Citation
The Tribune - Page 1

Material Information

Title:
The Tribune
Uniform Title:
Tribune (Nassau, Bahamas)
Portion of title:
Nassau tribune
Place of Publication:
Nassau, Bahamas
Publisher:
Tribune
Publication Date:
Copyright Date:
2009
Frequency:
Daily, except Sunday
daily
normalized irregular
Language:
English
Physical Description:
v. : ill. ; 58 cm.

Subjects

Genre:
newspaper ( sobekcm )
newspaper ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage:
Bahamas

Notes

General Note:
Description based on: Vol. 79, no. 210 (Aug. 3, 1983); title from caption.

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Holding Location:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
This item was contributed to the Digital Library of the Caribbean (dLOC) by the source institution listed in the metadata. This item may or may not be protected by copyright in the country where it was produced. Users of this work have responsibility for determining copyright status prior to reusing, publishing or reproducing this item for purposes other than what is allowed by applicable law, including any applicable international copyright treaty or fair use or fair dealing statutes, which dLOC partners have explicitly supported and endorsed. Any reuse of this item in excess of applicable copyright exceptions may require permission. dLOC would encourage users to contact the source institution directly or dloc@fiu.edu to request more information about copyright status or to provide additional information about the item.
Resource Identifier:
09994850 ( OCLC )

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Full Text
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Volume: 105 No.122






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Police identify latest
homicide victim, receive
reports high-powered
weapons were used

@ By NATARIO McKENZIE
Tribune Staff Reporter

POLICE have identified the
country’s latest homicide victim
as Marlon Javon Smith, 29, of
Pinewood Gardens who was
earlier charged in the Novem-
ber 2007 murder of accused hit-
man Samuel “Mouche’ McKen-
zie.

Smith was reportedly gunned
down in the back yard of his
Avocodo Street home shortly
after 1 am Sunday, raising the
country’s murder count to 22
for the year. Police had received
reports that high-powered
machine guns were used in
Smith’s murder but have yet to
confirm those reports.

“High powered weapons will
definitely be a concern for us,”
ASP Leon Bethel head of the
homicide division of the Cen-
tral Detective Unit said yester-
day.

“It is of grave concern
because we have already
increased our intelligence gath-
ering, trying to locate all types
of unlicensed firearms and get
them off the streets,” he said.

Police have launched an inten-
sive investigation into Smith’s
murder. ASP Bethel said yes-
terday that police have not yet
received any information to sug-
gest that Smith’s death is in any
way connected to McKenzie’s
murder.

Police received reports short-
ly after 1.15am Sunday, that
numerous gunshots were being
fired in or near Avocado Street,
Pinewood Gardens. According
to residents of the area Smith
had been sitting in a car near
his home on Avocado Street
when he was approached by
several persons in a gold
coloured Honda Accord. As he
got out of his vehicle, occupants
of the Accord fired several shots
at him and pursued him as he
ran to the back of his yard. The
gunmen continued to fire shots
at Smith before fleeing the
scene. Smith was found lying in
a low bushy area behind his
home with multiple gunshot
wounds about his body.

Police are also investigating
a Sunday afternoon shooting

SEE page eight

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BAHAMAS EDITION

www.tribune242.com

TUESDAY, APRIL 21, 2009

CARS FOR SALE,
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mit Clarke/Tribune staff



The Bahamas ‘must be careful’
in selecting trading partners

m@ By TANEKA itself in the process, for-
THOMPSON mer State Finance Minis-
Tribune Staff ter James Smith said.
Reporter Mr Smith, who served
tthompson@ as state finance minister

under the Christie
administration, also sup-
ported recent statements
made by Prime Minister
Hubert Ingraham regard-
ing the country's placement on
the current draft of the United

SEE page eight

tribunemedia.net

WHILE the country a
strives to meet interna- [Rf easiii
tional standards for tax
information exchange agree-
ments (TIEA) and transparen-
cy it must selectively choose
new partners and not harm



Sentencing of Dwight
Major is rescheduled

THE sentencing of drug convict Dwight Major has been
rescheduled, The Tribune has learned.

Major’s US attorney Troy Ferguson confirmed yesterday
that his client’s sentencing has been rescheduled to June 19.
Major 40, pleaded guilty last October to charges of conspiracy

SEE page eight



SHERVIN STUBBS arrives
at court yesterday.

@ By NATARIO
McKENZIE
Tribune Staff

Reporter



A 20-YEAR-OLD man
of Yellow Elder Gardens
accused of the shooting
death of Kendall Wallace
Jr who was gunned down
in West Bay Street last
week, was arraigned in
Magistrate’s Court yester-
day.

Police have charged
Shervin Stubbs of Old
Cedar Street, Yellow Elder
Gardens, with Wallace’s
murder. Wallace, 27, of
Nassau Village, was report-
edly gunned down during a
dispute with a group of
men in West Bay Street
last Tuesday. He was the
country’s 19th homicide
victim of the year.

Stubbs, who is repre-
sented by attorneys
Romauld Ferreira and
Michael Kemp was
arraigned before Magis-
trate Guillimina Archer in
Court 10, Nassau Street
yesterday on the murder

SEE page eight

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Almost $1m
worth of
illegal drugs
captured

@ By DENISE
MAYCOCK
Tribune Freeport
Reporter
dmaycock@
tribunemedia.net

FREEPORT - Local
and US drug enforce-
ment officials captured
almost one million dol-
lars worth of illegal
drugs when they discov-
ered three suspected
marijuana fields on
Grand Bahama yester-
day around noon.

Asst Supt Welbourne
Bootle, press liaison
officer, reported that the
fields were discovered
among bushes in the
Hunters area.

The estimated street
value of the illegal drugs
is $900,000.

ASP Bootle said
Bahamian Drug
Enforcement Unit offi-
cers, assisted by Drug
Enforcement Agency
(DEA) officers, acting
on information, went to
a bushy area east of
Grobola Restaurant and
Bar in Hunters.

He said the fields
were located some 500
to 600 yards in the bush-
es. The first field, which

SEE page eight



Challenge of judge’s
refusal to step down
from case underway

m@ By MEGAN REYNOLDS
Tribune Staff Reporter
mreynolds @tribunemedia.net

THE APPEAL court chal-
lenge of Senior Justice Anita
Allen’s refusal to step down
from a civil case opened yes-
terday with allegations that
the Supreme Court judge was
the first to suggest her own
recusal.

Justice Allen refused to step
down from the case involving
Israeli brothers Rami and
Amir Weissfisch last month
after she voiced concerns
about the integrity of a foren-
sic accounting report prepared
by Daniel Ferguson.

Ferguson was appointed by
Senior Justice Lyons before
the case was transferred to
Justice Allen in September
2008, and is reportedly the
brother of a close female
friend of Justice Lyons.

Under Justice Allen, Mr
Scott and Alan Steinfeld, QC,
representing Amir Weissfisch
claimed the appointment of

SEE page eight





PAGE 2, TUESDAY, APRIL 21, 2009

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Benny



Healthcare is evolving :: Follow the dots.

THE TRIBUNE





LOCAL NEWS

Motorists fume as film crew
work on US reality TV show

MOTORISTS on Bay Street
were delayed yesterday morning
as police diverted traffic to
accommodate a film crew work-
ing on a new American reality
television show.

“Superstars” pairs up celebri-
ties and professional athletes to
compete in various sporting chal-
lenges for a grand prize.

Kerzner International recent-
ly paid a “seven digit figure” to
have television network ABC
film the primetime show at the
resort and surrounding area as
part of its strategy to further raise
the property’s profile in the US
market and boost arrivals.

But while the resort’s execu-
tives have heralded the deal to
bring the show to the Bahamas

as a major win for tourism, Mon-
day morning motorists did not
seem very enthusiastic about traf-
fic drawing to a standstill.

Problem

One driver, who asked not to
be named, said he ran into traffic
near Rawson Square shortly after
10am. Turning off Bay Street
onto Victoria Avenue and
Dowdeswell Street in an attempt
to avoid the worst of it, the driver
said he ended up joining another
long line, as traffic was backed
up there too.

Another said: “Morning traf-
fic is always a problem nowadays,
but I didn’t expect it to be this
bad or last this long. If they knew

they would have to re-route traf-
fic, somebody should’ve put a
notice in the paper or something.”

However according to Atlantis,
the back-up was the result of an
unexpected delay in filming the
road race segment of Superstars.

“This was not anticipated and
hence impact on traffic was not
foreseen,” said the company in a
statement. “We do not anticipate
any further impact on traffic flow-
ing due to shooting of the Super-
stars.” Inspector Anthony Cur-
tis, second in command of the
police’s Traffic Division, said offi-
cers diverted traffic from Bay
Street onto Armstrong Street for
about half an hour beginning at
around 9am. He acknowledged
that this contributed to the traffic.

‘Go out and become a role model’

Twenty-seven

eraduate from
National Youth
Service Restorative
Programme in
Andros

Eric Rose





m By ERIC ROSE

NORTH ANDROS - Perma-
nent Secretary of the Ministry of
Youth, Sports and Culture,
Archie Nairn told the 27 gradu-
ates of the National Youth Ser-
vice Restorative Programme that
life is full of choices, and the
choices that they make today will
determine the kind of person they
will become tomorrow.

“You will have to determine
your own destiny, for you can
now go out and become a role
model or you can become a threat
to social society,” he said.

“My wish is that you would all
become educated, productive cit-
izens — for, more than ever, the
Bahamas is in need of young men
who are upright and focused.”

Mr Nairn was the keynote
speaker at the passing-out cere-
mony of the Character Leader-
ship Development and Skills
Training Academy Restorative
Programme for Boys (the Ado-
lescent Development Pro-
gramme), in North Andros.

Positive

The initiative was designed to
be a positive intervention in the
lives of at-risk young men from
challenging backgrounds.

Mr Nairn said the programme
offered at the facility has several
components; all geared towards
making the graduates become
better persons.

“We believe the basic educa-
tional concept will assist you in
staying relevant to the changing
society in which you will now find
yourselves,” he said. “You have
been provided the opportunity to
increase your knowledge base
and, for your part, we wanted to
be sure that a standard level of
literacy was achieved.”

Mr Nairn said the Ministry of
Youth, Sports and Culture is
extremely grateful to the Catholic
Church and the YEAST (Youth
Empowerment and Skills Train-
ing) programme for facilitating
the project through a “unique
partnership” which has brought
relief to many young men in soci-
ety over the past several years.

“This kind of initiative can only

Schuhe,

ecru.

SUPERDEATH



MEMBERS of the
National Youth
Service Restora-
tive Programme
Class of 2009 pre-
sent colours at the
passing out cere-
mony of the Char-
acter Leadership
Development and
Skills Training
Academy Restora-
tive Programme
for Boys in North
Andros.



PERMANENT SECRETARY at the
Ministry of Youth, Sports and Cul-
ture, Archie Nairn speaks to the grad-
uates.

be successful if there is a shared
vision and a common resolve to
make a difference among the
young men in our communities,”
he said. “In particular, I wish to
recognise the sterling efforts of
Deacon Jeffrey Lloyd, who has
been the real driving force behind
this programme.”

Mr Nairn explained that the
Ministry of Youth, Sports and
Culture also offers a Self Starter
Programme to young persons
who are prepared to venture out
in the field of business on a small
scale. The programme, he added,
allows them to start their own
businesses and learn marketing
and management skills in the
process.

He said it is an opportunity that
the graduates should embrace as
the programme promotes inde-
pendence, self-reliance and an
ability to interact with the public.

“Additionally, and just as
important, is the Fresh Start Pro-
gramme, which is really the next
phase of this programme which
you have just completed,” Mr
Nairn said. “This phase involves
assistance from the relevant offi-
cers from my ministry, who will
help you through the next step as
mentors — all I ask is that you lis-
ten and learn as the officers work
with you step by step.”

The permanent secretary said
he implores the graduates to work
towards meaningful social rein-
tegration.

“Join positive community
groups. Improve your self-image
and gain a sense of accomplish-
ment,” he said.

“Face your problems and chal-
lenges optimistically and embrace
the support and guidance of our
mentors.”



THE TRIBUNE

TUESDAY, APRIL 21, 2009, PAGE 3



LOCAL NEWS



._- | FIFTH SUMMIT OF THE AMERICAS
0 In brief

Caribbean leaders seek drug fight funds

Plea for US Congressmen to extend $1.4 billion initiative to the region

Man, 28, dies
in apparent
hike accident

A young man lost his life in
Cat Island on Saturday in an
apparent motorbike accident.

The 28-year-old Dean’s resi-
dent — identified as Renardo
Hall — was pronounced dead at
the local clinic in Smith’s Bay.

He is the country’s 22nd traf-
fic fatality. Police were called to
the site of the crash in New
Bight, Cat Island, at 7.30pm.

There they found a blue and
white 2005 model 900 Yamaha
LP25 motorbike in the bushes.
It had sustained extensive dam-
age.

The rider had already been
taken to the local clinic when
police arrived at the scene.

Investigations are continuing
into the incident, conducted by
local police with assistance from
New Providence-based officers.

Police appeal
for help over
discovery of
two bodies

POLICE are urging anyone
with information about the two
bodies found at separate loca-
tions over the weekend to come
forward.

The decomposed body of
man was found in a small wood-
en structure on Baillou Hill
Road just after 8am on Sunday.

The small house is located
behind some homes on Laird
Street.

Police have labelled the case
as a suspicious death.

Just a few hours after this dis-
covery, a fishermen alerted
authorities to the naked body of
an unidentified man floating in
the water off Arawak Cay.

Police said that in both cases,
they need the public’s help in
determining the manner of
death and the identity of the
victims.

RBDF looks for
missing cruise
passenger

THE Royal Bahamas
Defence Force is working with
the US Coast Guard in the
search for a man missing at sea
since early Saturday morning.

After receiving information
that a passenger of the cruise
liner “Norwegian Sky” had fall-
en overboard at 3am on April
18, the operations department
of the Defence Force dis-
patched a vessel to assist the
Coast Guard in the search.

The incident occurred about
14 miles north east of Great
Sturrup Cay in the Exumas.

Prohe into sex
misconduct
allegation
continuing

m By DENISE MAYCOCK
Tribune Freeport Reporter
dmaycock@tribunemedia.net

FREEPORT - Police say they
have not yet completed investi-
gations into the allegations of sex-
ual misconduct which have been
made against a female teacher at
the Eight Mile Rock High School.

Supt Wendell Deveaux told
reporters on Sunday that police
are still “actively investigating”
the matter. When asked why the
inquiry was taking so long, he
said: “It is a matter of conducting
inquiries and getting additional
information for evidence.”

It has been a little over a
month since the teacher was
removed from the school, after
being accused of having sexual
relations with a male student.

Two male teachers at the
school are also accused of having
sex with students.

Police are still searching for
Andre Birbal, a Trinidadian
teacher who is wanted for ques-
tioning in connection with the
alleged molestation of two for-
mer male students.

The Bahamas Union of Teach-
ers (BUT) has expressed concern
about the allegations. Quentin
LaRhoda, BUT area vice presi-
dent, stressed that the union does
not encourage sexual relations
between teachers and students, it
is also worried that its members
may be subject to false accusa-
tions.

In the wake of the claims, the
Ministry of Education announced
plans to have all new teachers
vetted by the police.

The ministry said it also plans
to create safety committees in
schools that will be made up of
teachers, students, parents and
administration staff.

CARIBBEAN leaders at the
Fifth Summit of the Americas
asked United States Congress-
men if a $1.4 billion initiative to
help Central America and Mexi-
co fight drug trafficking and
organised crime could be extend-
ed to provide funds to countries
in this region who worry they may
experience a dangerous knock-
on effect.

Guyanese President Bharrat
Jagdeo said Caribbean presidents
and prime ministers told US law-
makers at the Summit in Trinidad
that a crackdown in nearby Mex-
ico could boost drug trafficking
in the Caribbean, with more crim-
inals pushed into the region,
which lies between producer
countries in South America and
the United States.

The $1.4 billion Merida initia-
tive was announced by United
States President Obama during
his visit to Mexico in the days pri-
or to the Summit of the Americas
in Port of Spain, Trinidad, which
extended from Friday to Sunday.

Caribbean leaders’ call to Con-
gressmen on the anti-drug initia-
tive came on Saturday, the day
after a one-hour meeting with Mr
Obama himself.

Economic aid, drug and gun
smuggling, as well as the lifting
of the trade embargo on Cuba,
the problems the region will face
if offshore financial services are to
be targeted by the US govern-
ment and the problems caused by
deportees from the United States
to the Caribbean had all been
raised in the course of discussions
with Mr Obama which took place
late Friday night.

Prime Minister Hubert Ingra-
ham and other leaders said Mr
Obama, who was accompanied
to the meeting by Secretary of
State Hillary Clinton, was very
engaged and expressed hope that
greater ties would be established.

While further talks are antici-
pated, the US president has
already committed the US to pro-
viding $30 million towards
improving security in the
Caribbean region.

“The US is not lecturing us
anymore, but rather listening,”
said Bharrat Jagdeo. “They need



PRIME MINISTER Hubert Ingraham is pictured at right as leaders of
the 34 democratic countries in the Organisation of American States
(OAS) prepare to assemble for a group photo at the 5th Summit of the
Americas, Port of Spain, Trinidad on Saturday, April 18.



UNITED States President Barack Obama addresses reporters prior to
the commencement of bilateral talks between the United States and the
Caribbean Community (CARICOM) as US Secretary of State Hillary
Clinton (right) looks on at the summit on Friday, April 17.

to listen, and that is what we got.”

Meanwhile, Mr Jagdeo added
that, as the CARICOM repre-
sentative chosen by the 15-mem-
ber regional group to lead its dis-
cussions with the US president,
he also spoke extensively with Mr
Obama about the need for the
US government to understand the
peculiarities of Caribbean soci-
eties compared with those in oth-
er regions.

He said a failure by past US
administrations to recognise these
differences has led to policies
developed for other regions being
imposed on the Caribbean, cre-
ating many problems.

Meanwhile, the Guyanese leader
also proposed how the US can
help to fashion international
financial institutions to be more
responsive to the needs of the
region. “We argued for a more
practical type of reform,” said Mr
Jagdeo. Mr Jagdeo said the Port
of Spain Summit was different
from previous meetings, due to
“Obama’s presence, the historic
opportunity his administration
now presents for a changed rela-
tionship” with the region.
Caribbean leaders expressed
hope that talks would continue
in a second round of meetings in
Washington later this year.

Police release list of 2009’s
most wanted murder suspects

POLICE yesterday released
their list of the most wanted mur-
der suspects for 2009. The list is
made up of nine men, ranging in
age from 18 to 44.

The majority of the murders,
for which they are wanted for
questioning, occurred within the
past four years, while one case is
more than 15 years old.

Police want to question 18-
year-old Mario Brown in con-
nection with the 2008 murder of
Corey Whymms, who was shot
and killed on Adderley Street.
Police also want to question him
about the 2008 murder of
Kendrick Rolle, who was shot
and killed in Fox Hill.

David St Remy is wanted for
questioning in connection with
the 2007 murder of Ryan Wood,
who was shot and killed at Red-
wood Lane in Grand Bahama.

Christie Charlton, 44, the oldest
person on the list, is wanted for
questioning in connection with
the oldest case on the list: the
1993 murder of Pamela Eyma
who was found dead on Glad-
stone Road.

Carlos Gerve, alias Graves, is
wanted for questioning in rela-
tion to the 2006 murder of Gerald
Joseph who was stabbed to death
at the International Bazaar in
Grand Bahama.

Jamaal Bastian, alias Smokey,
is being sought for questioning in
connection with the 2009 murder
of Gentry McPhee who was shot
and killed at Arawak Cay.

Police want to question
Michael Gibson in connection
with the 2008 murder of Jodie

Correction

In an article in The Tribune
last week, under the headline,
“Magistrate alleged to have
collected fines without giving
record on payment” it was
incorrectly stated that: “The
cashier assigned to the magis-
trate’s court in Freeport...
said that Magistrate Swain
only paid the sum of $4000 to
the court.”

That sentence should have
read: “The cashier alleged
that the prosecutor for Mag-
istrate Swain's Court, Police
Sergeant 1611 Kirklyn
Wright (not Magistrate
Swain) paid the $4,000 fine
to her.”

The Tribune apologises for
any inconvenience this error
may have caused.



Deveaux-Smith who was stabbed
to death on East Sunrise High-
way, Grand Bahama.

Kelly Mitchell is being sought
for questioning by the police in
relation to the 2008 murder of
Peter Andrew Collie, who was
shot and killed on Elizabeth
Avenue.

Lavardo Simmons is being
sought for questioning about the
murder of Archange Augustine,
who was shot and killed on Key
West Street. He is also being
sought for questioning in con-
nection with the murder of Erison
Tanelus, who was shot and killed
at Eight Mile Rock.

Earle Beneby is wanted for
questioning in the 2006 murder



of Kemuel Hepburn II, who was
shot and killed on West Bay
Street.

All of these men are believed
to be armed and dangerous. Any-
one with information regarding
the whereabouts of these suspects
are asked to contact the police
emergency line at 911/919, CDU
at 502-9930/9991 or the Police
Control Room at 322-3333.

FOR 3 IN 1 LAWN SERVICE
Fertilizer, Fungicide,
SYA OTE)
Ue CU rey
322-2157





) a
PRIME Minister Hubert Ingraham, (far left) and United States President
Barack Obama (far right) share a light moment with leaders of the
Caribbean Community (CARICOM) prior to the commencement of bilat-
eral talks between the United States and Caricom on Friday, April 17.

PHOTOS: Sharon Turner/BIS Photos

KA









oLong Hot Summer
in a Beautiful
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PAGE 4, TUESDAY, APRIL 21, 2009

EDITORIAL/LETTERS TO THE EDITOR

THE TRIBUNE





The Tribune Limited

NULLIUS ADDICTUS JURARE IN VERBA MAGISTRI
Being Bound to Swear to The Dogmas of No Master

LEON E. H. DUPUCH, Publisher/Editor 1903-1914

SIR ETIENNE DUPUCH, Kt, O.B.E., K.M., K.C.S.G.,

(Hon.) LL.D., D.Litt.

Publisher/Editor 1919-1972
Contributing Editor 1972-199]

EILEEN DUPUCH CARRON, C.M.G., M.S. B.A., LL.B.

Publisher/Editor 1972-

Published Daily Monday to Saturday

Shirley Street, RO. Box N-3207, Nassau, Bahamas
Insurance Management Building., P.O. F-485, Freeport, Grand Bahama

TELEPHONES
Switchboard (News, Circulation and Advertising) 322-1986
Advertising Manager - (242) 502-2352
Circulation Department - (242) 502-2387
Nassau Fax: - (242) 328-2398

WEBSITE
www.tribune242.com — updated daily at 2pm

A way to help stop the killing

POLICE ARE urging anyone with any
knowledge of who killed 29-year-old Marlon
Smith of Pinewood Gardens early Sunday
morning to come forward with their informa-
tion.

Smith was one of three men released by the
court in late January for insufficient evidence in
the 2007 shooting death of Samuel “Mouche”
McKenzie, described as the “terror of East
Street.”

By Sunday afternoon a man in his mid-twen-
ties, standing outside his Garden Hills home
was shot at by two men in a passing car. He
received a flesh wound in his left leg. Police
are uncertain whether this last shooting was in
any way connected with the killing of Smith
earlier the same morning. However, they believe
it might have been.

There is also grave concern about the firearm
used to kill Smith. Those who saw his body —
they claim the top of his head was blown off —
are convinced that an AK47 rifle was the mur-
der weapon. The police have not confirmed
this.

However, police officers were in the
Pinewood area most of Sunday night investi-
gating the killing. As a result several persons
were taken in for questioning.

Police have not connected the two murders
and the Sunday afternoon shooting that result-
ed in a leg wound, but certain members of the
public have. According to street talk — and if
any of these persons have personal knowledge
of what they are saying they are urged to go to
the police — Smith was killed because the courts
released him from a murder charge that they are
convinced he should have faced in the death
of “Mouche” McKenzie. As for the man shot in
the leg on the same day, again according to
street talk, he was to be eliminated in retaliation
for Smith’s death.

The police are working overtime on these
cases, because although they are not saying so,
they obviously see a vicious circle of retaliatory
violence being unleashed. They are trying to
stop any further bloodshed. This is where per-
sons who have information can help by calling
the anonymous hotline —328-8477 — and leav-
ing their tip, but not their identity.

In November 2007 two men, both with crim-
inal records, were standing at 9 o’clock on a
Thursday morning on Wilson Street off Hay
Street when a passing car gunned them down.
According to police they were sprayed with
bullets from a “high calibre” firearm. One was
seriously injured, but survived. The second,
Samuel “Mouche” McKenzie, 35, died of his
wounds.















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“Mouche” not only had a checkered record,
he had a brutal record, and there are those
today who say they feel safer because “Mouche”
is no longer stalking East Street. At the time of
his death he was facing charges of murder,
attempted murder, assault of a police officer,
attempted escape, causing damage to a Cen-
tral Police Station holding cell, and multiple
other charges. At the time of his death the Pros-
ecutor in the Attorney General’s office told
The Tribune that his office was still compiling
the files on those “multiple other charges.”

In all he had four murder charges and one
attempted murder charge to face in the courts.
He had earned his reputation as a “hit man.” If
“Mouche” had been in jail where he should
have been, he would still be alive today. Instead
he was out on bail — still the “terror of East
Street.” His enemies, instead of the state, exe-
cuted him. And, Sunday morning’s murder and
Sunday afternoon’s attempted murder are
believed to be the fallout from Mouche’s death.
The police are now trying to prevent further
bloodshed.

Also of great concern is the murder weapon.
An AK47 rifle — if indeed it was the murder
weapon as claimed — is a high powered assault
rifle used by the military.

It is frightening to think that even one of
these could be on our streets. But in fact they do
make their way in through the drug under-
ground.

There have been instances of persons buying
as many as 50 weapons for shipment to the
Bahamas. Although the US claims to have laws
restricting purchase of firearms, there is no dif-
ficulty in walking into a pawn shop, or the free
market on the Atlanta seaboard and making a
selection of whatever weapon you want.

It has been found that purchases have been
made through Bahamians with legal status in the
US who often buy firearms for their buddies in
the Bahamas.

The guns can be sneaked in anywhere along
the Bahamas’ chain of islands.

However, our police, working closely with
the gun tracing system of Homeland Security,
have been able to intercept gun shipments to the
Bahamas.

It was through this intelligence that Bahami-
an police were able to block a large shipment of
guns consigned to the Bahamas not so long ago.

The police are faced with a daunting task.
The only way that our communities will be safe
is if they have the full cooperation of this coun-
try’s citizens.

So, please go to the phone and dial 328-8477.
Your identity will never be known.



BAHAMAS,

NOW
IN STOCK!

‘01 TOYOTA CAMRY

‘01 HYUNDAI COUPE
‘04 HYUNDAI SANTA FE

Disgusted by
Western Air’s

customer
service

LETTERS

EDITOR, The Tribune.

Allow me to express my dis-
gust about the poor customer
service within the service indus-
try in this country with regard to
Western Air Airline. I had
scheduled a flight to Freeport,
Grand Bahama on Western Air
for one day leaving Nassau at
8am to depart Freeport at 6pm.
At approximately 9.30am the
flight was called and all passen-
gers were asked to wait outside
of the departure gate to be
escorted to the plane. From the
time of check in to the first call
at 9.30am, there were no
announcements made about the
status of the scheduled flight,
and when questions were put
forth to Western Air employ-
ees, no one was able to give a
definitive answer about the
flight. After about 20 minutes of
waiting in the hot sun, we were
asked to return to the depar-
ture lounge. There was no rea-
son given for this. Once back
inside the terminal, all Western
Air staff disappeared from the
departure area without having
the decency to update its pas-
sengers about the status of the
flight or explain the situation.
So we waited and waited for
another hour until my colleague
and I grew tired of waiting and

letters@tribunemedia net



returned to the check-in counter
to ask for a refund. This is when
we were told that the flight was
now boarding, two hours late
and absolutely no announce-
ments or updates on the status
of the flight or when they
expected the flight to depart.
We checked in at about
5.30pm for our return flight to
Nassau. Because of our morn-
ing experience I asked the agent
at the counter if the flight was
on time...she said it wasn’t. I
then asked if she knew how
much later it would be. She stat-
ed that at 6pm they would give
an update. This never hap-
pened. Again no form of cus-
tomer service or courtesy was
shown to the passengers who
paid to travel on that airline.
Six o’clock came and went, so
did 7pm, 8pm, 9pm, 10pm and
1ipm. One of the agents finally
said something to a passenger
after being questioned that the
flight was in route and should
land in a few minutes. Bear in
mind that this information was
communicated to one passen-
ger who shared it with the rest

of us. At approximately
11.30pm we finally boarded the
flight on Pineapple Air to
return to Nassau.

Now this was my very first
time utilizing this airline but rest
assured Mr Owner of Western
Air I will never use your airline
ever again. This first impression
will surely be a lasting one and
I will discourage anyone I can
from using your airline services.
Your staff customer service lev-
el is way below the bar and as a
businessman in a service-ori-
ented industry you ought to
ensure that you invest in your
staff so that they are trained in
delivering supreme service no
matter the situation. I have
heard similar stories of this
nature and now that I have
experienced it for myself I have
to make it public. Say what you
like about Bahamasair with all
their internal issues and con-
stant delays, you know that no
matter what they will always
keep their passengers informed
about the status of their flight
regardless.

Thank you for the opportu-
nity to share my experience.

T SAUNDERS
Nassau,
April, 2009.

Angered by diabetic woman’s claim

EDITOR, The Tribune.

Tam extremely angry and agi-
tated by such a horrific accusa-
tion and allegation that was cur-
rently rumoured and circulated
in our media houses by a
woman who is traumatised by a
grievous diabetic ailment. I have
no idea who this lady is but it is
a sad and disturbing tragedy if
her claim is truthful.

Bahamas, this matter is far
beyond the accuser and the
accused. Adults are not the only
victims of this devastating dis-
ease; infants and children are
also recipients of this illness
(diabetes). Therefore diabetic
remedies and medications are
distributed for minors as well,
and if these minors were given
out dated medications the
effects may have been more life
threatening than this lady’s.
Imagine if this was a loved one,
family member, colleague or

NOTICE

NOTICE is hereby given that BRIAN RAMAISH SARJUDAS
of SEABREEZE ESTATES, P.O. BOX N-9505, NASSAU,
is applying to the Minister
Nationality and Citizenship, for registration/naturalization as a

responsible for

citizen of The Bahamas, and that any person who knows any
reason why registration/naturalization should not be granted,
should send a written and signed statement of the facts within
twenty-eight days from the 14 day of April, 2009 to the
Minister responsible for nationality and Citizenship, P.O. Box
N-7147, Nassau, Bahamas.



friend; imagine you being an
employee at a local hospital,
clinic, The Ministry of Health
or The Public Hospital Author-
ity, how would feel if your co-
worker issued you a disastrous
prescription drug?

In the early 1980’s Tylenol
had a major crisis, when I say
major I mean major. An indi-
vidual or a group of people
maliciously replaced Tylenol
capsules with cyanide-laced cap-
sules, resealed the packages and
replaced them on shelves for
distribution. As a result of this
evil, approximately ten people
died in the Chicago, [linois
area.

The Tylenol Company was
relentless in preventing the
death of other individuals.
Through their pubic relations
team and other media channels
they warned the nation to dis-
continue the use of their
Tylenol products until detailed
investigations and solutions
were concluded.

Due to the crisis, Tylenol
paved the way through innova-
tions to help secure its product
in the future, through imple-
menting a triple sealed packag-
ing procedure.

Tylenol regained its market
share after the whole ordeal was
cleaned.

Tylenol placed people over
product and money by admit-
ting to the problem at hand;

they fixed the issue and as a
result of their strategies they
regained the public’s trust and
repositioned themselves as a
leader in over the counter
drugs.

So you administrators at the
Elizabeth Estate clinic, the Min-
istry of Health and the Public
Hospital Authority who are
responsible for this alleged
wrong doing should look into
the matter with sincerity, apol-
ogise if this incident is truthful
and take the necessary steps to
ensure the public’s health, safe-
ty and to encourage quality ser-
vice.

To the alleged victim, your
argument may seem trivial to
some, probably because your
complaint is legitimate and peo-
ple, especially in the Bahamas,
seem to cover up the truth at
all costs.

My dear, if your claim is true,
I am truly disgusted and I
emphatically say to you: be
strong, be encouraged and fight
for what is right. Let us take
our country back. Adolf Hitler
may be classified as an evil man
based on the history books, but
he once said “pacifism is sim-
ply a disguise for cowardice.”
Good morning, Bahamas.

ELKIN
SUTHERLAND Jr
Nassau,

April 15, 2009.

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AUTHORIZED
ROM ROL TURER





THE TRIBUNE

TUESDAY, APRIL 21, 2009, PAGE 5



LOCAL NEWS



Donated computers
on way to Inagua
All-Age School

m@ By BETTY VEDRINE

FIFTEEN new comput-
ers donated by Rohm and
Haas, the parent company

of Morton Salt, through the

Bahamas Red Cross Soci-
ety are on their way to the
Inagua All-Age School.

The company made a
specific request when it
presented its donation,
director general of the
Bahamas Red Cross Kim
Sawyer said at a press con-
ference on Wednesday at
the organisation’s head-
quarters.

“Out of concern for the

local community, the Rohm

and Haas Company made a
donation to the Bahamas
Red Cross in October 2008,
to be used specifically for
the great island of Inagua,”
Ms Sawyer said.

In September 2008, Hur-
ricane Ike, a category four
hurricane, destroyed much
of the island and disrupted

schooling for many children

who were unable to attend
classes for weeks.

But Ms Sawyer said, “due
to the resilience of the local :
community, lives have been }

restored and the communi-
ty has returned to normal-
Cc a

She added that through
the efforts of local and
international partners, the
Bahamas Red Cross was
able to respond with relief
items, including food
parcels, hygiene kits,
kitchen sets, tarpaulins,

blankets, mosquito nets and :

water.

Experience

It was decided that dona-
tions from the Rohm and
Haas Company would go
towards enhancing the
learning experience for
children on the island by
purchasing computers and
audio-visual equipment.

Principal of the Inagua
All-Age School Christine
Williamson, who received
the donation on behalf of
the school, said the com-
puters would be put to
good use.

“We are very pleased to

be receiving this gift, as this

will further improve the

existing facility that we

have,” Ms Williamson said.
The computers will be

used in both the classrooms

and the computer lab, she
said.

Besides the computers,
the school will also receive
three printers, two InFocus
projectors, 14 whiteboards
and two Promethean
Activboards and Activotes.

Director of Education
Lionel Sands also
expressed gratitude for the
donation.

Mr Sands said the equip-
ment will be beneficial to
both students and teachers.

“One of the things that
we have found is that our
children learn so much bet-
ter when they use the tech-
nology that we were not so
used to when we were
growing. And one such
technology is the interac-
tive whiteboard,” he said.

Mr Sands said the white-
board is a tool that
enhances learning toa

greater degree than systems

used previously.
A whiteboard is a large

interactive display that con-

nects to a computer and
projector. A computer’s
desktop is projected onto
the board’s surface, where
users control the computer
using a pen, finger or other
device.

“These are tools that
would benefit both our

children and teachers great-

ly and so we are very
appreciative of it and we
thank the Morton Salt
Company for this generous
donation,” Mr Sands said.
Also present at the cere-
mony were Brendon Wat-
son, executive member of
the Bahamas Red Cross.
and Joel Lewis, district
education officer.

Hopes that passport office
crowds will be reduced

@ By ALISON LOWE
Tribune Staff Reporter
alowe@tribunemedia.net

FOLLOWING complaints
that applicants were forced to
queue outside the Passport
Office for hours on end last
week, the minister responsi-
ble for the facility yesterday
expressed hope that crowds
would be reduced as of today
as officials adjust the applica-
tion process.

However, Minister of For-
eign Affairs Brent Symonette
emphasised that this will not
minimise the amount of time
it takes for an applicant to
receive their e-passport once
they have put in their appli-
cation, and added that any fur-
ther steps towards reducing
waiting times at the office can-
not be implemented until the
department gets more office
space.

Last week MP for Fox Hill
and former minister of foreign
affairs, Fred Mitchell, held a
press conference at the Pass-

lems at the office sufficient
attention.

He decried the length of
time applicants were being
forced to wait outside the
building without water or san-
itary facilities and alleged that
some individuals are having
to wait up to four months to
receive their passports after

applying.
Parents

Mr Mitchell suggested that
it was unfortunate that par-
ents who had taken time off
work during midterm break
to bring their children to apply
were not being served “in a
timely manner”, while others
present complained that they
had travelled from the Family
Islands only to find that they
could not complete the appli-
cation process that day.

The Fox Hill MP suggested
the government must “buy
machines for data entry, for
printing and hire some more
people.”

port Office in New Providence
where he accused Mr Symon-
ette of not giving the prob-

Construction of subdivision
is underway at Hawksbill

@ By DENISE MAYCOCK
Tribune Freeport Reporter
dmaycock@tribunemedia.net

Mr Symonette yesterday
confirmed that the New Prov-

FREEPORT - The construction
of a new government subdivision is
underway at Hawksbill where some
50 houses are being built for those
residents who lost their homes dur-
ing Hurricane Wilma.

However, many of those affected
are unable to meet the requirements }
to qualify for one of the new homes.

Minister of Housing Kenneth
Russell met with the residents of
Pinder’s Point, Hunters, Mack
Town, Lewis Yard and Seaco Town
on Friday evening at the Upper
Zion Baptist Church in Pinder’s
Point.

He announced that the new sub-
division, renamed Sister Mary
Patricia (Russell) Estates, will con-
sist of a total of 210 low-income
houses. He said construction started
on the first 50 houses four months ago.

While the Bahamas Mortgage Corporation has relaxed qualifications
by lowering down payment requirements for applicants in the affect-
ed areas, residents still raised concerns about having first preference to
the houses.

Minister Russell stressed that while the new subdivision was built
with them in mind, they must qualify like everyone else.

“There is a problem with persons who want homes qualifying. The
problem is whether the people we want to help could qualify,” he
said.

In 2005, Hurricane Wilma, a category five storm, caused major dev-
astation along the southwest coast of the island. Settlements from
Mack Town to Pinder’s Point, as well as Eight Mile Rock and West End
were underwater and many homes were destroyed and damaged.

Subdivision

After the storm, the government announced plans to build a new sub-
division for the relocation of residents from low-lying areas to safer
ground. The Grand Bahama Port Authority donated land in Hawksbill
for the development of a new government subdivision.

So far, 10 persons have been approved for houses in the new sub-
division. However, many persons in the affected areas are having
problems meeting the qualifications.

“My understanding is that a number of persons who were affected
have since built new houses of their own, but we still have residents out
here in mind as to first preference.

“They still have to qualify for the houses as everyone else and we will
work with them as best we can,” said Mr Russell.

He noted that interest in the homes is very high and persons from
elsewhere on Grand Bahama are also making applications for houses
in the new subdivision.

Minister Russell stressed that once the houses are completed, they
cannot be left unoccupied for long periods of time while persons qual-
ify for loans from the Mortgage Corporation.

Noting that applications have been made by teachers, policemen,
Customs officers and other public service workers, he explained that the
government would like to see civil servants make up 10 per cent of the
subdivision’s residents.

“T hope that more persons from Pinder’s Point, Lewis Yard, Mack
Town, Hunters and Seaco Town apply and come forward and see
how we can fit them in this first batch of houses,” he said.

Minister Russell said some of the houses are conventional block
homes and others are ‘tilt-up’ constructions with concrete panel walls
set in place by a crane.

The houses range from around 1,000 sq ft to 1,200 sq ft in size.
There are some 25 contractors being used to build the houses and
700 persons are being employed in the building phase.

Mr Russell emphasised that it is important that the homes are prop-
erly built.

“We have learnt from a lot of the problems we had over the past two
years. We have our inspectors at every house and the Port Authority
inspectors must approve code inspections.

“We must ensure that the deficiencies (we have seen in the past) do
not happen in my watch. We want to give poor people a product they
can live in comfortably at least 15 to 20 years before any major repairs,”
he said.

Kenneth Russell



Brent Symonette



idence office, like the Freeport
office, is restricted in its abili-
ty to process applicants effi-
ciently due to staffing short-
ages. However, this cannot be
immediately remedied, the
minister said, as “not one
more” staff member can fit
into the building where the
office is currently housed.

He said his ministry has
“applied for” new premises
but have been “unable to
access” additional space yet.

“That’s part of the reason
for the delays that have been
ongoing. We are working on it
as a matter of urgency,” said
Mr Symonette.

Meanwhile, Mr Symonette
revealed that the Department

Se MICs

is in possession of more print-
ing machines which produce
e-passports, however, space
restrictions have also hindered
the department in putting all
of these to use.

“We physically cannot do
anything about that right
now,” he said.

Queues

The minister said that as of
today, officials hope that
queues will be minimised in
light of a decision by passport
processors to no longer keep
applicants in the office while
they verify their documents.

“We'll do that after the per-
son is left. It may result in
some of those people having
to come back but we hope
that number will be less, a
small percentage (of those
who applied),” said Mr
Symonette.

Mr Symonette called on
Bahamians to double check
when their passports expire to
ensure that they apply well in
advance to receive a new one
if they are travelling this sum-
mer.

“If you are travelling say
July 1, a passport takes six
weeks to issue, so you would
have to apply by the begin-
ning of May — next week.
Please do not consider trying
to get a passport in two or
three days. Apply now,” he
said.

& take your phone home

CT EMU g te
Cia

age FREE
local ‘242° number

CM eaten OURO RT ROM ITU

Plans from? 1 g% Sema
Calling plans to Family Islands,
Dems (VE Mee en]



ae Ed Hardy Clothing for Men anc
Nen Pants and Shirts

OVS Pharmacy and
- Caribbean Bottling

- Company team up for
: Red Cross Month

TO ASSIST those Bahami-

? ans who do not have regular
? access to clean drinking water
? and who are “less fortunate in
: all aspects of life”, QVS Phar-
? macy in conjunction with the
? Caribbean Bottling Company
? recently donated proceeds from
: a bottled water promotion to
? the Bahamas Red Cross Soci-
i ety.

For every bottle of Dasani

? water sold in March, known
? internationally as Red Cross
? Month, OVS Pharmacy donated
i partial proceeds from the sale
: to the Red Cross to support the
? assistance the charity gives to
? the Bahamian community.

On March 22, which was

World Water Day, QVS donat-
? ed every cent from Dasani
? water purchased to the charity.

“The Bahamas Red Cross

does such great work in our
? community,” said Cliff Pinder,
i vice-president of OVS Pharma-
i cy.

“Considering that March is

? Red Cross Month we wanted to
? do something special for the
? charity to show our apprecia-
? tion for all they do for those less
: fortunate. They provide a need-
? ed service to the Bahamas, and
? we’re honoured to do all we can
? to support them. We’re also
? very thankful to Caribbean Bot-
: thing for the assistance they have
? provided us in this endeavor. ”

Kim Sawyer, director general

i of the Bahamas Red Cross,
? accepted the cheque from QVS.

TROPICAL
EXTERMINATORS

ee UE
PHONE: 322-2157



onephone

IndiGO





PAGE 6, TUESDAY, APRIL 21, 2009

THE TRIBUNE



LOCAL NEWS

GBPA donates $15,000 for.
restoration of b-ball court:

@ By DENISE MAYCOCK
Tribune Freeport Reporter
dmaycock@tribunemedia.net

FREEPORT — The Grand
Bahama Port Authority presented
a $15,000 donation on Thursday
for the restoration of the basket-
ball facility at the YMCA.

The facility, which was
destroyed by the hurricanes, is
expected to be completed in time
for this year’s Junkanoo Jam Bas-
ketball Tournament, which is host-
ed by the Ministry of Tourism in
November.

Sean McShane, director of Bas-
ketball Travellers in the United
States, will spearhead the restora-
tion of the new basketball court.

Basketball Travellers has had
a long-standing relationship on
Grand Bahama, bringing college
teams from the United States to
participate in the annual
Junkanoo Jam tournament in
Freeport.

Mr McShane said the new court
is expected to be completed on
April 27. He commended the
Grand Bahama Port Authority
for its generous donation.

Presentation

Attending the presentation
were Ian Rolle, president of the
Grand Bahama Port Authority,
Ginger Moxey, vice president of
the Port Group Ltd, Geneva
Rutherford, director of training
at the Port Authority, Betty
Bethel, general manager of busi-
ness development at the Ministry
of Tourism, Lawrence Hepburn,
president of the Bahamas Bas-
ketball Association, and Karen
Pinder-Johnson, executive direc-
tor of YMCA.

Mr McShane said that 12 major
university teams are expected to
travel to Freeport to participate
in the Junkanoo Jam tournament
held during the week of thanks-
giving in November.

He noted that the Freeport
tournament is one of the premier
in-season women’s basketball
events recognised across the US.

“We want to thank the Port
Authority for their support...and
their sincere generosity in getting
this basketball facility restored,”
said Mr McShane.

“The brand new facilities to
host our teams will be tremen-
dous, but it is really the kids and
their families on Grand Bahama
who will benefit from this new

facility. We are just excited to be |
driving this project,” he said.

Karen Pinder Johnson said the | ;
restoration of the basketball facil- }
ity has been slow. She was grateful :
to the Port Authority and others }
who have supported the restora- }

tion of the YMCA.

Geneva Rutherford said the
YMCA is an important recre-
ational facility that every city ;

needs.

“Just 10 years after the found- :
ing of the City of Freeport the :
planners saw fit to establish our }
YMCA. They saw the need for a }
recreation facility to be used by }
all ages for all types of sports and }
activities by schools, civic organi- }
sations, churches, and youth :

groups on the island,” she said.

She noted that the facility has }
been in existence for nearly 40 }
years on Grand Bahama and has }
been the venue for many interna- }
tional and national tournaments }

and sporting events.

“Mr McShane your willingness ;
to spearhead the renovation of :
the new basketball court is highly }
commendable. We at the GBPA }
appreciate your kind gesture and }
we are happy to offer this dona- }
tion of $15,000 toward this pro- }

ject,” said Ms Rutherford.

Mr Rutherford said that Sir
Jack, patron of the Y, has also}
made a $40,000 donation toward :

the rebuilding effort of the Y.

“The YMCA represents one of }
the major philanthropic efforts of i
the shareholders of the GBPA }
and I am certain that Mr Hannes :
Babak, chairman, and Mr Rolle }
are fully committed to the ongoing }

support of YMCA,” she said.

Betty Bethel said Basketball
Travellers have been coming to }
Grand Bahama for seven years to }

participate in the tournament.

She said the Ministry of}
Tourism has been partnering with :
Basketball Travellers and the}
Bahamas Basketball Federation }

in putting on a successful event.

Ms Bethel stressed that it is }
important that collegiate teams }
that come to play in Freeport are :
able to have access to the same }
international standards in terms }
of the facility where they play and }

practice.

She reported that on average }
some 800 players, their families }
and friends travel to Freeport. i
“The impact is enormous if you }
multiply that by a week in hotel }
accommodations, meals, trans- !
portation, tours, and various activ- }

ities,” she said.

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Film made by nephew of Sir Sidney
Poitier to have Bahamas premiere

FREEPORT, GRAND
BAHAMA - A documentary film
by the nephew of movie star Sir
Sidney Poitier will have its
Bahamas premiere in Freeport lat-
er this month.

The film, VOICES, produced
by Jeffrey Poitier, documents
untold stories of Bahamians and
African-Americans who settled
Coconut Grove, Florida.

The Bahamas Weekly, along
with the Ministry of Tourism, Ross
University and Pelican Bay
Hotel, are presenting the premiere
on Saturday, April 25, at Ross
University Study Hall at Seahorse
Plaza East.

Born in Nassau into a family
spanning more than ten genera-
tions in the Bahamas, Jeffrey has a
strong film background.

His father, Carl, was one of ten
children of Reginald and Evelyn
Poitier, the most famous of whom
is Sidney.

The older generation of Poitier
children were raised on Cat Island
and later moved to Nassau where
Jeffrey was also raised.

Homeland

VOICES was born in 2004
when Jeffrey moved back to Mia-
mi and discovered that his own
neighbourhood was originally built
by people from his homeland. Fur-
ther research into anecdotes told
by Coconut Grove residents
uncovered a personal connection
to its history.

This documentary is a compre-
hensive story of pursuit of the
American Dream by a group of
people determined to make a
good life for themselves and their
children, and how the dream is
threatened by the very culture and
country that allowed it to be.

For the VOICES project, Jef-
frey enlisted Coconut Grove
natives, descended from the orig-
inal Bahamians, who are deter-
mined that the rich history of the
Grove and their people’s contri-
bution to it will not be lost.

Filming spanned more than
four years and includes interviews
with more than 200 people and
enough rich material for a multi-
part series. “Working on this pro-
ject has been the dream of my life-
time, and to be asked to screen a
portion of it for my people at
home in Freeport is a great hon-
our!” said Mr Poitier.





“T will never forget all that
growing up The Bahamas has pro-
vided me and I welcome this
chance to show you all what I have
done with those opportunities,”
said Jeffrey.

VOICES had its world pre-
miere at the AMC Theatre in
CocoWalk at Coconut Grove
in October 25, 2008. This will be
the first screening in The
Bahamas.

BAHAMIAN FILM-MAKER Jeffrey
Poitier, nephew of Sir Sidney
Poitier, will visit Grand Bahama to
premiere his documentary film
VOICES on Saturday, April 25, at
7pm at Ross University Study
Hall at Seahorse Plaza. Tickets
are now on sale. Part proceeds to
aid the Grand Bahama Heritage
Foundation.

Bahamas Film Commissioner
Craig Woods will attend to intro-
duce the film and said: "The
Bahamas Film and Television
Commission, in collaboration with
the Grand Bahama Film Office,
is extremely pleased to play a role
in bringing the production of
"Voices' to be screened on Grand
Bahama Island.

“The film portrays the ambi-
tious struggles of early Bahamian
settlers in South Florida who made
a tremendous impact in the
social development of Miami
and the Coconut Grove commu-
nities.

“Their efforts remind us today
of the unique qualities they
brought to the construction of
homes in those communities which
remain lasting pillars from the era
they came from.

“Writer-producer Jeffrey Poiti-
er does an outstanding job in cap-
turing the essence of their chal-
lenges and successes, providing all

with a wonderful blueprint to fol-
low for years to come."

Part proceeds will benefit the
Grand Bahama Heritage Founda-
tion.

“This is an important story to
tell, and it reinforces the role that
history and art can play in con-
necting Bahamians to their her-
itage,” said a foundation
spokesman.

Donation

“We wish to thank Jeffrey
Poitier, the screening organiser
and sponsors for the donation of
the premiere's proceeds to the
Grand Bahama Heritage Founda-
tion.

“These funds will support the
Freetown Historical Project, cur-
rently in production, which is using
the vehicle of art to capture the
oral histories of that settlement.
We'd like to thank Ross Univer-
sity for helping make this event
possible.”

The programme will begin at
7pm and following the screening a
question-and-answer session will
take place with the film-maker,
followed by a short 'Meet the Film
Maker’ reception sponsored by
Italian Specialty Wines, Agave,
Le Med, Sabor, The Ferry House
and Bahamian Brewery and Bev-
erage Company (brewers of Sands
beer).

ROSS UNIVERSITY DEAN’S LIST ACKNOWLEDGED



ROSS UNIVERSITY DEAN'S LIST was announced for the first set of iia studying in The Bahamas with Dean,
Dr Mary Coleman (standing third left). Recipients are Richard Pigg, Leslie Powell, Daphne Scaramangas, Anas
Saleh, Robert Westbrook, Jessica Black, Jeffrey Perumean and Daniel Speredelozzi. Back row from left: Knema
Rezaei-Bazazizad, Moses Wananu, Anas Saleh, Daniel Speredelozzi, Robert Westbrook, Jessica Black. Front row
from left: Dr Charles Seidel, Dr Mary Coleman (Dean), Dana Price, Daphne Scaramangas, Jeff Perumean, Leslie

Powell, Dr Michael Robinson and Meg Osman, Director of Student Services.

GRAND BAHAMA ISLAND - The first Dean's
List for students of Ross University Medical School,
Bahamas campus, were acknowledged in an award
ceremony with the Dean of the School of Medicine, Dr

Mary Coleman.

The Ross University Dean's List is for students
who receive all A’s in their courses for two consecutive
semesters and they remain on the Dean's list as long
as they maintain a B average in subsequent semesters.

The Dean’s List is posted every semester as soon as
grades are available from the previous semester.

Semester 3 recipients are Leslie Powell, Daphne
Scaramangas, Anas Saleh, Robert Westbrook, Dana
Price, Richard Pigg, Moses Wananu, and Knema
Rezaei-Bazizazad. Semester 4 recipients are Jeffrey
Perumean, Jessica Black and Daniel Speredelozzi.

"The curriculum at Ross University School of Med-
icine is accelerated and quite rigorous. We are proud
of students who make the Dean’s List - they deserve
recognition for the academic efforts to accomplish
this level of learning,” said Dr Mary Coleman, Dean

ily members

of Ross University.

The students came together, some along with fam-
also residing with them in
The Bahamas, to receive their certificates from Dean

Coleman, and heard encouraging words from Meg

Osman, Director of Student Services.

Closing remarks were offered by Dr Michael Robin-
son, Assistant Dean, Curricular and Faculty Affairs. A
toast was given by Dr Charles Seidel, chair Foundation
of Medicine. The students and faculty celebrated with
food, sparkling apple cider and cake.

Ross University was founded in 1978 and is a
provider of medical and veterinary education offering
doctor of medicine and doctor of veterinary medi-
cine degrees. The School of Medicine is located in
Dominica, West Indies, and the Freeport, Grand
Bahama, campus opened in January, 2009.

The School of Veterinary Medicine is located in St
Kitts. Ross University's administrative offices are in
North Brunswick, NJ. Ross University has more than
9,000 alumni with MD and DVM. degrees.

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THE TRIBUNE

TUESDAY, APRIL 21, 2009, PAGE 7



LOCAL NEWS



Dr Hubert Minnis



$30m spent on
metlication to
treat 11 chronic
(liseases in 2008

m@ By MATT MAURA

THE treatment of
chronic, non-communica-
ble diseases (CNCDs) is
placing an “astronomi-
cal” burden on the
healthcare system and the
economy of the Bahamas
as estimates show that
almost $30 million was
spent in 2008 on medica-
tion to treat 11 chronic
diseases at public and pri-
vate healthcare facilities,
Minister of Health Dr
Hubert Minnis said Fri-
day.

Dr Minnis said there is
“an unacceptable preva-
lence” of chronic, non-
communicable diseases in
The Bahamas.

CNCDs, which include
hypertension, diabetes,
cancers, heart disease and
respiratory illnesses, are
now considered the great-
est challenge facing the
healthcare sector.

The minister said the
government, through the
Ministry of Health and
Department of Public
Health, had implemented
a number of strategies to
reverse the growing trend
of CNCDs in The
Bahamas. The measures
are being bolstered by an
ongoing public awareness
and education campaign.

“This situation is cause
for concern from both the
social and economic per-
spectives,” Dr Minnis
said. “This is why the
Ministry of Health has
made containment, con-
trol and reduction of the
underlying causes of
CNCDs a priority.”

Initiatives

Addressing healthcare
professionals and medical
students attending the
University of the West
Indies, The Bahamas,
Third Research Day Con-
ference, Dr Minnis said
the Ministry of Health

Centreville House is set
for exterior renovations

WORK will begin soon on exterior ren-
ovations to the 78-year-old former Collins
mansion on Shirley Street, known as Cen-
treville House.

The project will be supervised by a
preservation architect from the Antiqui-
ties, Monuments and Museums Corpora-
tion (AMMC) - the national heritage
agency whose offices are housed in adja-
cent buildings on the estate.

The AMMC has been responsible for
archaeological research and heritage con-
servation in the Bahamas since it was cre-
ated by parliament in 1998. It currently
operates five public facilities in New Prov-
idence — Forts Fincastle, Montagu and
Charlotte, Balcony House and the Pompey
Museum.

It also administers the Long Island
Museum at Buckley's, and the South
Eleuthera Mission at Rock Sound. It is
developing a museum in the old jail house
on San Salvador.

Centreville House was the home of
Ralph G Collins, OBE, a prominent citizen
who died in 1946.

Near the heart of Nassau, the property
was occupied by St Andrew’s School from
1950 to 1971, when it was acquired by the
government. The AMMC moved to the
six-acre Collins Estate in 2005.

Hurricane

The 35,000-square-foot mansion is a vis-
ible link to the past. It was built in 1931 to
replace an earlier wooden home wrecked
by the 1929 hurricane. The estate itself
once extended from Shirley Street almost
to Wulff Road and east to what later
became Palmdale. It is a remnant of anoth-
er era.

Property records date back to a Florida
loyalist named Christie who arrived in
1791. A residence known as “Centreville”
existed on the site as early as 1871, and
was extensively renovated in 1913 by the
Brice family of Alligator Bay, Long Island,
who had acquired the estate some 30 years
before.

Marion Brice married Collins, an Amer-
ican who came to the Bahamas in 1905
and became a leading politician and mer-
chant. He was a member of the House of
Assembly for the Crooked Island district
and a member of the Executive Council.
With various Bahamian partners, he was
involved in the sponge trade, the liquor
business, handicraft distribution, and real
estate development. He was a major share-
holder in the Montagu Beach Hotel and



Girl Guides plant
for the future

Collins mansion on Shirley Street, known as Centreville House.

spearheaded the dredging of Nassau har-
bour.

Large sections of the estate's ornate
wrought-iron fence — erected in 1924 —
are still standing, but the Brice’s wooden
home was severely damaged in the 1929
hurricane. Collins rebuilt it using reinforced
concrete, although the new structure was
designed to resemble the building it
replaced.

According to a 1931 Tribune report, it
was the best-equipped residence on the
island, and represented "the most solid
type of construction possible — marble
columns rise at each side of the main
entrance, the steps of which are made of
granite."

The new Centreville House included
servants’ quarters, a library, private bar,
billiard room, dance floor and eight bed-
rooms, all with private baths. The hard-
wood floors and wall panelling were all of
mahogany.

After Collins' death, the estate was sold
to the association that opened St Andrew's
School, which moved from the Kirk down-
town to occupy the main house and
grounds, while a new subdivision called
Centreville was created from the eastern
portion of the property.

“Our investment and interest in the

Collins Estate is a prime example of the
way in which the AMMC works to pre-
serve our links to the past in ways that can
have a direct impact on the Bahamian
economy," said corporation's director Dr
Keith Tinker.

"We know that historical resources are
key elements of national development,
finding expression in visitor attractions,
cultural activities and educational exhibits."

Monuments

When the AMMC began in 1998, it
assumed responsibility for public monu-
ments (like the war memorial in the garden
of Remembrance downtown), archaeolog-
ical investigations (such as that into Grand
Bahama's historic Freetown settlement,
which was deserted in the 1960s), and
palaeontological research (like the study of
rare animal fossils found in a blue hole on
Abaco). The corporation also develops
and operates museums around the country,
both directly and in partnership with local
interests.

Dr Tinker is a history lecturer at the
College of the Bahamas who obtained his
doctorate at the Florida State University.
Other technical experts on staff include





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museum curator Kim Outten-Stubbs, Ali-
cia Oxley, a preservation architect, and
Michael Pateman, an archaeologist who is
completing doctoral studies in Ohio.

The corporation also enlists technical
support through partnership agreements.

For example, Dr James Miller, who was
Florida's state archaeologist for 20 years,
has been an adviser to the AMMC since
inception.

And an exchange programme was
recently arranged with the school of archi-
tecture at Florida A & M University in
Tallahassee.

"The Bahamas is probably now at the
point where Florida was 20 or 30 years
ago, so I am able to apply my experience to
help Bahamians avoid the pitfalls and
embrace the opportunities in this field.
The corporation is very aware of what
needs to be done to preserve Bahamian
heritage,” Dr Miller said.

One of the ‘big picture’ projects that
Dr Miller is supervising is the develop-
ment of a comprehensive file of archaeo-
logical and historical sites throughout the
Bahamas linked to Geographical Infor-
mation Systems data.

He also helped plan the country's first
national heritage park at Clifton in south-
western New Providence.







Proes nfede

as ol ere

had established a Clinical $]

Audit Programme for qa
chronic, non-communica- “Wednesday aes a”
ble diseases within the AS PART of the Bahamas Hot Off the Grill ma ee




Department of Public
Health as one of the ini-
tiatives to address the sit-
uation.

The Clinical Audit Pro-
gramme involves a
detailed evaluation of
patient care, which allows
for greater interaction
with physicians responsi-
ble for direct patient
care. The minister said
audit results would help
shape policies, protocols,
delivery models “and oth-
er strategies to achieve
better outcomes.”

Dr Minnis said prelimi-
nary data from the 2005
Healthy Lifestyle Survey
for persons between 15-
74 years of age show that
CNCDs accounted for
more than half the deaths
in The Bahamas at that
time.

Other statistics from
the survey (conducted in
New Providence, Grand
Bahama and Long
Island) showed that 21
per cent of Bahamians
were diagnosed with
hypertension and seven
per cent with diabetes.

Forty-three per cent, he
said, were found to be
obese, while another 27
per cent were found to be
overweight. Just 27 per
cent of the participating
persons had “normal
weight”, while three per
cent were underweight.



National Trust’s Earth Day
activities, 30 participants of
the Girl Guides Caribbean
Camp planted 500 hundred
mahogany seeds and 700
Horseflesh seeds. The initia-
tive is part of the Bahamas
Million Tree Campaign, in
which the Bahamas has
pledged to plant a million
trees by December 2009. The
girls came from throughout
the Bahamas, Belize, the
British Virgin Islands,
Trinidad and Tobago, Guyana
and Antigua and Barbuda.

“We were delighted to have
this opportunity to partner
with the Girl Guides in this
propagation project for native
trees,” said Portia Sweeting,
BNT director of education.

“We not only need to plant
native trees on Earth Day, but
also to begin to propagate
native trees in order to have a
supply of native hardwoods
for landscaping areas in our
national parks where we have
removed invasive species such
as Casuarina or Brazilian pep-

er.”

The Girl Guides planted the
seeds in trays and once the
seeds have sprouted they will
be transplanted to larger pots
and cared for until they are
large enough for transplanting
into areas in need of trees.

The BNT is encouraging cit-
izens to plant a tree on Earth
Day, April 22, in their gar-
dens, schools and places of
work.




hursde

usio




(a)
British Colonial Hilton



De Haticars ape ip

Trawel should take you places



PAGE 8, TUESDAY, APRIL 21, 2009

THE TRIBUNE



LOCAL NEWS



Man in court ©

FROM page one

charge. Stubbs was also
arraigned on a firearm pos-
session charge.

According to court dock-
ets, Stubbs on Tuesday April
14, intentionally caused Wal-
lace’s death. It is further
alleged that Stubbs was in
possession of a handgun with
intent to endanger the life
of Tanisha Newbold. Stubbs
was not required to enter a
plea to the charges.

Mr Kemp asked the court
to examine the bruises on his
client’s writs and ankles,
claiming that Stubbs had
been in shackles since last
week. Mr Kemp also told the
court that he had tried to vis-
it Stubbs while he was being
held at the Grove Police Sta-
tion, but was not allowed to
do so. He claimed that police
had used excessive force on
Stubbs. Mr Ferreira told the
court that when he had seen
Stubbs he observed bruises
on his face. Mr Ferreira
claimed that police had
refused to make notes of the
injuries and asked the court
yesterday to take judicial
note of Stubbs’ injuries.

Magistrate Archer noted
the bruises under Stubbs’
right eye, nostrils and around
his wrists. Stubbs was denied
bail, but was informed by the
magistrate that he could
make an application to the
Supreme Court for bail.
Stubbs was remanded to Her
Majesty’s Prison. His case
was adjourned to July 20,
which is when a preliminary
inquiry into the matter is
expected to open.

Murder

FROM page one

which could be connected
to the murder. Police say
that the incident took place
in the area of Amarillo
Street, Garden Hills some-
time around 3.30 pm. A
male believed to be in his
mid-20s told police that
while standing outside of his
residence, two males
approached in a vehicle and
opened fire at him. The man
reportedly received a flesh
wound to the right leg.
Police are following signifi-
cant leads and hope to make
an arrest in the matter soon.
ASP Bethel said yesterday
that police are uncertain if
the matter is connected to
Smith’s murder but are try-
ing to determine whether or
not it is.

Smith was charged with
Stephen Stubbs, Dashino
Wilson and Adrian Edge-
combe in the November 22,
2007 murder of hit-man
Samuel “Mouche” McKen-
zie, 35, and the attempted
murder of Keith Woodside
who was wounded during
the shooting incident. The
shooting took place in broad
daylight on Wilson Street
off Hay Street. The four
men accused in these shoot-
ings were discharged in late
January this year due to a
lack of evidence.

Police still seeking identity of
one of two men found dead

POLICE are still trying to determine
the identity of one of two men found
shot dead in a small wooden home on
Emmanuel Way off St Vincent Road
last week.

Police said they have yet to estab-
lish a motive for the brutal killings and
are still appealing for persons in the
community who may have information
regarding the unidentified victim to
come forward.

The victim is believed to be a Haitian
in his 60s who farmed in the area.

Last Thursday, police were called to

the gruesome scene where the older
man, known in the neighbourhood as
‘Daddy’, and 42-year-old Alpheus Cur-
tis Jr, known as Tracy, were found shot
to death in the eight-by-ten sized
dwelling.

The murders left the quiet area in
shock.

“We still don't know the name of
the elderly gentleman and continue to
make appeals in the community to
come forward,” Assistant Commis-
sioner Hulan Hanna told The Tribune
yesterday.

While some initial reports suggested
the two men were related, Mr Hanna
said police have not confirmed this.

The two men were found by a third
party early last Thursday morning.

When police arrived on the scene
around 9am, the two men were lying
on the ground with apparent gun shot
wounds about the body.

Police said it is believed the men may
have been killed up to 12 hours before
their bodies were discovered.

Yesterday, Assistant Superintendent
Leon Bethel of the Central Detective

Unit said police have no suspects in
custody.

"We do not have anyone in custody
at this time. We're still continuing the
investigation and we are in progress
of trying to interview some persons,"
he said.

“We've done some preliminary
inquiries, but at this time we have not
determined a motive for this double
killing.”

Persons with information about the
murders can contact police anony-
mously at 919, 502-9991 or 328-TIPS.

The Bahamas ‘must be careful’
in selecting trading partners

FROM page one

States’ Stop Tax Haven Abuse
Bill. Mr Smith said it would be
"preposterous" for the country
to remain in that standing con-
sidering that this country's only
TIEA lies with the US.

Both issues were said to be
forefront on the minds of
CARICOM members as they
met last week with US Presi-
dent Barack Obama and other
regional leaders for the fifth
Summit of the Americas in
Trinidad and Tobago.

The Summit came weeks
after the country was grey listed
by the Organisation for Eco-
nomic Co-operation and Devel-
opment and amid concerns that
the Bahamas would be part of a
targeted crackdown on tax
havens.

The proposed crackdown,
being pushed by developed
nations, is an attempt to collect
revenue from wealthy citizens
of those countries believed to
have invested in off-shore tax
havens to evade tax payment.

"The whole process is one in
which they keep changing the
rules of the game and moving
the goal post. I don't think
there's anytime going forward
that we would be in a position
to relax or take our eyes off the
ball. I think once we cleared
that we intend to meet whatev-
er standards there are we simply
have to just keep abreast of
them and make the necessary
changes," said Mr Smith.

"Once we said that we intend
to meet the standards — what-
ever they are — we will do so
judiciously, in which we do not
harm ourselves (and) minimise
any fallout to the sector so that
will mean to be careful in select-
ing trading partners with which
we execute the TIEAs and per-
haps conducting some form of
analysis to see what the out-

come would be depending on
where we go and how fast we
go," he said.

The prime minister has
already indicated that the coun-
try is ready to negotiate addi-
tional TIEAs and will do what
is necessary to meet the
OECD's standards.

The country has one such
agreement with the US. He also
suggests that Canada was likely
to be the next country with
whom the Bahamas signs a new
TIEA.

Mr Smith added that under
the existing TIEA with the
United States, the Bahamas
meets all the criteria for infor-
mation exchange and should
not remain listed as a secrecy
jurisdiction on the stop tax
haven abuse legislation.

"The tax information
exchange agreement, (signed)
with the United States several
years ago, did in fact meet all of
the international criterion for
information exchange and
transparency.

“So it was, at least from my
point of view it would be pre-
posterous for the US to have
one department certify you as
(having) met the requirements
and then another arm of gov-
ernment saying that you
haven't,” he said.

Raymond Winder, managing
partner of prominent account-
ing firm Deloitte and Touche,
also weighed in on the issue:
"The point is there is no justifi-
cation for putting the Bahamas
on the list (legislation) because
we have a tax information
exchange agreement with the
US and that has been working
and so there's no issues between
the Bahamas and the US — and
I can't see any reason why we'd
be put on that list,” he said.

Last week, while speaking
from the Summit in Trinidad,
Mr Ingraham said he does not

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Email: hr@luxuryretaillimited.com



expect the Bahamas to ulti-
mately appear in US’ legisla-
tion to stop tax haven abuse.
He said he previously wrote to
Chairman of the House Ways
and Means Committee and
Congressman Charles Rangel

on the Bahamas’ position, and
also on behalf of CARICOM
at the Community’s request.

“T think he gave us sufficient
assurances about the Bill to
cause most of our members to
be comfortable.

“There will be some addi-
tional discussions with the Con-
gress,” Mr Ingraham said.

The present draft of the Stop
Tax Haven Abuse Bill names
the Bahamas as one of 34 secre-
cy jurisdictions.

Challenge of judge’s
refusal to step down
from case underway

FROM page one

Ferguson created a conflict of interest.

Yesterday Nicholas Lavender, representing
Rami Weissfisch, told Justices of Appeal how
Justice Allen had described the proceedings
as a farce and was the first to raise the possi-
bility of her own recusal at a session held in
chambers.

However, as there was no court reporter in
the meeting Mr Lavender submitted evidence
from his notes, which he maintains were read
and discussed by the judge and counsel at the
time.

President of the Court of Appeal Dame Joan
Sawyer, sitting with Justice Emmanuel Osebe-
day and Justice Hartman Longley, criticised
other counsel for not also keeping notes of
discussions in the absence of a court reporter to
prevent speculation over what was said.

She said: “Either you do it by a court
reporter or you do it by hand, but a record
there must be.

“There is only one right way and the right
way is to keep a record.”

Mr Lavender further submitted that Justice
Allen had said she was conflicted over certain
things that had occurred, and she considered
herself unable to make a decision on the evi-
dence.

He said: “She found it difficult to do the job
she had to do as a judge, to determine that
issue in the detached impartial manner a judge
should.”

It was decided at the opening of proceed-

ings yesterday that the Appeal Court case
would be heard in public, and not behind closed
doors as had been done in the Supreme
Court.

Justices of Appeal dismissed submissions
from Mr Lavender to hold proceedings entire-
ly or partially in camera maintaining a dispute
over a judge’s conduct is in the public interest.

Mr Lavender had argued confidentiality
should be upheld particularly to protect minors
involved, but lawyer Michael Scott represent-
ing Amir Weissfisch, and Brian Moree repre-
senting the children, said their clients had no
objection to the case being held in open court
and asserted that the names of individuals
involved had already been reported in the
press.

Mr Moree said: “My clients feel no threat at
all by these proceedings being public in this
court because what is before this court has
absolutely nothing to do with the children in so
far as it’s a matter of dealing with the conduct
of the judge.”

Dame Joan ruled any information and the
names of parties and witnesses will not be kept
secret unless an application is made for Justices
of Appeal to consider during the course of the
hearing.

The Appeal Court president said: “The pub-
lic does have a vital interest in the indepen-
dence and impartiality of the judiciary, and if
the conduct of the judge is said to be impugned
then the public has a right to know.”

The case continues at the Court of Appeal in
Charlotte Street, Nassau, today.



Sentencing of Dwight
Major is rescheduled

FROM page one

to smuggle marijuana and
cocaine into Florida, six
months after he and his wife

The Tribune wants to hear
from people who are
making news in their
neighbourhoods. Perhaps
you are raising funds for a
good cause, campaigning
for improvements in the
area or have won an
award.

If so, call us on 322-1986
and share your story.

were extradited to the Unit-
ed States to face drug charges
last April. The couple had
been engaged in a nearly five-
year battle against extradition.
Both Majors had cases pend-
ing in the Bahamas.

The US alleges that the
husband and wife were part
of a drug conspiracy between
August, 2002, and January,
2003, involving the transport
of hundreds of pounds of

cocaine and marijuana.

Keva Major pleaded guilty
to the drug charges against her
last August. The prison time
she has already served has
been taken into consideration.
She is now under a three-year
supervised release in West
Palm Beach. Her husband is
facing up to 50 years in prison
on the drug charges, but could
also receive a much lesser sen-
tence for pleading guilty.

Almost $1m
worth of illegal
drugs captured

is about 50 x 85, consisted of some 300 suspected marijuana
plants, ranging in height from two feet to six feet.
The second and third field contained an additional 600 mar-

ijuana plants.

“Two other fields were also discovered, however, officers
were still at the scene conducting investigations,” said Mr

Bootle.

The police are asking persons to come forward with infor-
mation that could assist them in the arrest of the person or per-

sons responsible.



PAGE 9

THE TRIBUNE
- ) r o ,
b 7 A‘
TUESDAY, APRIL 21,

PAGES 10 & 14¢ International sports news

Knowles,
Bhupathi hope
for success at

* Barcelona
- Open...

See page 15



2009



More than
50 boats
expected
to set sail
at Family

Island
regatta

@‘Cariftabarmes—

Ballamas strokes’
lor second piace

‘estmta« Finishes behind Trinidad & Tobago



@ By BRENT STUBBS
Senior Sports Reporter
bstubbs@tribunemedia.net

THE 56th version of the
National Family Island Regat-
ta is all set to get underway
today in picturesque Elizabeth
Harbour on Georgetown, Exu-
ma.

The competition is expected
to begin with the Sir Durward
Knowles Junior Regatta where
Beerly Legal, skippered by
Gerard Knowles, will be out to
defend its title.

Sports Reporter
rdorsett@tribunemedia.net

Commodore Danny Stra- coe e . ‘ .
tere ture wit medals at Carita swimmin
aminimum of 15 boats to com- teaey ce

pete in the three-race series.

On Wednesday, the Ocean
races for the Prime Minister
Cup race in the A Class, the
Governor’s General Cup race
in the B Class and the Com-
modore Emeritus Cup race in
the C Class are scheduled to
take place.

Then on Thursday through
Saturday, the regular series for
the A, B, C, D and E Classes
will take place in honour of
Scott Weatherford of Abaco.

Weatherford, according to
Strachan, was the original skip-
per of the Abaco Rage, win-
ner of the national titles in 1983
and 1984.

The Tida Wave, skippered
by Brooks Miller from Staniel
Cay, Exuma, won the A Class
last year. Eudeva, skippered by
Lundy Robinson, won the B
Class. The Bulla Reg, skip-
pered by Buzzy Rolle, was
crowned the C Class champion
and in the D Class, the cham-
pion is Blue Wing.

“We anticipate having 50
plus boats compete this year,”
said Strachan, who noted that
he doesn’t think that the eco-
nomic crisis will have that
much effect on the regatta.

“[’m pleasantly surprised
because I thought the numbers

yesterday with a
series of thrilling
performances and a
second place finish
on both the medal
table and final points

standing at the 24th | a, ae
Dustin Tynes

Carifta Swimming
Championships in
Saventa, Aruba.

The Bahamas fin-
ished with a total of
49 medals over the
four-day meet,
which included 18
gold, 17 silver and 14
bronze.

Trinidad and
Tobago captured the
overall champi-
onship with 67
medals — 31 gold, 14
silver and 22 bronze.

Guadeloupe fin-
ished third with 47
medals — 18 gold, 17
silver and 12 bronze.
Aruba finished
fourth with 38
medals — five gold,
18 silver and 15
bronze. Martinique
rounded out the top
five with 34 medals
— eight gold, 16 sil-
ver and 10 bronze.

The Trinidadians





championships in Aruba



Maya Albury

Evante Gibson

Gabrielle Greene

stockpiled 815.50 points to win ahead
of the Bahamas with 691.50 points.

Guadeloupe finished third in the
points standings with 603, Martinique
with 578.50 and Jamaica rounded out
the top five with 571.50 points.

The Bahamas captured 10 medals
on the final day of competition high-
lighted by a pair of stunning individual
performances by McKayla Lightbourn.

In the Girls 15-17 division, Light-
bourn took gold in the 100m Breast-
stroke in a time of 1:17.87s and silver in
the 200m Breaststroke in 2:28.64s.

Dustin Tynes also took gold in the
Boys 11-12 division in the 100m
Breaststroke in 1:14.04s.

In the girls 13-14 division, the team
of Bria Deveaux, Berchadette Moss,
Maya Albury and Gabrielle Greene
took first place in the 200m Freestyle

would be down, but I don’t
think they will be down
because we have three new
boats in Exuma, a new A Class
from Nassau that is already
here and we have two C Class
out of long Island.”

In the A Class, the new boat
is the Ed Sky, owned by Joe
Brown. Hughie Lloyd from
Barreterre, has two C Classes,
Buzzy Rolle from Georgetown
has a C Class and Mark
Knowles from Long Island
built two C Class boats.

As usual, Strachan said there
are a number of on-shore activ-
ities planned, including church
and social events. They are
being coordinated by Gordy

Dionisio Carey
AVM eel



Carey in the 11-12
Boys Breaststroke
and Laura Morley
in the Girls 11-12
division.

The 36-member
team improved from
a third place finish
at the 2008 Champi-
onships despite fin-
ishing with one less
medal from their



McKAYLA LIGHTBOURN, who won gold in the 100m breast...

in 1:12.52s.
Ariel Weech finished second in the
Girls 15-17 50m Freestyle in 26.53s.
The final session also featured two

Team Bahamas finished with two
medals in the Boys 13-14 division 100m
Breaststroke.

Evante Gibson finished second in

UM el atsa

Gray.

“Given the state of the econ-
omy, I don’t know what to
expect in terms of crowd par-
ticipation,” Strachan said. “But
I do know as we speak, all of
the hotels are booked out, all
of the rental cars are booked
out and all of the apartments
that people normally rent all
booked out.

“Accommodation wise, it
might be difficult to find rooms
right now. There might be
some spare rooms around, but
if there are, I don’t know where
they are. But from talking to
the hotels and car rentals, there
are no more rooms or cars to
rent.”

Strachan said based on those
assessments, he anticipates that
the island should be flooded
with people coming in for the
regatta that was first held in
1954.

As a result of the Indepen-
dence Celebrations in 1973, the
annual regatta was held in New
Providence. But since then, a
committee was formed to stage
the event as the national event
in Exuma ever since.

relay in 1:49.75s.

1:12.34s and Toby McCarroll was third

LAURA MORLEY, who won bronze in the Girls 11-12 division, can be seen in this file photo..

bronze medal finishers — Dionisio

total of 50 last year.





PAGE 10, TUESDAY, APRIL 21, 2009

TRIBUNE SPORTS



SPORTS



Olympic boxer seeks "=«
win for boxing bill

B PHILLIP RAWLS
Associated Press Writer

MONTGOMERY, Ala.
(AP) — Olympic bronze medal-
list Deontay Wilder of
Tuscaloosa is undefeated as a
professional boxer. But so far,
none of those bouts have been
in his home state.

And they won't be unless the
Legislature creates a state box-
ing commission to sanction pro-
fessional boxing in Alabama.

Wilder and his co-manager,
Jay Deas, have been trying for
three years to get the Legisla-
ture to pass a law setting up a
commission.

They lost in 2007 and again in
2008. With the 2009 session end-
ing next month, they are in dan-
ger of going 0-3.

The sponsors of the legisla-
tion, Sen. Del Marsh, R-Annis-
ton, and Rep. Gerald Allen, R-
Cottonwood, aren't giving up.
"We feel confident this year is

IN THIS Nov. 15, 2008 file photo,
Deontay Wilder celebrates after
defeating Ethen Cox at Vanderbilt
University in Nashville, Tenn.

(AP Photo: Alan Poizner)





IN THIS April 19, 2007 file photo, boxer Deontay Wilder poses with his daughter Najeya in Northport, Ala.

going to be the year,” Allen
said.

The House has passed a box-
ing commission bill 96-1 and
sent it to the Senate. The Senate
has passed a separate bill 25-0
and sent it to the House.

To help with the effort,
Wilder has taken time from his
daily training schedule to visit
the Legislature, pose for pic-
tures with lawmakers, and pol-
itick for the right to fight in
front of his friends and family in
Alabama.

"We're trying to get some
Deontay Wilder believers," he
said.

Wilder, 23, doesn't look like a

typical heavyweight boxer.

He stands 6 feet 7 inches tall,
and he weighs 214 pounds. He
had hoped to have a career in
pro basketball or football. But
his daughter, Naiyea, was born
in 2005 with spina bifida, a birth
defect in which the spinal cord
develops improperly.

Wilder dropped out of Shel-
ton State Community College
in Tuscaloosa, took jobs as a
waiter and a beer truck driver,
and started training to be a box-
er. He figured boxing was a
quicker way to earn money to
pay his daughter's medical bills.

Wilder was the only Ameri-
can to medal at the Beijing

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alter being

struck by
softball

MISHAWAKA, Ind.
(AP) — A member of a
men's slow-pitch softball
team died Monday after he
was taken off life support,
two days after he was hit in
the neck by a ball.

Teammates say 24-year-
old Alberto Naranjo of
Elkhart was sliding into
home plate during a game
Saturday morning when a
throw struck him below his
left ear. He started to get
up, but collapsed.

Paramedics took Naranjo
to Memorial Hospital in
South Bend from Rose Park
in nearby Mishawaka after
attempts to revive him
failed.

St. Joseph County Coro-
ner Michael O'Connell says
a neurosurgeon pronounced
Naranjo brain dead early
Sunday. O'Connell said
Naranjo remained on life
support until Monday so his
organs could be used for
transplants.

Hospital spokeswoman
Ruth Linster said Monday
afternoon that Naranjo had
died.

the last two years.

Olympics. He had his first pro
bout in November 2008 and is
now 3-0 — all with knockouts.
His next bout is Friday night in
Chicago and will be televised
by ESPN2.

His daughter, 4, has gone
through several operations and
is now an active child. Visiting
Montgomery with her father
last week, she climbed in and
out of his lap and engaged him
in typical child play, causing the
big guy to show a gentle side.

Wilder laughs about how he
can be almost childlike when
he plays with his daughter and
then knock down opponents in
the ring.

(AP Photo: Robert Sutton)

"When you are in the ring,
it's time for business," he said.

His daughter is often at ring-
side, shouting "Go Daddy, Go
Daddy," he said.

Wilder says professional box-
ing in Alabama would give
opportunities to the young
Golden Gloves boxers he sees
training at Deas’ Skyy Gym in
Northport and other gyms
around the state. He also sees it
boosting tourism in Alabama.

"Nobody goes anywhere
without a reason to go. People
need a reason to come to
Alabama," he said.

The boxing commission got
knocked out on technicalities

In 2007, the bill was in line
for final passage in the Senate
on the last day of the session
when one senator punched
another, bringing action to a
halt.

On 2008's final day, the bill
was in position for a final vote
in the House when it got stalled
by debate on other issues.

"It's frustrating how close you
can get and somebody punches
somebody or somebody fili-
busters," Deas said.

Wilder keeps fighting back
by telling anyone who will listen
how badly he wants to step into
the ring surrounded by a cheer-
ing crowd of Alabama fans.

"It's time for change in
Alabama," he said.

Steelers promise no Super
Bowl letdown this time

@ ALAN ROBINSON
AP Sports Writer

PITTSBURGH (AP) — Super Bowl champions
don't get much of an offseason.

Only 2 1/2 months after the Pittsburgh defeated
the Arizona Cardinals for the franchise's sixth
NFL title, the Steelers — at least most of them —
were back on the practice field Monday. Rain
chased them indoors for the first of 14 organized
team practices that run periodically through early
June and are a supplement to next week's manda-
tory, three-day minicamp.

After winning their second Super Bow] in four
seasons, wide receiver Hines Ward said the Steel-
ers don't need to be pushed and prodded to return
to practice.

Apparently not — All-Pro linebacker James
Harrison was working out again only two days
after the Steelers’ last-minute, 27-23 win over the
Cardinals in Tampa. Wide receiver Limas Sweed
was talked out of doing conditioning work later
that same week, but he waited only two weeks
before resuming his personal workouts.

The Steelers are being driven by two factors,
according to Ward: 1) A determination not to
repeat the major letdown of their post-Super Bowl
2006 season, when they started 2-6 and finished 8-
8. 2) A desire to match the three Super Bowls
won in recent history by New England, and per-
haps even the four won by the Steelers of the
1970s.

"I know I want to win another one," Ward said.
"The teams in the 1970s, they won four. If we can
win another one, then I think we'll be right up
there with New England as one of the teams in the
dynasty.”

Nose tackle Casey Hampton believes one more
Super Bow] victory would cause these Steelers to
be remembered as one of the best teams in NFL
history.

While they've changed coaches, from Bill
Cowher to Mike Tomlin since winning the Super
Bowl during the 2005 season, many of the key
players (Ward, Hampton, Ben Roethlisberger,
Willie Parker, Heath Miller, James Farrior, Troy
Polamalu, Aaron Smith, Brett Keisel, Larry Foote,
Deshea Townsend) are the same.

"Especially with the same core of guys, it's kind
of like the same team," Hampton said. "We're
trying to catch the old Steelers, back in the day, see
if we can get us four, see what that would be like."

Since the Steelers won four times during the
1974-79 seasons, and the 49ers won four from
1981-89 (plus a fifth in 1994), the only teams to win
three Super Bowls are the Cowboys (1992-93,
1995) and the Patriots (2001, 2003-04).

Hampton said the Steelers got "lax ... forgot
how we got there” after winning three years ago,
but Ward promised that won't happen again.

"We've been through that. The veteran guys
who were on that first Super Bowl we won a cou-
ple of years ago, we came back with a disappoint-
ing 8-8 year,” Ward said. "I think there's a differ-
ent mindset coming into this. We've got a lot of
veteran guys mixed in with a lot of new, unproven
guys who have to step up their game. And coach
Tomlin, he won't let us have a down year. His



IN THIS Feb. 1, 2009, file photo, Pittsburgh Steelers
linebacker James Harrison returns an interception for
a 100-yard touchdown during the second quarter of the
Super Bowl XLIII game in Tampa, Fla. At right is Ari-
zona Cardinals guard Reggie Wells.

(AP Photo: John Bazemeore)

expectation levels are very high, and they should
be."

Intentionally or not, management is allowing a
number of players — Ward, Hampton, Foote,
Miller, Parker, Keisel, safety Ryan Clark and kick-
er Jeff Reed among them— to go into the final sea-
son of their contracts. Only All-Pro linebacker
James Harrison, the NFL Defensive Player of the
Year, and left guard Chris Kemoeatu have signed
new contracts.

Some others could be re-signed by the end of
training camp, but the franchise's philosophy has
long been that playing for a new contract isn't
necessarily a bad thing.

"We're not going to get as complacent as we
got the last time," Hampton said.

The last time Ward was going into the last sea-
son of a contract, in 2005, he stayed out of training
camp for two weeks before reporting. He signed a
contract extension the week of the season opener.

Ward said he won't stay out this time. One rea-
son is he is only 220 yards away from reaching
the 10,000-yard receiving mark, a number reached
by only 31 players in NFL history.

"T don't want to put on another uniform,” the
33-yard-old Ward said. "I'm too late in the game
(his career) to worry about it. You look at all the
previous players who went on and played in other
places. I learned a lot from Jerome (Bettis), what
he did. I want to go down in Steelers history to be
one of the better wideouts to wear the black and
gold.”

Among those missing Monday, some due to
travel problems, were Super Bowl MVP Santo-
nio Holmes, Polamalu, Parker, Clark, Foote, Tim-
mons and safety Tyrone Carter. Ward did not
practice because he is recovering from left rotator
cuff surgery, but he was in uniform.

Working out were three players who missed all
or most of last season, punter Daniel Sepulveda
(knee) backup quarterback Charlie Batch (bro-
ken collarbone) and running back Rashard
Mendenhall (shoulder).



TRIBUNE SPORTS

MARK KNOWLES (background) and MAHESH BHUPATHI got a bye in the

TUESDAY, APRIL 21, 2009, PAGE 13

LOCAL NEWS

Knowles, Bhupathi
hope for success at
Barcelona Open

first round of the Barcelona Open Banco Sabadell 2009...

AFTER getting ousted in
the quarterfinal of their last
tournament in Monaco last
week, Mark Knowles and
Mahesh Bhupathi are hoping
for better success this week at
the Barcelona Open Banco
Sabadell 2009.

The Bahamian-Indian duo
are seeded number four in
the tournament. They got a
bye in the first round and
await the winner of the match
between the Spanish team of
Feliciano Lopez and Fernan-
do Verdasco against Argenti-
na’s Lucas Arnold Ker and
Chile’s Fernando Gonzalez.

Knowles and Bhupathi
eliminated Lopez and Ver-
dasco 6-4, 6-4 in the second
round in Monaco before they
were sent packing by the
team of Novak Djokovic and
Viktor Troicki of Serbia.

Going into Barcelona,
Knowles and Bhupathi are
sitting in fourth place in the
ATP Doubles Team Rank-
ings with a total of 1695
points.

Leading the race is the
identical American twin
brothers of Bob and Mike
Bryan with 4115. Daniel
Nestor and Nenad Zimonjic
are in second with 1890 and
Max Mirnyi and Andy Ram
are third with 1735.

Nestor, the former long-
time partner of Knowles,
along with Zominjic, pulled
off a 6-4, 6-1 upset win over
the top seeded Bryans in the
final in Monaco. Nestor and
Zimonjic were seeded at
No.2.

In Barcelona, the Bryans
are again seeded at No.1 with
Nestor and Zimonjic at No.2.

TRIER MRT UCT TT

ao a

3 ry

~

RAFAEL NADAL (left), of Spain, attends a training session yesterday during the Barcelona Open tournament

in Barcelona, Spain...

(AP Photo: Manu Fernandez)

Dynasty Stars defeat
Rising Star by seven wickets

THE Dynasty Stars defeated
the Rising Star by seven wick-
ets on Saturday as the
Bahamas Cricket Association
continued its regular season
action.

Rising Star scored 148 runs
as Robert Campbell was the
top scorer with 62 runs and
Cyril Burrell made 17 runs.

Bowling for Dynasty Stars,
Alex Hernandez and Brian
Bascom took four wickets each.

Dynasty Stars scored 153

runs for the loss of three wick-
ets. Ranford Davson and
Johnathan Barry scored 37 and
36 runs respectively.

On Sunday, the Castrol
Commonwealth team was
bowled out for 111 runs as Ter-
ry Seepersad was the top scor-
er with 56 runs.

Bowling for Scotiabank Par-
adise was shared by Sean
Brathwaite and Mark Butler,
each taking two wickets.

Scotiabank Paradise, at bat,

scored 113 runs for the loss of
two wickets to win the match
by eight wickets.

Gary Bell and Andrew Nash
were the top scorers for Sco-
tiabank Paradise with scores of
37 and 32 runs not out respec-
tively.

Action is scheduled to con-
tinue this weekend. On Satur-
day, Dockendale is set to take
on Rising Star and on Sunday,
St Agnes is slated to face
Dynasty Stars.





PAGE 14, TUESDAY, APRIL 21, 2009

TRIBUNE SPORTS



SPORTS



Sixers are looking to stay
cool after stunning Magic

@ ANTONIO GONZALEZ
Associated Press Writer

ORLANDO, Florida (AP)
— Mindful of the past, the
Philadelphia 76ers are doing
their best to forget a thrilling
Game 1 win.

It won't be easy.

Andre Iguodala made a 22-
foot jumper with 2.2 seconds
remaining, and the Sixers ral-
lied from an 18-point deficit to
stun the Orlando Magic 100-98
on Sunday in Game 1 of their
opening-round playoff series.

For the second straight year,
Philadelphia finds itself up 1-0
and with home-court advantage
against a heavy favorite.

"We've been in this position
before," Iguodala said. "We still
have to stay focused. We have
to stay confident in ourselves
and fix some of the mistakes we
were making early."

The Sixers lost six of their last
seven games coming into the
playoffs but were able to put
that skid in the past the same
way they did a year ago, when
they won Game 1 at Detroit.
The Pistons eventually took the
series in six games.

"This is a different group than
played those last seven games,”
Sixers coach Tony DiLeo said.
"We're in a different mental
state, different physical state
because we had some games to
rest."

Iguodala had 20 points, eight
rebounds and eight assists, and
Louis Williams scored 18 to
help the Sixers beat the Magic
for the first time in four tries
this season — and when it mat-
tered most. Hedo Turkoglu's
fadeaway 3-pointer missed at
the buzzer, and Magic fans
stood in disbelief before filing
out quietly.

Dwight Howard had a career
playoff-high 31 points and 16
rebounds, and rookie Courtney
Lee scored 18 for the Magic. It
was the biggest lead the Magic
blew all season, topping the loss
on Oct. 31 to Memphis when
they were ahead by 15. Game 2

DWIGHT HOWARD dunks over

Philadelphia 76ers center Samuel
Dalembert (1) and forward Andre
Iguodala (not seen) during Game 14
of a first-round playoff game Sun-
day, in Orlando... (AP Photo)

Magic’s
Howard
to seek

treatment
on eyes

ORLANDO, Fla. (AP) —
Orlando Magic center Dwight
Howard says he's going to get
his eyes examined after he was
inadvertently scratched by
Philadelphia 76ers center
Samuel Dalembert.

Howard said Monday he
would see an eye doctor but
that the injury won't keep him
sidelined for Game 2 against
the 76ers on Wednesday night.
Dalembert swiped Howard's
eyes reaching for the ball late in
the third quarter of Philadel-
phia's 100-98 win over the Mag-
ic on Sunday night and was
called for a foul.

Howard said he was "seeing
just a whole bunch of crazy
stuff" when he closed his eyes
and felt a "pulsating" sensation
when they were open.



ORLANDO MAGIC forward Hedo Turkoglu (left) fights for a rebound with Philadelphia 76ers forward Andre Iguodala in the second half of Game 1 of
a first-round playoff game in Orlando, Florida, on Sunday. Philadelphia won 100-98...

in the best-of-seven series is
Wednesday night in Orlando.

"There's no need to panic,"
Howard said. "It's the first
game. We just have to come out
with a better effort on the
defensive end. We have to get
back on defense. We have to
really cut our turnovers down."

One thing the Sixers will have
to clean up is their defense — or
lack thereof — on Howard.
Orlando's do-it-all center scored
at will.

Rim-rocking dunks, smooth

hook shots and even some
uncharacteristic crisp free
throws by the Magic's center
capped a 15-3 spurt that put
Orlando ahead by 18 points.
The only time Philadelphia
actually slowed Howard was
when Samuel Dalembert inad-
vertently scratched both his
eyes and was called for a foul.

Howard said his eyes were
pulsating after the game but
shouldn't be a problem, even
joking afterward that, "I got
backslapped."”

(AP Photo: John Raoux)

So did the rest of the Magic.

Lakers 113, Jazz 100

At Los Angeles, Kobe Bryant
scored 24 points, Trevor Ariza
added 21 and Pau Gasol 20 for
the Lakers.

Allowing a Phil Jackson-
coached team to win Game 1
of any series doesn't bode well
for the opposition. Jackson's
teams have never lost a playoff
series after winning Game 1,
going 41-for-41 with Chicago
and the Lakers.

The Lakers had their way
against the Jazz, leading by 22
points at halftime and then
answered resoundingly both
times Utah got within nine in
the second half.

Bryant's total gave him 3,710
career postseason points, mov-
ing him past Magic Johnson and
into ninth on the NBA's list. He
trails only Kareem Abdul-Jab-
bar (4,070) and Jerry West
(4,457) for most points in the
playoffs with the Lakers.

Carlos Boozer led the Jazz



Cavaliers’ Brown named
NBA’s coach of the year

TOM WITHERS
AP Sports Writer

CLEVELAND (AP) — Mike Brown
was honored as the NBA's coach of the
year Monday after leading the Cleve-
land Cavaliers to their greatest regular
season.

He guided the club to a franchise-
record 66 wins, a second Central Division
title and the No. 1 overall seed in the
postseason. Cleveland leads the Detroit
Pistons 1-0 in the first round of the play-
offs.

Preaching trust to his players since
training camp, Brown has created a tight-
ly knit team led by superstar LeBron
James. The 38-year-old coach also has
given more authority to his assistants, a
sign of his maturity as a coach and con-
fidence as a leader.

Brown joined the Cavs in 2005 after
two seasons as an assistant with Indiana.
Bill Fitch in 1976 is the only other Cleve-
land coach to win the coaching award.

MIKE BROWN cheers on his team as they
faced the Indiana Pacers in the first half of a
game in Indianapolis...

(AP Photo: Michael Conroy)

Brown received 55 first-place votes
and earned 355 total points from a pan-
el of 122 sports writers and broadcasters.
Houston's Rick Adelman finished sec-
ond with 151 points and Orlando's Stan
Van Gundy was third with 150.

New Orleans coach Byron Scott won
the award last year.

Cleveland owner Dan Gilbert called
Brown a “natural leader" and credited
him with much of his team's success.

"Mike Brown is one of these rare peo-
ple that has nearly every tool in his tool
box," Gilbert said in a statement. "He is
smart, hard working, and selfless. He is
curious and hungry to learn. He is philo-
sophically driven and derives his deci-
sion making from his strong philosophy.

"Mike Brown is a critical element as to
why our franchise is growing into the
kind of success we all envisioned and
hoped to achieve.

“There is no man more deserving and
it proves to the world that, yes, nice guys
can indeed, finish first."



NCAA president Brand to
receive Pathfinder award

MYLES BRAND speaks during a news conference at Final Four tourney



(AP Photo: Eric Gay)

INDIANAPOLIS (AP) — NCAA
president Myles Brand will receive a
Pathfinder award in June for his long-
time contribution to youth sports.

The 66-year-old Brand, who is fight-
ing advanced pancreatic cancer, has been
president of the college sports governing
body since 2003. Before that, he was pres-
ident of Indiana University for six years.

The Pathfinder is presented each year
in conjunction with the Youthlinks Indi-
ana Charity Golf Tournament sponsored
by the Indiana Sports Corp. and Indiana
Black Expo. Youthlinks announced last
week that golfer Jack Nicklaus and his
wife, Barbara, would also be honored.

Brand and the Nicklauses will receive
the awards June 28 at the annual
Pathfinder banquet at Conseco Field-
house in Indianapolis.



with 27 points and Deron

Williams added 16 points and

a career playoff-high 17 assists.
Game 2 is Tuesday night.

Hawks 90, Heat 64

At Atlanta, with Josh Smith
delivering one rim-shaking
dunk after another and plenty
of teammates chipping in, the
Hawks made Miami look like
a one-man team.

The Hawks tied a franchise
record for fewest points allowed
in a playoff game, holding
Miami's Dwyane Wade, the
league's leading scorer, to 19
points.

Miami was held to its fewest
points of the season — its pre-
vious low was 68 — and the
Hawks equaled the mark they
set against the Charlotte Hor-
nets in a 1998 playoff victory.

Smith scored 23 points and
every other Atlanta starter also
was in double figures. Wade
made just 8 of 21 shots, and
Michael Beasley added 10
points, and the Heat shot just
37 percent and managed only
seven points in the final peri-
od. Game 2 is Wednesday night
in Atlanta.

Nuggets 113, Hornets 84

At Denver, Chauncey Billups
scored 36 points and made a
career-best eight 3-pointers in
the second-biggest blowout in
the Nuggets’ playoff history.

Capitalizing on their first
home-court edge in a playoff
series in 21 years, the Nuggets
nearly bested their previous
biggest margin of victory, a 141-
111 wallop of San Antonio in
1985.

Denver used a 21-0 run span-
ning the third and fourth quar-
ters to build a 95-69 cushion, a
run that was highlighted by
Billups’ seventh and eighth 3s.

Billups was 8-for-9 from
beyond the arc, one make off
the NBA playoff record, and
helped negate All-Star point
guard Chris Paul's big game.

Paul had 21 points and 11
assists for the Hornets.

Davidson’s
S Curry
wrestling

with NBA
decision

DAVIDSON, N.C. (AP)
— Stephen Curry is still
struggling with whether to
turn pro or return to David-
son for his senior season.

Coach Bob McKillop said
Monday that Curry hasn't
made up his mind. The star
guard has until Sunday to
declare for the NBA draft.

Curry led the nation in
scoring last season at 28.6
points a game and Is pro-
jected in many mock drafts
to be a lottery pick. But
Curry also wants to get his
degree, and McKillop said
that's an important factor in
Curry's decision-making.

Classes

Davidson does not have
summer classes, which
would make getting his
diploma difficult if he left
school early.

The 6-foot-3 Curry aver-
aged 32 points in the 2008
NCAA tournament. He
moved to point guard last
season and had 15 games of
30 or more points and three
of 40 or more.

TST

a am TRC hy

Rae
MAY)
Moniays



Who understands the
power of a promise?

PAGE 16, TUESDAY, APRIL 21, 2009

THE TRIBUNE



Seminar aims to teach

professionals how to
make the most of the day

THESE days, it’s become a
regional joke that Bahamians
acknowledge two time zones —
standard time and “when I
reach”.

Weddings, funerals, school
lessons, business meetings and
more are usually set to start on
“Bahamian time”, and while it’s
something the nation has seem-
ingly got used to, according to
business professional, corporate
trainer and master motivator
Spence Finlayson, it has become
a national embarrassment.

“Many people don’t realise it
but time management is what
can make or break an individual
or a business,” said Mr Finlayson, host of the
Dare To Be Great television show.

“In The Bahamas, we joke about being late
to everything but how can we depend on
tourism to be our leading industry when every-
thing from show times to flight times are off
schedule? We need to remember that tourists
are actually business people who save their
money to come here. We are leaving a sour
taste in their mouth and closing the door on the

Spence Finlayson



corporate tourism market. We
have to change this mindset if
we are going to compete global-
ly. We have to tame this time
monster before it controls us.”

Those who want to learn how
to leash the ‘time monster’ can
do so by taking part in a time
management seminar for pro-
fessionals on Wednesday, April
29, from 9am to 4pm at the
British Colonial Hilton facilitat-
ed by the Phoenix Institute.

“We get caught up with a bot-
tomless inbox, tons of e-mail,
millions of meetings, and more
all the time and it simply boils
down to too much to do and not
enough time to do it,” he added.

“This common problem people face in the
workplace and, as a result, the business can
suffer tremendously. People need to learn the
fundamentals of time management - under-
standing the value of time, proven ways to get
the most out of a day, how to balance work and
home, techniques for eliminating time wasters,
how to conquer procrastination, and much
more.”

We do.

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ELC iCM CALENDAR CONTEST EJ iesomenct commer intr

45th anniversary calendar

CONTEST RULES
1 Family Guardian’s Annual Calendar Photo Contest is open to all photographers. The title for the company’s 2010 calendar will be “A CELEBRATION OF
NATURE - 45th Anniversary Calendar”. Photographs may be of any subject (animate or inanimate) or a scene whichis a striking example of nature as
found in The Bahamas, as well as, photographs of the Family Guardian Corporate Centre, located on Village Road and East Bay Street. *Sec website
her competition details (www.familyguardian.com).
RIES IS JUNE 1, 2009. All entries are submitted at the owner's risk and will not be returned. 7 be
delivered to Family Guardian's Corporate Centre, Village Road and East Bay Street, Nassau, between S:00AM al
should be marked “Calendar Contest”.

anfed by an aliial emily m, ava

i .
INDIO.

=

se! pages vil be sendin Images must be provided a al mes on CD. Digital i images must be of high quality (2700 ,
es showing signs of photo manipulation, resolution enhancement or compression will be rejected. O ensure 0
, digital images should be supplied in RAW, TIFF or high quality JPEG and in the original colour format the camera uses (LAB or + RGB), All =
es Ir ist must be supplied with colour prints (8 x 10) which will be used in the judging process. (Note: prints submitted without CD's will not be eligible

i d vice versa). The photographer's name, photo subject and location must be written on the reverse of the print. :
ludging of entries will be based on beauty, interest, composition, colour, originality and quality of photograph. Particular areas and subjects of
interest are detailed on the website (www-familyguardian.com). The photographs selected will appear in Family Guardian's 2010 calendar. The
decision of the judges will be final.

A gift certificate valued at $400 will be presented for each of the photographs selected. Photographic credits will be given in the calendar. The number
of entries per photographer is limited to a maximum of 5 photos.

The winning photographs, along with all publication and reproduction rights attached thereto, become the property of Family Guardian and the company
reserves the right to use such in the future. Photos will not be returned.

Employees of Family Guardian, its affiliated companies or family members are not eligible.
10 Previously published photos are not eligible.

*For further details & key subjects of interest
visit our website at www.familyguardian.com

2010 Calendar Photo Contest Entry Form

Return with photos to:
Calendar Contest, Family Guardian Corporate Centre
Village Road & East Bay Street, Nassau, Bahamas

ENTRY DEADLINE: JUNE 1, 2009

L BUSINESS
AIL

0. BOX STREET
DDRESS

BER OF PHOTOS ENTERED (maximum of 5)

| agree that in the event one or more of my entered photographs is selected as a winner in the 2010 Family Guardian
Calendar Photo Contest it will become the property of Family Guardian Insurance Co. Ltd., and! assign to Family Guardian
all rights pertaining to its use in any way whatsoever. | also confirm that the photos entered in this contest were taken in
The Bahamas by the undersigned and have not been previously published.





Photo by Jade Greensword

Family Guardian’s 2009 Calendar ATURE DATE



Kristaan H. A. Ingraham II/BIS

High Commissioner-Designate of the Federation
of Malaysia pays a courtesy call on Deputy PM

YEAN Yoke Heng, High Com-
missioner-Designate of the Feder-
ation of Malaysia to the Common-
wealth of the Bahamas paid a Cour-
tesy Call on Deputy Prime Minister
and Minister of Foreign Affairs
Brent Symonette on Wednesday,
April 15, 2009 at the Ministry of
Foreign Affairs in the Goodman’s
Bay Corporate Centre.

They briefly discussed estab-
lishing ties between the Bahamas

and Malaysia in areas such as
tourism, manufacturing, agricul-
ture, trade and investment.

Pictured from left are Anthony
McKinney, Chief of Protocol; Mohd
Fareed Zakaria, second secretary,
Embassy of Malaysia; High
Commissioner Heng; Mr Symon-
ette; Joshua Sears, Director Gen-
eral, Ministry of Foreign Aftairs,
and Carlton Wright, undersecre-
tary.

eels Reds) sp Relea)
slits ate sos ae
Lots of Prizes & Surprises!

ee a aL



ROYAL 3FIDELITY

Money at Work



THE TRIBUNE

NASSAU OFFICE





Price structure,
regulations holt
up the Bahamas
Wasie's proposed
biodiesel plant

@ By NEIL HARTNELL
Tribune Business Editor

THE need
to create a
new pricing
structure, and
a regulatory
framework to
control areas
such as pro-
duction
process by-
products, are
among the
reasons why
Bahamas
Waste’s pro-
posed $750,000 biodiesel waste-
to-energy plant has yet to be
approved, a government minis-
ter said yesterday.

Phenton Neymour, minister
of state for the environment,
told Tribune Business that
before the Government could
give full approval to the renew-
able energy venture, a pricing
structure to accommodate a
“locally produced fuel” had to

SEE page 5B

Neymour



T UE $20 A Xe

AUER (ei 22a

usiness

2009

SECTION B ¢ business@tribunemedia.net

Bahamas Waste ‘shoots’ for
500 tonne recycling target

@ By NEIL HARTNELL
Tribune Business Editor

ahamas Waste yesterday said it was

aiming to generate 500 tonnes of

recycled cardboard per month

from its new production facility,
which will be operational by late April-early
May 2009, after being “pleasantly surprised” by
its 2009 first quarter results.

Francisco de Cardenas, the BISX-listed com-
pany’s managing director, told Tribune Busi-
ness that everything produced by the card-
board recycling plant would be exported, most
likely to the Asian market, thus generating a
not-insignificant foreign currency earnings rev-
enue stream.

“We’re hoping that the bailer people are
going to be here this weekend,” Mr de Carde-
nas said of the recycling plant, “so we need to
test the bailer. As soon as we get the equip-
ment up and running, we’re going to start, soif
it’s not this month it will be early May.

“We’re going to try and shoot for 500 tonnes
a month, which is what our least quota will
be.”

He acknowledged that the company would
“have a bit of a learning curve” to endure in its
new business line, but was not too concerned
yet about demand and pricing for recycled
cardboard, even though global commodities
prices have come under pressure as a result of
the worldwide downturn.

“We want to get our systems in place to be
able to do it, and do it right,” Mr de Cardenas
told Tribune Business. “We’ll look at the most
profitable markets, and my understanding is

* End-April/early May
target for cardboard
facility’s operational
start, with all
product exported

* Company ‘pleasantly
surprised’ by 2009
first quarter results

that the most profitable market international-
ly right now is the Far East.

“People are tired of talking to us, because
we’ve been looking at this for a year. Once
we start bailing, and have a product we can put
in containers, everything will fall into place.”

Mr de Cardenas said Bahamas Waste had
already taken on one additional staff mem-
ber to handle the cardboard recycling facility,
while others had been doing “double duty”.

Meanwhile, the Bahamas Waste managing
director told Tribune Business that the com-
pany had been “pleasantly surprised with our
results” for the 2009 first quarter.

“We’re a little below last year, year-to-date,”
he conceded of the company’s net income for
the first quarter. “But considering we had an

International investment
demand slows to trickle

@ By NEIL HARTNELL
Tribune Business Editor

BAHAMIAN _ investor
appetite for international secu-
rities has all but dried up, Roy-
alFidelity Merchant Bank &
Trust’s president said yesterday,
while adding that he was “cau-
tiously optimistic” that the local
equities market was close to the
bottom and would present
“some great buying opportuni-
ties” in late summer 2009.

Michael Anderson told Tri-
bune Business that RoyalFi-
delity had during the 2009 first
quarter only taken up $50,000 of
its available $2.083 million in
foreign currency for investing
in international markets on
behalf of Bahamian investors.

He explained that the
Bahamian investment bank
took up such a small allocation
due to minimal investor
demand for international equi-
ties and debt securities, some-
thing he attributed to recent
trends in most global stock mar-
kets and a general wariness of
stock investments.

“This quarter, we’re still look-
ing to see if we go out and do
another TIGRS [investment]
fund,” Mr Anderson said of
RoyalFidelity’s plans, “but we
don’t know what the market
sentiment is.”

Meanwhile, RoyalFidelity
had also seen “fairly strong

=F

* RoyalFidelity takes up just
$50,000 of available
$2.083m for international
investing in quarter one

* But ‘cautiously optimistic’
Bahamian equities market
near bottom, with upside
and buying opportunities
post-summer 2009

redemptions” from its mutual
fund portfolio, including the
RoyalFidelity Bahamas Growth
and Income Fund, as investors
moved to liquidate holdings due
to a need for cash, coupled with
concern about declining equity
values in the Bahamian market.

Although RoyalFidelity’s
FINDEX index, which mea-
sures equity returns based on a
weighted average of share price
movements and dividend yields,
was down by 4.49 per cent for
the first three-and-a-half
months of 2009, Mr Anderson
struck an upbeat note by indi-
cating he felt the Bahamian
equities market was close to
approaching the ‘bottom’ of its
current down cycle.

“Tm cautiously optimistic,”
he told Tribune Business. “I
think you'll have a tough sum-

SEE page 5B

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SEE page 3B



(242) 356-9801

FREEPORT OFFICE

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$22m judgment
sought against
Bahamas resort

@ By NEIL HARTNELL
Tribune Business Editor

AUS private equity fund has
applied to the New York courts
for a $22 million judgment
award against the principals of a
Bahamas-based resort project
now in receivership, after they
defaulted on a $16 million loan
that they guaranteed.

Attorneys for BA Chub Cay
Ltd, the vehicle through which
Cerberus Real Estate Capital
Management advanced $16 mil-
lion to finance the Berry Islands
development bearing the same
name, late last week filed their
proposed judgment against
principals Walter McCrory, Bob
Moss and the estate of the late
Kaye Pearson.

Michael Gordon, an attorney
with Katten Muchin Rosenman,
BA Chub Cay Ltd’s attorneys,
in an April 15, 2009, affidavit
accompanying the proposed
judgment urged the US District
Court for the southern district
of New York to grant its clients
$22.095 million.

Of this, some $16 million was
the original loan principal;
$1.335 million interest at 18.5

Real estate market seeing ‘slow down’

B By NEIL HARTNELL
Tribune Business Editor

RENTAL prices in the
Bahamian real estate market
have dropped by between 15-
20 per cent as a result of a
property surplus, Tribune Busi-
ness was told yesterday, with
both the international and
domestic property buyer mar-
kets having slowed in compari-
son to late 2008 and earlier this
year.

William Wong, the Bahamas
Real Estate Association’s
(BREA) president, said that
based on feedback from the
organisation’s members
demand for Bahamian real
estate had “slowed down quite a
bit” in recent weeks, a trend

Make ita

° Pension Plans

* Mutual Funds

* Demand falling compared to late 2008
and earlier this year, as downturn bites
* Rental prices off 15-20% due to property glut
* First-time buyer incentives do not yet have desired impact

attributed to the prevailing eco-
nomic climate.

Mr Wong, who heads the
rebranded RE/MAX Ocean
Realty Bahamas, said: “Based
on what I’m hearing from my
members, things are slowing.
That’s going for both the local
and international markets right
now.

“This is a world thing, not a
local issue. People are looking,
and there are still some buyers,
but it’s slow. I know a lot of my
members are hurting a little bit

reality.

* Stock Brokerage

* Corporate Finance

* Investment Management

* Trusts & Estate Planning

° Personal Pension Plan Accounts

* Education Investment Accounts

EP Pt

Nassau: 242.356.9801
Freeport: 242.351.3010

FAV LFV ele)

St. Michael: 246.435.1955

royalfidelity.com

right now.

“Hopefully, this will not go
on for too long, another six to
eight months. If we can survive
2009, hopefully we can take
some steps forward next year,
but it’s anyone’s guess. We’ve
just got to sharpen our pencils
and bring people here as much
as we can.”

The BREA president added:
“The market has slowed down
quite a bit. I think everyone’s

SEE page 4B

per cent, calculated from May
10, 2007, to June 1, 2008; $3.768
million in default interest, cal-
culated at 23.5 per cent from
June 2, 2008, to April 30, 2009;
an $320,000 Exit Fee premium;
and $672,550 to cover costs and
expenses.

In their proposed judgment,
Cerberus and its attorneys stat-
ed that “there is no genuine
issue as to any material fact con-
cerning [the trio’s] liability
under guarantees of, among
other things, the repayment of a
loan in the principal amount of
$16 million”.

Mr Gordon’s affidavit said
the New York court’s April 7,
2009, order had found that
because Messrs McCrory, Moss
and Pearson had failed to main-
tain insurance coverage on the
Chub Cay Club development
and its assets, they had default-
ed on the loan agreement and
BA Chub Cay Ltd “properly
accelerated the loan on June 2,
2008”.

In his April 7 order, Judge
Jed Rakoff said that exactly one
year earlier, 13 insurance poli-

SEE page 4B

The information contained is from a third
party and The Tribune can not be held
responsible for errors and/or omission
from the daily report.



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PAGE 2B, TUESDAY, APRIL 21, 2009 THE TRIBUNE



‘Time’ for new management conference

A time management seminar for
Bahamian professionals is scheduled to
be staged at the British Colonial Hilton
9am to 4pm April 29, facilitated by the
Phoenix Institute.

“Many people don’t realise it but time
management is what can make or break
and individual or a business,” said
Spence Finlayson, host of the Dare To
Be Great television show and a corpo-
rate trainer.

“In The Bahamas, we joke about
being late to everything, but how can
we depend on tourism to be our leading
industry when everything from show
times to flight times are off schedule?
We need to remember that tourists are
actually business people who save their
money to come here.

“We are leaving a sour taste in their
mouth and closing the door on the cor-
porate tourism market. We have to

change this mindset if we are going to
compete globally. We have to tame this
time monster before it controls us.”

“We get caught up with a bottomless
inbox, tons of e-mail, millions of meet-
ings, and more all the time, and it simply
boils down to too much to do and not
enough time to do it,” he added.

“This common problem people face
in the workplace and, as a result, the
business can suffer tremendously. People

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THE TRIBUNE

TUESDAY, APRIL 21, 2009, PAGE 3B



RoyalCaribbean praises
downtown revitalisation

m@ By CHESTER ROBARDS
Business Reporter
crobards@tribunemedia.net

ROYALCARIBBEAN
Cruise Lines is eagerly antici-
pating the revitalisation of
Downtown Nassau and the
expansion of the cruise port,
the company’s vice-president
of governmental relations for
the Caribbean told Tribune
Business, with last week’s
announcement of a public-pri-
vate partnership to oversee the
redevelopment signaling the
Bahamas’ commitment to
improving its tourism product.

Mike Ronan, who also rep-
resents his company within the
Florida Caribbean Cruise Asso-
ciation (FCCA), said the
Bahamas government should
be complimented for its com-
mitment to improving Nassau’s
cruise port facilities, which will
inevitably make the destination
more competitive in the
Caribbean.

Speaking to this newspaper
at the 13th annual Caribbean
Hotel and Tourism Investment
Conference (CHTIC) in
Bermuda, Mr Ronan asserted

that the Bahamas continues to
be a choice destination for
cruise travelers.

“The short cruises to the
Bahamas continue to be popu-
lar, there is no question about
it,” he said. Following the onset
of the economic downturn
cruise lines began slashing
prices and offering short-term
deals in order to fill staterooms.

“Each company is looking for
the balance. We are so accus-
tomed to traveling full that it’s
difficult when you decide to
leave cabins empty,” said Mr
Ronan

“Some (cruise lines) may
decide to leave some cabins
empty rather than drop the
prices further because it’s hard-
er to get your prices back up
to where they should be later
on.”

At present, he said price
points are not where the indus-
try would like them to be, even
though the cruise ship eco-
nomic environment is stabiliz-
ing.
“We are able to fill the ship,
and we are seeing bookings
come in for the summer for not
only the Caribbean but other

markets,” Mr Ronan said.

“Today, clearly, what you
pay for the ticket does not
match the value of the cost of
the product. Overall, the goal of
the industry is to keep the qual-
ity of the product up.

“We believe that people
understand the value of the
cruise experience, and for that
reason we will be considered
seriously when they decide
which option to select. Right
now, we think that we’re begin-
ning to see, like a lot of indus-
tries, a light at the end of the
tunnel in the advanced book-
ings.”

Mr Ronan said the Bahamas
is one of the most price com-
petitive destinations in the
region because of the limited
variation in the product
between cruise lines, whereas
other cruises will tend to go to
other locations and there is dif-
ferent demand.

“Where we are encouraged
is that the present government
has made serious drives, culmi-
nating with the recent signing of
the contract to do modifications
to the Harbour in Nassau,” he
said.

The Downtown Nassau Part-
nership, charged with spear-
heading the revitalisation of
Nassau, and the dredging of the
Harbour to accommodate the
world’s largest cruise vessel, the
Oasis of the Seas, will mean
that the Bahamas will not miss
any opportunities to accommo-
date newer ships looking for
world class ports of call, Mr
Ronan said.

Several tourism industry pro-
fessionals told this newspaper at
the CHTIC, under condition of
anonymity, that they were not
mmpressed by the state of New
Providence’s downtown area,
some saying they were
abhorred by what cruise pas-
sengers had to see as they dis-
embarked from their ships.
“They see the backs of what
looks like warehouses,” one
said.

The revitalisation of the
downtown area has been
mulled for years, through sev-
eral governments, and the cogs
now seem to be slowly grind-
ing to a start.

According to Mr Ronan,
Royal Caribbean continues to
expand its fleet with eight new

Bahamas Waste ‘shoots’ for 500 tonne recycling target

FROM page 1B

awful six months towards the end of last
year, we’re pleased. We’re a little bit down,
but still trying to hold our own.

“Total revenues are down. Not by much,
but they’re down. We’ve made a serious
attempt at cutting all of our costs. The one
saving grace at the moment is the fuel
costs.”

However, while fuel prices had dropped
as a result of the reduction in global oil
prices, the price of steel, tyres and oil lubri-
cants - all key ingredients in Bahamas
Waste’s business - had remained stubborn-
ly high.

Meanwhile, Mr de Cardenas said some
clients had dropped Bahamas Waste’s ser-

vices in a bid to save money. Some had
gone down from multiple to reduced col-
lections, and accounts receivables had
increased with some customer struggling

to pay.
Best

“We’re just trying to do our best,” he
added. “There’s talks that some develop-
ment projects are moving forward, some
are not. I won’t believe anything until I see
it.”

Writing in the annual report, Peter
Andrews, Bahamas Waste’s chairman, told
shareholders that the cancelling of con-
struction projects and reduction in tourist
arrivals had impacted two industries critical

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enue streams.

He wrote: “Although the storm clouds
were on the horizon, I do not think any of
us saw how quickly the September crash
of the international banking system would
affect our nation’s economy.”

As a result, the Board and Bahamas
Waste management had developed a strate-
gic plan “to do more with less”, imposing a
freeze on hiring and overtime expenses;
cutting costs; avoiding new capital spending;
and “maintaining flat budgets for all depart-
ments”.

“Our new projects will go ahead as
planned,” Mr Andrews added. “We feel
that this is not a time to panic, instead it is
atime to be prudent.”

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Commercial Accounting Supervisor- British Caribbean
British Canbbean Finance Manager
Bahamas.

This position is responsible for managing the Commercial Finance activities for four
counties within the British Caribbean: Bermuda, Bahamas, Gayman and Tortola,
Manages Revenue leakage, establishes credit limits and reviews shipments to profile
Supervises the fallawing staff; Billing Analyst, Quties and Vendor Analyst, Accounts

Receivable Analyst.

DUTIES AND RESPONSIBILITIES:

* Manage the Commercial activities for a country or group of countries

within the Cluster.

* Supervise Billing. Duties, Accounts Receivable and Vendor Analysts.
* Prepare and analyze statistics and KPIs far the country cluster,
* Responsible for weekly revenue forecasting to Finance Manager and SMT

* Wanage customer profiles,

: Establish AR Credit limits

* Principal contact for Commercial Controller,

“Assist with preparation of Customer profitability analysis.
* Handle Billing queries from Billing Genter.

* 1" level of approval for Credit notes.

* Special propacts and ad hoc reports as required.

* Performs other assignments as required.

* Anahyse daily transport collect and cash on delivery shipments
* Ensure accurate billing of inbound shipments

representative

MINIMUM QUALIFICATIONS:

* Coordinate all Freight and Logistics billing with Canbbean designated

* High school diploma and/or minimal of 5 years applicable experience
‘Minimum af 2 years supervisory or management experience leading

a department.

+, background in commercial credit required.
* Expaneance with a major Enterprise Reporting Package (ERP}

* Excallent analytical and interpersonal skills.
* Ability to raad and interpret data reports. Ability to understand and perform data

analysis.

“PCO skills should include the basic suite of MS products, Excel, Access, Word,

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* Excellent communication skills both written and verbal, this functian does a
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PREFERRED QUALIFICATIONS:

* Bachelor's degree in Accounting!Finance, a related field or equivalent

education

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P.O, Box W373,
Nassau, Bahamas

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PAGE 4B, TUESDAY, APRIL 21, 2009

THE TRIBUNE



Real estate market seeing ‘slow down’

FROM page 1B

taking a ‘wait and see’ attitude.
I think we’re getting into the
dog days of summer, and we’ve
just got to hang tight.”

Bahamian realtors spoken to
in recent weeks by Tribune
Business have indicated that
while buyer demand has
dropped, due to a conservative
‘wait and see how the econom-
ic situation pans out’ approach,
business is still there to be done
and companies/agents just have
to “hustle more” to obtain it.

“There are buyers out there,”
one told Tribune Business yes-
terday. “From a Bahamian per-
spective, the biggest problem is
getting mortgage financing. The
banks are being a lot more cau-
tious about lending.”

Mr Wong added: “I believe
some of the banks are being a
little more attentive to detail
right now and are concerned
about not having any more




loans on the books that go into
default.

“T think they’re scrutinising
things a bit more closely now. I
think they’re becoming a bit
more careful that people com-
ing up pay deposits and qualify.
Like any business, the banks
are concerned about people los-
ing their jobs and the economy,
so they’re being a bit more
eagle eyed.”

The BREA president told
Tribune Business that the Gov-
ernment’s 2008-2009 Budget tax
incentives, designed to stimu-
late the first-time buyer seg-
ment of the domestic market,
had not produced the anticipat-
ed boost because they were
effectively cancelled out by the
severity of the 2008 second half
economic downturn.

The incentives had included
an increase in the real property
tax ceiling from $250,000 to
$500,000 for first-time home
buyers, for the first five years

Job Opportunity for a

FINANCIAL CONTROLLER








An established Bahamian Company is seeking a
Financial Controller






Qualifications for a position are:
¢ Bachelor’s Degree or equivalent in Accounting
or applied finance from an accredited and








reputable university.

Certified Public Account

3-5 years Audit experience

Proficiency in Accounting Software such as
QuickBooks or Peachtree

Experience in preparing IFRS compliant










financial statements

The individual will be responsible for directing
the overall financial plans and accounting
practices of the organization.







Interested persons should send resumes to:
P.O.Box CB 13526
Nassau, Bahamas







post-purchase. In addition, first-
time buyers were exempt from
Stamp Tax payments on the
purchase of real estate valued at
$500,000 or less.

“They were certainly good
incentives for the local market,
but at this point they’ve not
really had the kind of impact
we thought they would have
had,” Mr Wong said. “It came
at the start of the economic
slowdown, so there’s not been
that push to purchase proper-

ty.”

As for short-term assistance,
the BREA president told Tri-
bune Business that the only
thing the Government could do
to stimulate the Bahamian real
estate market was to re-assess
its decision to eliminate the
$35,000 real property tax ceiling
for owner-occupied properties.
This amendment had also seen
the real property tax rate
reduced to 0.75 per cent, down
from 1 per cent, on properties

valued in excess of $5 million.

BREA members have argued
that the ceiling’s removal made
the Bahamas uncompetitive
against the rest of the
Caribbean when it came to
attracting second home buyers,
giving this nation among the
highest tax rates on such prop-
erties.

Mr Wong told Tribune Busi-
ness he had met with Zhivargo
Laing, minister of state for
finance, on the issue. The min-

ister, he added, said the Gov-
ernment would see what it
could do to accommodate
BREA’s request in its ongoing
2009-2010 Budget planning
exercise.

Mr Wong said: “The rental
market is still very slow, because
you have so many units on the
market. Prices on those units
have come down quite a bit,
anywhere from 15-20 per cent
on condos, houses and every-
thing.”

$22m judgment sought
against Bahamas resort

FROM page 1B

cies representing the insurance
coverage on Chub Cay, as
required by the loan agreement,
were cancelled because the
developers had not paid the
premiums.

Despite a series of e-mail
exchanges between Mr McCro-
ry and BA Chub Cay Ltd, the
required insurance coverage
had not been reinstated by May
28, 2008, leading to the loan
default. Insurance coverage, the
court noted, still had not been
reinstated by October 10, 2008.

Messrs McCrory, Moss and
Pearson had argued that they
were not bound by any insur-

ance requirement under the
loan agreement, alleging that
BA Chub Cay Ltd had orally
dropped this condition. How-
ever, the court rejected this
claim.

Judge Rakoff ordered that
the trio’s attorneys submit by
tomorrow any objections they
had to BA Chub Cay Ltd’s pro-
posed judgment, with a final
judgment to be entered on
April 30, 2009.

In court documents previ-
ously detailed by Tribune Busi-
ness, 13 policies providing insur-
ance coverage to Chub Cay
were cancelled by the Bahami-
an agent, Nassau Underwriters

Share your news

The Tribune wants to hear

from people who are
making news in their

neighbourhoods. Perhaps
you are raising funds for a

good cause, campaigning
for improvements in the
area or have won an
award.

If so, call us on 322-1986
and share your story.

THE PUBLIC HOSPITALS AUTHORITY
MATERIALS MANAGEMENT DIRECTORATE

rier.
a i,

deg

PUBLIC NOTICE

TENDER FOR THE SUPPLY
OF LINEN / TEXTILE, CLEANING,
AND STATIONARY SUPPLIES

Tenders are invited from qualified Contractors for the supply
of Linen/Textile, Cleaning, Stationary Supplies for the Public
Hospitals Authority Institutions and Agencies for a period of one

(1) vear.

Tender documents,

which include

instructions to Tenderers,

specifications and other relevant information, can be collected 9:00
am. — 3:00 pom, Monday through Friday at the Materials
Management Directorate, Poncess Margaret Hospital's compound,

Shirley Street.

A Tender must be submitted in duplicate in a sealed envelope or

packaged identified

as “Linen/Textile, Cleaning,

Stationary Supplies ” and addressed to:

The Chairman
Tenders Committee

Public Hospitals Authority

3 & West Terraces
Centerville
P.O. Box N-8200
Nassau, Bahamas

and/ or

All Tenders must be received at the above address by 3:00 p.m. on

2â„¢ June 2009.

A copy of a valid business license and a certificate of up to date
National Insurance Contributions should accompany all proposal

The Public Hospitals Authority reserves the right to refect any or all

Tendery si.

Association (NUA), for non-
payment of premiums.

It was alleged that to rein-
state coverage, NUA required
the developers to pay $400,000
immediately, with the remaining
$194,440 balance paid off in
monthly instalments of $64,813.

In response, Mr McCrory said
he had sought to obtain alter-
native coverage through Sun-
shine Insurance Agents & Bro-
kers, holding numerous com-
munications with a senior exec-
utive, Brian Moodie. He alleged
that Cerberus indicated it would
be flexible on the insurance
question.

Chub Cay, which was

INSIGHT

For the stories
behind the news,
read Insight
on Mondays



unveiled with much fanfare as
the so-called ‘anchor project’
for the Berry Islands and North
Andros just five years ago, is
the first such major mixed-use
resort project to suffer being
placed into receivership.

Its fate is a prime example of
just how bad a toll the global
economic downturn, and espe-
cially the freezing of credit/debt
markets, has exacted on foreign
direct investment projects that
the Bahamas was counting on
to generate jobs and economic
growth. Numerous other pro-
jects, including the Ritz-Carl-
ton Rose Island, Royal Island,
Ginn sur mer and Rum Cay
Resort Marina, have all been
impacted to some degree by the
immense difficulty — if not
impossibility — of obtaining debt
financing at reasonable cost and
terms.

Apart from Scotiabank
(Bahamas) and other financiers,
Chub Cay’s woes have also
impacted Bahamian contractors
engaged on the project’s con-
struction. Tribune Business pre-
viously reported that Osprey
Developers and Gunite Pools
had obtained separate default
judgments worth a total
$468,000 against the develop-
ment over allegedly unpaid bills.

Bahamas Agricultural & Industrial Corporation

PRPS HATE RHT HAHAHAHAHAHA HAHAH ETHER KTR RETR

In Conjunction With

MINISTRY OF HEALTH

Presents

NEW PROVIDENCE |

COCONUT CRAFT TRAINING PROGRAM

Date:

Name:
Address:
Settlement:
Telephone:

P.O). Box

April 27" — May 8, 2009
Venue: Ministry Of Health
Cafeteria

Time:

6:00 - 10:00pm
Location: Poinciana Hill & Meeting

Street

Application Form

Cellular:

Email:

ADMINISTRATIVE FEE: $100. 00 [EXCLUDING MATERIALS]

Tel: 322-3740-3

LERERERERERE

Contact Person

LaKeisha Thompson or Sharae Collie
HANDICRAFT DEVELOPMENT/MARKETING DEPARTMENTS - B ATC

Fax: 322-2123/328-6542





THE TRIBUNE

TUESDAY, APRIL 21, 2009, PAGE 5B





Price structure, regulations hold up the
Bahamas Waste’s proposed biodiesel plant

FROM page 1B

be implemented.

Tribune Business revealed
yesterday that Bahamas Waste’s
managing director, Francisco de
Cardenas, writing in the com-
pany’s 2008 annual report, had
said it found the three-year wait
for governmental approval for
its biodiesel facility “puzzling”.

Yet Mr Neymour replied yes-
terday: “I don’t know why
they’re puzzled. What is the

case is that in approving
biodiesel production, we
required some regulatory
changes.

“For instance, a prime con-
cern would be how we would
price the biodiesel. Right now
the Bahamas, in relation to
imported gasoline and diesel, is
a regulated market based on the
landed price. A locally pro-
duced product requires a dif-
ferent pricing structure.”

Currently, the Bahamas only
has pricing structures for
imported fuels, such as gasoline

and diesel, which are price con-
trolled by the Government. The
prices are based on the landed
cost of fuel, as shown by oil
company invoices, with the cost
paid by end-users determined
by government-imposed taxes
and wholesale/retail margins.
“We also need to address the
waste streams coming from the
production of biodiesel,” Mr
Neymour told Tribune Busi-
ness, “the glycerin that is a by-
product of the production. How
do we address the waste streams
coming from the biodiesel.”

To assist it, Mr Neymour
indicated the Government had
“engaged the assistance” of the
Inter-American Development
Bank (IDB) and its technical
assistance branch. The IDB is
working with the Government
to aid its sustainable, renewable
energy initiatives, and as part
of this will assess Bahamas
Waste’s biodiesel proposal.

Mr Neymour indicated that
final decisions on the per-
mits/approvals needed for the
facility would be taken within
the next 12 months, as this is

International investment
demand slows to trickle

FROM page 1B

mer, but ’m more optimistic
about 2010. The summer will
give some great buying oppor-
tunities for people who are will-
ing, and have funds available to
buy securities.

“There are good opportuni-
ties there. There’s a bunch of
sellers out there who, if they
don’t take their stock off the
market, will end up selling at a
lower price.”

The RoyalFidelity president
said global stock markets were
starting to show signs that the
worst may be over, having for
the moment put the major cor-
rections of late 2008 and earlier
this year behind them (despite
yesterday’s plummet). The
Bahamian economy, though,
and the Bahamas International
Securities Exchange (BISX)
stocks - whose earnings perfor-
mance is directly linked to its
health - may have to wait a little
longer, possibly six months, for
recovery to bear fruit.

“Throughout the summer
period, we’ll see a stagnant

slowing economy which will hot
back earnings growth, and drop
earnings growth for the compa-
nies here,” Mr Anderson said.
Stock market and economic
recovery was instead likely to
filter through into late 2009, and
possibly 2010.

Bahamian equity investors,
both institutional, brokerage
and retail clients, had seen the
paper value of their equity
investments fall by around 20-30
per cent on average compared
to one year ago, with many
BISX-listed stocks currently
trading at 52-week lows.

Yet Mr Anderson said he was
hopeful that “the bulk of the
losses are behind the market
and we’re in the last phase of
the down market”.

He added: “There’s a lot
more upside in the market than
downside left. People selling out
now are getting out close to the
bottom, and now is the time to
look to buy more.”

With minimal buying cur-
rently taking place in the
Bahamian equities market, Mr
Anderson said sellers were hav-
ing to drop their asking prices to
find buyers, especially if they

NOTICE

ESSO EXPLORATI

N AND PRODUCTI

N_NIGER INC,

Pursuant to the provisions of Section 137 (8) of
the International Business Companies Act 2000,
notice is hereby given that the above-named
Company has been dissolved and struck off the
Register pursuant to a Certificate of Dissolution
issued by The Registrar General on the 2nd day

of April, A.D., 2009.

Dated the 17th day of April, A.D., 2009.

Gary Johnsen

needed liquid cash rapidly. As a
result, a “build-up” of selling
pressure, depressing stock
prices, had taken place over the
last six months.

With BISX’s ‘10 per cent’
rule still in effect, meaning that
trades can only take place with-
in a range of 10 per cent above
or below the previous day’s
close, Mr Anderson said it was
possible that a stock could drop
by as much as 50 per cent with-



in one week.

While such a “precipitous
drop” had not been seen yet,
Mr Anderson said Bahamian
public company stocks had
dropped by as much as 20 per
cent within a week.

Yet he pointed out that cur-
rently, stocks such as Cable
Bahamas and Doctors Hospi-
tal Health Systems (DHHS)
were trading at very attractive
price/earnings ratios.

Position WANTED:
REGISTERED NURSE










A Major Development in Southwest New Providence is
seeking a full time on-site registered nurse. The nurse
will be responsible for non-critical incidents/accident
to provide the necessary first aid and first responder








treatment.

Duties include but not limited to:-





Stabilization of any injured person/s until
they can be transferred to a clinic or
hospital facilities for complete evaluation

by a doctor.

Administer drug and alcohol testing to
construction and company staff if required.

Complete any reports required by in house
and relevant government agencies
regarding injuries or incidents on site.

Suitable candidates must have full medical liability

insurance coverage,

be technically trained and

a Ministry of Health approved/certified medical
professional with at least five (5) years experience in the
medical field. Emergency room experience is a plus.

Salary

is commensurate with qualifications and

the length of time it will take
the IDB to complete its work.

The minister described
biodiesel as a “key component”
of its renewable energy mix,
with the Bahamas Waste pro-
posal having already been
reviewed, and BEC’s renewable
energy committee also provid-
ing comments and feedback on
it to the Government.

“It [the Bahamas Waste pro-
ject] is being addressed under
the IDB project,” Mr Neymour
confirmed. “It is important to
recognise that our pricing and

regulatory tools do not address
locally-produced products, and
it’s important to put these things
in place.”

On the biodiesel front,
Bahamas Waste has been seek-
ing to further increase share-
holder value by developing a
plant capable of recycling the
waste cooking oil created by
households, restaurants and
cruise ships that visit New Prov-
idence. The company believes
500,000 gallons of waste cook-
ing oil are generated every year
on New Providence alone.

Clico (Bahamas) Limited

(In Liquidation)



LIQUIDATOR’S NOTICE



Policyholders of Clico

(Bahamas)

Limited (In

Liquidation) are advised that premium payments and
other policy transactions can be made at the Company's
main office, located on Mt. Royal Avenue and Carew









Street, Nassau, Bahamas,

Policyholders and the public are further advised that
office hours are from 9:00 am to 4:30 pm daily.








Craig A. (Tony) Gomez
Official Liquidater

Insurance Company seeks

Administrative Assistant

Qualifications:

+ Associate degree or higher in Business or related field, and/or, minimum of 1

year insurance or financial related experience.

Professional Skills:

+ Excellent written, verbal communication, organizational and customer service

skills

+ Ability to work in a fast paced industry with minimal supervision and be a self

starter.

Computer Skills:

* Proficient with MS Windows Operating System

* Proficiency in MS Office Suite- Word, Excel, Access

+ Knowledge of USSI Policy System would be a plus.

Duties:

+ Processing & Managing new and renewal policy applications.

+ Issue policies, endorsements, reinstatements and lapse notices.

+ Maintain policy number inventory listing, Corporate documents,

* Policy files and records.

+ Work closely with Broker & Third Party Administrator.

+ Process premium billing and collection, check deposits, policy maintenance, and

claims.

+ Handle incoming correspondence from insured and insured companies to

distribute accordingly.

+ Liaise with Insurance Managers, Board of Directors and Third Party

Administrators.

experience. Interested persons may send resume to

Liquidator of P.O. Box SP-63158

ESSO EXPLORATION AND
PRODUCTION NIGER INC.

Resumes should be forwarded to:
hr@hessmgmt.com

FG CAPITAL
BROKEBAG:

oe Maerker
ROYAL = FIDELITY
TAYLOR =n —_
INDUSTRIES LTD.

WILL BE CLOSED FOR
ANNUAL STOCKTAKING

cv E€I Mm Tt & TL.

FINDEX: CLOSE 797.05 | YTD -4.53% | 2008 -12.31%
WWW .BISXBAHAMAS.COM | TELEPHONE: 242-323-2330 | FACSIMILE: 242-323-2320

Securit y Previous Close Today's Close Change Daily Vol. EPS $ Div $ P/E

Abaco Markets 1.28 1.28 0.127
Bahamas Property Fund 11.00 11.00
Bank of Bahamas 6.95 6.95
Benchmark 0.63 0.63
Bahamas Waste 3.15 3.15
2.37
11.09
2.83
6.45
2.42
1.89
7.76
11.00
10.40
5.10
1.00

11.00
6.95
0.63
3.15
1.95

11.09
2.83
6.45
1.31
1.89
6.02

11.00

10.35
5.00
1.00

0.992
0.244
-0.877
0.105
0.055
1.309
0.249
0.438
0.099
0.240
0.420
0.322
0.794
0.337
0.000
0.035
0.407
0.952
0.180

Fidelity Bank
Cable Bahamas
Colina Holdings
Commonwealth Bank (S1)
Consolidated Water BDRs
Doctor's Hospital
Famguard
Finco
FirstCaribbean Bank
Focol (S)
Focol Class B Preference
Freeport Concrete
ICD Utilities
J. S. Johnson 10.50 10.50
Premier Real Estate 10.00 10.00
BISX LISTED DEBT SECURITIES - (Bonds trade on a Percentage Pricing bases)
Securi Symbol Last Sale
Fidelity Bank Note 17 (Series A) + FBB17 100.00 7%
Fidelity Bank Note 22 (Series B) + FBB22 100.00 0.00 Prime + 1.75%
Fidelity Bank Note 13 (Series C) + FBB13 100.00 0.00 T%
Fidelity Bank Note 15 (Series D) + FBB15 100.00 0.00 Prime + 1.75%
Fidelity Over-The-Counter Securities
Bid $ Ask $ Last Price
7.92 8.42 14.60
4.00 6.25 6.00
0.35 0.40 0.35
Colina Over-The-Counter Securities
30.13 31.59 29.00
0.45 0.55 0.55
BISX Listed Mutual Funds
NA Vv YTD% Last 12 Months
1.3664 0.95 4.77
2.8962 -1.49 -3.35
1.4508 1.20 4.68
3.1964 -5.59 -13.64
12.7397 0.96 5.79
100.5606
96.4070
1.0000
9.1599
1.0440
1.0364 0.33.
1.0452 0.76
MARKET TERMS
YIELD - last 12 month dividends divided by closing price
Bid $ - Buying price of Colina and Fidelity
Ask $ - Selling price of Colina and fidelity
Last Price - Last traded over-the-counter price
Weekly Vol. - Trading volume of the prior week
EPS $ - Acompany’s reported earnings per share for the last 12 mths
NAV - Net Asset Value
N/M - Not Meaningful
FINDEX - The Fidelity Bahamas Stock Index. January 1, 1994 = 100

2.37
11.09
2.83
6.45
2.58
1.89
7.76
11.00
10.40
5.10
1.00

CC OC CeCe Oro eS
2290990309090900000
666666556565656056

0.30

5.50

8.60
10.00

0.30
5.59

0.30
5.59

S2wk-Hi S2wk-Low
1000.00
1000.00
1000.00
1000.00

Interest

19 October 2017

19 October 2022
30 May 2013
29 May 2015

THURSDAY, APRIL 23
FRIDAY, APRIL 24
SATURDAY, APRIL 25

52wk-Low Symbol
Bahamas Supermarkets
Caribbean Crossings (Pref)

RND Holdings

Weekly Vol. EPS $ Div $ P/E
0.300
0.000

0.001

0.480
0.000

ABDAB
RND Holdings

4.540
0.002

0.000
0.000

Fund Name

Colina Bond Fund

Colina MSI Preferred Fund
1.3859 Colina Money Market Fund
3.1964 Fidelity Bahamas G & | Fund
12.1564 Fidelity Prime Income Fund

100.0000 CFAL Global Bond Fund

96.4070 CFAL Global Equity Fund
1.0000 CFAL High Grade Bond Fund
9.0950 Fidelity International Investment Fund
1.0000
1.0000
1.0000

Div $ Yield %
1.3041

2.9230

28-Feb-09
31-Mar-09
3-Apr-09
31-Mar-09
28-Feb-09
31-Dec-08
31-Dec-08
31-Dec-07
31-Mar-09
9-Feb-09
9-Feb-09
9-Feb-09

0.56
-3.59
0.00
0.71
0.80

0.56
-3.59
0.00
-12.76
4.40
3.64
4.40

We regret any
inconvenience this will
cause to our customers.

FG Financial Preferred Income Fund
FG Financial Growth Fund
FG Financial Diversified Fund

BISX ALL SHARE INDEX - 19 Dec 02 = 1,000.00
S2wk-Hi - Highest closing price in last 52 weeks
52wk-Low - Lowest closing price in last 52 weeks
Previous Close - Previous day's weighted price for daily volume
Today's Close - Current day's weighted price for daily volume
Change - Change in closing price from day to day
Daily Vol. - Number of total shares traded today
DIV $ - Dividends per share paid in the last 12 months
P/E - Closing price divided by the last 12 month earnings
(S) - 4for-1 Stock Split - Effective Date 8/8/2007
('S1) - S-for-1 Stock Split - Effective Date 7/11/2007
TO TRADE CALL: COLINA 242-502-7010 | ROYALFIDELITY 242-356-7764 | FG CAPITAL MARKETS 242-396-4000 | COLONIAL 242-502-7525





PAGE 6B, TUESDAY, APRIL 21, 2009

THE TRIBUNE





New concerns about bank
health grip Wall Street

@ MARTIN CRUTSINGER
AP Economics Writer

WASHINGTON (AP) —
Anxiety is growing again over
the health of the nation’s largest
banks, and with Congress hesi-
tant to commit more money,
the Obama administration is
exploring ways to strengthen
them in the face of an unrelent-
ing recession.

Results of the federal gov-
ernment's "stress tests" on big
banks are due May 4, and Wall
Street is increasingly worried
they will show some banks are
in worse shape than expected.

The renewed bank fears
drove the stock market down
on Monday in its worst showing
in six weeks. Bank of America
stock lost nearly a quarter of its
value, and the Dow Jones
industrial average fell almost
290 points.

Bank of America reported a
first-quarter profit of $2.8 bil-
lion, joining other banks whose
earnings reports have looked
positive at first blush. But some
analysts say accounting steps
are concealing the depth of the
financial industry's woes.

The banks have been helped
by income from trading and
cheap borrowing, but they are
still struggling with bad debt,
said Joe Saluzzi, co-head of
equity trading at Themis Trad-
ing LLC.

Investors are "looking at



bank numbers and are saying
they are not that great,” he said.

Among the ideas being
explored by the administration
is converting the government's
loans into equity stakes, which
would improve the banks’ bot-
tom lines by increasing their
capital reserves.

The Treasury Department
will outline Friday how it plans
to structure the stress tests,
which aim to gauge the health
of 19 big banks. So far, investors
have been too optimistic about
the results, warned Jaret
Seiberg, a financial services pol-
icy analyst at Washington
Research Group.

"What we're seeing is a re-
evaluation of those positions,”
he said. "Until we have finality
on what the stress tests will tell
us, the markets will be very jit-
tery about the banks.”

The $700 billion in bailout
money approved by Congress
last fall has dwindled to about
$135 billion, and the adminis-
tration is under pressure to
show it has other tools to
strengthen weaker banks.

Critics have complained that
the bailout money has failed to
get banks to resume more nor-
mal lending to consumers and
businesses. Increased lending is
seen as vital to ending the finan-
cial crisis.

Congress has signaled that
additional money is unlikely, in
part because of public outrage

NOTICE

NOTICE is hereby given that LASHAN MARIE MOSS of JOAN






HEIGHT’S, P.O. BOX CB-13475, NASSAU,

BAHAMAS,

is applying to the Minister responsible for Nationality and
Citizenship, for registration/naturalization as a citizen of The
Bahamas, and that any person who knows any reason why







registration/naturalization

should

not be granted, should

send a written and signed statement of the facts within
twenty-eight days from the 14 day of April, 2009 to the
Minister responsible for nationality and Citizenship, P.O. Box






N-7147, Nassau, Bahamas.

Last Name:
Company:
Telephone # Home:
FOX #:



AMONG the ideas being explored by the Obama administration is converting the government's loans into
equity stakes, which would improve the banks’ bottom lines by increasing their capital reserves...

over executive bonuses at banks
getting taxpayer money.

"They understand that we
need an exit strategy from the
continuing cycle of bailouts,”
said Rep. Spencer Baucus of
Alabama, top Republican on
the House Financial Services
Committee.

Asked Monday whether Con-
gress would provide more mon-

ey, House Financial Services
Committee Chairman Barney
Frank, D-Mass., said: "Not at
this point, no."

The government has lent
nearly $240 billion to more than
540 banks since fall, much of it
in return for preferred stock.
Holders of preferred stock are
paid back before holders of
common stock if a company

2,320 sq. feet located on
Mt. Pleasant Avenue off Carib Road

Available for immediate occupancy
Call 393-7020 for further details

First Name:
Title:

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Exact Street Address:

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barcitiess =
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TODNY!

3 MONTHS | & MONTHS | 1 YEAR

U

goes bankrupt.

Converting government loans
from preferred stock into com-
mon shares might help reassure
investors and customers, though
it would hurt existing share-
holders by reducing the value
of their shares.

But some private economists
support the idea, noting that the
Treasury Department put such
a plan in place for Citigroup in
February as a way of restoring
confidence in the bank.

"T think Citigroup was a very
good test case,” said Sung Won
Sohn, an economics professor
at California State University
and a former president of a Los
Angeles bank. "It was a large
troubled bank that needed
more capital. Without the gov-
ernment's help, Citigroup could
have gotten into deeper trou-
ble."

Converting preferred stock
into common stock could show

lawmakers how far regulators
will go to buy time for financial
firms that need more capital,
said Simon Johnson, a professor
at the Massachusetts Institute
of Technology's Sloan School
of Management.

"In some ways, it's an appeal
for money," he said. "The stress
test is going to say they need

capital. ... So at some level,
they're communicating with
Congress."

Concerns about the banks
weighed heavily on financial
stocks Monday, and not just
Bank of America. Citigroup
stock lost 19 per cent of its val-
ue, Wells Fargo & Co. 16 per
cent and JPMorgan Chase 11
per cent.

The deepening recession only
makes business worse for the
banks, and the nation is still
waiting for sure signs that the
economy is improving, or at
least stabilizing.

On Monday, the Conference
Board said its monthly forecast
of economic activity fell 0.3 per
cent in March and has not risen
in nine months. The decline was
more than expected, but the
board did call for the recession's
intensity to ease this summer.

The government has said that
any banks found to need extra
capital under the stress tests will
be given six months to raise that
capital on their own. If they
can't, the government will pro-
vide it.

Some on Wall Street are
skeptical that the tests will be
tough enough.

"Of course, everyone will
pass because we don't want to
create a panic,” said Axel Merk,
president of Merk Investments.
"We're going to have the illu-
sion of healthy banks but they
won't want to lend."

¢ AP Economics Writer
Christopher S Rugaber, AP
Business Writer Daniel Wagner
and AP writers Deb Riechmann
and Anne Flaherty contributed
to this report.

LEGAL NOTICE

NOTICE

INTERNATIONAL BUSINESS COMPANIES ACT

(No.45 of 2000)

GUILFORD INVESTMENT
GROUP LTD.

Notice is

hereby given

that in accordance

with Section 138 (8) of the International Busi-

ness Companies Act,

No. 45

of 2000, the

Dissolution of GUILFORD INVESTMENT GROUP
LTD. has been completed, a Certificate of Dissolution
has been issued and the Company has therefore been
struck off the Register. The date of completion of the dis-
solution was the 6th day of April, 2009.



BUM acat ec caM TTR TT wta 2) fier

(the Tribune _
Estate



‘ai

io r





PAGE 8B, TUESDAY, APRIL 21, 2009



THE TRIBUNE





HEALTH



The Tribune



neaith





The importance
of exfoliation

DESQUAMATION is the
body's natural process of
exfoliation, or the shedding
of dry, old, hardened skin
cells so new cells can come
to the surface. In an oily skin
condition, desquamation can
be slowed, as oily skin acts
as a glue that holds dead skin
cells to the surface. This can
contribute to clogged follicles,
leading to the ‘build-up of oN, aaa!
acne bacteria which stimulates | Ps =~
the production of breakouts.

Exfoliation is especially



















helpful to those with oily skin. In addition to }
smoothing, improving skin tone and enhancing }
skin's receptiveness of oil-controlling ingredi- }
ents, exfoliation helps rid oily skin of dulling skin i

cells to help keep skin clear.

Your exfoliation regimen will depend heavily }
upon your professional skin analysis performed }
by a skin therapist. A professional skin thera- }
pist may recommend exfoliating with physical }
scrubs or chemical exfoliants, or both to deliver }
the desired result. They can advise you on how }
often to exfoliate, and how to successfully incor- :

porate exfoliation into your regimen.



URINARY

According to Dr Richard
Bridgewater of the Southern
Community General Clinic,
Urinary Incontinence (UI) or
Overactive Bladder is a com-
mon medical condition affect-
ing a significant number of
Bahamian women in particu-
lar, and is often undiagnosed
for a number of reasons.

Dr Bridgewater defined UI
as the overall weakening of
the bladder control muscles
where a person may experi-
OCT CMCC RICCO
lable urination, a condition
that has several risk factors.

He explained that risk fac-
tors increase for woman who
have had children (especially
large children), older persons,
those with a family history of
UI, and persons who have had
various types of surgeries.

OM iterem rial Copel mice
surgery as well as a hysterec-
tomies, while risk factors also
increase for persons who are
chronic smokers, have chronic
constipation, are obese or dia-
Lert Cu

For most sufferers, varied
types of uncontrolled urina-
tion may occur during laugh-
ter, exercise, coughing, sneez-
ing, jumping, or other activi-
ties which place pressure on
the abdomen.

Dr Bridgewater said that
although this condition is
ei Co mel come LoL CaM ie
has diagnosed several of his
own patients and feels there
exists a large number of undi-
PTO ACUTE
shame and fear to prevent
UMC M mC TmeO Ce
tion with their doctor.

Tee RC EN
ATOR MOM Cer Tal eae COLL
designed pads or pampers to
prevent wetting.

Men too can suffer from the
disorder, which in their case is
Peo eI WMe NMA M RER ELK
or glandular abnormalities.

Treatment for UI can range
from simple weight loss to
surgery, but should always be
diagnosed by a medical pro-
fessional such as an urologist
or gynocologist and obstetri-
cian (OBGYN) who specialis-
es in female urinary disorders
Lina

Pym uO roMe COMIC Kem ny
a common treatment used to

¢ Sarah Beek is a skin care therapist at the Dermal !
Clinic. Visit her and her team of skin and body thera- }
pists at One Sandyport Plaza (the same building as Bal- :

Wy’s Gym). For more information visit www dermal-clin- FROM L to R Staurt Chason Programme Manager for studentcity.com and gradcity.com,

ic.com or call 327.6788.

m@ By LLOYD ALLEN

correct UI, known as the
Kegels exercise.

“It’s a type of exercise that
the lady learns to stop her
flow of urine. She would go to
the restroom for example, and
as she is urinating she will
attempt to stop the stream of
flow, and will do that a couple
of times each time where she
should eventually develop a
mind body coordination so
that she can actually control
the sphincter muscles.”

The sphincter muscle or
urethral spincter is the group
of muscles which controls the
OM Ma TCR Com CC
der.

Dr Bridgewater explained
that as time continues, the
MADE MOM mA ULLe lh
be able to control the irregu-
lar flow of urine at other
times such as when she exer-
cises, coughs, jumps, or
laughs.

SCORE CMU MRC CME NE
include an examination of the
bladder for something known
as a cystocele - a condition
IQR ECA omits
bladder and vagina may
cero me VOM
to bulge into the vagina.

He explained: “The basic
premise of UI is where a nor-
mal person when feeling the
ORO UNTC Tom M EA CS
balanced pressure distributed
to both the bladder and ure-
CORAM Cem KES TT
no increased pressure on one
side or the other.

“With UI, there’s a prob-
lem where the pressure is
transferred too much to the
OETA oR oa
COCOA UO Com UD
thra, and where the end result
is where the bladder pushes
Uma Come a

Dr Bridgewater said if it is
determined that the individ-
ual suffers from a cystocele,
surgery may be the only mea-
CMA UUM TUG
tion.

He said although this condi-
tion may seem embarrassing
to some, it is by no mean a life
long condition, and with prop-
MIRC UIE MMO) Kec
allowing that person to
reclaim their freedom, mobili-
A MiCOmaN iC CoCeem mo. droge
encing life to its fullest.

? Ruth Strachan acting administrator at the Nazareth Centre, and Dereck Kaye, Programme
i Director for gradcity.com.

Tribune Features Reporter
lallen@tribunemedia.net

While going to the restroom for most
people is a normal bodily function, for
some people, incontinence or an over-
active bladder is such a serious prob-
lem that it affects their sense of control,
confidence and overall quality of life.




































































Studentcity.com and
gradcity.com donates
polo shirts to Children’s
Emergency Hospital

m@ By LLOYD ALLEN
Tribune Features
Reporter

lallen@tribunemedia.net

CHILDREN from the
Children’s Emergency

Hostel, the Ranfurly Home

for Children, and the
Nazareth Centre were
recently given 600 red Polo
shirts as a goodwill dona-
tion by studentcity.com
and gradcity.com last Fri-
day.

Dereck Kaye, pro-
gramme director for Grad-
City.com explained: “grad-
city.com and
studentcity.com have been
coming down here for over
20 years, and we’ve had
thousands of students com-
ing down where we’ve
been taking care of them,
so this gives us an opportu-
nity to give back to an
island that’s given so much
to our company and our



students as well.”
Mr Kaye explained that

beginning next year, the

company will be offering a
half day community service
option to spring breakers

willing to lend their time

and assistance to various
community groups.

“We'd like to offer basi-
cally three different homes
and allow our students to
come and interact with the
kids and give back to the
community,” he said.

During last week’s dona-
tion, the representatives
met with the various facili-
ty administrators and gave
them several dozen red

polo shirts in various sizes

for the children of their
homes. Organisers are
hoping that the initial
donation is the first of
many bridges bringing
together the local commu-
nity with studentcity.com
and gradcity.com.



THE TRIBUNE

TUESDAY, APRIL 21, 2009, PAGE 9B






os al Le ,
= i J

The
passage

‘time

By MAGGIE

aon



(AY LOVING RELATIONSHIPS i

EVEN as far back as 5000 BC and the birth of Tandra, the ancient East-
ern science of spiritual enlightenment, there has been interest in human
sexuality. In our lifetime it was Masters and Johnson's report in 1966 that
grabbed the public's attention to the concept of a four stage sexual
response cycle and from there evolved the special study of sex therapy.

Educating ourselves about human sexuality
allows us to understand ourselves and our
behavior. By taking the time to really try and
understand our own sensual and sexual needs we
find that there are in fact natural and predictable
changes that occur on average every decade
throughout our lives. These are partly due to our
individual needs and gender but perhaps more
significantly our sex hormones which strongly
drive our desires. As we know, men peak physi-
ologically in their teens and psychologically in
their fifties. This is partly due to the lowering of
hormone levels but also due to maturing traits
such as touching, tenderness, insight, patience
and understanding. Women peak sexually in
their thirties and forties following their child
rearing years and psychologically in their fifties.
As women mature they often display qualities
such as decisiveness, assertiveness, indepen-
dence and an increased sensuality.

As predictable as a person's sexual stage may
be it is by no means typical. A sexual stage
includes the emotional and physiological make
up of an individual and also that of the relation-
ship. So as you can see if you have a partner
close to your own age then it is not surprising
that you may seem sexually and emotionally
incompatible. You may feel life is a constant tug
of war but if you can ride the storm then there is
hope. As you can see men and women reach a
plateau in their fifties and there is often a pre-
vailing sense of calm and togetherness. Barring
debilitating diseases many such enviable couples
can look forward to a continued sex life for
many years. This has become a possible reality
due to the availability of hormone replacements,
medications and aids to help erectile function.
These aids have great value but are no supple-
ment if they are without the essential ingredient
- an abundance of touch. Touching is the super-
glue of a relationship and produces our own nat-
ural bonding agent; oxytocin. Our bodies crave
touch because of the high that it produces and it
is this that endures throughout the years.

Life however does not always flow so smooth-
ly for some people. Transitioning from one
decade may be disrupted by divorce or death.
Some appear to skip stages; for example men





Our own attitudes and
perceptions towards sexuality
have undoubtedly been
imbedded trom our early
childhood but that does not
mean that it can not change
as we grow and mature.



who fail to commit or women who have their
children late in life, whilst others may continue
on in one stage and they present to us with sexu-
al problems. If we view these as life's hurdles
then finding our inner peace and fulfilling our
true sexual potential will not seem a fantasy but
a reality. If we slow down and take stock of our
lives and look honestly within ourselves then we
can turn things around. Our own attitudes and
perceptions towards sexuality have undoubtedly
been imbedded from our early childhood but
that does not mean that it can not change as we
grow and mature. We have to learn from all our
past experiences. We have all seen people make
dramatic changes in their lives and enter a new
decade with a stronger sense of self and their
relationships improve. We are not born knowing
all these things but we can learn them if we are
willing. Living life with a sense of wonder,
curiosity and a big open heart will allow us to
become the person we were meant to become
and live the life we were meant to live.

¢ Margaret Bain is an Individual and Couples
Relationship Therapist. She is a Registered Nurse
and a Certified Clinical Sex Therapist located at The
Centre for Renewing Relationships, Grosvenor's
Close West. She can be contacted by calling 356-
7983 or by e-mail at relatebahamas@yahoo.com or
at www.relatebahamas. blogspot.com. She is avail-
able for speaking engagements.

By GARDENER JACK



(GY GREEN SCENE

Cuttings are easy



SOME plants reproduce by sending
up suckers, others by forming new
tubers or bulbs underground. Most,
however, rely on seeds but not all plants
are prodigious seeds producers.

Many of our favourite flowering
shrubs like bougainvillea and hibiscus
are rare seeders and need a little help
from their owners to form new plants.
This is easily done by taking cuttings:
removing a section of the plant and
encouraging it to grow independently.

The secret behind cuttings is the pres-
ence of bumps or scars along the length
of astem or branch. These growth nodes
have the ability to produce leaves and
new branches if they are above ground
but produce roots if they are below
ground.

The basic process is to remove a stem
from the parent plant by cutting just
below a growth node and to then cut
away excess length just above a growth
node. Cuttings are best made from
branches or stems that have a covering
of bark. It is very tempting to make cut-
tings of fresh green growth but these
need specialised attention and are called
tip cuttings.

The total length of a cutting does not

need to exceed 10 inches. A long cutting
will be affected by the wind and cause
the bottom of the cuttings - where we
want roots to form — to move around
and hinder root development. Even with
a short cutting it is best to plant at a 45
degree angle to lessen the effect of wind.

Many gardeners favour removing all
foliage from a cutting; others like to
leave bud clusters and small leaves, or
even larger leaves that they cut in half. I
find that softer plants like hibiscus do
well with a little foliage attached while
harder woods like bougainvillea are best
stripped bare.

Cuttings should have the bottom 4
inches buried in either potting soil in a
container or straight into the ground
where they are to grow. The soil for
these should be worked over and be
nice and friable in order to promote root
growth, but do not add any fertiliser to
the soil as this may burn delicate roots as
they form.

Resist the temptation to push your
cuttings into the soil. This will damage
the tissue below ground and compact
the soil exactly where we need it to be
friable. Instead, dig a small hole, set
your cutting upright and fill the hole

back in. Firm the soil around and water
lightly.

The area around new cuttings should
be kept damp but not waterlogged. Too
much water will promote rot. Some gar-
deners use a product called rooting hor-
mone that will speed up the rooting
process. It is not really necessary when
you grow cuttings at this time of year but
is useful when you try to grow them out
of season. Most manufacturers of root-
ing hormone include a fungicide in their
product and this is beneficial. If you
have rooting hormone, by all means use
it.

If you start your cuttings in a pot make
sure you do not have them too close
together. At some point you will have to
remove the new plants and if the roots
are entwined you will have a problem.
The pot is best kept in partial shade and
then moved gradually into full sun once
foliage has developed. Cuttings put into
the soil where they are to grow perma-
nently must be in full sun if the parent
plant was in full sun.

When are the container-grown cut-
tings ready to be transplanted? In no
less than two months, three months
being better. Soft cuttings root more

quickly than hard cuttings like
bougainvillea. Gardeners are naturally
patient people and know not to try and
hurry Mother Nature along.

Multiple cuttings can be usually be
taken from one limb that is severed from
the parent plant. Oleander limbs are
usually long and can give up to half-a-
dozen cuttings.

Back to tip cuttings. These are usual-
ly raised in a misting bed but the home
gardener can achieve tip cutting success
by planting a single end of a branch ina
3-gallon container of moist soil. Push
three (or four) bamboo canes into the
soil close to the rim so they stand about
12- inches tall. Then drape a 2-gallon
clear plastic storage bag over all and
secure the bag to the outside of the pot
with tape.

What you have achieved is a self-con-
tained unit. Moisture from the soil will
evaporate in heat and then condense in
cooler conditions so you do not have to
do any watering. Plastic intensified the
effect of the sun so your container with
your tip cutting should be kept in light
shade. I have found this method to be
particularly affective with Bridal Bou-
quet frangipani and rose cuttings.



The day
my nails
turned
black

@ By ALEX MISSICK
Tribune Features
Reporter
amissick@tribunemedia.net

AS women get older,
many changes occur in their
bodies. Everything from
menopause to weight gain
can be a constant bother in
their busy everyday lives.
However, in a society where
beauty is a must and perfec-
tion is a high goal to reach,
some women notice a prob-
lem with the pigmentation
in their nails.

The manicure and pedi-
cure business in the
Bahamas is a big one with
women getting pedicure and
manicure services everyday
for relaxation or beauty pur-
poses.

Genevieve Thompson, a
40 year old mother of three,
said she noticed a dark dis-
coloration of her toe nails
during a trip to the salon.

“The young lady was
soaking my feet and I
noticed the dark lines on my
toe nails as she was polishing
them. I paid it no mind
thinking it was a vitamin
deficiency or something I
had eaten. I even went as far
as thinking it was the type
of polish I was using. I was
rather alarmed but did not
pay much attention to it,”
Mrs Thompson said.

Doctor of Podiatric Medi-
cine, Monique Mitchell, said
this is a problem called
melanonychia that can occur
in older persons of darker
complexion.

“A lot of coloured people
have that as a normal variant
in toe and finger nails. It can
be caused by a vitamin defi-
ciency of vitamin B12 and
mostly occurs because of
increased production of
melanin, a pigment found in
the skin of darker people, by
melanocytes in the nail
matrix,” Mrs Mitchell said.

According to a book
called McCarthy’s Principles
and Practices of Podiatric
Onchopathy, Melanonychia
is “a brown or black longitu-
dinal stripe of hyper pig-
mentation of the nail, either
partial or complete. 77 per
cent of Black individuals old-
er than 20 years and almost
100 per cent older than 50
years have melanonychia.
The number and width of
the streaks also increases
with age. Melanonychia
most often occurs because
of increased production of
melanin by melanocytes in
the nail matrix. This results
in a visible band of pigment-
ed cells on the nail plate.
These streaks tend to be
multiple and lightly pig-
mented which differs from
the single darker streak typ-
ical of melanoma.”

Mrs Thompson said she
was insecure about the
markings, but is learning to
accept them.

“T would love to get rid of
the marks because I have
always had healthy nails.
Having those streaks come
up made me feel like I had
unhealthy nails. I stopped
wearing closed in shoes hop-
ing but I now use polish to
keep it covered,” Mrs
Thompson said.

The causes of Melanony-
chia are many, and according
to emedicine.com, can be
due to pregnancy, trauma,
poor fitting shoes, radiation
therapy, AIDS, malnutrition
and many more.

“Tf you all of a sudden get
a black on your toe nail, you
should get it checked out just
so that we would know how
to treat it. Ifit is normal, you
can get it as a young adult
or child. The only alarming
thing is when the streaks or
spot just showed up,” Mrs
Mitchell said.



PAGE 10B, TUESDAY, APRIL 21, 2009



Terrance Strachan/TLC Photo

FROM LEFT: Glenn Archer, President, Bahamas Golf Federation; Yvonne Shaw, Chairman, Ladies Division and Asst Secretary, Bahamas Golf Federation; Andrea Sweeting,
President, Sister, Sister, Breast Cancer Arm of the Cancer Society of The Bahamas; Sandra Ferguson-Rolle, Vice President, Sister, Sister and Gennie Dean, Treasurer, Sister,
Sister.

Golfing for

cancer

Bahamas Golf
Federation hosts
upcoming Sister
Sister Breast
Cancer Charity
Golf Tournament



aa ee eye Og

THE UN

m@ By LLOYD ALLEN
Tribune Features Reporter

lallen@tribunemedia.net

ACCORDING to recent unemploy-
ment figures calculated by the govern-
ment, more than 15,000 Bahamians
have been either job hunting without
success, or are discouraged from find-
ing a job over the past four years, an
unfortunate circumstance blamed on
the contracting local job market .

Because of this reality, the govern-
ment introduced an unemployment
assistance package earlier this month,
where those who’ve been out of work
for up to four years could receive some
financial support over a 13 week peri-
od.

Backed by a $20 million National
Insurance Board (NIB) medical/unem-
ployment benefit fund, this national
initiative is the most recent move by
the government to aid those most
affected by unemployment.

As initial media reports indicated,
774 unemployed persons applied at the
various application processing centers .
A question that has become increas-
ingly relevant after the “poor” turnout
of applicants during the first phase of
this initiative, is whether the govern-
ment has done enough to help hurting
Bahamians.

This week, the Barbershop went into
the Englerston community to hear what
some residents had to say.

Tribune Features visited the Here-
Cuts barbershop and car-wash on
Cordeaux Avenue and Acklins Street,
and asked several persons their views
on the matter.

First up was the proprietor of Here-
Cuts, C Antwan Bethel, who said
although there are many who would
benefit from the government’s unem-
ployment assistance package, there are
some persons with two jobs still apply-
ing for the assistance.

He said: “There are some people
with more than one job, they can prove
that they are unemployed because of
losing one of those jobs, yet they would
still claim for that benefit knowing that
they are making money on that other
job, yet someone else who really needs
it can’t get it.”

Mr Bethel added that with the coun-
try’s finances already compromised,
some of those individuals who are now
relying on the government for some
relief, “are the same people who would
cheat on custom duty, the same who
would have unscrupulous NIB claims,
and I think we as a people need to look
within ourselves and be fair about all
the efforts that are being made.”

Mr Bethel added, that apart from
the government initiatives, the average
Bahamian needs to make an effort in
helping those in their community in
any way they can.

On the flip side, 21-year-old con-
struction worker Stencil Gardiner, a
Bain Town resident, feels the govern-
ments efforts in providing various stim-
ulus and unemployment benefits have
helped in giving hope to many who
were on the verge of committing sui-
cides in months past.

Mr Gardiner argues: “I feel like the
number of suicides are reducing, so it

@ By ALEX MISSICK
Tribune Features Reporter
amissick@tribunemedia.net

AS Bahamian women continue to
show support for the fight against can-
cer in the country, The Bahamas Golf
Federation has decided to go a step
further by hosting the Sister Sister
Breast Cancer Charity Golf Tourna-
ment on May 9 to assist in providing
important medical equipment and
financial support for women fighting

the deadly disease.

Although The Bahamas Golf Fed-
eration has always supported the Can-
cer Society in The Bahamas through
their ladies’ golf tournaments, this
year a conscious decision was made to
target a special group of ladies that
work really hard to support females
diagnosed with breast cancer-the Sis-
ter Sister Organisation.

The Bahamas Golf Federation Cen-
tral Ladies Division and the Blue
Shark Golf Club are not only asking
persons to come out and play but also
to send donations to help support the
event.

Sister Sister not only supports
women financially by supplying much
needed portacath a device which is
inserted in the chest for the patient to
receive medication but also provide
much needed emotional support and
hope by example. The portacath is a

very expensive device costing $770.
Sister Sister tries to donate at least
five of these devices each month, an
effort that seriously depletes their
resources. It is said that it is not the
cancer that kills, but the lack of treat-
ment. Most of the women volunteers

working in the organisation are breast }
; self around them.

cancer survivors and therefore use
their personal experiences to encour-

ingful life.

ested persons can contact Yvonne
Shaw, chairman of the Central Ladies
Division at 324-2377 or download
sponsor forms and player registration
forms from the BGF website:
www.bgfnet.com Donations may be
sent to PO Box SS-19092. Registra-
tion forms may also be collected from
Ocean Club, Lyford Cay, Cable
Beach and Blue Shark Golf Courses.

EMPLOYMENT DILEMA

has to be something that the govern-
ment is doing right.

“A lot of people were burdened, they
had no jobs, searching for a way to pay
their bills, and that was too much for
them, so the government in my view
has done a good job so far.”

Now into his eight month at a con-
struction job soon to be completed, Mr
Gardiner said unlike many of his coun-
terparts who are unsure about their
future, he intends to begin culinary
training in the fall at a Florida college.

He said although saving for his
dream has been especially difficult in
recent months, it was necessary in order
to accomplish his dream of one day
becoming a chef.

“Now is not the time to be doing
unnecessary things that aren’t called
for, because that will only leave you
with bills, just guide your money and
use it for what you need.”

Terrence Brennen, a 37-year-old
manger at Here-Cuts Carwash
explained the economic situation in the
Englerston community is critical.

He said with his business only able to
employ a staff of three, he is forced to
turn countless men away daily. He
explained the ongoing economic slum
has also caused him to reduce the price
of a carwash from $15 to $12.

Mr Brennen said: “People who need
to survive, are trying to survive just like
I’m trying, but I had to run little spe-
cials like the Easter special in order to
promote my business.”

Adding to the discussion on whether
recent initiatives by the government
are adequate for those facing financial
deficiencies, Mr Brennen said although
there have been a good number of ini-
tiatives started, there remains a need
for more support from the government.

“The government has a habit of help-
ing people who are already wealthy,
and there are people in homes whose
lights are off, starving, these are the
things that need to be addressed from
the root.”

He said rather than the government
“running the country from the walls of
Parliament and Cabinet they need to
get up and walk around” to get a better
understand of the needs of Bahamians.

Twenty seven-year-old professional
Don Clarke said although changing
times have dictated a need to spend
more wisely, properly budgeting
finances is still the surest means of
directing one‘s future.

He explained: “I feel like if you pin-
point your budget from January, and
you allocate your funds on how you
are going to spend it, you would be
able to have some kind of savings at
the end of the year.”

Mr Clarke said because of his own
ability to budget his money from early
on in life, he has been able to convert a
property left to him by his father into
triplex to provide him with a source of
income.

He said despite whatever assistance
the government is able to offer those in
need, self discipline is still the only way
of securing a good future.

To view and add further comments
to this conversation, send an e-mail to
lallen@tribunemedia.net or comment
on our Facebook page ‘Tribune News
Network.’



“The government
has a habit of
helping people
who are already
wealthy, and there
are people in
homes whose
lights are off,
starving, these are
the things that
need to be
addressed from
the root.”

- HERE CUTS

CAR-WASH MANAGER
TERRENCE BRENNEN



“Now is not
the time to
be doing
unnecessary
things that
aren’t called
for, because
that will only
leave you
with bills,
just guide
your money
and use it for
what you
need.”



“T feel like if
you pin-point
your budget
from January,
and you allo-
cate your funds
on how you are
going to spend

able to have
some kind of
savings at the
end of the
year.”

Secrets to choosing
the right relationships

age women to not despair and to show | 80m God created you to be -

they can still have a productive mean- } relationships will allow you to see the
: real you and their presence in your life
To sign up for the tournament inter- Will cause you to become kinder, loving,
? and more sensitive to others. You will
? experience the freedom to unleash your
i gifts and talents with no reservations.
? Their presence in your life encourages

: you to fulfill your purpose and destiny.

it, you would be ? you are not meant to be alone and you
? are capable of finding the relationships
? that are right for you. When you choose
? relationships based on these secrets, you
? will come into a life-long relationships
i that will bring you fulfillment and enable
? you to experience true joy and happi-
: ness.

- DON CLARKE |
: lron Network. Email:
: ironnetwork.org@gmail.com

THE TRIBUNE

BAS ETI aN
BROWN



IN order to receive the benefits of hav-

? ing successful relationships in your life,
? you must be able to identify persons with
? whom you can enjoy healthy fulfilling
: relationships in every aspect of your life.
? In the past, many have experienced fail-
? ure in relationships, but the failures have
? not been as a result of people; it has been
? because of the inability to pick persons
} who are right.

In order to be successful in life and

? gain the benefits of relationships, you
: must be critical of who you invest your
? life in. The ability to determine good
? character in people is one of the key
? ways in determining who should be a
? part of your life. Here are some of the
: things you should look for in determining
: whether a relationship is right for you:

SECRETS TO CHOOSING
THE RELATIONSHIPS THAT
ARE RIGHT FOR YOU
1. They make you feel loved - You

? believe in your heart that they want the
? best for you and that they are willing to
? work with you in achieving the best for
? your life. They accept you just as you

are and give you the freedom to be your-

2. They bring you closer to the per-
The right

3. They bring you into other relation-

: ships - Your life was created to increase
? and any relationship that exists in your
? life should bring you into other connec-
? tions through that relationship i.e. you
? should have more mentors, friends, cus-
? tomers ete.

4. They help you to embrace both the

: good and the bad in your life - You are
? not perfect; the right relationships for
? you will celebrate your strengths and
? assist you with overcoming your weak-
? nesses. They will not judge or condemn
: you for the bad they see in you but they
? have the patience and the maturity to
: help you grow into the person you were
? created to be.

5. They give you freedom to be an

: adult - Being an adult requires that you
? make decisions without permission from
? others, that you choose your own values
? and opinions, develop your own person-
? al likes and dislikes, that you exercise
: your gifts, manage your own responsi-
? bilities, and that you are able to relate to
? other adults as peers inclusive of your
? parents and spiritual authority. The right
? relationships for you should bring you
? out of a one-down relationship and
? should eliminate the belief that people
? are above you. Their presence in your
: life should encourage you to pursue what
? you truly want for your life and not what
? they want for you. Essentially, the right
: relationship eliminates the desire to peo-
? ple please and helps you to focus on the
? best for your life with their consultation
? but without needing their approval.

6. They are an adult - You were creat-

? ed to exercise authority over your own
? life. Some of the best relationships for
? you are with people who are carryin

- 21-YEAR-OLD : sia The
STENCIL GARDINER } people that are right for you are those
? that are emotionally independent adults
? with no inappropriate support from their
? parents or any other authority. They
; manage their own finances, make their
? own decisions, maintain a spiritual life,
? are capable of maintaining their own sus-
? tenance and are pursuing their purpose
? and destiny with freedom.

out this command in their own lives. The

7. They are willing to invest in your

: growth and development - The right rela-
? tionships for you should have a willing-
? ness to help you become what you were
? purposed to become. They will invest in
? your growth and development by seeking
? out ways for you to mature in every
? aspect of your life.

8. They are equally yoked with you -

? Being equally yoked with someone
? means that you are able to connect with
? individuals at three levels: 1) spiritually 2)
? soulfully 3) physically. You are created a
: tri-part being (body, soul, and spirit) and
i the best relationships for you are the
? ones in which you can relate at all three
: levels. The right relationships for you are
? the ones that you share similar spiritual
? beliefs with, have social compatibility
? with ie similar family patterns, similar
_ ? mindsets on relating to people, have sim-
: ilar communication style, and share intel-
? lectual compatibility, you should also
? share some physical connection or attrac-
; tion to the persons that are right for you.

9. They always make you feel like

: a friend - The most important charac-
: teristic of any relationship that is right for
? you is that they make you feel like a
: friend. Right relationships always extend
? a bond of friendship to you and always
? make you comfortable with being your
? true self. With every decision that is
? made within the relationship, you have
} peace that they always have your best
: interest at heart.

‘You were created for a relationship,

¢ Sherika Brown, CEO & Founder of the






se




TUESDAY, APRIL 21st, 2009, PAGE 11B

INSURANCE MANAGEMENT

(BAHAMAS) LIMITED. INSURANCE BROKERS & AGENTS
Marine FORECAST










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Anchorage 50/10 31/0 51/10 34/1 s Jacksonville 78/25 51/10 s 80/26 55/12 s Phoenix 99/37 69/20 s 97/36 67/19 s CROOKED ISLAND / ACKLINS Santo Domingo 88/31 70/21 sh 84/28 69/20 sh eople pean trust
Atlanta 68/20 40/4 pc 6719 488 s Kansas City 68/20 44/6 pce 77/25 57/13 s Pittsburgh 52/11 38/3 sh 50/10 35/1 c RAGGEDISLAND — “igh:90°F/32"c Sumas Tee eee peop ¥y *
Atlantic City 68/20 48/8 t 58/14 37/2 c Las Vegas 95/35 647 s 95/35 70/21 s — Portland,OR 81/27 49/9 s 67/19 44/6 pc Higher rire 4 LOM TTPF/25°C Sokal : at 3 i r a a a 5
Baltimore 6719 44/6 t 60/15 39/3 c Little Rock 73/22 49/9 pe 79/26 58/14 Raleigh-Durham 71/21 44/6 pe 66/18 40/4 pc Low:72°F/22°C ae moi Ri [ BO SOAS a a
Boston 5613 48/8 + 58/14 42/5 sh LosAngeles 90/32 6015 pc 77/25 57/13 pc _ St. Louis 6246 45/7 po 71/21 55/12 s ° a ae A STEETOD ; ee r =
Buffalo 54/12 38/3 sh 47/8 3441 ¢ Louisville SHS 838 6 64/17 45/7 pe Salt Lake City 74/23 50/10 s 79/26 53/11 = s GREATINAGUA aa 68/20 61/16 72/22 57/13 po | URANCE MANAGEMENT
Charleston, SC 77/25 51/10 s 74/23 49/9 s Memphis 68/20 49/9 pce 75/23 58/14 s San Antonio 87/30 58/14 s 87/30 61/16 s Bon ag 6 t inal sifienteensee molec
Chicago 467 37/2 sn S512 41/5 po Miami 85/29 67/19 t 82/27 71/21 s SanDiego 76/24 GO/IS pc 68/20 58/14 pc High: 90° F/32"C cous SSMS OS BSD aoa Sale al (BAHAMAS) LIMITED. INSURANCE BROKERS & AGENTS
: . : Low: 76° F/24° C Trinidad 88/31 73/22 t 82/27 72/22 sh Co
Cleveland 52/11 38/3 sh 48/8 35/1 ¢ Minneapolis 58/14 38/3 pce 63/17 48/8 San Francisco 80/26 48/8 pce 65/18 51/10 s Vemeanvai 64/17 47/8 pe 56/13 «41/5 c j Hew Provid Grond Bah tha i h :
Dallas 82/27 5015 s 82/27 62/16 s Nashville 64/17 39/3 c 66/18 45/7 pc Seattle 71/21 45/7 s 5844 43/6 c ae 6317 48/8. pc B7/19 48/8 < ‘ Ge ome (0 eylherd Kuma
Denver 74/23 45/7 s 78/25 44/6 $ New Orleans 77/25 5713 pe 81/27 61/16 s Tallahassee 78/25 49/9 s 80/26 52/11 $s Warsaw 54/12 32/0 s 56/13 38/3 s j AM) 1 f
Detroit 49/9 36/2 sh 50/0 37/2 c New York 6417 49/9 t 60/15 44/6 sh Tampa 77/25 5814 pe 81/27 62/16 s i Winnipeg 50/10 32/0 s 56/13 40/4. pc t Tee (DA) 50 Tee (282) 390-3500 Tel (240) S744 Va: (242) 332-2042 Tet (240) S34-2304
Honolulu 79/26 67/19 sh 81/27 68/20 s Oklahoma City 81/27 53/11 pce 85/29 58/14 s Tucson 95/35 61/16 s 93/33 60/15 $s — : : 7 : — —
Houston 4/28 58/14 s 84/28 62/16 s Orlando 82/27 57/13 pc 83/28 60/15 s Washington,DC 67/19 47/8 t 61/16 41/5 Tho ee







@ By ALEX MISSICK
Tribune Features Reporter
amissick@tribunemedia.net

MOST women have jewelry
boxes filled with items for
every outfit they own. Howey-
er, as times are currently not
favorable for expensive jewel-
ry purchases, it would be an
advantage to have just one
piece that could match with
every outfit. This is what Lucy
Babb had in mind when she
started her line of jewelry.

Unique, dazzling and nothing short
of spectacular are the caliber of pre-
cious and semi precious stone jewelry
found at B’jou Classique located on
Mount Royal avenue. B’Jou specialis-
es in the interchangeable clasp system
where you can purchase one necklace

THE TRIBUNE

and then add a wide variety of inter-
changeable clasps in any style, any
stone and any color.

“We are one of the only companies
here in New Providence that can drill
any type of stone. We also string neck-
laces and we try to manufacture differ-
ent pieces. Most of our material or
parts come from Germany so the sys-
tem we have adopted is a German
type system. The interchangeable sys-
tem we have is where a woman can
dress in a very nice piece and inter-
change to enhance her appearance.
This allows her to not be limited to the
regular conventional pearl where it is
the same look all the time. The focal
piece on the interchangeable system is
the clasp piece. This takes it to anoth-
er level,” Mrs Babb said.

She noticed that ladies wanted dif-
ferent beautiful pieces as a centerpiece
on their necks and to have total free-
dom for personal design and creativi-
ty.

“We have times when ladies would
compete against each other and want

TUESDAY, APRIL 21,

to look better than the next person. So
they come in and out do the other lady
or they see someone wearing a certain
piece, they would want that exact
clasp,” Mrs Babb said.

Mrs Babb said although she enjoys
being exclusive, she has opened her
craft and her doors to others who want
to learn the business.

“Since I have been open to the pub-
lic I have helped numerous people
train and showed them how to string
and drill. It’s enough for all of us to
eat. I believe you should help people
learn the craft so you do not ‘hog up’
the craft. At least if you were to die
today someone else would continue
with the trade,” Mrs Babb said.

A few of the most common stones
her clients wear are fresh water pearls,
black onyx, amethyst, chalcedony,
rhodochrosite, chrysophate, tiger eyes,
cat eyes, smokey quartz, sun stones,
mother of pearl chips, mother of jade,
the native conch shell and many oth-
ers.

“One of my unique pieces is the

2009

Bahamian gold piece coin converted
into an interchangeable clasp. It’s a
masterpiece around your neck when
you wear it,” Mrs Babbs said.

Mrs Babbs said because she believes
in the upliftment of Bahamians, she
carries straw bags from five popular
designers throughout the country.

“Our girls spend a lot of money,
sometimes $500-$600 on Gucci, Fendi
and Versace but look at the unique-
ness to our work. Every piece is made
differently. I have taxi drivers bringing
tourists here because they want straw
bags that can not be found in the straw
market because they only seem to sell
designer knock offs. When the tourists
come they want all things Bahamian,”
Mrs Babbs said.

Mrs Babbs said she aims to work
with ladies because she knows jewelry
is not a necessity.

“My customers like the versatility of
our system. We prepare jewelry as an
art form to enhance a woman’s beauty
because we want to help them save on
cost and still look beautiful.”





B'Jou
specialises

in the inter-
changeable
clasp system
where you
can purchase
one necklace
and then add
a wide variety
of interchange
able clasps in
any style, any
stone and any
color.

Discover the goodness
of Ovaltine.

Ovaltine’s unique recipe includes milk and cocoa powder, 15 essential vitamins
and minerals, and complex carbohydrates. One cup of hot milky Ovaltine contains
half the amount of sugar as a cup of ordinary hot chocolate.

Distributed by: BWA, East West Highway e 394-1759





Full Text



PAGE 1

N N A A S S S S A A U U A A N N D D B B A A H H A A M M A A I I S S L L A A N N D D S S L L E E A A D D I I N N G G N N E E W W S S P P A A P P E E R R Murder prompts machine gun fears C M Y K C M Y K Volume: 105 No.122TUESDAY, APRIL 21, 2009 PRICE – 75 (Abaco and Grand Bahama $1.25 WEATHER CLOUDS ANDSUN HIGH 84F LOW 74F F E A T U R E S SEEWOMANSECTION S P O R T S Jewelled and SEEPAGEFOURTEEN fabulous Swimmers take second place n By NATARIO McKENZIE Tribune Staff Reporter POLICE have identified the country’s latest homicide victim as Marlon Javon Smith, 29, of Pinewood Gardens who was earlier charged in the Novem ber 2007 murder of accused hitman Samuel “Mouche’ McKenzie. Smith was reportedly gunned down in the back yard of his Avocodo Street home shortly after 1 am Sunday, raising the country’s murder count to 22 for the year. Police had received reports that high-powered machine guns were used in Smith’s murder but have yet to confirm those reports. “High powered weapons will definitely be a concern for us,” ASP Leon Bethel head of the homicide division of the Central Detective Unit said yester day. “It is of grave concern because we have already increased our intelligence gathering, trying to locate all types of unlicensed firearms and get them off the streets,” he said. Police have launched an inten sive investigation into Smith’s murder. ASP Bethel said yesterday that police have not yet received any information to sug gest that Smith’s death is in any way connected to McKenzie’s murder. Police received reports shortly after 1.15am Sunday, that numerous gunshots were being fired in or near Avocado Street, Pinewood Gardens. According to residents of the area Smith had been sitting in a car near his home on Avocado Street when he was approached by several persons in a gold coloured Honda Accord. As he got out of his vehicle, occupants of the Accord fired several shots at him and pursued him as he ran to the back of his yard. The gunmen continued to fire shots at Smith before fleeing the scene. Smith was found lying in a low bushy area behind his home with multiple gunshot wounds about his body. Police are also investigating a Sunday afternoon shooting Police identify latest homicide victim, receive reports high-powered weapons were used The Tribune ANYTIME ... ANYPLACE , WE RE #1 B AHAMASEDITION TRY OUR McFLURRY TWIX MIX www.tribune242.com BAHAMASBIGGEST CARSFORSALE, HELPWANTED ANDREALESTATE I N S I D E SEE page eight n By DENISE MAYCOCKT ribune Freeport Reporter d maycock@ tribunemedia.net F REEPORT – Local and US drug enforcem ent officials captured almost one million dol lars worth of illegal d rugs when they discov ered three suspected marijuana fields on Grand Bahama yester day around noon. A sst Supt Welbourne Bootle, press liaison officer, reported that the fields were discovered among bushes in theH unters area. The estimated street value of the illegal drugsi s $900,000. ASP Bootle said B ahamian Drug Enforcement Unit officers, assisted by DrugE nforcement Agency (DEA on information, went to a bushy area east of Grobola Restaurant andB ar in Hunters. He said the fields were located some 500 to 600 yards in the bushes. The first field, which Almost $1m worth of illegal drugs captured SEE page eight MAN IN C OUR T A CCUSED OFWESTBAYSHOOTING n By NATARIO McKENZIE Tribune Staff Reporter A 20-YEAR-OLDman of Yellow Elder Gardens accused of the shooting death of Kendall Wallace Jr who was gunned down in West Bay Street last week, was arraigned in Magistrate’s Court yesterday. Police have charged Shervin Stubbs of Old Cedar Street, Yellow Elder Gardens, with Wallace’s murder. Wallace, 27, of Nassau Village, was reportedly gunned down during a dispute with a group of men in West Bay Street last Tuesday. He was the country’s 19th homicide victim of the year. Stubbs, who is represented by attorneys Romauld Ferreira and Michael Kemp was arraigned before Magistrate Guillimina Archer in Court 10, Nassau Street yesterday on the murder SEE page eight SHERVINSTUBBS arrives at court yesterday. T i m C l a r k e / T r i b u n e s t a f f n By MEGAN REYNOLDS Tribune Staff Reporter mreynolds@tribunemedia.net THE APPEAL court chal lenge of Senior Justice Anita Allen’s refusal to step down from a civil case opened yes terday with allegations that the Supreme Court judge was the first to suggest her own recusal. Justice Allen refused to step down from the case involving Israeli brothers Rami and Amir Weissfisch last month after she voiced concerns about the integrity of a forensic accounting report prepared by Daniel Ferguson. Ferguson was appointed by Senior Justice Lyons before the case was transferred to Justice Allen in September 2008, and is reportedly the brother of a close female friend of Justice Lyons. Under Justice Allen, Mr Scott and Alan Steinfeld, QC, representing Amir Weissfisch claimed the appointment of Challenge of judge’ s refusal to step down from case underway SEE page eight n By TANEKA THOMPSON Tribune Staff Reporter tthompson@ tribunemedia.net WHILE the country strives to meet international standards for tax information exchange agreements (TIEA cy it must selectively choose new partners and not harm itself in the process, former State Finance Minis ter James Smith said. Mr Smith, who served as state finance minister under the Christie administration, also supported recent statements made by Prime Minister Hubert Ingraham regarding the country's placement on the current draft of the United THE sentencing of drug convict Dwight Major has been rescheduled, The Tribune has learned. Major’s US attorney Troy Ferguson confirmed yesterday that his client’s sentencing has been rescheduled to June 19. Major 40, pleaded guilty last October to charges of conspiracy Sentencing of Dwight Major is rescheduled SEE page eight The Bahamas ‘must be careful’ in selecting trading partners SEE page eight James Smith

PAGE 2

C M Y K C M Y K LOCAL NEWS PAGE 2, TUESDAY, APRIL 21, 2009 THE TRIBUNE Presenting Doors open at 9pm $5 Entrance fee Drink specials all nightSponsored by Nassau, Bahamas Charlotte Street Downtown (242) 325-(Rock)-7625 Hardrock.com nassau_gm@hardrock.com.bs The Official Food Of RockCLUB SUPERDEATHLive Music Live MusicSaturday, April 25th, 2009 Saturday, April 25th, 2009 M OTORISTS on Bay Street were delayed yesterday morning as police diverted traffic to accommodate a film crew worki ng on a new American reality t elevision show. “Superstars” pairs up celebrities and professional athletes to compete in various sporting chall enges for a grand prize. Kerzner International recently paid a “seven digit figure” to have television network ABC f ilm the primetime show at the resort and surrounding area as part of its strategy to further raise the property’s profile in the US market and boost arrivals. B ut while the resort’s executives have heralded the deal to bring the show to the Bahamas a s a major win for tourism, Monday morning motorists did not seem very enthusiastic about traffic drawing to a standstill. P roblem One driver, who asked not to be named, said he ran into traffic n ear Rawson Square shortly after 10am. Turning off Bay Street onto Victoria Avenue and Dowdeswell Street in an attempt t o avoid the worst of it, the driver said he ended up joining another long line, as traffic was backed up there too. Another said: “Morning traff ic is always a problem nowadays, but I didn’t expect it to be this bad or last this long. If they knew t hey would have to re-route traffic, somebody should’ve put a notice in the paper or something.” However according to Atlantis, t he back-up was the result of an u nexpected delay in filming the road race segment of Superstars. “This was not anticipated and hence impact on traffic was not f oreseen,” said the company in a statement. “We do not anticipate any further impact on traffic flowing due to shooting of the Supers tars.” Inspector Anthony Curtis, second in command of the police’s Traffic Division, said officers diverted traffic from Bay Street onto Armstrong Street for a bout half an hour beginning at around 9am. He acknowledged that this contributed to the traffic. n By ERIC ROSE NORTH ANDROS Perma nent Secretary of the Ministry of Youth, Sports and Culture, Archie Nairn told the 27 gradu a tes of the National Youth Ser vice Restorative Programme that l ife is full of choices, and the choices that they make today will determine the kind of person they will become tomorrow. “You will have to determine y our own destiny, for you can now go out and become a rolem odel or you can become a threat to social society,” he said. My wish is that you would all become educated, productive citizens – for, more than ever, the Bahamas is in need of young men who are upright and focused.” Mr Nairn was the keynote speaker at the passing-out cerem ony of the Character Leadership Development and Skills T raining Academy Restorative Programme for Boys (the Adolescent Development Programme), in North Andros. P ositive T he initiative was designed to be a positive intervention in the l ives of at-risk young men from challenging backgrounds. Mr Nairn said the programme offered at the facility has several components; all geared towards making the graduates become better persons. We believe the basic educational concept will assist you in staying relevant to the changing society in which you will now find yourselves,” he said. “You haveb een provided the opportunity to increase your knowledge base and, for your part, we wanted to be sure that a standard level of literacy was achieved.” Mr Nairn said the Ministry of Youth, Sports and Culture is extremely grateful to the Catholic Church and the YEAST (Youth Empowerment and Skills Training) programme for facilitating the project through a “unique partnership” which has brought relief to many young men in society over the past several years. “This kind of initiative can only be successful if there is a shared vision and a common resolve to make a difference among the y oung men in our communities,” he said. “In particular, I wish to r ecognise the sterling efforts of Deacon Jeffrey Lloyd, who has b een the real driving force behind this programme.” Mr Nairn explained that the Ministry of Youth, Sports and Culture also offers a Self Starter P rogramme to young persons who are prepared to venture out i n the field of business on a small scale. The programme, he added, a llows them to start their own businesses and learn marketing and management skills in the process. He said it is an opportunity that t he graduates should embrace as the programme promotes inde p endence, self-reliance and an ability to interact with the public. Additionally, and just as important, is the Fresh Start Programme, which is really the nextp hase of this programme which you have just completed,” Mr N airn said. “This phase involves assistance from the relevant officers from my ministry, who will help you through the next step as mentors – all I ask is that you listen and learn as the officers work with you step by step.” The permanent secretary said he implores the graduates to work towards meaningful social rein tegration. “Join positive community groups. Improve your self-image and gain a sense of accomplishment,” he said. “Face your problems and challenges optimistically and embrace the support and guidance of our mentors.” Motorists fume as film crew work on US reality TV show ‘Go out and become a role model’ Twenty-seven graduate from National Youth Service Restorative Programme in Andros MEMBERS of the N ational Youth Service Restorative Programme Class of 2009 present colours at thep assing out cerem ony of the Character Leadership Development and Skills Training A cademy Restorative Programme for Boys in North Andros. PERMANENT SECRETARY at the Ministry of Youth, Sports and Cul t ure, Archie Nairn speaks to the graduates. PHOTOS: Eric Rose

PAGE 3

CARIBBEAN leaders at the F ifth Summit of the Americas asked United States Congressmen if a $1.4 billion initiative to help Central America and Mexic o fight drug trafficking and o rganised crime could be extended to provide funds to countries in this region who worry they may experience a dangerous knocko n effect. Guyanese President Bharrat Jagdeo said Caribbean presidents and prime ministers told US lawm akers at the Summit in Trinidad that a crackdown in nearby Mexico could boost drug trafficking in the Caribbean, with more criminals pushed into the region, which lies between producer countries in South America and the United States. The $1.4 billion Merida initiat ive was announced by United States President Obama during his visit to Mexico in the days prior to the Summit of the Americas in Port of Spain, Trinidad, which extended from Friday to Sunday. C aribbean leaders’ call to Congressmen on the anti-drug initiat ive came on Saturday, the day after a one-hour meeting with Mr Obama himself. Economic aid, drug and gun smuggling, as well as the liftingo f the trade embargo on Cuba, the problems the region will facei f offshore financial services are to be targeted by the US governm ent and the problems caused by deportees from the United States to the Caribbean had all been raised in the course of discussions with Mr Obama which took placel ate Friday night. Prime Minister Hubert Ingra h am and other leaders said Mr Obama, who was accompanied t o the meeting by Secretary of State Hillary Clinton, was very e ngaged and expressed hope that greater ties would be established. While further talks are anticipated, the US president has already committed the US to pro v iding $30 million towards improving security in the C aribbean region. “The US is not lecturing us a nymore, but rather listening,” said Bharrat Jagdeo. “They need to listen, and that is what we got.” Meanwhile, Mr Jagdeo added t hat, as the CARICOM representative chosen by the 15-mem ber regional group to lead its discussions with the US president, he also spoke extensively with Mr O bama about the need for the US government to understand the p eculiarities of Caribbean soci eties compared with those in othe r regions. He said a failure by past US administrations to recognise these differences has led to policies developed for other regions being imposed on the Caribbean, creating many problems. Meanwhile, the Guyanese leader also proposed how the US can h elp to fashion international financial institutions to be more responsive to the needs of the region. “We argued for a more practical type of reform,” said MrJ agdeo. Mr Jagdeo said the Port of Spain Summit was different f rom previous meetings, due to “Obama’s presence, the historic o pportunity his administration now presents for a changed rela tionship” with the region. Caribbean leaders expressed hope that talks would continue in a second round of meetings in Washington later this year. POLICE yesterday released their list of the most wanted mur der suspects for 2009. The list is made up of nine men, ranging in a ge from 18 to 44. The majority of the murders, f or which they are wanted for questioning, occurred within the p ast four years, while one case is more than 15 years old. Police want to question 18year-old Mario Brown in connection with the 2008 murder ofC orey Whymms, who was shot and killed on Adderley Street. P olice also want to question him about the 2008 murder of Kendrick Rolle, who was shot and killed in Fox Hill. David St Remy is wanted for questioning in connection with the 2007 murder of Ryan Wood, who was shot and killed at Redwood Lane in Grand Bahama. Christie Charlton, 44, the oldest person on the list, is wanted for questioning in connection with the oldest case on the list: the 1993 murder of Pamela Eyma who was found dead on Gladstone Road. Carlos Gerve, alias Graves, is wanted for questioning in rela tion to the 2006 murder of Gerald Joseph who was stabbed to death at the International Bazaar in Grand Bahama. Jamaal Bastian, alias Smokey, is being sought for questioning in connection with the 2009 murder of Gentry McPhee who was shot and killed at Arawak Cay. Police want to question Michael Gibson in connection with the 2008 murder of Jodie Deveaux-Smith who was stabbed to death on East Sunrise High way, Grand Bahama. Kelly Mitchell is being sought f or questioning by the police in relation to the 2008 murder ofP eter Andrew Collie, who was shot and killed on Elizabeth A venue. Lavardo Simmons is being sought for questioning about the murder of Archange Augustine, who was shot and killed on KeyW est Street. He is also being sought for questioning in con n ection with the murder of Erison Tanelus, who was shot and killed at Eight Mile Rock. Earle Beneby is wanted for questioning in the 2006 murder of Kemuel Hepburn II, who was shot and killed on West Bay Street. All of these men are believed t o be armed and dangerous. Anyone with information regardingt he whereabouts of these suspects are asked to contact the police e mergency line at 911/919, CDU at 502-9930/9991 or the Police Control Room at 322-3333. C M Y K C M Y K LOCAL NEWS THE TRIBUNE TUESDAY, APRIL 21, 2009, PAGE 3 Man, 28, dies in apparentb ike accident RBDF looks for missing cr uise passenger Probe into sex misconduct allegation continuing Police appeal for help over discovery of two bodies In brief A young man lost his life in C at Island on Saturday in an a pparent motorbike accident. The 28-year-old Dean’s resident identified as Renardo Hall was pronounced dead at t he local clinic in Smith’s Bay. He is the country’s 22nd traffic fatality. Police were called to the site of the crash in New B ight, Cat Island, at 7.30pm. T here they found a blue and white 2005 model 900 Yamaha LP25 motorbike in the bushes. It had sustained extensive dama ge. The rider had already been taken to the local clinic when police arrived at the scene. I nvestigations are continuing i nto the incident, conducted by local police with assistance from New Providence-based officers. P OLICE are urging anyone w ith information about the two b odies found at separate locations over the weekend to come f orward. The decomposed body of m an was found in a small wooden structure on Baillou Hill R oad just after 8am on Sunday. The small house is located b ehind some homes on Laird Street. Police have labelled the case a s a suspicious death. Just a few hours after this dis c overy, a fishermen alerted authorities to the naked body of a n unidentified man floating in the water off Arawak Cay. P olice said that in both cases, they need the public’s help in determining the manner of death and the identity of the victims. THE Royal Bahamas Defence Force is working with the US Coast Guard in the s earch for a man missing at sea since early Saturday morning. After receiving information that a passenger of the cruise liner “Norwegian Sky” had fallen overboard at 3am on April 18, the operations departmentof the Defence Force dis patched a vessel to assist the Coast Guard in the search. The incident occurred about 14 miles north east of Great Sturrup Cay in the Exumas. n By DENISE MAYCOCK Tribune Freeport Reporter dmaycock@tribunemedia.net FREEPORT Police say they have not yet completed investigations into the allegations of sexual misconduct which have been made against a female teacher at the Eight Mile Rock High School. Supt Wendell Deveaux told reporters on Sunday that police are still “actively investigating” the matter. When asked why the inquiry was taking so long, he said: “It is a matter of conducting inquiries and getting additional information for evidence.” It has been a little over a month since the teacher was removed from the school, after being accused of having sexual relations with a male student. Two male teachers at the school are also accused of having sex with students. Police are still searching for Andre Birbal, a Trinidadian teacher who is wanted for questioning in connection with the alleged molestation of two former male students. The Bahamas Union of Teachers (BUT about the allegations. Quentin LaRhoda, BUT area vice presi-dent, stressed that the union does not encourage sexual relations between teachers and students, itis also worried that its members may be subject to false accusa tions. In the wake of the claims, the Ministry of Education announced plans to have all new teachers vetted by the police. The ministry said it also plans to create safety committees in schools that will be made up of teachers, students, parents and administration staff. In an article in The Tribune last week, under the headline, “Magistrate alleged to have collected fines without giving record on payment” it was incorrectly stated that: “The cashier assigned to the magistrate’s court in Freeport . . . said that Magistrate Swain only paid the sum of $4000 to the court.” That sentence should have read: “The cashier alleged that the prosecutor for Magistrate Swain's Court, Police Sergeant 1611 Kirklyn Wright (not Magistrate Swain) paid the $4,000 fine to her.” The Tribune apologises for any inconvenience this error may have caused. Correction FIFTHSUMMITOFTHEAMERICAS Caribbean leaders seek drug fight funds Plea for US Congressmen to extend $1.4 billion initiative to the region Police release list of 2009’s most wanted murder suspects PRIME MINISTER Hubert Ingraham is pictured at right as leaders of the 34 democratic countries in the Organisation of American States (OAS Americas, Port of Spain, Trinidad on Saturday, April 18. UNITED States President Barack Obama addresses reporters prior to the commencement of bilateral talks between the United States and the Caribbean Community (CARICOM C linton (right PRIME Minister Hubert Ingraham, (far left Barack Obama (far right Caribbean Community (CARICOM prior to the commencement of bilateral talks between the United States and Caricom on Friday, April 17. PHOTOS: Sharon T urner /BIS Photos

PAGE 4

E DITOR, The Tribune. I am extremely angry and agi tated by such a horrific accusation and allegation that was cur rently rumoured and circulated in our media houses by a woman who is traumatised by ag rievous diabetic ailment. I have no idea who this lady is but it isa sad and disturbing tragedy if her claim is truthful. Bahamas, this matter is far beyond the accuser and the accused. Adults are not the only victims of this devastating disease; infants and children are also recipients of this illness (diabetes remedies and medications are distributed for minors as well, and if these minors were given out dated medications the effects may have been more life threatening than this lady’s. Imagine if this was a loved one, family member, colleague or f riend; imagine you being an e mployee at a local hospital, clinic, The Ministry of Health or The Public Hospital Authority, how would feel if your coworker issued you a disastrous prescription drug? In the early 1980’s Tylenol h ad a major crisis, when I say major I mean major. An individual or a group of people maliciously replaced Tylenol capsules with cyanide-laced cap sules, resealed the packages and replaced them on shelves for distribution. As a result of this evil, approximately ten people died in the Chicago, Illinois area. The Tylenol Company was relentless in preventing the death of other individuals. Through their pubic relations team and other media channels they warned the nation to discontinue the use of their Tylenol products until detailed investigations and solutions were concluded. Due to the crisis, Tylenol paved the way through innova tions to help secure its product in the future, through implementing a triple sealed packaging procedure. Tylenol regained its market share after the whole ordeal was cleaned. Tylenol placed people over product and money by admitting to the problem at hand; t hey fixed the issue and as a r esult of their strategies they regained the public’s trust and repositioned themselves as a leader in over the counter drugs. So you administrators at the Elizabeth Estate clinic, the Min-i stry of Health and the Public Hospital Authority who are responsible for this alleged wrong doing should look into the matter with sincerity, apol ogise if this incident is truthful and take the necessary steps to ensure the public’s health, safety and to encourage quality service. To the alleged victim, your argument may seem trivial to some, probably because your complaint is legitimate and peo ple, especially in the Bahamas, seem to cover up the truth at all costs. My dear, if your claim is true, I am truly disgusted and I emphatically say to you: be strong, be encouraged and fight for what is right. Let us take our country back. Adolf Hitler may be classified as an evil man based on the history books, but he once said “pacifism is simply a disguise for cowardice.” Good morning, Bahamas. ELKIN SUTHERLAND Jr Nassau, April 15, 2009. EDITOR, The Tribune. Allow me to express my disg ust about the poor customer s ervice within the service industry in this country with regard to Western Air Airline. I had scheduled a flight to Freeport, Grand Bahama on Western Air for one day leaving Nassau at 8am to depart Freeport at 6pm. At approximately 9.30am the flight was called and all passen gers were asked to wait outside of the departure gate to be escorted to the plane. From the time of check in to the first call at 9.30am, there were no announcements made about the status of the scheduled flight, and when questions were put forth to Western Air employees, no one was able to give a definitive answer about the flight. After about 20 minutes of waiting in the hot sun, we were asked to return to the departure lounge. There was no reason given for this. Once back inside the terminal, all Western Air staff disappeared from the departure area without having the decency to update its passengers about the status of the flight or explain the situation. So we waited and waited for another hour until my colleague and I grew tired of waiting and returned to the check-in counter to ask for a refund. This is when we were told that the flight was now boarding, two hours late and absolutely no announcements or updates on the status of the flight or when they expected the flight to depart. We checked in at about 5.30pm for our return flight to Nassau. Because of our morning experience I asked the agent at the counter if the flight was on time...she said it wasn’t. I then asked if she knew how much later it would be. She stated that at 6pm they would give an update. This never happened. Again no form of customer service or courtesy was shown to the passengers who paid to travel on that airline. Six o’clock came and went, so did 7pm, 8pm, 9pm, 10pm and 11pm. One of the agents finally said something to a passenger after being questioned that the flight was in route and shouldl and in a few minutes. Bear in mind that this information was communicated to one passenger who shared it with the rest of us. At approximately 11.30pm we finally boarded the flight on Pineapple Air to r eturn to Nassau. N ow this was my very first time utilizing this airline but rest assured Mr Owner of Western Air I will never use your airline ever again. This first impression will surely be a lasting one andI will discourage anyone I can from using your airline services. Your staff customer service lev el is way below the bar and as a businessman in a service-oriented industry you ought to ensure that you invest in your staff so that they are trained in delivering supreme service no matter the situation. I have heard similar stories of this nature and now that I have experienced it for myself I have to make it public. Say what you like about Bahamasair with all their internal issues and constant delays, you know that no matter what they will always keep their passengers informed about the status of their flight regardless. Thank you for the opportu nity to share my experience. T SAUNDERS Nassau, April, 2009. C M Y K C M Y K EDITORIAL/LETTERS TO THE EDITOR PAGE 4, TUESDAY, APRIL 21, 2009 THE TRIBUNE The Tribune Limited NULLIUS ADDICTUS JURARE IN VERBA MAGISTRI Being Bound to Swear to The Dogmas of No Master L EON E. H. DUPUCH, Publisher/Editor 1903-1914 S IR ETIENNE DUPUCH, Kt., O.B.E., K.M., K.C.S.G., (Hon. P ublisher/Editor 1919-1972 Contributing Editor 1972-1991 EILEEN DUPUCH CARRON, C.M.G., M.S., B.A., LL.B. P ublisher/Editor 1972Published Daily Monday to Saturday S hirley Street, P.O. Box N-3207, Nassau, Bahamas Insurance Management Building., P.O. F-485, Freeport, Grand Bahama T ELEPHONES Switchboard (News, Circulation and Advertising Advertising Manager (242 C irculation Department (242 N assau Fax: (242 W EBSITE w ww.tribune242.com – updated daily at 2pm POLICE ARE urging anyone with any k nowledge of who killed 29-year-old Marlon S mith of Pinewood Gardens early Sunday morning to come forward with their information. S mith was one of three men released by the c ourt in late January for insufficient evidence in the 2007 shooting death of Samuel “Mouche” McKenzie, described as the “terror of East Street.” By Sunday afternoon a man in his mid-twenties, standing outside his Garden Hills homew as shot at by two men in a passing car. He r eceived a flesh wound in his left leg. Police are uncertain whether this last shooting was in a ny way connected with the killing of Smith e arlier the same morning. However, they believe i t might have been. There is also grave concern about the firearm used to kill Smith. Those who saw his body they claim the top of his head was blown off are convinced that an AK47 rifle was the murder weapon. The police have not confirmed this. However, police officers were in the Pinewood area most of Sunday night investigating the killing. As a result several persons were taken in for questioning. Police have not connected the two murders a nd the Sunday afternoon shooting that resulte d in a leg wound, but certain members of the p ublic have. According to street talk and if any of these persons have personal knowledge of what they are saying they are urged to go to the police Smith was killed because the courts released him from a murder charge that they are convinced he should have faced in the death of “Mouche” McKenzie. As for the man shot in the leg on the same day, again according to street talk, he was to be eliminated in retaliation for Smith’s death. The police are working overtime on these c ases, because although they are not saying so, t hey obviously see a vicious circle of retaliatory v iolence being unleashed. They are trying to stop any further bloodshed. This is where per sons who have information can help by calling the anonymous hotline 328-8477 and leaving their tip, but not their identity. In November 2007 two men, both with criminal records, were standing at 9 o’clock on a Thursday morning on Wilson Street off Hay Street when a passing car gunned them down. A ccording to police they were sprayed with bullets from a “high calibre” firearm. One was s eriously injured, but survived. The second, Samuel “Mouche” McKenzie, 35, died of his wounds. “Mouche” not only had a checkered record, h e had a brutal record, and there are those t oday who say they feel safer because “Mouche” is no longer stalking East Street. At the time of his death he was facing charges of murder,a ttempted murder, assault of a police officer, a ttempted escape, causing damage to a Central Police Station holding cell, and multiple other charges. At the time of his death the Prosecutor in the Attorney General’s office told The Tribune that his office was still compiling the files on those “multiple other charges.” I n all he had four murder charges and one a ttempted murder charge to face in the courts. He had earned his reputation as a “hit man.” If Mouche” had been in jail where he should h ave been, he would still be alive today. Instead h e was out on bail still the “terror of East Street.” His enemies, instead of the state, executed him. And, Sunday morning’s murder and Sunday afternoon’s attempted murder are believed to be the fallout from Mouche’s death. The police are now trying to prevent further bloodshed. Also of great concern is the murder weapon. An AK47 rifle if indeed it was the murder weapon as claimed is a high powered assault rifle used by the military. It is frightening to think that even one of t hese could be on our streets. But in fact they do m ake their way in through the drug underg round. There have been instances of persons buying as many as 50 weapons for shipment to the Bahamas. Although the US claims to have laws restricting purchase of firearms, there is no difficulty in walking into a pawn shop, or the free market on the Atlanta seaboard and making a selection of whatever weapon you want. It has been found that purchases have been made through Bahamians with legal status in the US who often buy firearms for their buddies in t he Bahamas. T he guns can be sneaked in anywhere along t he Bahamas’ chain of islands. However, our police, working closely with the gun tracing system of Homeland Security, have been able to intercept gun shipments to the Bahamas. It was through this intelligence that Bahamian police were able to block a large shipment of guns consigned to the Bahamas not so long ago. The police are faced with a daunting task. T he only way that our communities will be safe is if they have the full cooperation of this count ry’s citizens. So, please go to the phone and dial 328-8477. Your identity will never be known. Disgusted by Western Air’s customer service LETTERS letters@tribunemedia.net A way to help stop the killing '(6,*1 (1*,1((5,1* &203(7,7,9(,&,1* $67%,'',1*,1)250$7,21 5RDGWR&LW\'XPSDIWHUUHPL[ (PDLOJJRQJRUD#FRUDOZDYHFRP VENICEBAYSUBDIVISIONLOT NO. 1 Block No. 25 PROPERTY DESCRIPTION: Single-family Residence and Six Apartment Complex PROPERTYSIZE: 10,066 sq. ft. GROSS FLOOR AREA: 4,745 sq. ft. LOCATION: Property is located in the southern district of New Providence, off Bacardi Road; positioned outside the main entrance of the Venice Bay Development. APPRAISEDVALUE: $697,000 F O R S A L E I NTERESTED PARTIES SHOULD SUBMITOFFERS INCLUSIVE OF TELEPHONECONTACTAND POSTAL ADDRESS TO: CB DISTRESSEDPROPERTIES, CREDIT RISK MANAGEMENT DEPARTMENT,P.O BOX-SS-6263 NASSAU,BAHAMAS OR EMAIL US AT:DISTRESSED.PROPERTIES@COMBANKLTD.COM *WERESERVETHERIGHTTOREJECTANYORALL OFFERS. 127,&(LVKHUHE\JLYHQWKDW %5,$15$0$,6+6$5-8'$6 RI6($%5((=((67$3%2;1$66$8 %$+$0$6 LVDSSO\LQJWRWKH0LQLVWHUUHVSRQVLEOHIRU 1DWLRQDOLW\DQG&LWL]HQVKLSIRUUHJLVWUDWLRQQDWXUDOL]DWLRQDV FLWL]HQRI7KH%DKDPDVDQGWKDWDQ\SHUVRQZKRNQRZVDQ\ UHDVRQZK\UHJLVWUDWLRQQDWXUDOL]DWLRQVKRXOGQRWEHJUDQWHG VKRXOGVHQGZULWWHQDQGVLJQHGVWDWHPHQWRIWKHIDFWVZLWKLQ WZHQW\HLJKWGD\VIURPWKH W GD\ RI $SULO WRWKH 0LQLVWHUUHVSRQVLEOHIRUQDWLRQDOLW\DQG&LWL]HQVKLS3%R[ Angered by diabetic woman’s claim

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n By ALISON LOWE Tribune Staff Reporter alowe@tribunemedia.net FOLLOWING complaints t hat applicants were forced to q ueue outside the Passport O ffice for hours on end last week, the minister responsible for the facility yesterday expressed hope that crowds would be reduced as of today as officials adjust the applica-t ion process. However, Minister of Foreign Affairs Brent Symonettee mphasised that this will not minimise the amount of time it takes for an applicant to receive their e-passport once t hey have put in their application, and added that any further steps towards reducing w aiting times at the office cann ot be implemented until the d epartment gets more office space. L ast week MP for Fox Hill a nd former minister of foreign affairs, Fred Mitchell, held a press conference at the Pass port Office in New Providence where he accused Mr Symonette of not giving the prob l ems at the office sufficient attention. He decried the length of time applicants were being forced to wait outside the building without water or sanitary facilities and alleged that s ome individuals are having t o wait up to four months to receive their passports after applying. Parents Mr Mitchell suggested that i t was unfortunate that pare nts who had taken time off work during midterm break t o bring their children to apply w ere not being served “in a t imely manner”, while others present complained that theyh ad travelled from the Family I slands only to find that they could not complete the applic ation process that day. The Fox Hill MP suggested the government must “buym achines for data entry, for printing and hire some more p eople.” Mr Symonette yesterday c onfirmed that the New Provi dence office, like the Freeport o ffice, is restricted in its abilit y to process applicants effi c iently due to staffing shortages. However, this cannot be i mmediately remedied, the m inister said, as “not one more” staff member can fit i nto the building where the office is currently housed. H e said his ministry has “applied for” new premises but have been “unable toa ccess” additional space yet. “That’s part of the reason f or the delays that have been ongoing. We are working on it as a matter of urgency,” said M r Symonette. Meanwhile, Mr Symonette r evealed that the Department i s in possession of more printing machines which produce e-passports, however, space restrictions have also hindered the department in putting all of these to use. “We physically cannot do a nything about that right n ow,” he said. Q ueues The minister said that as of today, officials hope that queues will be minimised in l ight of a decision by passport p rocessors to no longer keep applicants in the office while t hey verify their documents. We’ll do that after the pers on is left. It may result in some of those people havingt o come back but we hope t hat number will be less, a small percentage (of those w ho applied),” said Mr Symonette. Mr Symonette called on B ahamians to double check when their passports expire to e nsure that they apply well in advance to receive a new one i f they are travelling this summ er. “If you are travelling say J uly 1, a passport takes six weeks to issue, so you would have to apply by the beginning of May – next week. Please do not consider tryingt o get a passport in two or three days. Apply now,” he s aid. C M Y K C M Y K LOCAL NEWS T HE TRIBUNE TUESDAY, APRIL 21, 2009, PAGE 5 n B y BETTY VEDRINE FIFTEEN new computers donated by Rohm and Haas, the parent company of Morton Salt, through the Bahamas Red Cross Soci-e ty are on their way to the Inagua All-Age School. The company made a specific request when it presented its donation, director general of the Bahamas Red Cross KimS awyer said at a press conference on Wednesday at the organisation’s headquarters. “Out of concern for the local community, the Rohma nd Haas Company made a d onation to the Bahamas Red Cross in October 2008, to be used specifically for the great island of Inagua,”M s Sawyer said. I n September 2008, Hurricane Ike, a category four hurricane, destroyed much o f the island and disrupted s chooling for many children w ho were unable to attend c lasses for weeks. But Ms Sawyer said, “due to the resilience of the local c ommunity, lives have been r estored and the community has returned to normal c y.” She added that through the efforts of local and international partners, the Bahamas Red Cross was a ble to respond with relief items, including food p arcels, hygiene kits, k itchen sets, tarpaulins, blankets, mosquito nets and water. Experience I t was decided that dona tions from the Rohm and Haas Company would go t owards enhancing the learning experience for children on the island byp urchasing computers and a udio-visual equipment. Principal of the Inagua All-Age School ChristineW illiamson, who received t he donation on behalf of the school, said the comp uters would be put to good use. “We are very pleased to be receiving this gift, as this w ill further improve the existing facility that we have,” Ms Williamson said. The computers will be used in both the classrooms and the computer lab, she said. B esides the computers, the school will also receive three printers, two InFocusp rojectors, 14 whiteboards and two Promethean Activboards and Activotes. D irector of Education Lionel Sands also expressed gratitude for the donation. Mr Sands said the equipment will be beneficial to both students and teachers. “One of the things that we have found is that our children learn so much bet ter when they use the technology that we were not so used to when we were growing. And one such technology is the interactive whiteboard,” he said. Mr Sands said the white board is a tool that enhances learning to a greater degree than systems used previously. A whiteboard is a large interactive display that connects to a computer and projector. A computer’s desktop is projected onto the board’s surface, where users control the computer using a pen, finger or other device. “These are tools that would benefit both our children and teachers great ly and so we are very appreciative of it and wethank the Morton Salt Company for this generous donation,” Mr Sands said. Also present at the ceremony were Brendon Watson, executive member of the Bahamas Red Cross. and Joel Lewis, district education officer. n By DENISE MAYCOCK Tribune Freeport Reporter dmaycock@tribunemedia.net FREEPORT – The construction of a new government subdivision is underway at Hawksbill where some 50 houses are being built for those residents who lost their homes dur ing Hurricane Wilma. However, many of those affected are unable to meet the requirements to qualify for one of the new homes. Minister of Housing Kenneth Russell met with the residents of Pinder’s Point, Hunters, Mack Town, Lewis Yard and Seaco Town on Friday evening at the Upper Zion Baptist Church in Pinder’s Point. He announced that the new subdivision, renamed Sister Mary Patricia (Russell sist of a total of 210 low-income houses. He said construction started on the first 50 houses four months ago. While the Bahamas Mortgage Corporation has relaxed qualifications by lowering down payment requirements for applicants in the affected areas, residents still raised concerns about having first preference to the houses. Minister Russell stressed that while the new subdivision was built with them in mind, they must qualify like everyone else. “There is a problem with persons who want homes qualifying. The p roblem is whether the people we want to help could qualify,” he said. In 2005, Hurricane Wilma, a category five storm, caused major dev astation along the southwest coast of the island. Settlements from Mack Town to Pinder’s Point, as well as Eight Mile Rock and West End were underwater and many homes were destroyed and damaged. Subdivision After the storm, the government announced plans to build a new subdivision for the relocation of residents from low-lying areas to safer ground. The Grand Bahama Port Authority donated land in Hawksbill for the development of a new government subdivision. So far, 10 persons have been approved for houses in the new subdivision. However, many persons in the affected areas are having problems meeting the qualifications. “My understanding is that a number of persons who were affected have since built new houses of their own, but we still have residents out here in mind as to first preference. “They still have to qualify for the houses as everyone else and we will work with them as best we can,” said Mr Russell. He noted that interest in the homes is very high and persons from elsewhere on Grand Bahama are also making applications for houses in the new subdivision. Minister Russell stressed that once the houses are completed, they cannot be left unoccupied for long periods of time while persons qualify for loans from the Mortgage Corporation. Noting that applications have been made by teachers, policemen, Customs officers and other public service workers, he explained that the government would like to see civil servants make up 10 per cent of the subdivision’s residents. “I hope that more persons from Pinder’s Point, Lewis Yard, Mack Town, Hunters and Seaco Town apply and come forward and see how we can fit them in this first batch of houses,” he said. Minister Russell said some of the houses are conventional block homes and others are ‘tilt-up’ constructions with concrete panel walls set in place by a crane. The houses range from around 1,000 sq ft to 1,200 sq ft in size. There are some 25 contractors being used to build the houses and 700 persons are being employed in the building phase. Mr Russell emphasised that it is important that the homes are properly built. “We have learnt from a lot of the problems we had over the past two years. We have our inspectors at every house and the Port Authority inspectors must approve code inspections. “We must ensure that the deficiencies (we have seen in the past not happen in my watch. We want to give poor people a product they can live in comfortably at least 15 to 20 years before any major repairs,” he said. TO ASSISTthose Bahamians who do not have regular access to clean drinking water and who are “less fortunate in all aspects of life”, QVS Pharmacy in conjunction with the Caribbean Bottling Company recently donated proceeds froma bottled water promotion to the Bahamas Red Cross Society. For every bottle of Dasani water sold in March, known internationally as Red Cross Month, QVS Pharmacy donated partial proceeds from the sale to the Red Cross to support the assistance the charity gives to the Bahamian community. On March 22, which was World Water Day, QVS donated every cent from Dasani water purchased to the charity. “The Bahamas Red Cross does such great work in our community,” said Cliff Pinder, vice-president of QVS Pharmacy. “Considering that March is Red Cross Month we wanted to do something special for the charity to show our appreciation for all they do for those less fortunate. They provide a needed service to the Bahamas, and we’re honoured to do all we can to support them. We’re also very thankful to Caribbean Bottling for the assistance they have provided us in this endeavor. ” Kim Sawyer, director general of the Bahamas Red Cross, accepted the cheque from QVS. Hopes that passport office crowds will be reduced Kenneth Russell Donated computers on way to Inagua All-Age School Construction of subdivision is underway at Hawksbill Q VS Pharmacy and C aribbean Bottling Company team up forR ed Cross Month Brent Symonette

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C M Y K C M Y K LOCAL NEWS PAGE 6, TUESDAY, APRIL 21, 2009 THE TRIBUNE n By DENISE MAYCOCK Tribune Freeport Reporter dmaycock@tribunemedia.net FREEPORT The Grand Bahama Port Authority presenteda $15,000 donation on Thursday for the restoration of the basketball facility at the YMCA. The facility, which was destroyed by the hurricanes, is expected to be completed in timef or this year’s Junkanoo Jam Basketball Tournament, which is hosted by the Ministry of Tourism in November. Sean McShane, director of Basketball Travellers in the United States, will spearhead the restoration of the new basketball court. Basketball Travellers has had a long-standing relationship on Grand Bahama, bringing college teams from the United States to p articipate in the annual Junkanoo Jam tournament in Freeport. Mr McShane said the new court is expected to be completed on April 27. He commended the Grand Bahama Port Authority for its generous donation. Pr esentation Attending the presentation were Ian Rolle, president of the Grand Bahama Port Authority, Ginger Moxey, vice president of the Port Group Ltd, Geneva Rutherford, director of training a t the Port Authority, Betty Bethel, general manager of business development at the Ministry of Tourism, Lawrence Hepburn, president of the Bahamas Basketball Association, and Karen P inder-Johnson, executive direc tor of YMCA. Mr McShane said that 12 major university teams are expected to travel to Freeport to participate in the Junkanoo Jam tournament held during the week of thanksg iving in November. He noted that the Freeport tournament is one of the premier in-season women’s basketball events recognised across the US. “We want to thank the Port Authority for their supportand their sincere generosity in getting this basketball facility restored,” said Mr McShane. “The brand new facilities to host our teams will be tremen dous, but it is really the kids and their families on Grand Bahama who will benefit from this new facility. We are just excited to be driving this project,” he said. Karen Pinder Johnson said the restoration of the basketball facility has been slow. She was grateful to the Port Authority and others who have supported the restoration of the YMCA. Geneva Rutherford said the YMCA is an important recreational facility that every city needs. “Just 10 years after the founding of the City of Freeport the planners saw fit to establish our YMCA. They saw the need for a recreation facility to be used by all ages for all types of sports and activities by schools, civic organisations, churches, and youth groups on the island,” she said. She noted that the facility has been in existence for nearly 40 years on Grand Bahama and has been the venue for many international and national tournaments and sporting events. Mr McShane your willingness to spearhead the renovation of the new basketball court is highly commendable. We at the GBPA appreciate your kind gesture and we are happy to offer this donation of $15,000 toward this project,” said Ms Rutherford. Mr Rutherford said that Sir Jack, patron of the Y, has also m ade a $40,000 donation toward the rebuilding effort of the Y. “The YMCA represents one of the major philanthropic efforts of the shareholders of the GBPA and I am certain that Mr Hannes Babak, chairman, and Mr Rolle are fully committed to the ongoing support of YMCA,” she said. Betty Bethel said Basketball Travellers have been coming to Grand Bahama for seven years to participate in the tournament. S he said the Ministry of Tourism has been partnering with Basketball Travellers and the Bahamas Basketball Federation in putting on a successful event. Ms Bethel stressed that it is important that collegiate teams that come to play in Freeport are able to have access to the same international standards in terms of the facility where they play and practice. She reported that on average some 800 players, their families and friends travel to Freeport. “The impact is enormous if you multiply that by a week in hotel accommodations, meals, trans portation, tours, and various activ ities,” she said. GBPA donates $15,000 for restoration of b-ball court FREEPORT,GRAND BAHAMAA documentary film by the nephew of movie star Sir Sidney Poitier will have its Bahamas premiere in Freeport later this month. The film, VOICES, produced by Jeffrey Poitier, documents untold stories of Bahamians and African-Americans who settled Coconut Grove, Florida. The Bahamas Weekly, along with the Ministry of Tourism, Ross University and Pelican Bay Hotel,are presenting the premiere on Saturday, April 25,at Ross University Study Hall at Seahorse Plaza East. Born in Nassau into a family spanning more than ten generations in the Bahamas, Jeffrey has a strong film background. His father, Carl, was one of ten children of Reginald and Evelyn Poitier, the most famous of whom is Sidney. The older generation of Poitier children were raised on Cat Island and later moved to Nassau where Jeffrey was also raised. Homeland VOICES was born in 2004 when Jeffrey moved back to Miami and discovered that his own neighbourhood was originally built by people from his homeland. Further research into anecdotes told by Coconut Grove residents u ncovered a personal connection to its history. This documentary is a comprehensive story of pursuit of the American Dream by a group of people determined to make a good life for themselves and their children, and how the dream is threatened by the very culture and c ountry that allowed it to be. For the VOICES project, Jeffrey enlisted Coconut Grove natives, descended from the original Bahamians, who are deter mined that the rich history of the Grove and their people’s contribution to it will not be lost. Filming spanned more than f our years and includes interviews with more than 200 people and enough rich material for a multipart series. “Working on this pro ject has been the dream of my life time, and to be asked to screen a portion of it for my people at home in Freeport is a great honour!” said Mr Poitier. “I will never forget all that growing up The Bahamas has provided me and I welcome this chance to show you all what I have done with those opportunities,” said Jeffrey. VOICES had its world premiere at the AMC Theatre inC ocoWalk at Coconut Grove inOctober 25, 2008.This will be t he first screening in The Bahamas. Bahamas Film Commissioner Craig Woods will attend to introduce the film and said: "The Bahamas Film and Television Commission, in collaboration with the Grand Bahama Film Office, is extremely pleased to play a role in bringing the production of 'Voices' to be screened on Grand Bahama Island. “The film portrays the ambitious struggles of early Bahamian settlers in South Florida who madea tremendous impact in the social development of Miami and the Coconut Grove communities. “Their efforts remind us today of the unique qualities they brought to the constructionof homes in those communities which remain lasting pillars from the era they came from. “Writer-producer Jeffrey Poitier does an outstanding job in cap turing the essence of their challenges and successes, providing all with a wonderful blueprint to follow for years to come." Part proceeds will benefit the Grand Bahama Heritage Foundation. “This is an important story to tell, and it reinforces the role that history and art can play in connecting Bahamians to their heritage,”saidafoundation spokesman. Donation We wish to thank Jeffrey Poitier, the screening organiser and sponsors for the donation of the premiere's proceeds to the Grand Bahama Heritage Foundation. “These funds will support the Freetown Historical Project, currently in production, which is using t he vehicle of art to capture the oral histories of that settlement. We’d like to thank Ross University for helping make this event possible.” The programme will begin at 7pm and following the screening a question-and-answer session will t ake place with the film-maker, followed by a short 'Meet the Film Maker' reception sponsored by Italian Specialty Wines, Agave, Le Med, Sabor, The Ferry House and Bahamian Brewery and Bev erage Company (brewers of Sands beer). Film made by nephew of Sir Sidney Poitier to have Bahamas premiere B AHAMIAN FILM-MAKER J effrey Poitier, nephew of Sir Sidney Poitier, will visit Grand Bahama to premiere his documentary film VOICES on Saturday, April 25, at7 pm at Ross University Study H all at Seahorse Plaza. Tickets a re now on sale. Part proceeds to aid the Grand Bahama Heritage Foundation. ROSS UNIVERSITY DEAN'S LIST was announced for the first set of students studying in The Bahamas with Dean, Dr Mary Coleman (standing third left Saleh, Robert Westbrook, Jessica Black, Jeffrey Perumean and Daniel Speredelozzi. Back row from left: Knema Rezaei-Bazazizad, Moses Wananu, Anas Saleh, Daniel Speredelozzi, Robert Westbrook, Jessica Black. Front row from left: Dr Charles Seidel, Dr Mary Coleman (Dean Powell, Dr Michael Robinson and Meg Osman, Director of Student Services. GRAND BAHAMA ISLAND -The first Dean's List for students of Ross University Medical School, Bahamas campus, were acknowledged in an award ceremony with the Dean of the School of Medicine, Dr Mary Coleman. The Ross University Dean's List is for students who receive all A’s in their courses for two consecutive semesters and they remain on the Dean's list as long as they maintain a B average in subsequent semesters. The Dean’s List is posted every semester as soon as grades are available from the previous semester. Semester 3 recipientsare Leslie Powell, Daphne Scaramangas, Anas Saleh, Robert Westbrook, Dana Price, Richard Pigg, Moses Wananu, and Knema Rezaei-Bazizazad. Semester 4 recipientsare Jeffrey Perumean, Jessica Black and Daniel Speredelozzi. "The curriculum at Ross University School of Medicine is accelerated and quite rigorous. We are proud of students who make the Dean’s List they deserve recognition for the academic efforts to accomplish this level of learning,” said Dr Mary Coleman, Dean of Ross University. The students came together,some along with family members also residing with them in The Bahamas, to receive their certificates from Dean Coleman, and heard encouraging words from Meg Osman, Director of Student Services. Closing remarks were offered by Dr Michael Robinson,Assistant Dean, Curricular and Faculty Affairs.A toast was given by Dr Charles Seidel,chair Foundation of Medicine.The students and faculty celebrated with food, sparkling apple cider and cake. Ross University was founded in 1978 and is a provider of medical and veterinary education offering doctor of medicine and doctor of veterinary medi cine degrees. The School of Medicine is located in Dominica, West Indies, and the Freeport, Grand Bahama, campus opened in January, 2009. The School of Veterinary Medicine is located in St Kitts. Ross University's administrative offices are in North Brunswick, NJ.Ross University has more than 9,000 alumni with MD and DVM. degrees. ROSS UNIVERSITYDEAN’SLISTACKNOWLEDGED

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C M Y K C M Y K LOCAL NEWS T HE TRIBUNE TUESDAY, APRIL 21, 2009, PAGE 7 WORK will begin soon on exterior renovations to the 78-year-old former Collins mansion on Shirley Street, known as Centreville House. The project will be supervised by a preservation architect from the Antiquities, Monuments and Museums Corporation (AMMC a gency whose offices are housed in adjacent buildings on the estate. The AMMC has been responsible for archaeological research and heritage conservation in the Bahamas since it was created by parliament in 1998. It currently operates five public facilities in New Providence Forts Fincastle, Montagu and Charlotte, Balcony House and the Pompey M useum. It also administers the Long Island Museum at Buckley's, and the South Eleuthera Mission at Rock Sound. It is developing a museum in the old jail house on San Salvador. Centreville House was the home of Ralph G Collins, OBE, a prominent citizen who died in 1946. N ear the heart of Nassau, the property was occupied by St Andrew’s School from 1950 to 1971, when it was acquired by the government. The AMMC moved to the six-acre Collins Estate in 2005. Hurricane The 35,000-square-foot mansion is a visible link to the past. It was built in 1931 to replace an earlier wooden home wrecked by the 1929 hurricane. The estate itself once extended from Shirley Street almost to Wulff Road and east to what later became Palmdale. It is a remnant of another era. Property records date back to a Florida loyalist named Christie who arrived in 1791. A residence known as “Centreville” existed on the site as early as 1871, and was extensively renovated in 1913 by the Brice family of Alligator Bay, Long Island, who had acquired the estate some 30 years before. Marion Brice married Collins, an American who came to the Bahamas in 1905 and became a leading politician and merchant. He was a member of the House of Assembly for the Crooked Island district and a member of the Executive Council. With various Bahamian partners, he was involved in the sponge trade, the liquor business, handicraft distribution, and reale state development. He was a major shareholder in the Montagu Beach Hotel and spearheaded the dredging of Nassau harbour. Large sections of the estate's ornate wrought-iron fence erected in 1924 are still standing, but the Brice’s wooden home was severely damaged in the 1929h urricane. Collins rebuilt it using reinforced concrete, although the new structure was d esigned to resemble the building it replaced. According to a 1931 Tribune report, it was the best-equipped residence on the island, and represented "the most solid type of construction possible – marble columns rise at each side of the maine ntrance, the steps of which are made of granite." T he new Centreville House included servants' quarters, a library, private bar, billiard room, dance floor and eight bed rooms, all with private baths. The hardwood floors and wall panelling were all of mahogany. After Collins' death, the estate was sold to the association that opened St Andrew's School, which moved from the Kirk downtown to occupy the main house and grounds, while a new subdivision called Centreville was created from the eastern portion of the property. "Our investment and interest in the Collins Estate is a prime example of the way in which the AMMC works to pre serve our links to the past in ways that can have a direct impact on the Bahamian economy," said corporation's director Dr Keith Tinker. " We know that historical resources are key elements of national development, f inding expression in visitor attractions, cultural activities and educational exhibits." Monuments When the AMMC began in 1998, it assumed responsibility for public monuments (like the war memorial in the garden of Remembrance downtown), archaeolog ical investigations (such as that into Grand Bahama's historic Freetown settlement, which was deserted in the 1960s), and palaeontological research (like the study of rare animal fossils found in a blue hole on Abaco). The corporation also develops and operates museums around the country, b oth directly and in partnership with local interests. Dr Tinker is a history lecturer at the College of the Bahamas who obtained his doctorate at the Florida State University. Other technical experts on staff include museum curator Kim Outten-Stubbs, Alicia Oxley, a preservation architect, and Michael Pateman, an archaeologist who is completing doctoral studies in Ohio. The corporation also enlists technical support through partnership agreements. F or example, Dr James Miller, who was Florida's state archaeologist for 20 years, h as been an adviser to the AMMC since inception. And an exchange programme was recently arranged with the school of architecture at Florida A & M University in Tallahassee. "The Bahamas is probably now at the p oint where Florida was 20 or 30 years ago, so I am able to apply my experience to h elp Bahamians avoid the pitfalls and embrace the opportunities in this field. The corporation is very aware of what needs to be done to preserve Bahamian heritage,” Dr Miller said. One of the 'big picture' projects that Dr Miller is supervising is the development of a comprehensive file of archaeological and historical sites throughout the Bahamas linked to Geographical Information Systems data. He also helped plan the country's first national heritage park at Clifton in south western New Providence. Centreville House is set for exterior renovations THE FORMER Collins mansion on Shirley Street, known as Centreville House. n By MATT MAURA T HE treatment of c hronic, non-communicab le diseases (CNCDs placing an “astronomi-c al” burden on the h ealthcare system and the economy of the Bahamas as estimates show that almost $30 million was spent in 2008 on medication to treat 11 chronic diseases at public and priv ate healthcare facilities, M inister of Health Dr Hubert Minnis said Frid ay. D r Minnis said there is an unacceptable prevalence” of chronic, noncommunicable diseases in The Bahamas. CNCDs, which include hypertension, diabetes, cancers, heart disease and respiratory illnesses, are now considered the great est challenge facing the healthcare sector. T he minister said the government, through the Ministry of Health andD epartment of Public Health, had implementeda number of strategies to reverse the growing trendo f CNCDs in The B ahamas. The measures are being bolstered by an ongoing public awareness and education campaign. “This situation is cause for concern from both the social and economic per s pectives,” Dr Minnis s aid. “This is why the Ministry of Health has made containment, control and reduction of the underlying causes of CNCDs a priority.” Initiatives Addressing healthcare professionals and medical students attending the University of the West Indies, The Bahamas, Third Research Day Con ference, Dr Minnis said the Ministry of Health had established a Clinical Audit Programme for chronic, non-communica ble diseases within the Department of Public Health as one of the initiatives to address the sit uation. The Clinical Audit Programme involves a detailed evaluation of patient care, which allows for greater interaction with physicians responsible for direct patient care. The minister said audit results would help shape policies, protocols, delivery models “and oth er strategies to achieve better outcomes.” Dr Minnis said preliminary data from the 2005 Healthy Lifestyle Survey for persons between 1574 years of age show that CNCDs accounted for more than half the deaths in The Bahamas at that time. Other statistics from the survey (conducted in New Providence, Grand Bahama and Long Island) showed that 21 per cent of Bahamians were diagnosed with hypertension and seven per cent with diabetes. Forty-three per cent, he said, were found to be obese, while another 27 per cent were found to be overweight. Just 27 per cent of the participating persons had “normal weight”, while three per cent were underweight. AS PARTof the Bahamas National Trust’s Earth Day activities, 30 participants of the Girl Guides Caribbean Camp planted 500 hundred mahogany seeds and 700 Horseflesh seeds. The initia tive is part of the Bahamas Million Tree Campaign, in which the Bahamas has pledged to plant a million trees by December 2009. The girls came from throughout the Bahamas, Belize, the British Virgin Islands, Trinidad and Tobago, Guyana and Antigua and Barbuda. “We were delighted to have this opportunity to partner with the Girl Guides in this propagation project for native trees,” said Portia Sweeting, BNT director of education. “We not only need to plant native trees on Earth Day, but also to begin to propagate native trees in order to have a supply of native hardwoods for landscaping areas in our national parks where we have removed invasive species such as Casuarina or Brazilian pepper.” The Girl Guides planted the seeds in trays and once the seeds have sprouted they will be transplanted to larger pots and cared for until they are large enough for transplanting into areas in need of trees. The BNT is encouraging citizens to plant a tree on Earth Day, April 22, in their gardens, schools and places of work. $30m spent on medication to treat 11 chronic diseases in 2008 Dr Hubert Minnis Girl Guides plant for the future PARTICIPANTS of the Girl Guides Caribbean Camp.

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C M Y K C M Y K LOCAL NEWS PAGE 8, TUESDAY, APRIL 21, 2009 THE TRIBUNE POLICE are still trying to determine the identity of one of two men founds hot dead in a small wooden home on Emmanuel Way off St Vincent Road last week. Police said they have yet to establish a motive for the brutal killings anda re still appealing for persons in the community who may have information regarding the unidentified victim to come forward. The victim is believed to be a Haitian in his 60s who farmed in the area. L ast Thursday, police were called to the gruesome scene where the older man, known in the neighbourhood as Daddy’, and 42-year-old Alpheus Curtis Jr, known as Tracy, were found shot to death in the eight-by-ten sized dwelling. The murders left the quiet area in s hock. “We still don't know the name of the elderly gentleman and continue to make appeals in the community to come forward,” Assistant Commissioner Hulan Hanna told The Tribune y esterday. While some initial reports suggested the two men were related, Mr Hannas aid police have not confirmed this. The two men were found by a third party early last Thursday morning. When police arrived on the scene around 9am, the two men were lyingo n the ground with apparent gun shot wounds about the body. Police said it is believed the men may have been killed up to 12 hours before their bodies were discovered. Yesterday, Assistant Superintendent L eon Bethel of the Central Detective Unit said police have no suspects in custody. " We do not have anyone in custody at this time. We're still continuing the investigation and we are in progress of trying to interview some persons," he said. We've done some preliminary inquiries, but at this time we have not determined a motive for this double killing.” Persons with information about the murders can contact police anony-m ously at 919, 502-9991 or 328-TIPS. Police still seeking identity of one of two men found dead which could be connected to the murder. Police say that the incident took place in the area of Amarillo Street, Garden Hills sometime around 3.30 pm. Am ale believed to be in his m id-20s told police that while standing outside of his residence, two males approached in a vehicle and opened fire at him. The man reportedly received a flesh wound to the right leg.P olice are following significant leads and hope to make an arrest in the matter soon. ASP Bethel said yesterday that police are uncertain if the matter is connected to Smith’s murder but are try ing to determine whether or not it is. Smith was charged with Stephen Stubbs, Dashino Wilson and Adrian Edge combe in the November 22, 2007 murder of hit-man Samuel “Mouche” McKenzie, 35, and the attempted murder of Keith Woodside who was wounded during the shooting incident. The shooting took place in broad daylight on Wilson Street off Hay Street. The four men accused in these shootings were discharged in late January this year due to a lack of evidence. States' Stop Tax Haven Abuse Bill. Mr Smith said it would be "preposterous" for the country to remain in that standing considering that this country's only TIEA lies with the US. Both issues were said to be forefront on the minds of CARICOM members as they met last week with US President Barack Obama and other regional leaders for the fifth Summit of the Americas in Trinidad and Tobago. The Summit came weeks after the country was grey listed by the Organisation for Eco nomic Co-operation and Devel opment and amid concerns that the Bahamas would be part of a targeted crackdown on tax havens. The proposed crackdown, being pushed by developed nations, is an attempt to collect revenue from wealthy citizens of those countries believed toh ave invested in off-shore tax h avens to evade tax payment. "The whole process is one in which they keep changing the rules of the game and moving the goal post. I don't think there's anytime going forward that we would be in a positiont o relax or take our eyes off the ball. I think once we cleared that we intend to meet whatever standards there are we simply have to just keep abreast of them and make the necessary changes," said Mr Smith. "Once we said that we intend to meet the standards whatever they are we will do so judiciously, in which we do not harm ourselves (and any fallout to the sector so that will mean to be careful in selecting trading partners with which we execute the TIEAs and per haps conducting some form of analysis to see what the outcome would be depending on where we go and how fast we g o," he said. T he prime minister has a lready indicated that the country is ready to negotiate additional TIEAs and will do what is necessary to meet the OECD's standards. The country has one such agreement with the US. He also suggests that Canada was likely to be the next country with whom the Bahamas signs a new TIEA. Mr Smith added that under the existing TIEA with the United States, the Bahamas meets all the criteria for information exchange and should not remain listed as a secrecy jurisdiction on the stop tax haven abuse legislation. "The tax information exchange agreement, (signed with the United States several years ago, did in fact meet all of the international criterion for information exchange and transparency. “So it was, at least from my point of view it would be pre posterous for the US to have one department certify you as (having and then another arm of gov ernment saying that you haven't," he said. Raymond Winder, managing partner of prominent account ing firm Deloitte and Touche, also weighed in on the issue: "The point is there is no justification for putting the Bahamas on the list (legislation we have a tax information exchange agreement with the US and that has been working and so there's no issues between the Bahamas and the US and I can't see any reason why we'd be put on that list," he said. Last week, while speaking from the Summit in Trinidad, Mr Ingraham said he does not expect the Bahamas to ultimately appear in US’ legislat ion to stop tax haven abuse. H e said he previously wrote to C hairman of the House Ways and Means Committee and Congressman Charles Rangel on the Bahamas’ position, and also on behalf of CARICOM a t the Community’s request. I think he gave us sufficient a ssurances about the Bill to cause most of our members to be comfortable. “There will be some additional discussions with the Cong ress,” Mr Ingraham said. T he present draft of the Stop T ax Haven Abuse Bill names the Bahamas as one of 34 secrecy jurisdictions. to smuggle marijuana and cocaine into Florida, six months after he and his wife were extradited to the Unit ed States to face drug charges last April. The couple had been engaged in a nearly fiveyear battle against extradition. Both Majors had cases pend ing in the Bahamas. The US alleges that the husband and wife were part of a drug conspiracy between August, 2002, and January, 2003, involving the transport of hundreds of pounds of cocaine and marijuana. Keva Major pleaded guilty to the drug charges against her last August. The prison time she has already served has been taken into consideration. She is now under a three-year supervised release in West Palm Beach. Her husband is facing up to 50 years in prison on the drug charges, but could also receive a much lesser sen tence for pleading guilty. charge. Stubbs was also a rraigned on a firearm possession charge. According to court dockets, Stubbs on Tuesday April 14, intentionally caused Wallace’s death. It is further alleged that Stubbs was in possession of a handgun with intent to endanger the life of Tanisha Newbold. Stubbs was not required to enter a plea to the charges. Mr Kemp asked the court to examine the bruises on his client’s writs and ankles, claiming that Stubbs had been in shackles since last week. Mr Kemp also told the court that he had tried to visit Stubbs while he was being held at the Grove Police Station, but was not allowed to do so. He claimed that police had used excessive force on Stubbs. Mr Ferreira told the court that when he had seen Stubbs he observed bruises on his face. Mr Ferreira claimed that police had refused to make notes of the injuries and asked the court yesterday to take judicial note of Stubbs’ injuries. M agistrate Archer noted the bruises under Stubbs’ right eye, nostrils and around his wrists. Stubbs was denied bail, but was informed by the magistrate that he could make an application to the Supreme Court for bail. Stubbs was remanded to Her Majesty’s Prison. His case was adjourned to July 20, which is when a preliminary inquiry into the matter is expected to open. is about 50 x 85, consisted of some 300 suspected marijuana plants, ranging in height from two feet to six feet. The second and third field contained an additional 600 marijuana plants. “Two other fields were also discovered, however, officers were still at the scene conducting investigations,” said Mr Bootle. The police are asking persons to come forward with infor mation that could assist them in the arrest of the person or persons responsible. F erguson created a conflict of interest. Yesterday Nicholas Lavender, representing Rami Weissfisch, told Justices of Appeal how Justice Allen had described the proceedings as a farce and was the first to raise the possi-b ility of her own recusal at a session held in chambers. However, as there was no court reporter in t he meeting Mr Lavender submitted evidence from his notes, which he maintains were read a nd discussed by the judge and counsel at the time. President of the Court of Appeal Dame Joan S awyer, sitting with Justice Emmanuel Osebe day and Justice Hartman Longley, criticised other counsel for not also keeping notes of d iscussions in the absence of a court reporter to prevent speculation over what was said. She said: “Either you do it by a court reporter or you do it by hand, but a record there must be. “There is only one right way and the right way is to keep a record.” Mr Lavender further submitted that Justice Allen had said she was conflicted over certain things that had occurred, and she considered herself unable to make a decision on the evidence. He said: “She found it difficult to do the job she had to do as a judge, to determine that issue in the detached impartial manner a judge should.” It was decided at the opening of proceedings yesterday that the Appeal Court case w ould be heard in public, and not behind closed doors as had been done in the Supreme Court. J ustices of Appeal dismissed submissions from Mr Lavender to hold proceedings entirel y or partially in camera maintaining a dispute over a judge’s conduct is in the public interest. Mr Lavender had argued confidentiality s hould be upheld particularly to protect minors involved, but lawyer Michael Scott representing Amir Weissfisch, and Brian Moree representing the children, said their clients had no objection to the case being held in open courta nd asserted that the names of individuals involved had already been reported in the press. Mr Moree said: “My clients feel no threat at all by these proceedings being public in this court because what is before this court has absolutely nothing to do with the children in so far as it’s a matter of dealing with the conduct of the judge.” Dame Joan ruled any information and the names of parties and witnesses will not be kept secret unless an application is made for Justices of Appeal to consider during the course of the hearing. The Appeal Court president said: “The pub lic does have a vital interest in the independence and impartiality of the judiciary, and if the conduct of the judge is said to be impugned then the public has a right to know.” The case continues at the Court of Appeal in Charlotte Street, Nassau, today. Man in court Mur der F ROM page one F ROM page one The Bahamas ‘must be careful’ in selecting trading partners F ROM page one Challenge of judgs refusal to step down from case underway FROM page one Almost $1m worth of illegal drugs captured Shar e your news The Tribune wants to hear fr om people who ar e making news in their neighbourhoods. Perhaps you are raising funds for a good cause, campaigning for improvements in the ar ea or have won an award. If so, call us on 322-1986 and shar e your stor y . Sentencing of Dwight Major is rescheduled FROM page one

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Bahamas ‘strokes’ for second place C M Y K C M Y K TUESDAY, APRIL 21, 2009 THETRIBUNE PAGE 9 P AGES 10 & 14 International sports news n By BRENT STUBBS Senior Sports Reporter bstubbs@tribunemedia.net THE 56th version of the N ational Family Island Regatta is all set to get underway today in picturesque Elizabeth H arbour on Georgetown, Exuma. The competition is expected to begin with the Sir Durward Knowles Junior Regatta where Beerly Legal, skippered by Gerard Knowles, will be out tod efend its title. Commodore Danny Stra chan said they are anticipating a minimum of 15 boats to compete in the three-race series. On Wednesday, the Ocean races for the Prime Minister C up race in the A Class, the G overnor’s General Cup race in the B Class and the Commodore Emeritus Cup race int he C Class are scheduled to take place. Then on Thursday through Saturday, the regular series for the A, B, C, D and E Classes will take place in honour of S cott Weatherford of Abaco. W eatherford, according to Strachan, was the original skipper of the Abaco Rage, winner of the national titles in 1983 and 1984. The Tida Wave, skippered by Brooks Miller from Staniel Cay, Exuma, won the A Class last year. Eudeva, skippered by Lundy Robinson, won the B C lass. The Bulla Reg, skip pered by Buzzy Rolle, was crowned the C Class champion and in the D Class, the champion is Blue Wing. “We anticipate having 50 p lus boats compete this year,” said Strachan, who noted that he doesn’t think that the economic crisis will have that much effect on the regatta. “I’m pleasantly surprised because I thought the numbers would be down, but I don’t think they will be down because we have three new boats in Exuma, a new A Class from Nassau that is already here and we have two C Class out of long Island.” In the A Class, the new boat is the Ed Sky, owned by Joe Brown. Hughie Lloyd from Barreterre, has two C Classes, Buzzy Rolle from Georgetown has a C Class and Mark Knowles from Long Island built two C Class boats. As usual, Strachan said there are a number of on-shore activ ities planned, including church and social events. They are being coordinated by Gordy Gray. “Given the state of the economy, I don’t know what to expect in terms of crowd participation,” Strachan said. “But I do know as we speak, all of the hotels are booked out, all of the rental cars are booked out and all of the apartments that people normally rent all booked out. “Accommodation wise, it might be difficult to find rooms right now. There might be some spare rooms around, but if there are, I don’t know where they are. But from talking to the hotels and car rentals, there are no more rooms or cars to rent.” Strachan said based on those assessments, he anticipates that the island should be flooded with people coming in for the regatta that was first held in 1954. As a result of the Independence Celebrations in 1973, the annual regatta was held in New Providence. But since then, a committee was formed to stage the event as the national event in Exuma ever since. More than 50 boats expected to set sail at Family Island regatta K nowles, B hupathi hope f or success at Barcelona Open... See page 13 n By RENALDO DORSETT Sports Reporter rdorsett@tribunemedia.net T eam Bahamas returned home yesterday with a series of thrilling performances and a second place finish on both the medal table and final points standing at the 24th Carifta Swimming Championships in Saventa, Aruba. The Bahamas finished with a total of 49 medals over the four-day meet, which included 18 gold, 17 silver and 14 bronze. Trinidad and Tobago captured the overall championship with 67 medals – 31 gold, 14 silver and 22 bronze. Guadeloupe fin ished third with 47 medals – 18 gold, 17 silver and 12 bronze. Aruba finished fourth with 38 medals – five gold, 1 8 silver and 15 b ronze. Martinique r ounded out the top f ive with 34 medals – eight gold, 16 silver and 10 bronze. The Trinidadians stockpiled 815.50 points to win ahead of the Bahamas with 691.50 points. Guadeloupe finished third in the points standings with 603, Martinique with 578.50 and Jamaica rounded out the top five with 571.50 points. The Bahamas captured 10 medals on the final day of competition highlighted by a pair of stunning individual performances by McKayla Lightbourn. In the Girls 15-17 division, Lightbourn took gold in the 100m Breast stroke in a time of 1:17.87s and silver in the 200m Breaststroke in 2:28.64s. Dustin Tynes also took gold in the Boys 11-12 division in the 100m Breaststroke in 1:14.04s. In the girls 13-14 division, the team of Bria Deveaux, Berchadette Moss, Maya Albury and Gabrielle Greene took first place in the 200m Freestyle relay in 1:49.75s. Team Bahamas finished with two medals in the Boys 13-14 division 100m Breaststroke. Evante Gibson finished second in 1:12.34s and Toby McCarroll was third in 1:12.52s. Ariel Weech finished second in the Girls 15-17 50m Freestyle in 26.53s. The final session also featured two bronze medal finishers – Dionisio Carey in the 11-12 Boys Breaststroke and Laura Morley in the Girls 11-12 division. The 36-member team improved from a third place finish at the 2008 Championships despite fin ishing with one less medal from their total of 50 last year. Finishes behind Trinidad & Tobago with 49 medals at Carifta swimming championships in Aruba Dustin Tynes Maya Albury Evante Gibson Ariel Weech Dionisio Carey Toby McCarroll Gabrielle Greene Bria Deveaux B Moss Laura Morley McKAYLA LIGHTBOURN , who won gold in the 100m breast... LAURA MORLEY , who won bronze in the Girls 11-12 division, can be seen in this file photo..

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n PHILLIP RAWLS Associated Press Writer MONTGOMERY, Ala. (AP Olympic bronze medallist Deontay Wilder of Tuscaloosa is undefeated as a professional boxer. But so far, none of those bouts have been in his home state. And they won't be unless the Legislature creates a state boxing commission to sanction professional boxing in Alabama. Wilder and his co-manager, Jay Deas, have been trying for three years to get the Legislature to pass a law setting up a commission. They lost in 2007 and again in 2008. With the 2009 session ending next month, they are in danger of going 0-3. The sponsors of the legislation, Sen. Del Marsh, R-Annist on, and Rep. Gerald Allen, RC ottonwood, aren't giving up. " We feel confident this year is going to be the year," Allen said. The House has passed a boxing commission bill 96-1 and sent it to the Senate. The Senate has passed a separate bill 25-0 and sent it to the House. To help with the effort, Wilder has taken time from his daily training schedule to visit the Legislature, pose for pictures with lawmakers, and politick for the right to fight in front of his friends and family in Alabama. "We're trying to get some Deontay Wilder believers," he said. Wilder, 23, doesn't look like a typical heavyweight boxer. He stands 6 feet 7 inches tall, and he weighs 214 pounds. He had hoped to have a career in pro basketball or football. But his daughter, Naiyea, was born in 2005 with spina bifida, a birth defect in which the spinal cord develops improperly. Wilder dropped out of Shelton State Community College in Tuscaloosa, took jobs as a waiter and a beer truck driver, and started training to be a box er. He figured boxing was a quicker way to earn money to pay his daughter's medical bills. Wilder was the only Ameri can to medal at the Beijing Olympics. He had his first pro bout in November 2008 and is now 3-0 all with knockouts. His next bout is Friday night in Chicago and will be televised by ESPN2. His daughter, 4, has gone through several operations and is now an active child. Visiting Montgomery with her father last week, she climbed in and out of his lap and engaged him in typical child play, causing the big guy to show a gentle side. Wilder laughs about how he can be almost childlike when he plays with his daughter and then knock down opponents in the ring. "When you are in the ring, it's time for business," he said. His daughter is often at ringside, shouting "Go Daddy, Go Daddy," he said. Wilder says professional box ing in Alabama would give opportunities to the young Golden Gloves boxers he sees training at Deas' Skyy Gym in Northport and other gyms around the state. He also sees it boosting tourism in Alabama. "Nobody goes anywhere without a reason to go. People need a reason to come to Alabama," he said. The boxing commission got knocked out on technicalities t he last two years. I n 2007, the bill was in line for final passage in the Senate on the last day of the session when one senator punched another, bringing action to a halt. On 2008's final day, the bill w as in position for a final vote in the House when it got stalled by debate on other issues. "It's frustrating how close you can get and somebody punches somebody or somebody fili busters," Deas said. Wilder keeps fighting back by telling anyone who will listen how badly he wants to step into the ring surrounded by a cheering crowd of Alabama fans. "It's time for change in Alabama," he said. Man dies after being struck by softball C M Y K C M Y K SPORTS PAGE 10, TUESDAY, APRIL 21, 2009 TRIBUNE SPORTS MISHAWAKA, Ind. (AP men's slow-pitch softball team died Monday after he was taken off life support, two days after he was hit in the neck by a ball. Teammates say 24-yearo ld Alberto Naranjo of Elkhart was sliding into home plate during a game Saturday morning when a throw struck him below his left ear. He started to get up, but collapsed. Paramedics took Naranjo to Memorial Hospital in South Bend from Rose Park in nearby Mishawaka after attempts to revive him failed. St. Joseph County Coroner Michael O'Connell saysa neurosurgeon pronounced Naranjo brain dead early Sunday. O'Connell said Naranjo remained on life support until Monday so his organs could be used for transplants. Hospital spokeswoman Ruth Linster said Monday afternoon that Naranjo had died. Olympic boxer seeks win for boxing bill IN THIS April 19, 2007 file photo, boxer Deontay Wilder poses with his daughter Najeya in Northport, Ala. (AP Photo: Robert Sutton IN THIS Nov. 15, 2008 file photo, Deontay Wilder celebrates after defeating Ethen Cox at Vanderbilt University in Nashville, Tenn. (AP Photo: Alan Poizner n ALAN ROBINSON A P Sports Writer PITTSBURGH (AP don't get much of an offseason. O nly 2 1/2 months after the Pittsburgh defeated the Arizona Cardinals for the franchise's sixth NFL title, the Steelers at least most of them were back on the practice field Monday. Rain chased them indoors for the first of 14 organized team practices that run periodically through early June and are a supplement to next week's mandatory, three-day minicamp. After winning their second Super Bowl in four seasons, wide receiver Hines Ward said the Steelers don't need to be pushed and prodded to return to practice. Apparently not All-Pro linebacker James Harrison was working out again only two days after the Steelers' last-minute, 27-23 win over the Cardinals in Tampa. Wide receiver Limas Sweed was talked out of doing conditioning work later that same week, but he waited only two weeks before resuming his personal workouts. The Steelers are being driven by two factors, according to Ward: 1) A determination not to repeat the major letdown of their post-Super Bowl 2006 season, when they started 2-6 and finished 88. 2) A desire to match the three Super Bowls won in recent history by New England, and per haps even the four won by the Steelers of the 1970s. "I know I want to win another one," Ward said. "The teams in the 1970s, they won four. If we can win another one, then I think we'll be right up there with New England as one of the teams in the dynasty." Nose tackle Casey Hampton believes one more Super Bowl victory would cause these Steelers to be remembered as one of the best teams in NFL history. While they've changed coaches, from Bill Cowher to Mike Tomlin since winning the Super Bowl during the 2005 season, many of the key players (Ward, Hampton, Ben Roethlisberger, Willie Parker, Heath Miller, James Farrior, Troy Polamalu, Aaron Smith, Brett Keisel, Larry Foote, Deshea Townsend) are the same. "Especially with the same core of guys, it's kind of like the same team," Hampton said. "We're trying to catch the old Steelers, back in the day, see if we can get us four, see what that would be like." Since the Steelers won four times during the 1974-79 seasons, and the 49ers won four from 1981-89 (plus a fifth in 1994 three Super Bowls are the Cowboys (1992-93, 1995) and the Patriots (2001, 2003-04). Hampton said the Steelers got "lax ... forgot how we got there" after winning three years ago, but Ward promised that won't happen again. "We've been through that. The veteran guys who were on that first Super Bowl we won a couple of years ago, we came back with a disappointing 8-8 year," Ward said. "I think there's a different mindset coming into this. We've got a lot of veteran guys mixed in with a lot of new, unproven guys who have to step up their game. And coach Tomlin, he won't let us have a down year. His expectation levels are very high, and they should be." Intentionally or not, management is allowing a number of players Ward, Hampton, Foote, Miller, Parker, Keisel, safety Ryan Clark and kicker Jeff Reed among them to go into the final season of their contracts. Only All-Pro linebacker James Harrison, the NFL Defensive Player of the Year, and left guard Chris Kemoeatu have signed new contracts. Some others could be re-signed by the end of training camp, but the franchise's philosophy has long been that playing for a new contract isn't necessarily a bad thing. "We're not going to get as complacent as we got the last time," Hampton said. The last time Ward was going into the last sea son of a contract, in 2005, he stayed out of training camp for two weeks before reporting. He signed a contract extension the week of the season opener. Ward said he won't stay out this time. One reason is he is only 220 yards away from reaching the 10,000-yard receiving mark, a number reached by only 31 players in NFL history. "I don't want to put on another uniform," the 33-yard-old Ward said. "I'm too late in the game (his career previous players who went on and played in other places. I learned a lot from Jerome (Bettis he did. I want to go down in Steelers history to be one of the better wideouts to wear the black and gold." Among those missing Monday, some due to travel problems, were Super Bowl MVP Santonio Holmes, Polamalu, Parker, Clark, Foote, Timmons and safety Tyrone Carter. Ward did not practice because he is recovering from left rotator cuff surgery, but he was in uniform. Working out were three players who missed all or most of last season, punter Daniel Sepulveda (knee) backup quarterback Charlie Batch (broken collarbone) and running back Rashard Mendenhall (shoulder Steeler s pr omise no Super Bowl letdown this time IN THIS Feb. 1, 2009, file photo, Pittsburgh Steelers linebacker James Harrison returns an interception for a 100-yard touchdown during the second quarter of the Super Bowl XLIII game in Tampa, Fla. At right is Arizona Cardinals guard Reggie Wells. (AP Photo: John Bazemore

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C M Y K C M Y K LOCAL NEWS TRIBUNE SPORTS TUESDAY, APRIL 21, 2009, PAGE 13 AFTER getting ousted in the quarterfinal of their lastt ournament in Monaco last week, Mark Knowles and Mahesh Bhupathi are hoping for better success this week at the Barcelona Open Banco Sabadell 2009. The Bahamian-Indian duo a re seeded number four in the tournament. They got a bye in the first round and await the winner of the match between the Spanish team ofF eliciano Lopez and Fernando Verdasco against Argentina’s Lucas Arnold Ker and Chile’s Fernando Gonzalez. Knowles and Bhupathi eliminated Lopez and Ver dasco 6-4, 6-4 in the second r ound in Monaco before they were sent packing by the team of Novak Djokovic andV iktor Troicki of Serbia. Going into Barcelona, Knowles and Bhupathi are sitting in fourth place in the ATP Doubles Team Rank ings with a total of 1695 points. L eading the race is the identical American twinb rothers of Bob and Mike Bryan with 4115. Daniel Nestor and Nenad Zimonjic are in second with 1890 and Max Mirnyi and Andy Ram are third with 1735. Nestor, the former longtime partner of Knowles, along with Zominjic, pulled off a 6-4, 6-1 upset win over t he top seeded Bryans in the final in Monaco. Nestor and Zimonjic were seeded at No.2. In Barcelona, the Bryans are again seeded at No.1 with Nestor and Zimonjic at No.2. Knowles, Bhupathi hope for success at Barcelona Open THE Dynasty Stars defeated the Rising Star by seven wickets on Saturday as the Bahamas Cricket Association continued its regular season action. Rising Star scored 148 runs as Robert Campbell was the top scorer with 62 runs and Cyril Burrell made 17 runs. Bowling for Dynasty Stars, Alex Hernandez and Brian Bascom took four wickets each. Dynasty Stars scored 153 runs for the loss of three wick ets. Ranford Davson and Johnathan Barry scored 37 and 36 runs respectively. On Sunday, the Castrol Commonwealth team was bowled out for 111 runs as Terry Seepersad was the top scorer with 56 runs. Bowling for Scotiabank Paradise was shared by Sean Brathwaite and Mark Butler, each taking two wickets. Scotiabank Paradise, at bat, scored 113 runs for the loss of two wickets to win the match by eight wickets. Gary Bell and Andrew Nash were the top scorers for Scotiabank Paradise with scores of 37 and 32 runs not out respectively. Action is scheduled to con tinue this weekend. On Saturday, Dockendale is set to take on Rising Star and on Sunday, St Agnes is slated to face Dynasty Stars. Dynasty Stars defeat Rising Star by seven wickets M ARK KNOWLES ( background) a nd MAHESH BHUPATHI g ot a bye in the first round of the Barcelona Open Banco Sabadell 2009... RAFAEL NADAL (left in Barcelona, Spain... (AP Photo: Manu Fernandez Nadal trains at Bar celona Open tourney

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n ANTONIO GONZALEZ Associated Press Writer ORLANDO, Florida (AP Mindful of the past, the Philadelphia 76ers are doing their best to forget a thrilling Game 1 win. It won't be easy. Andre Iguodala made a 22foot jumper with 2.2 seconds remaining, and the Sixers rallied from an 18-point deficit to stun the Orlando Magic 100-98 on Sunday in Game 1 of their opening-round playoff series. For the second straight year, Philadelphia finds itself up 1-0 and with home-court advantage against a heavy favorite. "We've been in this position before," Iguodala said. "We still have to stay focused. We have to stay confident in ourselves and fix some of the mistakes we w ere making early." T he Sixers lost six of their last s even games coming into the playoffs but were able to put that skid in the past the sameway they did a year ago, when they won Game 1 at Detroit. The Pistons eventually took the series in six games. "This is a different group than played those last seven games," Sixers coach Tony DiLeo said. "We're in a different mental state, different physical state because we had some games to rest." Iguodala had 20 points, eight rebounds and eight assists, and Louis Williams scored 18 to help the Sixers beat the Magic for the first time in four tries this season and when it mat tered most. Hedo Turkoglu's fadeaway 3-pointer missed at the buzzer, and Magic fans stood in disbelief before filing out quietly. Dwight Howard had a career playoff-high 31 points and 16 rebounds, and rookie CourtneyLee scored 18 for the Magic. It was the biggest lead the Magic blew all season, topping the loss on Oct. 31 to Memphis when they were ahead by 15. Game 2 in the best-of-seven series is Wednesday night in Orlando. "There's no need to panic," Howard said. "It's the first game. We just have to come out with a better effort on the defensive end. We have to get back on defense. We have to really cut our turnovers down." One thing the Sixers will have to clean up is their defense orl ack thereof on Howard. Orlando's do-it-all center scored at will. Rim-rocking dunks, smooth hook shots and even some uncharacteristic crisp free throws by the Magic's center capped a 15-3 spurt that put Orlando ahead by 18 points. The only time Philadelphia actually slowed Howard was when Samuel Dalembert inadvertently scratched both his eyes and was called for a foul. Howard said his eyes were p ulsating after the game but shouldn't be a problem, even joking afterward that, "I got backslapped." So did the rest of the Magic. L L a a k k e e r r s s 1 1 1 1 3 3 , , J J a a z z z z 1 1 0 0 0 0 At Los Angeles, Kobe Bryant scored 24 points, Trevor Ariza added 21 and Pau Gasol 20 for the Lakers. Allowing a Phil Jacksoncoached team to win Game 1 of any series doesn't bode well for the opposition. Jackson'st eams have never lost a playoff series after winning Game 1, going 41-for-41 with Chicago and the Lakers. The Lakers had their way against the Jazz, leading by 22 points at halftime and then answered resoundingly both times Utah got within nine in the second half. Bryant's total gave him 3,710 career postseason points, moving him past Magic Johnson and into ninth on the NBA's list. He trails only Kareem Abdul-Jab b ar (4,070 (4,457 playoffs with the Lakers. Carlos Boozer led the Jazz with 27 points and Deron Williams added 16 points and a career playoff-high 17 assists. Game 2 is Tuesday night. H H a a w w k k s s 9 9 0 0 , , H H e e a a t t 6 6 4 4 At Atlanta, with Josh Smith delivering one rim-shaking dunk after another and plenty of teammates chipping in, the Hawks made Miami look like a one-man team. The Hawks tied a franchise record for fewest points allowed in a playoff game, holding Miami's Dwyane Wade, the league's leading scorer, to 19 points. Miami was held to its fewest points of the season its previous low was 68 and the Hawks equaled the mark they set against the Charlotte Hornets in a 1998 playoff victory. Smith scored 23 points and every other Atlanta starter also was in double figures. Wade made just 8 of 21 shots, and Michael Beasley added 10 points, and the Heat shot just 37 percent and managed only seven points in the final period. Game 2 is Wednesday night in Atlanta. N N u u g g g g e e t t s s 1 1 1 1 3 3 , , H H o o r r n n e e t t s s 8 8 4 4 At Denver, Chauncey Billups scored 36 points and made ac areer-best eight 3-pointers in the second-biggest blowout in the Nuggets' playoff history. Capitalizing on their first home-court edge in a playoff series in 21 years, the Nuggets nearly bested their previousb iggest margin of victory, a 141111 wallop of San Antonio in 1985. Denver used a 21-0 run spanning the third and fourth quarters to build a 95-69 cushion, a run that was highlighted byB illups' seventh and eighth 3s. B illups was 8-for-9 from beyond the arc, one make off the NBAplayoff record, and helped negate All-Star point guard Chris Paul's big game. Paul had 21 points and 11 assists for the Hornets. C M Y K C M Y K SPORTS PAGE 14, TUESDAY, APRIL 21, 2009 TRIBUNE SPORTS Cavaliers’ Brown named NBAs coach of the year n TOM WITHERS AP Sports Writer CLEVELAND (AP was honored as the NBA's coach of the year Monday after leading the Cleveland Cavaliers to their greatest regular season. He guided the club to a franchiserecord 66 wins, a second Central Division title and the No. 1 overall seed in the postseason. Cleveland leads the Detroit Pistons 1-0 in the first round of the playoffs. Preaching trust to his players since training camp, Brown has created a tightly knit team led by superstar LeBron James. The 38-year-old coach also has given more authority to his assistants, a sign of his maturity as a coach and con fidence as a leader. Brown joined the Cavs in 2005 after two seasons as an assistant with Indiana. Bill Fitch in 1976 is the only other Cleveland coach to win the coaching award. Brown received 55 first-place votes and earned 355 total points from a panel of 122 sports writers and broadcasters. Houston's Rick Adelman finished second with 151 points and Orlando's Stan Van Gundy was third with 150. New Orleans coach Byron Scott won the award last year. Cleveland owner Dan Gilbert called Brown a "natural leader" and credited him with much of his team's success. "Mike Brown is one of these rare people that has nearly every tool in his tool box," Gilbert said in a statement. "He is smart, hard working, and selfless. He is curious and hungry to learn. He is philo sophically driven and derives his decision making from his strong philosophy. "Mike Brown is a critical element as to why our franchise is growing into the kind of success we all envisioned and hoped to achieve. “There is no man more deserving and it proves to the world that, yes, nice guys can indeed, finish first." MIKE BROWN cheers on his team as they faced the Indiana Pacers in the first half of a game in Indianapolis... (AP Photo: Michael Conroy Sixers are looking to stay cool after stunning Magic ORLANDO MAGIC forward Hedo Turkoglu (left a first-round playoff game in Orlando, Florida, on Sunday. Philadelphia won 100-98... (AP Photo: John Raoux ORLANDO, Fla. (AP Orlando Magic center Dwight Howard says he's going to get his eyes examined after he was inadvertently scratched by Philadelphia 76ers center Samuel Dalembert. Howard said Monday he would see an eye doctor but that the injury won't keep him sidelined for Game 2 against the 76ers on Wednesday night. Dalembert swiped Howard's eyes reaching for the ball late in the third quarter of Philadelphia's 100-98 win over the Mag ic on Sunday night and was called for a foul. Howard said he was "seeing just a whole bunch of crazy stuff" when he closed his eyes and felt a "pulsating" sensation when they were open. M M a a g g i i c c s s H H o o w w a a r r d d t t o o s s e e e e k k t t r r e e a a t t m m e e n n t t o o n n e e y y e e s s INSIGHT For the stories behind the news, r ead Insight on Mondays DWIGHT HOWARD dunks over Philadelphia 76ers center Samuel Dalembert (1 Iguodala (not seen of a first-round playoff game Sunday, in Orlando... (AP Photo DAVIDSON, N.C. (AP Stephen Curry is still struggling with whether to turn pro or return to Davidson for his senior season. Coach Bob McKillop said Monday that Curry hasn't made up his mind. The star guard has until Sunday to declare for the NBA draft. Curry led the nation in scoring last season at 28.6 points a game and is pro jected in many mock drafts to be a lottery pick. But Curry also wants to get his degree, and McKillop said that's an important factor in Curry's decision-making. Classes Davidson does not have summer classes, which would make getting his diploma difficult if he left school early. The 6-foot-3 Curry averaged 32 points in the 2008 NCAA tournament. He moved to point guard last season and had 15 games of 30 or more points and three of 40 or more. Davidson’ s S Curry wrestling with NBA decision INDIANAPOLIS (AP president Myles Brand will receive a Pathfinder award in June for his long time contribution to youth sports. The 66-year-old Brand, who is fighting advanced pancreatic cancer, has been president of the college sports governing body since 2003. Before that, he was president of Indiana University for six years. The Pathfinder is presented each year in conjunction with the Youthlinks Indiana Charity Golf Tournament sponsored by the Indiana Sports Corp. and Indiana Black Expo. Youthlinks announced last week that golfer Jack Nicklaus and his wife, Barbara, would also be honored. Brand and the Nicklauses will receive the awards June 28 at the annual Pathfinder banquet at Conseco Fieldhouse in Indianapolis. NCAA president Brand to receive Pathfinder award MYLES BRAND speaks during a news conference at Final Four tourney (AP Photo: Eric Gay

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C M Y K C M Y K LOCAL NEWS PAGE 16, TUESDAY, APRIL 21, 2009 THE TRIBUNE 2010 Calendar Photo Contest Entry FormReturn with photos to: Calendar Contest, Family Guardian Corporate Centre Village Road & East Bay Street, Nassau, Bahamas ENTRY DEADLINE: JUNE 1, 2009Photo by Jade Greensword Family Guardian’s 2009 CalendarNAME TEL BUSINESSHOME EMAIL P.O. BOXSTREET ADDRESSISLAND NUMBER OF PHOTOS ENTERED (maximum of 5I agree that in the event one or more of my entered photographs is selected as a winner in the 2010 Family Guardian Calendar Photo Contest it will become the property of Family Guardian Insurance Co. Ltd., and I assign to Family Guardian all rights pertaining to its use in any way whatsoever. I also conrm that the photos entered in this contest were taken in The Bahamas by the undersigned and have not been previously published.SIGNATUREDATE for a better lifeCALENDAR CONTEST CONTEST RULESFamily Guardian’s Annual Calendar Photo Contest is open to all photographers. The title for the company’s 2010 calendar will be A CELEBRATION OF NATURE45th Anniversary Calendar”.Photographs may be of any subject (animate or inanimate found in The Bahamas, as well as, photographs of the Family Guardian Corporate Centre, located on Village Road and East Bay Street. *See website for further competition details (www.familyguardian.com).DEADLINE FOR ENTRIES IS JUNE 1, 2009. All entries are submitted at the owner’s risk and will not be returned. All entries are to be delivered to Family Guardian’s Corporate Centre, Village Road and East Bay Street, Nassau, between 9:00AMand 5:00PMweekdays only. Envelopes should be marked “Calendar Contest”. All entries must be accompanied by an ofcial entry form, available at any Family Guardian ofce, as published in the newspapers or on the website (www.familyguardian.com). Only colour images will be considered. Images must be provided as digital les on CD. Digital images must be of high quality (2700 x 2100 pixels or larger). Digital images showing signs of photo manipulation, resolution enhancement or compression will be rejected. To ensure the best colour reproduction, digital images should be supplied in RAW, TIFFor high quality JPEGand in the original colour format the camera uses (LABor RGB). All entries must be supplied with colour prints (8 x 10) which will be used in the judging process. (Note: prints submitted without CD’s will not be eligible and vice versa). The photographer’s name, photo subject and location must be written on the reverse of the print. Judging of entries will be based on beauty, interest, composition, colour, originality and quality of photograph. Particular areas and subjects of interest are detailed on the website (www.familyguardian.com). The photographs selected will appear in Family Guardian’s 2010 calendar. The decision of the judges will be nal. A gift certicate valued at $400 will be presented for each of the photographs selected. Photographic credits will be given in the calendar. The number of entries per photographer is limited to a maximum of 5 photos. The winning photographs, along with all publication and reproduction rights attached thereto, become the property of Family Guardian and the company reserves the right to use such in the future. Photos will not be returned. Employees of Family Guardian, its afliated companies or family members are not eligible. Previously published photos are not eligible. 1 2 3 45 6 7 8 9 10a celebration of nature 45th anniversary calendar 14 winning entries will appear in Family G uardian’s 2010 Calendar Winning entries will receive a gift certicate v alued at $400.Entry deadline is June 1, 2009*For further details & key subjects of interest visit our website at www.familyguardian.com T HESE days, it’s become a regional joke that Bahamians acknowledge two time zones – standard time and “when I reach”. Weddings, funerals, school l essons, business meetings and m ore are usually set to start on “Bahamian time”, and while it’s something the nation has seem-i ngly got used to, according to b usiness professional, corporate t rainer and master motivator S pence Finlayson, it has become a national embarrassment. “Many people don’t realise it but time management is what can make or break an individual or a business,” said Mr Finlayson, host of the Dare To Be Great television show. In The Bahamas, we joke about being late t o everything but how can we depend on tourism to be our leading industry when everyt hing from show times to flight times are off s chedule? We need to remember that tourists a re actually business people who save their money to come here. We are leaving a sour taste in their mouth and closing the door on the c orporate tourism market. We have to change this mindset if we are going to compete globally. We have to tame this time monster before it controls us.” Those who want to learn how t o leash the ‘time monster’ can d o so by taking part in a time management seminar for professionals on Wednesday, April2 9, from 9am to 4pm at the B ritish Colonial Hilton facilitate d by the Phoenix Institute. We get caught up with a bottomless inbox, tons of e-mail, millions of meetings, and more all the time and it simply boils down to too much to do and not enough time to do it,” he added. “This common problem people face in the w orkplace and, as a result, the business can s uffer tremendously. People need to learn the fundamentals of time management unders tanding the value of time, proven ways to get t he most out of a day, how to balance work and h ome, techniques for eliminating time wasters, how to conquer procrastination, and much more.” Seminar aims to teach professionals how to make the most of the day Spence Finlayson Y EAN Yoke Heng, High Com missioner-Designate of the Feder ation of Malaysia to the Commonwealth of the Bahamas paid a Cour tesy Call on Deputy Prime Minister and Minister of Foreign AffairsB rent Symonette on Wednesday, April 15, 2009 at the Ministry of Foreign Affairs in the Goodman’sB ay Corporate Centre. T hey briefly discussed estab lishing ties between the Bahamas a nd Malaysia in areas such as tourism, manufacturing, agricul ture, trade and investment. Pictured from left are Anthony McKinney, Chief of Protocol; Mohd Fareed Zakaria, second secretary,E mbassy of Malaysia; High Commissioner Heng; Mr Symon ette; Joshua Sears, Director Gene ral, Ministry of Foreign Affairs, a nd Carlton Wright, undersecre tary. K r i s t a a n H . A . I n g r a h a m I I / B I S High Commissioner-Designate of the Federation of Malaysia pays a courtesy call on Deputy PM

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n By NEIL HARTNELL Tribune Business Editor A US private equity fund has applied to the New York courts for a $22 million judgment award against the principals of a Bahamas-based resort project now in receivership, after they defaulted on a $16 million loan that they guaranteed. Attorneys for BA Chub Cay Ltd, the vehicle through which Cerberus Real Estate Capital Management advanced $16 million to finance the Berry Islands development bearing the same name, late last week filed their proposed judgment against principals Walter McCrory, Bob Moss and the estate of the late Kaye Pearson. Michael Gordon, an attorney with Katten Muchin Rosenman, BA Chub Cay Ltd’s attorneys, in an April 15, 2009, affidavit accompanying the proposed judgment urged the US District Court for the southern district of New York to grant its clients $22.095 million. Of this, some $16 million was the original loan principal; $1.335 million interest at 18.5 per cent, calculated from May 10, 2007, to June 1, 2008; $3.768 million in default interest, calculated at 23.5 per cent from June 2, 2008, to April 30, 2009; an $320,000 Exit Fee premium; and $672,550 to cover costs and expenses. In their proposed judgment, Cerberus and its attorneys stated that “there is no genuine i ssue as to any material fact conc erning [the trio’s] liability u nder guarantees of, among other things, the repayment of a loan in the principal amount of $16 million”. Mr Gordon’s affidavit said the New York court’s April 7, 2009, order had found that because Messrs McCrory, Moss and Pearson had failed to maintain insurance coverage on the Chub Cay Club development and its assets, they had defaulted on the loan agreement and BA Chub Cay Ltd “properly accelerated the loan on June 2, 2008”. In his April 7 order, Judge Jed Rakoff said that exactly one year earlier, 13 insurance poli n By NEIL HARTNELL Tribune Business Editor THE need to create a new pricing structure, anda regulatory framework to control areas such as production process byproducts, are among the reasons why Bahamas Waste’s proposed $750,000 biodiesel wasteto-energy plant has yet to be approved, a government minister said yesterday. Phenton Neymour, minister of state for the environment, told Tribune Business that before the Government could give full approval to the renewable energy venture, a pricing structure to accommodate a “locally produced fuel” had to C M Y K C M Y K SECTIONB business@tribunemedia.net TUESDAY, APRIL 21, 2009 THETRIBUNE $4. 68 $4. 51 $4. 69The information contained is from a third party and The Tribune can not be held r esponsible for errors and/or omission f rom the daily report.$ $3.48 $3.63 $3.48 '%, f'&, , '%%-&",0/",!" !,$0'$'-*!'%+"$-+!,*'(" $+("& ,$0-*&"++,'*0+! ,'/&!'-&#'0+(*,"$'&./,"$(,"'*'/&+!-,,*+ "+/"%%"& (''$+ r""" n By NEIL HARTNELL Tribune Business Editor RENTAL prices in the Bahamian real estate market have dropped by between 1520 per cent as a result of a property surplus, Tribune Busi ness was told yesterday, with both the international and domestic property buyer markets having slowed in comparison to late 2008 and earlier this year. William Wong, the Bahamas Real Estate Association’s (BREA based on feedback from the organisation’s members demand for Bahamian real estate had “slowed down quite a bit” in recent weeks, a trend attributed to the prevailing eco nomic climate. Mr Wong, who heads the rebranded RE/MAX Ocean Realty Bahamas, said: “Based on what I’m hearing from my members, things are slowing. That’s going for both the local and international markets right now. “This is a world thing, not a local issue. People are looking, and there are still some buyers, but it’s slow. I know a lot of my members are hurting a little bit right now. “Hopefully, this will not go on for too long, another six to eight months. If we can survive 2009, hopefully we can take some steps forward next year, but it’s anyone’s guess. We’ve just got to sharpen our pencils and bring people here as much as we can.” The BREA president added: “The market has slowed down quite a bit. I think everyone’s Real estate market seeing ‘slow down’ * Demand falling compared to late 2008 and earlier this year, as downturn bites * Rental prices off 15-20% due to property glut * First-time buyer incentives do not yet have desired impact S S E E E E p p a a g g e e 4 4 B B S S E E E E p p a a g g e e 4 4 B B n By NEIL HARTNELL Tribune Business Editor BAHAMIAN investor appetite for international securities has all but dried up, RoyalFidelity Merchant Bank & Trust’s president said yesterday, while adding that he was “cau tiously optimistic” that the local equities market was close to the bottom and would present “some great buying opportunities” in late summer 2009. Michael Anderson told Tri bune Business that RoyalFi delity had during the 2009 first quarter only taken up $50,000 of its available $2.083 million in foreign currency for investing in international markets on behalf of Bahamian investors. He explained that the Bahamian investment bank took up such a small allocation due to minimal investor demand for international equi ties and debt securities, some thing he attributed to recent trends in most global stock markets and a general wariness of stock investments. “This quarter, we’re still looking to see if we go out and do another TIGRS [investment] fund,” Mr Anderson said of RoyalFidelity’s plans, “but we don’t know what the market sentiment is.” Meanwhile, RoyalFidelity had also seen “fairly strong redemptions” from its mutual fund portfolio, including the RoyalFidelity Bahamas Growth and Income Fund, as investors moved to liquidate holdings due to a need for cash, coupled with concern about declining equity values in the Bahamian market. Although RoyalFidelity’s FINDEX index, which measures equity returns based on a weighted average of share price movements and dividend yields, was down by 4.49 per cent for the first three-and-a-half months of 2009, Mr Anderson struck an upbeat note by indi cating he felt the Bahamian equities market was close to approaching the ‘bottom’ of its current down cycle. “I’m cautiously optimistic,” he told Tribune Business. “I think you’ll have a tough sum International investment demand slo ws to tr ic kle * RoyalFidelity takes up just $50,000 of available $2.083m for international investing in quarter one * But ‘cautiously optimistic’ Bahamian equities market near bottom, with upside and buying opportunities post-summer 2009 S S E E E E p p a a g g e e 5 5 B B S S E E E E p p a a g g e e 5 5 B B Price structure, regulations hold up the Bahamas Waste’s proposed biodiesel plant N eymour $22m judgment sought against Bahamas resort n By NEIL HARTNELL Tribune Business Editor B ahamas Waste yesterday said it was aiming to generate 500 tonnes of recycled cardboard per month from its new production facility, which will be operational by late April-early May 2009, after being “pleasantly surprised” by its 2009 first quarter results. Francisco de Cardenas, the BISX-listed company’s managing director, told Tribune Business that everything produced by the cardboard recycling plant would be exported, most likely to the Asian market, thus generating a not-insignificant foreign currency earnings revenue stream. “We’re hoping that the bailer people are going to be here this weekend,” Mr de Cardenas said of the recycling plant, “so we need to test the bailer. As soon as we get the equipment up and running, we’re going to start, so if it’s not this month it will be early May. “We’re going to try and shoot for 500 tonnes a month, which is what our least quota will be.” He acknowledged that the company would “have a bit of a learning curve” to endure in its new business line, but was not too concerned yet about demand and pricing for recycled cardboard, even though global commodities prices have come under pressure as a result of the worldwide downturn. “We want to get our systems in place to be able to do it, and do it right,” Mr de Cardenas told Tribune Business. “We’ll look at the most profitable markets, and my understanding is that the most profitable market internationally right now is the Far East. “People are tired of talking to us, because we’ve been looking at this for a year. Once we start bailing, and have a product we can put in containers, everything will fall into place.” Mr de Cardenas said Bahamas Waste had already taken on one additional staff member to handle the cardboard recycling facility, while others had been doing “double duty”. Meanwhile, the Bahamas Waste managing director told Tribune Business that the company had been “pleasantly surprised with our results” for the 2009 first quarter. “We’re a little below last year, year-to-date,” he conceded of the company’s net income for the first quarter. “But considering we had an Bahamas Waste ‘shoots’ for 500 tonne recycling target * End-April/early May target for cardboard facility’s operational start, with all product exported * Company ‘pleasantly surprised’ by 2009 first quarter results S S E E E E p p a a g g e e 3 3 B B

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C M Y K C M Y K BUSINESS PAGE 2B, TUESDAY, APRIL 21, 2009 THE TRIBUNE Atlantic MedicalATLANTIC MEDICAL INSURANCE CO.LTD. Atlantic House,2nd Terrace & Collins Avenue,P.O.Box SS-5915,Nassau Tel.326-8191 Suite 5,Jasmine Corporate Center,East Sunrise Highway,P.O.Box F-42655,Freeport Tel.351-3960A member of Colonial Group International:Insurance,Health,Pensions,LifeChoosing a health plan for your business is a major responsibility if you get it right,everyone is happy. P remier Health works for you the minute you pick up the phone.With 50,000 members,it is the most competitively priced health plan with more benefits, cover and service for your money,so it works for your business too.When you most need your health plan to perform,you will receive the best care anywhere,any time,at home or overseas,so it works for your peace of mind as well. Choosing a health plan is a major responsibility,affecting many people.However,you can be certain that choosing Premier Health for your employees could be one of the best decisions you are likely to make.You can choose Premier Health with CONFIDENCE.It works for your business. Colonial Group International is r ated A-(Excellentby AM Best. A time management seminar for Bahamian professionals is scheduled to be staged at the British Colonial Hilton 9am to 4pm April 29, facilitated by the Phoenix Institute. “Many people don’t realise it but time management is what can make or break and individual or a business,” said Spence Finlayson, host of the Dare To Be Great television show and a corporate trainer. “In The Bahamas, we joke about being late to everything, but how can we depend on tourism to be our leading industry when everything from show times to flight times are off schedule? We need to remember that tourists are actually business people who save their money to come here. “We are leaving a sour taste in their mouth and closing the door on the corporate tourism market. We have to change this mindset if we are going to compete globally. We have to tame this time monster before it controls us.” “We get caught up with a bottomless inbox, tons of e-mail, millions of meetings, and more all the time, and it simply boils down to too much to do and not enough time to do it,” he added. “This common problem people face in the workplace and, as a result, the business can suffer tremendously. People need to learn the fundamentals of time management understanding the value of time, proven ways to get the most out of a day, how to balance work and home, techniques for eliminating time wasters, how to conquer procrastination, and much more.” F F o o r r m m o o r r e e i i n n f f o o r r m m a a t t i i o o n n a a n n d d r r e e g g i i s s t t r r a a t t i i o o n n , , c c a a l l l l 3 3 6 6 4 4 4 4 0 0 1 1 1 1 o o r r e e m m a a i i l l p p h h o o e e n n i i x x i i n n s s t t i i t t u u t t e e @ @ g g m m a a i i l l . . c c o o m m ime’ for new management conference Spence Finlayson

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n By CHESTER ROBARDS Business Reporter crobards@tribunemedia.net ROYALCARIBBEAN Cruise Lines is eagerly anticipating the revitalisation of Downtown Nassau and the expansion of the cruise port, the company’s vice-president of governmental relations for the Caribbean told Tribune Business, with last week’s announcement of a public-private partnership to oversee the redevelopment signaling the Bahamas’ commitment to improving its tourism product. Mike Ronan, who also represents his company within the Florida Caribbean Cruise Association (FCCA Bahamas government should be complimented for its commitment to improving Nassau’s cruise port facilities, which will inevitably make the destination more competitive in the Caribbean. Speaking to this newspaper at the 13th annual Caribbean Hotel and Tourism Investment Conference (CHTIC Bermuda, Mr Ronan asserted that the Bahamas continues to be a choice destination for cruise travelers. “The short cruises to the Bahamas continue to be popular, there is no question about it,” he said. Following the onset of the economic downturn cruise lines began slashing prices and offering short-term deals in order to fill staterooms. “Each company is looking for the balance. We are so accustomed to traveling full that it’s difficult when you decide to leave cabins empty,” said Mr Ronan “Some (cruise lines decide to leave some cabins empty rather than drop the prices further because it’s harder to get your prices back up to where they should be later on.” At present, he said price points are not where the industry would like them to be, even though the cruise ship economic environment is stabilizing. “We are able to fill the ship, and we are seeing bookings come in for the summer for not only the Caribbean but other markets,” Mr Ronan said. “Today, clearly, what you pay for the ticket does not match the value of the cost of the product. Overall, the goal of the industry is to keep the quality of the product up. “We believe that people understand the value of the cruise experience, and for that reason we will be considered seriously when they decide which option to select. Right now, we think that we’re beginning to see, like a lot of industries, a light at the end of the tunnel in the advanced bookings.” Mr Ronan said the Bahamas is one of the most price competitive destinations in the region because of the limited variation in the product between cruise lines, whereas other cruises will tend to go to other locations and there is different demand. “Where we are encouraged is that the present government has made serious drives, culminating with the recent signing of the contract to do modifications to the Harbour in Nassau,” he said. The Downtown Nassau Partnership, charged with spearheading the revitalisation of Nassau, and the dredging of the Harbour to accommodate the world’s largest cruise vessel, the Oasis of the Seas, will mean that the Bahamas will not miss any opportunities to accommodate newer ships looking for world class ports of call, Mr Ronan said. Several tourism industry professionals told this newspaper at the CHTIC, under condition of anonymity, that they were not impressed by the state of New Providence’s downtown area, some saying they were abhorred by what cruise passengers had to see as they disembarked from their ships. “They see the backs of what looks like warehouses,” one said. The revitalisation of the downtown area has been mulled for years, through several governments, and the cogs now seem to be slowly grinding to a start. According to Mr Ronan, Royal Caribbean continues to expand its fleet with eight new ships due to join this year. “That’s 20,000 beds, but we’re comfortable that we can handle it and we’re going to get through this year with the challenges that the whole industry is meeting. We think it will be doable,” he said. C M Y K C M Y K BUSINESS THE TRIBUNE TUESDAY, APRIL 21, 2009, PAGE 3B Bahamas Waste ‘shoots’ for 500 tonne recycling target awful six months towards the end of last year, we’re pleased. We’re a little bit down, but still trying to hold our own. Total revenues are down. Not by much, b ut they’re down. We’ve made a serious attempt at cutting all of our costs. The one saving grace at the moment is the fuel costs.” However, while fuel prices had dropped as a result of the reduction in global oil prices, the price of steel, tyres and oil lubri-c ants all key ingredients in Bahamas Waste’s business had remained stubbornly high. Meanwhile, Mr de Cardenas said some clients had dropped Bahamas Waste’s services in a bid to save money. Some had gone down from multiple to reduced collections, and accounts receivables had increased with some customer struggling to pay. Best “We’re just trying to do our best,” he added. “There’s talks that some develop ment projects are moving forward, some are not. I won’t believe anything until I see it.” Writing in the annual report, Peter Andrews, Bahamas Waste’s chairman, told shareholders that the cancelling of construction projects and reduction in tourist arrivals had impacted two industries critical to Bahamas Waste’s bottom line and revenue streams. He wrote: “Although the storm clouds were on the horizon, I do not think any of us saw how quickly the September crash of the international banking system would affect our nation’s economy.” As a result, the Board and Bahamas Waste management had developed a strate gic plan “to do more with less”, imposing a freeze on hiring and overtime expenses; cutting costs; avoiding new capital spending; and “maintaining flat budgets for all departments”. “Our new projects will go ahead as planned,” Mr Andrews added. “We feel that this is not a time to panic, instead it isa time to be prudent.” RoyalCaribbean praises downtown revitalisation F F R R O O M M p p a a g g e e 1 1 B B

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C M Y K C M Y K BUSINESS PAGE 4B, TUESDAY, APRIL 21, 2009 THE TRIBUNE Real estate market seeing ‘slow down’ taking a ‘wait and see’ attitude. I think we’re getting into the dog days of summer, and we’ve just got to hang tight.” Bahamian realtors spoken to in recent weeks by Tribune Business have indicated that while buyer demand has dropped, due to a conservative ‘wait and see how the economic situation pans out’ approach, business is still there to be done and companies/agents just have to “hustle more” to obtain it. “There are buyers out there,” one told Tribune Business yesterday. “From a Bahamian perspective, the biggest problem is getting mortgage financing. The banks are being a lot more cautious about lending.” Mr Wong added: “I believe some of the banks are being a little more attentive to detail right now and are concerned about not having any more loans on the books that go into default. “I think they’re scrutinising things a bit more closely now. I think they’re becoming a bit more careful that people coming up pay deposits and qualify. Like any business, the banks are concerned about people losing their jobs and the economy, so they’re being a bit more eagle eyed.” The BREA president told Tribune Business that the Government’s 2008-2009 Budget tax incentives, designed to stimulate the first-time buyer segment of the domestic market, had not produced the anticipated boost because they were effectively cancelled out by the severity of the 2008 second half economic downturn. The incentives had included an increase in the real property tax ceiling from $250,000 to $500,000 for first-time home buyers, for the first five years post-purchase. In addition, firsttime buyers were exempt from Stamp Tax payments on the purchase of real estate valued at $500,000 or less. “They were certainly good incentives for the local market, but at this point they’ve not really had the kind of impact we thought they would have had,” Mr Wong said. “It came at the start of the economic slowdown, so there’s not been that push to purchase property.” As for short-term assistance, the BREA president told Tribune Business that the only thing the Government could do to stimulate the Bahamian real estate market was to re-assess its decision to eliminate the $35,000 real property tax ceiling for owner-occupied properties. This amendment had also seen the real property tax rate reduced to 0.75 per cent, down from 1 per cent, on properties valued in excess of $5 million. BREA members have argued that the ceiling’s removal made the Bahamas uncompetitive against the rest of the Caribbean when it came to attracting second home buyers, giving this nation among the highest tax rates on such properties. Mr Wong told Tribune Business he had met with Zhivargo Laing, minister of state for finance, on the issue. The minister, he added, said the Government would see what it could do to accommodate BREA’s request in its ongoing 2009-2010 Budget planning exercise. Mr Wong said: “The rental market is still very slow, because you have so many units on the market. Prices on those units have come down quite a bit, anywhere from 15-20 per cent on condos, houses and everything.” F F R R O O M M p p a a g g e e 1 1 B B $22m judgment sought against Bahamas resort cies representing the insurance coverage on Chub Cay, as required by the loan agreement, were cancelled because the developers had not paid the premiums. Despite a series of e-mail exchanges between Mr McCrory and BA Chub Cay Ltd, the required insurance coverage had not been reinstated by May 28, 2008, leading to the loan default. Insurance coverage, the court noted, still had not been reinstated by October 10, 2008. Messrs McCrory, Moss and Pearson had argued that they were not bound by any insur ance requirement under the loan agreement, alleging that BA Chub Cay Ltd had orally dropped this condition. How ever, the court rejected this claim. Judge Rakoff ordered that the trio’s attorneys submit by tomorrow any objections they had to BA Chub Cay Ltd’s proposed judgment, with a final judgment to be entered on April 30, 2009. In court documents previously detailed by Tribune Business, 13 policies providing insurance coverage to Chub Cay were cancelled by the Bahamian agent, Nassau Underwriters Association (NUA payment of premiums. It was alleged that to reinstate coverage, NUA required the developers to pay $400,000 immediately, with the remaining $194,440 balance paid off in monthly instalments of $64,813. In response, Mr McCrory said he had sought to obtain alternative coverage through Sunshine Insurance Agents & Brokers, holding numerous communications with a senior executive, Brian Moodie. He alleged that Cerberus indicated it would be flexible on the insurance question. Chub Cay, which was unveiled with much fanfare as the so-called ‘anchor project’ for the Berry Islands and North Andros just five years ago, is the first such major mixed-use resort project to suffer being placed into receivership. Its fate is a prime example of just how bad a toll the global economic downturn, and especially the freezing of credit/debt markets, has exacted on foreign direct investment projects that the Bahamas was counting on to generate jobs and economic growth. Numerous other projects, including the Ritz-Carlton Rose Island, Royal Island, Ginn sur mer and Rum Cay Resort Marina, have all been impacted to some degree by the immense difficulty – if not impossibility – of obtaining debt financing at reasonable cost and terms. Apart from Scotiabank (Bahamas Chub Cay’s woes have also impacted Bahamian contractors engaged on the project’s construction. Tribune Business previously reported that Osprey Developers and Gunite Pools had obtained separate default judgments worth a total $468,000 against the development over allegedly unpaid bills. Shar e your news The Tribune wants to hear from people who arem aking news in their neighbourhoods. Perhaps you ar e raising funds for a good cause, campaigning for improvements in the ar ea or have won an a war d. I f so, call us on 322-1986 and share your story. I I N N S S I I G G H H T T F o o r r t t h h e e s s t t o o r r i i e e s s b b e e h h i i n n d d t t h h e e n n e e w w s s , , r r e e a a d d I I n n s s i i g g h h t t o o n n M M o o n n d d a a y y s s F F R R O O M M p p a a g g e e 1 1 B B

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mer, but I’m more optimistic about 2010. The summer will give some great buying opportunities for people who are willing, and have funds available to buy securities. “There are good opportunities there. There’s a bunch of sellers out there who, if they don’t take their stock off the market, will end up selling at a lower price.” The RoyalFidelity president said global stock markets were starting to show signs that the worst may be over, having for the moment put the major corrections of late 2008 and earlier this year behind them (despite yesterday’s plummet). The Bahamian economy, though,and the Bahamas International Securities Exchange (BISX stocks whose earnings performance is directly linked to itshealth may have to wait a little longer, possibly six months, for recovery to bear fruit. “Throughout the summer period, we’ll see a stagnant slowing economy which will hot back earnings growth, and drop earnings growth for the companies here,” Mr Anderson said. Stock market and economic recovery was instead likely to filter through into late 2009, and possibly 2010. Bahamian equity investors, both institutional, brokerage and retail clients, had seen the paper value of their equity investments fall by around 20-30 per cent on average compared to one year ago, with many BISX-listed stocks currently trading at 52-week lows. Yet Mr Anderson said he was hopeful that “the bulk of the losses are behind the market and we’re in the last phase of the down market”. He added: “There’s a lot more upside in the market than downside left. People selling out now are getting out close to the bottom, and now is the time to look to buy more.” With minimal buying currently taking place in the Bahamian equities market, Mr Anderson said sellers were having to drop their asking prices tof ind buyers, especially if they needed liquid cash rapidly. As a result, a “build-up” of selling pressure, depressing stock prices, had taken place over the last six months. With BISX’s per cent’ rule still in effect, meaning that trades can only take place within a range of 10 per cent above or below the previous day’s close, Mr Anderson said it was possible that a stock could drop by as much as 50 per cent within one week. While such a “precipitous drop” had not been seen yet, Mr Anderson said Bahamian public company stocks had dropped by as much as 20 per cent within a week. Yet he pointed out that currently, stocks such as Cable Bahamas and Doctors Hospital Health Systems (DHHS were trading at very attractive price/earnings ratios. be implemented. Tribune Business revealed yesterday that Bahamas Waste’s managing director, Francisco de Cardenas, writing in the company’s 2008 annual report, had said it found the three-year wait for governmental approval for its biodiesel facility “puzzling”. Yet Mr Neymour replied yesterday: “I don’t know why they’re puzzled. What is the case is that in approving biodiesel production, we required some regulatory changes. “For instance, a prime concern would be how we would price the biodiesel. Right now the Bahamas, in relation to imported gasoline and diesel, is a regulated market based on the landed price. A locally produced product requires a different pricing structure.” Currently, the Bahamas only has pricing structures for imported fuels, such as gasoline and diesel, which are price controlled by the Government. The prices are based on the landed cost of fuel, as shown by oil company invoices, with the cost paid by end-users determined by government-imposed taxes and wholesale/retail margins. “We also need to address the waste streams coming from the production of biodiesel,” Mr Neymour told Tribune Business, “the glycerin that is a byproduct of the production. How do we address the waste streams coming from the biodiesel.” To assist it, Mr Neymour indicated the Government had “engaged the assistance” of the Inter-American Development Bank (IDB assistance branch. The IDB is working with the Government to aid its sustainable, renewable energy initiatives, and as part of this will assess Bahamas Waste’s biodiesel proposal. Mr Neymour indicated that final decisions on the permits/approvals needed for the facility would be taken within the next 12 months, as this is the length of time it will take the IDB to complete its work. The minister described biodiesel as a “key component” of its renewable energy mix, with the Bahamas Waste proposal having already been reviewed, and BEC’s renewable energy committee also providing comments and feedback on it to the Government. “It [the Bahamas Waste project] is being addressed under the IDB project,” Mr Neymour confirmed. “It is important to recognise that our pricing and regulatory tools do not address locally-produced products, and it’s important to put these things in place.” On the biodiesel front, Bahamas Waste has been seeking to further increase shareholder value by developing a plant capable of recycling the waste cooking oil created by households, restaurants and cruise ships that visit New Providence. The company believes 500,000 gallons of waste cooking oil are generated every year on New Providence alone. C M Y K C M Y K BUSINESS THE TRIBUNE TUESDAY, APRIL 21, 2009, PAGE 5B 52wk-Hi52wk-LowSecurit y Previous CloseToday's CloseChangeDaily Vol.EPS $Div $P/EYield 1.951.28Abaco Markets1.281.280.000.1270.00010.10.00% 1 1.8011.00Bahamas Property Fund11.0011.000.000.9920.20011.11.82% 9.686.95Bank of Bahamas6.956.950.000.2440.26028.53.74% 0.990.63Benchmark0.630.630.00-0.8770.000N/M0.00% 3.743.15Bahamas Waste3.153.150.000.1050.09030.02.86% 2 .601.95Fidelity Bank2.372.370.000.0550.04043.11.69% 14.1511.09Cable Bahamas11.0911.090.001.3090.2508.52.25% 3.142.83Colina Holdings2.832.830.000.2490.04011.41.41% 7.446.45Commonwealth Bank (S16.456.450.000.4380.05014.70.78% 5.001.31Consolidated Water BDRs2.422.580.160.0990.05226.12.02% 3.001.89Doctor's Hospital1.891.890.000.2400.0407.92.12% 8.106.02Famguard7.767.760.000.4200.24018.53.09% 13.0111.00Finco11.0011.000.000.3220.67034.26.09% 14.6610.35FirstCaribbean Bank10.4010.400.000.7940.40013.13.85% 6.045.00Focol (S5.105.100.000.3370.15015.12.94% 1.001.00Focol Class B Preference1.001.000.000.0000.000N/M0.00% 1.000.30Freeport Concrete0.300.300.000.0350.0008.60.00% 8.205.50ICD Utilities5.595.590.000.4070.50013.78.94% 12.508.60J. S. Johnson10.5010.500.000.9520.64011.06.10% 10.0010.00Premier Real Estate10.0010.000.000.1800.00055.60.00% 52wk-Hi52wk-LowSecuritySymbolLast SaleChangeDaily Vol. 1000.001000.00Fidelity Bank Note 17 (Series AFBB17100.000.00 1000.001000.00Fidelity Bank Note 22 (Series BFBB22100.000.00 1000.001000.00Fidelity Bank Note 13 (Series CFBB13100.000.00 1000.001000.00Fidelity Bank Note 15 (Series DFBB15100.000.00 52wk-Hi52wk-LowSymbolBid $ A sk $Last PriceWeekly Vol.EPS $Div $P/EYield 14.6014.25Bahamas Supermarkets7.928.4214.60-0.0410.300N/M2.05% 8.006.00Caribbean Crossings (Pref4.006.256.000.0000.480N/M7.80% 0.540.20RND Holdings0.350.400.350.0010.000256.60.00% 41.0029.00ABDAB30.1331.5929.004.5400.0009.030.00% 0.550.40RND Holdings0.450.550.550.0020.000261.900.00% 52wk-Hi52wk-LowFund NameNA V YTD%Last 12 MonthsDiv $Yield % 1.36641.3041Colina Bond Fund1.36640.954.77 3.03512.9230Colina MSI Preferred Fund2.8962-1.49-3.35 1.45081.3859Colina Money Market Fund1.45081.204.68 3.69603.1964Fidelity Bahamas G & I Fund3.1964-5.59-13.64 12.739712.1564Fidelity Prime Income Fund12.73970.965.79 100.5606100.0000CFAL Global Bond Fund100.56060.560.56 100.000096.4070CFAL Global Equity Fund96.4070-3.59-3.59 1.00001.0000CFAL High Grade Bond Fund1.00000.000.00 10.50009.0950Fidelity International Investment Fund9.15990.71-12.76 1.04401.0000FG Financial Preferred Income Fund1.04400.804.40 1.03641.0000FG Financial Growth Fund1.03640.333.64 1.04521.0000FG Financial Diversified Fund1.04520.764.40 BISX ALL SHARE INDEX 19 Dec 02 = 1,000.00YIELD last 12 month dividends divided by closing price 52wk-Hi Highest closing price in last 52 weeksBid $ Buying price of Colina and Fidelity 52wk-Low Lowest closing price in last 52 weeksAsk $ Selling price of Colina and fidelity Previous Close Previous day's weighted price for daily volumeLast Price Last traded over-the-counter price Today's Close Current day's weighted price for daily volumeWeekly Vol. Trading volume of the prior week Change Change in closing price from day to dayEPS $ A company's reported earnings per share for the last 12 mths Daily Vol. Number of total shares traded todayNAV Net Asset Value DIV $ Dividends per share paid in the last 12 monthsN/M Not Meaningful P/E Closing price divided by the last 12 month earningsFINDEX The Fidelity Bahamas Stock Index. January 1, 1994 = 100 (S (S19-Feb-09 9-Feb-09 W W W WW W . .B B I I S S X X B B A A H HA A M M A A S S . .C C O O M M | | T T E E L L E E P P H HO ON N E E : :2 24 4 2 2 -3 32 2 3 3 -2 2 3 3 3 3 0 0 | | F FA A C C S S I I M M I I L LE E : : 2 2 4 4 2 2-3 32 2 3 3 2 23 3 2 20 0NAV Date 31-Mar-09 3-Apr-09 31-Mar-09 28-Feb-09 31-Dec-08 9-Feb-09 28-Feb-09 31-Dec-08 31-Dec-07 31-Mar-09 Prime + 1.75% Maturity 19 October 2017 19 October 2022 30 May 2013 29 May 2015 Interest 7% Prime + 1.75% 7%T T O O T T R R A A D D E E C C A A L L L L : : C C O O L LI I N N A A 2 24 4 2 25 5 0 0 2 27 70 01 1 0 0 | | R R O O Y Y A A L LF F I I D D E E L LI I T T Y Y 2 24 4 2 2-3 35 5 6 6-7 77 7 6 6 4 4 | | F FG G C C A A P P I I T T A A L L M M A A R R K KE E T T S S 2 2 4 42 2 3 39 9 6 64 40 00 0 0 0 | | C C O O L LO ON N I I A A L L 2 2 4 4 2 2 5 5 0 02 2 7 7 5 5 2 2 5 5F INDEX: CLOSE 797.05 | YTD -4.53% | 2008 -12.31%BISX LISTED & TRADED SECURITIES AS OF: Fidelity Over-The-Counter Securities Colina Over-The-Counter Securities BISX Listed Mutual Funds MARKET TERMSTHURSDAY, 16 APRIL 2009B ISX ALL SHARE INDEX: CLOSE 1,620.03 | CHG 0.17 | %CHG 0.01 | YTD -92.33 | YTD % -5.39BISX LISTED DEBT SECURITIES (Bonds trade on a Percentage Pricing bases 7$
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n MARTIN CRUTSINGER AP Economics Writer WASHINGTON (AP Anxiety is growing again over the health of the nation’s largest banks, and with Congress hesitant to commit more money, the Obama administration is exploring ways to strengthen them in the face of an unrelenting recession. Results of the federal government's "stress tests" on big banks are due May 4, and Wall Street is increasingly worried they will show some banks are in worse shape than expected. The renewed bank fears drove the stock market down on Monday in its worst showing in six weeks. Bank of America stock lost nearly a quarter of its value, and the Dow Jones industrial average fell almost 290 points. Bank of America reported a first-quarter profit of $2.8 billion, joining other banks whose earnings reports have looked positive at first blush. But some analysts say accounting steps are concealing the depth of the financial industry's woes. The banks have been helped by income from trading and cheap borrowing, but they are still struggling with bad debt, said Joe Saluzzi, co-head of equity trading at Themis Trading LLC. Investors are "looking at bank numbers and are saying they are not that great," he said. Among the ideas being explored by the administration is converting the government's loans into equity stakes, which would improve the banks' bottom lines by increasing their capital reserves. The Treasury Department will outline Friday how it plans to structure the stress tests, which aim to gauge the health of 19 big banks. So far, investors have been too optimistic about the results, warned Jaret Seiberg, a financial services policy analyst at Washington Research Group. "What we're seeing is a reevaluation of those positions," he said. "Until we have finality on what the stress tests will tell us, the markets will be very jittery about the banks." The $700 billion in bailout money approved by Congress last fall has dwindled to about $135 billion, and the administration is under pressure to show it has other tools to strengthen weaker banks. Critics have complained that the bailout money has failed to get banks to resume more normal lending to consumers and businesses. Increased lending is seen as vital to ending the financial crisis. Congress has signaled that additional money is unlikely, in part because of public outrage over executive bonuses at banks getting taxpayer money. "They understand that we need an exit strategy from the continuing cycle of bailouts," said Rep. Spencer Baucus of Alabama, top Republican on the House Financial Services Committee. Asked Monday whether Congress would provide more money, House Financial Services Committee Chairman Barney Frank, D-Mass., said: "Not at this point, no." The government has lent nearly $240 billion to more than 540 banks since fall, much of it in return for preferred stock. Holders of preferred stock are paid back before holders of common stock if a company goes bankrupt. Converting government loans from preferred stock into common shares might help reassure investors and customers, though it would hurt existing shareholders by reducing the value of their shares. But some private economists support the idea, noting that the Treasury Department put such a plan in place for Citigroup in February as a way of restoring confidence in the bank. "I think Citigroup was a very good test case," said Sung Won Sohn, an economics professora t California State University a nd a former president of a Los Angeles bank. "It was a large troubled bank that needed more capital. Without the gov ernment's help, Citigroup could have gotten into deeper trouble." C onverting preferred stock i nto common stock could show lawmakers how far regulators will go to buy time for financial firms that need more capital, said Simon Johnson, a professor at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology's Sloan School of Management. "In some ways, it's an appeal for money," he said. "The stress test is going to say they need capital. ... So at some level, they're communicating with Congress." Concerns about the banks weighed heavily on financial stocks Monday, and not just Bank of America. Citigroup stock lost 19 per cent of its value, Wells Fargo & Co. 16 per cent and JPMorgan Chase 11 per cent. The deepening recession only makes business worse for the banks, and the nation is still waiting for sure signs that the economy is improving, or at least stabilizing. On Monday, the Conference Board said its monthly forecast of economic activity fell 0.3 per cent in March and has not risen in nine months. The decline was more than expected, but the board did call for the recession's intensity to ease this summer. The government has said that any banks found to need extra capital under the stress tests will be given six months to raise that capital on their own. If they can't, the government will provide it. Some on Wall Street are skeptical that the tests will be tough enough. "Of course, everyone will pass because we don't want to create a panic," said Axel Merk, president of Merk Investments. "We're going to have the illusion of healthy banks but they won't want to lend." AP Economics Writer Christopher S Rugaber, AP Business Writer Daniel Wagner and AP writers Deb Riechmann and Anne Flaherty contributed to this report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ew concerns about bank health grip Wall Street AMONG the ideas being explored by the Obama administration is converting the government's loans into equity stakes, which would improve the banks' bottom lines by increasing their capital reserves...

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ANDROS CAT ISLAND ELEUTHERA MA Y AGUANA SAN SALVADOR GREAT INAGUA GREAT EXUMA CROOKED ISLAND / ACKLINS LONG ISLAND ABACO Shown is today's weather. Temperatures are today's highs and tonights's lows. KEY WEST WEST PALM BEACH FT. LAUDERDALE TAMPA ORLANDOLow: 57F/14C Low: 58F/14C Low: 62F/17C Low: 65 F/18C Low: 67F/19C Low: 71F/22C Low: 74 F/23C Low: 68F/20C High: 82F/28C High: 77F/25C High: 85 F/29C High: 84F/29C High: 85F/29C High: 81 F/27 High: 84F/29C Low: 71F/22C High: 81 F/27C Low: 77 F/25 High: 85 F/29CRAGGED ISLANDLow: 72F/22C High: 87F/31C Low: 73 F/23C High: 85F/29C Low: 73 F/23C High: 82F/28C Low: 76 F/24C High: 86F/30C Low: 77F/25C High: 90 F/32C Low: 75F/24C High: 86 F/30C Low: 74 F/23C High: 89F/32C Low: 76F/24C High: 90F/32C Low: 78 F/26C High: 89F/32C High: 80F/27CFREEPOR T NASSAU MIAMI THE TRIBUNE TUESDAY, APRIL 21ST, 2009, PAGE 11BTHE WEATHER REPORT 5-DAYFORECAST Clouds giving way to some sun. Partly cloudy with a thunderstorm. Partly cloudy.Sunny and windy. Partly sunny with a shower possible. High: 84 Low: 74 High: 85 High: 81 High: 81 AccuWeather RealFeel AccuWeather RealFeel AccuWeather RealFeel AccuWeather RealFeel AccuWeather RealFeel Partly sunny, a thunderstorm; windy. High: 83 Low: 74 Low: 73 Low: 74 AccuWeather RealFeel 92F The exclusive AccuWeather RealFeel Temperatureis an index that combines the effects of temperature, wind, humidity, sunshine intensity, cloudiness, precipitation, pressure, and elevation on the human bodyeverything that effects how warm or cold a person feels. Temperatures reflect the high and the low for the day. 84F 103-75F 87-72F 82-71F 91-77F Low: 75 TODAYTONIGHTWEDNESDAYTHURSDAYFRIDAYSATURDAY ALMANAC High .................................................. 81F/27C Low .................................................... 72F/22C Normal high ...................................... 82F/28C Normal low ........................................ 69F/21C Last year's high .................................. 82F/28C Last year's low .................................. 65F/19C As of 2 p.m. yesterday ..................................0.00" Year to date ..................................................2.19"Normal year to date ......................................6.74" Statistics are for Nassau through 2 p.m. yesterday Temperature Precipitation SUNANDMOON TIDESFORNASSAU New First Full Last Apr . 24 May 1May 9May 17 Sunrise . . . . . . 6:42 a.m. Sunset . . . . . . . 7:35 p.m. Moonrise . . . . . 4:15 a.m. Moonset . . . . . 4:28 p.m. Today W ednesday Thursday Friday HighHt.(ft.LowHt.(ft. 5:38 a.m.2.411:38 a.m.0.3 5:55 p.m.2.7----6:25 a.m.2.512:15 a.m.0.2 6:41 p.m.2.912:21 p.m.0.2 7:10 a.m.2.61:03 a.m.0.1 7:25 p.m. 3.11:04 p.m.0.1 7:54 a.m. 2.61:49 a.m.0.0 8:10 p.m. 3.2 1:47 p.m.0.0 WORLDCITIES Acapulco 90/3273/22s88/3177/25pc Amsterdam64/1745/7s64/1743/6c Ankara, Turkey72/2241/5c65/1844/6t Athens68/2055/12sh66/1854/12sh Auckland61/1651/10r64/1749/9pc Bangkok93/3378/25s91/3278/25t Barbados84/2876/24pc85/2975/23s Barcelona65/1855/12sh66/1853/11pc Beijing72/2246/7s72/2250/10s Beirut74/2369/20pc78/2567/19s Belgrade59/1548/8sh61/1643/6c Berlin64/1745/7s66/1841/5s Bermuda 71/2168/20s69/2067/19pc Bogota65/1846/7r66/1847/8sh Brussels66/1845/7s66/1843/6pc Budapest74/2345/7pc72/2245/7sBuenos Aires 70/2159/15pc73/2263/17s Cairo95/3571/21s96/3563/17pc Calcutta 108/4282/27s107/4178/25s Calgar y69/2042/5pc47/825/-3c Cancun81/2766/18t86/3067/19c Caracas80/2671/21pc80/2670/21pcCasablanca 71/21 55/12 s 76/2453/11s Copenhagen 56/1347/8s58/1445/7sh Dublin57/1345/7pc55/1245/7pcFrankfurt 72/22 43/6s70/2143/6s Geneva65/1845/7pc69/2043/6s Halifax48/845/7r54/1243/6rHavana 84/28 66/18 t83/2867/19pc Helsinki45/730/-1pc48/832/0pc Hong Kong 84/2877/25pc82/2775/23t Islamabad97/3663/17pc97/3662/16c Istanbul68/2056/13c58/1446/7rJerusalem 79/2655/12s90/3255/12s Johannesburg 60/15 44/6c61/1645/7c Kingston 86/30 78/25sh86/3078/25r Lima83/2865/18pc82/2763/17pc London 68/20 45/7 pc68/2046/7s Madrid72/2237/2s73/2239/3s Manila90/3279/26t85/2977/25t Mexico City75/2350/10t75/2350/10t Monterrey91/3263/17s94/3467/19sMontreal 50/1043/6sh57/1337/2c Moscow 39/327/-2sf39/325/-3pc Munich66/1837/2pc64/1744/6s Nairobi85/2965/18t84/2863/17t New Delhi106/4177/25s102/3879/26s Oslo 52/1141/5c55/1239/3r Paris 70/2146/7s72/2245/7s Prague63/1741/5s65/1846/7s Rio de Janeiro74/2368/20sh76/2470/21pc Riyadh89/3165/18s93/3369/20s Rome68/2050/10sh68/2049/9pc St. Thomas 84/28 77/25sh86/3075/23s San Juan82/2753/11s86/3054/12s San Salvador93/3370/21s91/3274/23s Santiago82/2750/10s81/2746/7s Santo Domingo88/3170/21sh84/2869/20sh Sao Paulo68/2059/15sh72/2259/15t Seoul 50/1041/5r52/1139/3c Stockholm48/834/1pc52/1137/2pc Sydney70/2161/16sh68/2059/15sh T aipei 81/27 70/21r79/2672/22sh Tokyo68/2061/16r72/2257/13pc Toronto53/1139/3sh48/835/1c Trinidad88/3173/22t82/2772/22sh Vancouver64/1747/8pc56/1341/5cVienna 63/17 48/8pc67/1948/8s Warsaw54/1232/0s56/1338/3s Winnipeg50/1032/0s56/1340/4pc HighLowWHighLowW F/C F/CF/CF/C TodayWednesdayW eather (W s -sunny , pc -partly cloudy , c -cloudy , sh -showers, t -thunder storms, r -rain, sf -snow flurries, sn -snow, i -ice, Prcp-precipitation, Tr -trace TODAY'SU.S. FORECAST MARINEFORECAST WINDSWAVESVISIBILITYWATER TEMPS. NASSAU FREEPORT ABACO Today:W at 8-16 Knots2-4 Feet10-20 Miles77F Wednesday:NW at 12-25 Knots1-3 Feet10-20 Miles77F Today:W at 8-16 Knots2-4 Feet10-20 Miles77F Wednesday:NW at 12-25 Knots1-3 Feet10-20 Miles77F Today:W at 10-20 Knots2-4 Feet10-20 Miles77F Wednesday:NW at 12-25 Knots1-3 Feet10-20 Miles77F U.S. CITIES Albuquerque 79/2649/9s80/2651/10pc Anchorage50/1031/0s51/1034/1s Atlanta 68/20 40/4pc67/1948/8s Atlantic City68/2048/8t58/1437/2c Baltimore67/1944/6t60/1539/3cBoston 56/13 48/8r58/1442/5sh Buffalo54/1238/3sh47/834/1c Charleston, SC77/2551/10s74/2349/9s Chicago46/737/2sn55/1241/5pcCleveland 52/11 38/3sh48/835/1c Dallas82/2759/15s82/2762/16s Denver74/2345/7s78/2544/6s Detroit49/936/2sh50/1037/2c Honolulu79/2667/19sh81/2768/20sHouston 84/28 58/14 s84/2862/16s HighLowWHighLowW F/CF/CF/CF/C HighLowWHighLowW F/CF/CF/CF/C HighLowWHighLowW F/CF/CF/CF/C TodayWednesday T odayWednesday T odayWednesday Indianapolis 50/1037/2c59/1542/5pc Jacksonville78/2551/10s80/2655/12s Kansas City 68/20 44/6pc77/2557/13s Las Vegas95/3564/17s95/3570/21s Little Rock73/2249/9pc79/2658/14sLos Angeles 90/32 60/15pc77/2557/13pc Louisville57/1338/3c64/1745/7pc Memphis68/2049/9pc75/2358/14s Miami85/2967/19t82/2771/21s Minneapolis 58/14 38/3pc63/1748/8s Nashville64/1739/3c66/1845/7pc New Orleans77/2557/13pc81/2761/16s New York64/1749/9t60/1544/6sh Oklahoma City81/2753/11pc85/2958/14s Orlando 82/27 57/13 pc83/2860/15s Philadelphia66/1845/7t57/1340/4c Phoenix99/3769/20s97/3667/19s Pittsburgh52/1138/3sh50/1035/1c Portland, OR81/2749/9s67/1944/6pc Raleigh-Durham 71/2144/6pc66/1840/4pc St. Louis62/1645/7pc71/2155/12sSalt Lake City 74/2350/10s79/2653/11s San Antonio 87/30 58/14 s87/3061/16s San Diego76/2460/15pc68/2058/14pc San Francisco80/2648/8pc65/1851/10sSeattle 71/2145/7s58/1443/6c T allahassee 78/2549/9s80/2652/11s Tampa77/2558/14pc81/2762/16s Tucson95/3561/16s93/3360/15s Washington, DC67/1947/8t61/1641/5c UV INDEXTODAY The higher the AccuWeather UV IndexTM number, the greater the need for eye and skin protection.Forecasts and graphics provided by AccuW eather , Inc. Cold W arm Stationary FrontsShown are noon positions of weather systems and precipitation. T emperature bands are highs for the day. Forecast high/low temperatures are for selected cities. -10s-0s0s10s20s30s40s50s60s70s80s90s100s110s Showers T-storms RainFlurries Snow Ice AccuWeather.com

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C M Y K C M Y K HEALTH PAGE 8B, TUESDAY, APRIL 21, 2009 THE TRIBUNE DESQUAMATIONis the body's natural process of exfoliation, or the shedding of dry, old, hardened skin cells so new cells can come to the surface. In an oily skin condition, desquamation can be slowed, as oily skin actsas a glue that holds dead skin cells to the surface. This can contribute to clogged follicles, leading to the build-up of acne bacteria which stimulates the production of breakouts. Exfoliation is especially helpful to those with oily skin. In addition to smoothing, improving skin tone and enhancing skin's receptiveness of oil-controlling ingredients, exfoliation helps rid oily skin of dulling skin cells to help keep skin clear. Your exfoliation regimen will depend heavily upon your professional skin analysis performed by a skin therapist. A professional skin therapist may recommend exfoliating with physical scrubs or chemical exfoliants, or both to deliver the desired result. They can advise you on how often to exfoliate, and how to successfully incorporate exfoliation into your regimen. Sarah Beek is a skin care therapist at the Dermal Clinic. Visit her and her team of skin and body therapists at One Sandyport Plaza (the same building as Bal ly’s Gym). For more information visit www.dermal-clinic.com or call 327.6788 . By SARAH BEEK health BODYANDMIND T h e T r i b u n e n By LLOYD ALLEN Tribune Features Reporter lallen@tribunemedia.net CHILDREN from the Children’s Emergency Hostel, the Ranfurly Home for Children, and the Nazareth Centre were recently given 600 red Polo shirts as a goodwill donation by studentcity.com and gradcity.com last Friday. Dereck Kaye, programme director for GradCity.com explained: “gradcity.com and studentcity.com have been coming down here for over 20 years, and we’ve had thousands of students coming down where we’ve been taking care of them, so this gives us an opportunity to give back to an island that’s given so much to our company and our students as well.” Mr Kaye explained that beginning next year, the company will be offering a half day community service option to spring breakers willing to lend their time and assistance to various community groups. “We’d like to offer basi cally three different homes and allow our students to come and interact with the kids and give back to the community,” he said. During last week’s dona tion, the representatives met with the various facility administrators and gave them several dozen red polo shirts in various sizes for the children of their homes. Organisers are hoping that the initial donation is the first of many bridges bringing together the local community with studentcity.com and gradcity.com. FROM L to R Staurt Chason Programme Manager for studentcity.com and gradcity.com, Ruth Strachan acting administrator at the Nazareth Centre, and Dereck Kaye, Programme Director for gradcity.com. The importance of exfoliation Studentcity.com and gradcity.com donates polo shirts to Children’s Emergency Hospital URINARY INCONTENANCE n By LLOYD ALLEN T ribune Features Reporter lallen@tribunemedia.net While going to the restroom for most people is a normal bodily function, for some people, incontinence or an overactive bladder is such a serious problem that it affects their sense of control, confidence and overall quality of life. A ccording to Dr Richard Bridgewater of the Southern Community General Clinic, Urinary Incontinence (UIO veractive Bladder is a common medical condition affecting a significant number of Bahamian women in particular, and is often undiagnosed for a number of reasons. Dr Bridgewater defined UI a s the overall weakening of the bladder control muscles where a person may experience mild to severe uncontroll able urination, a condition that has several risk factors. He explained that risk factors increase for woman who have had children (especially large children), older persons,t hose with a family history of UI, and persons who have had v arious types of surgeries. These include fibroid s urgery as well as a hysterectomies, while risk factors also increase for persons who are chronic smokers, have chronic constipation, are obese or diabetic. For most sufferers, varied types of uncontrolled urination may occur during laughter, exercise, coughing, sneezing, jumping, or other activities which place pressure on the abdomen. Dr Bridgewater said that although this condition is hardly ever talked about, he has diagnosed several of his own patients and feels there exists a large number of undiagnosed women who allow shame and fear to prevent them from sharing their condi tion with their doctor. In some cases, sufferers may even resort to wearing adult designed pads or pampers to prevent wetting. Men too can suffer from the disorder, which in their case is generally caused by prostate o r glandular abnormalities. Treatment for UI can range from simple weight loss to surgery, but should always be diagnosed by a medical pro fessional such as an urologist or gynocologist and obstetrician (OBGYN es in female urinary disorders first. Dr Bridgewater said there is a common treatment used to c orrect UI, known as the Kegels exercise. “It’s a type of exercise that the lady learns to stop herf low of urine. She would go to the restroom for example, and as she is urinating she will attempt to stop the stream of flow, and will do that a couple of times each time where she should eventually develop a m ind body coordination so that she can actually control the sphincter muscles.” The sphincter muscle or u rethral spincter is the group of muscles which controls the flow of urine from the bladder. Dr Bridgewater explained that as time continues, thew oman would then eventually be able to control the irregu l ar flow of urine at other times such as when she exer c ises, coughs, jumps, or laughs. He said other steps may include an examination of the bladder for something known as a cystocele a condition where the walls between the bladder and vagina may weaken allowing the bladder to bulge into the vagina. He explained: “The basic premise of UI is where a normal person when feeling the need to urinate would have balanced pressure distributed to both the bladder and urethra, with the net result with no increased pressure on one side or the other. “With UI, there’s a problem where the pressure is transferred too much to the bladder and where insufficient support is on the urethra, and where the end result is where the bladder pushes the urine out.” Dr Bridgewater said if it is determined that the individ ual suffers from a cystocele,s urgery may be the only mea sure in correcting their condition. He said although this condition may seem embarrassing to some, it is by no mean a life long condition, and with proper treatment can be corrected allowing that person to reclaim their freedom, mobility, and confidence in experiencing life to its fullest.

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By MAGGIE BAIN C M Y K C M Y K WOMAN THE TRIBUNE TUESDAY, APRIL 21, 2009, PAGE 9B E VEN as far back as 5000 BC and the birth of Tandra, the ancient Eastern science of spiritual enlightenment, there has been interest in human sexuality. In our lifetime it was Masters and Johnson's report in 1966 that g rabbed the public's attention to the concept of a four stage sexual response cycle and from there evolved the special study of sex therapy. The passage time LOVING RELATIONSHIPS of Educating ourselves about human sexuality allows us to understand ourselves and our behavior. By taking the time to really try and understand our own sensual and sexual needs we find that there are in fact natural and predictable changes that occur on average every decade throughout our lives. These are partly due to our individual needs and gender but perhaps more significantly our sex hormones which strongly drive our desires. As we know, men peak physiologically in their teens and psychologically in their fifties. This is partly due to the lowering of hormone levels but also due to maturing traits such as touching, tenderness, insight, patience and understanding. Women peak sexually in their thirties and forties following their child rearing years and psychologically in their fifties. As women mature they often display qualities such as decisiveness, assertiveness, independence and an increased sensuality. As predictable as a person's sexual stage may be it is by no means typical. A sexual stage includes the emotional and physiological make up of an individual and also that of the relationship. So as you can see if you have a partner close to your own age then it is not surprising that you may seem sexually and emotionally incompatible. You may feel life is a constant tug of war but if you can ride the storm then there is hope. As you can see men and women reach a plateau in their fifties and there is often a prevailing sense of calm and togetherness. Barring debilitating diseases many such enviable couples can look forward to a continued sex life for many years. This has become a possible reality due to the availability of hormone replacements, medications and aids to help erectile function. These aids have great value but are no supplement if they are without the essential ingredient an abundance of touch. Touching is the superglue of a relationship and produces our own natural bonding agent; oxytocin. Our bodies crave touch because of the high that it produces and it is this that endures throughout the years. Life however does not always flow so smoothly for some people. Transitioning from one decade may be disrupted by divorce or death. Some appear to skip stages; for example men who fail to commit or women who have their children late in life, whilst others may continue on in one stage and they present to us with sexual problems. If we view these as life's hurdles then finding our inner peace and fulfilling our true sexual potential will not seem a fantasy but a reality. If we slow down and take stock of our l ives and look honestly within ourselves then we c an turn things around. Our own attitudes and p erceptions towards sexuality have undoubtedly been imbedded from our early childhood but that does not mean that it can not change as we grow and mature. We have to learn from all our past experiences. We have all seen people make dramatic changes in their lives and enter a new decade with a stronger sense of self and their relationships improve. We are not born knowing all these things but we can learn them if we are willing. Living life with a sense of wonder, curiosity and a big open heart will allow us to become the person we were meant to become and live the life we were meant to live. Margaret Bain is an Individual and Couples Relationship Therapist. She is a Registered Nurse and a Certified Clinical Sex Therapist located at The Centre for Renewing Relationships, Grosvenor's Close West. She can be contacted by calling 3567983 or by e-mail at relatebahamas@yahoo.com or at www.relatebahamas.blogspot.com. She is available for speaking engagements. n By ALEX MISSICK Tribune Features R eporter amissick@tribunemedia.net AS women get older, many changes occur in their bodies. Everything from menopause to weight gain can be a constant bother in their busy everyday lives. However, in a society where beauty is a must and perfection is a high goal to reach, some women notice a problem with the pigmentation in their nails. The manicure and pedicure business in the Bahamas is a big one with women getting pedicure and manicure services everyday f or relaxation or beauty pur poses. Genevieve Thompson, a 40 year old mother of three, said she noticed a dark discoloration of her toe nails during a trip to the salon. The young lady was s oaking my feet and I noticed the dark lines on my toe nails as she was polishing them. I paid it no mind thinking it was a vitamin deficiency or something I had eaten. I even went as fara s thinking it was the type of polish I was using. I was rather alarmed but did not pay much attention to it,” Mrs Thompson said. Doctor of Podiatric Medicine, Monique Mitchell, said this is a problem called melanonychia that can occur in older persons of darker complexion. “A lot of coloured people have that as a normal variant in toe and finger nails. It can be caused by a vitamin deficiency of vitamin B12 and mostly occurs because of increased production of melanin, a pigment found in the skin of darker people, by melanocytes in the nail matrix,” Mrs Mitchell said. According to a book called McCarthy’s Principles and Practices of Podiatric Onchopathy, Melanonychia is “a brown or black longitu dinal stripe of hyper pigmentation of the nail, either partial or complete. 77 per cent of Black individuals older than 20 years and almost 100 per cent older than 50 years have melanonychia. The number and width of the streaks also increases with age. Melanonychia most often occurs because of increased production of melanin by melanocytes in the nail matrix. This results in a visible band of pigment ed cells on the nail plate. These streaks tend to be multiple and lightly pigmented which differs from the single darker streak typical of melanoma.” Mrs Thompson said she was insecure about the markings, but is learning to accept them. “I would love to get rid of the marks because I have always had healthy nails. Having those streaks come up made me feel like I had unhealthy nails. I stopped wearing closed in shoes hoping but I now use polish to keep it covered,” Mrs Thompson said. The causes of Melanonychia are many, and according to emedicine.com, can be due to pregnancy, trauma, poor fitting shoes, radiation therapy, AIDS, malnutrition and many more. “If you all of a sudden get a black on your toe nail, you should get it checked out just so that we would know how to treat it. If it is normal, you can get it as a young adult or child. The only alarming thing is when the streaks or spot just showed up,” Mrs Mitchell said. SOME plants reproduce by sending up suckers, others by forming new tubers or bulbs underground. Most, however, rely on seeds but not all plants are prodigious seeds producers. Many of our favourite flowering shrubs like bougainvillea and hibiscus are rare seeders and need a little help from their owners to form new plants. This is easily done by taking cuttings: removing a section of the plant and encouraging it to grow independently. The secret behind cuttings is the pres ence of bumps or scars along the length of a stem or branch. These growth nodes have the ability to produce leaves and new branches if they are above ground but produce roots if they are below ground. The basic process is to remove a stem from the parent plant by cutting just below a growth node and to then cut away excess length just above a growth node. Cuttings are best made from branches or stems that have a covering of bark. It is very tempting to make cuttings of fresh green growth but these need specialised attention and are called tip cuttings. The total length of a cutting does not need to exceed 10 inches. A long cutting will be affected by the wind and cause the bottom of the cuttings – where we want roots to form – to move around and hinder root development. Even with a short cutting it is best to plant at a 45 degree angle to lessen the effect of wind. Many gardeners favour removing all foliage from a cutting; others like to leave bud clusters and small leaves, or even larger leaves that they cut in half. I find that softer plants like hibiscus do well with a little foliage attached while harder woods like bougainvillea are best stripped bare. Cuttings should have the bottom 4 inches buried in either potting soil in a container or straight into the ground where they are to grow. The soil for these should be worked over and be nice and friable in order to promote root growth, but do not add any fertiliser to the soil as this may burn delicate roots as they form. Resist the temptation to push your cuttings into the soil. This will damage the tissue below ground and compact the soil exactly where we need it to be friable. Instead, dig a small hole, set your cutting upright and fill the hole back in. Firm the soil around and water lightly. The area around new cuttings should be kept damp but not waterlogged. Too much water will promote rot. Some gardeners use a product called rooting hor mone that will speed up the rooting process. It is not really necessary when you grow cuttings at this time of year but is useful when you try to grow them out of season. Most manufacturers of rooting hormone include a fungicide in their product and this is beneficial. If you have rooting hormone, by all means use it. If you start your cuttings in a pot make sure you do not have them too close together. At some point you will have to remove the new plants and if the roots are entwined you will have a problem. The pot is best kept in partial shade and then moved gradually into full sun once foliage has developed. Cuttings put into the soil where they are to grow perma nently must be in full sun if the parent plant was in full sun. When are the container-grown cuttings ready to be transplanted? In no less than two months, three months being better. Soft cuttings root more quickly than hard cuttings like bougainvillea. Gardeners are naturally patient people and know not to try and hurry Mother Nature along. Multiple cuttings can be usually be taken from one limb that is severed from the parent plant. Oleander limbs are usually long and can give up to half-adozen cuttings. Back to tip cuttings. These are usually raised in a misting bed but the home gardener can achieve tip cutting success by planting a single end of a branch in a 3-gallon container of moist soil. Push three (or four soil close to the rim so they stand about 12inches tall. Then drape a 2-gallon clear plastic storage bag over all and secure the bag to the outside of the pot with tape. What you have achieved is a self-con tained unit. Moisture from the soil will evaporate in heat and then condense in cooler conditions so you do not have to do any watering. Plastic intensified the effect of the sun so your container with your tip cutting should be kept in light shade. I have found this method to be particularly affective with Bridal Bouquet frangipani and rose cuttings. Cuttings are easy GREEN SCENE B y GARDENER JACK The day my nails turned black O ur own attitudes and perceptions towards sexuality h ave undoubtedly been i mbedded from our early c hildhood but that does not m ean that it can not change as we grow and mature.

PAGE 23

n B y ALEX MISSICK T ribune Features Reporter amissick@tribunemedia.net AS Bahamian women continue to show support for the fight against cancer in the country, The Bahamas Golf Federation has decided to go a step further by hosting the Sister Sister Breast Cancer Charity Golf Tournament on May 9 to assist in providing important medical equipment and financial support for women fighting t he deadly disease. Although The Bahamas Golf Federation has always supported the Cancer Society in The Bahamas through their ladies’ golf tournaments, this year a conscious decision was made to target a special group of ladies that work really hard to support females diagnosed with breast cancer-the Sister Sister Organisation. The Bahamas Golf Federation Cent ral Ladies Division and the Blue S hark Golf Club are not only asking persons to come out and play but also to send donations to help support the event. Sister Sister not only supports women financially by supplying much needed portacath a device which is inserted in the chest for the patient to receive medication but also provide much needed emotional support and hope by example. The portacath is a very expensive device costing $770. Sister Sister tries to donate at least five of these devices each month, an effort that seriously depletes their resources. It is said that it is not the cancer that kills, but the lack of treatment. Most of the women volunteers working in the organisation are breast cancer survivors and therefore use their personal experiences to encourage women to not despair and to show they can still have a productive meaningful life. To sign up for the tournament interested persons can contact Yvonne Shaw, chairman of the Central Ladies Division at 324-2377 or download sponsor forms and player registration forms from the BGF website: www.bgfnet.com Donations may be sent to PO Box SS-19092. Registration forms may also be collected from Ocean Club, Lyford Cay, Cable Beach and Blue Shark Golf Courses. Bahamas Golf Federation hosts upcoming Sister Sister Breast Cancer Charity Golf Tournament C M Y K C M Y K WOMAN PAGE 10B, TUESDAY, APRIL 21, 2009 THE TRIBUNE Golfing for cancer FROM LEFT: Glenn Archer, President, Bahamas Golf Federation; Yvonne Shaw, Chairman, Ladies Division and Asst Secretary, Bahamas Golf Federation; Andrea Sweeting, President, Sister, Sister, Breast Cancer Arm of the Cancer Society of The Bahamas; Sandra Ferguson-Rolle, Vice President, Sister, Sister and Gennie Dean, Treasurer, Sister, Sister. T e r r a n c e S t r a c h a n / T L C P h o t o IN order to receive the benefits of having successful relationships in your life, you must be able to identify persons with whom you can enjoy healthy fulfilling relationships in every aspect of your life.I n the past, many have experienced failu re in relationships, but the failures have not been as a result of people; it has been because of the inability to pick persons who are right. In order to be successful in life and gain the benefits of relationships, you must be critical of who you invest your life in. The ability to determine goodc haracter in people is one of the key ways in determining who should be a part of your life. Here are some of the things you should look for in determining whether a relationship is right for you: SECRETS TO CHOOSING THE RELATIONSHIPS THAT ARE RIGHT FOR YOU 1. They make you feel loved You believe in your heart that they want the best for you and that they are willing to work with you in achieving the best for your life. They accept you just as you are and give you the freedom to be yourself around them. 2. They bring you closer to the pers on God created you to be The right relationships will allow you to see the real you and their presence in your life will cause you to become kinder, loving,a nd more sensitive to others. You will experience the freedom to unleash your gifts and talents with no reservations. Their presence in your life encourages you to fulfill your purpose and destiny. 3 . T hey bring you into other relationships Your life was created to increase and any relationship that exists in your life should bring you into other connections through that relationship i.e. you should have more mentors, friends, customers etc. 4 . T hey help you to embrace both the g ood and the bad in your life You are not perfect; the right relationships for you will celebrate your strengths and assist you with overcoming your weaknesses. They will not judge or condemn you for the bad they see in you but they have the patience and the maturity to help you grow into the person you were created to be. 5. They give you freedom to be an adult Being an adult requires that you make decisions without permission from others, that you choose your own values and opinions, develop your own personal likes and dislikes, that you exercise your gifts, manage your own responsi b ilities, and that you are able to relate to other adults as peers inclusive of your parents and spiritual authority. The right relationships for you should bring you o ut of a one-down relationship and should eliminate the belief that people are above you. Their presence in your life should encourage you to pursue what you truly want for your life and not what they want for you. Essentially, the right relationship eliminates the desire to people please and helps you to focus on the best for your life with their consultation but without needing their approval. 6. They are an adult You were creat ed to exercise authority over your own life. Some of the best relationships for you are with people who are carrying out this command in their own lives. The people that are right for you are those that are emotionally independent adults with no inappropriate support from their parents or any other authority. They manage their own finances, make their own decisions, maintain a spiritual life, are capable of maintaining their own sus tenance and are pursuing their purpose and destiny with freedom. 7. They are willing to invest in your growth and development The right relationships for you should have a willingness to help you become what you were purposed to become. They will invest in your growth and development by seeking out ways for you to mature in every aspect of your life. 8. They are equally yoked with you Being equally yoked with someone means that you are able to connect with individuals at three levels: 1) spiritually 2) soulfully 3) physically. You are created a tri-part being (body, soul, and spirit the best relationships for you are the ones in which you can relate at all three levels. The right relationships for you are the ones that you share similar spiritual beliefs with, have social compatibility with ie similar family patterns, similar mindsets on relating to people, have similar communication style, and share intellectual compatibility, you should also share some physical connection or attraction to the persons that are right for you. 9. They always make you feel like a friend The most important characteristic of any relationship that is right for you is that they make you feel like a friend. Right relationships always extend a bond of friendship to you and always make you comfortable with being your true self. With every decision that is made within the relationship, you have peace that they always have your best interest at heart. You were created for a relationship, you are not meant to be alone and you are capable of finding the relationships that are right for you. When you choose relationships based on these secrets, you will come into a life-long relationships that will bring you fulfillment and enable you to experience true joy and happiness. Sherika Brown, CEO & Founder of the Iron Network. Email: ironnetwork.org@gmail.com n By LLOYD ALLEN T ribune Features Reporter lallen@tribunemedia.net ACCORDING to recent unemployment figures calculated by the govern-m ent, more than 15,000 Bahamians have been either job hunting without success, or are discouraged from finding a job over the past four years, an unfortunate circumstance blamed on the contracting local job market . Because of this reality, the government introduced an unemployment assistance package earlier this month, where those who’ve been out of work f or up to four years could receive some financial support over a 13 week period. Backed by a $20 million National I nsurance Board (NIB ployment benefit fund, this national initiative is the most recent move by the government to aid those most affected by unemployment. As initial media reports indicated, 774 unemployed persons applied at the various application processing centers . A question that has become increasingly relevant after the “poor” turnout of applicants during the first phase of this initiative, is whether the govern ment has done enough to help hurting Bahamians. This week, the Barbershop went into the Englerston community to hear what some residents had to say. Tribune Features visited the HereCuts barbershop and car-wash on Cordeaux Avenue and Acklins Street, and asked several persons their views on the matter. First up was the proprietor of HereCuts, C Antwan Bethel, who said although there are many who would benefit from the government’s unem ployment assistance package, there are some persons with two jobs still apply ing for the assistance. He said: “There are some people with more than one job, they can prove that they are unemployed because of losing one of those jobs, yet they would still claim for that benefit knowing that they are making money on that other job, yet someone else who really needs it can’t get it.” Mr Bethel added that with the country’s finances already compromised, some of those individuals who are now relying on the government for some relief, “are the same people who would cheat on custom duty, the same who would have unscrupulous NIB claims, and I think we as a people need to look within ourselves and be fair about all the efforts that are being made.” Mr Bethel added, that apart from the government initiatives, the average Bahamian needs to make an effort in helping those in their community in any way they can. On the flip side, 21-year-old con struction worker Stencil Gardiner, a Bain Town resident, feels the govern ments efforts in providing various stimulus and unemployment benefits have helped in giving hope to many who were on the verge of committing sui cides in months past. Mr Gardiner argues: “I feel like the number of suicides are reducing, so it has to be something that the govern ment is doing right. “A lot of people were burdened, they h ad no jobs, searching for a way to pay their bills, and that was too much for them, so the government in my view has done a good job so far.” Now into his eight month at a construction job soon to be completed, Mr Gardiner said unlike many of his counterparts who are unsure about their future, he intends to begin culinary training in the fall at a Florida college. He said although saving for his dream has been especially difficult in recent months, it was necessary in order to accomplish his dream of one day becoming a chef. “Now is not the time to be doing unnecessary things that aren’t called for, because that will only leave you with bills, just guide your money and use it for what you need.” Terrence Brennen, a 37-year-old manger at Here-Cuts Carwash explained the economic situation in the Englerston community is critical. He said with his business only able to employ a staff of three, he is forced to turn countless men away daily. He explained the ongoing economic slum has also caused him to reduce the price of a carwash from $15 to $12. Mr Brennen said: “People who need to survive, are trying to survive just like I’m trying, but I had to run little specials like the Easter special in order to promote my business.” Adding to the discussion on whether recent initiatives by the government are adequate for those facing financial deficiencies, Mr Brennen said although there have been a good number of initiatives started, there remains a need for more support from the government. “The government has a habit of helping people who are already wealthy, and there are people in homes whose lights are off, starving, these are the things that need to be addressed from the root.” He said rather than the government “ running the country from the walls of Parliament and Cabinet they need to get up and walk around” to get a better understand of the needs of Bahamians. Twenty seven-year-old professional Don Clarke said although changing times have dictated a need to spend more wisely, properly budgeting finances is still the surest means of directing one‘s future. He explained: “I feel like if you pinpoint your budget from January, and you allocate your funds on how you are going to spend it, you would be able to have some kind of savings at the end of the year.” Mr Clarke said because of his own ability to budget his money from early on in life, he has been able to convert a property left to him by his father into triplex to provide him with a source of income. He said despite whatever assistance the government is able to offer those in need, self discipline is still the only way of securing a good future. To view and add further comments to this conversation, send an e-mail to lallen@tribunemedia.net or comment on our Facebook page ‘Tribune News Network.’ T HE BARBERSHOP THE UNEMPLOYMENT DILEMA “Now is not the time to be doing unnecessary things that aren’t called for, because that will only leave you with bills, just guide your money and use it for what you need.” “The government has a habit of helping people who are already wealthy, and there are people in homes whose lights are off, starving, these are the things that need to be addressed from the root.” “I feel like if you pin-point your budget from January, and you allo cate your funds on how you are going to spend it, you would be able to have some kind of savings at the end of the year.” – 21-YEAR-OLD STENCIL GARDINER – DON CLARKE – HERE CUTS CAR-WASH MANAGER TERRENCE BRENNEN By SHERIKA BROWN Secrets to choosing the right relationships

PAGE 24

C M Y K C M Y K THETRIBUNE SECTIONB HEALTH: Body and mind T UESDAY, APRIL 21, 2009 n By ALEX MISSICK Tribune Features Reporter amissick@tribunemedia.net MOST women have jewelry boxes filled with items for e v er y outf it t he y own. However, as times are currently not favorable for expensive jewelry purchases, it would be an adv ant age to have just one piece that could match with e very outfit. This is what Lucy Babb had in mind when she started her line of jewelry. Unique, dazzling and nothing short of spectacular are the caliber of precious and semi precious stone jewelry found at B’jou Classique located on Mount Royal avenue. B’Jou specialises in the interchangeable clasp system where you can purchase one necklace and then add a wide variety of interchangeable clasps in any style, any stone and any color. “We are one of the only companies here in New Providence that can drill any type of stone. We also string necklaces and we try to manufacture different pieces. Most of our material or parts come from Germany so the sys tem we have adopted is a German type system. The interchangeable system we have is where a woman can dress in a very nice piece and interchange to enhance her appearance. This allows her to not be limited to the regular conventional pearl where it is the same look all the time. The focal piece on the interchangeable system is the clasp piece. This takes it to another level,” Mrs Babb said. She noticed that ladies wanted different beautiful pieces as a centerpiece on their necks and to have total freedom for personal design and creativi ty. “We have times when ladies would compete against each other and want to look better than the next person. So they come in and out do the other lady or they see someone wearing a certain piece, they would want that exact clasp,” Mrs Babb said. Mrs Babb said although she enjoys being exclusive, she has opened her craft and her doors to others who want to learn the business. “Since I have been open to the public I have helped numerous people train and showed them how to string and drill. It’s enough for all of us to eat. I believe you should help people learn the craft so you do not ‘hog up’ the craft. At least if you were to die today someone else would continue with the trade,” Mrs Babb said. A few of the most common stones her clients wear are fresh water pearls, black onyx, amethyst, chalcedony, rhodochrosite, chrysophate, tiger eyes, cat eyes, smokey quartz, sun stones, mother of pearl chips, mother of jade, the native conch shell and many others. “One of my unique pieces is the Bahamian gold piece coin converted into an interchangeable clasp. It’s a masterpiece around your neck when you wear it,” Mrs Babbs said. Mrs Babbs said because she believes in the upliftment of Bahamians, she carries straw bags from five popular designers throughout the country. “Our girls spend a lot of money, sometimes $500-$600 on Gucci, Fendi and Versace but look at the uniqueness to our work. Every piece is made differently. I have taxi drivers bringing tourists here because they want straw bags that can not be found in the straw market because they only seem to sell designer knock offs. When the tourists come they want all things Bahamian,” Mrs Babbs said. Mrs Babbs said she aims to work with ladies because she knows jewelry is not a necessity. “My customers like the versatility of our system. We prepare jewelry as an art form to enhance a woman’s beauty because we want to help them save on cost and still look beautiful.” Jewelledfabulous B’Jou specialises in the inter changeable clasp system where you can purchase one necklace and then add a wide variety of interchangeable clasps in any style, any stone and any color. &


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FEATURES

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Police identify latest
homicide victim, receive
reports high-powered
weapons were used

@ By NATARIO McKENZIE
Tribune Staff Reporter

POLICE have identified the
country’s latest homicide victim
as Marlon Javon Smith, 29, of
Pinewood Gardens who was
earlier charged in the Novem-
ber 2007 murder of accused hit-
man Samuel “Mouche’ McKen-
zie.

Smith was reportedly gunned
down in the back yard of his
Avocodo Street home shortly
after 1 am Sunday, raising the
country’s murder count to 22
for the year. Police had received
reports that high-powered
machine guns were used in
Smith’s murder but have yet to
confirm those reports.

“High powered weapons will
definitely be a concern for us,”
ASP Leon Bethel head of the
homicide division of the Cen-
tral Detective Unit said yester-
day.

“It is of grave concern
because we have already
increased our intelligence gath-
ering, trying to locate all types
of unlicensed firearms and get
them off the streets,” he said.

Police have launched an inten-
sive investigation into Smith’s
murder. ASP Bethel said yes-
terday that police have not yet
received any information to sug-
gest that Smith’s death is in any
way connected to McKenzie’s
murder.

Police received reports short-
ly after 1.15am Sunday, that
numerous gunshots were being
fired in or near Avocado Street,
Pinewood Gardens. According
to residents of the area Smith
had been sitting in a car near
his home on Avocado Street
when he was approached by
several persons in a gold
coloured Honda Accord. As he
got out of his vehicle, occupants
of the Accord fired several shots
at him and pursued him as he
ran to the back of his yard. The
gunmen continued to fire shots
at Smith before fleeing the
scene. Smith was found lying in
a low bushy area behind his
home with multiple gunshot
wounds about his body.

Police are also investigating
a Sunday afternoon shooting

SEE page eight

The Taste

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BAHAMAS EDITION

www.tribune242.com

TUESDAY, APRIL 21, 2009

CARS FOR SALE,
a
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mit Clarke/Tribune staff



The Bahamas ‘must be careful’
in selecting trading partners

m@ By TANEKA itself in the process, for-
THOMPSON mer State Finance Minis-
Tribune Staff ter James Smith said.
Reporter Mr Smith, who served
tthompson@ as state finance minister

under the Christie
administration, also sup-
ported recent statements
made by Prime Minister
Hubert Ingraham regard-
ing the country's placement on
the current draft of the United

SEE page eight

tribunemedia.net

WHILE the country a
strives to meet interna- [Rf easiii
tional standards for tax
information exchange agree-
ments (TIEA) and transparen-
cy it must selectively choose
new partners and not harm



Sentencing of Dwight
Major is rescheduled

THE sentencing of drug convict Dwight Major has been
rescheduled, The Tribune has learned.

Major’s US attorney Troy Ferguson confirmed yesterday
that his client’s sentencing has been rescheduled to June 19.
Major 40, pleaded guilty last October to charges of conspiracy

SEE page eight



SHERVIN STUBBS arrives
at court yesterday.

@ By NATARIO
McKENZIE
Tribune Staff

Reporter



A 20-YEAR-OLD man
of Yellow Elder Gardens
accused of the shooting
death of Kendall Wallace
Jr who was gunned down
in West Bay Street last
week, was arraigned in
Magistrate’s Court yester-
day.

Police have charged
Shervin Stubbs of Old
Cedar Street, Yellow Elder
Gardens, with Wallace’s
murder. Wallace, 27, of
Nassau Village, was report-
edly gunned down during a
dispute with a group of
men in West Bay Street
last Tuesday. He was the
country’s 19th homicide
victim of the year.

Stubbs, who is repre-
sented by attorneys
Romauld Ferreira and
Michael Kemp was
arraigned before Magis-
trate Guillimina Archer in
Court 10, Nassau Street
yesterday on the murder

SEE page eight

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Almost $1m
worth of
illegal drugs
captured

@ By DENISE
MAYCOCK
Tribune Freeport
Reporter
dmaycock@
tribunemedia.net

FREEPORT - Local
and US drug enforce-
ment officials captured
almost one million dol-
lars worth of illegal
drugs when they discov-
ered three suspected
marijuana fields on
Grand Bahama yester-
day around noon.

Asst Supt Welbourne
Bootle, press liaison
officer, reported that the
fields were discovered
among bushes in the
Hunters area.

The estimated street
value of the illegal drugs
is $900,000.

ASP Bootle said
Bahamian Drug
Enforcement Unit offi-
cers, assisted by Drug
Enforcement Agency
(DEA) officers, acting
on information, went to
a bushy area east of
Grobola Restaurant and
Bar in Hunters.

He said the fields
were located some 500
to 600 yards in the bush-
es. The first field, which

SEE page eight



Challenge of judge’s
refusal to step down
from case underway

m@ By MEGAN REYNOLDS
Tribune Staff Reporter
mreynolds @tribunemedia.net

THE APPEAL court chal-
lenge of Senior Justice Anita
Allen’s refusal to step down
from a civil case opened yes-
terday with allegations that
the Supreme Court judge was
the first to suggest her own
recusal.

Justice Allen refused to step
down from the case involving
Israeli brothers Rami and
Amir Weissfisch last month
after she voiced concerns
about the integrity of a foren-
sic accounting report prepared
by Daniel Ferguson.

Ferguson was appointed by
Senior Justice Lyons before
the case was transferred to
Justice Allen in September
2008, and is reportedly the
brother of a close female
friend of Justice Lyons.

Under Justice Allen, Mr
Scott and Alan Steinfeld, QC,
representing Amir Weissfisch
claimed the appointment of

SEE page eight


PAGE 2, TUESDAY, APRIL 21, 2009

(Olr ilie tacea = Pelt re
+e ea
Benny



Healthcare is evolving :: Follow the dots.

THE TRIBUNE





LOCAL NEWS

Motorists fume as film crew
work on US reality TV show

MOTORISTS on Bay Street
were delayed yesterday morning
as police diverted traffic to
accommodate a film crew work-
ing on a new American reality
television show.

“Superstars” pairs up celebri-
ties and professional athletes to
compete in various sporting chal-
lenges for a grand prize.

Kerzner International recent-
ly paid a “seven digit figure” to
have television network ABC
film the primetime show at the
resort and surrounding area as
part of its strategy to further raise
the property’s profile in the US
market and boost arrivals.

But while the resort’s execu-
tives have heralded the deal to
bring the show to the Bahamas

as a major win for tourism, Mon-
day morning motorists did not
seem very enthusiastic about traf-
fic drawing to a standstill.

Problem

One driver, who asked not to
be named, said he ran into traffic
near Rawson Square shortly after
10am. Turning off Bay Street
onto Victoria Avenue and
Dowdeswell Street in an attempt
to avoid the worst of it, the driver
said he ended up joining another
long line, as traffic was backed
up there too.

Another said: “Morning traf-
fic is always a problem nowadays,
but I didn’t expect it to be this
bad or last this long. If they knew

they would have to re-route traf-
fic, somebody should’ve put a
notice in the paper or something.”

However according to Atlantis,
the back-up was the result of an
unexpected delay in filming the
road race segment of Superstars.

“This was not anticipated and
hence impact on traffic was not
foreseen,” said the company in a
statement. “We do not anticipate
any further impact on traffic flow-
ing due to shooting of the Super-
stars.” Inspector Anthony Cur-
tis, second in command of the
police’s Traffic Division, said offi-
cers diverted traffic from Bay
Street onto Armstrong Street for
about half an hour beginning at
around 9am. He acknowledged
that this contributed to the traffic.

‘Go out and become a role model’

Twenty-seven

eraduate from
National Youth
Service Restorative
Programme in
Andros

Eric Rose





m By ERIC ROSE

NORTH ANDROS - Perma-
nent Secretary of the Ministry of
Youth, Sports and Culture,
Archie Nairn told the 27 gradu-
ates of the National Youth Ser-
vice Restorative Programme that
life is full of choices, and the
choices that they make today will
determine the kind of person they
will become tomorrow.

“You will have to determine
your own destiny, for you can
now go out and become a role
model or you can become a threat
to social society,” he said.

“My wish is that you would all
become educated, productive cit-
izens — for, more than ever, the
Bahamas is in need of young men
who are upright and focused.”

Mr Nairn was the keynote
speaker at the passing-out cere-
mony of the Character Leader-
ship Development and Skills
Training Academy Restorative
Programme for Boys (the Ado-
lescent Development Pro-
gramme), in North Andros.

Positive

The initiative was designed to
be a positive intervention in the
lives of at-risk young men from
challenging backgrounds.

Mr Nairn said the programme
offered at the facility has several
components; all geared towards
making the graduates become
better persons.

“We believe the basic educa-
tional concept will assist you in
staying relevant to the changing
society in which you will now find
yourselves,” he said. “You have
been provided the opportunity to
increase your knowledge base
and, for your part, we wanted to
be sure that a standard level of
literacy was achieved.”

Mr Nairn said the Ministry of
Youth, Sports and Culture is
extremely grateful to the Catholic
Church and the YEAST (Youth
Empowerment and Skills Train-
ing) programme for facilitating
the project through a “unique
partnership” which has brought
relief to many young men in soci-
ety over the past several years.

“This kind of initiative can only

Schuhe,

ecru.

SUPERDEATH



MEMBERS of the
National Youth
Service Restora-
tive Programme
Class of 2009 pre-
sent colours at the
passing out cere-
mony of the Char-
acter Leadership
Development and
Skills Training
Academy Restora-
tive Programme
for Boys in North
Andros.



PERMANENT SECRETARY at the
Ministry of Youth, Sports and Cul-
ture, Archie Nairn speaks to the grad-
uates.

be successful if there is a shared
vision and a common resolve to
make a difference among the
young men in our communities,”
he said. “In particular, I wish to
recognise the sterling efforts of
Deacon Jeffrey Lloyd, who has
been the real driving force behind
this programme.”

Mr Nairn explained that the
Ministry of Youth, Sports and
Culture also offers a Self Starter
Programme to young persons
who are prepared to venture out
in the field of business on a small
scale. The programme, he added,
allows them to start their own
businesses and learn marketing
and management skills in the
process.

He said it is an opportunity that
the graduates should embrace as
the programme promotes inde-
pendence, self-reliance and an
ability to interact with the public.

“Additionally, and just as
important, is the Fresh Start Pro-
gramme, which is really the next
phase of this programme which
you have just completed,” Mr
Nairn said. “This phase involves
assistance from the relevant offi-
cers from my ministry, who will
help you through the next step as
mentors — all I ask is that you lis-
ten and learn as the officers work
with you step by step.”

The permanent secretary said
he implores the graduates to work
towards meaningful social rein-
tegration.

“Join positive community
groups. Improve your self-image
and gain a sense of accomplish-
ment,” he said.

“Face your problems and chal-
lenges optimistically and embrace
the support and guidance of our
mentors.”
THE TRIBUNE

TUESDAY, APRIL 21, 2009, PAGE 3



LOCAL NEWS



._- | FIFTH SUMMIT OF THE AMERICAS
0 In brief

Caribbean leaders seek drug fight funds

Plea for US Congressmen to extend $1.4 billion initiative to the region

Man, 28, dies
in apparent
hike accident

A young man lost his life in
Cat Island on Saturday in an
apparent motorbike accident.

The 28-year-old Dean’s resi-
dent — identified as Renardo
Hall — was pronounced dead at
the local clinic in Smith’s Bay.

He is the country’s 22nd traf-
fic fatality. Police were called to
the site of the crash in New
Bight, Cat Island, at 7.30pm.

There they found a blue and
white 2005 model 900 Yamaha
LP25 motorbike in the bushes.
It had sustained extensive dam-
age.

The rider had already been
taken to the local clinic when
police arrived at the scene.

Investigations are continuing
into the incident, conducted by
local police with assistance from
New Providence-based officers.

Police appeal
for help over
discovery of
two bodies

POLICE are urging anyone
with information about the two
bodies found at separate loca-
tions over the weekend to come
forward.

The decomposed body of
man was found in a small wood-
en structure on Baillou Hill
Road just after 8am on Sunday.

The small house is located
behind some homes on Laird
Street.

Police have labelled the case
as a suspicious death.

Just a few hours after this dis-
covery, a fishermen alerted
authorities to the naked body of
an unidentified man floating in
the water off Arawak Cay.

Police said that in both cases,
they need the public’s help in
determining the manner of
death and the identity of the
victims.

RBDF looks for
missing cruise
passenger

THE Royal Bahamas
Defence Force is working with
the US Coast Guard in the
search for a man missing at sea
since early Saturday morning.

After receiving information
that a passenger of the cruise
liner “Norwegian Sky” had fall-
en overboard at 3am on April
18, the operations department
of the Defence Force dis-
patched a vessel to assist the
Coast Guard in the search.

The incident occurred about
14 miles north east of Great
Sturrup Cay in the Exumas.

Prohe into sex
misconduct
allegation
continuing

m By DENISE MAYCOCK
Tribune Freeport Reporter
dmaycock@tribunemedia.net

FREEPORT - Police say they
have not yet completed investi-
gations into the allegations of sex-
ual misconduct which have been
made against a female teacher at
the Eight Mile Rock High School.

Supt Wendell Deveaux told
reporters on Sunday that police
are still “actively investigating”
the matter. When asked why the
inquiry was taking so long, he
said: “It is a matter of conducting
inquiries and getting additional
information for evidence.”

It has been a little over a
month since the teacher was
removed from the school, after
being accused of having sexual
relations with a male student.

Two male teachers at the
school are also accused of having
sex with students.

Police are still searching for
Andre Birbal, a Trinidadian
teacher who is wanted for ques-
tioning in connection with the
alleged molestation of two for-
mer male students.

The Bahamas Union of Teach-
ers (BUT) has expressed concern
about the allegations. Quentin
LaRhoda, BUT area vice presi-
dent, stressed that the union does
not encourage sexual relations
between teachers and students, it
is also worried that its members
may be subject to false accusa-
tions.

In the wake of the claims, the
Ministry of Education announced
plans to have all new teachers
vetted by the police.

The ministry said it also plans
to create safety committees in
schools that will be made up of
teachers, students, parents and
administration staff.

CARIBBEAN leaders at the
Fifth Summit of the Americas
asked United States Congress-
men if a $1.4 billion initiative to
help Central America and Mexi-
co fight drug trafficking and
organised crime could be extend-
ed to provide funds to countries
in this region who worry they may
experience a dangerous knock-
on effect.

Guyanese President Bharrat
Jagdeo said Caribbean presidents
and prime ministers told US law-
makers at the Summit in Trinidad
that a crackdown in nearby Mex-
ico could boost drug trafficking
in the Caribbean, with more crim-
inals pushed into the region,
which lies between producer
countries in South America and
the United States.

The $1.4 billion Merida initia-
tive was announced by United
States President Obama during
his visit to Mexico in the days pri-
or to the Summit of the Americas
in Port of Spain, Trinidad, which
extended from Friday to Sunday.

Caribbean leaders’ call to Con-
gressmen on the anti-drug initia-
tive came on Saturday, the day
after a one-hour meeting with Mr
Obama himself.

Economic aid, drug and gun
smuggling, as well as the lifting
of the trade embargo on Cuba,
the problems the region will face
if offshore financial services are to
be targeted by the US govern-
ment and the problems caused by
deportees from the United States
to the Caribbean had all been
raised in the course of discussions
with Mr Obama which took place
late Friday night.

Prime Minister Hubert Ingra-
ham and other leaders said Mr
Obama, who was accompanied
to the meeting by Secretary of
State Hillary Clinton, was very
engaged and expressed hope that
greater ties would be established.

While further talks are antici-
pated, the US president has
already committed the US to pro-
viding $30 million towards
improving security in the
Caribbean region.

“The US is not lecturing us
anymore, but rather listening,”
said Bharrat Jagdeo. “They need



PRIME MINISTER Hubert Ingraham is pictured at right as leaders of
the 34 democratic countries in the Organisation of American States
(OAS) prepare to assemble for a group photo at the 5th Summit of the
Americas, Port of Spain, Trinidad on Saturday, April 18.



UNITED States President Barack Obama addresses reporters prior to
the commencement of bilateral talks between the United States and the
Caribbean Community (CARICOM) as US Secretary of State Hillary
Clinton (right) looks on at the summit on Friday, April 17.

to listen, and that is what we got.”

Meanwhile, Mr Jagdeo added
that, as the CARICOM repre-
sentative chosen by the 15-mem-
ber regional group to lead its dis-
cussions with the US president,
he also spoke extensively with Mr
Obama about the need for the
US government to understand the
peculiarities of Caribbean soci-
eties compared with those in oth-
er regions.

He said a failure by past US
administrations to recognise these
differences has led to policies
developed for other regions being
imposed on the Caribbean, cre-
ating many problems.

Meanwhile, the Guyanese leader
also proposed how the US can
help to fashion international
financial institutions to be more
responsive to the needs of the
region. “We argued for a more
practical type of reform,” said Mr
Jagdeo. Mr Jagdeo said the Port
of Spain Summit was different
from previous meetings, due to
“Obama’s presence, the historic
opportunity his administration
now presents for a changed rela-
tionship” with the region.
Caribbean leaders expressed
hope that talks would continue
in a second round of meetings in
Washington later this year.

Police release list of 2009’s
most wanted murder suspects

POLICE yesterday released
their list of the most wanted mur-
der suspects for 2009. The list is
made up of nine men, ranging in
age from 18 to 44.

The majority of the murders,
for which they are wanted for
questioning, occurred within the
past four years, while one case is
more than 15 years old.

Police want to question 18-
year-old Mario Brown in con-
nection with the 2008 murder of
Corey Whymms, who was shot
and killed on Adderley Street.
Police also want to question him
about the 2008 murder of
Kendrick Rolle, who was shot
and killed in Fox Hill.

David St Remy is wanted for
questioning in connection with
the 2007 murder of Ryan Wood,
who was shot and killed at Red-
wood Lane in Grand Bahama.

Christie Charlton, 44, the oldest
person on the list, is wanted for
questioning in connection with
the oldest case on the list: the
1993 murder of Pamela Eyma
who was found dead on Glad-
stone Road.

Carlos Gerve, alias Graves, is
wanted for questioning in rela-
tion to the 2006 murder of Gerald
Joseph who was stabbed to death
at the International Bazaar in
Grand Bahama.

Jamaal Bastian, alias Smokey,
is being sought for questioning in
connection with the 2009 murder
of Gentry McPhee who was shot
and killed at Arawak Cay.

Police want to question
Michael Gibson in connection
with the 2008 murder of Jodie

Correction

In an article in The Tribune
last week, under the headline,
“Magistrate alleged to have
collected fines without giving
record on payment” it was
incorrectly stated that: “The
cashier assigned to the magis-
trate’s court in Freeport...
said that Magistrate Swain
only paid the sum of $4000 to
the court.”

That sentence should have
read: “The cashier alleged
that the prosecutor for Mag-
istrate Swain's Court, Police
Sergeant 1611 Kirklyn
Wright (not Magistrate
Swain) paid the $4,000 fine
to her.”

The Tribune apologises for
any inconvenience this error
may have caused.



Deveaux-Smith who was stabbed
to death on East Sunrise High-
way, Grand Bahama.

Kelly Mitchell is being sought
for questioning by the police in
relation to the 2008 murder of
Peter Andrew Collie, who was
shot and killed on Elizabeth
Avenue.

Lavardo Simmons is being
sought for questioning about the
murder of Archange Augustine,
who was shot and killed on Key
West Street. He is also being
sought for questioning in con-
nection with the murder of Erison
Tanelus, who was shot and killed
at Eight Mile Rock.

Earle Beneby is wanted for
questioning in the 2006 murder



of Kemuel Hepburn II, who was
shot and killed on West Bay
Street.

All of these men are believed
to be armed and dangerous. Any-
one with information regarding
the whereabouts of these suspects
are asked to contact the police
emergency line at 911/919, CDU
at 502-9930/9991 or the Police
Control Room at 322-3333.

FOR 3 IN 1 LAWN SERVICE
Fertilizer, Fungicide,
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) a
PRIME Minister Hubert Ingraham, (far left) and United States President
Barack Obama (far right) share a light moment with leaders of the
Caribbean Community (CARICOM) prior to the commencement of bilat-
eral talks between the United States and Caricom on Friday, April 17.

PHOTOS: Sharon Turner/BIS Photos

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PAGE 4, TUESDAY, APRIL 21, 2009

EDITORIAL/LETTERS TO THE EDITOR

THE TRIBUNE





The Tribune Limited

NULLIUS ADDICTUS JURARE IN VERBA MAGISTRI
Being Bound to Swear to The Dogmas of No Master

LEON E. H. DUPUCH, Publisher/Editor 1903-1914

SIR ETIENNE DUPUCH, Kt, O.B.E., K.M., K.C.S.G.,

(Hon.) LL.D., D.Litt.

Publisher/Editor 1919-1972
Contributing Editor 1972-199]

EILEEN DUPUCH CARRON, C.M.G., M.S. B.A., LL.B.

Publisher/Editor 1972-

Published Daily Monday to Saturday

Shirley Street, RO. Box N-3207, Nassau, Bahamas
Insurance Management Building., P.O. F-485, Freeport, Grand Bahama

TELEPHONES
Switchboard (News, Circulation and Advertising) 322-1986
Advertising Manager - (242) 502-2352
Circulation Department - (242) 502-2387
Nassau Fax: - (242) 328-2398

WEBSITE
www.tribune242.com — updated daily at 2pm

A way to help stop the killing

POLICE ARE urging anyone with any
knowledge of who killed 29-year-old Marlon
Smith of Pinewood Gardens early Sunday
morning to come forward with their informa-
tion.

Smith was one of three men released by the
court in late January for insufficient evidence in
the 2007 shooting death of Samuel “Mouche”
McKenzie, described as the “terror of East
Street.”

By Sunday afternoon a man in his mid-twen-
ties, standing outside his Garden Hills home
was shot at by two men in a passing car. He
received a flesh wound in his left leg. Police
are uncertain whether this last shooting was in
any way connected with the killing of Smith
earlier the same morning. However, they believe
it might have been.

There is also grave concern about the firearm
used to kill Smith. Those who saw his body —
they claim the top of his head was blown off —
are convinced that an AK47 rifle was the mur-
der weapon. The police have not confirmed
this.

However, police officers were in the
Pinewood area most of Sunday night investi-
gating the killing. As a result several persons
were taken in for questioning.

Police have not connected the two murders
and the Sunday afternoon shooting that result-
ed in a leg wound, but certain members of the
public have. According to street talk — and if
any of these persons have personal knowledge
of what they are saying they are urged to go to
the police — Smith was killed because the courts
released him from a murder charge that they are
convinced he should have faced in the death
of “Mouche” McKenzie. As for the man shot in
the leg on the same day, again according to
street talk, he was to be eliminated in retaliation
for Smith’s death.

The police are working overtime on these
cases, because although they are not saying so,
they obviously see a vicious circle of retaliatory
violence being unleashed. They are trying to
stop any further bloodshed. This is where per-
sons who have information can help by calling
the anonymous hotline —328-8477 — and leav-
ing their tip, but not their identity.

In November 2007 two men, both with crim-
inal records, were standing at 9 o’clock on a
Thursday morning on Wilson Street off Hay
Street when a passing car gunned them down.
According to police they were sprayed with
bullets from a “high calibre” firearm. One was
seriously injured, but survived. The second,
Samuel “Mouche” McKenzie, 35, died of his
wounds.















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“Mouche” not only had a checkered record,
he had a brutal record, and there are those
today who say they feel safer because “Mouche”
is no longer stalking East Street. At the time of
his death he was facing charges of murder,
attempted murder, assault of a police officer,
attempted escape, causing damage to a Cen-
tral Police Station holding cell, and multiple
other charges. At the time of his death the Pros-
ecutor in the Attorney General’s office told
The Tribune that his office was still compiling
the files on those “multiple other charges.”

In all he had four murder charges and one
attempted murder charge to face in the courts.
He had earned his reputation as a “hit man.” If
“Mouche” had been in jail where he should
have been, he would still be alive today. Instead
he was out on bail — still the “terror of East
Street.” His enemies, instead of the state, exe-
cuted him. And, Sunday morning’s murder and
Sunday afternoon’s attempted murder are
believed to be the fallout from Mouche’s death.
The police are now trying to prevent further
bloodshed.

Also of great concern is the murder weapon.
An AK47 rifle — if indeed it was the murder
weapon as claimed — is a high powered assault
rifle used by the military.

It is frightening to think that even one of
these could be on our streets. But in fact they do
make their way in through the drug under-
ground.

There have been instances of persons buying
as many as 50 weapons for shipment to the
Bahamas. Although the US claims to have laws
restricting purchase of firearms, there is no dif-
ficulty in walking into a pawn shop, or the free
market on the Atlanta seaboard and making a
selection of whatever weapon you want.

It has been found that purchases have been
made through Bahamians with legal status in the
US who often buy firearms for their buddies in
the Bahamas.

The guns can be sneaked in anywhere along
the Bahamas’ chain of islands.

However, our police, working closely with
the gun tracing system of Homeland Security,
have been able to intercept gun shipments to the
Bahamas.

It was through this intelligence that Bahami-
an police were able to block a large shipment of
guns consigned to the Bahamas not so long ago.

The police are faced with a daunting task.
The only way that our communities will be safe
is if they have the full cooperation of this coun-
try’s citizens.

So, please go to the phone and dial 328-8477.
Your identity will never be known.



BAHAMAS,

NOW
IN STOCK!

‘01 TOYOTA CAMRY

‘01 HYUNDAI COUPE
‘04 HYUNDAI SANTA FE

Disgusted by
Western Air’s

customer
service

LETTERS

EDITOR, The Tribune.

Allow me to express my dis-
gust about the poor customer
service within the service indus-
try in this country with regard to
Western Air Airline. I had
scheduled a flight to Freeport,
Grand Bahama on Western Air
for one day leaving Nassau at
8am to depart Freeport at 6pm.
At approximately 9.30am the
flight was called and all passen-
gers were asked to wait outside
of the departure gate to be
escorted to the plane. From the
time of check in to the first call
at 9.30am, there were no
announcements made about the
status of the scheduled flight,
and when questions were put
forth to Western Air employ-
ees, no one was able to give a
definitive answer about the
flight. After about 20 minutes of
waiting in the hot sun, we were
asked to return to the depar-
ture lounge. There was no rea-
son given for this. Once back
inside the terminal, all Western
Air staff disappeared from the
departure area without having
the decency to update its pas-
sengers about the status of the
flight or explain the situation.
So we waited and waited for
another hour until my colleague
and I grew tired of waiting and

letters@tribunemedia net



returned to the check-in counter
to ask for a refund. This is when
we were told that the flight was
now boarding, two hours late
and absolutely no announce-
ments or updates on the status
of the flight or when they
expected the flight to depart.
We checked in at about
5.30pm for our return flight to
Nassau. Because of our morn-
ing experience I asked the agent
at the counter if the flight was
on time...she said it wasn’t. I
then asked if she knew how
much later it would be. She stat-
ed that at 6pm they would give
an update. This never hap-
pened. Again no form of cus-
tomer service or courtesy was
shown to the passengers who
paid to travel on that airline.
Six o’clock came and went, so
did 7pm, 8pm, 9pm, 10pm and
1ipm. One of the agents finally
said something to a passenger
after being questioned that the
flight was in route and should
land in a few minutes. Bear in
mind that this information was
communicated to one passen-
ger who shared it with the rest

of us. At approximately
11.30pm we finally boarded the
flight on Pineapple Air to
return to Nassau.

Now this was my very first
time utilizing this airline but rest
assured Mr Owner of Western
Air I will never use your airline
ever again. This first impression
will surely be a lasting one and
I will discourage anyone I can
from using your airline services.
Your staff customer service lev-
el is way below the bar and as a
businessman in a service-ori-
ented industry you ought to
ensure that you invest in your
staff so that they are trained in
delivering supreme service no
matter the situation. I have
heard similar stories of this
nature and now that I have
experienced it for myself I have
to make it public. Say what you
like about Bahamasair with all
their internal issues and con-
stant delays, you know that no
matter what they will always
keep their passengers informed
about the status of their flight
regardless.

Thank you for the opportu-
nity to share my experience.

T SAUNDERS
Nassau,
April, 2009.

Angered by diabetic woman’s claim

EDITOR, The Tribune.

Tam extremely angry and agi-
tated by such a horrific accusa-
tion and allegation that was cur-
rently rumoured and circulated
in our media houses by a
woman who is traumatised by a
grievous diabetic ailment. I have
no idea who this lady is but it is
a sad and disturbing tragedy if
her claim is truthful.

Bahamas, this matter is far
beyond the accuser and the
accused. Adults are not the only
victims of this devastating dis-
ease; infants and children are
also recipients of this illness
(diabetes). Therefore diabetic
remedies and medications are
distributed for minors as well,
and if these minors were given
out dated medications the
effects may have been more life
threatening than this lady’s.
Imagine if this was a loved one,
family member, colleague or

NOTICE

NOTICE is hereby given that BRIAN RAMAISH SARJUDAS
of SEABREEZE ESTATES, P.O. BOX N-9505, NASSAU,
is applying to the Minister
Nationality and Citizenship, for registration/naturalization as a

responsible for

citizen of The Bahamas, and that any person who knows any
reason why registration/naturalization should not be granted,
should send a written and signed statement of the facts within
twenty-eight days from the 14 day of April, 2009 to the
Minister responsible for nationality and Citizenship, P.O. Box
N-7147, Nassau, Bahamas.



friend; imagine you being an
employee at a local hospital,
clinic, The Ministry of Health
or The Public Hospital Author-
ity, how would feel if your co-
worker issued you a disastrous
prescription drug?

In the early 1980’s Tylenol
had a major crisis, when I say
major I mean major. An indi-
vidual or a group of people
maliciously replaced Tylenol
capsules with cyanide-laced cap-
sules, resealed the packages and
replaced them on shelves for
distribution. As a result of this
evil, approximately ten people
died in the Chicago, [linois
area.

The Tylenol Company was
relentless in preventing the
death of other individuals.
Through their pubic relations
team and other media channels
they warned the nation to dis-
continue the use of their
Tylenol products until detailed
investigations and solutions
were concluded.

Due to the crisis, Tylenol
paved the way through innova-
tions to help secure its product
in the future, through imple-
menting a triple sealed packag-
ing procedure.

Tylenol regained its market
share after the whole ordeal was
cleaned.

Tylenol placed people over
product and money by admit-
ting to the problem at hand;

they fixed the issue and as a
result of their strategies they
regained the public’s trust and
repositioned themselves as a
leader in over the counter
drugs.

So you administrators at the
Elizabeth Estate clinic, the Min-
istry of Health and the Public
Hospital Authority who are
responsible for this alleged
wrong doing should look into
the matter with sincerity, apol-
ogise if this incident is truthful
and take the necessary steps to
ensure the public’s health, safe-
ty and to encourage quality ser-
vice.

To the alleged victim, your
argument may seem trivial to
some, probably because your
complaint is legitimate and peo-
ple, especially in the Bahamas,
seem to cover up the truth at
all costs.

My dear, if your claim is true,
I am truly disgusted and I
emphatically say to you: be
strong, be encouraged and fight
for what is right. Let us take
our country back. Adolf Hitler
may be classified as an evil man
based on the history books, but
he once said “pacifism is sim-
ply a disguise for cowardice.”
Good morning, Bahamas.

ELKIN
SUTHERLAND Jr
Nassau,

April 15, 2009.

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AUTHORIZED
ROM ROL TURER


THE TRIBUNE

TUESDAY, APRIL 21, 2009, PAGE 5



LOCAL NEWS



Donated computers
on way to Inagua
All-Age School

m@ By BETTY VEDRINE

FIFTEEN new comput-
ers donated by Rohm and
Haas, the parent company

of Morton Salt, through the

Bahamas Red Cross Soci-
ety are on their way to the
Inagua All-Age School.

The company made a
specific request when it
presented its donation,
director general of the
Bahamas Red Cross Kim
Sawyer said at a press con-
ference on Wednesday at
the organisation’s head-
quarters.

“Out of concern for the

local community, the Rohm

and Haas Company made a
donation to the Bahamas
Red Cross in October 2008,
to be used specifically for
the great island of Inagua,”
Ms Sawyer said.

In September 2008, Hur-
ricane Ike, a category four
hurricane, destroyed much
of the island and disrupted

schooling for many children

who were unable to attend
classes for weeks.

But Ms Sawyer said, “due
to the resilience of the local :
community, lives have been }

restored and the communi-
ty has returned to normal-
Cc a

She added that through
the efforts of local and
international partners, the
Bahamas Red Cross was
able to respond with relief
items, including food
parcels, hygiene kits,
kitchen sets, tarpaulins,

blankets, mosquito nets and :

water.

Experience

It was decided that dona-
tions from the Rohm and
Haas Company would go
towards enhancing the
learning experience for
children on the island by
purchasing computers and
audio-visual equipment.

Principal of the Inagua
All-Age School Christine
Williamson, who received
the donation on behalf of
the school, said the com-
puters would be put to
good use.

“We are very pleased to

be receiving this gift, as this

will further improve the

existing facility that we

have,” Ms Williamson said.
The computers will be

used in both the classrooms

and the computer lab, she
said.

Besides the computers,
the school will also receive
three printers, two InFocus
projectors, 14 whiteboards
and two Promethean
Activboards and Activotes.

Director of Education
Lionel Sands also
expressed gratitude for the
donation.

Mr Sands said the equip-
ment will be beneficial to
both students and teachers.

“One of the things that
we have found is that our
children learn so much bet-
ter when they use the tech-
nology that we were not so
used to when we were
growing. And one such
technology is the interac-
tive whiteboard,” he said.

Mr Sands said the white-
board is a tool that
enhances learning toa

greater degree than systems

used previously.
A whiteboard is a large

interactive display that con-

nects to a computer and
projector. A computer’s
desktop is projected onto
the board’s surface, where
users control the computer
using a pen, finger or other
device.

“These are tools that
would benefit both our

children and teachers great-

ly and so we are very
appreciative of it and we
thank the Morton Salt
Company for this generous
donation,” Mr Sands said.
Also present at the cere-
mony were Brendon Wat-
son, executive member of
the Bahamas Red Cross.
and Joel Lewis, district
education officer.

Hopes that passport office
crowds will be reduced

@ By ALISON LOWE
Tribune Staff Reporter
alowe@tribunemedia.net

FOLLOWING complaints
that applicants were forced to
queue outside the Passport
Office for hours on end last
week, the minister responsi-
ble for the facility yesterday
expressed hope that crowds
would be reduced as of today
as officials adjust the applica-
tion process.

However, Minister of For-
eign Affairs Brent Symonette
emphasised that this will not
minimise the amount of time
it takes for an applicant to
receive their e-passport once
they have put in their appli-
cation, and added that any fur-
ther steps towards reducing
waiting times at the office can-
not be implemented until the
department gets more office
space.

Last week MP for Fox Hill
and former minister of foreign
affairs, Fred Mitchell, held a
press conference at the Pass-

lems at the office sufficient
attention.

He decried the length of
time applicants were being
forced to wait outside the
building without water or san-
itary facilities and alleged that
some individuals are having
to wait up to four months to
receive their passports after

applying.
Parents

Mr Mitchell suggested that
it was unfortunate that par-
ents who had taken time off
work during midterm break
to bring their children to apply
were not being served “in a
timely manner”, while others
present complained that they
had travelled from the Family
Islands only to find that they
could not complete the appli-
cation process that day.

The Fox Hill MP suggested
the government must “buy
machines for data entry, for
printing and hire some more
people.”

port Office in New Providence
where he accused Mr Symon-
ette of not giving the prob-

Construction of subdivision
is underway at Hawksbill

@ By DENISE MAYCOCK
Tribune Freeport Reporter
dmaycock@tribunemedia.net

Mr Symonette yesterday
confirmed that the New Prov-

FREEPORT - The construction
of a new government subdivision is
underway at Hawksbill where some
50 houses are being built for those
residents who lost their homes dur-
ing Hurricane Wilma.

However, many of those affected
are unable to meet the requirements }
to qualify for one of the new homes.

Minister of Housing Kenneth
Russell met with the residents of
Pinder’s Point, Hunters, Mack
Town, Lewis Yard and Seaco Town
on Friday evening at the Upper
Zion Baptist Church in Pinder’s
Point.

He announced that the new sub-
division, renamed Sister Mary
Patricia (Russell) Estates, will con-
sist of a total of 210 low-income
houses. He said construction started
on the first 50 houses four months ago.

While the Bahamas Mortgage Corporation has relaxed qualifications
by lowering down payment requirements for applicants in the affect-
ed areas, residents still raised concerns about having first preference to
the houses.

Minister Russell stressed that while the new subdivision was built
with them in mind, they must qualify like everyone else.

“There is a problem with persons who want homes qualifying. The
problem is whether the people we want to help could qualify,” he
said.

In 2005, Hurricane Wilma, a category five storm, caused major dev-
astation along the southwest coast of the island. Settlements from
Mack Town to Pinder’s Point, as well as Eight Mile Rock and West End
were underwater and many homes were destroyed and damaged.

Subdivision

After the storm, the government announced plans to build a new sub-
division for the relocation of residents from low-lying areas to safer
ground. The Grand Bahama Port Authority donated land in Hawksbill
for the development of a new government subdivision.

So far, 10 persons have been approved for houses in the new sub-
division. However, many persons in the affected areas are having
problems meeting the qualifications.

“My understanding is that a number of persons who were affected
have since built new houses of their own, but we still have residents out
here in mind as to first preference.

“They still have to qualify for the houses as everyone else and we will
work with them as best we can,” said Mr Russell.

He noted that interest in the homes is very high and persons from
elsewhere on Grand Bahama are also making applications for houses
in the new subdivision.

Minister Russell stressed that once the houses are completed, they
cannot be left unoccupied for long periods of time while persons qual-
ify for loans from the Mortgage Corporation.

Noting that applications have been made by teachers, policemen,
Customs officers and other public service workers, he explained that the
government would like to see civil servants make up 10 per cent of the
subdivision’s residents.

“T hope that more persons from Pinder’s Point, Lewis Yard, Mack
Town, Hunters and Seaco Town apply and come forward and see
how we can fit them in this first batch of houses,” he said.

Minister Russell said some of the houses are conventional block
homes and others are ‘tilt-up’ constructions with concrete panel walls
set in place by a crane.

The houses range from around 1,000 sq ft to 1,200 sq ft in size.
There are some 25 contractors being used to build the houses and
700 persons are being employed in the building phase.

Mr Russell emphasised that it is important that the homes are prop-
erly built.

“We have learnt from a lot of the problems we had over the past two
years. We have our inspectors at every house and the Port Authority
inspectors must approve code inspections.

“We must ensure that the deficiencies (we have seen in the past) do
not happen in my watch. We want to give poor people a product they
can live in comfortably at least 15 to 20 years before any major repairs,”
he said.

Kenneth Russell



Brent Symonette



idence office, like the Freeport
office, is restricted in its abili-
ty to process applicants effi-
ciently due to staffing short-
ages. However, this cannot be
immediately remedied, the
minister said, as “not one
more” staff member can fit
into the building where the
office is currently housed.

He said his ministry has
“applied for” new premises
but have been “unable to
access” additional space yet.

“That’s part of the reason
for the delays that have been
ongoing. We are working on it
as a matter of urgency,” said
Mr Symonette.

Meanwhile, Mr Symonette
revealed that the Department

Se MICs

is in possession of more print-
ing machines which produce
e-passports, however, space
restrictions have also hindered
the department in putting all
of these to use.

“We physically cannot do
anything about that right
now,” he said.

Queues

The minister said that as of
today, officials hope that
queues will be minimised in
light of a decision by passport
processors to no longer keep
applicants in the office while
they verify their documents.

“We'll do that after the per-
son is left. It may result in
some of those people having
to come back but we hope
that number will be less, a
small percentage (of those
who applied),” said Mr
Symonette.

Mr Symonette called on
Bahamians to double check
when their passports expire to
ensure that they apply well in
advance to receive a new one
if they are travelling this sum-
mer.

“If you are travelling say
July 1, a passport takes six
weeks to issue, so you would
have to apply by the begin-
ning of May — next week.
Please do not consider trying
to get a passport in two or
three days. Apply now,” he
said.

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TO ASSIST those Bahami-

? ans who do not have regular
? access to clean drinking water
? and who are “less fortunate in
: all aspects of life”, QVS Phar-
? macy in conjunction with the
? Caribbean Bottling Company
? recently donated proceeds from
: a bottled water promotion to
? the Bahamas Red Cross Soci-
i ety.

For every bottle of Dasani

? water sold in March, known
? internationally as Red Cross
? Month, OVS Pharmacy donated
i partial proceeds from the sale
: to the Red Cross to support the
? assistance the charity gives to
? the Bahamian community.

On March 22, which was

World Water Day, QVS donat-
? ed every cent from Dasani
? water purchased to the charity.

“The Bahamas Red Cross

does such great work in our
? community,” said Cliff Pinder,
i vice-president of OVS Pharma-
i cy.

“Considering that March is

? Red Cross Month we wanted to
? do something special for the
? charity to show our apprecia-
? tion for all they do for those less
: fortunate. They provide a need-
? ed service to the Bahamas, and
? we’re honoured to do all we can
? to support them. We’re also
? very thankful to Caribbean Bot-
: thing for the assistance they have
? provided us in this endeavor. ”

Kim Sawyer, director general

i of the Bahamas Red Cross,
? accepted the cheque from QVS.

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PAGE 6, TUESDAY, APRIL 21, 2009

THE TRIBUNE



LOCAL NEWS

GBPA donates $15,000 for.
restoration of b-ball court:

@ By DENISE MAYCOCK
Tribune Freeport Reporter
dmaycock@tribunemedia.net

FREEPORT — The Grand
Bahama Port Authority presented
a $15,000 donation on Thursday
for the restoration of the basket-
ball facility at the YMCA.

The facility, which was
destroyed by the hurricanes, is
expected to be completed in time
for this year’s Junkanoo Jam Bas-
ketball Tournament, which is host-
ed by the Ministry of Tourism in
November.

Sean McShane, director of Bas-
ketball Travellers in the United
States, will spearhead the restora-
tion of the new basketball court.

Basketball Travellers has had
a long-standing relationship on
Grand Bahama, bringing college
teams from the United States to
participate in the annual
Junkanoo Jam tournament in
Freeport.

Mr McShane said the new court
is expected to be completed on
April 27. He commended the
Grand Bahama Port Authority
for its generous donation.

Presentation

Attending the presentation
were Ian Rolle, president of the
Grand Bahama Port Authority,
Ginger Moxey, vice president of
the Port Group Ltd, Geneva
Rutherford, director of training
at the Port Authority, Betty
Bethel, general manager of busi-
ness development at the Ministry
of Tourism, Lawrence Hepburn,
president of the Bahamas Bas-
ketball Association, and Karen
Pinder-Johnson, executive direc-
tor of YMCA.

Mr McShane said that 12 major
university teams are expected to
travel to Freeport to participate
in the Junkanoo Jam tournament
held during the week of thanks-
giving in November.

He noted that the Freeport
tournament is one of the premier
in-season women’s basketball
events recognised across the US.

“We want to thank the Port
Authority for their support...and
their sincere generosity in getting
this basketball facility restored,”
said Mr McShane.

“The brand new facilities to
host our teams will be tremen-
dous, but it is really the kids and
their families on Grand Bahama
who will benefit from this new

facility. We are just excited to be |
driving this project,” he said.

Karen Pinder Johnson said the | ;
restoration of the basketball facil- }
ity has been slow. She was grateful :
to the Port Authority and others }
who have supported the restora- }

tion of the YMCA.

Geneva Rutherford said the
YMCA is an important recre-
ational facility that every city ;

needs.

“Just 10 years after the found- :
ing of the City of Freeport the :
planners saw fit to establish our }
YMCA. They saw the need for a }
recreation facility to be used by }
all ages for all types of sports and }
activities by schools, civic organi- }
sations, churches, and youth :

groups on the island,” she said.

She noted that the facility has }
been in existence for nearly 40 }
years on Grand Bahama and has }
been the venue for many interna- }
tional and national tournaments }

and sporting events.

“Mr McShane your willingness ;
to spearhead the renovation of :
the new basketball court is highly }
commendable. We at the GBPA }
appreciate your kind gesture and }
we are happy to offer this dona- }
tion of $15,000 toward this pro- }

ject,” said Ms Rutherford.

Mr Rutherford said that Sir
Jack, patron of the Y, has also}
made a $40,000 donation toward :

the rebuilding effort of the Y.

“The YMCA represents one of }
the major philanthropic efforts of i
the shareholders of the GBPA }
and I am certain that Mr Hannes :
Babak, chairman, and Mr Rolle }
are fully committed to the ongoing }

support of YMCA,” she said.

Betty Bethel said Basketball
Travellers have been coming to }
Grand Bahama for seven years to }

participate in the tournament.

She said the Ministry of}
Tourism has been partnering with :
Basketball Travellers and the}
Bahamas Basketball Federation }

in putting on a successful event.

Ms Bethel stressed that it is }
important that collegiate teams }
that come to play in Freeport are :
able to have access to the same }
international standards in terms }
of the facility where they play and }

practice.

She reported that on average }
some 800 players, their families }
and friends travel to Freeport. i
“The impact is enormous if you }
multiply that by a week in hotel }
accommodations, meals, trans- !
portation, tours, and various activ- }

ities,” she said.

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Film made by nephew of Sir Sidney
Poitier to have Bahamas premiere

FREEPORT, GRAND
BAHAMA - A documentary film
by the nephew of movie star Sir
Sidney Poitier will have its
Bahamas premiere in Freeport lat-
er this month.

The film, VOICES, produced
by Jeffrey Poitier, documents
untold stories of Bahamians and
African-Americans who settled
Coconut Grove, Florida.

The Bahamas Weekly, along
with the Ministry of Tourism, Ross
University and Pelican Bay
Hotel, are presenting the premiere
on Saturday, April 25, at Ross
University Study Hall at Seahorse
Plaza East.

Born in Nassau into a family
spanning more than ten genera-
tions in the Bahamas, Jeffrey has a
strong film background.

His father, Carl, was one of ten
children of Reginald and Evelyn
Poitier, the most famous of whom
is Sidney.

The older generation of Poitier
children were raised on Cat Island
and later moved to Nassau where
Jeffrey was also raised.

Homeland

VOICES was born in 2004
when Jeffrey moved back to Mia-
mi and discovered that his own
neighbourhood was originally built
by people from his homeland. Fur-
ther research into anecdotes told
by Coconut Grove residents
uncovered a personal connection
to its history.

This documentary is a compre-
hensive story of pursuit of the
American Dream by a group of
people determined to make a
good life for themselves and their
children, and how the dream is
threatened by the very culture and
country that allowed it to be.

For the VOICES project, Jef-
frey enlisted Coconut Grove
natives, descended from the orig-
inal Bahamians, who are deter-
mined that the rich history of the
Grove and their people’s contri-
bution to it will not be lost.

Filming spanned more than
four years and includes interviews
with more than 200 people and
enough rich material for a multi-
part series. “Working on this pro-
ject has been the dream of my life-
time, and to be asked to screen a
portion of it for my people at
home in Freeport is a great hon-
our!” said Mr Poitier.





“T will never forget all that
growing up The Bahamas has pro-
vided me and I welcome this
chance to show you all what I have
done with those opportunities,”
said Jeffrey.

VOICES had its world pre-
miere at the AMC Theatre in
CocoWalk at Coconut Grove
in October 25, 2008. This will be
the first screening in The
Bahamas.

BAHAMIAN FILM-MAKER Jeffrey
Poitier, nephew of Sir Sidney
Poitier, will visit Grand Bahama to
premiere his documentary film
VOICES on Saturday, April 25, at
7pm at Ross University Study
Hall at Seahorse Plaza. Tickets
are now on sale. Part proceeds to
aid the Grand Bahama Heritage
Foundation.

Bahamas Film Commissioner
Craig Woods will attend to intro-
duce the film and said: "The
Bahamas Film and Television
Commission, in collaboration with
the Grand Bahama Film Office,
is extremely pleased to play a role
in bringing the production of
"Voices' to be screened on Grand
Bahama Island.

“The film portrays the ambi-
tious struggles of early Bahamian
settlers in South Florida who made
a tremendous impact in the
social development of Miami
and the Coconut Grove commu-
nities.

“Their efforts remind us today
of the unique qualities they
brought to the construction of
homes in those communities which
remain lasting pillars from the era
they came from.

“Writer-producer Jeffrey Poiti-
er does an outstanding job in cap-
turing the essence of their chal-
lenges and successes, providing all

with a wonderful blueprint to fol-
low for years to come."

Part proceeds will benefit the
Grand Bahama Heritage Founda-
tion.

“This is an important story to
tell, and it reinforces the role that
history and art can play in con-
necting Bahamians to their her-
itage,” said a foundation
spokesman.

Donation

“We wish to thank Jeffrey
Poitier, the screening organiser
and sponsors for the donation of
the premiere's proceeds to the
Grand Bahama Heritage Founda-
tion.

“These funds will support the
Freetown Historical Project, cur-
rently in production, which is using
the vehicle of art to capture the
oral histories of that settlement.
We'd like to thank Ross Univer-
sity for helping make this event
possible.”

The programme will begin at
7pm and following the screening a
question-and-answer session will
take place with the film-maker,
followed by a short 'Meet the Film
Maker’ reception sponsored by
Italian Specialty Wines, Agave,
Le Med, Sabor, The Ferry House
and Bahamian Brewery and Bev-
erage Company (brewers of Sands
beer).

ROSS UNIVERSITY DEAN’S LIST ACKNOWLEDGED



ROSS UNIVERSITY DEAN'S LIST was announced for the first set of iia studying in The Bahamas with Dean,
Dr Mary Coleman (standing third left). Recipients are Richard Pigg, Leslie Powell, Daphne Scaramangas, Anas
Saleh, Robert Westbrook, Jessica Black, Jeffrey Perumean and Daniel Speredelozzi. Back row from left: Knema
Rezaei-Bazazizad, Moses Wananu, Anas Saleh, Daniel Speredelozzi, Robert Westbrook, Jessica Black. Front row
from left: Dr Charles Seidel, Dr Mary Coleman (Dean), Dana Price, Daphne Scaramangas, Jeff Perumean, Leslie

Powell, Dr Michael Robinson and Meg Osman, Director of Student Services.

GRAND BAHAMA ISLAND - The first Dean's
List for students of Ross University Medical School,
Bahamas campus, were acknowledged in an award
ceremony with the Dean of the School of Medicine, Dr

Mary Coleman.

The Ross University Dean's List is for students
who receive all A’s in their courses for two consecutive
semesters and they remain on the Dean's list as long
as they maintain a B average in subsequent semesters.

The Dean’s List is posted every semester as soon as
grades are available from the previous semester.

Semester 3 recipients are Leslie Powell, Daphne
Scaramangas, Anas Saleh, Robert Westbrook, Dana
Price, Richard Pigg, Moses Wananu, and Knema
Rezaei-Bazizazad. Semester 4 recipients are Jeffrey
Perumean, Jessica Black and Daniel Speredelozzi.

"The curriculum at Ross University School of Med-
icine is accelerated and quite rigorous. We are proud
of students who make the Dean’s List - they deserve
recognition for the academic efforts to accomplish
this level of learning,” said Dr Mary Coleman, Dean

ily members

of Ross University.

The students came together, some along with fam-
also residing with them in
The Bahamas, to receive their certificates from Dean

Coleman, and heard encouraging words from Meg

Osman, Director of Student Services.

Closing remarks were offered by Dr Michael Robin-
son, Assistant Dean, Curricular and Faculty Affairs. A
toast was given by Dr Charles Seidel, chair Foundation
of Medicine. The students and faculty celebrated with
food, sparkling apple cider and cake.

Ross University was founded in 1978 and is a
provider of medical and veterinary education offering
doctor of medicine and doctor of veterinary medi-
cine degrees. The School of Medicine is located in
Dominica, West Indies, and the Freeport, Grand
Bahama, campus opened in January, 2009.

The School of Veterinary Medicine is located in St
Kitts. Ross University's administrative offices are in
North Brunswick, NJ. Ross University has more than
9,000 alumni with MD and DVM. degrees.

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THE TRIBUNE

TUESDAY, APRIL 21, 2009, PAGE 7



LOCAL NEWS



Dr Hubert Minnis



$30m spent on
metlication to
treat 11 chronic
(liseases in 2008

m@ By MATT MAURA

THE treatment of
chronic, non-communica-
ble diseases (CNCDs) is
placing an “astronomi-
cal” burden on the
healthcare system and the
economy of the Bahamas
as estimates show that
almost $30 million was
spent in 2008 on medica-
tion to treat 11 chronic
diseases at public and pri-
vate healthcare facilities,
Minister of Health Dr
Hubert Minnis said Fri-
day.

Dr Minnis said there is
“an unacceptable preva-
lence” of chronic, non-
communicable diseases in
The Bahamas.

CNCDs, which include
hypertension, diabetes,
cancers, heart disease and
respiratory illnesses, are
now considered the great-
est challenge facing the
healthcare sector.

The minister said the
government, through the
Ministry of Health and
Department of Public
Health, had implemented
a number of strategies to
reverse the growing trend
of CNCDs in The
Bahamas. The measures
are being bolstered by an
ongoing public awareness
and education campaign.

“This situation is cause
for concern from both the
social and economic per-
spectives,” Dr Minnis
said. “This is why the
Ministry of Health has
made containment, con-
trol and reduction of the
underlying causes of
CNCDs a priority.”

Initiatives

Addressing healthcare
professionals and medical
students attending the
University of the West
Indies, The Bahamas,
Third Research Day Con-
ference, Dr Minnis said
the Ministry of Health

Centreville House is set
for exterior renovations

WORK will begin soon on exterior ren-
ovations to the 78-year-old former Collins
mansion on Shirley Street, known as Cen-
treville House.

The project will be supervised by a
preservation architect from the Antiqui-
ties, Monuments and Museums Corpora-
tion (AMMC) - the national heritage
agency whose offices are housed in adja-
cent buildings on the estate.

The AMMC has been responsible for
archaeological research and heritage con-
servation in the Bahamas since it was cre-
ated by parliament in 1998. It currently
operates five public facilities in New Prov-
idence — Forts Fincastle, Montagu and
Charlotte, Balcony House and the Pompey
Museum.

It also administers the Long Island
Museum at Buckley's, and the South
Eleuthera Mission at Rock Sound. It is
developing a museum in the old jail house
on San Salvador.

Centreville House was the home of
Ralph G Collins, OBE, a prominent citizen
who died in 1946.

Near the heart of Nassau, the property
was occupied by St Andrew’s School from
1950 to 1971, when it was acquired by the
government. The AMMC moved to the
six-acre Collins Estate in 2005.

Hurricane

The 35,000-square-foot mansion is a vis-
ible link to the past. It was built in 1931 to
replace an earlier wooden home wrecked
by the 1929 hurricane. The estate itself
once extended from Shirley Street almost
to Wulff Road and east to what later
became Palmdale. It is a remnant of anoth-
er era.

Property records date back to a Florida
loyalist named Christie who arrived in
1791. A residence known as “Centreville”
existed on the site as early as 1871, and
was extensively renovated in 1913 by the
Brice family of Alligator Bay, Long Island,
who had acquired the estate some 30 years
before.

Marion Brice married Collins, an Amer-
ican who came to the Bahamas in 1905
and became a leading politician and mer-
chant. He was a member of the House of
Assembly for the Crooked Island district
and a member of the Executive Council.
With various Bahamian partners, he was
involved in the sponge trade, the liquor
business, handicraft distribution, and real
estate development. He was a major share-
holder in the Montagu Beach Hotel and



Girl Guides plant
for the future

Collins mansion on Shirley Street, known as Centreville House.

spearheaded the dredging of Nassau har-
bour.

Large sections of the estate's ornate
wrought-iron fence — erected in 1924 —
are still standing, but the Brice’s wooden
home was severely damaged in the 1929
hurricane. Collins rebuilt it using reinforced
concrete, although the new structure was
designed to resemble the building it
replaced.

According to a 1931 Tribune report, it
was the best-equipped residence on the
island, and represented "the most solid
type of construction possible — marble
columns rise at each side of the main
entrance, the steps of which are made of
granite."

The new Centreville House included
servants’ quarters, a library, private bar,
billiard room, dance floor and eight bed-
rooms, all with private baths. The hard-
wood floors and wall panelling were all of
mahogany.

After Collins' death, the estate was sold
to the association that opened St Andrew's
School, which moved from the Kirk down-
town to occupy the main house and
grounds, while a new subdivision called
Centreville was created from the eastern
portion of the property.

“Our investment and interest in the

Collins Estate is a prime example of the
way in which the AMMC works to pre-
serve our links to the past in ways that can
have a direct impact on the Bahamian
economy," said corporation's director Dr
Keith Tinker.

"We know that historical resources are
key elements of national development,
finding expression in visitor attractions,
cultural activities and educational exhibits."

Monuments

When the AMMC began in 1998, it
assumed responsibility for public monu-
ments (like the war memorial in the garden
of Remembrance downtown), archaeolog-
ical investigations (such as that into Grand
Bahama's historic Freetown settlement,
which was deserted in the 1960s), and
palaeontological research (like the study of
rare animal fossils found in a blue hole on
Abaco). The corporation also develops
and operates museums around the country,
both directly and in partnership with local
interests.

Dr Tinker is a history lecturer at the
College of the Bahamas who obtained his
doctorate at the Florida State University.
Other technical experts on staff include





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museum curator Kim Outten-Stubbs, Ali-
cia Oxley, a preservation architect, and
Michael Pateman, an archaeologist who is
completing doctoral studies in Ohio.

The corporation also enlists technical
support through partnership agreements.

For example, Dr James Miller, who was
Florida's state archaeologist for 20 years,
has been an adviser to the AMMC since
inception.

And an exchange programme was
recently arranged with the school of archi-
tecture at Florida A & M University in
Tallahassee.

"The Bahamas is probably now at the
point where Florida was 20 or 30 years
ago, so I am able to apply my experience to
help Bahamians avoid the pitfalls and
embrace the opportunities in this field.
The corporation is very aware of what
needs to be done to preserve Bahamian
heritage,” Dr Miller said.

One of the ‘big picture’ projects that
Dr Miller is supervising is the develop-
ment of a comprehensive file of archaeo-
logical and historical sites throughout the
Bahamas linked to Geographical Infor-
mation Systems data.

He also helped plan the country's first
national heritage park at Clifton in south-
western New Providence.







Proes nfede

as ol ere

had established a Clinical $]

Audit Programme for qa
chronic, non-communica- “Wednesday aes a”
ble diseases within the AS PART of the Bahamas Hot Off the Grill ma ee




Department of Public
Health as one of the ini-
tiatives to address the sit-
uation.

The Clinical Audit Pro-
gramme involves a
detailed evaluation of
patient care, which allows
for greater interaction
with physicians responsi-
ble for direct patient
care. The minister said
audit results would help
shape policies, protocols,
delivery models “and oth-
er strategies to achieve
better outcomes.”

Dr Minnis said prelimi-
nary data from the 2005
Healthy Lifestyle Survey
for persons between 15-
74 years of age show that
CNCDs accounted for
more than half the deaths
in The Bahamas at that
time.

Other statistics from
the survey (conducted in
New Providence, Grand
Bahama and Long
Island) showed that 21
per cent of Bahamians
were diagnosed with
hypertension and seven
per cent with diabetes.

Forty-three per cent, he
said, were found to be
obese, while another 27
per cent were found to be
overweight. Just 27 per
cent of the participating
persons had “normal
weight”, while three per
cent were underweight.



National Trust’s Earth Day
activities, 30 participants of
the Girl Guides Caribbean
Camp planted 500 hundred
mahogany seeds and 700
Horseflesh seeds. The initia-
tive is part of the Bahamas
Million Tree Campaign, in
which the Bahamas has
pledged to plant a million
trees by December 2009. The
girls came from throughout
the Bahamas, Belize, the
British Virgin Islands,
Trinidad and Tobago, Guyana
and Antigua and Barbuda.

“We were delighted to have
this opportunity to partner
with the Girl Guides in this
propagation project for native
trees,” said Portia Sweeting,
BNT director of education.

“We not only need to plant
native trees on Earth Day, but
also to begin to propagate
native trees in order to have a
supply of native hardwoods
for landscaping areas in our
national parks where we have
removed invasive species such
as Casuarina or Brazilian pep-

er.”

The Girl Guides planted the
seeds in trays and once the
seeds have sprouted they will
be transplanted to larger pots
and cared for until they are
large enough for transplanting
into areas in need of trees.

The BNT is encouraging cit-
izens to plant a tree on Earth
Day, April 22, in their gar-
dens, schools and places of
work.




hursde

usio




(a)
British Colonial Hilton



De Haticars ape ip

Trawel should take you places
PAGE 8, TUESDAY, APRIL 21, 2009

THE TRIBUNE



LOCAL NEWS



Man in court ©

FROM page one

charge. Stubbs was also
arraigned on a firearm pos-
session charge.

According to court dock-
ets, Stubbs on Tuesday April
14, intentionally caused Wal-
lace’s death. It is further
alleged that Stubbs was in
possession of a handgun with
intent to endanger the life
of Tanisha Newbold. Stubbs
was not required to enter a
plea to the charges.

Mr Kemp asked the court
to examine the bruises on his
client’s writs and ankles,
claiming that Stubbs had
been in shackles since last
week. Mr Kemp also told the
court that he had tried to vis-
it Stubbs while he was being
held at the Grove Police Sta-
tion, but was not allowed to
do so. He claimed that police
had used excessive force on
Stubbs. Mr Ferreira told the
court that when he had seen
Stubbs he observed bruises
on his face. Mr Ferreira
claimed that police had
refused to make notes of the
injuries and asked the court
yesterday to take judicial
note of Stubbs’ injuries.

Magistrate Archer noted
the bruises under Stubbs’
right eye, nostrils and around
his wrists. Stubbs was denied
bail, but was informed by the
magistrate that he could
make an application to the
Supreme Court for bail.
Stubbs was remanded to Her
Majesty’s Prison. His case
was adjourned to July 20,
which is when a preliminary
inquiry into the matter is
expected to open.

Murder

FROM page one

which could be connected
to the murder. Police say
that the incident took place
in the area of Amarillo
Street, Garden Hills some-
time around 3.30 pm. A
male believed to be in his
mid-20s told police that
while standing outside of his
residence, two males
approached in a vehicle and
opened fire at him. The man
reportedly received a flesh
wound to the right leg.
Police are following signifi-
cant leads and hope to make
an arrest in the matter soon.
ASP Bethel said yesterday
that police are uncertain if
the matter is connected to
Smith’s murder but are try-
ing to determine whether or
not it is.

Smith was charged with
Stephen Stubbs, Dashino
Wilson and Adrian Edge-
combe in the November 22,
2007 murder of hit-man
Samuel “Mouche” McKen-
zie, 35, and the attempted
murder of Keith Woodside
who was wounded during
the shooting incident. The
shooting took place in broad
daylight on Wilson Street
off Hay Street. The four
men accused in these shoot-
ings were discharged in late
January this year due to a
lack of evidence.

Police still seeking identity of
one of two men found dead

POLICE are still trying to determine
the identity of one of two men found
shot dead in a small wooden home on
Emmanuel Way off St Vincent Road
last week.

Police said they have yet to estab-
lish a motive for the brutal killings and
are still appealing for persons in the
community who may have information
regarding the unidentified victim to
come forward.

The victim is believed to be a Haitian
in his 60s who farmed in the area.

Last Thursday, police were called to

the gruesome scene where the older
man, known in the neighbourhood as
‘Daddy’, and 42-year-old Alpheus Cur-
tis Jr, known as Tracy, were found shot
to death in the eight-by-ten sized
dwelling.

The murders left the quiet area in
shock.

“We still don't know the name of
the elderly gentleman and continue to
make appeals in the community to
come forward,” Assistant Commis-
sioner Hulan Hanna told The Tribune
yesterday.

While some initial reports suggested
the two men were related, Mr Hanna
said police have not confirmed this.

The two men were found by a third
party early last Thursday morning.

When police arrived on the scene
around 9am, the two men were lying
on the ground with apparent gun shot
wounds about the body.

Police said it is believed the men may
have been killed up to 12 hours before
their bodies were discovered.

Yesterday, Assistant Superintendent
Leon Bethel of the Central Detective

Unit said police have no suspects in
custody.

"We do not have anyone in custody
at this time. We're still continuing the
investigation and we are in progress
of trying to interview some persons,"
he said.

“We've done some preliminary
inquiries, but at this time we have not
determined a motive for this double
killing.”

Persons with information about the
murders can contact police anony-
mously at 919, 502-9991 or 328-TIPS.

The Bahamas ‘must be careful’
in selecting trading partners

FROM page one

States’ Stop Tax Haven Abuse
Bill. Mr Smith said it would be
"preposterous" for the country
to remain in that standing con-
sidering that this country's only
TIEA lies with the US.

Both issues were said to be
forefront on the minds of
CARICOM members as they
met last week with US Presi-
dent Barack Obama and other
regional leaders for the fifth
Summit of the Americas in
Trinidad and Tobago.

The Summit came weeks
after the country was grey listed
by the Organisation for Eco-
nomic Co-operation and Devel-
opment and amid concerns that
the Bahamas would be part of a
targeted crackdown on tax
havens.

The proposed crackdown,
being pushed by developed
nations, is an attempt to collect
revenue from wealthy citizens
of those countries believed to
have invested in off-shore tax
havens to evade tax payment.

"The whole process is one in
which they keep changing the
rules of the game and moving
the goal post. I don't think
there's anytime going forward
that we would be in a position
to relax or take our eyes off the
ball. I think once we cleared
that we intend to meet whatev-
er standards there are we simply
have to just keep abreast of
them and make the necessary
changes," said Mr Smith.

"Once we said that we intend
to meet the standards — what-
ever they are — we will do so
judiciously, in which we do not
harm ourselves (and) minimise
any fallout to the sector so that
will mean to be careful in select-
ing trading partners with which
we execute the TIEAs and per-
haps conducting some form of
analysis to see what the out-

come would be depending on
where we go and how fast we
go," he said.

The prime minister has
already indicated that the coun-
try is ready to negotiate addi-
tional TIEAs and will do what
is necessary to meet the
OECD's standards.

The country has one such
agreement with the US. He also
suggests that Canada was likely
to be the next country with
whom the Bahamas signs a new
TIEA.

Mr Smith added that under
the existing TIEA with the
United States, the Bahamas
meets all the criteria for infor-
mation exchange and should
not remain listed as a secrecy
jurisdiction on the stop tax
haven abuse legislation.

"The tax information
exchange agreement, (signed)
with the United States several
years ago, did in fact meet all of
the international criterion for
information exchange and
transparency.

“So it was, at least from my
point of view it would be pre-
posterous for the US to have
one department certify you as
(having) met the requirements
and then another arm of gov-
ernment saying that you
haven't,” he said.

Raymond Winder, managing
partner of prominent account-
ing firm Deloitte and Touche,
also weighed in on the issue:
"The point is there is no justifi-
cation for putting the Bahamas
on the list (legislation) because
we have a tax information
exchange agreement with the
US and that has been working
and so there's no issues between
the Bahamas and the US — and
I can't see any reason why we'd
be put on that list,” he said.

Last week, while speaking
from the Summit in Trinidad,
Mr Ingraham said he does not

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expect the Bahamas to ulti-
mately appear in US’ legisla-
tion to stop tax haven abuse.
He said he previously wrote to
Chairman of the House Ways
and Means Committee and
Congressman Charles Rangel

on the Bahamas’ position, and
also on behalf of CARICOM
at the Community’s request.

“T think he gave us sufficient
assurances about the Bill to
cause most of our members to
be comfortable.

“There will be some addi-
tional discussions with the Con-
gress,” Mr Ingraham said.

The present draft of the Stop
Tax Haven Abuse Bill names
the Bahamas as one of 34 secre-
cy jurisdictions.

Challenge of judge’s
refusal to step down
from case underway

FROM page one

Ferguson created a conflict of interest.

Yesterday Nicholas Lavender, representing
Rami Weissfisch, told Justices of Appeal how
Justice Allen had described the proceedings
as a farce and was the first to raise the possi-
bility of her own recusal at a session held in
chambers.

However, as there was no court reporter in
the meeting Mr Lavender submitted evidence
from his notes, which he maintains were read
and discussed by the judge and counsel at the
time.

President of the Court of Appeal Dame Joan
Sawyer, sitting with Justice Emmanuel Osebe-
day and Justice Hartman Longley, criticised
other counsel for not also keeping notes of
discussions in the absence of a court reporter to
prevent speculation over what was said.

She said: “Either you do it by a court
reporter or you do it by hand, but a record
there must be.

“There is only one right way and the right
way is to keep a record.”

Mr Lavender further submitted that Justice
Allen had said she was conflicted over certain
things that had occurred, and she considered
herself unable to make a decision on the evi-
dence.

He said: “She found it difficult to do the job
she had to do as a judge, to determine that
issue in the detached impartial manner a judge
should.”

It was decided at the opening of proceed-

ings yesterday that the Appeal Court case
would be heard in public, and not behind closed
doors as had been done in the Supreme
Court.

Justices of Appeal dismissed submissions
from Mr Lavender to hold proceedings entire-
ly or partially in camera maintaining a dispute
over a judge’s conduct is in the public interest.

Mr Lavender had argued confidentiality
should be upheld particularly to protect minors
involved, but lawyer Michael Scott represent-
ing Amir Weissfisch, and Brian Moree repre-
senting the children, said their clients had no
objection to the case being held in open court
and asserted that the names of individuals
involved had already been reported in the
press.

Mr Moree said: “My clients feel no threat at
all by these proceedings being public in this
court because what is before this court has
absolutely nothing to do with the children in so
far as it’s a matter of dealing with the conduct
of the judge.”

Dame Joan ruled any information and the
names of parties and witnesses will not be kept
secret unless an application is made for Justices
of Appeal to consider during the course of the
hearing.

The Appeal Court president said: “The pub-
lic does have a vital interest in the indepen-
dence and impartiality of the judiciary, and if
the conduct of the judge is said to be impugned
then the public has a right to know.”

The case continues at the Court of Appeal in
Charlotte Street, Nassau, today.



Sentencing of Dwight
Major is rescheduled

FROM page one

to smuggle marijuana and
cocaine into Florida, six
months after he and his wife

The Tribune wants to hear
from people who are
making news in their
neighbourhoods. Perhaps
you are raising funds for a
good cause, campaigning
for improvements in the
area or have won an
award.

If so, call us on 322-1986
and share your story.

were extradited to the Unit-
ed States to face drug charges
last April. The couple had
been engaged in a nearly five-
year battle against extradition.
Both Majors had cases pend-
ing in the Bahamas.

The US alleges that the
husband and wife were part
of a drug conspiracy between
August, 2002, and January,
2003, involving the transport
of hundreds of pounds of

cocaine and marijuana.

Keva Major pleaded guilty
to the drug charges against her
last August. The prison time
she has already served has
been taken into consideration.
She is now under a three-year
supervised release in West
Palm Beach. Her husband is
facing up to 50 years in prison
on the drug charges, but could
also receive a much lesser sen-
tence for pleading guilty.

Almost $1m
worth of illegal
drugs captured

is about 50 x 85, consisted of some 300 suspected marijuana
plants, ranging in height from two feet to six feet.
The second and third field contained an additional 600 mar-

ijuana plants.

“Two other fields were also discovered, however, officers
were still at the scene conducting investigations,” said Mr

Bootle.

The police are asking persons to come forward with infor-
mation that could assist them in the arrest of the person or per-

sons responsible.
PAGE 9

THE TRIBUNE
- ) r o ,
b 7 A‘
TUESDAY, APRIL 21,

PAGES 10 & 14¢ International sports news

Knowles,
Bhupathi hope
for success at

* Barcelona
- Open...

See page 15



2009



More than
50 boats
expected
to set sail
at Family

Island
regatta

@‘Cariftabarmes—

Ballamas strokes’
lor second piace

‘estmta« Finishes behind Trinidad & Tobago



@ By BRENT STUBBS
Senior Sports Reporter
bstubbs@tribunemedia.net

THE 56th version of the
National Family Island Regat-
ta is all set to get underway
today in picturesque Elizabeth
Harbour on Georgetown, Exu-
ma.

The competition is expected
to begin with the Sir Durward
Knowles Junior Regatta where
Beerly Legal, skippered by
Gerard Knowles, will be out to
defend its title.

Sports Reporter
rdorsett@tribunemedia.net

Commodore Danny Stra- coe e . ‘ .
tere ture wit medals at Carita swimmin
aminimum of 15 boats to com- teaey ce

pete in the three-race series.

On Wednesday, the Ocean
races for the Prime Minister
Cup race in the A Class, the
Governor’s General Cup race
in the B Class and the Com-
modore Emeritus Cup race in
the C Class are scheduled to
take place.

Then on Thursday through
Saturday, the regular series for
the A, B, C, D and E Classes
will take place in honour of
Scott Weatherford of Abaco.

Weatherford, according to
Strachan, was the original skip-
per of the Abaco Rage, win-
ner of the national titles in 1983
and 1984.

The Tida Wave, skippered
by Brooks Miller from Staniel
Cay, Exuma, won the A Class
last year. Eudeva, skippered by
Lundy Robinson, won the B
Class. The Bulla Reg, skip-
pered by Buzzy Rolle, was
crowned the C Class champion
and in the D Class, the cham-
pion is Blue Wing.

“We anticipate having 50
plus boats compete this year,”
said Strachan, who noted that
he doesn’t think that the eco-
nomic crisis will have that
much effect on the regatta.

“[’m pleasantly surprised
because I thought the numbers

yesterday with a
series of thrilling
performances and a
second place finish
on both the medal
table and final points

standing at the 24th | a, ae
Dustin Tynes

Carifta Swimming
Championships in
Saventa, Aruba.

The Bahamas fin-
ished with a total of
49 medals over the
four-day meet,
which included 18
gold, 17 silver and 14
bronze.

Trinidad and
Tobago captured the
overall champi-
onship with 67
medals — 31 gold, 14
silver and 22 bronze.

Guadeloupe fin-
ished third with 47
medals — 18 gold, 17
silver and 12 bronze.
Aruba finished
fourth with 38
medals — five gold,
18 silver and 15
bronze. Martinique
rounded out the top
five with 34 medals
— eight gold, 16 sil-
ver and 10 bronze.

The Trinidadians





championships in Aruba



Maya Albury

Evante Gibson

Gabrielle Greene

stockpiled 815.50 points to win ahead
of the Bahamas with 691.50 points.

Guadeloupe finished third in the
points standings with 603, Martinique
with 578.50 and Jamaica rounded out
the top five with 571.50 points.

The Bahamas captured 10 medals
on the final day of competition high-
lighted by a pair of stunning individual
performances by McKayla Lightbourn.

In the Girls 15-17 division, Light-
bourn took gold in the 100m Breast-
stroke in a time of 1:17.87s and silver in
the 200m Breaststroke in 2:28.64s.

Dustin Tynes also took gold in the
Boys 11-12 division in the 100m
Breaststroke in 1:14.04s.

In the girls 13-14 division, the team
of Bria Deveaux, Berchadette Moss,
Maya Albury and Gabrielle Greene
took first place in the 200m Freestyle

would be down, but I don’t
think they will be down
because we have three new
boats in Exuma, a new A Class
from Nassau that is already
here and we have two C Class
out of long Island.”

In the A Class, the new boat
is the Ed Sky, owned by Joe
Brown. Hughie Lloyd from
Barreterre, has two C Classes,
Buzzy Rolle from Georgetown
has a C Class and Mark
Knowles from Long Island
built two C Class boats.

As usual, Strachan said there
are a number of on-shore activ-
ities planned, including church
and social events. They are
being coordinated by Gordy

Dionisio Carey
AVM eel



Carey in the 11-12
Boys Breaststroke
and Laura Morley
in the Girls 11-12
division.

The 36-member
team improved from
a third place finish
at the 2008 Champi-
onships despite fin-
ishing with one less
medal from their



McKAYLA LIGHTBOURN, who won gold in the 100m breast...

in 1:12.52s.
Ariel Weech finished second in the
Girls 15-17 50m Freestyle in 26.53s.
The final session also featured two

Team Bahamas finished with two
medals in the Boys 13-14 division 100m
Breaststroke.

Evante Gibson finished second in

UM el atsa

Gray.

“Given the state of the econ-
omy, I don’t know what to
expect in terms of crowd par-
ticipation,” Strachan said. “But
I do know as we speak, all of
the hotels are booked out, all
of the rental cars are booked
out and all of the apartments
that people normally rent all
booked out.

“Accommodation wise, it
might be difficult to find rooms
right now. There might be
some spare rooms around, but
if there are, I don’t know where
they are. But from talking to
the hotels and car rentals, there
are no more rooms or cars to
rent.”

Strachan said based on those
assessments, he anticipates that
the island should be flooded
with people coming in for the
regatta that was first held in
1954.

As a result of the Indepen-
dence Celebrations in 1973, the
annual regatta was held in New
Providence. But since then, a
committee was formed to stage
the event as the national event
in Exuma ever since.

relay in 1:49.75s.

1:12.34s and Toby McCarroll was third

LAURA MORLEY, who won bronze in the Girls 11-12 division, can be seen in this file photo..

bronze medal finishers — Dionisio

total of 50 last year.


PAGE 10, TUESDAY, APRIL 21, 2009

TRIBUNE SPORTS



SPORTS



Olympic boxer seeks "=«
win for boxing bill

B PHILLIP RAWLS
Associated Press Writer

MONTGOMERY, Ala.
(AP) — Olympic bronze medal-
list Deontay Wilder of
Tuscaloosa is undefeated as a
professional boxer. But so far,
none of those bouts have been
in his home state.

And they won't be unless the
Legislature creates a state box-
ing commission to sanction pro-
fessional boxing in Alabama.

Wilder and his co-manager,
Jay Deas, have been trying for
three years to get the Legisla-
ture to pass a law setting up a
commission.

They lost in 2007 and again in
2008. With the 2009 session end-
ing next month, they are in dan-
ger of going 0-3.

The sponsors of the legisla-
tion, Sen. Del Marsh, R-Annis-
ton, and Rep. Gerald Allen, R-
Cottonwood, aren't giving up.
"We feel confident this year is

IN THIS Nov. 15, 2008 file photo,
Deontay Wilder celebrates after
defeating Ethen Cox at Vanderbilt
University in Nashville, Tenn.

(AP Photo: Alan Poizner)





IN THIS April 19, 2007 file photo, boxer Deontay Wilder poses with his daughter Najeya in Northport, Ala.

going to be the year,” Allen
said.

The House has passed a box-
ing commission bill 96-1 and
sent it to the Senate. The Senate
has passed a separate bill 25-0
and sent it to the House.

To help with the effort,
Wilder has taken time from his
daily training schedule to visit
the Legislature, pose for pic-
tures with lawmakers, and pol-
itick for the right to fight in
front of his friends and family in
Alabama.

"We're trying to get some
Deontay Wilder believers," he
said.

Wilder, 23, doesn't look like a

typical heavyweight boxer.

He stands 6 feet 7 inches tall,
and he weighs 214 pounds. He
had hoped to have a career in
pro basketball or football. But
his daughter, Naiyea, was born
in 2005 with spina bifida, a birth
defect in which the spinal cord
develops improperly.

Wilder dropped out of Shel-
ton State Community College
in Tuscaloosa, took jobs as a
waiter and a beer truck driver,
and started training to be a box-
er. He figured boxing was a
quicker way to earn money to
pay his daughter's medical bills.

Wilder was the only Ameri-
can to medal at the Beijing

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alter being

struck by
softball

MISHAWAKA, Ind.
(AP) — A member of a
men's slow-pitch softball
team died Monday after he
was taken off life support,
two days after he was hit in
the neck by a ball.

Teammates say 24-year-
old Alberto Naranjo of
Elkhart was sliding into
home plate during a game
Saturday morning when a
throw struck him below his
left ear. He started to get
up, but collapsed.

Paramedics took Naranjo
to Memorial Hospital in
South Bend from Rose Park
in nearby Mishawaka after
attempts to revive him
failed.

St. Joseph County Coro-
ner Michael O'Connell says
a neurosurgeon pronounced
Naranjo brain dead early
Sunday. O'Connell said
Naranjo remained on life
support until Monday so his
organs could be used for
transplants.

Hospital spokeswoman
Ruth Linster said Monday
afternoon that Naranjo had
died.

the last two years.

Olympics. He had his first pro
bout in November 2008 and is
now 3-0 — all with knockouts.
His next bout is Friday night in
Chicago and will be televised
by ESPN2.

His daughter, 4, has gone
through several operations and
is now an active child. Visiting
Montgomery with her father
last week, she climbed in and
out of his lap and engaged him
in typical child play, causing the
big guy to show a gentle side.

Wilder laughs about how he
can be almost childlike when
he plays with his daughter and
then knock down opponents in
the ring.

(AP Photo: Robert Sutton)

"When you are in the ring,
it's time for business," he said.

His daughter is often at ring-
side, shouting "Go Daddy, Go
Daddy," he said.

Wilder says professional box-
ing in Alabama would give
opportunities to the young
Golden Gloves boxers he sees
training at Deas’ Skyy Gym in
Northport and other gyms
around the state. He also sees it
boosting tourism in Alabama.

"Nobody goes anywhere
without a reason to go. People
need a reason to come to
Alabama," he said.

The boxing commission got
knocked out on technicalities

In 2007, the bill was in line
for final passage in the Senate
on the last day of the session
when one senator punched
another, bringing action to a
halt.

On 2008's final day, the bill
was in position for a final vote
in the House when it got stalled
by debate on other issues.

"It's frustrating how close you
can get and somebody punches
somebody or somebody fili-
busters," Deas said.

Wilder keeps fighting back
by telling anyone who will listen
how badly he wants to step into
the ring surrounded by a cheer-
ing crowd of Alabama fans.

"It's time for change in
Alabama," he said.

Steelers promise no Super
Bowl letdown this time

@ ALAN ROBINSON
AP Sports Writer

PITTSBURGH (AP) — Super Bowl champions
don't get much of an offseason.

Only 2 1/2 months after the Pittsburgh defeated
the Arizona Cardinals for the franchise's sixth
NFL title, the Steelers — at least most of them —
were back on the practice field Monday. Rain
chased them indoors for the first of 14 organized
team practices that run periodically through early
June and are a supplement to next week's manda-
tory, three-day minicamp.

After winning their second Super Bow] in four
seasons, wide receiver Hines Ward said the Steel-
ers don't need to be pushed and prodded to return
to practice.

Apparently not — All-Pro linebacker James
Harrison was working out again only two days
after the Steelers’ last-minute, 27-23 win over the
Cardinals in Tampa. Wide receiver Limas Sweed
was talked out of doing conditioning work later
that same week, but he waited only two weeks
before resuming his personal workouts.

The Steelers are being driven by two factors,
according to Ward: 1) A determination not to
repeat the major letdown of their post-Super Bowl
2006 season, when they started 2-6 and finished 8-
8. 2) A desire to match the three Super Bowls
won in recent history by New England, and per-
haps even the four won by the Steelers of the
1970s.

"I know I want to win another one," Ward said.
"The teams in the 1970s, they won four. If we can
win another one, then I think we'll be right up
there with New England as one of the teams in the
dynasty.”

Nose tackle Casey Hampton believes one more
Super Bow] victory would cause these Steelers to
be remembered as one of the best teams in NFL
history.

While they've changed coaches, from Bill
Cowher to Mike Tomlin since winning the Super
Bowl during the 2005 season, many of the key
players (Ward, Hampton, Ben Roethlisberger,
Willie Parker, Heath Miller, James Farrior, Troy
Polamalu, Aaron Smith, Brett Keisel, Larry Foote,
Deshea Townsend) are the same.

"Especially with the same core of guys, it's kind
of like the same team," Hampton said. "We're
trying to catch the old Steelers, back in the day, see
if we can get us four, see what that would be like."

Since the Steelers won four times during the
1974-79 seasons, and the 49ers won four from
1981-89 (plus a fifth in 1994), the only teams to win
three Super Bowls are the Cowboys (1992-93,
1995) and the Patriots (2001, 2003-04).

Hampton said the Steelers got "lax ... forgot
how we got there” after winning three years ago,
but Ward promised that won't happen again.

"We've been through that. The veteran guys
who were on that first Super Bowl we won a cou-
ple of years ago, we came back with a disappoint-
ing 8-8 year,” Ward said. "I think there's a differ-
ent mindset coming into this. We've got a lot of
veteran guys mixed in with a lot of new, unproven
guys who have to step up their game. And coach
Tomlin, he won't let us have a down year. His



IN THIS Feb. 1, 2009, file photo, Pittsburgh Steelers
linebacker James Harrison returns an interception for
a 100-yard touchdown during the second quarter of the
Super Bowl XLIII game in Tampa, Fla. At right is Ari-
zona Cardinals guard Reggie Wells.

(AP Photo: John Bazemeore)

expectation levels are very high, and they should
be."

Intentionally or not, management is allowing a
number of players — Ward, Hampton, Foote,
Miller, Parker, Keisel, safety Ryan Clark and kick-
er Jeff Reed among them— to go into the final sea-
son of their contracts. Only All-Pro linebacker
James Harrison, the NFL Defensive Player of the
Year, and left guard Chris Kemoeatu have signed
new contracts.

Some others could be re-signed by the end of
training camp, but the franchise's philosophy has
long been that playing for a new contract isn't
necessarily a bad thing.

"We're not going to get as complacent as we
got the last time," Hampton said.

The last time Ward was going into the last sea-
son of a contract, in 2005, he stayed out of training
camp for two weeks before reporting. He signed a
contract extension the week of the season opener.

Ward said he won't stay out this time. One rea-
son is he is only 220 yards away from reaching
the 10,000-yard receiving mark, a number reached
by only 31 players in NFL history.

"T don't want to put on another uniform,” the
33-yard-old Ward said. "I'm too late in the game
(his career) to worry about it. You look at all the
previous players who went on and played in other
places. I learned a lot from Jerome (Bettis), what
he did. I want to go down in Steelers history to be
one of the better wideouts to wear the black and
gold.”

Among those missing Monday, some due to
travel problems, were Super Bowl MVP Santo-
nio Holmes, Polamalu, Parker, Clark, Foote, Tim-
mons and safety Tyrone Carter. Ward did not
practice because he is recovering from left rotator
cuff surgery, but he was in uniform.

Working out were three players who missed all
or most of last season, punter Daniel Sepulveda
(knee) backup quarterback Charlie Batch (bro-
ken collarbone) and running back Rashard
Mendenhall (shoulder).
TRIBUNE SPORTS

MARK KNOWLES (background) and MAHESH BHUPATHI got a bye in the

TUESDAY, APRIL 21, 2009, PAGE 13

LOCAL NEWS

Knowles, Bhupathi
hope for success at
Barcelona Open

first round of the Barcelona Open Banco Sabadell 2009...

AFTER getting ousted in
the quarterfinal of their last
tournament in Monaco last
week, Mark Knowles and
Mahesh Bhupathi are hoping
for better success this week at
the Barcelona Open Banco
Sabadell 2009.

The Bahamian-Indian duo
are seeded number four in
the tournament. They got a
bye in the first round and
await the winner of the match
between the Spanish team of
Feliciano Lopez and Fernan-
do Verdasco against Argenti-
na’s Lucas Arnold Ker and
Chile’s Fernando Gonzalez.

Knowles and Bhupathi
eliminated Lopez and Ver-
dasco 6-4, 6-4 in the second
round in Monaco before they
were sent packing by the
team of Novak Djokovic and
Viktor Troicki of Serbia.

Going into Barcelona,
Knowles and Bhupathi are
sitting in fourth place in the
ATP Doubles Team Rank-
ings with a total of 1695
points.

Leading the race is the
identical American twin
brothers of Bob and Mike
Bryan with 4115. Daniel
Nestor and Nenad Zimonjic
are in second with 1890 and
Max Mirnyi and Andy Ram
are third with 1735.

Nestor, the former long-
time partner of Knowles,
along with Zominjic, pulled
off a 6-4, 6-1 upset win over
the top seeded Bryans in the
final in Monaco. Nestor and
Zimonjic were seeded at
No.2.

In Barcelona, the Bryans
are again seeded at No.1 with
Nestor and Zimonjic at No.2.

TRIER MRT UCT TT

ao a

3 ry

~

RAFAEL NADAL (left), of Spain, attends a training session yesterday during the Barcelona Open tournament

in Barcelona, Spain...

(AP Photo: Manu Fernandez)

Dynasty Stars defeat
Rising Star by seven wickets

THE Dynasty Stars defeated
the Rising Star by seven wick-
ets on Saturday as the
Bahamas Cricket Association
continued its regular season
action.

Rising Star scored 148 runs
as Robert Campbell was the
top scorer with 62 runs and
Cyril Burrell made 17 runs.

Bowling for Dynasty Stars,
Alex Hernandez and Brian
Bascom took four wickets each.

Dynasty Stars scored 153

runs for the loss of three wick-
ets. Ranford Davson and
Johnathan Barry scored 37 and
36 runs respectively.

On Sunday, the Castrol
Commonwealth team was
bowled out for 111 runs as Ter-
ry Seepersad was the top scor-
er with 56 runs.

Bowling for Scotiabank Par-
adise was shared by Sean
Brathwaite and Mark Butler,
each taking two wickets.

Scotiabank Paradise, at bat,

scored 113 runs for the loss of
two wickets to win the match
by eight wickets.

Gary Bell and Andrew Nash
were the top scorers for Sco-
tiabank Paradise with scores of
37 and 32 runs not out respec-
tively.

Action is scheduled to con-
tinue this weekend. On Satur-
day, Dockendale is set to take
on Rising Star and on Sunday,
St Agnes is slated to face
Dynasty Stars.


PAGE 14, TUESDAY, APRIL 21, 2009

TRIBUNE SPORTS



SPORTS



Sixers are looking to stay
cool after stunning Magic

@ ANTONIO GONZALEZ
Associated Press Writer

ORLANDO, Florida (AP)
— Mindful of the past, the
Philadelphia 76ers are doing
their best to forget a thrilling
Game 1 win.

It won't be easy.

Andre Iguodala made a 22-
foot jumper with 2.2 seconds
remaining, and the Sixers ral-
lied from an 18-point deficit to
stun the Orlando Magic 100-98
on Sunday in Game 1 of their
opening-round playoff series.

For the second straight year,
Philadelphia finds itself up 1-0
and with home-court advantage
against a heavy favorite.

"We've been in this position
before," Iguodala said. "We still
have to stay focused. We have
to stay confident in ourselves
and fix some of the mistakes we
were making early."

The Sixers lost six of their last
seven games coming into the
playoffs but were able to put
that skid in the past the same
way they did a year ago, when
they won Game 1 at Detroit.
The Pistons eventually took the
series in six games.

"This is a different group than
played those last seven games,”
Sixers coach Tony DiLeo said.
"We're in a different mental
state, different physical state
because we had some games to
rest."

Iguodala had 20 points, eight
rebounds and eight assists, and
Louis Williams scored 18 to
help the Sixers beat the Magic
for the first time in four tries
this season — and when it mat-
tered most. Hedo Turkoglu's
fadeaway 3-pointer missed at
the buzzer, and Magic fans
stood in disbelief before filing
out quietly.

Dwight Howard had a career
playoff-high 31 points and 16
rebounds, and rookie Courtney
Lee scored 18 for the Magic. It
was the biggest lead the Magic
blew all season, topping the loss
on Oct. 31 to Memphis when
they were ahead by 15. Game 2

DWIGHT HOWARD dunks over

Philadelphia 76ers center Samuel
Dalembert (1) and forward Andre
Iguodala (not seen) during Game 14
of a first-round playoff game Sun-
day, in Orlando... (AP Photo)

Magic’s
Howard
to seek

treatment
on eyes

ORLANDO, Fla. (AP) —
Orlando Magic center Dwight
Howard says he's going to get
his eyes examined after he was
inadvertently scratched by
Philadelphia 76ers center
Samuel Dalembert.

Howard said Monday he
would see an eye doctor but
that the injury won't keep him
sidelined for Game 2 against
the 76ers on Wednesday night.
Dalembert swiped Howard's
eyes reaching for the ball late in
the third quarter of Philadel-
phia's 100-98 win over the Mag-
ic on Sunday night and was
called for a foul.

Howard said he was "seeing
just a whole bunch of crazy
stuff" when he closed his eyes
and felt a "pulsating" sensation
when they were open.



ORLANDO MAGIC forward Hedo Turkoglu (left) fights for a rebound with Philadelphia 76ers forward Andre Iguodala in the second half of Game 1 of
a first-round playoff game in Orlando, Florida, on Sunday. Philadelphia won 100-98...

in the best-of-seven series is
Wednesday night in Orlando.

"There's no need to panic,"
Howard said. "It's the first
game. We just have to come out
with a better effort on the
defensive end. We have to get
back on defense. We have to
really cut our turnovers down."

One thing the Sixers will have
to clean up is their defense — or
lack thereof — on Howard.
Orlando's do-it-all center scored
at will.

Rim-rocking dunks, smooth

hook shots and even some
uncharacteristic crisp free
throws by the Magic's center
capped a 15-3 spurt that put
Orlando ahead by 18 points.
The only time Philadelphia
actually slowed Howard was
when Samuel Dalembert inad-
vertently scratched both his
eyes and was called for a foul.

Howard said his eyes were
pulsating after the game but
shouldn't be a problem, even
joking afterward that, "I got
backslapped."”

(AP Photo: John Raoux)

So did the rest of the Magic.

Lakers 113, Jazz 100

At Los Angeles, Kobe Bryant
scored 24 points, Trevor Ariza
added 21 and Pau Gasol 20 for
the Lakers.

Allowing a Phil Jackson-
coached team to win Game 1
of any series doesn't bode well
for the opposition. Jackson's
teams have never lost a playoff
series after winning Game 1,
going 41-for-41 with Chicago
and the Lakers.

The Lakers had their way
against the Jazz, leading by 22
points at halftime and then
answered resoundingly both
times Utah got within nine in
the second half.

Bryant's total gave him 3,710
career postseason points, mov-
ing him past Magic Johnson and
into ninth on the NBA's list. He
trails only Kareem Abdul-Jab-
bar (4,070) and Jerry West
(4,457) for most points in the
playoffs with the Lakers.

Carlos Boozer led the Jazz



Cavaliers’ Brown named
NBA’s coach of the year

TOM WITHERS
AP Sports Writer

CLEVELAND (AP) — Mike Brown
was honored as the NBA's coach of the
year Monday after leading the Cleve-
land Cavaliers to their greatest regular
season.

He guided the club to a franchise-
record 66 wins, a second Central Division
title and the No. 1 overall seed in the
postseason. Cleveland leads the Detroit
Pistons 1-0 in the first round of the play-
offs.

Preaching trust to his players since
training camp, Brown has created a tight-
ly knit team led by superstar LeBron
James. The 38-year-old coach also has
given more authority to his assistants, a
sign of his maturity as a coach and con-
fidence as a leader.

Brown joined the Cavs in 2005 after
two seasons as an assistant with Indiana.
Bill Fitch in 1976 is the only other Cleve-
land coach to win the coaching award.

MIKE BROWN cheers on his team as they
faced the Indiana Pacers in the first half of a
game in Indianapolis...

(AP Photo: Michael Conroy)

Brown received 55 first-place votes
and earned 355 total points from a pan-
el of 122 sports writers and broadcasters.
Houston's Rick Adelman finished sec-
ond with 151 points and Orlando's Stan
Van Gundy was third with 150.

New Orleans coach Byron Scott won
the award last year.

Cleveland owner Dan Gilbert called
Brown a “natural leader" and credited
him with much of his team's success.

"Mike Brown is one of these rare peo-
ple that has nearly every tool in his tool
box," Gilbert said in a statement. "He is
smart, hard working, and selfless. He is
curious and hungry to learn. He is philo-
sophically driven and derives his deci-
sion making from his strong philosophy.

"Mike Brown is a critical element as to
why our franchise is growing into the
kind of success we all envisioned and
hoped to achieve.

“There is no man more deserving and
it proves to the world that, yes, nice guys
can indeed, finish first."



NCAA president Brand to
receive Pathfinder award

MYLES BRAND speaks during a news conference at Final Four tourney



(AP Photo: Eric Gay)

INDIANAPOLIS (AP) — NCAA
president Myles Brand will receive a
Pathfinder award in June for his long-
time contribution to youth sports.

The 66-year-old Brand, who is fight-
ing advanced pancreatic cancer, has been
president of the college sports governing
body since 2003. Before that, he was pres-
ident of Indiana University for six years.

The Pathfinder is presented each year
in conjunction with the Youthlinks Indi-
ana Charity Golf Tournament sponsored
by the Indiana Sports Corp. and Indiana
Black Expo. Youthlinks announced last
week that golfer Jack Nicklaus and his
wife, Barbara, would also be honored.

Brand and the Nicklauses will receive
the awards June 28 at the annual
Pathfinder banquet at Conseco Field-
house in Indianapolis.



with 27 points and Deron

Williams added 16 points and

a career playoff-high 17 assists.
Game 2 is Tuesday night.

Hawks 90, Heat 64

At Atlanta, with Josh Smith
delivering one rim-shaking
dunk after another and plenty
of teammates chipping in, the
Hawks made Miami look like
a one-man team.

The Hawks tied a franchise
record for fewest points allowed
in a playoff game, holding
Miami's Dwyane Wade, the
league's leading scorer, to 19
points.

Miami was held to its fewest
points of the season — its pre-
vious low was 68 — and the
Hawks equaled the mark they
set against the Charlotte Hor-
nets in a 1998 playoff victory.

Smith scored 23 points and
every other Atlanta starter also
was in double figures. Wade
made just 8 of 21 shots, and
Michael Beasley added 10
points, and the Heat shot just
37 percent and managed only
seven points in the final peri-
od. Game 2 is Wednesday night
in Atlanta.

Nuggets 113, Hornets 84

At Denver, Chauncey Billups
scored 36 points and made a
career-best eight 3-pointers in
the second-biggest blowout in
the Nuggets’ playoff history.

Capitalizing on their first
home-court edge in a playoff
series in 21 years, the Nuggets
nearly bested their previous
biggest margin of victory, a 141-
111 wallop of San Antonio in
1985.

Denver used a 21-0 run span-
ning the third and fourth quar-
ters to build a 95-69 cushion, a
run that was highlighted by
Billups’ seventh and eighth 3s.

Billups was 8-for-9 from
beyond the arc, one make off
the NBA playoff record, and
helped negate All-Star point
guard Chris Paul's big game.

Paul had 21 points and 11
assists for the Hornets.

Davidson’s
S Curry
wrestling

with NBA
decision

DAVIDSON, N.C. (AP)
— Stephen Curry is still
struggling with whether to
turn pro or return to David-
son for his senior season.

Coach Bob McKillop said
Monday that Curry hasn't
made up his mind. The star
guard has until Sunday to
declare for the NBA draft.

Curry led the nation in
scoring last season at 28.6
points a game and Is pro-
jected in many mock drafts
to be a lottery pick. But
Curry also wants to get his
degree, and McKillop said
that's an important factor in
Curry's decision-making.

Classes

Davidson does not have
summer classes, which
would make getting his
diploma difficult if he left
school early.

The 6-foot-3 Curry aver-
aged 32 points in the 2008
NCAA tournament. He
moved to point guard last
season and had 15 games of
30 or more points and three
of 40 or more.

TST

a am TRC hy

Rae
MAY)
Moniays
Who understands the
power of a promise?

PAGE 16, TUESDAY, APRIL 21, 2009

THE TRIBUNE



Seminar aims to teach

professionals how to
make the most of the day

THESE days, it’s become a
regional joke that Bahamians
acknowledge two time zones —
standard time and “when I
reach”.

Weddings, funerals, school
lessons, business meetings and
more are usually set to start on
“Bahamian time”, and while it’s
something the nation has seem-
ingly got used to, according to
business professional, corporate
trainer and master motivator
Spence Finlayson, it has become
a national embarrassment.

“Many people don’t realise it
but time management is what
can make or break an individual
or a business,” said Mr Finlayson, host of the
Dare To Be Great television show.

“In The Bahamas, we joke about being late
to everything but how can we depend on
tourism to be our leading industry when every-
thing from show times to flight times are off
schedule? We need to remember that tourists
are actually business people who save their
money to come here. We are leaving a sour
taste in their mouth and closing the door on the

Spence Finlayson



corporate tourism market. We
have to change this mindset if
we are going to compete global-
ly. We have to tame this time
monster before it controls us.”

Those who want to learn how
to leash the ‘time monster’ can
do so by taking part in a time
management seminar for pro-
fessionals on Wednesday, April
29, from 9am to 4pm at the
British Colonial Hilton facilitat-
ed by the Phoenix Institute.

“We get caught up with a bot-
tomless inbox, tons of e-mail,
millions of meetings, and more
all the time and it simply boils
down to too much to do and not
enough time to do it,” he added.

“This common problem people face in the
workplace and, as a result, the business can
suffer tremendously. People need to learn the
fundamentals of time management - under-
standing the value of time, proven ways to get
the most out of a day, how to balance work and
home, techniques for eliminating time wasters,
how to conquer procrastination, and much
more.”

We do.

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ELC iCM CALENDAR CONTEST EJ iesomenct commer intr

45th anniversary calendar

CONTEST RULES
1 Family Guardian’s Annual Calendar Photo Contest is open to all photographers. The title for the company’s 2010 calendar will be “A CELEBRATION OF
NATURE - 45th Anniversary Calendar”. Photographs may be of any subject (animate or inanimate) or a scene whichis a striking example of nature as
found in The Bahamas, as well as, photographs of the Family Guardian Corporate Centre, located on Village Road and East Bay Street. *Sec website
her competition details (www.familyguardian.com).
RIES IS JUNE 1, 2009. All entries are submitted at the owner's risk and will not be returned. 7 be
delivered to Family Guardian's Corporate Centre, Village Road and East Bay Street, Nassau, between S:00AM al
should be marked “Calendar Contest”.

anfed by an aliial emily m, ava

i .
INDIO.

=

se! pages vil be sendin Images must be provided a al mes on CD. Digital i images must be of high quality (2700 ,
es showing signs of photo manipulation, resolution enhancement or compression will be rejected. O ensure 0
, digital images should be supplied in RAW, TIFF or high quality JPEG and in the original colour format the camera uses (LAB or + RGB), All =
es Ir ist must be supplied with colour prints (8 x 10) which will be used in the judging process. (Note: prints submitted without CD's will not be eligible

i d vice versa). The photographer's name, photo subject and location must be written on the reverse of the print. :
ludging of entries will be based on beauty, interest, composition, colour, originality and quality of photograph. Particular areas and subjects of
interest are detailed on the website (www-familyguardian.com). The photographs selected will appear in Family Guardian's 2010 calendar. The
decision of the judges will be final.

A gift certificate valued at $400 will be presented for each of the photographs selected. Photographic credits will be given in the calendar. The number
of entries per photographer is limited to a maximum of 5 photos.

The winning photographs, along with all publication and reproduction rights attached thereto, become the property of Family Guardian and the company
reserves the right to use such in the future. Photos will not be returned.

Employees of Family Guardian, its affiliated companies or family members are not eligible.
10 Previously published photos are not eligible.

*For further details & key subjects of interest
visit our website at www.familyguardian.com

2010 Calendar Photo Contest Entry Form

Return with photos to:
Calendar Contest, Family Guardian Corporate Centre
Village Road & East Bay Street, Nassau, Bahamas

ENTRY DEADLINE: JUNE 1, 2009

L BUSINESS
AIL

0. BOX STREET
DDRESS

BER OF PHOTOS ENTERED (maximum of 5)

| agree that in the event one or more of my entered photographs is selected as a winner in the 2010 Family Guardian
Calendar Photo Contest it will become the property of Family Guardian Insurance Co. Ltd., and! assign to Family Guardian
all rights pertaining to its use in any way whatsoever. | also confirm that the photos entered in this contest were taken in
The Bahamas by the undersigned and have not been previously published.





Photo by Jade Greensword

Family Guardian’s 2009 Calendar ATURE DATE



Kristaan H. A. Ingraham II/BIS

High Commissioner-Designate of the Federation
of Malaysia pays a courtesy call on Deputy PM

YEAN Yoke Heng, High Com-
missioner-Designate of the Feder-
ation of Malaysia to the Common-
wealth of the Bahamas paid a Cour-
tesy Call on Deputy Prime Minister
and Minister of Foreign Affairs
Brent Symonette on Wednesday,
April 15, 2009 at the Ministry of
Foreign Affairs in the Goodman’s
Bay Corporate Centre.

They briefly discussed estab-
lishing ties between the Bahamas

and Malaysia in areas such as
tourism, manufacturing, agricul-
ture, trade and investment.

Pictured from left are Anthony
McKinney, Chief of Protocol; Mohd
Fareed Zakaria, second secretary,
Embassy of Malaysia; High
Commissioner Heng; Mr Symon-
ette; Joshua Sears, Director Gen-
eral, Ministry of Foreign Aftairs,
and Carlton Wright, undersecre-
tary.

eels Reds) sp Relea)
slits ate sos ae
Lots of Prizes & Surprises!

ee a aL
ROYAL 3FIDELITY

Money at Work



THE TRIBUNE

NASSAU OFFICE





Price structure,
regulations holt
up the Bahamas
Wasie's proposed
biodiesel plant

@ By NEIL HARTNELL
Tribune Business Editor

THE need
to create a
new pricing
structure, and
a regulatory
framework to
control areas
such as pro-
duction
process by-
products, are
among the
reasons why
Bahamas
Waste’s pro-
posed $750,000 biodiesel waste-
to-energy plant has yet to be
approved, a government minis-
ter said yesterday.

Phenton Neymour, minister
of state for the environment,
told Tribune Business that
before the Government could
give full approval to the renew-
able energy venture, a pricing
structure to accommodate a
“locally produced fuel” had to

SEE page 5B

Neymour



T UE $20 A Xe

AUER (ei 22a

usiness

2009

SECTION B ¢ business@tribunemedia.net

Bahamas Waste ‘shoots’ for
500 tonne recycling target

@ By NEIL HARTNELL
Tribune Business Editor

ahamas Waste yesterday said it was

aiming to generate 500 tonnes of

recycled cardboard per month

from its new production facility,
which will be operational by late April-early
May 2009, after being “pleasantly surprised” by
its 2009 first quarter results.

Francisco de Cardenas, the BISX-listed com-
pany’s managing director, told Tribune Busi-
ness that everything produced by the card-
board recycling plant would be exported, most
likely to the Asian market, thus generating a
not-insignificant foreign currency earnings rev-
enue stream.

“We’re hoping that the bailer people are
going to be here this weekend,” Mr de Carde-
nas said of the recycling plant, “so we need to
test the bailer. As soon as we get the equip-
ment up and running, we’re going to start, soif
it’s not this month it will be early May.

“We’re going to try and shoot for 500 tonnes
a month, which is what our least quota will
be.”

He acknowledged that the company would
“have a bit of a learning curve” to endure in its
new business line, but was not too concerned
yet about demand and pricing for recycled
cardboard, even though global commodities
prices have come under pressure as a result of
the worldwide downturn.

“We want to get our systems in place to be
able to do it, and do it right,” Mr de Cardenas
told Tribune Business. “We’ll look at the most
profitable markets, and my understanding is

* End-April/early May
target for cardboard
facility’s operational
start, with all
product exported

* Company ‘pleasantly
surprised’ by 2009
first quarter results

that the most profitable market international-
ly right now is the Far East.

“People are tired of talking to us, because
we’ve been looking at this for a year. Once
we start bailing, and have a product we can put
in containers, everything will fall into place.”

Mr de Cardenas said Bahamas Waste had
already taken on one additional staff mem-
ber to handle the cardboard recycling facility,
while others had been doing “double duty”.

Meanwhile, the Bahamas Waste managing
director told Tribune Business that the com-
pany had been “pleasantly surprised with our
results” for the 2009 first quarter.

“We’re a little below last year, year-to-date,”
he conceded of the company’s net income for
the first quarter. “But considering we had an

International investment
demand slows to trickle

@ By NEIL HARTNELL
Tribune Business Editor

BAHAMIAN _ investor
appetite for international secu-
rities has all but dried up, Roy-
alFidelity Merchant Bank &
Trust’s president said yesterday,
while adding that he was “cau-
tiously optimistic” that the local
equities market was close to the
bottom and would present
“some great buying opportuni-
ties” in late summer 2009.

Michael Anderson told Tri-
bune Business that RoyalFi-
delity had during the 2009 first
quarter only taken up $50,000 of
its available $2.083 million in
foreign currency for investing
in international markets on
behalf of Bahamian investors.

He explained that the
Bahamian investment bank
took up such a small allocation
due to minimal investor
demand for international equi-
ties and debt securities, some-
thing he attributed to recent
trends in most global stock mar-
kets and a general wariness of
stock investments.

“This quarter, we’re still look-
ing to see if we go out and do
another TIGRS [investment]
fund,” Mr Anderson said of
RoyalFidelity’s plans, “but we
don’t know what the market
sentiment is.”

Meanwhile, RoyalFidelity
had also seen “fairly strong

=F

* RoyalFidelity takes up just
$50,000 of available
$2.083m for international
investing in quarter one

* But ‘cautiously optimistic’
Bahamian equities market
near bottom, with upside
and buying opportunities
post-summer 2009

redemptions” from its mutual
fund portfolio, including the
RoyalFidelity Bahamas Growth
and Income Fund, as investors
moved to liquidate holdings due
to a need for cash, coupled with
concern about declining equity
values in the Bahamian market.

Although RoyalFidelity’s
FINDEX index, which mea-
sures equity returns based on a
weighted average of share price
movements and dividend yields,
was down by 4.49 per cent for
the first three-and-a-half
months of 2009, Mr Anderson
struck an upbeat note by indi-
cating he felt the Bahamian
equities market was close to
approaching the ‘bottom’ of its
current down cycle.

“Tm cautiously optimistic,”
he told Tribune Business. “I
think you'll have a tough sum-

SEE page 5B

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$22m judgment
sought against
Bahamas resort

@ By NEIL HARTNELL
Tribune Business Editor

AUS private equity fund has
applied to the New York courts
for a $22 million judgment
award against the principals of a
Bahamas-based resort project
now in receivership, after they
defaulted on a $16 million loan
that they guaranteed.

Attorneys for BA Chub Cay
Ltd, the vehicle through which
Cerberus Real Estate Capital
Management advanced $16 mil-
lion to finance the Berry Islands
development bearing the same
name, late last week filed their
proposed judgment against
principals Walter McCrory, Bob
Moss and the estate of the late
Kaye Pearson.

Michael Gordon, an attorney
with Katten Muchin Rosenman,
BA Chub Cay Ltd’s attorneys,
in an April 15, 2009, affidavit
accompanying the proposed
judgment urged the US District
Court for the southern district
of New York to grant its clients
$22.095 million.

Of this, some $16 million was
the original loan principal;
$1.335 million interest at 18.5

Real estate market seeing ‘slow down’

B By NEIL HARTNELL
Tribune Business Editor

RENTAL prices in the
Bahamian real estate market
have dropped by between 15-
20 per cent as a result of a
property surplus, Tribune Busi-
ness was told yesterday, with
both the international and
domestic property buyer mar-
kets having slowed in compari-
son to late 2008 and earlier this
year.

William Wong, the Bahamas
Real Estate Association’s
(BREA) president, said that
based on feedback from the
organisation’s members
demand for Bahamian real
estate had “slowed down quite a
bit” in recent weeks, a trend

Make ita

° Pension Plans

* Mutual Funds

* Demand falling compared to late 2008
and earlier this year, as downturn bites
* Rental prices off 15-20% due to property glut
* First-time buyer incentives do not yet have desired impact

attributed to the prevailing eco-
nomic climate.

Mr Wong, who heads the
rebranded RE/MAX Ocean
Realty Bahamas, said: “Based
on what I’m hearing from my
members, things are slowing.
That’s going for both the local
and international markets right
now.

“This is a world thing, not a
local issue. People are looking,
and there are still some buyers,
but it’s slow. I know a lot of my
members are hurting a little bit

reality.

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right now.

“Hopefully, this will not go
on for too long, another six to
eight months. If we can survive
2009, hopefully we can take
some steps forward next year,
but it’s anyone’s guess. We’ve
just got to sharpen our pencils
and bring people here as much
as we can.”

The BREA president added:
“The market has slowed down
quite a bit. I think everyone’s

SEE page 4B

per cent, calculated from May
10, 2007, to June 1, 2008; $3.768
million in default interest, cal-
culated at 23.5 per cent from
June 2, 2008, to April 30, 2009;
an $320,000 Exit Fee premium;
and $672,550 to cover costs and
expenses.

In their proposed judgment,
Cerberus and its attorneys stat-
ed that “there is no genuine
issue as to any material fact con-
cerning [the trio’s] liability
under guarantees of, among
other things, the repayment of a
loan in the principal amount of
$16 million”.

Mr Gordon’s affidavit said
the New York court’s April 7,
2009, order had found that
because Messrs McCrory, Moss
and Pearson had failed to main-
tain insurance coverage on the
Chub Cay Club development
and its assets, they had default-
ed on the loan agreement and
BA Chub Cay Ltd “properly
accelerated the loan on June 2,
2008”.

In his April 7 order, Judge
Jed Rakoff said that exactly one
year earlier, 13 insurance poli-

SEE page 4B

The information contained is from a third
party and The Tribune can not be held
responsible for errors and/or omission
from the daily report.



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PAGE 2B, TUESDAY, APRIL 21, 2009 THE TRIBUNE



‘Time’ for new management conference

A time management seminar for
Bahamian professionals is scheduled to
be staged at the British Colonial Hilton
9am to 4pm April 29, facilitated by the
Phoenix Institute.

“Many people don’t realise it but time
management is what can make or break
and individual or a business,” said
Spence Finlayson, host of the Dare To
Be Great television show and a corpo-
rate trainer.

“In The Bahamas, we joke about
being late to everything, but how can
we depend on tourism to be our leading
industry when everything from show
times to flight times are off schedule?
We need to remember that tourists are
actually business people who save their
money to come here.

“We are leaving a sour taste in their
mouth and closing the door on the cor-
porate tourism market. We have to

change this mindset if we are going to
compete globally. We have to tame this
time monster before it controls us.”

“We get caught up with a bottomless
inbox, tons of e-mail, millions of meet-
ings, and more all the time, and it simply
boils down to too much to do and not
enough time to do it,” he added.

“This common problem people face
in the workplace and, as a result, the
business can suffer tremendously. People

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THE TRIBUNE

TUESDAY, APRIL 21, 2009, PAGE 3B



RoyalCaribbean praises
downtown revitalisation

m@ By CHESTER ROBARDS
Business Reporter
crobards@tribunemedia.net

ROYALCARIBBEAN
Cruise Lines is eagerly antici-
pating the revitalisation of
Downtown Nassau and the
expansion of the cruise port,
the company’s vice-president
of governmental relations for
the Caribbean told Tribune
Business, with last week’s
announcement of a public-pri-
vate partnership to oversee the
redevelopment signaling the
Bahamas’ commitment to
improving its tourism product.

Mike Ronan, who also rep-
resents his company within the
Florida Caribbean Cruise Asso-
ciation (FCCA), said the
Bahamas government should
be complimented for its com-
mitment to improving Nassau’s
cruise port facilities, which will
inevitably make the destination
more competitive in the
Caribbean.

Speaking to this newspaper
at the 13th annual Caribbean
Hotel and Tourism Investment
Conference (CHTIC) in
Bermuda, Mr Ronan asserted

that the Bahamas continues to
be a choice destination for
cruise travelers.

“The short cruises to the
Bahamas continue to be popu-
lar, there is no question about
it,” he said. Following the onset
of the economic downturn
cruise lines began slashing
prices and offering short-term
deals in order to fill staterooms.

“Each company is looking for
the balance. We are so accus-
tomed to traveling full that it’s
difficult when you decide to
leave cabins empty,” said Mr
Ronan

“Some (cruise lines) may
decide to leave some cabins
empty rather than drop the
prices further because it’s hard-
er to get your prices back up
to where they should be later
on.”

At present, he said price
points are not where the indus-
try would like them to be, even
though the cruise ship eco-
nomic environment is stabiliz-
ing.
“We are able to fill the ship,
and we are seeing bookings
come in for the summer for not
only the Caribbean but other

markets,” Mr Ronan said.

“Today, clearly, what you
pay for the ticket does not
match the value of the cost of
the product. Overall, the goal of
the industry is to keep the qual-
ity of the product up.

“We believe that people
understand the value of the
cruise experience, and for that
reason we will be considered
seriously when they decide
which option to select. Right
now, we think that we’re begin-
ning to see, like a lot of indus-
tries, a light at the end of the
tunnel in the advanced book-
ings.”

Mr Ronan said the Bahamas
is one of the most price com-
petitive destinations in the
region because of the limited
variation in the product
between cruise lines, whereas
other cruises will tend to go to
other locations and there is dif-
ferent demand.

“Where we are encouraged
is that the present government
has made serious drives, culmi-
nating with the recent signing of
the contract to do modifications
to the Harbour in Nassau,” he
said.

The Downtown Nassau Part-
nership, charged with spear-
heading the revitalisation of
Nassau, and the dredging of the
Harbour to accommodate the
world’s largest cruise vessel, the
Oasis of the Seas, will mean
that the Bahamas will not miss
any opportunities to accommo-
date newer ships looking for
world class ports of call, Mr
Ronan said.

Several tourism industry pro-
fessionals told this newspaper at
the CHTIC, under condition of
anonymity, that they were not
mmpressed by the state of New
Providence’s downtown area,
some saying they were
abhorred by what cruise pas-
sengers had to see as they dis-
embarked from their ships.
“They see the backs of what
looks like warehouses,” one
said.

The revitalisation of the
downtown area has been
mulled for years, through sev-
eral governments, and the cogs
now seem to be slowly grind-
ing to a start.

According to Mr Ronan,
Royal Caribbean continues to
expand its fleet with eight new

Bahamas Waste ‘shoots’ for 500 tonne recycling target

FROM page 1B

awful six months towards the end of last
year, we’re pleased. We’re a little bit down,
but still trying to hold our own.

“Total revenues are down. Not by much,
but they’re down. We’ve made a serious
attempt at cutting all of our costs. The one
saving grace at the moment is the fuel
costs.”

However, while fuel prices had dropped
as a result of the reduction in global oil
prices, the price of steel, tyres and oil lubri-
cants - all key ingredients in Bahamas
Waste’s business - had remained stubborn-
ly high.

Meanwhile, Mr de Cardenas said some
clients had dropped Bahamas Waste’s ser-

vices in a bid to save money. Some had
gone down from multiple to reduced col-
lections, and accounts receivables had
increased with some customer struggling

to pay.
Best

“We’re just trying to do our best,” he
added. “There’s talks that some develop-
ment projects are moving forward, some
are not. I won’t believe anything until I see
it.”

Writing in the annual report, Peter
Andrews, Bahamas Waste’s chairman, told
shareholders that the cancelling of con-
struction projects and reduction in tourist
arrivals had impacted two industries critical

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He wrote: “Although the storm clouds
were on the horizon, I do not think any of
us saw how quickly the September crash
of the international banking system would
affect our nation’s economy.”

As a result, the Board and Bahamas
Waste management had developed a strate-
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freeze on hiring and overtime expenses;
cutting costs; avoiding new capital spending;
and “maintaining flat budgets for all depart-
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“Our new projects will go ahead as
planned,” Mr Andrews added. “We feel
that this is not a time to panic, instead it is
atime to be prudent.”

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Manages Revenue leakage, establishes credit limits and reviews shipments to profile
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PAGE 4B, TUESDAY, APRIL 21, 2009

THE TRIBUNE



Real estate market seeing ‘slow down’

FROM page 1B

taking a ‘wait and see’ attitude.
I think we’re getting into the
dog days of summer, and we’ve
just got to hang tight.”

Bahamian realtors spoken to
in recent weeks by Tribune
Business have indicated that
while buyer demand has
dropped, due to a conservative
‘wait and see how the econom-
ic situation pans out’ approach,
business is still there to be done
and companies/agents just have
to “hustle more” to obtain it.

“There are buyers out there,”
one told Tribune Business yes-
terday. “From a Bahamian per-
spective, the biggest problem is
getting mortgage financing. The
banks are being a lot more cau-
tious about lending.”

Mr Wong added: “I believe
some of the banks are being a
little more attentive to detail
right now and are concerned
about not having any more




loans on the books that go into
default.

“T think they’re scrutinising
things a bit more closely now. I
think they’re becoming a bit
more careful that people com-
ing up pay deposits and qualify.
Like any business, the banks
are concerned about people los-
ing their jobs and the economy,
so they’re being a bit more
eagle eyed.”

The BREA president told
Tribune Business that the Gov-
ernment’s 2008-2009 Budget tax
incentives, designed to stimu-
late the first-time buyer seg-
ment of the domestic market,
had not produced the anticipat-
ed boost because they were
effectively cancelled out by the
severity of the 2008 second half
economic downturn.

The incentives had included
an increase in the real property
tax ceiling from $250,000 to
$500,000 for first-time home
buyers, for the first five years

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post-purchase. In addition, first-
time buyers were exempt from
Stamp Tax payments on the
purchase of real estate valued at
$500,000 or less.

“They were certainly good
incentives for the local market,
but at this point they’ve not
really had the kind of impact
we thought they would have
had,” Mr Wong said. “It came
at the start of the economic
slowdown, so there’s not been
that push to purchase proper-

ty.”

As for short-term assistance,
the BREA president told Tri-
bune Business that the only
thing the Government could do
to stimulate the Bahamian real
estate market was to re-assess
its decision to eliminate the
$35,000 real property tax ceiling
for owner-occupied properties.
This amendment had also seen
the real property tax rate
reduced to 0.75 per cent, down
from 1 per cent, on properties

valued in excess of $5 million.

BREA members have argued
that the ceiling’s removal made
the Bahamas uncompetitive
against the rest of the
Caribbean when it came to
attracting second home buyers,
giving this nation among the
highest tax rates on such prop-
erties.

Mr Wong told Tribune Busi-
ness he had met with Zhivargo
Laing, minister of state for
finance, on the issue. The min-

ister, he added, said the Gov-
ernment would see what it
could do to accommodate
BREA’s request in its ongoing
2009-2010 Budget planning
exercise.

Mr Wong said: “The rental
market is still very slow, because
you have so many units on the
market. Prices on those units
have come down quite a bit,
anywhere from 15-20 per cent
on condos, houses and every-
thing.”

$22m judgment sought
against Bahamas resort

FROM page 1B

cies representing the insurance
coverage on Chub Cay, as
required by the loan agreement,
were cancelled because the
developers had not paid the
premiums.

Despite a series of e-mail
exchanges between Mr McCro-
ry and BA Chub Cay Ltd, the
required insurance coverage
had not been reinstated by May
28, 2008, leading to the loan
default. Insurance coverage, the
court noted, still had not been
reinstated by October 10, 2008.

Messrs McCrory, Moss and
Pearson had argued that they
were not bound by any insur-

ance requirement under the
loan agreement, alleging that
BA Chub Cay Ltd had orally
dropped this condition. How-
ever, the court rejected this
claim.

Judge Rakoff ordered that
the trio’s attorneys submit by
tomorrow any objections they
had to BA Chub Cay Ltd’s pro-
posed judgment, with a final
judgment to be entered on
April 30, 2009.

In court documents previ-
ously detailed by Tribune Busi-
ness, 13 policies providing insur-
ance coverage to Chub Cay
were cancelled by the Bahami-
an agent, Nassau Underwriters

Share your news

The Tribune wants to hear

from people who are
making news in their

neighbourhoods. Perhaps
you are raising funds for a

good cause, campaigning
for improvements in the
area or have won an
award.

If so, call us on 322-1986
and share your story.

THE PUBLIC HOSPITALS AUTHORITY
MATERIALS MANAGEMENT DIRECTORATE

rier.
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PUBLIC NOTICE

TENDER FOR THE SUPPLY
OF LINEN / TEXTILE, CLEANING,
AND STATIONARY SUPPLIES

Tenders are invited from qualified Contractors for the supply
of Linen/Textile, Cleaning, Stationary Supplies for the Public
Hospitals Authority Institutions and Agencies for a period of one

(1) vear.

Tender documents,

which include

instructions to Tenderers,

specifications and other relevant information, can be collected 9:00
am. — 3:00 pom, Monday through Friday at the Materials
Management Directorate, Poncess Margaret Hospital's compound,

Shirley Street.

A Tender must be submitted in duplicate in a sealed envelope or

packaged identified

as “Linen/Textile, Cleaning,

Stationary Supplies ” and addressed to:

The Chairman
Tenders Committee

Public Hospitals Authority

3 & West Terraces
Centerville
P.O. Box N-8200
Nassau, Bahamas

and/ or

All Tenders must be received at the above address by 3:00 p.m. on

2â„¢ June 2009.

A copy of a valid business license and a certificate of up to date
National Insurance Contributions should accompany all proposal

The Public Hospitals Authority reserves the right to refect any or all

Tendery si.

Association (NUA), for non-
payment of premiums.

It was alleged that to rein-
state coverage, NUA required
the developers to pay $400,000
immediately, with the remaining
$194,440 balance paid off in
monthly instalments of $64,813.

In response, Mr McCrory said
he had sought to obtain alter-
native coverage through Sun-
shine Insurance Agents & Bro-
kers, holding numerous com-
munications with a senior exec-
utive, Brian Moodie. He alleged
that Cerberus indicated it would
be flexible on the insurance
question.

Chub Cay, which was

INSIGHT

For the stories
behind the news,
read Insight
on Mondays



unveiled with much fanfare as
the so-called ‘anchor project’
for the Berry Islands and North
Andros just five years ago, is
the first such major mixed-use
resort project to suffer being
placed into receivership.

Its fate is a prime example of
just how bad a toll the global
economic downturn, and espe-
cially the freezing of credit/debt
markets, has exacted on foreign
direct investment projects that
the Bahamas was counting on
to generate jobs and economic
growth. Numerous other pro-
jects, including the Ritz-Carl-
ton Rose Island, Royal Island,
Ginn sur mer and Rum Cay
Resort Marina, have all been
impacted to some degree by the
immense difficulty — if not
impossibility — of obtaining debt
financing at reasonable cost and
terms.

Apart from Scotiabank
(Bahamas) and other financiers,
Chub Cay’s woes have also
impacted Bahamian contractors
engaged on the project’s con-
struction. Tribune Business pre-
viously reported that Osprey
Developers and Gunite Pools
had obtained separate default
judgments worth a total
$468,000 against the develop-
ment over allegedly unpaid bills.

Bahamas Agricultural & Industrial Corporation

PRPS HATE RHT HAHAHAHAHAHA HAHAH ETHER KTR RETR

In Conjunction With

MINISTRY OF HEALTH

Presents

NEW PROVIDENCE |

COCONUT CRAFT TRAINING PROGRAM

Date:

Name:
Address:
Settlement:
Telephone:

P.O). Box

April 27" — May 8, 2009
Venue: Ministry Of Health
Cafeteria

Time:

6:00 - 10:00pm
Location: Poinciana Hill & Meeting

Street

Application Form

Cellular:

Email:

ADMINISTRATIVE FEE: $100. 00 [EXCLUDING MATERIALS]

Tel: 322-3740-3

LERERERERERE

Contact Person

LaKeisha Thompson or Sharae Collie
HANDICRAFT DEVELOPMENT/MARKETING DEPARTMENTS - B ATC

Fax: 322-2123/328-6542


THE TRIBUNE

TUESDAY, APRIL 21, 2009, PAGE 5B





Price structure, regulations hold up the
Bahamas Waste’s proposed biodiesel plant

FROM page 1B

be implemented.

Tribune Business revealed
yesterday that Bahamas Waste’s
managing director, Francisco de
Cardenas, writing in the com-
pany’s 2008 annual report, had
said it found the three-year wait
for governmental approval for
its biodiesel facility “puzzling”.

Yet Mr Neymour replied yes-
terday: “I don’t know why
they’re puzzled. What is the

case is that in approving
biodiesel production, we
required some regulatory
changes.

“For instance, a prime con-
cern would be how we would
price the biodiesel. Right now
the Bahamas, in relation to
imported gasoline and diesel, is
a regulated market based on the
landed price. A locally pro-
duced product requires a dif-
ferent pricing structure.”

Currently, the Bahamas only
has pricing structures for
imported fuels, such as gasoline

and diesel, which are price con-
trolled by the Government. The
prices are based on the landed
cost of fuel, as shown by oil
company invoices, with the cost
paid by end-users determined
by government-imposed taxes
and wholesale/retail margins.
“We also need to address the
waste streams coming from the
production of biodiesel,” Mr
Neymour told Tribune Busi-
ness, “the glycerin that is a by-
product of the production. How
do we address the waste streams
coming from the biodiesel.”

To assist it, Mr Neymour
indicated the Government had
“engaged the assistance” of the
Inter-American Development
Bank (IDB) and its technical
assistance branch. The IDB is
working with the Government
to aid its sustainable, renewable
energy initiatives, and as part
of this will assess Bahamas
Waste’s biodiesel proposal.

Mr Neymour indicated that
final decisions on the per-
mits/approvals needed for the
facility would be taken within
the next 12 months, as this is

International investment
demand slows to trickle

FROM page 1B

mer, but ’m more optimistic
about 2010. The summer will
give some great buying oppor-
tunities for people who are will-
ing, and have funds available to
buy securities.

“There are good opportuni-
ties there. There’s a bunch of
sellers out there who, if they
don’t take their stock off the
market, will end up selling at a
lower price.”

The RoyalFidelity president
said global stock markets were
starting to show signs that the
worst may be over, having for
the moment put the major cor-
rections of late 2008 and earlier
this year behind them (despite
yesterday’s plummet). The
Bahamian economy, though,
and the Bahamas International
Securities Exchange (BISX)
stocks - whose earnings perfor-
mance is directly linked to its
health - may have to wait a little
longer, possibly six months, for
recovery to bear fruit.

“Throughout the summer
period, we’ll see a stagnant

slowing economy which will hot
back earnings growth, and drop
earnings growth for the compa-
nies here,” Mr Anderson said.
Stock market and economic
recovery was instead likely to
filter through into late 2009, and
possibly 2010.

Bahamian equity investors,
both institutional, brokerage
and retail clients, had seen the
paper value of their equity
investments fall by around 20-30
per cent on average compared
to one year ago, with many
BISX-listed stocks currently
trading at 52-week lows.

Yet Mr Anderson said he was
hopeful that “the bulk of the
losses are behind the market
and we’re in the last phase of
the down market”.

He added: “There’s a lot
more upside in the market than
downside left. People selling out
now are getting out close to the
bottom, and now is the time to
look to buy more.”

With minimal buying cur-
rently taking place in the
Bahamian equities market, Mr
Anderson said sellers were hav-
ing to drop their asking prices to
find buyers, especially if they

NOTICE

ESSO EXPLORATI

N AND PRODUCTI

N_NIGER INC,

Pursuant to the provisions of Section 137 (8) of
the International Business Companies Act 2000,
notice is hereby given that the above-named
Company has been dissolved and struck off the
Register pursuant to a Certificate of Dissolution
issued by The Registrar General on the 2nd day

of April, A.D., 2009.

Dated the 17th day of April, A.D., 2009.

Gary Johnsen

needed liquid cash rapidly. As a
result, a “build-up” of selling
pressure, depressing stock
prices, had taken place over the
last six months.

With BISX’s ‘10 per cent’
rule still in effect, meaning that
trades can only take place with-
in a range of 10 per cent above
or below the previous day’s
close, Mr Anderson said it was
possible that a stock could drop
by as much as 50 per cent with-



in one week.

While such a “precipitous
drop” had not been seen yet,
Mr Anderson said Bahamian
public company stocks had
dropped by as much as 20 per
cent within a week.

Yet he pointed out that cur-
rently, stocks such as Cable
Bahamas and Doctors Hospi-
tal Health Systems (DHHS)
were trading at very attractive
price/earnings ratios.

Position WANTED:
REGISTERED NURSE










A Major Development in Southwest New Providence is
seeking a full time on-site registered nurse. The nurse
will be responsible for non-critical incidents/accident
to provide the necessary first aid and first responder








treatment.

Duties include but not limited to:-





Stabilization of any injured person/s until
they can be transferred to a clinic or
hospital facilities for complete evaluation

by a doctor.

Administer drug and alcohol testing to
construction and company staff if required.

Complete any reports required by in house
and relevant government agencies
regarding injuries or incidents on site.

Suitable candidates must have full medical liability

insurance coverage,

be technically trained and

a Ministry of Health approved/certified medical
professional with at least five (5) years experience in the
medical field. Emergency room experience is a plus.

Salary

is commensurate with qualifications and

the length of time it will take
the IDB to complete its work.

The minister described
biodiesel as a “key component”
of its renewable energy mix,
with the Bahamas Waste pro-
posal having already been
reviewed, and BEC’s renewable
energy committee also provid-
ing comments and feedback on
it to the Government.

“It [the Bahamas Waste pro-
ject] is being addressed under
the IDB project,” Mr Neymour
confirmed. “It is important to
recognise that our pricing and

regulatory tools do not address
locally-produced products, and
it’s important to put these things
in place.”

On the biodiesel front,
Bahamas Waste has been seek-
ing to further increase share-
holder value by developing a
plant capable of recycling the
waste cooking oil created by
households, restaurants and
cruise ships that visit New Prov-
idence. The company believes
500,000 gallons of waste cook-
ing oil are generated every year
on New Providence alone.

Clico (Bahamas) Limited

(In Liquidation)



LIQUIDATOR’S NOTICE



Policyholders of Clico

(Bahamas)

Limited (In

Liquidation) are advised that premium payments and
other policy transactions can be made at the Company's
main office, located on Mt. Royal Avenue and Carew









Street, Nassau, Bahamas,

Policyholders and the public are further advised that
office hours are from 9:00 am to 4:30 pm daily.








Craig A. (Tony) Gomez
Official Liquidater

Insurance Company seeks

Administrative Assistant

Qualifications:

+ Associate degree or higher in Business or related field, and/or, minimum of 1

year insurance or financial related experience.

Professional Skills:

+ Excellent written, verbal communication, organizational and customer service

skills

+ Ability to work in a fast paced industry with minimal supervision and be a self

starter.

Computer Skills:

* Proficient with MS Windows Operating System

* Proficiency in MS Office Suite- Word, Excel, Access

+ Knowledge of USSI Policy System would be a plus.

Duties:

+ Processing & Managing new and renewal policy applications.

+ Issue policies, endorsements, reinstatements and lapse notices.

+ Maintain policy number inventory listing, Corporate documents,

* Policy files and records.

+ Work closely with Broker & Third Party Administrator.

+ Process premium billing and collection, check deposits, policy maintenance, and

claims.

+ Handle incoming correspondence from insured and insured companies to

distribute accordingly.

+ Liaise with Insurance Managers, Board of Directors and Third Party

Administrators.

experience. Interested persons may send resume to

Liquidator of P.O. Box SP-63158

ESSO EXPLORATION AND
PRODUCTION NIGER INC.

Resumes should be forwarded to:
hr@hessmgmt.com

FG CAPITAL
BROKEBAG:

oe Maerker
ROYAL = FIDELITY
TAYLOR =n —_
INDUSTRIES LTD.

WILL BE CLOSED FOR
ANNUAL STOCKTAKING

cv E€I Mm Tt & TL.

FINDEX: CLOSE 797.05 | YTD -4.53% | 2008 -12.31%
WWW .BISXBAHAMAS.COM | TELEPHONE: 242-323-2330 | FACSIMILE: 242-323-2320

Securit y Previous Close Today's Close Change Daily Vol. EPS $ Div $ P/E

Abaco Markets 1.28 1.28 0.127
Bahamas Property Fund 11.00 11.00
Bank of Bahamas 6.95 6.95
Benchmark 0.63 0.63
Bahamas Waste 3.15 3.15
2.37
11.09
2.83
6.45
2.42
1.89
7.76
11.00
10.40
5.10
1.00

11.00
6.95
0.63
3.15
1.95

11.09
2.83
6.45
1.31
1.89
6.02

11.00

10.35
5.00
1.00

0.992
0.244
-0.877
0.105
0.055
1.309
0.249
0.438
0.099
0.240
0.420
0.322
0.794
0.337
0.000
0.035
0.407
0.952
0.180

Fidelity Bank
Cable Bahamas
Colina Holdings
Commonwealth Bank (S1)
Consolidated Water BDRs
Doctor's Hospital
Famguard
Finco
FirstCaribbean Bank
Focol (S)
Focol Class B Preference
Freeport Concrete
ICD Utilities
J. S. Johnson 10.50 10.50
Premier Real Estate 10.00 10.00
BISX LISTED DEBT SECURITIES - (Bonds trade on a Percentage Pricing bases)
Securi Symbol Last Sale
Fidelity Bank Note 17 (Series A) + FBB17 100.00 7%
Fidelity Bank Note 22 (Series B) + FBB22 100.00 0.00 Prime + 1.75%
Fidelity Bank Note 13 (Series C) + FBB13 100.00 0.00 T%
Fidelity Bank Note 15 (Series D) + FBB15 100.00 0.00 Prime + 1.75%
Fidelity Over-The-Counter Securities
Bid $ Ask $ Last Price
7.92 8.42 14.60
4.00 6.25 6.00
0.35 0.40 0.35
Colina Over-The-Counter Securities
30.13 31.59 29.00
0.45 0.55 0.55
BISX Listed Mutual Funds
NA Vv YTD% Last 12 Months
1.3664 0.95 4.77
2.8962 -1.49 -3.35
1.4508 1.20 4.68
3.1964 -5.59 -13.64
12.7397 0.96 5.79
100.5606
96.4070
1.0000
9.1599
1.0440
1.0364 0.33.
1.0452 0.76
MARKET TERMS
YIELD - last 12 month dividends divided by closing price
Bid $ - Buying price of Colina and Fidelity
Ask $ - Selling price of Colina and fidelity
Last Price - Last traded over-the-counter price
Weekly Vol. - Trading volume of the prior week
EPS $ - Acompany’s reported earnings per share for the last 12 mths
NAV - Net Asset Value
N/M - Not Meaningful
FINDEX - The Fidelity Bahamas Stock Index. January 1, 1994 = 100

2.37
11.09
2.83
6.45
2.58
1.89
7.76
11.00
10.40
5.10
1.00

CC OC CeCe Oro eS
2290990309090900000
666666556565656056

0.30

5.50

8.60
10.00

0.30
5.59

0.30
5.59

S2wk-Hi S2wk-Low
1000.00
1000.00
1000.00
1000.00

Interest

19 October 2017

19 October 2022
30 May 2013
29 May 2015

THURSDAY, APRIL 23
FRIDAY, APRIL 24
SATURDAY, APRIL 25

52wk-Low Symbol
Bahamas Supermarkets
Caribbean Crossings (Pref)

RND Holdings

Weekly Vol. EPS $ Div $ P/E
0.300
0.000

0.001

0.480
0.000

ABDAB
RND Holdings

4.540
0.002

0.000
0.000

Fund Name

Colina Bond Fund

Colina MSI Preferred Fund
1.3859 Colina Money Market Fund
3.1964 Fidelity Bahamas G & | Fund
12.1564 Fidelity Prime Income Fund

100.0000 CFAL Global Bond Fund

96.4070 CFAL Global Equity Fund
1.0000 CFAL High Grade Bond Fund
9.0950 Fidelity International Investment Fund
1.0000
1.0000
1.0000

Div $ Yield %
1.3041

2.9230

28-Feb-09
31-Mar-09
3-Apr-09
31-Mar-09
28-Feb-09
31-Dec-08
31-Dec-08
31-Dec-07
31-Mar-09
9-Feb-09
9-Feb-09
9-Feb-09

0.56
-3.59
0.00
0.71
0.80

0.56
-3.59
0.00
-12.76
4.40
3.64
4.40

We regret any
inconvenience this will
cause to our customers.

FG Financial Preferred Income Fund
FG Financial Growth Fund
FG Financial Diversified Fund

BISX ALL SHARE INDEX - 19 Dec 02 = 1,000.00
S2wk-Hi - Highest closing price in last 52 weeks
52wk-Low - Lowest closing price in last 52 weeks
Previous Close - Previous day's weighted price for daily volume
Today's Close - Current day's weighted price for daily volume
Change - Change in closing price from day to day
Daily Vol. - Number of total shares traded today
DIV $ - Dividends per share paid in the last 12 months
P/E - Closing price divided by the last 12 month earnings
(S) - 4for-1 Stock Split - Effective Date 8/8/2007
('S1) - S-for-1 Stock Split - Effective Date 7/11/2007
TO TRADE CALL: COLINA 242-502-7010 | ROYALFIDELITY 242-356-7764 | FG CAPITAL MARKETS 242-396-4000 | COLONIAL 242-502-7525


PAGE 6B, TUESDAY, APRIL 21, 2009

THE TRIBUNE





New concerns about bank
health grip Wall Street

@ MARTIN CRUTSINGER
AP Economics Writer

WASHINGTON (AP) —
Anxiety is growing again over
the health of the nation’s largest
banks, and with Congress hesi-
tant to commit more money,
the Obama administration is
exploring ways to strengthen
them in the face of an unrelent-
ing recession.

Results of the federal gov-
ernment's "stress tests" on big
banks are due May 4, and Wall
Street is increasingly worried
they will show some banks are
in worse shape than expected.

The renewed bank fears
drove the stock market down
on Monday in its worst showing
in six weeks. Bank of America
stock lost nearly a quarter of its
value, and the Dow Jones
industrial average fell almost
290 points.

Bank of America reported a
first-quarter profit of $2.8 bil-
lion, joining other banks whose
earnings reports have looked
positive at first blush. But some
analysts say accounting steps
are concealing the depth of the
financial industry's woes.

The banks have been helped
by income from trading and
cheap borrowing, but they are
still struggling with bad debt,
said Joe Saluzzi, co-head of
equity trading at Themis Trad-
ing LLC.

Investors are "looking at



bank numbers and are saying
they are not that great,” he said.

Among the ideas being
explored by the administration
is converting the government's
loans into equity stakes, which
would improve the banks’ bot-
tom lines by increasing their
capital reserves.

The Treasury Department
will outline Friday how it plans
to structure the stress tests,
which aim to gauge the health
of 19 big banks. So far, investors
have been too optimistic about
the results, warned Jaret
Seiberg, a financial services pol-
icy analyst at Washington
Research Group.

"What we're seeing is a re-
evaluation of those positions,”
he said. "Until we have finality
on what the stress tests will tell
us, the markets will be very jit-
tery about the banks.”

The $700 billion in bailout
money approved by Congress
last fall has dwindled to about
$135 billion, and the adminis-
tration is under pressure to
show it has other tools to
strengthen weaker banks.

Critics have complained that
the bailout money has failed to
get banks to resume more nor-
mal lending to consumers and
businesses. Increased lending is
seen as vital to ending the finan-
cial crisis.

Congress has signaled that
additional money is unlikely, in
part because of public outrage

NOTICE

NOTICE is hereby given that LASHAN MARIE MOSS of JOAN






HEIGHT’S, P.O. BOX CB-13475, NASSAU,

BAHAMAS,

is applying to the Minister responsible for Nationality and
Citizenship, for registration/naturalization as a citizen of The
Bahamas, and that any person who knows any reason why







registration/naturalization

should

not be granted, should

send a written and signed statement of the facts within
twenty-eight days from the 14 day of April, 2009 to the
Minister responsible for nationality and Citizenship, P.O. Box






N-7147, Nassau, Bahamas.

Last Name:
Company:
Telephone # Home:
FOX #:



AMONG the ideas being explored by the Obama administration is converting the government's loans into
equity stakes, which would improve the banks’ bottom lines by increasing their capital reserves...

over executive bonuses at banks
getting taxpayer money.

"They understand that we
need an exit strategy from the
continuing cycle of bailouts,”
said Rep. Spencer Baucus of
Alabama, top Republican on
the House Financial Services
Committee.

Asked Monday whether Con-
gress would provide more mon-

ey, House Financial Services
Committee Chairman Barney
Frank, D-Mass., said: "Not at
this point, no."

The government has lent
nearly $240 billion to more than
540 banks since fall, much of it
in return for preferred stock.
Holders of preferred stock are
paid back before holders of
common stock if a company

2,320 sq. feet located on
Mt. Pleasant Avenue off Carib Road

Available for immediate occupancy
Call 393-7020 for further details

First Name:
Title:

Work:
PO.Box:

Exact Street Address:

House #:
House Colour:
Requested Start Date:

House Name:
Type of Fence/Wall:

4
F |

barcitiess =
1S aon

= nue eo





Vee
- 502-2386

TODNY!

3 MONTHS | & MONTHS | 1 YEAR

U

goes bankrupt.

Converting government loans
from preferred stock into com-
mon shares might help reassure
investors and customers, though
it would hurt existing share-
holders by reducing the value
of their shares.

But some private economists
support the idea, noting that the
Treasury Department put such
a plan in place for Citigroup in
February as a way of restoring
confidence in the bank.

"T think Citigroup was a very
good test case,” said Sung Won
Sohn, an economics professor
at California State University
and a former president of a Los
Angeles bank. "It was a large
troubled bank that needed
more capital. Without the gov-
ernment's help, Citigroup could
have gotten into deeper trou-
ble."

Converting preferred stock
into common stock could show

lawmakers how far regulators
will go to buy time for financial
firms that need more capital,
said Simon Johnson, a professor
at the Massachusetts Institute
of Technology's Sloan School
of Management.

"In some ways, it's an appeal
for money," he said. "The stress
test is going to say they need

capital. ... So at some level,
they're communicating with
Congress."

Concerns about the banks
weighed heavily on financial
stocks Monday, and not just
Bank of America. Citigroup
stock lost 19 per cent of its val-
ue, Wells Fargo & Co. 16 per
cent and JPMorgan Chase 11
per cent.

The deepening recession only
makes business worse for the
banks, and the nation is still
waiting for sure signs that the
economy is improving, or at
least stabilizing.

On Monday, the Conference
Board said its monthly forecast
of economic activity fell 0.3 per
cent in March and has not risen
in nine months. The decline was
more than expected, but the
board did call for the recession's
intensity to ease this summer.

The government has said that
any banks found to need extra
capital under the stress tests will
be given six months to raise that
capital on their own. If they
can't, the government will pro-
vide it.

Some on Wall Street are
skeptical that the tests will be
tough enough.

"Of course, everyone will
pass because we don't want to
create a panic,” said Axel Merk,
president of Merk Investments.
"We're going to have the illu-
sion of healthy banks but they
won't want to lend."

¢ AP Economics Writer
Christopher S Rugaber, AP
Business Writer Daniel Wagner
and AP writers Deb Riechmann
and Anne Flaherty contributed
to this report.

LEGAL NOTICE

NOTICE

INTERNATIONAL BUSINESS COMPANIES ACT

(No.45 of 2000)

GUILFORD INVESTMENT
GROUP LTD.

Notice is

hereby given

that in accordance

with Section 138 (8) of the International Busi-

ness Companies Act,

No. 45

of 2000, the

Dissolution of GUILFORD INVESTMENT GROUP
LTD. has been completed, a Certificate of Dissolution
has been issued and the Company has therefore been
struck off the Register. The date of completion of the dis-
solution was the 6th day of April, 2009.



BUM acat ec caM TTR TT wta 2) fier

(the Tribune _
Estate



‘ai

io r


PAGE 8B, TUESDAY, APRIL 21, 2009



THE TRIBUNE





HEALTH



The Tribune



neaith





The importance
of exfoliation

DESQUAMATION is the
body's natural process of
exfoliation, or the shedding
of dry, old, hardened skin
cells so new cells can come
to the surface. In an oily skin
condition, desquamation can
be slowed, as oily skin acts
as a glue that holds dead skin
cells to the surface. This can
contribute to clogged follicles,
leading to the ‘build-up of oN, aaa!
acne bacteria which stimulates | Ps =~
the production of breakouts.

Exfoliation is especially



















helpful to those with oily skin. In addition to }
smoothing, improving skin tone and enhancing }
skin's receptiveness of oil-controlling ingredi- }
ents, exfoliation helps rid oily skin of dulling skin i

cells to help keep skin clear.

Your exfoliation regimen will depend heavily }
upon your professional skin analysis performed }
by a skin therapist. A professional skin thera- }
pist may recommend exfoliating with physical }
scrubs or chemical exfoliants, or both to deliver }
the desired result. They can advise you on how }
often to exfoliate, and how to successfully incor- :

porate exfoliation into your regimen.



URINARY

According to Dr Richard
Bridgewater of the Southern
Community General Clinic,
Urinary Incontinence (UI) or
Overactive Bladder is a com-
mon medical condition affect-
ing a significant number of
Bahamian women in particu-
lar, and is often undiagnosed
for a number of reasons.

Dr Bridgewater defined UI
as the overall weakening of
the bladder control muscles
where a person may experi-
OCT CMCC RICCO
lable urination, a condition
that has several risk factors.

He explained that risk fac-
tors increase for woman who
have had children (especially
large children), older persons,
those with a family history of
UI, and persons who have had
various types of surgeries.

OM iterem rial Copel mice
surgery as well as a hysterec-
tomies, while risk factors also
increase for persons who are
chronic smokers, have chronic
constipation, are obese or dia-
Lert Cu

For most sufferers, varied
types of uncontrolled urina-
tion may occur during laugh-
ter, exercise, coughing, sneez-
ing, jumping, or other activi-
ties which place pressure on
the abdomen.

Dr Bridgewater said that
although this condition is
ei Co mel come LoL CaM ie
has diagnosed several of his
own patients and feels there
exists a large number of undi-
PTO ACUTE
shame and fear to prevent
UMC M mC TmeO Ce
tion with their doctor.

Tee RC EN
ATOR MOM Cer Tal eae COLL
designed pads or pampers to
prevent wetting.

Men too can suffer from the
disorder, which in their case is
Peo eI WMe NMA M RER ELK
or glandular abnormalities.

Treatment for UI can range
from simple weight loss to
surgery, but should always be
diagnosed by a medical pro-
fessional such as an urologist
or gynocologist and obstetri-
cian (OBGYN) who specialis-
es in female urinary disorders
Lina

Pym uO roMe COMIC Kem ny
a common treatment used to

¢ Sarah Beek is a skin care therapist at the Dermal !
Clinic. Visit her and her team of skin and body thera- }
pists at One Sandyport Plaza (the same building as Bal- :

Wy’s Gym). For more information visit www dermal-clin- FROM L to R Staurt Chason Programme Manager for studentcity.com and gradcity.com,

ic.com or call 327.6788.

m@ By LLOYD ALLEN

correct UI, known as the
Kegels exercise.

“It’s a type of exercise that
the lady learns to stop her
flow of urine. She would go to
the restroom for example, and
as she is urinating she will
attempt to stop the stream of
flow, and will do that a couple
of times each time where she
should eventually develop a
mind body coordination so
that she can actually control
the sphincter muscles.”

The sphincter muscle or
urethral spincter is the group
of muscles which controls the
OM Ma TCR Com CC
der.

Dr Bridgewater explained
that as time continues, the
MADE MOM mA ULLe lh
be able to control the irregu-
lar flow of urine at other
times such as when she exer-
cises, coughs, jumps, or
laughs.

SCORE CMU MRC CME NE
include an examination of the
bladder for something known
as a cystocele - a condition
IQR ECA omits
bladder and vagina may
cero me VOM
to bulge into the vagina.

He explained: “The basic
premise of UI is where a nor-
mal person when feeling the
ORO UNTC Tom M EA CS
balanced pressure distributed
to both the bladder and ure-
CORAM Cem KES TT
no increased pressure on one
side or the other.

“With UI, there’s a prob-
lem where the pressure is
transferred too much to the
OETA oR oa
COCOA UO Com UD
thra, and where the end result
is where the bladder pushes
Uma Come a

Dr Bridgewater said if it is
determined that the individ-
ual suffers from a cystocele,
surgery may be the only mea-
CMA UUM TUG
tion.

He said although this condi-
tion may seem embarrassing
to some, it is by no mean a life
long condition, and with prop-
MIRC UIE MMO) Kec
allowing that person to
reclaim their freedom, mobili-
A MiCOmaN iC CoCeem mo. droge
encing life to its fullest.

? Ruth Strachan acting administrator at the Nazareth Centre, and Dereck Kaye, Programme
i Director for gradcity.com.

Tribune Features Reporter
lallen@tribunemedia.net

While going to the restroom for most
people is a normal bodily function, for
some people, incontinence or an over-
active bladder is such a serious prob-
lem that it affects their sense of control,
confidence and overall quality of life.




































































Studentcity.com and
gradcity.com donates
polo shirts to Children’s
Emergency Hospital

m@ By LLOYD ALLEN
Tribune Features
Reporter

lallen@tribunemedia.net

CHILDREN from the
Children’s Emergency

Hostel, the Ranfurly Home

for Children, and the
Nazareth Centre were
recently given 600 red Polo
shirts as a goodwill dona-
tion by studentcity.com
and gradcity.com last Fri-
day.

Dereck Kaye, pro-
gramme director for Grad-
City.com explained: “grad-
city.com and
studentcity.com have been
coming down here for over
20 years, and we’ve had
thousands of students com-
ing down where we’ve
been taking care of them,
so this gives us an opportu-
nity to give back to an
island that’s given so much
to our company and our



students as well.”
Mr Kaye explained that

beginning next year, the

company will be offering a
half day community service
option to spring breakers

willing to lend their time

and assistance to various
community groups.

“We'd like to offer basi-
cally three different homes
and allow our students to
come and interact with the
kids and give back to the
community,” he said.

During last week’s dona-
tion, the representatives
met with the various facili-
ty administrators and gave
them several dozen red

polo shirts in various sizes

for the children of their
homes. Organisers are
hoping that the initial
donation is the first of
many bridges bringing
together the local commu-
nity with studentcity.com
and gradcity.com.
THE TRIBUNE

TUESDAY, APRIL 21, 2009, PAGE 9B






os al Le ,
= i J

The
passage

‘time

By MAGGIE

aon



(AY LOVING RELATIONSHIPS i

EVEN as far back as 5000 BC and the birth of Tandra, the ancient East-
ern science of spiritual enlightenment, there has been interest in human
sexuality. In our lifetime it was Masters and Johnson's report in 1966 that
grabbed the public's attention to the concept of a four stage sexual
response cycle and from there evolved the special study of sex therapy.

Educating ourselves about human sexuality
allows us to understand ourselves and our
behavior. By taking the time to really try and
understand our own sensual and sexual needs we
find that there are in fact natural and predictable
changes that occur on average every decade
throughout our lives. These are partly due to our
individual needs and gender but perhaps more
significantly our sex hormones which strongly
drive our desires. As we know, men peak physi-
ologically in their teens and psychologically in
their fifties. This is partly due to the lowering of
hormone levels but also due to maturing traits
such as touching, tenderness, insight, patience
and understanding. Women peak sexually in
their thirties and forties following their child
rearing years and psychologically in their fifties.
As women mature they often display qualities
such as decisiveness, assertiveness, indepen-
dence and an increased sensuality.

As predictable as a person's sexual stage may
be it is by no means typical. A sexual stage
includes the emotional and physiological make
up of an individual and also that of the relation-
ship. So as you can see if you have a partner
close to your own age then it is not surprising
that you may seem sexually and emotionally
incompatible. You may feel life is a constant tug
of war but if you can ride the storm then there is
hope. As you can see men and women reach a
plateau in their fifties and there is often a pre-
vailing sense of calm and togetherness. Barring
debilitating diseases many such enviable couples
can look forward to a continued sex life for
many years. This has become a possible reality
due to the availability of hormone replacements,
medications and aids to help erectile function.
These aids have great value but are no supple-
ment if they are without the essential ingredient
- an abundance of touch. Touching is the super-
glue of a relationship and produces our own nat-
ural bonding agent; oxytocin. Our bodies crave
touch because of the high that it produces and it
is this that endures throughout the years.

Life however does not always flow so smooth-
ly for some people. Transitioning from one
decade may be disrupted by divorce or death.
Some appear to skip stages; for example men





Our own attitudes and
perceptions towards sexuality
have undoubtedly been
imbedded trom our early
childhood but that does not
mean that it can not change
as we grow and mature.



who fail to commit or women who have their
children late in life, whilst others may continue
on in one stage and they present to us with sexu-
al problems. If we view these as life's hurdles
then finding our inner peace and fulfilling our
true sexual potential will not seem a fantasy but
a reality. If we slow down and take stock of our
lives and look honestly within ourselves then we
can turn things around. Our own attitudes and
perceptions towards sexuality have undoubtedly
been imbedded from our early childhood but
that does not mean that it can not change as we
grow and mature. We have to learn from all our
past experiences. We have all seen people make
dramatic changes in their lives and enter a new
decade with a stronger sense of self and their
relationships improve. We are not born knowing
all these things but we can learn them if we are
willing. Living life with a sense of wonder,
curiosity and a big open heart will allow us to
become the person we were meant to become
and live the life we were meant to live.

¢ Margaret Bain is an Individual and Couples
Relationship Therapist. She is a Registered Nurse
and a Certified Clinical Sex Therapist located at The
Centre for Renewing Relationships, Grosvenor's
Close West. She can be contacted by calling 356-
7983 or by e-mail at relatebahamas@yahoo.com or
at www.relatebahamas. blogspot.com. She is avail-
able for speaking engagements.

By GARDENER JACK



(GY GREEN SCENE

Cuttings are easy



SOME plants reproduce by sending
up suckers, others by forming new
tubers or bulbs underground. Most,
however, rely on seeds but not all plants
are prodigious seeds producers.

Many of our favourite flowering
shrubs like bougainvillea and hibiscus
are rare seeders and need a little help
from their owners to form new plants.
This is easily done by taking cuttings:
removing a section of the plant and
encouraging it to grow independently.

The secret behind cuttings is the pres-
ence of bumps or scars along the length
of astem or branch. These growth nodes
have the ability to produce leaves and
new branches if they are above ground
but produce roots if they are below
ground.

The basic process is to remove a stem
from the parent plant by cutting just
below a growth node and to then cut
away excess length just above a growth
node. Cuttings are best made from
branches or stems that have a covering
of bark. It is very tempting to make cut-
tings of fresh green growth but these
need specialised attention and are called
tip cuttings.

The total length of a cutting does not

need to exceed 10 inches. A long cutting
will be affected by the wind and cause
the bottom of the cuttings - where we
want roots to form — to move around
and hinder root development. Even with
a short cutting it is best to plant at a 45
degree angle to lessen the effect of wind.

Many gardeners favour removing all
foliage from a cutting; others like to
leave bud clusters and small leaves, or
even larger leaves that they cut in half. I
find that softer plants like hibiscus do
well with a little foliage attached while
harder woods like bougainvillea are best
stripped bare.

Cuttings should have the bottom 4
inches buried in either potting soil in a
container or straight into the ground
where they are to grow. The soil for
these should be worked over and be
nice and friable in order to promote root
growth, but do not add any fertiliser to
the soil as this may burn delicate roots as
they form.

Resist the temptation to push your
cuttings into the soil. This will damage
the tissue below ground and compact
the soil exactly where we need it to be
friable. Instead, dig a small hole, set
your cutting upright and fill the hole

back in. Firm the soil around and water
lightly.

The area around new cuttings should
be kept damp but not waterlogged. Too
much water will promote rot. Some gar-
deners use a product called rooting hor-
mone that will speed up the rooting
process. It is not really necessary when
you grow cuttings at this time of year but
is useful when you try to grow them out
of season. Most manufacturers of root-
ing hormone include a fungicide in their
product and this is beneficial. If you
have rooting hormone, by all means use
it.

If you start your cuttings in a pot make
sure you do not have them too close
together. At some point you will have to
remove the new plants and if the roots
are entwined you will have a problem.
The pot is best kept in partial shade and
then moved gradually into full sun once
foliage has developed. Cuttings put into
the soil where they are to grow perma-
nently must be in full sun if the parent
plant was in full sun.

When are the container-grown cut-
tings ready to be transplanted? In no
less than two months, three months
being better. Soft cuttings root more

quickly than hard cuttings like
bougainvillea. Gardeners are naturally
patient people and know not to try and
hurry Mother Nature along.

Multiple cuttings can be usually be
taken from one limb that is severed from
the parent plant. Oleander limbs are
usually long and can give up to half-a-
dozen cuttings.

Back to tip cuttings. These are usual-
ly raised in a misting bed but the home
gardener can achieve tip cutting success
by planting a single end of a branch ina
3-gallon container of moist soil. Push
three (or four) bamboo canes into the
soil close to the rim so they stand about
12- inches tall. Then drape a 2-gallon
clear plastic storage bag over all and
secure the bag to the outside of the pot
with tape.

What you have achieved is a self-con-
tained unit. Moisture from the soil will
evaporate in heat and then condense in
cooler conditions so you do not have to
do any watering. Plastic intensified the
effect of the sun so your container with
your tip cutting should be kept in light
shade. I have found this method to be
particularly affective with Bridal Bou-
quet frangipani and rose cuttings.



The day
my nails
turned
black

@ By ALEX MISSICK
Tribune Features
Reporter
amissick@tribunemedia.net

AS women get older,
many changes occur in their
bodies. Everything from
menopause to weight gain
can be a constant bother in
their busy everyday lives.
However, in a society where
beauty is a must and perfec-
tion is a high goal to reach,
some women notice a prob-
lem with the pigmentation
in their nails.

The manicure and pedi-
cure business in the
Bahamas is a big one with
women getting pedicure and
manicure services everyday
for relaxation or beauty pur-
poses.

Genevieve Thompson, a
40 year old mother of three,
said she noticed a dark dis-
coloration of her toe nails
during a trip to the salon.

“The young lady was
soaking my feet and I
noticed the dark lines on my
toe nails as she was polishing
them. I paid it no mind
thinking it was a vitamin
deficiency or something I
had eaten. I even went as far
as thinking it was the type
of polish I was using. I was
rather alarmed but did not
pay much attention to it,”
Mrs Thompson said.

Doctor of Podiatric Medi-
cine, Monique Mitchell, said
this is a problem called
melanonychia that can occur
in older persons of darker
complexion.

“A lot of coloured people
have that as a normal variant
in toe and finger nails. It can
be caused by a vitamin defi-
ciency of vitamin B12 and
mostly occurs because of
increased production of
melanin, a pigment found in
the skin of darker people, by
melanocytes in the nail
matrix,” Mrs Mitchell said.

According to a book
called McCarthy’s Principles
and Practices of Podiatric
Onchopathy, Melanonychia
is “a brown or black longitu-
dinal stripe of hyper pig-
mentation of the nail, either
partial or complete. 77 per
cent of Black individuals old-
er than 20 years and almost
100 per cent older than 50
years have melanonychia.
The number and width of
the streaks also increases
with age. Melanonychia
most often occurs because
of increased production of
melanin by melanocytes in
the nail matrix. This results
in a visible band of pigment-
ed cells on the nail plate.
These streaks tend to be
multiple and lightly pig-
mented which differs from
the single darker streak typ-
ical of melanoma.”

Mrs Thompson said she
was insecure about the
markings, but is learning to
accept them.

“T would love to get rid of
the marks because I have
always had healthy nails.
Having those streaks come
up made me feel like I had
unhealthy nails. I stopped
wearing closed in shoes hop-
ing but I now use polish to
keep it covered,” Mrs
Thompson said.

The causes of Melanony-
chia are many, and according
to emedicine.com, can be
due to pregnancy, trauma,
poor fitting shoes, radiation
therapy, AIDS, malnutrition
and many more.

“Tf you all of a sudden get
a black on your toe nail, you
should get it checked out just
so that we would know how
to treat it. Ifit is normal, you
can get it as a young adult
or child. The only alarming
thing is when the streaks or
spot just showed up,” Mrs
Mitchell said.
PAGE 10B, TUESDAY, APRIL 21, 2009



Terrance Strachan/TLC Photo

FROM LEFT: Glenn Archer, President, Bahamas Golf Federation; Yvonne Shaw, Chairman, Ladies Division and Asst Secretary, Bahamas Golf Federation; Andrea Sweeting,
President, Sister, Sister, Breast Cancer Arm of the Cancer Society of The Bahamas; Sandra Ferguson-Rolle, Vice President, Sister, Sister and Gennie Dean, Treasurer, Sister,
Sister.

Golfing for

cancer

Bahamas Golf
Federation hosts
upcoming Sister
Sister Breast
Cancer Charity
Golf Tournament



aa ee eye Og

THE UN

m@ By LLOYD ALLEN
Tribune Features Reporter

lallen@tribunemedia.net

ACCORDING to recent unemploy-
ment figures calculated by the govern-
ment, more than 15,000 Bahamians
have been either job hunting without
success, or are discouraged from find-
ing a job over the past four years, an
unfortunate circumstance blamed on
the contracting local job market .

Because of this reality, the govern-
ment introduced an unemployment
assistance package earlier this month,
where those who’ve been out of work
for up to four years could receive some
financial support over a 13 week peri-
od.

Backed by a $20 million National
Insurance Board (NIB) medical/unem-
ployment benefit fund, this national
initiative is the most recent move by
the government to aid those most
affected by unemployment.

As initial media reports indicated,
774 unemployed persons applied at the
various application processing centers .
A question that has become increas-
ingly relevant after the “poor” turnout
of applicants during the first phase of
this initiative, is whether the govern-
ment has done enough to help hurting
Bahamians.

This week, the Barbershop went into
the Englerston community to hear what
some residents had to say.

Tribune Features visited the Here-
Cuts barbershop and car-wash on
Cordeaux Avenue and Acklins Street,
and asked several persons their views
on the matter.

First up was the proprietor of Here-
Cuts, C Antwan Bethel, who said
although there are many who would
benefit from the government’s unem-
ployment assistance package, there are
some persons with two jobs still apply-
ing for the assistance.

He said: “There are some people
with more than one job, they can prove
that they are unemployed because of
losing one of those jobs, yet they would
still claim for that benefit knowing that
they are making money on that other
job, yet someone else who really needs
it can’t get it.”

Mr Bethel added that with the coun-
try’s finances already compromised,
some of those individuals who are now
relying on the government for some
relief, “are the same people who would
cheat on custom duty, the same who
would have unscrupulous NIB claims,
and I think we as a people need to look
within ourselves and be fair about all
the efforts that are being made.”

Mr Bethel added, that apart from
the government initiatives, the average
Bahamian needs to make an effort in
helping those in their community in
any way they can.

On the flip side, 21-year-old con-
struction worker Stencil Gardiner, a
Bain Town resident, feels the govern-
ments efforts in providing various stim-
ulus and unemployment benefits have
helped in giving hope to many who
were on the verge of committing sui-
cides in months past.

Mr Gardiner argues: “I feel like the
number of suicides are reducing, so it

@ By ALEX MISSICK
Tribune Features Reporter
amissick@tribunemedia.net

AS Bahamian women continue to
show support for the fight against can-
cer in the country, The Bahamas Golf
Federation has decided to go a step
further by hosting the Sister Sister
Breast Cancer Charity Golf Tourna-
ment on May 9 to assist in providing
important medical equipment and
financial support for women fighting

the deadly disease.

Although The Bahamas Golf Fed-
eration has always supported the Can-
cer Society in The Bahamas through
their ladies’ golf tournaments, this
year a conscious decision was made to
target a special group of ladies that
work really hard to support females
diagnosed with breast cancer-the Sis-
ter Sister Organisation.

The Bahamas Golf Federation Cen-
tral Ladies Division and the Blue
Shark Golf Club are not only asking
persons to come out and play but also
to send donations to help support the
event.

Sister Sister not only supports
women financially by supplying much
needed portacath a device which is
inserted in the chest for the patient to
receive medication but also provide
much needed emotional support and
hope by example. The portacath is a

very expensive device costing $770.
Sister Sister tries to donate at least
five of these devices each month, an
effort that seriously depletes their
resources. It is said that it is not the
cancer that kills, but the lack of treat-
ment. Most of the women volunteers

working in the organisation are breast }
; self around them.

cancer survivors and therefore use
their personal experiences to encour-

ingful life.

ested persons can contact Yvonne
Shaw, chairman of the Central Ladies
Division at 324-2377 or download
sponsor forms and player registration
forms from the BGF website:
www.bgfnet.com Donations may be
sent to PO Box SS-19092. Registra-
tion forms may also be collected from
Ocean Club, Lyford Cay, Cable
Beach and Blue Shark Golf Courses.

EMPLOYMENT DILEMA

has to be something that the govern-
ment is doing right.

“A lot of people were burdened, they
had no jobs, searching for a way to pay
their bills, and that was too much for
them, so the government in my view
has done a good job so far.”

Now into his eight month at a con-
struction job soon to be completed, Mr
Gardiner said unlike many of his coun-
terparts who are unsure about their
future, he intends to begin culinary
training in the fall at a Florida college.

He said although saving for his
dream has been especially difficult in
recent months, it was necessary in order
to accomplish his dream of one day
becoming a chef.

“Now is not the time to be doing
unnecessary things that aren’t called
for, because that will only leave you
with bills, just guide your money and
use it for what you need.”

Terrence Brennen, a 37-year-old
manger at Here-Cuts Carwash
explained the economic situation in the
Englerston community is critical.

He said with his business only able to
employ a staff of three, he is forced to
turn countless men away daily. He
explained the ongoing economic slum
has also caused him to reduce the price
of a carwash from $15 to $12.

Mr Brennen said: “People who need
to survive, are trying to survive just like
I’m trying, but I had to run little spe-
cials like the Easter special in order to
promote my business.”

Adding to the discussion on whether
recent initiatives by the government
are adequate for those facing financial
deficiencies, Mr Brennen said although
there have been a good number of ini-
tiatives started, there remains a need
for more support from the government.

“The government has a habit of help-
ing people who are already wealthy,
and there are people in homes whose
lights are off, starving, these are the
things that need to be addressed from
the root.”

He said rather than the government
“running the country from the walls of
Parliament and Cabinet they need to
get up and walk around” to get a better
understand of the needs of Bahamians.

Twenty seven-year-old professional
Don Clarke said although changing
times have dictated a need to spend
more wisely, properly budgeting
finances is still the surest means of
directing one‘s future.

He explained: “I feel like if you pin-
point your budget from January, and
you allocate your funds on how you
are going to spend it, you would be
able to have some kind of savings at
the end of the year.”

Mr Clarke said because of his own
ability to budget his money from early
on in life, he has been able to convert a
property left to him by his father into
triplex to provide him with a source of
income.

He said despite whatever assistance
the government is able to offer those in
need, self discipline is still the only way
of securing a good future.

To view and add further comments
to this conversation, send an e-mail to
lallen@tribunemedia.net or comment
on our Facebook page ‘Tribune News
Network.’



“The government
has a habit of
helping people
who are already
wealthy, and there
are people in
homes whose
lights are off,
starving, these are
the things that
need to be
addressed from
the root.”

- HERE CUTS

CAR-WASH MANAGER
TERRENCE BRENNEN



“Now is not
the time to
be doing
unnecessary
things that
aren’t called
for, because
that will only
leave you
with bills,
just guide
your money
and use it for
what you
need.”



“T feel like if
you pin-point
your budget
from January,
and you allo-
cate your funds
on how you are
going to spend

able to have
some kind of
savings at the
end of the
year.”

Secrets to choosing
the right relationships

age women to not despair and to show | 80m God created you to be -

they can still have a productive mean- } relationships will allow you to see the
: real you and their presence in your life
To sign up for the tournament inter- Will cause you to become kinder, loving,
? and more sensitive to others. You will
? experience the freedom to unleash your
i gifts and talents with no reservations.
? Their presence in your life encourages

: you to fulfill your purpose and destiny.

it, you would be ? you are not meant to be alone and you
? are capable of finding the relationships
? that are right for you. When you choose
? relationships based on these secrets, you
? will come into a life-long relationships
i that will bring you fulfillment and enable
? you to experience true joy and happi-
: ness.

- DON CLARKE |
: lron Network. Email:
: ironnetwork.org@gmail.com

THE TRIBUNE

BAS ETI aN
BROWN



IN order to receive the benefits of hav-

? ing successful relationships in your life,
? you must be able to identify persons with
? whom you can enjoy healthy fulfilling
: relationships in every aspect of your life.
? In the past, many have experienced fail-
? ure in relationships, but the failures have
? not been as a result of people; it has been
? because of the inability to pick persons
} who are right.

In order to be successful in life and

? gain the benefits of relationships, you
: must be critical of who you invest your
? life in. The ability to determine good
? character in people is one of the key
? ways in determining who should be a
? part of your life. Here are some of the
: things you should look for in determining
: whether a relationship is right for you:

SECRETS TO CHOOSING
THE RELATIONSHIPS THAT
ARE RIGHT FOR YOU
1. They make you feel loved - You

? believe in your heart that they want the
? best for you and that they are willing to
? work with you in achieving the best for
? your life. They accept you just as you

are and give you the freedom to be your-

2. They bring you closer to the per-
The right

3. They bring you into other relation-

: ships - Your life was created to increase
? and any relationship that exists in your
? life should bring you into other connec-
? tions through that relationship i.e. you
? should have more mentors, friends, cus-
? tomers ete.

4. They help you to embrace both the

: good and the bad in your life - You are
? not perfect; the right relationships for
? you will celebrate your strengths and
? assist you with overcoming your weak-
? nesses. They will not judge or condemn
: you for the bad they see in you but they
? have the patience and the maturity to
: help you grow into the person you were
? created to be.

5. They give you freedom to be an

: adult - Being an adult requires that you
? make decisions without permission from
? others, that you choose your own values
? and opinions, develop your own person-
? al likes and dislikes, that you exercise
: your gifts, manage your own responsi-
? bilities, and that you are able to relate to
? other adults as peers inclusive of your
? parents and spiritual authority. The right
? relationships for you should bring you
? out of a one-down relationship and
? should eliminate the belief that people
? are above you. Their presence in your
: life should encourage you to pursue what
? you truly want for your life and not what
? they want for you. Essentially, the right
: relationship eliminates the desire to peo-
? ple please and helps you to focus on the
? best for your life with their consultation
? but without needing their approval.

6. They are an adult - You were creat-

? ed to exercise authority over your own
? life. Some of the best relationships for
? you are with people who are carryin

- 21-YEAR-OLD : sia The
STENCIL GARDINER } people that are right for you are those
? that are emotionally independent adults
? with no inappropriate support from their
? parents or any other authority. They
; manage their own finances, make their
? own decisions, maintain a spiritual life,
? are capable of maintaining their own sus-
? tenance and are pursuing their purpose
? and destiny with freedom.

out this command in their own lives. The

7. They are willing to invest in your

: growth and development - The right rela-
? tionships for you should have a willing-
? ness to help you become what you were
? purposed to become. They will invest in
? your growth and development by seeking
? out ways for you to mature in every
? aspect of your life.

8. They are equally yoked with you -

? Being equally yoked with someone
? means that you are able to connect with
? individuals at three levels: 1) spiritually 2)
? soulfully 3) physically. You are created a
: tri-part being (body, soul, and spirit) and
i the best relationships for you are the
? ones in which you can relate at all three
: levels. The right relationships for you are
? the ones that you share similar spiritual
? beliefs with, have social compatibility
? with ie similar family patterns, similar
_ ? mindsets on relating to people, have sim-
: ilar communication style, and share intel-
? lectual compatibility, you should also
? share some physical connection or attrac-
; tion to the persons that are right for you.

9. They always make you feel like

: a friend - The most important charac-
: teristic of any relationship that is right for
? you is that they make you feel like a
: friend. Right relationships always extend
? a bond of friendship to you and always
? make you comfortable with being your
? true self. With every decision that is
? made within the relationship, you have
} peace that they always have your best
: interest at heart.

‘You were created for a relationship,

¢ Sherika Brown, CEO & Founder of the



se




TUESDAY, APRIL 21st, 2009, PAGE 11B

INSURANCE MANAGEMENT

(BAHAMAS) LIMITED. INSURANCE BROKERS & AGENTS
Marine FORECAST










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ORLANDO N Ankara, Turkey 72/22 41 ¢ 65/18 44/6 t ABACO Today: W at 10-20 Knots 2-4 Feet 10-20 Miles 77°F
High:82°F/28°C Clouds giving way to Partly cloudy with a Partly cloudy. Sunny and windy. Partly sunny with a Partly sunny, a The higher the AccuWeather UV Index™ number, the Athens 68/20 55/12 sh 66/18 54/12 s Wednesday: NW at 12-25 Knots 1-3 Feet 10-20 Miles TE
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© : FT. LAUDERDALE FREEPORT m* Year to date New First Full iat Dublin 57/13 45/7 pc 55/12 45/7 po
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Low: 65° F/18°C ered Low: 68° F/20° C AccuWeather a eo oe Geneva 65/18 45/7 pc 69/20 43/6 s
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all, i Low: 67° F/19° C NASSAU eS ome Islamabad 97/36 63/17 pe 97/36 62/16 ¢ Flurries Shown are noon positions of weather systems and veld
High: 84° F/29° C oe: Istanbul 68/20 56/13 ¢ 58/14 46/7 + Shaw precipitation. Temperature bands are highs for the day. Warm Low: 74° F/23°C Jerusalem 79/26 55/12 s 90/32 55/12 s Forecast high/low temperatures are for selected cities. Stationary -@ 2.
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KEY WEST => a: Kingston 86/30 78/25 sh 86/30 78/25 + .
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High: B1GE/276G High: 82° F/28° C London 68/20 45/7 pc 68/20 46/7 s
Low: ae eas re Low: 73° F/23°C Madrid 72/22 37/2 § 73/22 39/3
@ ‘alll, , Manila 90/32 79/26 t 85/29 77/25 t
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—_— High: 85° F/29° C High: 86° F/30°C Moscow 39/3 27/-2 sf 39/3 25/-3 pc
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Shown is today's weather. Temperatures are today's _ANDROS | f Nairobi 85/29 65/18 t 84/28 63/17 t
highs and tonights's lows. High: 89° F/32° C - New Delhi 106/41 77/25 s 102/38 79/26 s
Low: 78° F/26° C = Oslo 52/11 41/5 c 55/12 39/3 N t
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Anchorage 50/10 31/0 51/10 34/1 s Jacksonville 78/25 51/10 s 80/26 55/12 s Phoenix 99/37 69/20 s 97/36 67/19 s CROOKED ISLAND / ACKLINS Santo Domingo 88/31 70/21 sh 84/28 69/20 sh eople pean trust
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Charleston, SC 77/25 51/10 s 74/23 49/9 s Memphis 68/20 49/9 pce 75/23 58/14 s San Antonio 87/30 58/14 s 87/30 61/16 s Bon ag 6 t inal sifienteensee molec
Chicago 467 37/2 sn S512 41/5 po Miami 85/29 67/19 t 82/27 71/21 s SanDiego 76/24 GO/IS pc 68/20 58/14 pc High: 90° F/32"C cous SSMS OS BSD aoa Sale al (BAHAMAS) LIMITED. INSURANCE BROKERS & AGENTS
: . : Low: 76° F/24° C Trinidad 88/31 73/22 t 82/27 72/22 sh Co
Cleveland 52/11 38/3 sh 48/8 35/1 ¢ Minneapolis 58/14 38/3 pce 63/17 48/8 San Francisco 80/26 48/8 pce 65/18 51/10 s Vemeanvai 64/17 47/8 pe 56/13 «41/5 c j Hew Provid Grond Bah tha i h :
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Denver 74/23 45/7 s 78/25 44/6 $ New Orleans 77/25 5713 pe 81/27 61/16 s Tallahassee 78/25 49/9 s 80/26 52/11 $s Warsaw 54/12 32/0 s 56/13 38/3 s j AM) 1 f
Detroit 49/9 36/2 sh 50/0 37/2 c New York 6417 49/9 t 60/15 44/6 sh Tampa 77/25 5814 pe 81/27 62/16 s i Winnipeg 50/10 32/0 s 56/13 40/4. pc t Tee (DA) 50 Tee (282) 390-3500 Tel (240) S744 Va: (242) 332-2042 Tet (240) S34-2304
Honolulu 79/26 67/19 sh 81/27 68/20 s Oklahoma City 81/27 53/11 pce 85/29 58/14 s Tucson 95/35 61/16 s 93/33 60/15 $s — : : 7 : — —
Houston 4/28 58/14 s 84/28 62/16 s Orlando 82/27 57/13 pc 83/28 60/15 s Washington,DC 67/19 47/8 t 61/16 41/5 Tho ee




@ By ALEX MISSICK
Tribune Features Reporter
amissick@tribunemedia.net

MOST women have jewelry
boxes filled with items for
every outfit they own. Howey-
er, as times are currently not
favorable for expensive jewel-
ry purchases, it would be an
advantage to have just one
piece that could match with
every outfit. This is what Lucy
Babb had in mind when she
started her line of jewelry.

Unique, dazzling and nothing short
of spectacular are the caliber of pre-
cious and semi precious stone jewelry
found at B’jou Classique located on
Mount Royal avenue. B’Jou specialis-
es in the interchangeable clasp system
where you can purchase one necklace

THE TRIBUNE

and then add a wide variety of inter-
changeable clasps in any style, any
stone and any color.

“We are one of the only companies
here in New Providence that can drill
any type of stone. We also string neck-
laces and we try to manufacture differ-
ent pieces. Most of our material or
parts come from Germany so the sys-
tem we have adopted is a German
type system. The interchangeable sys-
tem we have is where a woman can
dress in a very nice piece and inter-
change to enhance her appearance.
This allows her to not be limited to the
regular conventional pearl where it is
the same look all the time. The focal
piece on the interchangeable system is
the clasp piece. This takes it to anoth-
er level,” Mrs Babb said.

She noticed that ladies wanted dif-
ferent beautiful pieces as a centerpiece
on their necks and to have total free-
dom for personal design and creativi-
ty.

“We have times when ladies would
compete against each other and want

TUESDAY, APRIL 21,

to look better than the next person. So
they come in and out do the other lady
or they see someone wearing a certain
piece, they would want that exact
clasp,” Mrs Babb said.

Mrs Babb said although she enjoys
being exclusive, she has opened her
craft and her doors to others who want
to learn the business.

“Since I have been open to the pub-
lic I have helped numerous people
train and showed them how to string
and drill. It’s enough for all of us to
eat. I believe you should help people
learn the craft so you do not ‘hog up’
the craft. At least if you were to die
today someone else would continue
with the trade,” Mrs Babb said.

A few of the most common stones
her clients wear are fresh water pearls,
black onyx, amethyst, chalcedony,
rhodochrosite, chrysophate, tiger eyes,
cat eyes, smokey quartz, sun stones,
mother of pearl chips, mother of jade,
the native conch shell and many oth-
ers.

“One of my unique pieces is the

2009

Bahamian gold piece coin converted
into an interchangeable clasp. It’s a
masterpiece around your neck when
you wear it,” Mrs Babbs said.

Mrs Babbs said because she believes
in the upliftment of Bahamians, she
carries straw bags from five popular
designers throughout the country.

“Our girls spend a lot of money,
sometimes $500-$600 on Gucci, Fendi
and Versace but look at the unique-
ness to our work. Every piece is made
differently. I have taxi drivers bringing
tourists here because they want straw
bags that can not be found in the straw
market because they only seem to sell
designer knock offs. When the tourists
come they want all things Bahamian,”
Mrs Babbs said.

Mrs Babbs said she aims to work
with ladies because she knows jewelry
is not a necessity.

“My customers like the versatility of
our system. We prepare jewelry as an
art form to enhance a woman’s beauty
because we want to help them save on
cost and still look beautiful.”





B'Jou
specialises

in the inter-
changeable
clasp system
where you
can purchase
one necklace
and then add
a wide variety
of interchange
able clasps in
any style, any
stone and any
color.

Discover the goodness
of Ovaltine.

Ovaltine’s unique recipe includes milk and cocoa powder, 15 essential vitamins
and minerals, and complex carbohydrates. One cup of hot milky Ovaltine contains
half the amount of sugar as a cup of ordinary hot chocolate.

Distributed by: BWA, East West Highway e 394-1759





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