of the global financial crisis. According to Minister of T ourism Vincent VanderpoolWallace, the Bahamas has a proximity advantage to the US that has allowed it to retain its arrivals numbers in the beginning of what could be a deep recession.Cruise lines have also cushioned the impact witha ggressive marketing to fill their staterooms. O ne cruise line official told T ribune Business that ships try not to cruise with empty beds. But into year-end 2008, thec ruise industry was slashing its prices to entice cruise travellers. Now, price points are so low the industry may have difficulty driving them back up, buto fficials say the sector is evening out ofl ate. It was hoped that cruise passenger spending m ight help to float the Bahamas e conomy, as stopover visit or numbers diminished because of the global recession. But all indications s how that cruise passenger spending has taken a hit on board the ships and at ports of call. “Whereas we do not have the statistics to support at present, t he general indications are that t he spending has lessened. This is not unique to the Bahamas, but globally,” said director of cruise d evelopment Carla Stuart. “During recessionary periods, spending is generally less, and it is anticipated that as consumer confidence heightens, spending will also improve.” A ccording to Ms Stuart, the Department of Statistics has not yet released the first quarterr eport on the Bahamas cruise industry. “Thus far, the feedback appears to be entirely favourable,” she said. T he largest cruise vessel in the world, the Oasis of the Seas, capable of bringing over 5,000 p assengers at one time, is expected to call on the Bahamas later t his year. And the former Imperial Majesty/Regal Empress, now the B ahamas Celebration, is making regular affordable trips to the Bahamas. “The demand for the Bahamas cruise product is still very high, and the Celebration offers pass engers the ability to escape for o ne day,” said Ms Stuart. It was announced yesterday that the Bahamas will possibly l ose its spot as the world’s third largest ship registry to the Marshall Islands in the Pacific, according to lloyd’slist.com. Cruise passenger spending declines A A I I R R T T A A X X I I , , f f r r o o m m 1 1 B B V-Wallace

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- “with better quality work at a much better price” in countries such as the Dominican Republic and Panama. Mr D’Aguilar said the investor told him he did not mind paying $150-$200 in construction costs. Yet he then informed the Chamber president: “I don’t see what advantage there is to investing in the Bahamas. I’m not prepared to be ripped-off by paying $400$500 per square foot for poor quality work.” Education/learning deficiencies, which result in an unproductive, poorly-qualified workforce, will hinder the Bahamas’ room to manoevere at a time when external forces are likely to force its economy to undergo some profound changes. The structure and model the Bahamian economy has been based upon, and the rules governing how its firms conduct business, are under pressure from the rules-based trading regimes this country is being required to join the Economic Partnership Agreement (EPA with the European Union, the World Trade Organisation (WTO with the US and Canada. Then there is the OECD/G20 assault on the Bahamian financial services industry, at a time when the Bahamian workforce is not well-equipped to handle and manage all these enforced changes. Expanding on this theme, Mr D’Aguilar added: “I was speaking to someone in the private sector, and they said quite rightly that in this adjustment, our labour force just doesn’t cut it. Then you’ve got an Immigration Department that appears to be under pressure to revoke most permits.” Referring to businesses such as landscaping and his own Superwash laundromat chain, Mr D’Aguilar said: “At the end of the day, businesses such as mine that get high school graduates from Bahamas government schools have an enormous difficulty in getting people with basic literacy skills, and we’re banging our heads against the wall because it’s so frustrating. We don’t want to expand our businesses.” Without reform of the education system, the Chamber president warned: “You’re going to smother the growth of businesses. Bahamian businessmen, if you ask them what the most troubling facet of runninga business is, 99 per cent of them will say it’s the difficulty in finding decent, qualified labour. “This is such a pressing issue for the country. You just smother your private sector. The private sector lacks a key ingredient to grow. From every businessman I’ve spoken to, the most pressing issue is the quality of our labour. How do you get a productive, honest, qualified labour force?” Using his business as an example, Mr D’Aguilar said Superwash was in desperate need of hiring male cleaners in their 30s, due to the need to lift/move machinery, garbage bins and heavy boxes. Employing men aged in their 20s was not the answer, the Chamber president explained, because “they’re not settled” to a working environment. “They’re impossible, and a cleaning job is not what they envisioned they’d be doing, even though that’s what they’re qualified for,” he added. “And finding male cleaners in their 30s is impossible. They don’t want to do it. It’s difficult to get work permits; it’s the hassle every year. You’ve got to go through the agony.” To help solve the problem, Mr D’Aguilar said the private sector needed to establish a partnership with the Bahamas Technical and Vocational Institute (BTVI ment of Labour, in a bid to address industry’s basic skills needs. He suggested that other sectors follow landscaping’s lead. That industry had assessed what was done in Florida, come back and set up its own certification course to provide workers with the required skills and standards, thus providing a career path. “These are the sort of things we need to be focusing on, rather than getting money from the IDB. Something concrete. Let’s get things done,” Mr D’Aguilar said. “All we need ask of the Government, and starting today, is to give us people who can read, write and add-up 1 + 1.” Ralph Massey, a founding member of the Nassau Institute economic think-tank, in a pre sentation last week drew on the research finding from his The Learning Crisis essay to show that, based on the 2006 BGCSE results, 39 per cent of New Providence high school students who sat the English exam failed, while another 17 per cent were “language illiterate”. As for mathematics, the findings were even more shocking 36 per cent of all New Providence high school leavers failed BGCSE maths in 2006, and another 46 per cent were deemed numerically illiterate they did not know the differ ence between addition and sub t raction. C M Y K C M Y K BUSINESS THE TRIBUNE WEDNESDAY, APRIL 22, 2009, PAGE 5B Workforce failings ‘smother’ expansion I I N N S S I I G G H H T T F o o r r t t h h e e s s t t o o r r i i e e s s b b e e h h i i n n d d t t h h e e n n e e w w s s , , r r e e a a d d I I n n s s i i g g h h t t o o n n M M o o n n d d a a y y s s F F R R O O M M p p a a g g e e 1 1 B B

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and subsequent debate likely to clog up parliamentary time afterwards, now represents the best time for the Government to move the three Bills. Tribune Business was told by one source close to the situation that the proposed new legislation should set the tele coms and communications regulatory regime in stone “for some time to come”, removing the uncertainty and inadequacies in the existing legislation. Yet the source added that the Bills were also flexible enough to provide for any future privatisations that the Government may contemplate, such as selling-off the Bahamas Electricity Corpo ration (BEC Water & Sewerage Corpora tion. Hence the Utilities Regulation and Competition Authority name given to the new regulator by the Bill of the same title, implying that this body once created would regulate BEC and the Water & Sewerage Corporation in the event of both being privatised. Industry and public consultation on the three Bills end ed on Monday, and the BTC Privatisation Committee aided by attorneys Charles Russell and its corporate advisors, KPMG is now rapidly assessing the feedback gleaned. The Government’s decision to move rapidly on the legis lation may not go down too well with Systems Resource Group (SRG Bahamas, both of whom have asked for more time to submit responses. However, sources suggested that the administration wanted to move rapidly, and any amendments required asa result of the feedback will be incorporated during the parliamentary process. When it comes to BTC’s actual privatisation, Tribune Business understands that Citibank has been testing the market waters since earlier this year to determine the level of interest in acquiring the state-owned telecoms provider. The privatisation aspect of t he Government’s telecoms sector policy is likely to gain momentum once the legisla tion is passed, with the Pri vatisation Committee and its advisors then likely to engage in the active solicitation anda ssessment of bids for the c ompany. The global economic downturn and tight credit markets are a far from ideal backdrop against which to attempt the privatisation, but the more than 10-year process needs tob e brought to an end as quickly as possible, something Mr Ingraham seems to have decided, too. His plans to liberalise cel lular after two years, while likely to depress BTC’s value and the price any bidder will pay further, will benefit the overall telecoms market and the Bahamian consumer, who will enjoy better prices, more efficient service and multiple provider options. Tribune Business understands that one provider still in the game is Bluewater Communications Holdings, the bidder that reached an agreement in principle with the former Christie adminis tration to acquire a 49 per cent BTC stake for $260 million, only to be turned down flat by the Ingraham administration. Bluewater is since understood to have adopted a twintrack process, making initial moves to start UK-based arbitration proceedings as per the terms of its initial contract with the Government, but also remaining in the game in the hope that no suitable buyer will emerge and the administration will be forced to return to the negotiating table with it. C M Y K C M Y K BUSINESS PAGE 6B, WEDNESDAY, APRIL 22, 2009 THE TRIBUNE and create employment, but they are being thwarted by the Government. The Government needs to make these decisions more quickly. My God; three years and counting, and then they’ve got to hire the Inter-American Development Bank (IDB posal. That’ll take another six months to a year.” Mr D’Aguilar was responding after Mr Neymour told Tribune Business on Tuesday that the Government had yet to approve Bahamas Waste’s biodiesel initiative due to concerns about the pricing structure for the project, and the environmental impact of production by-products such as glycerin. The Chamber president, though, said that with foreign fuel imports draining the Bahamas of close to $1 billion in foreign currency reserves per annum, it seemed a “no brainer” that the Government would want to e ncourage the production of domestic ally produced alternatives. W ith the IDB’s new involvement in the process, Mr D’Aguilar said it was possible that Bahamas Waste’s threeyear wait could turn into four years. “Where is the ability of the Government to move expeditiously on something like this?” Mr D’Aguilar asked. “If it takes three years on everything, people wanting to get into new, innovative ventures, are going to be so discouraged that they don’t bother. “It’s very off-putting. Every time you go to the Bahamas government to get something approved, it takes for ever. They need to change their business model. They need to make their decisions expeditiously. “What is disheartening in the Bahamas Waste application is that I don’t think Bahamas Waste even knows the reason why the Government is not getting back to them. They’re banging their heads against the wall. If biodiesel is not a good idea, I don’t know what is.” T he Chamber president added: “If I w as the Government, I would wholeheartedly encourage the production of domestic fuels. It’s good for the environment, and takes all this oil and fuel that’s being dumped in the ground and recycles it. “You have this glycerin by-product, but go down to the Cape Eleuthera Institute and they’re actually looking at what you can do with it. Glycerin is a major component of soap. “Yes, the glycerin run-off is a concern, but look at what it could save in terms of the drain on foreign reserves. It could also assist in a small way, but assists nonetheless, in the removal of price volatility. “Here you have a Bahamian company, owned by Bahamians, and looking to get into a field replicated around the world already. Both governments have seen fit to hold it up for three years. I just don’t get it. I hope this does not drag on and on. It’s so offp utting if every time you go to the B ahamas government it takes one year, t hree years.” Prime Minister Hubert Ingraham acknowledged earlier this year that the Bahamas was still, in many ways, too inflexible and bureaucratic a country when it came to the investments approvals process, implying that there was a need for change. He has also in the past suggested that the civil services needs to become more proactive and responsive. Mr D’Aguilar yesterday said he hoped that the Government and BEC search for renewable, sustainable energy suppliers would not become bogged down in the same bureaucratic maze that had seemingly impacted Bahamas Waste’s proposal. “Drag on for too long, and people lose interest; the dynamics change,” the Chamber president said. “We’ve seen this over and over again. “I would think this would be a major priority. The economy is hurting. Let’s f ocus on what can make a difference. A lternative energy is one area. It w ould reduce imports, and reduce emissions from burning fuel. But you never get the feeling the Government of the Bahamas is urgent; it only reacts to events.” Chamber chief ‘incredulous’ over Bahamas Waste permits the Bahamas has also appealed to the UK to consider what affect the tax hike will have on the region. The tax was originally introduced as a “green tax”, imposed to give the aviation industry accountability for its impact on the environment, but according to the CHTA, “none of the billionplus currently collected is specifically devoted to environmental projects”. The International Air Transport Association asserts that govern ments should refrain from “overdosing” the tourism industry with taxation in order to save the prod uct – especially in the Bahamas and the Caribbean, which is increasingly expanding its market share outside of the US to Europe and Asia. Despite trials with airlift, Mr Vanderpool-Wallace said preparations for the Miss Universe Pageant are going well. “There is a formula they [the organisers] find to be successful,” he said. Ministry targets reduced airlift cost for pageant F F R R O O M M p p a a g g e e 1 1 B B F F R R O O M M p p a a g g e e 1 1 B B Communications reform legislation tabling ‘imminent’ F F R R O O M M p p a a g g e e 1 1 B B

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Both in their senior year of high school, the teens say since winning scholarships to the prestigious cooking institute, their future plans of becoming professional chefs now seem more tangible. Kristen who is currently enrolled at North Andros High, said her interest in cooking first started around age of 12, which was when she first started high school. “I’ve always loved the chal lenge of creating new food, and my grandmother was the first person who worked with me in developing that talent.” Kristen said the first food she remembers creating was a home-made coconut bread. After watching her grandmother create the heavenly delight dozens of times before, Kristen said it was only natural for her to try it, with her first attempt just as good as her grandmother’s. From there, she said she con tinued fostering her talent, enrolling in cooking classes at school, and cooking for her fam ily occasionally. Kristen first entered the Young Chefs Competition in 2007, where she prepared a rice pudding with pumpkin, potato pancakes with strawberry sauce, and a chicken bread served with yogurt and mango chutney. Although she did not win, Kristen said she remained focused on her dream of one day attending an international culinary school. Practise makes perfect “I spent more time practising my knife skills, I practised different methods of cooking so that I could become more familiar with the kitchen, and continued to keep my eyes open for cooking opportuni ties.” Kristen also put her all into her bread recipe for the Agriexpo bread making she entered earlier this year. She said she was extremely disappointed when she discovered that once again not only did she not win, but she did not even place in the competition. She said at that point she was almost ready to throw in the towel, but after speaking with her cooking coach, realised that everything that had happened up to that point was a test, only to prove just how committed she was to accomplishing her dream. She said her third and final opportunity came when she had found out about the Keizerc ompetition. This time, Kristen s aid she submitted a completely unique dish which she was certain would be good enough to take her to victory. “It was a plantain conch wrap, with pickled vegetables, glazed beets, and sauce,” she said. By the end of the competition, Kristen walked away witha $5,000 scholarship, which for her finally proved that she was good enough to become a professional chef, and that her determination and commitment over the past six years was not in vain. Kristen said she hoped her experience of staying true to what she loves, will also be a testament to other young people to remain focused and believe in oneself regardless of how difficult something may seem, as you can end up with a worthwhile reward. Like Kristen, CC Sweeting Senior High twelfth grade stu dent Kendric Rolle was also glad when he discovered that he had won a scholarship to Keizer University. Preparing a ground chicken and plantain burger with home-made bread, with a side of green beans, Kendric placed second place overall, beating out more than a dozen of other young chefs. Kendric who is also a musician, youth leader, and Christ ian, said that apart from cooking being one of the most important things in his life, being able to inspire others through all that he does is what make his life worth living. With the intention of attending Keizer’s Miami campus in the fall, Kendric said within the next three years he hopes to become a certified culinarian, return home from his train ing, and begin his career as a professional chef. He said with this recent scholarship from Keizer being an amazing achievement, he is confident that God has much more in store for him, and he is happy to have family and friend that support him in that endeavor. Walking away with the top prize was Aquinas College twelfth grader Deandra Rolle who was featured in Tribune Taste last week. n By LLOYD ALLEN T ribune Features Reporter lallen@tribunemedia.net YOUNG chefs Kristen Taylor and Kenric Rolle, made history last month claiming top prizes in t he r ecent K eizer U niv ersity cooking com pe tition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h e T r i b u n e A savoury taste of victory K risten Taylor Kenric Rolle

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n B y ALEX MISSICK T ribune Feature Reporter amissick@tribunemedia.net PROM season 2009 is almost here and many young ladies from a cross the country are already s hopping around for the perfect p rom dress and scouting potential d ate prospects. However, as a result of the hard economic times that have fallen on some famil ies, many young girls may not b e able to afford the prom of t heir dreams. W ith this fact in mind, Bahamian recording artist Sammi Starr has decided to give one special young lady a chance to have her prom fantasies and dreams come true by holding a nation wide competition to win an all expense paid prom date with him. To be eligible to win this celebrity prom date, young ladies must be high school seniors with a GPA of at least 2.8, must be a ctive in their community -sports, s chool clubs, etc, have a good r apport with the student body, w rite a short essay as to why they s hould win the date, be a fan of Sammi Starr and be able to name at least four of his songs. The e ntire event will also be aired on JCN, making this special young l ady a reality star for the night. noticed that the majority of m y fans are between 14 and 23, which puts most of them in high school. I know that 65 per cent of them are females. I wanted to give back to my fans and show the Bahamian public, especially these young people that I am a strong advocate for education. I wanted to applaud the efforts of young female seniors who want to go away and study hard because we have a lot of teenage pregnancy, fighting and those that do not want to do anything serious with their lives in this country. So I wanted to reward one y oung lady for working hard in s chool, being a good role model a nd for being just a good all a round person,” Mr Starr said. M r Starr said he will pay for the young lady’s dress (designer of choice), limo ride to and from t he venue, prom pictures with family, friends and himself, and p rovide a laptop, a cell phone and even cash to pursue her d reams of going abroad to the college/university of her choice. “I haven’t been to prom in about six years. It is not about m e on that night. I’m not going to h ave fun at my prom, I am total l y into making sure whoever the w inner is gets her mind blown. I t’s going to be a night she will never forget. We have been getting countless applications so far. I think this will give young ladies for next year’s prom season more i ncentive to work harder and get good grades. I want the young l ady who wins to feel that she was made to feel special for her accomplishments in high school,” Mr Starr said. T h e T r i b u n e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ammi Starr goes to prom BAHAMIAN music sensation Sammi Starr. n By LLOYD ALLEN Tribune Features Reporter l allen@tribunemedia.net M ANYin the local entertainment arena and others were shocked to learn of the recent death of one of the Bahamas’ most energetic musicians Cyril “Dry Bread” Ferguson. Viewed as one of the last in a dying breed of traditional Bahamian musicians, Mr Ferguson’s lifetime career of producing indigenous Bahamian m elodies in many ways has influenced other local artists like KB, Geno D, Avvy and Visage. Longtime friend and colleague Dave Mackey said that when he last interviewed Dry Bread in 2 006, he did not dream that it would be the last time the two would work together. He explained that over the many years h e has worked as Dry Bread’s engineer, co-producer, and graphic designer, they were able to produce dozens of hits songs, all helping to cement Dry Bread a s a note worthy musician who has truly made his mark in Bahamian history. Mr Mackey stated: “From the days of Cay Gotlieb’s Cicada Sounds Stud io (now COOL96 studios Mackeymedia multimedia production studio, we produced tracks and albums like Sunshine On My Body , Bahamian Music , Sweet Ting In Da Can , She Jump , A Good Woman , Mr Jitney Man , Lover And A F riend , G et in the Groov e , S hake Up Your Body Line , Do the Junkanoo , and lots more.” Mr Mackey went on to say that one of the most chilling things about that interview back in 2006, was where Dry Bread spoke of having to perform at funerals for deceased musicians using his music as a healing tool for their families. Now five years later, Dry Bread himself has become one of those musicians. Reflecting on Dry Bread’s passion for music and ambition as an entertainer, Mr Mackey said: “ Perhaps Dry Bread’s greatest career wish was in b ecoming a senior representative as head of The Musician’s and Entertainer’s Union, a dream that never came to fruition during this life.” F ellow entertainer Ronnie Butler, said although death is a natural part of human life, he was extremely sad to learn of the passing of Mr Ferguson. It’s always sad to hear of any one of our fellow entertainers passing on, especially one with as much impact as Mr Ferguson,” he said. Mr Butler who has worked with Dry Bread on occasions, said that it is unfortunate that the hard work that goes in producing and promoting Bahamian music, is often overlooked for other artists outside of the country. Mr Butler said the passing of Dry Bread is another example of how artists are remembered after they are “dead and gone,” a reality that he said does not have to continue. A longtime activists for increased airplay of Bahamian music, Mr Butler said he hope that one day Bahamian music will rule the airways, giving youngsters a more tangible display of local culture, music, and Bahamian specific experiences. West End and Bimini MP Obie Wilchombe stated: “Dry Bread was a special person who touched lives and gave of the gift that was bequeathed to him by his God. He taught children music and encouraged each to embrace their gift and follow their dreams. Dry Bread’s departure saddens us all particularly the people of Grand Bahama where he spent the majority of his life, but his music remains with us and the memories that will last forever.” L EGEND Remembering a D ry Bread n By LLOYD ALLEN Tribune Features Reporter lallen@tribunemedia.net T HIS w eek in T he Tribune’s Things 2 Do rundown, we’ve searched higha nd low to bring you the best events. And as always, there’s a wide variety ofc oncerts, parties, art exhibits, and cultural events f or your complete indulgence. 1 . P opular RnB recording a rtist Bobby Valentino is scheduled to perform live from the Fort Charlotteg rounds this Saturday, along with some of the b iggest names in Bahamian entertainment including SO$A Man, Jah Hem,M DEEZ, Lady Millz, Rapp Quelle, and others. The e vent which is being sponsored by Kemis Digital, Cyclone Entertainment, FixY a Face Entertainment, Fluid Lounge, and others, is set to begin around 9.30pm. Tickets are priced at $25 general admission, and $40 VIP ina dvance, and can be purchased at Airbrush Junkies and the Juke Box both in the Marathon Mall. A pre-party is also scheduled for FluidL ounge on Friday, where the 2009 Trump Model competition will take place, withf ormer America’s next top model contestant Tiffany R ichardson as a judge. Ladies are free until midnight, and men are admittedf or $15 until midnight. 2. As part of its 50th anniversary celebrations, t he Bahamas National Trust is hosting a Robin-Hood inspired feast and extrava g anza at its Retreat Garden on Village Road this Friday from 6 -10pm. Featuring the fine cuisine of a few local chefs, the event will alsoh ost various musicians, magicians, and other entertainment. Tickets for thee vent are $75, and can be purchased at BNT headquarters. For more information, contact 393.1317. 3. Once again the Express Yourself movement is scheduled to present its open mic session at the Hub art centre on Bay Street tonight, artists of all forms and genres will have the freedom to share their talent with the Bahamas. This event which runs from 8.30pm to midnight, has no cover charge, however donations for the centre and event are welcomed. 4. This Friday, art work by local artist Jane Waterous is being featured at the Doongalik Studio gallery Marina Village from 6pm to 9. The event which is themed ‘Peace, Love, Happiness,’ consist of a 17 plus piece collection. Using resin and acrylic with some airbrush to create the pieces, this exhibit is said to illustrate an abstract approach and view of Mrs Waterous’ life. Admission is free, and will continue until May 1, 2009. 5. On Saturday, the Bahamas National Sympho ny Orchestra will have it annual gala concert at the St Andrews Presbyterian Kirk starting at 7.30pm. Featur ing a diverse mix ofsymphonies from the baroque period up to the contempo rary period, the BNSO is also expected to add a twist of jazz pieces. Tickets for the event are $25 in advance, and $30 at the door. Ticket venues include Logos Book Store, Maranatha Music Centre, and the Linen Shop on Bay St. Hors d'oeuvres and drinks will be also be served. THINGS 2 DO

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C M Y K C M Y K ARTS PAGE 10B, WEDNESDAY, APRIL 22, 2009 THE TRIBUNE n By LLOYD ALLEN T ribune Features Reporter lallen@tribunemedia.net T HEBahamas Antique Auto Club (BAAC) over the past 22 years has built a reputation for having some of the best kept vintage vehicles available in thec ountry, and this year the group celebrates its anniversary with a look into its past. Founding President Don Aranha along with other executives of the organisation recently spoke with Tribune Entertainment. Mr Aranha explained that back in the late 70s, he spent a great deal of time visiting car shows and auto exhib itions in the United States and Canad a. After he submitted his own vehicle i n an antique and specialty car show in 1987 he decided to create the BAAC with a major focus on fund raising and charity. Mr Aranha, said his passion for antique vehicles began with the purchase of his first vintage vehicle, a 1961 Corvette purchased in 1979. Club secretary Murray Forde explained that over the years, apart from traditional antique vehicles, the organisation has grown and they are also featuring more modern vehicles like the 1991 Eclipse entered in this year’s show held at Arawak Cay. Leslie Rahming who owns the 91’ Eclipse explained that the 1.8 turbo charged vehicle went through several alterations and updates since he bought it some years ago. According to Mr Rahming: “It has two motorised TVs, a yellow hand held play station, it has crocodile skin seats, with the exterior color changed to fuch sia pearl and blue pearl.” With around 20,000 watts needed for the sound system, there is a 350 ampli fied external alternator connecting four batteries to this seriously “whipped” ride. He added that in addition to the chrome detailing throughout the vehicle, there is an additional motorised screen in the car’s rear trunk, with fiberglass molding throughout its flooring.He said that the vehicle is valued at well over $100,000, an amount sure to increase with future modifications. Mr Forde said: “We have always had a special-interest class which is really generally a low production car, a kit car, a repli-car, but we don’t have a lot of those.” Referring to the Eclipse as “a rolling stereo,” Mr Forde said the vehicle was popular in this year’s competition and said that similar cars have helped in the overall appeal of the annual event. Overall the group registers more than 100 antique and special interest vehicles which one member explained, takes a whole lot of time to maintain and upkeep. BAAC member Richard Blake said, apart from members having adequate funds to purchase replacement parts, they themselves need to be handy or have a good mechanic to properly complete repair jobs. “I have particular difficulty with the 1969 AMX, which is a car produced by American Motors which is now out of business. The problem was in getting parts, so it was one or two specialty stores apart from Ford or GM that I used,” he said. Mr Blake said the introduction of the Internet has helped a lot in locating hard to find parts, but added that there are still some major external challenges to owning a special interest vehicle. BAAC president Peter Armstrong detailed one of those challenges as drivers who have no regard for the group’s regular island long ride. “We go out on a fun ride every three months with the last bringing togethera round 19 cars,...you can guarantee that somewhere during that drive, some other road user will attempt to get past us and attempt to cut into our ride,” an act he said is both dangerous and stupid. Noting that their “train of vehicles” may be somewhat annoying to othersd riving behind them, he said their pace i s usually within speeding limits, thus not imposing transport delays to others. The group also identified licensing as another major hurdle to BAAC members and others who own vintage cars. Mr Armstrong said in two separate incidents he was pulled over for not having the appropriate license for his vehicle, but said he along with the members of BAAC ride their vehicles only a few times a years, and feel something similar to a bond license (O/T plates) should be created for such vehicles. Another challenge for many of the BAAC members is the high duty on the vehicles. Overall the group has generated and maintained relationships with other groups such as the Florida Auto Association and the Jamaican Classic Car Club, as well as contributed to local charities and children’s homes. Apart from donating fund raising proceeds to children’s homes, the group also raises funds and donates groceries to about 80 unfortunate children during the Christmas holiday. Mr Forde said: “Generally we pick a different one each year, and last year we did the Bilney Lane Children’s Home, and what we realised was what we did was a good start with the things they needed but they need more.” With this type of commitment, he explained that although anyone is welcomed to apply for membership, the group prides itself on attracting family oriented individuals as well as those who have a serious interest in the antique auto world. “We go through a process with the a pplication forms where the board of directors would meet to discuss it, because obviously there are certain people that we would not want to be members, but we hardly ever turn anyone down.” He explained that there is n o age limit, but expressed t hat it was essential to target younger members to help in the future growth of the organisation. Many of the members noted that apart from the Toyota’s, Mercedes, and other tradi tional vintage cars that have become synonymous with the group, bringing in a younger crop of members would probably bring cars like Subaru’s, Skylines, and other modern day muscle rides. With the club’s definition of vintage vehicles being cars 20 years and older, members say now is the time to draw new life to the club which would reflect the change in time. Putting the past in gear babies in the mangroves and if they don’t have anywhere to go then we would loose that part of our economy. I also incorporated some of the things I enjoy such as soccer, my laptop and music,” Mr Taylor said. Mr Taylor said although he was never really confident with his painting skills, after experimenting with a few of his pieces he has gained a greater sense of confidence in using that medium. Most of his art pieces are abstract using materials such as coloring pencils and water colour pencils. Due to his love for conser vation and a healthy planet, Mr Taylor decided to also make a 3D art piece using some of the garbage items he collected dur ing a beach cleanup that he participated in. “I used old roof shingles, coke bottles, and broken bottles among other things. I painted it black to show the impact we are having on the environment. I also found an old shoe bottom which I used to depict our human/carbon footprint on the environment. There are also brightly colored fish jumping away from the garbage to show that they can’t live like that,” Mr Taylor said. He added that he would like his peers to become educated about what is going on around them. “The destruction of the mangroves is going on all the time and people just don’t pay attention to it, they just focus on their life. People normally only focus on temporary things and are not looking at the long terms effects of it,” Mr Taylor said. Franz’s mother, Rose Taylor, said her home country, Costa Rica, has a long history of conservation of the environment and she is very proud that her son holds a special inter est in it. “He has grown understand ing the value of nature. To me it is very rewarding to see that he is not just interested in looking after the environment and keeping it but trying to share that with other people so that more citizens of both countries can eventually learn that we have to recycle, reuse and make a better effort to keep the beauty of the environment,” Mrs Taylor said. Mr Taylor said the environ ment has had the most significant impact on his art pieces and research. “The environment brought up important topics such as deforestation, pollution and human destruction of the natural world that surround us. When creating these pieces my intent is to appreciate the natural beauty of our environment and encourage others to enjoy it and make sure that they are doing all they can to preserve it for future generations.” Mr Taylor has been a member of The Bahamas National U15 Soccer team, the Bahamas National U17 Soccer team, a member of the Bahamas National U19 Cricket team and a 2008 Ministry of Tourism Foreign Language Cadet. He won First place on the Dolphin Encounters Poster Competition 2008, and second place in 2007. Franz is currently a class representative in the Student Council and a member of the LCIS Senior Band and Steel Drum Band. The art of conservation FROM page 12 SENIOR Administrators at the Nazareth Centre accepting proceeds from the Auto Clubs 2009 car show, being given by Richard Blake, President, Peter Armstrong, and Secretary Murray Forde. THE ORIGINAL six members of the club when first formed in 1987. (L to R Chestnut, Lenny Brozozog, Don Aranha, Alonzo, Rolle, Murray Forde, and Charles Johnson. Phot By Elaine Forde. FOUNDING members (from left to right) Don Aranha, Murray Forde, Audley Munnings, and Robin Hardy planning the c lub’s first car s how in 1988, w hich was held at Tyerflex, on Wulff Road. E l a i n e F o r d e / P h o t o MORE OF FRANZ’S AR T

PAGE 21

ANDROS CAT ISLAND ELEUTHERA MA Y AGUANA SAN SALVADOR GREAT INAGUA GREAT EXUMA CROOKED ISLAND / ACKLINS LONG ISLAND ABACO Shown is today's weather. Temperatures are today's highs and tonights's lows. KEY WEST WEST PALM BEACH FT. LAUDERDALE TAMPA ORLANDOLow: 58F/14C Low: 62F/17C Low: 67F/19C Low: 67 F/19C Low: 71F/22C Low: 71F/22C Low: 72 F/22C Low: 65F/18C High: 83F/28C High: 81F/27C High: 82 F/28C High: 81F/27C High: 82F/28C High: 80 F/27 High: 85F/29C Low: 67F/19C High: 83 F/28C Low: 70 F/21 High: 84 F/29CRAGGED ISLANDLow: 73F/23C High: 86F/30C Low: 71 F/22C High: 83F/28C Low: 69 F/21C High: 80F/27C Low: 74 F/23C High: 85F/29C Low: 78F/26C High: 89 F/32C Low: 75F/24C High: 86 F/30C Low: 74 F/23C High: 88F/31C Low: 76F/24C High: 91F/33C Low: 72 F/22C High: 86F/30C High: 81F/27CFREEPOR T NASSAU MIAMI THE TRIBUNE WEDNESDAY, APRIL 22ND, 2009, PAGE 11BTHE WEATHER REPORT 5-DAYFORECAST Partly sunny. A starry night.Breezy with bright sunshine. Bright sunshine. Partly sunny and windy. High: 85 Low: 72 High: 84 High: 83 High: 83 AccuWeather RealFeel AccuWeather RealFeel AccuWeather RealFeel AccuWeather RealFeel AccuWeather RealFeel Mostly sunny, a t-storm possible. High: 82 Low: 75 Low: 74 Low: 75 AccuWeather RealFeel 99F The exclusive AccuWeather RealFeel Temperatureis an index that combines the effects of temperature, wind, humidity, sunshine intensity, cloudiness, precipitation, pressure, and elevation on the human bodyeverything that effects how warm or cold a person feels. Temperatures reflect the high and the low for the day. 72F 86-74F 86-72F 85-71F 85-75F Low: 75 TODAYTONIGHTTHURSDAYFRIDAYSATURDAYSUNDAY ALMANAC High .................................................. 82F/28C Low .................................................... 73F/23C Normal high ...................................... 82F/28C Normal low ........................................ 69F/21C Last year's high .................................. 86F/30C Last year's low .................................. 64F/18C As of 2 p.m. yesterday ..................................trace Year to date ..................................................2.19"Normal year to date ......................................6.82" Statistics are for Nassau through 2 p.m. yesterday Temperature Precipitation SUNANDMOON TIDESFORNASSAU New First Full Last Apr . 24 May 1May 9May 17 Sunrise . . . . . . 6:41 a.m. Sunset . . . . . . . 7:36 p.m. Moonrise . . . . . 4:47 a.m. Moonset . . . . . 5:24 p.m. Today Thursday Friday Saturday HighHt.(ft.LowHt.(ft. 6:25 a.m.2.512:15 a.m.0.2 6:41 p.m.2.912:21 p.m.0.2 7:10 a.m.2.61:03 a.m.0.1 7:25 p.m.3.11:04 p.m.0.1 7:54 a.m.2.61:49 a.m.0.0 8:10 p.m. 3.21:47 p.m.0.0 8:38 a.m. 2.62:36 a.m.-0.1 8:56 p.m. 3.3 2:31 p.m.-0.1 WORLDCITIES Acapulco 90/3273/22s90/3273/22pc Amsterdam63/1743/6pc59/1545/7pc Ankara, Turkey65/1844/6c58/1435/1t Athens65/1854/12r63/1752/11r Auckland64/1749/9s63/1750/10c Bangkok91/3278/25pc94/3478/25t Barbados85/2975/23pc85/2975/23sh Barcelona70/2156/13pc69/2057/13s Beijing72/2246/7r59/1545/7sh Beirut78/2567/19s68/2063/17pc Belgrade61/1646/7c66/1847/8pc Berlin66/1844/6sh63/1743/6pc Bermuda 74/2366/18t70/2162/16pc Bogota66/1847/8c65/1847/8r Brussels66/1843/6pc63/1741/5s Budapest72/2249/9s63/1748/8cBuenos Aires 75/2359/15s77/2559/15t Cairo100/3763/17s80/2667/19c Calcutta 107/4182/27s107/4181/27s Calgar y51/1025/-3c30/-120/-6sn Cancun86/3068/20pc88/3169/20s Caracas80/2670/21t82/2770/21pcCasablanca 74/23 56/13 s 80/2658/14s Copenhagen 57/1345/7sh59/1546/7s Dublin59/1545/7pc55/1243/6rFrankfurt 70/21 41/5pc64/1739/3pc Geneva68/2043/6pc68/2037/2s Halifax50/1048/8r52/1140/4cHavana 82/27 66/18 s82/2766/18sh Helsinki48/834/1pc52/1136/2pc Hong Kong 81/2775/23pc82/2777/25c Islamabad97/3660/15s97/3661/16s Istanbul58/1448/8sh57/1344/6rJerusalem 87/3058/14s66/1853/11pc Johannesburg 61/16 45/7c63/1745/7pc Kingston 86/30 75/23t86/3075/23sh Lima82/2765/18pc81/2763/17pc London 68/20 43/6 s66/1845/7pc Madrid72/2239/3s79/2643/6s Manila85/2977/25t86/3077/25r Mexico City77/2550/10pc79/2649/9pc Monterrey93/3366/18s95/3566/18pcMontreal 54/1241/5sh54/1239/3pc Moscow 41/527/-2pc46/728/-2pc Munich68/2044/6s55/1235/1c Nairobi80/2664/17t83/2861/16t New Delhi107/4166/18s105/4069/20s Oslo 50/1037/2sh54/1238/3pc Paris 70/2146/7s72/2245/7s Prague65/1843/6s50/1039/3c Rio de Janeiro76/2468/20c82/2771/21pc Riyadh93/3369/20s96/3572/22s Rome70/2149/9sh70/2152/11s St. Thomas 86/30 75/23sh85/2976/24sh San Juan88/3154/12s86/3052/11s San Salvador91/3270/21s91/3274/23pc Santiago81/2748/8s77/2546/7s Santo Domingo88/3170/21pc85/2969/20pc Sao Paulo74/2359/15t76/2457/13t Seoul 54/1235/1pc66/1844/6pc Stockholm52/1136/2pc54/1239/3pc Sydney70/2159/15sh72/2259/15sh T aipei 79/26 72/22c86/3076/24pc Tokyo70/2157/13pc63/1755/12s Toronto48/834/1sh53/1139/3pc Trinidad88/3172/22t85/2970/21t Vancouver56/1338/3c54/1238/3pcVienna 68/20 52/11s55/1249/9r Warsaw58/1438/3s59/1539/3s Winnipeg50/1043/6pc62/1635/1c HighLowWHighLowW F/C F/CF/CF/C TodayThursdayW eather (W s -sunny , pc -partly cloudy , c -cloudy , sh -showers, t -thunder storms, r -rain, sf -snow flurries, sn -snow, i -ice, Prcp-precipitation, Tr -trace TODAY'SU.S. FORECAST MARINEFORECAST WINDSWAVESVISIBILITYWATER TEMPS. NASSAU FREEPORT ABACO Today:NW at 10-20 Knots2-4 Feet10-20 Miles77F Thursday:NE at 10-20 Knots1-3 Feet10-20 Miles77F Today:NW at 10-20 Knots2-4 Feet10-20 Miles77F Thursday:NE at 10-20 Knots1-3 Feet10-20 Miles77F Today:NW at 10-20 Knots2-4 Feet10-20 Miles77F Thursday:NE at 10-20 Knots1-3 Feet10-20 Miles77F U.S. CITIES Albuquerque 80/2651/10pc78/2549/9pc Anchorage51/1034/1s51/1036/2s Atlanta 70/21 52/11s76/2459/15pc Atlantic City58/1439/3sh63/1738/3pc Baltimore60/1540/4sh62/1638/3sBoston 60/15 42/5sh63/1745/7pc Buffalo48/836/2sh51/1038/3pc Charleston, SC76/2453/11s78/2556/13s Chicago52/1135/1pc68/2053/11pcCleveland 48/8 35/1c56/1344/6pc Dallas86/3064/17s84/2865/18s Denver75/2344/6pc80/2645/7s Detroit50/1034/1c61/1644/6pc Honolulu81/2768/20pc81/2768/20pcHouston 84/28 62/16 s82/2764/17s HighLowWHighLowW F/CF/CF/CF/C HighLowWHighLowW F/CF/CF/CF/C HighLowWHighLowW F/CF/CF/CF/C TodayThursday T odayThursday T odayThursday Indianapolis 60/1538/3pc69/2055/12s Jacksonville80/2655/12s85/2960/15s Kansas City 77/25 53/11s76/2462/16s Las Vegas95/3565/18pc90/3266/18s Little Rock81/2756/13s83/2860/15sLos Angeles 78/25 58/14pc72/2256/13pc Louisville64/1745/7pc74/2357/13s Memphis75/2358/14s82/2763/17pc Miami82/2771/21s84/2871/21s Minneapolis 60/15 46/7s78/2554/12pc Nashville69/2047/8pc77/2556/13pc New Orleans83/2863/17s83/2862/16s New York62/1646/7sh62/1650/10pc Oklahoma City88/3160/15s84/2860/15s Orlando 83/28 58/14 s86/3062/16s Philadelphia60/1544/6sh63/1744/6pc Phoenix97/3667/19pc93/3367/19s Pittsburgh48/835/1sh62/1636/2pc Portland, OR60/1541/5pc56/1341/5pc Raleigh-Durham 66/1840/4pc72/2245/7s St. Louis68/2050/10s76/2462/16sSalt Lake City 77/2555/12s78/2549/9c San Antonio 89/31 63/17 s84/2866/18s San Diego68/2058/14pc66/1857/13pc San Francisco65/1851/10pc57/1348/8pcSeattle 54/1240/4c55/1238/3pc T allahassee 80/2657/13s87/3057/13s Tampa81/2762/16s84/2863/17s Tucson93/3360/15pc90/3260/15s Washington, DC62/1641/5sh63/1744/6s UV INDEXTODAY The higher the AccuWeather UV IndexTM number, the greater the need for eye and skin protection.Forecasts and graphics provided by AccuW eather , Inc. Cold Warm Stationary FrontsShown are noon positions of weather systems and precipitation. Temperature bands are highs for the day. Forecast high/low temperatures are for selected cities. -10s-0s0s10s20s30s40s50s60s70s80s90s100s110s Showers T -storms Rain Flurries SnowIce AccuWeather.com

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C M Y K C M Y K I N S I D E Dry Bread: A bahamian legend See page nine WEDNESDAY, APRIL 22, 2009 n BY ALEX MISSICK T ribune Features Reporter a missick@tribunemedia.net IN the Bahamas, our l ivelihood is greatly embedded in our environment and the creat ures and foliage that f l our ish her e. It onl y m akes sense for citiz ens to try and cons erve what is left of the natural beauty of theB ahamas and in recogn ition of Earth day, o ne y oung man has incor p or ated his love for the environment, his home countr y and those of his ancestors. Earth day, according to earthday.net, is a day designed to inspire awareness and apprecia tion for the earth’s environment. Earth Day has been an annual event for people around the world to celebrate the earth and renew a human commitment to building a safer, healthier and cleaner world for all since the first Earth Day was held on April 22, 1970, Franz Taylor, a Grade 12 stu dent at Lyford Cay International School, is currently taking an International Baccalaureate program course in Visual Arts Higher Level. “The IB course has expanded my knowledge and application of different media such as acrylic, water color, oil pastel and fine marker. I have become more creative, a risk taker, I have experimented with pen drawings, sculptures and large frame scale paint ings. In the past I always had preferred to draw small, detailed, graphic pieces. I have learned a lot and have been influenced by artists from a variety of cultures and backgrounds, artists that have also had an interest in the environment, their work has inspired and complemented my work and my theme ‘The Beauty and destruction of the environment’,” Mr Taylor said. Mr Taylor being of Bahamian and Costa Rican heritage through his parents, Francis and Rose Marie Taylor, said he wanted to concentrate on the mangroves of the Bahamas as well as to incorporate his passions in life. “What I like about both the Bahamas and Costa Rica are the natural environments. I looked at Adelaide Village, where there is unfortunately a lot of garbage. Most of the trash that is there takes hundreds of years to decompose. What I found out about the mangroves, especially in the Bahamas, is that the fish and lobsters have their The Tribune SECTIONB F F r r a a n n z z T T a a y y l l o o r r u u s s e e s s a a r r t t t t o o s s p p r r e e a a d d t t h h e e m m e e s s s s a a g g e e o o f f e e n n v v i i r r o o n n m m e e n n t t a a l l a a w w a a r r e e n n e e s s s s the of ar t conser vation SEE page 10 BAAC celebrates 22 years S ee page 10 THE ENVIRONMENT has had the most significant impact on Franz Taylor’s art pieces and research.


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The Tribune

ANY TIME..-ANY PLACE, WE’RE #1

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BAHAMAS EDITION

www.tribune242.com

WEDNESDAY, APRIL 22, 2009

Pim blowin’ it

SOF
72F

LOW
PARTLY

C SUNNY

Volume: 105 No.123





SUPPLEMENT INSIDE TODAY

Local criminal
In aris Face

Pmanerommm BURNING OF DEAD DOG SPARKS BLAZE
. — _ : ;



Claims of nepotism
in the granting of
Crown Land denied

Lands and Surveys cm
Director speaks out 4% oi

m@ By PAUL G TURNQUEST
Tribune Staff Reporter
pturnquest@tribunemedia.net

LANDS and Surveys Direc-
tor Tex Turnquest yesterday
denied claims of nepotism in
the granting of Crown land in
Exuma.

Speaking with The Tribune
yesterday, Mr Turnquest
denied his involvement in the
selection and sale of five
beachfront lots on the island i Timatet placed ie

: ponsibility at the feet of
of Exuma, which were sold by prime Minister Hubert Ingraham
government to members of his (left) and former Prime Minister
own family who in turn Perry Christie (right).
“flipped” the properties, net-
ting profits in the hundreds of thousands of dollars.

Placing the responsibility squarely at the feet of Prime
Minister Hubert Ingraham and former Prime Minister Per-
ry Christie, Mr Turnquest said that the minister with respon-
sibility for lands (ie the Prime Minister) is the person who
ultimately signs off on Crown land grants.

Located just outside the settlement of Forbes Hill, Exuma
these Crown land lots border each other and range in size
from over 34,000 square feet to just over 17,750 square feet.

These lots were purchased at $1,550 on January 27, 2003,
$2,340 on August 1, 2001, $1,270 on June 6, 2001, $1,370 on



alter reports that
high-powered rifle
used in murder

m@ By TANEKA THOMPSON
Tribune Staff Reporter

tthompson@tribunemedia.net

LOCAL thugs
may be engaging
in an arms race
to outmatch
rival criminals, it
was suggested
yesterday.

This suggestion

LANDS AND SURVEYS Director

came on the heels of reports
that high-powered machine
guns were used in the murder
of Marlon Javon Smith, a 29-
year-old man who was chased
and killed in the backyard of
his Pinewood Gardens home
Sunday morning. His death
was the twenty-second mur-
der this year. The majority of
these killings involved illegal
firearms.

Yesterday Commissioner of
Police Reginald Ferguson told
The Tribune that police have
ruled out the possibility that
an AK-47 assault rifle was
used in Smith's killing, but
added that it appears likely
that another high-powered
rifle was used to perpetrate

SEE page eight









THE Court of Appeal chal-
lenge over Senior Justice Ani-
ta Allen’s refusal to recuse
herself from a civil case that
involves another judge com-

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Challenge over judge’s refusal to
recuse from civil case continues

ing under fire, continued yes-
terday.

Justice Allen refused to
step down from a case involv-
ing Isracli brothers Rami and
Amir Weissfisch last month
after she expressed concerns
about the integrity of a foren-
sic accounting report prepared
by Daniel Ferguson, the
brother of a close female
friend of Justice John Lyons.
Justice Lyons had appointed
Ferguson to prepare the
report.

Nicholas Lavender, QC,
who represents Rami Weiss-
fisch, continued his submis-
sions yesterday on the grounds
of appeal.

Mr Lavender told the court
that he would need a half day
to complete his submissions.
The appeal hearing has now

SEE page eight

The?” Sa

Wainy

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FIREFIGHTERS put out a
blaze burning on a property
on Carmichael Road

near the Coral Harbour
roundabout. The fire
reportedly started when a
homeowner burned his
dead dog in his backyard
and the flames spread to a
large area of bush.




m@ By KARIN HERIG
Tribune Staff

Reporter

kherig@tribunemedia.net








A MAN burning a dead
dog in his backyard yes-
terday morning sparked a
fire that destroyed most of
his property, threatened
nearby homes and spread
through a large area of
bush on the southern side
of Carmichael Road near
the Coral Harbour round-
about.

Neighbours told The
Tribune that the home-
owner, who was living in
an unfinished building
with his daughter, started
the fire in his backyard in
very windy conditions and


















SEE page two









March 18, 2002 and $2,105 on June 6, 2001.

The first four of these lots have since been sold. Their
resale was recorded at $550,000 on June 8, 2006; $500,000 on
July 5, 2005; $550,000 on June 8, 2006 and $425,000 on Feb-

ruary 26, 2007.

Sources close to the transactions suggested that the deci-
sion to space out the sale of these properties was to ensure
that Prime Minister Ingraham, who signed the first four
transactions, did not become aware of the family link
between the vendors and the Director of Lands. This tactic,
sources allege, was the main reason for the delay in the final
sale in 2003 after government had changed so that former

SEE page eight



Tribune sales defy global
trends with 7.7 per cent rise

THE TRIBUNE has boost-
ed its lead as the Bahamas’
top daily with street sales up
7.7 per cent over last year in
defiance of all global trends.

Overall, circulation was up
more than five per cent in
March over the same period
last year in spite of the reces-
sion.

Tribune president Robert
Carron said: “Our newspaper
covers the right stories in the
right way and appeals to
Bahamians across the board.
This is a remarkable perfor-
mance.”

Metropolitan dailies in oth-
er parts of the world, and
especially in North America
and Europe, are suffering
unprecedented drops in circu-
lation.



NASSAU AND BAHAMEA

ISLANDS’ LEADING NEWSPAPER

In fact, many once great
titles are now facing bank-
ruptcy and extinction as the
Internet, television and falling
advertising revenues take their
toll.

But The Tribune continues
to rocket skywards, with Mon-
day and Thursday sales par-
ticularly strong. “On Thurs-
days, our print run frequently
hits 23,000 or more,” said Mr
Carron.

The Tribune has shown
steady gains since it turned
from evening to morning pub-
lication in the summer of 1998.

However, the trend has
accelerated since 2001-2002,
making it the undisputed mar-
ket leader.

SEE page eight


PAGE 2, WEDNESDAY, APRIL 22, 2009

THE TRIBUNE



LOCAL NEWS



Mother accused of causing baby’s
death to remain in Sandilands

CAE:

a eet

ae ge ee

Sages

12pe Thegn & bog

See um ee |



@ By NATARIO McKENZIE
Tribune Staff Reporter

A MOTHER accused of
causing the death of her new-
born baby boy, whose body
was discovered in a field near a
church on Soldier Road last
December, will remain at the
Sandilands Rehabilitation Cen-
tre for two more weeks for fur-
ther evaluation, a Magistrates
Court was told yesterday.

Stacia Rolle, 19, of Windsor
Place Road, alias Stacia
Adderley, was arraigned
before Chief Magistrate Roger
Gomez in Court One, Bank
Lane last month, charged with
concealing of the body of a
child.

According to court dockets,
it is alleged that on Wednes-
day, December 10, 2008, Rolle
caused the death of a child with
the intent of concealing its
birth.

The infant’s body was
reportedly discovered by a res-
ident of the neighborhood near
the Church of God on Soldier
Road.

It was suggested that the
baby may have been born only
about an hour before his body

Healthcare is evolving :: Follow the dots.

was discovered.

When police arrived at the
scene they found the body
mutilated; only one finger
remained on one of the baby’s
hands and the feet had been
extensively damaged.

Police also discovered what
appeared to be fresh blood on
pieces of clothing.

Rolle pleaded guilty during
her arraignment and was
remanded to the Sandilands
Rehabilitation Centre for a
psychological evaluation.

She did not appear in court
yesterday as expected.

Police prosecutor Sergeant
Sean Thurston told the court
that officials at Sandilands had
informed him that the psycho-
logical report was still not
ready and that they needed
more time to monitor the
accused.

Rolle’s attorney Ian Cargill
reminded the court that Chief
Magistrate Gomez had
ordered that Rolle be sent to
Sandilands for a period of two
weeks, and said she should
have been brought to court
yesterday.

The matter has now been
adjourned to May 13.

e
—_h



*

moe Naot ,
AIM MCOMIS HI SRROM NIL ICG

POTCAKE ‘Ginger’ went missing from her home in the
Village Road area on Monday, April 20, between 7.30pm and
10.30pm.

The owners say Ginger is a very sweet and friendly dog.

She weighs around 50 to 5Slbs and has long legs.
She was wearing a multi-colour striped collar at the time

she disappeared.

The owners are appealing to members of the public to
take a good look at Ginger’s photo and to keep their eyes

peeled when driving around.



Burning of dead
dog sparks blaze

FROM page one

the flames got out of control.
He reportedly asked his neigh-
bours to borrow a water hose
when he realised that the flames
were rapidly spreading across
his property, which contained
many derelict cars and boats.

The situation was exacerbat-
ed when the gas tanks of the
cars and boats in the yard
exploded, neighbours said.

The fire reportedly also
burned more intensely due to
the fibre glass contained in the
boats’ hulls, which made the
firefighters’ job more difficult.

Director of Fire Services Supt
Jeffrey Deleveaux confirmed to
The Tribune that the fire that
is now burning through several
acres of bush started from a
man burning a dog in his yard.

By yesterday afternoon, Mr
Deleveaux said, firefighters had
extinguished the fire on the
man’s property and had the
bush fire under control.

No further homes or proper-
ties are under threat from the
fire, he said.

However, the inside of the
man’s unfinished house was
completely gutted by the fire
and his possessions, which he
had stored in his backyard, were
reduced to ashes. Other dogs
and a raccoon that he kept on
his property were burned to
death.

The roof of a neighbour’s
two-storey building was also
damaged.

Fire Chief Deleveaux said
there is a possibility that the
homeowner could face charges
for starting a fire in a residential
area and/or negligence.

Yesterday morning’s blaze



DERELICT CARS and garbage
burning yesterday on the property
on Carmichael Road.

was just the latest in a series of
bush fires that have been burn-
ing in the Carmichael Road
area in the past two weeks.

Police believe that a massive
fire that spread across several
acres of forest in the Carmichael
Road area last week was started
by an arsonist near the area's
well-fields.

No one has so far been arrest-
ed in connection with that mat-
ter and investigations continue.

Last week’s fires have for the
most part been completely
extinguished. However, some
smaller areas of bush that are
still burning, are inaccessible
to the firefighters.

MAIN/SPORTS SECTION

Local News

Editorial/Letters. ..........

Pipes Oro oulc

Serrated eee a see eeececeeerstens P4

P9,10,11

BUSINESS/ARTS SECTION

CLASSIFIED SECTION 36 PAGES

USA TODAY MAIN SECTION 12 PAGES


THE TRIBUNE

WEDNESDAY, APRIL 22, 2009, PAGE 3



LOCAL NEWS





Police identify
victim of Queen's
Staircase tragedy




aa oN ba sk,
Tim Clarke/Tribune staff
SCENE OF TRAGEDY: The
Queen’s Staircase.

m By MEGAN REYNOLDS
Tribune Staff Reporter

mreynolds@tribunemedia.net

POLICE have identified the
man who died after falling on
the Queen’s Staircase last
month amid allegations that his
death was caused by the slow
response of medical workers.

Leslie Sands, 50, of Pinewood
Gardens, fell while walking up
the historic stone staircase next
to the Princess Margaret Hospi-
tal (PMH) and lost blood from a
head wound for 45 minutes
before paramedics stationed
only metres away went to his
aid, witness Rev Kevin Cooper
claims. Rev Cooper said he saw
Mr Sands, wearing a yellow
shirt and khaki trousers, in the
PMH pharmacy moments
before he saw him lying on the
central platform of the 65th step
stone staircase with blood pour-
ing from a head wound, the
bones of his nose broken and
his forehead split open.

When emergency services
were slow to respond to calls,
the pastor said, he ran to PMH
— less than 100ft away — to
report the accident but hospital
staff were slow to respond.

Blood

A doctor who walked up the
stairs to take Mr Sands’ pulse
confirmed he was living around
30 minutes after he fell at
around 3pm on Tuesday, March
17, but the injured man contin-
ued to lose blood for another 15
minutes before paramedics
arrived with a stretcher, Rev
Cooper claims. Mr Sands was
finally taken to hospital around
45 minutes after he fell, the wit-
ness said. “He would have been
messed up because of the fall,
but he died because he lost so
much blood and because they
didn’t react fast enough.

“It’s not like they did every-
thing they could, they didn’t do
anything,” he alleged.

Police investigating the death
have not confirmed whether or
not they are investigating Rev
Cooper’s claim. Assistant
Superintendent Walter Evans
said foul play is not suspected
and the cause of death, “could
have been a myriad of issues.”

Princess Margaret Hospital
would not release details of the
incident to the press.

Anyone with any information
which may assist the police
investigation can call the Cen-
tral Detective Unit on 322-2561
or log on to www.rbpf.org to file
an anonymous report online.

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THE BIG CASINO DEBATE

Game for a review
of gambling rules



Top Kerzner executive backs calls to let more people play in casinos

m@ By ALISON LOWE
Tribune Staff Reporter
alowe@tribunemedia.net

KERZNER’S top executive said the
resort stands behind calls for govern-
ment to allow a wider range of people in
the Bahamas to gamble.

George Markantonis, president and
managing director of Kerzner Interna-
tional (Bahamas), told The Tribune the
company “thinks some of the rules
regarding who should be allowed to gam-
ble should be reviewed.”

He said Kerzner International was
“very happy” to play a part in crafting a
recent presentation made by the
Bahamas Hotel Association to the gov-
ernment which addressed the need per-
ceived by the casino industry for a
swathe of changes in the regulatory
framework governing its operations as a
whole if it is to remain competitive.

The Tribune understands that amongst
the recommendations proposed was that,
contrary to current restrictions, residents
of the Bahamas who are not Bahamian

citizens should be allowed to gamble in
casinos.

The presentation was made shortly
after it became clear that Florida’s law-
makers were advancing proposals from
within its casino industry for an all-out
expansion of gambling opportunities in
the state — including permitting popular
table games such as those offered in
Bahamian casinos and lowering the legal
gambling age to 18.

Threat

The move is viewed as a further threat
to the Bahamas’ attractiveness as a des-
tination for US gamblers in particular,
following a decision last year by Florida
to allow Blackjack and Baccarat — games
which would have previously been found
only offshore and in Las Vegas — and
has prompted renewed concern from
stakeholders in the Bahamas that steps
must be taken to shore up the industry’s
position here.

Mr Markantonis said: “There’s no
doubt that Florida has hurt us. Even

though we haven’t seen a huge decline
(in gamblers) that’s just because we are
great marketers and attracting new play-
ers. We’d have been doing way better
(had things remained the same),” he
said. On a recent trip to Florida he was
disheartened to recognise some of
Atlantis’ big players enjoying betting
sessions at the Hard Rock Cafe —a mere
“five minutes from the airport.”

“Tf you go in there now it’s like you
could be in Las Vegas: They have huge
spectacular machines, they have huge
spectacular beautiful casino tables, and
this is what is sad — it was packed.

“We'd see people who were our cus-
tomers and we’d say ‘Jack, why aren’t
you (at Atlantis)?’ He’s like: ‘Well yeah,
instead of flying ... et cetera, et cetera.’
So instead of coming maybe 12 times a
year, once a month, now they’re coming
four, and I can see their point,” he said.

While the property is trying hard to
boost casino revenue in the face of the
Florida threats and an economic down-
turn, the executive noted that the indus-
try remains restricted by longstanding

controls. “I wouldn’t go so far as to say
we are way behind the rest of the world
— we are not — but we do have some
bureaucratic rules and regulations that
make it difficult for us sometimes to do
business in an expeditious way,” he said.

Giving the example of how quickly it is
possible for a player to redeem credit in
Las Vegas, Mr Markantonis claimed they
go through a “ten second process” while
those in the Bahamas are subject to a
more time-consuming process required
by the Gaming Board.

The regulation requiring staff working
in the vicinity of the casino to get a
licence from the Gaming Board also hin-
ders business, he suggested, with one
restaurant located near the casino recent-
ly having to shut down for several days
while the company awaited licenses for
replacement staff to take over from oth-
ers who had quit.

Nonetheless, Mr Markantonis said he
recognises that the hotel industry is just
“one constituency among many” whose
interests the government must weigh
when it determines policy.

‘No more job cuts — if Atlantis

occupancy levels hold up’

mw By ALISON LOWE
Tribune Staff Reporter
alowe@tribunemedia.net

As long as the occupancy levels
seen in the first three months of
2009 continue to hold up, there
will be no need for further job
cuts at Atlantis, Kerzner’s presi-
dent and managing director told
The Tribune.

George Markantonis said he
sees “the glass as half full, not
half empty”, with visitor arrivals
two percentage points higher in
January, February and March
than expected, while bookings for
June and July also look “encour-
aging.”

However, he said that the com-
pany “can’t see beyond” July
right now, and if occupancy levels
“suddenly go off the cliff versus
our projections for another rea-
son, then that may be a different
case.”

Atlantis let go 800 workers in
last year November, citing poor
arrivals and occupancy projec-
tions. At that time, Mr Markan-
tonis indicated that the company
would be in a better position to
undertake a review of employ-
ment levels again around Easter
2009. In the meantime, the com-
pany recently asked 2,500 staff to
take unpaid vacation as part of a
“cost cutting strategy”, indicat-
ing that the move was part of a
plan to ensure the company
meets its “bank covenants and
financial obligations.”

Queried about this statement,
Mr Markantonis defended the
company’s stance, saying it is tak-
ing proactive steps to “stay ahead
of the eightball” financially.

“We are not a knee jerk com-
pany, we are not a reactive com-
pany. This is a highly profession-
al institution. We are not going
to wait until we hit the bank
covenant because of some hurri-
cane coming and whapping us the
month of September, wiping out
business and putting covenants
in trouble and then try to fix it,”

——

. Ve ris|*

G

LANDMARK: The Atlantis re

he said. Bank covenants refer to
certain conditions placed on a
loan by a lender, requiring for
example that the recipient — in
this case Atlantis — meet specific
financial targets or else repay the
loan immediately.

Stating that the company went
“heavily into debt” to build phase
three of the resort and has put
“$3 billion into the Bahamas” to
date, Mr Markantonis said:
“When everything crashes and
particularly when your lenders
have been hurt by their own prac-
tices, they get very jumpy and
they are looking at everybody.

“But when we talk about
whether we are going to make
covenants — we are not going to
go bankrupt. We are making
money. If we weren’t, why the
hell are we here? We’re not run-
ning a charity.”

He noted that asking staff to
take unpaid holiday was just one
aspect of a broad-ranging plan to
reduce the company’s costs and
ensure it remains in a sound
financial position.

Another component, an energy
conservation programme imple-
mented last September, saw staff

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help reduce the resort’s electrici-
ty usage in February 2009 by a
million kilowatt hours versus the
same month in 2008.

Mr Markantonis said the resort
was delighted to see the number
of nights rooms were occupied
this February compared with Feb-
ruary 2008 grow by 4,000 — but
even happier to discover that
rewarding staff for finding ways to
keep the resort’s electricity bill
down led to massive reductions
in energy usage despite the needs
of a greater number of visitors.

Overall, the frugal practices of
the resort’s thousands of employ-
ees saved the company around
$250,000 in February, said Mr
Markantonis. Meanwhile,
although the final numbers are
not yet in, March looks set to
have been an energy saving suc-
cess too. “It was a great month,
kilowatt hours hugely down
again, rooms solid,” he said.



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PAGE 4, WEDNESDAY, APRIL 22, 2009 THE TRIBUNE



Our politicians
fiddle while the
country burns



The Tribune Limited

NULLIUS ADDICTUS JURARE IN VERBA MAGISTRI
Being Bound to Swear to The Dogmas of No Master



LEON E. H. DUPUCH, Publisher/Editor 1903-1914

SIR ETIENNE DUPUCH, Kt, O.B.E., K.M., K.CS.G.,
(Hon.) LL.D., D.Litt.

Publisher/Editor 1919-1972
Contributing Editor 1972-199]

EILEEN DUPUCH CARRON, C.M.G., M.S. B.A., LL.B.



Published Daily Monday to Saturday











Shirley Street, PO. Box N-3207, Nassau, Bahamas
Insurance Management Building., P.O. F-485, Freeport, Grand Bahama

TELEPHONES

Switchboard (News, Circulation and Advertising) 322-1986

Advertising Manager - (242) 502-2352














WEBSITE

www.tribune242.com — updated daily at 2pm

Obama gores foreign policy ox

WASHINGTON — President Barack Oba-
ma has gone abroad and gored an ox — the
deeply held belief that the United States does

Publisher/Editor 1972-

and wealthy nation that realizes it is just one
country among many. Obama said he believes
that other countries have "good ideas" and

EDITOR, The Tribune.

For at least the last three gov-
ernments we seem to have been
on a downward spiral in this
country and the various gov-
ernments and opposition par-
ties seem to be moving on a
stage “directionless”, all fiddling
while the country burns.

All around we see evidence
of chaos and reactions to events
instead of actions from formu-
lated national development
plans. Neither political party in
which we have entrusted the
future of ourselves and our
country seems to have a nation-
al plan for the forward move-
ment of this country, and no
amount of complaining about
what the other boys did or did
not do is easing our almost per-

ilous situation.

LETTERS

letters@tribunemedia net



employment of foreigners with-
out a proper registry of what
skilled and unskilled labour is
needed to promote the well
being of the country and its cit-
izens, criminals have taken over
the streets and the police and
the courts seem powerless to
stop the surge in crime, and we
do not seem able to properly
run a passport office. The edu-
cational outlook is dismal and
we wonder where the person-
nel will come from to man any
industries we may wish to pur-
sue. Instead of our movement
to the First World which was

the country so that a determi-
nation can be made as to how
the plan can be implemented,
and also voters can make edu-
cated decisions based on
responses from persons wish-
ing to engage in public service?

For instance, how do we see
the future of tourism, do we
continue to build mega hotels
like Atlantis when the Ameri-
can tourists who like this kind of
resort may not have the funds
to populate them, or do we
move to the modest hotels
which are preferred by Euro-
peans? Do we confine Family
Island tourism to the models of
Abaco and Harbour Island
which have worked over the
years or do we move the failed
Exuma experiment? Let the
people know you have a plan
and give us the elements of that




not make mistakes in dealings with either
friends or foes.
And in the process, he's taking a huge gam-

interests that cannot be ignored.
Second, while the United States best repre-
sents itself by living up to its universal values

Driving around our capital Promised some decades ago, we pan,
we see strong evidence of Seem to have moved to the sta-









































ble both at home and abroad, for a payoff that
could be a long time coming, if ever.

By way of explanation, senior adviser David
Axelrod describes the president's tactics this
way: “You plant, you cultivate, you harvest.
Over time, the seeds that were planted here
are going to be very, very valuable."

While historic analogies are never perfect,
Obama's stark efforts to change the U.S. image
abroad are reminiscent of the stunning realign-
ments sought by former Soviet leader Michael
Gorbachev. During his short — by Soviet stan-
dards — tenure, he scrambled incessantly to
shed the ideological entanglements that were
leading the communist empire toward ruin.

But Obama is outpacing even Gorbachev.
After just three months in power, the new
American leader has, among many other things:

¢ Admitted to Europeans that America
deserves at least part of the blame for the
world's financial crisis because it did not regu-
late high-flying and greedy Wall Street gam-

¢ Told the Russians he wants to reset rela-
tions that fell to Cold War-style levels under his
predecessor, George W. Bush.

¢ Asked NATO for more help in the fight in
Afghanistan, and, not getting much, did not
castigate alliance partners.

¢ Lifted some restrictions on Cuban Ameri- with."
cans' travel to their communist homeland and
eased rules on sending wages back to families

¢ Shook hands with, more than once, and
accepted a book from Hugo Chavez, the viru-
lently anti-American leader of oil-rich
Venezuela.

¢ Said America's appetite for illegal drugs
and its lax control of the flow of guns and cash
to Mexico were partly to blame for the drug-
lord-inspired violence that is rattling the south-
ern U.S. neighbour.

¢ Said that "if our only interaction with many
of these countries is drug interdiction, if our
only interaction is military, then we may not
be developing the connections that can, over
time, increase our influence" — neglecting to

and ideas, Obama said it must also respect the
variety of cultures and perspectives that guide
both American foes and friends.

"I firmly believe that if we're willing to break
free from the arguments and ideologies of an
earlier era and continue to act, as we have at this
summit, with a sense of mutual responsibility
and mutual respect and mutual interest, then
each of our nations can come out of this chal-
lenging period stronger and more prosperous,
and we can advance opportunity, equality, and
security across the Americas," the president
said. Critics, especially those deeply attached to
the foreign policy course of the past 50-plus
years, see a president whose lofty ideals expose
the country to a dangerous probing of USS.
weakness, of an unseemly readiness to admit
past mistakes, of a willingness to talk with
unpleasant opponents.

"T think it was irresponsible for the president
to be seen kind of laughing and joking with
Hugo Chavez,” said Sen. John Ensign, a Neva-
blers. da Republican. "This is a person along the lines
with Fidel Castro and the types of dictatorship
that he has down there in Venezuela and the
anti-Americanism that he has been spreading
around the world is not somebody the presi-
dent of the United States should be seen as
having, you know, kind of friendly relations

At his news conference Obama said he did-
n't think he did much damage to U.S. security or
there. interests by shaking the hand of Chavez, whose
country has a defence budget about one-six
hundredth the size of the United States, and
depends upon it's oil reserves for solvency.

But beyond specific attacks on his new for-
eign policy are the deeper philosophical chal-
lenges emerging from the still powerful, if dimin-
ished, conservative political structure in the
United States. Such opponents can play havoc
with Obama's attempts to change domestic pol-
icy and will work to weaken his 60-plus per
cent approval among Americans.

Obama brushes that aside:

"One of the benefits of my campaign and
how I've been trying to operate as president is

neglect and lack of mainte-

EDITOR, The Tribune.

something else.

nance. There are more traffic
lights out of order than working,
there are massive pot holes in so
many roads, the public build-
ings are national disgraces, deci-
sions are being made about the

Stop trying to

Did you know Mr Collins
personally? Then how is it that
you know what his intentions
were when he built his infamous
wall? I strongly disagree with
you when you say that he built
the wall to secure his property
from bushes (unless bushes is a
new term for black people).

It amazes me how you white
people are constantly trying to
defend your blatant racism as

Whatever his intentions, the

fact is a white man put up a wall
which was viewed by black peo-
ple as a means of segregation.
Who cares if he handed out a
few jobs to a few select coloured
people who had an obligation
to feel privilege because they
were employed in his fields?
Find something of interest to
write about please and stop try-
ing to make heroes out of

published or not.

AARON ROBERTS
Nassau,
April, 2009.

racists. Thank you, whether

(For years our family lived

tus of banana republic which so
many of our critics have accused
us of being.

Is it too much to ask of our
politicians that they enlighten
us as to what national plan they
have for the advancement of

JEANNE I

THOMPSON

(Tired of banana republic
government under the pretext
of first world status)

Nassau,

April 21, 2009.

make heroes out of racists

to get Bahamians employed. As
a matter of fact, this was very
much the main effort of lead-
ers of this country at that time,
and this happened to be Mr
Collins’ contribution — whether
this letter writer wishes to
accept it or not.

(Somewhere in our numer-
ous files we have an aerial pho-
to of the Collins homestead
with its surrounding environs,
which shows no residential
areas around it. The wall was
not built to segregate one resi-
dential area from another,
because at that time there were
no built up areas to segregate.

(We also remember — after
Mr Collins’ death, and Mrs
Collins’ eventual move to a
smaller residence on East Bay
Street — that the property was
broken up into lots and sold.
Part of the property became
Collins Avenue, and Palmdale
and Centreville grew up around
it. The land on which Doctor’s
Hospital now stands was a part
of the Collins gardens, and
Collins Avenue was all a part
of the estate. What remains of
the present property was
bought by the St Andrew’s

western side were climbing a
ladder as a short cut to get from
one side to the other. There
were several accidents, but the
one that brought the infamy of
the wall to a head was when a
pregnant woman lost her baby
trying to scale it.

(It is true that persons living
on the western side of the wall
were predominantly poor and
black. Those on the eastern side
were middle class Bahamians,
predominantly white, but black
families also had their homes
there. Those against Sir Etien-
ne’s drive to open the wall, pre-
sented a petition to the House
to keep the wall intact. It was
signed by both white and black
residents on the eastern side of
the wall. Black residents were
convinced that if their poor
black brothers to the west were
allowed in, it would reduce the
value of their property.

(The opening of the Collins
Wall became the main issue in
Sir Etienne’s election campaign.
It was because Sir Etienne
wanted the wall down, but his
constituents, both black and
white on the eastern side of the
wall, wanted it to remain up as a
barrier to the residents on the

on Shirley Street immediately Association for St Andrew’s

mention USS. health care, education and human- I don't worry about the politics — I try to figure



itarian relief efforts in Latin America.

At a news conference ending the three-day
Summit of the Americas on Sunday, Obama
was asked to explain what a reporter called this
emerging “Obama Doctrine."

He said that first, he remains intent on telling
the world that the United States is a powerful











Constant Working
Pressure Hoses

out what's right in terms of American inter-
ests, and on this one I think I'm right."

So thought Gorbachev. But being right is
not always politically healthy.

(This article was written by Steven R Hurst of
the Associated Press).

opposite the Collins’ home-
stead, where The Tribune now
stands. Yes, as a child we knew
Mr Collins. However, Sir Eti-
enne Dupuch was his parlia-
mentary colleague and served
on many committees with him.
Sir Etienne had intimate knowl-
edge of Mr Collins’ programme

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School. The property extended
almost to Wulff Road on the
south. It was opened on the
east, and south for development
and even a part of the ornate
black iron railings came down
on the Shirley Street side to
make way for Collins Avenue.
However, the new developers
did not demolish the wall on
the western side, which even-
tually created racial tensions —
long after Mr Collins’ death and
the bush was transformed into
the residential and business
community that we know today.

(The western wall became
an issue in the election of 1956
when Sir Etienne Dupuch cam-
paigned to have it opened so
that there could be a free flow
of people from both sides. Up
until that time, people on the

western side, that he lost his
House of Assembly seat as the
MP for the Eastern district.

(Much of this probably took
place before Mr Aaron Roberts
was even born. We were not
only born during those years,
but as a reporter we recorded
much of this history. We are not
here to convince people like Mr
Roberts who is probably more
comfortable with the political,
racist propaganda on which he
was raised. It is immaterial to
us what he believes. This coun-
try will move ahead with or
without people like him. When-
ever we locate the aerial pho-
tograph of the Collins property,
which over the years has prob-
ably been incorrectly filed, we
shall publish it if only to enlight-
en Aaron Roberts. — Ed).

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THE TRIBUNE

WEDNESDAY, APRIL 22, 2009, PAGE 5



LOCAL NEWS

Local
computer
company
goes green

CUSTOM Computers has
decided to help save planet
Earth — one ink cartridge at a
time.

The company has
announced that it is participat-
ing in the Planet Partners
Return and Recycling Pro-
gramme run by Hewlett-
Packard (HP), the world’s
leading supplier of computer
and software products.

The innovative programme
enables simple, convenient
recycling of original HP inkjet
cartridges, toners and other
products.

Custom Computers is
encouraging its customers to
support the effort, in order to
help rid the planet of the
harmful substances found in
cartridges and toners.

Custom Computers and
Hewlett-Packard will ensure
that the used products are
recycled properly and
processed to recover valuable
plastics and metals for new
products, which will help to
divert millions of tons of waste
from landfills around the
world.

Recyclable

According to the company,
98 per cent of the materials in
ink cartridges are recyclable.

Customers can visit any of
the company’s locations — in
the Island Traders Building on
East Bay Street near the foot
of the old Paradise Island
Bridge, the new location on
Cable Beach, or the Service
Centre on Okra Hill — to turn
in used ink cartridges.

In return, customers will
receive a specially designed
eco-friendly Custom Comput-
ers tote bag with the purchase
of a new ink cartridge or toner
throughout the month of
April.

The tote bags can be used as
areplacement for plastic bags,
which are harmful to the envi-
ronment and take hundreds of
years to decompose.

“Our goal was to make it
easy and convenient for peo-
ple to recycle their ink car-
tridges and toners in a safe
and responsible manner,” said
Pia Farmer, co-owner and
director of Custom Comput-
ers.

“Our customers can rest
assured that none of the ink
cartridges and toners, which
they turn in will be disposed of
at the city’s land fill site on
Harrold Road.

“We are firmly committed
to returning these items to
Hewlett-Packard, which has
an extensive recycling pro-
gramme, and is a proven envi-
ronmentally conscious global
business leader.”

Custom Computers hopes
to extend the recycling pro-
gramme to include other local
partners, and Mrs Farmer
hopes to some day be able to
transport shiploads of boxes
filled with used toners and
cartridges to Hewlett-Packard.

She also hopes that one day,
recycling boxes will be placed
in public places, making it sim-
pler and more convenient for
consumers to recycle.

The Tribune wants to hear
from people who are
making news in their
neighbourhoods. Perhaps
you are raising funds for a
good cause, campaigning
for improvements in the
area or have won an
award.

If so, call us on 322-1986
and share your story.

UB
US)
FOR PEST PROBLEMS
PHONE: 322-2157





A BUSINESSMAN on a mission to
reclaim properties allegedly “stolen” from
his family a century ago is now targeting
two derelict homes in downtown Nassau.

Warren Aranha, 50, says both of the
houses, on Cumberland Street, are part of
the old J S Johnson estate, of which he
claims to be the sole inheritor.

Yesterday, business sources dismissed
Mr Aranha’s claim as “idiotic” and said
the properties changed hands a year ago,
with attorney Nigel Bowe buying them for
around half a million dollars.

But Mr Aranha, president of White
Rose Estates Ltd, a property firm, insists
the houses are his and says he is prepared
to go to court to prove it.

The move is the latest in Mr Aranha’s
campaign to reclaim properties he alleges
were stolen from the J S Johnson family in
the late 19th and early 20th centuries.

He believes a conspiracy involving sev-
eral leading white Bahamian families led to
a massive land grab which dispossessed
descendants of Joseph Samuel Johnson, a
leading 19th century businessman who also
served in the House of Assembly.

Last week, Mr Aranha moved into the
derelict former home of American mur-
deress Sante Kimes on Cable Beach, claim-
ing the two-acre site is part of a 465-acre
parcel filched from the Johnsons in the
early years of the 20th century.

And he is preparing to confront devel-
opment firm Bahamar by leasing an adjoin-
ing three-acre site to a company of archi-
tects and developers, claiming it is also
part of the Johnson property.

Now he is alleging that the Cable Beach
site has a direct documentary link with the
houses in Cumberland Street, and that he
is the true owner of all three properties.

“T am sure my argument will stand up in
court because I have all the papers,” Mr
Aranha told The Tribune.

“All of my research work, all of my

=

DERELICT: Properties in Cumberland Street.

claims, are backed up with solid docu-
mentation.”

He said members of the Johnson family
had been making claims on their estate for
many years now.

But some had allowed themselves to be
intimidated and lost interest.

“People have called them crazy in the
past because of the claims they were mak-
ing. But that is just a tactic to influence
the public,” he said.

He maintained that lots 78 and 79 in
downtown Nassau — supposedly the sites
of the two Cumberland Street houses —
were, in fact, in George Street on the orig-
inal town map.

“Somewhere along the line one map has
been superimposed on another,” he said.
“Mr Bowe thinks he has bought lots 78
and 79, but they’re somewhere else.”



A source close to recent transactions
involving the Cumberland Street properties
has dismissed Mr Aranha’s claims out of
hand, saying solid title can be traced back
into the mid-19th century, with deeds to
support it.

Wrangle

Both homes have fallen into a ruined
state because they were subject to a
Supreme Court wrangle lasting more than
ten years, he added.

The late Mrs Kathleen Cartwright pro-
bated the will after the death of Ms
Clementina Anderson, who had a life ten-
ancy of the property and lived there for
more than 60 years, he said.

However, heirs emerged to question the
validity of the will and won in court. A

subsequent appeal against the judgment
failed.

Hence, said the source, Mr Bowe bought
the houses with secure title in 2007 from
beneficiaries of the estate for half a million
dollars. “Mr Aranha’s claim has no sub-
stance whatsoever,” he added. “He showed
up one day and built a wall on this property
and he was told to clear off.

“However, for anyone not Bahamian
this is a really bad reflection on the legal
system here.”

Yesterday, Mr Aranha’s title battle was
further complicated by the emergence of
historian and businessman Anthony Cun-
ningham, who is also laying claim to some
of the land said to have belonged to the JS
Johnson estate.

Mr Cunningham said Johnson property
was an off-shoot of the Cunningham estate,
which he said dated back to 1783 when a
British general, Robert Cunningham,
arrived in the Bahamas after the American
revolutionary war.

General Cunningham, he said, was
granted the land for services rendered dur-
ing the conflict.

“T am going to enter this fight,” said Mr
Cunningham, “I have engaged a lawyer
and we are looking into the boundaries. I
am prepared to go to court and fight this.

“Lake Cunningham is named after my
family and we are salvaging what we can of
our estate within the constraints of modern
law. There are laws you have to under-
stand, but Mr Aranha doesn’t appear to
understand the law. We have documenta-
tion from crown grants right up from this
date. But we are doing things the legal
way.”

Mr Aranha said his claim dates back to
a mortgage granted to Joseph Samuel
Johnson by Queen Victoria in the late 19th
century. His own link to the estate was
through his grandmother, Sarah Johnson,
he said.

Master plan to be completed for redevelopment of Queen Elizabeth Sports Centre

THE contract for the produc-
tion of a “master plan” and
Environmental Impact Assess-
ment study for the redevelop-
ment of the Queen Elizabeth
Sports Centre has been award-
ed to the Integrated Building
Services Group.

Minister of Public Works and
Transport Neko Grant said it
will take three years to fulfil the
$2,993,857 contract.

Mr Grant said IBS, which is a

to use land in a way that allows
for the future expansion of each
sporting facility, as well as the
construction of new sporting
facilities in years to come.

A second objective, he said, is
to make the most of potential
non-sporting revenue sources,
for example through the con-
struction of concession facili-
ties.

Mr Grant said the govern-
ment also plans to explore

options for further sporting
development.

“These objectives,” said Mr
Grant, “are expected to guide
the work of the consultants in
the completion of an EIA,
which will be completed in the
first instance followed by the
development of the master
plan.”

Desmond Bannister, Minis-
ter for Youth, Sports and Cul-
ture, said: “We look forward to

the development of the Sports
Centre, to the completion of the
master plan for the utilisation
in particular of the Bahamian
sporting public.

“The new stadium and the
related structures which are
planned for the Sports Centre
will ensure that we have the
best possible use of the land in
that area and that we will enjoy
the best sporting facilities in our
region of the world.”

Bahamian company, joined
forces with IBI, an American
company, to present an accept-
able proposal and succeeded in
their bid to execute the project.

“Bearing in mind the pro-
posed relocation of baseball and
softball facilities as a result of
the construction of the new
national stadium, it is the gov-
ernment’s intention to have an
EIA and master plan expedited
to assist in the determination of
a permanent location for these
sporting facilities,” he said.

He explained that the new
national stadium, the funding
for which is being donated by
the Chinese government, will
be the principal facility in the
Queen Elizabeth Sports Cen-
tre, but that other sporting facil-
ities need to be developed in
accordance with the design
brief.

Neko Grant



dium, softball stadium, basket-
ball arena, drag racing strip, rac-
quetball and squash complex,
lawn tennis training complex,
throwers’ practice field annex,
national cross country running
and walking trail, gymnastics
training hall and complex, vol-
leyball training hall and com-
plex, beach volleyball and beach
soccer complex, Bahamas Golf
Federation training facility,
Commonwealth American
Football League training facili-
ty, and a national driving centre.

Mr Grant said one of the
objectives of this master plan is

These include a baseball sta-

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PAGE 6, WEDNESDAY, APRIL 22, 2009

THE TRIBUNE





Investing in Bahamian culture

You MIGHT not know
it, but there is a fire
burning among artists and intel-
lectuals who believe we are in
grave danger of losing our cultural
heritage — all the things that make
us Bahamian.

They say that the products of
Bahamian culture — our music,
theatre, literature, art, buildings
and folkways — are under-rated,
under-supported and under threat.

More to the point, they argue
that the disintegration of our cul-
tural attractions over the years has
led to a tourism product so barren
and boring that one trip up a dete-
riorating Bay Street completes a
visit.

According to architect Pat Rah-
ming, the services that deliver a
unique experience are what makes
a destination successful. And in
our case, those services — defined
as tours, attractions and entertain-
ment — have been allowed "to
crumble, rot, or go out of busi-
ness."

In other words, there is no
Bahamian brand, a term which
refers to how we package and mar-
ket the Bahamian way of life —
the things that distinguish us from
other countries, and that are
expressed through the cultural
products mentioned above.

Sun, sand and sea do not distin-
guish the Bahamas from similar
destinations, the argument goes.
So rather than spending millions
every year on foreign advertising,
we should be investing more in
business and brand development
locally.

"We must commit resources to
create an environment rich with

opportunities to share the unique-
ness of the Bahamas through the
development of attractions," Rah-
ming says. "Cultural activity must
be acknowledged as the primary
product in the business that drives
(or should drive) our economy."

Or, to put it in the appropriate
intellectual context, as stated by
the African writer Léopold Sédar
Senghor, "culture is at the begin-
ning and the end of development."

This context can be monetarized
too. In most developed economies
cultural industries account for 2-5
per cent of GDP and have gener-
ated consistent and stable growth.
In some major destinations, cul-
tural tourism is estimated to be as
high as 40 per cent of annual visitor
arrivals.

A recent study commissioned
by Canada's Heritage Department,
for example, reckoned that arts
and culture contributed $46 billion
directly to the Canadian economy
in 2007, but the overall impact of
the sector was a much broader
$84.6 billion. That study attributed
more than a million jobs to arts
and culture or to spinoff industries,
such as tourism.

Currently, our Ministry of
Tourism spends most of its $91
million budget overseas. The Min-
istry of Culture has a $2 million
allocation — less than Bahamas
Information Services — and most

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of that goes to fund the annual
Junkanoo parades. The remainder
is used to finance festivals through-
out The Bahamas, maintain a
“national theatre”, and run the
National Arts Festival.

To demonstrate their anger over
this state of affairs, cultural activists
staged a 'Day of Absence’ this past
February. It was based on a play by
Douglas Turner Ward, which told
the story of a small town in the
American South in which the
white inhabitants discover on a
particular day that all the black
people have disappeared.

What would happen, our
activists asked, if Bahamians woke
up one day and found that all the
artists and cultural workers had
suddenly vanished? Wouldn't our
world be a poorer and sadder
place?

According to former cultural
affairs director Nicolette Bethel
(now a lecturer at the College of
The Bahamas), the Day of
Absence attempted to make the
point that Bahamian artists, musi-
cians, writers, actors, directors,
dancers, designers, craftworkers,
you name it — are marginalized,
disrespected, and taken for grant-
ed.

"They are unable to find work in
the areas in which God has gifted
them. There are virtually no
avenues in The Bahamas to enable
creative people to develop and
hone their talents, or to enable
them to make use of them when
they are developed. Our greatest
brain drain is arguably in the area
of the arts, and culture has
absolutely no respect in the nation-
al discourse."

Fred Ferguson is a legendary
musician and producer, who was
for years a member of BahaMen
— the iconic Bahamian band that
made a big splash with their hit
"Who Let the Dogs Out". In 2003
Ferguson started his own band —
Tingum Dem — and plays weekly
at the Tamarind Club on Harrold
Road, a venue that he opened with
partner Ronald Simms.

"The Bahamas is a tough mar-
ket for all entertainers," Ferguson
told me.

"Bahamians have very short
memories and there is a deep-root-

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ed lack of national pride, which
our leaders are not making any
effort to correct. They are only
interested in Bahamian music at
election time."

According to Ferguson, "there's
no programme to develop music
in the Bahamas. Teachers train
kids in the schools and they come
back to be music teachers who
train more kids to be music teach-
ers. There's no way for musicians
to practice their craft."

By most accounts, this is a com-
plex and multi-dimensional issue.
Even Ferguson admits that enter-
tainers often price themselves out
of work and are notoriously tem-
peramental from a business stand-
point.

Others say the problems faced
by cultural workers stem from feel-
ings of entitlement. Some veter-
ans have not produced creatively
for years, critics argue, yet they
expect to receive public support
as a matter of right.

"Government can create a sup-
portive environment but should
not be financing private ventures,"
one tourism executive told me.
"And what are the musicians doing
to promote themselves? Are they
willing to share the economic
risk?" Why don't the musicians
provide some leadership and vision
of their own? Visual artists have
done well over the years and are
well supported by Bahamians, why
not musicians? What are they
doing collectively to come up with
a plan or strategy to help them-
selves?"

W ell, Ferguson's
Tamarind Club was

set up to do just that, playing
Bahamian and old school music in
a comfortable and controlled envi-
ronment, but although he has been
able to build something of an audi-
ence, money is a constant
headache.

"The truth is, I'm struggling to
keep my entertainment business
afloat. I'm facing some of the same
challenges that Freddie Munnings
Sr. faced at the old Cat & Fiddle.
My partner and I have been trying
desperately to acquire financing
to improve our business and to just
basically stay in operation, but
finance institutions have basically
closed the door in offering any
form of assistance."

That's true, according to one
banker we surveyed: "The enter-
tainment industry is financed large-
ly by equity capital, venture capital,
personal resources or love money



“What would
happen, our
activists asked,
if Bahamians
woke up one day
and found that
all the artists and
cultural workers
had suddenly
vanished?”

(friends and family). The risks
associated with this industry cannot
be priced in the traditional prime
plus markets serviced by commer-
cial banks."

For another perspective on this
issue we spoke to Devlynn Stubbs
(who goes by the name of Jah
Doctrine).

He is a young Bahamian song-
writer with a degree in philosophy
who is tackling the industry from a
different angle. He's been produc-
ing music professionally for the
past five years, focusing on reggae,
hip hop and dance hall (see
myspace.com/jahdoctrine).

"T grew up in the church, which
stimulated my interest in music,
and I found I had an ability to
write. But it takes years of planning
and training to make a living off
this so you really gotta do it for
the love. Music is my career but I
need to get a job to live. You got-
ta get up and get humping.”

Stubbs says the local band cir-
cuit is very limited and even form-
ing a band is a challenge, since
musicians want to be paid for prac-
tice time.

"But these days you have to go
at things differently,” he told me.
"You don't form a band, get a
venue, build an audience and then
cut acd. You can cut a cd yourself
with a computer and create a mar-
keting buzz on your own. But you
still need to do shows and per-
form."

Aside from the economics, the
larger issue is the loss of Bahamian
culture: "We do little or nothing
to maintain the things that make us
culturally different," Ferguson says.

"There is an underlying sense
of embarrassment at being
Bahamian. We have to take a
stand. We need leadership and
focus and a determination that our
entertainment is important to us.
We need to put some energy and
funding into these matters and do



things properly.”

As former culture director Nico
Bethel put it: "For a generation
and a half — the entire time since
Independence — our national poli-
cies have been shaped by a group
of men and a handful of women
whose actions and behaviour
cumulatively suggest that they
would rather erase Bahamian cul-
ture than invest in it. Our cultural
industries are in effective decline."

Bethel (a sociologist whose late
father, Clement Bethel, was the
country's first and most eminent
director of culture) argues that the
government provides sporting
facilities throughout the country,
has legislation to promote hotels
and govern education and health,
but nothing — either in law or on
the ground — to support, encour-
age or develop artistic activity.

"We can read the reports for
ourselves, and accept the idea that
culture is the economic sector in
which to invest for nations that are
still developing; or we can share
the delusions of our politicians,
which confuse the grandeur of the
monstrosities that foreign investors
build (and usually protect behind
gates and bridges and visitor pass-
es) with development of a nation
and of a people."

Bethel says she quit as director
because decision-makers won't
take culture seriously: "My father
died at 49 and I have no intention
of wasting what could be the last
years of my life trying to get results
out of a non-responsive, uncaring,
and uninterested public service, or
waiting for the latest bright politi-
cal spark to make good on promis-
es they never intended to honour
in the first place."

Others may point out that it is
not the responsibility of govern-
ment to make it easier for artists to
make a living, or to take care of
musicians, or subsidise straw ven-
dors. In the final analysis we all
have to be responsible for our own
livelihoods.

But the real issue here is one of
judgment. We already spend huge
amounts of taxpayer dollars on
packaging the Bahamas overseas,
while very little thought or money
is invested in the product we are
selling. And it is an undeniable fact
that the average Bahamian vaca-
tion is hollow, superficial, and not
worth the money that tourists pay
for it.

What do you think?

Send comments to
larry@tribunemedia.net

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BAHAMAS ELECTRICITY CORPORATION

VACANCY NOTICE

MANAGER, REVENUE ACCOUNTING
CUSTOMER SERVICES DIVISION

A vacancy exists in the Corporation for the position of Manager, Revenue Accounting.

The job manages the billing of all customer accounts in New Providence and the Family Islands and the

reconciliation of all revenue accounts other than miscellaneous receivables.

Responsibilities of the position include, but are not limited to, the following:

Manages the meter reading and billing processes both in New Providence and the Family Islands.

Assists with the disconnection process through the use of meter readers.

Prepares the sales budget.

Prepares the Revenue Accounting Department Budget.

Oversees the preparation of the Accounts Receivable Reconciliation.
Oversees the training of all Customer Services staff in the new billing software.
Prepares monthly Board reports.

Prepares monthly sales analysis and unbilled revenue reports.
Prepares quarterly reports for the Central Bank & Department of Statistics.
Provides statistical billing information for Family Island managers.
Oversees the disconnection of services for non-payment of electricity in the Family Islands.
Attends yearly community meetings as well as ad hoc meetings required during acquisition of new

locations.

Develops and implements rules, guidelines and procedures for the efficient operation of the department.

Job requirements include:

A minimum of a Bachelors degree in Accounts or equivalent

A minimum of 8+ years of experience in accounting practice and theory.

Certified Accountant (CPA) or equivalent qualifications
Knowledge of the Electricity Act of the Bahamas.

Ability to communicate effectively both orally and in writing.
Sound reasoning and good judgment skills.

Ability to interpret financial reports.

Good time management skills.

Project management skills.

Interested persons should apply by completing and returning an Application Form to: The Manager-
Human Resources & Training Department, Bahamas Electricity Corporation, Blue Hill &
Tucker, P. O. Box N-7509 Nassau Bahamas on or before: May 4, 2009.


THE TRIBUNE



LOCAL NEWS

WEDNESDAY, APRIL 22, 2009, PAGE 7



WMO hurricane
session underway

THE 31st session of the
World Meteorological Organ-
isation’s hurricane committee
opened on Monday with a
reminder of the impact global
warming can have on island
nations like the Bahamas.

The melting of the polar ice
caps resulting in a steady rise
in sea levels “should be of
major concern” to Bahamians,
said Arthur Rolle, director of
the Department of Meteorol-
ogy.

He noted that about 80 per
cent of the Bahamas is only
“slightly” above sea level.

“Climate warming and the
melting of polar ice means sea
levels will rise and once that
happens our islands will expe-
rience a lot of inundation,”
said Mr Rolle, also the per-
manent representative of the
Bahamas with the WMO.
“And over time some of our
islands will disappear.

“We have to adapt through
public awareness. For exam-
ple, as the sea level rises, there
will be a need to have homes
built away from the coastline.”




























| in

ROYAL BAHAMAS DEFENCE
Oe am UE litemstr ICUs t ln
is all smiles as he talks with
Prime Minister Hubert Ingra-
ham and National Security
Minister Tommy Turnquest.

Sy
WT
seaman who was
FTAA TEC

m By SHARON TURNER

PORT OF SPAIN, Trinidad —
Prime Minister Hubert Ingraham
and National Security Minister
Tommy Turnquest met with Roy-
al Bahamas Defence Force Sea-
man Bernard Barr, who was acci-
dentally shot during a training
exercise in Trinidad.

The shooting, according to a
Trinidad and Tobago government
release, occurred during a training
exercise on the Tucker Valley
Shooting Range on the morning
of April 4.

Seaman Barr is one of 32
marines deployed to serve on the
5th Summit of the Americas’ mil-
itary team, Mr Turnquest
explained.

“We felt it was important being
here at this Summit to meet Sea-
man Barr and make sure he is
well,” he said. “He seemed to be
in excellent spirits. He indicated
that he felt well and he was well
taken care of as the Ministry of
National Security in Trinidad had
indicated to me personally.

“We have been able to see that,
We met with Lt Commander
Clarence Dean who was a part of
the Advanced Team and also Lt
Ferguson who was a part of the
Special Operations leading the 32
member marine team that is
here.”

share
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THE MINISTER OF STATE for the Environment addresses delegates at the 31st

pe ie!

session of the World Meteorological Organisation’s Hurricane Committee. Pic-
tured at right are Bill Read, chairman of the R A IV Hurricane Committee; and
Miguel Angel Rabiolo, regional director for the WMO for the Americas.

The opening session at
Wyndham Nassau Resort also
heard from Bill Read, chair-
man of the R A IV Hurricane
Committee; Miguel Angel
Rabiolo, WMO regional direc-
tor for the Americas; and
Phenton Neymour, MP and
Minister of State in the Min-

istry of the Environment.

This meeting follows the
successful Bahamas Weather
Conference, World Meteoro-
logical Day and World Water
Day.

These occasions provided
“great opportunities” for the
Department of Meteorology

La

ay
a

RAIV Hurricane Committee

3st Session

PUCK Toth A |



PICTURED, FROM LEFT, ARE: Koji Kuroiwa, WMO chief of the Tropical Cyclone Programme Division; Miguel

Angel Rabioli, WMO regional director for the Americas; Arthur Rolle, director of the Department of Meteorology
and permanent representative of the Bahamas with the WMO; Phenton Neymour, Minister of State for the Environ-
ment; Bill Read, chairman of the R A IV Hurricane Committee; Dr Jose Rubiera, hurricane committee vice chairman
for Spanish speaking countries and director of the National Forecast Centre in Cuba.

to further impress upon the
nation the gravity of tropical
cyclones, said Mr Neymour.
The hurricane season begins
June 1.

“The Bahamas has learned
its lessons well in that the risks
associated with tropical
cyclones and other related
hazards along coastal areas
could be greatly reduced
through early warning systems
and emergency preparedness,”
said Mr Neymour.

The national meteorologi-
cal service is fulfilling its role
by using a sound network of
meteorological surveillance
tools which provides automat-
ic weather observation on 14
major islands, and includes an
upper air station, lightening
data networks, a wave data
buoy, a Doppler weather
radar, and_ strategically
placed sea-level monitoring
stations.

“The government has pro-
vided the Department of
Meteorology with resources
enabling it to realise its
full potential to provide ser-
vices in real time on issues
relating to the safety and secu-
rity of society, economic wel-
fare, and the protection of the
environment,” said Mr Ney-
mour.



A.G. Electric Co. Ltd.

WE'RE SERIOUS ABOUT LIGHTING.

a

l

32 JEROME AVENUE
MON -FRI 7:00AM - 4:30PM, SAT 7:30AM - 3:00 PM

KY

PHONE: 393.8192

COMMONWEALTH OF THE BAHAMAS 2009

IN THE SUPREME COURT COM/com/00019

COMMERCIAL DIVISION

IN THE MATTER OF CLICO (BAHAMAS) LIMITED
Cn Liquidation)

AND

IN THE MATTER OF THE COMPANIES ACT, 1992
ORDER

Before Her Ladyship The Honourable Mrs. Justice Cheryl
Albury

Dated the 7th day of April, A. D., 2009

UPON THE PETITION of the Registrar appointed
pursuant to section 4 of the Insurance Act, Chapter 347 Revised
Statute Laws of The Bahamas 2000 filed herein on the 24" day
of February, A. D., 2009.

AND UPON READING the Affidavit of Lennox
McCartney filed herein on the 27" day of February, A.D., 2009
on behalf of the Petitioner.

AND UPON HEARING Mr. David Higgins and
Mts. Jacqueline Forbes-Foster of Counsel for the Petitioner.
AND UPON HEARING Mr. Sidney Cambridge, Mr.
Michael J. Saunders and Mr. Darron Pickstock of Counsel for
the Provisional Liquidator.

AND UPON HEARING Mr. Sidney Collie of
Counsel for Bahamasair Employees Provident Fund, David
Charlton, Laura Pratt-Charlton, Cheryl Sands, Sophia Lockhart,
Charine Major, De’andera Hanna, Leonie Minnis-Beneby,
Delora Forbes, Natasha Smith, Juleann Kemp, Charles Hunt,
Keith Beneby, Thomas Randall Hall, Ardis Seymour, Ardis
Evannette Forde, Lawrence (aka) Lawry P. Greene, Phillip
Johnson, and Deborah Palmer in support of the Petition.

AND UPON HEARING Mrs. G. Diane Stewart of
Counsel for First Caribbean International Bank (Bahamas)
Limited and Sheila Carey in support of the Petition.

AND UPON HEARING Mr. Godfrey Pinder and Mr.
Sidney Collie of Counsel (Mr. Collie holding brief for Mr.

Alfred Sears) for a group of ninety seven (97) Creditors in
support of the Petition.

AND UPON HEARING Mrs. Glenys Hanna-Martin
of Counsel for Bahama Islands Resorts & Casinos Cooperative
Credit Union (BIRCCCU) Limited, Oliver Hutchinson, Debra
Moss, Debra Gardiner, Chandalear Forbes, Marvin Smith,
Loletha Knowles, Catherine Knowles, Patrice Colebrooke,
Mavalo Duncanson and all other employees of Bahamas Island
Resort & Casino Cooperative Credit Union Limited in support
of the Petition.

AND UPON HEARING Mrs. Jennifer Mangra
of Counsel for Maurice Alexander Brooks in support of the
Petition.

AND UPON HEARING Mr. Luther McDonald
of Counsel along with Mr. Richard J.W. Horton for CLICO
(Bahamas) Limited.

AND UPON HEARING Mr. Damian Gomez of Counsel
along with Mr. Michael Hamilton for Frederick Emerson
Arnett, Terri Anita Bellot, Stephen Andrew Bellot, Bridgette
Nicolette Butler, John Wellington Dorsett, Marcheta Eneas,
Judson Frasier Eneas, Adrian Jerome Fox, Billy’s Furniture
and Appliance Trading as Donald’s Furniture Company, Zoe
Camille Allyson Gibson, Robert Leon Gibson, James Ikem
Iferenta, Andrea Johnson, Keshlia Shavonne Lockhart, Clement
Travelyan Maynard IIT, Heather Ann Maynard, David Michael
Maynard, Tonia Maynard, Pauline Agnes Outten, Aretha
Amanda Paul, Pratap Kumar Rout, Lofton Barry Russell,
Michael Carrington Symonette, Hilda Louise Symonette and
Shelley Yvette Woodside in opposition to the Petition.

IT IS HEREBY ORDERED:
That CLICO (Bahamas) Limited “the Company” be wound
up by this Honourable Court under the provisions of the
Companies Act, 1992;
Mr. Craig A. (Tony) Gomez be appointed Official Liquidator
of the Company;
Callenders & Co. be appointed Attorneys to the Liquidators;
Mr. David John Thurlow, specialist insurance manager, be
appointed to assist the Liquidator.

BY ORDER OF THE COURT
REGISTRAR


PAGE 8, WEDNESDAY, APRIL 22, 2009

THE TRIBUNE



KEMP'S FUNERAL HOME LIMITED

22 Palmdale Avenue, Palmdale
Nassau, N.P., The Bahamas

Funeral Service for

Violet “Pooey” G. Johnson, 77

of Highland Park, Nas-
sau, The Bahamas and
formerly of Harbour
Island, The Bahamas,
who died at Doctor’s
Hospital on Friday,
17th ~— April, 2009,
after a long Illness, will
be held at Ebenezer

Methodist Church will
be held at Ebenezer
Methodist Church,

East Shirley Street, Nassau on Friday, 24th
April, 2009 at 3:30p.m.Reverend Bill Higgs, Presi-
dent of the Bahamas Conference of The Methodist
Church will officiate. Interment will be in St. Cathe-
rine’s Cemetery, Harbour Island on Saturday morn-
ing, 25th April, 2009.Violet Johnson is survived by
her daughter, Carla Sweeting; her granddaughter,
Christie Sweeting; son-in-law, Andrew Sweeting;
sister, Patricia Aloury; brother, Derrick Johnson of
Harbour Island; brother-in-law, Lester Albury; sister-
in-law, Jo Johnson; nieces, Pamela Russell and her
husband Billy, Patrice Lleida and her husband Ste-
phen, Amanda Albury; nephews, Joseph “Buddy”
Bethell and Lenny Albury; great-nephew, William
Russell Jr.; great nieces, Ashlyn and Amber Llieda;
godson, Steve Taylor Jr.; special family and friends,
Robin Orrell and family of Florida, Diane Greene,
Samatha and Brian Carey and family, Millie and Joe
Lleida, Morette Ellis her caretaker and her friend,
Doreen Albury of Harbour Island, and other fam-
ily and friends in Harbour Island, Florence Carey,
Tootsie Thompson, Paulina Bowe, Suzanne Albury,
Grace Pinder, Dianne Dunn and all of the Friday
morning ladies, Jessie Sweeting and Daphne Un-
derwood and all her friends in Spanish Wells, Doro-
thea Brown, Ray, Richard and Leona Pyfrom and
families, Ebenezer Methodist Church Focus Group
and so many more, too many to name, all of whom
she loved.|Instead of flowers the family request that
donations be made to the Cancer Society of The
Bahmas, P.O. Box S.S. 6539, Nassau or the Ebene-
zer Methodist Church Focus Group, P. O. Box S.S.
6145, Nassau in memory of Violet G. Johnson.

Friends may pay their respects at Kemp’s Funeral
Home Limited, 22 Palmdale Avenue, Palmdale,

on Thursday, 23rd April, 2009 from 4:00p.m. to 6:
00p.m.Arrangements by Kemp’s Funeral Home

Limited.



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LOCAL NEWS



Claims of nepotism
in the granting of
Crown Land denied

FROM page one

Prime Minister Christie would
not be suspicious of this latest
sale.

“Tam a Bahamian. I have
relatives. I have friends,” Mr
Turnquest said in answer to the
speculation.

“Are you suggesting that as
long as Lam Director of Lands
and Surveys my friends and my
relatives are unable to get
Crown land like any other
Bahamian? I travel from
Inagua to Grand Bahama. I
covered the whole spectrum,
and I have family throughout
and I have friends throughout.

“If [was making the ultimate
decision I can see where I
would have to recuse myself.
But the decision is not made
by me ultimately. It rests with
someone else. So why then
should my friends and family
be prevented from being con-
sidered by somebody else for
Crown land?

“But I certainly know not of
any scheme that this office was
engaged in at any time by
myself or anybody that was
intentionally trying to influence
the decision makers in a way
that would cause them embar-
rassment or the office embar-
rassment or a problem for any
of them,” he said.

When asked if he felt it was
merely a “coincidence” that the
properties near Forbes Hill
were all sold to members of his
family, Mr Turnquest hesitated
before suggesting that he could
have been stationed at the
Prime Minister’s office from
2005 and therefore these trans-
actions could have occurred
after that date when he was not

in the Lands and Surveys
department.

However, the latest govern-
ment grant was signed by for-
mer Prime Minister Christie on
January 27, 2003.

Pointing out this discrepancy
and many others, the former
Agriculture and Lands Minis-
ter George Smith said it was
“inconceivable” for the Direc-
tor of Lands to suggest that he
was not involved in the sale of
these properties.

During Prime Minister
Ingraham’s first administration
in 1992, Mr Turnquest was
appointed Director of Lands
and Surveys. When former
Prime Minister Christie took
over the govenment in 2005,
Mr Turnquest was transferred
to the Prime Minister’s Office.
However, on Mr Ingraham’s
return to government, Mr
Turnquest was returned to
head Lands and Surveys.

Mr Smith, who had respon-
sibility for this ministry from
1977 to 1984, said that Mr
Turnquest, as head of the
department, receives the appli-
cations, processes them, attach-
es a fee to the property, and
ultimately advises the Prime
Minister as to whether or not
to agree to the sale of the
land.

With an intimate knowledge
of Exuma as its former Mem-
ber of Parliament, Mr Smith
said he has first hand knowl-
edge of the value of lands in
Exuma.

He noted that inland prop-
erties were valued far higher
than the price set for the sale
by government of these partic-
ular beachfront lots. This was
contrary to normal practice
where prime beachfront prop-
erty is always more expensive
than inland property.

“In these particular cases the

director has the obligation to
point out to the Minister his
relation to the applicants. He
has an obligation to point that
out and caution the Prime Min-
ister as to the potential reper-
cussions for conflict of inter-
est,” Mr Smith said, alleging
that in his opinion it was “a
bold case” of the Prime Minis-
ter being misled into making a
decision without having been
warned of the possible impli-
cations and “the recommenda-
tion for such a low price” when
a “much higher fee” could have
been recommended.

Mr Smith added that while
the Prime Minister does hold
ultimate responsibility over the
decision to sell these proper-
ties, in the discharge of his
duties, the PM must rely on
proper advice from his officials.
In this case, it was Mr Smith’s
opinion that this did not hap-
pen.

Local criminals
in arms race’

He estimates 15,000 persons in the country
are affiliated with gangs, most of whom may
have easy access to firearms.

FROM page one

the murder.

Head of the Central Detective Unit's homi-
cide squad Assistant Superintendent Leon

RBPF.

Mr Reid sees this as a threat against the

"Our police force boasts at having 3,000

Bethel dispelled concerns that local gangsters
were trading in illegal handguns in favour of
assault rifles and machine guns in an effort to
compile a superior arsenal than police.

"Criminals have to contend with other crim-
inals — I don't think criminals arm them-
selves to be able to outmatch police — they
want to outmatch other criminals in terms of
weapons,” Mr Bethel said.

He contended that local crooks sought
weapons that are more accessible and easily
concealed — like handguns — to secure their
illegal activities from rival threats.

"A pistol is more easily concealed and trans-
ported than an AK-47 or another high pow-
ered rifle, you see. So when these persons are
in a criminal enterprise, they know that they
may be subject to poaching by other criminals
who — especially if they are involved in drugs
— may be arming themselves properly against
other criminals," Mr Bethel said.

"What is being imported is what is accessi-
ble to criminals right now — what they can get
their hands on, and can be transported to the
Bahamas. Definitely they would want some
up-to-date weapons for their criminal enter-
prise, but I do not think there is an arms race
with police. It is only because of these certain
weapons whether they are the normal
revolvers or pistols, or rifles, it's just what is
available to the criminals and they seize what-
ever opportunities they can get their hands
on," he added.

But youth activist and reformed gang mem-
ber Carlos Reid said local thugs are bragging
about possessing assault rifles, bullet proof
vests, and hand grenades.

members but gangs are boasting of having
15,000 members — on a combined effort.
Imagine if just 30 per cent of that owns a
weapon and I'm sure that's higher.

“We're seeing now the emergence of AK-
47s, bullet proof vests, hand grenades, so we
can't say police have more sophisticated
weapons,” he said, claiming a criminal had
boasted to him of owning a pair of matching
Uzi guns.

However, Commissioner Ferguson said
while the RBPF has "always been vulnera-
ble" to heavy imports of illegal firearms, police
intelligence does not reflect an upswing in
more sophisticated weaponry in the country.

"What we see mostly in the Bahamas is a 9
millimeter, and .38 or the .40 Glock, those
type of weapons have been most commonly
confronting the police and we've been making
arrests along those lines," Mr Ferguson said.

He added that the RBPF had ongoing
efforts with international law enforcement
agencies to share intelligence while organising
efforts to seize illegal weaponry.

According to Mr Reid — founder of Youth
Against Violence — for as little as $150, a
crook can buy a gun and parlay that into thou-
sands of dollars from criminal proceeds.

"A lot of young men will tell you straight
up they only working for a couple dollars to
get a gun to make a living stealing, robbing
whatever you call it. You can even put a hit
on somebody for less than $5000," Mr Reid
said.

To counter violent crime, he suggested that
leaders of the country have to invest in com-
munity outreach and judicial reform.

Tribune sales defy
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The Tribune wants to hear
from people who are
making news in their
neighbourhoods. Perhaps
you are raising funds for a
good cause, campaigning
for improvements in the
area or have won an
award.

If so, call us on 322-1986
and share your story.



FROM page one

Managing editor John Mar-
quis said: “People like The
Tribune because it is fearless
and tells the truth. It is a
‘must’ read for everyone who

really wants to know what’s
going on in the Bahamas.

“Not everybody likes us —
but even those who don’t like
us can’t stop talking about us.
That’s the mark of a really
fine newspaper.”

Challenge over judge’s
refusal to recuse from
civil case continues

FROM page one

been adjourned to Thursday and is expected to continue next

Monday.

It emerged on Monday that Justice Allen had not made notes
of crucial discussions within chambers that were relevant to

the application for her recusal.

Alan Steinfeld, QC, and attorney Michael Scott represent
Amir Weissfisch. Attorney Brian Moree represents the Weiss-

fisch children.
TRIBUNE SPORTS

WEDNESDAY, APRIL 22, 2009, PAGE 9



SPORTS



Medal-winning swimmers shine

HERE’S a look at our
medal-winning swimmers and
the performances the 36-mem-
ber team turned in during the
XXIV Carifta Swimming
Championships that conclud-
ed in Aruba on Sunday.

Gold medallists

¢ McKayla Lightbourn, girls
15-17 800 freestyle, 9:14.88.

¢ Dustin Tynes, boys 11-12
200 breaststroke, 2:41.82.

¢ Evante Gibson, boys 100
butterfly, 1:00.81.

¢ McKayla Lightbourn, girls
15-17 100 butterfly, 1:05.89.

¢ Ashley Butler, McKayla
Lightbourn, Amber Weech,
Ariel Weech, girls 15-17 400
freestyle relay, 4:02.52.

¢ Evante Gibson, boys 13-
14 50 butterfly, 26.97.

¢ Ashley Butler, girls 15-17
50 butterfly, 28.72.

¢ McKayla Lightbourn, girls
15-17 400 IM, 5:08.27.

¢ McKayla Lightbourn, girls
15-17 200 IM, 2:25.44.

¢ Dustin Tynes, boys 11-12
50 breaststroke, 34.20.

¢ Bria Deveaux, girls 13-14
200 butterfly, 2:30.28.

¢ Matthew Lowe, girls 13-14
200 butterfly, 2:18.13.

¢ McKayla Lightbourn, girls
15-17 200 butterfly, 2:24.93.

¢ Amber Weech, Ariel
Weech, Ashley Butler, McK-
ayla Lightbourn, girls 15-17
800 freestyle relay, 9:03.01.

¢ McKayla Lightbourn, girls
15-17 400 freestyle, 4:27.38.

¢ McKayla Lightbourn, girls
15-17 400 freestyle, 4:27.38.

¢ Dustin Tynes, boys 11-12



Maya Albury

NSM slelicle

Zach Moses

JeNae Saunders

Amber Weech

Riquel Rolle



Matthew Lowe

Jacinda Williams

Taryn Smith

¢ Dionisio
Carey, boys 11-
12 50 back-
stroke, 31.42.

° Ariel
Weech, girls
15-17 50 back-
stroke, 31.82.

° Bria
Deveaux, girls
13-14 100 but-
ae 1:09.31.

Tamberly
Meridian

St. Bedes

Hill Cross
Westminster
Bishop Eldon
Blairwood
Faith Temple
Garvin Tynes
Spanish Wells
CC Sweeting
Catholic High
St. Andrews
Heritage

MINI DIVISION

1 St. Francis

2 Meridian

3 Lyford Cay

4 Sandlinds Primary

DIVISIONAL WINNERS
Primary Girls

Home School

Garvin Tynes

Temple Christian

Primary Boys
St. Johns
Queens College

Junior Girls
St. Augustines
Home School
St. Annes

Junior Boys
NCA
Lyford Cay
Kingsway

Senior Girls
SAC

St. Annes
Home School

Senior Boys
Pace
Lyford Cay
NCA



every surface, no? No one is
perfect. Sure, I can improve,"
Nadal said. "I always work to
improve because when you
feel you can't improve, is dif-
ficult to wake up and go on
court and practice."

Nadal is favored to also col-
lect a fifth straight French
Open title, but the way
Djokovic swept Nadal aside in
the second set, and the way
No. 4 Andy Murray rallied
back from 5-2 down to force a
tie break in Saturday's semi-
final offers his rivals a glim-
mer of hope.

Nadal was unhappy with
how he served, and plans to
improve on it before heading
to Roland Garros next month.

“This tournament I didn't
serve very well. Especially the
second serve was sometimes
120 kph (74 mph). So that's
(a) disaster," Nadal said.
"Yeah, I have to play more.
Have to serve better."

Even so, he was delighted
with his win.

"Always really important
for me (to) start the clay sea-
son like this," said Nadal, who
won his third title this season
after hard-court victories at
the Australian Open and Indi-
an Wells, Calif.

He trailed 3-1 in the first set
before reeling off five straight
games. Struggling on serve in
the third, he saved three break
points and needed 14 minutes
to hold his opening service
game.

After a long rally at 30-40,
Djokovic seemed certain to
break Nadal with a drop shot,
but Nadal somehow got it back
for a winner and Djokovic
sank to his knees.

"A little bit lucky because
he has two break points and
important drop shot. I came
back. That point was really
important,” Nadal said. "After
that I think I played really



RAFAEL NADAL reacts after
defeating Serbia's Novak Djokovic
in their final match of the Monte
Carlo Masters tournament, in
Monaco, Sunday...

(AP Photo: Claude Paris)

well. In the important
moments, I was focused all the
time."

It was the third-seeded
Djokovic who crumbled as
Nadal clinched victory on his
first match point when the Ser-
bian sent a backhand into the
net.

"IT played a very good
match, actually one of the best
I have played against him on
this surface," Djokovic said.
"It's really unfortunate that in
certain moments I didn't play
the way I was supposed to
play, with a little bit more
patience.”

Nadal extended his winning
streak at Monte Carlo to 27
matches and won his 21st
straight victory on clay since
losing to Juan Carlos Ferrero
of Spain in the second round

his other title in 1908.

Keith Lloyd Tew lelaleay



Laron Morley

RIM eC liTIAle)

The medal count...

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Medal Count
Combined: Men + Women

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100 breaststroke, 1:14.04. a ae
¢ McKayla Lightbourn, girls eveaux, girls .
15-17 100 seen es ¢ Taryn Smith, girls 11-12 ¢Bria Deveauv, girls 13-14 13-14 200 Team Bronze Silver Gold Total
1:17.87. 100 butterfly, 1:09.09. 200 IM, 2:31.72. freestyle, 2:14.49.
¢ Bria Deveaux, Maya ¢ McKayla Lightbourn, girls eEvante Gibson, boys 13- * Jacinda Williams, Laura T&T 31 14 22 67
Albury, Berchadette Moss 15-17 200 freestyle, 2:08.08. 14 50 breaststroke, 31.89. Morley, Taryn Smith, Crystal Bah 18 17 14 49
and Gabrielle Greene, girls ¢ Ariel Weech, girls 15-17 ¢ McKayla Lightbourn, girls Rahming, girls 11-12 400 Guadeloupe 18 17 12 47
13-14 200 freestyle relay, 50 butterfly, 29.30. 15-17 50 breaststroke, 35.41. medley relay, 5:02.48. Barbados Amateur Swimming 12 9 8 29
1:54.58. ¢ Bria Deveaux, girls 13-14 ¢ Amber Weech, girls 15- ¢ Laron Morley, Toby Martinique Natation 8 16 10 34
¢ Ashley Butler, McKayla 400 IM, 5:26.48. 17 50 freestyle, 27.02. McCarroll, Evante Gibson, | 7 aica 8 12 12 32
Lightbourn, Amber Weech ¢ Dionisio Carey, Dustin ¢ Evante Gibson, boys 13- Matthew Lowe, boys 13-14 B A 8 1 3 D
and Ariel Weech, girls 15-17 Tynes, Keith Lloyd, Zach 14 100 backstroke, 1:12.34. 400 medley relay, 4:19.90. ee
200 freestyle relay, 1:49.75. Moses, boys 11-12 400 med- ¢ McKayla Lightbourn, girls ¢ Evante Gibson, boys 13- Suriname 6 6 12 24
ley relay, 4:46.17. 15-17 200 backstroke, 2:28.64. 14 200 IM, 2:18.57. Aruba 5 18 15 38
Silver medallists ¢ Je’Nae Saunders, Riquel ¢ Ashley Butler, girls 15-17 Cayman Islands Junior 3 0 2 5
¢ Laura Lowe (no photo), Rolle, Maya Albury, Bria Bronze medallists 100 freestyle, 59.98. Bermuda Swim Team 1 0 1 2
girls 11-12 200 breaststroke, Deveaux, girls 13-14 400 med- ¢ Matthew Lowe, boys 13- ¢ Laura Morley, girls 11-12 Suriname Swim Club 0 2 2 4
2:51.04. ley relay, 4:48.55. 14 1500, 17:10.57. 100 breaststroke, 1:23.40. Netherlands Antilles 0 1 2 3
¢ Dustin Tynes, boys 11-12 ¢ Ariel Weech, McKayla ¢ Dionisio Carey, boys 11- * Dionisio Carey, boys 11- United States Virgin Islands 0 1 1 2
200 breaststroke, 2:38.79. Lightbourn, Ashley Butler, 12 200 breastroke, 2:50.36. 12 100 breaststroke, 1:18.64. Grenada 0 1 1 2
¢ Toby McCarroll, boys 13- Amber Weech, girls 15-17400 _* McKayla Lightbourn, girls * Toby McCarroll, boys 13- gt neia National Team 0 1 0 1
14 200 breastroke, 2:38.05. medley relay, 4:40.05. 15-17 200 breastroke, 2:44.39. 14 100 backstroke, 1:12.52. ,
Team Rankings - Through Event 114
. : Combined Team Scores
°
MARC REHA Nadal wins 5th straight |
J Place Team Points
e
enti Monte Carlo Masters title | tisisstanstova —rersisso
S an SPURL 2 Bahamas BAH 691.50
3 Guadeloupe GUAD 603
mg JEROME PUGMIRE of the Rome Masters | 4 Martinique Natation 578.50
HERE’S a look at the final AP Sports Writer in May 2008. 5 Jamaica JAM 571.50
standings of the Bahamas Nobody has | 6 Aruba ARU 482
Lawn Tennis Association’s MONACO (AP) — Rafael matched Nadal’s per-_ 7 Suriname SUR 469
first High School Invitational Nadal knows he won't stay on formance at the g Barbados Amateur 312
Tournament held last week at an he oo. cate get — aes — 9 Bermuda BERM 163
: : : etter, even when playing on :
the National Tennis Center: Giay, his favorite durtace furned proie.sionalin - eae re ae : ae
The top-ranked Spaniard 1968. 12 G a a 43
I NCA 84 overcame an upset bid by Reggie Doherty oo .
2 Queens College 61 Novak Djokovic on Sunday, won the event six 13 Netherlands Antilles = 37
3 St. Johns 60 beating the third-ranked Ser- times overall between 14 Suriname Swim Club 31
4 St. Augustine 50 bian 6-3, 2-6, 6-1 for his fifth 1897-99 and 1902-04, | 15 Bermuda Swim Team = 30
5 Home School 48 straight Monte Carlo Masters while five-time win- 16 St. Lucia National Team 17
6 Lyford Cay 45 title after losing a set here for ner Anthony Wilding | 17 Cayman IslandsSwim = 12
7 Kingsway 39 the first time since the 2006 of New Zealand won | 1g Guyana GUY 9
8 Pace 3 final against Roger Federer. four times in a row | 19 Barbados Swim Club 1
9 St. Annes 34 "Everyone can improve in from 1911-14 and got 5,018.00 Total

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PAGE 10, WEDNESDAY, APRIL 22, 2009



SPORTS

TRIBUNE SPORTS



Junior baseball
action resumes
this weekend

THE Junior Baseball League
of Nassau (JBLN) is scheduled
to resume play this weekend
after a two-week break for the
Easter holidays.

With three weeks left in the
regular season, playoff positions
and the pennant winners are
still to be determined in all six
divisions as the league contin-
ued its regular season on Sat-
urday and Sunday at the St
Andrew’s Field of Dreams.

Listed below is a full schedule
of games on tap:

TEE BALL
SATURDAY

liam — Sand Gnats

vs Blue Claws

lpm — Grasshoppers

vs Knights

3pm — Sidewinders

vs Raptors

SUNDAY

2pm — Grasshoppers

vs Blue Claws

3:30pm — Knights Raptors

COACH PITCH
SATURDAY

10am — Blue Jays vs Athletics
12:30pm — Cubs vs Angels
3pm — Astros vs
Diamondbacks

MINOR LEAGUE
SATURDAY

10am — Rockies vs Red Sox
12:30pm — Mets vs Royals
MAJOR LEAGUE
SATURDAY

12:30pm — Marlins vs Indians
3pm — Mariners vs Reds
SUNDAY

2pm — Marlins vs Mariners

JUNIOR LEAGUE
SATURDAY

10am — Cardinals vs Yankees
12:30pm — Twins vs Dodgers

SENIOR LEAGUE
SATURDAY

3pm — Phillies vs Tigers
SUNDAY

3pm — Rangers vs Pirates




Celtics ‘buck’
even with Bulls

m@ HOWARD ULMAN

AP Sports Writer

BOSTON (AP) — Ray
Allen and Ben Gordon can
reminisce this offseason
about their playoff shootout.

For one of the former
UConn guards, his team's
offseason will last longer
than he'd like.

Allen kept the Boston
Celtics from coming dan-
gerously close to being that
team when he broke out of a
slump to score 30 points,
including the decisive 3-
pointer with 2 seconds left.
That gave the defending
NBA champions a 118-115
win over the Bulls on Mon-
day night and a split of the
first two games of the best-
of-seven series. Game 3 is
in Chicago on Thursday
night.

"T'll talk about it over the
summertime and I'll laugh
with him about it," Allen
said. "We were exchanging
jabs there, and I don't mean
shots. I mean he caught me
with an elbow, I got him
right back with an elbow."

Gordon is in his fifth
NBA season, eight fewer
than Allen, but they've
faced each other in summer
pickup games at their old
school.

"UConn has a lot of great
professionals,” Gordon said,
"so anytime you play against
someone from UConn you
just want to go out there and
outdo them. It’s like a game
within the game.”

Gordon outscored Allen
with 42 points exactly 23
years after Michael Jordan
set an NBA playoff record
with 63. But the Celtics beat
the Bulls then, too, 135-131
in double overtime.

Gordon's last basket came
with 12.3 seconds left, tying
the score at 115. Then the



RAY ALLEN is fouled by Bulls forward Tyrus Thomas (left in the
third quarter of a first-round playoff game in Boston Monday...

Celtics set up a play for
Allen, who took a pass from
Rajon Rondo and connected
from the right side.

Allen scored 28 of his 30
points after getting some
advice from coach Doc
Rivers at halftime.

"Doc said going into the
half, ‘Be aggressive, but let it
come to you,’" Allen said.
"T never think I'm not in my
rhythm. It can be a grind as
a shooter. As a scorer you're
always trying to find some-
thing.”

After Tyrus Thomas
missed a shot from midcourt
as time expired, Allen head-
ed for the bench where
injured Kevin Garnett deliv-
ered a couple of congratu-
latory slaps — to his head
and chest.

Allen said he doesn't like
"being made a fuss over.”
But that was unavoidable
after he broke out of his
shooting slump. He scored
just four points on 1-for-12
shooting and missed the
final shot in Chicago's 105-
103 overtime win Saturday.
"We feel very confident

because we feel like we
haven't even played
good basketball yet,”

NOTICE

NOTICE is hereby given that CHRISTOPHER DOUGLAS
MAY of BEACHWAY DRIVE NORTH, FREEPORT, GRAND
BAHAMA, BAHAMAS P.O. BOX F42915 is applying to
the Minister responsible for Nationality and Citizenship, for
registration/naturalization as a citizen of The Bahamas, and
that any person who knows any reason why registration/
naturalization should not be granted, should send a written
and signed statement of the facts within twenty-eight days from
the 22nd day of APRIL, 2009 to the Minister responsible for
Nationality and Citizenship, PO.BoxN-7147, Freeport, Bahamas.

Quality Auto Sales




















Boston's Paul Pierce
said. "Our best is yet to
come."

But that will have to
come in Chicago.

"We got a split and
that's tough to do against
the defending champs,”
Gordon said.

Consecutive 3-point-
ers by Gordon gave the
Bulls a 109-104 lead
before the Celtics rallied.
Glen Davis made two
free throws and Rondo
connected on a long
jumper to give Boston a
112-111 lead with 1:01 to




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play.
Gordon followed with
a 16-foot jumper and

(AP Photo: Elise Amendola)

Allen countered with a 3-
pointer that put Boston
ahead 115-113 with 25.3 sec-
onds remaining.

Then it was Gordon's
turn. He connected from
near the foul line before the
Celtics called a timeout to
set up their final play.

Rondo dribbled on the
left side and Allen worked
himself free, caught the pass
in rhythm and converted as
the crowd went wild.

Davis had 26 points for
second-seeded Boston and
Rondo had a triple-dou-
ble — 19 points, 16
assists and 12 rebounds.
Pierce added 18 points
and Kendrick Perkins
contributed 16 points
and 12 rebounds.

John Salmons had 17
points and Brad Miller
scored 16 for Chicago.

The Allen-Gordon
shootout "almost
looked like they turned
it into a personal bat-
tle," Rivers said. "You
know, who's the best
UConn player to ever
play. And it was amaz-
ing."

Chicago coach Vinny
Del Negro cited the
Celtics' rebounding as a
Key to their win.

"They had 21 offen-
sive rebounds," he said,
“and it's going to be
hard to win any game,
not even a playoff
game, if you give up
that many offensive
rebounds.”

The Celtics nearly
lost despite controlling
rookie point guard Der-
rick Rose, who sat out
most of the first quar-
ter with two fouls. He
finished with 10 points,
seven assists and six
rebounds after leading the
Bulls with 36 points and 11
assists on Saturday.

Track & Field
Officials Training

FREEDOM FARM CURRENT
STANDINGS (WEEK 15)

T-BALL

1. SEA GRAPES cp/pw
2. COCO PLUMS cp

3. JUJUS ep

4. GUINEPS cp

5. DILLIES e

COACH PITCH

. BOAS ep

. BEES cp

. SANDFLIES cp

. MOSQUITOES

. GREEN TURTLES
. WASPS

9-10 DIVISION
1. BARRACUDAS cp
2. DOLPHINS cp
3. TURBOTS cp
4. OCTOPUS

5. RED SNAPPERS
6. EELS

11-12 DIVISION WINS
WILD DOGS cp 19

. CONCHS 14
BLUE MARLINS 13
NASSAU GROUPERS 11
DIVERS 10

. HURRICANES 8

. GREEN PAROTTS — 8

. IGUANAS 6

. WHITE CROWNS 1

CKAAMABRYNE

13. 15 DIVISION WINS
. OWLZ cp u

. SILVER JACKS ul

. POTCAKES

. STINGRAYS

. RACCOONS

LOSSES
1

3
4
9
1

2
L
2
3
7
12

12
14

OSSES

LOSSES

3
4
6
8
12
15

LOSSES



Pea Brier CM er Re Col Tey bg

T-Ball Division
Friday Apr. 17th
Saturday Apr. 18th
Saturday Apr. 18th
Coach Pitch
Friday Apr. 17th
Saturday Apr. 18th
Saturday Apr. 18th
Saturday Apr. 18th
Sunday Apr. 19th
9-10 Division
Friday Apr. 17th
Saturday Apr. 18th
Saturday Apr. 18th
Sunday Apr. 19th
11-12 Division

Won

Sea Grapes
Coco Plums
Jujus

Won

Sand Flies
Boas

Bees

Sand Flies
Wasps
Won

Eels
Turbots
Barracudas
Dolphins
Won

Loss

Jujus

Guineps
Dillies

Loss

Green Turtles
Mosquitoes
Green Turtles
Wasps
Mosquitoes

Loss

Octopus

Red Snappers
Eels

Red Snappers
Loss

Friday Apr. 17th
Saturday Apr. 18th
Saturday Apr. 18th
Saturday Apr. 18th
Saturday Apr. 18th
Saturday Apr. 18th
Sunday Apr. 19th
Sunday Apr. 19th
13-15 Division
Saturday Apr. 18th
Saturday Apr. 18th
Saturday Apr. 18th
Saturday Apr. 18th
16-18 Division
Sunday Apr. 19th
Sunday Apr. 19th

Conchs
Divers

Blue Marlins
Divers

Wild Dogs
Iguanas
Conchs
Green Parrots
Won
Potcakes
Owlz
Potcakes
Sharks

Won
Arawaks
Tainos

Iguanas
Hurricanes
Groupers
Hurricanes
White Crowns
Green Parrots
Blue Marlins
White Crowns
Loss

Stingrays
Sharks
Stingrays
Silver Jacks
Loss
Lucayans
Caribs

Score
10-10 Tied Score
16-14
15-3
Score
22-10
21-11
15-5
15-6
10-9
Score
7-0
9-6
19-6
12-8
Score
6-0
14-4
6-3
16-8
7-0
9-5
24-7
9-0
Score
5-2
4-3
11-10
4-3
Score
9-7
7-0



Are you interested in becoming an Official
for Track & Field?

The Bahamas Association of Certified
Officials (BACQ) is extending an invitation

to al! present officials and all interested
persons to participate in a training
session for track & field.

Date: Saturday, April 25, 2009

Venue: Thomas A. Robinson frack & Field

Stadium

Time; 12:00 p.m. - 4:00 p.m.

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Men Pants and Shirts

NOTICE

NOTICE is hereby given that LINDA = CHRISTINA
BUCHANAN of BEACHWAY DRIVE NORTH, FREEPORT,
GRAND BAHAMA, BAHAMAS P.O. BOX F42915 is applying
to the Minister responsible for Nationality and Citizenship,
for registration/naturalization as a citizen of The Bahamas,
and that any person who knows any reason why registration/
naturalization should not be granted, should send a written and
signed statement of the facts within twenty-eight days from
the 22nd day of APRIL, 2009 to the Minister responsible for
Nationality and Citizenship, PO.BoxN-7147, Freeport, Bahamas.

NOTICE

NOTICE is hereby given that YOUDLYN CALIXTE of SOUTH
BEACH, HOLIDAY DRIVE, NASSAU, BAHAMAS, is applying
to the Minister responsible for Nationality and Citizenship, for
registration/naturalization as a citizen of The Bahamas, and that
any person who knows any reason why registration/naturalization
should not be granted, should send a written and signed statement
ofthe facts within twenty-eight days fromthe 22" day of April, 2009
to the Minister responsible for nationality and Citizenship, P.O. Box
N-7147, Nassau, Bahamas.

NOTICE is hereby given that RODLIN FLORESTAL of
EAST ST., NASSAU, BAHAMAS, is applying to the Minister
responsible for Nationality and Citizenship, for registration/
naturalization as a citizen of The Bahamas, and that any person
who knows any reason why registration/naturalization should not
be granted, should send a written and signed statement of the
facts within twenty-eight days from the 15" day of April, 2009 to
the Minister responsible for nationality and Citizenship, PRO. Box
N-7147, Nassau, Bahamas.




THE TRIBUNE

Sp

F

PAGE 1



WEDNESDAY, APRIL 22,

Algernon Cargill



m@ By RENALDO DORSETT
Sports Reporter
rdorsett@tribunemedia.net

ith a third place

finish in 2008 and

a second place

finish at this
year’s Carifta Swimming and Syn-
chronized Swimming Champi-
onships, the Bahamas continues
to bridge the gap between itself
and some of the perennial pow-
erhouses in the Caribbean,
reclaiming a spot atop the Carifta
leaderboard.

The Bahamas finished second
in both the medal count (49) and
points standings (691.50) at the
24th edition of the meet last week
in Savaneta, Aruba.

Trinidad and Tobago captured
the overall title with 67 medals



and 815.50 points.

Bahamas Swimming Federa-
tion president Algernon Cargill
said for the Bahamas to again
capture another Carifta champi-
onship, the teams must meet the
challenge set forth in the distance
races.

“What still separates us some-
what from the countries that fin-
ish ahead of us is their proficien-
cy in the distance events,” he said.
“Our athletes love to sprint, they
do exceptionally well at it at this
level, at the collegiate level, when
they continue on as seniors, and it
is definitely the stronghold in
most our development and train-
ing programmes.”

Cargill said while the Bahamas
continues to enter each Carifta
Games with lofty expectations,
the federation continues to pro-

ARCHIE NAIRN, the
permanent secretary
in the Ministry of
Sports, greets a swim
team member on his
arrival from Carifta
Games in St Lucia on
Monday...

Bimini to host men and
women national round
robin b-ball tourney

@ By BRENT STUBBS
Senior Sports Reporter
bstubbs@tribunemedia.net

FOR the first time, the island
of Bimini will play host to the
Bahamas Basketball Federation
men’s and women’s national
round robin tournament.

Originally, the federation had
intended to host only the men’s
series in Bimini this weekend,
while the women were going to
Grand Bahama next weekend.

But the federation decided that
it would be best if they combine
the two tournaments, thus utiliz-
ing all of their manpower in the
same setting at the same time.

“It’s good for the basketball
family,” said federation president
Lawrence Hepburn. “We get to
see all of the local talent that we
have here.

“In that way, we get a chance
to get a good eye of what we are
looking at in terms of the local
selection for the national team
trials. But it’s good for the bas-
ketball family to get them all
together collectively for the first
time in a long time.”

Hepburn said they are encour-
aging all of the association presi-
dents to accompany their teams
so that the federation can discuss
and plan their future.

“This is a seed which we are
trying to germinate to get the
basketball all together and shar-
ing in the same vision,” Hepburn
said. “So I envision a festive occa-
sion.”

By having the two tourna-
ments going on at the same time,
Hepburn said the women from
their respective islands can watch
and cheer for their male coun-
terparts and vise versa.

Tournament director Sean
‘Bass’ Bastian said everything is
set to go with at least five teams
confirmed to compete in the
women’s division.

“We have the Johnson’s Lady
Truckers, Bommer G Angels, the
Junior All-Stars, the Electro

Telecom Cybots and the Grand
Bahama’s Investment Gems,”
Bastian revealed. “So that’s good
for the female side.”

On the men’s side, Bastian said
they have at least nine teams
already confirmed to compete.
The list is expected to be headed
by the Electro Telecom Cybots,
the champions of the New Prov-
idence Basketball Association.

“This weekend is going to be
power-packed with basketball,”
he pointed out. “We are looking
at least between 25-30 games to
be played over the weekend.”

The teams will be play in a
double elimination format.

“From what we’ve seen, the
Grand Bahama, Eleuthera and
Cybots are expected to be the
top teams in the men’s division,”
Bastian sad. “But it could be a
Truckers and Angels rematch in
the women. But I don’t know
what the Gems look like.”

Hepburn said Bimini is more
than ready to host the spectacu-
lar.

“The housing is ready, the
restaurants are ready and the
venue is ready,” he said. “I think
all who play in the Gateway Min-
istries Gymnasium will be thor-
oughly pleased with the facili-
ties.”

As a result of hosting the two
tournaments at the same time,
Bastian said they are hoping to
generate a lot more support for
the federation’s Independence
Tournament from July 9-12 at
the Kendal Isaacs Gymnasium.

“So this is an opportunity for
us to meet with the presidents of
the associations to plan for that,”
Bastian stated.

Next year’s nationals is tipped
to be staged in Abaco, if their
new gymnasium is completed. If
it’s not, Bastian said they intend
to take the tournament to North
Andros.

“This weekend will be a good
weekend for basketball heads to
come together to plan for the
future,” he summed up.

THE 56th National Family Island Regatta in Georgetown, Exuma,
didn’t get off the ground as planned yesterday in Elizabeth Harbour as
the Sir Durward Knowles Junior Regatta was called off and will get

started today.

Organisers were forced to delay the start until today because all of
the competitors from Long Island had not arrived in sufficient time for
the start of the series of races. So organisers are hoping to stage them

at the start of each daily session.

In addition to the start of the junior regatta, the Ocean Races for the
A Class Prime Minister Cup, the B Class Governor’s General Cup and
the C Class Commodore Emeritus Cup are also scheduled to take
place. Then on Thursday, the first series races for the A, B, C, D and
E Classes will take place. The regatta is expected to continue through

Saturday.

‘ts

2009

Memorial



Our

duce teams which routinely
record top three finishes.

The Bahamas finished third in
the points standings and second in
the medal count in 2004, tied for
the lead in the medal count and
third in the points standings in
2005, and in 2006 finished second
in the medal count and third in
the points standings. “We have
to make further initiatives to
solidify our training programmes
to become more well rounded
and include more distance events
for us to continue to perform at a
high level on this stage,” he said.

The Bahamas took first place
at the 2007 Championships with
an incredible 79 medals, one

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os &
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even with
the Bulls...

See page 10

More distance training needed for
Carifta swimmers, says BSF boss

ahead of second place French
Guyana (78) and third place
Trinidad and Tobago (74).

Cargill said the team’s overall
effort was a complete effort by
athletes, administrators and gov-
ernment. “We just about equal
our performance from last year
in terms of the final medal count
and overall placing,” he said.
“The entire team performed
exceptionally well, they were a
number of outstanding perfor-
mances in the pool and from an
executive standpoint. The min-
istry stepped up, provided a char-
ter and cash support to help the
team. This contributed greatly to
the success of the team.”

A
Rotary Club
of Nassau
Event

SELiTe ECORI
The Bahamas Golf Federation

ULATIONS TO OUR WINNERS:

3RD NET - Anthony Hinsey &
Pete Drake with Jean Bethel


PAGE 12, WEDNESDAY, APRIL 22, 2009 THE TRIBUNE



Address to Rotary Club

Ry |
‘ wn |

THE HUB, a downtown art gallery, cele-
brates Earth Day with the completion of

DR. JUDSON ENEAS addressed the Rotary Club of West Nassau at the Soa thetye the Hat's foeves on Baa



club’s meeting on April 2 at Graycliff Restaurant. Dr. Eneas’s topic was Street was transformed from peeling
Men’s Health when he talked about prostate cancer, heart disease and dia- paint to vibrant and colourful imagery
betes. Pictured from left to right: President Michael Hepburn and Dr a I reflecting some of the Bahamas’ most

Judson Eneas. : precious and endangered species. Pine
forest, grouper, mangroves, conch,
flamingo and more adorn the building ina
tribute to the significance and magnifi-
cence of the Bahamas’ natural environ-

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ministry should summon Ros-
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in a week.

Peruvian Foreign Minister
Jose Antonio Garcia Belaunde
said earlier Tuesday that Ros-
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on April 4.

Venezuelan officials say the
charges against Rosales are cor-
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in nature.

Rosales, who lost a presiden-
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ul



THE TRIBUNE



WEDNESDAY.

ine

APR 20.



2009

SECTION B ¢ business@tribunemedia.net

Communications
reform legislation
tabling ‘imminent’

B By NEIL HARTNELL
Tribune Business Editor

THE legislation to usher in a
new regulatory regime for the
Bahamian communications
industry is set to be tabled in
the House of Assembly within
the next week, and possibly as
early as today, Tribune Busi-
ness has been told, as the Gov-
ernment seeks to create the cer-
tainty that will enable it to “pull
the trigger” for the Bahamas
Telecommunications Compa-
ny’s (BTC) privatisation.

The three Bills - the Com-
munications Bill, the Utilities
Regulation and Competition
Authority Bill, and the Utilities
Appeal Tribunal Bill - will cov-
er all communications sectors,
including Internet, radio and
telecoms, creating a new regu-
latory framework and regula-
tor to oversee the sector.

Prime Minister Hubert Ingra-
ham and his government are
understood to be especially
keen to push the Bills through
Parliament because the estab-
lishment of the new regulatory

regime is the
critical pre-
cursor to
starting
BTC’s privati-
sation in
earnest..

Potential
suitors inter-
ested in
acquiring a 51
per cent stake
in BTC will
want to have
certainty and
clarity regarding the regulato-
ry regime they will face, as it
sets the ‘playing field’ and ‘rules
of the game’ that they must
abide by.

Sources suggested that the
Government would look to
table the Bills in the House of
Assembly either this week or, at
latest, by next Wednesday in
order to kick-start debate dur-
ing the second reading. With
the upcoming 2009-2010 Bud-
get presentation set for late May
- some four to five weeks away

SEE page 6B



Chamber chief ‘incredulous’
over Bahamas Waste permits

@ By NEIL HARTNELL
Tribune Business Editor

Warns three-year wait
‘off-putting’ for other

THE Bahamas Chamber of investors and Bahamians
Commerce’s president yesterday with innovative ideas

hit out at the Government for to-
date failing to approve Bahamas

Waste’s $750,000 biodiesel production facility, saying he “found it
incredulous” that the company had endured a three-year wait,
with the situation likely to discourage others from seeking gov-
ernment permits for new ventures.

“T find it incredulous that the minister of state for the environ-
ment [Phenton Neymour] would find it normal to wait for three
years for the Government to make up their minds about a pro-
posal,” Dionisio D’Aguilar, who is also Superwash’s president,

told Tribune Business.

“Tt’s taken three years to make a decision on how to price fuels
produced domestically. This is the problem with government -
they simply take far too long to make a decision.

“Here a company is anxious to
start an initiative in a new field,

SEE page 6B

Ministry targets reduced
airlift cost for pageant

m By CHESTER ROBARDS
Business Reporter
crobards@tribunemedia.net

THE MINISTRY of Tourism
and Aviation is working with
major airlines to find ways to
slash airlift costs to the
Bahamas as the Miss Universe
Pageant nears, as high access
costs threaten to stunt tourism
growth in the Bahamas and the
wider Caribbean.

According to Vincent Van-
derpool-Wallace, minister of
tourism and aviation, his min-
istry is engaged in private dis-
cussions with carriers who could
bring thousands of pageant fol-
lowers to this country in August
2009.

The Ministry of Tourism has
been working since the begin-

The information contained is from a third
party and The Tribune can not be held
responsible for errors and/or omission |
from the daily report.



ning of this year — months
before it was announced that
the Bahamas would host the
Pageant — to have carriers agree
to make some changes that
would result in lower airfares
for flying to the Bahamas.

However, Mr Vanderpool-
Wallace told Tribune Business
that there are still some “struc-
tural issues that have to be
resolved”, along with “other
factors that come into play.”

“A specific programme
requires significant changes on
our part and their part,” he said.
“We need to make sure we get
them aligned.”

As the Ministry exerts every
effort to increase airlift to the
Bahamas by lobbying for com-
petitive pricing, the UK is con-
sidering the implementation of
a higher air passenger duty that
could make air travel to this
region extremely unattractive.

The Caribbean Hotel and
Tourism Association (CHTA)
has appeal to the UK to rescind
the tax they call discriminato-
ry, because it imposes a higher
rate on the Caribbean than
major competing destinations.

“Pending changes to the UK
Air Passenger Duty are expect-
ed to result in increased levels
of duties applied to air tickets
from the UK to all destina-
tions. Of particular concern to
us in the Caribbean are the high
levels of duty to be applied to
tickets to the Caribbean, as well
as the discrimination against the
Caribbean region by illogically
allocating to it a higher tax band
than major competing destina-
tions,” said CHTA president
Enrique De Marchena Kaluche.

Mr Vanderpool-Wallace said

SEE page 6B

ROYAL FIDELITY



Money at Work

NASSAU OFFICE

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$35m air taxi proposal
‘offers new experience’

@ By NEIL HARTNELL
Tribune Business Editor

Canada-based

entrepreneur yes-

terday said he was

proposing a $35
million project to create a fleet
of amphibious aircraft, or air
taxis, to provide a “new experi-
ence” for Bahamians and
tourists in transporting them
around this nation.

Captain Petr Khomoutovski,
managing director of Lomanti
Transport & Trading, told Tri-
bune Business that he was set to
submit a formal project pro-
posal to the Ministry of Tourism
& Aviation, with construction
of the first five Amphibian Air-
craft Dingo set to cost between
$30-$35 million.

Arguing that his project could
help differentiate the Bahamian
tourism product from its rivals,
as it was not replicated any-
where else in the world, Cap-
tain Khomoutovski said his
amphibious air taxis would not
need to use land-based airports,
instead being able to embark

* Canadian entrepreneur says project part of wider $100m
cruise ships/submarine initiative designed to revolutionise
tourist transport and experience, and create 200-400 jobs

* But financing dependent on government support,
with proposal yet to formally go to the Government

and pick up tourists and
Bahamians from virtually any
coastal locations in this nation.

He suggested that the
amphibious air taxi project
could create between 200 to 400
jobs in the Bahamas if the Gov-
ernment approved it. This ini-
tiative, Captain Khomoutovski
added, was the first pillar in a
much wider strategy that
involved constructing a mini-
cruise passenger ship which
could carry an excursion sub-
marine, giving tourists a whole
new view of the Bahamas - from
underwater.

Describing his project pro-
posal as the Bahamas Cruise
Sub-Air Project, Captain Kho-
moutovski said: “The estimated
pricing of design and construc-

tion of a cruise vessel with 400
passengers, excursion subma-
rine and amphibious aircraft
with air-cushion landing gear is
about $100 million.”

The cruise ship would cost
$60-$65 million, he added, with
the amphibious air taxis adding
the remaining $35 million.
Despite the steep price, he
argued that investors/financiers
would receive their funds back
within five years, with estimated
net income on the cruise ship
side totalling $899,200 in the
first year.

This was based on $9.072 mil-
lion in passenger revenues, off-
set by $2.722 million in expens-
es, $5.351 million in debt ser-
vicing costs, and $100,000 in
insurance costs.

As for the amphibious air
taxis, Captain Khomoutovski
suggested that they would be
relatively cheaply priced, with
service between Nassau-Abaco
costing $30-$40 on a plane that
would seat between 10-20 pas-
sengers.

It is unclear whether the Min-
istry of Tourism and Aviation,
and indeed the Government,
will go for such a project, as it
may be too exotic for its tastes.

When asked by Tribune Busi-
ness whether he had financing
in place for the project, Cap-
tain Khomoutovski indicated
that while he had several part-
ners behind him, prior govern-
ment approval was necessary to

SEE page 3B

Workforce failings ‘smother’ expansion

B By NEIL HARTNELL
Tribune Business Editor

BAHAMIAN-OWNED
businesses are seeing their
growth and expansion “smoth-
ered” because they cannot find
adequately-skilled workers in
sufficient numbers, the
Bahamas Chamber of Com-
merce’s president said yester-
day, with the education system’s
failings “contradicting” the
Government’s pro-foreign
direct investment policies.

Dionisio D’ Aguilar said find-
ing a qualified, productive
workforce was the “most trou-
bling facet of running a busi-
ness” for 99 per cent of Bahami-
an businessmen he had spoken
to, while foreign investors were
complaining about being
“ripped off” by a combination

* Chamber chief: Investors feeling ‘ripped off by high prices and low quality labour force
* Worker woes main concern for ‘99 per cent of Bahamian businessmen’
* ‘Businesses that get high school graduates from Bahamas government

schools have an enormous difficulty in getting people with basic literacy skills’

of high prices
and poor
workmanship.

“The prob-
lem is that the
Government
of the
Bahamas is
producing
schoolchild-
ren who sim-
ply cannot
work, and are
not equipped
to work,” the
Chamber president told Tri-
bune Business. “That appears

D’ Aguilar



to be in contradiction to their
policy of going out and attract-
ing foreign direct investment.

“What is happening is that
we are attracting these foreign-
ers here, and what they’re find-
ing is that there’s insufficient
labour here to fulfil their needs.
They then get frustrated.”

Mr D’Aguilar recalled a
recent conversation he had with
an American investor in the
Bahamas on a flight from Exu-
ma. He said the American had
asked him to detail the advan-
tages of investing in this nation,
to which Mr D’Aguilar cited the

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Bahamas’ tax neutral platform.
Yet the American reminded
him that he was still subject to
US taxes because of Washing-
ton’s insistence on levying taxes
on its citizens’ worldwide
income.

The investor then cited as
major concerns “the cost of
labour, the productivity of
labour and the quality of
labour” in the Bahamas, saying
property construction was cost-
ing him $350-$400 per square
foot when it was much cheaper

SEE page 5B

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PAGE 2B, WEDNESDAY, APRIL 22, 2009

THE TRIBUNE



a > =~
‘Trust’ in launch of marketing offensive

JUST as very few persons
would have predicted that the
price of gas would drop signifi-
cantly, months after being at
record-high levels, the future
has a tendency to be full of sur-
prises. That’s why it is impor-
tant to take a smart, offensive
posture to mitigate risk so that
you’re positioned to take on
new challenges, especially when
the economy recovers. And it
will, rather quickly and effec-
tively.

Individuals and companies
alike need to position them-
selves now. When your poten-
tial customers and clients are
ready to make a decision, make
a purchase or use a product,
who are they going to think of?
Who have they been thinking
about? Hopefully, it’s you or
your company. If you start posi-
tioning yourself and your com-
pany now, you increase that

probability exponentially.

History has proven that dur-
ing economic downturns
THOSE WHO MARKET
WILL MAKE IT, and when
things do turn around you and
your company will be miles
ahead of your competition.

Look at the auto industry.
It’s probably in the worst con-
dition ever. However, auto
companies are marketing more
than ever. Why? Because they
know from past experience that
when things do turn around
they far outsell their competi-
tion.

This brings me to the second
question we all need to ask our-
selves. What has changed in this
marketplace? There are really
important, dramatic shifts tak-
ing place in buyer behaviour
that may well reshape the way
you do your work. In the past, it
was the economic decision

Promotional

Marketing

a yaNoim icine rynen



maker who was sought out in
an organisationm - that key
executive who made the deci-
sion to buy.

In many businesses, that
authority is being replaced by a
committee. Officials now have
to obtain sign-offs from several
people to close a deal. For indi-
viduals and companies, this pre-
sents a new challenge. You
need to broaden your market-
ing to ensure you're selling in
broadcast rather than narrow-
cast mode, extending your
reach as widely as possible
across each potential customer.

Another mportant change -

one that clients are confirming
in their own experiences - is
that buyers are taking a longer
time to make decisions. Some
clients are seeing sales cycles
increase from an average of 30
days to 90 days. Some are see-
ing delays of up to 20 per cent.
The reason this is happening is
that customers want to make
sure that they’re making the
right decisions.

And in challenging times,
who can blame them? They
want proof to back the claims
you’re making about your
product or service. They want
someone to demonstrate how
good the return on investment
will be, so that they choose
what you're selling versus that
of a competitor. This means
your marketing message has to
be adjusted.

Bottom line, clients want
comfort, assurance and trust.

Companies are entrenching
their existing business relation-
ships. It’s becoming increasing-
ly difficult to find new cus-
tomers, but existing relation-
ships have become invaluable.
Buyers want to stick with peo-
ple and companies they trust.
As I mentioned earlier, it
comes down to a matter of risk
and trust. Just as you need to
position yourself correctly in
this new economy, buyers are
also doing this. Recognising this
fact, your task is to demonstrate
to your customers that buying
from you or using your service
or product is a good choice -
one that reduces or even elimi-
nates risk.

By branding and marketing
now, you will be sure to deliver
this message. When your poten-
tial customer is ready to make a
decision, who will they think
of?

All these marketing strate-
gies are certain to keep your
business on top during these
challenging economic times.

Have a productive and prof-
itable week! Remember,
“THOSE WHO MARKET
WILL MAKE IT!”

NB: Scott Farrington is pres-
ident of SunTee EmbroidMe,
a promotional and marketing
company specialising in pro-
motional products. Established
over 27 years ago, SunTee
EmbroidMe has assisted local
businesses in various industries
- ranging from tourism and
banking to telecommunications
- in marketing themselves.

Readers can contact Mr Far-
rington at SunTee EmbroidMe
on East Shirley Street, by e-
mail at scott@sun-tee.com or
by telephone at 242-393-3104,

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DHL JOB DESCRIPTION

POSITION:
REPORTS TO:
LOCATION:

British Caribbean Finance Manager
Bahamas

OVERALL PURPOSE:

China’s $90bn tourism market remains target for Bahamas

m@ By CHESTER ROBARDS
Business Reporter
crobards@tribunemedia.net

CHINA is poised to become an almost
$90 billion leader in outbound tourist flows
within the next 10 years, still one place
below the US, according to the president
and chief executive of the World Travel
and Tourism Council (WTTC). The sta-
tistics show just why the Bahamas has been
attempting to make inroads into the Chi-
nese tourism market.

Jean-Claude Baumgarten, during his
address at the 13th annual Caribbean
Hotel Tourism Investment Conference
(CHTIC), revealed statistics showing Chi-
na’s rise to power in leisure and business
travel in the immediate future.

According to projections, the number
of Chinese visiting countries outside of
their homeland could reach 100 billion by
2020.

Critics have quickly dismissed the rele-
vance of certain monies invested by China
in the Bahamas, including a $150 million
loan by the Asian superpower, some of
which is earmarked for road improvement.

However, most of those critics are more
interested in the terms of the loan signed
on behalf of the Bahamian people by the
Government and not the monetary injec-
tion itself, which by all accounts is regard-
ed as much needed funding for capital
works projects.

my
= 72 EEE
EAP REEF

Commercial Accounting Supervisor- British Caribbean

This position is responsible for managing the Commercial Finance activities for four
countries within the British Caribbean: Bermuda, Bahamas, Cayman and Tortola.
Manages Revenue leakage, establishes credit limits and reviews shipments to profile.
Supervises the following staff; Billing Analyst, Duties and Vendor Analyst, Accounts

Receivable Analyst.

DUTIES AND RESPONSIBILITIES:

* Manage the Commercial activities for a country or group of countries

within the Cluster.

* Supervise Billing, Duties, Accounts Receivable and Vendor Analysts.
* Prepare and analyze statistics and KPls for the country/cluster.
* Responsible for weekly revenue forecasting to Finance Manager and SMT

* Manage customer profiles.

* Establish AR Credit limits.

* Principal contact for Commercial Controller.

* Assist with preparation of Customer profitability analysis.
* Handle Billing queries from Billing Center.

* 1% level of approval for Credit notes.

* Special projects and ad hoc reports as required.

* Performs other assignments as required.

* Analyse daily transport collect and cash on delivery shipments

* Ensure accurate billing of inbound shipments

* Coordinate all Freight and Logistics billing with Caribbean designated

representative

MINIMUM QUALIFICATIONS:

* High school diploma and/or minimal of 5 years applicable experience
* Minimum of 2 years supervisory or management experience leading

a department.
* A background in commercial credit required.

* Experience with a major Enterprise Reporting Package (ERP)

* Excellent analytical and interpersonal skills.

* Ability to read and interpret data reports. Ability to understand and perform data

analysis.

* PC skills should include the basic suite of MS products, Excel, Access, Word,

Office

* Excellent communication skills both written and verbal, this function does a
lot of interfacing with internal and external customers and the Shared Service

Center

PREFERRED QUALIFICATIONS:

* Bachelor’s degree in Accounting/Finance, a related field or equivalent

education

E-mail Romell.knowles @DHL.com

or mail to
C/O Romell Knowles,
P.O. Box N3735,
Nassau, Bahamas

Chinese investors have also signed a let-
ter of intent with the developers of the
$2.6 billion Baha Mar project, and China is
financing the building of the Bahamas’ $30
million National Stadium. The Govern-
ment, as well as the private sector, thus
appear to be positioning themselves to
take full advantage of China’s ever -xpand-
ing economy.

Direct investment in the Bahamas by
the Chinese could mean direct interest in
the Bahamas as a leisure travel destina-
tion.

The Ministry of Tourism and Aviation
has invested a sizeable portion of its bud-
get in creating ads for distribution in Asia,
underscoring the importance of that mar-
ket for these islands.

“Tt’s amazing how this country [China],
when you open it up, how people are going
to go overseas, here on the chart we said
that in 2020 there will be 100 million Chi-
nese going overseas — maybe more,” said
Mr Baumgarten.

China saw 1.6 billion domestic travellers
recently — 300 million more than the coun-
try’s population, he added, underlining
that population’s interest in leisure travel.

According to WTTC statistics, China
will become the second largest Travel and
Tourism economy in the world by 2019,
just below the US.

The other eight biggest Travel and
Tourism economies are projected to be
Japan, Great Britian, France, Spain, Ger-

many, Russia, Italy and Mexico.

With regard to those statistics, the Min-
istry of Tourism has targeted at least three
of the top five emerging Travel and
Tourism Economies, with increased airlift
to Great Britain, direct flights into France
and its proximity to the US.

This country’s direct interest in China
and other Asian markets highlights its
commitment to tapping emerging markets.
And its choice of Vincent Vanderpool-
Wallace for Tourism Minister, several lead-
ers in the industry told this paper at the
CHTIC conference in Bermuda, can only
serve to make the Bahamas’ tourism prod-
uct more progressive than ever.

With the uncertainty of the economic
downturn this year, and the recent worry
over the US relaxing its once-resolute
stance on travel to Cuba, the Bahamas has
been more forward thinking than ever in
terms of its tourism product.

These islands are set to take centre stage,
along with some of the world’s most beau-
tiful woman, as the Miss Universe pageant
airs live from Atlantis, Paradise Island, in
August, and the world’s most popular
sport, soccer, holds its Congress at the
resort in June.

“Long-term prospects in the Travel &
Tourism industry are supported thanks to
the continued rapid expansion of emerging
destinations, along with the global increase
in per capita income,” said Mr Baum-
garten.

Carib Insurance
Brokers & Agents Ltd.

Will Be CLOSED on
Friday 24 April 2009
at 1:00p.m.

We apologize for any



inconvenience caused

signed,

Management
THE TRIBUNE

m@ By CHESTER ROBARDS
Business Reporter
crobards@tribunemedia.net

THOUGH official statistics
are not available, feedback on
the Bahamas cruise product has
been favourable this year, Min-
istry of Tourism officials said yes-
terday. However, visitor spend-
ing is comparatively less than
previous years due to the impact
of the global financial crisis.

According to Minister of
Tourism Vincent Vanderpool-
Wallace, the Bahamas has a
proximity advantage to the US
that has allowed it to retain its
arrivals numbers in the begin-
ning of what could be a deep
recession. Cruise lines have also
cushioned the impact with
aggressive marketing to fill their
staterooms.

One cruise line official told
Tribune Business that ships try
not to cruise with empty beds.
But into year-end 2008, the
cruise industry was slashing its
prices to entice cruise travellers.
Now, price points are so low the
industry may have difficulty dri-

AIR TAXI, from 1B

encourage financial institutions
such as banks, private equity
funds and venture capitalists to
invest in his venture.

Given the Government’s
track record, it is likely to be -
and quite rightly - concerned
about approving projects that
do not have financing arrange-
ments nailed down. Captain
Khomoutovski may also have
to overcome the fact that the
National Investment Policy
adhered to by the Government,
at least in theory, reserves
domestic transportation busi-
nesses for Bahamians only.

Yet Captain Khomoutovski
said yesterday: “The market for
this project is very big. Every
year the Bahamas gets five mil-
lion tourists. It’s a new experi-
ence for the Bahamas, and will
create new jobs. The Bahamas
has real prospects for this.”

WEDNESDAY, APRIL 22, 2009, PAGE 3B

Cruise passenger
spending declines

ving them
back up, but
officials say
the sector is
evening out of
late.

It was
hoped that
cruise passen-
ger spending "
might help to
float the
Bahamas
economy, as
stopover Visi-
tor numbers
diminished because of the global
recession. But all indications
show that cruise passenger
spending has taken a hit on
board the ships and at ports of
call.

“Whereas we do not have the
statistics to support at present,
the general indications are that
the spending has lessened. This is
not unique to the Bahamas, but
globally,” said director of cruise
development Carla Stuart. “Dur-
ing recessionary periods, spend-
ing is generally less, and it is
anticipated that as consumer

*

e.

V-Wallace

confidence heightens, spending
will also improve.”

According to Ms Stuart, the
Department of Statistics has not
yet released the first quarter
report on the Bahamas cruise
industry.

“Thus far, the feedback
appears to be entirely
favourable,” she said.

The largest cruise vessel in the
world, the Oasis of the Seas,
capable of bringing over 5,000
passengers at one time, is expect-
ed to call on the Bahamas later
this year.

And the former Imperial
Majesty/Regal Empress, now the
Bahamas Celebration, is making
regular affordable trips to the
Bahamas.

“The demand for the Bahamas
cruise product is still very high,
and the Celebration offers pas-
sengers the ability to escape for
one day,” said Ms Stuart.

It was announced yesterday
that the Bahamas will possibly
lose its spot as the world’s third
largest ship registry to the Mar-
shall Islands in the Pacific,
according to lloyd’slist.com.

NOTICE

PEAR

IMIT

NOTIC EIS HEREBY GIVEN as follows:

(a) PEARL LEE LIMITED is in voluntary dissolution under
the provisions of Section 137 (4) of the International Business

Companies Act 2000.

(b) The dissolution of the said company commenced on the
20th April, 2009 when the Articles of Dissolution were submitted
to and registered by the Registrar General.

(c) The Liquidator of the said company is Mr. Michael Low of 1
Raffles Link #05-02 Singapore 039393

Dated this 22nd day of April, A. D. 2009

Credit Suisse Trust Limited
Liquidator

Vacation in Paradise.
On ly $69"

— per person double occupancy.

Minimum 2-night stay. Bahamas residents only,

a

Full use of all Atlantis facilities. Plus:
. Complimentary continental breakfast datly

+ Junior Suites with King-size or two double beds
* Cable TV, refrigerator, in-room safe,

coffee maker, haty dryer

* Kids 15 and under, free

¢ Pool with swim-up bar

Limited-time offer! Reserve today /

Call 242-363-3680

*$69 per person double occupancy per night Sun. - Wed. Add $20 pp for Thurs. - Sat. Maximum
four persons per room. Rates effective through December 15. Additional fees apply for mandatory
taxes, mandatory housekeeping gratuities and utility service fees. Rates quoted are based on



standard room category and are subject to availability. Cancellations must be received 48 hours
prior to arrival or a one night penalty will apply.


THE TRIBUNE

FROM page 1B

- “with better quality work at a
much better price” - in coun-
tries such as the Dominican
Republic and Panama.

Mr D’Aguilar said the
investor told him he did not
mind paying $150-$200 in con-
struction costs. Yet he then
informed the Chamber presi-
dent: “I don’t see what advan-
tage there is to investing in the
Bahamas. I’m not prepared to
be ripped-off by paying $400-
$500 per square foot for poor
quality work.”

Education/learning deficien-
cies, which result in an unpro-
ductive, poorly-qualified work-
force, will hinder the Bahamas’
room to manoevere at a time
when external forces are likely
to force its economy to undergo
some profound changes.

The structure and model the
Bahamian economy has been
based upon, and the rules gov-
erning how its firms conduct
business, are under pressure
from the rules-based trading
regimes this country is being
required to join - the Economic
Partnership Agreement (EPA)
with the European Union, the
World Trade Organisation
(WTO) and future trade deals
with the US and Canada.

Then there is the OECD/G-
20 assault on the Bahamian
financial services industry, at a
time when the Bahamian work-
force is not well-equipped to
handle and manage all these

WEDNESDAY, APRIL 22, 2009, PAGE 5B

a
Workforce failings

‘smother’ expansion

enforced changes.

Expanding on this theme, Mr
D’ Aguilar added: “I was speak-
ing to someone in the private
sector, and they said quite right-
ly that in this adjustment, our
labour force just doesn’t cut it.
Then you’ve got an Immigra-
tion Department that appears
to be under pressure to revoke
most permits.”

Referring to businesses such
as landscaping and his own
Superwash laundromat chain,
Mr D’Aguilar said: “At the end
of the day, businesses such as
mine that get high school grad-
uates from Bahamas govern-
ment schools have an enormous
difficulty in getting people with
basic literacy skills, and we’re
banging our heads against the
wall because it’s so frustrating.
We don’t want to expand our
businesses.”

Without reform of the edu-
cation system, the Chamber
president warned: “You’re
going to smother the growth of
businesses. Bahamian business-
men, if you ask them what the
most troubling facet of running
a business is, 99 per cent of
them will say it’s the difficulty in
finding decent, qualified labour.

“This is such a pressing issue
for the country. You just smoth-
er your private sector. The pri-
vate sector lacks a key ingredi-
ent to grow. From every busi-
nessman I’ve spoken to, the
most pressing issue is the qual-
ity of our labour. How do you
get a productive, honest, quali-

Insurance Company seeks

Administrative Assistant

Qualifications:

+ Associate degree or higher in Business or related field, and/or, minimum of 1

year insurance or financial related experience.

Professional Skills:

+ Excellent written, verbal communication, organizational and customer service

skills

+ Ability to work in a fast paced industry with minimal supervision and be a self

starter.

Computer Skills:

+ Proficient with MS Windows Operating System

+ Proficiency in MS Office Suite- Word, Excel, Access

+ Knowledge of USSI Policy System would be a plus.

Duties:

+ Processing & Managing new and renewal policy applications.

+ Issue policies, endorsements, reinstatements and lapse notices.

+ Maintain policy number inventory listing, Corporate documents,

+ Policy files and records.

+ Work closely with Broker & Third Party Administrator.

+ Process premium billing and collection, check deposits, policy maintenance, and

claims.

+ Handle incoming correspondence from insured and insured companies to

distribute accordingly.

+ Liaise with Insurance Managers, Board of Directors and Third Party

Administrators.

Resumes should be forwarded to:
hr@hessmgmt.com



fied labour force?”

Using his business as an
example, Mr D’Aguilar said
Superwash was in desperate
need of hiring male cleaners in
their 30s, due to the need to
lift/move machinery, garbage
bins and heavy boxes.

Employing men aged in their
20s was not the answer, the
Chamber president explained,
because “they’re not settled” to
a working environment.
“They’re impossible, and a
cleaning job is not what they
envisioned they’d be doing,
even though that’s what they’re
qualified for,” he added.

“And finding male cleaners
in their 30s is impossible. They
don’t want to do it. It’s difficult
to get work permits; it’s the has-
sle every year. You’ve got to go
through the agony.”

To help solve the problem,
Mr D’Aguilar said the private
sector needed to establish a
partnership with the Bahamas
Technical and Vocational Insti-
tute (BTVI) and the Depart-
ment of Labour, in a bid to
address industry’s basic skills
needs.

He suggested that other sec-
tors follow landscaping’s lead.
That industry had assessed what
was done in Florida, come back
and set up its own certification
course to provide workers with
the required skills and stan-
dards, thus providing a career
path.

“These are the sort of things
we need to be focusing on,
rather than getting money from
the IDB. Something concrete.
Let’s get things done,” Mr
D’ Aguilar said.

“All we need ask of the Gov-
ernment, and starting today, is
to give us people who can read,
write and add-up 1+ 1.”

Ralph Massey, a founding
member of the Nassau Institute
economic think-tank, in a pre-
sentation last week drew on the
research finding from his The
Learning Crisis essay to show
that, based on the 2006 BGCSE
results, 39 per cent of New
Providence high school students
who sat the English exam failed,
while another 17 per cent were
“language illiterate”.

As for mathematics, the find-
ings were even more shocking -
36 per cent of all New Provi-
dence high school leavers failed
BGCSE maths in 2006, and
another 46 per cent were
deemed numerically illiterate -
they did not know the differ-
ence between addition and sub-
traction.

el a

For the stories
behind the news,
ecto Maro [e lad
on Mondays

A leading retailer is seeking applications for the position of

BOOKKEEPER/ASSISTANT ACCOUNTANT

Requirements

Applicants should possess the following:

¢ Experience in the field of Accounting or Bookkeeping
¢ An energetic personality

¢ Strong Interpersonal Skills

¢ Good Organizational Skills

¢ Computer Literacy (Microsoft Office Suite)
¢ Willingness to work flexible hours and weekends

¢ Experience in Payroll preparation, would be an asset

Responsibilities

The successful candidate will be responsible for properly preparing
cheques, maintaining general ledger with QuickBooks, Bank
reconciliation, payment of salary maintain and reconcile current
payable and receivable listings, reconciling credit cards spreadsheets,
resolving accounting queries.

Remuneration

We offer in return an excellent remuneration package, inclusive of
medical and life insurance.

Interested persons please forward your resume to:
The Human Resources Manager

P.O. Box N-623
Fax: (242) 322-6607

Email: hr@luxuryretaillimited.com


PAGE 6B, WEDNESDAY, APRIL 22, 2009

THE TRIBUNE



ee ee
Chamber chief ‘incredulous’ over Bahamas Waste permits

FROM page 1B

and create employment, but they are
being thwarted by the Government.
The Government needs to make these
decisions more quickly. My God; three
years and counting, and then they’ve
got to hire the Inter-American Devel-
opment Bank (IDB) to assess the pro-
posal. That'll take another six months
to a year.”

Mr D’Aguilar was responding after
Mr Neymour told Tribune Business
on Tuesday that the Government had
yet to approve Bahamas Waste’s
biodiesel initiative due to concerns
about the pricing structure for the pro-
ject, and the environmental impact of
production by-products such as glyc-
erin.

The Chamber president, though, said
that with foreign fuel imports drain-
ing the Bahamas of close to $1 billion
in foreign currency reserves per
annum, it seemed a “no brainer” that
the Government would want to

encourage the production of domesti-
cally produced alternatives.

With the IDB’s new involvement in
the process, Mr D’Aguilar said it was
possible that Bahamas Waste’s three-
year wait could turn into four years.

“Where is the ability of the Govern-
ment to move expeditiously on some-
thing like this?” Mr D’Aguilar asked.
“Tf it takes three years on everything,
people wanting to get into new, innov-
ative ventures, are going to be so dis-
couraged that they don’t bother.

“It’s very off-putting. Every time you
go to the Bahamas government to get
something approved, it takes for ever.
They need to change their business
model. They need to make their deci-
sions expeditiously.

“What is disheartening in the
Bahamas Waste application is that I
don’t think Bahamas Waste even
knows the reason why the Govern-
ment is not getting back to them.
They’re banging their heads against
the wall. If biodiesel is not a good idea,

I don’t know what is.”

The Chamber president added: “If I
was the Government, I would whole-
heartedly encourage the production of
domestic fuels. It’s good for the envi-
ronment, and takes all this oil and fuel
that’s being dumped in the ground and
recycles it.

“You have this glycerin by-product,
but go down to the Cape Eleuthera
Institute and they’re actually looking at
what you can do with it. Glycerin is a
major component of soap.

“Yes, the glycerin run-off is a con-
cern, but look at what it could save in
terms of the drain on foreign reserves.
It could also assist in a small way, but
assists nonetheless, in the removal of
price volatility.

“Here you have a Bahamian com-
pany, owned by Bahamians, and look-
ing to get into a field replicated around
the world already. Both governments
have seen fit to hold it up for three
years. I just don’t get it. I hope this
does not drag on and on. It’s so off-

putting if every time you go to the
Bahamas government it takes one year,
three years.”

Prime Minister Hubert Ingraham
acknowledged earlier this year that the
Bahamas was still, in many ways, too
inflexible and bureaucratic a country
when it came to the investments
approvals process, implying that there
was a need for change.

He has also in the past suggested
that the civil services needs to become
more proactive and responsive.

Mr D’Aguilar yesterday said he
hoped that the Government and BEC
search for renewable, sustainable ener-
gy suppliers would not become bogged
down in the same bureaucratic maze
that had seemingly impacted Bahamas
Waste’s proposal.

“Drag on for too long, and people
lose interest; the dynamics change,”
the Chamber president said. “We’ve
seen this over and over again.

“T would think this would be a major
priority. The economy is hurting. Let’s

NOTICE

INTERNATIONAL BUSINESS COMPANIES ACT





























































No. 45 of 2000

FOREXMA ONE S.A.

Notice is hereby given that in accordance with
Section 137 of The
Companies Act No. 45 of 2000, FOREXMA ONE
5.4. is in dissolution. The date of commencement
of dissolution was the 16th day of April, 2009, Dillon
Dean of Nassau, Bahamas is the Liquidator of
FOREXMA ONE S.A

Intemational Business

Dillon Dean
LIQUIDATOR

NOTICE
PANTALLNA INCORPORATION LTD.

NOTIC £ IS HEREBY GIVEN as follows







(ai) PANTALLNA INCORPORATION LTD. is in voluntary
dissolutom under the provisions of Section 197 (4) of the
Infarnatonal Business Companies Act 2000.

(b) The dissolution of the said oxenpany commenced on ihe 21h
April, 2009 when the Anicles of Dissolution were submited to
and reqestered by the Registrar General.

fc) The Liquidator of ihe said company & Credit Suisse Trust
Limited, Fue de Lausanne 17 bis, Gereva

Dated this 22nd day of April, A.D. 2009

Credit Suisse Trust Limited
Liquidator

orks

Paul Miecheall Salar
fos Woes & Mas

Hair

326-1696
Fax: 326-1698

$6 Madeira Street, Pulmoduwe

Professional Hair Stylist Wanted

Looking for energetic, professionally trained Hair
Stylist for a full time position.

Must have at least three years experience in hair
coloring and styling.

Experience with Paul Mitchell colors and products
would be benefical.

Please email resume to
hairworks 2 coralwave.com or fax to 326-1698,

Clico (Bahamas) Limited
(In Liquidation)

LIQUIDATOR’S NOTICE

Policyholders of Clico (Bahamas) Limited {In
Liquidation) are advised that premium payments and
other policy transactions can be made at the Company’s
}inain otfice, located on Mt. Royal Avenue and Carew
| Strect, Nassau, Bahamas.

Policyholders and the public are further advised that |

office hours are from 9:00 am to 4:30 pm daily.

Craig 4. (Tony) Gomer
Official Liquidator

Communications
reform legislation
tabling ‘imminent’

FROM page 1B

- and subsequent debate like-
ly to clog up parliamentary
time afterwards, now repre-
sents the best time for the
Government to move the
three Bills.

Tribune Business was told
by one source close to the sit-
uation that the proposed new
legislation should set the tele-
coms and communications
regulatory regime in stone
“for some time to come”,
removing the uncertainty and
inadequacies in the existing
legislation.

Yet the source added that
the Bills were also flexible
enough to provide for any
future privatisations that the
Government may contem-
plate, such as selling-off the
Bahamas Electricity Corpo-
ration (BEC) and/or the
Water & Sewerage Corpora-
tion.

Hence the Utilities Regu-
lation and Competition
Authority name given to the
new regulator by the Bill of
the same title, implying that
this body - once created -
would regulate BEC and the
Water & Sewerage Corpora-
tion in the event of both
being privatised.

Industry and public consul-
tation on the three Bills end-
ed on Monday, and the BTC
Privatisation Committee -
aided by attorneys Charles
Russell and its corporate
advisors, KPMG - is now
rapidly assessing the feedback
gleaned.

The Government’s decision
to move rapidly on the legis-
lation may not go down too
well with Systems Resource
Group (SRG) and Cable
Bahamas, both of whom have
asked for more time to sub-
mit responses.

However, sources suggest-
ed that the administration

wanted to move rapidly, and
any amendments required as
a result of the feedback will
be incorporated during the
parliamentary process.

When it comes to BTC’s
actual privatisation, Tribune
Business understands that
Citibank has been testing the
market waters since earlier
this year to determine the lev-
el of interest in acquiring the
state-owned telecoms
provider.

The privatisation aspect of
the Government’s telecoms
sector policy is likely to gain
momentum once the legisla-
tion is passed, with the Pri-
vatisation Committee and its
advisors then likely to engage
in the active solicitation and
assessment of bids for the
company.

The global economic down-
turn and tight credit markets
are a far from ideal backdrop
against which to attempt the
privatisation, but the more
than 10-year process needs to
be brought to an end as
quickly as possible, something
Mr Ingraham seems to have
decided, too.

His plans to liberalise cel-
lular after two years, while
likely to depress BTC’s value
and the price any bidder will
pay further, will benefit the
overall telecoms market and
the Bahamian consumer, who
will enjoy better prices, more
efficient service and multiple
provider options.

Tribune Business under-
stands that one provider still
in the game is Bluewater
Communications Holdings,
the bidder that reached an
agreement in principle with
the former Christie adminis-
tration to acquire a 49 per
cent BTC stake for $260 mil-
lion, only to be turned down
flat by the Ingraham admin-
istration.

Bluewater is since under-

TAYLOR

INDUSTRIES LTD.

WILL BE CLOSED FoR
ANNUAL STOCKTAKING

THURSDAY, APRIL 23
FRIDAY, APRIL 24
SATURDAY, APRIL 25

We regret any
inconvenience this will
cause to our customers.

stood to have adopted a twin-
track process, making initial
moves to start UK-based
arbitration proceedings as per
the terms of its initial con-
tract with the Government,
but also remaining in the
game in the hope that no suit-
able buyer will emerge and
the administration will be
forced to return to the nego-
tiating table with it.

focus on what can make a difference.
Alternative energy is one area. It
would reduce imports, and reduce
emissions from burning fuel. But you
never get the feeling the Government
of the Bahamas is urgent; it only reacts
to events.”

WT a]
Ce A TL
TMT
HUT

FROM page 1B

the Bahamas has also appealed to
the UK to consider what affect the
tax hike will have on the region.

The tax was originally intro-
duced as a “green tax”, imposed
to give the aviation industry
accountability for its impact on the
environment, but according to the
CHTA, “none of the £2 billion-
plus currently collected is specifi-
cally devoted to environmental
projects”.

The International Air Transport
Association asserts that govern-
ments should refrain from “over-
dosing” the tourism industry with
taxation in order to save the prod-
uct — especially in the Bahamas
and the Caribbean, which is
increasingly expanding its market
share outside of the US to Europe
and Asia.

Despite trials with airlift, Mr
Vanderpool-Wallace said prepa-
rations for the Miss Universe
Pageant are going well.

“There is a formula they [the
organisers] find to be successful,”
he said.



ae eer a ear ae

FINANCIAL CONTROLLER

An established Bahantian Company is seeking a

Financial Controller

Qualifications for a position are:

* Bachelor's Degree or equivalent in Accounting
or applied finance from an accredited and
reputable university.

Certified Public Account

3-5 years Audit experience

Proficiency in Accounting Software such as
QuickBooks or Peachtree

Expericnce in preparing IFRS compliant

financial statements

The individual will be responsible for directing
the overall financial plans and accounting
practices of the organization

Interested persons should send resumes to:
PA).Box CB 13526
Nassau, Bahamas

Position WANTED:

treatment,

by a doctor,

Insurance
a Ministry

Salary is

Fa. Box SP-p3 158

REGISTERED NURSE

A Major Development in Southwest New Providence is
seeking @ full time on-site registered nurse. The nurse
will be responsible for non-critical incidents/accident
to provide the necessary first aid and first responder

Duties Include but not limited to:-

Stabilization of any injured person/s until
they can be transferred to a clinic or
hospital facilities for complete evaluation

Administer drug and alcohol testing to
construction and company staff if required.

Complete any reports required by in house
and relevant government agencies
regarding injuries or incidents on site.

Suitable candidates must have foll medical lability
coverare,
of Health approved/certitied
professional with at least five (3) years experience in the
medical field, Emergency room experience is a plus,

trained and

be technically
medical

commensurate with qualifications and
expericnce. Interested persons may send resume tu


PAGE 8B, WEDNESDAY, APRIL 22, 2009

THE TRIBUNE



eS



The Tribune

Kenric Rolle



Kristen Taylor

savoury taste of victory

yo
Nassau Alrport
Development Company

Removal of Derelict Aircraft

Effectve April 20, 2009, the Nassau Arport Deve opment
Campany (NAD is requesting the ewners of the aircraft pictured
ae ow to renove her prooerly within 30 days of this
notice,

Beth aircraft are Cessna 423 parted on Apron 5 et the Lynden
Pindling Intéemabanal Airoert. Fa luré to de sow | result in he
aircratt oeing remeved and discarded oy the a port
manacement comparry,

For further information contact:
Paice Salely esceriment

Nassau Airpon Development Co,

Lynear Pinang Inemeatiang! Airport

PO, Gox AP Sa225, heseau, Gahenge

Bae MP PP Od



m@ By LLOYD ALLEN

Tribune Features Reporter

lallen@tribunemedia.net

YOUNG chefs Kristen Taylor and Kenric Rolle,
made history last month claiming top prizes in
the recent Keizer University cooking competition.

Both in their senior year of
high school, the teens say since
winning scholarships to the
prestigious cooking institute,
their future plans of becoming
professional chefs now seem
more tangible.

Kristen who is currently
enrolled at North Andros High,
said her interest in cooking first
started around age of 12, which
was when she first started high
school.

“T’ve always loved the chal-
lenge of creating new food, and
my grandmother was the first
person who worked with me in
developing that talent.”

Kristen said the first food she
remembers creating was a
home-made coconut bread.
After watching her grandmoth-
er create the heavenly delight
dozens of times before, Kristen
said it was only natural for her
to try it, with her first attempt
just as good as her grandmoth-
er’s.

From there, she said she con-
tinued fostering her talent,
enrolling in cooking classes at
school, and cooking for her fam-
ily occasionally.

Kristen first entered the
Young Chefs Competition in

2007, where she prepared a rice
pudding with pumpkin, potato
pancakes with strawberry sauce,
and a chicken bread served with
yogurt and mango chutney.

Although she did not win,
Kristen said she remained
focused on her dream of one
day attending an international
culinary school.

Practise makes perfect

“T spent more time practis-
ing my knife skills, I practised
different methods of cooking
so that I could become more
familiar with the kitchen, and
continued to keep my eyes
open for cooking opportuni-
ties.”

Kristen also put her all into
her bread recipe for the Agri-
expo bread making she entered
earlier this year.

She said she was extremely
disappointed when she discov-
ered that once again not only
did she not win, but she did not
even place in the competition.

She said at that point she was
almost ready to throw in the
towel, but after speaking with
her cooking coach, realised that
everything that had happened

NOTICE

NOTICE is hereby given that ELLIOTTE SANDS of BALFOUR

AVE., NASSAU,

BAHAMAS, is applying to the Minister

responsible for Nationality and Citizenship, for registration/
naturalization as a citizen of The Bahamas, and that any person
who knows any reason why registration/naturalization should not
be granted, should send a written and signed statement of the
facts within twenty-eight days from the 22° day of April, 2009 to
the Minister responsible for nationality and Citizenship, P.O. Box

N-7147, Nassau, Bahamas.

NOTICE

NOTICE is hereby given that KADIAN BECKFORD of
#23 SAN SOUCI DRIVE, P.O. BOX EE-15368, NASSAU,
BAHAMAS, is applying to the Minister responsible for
Nationality and Citizenship, for registration/naturalization
as a citizen of The Bahamas, and that any person
who knows any reason why registration/naturalization
should not be granted, should send a written and
signed statement of the facts within twenty-eight
days from the 15 day of April, 2009 to the Minister
responsible for nationality and Citizenship, P.O. Box

N-7147, Nassau, Bahamas.



up to that point was a test, only
to prove just how committed she
was to accomplishing her dream.

She said her third and final
opportunity came when she had
found out about the Keizer
competition. This time, Kristen
said she submitted a complete-
ly unique dish which she was
certain would be good enough
to take her to victory.

“It was a plantain conch
wrap, with pickled vegetables,
glazed beets, and sauce,” she
said.

By the end of the competi-
tion, Kristen walked away with
a $5,000 scholarship, which for
her finally proved that she was
good enough to become a pro-
fessional chef, and that her
determination and commit-
ment over the past six years
was not in vain.

Kristen said she hoped her
experience of staying true to
what she loves, will also be a
testament to other young peo-
ple to remain focused and
believe in oneself regardless
of how difficult something may
seem, as you can end up with a
worthwhile reward.

Like Kristen, CC Sweeting
Senior High twelfth grade stu-
dent Kendric Rolle was also
glad when he discovered that
he had won a scholarship to
Keizer University.

Preparing a ground chicken
and plantain burger with
home-made bread, with a side
of green beans, Kendric placed
second place overall, beating
out more than a dozen of oth-
er young chefs.

Kendric who is also a musi-
cian, youth leader, and Christ-
ian, said that apart from cook-
ing being one of the most
important things in his life,
being able to inspire others
through all that he does is what
make his life worth living.

With the intention of attend-
ing Keizer’s Miami campus in
the fall, Kendric said within
the next three years he hopes
to become a certified culinari-
an, return home from his train-
ing, and begin his career as a
professional chef.

He said with this recent
scholarship from Keizer being
an amazing achievement, he is
confident that God has much
more in store for him, and he is
happy to have family and
friend that support him in that
endeavor.

Walking away with the top
prize was Aquinas College
twelfth grader Deandra Rolle
who was featured in Tribune
Taste last week.
THE TRIBUNE

WEDNESDAY, APRIL 22, 2009, PAGE 9B



See



The Tribune



@ By LLOYD ALLEN
Tribune Features
Reporter
lallen@tribunemedia.net

THIS week in The Tri-
bune’s Things 2 Do run-
down, we’ve searched high
and low to bring you the
best events. And as always,
there’s a wide variety of
concerts, parties, art
exhibits, and cultural events
for your complete indul-
gence.

1. Popular RnB recording
artist Bobby Valentino is
scheduled to perform live
from the Fort Charlotte
grounds this Saturday,
along with some of the
biggest names in Bahamian
entertainment including
SO$A Man, Jah Hem,
MDEEZ, Lady Millz, Rapp
Quelle, and others. The
event which is being spon-
sored by Kemis Digital,
Cyclone Entertainment, Fix
Ya Face Entertainment, Fluid

Lounge, and others, is set to |

begin around 9.30pm. Tick-
ats are priced at $25 general
admission, and $40 VIP in
advance, and can be pur-
chased at Airbrush Junkies

and the Juke Box both in the /

Marathon Mall. A pre-party
is also scheduled for Fluid
Lounge on Friday, where the
2009 Trump Model compe-
tition will take place, with
former America’s next top
model contestant Tiffany
Richardson as a judge.
Ladies are free until mid-
night, and men are admitted
for $15 until midnight.

2. As part of its 50th
anniversary celebrations,
the Bahamas National Trust
is hosting a Robin-Hood
inspired feast and extrava-
ganza at its Retreat Garden
on Village Road this Friday

from 6 -10pm. Featuring the

fine cuisine of a few local
chefs, the event will also
host various musicians,
magicians, and other enter-
tainment. Tickets for the
avent are $75, and can be

purchased at BNT headquar-

ters. For more information,
contact 393.1317.

3. Once again the
Express Yourself movement
is scheduled to present its
open mic session at the Hub
art centre on Bay Street
tonight, artists of all forms
and genres will have the
freedom to share their talent
with the Bahamas. This
event which runs from
8.30pm to midnight, has no
cover charge, however
donations for the centre and
event are welcomed.

4, This Friday, art work
by local artist Jane Water-
ous is being featured at the
Doongalik Studio gallery
Marina Village from 6pm to
9. The event which is

themed ‘Peace, Love, Happi-

ness,’ consist of a 17 plus
piece collection. Using resin
and acrylic with some air-
brush to create the pieces,
this exhibit is said to illus-
trate an abstract approach
and view of Mrs Waterous’
life. Admission is free, and
will continue until May 1,
2009.

5. On Saturday, the
Bahamas National Sympho-
ny Orchestra will have it

annual gala concert at the St

Andrews Presbyterian Kirk
Starting at 7.30pm. Featur-
ing a diverse mix of sym-
phonies from the baroque
period up to the contempo-
rary period, the BNSO is
also expected to add a twist
of jazz pieces. Tickets for
the event are $25 in
advance, and $30 at the
door. Ticket venues include
Logos Book Store,
Maranatha Music Centre,
and the Linen Shop on Bay
St. Hors d'oeuvres and
drinks will be also be
served.



Sammi Starr goes to prom

@ By ALEX MISSICK
Tribune Feature Reporter
amissick@tribunemedia.net

PROM season 2009 is almost
here and many young ladies from
across the country are already
shopping around for the perfect
prom dress and scouting potential
date prospects. However, as a
result of the hard economic times
that have fallen on some fami-
lies, many young girls may not
be able to afford the prom of
their dreams.

With this fact in mind, Bahami-
an recording artist Sammi Starr
has decided to give one special
young lady a chance to have her
prom fantasies and dreams come
true by holding a nation wide
competition to win an all expense
paid prom date with him.

To be eligible to win this
celebrity prom date, young ladies
must be high school seniors with
a GPA of at least 2.8, must be

active in their community -sports,
school clubs, etc, have a good
rapport with the student body,
write a short essay as to why they
should win the date, be a fan of
Sammi Starr and be able to name
at least four of his songs. The
entire event will also be aired on
JCN, making this special young
lady a reality star for the night.
“T noticed that the majority of
my fans are between 14 and 23,
which puts most of them in high
school. I know that 65 per cent of
them are females. I wanted to
give back to my fans and show
the Bahamian public, especially
these young people that I am a
strong advocate for education. I
wanted to applaud the efforts of
young female seniors who want
to go away and study hard
because we have a lot of teenage
pregnancy, fighting and those that
do not want to do anything seri-
ous with their lives in this coun-
try. So I wanted to reward one

TRY
2,320 sq. feet located on

Mt. Pleasant Avenue off Carib Road

Available for immediate occupancy
Call 393-7020 for further details

NOTICE is hereby given that



MYRIAME BELLUNE

of COLONY VILLAGE, P.O. BOX N-4218, NASSAU,
BAHAMAS, is applying to the Minister responsible for
Nationality and Citizenship, for registration/naturalization
as a citizen of The Bahamas, and that any person
who knows any reason why registration/naturalization
should not be granted, should send a written and
signed statement of the facts within twenty-eight
days from the 15 day of April, 2009 to the Minister
responsible for nationality and Citizenship, P.O. Box

N-7147, Nassau, Bahamas.



NOTICE

NOTICE is hereby given that IZMA MARCNER of PINEDALE,
EIGHT MILE ROCK, GRAND BAHAMA, BAHAMAS P.O. BOX
F2197 is applying to the Minister responsible for Nationality and
Citizenship, for registration/naturalization as a citizen of The

Bahamas, and that any person who knows any reason why
registration/ naturalization should not be granted, should send a
written and signed statement of the facts within twenty-eight days
from the 22nd day of APRIL, 2009 to the Minister responsible for
Nationality and Citizenship, P.O.Box N-7147, Freeport, Bahamas.



‘

@ By LLOYD ALLEN
Tribune Features Reporter
lallen@tribunemedia.net

MANY in the local entertainment arena and
others were shocked to learn of the recent
death of one of the Bahamas’ most energetic
musicians Cyril “Dry Bread” Ferguson.

Viewed as one of the last in a dying breed of tra-
ditional Bahamian musicians, Mr Ferguson’s life-
time career of producing indigenous Bahamian
melodies in many ways has influenced other local

artists like KB, Geno D, Avvy and Visage.
Longtime friend and colleague Dave Mackey
said that when he last interviewed Dry Bread in
\ 2006, he did not dream that it would be the
| last time the two would work together.
; He explained that over the many years
he has worked as Dry Bread’s engineer,
\, co-producer, and graphic designer, they
\ were able to produce dozens of hits
\ songs, all helping to cement Dry Bread
as a note worthy musician who has tru-
ly made his mark in Bahamian history.
Mr Mackey stated: “From the days
of Cay Gotlieb’s Cicada Sounds Stu-
dio (now COOL96 studios), to my
Mackeymedia multimedia produc-
tion studio, we produced tracks and
albums like Sunshine On My Body,
Bahamian Music, Sweet Ting In Da
Can, She Jump, A Good Woman,
Mr Jitney Man, Lover And A
Friend, Get in the Groove, Shake
Up Your Body Line, Do the
Junkanoo, and lots more.”

Mr Mackey went on to say that
one of the most chilling things
about that interview back in 2006,
was where Dry Bread spoke of hav-
ing to perform at funerals for
























deceased musicians using his music as a healing
tool for their families. Now five years later, Dry
Bread himself has become one of those musi-
cians.

Reflecting on Dry Bread’s passion for music
and ambition as an entertainer, Mr Mackey said:
“ Perhaps Dry Bread’s greatest career wish was in
becoming a senior representative as head of The
Musician’s and Entertainer’s Union, a dream that
never came to fruition during this life.”

Fellow entertainer Ronnie Butler, said although
death is a natural part of human life, he was
extremely sad to learn of the passing of Mr Fer-
guson.

“It’s always sad to hear of any one of our fellow
entertainers passing on, especially one with as
much impact as Mr Ferguson,” he said.

Mr Butler who has worked with Dry Bread on
occasions, said that it is unfortunate that the hard
work that goes in producing and promoting
Bahamian music, is often overlooked for other
artists outside of the country.

Mr Butler said the passing of Dry Bread is
another example of how artists are remembered
after they are “dead and gone,” a reality that he
said does not have to continue.

A longtime activists for increased airplay of
Bahamian music, Mr Butler said he hope that
one day Bahamian music will rule the airways,
giving youngsters a more tangible display of local
culture, music, and Bahamian specific experi-
ences.

West End and Bimini MP Obie Wilchombe
stated: “Dry Bread was a special person who
touched lives and gave of the gift that was
bequeathed to him by his God. He taught chil-
dren music and encouraged each to embrace their
gift and follow their dreams. Dry Bread’s depar-
ture saddens us all particularly the people of
Grand Bahama where he spent the majority of his
life, but his music remains with us and the mem-
ories that will last forever.”

young lady for working hard in
school, being a good role model
and for being just a good all
around person,” Mr Starr said.
Mr Starr said he will pay for
the young lady’s dress (designer
of choice), limo ride to and from
the venue, prom pictures with
family, friends and himself, and
provide a laptop, a cell phone
and even cash to pursue her
dreams of going abroad to the
college/university of her choice.
“T haven’t been to prom in
about six years. It is not about

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winner is gets her mind blown.
It’s going to be a night she will
never forget. We have been get-
ting countless applications so far.
I think this will give young ladies
for next year’s prom season more
incentive to work harder and get
good grades. I want the young
lady who wins to feel that she
was made to feel special for her
accomplishments in high school,”
Mr Starr said.



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PAGE 10B, WEDNESDAY, APRIL 22, 2009

THE TRIBUNE



ARTS



Putting the past in gear

@ By LLOYD ALLEN
Tribune Features Reporter
lallen@tribunemedia.net

THE Bahamas Antique
Auto Club (BAAC) over the
past 22 years has built a
reputation for having some
of the best kept vintage
vehicles available in the
country, and this year the
group celebrates its anniver-
sary with a look into its

past.

Founding President Don Aranha
along with other executives of the
organisation recently spoke with Tri-
bune Entertainment.

Mr Aranha explained that back in
the late 70s, he spent a great deal of
time visiting car shows and auto exhi-
bitions in the United States and Cana-
da. After he submitted his own vehicle
in an antique and specialty car show in
1987 he decided to create the BAAC
with a major focus on fund raising and
charity.

Mr Aranha, said his passion for
antique vehicles began with the pur-
chase of his first vintage vehicle, a 1961
Corvette purchased in 1979.

Club secretary Murray Forde
explained that over the years, apart
from traditional antique vehicles, the
organisation has grown and they are
also featuring more modern vehicles
like the 1991 Eclipse entered in this
year’s show held at Arawak Cay.

Leslie Rahming who owns the 91’
Eclipse explained that the 1.8 turbo
charged vehicle went through several
alterations and updates since he bought
it some years ago.

According to Mr Rahming: “It has
two motorised TVs, a yellow hand held
play station, it has crocodile skin seats,
with the exterior color changed to fuch-
sia pearl and blue pearl.”

With around 20,000 watts needed for
the sound system, there is a 350 ampli-
fied external alternator connecting four
batteries to this seriously “whipped”
ride. He added that in addition to the
chrome detailing throughout the vehi-
cle, there is an additional motorised
screen in the car’s rear trunk, with fiber-
glass molding throughout its flooring.
He said that the vehicle is valued at
well over $100,000, an amount sure to
increase with future modifications.

Mr Forde said: “We have always had
a special-interest class which is really
generally a low production car, a kit
car, a repli-car, but we don’t have a lot
of those.”

Referring to the Eclipse as “a rolling
stereo,” Mr Forde said the vehicle was
popular in this year’s competition and
said that similar cars have helped in
the overall appeal of the annual event.

Overall the group registers more than
100 antique and special interest vehicles
which one member explained, takes a
whole lot of time to maintain and

SENIOR Administrators at the Nazareth Centre accepting proceeds from the Auto Clubs

2009 car show, being given by Richard Blake, President, Peter Armstrong, and Secre-

tary Murray Forde.

upkeep.

BAAC member Richard Blake said,
apart from members having adequate
funds to purchase replacement parts,
they themselves need to be handy or
have a good mechanic to properly com-
plete repair jobs.

“T have particular difficulty with the
1969 AMX, which is a car produced by
American Motors which is now out of
business. The problem was in getting
parts, so it was one or two specialty
stores apart from Ford or GM that I
used,” he said.

Mr Blake said the introduction of
the Internet has helped a lot in locating
hard to find parts, but added that there
are still some major external challenges
to owning a special interest vehicle.

BAAC president Peter Armstrong
detailed one of those challenges as dri-
vers who have no regard for the group’s
regular island long ride.

“We go out on a fun ride every three
months with the last bringing together
around 19 cars,...you can guarantee that
somewhere during that drive, some oth-
er road user will attempt to get past us
and attempt to cut into our ride,” an act
he said is both dangerous and stupid.

Noting that their “train of vehicles”
may be somewhat annoying to others
driving behind them, he said their pace
is usually within speeding limits, thus
not imposing transport delays to others.

The group also identified licensing
as another major hurdle to BAAC
members and others who own vintage
cars.

Mr Armstrong said in two separate
incidents he was pulled over for not
having the appropriate license for his
vehicle, but said he along with the
members of BAAC ride their vehicles
only a few times a years, and feel some-
thing similar to a bond license (O/T
plates) should be created for such vehi-
cles.

Another challenge for many of the
BAAC members is the high duty on
the vehicles.







The art of
conservation

FROM page 12

Franz’s mother, Rose Tay-

Overall the group has generated and
maintained relationships with other
groups such as the Florida Auto Asso-
ciation and the Jamaican Classic Car
Club, as well as contributed to local
charities and children’s homes. Apart
from donating fund raising proceeds
to children’s homes, the group also rais-
es funds and donates groceries to about
80 unfortunate children during the
Christmas holiday.

Mr Forde said: “Generally we pick a
different one each year, and last year
we did the Bilney Lane Children’s
Home, and what we realised was what
we did was a good start with the things
they needed but they need more.”

With this type of commitment, he
explained that although anyone is wel-
comed to apply for membership, the
group prides itself on attracting family
oriented individuals as well as those
who have a serious interest in the
antique auto world.

“We go through a process with the
application forms where the board of
directors would meet to discuss it,
because obviously there are certain
people that we would not want to be
members, but we hardly ever turn
anyone down.”

He explained that there is
no age limit, but expressed
that it was essential to target
younger members to help in
the future growth of the organ-
isation.

Many of the members noted
that apart from the Toyota’s,
Mercedes, and other tradi-
tional vintage cars that have
become synonymous with
the group, bringing in a
younger crop of members
would probably bring cars like
Subaru’s, Skylines, and other modern
day muscle rides. With the club’s defi-
nition of vintage vehicles being cars 20
years and older, members say now is
the time to draw new life to the club
which would reflect the change in time.



babies in the mangroves and if
they don’t have anywhere to
go then we would loose that
part of our economy. I also
incorporated some of the
things I enjoy such as soccer,
my laptop and music,” Mr Tay-
lor said.

Mr Taylor said although he
was never really confident with
his painting skills, after exper-
imenting with a few of his
pieces he has gained a greater
sense of confidence in using
that medium. Most of his art
pieces are abstract using mate-
rials such as coloring pencils
and water colour pencils.

Due to his love for conser-
vation and a healthy planet, Mr
Taylor decided to also make a
3D art piece using some of the
garbage items he collected dur-
ing a beach cleanup that he
participated in.

“T used old roof shingles,
coke bottles, and broken bot-
tles among other things. I
painted it black to show the
impact we are having on the
environment. I also found an
old shoe bottom which I used
to depict our human/carbon
footprint on the environment.
There are also brightly colored
fish jumping away from the
garbage to show that they can’t
live like that,” Mr Taylor said.

He added that he would like
his peers to become educated
about what is going on around
them.

“The destruction of the man-
groves is going on all the time
and people just don’t pay atten-
tion to it, they just focus on
their life. People normally only
focus on temporary things and
are not looking at the long
terms effects of it,” Mr Taylor
said.

lor, said her home country,
Costa Rica, has a long history
of conservation of the environ-
ment and she is very proud that
her son holds a special inter-
est in it.

“He has grown understand-
ing the value of nature. To me
it is very rewarding to see that
he is not just interested in look-
ing after the environment and
keeping it but trying to share
that with other people so that
more citizens of both countries
can eventually learn that we
have to recycle, reuse and
make a better effort to keep
the beauty of the environ-
ment,” Mrs Taylor said.

Mr Taylor said the environ-
ment has had the most signifi-
cant impact on his art pieces
and research.

“The environment brought
up important topics such as
deforestation, pollution and
human destruction of the nat-
ural world that surround us.
When creating these pieces my
intent is to appreciate the nat-
ural beauty of our environment
and encourage others to enjoy
it and make sure that they are
doing all they can to preserve it
for future generations.”

Mr Taylor has been a mem-
ber of The Bahamas National
U15 Soccer team, the Bahamas
National U17 Soccer team, a
member of the Bahamas
National U19 Cricket team and
a 2008 Ministry of Tourism
Foreign Language Cadet. He
won First place on the Dolphin
Encounters Poster Competi-
tion 2008, and second place in
2007. Franz is currently a class
representative in the Student
Council and a member of the
LCIS Senior Band and Steel
Drum Band.

AON Ols
FRANZ’S ART



THE ORIGINAL six members of the club when first formed in 1987. (L to R) Richard
Chestnut, Lenny Brozozog, Don Aranha, Alonzo, Rolle, Murray Forde, and Charles
Johnson. Phot By Elaine Forde.

FOUNDING
members
(from left to
right) Don
Aranha, Mur-
ray Forde,



















































Hardy plan-
ning the
club’s first car
show in 1988,
| which was

| held at Tyer-

| flex, on Wulff
Road.






















ae



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_ High:83°F/28°C ; ; 5 i reater the need for eye and skin protection.
’ ¢ ot sunshine. windy. t-storm possible. g y p
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. @ a High: 84 High: 83 High: 83 High: 82
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Low: 62° F/A17°C as r The exclusive AccuWeather RealFeel Temperature® is an index that combines the effects of temperature, wind, humidity, sunshine intensity, cloudiness, precipitation, pressure, and Today 6:25am. 25 12:15am. 0.2
aa @ r - elevation on the human body—everything that effects how warm or cold a person feels. Temperatures reflect the high and the low for the day. 6:41pm. 29 12:21pm. 0.2
: ; , Thursd 10am. 26 1:03am. 0.1
| CO te re tae. o
5 ae Statistics are for Nassau through 2 p.m. yesterday Friday 75dam. 06 149am. 00
; a ABACO Temperature 8:10pm. 3.2 1:47pm. 0.0
? : = ano ° PUG MN, eescceatstes Qaceeuetaceraaect eee 82° F/28° C 3:38 76 7-36 04
= F 1 High: 83° F/28" c LOW cesssiassccsgetes 73° F/23° C Saturday 3:56 a 33 9-34 oa 04
f A Low: 67° F/19°C Normal high... ge a a I
” . Normal low 69° F/21° C
a _ eS @ WEST PALM BEACH Last year's High .....sseccsssscssssesssseeee serrzo°c | NYT TIM UCI
' ll High: 82° F/28° C Last year's lOW oeeceeeseesceeseeeeteeeeeees 64° F/18° C oa ae te os
“os Low: 67°FA9°C 5 Precipitation = ==———————i—SC—S—C——sSSnrise...... ‘41 a.m. Moonrise. .... ‘47 a.m.
i As of 2 p.m. yesterday ..ccccccccccccsssssseeeeeeeeen trace Sumset....... 7:36 p.m. Moonset... .. 5:24 p.m.
; FT. LAUDERDALE FREEPORT Year to date New First Full Last
High: 81° F/27° C @ High: 81° F/27°C Normal year to date... cececsesceeseeseenees 6.82" - na
Low: 67° F/19°C Low: 65° F/18°C a eo
AccuWeather.com al 5
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‘. MIAMI AccuWeather, Inc. ©2009 Apr. 24 May 1 May 9 May 17
High: 82° F/28° C EL ELT HERA
ee — Low:71°F/22°¢ NASSAU Low:70°F/21°C
High: 85° F/29° C ow:
Low: 72° F/22°C
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High: 80° F/27°C i High: 80° F/27° C
Low: 71° F/22°C Low:69°F/21°C
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GREAT EXUMA — SAN SALVADOR
— eee High: 85° F/29° C
ow:71° . Low: 74° °
ow: 74° F/23° C
Shown is today's weather. Temperatures are today's . ANDROS | , f
highs and tonights's lows. High: 86° F/30° C Pe, ~—
Low: 72° F/22°C —— li
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LONG ISLAND
isto
Low: 75° F/24°C
Today Thursday Today Thursday Today Thursday —< MAYAGUANA
High Low W High Low W High Low W High Low W High Low W High Low W K High: 88° F/31° C
Fic FIC Fic FC Fic FIC Fic FC FC FIC FIC FIC KW@® Low: 74° F/23°C
Albuquerque 80/26 51/10 pe 78/25 49/9 pc Indianapolis 60/15 38/8 pe 69/20 55/12 s Philadelphia 60/115 44/6 sh 63/17 44/6 pc
Anchorage 5110 34/1 s 51/10 36/2 s Jacksonville 80/26 55/12 s 85/29 60/15 s Phoenix 97/36 67/19 pc 93/83 67/19 s CROOKED ISLAND / ACKLINS
Atlanta 70/21 52/11 s 76/24 59/15 po Kansas City 77/25 53/11 s 76/24 6216 s Pittsburgh 48/8 35/1 sh 62/16 36/2 pe RAGGEDISLAND — Migh:89°F/s2°c
Atlantic City 58/14 39/3 sh 63/17 38/3 pc Las Vegas 95/35 65/18 pc 90/32 66/418 s Portland,OR 60/15 41/5 pe 56/13 415 pc High: 86° F/30° C Low: 78° F/26°C
Baltimore 60/15 40/4 sh 62/16 38/3 ¢ Little Rock 81/27 56/13 s 83/28 60/15 $s Raleigh-Durham 66/18 40/4 pc 72/22 45/7 s Low: 73°F/23°C
Boston 60/15 42/5 sh 6347 45/7 pec Los Angeles 78/25 58/14 po 72/22 56/13 pc St. Louis 68/20 50/10 s 76/24 62/16 s . a.
Buffalo 48/8 36/2 sh 51/0 38/3 pc Louisville 6417 45/7 pe 74/23 57/13 s Salt Lake City 77/25 55/12 s 78/25 49/9 c GREAT INAGUA
Charleston, SC 76/24 53/11 s 78/25 56/13 $s Memphis 75/23 58/14 s 82/27 63/17 pc San Antonio 89/31 63/17 §s 84/28 66/18 s High: 91° F/33°C
Chicago 52/11 35/1 pe 68/20 53/11 pc Miami 82/27 71/21 $s 84/28 71/21 s San Diego 68/20 58/14 pce 66/18 57/13 pc Low. 76°F/24°C
Cleveland 48/8 35/1 c 56/13 44/6 pc Minneapolis 60/15 46/7 §s 78/25 54/12 pe San Francisco 65/18 51/10 pce 57/13 48/8 pc .
Dallas 86/30 64/17 s 84/28 65/18 $s Nashville 69/20 47/8 pe 77/25 56/13 pc Seattle 5412 40/4 c 55/12 38/3 pe
Denver 75/23, 44/6 pe 80/26 45/7 s New Orleans 83/28 63/17 $s 83/28 62/16 s Tallahassee 80/26 57/13 s 87/30 57/13 s
Detroit 5010 344 c 61/16 44/6 pc New York 62/16 46/7 sh 62/16 50/10 pc Tampa 81/27 62/16 s 84/28 63/17 $s
Honolulu 81/27 68/20 pce 81/27 68/20 pc Oklahoma City 88/31 60/15 s 84/28 60/15 s Tucson 93/33 60/15 pce 90/82 60/15 s
Houston 84/28 62/16 s 82/27 64/17 $s Orlando 83/28 58/14 $s 86/30 62/16 s Washington,DC 62/16 41/5 sh 63/17 44/6 5s








a





Acapulco
Amsterdam
Ankara, Turkey
Athens
Auckland
Bangkok
Barbados
Barcelona
Beijing
Beirut
Belgrade
Berlin
Bermuda
Bogota
Brussels
Budapest
Buenos Aires
Cairo
Calcutta
Calgary
Cancun
Caracas
Casablanca
Copenhagen
Dublin
Frankfurt
Geneva
Halifax
Havana
Helsinki
Hong Kong
Islamabad
Istanbul
Jerusalem
Johannesburg
Kingston
Lima
London
Madrid
Manila
Mexico City
Monterrey
Montreal
Moscow
Munich
Nairobi
New Delhi
Oslo

Paris
Prague

Rio de Janeiro
Riyadh
Rome

St. Thomas
San Juan
San Salvador
Santiago
Santo Domingo
Sao Paulo
Seoul
Stockholm
Sydney
Taipei

Tokyo
Toronto
Trinidad
Vancouver
Vienna
Warsaw
Winnipeg

High
F/C
90/32
63/17
65/18
65/18
64/17
91/32
85/29
70/21
72/22
78/25
61/16
66/18
74/23
66/18
66/18
72/22
75/23
100/37
107/41
51/10
86/30
80/26
74/23
57/13
59/15
70/21
68/20
50/10
82/27
48/8
81/27
97/36
58/14
87/30
61/16
86/30
82/27
68/20
72/22
85/29
77/25
93/33
54/12
41/5
68/20
80/26
107/41
50/10
70/21
65/18
76/24
93/33
70/21
86/30
88/31
91/32
81/27
88/31
74/23
54/12
52/11
70/21
79/26
70/21
48/8
88/31
56/13
68/20
58/14
50/10

Til

Today

Low
F/C
73/22
43/6
44/6
54/12
49/9
78/25
75/23
56/13
46/7
67/19
46/7
44/6
66/18
47/8
43/6
49/9
59/15
63/17
82/27
25/-3
68/20
70/21
56/13
45/7
45/7
41/5
43/6
43/8
66/18
34/1
75/23
60/15
43/8
58/14
45/7
75/23
65/18
43/6
39/3
77/25
50/10
66/18
41/5
27/-2

INSURANCE MANAGEMENT

(BAHAMAS) LIMITED. INSURANCE BROKERS & AGENTS

OQ —- on
es —

naAnoT7T MN stSe TT eANM TTD OMAN NN
= i) > ooo = oO

oO

eS“ Ba’ e“a°’

2)
°

44/6 s

64/17

+

66/18 s

37/2
46/7
43/6
68/20
69/20
49/9
75/23
54/12
70/21
48/8
70/21
59/15
35/1
36/2
59/15
72/22
57/13
34/1
72/22
38/3
52/11
38/3
43/6

pc

High
F/C
90/32
59/15
58/14
63/17
63/17
94/34
85/29
69/20
59/15
68/20
66/18
63/17
70/21
65/18
63/17
63/17
77/25
80/26
107/41
30/-1
838/31
82/27
80/26
59/15
55/12
64/17
68/20
52/11
82/27
52/11
82/27
97/36
57/13
66/18
63/17
86/30
81/27
66/18
79/26
86/30
79/26
95/35
54/12
46/7
55/12
83/28
105/40
54/12
72/22
50/10
82/27
96/35
70/21
85/29
86/30
91/32
17/25
85/29
76/24
66/18
54/12
72/22
86/30
63/17
53/11
85/29
54/12
55/12
59/15
62/16

Thursday

Low
F/C
73/22
45/7
35/1
52/11
50/10
78/25
75/23
57/13
45/7
63/17
47/8
43/6
62/16
47/8
41/5
48/8
59/15
67/19
81/27
20/-6
69/20
70/21
58/14
46/7
43/6
39/3
37/2
40/4
66/18
36/2
77/25
61/16
44/6
53/11
45/7
75/23
63/17
45/7
43/6
77/25
49/9





Ww

pc
pc
t
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C
t
sh
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sh
pc
pc
pc
pc

=

=

Oo Bo BO ho eee ec ae o> ee
oO

+

Weather (W): s-sunny, pe-partly cloudy, e-cloudy, sh-showers, t-thunder-
storms, r-rain, sf-snow flurries, sn-snow, i-ice, Prcp-precipitation, Tr-trace

WEDNESDAY, APRIL 22np, 2009, PAGE 11B




MARINE FORECAST



WINDS WAVES VISIBILITY WATER TEMPS.
NASSAU Today: NW at 10-20 Knots 2-4 Feet 10-20 Miles 77°F
Thursday: — NE at 10-20 Knots 1-3 Feet 10-20 Miles 77°F
FREEPORT Today: NW at 10-20 Knots 2-4 Feet 10-20 Miles 77°F
Thursday: — NE at 10-20 Knots 1-3 Feet 10-20 Miles 77°F
ABACO Today: NW at 10-20 Knots 2-4 Feet 10-20 Miles 77°F
Thursday: NE at 10-20 Knots 1-3 Feet 10-20 Miles 77°F



-

On

Showers
EX XJ T-storms
Rain

Miami
82/71



eure Cold Fronts
mules Shown are noon positions of weather systems and ee
Snow precipitation. Temperature bands are highs for the day. Warm Mienflinfilie
Ice Forecast high/low temperatures are for selected cities. Stationary a
-10s| -0s [081] 10s 20s [308%] 40s









ik e mri

our
t us!

Lcomes to Auto Insurance,
miber the smart choice is
nee Management.
sople you can trust.

Never start
Cmeaine) Witho

he






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INSURANCE MANAGEMENT

(BAHAMAS) LIME. INSURANCE BROKERS & AGENTS

Naw Provider i a Abaco ae trum
Tet (AD) SOHO BD) SSG PETA) SoPHATO | Tek (TNT) SE0-D8K2 Tek (240) 134-2504











Dry Brea: BAAG celebrates _ ms
A hahamian 22 years \ ee
legend see page 10 \ air

see page nine

WEDNESDAY, APRIL 22, 2009

fp THE ENVIRONMENT

ad has had the most
~ _ significant impact

; on Franz Taylor’s

art pieces and

research.