Citation
The Tribune - Page 1

Material Information

Title:
The Tribune
Uniform Title:
Tribune (Nassau, Bahamas)
Portion of title:
Nassau tribune
Place of Publication:
Nassau, Bahamas
Publisher:
Tribune
Publication Date:
Copyright Date:
2009
Frequency:
Daily, except Sunday
daily
normalized irregular
Language:
English
Physical Description:
v. : ill. ; 58 cm.

Subjects

Genre:
newspaper ( sobekcm )
newspaper ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage:
Bahamas

Notes

General Note:
Description based on: Vol. 79, no. 210 (Aug. 3, 1983); title from caption.

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Holding Location:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
This item was contributed to the Digital Library of the Caribbean (dLOC) by the source institution listed in the metadata. This item may or may not be protected by copyright in the country where it was produced. Users of this work have responsibility for determining copyright status prior to reusing, publishing or reproducing this item for purposes other than what is allowed by applicable law, including any applicable international copyright treaty or fair use or fair dealing statutes, which dLOC partners have explicitly supported and endorsed. Any reuse of this item in excess of applicable copyright exceptions may require permission. dLOC would encourage users to contact the source institution directly or dloc@fiu.edu to request more information about copyright status or to provide additional information about the item.
Resource Identifier:
09994850 ( OCLC )

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WEATHER

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The Tribune

ANY TIME..-ANY PLACE, WE’RE #1

=USA TODAY.

BAHAMAS EDITION

www.tribune242.com

FRIDAY, APRIL 17, 2009

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is investi

Two men found dead
in ‘gruesome’ killings

m@ By TANEKA THOMPSON
Tribune Staff Reporter
tthompson@tribunemedia.net

POLICE are investigating the
"gruesome" double homicide
of two men who were found
dead inside a small wooden
home in the area of St Vincent
Road yesterday.

The oldest victim — believed
to be in his 60s — was shot in
his left side, while the second
victim — believed to be a father
in his 40s — was shot in his left
arm. Police said the extent of
the younger victim's wounds

were so severe that his arm was
"nearly ripped off" his body.

Their identities were not
released by police up to press
time yesterday, however resi-
dents of the area identified the
older victim as a quiet Haitian
farmer known only as ‘Daddy’.
The younger man was identi-
fied by his first name — Tracey
— a man well-known in the
area who did odd-jobs and car
repairs.

Police said it is a possibility
that the two men are related.

SEE page six

Three arrests after firearms,
ammunition, $160,000 seized

m@ By DENISE MAYCOCK

Tribune Freeport Reporter

dmaycock@tribunemedia.net

FREEPORT — Two Bahamians and a Jamaican were arrested
after law enforcement officials discovered and seized a number of
firearms, ammunition, and over $160,000 in cash at an apartment

complex in Freeport.

Asst Supt Welbourne Bootle reported that Police and Customs
officials went to Malibu Reef Estates around 8.40am on Wednes-

day.

He said a search warrant for illegal drugs and contraband was
executed by a team of officers from DEU, the Anti-violence Inter-

SEE page six

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Tim Clarke/Tribune staff

A FAMILY member of one of the men killed had to be helped from the scene.

CLICO-Guyana
manager in
hospital after
being shot

THE court-appointed man-
ager of CLICO-Guyana is in
hospital after being shot by an
unidentified gunman in George-
town early Thursday morning,
Caribbean news outlets report-
ed yesterday.

The shooting of Maria van
Beek, the judicial manager of
CLICO in Guyana and also the
Commissioner of Insurance,
came less than a week after she
presented a report to the
Supreme Court on the state of

SEE page six



400 ZNS
HIB Kaua lis
Bea
Waite ik

m By ALISON LOWE
Tribune Staff Reporter
alowe@tribunemedia.net

THE Bahamas Communi-
cations and Public Officers
Union is considering its next
move after 400 ZNS employ-
ees received late salary pay-
ments this week and were told
overdue increments may have
to be paid in stages.

ZNS employees blamed the
delayed salary payouts on

SEE page six



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Marina Village
restaurant
staff ‘robbed
at gunpoint’

Sources say cashier,
security guard accosted

m@ By ALISON LOWE
Tribune Staff Reporter
alowe@tribunemedia.net

STAFF carrying the day’s takings from Carmine’s restau-
rant in Marina Village were ambushed and robbed by gun-
men after closing time on Wednesday.

Well-placed sources said a cashier and a security guard

were just emerging from the popular Italian restaurant at
around 11.30pm when they were accosted — a stone’s throw
away from the Paradise Island Police Station.

Police refused to acknowledge that the robbery had taken
place and the resort did not specify where the incident
occurred.

In a statement, Atlantis said: “We can confirm that a
cashier was robbed in transit to making a deposit after clos-
ing. At no time were patrons in any danger. There was no
injury to patrons or staff. We are co-operating with police
who are handling the investigation.”

The Tribune’s sources said speculation was rife yesterday
that the robbery was an “inside job”, perpetrated by indi-
viduals who would have known the staff’s routine.

It is not known how much money was stolen.

Voluntary Bill of Indictment presented
in Bridgewater and Lighthourne case



m@ By NATARIO wood actor John Tra-

McKENZIE volta.
Tribune Staff According to a sum-
Reporter mons from _ the
Supreme Court,

DIRECTOR | of
Public Prosecutions
Bernard Turner yes-
terday presented a
Voluntary Bill of
Indictment in the case
of former PLP senator
Pleasant Bridgewater
and paramedic Tarino Light-
bourne who are charged in con-
nection with an alleged plot to
extort $25 million from Holly-

Magistrate alleged to have collected
fines without giving record on payment
@ By RUPERT MISSICK Jr

Chief Reporter
rmissick@tribunemedia.net

Bridgewater, 49, who
is also an attorney, and
Lightbourne, 47, both
of Grand Bahama, are
to appear before
Senior Justice Anita
Allen on Tuesday,
April 28, at 1pm for
their arraignment. At that time
a date is expected to be set for

SEE page six



ale SLAOLS AN eed

A DEFENCE has been filed in the Supreme Court alleging that a
Grand Bahama Magistrate collected fines against convicted persons in
her court but provided no record to the court that the fines were paid.

In a defence filed by Deputy Chief Magistrate Helen Almorales-
Jones on April 14 it is alleged that there were several instances when
Grand Bahama Magistrate Subusola Lawanson Swain failed to provide
records of fines that were paid to her court.

The defence was filed in response to an action brought by Magistrate
Swain alleging that Deputy Chief Magistrate Jones wrongly accused her
of accepting bribes and stealing fines.

SEE page seven

a)

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Visit us on Wulff Road Opposite Mackey Street
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NASSAU AND BAHAMEA

ISLANDS’ LEADING NEWSPAPER



PAGE 2, FRIDAY, APRIL 17, 2009

THE TRIBUNE



LOCAL NEWS



Board appointed to guide
downtown revitalisation

m@ By ALISON LOWE
Tribune Staff Reporter
alowe@tribunemedia.net

DOWNTOWN Nassau
took another step towards a
return to its former glory yes-
terday with the appointment
of public-private stakeholders



to a board mandated by the
government to guide the
area’s revitalisation.
Minister of Tourism Vin-
cent Vanderpool Wallace sug-
gested that the creation of the
Downtown Nassau Partner-
ship will allow the Bahamas
to progress towards fully real-

ising its potential as a desti-
nation.

“This is not a facelift. This is
a transformation. That is what
this is all about,” he told a
press conference at the British
Colonial Hilton attended by
all the new board members,
along with the ministers of the

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environment and works.

At the same time, Vaughn
Roberts, former vice president
of finance at Bahamar, was
formally announced as the
managing director of the

Aside from his qualifica-
tions and experience in
finance and business, Mr
Roberts vowed to bring “new
energy”, the perspective of
someone who has lived in
major cities around the world,
and “non political profession-
alism” to the role.

Alongside Mr Roberts, it
was revealed that the DNP is
to consist of 11 additional
directors, among them
tourism director general Ver-
nice Walkine and Nassau
Tourism Development Board
chairman Charles Klonaris,
who will act as co-chairs.

A variety of other
appointees from the ministries
of public works, finance and
environment, and from the
private sector in the fields of
tourism, banking, real estate
and retail, were also intro-
duced at the press conference.

One of the private sector
board members, Charles
Klonaris, also chairman of the
Nassau Tourism Develop-
ment Board, said: “Many do
not know the extent of com-
mitment it has taken over the
years to get us to this impor-
tant point. It has not been
easy and it will not all of a
sudden become easy because
of new levels of commitment.

“Over the coming months
we will lay the foundation for
leapfrogging this revitalisation
and at some point thereafter
the fruits of our labour will
become more evident to the
man on the street, the shop
owner and the many visitors
to our city.”

The DNP board will meet

Vincent Vanderpool-Wallace



on a regular basis, initially
every two weeks, to address
the mandate it has been given
by Cabinet, with “priority
areas” to include finalising a
master plan for downtown,
creating a Business Improve-
ment District (BID) — which
will likely see downtown busi-
nesses paying a tax to an
authority charged with
upkeeping the area — and
overseeing short term
improvements to the environs.

Mrs Walkine said that,
importantly, the DNP has a
pool of funds contributed to
by both government and the
private sector from which it
can draw resources to
fund the fulfilment of its man-
date.

She added that once the
BID is implemented, the DNP
board will likely “evolve” into
the BID authority.

The DNP will host a town
meeting at the Hilton on May
6 at 6pm to update the public
on the revitalisation efforts
and solicit input.

Greetings from your parents Paul & Esther Barry;
Darian Barry, other relatives and friends.

We Love You!



Customs staff
welcome dept
‘clean up’

CUSTOMS staff yesterday wel-
comed government moves to “clean
up” their department, saying its defi-
ciencies had been allowed to con-
tinue for far too long.

And they thanked The Tribune
— and especially its Insight section
— for prompting a massive shake-up
with a string of shocking revelations
about departmental corruption.

A Customs insider said: “We are
glad this has happened because it is
breaking up some of the old ties and
loyalties inside the department.

“There was an unseen clique in
Customs that looked after its own
interests at the expense of the coun-
try. There was speculation about
rampant corruption for years, but
no-one would address it.

“Prime Minister Hubert Ingra-
ham has done the right thing. I feel
he is doing a good job, but he must
not slacken because there is still
some way to go.”

Since January, the dismissal of
scores of senior Customs staff and a
major restructuring of the depart-
ment have gone some way towards
making the department more effi-
cient.

The shake-up has come amid
claims and counter claims about
alleged scams inside the department,
including an allegation by business-
man Jackson Ritchie that corrupt
Customs officials had swindled local
brokerage firms of millions of dol-
lars.

Ritchie’s Global United shipping
company is among those alleged to
owe substantial sums in unpaid Cus-
toms duties and taxes.

Last December, after the home
of a Customs officer had been
burned down by arsonists, The Tri-
bune’s Insight section explored the
department’s corruption problems
under the headline: “It’s time for a
clean-out.”

It revealed collusion between
some corrupt Customs employees
and complicit members of the busi-
ness community designed to rip off
the nation for self-gain.

And it concluded that government
inertia “might suggest that politi-
clans now accept corruption as an
immutable component of Bahamian
life and are cowed by its enormity.”

In the second of a two-part expo-
sure, Insight said: “It’s time for the
government to confront the cheats in
its own ranks, or face what could be
very serious consequences as the
country buckles under the weight of
global economic decline.”

Yesterday, Customs insiders said
The Tribune's disclosures triggered
mass dismissals and reorganisation of
the department.

“However,” one source said,
“there are still areas which need to
be dealt with. There is still work to
be done.”

National Art Gallery
opens exhibition tonight

THE National Art Gallery hosts
the opening of the exhibition “Col-
lections within the National Collec-
tion” tonight from 6.30 pm to
9.30pm.

The show highlights the painstak-
ing process involved in acquiring
works of art for inclusion in the
national collection.

In honour of the occasion, a cock-
tail reception will be held on the
verandah of the National Art
Gallery.

The exhibition chronicles approx-
imately 30 years of work involved in
acquiring objects long before the
gallery opened its doors in July 2003.

It also highlights the various
methods used to acquire objects,
including outright purchases funded
by gallery membership, individual
and corporate or estate donations.

This collection and individual
works currently on exhibition rep-
resent only a small part of the
national collection.

Features include the Amos Fer-
guson Collection, saved during the
Straw Market fire, and a collection
of 19th century albumen photo-
graphic prints by the American artist
Jacob F Coonley - the first major
purchase for the national collection
after the National Art Gallery
became a corporate body in 2003
and acquired from the late artist R
Brent Malone.

Additionally, the exhibition fea-
tures 12 paintings of historic build-
ings and scenes of over-the-hill Nas-
sau commissioned by the Finance
Corporation of the Bahamas specif-
ically for the National Art Gallery
25 years before its doors opened.





THE TRIBUNE

FRIDAY, APRIL 17, 2009, PAGE 3



LOCAL NEWS



0 In brief

Six questioned —
in connection
with seizure
of shotgun

SIX men are being ques-
tioned by police in connec-
tion with the seizure of a
shotgun in the area of Roo-
sevelt Avenue.

Press liaison officer super-
intendent Walter Evans said
Mobile Division officers
were patrolling the area
sometime before 6pm on
Wednesday when they
observed a group of men
“acting suspiciously.”

The officers searched the
area where the men were
assembled and uncovered a
shotgun hidden in a red and
white sweater, Mr Evans
said. All six men were taken
into police custody.

e POLICE apprehended
two men in the Arawak Cay
area who were allegedly dri-
ving with an illegal firearm
in their vehicle.

Mr Evans said officers
from the Arawak Cay Police
Station were patrolling the
general area around the Fish
Fry shortly after 10pm on
Wednesday when they spot-
ted “a shiny object” inside a
white Honda Accord, regis-
tration number 197496.

Police then ordered the
three male occupants to get
out of the car.

The officers stopped two
of the passengers, but the
third man was able to flee
the scene.

The 20-year-old driver, of
Pinewood Gardens, and one
passenger, a 28-year-old
Augusta Street resident,
were taken into police cus-
tody after the officers found
a loaded .38 handgun inside
the car, Mr Evans said. The
third man is actively being
sought.

¢ OFFICERS of the Wulff
Road Police Station found
two shotguns in an aban-
doned house on St James
Road. The officers were act-
ing on a tip when they made
the discovery around 2.30pm
on Wednesday. The weapons
were recovered and are in
police custody. No arrests
were made as investigations
continues.

e St George's Anglican
Church will hold its 60th
anniversary patronal mission
services next week.

The speakers will include:
Rev'd Dr Leonard Johnson
(April 20), Rev'd Terrance

Morrison (April 21) and
Dr C W Saunders (April 22).

Mission services start at
7pm.

Man in court
on marijuana
possession
charge

A 19-YEAR-OLD man
was convicted in a Magis-
trates Court yesterday on
a Marijuana possession
charge.

Lamar Albury, of
Kennedy Subdivision, is
accused of being in pos-
session of 25 grams of
marijuana.

According to police, the
drugs were found in 13 foil
wraps in a car.

Albury was expected to
stand trial yesterday but
pleaded guilty to the
charge.

He was fined $1,500.
Failure to pay the fine will
result in a nine month
prison term.

Furious land dispute over
former home of killer

mg By JOHN MARQUIS
Managing Editor

A BAHAMIAN building con-
tractor has sparked a furious land
title dispute by moving into the
derelict former home of killer
Sante Kimes, claiming he is the
true owner of the desirable
seafront property.

Warren Aranha, 50, president
of White Rose Estate property
company, has taken possession
of the two-storey Cable Beach
home where Kimes and her dot-
ing son Kenny are said to have
drowned the Bahraini banker
Syed Bilal Ahmed in 1996.

Mr Aranha admits that his
action — which included remoy-
ing a metal gate to gain access to
the land — is likely to provoke a
legal showdown with Nassau busi-
nessman Raymond Wong, whose
family claims to have owned the
property for 23 years.

“Mr Wong has said the prop-
erty is his, but I maintain it is
mine,” said Mr Aranha, “And I
have the papers to prove it.”

The once attractive house, set
in a stunning beachfront position,
hit the headlines three years ago
when Kimes and her son were
jailed in the United States for two
murders committed in 1998.

Hearings

During one of the hearings,
Kenny Kimes admitted he and
his mother drowned Mr Ahmed
in a bath at their Nassau home in
1996 after giving him a date-rape
drug.

Though he later went on to say
he had dumped Mr Ahmed’s
body at sea, neighbours in Sul-
grave Manor, a condo block next
to the Kimes home, are convinced
the body is buried on the site,
possibly under the patio.

When the Kimes story broke,
the murderess and _ her
family were said to have been
renting the property from Mr
Wong.

But Mr Aranha claims the
house is one of many properties
in New Providence at the centre
of a major land dispute dating
back to the late 19th century.

And he says he is the true



WARREN ARANHA has taken possession of the two-storey Cable
Beach home where Kimes and her son Kenny lived.

inheritor of the property as the
last surviving member of the
allegedly dispossessed J S John-
son family.

Mr Aranha’s dispute with Mr
Wong does not imply any wrong-
doing by the Wong family.

He said it is the result of his
determined attempt to seize back
land he alleges was stolen from
the Johnson family between the
1890s and 1950s.

Mr Aranha’s incredible tale,
which will be fully explored in
next Monday’s Tribune Insight
section, suggests that three or four
prominent white Bahamian fam-
ilies plotted over several genera-
tions to dispossess the Johnsons
of thousands of acres of New
Providence land.

Included in the property, he
claims, are 465 acres of prime
Cable Beach land, including much
of the area earmarked for the $2.6
billion Bahamar resort develop-
ment.

Mr Aranha said the decision
by Harrahs Entertainment to
withdraw funding from the
Bahamar project was partly due
to concerns about land title.

He told The Tribune: “The
truth is that the JS Johnson fam-
ily was robbed over a period of 50
years or more by several promi-
nent white Bahamians, all of
them long dead.

“IT have been researching this
matter thoroughly now since 1995
and have collected all the paper-
work I need to prove that the title
of this house and numerous other
properties belongs to me.”

Standing jubilantly on the bal-
cony of the now ruined house,
Mr Aranha said: “If Mr Wong is
the owner, let him come forward
with the documents to show he
has a greater claim than me.

“As far as I am concerned, this
property is mine — and I aim to
use it as my weekend playground
in future after it has been refur-
bished.”

At one point, the two-acre site
was on the market with a multi-
million dollar price tag. But Mr
Aranha moved in, took down the
‘For Sale’ signs and threw a huge
metal gate into the grass.

Last weekend, he drove his
truck up to the house to continue
clearing the property to prepare

‘No evidence’ to back claims of
Bahamians missing in Jamaica

THE Ministry of Foreign Affairs is
looking into reports that several Bahami-
ans might be missing in Jamaica, how-
ever Bahamian officials say there is no
evidence to substantiate the claims.

After a report published last week in a
local tabloid which claimed that four
Bahamian men were killed in Jamaica,
several people approached the ministry's
consular division asking for help in track-
ing down missing relatives, Deputy Prime
Minister and Minister of Foreign Affairs
Brent Symonette said. Since then, a few
have returned to report that they have

found their loved ones.

While the ministry's probe is still ongo-
ing, Jamaican authorities report that they
are not aware of any missing Bahamians turning up
on their shores, Mr Symonette said yesterday.

"As a result of the article, several persons came
into the consular office to report that their family
members were missing. Of that group, a number of

Maderia St. ONLY

ENT

Brent Symonette



them have come back to the office and
advised us that their relatives have been
located elsewhere.

"Jamaican authorities have no knowl-
edge, according to what I've been
advised, of any persons that are missing
and without any concrete evidence it
would be very difficult to proceed any
further with the investigation," he said.

Mr Symonette said officials are still
working with Jamaican authorities to
determine if any Bahamians have been
incarcerated in that country.

According to an official at the Min-
istry of Foreign Affairs, there have been
a number of cases of Bahamians coming
into the ministry after not hearing from
relatives who have left the country.

The official said that in many cases, the missing
persons turn up far from where their families think
they are and advised travellers to keep relatives
abreast of their whereabouts.

APRIL 15 - 25

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for a full-scale restoration pro-
ject.

During the Kimes family’s
occupation of the house in the
early 1990s, it was still a very
desirable home with huge plate
glass windows looking out over
Goodman’s Bay.

Now the house is in ruins, with
doors and windows missing and
heaps of soil in the front drive-
way.

Structure

But Mr Aranha said: “The
structure is still very sound. I
intend to make it look good
again.”

Joseph Samuel Johnson,
founder of the Johnson family
fortune, was a prominent busi-
nessman and parliamentarian in
Nassau during the second half of
the 19th century.

Mr Aranha, who claims to be
descended from the Johnsons via
the female line, believes the plot
to rob his family began after the
original J S Johnson died.

He said maps of Cable Beach
were changed by a succession of
swindlers so they could ‘elimi-
nate’ the family’s holdings and
take possession.

Since then, he said, much of
the land had been sold on to
unsuspecting buyers over the

generations.

Mr Wong, however, claims the
Kimes house was bought legiti-
mately by his family from Scottish
resident Marilyn Jane Crawford
in 1986. “Our title is secure and
an attorney is working on the
matter now. We will apply for an
injunction and see whether he
(Mr Aranha) responds or fights
that.”

He said Mr Aranha’s claims
first surfaced two years ago when
he discovered that he was using
the beach at the Kimes house.

Mr Wong said the matter could
end up in court “because I don’t
know how far he intends to go.”

The Kimes family lived at the
house between 1992 and 1996.
After leaving Nassau, Sante and
Kenny Kimes became America’s
most notorious mom-and-son
crime team, conning and killing
their way across the States in their
attempt to amass a fortune
through crime.

Both are now serving life terms
in US prisons with no chance of
parole.

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PAGE 4, FRIDAY, APRIL 17, 2009

EDITORIAL/LETTERS TO THE EDITOR

THE TRIBUNE





The Tribune Limited

NULLIUS ADDICTUS JURARE IN VERBA MAGISTRI
Being Bound to Swear to The Dogmas of No Master

LEON E. H. DUPUCH, Publisher/Editor 1903-1914

SIR ETIENNE DUPUCH, Kt, O.B.E., K.M., K.C.S.G.,

(Hon.) LL.D., D.Litt.

Publisher/Editor 1919-1972
Contributing Editor 1972-199]

EILEEN DUPUCH CARRON, C.M.G., M.S. B.A., LL.B.

Publisher/Editor 1972-

Published Daily Monday to Saturday

Shirley Street, RO. Box N-3207, Nassau, Bahamas
Insurance Management Building., P.O. F-485, Freeport, Grand Bahama

WEBSITE
www.tribune242.com — updated daily at 2pm

Obama says Cuba should make next move

MEXICO CITY — President Barack Oba-
ma wants Havana to make the next move to
improve U.S.-Cuba relations, saying Thursday
that he needs to see signs of changes on the
island before he makes any more overtures.

President Obama already has lifted restric-
tions on visits and money sent to Cuba by
Americans with families there — steps he called
"extraordinarily significant" for those families,
and a show of good faith by the U.S. govern-
ment that it wants to recast the relationship.

But he reiterated that the U.S. won't unilat-
erally end its trade embargo against Cuba, even
though the policy is widely seen as a failure
that has complicated U.S. relations throughout
Latin America and the Caribbean.

President Obama said a relationship frozen
for 50 years "won't thaw overnight," and that
Cuba can show it wants to move forward by
lifting its own restrictions on Cubans’ ability to
travel and to voice their opinions.

Cuba's communist government had no
immediate reaction, but President Raul Castro
has said he is willing to negotiate with the US
President on neutral ground as equals and with-
out conditions. Castro was in Venezuela, where
President Hugo Chavez and other close allies
were planning to show a united front in their
first encounter with him today at the Summit of
the Americas.

Chavez called the U.S. position a "show of
disrespect."

"If that's the way it is, what more can we
expect from the rest? Nothing,” Chavez said. "I
hope we're wrong, but they'll be the ones who
will have to show us — not with tales and
speeches."

President Obama spoke at a news conference
after meeting with Mexican President Felipe
Calderon, who called the U.S. embargo a failed
strategy. Asked what the U.S. should do on
Cuba to improve its image across Latin Amer-
ica, Calderon said "we do not believe that the
embargo or the isolation of Cuba is a good
measure for things to change.”

But President Obama says Cuba needs to
reciprocate to his overtures with actions
"grounded in respect for human rights.”

Asimilar message was sent by US. Secretary
of State Hillary Rodham Clinton in Haiti earli-
er Thursday. "We stand ready to discuss with
Cuba additional steps that could be taken,” she
said. "But we do expect Cuba to reciprocate."

"We would like to see Cuba open up its soci-
ety, release political prisoners, open up to out-
side opinions and media, have the kind of soci-
ety that we all know that would improve the
opportunities for the Cuban people and for
their nation," she said.

Leaders of 34 nations are making their way
to Trinidad and Tobago for the summit, a gath-
ering of democracies where communist Cuba is
not invited. That rankles several of the leaders
— not only close ally Chavez but also people
like Haitian President Rene Preval, who has
had warm relations with the Castro govern-
ment and received medical treatment on the

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island. He told reporters that he hopes Cuba will
be able to attend the next summit, and that
"Cuba is a friend of Haiti even though we have
different political systems."

(This article was written by Ben Feller of the
Associated Press).

Haitians want Hillary Clinton
to stop deportations

PORT-AU-PRINCE, Haiti — Women sell-
ing hot peppers and black beans in a sprawling
market in Haiti's capital talk of their unending
economic woes, their hungry children and their
dismal hopes that politicians will do anything
about it.

As USS. Secretary of State Hillary Rodham
Clinton arrived in Haiti on Thursday, the expec-
tations of Haiti's people are dismally low. Pres-
ident Rene Preval escorted Mrs Clinton from
the airport to the national palace for a private
meeting.

Disappointment is widespread over unkept
promises of aid to Haiti. The country has not yet
recovered from last year's food riots and four
tropical storms that killed nearly 800 people
and caused $1 billion in damage.

Political tensions also are running high ahead
of Sunday's long-delayed Senate elections,
which some parties disqualified from running
have threatened to disrupt.

In the noisy Croix-des-Bossales market,
women fixate on their families’ hunger as they
bat beetles away from unsold piles of food.

"There's no money in this country because
there isn't any work,” said Therese Bejaman, 38,
who sells coconuts imported from the neigh-
bouring Dominican Republic.

Bejaman's husband lost his job at the com-
mercial port across the street a few years ago.
Now their seven children, aged 6 to 18, depend
on her travelling hours over washed-out roads to
the border, where she pays about $5.60 for a
dozen coconuts with hopes of making about 5
cents of profit on each one. It's not going well.

"They aren't selling fast,” she said.

With other countries struggling amid the
global economic crisis, aid to Haiti has been
affected. A donors conference Tuesday in
Washington was a disappointment. It raised
$324 million for Haiti but — despite entreaties
by U.N. Secretary-General Ban Ki-moon, secu-
rity council members, Bill Clinton and others —
that amount was more than $600 million short of
what the country needs for economic develop-
ment and hurricane recovery.

The discussions with Secretary of State Clin-
ton will likely include a request to temporarily
stay deportation orders against an estimated
30,000 Haitians in the United States, whose
repatriations would further drain Haiti's
resources by eliminating the money they send
home. Preval may also ask for more relief from
Haiti's heavy debt burden, estimated to include
$1.6 million in payments to the World Bank
each month.



Let common
sense prevail at
the Lynden
Pindling Airport

EDITOR, The Tribune.

PLEASE allow me to express
one of the most aggravating air-
port security observations that I
have witnessed in my many
years of travelling throughout
the world, sadly to say it is at
our very own Lynden Pindling
International Airport.

Security personnel and many
sophisticated security screening
devices took over the majority
of airports throughout the world
after September 11th. This act
not to be discounted could, and
should be regarded as the
largest global stimulus package
ever created. Security jobs and
security machinery changed the
way the world travelled forever.
In some cases it took the joy
out travelling, even though in
many cases and in reality gave a
false sense of security.

The Bahamas Government
spends millions of advertising
dollars to bring visitors to our
shores every year.

On entrance to our national
airport, the three piece band
with their discoloured uniforms
and busted speakers, do their
best to welcome guests with
native tunes, of course the visi-
tors don’t understand what the
band is playing or exhibiting.
At least with Junkanoo music,
they are guaranteed to feel
rhythm, excitement and some-

LETTERS

letters@triounemedia net



thing culturally authentic.

On the other hand, upon
leaving the island of New Prov-
idence no matter how great a
vacation the visitor may have
experienced, the double secu-
rity and unnecessary delayed
screening, with no space along
with the numerous check points
at LPIA leaves visitors and res-
idents alike very angry, con-
fused, and looking at the island
of New Providence, Bahamas
as the worst choice destination.

Many whom I have spoken
to after their ordeal question
the airport authorities and secu-
rity personnel’s intellect, as not
having enough common sense
to know that you do not make
the airport a retirement park
for ex-police officers who are
not global or experienced trav-
ellers, or have not travelled out-
side the Bahamas or understand
the complexities of modern air-
port security.

After all, they were probably
stationed in a remote island dur-
ing their entire career.

We may not have the proper
size or designed airport at this
time to support the number of
travellers that come to our

island, but we do have the intel-
lectual capacity to know when a
system is flawed and needs to
be corrected.

We should not allow the TSA
or other foreign jurisdictions to
dictate the operational and
security measures at our airport
that is totally inappropriate and
contributes to the inefficiencies,
disruptions and delays in visi-
tor and citizen travel abroad.

US Customs and Immigra-
tion should have realized by
now that two officers cannot
man a destination like the Lyn-
den Pindling International Air-
port and should, at a minimum,
open up other booths to accom-
modate the large numbers at
convenient or peak travel peri-
ods.

I urge the respective individ-
uals who are responsible at the
airport to please re-examine the
entire situation at LPIA, espe-
cially the senseless double secu-
rity screening process and
implement proactive corrective
measures that will not impede
or leave as it so often does, the
worst impression of the
Bahamas in hearts and minds
of the travellers to island of
New Providence.

ANTHONY U
BOSTWICK Jr
Nassau,

April, 2009.

Haven't we suffered enough from laissez-faire capitalism?

EDITOR, The Tribune.

Re: Redefining the Bahamas government’s role
in the economy (Your Say) March 10, 2009.

The Nassau Institute reportedly stated: “In
simple terms, we should turn toward laissez-faire
capitalism rather than more government plan-

ning...”

Really? Turn toward laissez-faire capitalism?
Isn’t much of the world suffering economically

talism?

Nassau,

right now largely as a result of laissez-faire capi-

KENNETH W
KNOWLES MD

March 11, 2009.

My customers want me to add turtle to my menu!

EDITOR, The Tribune.

It seems to me that the peo-
ple calling for a ban on turtle
meat and now attacking
Andrew Allen for opposing,
are extremely out of touch
with mainstream Bahamian
feelings on the issue.

I am a chef and restaurant
owner of 30 plus years and can
tell you that the vast majority
of Bahamians all over this
Bahamas have no time for a
ban on yet another Bahami-
an delicacy.

In fact, when Mr Allen
gave me a petition, I began
canvassing my customers and



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me if I could add turtle to my
menu!

Well done, Mr Allen and

keep speaking up loud and
clear.
ANDRIA V DAMES
Nassau,
April, 2009.

Significant point overlooked

EDITOR, The Tribune.

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Re: Do not ban harvesting of sea turtles Tribune/14 March 2009

Unfortunately, the well written and interesting letter overlooks
a significant point: some apparently “self-righteous, arrogant and
ignorant” Bahamians approve of the turtle conservation bill in the
hope that it may reduce the mindless yet “culturally correct” torture
that these wonderful creatures must endure as they are slowly
butchered. This needless cruelty is inflicted while the turtles are lying
on their backs and gasping for air as the sun beats down on them
mercilessly.

KENNETH

W KNOWLES, MD
(Turtle pie lover) Nassau,
March 15, 2009.

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THE TRIBUNE

FRIDAY, APRIL 17, 2009, PAGE 5



LOCAL NEWS

Residents call for action over
dark and dangerous road

Search for
man wanted

in connection
with drug
Smuggling case

POLICE have launched an
island-wide search for Omar
Chisholm, 31, who is wanted
for questioning in connection
with a million dollar drug
smuggling case.

Chisholm is of medium
build, around 5’ 11” tall and
weighs around 190 lbs. His
last known address is No 52
Yamacraw Beach Estates.

The police have yet to
release a likeness of the sus-
pect.

Anyone with information
about Chisholm’s where-
abouts is being asked to con-
tact the Drug Enforcement
Unit at 323-7139 or 397-3801;
the Police Control Room at
322-3333; Crime Stoppers at
328-8474 or their nearest
police station.

The police said Chisholm
should be considered armed
and dangerous.

He is being sought in con-
nection with a high speed
boat chase which took place
near BarraTerre, Exuma,
around midnight on Saturday.

Officers chasing a suspi-
cious vessel were eventually
able to bring it to a stop and
arrest two men, but two oth-
ers reportedly jumped over-
board.

Marijuana

Several taped bales contain- :

ing 945 pounds of marijuana
with an estimated street value
of $945,000 were allegedly
found aboard the boat.

A third man was eventually
arrested and appeared before
a Magistrates Court in Nassau
on Wednesday along with the
two other suspects. They were
charged with conspiracy to
import and possess marijuana,
and possession of marijuana.

It is also alleged that the
men imported the drugs and
were in possession of the
drugs with intent to supply
them to others.

Garnette Augustus Nevell,
48, alias George Brown, of
Sandy Bay, Clarendon,
Jamaica, pleaded guilty to
conspiring with others to
import and possess marijuana,
as well as to the importation
and possession of marijuana.

Kenworth Smith, 32, of
Behring Point, Andros, and
Valentino Johnson, 33, of Sut-
ton Street, who were
arraigned along with Nevell,
both pleaded not guilty to the
intent to supply charges, but
guilty to the drug charges.

All three men also pleaded
not guilty to the charge of
stealing a 28-foot Intrepid

speedboat while at Highbourn

Cay, Exuma.

m@ By MEGAN REYNOLDS
Tribune Staff Reporter
mreynolds@tribunemedia.net

RESIDENTS forced to use a
dark and dangerous unpaved
road to get to their homes in a
rapidly developing area are call-
ing on government to take
action.

The Killarney community of
several hundred people who use
Munnings Drive, a mile-long
stretch of dirt track linking
Gladstone Road and JFK Dri-
ve, as the primary access route
to their homes are fed up with
the pot holes, flytipping and
lack of street lights on the way
to and from their homes.

When they purchased prop-
erties in the growing subdivi-
sions around South Westridge
in the last two years, new resi-
dents were told roadworks
would be done.

But over one year later
Munnings Drive remains
unchanged, while homes con-
tinue to be built.

Residents are concerned the
dumping is posing a health haz-
ard and environmental risk to
nearby Lake Killarney, and say



RESIDENTS are fed up with the pot holes, flytipping and lack of street
lights on the way to and from their homes.

the rocky road is damaging their
cars and hindering further
infrastructure as Cable
Bahamas will not serve the
expanding community of over
100 homes.

Lisa McCartney, a resident
of Emerald Coast, said: “I have
friends who will not drive to

The Bahamas Hot Rod
Association distances itself
from unregulated facility

IN THE wake of last Sunday’s murder of a 18-year-old youth near the
Queen Elizabeth Sports Centre, the Bahamas Hot Rod Association yes-
terday released a statement seeking to set their racing facility apart from the
unregulated one where the crime took place.

BHRA’s public relations officer Mia Campbell said Sunday’s murder took
place on the nearby unregulated racetrack, and not at the MotorSports Park.

“Safety is the most important factor of any event held at the MotorSports
Park which is why we always have the presence of the ambulance and the

police department,” she said.

Richard Bremmer, of Pinewood Gardens, died after he was stabbed
multiple times in the chest while attending a car rally near the Queen

Elizabeth Sports Centre.

According to police reports, the teenager was attacked by a group of men
when he accidentally hit and seriously injured a 31-year-old Wilson Tract
man while driving away from the Sports Centre in a 1994 Honda Prelude.

Police have charged Shelton Devarso Thompson, 21, of Chippingham, in

connection with the murder.

Ms Campbell expressed condolences to the Bremmer family on behalf of

the association.

She said that the event that the teenager was attending prior to his
death was held on a strip next to the Government High School.

Ms Campbell said that all racing activities should take place in a contained
environment such as the MotorSports Park.

“Activities of any kind dealing with motor sports, whether motorbikes
or cars, are all welcomed at our park and we continue to open our arms to

them.

“Our previous administration has been in many discussions with the
organisers of these groups to use our park and to not only bring enter-
tainment to the spectators of their sport but also to provide a safe envi-

ronment,” she said.

“Motor sports are on the rise in the Bahamas and the BHRA along with
the public and private sectors have recognised this by the many events

planned.”

come visit me at night because
they’re concerned about them-
selves coming in this dark area
at night.

“Another one of my neigh-
bours doesn’t even invite people
over because of what they
would have to pass along the

2

way.

FURNI

Celebrarin ig

2 Q years

Bethsheba Haven, 31, a
mother-of-one who moved to
the Emerald Coast in January
last year added: “I’m embar-
rassed to have people visit me
here.

“There are lots of holes, so
you have to go slow, and when
it rains, you are really and truly
swimming through in the car.

“Beyond that is the dumping
problem, which is horrible, and
it’s right in the road.

“If I drive at night ’'m con-
stantly looking to see if any-
one’s following me, because
someone could easily pull across
in front of you in the road and
no one would see.”

Bahamas Logistics Centre
Ltd is one of two businesses in
the area which find clients are
reluctant to use the road, and
they supported residents in a
press conference on Wednes-
day night demanding something
to be done.

A press statement from the
Munnings Drive residents reads:
“We would like to appeal to the
government to take a second

look at this area to see if

Munnings Drive can be given
priority in the 2009-10 budget
for capital improvement works,

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or at worst incorporated into
the New Providence Road
Improvement programme.

“The developers in the area
were given subdivision approval
by the Government to develop
subdivisions that border
Munnings Drive and we, the
individual property owners,
were given permission to build
also by the government.

“Should there not be a corre-
sponding obligation on the part
of the government to ensure
safe and reasonable road access
for the Killarney residents who
they indirectly encouraged to
move to the area?”

Ministry of Works director
Gordon Major said: “If the road
has not been turned over to us
we are not able to pave the
road.

“The subdivision developer
would have to turn the road
over to government.”

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PAGE 6, FRIDAY, APRIL 17, 2009

THE TRIBUNE



LOCAL NEWS

ZNS STAFF gather outside of the Monee yesterday.

FROM page one

“bad management” practices
leading to a funding shortfall.

However, ZNS Chairman
Michael Moss told The Tribune
yesterday that the late salary pay-
ments were “due to a bank error
more than a ZNS problem.”

Meanwhile, admitting that a
funding shortfall does exist with
respect to the increment pay-
ments, he claimed that this hap-
pened because a larger number
of employees than anticipated
were given “above average”
appraisals by “generous” super-
visors entitling them to incre-
ments.

BCPOU President Robert
Farquharson held a general meet-
ing with line staff at ZNS yester-
day afternoon to appraise them of
the union’s efforts on behalf of
employees there.

According to employees, they
were due to receive their pay
cheques on Tuesday, but the
money was not made available.

One employee said: “It doesn’t
surprise me, but people are fed
up. It’s just one of many issues
we have here.”

Yesterday Mr Moss said
employees who had accounts at
the bank where the funds were
being held would have been able
to collect their cheques yester-
day, while remaining staff should
be able to do so by today.

“The funds were made avail-
able at the bank on Thursday of
last week and payment should
have been made on Tuesday.
Apparently there was some kind
of oversight at the bank and I’m
told the instruction on the pay-
roll only has a validity period of
four days so by the time Wednes-
day rolled around the validity
period of the instruction had







ZNS staff

expired and it was only when peo-
ple went to the bank that it came
to light,” he said.

Employees, who are paid on a
bi-monthly basis, said this was the
first time salaries had been late.
Mr Moss maintained that this
week’s troubles do not indicate
any likelihood of such an occur-
rence happening again.

Meanwhile, the Chairman
claimed that although payment
of increments was budgeted for,
the total amount needed to cover
the payouts has fallen short
because “you have supervisory
personnel who, on balance, gave
a much larger percentage of
employees ‘excellent’ appraisals
entitling them to increments”
than expected.

Describing the system as “a bit
crazy”, Mr Moss said there “is
going to be a need for some very
deep review of these agreements
and policies.”

“You have some people who
may not be too au fait with doing
appraisals and might just want to
be nice to everyone.”

The Board, which is still nego-
tiating with the union, has agreed
it can pay the increments over a
three month period beginning
April 30.

“The union has indicated that
50 per cent this month and 50
next month is more palatable for
them. Our response is that we
don’t want to commit to some-
thing our cash flow forecast does-
n’t show to be sustainable
because people would end up
being disappointed, but if rev-
enue is better then we’ll try,” said
Mr Moss.

Attempts to reach Mr Far-
quharson were unsuccessful up
to press time.

British Colonial Hilton's
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FROM page one

The bodies were found by a

? third-party who went to the tiny
? house, which sits about 100 feet
? away from the street, early yes-
? terday morning. Officers
? responded around 9 am yester-
? day when they found the men
? lying on the ground, fully
? clothed, with apparent gun
i shots about the body.

Police believe the men were

killed as many as 12 hours
: before their bodies were stum-
i bled on.

"We have now launched an

? intensive investigation into
? these latest two homicides —
? we do not have any informa-
: tion with respect to the identity
; of these individuals, nor do we

CLICO-Guyana
ETOP BN
hospital after
being shot

FROM page one

the insurance company, stat-
ing that its US$60 million in
liabilities exceed its assets
by US$5 million, Caribbean
News Net reported.

In her report, she also
criticised how CLICO was
being managed in Guyana.

Ms Van Beek was shot in
her chest while she was dri-
ving along a main street in
Georgetown. She is report-
edly in stable condition.

The circumstances sur-
rounding the shooting are
still unclear at this time, but
Guyana police said they are
following some leads
although they were report-
edly unable to get a descrip-
tion of the gunman from
eyewitnesses.

Ms Van Beek was shot

when she stopped at a junc-
tion on the Lombard Street
thoroughfare in George-

town. Seelall Persaud,
Assistant Police Commis-
sioner for Law Enforcement
in Guyana, said that a gun-
man shot her through her
driver's seat window.





have any information with
respect to the motives for this
incident.

"At this stage we are asking
anyone with information who
might have seen or heard any-
thing around, perhaps within
the last 12 hours gunshots being
heard throughout this general
area, they can contact the
police at 919, 502-9991, or 328-
TIPS," said Assistant Superin-
tendent Walter Evans.

Although Drug Enforcement
Unit officers were on site,
police dismissed assertions that
the murders may be drug relat-
ed.

When The Tribune arrived
on the scene shortly before 10

am yesterday, more than a
dozen investigators combed the
area as curious bystanders
looked on. Screams of anguish
rang through the air about an
hour later when a relative of
one of the victims arrived.
Seemingly overcome with grief,
she had to be supported by
friends and was eventually
escorted away from the area.

While a motive for the
killings had not been estab-
lished by police up to press
time yesterday, friends and
family of the victims were left
dumbfounded over who would
murder them.

Gerty Bullard, whose family
owns the plot of land where the
older victim lived for about 30
years, recalled ‘Daddy’ as a qui-
et, peaceful man who farmed

and "never troubled anybody."

"That old man couldn't hurt
a fly — he was a nice guy and
friendly,” said Ms Bullard, who
said she last saw the farmer on
Monday.

According to reports, the
younger victim Tracey was
down on his luck and had
recently moved in with the old-
er man.

Harvey Knowles, a friend
who grew up with Tracey said
he was last seen in good spirits
Tuesday night. Mr Knowles
said while the younger victim
was sometimes boisterous, he
did not know if he had any ene-
mies.

The double homicide
marked the 20th and 21st mur-
ders of the year and the fourth
murder this week.

Three arrests after firearms,
ammunition, $160,000 seized

FROM page one

vention Taskforce and Customs officers at an
apartment complex at Whaleback Close.
During a search, officers recovered three
firearms, one SAR-1 Caliber Rifle containing
(17) 7.62 live rounds of ammunition; a .45 Austria
Glock pistol containing (9) live rounds of .45 live
rounds of ammunition, and a 5.7 FN Herstal Bel-
gium pistol containing (19) live rounds of 5.7

ammunition.

ASP Bootle reported that some $164,319.52 in
Bahamian and U.S. currency was also discov-
ered, along with an additional assortment of
ammunition, including (50) live rounds of .40
ammunition and a box containing (72) live rounds

FROM page one

the start of the trial.

Mr Turner told Magistrate
Carolita Bethel yesterday that
the prosecution has filed the
necessary statements as part of
a bundle of documents relative
to the case. Magistrate Bethel
informed Bridgewater, who was
again dressed in a white outfit
and Lightbourne, who was
dressed in a suit, that they were
discharged from her court now
that the matter has been trans-
ferred to the Supreme Court.
She informed them that their
$50,000 bail will continue until
they are arraigned in the
Supreme Court.

Bridgewater and Lightbourne
were first charged in January in
connection with the alleged

of ammunition.

He said officers also searched two 40-foot con-
tainers that contained an assortment of building

later.

investigations.

materials, as well as a white cargo truck, which
contained an assortment of alcoholic beverages
and soft drinks.

Mr Bootle said the goods are suspected of
being brought into the country illegally.

He said the containers, truck, and five boats
were impounded by Bahamas Customs. He said
the estimated value of the seizure will be released

ASP Bootle said three men — a 28-year-old
Jamaican national, a 46-year-old Bahamian and
an 18-year-old Bahamian — were arrested. The
men are presently assisting authorities with their

Voluntary Bill of Indictment presented
in Bridgewater and Lighthourne case

plot, which has attracted a great
deal of international media
attention. Lightbourne and
Bridgewater are charged with
conspiring to commit extor-
tion between January 2 and
January 20 of this year. Light-
bourne is also charged with
attempted extortion, while
Bridgewater is charged with
abetment to extort. It is
alleged that Bridgewater pur-
posely facilitated the attempt
to extort $25 million from Mr
Travolta. She is represented
by attorney Murrio Ducille.
Reports of the alleged
extortion attempt emerged

days after Jett Travolta, the
16-year-old son of actors John
Travolta, 54, and Kelly Pre-
ston, 46, died of a seizure at
the family’s vacation home in
Freeport, Grand Bahama, on
January 2.

Bridgewater announced her
resignation from the Senate
days after the police brought
charges against her. Mr Tra-
volta, PLP Senator Allyson
Maynard-Gibson and the Tra-
volta family’s US attorneys are
expected to be called as wit-
nesses at the trial.

Actor John Travolta is also
listed as a witness.

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THE TRIBUNE

FRIDAY, APRIL 17, 2009, PAGE 7



Magistrate alleged

to have collected
fines without
giving record
on payment
FROM page one

Magistrate Swain has
accused Mrs Almorales-Jones
of making false accusations
against her and trying to pun-
ish her because of the way she
handled cases connected to the
Deputy Chief Magistrate’s hus-
band, father-in-law and electri-
cian.

In her defence, the Deputy
Chief Magistrate denied all of
Magistrate Swain’s accusations.

She is seeking damages for
slander, libel, malicious false-
hood and misfeasance in public
office.

Magistrate Swain presided
over Magistrate’s Court Num-
ber 2 in Grand Bahama.

However, she was placed on
leave by Chief Justice Burton
Hall in May of 2007 when alle-
gations of “serious miscon-
duct” were levied against her
in a report prepared by Deputy
Chief Magistrate Almorales-
Jones.

Deputy Chief Magistrate
Almorales-Jones in her
defence has denied that she
complained to the Deputy
Registrar or the Supreme
Court and the Chief Justice
that Magistrate Swain had
accepted a bribe from Darren
Davies, Samantha Ferguson or
Garcia Marshall.

However, Magistrate
Almorales-Jones said in her
defence that she had advised
Chief Justice Hall that without
giving any prior notice and
without having any communi-
cation with her or the prosecu-
tor assigned to her court, Mag-
istrate Swain and her prosecu-
tor, Police Sergeant 1611 Kirk-
lyn Wright, heard Davies, Fer-
guson and Marshall’s case
nearly a week before it was
scheduled for her court.

The trio were charged with
possession of an unlicensed
firearm and possession of
ammunition.

Deputy Chief Magistrate
Almorales-Jones did not
attend work on May 14 and
May 15 of 2007 because she
was suffering from food poi-
soning. On May 15, the prose-
cutor assigned to Magistrate’s
Court Number 3 allegedly con-
tacted Magistrate Almorales-
Jones at home to register a
complaint that the criminal
proceedings of the three
accused, which was to be heard
on the 29th of that month, had
been heard by Magistrate
Swain in Court Number Three
the day before.

Deputy Chief Magistrate
Almorales-Jones claims she
returned to work the following
day and interviewed several
people regarding the circum-
stances surrounding the hear-
ing of the criminal case on May
14.

She alleges that she found
that Magistrate Swain made a
manuscript note on the charge
sheet that she had convicted
and fined Marshall $2,000 or
nine months imprisonment on
each count ($4,000 for both
counts).

The defendants, however,
alleged that Magistrate Swain
ordered Marshall to pay a fine
of $10,000 which was paid in
cash to prosecutor Wright.

The cashier assigned to the
magistrate’s court in Freeport,
however, said that Magistrate
Swain only paid the sum of
$4,000 to the court.

Deputy Chief Magistrate
Almorales-Jones claims in her
defence that there were similar
instances that caused her con-
cern over the way Magistrate
Swain conducted the affairs of
Court Number 2.

Among them was an
instance on May 17, 2007 when
Christopher Rolle reported to
her that in April of that year
he had pleaded guilty to two
counts of receiving before
Magistrate Swain who ordered
him to pay $1,000.

He reportedly paid the fine
to the prosecutor assigned to
the court in the corridor of
Magistrate’s Court Number 2,
but the prosecutor allegedly
failed to give him a receipt.

The court’s record, however,
did not reflect that the fine was
paid into court for Mr Rolle, it
is stated in the defence.

In addition, several staff
members alleged that Magis-
trate Swain frequently heard
criminal and traffic cases in her
private office.

These staff members also
allege that the Magistrate
and/or the prosecutor person-
ally collected money from the
defendants in these cases and
did not issue receipts to them.

In Deputy Chief Magistrate
Almorales-Jones’ defence she
requests that Magistrate
Swain’s writ of summons and
statement of claim be struck
out on the grounds that it fails
to disclose a reasonable cause
of action, is frivolous, vexa-
tious and an “abuse of the
court’s process.”

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1. CANTERBURY PARK ESTATES

LOT NO. 13

PROPERTY DESCRIPTION:
Single-storey Residence

3 Beds / 2 1/2 Baths
PROPERTY SIZE: 8,086 sq. ft.
LOCATION: Traveling east

on Prince Charles Drive, turn
through corner on the right
(opposite St. Augustine’s Road)
and head south around the
curve to the right. The property
is the 2nd to the last house on
the left.

APPRAISED VALUE: $283,000

2. COLLEGE GARDENS

SUBDIVISION

LOT NO. 5

PROPERTY DESCRIPTION:
Single-storey Duplex Apartment
2 Beds / 1 Bath each
PROPERTY SIZE: 5,976 sq. ft.
LOCATION: Traveling east along
Prince Charles Drive for St.
Augustine’s Road, take the 2nd
corner right (College Gardens
Road) and head south to the “T”
junction; turn onto Pine Barren
Road. Heading west, turn through
2nd paved road on left. The
property is the 5th building on the
right.

APPRAISED VALUE: $209,000

. BEL-AIR ESTATES -

CARMICHAEL ROAD

LOT NO. 259

PROPERTY DESCRIPTION:
Single-storey Residence,

3 beds / 2 baths

PROPERTY SIZE: 6,000 sq. ft.
LOCATION: Traveling east on
Carmichael Road from Faith
Avenue, take the 4th corner right
(Turtle Drive). The property is the
4th house on the right.
APPRAISED VALUE: $186,000

. CHIPPINGHAM SUBDIVISION

LOT NO. 17

PROPERTY DESCRIPTION:
Single-storey Residence,

2 beds / 1 bath

PROPERTY SIZE: 6,375 sq. ft.
LOCATION: Traveling west on
Quarry Mission Road off Nassau
Street, the property is located on
the northern side (approximately
500 ft. from Nassau Street).
APPRAISED VALUE: $120,000

10. ENGLERSTON SUBDIVISION

LOT NO. 4 Block 7

PROPERTY DESCRIPTION:
Triplex Apartment building
PROPERTY SIZE: 7,000 sq. ft.
LOCATION: Traveling east on
Cordeaux Avenue from East
Street, take the 2nd right (Key
West Street) and head south. The
property is the 6th building on the
left.

APPRAISED VALUE: $243,000

. BERNARD TERRACE

SUBDIVISION

LOT NO. 14 - Southern Moiety
PROPERTY DESCRIPTION:
Multi-Family Residential Lot
PROPERTY SIZE: 5,700 sq. ft.
with foundation

LOCATION: Traveling east on
Bernard Road, take the 1st
corner on the right past Windsor
Terrace. The vacant lot is the 4th
on the left.

APPRAISED VALUE: $85,000

. CARMICHAEL VILLAGE

LOT NO. “A”

PROPERTY DESCRIPTION:
Single family Residential Lot
PROPERTY SIZE: 4,650 sq. ft.
LOCATION: Traveling west

on Avocado Road from Faith
Avenue, turn through the 1st
graveled corner on the left. The
vacant lot is the 2nd on the left,
enclosed with chain link fence
and fruit trees.

APPRAISED VALUE: $51,000

3._ GAMBLE HEIGHTS

SUBDIVISION

LOT NO. Parcel of Land
PROPERTY DESCRIPTION:
Split Level Residence with Two
1 bed/1 bath Apartment Units
under construction
PROPERTY SIZE: 7,141 sq. ft.
LOCATION: Traveling south on
Blue Hill Road from Faith
United Way, take the 1st corner
left (Sunrise Road) and head
south; take the 5th corner

left and head east to the 1st
corner right. The property is
the 7th house on the right.
APPRAISED VALUE: $150,000

. PINEWOOD GARDENS

SUBDIVISION

LOT NO. 1714

PROPERTY DESCRIPTION:
Single-storey Residence
PROPERTY SIZE: 5,000 sq. ft.
LOCATION: Traveling east onto
Bamboo Boulevard from East
Street, take the 3rd corner right
(Thatch Palm Avenue) and travel
south, turn through 2nd corner
on the left (Avocado Street). The
property is the 17th house on
the left.

APPRAISED VALUE: $137,000

. GOLDEN ISLES ROAD

LOT NO. “B”

PROPERTY DESCRIPTION:
Triplex Apartment Complex
PROPERTY SIZE: 7,203 sq. ft.
LOCATION: Traveling north on
Golden Isles Road from Cowpen
Road, after the 1st paved road
on left; the property is the 2nd
building on the left.
APPRAISED VALUE: $333,000

12. MARSHALL ROAD

LOT NO. 17D

PROPERTY DESCRIPTION:
Triplex Apartment-One 2-
bedroom/ 2-bath & Two 2-
bedroom /1-bath

PROPERTY SIZE: 10,000 sq. ft.
LOCATION: Traveling west on
Marshall Road from South Beach
Road, take the 1st corner right
(Tiao End Road). The property is
the 4th building on the left.
APPRAISED VALUE: $288,000

13. MARSHALL ROAD

LOT NO. 52

PROPERTY DESCRIPTION:
Single-storey Residence 3 beds /
2 baths

PROPERTY SIZE: 37,550 sq. ft.
LOCATION: Traveling on Marshall
Road from Blue Hill Road, turn
left at “T” junction, then right. The
property is the 5th on the right, to
the rear.

APPRAISED VALUE: $345,000

. KOOL ACRES SUBDIVISION

LOT NO. 46 Parcel ‘C”
PROPERTY DESCRIPTION:
Multi / Single Family Residential
PROPERTY SIZE: 7,604 sq. ft.
LOCATION: Traveling south

on Fox Hill Road from Joe
Farrington Road, take the 2nd
corner left - opposite Guana
Cay Avenue - on to Kool Acres
Subdivision Road. The vacant lot
is 1st on the left; directly on the
corner of Fox Hill Road and Kool
Acres Subdivision Road.
APPRAISED VALUE: $84,000

4. SEA GULL GARDEN

SUBDIVISION

LOT NO. 33

PROPERTY DESCRIPTION: Multi
- Family Residential Lot

Beach Front

PROPERTY SIZE: 14,723 sq. ft.
LOCATION: On Flemming Road.
APPRAISED VALUE: $200,000

\

yr

DEVELOPED RESIDENTIAL & COMMERCIAL

5, CENTERVILLE

LOT NO. 5 Block 14
PROPERTY DESCRIPTION:
Single-storey Commercial
Building

PROPERTY SIZE: 5,000 sq. ft.
LOCATION: Madeira Street
between Montrose Avenue and
Mt. Royal Avenue
APPRAISED VALUE: $302,000

6._ SIR LYNDEN PINDLING

ESTATES SUBDIVISION

LOT NO. 3014/15

PROPERTY DESCRIPTION:
Single-family Residence

3 beds / 2 baths

PROPERTY SIZE: 5,000 sq. ft.
LOCATION: Traveling east

on Bamboo Boulevard to the
roundabout, continue traveling
eastward on C.W. Saunders
Highway. Take the 2nd right (Lady
Pindling Avenue) and head south
to the 1st paved corner on the left
(Lauren Street); turn through 2nd
corner left (Pear Tree Avenue).
The property is the 6th house on
the left.

APPRAISED VALUE: $145,000

14. PINEWOOD GARDENS

SUBDIVISION

LOT NO. 13

PROPERTY DESCRIPTION:
Single-storey Residence,

3 beds / 2 baths

PROPERTY SIZE: 7,191 sq. ft.
LOCATION: Traveling east on
Sapodilla Boulevard from East
Street, take the 1st left (Thatch
Palm Avenue) and head north
to the “T” junction. Take a left
(Mahogany Street); the property is
the 2nd on the right.
APPRAISED VALUE: $148,000

15. SANDILANDS VILLAGE

LOT NOS. 7 and 8
PROPERTY DESCRIPTION:
Single-storey Residence

With 3 apartments under
construction

PROPERTY SIZE: Lot 7: 7,970
sq. ft, Lot 8:8,419 sq. ft.
LOCATION: Traveling west on
Sandilands Village Road from
Fox Hill Road, turn through the
9th paved road on left (Vanessa
Close). The properties are located
on the northwestern side of the
street.

APPRAISED VALUE: $277,000

. SOUTH OCEAN ESTATES

SUBDIVISION

LOT NO. 1 Block 5

PROPERTY DESCRIPTION:
Multi-family Residential Lot
PROPERTY SIZE: 11,566 sq. ft.
LOCATION: Traveling south of
Lyford Cay, immediately pass
Mount Pleasant turn left on
South Ocean Boulevard to New
South Ocean Estates. The vacant
lot is the 1st on the right.
APPRAISED VALUE: $110,000

6. SOUTHERN SHORES

SUBDIVISION

LOT NO. 4 parcel of lot 24
PROPERTY DESCRIPTION:
Multi - Family Residential Lot
PROPERTY SIZE: 7,706 sq. ft.
LOCATION: The vacant

lot is on the west side of a
road reservation nearly 400
feet south of Marshall Road.
APPRAISED VALUE: $77,000

7. WINTON MEADOWS ESTATES
SUBDIVISION I
LOT NO. 115
PROPERTY DESCRIPTION:
Single-storey Residence 3 beds
/ 2 baths
PROPERTY SIZE: 8,000 sq. ft.
LOCATION: Traveling east
on Prince Charles Drive for
Culberts Hill, take the 1st corner
right (Jasmine Drive) and head
south; turn through 2nd corner
on the right (Violette Drive). The
property is the 4th house on the
left.
APPRAISED VALUE: $274,000

16. SANDILANDS VILLAGE
LOT NO. “E”
PROPERTY DESCRIPTION:
Duplex Apartment Complex
PROPERTY SIZE: 5,500 sq. ft.
LOCATION: Traveling west on
Sandilands Village Road from
Fox Hill Road, turn through the
2nd paved road on the left. The
property is the 5th on the left.
APPRAISED VALUE: $219,000

VACANT LOTS

INTERESTED PARTIES SHOULD SUBMIT OFFERS INCLUSIVE OF TELEPHONE CONTACT AND POSTAL ADDRESS
TO: CB DISTRESSED PROPERTIES, CREDIT RISK MANAGEMENT DEPARTMENT, P.O BOX - SS-6263 NASSAU, BAHAMAS OR
EMAIL US AT: DISTRESSED. PROPERTIES@COMBANKLTD.COM * WE RESERVE THE RIGHT TO REJECT ANY OR ALL OFFERS.







TRIBUNE SPORTS

FRIDAY, APRIL 17, 2009, PAGE 9



SPORTS



ai

Grizzlies see signs
of improvement —

@ BASKETBALL
MEMPHIS, Tenn. i
Associated Press i



MEASURING progress }
with the Memphis Grizzlies }
isn't easy. For perhaps the
first time in a couple years, }
they see signs of improve- }
ment. ;
And strong reasons for }
hope. i
"I think we're very happy :
and fortunate where we are }
now," guard Mike Conley }
said. "We've come a long }
way through the coaching }
change and different things. I ;
think finally, in the last }
month of the season, we real- }
ly started to gel together.
Hopefully, we've laid afoun- }
dation to build upon." i

The Grizzlies posted a 24- ;
58 record, a two-win }
improvement over last year, ;
and they even capped the }
season by beating the Atlanta }
Hawks 98-90 in the finale }
Wednesday night. That tied :
them for fifth-worst record }
in the NBA with Minnesota. }

One measure of progress? }
And yes, it's a bit small. :

"Just having 4-game win }
streaks and things like that, :
shows an improvement," :
Hakim Warrick said. ;

Still, this is a team that won }
only 11 games before Marc
Iavaroni was fired as coach }
in January and replaced by }
Lionel Hollins. The Grizzlies }
went 13-26 under Hollins }
who has job security for next }
season as he tries to add }
more wins and grow this :
team. :
"I'm very happy with :
where we are. The young }
guys have developed acama- }
raderie. We move the ball, }
we play better together. Our }
offense flows a lot better }
most nights. We have gotten :
better individually," Hollins :
said. i
He likes how Marc Gasol, }
Conley, Rudy Gay and O.J. }
Mayo, the No. 3 pick in the }
draft, improved together. i

The next step is adding :
more talent to the bench to }
avoid having to play starters :
so much. Gay, Mayo, Conley }
and Gasol each played at }
least 30 minutes per game }
this season. Hollins wants }
more rebounding and more :
scoring from the bench as }
well. :
Only Charlotte scored few- ;
er than Memphis’ 93.8 points }
per game, and the Grizzlies }
were last in the NBA with
38.8 rebounds per game. i



dames feeling like a kid again ahead of playoffs

m@ BASKETBALL
Associated Press

WITH THE NBA playoffs
starting up this weekend,
LeBron James is feeling like a
kid all over again.

The Cleveland Cavaliers
player led his team to a league
best 66-16 record this season,
and the 24-year-old star is one
of the main contenders to win
his first MVP award. But it's
the NBA title he is craving.

"The playoffs is like taking
the kid to the candy story,”
James said. "We all know that
it's a new season now."

The Cavs face the Detroit
Pistons in the first round of the
playoffs, and they will host the
first game on Saturday. The
Pistons, which finished third in
the Central Division, are the
only team in the playoffs with a
losing record (39-43).

But that doesn't mean that
James and his gang are going to
take them lightly.

"There's no way you can
overlook the Pistons. This is a
team that's been to the Eastern
Conference finals like six years
in a row," James said. "We
know how experienced that
team is. We know how power-
ful and dangerous that team
is.”

Another strong team in the
league is the Boston Celtics.
But the defending champions
may have lost star Kevin Gar-
nett for the entire playoffs
because of a knee injury that
has limited him to four games
over the final two months of
the season.

"KG has to do what's best
for him. He doesn't want to do
something that can hurt him
for a long period of time,”
James said. "The team may be



WASHINGTON Wizards guard
Gilbert Arenas signs a ball after
their NBA basketball practice in
Washington Friday, March 27,
2009.

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Departs Nassau: Tues, Thurs.& Sat
Pam UCL MOA al

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Michael Conroy/AP Photo

CLEVELAND Cavaliers’ LeBron James, front, is fouled by Indiana Pacers' Rasho Nesterovic, of Slovenia, in the first half of an NBA bas-
ketball game in Indianapolis, Monday, April 13, 2009.

a little bit down, but they still
have a lot of veteran guys.”
James is the key to Cleve-
land's success. He finished sec-
ond in the league's scoring
chart with 28.4 points per
game, but he's about more than
just putting points on the score-

board.

"My game is geared around
making my teammates better,”
said James, who also has a
documentary called "More
Than a Game" coming out in
October. "The way I play the
game of basketball automati-

cally gives my teammates the
ball just because I like to pass
— very unselfish basketball
player.”

And while James also said
this season was his best yet as a
pro player, he’s also prepared
to keep improving, saying that

every part of his game could
still get better.

James was drafted by the
Cavaliers out of high school in
2003, and he has spent his
entire professional career in
Cleveland. Win or lose this
year, that’s not likely to change.

Arenas wants to shed

Wizards’

@ BASKETBALL
WASHINGTON
Associated Press

ON THE flight home from Boston, after
the final game of one of the worst seasons in
Washington Wizards franchise history,
Gilbert Arenas laid down the law.

Next season, Arenas said, the goofing
around has got to stop.

"We've just been a goofball team for a
while,” Arenas said Thursday, explaining the
speech he gave to his teammates on the
plane. "It's fun when you're winning. But
when you're not winning, it's depressing a
little bit. The same guys are here, but we're
going to have to approach — especially the
young guys — the game seriously."

Wait a minute. This was Agent Zero?
Talking about being serious? Was he hav-
ing an out-of-body experience or something?

"He said next year's totally different —
no playing around,” forward Andray Blatche
said. "I was surprised. I was like, ‘Is this
Gil?"

With the 19-63 campaign mercifully over
and new coach Flip Saunders not expected to
formally take the job until next week, there



‘goofball’ image

was time for lots of Gilbertology on Thursday
as the Wizards took their end-of-season phys-
icals. Speaking for more than 15 minutes,
Arenas addressed his reputation for being
"uncoachable,” his ongoing comeback from
knee surgery, his "smoke and mirrors" pub-
lic persona and his unexpected lecture aboard
the team plane.

Arenas said the talk was meant to bridge
the divide between the team's professional,
serious veterans and the young players, whose
pregame jokes and pranks seem more befit-
ting of a high school locker room.

"To be honest, I'm a goofball,” Arenas
said. "But when I step inside those lines, it’s
serious. Some of them don't know how to
turn that on and off. I told them, it comes
with time. You've got to put your work in the
summer because we're coming at you. It's
everybody for themselves."

One player who didn't hear Arenas was co-
captain Caron Butler, who said he was watch-
ing the movie "The Notebook" on the plane.
Told of Arenas' comments, Butler said: "It's
about time for that talk to be coming out of
his mouth."

Arenas’ returned to the court March 28
against Detroit, ending a two-year span in




which he had three left knee operations,
missed 156 of 173 games and signed a $111
million, six-year contract. But he played in
that game and only one other, raising suspi-
cions that his knee was again giving him prob-
lems.

Arenas said the knee is fine, and that the
two games were all the doctors needed to
see. "They were comfortable with the two
games I gave them,” Arenas said. "So I decid-
ed after those two games I played, let's just
think about next season. I'm getting killed this
season anyway, might as well just add to it.
Somebody has to be smart here and focus on
what's to come. It's a five-year investment,
not a one-year pressure to deliver."

Arenas said his offseason regimen will
include 1,000 shots per day in May and June,
and he plans to do football-related workouts
to increase his leg strength.

Former Wizards coach Eddie Jordan did-
n't coin the term Gilbertology without good
reason. Arenas is the first to admit his per-
sonality has its quirks, but he said a lot of his
self-marketing act is truly just an act — begun
after he was originally snubbed for 2006 All-
Star game.

"I'm more smoke and mirrors than any-
thing,” Arenas said. "Once I got snubbed, I
felt if I talked a little trash, people would
actually hear it and see it. And then it started
working, so I kept going with it. ... Since I said
I was the ‘East Coast Assassin,’ everybody
started paying attention — like, oh yeah, he's
gotten better."

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PAGE 10, FRIDAY, APRIL 17, 2009

TRIBUNE SPORTS



SPORTS



No Bull Basketball Club
returns from successful trip |

@ By BRENT STUBBS
Senior Sports Reporter
bstubbs@tribunemedia.net

COACH Geno Bullard said
his No Bull Basketball Club
was in no mood for fooling
around during a tour of Canada
last week.

The club returned home hav-
ing secured athletic scholarships
for at least five of the players
with a number of the others
being considered for the future.

“We are working on getting
all of the paperwork completed
for the players before we make
an official announcement on
exactly where they are going,”
Bullard said.

“But the coaches we have
been in contact with have been

very impressed with the players
and they are all eager in get-
ting them into their programme
in August.”

Bullard, who also coaches at
Westminster College, said the
trip was quite a success with
the team playing in a number of
exhibition games against local
colleges such as Ridley College,
Seneca College, York Univer-
sity, Niagara College and Hum-
ber College.

“It wasn’t so much about
winning basketball games,”
Bullard said. “We went there
to get the exposure for the play-
ers at the college level.

“But a lot of the coaches
were surprised to learn that our
players were still in college.
They didn’t believe that the



“We went
there to get
the exposure
for the players
at the college
level.”



Geno Bullard

way the players played that
they were not ready for college.
They have indicated that they
will keep an interest in the play-
ers for the future.”

During their trip, No Bull
also attended the National Bas-

Stopping D-Wade: Hawks
facing NBA’s top scorer

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ketball Association game
between the Toronto Raptors
and the Philadelphia 76ers.

“We really had a good time
on the tour,” Bullard said. “All
of the schools treated us very
well. They made us felt as if we
were right at home.”

Now that they are back
home, Bullard said the empha-
sis will be placed on ensuring
that the players who have
secured the scholarships will be
ready to make the trip once
their paperwork is complete.

Additionally, Bullard said his
club will begin preparation for
their summer programme,
which includes a tour and exhi-
bition series in Cuba.

The No Bull Basketball Club
will also be participating in a

@ BASKETBALL
ATLANTA
Asociated Press

AS THE Atlanta Hawks
wrapped up their first practice
of a new season, Mike Wood-
son implored his team to take
advantage of this once-in-a-
decade opportunity.

"Mentally, we've got to step it
up a notch,” the coach told his
players, gathered around him
Thursday in the middle of their
Philips Arena practice court.

But one thing is clear with-
out extra time in the film room:
The Hawks must stop — check
that, slow down — Dwyane
Wade if they want to advance to
the second round of the play-
offs for the first time since 1999,
which also was the last time
they had home-court advantage.

M-V-3 is the league's leading
scorer, a guy who literally took
a young Miami Heat team on
his back and lifted them back
to the playoffs after a 15-win
season. He's a guard on a mis-
sion, still angry about those who
wondered if he'd seen his best
days after two injury plagued
seasons.

Now, he's ready to take his
well-controlled wrath out on the
Hawks in what appears to be
the most intriguing Eastern
Conference series of the open-

Two events
You don't want to miss

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number of local tournaments
in New Providence and Grand
Bahama where they have
enjoyed a great deal of success.

Bullard has indicated that as
a recruiter for at least five col-
leges and universities in Cana-
da, he is willing to assist any
local basketball player if they
are interested in furthering
their education.

“They don’t have to be a
member of the No Bull Bas-
ketball Club,” he said. “Once
they have an interest and are
willing to make the transition,
we can help them out.”

Interested persons can con-
tact Bullard through email nob-
ullitd@hotmail.com or visit
their website at nobulllimit-
ed.page.tl



Gregory Smith/AP Photo

ATLANTA Hawks center Al Horford, left, drives against Miami Heat
forward Michael Beasley, right, during the first quarter, of an NBA
basketball game at Philips Arena, Tuesday, April 14, 2009 in Atlanta.

ing round. Game 1 is Sunday
night in Atlanta.

"Oh, man, I don't think any-
body shuts him down. He's
proven that this year,” Hawks
forward Marvin Williams said.
"But we have some athletic
guys who can really help out.
Whoever has the assignment of
guarding him is going to have a
tough assignment, but they'll
know the rest of the team has
their back."

Atlanta did a good job on
Wade in two regular-season
games. He hit only 9-of-24 shots
in a December matchup, then
was limited to a pair of free
throws — one of his most effec-
tive weapons — in a February
loss to the Hawks. He scored
21 points in each, nine below
his league-best average of 30.2.

But Wade torched Atlanta
for 35 points on 13-of-19 shoot-
ing (plus 9-of-10 foul shots) in
Miami's lone victory over the
Hawks this season (He sat out
the teams’ final regular-season
meeting Tuesday, a meaning-
less game with both teams
already locked into the 4-5
seeds in the East).

"He's just relentless in get-
ting to the basket," said Joe
Johnson, the Hawks’ leading
scorer. "He shoots a lot of free
throws. It's tough. Everybody,
all five guys, have really got to
be in sync trying to stop him."

Woodson shrugged off the
inevitable questions about shut-
ting down Wade, stressing that
Miami is not a one-man team.

Four other players averaged
in double figures, led by rookie
Michael Beasley at 13.9, and
several Atlanta players men-
tioned 3-point specialist Dae-
quan Cook, who scored nearly
two-thirds of his field goals from
beyond the arc.

"It's not our job to sit here
and just try to figure out how to
stop Dwyane Wade,” Woodson
said. "I don't think you can do
that. Their supporting case was
good enough to get them into
the fifth spot this year. I look
at the Miami Heat as the Miami
Heat, as a team, and we've got
to figure that out."

In three games that mattered
during the regular season,
Atlanta held the Heat to just
under 84 points a game, far
below its 98.1 average.

Again, Woodson doesn't
much stock in what happened
before the playoffs.

| WEDN

: « TARYN SMITH,
i girls 11-12 100 butterfly in
: 1:10.62,

Ke

: CYCLING











SDAY CLASH



e THE New Providence

? Cycling Association contin-

? ued its Wednesday Cycling

: Clash at the one mile cycling
? track at the Queen Elizabeth
} Sports Center.

Two cyclists started at

? opposite sides of the track,

? each doing 6 laps. With

: heads bent and concentra-

? tion written on their faces, it
? was tempting to slip a glance
i to see exactly where the

i competition was.

Here’s how they finished:
Justin Minnis — 4.40.44.
Antinece Simmons —
4.49.28.

Lashane Dean — 4.23.06.
Henry Kline — 4.30.12.
Anthony Colebrook —
4.03.38.

Robert Bethel — 4.08.53
Van Demeritte — 4.11.91.
Eugene Heastie — 4.25.41
(Track bike)

Larry Russell — 6.42.66

Next Wednesday, the com-

petitors will compete in a
i kilo race.





| FREEDOM FARM
SCH













DUL

® Here’s a look at the





: schedule for the Freedom
? Farm Baseball League this
‘ weekend in Yamacraw:

? TBALL:

i? Friday

? 6 pm Jujus vs Sea Grapes

? Saturday

? 9am Coco Plums vs Guineps
? 10:15 am Dillies vs Jujus

? COACHPITCH:

? Friday

? 7:30 pm Sandflies vs Green

? Turtles

i Saturday

? 11:30 am Mosquitoes vs Boas
i 1 pm Green Turtles vs Bees

? 3 pm Wasps vs Sandflies

? Sunday

? 3pm Wasps vs Mosquitoes

: 9-10:

i Friday

? 6 pm Octopus vs Eels

? Saturday

? 9am Turbots vs Red Snap-
j per

? 10:30 am
? Barracudas

? Sunday

: 4:30 pm Eels

Eels vs

vs Turbots

11-12
i Friday
: 7:30 pm Conchs vs Iguanas

i Saturday
: 11 am Hurricanes vs Divers

? Noon Groupers vs Marlins
? 1 pm Hurricanes vs Divers
i? 3:30 pm Parrots vs Iguanas
? Sunday

? 3 pm Conchs vs Marlins

? 4:30 pm Crowns vs Parrots

: 13-15:

i Saturday

? 9 am Sharks vs Owlz

? 1 pm Potcakes vs Stingrays
? 3 pm Silverjacks vs Sharks
? 16-18:

? Sunday

? 2:30 pm Arawaks vs

? Lucayans

: 4 pm Tainos vs Caribs

Bahamas wins
first medal

FROM page 11

second in the

¢ DIONISIO CAREY, fourth in the
; boys 11-12 butterfly in 1:09.17.

? ¢ MAYA ALBURY, second in the
? girls 13-14 100 butterfly in
? 1:09.56 and BRIA DEVEAUX, sev-
? enth in 1:10.47.

¢ EVANTE GIBSON, second in the
? boys 13-14 100 butterfly in
; 1:01.80.

i e« MCKAYLA LIGHTBOURN,
? fourth in the girls 15-17 100 but-
? terfly in 1:09.07 and ARIEL
? WEECH, seventh in 1:11.27.

During the evening ses-

i sions, the official opening cer-
? emonies took place.

The meet will continue with

i two sessions today starting at
: 8:30 am and 3:30 pm.

The championships will

? conclude on Sunday. The
? Bahamas is
? improve on its third place fin-
? ish last year behind the com-
? bined French Antilles and
? Trinidad & Tobago.

hoping to



THE TRIBUNE



FRIDAY, APRIL 17,

nowles,

@ By BRENT STUBBS
Senior Sports Reporter
bstubbs@tribunemedia.net

MARK Knowles and Mahesh Bhupathi
will have to wait a little longer before they
play their first match at the Monte Carlo
Rolex Masters Tournament.

The Bahamian-Indian connection was
scheduled to play their opener in the second
round yesterday, but heavy rain in Monaco
forced the postponement of the match until
today.

“We're ready to play,” said Knowles in an
interview with The Tribune from his hotel
room yesterday. “We just couldn’t play
because of the heavy rain. Only one match
was played. But we hope to play tomorrow.”

Knowles and Bhupthai, the number four
seeds in the tournament, are scheduled to
play against the unseeded team of Feliciano
Lopez and Fernando Verdasco, both from
Spain.

But they will have to wait until Verdasco
play his singles match against number three
seed Novak Djokovic from Serbia. Verdasco
is the number seven seed in singles.

“They gave us a very tough match right out

PAGE 11

rts



2009

“There are a
lot of tough teams
in our draw, but
we just have to
be ready to play and
I think we are.”
MARK KNOWLES

of the gate,” Knowles pointed out. “So we
will have to be ready to go and play from
the start.

“Verdasco and Lopez are a pretty good
team. But we feel confident that we can play
well enough to get to the next round.”

If they are successful, Knowles and Bhu-
pathi will have to play their quarter-final
match against the unseeded team of Djokovic
and his compatriot Viktor Troicki.

“Tt doesn’t get any easier for us,” Knowles
said. “There are a lot of tough teams in our
draw, but we just have to be ready to play and
I think we are.”

Bhupathi match rained out

Knowles and Bhupathi reached the final of
this tournament last year and he’s hoping
that they will not just get back there, but go
all the way and win the title this time around.

If they advance to the semifinal, Knowles
and Bhupathi could possibly end up playing
against the No.2 seeded team of Daniel
Nestor of Canada and Nenad Zimonjic from
Serbia.

Knowles and Nestor were former part-
ners, having split up after playing together for
more than 10 years. They were considered
one of the most successful partners, winning
just about every tournament except Wim-
bledon. After their spilt three years ago,
Knowles teamed up with Bhupathi.

The duo got off to a great start this year,
playing in the final of the Australian Open
where they lost to the American identical
twin brothers Bob and Mike Bryan. They
also played in the semi’s of a tournament in
Sydney.

But since January, the duo have not had a
winning streak.

“We lost in some big tournaments,”
Knowles said. “But we’re hoping that we can
get back to the level that we were in January
and eventually turn things around.”

Bahamas wins first medal



File photoAP Photo

HEAVY rain in Monaco forced the postponement of the first match
for Mark Knowles (background) and Mahesh Bhupathi (foreground).

of two other events to join a
number of Bahamians who
advanced for a shot at a medal

¢ MCKAYLA LIGHTBOURN, first in
the girls 15-17 200 breaststroke
























McKayla Lightbourn

@ By BRENT STUBBS
Senior Sports Reporter
bstubbs@tribunemedia.net

McKAYLA Lightbourn, one
of the most decorated Bahami-
an swimmers at last year’s
Carifta Swimming Champi-
onships, picked up where she
left off at this year’s event.

As a member of the 36-
strong team competing in
Savaneta, Aruba, Lightbourn
picked up the Bahamas’ lone
medal on the first day of com-
petition yesterday.

In one of the two finals con-

tested during the morning ses-
sion, Lightbourn posted a win-
ning time of nine minutes and
14.88 seconds to secure the
gold in the girls 15-17 800
metre freestyle.

Her nearest rival was
Trinidad & Tobago’s Saman-
tha Rahael, who clocked
9:22.26 for the silver. The
bronze went to Laura Butler
of the Cayman Islands in
9:48.26.

Another Bahamian Amber
Weech was sixth in the race in
10:02.13 as she improved on
her personal best time of
10:07.96.

The other final contested
was in the girls 13-14 800
freestyle.

Two Bahamians competed
in that event, but the best finish
came from Bria Deveaux in a
PR of 10:14.57, surpassing her
previous best of 10:23.46.
Riquel Rolle was 13th in
11:00.82.

Martinique’s Julie-Anne
Malidor took the gold in
9:31.48 with the silver going to
Trinidad & Tobago’s Kimber
John Williams in 9:32.80 and
the bronze to Cayman Island’s
Lara Butler in 9:48.26.

McKayla also made the final

in 13 of the 18 other prelimi-
nary events staged in the morn-
ing session.

Swimmers advancing are as
follows:

¢ LAURA MORLEY, second in the
girls 11-12 200 breaststroke heats
in 2:53.31.

¢ DUSTIN TYNES, first in the boys
11-12 200 breaststroke in 2:40.35
with Dionisio Carey, third in
2:51.95.

¢ EVANTE GIBSON, second in the
boys 13-14 200 breaststroke in
2:40.54 and Toby McCarroll, third
in 2:41.04.

¢ Outdoor Tiles
* Pool Tiles

« Mosaic Tifas

in 2:48.67 and SHAUNTE MOSS,
seventh in 3:02.55.

¢ JACINDA WILLIAMS, seventh in
the girls 11-12 50 backstroke in
35.51.

¢ DIONISIO CAREY, third in the
boys 11-12 50 backstroke in 31.61
and DYLAN CASH, seventh in
34.07.

¢ LARON MORLEY, eighth in the
boys 13-14 50 backstroke in 31.02.

¢ ARIEL WEECH, second in the
girls 15-17 50 backstroke in 31.84.

SEE page 10

EW TERPRISES LIMITED

parr merge apm ge pret la
Ce ee ee A ee EL ra
Lee ee ee ee
Ps em De re i ie Med
fata EM ema cette tg tt tt meen



PAGE 12, FRIDAY, APRIL 17, 2009

THE TRIBUNE



Whe :

&

@ribune |

Let. Fos



THE Colouring Contest winners with their Easter baskets. Not pictured are Summer Burrows, second place
winner in the 4-5 years category, and Abishai Beneby, second place winner in the 9-10 years category.

2009

CONTEST

@ The Tribune and Kelly’s Home Centre are pleased
to announce the winners of the 2009 Easter Colouring
Contest.

The judges had the difficult task of determining the
winners following the submission of hundreds of pic-
tures by children between the ages of four and 10. Pic-
tured are the first, second and third place winners in
the three age categories with their prizes - fabulous
Easter baskets, all donated by Kelly’s.



TAMERA CAMBRIDGE,
second place winner in the
6-8 years category.



JAIAIRE BRENNEN, first place winner
in the 4-5 years age category.



SARAI BAIN, third place winner
in the 6-8 years category.



ARIANNA JOBSON, third place winner
in the 4-5 years category.

ist - JAIAIRE BRENNEN
2nd - SUMMER BURROWS
3rd - ARIANNA JOHNSON

TS UL SASH

ist - RHYAN ROBERTS
2nd - TAMERA CAMBRIDGE
3rd - SARAI BAIN



BERTRAM MURRAY, first place
winner in the 9-10 years category.

ist - BERTRAM MURRAY
2nd - ABISHAI BENEBY
3rd - GLENWITTE RUSSELL

ues

GINA BETHEL - Tribune Classified/Advertising Agent
LLOYD ALLEN- Tribune Features Reporter

CARA BETHEL- Tribune Features Editor

LASHANTA DUGAY- Kelly's Home Centre Representative
JANELL BRENNEN- Kelly's Home Centre Representative



GLENWITTE RUSSELL,
third place winner in the
9-10 years category.

RHYAN ROBERTS, first place winner
in the 6-8 years category.







THE TRIBUNE a

Linite



FAMILY GUARDIAN

FRIDAY, APRIL INSURANCE COMPANY LIMITED

ie

2009

SECTION B e business@tribunemedia.net

City Markets rejects Bringing export
50% of j ob seekers back into ‘fashion

* Islands of the World Fashion Week to
expand beyond 35 designers from 2008 after







Narra
awT Ke

‘devastating’
for economy



* Top economist says fl Human resources head says recruitment, productivity ‘scary ee

education failings leave and brutal’ sane aiaien award ick ’
‘ ; : : reaniser urges tourism tO LOOK at His even

unproductive workforce | J. Fears that education woes will cause Bahamian economy and 8 ;

‘less able to adapt’ to rapid
changes free trade, financial
regulation will force on
Bahamas and way it
conducts business

* ‘You can't have the levels
of illiteracy that prevail here
continue to be pumped out
into society’, as economy
becomes ‘progressively less
competitive’

m@ By NEIL HARTNELL
Tribune Business Editor

High illiteracy levels among
Bahamian public high school
leavers have “devastating impli-
cations” for the economy at a
time when the foundations of its
long-standing business model are
likely to undergo rapid change, a
New Providence telling Tribune
Business the situation would
make this nation “progressively
less competitive”.

Ralph Massey, a founding
member of the Nassau Institute
economic think-tank, told this
newspaper that the English and
mathematical illiteracy prevalent
among many high school gradu-
ates would depress workforce
productivity and skills, leaving
the Bahamian economy less able
to adapt to the changes being
forced upon it by rules-based
trading regimes and _ the
OECD/G-20 assault on interna-
tional financial centres.

In a presentation to a Nassau
Institute meeting on Wednesday
night, Mr Massey drew on the
research finding from his The
Learning Crisis essay to show
that, based on the 2006 BGCSE
results, 39 per cent of New Prov-
idence high school students who
sat the English exam failed, while
another 17 per cent were “lan-
guage illiterate”.

As for mathematics, the find-
ings were even more shocking -

SEE page 4B

Receivers:
Buyer interest
in Bimini resort

already seen

m@ By CHESTER ROBARDS
Business Reporter
crobards@tribunemedia. net

SOUTHAMPTON, Bermuda
— Receivers for the Bimini Big
Game Resort have already
received interest in the property
from prospective, a senior execu-
tive with KPMG (Bahamas) told
Tribune Business yesterday. The
property, though only closed for
several months, would need mod-
erate capital investment.

Simon Townend, head of
Bahamas-based KPMG Corpo-
rate Finance, said the receivers
were considering all available
options with regard to the future
of the resort.

“We were only just appointed
receivers recently, so we’re still
looking at all the options. I can’t
categorically say, but certainly the
property is on the market,” he
said.

“There already has been inter-
est. It’s got a lot of history, so
people know what’s happening
and quite a few have already
expressed interest.”

The owners of the resort shut
down operations late last year,
left the staff with unpaid wages
and were never heard from again.

Now, a Cayman Islands-based
company is looking to recover the
loan it made to finance the Bimi-
ni Big Game Resort.

“The company has a reason-
able level of liabilities to various

SEE page 2B

firms to ‘be swallowed’ up by better prepared foreign rivals

@ By NEIL HARTNELL
Tribune Business Editor

“At least half” of all school
leaver applicants who apply for
jobs at City Markets are reject-
ed because they cannot pass the
company’s basic maths test, its
human resources head has
revealed to Tribune Business,
describing the recruitment and
productivity issues facing it and
other Bahamian companies as
“brutal” and “scary”.

Peter Goudie told this news-
paper: “It’s absolutely brutal.
What we all run into, and it’s
not just me, is that most of the
kids looking for work in our
industry can’t get past the basic
maths test. We turn down most
of those who apply.”

He explained that the test
used by the 12-store grocery
chain, whose immediate hold-
ing company is publicly-owned

Bahamas Supermarkets, tested
simple addition, subtraction,
multiplication and recognition.

“It’s so basic it would scare
you,” Mr Goudie told Tribune
Business. When asked how
many job applicants City Mar-
kets, which employs 800 per-
sons in New Providence and
Grand Bahama, rejected, Mr
Goudie said: “Maybe at least
half.” Most were high school
leavers.

His revelations capture the
stark reality facing many
Bahamian school leavers, espe-
cially those who are function-
ally illiterate in maths and Eng-
lish. Not only are the unfit to
join the workforce, many lack
the social and life skills they will
need as adults.

All this translates into a
Bahamian workforce with rela-
tively low productivity, and an
uncompetitive economy. This

Government does
not ‘appreciate the
value’ of engineers

* Undervaluation of talents by decision-makers means
Bahamian engineers and other professionals not
setting ‘their piece of the pie’ from major

development projects

* Bahamians must overcome ‘ring fencing’ of foreign

direct investment projects

* BEC Board mandates Corporation's engineers to
contract-out as much work as possible locally

@ By NEIL HARTNELL
Tribune Business Editor

The Government does not
“appreciate the value” offered
by Bahamian engineers and
other associated professionals,
an attorney/environmental con-
sultant said yesterday, and as a
result it fails to ensure they get
a “piece of the pie” from the
many foreign direct investment
projects attracted to this nation.

Romauld Ferreira, an attor-
ney and partner in Ferreira &
Company attorneys-at-law, told
a Bahamas Society of Engineers
(BSE) meeting that their pro-
fession and others were being
“ring-fenced out of opportuni-
ties for work” by foreign devel-
opers who brought their ready-
made engineering, environ-
mental and project manage-
ment teams to the Bahamas
with them.

Mr Ferreira explained that
“the biggest problem we find” is
that foreign engineering firms,
brought in to work on
Bahamas-based projects, were
increasingly owned or part-
owned by the same financial
groups financing the developer
who hired them.

This, in turn, allowed project
financiers to generate earnings
streams from these develop-
ments in several different ways.

“Tf we can’t make it here,
we'll all be in trouble,” Mr Fer-
reira warned.

“Our challenge, then, is to
break this sort of ring-fencing.
We know this to be a very seri-
ous concern, and a huge prob-
lem.

“When they [foreign devel-
opers] come into a country,
they’ve done all of this.

“Because the Government is
run by a bunch of lawyers,
they’re less enthusiastic about
ensuring Bahamian engineers

SEE page 5B

for a better life

home ownership

was captured by Bahamas-
based economist Ralph Massey
who, using the research from his
The Learning Crisis essay,
showed that based on the 2006
BGCSE results, 39 per cent of
New Providence high school stu-
dents who sat the English exam
failed, while another 17 per cent
were “language illiterate”.

As for mathematics, the find-
ings were even more shocking -
36 per cent of all New Providence
high school leavers failed BGCSE
maths in 2006, and another 46 per
cent were deemed numerically
illiterate - they did not know the
difference between addition and
subtraction.

Mr Goudie, emphasising that
most entry-level jobs at City
Markets were “very basic”, such
as shelf-stacking, said the high

SEE page 3B

The information contained is from a third
party and The Tribune can not be held
responsible for errors and/or omission.
from the daily report.



Pee

and others as source of divesification, and
hopes to build up Bahamian fashion industry

as exporter/foreign currency earner

@ By NEIL HARTNELL
Tribune Business Editor

A Bahamian fashion industry
could provide this nation with a
key source of foreign currency
from export earnings, the head
organiser of a Nassau-based fash-
ion show told Tribune Business
yesterday, hoping that his event -
which is set to expand in its second
year - will help stimulate local
designers.

Owen Bethel, president and
chief executive of Bahamian finan-
cial services provider, the Mon-
taque Group, said the Islands of
the World Fashion Week will
stage its second appearance on
November 4-8, 2009, and likely
feature an expanded designer line-

SEE page 2B

Uy
Owen Bethel



BIC to assess cellular card distribution

@ By NEIL HARTNELL
Tribune Business
Editor

The Bahamas Telecom-
munications Company
(BTC) is conducting an
assessment of its “entire” cel-
lular phone card distribution
network, Tribune Business
was told yesterday, examin-
ing whether the market that
nets the company $10-$12
million per month is operat-
ing at “optimal efficiency”
and is not over-saturated
with vendors.

Marlon Johnson, BTC’s
vice-president of sales and
marketing, said the assess-
ment would take place over
the next month-and-a-half,

SEE page 4B

SS

* Study of ‘whole platform’ to
look at market efficiency, best
practices, whether there is

vendor oversupply and market

transparency/elimination of
any predatory practices

* BIC earning $10-$12m per
month from pre-paid card
sales, with 90 per cent of
cellular customers — some
300,000 — on this platform
* Planning revised post-paid
package

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PAGE 2B, FRIDAY, APRIL 17, 2009

THE TRIBUNE





Receivers: Buyer interest in
Bimini resort already seen

FROM page 1B

government suppliers, but we don’t have all the records yet,” said Mr
Townend. He said the attraction of the property was its unique location
and its history.

Mr Townend said the Bimini Big Game Resort’s infrastructure was
in reasonable condition, but still needed some investment.

The resort has frequently been heralded as a backbone of Bimini’s
economy, becoming a tourist haven over the years with its marina a fish-
ing boat Mecca during that season.

The property boasts two restaurants, and was due to undergo ren-
ovations to add luxury rooms, scuba operations, gift shops, a gourmet
food market, a bait and tackle shop, a spa and a game room.

Now, its electricity is shut off and the marina’s 103 slips that can
secure vessels up to 120 feet in length are empty.

Refinancing

The Bimini Big Game Resort’s owner is understood to be a
CalifOrnia-based American, who was attempting to find new refi-
nancing to keep the resort open and pay his financial backers. That
appears not to have happened.

When management left, workers were given $100 and letters stating
what they were owed by the company. They were told this payment
would be forthcoming at a later date. However, nothing has been
heard since.

There has also been speculation that the Bimini Big Game Resort ran
up an unpaid $500,000 BEC bill before closing.

Mr Townend said businesses in the Bahamas were generally keep-
ing an eye on their costs and expenses, as income has contracted with
the economy.

“Everyone’s battening down the hatches and looking at their cost
base, as everyone has seen a slowdown in revenue,” he said.

NOTICE
INTERNATIONAL BUSINESS COMPANIES ACT
No. 45 of 2000

VIVARO CONSULTING LTD

Notice is hereby given that in accordance with Section
137 of The International Business Companies Act
No. 45 of 2000, VIVARO CONSULTING LTD is in
dissolution. The date of commencement of dissolution
was the 14th day of April, 2009. Dillon Dean of
Nassau, Bahamas is the Liquidator of VIVARO

CONSULTING LTD.

Dillon Dean
LIQUIDATOR

NOTICE
INTERNATIONAL BUSINESS COMPANIES ACT
No. 45 of 2000

GROUPO MIRADAR LTD.

Notice is hereby given that in accordance with Section
137 of The International Business Companies Act
No. 45 of 2000, GROUPO MIRADAR LTD. is in
dissolution. The date of commencement of dissolution
was the 14th day of April, 2009. Dillon Dean of
Nassau, Bahamas is the Liquidator of GROUPO
MIRDAR LTD.

Dillon Dean
LIQUIDATOR

As a privately-owned, mid-sized Bahamian Company and
the authorized Caterpillar dealer in the Bahamas, we are
seeking a candidate to work as a Service Manager of the
Service Department. The Candidate should have the
following qualifications:

* Be a graduate with a Bachelors Degree in Mechanical
Engineering;

* Have post-graduate studies in Management;

* Have Caterpillar training in Heavy Equipment
Machines;

* Have Caterpillar training in power generation;

* Have 5 years or more experience with working with a
Caterpillar dealer or a similar Organization;

* The candidate should have certification as an ISO
9000 auditor and;

* The candidate should have Six Sigma training (a Black
belt in 6-Sigma is preferred).

This candidate is required to be a professional who
thrives on the challenge of developing outstanding
customer relations and service excellence.

Send complete resume with education and work
experience to M & E Limited, P. O. Box N-3238,
Nassau Bahamas, Attention: Service Manager, or

email: me@me-litd.com .

Only persons being interviewed for this position
will be contacted.



Bringing exports
back into ‘fashion’

FROM page 1B

up after its debut won the event
the Caribbean’s Best Fashion
Show Award.

Mr Bethel, who this week
returned from being presented
with the award at the Caribbean
Fashion Awards ceremony in
Barbados, told Tribune Business
that interest in Islands of the
World meant designer numbers
in 2009 were likely to increase
over last year, forcing him to
abandon initial plans to lower
them. He explained: “Based on
my visit to Barbados, where a
number of designers were at the
event, there appears to be signif-
icant interest from a number of
Barbadian designers. Trinidad has
endorsed it, and looking at send-
ing a significant number of
Trinidadian designers to it.

“Last year, we had 35 design-
ers, and I anticipated we were

looking to reduce it this year to
20-25. But I’ve been told, simply
from the event in Barbados, that
we’re really going to have to look
at increasing the numbers as
opposed to decreasing them. I
anticipate it will be a significant
showing this year.”

Mr Bethel said the Islands of
the World Fashion Week would
likely be able to leverage addi-
tional interest in the show via
both the Fashion Show of the
Year Award, and the staging of
the Miss Universe Pageant at
Atlantis this summer.

“The Award that we just got,
which has significant bearing
among designers and the fashion
industry in the Caribbean, places
the Bahamas on the map region-
ally,” Mr Bethel told Tribune
Business, adding that the Miss
Universe Pageant would place
this nation at the “forefront”
internationally.

“We should be able to capture

NOTICE

INTERNATIONAL BUSINESS COMPANIES ACT

No. 45 of 2000

AZZILON SA

Notice is hereby given that in accordance with Section

that, and harness that to the
advantage of events like Islands
of the World, making sure similar
events catch the eye, and making
sure the Bahamas continues to
act as a location for these types of
activity going forward.”

The increased number of
designers, and their entourages,
for Islands of the World Fashion
Week 2009 was likely to bring
short-term occupancy benefits for
the Bahamian hotel industry at a
time when it was much-needed.

But, long-term, Mr Bethel indi-
cated that he hoped the fashion
show would both help diversify
the Bahamian tourism product
and stimulate renewed interest in
the industry from Bahamian
designers, ultimately leading to
the creation of an indigenous
Bahamian fashion sector.

Arguing that events such as
Islands of the World Fashion
Week and the Bahamas Interna-
tional Film Festival were “neces-
sary for our product diversifica-
tion:, Mr Bethel said such events
held throughout the calendar year
were “a direction the tourism
industry needs to look at”.

He added: “The beauty and
importance of the fashion indus-
try is it’s an export if you can
develop it locally. More so from
the fashion side, where you have
local designers able to export
their products and their designs.
That type of income not only
focuses on diversification of the
tourism product, but diversifica-

tion of the broader economy.”

Based on feedback from the
2008 fashion show, Mr Bethel
said: “A number of persons have
looked at it with renewed energy,
others had not looked at it before.

“T think the fact that the event
took place here, and those who
attended and had an interest in
the industry before saw it at a dif-
ferent level, helped people see
the potential for where the indus-
try could go. A concerted effort is
needed, and it’s not going to hap-
pen overnight, but it could really
get the industry going.”

Mr Bethel said fashion design,
and garment production, almost
lent themselves to a “cottage
industry”, where designers and
those involved in manufacture
could work at home.

The former could outsource
production to the latter, he
explained, with no one person
having to bear all the start-up
costs and manufacturing costs.

Mr Bethel said the Islands of
the World Fashion Week in 2008
had shown Bahamian designers
the quality, standards and level
of designs being produced else-
where, challenging them to match
and exceed this. He also urged
Bahamian designers “from the
next generation”, those with
potential, to participate in the
2009 version, and pledged to
work closely with the Bahamas
Technical and Vocational Insti-
tute (BT VI) to get its students
involved.

137 of The International Business Companies Act No.
45 of 2000, AZZILON SA is in dissolution. The date
of commencement of dissolution was the 14th day of

April, 2009. Dillon Dean of Nassau, Bahamas is the
Liquidator of AZZILON SA.

Dillon Dean
LIQUIDATOR

NOTICE
INTERNATIONAL BUSINESS COMPANIES ACT
No. 45 of 2000

NOBLE & SMITH CONSULTING LTD.

Notice is hereby given that in accordance with Section
137 of The International Business Companies Act
No. 45 of 2000, NOBLE & SMITH CONSULTING
LTD is in dissolution. The date of commencement
of dissolution was the 14th day of April, 2009. Dillon
Dean of Nassau, Bahamas is the Liquidator of
NOBLE & SMITH CONSULTING LTD.

Dillon Dean
LIQUIDATOR



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NOTICE

IN THE ESTATE OF WILTON

ELIJAH EDGECOMBE late of the

Island of San Salvador one of the Islands
of the Commonwealth of the Bahamas,
deceased.

NOTICE is hereby given that all persons
having any claim or demand against the above
Estate are required to send the same duly
certified in writing to the Undersigned on or
before the 7th day of April, 2009, after which
date the Administratrix will proceed to distribute
the assets having regard only to the claims of
which she shall then have had notice.

AND NOTICE is hereby also given that
all persons indebted to the said Estate are
requested to make full settlement on or before
the date hereinbefore mentioned.

HIGGS & JOHNSON
Attorneys for the Administratrix
Chambers

P.O. Box N-3247

Ocean Centre

Montagu Foreshore

East Bay Street

Nassau, Bahamas.

TAYLOR
INDUSTRIES LTD.

WILL BE CLOSED FOR
ANNUAL STOCKTAKING

THURSDAY, APRIL 23
FRIDAY, APRIL 24
SATURDAY, APRIL 25

We regret any
inconvenience this will
cause to our customers.





THE TRIBUNE

FRIDAY, APRIL 17, 2009, PAGE 3B



aS
Tourism facing 2009 contraction

m@ By CHESTER
ROBARDS
Business Reporter
crobards@tribunemedia.net

SOUTHAMPTON,
Bermuda — All indicators
point to the global travel
and tourism economy’s Gross
Domestic Product (GDP)
contracting by 3.5 per cent this
year, with 4 per cent growth
expected after year-end 2010,
according to the World Trav-
el and Tourism Council
(WTTC) yesterday.

The WTTC foreshadowed
a tough year for the Bahamas
tourism industry, with incre-
mental growth through next
year.

The Caribbean product was
estimated to contract by a
“staggering” 7.9 per cent this
year.

The WTTC’s president and
chief executive, Jean-Claude
Baumgarten, told an audience
of Caribbean tourism market
stakeholders - mostly
investors and developers - at
the 13th annual Caribbean
Hotel and Tourism Invest-
ment Conference that the neg-
ative impact on the tourism
sector for 2009 looked
extremely “worrying”.

However, he reassured
them that Caribbean touris-
m’s real GDP growth would
occur at an average 3.3 per
cent per annum over the next
10 years.

According to the WTTC’s
findings, quarterly travel
spending data pointed to a
rapid slowdown in the third
quarter of 2008, with a further
deterioration occurring by
year-end.

Year-on-year air passenger
arrivals to the Caribbean con-
tracted, from September of
last year into December, by
4.6 per cent, a trend that has
continued into 2009.

Concern

Airlift has been a para-
mount concern for travel and
tourism-dependent nations,
one Mr Baumgarten said must
be at the forefront of the strat-
egy to right-size the tourism
sector in the Caribbean.

The WTTC findings showed
the Bahamas Travel and
Tourism Economy GDP
growing by 3.4 per cent annu-
ally over the next 10 years,
beginning marginally with 1
per cent growth next year.
That figure puts the Bahamas
above Cuba, which is project-

City Markets rejects

FROM page 1B

failure rate of applicants to meet the company’s
standards raised disturbing questions about the
job and social prospects for those it rejected.

“You’ve got to have someone who can under-
stand. That’s the problem,” he explained. “If they
haven’t got the basics, and can operate a job
stacking shelves in the food store, where to they
go from there.

“Tt’s really bad, period. Productivity is very
poor, obviously. If someone’s not got the basic
cognitive skills, and basic understanding, then
they’re not going to be very productive. It’s stress-
ful.”

Presentation

In a presentation to a Nassau Institute meeting on
Wednesday night, Mr Massey said of his findings:
“In a world where knowledge is growing so fast,
and the Bahamas is in a status quo situation on its
education system, the learning gap between the
Bahamas and the rest of the world will continue
to grow. The disadvantages facing the country
will only grow if nothing is going to change.”

Andre Rollins, head of the Bahamas Dental
Association, during the audience question and
answer session, said Mr Massey’s findings showed
that the Bahamian workforce and wider economy
would simply be unable to compete in the free
trade era that was upon the country.

The structure and model the Bahamian econ-
omy has been based upon, and the rules govern-
ing how its firms conduct business, are under

VA |

= |

‘50%’ of job seekers

pressure from the rules-based trading regimes
this country is being required to join - the Eco-
nomic Partnership Agreement (EPA) with the Euro-
pean Union, the World Trade Organisation (WTO)
and future trade deals with the US and Canada.

Then there is the OECD/G-20 assault on the
Bahamian financial services industry, at a time
when the Bahamian workforce is not well-
equipped to handle and manage all these enforced
changes.

Mr Rollins said: “In this whole move to a glob-
alised economy, with the EPA and trend to open
up all borders, we will be swallowed up by persons
more prepared to take advantage of a globalised
economy because of our years of failure.”

As a first step towards reforming the Bahami-
an education system, Mr Massey suggested that
the Department of Education be reconstituted
as a Corporation out of reach of political control
and influence.

When asked about the former PLP and current
FNM governments’ approach to the proposals
on reform submitted by the private sector/trade
union Coalition for Education Reform, Mr
Massey replied: “It’s a discouraging process.

“The Coalition for Education Reform started in
2004. It took the [former PLP] Government six
months to formally recognise receipt of their pro-
posals. The PLP education minister never talked
to the Coalition except for one five-minute con-
versation at a cocktail party at Atlantis.

“The FNM came in, and it took them a long
time to sit down with the Coalition. There is an
apparent desire not to listen.”

WInNts

Notice

Notice is hereby given that the

General Meeting

for the West Winds Property Owners Association

Limited will be

held

at New _ Providence

Community Church located on Blake Road on
Monday the 20" day of April 2009 at 7:00pm

Should you need further information kindly contact

325.6666 or 325-8905.

Dated the 7" day of April, A.D., 2009

WITH THE COMPLIMENTS OF:-
West Winds Property
Owners Association
Limited

Notice

Notice is hereby given of loss of Bahamas Government Registered
Stock Certificate as follows:

Certificate
No.
24-001

Interest
Stock Rate
1998 9.12500% APR

Maturity
Date
10/05/1998

ed to show growth of 2.7 per
cent over the next 10 years,
but places this country mod-
erately behind the Nether-
lands Antilles, Martinique, St
Kitts and Nevis, Bermuda and
several other Caribbean
nations.

The Caribbean itself is pro-
jected to grow by around 3.3
per cent over 10 years.

Statistics show that regional
government expenditure
growth of some 0.7 per cent
is “sub-optimal” to reverse the
short-term contraction of the
sector.

In 2009, total demand for
the Travel and Tourism prod-
uct in the Caribbean region is
expected to shrink, along with
business travel, capital invest-
ments and employment.

However, according to Mr
Baumgarten, there is an unwa-
vering confidence in the
Caribbean tourism market.
And markets in this region
should be prepared for its
medium and long-term
growth.

“Long-term prospects in the
travel and tourism industry
are supported thanks to the
continued rapid expansion of
emerging destinations, along
with the global increase in per
capita income,” said Mr
Baumgarten.

AUCTION

cer ae eb
eR eal ea

(ars

Colbbe

Amount
$400.00

I intend to request The Registrar to issue a replacement certificate. If
this certificate is found, please write to PO. Box SP-63854, Nassau
Bahamas.

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PAGE 4B, FRIDAY, APRIL 17, 2009

THE TRIBUNE



Illiteracy woes ‘devastating’ for economy

FROM page 1B

36 per cent of all New Providence
high school leavers failed BGCSE
maths in 2006, and another 46 per
cent were deemed numerically
illiterate - they did not know the
difference between addition and
subtraction.

“It’s devastating. It has devas-
tating implications,” Mr Massey
told Tribune Business of the find-
ings’ consequences for the
Bahamian economy. “That’s the

Tas Gla ‘Chisel asi

Cotmalraperial inurance 1

only way you can look at it.

“You can’t have the levels of
illiteracy that prevail here con-
tinue to be pumped out into soci-
ety, especially as it doesn’t have to
be this way.

“The world is changing at what
looks like lightning speed, and
the question is how this work-
force can absorb that technolo-
gy. In a situation where you have
all this new technology driving
change, you can’t have a dumb
workforce.”

Sy Freasr& YOUNG

The relatively high levels of
functional illiteracy among new
entrants to the Bahamian work-
force, and the resulting impact on
productivity, held especially
severe consequences for the econ-
omy’s foundations, which are
based on service exports.

Communications skills are as
vital on the hotel and tourism
industry front line as maths is to
financial services sector employ-
ees. “If people have problems
communicating in the English lan-

Peet bk Frere

guage, how can the services indus-
tries be as successful as they might
be, and as productive? It’s a no
brainer,” Mr Massey told Tribune
Business.

A relatively poor quality work-
force will also hamper the
Bahamas’ ability to respond, and
successfully adjust, to the game-
changing rules being forced upon
the ways in which its companies
and industries do business.

Trading

The Economic Partnership
Agreement (EPA) with the Euro-
pean Union will result in the
Bahamas joining a rules-based
trading regime for the first time.
With it comes a number of oblig-
ations that will see new rules, laws
and bureaucracies created to
change - and govern - how busi-
ness is conducted in this nation.

And, on top of that, the
OECD/G-20 offensive on inter-

national financial services centres
will likely forever alter the busi-
ness model on which the
Bahamas has largely operated for
the past 40-50 years.

“What you have is a popula-
tion that is less equipped to
adapt,” Mr Massey said of the
education system’s woes and their
implications for dealing with these
changes. “The dangers are that
you don’t have the businesses
with which you can register suc-
cess.

“It means the Bahamas is pro-
gressively less competitive, that’s
what it means, and the learning
gap between the Bahamas and
other countries will increase to
the disadvantage of the Bahamas.
The bottom line is that it doesn’t
have to be this way.

“It just accentuates the prob-
lem. We’re in a situation where all
the problems of the country are
being accentuated.”

Mr Massey, who performed the

research and wrote much of the
2005 report produced by the
Coalition for Education Reform,
and has written extensively on
the Bahamian education system’s
problems, said relatively low
workforce productivity only
increased the costs, inefficiencies
and spending on staff training for
businesses.

“The inevitable consequences
in the short-term are that you
don’t get a lift from the work-
force, because the people you
have are the people who came
out of the system in the previous
15-20 years,” he added.

Long-term, Mr Massey said the
question facing the Bahamas was
whether it would take the neces-
sary steps to reform the educa-
tion system for the benefit of its
economic competitiveness and
social cohesion.

“This is a question of whether
the country chooses to be suc-
cessful or not successful,” he said.

BIC to assess cellular card distribution

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Consolidated Balamce Sheet

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FROM page 1B

and aimed to examine whether the cellular phone
card distribution network was operating in line with
“best global practices”.

“What we are doing is a current assessment exer-
cise of our entire distribution network - relation-
ships with wholesalers and how cards are being dis-
tributed,” he explained.

“Tt is an exercise looking at the entire distribution
network. We want to make sure we’re operating
optimally, and in accordance with best global prac-
tices.”

BITC sells the pre-paid cellular phone cards, which
come in denominations of $5, $10, $20, $50 and
$100, to some 34 wholesalers, who include the likes
of Let’s Talk Wireless and Tripoint. In turn, those
wholesalers sell the cards on to retailers and street
vendors.

Mr Johnson explained that the study would also
assess the distribution network’s efficiency, and
whether end-user consumers - the BTC pre-paid
cellular network has some 300,000 subscribers - had
the best possible access to the cards they purchased.

The BTC executive said the state-owned tele-
coms provider’s study would also assess “what ought
to be the optimal number of vendors given the mar-
ketplace, its size and how we manage that”.

This had come in response to concerns that the
pre-paid cell phone card market had too many ven-
dors, given the increasing number of Bahamians
now selling them on the streets - no doubt because
they perceive it as a relatively easy, and lucrative,
income stream in a declining economy where many
people have lost their jobs.

Mr Johnson acknowledged that an oversupply of
vendors and cards would be “detrimental” in any

NT
NAD

Nassau Airport

Oevelopment Company

market, but said that “heavy-handed intervention”
had the potential to cause more problems than it
solved through the inevitable disruption it would
provoke. It was far better, he indicated, for the mar-
ket itself to work out and correct any problems.

Still, BT'C’s vice-president for sales and marketing
told Tribune Business that the company’s study
would examine “the whole phenomenon” of the
rise in street phone card vendors, and assess where
they fitted into the broader distribution network.

“We are looking at the whole platform,” Mr John-
son said. “We are making sure the distribution net-
work is efficient, and customer and vendor appetites
are served.

“We want to make sure we have a sense of integri-
ty, best practices and a system that works well for the
consumer and marketplace generally - that there
are very transparent, clear rules for engagement,
and guidelines are being followed.”

He added: “On average, we sell on our pre-paid
side anywhere from $10-$12 million worth per
month.

“The pre-paid side of our business is certainly a
significant contributor to our bottom line. More
than 90 per cent of our customers are on the pre-paid
platform.”

Mr Johnson said BTC sold the pre-paid cellular
phone cards to wholesalers at a 25 per cent discount
to the price paid by end-users. They then sold it on
to retailers for a mark-up.

BTC did not fix the prices that wholesalers sold
pre-paid cards at, but he added: “Part of the exercise
is to have some guidelines as to what is happening,
and determine whether predatory actions are hap-
pening in the market.”

Mr Johnson said that BTC “in a couple of weeks”
would release “revised packages” for its post-paid
cellular product.

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PART-TIME ASSISTANT

To The Capital & Development Committee

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Potential candidate will
possess the following skills
and experience:

« Effective communicator,
proficient in both report
writing and oral
presentations

+ Intuitive and insightful with
the confidence to question
decisions and processes

+ Familiar with infrastructure
development

+ Familiar with the process of
reviewing tenders and RFP
proposals for construction
and procurement

» Understanding of project
management processes

« Understanding of financial
management processes

» Must have substantial
experience in the areas
outlined above.

The Board of the Nassau Airport
Development Company (NAD) is
seeking candidates for the part-
time position of Assistant to The
Capital & Development Committee.
The duties and responsibilities of
the successful applicant will
include:

Book £665,078
S05, EIA 120962

81,015

(Phe? abe ees
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111 78

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LIABILITIES
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202 704 0H 5

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284,084,514
+ Time requirement of

approx. two days per week

» Attending monthly meetings for
approx. four hours

- Assisting the Committee on
matters to be recommended to the
Board for approval

» Attending meetings requested
by the Committee in order to
report on the proceedings of the
meetings attended

«Commenting on the reports,
minutes, and other matters that
may arise at monthly committee
meetings.

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Total (hia Bilitirs amd eequily 4b Bi heh

If you are qualified and interested, please submit your
resume by April 30, 2009 to:

Manager, People

Nassau Airport Development Co.
P.O. Box AP 59229

Nassau, Bahamas

APTOS ie by the Gad 76 reer om of

pred &, PO aed pigmed on te behalf by

=e

EM. Alsiga — Eemoetiee Vice-Chair

Only those applicants short listed will be contacted.

Aor a comes py of he Conant” Andi Financial Sratcmenrs of Calinaimperiad iamace Lid gr
the pear omled December 31, 2008. plow contact aus Capone Commonications Ufiicer at 204 Bay St 2nd
Floor, Aan, The Bahamas by phone 242) 2 2nd ar by email at finances eolineinpeielcom or visit
amr hie at wn olin com





THE TRIBUNE

FRIDAY, APRIL 17, 2009, PAGE 5B



OOS eee
Govt does not ‘appreciate the value’ of engineers

FROM page 1B

and affiliated professionals get a
piece of the pie.

“They don’t appreciate our
value because they undervalue
us, so we have to sell ourselves
and show we have the capabili-
ty, expertise and talent to do
anything.”

Mr Ferreira said Bahamian
engineers and other profes-
sionals needed to work togeth-
er as “a cohesive unit”, as they
would achieve more by work-
ing together to “create a sense
of value among the decision
makers of the country, so they
want what we bring to the
table”.

His sentiments were echoed
by Robert Reiss, head of Reiss
Engineering, who told the meet-
ing that when foreign develop-
ers and their associated engi-
neers came into the Bahamas,
Bahamian firms needed to
“make clear that work is kept
for Bahamians” and ensure the
value they brought to the
process was recognised.

“What is critical is how we
present ourselves in conjunc-
tion with the value we have,”
Mr Reiss said.

“We also need to recognise
our responsibilities, whether it’s
a suit and tie, being in the right
place or making sure people
recognise our value - having val-
ue, in conjunction with keeping
work for Bahamians. In con-
junction with government giving
a push, we may get some-
where.”

Mr Reiss said there were
already some small signs of
progress.

While the consortium his firm
was in had not won the contract
for the configuration and site
planning work at the Queen



“What is critical
is how we present
ourselves in
conjunction with
the value we
have.”



Robert Reiss

group featuring predominantly
Bahamian firms.

Of the eight companies in his
group, Mr Reiss said six were
Bahamian. He added: “My
understanding on the street ini-
tially is that that contract was
not going to be awarded to a
Bahamian firm. While we did
not win it, I’m pleased a corner
was turned and it was not
flipped to a foreign-owned
firm.”

Mandated

Meanwhile, the BSE’s presi-
dent, Jerome Elliott, a senior
Bahamas Electricity Corpora-
tion (BEC) engineer, said his
department had been mandated
by the Board of Directors to
send as much contracted-out
engineering work as possible to
Bahamian firms.

“What we have been man-
dated to do as engineers in
BEC, by our Board, is to do as
much engineering work as we
can with local firms,” Mr Elliott
said, urging all Bahamian struc-
tural engineers to respond toa
tender BEC was set to immi-
nently issue for work on its
Clifton Pier power station.

Meanwhile, Mr Ferreira said

neers and environmental con-
sultants was a key point of dif-
ferentiation they could use to
defeat foreign companies on
contract bidding.

“The great thing about us is
that the expertise we offer is
local. We are trained in
Bahamian ecology, Bahamian
trees, Bahamian fish, the corals

that exist here. What we sell
here is local expertise,” he
explained.

Mr Ferreira said the environ-
mental consulting arm of his
business was partnering with
the College of the Bahamas
(COB) to give Bahamian stu-
dents access to the same oppor-
tunities.

NOTICE

MUNIA (BAHAMAS) SHIPPING LTD.
N OTIC EIS HEREBY GIVEN as follows:

(a) MUNIA (BAHAMAS) SHIPPING LTD. is in
dissolution under the provisions of the
International Business Companies Act 2000.

(b) The dissolution of the said Company
commenced on the 7th day of April, 2009
when its Articles of Dissolution were submitted
to and registered by the Registrar General.

The Joint -Liquidators of the said Company
are Mr. Swen-Uwe Horvath and Dr. Jochen
Koeber of Schaarsteinwegsbrucke 2, 20459

Hamburg, Germany.

Dated the 15th day of April, 2009.

HARRY B. SANDS, LOBOSKY
MANAGEMENT CO. LTD.
Attorneys for the above-named
Company



NOTICE

MUNIA (BAHAMAS) SHIPPING LTD.

Creditors having debts
above-named Company

or claims against the
are required to send

NOTICE

NOTICE is hereby given that BOLNEVA ETOY of LEEWARD
PALMS, PROVIDECIALS, TURKS AND CAICOS ISLANDS
is applying to the Minister responsible for Nationality and

Citizenship, for registration/naturalization as a citizen of The
Bahamas, and that any person who knows any reason why
registration/ naturalization should not be granted, should send a
written and signed statement of the facts within twenty-eight days
from the 17th day of APRIL, 2009 to the Minister responsible for
Nationality and Citizenship, PO.Box N-7147, Freeport, Bahamas.






































NOTICE

EXXONMOBIL EXPLORATION AND PRODUCTION
BARBADOS LIMITED

Pursuant to the provisions of Section 137 (8) of the
International Business Companies Act 2000, notice
is hereby given that the above-named Company
has been dissolved and struck off the Register
pursuant to a Certificate of Dissolution issued by
The Registrar General on the 25th day of March,
A.D., 2009.
Dated the 15th day of April, A.D., 2009.

Gary H. Johnsen

Liquidator of

EXXONMOBIL EXPLORATION

AND PRODUCTION BARBADOS LIMITED





particulars thereof to the undersigned c/o P.O. Box
N-624, Nassau, Bahamas on or before 15th day ofMay,
A.D.,2009. Indefaultthereofthey willbe excluded from
the benefit of any distribution made by the Liquidator.
Dated the 15th day of April, A.D., 2009.

the local expertise and knowl-

Elizabeth Sports Centre, he was
edge offered by Bahamian engi-

pleased it had gone to another

Notice

Pursuant to the provisions of Section 235 of the Companies Act,
1992, as Amended, Notice is hereby given that:-

REGIONAL PARTS MANAGER

The Regional Parts Manager will report to the President
of Machinery & Energy Limited, and be accountable
for the operating performance of the Parts Department
within the Bahamas, Turks and Caicos Islands and the
Cayman Islands. As a key member of the Management
Team, the incumbent will participate in and contribute
to all major operating and strategic business decisions.

Mr. Swen-Uwe Horvath and Dr. Jochen Koeber
Joint -Liquidators
Schaarsteinwegsbrucke 2,

20459 Hamburg, Germany.

1. SAFRA INTERNATIONAL HOLDING LTD.
(In Voluntary Liquidation) is in dissolution.

. Proceedings to wind-up and dissolve the Company were
commenced on the 12th day of March A.D, 2009.

3. All persons having claims against the above-named
Company are required to send their names, addresses
and particulars of their debts or claims to the Liquidator
before the 27th day of April, 2009.

The Regional Parts Manager is responsible for fulfillment
of the mandates set by The President, and will provide
day-to-day leadership, management and training of
the Parts personnel who work in the Department.

NOTICE

WILLIAMS LAW COARMERS
Registered Agent

MUNIA (BAHAMAS) MANAGEMENT LTD.

Creditors having debts or claims against
the above-named Company are required to
send particulars thereof to the undersigned
clo P.O. Box N-624, Nassau, Bahamas on or
before 15th day of May, A.D., 2009. In default
thereof they will be excluded from the benefit
of any distribution made by the Liquidator.
Dated the 15th day of April, A.D., 2009.

The Regional Parts Manager will represent the
corporation externally to customers and other relevant
organizations, and will be responsible for the budgeting
of the department and for its financial performance.
NOTICE
Close cooperation with the Sales and Service
Departments will be essential to achieve value-added
in all prime product sales and to maximize revenue
and profit from parts sales. These activities will include
appropriate effort to help the Parts Department acquire
the parts necessary to carry out their functions.

MUNIA (BAHAMAS) MANAGEMENT LTD.
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN as follows:

(a) MUNIA (BAHAMAS) MANAGEMENT LTD. is
in dissolution under the provisions of the

International Business Companies Act 2000. . . a
Appropriate experience and training may be acceptable

in lieu of formal education, but the applicant must be a 6
Sigma DMAIC Black Belt and should be well versed in
Antares, DCES Operations, RPGProgramming,
Caterpillar CMIS 2, Installing, Configuring Administering
MS Win/2000 Server

(b) The dissolution of the said Company commenced
on the 7th day of April, 2009 when its Articles
of Dissolution were submitted to and registered by

the Registrar General. Mr. Swen-Uwe Horvath and Dr. Jochen Koeber

Joint -Liquidators
Schaarsteinwegsbrucke 2,
20459 Hamburg, Germany.

The Joint -Liquidators of the said Company

are Mr. Swen-Uwe Horvath andDr. Jochen Koeber
of Schaarsteinwegsbrucke 2, 20459 Hamburg,
Germany.

Send complete resume with education and work
experience to the Human Resources Department
Machinery & Energy Limited, P. O. Box N-3238 or
Facsimile 323-5705.

Dated the 15th day of April, 2009.

FG CAPITAL MARKETS

BROKERAGE & ADVISORY SERVICES

HARRY B. SANDS, LOBOSKY MANAGEMENT
Co. LTD.
Attorneys for the above-named Company

ROYAL = FIDELITY

Money ot Work

BISX LISTED & TRADED SECURITIES AS OF:
THURSDAY, 16 APRIL 2009
BISX ALL SHARE INDEX: CLOSE 1,620.03 | CHG 0.17 | %CHG 0.01 | YTD -92.33 | YTD % -5.39
FINDEX: CLOSE 797.05 | YTD -4.53% | 2008 -12.31%
WWW.BISXBAHAMAS.COM | TELEPHONE:242-323-2330 | FACSIMILE: 242-323-2320

Securit y EPS $
Abaco Markets
Bahamas Property Fund
Bank of Bahamas
Benchmark
Bahamas Waste
Fidelity Bank
Cable Bahamas
Colina Holdings
Commonwealth Bank ($1)
Consolidated Water BDRs
Doctor's Hospital
Famguard
Finco
FirstCaribbean Bank
Focol (S)
Focol Class B Preference
Freeport Concrete
ICD Utilities
J. S. Johnsen 10.50
Premier Real Estate 10.00 10.00 0.00
BISX LISTED DEBT SECURITIES - (Bonds trade on a Percentage Pricing bases)
Securi Symbol Last Sale Dai
Fidelity Bank Note 17 (Series A) + " z 7%
Fidelity Bank Note 22 (Series B) + FBB22 Prime + 1.75%
Fidelity Bank Note 13 (Series C) + FBB13. al # T%
Fidelity Bank Note 15 (Series D) + FBB15 Prime + 1.75%
Fidelity Over-The-Counter Securities
Bid $ Ask $ Last Price

¢.92

4.00 6.25

0.35 0.40
Colina Over-The-Counter Securities
ABDAB 30.13 31.59 29.00
RND Holdings 0.45 0.55 0.55
BISX Listed Mutual Funds

Last 12 Months

Previous Close Today's Close Change Daily Vol.

Job Opportunity for a

FINANCIAL CONTROLLER

An established Bahamian Company is seeking a
Financial Controller

Qualifications for a position are:

¢ Bachelor’s Degree or equivalent in Accounting
or applied finance from an accredited and
reputable university.
Certified Public Account
3-5 years Audit experience
Proficiency in Accounting Software such as
QuickBooks or Peachtree
Experience in preparing IFRS compliant
financial statements
The individual will be responsible for directing
the overall financial plans and accounting
practices of the organization.

19 October 2017
19 October 2022
30 May 2013
1000.00 29 May 2015

52wk-Low Symbol
Bahamas Supermarkets
Caribbean Crossings (Pref)
RND Holdings

Fund Name
Colina Bond Fund
Colina MSI Preferred Fund
Colina Money Market Fund
Fidelity Bahamas G & I Fund
Fidelity Prime Income Fund
CFAL Global Bond Fund
CFAL Global Equity Fund
CFAL High Grade Bond Fund
Fidelity International Investment Fund
FG Financial Preferred Income Fund
FG Financial Growth Fund
FG Financial Diversified Fund

Yield %

4.40

BISX ALL SHARE INDEX - 19 Dec 02 = 1,000.00
52wWk-Hi - Highest closing price in last 52 weeks

YIELD - last 12 month dividends divided by closing price

Bid $ - Buying price of Colina and Fidelity

Ask $ - Selling price of Co!

Last Price - Last traded over-the-counter price

Weekly Vol. - Trading me of the prior week

EPS $ - A company’s reported earnings per share for the last 12 mths
NAV - Net Asset Value

N/M - Not Meaningful

FINDEX - The Fidelity Bahamas Stock Index. January 1, 1994 = 100

ighted price for daily volume
hted price for daily volume

Interested persons should send resumes to:
P.O.Box CB 13526
Nassau, Bahamas

Daily Vol. -
DIV $ - Dividends per share paid in the last 12 months
P/E - Closing price divided by the last 12 month earnin gs

TO TRADE CALL: COLINA 242-502-7010 | ROYALFIDELITY 242-356-7764 | FG CAPITAL MARKETS 242-396-4000 | COLONIAL 242-502-7525



THE TRIBUNE

THE WEATHER REPO

5-Day FORECAST

FRIDAY, APRIL17TH 2009, PAGE 7B

INSURANCE MANAGEMENT



FL (BAHAMAS) LIMITED. INSURANCE BROKERS & AGENTS

kc [Cc (1s

































Ff P Today Saturday WINDS WAVES VISIBILITY WATER TEMPS.
a | rs, High = Low W Hign Low W WASSAU Today: | NWat10-20Knots | 2-4Feet 10-20Miles 76°F
“ oS in - La, Ee - -F 0| 1|2 3|4|5 6|7 s|olioh FC F/G FC FIC Saturday: _NNE at 10-20 Knots 3-5 Feet 10-20 Miles 76° F
. “a Acapulco 90/32 75/23 s 89/31 71/21 S FREEPORT Today: NW at 10-20 Knots 2-4 Feet 10-20 Miles 76° F
Ja a i. io Low MODERATE } HIGH | \V.HIGH EXT. Amsterdam S412 46/7 r 6116 46/7 pc Saturday: __NNE at 10-20 Knots 3-5 Feet 10-20 Miles 76° F
ORLANDO X Ankara, Turkey 55/12 32/0 sh 61/16 35/1 Ss = ABACO Today: NW at 10-20 Knots 2-4 Feet 10-20 Miles 76° F
High: 78° F/26°C fo —_ Sunny, breezy and Partly cloudy and Partly sunny with a Breezy with low Periods of clouds and Partly sunny and The higher the AccuWeather UV Index™ number, the Athens 72/22 60/15 s 74/23 59/15 s Saturday: Nat 8-16 Knots 3-5 Feet 10-20 Miles 76° F
6 Low63°FA7°C — pleasant. breezy. gusty breeze. clouds. sunshine. warm. greater the need for eye and skin protection. Auckland 66/18 54/12 pc 67/19 60/15 pc
f aot ° ° ° ° Bangkok 93/33 80/26 pc 94/34 78/25 c rr
(2 @ VK High: 78° ewer oe - oe = oe ie riigh: Le T 7 Barbados 85/29 75/23 s Eee TODAY'S U.S. FORECAST
TAMPA ly i SS ey Barcelona 6216 49/9 s 58/14 51/0 sh
2 ora i TL Ea Tg Beijing 75/23 54/12 s 68/20 55/12 c
High: 84° F/29° C f a [68°F | FT 82e-6o° 80°-71° F 86°-74° F 107°-83° F High Ht.(ft.) Low Ht. (ft. Beirut B58 59/15 B16 58/14
Low: 62° F/17°C my . The exclusive AccuWeather RealFeel Temperature® is an index that combines the effects of temperature, wind, humidity, sunshine intensity, cloudiness, precipitation, pressure, and Today 1:56 a.m. 24 8:16am. 06 Belgrade 76/24 49/9 sh 73/22 53/11 ¢
i @ o s elevation on the human body—everything that effects how warm or cold a person feels. Temperatures reflect the high and the low for the day. 2:15pm. 24 8:25 p.m. 0.6 ana 64/17 51/10 sh 6317 46/7 pc
7 J . Saturday 299am. 23 O1lam. 06 Bermuda 68/20 62/16 pc 68/20 64/17 s = ein
a © | CO 3:16pm. 22 9:29pm. 06 Bogota 6518 47/8 r 67/19 48/8 sh Ol
4 lie Statistics are for Nassau through 2 p.m. yesterday Sunday 353am. 23 1003am. 05 Brussels 55/12 43/6 + 6317 41/5 pe
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PAGE 8B, FRIDAY, APRIL 17, 2009

THE TRIBUNE





Bahamian realtors win top
Coldwell Banker honours

= ter PS oe =

EAPREEF

DHL JOB DESCRIPTION

POSITION:
REPORTS TO:
LOCATION:

Commercial Accounting Supervisor- British Caribbean
British Caribbean Finance Manager
Bahamas

OVERALL PURPOSE:

This position is responsible for managing the Commercial Finance activities
for four countries within the British Caribbean: Bermuda, Bahamas, Cayman
and Tortola. Manages Revenue leakage, establishes credit limits and reviews
shipments to profile. Supervises the following staff; Billing Analyst, Duties and
Vendor Analyst, Accounts Receivable Analyst.

DUTIES AND RESPONSIBILITIES:

* Manage the Commercial activities for a country or group of countries
within the Cluster.

* Supervise Billing, Duties, Accounts Receivable and Vendor Analysts.

* Prepare and analyze statistics and KPls for the country/cluster.

* Responsible for weekly revenue forecasting to Finance Manager and SMT

* Manage customer profiles.

* Establish AR Credit limits.

* Principal contact for Commercial Controller.

* Assist with preparation of Customer profitability analysis.

* Handle Billing queries from Billing Center.

* 1° level of approval for Credit notes.

* Special projects and ad hoc reports as required.

* Performs other assignments as required.

* Analyse daily transport collect and cash on delivery shipments

* Ensure accurate billing of inbound shipments

* Coordinate all Freight and Logistics billing with Caribbean designated
representative

MINIMUM QUALIFICATIONS:

* High school diploma and/or minimal of 5 years applicable experience

¢ Minimum of 2 years supervisory or management experience leading
a department.

* A background in commercial credit required.

* Experience with a major Enterprise Reporting Package (ERP)

* Excellent analytical and interpersonal skills.

* Ability to read and interpret data reports. Ability to understand and perform data
analysis.

* PC skills should include the basic suite of MS products, Excel, Access, Word,
Office

¢ Excellent communication skills both written and verbal, this function does a
lot of interfacing with internal and external customers and the Shared Service
Center

PREFERRED QUALIFICATIONS:

* Bachelor’s degree in Accounting/Finance, a related field or equivalent
education



COLDWELL Banker
Lightbourn Realty's Carmen
Massoni has captured the
International President's Elite
2008 award, a category
reserved for only 1 per cent
of the more than 107,000 sales
associates worldwide in the
Coldwell Banker real estate
system.

And two other Lightbourn
Realty sales associates, Robert
Arthur of Harbour Island and
Rudy Carroll of Nassau,
earned special awards at the
recent Coldwell Banker Inter-
national Business Conference,
which was held at the Henry
B. Gonzalez Convention Cen-
tre in San Antonio, Texas

Mr Arthur won the Inter-
national President's Circles
Award, placing him in the top
2 per cent of Coldwell
Banker's worldwide sales
force.

And Mr Carroll, in his first
full year in real estate, was
admitted to the International
Sterling Society. This means
he is in the top 8 per cent of
the 107,000 global sales force.

In addition to capturing
Lightbourn Realty's Top Pro-
ducer designation, Ms Mas-
soni shared the Coldwell
Banker Island Affiliates
Above and Beyond Award
with Kim Webb of Coldwell
Banker Bermuda. The award
is in recognition of extraordi-
nary service and customer
commitment.

Mike Lightbourn, president
of Coldwell Banker Light-
bourn Realty, said he was
extremely proud of his associ-
ates, who worked hard to beat
the odds in a challenging real
estate environment.

"I'm delighted that Carmen,
Robert and Rudy have been
recognised for their outstand-
ing results. Carmen and
Robert have each earned the
Top Producer designation in
the past, and so it's not sur-
prising that they've both done
so well,” said Mr Lightbourn.

He added that Mr Carroll
deserved special mention for
his performance in his first full
year as a Sales associate.

"I'm also proud of my
agents, who may not have
been on this year's awards list,
but who worked hard and
delivered to their clients the
high standards of excellence
associated with Coldwell
Banker," Mr Lightbourn
added.

Jim Gillespie, president and

Our youth will be responsible for their financial futures one day. Will they ber

This Financial Literacy Workshop will guide youth ages 13-18 through the tools necessary to create

financial freedom in their lives - fully taught in the form of a game!

Saturday, April 18th, 2009 or Saturday April 25th, 2009
Session Times: 10 am- 2 pmand 3 pm-7 pm
British American Financial, Independence Drive

Hosted by

in conjunction with
Registration: $30.00

BU Knerkan
Group discounts available *** Free of charge to adults

Providing § Money Skills Youth Need for Life!

For more information: Ph 341-5860 - www.creativewealthbahamas.com

Creative Wealth







LIGHTBOURN REALTY
sales associates,
Robert Arthur (above)
of Harbour Island and
Rudy Carroll (left) of
Nassau, earned special
awards at the recent
Coldwell Banker
International Business
Conference.



CARMEN MASSONI (centre) with Beth Makatura, vice president, inter-
national service and operations, Coldwell Banker Real Estate LLC, and Jim
Reed, chief executive of Coldwell Banker Island Affiliates.

chief executive of Coldwell
Banker Real Estate LLC,
said: "Coldwell Banker Light-
bourn Realty has established
itself as a leader by highlight-
ing the positives that exist in
the real estate industry, and
we are proud to call them a
member of the Coldwell
Banker family.”

He added that while this
was a challenging year for the
real estate industry, millions
of people continued to buy
and sell homes based on their
lifestyles and needs.

"This was undoubtedly a
difficult year in our industry,
but people need to remember
that real estate is cyclical, and
positive signs over recent
months signal a tipping point
for the residential real estate
market," Mr Gillespie said.

Lightbourn Realty is part of
the Coldwell Banker global
network, which has 3,500
offices in 47 countries and ter-
ritories.

It has offices and represen-
tatives in Nassau, the Abacos,
Andros, Berry Islands, Bimini,
Eleuthera, including Harbour
Island and Spanish Wells,
Exuma and Long Island.



“I'm delighted
that Carmen,
Robert and
Rudy have been
recognised for
their
outstanding
results.

Carmen and
Robert have
each earned the
Top Producer
designation in
the past, and so
it's not
surprising that
they've both
done so well”



Mike Lightbourn

NOTICE

INTERNATIONAL BUSINESS COMPANIES ACT, 2000
(No. 45 of 2000)

MIRINDA INVESTMENTS LIMITED

Notice is hereby given that in accordance with Section 138 (8)
of the International Business Companies Act, (No. 45 of 2000),
the Dissolution of MIRINDA INVESTMENTS LIMITED

has been completed, a Certificate of Dissolution has been

issued and the Company has therefore been struck off the

Register. The date of completion of the dissolution was the 9th
day of April, 2009.

Betetechest teri
“ite Pus

Pot Corwinamadl | npiedaines, ten
Liqaidetee





Full Text

PAGE 1

N N A A S S S S A A U U A A N N D D B B A A H H A A M M A A I I S S L L A A N N D D S S L L E E A A D D I I N N G G N N E E W W S S P P A A P P E E R R Double homicide is investigated C M Y K C M Y K Volume: 105 No.119FRIDAY, APRIL 17, 2009 PRICE – 75 (Abaco and Grand Bahama $1.25 WEATHER SUNNY AND COMFORTABLE HIGH 80F LOW 69F I N S I D E n By TANEKA THOMPSON Tribune Staff Reporter tthompson@tribunemedia.net POLICE are investigating the "gruesome" double homicide of two men who were found dead inside a small wooden home in the area of St Vincent Road yesterday. The oldest victim believed to be in his 60s was shot in his left side, while the second victim believed to be a father in his 40s was shot in his left arm. Police said the extent of the younger victim's wounds were so severe that his arm was "nearly ripped off" his body. Their identities were not released by police up to press time yesterday, however resi dents of the area identified the older victim as a quiet Haitian farmer known only as 'Daddy'. The younger man was identi fied by his first name Tracey a man well-known in the area who did odd-jobs and car repairs. Police said it is a possibility that the two men are related. T w o men f ound dead in ‘gruesome’ killings The Tribune ANYTIME ... ANYPLACE , WE RE #1 B AHAMASEDITION TRY OUR McFLURRY TWIX MIX www.tribune242.com SEE page six n B y ALISON LOWE Tribune Staff Reporter alowe@tribunemedia.net STAFF carrying the day’s takings from Carmine’s restaurant in Marina Village were ambushed and robbed by gunmen after closing time on Wednesday. W ell-placed sources said a cashier and a security guard were just emerging from the popular Italian restaurant at around 11.30pm when they were accosted – a stone’s throw away from the Paradise Island Police Station. Police refused to acknowledge that the robbery had taken place and the resort did not specify where the incident occurred. In a statement, Atlantis said: “We can confirm that a cashier was robbed in transit to making a deposit after closing. At no time were patrons in any danger. There was no injury to patrons or staff. We are co-operating with police who are handling the investigation.” The Tribune’s sources said speculation was rife yesterday that the robbery was an “inside job”, perpetrated by individuals who would have known the staff’s routine. It is not known how much money was stolen. Marina Village restaurant staff ‘robbed at gunpoint’ Sources say cashier , security guard accosted A FAMILY member of one of the men killed had to be helped from the scene. CARIFTA GAMES 2009 SPECIALSUPPLEMENTINSIDETODAY T i m C l a r k e / T r i b u n e s t a f f n By DENISE MAYCOCK Tribune Freeport Reporter dmaycock@tribunemedia.net FREEPORT – Two Bahamians and a Jamaican were arrested after law enforcement officials discovered and seized a number of firearms, ammunition, and over $160,000 in cash at an apartment complex in Freeport. Asst Supt Welbourne Bootle reported that Police and Customs officials went to Malibu Reef Estates around 8.40am on Wednesday. He said a search warrant for illegal drugs and contraband was executed by a team of officers from DEU, the Anti-violence Inter Three arrests after firearms, ammunition, $160,000 seized SEE page six n By RUPERT MISSICK Jr Chief Reporter rmissick@tribunemedia.net A DEFENCEhas been filed in the Supreme Court alleging that a Grand Bahama Magistrate collected fines against convicted persons in her court but provided no record to the court that the fines were paid. In a defence filed by Deputy Chief Magistrate Helen AlmoralesJones on April 14 it is alleged that there were several instances when Grand Bahama Magistrate Subusola Lawanson Swain failed to provide records of fines that were paid to her court. The defence was filed in response to an action brought by Magistrate Swain alleging that Deputy Chief Magistrate Jones wrongly accused her of accepting bribes and stealing fines. n By NATARIO McKENZIE Tribune Staff Reporter DIRECTOR of Public Prosecutions Bernard Turner yes terday presented a Voluntary Bill of Indictment in the case of former PLP senator Pleasant Bridgewater and paramedic Tarino Lightbourne who are charged in con nection with an alleged plot to extort $25 million from Holly wood actor John Travolta. According to a summons from the Supreme Court, Bridgewater, 49, who is also an attorney, and Lightbourne, 47, both of Grand Bahama, are to appear before Senior Justice Anita Allen on Tuesday, April 28, at 1pm for their arraignment. At that time a date is expected to be set for V oluntar y Bill of Indictment presented in Bridgewater and Lightbourne case Magistrate alleged to have collected fines without giving record on payment SEE page seven SEE page six Pleasant Bridgewater THE court-appointed manager of CLICO-Guyana is in hospital after being shot by an unidentified gunman in Georgetown early Thursday morning, Caribbean news outlets reported yesterday. The shooting of Maria van Beek, the judicial manager of CLICO in Guyana and also the Commissioner of Insurance, came less than a week after she presented a report to the Supreme Court on the state of n By ALISON LOWE Tribune Staff Reporter alowe@tribunemedia.net THE Bahamas Communi cations and Public Officers Union is considering its next move after 400 ZNS employ ees received late salary pay ments this week and were told overdue increments may have to be paid in stages. ZNS employees blamed the delayed salary payouts on 400 ZNS staff receive late salary payments CLICO-Guyana manager in hospital after being shot SEE page six SEE page six

PAGE 2

n B y ALISON LOWE Tribune Staff Reporter alowe@tribunemedia.net D OWNTOWN Nassau t ook another step towards a return to its former glory yesterday with the appointment of public-private stakeholders to a board mandated by the government to guide the a rea’s revitalisation. Minister of Tourism Vincent Vanderpool Wallace suggested that the creation of the D owntown Nassau Partnership will allow the Bahamas to progress towards fully realising its potential as a destination. This is not a facelift. This is a transformation. That is what this is all about,” he told a press conference at the British C olonial Hilton attended by all the new board members, along with the ministers of the environment and works. At the same time, Vaughn R oberts, former vice president of finance at Bahamar, was formally announced as the managing director of the D NP. Aside from his qualifications and experience in finance and business, Mr R oberts vowed to bring “new e nergy”, the perspective of someone who has lived in major cities around the world, and “non political profession-a lism” to the role. A longside Mr Roberts, it was revealed that the DNP is to consist of 11 additional directors, among them tourism director general Vernice Walkine and NassauT ourism Development Board c hairman Charles Klonaris, who will act as co-chairs. A variety of other a ppointees from the ministries of public works, finance and e nvironment, and from the private sector in the fields oft ourism, banking, real estate a nd retail, were also introduced at the press conference. One of the private sector board members, Charles Klonaris, also chairman of the Nassau Tourism Develop-m ent Board, said: “Many do not know the extent of com m itment it has taken over the y ears to get us to this import ant point. It has not been easy and it will not all of a sudden become easy becauseo f new levels of commitment. “Over the coming months we will lay the foundation for leapfrogging this revitalisation a nd at some point thereafter the fruits of our labour willb ecome more evident to the man on the street, the shop o wner and the many visitors to our city.” The DNP board will meet on a regular basis, initially every two weeks, to address the mandate it has been given by Cabinet, with “prioritya reas” to include finalising a master plan for downtown, creating a Business Improvem ent District (BID will likely see downtown businesses paying a tax to ana uthority charged with upkeeping the area – and overseeing short termi mprovements to the environs. Mrs Walkine said that, i mportantly, the DNP has a p ool of funds contributed to by both government and the private sector from which it c an draw resources to fund the fulfilment of its mandate. She added that once the BID is implemented, the DNP board will likely “evolve” intot he BID authority. The DNP will host a town m eeting at the Hilton on May 6 at 6pm to update the public on the revitalisation efforts and solicit input. C M Y K C M Y K LOCAL NEWS PAGE 2, FRIDAY, APRIL 17, 2009 THE TRIBUNE CUSTOMS staff yesterday welcomed government moves to “clean up” their department, saying its deficiencies had been allowed to continue for far too long. And they thanked The Tribune and especially its Insight section for prompting a massive shake-up with a string of shocking revelations about departmental corruption. A Customs insider said: “We are glad this has happened because it is breaking up some of the old ties and loyalties inside the department. “There was an unseen clique in Customs that looked after its own interests at the expense of the country. There was speculation about rampant corruption for years, but no-one would address it. “Prime Minister Hubert Ingraham has done the right thing. I feel he is doing a good job, but he must not slacken because there is still some way to go.” Since January, the dismissal of scores of senior Customs staff and a major restructuring of the department have gone some way towards making the department more efficient. The shake-up has come amid claims and counter claims about alleged scams inside the department, including an allegation by businessman Jackson Ritchie that corrupt Customs officials had swindled local brokerage firms of millions of dollars. Ritchie’s Global United shipping company is among those alleged to owe substantial sums in unpaid Cus toms duties and taxes. Last December, after the home of a Customs officer had been burned down by arsonists, The Tribune’s Insight section explored the department’s corruption problems under the headline: “It’s time for a clean-out.” It revealed collusion between some corrupt Customs employees and complicit members of the business community designed to rip off the nation for self-gain. And it concluded that government inertia “might suggest that politi cians now accept corruption as an immutable component of Bahamian life and are cowed by its enormity.” In the second of a two-part expo sure, Insight said: “It’s time for theg overnment to confront the cheats in its own ranks, or face what could be very serious consequences as the country buckles under the weight of global economic decline.” Yesterday, Customs insiders said The Tribune’s disclosures triggered mass dismissals and reorganisation of the department. “However,” one source said, “there are still areas which need to be dealt with. There is still work to be done.” Customs staff welcome dept ‘clean up’ Board appointed to guide downtown revitalisation PRIME MINISTER H ubert Ingraham is p ictured being escorted u pon his arrival at the Piarco International Airport, Port of Spain, T rinidad for the 5th Summit of the Americas. S h a r o n T u r n e r / B I S PMARRIVESFORTHESUMMITOFTHEAMERICAS V incent Vanderpool-Wallace THE National Art Gallery hosts the opening of the exhibition “Col lections within the National Collection” tonight from 6.30 pm to 9.30pm. The show highlights the painstaking process involved in acquiring works of art for inclusion in the national collection. In honour of the occasion, a cocktail reception will be held on the verandah of the National Art Gallery. The exhibition chronicles approx imately 30 years of work involved in acquiring objects long before the gallery opened its doors in July 2003. It also highlights the various methods used to acquire objects, including outright purchases funded by gallery membership, individual and corporate or estate donations. This collection and individual works currently on exhibition rep resent only a small part of the national collection. Features include the Amos Fer guson Collection, saved during the Straw Market fire, and a collection of 19th century albumen photographic prints by the American artist Jacob F Coonley – the first major purchase for the national collection after the National Art Gallery became a corporate body in 2003 and acquired from the late artist R Brent Malone. Additionally, the exhibition fea tures 12 paintings of historic buildings and scenes of over-the-hill Nassau commissioned by the Finance Corporation of the Bahamas specifically for the National Art Gallery 25 years before its doors opened. National Art Gallery opens exhibition tonight

PAGE 3

n By JOHN MARQUIS Managing Editor A BAHAMIANbuilding contractor has sparked a furious land title dispute by moving into the derelict former home of killer Sante Kimes, claiming he is the true owner of the desirable seafront property. Warren Aranha, 50, president of White Rose Estate property company, has taken possession of the two-storey Cable Beach home where Kimes and her doting son Kenny are said to have drowned the Bahraini banker Syed Bilal Ahmed in 1996. Mr Aranha admits that his action – which included removing a metal gate to gain access to the land – is likely to provoke a legal showdown with Nassau businessman Raymond Wong, whose family claims to have owned the property for 23 years. “Mr Wong has said the property is his, but I maintain it is mine,” said Mr Aranha, “And I have the papers to prove it.” The once attractive house, set in a stunning beachfront position, hit the headlines three years ago when Kimes and her son were jailed in the United States for two murders committed in 1998. Hearings During one of the hearings, K enny Kimes admitted he and his mother drowned Mr Ahmed in a bath at their Nassau home in 1996 after giving him a date-rape drug. Though he later went on to say he had dumped Mr Ahmed’s body at sea, neighbours in Sul grave Manor, a condo block next t o the Kimes home, are convinced the body is buried on the site, possibly under the patio. When the Kimes story broke, the murderess and her family were said to have been renting the property from Mr Wong. But Mr Aranha claims the h ouse is one of many properties in New Providence at the centre of a major land dispute dating back to the late 19th century. And he says he is the true inheritor of the property as the last surviving member of the allegedly dispossessed J S Johnson family. Mr Aranha’s dispute with Mr Wong does not imply any wrongdoing by the Wong family. He said it is the result of his determined attempt to seize back land he alleges was stolen from the Johnson family between the 1890s and 1950s. Mr Aranha’s incredible tale, which will be fully explored in next Monday’s Tribune Insight section, suggests that three or four prominent white Bahamian families plotted over several generations to dispossess the Johnsons of thousands of acres of New Providence land. Included in the property, he claims, are 465 acres of prime Cable Beach land, including much of the area earmarked for the $2.6 billion Bahamar resort develop ment. Mr Aranha said the decision by Harrahs Entertainment to withdraw funding from the Bahamar project was partly due to concerns about land title. He told The Tribune : “The truth is that the J S Johnson family was robbed over a period of 50 years or more by several prominent white Bahamians, all of them long dead. “I have been researching this matter thoroughly now since 1995 and have collected all the paper work I need to prove that the title of this house and numerous other properties belongs to me.” Standing jubilantly on the balcony of the now ruined house, Mr Aranha said: “If Mr Wong is the owner, let him come forward with the documents to show he has a greater claim than me. “As far as I am concerned, this property is mine – and I aim to use it as my weekend playground in future after it has been refur bished.” At one point, the two-acre site was on the market with a multimillion dollar price tag. But Mr Aranha moved in, took down the ‘For Sale’ signs and threw a huge metal gate into the grass. Last weekend, he drove his truck up to the house to continue clearing the property to prepare for a full-scale restoration project. During the Kimes family’s occupation of the house in the early 1990s, it was still a very desirable home with huge plate glass windows looking out over Goodman’s Bay. Now the house is in ruins, with doors and windows missing and heaps of soil in the front driveway. Structure But Mr Aranha said: “The structure is still very sound. I intend to make it look good again.” J oseph Samuel Johnson, founder of the Johnson family fortune, was a prominent businessman and parliamentarian in Nassau during the second half of the 19th century. Mr Aranha, who claims to be descended from the Johnsons via t he female line, believes the plot to rob his family began after the o riginal J S Johnson died. He said maps of Cable Beach were changed by a succession of swindlers so they could ‘eliminate’ the family’s holdings and take possession. Since then, he said, much of t he land had been sold on to unsuspecting buyers over the generations. Mr Wong, however, claims the Kimes house was bought legitimately by his family from Scottish resident Marilyn Jane Crawford in 1986. “Our title is secure and an attorney is working on the matter now. We will apply for an injunction and see whether he (Mr Aranha that.” He said Mr Aranha’s claims first surfaced two years ago when he discovered that he was using the beach at the Kimes house. Mr Wong said the matter could end up in court “because I don’t know how far he intends to go.” The Kimes family lived at the house between 1992 and 1996. After leaving Nassau, Sante and Kenny Kimes became America’s most notorious mom-and-son crime team, conning and killing their way across the States in their attempt to amass a fortune through crime. Both are now serving life terms in US prisons with no chance of parole. C M Y K C M Y K LOCAL NEWS T HE TRIBUNE FRIDAY, APRIL 17, 2009, PAGE 3 INDEX MAIN/SPORTS SECTION Local News.............................P1,2,3,5,6,7,12 E ditorial/Letters..........................................P4 A dvt ...........................................................P8 S ports . ..............................................P9,10,11 B USINESS SECTION B usiness......................................P1,2,3,4,5,8 Comics . ....................................................... P6 W eather ....................................................... P 7 CLASSIFIED SECTION 36 P A GES U SA TODA Y MAIN SECTION 12 PAGES THE Ministry of Foreign Affairs is looking into reports that several Bahamians might be missing in Jamaica, how ever Bahamian officials say there is no evidence to substantiate the claims. After a report published last week in a local tabloid which claimed that four Bahamian men were killed in Jamaica, several people approached the ministry's consular division asking for help in tracking down missing relatives, Deputy Prime Minister and Minister of Foreign Affairs Brent Symonette said. Since then, a few have returned to report that they have found their loved ones. While the ministry's probe is still ongo ing, Jamaican authorities report that they are not aware of any missing Bahamians turning up on their shores, Mr Symonette said yesterday. "As a result of the article, several persons came into the consular office to report that their family members were missing. Of that group, a number of them have come back to the office and advised us that their relatives have been located elsewhere. "Jamaican authorities have no knowl edge, according to what I've been advised, of any persons that are missing and without any concrete evidence it would be very difficult to proceed any further with the investigation," he said. Mr Symonette said officials are still working with Jamaican authorities to determine if any Bahamians have been incarcerated in that country. According to an official at the Min istry of Foreign Affairs, there have been a number of cases of Bahamians coming into the ministry after not hearing from relatives who have left the country. The official said that in many cases, the missing persons turn up far from where their families think they are and advised travellers to keep relatives abreast of their whereabouts. SIX men are being quest ioned by police in connect ion with the seizure of a shotgun in the area of Roosevelt Avenue. Press liaison officer superintendent Walter Evans said Mobile Division officers w ere patrolling the area s ometime before 6pm on Wednesday when they observed a group of men “acting suspiciously.” The officers searched the a rea where the men were a ssembled and uncovered a s hotgun hidden in a red and white sweater, Mr Evans said. All six men were taken into police custody. POLICE apprehended two men in the Arawak Cay area who were allegedly driving with an illegal firearm in their vehicle. M r Evans said officers f rom the Arawak Cay Police Station were patrolling the general area around the FishF ry shortly after 10pm on Wednesday when they spotted “a shiny object” inside a w hite Honda Accord, regist ration number 197496. Police then ordered the three male occupants to get o ut of the car. The officers stopped two of the passengers, but the t hird man was able to flee t he scene. The 20-year-old driver, of Pinewood Gardens, and one passenger, a 28-year-old Augusta Street resident, were taken into police cus t ody after the officers found a loaded .38 handgun inside the car, Mr Evans said. The third man is actively beings ought. OFFICERS of the Wulff R oad Police Station found two shotguns in an aban doned house on St James R oad. The officers were acti ng on a tip when they made the discovery around 2.30pm on Wednesday. The weapons w ere recovered and are in police custody. No arrests were made as investigationsc ontinues. St George's Anglican C hurch will hold its 60th anniversary patronal mission services next week. The speakers will include: R ev'd Dr Leonard Johnson (April 20 Morrison (April 21 D r C W Saunders (April 22 Mission services start at 7pm. Six questioned in connection with seizureof shotgun Man in cour t on marijuana possession charge In brief Furious land dispute over former home of killer Brent Symonette ‘No evidence’ to back claims of Bahamians missing in Jamaica A 19-YEAR-OLDman was convicted in a Magistrates Court yesterday ona marijuana possession charge. Lamar Albury, of Kennedy Subdivision, is accused of being in possession of 25 grams of marijuana. According to police, the drugs were found in 13 foil wraps in a car. Albury was expected to stand trial yesterday but pleaded guilty to the charge. He was fined $1,500. Failure to pay the fine will result in a nine month prison term. WARREN ARANHA has taken possession of the two-storey Cable B each home where Kimes and her son Kenny lived. Shar e your news The T ribune wants to hear from people who are making news in their neighbourhoods. Perhaps you ar e raising funds for a good cause, campaigning for improvements in the area or have won an awar d. If so, call us on 322-1986 and share your story.

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EDITOR, The Tribune. PLEASE allow me to express one of the most aggravating airport security observations that I h ave witnessed in my many years of travelling throughout the world, sadly to say it is at our very own Lynden Pindling International Airport. Security personnel and many sophisticated security screening devices took over the majority of airports throughout the world after September 11th. This act not to be discounted could, and should be regarded as the largest global stimulus package ever created. Security jobs and security machinery changed the way the world travelled forever. In some cases it took the joy out travelling, even though in many cases and in reality gave a false sense of security. The Bahamas Government spends millions of advertisingd ollars to bring visitors to our shores every year. On entrance to our national airport, the three piece band with their discoloured uniforms and busted speakers, do their best to welcome guests with native tunes, of course the visitors don’t understand what the band is playing or exhibiting. At least with Junkanoo music, they are guaranteed to feel rhythm, excitement and something culturally authentic. On the other hand, upon leaving the island of New Providence no matter how great a vacation the visitor may have experienced, the double security and unnecessary delayed screening, with no space along with the numerous check points at LPIA leaves visitors and residents alike very angry, confused, and looking at the island of New Providence, Bahamas as the worst choice destination. Many whom I have spoken to after their ordeal question the airport authorities and security personnel’s intellect, as not having enough common sense to know that you do not make the airport a retirement park for ex-police officers who are not global or experienced travellers, or have not travelled outside the Bahamas or understand the complexities of modern airport security. After all, they were probably stationed in a remote island during their entire career. We may not have the proper size or designed airport at this time to support the number of travellers that come to our island, but we do have the intellectual capacity to know when a system is flawed and needs to be corrected. We should not allow the TSA o r other foreign jurisdictions to dictate the operational and security measures at our airport that is totally inappropriate and contributes to the inefficiencies, disruptions and delays in visitor and citizen travel abroad. US Customs and Immigration should have realized by now that two officers cannot man a destination like the Lynden Pindling International Airport and should, at a minimum, open up other booths to accommodate the large numbers at convenient or peak travel periods. I urge the respective individuals who are responsible at the airport to please re-examine the entire situation at LPIA, especially the senseless double secu-r ity screening process and implement proactive corrective measures that will not impede or leave as it so often does, the worst impression of the Bahamas in hearts and minds of the travellers to island of New Providence. ANTHONY U BOSTWICK Jr Nassau, April, 2009. C M Y K C M Y K EDITORIAL/LETTERS TO THE EDITOR PAGE 4, FRIDAY, APRIL 17, 2009 THE TRIBUNE The Tribune Limited NULLIUS ADDICTUS JURARE IN VERBA MAGISTRI Being Bound to Swear to The Dogmas of No Master L EON E. H. DUPUCH, Publisher/Editor 1903-1914 S IR ETIENNE DUPUCH, Kt., O.B.E., K.M., K.C.S.G., (Hon. P ublisher/Editor 1919-1972 Contributing Editor 1972-1991 EILEEN DUPUCH CARRON, C.M.G., M.S., B.A., LL.B. P ublisher/Editor 1972Published Daily Monday to Saturday S hirley Street, P.O. Box N-3207, Nassau, Bahamas Insurance Management Building., P.O. F-485, Freeport, Grand Bahama W EBSITE www.tribune242.com – updated daily at 2pm MEXICO CITY President Barack Obama wants Havana to make the next move to improve U.S.-Cuba relations, saying Thursday that he needs to see signs of changes on the i sland before he makes any more overtures. President Obama already has lifted restrictions on visits and money sent to Cuba byA mericans with families there steps he called " extraordinarily significant" for those families, a nd a show of good faith by the U.S. governm ent that it wants to recast the relationship. B ut he reiterated that the U.S. won't unilaterally end its trade embargo against Cuba, even though the policy is widely seen as a failuret hat has complicated U.S. relations throughout Latin America and the Caribbean. President Obama said a relationship frozen for 50 years "won't thaw overnight," and that Cuba can show it wants to move forward by lifting its own restrictions on Cubans' ability to t ravel and to voice their opinions. C uba's communist government had no immediate reaction, but President Raul Castro has said he is willing to negotiate with the US President on neutral ground as equals and with out conditions. Castro was in Venezuela, whereP resident Hugo Chavez and other close allies w ere planning to show a united front in their first encounter with him today at the Summit of the Americas. Chavez called the U.S. position a "show of d isrespect." " If that's the way it is, what more can we e xpect from the rest? Nothing," Chavez said. "I hope we're wrong, but they'll be the ones who will have to show us not with tales and speeches." P resident Obama spoke at a news conference a fter meeting with Mexican President Felipe Calderon, who called the U.S. embargo a failed strategy. Asked what the U.S. should do on Cuba to improve its image across Latin Amer i ca, Calderon said "we do not believe that the e mbargo or the isolation of Cuba is a good m easure for things to change." But President Obama says Cuba needs to reciprocate to his overtures with actions "grounded in respect for human rights." A similar message was sent by U.S. Secretary o f State Hillary Rodham Clinton in Haiti earlier Thursday. "We stand ready to discuss with Cuba additional steps that could be taken," she said. "But we do expect Cuba to reciprocate." "We would like to see Cuba open up its soci e ty, release political prisoners, open up to out side opinions and media, have the kind of society that we all know that would improve the opportunities for the Cuban people and for their nation," she said. Leaders of 34 nations are making their way to Trinidad and Tobago for the summit, a gathering of democracies where communist Cuba isnot invited. That rankles several of the leaders not only close ally Chavez but also people like Haitian President Rene Preval, who has had warm relations with the Castro government and received medical treatment on the island. He told reporters that he hopes Cuba will be able to attend the next summit, and that "Cuba is a friend of Haiti even though we have different political systems." ( This article was written by Ben Feller of the Associated Press). Haitians want Hillary Clinton to stop deportations PORT-AU-PRINCE, Haiti Women sell ing hot peppers and black beans in a sprawlingm arket in Haiti's capital talk of their unending economic woes, their hungry children and their dismal hopes that politicians will do anything a bout it. As U.S. Secretary of State Hillary Rodham C linton arrived in Haiti on Thursday, the expectations of Haiti's people are dismally low. President Rene Preval escorted Mrs Clinton from the airport to the national palace for a private meeting. D isappointment is widespread over unkept promises of aid to Haiti. The country has not yet recovered from last year's food riots and four t ropical storms that killed nearly 800 people and caused $1 billion in damage. P olitical tensions also are running high ahead of Sunday's long-delayed Senate elections, which some parties disqualified from running have threatened to disrupt. In the noisy Croix-des-Bossales market, w omen fixate on their families' hunger as they bat beetles away from unsold piles of food. "There's no money in this country because there isn't any work," said Therese Bejaman, 38, who sells coconuts imported from the neighb ouring Dominican Republic. Bejaman's husband lost his job at the commercial port across the street a few years ago. N ow their seven children, aged 6 to 18, depend on her travelling hours over washed-out roads tot he border, where she pays about $5.60 for a dozen coconuts with hopes of making about 5 cents of profit on each one. It's not going well. "They aren't selling fast," she said. With other countries struggling amid the g lobal economic crisis, aid to Haiti has been affected. A donors conference Tuesday in Washington was a disappointment. It raised $ 324 million for Haiti but despite entreaties by U.N. Secretary-General Ban Ki-moon, secu r ity council members, Bill Clinton and others that amount was more than $600 million short of what the country needs for economic developm ent and hurricane recovery. The discussions with Secretary of State Clint on will likely include a request to temporarily stay deportation orders against an estimated3 0,000 Haitians in the United States, whose repatriations would further drain Haiti's resources by eliminating the money they send home. Preval may also ask for more relief from Haiti's heavy debt burden, estimated to include $1.6 million in payments to the World Bank each month. Let common sense prevail at the Lynden Pindling Airport LETTERS l etters@tribunemedia.net Obama says Cuba should make next move E DITOR, The Tribune. It seems to me that the peo ple calling for a ban on turtle meat and now attackingA ndrew Allen for opposing, are extremely out of touch with mainstream Bahamian feelings on the issue. I am a chef and restaurant o wner of 30 plus years and can tell you that the vast majority of Bahamians all over this Bahamas have no time for a ban on yet another Bahamian delicacy. In fact, when Mr Allen gave me a petition, I began canvassing my customers and s o far 100 per cent not only agree with him but have asked me if I could add turtle to my menu! Well done, Mr Allen and k eep speaking up loud and clear. ANDRIA V DAMES Nassau, April, 2009. My customers want me to add turtle to my menu! EDITOR, The Tribune. Re: Do not ban harvesting of sea turtles Tribune/14 March 2009 Unfortunately, the well written and interesting letter overlooks a significant point: some apparently “self-righteous, arrogant and ignorant” Bahamians approve of the turtle conservation bill in the hope that it may reduce the mindless yet “culturally correct” torture that these wonderful creatures must endure as they are slowly butchered. This needless cruelty is inflicted while the turtles are lying on their backs and gasping for air as the sun beats down on them mercilessly. KENNETH W KNOWLES, MD (Turtle pie lover Nassau, March 15, 2009. Significant point overlooked EDITOR, The Tribune. Re: Redefining the Bahamas government’s role in the economy (Your Say The Nassau Institute reportedly stated: “In simple terms, we should turn toward laissez-faire capitalism rather than more government planning....” Really? Turn toward laissez-faire capitalism? Isn’t much of the world suffering economically right now largely as a result of laissez-faire capitalism? KENNETH W KNOWLES MD Nassau, March 11, 2009. Haven’ t we suf fer ed enough from laissez-faire capitalism?

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n By MEGAN REYNOLDS Tribune Staff Reporter mreynolds@tribunemedia.net RESIDENTS forced to use a dark and dangerous unpaved road to get to their homes in a rapidly developing area are calling on government to take action. The Killarney community of several hundred people who use M unnings Drive, a mile-long stretch of dirt track linking G ladstone Road and JFK Drive, as the primary access route to their homes are fed up with the pot holes, flytipping and l ack of street lights on the way t o and from their homes. When they purchased prope rties in the growing subdivisions around South Westridge i n the last two years, new residents were told roadworks would be done. But over one year later Munnings Drive remains unchanged, while homes con t inue to be built. R esidents are concerned the d umping is posing a health hazard and environmental risk ton earby Lake Killarney, and say t he rocky road is damaging their cars and hindering further i nfrastructure as Cable Bahamas will not serve the expanding community of over1 00 homes. Lisa McCartney, a resident of Emerald Coast, said: “I have f riends who will not drive to c ome visit me at night because they’re concerned about thems elves coming in this dark area at night. “Another one of my neighb ours doesn’t even invite people over because of what they would have to pass along the w ay.” Bethsheba Haven, 31, a mother-of-one who moved to the Emerald Coast in January last year added: “I’m embarrassed to have people visit me here. “There are lots of holes, so you have to go slow, and when it rains, you are really and truly swimming through in the car. “Beyond that is the dumping problem, which is horrible, and it’s right in the road. “If I drive at night I’m cons tantly looking to see if anyone’s following me, because s omeone could easily pull across in front of you in the road and n o one would see.” Bahamas Logistics Centre Ltd is one of two businesses in the area which find clients are reluctant to use the road, and they supported residents in a p ress conference on Wednesday night demanding something to be done. A press statement from the Munnings Drive residents reads: “We would like to appeal to the government to take a second look at this area to see if Munnings Drive can be given priority in the 2009-10 budget f or capital improvement works, or at worst incorporated into the New Providence Road Improvement programme. “The developers in the area were given subdivision approvalb y the Government to develop s ubdivisions that border Munnings Drive and we, the individual property owners, were given permission to build also by the government. Should there not be a corres ponding obligation on the part o f the government to ensure safe and reasonable road access for the Killarney residents who they indirectly encouraged to move to the area?” M inistry of Works director Gordon Major said: “If the road h as not been turned over to us w e are not able to pave the road. “The subdivision developer w ould have to turn the road over to government.” C M Y K C M Y K LOCAL NEWS T HE TRIBUNE FRIDAY, APRIL 17, 2009, PAGE 5 IN THE wake of last Sunday’s murder of a 18-year-old youth near the Q ueen Elizabeth Sports Centre, the Bahamas Hot Rod Association yesterday released a statement seeking to set their racing facility apart from the unregulated one where the crime took place. BHRA’s public relations officer Mia Campbell said Sunday’s murder took place on the nearby unregulated racetrack, and not at the MotorSports Park. “Safety is the most important factor of any event held at the MotorSports Park which is why we always have the presence of the ambulance and the police department,” she said. Richard Bremmer, of Pinewood Gardens, died after he was stabbed multiple times in the chest while attending a car rally near the Queen Elizabeth Sports Centre. According to police reports, the teenager was attacked by a group of men when he accidentally hit and seriously injured a 31-year-old Wilson Tract man while driving away from the Sports Centre in a 1994 Honda Prelude. Police have charged Shelton Devarso Thompson, 21, of Chippingham, in connection with the murder. Ms Campbell expressed condolences to the Bremmer family on behalf of the association. She said that the event that the teenager was attending prior to his death was held on a strip next to the Government High School. Ms Campbell said that all racing activities should take place in a contained environment such as the MotorSports Park. “Activities of any kind dealing with motor sports, whether motorbikes or cars, are all welcomed at our park and we continue to open our arms to them. “Our previous administration has been in many discussions with the organisers of these groups to use our park and to not only bring enter t ainment to the spectators of their sport but also to provide a safe environment,” she said. “Motor sports are on the rise in the Bahamas and the BHRA along with the public and private sectors have recognised this by the many events planned.” The BHRA recently held elections and is now under a new administration which has emphasised its commitment to the sport and its spectators. POLICE have launched an island-wide search for Omar Chisholm, 31, who is wanted for questioning in connection with a million dollar drug smuggling case. Chisholm is of medium build, around 5’ 11” tall and weighs around 190 lbs. His last known address is No 52 Yamacraw Beach Estates. The police have yet to release a likeness of the suspect. Anyone with information about Chisholm’s whereabouts is being asked to contact the Drug Enforcement Unit at 323-7139 or 397-3801; the Police Control Room at 322-3333; Crime Stoppers at 328-8474 or their nearest police station. The police said Chisholm should be considered armed and dangerous. He is being sought in con nection with a high speed boat chase which took place near BarraTerre, Exuma, around midnight on Saturday. Officers chasing a suspi cious vessel were eventually able to bring it to a stop and arrest two men, but two others reportedly jumped overboard. Marijuana Several taped bales containi ng 945 pounds of marijuana with an estimated street value of $945,000 were allegedly found aboard the boat. A third man was eventually arrested and appeared before a Magistrates Court in Nassau on Wednesday along with the two other suspects. They were c harged with conspiracy to import and possess marijuana,and possession of marijuana. It is also alleged that the men imported the drugs and were in possession of thedrugs with intent to supply them to others. Garnette Augustus Nevell, 4 8, alias George Brown, of Sandy Bay, Clarendon, Jamaica, pleaded guilty to conspiring with others to import and possess marijuana,as well as to the importation and possession of marijuana. Kenworth Smith, 32, of Behring Point, Andros, and V alentino Johnson, 33, of Sut ton Street, who were arraigned along with Nevell, both pleaded not guilty to the intent to supply charges, but guilty to the drug charges. All three men also pleaded not guilty to the charge of stealing a 28-foot Intrepid speedboat while at Highbourn Cay, Exuma. Residents call for action over dark and dangerous road R ESIDENTS a re fed up with the pot holes, flytipping and lack of street lights on the way to and from their homes. The Bahamas Hot Rod Association distances itself from unregulated facility Search for man wanted in connection with drug smuggling case

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C M Y K C M Y K LOCAL NEWS PAGE 6, FRIDAY, APRIL 17, 2009 THE TRIBUNE The bodies were found by a third-party who went to the tiny house, which sits about 100 feet away from the street, early yesterday morning. Officers responded around 9 am yesterday when they found the men lying on the ground, fully clothed, with apparent gun shots about the body. Police believe the men were killed as many as 12 hours before their bodies were stumbled on. "We have now launched an intensive investigation into these latest two homicides we do not have any information with respect to the identity of these individuals, nor do we have any information with r espect to the motives for this incident. "At this stage we are asking anyone with information who might have seen or heard anything around, perhaps within the last 12 hours gunshots being heard throughout this general area, they can contact the police at 919, 502-9991, or 328TIPS," said Assistant Superintendent Walter Evans. Although Drug Enforcement Unit officers were on site, police dismissed assertions that the murders may be drug related. When The Tribune arrived on the scene shortly before 10 am yesterday, more than a dozen investigators combed the area as curious bystanders looked on. Screams of anguish rang through the air about an hour later when a relative of one of the victims arrived. Seemingly overcome with grief, she had to be supported by friends and was eventually escorted away from the area. While a motive for the killings had not been established by police up to press time yesterday, friends and family of the victims were left dumbfounded over who would murder them. Gerty Bullard, whose family owns the plot of land where the older victim lived for about 30 years, recalled 'Daddy' as a quiet, peaceful man who farmed and "never troubled anybody." "That old man couldn't hurt a fly he was a nice guy and friendly," said Ms Bullard, who said she last saw the farmer on Monday. According to reports, the younger victim Tracey was down on his luck and had recently moved in with the older man. Harvey Knowles, a friend who grew up with Tracey said he was last seen in good spirits Tuesday night. Mr Knowles said while the younger victim was sometimes boisterous, he did not know if he had any enemies. The double homicide marked the 20th and 21st murders of the year and the fourth murder this week. vention Taskforce and Customs officers at an apartment complex at Whaleback Close. During a search, officers recovered three firearms, one SAR-1 Caliber Rifle containing (17a .45 Austria Glock pistol containing (9 rounds of ammunition, and a 5.7 FN Herstal Belgium pistol containing (19 ammunition. ASP Bootle reported that some $164,319.52 in Bahamian and U.S. currency was also discovered, along with an additional assortment of ammunition, including (50 ammunition and a box containing (72 of ammunition. He said officers also searched two 40-foot containers that contained an assortment of building materials, as well as a white cargo truck, which contained an assortment of alcoholic beverages and soft drinks. Mr Bootle said the goods are suspected of being brought into the country illegally. H e said the containers, truck, and five boats were impounded by Bahamas Customs. He said the estimated value of the seizure will be released later. ASP Bootle said three men – a 28-year-old Jamaican national, a 46-year-old Bahamian and an 18-year-old Bahamian were arrested. The men are presently assisting authorities with their investigations. the insurance company, stating that its US$60 million in liabilities exceed its assets by US$5 million, Caribbean News Net reported. In her report, she also criticised how CLICO was being managed in Guyana. Ms Van Beek was shot in her chest while she was driving along a main street in Georgetown. She is reportedly in stable condition. The circumstances surrounding the shooting are still unclear at this time, but Guyana police said they are following some leads although they were reportedly unable to get a descrip tion of the gunman from eyewitnesses. Ms Van Beek was shot when she stopped at a junction on the Lombard Street thoroughfare in Georgetown. Seelall Persaud, Assistant Police Commis sioner for Law Enforcement in Guyana, said that a gun man shot her through her driver's seat window. “bad management” practices l eading to a funding shortfall. However, ZNS Chairman Michael Moss told The Tribune yesterday that the late salary payments were “due to a bank errorm ore than a ZNS problem.” Meanwhile, admitting that a funding shortfall does exist with respect to the increment paym ents, he claimed that this happened because a larger number of employees than anticipated were given “above average” appraisals by “generous” super-v isors entitling them to increm ents. BCPOU President Robert F arquharson held a general meeting with line staff at ZNS yester-day afternoon to appraise them of t he union’s efforts on behalf of employees there. A ccording to employees, they were due to receive their pay c heques on Tuesday, but the money was not made available. O ne employee said: “It doesn’t surprise me, but people are fed up. It’s just one of many issuesw e have here.” Yesterday Mr Moss said e mployees who had accounts at the bank where the funds were b eing held would have been able to collect their cheques yesterd ay, while remaining staff should be able to do so by today. “The funds were made available at the bank on Thursday of last week and payment should have been made on Tuesday. Apparently there was some kindo f oversight at the bank and I’m told the instruction on the payr oll only has a validity period of four days so by the time Wednes day rolled around the validity period of the instruction had expired and it was only when peop le went to the bank that it came to light,” he said. Employees, who are paid on a bi-monthly basis, said this was the f irst time salaries had been late. Mr Moss maintained that this week’s troubles do not indicate any likelihood of such an occurrence happening again. M eanwhile, the Chairman claimed that although payment of increments was budgeted for, the total amount needed to cover t he payouts has fallen short because “you have supervisory p ersonnel who, on balance, gave a much larger percentage of e mployees ‘excellent’ appraisals entitling them to increments” t han expected. Describing the system as “a bit c razy”, Mr Moss said there “is going to be a need for some veryd eep review of these agreements a nd policies.” You have some people who m ay not be too a u fait w ith doing appraisals and might just want to b e nice to everyone.” The Board, which is still nego t iating with the union, has agreed it can pay the increments over at hree month period beginning April 30. The union has indicated that 50 per cent this month and 50 next month is more palatable for them. Our response is that we don’t want to commit to some t hing our cash flow forecast doesn’t show to be sustainable b ecause people would end up being disappointed, but if reve nue is better then we’ll try,” said Mr Moss. Attempts to reach Mr Farquharson were unsuccessful upto press time. t he start of the trial. Mr Turner told Magistrate C arolita Bethel yesterday that the prosecution has filed the necessary statements as part ofa bundle of documents relative to the case. Magistrate Betheli nformed Bridgewater, who was again dressed in a white outfit and Lightbourne, who was dressed in a suit, that they were discharged from her court now that the matter has been trans ferred to the Supreme Court. She informed them that their $50,000 bail will continue until they are arraigned in the Supreme Court. Bridgewater and Lightbourne were first charged in January in connection with the alleged plot, which has attracted a great deal of international media attention. Lightbourne and Bridgewater are charged with conspiring to commit extor tion between January 2 and January 20 of this year. Light bourne is also charged with attempted extortion, while Bridgewater is charged with abetment to extort. It is alleged that Bridgewater purposely facilitated the attempt to extort $25 million from Mr Travolta. She is represented by attorney Murrio Ducille. Reports of the alleged extortion attempt emerged days after Jett Travolta, the 16-year-old son of actors John Travolta, 54, and Kelly Preston, 46, died of a seizure at the family’s vacation home in Freeport, Grand Bahama, on January 2. Bridgewater announced her resignation from the Senate days after the police brought charges against her. Mr Tra volta, PLP Senator Allyson Maynard-Gibson and the Travolta family’s US attorneys are expected to be called as wit nesses at the trial. Actor John Travolta is also listed as a witness. ZNSSTAFF gather outside of the premises yesterday. FROM page one ZNSstaff Double homicide F ROM page one CLICO-Guyana manager in hospital after being shot FROM page one Three arrests after firearms, ammunition, $160,000 seized F ROM page one F ROM page one Voluntary Bill of Indictment presented in Bridgewater and Lightbourne case

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C M Y K C M Y K LOCAL NEWS THE TRIBUNE FRIDAY, APRIL 17, 2009, PAGE 7 NASSAU LISTINGS DEVELOPED RESIDENTIAL & COMMERCIAL VACANT LOTS P R O P E R T I E S F O R S A L E 1.BERNARD TERRACE SUBDIVISION LOT NO. 14SouthernMoiety PROPERTY DESCRIPTION: Multi-FamilyResidentialLot PROPERTY SIZE: 5,700sq.ft. withfoundation LOCATION: Travelingeaston BernardRoad,takethe1st cornerontherightpastWindsor Terrace.Thevacantlotisthe4th ontheleft. APPRAISEDVALUE: $85,0002.CARMICHAELVILLAGE LOT NO. PROPERTY DESCRIPTION: SinglefamilyResidentialLot PROPERTY SIZE: 4,650sq.ft. LOCATION: Travelingwest onAvocadoRoadfromFaith Avenue,turnthroughthe1st graveledcornerontheleft.The vacantlotisthe2ndontheleft, enclosedwithchainlinkfence andfruittrees. APPRAISEDVALUE: $51,000 3.KOOLACRES SUBDIVISION LOT NO. 46Parcel PROPERTY DESCRIPTION: Multi/SingleFamilyResidential PROPERTY SIZE: 7,604sq.ft. LOCATION: Travelingsouth onFoxHillRoadfromJoe FarringtonRoad,takethe2nd cornerleft-oppositeGuana CayAvenue-ontoKoolAcres SubdivisionRoad.Thevacantlot is1stontheleft;directlyonthe cornerofFoxHillRoadandKool AcresSubdivisionRoad. APPRAISEDVALUE: $84,0004.SEA GULL GARDEN SUBDIVISIONLOT NO. 33 PROPERTY DESCRIPTION: Multi -FamilyResidentialLot BeachFront PROPERTY SIZE: 14,723sq.ft. LOCATION: OnFlemmingRoad. APPRAISEDVALUE: $200,000 5.SOUTH OCEANESTATES SUBDIVISION LOT NO. 1Block5 PROPERTY DESCRIPTION: Multi-familyResidentialLot PROPERTY SIZE: 11,566sq.ft. LOCATION: Travelingsouthof LyfordCay,immediatelypass MountPleasantturnlefton SouthOceanBoulevardtoNew SouthOceanEstates.Thevacant lotisthe1stontheright. APPRAISEDVALUE: $110,0006.SOUTHERNSHORES SUBDIVISION LOT NO. 4parceloflot24 PROPERTY DESCRIPTION: Multi-FamilyResidentialLot PROPERTY SIZE: 7,706sq.ft. LOCATION: Thevacant lotisonthewestsideofa roadreservationnearly400 feetsouthofMarshallRoad. APPRAISEDVALUE: $77,000 8.BEL-AIRESTATES – CARMICHAEL ROAD L OT NO. 259 P ROPERTY DESCRIPTION: S ingle-storeyResidence, 3beds/2baths PROPERTY SIZE: 6,000sq.ft. LOCATION: Travelingeaston CarmichaelRoadfromFaith Avenue,takethe4thcornerright (TurtleDrive).Thepropertyisthe 4thhouseontheright. APPRAISEDVALUE: $186,000 9.CHIPPINGHAMSUBDIVISION LOT NO. 17 PROPERTY DESCRIPTION: Single-storeyResidence, 2beds/1bath PROPERTY SIZE: 6,375sq.ft. LOCATION: Travelingweston QuarryMissionRoadoffNassauS treet,thepropertyislocatedon t henorthernside(approximately 5 00ft.fromNassauStreet). A PPRAISEDVALUE: $120,000 10.ENGLERSTONSUBDIVISION LOT NO. 4Block7 PROPERTY DESCRIPTION: TriplexApartmentbuilding PROPERTY SIZE: 7,000sq.ft. L OCATION: Travelingeaston CordeauxAvenuefromEast Street,takethe2ndright(Key WestStreet)andheadsouth.The propertyisthe6thbuildingonthe left. APPRAISEDVALUE: $243,000 11. GOLDEN ISLES ROAD LOT NO. PROPERTY DESCRIPTION: TriplexApartmentComplex PROPERTY SIZE: 7,203sq.ft. LOCATION: Travelingnorthon GoldenIslesRoadfromCowpen Road,afterthe1stpavedroad onleft;thepropertyisthe2nd buildingontheleft. APPRAISEDVALUE: $333,000 12.MARSHALL ROAD LOT NO. 17D PROPERTY DESCRIPTION: TriplexApartment-One2bedroom/2-bath&Two2bedroom/1-bath PROPERTY SIZE: 10,000sq.ft. LOCATION: Travelingweston MarshallRoadfromSouthBeach R oad,takethe1stcornerright ( TiaoEndRoad).Thepropertyis t he4thbuildingontheleft. A PPRAISEDVALUE: $288,000 13.MARSHALL ROAD LOT NO. 52 PROPERTY DESCRIPTION: Single-storeyResidence3beds/ 2baths PROPERTY SIZE: 37,550sq.ft. LOCATION: TravelingonMarshall RoadfromBlueHillRoad,turn leftatjunction,thenright.The propertyisthe5thontheright,to therear. APPRAISEDVALUE: $345,000 14.PINEWOOD GARDENS SUBDIVISION LOT NO. 13 PROPERTY DESCRIPTION: Single-storeyResidence, 3beds/2baths P ROPERTY SIZE: 7,191sq.ft. L OCATION: Travelingeaston S apodillaBoulevardfromEast S treet,takethe1stleft(Thatch P almAvenue)andheadnorth tothejunction.Takealeft (MahoganyStreet);thepropertyis the2ndontheright. APPRAISEDVALUE: $148,000 15.SANDILANDS VILLAGE LOT NOS. 7and8 PROPERTY DESCRIPTION: Single-storeyResidence With3apartmentsunder construction PROPERTY SIZE: Lot7:7,970 sq.ft,Lot8:8,419sq.ft. LOCATION: Travelingweston SandilandsVillageRoadfrom FoxHillRoad,turnthroughthe 9thpavedroadonleft(Vanessa Close).Thepropertiesarelocatedo nthenorthwesternsideofthe s treet. APPRAISEDVALUE: $277,000 16.SANDILANDS VILLAGE LOT NO. PROPERTY DESCRIPTION: DuplexApartmentComplex PROPERTY SIZE: 5,500sq.ft. LOCATION: Travelingweston SandilandsVillageRoadfrom FoxHillRoad,turnthroughthe 2ndpavedroadontheleft.The propertyisthe5thontheleft. APPRAISEDVALUE: $219,000 INTERESTED PARTIES SHOULD SUBMIT OFFERS INCLUSIVEOF TELEPHONE CONTACT AND POSTAL ADDRESS TO: CB DISTRESSEDPROPERTIES, CREDIT RISK MANAGEMENT DEPARTMENT, P.O BOX SS-6263 NASSAU, BAHAMAS OR EMAIL USAT: DISTRESSED.PROPERTIES@COMBANKLTD.COM* WE RESERVE THE RIGHTTO REJECT ANY OR ALL OFFERS. 3.GAMBLE HEIGHTS S UBDIVISION LOT NO. ParcelofLand PROPERTY DESCRIPTION: S plitLevelResidencewithTwo 1bed/1bathApartmentUnits underconstruction P ROPERTY SIZE: 7,141sq.ft. LOCATION: Travelingsouthon BlueHillRoadfromFaith U nitedWay,takethe1stcorner left(SunriseRoad)andhead south;takethe5thcorner leftandheadeasttothe1st cornerright.Thepropertyis the7thhouseontheright. APPRAISEDVALUE: $150,000 5.CENTERVILLE L OT NO. 5Block14 PROPERTY DESCRIPTION: Single-storeyCommercial B uilding PROPERTY SIZE: 5,000sq.ft. LOCATION: MadeiraStreet b etweenMontroseAvenueand Mt.RoyalAvenue APPRAISEDVALUE: $302,000 7.WINTON MEADOWS ESTATES S UBDIVISION I LOT NO. 115 PROPERTY DESCRIPTION: S ingle-storeyResidence3beds /2baths PROPERTY SIZE: 8,000sq.ft. L OCATION: Travelingeast onPrinceCharlesDrivefor CulbertsHill,takethe1stcorner r ight(JasmineDrive)andhead south;turnthrough2ndcorner ontheright(VioletteDrive).The propertyisthe4thhouseonthe left. APPRAISEDVALUE: $274,000 1.CANTERBURY PARKESTATES LOT NO. 13 P ROPERTY DESCRIPTION: Single-storeyResidence 3Beds/21/2Baths PROPERTY SIZE: 8,086sq.ft. L OCATION: Travelingeast onPrinceCharlesDrive,turn throughcornerontheright( oppositeSt.Augustine’sRoad) andheadsoutharoundthe curvetotheright.Theproperty isthe2ndtothelasthouseon theleft. APPRAISEDVALUE: $283,000 2 . COLLEGE GARDENS S UBDIVISION L OT NO. 5 PROPERTY DESCRIPTION: Single-storeyDuplexApartment 2 Beds/1Batheach P ROPERTY SIZE: 5,976sq.ft. LOCATION: Travelingeastalong P rinceCharlesDriveforSt. Augustine’sRoad,takethe2nd cornerright(CollegeGardens R oad)andheadsouthtothe junction;turnontoPineBarren Road.Headingwest,turnthrough 2ndpavedroadonleft.The propertyisthe5thbuildingonthe right. A PPRAISEDVALUE: $209,000 4 .PINEWOOD GARDENS S UBDIVISION L OT NO. 1714 PROPERTY DESCRIPTION: Single-storeyResidence PROPERTY SIZE: 5,000sq.ft. LOCATION: Travelingeastonto B ambooBoulevardfromEast Street,takethe3rdcornerright (ThatchPalmAvenue)andtravel south,turnthrough2ndcorner ontheleft(AvocadoStreet).The propertyisthe17thhouseon theleft.A PPRAISEDVALUE: $137,000 6 .SIR LYNDENPINDLING E STATES SUBDIVISION L OT NO. 3014/15 PROPERTY DESCRIPTION: Single-familyResidence 3beds/2baths PROPERTY SIZE: 5,000sq.ft. L OCATION: Travelingeast onBambooBoulevardtothe roundabout,continuetraveling eastwardonC.W.Saunders Highway.Takethe2ndright(Lady PindlingAvenue)andheadsouth tothe1stpavedcornerontheleft( LaurenStreet);turnthrough2nd cornerleft(PearTreeAvenue). Thepropertyisthe6thhouseon theleft. APPRAISEDVALUE: $145,000 Magistrate Swain has accused Mrs Almorales-Joneso f making false accusations against her and trying to punish her because of the way she handled cases connected to the D eputy Chief Magistrate’s husband, father-in-law and electrician. In her defence, the Deputy Chief Magistrate denied all ofM agistrate Swain’s accusations. She is seeking damages for slander, libel, malicious falsehood and misfeasance in public o ffice. Magistrate Swain presided over Magistrate’s Court Number 2 in Grand Bahama. However, she was placed on l eave by Chief Justice Burton Hall in May of 2007 when allegations of “serious misconduct” were levied against her i n a report prepared by Deputy Chief Magistrate AlmoralesJ ones. Deputy Chief Magistrate Almorales-Jones in her defence has denied that shec omplained to the Deputy Registrar or the SupremeC ourt and the Chief Justice that Magistrate Swain had a ccepted a bribe from Darren Davies, Samantha Ferguson or Garcia Marshall. However, Magistrate Almorales-Jones said in herd efence that she had advised Chief Justice Hall that withoutg iving any prior notice and without having any communic ation with her or the prosecutor assigned to her court, Magi strate Swain and her prosecu tor, Police Sergeant 1611 Kirklyn Wright, heard Davies, Ferguson and Marshall’s case nearly a week before it was s cheduled for her court. The trio were charged with p ossession of an unlicensed firearm and possession of a mmunition. Deputy Chief Magistrate Almorales-Jones did not attend work on May 14 and May 15 of 2007 because she was suffering from food poisoning. On May 15, the prosec utor assigned to Magistrate’s Court Number 3 allegedly cont acted Magistrate AlmoralesJones at home to register a complaint that the criminal proceedings of the three accused, which was to be heard on the 29th of that month, had been heard by Magistrate S wain in Court Number Three the day before. D eputy Chief Magistrate Almorales-Jones claims she returned to work the following day and interviewed several people regarding the circumstances surrounding the hear ing of the criminal case on May 14. She alleges that she found that Magistrate Swain made a manuscript note on the charge sheet that she had convicted and fined Marshall $2,000 or nine months imprisonment on each count ($4,000 for both counts). The defendants, however, alleged that Magistrate Swain ordered Marshall to pay a fine of $10,000 which was paid in cash to prosecutor Wright. The cashier assigned to the magistrate’s court in Freeport, however, said that Magistrate Swain only paid the sum of $4,000 to the court. Deputy Chief Magistrate Almorales-Jones claims in her defence that there were similar instances that caused her con cern over the way Magistrate Swain conducted the affairs of Court Number 2. Among them was an instance on May 17, 2007 when Christopher Rolle reported to her that in April of that year he had pleaded guilty to two counts of receiving before Magistrate Swain who ordered him to pay $1,000. He reportedly paid the fine to the prosecutor assigned to the court in the corridor of Magistrate’s Court Number 2, but the prosecutor allegedly failed to give him a receipt. The court’s record, however, did not reflect that the fine was paid into court for Mr Rolle, it is stated in the defence. In addition, several staff members alleged that Magistrate Swain frequently heard criminal and traffic cases in her private office. These staff members also allege that the Magistrate and/or the prosecutor personally collected money from the defendants in these cases and did not issue receipts to them. In Deputy Chief Magistrate Almorales-Jones’ defence she requests that Magistrate Swain’s writ of summons and statement of claim be struck out on the grounds that it fails to disclose a reasonable cause of action, is frivolous, vexatious and an “abuse of the court’s process.” Magistrate alleged to have collected fines without giving record on payment F ROM page one

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n BASKETBALL WASHINGTON A ssociated Press ON THE flight home from Boston, after the final game of one of the worst seasons in Washington Wizards franchise history, Gilbert Arenas laid down the law. Next season, Arenas said, the goofing around has got to stop. "We've just been a goofball team for a while," Arenas said Thursday, explaining the speech he gave to his teammates on the plane. "It's fun when you're winning. But when you're not winning, it's depressing a little bit. The same guys are here, but we're going to have to approach especially the young guys the game seriously." Wait a minute. This was Agent Zero? Talking about being serious? Was he having an out-of-body experience or something? "He said next year's totally different no playing around," forward Andray Blatche said. "I was surprised. I was like, 'Is this Gil?'" With the 19-63 campaign mercifully over and new coach Flip Saunders not expected to formally take the job until next week, there was time for lots of Gilbertology on Thursday as the Wizards took their end-of-season physicals. Speaking for more than 15 minutes,A renas addressed his reputation for being " uncoachable," his ongoing comeback from knee surgery, his "smoke and mirrors" public persona and his unexpected lecture aboard the team plane. Arenas said the talk was meant to bridge the divide between the team's professional, serious veterans and the young players, whosep regame jokes and pranks seem more befitting of a high school locker room. "To be honest, I'm a goofball," Arenas said. "But when I step inside those lines, it's serious. Some of them don't know how to turn that on and off. I told them, it comes with time. You've got to put your work in the summer because we're coming at you. It's everybody for themselves." One player who didn't hear Arenas was cocaptain Caron Butler, who said he was watching the movie "The Notebook" on the plane. Told of Arenas' comments, Butler said: "It's about time for that talk to be coming out of his mouth." Arenas' returned to the court March 28 against Detroit, ending a two-year span in w hich he had three left knee operations, m issed 156 of 173 games and signed a $111 million, six-year contract. But he played in that game and only one other, raising suspicions that his knee was again giving him prob lems. Arenas said the knee is fine, and that the two games were all the doctors needed tos ee. "They were comfortable with the two games I gave them," Arenas said. "So I decided after those two games I played, let's just think about next season. I'm getting killed this season anyway, might as well just add to it. Somebody has to be smart here and focus on what's to come. It's a five-year investment, not a one-year pressure to deliver." Arenas said his offseason regimen will include 1,000 shots per day in May and June, and he plans to do football-related workouts to increase his leg strength. Former Wizards coach Eddie Jordan didn't coin the term Gilbertology without good reason. Arenas is the first to admit his per sonality has its quirks, but he said a lot of his self-marketing act is truly just an act begun after he was originally snubbed for 2006 AllStar game. "I'm more smoke and mirrors than anything," Arenas said. "Once I got snubbed, I felt if I talked a little trash, people would actually hear it and see it. And then it started working, so I kept going with it. ... Since I saidI was the 'East Coast Assassin,' everybody started paying attention like, oh yeah, he's gotten better." C M Y K C M Y K SPORTS TRIBUNE SPORTS FRIDAY, APRIL 17, 2009, PAGE 9 You’ll wonder how you ever got along without it. 2 0 0 9 C r e a t i v e R e l a t i o n s . n e t 322-2188/9 Ill SPORTS IN BRIEF n B ASKETBALL MEMPHIS, Tenn. Associated Press MEASURING progress with the Memphis Grizzlies isn't easy. For perhaps the f irst time in a couple years, t hey see signs of improvem ent. And strong reasons for hope. "I think we're very happy and fortunate where we are now," guard Mike Conley said. "We've come a long way through the coaching change and different things. I think finally, in the last month of the season, we really started to gel together. Hopefully, we've laid a foundation to build upon." The Grizzlies posted a 2458 record, a two-win improvement over last year, and they even capped the season by beating the Atlanta Hawks 98-90 in the finale W ednesday night. That tied them for fifth-worst record in the NBA with Minnesota. One measure of progress? And yes, it's a bit small. "Just having 4-game win streaks and things like that, shows an improvement," Hakim Warrick said. Still, this is a team that won only 11 games before Marc Iavaroni was fired as coach in January and replaced byL ionel Hollins. The Grizzlies went 13-26 under Hollins who has job security for next season as he tries to add more wins and grow this team. "I'm very happy with w here we are. The young guys have developed a cama raderie. We move the ball, we play better together. Our offense flows a lot better most nights. We have gotten better individually," Hollins said. He likes how Marc Gasol, Conley, Rudy Gay and O.J. Mayo, the No. 3 pick in the draft, improved together. The next step is adding more talent to the bench to avoid having to play starters so much. Gay, Mayo, Conley and Gasol each played at least 30 minutes per game this season. Hollins wants more rebounding and more scoring from the bench as well. Only Charlotte scored fewer than Memphis' 93.8 points per game, and the Grizzlies were last in the NBA with 38.8 rebounds per game. G rizzlies see signs of improvement Arenas wants to shed Wizards’ ‘goofball’ image WASHINGTON Wizards guard G ilbert Arenas signs a ball after their NBA basketball practice in Washington Friday, March 27, 2009. n BASKETBALL A ssociated Press WITH THE NBA playoffs starting up this weekend, LeBron James is feeling like a kid all over again. The Cleveland Cavaliers player led his team to a league best 66-16 record this season, and the 24-year-old star is one of the main contenders to win his first MVP award. But it's the NBA title he is craving. "The playoffs is like taking the kid to the candy story," James said. "We all know that it's a new season now." The Cavs face the Detroit Pistons in the first round of the playoffs, and they will host the first game on Saturday. The Pistons, which finished third in the Central Division, are the only team in the playoffs with a losing record (39-43 But that doesn't mean that James and his gang are going to take them lightly. "There's no way you can overlook the Pistons. This is a team that's been to the Eastern Conference finals like six years in a row," James said. "We know how experienced that team is. We know how powerful and dangerous that team is." Another strong team in the league is the Boston Celtics. But the defending champions may have lost star Kevin Garnett for the entire playoffs because of a knee injury that has limited him to four games over the final two months of the season. "KG has to do what's best for him. He doesn't want to do something that can hurt him for a long period of time," James said. "The team may be a little bit down, but they still have a lot of veteran guys." James is the key to Cleveland's success. He finished second in the league's scoring chart with 28.4 points per game, but he's about more thanj ust putting points on the scoreboard. "My game is geared around making my teammates better," said James, who also has a documentary called "More Than a Game" coming out in October. "The way I play theg ame of basketball automatically gives my teammates the ball just because I like to pass very unselfish basketball player." And while James also said this season was his best yet as a pro player, he's also preparedt o keep improving, saying that every part of his game could still get better. James was drafted by the Cavaliers out of high school in 2003, and he has spent his entire professional career in Cleveland. Win or lose thisy ear, that's not likely to change. James feeling like a kid again ahead of playoffs C LEVELAND C avaliers' LeBron James, front, is fouled by Indiana Pacers' Rasho Nesterovic, of Slovenia, in the first half of an NBA basketball game in Indianapolis, Monday, April 13, 2009. M i c h a e l C o n r o y / A P P h o t o

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n BASKETBALL ATLANTA Asociated Press AS THE Atlanta Hawks wrapped up their first practice of a new season, Mike Wood-s on implored his team to take a dvantage of this once-in-adecade opportunity. "Mentally, we've got to step it up a notch," the coach told his players, gathered around him Thursday in the middle of their Philips Arena practice court. But one thing is clear with out extra time in the film room: The Hawks must stop check that, slow down Dwyane Wade if they want to advance to the second round of the playoffs for the first time since 1999, which also was the last time they had home-court advantage. M-V-3 is the league's leading scorer, a guy who literally took a young Miami Heat team on his back and lifted them back to the playoffs after a 15-win season. He's a guard on a mission, still angry about those who wondered if he'd seen his best days after two injury plagued seasons. Now, he's ready to take his well-controlled wrath out on the Hawks in what appears to be the most intriguing Eastern Conference series of the open ing round. Game 1 is Sunday night in Atlanta. "Oh, man, I don't think any body shuts him down. He's proven that this year," Hawks forward Marvin Williams said. "But we have some athletic guys who can really help out. Whoever has the assignment of guarding him is going to have a tough assignment, but they'll know the rest of the team has their back." Atlanta did a good job on Wade in two regular-season games. He hit only 9-of-24 shots in a December matchup, then was limited to a pair of free throws one of his most effective weapons in a February loss to the Hawks. He scored 21 points in each, nine below his league-best average of 30.2. But Wade torched Atlanta for 35 points on 13-of-19 shooting (plus 9-of-10 foul shots Miami's lone victory over the Hawks this season (He sat out the teams' final regular-season meeting Tuesday, a meaningless game with both teams already locked into the 4-5 seeds in the East). "He's just relentless in get ting to the basket," said Joe Johnson, the Hawks' leading scorer. "He shoots a lot of free throws. It's tough. Everybody, all five guys, have really got to be in sync trying to stop him." Woodson shrugged off the inevitable questions about shutting down Wade, stressing that Miami is not a one-man team. Four other players averaged in double figures, led by rookie Michael Beasley at 13.9, and several Atlanta players mentioned 3-point specialist Daequan Cook, who scored nearly two-thirds of his field goals from beyond the arc. "It's not our job to sit here and just try to figure out how to stop Dwyane Wade," Woodson said. "I don't think you can do that. Their supporting case was good enough to get them into the fifth spot this year. I look at the Miami Heat as the Miami Heat, as a team, and we've got to figure that out." In three games that mattered during the regular season, Atlanta held the Heat to just under 84 points a game, far below its 98.1 average. Again, Woodson doesn't much stock in what happened before the playoffs. C M Y K C M Y K SPORTS PAGE 10, FRIDAY, APRIL 17, 2009 TRIBUNE SPORTS CYCLING WEDNESDAY CLASH THE New Providence Cycling Association continued its Wednesday Cycling Clash at the one mile cycling track at the Queen Elizabeth Sports Center. Two cyclists started at opposite sides of the track, each doing 6 laps. With heads bent and concentration written on their faces, it was tempting to slip a glance to see exactly where the competition was. Here’s how they finished: Justin Minnis – 4 4 . . 4 4 0 0 . . 4 4 4 4 . . Antinece Simmons – 4 4 . . 4 4 9 9 . . 2 2 8 8 . . Lashane Dean – 4 4 . . 2 2 3 3 . . 0 0 6 6 . . Henry Kline – 4 4 . . 3 3 0 0 . . 1 1 2 2 . . Anthony Colebrook – 4 4 . . 0 0 3 3 . . 3 3 8 8 . . Robert Bethel – 4 4 . . 0 0 8 8 . . 5 5 3 3 Van Demeritte – 4 4 . . 1 1 1 1 . . 9 9 1 1 . . Eugene Heastie – 4 4 . . 2 2 5 5 . . 4 4 1 1 (Track bike Larry Russell – 6 6 . . 4 4 2 2 . . 6 6 6 6 Next Wednesday, the competitors will compete in a kilo race. BASEBALL FREEDOM FARM SCHEDULE Here’s a look at the schedule for the Freedom Farm Baseball League this weekend in Yamacraw: T T B B A A L L L L : : F F r r i i d d a a y y 6 pm Jujus vs Sea Grapes S S a a t t u u r r d d a a y y 9 am Coco Plums vs Guineps 10:15 am Dillies vs Jujus C C O O A A C C H H P P I I T T C C H H : : F F r r i i d d a a y y 7:30 pm Sandflies vs Green Turtles S S a a t t u u r r d d a a y y 11:30 am Mosquitoes vs Boas 1 pm Green Turtles vs Bees 3 pm Wasps vs Sandflies S S u u n n d d a a y y 3 pm Wasps vs Mosquitoes 9 9 1 1 0 0 : : F F r r i i d d a a y y 6 pm Octopus vs Eels S S a a t t u u r r d d a a y y 9 am Turbots vs Red Snap p er 10:30 a m Eels vs Barracudas S S u u n n d d a a y y 4:30 pm Eelsvs Turbots 1 1 1 1 1 1 2 2 F F r r i i d d a a y y 7:30 pm Conchs vs Iguanas S S a a t t u u r r d d a a y y 11 am Hurricanes vs Divers Noon Groupers vs Marlins 1 pm Hurricanes vs Divers 3:30 pm Parrots vs Iguanas S S u u n n d d a a y y 3 pm Conchs vs Marlins 4:30 pm Crowns vs Parrots 1 1 3 3 1 1 5 5 : : S S a a t t u u r r d d a a y y 9 am Sharks vs Owlz 1 pm Potcakes vs Stingrays 3 pm Silverjacks vs Sharks 1 1 6 6 1 1 8 8 : : S S u u n n d d a a y y 2:30 pm Arawaks vs Lucayans 4 pm Tainos vs Caribs TARYN SMITH, second in the girls 11-12 100 butterfly in 1:10.62, DIONISIO CAREY, fourth in the boys 11-12 butterfly in 1:09.17. MAYA ALBURY, second in the girls 13-14 100 butterfly in 1:09.56 and BRIA DEVEAUX, sev enth in 1:10.47. EVANTE GIBSON, second in the boys 13-14 100 butterfly in 1:01.80. MCKAYLA LIGHTBOURN, fourth in the girls 15-17 100 butterfly in 1:09.07 and ARIEL WEECH, seventh in 1:11.27. During the evening sessions, the official opening cer emonies took place. The meet will continue with two sessions today starting at 8:30 am and 3:30 pm. The championships will conclude on Sunday. The Bahamas is hoping to improve on its third place finish last year behind the com bined French Antilles and Trinidad & Tobago. Bahamas wins first medal FROM page 11 sports NOTES n B y BRENT STUBBS Senior Sports Reporter bstubbs@tribunemedia.net COACH Geno Bullard said his No Bull Basketball Club was in no mood for fooling around during a tour of Canada last week. The club returned home having secured athletic scholarships for at least five of the players with a number of the others being considered for the future. We are working on getting a ll of the paperwork completed f or the players before we make an official announcement on exactly where they are going,” Bullard said. “But the coaches we have been in contact with have been very impressed with the players and they are all eager in getting them into their programme in August.” Bullard, who also coaches at Westminster College, said the trip was quite a success with the team playing in a number of exhibition games against local colleges such as Ridley College, Seneca College, York University, Niagara College and Humber College. “It wasn’t so much about winning basketball games,” Bullard said. “We went there to get the exposure for the players at the college level. “But a lot of the coaches were surprised to learn that our players were still in college. They didn’t believe that the way the players played that they were not ready for college. They have indicated that they will keep an interest in the players for the future.” During their trip, No Bull also attended the National Basketball Association game between the Toronto Raptors and the Philadelphia 76ers. “We really had a good time on the tour,” Bullard said. “All of the schools treated us very well. They made us felt as if we were right at home.” Now that they are back home, Bullard said the emphasis will be placed on ensuring that the players who have secured the scholarships will be ready to make the trip once their paperwork is complete. Additionally, Bullard said his club will begin preparation for their summer programme, which includes a tour and exhibition series in Cuba. The No Bull Basketball Club will also be participating in a number of local tournaments in New Providence and Grand Bahama where they have enjoyed a great deal of success. Bullard has indicated that as a recruiter for at least five colleges and universities in Canada, he is willing to assist any local basketball player if they are interested in furthering their education. “They don’t have to be a member of the No Bull Basketball Club,” he said. “Once they have an interest and are willing to make the transition, we can help them out.” Interested persons can contact Bullard through email nobullitd@hotmail.com or visit their website at nobulllimited.page.tl No Bull BasketballClub returns from successful trip Stopping D-Wade: Hawks facing NBAs top scorer e went there to get t he exposure for the players at the college level.” G eno Bullard ATLANTA Hawks center Al Horford, left, drives against Miami Heat forward Michael Beasley, right, during the first quarter, of an NBA basketball game at Philips Arena, Tuesday, April 14, 2009 in Atlanta. Gregory Smith/ AP Photo

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n By BRENT STUBBS S enior Sports Reporter bstubbs@tribunemedia.net McKAYLA Lightbourn, one of the most decorated Bahami an swimmers at last year’s Carifta Swimming Championships, picked up where she left off at this year’s event. As a member of the 36strong team competing in Savaneta, Aruba, Lightbourn picked up the Bahamas’ lone medal on the first day of com petition yesterday. In one of the two finals cont ested during the morning session, Lightbourn posted a winning time of nine minutes and 14.88 seconds to secure the gold in the girls 15-17 800 metre freestyle. Her nearest rival was Trinidad & Tobago’s Saman tha Rahael, who clocked 9:22.26 for the silver. The bronze went to Laura Butler of the Cayman Islands in 9:48.26. Another Bahamian Amber Weech was sixth in the race in 10:02.13 as she improved on her personal best time of 10:07.96. T he other final contested was in the girls 13-14 800 freestyle. Two Bahamians competed in that event, but the best finish came from Bria Deveaux in a PR of 10:14.57, surpassing her previous best of 10:23.46. Riquel Rolle was 13th in 11:00.82. Martinique’s Julie-Anne Malidor took the gold in 9:31.48 with the silver going to Trinidad & Tobago’s Kimber John Williams in 9:32.80 and the bronze to Cayman Island’s Lara Butler in 9:48.26. McKayla also made the final of two other events to join a number of Bahamians who advanced for a shot at a medal in 13 of the 18 other preliminary events staged in the morning session. Swimmers advancing are as follows: L AURA MORLEY, s econd in the g irls 11-12 200 breaststroke heats in 2:53.31. DUSTIN TYNES, first in the boys 11-12 200 breaststroke in 2:40.35 with Dionisio Carey, third in 2:51.95. EVANTE GIBSON, second in the boys 13-14 200 breaststroke in 2:40.54 and Toby McCarroll, third in 2:41.04. MCKAYLA LIGHTBOURN, first in the girls 15-17 200 breaststroke in 2:48.67 and SHAUNTE MOSS, seventh in 3:02.55. JACINDA WILLIAMS, seventh in the girls 11-12 50 backstroke in 35.51. D IONISIO CAREY, t hird in the boys 11-12 50 backstroke in 31.61 and DYLAN CASH, seventh in 34.07. LARON MORLEY, eighth in the boys 13-14 50 backstroke in 31.02. ARIEL WEECH, second in the girls 15-17 50 backstroke in 31.84. C M Y K C M Y K FRIDAY, APRIL 17, 2009 THETRIBUNE PAGE 11 I NSIDE International sports news n By BRENT STUBBS Senior Sports Reporter bstubbs@tribunemedia.net MARK Knowles and Mahesh Bhupathi will have to wait a little longer before they play their first match at the Monte Carlo Rolex Masters Tournament. The Bahamian-Indian connection was scheduled to play their opener in the second round yesterday, but heavy rain in Monaco forced the postponement of the match until today. “We’re ready to play,” said Knowles in an interview with The Tribune from his hotel room yesterday. “We just couldn’t play because of the heavy rain. Only one match was played. But we hope to play tomorrow.” Knowles and Bhupthai, the number four seeds in the tournament, are scheduled to play against the unseeded team of Feliciano Lopez and Fernando Verdasco, both from Spain. But they will have to wait until Verdasco p lay his singles match against number three s eed Novak Djokovic from Serbia. Verdasco i s the number seven seed in singles. “They gave us a very tough match right out of the gate,” Knowles pointed out. “So we will have to be ready to go and play from the start. “Verdasco and Lopez are a pretty good team. But we feel confident that we can play well enough to get to the next round.” If they are successful, Knowles and Bhupathi will have to play their quarter-final m atch against the unseeded team of Djokovic a nd his compatriot Viktor Troicki. It doesn’t get any easier for us,” Knowles said. “There are a lot of tough teams in our draw, but we just have to be ready to play andI think we are.” Knowles and Bhupathi reached the final of this tournament last year and he’s hoping that they will not just get back there, but go all the way and win the title this time around. If they advance to the semifinal, Knowles and Bhupathi could possibly end up playing against the No.2 seeded team of Daniel Nestor of Canada and Nenad Zimonjic from Serbia. Knowles and Nestor were former partners, having split up after playing together for more than 10 years. They were considered one of the most successful partners, winning just about every tournament except Wimbledon. After their spilt three years ago, Knowles teamed up with Bhupathi. The duo got off to a great start this year, playing in the final of the Australian Open where they lost to the American identical twin brothers Bob and Mike Bryan. They also played in the semi’s of a tournament in Sydney. But since January, the duo have not had a winning streak. “We lost in some big tournaments,” Knowles said. “But we’re hoping that we can get back to the level that we were in January and eventually turn things around.” Knowles, Bhupathi match rained out Bahamas wins first medal McKayla Lightbourn SEE page 10 There are a lot of tough teams in our draw, but we just have to be ready to play and I think we are.” MARK KNOWLES H EAVY r ain in Monaco forced the postponement of the first match for Mark Knowles (backgroundforeground F i l e p h o t o A P P h o t o

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WINNERS OF THE 4-5 YEARS CATEGORY 1st JAIAIRE BRENNEN 2 nd S UMMER BURROWS 3 rd A RIANNA JOHNSON W INNER OF THE 6-8 YEARS CATEGORY 1 st R HYAN ROBERTS 2nd TAMERA CAMBRIDGE 3rd SARAI BAIN W INNERS OF THE 9-10 YEARS CATEGORY 1st BERTRAM MURRAY 2 nd A BISHAI BENEBY 3rd GLENWITTE RUSSELL JUDGES GINA BETHEL Tribune Classified/Advertising Agent LLOYD ALLENTribune Features Reporter C ARA BETHELT ribune Features Editor LASHANTA DUGAYKelly's Home Centre Representative JANELL BRENNENKelly's Home Centre Representative C M Y K C M Y K LOCAL NEWS PAGE 12, FRIDAY, APRIL 17, 2009 THE TRIBUNE 2009 CONTEST EASTER COLOURING n The Tribune and Kelly’s Home Centre are pleased to announce the winners of the 2009 Easter Colouring Contest. The judges had the difficult task of determining the winners following the submission of hundreds of pic tures by children between the ages of four and 10. Pictured are the first, second and third place winners in the three age categories with their prizes fabulous Easter baskets, all donated by Kelly’s. T HE Colouring Contest winners with their Easter baskets. Not pictured are Summer Burrows, second place w inner in the 4-5 years category, and Abishai Beneby, second place winner in the 9-10 years category. J AIAIRE BRENNEN, f irst place winner i n the 4-5 years age category. TAMERA CAMBRIDGE, second place winner in the 6-8 years category. S ARAI BAIN, t hird place winner in the 6-8 years category. BERTRAM MURRAY, first place w inner in the 9-10 years category. G LENWITTE RUSSELL, third place winner in the 9-10 years category. ARIANNA JOBSON, third place winner in the 4-5 years category. R HYAN ROBERTS, f irst place winner in the 6-8 years category.

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C M Y K C M Y K SECTIONB business@tribunemedia.net FRIDAY, APRIL 17, 2009 THETRIBUNE $4. 68 $4. 51 $4. 69T he information contained is from a third p arty and The Tribune can not be held responsible for errors and/or omission from the daily report.$ $3.48 $3.63 $3.48 for a better lifeMORTGAGE SALES OFFICES: NASSAU I FREEPORT I ABACO I ELEUTHERA I EXUMA I CORPORATE CENTRE: EAST BAY STREET I www.famguardbahamas.com call our mortgage department today at396-4000 (Nassau, 352-3670 (Freeport A SUBSIDIARY OF A MBESTA-ExcellentFinancialStrengthRating home ownership rent forever wait to inherit a home live with your in-lawsown your own home for as little as 5% down n By NEIL HARTNELL Tribune Business Editor The Government does not “appreciate the value” offered by Bahamian engineers and other associated professionals, an attorney/environmental consultant said yesterday, and as a result it fails to ensure they get a “piece of the pie” from the many foreign direct investment projects attracted to this nation. Romauld Ferreira, an attorney and partner in Ferreira & Company attorneys-at-law, told a Bahamas Society of Engineers (BSE fession and others were being “ring-fenced out of opportuni ties for work” by foreign developers who brought their readymade engineering, environmental and project management teams to the Bahamas with them. Mr Ferreira explained that “the biggest problem we find” is that foreign engineering firms, brought in to work on Bahamas-based projects, were increasingly owned or partowned by the same financial groups financing the developer who hired them. This, in turn, allowed project financiers to generate earnings streams from these developments in several different ways. “If we can’t make it here, we’ll all be in trouble,” Mr Ferreira warned. “Our challenge, then, is to break this sort of ring-fencing. We know this to be a very seri ous concern, and a huge prob lem. “When they [foreign developers] come into a country, they’ve done all of this. “Because the Government is run by a bunch of lawyers, they’re less enthusiastic about ensuring Bahamian engineers Government does not ‘appreciate the value’ of engineers Bringing exports back into ‘fashion’ Illiteracy woes are ‘devastating’ for economy * Undervaluation of talents by decision-makers means Bahamian engineers and other professionals not getting ‘their piece of the pie’ from major development projects * Bahamians must overcome ‘ring fencing’ of foreign direct investment projects * BEC Board mandates Corporation’s engineers to contract-out as much work as possible locally SEE page 5B n B y NEIL HARTNELL Tribune Business Editor High illiteracy levels among Bahamian public high school l eavers have “devastating implications” for the economy at a t ime when the foundations of its long-standing business model are l ikely to undergo rapid change, a New Providence telling Tribune Business the situation would make this nation “progressively less competitive”. R alph Massey, a founding member of the Nassau Institute e conomic think-tank, told this newspaper that the English and m athematical illiteracy prevalent among many high school gradu ates would depress workforce productivity and skills, leaving the Bahamian economy less able to adapt to the changes being forced upon it by rules-based t rading regimes and the OECD/G-20 assault on interna t ional financial centres. In a presentation to a Nassau I nstitute meeting on Wednesday night, Mr Massey drew on the research finding from his The Learning Crisis essay to show that, based on the 2006 BGCSEr esults, 39 per cent of New Providence high school students who s at the English exam failed, while another 17 per cent were “lang uage illiterate”. As for mathematics, the findings were even more shocking * Top economist says education failings leave unproductive workforce ‘less able to adapt’ to rapid changes free trade, financial regulation will force on Bahamas and way it conducts business * ‘You can’t have the levels of illiteracy that prevail here continue to be pumped out into society’, as economy becomes ‘progressively less competitive’ SEE page 4B n By NEIL HARTNELL Tribune Business Editor The Bahamas Telecommunications Company ( BTC) is conducting an assessment of its “entire” cel lular phone card distribution network, Tribune Business was told yesterday, examin ing whether the market that nets the company $10-$12 million per month is operating at “optimal efficiency” a nd is not over-saturated with vendors. Marlon Johnson, BTC’s vice-president of sales and marketing, said the assess ment would take place over the next month-and-a-half, BTC to assess cellular card distribution * Study of ‘whole platform’ to look at market efficiency, best practices, whether there is vendor oversupply and market transparency/elimination of any predatory practices * BTC earning $10-$12m per month from pre-paid card sales, with 90 per cent of cellular customers – some 300,000 – on this platform * Planning revised post-paid package SEE page 4B n By CHESTER ROBARDS Business Reporter crobards@tribunemedia.net SOUTHAMPTON, Bermuda – Receivers for the Bimini Big Game Resort have already received interest in the property from prospective, a senior executive with KPMG (Bahamas Tribune Business yesterday. The property, though only closed for several months, would need moderate capital investment. Simon Townend, head of Bahamas-based KPMG Corporate Finance, said the receivers were considering all available options with regard to the future of the resort. “We were only just appointed receivers recently, so we’re still looking at all the options. I can’t categorically say, but certainly the property is on the market,” he said. “There already has been interest. It’s got a lot of history, so people know what’s happening and quite a few have already expressed interest.” The owners of the resort shut down operations late last year, left the staff with unpaid wages and were never heard from again. Now, a Cayman Islands-based company is looking to recover the loan it made to finance the Bimini Big Game Resort. “The company has a reason able level of liabilities to various Receivers: Buyer interest in Bimini resort already seen SEE page 2B n By NEIL HARTNELL T ribune Business Editor A Bahamian fashion industry could provide this nation with a k ey source of foreign currency from export earnings, the head organiser of a Nassau-based fashion show told Tribune Business yesterday, hoping that his event -w hich is set to expand in its second year will help stimulate locald esigners. Owen Bethel, president and c hief executive of Bahamian financial services provider, the Montaque Group, said the Islands of t he World Fashion Week will stage its second appearance on N ovember 4-8, 2009, and likely feature an expanded designer line* Islands of the World Fashion Week to expand beyond 35 designers from 2008 after winning Caribbean award * Organiser urges tourism to look at his event and others as source of divesification, and hopes to build up Bahamian fashion industry as exporter/foreign currency earner SEE page 2B Owen Bethel n By NEIL HARTNELL Tribune Business Editor “At least half” of all school leaver applicants who apply for jobs at City Markets are rejected because they cannot pass the company’s basic maths test, its human resources head has revealed to Tribune Business, describing the recruitment and productivity issues facing it and other Bahamian companies as “brutal” and “scary”. Peter Goudie told this newspaper: “It’s absolutely brutal. What we all run into, and it’s not just me, is that most of the kids looking for work in our industry can’t get past the basic maths test. We turn down most of those who apply.” He explained that the test used by the 12-store grocery chain, whose immediate holding company is publicly-owned Bahamas Supermarkets, tested simple addition, subtraction, multiplication and recognition. “It’s so basic it would scare y ou,” Mr Goudie told Tribune B usiness. When asked how many job applicants City Markets, which employs 800 persons in New Providence and Grand Bahama, rejected, Mr Goudie said: “Maybe at least half.” Most were high school leavers. His revelations capture the stark reality facing many Bahamian school leavers, especially those who are functionally illiterate in maths and English. Not only are the unfit toj oin the workforce, many lack the social and life skills they will need as adults. All this translates into a Bahamian workforce with rela tively low productivity, and an uncompetitive economy. This was captured by Bahamasbased economist Ralph Massey who, using the research from his T he Learning Crisis e ssay, s howed that based on the 2006 B GCSE results, 39 per cent of New Providence high school students who sat the English exam failed, while another 17 per cent were “language illiterate”. As for mathematics, the find ings were even more shocking -3 6 per cent of all New Providence h igh school leavers failed BGCSE m aths in 2006, and another 46 per cent were deemed numerically illiterate they did not know the difference between addition and subtraction. M r Goudie, emphasising that most entry-level jobs at City Markets were “very basic”, such as shelf-stacking, said the high City Markets rejects %’ of job seekers Human resources head says recruitment, productivity ‘scary a nd brutal’ F ears that education woes will cause Bahamian economy and f irms to ‘be swallowed’ up by better prepared foreign rivals S EE page 3B

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u p after its debut won the event the Caribbean’s Best Fashion Show Award. Mr Bethel, who this week returned from being presentedw ith the award at the Caribbean Fashion Awards ceremony in Barbados, told Tribune Business that interest in Islands of the W orld meant designer numbers in 2009 were likely to increase over last year, forcing him to abandon initial plans to lower them. He explained: “Based on my visit to Barbados, where a number of designers were at the event, there appears to be significant interest from a number of B arbadian designers. Trinidad has endorsed it, and looking at sending a significant number of Trinidadian designers to it. “Last year, we had 35 designe rs, and I anticipated we were looking to reduce it this year to 2 0-25. But I’ve been told, simply from the event in Barbados, that we’re really going to have to look at increasing the numbers as o pposed to decreasing them. I a nticipate it will be a significant showing this year.” Mr Bethel said the Islands of the World Fashion Week wouldl ikely be able to leverage additional interest in the show via both the Fashion Show of the Year Award, and the staging of t he Miss Universe Pageant at A tlantis this summer. “The Award that we just got, which has significant bearing among designers and the fashioni ndustry in the Caribbean, places the Bahamas on the map regionally,” Mr Bethel told Tribune Business, adding that the Miss U niverse Pageant would place t his nation at the “forefront” internationally. “We should be able to capture that, and harness that to the a dvantage of events like Islands of the World, making sure similar events catch the eye, and making sure the Bahamas continues to a ct as a location for these types of a ctivity going forward.” The increased number of designers, and their entourages, for Islands of the World FashionW eek 2009 was likely to bring short-term occupancy benefits for the Bahamian hotel industry at a time when it was much-needed. B ut, long-term, Mr Bethel indic ated that he hoped the fashion show would both help diversify the Bahamian tourism product and stimulate renewed interest int he industry from Bahamian designers, ultimately leading to the creation of an indigenous Bahamian fashion sector. A rguing that events such as I slands of the World Fashion Week and the Bahamas International Film Festival were “necess ary for our product diversifica tion:, Mr Bethel said such events h eld throughout the calendar year were “a direction the tourism industry needs to look at”. He added: “The beauty and importance of the fashion indus-t ry is it’s an export if you can develop it locally. More so fromt he fashion side, where you have local designers able to export t heir products and their designs. That type of income not only focuses on diversification of the tourism product, but diversification of the broader economy.” B ased on feedback from the 2008 fashion show, Mr Bethel said: “A number of persons have looked at it with renewed energy, o thers had not looked at it before. I think the fact that the event took place here, and those who attended and had an interest in the industry before saw it at a dif-f erent level, helped people see the potential for where the industry could go. A concerted effort is needed, and it’s not going to happ en overnight, but it could really g et the industry going.” Mr Bethel said fashion design, and garment production, almost lent themselves to a “cottagei ndustry”, where designers and those involved in manufacture could work at home. The former could outsource p roduction to the latter, he e xplained, with no one person having to bear all the start-up costs and manufacturing costs. M r Bethel said the Islands of the World Fashion Week in 2008 h ad shown Bahamian designers the quality, standards and level of designs being produced elsewhere, challenging them to match and exceed this. He also urgedB ahamian designers “from the next generation”, those withp otential, to participate in the 2009 version, and pledged to w ork closely with the Bahamas Technical and Vocational Insti tute (BTVI involved. C M Y K C M Y K BUSINESS PAGE 2B, FRIDAY, APRIL 17, 2009 THE TRIBUNE 7$
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n By CHESTER ROBARDS Business Reporter c robards@tribunemedia.net SOUTHAMPTON, Bermuda – All indicators point to the global travela ndtourism economy’s Gross Domestic Product (GDP contracting by 3.5 per cent this year, with 4 per cent growth expected after year-end 2010,a ccording to the World Travel and Tourism Council (WTTC The WTTC foreshadowed a tough year for the Bahamas t ourism industry, with increm ental growth through next year. The Caribbean product was e stimated to contract by a “staggering” 7.9 per cent this y ear. The WTTC’s president and c hief executive, Jean-Claude Baumgarten, told an audience of Caribbean tourism market stakeholders – mostly investors and developers att he 13th annual Caribbean H otel and Tourism Investment Conference that the negative impact on the tourism sector for 2009 looked extremely “worrying”. H owever, he reassured them that Caribbean tourism’s real GDP growth would occur at an average 3.3 per cent per annum over the next1 0 years. According to the WTTC’s findings, quarterly travel spending data pointed to ar apid slowdown in the third quarter of 2008, with a further d eterioration occurring by year-end. Year-on-year air passenger a rrivals to the Caribbean contracted, from September of last year into December, by 4.6 per cent, a trend that has continued into 2009. Concern Airlift has been a paramount concern for travel and tourism-dependent nations,o ne Mr Baumgarten said must be at the forefront of the strategy to right-size the tourism sector in the Caribbean. The WTTC findings showed t he Bahamas Travel and Tourism Economy GDP growing by 3.4 per cent annually over the next 10 years,b eginning marginally with 1 per cent growth next year. T hat figure puts the Bahamas above Cuba, which is projected to show growth of 2.7 per cent over the next 10 years, but places this country moderately behind the Netherlands Antilles, Martinique, St Kitts and Nevis, Bermuda and several other Caribbean nations. The Caribbean itself is projected to grow by around 3.3 per cent over 10 years. Statistics show that regional government expenditure growth of some 0.7 per cent is “sub-optimal” to reverse the short-term contraction of the sector. I n 2009, total demand for the Travel and Tourism prod-u ct in the Caribbean region is e xpected to shrink, along with business travel, capital investm ents and employment. However, according to Mr B aumgarten, there is an unwav ering confidence in the Caribbean tourism market. And markets in this region should be prepared for its medium and long-termg rowth. Long-term prospects in the travel and tourism industry are supported thanks to the c ontinued rapid expansion of e merging destinations, along w ith the global increase in per capita income,” said Mr Baumgarten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failure rate of applicants to meet the company’s standards raised disturbing questions about the job and social prospects for those it rejected. “You’ve got to have someone who can understand. That’s the problem,” he explained. “If they haven’t got the basics, and can operate a job stacking shelves in the food store, where to they go from there. “It’s really bad, period. Productivity is very poor, obviously. If someone’s not got the basic cognitive skills, and basic understanding, then they’re not going to be very productive. It’s stressful.” Presentation I n a presentation to a Nassau Institute meeting on Wednesday night, Mr Massey said of his findings: “In a world where knowledge is growing so fast, and the Bahamas is in a status quo situation on its education system, the learning gap between the Bahamas and the rest of the world will continue to grow. The disadvantages facing the country will only grow if nothing is going to change.” Andre Rollins, head of the Bahamas Dental Association, during the audience question and answer session, said Mr Massey’s findings showed that the Bahamian workforce and wider economy would simply be unable to compete in the free trade era that was upon the country. The structure and model the Bahamian econ omy has been based upon, and the rules governing how its firms conduct business, are under pressure from the rules-based trading regimes this country is being required to join the Economic Partnership Agreement (EPA pean Union, the World Trade Organisation (WTO and future trade deals with the US and Canada. Then there is the OECD/G-20 assault on the Bahamian financial services industry, at a time when the Bahamian workforce is not wellequipped to handle and manage all these enforced changes. Mr Rollins said: “In this whole move to a globalised economy, with the EPA and trend to open up all borders, we will be swallowed up by persons more prepared to take advantage of a globalised economy because of our years of failure.” As a first step towards reforming the Bahamia n education system, Mr Massey suggested that the Department of Education be reconstituted as a Corporation out of reach of political control and influence. When asked about the former PLP and current FNM governments’ approach to the proposals on reform submitted by the private sector/trade union Coalition for Education Reform, Mr Massey replied: “It’s a discouraging process. “The Coalition for Education Reform started in 2004. It took the [former PLP] Government six months to formally recognise receipt of their proposals. The PLP education minister never talked to the Coalition except for one five-minute con versation at a cocktail party at Atlantis. “The FNM came in, and it took them a long time to sit down with the Coalition. There is an apparent desire not to listen.” City Markets rejects %’ of job seekers Tourism facing 2009 contraction FROM page 1B

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36 per cent of all New Providence high school leavers failed BGCSE m aths in 2006, and another 46 per cent were deemed numerically i lliterate they did not know the difference between addition and s ubtraction. “It’s devastating. It has devastating implications,” Mr Massey told Tribune Business of the findings’ consequences for the Bahamian economy. “That’s the only way you can look at it. “You can’t have the levels of illiteracy that prevail here continue to be pumped out into society, especially as it doesn’t have to be this way. The world is changing at what looks like lightning speed, andt he question is how this workf orce can absorb that technolog y. In a situation where you have all this new technology driving change, you can’t have a dumb workforce.” The relatively high levels of functional illiteracy among new entrants to the Bahamian workforce, and the resulting impact on productivity, held especially severe consequences for the econo my’s foundations, which are based on service exports. C ommunications skills are as v ital on the hotel and tourism i ndustry front line as maths is to financial services sector employees. “If people have problems communicating in the English language, how can the services industries be as successful as they might be, and as productive? It’s a no brainer,” Mr Massey told Tribune B usiness. A relatively poor quality workforce will also hamper theB ahamas’ ability to respond, and successfully adjust, to the gamechanging rules being forced upon the ways in which its companies and industries do business. T rading The Economic Partnership A greement (EPA pean Union will result in the Bahamas joining a rules-based t rading regime for the first time. With it comes a number of obligations that will see new rules, laws and bureaucracies created to change and govern how business is conducted in this nation. A nd, on top of that, the OECD/G-20 offensive on international financial services centres will likely forever alter the business model on which the Bahamas has largely operated for t he past 40-50 years. “What you have is a population that is less equipped toa dapt,” Mr Massey said of the education system’s woes and their implications for dealing with these changes. “The dangers are that you don’t have the businesses with which you can register suc-c ess. “It means the Bahamas is progressively less competitive, that’sw hat it means, and the learning gap between the Bahamas and other countries will increase to t he disadvantage of the Bahamas. The bottom line is that it doesn’t have to be this way. “It just accentuates the problem. We’re in a situation where all the problems of the country are b eing accentuated.” Mr Massey, who performed the research and wrote much of the 2005 report produced by the Coalition for Education Reform, and has written extensively on t he Bahamian education system’s problems, said relatively low workforce productivity onlyi ncreased the costs, inefficiencies and spending on staff training for businesses. “The inevitable consequences in the short-term are that you don’t get a lift from the work-f orce, because the people you have are the people who came out of the system in the previous1 5-20 years,” he added. Long-term, Mr Massey said the question facing the Bahamas was w hether it would take the necessary steps to reform the education system for the benefit of its economic competitiveness and social cohesion. “This is a question of whether t he country chooses to be successful or not successful,” he said. C M Y K C M Y K BUSINESS PAGE 4B, FRIDAY, APRIL 17, 2009 THE TRIBUNE FROM page 1B Illiteracy woes ‘devastating’ for economy a nd aimed to examine whether the cellular phone card distribution network was operating in line with best global practices”. “What we are doing is a current assessment exerc ise of our entire distribution network relationships with wholesalers and how cards are being dis-t ributed,” he explained. It is an exercise looking at the entire distribution n etwork. We want to make sure we’re operating o ptimally, and in accordance with best global practices.” B TC sells the pre-paid cellular phone cards, which come in denominations of $5, $10, $20, $50 and $ 100, to some 34 wholesalers, who include the likes of Let’s Talk Wireless and Tripoint. In turn, thosew holesalers sell the cards on to retailers and street vendors. M r Johnson explained that the study would also assess the distribution network’s efficiency, and whether end-user consumers the BTC pre-paid cellular network has some 300,000 subscribers had the best possible access to the cards they purchased. T he BTC executive said the state-owned telecoms provider’s study would also assess “what ought t o be the optimal number of vendors given the mar ketplace, its size and how we manage that”. T his had come in response to concerns that the pre-paid cell phone card market had too many ven dors, given the increasing number of Bahamians now selling them on the streets no doubt because they perceive it as a relatively easy, and lucrative, i ncome stream in a declining economy where many people have lost their jobs. M r Johnson acknowledged that an oversupply of vendors and cards would be “detrimental” in any m arket, but said that “heavy-handed intervention” had the potential to cause more problems than it solved through the inevitable disruption it would provoke. It was far better, he indicated, for the market itself to work out and correct any problems. S till, BTC’s vice-president for sales and marketing t old Tribune Business that the company’s study would examine “the whole phenomenon” of the rise in street phone card vendors, and assess where they fitted into the broader distribution network. We are looking at the whole platform,” Mr Johnson said. “We are making sure the distribution network is efficient, and customer and vendor appetites are served. We want to make sure we have a sense of integrit y, best practices and a system that works well for the consumer and marketplace generally that there are very transparent, clear rules for engagement, and guidelines are being followed.” H e added: “On average, we sell on our pre-paid side anywhere from $10-$12 million worth perm onth. “The pre-paid side of our business is certainly a s ignificant contributor to our bottom line. More than 90 per cent of our customers are on the pre-paid platform.” Mr Johnson said BTC sold the pre-paid cellular phone cards to wholesalers at a 25 per cent discount t o the price paid by end-users. They then sold it on to retailers for a mark-up. B TC did not fix the prices that wholesalers sold pre-paid cards at, but he added: “Part of the exercise i s to have some guidelines as to what is happening, and determine whether predatory actions are happening in the market.” Mr Johnson said that BTC “in a couple of weeks” would release “revised packages” for its post-paid c ellular product. BTC to assess cellular card distribution F ROM page 1B

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and affiliated professionals get a piece of the pie. “They don’t appreciate our value because they undervalue us, so we have to sell ourselves and show we have the capability, expertise and talent to do anything.” Mr Ferreira said Bahamian engineers and other professionals needed to work together as “a cohesive unit”, as they would achieve more by working together to “create a sense of value among the decision makers of the country, so they want what we bring to the table”. His sentiments were echoed by Robert Reiss, head of Reiss Engineering, who told the meeting that when foreign developers and their associated engineers came into the Bahamas, Bahamian firms needed to “make clear that work is kept for Bahamians” and ensure the value they brought to the process was recognised. “What is critical is how we present ourselves in conjunction with the value we have,” Mr Reiss said. “We also need to recognise o ur responsibilities, whether it’s a suit and tie, being in the right p lace or making sure people recognise our value having value, in conjunction with keeping work for Bahamians. In conjunction with government giving a push, we may get somewhere.” Mr Reiss said there were already some small signs of progress. While the consortium his firm was in had not won the contract for the configuration and site planning work at the Queen Elizabeth Sports Centre, he was pleased it had gone to another group featuring predominantly Bahamian firms. Of the eight companies in his group, Mr Reiss said six were Bahamian. He added: “My understanding on the street initially is that that contract was not going to be awarded to a Bahamian firm. While we did not win it, I’m pleased a corner was turned and it was not flipped to a foreign-owned firm.” Mandated Meanwhile, the BSE’s presi dent, Jerome Elliott, a senior Bahamas Electricity Corporation (BEC department had been mandated by the Board of Directors to send as much contracted-out engineering work as possible to Bahamian firms. “What we have been man dated to do as engineers in BEC, by our Board, is to do as much engineering work as we can with local firms,” Mr Elliott said, urging all Bahamian structural engineers to respond to a tender BEC was set to imminently issue for work on its Clifton Pier power station. Meanwhile, Mr Ferreira said the local expertise and knowledge offered by Bahamian engineers and environmental consultants was a key point of differentiation they could use to defeat foreign companies on contract bidding. “The great thing about us is that the expertise we offer is local. We are trained in Bahamian ecology, Bahamian trees, Bahamian fish, the corals that exist here. What we sell here is local expertise,” he explained. Mr Ferreira said the environmental consulting arm of his business was partnering with the College of the Bahamas (COB dents access to the same opportunities. C M Y K C M Y K BUSINESS THE TRIBUNE FRIDAY, APRIL 17, 2009, PAGE 5B 52wk-Hi52wk-LowSecurit y Previous CloseToday's CloseChangeDaily Vol.EPS $Div $P/EYield 1.951.28Abaco Markets1.281.280.000.1270.00010.10.00% 11.8011.00Bahamas Property Fund11.0011.000.000.9920.20011.11.82% 9.686.95Bank of Bahamas6.956.950.000.2440.26028.53.74%0 .990.63Benchmark0.630.630.00-0.8770.000N/M0.00% 3.743.15Bahamas Waste3.153.150.000.1050.09030.02.86% 2.601.95Fidelity Bank2.372.370.000.0550.04043.11.69% 1 4.1511.09Cable Bahamas11.0911.090.001.3090.2508.52.25% 3.142.83Colina Holdings2.832.830.000.2490.04011.41.41% 7.446.45Commonwealth Bank (S16.456.450.000.4380.05014.70.78% 5 .001.31Consolidated Water BDRs2.422.580.160.0990.05226.12.02% 3.001.89Doctor's Hospital1.891.890.000.2400.0407.92.12% 8.106.02Famguard7.767.760.000.4200.24018.53.09% 13.0111.00Finco11.0011.000.000.3220.67034.26.09% 14.6610.35FirstCaribbean Bank10.4010.400.000.7940.40013.13.85% 6.045.00Focol (S5.105.100.000.3370.15015.12.94%1 .001.00Focol Class B Preference1.001.000.000.0000.000N/M0.00% 1.000.30Freeport Concrete0.300.300.000.0350.0008.60.00% 8.205.50ICD Utilities5.595.590.000.4070.50013.78.94% 12.508.60J. S. Johnson10.5010.500.000.9520.64011.06.10% 10.0010.00Premier Real Estate10.0010.000.000.1800.00055.60.00% 52wk-Hi52wk-LowSecuritySymbolLast SaleChangeDaily Vol. 1000.001000.00Fidelity Bank Note 17 (Series AFBB17100.000.00 1000.001000.00Fidelity Bank Note 22 (Series BFBB22100.000.00 1000.001000.00Fidelity Bank Note 13 (Series CFBB13100.000.00 1000.001000.00Fidelity Bank Note 15 (Series DFBB15100.000.00 52wk-Hi52wk-LowSymbolBid $ A sk $Last PriceWeekly Vol.EPS $Div $P/EYield 14.6014.25Bahamas Supermarkets7.928.4214.60-0.0410.300N/M2.05% 8.006.00Caribbean Crossings (Pref4.006.256.000.0000.480N/M7.80% 0.540.20RND Holdings0.350.400.350.0010.000256.60.00% 41.0029.00ABDAB30.1331.5929.004.5400.0009.030.00% 0.550.40RND Holdings0.450.550.550.0020.000261.900.00% 52wk-Hi52wk-LowFund NameNA V YTD%Last 12 MonthsDiv $Yield % 1.36641.3041Colina Bond Fund1.36640.954.77 3.03512.9230Colina MSI Preferred Fund2.8962-1.49-3.35 1.45081.3859Colina Money Market Fund1.45081.204.68 3.69603.1964Fidelity Bahamas G & I Fund3.1964-5.59-13.64 12.739712.1564Fidelity Prime Income Fund12.73970.965.79 100.5606100.0000CFAL Global Bond Fund100.56060.560.56 100.000096.4070CFAL Global Equity Fund96.4070-3.59-3.59 1.00001.0000CFAL High Grade Bond Fund1.00000.000.00 10.50009.0950Fidelity International Investment Fund9.15990.71-12.76 1.04401.0000FG Financial Preferred Income Fund1.04400.804.40 1.03641.0000FG Financial Growth Fund1.03640.333.64 1.04521.0000FG Financial Diversified Fund1.04520.764.40 BISX ALL SHARE INDEX 19 Dec 02 = 1,000.00YIELD last 12 month dividends divided by closing price 52wk-Hi Highest closing price in last 52 weeksBid $ Buying price of Colina and Fidelity 52wk-Low Lowest closing price in last 52 weeksAsk $ Selling price of Colina and fidelity Previous Close Previous day's weighted price for daily volumeLast Price Last traded over-the-counter price Today's Close Current day's weighted price for daily volumeWeekly Vol. Trading volume of the prior week Change Change in closing price from day to dayEPS $ A company's reported earnings per share for the last 12 mths Daily Vol. Number of total shares traded todayNAV Net Asset Value DIV $ Dividends per share paid in the last 12 monthsN/M Not Meaningful P/E Closing price divided by the last 12 month earningsFINDEX The Fidelity Bahamas Stock Index. January 1, 1994 = 100 (S (S19-Feb-09 9-Feb-09 W W W WW W. .B B I I S S X X B B A A H H A A M M A A S S . .C C O O M M | | T T E E L L E E P P H HO O N NE E : :2 2 4 4 2 2 -3 3 2 2 3 32 2 3 3 3 3 0 0 | | F FA A C C S S I I M M I I L L E E : : 2 2 4 42 2 3 3 2 23 3 -2 23 3 2 20 0NAV Date 31-Mar-09 3-Apr-09 31-Mar-09 28-Feb-09 31-Dec-08 9-Feb-09 28-Feb-09 31-Dec-08 31-Dec-07 31-Mar-09 Prime + 1.75% Maturity 19 October 2017 19 October 2022 30 May 2013 29 May 2015 Interest 7% Prime + 1.75% 7%T T O O T T R R A A D D E E C C A A L L L L : : C C O O L LI I N N A A 2 24 4 2 2 5 50 0 2 2 7 7 0 0 1 1 0 0 | | R R O O Y Y A A L LF F I I D D E E L LI I T T Y Y 2 24 42 2 -3 3 5 56 6 -7 77 7 6 64 4 | | F F G G C C A A P P I I T T A A L L M M A A R R K KE E T T S S 2 2 4 42 2 -3 3 9 9 6 6 -4 4 0 00 00 0 | | C C O O L L O O N N I I A A L L 2 24 4 2 25 5 0 0 2 2 7 7 5 5 2 25 5FINDEX: CLOSE 797.05 | YTD -4.53% | 2008 -12.31%BISX LISTED & TRADED SECURITIES AS OF: Fidelity Over-The-Counter Securities Colina Over-The-Counter Securities BISX Listed Mutual Funds MARKET TERMSTHURSDAY, 16 APRIL 2009BISX ALL SHARE INDEX: CLOSE 1,620.03 | CHG 0.17 | %CHG 0.01 | YTD -92.33 | YTD % -5.39BISX LISTED DEBT SECURITIES (Bonds trade on a Percentage Pricing bases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f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f+,33,1*/7' & UHGLWRUVKDYLQJGHEWVRUFODLPVDJDLQVWWKH DERYHQDPHG&RPSDQ\DUHUHTXLUHGWRVHQG SDUWLFXODUVWKHUHRIWRWKHXQGHUVLJQHG3%R[1 1DVVDX%DKDPDVRQRUEHIRUHGD\RI0D\ ,QGHIDXOWWKHUHRIWKH\ZLOOEHH[FOXGHGIURP W KHEHQHRIDQ\GLVWULEXWLRQPDGHWKH/LTXLGDWRU ' $SULO0UZHQZH+RUYDWKDQG'U-RFKHQ.RHEHU RLQW/LTXLGDWRUV 6FKDDUVWHLQZHJVEUXFNH 1 2 7 , & ( 081,$%$+$0$6f$1$*(0(17/7' 1 2 7 , & ( ,6 +(5(%<*,9(1DVIROORZV 081,$ %$+$0$6f$1$*(0(17/ LQGLVVROXWLRQXQGHUWKHSURYLVLRQVRIWKH ,QWHUQDWLRQDO%XVLQHVV&RPSDQLHV 7KHGLVVROXWLRQRIWKHVDLG&RPSDQ\FRPPHQFHG $UWLFOHV RI'LVVROXWLRQZHUHVXEPLWWHGWRDQGUHJLVWHUHGE\ WKHHJLVWUDU*HQHUDO 7KH-RLQW/LTXLGDWRUVRIWKHVDLG&RPSDQ\ DUHUZHQZH+RUYDWKDQG'U-RFKHQ.RHEHU RIFKDDUVWHLQZHJVEUXFNH+DPEXUJ *HUPDQ\ 'DWHGWKHWKGD\RI+$55<%$1'6/2%26.< 7' $WWRUQH\VIRUWKHDERYHQDPHG&RPSDQ\ 1 2 7 , & ( 081,$%$+$0$6f+,33,1*/7' 1 2 7 , & ( ,6 +(5(%<*,9(1DVIROORZV 081,$%$+$0$6f+,33,1*/ LV LQ GLVVROXWLRQXQGHUWKHSURYLVLRQVRIWKH ,QWHUQDWLRQDO%XVLQHVV&RPSDQLHV 7KHGLVVROXWLRQRIWKHVDLG&RPSDQ\ FRPPHQFHGRQWKHWKGD\RI ZKHQLWV$UWLFOHVRI'LVVROXWLRQZHUHVXEPLWWHG WRDQGUHJLVWHUHGE\WKHHJLVWUDU*HQHUDO 7KH-RLQW/LTXLGDWRUVRIWKHVDLG&RPSDQ\ DUHUZHQZH+RUYDWKDQG'U-RFKHQ .RHEHURIFKDDUVWHLQZHJVEUXFNH +DPEXUJ*HUPDQ\ ' +$55<%$1'6/2%26.< 0$1$*(0(17&2/7' $WWRUQH\VIRUWKHDERYHQDPHG &RPSDQ\ Govt does not ‘appreciate the value’ of engineers FROM page 1B “What is critical is how we present ourselves in conjunction with the value we have.” R obert Reiss

PAGE 17

C OLDWELL Banker Lightbourn Realty's Carmen Massoni has captured the International President's Elite 2008 award, a categoryr eserved for only 1 per cent of the more than 107,000 sales associates worldwide in the Coldwell Banker real estate system. A nd two other Lightbourn Realty sales associates, Robert A rthur of Harbour Island and Rudy Carroll of Nassau, e arned special awards at the recent Coldwell Banker International Business Conference,w hich was held at the Henry B. Gonzalez Convention Cent re in San Antonio, Texas Mr Arthur won the International President's CirclesA ward, placing him in the top 2 per cent of Coldwell Banker's worldwide salesf orce. And Mr Carroll, in his first f ull year in real estate, was admitted to the International Sterling Society. This meansh e is in the top 8 per cent of the 107,000 global sales force. I n addition to capturing Lightbourn Realty's Top Producer designation, Ms Mas-s oni shared the Coldwell Banker Island Affiliates A bove and Beyond Award with Kim Webb of Coldwell Banker Bermuda. The awardi s in recognition of extraordinary service and customer commitment. Mike Lightbourn, president of Coldwell Banker Light b ourn Realty, said he was extremely proud of his associates, who worked hard to beatt he odds in a challenging real estate environment. " I'm delighted that Carmen, Robert and Rudy have been recognised for their outstand-i ng results. Carmen and Robert have each earned the Top Producer designation in the past, and so it's not sur prising that they've both done s o well,” said Mr Lightbourn. He added that Mr Carroll deserved special mention for his performance in his first full year as a sales associate. " I'm also proud of my agents, who may not have been on this year's awards list, but who worked hard and delivered to their clients theh igh standards of excellence associated with Coldwell Banker," Mr Lightbourna dded. Jim Gillespie, president and chief executive of Coldwell Banker Real Estate LLC,s aid: "Coldwell Banker Lightbourn Realty has established itself as a leader by highlight-i ng the positives that exist in the real estate industry, and we are proud to call them a member of the Coldwell Banker family.” He added that while this was a challenging year for the real estate industry, millions of people continued to buy and sell homes based on their lifestyles and needs. "This was undoubtedly a difficult year in our industry, but people need to remember that real estate is cyclical, and positive signs over recent months signal a tipping point for the residential real estate market," Mr Gillespie said. Lightbourn Realty is part of the Coldwell Banker global network, which has 3,500 offices in 47 countries and territories. It has offices and represen tatives in Nassau, the Abacos, Andros, Berry Islands, Bimini, Eleuthera, including Harbour Island and Spanish Wells, Exuma and Long Island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f ([FHOOHQWDQDO\WLFDODQGLQWHUSHUVRQDOVNLOOV $ELOLW\WRUHDGDQGLQWHUSUHWGDWDUHSRUWV$ELOLW\WRXQGHUVWDQGDQGSHUIRUPGDWD DQDO\VLV 3& VNLOOV VKRXOGLQFOXGHWKHEDVLFVXLWHRISURGXFWV([FHO$FFHVV:RUG 2IFH ([FHOOHQWFRPPXQLFDWLRQVNLOOVERWKZULWWHQDQGYHUEDOWKLVIXQFWLRQGRHVD O RWRILQWHUIDFLQJZLWKLQWHUQDODQGH[WHUQDOFXVWRPHUVDQGWKHKDUHGHUYLFH &HQWHU 35()(55('$/,),&$7,216 4 %DFKHORUVGHJUHHLQ$FFRXQWLQJ)LQDQFHDUHODWHGHOGRUHTXLYDOHQW HGXFDWLRQ Bahamian realtors win top Coldwell Banker honours LIGHTBOURN REALTY sales associates, Robert Arthur (above of Harbour Island and Rudy Carroll (left Nassau, earned special awards at the recent Coldwell Banker International Business Conference. CARMEN MASSONI (centre national service and operations, Coldwell Banker Real Estate LLC, and Jim Reed, chief executive of Coldwell Banker Island Affiliates. “I'm delighted that Carmen, Robert and Rudy have been recognised for their outstanding results. Car men and Robert have each earned theT op Pr oducer designation in the past, and so it's not surprising that they've both done so well” Mike Lightbourn

PAGE 18

ANDROS CAT ISLAND ELEUTHERA MA Y AGUANA SAN SALVADOR GREAT INAGUA GREAT EXUMA CROOKED ISLAND / ACKLINS LONG ISLAND ABACO Shown is today's weather. Temperatures are today's highs and tonights's lows. KEY WEST WEST PALM BEACH FT. LAUDERDALE TAMPA ORLANDOLow: 63F/17C Low: 62F/17C Low: 70F/21C Low: 71 F/22C Low: 71F/22C Low: 73F/23C Low: 70 F/21C Low: 61F/16C High: 78F/26C High: 84F/29C High: 78 F/26C High: 80F/27C High: 80F/27C High: 80 F/27 High: 78F/26C Low: 63F/17C High: 76 F/24C Low: 66 F/19 High: 80 F/27CRAGGED ISLANDLow: 64F/18C High: 86F/30C Low: 70 F/21C High: 78F/26C Low: 61 F/16C High: 78F/26C Low: 64 F/18C High: 82F/28C Low: 67F/19C High: 88 F/31C Low: 65F/18C High: 83 F/28C Low: 66 F/19C High: 87F/31C Low: 70F/21C High: 89F/32C Low: 67 F/19C High: 84F/29C High: 75F/24CFREEPOR T NASSAU MIAMI THE TRIBUNE FRIDAY, APRIL17TH2009, PAGE 7BTHE WEATHER REPORT 5-DAYFORECAST Sunny, breezy and pleasant. Partly cloudy and breezy. Partly sunny with a gusty breeze. Breezy with low clouds. Periods of clouds and sunshine. High: 78 Low: 70 High: 81 High: 83 High: 85 AccuWeather RealFeel AccuWeather RealFeel AccuWeather RealFeel AccuWeather RealFeel AccuWeather RealFeel Partly sunny and warm. High: 86 Low: 71 Low: 71 Low: 73 AccuWeather RealFeel 79F The exclusive AccuWeather RealFeel Temperatureis an index that combines the effects of temperature, wind, humidity, sunshine intensity, cloudiness, precipitation, pressure, and elevation on the human bodyeverything that effects how warm or cold a person feels. Temperatures reflect the high and the low for the day. 68F 82-69F 80-71F 86-74F 107-83F Low: 75 TODAYTONIGHTSATURDAYSUNDAYMONDAYTUESDAY ALMANAC High .................................................. 90F/32C Low .................................................... 75F/24C Normal high ...................................... 81F/27C Normal low ........................................ 69F/21C Last year's high .................................. 81F/27C Last year's low .................................. 66F/19C As of 2 p.m. yesterday ..................................0.05" Year to date ..................................................2.19"Normal year to date ......................................6.42" Statistics are for Nassau through 2 p.m. yesterday Temperature Precipitation SUNANDMOON TIDESFORNASSAU Last New First Full Apr . 17 Apr . 24 May 1May 9 Sunrise . . . . . . 6:46 a.m. Sunset . . . . . . . 7:33 p.m. Moonrise . . . . . 1:57 a.m. Moonset . . . . 12:51 p.m. Today Saturday Sunday Monday HighHt.(ft.LowHt.(ft. 1:56 a.m.2.48:16 a.m.0.6 2:15 p.m.2.18:25 p.m.0.6 2:55 a.m.2.39:11 a.m.0.6 3:16 p.m.2.29:29 p.m.0.6 3:53 a.m.2.310:03 a.m.0.5 4:14 p.m. 2.310:29 p.m.0.5 4:47 a.m. 2.410:52 a.m.0.4 5:07 p.m. 2.5 11:25 p.m.0.4 WORLDCITIES Acapulco 90/3275/23s89/3171/21s Amsterdam54/1246/7r61/1646/7pc Ankara, Turkey55/1232/0sh61/1635/1s Athens72/2260/15s74/2359/15s Auckland66/1854/12pc67/1960/15pc Bangkok93/3380/26pc94/3478/25c Barbados85/2975/23s85/2975/23pc Barcelona62/1649/9s58/1451/10sh Beijing75/2354/12s68/2055/12c Beirut65/1859/15s62/1658/14s Belgrade76/2449/9sh73/2253/11c Berlin64/1751/10sh63/1746/7pc Bermuda 68/2062/16pc68/2064/17s Bogota65/1847/8r67/1948/8sh Brussels55/1243/6r63/1741/5pc Budapest63/1745/7r70/2146/7shBuenos Aires 82/2764/17s73/2255/12c Cairo80/2656/13s82/2758/14s Calcutta 99/3781/27s103/3980/26s Calgar y57/1333/0pc52/1129/-1c Cancun88/3170/21s87/3068/20pc Caracas82/2771/21pc81/2771/21tCasablanca 71/21 52/11 pc 67/1951/10pc Copenhagen 58/1446/7s56/1341/5s Dublin52/1141/5sh54/1239/3pcFrankfurt 59/15 43/6r63/1739/3sh Geneva56/1347/8sh64/1747/8pc Halifax53/1128/-2pc45/724/-4pcHavana 86/30 64/17 s87/3061/16s Helsinki43/630/-1c39/328/-2pc Hong Kong 79/2672/22pc79/2673/22pc Islamabad96/3562/16pc99/3763/17s Istanbul65/1851/10s71/2159/15sJerusalem 59/1544/6sh62/1639/3s Johannesburg 69/20 49/9s73/2250/10s Kingston 88/31 76/24s85/2974/23sh Lima83/2865/18c83/2865/18pc London 59/15 45/7 sh59/1541/5pc Madrid57/1337/2sh54/1236/2r Manila87/3077/25t85/2977/25sh Mexico City82/2752/11s81/2747/8pc Monterrey99/3768/20pc88/3165/18cMontreal 63/1741/5pc50/1025/-3pc Moscow 45/732/0pc43/628/-2r Munich53/1142/5r60/1542/5pc Nairobi86/3064/17t88/3162/16t New Delhi100/3773/22s102/3875/23s Oslo 54/1232/0pc47/837/2pc Paris 63/1743/6pc70/2145/7pc Prague56/1347/8r59/1545/7pc Rio de Janeiro77/2568/20s80/2669/20s Riyadh91/3266/18pc89/3165/18s Rome65/1852/11pc68/2053/11sh St. Thomas 83/28 74/23s82/2775/23s San Juan91/3259/15s73/2253/11r San Salvador91/3272/22s90/3273/22pc Santiago81/2750/10pc81/2750/10s Santo Domingo86/3070/21pc83/2868/20sh Sao Paulo72/2259/15s75/2359/15s Seoul 63/1741/5s70/2149/9pc Stockholm50/1032/0pc46/732/0sh Sydney73/2257/13s72/2259/15pc T aipei 82/27 69/20pc83/2871/21s Tokyo63/1754/12r71/2157/13s Toronto65/1844/6s59/1540/4c Trinidad91/3272/22s85/2970/21sh Vancouver52/1140/4r54/1241/5pcVienna 64/17 48/8sh65/1851/10pc Warsaw61/1641/5sh55/1236/2r Winnipeg54/1234/1c48/830/-1pc HighLowWHighLowW F/C F/CF/CF/C TodaySaturdayW eather (W s -sunny , pc -partly cloudy , c -cloudy , sh -showers, t -thunder storms, r -rain, sf -snow flurries, sn -snow, i -ice, Prcp-precipitation, Tr -trace TODAY'SU.S. FORECAST MARINEFORECAST WINDSWAVESVISIBILITYWATER TEMPS. NASSAU FREEPORT ABACO Today:NW at 10-20 Knots2-4 Feet10-20 Miles76F Saturday:NNE at 10-20 Knots3-5 Feet10-20 Miles76F Today:NW at 10-20 Knots2-4 Feet10-20 Miles76F Saturday:NNE at 10-20 Knots3-5 Feet10-20 Miles76F Today:NW at 10-20 Knots2-4 Feet10-20 Miles76F Saturday:N at 8-16 Knots3-5 Feet10-20 Miles76F U.S. CITIES Albuquerque 56/1337/2pc65/1842/5pc Anchorage46/733/0c45/733/0sf Atlanta 70/21 49/9s70/2153/11pc Atlantic City66/1844/6s77/2548/8s Baltimore71/2144/6s78/2548/8sBoston 69/20 46/7s60/1541/5pc Buffalo64/1743/6s57/1338/3c Charleston, SC70/2148/8s77/2554/12s Chicago70/2147/8s68/2044/6cCleveland 67/19 43/6s64/1745/7pc Dallas68/2057/13t77/2554/12pc Denver34/128/-2sn40/432/0sn Detroit71/2144/6s70/2144/6pc Honolulu81/2768/20pc82/2770/21pcHouston 77/25 67/19 t78/2564/17t HighLowWHighLowW F/CF/CF/CF/C HighLowWHighLowW F/CF/CF/CF/C HighLowWHighLowW F/CF/CF/CF/C TodaySaturday T odaySaturday T odaySaturday Indianapolis 73/2253/11s69/2049/9c Jacksonville72/2251/10s77/2555/12pc Kansas City 66/18 54/12c65/1848/8t Las Vegas77/2555/12s83/2861/16s Little Rock67/1959/15c68/2056/13tLos Angeles 78/25 54/12s84/2856/13s Louisville72/2254/12s70/2152/11c Memphis72/2260/15pc65/1857/13t Miami80/2671/21s79/2667/19s Minneapolis 69/20 48/8pc62/1641/5c Nashville73/2251/10s66/1852/11t New Orleans74/2367/19pc78/2566/18t New York68/2054/12s74/2349/9pc Oklahoma City63/1751/10t73/2248/8t Orlando 78/25 63/17 s81/2760/15s Philadelphia70/2149/9s77/2550/10s Phoenix79/2656/13s87/3064/17s Pittsburgh72/2242/5s73/2245/7s Portland, OR58/1441/5r67/1943/6s Raleigh-Durham 72/2246/7s82/2753/11s St. Louis70/2155/12pc67/1954/12tSalt Lake City 56/1342/5c62/1642/5pc San Antonio 78/25 60/15 t77/2559/15t San Diego71/2156/13s73/2257/13s San Francisco67/1950/10s72/2252/11sSeattle 56/1340/4r62/1644/6s T allahassee 77/2555/12s81/2757/13pc Tampa84/2862/16s84/2865/18s Tucson74/2350/10s83/2857/13s Washington, DC70/2149/9s78/2551/10s UV INDEXTODAY The higher the AccuWeather UV IndexTM number, the greater the need for eye and skin protection.Forecasts and graphics provided by AccuW eather , Inc. Cold W arm Stationary FrontsShown are noon positions of weather systems and precipitation. Temperature bands are highs for the day. Forecast high/low temperatures are for selected cities. -10s-0s0s10s20s30s40s50s60s70s80s90s100s110s Showers T-storms Rain FlurriesSnow Ice AccuWeather.com




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=USA TODAY.

BAHAMAS EDITION

www.tribune242.com

FRIDAY, APRIL 17, 2009

Pim flowin’ it

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is investi

Two men found dead
in ‘gruesome’ killings

m@ By TANEKA THOMPSON
Tribune Staff Reporter
tthompson@tribunemedia.net

POLICE are investigating the
"gruesome" double homicide
of two men who were found
dead inside a small wooden
home in the area of St Vincent
Road yesterday.

The oldest victim — believed
to be in his 60s — was shot in
his left side, while the second
victim — believed to be a father
in his 40s — was shot in his left
arm. Police said the extent of
the younger victim's wounds

were so severe that his arm was
"nearly ripped off" his body.

Their identities were not
released by police up to press
time yesterday, however resi-
dents of the area identified the
older victim as a quiet Haitian
farmer known only as ‘Daddy’.
The younger man was identi-
fied by his first name — Tracey
— a man well-known in the
area who did odd-jobs and car
repairs.

Police said it is a possibility
that the two men are related.

SEE page six

Three arrests after firearms,
ammunition, $160,000 seized

m@ By DENISE MAYCOCK

Tribune Freeport Reporter

dmaycock@tribunemedia.net

FREEPORT — Two Bahamians and a Jamaican were arrested
after law enforcement officials discovered and seized a number of
firearms, ammunition, and over $160,000 in cash at an apartment

complex in Freeport.

Asst Supt Welbourne Bootle reported that Police and Customs
officials went to Malibu Reef Estates around 8.40am on Wednes-

day.

He said a search warrant for illegal drugs and contraband was
executed by a team of officers from DEU, the Anti-violence Inter-

SEE page six

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Tim Clarke/Tribune staff

A FAMILY member of one of the men killed had to be helped from the scene.

CLICO-Guyana
manager in
hospital after
being shot

THE court-appointed man-
ager of CLICO-Guyana is in
hospital after being shot by an
unidentified gunman in George-
town early Thursday morning,
Caribbean news outlets report-
ed yesterday.

The shooting of Maria van
Beek, the judicial manager of
CLICO in Guyana and also the
Commissioner of Insurance,
came less than a week after she
presented a report to the
Supreme Court on the state of

SEE page six



400 ZNS
HIB Kaua lis
Bea
Waite ik

m By ALISON LOWE
Tribune Staff Reporter
alowe@tribunemedia.net

THE Bahamas Communi-
cations and Public Officers
Union is considering its next
move after 400 ZNS employ-
ees received late salary pay-
ments this week and were told
overdue increments may have
to be paid in stages.

ZNS employees blamed the
delayed salary payouts on

SEE page six



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Marina Village
restaurant
staff ‘robbed
at gunpoint’

Sources say cashier,
security guard accosted

m@ By ALISON LOWE
Tribune Staff Reporter
alowe@tribunemedia.net

STAFF carrying the day’s takings from Carmine’s restau-
rant in Marina Village were ambushed and robbed by gun-
men after closing time on Wednesday.

Well-placed sources said a cashier and a security guard

were just emerging from the popular Italian restaurant at
around 11.30pm when they were accosted — a stone’s throw
away from the Paradise Island Police Station.

Police refused to acknowledge that the robbery had taken
place and the resort did not specify where the incident
occurred.

In a statement, Atlantis said: “We can confirm that a
cashier was robbed in transit to making a deposit after clos-
ing. At no time were patrons in any danger. There was no
injury to patrons or staff. We are co-operating with police
who are handling the investigation.”

The Tribune’s sources said speculation was rife yesterday
that the robbery was an “inside job”, perpetrated by indi-
viduals who would have known the staff’s routine.

It is not known how much money was stolen.

Voluntary Bill of Indictment presented
in Bridgewater and Lighthourne case



m@ By NATARIO wood actor John Tra-

McKENZIE volta.
Tribune Staff According to a sum-
Reporter mons from _ the
Supreme Court,

DIRECTOR | of
Public Prosecutions
Bernard Turner yes-
terday presented a
Voluntary Bill of
Indictment in the case
of former PLP senator
Pleasant Bridgewater
and paramedic Tarino Light-
bourne who are charged in con-
nection with an alleged plot to
extort $25 million from Holly-

Magistrate alleged to have collected
fines without giving record on payment
@ By RUPERT MISSICK Jr

Chief Reporter
rmissick@tribunemedia.net

Bridgewater, 49, who
is also an attorney, and
Lightbourne, 47, both
of Grand Bahama, are
to appear before
Senior Justice Anita
Allen on Tuesday,
April 28, at 1pm for
their arraignment. At that time
a date is expected to be set for

SEE page six



ale SLAOLS AN eed

A DEFENCE has been filed in the Supreme Court alleging that a
Grand Bahama Magistrate collected fines against convicted persons in
her court but provided no record to the court that the fines were paid.

In a defence filed by Deputy Chief Magistrate Helen Almorales-
Jones on April 14 it is alleged that there were several instances when
Grand Bahama Magistrate Subusola Lawanson Swain failed to provide
records of fines that were paid to her court.

The defence was filed in response to an action brought by Magistrate
Swain alleging that Deputy Chief Magistrate Jones wrongly accused her
of accepting bribes and stealing fines.

SEE page seven

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NASSAU AND BAHAMEA

ISLANDS’ LEADING NEWSPAPER
PAGE 2, FRIDAY, APRIL 17, 2009

THE TRIBUNE



LOCAL NEWS



Board appointed to guide
downtown revitalisation

m@ By ALISON LOWE
Tribune Staff Reporter
alowe@tribunemedia.net

DOWNTOWN Nassau
took another step towards a
return to its former glory yes-
terday with the appointment
of public-private stakeholders



to a board mandated by the
government to guide the
area’s revitalisation.
Minister of Tourism Vin-
cent Vanderpool Wallace sug-
gested that the creation of the
Downtown Nassau Partner-
ship will allow the Bahamas
to progress towards fully real-

ising its potential as a desti-
nation.

“This is not a facelift. This is
a transformation. That is what
this is all about,” he told a
press conference at the British
Colonial Hilton attended by
all the new board members,
along with the ministers of the

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environment and works.

At the same time, Vaughn
Roberts, former vice president
of finance at Bahamar, was
formally announced as the
managing director of the

Aside from his qualifica-
tions and experience in
finance and business, Mr
Roberts vowed to bring “new
energy”, the perspective of
someone who has lived in
major cities around the world,
and “non political profession-
alism” to the role.

Alongside Mr Roberts, it
was revealed that the DNP is
to consist of 11 additional
directors, among them
tourism director general Ver-
nice Walkine and Nassau
Tourism Development Board
chairman Charles Klonaris,
who will act as co-chairs.

A variety of other
appointees from the ministries
of public works, finance and
environment, and from the
private sector in the fields of
tourism, banking, real estate
and retail, were also intro-
duced at the press conference.

One of the private sector
board members, Charles
Klonaris, also chairman of the
Nassau Tourism Develop-
ment Board, said: “Many do
not know the extent of com-
mitment it has taken over the
years to get us to this impor-
tant point. It has not been
easy and it will not all of a
sudden become easy because
of new levels of commitment.

“Over the coming months
we will lay the foundation for
leapfrogging this revitalisation
and at some point thereafter
the fruits of our labour will
become more evident to the
man on the street, the shop
owner and the many visitors
to our city.”

The DNP board will meet

Vincent Vanderpool-Wallace



on a regular basis, initially
every two weeks, to address
the mandate it has been given
by Cabinet, with “priority
areas” to include finalising a
master plan for downtown,
creating a Business Improve-
ment District (BID) — which
will likely see downtown busi-
nesses paying a tax to an
authority charged with
upkeeping the area — and
overseeing short term
improvements to the environs.

Mrs Walkine said that,
importantly, the DNP has a
pool of funds contributed to
by both government and the
private sector from which it
can draw resources to
fund the fulfilment of its man-
date.

She added that once the
BID is implemented, the DNP
board will likely “evolve” into
the BID authority.

The DNP will host a town
meeting at the Hilton on May
6 at 6pm to update the public
on the revitalisation efforts
and solicit input.

Greetings from your parents Paul & Esther Barry;
Darian Barry, other relatives and friends.

We Love You!



Customs staff
welcome dept
‘clean up’

CUSTOMS staff yesterday wel-
comed government moves to “clean
up” their department, saying its defi-
ciencies had been allowed to con-
tinue for far too long.

And they thanked The Tribune
— and especially its Insight section
— for prompting a massive shake-up
with a string of shocking revelations
about departmental corruption.

A Customs insider said: “We are
glad this has happened because it is
breaking up some of the old ties and
loyalties inside the department.

“There was an unseen clique in
Customs that looked after its own
interests at the expense of the coun-
try. There was speculation about
rampant corruption for years, but
no-one would address it.

“Prime Minister Hubert Ingra-
ham has done the right thing. I feel
he is doing a good job, but he must
not slacken because there is still
some way to go.”

Since January, the dismissal of
scores of senior Customs staff and a
major restructuring of the depart-
ment have gone some way towards
making the department more effi-
cient.

The shake-up has come amid
claims and counter claims about
alleged scams inside the department,
including an allegation by business-
man Jackson Ritchie that corrupt
Customs officials had swindled local
brokerage firms of millions of dol-
lars.

Ritchie’s Global United shipping
company is among those alleged to
owe substantial sums in unpaid Cus-
toms duties and taxes.

Last December, after the home
of a Customs officer had been
burned down by arsonists, The Tri-
bune’s Insight section explored the
department’s corruption problems
under the headline: “It’s time for a
clean-out.”

It revealed collusion between
some corrupt Customs employees
and complicit members of the busi-
ness community designed to rip off
the nation for self-gain.

And it concluded that government
inertia “might suggest that politi-
clans now accept corruption as an
immutable component of Bahamian
life and are cowed by its enormity.”

In the second of a two-part expo-
sure, Insight said: “It’s time for the
government to confront the cheats in
its own ranks, or face what could be
very serious consequences as the
country buckles under the weight of
global economic decline.”

Yesterday, Customs insiders said
The Tribune's disclosures triggered
mass dismissals and reorganisation of
the department.

“However,” one source said,
“there are still areas which need to
be dealt with. There is still work to
be done.”

National Art Gallery
opens exhibition tonight

THE National Art Gallery hosts
the opening of the exhibition “Col-
lections within the National Collec-
tion” tonight from 6.30 pm to
9.30pm.

The show highlights the painstak-
ing process involved in acquiring
works of art for inclusion in the
national collection.

In honour of the occasion, a cock-
tail reception will be held on the
verandah of the National Art
Gallery.

The exhibition chronicles approx-
imately 30 years of work involved in
acquiring objects long before the
gallery opened its doors in July 2003.

It also highlights the various
methods used to acquire objects,
including outright purchases funded
by gallery membership, individual
and corporate or estate donations.

This collection and individual
works currently on exhibition rep-
resent only a small part of the
national collection.

Features include the Amos Fer-
guson Collection, saved during the
Straw Market fire, and a collection
of 19th century albumen photo-
graphic prints by the American artist
Jacob F Coonley - the first major
purchase for the national collection
after the National Art Gallery
became a corporate body in 2003
and acquired from the late artist R
Brent Malone.

Additionally, the exhibition fea-
tures 12 paintings of historic build-
ings and scenes of over-the-hill Nas-
sau commissioned by the Finance
Corporation of the Bahamas specif-
ically for the National Art Gallery
25 years before its doors opened.


THE TRIBUNE

FRIDAY, APRIL 17, 2009, PAGE 3



LOCAL NEWS



0 In brief

Six questioned —
in connection
with seizure
of shotgun

SIX men are being ques-
tioned by police in connec-
tion with the seizure of a
shotgun in the area of Roo-
sevelt Avenue.

Press liaison officer super-
intendent Walter Evans said
Mobile Division officers
were patrolling the area
sometime before 6pm on
Wednesday when they
observed a group of men
“acting suspiciously.”

The officers searched the
area where the men were
assembled and uncovered a
shotgun hidden in a red and
white sweater, Mr Evans
said. All six men were taken
into police custody.

e POLICE apprehended
two men in the Arawak Cay
area who were allegedly dri-
ving with an illegal firearm
in their vehicle.

Mr Evans said officers
from the Arawak Cay Police
Station were patrolling the
general area around the Fish
Fry shortly after 10pm on
Wednesday when they spot-
ted “a shiny object” inside a
white Honda Accord, regis-
tration number 197496.

Police then ordered the
three male occupants to get
out of the car.

The officers stopped two
of the passengers, but the
third man was able to flee
the scene.

The 20-year-old driver, of
Pinewood Gardens, and one
passenger, a 28-year-old
Augusta Street resident,
were taken into police cus-
tody after the officers found
a loaded .38 handgun inside
the car, Mr Evans said. The
third man is actively being
sought.

¢ OFFICERS of the Wulff
Road Police Station found
two shotguns in an aban-
doned house on St James
Road. The officers were act-
ing on a tip when they made
the discovery around 2.30pm
on Wednesday. The weapons
were recovered and are in
police custody. No arrests
were made as investigations
continues.

e St George's Anglican
Church will hold its 60th
anniversary patronal mission
services next week.

The speakers will include:
Rev'd Dr Leonard Johnson
(April 20), Rev'd Terrance

Morrison (April 21) and
Dr C W Saunders (April 22).

Mission services start at
7pm.

Man in court
on marijuana
possession
charge

A 19-YEAR-OLD man
was convicted in a Magis-
trates Court yesterday on
a Marijuana possession
charge.

Lamar Albury, of
Kennedy Subdivision, is
accused of being in pos-
session of 25 grams of
marijuana.

According to police, the
drugs were found in 13 foil
wraps in a car.

Albury was expected to
stand trial yesterday but
pleaded guilty to the
charge.

He was fined $1,500.
Failure to pay the fine will
result in a nine month
prison term.

Furious land dispute over
former home of killer

mg By JOHN MARQUIS
Managing Editor

A BAHAMIAN building con-
tractor has sparked a furious land
title dispute by moving into the
derelict former home of killer
Sante Kimes, claiming he is the
true owner of the desirable
seafront property.

Warren Aranha, 50, president
of White Rose Estate property
company, has taken possession
of the two-storey Cable Beach
home where Kimes and her dot-
ing son Kenny are said to have
drowned the Bahraini banker
Syed Bilal Ahmed in 1996.

Mr Aranha admits that his
action — which included remoy-
ing a metal gate to gain access to
the land — is likely to provoke a
legal showdown with Nassau busi-
nessman Raymond Wong, whose
family claims to have owned the
property for 23 years.

“Mr Wong has said the prop-
erty is his, but I maintain it is
mine,” said Mr Aranha, “And I
have the papers to prove it.”

The once attractive house, set
in a stunning beachfront position,
hit the headlines three years ago
when Kimes and her son were
jailed in the United States for two
murders committed in 1998.

Hearings

During one of the hearings,
Kenny Kimes admitted he and
his mother drowned Mr Ahmed
in a bath at their Nassau home in
1996 after giving him a date-rape
drug.

Though he later went on to say
he had dumped Mr Ahmed’s
body at sea, neighbours in Sul-
grave Manor, a condo block next
to the Kimes home, are convinced
the body is buried on the site,
possibly under the patio.

When the Kimes story broke,
the murderess and _ her
family were said to have been
renting the property from Mr
Wong.

But Mr Aranha claims the
house is one of many properties
in New Providence at the centre
of a major land dispute dating
back to the late 19th century.

And he says he is the true



WARREN ARANHA has taken possession of the two-storey Cable
Beach home where Kimes and her son Kenny lived.

inheritor of the property as the
last surviving member of the
allegedly dispossessed J S John-
son family.

Mr Aranha’s dispute with Mr
Wong does not imply any wrong-
doing by the Wong family.

He said it is the result of his
determined attempt to seize back
land he alleges was stolen from
the Johnson family between the
1890s and 1950s.

Mr Aranha’s incredible tale,
which will be fully explored in
next Monday’s Tribune Insight
section, suggests that three or four
prominent white Bahamian fam-
ilies plotted over several genera-
tions to dispossess the Johnsons
of thousands of acres of New
Providence land.

Included in the property, he
claims, are 465 acres of prime
Cable Beach land, including much
of the area earmarked for the $2.6
billion Bahamar resort develop-
ment.

Mr Aranha said the decision
by Harrahs Entertainment to
withdraw funding from the
Bahamar project was partly due
to concerns about land title.

He told The Tribune: “The
truth is that the JS Johnson fam-
ily was robbed over a period of 50
years or more by several promi-
nent white Bahamians, all of
them long dead.

“IT have been researching this
matter thoroughly now since 1995
and have collected all the paper-
work I need to prove that the title
of this house and numerous other
properties belongs to me.”

Standing jubilantly on the bal-
cony of the now ruined house,
Mr Aranha said: “If Mr Wong is
the owner, let him come forward
with the documents to show he
has a greater claim than me.

“As far as I am concerned, this
property is mine — and I aim to
use it as my weekend playground
in future after it has been refur-
bished.”

At one point, the two-acre site
was on the market with a multi-
million dollar price tag. But Mr
Aranha moved in, took down the
‘For Sale’ signs and threw a huge
metal gate into the grass.

Last weekend, he drove his
truck up to the house to continue
clearing the property to prepare

‘No evidence’ to back claims of
Bahamians missing in Jamaica

THE Ministry of Foreign Affairs is
looking into reports that several Bahami-
ans might be missing in Jamaica, how-
ever Bahamian officials say there is no
evidence to substantiate the claims.

After a report published last week in a
local tabloid which claimed that four
Bahamian men were killed in Jamaica,
several people approached the ministry's
consular division asking for help in track-
ing down missing relatives, Deputy Prime
Minister and Minister of Foreign Affairs
Brent Symonette said. Since then, a few
have returned to report that they have

found their loved ones.

While the ministry's probe is still ongo-
ing, Jamaican authorities report that they
are not aware of any missing Bahamians turning up
on their shores, Mr Symonette said yesterday.

"As a result of the article, several persons came
into the consular office to report that their family
members were missing. Of that group, a number of

Maderia St. ONLY

ENT

Brent Symonette



them have come back to the office and
advised us that their relatives have been
located elsewhere.

"Jamaican authorities have no knowl-
edge, according to what I've been
advised, of any persons that are missing
and without any concrete evidence it
would be very difficult to proceed any
further with the investigation," he said.

Mr Symonette said officials are still
working with Jamaican authorities to
determine if any Bahamians have been
incarcerated in that country.

According to an official at the Min-
istry of Foreign Affairs, there have been
a number of cases of Bahamians coming
into the ministry after not hearing from
relatives who have left the country.

The official said that in many cases, the missing
persons turn up far from where their families think
they are and advised travellers to keep relatives
abreast of their whereabouts.

APRIL 15 - 25

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for a full-scale restoration pro-
ject.

During the Kimes family’s
occupation of the house in the
early 1990s, it was still a very
desirable home with huge plate
glass windows looking out over
Goodman’s Bay.

Now the house is in ruins, with
doors and windows missing and
heaps of soil in the front drive-
way.

Structure

But Mr Aranha said: “The
structure is still very sound. I
intend to make it look good
again.”

Joseph Samuel Johnson,
founder of the Johnson family
fortune, was a prominent busi-
nessman and parliamentarian in
Nassau during the second half of
the 19th century.

Mr Aranha, who claims to be
descended from the Johnsons via
the female line, believes the plot
to rob his family began after the
original J S Johnson died.

He said maps of Cable Beach
were changed by a succession of
swindlers so they could ‘elimi-
nate’ the family’s holdings and
take possession.

Since then, he said, much of
the land had been sold on to
unsuspecting buyers over the

generations.

Mr Wong, however, claims the
Kimes house was bought legiti-
mately by his family from Scottish
resident Marilyn Jane Crawford
in 1986. “Our title is secure and
an attorney is working on the
matter now. We will apply for an
injunction and see whether he
(Mr Aranha) responds or fights
that.”

He said Mr Aranha’s claims
first surfaced two years ago when
he discovered that he was using
the beach at the Kimes house.

Mr Wong said the matter could
end up in court “because I don’t
know how far he intends to go.”

The Kimes family lived at the
house between 1992 and 1996.
After leaving Nassau, Sante and
Kenny Kimes became America’s
most notorious mom-and-son
crime team, conning and killing
their way across the States in their
attempt to amass a fortune
through crime.

Both are now serving life terms
in US prisons with no chance of
parole.

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PAGE 4, FRIDAY, APRIL 17, 2009

EDITORIAL/LETTERS TO THE EDITOR

THE TRIBUNE





The Tribune Limited

NULLIUS ADDICTUS JURARE IN VERBA MAGISTRI
Being Bound to Swear to The Dogmas of No Master

LEON E. H. DUPUCH, Publisher/Editor 1903-1914

SIR ETIENNE DUPUCH, Kt, O.B.E., K.M., K.C.S.G.,

(Hon.) LL.D., D.Litt.

Publisher/Editor 1919-1972
Contributing Editor 1972-199]

EILEEN DUPUCH CARRON, C.M.G., M.S. B.A., LL.B.

Publisher/Editor 1972-

Published Daily Monday to Saturday

Shirley Street, RO. Box N-3207, Nassau, Bahamas
Insurance Management Building., P.O. F-485, Freeport, Grand Bahama

WEBSITE
www.tribune242.com — updated daily at 2pm

Obama says Cuba should make next move

MEXICO CITY — President Barack Oba-
ma wants Havana to make the next move to
improve U.S.-Cuba relations, saying Thursday
that he needs to see signs of changes on the
island before he makes any more overtures.

President Obama already has lifted restric-
tions on visits and money sent to Cuba by
Americans with families there — steps he called
"extraordinarily significant" for those families,
and a show of good faith by the U.S. govern-
ment that it wants to recast the relationship.

But he reiterated that the U.S. won't unilat-
erally end its trade embargo against Cuba, even
though the policy is widely seen as a failure
that has complicated U.S. relations throughout
Latin America and the Caribbean.

President Obama said a relationship frozen
for 50 years "won't thaw overnight," and that
Cuba can show it wants to move forward by
lifting its own restrictions on Cubans’ ability to
travel and to voice their opinions.

Cuba's communist government had no
immediate reaction, but President Raul Castro
has said he is willing to negotiate with the US
President on neutral ground as equals and with-
out conditions. Castro was in Venezuela, where
President Hugo Chavez and other close allies
were planning to show a united front in their
first encounter with him today at the Summit of
the Americas.

Chavez called the U.S. position a "show of
disrespect."

"If that's the way it is, what more can we
expect from the rest? Nothing,” Chavez said. "I
hope we're wrong, but they'll be the ones who
will have to show us — not with tales and
speeches."

President Obama spoke at a news conference
after meeting with Mexican President Felipe
Calderon, who called the U.S. embargo a failed
strategy. Asked what the U.S. should do on
Cuba to improve its image across Latin Amer-
ica, Calderon said "we do not believe that the
embargo or the isolation of Cuba is a good
measure for things to change.”

But President Obama says Cuba needs to
reciprocate to his overtures with actions
"grounded in respect for human rights.”

Asimilar message was sent by US. Secretary
of State Hillary Rodham Clinton in Haiti earli-
er Thursday. "We stand ready to discuss with
Cuba additional steps that could be taken,” she
said. "But we do expect Cuba to reciprocate."

"We would like to see Cuba open up its soci-
ety, release political prisoners, open up to out-
side opinions and media, have the kind of soci-
ety that we all know that would improve the
opportunities for the Cuban people and for
their nation," she said.

Leaders of 34 nations are making their way
to Trinidad and Tobago for the summit, a gath-
ering of democracies where communist Cuba is
not invited. That rankles several of the leaders
— not only close ally Chavez but also people
like Haitian President Rene Preval, who has
had warm relations with the Castro govern-
ment and received medical treatment on the

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island. He told reporters that he hopes Cuba will
be able to attend the next summit, and that
"Cuba is a friend of Haiti even though we have
different political systems."

(This article was written by Ben Feller of the
Associated Press).

Haitians want Hillary Clinton
to stop deportations

PORT-AU-PRINCE, Haiti — Women sell-
ing hot peppers and black beans in a sprawling
market in Haiti's capital talk of their unending
economic woes, their hungry children and their
dismal hopes that politicians will do anything
about it.

As USS. Secretary of State Hillary Rodham
Clinton arrived in Haiti on Thursday, the expec-
tations of Haiti's people are dismally low. Pres-
ident Rene Preval escorted Mrs Clinton from
the airport to the national palace for a private
meeting.

Disappointment is widespread over unkept
promises of aid to Haiti. The country has not yet
recovered from last year's food riots and four
tropical storms that killed nearly 800 people
and caused $1 billion in damage.

Political tensions also are running high ahead
of Sunday's long-delayed Senate elections,
which some parties disqualified from running
have threatened to disrupt.

In the noisy Croix-des-Bossales market,
women fixate on their families’ hunger as they
bat beetles away from unsold piles of food.

"There's no money in this country because
there isn't any work,” said Therese Bejaman, 38,
who sells coconuts imported from the neigh-
bouring Dominican Republic.

Bejaman's husband lost his job at the com-
mercial port across the street a few years ago.
Now their seven children, aged 6 to 18, depend
on her travelling hours over washed-out roads to
the border, where she pays about $5.60 for a
dozen coconuts with hopes of making about 5
cents of profit on each one. It's not going well.

"They aren't selling fast,” she said.

With other countries struggling amid the
global economic crisis, aid to Haiti has been
affected. A donors conference Tuesday in
Washington was a disappointment. It raised
$324 million for Haiti but — despite entreaties
by U.N. Secretary-General Ban Ki-moon, secu-
rity council members, Bill Clinton and others —
that amount was more than $600 million short of
what the country needs for economic develop-
ment and hurricane recovery.

The discussions with Secretary of State Clin-
ton will likely include a request to temporarily
stay deportation orders against an estimated
30,000 Haitians in the United States, whose
repatriations would further drain Haiti's
resources by eliminating the money they send
home. Preval may also ask for more relief from
Haiti's heavy debt burden, estimated to include
$1.6 million in payments to the World Bank
each month.



Let common
sense prevail at
the Lynden
Pindling Airport

EDITOR, The Tribune.

PLEASE allow me to express
one of the most aggravating air-
port security observations that I
have witnessed in my many
years of travelling throughout
the world, sadly to say it is at
our very own Lynden Pindling
International Airport.

Security personnel and many
sophisticated security screening
devices took over the majority
of airports throughout the world
after September 11th. This act
not to be discounted could, and
should be regarded as the
largest global stimulus package
ever created. Security jobs and
security machinery changed the
way the world travelled forever.
In some cases it took the joy
out travelling, even though in
many cases and in reality gave a
false sense of security.

The Bahamas Government
spends millions of advertising
dollars to bring visitors to our
shores every year.

On entrance to our national
airport, the three piece band
with their discoloured uniforms
and busted speakers, do their
best to welcome guests with
native tunes, of course the visi-
tors don’t understand what the
band is playing or exhibiting.
At least with Junkanoo music,
they are guaranteed to feel
rhythm, excitement and some-

LETTERS

letters@triounemedia net



thing culturally authentic.

On the other hand, upon
leaving the island of New Prov-
idence no matter how great a
vacation the visitor may have
experienced, the double secu-
rity and unnecessary delayed
screening, with no space along
with the numerous check points
at LPIA leaves visitors and res-
idents alike very angry, con-
fused, and looking at the island
of New Providence, Bahamas
as the worst choice destination.

Many whom I have spoken
to after their ordeal question
the airport authorities and secu-
rity personnel’s intellect, as not
having enough common sense
to know that you do not make
the airport a retirement park
for ex-police officers who are
not global or experienced trav-
ellers, or have not travelled out-
side the Bahamas or understand
the complexities of modern air-
port security.

After all, they were probably
stationed in a remote island dur-
ing their entire career.

We may not have the proper
size or designed airport at this
time to support the number of
travellers that come to our

island, but we do have the intel-
lectual capacity to know when a
system is flawed and needs to
be corrected.

We should not allow the TSA
or other foreign jurisdictions to
dictate the operational and
security measures at our airport
that is totally inappropriate and
contributes to the inefficiencies,
disruptions and delays in visi-
tor and citizen travel abroad.

US Customs and Immigra-
tion should have realized by
now that two officers cannot
man a destination like the Lyn-
den Pindling International Air-
port and should, at a minimum,
open up other booths to accom-
modate the large numbers at
convenient or peak travel peri-
ods.

I urge the respective individ-
uals who are responsible at the
airport to please re-examine the
entire situation at LPIA, espe-
cially the senseless double secu-
rity screening process and
implement proactive corrective
measures that will not impede
or leave as it so often does, the
worst impression of the
Bahamas in hearts and minds
of the travellers to island of
New Providence.

ANTHONY U
BOSTWICK Jr
Nassau,

April, 2009.

Haven't we suffered enough from laissez-faire capitalism?

EDITOR, The Tribune.

Re: Redefining the Bahamas government’s role
in the economy (Your Say) March 10, 2009.

The Nassau Institute reportedly stated: “In
simple terms, we should turn toward laissez-faire
capitalism rather than more government plan-

ning...”

Really? Turn toward laissez-faire capitalism?
Isn’t much of the world suffering economically

talism?

Nassau,

right now largely as a result of laissez-faire capi-

KENNETH W
KNOWLES MD

March 11, 2009.

My customers want me to add turtle to my menu!

EDITOR, The Tribune.

It seems to me that the peo-
ple calling for a ban on turtle
meat and now attacking
Andrew Allen for opposing,
are extremely out of touch
with mainstream Bahamian
feelings on the issue.

I am a chef and restaurant
owner of 30 plus years and can
tell you that the vast majority
of Bahamians all over this
Bahamas have no time for a
ban on yet another Bahami-
an delicacy.

In fact, when Mr Allen
gave me a petition, I began
canvassing my customers and



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so far 100 per cent not only
agree with him but have asked
me if I could add turtle to my
menu!

Well done, Mr Allen and

keep speaking up loud and
clear.
ANDRIA V DAMES
Nassau,
April, 2009.

Significant point overlooked

EDITOR, The Tribune.

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Re: Do not ban harvesting of sea turtles Tribune/14 March 2009

Unfortunately, the well written and interesting letter overlooks
a significant point: some apparently “self-righteous, arrogant and
ignorant” Bahamians approve of the turtle conservation bill in the
hope that it may reduce the mindless yet “culturally correct” torture
that these wonderful creatures must endure as they are slowly
butchered. This needless cruelty is inflicted while the turtles are lying
on their backs and gasping for air as the sun beats down on them
mercilessly.

KENNETH

W KNOWLES, MD
(Turtle pie lover) Nassau,
March 15, 2009.

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THE TRIBUNE

FRIDAY, APRIL 17, 2009, PAGE 5



LOCAL NEWS

Residents call for action over
dark and dangerous road

Search for
man wanted

in connection
with drug
Smuggling case

POLICE have launched an
island-wide search for Omar
Chisholm, 31, who is wanted
for questioning in connection
with a million dollar drug
smuggling case.

Chisholm is of medium
build, around 5’ 11” tall and
weighs around 190 lbs. His
last known address is No 52
Yamacraw Beach Estates.

The police have yet to
release a likeness of the sus-
pect.

Anyone with information
about Chisholm’s where-
abouts is being asked to con-
tact the Drug Enforcement
Unit at 323-7139 or 397-3801;
the Police Control Room at
322-3333; Crime Stoppers at
328-8474 or their nearest
police station.

The police said Chisholm
should be considered armed
and dangerous.

He is being sought in con-
nection with a high speed
boat chase which took place
near BarraTerre, Exuma,
around midnight on Saturday.

Officers chasing a suspi-
cious vessel were eventually
able to bring it to a stop and
arrest two men, but two oth-
ers reportedly jumped over-
board.

Marijuana

Several taped bales contain- :

ing 945 pounds of marijuana
with an estimated street value
of $945,000 were allegedly
found aboard the boat.

A third man was eventually
arrested and appeared before
a Magistrates Court in Nassau
on Wednesday along with the
two other suspects. They were
charged with conspiracy to
import and possess marijuana,
and possession of marijuana.

It is also alleged that the
men imported the drugs and
were in possession of the
drugs with intent to supply
them to others.

Garnette Augustus Nevell,
48, alias George Brown, of
Sandy Bay, Clarendon,
Jamaica, pleaded guilty to
conspiring with others to
import and possess marijuana,
as well as to the importation
and possession of marijuana.

Kenworth Smith, 32, of
Behring Point, Andros, and
Valentino Johnson, 33, of Sut-
ton Street, who were
arraigned along with Nevell,
both pleaded not guilty to the
intent to supply charges, but
guilty to the drug charges.

All three men also pleaded
not guilty to the charge of
stealing a 28-foot Intrepid

speedboat while at Highbourn

Cay, Exuma.

m@ By MEGAN REYNOLDS
Tribune Staff Reporter
mreynolds@tribunemedia.net

RESIDENTS forced to use a
dark and dangerous unpaved
road to get to their homes in a
rapidly developing area are call-
ing on government to take
action.

The Killarney community of
several hundred people who use
Munnings Drive, a mile-long
stretch of dirt track linking
Gladstone Road and JFK Dri-
ve, as the primary access route
to their homes are fed up with
the pot holes, flytipping and
lack of street lights on the way
to and from their homes.

When they purchased prop-
erties in the growing subdivi-
sions around South Westridge
in the last two years, new resi-
dents were told roadworks
would be done.

But over one year later
Munnings Drive remains
unchanged, while homes con-
tinue to be built.

Residents are concerned the
dumping is posing a health haz-
ard and environmental risk to
nearby Lake Killarney, and say



RESIDENTS are fed up with the pot holes, flytipping and lack of street
lights on the way to and from their homes.

the rocky road is damaging their
cars and hindering further
infrastructure as Cable
Bahamas will not serve the
expanding community of over
100 homes.

Lisa McCartney, a resident
of Emerald Coast, said: “I have
friends who will not drive to

The Bahamas Hot Rod
Association distances itself
from unregulated facility

IN THE wake of last Sunday’s murder of a 18-year-old youth near the
Queen Elizabeth Sports Centre, the Bahamas Hot Rod Association yes-
terday released a statement seeking to set their racing facility apart from the
unregulated one where the crime took place.

BHRA’s public relations officer Mia Campbell said Sunday’s murder took
place on the nearby unregulated racetrack, and not at the MotorSports Park.

“Safety is the most important factor of any event held at the MotorSports
Park which is why we always have the presence of the ambulance and the

police department,” she said.

Richard Bremmer, of Pinewood Gardens, died after he was stabbed
multiple times in the chest while attending a car rally near the Queen

Elizabeth Sports Centre.

According to police reports, the teenager was attacked by a group of men
when he accidentally hit and seriously injured a 31-year-old Wilson Tract
man while driving away from the Sports Centre in a 1994 Honda Prelude.

Police have charged Shelton Devarso Thompson, 21, of Chippingham, in

connection with the murder.

Ms Campbell expressed condolences to the Bremmer family on behalf of

the association.

She said that the event that the teenager was attending prior to his
death was held on a strip next to the Government High School.

Ms Campbell said that all racing activities should take place in a contained
environment such as the MotorSports Park.

“Activities of any kind dealing with motor sports, whether motorbikes
or cars, are all welcomed at our park and we continue to open our arms to

them.

“Our previous administration has been in many discussions with the
organisers of these groups to use our park and to not only bring enter-
tainment to the spectators of their sport but also to provide a safe envi-

ronment,” she said.

“Motor sports are on the rise in the Bahamas and the BHRA along with
the public and private sectors have recognised this by the many events

planned.”

come visit me at night because
they’re concerned about them-
selves coming in this dark area
at night.

“Another one of my neigh-
bours doesn’t even invite people
over because of what they
would have to pass along the

2

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Bethsheba Haven, 31, a
mother-of-one who moved to
the Emerald Coast in January
last year added: “I’m embar-
rassed to have people visit me
here.

“There are lots of holes, so
you have to go slow, and when
it rains, you are really and truly
swimming through in the car.

“Beyond that is the dumping
problem, which is horrible, and
it’s right in the road.

“If I drive at night ’'m con-
stantly looking to see if any-
one’s following me, because
someone could easily pull across
in front of you in the road and
no one would see.”

Bahamas Logistics Centre
Ltd is one of two businesses in
the area which find clients are
reluctant to use the road, and
they supported residents in a
press conference on Wednes-
day night demanding something
to be done.

A press statement from the
Munnings Drive residents reads:
“We would like to appeal to the
government to take a second

look at this area to see if

Munnings Drive can be given
priority in the 2009-10 budget
for capital improvement works,

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or at worst incorporated into
the New Providence Road
Improvement programme.

“The developers in the area
were given subdivision approval
by the Government to develop
subdivisions that border
Munnings Drive and we, the
individual property owners,
were given permission to build
also by the government.

“Should there not be a corre-
sponding obligation on the part
of the government to ensure
safe and reasonable road access
for the Killarney residents who
they indirectly encouraged to
move to the area?”

Ministry of Works director
Gordon Major said: “If the road
has not been turned over to us
we are not able to pave the
road.

“The subdivision developer
would have to turn the road
over to government.”

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PAGE 6, FRIDAY, APRIL 17, 2009

THE TRIBUNE



LOCAL NEWS

ZNS STAFF gather outside of the Monee yesterday.

FROM page one

“bad management” practices
leading to a funding shortfall.

However, ZNS Chairman
Michael Moss told The Tribune
yesterday that the late salary pay-
ments were “due to a bank error
more than a ZNS problem.”

Meanwhile, admitting that a
funding shortfall does exist with
respect to the increment pay-
ments, he claimed that this hap-
pened because a larger number
of employees than anticipated
were given “above average”
appraisals by “generous” super-
visors entitling them to incre-
ments.

BCPOU President Robert
Farquharson held a general meet-
ing with line staff at ZNS yester-
day afternoon to appraise them of
the union’s efforts on behalf of
employees there.

According to employees, they
were due to receive their pay
cheques on Tuesday, but the
money was not made available.

One employee said: “It doesn’t
surprise me, but people are fed
up. It’s just one of many issues
we have here.”

Yesterday Mr Moss said
employees who had accounts at
the bank where the funds were
being held would have been able
to collect their cheques yester-
day, while remaining staff should
be able to do so by today.

“The funds were made avail-
able at the bank on Thursday of
last week and payment should
have been made on Tuesday.
Apparently there was some kind
of oversight at the bank and I’m
told the instruction on the pay-
roll only has a validity period of
four days so by the time Wednes-
day rolled around the validity
period of the instruction had







ZNS staff

expired and it was only when peo-
ple went to the bank that it came
to light,” he said.

Employees, who are paid on a
bi-monthly basis, said this was the
first time salaries had been late.
Mr Moss maintained that this
week’s troubles do not indicate
any likelihood of such an occur-
rence happening again.

Meanwhile, the Chairman
claimed that although payment
of increments was budgeted for,
the total amount needed to cover
the payouts has fallen short
because “you have supervisory
personnel who, on balance, gave
a much larger percentage of
employees ‘excellent’ appraisals
entitling them to increments”
than expected.

Describing the system as “a bit
crazy”, Mr Moss said there “is
going to be a need for some very
deep review of these agreements
and policies.”

“You have some people who
may not be too au fait with doing
appraisals and might just want to
be nice to everyone.”

The Board, which is still nego-
tiating with the union, has agreed
it can pay the increments over a
three month period beginning
April 30.

“The union has indicated that
50 per cent this month and 50
next month is more palatable for
them. Our response is that we
don’t want to commit to some-
thing our cash flow forecast does-
n’t show to be sustainable
because people would end up
being disappointed, but if rev-
enue is better then we’ll try,” said
Mr Moss.

Attempts to reach Mr Far-
quharson were unsuccessful up
to press time.

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FROM page one

The bodies were found by a

? third-party who went to the tiny
? house, which sits about 100 feet
? away from the street, early yes-
? terday morning. Officers
? responded around 9 am yester-
? day when they found the men
? lying on the ground, fully
? clothed, with apparent gun
i shots about the body.

Police believe the men were

killed as many as 12 hours
: before their bodies were stum-
i bled on.

"We have now launched an

? intensive investigation into
? these latest two homicides —
? we do not have any informa-
: tion with respect to the identity
; of these individuals, nor do we

CLICO-Guyana
ETOP BN
hospital after
being shot

FROM page one

the insurance company, stat-
ing that its US$60 million in
liabilities exceed its assets
by US$5 million, Caribbean
News Net reported.

In her report, she also
criticised how CLICO was
being managed in Guyana.

Ms Van Beek was shot in
her chest while she was dri-
ving along a main street in
Georgetown. She is report-
edly in stable condition.

The circumstances sur-
rounding the shooting are
still unclear at this time, but
Guyana police said they are
following some leads
although they were report-
edly unable to get a descrip-
tion of the gunman from
eyewitnesses.

Ms Van Beek was shot

when she stopped at a junc-
tion on the Lombard Street
thoroughfare in George-

town. Seelall Persaud,
Assistant Police Commis-
sioner for Law Enforcement
in Guyana, said that a gun-
man shot her through her
driver's seat window.





have any information with
respect to the motives for this
incident.

"At this stage we are asking
anyone with information who
might have seen or heard any-
thing around, perhaps within
the last 12 hours gunshots being
heard throughout this general
area, they can contact the
police at 919, 502-9991, or 328-
TIPS," said Assistant Superin-
tendent Walter Evans.

Although Drug Enforcement
Unit officers were on site,
police dismissed assertions that
the murders may be drug relat-
ed.

When The Tribune arrived
on the scene shortly before 10

am yesterday, more than a
dozen investigators combed the
area as curious bystanders
looked on. Screams of anguish
rang through the air about an
hour later when a relative of
one of the victims arrived.
Seemingly overcome with grief,
she had to be supported by
friends and was eventually
escorted away from the area.

While a motive for the
killings had not been estab-
lished by police up to press
time yesterday, friends and
family of the victims were left
dumbfounded over who would
murder them.

Gerty Bullard, whose family
owns the plot of land where the
older victim lived for about 30
years, recalled ‘Daddy’ as a qui-
et, peaceful man who farmed

and "never troubled anybody."

"That old man couldn't hurt
a fly — he was a nice guy and
friendly,” said Ms Bullard, who
said she last saw the farmer on
Monday.

According to reports, the
younger victim Tracey was
down on his luck and had
recently moved in with the old-
er man.

Harvey Knowles, a friend
who grew up with Tracey said
he was last seen in good spirits
Tuesday night. Mr Knowles
said while the younger victim
was sometimes boisterous, he
did not know if he had any ene-
mies.

The double homicide
marked the 20th and 21st mur-
ders of the year and the fourth
murder this week.

Three arrests after firearms,
ammunition, $160,000 seized

FROM page one

vention Taskforce and Customs officers at an
apartment complex at Whaleback Close.
During a search, officers recovered three
firearms, one SAR-1 Caliber Rifle containing
(17) 7.62 live rounds of ammunition; a .45 Austria
Glock pistol containing (9) live rounds of .45 live
rounds of ammunition, and a 5.7 FN Herstal Bel-
gium pistol containing (19) live rounds of 5.7

ammunition.

ASP Bootle reported that some $164,319.52 in
Bahamian and U.S. currency was also discov-
ered, along with an additional assortment of
ammunition, including (50) live rounds of .40
ammunition and a box containing (72) live rounds

FROM page one

the start of the trial.

Mr Turner told Magistrate
Carolita Bethel yesterday that
the prosecution has filed the
necessary statements as part of
a bundle of documents relative
to the case. Magistrate Bethel
informed Bridgewater, who was
again dressed in a white outfit
and Lightbourne, who was
dressed in a suit, that they were
discharged from her court now
that the matter has been trans-
ferred to the Supreme Court.
She informed them that their
$50,000 bail will continue until
they are arraigned in the
Supreme Court.

Bridgewater and Lightbourne
were first charged in January in
connection with the alleged

of ammunition.

He said officers also searched two 40-foot con-
tainers that contained an assortment of building

later.

investigations.

materials, as well as a white cargo truck, which
contained an assortment of alcoholic beverages
and soft drinks.

Mr Bootle said the goods are suspected of
being brought into the country illegally.

He said the containers, truck, and five boats
were impounded by Bahamas Customs. He said
the estimated value of the seizure will be released

ASP Bootle said three men — a 28-year-old
Jamaican national, a 46-year-old Bahamian and
an 18-year-old Bahamian — were arrested. The
men are presently assisting authorities with their

Voluntary Bill of Indictment presented
in Bridgewater and Lighthourne case

plot, which has attracted a great
deal of international media
attention. Lightbourne and
Bridgewater are charged with
conspiring to commit extor-
tion between January 2 and
January 20 of this year. Light-
bourne is also charged with
attempted extortion, while
Bridgewater is charged with
abetment to extort. It is
alleged that Bridgewater pur-
posely facilitated the attempt
to extort $25 million from Mr
Travolta. She is represented
by attorney Murrio Ducille.
Reports of the alleged
extortion attempt emerged

days after Jett Travolta, the
16-year-old son of actors John
Travolta, 54, and Kelly Pre-
ston, 46, died of a seizure at
the family’s vacation home in
Freeport, Grand Bahama, on
January 2.

Bridgewater announced her
resignation from the Senate
days after the police brought
charges against her. Mr Tra-
volta, PLP Senator Allyson
Maynard-Gibson and the Tra-
volta family’s US attorneys are
expected to be called as wit-
nesses at the trial.

Actor John Travolta is also
listed as a witness.

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THE TRIBUNE

FRIDAY, APRIL 17, 2009, PAGE 7



Magistrate alleged

to have collected
fines without
giving record
on payment
FROM page one

Magistrate Swain has
accused Mrs Almorales-Jones
of making false accusations
against her and trying to pun-
ish her because of the way she
handled cases connected to the
Deputy Chief Magistrate’s hus-
band, father-in-law and electri-
cian.

In her defence, the Deputy
Chief Magistrate denied all of
Magistrate Swain’s accusations.

She is seeking damages for
slander, libel, malicious false-
hood and misfeasance in public
office.

Magistrate Swain presided
over Magistrate’s Court Num-
ber 2 in Grand Bahama.

However, she was placed on
leave by Chief Justice Burton
Hall in May of 2007 when alle-
gations of “serious miscon-
duct” were levied against her
in a report prepared by Deputy
Chief Magistrate Almorales-
Jones.

Deputy Chief Magistrate
Almorales-Jones in her
defence has denied that she
complained to the Deputy
Registrar or the Supreme
Court and the Chief Justice
that Magistrate Swain had
accepted a bribe from Darren
Davies, Samantha Ferguson or
Garcia Marshall.

However, Magistrate
Almorales-Jones said in her
defence that she had advised
Chief Justice Hall that without
giving any prior notice and
without having any communi-
cation with her or the prosecu-
tor assigned to her court, Mag-
istrate Swain and her prosecu-
tor, Police Sergeant 1611 Kirk-
lyn Wright, heard Davies, Fer-
guson and Marshall’s case
nearly a week before it was
scheduled for her court.

The trio were charged with
possession of an unlicensed
firearm and possession of
ammunition.

Deputy Chief Magistrate
Almorales-Jones did not
attend work on May 14 and
May 15 of 2007 because she
was suffering from food poi-
soning. On May 15, the prose-
cutor assigned to Magistrate’s
Court Number 3 allegedly con-
tacted Magistrate Almorales-
Jones at home to register a
complaint that the criminal
proceedings of the three
accused, which was to be heard
on the 29th of that month, had
been heard by Magistrate
Swain in Court Number Three
the day before.

Deputy Chief Magistrate
Almorales-Jones claims she
returned to work the following
day and interviewed several
people regarding the circum-
stances surrounding the hear-
ing of the criminal case on May
14.

She alleges that she found
that Magistrate Swain made a
manuscript note on the charge
sheet that she had convicted
and fined Marshall $2,000 or
nine months imprisonment on
each count ($4,000 for both
counts).

The defendants, however,
alleged that Magistrate Swain
ordered Marshall to pay a fine
of $10,000 which was paid in
cash to prosecutor Wright.

The cashier assigned to the
magistrate’s court in Freeport,
however, said that Magistrate
Swain only paid the sum of
$4,000 to the court.

Deputy Chief Magistrate
Almorales-Jones claims in her
defence that there were similar
instances that caused her con-
cern over the way Magistrate
Swain conducted the affairs of
Court Number 2.

Among them was an
instance on May 17, 2007 when
Christopher Rolle reported to
her that in April of that year
he had pleaded guilty to two
counts of receiving before
Magistrate Swain who ordered
him to pay $1,000.

He reportedly paid the fine
to the prosecutor assigned to
the court in the corridor of
Magistrate’s Court Number 2,
but the prosecutor allegedly
failed to give him a receipt.

The court’s record, however,
did not reflect that the fine was
paid into court for Mr Rolle, it
is stated in the defence.

In addition, several staff
members alleged that Magis-
trate Swain frequently heard
criminal and traffic cases in her
private office.

These staff members also
allege that the Magistrate
and/or the prosecutor person-
ally collected money from the
defendants in these cases and
did not issue receipts to them.

In Deputy Chief Magistrate
Almorales-Jones’ defence she
requests that Magistrate
Swain’s writ of summons and
statement of claim be struck
out on the grounds that it fails
to disclose a reasonable cause
of action, is frivolous, vexa-
tious and an “abuse of the
court’s process.”

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and head south around the
curve to the right. The property
is the 2nd to the last house on
the left.

APPRAISED VALUE: $283,000

2. COLLEGE GARDENS

SUBDIVISION

LOT NO. 5

PROPERTY DESCRIPTION:
Single-storey Duplex Apartment
2 Beds / 1 Bath each
PROPERTY SIZE: 5,976 sq. ft.
LOCATION: Traveling east along
Prince Charles Drive for St.
Augustine’s Road, take the 2nd
corner right (College Gardens
Road) and head south to the “T”
junction; turn onto Pine Barren
Road. Heading west, turn through
2nd paved road on left. The
property is the 5th building on the
right.

APPRAISED VALUE: $209,000

. BEL-AIR ESTATES -

CARMICHAEL ROAD

LOT NO. 259

PROPERTY DESCRIPTION:
Single-storey Residence,

3 beds / 2 baths

PROPERTY SIZE: 6,000 sq. ft.
LOCATION: Traveling east on
Carmichael Road from Faith
Avenue, take the 4th corner right
(Turtle Drive). The property is the
4th house on the right.
APPRAISED VALUE: $186,000

. CHIPPINGHAM SUBDIVISION

LOT NO. 17

PROPERTY DESCRIPTION:
Single-storey Residence,

2 beds / 1 bath

PROPERTY SIZE: 6,375 sq. ft.
LOCATION: Traveling west on
Quarry Mission Road off Nassau
Street, the property is located on
the northern side (approximately
500 ft. from Nassau Street).
APPRAISED VALUE: $120,000

10. ENGLERSTON SUBDIVISION

LOT NO. 4 Block 7

PROPERTY DESCRIPTION:
Triplex Apartment building
PROPERTY SIZE: 7,000 sq. ft.
LOCATION: Traveling east on
Cordeaux Avenue from East
Street, take the 2nd right (Key
West Street) and head south. The
property is the 6th building on the
left.

APPRAISED VALUE: $243,000

. BERNARD TERRACE

SUBDIVISION

LOT NO. 14 - Southern Moiety
PROPERTY DESCRIPTION:
Multi-Family Residential Lot
PROPERTY SIZE: 5,700 sq. ft.
with foundation

LOCATION: Traveling east on
Bernard Road, take the 1st
corner on the right past Windsor
Terrace. The vacant lot is the 4th
on the left.

APPRAISED VALUE: $85,000

. CARMICHAEL VILLAGE

LOT NO. “A”

PROPERTY DESCRIPTION:
Single family Residential Lot
PROPERTY SIZE: 4,650 sq. ft.
LOCATION: Traveling west

on Avocado Road from Faith
Avenue, turn through the 1st
graveled corner on the left. The
vacant lot is the 2nd on the left,
enclosed with chain link fence
and fruit trees.

APPRAISED VALUE: $51,000

3._ GAMBLE HEIGHTS

SUBDIVISION

LOT NO. Parcel of Land
PROPERTY DESCRIPTION:
Split Level Residence with Two
1 bed/1 bath Apartment Units
under construction
PROPERTY SIZE: 7,141 sq. ft.
LOCATION: Traveling south on
Blue Hill Road from Faith
United Way, take the 1st corner
left (Sunrise Road) and head
south; take the 5th corner

left and head east to the 1st
corner right. The property is
the 7th house on the right.
APPRAISED VALUE: $150,000

. PINEWOOD GARDENS

SUBDIVISION

LOT NO. 1714

PROPERTY DESCRIPTION:
Single-storey Residence
PROPERTY SIZE: 5,000 sq. ft.
LOCATION: Traveling east onto
Bamboo Boulevard from East
Street, take the 3rd corner right
(Thatch Palm Avenue) and travel
south, turn through 2nd corner
on the left (Avocado Street). The
property is the 17th house on
the left.

APPRAISED VALUE: $137,000

. GOLDEN ISLES ROAD

LOT NO. “B”

PROPERTY DESCRIPTION:
Triplex Apartment Complex
PROPERTY SIZE: 7,203 sq. ft.
LOCATION: Traveling north on
Golden Isles Road from Cowpen
Road, after the 1st paved road
on left; the property is the 2nd
building on the left.
APPRAISED VALUE: $333,000

12. MARSHALL ROAD

LOT NO. 17D

PROPERTY DESCRIPTION:
Triplex Apartment-One 2-
bedroom/ 2-bath & Two 2-
bedroom /1-bath

PROPERTY SIZE: 10,000 sq. ft.
LOCATION: Traveling west on
Marshall Road from South Beach
Road, take the 1st corner right
(Tiao End Road). The property is
the 4th building on the left.
APPRAISED VALUE: $288,000

13. MARSHALL ROAD

LOT NO. 52

PROPERTY DESCRIPTION:
Single-storey Residence 3 beds /
2 baths

PROPERTY SIZE: 37,550 sq. ft.
LOCATION: Traveling on Marshall
Road from Blue Hill Road, turn
left at “T” junction, then right. The
property is the 5th on the right, to
the rear.

APPRAISED VALUE: $345,000

. KOOL ACRES SUBDIVISION

LOT NO. 46 Parcel ‘C”
PROPERTY DESCRIPTION:
Multi / Single Family Residential
PROPERTY SIZE: 7,604 sq. ft.
LOCATION: Traveling south

on Fox Hill Road from Joe
Farrington Road, take the 2nd
corner left - opposite Guana
Cay Avenue - on to Kool Acres
Subdivision Road. The vacant lot
is 1st on the left; directly on the
corner of Fox Hill Road and Kool
Acres Subdivision Road.
APPRAISED VALUE: $84,000

4. SEA GULL GARDEN

SUBDIVISION

LOT NO. 33

PROPERTY DESCRIPTION: Multi
- Family Residential Lot

Beach Front

PROPERTY SIZE: 14,723 sq. ft.
LOCATION: On Flemming Road.
APPRAISED VALUE: $200,000

\

yr

DEVELOPED RESIDENTIAL & COMMERCIAL

5, CENTERVILLE

LOT NO. 5 Block 14
PROPERTY DESCRIPTION:
Single-storey Commercial
Building

PROPERTY SIZE: 5,000 sq. ft.
LOCATION: Madeira Street
between Montrose Avenue and
Mt. Royal Avenue
APPRAISED VALUE: $302,000

6._ SIR LYNDEN PINDLING

ESTATES SUBDIVISION

LOT NO. 3014/15

PROPERTY DESCRIPTION:
Single-family Residence

3 beds / 2 baths

PROPERTY SIZE: 5,000 sq. ft.
LOCATION: Traveling east

on Bamboo Boulevard to the
roundabout, continue traveling
eastward on C.W. Saunders
Highway. Take the 2nd right (Lady
Pindling Avenue) and head south
to the 1st paved corner on the left
(Lauren Street); turn through 2nd
corner left (Pear Tree Avenue).
The property is the 6th house on
the left.

APPRAISED VALUE: $145,000

14. PINEWOOD GARDENS

SUBDIVISION

LOT NO. 13

PROPERTY DESCRIPTION:
Single-storey Residence,

3 beds / 2 baths

PROPERTY SIZE: 7,191 sq. ft.
LOCATION: Traveling east on
Sapodilla Boulevard from East
Street, take the 1st left (Thatch
Palm Avenue) and head north
to the “T” junction. Take a left
(Mahogany Street); the property is
the 2nd on the right.
APPRAISED VALUE: $148,000

15. SANDILANDS VILLAGE

LOT NOS. 7 and 8
PROPERTY DESCRIPTION:
Single-storey Residence

With 3 apartments under
construction

PROPERTY SIZE: Lot 7: 7,970
sq. ft, Lot 8:8,419 sq. ft.
LOCATION: Traveling west on
Sandilands Village Road from
Fox Hill Road, turn through the
9th paved road on left (Vanessa
Close). The properties are located
on the northwestern side of the
street.

APPRAISED VALUE: $277,000

. SOUTH OCEAN ESTATES

SUBDIVISION

LOT NO. 1 Block 5

PROPERTY DESCRIPTION:
Multi-family Residential Lot
PROPERTY SIZE: 11,566 sq. ft.
LOCATION: Traveling south of
Lyford Cay, immediately pass
Mount Pleasant turn left on
South Ocean Boulevard to New
South Ocean Estates. The vacant
lot is the 1st on the right.
APPRAISED VALUE: $110,000

6. SOUTHERN SHORES

SUBDIVISION

LOT NO. 4 parcel of lot 24
PROPERTY DESCRIPTION:
Multi - Family Residential Lot
PROPERTY SIZE: 7,706 sq. ft.
LOCATION: The vacant

lot is on the west side of a
road reservation nearly 400
feet south of Marshall Road.
APPRAISED VALUE: $77,000

7. WINTON MEADOWS ESTATES
SUBDIVISION I
LOT NO. 115
PROPERTY DESCRIPTION:
Single-storey Residence 3 beds
/ 2 baths
PROPERTY SIZE: 8,000 sq. ft.
LOCATION: Traveling east
on Prince Charles Drive for
Culberts Hill, take the 1st corner
right (Jasmine Drive) and head
south; turn through 2nd corner
on the right (Violette Drive). The
property is the 4th house on the
left.
APPRAISED VALUE: $274,000

16. SANDILANDS VILLAGE
LOT NO. “E”
PROPERTY DESCRIPTION:
Duplex Apartment Complex
PROPERTY SIZE: 5,500 sq. ft.
LOCATION: Traveling west on
Sandilands Village Road from
Fox Hill Road, turn through the
2nd paved road on the left. The
property is the 5th on the left.
APPRAISED VALUE: $219,000

VACANT LOTS

INTERESTED PARTIES SHOULD SUBMIT OFFERS INCLUSIVE OF TELEPHONE CONTACT AND POSTAL ADDRESS
TO: CB DISTRESSED PROPERTIES, CREDIT RISK MANAGEMENT DEPARTMENT, P.O BOX - SS-6263 NASSAU, BAHAMAS OR
EMAIL US AT: DISTRESSED. PROPERTIES@COMBANKLTD.COM * WE RESERVE THE RIGHT TO REJECT ANY OR ALL OFFERS.




TRIBUNE SPORTS

FRIDAY, APRIL 17, 2009, PAGE 9



SPORTS



ai

Grizzlies see signs
of improvement —

@ BASKETBALL
MEMPHIS, Tenn. i
Associated Press i



MEASURING progress }
with the Memphis Grizzlies }
isn't easy. For perhaps the
first time in a couple years, }
they see signs of improve- }
ment. ;
And strong reasons for }
hope. i
"I think we're very happy :
and fortunate where we are }
now," guard Mike Conley }
said. "We've come a long }
way through the coaching }
change and different things. I ;
think finally, in the last }
month of the season, we real- }
ly started to gel together.
Hopefully, we've laid afoun- }
dation to build upon." i

The Grizzlies posted a 24- ;
58 record, a two-win }
improvement over last year, ;
and they even capped the }
season by beating the Atlanta }
Hawks 98-90 in the finale }
Wednesday night. That tied :
them for fifth-worst record }
in the NBA with Minnesota. }

One measure of progress? }
And yes, it's a bit small. :

"Just having 4-game win }
streaks and things like that, :
shows an improvement," :
Hakim Warrick said. ;

Still, this is a team that won }
only 11 games before Marc
Iavaroni was fired as coach }
in January and replaced by }
Lionel Hollins. The Grizzlies }
went 13-26 under Hollins }
who has job security for next }
season as he tries to add }
more wins and grow this :
team. :
"I'm very happy with :
where we are. The young }
guys have developed acama- }
raderie. We move the ball, }
we play better together. Our }
offense flows a lot better }
most nights. We have gotten :
better individually," Hollins :
said. i
He likes how Marc Gasol, }
Conley, Rudy Gay and O.J. }
Mayo, the No. 3 pick in the }
draft, improved together. i

The next step is adding :
more talent to the bench to }
avoid having to play starters :
so much. Gay, Mayo, Conley }
and Gasol each played at }
least 30 minutes per game }
this season. Hollins wants }
more rebounding and more :
scoring from the bench as }
well. :
Only Charlotte scored few- ;
er than Memphis’ 93.8 points }
per game, and the Grizzlies }
were last in the NBA with
38.8 rebounds per game. i



dames feeling like a kid again ahead of playoffs

m@ BASKETBALL
Associated Press

WITH THE NBA playoffs
starting up this weekend,
LeBron James is feeling like a
kid all over again.

The Cleveland Cavaliers
player led his team to a league
best 66-16 record this season,
and the 24-year-old star is one
of the main contenders to win
his first MVP award. But it's
the NBA title he is craving.

"The playoffs is like taking
the kid to the candy story,”
James said. "We all know that
it's a new season now."

The Cavs face the Detroit
Pistons in the first round of the
playoffs, and they will host the
first game on Saturday. The
Pistons, which finished third in
the Central Division, are the
only team in the playoffs with a
losing record (39-43).

But that doesn't mean that
James and his gang are going to
take them lightly.

"There's no way you can
overlook the Pistons. This is a
team that's been to the Eastern
Conference finals like six years
in a row," James said. "We
know how experienced that
team is. We know how power-
ful and dangerous that team
is.”

Another strong team in the
league is the Boston Celtics.
But the defending champions
may have lost star Kevin Gar-
nett for the entire playoffs
because of a knee injury that
has limited him to four games
over the final two months of
the season.

"KG has to do what's best
for him. He doesn't want to do
something that can hurt him
for a long period of time,”
James said. "The team may be



WASHINGTON Wizards guard
Gilbert Arenas signs a ball after
their NBA basketball practice in
Washington Friday, March 27,
2009.

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Michael Conroy/AP Photo

CLEVELAND Cavaliers’ LeBron James, front, is fouled by Indiana Pacers' Rasho Nesterovic, of Slovenia, in the first half of an NBA bas-
ketball game in Indianapolis, Monday, April 13, 2009.

a little bit down, but they still
have a lot of veteran guys.”
James is the key to Cleve-
land's success. He finished sec-
ond in the league's scoring
chart with 28.4 points per
game, but he's about more than
just putting points on the score-

board.

"My game is geared around
making my teammates better,”
said James, who also has a
documentary called "More
Than a Game" coming out in
October. "The way I play the
game of basketball automati-

cally gives my teammates the
ball just because I like to pass
— very unselfish basketball
player.”

And while James also said
this season was his best yet as a
pro player, he’s also prepared
to keep improving, saying that

every part of his game could
still get better.

James was drafted by the
Cavaliers out of high school in
2003, and he has spent his
entire professional career in
Cleveland. Win or lose this
year, that’s not likely to change.

Arenas wants to shed

Wizards’

@ BASKETBALL
WASHINGTON
Associated Press

ON THE flight home from Boston, after
the final game of one of the worst seasons in
Washington Wizards franchise history,
Gilbert Arenas laid down the law.

Next season, Arenas said, the goofing
around has got to stop.

"We've just been a goofball team for a
while,” Arenas said Thursday, explaining the
speech he gave to his teammates on the
plane. "It's fun when you're winning. But
when you're not winning, it's depressing a
little bit. The same guys are here, but we're
going to have to approach — especially the
young guys — the game seriously."

Wait a minute. This was Agent Zero?
Talking about being serious? Was he hav-
ing an out-of-body experience or something?

"He said next year's totally different —
no playing around,” forward Andray Blatche
said. "I was surprised. I was like, ‘Is this
Gil?"

With the 19-63 campaign mercifully over
and new coach Flip Saunders not expected to
formally take the job until next week, there



‘goofball’ image

was time for lots of Gilbertology on Thursday
as the Wizards took their end-of-season phys-
icals. Speaking for more than 15 minutes,
Arenas addressed his reputation for being
"uncoachable,” his ongoing comeback from
knee surgery, his "smoke and mirrors" pub-
lic persona and his unexpected lecture aboard
the team plane.

Arenas said the talk was meant to bridge
the divide between the team's professional,
serious veterans and the young players, whose
pregame jokes and pranks seem more befit-
ting of a high school locker room.

"To be honest, I'm a goofball,” Arenas
said. "But when I step inside those lines, it’s
serious. Some of them don't know how to
turn that on and off. I told them, it comes
with time. You've got to put your work in the
summer because we're coming at you. It's
everybody for themselves."

One player who didn't hear Arenas was co-
captain Caron Butler, who said he was watch-
ing the movie "The Notebook" on the plane.
Told of Arenas' comments, Butler said: "It's
about time for that talk to be coming out of
his mouth."

Arenas’ returned to the court March 28
against Detroit, ending a two-year span in




which he had three left knee operations,
missed 156 of 173 games and signed a $111
million, six-year contract. But he played in
that game and only one other, raising suspi-
cions that his knee was again giving him prob-
lems.

Arenas said the knee is fine, and that the
two games were all the doctors needed to
see. "They were comfortable with the two
games I gave them,” Arenas said. "So I decid-
ed after those two games I played, let's just
think about next season. I'm getting killed this
season anyway, might as well just add to it.
Somebody has to be smart here and focus on
what's to come. It's a five-year investment,
not a one-year pressure to deliver."

Arenas said his offseason regimen will
include 1,000 shots per day in May and June,
and he plans to do football-related workouts
to increase his leg strength.

Former Wizards coach Eddie Jordan did-
n't coin the term Gilbertology without good
reason. Arenas is the first to admit his per-
sonality has its quirks, but he said a lot of his
self-marketing act is truly just an act — begun
after he was originally snubbed for 2006 All-
Star game.

"I'm more smoke and mirrors than any-
thing,” Arenas said. "Once I got snubbed, I
felt if I talked a little trash, people would
actually hear it and see it. And then it started
working, so I kept going with it. ... Since I said
I was the ‘East Coast Assassin,’ everybody
started paying attention — like, oh yeah, he's
gotten better."

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PAGE 10, FRIDAY, APRIL 17, 2009

TRIBUNE SPORTS



SPORTS



No Bull Basketball Club
returns from successful trip |

@ By BRENT STUBBS
Senior Sports Reporter
bstubbs@tribunemedia.net

COACH Geno Bullard said
his No Bull Basketball Club
was in no mood for fooling
around during a tour of Canada
last week.

The club returned home hav-
ing secured athletic scholarships
for at least five of the players
with a number of the others
being considered for the future.

“We are working on getting
all of the paperwork completed
for the players before we make
an official announcement on
exactly where they are going,”
Bullard said.

“But the coaches we have
been in contact with have been

very impressed with the players
and they are all eager in get-
ting them into their programme
in August.”

Bullard, who also coaches at
Westminster College, said the
trip was quite a success with
the team playing in a number of
exhibition games against local
colleges such as Ridley College,
Seneca College, York Univer-
sity, Niagara College and Hum-
ber College.

“It wasn’t so much about
winning basketball games,”
Bullard said. “We went there
to get the exposure for the play-
ers at the college level.

“But a lot of the coaches
were surprised to learn that our
players were still in college.
They didn’t believe that the



“We went
there to get
the exposure
for the players
at the college
level.”



Geno Bullard

way the players played that
they were not ready for college.
They have indicated that they
will keep an interest in the play-
ers for the future.”

During their trip, No Bull
also attended the National Bas-

Stopping D-Wade: Hawks
facing NBA’s top scorer

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ketball Association game
between the Toronto Raptors
and the Philadelphia 76ers.

“We really had a good time
on the tour,” Bullard said. “All
of the schools treated us very
well. They made us felt as if we
were right at home.”

Now that they are back
home, Bullard said the empha-
sis will be placed on ensuring
that the players who have
secured the scholarships will be
ready to make the trip once
their paperwork is complete.

Additionally, Bullard said his
club will begin preparation for
their summer programme,
which includes a tour and exhi-
bition series in Cuba.

The No Bull Basketball Club
will also be participating in a

@ BASKETBALL
ATLANTA
Asociated Press

AS THE Atlanta Hawks
wrapped up their first practice
of a new season, Mike Wood-
son implored his team to take
advantage of this once-in-a-
decade opportunity.

"Mentally, we've got to step it
up a notch,” the coach told his
players, gathered around him
Thursday in the middle of their
Philips Arena practice court.

But one thing is clear with-
out extra time in the film room:
The Hawks must stop — check
that, slow down — Dwyane
Wade if they want to advance to
the second round of the play-
offs for the first time since 1999,
which also was the last time
they had home-court advantage.

M-V-3 is the league's leading
scorer, a guy who literally took
a young Miami Heat team on
his back and lifted them back
to the playoffs after a 15-win
season. He's a guard on a mis-
sion, still angry about those who
wondered if he'd seen his best
days after two injury plagued
seasons.

Now, he's ready to take his
well-controlled wrath out on the
Hawks in what appears to be
the most intriguing Eastern
Conference series of the open-

Two events
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number of local tournaments
in New Providence and Grand
Bahama where they have
enjoyed a great deal of success.

Bullard has indicated that as
a recruiter for at least five col-
leges and universities in Cana-
da, he is willing to assist any
local basketball player if they
are interested in furthering
their education.

“They don’t have to be a
member of the No Bull Bas-
ketball Club,” he said. “Once
they have an interest and are
willing to make the transition,
we can help them out.”

Interested persons can con-
tact Bullard through email nob-
ullitd@hotmail.com or visit
their website at nobulllimit-
ed.page.tl



Gregory Smith/AP Photo

ATLANTA Hawks center Al Horford, left, drives against Miami Heat
forward Michael Beasley, right, during the first quarter, of an NBA
basketball game at Philips Arena, Tuesday, April 14, 2009 in Atlanta.

ing round. Game 1 is Sunday
night in Atlanta.

"Oh, man, I don't think any-
body shuts him down. He's
proven that this year,” Hawks
forward Marvin Williams said.
"But we have some athletic
guys who can really help out.
Whoever has the assignment of
guarding him is going to have a
tough assignment, but they'll
know the rest of the team has
their back."

Atlanta did a good job on
Wade in two regular-season
games. He hit only 9-of-24 shots
in a December matchup, then
was limited to a pair of free
throws — one of his most effec-
tive weapons — in a February
loss to the Hawks. He scored
21 points in each, nine below
his league-best average of 30.2.

But Wade torched Atlanta
for 35 points on 13-of-19 shoot-
ing (plus 9-of-10 foul shots) in
Miami's lone victory over the
Hawks this season (He sat out
the teams’ final regular-season
meeting Tuesday, a meaning-
less game with both teams
already locked into the 4-5
seeds in the East).

"He's just relentless in get-
ting to the basket," said Joe
Johnson, the Hawks’ leading
scorer. "He shoots a lot of free
throws. It's tough. Everybody,
all five guys, have really got to
be in sync trying to stop him."

Woodson shrugged off the
inevitable questions about shut-
ting down Wade, stressing that
Miami is not a one-man team.

Four other players averaged
in double figures, led by rookie
Michael Beasley at 13.9, and
several Atlanta players men-
tioned 3-point specialist Dae-
quan Cook, who scored nearly
two-thirds of his field goals from
beyond the arc.

"It's not our job to sit here
and just try to figure out how to
stop Dwyane Wade,” Woodson
said. "I don't think you can do
that. Their supporting case was
good enough to get them into
the fifth spot this year. I look
at the Miami Heat as the Miami
Heat, as a team, and we've got
to figure that out."

In three games that mattered
during the regular season,
Atlanta held the Heat to just
under 84 points a game, far
below its 98.1 average.

Again, Woodson doesn't
much stock in what happened
before the playoffs.

| WEDN

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e THE New Providence

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Two cyclists started at

? opposite sides of the track,

? each doing 6 laps. With

: heads bent and concentra-

? tion written on their faces, it
? was tempting to slip a glance
i to see exactly where the

i competition was.

Here’s how they finished:
Justin Minnis — 4.40.44.
Antinece Simmons —
4.49.28.

Lashane Dean — 4.23.06.
Henry Kline — 4.30.12.
Anthony Colebrook —
4.03.38.

Robert Bethel — 4.08.53
Van Demeritte — 4.11.91.
Eugene Heastie — 4.25.41
(Track bike)

Larry Russell — 6.42.66

Next Wednesday, the com-

petitors will compete in a
i kilo race.





| FREEDOM FARM
SCH













DUL

® Here’s a look at the





: schedule for the Freedom
? Farm Baseball League this
‘ weekend in Yamacraw:

? TBALL:

i? Friday

? 6 pm Jujus vs Sea Grapes

? Saturday

? 9am Coco Plums vs Guineps
? 10:15 am Dillies vs Jujus

? COACHPITCH:

? Friday

? 7:30 pm Sandflies vs Green

? Turtles

i Saturday

? 11:30 am Mosquitoes vs Boas
i 1 pm Green Turtles vs Bees

? 3 pm Wasps vs Sandflies

? Sunday

? 3pm Wasps vs Mosquitoes

: 9-10:

i Friday

? 6 pm Octopus vs Eels

? Saturday

? 9am Turbots vs Red Snap-
j per

? 10:30 am
? Barracudas

? Sunday

: 4:30 pm Eels

Eels vs

vs Turbots

11-12
i Friday
: 7:30 pm Conchs vs Iguanas

i Saturday
: 11 am Hurricanes vs Divers

? Noon Groupers vs Marlins
? 1 pm Hurricanes vs Divers
i? 3:30 pm Parrots vs Iguanas
? Sunday

? 3 pm Conchs vs Marlins

? 4:30 pm Crowns vs Parrots

: 13-15:

i Saturday

? 9 am Sharks vs Owlz

? 1 pm Potcakes vs Stingrays
? 3 pm Silverjacks vs Sharks
? 16-18:

? Sunday

? 2:30 pm Arawaks vs

? Lucayans

: 4 pm Tainos vs Caribs

Bahamas wins
first medal

FROM page 11

second in the

¢ DIONISIO CAREY, fourth in the
; boys 11-12 butterfly in 1:09.17.

? ¢ MAYA ALBURY, second in the
? girls 13-14 100 butterfly in
? 1:09.56 and BRIA DEVEAUX, sev-
? enth in 1:10.47.

¢ EVANTE GIBSON, second in the
? boys 13-14 100 butterfly in
; 1:01.80.

i e« MCKAYLA LIGHTBOURN,
? fourth in the girls 15-17 100 but-
? terfly in 1:09.07 and ARIEL
? WEECH, seventh in 1:11.27.

During the evening ses-

i sions, the official opening cer-
? emonies took place.

The meet will continue with

i two sessions today starting at
: 8:30 am and 3:30 pm.

The championships will

? conclude on Sunday. The
? Bahamas is
? improve on its third place fin-
? ish last year behind the com-
? bined French Antilles and
? Trinidad & Tobago.

hoping to
THE TRIBUNE



FRIDAY, APRIL 17,

nowles,

@ By BRENT STUBBS
Senior Sports Reporter
bstubbs@tribunemedia.net

MARK Knowles and Mahesh Bhupathi
will have to wait a little longer before they
play their first match at the Monte Carlo
Rolex Masters Tournament.

The Bahamian-Indian connection was
scheduled to play their opener in the second
round yesterday, but heavy rain in Monaco
forced the postponement of the match until
today.

“We're ready to play,” said Knowles in an
interview with The Tribune from his hotel
room yesterday. “We just couldn’t play
because of the heavy rain. Only one match
was played. But we hope to play tomorrow.”

Knowles and Bhupthai, the number four
seeds in the tournament, are scheduled to
play against the unseeded team of Feliciano
Lopez and Fernando Verdasco, both from
Spain.

But they will have to wait until Verdasco
play his singles match against number three
seed Novak Djokovic from Serbia. Verdasco
is the number seven seed in singles.

“They gave us a very tough match right out

PAGE 11

rts



2009

“There are a
lot of tough teams
in our draw, but
we just have to
be ready to play and
I think we are.”
MARK KNOWLES

of the gate,” Knowles pointed out. “So we
will have to be ready to go and play from
the start.

“Verdasco and Lopez are a pretty good
team. But we feel confident that we can play
well enough to get to the next round.”

If they are successful, Knowles and Bhu-
pathi will have to play their quarter-final
match against the unseeded team of Djokovic
and his compatriot Viktor Troicki.

“Tt doesn’t get any easier for us,” Knowles
said. “There are a lot of tough teams in our
draw, but we just have to be ready to play and
I think we are.”

Bhupathi match rained out

Knowles and Bhupathi reached the final of
this tournament last year and he’s hoping
that they will not just get back there, but go
all the way and win the title this time around.

If they advance to the semifinal, Knowles
and Bhupathi could possibly end up playing
against the No.2 seeded team of Daniel
Nestor of Canada and Nenad Zimonjic from
Serbia.

Knowles and Nestor were former part-
ners, having split up after playing together for
more than 10 years. They were considered
one of the most successful partners, winning
just about every tournament except Wim-
bledon. After their spilt three years ago,
Knowles teamed up with Bhupathi.

The duo got off to a great start this year,
playing in the final of the Australian Open
where they lost to the American identical
twin brothers Bob and Mike Bryan. They
also played in the semi’s of a tournament in
Sydney.

But since January, the duo have not had a
winning streak.

“We lost in some big tournaments,”
Knowles said. “But we’re hoping that we can
get back to the level that we were in January
and eventually turn things around.”

Bahamas wins first medal



File photoAP Photo

HEAVY rain in Monaco forced the postponement of the first match
for Mark Knowles (background) and Mahesh Bhupathi (foreground).

of two other events to join a
number of Bahamians who
advanced for a shot at a medal

¢ MCKAYLA LIGHTBOURN, first in
the girls 15-17 200 breaststroke
























McKayla Lightbourn

@ By BRENT STUBBS
Senior Sports Reporter
bstubbs@tribunemedia.net

McKAYLA Lightbourn, one
of the most decorated Bahami-
an swimmers at last year’s
Carifta Swimming Champi-
onships, picked up where she
left off at this year’s event.

As a member of the 36-
strong team competing in
Savaneta, Aruba, Lightbourn
picked up the Bahamas’ lone
medal on the first day of com-
petition yesterday.

In one of the two finals con-

tested during the morning ses-
sion, Lightbourn posted a win-
ning time of nine minutes and
14.88 seconds to secure the
gold in the girls 15-17 800
metre freestyle.

Her nearest rival was
Trinidad & Tobago’s Saman-
tha Rahael, who clocked
9:22.26 for the silver. The
bronze went to Laura Butler
of the Cayman Islands in
9:48.26.

Another Bahamian Amber
Weech was sixth in the race in
10:02.13 as she improved on
her personal best time of
10:07.96.

The other final contested
was in the girls 13-14 800
freestyle.

Two Bahamians competed
in that event, but the best finish
came from Bria Deveaux in a
PR of 10:14.57, surpassing her
previous best of 10:23.46.
Riquel Rolle was 13th in
11:00.82.

Martinique’s Julie-Anne
Malidor took the gold in
9:31.48 with the silver going to
Trinidad & Tobago’s Kimber
John Williams in 9:32.80 and
the bronze to Cayman Island’s
Lara Butler in 9:48.26.

McKayla also made the final

in 13 of the 18 other prelimi-
nary events staged in the morn-
ing session.

Swimmers advancing are as
follows:

¢ LAURA MORLEY, second in the
girls 11-12 200 breaststroke heats
in 2:53.31.

¢ DUSTIN TYNES, first in the boys
11-12 200 breaststroke in 2:40.35
with Dionisio Carey, third in
2:51.95.

¢ EVANTE GIBSON, second in the
boys 13-14 200 breaststroke in
2:40.54 and Toby McCarroll, third
in 2:41.04.

¢ Outdoor Tiles
* Pool Tiles

« Mosaic Tifas

in 2:48.67 and SHAUNTE MOSS,
seventh in 3:02.55.

¢ JACINDA WILLIAMS, seventh in
the girls 11-12 50 backstroke in
35.51.

¢ DIONISIO CAREY, third in the
boys 11-12 50 backstroke in 31.61
and DYLAN CASH, seventh in
34.07.

¢ LARON MORLEY, eighth in the
boys 13-14 50 backstroke in 31.02.

¢ ARIEL WEECH, second in the
girls 15-17 50 backstroke in 31.84.

SEE page 10

EW TERPRISES LIMITED

parr merge apm ge pret la
Ce ee ee A ee EL ra
Lee ee ee ee
Ps em De re i ie Med
fata EM ema cette tg tt tt meen
PAGE 12, FRIDAY, APRIL 17, 2009

THE TRIBUNE



Whe :

&

@ribune |

Let. Fos



THE Colouring Contest winners with their Easter baskets. Not pictured are Summer Burrows, second place
winner in the 4-5 years category, and Abishai Beneby, second place winner in the 9-10 years category.

2009

CONTEST

@ The Tribune and Kelly’s Home Centre are pleased
to announce the winners of the 2009 Easter Colouring
Contest.

The judges had the difficult task of determining the
winners following the submission of hundreds of pic-
tures by children between the ages of four and 10. Pic-
tured are the first, second and third place winners in
the three age categories with their prizes - fabulous
Easter baskets, all donated by Kelly’s.



TAMERA CAMBRIDGE,
second place winner in the
6-8 years category.



JAIAIRE BRENNEN, first place winner
in the 4-5 years age category.



SARAI BAIN, third place winner
in the 6-8 years category.



ARIANNA JOBSON, third place winner
in the 4-5 years category.

ist - JAIAIRE BRENNEN
2nd - SUMMER BURROWS
3rd - ARIANNA JOHNSON

TS UL SASH

ist - RHYAN ROBERTS
2nd - TAMERA CAMBRIDGE
3rd - SARAI BAIN



BERTRAM MURRAY, first place
winner in the 9-10 years category.

ist - BERTRAM MURRAY
2nd - ABISHAI BENEBY
3rd - GLENWITTE RUSSELL

ues

GINA BETHEL - Tribune Classified/Advertising Agent
LLOYD ALLEN- Tribune Features Reporter

CARA BETHEL- Tribune Features Editor

LASHANTA DUGAY- Kelly's Home Centre Representative
JANELL BRENNEN- Kelly's Home Centre Representative



GLENWITTE RUSSELL,
third place winner in the
9-10 years category.

RHYAN ROBERTS, first place winner
in the 6-8 years category.




THE TRIBUNE a

Linite



FAMILY GUARDIAN

FRIDAY, APRIL INSURANCE COMPANY LIMITED

ie

2009

SECTION B e business@tribunemedia.net

City Markets rejects Bringing export
50% of j ob seekers back into ‘fashion

* Islands of the World Fashion Week to
expand beyond 35 designers from 2008 after







Narra
awT Ke

‘devastating’
for economy



* Top economist says fl Human resources head says recruitment, productivity ‘scary ee

education failings leave and brutal’ sane aiaien award ick ’
‘ ; : : reaniser urges tourism tO LOOK at His even

unproductive workforce | J. Fears that education woes will cause Bahamian economy and 8 ;

‘less able to adapt’ to rapid
changes free trade, financial
regulation will force on
Bahamas and way it
conducts business

* ‘You can't have the levels
of illiteracy that prevail here
continue to be pumped out
into society’, as economy
becomes ‘progressively less
competitive’

m@ By NEIL HARTNELL
Tribune Business Editor

High illiteracy levels among
Bahamian public high school
leavers have “devastating impli-
cations” for the economy at a
time when the foundations of its
long-standing business model are
likely to undergo rapid change, a
New Providence telling Tribune
Business the situation would
make this nation “progressively
less competitive”.

Ralph Massey, a founding
member of the Nassau Institute
economic think-tank, told this
newspaper that the English and
mathematical illiteracy prevalent
among many high school gradu-
ates would depress workforce
productivity and skills, leaving
the Bahamian economy less able
to adapt to the changes being
forced upon it by rules-based
trading regimes and _ the
OECD/G-20 assault on interna-
tional financial centres.

In a presentation to a Nassau
Institute meeting on Wednesday
night, Mr Massey drew on the
research finding from his The
Learning Crisis essay to show
that, based on the 2006 BGCSE
results, 39 per cent of New Prov-
idence high school students who
sat the English exam failed, while
another 17 per cent were “lan-
guage illiterate”.

As for mathematics, the find-
ings were even more shocking -

SEE page 4B

Receivers:
Buyer interest
in Bimini resort

already seen

m@ By CHESTER ROBARDS
Business Reporter
crobards@tribunemedia. net

SOUTHAMPTON, Bermuda
— Receivers for the Bimini Big
Game Resort have already
received interest in the property
from prospective, a senior execu-
tive with KPMG (Bahamas) told
Tribune Business yesterday. The
property, though only closed for
several months, would need mod-
erate capital investment.

Simon Townend, head of
Bahamas-based KPMG Corpo-
rate Finance, said the receivers
were considering all available
options with regard to the future
of the resort.

“We were only just appointed
receivers recently, so we’re still
looking at all the options. I can’t
categorically say, but certainly the
property is on the market,” he
said.

“There already has been inter-
est. It’s got a lot of history, so
people know what’s happening
and quite a few have already
expressed interest.”

The owners of the resort shut
down operations late last year,
left the staff with unpaid wages
and were never heard from again.

Now, a Cayman Islands-based
company is looking to recover the
loan it made to finance the Bimi-
ni Big Game Resort.

“The company has a reason-
able level of liabilities to various

SEE page 2B

firms to ‘be swallowed’ up by better prepared foreign rivals

@ By NEIL HARTNELL
Tribune Business Editor

“At least half” of all school
leaver applicants who apply for
jobs at City Markets are reject-
ed because they cannot pass the
company’s basic maths test, its
human resources head has
revealed to Tribune Business,
describing the recruitment and
productivity issues facing it and
other Bahamian companies as
“brutal” and “scary”.

Peter Goudie told this news-
paper: “It’s absolutely brutal.
What we all run into, and it’s
not just me, is that most of the
kids looking for work in our
industry can’t get past the basic
maths test. We turn down most
of those who apply.”

He explained that the test
used by the 12-store grocery
chain, whose immediate hold-
ing company is publicly-owned

Bahamas Supermarkets, tested
simple addition, subtraction,
multiplication and recognition.

“It’s so basic it would scare
you,” Mr Goudie told Tribune
Business. When asked how
many job applicants City Mar-
kets, which employs 800 per-
sons in New Providence and
Grand Bahama, rejected, Mr
Goudie said: “Maybe at least
half.” Most were high school
leavers.

His revelations capture the
stark reality facing many
Bahamian school leavers, espe-
cially those who are function-
ally illiterate in maths and Eng-
lish. Not only are the unfit to
join the workforce, many lack
the social and life skills they will
need as adults.

All this translates into a
Bahamian workforce with rela-
tively low productivity, and an
uncompetitive economy. This

Government does
not ‘appreciate the
value’ of engineers

* Undervaluation of talents by decision-makers means
Bahamian engineers and other professionals not
setting ‘their piece of the pie’ from major

development projects

* Bahamians must overcome ‘ring fencing’ of foreign

direct investment projects

* BEC Board mandates Corporation's engineers to
contract-out as much work as possible locally

@ By NEIL HARTNELL
Tribune Business Editor

The Government does not
“appreciate the value” offered
by Bahamian engineers and
other associated professionals,
an attorney/environmental con-
sultant said yesterday, and as a
result it fails to ensure they get
a “piece of the pie” from the
many foreign direct investment
projects attracted to this nation.

Romauld Ferreira, an attor-
ney and partner in Ferreira &
Company attorneys-at-law, told
a Bahamas Society of Engineers
(BSE) meeting that their pro-
fession and others were being
“ring-fenced out of opportuni-
ties for work” by foreign devel-
opers who brought their ready-
made engineering, environ-
mental and project manage-
ment teams to the Bahamas
with them.

Mr Ferreira explained that
“the biggest problem we find” is
that foreign engineering firms,
brought in to work on
Bahamas-based projects, were
increasingly owned or part-
owned by the same financial
groups financing the developer
who hired them.

This, in turn, allowed project
financiers to generate earnings
streams from these develop-
ments in several different ways.

“Tf we can’t make it here,
we'll all be in trouble,” Mr Fer-
reira warned.

“Our challenge, then, is to
break this sort of ring-fencing.
We know this to be a very seri-
ous concern, and a huge prob-
lem.

“When they [foreign devel-
opers] come into a country,
they’ve done all of this.

“Because the Government is
run by a bunch of lawyers,
they’re less enthusiastic about
ensuring Bahamian engineers

SEE page 5B

for a better life

home ownership

was captured by Bahamas-
based economist Ralph Massey
who, using the research from his
The Learning Crisis essay,
showed that based on the 2006
BGCSE results, 39 per cent of
New Providence high school stu-
dents who sat the English exam
failed, while another 17 per cent
were “language illiterate”.

As for mathematics, the find-
ings were even more shocking -
36 per cent of all New Providence
high school leavers failed BGCSE
maths in 2006, and another 46 per
cent were deemed numerically
illiterate - they did not know the
difference between addition and
subtraction.

Mr Goudie, emphasising that
most entry-level jobs at City
Markets were “very basic”, such
as shelf-stacking, said the high

SEE page 3B

The information contained is from a third
party and The Tribune can not be held
responsible for errors and/or omission.
from the daily report.



Pee

and others as source of divesification, and
hopes to build up Bahamian fashion industry

as exporter/foreign currency earner

@ By NEIL HARTNELL
Tribune Business Editor

A Bahamian fashion industry
could provide this nation with a
key source of foreign currency
from export earnings, the head
organiser of a Nassau-based fash-
ion show told Tribune Business
yesterday, hoping that his event -
which is set to expand in its second
year - will help stimulate local
designers.

Owen Bethel, president and
chief executive of Bahamian finan-
cial services provider, the Mon-
taque Group, said the Islands of
the World Fashion Week will
stage its second appearance on
November 4-8, 2009, and likely
feature an expanded designer line-

SEE page 2B

Uy
Owen Bethel



BIC to assess cellular card distribution

@ By NEIL HARTNELL
Tribune Business
Editor

The Bahamas Telecom-
munications Company
(BTC) is conducting an
assessment of its “entire” cel-
lular phone card distribution
network, Tribune Business
was told yesterday, examin-
ing whether the market that
nets the company $10-$12
million per month is operat-
ing at “optimal efficiency”
and is not over-saturated
with vendors.

Marlon Johnson, BTC’s
vice-president of sales and
marketing, said the assess-
ment would take place over
the next month-and-a-half,

SEE page 4B

SS

* Study of ‘whole platform’ to
look at market efficiency, best
practices, whether there is

vendor oversupply and market

transparency/elimination of
any predatory practices

* BIC earning $10-$12m per
month from pre-paid card
sales, with 90 per cent of
cellular customers — some
300,000 — on this platform
* Planning revised post-paid
package

FAMILY GUARDIAN

INSURANCE COMPANY LIMITED

[ rent forever
[] wait to inherit a home
[live with your in-laws

& own your own home for

little as 5% down

(Nassau) or, 352-3670 (Freeport)

PORT | ABACO | ELEUTHERA | EXUMA | CORPO


PAGE 2B, FRIDAY, APRIL 17, 2009

THE TRIBUNE





Receivers: Buyer interest in
Bimini resort already seen

FROM page 1B

government suppliers, but we don’t have all the records yet,” said Mr
Townend. He said the attraction of the property was its unique location
and its history.

Mr Townend said the Bimini Big Game Resort’s infrastructure was
in reasonable condition, but still needed some investment.

The resort has frequently been heralded as a backbone of Bimini’s
economy, becoming a tourist haven over the years with its marina a fish-
ing boat Mecca during that season.

The property boasts two restaurants, and was due to undergo ren-
ovations to add luxury rooms, scuba operations, gift shops, a gourmet
food market, a bait and tackle shop, a spa and a game room.

Now, its electricity is shut off and the marina’s 103 slips that can
secure vessels up to 120 feet in length are empty.

Refinancing

The Bimini Big Game Resort’s owner is understood to be a
CalifOrnia-based American, who was attempting to find new refi-
nancing to keep the resort open and pay his financial backers. That
appears not to have happened.

When management left, workers were given $100 and letters stating
what they were owed by the company. They were told this payment
would be forthcoming at a later date. However, nothing has been
heard since.

There has also been speculation that the Bimini Big Game Resort ran
up an unpaid $500,000 BEC bill before closing.

Mr Townend said businesses in the Bahamas were generally keep-
ing an eye on their costs and expenses, as income has contracted with
the economy.

“Everyone’s battening down the hatches and looking at their cost
base, as everyone has seen a slowdown in revenue,” he said.

NOTICE
INTERNATIONAL BUSINESS COMPANIES ACT
No. 45 of 2000

VIVARO CONSULTING LTD

Notice is hereby given that in accordance with Section
137 of The International Business Companies Act
No. 45 of 2000, VIVARO CONSULTING LTD is in
dissolution. The date of commencement of dissolution
was the 14th day of April, 2009. Dillon Dean of
Nassau, Bahamas is the Liquidator of VIVARO

CONSULTING LTD.

Dillon Dean
LIQUIDATOR

NOTICE
INTERNATIONAL BUSINESS COMPANIES ACT
No. 45 of 2000

GROUPO MIRADAR LTD.

Notice is hereby given that in accordance with Section
137 of The International Business Companies Act
No. 45 of 2000, GROUPO MIRADAR LTD. is in
dissolution. The date of commencement of dissolution
was the 14th day of April, 2009. Dillon Dean of
Nassau, Bahamas is the Liquidator of GROUPO
MIRDAR LTD.

Dillon Dean
LIQUIDATOR

As a privately-owned, mid-sized Bahamian Company and
the authorized Caterpillar dealer in the Bahamas, we are
seeking a candidate to work as a Service Manager of the
Service Department. The Candidate should have the
following qualifications:

* Be a graduate with a Bachelors Degree in Mechanical
Engineering;

* Have post-graduate studies in Management;

* Have Caterpillar training in Heavy Equipment
Machines;

* Have Caterpillar training in power generation;

* Have 5 years or more experience with working with a
Caterpillar dealer or a similar Organization;

* The candidate should have certification as an ISO
9000 auditor and;

* The candidate should have Six Sigma training (a Black
belt in 6-Sigma is preferred).

This candidate is required to be a professional who
thrives on the challenge of developing outstanding
customer relations and service excellence.

Send complete resume with education and work
experience to M & E Limited, P. O. Box N-3238,
Nassau Bahamas, Attention: Service Manager, or

email: me@me-litd.com .

Only persons being interviewed for this position
will be contacted.



Bringing exports
back into ‘fashion’

FROM page 1B

up after its debut won the event
the Caribbean’s Best Fashion
Show Award.

Mr Bethel, who this week
returned from being presented
with the award at the Caribbean
Fashion Awards ceremony in
Barbados, told Tribune Business
that interest in Islands of the
World meant designer numbers
in 2009 were likely to increase
over last year, forcing him to
abandon initial plans to lower
them. He explained: “Based on
my visit to Barbados, where a
number of designers were at the
event, there appears to be signif-
icant interest from a number of
Barbadian designers. Trinidad has
endorsed it, and looking at send-
ing a significant number of
Trinidadian designers to it.

“Last year, we had 35 design-
ers, and I anticipated we were

looking to reduce it this year to
20-25. But I’ve been told, simply
from the event in Barbados, that
we’re really going to have to look
at increasing the numbers as
opposed to decreasing them. I
anticipate it will be a significant
showing this year.”

Mr Bethel said the Islands of
the World Fashion Week would
likely be able to leverage addi-
tional interest in the show via
both the Fashion Show of the
Year Award, and the staging of
the Miss Universe Pageant at
Atlantis this summer.

“The Award that we just got,
which has significant bearing
among designers and the fashion
industry in the Caribbean, places
the Bahamas on the map region-
ally,” Mr Bethel told Tribune
Business, adding that the Miss
Universe Pageant would place
this nation at the “forefront”
internationally.

“We should be able to capture

NOTICE

INTERNATIONAL BUSINESS COMPANIES ACT

No. 45 of 2000

AZZILON SA

Notice is hereby given that in accordance with Section

that, and harness that to the
advantage of events like Islands
of the World, making sure similar
events catch the eye, and making
sure the Bahamas continues to
act as a location for these types of
activity going forward.”

The increased number of
designers, and their entourages,
for Islands of the World Fashion
Week 2009 was likely to bring
short-term occupancy benefits for
the Bahamian hotel industry at a
time when it was much-needed.

But, long-term, Mr Bethel indi-
cated that he hoped the fashion
show would both help diversify
the Bahamian tourism product
and stimulate renewed interest in
the industry from Bahamian
designers, ultimately leading to
the creation of an indigenous
Bahamian fashion sector.

Arguing that events such as
Islands of the World Fashion
Week and the Bahamas Interna-
tional Film Festival were “neces-
sary for our product diversifica-
tion:, Mr Bethel said such events
held throughout the calendar year
were “a direction the tourism
industry needs to look at”.

He added: “The beauty and
importance of the fashion indus-
try is it’s an export if you can
develop it locally. More so from
the fashion side, where you have
local designers able to export
their products and their designs.
That type of income not only
focuses on diversification of the
tourism product, but diversifica-

tion of the broader economy.”

Based on feedback from the
2008 fashion show, Mr Bethel
said: “A number of persons have
looked at it with renewed energy,
others had not looked at it before.

“T think the fact that the event
took place here, and those who
attended and had an interest in
the industry before saw it at a dif-
ferent level, helped people see
the potential for where the indus-
try could go. A concerted effort is
needed, and it’s not going to hap-
pen overnight, but it could really
get the industry going.”

Mr Bethel said fashion design,
and garment production, almost
lent themselves to a “cottage
industry”, where designers and
those involved in manufacture
could work at home.

The former could outsource
production to the latter, he
explained, with no one person
having to bear all the start-up
costs and manufacturing costs.

Mr Bethel said the Islands of
the World Fashion Week in 2008
had shown Bahamian designers
the quality, standards and level
of designs being produced else-
where, challenging them to match
and exceed this. He also urged
Bahamian designers “from the
next generation”, those with
potential, to participate in the
2009 version, and pledged to
work closely with the Bahamas
Technical and Vocational Insti-
tute (BT VI) to get its students
involved.

137 of The International Business Companies Act No.
45 of 2000, AZZILON SA is in dissolution. The date
of commencement of dissolution was the 14th day of

April, 2009. Dillon Dean of Nassau, Bahamas is the
Liquidator of AZZILON SA.

Dillon Dean
LIQUIDATOR

NOTICE
INTERNATIONAL BUSINESS COMPANIES ACT
No. 45 of 2000

NOBLE & SMITH CONSULTING LTD.

Notice is hereby given that in accordance with Section
137 of The International Business Companies Act
No. 45 of 2000, NOBLE & SMITH CONSULTING
LTD is in dissolution. The date of commencement
of dissolution was the 14th day of April, 2009. Dillon
Dean of Nassau, Bahamas is the Liquidator of
NOBLE & SMITH CONSULTING LTD.

Dillon Dean
LIQUIDATOR



_=



es ea ’
— I

The Professors‘ Cancer Clinie

Friday, 17th April |
From 2.00 pm Until

At The Cancer Centre
72, Collins Avenue |
Please callfor Appointment ,
with one Senior Oncologist: |

Professor Karol Sikora
(Here from the UK)
or |
Hon. Prof. Arthur Porter MD
(Director of The Cancer Centre)

EET

| CALL Salome at 502 9610-5

ett dt eee fue: eee dem tees ee

NOTICE

IN THE ESTATE OF WILTON

ELIJAH EDGECOMBE late of the

Island of San Salvador one of the Islands
of the Commonwealth of the Bahamas,
deceased.

NOTICE is hereby given that all persons
having any claim or demand against the above
Estate are required to send the same duly
certified in writing to the Undersigned on or
before the 7th day of April, 2009, after which
date the Administratrix will proceed to distribute
the assets having regard only to the claims of
which she shall then have had notice.

AND NOTICE is hereby also given that
all persons indebted to the said Estate are
requested to make full settlement on or before
the date hereinbefore mentioned.

HIGGS & JOHNSON
Attorneys for the Administratrix
Chambers

P.O. Box N-3247

Ocean Centre

Montagu Foreshore

East Bay Street

Nassau, Bahamas.

TAYLOR
INDUSTRIES LTD.

WILL BE CLOSED FOR
ANNUAL STOCKTAKING

THURSDAY, APRIL 23
FRIDAY, APRIL 24
SATURDAY, APRIL 25

We regret any
inconvenience this will
cause to our customers.


THE TRIBUNE

FRIDAY, APRIL 17, 2009, PAGE 3B



aS
Tourism facing 2009 contraction

m@ By CHESTER
ROBARDS
Business Reporter
crobards@tribunemedia.net

SOUTHAMPTON,
Bermuda — All indicators
point to the global travel
and tourism economy’s Gross
Domestic Product (GDP)
contracting by 3.5 per cent this
year, with 4 per cent growth
expected after year-end 2010,
according to the World Trav-
el and Tourism Council
(WTTC) yesterday.

The WTTC foreshadowed
a tough year for the Bahamas
tourism industry, with incre-
mental growth through next
year.

The Caribbean product was
estimated to contract by a
“staggering” 7.9 per cent this
year.

The WTTC’s president and
chief executive, Jean-Claude
Baumgarten, told an audience
of Caribbean tourism market
stakeholders - mostly
investors and developers - at
the 13th annual Caribbean
Hotel and Tourism Invest-
ment Conference that the neg-
ative impact on the tourism
sector for 2009 looked
extremely “worrying”.

However, he reassured
them that Caribbean touris-
m’s real GDP growth would
occur at an average 3.3 per
cent per annum over the next
10 years.

According to the WTTC’s
findings, quarterly travel
spending data pointed to a
rapid slowdown in the third
quarter of 2008, with a further
deterioration occurring by
year-end.

Year-on-year air passenger
arrivals to the Caribbean con-
tracted, from September of
last year into December, by
4.6 per cent, a trend that has
continued into 2009.

Concern

Airlift has been a para-
mount concern for travel and
tourism-dependent nations,
one Mr Baumgarten said must
be at the forefront of the strat-
egy to right-size the tourism
sector in the Caribbean.

The WTTC findings showed
the Bahamas Travel and
Tourism Economy GDP
growing by 3.4 per cent annu-
ally over the next 10 years,
beginning marginally with 1
per cent growth next year.
That figure puts the Bahamas
above Cuba, which is project-

City Markets rejects

FROM page 1B

failure rate of applicants to meet the company’s
standards raised disturbing questions about the
job and social prospects for those it rejected.

“You’ve got to have someone who can under-
stand. That’s the problem,” he explained. “If they
haven’t got the basics, and can operate a job
stacking shelves in the food store, where to they
go from there.

“Tt’s really bad, period. Productivity is very
poor, obviously. If someone’s not got the basic
cognitive skills, and basic understanding, then
they’re not going to be very productive. It’s stress-
ful.”

Presentation

In a presentation to a Nassau Institute meeting on
Wednesday night, Mr Massey said of his findings:
“In a world where knowledge is growing so fast,
and the Bahamas is in a status quo situation on its
education system, the learning gap between the
Bahamas and the rest of the world will continue
to grow. The disadvantages facing the country
will only grow if nothing is going to change.”

Andre Rollins, head of the Bahamas Dental
Association, during the audience question and
answer session, said Mr Massey’s findings showed
that the Bahamian workforce and wider economy
would simply be unable to compete in the free
trade era that was upon the country.

The structure and model the Bahamian econ-
omy has been based upon, and the rules govern-
ing how its firms conduct business, are under

VA |

= |

‘50%’ of job seekers

pressure from the rules-based trading regimes
this country is being required to join - the Eco-
nomic Partnership Agreement (EPA) with the Euro-
pean Union, the World Trade Organisation (WTO)
and future trade deals with the US and Canada.

Then there is the OECD/G-20 assault on the
Bahamian financial services industry, at a time
when the Bahamian workforce is not well-
equipped to handle and manage all these enforced
changes.

Mr Rollins said: “In this whole move to a glob-
alised economy, with the EPA and trend to open
up all borders, we will be swallowed up by persons
more prepared to take advantage of a globalised
economy because of our years of failure.”

As a first step towards reforming the Bahami-
an education system, Mr Massey suggested that
the Department of Education be reconstituted
as a Corporation out of reach of political control
and influence.

When asked about the former PLP and current
FNM governments’ approach to the proposals
on reform submitted by the private sector/trade
union Coalition for Education Reform, Mr
Massey replied: “It’s a discouraging process.

“The Coalition for Education Reform started in
2004. It took the [former PLP] Government six
months to formally recognise receipt of their pro-
posals. The PLP education minister never talked
to the Coalition except for one five-minute con-
versation at a cocktail party at Atlantis.

“The FNM came in, and it took them a long
time to sit down with the Coalition. There is an
apparent desire not to listen.”

WInNts

Notice

Notice is hereby given that the

General Meeting

for the West Winds Property Owners Association

Limited will be

held

at New _ Providence

Community Church located on Blake Road on
Monday the 20" day of April 2009 at 7:00pm

Should you need further information kindly contact

325.6666 or 325-8905.

Dated the 7" day of April, A.D., 2009

WITH THE COMPLIMENTS OF:-
West Winds Property
Owners Association
Limited

Notice

Notice is hereby given of loss of Bahamas Government Registered
Stock Certificate as follows:

Certificate
No.
24-001

Interest
Stock Rate
1998 9.12500% APR

Maturity
Date
10/05/1998

ed to show growth of 2.7 per
cent over the next 10 years,
but places this country mod-
erately behind the Nether-
lands Antilles, Martinique, St
Kitts and Nevis, Bermuda and
several other Caribbean
nations.

The Caribbean itself is pro-
jected to grow by around 3.3
per cent over 10 years.

Statistics show that regional
government expenditure
growth of some 0.7 per cent
is “sub-optimal” to reverse the
short-term contraction of the
sector.

In 2009, total demand for
the Travel and Tourism prod-
uct in the Caribbean region is
expected to shrink, along with
business travel, capital invest-
ments and employment.

However, according to Mr
Baumgarten, there is an unwa-
vering confidence in the
Caribbean tourism market.
And markets in this region
should be prepared for its
medium and long-term
growth.

“Long-term prospects in the
travel and tourism industry
are supported thanks to the
continued rapid expansion of
emerging destinations, along
with the global increase in per
capita income,” said Mr
Baumgarten.

AUCTION

cer ae eb
eR eal ea

(ars

Colbbe

Amount
$400.00

I intend to request The Registrar to issue a replacement certificate. If
this certificate is found, please write to PO. Box SP-63854, Nassau
Bahamas.

| BUSINESS DEVELOPMENT SPECIALIST

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PAGE 4B, FRIDAY, APRIL 17, 2009

THE TRIBUNE



Illiteracy woes ‘devastating’ for economy

FROM page 1B

36 per cent of all New Providence
high school leavers failed BGCSE
maths in 2006, and another 46 per
cent were deemed numerically
illiterate - they did not know the
difference between addition and
subtraction.

“It’s devastating. It has devas-
tating implications,” Mr Massey
told Tribune Business of the find-
ings’ consequences for the
Bahamian economy. “That’s the

Tas Gla ‘Chisel asi

Cotmalraperial inurance 1

only way you can look at it.

“You can’t have the levels of
illiteracy that prevail here con-
tinue to be pumped out into soci-
ety, especially as it doesn’t have to
be this way.

“The world is changing at what
looks like lightning speed, and
the question is how this work-
force can absorb that technolo-
gy. In a situation where you have
all this new technology driving
change, you can’t have a dumb
workforce.”

Sy Freasr& YOUNG

The relatively high levels of
functional illiteracy among new
entrants to the Bahamian work-
force, and the resulting impact on
productivity, held especially
severe consequences for the econ-
omy’s foundations, which are
based on service exports.

Communications skills are as
vital on the hotel and tourism
industry front line as maths is to
financial services sector employ-
ees. “If people have problems
communicating in the English lan-

Peet bk Frere

guage, how can the services indus-
tries be as successful as they might
be, and as productive? It’s a no
brainer,” Mr Massey told Tribune
Business.

A relatively poor quality work-
force will also hamper the
Bahamas’ ability to respond, and
successfully adjust, to the game-
changing rules being forced upon
the ways in which its companies
and industries do business.

Trading

The Economic Partnership
Agreement (EPA) with the Euro-
pean Union will result in the
Bahamas joining a rules-based
trading regime for the first time.
With it comes a number of oblig-
ations that will see new rules, laws
and bureaucracies created to
change - and govern - how busi-
ness is conducted in this nation.

And, on top of that, the
OECD/G-20 offensive on inter-

national financial services centres
will likely forever alter the busi-
ness model on which the
Bahamas has largely operated for
the past 40-50 years.

“What you have is a popula-
tion that is less equipped to
adapt,” Mr Massey said of the
education system’s woes and their
implications for dealing with these
changes. “The dangers are that
you don’t have the businesses
with which you can register suc-
cess.

“It means the Bahamas is pro-
gressively less competitive, that’s
what it means, and the learning
gap between the Bahamas and
other countries will increase to
the disadvantage of the Bahamas.
The bottom line is that it doesn’t
have to be this way.

“It just accentuates the prob-
lem. We’re in a situation where all
the problems of the country are
being accentuated.”

Mr Massey, who performed the

research and wrote much of the
2005 report produced by the
Coalition for Education Reform,
and has written extensively on
the Bahamian education system’s
problems, said relatively low
workforce productivity only
increased the costs, inefficiencies
and spending on staff training for
businesses.

“The inevitable consequences
in the short-term are that you
don’t get a lift from the work-
force, because the people you
have are the people who came
out of the system in the previous
15-20 years,” he added.

Long-term, Mr Massey said the
question facing the Bahamas was
whether it would take the neces-
sary steps to reform the educa-
tion system for the benefit of its
economic competitiveness and
social cohesion.

“This is a question of whether
the country chooses to be suc-
cessful or not successful,” he said.

BIC to assess cellular card distribution

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Reporting Standards

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Consolidated Balamce Sheet

Ac Lecembser $1, BOE
thapressed in Balamian dol tars}

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FROM page 1B

and aimed to examine whether the cellular phone
card distribution network was operating in line with
“best global practices”.

“What we are doing is a current assessment exer-
cise of our entire distribution network - relation-
ships with wholesalers and how cards are being dis-
tributed,” he explained.

“Tt is an exercise looking at the entire distribution
network. We want to make sure we’re operating
optimally, and in accordance with best global prac-
tices.”

BITC sells the pre-paid cellular phone cards, which
come in denominations of $5, $10, $20, $50 and
$100, to some 34 wholesalers, who include the likes
of Let’s Talk Wireless and Tripoint. In turn, those
wholesalers sell the cards on to retailers and street
vendors.

Mr Johnson explained that the study would also
assess the distribution network’s efficiency, and
whether end-user consumers - the BTC pre-paid
cellular network has some 300,000 subscribers - had
the best possible access to the cards they purchased.

The BTC executive said the state-owned tele-
coms provider’s study would also assess “what ought
to be the optimal number of vendors given the mar-
ketplace, its size and how we manage that”.

This had come in response to concerns that the
pre-paid cell phone card market had too many ven-
dors, given the increasing number of Bahamians
now selling them on the streets - no doubt because
they perceive it as a relatively easy, and lucrative,
income stream in a declining economy where many
people have lost their jobs.

Mr Johnson acknowledged that an oversupply of
vendors and cards would be “detrimental” in any

NT
NAD

Nassau Airport

Oevelopment Company

market, but said that “heavy-handed intervention”
had the potential to cause more problems than it
solved through the inevitable disruption it would
provoke. It was far better, he indicated, for the mar-
ket itself to work out and correct any problems.

Still, BT'C’s vice-president for sales and marketing
told Tribune Business that the company’s study
would examine “the whole phenomenon” of the
rise in street phone card vendors, and assess where
they fitted into the broader distribution network.

“We are looking at the whole platform,” Mr John-
son said. “We are making sure the distribution net-
work is efficient, and customer and vendor appetites
are served.

“We want to make sure we have a sense of integri-
ty, best practices and a system that works well for the
consumer and marketplace generally - that there
are very transparent, clear rules for engagement,
and guidelines are being followed.”

He added: “On average, we sell on our pre-paid
side anywhere from $10-$12 million worth per
month.

“The pre-paid side of our business is certainly a
significant contributor to our bottom line. More
than 90 per cent of our customers are on the pre-paid
platform.”

Mr Johnson said BTC sold the pre-paid cellular
phone cards to wholesalers at a 25 per cent discount
to the price paid by end-users. They then sold it on
to retailers for a mark-up.

BTC did not fix the prices that wholesalers sold
pre-paid cards at, but he added: “Part of the exercise
is to have some guidelines as to what is happening,
and determine whether predatory actions are hap-
pening in the market.”

Mr Johnson said that BTC “in a couple of weeks”
would release “revised packages” for its post-paid
cellular product.

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Learn Cee

1607, tate 1155023
193,204,745
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195,581,458
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invent properties J5,220,52 |

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lieve of Ase ah

PART-TIME ASSISTANT

To The Capital & Development Committee

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10,.865,1 18
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SG.T25

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Property and equiped

Crocdval

Potential candidate will
possess the following skills
and experience:

« Effective communicator,
proficient in both report
writing and oral
presentations

+ Intuitive and insightful with
the confidence to question
decisions and processes

+ Familiar with infrastructure
development

+ Familiar with the process of
reviewing tenders and RFP
proposals for construction
and procurement

» Understanding of project
management processes

« Understanding of financial
management processes

» Must have substantial
experience in the areas
outlined above.

The Board of the Nassau Airport
Development Company (NAD) is
seeking candidates for the part-
time position of Assistant to The
Capital & Development Committee.
The duties and responsibilities of
the successful applicant will
include:

Book £665,078
S05, EIA 120962

81,015

(Phe? abe ees
Invesaret in Parent *
111 78

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LIABILITIES
Prowizios for falure pediey benefits L
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202 704 0H 5

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284,084,514
+ Time requirement of

approx. two days per week

» Attending monthly meetings for
approx. four hours

- Assisting the Committee on
matters to be recommended to the
Board for approval

» Attending meetings requested
by the Committee in order to
report on the proceedings of the
meetings attended

«Commenting on the reports,
minutes, and other matters that
may arise at monthly committee
meetings.

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Total (hia Bilitirs amd eequily 4b Bi heh

If you are qualified and interested, please submit your
resume by April 30, 2009 to:

Manager, People

Nassau Airport Development Co.
P.O. Box AP 59229

Nassau, Bahamas

APTOS ie by the Gad 76 reer om of

pred &, PO aed pigmed on te behalf by

=e

EM. Alsiga — Eemoetiee Vice-Chair

Only those applicants short listed will be contacted.

Aor a comes py of he Conant” Andi Financial Sratcmenrs of Calinaimperiad iamace Lid gr
the pear omled December 31, 2008. plow contact aus Capone Commonications Ufiicer at 204 Bay St 2nd
Floor, Aan, The Bahamas by phone 242) 2 2nd ar by email at finances eolineinpeielcom or visit
amr hie at wn olin com


THE TRIBUNE

FRIDAY, APRIL 17, 2009, PAGE 5B



OOS eee
Govt does not ‘appreciate the value’ of engineers

FROM page 1B

and affiliated professionals get a
piece of the pie.

“They don’t appreciate our
value because they undervalue
us, so we have to sell ourselves
and show we have the capabili-
ty, expertise and talent to do
anything.”

Mr Ferreira said Bahamian
engineers and other profes-
sionals needed to work togeth-
er as “a cohesive unit”, as they
would achieve more by work-
ing together to “create a sense
of value among the decision
makers of the country, so they
want what we bring to the
table”.

His sentiments were echoed
by Robert Reiss, head of Reiss
Engineering, who told the meet-
ing that when foreign develop-
ers and their associated engi-
neers came into the Bahamas,
Bahamian firms needed to
“make clear that work is kept
for Bahamians” and ensure the
value they brought to the
process was recognised.

“What is critical is how we
present ourselves in conjunc-
tion with the value we have,”
Mr Reiss said.

“We also need to recognise
our responsibilities, whether it’s
a suit and tie, being in the right
place or making sure people
recognise our value - having val-
ue, in conjunction with keeping
work for Bahamians. In con-
junction with government giving
a push, we may get some-
where.”

Mr Reiss said there were
already some small signs of
progress.

While the consortium his firm
was in had not won the contract
for the configuration and site
planning work at the Queen



“What is critical
is how we present
ourselves in
conjunction with
the value we
have.”



Robert Reiss

group featuring predominantly
Bahamian firms.

Of the eight companies in his
group, Mr Reiss said six were
Bahamian. He added: “My
understanding on the street ini-
tially is that that contract was
not going to be awarded to a
Bahamian firm. While we did
not win it, I’m pleased a corner
was turned and it was not
flipped to a foreign-owned
firm.”

Mandated

Meanwhile, the BSE’s presi-
dent, Jerome Elliott, a senior
Bahamas Electricity Corpora-
tion (BEC) engineer, said his
department had been mandated
by the Board of Directors to
send as much contracted-out
engineering work as possible to
Bahamian firms.

“What we have been man-
dated to do as engineers in
BEC, by our Board, is to do as
much engineering work as we
can with local firms,” Mr Elliott
said, urging all Bahamian struc-
tural engineers to respond toa
tender BEC was set to immi-
nently issue for work on its
Clifton Pier power station.

Meanwhile, Mr Ferreira said

neers and environmental con-
sultants was a key point of dif-
ferentiation they could use to
defeat foreign companies on
contract bidding.

“The great thing about us is
that the expertise we offer is
local. We are trained in
Bahamian ecology, Bahamian
trees, Bahamian fish, the corals

that exist here. What we sell
here is local expertise,” he
explained.

Mr Ferreira said the environ-
mental consulting arm of his
business was partnering with
the College of the Bahamas
(COB) to give Bahamian stu-
dents access to the same oppor-
tunities.

NOTICE

MUNIA (BAHAMAS) SHIPPING LTD.
N OTIC EIS HEREBY GIVEN as follows:

(a) MUNIA (BAHAMAS) SHIPPING LTD. is in
dissolution under the provisions of the
International Business Companies Act 2000.

(b) The dissolution of the said Company
commenced on the 7th day of April, 2009
when its Articles of Dissolution were submitted
to and registered by the Registrar General.

The Joint -Liquidators of the said Company
are Mr. Swen-Uwe Horvath and Dr. Jochen
Koeber of Schaarsteinwegsbrucke 2, 20459

Hamburg, Germany.

Dated the 15th day of April, 2009.

HARRY B. SANDS, LOBOSKY
MANAGEMENT CO. LTD.
Attorneys for the above-named
Company



NOTICE

MUNIA (BAHAMAS) SHIPPING LTD.

Creditors having debts
above-named Company

or claims against the
are required to send

NOTICE

NOTICE is hereby given that BOLNEVA ETOY of LEEWARD
PALMS, PROVIDECIALS, TURKS AND CAICOS ISLANDS
is applying to the Minister responsible for Nationality and

Citizenship, for registration/naturalization as a citizen of The
Bahamas, and that any person who knows any reason why
registration/ naturalization should not be granted, should send a
written and signed statement of the facts within twenty-eight days
from the 17th day of APRIL, 2009 to the Minister responsible for
Nationality and Citizenship, PO.Box N-7147, Freeport, Bahamas.






































NOTICE

EXXONMOBIL EXPLORATION AND PRODUCTION
BARBADOS LIMITED

Pursuant to the provisions of Section 137 (8) of the
International Business Companies Act 2000, notice
is hereby given that the above-named Company
has been dissolved and struck off the Register
pursuant to a Certificate of Dissolution issued by
The Registrar General on the 25th day of March,
A.D., 2009.
Dated the 15th day of April, A.D., 2009.

Gary H. Johnsen

Liquidator of

EXXONMOBIL EXPLORATION

AND PRODUCTION BARBADOS LIMITED





particulars thereof to the undersigned c/o P.O. Box
N-624, Nassau, Bahamas on or before 15th day ofMay,
A.D.,2009. Indefaultthereofthey willbe excluded from
the benefit of any distribution made by the Liquidator.
Dated the 15th day of April, A.D., 2009.

the local expertise and knowl-

Elizabeth Sports Centre, he was
edge offered by Bahamian engi-

pleased it had gone to another

Notice

Pursuant to the provisions of Section 235 of the Companies Act,
1992, as Amended, Notice is hereby given that:-

REGIONAL PARTS MANAGER

The Regional Parts Manager will report to the President
of Machinery & Energy Limited, and be accountable
for the operating performance of the Parts Department
within the Bahamas, Turks and Caicos Islands and the
Cayman Islands. As a key member of the Management
Team, the incumbent will participate in and contribute
to all major operating and strategic business decisions.

Mr. Swen-Uwe Horvath and Dr. Jochen Koeber
Joint -Liquidators
Schaarsteinwegsbrucke 2,

20459 Hamburg, Germany.

1. SAFRA INTERNATIONAL HOLDING LTD.
(In Voluntary Liquidation) is in dissolution.

. Proceedings to wind-up and dissolve the Company were
commenced on the 12th day of March A.D, 2009.

3. All persons having claims against the above-named
Company are required to send their names, addresses
and particulars of their debts or claims to the Liquidator
before the 27th day of April, 2009.

The Regional Parts Manager is responsible for fulfillment
of the mandates set by The President, and will provide
day-to-day leadership, management and training of
the Parts personnel who work in the Department.

NOTICE

WILLIAMS LAW COARMERS
Registered Agent

MUNIA (BAHAMAS) MANAGEMENT LTD.

Creditors having debts or claims against
the above-named Company are required to
send particulars thereof to the undersigned
clo P.O. Box N-624, Nassau, Bahamas on or
before 15th day of May, A.D., 2009. In default
thereof they will be excluded from the benefit
of any distribution made by the Liquidator.
Dated the 15th day of April, A.D., 2009.

The Regional Parts Manager will represent the
corporation externally to customers and other relevant
organizations, and will be responsible for the budgeting
of the department and for its financial performance.
NOTICE
Close cooperation with the Sales and Service
Departments will be essential to achieve value-added
in all prime product sales and to maximize revenue
and profit from parts sales. These activities will include
appropriate effort to help the Parts Department acquire
the parts necessary to carry out their functions.

MUNIA (BAHAMAS) MANAGEMENT LTD.
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN as follows:

(a) MUNIA (BAHAMAS) MANAGEMENT LTD. is
in dissolution under the provisions of the

International Business Companies Act 2000. . . a
Appropriate experience and training may be acceptable

in lieu of formal education, but the applicant must be a 6
Sigma DMAIC Black Belt and should be well versed in
Antares, DCES Operations, RPGProgramming,
Caterpillar CMIS 2, Installing, Configuring Administering
MS Win/2000 Server

(b) The dissolution of the said Company commenced
on the 7th day of April, 2009 when its Articles
of Dissolution were submitted to and registered by

the Registrar General. Mr. Swen-Uwe Horvath and Dr. Jochen Koeber

Joint -Liquidators
Schaarsteinwegsbrucke 2,
20459 Hamburg, Germany.

The Joint -Liquidators of the said Company

are Mr. Swen-Uwe Horvath andDr. Jochen Koeber
of Schaarsteinwegsbrucke 2, 20459 Hamburg,
Germany.

Send complete resume with education and work
experience to the Human Resources Department
Machinery & Energy Limited, P. O. Box N-3238 or
Facsimile 323-5705.

Dated the 15th day of April, 2009.

FG CAPITAL MARKETS

BROKERAGE & ADVISORY SERVICES

HARRY B. SANDS, LOBOSKY MANAGEMENT
Co. LTD.
Attorneys for the above-named Company

ROYAL = FIDELITY

Money ot Work

BISX LISTED & TRADED SECURITIES AS OF:
THURSDAY, 16 APRIL 2009
BISX ALL SHARE INDEX: CLOSE 1,620.03 | CHG 0.17 | %CHG 0.01 | YTD -92.33 | YTD % -5.39
FINDEX: CLOSE 797.05 | YTD -4.53% | 2008 -12.31%
WWW.BISXBAHAMAS.COM | TELEPHONE:242-323-2330 | FACSIMILE: 242-323-2320

Securit y EPS $
Abaco Markets
Bahamas Property Fund
Bank of Bahamas
Benchmark
Bahamas Waste
Fidelity Bank
Cable Bahamas
Colina Holdings
Commonwealth Bank ($1)
Consolidated Water BDRs
Doctor's Hospital
Famguard
Finco
FirstCaribbean Bank
Focol (S)
Focol Class B Preference
Freeport Concrete
ICD Utilities
J. S. Johnsen 10.50
Premier Real Estate 10.00 10.00 0.00
BISX LISTED DEBT SECURITIES - (Bonds trade on a Percentage Pricing bases)
Securi Symbol Last Sale Dai
Fidelity Bank Note 17 (Series A) + " z 7%
Fidelity Bank Note 22 (Series B) + FBB22 Prime + 1.75%
Fidelity Bank Note 13 (Series C) + FBB13. al # T%
Fidelity Bank Note 15 (Series D) + FBB15 Prime + 1.75%
Fidelity Over-The-Counter Securities
Bid $ Ask $ Last Price

¢.92

4.00 6.25

0.35 0.40
Colina Over-The-Counter Securities
ABDAB 30.13 31.59 29.00
RND Holdings 0.45 0.55 0.55
BISX Listed Mutual Funds

Last 12 Months

Previous Close Today's Close Change Daily Vol.

Job Opportunity for a

FINANCIAL CONTROLLER

An established Bahamian Company is seeking a
Financial Controller

Qualifications for a position are:

¢ Bachelor’s Degree or equivalent in Accounting
or applied finance from an accredited and
reputable university.
Certified Public Account
3-5 years Audit experience
Proficiency in Accounting Software such as
QuickBooks or Peachtree
Experience in preparing IFRS compliant
financial statements
The individual will be responsible for directing
the overall financial plans and accounting
practices of the organization.

19 October 2017
19 October 2022
30 May 2013
1000.00 29 May 2015

52wk-Low Symbol
Bahamas Supermarkets
Caribbean Crossings (Pref)
RND Holdings

Fund Name
Colina Bond Fund
Colina MSI Preferred Fund
Colina Money Market Fund
Fidelity Bahamas G & I Fund
Fidelity Prime Income Fund
CFAL Global Bond Fund
CFAL Global Equity Fund
CFAL High Grade Bond Fund
Fidelity International Investment Fund
FG Financial Preferred Income Fund
FG Financial Growth Fund
FG Financial Diversified Fund

Yield %

4.40

BISX ALL SHARE INDEX - 19 Dec 02 = 1,000.00
52wWk-Hi - Highest closing price in last 52 weeks

YIELD - last 12 month dividends divided by closing price

Bid $ - Buying price of Colina and Fidelity

Ask $ - Selling price of Co!

Last Price - Last traded over-the-counter price

Weekly Vol. - Trading me of the prior week

EPS $ - A company’s reported earnings per share for the last 12 mths
NAV - Net Asset Value

N/M - Not Meaningful

FINDEX - The Fidelity Bahamas Stock Index. January 1, 1994 = 100

ighted price for daily volume
hted price for daily volume

Interested persons should send resumes to:
P.O.Box CB 13526
Nassau, Bahamas

Daily Vol. -
DIV $ - Dividends per share paid in the last 12 months
P/E - Closing price divided by the last 12 month earnin gs

TO TRADE CALL: COLINA 242-502-7010 | ROYALFIDELITY 242-356-7764 | FG CAPITAL MARKETS 242-396-4000 | COLONIAL 242-502-7525
THE TRIBUNE

THE WEATHER REPO

5-Day FORECAST

FRIDAY, APRIL17TH 2009, PAGE 7B

INSURANCE MANAGEMENT



FL (BAHAMAS) LIMITED. INSURANCE BROKERS & AGENTS

kc [Cc (1s

































Ff P Today Saturday WINDS WAVES VISIBILITY WATER TEMPS.
a | rs, High = Low W Hign Low W WASSAU Today: | NWat10-20Knots | 2-4Feet 10-20Miles 76°F
“ oS in - La, Ee - -F 0| 1|2 3|4|5 6|7 s|olioh FC F/G FC FIC Saturday: _NNE at 10-20 Knots 3-5 Feet 10-20 Miles 76° F
. “a Acapulco 90/32 75/23 s 89/31 71/21 S FREEPORT Today: NW at 10-20 Knots 2-4 Feet 10-20 Miles 76° F
Ja a i. io Low MODERATE } HIGH | \V.HIGH EXT. Amsterdam S412 46/7 r 6116 46/7 pc Saturday: __NNE at 10-20 Knots 3-5 Feet 10-20 Miles 76° F
ORLANDO X Ankara, Turkey 55/12 32/0 sh 61/16 35/1 Ss = ABACO Today: NW at 10-20 Knots 2-4 Feet 10-20 Miles 76° F
High: 78° F/26°C fo —_ Sunny, breezy and Partly cloudy and Partly sunny with a Breezy with low Periods of clouds and Partly sunny and The higher the AccuWeather UV Index™ number, the Athens 72/22 60/15 s 74/23 59/15 s Saturday: Nat 8-16 Knots 3-5 Feet 10-20 Miles 76° F
6 Low63°FA7°C — pleasant. breezy. gusty breeze. clouds. sunshine. warm. greater the need for eye and skin protection. Auckland 66/18 54/12 pc 67/19 60/15 pc
f aot ° ° ° ° Bangkok 93/33 80/26 pc 94/34 78/25 c rr
(2 @ VK High: 78° ewer oe - oe = oe ie riigh: Le T 7 Barbados 85/29 75/23 s Eee TODAY'S U.S. FORECAST
TAMPA ly i SS ey Barcelona 6216 49/9 s 58/14 51/0 sh
2 ora i TL Ea Tg Beijing 75/23 54/12 s 68/20 55/12 c
High: 84° F/29° C f a [68°F | FT 82e-6o° 80°-71° F 86°-74° F 107°-83° F High Ht.(ft.) Low Ht. (ft. Beirut B58 59/15 B16 58/14
Low: 62° F/17°C my . The exclusive AccuWeather RealFeel Temperature® is an index that combines the effects of temperature, wind, humidity, sunshine intensity, cloudiness, precipitation, pressure, and Today 1:56 a.m. 24 8:16am. 06 Belgrade 76/24 49/9 sh 73/22 53/11 ¢
i @ o s elevation on the human body—everything that effects how warm or cold a person feels. Temperatures reflect the high and the low for the day. 2:15pm. 24 8:25 p.m. 0.6 ana 64/17 51/10 sh 6317 46/7 pc
7 J . Saturday 299am. 23 O1lam. 06 Bermuda 68/20 62/16 pc 68/20 64/17 s = ein
a © | CO 3:16pm. 22 9:29pm. 06 Bogota 6518 47/8 r 67/19 48/8 sh Ol
4 lie Statistics are for Nassau through 2 p.m. yesterday Sunday 353am. 23 1003am. 05 Brussels 55/12 43/6 + 6317 41/5 pe
: 5X ABACO Temperature 4:14pm. 2.3 10:29p.m. 05 Budapest 6317 45/7 + 70/21 = 46/7 sh
y ; =» ; PGI, eeesccatcezes Qaceeuee tate caaeee tose 90° F/32° C : : Buenos Aires 82/27 64/17 s 73/22 55/12 c
; b High: 76° F/24° C : . Mond 4:47am. 24 10:52am. 04 ;
7 “a Umea FTC DOM assist 75° F/24° C may 5.07pm. 25 14:25pm. 04 Cairo 80/26 56/13 s 82/27 58/14 s
. - Aik i a Normal high. .... 81° F/27° C —————— — Calcutta 99/37 81/27 s 103/39 80/26 s
r Normal low 69° F/21° C Calgary 57/13 33/0 pe 52/11 29/-1 ¢ 66/54
he A hes @ WEST PALM BEACH an Last year's PIG Ue seassie eased aecesstestesecreec: 81° F/27° C SUN ay Ty ify Cancun 88/31 70/21 s 87/30 68/20 pc
High: 78° F/26° C . Last year's low spaar Weaeataeeenses 66° F/19° C " Caracas 82/27 71/21 pc 81/27 71/21 t
Low: 70° F/21°C oe Precipitation _ tenes ae am. Lan ag a am. Casablanca 71/21 52/11 pe 67/19 51/10 pc
As of 2 p.m. yesterday oo... ceeccecsseecsseeesseees 0.05" UNS OL somes 9 p.m. Moonset... Teo! p.m. Gopenhagen 58/14 46/7 s 56/13 41/5 s
FT. LAUDERDALE FREEPORT Year to date Last New First Full Dublin 52/11 44/5 sh 54/12 39/3 pc
iy 80 aa C @ High: 75° F/24° C Normal year to date oo. 6.42" a iy seat Frankfurt 59/15 43/6 5 63/17 39/3 sh
ow: 71° F/22° Low: 61° F/16°C : Geneva 56/13 47/8 sh 6417 47/8 pc
. AccuWeather.com = Halifax 53/11 28/-2 pc 45/7 24/-4 pc Showers Miami
be @ Forecasts and graphics provided by a Havana 86/30 64/17 s 87/30 61/16 s T-storms
oy MIAMI AccuWeather, Inc. ©2009 Apr.17 Apr. 24 May 1 Helsinki 43/6 30/-1 ¢ 39/3 28/-2 pc Rain Fronts
ELEUTHERA
High: 80° F/27° C High: 80° F/27°C Eieralisorg Se eoaS OR GaRISieeaie [a4 Plumes Shown are noon positions of weather systems and ened
en Low: 71°F/22°C NASSAU a “66° i aC Islamabad 96/35 62/16 pc 99/37 63/17 s Bk.) Snow precipitation. Temperature bands are highs for the day. Warm fitnfitfita
High: 78° F/26° C oe: A oe Te me on ae s [v=] Ice Forecast high/low temperatures are for selected cities. Stationary Magu
ane EAD4° erusalem 8 8
i pe Johannesburg 69/20 49/9 s 73/22 500s |] 10s -Os (J03)) 10s 20s [BOSl) 40s [50s) cos 70s (0s (SOSA
KEY WEST an. - CATISLAND Kingston 88/31 76/24 s 85/29 74/23 sh
High: 80° F/27°C = a 3 Lima 83/28 65/18 c 83/28 65/18 pc
Low: 73° F/23°C High: 78° F/26° C London 59/15 45/7 sh 59/15 41/5 po
7 @ Low: 61° F/16°C Madrid 57/13 37/2 sh 54412 36/2 6 ,
. Manila 87/30 77/25 t 85/29 77/25 sh AAG Te N s 8 ft A N & iz
oa Mexico City 82/27 52/11 s 81/27 47/8 pc :
8 GnevUMA Monterrey 99/37 68/20 pc 88/31 65/18 c
SAN SALVADOR Montreal 63/17 41/5 pc 50/10 25/-3 pc
High: 78° F/26° C Bi nao 6 Moscow 45/7 32/0 pe 43/6 28/-2 r
Low: 70°F/21°C righ: 82’ F26' ¢ Munich 53/11 42/5 + 60/15 42/5 pe
. ANDROS / Low: 64°F/18°C oe
Shown is today's weather. Temperatures are today's ; Nairobi 86/30 64/17 t 88/31 62/16 t
ighis' ; ew Delhi $ $
highs and tonights s lows. High 84° F/29°C New Delh 100/37 73/22 102/38 75/23 V T ul
Low: 67° F/19°C Oslo 5412 32/0 pc 47/8 37/2 pc
Pai G37 43/6 po 70/21 A5I7 po en Sune it out us!
Prague 56/13 47/8 + 59/15 45/7 pc
LONG ISLAND Rio de Janeiro 77/25 68/20 s 80/26 69/20 s F
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MAYAGUANA St. Thomas 83/28 74/23 s 82/27 75/23 s
Today Saturday Today Saturday Today Saturday _
High Low W High Low W High Low W High Low W High Low W High Low W High: 87° F/31°C San Juan 91/32 59/15 s 73/22) 53/11 5 ner the smart choice | IS
it "66° e San Salvador 91/32 72/22 s 90/32 73/22 pc ;
FC FIC FC FIC FC FIC FC FIC FC FIC FC FIC Low: 66° F/19°C sea DFC AOO SUDaRSO ; n semen.
Albuquerque 56/13 37/2 pe 65/18 42/5 pc Indianapolis 73/22 53/11 s 69/20 49/9 c Philadelphia 70/21 49/9 s 77/25 50/10 s antago pe $ Se ae
Anchorage 46/7 33/0 c 45/7 33/0 sf Jacksonville 72/22 5110 s 77/25 55/412 pc — Phoenix 79/26 56/13 s 87/30 64/17 CROOKED ISLAND / ACKLINS Santo Domingo 86/30 70/21 pe 83/28 68/20 sh art people you can trust.
Atlanta 70/21 49/9 s 70/21 53/11 pc Kansas City 66/18 5442 c 65/18 488 t Pittsburgh 7222S sn 72/22 RAGGEDISLAND — Tigh:88°F/31°C - _ ar err s ee por s
Atlantic City 66/18 44/6 s 77/25 48/8 s Las Vegas 77/25 55/12 s 83/28 6146 s Portland,OR 58/14 415 + 67/19 436 s High: 86° F/30°C Low: 67° F/19°C aaa oma om s a a a n ee al
Baltimore 71/21 44/6 s 78/25 48/8 s Little Rock 6719 5915 c 68/20 56/13 t Raleigh-Durham 72/22 46/7 s 82/27 53/11 s Low:64°F/18°C a a rane ETS pe Tone SOs | * .
Boston 69/20 46/7 s 60/15 41/5 pc LosAngeles 78/25 54/12 s 84/28 56/13 s St. Louis 70/21 5512 po 67/19 5412 t . ele AD TERCODORTE aS INSURANCE M AN AGEMENT
Buffalo 64/17 43/6 s 57/13 38/3 c Louisville 72/22 54/12 s 70/21 52/41 c Salt Lake City 56/13 42/5 c 62/16 42/5 pc GREATINAGUA Te 63/17 oie 741/21 57/413 s ;
Charleston, SC 70/21 48/8 s 77/25 54/12 s Memphis 72/22 60/15 pe 65/18 57/13 t San Antonio 78/25 60/15 t 77/25 59/15 t High: 89° F/32° C arnt 65/18 44/6 s 50/15 40/4 c 5 (BAHAMAS) LIMITED, INSURANCE RROKERS & AGENTS
Chicago 70/21 47/8 s 68/20 44/6 c Miami 80/26 71/21 s 79/26 67/19 s San Diego 71/21 56/13 s 73/22 57/13 $s Low: 70°F/21°C Trinidad 91/32 72/29 s 95/29 70/21 sh :
Cleveland 67/19 43/6 s 6417 45/7 pc Minneapolis 69/20 48/8 pe 62/16 41/5 c San Francisco 67/19 50/10 s 72/22 52/11 s ’ Tanah 5/11 40/4 r 5412 44/5 pe ' Hew Provideng Grand Bahu are Flay f
Dallas 68/20 57/13 t 77/25 54/12 pc Nashville 73/22 51/10 s 66/18 52/11 t Seattle 5613 40/4 r 62/16 446s cares circa B5/18 51/10 po A Gy VrOnd BOnOMG ed rund
Denver 34/1 28/-2. sn 40/4 32/0 sn New Orleans 74/23 67/19 pce 78/25 66/18 t Tallahassee 77/25 55/12 s 81/27 57/13 pe — © W B16 41/5 sh 552 36/2 i 5a Ii: IH ye TON ii ii 9-184) It i eB
2 arsaW s re a (it) (i) (DST) 230-2060 | Te (242)
Detroit 71/21 44/6 s 70/21 44/6 pc New York 68/20 54/12 s 74/23 49/9 pc ‘Tampa 84/28 62/16 s 84/28 65/18 s * Winnipeg 54/12 34/1 c 48/8 30/-1 pc Ma.
Honolulu 81/27 68/20 pce 82/27 70/21 pc Oklahoma City 63/17 51/10 t 73/22 48/8 t Tucson 74/23 50/10 s 83/28 57/13 $s VW : 7 ——_
Houston 77/25 67/19 t 78/25 64/17 t Orlando 78/25 63/17 s 81/27 60/15 s Washington, DC 70/21 49/9 s 78/25 51/10 s Sah ce
PAGE 8B, FRIDAY, APRIL 17, 2009

THE TRIBUNE





Bahamian realtors win top
Coldwell Banker honours

= ter PS oe =

EAPREEF

DHL JOB DESCRIPTION

POSITION:
REPORTS TO:
LOCATION:

Commercial Accounting Supervisor- British Caribbean
British Caribbean Finance Manager
Bahamas

OVERALL PURPOSE:

This position is responsible for managing the Commercial Finance activities
for four countries within the British Caribbean: Bermuda, Bahamas, Cayman
and Tortola. Manages Revenue leakage, establishes credit limits and reviews
shipments to profile. Supervises the following staff; Billing Analyst, Duties and
Vendor Analyst, Accounts Receivable Analyst.

DUTIES AND RESPONSIBILITIES:

* Manage the Commercial activities for a country or group of countries
within the Cluster.

* Supervise Billing, Duties, Accounts Receivable and Vendor Analysts.

* Prepare and analyze statistics and KPls for the country/cluster.

* Responsible for weekly revenue forecasting to Finance Manager and SMT

* Manage customer profiles.

* Establish AR Credit limits.

* Principal contact for Commercial Controller.

* Assist with preparation of Customer profitability analysis.

* Handle Billing queries from Billing Center.

* 1° level of approval for Credit notes.

* Special projects and ad hoc reports as required.

* Performs other assignments as required.

* Analyse daily transport collect and cash on delivery shipments

* Ensure accurate billing of inbound shipments

* Coordinate all Freight and Logistics billing with Caribbean designated
representative

MINIMUM QUALIFICATIONS:

* High school diploma and/or minimal of 5 years applicable experience

¢ Minimum of 2 years supervisory or management experience leading
a department.

* A background in commercial credit required.

* Experience with a major Enterprise Reporting Package (ERP)

* Excellent analytical and interpersonal skills.

* Ability to read and interpret data reports. Ability to understand and perform data
analysis.

* PC skills should include the basic suite of MS products, Excel, Access, Word,
Office

¢ Excellent communication skills both written and verbal, this function does a
lot of interfacing with internal and external customers and the Shared Service
Center

PREFERRED QUALIFICATIONS:

* Bachelor’s degree in Accounting/Finance, a related field or equivalent
education



COLDWELL Banker
Lightbourn Realty's Carmen
Massoni has captured the
International President's Elite
2008 award, a category
reserved for only 1 per cent
of the more than 107,000 sales
associates worldwide in the
Coldwell Banker real estate
system.

And two other Lightbourn
Realty sales associates, Robert
Arthur of Harbour Island and
Rudy Carroll of Nassau,
earned special awards at the
recent Coldwell Banker Inter-
national Business Conference,
which was held at the Henry
B. Gonzalez Convention Cen-
tre in San Antonio, Texas

Mr Arthur won the Inter-
national President's Circles
Award, placing him in the top
2 per cent of Coldwell
Banker's worldwide sales
force.

And Mr Carroll, in his first
full year in real estate, was
admitted to the International
Sterling Society. This means
he is in the top 8 per cent of
the 107,000 global sales force.

In addition to capturing
Lightbourn Realty's Top Pro-
ducer designation, Ms Mas-
soni shared the Coldwell
Banker Island Affiliates
Above and Beyond Award
with Kim Webb of Coldwell
Banker Bermuda. The award
is in recognition of extraordi-
nary service and customer
commitment.

Mike Lightbourn, president
of Coldwell Banker Light-
bourn Realty, said he was
extremely proud of his associ-
ates, who worked hard to beat
the odds in a challenging real
estate environment.

"I'm delighted that Carmen,
Robert and Rudy have been
recognised for their outstand-
ing results. Carmen and
Robert have each earned the
Top Producer designation in
the past, and so it's not sur-
prising that they've both done
so well,” said Mr Lightbourn.

He added that Mr Carroll
deserved special mention for
his performance in his first full
year as a Sales associate.

"I'm also proud of my
agents, who may not have
been on this year's awards list,
but who worked hard and
delivered to their clients the
high standards of excellence
associated with Coldwell
Banker," Mr Lightbourn
added.

Jim Gillespie, president and

Our youth will be responsible for their financial futures one day. Will they ber

This Financial Literacy Workshop will guide youth ages 13-18 through the tools necessary to create

financial freedom in their lives - fully taught in the form of a game!

Saturday, April 18th, 2009 or Saturday April 25th, 2009
Session Times: 10 am- 2 pmand 3 pm-7 pm
British American Financial, Independence Drive

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LIGHTBOURN REALTY
sales associates,
Robert Arthur (above)
of Harbour Island and
Rudy Carroll (left) of
Nassau, earned special
awards at the recent
Coldwell Banker
International Business
Conference.



CARMEN MASSONI (centre) with Beth Makatura, vice president, inter-
national service and operations, Coldwell Banker Real Estate LLC, and Jim
Reed, chief executive of Coldwell Banker Island Affiliates.

chief executive of Coldwell
Banker Real Estate LLC,
said: "Coldwell Banker Light-
bourn Realty has established
itself as a leader by highlight-
ing the positives that exist in
the real estate industry, and
we are proud to call them a
member of the Coldwell
Banker family.”

He added that while this
was a challenging year for the
real estate industry, millions
of people continued to buy
and sell homes based on their
lifestyles and needs.

"This was undoubtedly a
difficult year in our industry,
but people need to remember
that real estate is cyclical, and
positive signs over recent
months signal a tipping point
for the residential real estate
market," Mr Gillespie said.

Lightbourn Realty is part of
the Coldwell Banker global
network, which has 3,500
offices in 47 countries and ter-
ritories.

It has offices and represen-
tatives in Nassau, the Abacos,
Andros, Berry Islands, Bimini,
Eleuthera, including Harbour
Island and Spanish Wells,
Exuma and Long Island.



“I'm delighted
that Carmen,
Robert and
Rudy have been
recognised for
their
outstanding
results.

Carmen and
Robert have
each earned the
Top Producer
designation in
the past, and so
it's not
surprising that
they've both
done so well”



Mike Lightbourn

NOTICE

INTERNATIONAL BUSINESS COMPANIES ACT, 2000
(No. 45 of 2000)

MIRINDA INVESTMENTS LIMITED

Notice is hereby given that in accordance with Section 138 (8)
of the International Business Companies Act, (No. 45 of 2000),
the Dissolution of MIRINDA INVESTMENTS LIMITED

has been completed, a Certificate of Dissolution has been

issued and the Company has therefore been struck off the

Register. The date of completion of the dissolution was the 9th
day of April, 2009.

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